Science.gov

Sample records for erkki-sven tr flux

  1. Mixed-metal flux synthesis of quaternary RMn 2Tr xZn 20-x compounds with Tr=Al, In

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benbow, Evan M.; Latturner, Susan E.

    2006-12-01

    Eighteen new intermetallic compounds RMn 2Tr xZn 20-x (2< x<7; R=rare-earth metal; Tr=Al, In) were synthesized using low-melting mixtures of ( Tr/Zn) as a solvent. Structural refinement using single-crystal X-ray diffraction data shows that the compounds are substituted variants of the cubic CeCr 2Al 20-type structure ( Fd-3 m, Z=8; unit cell parameters vary from a=14.1152(3)Å for YbMn 2Al 5.3Zn 14.7 to a=14.8125(4)Å for SmMn 2In 5.9Zn 14.1). The Zn and Tr elements show site preferences in the indium compounds, but not in the aluminum analogs. The substitution of trielide element for zinc modifies the valence electron count of the compounds to allow for the incorporation of Mn into the structure. Magnetic susceptibility data show no evidence of magnetic ordering down to 3 K.

  2. The Star Formation History of TR 14 and TR 16

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degioia-Eastwood, K.; Throop, H.; Walker, G.; Cudworth, K.

    1997-05-01

    H-R diagrams are presented for the very young galactic clusters Trumpler 14 and Trumpler 16, which are the two most populous clusters in the region of vigorous star formation surrounding eta Carinae. Point-spread function photometry of UBV CCD images is presented to a limiting magnitude of V ~ 19 for over 560 stars in Tr 16 and 290 stars in Tr 14. We have also obtained similar data for local background fields. Existing proper motions (Cudworth et al. 1993) have allowed us to analyze the reddening of both cluster members and the local background stars, thus providing an excellent determination of the cluster membership far deeper than the original proper motions. This work has revealed a significant population of protostars in both clusters. The location of the protostars in the diagram indicates that the theoretical "stellar birthline" of Palla and Stahler (1993) is much closer to the observations than that of Beech and Mitalas (1986). We also use the protostars and most massive stars to put limits on the coevality of the cluster.

  3. Integration Window Position Estimation in TR Receivers

    SciTech Connect

    Nekoogar, F; Dowla, F; Spiridon, A

    2005-03-15

    Transmitted-reference (TR) receivers avoid the stringent synchronization requirements that exist in conventional pulse detection schemes. However, the performance of such receivers is highly sensitive to precise timing acquisition and tracking as well as the length of their integration window. This window in TR receivers defines the limits of the finite integrator prior to the final decision making block. In this paper, we propose a novel technique that allows us to extract the timing information of the integration window very accurately in UWB-TR receivers in the presence of channel noise. The principles of the method are presented and the BER performance of a modified UWB-TR receiver is investigated by computer simulation. Our studies show that the proposed estimation technique adds value to the conventional TR receiver structure with modest increase in complexity.

  4. ) Mold Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Myung-Duk; Shi, Cheng-Bin; Cho, Jung-Wook; Kim, Seon-Hyo

    2014-10-01

    The effects of basicity (CaO/SiO2), B2O3, and Li2O addition on the crystallization behaviors of lime-silica-based mold fluxes have been investigated by non-isothermal differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), field emission scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and single hot thermocouple technique. It was found that the crystallization temperature of cuspidine increased with increasing the basicity of mold fluxes. The crystallization of wollastonite was suppressed with increasing the mold flux basicity due to the enhancement of cuspidine crystallization. The addition of B2O3 suppresses the crystallization of mold flux. The crystallization temperature of mold flux decreases with Li2O addition. The size of cuspidine increases, while the number of cuspidine decreases with increasing mold flux basicity. The morphology of cuspidine in mold fluxes with lower basicity is largely dendritic. The dendritic cuspidine in mold fluxes is composed of many fine cuspidine crystals. On the contrary, in mold fluxes with higher basicity, the cuspidine crystals are larger in size with mainly faceted morphology. The crystalline phase evolution was also calculated using a thermodynamic database, and compared with the experimental results determined by DSC and XRD. The results of thermodynamic calculation of crystalline phase formation are in accordance with the results determined by DSC and XRD.

  5. Telling bacteria: Do not LytTR

    PubMed Central

    Galperin, Michael Y.

    2009-01-01

    Transcriptional regulators containing the LytTR-type DNA-binding domain control production of virulence factors in several bacterial pathogens. In this issue of Structure, Ann Stock and colleagues report the crystal structure of this elusive domain in complex with its DNA target. PMID:18462668

  6. TR-IA payload recovery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochiyama, Jiro; Kinai, Shigeki; Morita, Shinya

    The TR-IA microgravity-experimentation sounding rocket baseline configuration and recovery system are presented. Aerodynamic braking is incorporated through the requisite positioning of the reentry-body center of gravity. The recovery sequence is initiated by baroswitches, which eject the pilot chute. Even in the event of flotation bag malfunction, the structure containing the experiment is watertight. An account is given of the nature and the results of the performance tests conducted to establish the soundness of various materials and components.

  7. Detection of Planetary Emission from the Exoplanet TrES-2 Using Spitzer/IRAC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donovan, Francis T.; Charbonneau, David; Harrington, Joseph; Madhusudhan, N.; Seager, Sara; Deming, Drake; Knutson, Heather A.

    2010-01-01

    We present here the results of our observations of TrES-2 using the Infrared Array Camera on Spitzer. We monitored this transiting system during two secondary eclipses, when the planetary emission is blocked by the star. The resulting decrease in flux is 0.127% +/- 0.021%, 0.230% +/- 0.024%, 0.199% +/- 0.054%, and 0.359% +/- 0.060% at 3.6 microns, 4.5 microns, 5.8 microns, and 8.0 microns, respectively. We show that three of these flux contrasts are well fit by a blackbody spectrum with T(sub eff) = 1500 K, as well as by a more detailed model spectrum of a planetary atmosphere. The observed planet-to-star flux ratios in all four lRAC channels can be explained by models with and without a thermal inversion in the atmosphere of TrES-2, although with different atmospheric chemistry. Based on the assumption of thermochemical equilibrium, the chemical composition of the inversion model seems more plausible, making it a more favorable scenario. TrES-2 also falls in the category of highly irradiated planets which have been theoretically predicted to exhibit thermal inversions. However, more observations at infrared and visible wavelengths would be needed to confirm a thermal inversion in this system. Furthermore, we find that the times of the secondary eclipses are consistent with previously published times of transit and the expectation from a circular orbit. This implies that TrES-2 most likely has a circular orbit, and thus does not obtain additional thermal energy from tidal dissipation of a non-zero orbital eccentricity, a proposed explanation for the large radius of this planet. Key words: eclipses - infrared: stars - planetary systems - stars: individual (OSC 03549-02811) - techniques: photometric

  8. DETECTION OF PLANETARY EMISSION FROM THE EXOPLANET TrES-2 USING SPITZER/IRAC

    SciTech Connect

    O'Donovan, Francis T.; Charbonneau, David; Knutson, Heather A.; Harrington, Joseph; Madhusudhan, N.; Seager, Sara; Deming, Drake

    2010-02-20

    We present here the results of our observations of TrES-2 using the Infrared Array Camera on Spitzer. We monitored this transiting system during two secondary eclipses, when the planetary emission is blocked by the star. The resulting decrease in flux is 0.127% +- 0.021%, 0.230% +- 0.024%, 0.199% +- 0.054%, and 0.359% +- 0.060% at 3.6 {mu}m, 4.5 {mu}m, 5.8 {mu}m, and 8.0 {mu}m, respectively. We show that three of these flux contrasts are well fit by a blackbody spectrum with T{sub eff} = 1500 K, as well as by a more detailed model spectrum of a planetary atmosphere. The observed planet-to-star flux ratios in all four IRAC channels can be explained by models with and without a thermal inversion in the atmosphere of TrES-2, although with different atmospheric chemistry. Based on the assumption of thermochemical equilibrium, the chemical composition of the inversion model seems more plausible, making it a more favorable scenario. TrES-2 also falls in the category of highly irradiated planets which have been theoretically predicted to exhibit thermal inversions. However, more observations at infrared and visible wavelengths would be needed to confirm a thermal inversion in this system. Furthermore, we find that the times of the secondary eclipses are consistent with previously published times of transit and the expectation from a circular orbit. This implies that TrES-2 most likely has a circular orbit, and thus does not obtain additional thermal energy from tidal dissipation of a non-zero orbital eccentricity, a proposed explanation for the large radius of this planet.

  9. ATMOSPHERE AND SPECTRAL MODELS OF THE KEPLER-FIELD PLANETS HAT-P-7b AND TrES-2

    SciTech Connect

    Spiegel, David S.; Burrows, Adam E-mail: burrows@astro.princeton.ed

    2010-10-10

    We develop atmosphere models of two of the three Kepler-field planets that were known prior to the start of the Kepler mission (HAT-P-7b and TrES-2). We find that published Kepler and Spitzer data for HAT-P-7b appear to require an extremely hot upper atmosphere on the dayside, with a strong thermal inversion and little day-night redistribution. The Spitzer data for TrES-2 suggest a mild thermal inversion with moderate day-night redistribution. We examine the effect of nonequilibrium chemistry on TrES-2 model atmospheres and find that methane levels must be adjusted by extreme amounts in order to cause even mild changes in atmospheric structure and emergent spectra. Our best-fit models to the Spitzer data for TrES-2 lead us to predict a low secondary eclipse planet-star flux ratio ({approx}<2 x 10{sup -5}) in the Kepler bandpass, which is consistent with what very recent observations have found. Finally, we consider how the Kepler-band optical flux from a hot exoplanet depends on the strength of a possible extra optical absorber in the upper atmosphere. We find that the optical flux is not monotonic in optical opacity, and the non-monotonicity is greater for brighter, hotter stars.

  10. 40 CFR 97.521 - Recordation of TR NOX Ozone Season allowance allocations and auction results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Recordation of TR NOX Ozone Season... SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS TR NOX Ozone Season Trading Program § 97.521 Recordation of TR NOX Ozone Season... Ozone Season source's compliance account the TR NOX Ozone Season allowances allocated to the TR...

  11. 40 CFR 97.521 - Recordation of TR NOX Ozone Season allowance allocations and auction results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Recordation of TR NOX Ozone Season... SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS TR NOX Ozone Season Trading Program § 97.521 Recordation of TR NOX Ozone Season... Ozone Season source's compliance account the TR NOX Ozone Season allowances allocated to the TR...

  12. 40 CFR 97.521 - Recordation of TR NOX Ozone Season allowance allocations and auction results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Recordation of TR NOX Ozone Season... SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS TR NOX Ozone Season Trading Program § 97.521 Recordation of TR NOX Ozone Season... Ozone Season source's compliance account the TR NOX Ozone Season allowances allocated to the TR...

  13. Spectroscopic studies of Cepheids in Circinus (AV Cir, BP Cir) and Triangulum Australe (R TrA, S TrA, U TrA, LR TrA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usenko, I. A.; Kniazev, A. Yu.; Berdnikov, L. N.; Kravtsov, V. V.

    2014-12-01

    Based on high-resolution spectra taken with the 1.9-m telescope of the South African Astronomical Observatory, we have determined the atmospheric parameters and chemical composition for three small-amplitude (AV Cir, BP Cir, and LR TrA), two classical (R TrA and S TrA), and one double-mode (U TrA) Cepheids. The averaged atmospheric parameters have been estimated for three Cepheids (AV Cir, BP Cir, and U TrA) observed at various pulsation phases. In all Cepheids, except U TrA, the metallicity has turned out to be higher than the solar one by 0.1-0.2 dex. The abundances of the key elements of the evolution of yellow supergiants (C, O, Na, Mg, Al) show that these objects have already passed the first dredge-up, while those of the remaining elements are nearly solar. Comparison of our results on the Cepheids from the list (except U TrA) with those of other authors shows significant differences in C and O abundance estimates for AV Cir, R TrA, S TrA, and LR TrA. For AV Cir and BP Cir, the H α line profiles are symmetric but with a slight asymmetry in the core at approximately the same phase near 0{·/ P } 7: on the "blue" side for AV Cir and on the "red" one for BP Cir. BP Cir exhibits a distinct asymmetry in the absorption lines of neutral atoms and ions at various pulsation phases, which can be explained by nonradial first-overtone pulsations. The constancy of the H α absorption line profiles with pulsation phase for AV Cir and BP Cir may suggest the presence of a hydrogen envelope around them. For the double-mode Cepheid U TrA, an asymmetry is observed in the cores of the H α line and the absorption lines of neutral atoms and ions at various pulsation phases, which can be explained by nonradial pulsations in the Cepheid's atmosphere. The absorption lines of neutral atoms and ions of metals in LR TrA closely resemble those in the well-known Cepheid BG Cru: secondary "blue" and "red" components whose line depths vary with pulsation phase are noticeable. This Cepheid

  14. Outline of the microgravity experiment rocket (TR-1A)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochiyama, Jiro

    1990-06-01

    In 1989, the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA) decided to conduct the space processing experiment project, using the new microgravity experiment rocket (TR-1A), for the effective utilization of the Japanese Experiment Module, one part of the international space station. The project goal is to obtain the basic know-how of microgravity experiments and experimental devices through the flight opportunity of TR-1A (Test Rocket-1A) rocket. This TR-1A rocket can project a 1500 kg gross payload to about 270 km altitude and remain in a free fall condition about six minutes or more. Obtained microgravity condition is less than 10(exp -9)G. The first flight will be held in 1991, and now the development of the rocket and experimental devices are ongoing. This report describes an outline of the microgravity experiment rocket (TR-1A) and its standing point and prospect in the test rocket family.

  15. 42. Credit TR. Dam No. 4 after 1936 flood; break ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    42. Credit TR. Dam No. 4 after 1936 flood; break as seen from upstream. Note original timber cribbing to left. Photo c. 1936. - Dam No. 4 Hydroelectric Plant, Potomac River, Martinsburg, Berkeley County, WV

  16. 44. Credit TR. Dam No. 4 after 1936 flood from ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    44. Credit TR. Dam No. 4 after 1936 flood from downstream showing break closed and installation of new concrete cap piece under way. Photo c. 1936. - Dam No. 4 Hydroelectric Plant, Potomac River, Martinsburg, Berkeley County, WV

  17. Fast flux locked loop

    DOEpatents

    Ganther, Jr., Kenneth R.; Snapp, Lowell D.

    2002-09-10

    A flux locked loop for providing an electrical feedback signal, the flux locked loop employing radio-frequency components and technology to extend the flux modulation frequency and tracking loop bandwidth. The flux locked loop of the present invention has particularly useful application in read-out electronics for DC SQUID magnetic measurement systems, in which case the electrical signal output by the flux locked loop represents an unknown magnetic flux applied to the DC SQUID.

  18. Superconductivity in Y6Tr4Al43 (Tr = Nb, Mo, Ta) with Peanut-Shaped Cage Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kase, Naoki; Satoh, Ryoh; Nakano, Tomohito; Takeda, Naoya

    2016-10-01

    Superconductivity is discovered in Y6Tr4Al43 (Tr = Nb, Mo, Ta) with a peanut-shaped cage structure at Tc = 0.86, 0.75, and 0.68 K, respectively. The superconducting state is revealed by performing electrical resistivity and specific heat measurements. The upper critical field is obtained to be 0.22 (Nb), 0.175 (Mo), and 0.15 T (Ta). A specific heat jump provides evidence of bulk superconductivity in these compounds.

  19. DISTANCE AND THE INITIAL MASS FUNCTION OF YOUNG OPEN CLUSTERS IN THE {eta} CARINA NEBULA: Tr 14 AND Tr 16

    SciTech Connect

    Hur, Hyeonoh; Sung, Hwankyung; Bessell, Michael S. E-mail: sungh@sejong.ac.kr

    2012-02-15

    We present new UBVI{sub c} CCD photometry of the young open clusters Trumpler 14 (Tr 14) and Trumpler 16 (Tr 16) in the {eta} Carina Nebula. We also identify the optical counterpart of Chandra X-ray sources and Two Micron All Sky Survey point sources. The members of the clusters were selected from the proper-motion study, spectral types, reddening characteristics, and X-ray or near-IR excess emission. An abnormal reddening law R{sub V,cl} = 4.4 {+-} 0.2 was obtained for the stars in the {eta} Carina Nebula using the 141 early-type stars with high proper-motion membership probability (P{sub {mu}} gE 70%). We determined the distance to each cluster and conclude that Tr 14 and Tr 16 have practically the same distance modulus of V{sub 0} - M{sub V} = 12.3 {+-} 0.2 mag (d = 2.9 {+-} 0.3 kpc). The slope of the initial mass function was determined to be {Gamma} = -1.3 {+-} 0.1 for Tr 14, {Gamma} = -1.3 {+-} 0.1 for Tr 16, and {Gamma} = -1.4 {+-} 0.1 for all members in the observed region for the stars with log mgE0.2. We also estimated the age of the clusters to be about 1-3 Myr from the evolutionary stage of evolved stars and low-mass pre-main-sequence stars.

  20. Magnetic-flux pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hildebrandt, A. F.; Elleman, D. D.; Whitmore, F. C. (Inventor)

    1966-01-01

    A magnetic flux pump is described for increasing the intensity of a magnetic field by transferring flux from one location to the magnetic field. The device includes a pair of communicating cavities formed in a block of superconducting material, and a piston for displacing the trapped magnetic flux into the secondary cavity producing a field having an intense flux density.

  1. 40 CFR 97.511 - Timing requirements for TR NOX Ozone Season allowance allocations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Timing requirements for TR NOX Ozone... TRADING PROGRAMS TR NOX Ozone Season Trading Program § 97.511 Timing requirements for TR NOX Ozone Season allowance allocations. (a) Existing units. (1) TR NOX Ozone Season allowances are allocated, for the...

  2. 40 CFR 97.512 - TR NOX Ozone Season allowance allocations to new units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false TR NOX Ozone Season allowance... TR NOX Ozone Season Trading Program § 97.512 TR NOX Ozone Season allowance allocations to new units. (a) For each control period in 2012 and thereafter and for the TR NOX Ozone Season units in...

  3. 40 CFR 97.522 - Submission of TR NOX Ozone Season allowance transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Submission of TR NOX Ozone Season... TR NOX Ozone Season Trading Program § 97.522 Submission of TR NOX Ozone Season allowance transfers. (a) An authorized account representative seeking recordation of a TR NOX Ozone Season...

  4. 40 CFR 97.524 - Compliance with TR NOX Ozone Season emissions limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Compliance with TR NOX Ozone Season... TR NOX Ozone Season Trading Program § 97.524 Compliance with TR NOX Ozone Season emissions limitation. (a) Availability for deduction for compliance. TR NOX Ozone Season allowances are available to...

  5. 40 CFR 97.524 - Compliance with TR NOX Ozone Season emissions limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Compliance with TR NOX Ozone Season... TR NOX Ozone Season Trading Program § 97.524 Compliance with TR NOX Ozone Season emissions limitation. (a) Availability for deduction for compliance. TR NOX Ozone Season allowances are available to...

  6. 40 CFR 97.512 - TR NOX Ozone Season allowance allocations to new units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false TR NOX Ozone Season allowance... TR NOX Ozone Season Trading Program § 97.512 TR NOX Ozone Season allowance allocations to new units. (a) For each control period in 2012 and thereafter and for the TR NOX Ozone Season units in...

  7. 40 CFR 97.512 - TR NOX Ozone Season allowance allocations to new units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false TR NOX Ozone Season allowance... TR NOX Ozone Season Trading Program § 97.512 TR NOX Ozone Season allowance allocations to new units. (a) For each control period in 2012 and thereafter and for the TR NOX Ozone Season units in...

  8. 40 CFR 97.524 - Compliance with TR NOX Ozone Season emissions limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Compliance with TR NOX Ozone Season... TR NOX Ozone Season Trading Program § 97.524 Compliance with TR NOX Ozone Season emissions limitation. (a) Availability for deduction for compliance. TR NOX Ozone Season allowances are available to...

  9. 40 CFR 97.511 - Timing requirements for TR NOX Ozone Season allowance allocations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Timing requirements for TR NOX Ozone... TRADING PROGRAMS TR NOX Ozone Season Trading Program § 97.511 Timing requirements for TR NOX Ozone Season allowance allocations. (a) Existing units. (1) TR NOX Ozone Season allowances are allocated, for the...

  10. 40 CFR 97.511 - Timing requirements for TR NOX Ozone Season allowance allocations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Timing requirements for TR NOX Ozone... TRADING PROGRAMS TR NOX Ozone Season Trading Program § 97.511 Timing requirements for TR NOX Ozone Season allowance allocations. (a) Existing units. (1) TR NOX Ozone Season allowances are allocated, for the...

  11. 40 CFR 97.522 - Submission of TR NOX Ozone Season allowance transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Submission of TR NOX Ozone Season... TR NOX Ozone Season Trading Program § 97.522 Submission of TR NOX Ozone Season allowance transfers. (a) An authorized account representative seeking recordation of a TR NOX Ozone Season...

  12. 40 CFR 97.522 - Submission of TR NOX Ozone Season allowance transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Submission of TR NOX Ozone Season... TR NOX Ozone Season Trading Program § 97.522 Submission of TR NOX Ozone Season allowance transfers. (a) An authorized account representative seeking recordation of a TR NOX Ozone Season...

  13. 40 CFR 97.421 - Recordation of TR NOX Annual allowance allocations and auction results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Recordation of TR NOX Annual allowance... TRADING PROGRAMS TR NOX Annual Trading Program § 97.421 Recordation of TR NOX Annual allowance allocations and auction results. (a) By November 7, 2011, the Administrator will record in each TR NOX...

  14. 40 CFR 97.525 - Compliance with TR NOX Ozone Season assurance provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Compliance with TR NOX Ozone Season... TR NOX Ozone Season Trading Program § 97.525 Compliance with TR NOX Ozone Season assurance provisions. (a) Availability for deduction. TR NOX Ozone Season allowances are available to be deducted...

  15. 40 CFR 97.525 - Compliance with TR NOX Ozone Season assurance provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Compliance with TR NOX Ozone Season... TR NOX Ozone Season Trading Program § 97.525 Compliance with TR NOX Ozone Season assurance provisions. (a) Availability for deduction. TR NOX Ozone Season allowances are available to be deducted...

  16. 40 CFR 97.525 - Compliance with TR NOX Ozone Season assurance provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Compliance with TR NOX Ozone Season... TR NOX Ozone Season Trading Program § 97.525 Compliance with TR NOX Ozone Season assurance provisions. (a) Availability for deduction. TR NOX Ozone Season allowances are available to be deducted...

  17. TR-GRAV: National Center for Turkish Gravity Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simav, Mehmet; Akpınar, İlyas; Sezen, Erdinc; Cingöz, Ayhan; Yıldız, Hasan

    2016-04-01

    TR-GRAV, the National Center for Turkish Gravity Field (TR-GRAV) that has recently become operational,is a national center that collects, processes and distributes Absolute Gravimetry,Relative Gravimetry, Airborne Gravimetry,Shipborne Gravimetry,Satellite Gravimetry, GNSS/Levelling, Astrogeodetic Vertical Deflection data to model and improve regional gravity field for the Turkish territory and its surrounding regions and to provide accurate, consistent and value-added data & products to the scientific and engineering communities. In this presentation, we will introduce the center web portal and give some details about the database.

  18. Exotic Ground State and Elastic Softening under Pulsed Magnetic Fields in PrTr2Zn20 (Tr = Rh, Ir)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Isao; Goto, Hiroki; Kamikawa, Shuhei; Yasin, Shadi; Zherlitsyn, Sergei; Wosnitza, Joachim; Onimaru, Takahiro; Matsumoto, Keisuke T.; Takabatake, Toshiro; Suzuki, Takashi

    2016-04-01

    To investigate a field-induced level crossing of the ground-state doublet in PrTr2Zn20 (Tr = Rh, Ir), we performed ultrasonic measurements in pulsed magnetic fields applied along the [110] and [001] directions and analyzed the results in the framework of the strain-susceptibility approach. Above 40 T for H || [110], we observed an elastic softening of the transverse modulus (C11 - C12)/2 corresponding to the ground-state doublet. In both compounds the softening is followed by a minimum at about 47 T at low temperatures. We predict the presence of a new field-induced phase boundary in PrTr2Zn20 at this field with two possible cases. The magnetic field of the minimum cannot be explained by only the quadrupole interaction.

  19. Flux-p: automating metabolic flux analysis.

    PubMed

    Ebert, Birgitta E; Lamprecht, Anna-Lena; Steffen, Bernhard; Blank, Lars M

    2012-11-12

    Quantitative knowledge of intracellular fluxes in metabolic networks is invaluable for inferring metabolic system behavior and the design principles of biological systems. However, intracellular reaction rates can not often be calculated directly but have to be estimated; for instance, via 13C-based metabolic flux analysis, a model-based interpretation of stable carbon isotope patterns in intermediates of metabolism. Existing software such as FiatFlux, OpenFLUX or 13CFLUX supports experts in this complex analysis, but requires several steps that have to be carried out manually, hence restricting the use of this software for data interpretation to a rather small number of experiments. In this paper, we present Flux-P as an approach to automate and standardize 13C-based metabolic flux analysis, using the Bio-jETI workflow framework. Exemplarily based on the FiatFlux software, it demonstrates how services can be created that carry out the different analysis steps autonomously and how these can subsequently be assembled into software workflows that perform automated, high-throughput intracellular flux analysis of high quality and reproducibility. Besides significant acceleration and standardization of the data analysis, the agile workflow-based realization supports flexible changes of the analysis workflows on the user level, making it easy to perform custom analyses.

  20. Northrop Grumman TR202 LOX/LH2 Deep Throttling Engine Project Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gromski, J.; Majamaki, A. N.; Chianese, S. G.; Weinstock, V. D.; Kim, T.

    2010-01-01

    NASA's Propulsion and Cryogenic Advanced Development (PCAD) project is currently developing enabling propulsion technologies in support of the Exploration Initiative, with a particular focus on the needs of the Altair Project. To meet Altair requirements, several technical challenges need to be overcome, one of which is the ability for the lunar descent engine(s) to operate over a deep throttle range with cryogenic propellants. To address this need, PCAD has enlisted Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems (NGAS) in a technology development effort associated with the TR202, a LOX/LH2 expander cycle engine driven by independent turbopump assemblies and featuring a variable area pintle injector similar to the injector used on the TR200 Apollo Lunar Module Descent Engine (LMDE). Since the Apollo missions, NGAS has continued to mature deep throttling pintle injector technology. The TR202 program has completed two phases of pintle injector testing. The first phase of testing used ablative thrust chambers and demonstrated igniter operation as well as stable performance at several power levels across the designed 10:1 throttle range. The second phase of testing was performed on a calorimeter chamber and demonstrated injector performance at various power levels (75%, 50%, 25%, 10%, and 7.5%) across the throttle range as well as chamber heat flux to show that the engine can close an expander cycle design across the throttle range. This paper provides an overview of the TR202 program. It describes the different phases of the program with the key milestones of each phase. It then shows when those milestones were met. Next, it describes how the test data was used to update the conceptual design and how the test data has created a database for deep throttling cryogenic pintle technology that is readily scaleable and can be used to again update the design once the Altair program's requirements are firm. The final section of the paper describes the path forward, which includes

  1. Northrop Grumman TR202 LOX/GH2 Deep Throttling Pintle Injector Fabrication and Demonstration Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstock, V. D.; Chianese, S.G.; Majamaki, A. N.; Litchford, R. J.; Foote, J. P.; Wall, T. R.

    2010-01-01

    NASA s Propulsion and Cryogenic Advanced Development (PCAD) project is developing enabling propulsion technologies in support of in support of the Exploration Initiative with a particular focus on the needs of the Altair Lunar Lander. To address Altair's need for deep-throttling cryogenic engines, PCAD has enlisted Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems (NGAS) in a technology development effort associated with a LOX/LH2 expander cycle engine known as the TR202. This engine features independent turbopump assemblies and a variable area pintle injector similar to that used on the TR200 Apollo Lunar Module Descent Engine (LMDE). The TR202 program has completed a Conceptual Design (CoDR) of a possible throttling engine and has designed and built injector test hardware to demonstrate stable high performance over a 10:1 throttling range while providing the heat flux necessary to close the engine cycle. NGAS has partnered with NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), which supplied the ablative and calorimeter thrust chambers for the injector test program and provided the test facility as well as test and engineering support personnel. An extensive hot-fire test campaign comprising more than 50 tests was initiated and successfully completed during 2009 on MSFC's Test Stand 116 using pressure-fed liquid oxygen and gaseous hydrogen propellants. All planned test objectives were met. The test program was structured in two distinct phases: Phase 1 relied on ablative chambers to demonstrate injector hardware durability and to obtain early deep-throttling results, while Phase 2 used a water-cooled calorimeter chamber to obtain detailed performance and heat flux measurements at various power levels and mixture ratios. This paper focuses on the early part of the test program and describes final hardware build and test integration efforts, injector water flow testing, igniter and engine operational sequence development, and results from the ablative chamber tests. Challenges

  2. 19. View of satcom communication dome with TR radome in ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. View of satcom communication dome with TR radome in background right. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  3. Counsellors Respond to the DSM-IV-TR

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strong, Tom; Gaete, Joaquin; Sametband, Ines N.; French, Jared; Eeson, Jen

    2012-01-01

    The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV-TR) is an administrative fact for many counsellors. This psychiatric approach to formulating client concerns runs counter to those used by counsellors of many approaches (e.g., systemic, feminist). Using an online survey of counsellors (N = 116), invited contributions to a website…

  4. 104. View of TR antenna, workers on "hanging garden," official ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    104. View of TR antenna, workers on "hanging garden," official photograph BMEWS Project by Hansen, 11 February 1981, clear as negative no. A-17701. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  5. 33. View of data converter and power supply for TR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    33. View of data converter and power supply for TR system in transmitter building no. 102, mezzanine level. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  6. 61. View of TR spiral access stair system from transmitter ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    61. View of TR spiral access stair system from transmitter building no. 102 mezzanine level; note elevator door on right. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  7. Patterns of Flux Emergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Title, A.; Cheung, M.

    2008-05-01

    The high spatial resolution and high cadence of the Solar Optical Telescope on the JAXA Hinode spacecraft have allowed capturing many examples of magnetic flux emergence from the scale of granulation to active regions. The observed patterns of emergence are quite similar. Flux emerges as a array of small bipoles on scales from 1 to 5 arc seconds throughout the region that the flux eventually condenses. Because the fields emerging from the underlying flux rope my appear many in small segments and the total flux (absolute sum) is not a conserved quantity the amount of total flux on the surface may vary significantly during the emergence process. Numerical simulations of flux emergence exhibit patterns similar to observations. Movies of both observations and numerical simulations will be presented.

  8. Optical control of MMIC-based T/R modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herczfeld, P. R.; Paolella, A.; Daryoush, A. S.; Jemison, W.; Rosen, A.

    1988-05-01

    Some of the basic issues of optical control and interconnects of MMICs are discussed with special consideration given to the application of optical technology to the new generation of phased-array antennas utilizing a very large number of individually controlled MMIC T/R modules. In these antennas, the fiber optic links are used to achieve synchronization of the T/R modules and signal coding; in optical beamforming in the microwave domain, where the control elements, such as microwave phase shifters and attennuators are activated by control signals transmitted via optical fibers; and in beamforming in the optical domain. Optial fibers are also used in control of passive microwave components such as microstrip lines and dielectric resonators.

  9. 99. View of initial TR panel emplacement for radome, with ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    99. View of initial TR panel emplacement for radome, with workman welding at panel joint, RCA Services Company 8 October, 1965, Official photograph BMEWS Project, by unknown photographer, Photographic Services, Riverton, NJ, BMEWS, clear as negative no. A-6741. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  10. UWB channel estimation using new generating TR transceivers

    DOEpatents

    Nekoogar, Faranak; Dowla, Farid U.; Spiridon, Alex; Haugen, Peter C.; Benzel, Dave M.

    2011-06-28

    The present invention presents a simple and novel channel estimation scheme for UWB communication systems. As disclosed herein, the present invention maximizes the extraction of information by incorporating a new generation of transmitted-reference (Tr) transceivers that utilize a single reference pulse(s) or a preamble of reference pulses to provide improved channel estimation while offering higher Bit Error Rate (BER) performance and data rates without diluting the transmitter power.

  11. 16. 'Erection Plan for 1 236' Single Tr. Thro' Draw ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. 'Erection Plan for 1 236' Single Tr. Thro' Draw Span over Sacramento River at Tehama Cal., Southern Pacific Co., The Phoenix Bridge Co., City Order: 952, Drawing No.: 2, Scale: 3/16' to 1', Engineer: F.G. Lippert, Drawn by: F.E. King, Date: May 20 98.' - Southern Pacific Railroad Shasta Route, Bridge No. 210.52, Milepost 210.52, Tehama, Tehama County, CA

  12. 100. View of TR radome construction showing crane assembly and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    100. View of TR radome construction showing crane assembly and workers, original radome, RCA Services Company 2 October, 1965, Official photograph BMEWS Project by unknown photographer, Photographic Services, Riverton, NJ, BMEWS, clear as negative no. A-6705. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  13. DW4TR: A Data Warehouse for Translational Research.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hai; Correll, Mick; Kvecher, Leonid; Osmond, Michelle; Clark, Jim; Bekhash, Anthony; Schwab, Gwendolyn; Gao, De; Gao, Jun; Kubatin, Vladimir; Shriver, Craig D; Hooke, Jeffrey A; Maxwell, Larry G; Kovatich, Albert J; Sheldon, Jonathan G; Liebman, Michael N; Mural, Richard J

    2011-12-01

    The linkage between the clinical and laboratory research domains is a key issue in translational research. Integration of clinicopathologic data alone is a major task given the number of data elements involved. For a translational research environment, it is critical to make these data usable at the point-of-need. Individual systems have been developed to meet the needs of particular projects though the need for a generalizable system has been recognized. Increased use of Electronic Medical Record data in translational research will demand generalizing the system for integrating clinical data to support the study of a broad range of human diseases. To ultimately satisfy these needs, we have developed a system to support multiple translational research projects. This system, the Data Warehouse for Translational Research (DW4TR), is based on a light-weight, patient-centric modularly-structured clinical data model and a specimen-centric molecular data model. The temporal relationships of the data are also part of the model. The data are accessed through an interface composed of an Aggregated Biomedical-Information Browser (ABB) and an Individual Subject Information Viewer (ISIV) which target general users. The system was developed to support a breast cancer translational research program and has been extended to support a gynecological disease program. Further extensions of the DW4TR are underway. We believe that the DW4TR will play an important role in translational research across multiple disease types.

  14. APOSTLE: 11 TRANSIT OBSERVATIONS OF TrES-3b

    SciTech Connect

    Kundurthy, P.; Becker, A. C.; Agol, E.; Barnes, R.; Williams, B.

    2013-02-10

    The Apache Point Survey of Transit Lightcurves of Exoplanets (APOSTLE) observed 11 transits of TrES-3b over two years in order to constrain system parameters and look for transit timing and depth variations. We describe an updated analysis protocol for APOSTLE data, including the reduction pipeline, transit model, and Markov Chain Monte Carlo analyzer. Our estimates of the system parameters for TrES-3b are consistent with previous estimates to within the 2{sigma} confidence level. We improved the errors (by 10%-30%) on system parameters such as the orbital inclination (i {sub orb}), impact parameter (b), and stellar density ({rho}{sub *}) compared to previous measurements. The near-grazing nature of the system, and incomplete sampling of some transits, limited our ability to place reliable uncertainties on individual transit depths and hence we do not report strong evidence for variability. Our analysis of the transit timing data shows no evidence for transit timing variations and our timing measurements are able to rule out super-Earth and gas giant companions in low-order mean motion resonance with TrES-3b.

  15. The Historical X-ray Transient KY TrA in quiescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zurita, C.; Corral-Santana, J. M.; Casares, J.

    2015-12-01

    We present deep optical images of the historical X-ray Transient KY TrA in quiescence from which we confirm the identification of the counterpart reported by Murdin et al. and derive an improved position of α = 15:28:16.97 and δ = -61:52:57.8. In 2007 June we obtained I, R and V images, where the counterpart seems to be double indicating the presence of an interloper at ˜1.4 arcsec NW. After separating the contribution of KY TrA we calculate I = 21.47 ± 0.09, R = 22.3 ± 0.1 and V = 23.6 ± 0.1. Similar brightness in the I-band was measured in 2004 May and 2010 June. Variability was analysed from series of images taken in 2004, spanning 0.6 h, and in two blocks of 6 h during 2007. We find that the target is not variable in any data set above the error levels ˜0.07 mags. The presence of the interloper might explain the non-detection of the classic ellipsoidal modulation; our data indicates that it contributes around half of the total flux, which would make a variation <0.15 mag not detectable. A single spectrum obtained in 2004 May shows the H α emission characteristic of X-ray transients in quiescence with a full width at half-maximum FWHM = 2700 ± 280 km s-1. If the system follows the FWHM-K2 correlation found by Casares, this would correspond to a velocity semi-amplitude of the donor star of K2 = 630 ± 74 km s-1. Based on the outburst amplitude and colours of the optical counterpart in quiescence we derive a crude estimate of the orbital period of 8 h and an upper limit of 15 h which would lead to mass function estimates of ≈9 M⊙ and <16 M⊙, respectively.

  16. Return flux experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tveekrem, June L.

    1992-01-01

    All spacecraft emit molecules via outgassing, thruster plumes, vents, etc. The return flux is the portion of those molecules that scatter from the ambient atmosphere and return to the spacecraft. Return flux allows critical spacecraft surfaces to become contaminated even when there is no direct line of sight between the contamination source and the critical surface. Data from the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) show that contamination of LDEF surfaces could not have come entirely from direct flux. The data suggest significant return flux. Several computer models have been developed to simulate return flux, but the predictions have never been verified in orbit. Large uncertainties in predictions lead to overly conservative spacecraft designs. The purpose of the REturn FLux EXperiment (REFLEX) is to fly a controlled experiment that can be directly compared with predictions from several models.

  17. Return flux experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tveekrem, June L.

    All spacecraft emit molecules via outgassing, thruster plumes, vents, etc. The return flux is the portion of those molecules that scatter from the ambient atmosphere and return to the spacecraft. Return flux allows critical spacecraft surfaces to become contaminated even when there is no direct line of sight between the contamination source and the critical surface. Data from the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) show that contamination of LDEF surfaces could not have come entirely from direct flux. The data suggest significant return flux. Several computer models have been developed to simulate return flux, but the predictions have never been verified in orbit. Large uncertainties in predictions lead to overly conservative spacecraft designs. The purpose of the REturn FLux EXperiment (REFLEX) is to fly a controlled experiment that can be directly compared with predictions from several models.

  18. Heat flux measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebert, Curt H.; Weikle, Donald H.

    1989-01-01

    A new automated, computer controlled heat flux measurement facility is described. Continuous transient and steady-state surface heat flux values varying from about 0.3 to 6 MW/sq m over a temperature range of 100 to 1200 K can be obtained in the facility. An application of this facility is the development of heat flux gauges for continuous fast transient surface heat flux measurement on turbine blades operating in space shuttle main engine turbopumps. The facility is useful for durability testing at fast temperature transients.

  19. Aspects of flux compactification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tao

    In this thesis, we study three main aspects of flux compactifications: (1) classify supergravity solutions from flux compactification; (2) construct flux-deformed geometry and 4D low-energy theory to describe these flux vacua; and (3) study 4D particle phenomenology and cosmology of flux vacua. In the first part, we review G-structure, the basic tool to study supersymmetric flux solutions, and some typical solutions obtained in heterotic, type IIA and type IIB string theories. Then we present a comprehensive classification of supersymmetric vacua of M-theory compactification on 7D manifolds with general four-form fluxes. We analyze the cases where the resulting four-dimensional vacua have N = 1, 2, 3, 4 supersymmetry and the internal space allows for SU(2)-, SU(3)- or G 2-structures. In particular, we find for N = 2 supersymmetry, that the external space-time is Minkowski and the base manifold of the internal space is conformally Kahler for SU(2) structures, while for SU(3) structures the internal space has to be Einstein-Sasaki and no internal fluxes are allowed. Moreover, we provide a new vacuum with N = 1 supersymmetry and SU(3) structure, where all fluxes are non-zero and the first order differential equations are solved. In the second part, we simply review the methods used to construct one subclass of fluxed-deformed geometry or the so-called "twisted manifold", and the associated 4D effective theory describing these flux vacua. Then by employing (generalized) Scherk-Schwarz reduction, we construct the geometric twisting for Calabi-Yau manifolds of Voisin-Borcea type (K 3 x T2)/ Z2 and study the superpotential in a type IIA orientifold based on this geometry. The twists modify the direct product by fibering the K 3 over T2 while preserving the Z2 involution. As an important application, the Voisin-Borcea class contains T6/( Z2 x Z2 ), the usual setting for intersecting D6 brane model building. Past work in this context considered only those twists inherited

  20. 40 CFR 97.423 - Recordation of TR NOX Annual allowance transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Recordation of TR NOX Annual allowance... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS TR NOX Annual Trading Program § 97.423 Recordation of TR NOX Annual allowance transfers. (a) Within 5 business...

  1. 40 CFR 97.425 - Compliance with TR NOX Annual assurance provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Compliance with TR NOX Annual... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS TR NOX Annual Trading Program § 97.425 Compliance with TR NOX Annual assurance provisions....

  2. 40 CFR 97.422 - Submission of TR NOX Annual allowance transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Submission of TR NOX Annual allowance... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS TR NOX Annual Trading Program § 97.422 Submission of TR NOX Annual allowance transfers. (a) An authorized...

  3. 40 CFR 97.423 - Recordation of TR NOX Annual allowance transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Recordation of TR NOX Annual allowance... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS TR NOX Annual Trading Program § 97.423 Recordation of TR NOX Annual allowance transfers. (a) Within 5 business...

  4. 40 CFR 97.423 - Recordation of TR NOX Annual allowance transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Recordation of TR NOX Annual allowance... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS TR NOX Annual Trading Program § 97.423 Recordation of TR NOX Annual allowance transfers. (a) Within 5 business...

  5. 40 CFR 97.424 - Compliance with TR NOX Annual emissions limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Compliance with TR NOX Annual... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS TR NOX Annual Trading Program § 97.424 Compliance with TR NOX Annual emissions limitation....

  6. 40 CFR 97.422 - Submission of TR NOX Annual allowance transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Submission of TR NOX Annual allowance... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS TR NOX Annual Trading Program § 97.422 Submission of TR NOX Annual allowance transfers. (a) An authorized...

  7. 40 CFR 97.422 - Submission of TR NOX Annual allowance transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Submission of TR NOX Annual allowance... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS TR NOX Annual Trading Program § 97.422 Submission of TR NOX Annual allowance transfers. (a) An authorized...

  8. 40 CFR 97.425 - Compliance with TR NOX Annual assurance provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Compliance with TR NOX Annual... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS TR NOX Annual Trading Program § 97.425 Compliance with TR NOX Annual assurance provisions....

  9. 40 CFR 97.425 - Compliance with TR NOX Annual assurance provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Compliance with TR NOX Annual... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS TR NOX Annual Trading Program § 97.425 Compliance with TR NOX Annual assurance provisions....

  10. 40 CFR 97.623 - Recordation of TR SO2 Group 1 allowance transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Recordation of TR SO2 Group 1... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS TR SO2 Group 1 Trading Program § 97.623 Recordation of TR SO2 Group 1 allowance transfers. (a)...

  11. 40 CFR 97.725 - Compliance with TR SO2 Group 2 assurance provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Compliance with TR SO2 Group 2... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS TR SO2 Group 2 Trading Program § 97.725 Compliance with TR SO2 Group 2 assurance provisions....

  12. 40 CFR 97.625 - Compliance with TR SO2 Group 1 assurance provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Compliance with TR SO2 Group 1... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS TR SO2 Group 1 Trading Program § 97.625 Compliance with TR SO2 Group 1 assurance provisions....

  13. 40 CFR 97.725 - Compliance with TR SO2 Group 2 assurance provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Compliance with TR SO2 Group 2... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS TR SO2 Group 2 Trading Program § 97.725 Compliance with TR SO2 Group 2 assurance provisions....

  14. 40 CFR 97.723 - Recordation of TR SO2 Group 2 allowance transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Recordation of TR SO2 Group 2... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS TR SO2 Group 2 Trading Program § 97.723 Recordation of TR SO2 Group 2 allowance transfers. (a)...

  15. 40 CFR 97.723 - Recordation of TR SO2 Group 2 allowance transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Recordation of TR SO2 Group 2... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS TR SO2 Group 2 Trading Program § 97.723 Recordation of TR SO2 Group 2 allowance transfers. (a)...

  16. 40 CFR 97.622 - Submission of TR SO2 Group 1 allowance transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Submission of TR SO2 Group 1 allowance... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS TR SO2 Group 1 Trading Program § 97.622 Submission of TR SO2 Group 1 allowance transfers. (a) An...

  17. 40 CFR 97.724 - Compliance with TR SO2 Group 2 emissions limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Compliance with TR SO2 Group 2... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS TR SO2 Group 2 Trading Program § 97.724 Compliance with TR SO2 Group 2 emissions limitation....

  18. 40 CFR 97.623 - Recordation of TR SO2 Group 1 allowance transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Recordation of TR SO2 Group 1... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS TR SO2 Group 1 Trading Program § 97.623 Recordation of TR SO2 Group 1 allowance transfers. (a)...

  19. 40 CFR 97.622 - Submission of TR SO2 Group 1 allowance transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Submission of TR SO2 Group 1 allowance... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS TR SO2 Group 1 Trading Program § 97.622 Submission of TR SO2 Group 1 allowance transfers. (a) An...

  20. 40 CFR 97.624 - Compliance with TR SO2 Group 1 emissions limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Compliance with TR SO2 Group 1... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS TR SO2 Group 1 Trading Program § 97.624 Compliance with TR SO2 Group 1 emissions limitation....

  1. 40 CFR 97.724 - Compliance with TR SO2 Group 2 emissions limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Compliance with TR SO2 Group 2... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS TR SO2 Group 2 Trading Program § 97.724 Compliance with TR SO2 Group 2 emissions limitation....

  2. 40 CFR 97.623 - Recordation of TR SO2 Group 1 allowance transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Recordation of TR SO2 Group 1... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS TR SO2 Group 1 Trading Program § 97.623 Recordation of TR SO2 Group 1 allowance transfers. (a)...

  3. 40 CFR 97.624 - Compliance with TR SO2 Group 1 emissions limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Compliance with TR SO2 Group 1... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS TR SO2 Group 1 Trading Program § 97.624 Compliance with TR SO2 Group 1 emissions limitation....

  4. 40 CFR 97.722 - Submission of TR SO2 Group 2 allowance transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Submission of TR SO2 Group 2 allowance... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS TR SO2 Group 2 Trading Program § 97.722 Submission of TR SO2 Group 2 allowance transfers. (a) An...

  5. 40 CFR 97.622 - Submission of TR SO2 Group 1 allowance transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Submission of TR SO2 Group 1 allowance... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS TR SO2 Group 1 Trading Program § 97.622 Submission of TR SO2 Group 1 allowance transfers. (a) An...

  6. 40 CFR 97.725 - Compliance with TR SO2 Group 2 assurance provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Compliance with TR SO2 Group 2... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS TR SO2 Group 2 Trading Program § 97.725 Compliance with TR SO2 Group 2 assurance provisions....

  7. 40 CFR 97.624 - Compliance with TR SO2 Group 1 emissions limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Compliance with TR SO2 Group 1... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS TR SO2 Group 1 Trading Program § 97.624 Compliance with TR SO2 Group 1 emissions limitation....

  8. 40 CFR 97.722 - Submission of TR SO2 Group 2 allowance transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Submission of TR SO2 Group 2 allowance... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS TR SO2 Group 2 Trading Program § 97.722 Submission of TR SO2 Group 2 allowance transfers. (a) An...

  9. 40 CFR 97.724 - Compliance with TR SO2 Group 2 emissions limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Compliance with TR SO2 Group 2... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS TR SO2 Group 2 Trading Program § 97.724 Compliance with TR SO2 Group 2 emissions limitation....

  10. 40 CFR 97.625 - Compliance with TR SO2 Group 1 assurance provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Compliance with TR SO2 Group 1... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS TR SO2 Group 1 Trading Program § 97.625 Compliance with TR SO2 Group 1 assurance provisions....

  11. 40 CFR 97.723 - Recordation of TR SO2 Group 2 allowance transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Recordation of TR SO2 Group 2... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS TR SO2 Group 2 Trading Program § 97.723 Recordation of TR SO2 Group 2 allowance transfers. (a)...

  12. 40 CFR 97.722 - Submission of TR SO2 Group 2 allowance transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Submission of TR SO2 Group 2 allowance... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS TR SO2 Group 2 Trading Program § 97.722 Submission of TR SO2 Group 2 allowance transfers. (a) An...

  13. 40 CFR 97.625 - Compliance with TR SO2 Group 1 assurance provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Compliance with TR SO2 Group 1... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX BUDGET TRADING PROGRAM AND CAIR NOX AND SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS TR SO2 Group 1 Trading Program § 97.625 Compliance with TR SO2 Group 1 assurance provisions....

  14. 40 CFR 97.523 - Recordation of TR NOX Ozone Season allowance transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... days of recordation of a TR NOX Ozone Season allowance transfer under paragraphs (a) and (b) of the... transferee accounts. (e) Within 10 business days of receipt of a TR NOX Ozone Season allowance transfer that... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Recordation of TR NOX Ozone...

  15. 40 CFR 97.523 - Recordation of TR NOX Ozone Season allowance transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... days of recordation of a TR NOX Ozone Season allowance transfer under paragraphs (a) and (b) of the... transferee accounts. (e) Within 10 business days of receipt of a TR NOX Ozone Season allowance transfer that... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Recordation of TR NOX Ozone...

  16. 40 CFR 97.523 - Recordation of TR NOX Ozone Season allowance transfers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... days of recordation of a TR NOX Ozone Season allowance transfer under paragraphs (a) and (b) of the... transferee accounts. (e) Within 10 business days of receipt of a TR NOX Ozone Season allowance transfer that... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Recordation of TR NOX Ozone...

  17. 40 CFR 97.612 - TR SO2 Group 1 allowance allocations to new units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... to new units. 97.612 Section 97.612 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... TR SO2 Group 1 Trading Program § 97.612 TR SO2 Group 1 allowance allocations to new units. (a) For... 1 allowances in the notice of data availability issued under § 97.611(a)(1); (ii) TR SO2 Group...

  18. 40 CFR 97.712 - TR SO2 Group 2 allowance allocations to new units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... to new units. 97.712 Section 97.712 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... TR SO2 Group 2 Trading Program § 97.712 TR SO2 Group 2 allowance allocations to new units. (a) For... 2 allowances in the notice of data availability issued under § 97.711(a)(1); (ii) TR SO2 Group...

  19. 40 CFR 97.612 - TR SO2 Group 1 allowance allocations to new units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... to new units. 97.612 Section 97.612 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... TR SO2 Group 1 Trading Program § 97.612 TR SO2 Group 1 allowance allocations to new units. (a) For... 1 allowances in the notice of data availability issued under § 97.611(a)(1); (ii) TR SO2 Group...

  20. 40 CFR 97.612 - TR SO2 Group 1 allowance allocations to new units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... to new units. 97.612 Section 97.612 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... TR SO2 Group 1 Trading Program § 97.612 TR SO2 Group 1 allowance allocations to new units. (a) For... 1 allowances in the notice of data availability issued under § 97.611(a)(1); (ii) TR SO2 Group...

  1. 40 CFR 97.712 - TR SO2 Group 2 allowance allocations to new units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... to new units. 97.712 Section 97.712 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... TR SO2 Group 2 Trading Program § 97.712 TR SO2 Group 2 allowance allocations to new units. (a) For... 2 allowances in the notice of data availability issued under § 97.711(a)(1); (ii) TR SO2 Group...

  2. 40 CFR 97.712 - TR SO2 Group 2 allowance allocations to new units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... to new units. 97.712 Section 97.712 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... TR SO2 Group 2 Trading Program § 97.712 TR SO2 Group 2 allowance allocations to new units. (a) For... 2 allowances in the notice of data availability issued under § 97.711(a)(1); (ii) TR SO2 Group...

  3. 40 CFR 97.421 - Recordation of TR NOX Annual allowance allocations and auction results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... July 1, 2013, the Administrator will record in each TR NOX Annual source's compliance account the TR... the control period in 2014 and 2015. (d) By July 1, 2014, the Administrator will record in each TR NOX....38(a)(4) or (5) of this chapter, for the control period in 2016 and 2017. (e) By July 1, 2015,...

  4. Posttranslational Control of ALA Synthesis Includes GluTR Degradation by Clp Protease and Stabilization by GluTR-Binding Protein1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Apitz, Janina; Nishimura, Kenji; Wolf, Anja; Hedtke, Boris

    2016-01-01

    5-Aminolevulinic acid (ALA) is the first committed substrate of tetrapyrrole biosynthesis and is formed from glutamyl-tRNA by two enzymatic steps. Glutamyl-tRNA reductase (GluTR) as the first enzyme of ALA synthesis is encoded by HEMA genes and tightly regulated at the transcriptional and posttranslational levels. Here, we show that the caseinolytic protease (Clp) substrate adaptor ClpS1 and the ClpC1 chaperone as well as the GluTR-binding protein (GBP) interact with the N terminus of GluTR. Loss-of function mutants of ClpR2 and ClpC1 proteins show increased GluTR stability, whereas absence of GBP results in decreased GluTR stability. Thus, the Clp protease system and GBP contribute to GluTR accumulation levels, and thereby the rate-limiting ALA synthesis. These findings are supported with Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) hema1 mutants expressing a truncated GluTR lacking the 29 N-terminal amino acid residues of the mature protein. Accumulation of this truncated GluTR is higher in dark periods, resulting in increased protochlorophyllide content. It is proposed that the proteolytic activity of Clp protease counteracts GBP binding to assure the appropriate content of GluTR and the adequate ALA synthesis for chlorophyll and heme in higher plants. PMID:26884485

  5. Video Meteor Fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell-Brown, M. D.; Braid, D.

    2011-01-01

    The flux of meteoroids, or number of meteoroids per unit area per unit time, is critical for calibrating models of meteoroid stream formation and for estimating the hazard to spacecraft from shower and sporadic meteors. Although observations of meteors in the millimetre to centimetre size range are common, flux measurements (particularly for sporadic meteors, which make up the majority of meteoroid flux) are less so. It is necessary to know the collecting area and collection time for a given set of observations, and to correct for observing biases and the sensitivity of the system. Previous measurements of sporadic fluxes are summarized in Figure 1; the values are given as a total number of meteoroids striking the earth in one year to a given limiting mass. The Gr n et al. (1985) flux model is included in the figure for reference. Fluxes for sporadic meteoroids impacting the Earth have been calculated for objects in the centimeter size range using Super-Schmidt observations (Hawkins & Upton, 1958); this study used about 300 meteors, and used only the physical area of overlap of the cameras at 90 km to calculate the flux, corrected for angular speed of meteors, since a large angular speed reduces the maximum brightness of the meteor on the film, and radiant elevation, which takes into account the geometric reduction in flux when the meteors are not perpendicular to the horizontal. They bring up corrections for both partial trails (which tends to increase the collecting area) and incomplete overlap at heights other than 90 km (which tends to decrease it) as effects that will affect the flux, but estimated that the two effects cancelled one another. Halliday et al. (1984) calculated the flux of meteorite-dropping fireballs with fragment masses greater than 50 g, over the physical area of sky accessible to the MORP fireball cameras, counting only observations in clear weather. In the micron size range, LDEF measurements of small craters on spacecraft have been used to

  6. LCLS Spectral Flux Viewer

    2005-10-25

    This application (FluxViewer) is a tool for displaying spectral flux data for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). This tool allows the user to view sliced spatial and energy distributions of the photons selected for specific energies and positions transverse to the beam axis.

  7. PHOTOMETRICALLY DERIVED MASSES AND RADII OF THE PLANET AND STAR IN THE TrES-2 SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Barclay, Thomas; Huber, Daniel; Rowe, Jason F.; Quintana, Elisa V.; Christiansen, Jessie L.; Jenkins, Jon M.; Mullally, Fergal; Seader, Shaun E.; Tenenbaum, Peter; Thompson, Susan E.; Barentsen, Geert; Bloemen, Steven; Demory, Brice-Olivier; Fulton, Benjamin J.; Shporer, Avi; Ragozzine, Darin

    2012-12-10

    We measure the mass and radius of the star and planet in the TrES-2 system using 2.7 years of observations by the Kepler spacecraft. The light curve shows evidence for ellipsoidal variations and Doppler beaming on a period consistent with the orbital period of the planet with amplitudes of 2.79{sup +0.44}{sub -0.62} and 3.44{sup +0.32}{sub -0.37} parts per million (ppm), respectively, and a difference between the dayside and the nightside planetary flux of 3.41{sup +0.55}{sub -0.82} ppm. We present an asteroseismic analysis of solar-like oscillations on TrES-2A which we use to calculate the stellar mass of 0.94 {+-} 0.05 M{sub Sun} and radius of 0.95 {+-} 0.02 R{sub Sun }. Using these stellar parameters, a transit model fit and the phase-curve variations, we determine the planetary radius of 1.162{sup +0.020}{sub -0.024} R{sub Jup} and derive a mass for TrES-2b from the photometry of 1.44 {+-} 0.21 M{sub Jup}. The ratio of the ellipsoidal variation to the Doppler beaming amplitudes agrees to better than 2{sigma} with theoretical predications, while our measured planet mass and radius agree within 2{sigma} of previously published values based on spectroscopic radial velocity measurements. We measure a geometric albedo of 0.0136{sup +0.0022}{sub -0.0033} and an occultation (secondary eclipse) depth of 6.5{sup +1.7}{sub -1.8} ppm which we combined with the day/night planetary flux ratio to model the atmosphere of TrES-2b. We find that an atmosphere model that contains a temperature inversion is strongly preferred. We hypothesize that the Kepler bandpass probes a significantly greater atmospheric depth on the night side relative to the day side.

  8. Intramolecular Nuclear Flux Densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, I.; Daniel, C.; Gindensperger, E.; Manz, J.; PéRez-Torres, J. F.; Schild, A.; Stemmle, C.; Sulzer, D.; Yang, Y.

    The topic of this survey article has seen a renaissance during the past couple of years. Here we present and extend the results for various phenomena which we have published from 2012-2014, with gratitude to our coauthors. The new phenomena include (a) the first reduced nuclear flux densities in vibrating diatomic molecules or ions which have been deduced from experimental pump-probe spectra; these "experimental" nuclear flux densities reveal several quantum effects including (b) the "quantum accordion", i.e., during the turn from bond stretch to bond compression, the diatomic system never stands still — instead, various parts of it with different bond lengths flow into opposite directions. (c) Wavepacket interferometry has been extended from nuclear densities to flux densities, again revealing new phenomena: For example, (d) a vibrating nuclear wave function with compact initial shape may split into two partial waves which run into opposite directions, thus causing interfering flux densities. (e) Tunneling in symmetric 1-dimensional double-well systems yields maximum values of the associated nuclear flux density just below the potential barrier; this is in marked contrast with negligible values of the nuclear density just below the barrier. (f) Nuclear flux densities of pseudorotating nuclei may induce huge magnetic fields. A common methodologic theme of all topics is the continuity equation which connects the time derivative of the nuclear density to the divergence of the flux density, subject to the proper boundary conditions. (g) Nearly identical nuclear densities with different boundary conditions may be related to entirely different flux densities, e.g., during tunneling in cyclic versus non-cyclic systems. The original continuity equation, density and flux density of all nuclei, or of all nuclear degrees of freedom, may be reduced to the corresponding quantities for just a single nucleus, or just a single degree of freedom.

  9. Directed flux motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Andrew (Inventor); Punnoose, Andrew (Inventor); Strausser, Katherine (Inventor); Parikh, Neil (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A directed flux motor described utilizes the directed magnetic flux of at least one magnet through ferrous material to drive different planetary gear sets to achieve capabilities in six actuated shafts that are grouped three to a side of the motor. The flux motor also utilizes an interwoven magnet configuration which reduces the overall size of the motor. The motor allows for simple changes to modify the torque to speed ratio of the gearing contained within the motor as well as simple configurations for any number of output shafts up to six. The changes allow for improved manufacturability and reliability within the design.

  10. Heat Flux Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    A heat flux microsensor developed under a NASP Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) has a wide range of potential commercial applications. Vatell Corporation originally designed microsensors for use in very high temperatures. The company then used the technology to develop heat flux sensors to measure the rate of heat energy flowing in and out of a surface as well as readings on the surface temperature. Additional major advantages include response to heat flux in less than 10 microseconds and the ability to withstand temperatures up to 1,200 degrees centigrade. Commercial applications are used in high speed aerodynamics, supersonic combustion, blade cooling, and mass flow measurements, etc.

  11. TR3 is preferentially expressed by bulge epithelial stem cells in human hair follicles.

    PubMed

    Xie, Lin; Yang, Ruifeng; Liu, Shujing; Lyle, Stephen; Cotsarelis, George; Xiang, Leihong; Zhang, Litao; Li, Bin; Wan, Miaojian; Xu, Xiaowei

    2016-01-01

    TR3 is an orphan member of the steroid/thyroid/retinoid nuclear receptor superfamily of transcription factors and it plays a pivotal role in regulating cell growth and apoptosis. The expression and function of TR3 in skin have not been well investigated. Using a cDNA expression assay, we discover that TR3 is significantly enriched in human telogen bulge compared with anagen bulb. Immunohistochemical staining confirms that TR3 is highly expressed in the bulge region of human hair follicles and it colocalizes with cytokeratin 15 (K15), an epithelial stem cell marker. To study the function of TR3 in the effect of androgens in keratinocytes, we treat HaCaT keratinocytes and primary human keratinocytes with dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and testosterone (T). The treated keratinocytes show a dose-dependent growth reduction to DHT and T. DHT increases the expression of TR3 in keratinocytes, associated with a concomitant increase of BAD and decrease of Bcl-2 expression. Knockdown TR3 expression by siRNA blocks the inhibitory effect of DHT on keratinocyte proliferation. Our results demonstrate that TR3 is localized to the stem cell compartment in the human hair follicles. Androgen increases TR3 expression in cultured keratinocytes. Our data suggest that TR3 mediates at least part of the inhibitory effect of androgens on keratinocytes.

  12. Modeling Magnetic Flux Ropes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Chun; Keppens, Rony

    2014-01-01

    The magnetic configuration hosting prominences can be a large-scale helical magnetic flux rope. As a necessary step towards future prominence formation studies, we report on a stepwise approach to study flux rope formation. We start with summarizing our recent three-dimensional (3D) isothermal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation where a flux rope is formed, including gas pressure and gravity. This starts from a static corona with a linear force-free bipolar magnetic field, altered by lower boundary vortex flows around the main polarities and converging flows towards the polarity inversion. The latter flows induce magnetic reconnection and this forms successive new helical loops so that a complete flux rope grows and ascends. After stopping the driving flows, the system relaxes to a stable helical magnetic flux rope configuration embedded in an overlying arcade. Starting from this relaxed isothermal endstate, we next perform a thermodynamic MHD simulation with a chromospheric layer inserted at the bottom. As a result of a properly parametrized coronal heating, and due to radiative cooling and anisotropic thermal conduction, the system further relaxes to an equilibrium where the flux rope and the arcade develop a fully realistic thermal structure. This paves the way to future simulations for 3D prominence formation.

  13. Dynamic Mechanical Thermal Analysis of Virgin TR-55 Silicone Rubber

    SciTech Connect

    Small IV, W; Wilson, T S

    2009-10-09

    Dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA) of virgin TR-55 silicone rubber specimens was conducted. Dynamic frequency/temperature sweep tests were conducted over the ranges 0.1-100 rad/s and 30-100 C using a parallel plate test geometry. A strain of 0.2% was used, which was near the upper limit of the linear viscoelastic region of the material based on initial dynamic strain sweep tests. Master curves of G{prime} and G{double_prime} as a function of frequency were generated using time-temperature superposition (horizontal shift with initial vertical correction). The activation energy calculated from an Arrhenius fit to the horizontal shift factors was 178-355 kJ/mol. The calculated percent load retention at {approx}50 years was 61-68%.

  14. 40 CFR 97.721 - Recordation of TR SO2 Group 2 allowance allocations and auction results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Recordation of TR SO2 Group 2... SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS TR SO2 Group 2 Trading Program § 97.721 Recordation of TR SO2 Group 2 allowance allocations and auction results. (a) By November 7, 2011, the Administrator will record in each TR SO2 Group...

  15. 40 CFR 97.721 - Recordation of TR SO2 Group 2 allowance allocations and auction results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Recordation of TR SO2 Group 2... SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS TR SO2 Group 2 Trading Program § 97.721 Recordation of TR SO2 Group 2 allowance allocations and auction results. (a) By November 7, 2011, the Administrator will record in each TR SO2 Group...

  16. 40 CFR 97.621 - Recordation of TR SO2 Group 1 allowance allocations and auction results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Recordation of TR SO2 Group 1... SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS TR SO2 Group 1 Trading Program § 97.621 Recordation of TR SO2 Group 1 allowance allocations and auction results. (a) By November 7, 2011, the Administrator will record in each TR SO2 Group...

  17. 40 CFR 97.621 - Recordation of TR SO2 Group 1 allowance allocations and auction results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Recordation of TR SO2 Group 1... SO2 TRADING PROGRAMS TR SO2 Group 1 Trading Program § 97.621 Recordation of TR SO2 Group 1 allowance allocations and auction results. (a) By November 7, 2011, the Administrator will record in each TR SO2 Group...

  18. Human and rat TR4 orphan receptors specify a subclass of the steroid receptor superfamily.

    PubMed Central

    Chang, C; Da Silva, S L; Ideta, R; Lee, Y; Yeh, S; Burbach, J P

    1994-01-01

    We have identified a member of the steroid receptor superfamily and cloned it from human and rat hypothalamus, prostate, and testis cDNA libraries. The open reading frame between first ATG and terminator TGA can encode 615 (human) and 596 (rat) amino acids with calculated molecular mass of 67.3 (human) and 65.4 (rat) kDa. The amino acid sequence of this protein, called TR4 orphan receptor, is closely related to the previously identified TR2 orphan receptor. The high homology between TR2 and TR4 orphan receptor suggests that these two orphan receptors constitute a unique subfamily within the steroid receptor superfamily. These two orphan receptors are differentially expressed in rat tissues. Unlike TR2 orphan receptors, the TR4 orphan receptor appears to be predominantly located in granule cells of the hippocampus and the cerebellum, suggesting that it may play some role(s) in transcriptional regulation in these neurons. Images PMID:8016112

  19. Fabrication of PVDF-TrFE based bilayered PbTiO3/PVDF-TrFE films capacitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurbaya, Z.; Wahid, M. H.; Rozana, M. D.; Annuar, I.; Alrokayan, S. A. H.; Khan, H. A.; Rusop, M.

    2016-07-01

    Development of high performance capacitor is reaching towards new generation where the ferroelectric materials take places as the active dielectric layer. The motivation of this study is to produce high capacitance device with long life cycle. This was configured by preparing bilayered films where lead titanate as an active dielectric layer and stacked with the top dielectric layer, poly(vinyledenefluoride-trifluoroethylene). Both of them are being referred that have one in common which is ferroelectric behavior. Therefore the combination of ceramic and polymer ferroelectric material could perform optimum dielectric characteristic for capacitor applications. The fabrication was done by simple sol-gel spin coating method that being varied at spinning speed property for polymer layers, whereas maintaining the ceramic layer. The characterization of PVDF-TrFE/PbTiO3 was performed according to metal-insulator-metal stacked capacitor measurement which includes structural, dielectric, and ferroelectric measurement.

  20. An intermediary role for the tremorgenic mycotoxin TR-2 in the biosynthesis of verruculogen.

    PubMed

    Willingale, J; Perera, K P; Mantle, P G

    1983-09-15

    14C-Labelled compound TR-2, a tremorgenic mycotoxin, was administered to Penicillium raistrickii in submerged fermentation. Half of the added radiolabel was taken up by the fungus during the 60 h incubation period and the secondary metabolites subsequently isolated, principally verruculogen but also fumitremorgin B, were found to be radiolabelled. The efficiency of biosynthetic incorporation of TR-2 into verruculogen within the mycelium was at least 35%, demonstrating for the first time an intermediary role for TR-2. Fumitremorgin B was also TR-2-derived but may not be an important intermediate in verruculogen biosynthesis. PMID:6626168

  1. An intermediary role for the tremorgenic mycotoxin TR-2 in the biosynthesis of verruculogen.

    PubMed Central

    Willingale, J; Perera, K P; Mantle, P G

    1983-01-01

    14C-Labelled compound TR-2, a tremorgenic mycotoxin, was administered to Penicillium raistrickii in submerged fermentation. Half of the added radiolabel was taken up by the fungus during the 60 h incubation period and the secondary metabolites subsequently isolated, principally verruculogen but also fumitremorgin B, were found to be radiolabelled. The efficiency of biosynthetic incorporation of TR-2 into verruculogen within the mycelium was at least 35%, demonstrating for the first time an intermediary role for TR-2. Fumitremorgin B was also TR-2-derived but may not be an important intermediate in verruculogen biosynthesis. PMID:6626168

  2. Superradiance and flux conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boonserm, Petarpa; Ngampitipan, Tritos; Visser, Matt

    2014-09-01

    The theoretical foundations of the phenomenon known as superradiance still continue to attract considerable attention. Despite many valiant attempts at pedagogically clear presentations, the effect nevertheless still continues to generate some significant confusion. Part of the confusion arises from the fact that superradiance in a quantum field theory context is not the same as superradiance (superfluorescence) in some condensed matter contexts; part of the confusion arises from traditional but sometimes awkward normalization conventions, and part is due to sometimes unnecessary confusion between fluxes and probabilities. We shall argue that the key point underlying the effect is flux conservation (and, in the presence of dissipation, a controlled amount of flux nonconservation), and that attempting to phrase things in terms of reflection and transmission probabilities only works in the absence of superradiance. To help clarify the situation we present a simple exactly solvable toy model exhibiting both superradiance and damping.

  3. Flux amplification in SSPX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lodestro, Lynda; Hooper, E. B.; Jayakumar, R. J.; Pearlstein, L. D.; Wood, R. D.; McLean, H. S.

    2007-11-01

    Flux amplification---the ratio of poloidal flux enclosed between the magnetic and geometric axes to that between the separatrix and the geometric axis---is a key measure of efficiency for edge-current-driven spheromaks. With the new, modular capacitor bank, permitting flexible programming of the gun current, studies of flux amplification under various drive scenarios can be performed. Analysis of recent results of pulsed operation with the new bank finds an efficiency ˜ 0.2, in selected shots, of the conversion of gun energy to confined magnetic energy during the pulses, and suggests a route toward sustained efficiency at 0.2. Results of experiments, a model calculation of field build-up, and NIMROD simulations exploring this newly suggested scenario will be presented.

  4. Optical heat flux gauge

    DOEpatents

    Noel, Bruce W.; Borella, Henry M.; Cates, Michael R.; Turley, W. Dale; MaCarthur, Charles D.; Cala, Gregory C.

    1991-01-01

    A heat flux gauge comprising first and second thermographic phosphor layers separated by a layer of a thermal insulator. The gauge may be mounted on a surface with the first thermographic phosphor in contact with the surface. A light source is directed at the gauge, causing the phosphors to luminesce. The luminescence produced by the phosphors is collected and its spectra analyzed in order to determine the heat flux on the surface. First and second phosphor layers must be different materials to assure that the spectral lines collected will be distinguishable.

  5. Optical heat flux gauge

    DOEpatents

    Noel, Bruce W.; Borella, Henry M.; Cates, Michael R.; Turley, W. Dale; MacArthur, Charles D.; Cala, Gregory C.

    1991-01-01

    A heat flux gauge comprising first and second thermographic phosphor layers separated by a layer of a thermal insulator wherein each thermographic layer comprises a plurality of respective thermographic phosphors. The gauge may be mounted on a surface with the first thermographic phosphor in contact with the surface. A light source is directed at the gauge, causing the phosphors to luminesce. The luminescence produced by the phosphors is collected and its spectra analyzed in order to determine the heat flux on the surface. First and second phosphor layers must be different materials to assure that the spectral lines collected will be distinguishable.

  6. Optical heat flux gauge

    DOEpatents

    Noel, Bruce W.; Borella, Henry M.; Cates, Michael R.; Turley, W. Dale; MacArthur, Charles D.; Cala, Gregory C.

    1991-01-01

    A heat flux gauge comprising first and second thermographic phosphor layers separated by a layer of a thermal insulator, wherein each thermographic layer comprises a plurality of respective thermographic sensors in a juxtaposed relationship with respect to each other. The gauge may be mounted on a surface with the first thermographic phosphor in contact with the surface. A light source is directed at the gauge, causing the phosphors to luminesce. The luminescence produced by the phosphors is collected and its spectra analyzed in order to determine the heat flux on the surface. First and second phosphor layers must be different materials to assure that the spectral lines collected will be distinguishable.

  7. [Research advances in ecosystem flux].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xudong; Peng, Zhenhua; Qi, Lianghua; Zhou, Jinxing

    2005-10-01

    To develop the long-term localized observation and investigation on ecosystem flux is of great importance. On the basis of generalizing the concepts and connotations of ecosystem flux, this paper introduced the construction and development histories of Global Flux Networks, Regional Flux Networks (Ameri-Flux, Euro-Flux and Asia-Flux) and China-Flux, as well as the main methodologies, including micrometeorological methods (such as eddy correlation method, mass balance method, energy balance method and air dynamic method)and chamber methods (static and dynamic chamber methods), and their basic operation principles. The research achievements, approaches and advances of CO2, N2O, CH4, and heat fluxes in forest ecosystem, farmland ecosystem, grassland ecosystem and water ecosystem were also summarized. In accordance with the realities and necessities of ecosystem flux research in China, some suggestions and prospects were put forward.

  8. High flux heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, Edward M.; Mackowski, Michael J.

    1993-01-01

    This interim report documents the results of the first two phases of a four-phase program to develop a high flux heat exchanger for cooling future high performance aircraft electronics. Phase 1 defines future needs for high flux heat removal in advanced military electronics systems. The results are sorted by broad application categories: (1) commercial digital systems, (2) military data processors, (3) power processors, and (4) radar and optical systems. For applications expected to be fielded in five to ten years, the outlook is for steady state flux levels of 30-50 W/sq cm for digital processors and several hundred W/sq cm for power control applications. In Phase 1, a trade study was conducted on emerging cooling technologies which could remove a steady state chip heat flux of 100 W/sq cm while holding chip junction temperature to 90 C. Constraints imposed on heat exchanger design, in order to reflect operation in a fighter aircraft environment, included a practical lower limit on coolant supply temperature, the preference for a nontoxic, nonflammable, and nonfreezing coolant, the need to minimize weight and volume, and operation in an accelerating environment. The trade study recommended the Compact High Intensity Cooler (CHIC) for design, fabrication, and test in the final two phases of this program.

  9. Radiative Flux Analysis

    DOE Data Explorer

    Long, Chuck [NOAA

    2008-05-14

    The Radiative Flux Analysis is a technique for using surface broadband radiation measurements for detecting periods of clear (i.e. cloudless) skies, and using the detected clear-sky data to fit functions which are then used to produce continuous clear-sky estimates. The clear-sky estimates and measurements are then used in various ways to infer cloud macrophysical properties.

  10. Muon and neutrino fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, P. G.; Protheroe, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    The result of a new calculation of the atmospheric muon and neutrino fluxes and the energy spectrum of muon-neutrinos produced in individual extensive air showers (EAS) initiated by proton and gamma-ray primaries is reported. Also explained is the possibility of detecting atmospheric nu sub mu's due to gamma-rays from these sources.

  11. Incident meteoroid flux density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badadjanov, P. B.; Bibarsov, R. SH.; Getman, V. S.; Kolmakov, V. M.

    1987-01-01

    Complex photographic and radar meteor observations were carried out. Using the available observational data, the density of incident flux of meteoroids was estimated over a wide mass range of 0.001 to 100 g. To avoid the influence of apparatus selectivity a special technique was applied. The main characteristics of this technique are given and discussed.

  12. TR-EDB: Test Reactor Embrittlement Data Base, Version 1

    SciTech Connect

    Stallmann, F.W.; Wang, J.A.; Kam, F.B.K.

    1994-01-01

    The Test Reactor Embrittlement Data Base (TR-EDB) is a collection of results from irradiation in materials test reactors. It complements the Power Reactor Embrittlement Data Base (PR-EDB), whose data are restricted to the results from the analysis of surveillance capsules in commercial power reactors. The rationale behind their restriction was the assumption that the results of test reactor experiments may not be applicable to power reactors and could, therefore, be challenged if such data were included. For this very reason the embrittlement predictions in the Reg. Guide 1.99, Rev. 2, were based exclusively on power reactor data. However, test reactor experiments are able to cover a much wider range of materials and irradiation conditions that are needed to explore more fully a variety of models for the prediction of irradiation embrittlement. These data are also needed for the study of effects of annealing for life extension of reactor pressure vessels that are difficult to obtain from surveillance capsule results.

  13. EdTrAc Teacher Education Program: First-Year Implementation Evaluation (2005-2006)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pittman, Brian; Shelton, Ellen

    2006-01-01

    The Educational Training Academy (EdTrAc) is an NSF-funded project of Normandale Community College to increase the number, diversity, and skills of students preparing to be elementary and middle school teachers with a specialty in math and science. Overall, this evaluation indicates that the EdTrAc implementation is on track after its first year…

  14. The anti-inflammatory effect of TR6 on LPS-induced mastitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiaoyu; Fu, Yunhe; Tian, Yuan; Zhang, Zecai; Zhang, Wenlong; Gao, Xuejiao; Lu, Xiaojie; Cao, Yongguo; Zhang, Naisheng

    2016-01-01

    [TRIAP]-derived decoy peptides have anti-inflammatory properties. In this study, we synthesized a TRIAP-derived decoy peptide (TR6) containing, the N-terminal portion of the third helical region of the [TIRAP] TIR domain (sequence "N"-RQIKIWFQNRRMKWK and -KPGFLRDPWCKYQML-"C"). We evaluated the effects of TR6 on lipopolysaccharide-induced mastitis in mice. In vivo, the mastitis model was induced by LPS administration for 24h, and TR6 treatment was initiated 1h before or after induction of LPS. In vitro, primary mouse mammary epithelial cells and neutrophils were used to investigate the effects of TR6 on LPS-induced inflammatory responses. The results showed that TR6 significantly inhibited mammary gland hisopathologic changes, MPO activity, and LPS-induced production of TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6. In vitro, TR6 significantly inhibited LPS-induced TNF-α and IL-6 production and phosphorylation of NF-κB and MAPKs. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that the anti-inflammatory effect of TR6 against LPS-induced mastitis may be due to its ability to inhibit TLR4-mediated NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways. TR6 may be a promising therapeutic reagent for mastitis treatment.

  15. 40 CFR 97.424 - Compliance with TR NOX Annual emissions limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Compliance with TR NOX Annual emissions limitation. 97.424 Section 97.424 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... accounting basis in the following order: (i) Any TR NOX Annual allowances that were allocated to the units...

  16. 40 CFR 97.424 - Compliance with TR NOX Annual emissions limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Compliance with TR NOX Annual emissions limitation. 97.424 Section 97.424 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... accounting basis in the following order: (i) Any TR NOX Annual allowances that were allocated to the units...

  17. The anti-inflammatory effect of TR6 on LPS-induced mastitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiaoyu; Fu, Yunhe; Tian, Yuan; Zhang, Zecai; Zhang, Wenlong; Gao, Xuejiao; Lu, Xiaojie; Cao, Yongguo; Zhang, Naisheng

    2016-01-01

    [TRIAP]-derived decoy peptides have anti-inflammatory properties. In this study, we synthesized a TRIAP-derived decoy peptide (TR6) containing, the N-terminal portion of the third helical region of the [TIRAP] TIR domain (sequence "N"-RQIKIWFQNRRMKWK and -KPGFLRDPWCKYQML-"C"). We evaluated the effects of TR6 on lipopolysaccharide-induced mastitis in mice. In vivo, the mastitis model was induced by LPS administration for 24h, and TR6 treatment was initiated 1h before or after induction of LPS. In vitro, primary mouse mammary epithelial cells and neutrophils were used to investigate the effects of TR6 on LPS-induced inflammatory responses. The results showed that TR6 significantly inhibited mammary gland hisopathologic changes, MPO activity, and LPS-induced production of TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6. In vitro, TR6 significantly inhibited LPS-induced TNF-α and IL-6 production and phosphorylation of NF-κB and MAPKs. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that the anti-inflammatory effect of TR6 against LPS-induced mastitis may be due to its ability to inhibit TLR4-mediated NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways. TR6 may be a promising therapeutic reagent for mastitis treatment. PMID:26679677

  18. 40 CFR 97.412 - TR NOX Annual allowance allocations to new units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... new units. 97.412 Section 97.412 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... NOX Annual Trading Program § 97.412 TR NOX Annual allowance allocations to new units. (a) For each... the notice of data availability issued under § 97.411(a)(1); (ii) TR NOX Annual units whose...

  19. 40 CFR 97.412 - TR NOX Annual allowance allocations to new units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... new units. 97.412 Section 97.412 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... NOX Annual Trading Program § 97.412 TR NOX Annual allowance allocations to new units. (a) For each... the notice of data availability issued under § 97.411(a)(1); (ii) TR NOX Annual units whose...

  20. 40 CFR 97.412 - TR NOX Annual allowance allocations to new units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... new units. 97.412 Section 97.412 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... NOX Annual Trading Program § 97.412 TR NOX Annual allowance allocations to new units. (a) For each... the notice of data availability issued under § 97.411(a)(1); (ii) TR NOX Annual units whose...

  1. The Orphan Nuclear Receptor TR4 Is a Vitamin A-activated Nuclear Receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, X. Edward; Suino-Powell, Kelly M.; Xu, Yong; Chan, Cee-Wah; Tanabe, Osamu; Kruse, Schoen W.; Reynolds, Ross; Engel, James Douglas; Xu, H. Eric

    2015-11-30

    Testicular receptors 2 and 4 (TR2/4) constitute a subgroup of orphan nuclear receptors that play important roles in spermatogenesis, lipid and lipoprotein regulation, and the development of the central nervous system. Currently, little is known about the structural features and the ligand regulation of these receptors. Here we report the crystal structure of the ligand-free TR4 ligand binding domain, which reveals an autorepressed conformation. The ligand binding pocket of TR4 is filled by the C-terminal half of helix 10, and the cofactor binding site is occupied by the AF-2 helix, thus preventing ligand-independent activation of the receptor. However, TR4 exhibits constitutive transcriptional activity on multiple promoters, which can be further potentiated by nuclear receptor coactivators. Mutations designed to disrupt cofactor binding, dimerization, or ligand binding substantially reduce the transcriptional activity of this receptor. Importantly, both retinol and retinoic acid are able to promote TR4 to recruit coactivators and to activate a TR4-regulated reporter. These findings demonstrate that TR4 is a ligand-regulated nuclear receptor and suggest that retinoids might have a much wider regulatory role via activation of orphan receptors such as TR4.

  2. Datasets from an interaction proteomics screen for substrates of the SCFβTrCP ubiquitin ligase

    PubMed Central

    Magliozzi, Roberto; Peng, Mao; Mohammed, Shabaz; Guardavaccaro, Daniele; Heck, Albert J.R.; Low, Teck Yew

    2015-01-01

    An affinity purification-mass spectrometry (AP-MS) method was employed to identify novel substrates of the SCFβTrCP ubiquitin ligase. A FLAG-HA tagged version of the F-box protein βTrCP2, the substrate recognition subunit of SCFβTrCP, was used as bait. βTrCP2 wild type and the two mutants βTrCP2-R447A and βTrCP2-ΔF were expressed and purified from HEK293T cells to be able to discriminate between potential substrates of SCFβTrCP and unspecific binders. Affinity-purified samples were analyzed by mass spectrometry-based proteomics, applying ultra-high performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) coupled to high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry. The raw mass spectrometry data have been deposited to the PRIDE partner repository with the identifiers PXD001088 and PXD001224. The present dataset is associated with a research resource published in T.Y. Low, M. Peng, R. Magliozzi, S. Mohammed, D. Guardavaccaro, A.J.R. Heck, A systems-wide screen identifies substrates of the SCFβTrCP ubiquitin ligase. Sci. Signal. 7 (2014) rs8–rs8, 10.1126/scisignal.2005882. PMID:26217795

  3. Measurement and Prediction of Water Outgassing from TR55 Silicone by the Isoconversional Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Dinh, L N; Schildbach, M A; Burnham, A K; Maxwell, R S; Balazs, B

    2006-05-01

    The objectives of this report are to measure the H{sub 2}O outgassing kinetics of TR55 silicon after a few hours of vacuum pumping; and to make H{sub 2}O outgassing kinetic predictions for TR55 at low temperatures in a vacuum/dry environment.

  4. NIF-scale re-emission sphere measurements of early-time Tr = 100 eV hohlraum symmetry (invited).

    PubMed

    Dewald, E L; Thomas, C; Milovich, J; Edwards, J; Sorce, C; Kirkwood, R; Meeker, D; Jones, O; Izumi, N; Landen, O L

    2008-10-01

    The indirect-drive National Ignition Campaign (NIC) proposes to set the first 2 ns of hohlraum radiation symmetry by observing the instantaneous soft x-ray re-emission pattern from a high-Z sphere in place of the ignition capsule. To assess this technique under NIC conditions, we used the Omega Laser Facility to image the re-emission of Bi coated spheres with 200 ps temporal, 50-100 microm spatial, and 30% spectral resolution. The sphere is driven by 70% NIC-scale vacuum Au hohlraums heated to Tr=100 eV using two cones per side laser beam illumination. The experiments have demonstrated the required accuracies of <3%P(2)/P(0) and <3%P(4)/P(0) Legendre mode flux asymmetry at both 900 and 1200 eV re-emission photon energies. The re-emission patterns at 900 and 1200 eV are also consistent with each other and their relative dependence on radiation temperature. We measured the P(2)/P(0) and P(4)/P(0) dependence to laser cone power ratio. View factor calculations are in agreement with the experimentally measured radiation flux and re-emit images when assuming 55% inner beam and 100 % outer beam coupling into x rays at the hohlraum wall.

  5. Optical heat flux gauge

    DOEpatents

    Noel, B.W.; Borella, H.M.; Cates, M.R.; Turley, W.D.; MacArthur, C.D.; Cala, G.C.

    1991-04-09

    A heat flux gauge is disclosed comprising first and second thermographic phosphor layers separated by a layer of a thermal insulator, wherein each thermographic layer comprises a plurality of respective thermographic sensors in a juxtaposed relationship with respect to each other. The gauge may be mounted on a surface with the first thermographic phosphor in contact with the surface. A light source is directed at the gauge, causing the phosphors to luminesce. The luminescence produced by the phosphors is collected and its spectra analyzed in order to determine the heat flux on the surface. First and second phosphor layers must be different materials to assure that the spectral lines collected will be distinguishable. 9 figures.

  6. NEUTRON FLUX INTENSITY DETECTION

    DOEpatents

    Russell, J.T.

    1964-04-21

    A method of measuring the instantaneous intensity of neutron flux in the core of a nuclear reactor is described. A target gas capable of being transmuted by neutron bombardment to a product having a resonance absorption line nt a particular microwave frequency is passed through the core of the reactor. Frequency-modulated microwave energy is passed through the target gas and the attenuation of the energy due to the formation of the transmuted product is measured. (AEC)

  7. Reconnecting Flux Ropes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gekelman, Walter; van Compernolle, Bart

    2012-10-01

    Magnetic flux ropes are due to helical currents and form a dense carpet of arches on the surface of the sun. Occasionally one tears loose as a coronal mass ejection and its rope structure is detected by satellites close to the earth. Current sheets can tear into filaments and these are nothing other than flux ropes. Ropes are not static, they exert mutual JxB forces causing them to twist about each other and merge. Kink instabilities cause them to violently smash into each other and reconnect at the point of contact. We report on experiments done in the large plasma device (LAPD) at UCLA (L=17m,dia=60cm,0.3<=B0z<=2.5kG,n˜2x10^12cm-3)on three dimensional flux ropes. Two, three or more magnetic flux ropes are generated from initially adjacent pulsed current channels in a background magnetized plasma. The currents and magnetic fields form exotic shapes with no ignorable direction and no magnetic nulls. Volumetric space-time data show multiple reconnection sites with time-dependent locations. The concept of a quasi-separatrix layer (QSL), a tool to understand 3D reconnection without null points. In our experiment the QSL is a narrow ribbon-like region(s) that twists between field lines. Within the QSL(s) field lines that start close to one another rapidly diverge as they pass through one or more reconnection regions. When the field lines are tracked they are observed to slip along the QSL when reconnection occurs. The Heating and other co-existing waves will be presented.

  8. Heat Flux Sensor Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, D. W.

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on the following objectives: Developing secondary calibration capabilities for MSFC's (Marshall Space Flight Center) Hot Gas Facility (HGF), a Mach 4 Aerothermal Wind Tunnel; Evaluating ASTM (American Society for Testing and Materials) slug/ thinskin calorimeters against current HGF heat flux sensors; Providing verification of baselined AEDC (Arnold Engineering Development Center) / Medtherm gage calibrations; Addressing future calibration issues involving NIST (National Institute of Standards and Technology) certified radiant gages.

  9. The distribution of solar magnetic fluxes and the nonlinearity of stellar flux-flux relations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrijver, C. J.; Harvey, K. L.

    1989-01-01

    Synoptic maps for the 1975-1984 period are used to determine the time-dependent distribution function of magnetic flux densities in the solar atmosphere. The distribution function depends only on the global level of magnetic activity, and it is used to study how relations between magnetic flux densities and radiative flux densities from different temperature regimes in the outer atmosphere (derived from spatially resolved solar observations) transform into relations between surface-averaged flux densities. It is found that the transformation to surface-averaged fluxes preserves the power-law character of relations between radiative and magnetic flux densities for spatially resolved data.

  10. TR32DB - Management of Research Data in a Collaborative, Interdisciplinary Research Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curdt, Constanze; Hoffmeister, Dirk; Waldhoff, Guido; Lang, Ulrich; Bareth, Georg

    2015-04-01

    The management of research data in a well-structured and documented manner is essential in the context of collaborative, interdisciplinary research environments (e.g. across various institutions). Consequently, set-up and use of a research data management (RDM) system like a data repository or project database is necessary. These systems should accompany and support scientists during the entire research life cycle (e.g. data collection, documentation, storage, archiving, sharing, publishing) and operate cross-disciplinary in interdisciplinary research projects. Challenges and problems of RDM are well-know. Consequently, the set-up of a user-friendly, well-documented, sustainable RDM system is essential, as well as user support and further assistance. In the framework of the Transregio Collaborative Research Centre 32 'Patterns in Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere Systems: Monitoring, Modelling, and Data Assimilation' (CRC/TR32), funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG), a RDM system was self-designed and implemented. The CRC/TR32 project database (TR32DB, www.tr32db.de) is operating online since early 2008. The TR32DB handles all data, which are created by the involved project participants from several institutions (e.g. Universities of Cologne, Bonn, Aachen, and the Research Centre Jülich) and research fields (e.g. soil and plant sciences, hydrology, geography, geophysics, meteorology, remote sensing). Very heterogeneous research data are considered, which are resulting from field measurement campaigns, meteorological monitoring, remote sensing, laboratory studies and modelling approaches. Furthermore, outcomes like publications, conference contributions, PhD reports and corresponding images are regarded. The TR32DB project database is set-up in cooperation with the Regional Computing Centre of the University of Cologne (RRZK) and also located in this hardware environment. The TR32DB system architecture is composed of three main components: (i) a file-based data

  11. miRNA-133a attenuates lipid accumulation via TR4-CD36 pathway in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xiao-Ping; Huang, Lei; Liu, Zhi-Hong

    2016-08-01

    lipid metabolism is the major causes of atherosclerosis. There is increasing evidence that miR-133a plays an important role in atherosclerosis. However, the regulatory mechanism of miR-133a in macrophages is still unclear. Several lines of evidence indicate that loss of TR4 leads to reduce lipid accumulation in liver and adipose tissues, etc, and lesional macrophages-derived TR4 can greatly increase the foam cell formation through increasing the CD36-mediated the uptake of ox-LDL. Interestingly, computational analysis suggests that TR4 may be a target gene of miR-133a. Here, we examined whether miR-133a regulates TR4 expression in ox-LDL-induced mouse RAW 264.7 macrophages, thereby affecting lipid accumulation. Using ox-LDL-treatment RAW 264.7 macrophages transfected with miR-133a mimics or inhibitors, we have showed that miR-133a can directly regulate the expression of TR4 in RAW 264.7 cells, thereby attenuates CD36-medide lipid accumulation. Furthermore, our studies suggest an additional explanation for the regulatory mechanism of miR-133a regulation to its functional target, TR4 in RAW 264.7 macrophages. Thus, our findings suggest that miR-133a may regulate lipid accumulation in ox-LDL-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages via TR4-CD36 pathway.

  12. Fate of TR-2, the hepatic metabolite of the tremorgenic mycotoxin verruculogen, in sheep.

    PubMed

    Laws, I; Mantle, P G; Rodrigues, L; Penny, R H

    1987-08-01

    1. Verruculogen is eliminated in bile after transformation to TR-2, only a trace of which was excreted as such in faeces of sheep given verruculogen per os. Negligible TR-2 was present free in urine; no glucuronide was found. 2. An isomer of TR-2, a minor component of the bile of sheep given verruculogen, has been defined by 1H-n.m.r. spectroscopy and the isomerism involves the disposition of the two adjacent hydroxyl groups with a concomitant change in the conformation of the ring adjacent to the indole. 3. 14C-TR-2, added to the perfusate of isolated rat liver, was excreted unchanged in the bile, implying no significant loss of any biliary TR-2 subject to enterohepatic recycling in vivo. 4. 14C-TR-2 incubated anaerobically in sheep ileum contents was 95% transformed into more polar metabolites, the majority of the radiolabelled metabolites isolated being water soluble. 5. The principal fate of biliary TR-2 is as a metabolic substrate for the intestinal microflora. PMID:3673112

  13. Differential roles of PPARγ vs TR4 in prostate cancer and metabolic diseases.

    PubMed

    Liu, Su; Lin, Shin-Jen; Li, Gonghui; Kim, Eungseok; Chen, Yei-Tsung; Yang, Dong-Rong; Tan, M H Eileen; Yong, Eu Leong; Chang, Chawnshang

    2014-06-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ, NR1C3) and testicular receptor 4 nuclear receptor (TR4, NR2C2) are two members of the nuclear receptor (NR) superfamily that can be activated by several similar ligands/activators including polyunsaturated fatty acid metabolites, such as 13-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid and 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid, as well as some anti-diabetic drugs such as thiazolidinediones (TZDs). However, the consequences of the transactivation of these ligands/activators via these two NRs are different, with at least three distinct phenotypes. First, activation of PPARγ increases insulin sensitivity yet activation of TR4 decreases insulin sensitivity. Second, PPARγ attenuates atherosclerosis but TR4 might increase the risk of atherosclerosis. Third, PPARγ suppresses prostate cancer (PCa) development and TR4 suppresses prostate carcinogenesis yet promotes PCa metastasis. Importantly, the deregulation of either PPARγ or TR4 in PCa alone might then alter the other receptor's influences on PCa progression. Knocking out PPARγ altered the ability of TR4 to promote prostate carcinogenesis and knocking down TR4 also resulted in TZD treatment promoting PCa development, indicating that both PPARγ and TR4 might coordinate with each other to regulate PCa initiation, and the loss of either one of them might switch the other one from a tumor suppressor to a tumor promoter. These results indicate that further and detailed studies of both receptors at the same time in the same cells/organs may help us to better dissect their distinct physiological roles and develop better drug(s) with fewer side effects to battle PPARγ- and TR4-related diseases including tumor and cardiovascular diseases as well as metabolic disorders. PMID:24623743

  14. A model-based assessment of the TrOCA approach for estimating oceanic anthropogenic carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yool, A.; Oschlies, A.; Nurser, A. J. G.

    2009-07-01

    The future behaviour of the global ocean as a sink for CO2 is significant for climate change, but it is also important to understand its past by quantifying anthropogenic CO2 (Cant) in the ocean today. Unfortunately, this is complicated by the difficulty of deconvoluting Cant from the natural, unperturbed carbon cycle. Nonetheless, a range of techniques have been devised that perform this separation using the information implicit in other physical, biogeochemical and artificial ocean tracers. One such method is the TrOCA approach, whose parameterisation is derived from relationships between biogeochemical tracers within watermasses defined by age tracers such as CFC-11. TrOCA has a number of methodological advantages, and has been shown to be plausible, relative to other methods, in a number of studies. Here we examine the TrOCA approach by using it to deconvolute the known distribution of Cant from an ocean general circulation model (OGCM) simulation of the industrial period (1864-2004). TrOCA is evaluated at local, regional and global scales, with an emphasis on the wider applicability of the parameterisations derived at these scales. Our work finds that the published TrOCA parameterisation performs poorly when extrapolated beyond its calibration region, either with observational data or (especially) model output. Optimising TrOCA parameters using model output as a synthetic dataset leads to some small improvements, but the resulting TrOCA variants still perform poorly. Furthermore, there are large ranges on the optimised TrOCA parameters suggesting that a "universal" TrOCA parameterisation is not achieveable.

  15. Stabilization of moduli by fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    Behrndt, Klaus

    2004-12-10

    In order to fix the moduli, non-trivial fluxes might the essential input. We summarize different aspects of compactifications in the presence of fluxes, as there is the relation to generalized Scherk-Schwarz reductions and gauged supergravity but also the description of flux-deformed geometries in terms of G-structures and intrinsic torsion.

  16. TR4 orphan nuclear receptor functions as an apoptosis modulator via regulation of Bcl-2 gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Eungseok; Ma, Wen-Lung; Lin, Din-Lii; Inui, Shigeki; Chen, Yuh-Ling; Chang, Chawnshang . E-mail: chang@urmc.rochester.edu

    2007-09-21

    While Bcl-2 plays an important role in cell apoptosis, its relationship to the orphan nuclear receptors remains unclear. Here we report that mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells prepared from TR4-deficient (TR4{sup -} {sup /-}) mice are more susceptible to UV-irradiation mediated apoptosis compared to TR4-Wildtype (TR4 {sup +/+}) littermates. Substantial increasing TR4{sup -} {sup /-} MEF apoptosis to UV-irradiation was correlated to the down-regulation of Bcl-2 RNA and protein expression and collaterally increased caspase-3 activity. Furthermore, this TR4-induced Bcl-2 gene expression can be suppressed by co-transfection with TR4 coregulators, such as androgen receptor (AR) and receptor-interacting protein 140 (RIP140) in a dose-dependent manner. Together, our results demonstrate that TR4 might function as an apoptosis modulator through induction of Bcl-2 gene expression.

  17. Modeling turbulent fluxes at a winter wheat stand -possibilities and limitations of ground-based thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahrends, H. E.; Haseneder-Lind, R.; Schickling, A.; Crewell, S.; Rascher, U.

    2013-12-01

    Aircraft and satellite sensors operating in the thermal infrared (TIR) region of the spectrum provide spatially comprehensive information on the radiometric surface temperature (TR), representing an integrated temperature based on the radiation emitted from different surface components. TR data are commonly applied as a proxy for the (theoretical) aerodynamic temperature, which satisfies the bulk resistance formulation for the sensible heat transport. The quantitative relation between the radiometric and the aerodynamic temperature is however complex and strongly affected by ambient conditions and surface characteristics. Consequently, TR-based estimates of the latent and sensible heat flux can have high levels of uncertainty. Ground-based studies for the validation of remotely sensed TR data and for the evaluation of TR-based models are crucial. Ground-based TIR cameras, allowing for a high observation frequency and for studying the spatial variability of temperatures, might provide a suitable tool for such studies. We aim at testing the limitations and the possibilities of passive ground-based thermography for the application in studies on the diurnal and seasonal changes of land-atmosphere interactions. Operating at a frequency of 5 min., a TIR camera is mounted at a height of 2m at a winter wheat stand (TR32 research site, Germany), capturing images of a 1m x 1m area (320 × 240 pixel) during spring and summer 2013. Radiometric temperatures are corrected for the influence of cloud cover and evaluated using observations from thermocouples (leaf temperature), RTDs (canopy temperature profile) and an IR radiometer (spatially integrated temperature). Simultaneous hyperspectral and sun-induced chlorophyll fluorescence measurements are used as a proxy for plant functioning and status. Spatial image information is integrated into the framework of different flux modeling approaches, ranging from established one-source to complex, multi-layer models. Modelled fluxes are

  18. Validation of the Turkish Version of the Montreal Cognitive Assessment Scale (MoCA-TR) in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Ozdilek, Betul; Kenangil, Gulay

    2014-01-01

    The study aimed to examine the reliability and validity of the Turkish version of the Montreal Cognitive Assessment Scale (MoCA-TR) as a screening tool for cognitive dysfunction in Parkinson's disease (PD). A total of 50 patients with PD and 50 healthy controls were included. The screening instruments-MoCA-TR followed by the Mini-Mental Status Examination (MMSE-TR) and MoCA-TR retest within 1 month-and detailed neuropsychological testing were administered to the PD patients. MoCA-TR and MMSE-TR were also administered to controls. The discriminant validities of the MoCA-TR and MMSE-TR as screening and diagnostic instruments were ascertained. The concurrent and criterion validity, test-retest reliability, and internal consistency of the MoCA-TR and MMSE-TR were examined. The Cronbach's alpha of the MoCA-TR as an index of internal consistency was 0.664, and the test-retest reliability of MoCA-TR was 0.742. With a cut-off score of < 21 points, the MoCA-TR showed sensitivity of 59% and specificity of 89% in the detection of cognitive dysfunction in PD. The area under the receiver-operating characteristics curve (95% confidence interval) for MoCA-TR was 0.794 (0.670-0.918), p<.001. The present results indicated that the MoCA-TR has acceptable psychometric properties and it should be used to assess mild cognitive impairment and early dementia in PD patients, whereas the MMSE-TR should remain the instrument of choice to assess cognitive impairment in PD dementia. PMID:24528299

  19. High flux reactor

    DOEpatents

    Lake, James A.; Heath, Russell L.; Liebenthal, John L.; DeBoisblanc, Deslonde R.; Leyse, Carl F.; Parsons, Kent; Ryskamp, John M.; Wadkins, Robert P.; Harker, Yale D.; Fillmore, Gary N.; Oh, Chang H.

    1988-01-01

    A high flux reactor is comprised of a core which is divided into two symetric segments housed in a pressure vessel. The core segments include at least one radial fuel plate. The spacing between the plates functions as a coolant flow channel. The core segments are spaced axially apart such that a coolant mixing plenum is formed between them. A channel is provided such that a portion of the coolant bypasses the first core section and goes directly into the mixing plenum. The outlet coolant from the first core segment is mixed with the bypass coolant resulting in a lower inlet temperature to the lower core segment.

  20. Thermal flux transfer system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freggens, R. A. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A thermal flux transfer system for use in maintaining the thrust chamber of an operative reaction motor at given temperatures is described. The system is characterized by an hermetically sealed chamber surrounding a thrust chamber to be cooled, with a plurality of parallel, longitudinally spaced, disk-shaped wick members formed of a metallic mesh and employed in delivering a working fluid, in its liquid state, radially toward the thrust chamber and delivering the working fluid, in its vapor state, away from the nozzle for effecting a cooling of the nozzle, in accordance with known principles of an operating heat pipe.

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of Clostridium mangenotii TR, Isolated from the Fecal Material of a Timber Rattlesnake.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Richard W; Cochran, Philip A; Dowd, Scot E; Andersen, Kylie; Anderson, Nichole; Brennan, Rachel; Brook, Nicole; Callaway, Tracie; Diamante, Kimberly; Duberstine, Annie; Fitch, Karla; Freiheit, Heidi; Godlewski, Chantel; Gorman, Kelly; Haubrich, Mark; Hernandez, Mercedes; Hirtreiter, Amber; Ivanoski, Beth; Jaminet, Xochitl; Kirkpatrick, Travis; Kratowicz, Jennifer; Latus, Casey; Leable, Tiegen; Lingafelt, Nicole; Lowe, Deanna; Lowrance, Holly; Malsack, Latiffa; Mazurkiewicz, Julie; Merlos, Persida; Messley, Jamie; Montemurro, Dawn; Nakitare, Samora; Nelson, Christine; Nye, Amber; Pazera, Valerie; Pierangeli, Gina; Rellora, Ashley; Reyes, Angelica; Roberts, Jennifer; Robins, Shadara; Robinson, Jeshannah; Schultz, Alissa; Seifert, Sara; Sigler, Elona; Spangler, Julie; Swift, Ebony; Tencate, Rebecca; Thurber, Jessica; Vallee, Kristin; Wamboldt, Jennifer; Whitten, Shannon; Woods, De'andrea; Wright, Amanda; Yankunas, Darin

    2014-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Clostridium mangenotii strain TR, which was isolated from the fecal material of a timber rattlesnake. This bacterium is nonpathogenic but contains 68 genes involved in virulence, disease, and defense. PMID:24407632

  2. Draft Genome Sequence of Clostridium mangenotii TR, Isolated from the Fecal Material of a Timber Rattlesnake

    PubMed Central

    Cochran, Philip A.; Dowd, Scot E.; Andersen, Kylie; Anderson, Nichole; Brennan, Rachel; Brook, Nicole; Callaway, Tracie; Diamante, Kimberly; Duberstine, Annie; Fitch, Karla; Freiheit, Heidi; Godlewski, Chantel; Gorman, Kelly; Haubrich, Mark; Hernandez, Mercedes; Hirtreiter, Amber; Ivanoski, Beth; Jaminet, Xochitl; Kirkpatrick, Travis; Kratowicz, Jennifer; Latus, Casey; Leable, Tiegen; Lingafelt, Nicole; Lowe, DeAnna; Lowrance, Holly; Malsack, Latiffa; Mazurkiewicz, Julie; Merlos, Persida; Messley, Jamie; Montemurro, Dawn; Nakitare, Samora; Nelson, Christine; Nye, Amber; Pazera, Valerie; Pierangeli, Gina; Rellora, Ashley; Reyes, Angelica; Roberts, Jennifer; Robins, Shadara; Robinson, Jeshannah; Schultz, Alissa; Seifert, Sara; Sigler, Elona; Spangler, Julie; Swift, Ebony; TenCate, Rebecca; Thurber, Jessica; Vallee, Kristin; Wamboldt, Jennifer; Whitten, Shannon; Woods, De’andrea; Wright, Amanda; Yankunas, Darin

    2014-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Clostridium mangenotii strain TR, which was isolated from the fecal material of a timber rattlesnake. This bacterium is nonpathogenic but contains 68 genes involved in virulence, disease, and defense. PMID:24407632

  3. Comparative Activities of TR-700 (Torezolid) against Staphylococcal Blood Isolates Collected in Spain▿

    PubMed Central

    Betriu, Carmen; Morales, Gracia; Rodríguez-Avial, Icíar; Culebras, Esther; Gómez, María; López-Fabal, Fátima; Picazo, Juan J.

    2010-01-01

    The in vitro activity of TR-700 (torezolid) was evaluated against a collection of 660 staphylococcal blood isolates. TR-700 showed excellent activity against all the staphylococci tested. The MIC50 and MIC90 values of TR-700, linezolid, daptomycin, and vancomycin against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates were 0.25 and 0.5, 2 and 4, 0.5 and 0.5, and 1 and 2 μg/ml, respectively. TR-700 demonstrated greater in vitro potency than linezolid against staphylococci, including linezolid-resistant and vancomycin-nonsusceptible strains, and was 32-fold more active than linezolid against the seven cfr-positive MRSA strains tested. PMID:20176900

  4. Laboratory combustion tube studies. Part II. Report SUPRI TR-10

    SciTech Connect

    Brigham, W.E.; Fassihi, M.R.; Satman, A.; Williams, R.L.; Pettit, P.; Grim, J.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.

    1981-03-01

    To promote a better understanding of the problems and mechanisms involved in dry in-situ combustion of crude oils in porous media, continuing laboratory studies are carried out at SUPRI. The report about the first two experiments was submitted earlier to the Department of Energy. This report describes the results of the last three tube runs. Three laboratory combustion tube studies were made with unconsolidated core material, and Lombardi Zone crude oil from the San Ardo field, California. After preparation, the material was packed into the combustion tube. Conditions employed during the steady burning phase of each run were about constant. Injection pressure for all of them was 100 Psig (6.8 Atm.). Burning front velocities ranged from 7.22 cm/hr (5.68 ft/day) to 12.96 cm/hr (10.2 ft/day) while the stream front velocities ranged from 10.4 cm/hr to 13.48 cm/hr. The air flux was between 88.33 SCF/hr-ft/sup 2/ and 122.7SCF/hr-ft/sup 2/. Observed fuel ration ranged from 162.54 SCF/lb to 169.33 SCF/lb of fuel burned. The detailed analysis of these experiments accompanied with their field application will be presented later.

  5. Flux qubit as a sensor of magnetic flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Il'ichev, E.; Greenberg, Ya. S.

    2007-03-01

    A magnetometer based on the quantum properties of a superconducting flux qubit is proposed. The main advantage of this device is that its sensitivity can be below the so-called "standard quantum limit" (for an oscillator this is half of the Plank constant). Moreover its transfer functions relative to the measured flux can be made to be about 10 mV/Φ0, which is an order of magnitude more than the best value for a conventional DC SQUIDs with a direct readout. We analyze here the voltage-to-flux, the phase-to-flux transfer functions and the main noise sources. We show that the experimental characteristics of a flux qubit, obtained in recent experiments, allow the use of a flux qubit as magnetometer with energy resolution close to the Planck constant.

  6. Synthesis, Crystal and Electronic Structures of the Pnictides AE3TrPn3 (AE = Sr, Ba; Tr = Al, Ga; Pn = P, As)

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Stoyko, Stanislav; Voss, Leonard; He, Hua; Bobev, Svilen

    2015-09-24

    New ternary arsenides AE3TrAs3 (AE = Sr, Ba; Tr = Al, Ga) and their phosphide analogs Sr3GaP3 and Ba3AlP3 have been prepared by reactions of the respective elements at high temperatures. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies reveal that Sr3AlAs3 and Ba3AlAs3 adopt the Ba3AlSb3-type structure (Pearson symbol oC56, space group Cmce, Z = 8). This structure is also realized for Sr3GaP3 and Ba3AlP3. Likewise, the compounds Sr3GaAs3 and Ba3GaAs3 crystallize with the Ba3GaSb3-type structure (Pearson symbol oP56, space group Pnma, Z = 8). Both structures are made up of isolated pairs of edge-shared AlPn4 and GaPn4 tetrahedra (Pn = pnictogen, i.e.,more » P or As), separated by the alkaline-earth Sr2+ and Ba2+ cations. In both cases, there are no homoatomic bonds, hence, regardless of the slightly different atomic arrangements, both structures can be rationalized as valence-precise [AE2+]3[Tr3+][Pn3-]3, or rather [AE2+]6[Tr2Pn6]12-, i.e., as Zintl phases.« less

  7. Metabolic control of type 1 regulatory (Tr1) cell differentiation by AHR and HIF1-α

    PubMed Central

    Mascanfroni, Ivan D.; Takenaka, Maisa C.; Yeste, Ada; Patel, Bonny; Wu, Yan; Kenison, Jessica E.; Siddiqui, Shafiuddin; Basso, Alexandre S.; Otterbein, Leo E.; Pardoll, Drew M.; Pan, Fan; Priel, Avner; Clish, Clary B.; Robson, Simon C.; Quintana, Francisco J.

    2015-01-01

    Our understanding of the pathways that regulate lymphocyte metabolism, as well as the effects of metabolism and its products on the immune response, is still limited. We report that a metabolic program controlled by the transcription factors hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF1-α) and aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) supports the differentiation of type 1 regulatory (Tr1) cells. HIF1-α controls the early metabolic reprograming of Tr1 cells. At later time points, AHR promotes HIF1-α degradation and takes control of Tr1 cell metabolism. Extracellular adenosine triphosphate (eATP) and hypoxia, linked to inflammation, trigger AHR inactivation by HIF1-α and inhibit Tr1 cell differentiation. Conversely, CD39 promotes Tr1 cell differentiation by depleting eATP. CD39 also contributes to Tr1 suppressive activity by generating adenosine in cooperation with CD73 expressed by responder T cells and antigen presenting cells. These results suggest that HIF1-α and AHR integrate immunological, metabolic and environmental signals to regulate the immune response. PMID:26005855

  8. The Novel Antitubulin Agent TR-764 Strongly Reduces Tumor Vasculature and Inhibits HIF-1α Activation

    PubMed Central

    Porcù, Elena; Persano, Luca; Ronca, Roberto; Mitola, Stefania; Bortolozzi, Roberta; Romagnoli, Romeo; Oliva, Paola; Basso, Giuseppe; Viola, Giampietro

    2016-01-01

    Tubulin binding agents (TBAs) are commonly used in cancer therapy as antimitotics. It has been described that TBAs, like combretastatin A-4 (CA-4), present also antivascular activity and among its derivatives we identified TR-764 as a new inhibitor of tubulin polymerization, based on the 2-(alkoxycarbonyl)-3-(3′,4′,5′-trimethoxyanilino)benzo[b]thiophene molecular skeleton. The antiangiogenic activity of TR-764 (1–10 nM) was tested in vitro on human umbilical endothelial cells (HUVECs), and in vivo, on the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) and two murine tumor models. TR-764 binding to tubulin triggers cytoskeleton rearrangement without affecting cell cycle and viability. It leads to capillary tube disruption, increased cell permeability, and cell motility reduction. Moreover it disrupts adherens junctions and focal adhesions, through mechanisms involving VE-cadherin/β-catenin and FAK/Src. Importantly, TR-764 is active in hypoxic conditions significantly reducing HIF-1α. In vivo TR-764 (1–100 pmol/egg) remarkably blocks the bFGF proangiogenic activity on CAM and shows a stronger reduction of tumor mass and microvascular density both in murine syngeneic and xenograft tumor models, compared to the lead compound CA-4P. Altogether, our results indicate that TR-764 is a novel TBA with strong potential as both antivascular and antitumor molecule that could improve the common anticancer therapies, by overcoming hypoxia-induced resistance mechanisms. PMID:27292568

  9. Blimp-1-Dependent IL-10 Production by Tr1 Cells Regulates TNF-Mediated Tissue Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Montes de Oca, Marcela; Kumar, Rajiv; de Labastida Rivera, Fabian; Amante, Fiona H; Sheel, Meru; Faleiro, Rebecca J.; Bunn, Patrick T.; Best, Shannon E.; Beattie, Lynette; Ng, Susanna S.; Edwards, Chelsea L.; Muller, Werner; Cretney, Erika; Nutt, Stephen L.; Smyth, Mark J.; Haque, Ashraful; Hill, Geoffrey R.; Sundar, Shyam; Kallies, Axel; Engwerda, Christian R.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is critical for controlling many intracellular infections, but can also contribute to inflammation. It can promote the destruction of important cell populations and trigger dramatic tissue remodeling following establishment of chronic disease. Therefore, a better understanding of TNF regulation is needed to allow pathogen control without causing or exacerbating disease. IL-10 is an important regulatory cytokine with broad activities, including the suppression of inflammation. IL-10 is produced by different immune cells; however, its regulation and function appears to be cell-specific and context-dependent. Recently, IL-10 produced by Th1 (Tr1) cells was shown to protect host tissues from inflammation induced following infection. Here, we identify a novel pathway of TNF regulation by IL-10 from Tr1 cells during parasitic infection. We report elevated Blimp-1 mRNA levels in CD4+ T cells from visceral leishmaniasis (VL) patients, and demonstrate IL-12 was essential for Blimp-1 expression and Tr1 cell development in experimental VL. Critically, we show Blimp-1-dependent IL-10 production by Tr1 cells prevents tissue damage caused by IFNγ-dependent TNF production. Therefore, we identify Blimp-1-dependent IL-10 produced by Tr1 cells as a key regulator of TNF-mediated pathology and identify Tr1 cells as potential therapeutic tools to control inflammation. PMID:26765224

  10. Ferroelectric switching response of P(VDF-TrFE) nanodots with and without nanomolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Yoonho; Shin, Young-Han; Son, Jong Yeog

    2016-10-01

    We investigated ferroelectric switching response of poly(vinylidene fluoride- ran-trifluoroethylene) (P(VDF-TrFE)) nanodots with and without nanomolds using piezoelectric force microscopy. Nanomolds with diameter of about 20 and 40 nm were formed on Nb-doped SrTiO3 substrate by nanointaglio process using an atomic force microscopy tip. The P(VDF-TrFE) nanodots were fabricated with and without nanomolds on the surface of the Nb-doped SrTiO3 substrate, which was conducted by precisely controllable dip-pen nanolithography. These P(VDF-TrFE) nanodots exhibited good ferroelectric properties with asymmetric behavior in ferroelectric switching response. In particular, the P(VDF-TrFE) nanodots with nanomolds exhibited larger asymmetric switching characteristic compared to the P(VDF-TrFE) nanodots without nanomolds, which came from the difference of contact area between the P(VDF-TrFE) nanodots and Nb-doped SrTiO3 substrate (bottom electrode).

  11. Deep mantle subduction flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, Katherine A.; White, William M.

    2009-12-01

    We assess the flux of incompatible trace elements into the deep mantle in the Aleutian, Central America, Izu-Bonin, Kurile, Lesser Antilles, Mariana, Sunda, and Tonga subduction zones. We use a simple mass balance approach in which we assume that all of the material lost from the subducting crust and sediment (the "slab") is incorporated into the magmas erupted above the subduction zone, and we use these assumptions to calculate a residual slab composition. The calculated residual slabs are enriched in incompatible elements compared to mid-ocean ridge basalts and highly enriched compared to primitive or depleted mantle. Almost all of the subducted Nb, Ta, and intermediate and heavy rare earths survive into the deep mantle, as do most of the light rare earths. On average, 73% of Th and Pb, 74% of K, 79% of U, 80% of Rb, 80% of Sr, and 82% of Ba survive into the deep mantle. Pb/Ce ratios are systematically lower, and Nb/U ratios are systematically higher, in the deep mantle flux than they are in the flux of material into the trench. Nevertheless, most residual slabs have Pb/Ce and Nb/U ratios outside the typical mantle range. Changes to U/Pb and Th/U ratios tend to be small and are not systematic. Rb/Sr ratios significantly decrease in some subduction zones but increase in others. In contrast, Sm/Nd ratios increase by small but significant amounts in most arcs. Based on these results, we attempt to predict the Sr, Nd, and Pb composition of anciently recycled material now in the mantle. We find that such material would most resemble enriched mantle II-type oceanic island basalts (OIB). None of our calculated residual slabs would evolve to Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic compositions similar to either high 238U/204Pb or enriched mantle I. The range of Sr and Pb isotope ratios in anciently recycled material is similar to that seen in modern OIB, but Nd isotopic compositions do not range to ɛNd values as low as those in some modern OIB. Neither radiogenic nor unradiogenic Pb isotope

  12. Permanent magnet flux-biased magnetic actuator with flux feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groom, Nelson J. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    The invention is a permanent magnet flux-biased magnetic actuator with flux feedback for adjustably suspending an element on a single axis. The magnetic actuator includes a pair of opposing electromagnets and provides bi-directional forces along the single axis to the suspended element. Permanent magnets in flux feedback loops from the opposing electromagnets establish a reference permanent magnet flux-bias to linearize the force characteristics of the electromagnets to extend the linear range of the actuator without the need for continuous bias currents in the electromagnets.

  13. Canalization: what the flux?

    PubMed

    Bennett, Tom; Hines, Geneviève; Leyser, Ottoline

    2014-02-01

    Polarized transport of the hormone auxin plays crucial roles in many processes in plant development. A self-organizing pattern of auxin transport--canalization--is thought to be responsible for vascular patterning and shoot branching regulation in flowering plants. Mathematical modeling has demonstrated that membrane localization of PIN-FORMED (PIN)-family auxin efflux carriers in proportion to net auxin flux can plausibly explain canalization and possibly other auxin transport phenomena. Other plausible models have also been proposed, and there has recently been much interest in producing a unified model of all auxin transport phenomena. However, it is our opinion that lacunae in our understanding of auxin transport biology are now limiting progress in developing the next generation of models. Here we examine several key areas where significant experimental advances are necessary to address both biological and theoretical aspects of auxin transport, including the possibility of a unified transport model.

  14. Quantum tunneling in flux compactifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco-Pillado, Jose J.; Schwartz-Perlov, Delia; Vilenkin, Alexander

    2009-12-01

    We identify instantons representing vacuum decay in a 6-dimensional toy model for string theory flux compactifications, with the two extra dimensions compactified on a sphere. We evaluate the instanton action for tunneling between different flux vacua, as well as for the decompactification decay channel. The bubbles resulting from flux tunneling have an unusual structure. They are bounded by two-dimensional branes, which are localized in the extra dimensions. This has important implications for bubble collisions.

  15. Heat-Flux-Measuring Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebert, Curt H.; Weikle, Donald H.

    1990-01-01

    Apparatus simulates conditions in turbine engines. Automated facility generates and measures transient and steady-state heat fluxes at flux densities from 0.3 to 6 MW/m(Sup2) and temperatures from 100 to 1,200 K. Positioning arm holds heat-flux gauge at focal point of arc lamp. Arm previously chilled gauge in liquid nitrogen in Dewar flask. Cooling water flows through lamp to heat exchanger. Used to develop heat-flux gauges for turbine blades and to test materials for durability under rapidly changing temperatures.

  16. Measuring surface fluxes in CAPE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanemasu, E. T.; D-Shah, T.; Nie, Dalin

    1992-01-01

    Two stations (site 1612 and site 2008) were operated by the University of Georgia group from 6 July 1991 to 18 August 1991. The following data were collected continuously: surface energy fluxes (i.e., net radiation, soil heat fluxes, sensible heat flux and latent heat flux), air temperature, vapor pressure, soil temperature (at 1 cm depth), and precipitation. Canopy reflectance and light interception data were taken three times at each site between 6 July and 18 August. Soil moisture content was measured twice at each site.

  17. KoFlux: Korean Regional Flux Network in AsiaFlux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.

    2002-12-01

    AsiaFlux, the Asian arm of FLUXNET, held the Second International Workshop on Advanced Flux Network and Flux Evaluation in Jeju Island, Korea on 9-11 January 2002. In order to facilitate comprehensive Asia-wide studies of ecosystem fluxes, the meeting launched KoFlux, a new Korean regional network of long-term micrometeorological flux sites. For a successful assessment of carbon exchange between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere, an accurate measurement of surface fluxes of energy and water is one of the prerequisites. During the 7th Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) Asian Monsoon Experiment (GAME) held in Nagoya, Japan on 1-2 October 2001, the Implementation Committee of the Coordinated Enhanced Observing Period (CEOP) was established. One of the immediate tasks of CEOP was and is to identify the reference sites to monitor energy and water fluxes over the Asian continent. Subsequently, to advance the regional and global network of these reference sites in the context of both FLUXNET and CEOP, the Korean flux community has re-organized the available resources to establish a new regional network, KoFlux. We have built up domestic network sites (equipped with wind profiler and radiosonde measurements) over deciduous and coniferous forests, urban and rural rice paddies and coastal farmland. As an outreach through collaborations with research groups in Japan, China and Thailand, we also proposed international flux sites at ecologically and climatologically important locations such as a prairie on the Tibetan plateau, tropical forest with mixed and rapid land use change in northern Thailand. Several sites in KoFlux already begun to accumulate interesting data and some highlights are presented at the meeting. The sciences generated by flux networks in other continents have proven the worthiness of a global array of micrometeorological flux towers. It is our intent that the launch of KoFlux would encourage other scientists to initiate and

  18. Xylan oligosaccharides and cellobiohydrolase I (TrCel7A) interaction and effect on activity

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The well-studied cellulase mixture secreted by Trichoderma reesei (anamorph to Hypocrea jecorina) contains two cellobiohydolases (CBHs), cellobiohydrolase I (TrCel7A) and cellobiohydrolase II (TrCeI6A), that are core enzymes for the solubilisation of cellulose. This has attracted significant research interest because of the role of the CBHs in the conversion of biomass to fermentable sugars. However, the CHBs are notoriously slow and susceptible to inhibition, which presents a challenge for the commercial utilisation of biomass. The xylans and xylan fragments that are also present in the biomass have been suggested repeatedly as one cause of the reduced activity of CHBs. Yet, the extent and mechanisms of this inhibition remain poorly elucidated. Therefore, we studied xylan oligosaccharides (XOSs) of variable lengths with respect to their binding and inhibition of both TrCel7A and an enzyme variant without the cellulose-binding domain (CBM). Results We studied the binding of XOSs to TrCel7A by isothermal titration calorimetry. We found that XOSs bind to TrCel7A and that the affinity increases commensurate with XOS length. The CBM, on the other hand, did not affect the affinity significantly, which suggests that XOSs may bind to the active site. Activity assays of TrCel7A clearly demonstrated the negative effect of the presence of XOSs on the turnover number. Conclusions On the basis of these binding data and a comparison of XOS inhibition of the activity of the two enzyme variants towards, respectively, soluble and insoluble substrates, we propose a competitive mechanism for XOS inhibition of TrCel7A with phosphoric swollen cellulose as a substrate. PMID:22035059

  19. Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems (CO2Flux) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, M

    2005-01-01

    The Southern Great Plains (SGP) carbon dioxide flux (CO2 flux) measurement systems provide half-hour average fluxes of CO2, H2O (latent heat), and sensible heat. The fluxes are obtained by the eddy covariance technique, which computes the flux as the mean product of the vertical wind component with CO2 and H2O densities, or estimated virtual temperature. A three-dimensional sonic anemometer is used to obtain the orthogonal wind components and the virtual (sonic) temperature. An infrared gas analyzer is used to obtain the CO2 and H2O densities. A separate sub-system also collects half-hour average measures of meteorological and soil variables from separate 4-m towers.

  20. Flux Compression Magnetic Nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thio, Y. C. Francis; Schafer, Charles (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In pulsed fusion propulsion schemes in which the fusion energy creates a radially expanding plasma, a magnetic nozzle is required to redirect the radially diverging flow of the expanding fusion plasma into a rearward axial flow, thereby producing a forward axial impulse to the vehicle. In a highly electrically conducting plasma, the presence of a magnetic field B in the plasma creates a pressure B(exp 2)/2(mu) in the plasma, the magnetic pressure. A gradient in the magnetic pressure can be used to decelerate the plasma traveling in the direction of increasing magnetic field, or to accelerate a plasma from rest in the direction of decreasing magnetic pressure. In principle, ignoring dissipative processes, it is possible to design magnetic configurations to produce an 'elastic' deflection of a plasma beam. In particular, it is conceivable that, by an appropriate arrangement of a set of coils, a good approximation to a parabolic 'magnetic mirror' may be formed, such that a beam of charged particles emanating from the focal point of the parabolic mirror would be reflected by the mirror to travel axially away from the mirror. The degree to which this may be accomplished depends on the degree of control one has over the flux surface of the magnetic field, which changes as a result of its interaction with a moving plasma.

  1. High-efficiency L-band T/R Module: Development Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edelstein, Wendy N.; Andricos, Constantine; Wang, Feiyu; Rutled, David B.

    2005-01-01

    Future interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) systems require electronically scanned phased-array antennas, where the transmit/receive (T/R) module is a key component. The T/R module efficiency is a critical figure of merit and has direct implications on the power dissipation and power generation requirements of the system. Significant improvements in the efficiency of the T/R module will make SAR missions more feasible and affordable. The results of two high-efficiency T/R modules are presented, each based on different power amplifier technologies. One module uses a 30W GaAs Class-AlB power amplifier and the second module uses a 70W LD-MOS Class-ElF power amplifier, where both modules use a common low power section. Each module operates over an 80MHz bandwidth at L-band (1.2GHz) with an overall module efficiency greater than 58%. We will present the results of these two T/R modules that have been designed, built and tested.

  2. Estimation of Theaflavins (TF) and Thearubigins (TR) Ratio in Black Tea Liquor Using Electronic Vision System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akuli, Amitava; Pal, Abhra; Ghosh, Arunangshu; Bhattacharyya, Nabarun; Bandhopadhyya, Rajib; Tamuly, Pradip; Gogoi, Nagen

    2011-09-01

    Quality of black tea is generally assessed using organoleptic tests by professional tea tasters. They determine the quality of black tea based on its appearance (in dry condition and during liquor formation), aroma and taste. Variation in the above parameters is actually contributed by a number of chemical compounds like, Theaflavins (TF), Thearubigins (TR), Caffeine, Linalool, Geraniol etc. Among the above, TF and TR are the most important chemical compounds, which actually contribute to the formation of taste, colour and brightness in tea liquor. Estimation of TF and TR in black tea is generally done using a spectrophotometer instrument. But, the analysis technique undergoes a rigorous and time consuming effort for sample preparation; also the operation of costly spectrophotometer requires expert manpower. To overcome above problems an Electronic Vision System based on digital image processing technique has been developed. The system is faster, low cost, repeatable and can estimate the amount of TF and TR ratio for black tea liquor with accuracy. The data analysis is done using Principal Component Analysis (PCA), Multiple Linear Regression (MLR) and Multiple Discriminate Analysis (MDA). A correlation has been established between colour of tea liquor images and TF, TR ratio. This paper describes the newly developed E-Vision system, experimental methods, data analysis algorithms and finally, the performance of the E-Vision System as compared to the results of traditional spectrophotometer.

  3. Transactivation of the proximal promoter of human oxytocin gene by TR4 orphan receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.-P.; Lee, Y.-F.; Chang, C.; Lee, H.-J. . E-mail: hjlee@mail.ndhu.edu.tw

    2006-12-08

    The human testicular receptor 4 (TR4) shares structural homology with members of the nuclear receptor superfamily. Some other members of this superfamily were able to regulate the transcriptional activity of the human oxytocin (OXT) promoter by binding to the first DR0 regulatory site. However, little investigation was conducted systematically in the study of the second dDR4 site of OXT proximal promoter, and the relationship between the first and the second sites of OXT promoter. Here, we demonstrated for the first time that TR4 could increase the proximal promoter activity of the human OXT gene via DR0, dDR4, and OXT (both DR0 and dDR4) elements, respectively. TR4 might induce OXT gene expression through the OXT element in a dose-dependent manner. However, there is no synergistic effect between DR0 and dDR4 elements during TR4 transactivation. Taken together, these results suggested that TR4 should be one of important regulators of OXT gene expression.

  4. Errors in airborne flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Jakob; Lenschow, Donald H.

    1994-07-01

    We present a general approach for estimating systematic and random errors in eddy correlation fluxes and flux gradients measured by aircraft in the convective boundary layer as a function of the length of the flight leg, or of the cutoff wavelength of a highpass filter. The estimates are obtained from empirical expressions for various length scales in the convective boundary layer and they are experimentally verified using data from the First ISLSCP (International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Experiment) Field Experiment (FIFE), the Air Mass Transformation Experiment (AMTEX), and the Electra Radome Experiment (ELDOME). We show that the systematic flux and flux gradient errors can be important if fluxes are calculated from a set of several short flight legs or if the vertical velocity and scalar time series are high-pass filtered. While the systematic error of the flux is usually negative, that of the flux gradient can change sign. For example, for temperature flux divergence the systematic error changes from negative to positive about a quarter of the way up in the convective boundary layer.

  5. The University of Arizona Astronomy Club Observations of Transiting Extrasolar Planets TrES-3b and TrES-4b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Jake; Hardegree-Ullman, K.; Smart, B.; Walker-LaFollette, A.; Cunningham, K.; Hardegree-Ullman, E. E.; Crawford, B.; Mueting, J.; Carleton, T.; Schwarz, K.; Robertson, A.; Guvenen, B.; Towner, A.; Austin, C.; Henz, T.; Keys, D.; Johnson, K.

    2011-05-01

    Using the Steward Observatory 61" Kuiper Telescope, The University of Arizona Astronomy Club observed extrasolar planets TrES-3b and TrES-4b. We observed the planets with the Harris-B, V, and R filters as they transited their parent stars during the months of May-July 2009. The main goal of this project was to get undergraduates involved with a research astronomy project and allow them to gain experience beyond what they would receive in the classroom. Many of the team members were introduced to astronomical observing techniques and data reduction using IRAF. Part of the project involved determining the optimum number of flat-field and bias frames required for image calibrations. With our results, we have been able to confirm and refine previously published values for the planets' orbital inclination, mass, radius, and density.

  6. Designing with null flux coils

    SciTech Connect

    Davey, K.R.

    1997-09-01

    Null flux were suggested by Danby and Powell in the late 1960`s as a useful means for realizing induced lift with little drag. As an array of alternating magnets is translated past a set of null flux coils, the currents induced in these coils act to vertically center the magnets on those coils. At present, one Japanese MAGLEV system company and two American-based companies are employing either null flux or flux eliminating coils in their design for high speed magnetically levitated transportation. The principle question addressed in paper is: what is the proper choice of coil length to magnet length in a null flux system? A generic analysis in the time and frequency domain is laid out with the intent of showing the optimal design specification in terms of coil parameters.

  7. PHLUX: Photographic Flux Tools for Solar Glare and Flux

    2010-12-02

    A web-based tool to a) analytically and empirically quantify glare from reflected light and determine the potential impact (e.g., temporary flash blindness, retinal burn), and b) produce flux maps for central receivers. The tool accepts RAW digital photographs of the glare source (for hazard assessment) or the receiver (for flux mapping), as well as a photograph of the sun for intensity and size scaling. For glare hazard assessment, the tool determines the retinal irradiance (W/cm2)more » and subtended source angle for an observer and plots the glare source on a hazard spectrum (i.e., low-potential for flash blindness impact, potential for flash blindness impact, retinal burn). For flux mapping, the tool provides a colored map of the receiver scaled by incident solar flux (W/m2) and unwraps the physical dimensions of the receiver while accounting for the perspective of the photographer (e.g., for a flux map of a cylindrical receiver, the horizontal axis denotes receiver angle in degrees and the vertical axis denotes vertical position in meters; for a flat panel receiver, the horizontal axis denotes horizontal position in meters and the vertical axis denotes vertical position in meters). The flux mapping capability also allows the user to specify transects along which the program plots incident solar flux on the receiver.« less

  8. Flux growth utilizing the reaction between flux and crucible

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, J.-Q.

    2015-04-01

    Flux growth involves dissolving the components of the target compound in an appropriate flux at high temperatures and then crystallizing under supersaturation controlled by cooling or evaporating the flux. A refractory crucible is generally used to contain the high temperature melt. The reaction between the melt and crucible materials can modify the composition of the melt, which typically results in growth failure, or contaminates the crystals. Thus one principle in designing a flux growth is to select suitable flux and crucible materials thus to avoid any reaction between them. In this paper, we review two cases of flux growth in which the reaction between flux and Al2O3 crucible tunes the oxygen content in the melt and helps the crystallization of desired compositions. For the case of La5Pb3O, the Al2O3 crucible oxidizes La to form a passivating La2O3 layer which not only prevents further oxidization of La in the melt but also provides [O] to the melt. For the case of La0.4Na0.6Fe2As2, it is believed that the Al2O3 crucible reacts with NaAsO2 and the reaction consumes oxygen in the melt thus maintaining an oxygen-free environment.

  9. Flux growth utilizing the reaction between flux and crucible

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yan, J. -Q.

    2015-01-22

    Flux growth involves dissolving the components of the target compound in an appropriate flux at high temperatures and then crystallizing under supersaturation controlled by cooling or evaporating the flux. A refractory crucible is generally used to contain the high temperature melt. Moreover, the reaction between the melt and crucible materials can modify the composition of the melt, which typically results in growth failure, or contaminates the crystals. Thus one principle in designing a flux growth is to select suitable flux and crucible materials thus to avoid any reaction between them. In this paper, we review two cases of flux growthmore » in which the reaction between flux and Al2O3 crucible tunes the oxygen content in the melt and helps the crystallization of desired compositions. For the case of La5Pb3O, the Al2O3 crucible oxidizes La to form a passivating La2O3 layer which not only prevents further oxidization of La in the melt but also provides [O] to the melt. Finally, in the case of La0.4Na0.6Fe2As2, it is believed that the Al2O3 crucible reacts with NaAsO2 and the reaction consumes oxygen in the melt thus maintaining an oxygen-free environment.« less

  10. PHLUX: Photographic Flux Tools for Solar Glare and Flux

    SciTech Connect

    2010-12-02

    A web-based tool to a) analytically and empirically quantify glare from reflected light and determine the potential impact (e.g., temporary flash blindness, retinal burn), and b) produce flux maps for central receivers. The tool accepts RAW digital photographs of the glare source (for hazard assessment) or the receiver (for flux mapping), as well as a photograph of the sun for intensity and size scaling. For glare hazard assessment, the tool determines the retinal irradiance (W/cm2) and subtended source angle for an observer and plots the glare source on a hazard spectrum (i.e., low-potential for flash blindness impact, potential for flash blindness impact, retinal burn). For flux mapping, the tool provides a colored map of the receiver scaled by incident solar flux (W/m2) and unwraps the physical dimensions of the receiver while accounting for the perspective of the photographer (e.g., for a flux map of a cylindrical receiver, the horizontal axis denotes receiver angle in degrees and the vertical axis denotes vertical position in meters; for a flat panel receiver, the horizontal axis denotes horizontal position in meters and the vertical axis denotes vertical position in meters). The flux mapping capability also allows the user to specify transects along which the program plots incident solar flux on the receiver.

  11. Synthesis, Crystal and Electronic Structures of the Pnictides AE3TrPn3 (AE = Sr, Ba; Tr = Al, Ga; Pn = P, As)

    SciTech Connect

    Stoyko, Stanislav; Voss, Leonard; He, Hua; Bobev, Svilen

    2015-09-24

    New ternary arsenides AE3TrAs3 (AE = Sr, Ba; Tr = Al, Ga) and their phosphide analogs Sr3GaP3 and Ba3AlP3 have been prepared by reactions of the respective elements at high temperatures. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies reveal that Sr3AlAs3 and Ba3AlAs3 adopt the Ba3AlSb3-type structure (Pearson symbol oC56, space group Cmce, Z = 8). This structure is also realized for Sr3GaP3 and Ba3AlP3. Likewise, the compounds Sr3GaAs3 and Ba3GaAs3 crystallize with the Ba3GaSb3-type structure (Pearson symbol oP56, space group Pnma, Z = 8). Both structures are made up of isolated pairs of edge-shared AlPn4 and GaPn4 tetrahedra (Pn = pnictogen, i.e., P or As), separated by the alkaline-earth Sr2+ and Ba2+ cations. In both cases, there are no homoatomic bonds, hence, regardless of the slightly different atomic arrangements, both structures can be rationalized as valence-precise [AE2+]3[Tr3+][Pn3-]3, or rather [AE2+]6[Tr2Pn6]12-, i.e., as Zintl phases.

  12. The structure of DSM-IV-TR personality disorder diagnoses in NESARC: a reanalysis.

    PubMed

    Trull, Timothy J; Vergés, Alvaro; Wood, Phillip K; Sher, Kenneth J

    2013-12-01

    Cox, Clara, Worobec, and Grant (2012) recently presented results from a series of analyses aimed at identifying the factor structure underlying the DSM-IV-TR (APA, 2000) personality diagnoses assessed in the large NESARC study. Cox et al. (2012) concluded that the best fitting model was one that modeled three lower-order factors (the three clusters of PDs as outlined by DSM-IV-TR), which in turn loaded on a single PD higher-order factor. Our reanalyses of the NESARC Wave 1 and Wave 2 data for personality disorder diagnoses revealed that the best fitting model was that of a general PD factor that spans each of the ten DSM-IV PD diagnoses, and our reanalyses do not support the three-cluster hierarchical structure outlined by Cox et al. (2012) and DSM-IV-TR. Finally, we note the importance of modeling the Wave 2 assessment method factor in analyses of NESARC PD data.

  13. Comparing Diagnostic Outcomes of Autism Spectrum Disorder Using DSM-IV-TR and DSM-5 Criteria.

    PubMed

    Harstad, Elizabeth B; Fogler, Jason; Sideridis, Georgios; Weas, Sarah; Mauras, Carrie; Barbaresi, William J

    2015-05-01

    Controversy exists regarding the DSM-5 criteria for ASD. This study tested the psychometric properties of the DSM-5 model and determined how well it performed across different gender, IQ, and DSM-IV-TR sub-type, using clinically collected data on 227 subjects (median age = 3.95 years, majority had IQ > 70). DSM-5 was psychometrically superior to the DSM-IV-TR model (Comparative Fit Index of 0.970 vs 0.879, respectively). Measurement invariance revealed good model fit across gender and IQ. Younger children tended to meet fewer diagnostic criteria. Those with autistic disorder were more likely to meet social communication and repetitive behaviors criteria (p < .001) than those with PDD-NOS. DSM-5 is a robust model but will identify a different, albeit overlapping population of individuals compared to DSM-IV-TR.

  14. Standardized test for anti-Tr/DNER in patients with paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Probst, Christian; de Graaff, Esther; van Coevorden-Hameete, Marleen; Rogemond, Veronique; Honnorat, Jerome; Sabeter, Lidia; Graus, Francesc; Jarius, Sven; Voltz, Raymond; Wildemann, Brigitte; Franciotta, Diego; Blöcker, Inga M.; Schlumberger, Wolfgang; Stöcker, Winfried; Sillevis Smitt, Peter A.E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine sensitivity and specificity of a standardized recombinant cell-based indirect immunofluorescence assay (RC-IFA) for anti-Tr antibodies in comparison to a reference procedure. Methods: Delta/Notch-like epidermal growth factor-related receptor (DNER) was expressed in HEK293 and used as a substrate for RC-IFA. HEK293 control cells expressing CDR2/Yo and CDR2L as well as mock-transfected HEK293 cells were used as controls. Serum samples from 38 patients with anti-Tr antibodies (33 with paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration [PCD] and Hodgkin lymphoma), 66 patients with anti-Tr–negative PCD, 53 patients with Hodgkin lymphoma without neurologic symptoms, 40 patients with rheumatic diseases, and 42 healthy blood donors were tested for anti-DNER reactivity in the RC-IFA. In addition, RC-IFA results were compared to those from a commercial tissue-based IFA using monkey cerebellum. Results: Using the RC-IFA, anti-DNER was detected in all anti-Tr–positive patients but in none of the controls (sensitivity 100%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 92.8%–100%; specificity 100%, 95% CI 98.7%–100%). In comparison, anti-Tr was not detected in 4 samples with low-titer autoantibodies using the commercial tissue-based assay. Preadsorption of sera with either recombinant full-length DNER or its extracellular domain selectively abolished anti-Tr reactivity. Conclusion: Anti-Tr antibodies bind to the extracellular domain of DNER and can be detected by RC-IFA using HEK293 cells expressing the recombinant receptor. The new method performs better than a frequently used commercial tissue-based indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) in samples with low-titer antibodies. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class II evidence that RC-IFA accurately detects anti-Tr as compared to conventional IFA. PMID:25745634

  15. A mechanism for the dynamo terms to sustain closed-flux current, including helicity balance, by driving current which crosses the magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Jarboe, T. R.; Nelson, B. A.; Sutherland, D. A.

    2015-07-15

    An analysis of imposed dynamo current drive (IDCD) [T.R. Jarboe et al., Nucl. Fusion 52 083017 (2012)] reveals: (a) current drive on closed flux surfaces seems possible without relaxation, reconnection, or other flux-surface-breaking large events; (b) the scale size of the key physics may be smaller than is often computationally resolved; (c) helicity can be sustained across closed flux; and (d) IDCD current drive is parallel to the current which crosses the magnetic field to produce the current driving force. In addition to agreeing with spheromak data, IDCD agrees with selected tokamak data.

  16. Magnetospheric-ionospheric Poynting flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thayer, Jeffrey P.

    1994-01-01

    Over the past three years of funding SRI, in collaboration with the University of Texas at Dallas, has been involved in determining the total electromagnetic energy flux into the upper atmosphere from DE-B electric and magnetic field measurements and modeling the electromagnetic energy flux at high latitudes, taking into account the coupled magnetosphere-ionosphere system. This effort has been very successful in establishing the DC Poynting flux as a fundamental quantity in describing the coupling of electromagnetic energy between the magnetosphere and ionosphere. The DE-B satellite electric and magnetic field measurements were carefully scrutinized to provide, for the first time, a large data set of DC, field-aligned, Poynting flux measurement. Investigations describing the field-aligned Poynting flux observations from DE-B orbits under specific geomagnetic conditions and from many orbits were conducted to provide a statistical average of the Poynting flux distribution over the polar cap. The theoretical modeling effort has provided insight into the observations by formulating the connection between Poynting's theorem and the electromagnetic energy conversion processes that occur in the ionosphere. Modeling and evaluation of these processes has helped interpret the satellite observations of the DC Poynting flux and improved our understanding of the coupling between the ionosphere and magnetosphere.

  17. Interpreting Flux from Broadband Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Peter J.; Breeveld, Alice; Roming, Peter W. A.; Siegel, Michael

    2016-10-01

    We discuss the transformation of observed photometry into flux for the creation of spectral energy distributions (SED) and the computation of bolometric luminosities. We do this in the context of supernova studies, particularly as observed with the Swift spacecraft, but the concepts and techniques should be applicable to many other types of sources and wavelength regimes. Traditional methods of converting observed magnitudes to flux densities are not very accurate when applied to UV photometry. Common methods for extinction and the integration of pseudo-bolometric fluxes can also lead to inaccurate results. The sources of inaccuracy, though, also apply to other wavelengths. Because of the complicated nature of translating broadband photometry into monochromatic flux densities, comparison between observed photometry and a spectroscopic model is best done by forward modeling the spectrum into the count rates or magnitudes of the observations. We recommend that integrated flux measurements be made using a spectrum or SED which is consistent with the multi-band photometry rather than converting individual photometric measurements to flux densities, linearly interpolating between the points, and integrating. We also highlight some specific areas where the UV flux can be mischaracterized.

  18. Monte Carlo surface flux tallies

    SciTech Connect

    Favorite, Jeffrey A

    2010-11-19

    Particle fluxes on surfaces are difficult to calculate with Monte Carlo codes because the score requires a division by the surface-crossing angle cosine, and grazing angles lead to inaccuracies. We revisit the standard practice of dividing by half of a cosine 'cutoff' for particles whose surface-crossing cosines are below the cutoff. The theory behind this approximation is sound, but the application of the theory to all possible situations does not account for two implicit assumptions: (1) the grazing band must be symmetric about 0, and (2) a single linear expansion for the angular flux must be applied in the entire grazing band. These assumptions are violated in common circumstances; for example, for separate in-going and out-going flux tallies on internal surfaces, and for out-going flux tallies on external surfaces. In some situations, dividing by two-thirds of the cosine cutoff is more appropriate. If users were able to control both the cosine cutoff and the substitute value, they could use these parameters to make accurate surface flux tallies. The procedure is demonstrated in a test problem in which Monte Carlo surface fluxes in cosine bins are converted to angular fluxes and compared with the results of a discrete ordinates calculation.

  19. An introduction to TR-X: a simplified tool for standardized analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Johns, Russell C; Waters, Laurie S; Fallgren, Andrew J; Ghoreson, Gregory G

    2010-09-09

    TR-X is a multi-platform program that provides a graphical interface to Monte Carlo N-Particle transport (MCNP) and Monte Carlo N-Particle transport eXtended (MCNPX) codes. Included in this interface are tools to reduce the tedium of input file creation, provide standardization of model creation and analysis, and expedite the execution of the created models. TR-X provides tools to make the rapid testing of multiple permutations of these models easier, while also building in standardization that allows multiple solutions to be compared.

  20. Space-charge-mediated anomalous ferroelectric switching in P(VDF-TrEE) polymer films.

    PubMed

    Hu, Weijin; Wang, Zhihong; Du, Yuanmin; Zhang, Xi-Xiang; Wu, Tom

    2014-11-12

    We report on the switching dynamics of P(VDF-TrEE) copolymer devices and the realization of additional substable ferroelectric states via modulation of the coupling between polarizations and space charges. The space-charge-limited current is revealed to be the dominant leakage mechanism in such organic ferroelectric devices, and electrostatic interactions due to space charges lead to the emergence of anomalous ferroelectric loops. The reliable control of ferroelectric switching in P(VDF-TrEE) copolymers opens doors toward engineering advanced organic memories with tailored switching characteristics.

  1. A Case of Leser-Trélat Syndrome Associated with a Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Barth, Dietrich; Puhlmann, Silvio; Barth, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Seborrheic keratoses can often be found in elderly people. In general, they appear gradually. In cases of a sudden eruption with itching it might be paraneoplastic. Although some authors doubt the existence of the paraneoplastic Leser-Trélat syndrome, we present a case of sudden eruption of seborrheic keratoses connected with a newly diagnosed renal cell carcinoma. As far as we know, this is the first case report of a Leser-Trélat syndrome with a malignancy of the kidney. PMID:26500537

  2. Optimization Of PVDF-TrFE Processing Conditions For The Fabrication Of Organic MEMS Resonators.

    PubMed

    Ducrot, Pierre-Henri; Dufour, Isabelle; Ayela, Cédric

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports a systematic optimization of processing conditions of PVDF-TrFE piezoelectric thin films, used as integrated transducers in organic MEMS resonators. Indeed, despite data on electromechanical properties of PVDF found in the literature, optimized processing conditions that lead to these properties remain only partially described. In this work, a rigorous optimization of parameters enabling state-of-the-art piezoelectric properties of PVDF-TrFE thin films has been performed via the evaluation of the actuation performance of MEMS resonators. Conditions such as annealing duration, poling field and poling duration have been optimized and repeatability of the process has been demonstrated.

  3. Optimization Of PVDF-TrFE Processing Conditions For The Fabrication Of Organic MEMS Resonators

    PubMed Central

    Ducrot, Pierre-Henri; Dufour, Isabelle; Ayela, Cédric

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports a systematic optimization of processing conditions of PVDF-TrFE piezoelectric thin films, used as integrated transducers in organic MEMS resonators. Indeed, despite data on electromechanical properties of PVDF found in the literature, optimized processing conditions that lead to these properties remain only partially described. In this work, a rigorous optimization of parameters enabling state-of-the-art piezoelectric properties of PVDF-TrFE thin films has been performed via the evaluation of the actuation performance of MEMS resonators. Conditions such as annealing duration, poling field and poling duration have been optimized and repeatability of the process has been demonstrated. PMID:26792224

  4. Optimization Of PVDF-TrFE Processing Conditions For The Fabrication Of Organic MEMS Resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ducrot, Pierre-Henri; Dufour, Isabelle; Ayela, Cédric

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports a systematic optimization of processing conditions of PVDF-TrFE piezoelectric thin films, used as integrated transducers in organic MEMS resonators. Indeed, despite data on electromechanical properties of PVDF found in the literature, optimized processing conditions that lead to these properties remain only partially described. In this work, a rigorous optimization of parameters enabling state-of-the-art piezoelectric properties of PVDF-TrFE thin films has been performed via the evaluation of the actuation performance of MEMS resonators. Conditions such as annealing duration, poling field and poling duration have been optimized and repeatability of the process has been demonstrated.

  5. Were the Trænadjupet and Nyk Slides multi-staged?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allin, Joshua; Mozzato, Alessandro; Tappin, David; Talling, Peter; Hunt, James

    2016-04-01

    Submarine landslides originating from active and extinct trough mouth fans are some of the largest single mass movements evident on Earth. These landslides are capable of damaging offshore infrastructure and can also trigger far-reaching tsunamis. For these reasons understanding the timing, dynamics, and triggering mechanisms of large submarine landslides is important for regional geohazard assessment. The Trænadjupet Slide occurred 4,000 ca. years ago and originated from the Trænadjupet paleo-ice stream on the Central Norwegian margin. The Trænadjupet Slide partially buried the deposits of a previous slide originating from the same section of the Norwegian margin; the Nyk Slide, which occurred at 16,000 ca years ago. Although the Trænadjupet Slide had an estimated volume of 900 km3 and originated from a shallow water depth, it does not appear to have triggered a tsunami. This is in contrast to the comparably-sized Storegga Slide, which produced a tsunami that devastated coastal areas as far away as Scotland. The apparent absence of a tsunami suggests that the failure dynamics for the Trænadjupet slide were different to that of other large slides along the Norwegian Margin. The deposits of both the Trænadjupet and Nyk Slides consist of several blocky lobes extending out into the Lofoten Basin. The lobate morphology of the deposits may imply that both slides occurred in a number of different and possibly temporally-disparate stages. Importantly, multi-staged failures have a much lower tsunamigenic potential due to the lower initial volume displacement. These staggered failures consisting of smaller sediment volumes might explain why no contemporaneous onshore tsunami deposits are found on nearby coastlines, particularly in the case of the post-glacial Trænadjupet Slide. Here we present a new sediment core dataset collected from the previously un-sampled lobes of the Trænadjupet and Nyk Slides. These cores will help us better characterise the deposit types

  6. Evolution, three-dimensional model and localization of truncated hemoglobin PttTrHb of hybrid aspen.

    PubMed

    Dumont, Estelle; Jokipii-Lukkari, Soile; Parkash, Vimal; Vuosku, Jaana; Sundström, Robin; Nymalm, Yvonne; Sutela, Suvi; Taskinen, Katariina; Kallio, Pauli T; Salminen, Tiina A; Häggman, Hely

    2014-01-01

    Thus far, research on plant hemoglobins (Hbs) has mainly concentrated on symbiotic and non-symbiotic Hbs, and information on truncated Hbs (TrHbs) is scarce. The aim of this study was to examine the origin, structure and localization of the truncated Hb (PttTrHb) of hybrid aspen (Populus tremula L. × tremuloides Michx.), the model system of tree biology. Additionally, we studied the PttTrHb expression in relation to non-symbiotic class1 Hb gene (PttHb1) using RNAi-silenced hybrid aspen lines. Both the phylogenetic analysis and the three-dimensional (3D) model of PttTrHb supported the view that plant TrHbs evolved vertically from a bacterial TrHb. The 3D model suggested that PttTrHb adopts a 2-on-2 sandwich of α-helices and has a Bacillus subtilis -like ligand-binding pocket in which E11Gln and B10Tyr form hydrogen bonds to a ligand. However, due to differences in tunnel cavity and gate residue (E7Ala), it might not show similar ligand-binding kinetics as in Bs-HbO (E7Thr). The immunolocalization showed that PttTrHb protein was present in roots, stems as well as leaves of in vitro -grown hybrid aspens. In mature organs, PttTrHb was predominantly found in the vascular bundles and specifically at the site of lateral root formation, overlapping consistently with areas of nitric oxide (NO) production in plants. Furthermore, the NO donor sodium nitroprusside treatment increased the amount of PttTrHb in stems. The observed PttTrHb localization suggests that PttTrHb plays a role in the NO metabolism.

  7. TR4 nuclear receptor functions as a tumor suppressor for prostate tumorigenesis via modulation of DNA damage/repair system.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shin-Jen; Lee, Soo Ok; Lee, Yi-Fen; Miyamoto, Hiroshi; Yang, Dong-Rong; Li, Gonghui; Chang, Chawnshang

    2014-06-01

    Testicular nuclear receptor 4 (TR4), a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily, plays important roles in metabolism, fertility and aging. The linkage of TR4 functions in cancer progression, however, remains unclear. Using three different mouse models, we found TR4 could prevent or delay prostate cancer (PCa)/prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia development. Knocking down TR4 in human RWPE1 and mouse mPrE normal prostate cells promoted tumorigenesis under carcinogen challenge, suggesting TR4 may play a suppressor role in PCa initiation. Mechanism dissection in both in vitro cell lines and in vivo mice studies found that knocking down TR4 led to increased DNA damage with altered DNA repair system that involved the modulation of ATM expression at the transcriptional level, and addition of ATM partially interrupted the TR4 small interfering RNA-induced tumorigenesis in cell transformation assays. Immunohistochemical staining in human PCa tissue microarrays revealed ATM expression is highly correlated with TR4 expression. Together, these results suggest TR4 may function as a tumor suppressor to prevent or delay prostate tumorigenesis via regulating ATM expression at the transcriptional level. PMID:24583925

  8. Flux Emergence at the Photosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, M. C. M.; Schüssler, M.; Moreno-Insertis, F.

    2006-12-01

    To model the emergence of magnetic fields at the photosphere, we carried out 3D magneto-hydrodynamics (MHD) simulations using the MURaM code. Our simulations take into account the effects of compressibility, energy exchange via radiative transfer and partial ionization in the equation of state. All these physical ingredients are essential for a proper treatment of the problem. In the simulations, an initially buoyant magnetic flux tube is embedded in the upper layers of the convection zone. We find that the interaction between the flux tube and the external flow field has an important influence on the emergent morphology of the magnetic field. Depending on the initial properties of the flux tube (e.g. field strength, twist, entropy etc.), the emergence process can also modify the local granulation pattern. The inclusion of radiative transfer allows us to directly compare the simulation results with real observations of emerging flux.

  9. Conical electromagnetic radiation flux concentrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, E. R.

    1972-01-01

    Concentrator provides method of concentrating a beam of electromagnetic radiation into a smaller beam, presenting a higher flux density. Smaller beam may be made larger by sending radiation through the device in the reverse direction.

  10. Flux tubes at finite temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cea, Paolo; Cosmai, Leonardo; Cuteri, Francesca; Papa, Alessandro

    2016-06-01

    The chromoelectric field generated by a static quark-antiquark pair, with its peculiar tube-like shape, can be nicely described, at zero temperature, within the dual superconductor scenario for the QCD confining vacuum. In this work we investigate, by lattice Monte Carlo simulations of the SU (3) pure gauge theory, the fate of chromoelectric flux tubes across the deconfinement transition. We find that, if the distance between the static sources is kept fixed at about 0.76 fm˜eq 1.6/√{σ } and the temperature is increased towards and above the deconfinement temperature T c , the amplitude of the field inside the flux tube gets smaller, while the shape of the flux tube does not vary appreciably across deconfinement. This scenario with flux-tube "evaporation" above T c has no correspondence in ordinary (type-II) superconductivity, where instead the transition to the phase with normal conductivity is characterized by a divergent fattening of flux tubes as the transition temperature is approached from below. We present also some evidence about the existence of flux-tube structures in the magnetic sector of the theory in the deconfined phase.

  11. Methane flux from Minnesota peatlands

    SciTech Connect

    Crill, P.M.; Bartlett, K.B.; Harriss, R.C.; Gorham, E.; Verry, E.S. )

    1988-12-01

    Northern (> 40 deg N) wetlands have been suggested as the largest natural source of methane (CH{sub 4}) to the troposphere. To refine the authors estimates of source strengths from this region and to investigate climatic controls on the process, fluxes were measured from a variety of Minnesota peatlands during May, June, and August 1986. Late spring and summer fluxes ranged from 11 to 866 mg CH{sub 4}/sq/m/day, averaging 207 mg CH{sub 4} sq/m/day overall. At Marcell Forest, forested bogs and fen sites had lower fluxes than open bogs. In the Red Lake peatland, circumneutral fens, with standing water above the peat surface, produced more methane than acid bog sites in which the water table was beneath the moss surface. Peat temperature was an important control. Methane flux increased in response to increasing soil temperature. It is estimated that the methane flux from all peatlands north of 40 deg may be on the order of 70 to 90 Tg/yr though estimates of this sort are plagued by uncertainties in the areal extent of peatlands, length of the CH{sub 4} producing season, and the spatial and temporal variability of the flux. 60 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  12. Flux growth utilizing the reaction between flux and crucible

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, J. -Q.

    2015-01-22

    Flux growth involves dissolving the components of the target compound in an appropriate flux at high temperatures and then crystallizing under supersaturation controlled by cooling or evaporating the flux. A refractory crucible is generally used to contain the high temperature melt. Moreover, the reaction between the melt and crucible materials can modify the composition of the melt, which typically results in growth failure, or contaminates the crystals. Thus one principle in designing a flux growth is to select suitable flux and crucible materials thus to avoid any reaction between them. In this paper, we review two cases of flux growth in which the reaction between flux and Al2O3 crucible tunes the oxygen content in the melt and helps the crystallization of desired compositions. For the case of La5Pb3O, the Al2O3 crucible oxidizes La to form a passivating La2O3 layer which not only prevents further oxidization of La in the melt but also provides [O] to the melt. Finally, in the case of La0.4Na0.6Fe2As2, it is believed that the Al2O3 crucible reacts with NaAsO2 and the reaction consumes oxygen in the melt thus maintaining an oxygen-free environment.

  13. Planetary transit observations at the University Observatory Jena: TrES-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raetz, St.; Mugrauer, M.; Schmidt, T. O. B.; Roell, T.; Eisenbeiss, T.; Hohle, M. M.; Koeltzsch, A.; Vaňko, M.; Ginski, Ch.; Marka, C.; Moualla, M.; Tetzlaff, N.; Seifahrt, A.; Broeg, Ch.; Koppenhoefer, J.; Raetz, M.; Neuhäuser, R.

    2009-05-01

    We report on observations of several transit events of the transiting planet TrES-2 obtained with the Cassegrain-Teleskop-Kamera at the University Observatory Jena. Between March 2007 and November 2008 ten different transits and almost a complete orbital period were observed. Overall, in 40 nights of observation 4291 exposures (in total 71.52 h of observation) of the TrES-2 parent star were taken. With the transit timings for TrES-2 from the 34 events published by the TrES-network, the Transit Light Curve project and the Exoplanet Transit Database plus our own ten transits, we find that the orbital period is P=(2.470614± 0.000001) d, a slight change by ˜ 0.6 s compared to the previously published period. We present new ephemeris for this transiting planet. Furthermore, we found a second dip after the transit which could either be due to a blended variable star or occultation of a second star or even an additional object in the system. Our observations will be useful for future investigations of timing variations caused by additional perturbing planets and/or stellar spots and/or moons. Based on observations obtained with telescopes of the University Observatory Jena, which is operated by the Astrophysical Institute of the Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena and the 80cm telescope of the Wendelstein Observatory of the Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich.

  14. Removal Characteristics of Immunoadsorption With the Immusorba TR-350 Column Using Conventional and Selective Plasma Separators.

    PubMed

    Ohkubo, Atsushi; Okado, Tomokazu; Miyamoto, Satoko; Goto, Keigo; Yamamoto, Motoki; Maeda, Takuma; Itagaki, Ayako; Seshima, Hiroshi; Kurashima, Naoki; Sohara, Eisei; Uchida, Shinichi; Rai, Tatemitsu

    2016-08-01

    In Japan, immunoadsorption (IA) is performed using a conventional plasma separator and Immusorba TR-350 column (TR-350) for the treatment of neurological immune diseases. By this method, TR-350 has the limited maximal capacity of the immunoglobulin G (IgG) adsorption, and fibrinogen (Fbg) is reduced remarkably. Evacure EC-4A10 (EC-4A) is a selective plasma separator and the sieving coefficients of IgG and Fbg using EC-4A were 0.5 and 0, respectively. Here, we investigated the removal characteristics of IgG and Fbg in IA by TR-350 using two different plasma membrane separators: conventional plasma separator (PE-IA) and EC-4A (EC-IA). In vitro filtration using plasma effluent was performed with a closed circuit. When the processed volume was 3 L, estimated removal amounts by PE-IA were 3172 mg for IgG and 3329 mg for Fbg, respectively. When the processed volume was 3 L, estimated removal amounts by EC-IA were 4946 mg and 1916 mg, respectively. EC-IA can be considered useful for the removal of IgG, including auto-antibodies, while retaining Fbg, thereby allowing even daily use. PMID:27523076

  15. Hans Georg Trüper (1936-2016) and His Contributions to Halophile Research.

    PubMed

    Oren, Aharon

    2016-05-12

    Prof. Hans Georg Trüper, one of the most important scientists in the field of halophile research, passed away on 9 March 2016 at the age of 79. I here present a brief obituary with special emphasis on Prof. Trüper's contributions to our understanding of the halophilic prokaryotes and their adaptations to life in hypersaline environments. He has pioneered the study of the halophilic anoxygenic phototrophic sulfur bacteria of the Ectothiorhodospira-Halorhodospira group. Some of the species he and his group isolated from hypersaline and haloalkaline environments have become model organisms for the study of the mechanisms of haloadaptation: the functions of three major organic compounds - glycine betaine, ectoine, and trehalose - known to serve as "compatible solutes" in halophilic members of the Bacteria domain, were discovered during studies of these anoxygenic phototrophs. Prof. Trüper's studies of hypersaline alkaline environments in Egypt also led to the isolation of the first known extremely halophilic archaeon (Natronomonas pharaonis). The guest editors dedicate this special volume of Life to the memory of Prof. Hans Georg Trüper.

  16. Protein disulfide isomerase homolog TrPDI2 contributing to cellobiohydrolase production in Trichoderma reesei.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guokun; Lv, Pin; He, Ronglin; Wang, Haijun; Wang, Lixian; Zhang, Dongyuan; Chen, Shulin

    2015-09-01

    The majority of the cysteine residues in the secreted proteins form disulfide bonds via protein disulfide isomerase (PDI)-mediated catalysis, stabilizing the enzyme activity. The role of PDI in cellulase production is speculative, as well as the possibility of PDI as a target for improving enzyme production efficiency of Trichoderma reesei, a widely used producer of enzyme for the production of lignocellulose-based biofuels and biochemicals. Here, we report that a PDI homolog, TrPDI2 in T. reesei exhibited a 36.94% and an 11.81% similarity to Aspergillus niger TIGA and T. reesei PDI1, respectively. The capability of TrPDI2 to recover the activity of reduced and denatured RNase by promoting refolding verified its protein disulfide isomerase activity. The overexpression of Trpdi2 increased the secretion and the activity of CBH1 at the early stage of cellulase induction. In addition, both the expression level and redox state of TrPDI2 responded to cellulase induction in T. reesei, providing sustainable oxidative power to ensure cellobiohydrolase maturation and production. The results suggest that TrPDI2 may contribute to cellobiohydrolase secretion by enhancing the capability of disulfide bond formation, which is essential for protein folding and maturation. PMID:26138396

  17. Deploying the Win TR-20 computational engine as a web service

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Despite its simplicity and limitations, the runoff curve number method remains a widely-used hydrologic modeling tool, and its use through the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) computer application WinTR-20 is expected to continue for the foreseeable future. To facilitate timely up...

  18. Comparing Diagnostic Outcomes of Autism Spectrum Disorder Using "DSM-IV-TR" and "DSM-5" Criteria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harstad, Elizabeth B.; Fogler, Jason; Sideridis, Georgios; Weas, Sarah; Mauras, Carrie; Barbaresi, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Controversy exists regarding the "DSM-5" criteria for ASD. This study tested the psychometric properties of the "DSM-5" model and determined how well it performed across different gender, IQ, and "DSM-IV-TR" sub-type, using clinically collected data on 227 subjects (median age = 3.95 years, majority had IQ > 70).…

  19. Vertically aligned P(VDF-TrFE) core-shell structures on flexible pillar arrays

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yoon-Young; Yun, Tae Gwang; Qaiser, Nadeem; Paik, Haemin; Roh, Hee Seok; Hong, Jongin; Hong, Seungbum; Han, Seung Min; No, Kwangsoo

    2015-01-01

    PVDF and P(VDF-TrFE) nano- and micro- structures have been widely used due to their potential applications in several fields, including sensors, actuators, vital sign transducers, and energy harvesters. In this study, we developed vertically aligned P(VDF-TrFE) core-shell structures using high modulus polyurethane acrylate (PUA) pillars as the support structure to maintain the structural integrity. In addition, we were able to improve the piezoelectric effect by 1.85 times from 40 ± 2 to 74 ± 2 pm/V when compared to the thin film counterpart, which contributes to the more efficient current generation under a given stress, by making an effective use of the P(VDF-TrFE) thin top layer as well as the side walls. We attribute the enhancement of piezoelectric effects to the contributions from the shell component and the strain confinement effect, which was supported by our modeling results. We envision that these organic-based P(VDF-TrFE) core-shell structures will be used widely as 3D sensors and power generators because they are optimized for current generations by utilizing all surface areas, including the side walls of core-shell structures. PMID:26040539

  20. T/R module development for large aperture L-band phased array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, Neil; Andricos, Constantine; Kumley, Kendra; Berkun, Andrew; Hodges, Richard; Spitz, Suzanne

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes a transmit / receive (T/R) module for a large L-band space based radar active phased array being developed at JPL. Electrical performance and construction techniques are described, with emphasis on the former. The T/R modules have a bandwidth of more than 80 MHz centered at 1260MHz and support dual, switched polarizations. Phase and amplitude are controlled by a 6-bit phase shifter and a 6-bit attenuator, respectively. The transmitter power amplifier generates 2.4 W into a nominal 50 ohm load with 36% overall efficiency. The receiver noise figure is 4.4 dB including all front-end losses. The module weighs 32 g and has a footprint of 8 cm x 4.5 cm. Fourteen of these T/R modules were fabricated at the JPL Pick-and-Place Facility and were tested using a computer-controlled measurement facility developed at JPL. Calibrated performance of this set of T/R modules is presented and shows good agreement with design predictions.

  1. Enhanced Piezoelectric Energy Harvesting Performance of Flexible PVDF-TrFE Bilayer Films with Graphene Oxide.

    PubMed

    Bhavanasi, Venkateswarlu; Kumar, Vipin; Parida, Kaushik; Wang, Jiangxin; Lee, Pooi See

    2016-01-13

    Ferroelectric materials have attracted interest in recent years due to their application in energy harvesting owing to its piezoelectric nature. Ferroelectric polymers are flexible and can sustain larger strains compared to inorganic counterparts, making them attractive for harvesting energy from mechanical vibrations. Herein, we report, for the first time, the enhanced piezoelectric energy harvesting performance of the bilayer films of poled poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene) [PVDF-TrFE] and graphene oxide (GO). The bilayer film exhibits superior energy harvesting performance with a voltage output of 4 V and power output of 4.41 μWcm(-2) compared to poled PVDF-TrFE films alone (voltage output of 1.9 V and power output of 1.77 μWcm(-2)). The enhanced voltage and power output in the presence of GO film is due to the combined effect of electrostatic contribution from graphene oxide, residual tensile stress, enhanced Young's modulus of the bilayer films, and the presence of space charge at the interface of the PVDF-TrFE and GO films, arising from the uncompensated polarization of PVDF-TrFE. Higher Young's modulus and dielectric constant of GO led to the efficient transfer of mechanical and electrical energy.

  2. Ultrasonic imaging using air-coupled P(VDF/TrFE) transducers at 2 MHz.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Sadayuki; Ohigashi, Hiroji

    2009-05-01

    A reflection non-contact ultrasonic microscope system working both in amplitude and phase difference modes at 2 MHz has been developed using an air-coupled concave transducer made of piezoelectric polymer films of poly(vinylidene fluoride/trifluoroethylene) [P(VDF/TrFE)]. The transducer is composed of three 95 microm-thick P(VDF/TrFE) films stacked together, each of which is activated electrically in parallel by a driving source. The transducer has a wide aperture angle of 140 degrees and a focal length of 10mm. The measured two-way transducer insertion loss is 80 dB at 1.83 MHz. Despite 20 dB higher insertion loss than that estimated from Mason's equivalent circuit, we have obtained clear amplitude acoustic images of a coin with transverse resolution of 150 microm, and clear phase difference acoustic images of the rough surface of a paper currency bill with depth resolution of sub-micrometer. Using two planar transducers of P(VDF/TrFE), we have also successfully measured in through-transmission mode the sound velocity and absorption of a 3mm-thick silicone-rubber plate. The present study proves that, owing to its low acoustic impedance and flexibility, P(VDF/TrFE) piezoelectric film is very useful for high frequency acoustic imaging in air in the MHz range. PMID:19215951

  3. Protein disulfide isomerase homolog TrPDI2 contributing to cellobiohydrolase production in Trichoderma reesei.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guokun; Lv, Pin; He, Ronglin; Wang, Haijun; Wang, Lixian; Zhang, Dongyuan; Chen, Shulin

    2015-09-01

    The majority of the cysteine residues in the secreted proteins form disulfide bonds via protein disulfide isomerase (PDI)-mediated catalysis, stabilizing the enzyme activity. The role of PDI in cellulase production is speculative, as well as the possibility of PDI as a target for improving enzyme production efficiency of Trichoderma reesei, a widely used producer of enzyme for the production of lignocellulose-based biofuels and biochemicals. Here, we report that a PDI homolog, TrPDI2 in T. reesei exhibited a 36.94% and an 11.81% similarity to Aspergillus niger TIGA and T. reesei PDI1, respectively. The capability of TrPDI2 to recover the activity of reduced and denatured RNase by promoting refolding verified its protein disulfide isomerase activity. The overexpression of Trpdi2 increased the secretion and the activity of CBH1 at the early stage of cellulase induction. In addition, both the expression level and redox state of TrPDI2 responded to cellulase induction in T. reesei, providing sustainable oxidative power to ensure cellobiohydrolase maturation and production. The results suggest that TrPDI2 may contribute to cellobiohydrolase secretion by enhancing the capability of disulfide bond formation, which is essential for protein folding and maturation.

  4. Alternatives to the DSM-IV-TR for Multicultural Counseling: Some Preliminary Concerns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, Gary E.; Stalling, Janice E.

    Many counselors, social workers, and psychologists routinely use the DSM-IV-TR as a basis for most psychological diagnoses. This includes counselors' work with clients from diverse cultural backgrounds. Multicultural counseling theorists and practitioners are beginning to voice their concerns about finding a more appropriate alternative to the…

  5. Vertically aligned P(VDF-TrFE) core-shell structures on flexible pillar arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Yoon-Young; Yun, Tae Gwang; Qaiser, Nadeem; Paik, Haemin; Roh, Hee Seok; Hong, Jongin; Hong, Seungbum; Han, Seung Min; No, Kwangsoo

    2015-06-04

    PVDF and P(VDF-TrFE) nano- and micro- structures are widely used due to their potential applications in several fields, including sensors, actuators, vital sign transducers, and energy harvesters. In this study, we developed vertically aligned P(VDF-TrFE) core-shell structures using high modulus polyurethane acrylate (PUA) pillars as the support structure to maintain the structural integrity. In addition, we were able to improve the piezoelectric effect by 1.85 times from 40 ± 2 to 74 ± 2 pm/V when compared to the thin film counterpart, which contributes to the more efficient current generation under a given stress, by making an effective use of the P(VDF-TrFE) thin top layer as well as the side walls. We attribute the enhancement of piezoelectric effects to the contributions from the shell component and the strain confinement effect, which was supported by our modeling results. We envision that these organic-based P(VDF-TrFE) core-shell structures will be used widely as 3D sensors and power generators because they are optimized for current generations by utilizing all surface areas, including the side walls of core-shell structures.

  6. Vertically aligned P(VDF-TrFE) core-shell structures on flexible pillar arrays

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Choi, Yoon-Young; Yun, Tae Gwang; Qaiser, Nadeem; Paik, Haemin; Roh, Hee Seok; Hong, Jongin; Hong, Seungbum; Han, Seung Min; No, Kwangsoo

    2015-06-04

    PVDF and P(VDF-TrFE) nano- and micro- structures are widely used due to their potential applications in several fields, including sensors, actuators, vital sign transducers, and energy harvesters. In this study, we developed vertically aligned P(VDF-TrFE) core-shell structures using high modulus polyurethane acrylate (PUA) pillars as the support structure to maintain the structural integrity. In addition, we were able to improve the piezoelectric effect by 1.85 times from 40 ± 2 to 74 ± 2 pm/V when compared to the thin film counterpart, which contributes to the more efficient current generation under a given stress, by making an effective use ofmore » the P(VDF-TrFE) thin top layer as well as the side walls. We attribute the enhancement of piezoelectric effects to the contributions from the shell component and the strain confinement effect, which was supported by our modeling results. We envision that these organic-based P(VDF-TrFE) core-shell structures will be used widely as 3D sensors and power generators because they are optimized for current generations by utilizing all surface areas, including the side walls of core-shell structures.« less

  7. Vertically aligned P(VDF-TrFE) core-shell structures on flexible pillar arrays.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yoon-Young; Yun, Tae Gwang; Qaiser, Nadeem; Paik, Haemin; Roh, Hee Seok; Hong, Jongin; Hong, Seungbum; Han, Seung Min; No, Kwangsoo

    2015-01-01

    PVDF and P(VDF-TrFE) nano- and micro- structures have been widely used due to their potential applications in several fields, including sensors, actuators, vital sign transducers, and energy harvesters. In this study, we developed vertically aligned P(VDF-TrFE) core-shell structures using high modulus polyurethane acrylate (PUA) pillars as the support structure to maintain the structural integrity. In addition, we were able to improve the piezoelectric effect by 1.85 times from 40 ± 2 to 74 ± 2 pm/V when compared to the thin film counterpart, which contributes to the more efficient current generation under a given stress, by making an effective use of the P(VDF-TrFE) thin top layer as well as the side walls. We attribute the enhancement of piezoelectric effects to the contributions from the shell component and the strain confinement effect, which was supported by our modeling results. We envision that these organic-based P(VDF-TrFE) core-shell structures will be used widely as 3D sensors and power generators because they are optimized for current generations by utilizing all surface areas, including the side walls of core-shell structures. PMID:26040539

  8. Hans Georg Trüper (1936–2016) and His Contributions to Halophile Research

    PubMed Central

    Oren, Aharon

    2016-01-01

    Prof. Hans Georg Trüper, one of the most important scientists in the field of halophile research, passed away on 9 March 2016 at the age of 79. I here present a brief obituary with special emphasis on Prof. Trüper’s contributions to our understanding of the halophilic prokaryotes and their adaptations to life in hypersaline environments. He has pioneered the study of the halophilic anoxygenic phototrophic sulfur bacteria of the Ectothiorhodospira—Halorhodospira group. Some of the species he and his group isolated from hypersaline and haloalkaline environments have become model organisms for the study of the mechanisms of haloadaptation: the functions of three major organic compounds – glycine betaine, ectoine, and trehalose – known to serve as “compatible solutes” in halophilic members of the Bacteria domain, were discovered during studies of these anoxygenic phototrophs. Prof. Trüper’s studies of hypersaline alkaline environments in Egypt also led to the isolation of the first known extremely halophilic archaeon (Natronomonas pharaonis). The guest editors dedicate this special volume of Life to the memory of Prof. Hans Georg Trüper. PMID:27187481

  9. Enhanced Piezoelectric Energy Harvesting Performance of Flexible PVDF-TrFE Bilayer Films with Graphene Oxide.

    PubMed

    Bhavanasi, Venkateswarlu; Kumar, Vipin; Parida, Kaushik; Wang, Jiangxin; Lee, Pooi See

    2016-01-13

    Ferroelectric materials have attracted interest in recent years due to their application in energy harvesting owing to its piezoelectric nature. Ferroelectric polymers are flexible and can sustain larger strains compared to inorganic counterparts, making them attractive for harvesting energy from mechanical vibrations. Herein, we report, for the first time, the enhanced piezoelectric energy harvesting performance of the bilayer films of poled poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene) [PVDF-TrFE] and graphene oxide (GO). The bilayer film exhibits superior energy harvesting performance with a voltage output of 4 V and power output of 4.41 μWcm(-2) compared to poled PVDF-TrFE films alone (voltage output of 1.9 V and power output of 1.77 μWcm(-2)). The enhanced voltage and power output in the presence of GO film is due to the combined effect of electrostatic contribution from graphene oxide, residual tensile stress, enhanced Young's modulus of the bilayer films, and the presence of space charge at the interface of the PVDF-TrFE and GO films, arising from the uncompensated polarization of PVDF-TrFE. Higher Young's modulus and dielectric constant of GO led to the efficient transfer of mechanical and electrical energy. PMID:26693844

  10. The Traffic Adaptive Data Dissemination (TrAD) Protocol for both Urban and Highway Scenarios.

    PubMed

    Tian, Bin; Hou, Kun Mean; Zhou, Haiying

    2016-01-01

    The worldwide economic cost of road crashes and injuries is estimated to be US$518 billion per year and the annual congestion cost in France is estimated to be €5.9 billion. Vehicular Ad hoc Networks (VANETs) are one solution to improve transport features such as traffic safety, traffic jam and infotainment on wheels, where a great number of event-driven messages need to be disseminated in a timely way in a region of interest. In comparison with traditional wireless networks, VANETs have to consider the highly dynamic network topology and lossy links due to node mobility. Inter-Vehicle Communication (IVC) protocols are the keystone of VANETs. According to our survey, most of the proposed IVC protocols focus on either highway or urban scenarios, but not on both. Furthermore, too few protocols, considering both scenarios, can achieve high performance. In this paper, an infrastructure-less Traffic Adaptive data Dissemination (TrAD) protocol which takes into account road traffic and network traffic status for both highway and urban scenarios will be presented. TrAD has double broadcast suppression techniques and is designed to adapt efficiently to the irregular road topology. The performance of the TrAD protocol was evaluated quantitatively by means of realistic simulations taking into account different real road maps, traffic routes and vehicular densities. The obtained simulation results show that TrAD is more efficient in terms of packet delivery ratio, number of transmissions and delay in comparison with the performance of three well-known reference protocols. Moreover, TrAD can also tolerate a reasonable degree of GPS drift and still achieve efficient data dissemination.

  11. The Traffic Adaptive Data Dissemination (TrAD) Protocol for both Urban and Highway Scenarios

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Bin; Hou, Kun Mean; Zhou, Haiying

    2016-01-01

    The worldwide economic cost of road crashes and injuries is estimated to be US$518 billion per year and the annual congestion cost in France is estimated to be €5.9 billion. Vehicular Ad hoc Networks (VANETs) are one solution to improve transport features such as traffic safety, traffic jam and infotainment on wheels, where a great number of event-driven messages need to be disseminated in a timely way in a region of interest. In comparison with traditional wireless networks, VANETs have to consider the highly dynamic network topology and lossy links due to node mobility. Inter-Vehicle Communication (IVC) protocols are the keystone of VANETs. According to our survey, most of the proposed IVC protocols focus on either highway or urban scenarios, but not on both. Furthermore, too few protocols, considering both scenarios, can achieve high performance. In this paper, an infrastructure-less Traffic Adaptive data Dissemination (TrAD) protocol which takes into account road traffic and network traffic status for both highway and urban scenarios will be presented. TrAD has double broadcast suppression techniques and is designed to adapt efficiently to the irregular road topology. The performance of the TrAD protocol was evaluated quantitatively by means of realistic simulations taking into account different real road maps, traffic routes and vehicular densities. The obtained simulation results show that TrAD is more efficient in terms of packet delivery ratio, number of transmissions and delay in comparison with the performance of three well-known reference protocols. Moreover, TrAD can also tolerate a reasonable degree of GPS drift and still achieve efficient data dissemination. PMID:27338393

  12. The Traffic Adaptive Data Dissemination (TrAD) Protocol for both Urban and Highway Scenarios.

    PubMed

    Tian, Bin; Hou, Kun Mean; Zhou, Haiying

    2016-01-01

    The worldwide economic cost of road crashes and injuries is estimated to be US$518 billion per year and the annual congestion cost in France is estimated to be €5.9 billion. Vehicular Ad hoc Networks (VANETs) are one solution to improve transport features such as traffic safety, traffic jam and infotainment on wheels, where a great number of event-driven messages need to be disseminated in a timely way in a region of interest. In comparison with traditional wireless networks, VANETs have to consider the highly dynamic network topology and lossy links due to node mobility. Inter-Vehicle Communication (IVC) protocols are the keystone of VANETs. According to our survey, most of the proposed IVC protocols focus on either highway or urban scenarios, but not on both. Furthermore, too few protocols, considering both scenarios, can achieve high performance. In this paper, an infrastructure-less Traffic Adaptive data Dissemination (TrAD) protocol which takes into account road traffic and network traffic status for both highway and urban scenarios will be presented. TrAD has double broadcast suppression techniques and is designed to adapt efficiently to the irregular road topology. The performance of the TrAD protocol was evaluated quantitatively by means of realistic simulations taking into account different real road maps, traffic routes and vehicular densities. The obtained simulation results show that TrAD is more efficient in terms of packet delivery ratio, number of transmissions and delay in comparison with the performance of three well-known reference protocols. Moreover, TrAD can also tolerate a reasonable degree of GPS drift and still achieve efficient data dissemination. PMID:27338393

  13. Northrop Grumman TR202 LOX/LH2 Deep Throttling Engine Technology Project Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gromski, Jason; Majamaki, Annik; Chianese, Silvio; Weinstock, Vladimir; Kim, Tony S.

    2010-01-01

    NASA's Propulsion and Cryogenic Advanced Development (PCAD) project is currently developing enabling propulsion technologies in support of future lander missions. To meet lander requirements, several technical challenges need to be overcome, one of which is the ability for the descent engine(s) to operate over a deep throttle range with cryogenic propellants. To address this need, PCAD has enlisted Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems (NGAS) in a technology development effort associated with the TR202 engine. The TR202 is a LOX/LH2 expander cycle engine driven by independent turbopump assemblies and featuring a variable area pintle injector similar to the injector used on the TR200 Apollo Lunar Module Descent Engine (LMDE). Since the Apollo missions, NGAS has continued to mature deep throttling pintle injector technology. The TR202 program has completed two series of pintle injector testing. The first series of testing used ablative thrust chambers and demonstrated igniter operation as well as stable performance at discrete points throughout the designed 10:1 throttle range. The second series was conducted with calorimeter chambers and demonstrated injector performance at discrete points throughout the throttle range as well as chamber heat flow adequate to power an expander cycle design across the throttle range. This paper provides an overview of the TR202 program, describing the different phases and key milestones. It describes how test data was correlated to the engine conceptual design. The test data obtained has created a valuable database for deep throttling cryogenic pintle technology, a technology that is readily scalable in thrust level.

  14. 40 CFR 52.38 - What are the requirements of the Federal Implementation Plans (FIPs) under the Transport Rule (TR...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Federal Implementation Plans (FIPs) under the Transport Rule (TR) relating to emissions of nitrogen oxides... emissions of nitrogen oxides? (a)(1) The TR NOX Annual Trading Program provisions set forth in subpart AAAAA... annual emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOX). (2) The provisions of subpart AAAAA of part 97 of this...

  15. 40 CFR 52.38 - What are the requirements of the Federal Implementation Plans (FIPs) under the Transport Rule (TR...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Federal Implementation Plans (FIPs) under the Transport Rule (TR) relating to emissions of nitrogen oxides... emissions of nitrogen oxides? (a)(1) The TR NOX Annual Trading Program provisions set forth in subpart AAAAA... annual emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOX). (2) The provisions of subpart AAAAA of part 97 of this...

  16. 40 CFR 52.38 - What are the requirements of the Federal Implementation Plans (FIPs) under the Transport Rule (TR...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Federal Implementation Plans (FIPs) under the Transport Rule (TR) relating to emissions of nitrogen oxides... emissions of nitrogen oxides? (a)(1) The TR NOX Annual Trading Program provisions set forth in subpart AAAAA... annual emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOX). (2) The provisions of subpart AAAAA of part 97 of this...

  17. 40 CFR 52.39 - What are the requirements of the Federal Implementation Plans (FIPs) for the Transport Rule (TR...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., Maryland, Michigan, Missouri, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Virginia... 2013, of TR SO2 Group 1 trading budget minus the sum of the new unit set-aside and Indian country new... trading budget minus the sum of the Indian country new unit set-aside and the amount of any TR SO2 Group...

  18. 40 CFR 52.39 - What are the requirements of the Federal Implementation Plans (FIPs) for the Transport Rule (TR...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., Maryland, Michigan, Missouri, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Virginia... 2013, of TR SO2 Group 1 trading budget minus the sum of the new unit set-aside and Indian country new... trading budget minus the sum of the Indian country new unit set-aside and the amount of any TR SO2 Group...

  19. 40 CFR 52.39 - What are the requirements of the Federal Implementation Plans (FIPs) for the Transport Rule (TR...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., Maryland, Michigan, Missouri, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Virginia... 2013, of TR SO2 Group 1 trading budget minus the sum of the new unit set-aside and Indian country new... trading budget minus the sum of the Indian country new unit set-aside and the amount of any TR SO2 Group...

  20. T-R CYCLE CHARACTERIZATION AND IMAGING: ADVANCED DIAGNOSTIC METHODOLOGY FOR PETROLEUM RESERVOIR AND TRAP DETECTION AND DELINEATION

    SciTech Connect

    Ernest A. Mancini; William C. Parcell; Bruce S. Hart

    2004-03-05

    The principal research effort for Year 1 of the project is T-R cycle characterization and modeling. The research focus for the first nine (9) months of Year 1 is on outcrop study, well log analysis, seismic interpretation and data integration and for the remainder of the year the emphasis is on T-R cycle model development.

  1. T-R CYCLE CHARACTERIZATION AND IMAGING: ADVANCED DIAGNOSTIC METHODOLOGY FOR PETROLEUM RESERVOIR AND TRAP DETECTION AND DELINEATION

    SciTech Connect

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2004-06-01

    The principal research effort for Year 1 of the project is T-R cycle characterization and modeling. The research focus for the first nine (9) months of Year 1 is on outcrop study, well log analysis, seismic interpretation and data integration and for the remainder of the year the emphasis is on T-R cycle model development.

  2. Autism Spectrum Disorders According to "DSM-IV-TR" and Comparison with "DSM-5" Draft Criteria: An Epidemiological Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattila, Marja-Leena; Kielinen, Marko; Linna, Sirkka-Liisa; Jussila, Katja; Ebeling, Hanna; Bloigu, Risto; Joseph, Robert M.; Moilanen, Irma

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The latest definitions of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) were specified in "DSM-IV-TR" in 2000. "DSM-5" criteria are planned for 2013. Here, we estimated the prevalence of ASDs and autism according to "DSM-IV-TR," clarified confusion concerning diagnostic criteria, and evaluated "DSM-5" draft criteria for ASD posted by the American…

  3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: TrES-4b RV and Ic curves (Sozzetti+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sozzetti, A.; Bonomo, A. S.; Biazzo, K.; Mancini, L.; Damasso, M.; Desidera, S.; Gratton, R.; Lanza, A. F.; Poretti, E.; Rainer, M.; Malavolta, L.; Affer, L.; Barbieri, M.; Bedin, L. R.; Boccato, C.; Bonavita, M.; Borsa, F.; Ciceri, S.; Claudi, R. U.; Gandolfi, D.; Giacobbe, P.; Henning, T.; Knapic, C.; Latham, D. W.; Lodato, G.; Maggio, A.; Maldonado, J.; Marzari, F.; Martinez Fiorenzano, A. F.; Micela, G.; Molinari, E.; Mordasini, C.; Nascimbeni, V.; Pagano, I.; Pedani, M.; Pepe, F.; Piotto, G.; Santos, N.; Scandariato, G.; Shkolnik, E.; Southworth, J.

    2015-06-01

    The TrES-4 system was observed with HARPS-N on 17 individual epochs between March 2013 and July 2014. We carried out Ic-band precision photometric observations of two complete transit events of TrES-4 b with the CAHA 1.23-m on UT 2013 July 6 and UT 2014 June 30. (2 data files).

  4. TrAVis to Enhance Online Tutoring and Learning Activities: Real-Time Visualization of Students Tracking Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Madeth; George, Sebastien; Prevot, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This paper presents a part of our research work that places an emphasis on Tracking Data Analysis and Visualization (TrAVis) tools, a web-based system, designed to enhance online tutoring and learning activities, supported by computer-mediated communication (CMC) tools. TrAVis is particularly dedicated to assist both tutors and students…

  5. Identification of positive and negative regulatory regions controlling expression of the Xenopus laevis betaTrCP gene.

    PubMed

    Ballarino, Monica; Fruscalzo, Alberto; Marchioni, Marcella; Carnevali, Francesca

    2004-07-21

    betaTrCP mediates the ubiquitination and subsequent degradation of several key molecules thereby playing a relevant role in different cellular processes during development and in the adult. In Xenopus embryo, betaTrCP acts as a negative regulator of Wnt signaling by interacting with beta-catenin. In this paper, we report results of the study on expression and regulation of the Xenopus betaTrCP gene. We found that xbetaTrCP is expressed in Xenopus oocytes as three transcripts, which very likely correspond to the previously identified localized mRNAs, and four isoforms. The xbetaTrCP promoter functional and structural analysis showed the presence of elements target of positive transcriptional control. Among them, we have identified a beta-catenin/Tcf signaling responsive region and a 45-bp element containing a sequence motif conforming to the SRF binding site, closer to the transcription initiation sites. There are also elements of transcriptional negative control.

  6. Ideal flux field dielectric concentrators.

    PubMed

    García-Botella, Angel

    2011-10-01

    The concept of the vector flux field was first introduced as a photometrical theory and later developed in the field of nonimaging optics; it has provided new perspectives in the design of concentrators, overcoming standard ray tracing techniques. The flux field method has shown that reflective concentrators with the geometry of the field lines achieve the theoretical limit of concentration. In this paper we study the role of surfaces orthogonal to the field vector J. For rotationally symmetric systems J is orthogonal to its curl, and then a family of surfaces orthogonal to the lines of J exists, which can be called the family of surfaces of constant pseudopotential. Using the concept of the flux tube, it is possible to demonstrate that refractive concentrators with the shape of these pseudopotential surfaces achieve the theoretical limit of concentration. PMID:22016201

  7. Surface flux evolution constraints for flux transport dynamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, R. H.; Schmitt, D.; Jiang, J.; Işık, E.

    2012-06-01

    The surface flux transport (SFT) model of solar magnetic fields involves empirically well-constrained velocity and magnetic fields. The basic evolution of the Sun's large-scale surface magnetic field is well described by this model. The azimuthally averaged evolution of the SFT model can be compared to the surface evolution of the flux transport dynamo (FTD), and the evolution of the SFT model can be used to constrain several near-surface properties of the FTD model. We compared the results of the FTD model with different upper boundary conditions and diffusivity profiles against the results of the SFT model. Among the ingredients of the FTD model, downward pumping of magnetic flux, related to a positive diffusivity gradient, has a significant effect in slowing down the diffusive radial transport of magnetic flux through the solar surface. Provided the pumping was strong enough to give rise to a downflow of a magnetic Reynolds number of 5 in the near-surface boundary layer, the FTD using a vertical boundary condition matches the SFT model based on the average velocities above the boundary layer. The FTD model with a potential field was unable to match the SFT results.

  8. Beta ray flux measuring device

    DOEpatents

    Impink, Jr., Albert J.; Goldstein, Norman P.

    1990-01-01

    A beta ray flux measuring device in an activated member in-core instrumentation system for pressurized water reactors. The device includes collector rings positioned about an axis in the reactor's pressure boundary. Activated members such as hydroballs are positioned within respective ones of the collector rings. A response characteristic such as the current from or charge on a collector ring indicates the beta ray flux from the corresponding hydroball and is therefore a measure of the relative nuclear power level in the region of the reactor core corresponding to the specific exposed hydroball within the collector ring.

  9. ASGASEX, a comprehensive flux experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Oost, W.A.

    1994-12-31

    Among scientists working on CO{sub 2} exchange between air and sea there is a controversy between methods based on concentration measurements and transport coefficients on one hand and direct measurements of CO{sub 2} fluxes with the eddy correlation technique on the other. The controversy is caused by a gap of often more than an order of magnitude between the results of the two methods, in the transfer velocity k. The author decided to use the expertise gained during the HEXOS program to try to contribute to a solution of this problem by measuring all fluxes involved.

  10. High flux solar energy transformation

    DOEpatents

    Winston, R.; Gleckman, P.L.; O'Gallagher, J.J.

    1991-04-09

    Disclosed are multi-stage systems for high flux transformation of solar energy allowing for uniform solar intensification by a factor of 60,000 suns or more. Preferred systems employ a focusing mirror as a primary concentrative device and a non-imaging concentrator as a secondary concentrative device with concentrative capacities of primary and secondary stages selected to provide for net solar flux intensification of greater than 2000 over 95 percent of the concentration area. Systems of the invention are readily applied as energy sources for laser pumping and in other photothermal energy utilization processes. 7 figures.

  11. Simulations of Magnetic Flux Emergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Robert; Nordlund, Aake

    Magnetic flux emerges from the solar surface on a wide range of scales. We review recent simulations of both large and small scale flux emergence. In our own simulations, we represent the magnetic flux produced by the global dynamo as uniform, untwisted, horizontal field advected into the simulation domain by supergranule scale inflows at the bottom. Our computational domain extends from the temperature minimum (half a megameter above the visible surface) to 20 Mm below the surface, which is 10% of the depth of the convection zone, but contains 2/3 of its scale heights. We investigate how magnetic flux rises through the upper solar convection zone and emerges through the surface. Convective up-flows and magnetic buoyancy bring field toward the surface. Convective down-flows pin down field and prevent its rise. Most of the field gets pumped downward by the convection, but some field rises to the surface. The convective motions both confine the flux concentrations (without the need for twist) and shred them. This process creates a hierarchy of magnetic loops with smaller loops riding "piggy-back", in a serpentine pattern, on larger loops. As a result, magnetic flux emerges in a mixed polarity, "pepper and salt" pattern. The small loops appear as horizontal field over granules with their vertical legs in the bounding intergranular lanes. The fields are quickly swept into the intergranular lanes. As the larger, parent, flux concentrations reach the surface with their legs rooted in the the downflow boundaries of the underlying, supergranule-scale, convective cells near the bottom of the simulation domain, the surface field counter-streams into separate, opposite polarity concentrations, creating pores and spots. The subsurface magnetic field lines of the pores and spots formed by the magneto-convection (without being imposed as an initial condition) are braided, some tightly, some loosely and they connect in complicated ways to the surrounding field at large depths

  12. High flux solar energy transformation

    DOEpatents

    Winston, Roland; Gleckman, Philip L.; O'Gallagher, Joseph J.

    1991-04-09

    Disclosed are multi-stage systems for high flux transformation of solar energy allowing for uniform solar intensification by a factor of 60,000 suns or more. Preferred systems employ a focusing mirror as a primary concentrative device and a non-imaging concentrator as a secondary concentrative device with concentrative capacities of primary and secondary stages selected to provide for net solar flux intensification of greater than 2000 over 95 percent of the concentration area. Systems of the invention are readily applied as energy sources for laser pumping and in other photothermal energy utilization processes.

  13. The structure of photospheric flux tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, John H.

    1990-01-01

    Basic physical mechanisms for producing the observed intense magnetic flux tubes in the solar photosphere are reviewed. The mechanism of flux expulsion by convective cells can concentrate magnetic flux up to the equipartition field strength, which is only about 200 G at the solar surface for the observed granular convection. Other mechanisms that partially evacuate the flux tube are needed to produce further concentration of magnetic flux to the observed values of 1000-1500 G. Two such mechanisms are discussed: concentration by convective collapse of a vertical flux tube in the superadiabatic layer just below the solar surface, and concentration by a siphon flow in an arched, isolated flux tube.

  14. Optical and Near-UV Observations of the Transiting Extrasolar Planet TrES-4b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Carter-Thaxton; Turner, J.; Carleton, T.; Crawford, B.; Guvenen, B.; Hardegree-Ullman, K.; Small, L.; Towner, A. P.; Walker-LaFollette, A.; Henz, T.

    2013-01-01

    Using the Steward Observatory 61” Kuiper Telescope, The University of Arizona Astronomy Club conducted photometric observations of the transiting extrasolar planet TrES-4b as part of the Exoplanet Observation Project. Observations were made in the Bessell U, Harris B, and Harris R filters. Initial observations were made in 2009, with follow up observations in 2011. Basic data reduction and photometry was done using IRAF and determination of transit parameters was done using Transit Analysis Package (TAP) and JKTEBOP transit modeling code. We present an updated planetary mass, radius, density, surface gravity, Safronov number, equilibrium temperature, orbital distance, and orbital inclination for TrES-4b. In addition, we also searched for asymmetries between the near-UV and optical light curves. This project, started in spring 2009, has introduced many undergraduate students to research and given them valuable experience with data reduction and observation techniques.

  15. Production a characterization of new system superconductor TR3Ba8Cu11Oδ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandoval Gutiérrez, S.; Supelano G, I.; Roa-Rojas, J.; Parra Vargas, C. A.

    2016-02-01

    The production and structural & magnetic characterization of new superconductor system TR:3811 (TR=Sm, Y, Yb) is presented in this work. The samples were produced by the solid state reaction method. The analysis of the measures of the diffraction X-ray, were made with the Rietveld refinement technique, that allowed to infer that the system presents a Pmm2 type structure with the following lattice parameters (a=3.88Å, b=3.82Å, c=42.82Å). The magnetization measurements were made by using the VSM-VERSALAB equipment with a magnetic field variation from a 100Oe to 7000Oe, and a temperature from 50K to 350K, showing the superconducting transition of the order of 90K.

  16. H2O outgassing from silica-filled polysiloxane TR55.

    PubMed

    Dinh, L N; Schildbach, M A; Maxwell, R S; Siekhaus, W J; Balazs, B; McLean, W

    2004-06-01

    Temperature-programmed desorption/decomposition (TPD) was employed to obtain the moisture content and outgassing kinetics of TR55, a silica-filled cross-linked polysiloxane. The total moisture content of TR55 in the as-received state and after 20-30 min of vacuum pumping in the load-lock prior to TPD was measured to be on the order of 0.35 wt%. Physisorbed H(2)O and chemisorbed H(2)O account for about 13.2 and 86.8%, respectively, of the 0.35 wt% measured moisture content. H(2)O outgassing models based on the kinetics measured from TPD experiments suggest that loosely bound chemisorbed water outgasses in a dry environment slowly but continuously over many decades at or a little above room temperature. However, physisorbed water can be easily pumped out in a matter of hours at around 400 K.

  17. Tr1-Like T Cells – An Enigmatic Regulatory T Cell Lineage

    PubMed Central

    White, Anna Malgorzata; Wraith, David C.

    2016-01-01

    The immune system evolved to respond to foreign invaders and prevent autoimmunity to self-antigens. Several types of regulatory T cells facilitate the latter process. These include a subset of Foxp3− CD4+ T cells able to secrete IL-10 in an antigen-specific manner, type 1 regulatory (Tr1) T cells. Although their suppressive function has been confirmed both in vitro and in vivo, their phenotype remains poorly defined. It has been suggested that the surface markers LAG-3 and CD49b are biomarkers for murine and human Tr1 cells. Here, we discuss these findings in the context of our data regarding the expression pattern of inhibitory receptors (IRs) CD49b, TIM-3, PD-1, TIGIT, LAG-3, and ICOS on Tr1-like human T cells generated in vitro from CD4+ memory T cells stimulated with αCD3 and αCD28 antibodies. We found that there were no differences in IR expression between IL-10+ and IL-10− T cells. However, CD4+IL-10+ T cells isolated ex vivo, following a short stimulation and cytokine secretion assay, contained significantly higher proportions of TIM-3+ and PD-1+ cells. They also expressed significantly higher TIGIT mRNA and showed a trend toward increased TIM-3 mRNA levels. These data led us to conclude that large pools of IRs may be stored intracellularly; hence, they may not represent ideal candidates as cell surface biomarkers for Tr1-like T cells. PMID:27683580

  18. Bowl-shaped Tröger's bases and their recognition properties.

    PubMed

    Mosca, Lorenzo; Čejka, Jan; Dolenský, Bohumil; Havlík, Martin; Jakubek, Milan; Kaplánek, Robert; Král, Vladimír; Anzenbacher, Pavel

    2016-08-23

    The tris-Tröger's bases (TBs) are electron-rich fluorescent concave receptors due to the incorporation of naphthalene or triphenylene moieties (calix-1 and calix-2). The structures of the TBs were studied using SXRD to reveal the propensity to bind nitroaromatics. Titration with explosive-related nitro-compounds suggests that the TBs may be used for sensing explosives. PMID:27501993

  19. Advanced Packaging Materials and Techniques for High Power TR Module: Standard Flight vs. Advanced Packaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, James Patrick; Del Castillo, Linda; Miller, Jennifer; Jenabi, Masud; Hunter, Donald; Birur, Gajanana

    2011-01-01

    The higher output power densities required of modern radar architectures, such as the proposed DESDynI [Deformation, Ecosystem Structure, and Dynamics of Ice] SAR [Synthetic Aperture Radar] Instrument (or DSI) require increasingly dense high power electronics. To enable these higher power densities, while maintaining or even improving hardware reliability, requires advances in integrating advanced thermal packaging technologies into radar transmit/receive (TR) modules. New materials and techniques have been studied and compared to standard technologies.

  20. Tr1-Like T Cells – An Enigmatic Regulatory T Cell Lineage

    PubMed Central

    White, Anna Malgorzata; Wraith, David C.

    2016-01-01

    The immune system evolved to respond to foreign invaders and prevent autoimmunity to self-antigens. Several types of regulatory T cells facilitate the latter process. These include a subset of Foxp3− CD4+ T cells able to secrete IL-10 in an antigen-specific manner, type 1 regulatory (Tr1) T cells. Although their suppressive function has been confirmed both in vitro and in vivo, their phenotype remains poorly defined. It has been suggested that the surface markers LAG-3 and CD49b are biomarkers for murine and human Tr1 cells. Here, we discuss these findings in the context of our data regarding the expression pattern of inhibitory receptors (IRs) CD49b, TIM-3, PD-1, TIGIT, LAG-3, and ICOS on Tr1-like human T cells generated in vitro from CD4+ memory T cells stimulated with αCD3 and αCD28 antibodies. We found that there were no differences in IR expression between IL-10+ and IL-10− T cells. However, CD4+IL-10+ T cells isolated ex vivo, following a short stimulation and cytokine secretion assay, contained significantly higher proportions of TIM-3+ and PD-1+ cells. They also expressed significantly higher TIGIT mRNA and showed a trend toward increased TIM-3 mRNA levels. These data led us to conclude that large pools of IRs may be stored intracellularly; hence, they may not represent ideal candidates as cell surface biomarkers for Tr1-like T cells.

  1. Tr1-Like T Cells - An Enigmatic Regulatory T Cell Lineage.

    PubMed

    White, Anna Malgorzata; Wraith, David C

    2016-01-01

    The immune system evolved to respond to foreign invaders and prevent autoimmunity to self-antigens. Several types of regulatory T cells facilitate the latter process. These include a subset of Foxp3(-) CD4(+) T cells able to secrete IL-10 in an antigen-specific manner, type 1 regulatory (Tr1) T cells. Although their suppressive function has been confirmed both in vitro and in vivo, their phenotype remains poorly defined. It has been suggested that the surface markers LAG-3 and CD49b are biomarkers for murine and human Tr1 cells. Here, we discuss these findings in the context of our data regarding the expression pattern of inhibitory receptors (IRs) CD49b, TIM-3, PD-1, TIGIT, LAG-3, and ICOS on Tr1-like human T cells generated in vitro from CD4(+) memory T cells stimulated with αCD3 and αCD28 antibodies. We found that there were no differences in IR expression between IL-10(+) and IL-10(-) T cells. However, CD4(+)IL-10(+) T cells isolated ex vivo, following a short stimulation and cytokine secretion assay, contained significantly higher proportions of TIM-3(+) and PD-1(+) cells. They also expressed significantly higher TIGIT mRNA and showed a trend toward increased TIM-3 mRNA levels. These data led us to conclude that large pools of IRs may be stored intracellularly; hence, they may not represent ideal candidates as cell surface biomarkers for Tr1-like T cells. PMID:27683580

  2. A Chandra Search for Low-mass Companions of Late B Stars in Tr 16

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remage Evans, Nancy; DeGioia-Eastwood, K.; Gagne, M.; Townsley, L.; Wolk, S.; Naze, Y.; Broos, P.; Corcoran, M.; Oskinova, L.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Wang, J.; Walborn, N.

    2011-01-01

    The cluster Tr 16 is included within the area of the large survey of the Carina region with Chandra (PI: Townsley). Stars later than B3 are not known to produce X-rays. On the other hand, low mass stars (later than mid-F spectral type) produce copious X-rays when they are young. We have developed a list of B3 to A0 stars in the young cluster Tr 16 which: 1.) are within 3' of Eta Car, 2.) have an appropriate V and B-V combination (including a range of +/- 0.1 in E(B-V), and 3.) have proper motions consistent with cluster membership. We have identified stars from this list which are X-ray sources on a 90 ksec Chandra image of Tr 16. Presumably the X-rays are produced by a low mass companion, at least in nearly all cases. This attribution is reinforced by the fact that the X-ray sources have higher median temperatures than O and early B sources. In addition, the spectral fits to 4 strongest sources produce temperatures typical of low-mass coronal sources. On this basis, 39% of the late B stars have low mass companions. Interpretation of this number depends on the completeness of the X-ray detections, however discussion of the low mass stars in Tr 16 indicates that stars which will be M stars on the main sequence are detected. N. Evans acknowledges support from the Chandra X-ray Center NASA Contract NAS8-03060

  3. Preclinical toxicity and teratogenicity studies with the narcotic antagonist analgesic drug TR5379M.

    PubMed

    Porter, M C; Hartnagel, R E; Clemens, G R; Kowalski, R L; Bare, J J; Halliwell, W E; Kitchen, D N

    1983-01-01

    The narcotic antagonist TR5379M had po LD50 values of 365 and 750 mg/kg and iv LD50 values of 35.0 and 22.3 mg/kg in the mouse and rat, respectively. Subchronic (one month) po administration to rats at 40, 120, or 400 mg/kg/day and to cynomolgus monkeys at 20, 45, or 100 mg/kg/day showed the compound to be well tolerated at doses of 40 and 45 mg/kg, respectively. Deaths during the subchronic studies included one monkey following a single dose of 100 mg/kg and six rats following repeated doses of 400 mg/kg. Signs of toxicosis in rats included clonic convulsions (high-dose animals only) and mild dose-related salivation and hyperactivity. Signs of toxicosis in monkeys were limited to sporadic emesis and transiently decreased food consumption at all three dose levels. Emesis was not observed at doses of 20 or 45 mg/kg after the first week. Slightly increased weights (not significant at 40 mg/kg) for thyroid and adrenal glands occurred in male rats. Gross, microscopic, and clinical pathologic examinations revealed no treatment-related adverse effects at any dose level for either species. Administration of TR5379M to pregnant rats (20, 70, or 250 mg/kg/day on Days 6-15 of gestation) caused no teratogenicity or embryotoxicity and did not adversely affect any of the reproductive parameters examined. Dams given TR5379M at doses of 70 and 250 mg/kg salivated and had reduced weight gain. It was concluded from these studies that TR5379M has an adequate margin of safety to begin clinical investigations.

  4. Solvent vapor annealing of ferroelectric P(VDF-TrFE) thin films.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jinghang; Zhang, Jianchi; Fu, Zongyuan; Jiang, Yulong; Ding, Shijin; Zhu, Guodong

    2014-10-22

    Ferroelectric polymers are a kind of promising materials for low-cost flexible memories. However, the relatively high thermal annealing temperature restricts the selection of some flexible polymer substrates. Here we report an alternative method to obtain ferroelectric poly(vinylidenefluoride-co-trifluoroethylene) (P(VDF-TrFE)) thin films under low process temperatures. Spin-coated P(VDF-TrFE) thin films were solvent vapor processed at 30 °C for varied times. Structural analyses indicated that solvent vapor annealing induced crystallization to form a ferroelectric β phase, and electrical measurements from both macroscopic ferroelectric switching and microscopic vertical piezoresponse force microscopy further proved the films enduring solvent vapor annealing for suitable short times possessed good ferroelectric and piezoelectric properties. To illuminate the application of solvent vapor annealing on ferroelectric devices, we further fabricated ferroelectric capacitor memory devices with a structure of Al/P(VDF-TrFE)/Al2O3/p-Si/Al where the ferroelectric layer was solvent vapor annealed. Ferroelectric capacitors showed obvious bistable operation and comparable ON/OFF ratio and retention performance. Our work makes it possible to structure ferroelectric devices on flexible substrates that require low process temperatures.

  5. A TR-FRET-based functional assay for screening activators of CARM1.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Hao; Wu, Jiacai; Bedford, Mark T; Sbardella, Gianluca; Hoffmann, F Michael; Bi, Kun; Xu, Wei

    2013-05-10

    Epigenetics is an emerging field that demands selective cell-permeable chemical probes to perturb, especially in vivo, the activity of specific enzymes involved in modulating the epigenetic codes. Coactivator-associated arginine methyltransferase 1 (CARM1) is a coactivator of estrogen receptor α (ERα), the main target in human breast cancer. We previously showed that twofold overexpression of CARM1 in MCF7 breast cancer cells increased the expression of ERα-target genes involved in differentiation and reduced cell proliferation, thus leading to the hypothesis that activating CARM1 by chemical activators might be therapeutically effective in breast cancer. Selective, potent, cell-permeable CARM1 activators will be essential to test this hypothesis. Here we report the development of a cell-based, time-resolved (TR) FRET assay that uses poly(A) binding protein 1 (PABP1) methylation to monitor cellular activity of CARM1. The LanthaScreen TR-FRET assay uses MCF7 cells expressing GFP-PABP1 fusion protein through BacMam gene delivery system, methyl-PABP1 specific antibody, and terbium-labeled secondary antibody. This assay has been validated as reflecting the expression and/or activity of CARM1 and optimized for high throughput screening to identify CARM1 allosteric activators. This TR-FRET platform serves as a generic tool for functional screening of cell-permeable, chemical modulators of CARM1 for elucidation of its in vivo functions. PMID:23585185

  6. Evaluation of the disposable absorption containment trunk for female U-2 and TR-1 pilots.

    PubMed

    Barlow, J F; Richardson, S E

    1991-06-01

    Female U-2 and TR-1 pilots needed a urine collection device as part of their high flight pressure suit ensembles. The Disposable Absorption Containment Trunk (DACT) had been designed for short term use with the NASA Space Shuttle Program. This study evaluated the DACT for the extended and repetitive use required for integration into the U-2 and TR-1 aircraft. Six female subjects were tested wearing a custom-fit DACT and the 1030 full pressure suit ensemble with torso harness. They were strapped into the U-2 ejection seat with parachute and seat kit for 10 h and 45 min every 3 d for a total of 5 sessions. The DACT was evaluated for absorptive capability and comfort. Subjects were monitored for dermatitis, vaginitis, and urinary tract infections. The DACT reliably absorbed menstrual flow and urinary outputs to 950 cc. Higher urinary outputs resulted in minimal leakage. Dermatitis in the form of mild erythema and chafing was present, but cleared between sessions without medical intervention. Complaints concerning comfort were minor and limited to fit problems. One case of vaginitis developed. There were no cases of urinary tract infection. The DACT was found to be an acceptable method of urine collection for female U-2 and TR-1 pilots. Minor changes in design will enhance the comfort and performance of the DACT. PMID:1859348

  7. Evaluation of the disposable absorption containment trunk for female U-2 and TR-1 pilots.

    PubMed

    Barlow, J F; Richardson, S E

    1991-06-01

    Female U-2 and TR-1 pilots needed a urine collection device as part of their high flight pressure suit ensembles. The Disposable Absorption Containment Trunk (DACT) had been designed for short term use with the NASA Space Shuttle Program. This study evaluated the DACT for the extended and repetitive use required for integration into the U-2 and TR-1 aircraft. Six female subjects were tested wearing a custom-fit DACT and the 1030 full pressure suit ensemble with torso harness. They were strapped into the U-2 ejection seat with parachute and seat kit for 10 h and 45 min every 3 d for a total of 5 sessions. The DACT was evaluated for absorptive capability and comfort. Subjects were monitored for dermatitis, vaginitis, and urinary tract infections. The DACT reliably absorbed menstrual flow and urinary outputs to 950 cc. Higher urinary outputs resulted in minimal leakage. Dermatitis in the form of mild erythema and chafing was present, but cleared between sessions without medical intervention. Complaints concerning comfort were minor and limited to fit problems. One case of vaginitis developed. There were no cases of urinary tract infection. The DACT was found to be an acceptable method of urine collection for female U-2 and TR-1 pilots. Minor changes in design will enhance the comfort and performance of the DACT.

  8. Terahertz beats of vibrational modes in methanol and ethanol selectively excited by tr-CARS technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Ping; Wang, HuiLi; Fan, RongWei; Chen, DeYing; Xia, YuanQin; Yu, Xin; Wang, JiaLing; Jiang, YuGang

    2012-12-01

    A recently developed time-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (tr-CARS) technique allows the measurement of vibrational coherences with high frequency differences with the ambient environment. The method is based on the short spatial extension of femtosecond pulses with a broadband tunable nonlinear optical parametric amplifier (NOPA) and an internal time delay between the probe and pump/Stokes pulse pair in the CARS process. The different beat frequencies between Raman modes can be selectively detected as oscillations in the tr-CARS transient signal with the broadband tunable NOPA. In this work, we aim at the Raman C—H stretching vibrations from 2800 cm-1 to 3000 cm-1, within which the different vibrational modes in both ethanol and methanol are selectively excited and simultaneously detected. The high time resolution of the experimental set-up allows one to monitor the vibrational coherence dynamics and to observe the quantum beat phenomena on a terahertz scale. This investigation indicates that the femtosecond tr-CARS technique is a powerful tool for the real-time monitoring and detection of molecular and biological agents, including airborne contaminants such as bacterial spores, viruses and their toxins.

  9. T/R switch design for short-range measurements, part 6.1A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, B.

    1984-01-01

    The positive intrinsic negative (PIN) diode switch which is designed to protect the receiver from burnout or damage on transmission and channel the echo signal to the receiver on reception is outlined. The receiver must be protected firmly. A schematic diagram of a transformer rectifier (TR-ATR) switch for the Urbana Radar is shown. The T/R switch consists of a half wavelength coaxial cavity with tuning condenser and PIN diodes. Two UM4300 PIN diodes were mounted between the inner and outer conductor. The dc biasing voltage required for the PIN diodes is supplied by a control circuit. On transmission, the PIN diodes are forward biased to about 0.5 amperes. On reception, about 10 volts reverse voltage is applied to the diodes, which produces an initial reverse current to speed the recovery time. The T/R switch characteristics are estimated and the result of testing at different peak transmitter powers from 410 kW to 1500 kW is shown.

  10. Fabrication of piezoelectric P(VDF-TrFE) microcantilevers by wafer-level surface micromachining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Sharon Roslyn; Yao, Kui; Eng Hock Tay, Francis

    2013-09-01

    A wafer-level microfabrication process using standard cleanroom facilities was established and implemented to batch produce free-standing poly(vinylidine fluoride-trifluoroethylene) (P(VDF-TrFE)) piezoelectric microelectromechanical systems cantilevers via surface micromachining. Furthermore, the fabrication of a prototype of double-level cantilevers was demonstrated. The fabrication of working piezoelectric polymer cantilever structures required the deposition and patterning of multiple polymer and metal layers including the pattering and removal of the sacrificial layer, which posed many challenging limitations on the chemicals and processing conditions. Dedicatedly selected chemicals and materials were used in our fabrication, including water soluble PVA with an appropriate molecular weight and degree of hydrolysis as the sacrificial layer for releasing the cantilever structure. The temperature in the whole process was kept low with controlled durations, due to the sensitivity of the polymers to thermal impacts. The P(VDF-TrFE) active layers, after going through the fabrication, exhibited ferroelectric and piezoelectric properties comparable to the intact films. Furthermore, the free-standing P(VDF-TrFE) cantilevers exhibited piezoelectric vibrations under electrical excitation. This low temperature fabrication method, which only involves mild chemicals, also has the potential to be integrated with CMOS processes.

  11. High flux compact neutron generators

    SciTech Connect

    Reijonen, J.; Lou, T.-P.; Tolmachoff, B.; Leung, K.-N.; Verbeke, J.; Vujic, J.

    2001-06-15

    Compact high flux neutron generators are developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The neutron production is based on D-D or D-T reaction. The deuterium or tritium ions are produced from plasma using either a 2 MHz or 13.56 MHz radio frequency (RF) discharge. RF-discharge yields high fraction of atomic species in the beam which enables higher neutron output. In the first tube design, the ion beam is formed using a multiple hole accelerator column. The beam is accelerated to energy of 80 keV by means of a three-electrode extraction system. The ion beam then impinges on a titanium target where either the 2.4 MeV D-D or 14 MeV D-T neutrons are generated. The MCNP computation code has predicted a neutron flux of {approximately}10{sup 11} n/s for the D-D reaction at beam intensity of 1.5 A at 150 kV. The neutron flux measurements of this tube design will be presented. Recently new compact high flux tubes are being developed which can be used for various applications. These tubes also utilize RF-discharge for plasma generation. The design of these tubes and the first measurements will be discussed in this presentation.

  12. Flux distribution---pipeline flaws

    SciTech Connect

    Lord, W.

    1989-03-16

    The physical basis for gas pipeline inspection with flux leakage pigs is the interaction of a magnetostatic (d.c.) excitation field with defects in the pipeline wall. Such an interaction produces a leakage field which is characteristic of the defect type, and can be detected with any flux density sensitive device such as a Hall plate. Predictions of defect leakage field profiles are necessary in order to optimize the design of flux leakage pigs, and also aid in the development of reliable defect characterization schemes. In order to carry out generic leakage field studies without reference to a specific flux leakage pig structure, finite element studies were made out on a 1.5-inch diameter carbon steel pipe excited by a central d.c. current carrying conductor. This report gives finite element predictions as well as experimental measurements for a wide variety of defect shapes. Some difficulty was encountered in obtaining an appropriate mesh discretization for the finite element studies. The background to this is given in detail because of its importance to 3-D modeling work. 15 refs., 40 figs.

  13. Mass fluxes for hot stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucy, L. B.

    2010-03-01

    In an attempt to understand the extraordinarily small mass-loss rates of late-type O dwarfs, mass fluxes in the relevant part of (Teff, g)-space are derived from first principles using a previously-described code for constructing moving reversing layers. From these mass fluxes, a weak-wind domain is identified within which a star's rate of mass loss by a radiatively-driven wind is less than that due to nuclear burning. The five weak-wind stars recently analysed by Marcolino et al. (2009, A&A, 498, 837) fall within or at the edge of this domain. But although the theoretical mass fluxes for these stars are ≈1.4 dex lower than those derived with the formula of Vink et al. (2000), the observed rates are still not matched, a failure that may reflect our poor understanding of low-density supersonic outflows. Mass fluxes are also computed for two strong-wind O4 stars analysed by Bouret et al. (2005, A&A, 438, 301). The predictions agree with the sharply reduced mass loss rates found when Bouret et al. take wind clumping into account.

  14. Superconducting flux flow digital circuits

    DOEpatents

    Hietala, V.M.; Martens, J.S.; Zipperian, T.E.

    1995-02-14

    A NOR/inverter logic gate circuit and a flip flop circuit implemented with superconducting flux flow transistors (SFFTs) are disclosed. Both circuits comprise two SFFTs with feedback lines. They have extremely low power dissipation, very high switching speeds, and the ability to interface between Josephson junction superconductor circuits and conventional microelectronics. 8 figs.

  15. Superconducting flux flow digital circuits

    DOEpatents

    Hietala, Vincent M.; Martens, Jon S.; Zipperian, Thomas E.

    1995-01-01

    A NOR/inverter logic gate circuit and a flip flop circuit implemented with superconducting flux flow transistors (SFFTs). Both circuits comprise two SFFTs with feedback lines. They have extremely low power dissipation, very high switching speeds, and the ability to interface between Josephson junction superconductor circuits and conventional microelectronics.

  16. Clinical grade production of IL-10 producing regulatory Tr1 lymphocytes for cell therapy of chronic inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Brun, Valérie; Bastian, Hervé; Neveu, Virginie; Foussat, Arnaud

    2009-05-01

    IL-10 producing regulatory type 1 (Tr1) cells represents a subpopulation of CD4(+) regulatory cells able to prevent in vitro bystander T-cell proliferation and to cure ongoing chronic colitis in mice. In order to assess the efficacy and tolerance of Tr1 cell therapy in a Phase I/IIa clinical trial in patients displaying severe Crohn's disease, we set up a reproducible manufacturing process for the GMP production of human ovalbumin specific Tr1 cells. Procedures used for Tr1-cell production include the use of Drosophila derived artificial Antigen Presenting Cells transfected with specific stimulatory molecules. Characterization of the human cell therapy product shows an in vitro suppressive activity on T-cell proliferation dependent on the production of both IL-10 and TGF-beta. Manufactured Tr1 cells display a regulatory phenotype including Foxp3, GITR and CTLA-4 surface expression. In vitro toxicity studies of human Tr1 cell product show a safety profile compatible with the use of these regulatory Tr1 lymphocytes for cell therapy. PMID:19539556

  17. Requirement of novel amino acid fragments of orphan nuclear receptor TR3/Nur77 for its functions in angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Marianne A.; Peng, Jin; Ye, Taiyang; Zhao, Dezheng; Zeng, Huiyan

    2015-01-01

    Pathological angiogenesis is a hallmark of many diseases. We demonstrated that TR3/Nur77 is an excellent target for pro-angiogenesis and anti-angiogenesis therapies. Here, we report that TR3 transcriptionally regulates endothelial cell migration, permeability and the formation of actin stress fibers that is independent of RhoA GTPase. 1) Amino acid residues 344-GRR-346 and de-phosphorylation of amino acid residue serine 351 in the DNA binding domain, and 2) phosphorylation of amino acid residues in the 41-61 amino acid fragment of the transactivation domain, of TR3 are required for its induction of the formation of actin stress fibers, cell proliferation, migration and permeability. The 41-61 amino acid fragment contains one of the three potential protein interaction motifs in the transactivation domain of TR3, predicted by computational modeling and analysis. These studies further our understanding of the molecular mechanism, by which TR3 regulates angiogenesis, identify novel therapeutic targeted sites of TR3, and set the foundation for the development of high-throughput screening assays to identify compounds targeting TR3/Nur77 for pro-angiogenesis and anti-angiogenesis therapies. PMID:26155943

  18. Involvement of TR3/Nur77 translocation to the endoplasmic reticulum in ER stress-induced apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Liang Bin; Song Xuhong; Liu Gefei; Li Rui; Xie Jianping; Xiao Lifeng; Du Mudan; Zhang Qiaoxia; Xu Xiaoyuan; Gan Xueqiong; Huang Dongyang . E-mail: huangdy@stu.edu.cn

    2007-08-01

    Nuclear orphan receptor TR3/Nur77/NGFI-B is a novel apoptotic effector protein that initiates apoptosis largely by translocating from the nucleus to the mitochondria, causing the release of cytochrome c. However, it is possible that TR3 translocates to other organelles. The present study was designed to determine the intracellular localization of TR3 following CD437-induced nucleocytoplasmic translocation and the mechanisms involved in TR3-induced apoptosis. In human neuroblastoma SK-N-SH cells and human esophageal squamous carcinoma EC109 and EC9706 cells, 5 {mu}M CD437 induced translocation of TR3 to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). This distribution was confirmed by immunofluorescence analysis, subcellular fractionation analysis and coimmunoprecipitation analysis. The translocated TR3 interacted with ER-targeting Bcl-2; initiated an early release of Ca{sup 2+} from ER; resulted in ER stress and induced apoptosis through ER-specific caspase-4 activation, together with induction of mitochondrial stress and subsequent activation of caspase-9. Our results identified a novel distribution of TR3 in the ER and defined two parallel mitochondrial- and ER-based pathways that ultimately result in apoptotic cell death.

  19. Plant Canopy Temperature and Heat Flux Profiles: What Difference Does an Isothermal Skin Make?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crago, R. D.; Qualls, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    Land surface temperature Ts plays a vital role in the determination of sensible (H) and latent heat flux, upwelling long-wave radiation, and ground heat flux. While it is widely recognized that there is a range of skin temperatures represented in even a homogeneous canopy, it is often necessary or convenient to treat the surface as isothermal. This study investigates, at the sub-canopy scale, the implications of assuming that a canopy is isothermal. The focus is on profiles within the canopy of air, foliage, and soil surface temperature, and of sensible and latent heat flux source strength. Data from a dense grassland at the Southern Great Plains experiment in 1997 (SGP97) were used to assess the ability of a multi-layer canopy model to match measured sensible and latent heat fluxes along with radiometric surface temperatures. In its standard mode, the model solves the energy balance for each canopy layer and uses Localized Near Field (LNF) theory to model the turbulent transport. The results suggest the model captures the most important features of canopy flux generation and transport, and support its use to investigate scalar profiles within canopies. For 112 data points at SGP97, the model produced realistic temperature and sensible heat flux source profiles. In addition, it was run in a mode that seeks the isothermal (soil and foliage) skin temperature (Ti) that provides the same Hproduced by the model in its standard mode. This produces profiles of air and foliage temperature and of sensible heat source strength that differ significantly from profiles from the standard mode. Based on these simulations, realistic canopies may have a mixture of positive and negative sensible heat flux sources at various heights, typically with large contributions from the soil surface. There is frequently a discontinuity between foliage temperatures near the soil and the actual soil surface temperature. For isothermal canopies, heat sources at all levels had the same sign and

  20. Fluxes across a thermohaline interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleury, M.; Lueck, R. G.

    1991-07-01

    Measurements of velocity and temperature microstructure and hydrography were made with a towed vehicle moving in and around a single interface in a double-diffusive staircase. The interface was traversed 222 times in a saw-tooth pattern over a track 35 km long. The salinity and potential temperature and density in the mixed layers adjacent to the interface were spatially uniform except for one 8 km long anomaly. The rate of dissipation of kinetic energy was uniformly low in the interface and in the mixed layers, except for one section 600 m long where a Kelvin-Helmholtz instability generated turbulence. For the non-turbulent section of the interface, the mean rate of dissipation was 30.2 × 10 -10 W kg -1 in the mixed layers and 9.5 × 10 -10 W kg -1 in the interface. The non-dimensional dissipation rate, ɛ/vN 2, was almost always less than 16 in the interface and therfore, there was no turblent buoyancy flux according to ROHRet al. (1988, Journal of Fluid Mechanics, 195, 77-111). The average double-diffusive flux of buoyancy by heat was 3.6 × 10 -10 W kg -1. Under certain assumptions the ratio of the flux of buoyancy by heat and salt can be estimated to be 0.53 ± 0.10, in good agreement with laboratory and theoretical estimates for salt fingers. The average Cox number was about 8 in the interface, consistent with the theories of STERN (1975, Ocean circulation physics, Academic Press) and KUNZE (1987, Journal of Marine Research, 45 533-556), but displayed an inverse dependence on the vertical temperature gradient which was not predicted. As a result, the flux of buoyancy, as well as the individual contributions by heat and salt, were independent of the local mean vertical temperature gradient and the buoyancy frequency. The length of the turbulent section of the interface was only 1.7% of the total length observed. However, the turbulence was intense—the mean rate of dissipation was 2.5 × 10 -8 W kg -1—and may have sufficiently enhanced the flux of heat to

  1. First Detection of TR46/Y121F/T289A and TR34/L98H Alterations in Aspergillus fumigatus Isolates from Azole-Naive Patients in Denmark despite Negative Findings in the Environment

    PubMed Central

    Astvad, K. M. T.; Jensen, R. H.; Hassan, T. M.; Mathiasen, E. G.; Thomsen, G. M.; Pedersen, U. G.; Christensen, M.; Hilberg, O.

    2014-01-01

    Azole-resistant Aspergillus fumigatus harboring the TR34/L98H or TR46/Y121F/T289A alterations is increasingly found in Europe and Asia. Here, we present the first clinical cases of TR46/Y121/T289A and three cases of TR34/L98H outside the cystic fibrosis (CF) population in Denmark and the results of environmental surveys. Four patients (2012 to 2014) with 11 A. fumigatus and 4 Rhizomucor pusillus isolates and 239 soil samples (spring 2010 and autumn 2013, respectively) with a total of 113 A. fumigatus isolates were examined. Aspergillus isolates were screened for azole resistance using azole-containing agar. Confirmatory susceptibility testing was done using the EUCAST microbroth dilution EDEF 9.1 reference method. For relevant A. fumigatus isolates, CYP51A sequencing and microsatellite genotyping were performed. Three patients harbored TR34/L98H isolates. Two were azole naive at the time of acquisition and two were coinfected with wild-type A. fumigatus or R. pusillus isolates, complicating and delaying diagnosis. The TR46/Y121F/T289A strain was isolated in 2014 from a lung transplant patient. Genotyping indicated that susceptible and resistant Aspergillus isolates were unrelated and that no transmission between patients occurred. Azole resistance was not detected in any of the 113 soil isolates. TR34/L98H and TR46/Y121F/T289A alterations appear to be emerging in the clinical setting in Denmark and now involve azole-naive patients. Two recent soil-sampling surveys in Denmark were unable to indicate any increased prevalence of azole-resistant A. fumigatus in the environment. These findings further support the demand for real-time susceptibility testing of all clinically relevant isolates and for studies investigating the seasonal variation and ecological niches for azole-resistant environmental A. fumigatus. PMID:24936595

  2. First detection of TR46/Y121F/T289A and TR34/L98H alterations in Aspergillus fumigatus isolates from azole-naive patients in Denmark despite negative findings in the environment.

    PubMed

    Astvad, K M T; Jensen, R H; Hassan, T M; Mathiasen, E G; Thomsen, G M; Pedersen, U G; Christensen, M; Hilberg, O; Arendrup, M C

    2014-09-01

    Azole-resistant Aspergillus fumigatus harboring the TR34/L98H or TR46/Y121F/T289A alterations is increasingly found in Europe and Asia. Here, we present the first clinical cases of TR46/Y121/T289A and three cases of TR34/L98H outside the cystic fibrosis (CF) population in Denmark and the results of environmental surveys. Four patients (2012 to 2014) with 11 A. fumigatus and 4 Rhizomucor pusillus isolates and 239 soil samples (spring 2010 and autumn 2013, respectively) with a total of 113 A. fumigatus isolates were examined. Aspergillus isolates were screened for azole resistance using azole-containing agar. Confirmatory susceptibility testing was done using the EUCAST microbroth dilution EDEF 9.1 reference method. For relevant A. fumigatus isolates, CYP51A sequencing and microsatellite genotyping were performed. Three patients harbored TR34/L98H isolates. Two were azole naive at the time of acquisition and two were coinfected with wild-type A. fumigatus or R. pusillus isolates, complicating and delaying diagnosis. The TR46/Y121F/T289A strain was isolated in 2014 from a lung transplant patient. Genotyping indicated that susceptible and resistant Aspergillus isolates were unrelated and that no transmission between patients occurred. Azole resistance was not detected in any of the 113 soil isolates. TR34/L98H and TR46/Y121F/T289A alterations appear to be emerging in the clinical setting in Denmark and now involve azole-naive patients. Two recent soil-sampling surveys in Denmark were unable to indicate any increased prevalence of azole-resistant A. fumigatus in the environment. These findings further support the demand for real-time susceptibility testing of all clinically relevant isolates and for studies investigating the seasonal variation and ecological niches for azole-resistant environmental A. fumigatus. PMID:24936595

  3. Absolute flux scale for radioastronomy

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, V.P.; Stankevich, K.S.

    1986-07-01

    The authors propose and provide support for a new absolute flux scale for radio astronomy, which is not encumbered with the inadequacies of the previous scales. In constructing it the method of relative spectra was used (a powerful tool for choosing reference spectra). A review is given of previous flux scales. The authors compare the AIS scale with the scale they propose. Both scales are based on absolute measurements by the ''artificial moon'' method, and they are practically coincident in the range from 0.96 to 6 GHz. At frequencies above 6 GHz, 0.96 GHz, the AIS scale is overestimated because of incorrect extrapolation of the spectra of the primary and secondary standards. The major results which have emerged from this review of absolute scales in radio astronomy are summarized.

  4. Flux Quantization Without Cooper Pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadin, Alan

    2013-03-01

    It is universally accepted that the superconducting flux quantum h/2e requires the existence of a phase-coherent macroscopic wave function of Cooper pairs, each with charge 2e. On the contrary, we assert that flux quantization can be better understood in terms of single-electron quantum states, localized on the scale of the coherence length and organized into a real-space phase-antiphase structure. This packing configuration is consistent with the Pauli exclusion principle for single-electron states, maintains long-range phase coherence, and is compatible with much of the BCS formalism. This also accounts for h/2e in the Josephson effect, without Cooper pairs. Experimental evidence for this alternative picture may be found in deviations from h/2e in loops and devices much smaller than the coherence length. A similar phase-antiphase structure may also account for superfluids, without the need for boson condensation.

  5. Heisenberg groups and noncommutative fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    Freed, Daniel S. . E-mail: dafr@math.utexas.edu; Moore, Gregory W.; Segal, Graeme

    2007-01-15

    We develop a group-theoretical approach to the formulation of generalized abelian gauge theories, such as those appearing in string theory and M-theory. We explore several applications of this approach. First, we show that there is an uncertainty relation which obstructs simultaneous measurement of electric and magnetic flux when torsion fluxes are included. Next, we show how to define the Hilbert space of a self-dual field. The Hilbert space is Z{sub 2}-graded and we show that, in general, self-dual theories (including the RR fields of string theory) have fermionic sectors. We indicate how rational conformal field theories associated to the two-dimensional Gaussian model generalize to (4k+2)-dimensional conformal field theories. When our ideas are applied to the RR fields of string theory we learn that it is impossible to measure the K-theory class of a RR field. Only the reduction modulo torsion can be measured.

  6. SQUID With Integral Flux Concentrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Palmer N.; Sisk, Robert C.

    1989-01-01

    In improved superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID), change in size and shape of superconducting ring improves coupling to external signal coil and eases coil-positioning tolerances. More rugged and easier to manufacture than conventional SQUID's with comparable electrical characteristics. Thin-film superconducting flux concentrator utilizes Meissner effect to deflect magnetic field of signal coil into central hole of SQUID. Used in magnetometers, ammeters, analog-to-digital converters, and related electronic applications in which high signal-to-noise ratios required.

  7. Recent Solar-Proton Fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reedy, R. C.

    2005-01-01

    The event-integrated fluences of energetic solar protons up to 2004 at the Earth have been determined and compared to previous data. The current solar cycle has been very active, and very large fluxes of solar protons have been observed that have had serious effects in the solar system and will have produced many radionuclides in the surfaces of meteorites. Such huge events are not expected again until about 2008 or 2009.

  8. Structural Control of Metabolic Flux

    PubMed Central

    Sajitz-Hermstein, Max; Nikoloski, Zoran

    2013-01-01

    Organisms have to continuously adapt to changing environmental conditions or undergo developmental transitions. To meet the accompanying change in metabolic demands, the molecular mechanisms of adaptation involve concerted interactions which ultimately induce a modification of the metabolic state, which is characterized by reaction fluxes and metabolite concentrations. These state transitions are the effect of simultaneously manipulating fluxes through several reactions. While metabolic control analysis has provided a powerful framework for elucidating the principles governing this orchestrated action to understand metabolic control, its applications are restricted by the limited availability of kinetic information. Here, we introduce structural metabolic control as a framework to examine individual reactions' potential to control metabolic functions, such as biomass production, based on structural modeling. The capability to carry out a metabolic function is determined using flux balance analysis (FBA). We examine structural metabolic control on the example of the central carbon metabolism of Escherichia coli by the recently introduced framework of functional centrality (FC). This framework is based on the Shapley value from cooperative game theory and FBA, and we demonstrate its superior ability to assign “share of control” to individual reactions with respect to metabolic functions and environmental conditions. A comparative analysis of various scenarios illustrates the usefulness of FC and its relations to other structural approaches pertaining to metabolic control. We propose a Monte Carlo algorithm to estimate FCs for large networks, based on the enumeration of elementary flux modes. We further give detailed biological interpretation of FCs for production of lactate and ATP under various respiratory conditions. PMID:24367246

  9. Sediment flux and the Anthropocene.

    PubMed

    Syvitski, James P M; Kettner, Albert

    2011-03-13

    Data and computer simulations are reviewed to help better define the timing and magnitude of human influence on sediment flux--the Anthropocene epoch. Impacts on the Earth surface processes are not spatially or temporally homogeneous. Human influences on this sediment flux have a secondary effect on floodplain and delta-plain functions and sediment dispersal into the coastal ocean. Human impact on sediment production began 3000 years ago but accelerated more widely 1000 years ago. By the sixteenth century, societies were already engineering their environment. Early twentieth century mechanization has led to global signals of increased sediment flux in most large rivers. By the 1950s, this sediment disturbance signal reversed for many rivers owing to the proliferation of dams, and sediment load reduction below pristine conditions is the dominant signal today. A delta subsidence signal began in the 1930s and is now a dominant signal in terms of sea level for many coastal environments, overwhelming even the global warming imprint on sea level. Humans have engineered how most water and sediment are discharged into the coastal ocean. Hyperpycnal flow events have become more common for some rivers, and less common for other rivers. Bottom trawling is now widespread, suggesting that even continental shelves have received a significant but as yet quantified Anthropocene impact. The Anthropocene attains the level of a geological climate event, such as that seen in the transition between the Pleistocene and the Holocene.

  10. β-TrCP-mediated ubiquitination and degradation of liver-enriched transcription factor CREB-H

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yun; Gao, Wei-Wei; Tang, Hei-Man Vincent; Deng, Jian-Jun; Wong, Chi-Ming; Chan, Chi-Ping; Jin, Dong-Yan

    2016-01-01

    CREB-H is an endoplasmic reticulum-resident bZIP transcription factor which critically regulates lipid homeostasis and gluconeogenesis in the liver. CREB-H is proteolytically activated by regulated intramembrane proteolysis to generate a C-terminally truncated form known as CREB-H-ΔTC, which translocates to the nucleus to activate target gene expression. CREB-H-ΔTC is a fast turnover protein but the mechanism governing its destruction was not well understood. In this study, we report on β-TrCP-dependent ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of CREB-H-ΔTC. The degradation of CREB-H-ΔTC was mediated by lysine 48-linked polyubiquitination and could be inhibited by proteasome inhibitor. CREB-H-ΔTC physically interacted with β-TrCP, a substrate recognition subunit of the SCFβ-TrCP E3 ubiquitin ligase. Forced expression of β-TrCP increased the polyubiquitination and decreased the stability of CREB-H-ΔTC, whereas knockdown of β-TrCP had the opposite effect. An evolutionarily conserved sequence, SDSGIS, was identified in CREB-H-ΔTC, which functioned as the β-TrCP-binding motif. CREB-H-ΔTC lacking this motif was stabilized and resistant to β-TrCP-induced polyubiquitination. This motif was a phosphodegron and its phosphorylation was required for β-TrCP recognition. Furthermore, two inhibitory phosphorylation sites close to the phosphodegron were identified. Taken together, our work revealed a new intracellular signaling pathway that controls ubiquitination and degradation of the active form of CREB-H transcription factor. PMID:27029215

  11. Single-Chip T/R Module for 1.2 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moussessian, Alina; Mojarradi, Mohammad; Johnson, Travis; Davis, John; Grigorian, Edwin; Hoffman, James; Caro, Edward; Kuhn, William

    2006-01-01

    A single-chip CMOS-based (complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductorbased) transmit/receive (T/R) module is being developed for L-band radar systems. Previous T/R module implementations required multiple chips employing different technologies (GaAs, Si, and others) combined with off-chip transmission lines and discrete components including circulators. The new design eliminates the bulky circulator, significantly reducing the size and mass of the T/R module. Compared to multi-chip designs, the single-chip CMOS can be implemented with lower cost. These innovations enable cost-effective realization of advanced phased array and synthetic aperture radar systems that require integration of thousands of T/R modules. The circulator is a ferromagnetic device that directs the flow of the RF (radio frequency) power during transmission and reception. During transmission, the circulator delivers the transmitted power from the amplifier to the antenna, while preventing it from damaging the sensitive receiver circuitry. During reception, the circulator directs the energy from the antenna to the low-noise amplifier (LNA) while isolating the output of the power amplifier (PA). In principle, a circulator could be replaced by series transistors acting as electronic switches. However, in practice, the integration of conventional series transistors into a T/R chip introduces significant losses and noise. The prototype single-chip T/R module contains integrated transistor switches, but not connected in series; instead, they are connected in a shunt configuration with resonant circuits (see figure). The shunt/resonant circuit topology not only reduces the losses associated with conventional semiconductor switches but also provides beneficial transformation of impedances for the PA and the LNA. It provides full singlepole/ double-throw switching for the antenna, isolating the LNA from the transmitted signal and isolating the PA from the received signal. During reception, the voltage on

  12. Energetic particle characteristics of magnetotail flux ropes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholer, M.; Klecker, B.; Hovestadt, D.; Gloeckler, G.; Ipavich, F. M.; Galvin, A. B.

    1985-01-01

    During the recent ISEE-3 Geotail Mission three events have been identified from the magnetometer data which are consistent with a spacecraft crossing of a magnetotail flux rope. Energetic electron and proton observations obtained by the Max-Planck-Institut/University of Maryland sensor system during two of the possible flux rope events are presented. During one event remote sensing of the flux rope with energetic protons reveals that the flux rope is crossed by the spacecraft from south to north. This allows determination of the bandedness of the magnetic field twist and of the flux rope velocity relative to the spacecraft. A minimal flux rope radius of 3 earth radii is derived. Energetic proton intensity is highest just inside of the flux rope and decreases towards the core. Energetic electrons are streaming tailward near the outer boundary, indicating openness of the field lines, and are isotropic through the inner part of the flux rope.

  13. Vertical transport and sources in flux models

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1997-01-01

    Vertical transport in flux models in examined and shown to reproduce expected limits for densities and fluxes. Disparities with catalog distributions are derived and inverted to find the sources required to rectify them.

  14. Simultaneous nitrification/denitrification and trace organic contaminant (TrOC) removal by an anoxic-aerobic membrane bioreactor (MBR).

    PubMed

    Phan, Hop V; Hai, Faisal I; Kang, Jinguo; Dam, Hoa K; Zhang, Ren; Price, William E; Broeckmann, Andreas; Nghiem, Long D

    2014-08-01

    Simultaneous nitrification/denitrification and trace organic contaminant (TrOC) removal during wastewater treatment by an integrated anoxic-aerobic MBR was examined. A set of 30 compounds was selected to represent TrOCs that occur ubiquitously in domestic wastewater. The system achieved over 95% total organic carbon (TOC) and over 80% total nitrogen (TN) removal. In addition, 21 of the 30 TrOCs investigated here were removed by over 90%. Low oxidation reduction potential (i.e., anoxic/anaerobic) regimes were conducive to moderate to high (50% to 90%) removal of nine TrOCs. These included four pharmaceuticals and personal care products (primidone, metronidazole, triclosan, and amitriptyline), one steroid hormone (17β-estradiol-17-acetate), one industrial chemical (4-tert-octylphenol) and all three selected UV filters (benzophenone, oxybenzone, and octocrylene). Internal recirculation between the anoxic and aerobic bioreactors was essential for anoxic removal of remaining TrOCs. A major role of the aerobic MBR for TOC, TN, and TrOC removal was observed.

  15. Geminivirus-encoded TrAP suppressor inhibits the histone methyltransferase SUVH4/KYP to counter host defense

    PubMed Central

    Castillo-González, Claudia; Liu, Xiuying; Huang, Changjun; Zhao, Changjiang; Ma, Zeyang; Hu, Tao; Sun, Feng; Zhou, Yijun; Zhou, Xueping; Wang, Xiu-Jie; Zhang, Xiuren

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptional gene silencing (TGS) can serve as an innate immunity against invading DNA viruses throughout Eukaryotes. Geminivirus code for TrAP protein to suppress the TGS pathway. Here, we identified an Arabidopsis H3K9me2 histone methyltransferase, Su(var)3-9 homolog 4/Kryptonite (SUVH4/KYP), as a bona fide cellular target of TrAP. TrAP interacts with the catalytic domain of KYP and inhibits its activity in vitro. TrAP elicits developmental anomalies phenocopying several TGS mutants, reduces the repressive H3K9me2 mark and CHH DNA methylation, and reactivates numerous endogenous KYP-repressed loci in vivo. Moreover, KYP binds to the viral chromatin and controls its methylation to combat virus infection. Notably, kyp mutants support systemic infection of TrAP-deficient Geminivirus. We conclude that TrAP attenuates the TGS of the viral chromatin by inhibiting KYP activity to evade host surveillance. These findings provide new insight on the molecular arms race between host antiviral defense and virus counter defense at an epigenetic level. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06671.001 PMID:26344546

  16. El espectro de KX TrA entre 1990 y 1996

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandi, E.; García, L.; Ferrer, O.; Barbá, R.

    La estrella simbiótica KX TrA = He2-177 fue observada espectroscópicamente con el telescopio de 2.15 m del CASLEO entre los años 1990 y 1996, utilizándose resoluciones intermedia y alta. El rango espectral estudiado se extiende desde 4400 Åa 7200 Å. La historia fotométrica de KX TrA presenta explosiones del mismo tipo que las mostradas por la nova lenta RR Tel y su espectro de alta excitación, muy rico en líneas de emisión, es también similar al de RR Tel. Por lo tanto, es importante analizar la evolución espectral de KX TrA en el tiempo, prestando especial atención a los posibles cambios en los niveles de excitación. Las emisiones presentes corresponden a transiciones permitidas y prohibidas con un amplio rango de ionización, incluyéndose las anchas e intensas líneas originadas por scattering Raman de O VI en λλ 6825 y 7082 Å. En el período cubierto por nuestras observaciones se estudia la variación de la intensidad relativa de las emisiones, el comportamiento de las velocidades radiales y los cambios de perfiles de las líneas, especialmente en Hα y Hβ. El contínuo de la región roja observada indica un tipo espectral no más tardío que M3 para la componente gigante fría del sistema.

  17. A Spitzer five-band analysis of the Jupiter-sized planet TrES-1

    SciTech Connect

    Cubillos, Patricio; Harrington, Joseph; Foster, Andrew S. D.; Lust, Nate B.; Hardy, Ryan A.; Bowman, M. Oliver; Madhusudhan, Nikku

    2014-12-10

    With an equilibrium temperature of 1200 K, TrES-1 is one of the coolest hot Jupiters observed by Spitzer. It was also the first planet discovered by any transit survey and one of the first exoplanets from which thermal emission was directly observed. We analyzed all Spitzer eclipse and transit data for TrES-1 and obtained its eclipse depths and brightness temperatures in the 3.6 μm (0.083% ± 0.024%, 1270 ± 110 K), 4.5 μm (0.094% ± 0.024%, 1126 ± 90 K), 5.8 μm (0.162% ± 0.042%, 1205 ± 130 K), 8.0 μm (0.213% ± 0.042%, 1190 ± 130 K), and 16 μm (0.33% ± 0.12%, 1270 ± 310 K) bands. The eclipse depths can be explained, within 1σ errors, by a standard atmospheric model with solar abundance composition in chemical equilibrium, with or without a thermal inversion. The combined analysis of the transit, eclipse, and radial-velocity ephemerides gives an eccentricity of e=0.033{sub −0.031}{sup +0.015}, consistent with a circular orbit. Since TrES-1's eclipses have low signal-to-noise ratios, we implemented optimal photometry and differential-evolution Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithms in our Photometry for Orbits, Eclipses, and Transits pipeline. Benefits include higher photometric precision and ∼10 times faster MCMC convergence, with better exploration of the phase space and no manual parameter tuning.

  18. CRTF Real-Time Aperture Flux system

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, D.B.

    1980-01-01

    The Real-Time Aperture Flux system (TRAF) is a test measurement system designed to determine the input power/unit area (flux density) during solar experiments conducted at the Central Receiver Test Facility, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico. The RTAF is capable of using both thermal sensors and photon sensors to determine the flux densities in the RTAF measuring plane. These data are manipulated in various ways to derive input power and flux density distribution to solar experiments.

  19. Flux balance analysis accounting for metabolite dilution.

    PubMed

    Benyamini, Tomer; Folger, Ori; Ruppin, Eytan; Shlomi, Tomer

    2010-01-01

    Flux balance analysis is a common method for predicting steady-state flux distributions within metabolic networks, accounting for the growth demand for the synthesis of a predefined set of essential biomass precursors. Ignoring the growth demand for the synthesis of intermediate metabolites required for balancing their dilution leads flux balance analysis to false predictions in some cases. Here, we present metabolite dilution flux balance analysis, which addresses this problem, resulting in improved metabolic phenotype predictions. PMID:20398381

  20. High-flux solar photon processes

    SciTech Connect

    Lorents, D.C.; Narang, S.; Huestis, D.C.; Mooney, J.L.; Mill, T.; Song, H.K.; Ventura, S.

    1992-06-01

    This study was commissioned by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for the purpose of identifying high-flux photoprocesses that would lead to beneficial national and commercial applications. The specific focus on high-flux photoprocesses is based on the recent development by NREL of solar concentrator technology capable of delivering record flux levels. We examined photolytic and photocatalytic chemical processes as well as photothermal processes in the search for processes where concentrated solar flux would offer a unique advantage. 37 refs.

  1. Force sensor using changes in magnetic flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pickens, Herman L. (Inventor); Richard, James A. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A force sensor includes a magnetostrictive material and a magnetic field generator positioned in proximity thereto. A magnetic field is induced in and surrounding the magnetostrictive material such that lines of magnetic flux pass through the magnetostrictive material. A sensor positioned in the vicinity of the magnetostrictive material measures changes in one of flux angle and flux density when the magnetostrictive material experiences an applied force that is aligned with the lines of magnetic flux.

  2. Flux balance analysis accounting for metabolite dilution.

    PubMed

    Benyamini, Tomer; Folger, Ori; Ruppin, Eytan; Shlomi, Tomer

    2010-01-01

    Flux balance analysis is a common method for predicting steady-state flux distributions within metabolic networks, accounting for the growth demand for the synthesis of a predefined set of essential biomass precursors. Ignoring the growth demand for the synthesis of intermediate metabolites required for balancing their dilution leads flux balance analysis to false predictions in some cases. Here, we present metabolite dilution flux balance analysis, which addresses this problem, resulting in improved metabolic phenotype predictions.

  3. Electric field dependence of topography in ferroelectric P(VDF/TrFE) films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Guodong; Xu, Jing; Zeng, Zhigang; Zhang, Li; Yan, Xuejian; Li, Jie

    2006-12-01

    The effect of electric fields on the topography and structures in P(VDF/TrFE) ferroelectric films was studied. The morphological changes after poling treatment at 25 °C, from previously chrysanthemum-like structures to regular and parallel slug-like domains, were observed by scanning probe microscope. Poling process at higher temperature induced even greater morphological changes. Imaging of local electrical properties showed that these changes could not be attributed to the influence of local charges injected into film surface during poling process. It was believed that this new morphology came from the reform of film structures induced by electric fields.

  4. Ensemble Streamflow Predictions in the Três Marias Basin, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mainardi Fan, Fernando; Schwanenberg, Dirk; Kuwajima, Julio; Assis dos Reis, Alberto; Collischonn, Walter

    2014-05-01

    Hydropower is the main electricity source of Brazil. The related hydropower reservoirs are multi-purpose thus besides efficient and reliable energy production, they are relevant for flood control. In this context, the present study shows results of an Ensemble Streamflow Prediction (ESP) for supporting the operational decision making implemented at Três Marias hydroelectric power project located in the São Francisco River basin in Brazil. It is a large tropical river basin with approximately 55,000km² up to the Três Marias dam. The hydrological model used in the study is the MGB-IPH (Modelo de Grandes Bacias from Instituto de Pesquisas Hidráulicas), a large scale distributed hydrological model. Applied in an operational forecasting mode, it uses an empirical data assimilation method to take into account real time streamflow observations to update its state variables. We present results of a hindcast experiment with observed precipitation and streamflow data from the local energy utility, CEMIG (Companhia Energética de Minas Gerais), and from the Brazilian water agency, ANA (Agencia Nacional de Água),. Probabilistic Numerical Weather Predictions (NWP) from CPTEC (Centro de Previsão de Tempo e Estudos Climáticos), ECMWF (European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecast) and NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) are used to generate the ESP. The data products and the MGB-IPH model are integrated into an open shell forecasting platform based on the software package Delft-FEWS. Inside the forecasting platform a hindcast mode over a forecast lead time of 10-16 days in recent rainfall periods is applied in. The ESP results are compared to deterministic forecasts of the Três Marias reservoir inflow. The results assessment verifies the added value of the ESP in general in comparison to the use of deterministic forecasts by means of different performance indicators. The ESP derived from the ECMWP ensemble shows the best performance. A future

  5. Absolute and relative ages: the Tr-J boundary and the CAMP volcanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuwerth, R.; Allenbach, K.; Verati, C.; Martini, R.; Cirilli, S.; Youbi, N.; Bertrand, H.; Knight, K.; Rapaille, C.; Marzoli, A.

    2003-04-01

    A broad temporal correlation between major mass extinction events and continental flood basalt provinces has been widely recognized. In order to establish a causal link between flood volcanism and biotic turnovers, a very precise knowledge of the absolute ages is necessary. However, analytical errors (including those due to uncertainties of the decay constants) are generally too large (about 1%, i.e., about 1-2 My for the Mesozoic), when compared to biotic crises which may have a very short duration. Further complications are introduced by comparison of absolute ages obtained with different isotopic systems (e.g., U/Pb vs 40Ar/39Ar). For example, the peak activity of the Central Atlantic magmatic province (CAMP; peak activity at 40Ar/39Ar age = 199 n 2 Ma) is roughly contemporaneous with the TriassicJurassic (Tr/J) boundary. Despite this broad temporal coincidence, CAMP lava flows of eastern North-America (Fowell and Olsen, 1993) and Europe (our data) overlay sedimentary rocks with earliest Jurassic fossils or pollens. Therefore, it has been suggested that the entire CAMP volcanism postdates the extinction event by a few thousands of years, questioning a possible causal relation between the magmatic event and the biotic turnover. However, detailed geochemical stratigraphy indicates that the CAMP lava flows on the Moroccan High Atlas preceded extrusion of the CAMP lava flows of eastern N-America and Europe. Our new 40Ar/39Ar data indicate that CAMP volcanism in Morocco started at an age of 198.8 n 0.9 Ma (2 sigma; FCs monitor = 28.02 Ma), which is undistinguishable from the U/Pb age of the Tr/J boundary (199.6 n 0.3; Palfy et al., 2000). Considering that Mesozoic U/Pb ages appear to be systematically older (ca. 1%) than 40Ar/39Ar ages, it may well be possible that extrusion of the oldest CAMP basalts indeed preceded the Tr-J boundary. This is confirmed by our ongoing palynological studies, which indicate that the Moroccan CAMP flows were erupted onto latest Triassic

  6. Leser-Trélat Sign in Tumor-Stage Mycosis Fungoides.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Brandon; Shevchenko, Alina; Yosipovitch, Gil

    2016-01-01

    A 71-year-old man presented with numerous pruritic seborrheic keratoses, with an eruptive onset over the course of 3 months. At presentation, he was also found to have hypopigmented tumors diffusely scattered throughout his body that were found to be mycosis fungoides on histologic examination. A theory regarding the pathophysiology of the development of eruptive seborrheic keratoses in the presence of mycosis fungoides is briefly discussed and 10 previous case reports of the Leser-Trélat sign in the setting of mycosis fungoides are reviewed.

  7. Robust, Rework-able Thermal Electronic Packaging: Applications in High Power TR Modules for Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, James Patrick; Del Castillo, Linda; Hunter, Don; Miller, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    The higher output power densities required of modern radar architectures, such as the proposed DESDynI [Deformation, Ecosystem Structure, and Dynamics of Ice] SAR [Synthetic Aperture Radar] Instrument (or DSI) require increasingly dense high power electronics. To enable these higher power densities, while maintaining or even improving hardware reliability, requires improvements in integrating advanced thermal packaging technologies into radar transmit/receive (TR) modules. New materials and techniques have been studied and are now being implemented side-by-side with more standard technology typically used in flight hardware.

  8. What are Up, Down and Net Fluxes?

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-12-08

    ... is of particular interest. Hence the term "Up" and "Down" for characterizing the direction of flow of radiative fluxes at a ... level. Moreover, by counting in or out these "Up" and "Down" energy fluxes, one can define a "Net" flux that is ultimately ...

  9. Apparatus for measuring a flux of neutrons

    DOEpatents

    Stringer, James L.

    1977-01-01

    A flux of neutrons is measured by disposing a detector in the flux and applying electronic correlation techniques to discriminate between the electrical signals generated by the neutron detector and the unwanted interfering electrical signals generated by the incidence of a neutron flux upon the cables connecting the detector to the electronic measuring equipment at a remote location.

  10. Latent Heat in Soil Heat Flux Measurements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The surface energy balance includes a term for soil heat flux. Soil heat flux is difficult to measure because it includes conduction and convection heat transfer processes. Accurate representation of soil heat flux is an important consideration in many modeling and measurement applications. Yet, the...

  11. High Resolution Simulations of Tearing and Flux-Rope Formation in Active Region Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyper, P. F.; DeVore, C. R.; Karpen, J. T.

    2015-12-01

    Observations of coronal jets increasingly suggest that local fragmentation and the generation of small-scale structure plays an important role in the dynamics of these events. In the magnetically closed corona, jets most often occur near active regions and are associated with an embedded-bipole topology consisting of a 3D magnetic null point atop a domed fan separatrix surface at the base of a coronal loop. Impulsive reconnection in the vicinity of the null point between the magnetic fluxes inside and outside the dome launches the jet along the loop. Wyper & Pontin 2014 showed that the 3D current layers that facilitate such reconnection are explosively unstable to tearing, generating complex flux-rope structures. Utilizing the adaptive mesh capabilities of the Adaptively Refined Magnetohydrodynamics Solver, we investigate the generation of such fine-scale structure in high-resolution simulations of active-region jets. We observe the formation of multiple flux-rope structures forming across the fan separatrix surface and discuss the photospheric signatures of these flux ropes and the associated local topology change. We also introduce a new way of identifying such flux ropes in the magnetic field, based on structures observed in the magnetic squashing factor calculated on the photosphere. By tracking the position and number of new null points produced by the fragmentation, we also show that the formation of flux ropes can occur away from the main null region on the flanks of the separatrix dome and that the jet curtain has a highly complex magnetic structure. This work was funded through an appointment to the NASA Postdoctoral Program and by NASA's Living With a Star TR&T program.

  12. Distributions of nonsupersymmetric flux vacua

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denef, Frederik; Douglas, Michael R.

    2005-03-01

    We continue the study of the distribution of nonsupersymmetric flux vacua in IIb string theory compactified on Calabi-Yau manifolds, as in hep-th/0404116. We show that the basic structure of this problem is that of finding eigenvectors of the matrix of second derivatives of the superpotential, and that many features of the results are determined by features of the generic ensemble of such matrices, the CI ensemble of Altland and Zirnbauer originating in mesoscopic physics. We study some simple examples in detail, exhibiting various factors which can favor low or high scale supersymmetry breaking.

  13. Methane Fluxes from Subtropical Wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeLucia, N.; Gomez-Casanovas, N.; Bernacchi, C.

    2013-12-01

    It is well documented that green house gas concentrations have risen at unequivocal rates since the industrial revolution but the disparity between anthropogenic sources and natural sources is uncertain. Wetlands are one example of a natural ecosystem that can be a substantial source or sink for methane (CH4) depending on climate conditions. Due to strict anaerobic conditions required for CH4-generating microorganisms, natural wetlands are one of the main sources for biogenic CH4. Although wetlands occupy less than 5% of total land surface area, they contribute approximately 20% of total CH4 emissions to the atmosphere. The processes regulating CH4 emissions are sensitive to land use and management practices of areas surrounding wetlands. Variation in adjacent vegetation or grazing intensity by livestock can, for example, alter CH4 fluxes from wetland soils by altering nutrient balance, carbon inputs and hydrology. Therefore, understanding how these changes will affect wetland source strength is essential to understand the impact of wetland management practices on the global climate system. In this study we quantify wetland methane fluxes from subtropical wetlands on a working cattle ranch in central Florida near Okeechobee Lake (27o10'52.04'N, 81o21'8.56'W). To determine differences in CH4 fluxes associated with land use and management, a replicated (n = 4) full factorial experiment was designed for wetlands where the surrounding vegetation was (1) grazed or un-grazed and (2) composed of native vegetation or improved pasture. Net exchange of CH4 and CO2 between the land surface and the atmosphere were sampled with a LICOR Li-7700 open path CH4 analyzer and Li-7500A open path CO2/H20 analyzer mounted in a 1-m3 static gas-exchange chamber. Our results showed and verified that CH4 emissions from subtropical wetlands were larger when high soil moisture was coupled with high temperatures. The presence of cattle only amplified these results. These results help quantify

  14. Flux emergence event underneath a filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palacios, J.; Cerrato, Y.; Cid, C.; Guerrero, A.; Saiz, E.

    2015-10-01

    Flux emergence phenomena are relevant at different temporal and spatial scales. We have studied a flux emergence region underneath a filament. This filament elevated itself smoothly, and the associated CME reached the Earth. In this study we investigate the size and the amount of flux in the emergence event. The flux emergence site appeared just beneath a filament. The emergence acquired a size of 24 Mm in half a day. The unsigned magnetic flux density from LOS-magnetograms was around 1 kG at its maximum. The transverse field as well as the filament eruption were also analysed.

  15. Planetary transit observations at the University Observatory Jena: XO-1b and TrES-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raetz, St.; Mugrauer, M.; Schmidt, T. O. B.; Roell, T.; Eisenbeiss, T.; Hohle, M. M.; Tetzlaff, N.; Vaňko, M.; Seifahrt, A.; Broeg, Ch.; Koppenhoefer, J.; Neuhäuser, R.

    2009-05-01

    We report on observations of transit events of the transiting planets XO-1b and TrES-1 with a 25 cm telescope of the University Observatory Jena. With the transit timings for XO-1b from all 50 available XO, SuperWASP, Transit Light Curve (TLC)-Project- and Exoplanet Transit Database (ETD)-data, including our own I-band photometry obtained in March 2007, we find that the orbital period is P=(3.941501± 0.000001) d, a slight change by ˜3 s compared to the previously published period. We present new ephemeris for this transiting planet. Furthermore, we present new R-band photometry of two transits of TrES-1. With the help of all available transit times from literature this allows us to refine the estimate of the orbital period: P=(3.0300722± 0.0000002) d. Our observations will be useful for future investigations of timing variations caused by additional perturbing planets and/or stellar spots and/or moons. Based on observations obtained with telescopes of the University Observatory Jena, which is operated by the Astrophysical Institute of the Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena.

  16. Glycoantigens Induce Human Peripheral Tr1 Cell Differentiation with Gut-homing Specialization*

    PubMed Central

    Kreisman, Lori S. C.; Cobb, Brian A.

    2011-01-01

    The carbohydrate antigen (glycoantigen) PSA from an intestinal commensal bacteria is able to down-regulate inflammatory bowel disease in model mice, suggesting that stimulation with PSA results in regulatory T cell (Treg) generation. However, mechanisms of how peripheral human T cells respond and home in response to commensal antigens are still not understood. Here, we demonstrate that a single exposure to PSA induces differentiation of human peripheral CD4+ T cells into type-Tr1 Tregs. This is in contrast to mouse models where PSA induced the production of Foxp3+ iTregs. The human PSA-induced Tr1 cells are profoundly anergic and exhibit nonspecific bystander suppression mediated by IL-10 secretion. Most surprisingly, glycoantigen exposure provoked expression of gut homing receptors on their surface. These findings reveal a mechanism for immune homeostasis in the gut whereby exposure to commensal glycoantigens provides the requisite information to responding T cells for proper tissue localization (gut) and function (anti-inflammatory/regulatory). PMID:21228275

  17. ANALYSIS OF KEPLER'S SHORT-CADENCE PHOTOMETRY FOR TrES-2b

    SciTech Connect

    Kipping, David; Bakos, Gaspar

    2011-05-20

    We present an analysis of 18 short-cadence (SC) transit light curves of TrES-2b using quarter 0 (Q0) and quarter 1 (Q1) from the Kepler Mission. The photometry is of unprecedented precision, 237 ppm minute{sup -1}, allowing for the most accurate determination of the transit parameters yet obtained for this system. Global fits of the transit photometry, radial velocities, and known transit times are used to obtain a self-consistent set of refined parameters for this system, including updated stellar and planetary parameters. Special attention is paid to fitting for limb darkening and eccentricity. We place an upper limit on the occultation depth to be <72.9 ppm to 3{sigma} confidence, indicating TrES-2b has the lowest determined geometric albedo for an exoplanet, of A{sub g} < 0.146. We also produce a transit timing analysis using Kepler's SC data and demonstrate exceptional timing precision at the level of a few seconds for each transit event. With 18 fully sampled transits at such high precision, we are able to produce stringent constraints on the presence of perturbing planets, Trojans, and extrasolar moons. We introduce the novel use of control data to identify phasing effects. We also exclude the previously proposed hypotheses of short-period transit time variation and additional transits but find that the hypothesis of long-term inclination change is neither supported nor refuted by our analysis.

  18. Functional role of water in membranes updated: A tribute to Träuble.

    PubMed

    Disalvo, E A; Pinto, O A; Martini, M F; Bouchet, A M; Hollmann, A; Frías, M A

    2015-07-01

    The classical view of a cell membrane is as a hydrophobic slab in which only nonpolar solutes can dissolve and permeate. However, water-soluble non-electrolytes such as glycerol, erythritol, urea and others can permeate lipid membranes in the liquid crystalline state. Moreover, recently polar amino acid's penetration has been explained by means of molecular dynamics in which appearance of water pockets is postulated. According to Träuble (1971), water diffuses across the lipid membranes by occupying holes formed in the lipid matrix due to fluctuations of the acyl chain trans-gauche isomers. These holes, named "kinks" have the molecular dimension of CH2 vacancies. The condensation of kinks may form aqueous spaces into which molecular species of the size of low molecular weight can dissolve. This molecular view can explain permeability properties considering that water may be distributed along the hydrocarbon chains in the lipid matrix. The purpose of this review is to consolidate the mechanism anticipated by Träuble by discussing recent data in literature that directly correlates the molecular state of methylene groups of the lipids with the state of water in each of them. In addition, the structural properties of water near the lipid residues can be related with the water activity triggering kink formation by changes in the head group conformation that induces the propagation along the acyl chains and hence to the diffusion of water.

  19. Symmetrically biased T/R switches for NMR and MRI with microsecond dead time.

    PubMed

    Brunner, David O; Furrer, Lukas; Weiger, Markus; Baumberger, Werner; Schmid, Thomas; Reber, Jonas; Dietrich, Benjamin E; Wilm, Bertram J; Froidevaux, Romain; Pruessmann, Klaas P

    2016-02-01

    For direct NMR detection and imaging of compounds with very short coherence life times the dead time between radio-frequency (RF) pulse and reception of the free induction decay (FID) is a major limiting factor. It is typically dominated by the transient and recovery times of currently available transmit-receive (T/R) switches and amplification chains. A novel PIN diode-based T/R switch topology is introduced allowing for fast switching by high bias transient currents but nevertheless producing a very low video leakage signal and insertion loss (0.5dB). The low transient spike level in conjunction with the high isolation (75dB) prevent saturation of the preamplifier entirely which consequently does not require time for recovery. Switching between transmission and reception is demonstrated within less than 1μs in bench tests as well as in acquisitions of FIDs and zero echo time (ZTE) images with bandwidths up to 500kHz at 7T. Thereby the 2kW switch exhibited a rise-time of 350ns (10-99%) producing however a total video leakage of below 20mV peak-to-peak and less than -89dBm in-band. The achieved switching time renders the RF pulse itself the dominant contribution to the dead time in which a coherence cannot be observed, thus making pulsed NMR experiments almost time-optimal even for compounds with very short signal life times. PMID:26796113

  20. Symmetrically biased T/R switches for NMR and MRI with microsecond dead time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunner, David O.; Furrer, Lukas; Weiger, Markus; Baumberger, Werner; Schmid, Thomas; Reber, Jonas; Dietrich, Benjamin E.; Wilm, Bertram J.; Froidevaux, Romain; Pruessmann, Klaas P.

    2016-02-01

    For direct NMR detection and imaging of compounds with very short coherence life times the dead time between radio-frequency (RF) pulse and reception of the free induction decay (FID) is a major limiting factor. It is typically dominated by the transient and recovery times of currently available transmit-receive (T/R) switches and amplification chains. A novel PIN diode-based T/R switch topology is introduced allowing for fast switching by high bias transient currents but nevertheless producing a very low video leakage signal and insertion loss (0.5 dB). The low transient spike level in conjunction with the high isolation (75 dB) prevent saturation of the preamplifier entirely which consequently does not require time for recovery. Switching between transmission and reception is demonstrated within less than 1 μs in bench tests as well as in acquisitions of FIDs and zero echo time (ZTE) images with bandwidths up to 500 kHz at 7 T. Thereby the 2 kW switch exhibited a rise-time of 350 ns (10-99%) producing however a total video leakage of below 20 mV peak-to-peak and less than -89 dBm in-band. The achieved switching time renders the RF pulse itself the dominant contribution to the dead time in which a coherence cannot be observed, thus making pulsed NMR experiments almost time-optimal even for compounds with very short signal life times.

  1. NORE1A Regulates MDM2 Via β-TrCP

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, M. Lee; Calvisi, Diego F.; Clark, Geoffrey J.

    2016-01-01

    Mouse Double Minute 2 Homolog (MDM2) is a key negative regulator of the master tumor suppressor p53. MDM2 regulates p53 on multiple levels, including acting as an ubiquitin ligase for the protein, thereby promoting its degradation by the proteasome. MDM2 is oncogenic and is frequently found to be over-expressed in human tumors, suggesting its dysregulation plays an important role in human cancers. We have recently found that the Ras effector and RASSF (Ras Association Domain Family) family member RASSF5/NORE1A enhances the levels of nuclear p53. We have also found that NORE1A (Novel Ras Effector 1A) binds the substrate recognition component of the SCF-ubiquitin ligase complex β-TrCP. Here, we now show that NORE1A regulates MDM2 protein levels by targeting it for ubiquitination by SCF-β-TrCP. We also show the suppression of NORE1A protein levels enhances MDM2 protein expression. Finally, we show that MDM2 can suppress the potent senescence phenotype induced by NORE1A over-expression. Thus, we identify a mechanism by which Ras/NORE1A can modulate p53 protein levels. As MDM2 has several important targets in addition to p53, this finding has broad implications for cancer biology in tumor cells that have lost expression of NORE1A due to promoter methylation. PMID:27023610

  2. DNA damage induces the accumulation of Tiam1 by blocking β-TrCP-dependent degradation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Guixin; Fan, Zhongyun; Ding, Miao; Mu, Libing; Liang, Juan; Ding, Yajie; Fu, Yu; Huang, Binlu; Wu, Wei

    2014-05-30

    The Rac1/JNK cascade plays important roles in DNA damage-induced apoptosis. However, how this cascade is activated upon DNA damage remains to be fully understood. We show here that, in untreated cells, Tiam1, a Rac1-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor, is phosphorylated by casein kinase 1 (CK1) at its C terminus, leading to Skp, Cullin, F-box-containing(β-TrCP) recognition, ubiquitination, and proteasome-mediated degradation. Upon DNA-damaging anticancer drug treatment, CK1/β-TrCP-mediated Tiam1 degradation is abolished, and the accumulated Tiam1 contributes to downstream activation of Rac1/JNK. Consistently, tumor cells overexpressing Tiam1 are hypersensitive to DNA-damaging drug treatment. In xenograft mice, Tiam1-high cells are more susceptible to doxorubicin treatment. Thus, our results uncover that inhibition of proteasome-mediated Tiam1 degradation is an upstream event leading to Rac1/JNK activation and cell apoptosis in response to DNA-damaging drug treatment.

  3. Amyloid formation and disaggregation of {alpha}-synuclein and its tandem repeat ({alpha}-TR)

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, Song Yi; Kim, Seulgi; Hwang, Heejin; Kim, Hyun-Kyung; Yoon, Hyun C.; Kim, Jae Ho; Lee, SangYoon; Kim, T. Doohun

    2010-10-01

    Research highlights: {yields} Formation of the {alpha}-synuclein amyloid fibrils by [BIMbF{sub 3}Im]. {yields} Disaggregation of amyloid fibrils by epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) and baicalein. {yields} Amyloid formation of {alpha}-synuclein tandem repeat ({alpha}-TR). -- Abstract: The aggregation of {alpha}-synuclein is clearly related to the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease. Therefore, detailed understanding of the mechanism of fibril formation is highly valuable for the development of clinical treatment and also of the diagnostic tools. Here, we have investigated the interaction of {alpha}-synuclein with ionic liquids by using several biochemical techniques including Thioflavin T assays and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Our data shows a rapid formation of {alpha}-synuclein amyloid fibrils was stimulated by 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide [BIMbF{sub 3}Im], and these fibrils could be disaggregated by polyphenols such as epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) and baicalein. Furthermore, the effect of [BIMbF{sub 3}Im] on the {alpha}-synuclein tandem repeat ({alpha}-TR) in the aggregation process was studied.

  4. Symmetrically biased T/R switches for NMR and MRI with microsecond dead time.

    PubMed

    Brunner, David O; Furrer, Lukas; Weiger, Markus; Baumberger, Werner; Schmid, Thomas; Reber, Jonas; Dietrich, Benjamin E; Wilm, Bertram J; Froidevaux, Romain; Pruessmann, Klaas P

    2016-02-01

    For direct NMR detection and imaging of compounds with very short coherence life times the dead time between radio-frequency (RF) pulse and reception of the free induction decay (FID) is a major limiting factor. It is typically dominated by the transient and recovery times of currently available transmit-receive (T/R) switches and amplification chains. A novel PIN diode-based T/R switch topology is introduced allowing for fast switching by high bias transient currents but nevertheless producing a very low video leakage signal and insertion loss (0.5dB). The low transient spike level in conjunction with the high isolation (75dB) prevent saturation of the preamplifier entirely which consequently does not require time for recovery. Switching between transmission and reception is demonstrated within less than 1μs in bench tests as well as in acquisitions of FIDs and zero echo time (ZTE) images with bandwidths up to 500kHz at 7T. Thereby the 2kW switch exhibited a rise-time of 350ns (10-99%) producing however a total video leakage of below 20mV peak-to-peak and less than -89dBm in-band. The achieved switching time renders the RF pulse itself the dominant contribution to the dead time in which a coherence cannot be observed, thus making pulsed NMR experiments almost time-optimal even for compounds with very short signal life times.

  5. Digital Calibration of TR Modules for Real-Tme Digital Beamforming SweepSAR Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, James Patrick; Perkovic, Dragana; Shaffer, Scott; Veilleux, Louise; Peral, Eva

    2012-01-01

    Real-time digital beamforming, combined with lightweight, large aperture reflectors, enable a new architecture, which is the baseline for the proposed DESDynI [Deformation, Ecosystem Structure, and Dynamics of Ice] SAR [Synthetic Aperture Radar] Instrument (or DSI). This new instrument concept requires new methods for calibrating multiple simultaneous channels. The calibration of current state-of-the-art Electronically Steered Arrays typically involves pre-flight TR (Transmit/Receive) module characterization over temperature, and in-flight correction based on measured temperatures. This method ignores the effects of element aging and any drifts unrelated to temperature. We are developing new digital calibration of digital beamforming arrays, which helps to reduce development time, risk and cost. Precision calibrated TR modules enable real-time beamforming architectures by accurately tracking modules' characteristics through closed-loop digital calibration, which tracks systematic changes regardless of temperature. The benefit of this effort is that it would enable a new, lightweight radar architecture, with on-board digital beamforming. This provides significantly larger swath coverage than conventional SAR architectures

  6. Flux Sampling Errors for Aircraft and Towers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahrt, Larry

    1998-01-01

    Various errors and influences leading to differences between tower- and aircraft-measured fluxes are surveyed. This survey is motivated by reports in the literature that aircraft fluxes are sometimes smaller than tower-measured fluxes. Both tower and aircraft flux errors are larger with surface heterogeneity due to several independent effects. Surface heterogeneity may cause tower flux errors to increase with decreasing wind speed. Techniques to assess flux sampling error are reviewed. Such error estimates suffer various degrees of inapplicability in real geophysical time series due to nonstationarity of tower time series (or inhomogeneity of aircraft data). A new measure for nonstationarity is developed that eliminates assumptions on the form of the nonstationarity inherent in previous methods. When this nonstationarity measure becomes large, the surface energy imbalance increases sharply. Finally, strategies for obtaining adequate flux sampling using repeated aircraft passes and grid patterns are outlined.

  7. Automated Heat-Flux-Calibration Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebert, Curt H.; Weikle, Donald H.

    1989-01-01

    Computer control speeds operation of equipment and processing of measurements. New heat-flux-calibration facility developed at Lewis Research Center. Used for fast-transient heat-transfer testing, durability testing, and calibration of heat-flux gauges. Calibrations performed at constant or transient heat fluxes ranging from 1 to 6 MW/m2 and at temperatures ranging from 80 K to melting temperatures of most materials. Facility developed because there is need to build and calibrate very-small heat-flux gauges for Space Shuttle main engine (SSME).Includes lamp head attached to side of service module, an argon-gas-recirculation module, reflector, heat exchanger, and high-speed positioning system. This type of automated heat-flux calibration facility installed in industrial plants for onsite calibration of heat-flux gauges measuring fluxes of heat in advanced gas-turbine and rocket engines.

  8. ClassTR: Classifying Within-Host Heterogeneity Based on Tandem Repeats with Application to Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infections

    PubMed Central

    Chindelevitch, Leonid; Colijn, Caroline; Moodley, Prashini; Wilson, Douglas; Cohen, Ted

    2016-01-01

    Genomic tools have revealed genetically diverse pathogens within some hosts. Within-host pathogen diversity, which we refer to as “complex infection”, is increasingly recognized as a determinant of treatment outcome for infections like tuberculosis. Complex infection arises through two mechanisms: within-host mutation (which results in clonal heterogeneity) and reinfection (which results in mixed infections). Estimates of the frequency of within-host mutation and reinfection in populations are critical for understanding the natural history of disease. These estimates influence projections of disease trends and effects of interventions. The genotyping technique MLVA (multiple loci variable-number tandem repeats analysis) can identify complex infections, but the current method to distinguish clonal heterogeneity from mixed infections is based on a rather simple rule. Here we describe ClassTR, a method which leverages MLVA information from isolates collected in a population to distinguish mixed infections from clonal heterogeneity. We formulate the resolution of complex infections into their constituent strains as an optimization problem, and show its NP-completeness. We solve it efficiently by using mixed integer linear programming and graph decomposition. Once the complex infections are resolved into their constituent strains, ClassTR probabilistically classifies isolates as clonally heterogeneous or mixed by using a model of tandem repeat evolution. We first compare ClassTR with the standard rule-based classification on 100 simulated datasets. ClassTR outperforms the standard method, improving classification accuracy from 48% to 80%. We then apply ClassTR to a sample of 436 strains collected from tuberculosis patients in a South African community, of which 92 had complex infections. We find that ClassTR assigns an alternate classification to 18 of the 92 complex infections, suggesting important differences in practice. By explicitly modeling tandem repeat

  9. Ras regulates SCF(β-TrCP) protein activity and specificity via its effector protein NORE1A.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, M Lee; Donninger, Howard; Clark, Geoffrey J

    2014-11-01

    Ras is the most frequently activated oncogene found in human cancer, but its mechanisms of action remain only partially understood. Ras activates multiple signaling pathways to promote transformation. However, Ras can also exhibit a potent ability to induce growth arrest and death. NORE1A (RASSF5) is a direct Ras effector that acts as a tumor suppressor by promoting apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. Expression of NORE1A is frequently lost in human tumors, and its mechanism of action remains unclear. Here we show that NORE1A forms a direct, Ras-regulated complex with β-TrCP, the substrate recognition component of the SCF(β-TrCP) ubiquitin ligase complex. This interaction allows Ras to stimulate the ubiquitin ligase activity of SCF(β-TrCP) toward its target β-catenin, resulting in degradation of β-catenin by the 26 S proteasome. However, the action of Ras/NORE1A/β-TrCP is substrate-specific because IκB, another substrate of SCF(β-TrCP), is not sensitive to NORE1A-promoted degradation. We identify a completely new signaling mechanism for Ras that allows for the specific regulation of SCF(β-TrCP) targets. We show that the NORE1A levels in a cell may dictate the effects of Ras on the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. Moreover, because NORE1A expression is frequently impaired in tumors, we provide an explanation for the observation that β-TrCP can act as a tumor suppressor or an oncogene in different cell systems.

  10. ClassTR: Classifying Within-Host Heterogeneity Based on Tandem Repeats with Application to Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infections.

    PubMed

    Chindelevitch, Leonid; Colijn, Caroline; Moodley, Prashini; Wilson, Douglas; Cohen, Ted

    2016-02-01

    Genomic tools have revealed genetically diverse pathogens within some hosts. Within-host pathogen diversity, which we refer to as "complex infection", is increasingly recognized as a determinant of treatment outcome for infections like tuberculosis. Complex infection arises through two mechanisms: within-host mutation (which results in clonal heterogeneity) and reinfection (which results in mixed infections). Estimates of the frequency of within-host mutation and reinfection in populations are critical for understanding the natural history of disease. These estimates influence projections of disease trends and effects of interventions. The genotyping technique MLVA (multiple loci variable-number tandem repeats analysis) can identify complex infections, but the current method to distinguish clonal heterogeneity from mixed infections is based on a rather simple rule. Here we describe ClassTR, a method which leverages MLVA information from isolates collected in a population to distinguish mixed infections from clonal heterogeneity. We formulate the resolution of complex infections into their constituent strains as an optimization problem, and show its NP-completeness. We solve it efficiently by using mixed integer linear programming and graph decomposition. Once the complex infections are resolved into their constituent strains, ClassTR probabilistically classifies isolates as clonally heterogeneous or mixed by using a model of tandem repeat evolution. We first compare ClassTR with the standard rule-based classification on 100 simulated datasets. ClassTR outperforms the standard method, improving classification accuracy from 48% to 80%. We then apply ClassTR to a sample of 436 strains collected from tuberculosis patients in a South African community, of which 92 had complex infections. We find that ClassTR assigns an alternate classification to 18 of the 92 complex infections, suggesting important differences in practice. By explicitly modeling tandem repeat evolution

  11. Atmospheric discharges and particle fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilingarian, A.; Chilingaryan, S.; Reymers, A.

    2015-07-01

    Fluxes of the electrons, gamma rays, and neutrons observed by particle detectors located on the Earth's surface during thunderstorms originate so-called Thunderstorm Ground Enhancements (TGEs). The relativistic runaway electron avalanches giving rise to TGEs originate in the thundercloud's lower dipole between the main negatively charged region in the middle of the thundercloud and transient lower positively charged region. Acceleration of electrons in the upper dipole between main negative and main positive charge regions leads to initiation of the terrestrial gamma flashes (TGFs) intensive researched during the last two decades by orbiting gamma ray observatories. TGFs are exceptionally intense, submillisecond bursts of electromagnetic radiation directed to the open space from the thunderstorm atmosphere. Unlike visible lightning, TGF beams do not create a hot plasma channel and optical flash; hence, in the literature they got name "dark lightning." We investigate the TGEs development in 1 min and 1 s time series of particle detector count rates. Synchronized time series of the near-surface electric field and lightning occurrences allows interconnecting two atmospheric phenomena. Registration of the Extensive Air Showers allows approaching problems of relation of the lightning occurrences and particle fluxes.

  12. Cosmic Ray Neutron Flux Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayananda, Mathes

    2009-11-01

    Cosmic rays are high-energetic particles originating from outer space that bombard the upper atmosphere of the Earth. Almost 90% of cosmic ray particles consist of protons, electrons and heavy ions. When these particles hit the Earth's atmosphere, cascade of secondary particles are formed. The most abundant particles reach to the surface of the Earth are muons, electrons and neutrons. In recent years many research groups are looking into potential applications of the effects of cosmic ray radiation at the surface of the Earth [1, 2]. At Georgia State University we are working on a long-term measurement of cosmic ray flux distribution. This study includes the simultaneous measurement of cosmic ray muons, neutrons and gamma particles at the Earth surface in downtown Atlanta. The initial effort is focusing on the correlation studies of the cosmic ray particle flux distribution and the atmospheric weather conditions. In this presentation, I will talk about the development of a cosmic ray detector using liquid scintillator and the preliminary results. [4pt] [1] K.Borozdin, G.Hogan, C.Morris, W.Priedhorsky, A.Saunders, L.Shultz, M.Teasdale, ``Radiographic imaging with cosmic-ray muons'', Nature, Vol.422, p.277, Mar.2003[0pt] [2] Svensmark Henrik, Physical Review 81, 3, (1998)

  13. Constrained Allocation Flux Balance Analysis.

    PubMed

    Mori, Matteo; Hwa, Terence; Martin, Olivier C; De Martino, Andrea; Marinari, Enzo

    2016-06-01

    New experimental results on bacterial growth inspire a novel top-down approach to study cell metabolism, combining mass balance and proteomic constraints to extend and complement Flux Balance Analysis. We introduce here Constrained Allocation Flux Balance Analysis, CAFBA, in which the biosynthetic costs associated to growth are accounted for in an effective way through a single additional genome-wide constraint. Its roots lie in the experimentally observed pattern of proteome allocation for metabolic functions, allowing to bridge regulation and metabolism in a transparent way under the principle of growth-rate maximization. We provide a simple method to solve CAFBA efficiently and propose an "ensemble averaging" procedure to account for unknown protein costs. Applying this approach to modeling E. coli metabolism, we find that, as the growth rate increases, CAFBA solutions cross over from respiratory, growth-yield maximizing states (preferred at slow growth) to fermentative states with carbon overflow (preferred at fast growth). In addition, CAFBA allows for quantitatively accurate predictions on the rate of acetate excretion and growth yield based on only 3 parameters determined by empirical growth laws.

  14. Constrained Allocation Flux Balance Analysis.

    PubMed

    Mori, Matteo; Hwa, Terence; Martin, Olivier C; De Martino, Andrea; Marinari, Enzo

    2016-06-01

    New experimental results on bacterial growth inspire a novel top-down approach to study cell metabolism, combining mass balance and proteomic constraints to extend and complement Flux Balance Analysis. We introduce here Constrained Allocation Flux Balance Analysis, CAFBA, in which the biosynthetic costs associated to growth are accounted for in an effective way through a single additional genome-wide constraint. Its roots lie in the experimentally observed pattern of proteome allocation for metabolic functions, allowing to bridge regulation and metabolism in a transparent way under the principle of growth-rate maximization. We provide a simple method to solve CAFBA efficiently and propose an "ensemble averaging" procedure to account for unknown protein costs. Applying this approach to modeling E. coli metabolism, we find that, as the growth rate increases, CAFBA solutions cross over from respiratory, growth-yield maximizing states (preferred at slow growth) to fermentative states with carbon overflow (preferred at fast growth). In addition, CAFBA allows for quantitatively accurate predictions on the rate of acetate excretion and growth yield based on only 3 parameters determined by empirical growth laws. PMID:27355325

  15. Flux focusing eddy current probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, John W. (Inventor); Clendenin, C. Gerald (Inventor); Fulton, James P. (Inventor); Wincheski, Russell A. (Inventor); Todhunter, Ronald G. (Inventor); Namkung, Min (Inventor); Nath, Shridhar C. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A flux-focusing electromagnetic sensor which uses a ferromagnetic flux-focusing lens simplifies inspections and increases detectability of fatigue cracks and material loss in high conductivity material. The unique feature of the device is the ferrous shield isolating a high-turn pick-up coil from an excitation coil. The use of the magnetic shield is shown to produce a null voltage output across the receiving coil in the presence of an unflawed sample. A redistribution of the current flow in the sample caused by the presence of flaws, however, eliminates the shielding condition and a large output voltage is produced, yielding a clear unambiguous flaw signal. The maximum sensor output is obtained when positioned symmetrically above the crack. Hence, by obtaining the position of the maximum sensor output, it is possible to track the fault and locate the area surrounding its tip. The accuracy of tip location is enhanced by two unique features of the sensor; a very high signal-to-noise ratio of the probe's output which results in an extremely smooth signal peak across the fault, and a rapidly decaying sensor output outside a small area surrounding the crack tip which enables the region for searching to be clearly defined. Under low frequency operation, material thinning due to corrosion damage causes an incomplete shielding of the pick-up coil. The low frequency output voltage of the probe is therefore a direct indicator of the thickness of the test sample.

  16. Constrained Allocation Flux Balance Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Matteo; Hwa, Terence; Martin, Olivier C.

    2016-01-01

    New experimental results on bacterial growth inspire a novel top-down approach to study cell metabolism, combining mass balance and proteomic constraints to extend and complement Flux Balance Analysis. We introduce here Constrained Allocation Flux Balance Analysis, CAFBA, in which the biosynthetic costs associated to growth are accounted for in an effective way through a single additional genome-wide constraint. Its roots lie in the experimentally observed pattern of proteome allocation for metabolic functions, allowing to bridge regulation and metabolism in a transparent way under the principle of growth-rate maximization. We provide a simple method to solve CAFBA efficiently and propose an “ensemble averaging” procedure to account for unknown protein costs. Applying this approach to modeling E. coli metabolism, we find that, as the growth rate increases, CAFBA solutions cross over from respiratory, growth-yield maximizing states (preferred at slow growth) to fermentative states with carbon overflow (preferred at fast growth). In addition, CAFBA allows for quantitatively accurate predictions on the rate of acetate excretion and growth yield based on only 3 parameters determined by empirical growth laws. PMID:27355325

  17. Neutron flux enhancement at LASREF

    SciTech Connect

    Sommer, W.F.; Ferguson, P.D.; Wechsler, M.S.

    1991-01-01

    The accelerator at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility produces a 1-mA beam of protons at an energy of 800 MeV. Since 1985, the Los Alamos Spallation Radiation Effects Facility (LASREF) has made use of the neutron flux that is generated as the incident protons interact with the nuclei in targets and a copper beam stop. A variety of basic and applied experiments in radiation damage and radiation effects have been completed. Recent studies indicate that the flux at LASREF can be increased by at least a factor of ten from the present level of about 5 E+17 m{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1}. This requires changing the beam-stop material from Cu to W and optimizing the geometry of the beam-target interaction region. These studies are motivated by the need for a large volume, high energy, and high intensity neutron source in the development of materials for advanced energy concepts such as fusion reactors. 18 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Braiding fluxes in Pauli Hamiltonian

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth, O. Avron, J.E.

    2014-10-15

    Aharonov and Casher showed that Pauli Hamiltonians in two dimensions have gapless zero modes. We study the adiabatic evolution of these modes under the slow motion of N fluxons with fluxes Φ{sub a}∈R. The positions, r{sub a}∈R{sup 2}, of the fluxons are viewed as controls. We are interested in the holonomies associated with closed paths in the space of controls. The holonomies can sometimes be abelian, but in general are not. They can sometimes be topological, but in general are not. We analyse some of the special cases and some of the general ones. Our most interesting results concern the cases where holonomy turns out to be topological which is the case when all the fluxons are subcritical, Φ{sub a}<1, and the number of zero modes is D=N−1. If N≥3 it is also non-abelian. In the special case that the fluxons carry identical fluxes the resulting anyons satisfy the Burau representations of the braid group.

  19. Nanoconfinement induced crystal orientation and large piezoelectric coefficient in vertically aligned P(VDF-TrFE) nanotube array.

    PubMed

    Liew, Weng Heng; Mirshekarloo, Meysam Sharifzadeh; Chen, Shuting; Yao, Kui; Tay, Francis Eng Hock

    2015-05-12

    Vertically aligned piezoelectric P(VDF-TrFE) nanotube array comprising nanotubes embedded in anodized alumina membrane matrix without entanglement has been fabricated. It is found that the crystallographic polar axes of the P(VDF-TrFE) nanotubes are oriented along the nanotubes long axes. Such a desired crystal orientation is due to the kinetic selection mechanism for lamellae growth confined in the nanopores. The preferred crystal orientation in nanotubes leads to huge piezoelectric coefficients of the P(VDF-TrFE). The piezoelectric strain and voltage coefficients of P(VDF-TrFE) nanotube array are observed to be 1.97 and 3.40 times of those for conventional spin coated film. Such a significant performance enhancement is attributed to the well-controlled polarization orientation, the elimination of the substrate constraint, and the low dielectric constant of the nanotube array. The P(VDF-TrFE) nanotube array exhibiting the unique structure and outstanding piezoelectric performance is promising for wide applications, including various electrical devices and electromechanical sensors and transducers.

  20. Considering DSM-5: the personal experience of schizophrenia in relation to the DSM-IV-TR criteria.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, Elizabeth H; Solomon, Lesley Anne; Johnson, Amy; Ridgway, Priscilla; Strauss, John S; Davidson, Larry

    2012-01-01

    Previous analyses have suggested that the personal experience of schizophrenia might be different from its depiction in the DSM-IV-TR. In this study, 17 people with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder were interviewed about their experiences of the DSM-IV-TR diagnostic criteria for schizophrenia. Descriptive phenomenological analysis was used to analyze the ways in which the personal experiences of the people in this study were similar to or different from the depiction of schizophrenia in the DSM-IV-TR. The personal experience of schizophrenia was similar in some way to each of the five diagnostic criteria for schizophrenia. Participants' personal experiences also went beyond the DSM-IV-TR criteria. Specifically, participants described strong emotional reactions to their symptoms, including fear, sadness, embarrassment, and alienation. Also, participants described intense interest but severe disruptions in goal-directed behavior due to their hallucinations being engrossing, confusing, and distracting. Further, participants described not sharing their experiences in order to avoid social stigma. These findings suggest that the description of schizophrenia in DSM-5 may benefit from a change to DSM-IV-TR criteria to incorporate more of the personal experience of schizophrenia. Further research is needed to establish the representativeness, reliability, and validity of the qualitative findings described here.

  1. T-R CYCLE CHARACTERIZATION AND IMAGING: ADVANCED DIAGNOSTIC METHODOLOGY FOR PETROLEUM RESERVOIR AND TRAP DETECTION AND DELINEATION

    SciTech Connect

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2004-09-24

    The principal research effort for Year 1 of the project has been T-R cycle characterization and modeling. The research focus for the first nine (9) months of Year 1 was on outcrop study, well log analysis, seismic interpretation and data integration and for the remainder of the year the emphasis has been on T-R cycle model development. Information regarding the characteristics of T-R cycles has been assembled from the study of outcrops, from well log analyses, and from seismic reflection interpretation. From these studies, stratal boundaries separating T-R cycles have been found to be useful for the recognition and delineation of these cycles. The key stratal surfaces include subaerial unconformities, shoreface ravinement surfaces, transgressive surfaces, surfaces of maximum regression, and surfaces of maximum transgression. These surfaces can be identified and mapped in surface exposures and can be recognized in well log signatures and seismic reflection profiles as discontinuities. The findings from the study of outcrop, well log, and seismic reflection data are being integrated into a database for use in constructing a model for T-R cycle development.

  2. Nanoconfinement induced crystal orientation and large piezoelectric coefficient in vertically aligned P(VDF-TrFE) nanotube array

    PubMed Central

    Liew, Weng Heng; Mirshekarloo, Meysam Sharifzadeh; Chen, Shuting; Yao, Kui; Tay, Francis Eng Hock

    2015-01-01

    Vertically aligned piezoelectric P(VDF-TrFE) nanotube array comprising nanotubes embedded in anodized alumina membrane matrix without entanglement has been fabricated. It is found that the crystallographic polar axes of the P(VDF-TrFE) nanotubes are oriented along the nanotubes long axes. Such a desired crystal orientation is due to the kinetic selection mechanism for lamellae growth confined in the nanopores. The preferred crystal orientation in nanotubes leads to huge piezoelectric coefficients of the P(VDF-TrFE). The piezoelectric strain and voltage coefficients of P(VDF-TrFE) nanotube array are observed to be 1.97 and 3.40 times of those for conventional spin coated film. Such a significant performance enhancement is attributed to the well-controlled polarization orientation, the elimination of the substrate constraint, and the low dielectric constant of the nanotube array. The P(VDF-TrFE) nanotube array exhibiting the unique structure and outstanding piezoelectric performance is promising for wide applications, including various electrical devices and electromechanical sensors and transducers. PMID:25966301

  3. Nanoconfinement induced crystal orientation and large piezoelectric coefficient in vertically aligned P(VDF-TrFE) nanotube array.

    PubMed

    Liew, Weng Heng; Mirshekarloo, Meysam Sharifzadeh; Chen, Shuting; Yao, Kui; Tay, Francis Eng Hock

    2015-01-01

    Vertically aligned piezoelectric P(VDF-TrFE) nanotube array comprising nanotubes embedded in anodized alumina membrane matrix without entanglement has been fabricated. It is found that the crystallographic polar axes of the P(VDF-TrFE) nanotubes are oriented along the nanotubes long axes. Such a desired crystal orientation is due to the kinetic selection mechanism for lamellae growth confined in the nanopores. The preferred crystal orientation in nanotubes leads to huge piezoelectric coefficients of the P(VDF-TrFE). The piezoelectric strain and voltage coefficients of P(VDF-TrFE) nanotube array are observed to be 1.97 and 3.40 times of those for conventional spin coated film. Such a significant performance enhancement is attributed to the well-controlled polarization orientation, the elimination of the substrate constraint, and the low dielectric constant of the nanotube array. The P(VDF-TrFE) nanotube array exhibiting the unique structure and outstanding piezoelectric performance is promising for wide applications, including various electrical devices and electromechanical sensors and transducers. PMID:25966301

  4. A quantitative method for silica flux evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schonewille, R. H.; O'Connell, G. J.; Toguri, J. M.

    1993-02-01

    In the smelting of copper and copper/nickel concentrates, the role of silica flux is to aid in the removal of iron by forming a slag phase. Alternatively, the role of flux may be regarded as a means of controlling the formation of magnetite, which can severely hinder the operation of a furnace. To adequately control the magnetite level, the flux must react rapidly with all of the FeO within the bath. In the present study, a rapid method for silica flux evaluation that can be used directly in the smelter has been developed. Samples of flux are mixed with iron sulfide and magnetite and then smelted at a temperature of 1250 °C. Argon was swept over the reaction mixture and analyzed continuously for sulfur dioxide. The sulfur dioxide concentration with time was found to contain two peaks, the first one being independent of the flux content of the sample. A flux quality parameter has been defined as the height-to-time ratio of the second peak. The value of this parameter for pure silica is 5100 ppm/min. The effects of silica content, silica particle size, and silicate mineralogy were investigated. It was found that a limiting flux quality is achieved for particle sizes less than 0.1 mm in diameter and that fluxes containing feldspar are generally of a poorer quality. The relative importance of free silica and melting point was also studied using synthetic flux mixtures, with free silica displaying the strongest effect.

  5. Emergence of Twisted Flux in Prominence Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, T. J.; Tsuneta, S.; Berger, T. E.; Lites, B. W.

    2012-05-01

    The emergence of twisted flux is a key process for supply of magnetic flux into the corona as well as solar dynamic activities such as sunspot formation and trigger of coronal mass ejections. In particular, there are numerous discussions about the role and necessity of twisted flux emergence for origin of prominences. However, the difficulty to measure vector magnetic fields has not allowed us to investigate the detailed relationship between emerging twisted flux and prominence. Hinode has changed the situation. The Spectro-Polarimeter aboard Hinode has high sensitivity to weaker magnetic fields of fine structures, and provides opportunities to detect weak horizontal magnetic fields. As a result, we have obtained signatures of twisted flux emergence associated with prominences: The observational features are "broadening and narrowing of a region dominated by horizontal magnetic field" and "rotating direction of horizontal field" on the photosphere. Moreover, the data show the interaction between the emerging twisted flux and granules, and that the flux rope has high intrinsic strength 650 G, while the flux density is as low as 100 G. Theoretical research with numerical simulation on the basis of these results is active. In addition, we investigate activities of a coronal cavity overlying a prominence on the limb, and suggest the existence of twisted flux rope to explain the activities of prominence and the coronal cavity comprehensively. Here we introduce both these observational and theoretical results, and discuss the details about emerging twisted flux.

  6. Isotopic Compositions of Evaporative Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, X.; Lauder, A. M.; Kopec, B. G.; Dade, W. B.; Virginia, R. A.; Posmentier, E. S.

    2013-12-01

    The isotopic fluxes of evaporation from a water surface are typically computed using a one-dimensional model, originally conceptualized by Craig and Gordon (1965) and further developed and adapted to different natural settings (such as transpiration, open surface evaporation, etc.) by various investigators. These models have two distinguishing characteristics. First, there exists a laminar layer where molecular diffusion away from the water-air interface causes kinetic isotopic fractionation. The magnitude of this fractionation is controlled by the diffusion/transport coefficient of each vapor isotopologue in air and their concentration gradients, the latter being controlled by relative humidity, isotopic ratios of ambient air, and turbulent conditions (such as wind and surface roughness). Second, the horizontal variations are ignored. In particular, the effect of horizontal advection on isotopic variations in the ambient air is not considered. The research reported here addresses the effects of relinquishing the simplifying assumptions in both of these areas. We developed a model, in which the simplification of a purely laminar layer is dropped. Instead, we express the vertical transport coefficient as the sum of the molecular diffusivity, that differs for each water isotopologue, and the turbulent diffusivity that increases linearly with height but does not vary among water isotopologues. With this model, the kinetic isotopic effect reduces with height in the vicinity of the water surface, and the net isotopic fractionation through the boundary layer can be integrated. The advantage of this conceptualization is that the magnitude of kinetic isotopic fractionation can be assessed directly with changing environmental conditions, such as humidity and wind speed, rather than approximated by discontinuous empirical functions of the environmental conditions, as in the conventional models mentioned above. To address the effect of lateral heterogeneity, we expanded the

  7. Partitioning evapotranspiration fluxes using atmometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orsag, Matej; Fischer, Milan; Trnka, Miroslav; Kucera, Jiri; Zalud, Zdenek

    2013-04-01

    This effort is aimed to derive a simple tool for separating soil evaporation and transpiration from evapotranspiration, measured by Bowen ration energy balance method (BREB) in short rotation coppice (SRC). The main idea is to utilize daily data of actual evapotranspiration (ETa) measured above bare soil (spring 2010 - first year following harvest), reference evapotranspiration (ETo) measured by atmometer ETgage and precipitation data, in order to create an algorithm for estimation evaporation from bare soil. This approach is based on the following assumption: evaporation of wetted bare soil same as the ETo from atmometer is assumed to be identical in days with rain. In first and further days with no rain (and e.g. high evaporative demand) the easily evaporable soil water depletes and ETa so as crop coefficient of bare soil (Kcb) decreases in a way similar to decreasing power function. The algorithm represents a parameterized function of daily cumulated ETo (ETc) measured by atmometer in days elapsed from last rain event (Kcb = a*ETc^b). After each rain event the accumulation of ETo starts again till next rain event (e. g. only days with no rain are cumulated). The function provides decreasing Kcb for each day without rain. The bare soil evaporation can be estimated when the atmometer-recorded value is multiplied by Kcb for particular day without rain. In days with rain Kcb is assumed to be back at 1. This method was successfully tested for estimating evaporation from bare soil under closed canopy of poplar-based SRC. When subtracting the estimated soil evaporation from total ETa flux, measured above the canopy using BREB method, it is possible to obtain transpiration flux of the canopy. There is also possibility to test this approach on the contrary - subtracting transpiration derived from sap-flow measurement from total ETa flux is possible to get soil evaporation as well. Acknowledgements: The present experiment is made within the frame of project Inter

  8. Nanomanufacturing and analysis of novel continuous ferroelectric PVDF and P(VDF-TrFE) nanofibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Xi

    Poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) and PVDF copolymers are well known for their ferroelectric and piezoelectric properties. Currently, they are mainly used in applications in the form of films. Thin PVDF films have been shown to possess unique ferroelectric properties in the nanoscale range. However, their two-dimensional nature limits their applicability in active engineering materials and structures. One-dimensional PVDF nanofibers can be expected to combine ferroelectric behavior with enhanced mechanical properties and ultrahigh flexibility providing critical advantages for applications. In this work, novel continuous PVDF nanofibers were nanomanufactured and systematically studied for the first time. Nanofibers from PVDF and P(VDF-TrFE) copolymer with several molecular weights and co-polymer compositions were manufactured by electrospinning. The method consists of spinning polymer solutions in high electric fields. Effects of process parameters on nanofiber diameters and morphology were studied. Resulting nanofibers were characterized by FE-SEM, TEM, XRD, FTIR, DSC and TGA. Effects of annealing on copolymer nanofibers were analyzed. Nanofiber-reinforced composites were manufactured and their polarization behavior studied using a specially designed experimental device. A number of pioneering observations and discoveries were made as a result of this analysis. For example, analysis of crystalline structure of PVDF nanofibers showed that the initial a phase of the PVDF raw material was converted to beta phase during electrospinning. This result is very encouraging as the beta phase is primarily responsible for the piezo- and ferroelectric behavior of PVDF polymers. It was also shown for the first time that nanofabricated P(VDF-TrFE) nanofibers exhibited distinct Curie points and different structures than their raw materials. Annealing was shown to be an effective way to modify properties of P(VDF-TrFE) co-polymer nanofibers. Overall, the results demonstrated for the

  9. How the Saturnian Magnetosphere Conserves Magnetic Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, R. L.; Wei, H.; Russell, C. T.; Arridge, C. S.; Dougherty, M. K.

    2012-12-01

    The magnetospheric dynamics at Saturn are driven by the centrifugal force of near co-rotating water group ions released at a rate of hundreds of kilograms per second by Saturn's moon Enceladus. The plasma is accelerated up to co-rotation speed by the magnetospheric magnetic field coupled to the Saturnian ionosphere. The plasma is lost ultimately through the process of magnetic reconnection in the tail. Conservation of magnetic flux requires that plasma-depleted, "empty" flux tubes return magnetic flux to the inner magnetosphere. After completion of the initial inrush of the reconnected and largely emptied flux tubes inward of the reconnection point, the flux tubes face the outflowing plasma and must move inward against the flow. Observations of such flux tubes have been identified in the eight years of Cassini magnetometer data. The occurrence of these tubes is observed at all local times indicating slow inward transport of the tubes relative to the co-rotation speed. Depleted flux tubes observed in the equatorial region appear as an enhancement in the magnitude of the magnetic field, whereas the same flux tubes observed at higher latitudes appear as decreased field strength. The difference in appearance of the low latitude and the high latitude tubes is due to the plasma environment just outside the tube. Warm low-density plasma fills the inside of the flux tube at all latitudes. This flux tube thus will expand in the less dense regions away from the magnetic equator and will be observed as a decrease in the magnitude of the magnetic field from the background. These flux tubes near the equator, where the plasma density outside of the flux tube is much greater, will be observed as an enhancement in the magnitude of the magnetic field. Cassini magnetometer and CAPS data are examined to understand the properties of these flux tubes and their radial and latitudinal evolution throughout the Saturnian magnetospheric environment.

  10. Warped branches of flux compactifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Yen-Kheng

    2012-03-01

    We consider Freund-Rubin-type compactifications which are described by (p+q)-dimensional Einstein gravity with a positive cosmological constant and a q-form flux. Using perturbative expansions of Kinoshita’s ansatz for warped dSp×Sq and AdSp×Sq spacetimes, we obtain analytical solutions describing the warped branches and their respective phase spaces. These equations are given by inhomogeneous Gegenbauer differential equations which can be solved by the Green’s function method. The requirement that the Green’s functions are regular provides constraints which determine the structure of the phase space of the warped branches. We apply the perturbation results to calculate the thermodynamic variables for the warped dSp×Sq branch. In particular, the first law of thermodynamics can be reproduced using this method.

  11. Insects, infestations and nutrient fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalzik, B.

    2012-04-01

    Forest ecosystems are characterized by a high temporal and spatial variability in the vertical transfer of energy and matter within the canopy and the soil compartment. The mechanisms and controlling factors behind canopy processes and system-internal transfer dynamics are imperfectly understood at the moment. Seasonal flux diversities and inhomogeneities in throughfall composition have been reported from coniferous and deciduous forests, and in most cases leaf leaching has been considered as principle driver for differences in the amount and quality of nutrients and organic compounds (Tukey and Morgan 1963). Since herbivorous insects and the processes they initiate received less attention in past times, ecologists now emphasize the need for linking biological processes occurring in different ecosystem strata to explain rates and variability of nutrient cycling (Bardgett et al. 1998, Wardle et al. 2004). Consequently, herbivore insects in the canopies of forests are increasingly identified to play an important role for the (re)cycling and availability of nutrients, or, more generally, for the functioning of ecosystems not only in outbreak situations but also at endemic (non-outbreak) density levels (Stadler et al. 2001, Hunter et al. 2003). Before, little attention was paid to insect herbivores when quantifying element and energy fluxes through ecosystems, although the numerous and different functions insects fulfill in ecosystems (e.g. as pollinators, herbivores or detritivores) were unanimously recognized (Schowalter 2000). Amongst the reasons for this restraint was the argument that the total biomass of insects tends to be relatively low compared to the biomass of trees or the pool of soil organic matter (Ohmart et al. 1983). A second argument which was put forward to justify the inferior role of insects in nutrient cycling were the supposed low defoliation losses between 5-10% of the annual leaf biomass, or net primary production, due to insect herbivory under

  12. Chaos in Magnetic Flux Ropes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gekelman, Walter; DeHaas, T.; Van Compernolle, B.; Vincena, S.

    2013-07-01

    Magnetic Flux Ropes Immersed in a uniform magnetoplasma are observed to twist about themselves, writhe about each other and rotate about a central axis. They are kink unstable and smash into one another as they move. Each collision results in magnetic field line generation and the generation of a quasi-seperatrix layer. Three dimensional magnetic field lines are computed by conditionally averaging the data using correlation techniques. When the currents associated with the ropes are large,this is possible for only a number of rotation cycles as the field line motion becomes chaotic. The permutation entropy1 can be calculated from the the time series of the magnetic field data (this is also done with flows) and used to calculate the positions of the data on a Jensen Shannon complexity map2. The power spectra of much of the magnetic and flow data is exponential and Lorentzian structures in the time domain are embedded in them. The location of data on this map indicates if the magnetic fields are stochastic, or fall into regions of minimal or maximal complexity. The complexity is a function of space and time. The complexity map, and analysis will be explained in the course of the talk. Other types of chaotic dynamical models such as the Lorentz or Gissinger process also fall on the map and can give a clue to the nature of the flux rope turbulence. The ropes fall in the region of the C-H plane where chaotic systems lie. 1 C. Bandt, B. Pompe, Phys. Rev. Lett., 88,174102 (2007) 2 O. Russo et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 99, 154102 (2007), J. Maggs, G.Morales, “Permutation Entropy analysis of temperature fluctuations from a basic electron heat transport experiment”,submitted PPCF (2013)

  13. Flux emergence in a magnetized convection zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, Rui; Brun, Allan Sacha

    We study the influence of a dynamo magnetic field on the buoyant rise and emergence of twisted magnetic flux-ropes, and their influence on the global external magnetic field. We ran three-dimensional MHD numerical simulations using the ASH code and analysed the dynamical evolution of such buoyant flux-ropes from the bottom of the convection zone until the post-emergence phases. The actual flux-emergence episode is preceded by a localised increase of radial velocity, density and current density at the top of the convection zone. During the buoyant rise, the flux-rope's magnetic field strength and density scale as B~rho(alpha) , with alpha≤sssim 1. The properties of initial phases of the buoyant rise are determined essentially by the flux-rope's properties and the convective flows and are, in consequence, in good agreement with previous studies. However, the effects of the interaction of the background dynamo field become increasingly stronger as the flux-ropes evolve. The threshold for the initial magnetic field amplitude is slightly increased by the presence of the background dynamo field, even if it is on average much weaker than the flux-rope's field. The geometry and relative orientation of the magnetic field in the flux-ropes with respect to that in the background magnetic field influences the resulting rise speeds, zonal flows amplitudes (which develop within the flux-ropes) and surface signatures of magnetic flux emergence. This strongly influences the morphology, duration and amplitude of the surface shearing and Poynting flux associated with magnetic flux-rope emergence, which are key ingredients to the current coronal eruption triggering scenarios. The actual magnetic flux emergence is consistently preceded by strong and localised radial velocity enhancements at the place where the flux rope will emerge. The emerged magnetic flux is in most of the cases studied enough to influence the global surface magnetic field. In some cases, the emergence reinforces

  14. Quantitative Analysis of Single-Nucleotide Polymorphism for Rapid Detection of TR34/L98H- and TR46/Y121F/T289A-Positive Aspergillus fumigatus Isolates Obtained from Patients in Iran from 2010 to 2014

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Faezeh; Hashemi, Seyed Jamal; Zoll, Jan; Melchers, Willem J. G.; Rafati, Haleh; Dehghan, Parvin; Rezaie, Sasan; Tolooe, Ali; Tamadon, Yalda; van der Lee, Henrich A.; Verweij, Paul E.

    2015-01-01

    We employed an endpoint genotyping method to update the prevalence rate of positivity for the TR34/L98H mutation (a 34-bp tandem repeat mutation in the promoter region of the cyp51A gene in combination with a substitution at codon L98) and the TR46/Y121F/T289A mutation (a 46-bp tandem repeat mutation in the promoter region of the cyp51A gene in combination with substitutions at codons Y121 and T289) among clinical Aspergillus fumigatus isolates obtained from different regions of Iran over a recent 5-year period (2010 to 2014). The antifungal activities of itraconazole, voriconazole, and posaconazole against 172 clinical A. fumigatus isolates were investigated using the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) broth microdilution method. For the isolates with an azole resistance phenotype, the cyp51A gene and its promoter were amplified and sequenced. In addition, using a LightCycler 480 real-time PCR system, a novel endpoint genotyping analysis method targeting single-nucleotide polymorphisms was evaluated to detect the L98H and Y121F mutations in the cyp51A gene of all isolates. Of the 172 A. fumigatus isolates tested, the MIC values of itraconazole (≥16 mg/liter) and voriconazole (>4 mg/liter) were high for 6 (3.5%). Quantitative analysis of single-nucleotide polymorphisms showed the TR34/L98H mutation in the cyp51A genes of six isolates. No isolates harboring the TR46/Y121F/T289A mutation were detected. DNA sequencing of the cyp51A gene confirmed the results of the novel endpoint genotyping method. By microsatellite typing, all of the azole-resistant isolates had genotypes different from those previously recovered from Iran and from the Dutch TR34/L98H controls. In conclusion, there was not a significant increase in the prevalence of azole-resistant A. fumigatus isolates harboring the TR34/L98H resistance mechanism among isolates recovered over a recent 5-year period (2010 to 2014) in Iran. A quantitative assay detecting a single

  15. Quantitative Analysis of Single-Nucleotide Polymorphism for Rapid Detection of TR34/L98H- and TR46/Y121F/T289A-Positive Aspergillus fumigatus Isolates Obtained from Patients in Iran from 2010 to 2014.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Faezeh; Hashemi, Seyed Jamal; Zoll, Jan; Melchers, Willem J G; Rafati, Haleh; Dehghan, Parvin; Rezaie, Sasan; Tolooe, Ali; Tamadon, Yalda; van der Lee, Henrich A; Verweij, Paul E; Seyedmousavi, Seyedmojtaba

    2015-11-02

    We employed an endpoint genotyping method to update the prevalence rate of positivity for the TR34/L98H mutation (a 34-bp tandem repeat mutation in the promoter region of the cyp51A gene in combination with a substitution at codon L98) and the TR46/Y121F/T289A mutation (a 46-bp tandem repeat mutation in the promoter region of the cyp51A gene in combination with substitutions at codons Y121 and T289) among clinical Aspergillus fumigatus isolates obtained from different regions of Iran over a recent 5-year period (2010 to 2014). The antifungal activities of itraconazole, voriconazole, and posaconazole against 172 clinical A. fumigatus isolates were investigated using the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) broth microdilution method. For the isolates with an azole resistance phenotype, the cyp51A gene and its promoter were amplified and sequenced. In addition, using a LightCycler 480 real-time PCR system, a novel endpoint genotyping analysis method targeting single-nucleotide polymorphisms was evaluated to detect the L98H and Y121F mutations in the cyp51A gene of all isolates. Of the 172 A. fumigatus isolates tested, the MIC values of itraconazole (≥16 mg/liter) and voriconazole (>4 mg/liter) were high for 6 (3.5%). Quantitative analysis of single-nucleotide polymorphisms showed the TR34/L98H mutation in the cyp51A genes of six isolates. No isolates harboring the TR46/Y121F/T289A mutation were detected. DNA sequencing of the cyp51A gene confirmed the results of the novel endpoint genotyping method. By microsatellite typing, all of the azole-resistant isolates had genotypes different from those previously recovered from Iran and from the Dutch TR34/L98H controls. In conclusion, there was not a significant increase in the prevalence of azole-resistant A. fumigatus isolates harboring the TR34/L98H resistance mechanism among isolates recovered over a recent 5-year period (2010 to 2014) in Iran. A quantitative assay detecting a single

  16. Structural impact on piezoelectricity in PVDF and P(VDF-TrFE) thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strashilov, V.; Alexieva, G.; Vincent, B.; Nguyen, V. S.; Rouxel, D.

    2015-03-01

    PVDF and its mostly used copolymer P(VDF-TrFE) are known to possess piezoelectric properties which strongly vary with processing conditions. As the final target of processing ultimately is the structure of the polymer, establishing a more detailed link between structure and properties would ease both the understanding and the practical usage of films piezoelectric activity. In spite of a number of thorough studies exploiting the nature of piezoelectricity in PVDF, available data does not generally exhibit reliable level of consistency and, in some cases, elements of contradiction are observed. Making no claim to be exhaustive in this vast area, we present a survey and discuss on a number of results both available and obtained by ourselves in an effort to assist to better interpretation and further progress in the field.

  17. Highly Conductive Anion-Exchange Membranes from Microporous Tröger's Base Polymers.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhengjin; Guo, Rui; Malpass-Evans, Richard; Carta, Mariolino; McKeown, Neil B; Guiver, Michael D; Wu, Liang; Xu, Tongwen

    2016-09-12

    The development of polymeric anion-exchange membranes (AEMs) combining high ion conductivity and long-term stability is a major challenge for materials chemistry. AEMs with regularly distributed fixed cationic groups, based on the formation of microporous polymers containing the V-shape rigid Tröger's base units, are reported for the first time. Despite their simple preparation, which involves only two synthetic steps using commercially available precursors, the polymers provide AEMs with exceptional hydroxide conductivity at relatively low ion-exchange capacity, as well as a high swelling resistance and chemical stability. An unprecedented hydroxide conductivity of 164.4 mS cm(-1) is obtained at a relatively a low ion-exchange capacity of 0.82 mmol g(-1) under optimal operating conditions. The exceptional anion conductivity appears related to the intrinsic microporosity of the charged polymer matrix, which facilitates rapid anion transport. PMID:27505421

  18. Modeling Active Region Evolution - A New LWS TR and T Strategic Capability Model Suite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacNeice, Peter

    2012-01-01

    In 2006 the LWS TR&T Program funded us to develop a strategic capability model of slowly evolving coronal active regions. In this poster we report on the overall design, and status of our new modeling suite. Our design features two coronal field models, a non-linear force free field model and a global 3D MHD code. The suite includes supporting tools and a user friendly GUI which will enable users to query the web for relevant magnetograms, download them, process them to synthesize a sequence of photospheric magnetograms and associated photospheric flow field which can then be applied to drive the coronal model innner boundary, run the coronal models and finally visualize the results.

  19. Core-free rolled actuators for Braille displays using P(VDF-TrFE-CFE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levard, Thomas; Diglio, Paul J.; Lu, Sheng-Guo; Rahn, Christopher D.; Zhang, Q. M.

    2012-01-01

    Refreshable Braille displays require many small diameter actuators to move the pins. The electrostrictive P(VDF-TrFE-CFE) terpolymer can provide the high strain and actuation force under modest electric fields that are required for this application. In this paper, we develop core-free tubular actuators and integrate them into a 3 × 2 Braille cell. The terpolymer films are solution cast, stretched to 6 μm thick, electroded, laminated into a bilayer, rolled into a 2 mm diameter tube, bonded, and provided with top and bottom contacts. Experimental testing of 17 actuators demonstrates significant strains (up to 4%) and blocking forces (1 N) at moderate electric fields (100 MV m-1). A novel Braille cell is designed and fabricated using six of these actuators.

  20. RS cyclophilins: identification of an NK-TR1-related cyclophilin.

    PubMed

    Nestel, F P; Colwill, K; Harper, S; Pawson, T; Anderson, S K

    1996-11-21

    We report the isolation of a large cyclophilin protein containing RS (arginine-serine) repeats from a yeast two-hybrid screen using ClK (CDC28/cdc2-like kinase) as a probe. This Clk associating RS-cyclophilin (CARS-Cyp) possesses 39% homology to the NK-TR1 (natural killer tumor recognition protein-1) we have previously characterized (Anderson et al. (1993) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 90 (1993) 542-546). CARS-Cyp is expressed in a variety of tissues and cell types, and codes for a protein with a predicted mass of 89 kDa containing a cyclophilin-related domain, two Nopp140 (nucleolar phosphoprotein of 140 kDa)-related domains, and a large RS domain. The RS-cyclophilins, a novel class of proteins, may play an important role in the regulation of pre-mRNA splicing.

  1. TiTrATE: A Novel Approach to Diagnosing Acute Dizziness and Vertigo

    PubMed Central

    Newman-Toker, David E.; Edlow, Jonathan A.

    2015-01-01

    Diagnosing dizziness can be challenging, and the consequences of missing dangerous causes such as stroke can be substantial. Most physicians use a diagnostic paradigm developed over 40 years ago that focuses on the type of dizziness (e.g., vertigo vs. non-vertigo), but this approach is flawed. In this article we propose a new paradigm based on symptom timing, triggers, and targeted bedside eye examinations (‘TiTrATE’). Using timing and triggers, patients with recent-onset dizziness will fall into one of four major ‘syndrome’ categories (triggered episodic, spontaneous episodic, post-exposure acute, and spontaneous acute), each with its own differential diagnosis and set of targeted examination techniques that help clinicians make a specific diagnosis. Following an evidence-based approach such as this could help reduce the frequency of misdiagnosis of serious causes of dizziness. PMID:26231273

  2. Discrete wavelet transform coupled with ANN for daily discharge forecasting into Três Marias reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, C. A. G.; Freire, P. K. M. M.; Silva, G. B. L.; Silva, R. M.

    2014-09-01

    This paper proposes the use of discrete wavelet transform (DWT) to remove the high-frequency components (details) of an original signal, because the noises generally present in time series (e.g. streamflow records) may influence the prediction quality. Cleaner signals could then be used as inputs to an artificial neural network (ANN) in order to improve the model performance of daily discharge forecasting. Wavelet analysis provides useful decompositions of original time series in high and low frequency components. The present application uses the Coiflet wavelets to decompose hydrological data, as there have been few reports in the literature. Finally, the proposed technique is tested using the inflow records to the Três Marias reservoir in São Francisco River basin, Brazil. This transformed signal is used as input for an ANN model to forecast inflows seven days ahead, and the error RMSE decreased by more than 50% (i.e. from 454.2828 to 200.0483).

  3. Magnetic liposomes and entrapping : time-resolved neutron scattering TR-SANS and electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nawroth, Thomas; Rusp, Monika; May, Roland P.

    2004-07-01

    Magnetic liposomes were prepared by a novel method from stabilized iron-complex solutions and biogenic phospholipids using a pH-jump procedure. During preparation Boron was entrapped inside the liposomes. This enables the later application in Neutron capture cancer therapy, a local radiation therapy, as well as rheological experiments with magnetic tweezers. The formation of the liposomes and the internal iron oxide structure was observed by time-resolved neutron scattering TR-SANS and electron microscopy using a stopped-flow mixing device. The liposome size was estimated by dynamic light scattering (DLS) also. Under selected conditions, the iron oxide was obtained as shell located at the inner surface of the lipid layer. Thus the internal volume was free for entrapping of other material, e.g. the Boron compounds for Neutron capture or drug targetting applications. The magnetic shell liposomes revealed a typical size of 100-400nm, as required for applications in vivo.

  4. POSSIBLE TRANSIT TIMING VARIATIONS OF THE TrES-3 PLANETARY SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Ing-Guey; Wu, Yu-Ting; Chien, Ping; Lin, Yi-Ling; Chen, Hong-Yu; Hu, Juei-Hwa; Yeh, Li-Chin; Thakur, Parijat; Sun Zhao; Ji Jianghui

    2013-03-15

    Five newly observed transit light curves of the TrES-3 planetary system are presented. Together with other light-curve data from the literature, 23 transit light curves in total, which cover an overall timescale of 911 epochs, have been analyzed through a standard procedure. From these observational data, the system's orbital parameters are determined and possible transit timing variations (TTVs) are investigated. Given that a null TTV produces a fit with reduced {chi}{sup 2} = 1.52, our results agree with previous work, that TTVs might not exist in these data. However, a one-frequency oscillating TTV model, giving a fit with a reduced {chi}{sup 2} = 0.93, does possess a statistically higher probability. It is thus concluded that future observations and dynamical simulations for this planetary system will be very important.

  5. T/R Multi-Chip MMIC Modules for 150 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samoska, Lorene A.; Pukala, David M.; Soria, Mary M.; Sadowy, Gregory A.

    2009-01-01

    Modules containing multiple monolithic microwave integrated-circuit (MMIC) chips have been built as prototypes of transmitting/receiving (T/R) modules for millimeter-wavelength radar systems, including phased-array radar systems to be used for diverse purposes that could include guidance and avoidance of hazards for landing spacecraft, imaging systems for detecting hidden weapons, and hazard-avoidance systems for automobiles. Whereas prior landing radar systems have operated at frequencies around 35 GHz, the integrated circuits in this module operate in a frequency band centered at about 150 GHz. The higher frequency (and, hence, shorter wavelength), is expected to make it possible to obtain finer spatial resolution while also using smaller antennas and thereby reducing the sizes and masses of the affected systems.

  6. An evaluation of the "TrEAT Yourself Well" restaurant nutrition campaign.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Ram N; Patterson, Paul M; Hill, Esther P; Schmitz, Troy G; Bohm, Erica

    2006-06-01

    This study examined the effect of the "TrEAT Yourself Well" campaign on diners'menu choices using data from four restaurant chains in California. Within each chain, two locations in the greater San Diego area were selected as experimental sites and either one or two locations outside the greater San Diego area were selected as control sites. Various promotional activities, including in-restaurant promotions, community events, and paid media advertising, were conducted in the experimental region to promote healthy menu entrées. The results show that the campaign was successful in reaching diners and had positive effects on their beliefs and attitudes toward healthy dining. The campaign directly increased the probability of a consumer purchasing a healthy menu item by 3.7% (p = .05). By improving consumer attitudes toward healthy menu items, the campaign indirectly increased purchases of these items by 4.4%.

  7. Pyrolytic graphite gauge for measuring heat flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunker, Robert C. (Inventor); Ewing, Mark E. (Inventor); Shipley, John L. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A gauge for measuring heat flux, especially heat flux encountered in a high temperature environment, is provided. The gauge includes at least one thermocouple and an anisotropic pyrolytic graphite body that covers at least part of, and optionally encases the thermocouple. Heat flux is incident on the anisotropic pyrolytic graphite body by arranging the gauge so that the gauge surface on which convective and radiative fluxes are incident is perpendicular to the basal planes of the pyrolytic graphite. The conductivity of the pyrolytic graphite permits energy, transferred into the pyrolytic graphite body in the form of heat flux on the incident (or facing) surface, to be quickly distributed through the entire pyrolytic graphite body, resulting in small substantially instantaneous temperature gradients. Temperature changes to the body can thereby be measured by the thermocouple, and reduced to quantify the heat flux incident to the body.

  8. Why live recording sounds better: a case study of Schumann's Träumerei

    PubMed Central

    Shoda, Haruka; Adachi, Mayumi

    2015-01-01

    We explore the concept that artists perform best in front of an audience. The negative effects of performance anxiety are much better known than their related cousin on the other shoulder: the positive effects of “social facilitation.” The present study, however, reveals a listener's preference for performances recorded in front of an audience. In Study 1, we prepared two types of recordings of Träumerei performed by 13 pianists: recordings in front of an audience and those with no audience. According to the evaluation by 153 listeners, the recordings performed in front of an audience sounded better, suggesting that the presence of an audience enhanced or facilitated the performance. In Study 2, we analyzed pianists' durational and dynamic expressions. According to the functional principal components analyses, we found that the expression of “Träumerei” consisted of three components: the overall quantity, the cross-sectional contrast between the final and the remaining sections, and the control of the expressive variability. Pianists' expressions were targeted more to the “average” of the cross-sectional variation in the audience-present than in the audience-absent recordings. In Study 3, we explored a model that explained listeners' responses induced by pianists' acoustical expressions, using path analyses. The final model indicated that the cross-sectional variation of the duration and that of the dynamics determined listeners' evaluations of the quality and the emotionally moving experience, respectively. In line with human's preferences for commonality, the more “average” the durational expressions were in live recording, the better the listeners' evaluations were regardless of their musical experiences. Only the well-experienced listeners (at least 16 years of musical training) were moved more by the “deviated” dynamic expressions in live recording, suggesting a link between the experienced listener's emotional experience and the unique

  9. Millimagnitude Optical Photometry for the Transiting Planetary Candidate OGLE-TR-109

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, José Miguel; Minniti, Dante; Pietrzynski, Grzegorz; Gieren, Wolfgang; Ruíz, María Teresa; Zoccali, Manuela; Udalski, Andrzej; Szeifert, Thomas

    2006-08-01

    We present precise V-band photometry for the low-amplitude transit candidate star OGLE-TR-109. This is an extreme case among the transiting candidates found by the OGLE group because of the early spectral type of the star (F0 V), the low transit amplitude (AI=0.008 mag), and the very short period (P=0.58909 days) of the orbiting companion. Using difference image photometry, we are able to achieve millimagnitude errors in the individual data points. One transit of this star is well defined in our light curve. This confirms the OGLE detection and rules out the possibility of a false positive. The measurement of this transit allows us to refine the transit amplitude (AV=0.006+/-0.001 mag) and the ephemerides for this interesting system, as well as the radius of the possible orbiting companion (RP=0.90RJ+/-0.09RJ) and the inclination of the orbit (i=77deg+/-5deg). Two other transits observed at lower S/N confirm the period of this system measured by OGLE. There is no evidence for a blend of the F-type main-sequence star with a redder eclipsing binary or for secondary transits in the present observations. The absence of ellipsoidal modulation in the light curve of the primary rules out a low-mass star companion or brown dwarf with M>14MJ+/-8MJ. The remaining possibilities for OGLE-TR-109 are a blend between the F-type star and a binary with a bluer primary star, or a new transiting extrasolar planet. Based on observations collected with the Very Large Telescope at Paranal Observatory [ESO Program 075.C-0427(A), J. M. F. and D. M. visiting observers].

  10. TrOn: an anatomical ontology for the beetle Tribolium castaneum.

    PubMed

    Dönitz, Jürgen; Grossmann, Daniela; Schild, Inga; Schmitt-Engel, Christian; Bradler, Sven; Prpic, Nikola-Michael; Bucher, Gregor

    2013-01-01

    In a morphological ontology the expert's knowledge is represented in terms, which describe morphological structures and how these structures relate to each other. With the assistance of ontologies this expert knowledge is made processable by machines, through a formal and standardized representation of terms and their relations to each other. The red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum, a representative of the most species rich animal taxon on earth (the Coleoptera), is an emerging model organism for development, evolution, physiology, and pest control. In order to foster Tribolium research, we have initiated the Tribolium Ontology (TrOn), which describes the morphology of the red flour beetle. The content of this ontology comprises so far most external morphological structures as well as some internal ones. All modeled structures are consistently annotated for the developmental stages larva, pupa and adult. In TrOn all terms are grouped into three categories: Generic terms represent morphological structures, which are independent of a developmental stage. In contrast, downstream of such terms are concrete terms which stand for a dissectible structure of a beetle at a specific life stage. Finally, there are mixed terms describing structures that are only found at one developmental stage. These terms combine the characteristics of generic and concrete terms with features of both. These annotation principles take into account the changing morphology of the beetle during development and provide generic terms to be used in applications or for cross linking with other ontologies and data resources. We use the ontology for implementing an intuitive search function at the electronic iBeetle-Base, which stores morphological defects found in a genome wide RNA interference (RNAi) screen. The ontology is available for download at http://ibeetle-base.uni-goettingen.de.

  11. Why live recording sounds better: a case study of Schumann's Träumerei.

    PubMed

    Shoda, Haruka; Adachi, Mayumi

    2014-01-01

    We explore the concept that artists perform best in front of an audience. The negative effects of performance anxiety are much better known than their related cousin on the other shoulder: the positive effects of "social facilitation." The present study, however, reveals a listener's preference for performances recorded in front of an audience. In Study 1, we prepared two types of recordings of Träumerei performed by 13 pianists: recordings in front of an audience and those with no audience. According to the evaluation by 153 listeners, the recordings performed in front of an audience sounded better, suggesting that the presence of an audience enhanced or facilitated the performance. In Study 2, we analyzed pianists' durational and dynamic expressions. According to the functional principal components analyses, we found that the expression of "Träumerei" consisted of three components: the overall quantity, the cross-sectional contrast between the final and the remaining sections, and the control of the expressive variability. Pianists' expressions were targeted more to the "average" of the cross-sectional variation in the audience-present than in the audience-absent recordings. In Study 3, we explored a model that explained listeners' responses induced by pianists' acoustical expressions, using path analyses. The final model indicated that the cross-sectional variation of the duration and that of the dynamics determined listeners' evaluations of the quality and the emotionally moving experience, respectively. In line with human's preferences for commonality, the more "average" the durational expressions were in live recording, the better the listeners' evaluations were regardless of their musical experiences. Only the well-experienced listeners (at least 16 years of musical training) were moved more by the "deviated" dynamic expressions in live recording, suggesting a link between the experienced listener's emotional experience and the unique dynamics in music

  12. [Forensic assessment of DSM-5 posttraumatic stress disorder: a commentary on the transition from DSM-IV-TR (I)].

    PubMed

    Stevens, A; Fabra, M

    2013-12-01

    In May 2013 the American Psychiatric Association (APA) has released the latest and fifth edition of the diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (DSM-5). Like its predecessor, the DSM-IV-TR, it will have considerable impact on the science of Psychiatry. The DSM-5 describes - actually available in English - the present medical knowledge about mental disorders. In the short run, German medical science and scientific medicolegal expertises will continue to rely on the German version of the DSM-IV-TR, however, they will be difficult to defend without bearing in mind the changes that DSM-5 brings about. This report discusses the transition from DSM-IV-TR to DSM-5 with regard to posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and provides suggestions, how the criteria might be evaluated.

  13. Measurement and Prediction of H2O Outgassing Kinetics from Silica-Filled Polydimethylsiloxane TR55 and S5370

    SciTech Connect

    Dinh, L N; Burnham, A K; Schildbach, M A; Smith, R A; Maxwell, R S; Balazs, B; McLean II, W

    2006-08-28

    The isoconversional technique was employed for the measurement and prediction of H2O outgassing kinetics from silica-filled polydimethylsiloxane TR55 and S5370 in a vacuum or dry environment. Isoconversional analysis indicates that the energy barrier for H2O release from TR55 and S5370 is an increasing function of the fractional H2O release. This can be interpreted as the release of H2O from physisorbed water and then chemisorbed water with decreasing OH density from the surfaces of the embedded silica particles. Model independent predictions of H2O outgassing based on the measured kinetics follow the trend of actual isothermal outgassing at elevated temperatures, and suggest gradual outgassing in dry storage over many decades at low temperatures for both TR55 and S5370.

  14. Data model and relational database design for the New Jersey Water-Transfer Data System (NJWaTr)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tessler, Steven

    2003-01-01

    The New Jersey Water-Transfer Data System (NJWaTr) is a database design for the storage and retrieval of water-use data. NJWaTr can manage data encompassing many facets of water use, including (1) the tracking of various types of water-use activities (withdrawals, returns, transfers, distributions, consumptive-use, wastewater collection, and treatment); (2) the storage of descriptions, classifications and locations of places and organizations involved in water-use activities; (3) the storage of details about measured or estimated volumes of water associated with water-use activities; and (4) the storage of information about data sources and water resources associated with water use. In NJWaTr, each water transfer occurs unidirectionally between two site objects, and the sites and conveyances form a water network. The core entities in the NJWaTr model are site, conveyance, transfer/volume, location, and owner. Other important entities include water resource (used for withdrawals and returns), data source, permit, and alias. Multiple water-exchange estimates based on different methods or data sources can be stored for individual transfers. Storage of user-defined details is accommodated for several of the main entities. Many tables contain classification terms to facilitate the detailed description of data items and can be used for routine or custom data summarization. NJWaTr accommodates single-user and aggregate-user water-use data, can be used for large or small water-network projects, and is available as a stand-alone Microsoft? Access database. Data stored in the NJWaTr structure can be retrieved in user-defined combinations to serve visualization and analytical applications. Users can customize and extend the database, link it to other databases, or implement the design in other relational database applications.

  15. TransRapid TR-07 maglev-spectrum magnetic field effects on daily pineal indoleamine metabolic rhythms in rodents

    SciTech Connect

    Groh, K.R.

    1993-01-01

    This study examined the effects on pineal function of magnetic field (MF) exposures (ac and dc components) similar to those produced by the TransRapid TR-07 and other electromagnetic maglev systems (EMS). Rats were entrained to a light-dark cycle and then exposed to a continuous, or to an inverted, intermittent (on = 45 s, off = 15 s, induced current = 267 G/s) simulated multifrequency ac and dc magnetic field (MF) at 1 or 7 times the TR-07 maglev vehicle MF intensity for 2 hr. Other groups of rats were exposed to only the ac or the dc-component of the maglev MF. For comparison, one group was exposed to an inverted, intermittent 60-Hz MF. Each group was compared to an unexposed group of rats for changes in pineal melatonin and serotonin-N-acetyltransferase (NAT). MF exposures at an intensity equivalent to that produced by the TR-07 vehicle had no effect on melatonin or NAT compared with sham-exposed animals under any of the conditions examined. However, 7X TR-07-level continuous 2-h MF exposures significantly depressed pineal NAT by 45%. Pineal melatonin was also depressed 33--43% by a continuous 7X TR-07 MF exposure and 28% by an intermittent 60-Hz 850-mG MF, but the results were not statically significant. This study demonstrates that intermittent, combined ac and dc MFs similar to those produced by the TR-07 EMS maglev vehicle alter the normal circadian rhythm of pineal indoleamine metabolism. The pineal regulatory enzyme NAT was more sensitive to MF exposure than melatonin and may be a more desirable measure of the biological effects of MF exposure.

  16. TransRapid TR-07 maglev-spectrum magnetic field effects on daily pineal indoleamine metabolic rhythms in rodents

    SciTech Connect

    Groh, K.R.

    1993-06-01

    This study examined the effects on pineal function of magnetic field (MF) exposures (ac and dc components) similar to those produced by the TransRapid TR-07 and other electromagnetic maglev systems (EMS). Rats were entrained to a light-dark cycle and then exposed to a continuous, or to an inverted, intermittent (on = 45 s, off = 15 s, induced current = 267 G/s) simulated multifrequency ac and dc magnetic field (MF) at 1 or 7 times the TR-07 maglev vehicle MF intensity for 2 hr. Other groups of rats were exposed to only the ac or the dc-component of the maglev MF. For comparison, one group was exposed to an inverted, intermittent 60-Hz MF. Each group was compared to an unexposed group of rats for changes in pineal melatonin and serotonin-N-acetyltransferase (NAT). MF exposures at an intensity equivalent to that produced by the TR-07 vehicle had no effect on melatonin or NAT compared with sham-exposed animals under any of the conditions examined. However, 7X TR-07-level continuous 2-h MF exposures significantly depressed pineal NAT by 45%. Pineal melatonin was also depressed 33--43% by a continuous 7X TR-07 MF exposure and 28% by an intermittent 60-Hz 850-mG MF, but the results were not statically significant. This study demonstrates that intermittent, combined ac and dc MFs similar to those produced by the TR-07 EMS maglev vehicle alter the normal circadian rhythm of pineal indoleamine metabolism. The pineal regulatory enzyme NAT was more sensitive to MF exposure than melatonin and may be a more desirable measure of the biological effects of MF exposure.

  17. Fluxing agent for metal cast joining

    DOEpatents

    Gunkel, Ronald W.; Podey, Larry L.; Meyer, Thomas N.

    2002-11-05

    A method of joining an aluminum cast member to an aluminum component. The method includes the steps of coating a surface of an aluminum component with flux comprising cesium fluoride, placing the flux coated component in a mold, filling the mold with molten aluminum alloy, and allowing the molten aluminum alloy to solidify thereby joining a cast member to the aluminum component. The flux preferably includes aluminum fluoride and alumina. A particularly preferred flux includes about 60 wt. % CsF, about 30 wt. % AlF.sub.3, and about 10 wt. % Al.sub.2 O.sub.3.

  18. Siphon flows in isolated magnetic flux tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, John H.

    1988-01-01

    The paper considers steady siphon flows in isolated thin magnetic flux tubes surrounded by field-free gas, with plasma beta greater than or equal to 1, appropriate for conditions in the solar photosphere. The cross-sectional area of the flux tube varies along the tube in response to pressure changes induced by the siphon flow. Consideration is also given to steady isothermal siphon flows in arched magnetic flux tubes in a stratified atmosphere. Applications of the results to intense magnetic flux tubes in the solar photosphere and to the photospheric Evershed flow in a sunspot penumbra are addressed.

  19. Parity-time symmetry under magnetic flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, L.; Song, Z.

    2016-06-01

    We study a parity-time-(PT -) symmetric ring lattice, with one pair of balanced gain and loss located at opposite positions. The system remains PT -symmetric when threaded by a magnetic flux; however, the PT symmetry is sensitive to the magnetic flux in the presence of a large balanced gain and loss, or in a large system. We find a threshold gain or loss above which any nontrivial magnetic flux breaks the PT symmetry. We obtain the maximally tolerable magnetic flux for the exact PT -symmetric phase, which is approximately linearly dependent on a weak gain or loss.

  20. Flux-mediated diffuse mismatch model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loh, G. C.; Tay, B. K.; Teo, E. H. T.

    2010-09-01

    The diffuse mismatch model (DMM) is modified to account for the effect of thermal flux on phonon transmission at interfaces. This new model, the flux-mediated diffuse mismatch model (FMDMM) takes a slightly different approach in its formulation, and does not employ the principle of detailed balance. Two competing processes—an increase in the flux coefficient, and a decrease in the rest of the transmission term, may result in either a rise or fall in thermal boundary resistance when thermal flux is increased. This might partially explain the large disparities between experimental, theoretical, and simulated results of thermal boundary resistance.

  1. Chloride flux out of Yellowstone National Park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Norton, D.R.; Friedman, I.

    1985-01-01

    Monitoring of the chloride concentration, electrical conductivity, and discharge was carried out for the four major rivers of Yellowstone National Park from September 1982 to January 1984. Chloride flux out of the Park was determined from the measured values of chloride concentration and discharge. The annual chloride flux from the Park was 5.86 ?? 1010 g. Of this amount 45% was from the Madison River drainage basin, 32% from the Yellowstone River basin, 12% from the Snake River basin, and 11% from the Falls River basin. Of the annual chloride flux from the Yellowstone River drainage basin 36% was attributed to the Yellowstone Lake drainage basin. The geothermal contribution to the chloride flux was determined by subtracting the chloride contribution from rock weathering and atmospheric precipitation and is 94% of the total chloride flux. Calculations of the geothermal chloride flux for each river are given and the implications of an additional chloride flux out of the western Park boundary discussed. An anomalous increase in chloride flux out of the Park was observed for several weeks prior to the Mt. Borah earthquake in Central Idaho on October 28, 1983, reaching a peak value shortly thereafter. It is suggested that the rise in flux was a precursor of the earthquake. The information in this paper provides baseline data against which future changes in the hydrothermal systems can be measured. It also provides measurements related to the thermal contributions from the different drainage basins of the Park. ?? 1985.

  2. Helical flux ropes in solar prominences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martens, P. C. H.; Van Ballegooijen, A. A.

    1990-01-01

    The present numerical method for the computation of force-free, cancelling magnetic structures shows that flux cancellation at the neutral line in a sheared magnetic arcade generates helical field lines that can support a prominence's plasma. With increasing flux cancellation, the axis of the helical fields moves to greater heights; this is suggestive of a prominence eruption. Two alternative scenarios are proposed for the formation of polar crown prominences which yield the correct axial magnetic field sign. Both models are noted to retain the formation of helical flux tubes through flux cancellation as their key feature.

  3. Charm contribution to the atmospheric neutrino flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halzen, Francis; Wille, Logan

    2016-07-01

    We revisit the estimate of the charm particle contribution to the atmospheric neutrino flux that is expected to dominate at high energies because long-lived high-energy pions and kaons interact in the atmosphere before decaying into neutrinos. We focus on the production of forward charm particles which carry a large fraction of the momentum of the incident proton. In the case of strange particles, such a component is familiar from the abundant production of K+Λ pairs. These forward charm particles can dominate the high-energy atmospheric neutrino flux in underground experiments. Modern collider experiments have no coverage in the very large rapidity region where charm forward pair production dominates. Using archival accelerator data as well as IceCube measurements of atmospheric electron and muon neutrino fluxes, we obtain an upper limit on forward D¯0Λc pair production and on the associated flux of high-energy atmospheric neutrinos. We conclude that the prompt flux may dominate the much-studied central component and represent a significant contribution to the TeV atmospheric neutrino flux. Importantly, it cannot accommodate the PeV flux of high-energy cosmic neutrinos, or the excess of events observed by IceCube in the 30-200 TeV energy range indicating either structure in the flux of cosmic accelerators, or a presence of more than one component in the cosmic flux observed.

  4. T-R Cycle Characterization and Imaging: Advanced Diagnostic Methodology for Petroleum Reservoir and Trap Detection and Delineation

    SciTech Connect

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2006-08-30

    Characterization of stratigraphic sequences (T-R cycles or sequences) included outcrop studies, well log analysis and seismic reflection interpretation. These studies were performed by researchers at the University of Alabama, Wichita State University and McGill University. The outcrop, well log and seismic characterization studies were used to develop a depositional sequence model, a T-R cycle (sequence) model, and a sequence stratigraphy predictive model. The sequence stratigraphy predictive model developed in this study is based primarily on the modified T-R cycle (sequence) model. The T-R cycle (sequence) model using transgressive and regressive systems tracts and aggrading, backstepping, and infilling intervals or sections was found to be the most appropriate sequence stratigraphy model for the strata in the onshore interior salt basins of the Gulf of Mexico to improve petroleum stratigraphic trap and specific reservoir facies imaging, detection and delineation. The known petroleum reservoirs of the Mississippi Interior and North Louisiana Salt Basins were classified using T-R cycle (sequence) terminology. The transgressive backstepping reservoirs have been the most productive of oil, and the transgressive backstepping and regressive infilling reservoirs have been the most productive of gas. Exploration strategies were formulated using the sequence stratigraphy predictive model and the classification of the known petroleum reservoirs utilizing T-R cycle (sequence) terminology. The well log signatures and seismic reflector patterns were determined to be distinctive for the aggrading, backstepping and infilling sections of the T-R cycle (sequence) and as such, well log and seismic data are useful for recognizing and defining potential reservoir facies. The use of the sequence stratigraphy predictive model, in combination with the knowledge of how the distinctive characteristics of the T-R system tracts and their subdivisions are expressed in well log patterns

  5. Self-organization in magnetic flux ropes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukin, Vyacheslav S.

    2014-06-01

    This cross-disciplinary special issue on 'Self-organization in magnetic flux ropes' follows in the footsteps of another collection of manuscripts dedicated to the subject of magnetic flux ropes, a volume on 'Physics of magnetic flux ropes' published in the American Geophysical Union's Geophysical Monograph Series in 1990 [1]. Twenty-four years later, this special issue, composed of invited original contributions highlighting ongoing research on the physics of magnetic flux ropes in astrophysical, space and laboratory plasmas, can be considered an update on our state of understanding of this fundamental constituent of any magnetized plasma. Furthermore, by inviting contributions from research groups focused on the study of the origins and properties of magnetic flux ropes in a variety of different environments, we have attempted to underline both the diversity of and the commonalities among magnetic flux ropes throughout the solar system and, indeed, the universe. So, what is a magnetic flux rope? The answer will undoubtedly depend on whom you ask. A flux rope can be as narrow as a few Larmor radii and as wide as the Sun (see, e.g., the contributions by Heli Hietala et al and by Angelous Vourlidas). As described below by Ward Manchester IV et al , they can stretch from the Sun to the Earth in the form of interplanetary coronal mass ejections. Or, as in the Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment described by David Schaffner et al , they can fit into a meter-long laboratory device tended by college students. They can be helical and line-tied (see, e.g., Walter Gekelman et al or J Sears et al ), or toroidal and periodic (see, e.g., John O'Bryan et al or Philippa Browning et al ). They can form in the low plasma beta environment of the solar corona (Tibor Török et al ), the order unity beta plasmas of the solar wind (Stefan Eriksson et al ) and the plasma pressure dominated stellar convection zones (Nicholas Nelson and Mark Miesch). In this special issue, Setthivoine You

  6. Magnetic Flux Compression in Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velikovich, A. L.

    2012-10-01

    Magnetic flux compression (MFC) as a method for producing ultra-high pulsed magnetic fields had been originated in the 1950s by Sakharov et al. at Arzamas in the USSR (now VNIIEF, Russia) and by Fowler et al. at Los Alamos in the US. The highest magnetic field produced by explosively driven MFC generator, 28 MG, was reported by Boyko et al. of VNIIEF. The idea of using MFC to increase the magnetic field in a magnetically confined plasma to 3-10 MG, relaxing the strict requirements on the plasma density and Lawson time, gave rise to the research area known as MTF in the US and MAGO in Russia. To make a difference in ICF, a magnetic field of ˜100 MG should be generated via MFC by a plasma liner as a part of the capsule compression scenario on a laser or pulsed power facility. This approach was first suggested in mid-1980s by Liberman and Velikovich in the USSR and Felber in the US. It has not been obvious from the start that it could work at all, given that so many mechanisms exist for anomalously fast penetration of magnetic field through plasma. And yet, many experiments stimulated by this proposal since 1986, mostly using pulsed-power drivers, demonstrated reasonably good flux compression up to ˜42 MG, although diagnostics of magnetic fields of such magnitude in HED plasmas is still problematic. The new interest of MFC in plasmas emerged with the advancement of new drivers, diagnostic methods and simulation tools. Experiments on MFC in a deuterium plasma filling a cylindrical plastic liner imploded by OMEGA laser beam led by Knauer, Betti et al. at LLE produced peak fields of 36 MG. The novel MagLIF approach to low-cost, high-efficiency ICF pursued by Herrmann, Slutz, Vesey et al. at Sandia involves pulsed-power-driven MFC to a peak field of ˜130 MG in a DT plasma. A review of the progress, current status and future prospects of MFC in plasmas is presented.

  7. Chaos in Magnetic Flux Ropes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gekelman, W. N.; DeHaas, T.; Van Compernolle, B.

    2013-12-01

    Magnetic Flux Ropes Immersed in a uniform magnetoplasma are observed to twist about themselves, writhe about each other and rotate about a central axis. They are kink unstable and smash into one another as they move. Full three dimensional magnetic field and flows are measured at thousands of time steps. Each collision results in magnetic field line generation and the generation of a quasi-seperatrix layer and induced electric fields. Three dimensional magnetic field lines are computed by conditionally averaging the data using correlation techniques. The permutation entropy1 ,which is related to the Lyapunov exponent, can be calculated from the the time series of the magnetic field data (this is also done with flows) and used to calculate the positions of the data on a Jensen Shannon complexity map2. The location of data on this map indicates if the magnetic fields are stochastic, or fall into regions of minimal or maximal complexity. The complexity is a function of space and time. The complexity map, and analysis will be explained in the course of the talk. Other types of chaotic dynamical models such as the Lorentz, Gissinger and Henon process also fall on the map and can give a clue to the nature of the flux rope turbulence. The ropes fall in the region of the C-H plane where chaotic systems lie. The entropy and complexity change in space and time which reflects the change and possibly type of chaos associated with the ropes. The maps give insight as to the type of chaos (deterministic chaos, fractional diffusion , Levi flights..) and underlying dynamical process. The power spectra of much of the magnetic and flow data is exponential and Lorentzian structures in the time domain are embedded in them. Other quantities such as the Hurst exponent are evaluated for both magnetic fields and plasma flow. Work Supported by a UC-LANL Lab fund and the Basic Plasma Science Facility which is funded by DOE and NSF. 1) C. Bandt, B. Pompe, Phys. Rev. Lett., 88,174102 (2007) 2

  8. Comparison of the high temperature heat flux sensor to traditional heat flux gages under high heat flux conditions.

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchat, Thomas K.; Hanks, Charles R.

    2013-04-01

    Four types of heat flux gages (Gardon, Schmidt-Boelter, Directional Flame Temperature, and High Temperature Heat Flux Sensor) were assessed and compared under flux conditions ranging between 100-1000 kW/m2, such as those seen in hydrocarbon fire or propellant fire conditions. Short duration step and pulse boundary conditions were imposed using a six-panel cylindrical array of high-temperature tungsten lamps. Overall, agreement between all gages was acceptable for the pulse tests and also for the step tests. However, repeated tests with the HTHFS with relatively long durations at temperatures approaching 1000ÀC showed a substantial decrease (10-25%) in heat flux subsequent to the initial test, likely due to the mounting technique. New HTHFS gages have been ordered to allow additional tests to determine the cause of the flux reduction.

  9. Dual Active Surface Heat Flux Gage Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebert, Curt H.; Kolodziej, Paul

    1995-01-01

    A unique plug-type heat flux gage probe was tested in the NASA Ames Research Center 2x9 turbulent flow duct facility. The probe was fabricated by welding a miniature dual active surface heat flux gage body to the end of a hollow metal cylindrical bolt containing a metal inner tube. Cooling air flows through the inner tube, impinges onto the back of the gage body and then flows out through the annulus formed between the inner tube and the hollow bolt wall. Heat flux was generated in the duct facility with a Huels arc heater. The duct had a rectangular cross section and one wall was fabricated from 2.54 centimeter thick thermal insulation rigid surface material mounted onto an aluminum plate. To measure heat flux, the probe was inserted through the plate and insulating materials with the from of the gage located flush with the hot gas-side insulation surface. Absorbed heat fluxes measured with the probe were compared with absorbed heat fluxes measured with six water-cooled reference calorimeters. These calorimeters were located in a water-cooled metal duct wall which was located across from the probe position. Correspondence of transient and steady heat fluxes measured with the reference calorimeters and heat flux gage probe was generally within a satisfactory plus or minus 10 percent. This good correspondence was achieved even though the much cooler probe caused a large surface temperature disruption of 1000K between the metal gage and the insulation. However, this temperature disruption did not seriously effect the accuracy of the heat flux measurement. A current application for dual active surface heat flux gages is for transient and steady absorbed heat flux, surface temperature and heat transfer coefficient measurements on the surface of an oxidizer turbine inlet deflector operating in a space shuttle test bed engine.

  10. Neutron Flux Perturbations due to Infinite Plane Absorbers IV: The Exponential Flux Revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, M.M.R

    2002-02-15

    Flux depression factors and measures of asymmetry are presented for an absorbing and scattering slab in an infinite medium in which there is an overall exponential flux. One speed transport theory is employed. The effect of the slab on the exponential flux is determined and the necessary correction factors to recover the unperturbed flux from the activation of the slab are calculated. Although this is an old problem, we present here a new formalism which highlights clearly some important physical aspects.

  11. PHELIX for flux compression studies

    SciTech Connect

    Turchi, Peter J; Rousculp, Christopher L; Reinovsky, Robert E; Reass, William A; Griego, Jeffrey R; Oro, David M; Merrill, Frank E

    2010-06-28

    PHELIX (Precision High Energy-density Liner Implosion eXperiment) is a concept for studying electromagnetic implosions using proton radiography. This approach requires a portable pulsed power and liner implosion apparatus that can be operated in conjunction with an 800 MeV proton beam at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. The high resolution (< 100 micron) provided by proton radiography combined with similar precision of liner implosions driven electromagnetically can permit close comparisons of multi-frame experimental data and numerical simulations within a single dynamic event. To achieve a portable implosion system for use at high energy-density in a proton laboratory area requires sub-megajoule energies applied to implosions only a few cms in radial and axial dimension. The associated inductance changes are therefore relatively modest, so a current step-up transformer arrangement is employed to avoid excessive loss to parasitic inductances that are relatively large for low-energy banks comprising only several capacitors and switches. We describe the design, construction and operation of the PHELIX system and discuss application to liner-driven, magnetic flux compression experiments. For the latter, the ability of strong magnetic fields to deflect the proton beam may offer a novel technique for measurement of field distributions near perturbed surfaces.

  12. Extraterrestrial high energy neutrino fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.

    1979-01-01

    Using the most recent cosmic ray spectra up to 2x10 to the 20th power eV, production spectra of high energy neutrinos from cosmic ray interactions with interstellar gas and extragalactic interactions of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays with 3K universal background photons are presented and discussed. Estimates of the fluxes from cosmic diffuse sources and the nearby quasar 3C273 are made using the generic relationship between secondary neutrinos and gammas and using recent gamma ray satellite data. These gamma ray data provide important upper limits on cosmological neutrinos. Quantitative estimates of the observability of high energy neutrinos from the inner galaxy and 3C273 above atmospheric background for a DUMAND type detector are discussed in the context of the Weinberg-Salam model with sq sin theta omega = 0.2 and including the atmospheric background from the decay of charmed mesons. Constraints on cosmological high energy neutrino production models are also discussed. It appears that important high energy neutrino astronomy may be possible with DUMAND, but very long observing times are required.

  13. Pulmonary transvascular flux of transferrin

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, J.A.; Malik, A.B. )

    1989-11-01

    We compared the pulmonary transvascular fluxes of transferrin and albumin in the intact sheep lung. Anesthetized sheep were prepared with lung lymph fistulas. The vascular blood pool was marked with {sup 99m}Tc-erythrocytes, autologous transferrin was labeled with {sup 113m}In, and albumin was labeled with {sup 125}I. Samples of blood, plasma, lymph, and lung were obtained up to 180 min after tracer infusion. Lymph tissue radioactivities were corrected for the intravascular component and expressed as extravascular-to-plasma concentration ratios. Clearance of transferrin and albumin from the plasma space followed a two-compartment model. The clearance rate constant was 2.1 {plus minus} 0.1 x 10(-3) min for albumin and 2.4 {plus minus} 0.1 x 10(-3) min for transferrin (P less than 0.05). Lymph-to-plasma ratios for albumin and transferrin were not different. However, the extravascular-to-plasma ratio for albumin was greater than transferrin (P less than 0.05). The lymph and lung data were deconvoluted for the plasma input function and fit to a two-compartment model. The results indicate that albumin and transferrin have similar permeabilities across the vascular barrier but have different pulmonary circulation to lymph kinetics because the extravascular volume of distribution of albumin is greater than transferrin.

  14. Chaos in magnetic flux ropes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gekelman, Walter; Van Compernolle, Bart; DeHaas, Tim; Vincena, Stephen

    2014-06-01

    Magnetic flux ropes immersed in a uniform magnetoplasma are observed to twist about themselves, writhe about each other and rotate about a central axis. They are kink unstable and smash into one another as they move. Each collision results in magnetic field line reconnection and the generation of a quasi-separatrix layer. Three-dimensional magnetic field lines are computed by conditionally averaging the data using correlation techniques. Conditional averaging is possible for only a number of rotation cycles as the field line motion becomes chaotic. The permutation entropy can be calculated from the time series of the magnetic field data (this is also done with flows) and is used to calculate the positions of the data on a Jensen-Shannon complexity map. The location of data on this map indicates if the magnetic fields are stochastic, or fall into regions of minimal or maximal complexity. The complexity is a function of space and time. The Lyapunov and Hurst exponents are calculated and the complexity and permutation entropy of the flows and field components are shown throughout the volume.

  15. Heat flux viscosity in collisional magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.; Fox, W.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2015-05-15

    Momentum transport in collisional magnetized plasmas due to gradients in the heat flux, a “heat flux viscosity,” is demonstrated. Even though no net particle flux is associated with a heat flux, in a plasma there can still be momentum transport owing to the velocity dependence of the Coulomb collision frequency, analogous to the thermal force. This heat-flux viscosity may play an important role in numerous plasma environments, in particular, in strongly driven high-energy-density plasma, where strong heat flux can dominate over ordinary plasma flows. The heat flux viscosity can influence the dynamics of the magnetic field in plasmas through the generalized Ohm's law and may therefore play an important role as a dissipation mechanism allowing magnetic field line reconnection. The heat flux viscosity is calculated directly using the finite-difference method of Epperlein and Haines [Phys. Fluids 29, 1029 (1986)], which is shown to be more accurate than Braginskii's method [S. I. Braginskii, Rev. Plasma Phys. 1, 205 (1965)], and confirmed with one-dimensional collisional particle-in-cell simulations. The resulting transport coefficients are tabulated for ease of application.

  16. Surface Flux Modeling for Air Quality Applications

    EPA Science Inventory

    For many gasses and aerosols, dry deposition is an important sink of atmospheric mass. Dry deposition fluxes are also important sources of pollutants to terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. The surface fluxes of some gases, such as ammonia, mercury, and certain volatile organic c...

  17. AmeriFlux US-Dia Diablo

    DOE Data Explorer

    Wharton, Sonia [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Dia Diablo. Site Description - The site is on land owned by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (Site 300) and has no grazing or management history since the 1950's except for summer-time burning of selected acres for fire management (not included in the tower footprint).

  18. The minimum flux corona; theory or concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Underwood, J. H.; Antiochos, S. K.

    1980-01-01

    The reply to the criticisms of the minimum flux theory is discussed. These criticisms are correct in substance, as well as in detail. Counter arguments that the minimum flux corona theory is untenable, because of errors in its formulation, are presented.

  19. Fast flux module detection using matroid theory.

    PubMed

    Reimers, Arne C; Bruggeman, Frank J; Olivier, Brett G; Stougie, Leen

    2015-05-01

    Flux balance analysis (FBA) is one of the most often applied methods on genome-scale metabolic networks. Although FBA uniquely determines the optimal yield, the pathway that achieves this is usually not unique. The analysis of the optimal-yield flux space has been an open challenge. Flux variability analysis is only capturing some properties of the flux space, while elementary mode analysis is intractable due to the enormous number of elementary modes. However, it has been found by Kelk et al. (2012) that the space of optimal-yield fluxes decomposes into flux modules. These decompositions allow a much easier but still comprehensive analysis of the optimal-yield flux space. Using the mathematical definition of module introduced by Müller and Bockmayr (2013b), we discovered useful connections to matroid theory, through which efficient algorithms enable us to compute the decomposition into modules in a few seconds for genome-scale networks. Using that every module can be represented by one reaction that represents its function, in this article, we also present a method that uses this decomposition to visualize the interplay of modules. We expect the new method to replace flux variability analysis in the pipelines for metabolic networks. PMID:25565150

  20. AmeriFlux US-Ivo Ivotuk

    SciTech Connect

    Oechel, Walter; Zona, Donatella

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Ivo Ivotuk. Site Description - This site is 300 km south of Barrow and is located at the foothill of the Brooks Range and is classified as tussock sedge, dwarf-shrub, moss tundra.

  1. AmeriFlux US-Atq Atqasuk

    SciTech Connect

    Oechel, Walt; Zona, Donatella

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Atq Atqasuk. Site Description - This site is 100 km south of Barrow, Alaska, Variety of moist-wet coastal sedge tundra, and moist-tussock tundra surfaces in the more well-drained upland.

  2. AmeriFlux US-Brw Barrow

    SciTech Connect

    Oechel, Walt; Zona, Donatella

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Brw Barrow. Site Description - The local landscape surrounding the Barrow site has a history absent of any disturbances. The terrain was not heavily glaciated during the last period of glaciation. The vegetation is mature in an unmanaged and undisturbed Arctic tundra.

  3. Heat flux viscosity in collisional magnetized plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C.; Fox, W.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2015-05-01

    Momentum transport in collisional magnetized plasmas due to gradients in the heat flux, a "heat flux viscosity," is demonstrated. Even though no net particle flux is associated with a heat flux, in a plasma there can still be momentum transport owing to the velocity dependence of the Coulomb collision frequency, analogous to the thermal force. This heat-flux viscosity may play an important role in numerous plasma environments, in particular, in strongly driven high-energy-density plasma, where strong heat flux can dominate over ordinary plasma flows. The heat flux viscosity can influence the dynamics of the magnetic field in plasmas through the generalized Ohm's law and may therefore play an important role as a dissipation mechanism allowing magnetic field line reconnection. The heat flux viscosity is calculated directly using the finite-difference method of Epperlein and Haines [Phys. Fluids 29, 1029 (1986)], which is shown to be more accurate than Braginskii's method [S. I. Braginskii, Rev. Plasma Phys. 1, 205 (1965)], and confirmed with one-dimensional collisional particle-in-cell simulations. The resulting transport coefficients are tabulated for ease of application.

  4. Nitrous oxide fluxes in an ecosystem context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groffman, P. M.; Burgin, A. J.; Morse, J. L.

    2011-12-01

    Nitrous oxide fluxes are extremely difficult to quantify because this gas is produced by multiple processes that have complex controls that vary in time and space. Fluxes often exhibit extraordinary variability, with activity dominated by brief periods (hot moments) and small areas (hotspots) of flux. One approach to evaluating nitrous oxide is to focus on how flux is linked to overall patterns of nitrogen cycling in an ecosystem which can point to potential hotspots and hot moments that be incorporated into sampling campaigns. A key impediment to this approach, has been an inability to quantify the ratio of nitrous oxide to dinitrogen produced during dissimilatory processes, especially denitrification. Here we present data on nitrous oxide and dinitrogen fluxes from watershed/landscape studies at National Science Foundation funded Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) sites in Maryland (Baltimore LTER) and New Hampshire (Hubbard Brook LTER). Fluxes were measured using a new direct flow soil core incubation system that allows for quantification of the nitrous oxide yield during denitrification and the watershed/landscape studies provide data on overall ecosystem nitrogen cycling. Results suggest that nitrous oxide flux and yield vary coherently with spatial and temporal patterns of ecosystem nitrogen cycling. These patterns should allow us to develop more focused measurement and modeling campaigns that should result in improved understanding and estimates of nitrous oxide fluxes from forest ecosystems.

  5. METHOD AND FLUX COMPOSITION FOR TREATING URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Foote, F.

    1958-08-23

    ABS>A flux composition is described fer use with molten uranium or uranium alloys. The flux consists of about 46 weight per cent calcium fiuoride, 46 weight per cent magnesium fluoride and about 8 weight per cent of uranium tetrafiuoride.

  6. Methane flux time series for tundra environments

    SciTech Connect

    Whalen, S.C.; Reeburgh, W.E. )

    1988-12-01

    Seasonal measurements of net methane flux were made at permanent sites representing important components of arctic tundra. The sites include Eriophorum tussocks, intertussock depressions, moss-covered areas, and Carex stands. Methane fluxes showed high diel, seasonal, intra site, and between site variability. Eriophorum tussocks and Carex dominated methane release to the atmosphere, with mean annual net methane fluxes of 8.05 + or{minus}2.50 g CH{sub 4}/sq m and 4.88 + or{minus}0.73 g CH{sub 4}/sq m, respectively. Methane fluxes form the moss sites and intertussock depressions were much lower. Over 90% of the mean annual methane flux from the Eriophorum, intertussock depressions, and Carex sites occurred between thaw and freeze-up. Some 40% of the mean annual methane flux from the moss sites occurred during winter. Composite methane fluxes for tussock tundra and Carex-dominated wet meadow tundra environments were produced by weighting measured component fluxes according to areal coverage. Tussock and wet meadow tundra account for an estimated global methane emission of 19-33 Tg/yr. 39 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Investigating the Dynamics of Canonical Flux Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von der Linden, Jens; Carroll, Evan; Kamikawa, Yu; Lavine, Eric; Vereen, Keon; You, Setthivoine

    2013-10-01

    Canonical flux tubes are defined by tracing areas of constant magnetic and fluid vorticity flux. This poster will present the theory for canonical flux tubes and current progress in the construction of an experiment designed to observe their evolution. In the zero flow limit, canonical flux tubes are magnetic flux tubes, but in full form, present the distinct advantage of reconciling two-fluid plasma dynamics with familiar concepts of helicity, twists and linkages. The experiment and the DCON code will be used to investigate a new MHD stability criterion for sausage and kink modes in screw pinches that has been generalized to magnetic flux tubes with skin and core currents. Camera images and a 3D array of ˙ B probes will measure tube aspect-ratio and ratio of current-to-magnetic flux, respectively, to trace these flux tube parameters in a stability space. The experiment's triple electrode planar gun is designed to generate azimuthal and axial flows. These diagnostics together with a 3D vector tomographic reconstruction of ion Doppler spectroscopy will be used to verify the theory of canonical helicity transport. This work was sponsored in part by the US DOE Grant DE-SC0010340.

  8. Magnetic Flux Emergence in the Solar Photosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, M. C. M.; Schüssler, M.; Moreno-Insertis, F.

    2008-04-01

    The most prominent magnetic structures on the surface of the Sun are bipolar active regions. These magnetic complexes are comprised of a hierarchy of magnetic structures of different sizes, the largest of which are sunspots. Observations indicate that the appearance of active regions on the solar surface result from the emergence of bundles of magnetic flux from the underlying convection zone. We study the emergence process by means of 3D radiation MHD simulations. In the simulations, an initially buoyant magnetic flux tube is introduced into the near-surface layers of the convection zone. Subject to the buoyancy force, the flux tube rises towards the photosphere. Our simulations highlight the importance of magneto-convection on the evolution of the magnetic flux tube. The external convective flow field has an important influence on the emergence morphology of the emerging magnetic field. Depending on the initial properties of the magnetic flux tube (e.g. field strength, twist, entropy etc.), flux emergence may lead to a disturbance of the local granulation pattern. The observational signatures associated with emerging magnetic flux in our simulations are in qualitative and quantitative agreement with observational studies of emerging flux regions on the Sun.

  9. Digitally Calibrated TR Modules Enabling Real-Time Beamforming SweepSAR Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, James P.; Veilleux, Louse A.; Peral, Eva; Chuang, Chung-Lun; Shaffer, Scott J.

    2013-01-01

    SweepSAR, a novel radar architecture that depends on a DBF (digital beamforming) array, requires calibration accuracies that are order(s) of magnitude greater than is possible with traditional techniques, such as a priori characterization of TR (transmit/receive) modules in thermal vacuum chambers, or simple loop-back of the calibration signal. The advantages of a SweepSAR architecture are so great that it is worth applying significant resources to calibration efforts. Due to the nature of the DBF, each channel contains a digitizer and very powerful digital processor. Each channel can independently digitize (with the digitizer) and analyze (with the processor) its channel's unique calibration signal, and extract the relevant calibration parameters, namely channel gain and channel phase delay commonly referred to as the gain (or amplitude) and phase of the channel. Using the processor, each channel's gain and phase can theoretically be estimated with arbitrary precision through averaging a sufficiently large number of samples. Systematic errors and the changing gain and phase of the channels, typically due to temperature drifts, limits how long the averaging can occur, which limits the precision of the calibration estimate. However, results indicate that calibration knowledge of both the transmit and receive chains of each TR module can be improved by one or two orders of magnitude. Due to the digital nature of the receiver data, the channel's gain and phase may be corrected by a similar amount, while the transmit chain can only be corrected in a traditional manner. To implement Sweep SAR, the order of magnitude improvement in the knowledge of the channel's gain and phase is needed, and the control of the receiver to a similar level is required. Inherent to the DBF array is the individual digitization of each of the array's receiver channels. Current systems typically combine all of the analog signals in the array into one or two analog channels, which are then

  10. Spacecraft-produced neutron fluxes on Skylab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quist, T. C.; Furst, M.; Burnett, D. S.; Baum, J. H.; Peacock, C. L., Jr.; Perry, D. G.

    1977-01-01

    Estimates of neutron fluxes in different energy ranges are reported for the Skylab spacecraft. Detectors composed of uranium, thorium, and bismuth foils with mica as a fission track recorder, as well as boron foils with cellulose acetate as an alpha-particle recorder, were deployed at different positions in the Orbital Workshop. It was found that the Skylab neutron flux was dominated by high energy (greater than 1 MeV) contributions and that there was no significant time variation in the fluxes. Firm upper limits of 7-15 neutrons/sq cm-sec, depending on the detector location in the spacecraft, were established for fluxes above 1 MeV. Below 1 MeV, the neutron fluxes were about an order of magnitude lower. The neutrons are interpreted as originating from the interactions of leakage protons from the radiation belt with the spacecraft.

  11. Modeling Magnetic Flux-Ropes Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieves-Chinchilla, T.; Linton, M.; Hidalgo, M. A. U.; Vourlidas, A.; Savani, N.; Szabo, A.; Farrugia, C. J.; Yu, W.

    2015-12-01

    Flux-ropes are usually associated with magnetic structures embedded in the interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections (ICMEs) with a depressed proton temperature (called Magnetic Clouds, MCs). However, small-scale flux-ropes in the solar wind are also identified with different formation, evolution, and dynamic involved. We present an analytical model to describe magnetic flux-rope topologies. The model is generalized to different grades of complexity. It extends the circular-cylindrical concept of Hidalgo et al. (2002) by introducing a general form for the radial dependence of the current density. This generalization provides information on the force distribution inside the flux rope in addition to the usual parameters of flux-rope geometrical information and orientation. The generalized model provides flexibility for implementation in 3-D MHD simulations.

  12. Transit Timing Variations of TrES-2: a combined analysis of ground- and space-based photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raetz, St.; Ginski, Ch.; Mugrauer, M.; Berndt, A.; Eisenbeiss, T.; Adam, Ch.; Raetz, M.; Roell, T.; Seeliger, M.; Maciejewski, G.; Marka, C.; Vanko, M.; Bukowiecki, L.; Errmann, R.; Kitze, M.; Ohlert, J.; Pribulla, T.; Schmidt, J. G.; Sebastian, D.; Tetzlaff, N.; Hohle, M. M.; Schmidt, T. O. B.; Neuhäuser, R.

    2013-07-01

    TrES-2 is one of the few exoplanets, which offer the matchless possibility to combine long-term ground-based observations with continuous satellite data. TrES-2 is a target of our "Transit Timing Variations @ YETI" (TTV@YETI) project which is dedicated to detect and characterize signals of transit timing variations. We observed 43 ground-based light curves of 30 individual transit events of TrES-2. We used seven 0.2 - 2.2m telescopes located at five observatories in Germany and Spain. In addition, we analyzed 16 quarters (Q0-Q15) of observational data from NASA's space telescope Kepler including 424 individual transit events. The continuous monitoring of Kepler allows to determine the system parameters of each of the 424 transits and search for possible changes of these quantities. Here we present a first indication of an increasing stellar activity of the TrES-2 host star and provide new limits on possible transit timing variations.

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of Caloranaerobacter sp. TR13, an Anaerobic Thermophilic Bacterium Isolated from a Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Vent

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yunbiao; Dong, Binbin; Liu, Qing; Chen, Xiaoyao

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report the draft 2,261,881-bp genome sequence of Caloranaerobacter sp. TR13, isolated from a deep-sea hydrothermal vent on the East Pacific Rise. The sequence will be helpful for understanding the genetic and metabolic features, as well as potential biotechnological application in the genus Caloranaerobacter. PMID:26679595

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of Caloranaerobacter sp. TR13, an Anaerobic Thermophilic Bacterium Isolated from a Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Vent.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Meixian; Xie, Yunbiao; Dong, Binbin; Liu, Qing; Chen, Xiaoyao

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report the draft 2,261,881-bp genome sequence of Caloranaerobacter sp. TR13, isolated from a deep-sea hydrothermal vent on the East Pacific Rise. The sequence will be helpful for understanding the genetic and metabolic features, as well as potential biotechnological application in the genus Caloranaerobacter. PMID:26679595

  15. Variability among Research Diagnostic Interview Instruments in the Application of "DSM-IV-TR" Criteria for Pediatric Bipolar Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galanter, Cathryn A.; Hundt, Stephanie R.; Goyal, Parag; Le, Jenna; Fisher, Prudence W.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The "DSM-IV-TR "criteria for a manic episode and bipolar disorder (BD) were developed for adults but are used for children. The manner in which clinicians and researchers interpret these criteria may have contributed to the increase in BD diagnoses given to youth. Research interviews are designed to improve diagnostic reliability and…

  16. The GAPS programme with HARPS-N at TNG. VI. The curious case of TrES-4b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sozzetti, A.; Bonomo, A. S.; Biazzo, K.; Mancini, L.; Damasso, M.; Desidera, S.; Gratton, R.; Lanza, A. F.; Poretti, E.; Rainer, M.; Malavolta, L.; Affer, L.; Barbieri, M.; Bedin, L. R.; Boccato, C.; Bonavita, M.; Borsa, F.; Ciceri, S.; Claudi, R. U.; Gandolfi, D.; Giacobbe, P.; Henning, T.; Knapic, C.; Latham, D. W.; Lodato, G.; Maggio, A.; Maldonado, J.; Marzari, F.; Martinez Fiorenzano, A. F.; Micela, G.; Molinari, E.; Mordasini, C.; Nascimbeni, V.; Pagano, I.; Pedani, M.; Pepe, F.; Piotto, G.; Santos, N.; Scandariato, G.; Shkolnik, E.; Southworth, J.

    2015-03-01

    We update the TrES-4 system parameters using high-precision HARPS-N radial-velocity measurements and new photometric light curves. A combined spectroscopic and photometric analysis allows us to determine a spectroscopic orbit with a semi-amplitude K = 51 ± 3 m s-1. The derived mass of TrES-4b is found to be Mp = 0.49 ± 0.04 MJup, significantly lower than previously reported. Combined with the large radius () inferred from our analysis, TrES-4b becomes the transiting hot Jupiter with the second-lowest density known. We discuss several scenarios to explain the puzzling discrepancy in the mass of TrES-4b in the context of the exotic class of highly inflated transiting giant planets. Based on observations made with the Italian Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG) operated on the island of La Palma by the Fundacion Galileo Galilei of the INAF at the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the IAC in the frame of the program Global Architecture of Planetary Systems (GAPS), and with the Zeiss 1.23-m telescope at the German-Spanish Astronomical Center at Calar Alto, Spain. Tables 1 and 3 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  17. βTrCP controls the lysosome-mediated degradation of CDK1, whose accumulation correlates with tumor malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Herrero-Ruiz, Joaquín; Mora-Santos, Mar; Giráldez, Servando; Sáez, Carmen; Japón, Miguel Á.; Tortolero, Maria; Romero, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    In mammals, cell cycle progression is controlled by cyclin-dependent kinases, among which CDK1 plays important roles in the regulation of the G2/M transition, G1 progression and G1/S transition. CDK1 is highly regulated by its association to cyclins, phosphorylation and dephosphorylation, changes in subcellular localization, and by direct binding of CDK inhibitor proteins. CDK1 steady-state protein levels are held constant throughout the cell cycle by a coordinated regulation of protein synthesis and degradation. We show that CDK1 is ubiquitinated by the E3 ubiquitin ligase SCFβTrCP and degraded by the lysosome. Furthermore, we found that DNA damage not only triggers the stabilization of inhibitory phosphorylation sites on CDK1 and repression of CDK1 gene expression, but also regulates βTrCP-induced CDK1 degradation in a cell type-dependent manner. Specifically, treatment with the chemotherapeutic agent doxorubicin in certain cell lines provokes CDK1 degradation and induces apoptosis, whereas in others it inhibits destruction of the protein. These observations raise the possibility that different tumor types, depending on their pathogenic spectrum mutations, may display different sensitivity to βTrCP-induced CDK1 degradation after DNA damage. Finally, we found that CDK1 accumulation in patients’ tumors shows a negative correlation with βTrCP and a positive correlation with the degree of tumor malignancy. PMID:25149538

  18. TR-FRET Assays of Huntingtin Protein Fragments Reveal Temperature and PolyQ Length-Dependent Conformational Changes

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Xiaotian; Liang, Qingnan; Liang, Yijian; Lu, Mingxing; Ding, Yu; Lu, Boxun

    2014-01-01

    Time-Resolved Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (TR-FRET) technology is a widely used immunoassay that enables high-throughput quantitative measurements of proteins of interest. One of the well established examples is the TR-FRET assay for mutant huntingtin protein (HTT), which is the major cause of the neurodegenerative Huntington's disease (HD). To measure the mutant HTT protein, the published assays utilize a polyQ antibody, MW1, paired with HTT N-terminal antibodies. MW1 has much higher apparent affinity to mutant HTT with expanded polyQ stretch than to wild-type HTT with shorter polyQ, and thus the assays detect mutant HTT preferentially. Here we report a reversible temperature dependent change of TR-FRET signals for HTT N-terminal fragments: the signals become higher when the temperature is lowered from room temperature to 4°C. Interestingly, the temperature sensitivity of the TR-FRET signals is much higher for the Q25 (wild-type) than for the Q72 (mutant) protein. We further revealed that it is likely due to a temperature and polyQ length-dependent structural or spatial change of HTT, which is potentially useful for understanding polyQ structure and toxicity. PMID:24998512

  19. Structural and Functional Characterization of Nrf2 Degradation by the Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3/β-TrCP Axis

    PubMed Central

    Rada, Patricia; Rojo, Ana I.; Evrard-Todeschi, Nathalie; Innamorato, Nadia G.; Cotte, Axelle; Jaworski, Tomasz; Tobón-Velasco, Julio C.; Devijver, Herman; García-Mayoral, María Flor; Van Leuven, Fred; Hayes, John D.

    2012-01-01

    The transcription factor NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a master regulator of a genetic program, termed the phase 2 response, that controls redox homeostasis and participates in multiple aspects of physiology and pathology. Nrf2 protein stability is regulated by two E3 ubiquitin ligase adaptors, Keap1 and β-TrCP, the latter of which was only recently reported. Here, two-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis and site-directed mutagenesis allowed us to identify two serines of Nrf2 that are phosphorylated by glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β) in the sequence DSGISL. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies defined key residues of this phosphosequence involved in docking to the WD40 propeller of β-TrCP, through electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions. We also identified three arginine residues of β-TrCP that participate in Nrf2 docking. Intraperitoneal injection of the GSK-3 inhibitor SB216763 led to increased Nrf2 and heme oxygenase-1 levels in liver and hippocampus. Moreover, mice with hippocampal absence of GSK-3β exhibited increased levels of Nrf2 and phase 2 gene products, reduced glutathione, and decreased levels of carbonylated proteins and malondialdehyde. This study establishes the structural parameters of the interaction of Nrf2 with the GSK-3/β-TrCP axis and its functional relevance in the regulation of Nrf2 by the signaling pathways that impinge on GSK-3. PMID:22751928

  20. Nitrogen Gas Fluxes in Northeastern Temperate Forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafave, S.; Groffman, P. M.; Venterea, R. T.; Lovett, G. M.

    2002-12-01

    Nitrogen gas fluxes are a poorly quantified component of the nitrogen (N) cycle of forest ecosystems and are important to water quality, atmospheric chemistry and forest health. We measured fluxes of nitric oxide (NO), nitrous oxide (N2O) and dinitrogen (N2) in oak and maple stands in the Catskill mountains of New York State. Fluxes of NO and N2O were measured using in situ chambers and N2 flux was measured in intact cores incubated in a helium-oxygen atmosphere closed recirculation system in the laboratory. Fluxes of NO and N2O were higher in maple than in oak stands, which is consistent with previous work showing higher rates of N cycling under maple than oak. NO fluxes averaged 1.7 mg N m-2 d-1 in maple and 0.2 in oak. N2O fluxes averaged 0.10 mg N m-2 d-1 in maple and 0.004 in oak. However, N2 fluxes were higher in oak (2.3 mg N m-2 d-1) than maple (0.15), a surprising result that was supported by independent measurements of denitrification potential. There was marked variability in fluxes between replicate plots that was linked to the presence of understory vegetation and physical characteristics of the forest floor. Results suggest that N gas fluxes in northeastern temperate forests may be more important than previously thought and may be an important regulator of export of N to coastal waters, N-related atmospheric chemistry and forest N saturation.

  1. Comparison of debris flux models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sdunnus, H.; Beltrami, P.; Klinkrad, H.; Matney, M.; Nazarenko, A.; Wegener, P.

    The availability of models to estimate the impact risk from the man-made space debris and the natural meteoroid environment is essential for both, manned and unmanned satellite missions. Various independent tools based on different approaches have been developed in the past years. Due to an increased knowledge of the debris environment and its sources e.g. from improved measurement capabilities, these models could be updated regularly, providing more detailed and more reliable simulations. This paper addresses an in-depth, quantitative comparison of widely distributed debris flux models which were recently updated, namely ESA's MASTER 2001 model, NASA's ORDEM 2000 and the Russian SDPA 2000 model. The comparison was performed in the frame of the work of the 20t h Interagency Debris Coordination (IADC) meeting held in Surrey, UK. ORDEM 2000ORDEM 2000 uses careful empirical estimates of the orbit populations based onthree primary data sources - the US Space Command Catalog, the H ystackaRadar, and the Long Duration Exposure Facility spacecraft returned surfaces.Further data (e.g. HAX and Goldstone radars, impacts on Shuttle windows andradiators, and others) were used to adjust these populations for regions in time,size, and space not covered by the primary data sets. Some interpolation andextrapolation to regions with no data (such as projections into the future) wasprovided by the EVOLVE model. MASTER 2001The ESA MASTER model offers a full three dimensional description of theterrestrial debris distribution reaching from LEO up to the GEO region. Fluxresults relative to an orbiting target or to an inertial volume can be resolved intosource terms, impactor characteristics and orbit, as well as impact velocity anddirection. All relevant debris source terms are considered by the MASTERmodel. For each simulated source, a corresponding debris generation model interms of mass/diameter distribution, additional velocities, and directionalspreading has been developed. A

  2. Genomic and proteomic analysis of the Alkali-Tolerance Response (AlTR) in Listeria monocytogenes 10403S

    PubMed Central

    Giotis, Efstathios S; Muthaiyan, Arunachalam; Blair, Ian S; Wilkinson, Brian J; McDowell, David A

    2008-01-01

    Background Information regarding the Alkali-Tolerance Response (AlTR) in Listeria monocytogenes is very limited. Treatment of alkali-adapted cells with the protein synthesis inhibitor chloramphenicol has revealed that the AlTR is at least partially protein-dependent. In order to gain a more comprehensive perspective on the physiology and regulation of the AlTR, we compared differential gene expression and protein content of cells adapted at pH 9.5 and un-adapted cells (pH 7.0) using complementary DNA (cDNA) microarray and two-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis, (combined with mass spectrometry) respectively. Results In this study, L. monocytogenes was shown to exhibit a significant AlTR following a 1-h exposure to mild alkali (pH 9.5), which is capable of protecting cells from subsequent lethal alkali stress (pH 12.0). Adaptive intracellular gene expression involved genes that are associated with virulence, the general stress response, cell division, and changes in cell wall structure and included many genes with unknown functions. The observed variability between results of cDNA arrays and 2D gel electrophoresis may be accounted for by posttranslational modifications. Interestingly, several alkali induced genes/proteins can provide a cross protective overlap to other types of stresses. Conclusion Alkali pH provides therefore L. monocytogenes with nonspecific multiple-stress resistance that may be vital for survival in the human gastrointestinal tract as well as within food processing systems where alkali conditions prevail. This study showed strong evidence that the AlTR in L. monocytogenes functions as to minimize excess alkalisation and energy expenditures while mobilizing available carbon sources. PMID:18577215

  3. Effects of Traumeel (Tr14) on Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage Response in Healthy Subjects: A Double-Blind RCT

    PubMed Central

    Deuster, Vanessa; Frech, Torsten; Pons-Kühnemann, Jörn; Mooren, Frank-Christoph

    2016-01-01

    The present double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial intended to test whether ingestion of a natural combination medicine (Tr14 tablets) affects serum muscle damage and inflammatory immune response after downhill running. 96 male subjects received Tr14 tablets, which consist of 14 diluted biological and mineral components, or a placebo for 72 h after the exercise test, respectively. Changes in postexercise levels of various serum muscle damage and immunological markers were investigated. The area under the curve with respect to the increase (AUCi) of perceived pain score and creatine kinase (CK) were defined as primary outcome measures. While for CK the p value of the difference between the two groups is borderline, the pain score and muscle strength were not statistically significant. However, a trend towards lower levels of muscle damage (CK, p = 0.05; LDH, p = 0.06) in the Tr14 group was shown. Less pronounced lymphopenia (p = 0.02), a trend towards a lower expression of CD69 count (p = 0.07), and antigen-stimulated ICAM-1 (p = 0.01) were found in the verum group. The Tr14 group showed a tendentially lower increase of neutrophils (p = 0.10), BDNF (p = 0.03), stem cell factor (p = 0.09), and GM-CSF (p = 0.09) to higher levels. The results of the current study indicate that Tr14 seems to limit exercise-induced muscle damage most likely via attenuation of both innate and adaptive immune responses. This study was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01912469). PMID:27478305

  4. High-Flux and Low-Flux Membranes: Efficacy in Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Oshvandi, Khodayar; Kavyannejad, Rasol; Borzuo, Sayed Reza; Gholyaf, Mahmoud

    2014-01-01

    Background: Inadequacy of dialysis is one of the main causes of death in hemodialysis patients. Some studies have suggested that high‐flux membrane improves the removal of moderate-sized molecules while other studies indicate no significant effect on them. Objectives: This study aimed to investigate the dialysis efficacy of low-flux versus high-flux membranes in hemodialysis patients. Patients and Methods: Forty hemodialysis patients participated in this cross-over clinical trial. Two sessions of low-flux and high-flux membrane dialysis were performed consecutively, in the first and second stage of the trial. In both stages, blood samples before and after the dialysis were taken and sent to the laboratory for assessment. Blood urea nitrogen (BUN), KT/V and the urea reduction ratio (URR) indexes were used to determine dialysis efficacy. Data were analyzed using t test and paired t test. Results: The mean KT/V was 1.27 ± 0.28 in high-flux and 1.10 ± 0.32 in low-flux membrane which, these differences were statistically significant (P = 0.017). The mean of URR was 0.65 ± 0.09 in high-flux and 0.61 ± 0.14 in low-flux membrane, which these differences were not statistically significant (P = 0.221). Conclusions: The high-flux membrane had better dialysis adequacy, so we suggest using high-flux membrane in hemodialysis centers. PMID:25699283

  5. Topology of magnetic flux ropes and formation of fossil flux transfer events and boundary layer plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, L. C.; Ma, Z. W.; Fu, Z. F.; Otto, A.

    1993-01-01

    A mechanism for the formation of fossil flux transfer events and the low-level boundary layer within the framework of multiple X-line reconnection is proposed. Attention is given to conditions for which the bulk of magnetic flux in a flux rope of finite extent has a simple magnetic topology, where the four possible connections of magnetic field lines are: IMF to MSP, MSP to IMF, IMF to IMF, and MSP to MSP. For a sufficient relative shift of the X lines, magnetic flux may enter a flux rope from the magnetosphere and exit into the magnetosphere. This process leads to the formation of magnetic flux ropes which contain a considerable amount of magnetosheath plasma on closed magnetospheric field lines. This process is discussed as a possible explanation for the formation of fossil flux transfer events in the magnetosphere and the formation of the low-latitude boundary layer.

  6. Radiotherapy in the management of Klippel-Trénaunay-Weber syndrome: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Yildiz, Ferah; Yilmaz, Mustafa; Cengiz, Mustafa; Gürkaynak, Murat; Cila, Ayse Nur; Doğan, A Işin; Atahan, I Lale

    2005-07-01

    Klippel-Trénaunay-Weber syndrome (KTWS) is characterized by combined vascular malformations of capillary, venous, and lymphatic types usually observed during infancy or childhood. In this report, we describe two KTWS patients treated with radiotherapy after long-term conservative treatment or multiple surgical interventions. The first patient, a 15-year-old female, presented with vascular masses located on the right upper extremity. She was treated conservatively for 14 years, and amputation was offered at the age of 14 due to cardiac failure. A course of radiotherapy to a total dose of 40 Gy with conventional daily fractionation was administered as an alternative to the mutilating surgery, and prominent improvement both subjectively and objectively was detected 1 year after radiotherapy. The second patient, a 40-year-old male, suffered from huge vascular masses of both the trunk and lower extremities. Despite multiple surgical interventions and conservative treatment, disease progressed and neurological symptoms occurred due to compression of vertebral structures. He was administered a course of 30 Gy radiotherapy with 1.5 Gy daily fractions to the lower thoracic region and whole abdominal cavity. Six months after radiotherapy, subjective relief described by the patient but without any objective response was detected. Though considered as a benign disease, KTWS can cause life-threatening complications. The response of one of our patients is a hopeful finding for considering radiotherapy as an alternative treatment modality for these patients.

  7. IL-10-dependent Tr1 cells attenuate astrocyte activation and ameliorate chronic central nervous system inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Mayo, Lior; Cunha, Andre Pires Da; Madi, Asaf; Beynon, Vanessa; Yang, Zhiping; Alvarez, Jorge I.; Prat, Alexandre; Sobel, Raymond A.; Kobzik, Lester; Lassmann, Hans; Quintana, Francisco J.

    2016-01-01

    See Winger and Zamvil (doi:10.1093/brain/aww121) for a scientific commentary on this article. The innate immune system plays a central role in the chronic central nervous system inflammation that drives neurological disability in progressive forms of multiple sclerosis, for which there are no effective treatments. The mucosal immune system is a unique tolerogenic organ that provides a physiological approach for the induction of regulatory T cells. Here we report that nasal administration of CD3-specific antibody ameliorates disease in a progressive animal model of multiple sclerosis. This effect is IL-10-dependent and is mediated by the induction of regulatory T cells that share a similar transcriptional profile to Tr1 regulatory cells and that suppress the astrocyte inflammatory transcriptional program. Treatment results in an attenuated inflammatory milieu in the central nervous system, decreased microglia activation, reduced recruitment of peripheral monocytes, stabilization of the blood–brain barrier and less neurodegeneration. These findings suggest a new therapeutic approach for the treatment of progressive forms of multiple sclerosis and potentially other types of chronic central nervous system inflammation. PMID:27246324

  8. FIVE NEW TRANSIT EPOCHS OF THE EXOPLANET OGLE-TR-111b

    SciTech Connect

    Hoyer, S.; Rojo, P.; Lopez-Morales, M.; DIaz, R. F.; Chambers, J.; Minniti, D. E-mail: pato@das.uchile.cl E-mail: diaz@iap.fr E-mail: dante@astro.puc.cl

    2011-05-20

    We report five new transit epochs of the extrasolar planet OGLE-TR-111b, observed in the v-HIGH and Bessell I bands with the FORS1 and FORS2 at the ESO Very Large Telescope between 2008 April and May. The new transits have been combined with all previously published transit data for this planet to provide a new transit timing variations (TTVs) analysis of its orbit. We find no TTVs with amplitudes larger than 1.5 minutes over a four-year observation time baseline, in agreement with the recent result by Adams et al. Dynamical simulations fully exclude the presence of additional planets in the system with masses greater than 1.3, 0.4, and 0.5 M{sub +} at the 3:2, 1:2, and 2:1 resonances, respectively. We also place an upper limit of about 30 M{sub +} on the mass of potential second planets in the region between the 3:2 and 1:2 mean-motion resonances.

  9. The deglaciation of the Tröllaskagi Peninsula, Northern Iceland, based on cosmogenic datings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palacios, David; Andres, Nuria; Sæmundsson, Þorsteinn; Brynjólfsson, Skafti

    2015-04-01

    The Tröllaskagi Peninsula is a mountainous area in central northern Iceland. Deep valleys have dissected the Tertiary plateau basalts which form the peninsula, ranging in altitude from sea level to 1500 m. The aim of this work is to provide an initial approach to the deglaciation process in some valleys in the Tröllaskagi Peninsula, mainly by dating polished thresholds and some moraine boulders using cosmic radiation exposure and production of isotope 36Cl. The results obtained lead to the following conclusions: a) In the outermost coastal areas, i.e. the peninsular capes and the mouths of the great fjords, the dating of polished thresholds situated at present around 100-150 m a.s.l obtains ages immediately after Heinrich Event 1: thus two thresholds located at the end point of the Skagi Peninsula give ages of 16.9 ± 1.5 ka and 17.1 ± 1.6 ka. At the entrance to the Eyjafjördur, fjord near the town of Dalvik, another polished threshold has been dated to 16.3 ± 1.4 ka. b) In the intermediate areas of the fiords, deglaciation occurred just at the end of the Oldest Dryas: two thresholds, one on each side of the Skagafjördur fjord at around 150 m a.s.l. obtain minimum ages of 12.6 ± 1.2 ka on the edge of the Skagi Peninsula and 13.8 ± 1.3 ka on the island of Þórđarhöfđi, at a similar altitude. c) The bottoms of the great valleys which originate in the central highlands of the island and which currently drain the proglacial waters from the inland ice caps were deglaciated very early in the Holocene. Dates ranging from 11.5 to 10.00 ka were obtained from 7 polished thresholds at altitudes of between 120 and 700 m a.s.l. in the valley of the Eystri and Vestrari Jökulrsár Rivers which flows into the Skagafjördur fjord, with no clear altitude-related differences observed in the chronology. Taking into account the margin of error, these results may in fact show that the deglaciation of these thresholds was practically simultaneous. A similar date of 11.6 ±1

  10. Mechanical Testing of TR-55 Rubber Thermally Aged Under Tensile Strain

    SciTech Connect

    Small IV, W; Alviso, C T; Wilson, T S; Chinn, S C; Maxwell, R S

    2009-03-10

    TR-55 rubber specimens were previously subjected to an aging process consisting of the application of a tensile strain of approximately 67%, 100%, 133%, or 167% elongation for 4, 8, 12, or 16 h at either 250 C or room temperature. Control specimens at the same temperatures/durations were not subjected to tensile strain. The specimens were allowed to recover at room temperature without external stimuli for over 100 days before tensile testing. A single dog bone was cut from each specimen and a stress-strain curve was obtained. The elastic modulus of each specimen was calculated. Specimens aged under tensile strain exhibited rubber-like behavior dependent on the aging elongation and duration. This behavior was not evident in the unstrained controls. For the unstrained controls, exposure to 250 C resulted in an increase in modulus relative to the unheated material independent of the heating duration. The tensile strain applied during the aging process caused a reduction in modulus relative to the controls; lower moduli were observed for the shorter aging durations. Slippage of the specimens in the grips prevented determination of ultimate strength, as all specimens either slipped completely out of the grip before failure or failed at the original grip edge after slipping.

  11. THE BROADBAND INFRARED EMISSION SPECTRUM OF THE EXOPLANET TrES-3

    SciTech Connect

    Fressin, Francois; Knutson, Heather A.; Charbonneau, David; O'Donovan, Francis T.; Burrows, Adam; Spiegel, David; Deming, Drake; Mandushev, Georgi

    2010-03-01

    We use the Spitzer Space Telescope to estimate the dayside thermal emission of the exoplanet TrES-3 integrated in the 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 {mu}m bandpasses of the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) instrument. We observe two secondary eclipses and find relative eclipse depths of 0.00346 +- 0.00035, 0.00372 +- 0.00054, 0.00449 +- 0.00097, and 0.00475 +- 0.00046, respectively, in the four IRAC bandpasses. We combine our results with the earlier K-band measurement of De Mooij et al., and compare them with models of the planetary emission. We find that the planet does not require the presence of an inversion layer in the high atmosphere. This is the first very strongly irradiated planet that does not have a temperature inversion, which indicates that stellar or planetary characteristics other than temperature have an important impact on temperature inversion. De Mooij and Snellen also detected a possible slight offset in the timing of the secondary eclipse in the K band. However, based on our four Spitzer channels, we place a 3sigma upper limit of |ecos(omega)| < 0.0056, where e is the planet's orbital eccentricity and omega is the longitude of the periastron. This result strongly indicates that the orbit is circular, as expected from tidal circularization theory.

  12. Flexural Properties of E Glass and TR50S Carbon Fiber Reinforced Epoxy Hybrid Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Chensong; Sudarisman; Davies, Ian J.

    2013-01-01

    A study on the flexural properties of E glass and TR50S carbon fiber reinforced hybrid composites is presented in this paper. Specimens were made by the hand lay-up process in an intra-ply configuration with varying degrees of glass fibers added to the surface of a carbon laminate. These specimens were then tested in the three-point bend configuration in accordance with ASTM D790-07 at three span-to-depth ratios: 16, 32, and 64. The failure modes were examined under an optical microscope. The flexural behavior was also simulated by finite element analysis, and the flexural modulus, flexural strength, and strain to failure were calculated. It is shown that although span-to-depth ratio shows an influence on the stress-strain relationship, it has no effect on the failure mode. The majority of specimens failed by either in-plane or out-of-plane local buckling followed by kinking and splitting at the compressive GFRP side and matrix cracking combined with fiber breakage at the CFRP tensile face. It is shown that positive hybrid effects exist for the flexural strengths of most of the hybrid configurations. The hybrid effect is noted to be more obvious when the hybrid ratio is small, which may be attributed to the relative position of the GFRP layer(s) with respect to the neutral plane. In contrast to this, flexural modulus seems to obey the rule of mixtures equation.

  13. Flexible thin-film PVDF-TrFE based pressure sensor for smart catheter applications.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Tushar; Aroom, Kevin; Naik, Sahil; Gill, Brijesh; Zhang, John X J

    2013-04-01

    We demonstrate the design of thin flexible pressure sensors based on piezoelectric PVDF-TrFE (polyvinyledenedifluoride-tetrafluoroethylene) co-polymer film, which can be integrated onto a catheter, where the compact inner lumen space limit the dimensions of the pressure sensors. Previously, we demonstrated that the thin-film sensors of one micrometer thickness were shown to have better performance compared to the thicker film with no additional electrical poling or mechanical stretching due to higher crystallinity. The pressure sensors can be mass producible using standard lithography process, with excellent control of film uniformity and thickness down to one micrometer. The fabricated pressure sensors were easily mountable on external surface of commercial catheters. Elaborate experiments were performed to demonstrate the applicability of PVDF sensors towards catheter based biomedical application. The resonant frequency of the PVDF sensor was found to be 6.34 MHz. The PVDF sensors can operate over a broad pressure range of 0-300 mmHg. The average sensitivity of the PVDF sensor was found to be four times higher (99 μV/mmHg) than commercial pressure sensor while the PVDF sensor (0.26 s) had fivefold shorter response time than commercial pressure sensor (1.30 s), making the PVDF sensors highly suitable for real-time pressure measurements using catheters. PMID:23519532

  14. Five New Transit Epochs of the Exoplanet OGLE-TR-111b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyer, S.; Rojo, P.; López-Morales, M.; Díaz, R. F.; Chambers, J.; Minniti, D.

    2011-05-01

    We report five new transit epochs of the extrasolar planet OGLE-TR-111b, observed in the v-HIGH and Bessell I bands with the FORS1 and FORS2 at the ESO Very Large Telescope between 2008 April and May. The new transits have been combined with all previously published transit data for this planet to provide a new transit timing variations (TTVs) analysis of its orbit. We find no TTVs with amplitudes larger than 1.5 minutes over a four-year observation time baseline, in agreement with the recent result by Adams et al. Dynamical simulations fully exclude the presence of additional planets in the system with masses greater than 1.3, 0.4, and 0.5 M ⊕ at the 3:2, 1:2, and 2:1 resonances, respectively. We also place an upper limit of about 30 M ⊕ on the mass of potential second planets in the region between the 3:2 and 1:2 mean-motion resonances. Based on observations made with ESO Telescopes at the Paranal Observatories under program ID 278.C-5022.

  15. Enhancing the piezoelectric performance of PVDF-TrFE thin films using zinc oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodds, John S.; Meyers, Frederick N.; Loh, Kenneth J.

    2012-04-01

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) is crucial for detecting sudden and progressive damage and for preventing catastrophic structural failure. Piezoelectric materials have been widely adopted for their use as sensors and as actuators. Piezoceramics (such as lead zirconate titanate) offer high piezoelectricity but are mechanically brittle. Poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) piezopolymers are conformable to complex structural surfaces but exhibit lower piezoelectricity. So as to achieve a combination of these desirable properties, piezoelectric zinc oxide (ZnO) nanomaterials are proposed for embedment in flexible polymer matrices during fabrication to yield high-performance piezoelectric nanocomposites. The main objective of this research is to characterize the piezoelectricity of nanocomposites formed by embedding ZnO nanoparticles in a PVDF-trifluoroethylene (TrFE) matrix. Film fabrication is performed by dispersing ZnO into a PVDFTrFE solution and then by spin coating the solution onto a rigid substrate. A high electric field is applied to each of the films for poling, and the films' remnant polarization is quantified by measuring their ferroelectric response using a Sawyer-Tower circuit. Graphs of electric field compared to electric displacement can be obtained for determining the films' piezoelectricity. Finally, validation of their sensing performance is achieved by hammer impact testing.

  16. Glycosylflavonoids from Cecropia pachystachya Trécul are quorum sensing inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Brango-Vanegas, J; Costa, G M; Ortmann, C F; Schenkel, E P; Reginatto, F H; Ramos, F A; Arévalo-Ferro, C; Castellanos, L

    2014-04-15

    The Cecropia genus is widely distributed in Latin America including at least 60 species, and some of them are commonly used in traditional medicine for the treatment of several diseases. We used Cecropia pachystachya Trécul to search for quorum sensing (QS) inhibitors compounds and found that the aqueous extract of C. pachystachya leaves is a promising source of substances with this activity. Using as biosensor Chromobacterium violaceum ATCC 31532 and Escherichia coli pSB403, the compounds chlorogenic acid (2), isoorientin (3), orientin (4), isovitexin (6), vitexin (7), and rutin (9) were identified as QS inhibitors. None of these compounds inhibited the growth of neither the used biosensors nor the microorganisms Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 23591, Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, used here as growth inhibition controls. Along with the rutin, here we presented for the first time the QS-inhibition potential of the C-glycosyl flavonoids. The prospective of this evidence lead to the use of these compounds as antipathogenic drugs or antifoulants.

  17. Benthic fluxes in San Francisco Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hammond, Douglas E.; Fuller, C.; Harmon, D.; Hartman, Blayne; Korosec, M.; Miller, L.G.; Rea, R.; Warren, S.; Berelson, W.; Hager, S.W.

    1985-01-01

    Measurements of benthic fluxes have been made on four occasions between February 1980 and February 1981 at a channel station and a shoal station in South San Francisco Bay, using in situ flux chambers. On each occasion replicate measurements of easily measured substances such as radon, oxygen, ammonia, and silica showed a variability (??1??) of 30% or more over distances of a few meters to tens of meters, presumably due to spatial heterogeneity in the benthic community. Fluxes of radon were greater at the shoal station than at the channel station because of greater macrofaunal irrigation at the former, but showed little seasonal variability at either station. At both stations fluxes of oxygen, carbon dioxide, ammonia, and silica were largest following the spring bloom. Fluxes measured during different seasons ranged over factors of 2-3, 3, 4-5, and 3-10 (respectively), due to variations in phytoplankton productivity and temperature. Fluxes of oxygen and carbon dioxide were greater at the shoal station than at the channel station because the net phytoplankton productivity is greater there and the organic matter produced must be rapidly incorporated in the sediment column. Fluxes of silica were greater at the shoal station, probably because of the greater irrigation rates there. N + N (nitrate + nitrite) fluxes were variable in magnitude and in sign. Phosphate fluxes were too small to measure accurately. Alkalinity fluxes were similar at the two stations and are attributed primarily to carbonate dissolution at the shoal station and to sulfate reduction at the channel station. The estimated average fluxes into South Bay, based on results from these two stations over the course of a year, are (in mmol m-2 d-1): O2 = -27 ?? 6; TCO2 = 23 ?? 6; Alkalinity = 9 ?? 2; N + N = -0.3 ?? 0.5; NH3 = 1.4 ?? 0.2; PO4 = 0.1 ?? 0.4; Si = 5.6 ?? 1.1. These fluxes are comparable in magnitude to those in other temperate estuaries with similar productivity, although the seasonal

  18. Magnetic balltracking: Tracking the photospheric magnetic flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attie, R.; Innes, D. E.

    2015-02-01

    Context. One aspect of understanding the dynamics of the quiet Sun is to quantify the evolution of the flux within small-scale magnetic features. These features are routinely observed in the quiet photosphere and were given various names, such as pores, knots, magnetic patches. Aims: This work presents a new algorithm for tracking the evolution of the broad variety of small-scale magnetic features in the photosphere, with a precision equal to the instrumental resolution. Methods: We have developed a new technique to track the evolution of the individual magnetic features from magnetograms, called "magnetic balltracking". It quantifies the flux of the tracked features, and it can track the footpoints of magnetic field lines inferred from magnetic field extrapolation. The algorithm can detect and quantify flux emergence, as well as flux cancellation. Results: The capabilities of magnetic balltracking are demonstrated with the detection and the tracking of two cases of magnetic flux emergence that lead to the brightening of X-ray loops. The maximum emerged flux ranges from 1018 Mx to 1019 Mx (unsigned flux) when the X-ray loops are observed. Movies associated to Figs. 6 and 18 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  19. Conditional flux analysis and stable isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeeman, M. J.; Knohl, A.; Sturm, P.; Buchmann, N. C.; Thomas, C. K.

    2009-12-01

    We propose to investigate to what extend conditional flux analysis can benefit from the addition of stable isotope information. Stable isotopes have been recognized for their potential as process tracer, and could add an extra dimension to the conditional flux concept, which aims at directly quantifying component fluxes and identifying their sources. Differences in 13C abundance in carbon dioxide can be used to distinguish assimilation or respiration sources, whereas the 18O abundance expresses differences in water exchange, for instance between canopy and soil. Lending to recent advances in measurement technology, stable isotopes can now be measured at high temporal resolutions (10Hz) required for commonly applied micrometeorological methods such as the eddy-covariance technique, or related conditional flux methods. We will present current ideas on how the conditional flux method, as recently proposed and evaluated by Thomas et al. (2008), Scanlon & Sahu (2008), to perform daytime flux partitioning at the ecosystem level, can be refined by stable isotope analysis (13C and 18O) of carbon dioxide as additional dimension for identification of fluxes.

  20. Plasma flux-dependent lipid A deactivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Hung-Wen; Hsu, Cheng-Che; Ahmed, Musahid; Liu, Suet Yi; Fang, Yigang; Seog, Joonil; Oehrlein, Gottlieb S.; Graves, David B.

    2014-06-01

    This paper reports the influence of gas plasma flux on endotoxin lipid A film deactivation. To study the effect of the flux magnitude of reactive species, a modified low-pressure inductively coupled plasma (ICP) with O radical flux ˜1016 cm-2 s-1 was used. After ICP exposures, it was observed that while the Fourier transform infrared absorbance of fatty chains responsible for the toxicity drops by 80% through the film, no obvious film endotoxin deactivation is seen. This is in contrast to that previously observed under low flux exposure conducted in a vacuum beam system: near-surface only loss of fatty chains led to significant film deactivation. Secondary ion mass spectrometry characterization of changes at the film surface did not appear to correlate with the degree of deactivation. Lipid A films need to be nearly completely removed in order to detect significant deactivation under high flux conditions. Additional high reactive species flux experiments were conducted using an atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet and a UV/ozone device. Exposure of lipid A films to reactive species with these devices showed similar deactivation behaviour. The causes for the difference between low and high flux exposures may be due to the nature of near-surface structural modifications as a function of the rate of film removal.

  1. On calculating the potential vorticity flux

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Pei-Chun; Diamond, P. H.

    2015-03-15

    We discuss and compare different approaches to calculating the dynamics of anisotropic flow structure formation in quasi two-dimensional turbulence based on potential vorticity (PV) transport in real space. The general structure of the PV flux in the relaxation processes is deduced non-perturbatively. The transport coefficients of the PV flux are then systematically calculated using perturbation theory. We develop two non-perturbative relaxation models: the first is a mean field theory for the dynamics of minimum enstrophy relaxation based on the requirement that the mean flux of PV dissipates total potential enstrophy but conserves total fluid kinetic energy. The results show that the structure of PV flux has the form of a sum of a positive definite hyper-viscous and a negative or positive viscous flux of PV. Turbulence spreading is shown to be related to PV mixing via the link of turbulence energy flux to PV flux. In the relaxed state, the ratio of the PV gradient to zonal flow velocity is homogenized. This homogenized quantity sets a constraint on the amplitudes of PV and zonal flow in the relaxed state. The second relaxation model is derived from symmetry principles alone. The form of PV flux contains a nonlinear convective term in addition to viscous and hyper-viscous terms. For both cases, the transport coefficients are calculated using perturbation theory. For a broad turbulence spectrum, a modulational calculation of the PV flux gives both a negative viscosity and a positive hyper-viscosity. For a narrow turbulence spectrum, the result of a parametric instability analysis shows that PV transport is also convective. In both relaxation and perturbative analyses, it is shown that turbulent PV transport is sensitive to flow structure, and the transport coefficients are nonlinear functions of flow shear.

  2. Magnetic Flux Cancellation and Formation of Prominence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miley, George; Kim, Mun Song; Chon Nam, Sok; Kim, Kyong Chol

    2015-08-01

    Magnetic flux cancellation appears to be closely related to various kinds of solar activities such as flares, microflares/surges/jets, X-ray bright points, erupting mini-filaments, transition region explosive events, filament formation, filament activation and eruption, and coronal mass ejections. It is commonly believed that magnetic reconnections in the low atmosphere are responsible for canceling magnetic features, and magnetic fragments are observed to originate as bipoles. According to the Sweet-Parker type reconnection model, the inflow speed closely corresponds to the converging speed of each pole in a canceling magnetic feature and the rate of flux cancellation must be explained by the observed converging speed. As distinct from the corona, the efficiency of photospheric magnetic reconnection may be due to the small Cowling conductivity, instead of the Spitzer, of weakly ionized and magnetized plasma in the low atmosphere of the sun. Using the VAL-C atmospheric model and Cowling conductivity, we have computed the parameters describing Sweet-Parker type reconnecting current sheets in the plasma of the solar photosphere and chromosphere, and particularly for the phenomena of magnetic flux cancellation and dark filament formation which occurred on July 2, 1994 we have estimated the rate of flux cancellation, the inflow speed(the converging speed) and the upward mass flux to compare with the observation. The results show that when taking account of the Cowling conductivity in the low atmosphere, large flux cancellation rates(>1019Mxhr-1) in solar active regions are better explained than by the Spitzer conductivity-considered reconnection model. Particularly for the flux cancellation event on July 2, 1994, the inflow speed(0.26kms-1)is almost similar to the converging speed(0.22kms-1)and the upward mass flux(3.3X1012gs-1) in the model is sufficient for the large dark filament formation in a time of several hours through magnetic flux cancellation process.

  3. ON THE ERUPTION OF CORONAL FLUX ROPES

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Y.

    2010-08-10

    We present three-dimensional MHD simulations of the evolution of the magnetic field in the corona where the emergence of a twisted magnetic flux tube is driven at the lower boundary into a pre-existing coronal potential arcade field. Through a sequence of simulations in which we vary the amount of twisted flux transported into the corona before the emergence is stopped, we investigate the conditions that lead to a dynamic eruption of the resulting coronal flux rope. It is found that the critical condition for the onset of eruption is for the center of the flux rope to reach a critical height at which the corresponding potential field declines with height at a sufficiently steep rate, consistent with the onset of the torus instability of the flux rope. In some cases, immediately after the emergence is stopped, the coronal flux rope first settles into a quasi-static rise with an underlying sigmoid-shaped current layer developing. Preferential heating of field lines going through this current layer may give rise to the observed quiescent X-ray sigmoid loops before eruption. Reconnections in the current layer during the initial quasi-static stage is found to add detached flux to the coronal flux rope, allowing it to rise quasi-statically to the critical height and dynamic eruption of the flux rope then ensues. By identifying field lines whose tops are in the most intense part of the current layer during the eruption, we deduce the evolution and morphology of the post-flare X-ray loops and the flare ribbons at their footpoints.

  4. Mycobacterium tuberculosis keto-mycolic acid and macrophage nuclear receptor TR4 modulate foamy biogenesis in granulomas: a case of a heterologous and noncanonical ligand-receptor pair.

    PubMed

    Dkhar, Hedwin Kitdorlang; Nanduri, Ravikanth; Mahajan, Sahil; Dave, Sandeep; Saini, Ankita; Somavarapu, Arun Kumar; Arora, Ashish; Parkesh, Raman; Thakur, Krishan Gopal; Mayilraj, Shanmugam; Gupta, Pawan

    2014-07-01

    The cell wall of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is configured of bioactive lipid classes that are essential for virulence and potentially involved in the formation of foamy macrophages (FMs) and granulomas. Our recent work established crosstalk between M. tuberculosis cell wall lipids and the host lipid-sensing nuclear receptor TR4. In this study, we have characterized, identified, and adopted a heterologous ligand keto-mycolic acid from among M. tuberculosis lipid repertoire for the host orphan NR TR4. Crosstalk between cell wall lipids and TR4 was analyzed by transactivation and promoter reporter assays. Mycolic acid (MA) was found to transactivate TR4 significantly compared with other cell wall lipids. Among the MA, the oxygenated form, keto-MA, was responsible for transactivation, and the identity was validated by TR4 binding assays followed by TLC and nuclear magnetic resonance. Isothermal titration calorimetry revealed that keto-MA binding to TR4 is energetically favorable. This keto-MA-TR4 axis seems to be essential to this oxygenated MA induction of FMs and granuloma formation as evaluated by in vitro and in vivo model of granuloma formation. TR4 binding with keto-MA features a unique association of host nuclear receptor with a bacterial lipid and adds to the presently known ligand repertoire beyond dietary lipids. Pharmacologic modulation of this heterologous axis may hold promise as an adjunct therapy to frontline tuberculosis drugs.

  5. Magnetic refrigeration using flux compression in superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Israelsson, U. E.; Strayer, D. M.; Jackson, H. W.; Petrac, D.

    1990-01-01

    The feasibility of using flux compression in high-temperature superconductors to produce the large time-varying magnetic fields required in a field cycled magnetic refrigerator operating between 20 K and 4 K is presently investigated. This paper describes the refrigerator concept and lists limitations and advantages in comparison with conventional refrigeration techniques. The maximum fields obtainable by flux compression in high-temperature supercoductor materials, as presently prepared, are too low to serve in such a refrigerator. However, reports exist of critical current values that are near usable levels for flux pumps in refrigerator applications.

  6. Diamagnetic flux measurement in Aditya tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Sameer; Jha, Ratneshwar; Lal, Praveen; Hansaliya, Chandresh; Gopalkrishna, M. V.; Kulkarni, Sanjay; Mishra, Kishore

    2010-12-15

    Measurements of diamagnetic flux in Aditya tokamak for different discharge conditions are reported for the first time. The measured diamagnetic flux in a typical discharge is less than 0.6 mWb and therefore it has required careful compensation for various kinds of pick-ups. The hardware and software compensations employed in this measurement are described. We introduce compensation of a pick-up due to plasma current of less than 20 kA in short duration discharges, in which plasma pressure gradient is supposed to be negligible. The flux measurement during radio frequency heating is also presented in order to validate compensation.

  7. Extending quantum coherence of superconducting flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Fei; Kamal, Archana; Orlando, Terry; Gustavsson, Simon; Oliver, William; Engineering Quantum Systems, MIT Team

    We present the design of a superconducting qubit with multiple Josephson junctions. The design starts with a capacitively shunted flux qubit, and it incorporates particular junction parameter choices for the purpose of simultaneously optimizing over transition frequency, anharmonicity, flux- and charge-noise sensitivity around flux degeneracy. By studying the scaling properties with design parameters, we identify directions to extend coherence substantially. This research was funded by the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI), Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA) via MIT Lincoln Laboratory under Air Force Contract No. FA8721-05-C-0002.

  8. FLUX EMERGENCE IN A MAGNETIZED CONVECTION ZONE

    SciTech Connect

    Pinto, R. F.; Brun, A. S.

    2013-07-20

    We study the influence of a dynamo magnetic field on the buoyant rise and emergence of twisted magnetic flux ropes and their influence on the global external magnetic field. We ran three-dimensional MHD numerical simulations using the ASH code (anelastic spherical harmonics) and analyzed the dynamical evolution of such buoyant flux ropes from the bottom of the convection zone until the post-emergence phases. The global nature of this model can only very crudely and inaccurately represent the local dynamics of the buoyant rise of the implanted magnetic structure, but nonetheless allows us to study the influence of global effects, such as self-consistently generated differential rotation and meridional circulation, and of Coriolis forces. Although motivated by the solar context, this model cannot be thought of as a realistic model of the rise of magnetic structures and their emergence in the Sun, where the local dynamics are completely different. The properties of initial phases of the buoyant rise are determined essentially by the flux-rope's properties and the convective flows and consequently are in good agreement with previous studies. However, the effects of the interaction of the background dynamo field become increasingly strong as the flux ropes evolve. During the buoyant rise across the convection zone, the flux-rope's magnetic field strength scales as B{proportional_to}{rho}{sup {alpha}}, with {alpha} {approx}< 1. An increase of radial velocity, density, and current density is observed to precede flux emergence at all longitudes. The geometry, latitude, and relative orientation of the flux ropes with respect to the background magnetic field influences the resulting rise speeds, zonal flow amplitudes (which develop within the flux ropes), and the corresponding surface signatures. This influences the morphology, duration and amplitude of the surface shearing, and the Poynting flux associated with magnetic flux-rope emergence. The emerged magnetic flux

  9. A time-varying magnetic flux concentrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kibret, B.; Premaratne, M.; Lewis, P. M.; Thomson, R.; Fitzgerald, P. B.

    2016-08-01

    It is known that diverse technological applications require the use of focused magnetic fields. This has driven the quest for controlling the magnetic field. Recently, the principles in transformation optics and metamaterials have allowed the realization of practical static magnetic flux concentrators. Extending such progress, here, we propose a time-varying magnetic flux concentrator cylindrical shell that uses electric conductors and ferromagnetic materials to guide magnetic flux to its center. Its performance is discussed based on finite-element simulation results. Our proposed design has potential applications in magnetic sensors, medical devices, wireless power transfer, and near-field wireless communications.

  10. Flux qubit on a mesoscopic nonsuperconducting ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zipper, E.; Kurpas, M.; Szeląg, M.; Dajka, J.; Szopa, M.

    2006-09-01

    The possibility of making a flux qubit on a nonsuperconducting mesoscopic ballistic quasi-one-dimensional ring is discussed. We showed that such a ring can be effectively reduced to a two-state system with two external control parameters. The two states carry opposite persistent currents and are coupled by tunneling, which leads to a quantum superposition of states. The qubit states can be manipulated by resonant microwave pulses. The flux state of the sample can be measured by a superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer. Two or more qubits can be coupled by the flux the circulating currents generate. The problem of decoherence is also discussed.

  11. Open flux in Saturn’s magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badman, Sarah V.; Jackman, Caitriona M.; Nichols, Jonathan D.; Clarke, John T.; Gérard, Jean-Claude

    2014-03-01

    We characterise the interaction between the solar wind and Saturn’s magnetosphere by evaluating the amount of ‘open’ magnetic flux connected to the solar wind. This is deduced from a large set of Hubble Space Telescope images of the ultraviolet aurora, using the poleward boundary of the main aurora as a proxy for the open-closed field line boundary in the ionosphere. The amount of open flux is found to be 10-50 GWb, with a mean of 35 GWb. The typical change in open flux between consecutive observations separated by 10-60 h is -5 or +7 GWb. These changes are a result of imbalance between open flux creation at the dayside magnetopause and its closure in the magnetotail. The 5 GWb typical decrease in open flux is consistent with in situ measurements of the flux transported following a reconnection event. Estimates of average, net reconnection rates are found to be typically a few tens of kV, with some extreme examples of unbalanced magnetopause or tail reconnection occurring at ∼300 kV. The range of values determined suggest that Saturn’s magnetosphere does not generally achieve a steady state between flux opening at the magnetopause and flux closure in the magnetotail. The percentage of magnetic flux which is open in Saturn’s magnetosphere is similar to that measured at the Earth (2-11%), but the typical percentage that is closed between observations is significantly lower (13% compared to 40-70%). Therefore, open flux is usually closed in smaller (few GWb) events in Saturn’s magnetosphere. The exception to this behaviour is large, rapid flux closure events which are associated with solar wind compressions. While the rates of flux opening and closure should be equal over long timescales, they are evidently different on shorter (up to tens of hours) timescales. The relative independence of the magnetopause and tail reconnection rates can be attributed to the long loading timescales required to transport open field lines into the tail.

  12. Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System (ECOR) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, DR

    2011-01-31

    The eddy correlation (ECOR) flux measurement system provides in situ, half-hour measurements of the surface turbulent fluxes of momentum, sensible heat, latent heat, and carbon dioxide (CO2) (and methane at one Southern Great Plains extended facility (SGP EF) and the North Slope of Alaska Central Facility (NSA CF). The fluxes are obtained with the eddy covariance technique, which involves correlation of the vertical wind component with the horizontal wind component, the air temperature, the water vapor density, and the CO2 concentration.

  13. Magnetic flux amplification by Lenz lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoenmaker, J.; Pirota, K. R.; Teixeira, J. C.

    2013-08-01

    Tailoring magnetic flux distribution is highly desirable in a wide range of applications such as magnetic sensors and biomedicine. In this paper we study the manipulation of induced currents in passive devices in order to engineer the distribution of magnetic flux intensity in a given region. We propose two different approaches, one based on especially designed wire loops (Lenz law) and the other based on solid conductive pieces (eddy currents). The gain of such devices is mainly determined by geometry giving perspective of high amplification. We consistently modeled, simulated, and executed the proposed devices. Doubled magnetic flux intensity is demonstrated experimentally for a moderate aspect ratio.

  14. Nitrous oxide flux following tropical land clearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luizao, Flavio; Luizao, Regina; Matson, Pamela; Livingston, Gerald; Vitousek, Peter

    1989-01-01

    The importance of seasonal cycles of N2O flux from tropical ecosystems and the possibility that tropical deforestation could contribute to the ongoing global increase in N2O concentrations were assessed by measuring N2O flux from forest, cleared land, and pasture over an annual cycle in the central Amazon. A pasture that had been converted from tropical forest had threefold greater annual N2O flux than a paired forest site; similar results were obtained in spot measurements in other pastures. If these results are general, such tropical pastures represent a globally significant source of increased N2O.

  15. Magnetic Flux Emergence on Different Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagenaar, H.; Cheung, M.

    2008-09-01

    Magnetic flux emerges on the Sun on many different scales, from weak intranetwork to network concentrations and (ephemeral) active regions. Methods previously developed to recognize regions of magnetic emergence on MDI Full Disk magnetograms fail when applied to Hinode/SOT Stokes maps: the resolution is so much higher that simple bipoles on MDI are observed as collections of fragments. We present a new method for the automatic detection and characterization of flux emergence on a range of scales. Our findings are compared with simulations and discuss the implications for our understanding of emerging flux ropes.

  16. Brief report: an exploratory study comparing diagnostic outcomes for autism spectrum disorders under DSM-IV-TR with the proposed DSM-5 revision.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, Vicki; Aldridge, Fiona; Chandler, Felicity; Witzlsperger, Ellen; Smith, Karen

    2012-08-01

    The proposed revision for Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders--Fifth Edition (DSM-5) represents a shift from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders--Fourth Edition, Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR). As the proposed DSM-5 criteria require a higher minimum number of symptoms to be present compared to DSM-IV-TR, there have been some concerns about the impact that this will have on diagnostic outcomes. Therefore, the current study aimed to compare diagnostic outcomes using both DSM-IV-TR and DSM-5 criteria for 132 children. Of the 111 participants who received an ASD diagnosis under DSM-IV-TR, 26 did not meet DSM-5 criteria. The majority of these had received a DSM-IV-TR PDD-NOS diagnosis. Implications of the results and the proposed DSM-5 changes to the ASD criteria are discussed.

  17. Mapping carbon flux uncertainty and selecting optimal locations for future flux towers in the Great Plains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gu, Y.; Howard, D.M.; Wylie, B.K.; Zhang, L.

    2012-01-01

    Flux tower networks (e. g., AmeriFlux, Agriflux) provide continuous observations of ecosystem exchanges of carbon (e. g., net ecosystem exchange), water vapor (e. g., evapotranspiration), and energy between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere. The long-term time series of flux tower data are essential for studying and understanding terrestrial carbon cycles, ecosystem services, and climate changes. Currently, there are 13 flux towers located within the Great Plains (GP). The towers are sparsely distributed and do not adequately represent the varieties of vegetation cover types, climate conditions, and geophysical and biophysical conditions in the GP. This study assessed how well the available flux towers represent the environmental conditions or "ecological envelopes" across the GP and identified optimal locations for future flux towers in the GP. Regression-based remote sensing and weather-driven net ecosystem production (NEP) models derived from different extrapolation ranges (10 and 50%) were used to identify areas where ecological conditions were poorly represented by the flux tower sites and years previously used for mapping grassland fluxes. The optimal lands suitable for future flux towers within the GP were mapped. Results from this study provide information to optimize the usefulness of future flux towers in the GP and serve as a proxy for the uncertainty of the NEP map.

  18. The Coupling of Solute Fluxes in Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Galey, William R.; Van Bruggen, J. T.

    1970-01-01

    Our previous description of solute drag on a synthetic membrane has been extended to include the solutes mannitol, sucrose, raffinose, inulin, and dextran. Labeled and nonlabeled forms of these solutes were used in pairs to quantitate solute flux interaction. Three membranes with pore sizes of 350, 80, and 20 A, respectively, have been utilized. It is shown that solute flux interaction occurs with all the solutes and that the extent of interaction is related directly to solute permeability, concentration, and molecular size. The magnitude of solute interaction is reciprocally related to the radii of the membrane pores, greater interaction occurring with small pored membranes. Solute drag is seen as an increased flux of tracer solute in the direction of the diffusion gradient of a second solute as well as a decreased tracer flux into the diffusion gradient. Values are given for self-diffusion and interaction coefficients as well as for a new coefficient, the "effectiveness coefficient." PMID:5413079

  19. A Brazilian network of carbon flux stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberti, Débora R.; Acevedo, Otávio C.; Moraes, Osvaldo L. L.

    2012-05-01

    First Brasflux Workshop; Santa Maria, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, 14-15 November 2011 Last November, 33 researchers participated in a workshop to establish Brasflux, the Brazilian network of carbon flux stations, with the objective of integrating previous efforts and planning for the future. Among the participants were those leading ongoing flux observation projects and others planning to establish flux stations in the near future. International scientists also participated to share the experiences gained with other networks. The need to properly characterize terrestrial ecosystems for their roles in the global carbon, water, and energy budgets has motivated the implementation of hundreds of micrometeorological research sites throughout the world in recent years. The eddy covariance (EC) technique for turbulent flux determination is the preferred method to provide integral information on ecosystematmosphere exchanges. Integrating the observations regionally and globally has proven to be an effective approach to maximizing the usefulness of this technique for carbon cycle studies at multiple scales.

  20. On the Taxonomy of Flux Vacua

    SciTech Connect

    Giryavets, Alexander

    2004-04-25

    We investigate several predictions about the properties of IIB flux vacua on Calabi-Yau orientifolds, by constructing and characterizing a very large set of vacua in a specific example, an orientifold of the Calabi-Yau hypersurface in WP{sub 1,1,1,1,4}{sup 4}. We find support for the prediction of Ashok and Douglas that the density of vacua on moduli space is governed by det(-R-{omega}) where R and {omega} are curvature and Kaehler forms on the moduli space. The conifold point {psi} = 1 on moduli space therefore serves as an attractor, with a significant fraction of the flux vacua contained in a small neighborhood surrounding {psi} = 1. We also study the functional dependence of the number of flux vacua on the D3 charge in the fluxes, finding simple power law growth.

  1. Cool and hot flux ropes, their helicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nindos, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    We will review recent indirect and direct evidence for the existence of magnetic flux ropes in the solar atmosphere. Magnetic flux ropes may appear as S-shaped or reverse S-shaped (sigmoidal) structures in regions that are likely to erupt, and may also show in nonlinear force-free field extrapolations that use data from photospheric vector magnetograms as boundary condition. The availability of high sensitivity data recorded with unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution in hot EUV wavelengths by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) has revealed the existence of coherent structures identified as hot flux ropes. In this presentation, we will review the properties of both cool and hot flux ropes with an emphasis on the frequency of their occurrence in large flares and on their magnetic helicity content.

  2. Flux transfer events: Reconnection without separators. [magnetopause

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesse, M.; Birn, J.; Schindler, K.

    1989-01-01

    A topological analysis of a simple model magnetic field of a perturbation at the magnetopause modeling an apparent flux transfer event is presented. It is shown that a localized perturbation at the magnetopause can in principle open a closed magnetosphere by establishing magnetic connections across the magnetopause. Although the model field exhibits neutral points, these are not involved in the magnetic connection of the flux tubes. The topological substructure of a localized perturbation is analyzed in a simpler configuration. The presence of both signs of the magnetic field component normal to the magnetopause leads to a linkage of topologically different flux tubes, described as a flux knot, and a filamentary substructure of field lines of different topological types which becomes increasingly complicated for decreasing magnetic shear at the magnetopause.

  3. High Flux Isotope Reactor technical specifications

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-11-01

    This report gives technical specifications for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) on the following: safety limits and limiting safety system settings; limiting conditions for operation; surveillance requirements; design features; and administrative controls.

  4. Heat flux microsensor measurements and calibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Terrell, James P.; Hager, Jon M.; Onishi, Shinzo; Diller, Thomas E.

    1992-01-01

    A new thin-film heat flux gage has been fabricated specifically for severe high temperature operation using platinum and platinum-10 percent rhodium for the thermocouple elements. Radiation calibrations of this gage were performed at the AEDC facility over the available heat flux range (approx. 1.0 - 1,000 W/cu cm). The gage output was linear with heat flux with a slight increase in sensitivity with increasing surface temperature. Survivability of gages was demonstrated in quench tests from 500 C into liquid nitrogen. Successful operation of gages to surface temperatures of 750 C has been achieved. No additional cooling of the gages is required because the gages are always at the same temperature as the substrate material. A video of oxyacetylene flame tests with real-time heat flux and temperature output is available.

  5. Electron Flux of Radiation Belts Animation

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation shows meridional (from north-south) plane projections of the REPT-A and REPT-B electron flux values. The animation first shows the expected two-belt Van Allen zone structure; from Se...

  6. Experimental flux measurements on a network scale

    SciTech Connect

    Schwender, J.

    2011-10-11

    Metabolic flux is a fundamental property of living organisms. In recent years, methods for measuring metabolic flux in plants on a network scale have evolved further. One major challenge in studying flux in plants is the complexity of the plant's metabolism. In particular, in the presence of parallel pathways in multiple cellular compartments, the core of plant central metabolism constitutes a complex network. Hence, a common problem with the reliability of the contemporary results of {sup 13}C-Metabolic Flux Analysis in plants is the substantial reduction in complexity that must be included in the simulated networks; this omission partly is due to limitations in computational simulations. Here, I discuss recent emerging strategies that will better address these shortcomings.

  7. Tetrakis-amido high flux membranes

    DOEpatents

    McCray, Scott B.

    1989-01-01

    Composite RO membranes of a microporous polymeric support and a polyamide reaction product of a tetrakis-aminomethyl compound and a polyacylhalide are disclosed, said membranes exhibiting high flux and good chlorine resistance.

  8. Tetrakis-amido high flux membranes

    DOEpatents

    McCray, S.B.

    1989-10-24

    Composite RO membranes of a microporous polymeric support and a polyamide reaction product of a tetrakis-aminomethyl compound and a polyacylhalide are disclosed, said membranes exhibiting high flux and good chlorine resistance.

  9. Fast Ion Transport by Magnetic Flux Ropes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preiwisch, Adam; Heidbrink, William; Boehmer, Heinrich; McWilliams, Roger; Carter, Troy; Gekelman, Walter; Tripathi, Shreekrishna; Compernolle, Bart; Vincena, Steven

    2014-10-01

    Energetic Lithium test ions (500 <= Efast/Ti <= 1000) are launched in a Helium plasma in the presence of current-produced magnetic flux ropes at the upgraded Large Plasma Device (LAPD) at UCLA. Perturbing flux ropes are introduced via a hot, biased LaB6 cathode in the main chamber. Ion beam broadening up to fifty percent above background levels is observed in the radial direction after passing through the flux rope region (Te,max = 7 eV, Bperp = 7G, ΔV = 160 V). Density, temperature, and magnetic fluctuation profiles are also obtained. A noise model has been developed to assess the quality of ion signals during the flux rope discharge period. The enhancement to transport may be a result of increased Coulomb scattering, magnetic fluctuations, or electric fields. Further analysis to determine the primary mechanism is ongoing.

  10. Chesapeake Bay sediment flux model. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Di Toro, D.M.; Fitzpatrick, J.J.

    1993-06-01

    Formulation and application of a predictive diagenetic sediment model are described in this report. The model considers two benthic sediment layers: a thin aerobic layer in contact with the water column and a thicker anaerobic layer. Processes represented include diagenesis, diffusion, particle mixing, and burial. Deposition of organic matter, water column concentrations, and temperature are treated as independent variables that influence sediment-water fluxes. Sediment oxygen demand and sediment-water fluxes of sulfide, ammonium, nitrate, phosphate, and silica are predicted. The model was calibrated using sediment-water flux observations collected in Chesapeake Bay 1985-1988. When independent variables were specified based on observations, the model correctly represented the time series of sediment-water fluxes observed at eight stations in the Bay and tributaries.... Chesapeake Bay, Models, Sediments, Dissolved oxygen, Nitrogen Eutrophication, Phosphorus.

  11. [Mutagenic effects of ionized plasma light flux].

    PubMed

    Stupin, I V; Dombrovskiĭ, A M; Novokshonov, A I; Belova, L L; Belous, G G

    1990-10-01

    The effect of ion plasma light flux on the genomes of auxotrophic Escherichia coli strain and Drosophilla melanogaster has been examined. Essentially no mutagenic effect was found in doses close to therapeutic ones. PMID:2126213

  12. Hydrodynamic focusing of a particle flux

    SciTech Connect

    Makhviladze, G.M.; Melikhov, O.I.; Nikolova, I.P.

    1995-12-01

    Based on numerical integration of the equations of mechanics of multiphase media, an effect of focusing of a particle flux generated by a source located on the upper wall of a closed vessel has been revealed and investigated.

  13. Calculation of eigenfunction fluxes in nuclear systems.

    PubMed

    Hendricks, John S; Finch, Joshua P; Choi, Chan

    2005-01-01

    A new Monte Carlo method is being developed to calculate eigenfunction fluxes in critical or near-critical nuclear systems. The correct estimation of fluxes is essential for radiation protection and shielding near these systems, in addition to isotope production, isotope depletion, nuclear criticality and other applications. The proposed method applies to Monte Carlo criticality eigenvalue calculations in which the fission sites in one generation are used as fission sources in subsequent generations. The usual Monte Carlo power iteration method for such problems often calculates fluxes (eigenfunctions) that are inaccurate and very different in symmetric parts of a problem geometry. The proposed method calculates flux distributions by estimating an approximate fission matrix. The way the fission matrix is estimated and used differs from other recent works. Preliminary results are promising.

  14. Pulse power applications of flux compression generators

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, C.M.; Caird, R.S.; Erickson, D.J.; Freeman, B.L.

    1981-01-01

    Characteristics are presented for two different types of explosive driven flux compression generators and a megavolt pulse transformer. Status reports are given for rail gun and plasma focus programs for which the generators serve as power sources.

  15. Brownian simulations and unidirectional flux in diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, A.; Schuss, Z.

    2005-02-01

    The prediction of ionic currents in protein channels of biological membranes is one of the central problems of computational molecular biophysics. Existing continuum descriptions of ionic permeation fail to capture the rich phenomenology of the permeation process, so it is therefore necessary to resort to particle simulations. Brownian dynamics (BD) simulations require the connection of a small discrete simulation volume to large baths that are maintained at fixed concentrations and voltages. The continuum baths are connected to the simulation through interfaces, located in the baths sufficiently far from the channel. Average boundary concentrations have to be maintained at their values in the baths by injecting and removing particles at the interfaces. The particles injected into the simulation volume represent a unidirectional diffusion flux, while the outgoing particles represent the unidirectional flux in the opposite direction. The classical diffusion equation defines net diffusion flux, but not unidirectional fluxes. The stochastic formulation of classical diffusion in terms of the Wiener process leads to a Wiener path integral, which can split the net flux into unidirectional fluxes. These unidirectional fluxes are infinite, though the net flux is finite and agrees with classical theory. We find that the infinite unidirectional flux is an artifact caused by replacing the Langevin dynamics with its Smoluchowski approximation, which is classical diffusion. The Smoluchowski approximation fails on time scales shorter than the relaxation time 1/γ of the Langevin equation. We find that the probability of Brownian trajectories that cross an interface in one direction in unit time Δt equals that of the probability of the corresponding Langevin trajectories if γΔt=2 . That is, we find the unidirectional flux (source strength) needed to maintain average boundary concentrations in a manner consistent with the physics of Brownian particles. This unidirectional flux

  16. Interspecific Variation in SO2 Flux 1

    PubMed Central

    Olszyk, David M.; Tingey, David T.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of this study was to clarify the relationships among stomatal, residual, and epidermal conductances in determining the flux of SO2 air pollution to leaves. Variations in leaf SO2 and H2O vapor fluxes were determined using four plant species: Pisum sativum L. (garden pea), Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. flacca (mutant of tomato), Geranium carolinianum L. (wild geranium), and Diplacus aurantiacus (Curtis) Jeps. (a native California shrub). Fluxes were measured using the mass-balance approach during exposure to 4.56 micromoles per cubic meter (0.11 microliters per liter) SO2 for 2 hours in a controlled environmental chamber. Flux through adaxial and abaxial leaf surfaces with closed stomata ranged from 1.9 to 9.4 nanomoles per square meter per second for SO2, and 0.3 to 1.3 millimoles per square meter per second for H2O vapor. Flux of SO2 into leaves through stomata ranged from ∼0 to 8.5 (dark) and 3.8 to 16.0 (light) millimoles per square meter per second. Flux of H2O vapor from leaves through stomata ranged from ∼0 to 0.6 (dark) to 0.4 to 0.9 (light) millimole per square meter per second. Lycopersicon had internal flux rates for both SO2 and H2O vapor over twice as high as for the other species. Stomatal conductance based on H2O vapor flux averaged from 0.07 to 0.13 mole per square meter per second among the four species. Internal conductance of SO2 as calculated from SO2 flux was from 0.04 mole per square meter per second lower to 0.06 mole per square meter per second higher than stomatal conductance. For Pisum, Geranium, and Diplacus stomatal conductance was the same or slightly higher than internal conductance, indicating that, in general, SO2 flux could be predicted from stomatal conductance for H2O vapor. However, for the Lycopersicon mutant, internal leaf conductance was much higher than stomatal conductance, indicating that factors inside leaves can play a significant role in determining SO2 flux. PMID:16664551

  17. Remote sensing of hydrological fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurney, R. J.

    Remote sensing is developing as a measurement technique to the point where data are starting to be used operationally in a quantitative way other than just in weather forecasting. In addition, many other uses of the data are being developed because of the sparseness of conventional data in many parts of the world. A recent session of AGU's Hydrology Section at the Spring Meeting in Baltimore, Md., featured discussions of some of the recent advances in the use of remotely sensed data to estimate hydrological fluxes.Several papers dealt with remote sensing aspects of the First ISLSCP Field Experiment (FIFE), following another session of the Hydrology Section, which discussed nonremote sensing results from FIFE. S. N. Goward (University of Maryland, College Park) presented a review of empirical results from time series of Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer at the FIFE site and their relationship to some conventional observations. He showed strong relationships between spectral vegetation indices and surface temperature with scatter being at least partly caused by surface moisture variations. Unraveling the relationships from a physical point of view will involve a greater understanding of atmospheric effects and surface properties from other concurrent measurements during FIFE. Similar relationships between spectral vegetation indices and surface temperature were observed and reported by C. L. Walthall (University of Maryland, College Park), who used a radiometer mounted on a helicopter to collect data at the FIFE site. This indicates that the relationships are not entirely due to atmospheric effects. M. F. Jasinski and P. S. Eagleson (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge) described a theoretical reflectance model for spectral vegetation indices in terms of ground cover that will be extremely useful in interpreting these experimental results. R. N. Halthore (Applied Research Corp., Landover, Md.) described some of the measurements of aerosols during

  18. Micromorphic Balances and Source-flux Duality

    SciTech Connect

    Goddard, J. D.

    2011-11-29

    This is a further note on the (Gauss-Maxwell) force-flux construct proposed previously (Goddard, J. D., A note on Eringen's moment balances, Int. J. Eng. Sci., in the press, 2011). Motivated in part by its promise as a homogenization technique for constructing micromorphic continua, the present work is focused rather on some additional representations and on novel applications, such as the derivation of dissipative thermodynamic potentials from force-flux relations.

  19. Recurrence Analysis of Eddy Covariance Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, Holger; Flach, Milan; Foken, Thomas; Hauhs, Michael

    2015-04-01

    The eddy covariance (EC) method is one key method to quantify fluxes in biogeochemical cycles in general, and carbon and energy transport across the vegetation-atmosphere boundary layer in particular. EC data from the worldwide net of flux towers (Fluxnet) have also been used to validate biogeochemical models. The high resolution data are usually obtained at 20 Hz sampling rate but are affected by missing values and other restrictions. In this contribution, we investigate the nonlinear dynamics of EC fluxes using Recurrence Analysis (RA). High resolution data from the site DE-Bay (Waldstein-Weidenbrunnen) and fluxes calculated at half-hourly resolution from eight locations (part of the La Thuile dataset) provide a set of very long time series to analyze. After careful quality assessment and Fluxnet standard gapfilling pretreatment, we calculate properties and indicators of the recurrent structure based both on Recurrence Plots as well as Recurrence Networks. Time series of RA measures obtained from windows moving along the time axis are presented. Their interpretation is guided by three different questions: (1) Is RA able to discern periods where the (atmospheric) conditions are particularly suitable to obtain reliable EC fluxes? (2) Is RA capable to detect dynamical transitions (different behavior) beyond those obvious from visual inspection? (3) Does RA contribute to an understanding of the nonlinear synchronization between EC fluxes and atmospheric parameters, which is crucial for both improving carbon flux models as well for reliable interpolation of gaps? (4) Is RA able to recommend an optimal time resolution for measuring EC data and for analyzing EC fluxes? (5) Is it possible to detect non-trivial periodicities with a global RA? We will demonstrate that the answers to all five questions is affirmative, and that RA provides insights into EC dynamics not easily obtained otherwise.

  20. AmeriFlux US-Bkg Brookings

    SciTech Connect

    Meyers, Tilden

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Bkg Brookings. Site Description - The Brookings site is located in a private pasture, consisting of a mixture of C3 and C4 species actively used for grazing. Belonging to the Northern Great Plains Rangelands, the grassland is representative of many in the north central United States, with seasonal winter conditions and a wet growing season.

  1. Galileo Net Flux Radiometer Report 1997

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomasko, Martin G.

    1997-01-01

    On 7 December 1995, the Galileo probe entered Jupiter's atmosphere. The Net Flux Radiometer (NFR) on board the probe, measured upward and downward fluxes in the visible and infrared. At the University of Arizona, we have analyzed the data from the two visible-light channels, as well as the solar contributions to the thermal channels. The results are being prepared for submission to JGR in early September.

  2. Effective string description of confining flux tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, Bastian B.; Meineri, Marco

    2016-08-01

    We review the current knowledge about the theoretical foundations of the effective string theory for confining flux tubes and the comparison of the predictions to pure gauge lattice data. A concise presentation of the effective string theory is provided, incorporating recent developments. We summarize the predictions for the spectrum and the profile/width of the flux tube and their comparison to lattice data. The review closes with a short summary of open questions for future research.

  3. Anisotropic flux pinning in high Tc superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koleśnik, S.; Igalson, J.; Skośkiewicz, T.; Szymczak, R.; Baran, M.; Pytel, K.; Pytel, B.

    1995-02-01

    In this paper we present a comparison of the results of FC magnetization measurements on several PbSr(Y,Ca)CuO crystals representing various levels of flux pinning. The pinning centers in our crystals have been set up during the crystal growth process or introduced by neutron irradiation. Some possible explanations of the observed effects, including surface barrier, flux-center distribution and sample-shape effects, are discussed.

  4. Splitting of inviscid fluxes for real gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Meng-Sing; Vanleer, Bram; Shuen, Jian-Shun

    1988-01-01

    Flux-vector and flux-difference splittings for the inviscid terms of the compressible flow equations are derived under the assumption of a general equation of state for a real gas in equilibrium. No necessary assumptions, approximations or auxiliary quantities are introduced. The formulas derived include several particular cases known for ideal gases and readily apply to curvilinear coordinates. Applications of the formulas in a TVD algorithm to one-dimensional shock-tube and nozzle problems show their quality and robustness.

  5. Dynamics of flux tubes in accretion disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vishniac, E. T.; Duncan, R. C.

    1994-01-01

    The study of magnetized plasmas in astrophysics is complicated by a number of factors, not the least of which is that in considering magnetic fields in stars or accretion disks, we are considering plasmas with densities well above those we can study in the laboratory. In particular, whereas laboratory plasmas are dominated by the confining magnetic field pressure, stars, and probably accretion disks, have magnetic fields whose beta (ratio of gas pressure to magnetic field pressure) is much greater than 1. Observations of the Sun suggest that under such circumstances the magnetic field breaks apart into discrete flux tubes with a small filling factor. On the other hand, theoretical treatments of MHD turbulence in high-beta plasmas tend to assume that the field is more or less homogeneously distributed throughout the plasma. Here we consider a simple model for the distribution of magnetic flux tubes in a turbulent medium. We discuss the mechanism by which small inhomogeneities evolve into discrete flux tubes and the size and distribution of such flux tubes. We then apply the model to accretion disks. We find that the fibrilation of the magnetic field does not enhance magnetic buoyancy. We also note that the evolution of an initially diffuse field in a turbulent medium, e.g., any uniform field in a shearing flow, will initially show exponential growth as the flux tubes form. This growth saturates when the flux tube formation is complete and cannot be used as the basis for a self-sustaining dynamo effect. Since the typical state of the magnetic field is a collection of intense flux tubes, this effect is of limited interest. However, it may be important early in the evolution of the galactic magnetic field, and it will play a large role in numerical simulations. Finally, we note that the formation of flux tubes is an essential ingredient in any successful dynamo model for stars or accretion disks.

  6. Magnetic Flux Emergence on Different Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagenaar, M.; Cheung, M.

    2009-12-01

    Magnetic flux emerges on the Sun on many different scales, from weak intranetwork to network concentrations and (ephemeral) active regions. Methods previously developed to recognize regions of magnetic emergence on MDI Full Disk magnetograms fail when applied to Hinode/SOT Stokes maps: the resolution is so much higher that simple bipoles on MDI are observed as collections of fragments. We present a new method for the automatic detection and characterization of flux emergence on a range of scales.

  7. Substrate Trapping Proteomics Reveals Targets of the βTrCP2/FBXW11 Ubiquitin Ligase

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tai Young; Siesser, Priscila F.; Rossman, Kent L.; Goldfarb, Dennis; Mackinnon, Kathryn; Yan, Feng; Yi, XianHua; MacCoss, Michael J.; Moon, Randall T.; Der, Channing J.

    2014-01-01

    Defining the full complement of substrates for each ubiquitin ligase remains an important challenge. Improvements in mass spectrometry instrumentation and computation and in protein biochemistry methods have resulted in several new methods for ubiquitin ligase substrate identification. Here we used the parallel adapter capture (PAC) proteomics approach to study βTrCP2/FBXW11, a substrate adaptor for the SKP1–CUL1–F-box (SCF) E3 ubiquitin ligase complex. The processivity of the ubiquitylation reaction necessitates transient physical interactions between FBXW11 and its substrates, thus making biochemical purification of FBXW11-bound substrates difficult. Using the PAC-based approach, we inhibited the proteasome to “trap” ubiquitylated substrates on the SCFFBXW11 E3 complex. Comparative mass spectrometry analysis of immunopurified FBXW11 protein complexes before and after proteasome inhibition revealed 21 known and 23 putatively novel substrates. In focused studies, we found that SCFFBXW11 bound, polyubiquitylated, and destabilized RAPGEF2, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor that activates the small GTPase RAP1. High RAPGEF2 protein levels promoted cell-cell fusion and, consequently, multinucleation. Surprisingly, this occurred independently of the guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) catalytic activity and of the presence of RAP1. Our data establish new functions for RAPGEF2 that may contribute to aneuploidy in cancer. More broadly, this report supports the continued use of substrate trapping proteomics to comprehensively define targets for E3 ubiquitin ligases. All proteomic data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001062. PMID:25332235

  8. Obtainment of pellets using the standardized liquid extract of Brosimum gaudichaudii Trécul (Moraceae)

    PubMed Central

    Filho, Omar Paulino Silva; Oliveira, Leandra Almeida Ribeiro; Martins, Frederico Severino; Borges, Leonardo Luiz; de Freitas, Osvaldo; da Conceição, Edemilson Cardoso

    2015-01-01

    Background: The standardized liquid extract of Brosimum gaudichaudii Trécul is an alternative for the treatment of vitiligo. There is a shortage of solid oral dosage forms developed from standardized extracts of this plant specie. Objective: This study is aimed to obtain pellets with a standardized liquid extract of B. gaudichaudii. Results: The standardized liquid extract of B. gaudichaudii was obtained through maceration and percolation with a 55% ethanol-water solution (v/v). Pellets were obtained through a mixture of extract of 500 g of B. gaudichaudii standardized extract, 500 g of microcrystalline cellulose PH101 and 10 g of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose K100. The pellets obtained presented a homogeneity yield of 92%, aspect ratio of 1.16 ± 0.65, shape fator eR of 0.35 ± 0.09 and Feret diammeter of 0.87 ± 0.27. These pellets were coated with a suspension composed of titanium dioxide, aluminum red lacquer, ethyl cellulose, talc and magnesium stearate. Before the photostability test, the uncoated pellets showed psoralen content equal to 0.13 ± 0.01% and to the 5-MOP was 1.40 ± 0.27%. After exposure to one level (3 J.cm-2) of UVB irradiation the uncoated pellets presented a degradation of 2.16% of psoralen and 8.1% of 5-MOP. After exposure to three levels (10, 20 and 30 J.cm-2) of UVA irradiation the uncoated pellets exhibited photodegradation of 9.78, 17.64, 24.21% of psoralen and 18.95, 23.68, 28.48% for 5-MOP. The coated pellets where unaffected after photostability test. Conclusion: Pellets were obtained with the standardized liquid extract of B. gaudichaudii and coating is a technological alternative to ensure the stability of the formula. PMID:25709229

  9. Genome Sequencing and Comparative Analysis of the Biocontrol Agent Trichoderma harzianum sensu stricto TR274

    SciTech Connect

    Steindorff, Andrei S.; Noronha, Elilane F.; Ulhoa, Cirano J.; Kuo, Alan; Salamov, Asaf A.; Haridas, Sajeet; Riley, Robert W.; Druzhinina, Irina S.; Kubicek, Christian P.; Grigoriev, Igor V.

    2015-03-17

    Biological control is a complex process which requires many mechanisms and a high diversity of biochemical pathways. The species of Trichoderma harzianum are well known for their biocontrol activity against many plant pathogens. To gain new insights into the biocontrol mechanism used by T. harzianum, we sequenced the isolate TR274 genome using Illumina. The assembly was performed using AllPaths-LG with a maximum coverage of 100x. The assembly resulted in 2282 contigs with a N50 of 37033bp. The genome size generated was 40.8 Mb and the GC content was 47.7%, similar to other Trichoderma genomes. Using the JGI Annotation Pipeline we predicted 13,932 genes with a high transcriptome support. CEGMA tests suggested 100% genome completeness and 97.9% of RNA-SEQ reads were mapped to the genome. The phylogenetic comparison using orthologous proteins with all Trichoderma genomes sequenced at JGI, corroborates the Trichoderma (T. asperellum and T. atroviride), Longibrachiatum (T. reesei and T. longibrachiatum) and Pachibasium (T. harzianum and T. virens) section division described previously. The comparison between two Trichoderma harzianum species suggests a high genome similarity but some strain-specific expansions. Analyses of the secondary metabolites, CAZymes, transporters, proteases, transcription factors were performed. The Pachybasium section expanded virtually all categories analyzed compared with the other sections, specially Longibrachiatum section, that shows a clear contraction. These results suggests that these proteins families have an important role in their respective phenotypes. Future analysis will improve the understanding of this complex genus and give some insights about its lifestyle and the interactions with the environment.

  10. Peptaibols from Trichoderma asperellum TR356 strain isolated from Brazilian soil.

    PubMed

    Brito, João Pc; Ramada, Marcelo Hs; de Magalhães, Mariana Tq; Silva, Luciano P; Ulhoa, Cirano J

    2014-01-01

    The Trichoderma genus consists of a group of free-living filamentous fungi, including species able to act as biological control agents (BCAs) against pathogenic fungi. It is believed that this ability is due to synergy between several mechanisms, including the production of a wide variety of secondary metabolites by these organisms. Among these, we highlight the production of peptaibols, an antibiotic peptide group characterized by the presence of non-proteinogenic amino acids such as α-aminoisobutyrate (Aib), as well as by N-terminal modifications and amino alcohols in the C-terminal region. This study aimed to outline a profile of peptaibol production and to identify secreted peptaibols from the Trichoderma asperellum TR356 strain, described as an efficient BCA against S. sclerotiorum. The fungus was grown on TLE 0.3% glucose medium for 5 days, with agitation at 120 rpm in the dark. Liquid medium filtrate was used as the metabolite source. These extracts were subjected to high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and subsequent analysis by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF). The results indicate the production of two classes of peptaibols for this T. asperellum strain. Primary structures of two asperelines (A and E) and five trichotoxins (T5D2, T5E, T5F, T5G and 1717A) have been elucidated. Most of these peptaibols had been previously described in T. viride and T. asperellum marine strains. This is the first report of some of these compounds being produced by a T. asperellum strain from soil. Future analyses will be necessary to elucidate the three-dimensional structures and their activities against pathogens. PMID:25392773

  11. Fabrication of Thin Film Heat Flux Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Will, Herbert A.

    1992-01-01

    Prototype thin film heat flux sensors have been constructed and tested. The sensors can be applied to propulsion system materials and components. The sensors can provide steady state and fast transient heat flux information. Fabrication of the sensor does not require any matching of the mounting surface. Heat flux is proportional to the temperature difference across the upper and lower surfaces of an insulation material. The sensor consists of an array of thermocouples on the upper and lower surfaces of a thin insulating layer. The thermocouples for the sensor are connected in a thermopile arrangement. A 100 thermocouple pair heat flux sensor has been fabricated on silicon wafers. The sensor produced an output voltage of 200-400 microvolts when exposed to a hot air heat gun. A 20 element thermocouple pair heat flux sensor has been fabricated on aluminum oxide sheet. Thermocouples are Pt-Pt/Rh with silicon dioxide as the insulating material. This sensor produced an output of 28 microvolts when exposed to the radiation of a furnace operating at 1000 C. Work is also underway to put this type of heat flux sensor on metal surfaces.

  12. Vertical eddy heat fluxes from model simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, Peter H.; Yao, Mao-Sung

    1991-01-01

    Vertical eddy fluxes of heat are calculated from simulations with a variety of climate models, ranging from three-dimensional GCMs to a one-dimensional radiative-convective model. The models' total eddy flux in the lower troposphere is found to agree well with Hantel's analysis from observations, but in the mid and upper troposphere the models' values are systematically 30 percent to 50 percent smaller than Hantel's. The models nevertheless give very good results for the global temperature profile, and the reason for the discrepancy is unclear. The model results show that the manner in which the vertical eddy flux is carried is very sensitive to the parameterization of moist convection. When a moist adiabatic adjustment scheme with a critical value for the relative humidity of 100 percent is used, the vertical transports by large-scale eddies and small-scale convection on a global basis are equal: but when a penetrative convection scheme is used, the large-scale flux on a global basis is only about one-fifth to one-fourth the small-scale flux. Comparison of the model results with observations indicates that the results with the latter scheme are more realistic. However, even in this case, in mid and high latitudes the large and small-scale vertical eddy fluxes of heat are comparable in magnitude above the planetary boundary layer.

  13. Quantitation of cellular metabolic fluxes of methionine.

    PubMed

    Shlomi, Tomer; Fan, Jing; Tang, Baiqing; Kruger, Warren D; Rabinowitz, Joshua D

    2014-02-01

    Methionine is an essential proteogenic amino acid. In addition, it is a methyl donor for DNA and protein methylation and a propylamine donor for polyamine biosynthesis. Both the methyl and propylamine donation pathways involve metabolic cycles, and methods are needed to quantitate these cycles. Here, we describe an analytical approach for quantifying methionine metabolic fluxes that accounts for the mixing of intracellular and extracellular methionine pools. We observe that such mixing prevents isotope tracing experiments from reaching the steady state due to the large size of the media pools and hence precludes the use of standard stationary metabolic flux analysis. Our approach is based on feeding cells with (13)C methionine and measuring the isotope-labeling kinetics of both intracellular and extracellular methionine by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). We apply this method to quantify methionine metabolism in a human fibrosarcoma cell line and study how methionine salvage pathway enzyme methylthioadenosine phosphorylase (MTAP), frequently deleted in cancer, affects methionine metabolism. We find that both transmethylation and propylamine transfer fluxes amount to roughly 15% of the net methionine uptake, with no major changes due to MTAP deletion. Our method further enables the quantification of flux through the pro-tumorigenic enzyme ornithine decarboxylase, and this flux increases 2-fold following MTAP deletion. The analytical approach used to quantify methionine metabolic fluxes is applicable for other metabolic systems affected by mixing of intracellular and extracellular metabolite pools.

  14. Cosmic string formation by flux trapping

    SciTech Connect

    Blanco-Pillado, Jose J.; Olum, Ken D.; Vilenkin, Alexander

    2007-11-15

    We study the formation of cosmic strings by confining a stochastic magnetic field into flux tubes in a numerical simulation. We use overdamped evolution in a potential that is minimized when the flux through each face in the simulation lattice is a multiple of the fundamental flux quantum. When the typical number of flux quanta through a correlation-length-sized region is initially about 1, we find a string network similar to that generated by the Kibble-Zurek mechanism. With larger initial flux, the loop distribution and the Brownian shape of the infinite strings remain unchanged, but the fraction of length in infinite strings is increased. A 2D slice of the network exhibits bundles of strings pointing in the same direction, as in earlier 2D simulations. We find, however, that strings belonging to the same bundle do not stay together in 3D for much longer than the correlation length. As the initial flux per correlation length is decreased, there is a point at which infinite strings disappear, as in the Hagedorn transition.

  15. Transition region fluxes in A-F Dwarfs: Basal fluxes and dynamo activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, Frederick M.; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Boyd, William

    1988-01-01

    The transition region spectra of 87 late A and early F dwarfs and subgiants were analyzed. The emission line fluxes are uniformly strong in the early F stars, and drop off rapidly among the late A stars. The basal flux level in the F stars is consistent with an extrapolation of that observed among the G stars, while the magnetic component displays the same flux-flux relations seen among solar-like stars. Despite the steep decrease in transition region emission flux for B-V less than 0.28, C II emission is detected in alpha Aql (B-V = 0.22). The dropoff in emission is inconsistent with models of the mechanically generated acoustic flux available. It is concluded that, although the nonmagnetic basal heating is an increasingly important source of atmospheric heating among the early F stars, magnetic heating occurs in any star which has a sufficiently thick convective zone to generate acoustic heating.

  16. Turbulent fluxes by "Conditional Eddy Sampling"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siebicke, Lukas

    2015-04-01

    Turbulent flux measurements are key to understanding ecosystem scale energy and matter exchange, including atmospheric trace gases. While the eddy covariance approach has evolved as an invaluable tool to quantify fluxes of e.g. CO2 and H2O continuously, it is limited to very few atmospheric constituents for which sufficiently fast analyzers exist. High instrument cost, lack of field-readiness or high power consumption (e.g. many recent laser-based systems requiring strong vacuum) further impair application to other tracers. Alternative micrometeorological approaches such as conditional sampling might overcome major limitations. Although the idea of eddy accumulation has already been proposed by Desjardin in 1972 (Desjardin, 1977), at the time it could not be realized for trace gases. Major simplifications by Businger and Oncley (1990) lead to it's widespread application as 'Relaxed Eddy Accumulation' (REA). However, those simplifications (flux gradient similarity with constant flow rate sampling irrespective of vertical wind velocity and introduction of a deadband around zero vertical wind velocity) have degraded eddy accumulation to an indirect method, introducing issues of scalar similarity and often lack of suitable scalar flux proxies. Here we present a real implementation of a true eddy accumulation system according to the original concept. Key to our approach, which we call 'Conditional Eddy Sampling' (CES), is the mathematical formulation of conditional sampling in it's true form of a direct eddy flux measurement paired with a performant real implementation. Dedicated hardware controlled by near-real-time software allows full signal recovery at 10 or 20 Hz, very fast valve switching, instant vertical wind velocity proportional flow rate control, virtually no deadband and adaptive power management. Demonstrated system performance often exceeds requirements for flux measurements by orders of magnitude. The system's exceptionally low power consumption is ideal

  17. Characterizing In Situ Uranium and Groundwater Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, J.; Newman, M. A.; Stucker, V.; Peacock, A.; Ranville, J.; Cabaniss, S.; Hatfield, K.; Annable, M. D.; Klammler, H.; Perminova, I. V.

    2010-12-01

    The goal of this project is to develop a new sensor that incorporates the field-tested concepts of the passive flux meter to provide direct in situ measures of uranium and groundwater fluxes. The sensor uses two sorbents and resident tracers to measure uranium flux and specific discharge directly; but, sensor principles and design should also apply to fluxes of other radionuclides. Flux measurements will assist with obtaining field-scale quantification of subsurface processes affecting uranium transport (e.g., advection) and transformation (e.g., uranium attenuation) and further advance conceptual and computational models for field scale simulations. Project efforts will expand our current understanding of how field-scale spatial variations in uranium fluxes and those for salient electron donor/acceptors, and groundwater are coupled to spatial variations in measured microbial biomass/community composition, effective field-scale uranium mass balances, attenuation, and stability. The new sensor uses an anion exchange resin to measure uranium fluxes and activated carbon with resident tracers to measure water fluxes. Several anion-exchange resins including Dowex 21K and 21K XLT, Purolite A500, and Lewatit S6328 were tested as sorbents for capturing uranium on the sensor and Lewatit S6328 was determined to be the most effective over the widest pH range. Four branched alcohols proved useful as resident tracers for measuring groundwater flows using activated carbon for both laboratory and field conditions. The flux sensor was redesigned to prevent the discharge of tracers to the environment, and the new design was tested in laboratory box aquifers and the field. Geochemical modeling of equilibrium speciation using Visual Minteq and an up-to-date thermodynamic data base suggested Ca-tricarbonato-uranyl complexes predominate under field conditions, while calculated uranyl ion activities were sensitive to changes in pH, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and alkaline earth

  18. Kinetics of cytochrome c oxidase from R. sphaeroides initiated by direct electron transfer followed by tr-SEIRAS.

    PubMed

    Steininger, Christoph; Reiner-Rozman, Ciril; Schwaighofer, Andreas; Knoll, Wolfgang; Naumann, Renate L C

    2016-12-01

    Time-resolved surface-enhanced IR-absorption spectroscopy (tr-SEIRAS) has been performed on cytochrome c oxidase from Rhodobacter sphaeroides. The enzyme was converted electrochemically into the fully reduced state. Thereafter, in the presence of oxygen, the potential was switched to open circuit potential (OCP). Under these conditions, the enzyme is free to undergo enzymatic oxidation in the absence of an external electric field. Tr-SEIRAS was performed using the step-scan technique, triggered by periodic potential pulses switching between - 800mV and OCP. Single bands were resolved in a broad band in the amide I region using phase sensitive detection. Amplitudes of these bands were analyzed as a function of time. Time constants in the ms time scale were considered in terms of conformational changes of the protein secondary structures associated with the enzymatic turnover of the protein. PMID:27398977

  19. The pyoverdine from Pseudomonas chlororaphis D-TR133 showing mutual acceptance with the pyoverdine of Pseudomonas fluorescens CHAO.

    PubMed

    Barelmann, Insa; Fernández, Diana Uría; Budzikiewicz, Herbert; Meyer, Jean-Marie

    2003-06-01

    From Pseudomonas chlororaphis D-TR 133 a pyoverdine was isolated and its primary structure were elucidated by spectroscopic methods and degradation reactions. Despite some structural differences, its Fe(III) complex and that of the pyoverdine from Pseudomonas fluorescens CHA0 were taken up by either strain with a high rate. This is explained by a structural similarity between the two pyoverdines which were shown to differ in their structures only by the replacement of Lys by Ala in the C-terminal part of the molecules. An unexpected feature is that the main pyoverdine of P. chlororaphis D-TR133 is accompanied by a minor one where specifically one Ala is replaced by Gly. So far amino acid variations in the peptide chain of pyoverdines produced by a given strain had not been observed amongst the producers of the about fifty pyoverdines reported in the literature. PMID:12572684

  20. Screening for DSM-IV-TR Cognitive Disorder NOS in Parkinson’s disease using the Mattis Dementia Rating Scale

    PubMed Central

    Pontone, Gregory M.; Palanci, Justin; Williams, James R.; Bassett, Susan Spear

    2012-01-01

    Objective This study explores the utility of the Mattis Dementia Rating Scale (MDRS) as a screening tool for the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders 4th edition (DSM-IV-TR) diagnosis Cognitive Disorder Not Otherwise Specified in Parkinson’s disease(PD). Methods 125 individuals with PD were diagnosed using DSM-IV-TR criteria for Cognitive Disorder NOS and dementia. Receiver operating characteristics tested the discriminant validity of the MDRS, with the clinician’s diagnosis serving as the gold standard. Results The MDRS ROC curve to discriminate subjects with Cognitive Disorder NOS from non-demented subjects had an AUC of 0.59 (std. err.= 0.08, 95% CI: 0.43–0.74). Conclusions The MDRS is not effective for identifying PD patients with Cognitive Disorder NOS without dementia. PMID:22628158