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Sample records for erm helgi arst

  1. ERM Ideas and Innovations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    England, Lenore

    2012-01-01

    Welcome to the new "Journal of Electronic Resources Librarianship" column entitled "ERM Ideas and Innovations," which will appear in each issue of JERL for the next 2 years, and possibly more, beginning with this issue. The overall focus of each column will be to introduce and expand ideas, discuss innovations, and ultimately encourage and foster…

  2. ERM Ideas and Innovations: Digital Repository Management as ERM

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinkas, María M.; Lin, Na

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the application of electronic resources management (ERM) to digital repository management at the Health Sciences and Human Services Library at the University of Maryland, Baltimore. The authors discuss electronic resources management techniques, through the application of "Techniques for Electronic Management,"…

  3. ERM Ideas and Innovations: Digital Repository Management as ERM

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinkas, María M.; Lin, Na

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the application of electronic resources management (ERM) to digital repository management at the Health Sciences and Human Services Library at the University of Maryland, Baltimore. The authors discuss electronic resources management techniques, through the application of "Techniques for Electronic Management,"…

  4. Intrinsic Macrolide Resistance in Mycobacterium smegmatis Is Conferred by a Novel erm Gene, erm(38)

    PubMed Central

    Nash, Kevin A.

    2003-01-01

    High-level, acquired macrolide resistance in mycobacteria is conferred by mutation within the 23S rRNA gene. However, several mycobacteria are naturally resistant to macrolides, including the Mycobacterium smegmatis group and Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. Thus, the aim of this study was to characterize this resistance. Intrinsic macrolide resistance in M. smegmatis was inducible and showed cross-resistance to lincosamides but not to streptogramin B (i.e., ML resistance). A similar phenotype was found with Mycobacterium microti and macrolide-resistant Mycobacterium fortuitum. A search of the DNA sequence data for M. smegmatis strain mc2155 identified a novel erm gene, erm(38), and expression analysis showed that erm(38) RNA levels increased >10-fold after a 2-h incubation with macrolide. Inducible ML resistance was not expressed by an erm(38) knockout mutant, and complementation of this mutant with intact erm(38) in trans resulted in high-level ML resistance (e.g., clarithromycin MIC of >512 μg/ml). Thus, the results indicate that erm(38) confers the intrinsic ML resistance of M. smegmatis. Southern blot analysis with an erm(38)-specific probe indicated that a similar gene may be present in macrolide-resistant M. fortuitum. This finding, with the presence of the erm(37) gene (Rv1988) in the M. tuberculosis complex, suggests that such genes are widespread in mycobacteria with intrinsic macrolide resistance. PMID:14506008

  5. Ermüdungs- und Wachsamkeitsmanagement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebermann, Hans-Joachim; Murtha, Maria-Pascaline

    1994 wurde erstmals Ermüdung (Fatigue) durch die amerikanische Unfalluntersuchungsbehörde NTSB (National Transportation Safety Board) offiziell als Hauptursache für einen Unfall in der Luftfahrt erklärt. Seitdem wird Müdigkeit bei der Untersuchung von Unfällen systematisch abgefragt.

  6. ERMes: Open Source Simplicity for Your E-Resource Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doering, William; Chilton, Galadriel

    2009-01-01

    ERMes, the latest version of electronic resource management system (ERM), is a relational database; content in different tables connects to, and works with, content in other tables. ERMes requires Access 2007 (Windows) or Access 2008 (Mac) to operate as the database utilizes functionality not available in previous versions of Microsoft Access. The…

  7. ERMes: Open Source Simplicity for Your E-Resource Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doering, William; Chilton, Galadriel

    2009-01-01

    ERMes, the latest version of electronic resource management system (ERM), is a relational database; content in different tables connects to, and works with, content in other tables. ERMes requires Access 2007 (Windows) or Access 2008 (Mac) to operate as the database utilizes functionality not available in previous versions of Microsoft Access. The…

  8. Molecular analysis of constitutive mutations in ermB and ermA selected in vitro from inducibly MLSB-resistant enterococci.

    PubMed

    Min, Yu-Hong; Kwon, Ae-Ran; Yoon, Jong-Min; Yoon, Eun-Jeong; Shim, Mi-Ja; Choi, Eung-Chil

    2008-03-01

    Frequencies of spontaneous mutation from inducible resistance to constitutive resistance were determined for the four clinical isolates of erythromycin-resistant enterococci, including one isolate with ermB gene and three clinical isolates with ermA gene. The rate of ermB mutation was higher than that of ermA mutation by more than 10 fold. Sequence analysis of the regulatory regions of erm genes revealed that mutation type of ermB was just point mutation, by contraries the mutation type of ermA was either deletion or tandem duplication. These results showed distinct characteristics in mutation patterns of ermB and ermA.

  9. A Second Tylosin Resistance Determinant, Erm B, in Arcanobacterium pyogenes

    PubMed Central

    Jost, B. Helen; Trinh, Hien T.; Songer, J. Glenn; Billington, Stephen J.

    2004-01-01

    Arcanobacterium pyogenes, a common inhabitant of the mucosal surfaces of livestock, is also a pathogen associated with a variety of infections. In livestock, A. pyogenes is exposed to antimicrobial agents used for prophylaxis and therapy, notably tylosin, a macrolide used extensively for the prevention of liver abscessation in feedlot cattle in the United States. Many, but not all, tylosin-resistant A. pyogenes isolates carry erm(X), suggesting the presence of other determinants of tylosin resistance. Oligonucleotide primers designed for conserved regions of erm(B), erm(C), and erm(T) were used to amplify a 404-bp fragment from a tylosin-resistant A. pyogenes isolate, OX-7. DNA sequencing revealed that the PCR product was 100% identical to erm(B) genes, and the erm(B) gene region was cloned in Escherichia coli. The A. pyogenes Erm B determinant had the most DNA identity with an Erm B determinant carried by the Clostridium perfringens plasmid pIP402. However, the A. pyogenes determinant lacked direct repeat DR1 and contained a deletion in DR2. Flanking the A. pyogenes erm(B) gene were partial and entire genes similar to those found on the Enterococcus faecalis multiresistance plasmid pRE25. This novel architecture suggests that the erm(B) element may have arisen by recombination of two distinct genetic elements. Ten of 32 tylosin-resistant isolates carried erm(B), as determined by DNA hybridization, and all 10 isolates carried a similar element. Insertion of the element was site specific, as PCR and Southern blotting analysis revealed that the erm(B) element was inserted into orfY, a gene of unknown function. However, in three strains, this insertion resulted in a partial duplication of orfY. PMID:14982756

  10. Mycobacterium smegmatis Erm(38) Is a Reluctant Dimethyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Madsen, Christian Toft; Jakobsen, Lene; Douthwaite, Stephen

    2005-01-01

    The waxy cell walls of mycobacteria provide intrinsic tolerance to a broad range of antibiotics, and this effect is augmented by specific resistance determinants. The inducible determinant erm(38) in the nontuberculous species Mycobacterium smegmatis confers high resistance to lincosamides and some macrolides, without increasing resistance to streptogramin B antibiotics. This is an uncharacteristic resistance pattern falling between the type I and type II macrolide, lincosamide, and streptogramin B (MLSB) phenotypes that are conferred, respectively, by Erm monomethyltransferases and dimethyltransferases. Erm dimethyltransferases are typically found in pathogenic bacteria and confer resistance to all MLSB drugs by addition of two methyl groups to nucleotide A2058 in 23S rRNA. We show here by mass spectrometry analysis of the mycobacterial rRNA that Erm(38) is indeed an A2058-specific dimethyltransferase. The activity of Erm(38) is lethargic, however, and only a meager proportion of the rRNA molecules become dimethylated in M. smegmatis, while most of the rRNAs are either monomethylated or remain unmethylated. The methylation pattern produced by Erm(38) clarifies the phenotype of M. smegmatis, as it is adequate to confer resistance to lincosamides and 14-member ring macrolides such as erythromycin, but it is insufficient to raise the level of resistance to streptogramin B drugs above the already high intrinsic tolerance displayed by this species. PMID:16127056

  11. [The frequency of the occurrence of genes ermA, ermB, ermC and msrA/B among methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains resistant to erythromycin].

    PubMed

    Młynarczyk, Grazyna; Młynarczyk, Andrzej; Szymanek, Ksenia; Luczak, Mirosław

    2006-01-01

    The group of 50 clinical MRSA strains resistant to MLS-B was examined for the presence of ermA, ermB, ermC, msrA/B genes by using PCR. Gene ermA was found in 43 strains (86%). 20 of ermA strains demonstrated inducible whereas 23 constitutive type of expression. The gene ermC was present in 15 of examined MRSA strains (30%). The expression of the gene was inducible in the case of 9 and constitutive in the case of 6 of the strains. The msrA/B gene was present in the case of 5 strains (10%). The ermB gene was not detected among the investigated strains.

  12. A Novel Erythromycin Resistance Methylase Gene (ermTR) in Streptococcus pyogenes

    PubMed Central

    Seppälä, Helena; Skurnik, Mikael; Soini, Hanna; Roberts, Marilyn C.; Huovinen, Pentti

    1998-01-01

    Erythromycin resistance among streptococci is commonly due to target site modification by an rRNA-methylating enzyme, which results in coresistance to macrolide, lincosamide, and streptogramin B antibiotics (MLSB resistance). Genes belonging to the ermAM (ermB) gene class are the only erythromycin resistance methylase (erm) genes in Streptococcus pyogenes with MLSB resistance that have been sequenced so far. We identified a novel erm gene, designated ermTR, from an erythromycin-resistant clinical strain of S. pyogenes (strain A200) with an inducible type of MLSB resistance. The nucleotide sequence of ermTR is 82.5% identical to ermA, previously found, for example, in Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci. Our finding provides the first sequence of an erm gene other than ermAM that mediates MLSB resistance in S. pyogenes. PMID:9527769

  13. Methyltransferase Erm(37) slips on rRNA to confer atypical resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Christian Toft; Jakobsen, Lene; Buriánková, Karolina; Doucet-Populaire, Florence; Pernodet, Jean-Luc; Douthwaite, Stephen

    2005-11-25

    Members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex possess a resistance determinant, erm(37) (also termed ermMT), which is a truncated homologue of the erm genes found in a diverse range of drug-producing and pathogenic bacteria. All erm genes examined thus far encode N(6)-monomethyltransferases or N(6),N(6)-dimethyltransferases that show absolute specificity for nucleotide A2058 in 23 S rRNA. Monomethylation at A2058 confers resistance to a subset of the macrolide, lincosamide, and streptogramin B (MLS(B)) group of antibiotics and no resistance to the latest macrolide derivatives, the ketolides. Dimethylation at A2058 confers high resistance to all MLS(B) and ketolide drugs. The erm(37) phenotype fits into neither category. We show here by tandem mass spectrometry that Erm(37) initially adds a single methyl group to its primary target at A2058 but then proceeds to attach additional methyl groups to the neighboring nucleotides A2057 and A2059. Other methyltransferases, Erm(E) and Erm(O), maintain their specificity for A2058 on mycobacterial rRNA. Erm(E) and Erm(O) have a full-length C-terminal domain, which appears to be important for stabilizing the methyltransferases at their rRNA target, and this domain is truncated in Erm(37). The lax interaction of the M. tuberculosis Erm(37) with its rRNA produces a unique methylation pattern and confers resistance to the ketolide telithromycin.

  14. Opportunities for Improvement in Pathology Reporting of Childhood Nonrhabdomyosarcoma Soft Tissue Sarcomas:  A Report From Children's Oncology Group (COG) Study ARST0332.

    PubMed

    Black, Jennifer O; Coffin, Cheryl M; Parham, David M; Hawkins, Douglas S; Speights, Rose A; Spunt, Sheri L

    2016-09-01

    Treatment of soft tissue tumors in young patients relies on the diagnostic information conveyed in the pathology report. We examined pathology reports from Children's Oncology Group ARST0332 for inclusion of data elements required in published guidelines. Pathology reports for 551 eligible patients were examined for required data elements defined by the College of American Pathologists, including tissue type, procedure, tumor site, tumor maximum diameter, macroscopic extent of tumor, histologic type, mitotic rate, extent of necrosis, tumor grade, margin status, use of ancillary studies, and pathologic stage. Only 65 (12%) of 551 reports included all required data elements. Of reports containing synoptic templates, 57% were complete. This study reveals significant opportunity to improve the quality of pathology reports in young patients with soft tissue tumors. Use of templates or checklists improves completeness of reports. © American Society for Clinical Pathology, 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Simultaneous detection of erythromycin-resistant methylase genes ermA and ermC from Staphylococcus spp. by multiplex-PCR.

    PubMed

    Khan, S A; Nawaz, M S; Khan, A A; Cerniglia, C E

    1999-10-01

    A comparative analysis of the two most dominant erythromycin-resistance determinant genes in Staphylococcus sppnamely, the ermA and ermC genes, was carried out. Sixty erythromycin-resistant strains of Staphylococcus spp. were tested, of which 24 were avian and 36 were clinical isolates. Our results indicated the prevalence of ermA over the ermC gene as opposed to the widely held opinion of the ermC gene being the most dominant resistance determinant gene. A multiplex-PCR assay was developed to detect the presence of ermA and ermC genes. Two pairs of primers, specific for the detection of ermA and ermC genes, were used in a multiplex-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay to yield amplified DNA products of 610 and 520 bp, respectively. Their digestion with restriction enzyme FokI that yielded a 477 bp and a 132 bp digestion product for ermA and a 333 bp and a 187 bp digestion product for ermC confirmed the authenticity of PCR products. The method could be used to amplify the ermA and ermC genes with as little as 5 pg of template DNA. The use of excess primers or the template DNA resulted in gene-specific amplification and no non-specific amplification was observed by changing the primer to primer or template to primer ratios. Furthermore, no amplification from erythromycin-sensitive S. aureus strain was observed. Using this assay, the poultry strains were found to contain either ermA alone (50%) or a combination of ermA (100%) and ermC (50%) both. The clinical strains contained either ermA (94.5%) or ermC (5.5%) but never both. The gene-specific internal probes were also used to verify the above findings and a high degree of correlation between the multiplex PCR and Southern hybridization data was observed. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  16. Ecoremediation (ERM) and Saprobiology - is there a link?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svirčev, Zorica; Marković, Slobodan; Krstić, Svetislav; Krstić, Kosta; Obreht, Igor

    2010-05-01

    Healthy environment is rapidly becoming very important value in human life and a criterion of the quality of living. To achieve this target, many of us consider the 'returning to nature' and respecting the ancient laws of nature as the possible solution. Accelerated or fast eutrophization is detected destiny in majority of fresh water ecosystems today, mainly due to global climate changes and adverse human impact. However, this process can be tackled by different activities, ecoremedation (ERM) having an especially important place. Ecoremediation is a system of utilizing the natural processes for revival and protection of the environment. ERM methods may reduce and avert the consequences of agricultural pollution, tourism, transport, industry, land fills and (over)population. In its essence, ERM represents the 'returning to nature' approach aiming to preserve or re-establish the natural balance of the ecosystems, but also a human endevour that enables new jobs and by-side activities important for economic and social (sustainable) development of the human society. In this study we propose the model of eutrophication control achieved on four important levels in the functional dynamics of the ecosystems. ERM is placed as key element in prevention, increasing of decomposition processes through different modes of aeration, decreasing of the total capacity of the ecosystem usually via constructed wetlands, planting and removing of the riparian vegetation.

  17. ERMS guidebook: Cleaner air, reduced cost, Illinois EPA

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-01

    The Illinois EPA has prepared this guidebook to help participants in the Emissions Reduction Market System and other interested persons understand how the system is designed and going to be operated. This guidebook serves as a supplement to other important reference materials such as the ERMS regulations (35 Ill. Admin. Code 205) and the Environmental Protection Act (Sec. 98.).

  18. Induction of ermSV by 16-membered-ring macrolide antibiotics.

    PubMed Central

    Kamimiya, S; Weisblum, B

    1997-01-01

    The erm family of 23S rRNA adenine-N6-methyltransferases confers resistance to all macrolide-lincosamide-streptograminB (MLS) antibiotics, but not all MLS antibiotics induce synthesis of Erm methyltransferase with equal efficiency in a given organism. The induction efficiency of a test panel of MLS antibiotics was studied by using two translational attenuator-lac reporter gene fusion constructs, one based on ermSV from Streptomyces viridochromogenes NRRL 2860 and the other based on ermC from Staphylococcus aureus RN2442. Four types of responses which were correlated with the macrolide ring size were seen, as follows: group 1, both ermSV and ermC were induced by the 14-membered-ring macrolides erythromycin, lankamycin, and matromycin, as well as by the lincosamide celesticetin; group 2, neither ermSV nor ermC was induced by the 12-membered-ring macrolide methymycin or by the lincosamide lincomycin or the streptogramin type B antibiotic ostreogrycin B; group 3, ermSV was selectively induced over ermC by the 16-membered-ring macrolides carbomycin, chalcomycin, cirramycin, kitasamycin, maridomycin, and tylosin; and group 4, ermC was selectively induced over ermSV by the 14-membered-ring macrolide megalomicin. These data suggest that the leader peptide determines the specificity of induction by different classes of MLS antibiotics and that for a given attenuator, a major factor which determines whether a given macrolide induces resistance is its size. PMID:9055987

  19. Prevalence of erm genes encoding macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin (MLS) resistance among clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus in a Turkish university hospital.

    PubMed

    Saribas, Z; Tunckanat, F; Pinar, A

    2006-08-01

    This study investigated the prevalence of the erm(A), erm(B) and erm(C) genes among 122 MLS-resistant clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus from a Turkish university hospital. Of these isolates, 44 were inducibly resistant and 78 were constitutively resistant. The presence of one or more erm genes was demonstrated in 114 isolates; the erm(C) gene was detected in 97 isolates, and the erm(A) gene was detected in 96 isolates. Seventy-eight isolates harboured both erm(A) and erm(C). The combination of erm(A), erm(B) and erm(C) genes was detected in only one isolate.

  20. Erythromycin-induced ribosome stall in the ermA leader: a barricade to 5'-to-3' nucleolytic cleavage of the ermA transcript.

    PubMed

    Sandler, P; Weisblum, B

    1989-12-01

    The Staphylococcus aureus ermA gene, whose product confers resistance to the macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B family of antibiotics, is induced at the level of translation by nanomolar concentrations of erythromycin. Erythromycin also specifically stabilizes ermA transcripts, and the induced stabilization requires in-phase translation of at least one of two small leader peptides in the 5' leader region of the transcript. Erythromycin-induced mRNA stabilization was tested in three constructions in which the ermA transcript was elongated by making insertions at the ermA transcription start. Whereas mRNA downstream of the leader peptide is stabilized by erythromycin, mRNA upstream is not. In the presence of erythromycin, specific mRNA decay intermediates in both the extended ermA genes and the wild-type ermA gene were detected by both Northern blotting and S1 nuclease mapping. The 5' ends of the intermediates map to the sequences that encode each of the two ermA leader peptides, suggesting that the intermediates are produced by stalled erythromycin-bound ribosomes acting as barricades to degradation by 5'-to-3' RNases. In addition, whereas erythromycin was found previously to stabilize ermA transcripts only physically, an ermC-cat-86 hybrid transcript was stabilized both physically and functionally by erythromycin.

  1. Erythromycin-induced ribosome stall in the ermA leader: a barricade to 5'-to-3' nucleolytic cleavage of the ermA transcript.

    PubMed Central

    Sandler, P; Weisblum, B

    1989-01-01

    The Staphylococcus aureus ermA gene, whose product confers resistance to the macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B family of antibiotics, is induced at the level of translation by nanomolar concentrations of erythromycin. Erythromycin also specifically stabilizes ermA transcripts, and the induced stabilization requires in-phase translation of at least one of two small leader peptides in the 5' leader region of the transcript. Erythromycin-induced mRNA stabilization was tested in three constructions in which the ermA transcript was elongated by making insertions at the ermA transcription start. Whereas mRNA downstream of the leader peptide is stabilized by erythromycin, mRNA upstream is not. In the presence of erythromycin, specific mRNA decay intermediates in both the extended ermA genes and the wild-type ermA gene were detected by both Northern blotting and S1 nuclease mapping. The 5' ends of the intermediates map to the sequences that encode each of the two ermA leader peptides, suggesting that the intermediates are produced by stalled erythromycin-bound ribosomes acting as barricades to degradation by 5'-to-3' RNases. In addition, whereas erythromycin was found previously to stabilize ermA transcripts only physically, an ermC-cat-86 hybrid transcript was stabilized both physically and functionally by erythromycin. Images PMID:2592348

  2. Clinical outcomes of double staining and additional ILM peeling during ERM surgery.

    PubMed

    Oh, Ha Na; Lee, Joo Eun; Kim, Hyun Woong; Yun, Il Han

    2013-08-01

    To assess the clinical outcomes in idiopathic epiretinal membrane (ERM) patients after vitrectomy and ERM removal with or without additional indocyanine green (ICG)-assisted internal limiting membrane (ILM) peeling. The medical records of 43 patients with an idiopathic ERM that underwent vitrectomy and ERM removal between July 2007 and April 2010 were reviewed. The patients were divided into two groups: triamcinolone-assisted simple ERM peeling only (group A, n = 23) and triamcinolone-assisted ERM peeling followed by ICG staining and peeling of the remaining internal ILM (group B, n = 20). No difference was found between the two groups in terms of visual acuity, macular thickness, P1 amplitude or implicit time on multifocal-electroretinogram (mfERG) at six and 12 months postoperatively. In group B, ICG staining after ERM peeling demonstrated that the ILM had been removed together with the ERM in 12 eyes (60%), and all 12 eyes showed punctate retinal hemorrhages during ERM peeling. There was no recurrence of an ERM in either group. Additional procedures involving ICG staining and ILM peeling during ERM surgery do not appear to have an additive effect on the clinical outcomes in terms of visual acuity, retinal function based on mfERG, or recurrence rate.

  3. Merlin/ERM proteins establish cortical asymmetry and centrosome position

    PubMed Central

    Hebert, Alan M.; DuBoff, Brian; Casaletto, Jessica B.; Gladden, Andrew B.; McClatchey, Andrea I.

    2012-01-01

    The ability to generate asymmetry at the cell cortex underlies cell polarization and asymmetric cell division. Here we demonstrate a novel role for the tumor suppressor Merlin and closely related ERM proteins (Ezrin, Radixin, and Moesin) in generating cortical asymmetry in the absence of external cues. Our data reveal that Merlin functions to restrict the cortical distribution of the actin regulator Ezrin, which in turn positions the interphase centrosome in single epithelial cells and three-dimensional organotypic cultures. In the absence of Merlin, ectopic cortical Ezrin yields mispositioned centrosomes, misoriented spindles, and aberrant epithelial architecture. Furthermore, in tumor cells with centrosome amplification, the failure to restrict cortical Ezrin abolishes centrosome clustering, yielding multipolar mitoses. These data uncover fundamental roles for Merlin/ERM proteins in spatiotemporally organizing the cell cortex and suggest that Merlin's role in restricting cortical Ezrin may contribute to tumorigenesis by disrupting cell polarity, spindle orientation, and, potentially, genome stability. PMID:23249734

  4. e-Learning system ERM for medical radiation physics education.

    PubMed

    Stoeva, Magdalena; Cvetkov, Asen

    2005-09-01

    The objective of this paper is to present the Education for Radiation in Medicine (ERM) e-Learning System. The system was developed, tested and piloted in the Inter-University Medical Physics Centre, Plovdiv, Bulgaria. It was based on the results of EU Project TEMPUS S-JEP 09826. The ERM e-Learning System is an integrated on-line system for remote education covering aspects of Medical Radiation Physics education (M.Sc. level). It provides user-friendly interface and optimised functionality with three different access levels: trainee, professor and administrator. The minimum server requirements and the standard client side working environment turn the system into a good, cost effective and easy to support solution for remote education.

  5. Redundant control of migration and adhesion by ERM proteins in vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Baeyens, Nicolas; Latrache, Iman; Yerna, Xavier; Noppe, Gauthier; Horman, Sandrine; Morel, Nicole

    2013-11-22

    Highlights: •The three ERM proteins are expressed in vascular smooth muscle cell. •ERM depletion inhibited PDGF-evoked migration redundantly. •ERM depletion increased cell adhesion redundantly. •ERM depletion did not affect PDGF-evoked Ca signal, Rac1 activation, proliferation. •ERM proteins control PDGF-induced migration by regulating adhesion. -- Abstract: Ezrin, radixin, and moesin possess a very similar structure with a C-terminal actin-binding domain and a N-terminal FERM interacting domain. They are known to be involved in cytoskeleton organization in several cell types but their function in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) is still unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of ERM proteins in cell migration induced by PDGF, a growth factor involved in pathophysiological processes like angiogenesis or atherosclerosis. We used primary cultured VSMC obtained from rat aorta, which express the three ERM proteins. Simultaneous depletion of the three ERM proteins with specific siRNAs abolished the effects of PDGF on cell architecture and migration and markedly increased cell adhesion and focal adhesion size, while these parameters were only slightly affected by depletion of ezrin, radixin or moesin alone. Rac1 activation, cell proliferation, and Ca{sup 2+} signal in response to PDGF were unaffected by ERM depletion. These results indicate that ERM proteins exert a redundant control on PDGF-induced VSMC migration by regulating focal adhesion turn-over and cell adhesion to substrate.

  6. Essential role of endogenously synthesized tylosin for induction of ermSF in Streptomyces fradiae.

    PubMed Central

    Memili, E; Weisblum, B

    1997-01-01

    We compared ermSF induction in wild-type Streptomyces fradiae NRRL B-2702 and that in GS-14, a tylA mutant which cannot synthesize tylosin. Our findings suggest that (i) endogenously synthesized tylosin plays an obligatory role in ermSF induction and (ii) tylosin, or a biosynthetic intermediate beyond tylactone, has an "autocrine" function that induces ErmSF synthesis, thereby enabling S. fradiae to resist higher levels of tylosin. PMID:9145902

  7. Rapid detection of ermB gene in Clostridium difficile by loop-mediated isothermal amplification.

    PubMed

    Lin, Minyi; Liu, Wei; Wang, Pu; Tan, Jiasheng; Zhou, Youlian; Wu, Peiqun; Zhang, Ting; Yuan, Jing; Chen, Ye

    2015-08-01

    Macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B resistance in Clostridium difficile is mostly due to the ermB resistance determinant. Here, we describe a sensitive and rapid molecular method to detect ermB in C. difficile to contribute to the wider epidemiological study. Five sets of loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) primers were designed and optimized for rapid detection of ermB. The specificity and sensitivity of the primers for ermB were detected, and the ermB LAMP assay was compared to conventional PCR with 80 clinical isolates of C. difficile. Real-time monitoring of turbidity and chromogenic reaction were used to determine negative and positive results. A total of 26 pathogenic bacterial strains of different species were found to be negative for ermB, which indicated the high specificity of the primers. ermB was detected in 78.8 % (63/80) of the clinical isolates by both LAMP and conventional PCR. The detection limit of LAMP was 36.1  pg DNA μl- 1 and its sensitivity was 10-fold greater than that of conventional PCR. This study is the first report regarding the development and application of the LAMP assay for detection of the ermB gene in C. difficile strains. The developed LAMP method is sensitive, specific and provides a user-friendly visual approach for the rapid detection of ermB-bearing C. difficile.

  8. Constitutive and Inducible Expression of the rRNA Methylase Gene erm(B) in Campylobacter

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Fengru; Shen, Jianzhong; Zhang, Maojun; Wu, Congming

    2015-01-01

    Macrolides are the antimicrobials of choice for treating human campylobacteriosis. The recent emergence of erm(B) in Campylobacter bacteria threatens the utility of this class of antibiotics. Here we report the constitutive and inducible expression of erm(B) in Campylobacter isolates derived from diarrheal patients and food-producing animals. Constitutive expression of erm(B) was associated with insertion and deletion in the regulatory region of the gene, providing the first documentation of the differential expression of erm(B) in Campylobacter bacteria. PMID:26259800

  9. Inducible clindamycin resistance in clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus due to erm genes, Iran.

    PubMed

    Moosavian, Mojtaba; Shoja, Saeed; Rostami, Soodabeh; Torabipour, Maryam; Farshadzadeh, Zahra

    2014-12-01

    Resistance to macrolide can be mediated by erm and msrA genes in Staphylococcus aureus. There are the evidences that show erm genes may be causative agent of inducible or constitutive resistance. The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence of inducible clindamycin resistance and determine the most frequency of erm and msrA genes among S. aureus isolates. In this study a total of 124 non duplicated clinical isolates of S. aureus were tested with disk diffusion method. All isolates were tested by PCR for mecA, ermA, ermB, ermC and msrA genes. According to PCR results, 48.4% had mecA gene and 51.6% were mecA negative. By phenotypic D-test method, 32.3% revealed inducible resistance and recorded as D and D(+). Sensitive and constitutive phenotypes were found in 54.8% and 12.9% of isolates respectively. Inducible clindamycin resistance was more prevalent in MRSA (29%) than MSSA isolates (2.4%). Among studied erm genes, the most frequency genes were ermA and ermC with 41.1% and 17.7% respectively. Three isolates of them had D phenotype, while the PCR results of erm genes were negative. All isolates were negative for ermB or msrA genes. Since S. aureus isolates with inducible resistance may mutate and change to constitutive resistance, to prevent treatment failure, we suggest that inducible resistance test be performed on erythromycin resistant/clindamycin sensitive isolates.

  10. Inducible Expression of both ermB and ermT Conferred High Macrolide Resistance in Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. pasteurianus Isolates in China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Meixia; Cai, Chao; Chen, Juan; Cheng, Changwei; Cheng, Guofu; Hu, Xueying; Liu, Cuiping

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. pasteurianus is an under-recognized pathogen and zoonotic agent causing opportunistic infections in humans. Despite increasing recognition of this subspecies as a cause for human infectious diseases, limited information is known about its antibiotic resistance mechanism. In this study, we aim to identify the molecular mechanism underlying the high macrolide resistance of six S. gallolyticus subsp. pasteurianus isolates from dead ducklings collected in several natural outbreaks in China during 2010–2013. All isolates exhibited multi-drug resistance including high macrolide resistance (MIC ≥ 1024 mg/L for erythromycin, and 512 mg/L for clarithromycin). Efflux-encoding mefA and mefE genes were not detectable in these isolates. The presence of 23S rRNA mutations in specific isolates did not significantly change macrolide MICs. No nucleotide substitutions were found in genes encoding ribosomal proteins L4 or L22. The ermB and ermT genes were found in the genomes of all isolates. These two genes were acquired independently in one highly virulent isolate AL101002, and clustered with Tn916 and IS1216, respectively. The expression of both ermB and ermT in all isolates was erythromycin inducible and yielded comparable macrolide MICs in all six isolates. Taken together, inducible expression of both ermB and ermT conferred high macrolide resistance in these S. gallolyticus subsp. pasterianus isolates. Our findings reveal new macrolide resistance features in S. gallolyticus subsp. pasteurianus by both ermB and ermT. PMID:27669217

  11. Prevalence of erm gene classes in erythromycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated between 1959 and 1988.

    PubMed Central

    Westh, H; Hougaard, D M; Vuust, J; Rosdahl, V T

    1995-01-01

    The epidemiology of the two common erythromycin resistance methylase (erm) genes ermA and ermC was analyzed by Southern blotting in 428 erythromycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from blood between 1959 and 1988 in Denmark. ermA and/or ermC was present in 98% of the erythromycin-resistant strains tested. ermA was found only as a chromosomal insert and was solely responsible for erythromycin resistance in these strains until about 1971. ermA was the only erm gene found in 337 strains and was a single insert in 61% of these strains, two inserts were seen in 37%, and three inserts were found in 2%. Thirteen different ermA EcoRI restriction fragment length polymorphisms were identified. ermA was not found in strains of phage type patterns group II and type 95, which are very common today. ermC was found on a plasmid in 77 strains. ermC was first seen in 1971 and spread rapidly in the S. aureus population, with a 5- to 10-fold increase every 5 years, and in 1984 to 1988, it was responsible for erythromycin resistance in 72% of the strains. The predominant plasmid carrying ermC was 2.5 kb, while four plasmids were smaller and three were larger. ermC has been found in all phage type patterns. Eight strains contained combinations of ermA and ermC, and no erm gene was detected in six strains. PMID:7726500

  12. New Genetic Element Carrying the Erythromycin Resistance Determinant erm(TR) in Streptococcus pneumoniae▿

    PubMed Central

    Camilli, Romina; Del Grosso, Maria; Iannelli, Francesco; Pantosti, Annalisa

    2008-01-01

    erm(A) subclass erm(TR), a common macrolide resistance determinant in Streptococcus pyogenes but quite rare in Streptococcus pneumoniae, was found in a clinical S. pneumoniae isolate (AP200) from Italy. In this isolate, erm(TR) was found included in a genetic element approximately 56 kb in size that did not appear to be conjugative but could be transferred by transformation. An erm(TR)-containing DNA fragment of approximately 10 kb was sequenced and 12 open reading frames (ORFs) were identified. Upstream of erm(TR), a regulatory protein of the TetR family and the two components of an efflux pump of the ABC type were found. Downstream of erm(TR), there were ORFs homologous to a spectinomycin phosphotransferase, transposases, and a relaxase. Since the genomic sequence of S. pyogenes MGAS10750 carrying erm(TR) became available, comparison between the erm(TR)-containing genetic elements in AP200 and in MGAS10750 was performed. The region flanking erm(TR) in MGAS10750 showed identity with AP200 for 10 ORFs out of 12. PCR mapping using primers designed on the sequence of MGAS10750 confirmed that AP200 carries a genetic element similar to that of MGAS10750. In AP200 the genetic element was inserted inside an ORF homologous to spr0790 of S. pneumoniae R6, coding for a type I restriction modification system. Homologies between the insertion sites in AP200 and MGAS10750 consisted of eight conserved nucleotides, of which three were duplicated, likely representing target site duplication. The structure of the erm(TR)-carrying genetic element shows characteristics of a transposon/prophage remnant chimera. In AP200 this genetic element was designated Tn1806. PMID:18070957

  13. [Relation of pbp2B, ermB, ermA/B, mefA genes with resistance to penicillin and erythromycin among Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates from children].

    PubMed

    Ding, Yun-fang; Zhang, Jian-hua; Mi, Zu-huang; Tao, Yun-zhen; Qin, Ling

    2005-05-01

    To investigate the relation of pbp2B, ermB, ermA/B and mefA genes to penicillin and erythromycin resistance among isolated Streptococcus pneumoniae (Sp) in children. Twenty-six strains of Sp were collected from September 2002 to April 2003 at the Children Hospital of Suzhou University. (1) Twenty-six pneumococcal isolates were obtained from respiratory tract secretions of children with respiratory diseases. (2) Susceptibility of the isolates to penicillin, cefuroxime, ceftriaxone, cefotaxime and erythromycin was determined by E-test. (3) The genes pbp2B, ermB, ermA/B and mefA of the isolates were detected with PCR. (4) The PCR product of pbp2B gene was sequenced. (5) DNA sequences of pbp2B of pneumococcal isolates were compared with those of SpR6 [penicillin sensitive (www.ncbi.nlm.gov/nucleotide, NC-003098)]. Among the 26 isolates studied, pbp2B gene mutation was found in 15(58%) isolates, all were point mutation of A, B, C and D genotypes which were seen in 11(73%), 2(13%), 1(7%) and 1(7%), respectively. The numbers of isolates susceptible to penicillin, cefuroxime, ceftriaxone and cefotaxime were 9(82%), 10(91%), 11(100%) and 11(100%), of 11 non-mutation isolates;numbers of isolates resistant to penicillin, cefuroxime, ceftriaxone, and cefotaxime were 13(87%), 11(73%), 1(7%) and 1(7%) out of 15 isolates with mutation.ErmB, ermA/B, mefA and erm/mef genes were positive in 9(35%), 16(62%), 7(27%) and 21(81%)isolates. MIC of erythromycin was 2 to > 256 mg/L among pneumococcal isolates with erm/mef genes. Among antibiotic resistant pneumococcal isolates in the area, the main basis of penicillin resistance was the mutation of pbp2B genes. Genotype A mutation had the highest rate among the isolates with mutation and manifested as resistance to penicillin and cefuroxime. Expression of either all or any of the ermA, ermB and mef genes led to erythromycin resistance. Antibiotics resistant Sp strains in this area are forming a challenge to efficacy of penicillin and

  14. Recombination rates of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates with both erm(B) and mef(A) genes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji-Young; Song, Jae-Hoon; Ko, Kwan Soo

    2010-08-01

    Erythromycin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates containing both erm(B) and mef(A) genes have a higher rate of multidrug resistance (MDR). We investigated the relationships between the presence of erythromycin resistance determinants and the recombination rate. We determined the mutation and recombination frequencies of 46 S. pneumoniae isolates, which included 19 with both erm(B) and mef(A), nine with only erm(B), six with only mef(A), and 11 erythromycin-susceptible isolates. Mutation frequency values were estimated as the number of rifampin-resistant colonies as a proportion of total viable count. Genotypes and serotypes of isolates with the hyper-recombination phenotype were determined. Twelve S. pneumoniae isolates were hypermutable and four isolates were determined to have hyper-recombination frequency. Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates with both erm(B) and mef(A) genes did not show a high mutation frequency. In contrast, all isolates with a hyper-recombination phenotype contained both erm(B) and mef(A) genes. In addition, the recombination rate of isolates with both erm(B) and mef(A) genes was statistically higher than the rate of other isolates. The dual presence of erm(B) and mef(A) genes in some pneumococcal isolates may be associated with high recombination frequency. This may be one of the reasons for the frequent emergence of MDR in certain pneumococcal isolates.

  15. Identification of ribosomal RNA methyltransferase gene ermF in Riemerella anatipestifer.

    PubMed

    Luo, Hongyan; Liu, Mafeng; Wang, Lanying; Zhou, Wangshu; Wang, Mingshu; Cheng, Anchun; Jia, Renyong; Chen, Shun; Sun, Kunfeng; Yang, Qiao; Chen, Xiaoyue; Zhu, Dekang

    2015-01-01

    Riemerella anatipestifer is a major bacterial pathogen of waterfowl, globally responsible for avian septicaemic disease. As chemotherapy is the predominant method for the prevention and treatment of R. anatipestifer infection in poultry, the widespread use of antibiotics has favoured the emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains. However, little is known about R. anatipestifer susceptibility to macrolide antibiotics and its resistance mechanism. We report for the first time the identification of a macrolide resistance mechanism in R. anatipestifer that is mediated by the ribosomal RNA methyltransferase ermF. We identified the presence of the ermF gene in 64/206 (31%) R. anatipestifer isolates from different regions in China. An ermF deletion strain was constructed to investigate the function of the ermF gene on the resistance to high levels of macrolides. The ermF mutant strain showed significantly decreased resistance to macrolide and lincosamide, exhibiting 1024-, 1024-, 4- and >2048-fold reduction in the minimum inhibitory concentrations for erythromycin, azithromycin, tylosin and lincomycin, respectively. Furthermore, functional analysis of ermF expression in E. coli XL1-blue showed that the R. anatipestifer ermF gene was functional in E. coli XL1-blue and conferred resistance to high levels of erythromycin (100 µg/ml), supporting the hypothesis that the ermF gene is associated with high-level macrolide resistance. Our work suggests that ribosomal RNA modification mediated by the ermF methyltransferase is the predominant mechanism of resistance to erythromycin in R. anatipestifer isolates.

  16. Distribution of erm genes and low prevalence of inducible resistance to clindamycin among staphylococci isolates.

    PubMed

    Coutinho, Vivian de Lima Spode; Paiva, Rodrigo Minuto; Reiter, Keli Cristine; de-Paris, Fernanda; Barth, Afonso Luis; Machado, Alice Beatriz Mombach Pinheiro

    2010-01-01

    Resistance to macrolides, lincosamides and streptogramins B (MLS(B) antibiotics) in staphylococci may be due to modification in ribosomal target methylase encoded by erm genes. The expression of MLS(B) resistance lead to three phenotypes, namely constitutive resistance (cMLS(B)), inducible resistance (iMLS(B)), and resistance only to macrolides and streptogramins B (MS(B)). The iMLS(B) resistance is the most difficult to detect in the clinical laboratory. This study investigated the expression of MLS(B) resistance and the prevalence of the erm genes among 152 clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (CNS) from Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre. Primary MLS(B) resistance was detected by the disk diffusion method. Isolates with iMLS(B) phenotype were tested by double-disk induction method. All isolates were tested by a genotypic assay, PCR with specific primers. A total of 46.7% of staphylococci were positive for cMLS(B); 3.3% for iMLS(B) and 3.3% for MS(B). One or more erm genes were present in 50.1% of isolates. The gene ermA was detected in 49 isolates, ermC in 29 and ermB in 3. The prevalence of the ermA, ermB and ermC genes were 29.6%, 17.1% and 0.66% respectively, and constitutive resistance was the most frequent as compared to the other two phenotypes.

  17. Distribution of erm genes among Staphylococcus aureus isolates with inducible resistance to clindamycin in Isfahan, Iran.

    PubMed

    Ghanbari, Fahimeh; Ghajavand, Hasan; Havaei, Roholla; Jami, Mohammad-Saeid; Khademi, Farzad; Heydari, Leila; Shahin, Mojtaba; Havaei, Seyed Asghar

    2016-01-01

    The rising frequency of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has led to an increased use of antibiotics such as macrolide, lincosamide, streptogramin B (MLSB) for the treatment of S. aureus infections. Resistance to MLSB in S. aureus is commonly encoded by erm genes, which can be constitutive MLSB (cMLSB) or inducible MLSB (iMLSB). The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency of cMLSB, iMLSB, and MS phenotypes using D-test and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods. A total of 215 isolates of S. aureus were collected from January 2010 to May 2012 from Al-Zahra Hospital in Isfahan. PCR was performed for detection of mecA gene on all isolates using specific primers. The frequency of MLSB-resistant isolates was determined using D-test, and then a multiplex PCR was performed for detection of ermA, ermB, and ermC genes. Among 215 S. aureus isolates examined, 82 (40.9%) were MRSA, and iMLSB, cMLSB, and MS resistance phenotypes had a frequency of 9 (4.18%), 58 (26.9%), and 11 (5.1%), respectively. Among nine isolates with iMLSB resistance phenotype, four isolates contained ermC gene, two isolates ermB gene, and one isolate ermA gene. Two isolates did not have any erm gene. In the current study, cMLSB was the most frequent phenotype and ermC was the most common gene in iMLSB resistant phenotypes.

  18. Distribution of erm genes among Staphylococcus aureus isolates with inducible resistance to clindamycin in Isfahan, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Ghanbari, Fahimeh; Ghajavand, Hasan; Havaei, Roholla; Jami, Mohammad-Saeid; Khademi, Farzad; Heydari, Leila; Shahin, Mojtaba; Havaei, Seyed Asghar

    2016-01-01

    Background: The rising frequency of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has led to an increased use of antibiotics such as macrolide, lincosamide, streptogramin B (MLSB) for the treatment of S. aureus infections. Resistance to MLSB in S. aureus is commonly encoded by erm genes, which can be constitutive MLSB (cMLSB) or inducible MLSB (iMLSB). The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency of cMLSB, iMLSB, and MS phenotypes using D-test and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods. Materials and Methods: A total of 215 isolates of S. aureus were collected from January 2010 to May 2012 from Al-Zahra Hospital in Isfahan. PCR was performed for detection of mecA gene on all isolates using specific primers. The frequency of MLSB-resistant isolates was determined using D-test, and then a multiplex PCR was performed for detection of ermA, ermB, and ermC genes. Results: Among 215 S. aureus isolates examined, 82 (40.9%) were MRSA, and iMLSB, cMLSB, and MS resistance phenotypes had a frequency of 9 (4.18%), 58 (26.9%), and 11 (5.1%), respectively. Among nine isolates with iMLSB resistance phenotype, four isolates contained ermC gene, two isolates ermB gene, and one isolate ermA gene. Two isolates did not have any erm gene. Conclusion: In the current study, cMLSB was the most frequent phenotype and ermC was the most common gene in iMLSB resistant phenotypes. PMID:27135031

  19. Structural Alterations in the Translational Attenuator of Constitutively Expressed ermC Genes

    PubMed Central

    Werckenthin, Christiane; Schwarz, Stefan; Westh, Henrik

    1999-01-01

    Sequence deletions of 16, 59, and 111 bp as well as a tandem duplication of 272 bp with respect to the corresponding sequence of pT48 were identified in the regulatory regions of constitutively expressed ermC genes. Constitutive ermC gene expression as a consequence of these structural alterations is based on either the prevention of the formation of mRNA secondary structures in the translational attenuator or the preferential formation of those mRNA secondary structures which do not interfere with the translation of the ermC transcripts. A model for the development of sequence deletions in the ermC translational attenuator by homologous recombination is presented and experimentally tested by in vitro selection of constitutively expressed mutants in staphylococcal strains deficient and proficient in homologous recombination. PMID:10390222

  20. Erythromycin-induced stabilization of ermA messenger RNA in Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Sandler, P; Weisblum, B

    1988-10-20

    Erythromycin-induced stabilization of ermA mRNA was studied in Staphylococcus aureus, its original host background, and in Bacillus subtilis, subcloned on plasmid vectors. By RNA blot analysis it was shown that 40 nM-erythromycin specifically increased the chemical half-life of ermA mRNA from 2.5 to 17.5 minutes whereas the half-life of cat-86 mRNA was not increased by erythromycin. While expression of ermA has been shown to be induced by erythromycin at the level of translation, our studies with three ermA constitutive mutants demonstrated that mRNA stabilization in growing cells occurred independently of induced gene expression, suggesting that the stabilized mRNA was not functional for protein synthesis. Studies of ermA/lacZ fusions demonstrated that the 5' end of the mRNA was sufficient to confer stabilization. Translation of specific amino acid codons in a leader peptide located at the extreme 5' end of the mRNA was required for the erythromycin-induced stabilization as a frameshift mutation introduced into the leader peptide determinant abolished stabilization. By S1 mapping, no differences were detected in the length of the 5' or 3' end of ermA mRNA with the addition of erythromycin, indicating that the stabilized transcript was not processed at its ends.

  1. Nucleotide sequence of ermA, a macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B determinant in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Murphy, E

    1985-05-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of ermA, the prototype macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B resistance gene from Staphylococcus aureus, has been determined. The sequence predicts a 243-amino-acid protein that is homologous to those specified by ermC, ermAM, and ermD, resistance determinants from Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus sanguis, and Bacillus licheniformis, respectively. The ermA transcript, identified by Northern analysis and S1 mapping, contains a 5' leader sequence of 211 bases which has the potential to encode two short peptides of 15 and 19 amino acids; the second, longer peptide has 13 amino acids in common with the putative regulatory leader peptide of ermC. The coding sequence for this peptide is deleted in several mutants in which macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B resistance is constitutively expressed. Potential secondary structures available to the leader sequence of the wild-type (inducible) transcript and to constitutive deletion, insertion, and point mutations provide additional support for the translational attenuation model for induction of macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B resistance.

  2. Nucleotide sequence of ermA, a macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B determinant in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, E

    1985-01-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of ermA, the prototype macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B resistance gene from Staphylococcus aureus, has been determined. The sequence predicts a 243-amino-acid protein that is homologous to those specified by ermC, ermAM, and ermD, resistance determinants from Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus sanguis, and Bacillus licheniformis, respectively. The ermA transcript, identified by Northern analysis and S1 mapping, contains a 5' leader sequence of 211 bases which has the potential to encode two short peptides of 15 and 19 amino acids; the second, longer peptide has 13 amino acids in common with the putative regulatory leader peptide of ermC. The coding sequence for this peptide is deleted in several mutants in which macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B resistance is constitutively expressed. Potential secondary structures available to the leader sequence of the wild-type (inducible) transcript and to constitutive deletion, insertion, and point mutations provide additional support for the translational attenuation model for induction of macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B resistance. Images PMID:2985541

  3. Protein Phosphatase 1α Mediates Ceramide-induced ERM Protein Dephosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Canals, Daniel; Roddy, Patrick; Hannun, Yusuf A.

    2012-01-01

    ERM (ezrin, radixin, and moesin) proteins are cytoskeletal interacting proteins that bind cortical actin, the plasma membrane, and membrane proteins, which are found in specialized plasma membrane structures such as microvilli and filopodia. ERM proteins are regulated by phosphatidylinositol 4, 5-biphosphate (PIP2) and by phosphorylation of a C-terminal threonine, and its inactivation involves PIP2 hydrolysis and/or myosin phosphatase (MP). Recently, we demonstrated that ERM proteins are also subject to counter regulation by the bioactive sphingolipids ceramide and sphingosine 1-phosphate. Plasma membrane ceramide induces ERM dephosphorylation whereas sphingosine 1-phosphate induces their phosphorylation. In this work, we pursue the mechanisms by which ceramide regulates dephosphorylation. We found that this dephosphorylation was independent of hydrolysis and localization of PIP2 and MP. However, the results show that ERM dephosphorylation was blocked by treatment with protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) pharmacological inhibitors and specifically by siRNA to PP1α, whereas okadaic acid, a PP2A inhibitor, failed. Moreover, a catalytic inactive mutant of PP1α acted as dominant negative of the endogenous PP1α. Additional results showed that the ceramide mechanism of PP1α activation is largely independent of PIP2 hydrolysis and MP. Taken together, these results demonstrate a novel, acute mechanism of ERM regulation dependent on PP1α and plasma membrane ceramide. PMID:22311981

  4. Differential expression of ezrin/radixin/moesin (ERM) and ERM-associated adhesion molecules in the blastocyst and uterus suggests their functions during implantation.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Hiromichi; Daikoku, Takiko; Wang, Haibin; Sato, Eimei; Dey, S K

    2004-03-01

    Development of the blastocyst to implantation competency, differentiation of the uterus to the receptive state, and a cross talk between the implantation-competent blastocyst and the uterine luminal epithelium are all essential to the process of implantation. In the present investigation, we examined the possibility for a potential cross talk between the blastocyst and uterus involving the ezrin/radixin/moesin (ERM) proteins and ERM-associated cytoskeletal cross-linker proteins CD43, CD44, ICAM-1, and ICAM-2. In normal Day 4 blastocysts and after rendering dormant blastocysts to implantation-competent by estrogen in vivo (activated), the outer surface of mural trophectoderm cells showed much higher levels of radixin as compared to those in the polar trophectoderm cells, inner cell mass (ICM), and primitive endoderm. In contrast, ezrin was present on both the mural and the polar trophectoderm cell surfaces of normal Day 4 and activated blastocysts at higher intensity than dormant blastocysts. A distinct localization was noted in the primitive endoderm of dormant blastocysts that was not apparent in activated or normal Day 4 blastocysts. The expression of moesin was modestly higher at the mural trophectoderm of implantation-competent blastocysts, while the localization appeared to be present primarily on the polar trophectoderm cell surface of Day 4 blastocysts. The localization of ERM-associated adhesion molecules CD43, CD44, and ICAM-2 was more intense in the implantation-competent blastocysts compared with the dormant blastocysts. However, while CD44 was present both in the trophectoderm and in ICM, CD43 and ICAM-2 were localized primarily to the trophectoderm. The signal for ICAM-1 was very intense in the ICM but was modest in the trophectoderm. No significant changes in fluorescence intensity were noted between activated and dormant blastocysts. In the receptive uterus on Day 4 of pregnancy, ERM proteins were localized to the uterine epithelium, while on Day 5

  5. SLK-dependent activation of ERMs controls LGN–NuMA localization and spindle orientation

    PubMed Central

    Machicoane, Mickael; de Frutos, Cristina A.; Fink, Jenny; Rocancourt, Murielle; Lombardi, Yannis; Garel, Sonia; Piel, Matthieu

    2014-01-01

    Mitotic spindle orientation relies on a complex dialog between the spindle microtubules and the cell cortex, in which F-actin has been recently implicated. Here, we report that the membrane–actin linkers ezrin/radixin/moesin (ERMs) are strongly and directly activated by the Ste20-like kinase at mitotic entry in mammalian cells. Using microfabricated adhesive substrates to control the axis of cell division, we found that the activation of ERMs plays a key role in guiding the orientation of the mitotic spindle. Accordingly, impairing ERM activation in apical progenitors of the mouse embryonic neocortex severely disturbed spindle orientation in vivo. At the molecular level, ERM activation promotes the polarized association at the mitotic cortex of leucine-glycine-asparagine repeat protein (LGN) and nuclear mitotic apparatus (NuMA) protein, two essential factors for spindle orientation. We propose that activated ERMs, together with Gαi, are critical for the correct localization of LGN–NuMA force generator complexes and hence for proper spindle orientation. PMID:24958772

  6. A study on erm(B)-mediated MLS resistance in Streptococcus pyogenes clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Rombini, Silvia; Petrelli, Dezemona; Bolli, Elisabetta; Tran, Chi Nhan; Falconi, Maurizio; Di Luca, Maria Chiara; Prenna, Manuela; Ripa, Sandro; Vitali, Luca Agostino

    2011-07-01

    The constitutive or inducible macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin (MLS) phenotype of 30 erm(B)-positive Streptococcus pyogenes isolates was determined by different methods and under various growth conditions and correlated to the sequence of the 5'-untranslated regions of erm(B). The MLS phenotype of one-third of the isolates could not be classified. In liquid medium, some of these isolates responded to induction only during the logarithmic phase of growth, while others expressed clindamycin resistance even under noninducing conditions. By increasing the growth rate, we observed a shift from a constitutive towards an inducible pattern of resistance. All data were confirmed by analysis of the 23S rRNA methylation level. The erm(B)-5'-untranslated region was 99% similar in sequence. In erm(B)-positive S. pyogenes, the MLS phenotype is strongly influenced by culture conditions and control of its expression does not depend exclusively on the sequence of the erm(B)-5'-untranslated region. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Gem1 and ERMES do not directly affect phosphatidylserine transport from ER to mitochondria or mitochondrial inheritance.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tammy T; Lewandowska, Agnieszka; Choi, Jae-Yeon; Markgraf, Daniel F; Junker, Mirco; Bilgin, Mesut; Ejsing, Christer S; Voelker, Dennis R; Rapoport, Tom A; Shaw, Janet M

    2012-06-01

    In yeast, a protein complex termed the ER-Mitochondria Encounter Structure (ERMES) tethers mitochondria to the endoplasmic reticulum. ERMES proteins are implicated in a variety of cellular functions including phospholipid synthesis, mitochondrial protein import, mitochondrial attachment to actin, polarized mitochondrial movement into daughter cells during division, and maintenance of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). The mitochondrial-anchored Gem1 GTPase has been proposed to regulate ERMES functions. Here, we show that ERMES and Gem1 have no direct role in the transport of phosphatidylserine (PS) from the ER to mitochondria during the synthesis of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), as PS to PE conversion is not affected in ERMES or gem1 mutants. In addition, we report that mitochondrial inheritance defects in ERMES mutants are a secondary consequence of mitochondrial morphology defects, arguing against a primary role for ERMES in mitochondrial association with actin and mitochondrial movement. Finally, we show that ERMES complexes are long-lived, and do not depend on the presence of Gem1. Our findings suggest that the ERMES complex may have primarily a structural role in maintaining mitochondrial morphology.

  8. Bactericidal activity of quinupristin-dalfopristin against strains of Staphylococcus aureus with the MLS(B) phenotype of resistance according to the erm gene type.

    PubMed

    Clarebout, G; Nativelle, E; Bozdogan, B; Villers, C; Leclercq, R

    2004-11-01

    The bactericidal activity of quinupristin-dalfopristin was assessed by time-kill experiments against Staphylococcus aureus strains with characterized phenotypes and genotypes of MLS(B) resistance. A set of laboratory strains composed of isogenic pairs of S. aureus RN4220 derivatives containing or not the erm(A), erm(B) or erm(C) genes constitutively expressed and of 13 clinical isolates containing these genes inducibly or constitutively expressed were studied. Three of the clinical isolates with erm(B) or erm(A) genes had an unusual inducible MLS(B) cross resistance. The early bactericidal activity of quinupristin-dalfopristin was altered against strains expressing constitutive quinupristin resistance regardless of the erm(A), erm(B) or erm(C) type of gene. We conclude that the bactericidal activity of quinupristin-dalfopristin against staphylococci was dependent on the activity of quinupristin rather than on the erm genotype of the strain.

  9. Ubiquitination of ERMES components by the E3 ligase Rsp5 is involved in mitophagy

    PubMed Central

    Belgareh-Touzé, Naïma; Cavellini, Laetitia; Cohen, Mickael M.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mitochondria are dynamic organelles that undergo permanent fission and fusion events. These processes play an essential role in maintaining normal cellular function. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondrial encounter structure (ERMES) is a marker of sites of mitochondrial division, but it is also involved in a plethora of other mitochondrial functions. However, it remains unclear how these different functions are regulated. We show here that Mdm34 and Mdm12, 2 components of ERMES, are ubiquitinated by the E3 ligase Rsp5. This ubiquitination is not involved in mitochondrial dynamics or in the distribution and turnover of ERMES. Nevertheless, the ubiquitination of Mdm34 and Mdm12 was required for efficient mitophagy. We thus report here the first identification of ubiquitinated substrates participating in yeast mitophagy. PMID:27846375

  10. Tylosin Resistance in Arcanobacterium pyogenes Is Encoded by an Erm X Determinant

    PubMed Central

    Jost, B. Helen; Field, Adam C.; Trinh, Hien T.; Songer, J. Glenn; Billington, Stephen J.

    2003-01-01

    Arcanobacterium pyogenes, a commensal on the mucous membranes of many economically important animal species, is also a pathogen, causing abscesses of the skin, joints, and visceral organs as well as mastitis and abortion. In food animals, A. pyogenes is exposed to antimicrobial agents used for growth promotion, prophylaxis, and therapy, notably tylosin, a macrolide antibiotic used extensively for the prevention of liver abscessation in feedlot cattle in the United States. Of 48 A. pyogenes isolates, 11 (22.9%) exhibited inducible or constitutive resistance to tylosin (MIC of ≥128 μg/ml). These isolates also exhibited resistance to other macrolide and lincosamide antibiotics, suggesting a macrolide-lincosamide resistance phenotype. Of the 11 resistant isolates, genomic DNA from nine hybridized to an erm(X)-specific probe. Cloning and nucleotide sequencing of the A. pyogenes erm(X) gene indicated that it was >95% similar to erm(X) genes from Corynebacterium and Propionibacterium spp. Eight of the erm(X)-containing A. pyogenes isolates exhibited inducible tylosin resistance, which was consistent with the presence of a putative leader peptide upstream of the erm(X) open reading frame. For at least one A. pyogenes isolate, 98-4277-2, erm(X) was present on a plasmid, pAP2, and was associated with the insertion sequence IS6100. pAP2 also carried genes encoding the repressor-regulated tetracycline efflux system determinant Tet 33. The repA gene from pAP2 was nonfunctional in Escherichia coli and at least one A. pyogenes isolate, suggesting that there may be host-encoded factors required for replication of this plasmid. PMID:14576111

  11. Novel transferable erm(46) determinant responsible for emerging macrolide resistance in Rhodococcus equi.

    PubMed

    Anastasi, Elisa; Giguère, Steeve; Berghaus, Londa J; Hondalus, Mary K; Willingham-Lane, Jennifer M; MacArthur, Iain; Cohen, Noah D; Roberts, Marilyn C; Vazquez-Boland, Jose A

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the molecular mechanism of macrolide resistance in the actinomycete Rhodococcus equi, a major equine pathogen and zoonotic agent causing opportunistic infections in people. Macrolide-resistant (n = 62) and macrolide-susceptible (n = 62) clinical isolates of R. equi from foals in the USA were studied. WGS of 18 macrolide-resistant and 6 macrolide-susceptible R. equi was performed. Representative sequences of all known macrolide resistance genes identified to date were used to search the genome assemblies for putative homologues. PCR was used to screen for the presence of the identified resistance determinant in the rest of the isolates. Mating experiments were performed to verify mobility of the gene. A novel erm gene, erm(46), was identified in all sequenced resistant isolates, but not in susceptible isolates. There was complete association between macrolide resistance and the presence of erm(46) as detected by PCR screening of all 124 clinical isolates of R. equi. Expression of erm(46) in a macrolide-susceptible strain of R. equi induced high-level resistance to macrolides, lincosamides and streptogramins B, but not to other classes of antimicrobial agents. Transfer of erm(46) to macrolide-susceptible R. equi was confirmed. The transfer frequency ranged from 3 × 10(-3) to 1 × 10(-2). This is the first molecular characterization of resistance to macrolides, lincosamides and streptogramins B in R. equi. Resistance was due to the presence of a novel erm(46) gene mobilizable likely by conjugation, which has spread among equine isolates of R. equi in the USA. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Scarce detection of mobile erm genes associated with tetQ in Bacteroides and Parabacteroides from Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Quesada-Gómez, Carlos; Rodríguez-Cavallini, Evelyn; Rodríguez, César

    2013-06-01

    The frequency of finding of clindamycin-resistant anaerobic bacteria in clinical samples has doubled from 2008 to 2010 in Costa Rica. To determine whether this increase is due to dissemination of erm genes aided by tetQ elements, we analyzed 100 isolates of Bacteroides or Parabacteroides from a regional hospital, a national hospital, and the community. Antimicrobial susceptibilities were recorded with a broth micro-dilution method and erm genes were detected by PCR and Southern blotting. In addition, plasmid isolation and mating experiments were performed to clarify the location and mobility of the detected erm genes. Resistance to clindamycin was by far more frequent in the regional hospital (72%) than in the national hospital (29%) and the community (26%). Resistance to tetracycline was even more common, with the community (85%) outweighing the hospitals (71-72%). While MIC of clindamycin were higher in the hospitals than in the community (P < 0.05), the opposite was seen for tetracycline (P < 0.0001). Of the sought-after genes, only ermG (n = 2), ermA (n = 1), and ermF (n = 1) were detected in the hospitals and ermF in the community (n = 2). In opposition to the low frequency of finding of erm genes, 71% of the isolates were positive for tetQ. None of the detected genes were encoded on plasmids. Only three isolates from the hospitals transferred their erm genes laterally. By contrast, 13 hospital isolates and two community isolates transferred tetQ. Despite the widespread finding of tetracycline-resistant tetQ-positive bacteria, mobile erm genes were rare in our bacterial collection. We conclude that the detected erm genes are likely not included in typical conjugative transposons of Bacteroides and Parabacteroides. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Characterization of a novel type of MLSB resistance plasmid from Staphylococcus saprophyticus carrying a constitutively expressed erm(C) gene.

    PubMed

    Hauschild, Tomasz; Lüthje, Petra; Schwarz, Stefan

    2006-06-15

    An erm(C)-carrying plasmid of unusual size and restriction map, designated pSES22, was identified in a Staphylococcus saprophyticus strain and sequenced completely. Constitutive expression of the erm(C) gene from pSES22 is based on a novel 22-bp tandem duplication in the erm(C) translational attenuator. Comparative analysis of the deduced Erm(C) amino acid sequence revealed that Erm(C) from pSES22 - together with an Erm(C) methylase from S. hyicus - represented a separate branch in the homology tree of Erm(C) methylases. Structural comparisons showed that plasmid pSES22 differed distinctly from all other completely sequenced erm(C)-carrying resistance plasmids. However, pSES22 was similar to several members of a diverse group of small plasmids, all of which carried closely related plasmid backbones consisting of the genes repU and pre/mob, but differed in their resistance genes.

  14. Selecting and Implementing an ERMS at Wayne State University: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beals, Nancy

    2008-01-01

    The successful development and implementation of an electronic resources management (ERM) system depends on an undertaking that includes many key factors. Some of these key factors include determining user groups and their needs, evaluating implementation and technical issues, testing the system, exploring how the system will be used, setting…

  15. Emergence and spread of Streptococcus pneumoniae with erm(B) and mef(A) resistance.

    PubMed

    Farrell, David J; Jenkins, Stephen G; Brown, Steven D; Patel, Manish; Lavin, Bruce S; Klugman, Keith P

    2005-06-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates (N = 31,001) were collected from patients with community-acquired respiratory tract infections during the PROTEKT US surveillance study (2000-2003). While the macrolide (erythromycin) resistance rate remained stable at approximately 29%, the prevalence of resistant isolates containing both erm(B) and mef(A) increased from 9.7% in year 1 to 16.4% in year 3, with substantial regional variability. Almost all (99.2%) dual erm(B) + mef(A) macrolide-resistant isolates exhibited multidrug resistance, whereas 98.6% and 99.0% were levofloxacin- and telithromycin-susceptible, respectively. These strains were most commonly isolated from the ear or middle-ear fluid of children. Of 152 representative erm(B)+mef(A) isolates, >90% were clonally related to the multidrug-resistant international Taiwan19F-14 clonal complex 271 (CC271). Of 366 erm(B)+mef(A) isolates from the PROTEKT global study (1999-2003), 83.3% were CC271, with the highest prevalence seen in South Africa, South Korea, and the United States. This study confirms the increasing global emergence and rapidly increasing US prevalence of this multidrug-resistant pneumococcal clone.

  16. The Brm-HDAC3-Erm repressor complex suppresses dedifferentiation in Drosophila type II neuroblast lineages

    PubMed Central

    Koe, Chwee Tat; Li, Song; Rossi, Fabrizio; Wong, Jack Jing Lin; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Zhizhuo; Chen, Keng; Aw, Sherry Shiying; Richardson, Helena E; Robson, Paul; Sung, Wing-Kin; Yu, Fengwei; Gonzalez, Cayetano; Wang, Hongyan

    2014-01-01

    The control of self-renewal and differentiation of neural stem and progenitor cells is a crucial issue in stem cell and cancer biology. Drosophila type II neuroblast lineages are prone to developing impaired neuroblast homeostasis if the limited self-renewing potential of intermediate neural progenitors (INPs) is unrestrained. Here, we demonstrate that Drosophila SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling Brahma (Brm) complex functions cooperatively with another chromatin remodeling factor, Histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) to suppress the formation of ectopic type II neuroblasts. We show that multiple components of the Brm complex and HDAC3 physically associate with Earmuff (Erm), a type II-specific transcription factor that prevents dedifferentiation of INPs into neuroblasts. Consistently, the predicted Erm-binding motif is present in most of known binding loci of Brm. Furthermore, brm and hdac3 genetically interact with erm to prevent type II neuroblast overgrowth. Thus, the Brm-HDAC3-Erm repressor complex suppresses dedifferentiation of INPs back into type II neuroblasts. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01906.001 PMID:24618901

  17. Findability Enabled: The Rise of the Knowledgebase Puts the ERMS on a New Stage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ownes, Dodie

    2006-01-01

    As public and academic librarians rely more heavily on electronic resources to satisfy patrons' information needs, seamless searching across print and electronic holdings gets more and more essential. Enter the integrated library system (ILS)-independent electronic resource management system (ERMS), which promises to integrate, search, and expose…

  18. Selecting and Implementing an ERMS at Wayne State University: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beals, Nancy

    2008-01-01

    The successful development and implementation of an electronic resources management (ERM) system depends on an undertaking that includes many key factors. Some of these key factors include determining user groups and their needs, evaluating implementation and technical issues, testing the system, exploring how the system will be used, setting…

  19. Findability Enabled: The Rise of the Knowledgebase Puts the ERMS on a New Stage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ownes, Dodie

    2006-01-01

    As public and academic librarians rely more heavily on electronic resources to satisfy patrons' information needs, seamless searching across print and electronic holdings gets more and more essential. Enter the integrated library system (ILS)-independent electronic resource management system (ERMS), which promises to integrate, search, and expose…

  20. An examination of the differential sensitivity to ketolide antibiotics in ermB strains of Streptococcus pyogenes and Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Champney, W Scott; Mentens, Nicole; Zurawick, Kimberly

    2004-10-01

    Several reports in the literature have described a differential sensitivity to ketolide antibiotics in ermB strains of Streptococcus pyogenes and Streptococcus pneumoniae resistant to erythromycin. Strains of S. pyogenes and S. pneumoniae carrying different erm gene alleles were examined for their susceptibility to the ketolide antibiotics cethromycin (ABT-773) and telithromycin. The effect of the antibiotics on cell growth and viability was assessed as were effects on protein synthesis and 50S ribosomal subunit formation. The susceptibility of wild-type strains of both organisms was compared with effects in strains containing the ermA and ermB methyltransferase genes. A wild-type antibiotic-susceptible strain of S. pyogenes was comparable to an ermA strain of the organism in its ketolide sensitivity, with IC(50) values for 50% inhibition of protein synthesis and 50S ribosomal subunit formation of 10 ng/mL for cethromycin and 16 ng/mL for telithromycin. An S. pneumoniae strain with the ermB gene and an S. pyogenes strain with the ermA gene were also similar in their sensitivity to ketolide inhibition. IC(50) values for inhibition of translation and subunit formation in S. pneumoniae ( ermB) were 30 ng/mL and 55 ng/mL and for the ermA strain of S. pyogenes they were 15 ng/mL and 35 ng/mL respectively. By contrast, an S. pyogenes ermB strain was significantly more resistant to both ketolides, with IC(50) values for inhibition of 50S synthesis of 215 and 380 ng/mL for the two ketolides. Experiments were conducted to examine ribosome synthesis and translational activity in the two ermB strains at intervals during growth in the presence of each antibiotic. Cell viability and 50S subunit formation were dramatically reduced in the S. pneumoniae strain during continued growth with either drug. By contrast, the ketolides had little effect on the S. pyogenes strain growing with the antibiotics. The results indicate that ketolides have a reduced inhibitory effect on

  1. First report of macrolide resistance gene erm(T) harbored by a novel small plasmid from Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chang-Wen; Zhang, An-Yun; Yang, Chun-Mei; Pan, Yun; Guan, Zhong-Bin; Lei, Chang-Wei; Peng, Lin-Yao; Li, Qing-Zhou; Wang, Hong-Ning

    2015-04-01

    The macrolide resistance gene erm(T) was identified for the first time in a porcine Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae isolate from swine in China. The novel 3,749-bp small plasmid pER29, which carries erm(T), had a G+C content of 31% and four distinct open reading frames. The presence of pER29 increased by at least 128-fold the MICs of clindamycin and erythromycin for E. rhusiopathiae. The fitness cost of pER29 could be responsible for the low frequency of erm(T) in E. rhusiopathiae.

  2. First Report of Macrolide Resistance Gene erm(T) Harbored by a Novel Small Plasmid from Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Chang-Wen; Zhang, An-Yun; Yang, Chun-Mei; Pan, Yun; Guan, Zhong-Bin; Lei, Chang-Wei; Peng, Lin-Yao; Li, Qing-Zhou

    2015-01-01

    The macrolide resistance gene erm(T) was identified for the first time in a porcine Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae isolate from swine in China. The novel 3,749-bp small plasmid pER29, which carries erm(T), had a G+C content of 31% and four distinct open reading frames. The presence of pER29 increased by at least 128-fold the MICs of clindamycin and erythromycin for E. rhusiopathiae. The fitness cost of pER29 could be responsible for the low frequency of erm(T) in E. rhusiopathiae. PMID:25666150

  3. Macrolide resistance gene erm(TR) and erm(TR)-carrying genetic elements in Streptococcus agalactiae: characterization of ICESagTR7, a new composite element containing IMESp2907.

    PubMed

    Mingoia, Marina; Morici, Eleonora; Marini, Emanuela; Brenciani, Andrea; Giovanetti, Eleonora; Varaldo, Pietro E

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate macrolide-resistant Streptococcus agalactiae isolates harbouring erm(TR), an erm(A) gene subclass, with emphasis on their erm(TR)-carrying genetic elements. Four erm(TR)-carrying elements have been described to date: three closely related (ICE10750-RD.2, Tn1806 and ICESp1108) in Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus pneumoniae and S. pyogenes, respectively; and one completely different (IMESp2907, embedded in ICESp2906 to form ICESp2905) in S. pyogenes. Seventeen macrolide-resistant erm(TR)-positive S. agalactiae isolates were phenotypically and genotypically characterized. Their erm(TR)-carrying elements were explored by analysing the distinctive recombination genes of known erm(TR)-carrying integrative and conjugative elements (ICEs) and by PCR mapping. The new genetic context and organization of IMESp2907 in S. agalactiae were explored using several experimental procedures and in silico analyses. Five isolates harboured ICE10750-RD.2/Tn1806, five isolates harboured ICESp1108 and five isolates bore unknown erm(TR)-carrying elements. The remaining two isolates, exhibiting identical serotypes and pulsotypes, harboured IMESp2907 in a new genetic environment, which was further investigated in one of the two isolates, SagTR7. IMESp2907 was circularizable in S. agalactiae, as described in S. pyogenes. The new IMESp2907 junctions were identified based on its site-specific integration; the att sites were almost identical to those in S. pyogenes. In strain SagTR7, erm(TR)-carrying IMESp2907 was embedded in an erm(TR)-less internal element related to ICE10750-RD.2/Tn1806, which, in turn, was embedded in an ICESde3396-like element. The resulting whole ICE, ICESagTR7 (∼129 kb), was integrated into the chromosome downstream of the rplL gene, and was excisable in circular form and transferable by conjugation. This is the first study exploring erm(TR)-carrying genetic elements in S. agalactiae. © The Author 2015. Published by

  4. Conserved SMP domains of the ERMES complex bind phospholipids and mediate tether assembly

    PubMed Central

    AhYoung, Andrew P.; Jiang, Jiansen; Zhang, Jiang; Khoi Dang, Xuan; Loo, Joseph A.; Zhou, Z. Hong; Egea, Pascal F.

    2015-01-01

    Membrane contact sites (MCS) between organelles are proposed as nexuses for the exchange of lipids, small molecules, and other signals crucial to cellular function and homeostasis. Various protein complexes, such as the endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondrial encounter structure (ERMES), function as dynamic molecular tethers between organelles. Here, we report the reconstitution and characterization of subcomplexes formed by the cytoplasm-exposed synaptotagmin-like mitochondrial lipid-binding protein (SMP) domains present in three of the five ERMES subunits—the soluble protein Mdm12, the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-resident membrane protein Mmm1, and the mitochondrial membrane protein Mdm34. SMP domains are conserved lipid-binding domains found exclusively in proteins at MCS. We show that the SMP domains of Mdm12 and Mmm1 associate into a tight heterotetramer with equimolecular stoichiometry. Our 17-Å-resolution EM structure of the complex reveals an elongated crescent-shaped particle in which two Mdm12 subunits occupy symmetric but distal positions at the opposite ends of a central ER-anchored Mmm1 homodimer. Rigid body fitting of homology models of these SMP domains in the density maps reveals a distinctive extended tubular structure likely traversed by a hydrophobic tunnel. Furthermore, these two SMP domains bind phospholipids and display a strong preference for phosphatidylcholines, a class of phospholipids whose exchange between the ER and mitochondria is essential. Last, we show that the three SMP-containing ERMES subunits form a ternary complex in which Mdm12 bridges Mmm1 to Mdm34. Our findings highlight roles for SMP domains in ERMES assembly and phospholipid binding and suggest a structure-based mechanism for the facilitated transport of phospholipids between organelles. PMID:26056272

  5. Development of the Extendable and Retractable Mast (ERM), Design phase 2. Volume 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Specht; Schmid; Chellingsworth; Wislez; Bhatti; Stenne

    1987-03-01

    An Extendable and Retractable Mast (ERM) for space applications such as deployment and retraction of high power rollable, foldable, or rigid solar arrays, large unfurlable antennas, and scientific payloads, was developed. The coverage of a large field of application requires a strong and stiff light-weight mast with good pointing accuracy allowing the adaptation of heavy tip masses as well as the fixation of line-loads to intermediate attachment points along the mast at the same time. The ERM payload capability is 40 kg on tip, plus 10 kg/m line load, plus 100N eccentric load. Deployed length is 40 m. The ERM is designed as a spindle-driven telescopic mast in carbon-fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) technology. A 40 m solar array mast and a 20 m antenna mast were considered. The feasibility of a 60 m mast is also shown. Manufacturing and test of a breadboard model hardware, and the detailed design of an engineering model mast are described.

  6. Noise-induced cochlear F-actin depolymerization is mediated via ROCK2/p-ERM signaling

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yu; Wang, Xianren; Chen, Jun; Sha, Su-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Our previous work has suggested that traumatic noise activates Rho-GTPase pathways in cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs), resulting in cell death and noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). In this study, we investigated Rho effectors, Rho-associated kinases (ROCKs), and the targets of ROCKs, the ezrin-radixin-moesin (ERM) proteins, in the regulation of the cochlear actin cytoskeleton using adult CBA/J mice under conditions of noise-induced temporary threshold shift (TTS) and permanent threshold shift (PTS) hearing loss, which result in changes to the F/G-actin ratio. The levels of cochlear ROCK2 and p-ERM decreased 1 h after either TTS- or PTS-noise exposure. In contrast, ROCK2 and p-ERM in OHCs decreased only after PTS-, not after TTS-noise exposure. Treatment with lysophosphatidic acid, an activator of the Rho pathway, resulted in significant reversal of the F/G-actin ratio changes caused by noise exposure and attenuated OHC death and NIHL. Conversely, the down-regulation of ROCK2 by pretreatment with ROCK2 siRNA reduced the expression of ROCK2 and p-ERM in OHCs, exacerbated TTS to PTS, and worsened OHC loss. Additionally, pretreatment with siRNA against radixin, an ERM protein, aggravated TTS to PTS. Our results indicate that a ROCK2-mediated ERM-phosphorylation signaling cascade modulates noise-induced hair cell loss and NIHL by targeting the cytoskeleton. PMID:25683353

  7. Ezrin, Radixin, and Moesin (ERM) proteins function as pleiotropic regulators of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection

    SciTech Connect

    Kubo, Yoshinao Yoshii, Hiroaki; Kamiyama, Haruka; Tominaga, Chika; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Sato, Hironori; Yamamoto, Naoki

    2008-05-25

    Ezrin, radixin, and moesin (ERM) proteins supply functional linkage between integral membrane proteins and cytoskeleton in mammalian cells to regulate membrane protein dynamisms and cytoskeleton rearrangement. To assess potential role of the ERM proteins in HIV-1 lifecycle, we examined if suppression of ERM function in human cells expressing HIV-1 infection receptors influences HIV-1 envelope (Env)-mediated HIV-1-vector transduction and cell-cell fusion. Expression of an ezrin dominant negative mutant or knockdown of ezrin, radixin, or moesin with siRNA uniformly decreased transduction titers of HIV-1 vectors having X4-tropic Env. In contrast, transduction titers of R5-tropic Env HIV-1 vectors were decreased only by radixin knockdown: ezrin knockdown had no detectable effects and moesin knockdown rather increased transduction titer. Each of the ERM suppressions had no detectable effects on cell surface expression of CD4, CCR5, and CXCR4 or VSV-Env-mediated HIV-1 vector transductions. Finally, the individual knockdown of ERM mRNAs uniformly decreased efficiency of cell-cell fusion mediated by X4- or R5-tropic Env and HIV-1 infection receptors. These results suggest that (i) the ERM proteins function as positive regulators of infection by X4-tropic HIV-1, (ii) moesin additionally functions as a negative regulator of R5-tropic HIV-1 virus infection at the early step(s) after the membrane fusion, and (iii) receptor protein dynamisms are regulated differently in R5- and X4-tropic HIV-1 infections.

  8. A piRNA-like small RNA interacts with and modulates p-ERM proteins in human somatic cells

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Yuping; Wang, Yuyan; Kumari, Priti; Shetty, Amol Carl; Clark, David; Gable, Tyler; MacKerell, Alexander D.; Ma, Mark Z.; Weber, David J.; Yang, Austin J.; Edelman, Martin J.; Mao, Li

    2015-01-01

    PIWI-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) are thought to silence transposon and gene expression during development. However, the roles of piRNAs in somatic tissues are largely unknown. Here we report the identification of 555 piRNAs in human lung bronchial epithelial (HBE) and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines, including 295 that do not exist in databases termed as piRNA-like sncRNAs or piRNA-Ls. Distinctive piRNA/piRNA-L expression patterns are observed between HBE and NSCLC cells. piRNA-like-163 (piR-L-163), the top downregulated piRNA-L in NSCLC cells, binds directly to phosphorylated ERM proteins (p-ERM), which is dependent on the central part of UUNNUUUNNUU motif in piR-L-163 and the RRRKPDT element in ERM. The piR-L-163/p-ERM interaction is critical for p-ERM's binding capability to filamentous actin (F-actin) and ERM-binding phosphoprotein 50 (EBP50). Thus, piRNA/piRNA-L may play a regulatory role through direct interaction with proteins in physiological and pathophysiological conditions. PMID:26095918

  9. Ezrin, Radixin, and Moesin (ERM) proteins function as pleiotropic regulators of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Yoshinao; Yoshii, Hiroaki; Kamiyama, Haruka; Tominaga, Chika; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Sato, Hironori; Yamamoto, Naoki

    2008-05-25

    Ezrin, radixin, and moesin (ERM) proteins supply functional linkage between integral membrane proteins and cytoskeleton in mammalian cells to regulate membrane protein dynamisms and cytoskeleton rearrangement. To assess potential role of the ERM proteins in HIV-1 lifecycle, we examined if suppression of ERM function in human cells expressing HIV-1 infection receptors influences HIV-1 envelope (Env)-mediated HIV-1-vector transduction and cell-cell fusion. Expression of an ezrin dominant negative mutant or knockdown of ezrin, radixin, or moesin with siRNA uniformly decreased transduction titers of HIV-1 vectors having X4-tropic Env. In contrast, transduction titers of R5-tropic Env HIV-1 vectors were decreased only by radixin knockdown: ezrin knockdown had no detectable effects and moesin knockdown rather increased transduction titer. Each of the ERM suppressions had no detectable effects on cell surface expression of CD4, CCR5, and CXCR4 or VSV-Env-mediated HIV-1 vector transductions. Finally, the individual knockdown of ERM mRNAs uniformly decreased efficiency of cell-cell fusion mediated by X4- or R5-tropic Env and HIV-1 infection receptors. These results suggest that (i) the ERM proteins function as positive regulators of infection by X4-tropic HIV-1, (ii) moesin additionally functions as a negative regulator of R5-tropic HIV-1 virus infection at the early step(s) after the membrane fusion, and (iii) receptor protein dynamisms are regulated differently in R5- and X4-tropic HIV-1 infections.

  10. ermA, ermC , tetM and tetK are essential for erythromycin and tetracycline resistance among methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from a tertiary hospital in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Lim, K T; Hanifah, Y A; Yusof, Mym; Thong, K L

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the expression and transferability of tetracycline and erythromycin resistance among 188 MRSA strains from a Malaysian tertiary hospital. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) for oxacillin, erythromycin, tetracycline and ciprofloxacin ranged from 4 to 512 μg/ml, 0.25 to 256 μg/ml, 0.5 to 256 μg/ml and 0.5 to 512 μg/ml, respectively. Tetracycline-resistant strains showed co-resistance towards ciprofloxacin and erythromycin. There was a significant increase (P<0.05) of high-level tetracycline (≥MIC 256 μg/ml) and erythromycin (≥MIC 128 μg/ml) resistant strains in between the years 2003 and 2008. All erythromycin-resistant strains harboured ermA or ermC gene and all tetracycline-resistant strains harboured tetM or tetK gene. The blaZ was detected in all MRSA strains, whereas ermA, tetM, ermC, tetK and msrA genes were detected in 157 (84%), 92 (49%), 40 (21%), 39 (21%) and 4 (2%) MRSA strains, respectively. The blaZ, tetM, ermC and tetK genes were plasmid-encoded, with ermC gene being easily transmissible. Tn5801-like transposon was present in 78 tetM-positive strains. ermA and tetM genes were the most prevalent erythromycin and tetracycline resistance determinants, respectively, in MRSA strains. The association of resistance genes with mobile genetic elements possibly enhances the spread of resistant traits in MRSA.

  11. A Novel erm(44) Gene Variant from a Human Staphylococcus saprophyticus Isolate Confers Resistance to Macrolides and Lincosamides but Not Streptogramins.

    PubMed

    Strauss, Christian; Hu, Yanmin; Coates, Anthony; Perreten, Vincent

    2017-01-01

    A novel erm(44) gene variant, erm(44)v, has been identified by whole-genome sequencing in a Staphylococcus saprophyticus isolate from the skin of a healthy person. It has the particularity to confer resistance to macrolides and lincosamides but not to streptogramin B when expressed in S. aureus The erm(44)v gene resides on a 19,400-bp genomic island which contains phage-associated proteins and is integrated into the chromosome of S. saprophyticus.

  12. Novel Structure of Enterococcus faecium-Originated ermB-Positive Tn1546-Like Element in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Wan, Tsai-Wen; Hung, Wei-Chun; Tsai, Jui-Chang; Lin, Yu-Tzu; Lee, Hao; Hsueh, Po-Ren; Lee, Tai-Fen; Teng, Lee-Jene

    2016-10-01

    We determined the resistance determinants in 274 erythromycin-resistant methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) isolates during a 13-year period, 2000 to 2012. The resistance phenotypes, inducible macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin (iMLS), constitutive MLS (cMLS), and macrolide-streptogramin (MS) resistance phenotypes, were examined by a double-disk diffusion D test. The ermB gene was more frequent (35%; 97/274) than ermC (27%; 75/274) or ermA (21%; 58/274). All 97 ermB-positive isolates harbored Tn551 and IS1216V The majority (89/97) of ermB-positive isolates displayed the cMLS phenotype and carried mobile element structure (MES)-like structures, which has been previously reported in sequence type 59 (ST59) methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). The remaining 8 ermB-carrying isolates, belonging to ST7 (n = 4), ST5 (n = 3), and ST59 (n = 1), were sasK intact and did not carry MES-like structures. Unlike a MES-like structure that was located on the chromosome, the ermB elements on sasK-intact isolates were located on plasmids by S1 nuclease pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis and conjugation tests. Sequence data for the ermB-containing region (14,566 bp) from ST59 NTUH_3874 revealed that the best match was a Tn1546-like element in plasmid pMCCL2 DNA (GenBank accession number AP009486) of Macrococcus caseolyticus Tn1546 is recognized as an enterococcal transposon and was known from the vancomycin resistance gene cluster in vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE). So far, acquisitions of Tn1546 in S. aureus have occurred in clonal complex 5 (CC5) MRSA, but not in MSSA. This is the first report that MSSA harbors an Enterococcus faecium-originated ermB-positive Tn1546-like element located on a plasmid. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  13. Noise-induced cochlear F-actin depolymerization is mediated via ROCK2/p-ERM signaling.

    PubMed

    Han, Yu; Wang, Xianren; Chen, Jun; Sha, Su-Hua

    2015-06-01

    Our previous work has suggested that traumatic noise activates Rho-GTPase pathways in cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs), resulting in cell death and noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). In this study, we investigated Rho effectors, Rho-associated kinases (ROCKs), and the targets of ROCKs, the ezrin-radixin-moesin (ERM) proteins, in the regulation of the cochlear actin cytoskeleton using adult CBA/J mice under conditions of noise-induced temporary threshold shift (TTS) and permanent threshold shift (PTS) hearing loss, which result in changes to the F/G-actin ratio. The levels of cochlear ROCK2 and p-ERM decreased 1 h after either TTS- or PTS-noise exposure. In contrast, ROCK2 and p-ERM in OHCs decreased only after PTS-, not after TTS-noise exposure. Treatment with lysophosphatidic acid, an activator of the Rho pathway, resulted in significant reversal of the F/G-actin ratio changes caused by noise exposure and attenuated OHC death and NIHL. Conversely, the down-regulation of ROCK2 by pretreatment with ROCK2 siRNA reduced the expression of ROCK2 and p-ERM in OHCs, exacerbated TTS to PTS, and worsened OHC loss. Additionally, pretreatment with siRNA against radixin, an ERM protein, aggravated TTS to PTS. Our results indicate that a ROCK2-mediated ERM-phosphorylation signaling cascade modulates noise-induced hair cell loss and NIHL by targeting the cytoskeleton. We propose the following cascade following noise trauma leading to alteration of the F-actin arrangement in the outer hair cell cytoskeleton: Noise exposure reduces the levels of GTP-RhoA and subsequently diminishes levels of RhoA effector ROCK2 (Rho-associated kinase 2). Phosphorylation of ezrin-radixin-moesin (ERM) by ROCK2 normally allows ERM to cross-link actin filaments with the plasma membrane. Noise-decreased levels of ROCK results in reduction of phosphorylation of ERM that leads to depolymerization of actin filaments. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), an agonist of RhoA, binds to the G-protein-coupled receptor

  14. TcdC Does Not Significantly Repress Toxin Expression in Clostridium difficile 630ΔErm

    PubMed Central

    Bakker, Dennis; Smits, Wiep Klaas; Kuijper, Ed J.; Corver, Jeroen

    2012-01-01

    In the past decade, Clostridium difficile has emerged as an important gut pathogen. Symptoms of C. difficile infection range from mild diarrhea to pseudomembranous colitis, sometimes resulting in colectomy or death. The main virulence factors of C. difficile are toxin A and toxin B. Besides the genes encoding these toxins (tcdA and tcdB), the pathogenicity locus (PaLoc) also contains genes encoding a sigma factor (tcdR) and a putative anti-sigma factor (tcdC). The important role of TcdR as a sigma factor for toxin expression is undisputed, whereas the role of TcdC as an anti-sigma factor, inhibiting toxin expression, is currently the subject of debate. To clarify the role of TcdC in toxin expression, we generated an isogenic ClosTron-based mutant of tcdC in Clostridium difficile strain 630Δ Erm (CT::tcdC) and determined the transcription levels of the PaLoc genes and the expression levels of the toxins in the wild type strain and the tcdC mutant strain. We found only minor differences in transcription levels of the PaLoc genes between the wild type and CT::tcdC strains and total toxin levels did not significantly differ either. These results suggest that in C. difficile 630Δerm TcdC is not a major regulator of toxin expression under the conditions tested. PMID:22912837

  15. New genetic environments of the macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin resistance determinant erm(X) and their influence on potential horizontal transferability in bifidobacteria.

    PubMed

    Wang, Na; Hang, Xiaomin; Zhang, Min; Peng, Xiaoyun; Yang, Hong

    2017-06-27

    With the abuse of macrolide, lincosamide, and streptogramin (MLS), the traditionally safe bifidobacterial strains in the human intestine could serve as a reservoir of MLS resistance genes. In this study, the erm(X) gene was detected in 29 MLS-resistant strains and one MLS-susceptible strain among 92 bifidobacterial strains of human origin. This study is the first to report erm(X)-mediated MLS resistance in Bifidobacterium pseudocatenulatum, Bifidobacterium breve and Bifidobacterium bifidum. The insertion sequences (ISs) flanking antibiotic resistance (AR) genes (i.e., the genetic environment of AR genes) could contribute to the horizontal spreading of AR. However, the potential transferability of erm(X) in bifidobacteria has not been previously verified. Here, we retrieved four genetic environments (I-IV) of erm(X) from 30 erm(X)-positive bifidobacterial strains. This study is the first to identify the erm(X) gene in three new genetic environments (II, III and IV) in bifidobacteria. The erm(X) gene was individually flanked by IS1249 or IS3 in genetic environments I, II and IV and was simultaneously flanked by IS1249 and IS3 elements in genetic environment III. Only the transfer of erm(X) from genetic environment III simultaneously flanked by IS1249 and IS3 elements was successfully observed in filter mating experiments. These findings indicate a synergic effect of IS1249 and IS3 elements in the transfer of erm(X) in bifidobacteria, and further reveal that the various genetic environments of erm(X) result in significant differences in the transferability of erm(X) in bifidobacteria. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  16. Transport and persistence of tylosin-resistant enterococci, erm genes, and tylosin in soil and drainage water from fields receiving swine manure

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Land application of manure from tylosin-treated swine introduces tylosin-resistant enterococci, erm genes, which confer resistance to tylosin, and tylosin. This study documents the occurrence and transport of tylosin-resistant enterococci, erm genes, and tylosin in tile-drained chisel plow and no-ti...

  17. Knockdown of ERM family member moesin in host cells increases HIV type 1 replication.

    PubMed

    Capalbo, Gianni; Mueller-Kuller, Thea; Markovic, Sandra; Klein, Stefan A; Dietrich, Ursula; Hoelzer, Dieter; Ottmann, Oliver G; Scheuring, Urban J

    2011-12-01

    Moesin is a member of the ERM (ezrin, radixin, moesin) family of cytoskeleton/membrane structure organizing and signal transduction proteins. Previously, we found an increased expression of moesin during HIV-1 infection. Moesin was also reported to be incorporated into HIV-1 virions. To analyze whether moesin is a host factor affecting the replication cycle of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), we used small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) to evaluate the effect of moesin knockdown on HIV-1 replication in P4-CCR5 cells. Moesin's knockdown did not affect the cell viability or cell phenotype. Interestingly, we observed a marked increase in viral replication, as demonstrated by enhanced HIV-1 RNA, p24 antigen, and ß-galactosidase reporter expression. Moesin-dependent enhancement of HIV-1 replication was confirmed in lymphocytic host cells (Jurkat). These results suggest an overall rather restrictive role of moesin for HIV-1 replication in host cells in vitro.

  18. Assessment of commutability for candidate certified reference material ERM-BB130 "chloramphenicol in pork".

    PubMed

    Zeleny, Reinhard; Emteborg, Håkan; Schimmel, Heinz

    2010-10-01

    Chloramphenicol (CAP), an effective antibiotic against many microorganisms, is meanwhile banned in the EU for treatment of food-producing animals due to adverse health effects. The Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM) is currently developing a certified reference material (CRM) for CAP in pork, intended for validation and method performance verifications of analytical methods. The material will be certified using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) methods and has a target CAP level around the minimum required performance limit (MRPL) of 0.3 microg/kg. To prove that the material can be applied as a quality control tool for screening methods, a commutability study was conducted, involving five commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits and one biosensor assay (BiaCore kit). Meat homogenates (cryo-milled wet tissue) with CAP concentrations around the MRPL and the candidate CRM (lyophilised powder) were measured by LC-MS/MS and GC-MS as well as the six screening methods. Pairwise method comparisons of results obtained for the two sample types showed that the CRM can successfully be applied as quality control (QC) sample to all six screening methods. The study suggests that ERM-BB130 is sufficiently commutable with the investigated assays and that laboratories applying one of the investigated kits therefore benefit from using ERM-BB130 to demonstrate the correctness of their results. However, differences among the assays were observed, either in the abundance of bias between screening and confirmatory LC and GC methods, the repeatability of test results, or goodness of fit between the methods.

  19. Oral and Anal Vaccination Confers Full Protection against Enteric Redmouth Disease (ERM) in Rainbow Trout

    PubMed Central

    Ohtani, Maki; Strøm, Helene Kragelund; Raida, Martin Kristian

    2014-01-01

    The effect of oral vaccines against bacterial fish diseases has been a topic for debate for decades. Recently both M-like cells and dendritic cells have been discovered in the intestine of rainbow trout. It is therefore likely that antigens reaching the intestine can be taken up and thereby induce immunity in orally vaccinated fish. The objective of this project was to investigate whether oral and anal vaccination of rainbow trout induces protection against an experimental waterborne infection with the pathogenic enterobacteria Yersinia ruckeri O1 biotype 1 the causative agent of enteric redmouth disease (ERM). Rainbow trout were orally vaccinated with AquaVac ERM Oral (MERCK Animal Health) or an experimental vaccine bacterin of Y. ruckeri O1. Both vaccines were tested with and without a booster vaccination four months post the primary vaccination. Furthermore, two groups of positive controls were included, one group receiving the experimental oral vaccine in a 50 times higher dose, and the other group receiving a single dose administered anally in order to bypass the stomach. Each group was bath challenged with 6.3×108 CFU/ml Y. ruckeri, six months post the primary vaccination. The challenge induced significant mortality in all the infected groups except for the groups vaccinated anally with a single dose or orally with the high dose of bacterin. Both of these groups had 100% survival. These results show that a low dose of Y. ruckeri bacterin induces full protection when the bacterin is administered anally. Oral vaccination also induces full protection, however, at a dose 50 times higher than if the fish were to be vaccinated anally. This indicates that much of the orally fed antigen is digested in the stomach before it reaches the second segment of the intestine where it can be taken up as immunogenic antigens and presented to lymphocytes. PMID:24705460

  20. Oral and anal vaccination confers full protection against enteric redmouth disease (ERM) in rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Villumsen, Kasper Rømer; Neumann, Lukas; Ohtani, Maki; Strøm, Helene Kragelund; Raida, Martin Kristian

    2014-01-01

    The effect of oral vaccines against bacterial fish diseases has been a topic for debate for decades. Recently both M-like cells and dendritic cells have been discovered in the intestine of rainbow trout. It is therefore likely that antigens reaching the intestine can be taken up and thereby induce immunity in orally vaccinated fish. The objective of this project was to investigate whether oral and anal vaccination of rainbow trout induces protection against an experimental waterborne infection with the pathogenic enterobacteria Yersinia ruckeri O1 biotype 1 the causative agent of enteric redmouth disease (ERM). Rainbow trout were orally vaccinated with AquaVac ERM Oral (MERCK Animal Health) or an experimental vaccine bacterin of Y. ruckeri O1. Both vaccines were tested with and without a booster vaccination four months post the primary vaccination. Furthermore, two groups of positive controls were included, one group receiving the experimental oral vaccine in a 50 times higher dose, and the other group receiving a single dose administered anally in order to bypass the stomach. Each group was bath challenged with 6.3 × 10(8) CFU/ml Y. ruckeri, six months post the primary vaccination. The challenge induced significant mortality in all the infected groups except for the groups vaccinated anally with a single dose or orally with the high dose of bacterin. Both of these groups had 100% survival. These results show that a low dose of Y. ruckeri bacterin induces full protection when the bacterin is administered anally. Oral vaccination also induces full protection, however, at a dose 50 times higher than if the fish were to be vaccinated anally. This indicates that much of the orally fed antigen is digested in the stomach before it reaches the second segment of the intestine where it can be taken up as immunogenic antigens and presented to lymphocytes.

  1. Efficacy testing of 35-year-old commercially-produced ERM bacterin reveals the remarkable stability of this product

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Recently, a bottle of ERM bacterin that was approximately 35-years-old and labeled by Wildlife Vaccines with a serial number of 236 and an expiration date of October 18, 1982 was discovered in a storage closet at room temperature at the Clear Springs Foods Research Division. Microscopic evaluation a...

  2. Life-Threatening Invasive Helcococcus kunzii Infections in Intravenous-Drug Users and ermA-Mediated Erythromycin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Patrick C. Y.; Tse, Herman; Wong, Samson S. Y.; Tse, Cindy W. S.; Fung, Ami M. Y.; Tam, Dorothy M. W.; Lau, Susanna K. P.; Yuen, Kwok-yung

    2005-01-01

    We report the first two cases of life-threatening invasive Helcococcus kunzii infection, with primary bacteremia and empyema thoracis, respectively. Gram smears of both H. kunzii isolates showed a mixture of gram-positive and gram-negative cocci. The isolate from the first patient, resistant to erythromycin and clindamycin, possessed an ermA gene. PMID:16333132

  3. Life-threatening invasive Helcococcus kunzii infections in intravenous-drug users and ermA-mediated erythromycin resistance.

    PubMed

    Woo, Patrick C Y; Tse, Herman; Wong, Samson S Y; Tse, Cindy W S; Fung, Ami M Y; Tam, Dorothy M W; Lau, Susanna K P; Yuen, Kwok-yung

    2005-12-01

    We report the first two cases of life-threatening invasive Helcococcus kunzii infection, with primary bacteremia and empyema thoracis, respectively. Gram smears of both H. kunzii isolates showed a mixture of gram-positive and gram-negative cocci. The isolate from the first patient, resistant to erythromycin and clindamycin, possessed an ermA gene.

  4. Characterization of a New erm-Related Macrolide Resistance Gene Present in Probiotic Strains of Bacillus clausii

    PubMed Central

    Bozdogan, Bülent; Galopin, Sébastien; Leclercq, Roland

    2004-01-01

    The mechanism of resistance to macrolides, lincosamides, and streptogramins B was studied in four Bacillus clausii strains that are mixed in a probiotic administered to humans for prevention of gastrointestinal side effects due to oral antibiotic chemotherapy and in three reference strains of B. clausii, DSM8716, ATCC 21536, and ATCC 21537. An 846-bp gene called erm(34), which is related to the erm genes conferring resistance to these antibiotics by ribosomal methylation, was cloned from total DNA of B. clausii DSM8716 into Escherichia coli. The deduced amino acid sequence presented 61% identity with that of Erm(D) from B. licheniformis, B. halodurans, and B. anthracis. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of total DNA digested by I-CeuI, followed by hybridization with an erm(34)-specific probe, indicated a chromosomal location of the gene in all B. clausii strains. Repeated attempts to transfer resistance to macrolides by conjugation from B. clausii strains to Enterococcus faecalis JH2-2, E. faecium HM1070, and B. subtilis UCN19 were unsuccessful. PMID:14711653

  5. The ETS family member ERM contains an alpha-helical acidic activation domain that contacts TAFII60.

    PubMed Central

    Defossez, P A; Baert, J L; Monnot, M; de Launoit, Y

    1997-01-01

    Transcription factors are modular entities built up of discrete domains, some devoted to DNA binding and others permitting transcriptional modulation. The structure of DNA binding domains has been thoroughly investigated and structural classes clearly defined. In sharp contrast, the structural constraints put on transactivating regions, if any, are mostly unknown. Our investigations focus on ERM, a eukaryotic transcription factor of the ETS family. We have previously shown that ERM harbours two transactivating domains (TADs) with distinct functional features: AD1 lies in the first 72 amino acids of ERM, while AD2 sits in the last 62. Here we show that AD1 is a bona fide acidic TAD, for it activated transcription in yeast cells, while AD2 did not. AD1 contains a 20 amino acid stretch predicted to form an alpha-helix that is found unchanged in the related PEA3 and ER81 transcription factors. Circular dichroism analysis revealed that a 32 amino acid peptide encompassing this region is unstructured in water but folds into a helix when the hydrophobic solvent trifluoroethanol is added. The isolated helix was sufficient to activate transcription and mutations predicted to disrupt it dramatically affected AD1-driven transactivation, whereas mutations decreasing its acidity had more gentle effects. A phenylalanine residue within the helix was particularly sensitive to mutations. Finally, we observed that ERM bound TAFII60 via AD1 and bound TBP and TAFII40, presumably via other activation domains. PMID:9358152

  6. Characterization of a new erm-related macrolide resistance gene present in probiotic strains of Bacillus clausii.

    PubMed

    Bozdogan, Bülent; Galopin, Sébastien; Leclercq, Roland

    2004-01-01

    The mechanism of resistance to macrolides, lincosamides, and streptogramins B was studied in four Bacillus clausii strains that are mixed in a probiotic administered to humans for prevention of gastrointestinal side effects due to oral antibiotic chemotherapy and in three reference strains of B. clausii, DSM8716, ATCC 21536, and ATCC 21537. An 846-bp gene called erm(34), which is related to the erm genes conferring resistance to these antibiotics by ribosomal methylation, was cloned from total DNA of B. clausii DSM8716 into Escherichia coli. The deduced amino acid sequence presented 61% identity with that of Erm(D) from B. licheniformis, B. halodurans, and B. anthracis. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of total DNA digested by I-CeuI, followed by hybridization with an erm(34)-specific probe, indicated a chromosomal location of the gene in all B. clausii strains. Repeated attempts to transfer resistance to macrolides by conjugation from B. clausii strains to Enterococcus faecalis JH2-2, E. faecium HM1070, and B. subtilis UCN19 were unsuccessful.

  7. Opening a Can of wERMS: Texas A&M University's Experiences in Implementing Two Electronic Resource Management Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartnett, Eric; Price, Apryl; Smith, Jane; Barrett, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Over the past few years, Texas A&M University (TAMU) has searched for a way to administer its electronic subscriptions as well as the electronic subscriptions shared among the TAMU System. In this article, we address our attempts to implement an effective electronic resource management system (ERMS), both for subscriptions on the main campus…

  8. The Endoplasmic Reticulum-Mitochondrion Tether ERMES Orchestrates Fungal Immune Evasion, Illuminating Inflammasome Responses to Hyphal Signals

    PubMed Central

    Tucey, Timothy M.; Verma-Gaur, Jiyoti; Nguyen, Julie; Hewitt, Victoria L.; Lo, Tricia L.; Shingu-Vazquez, Miguel; Robertson, Avril A. B.; Hill, James R.; Pettolino, Filomena A.; Beddoe, Travis; Cooper, Matthew A.; Naderer, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The pathogenic yeast Candida albicans escapes macrophages by triggering NLRP3 inflammasome-dependent host cell death (pyroptosis). Pyroptosis is inflammatory and must be tightly regulated by host and microbe, but the mechanism is incompletely defined. We characterized the C. albicans endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-mitochondrion tether ERMES and show that the ERMES mmm1 mutant is severely crippled in killing macrophages despite hyphal formation and normal phagocytosis and survival. To understand dynamic inflammasome responses to Candida with high spatiotemporal resolution, we established live-cell imaging for parallel detection of inflammasome activation and pyroptosis at the single-cell level. This showed that the inflammasome response to mmm1 mutant hyphae is delayed by 10 h, after which an exacerbated activation occurs. The NLRP3 inhibitor MCC950 inhibited inflammasome activation and pyroptosis by C. albicans, including exacerbated inflammasome activation by the mmm1 mutant. At the cell biology level, inactivation of ERMES led to a rapid collapse of mitochondrial tubular morphology, slow growth and hyphal elongation at host temperature, and reduced exposed 1,3-β-glucan in hyphal populations. Our data suggest that inflammasome activation by C. albicans requires a signal threshold dependent on hyphal elongation and cell wall remodeling, which could fine-tune the response relative to the level of danger posed by C. albicans. The phenotypes of the ERMES mutant and the lack of conservation in animals suggest that ERMES is a promising antifungal drug target. Our data further indicate that NLRP3 inhibition by MCC950 could modulate C. albicans-induced inflammation. IMPORTANCE The yeast Candida albicans causes human infections that have mortality rates approaching 50%. The key to developing improved therapeutics is to understand the host-pathogen interface. A critical interaction is that with macrophages: intracellular Candida triggers the NLRP3/caspase-1

  9. Standardized interpretation of antibiotic susceptibility testing and resistance genotyping for Mycobacterium abscessus with regard to subspecies and erm41 sequevar.

    PubMed

    Mougari, Faiza; Amarsy, Rishma; Veziris, Nicolas; Bastian, Sylvaine; Brossier, Florence; Berçot, Béatrice; Raskine, Laurent; Cambau, Emmanuelle

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to provide standardized antibiotic susceptibility testing (AST) for Mycobacterium abscessus with regard to subspecies. One hundred and sixty-five clinical isolates were tested for susceptibility to 15 antibiotics using a commercial microdilution method, at two reading times: (i) early reading time (ERT), when the growth control was first positive; and (ii) late reading time (LRT), of 14 days, for detecting inducible resistance. In addition, genes or mutations involved in resistance were studied [erm(41), rrl and rrs]. Three patterns were observed for clarithromycin: (i) MIC >16 mg/L at ERT (median 5 days) for 15 isolates [10 subsp. abscessus erm(41) sequevar T28, 3 subsp. bolletii and 2 subsp. massiliense] among which 9 harboured an a2058g/c rrl mutation; (ii) MIC ≤16 mg/L at ERT, but >16 mg/L at LRT, for 106 isolates [84 abscessus erm(41) T28 and 22 bolletii] showing intrinsic inducible resistance; and (iii) MIC ≤4 mg/L at ERT and LRT for 44 isolates [18 abscessus erm(41) C28 and 26 massiliense]. Amikacin MIC was >64 mg/L for eight isolates [five abscessus erm(41) T28, two massiliense and one bolletii] among which seven harboured the a1408g rrs mutation, but ≤64 mg/L for the remaining isolates without mutation. For the other antibiotics, only one WT pattern was observed, with cefoxitin, tigecycline and linezolid showing MIC values compatible with susceptibility. Standard AST can predict clarithromycin and amikacin resistance using interpretation rules with regard to subspecies. For other antibiotics, since only one pattern is observed, there is no need for systematic phenotypic or genotypic testing. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Two novel functions of hyaluronidase-2 (Hyal2) are formation of the glycocalyx and control of CD44-ERM interactions.

    PubMed

    Duterme, Cecile; Mertens-Strijthagen, Jeannine; Tammi, Markku; Flamion, Bruno

    2009-11-27

    It has long been predicted that the members of the hyaluronidase enzyme family have important non-enzymatic functions. However, their nature remains a mystery. The metabolism of hyaluronan (HA), their major enzymatic substrate, is also enigmatic. To examine the function of Hyal2, a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored hyaluronidase with intrinsically weak enzymatic activity, we have compared stably transfected rat fibroblastic BB16 cell lines with various levels of expression of Hyal2. These cell lines continue to express exclusively the standard form (CD44s) of the main HA receptor, CD44. Hyal2, CD44, and one of its main intracellular partners, ezrin-radixin-moesin (ERM), were found to co-immunoprecipitate. Functionally, Hyal2 overexpression was linked to loss of the glycocalyx, the HA-rich pericellular coat. This effect could be mimicked by exposure of BB16 cells either to Streptomyces hyaluronidase, to HA synthesis inhibitors, or to HA oligosaccharides. This led to shedding of CD44, separation of CD44 from ERM, reduction in baseline level of ERM activation, and markedly decreased cell motility (50% reduction in a wound healing assay). The effects of Hyal2 on the pericellular coat and on CD44-ERM interactions were inhibited by treatment with the Na(+)/H(+) exchanger-1 inhibitor ethyl-N-isopropylamiloride. We surmise that Hyal2, through direct interactions with CD44 and possibly some pericellular hyaluronidase activity requiring acidic foci, suppresses the formation or the stability of the glycocalyx, modulates ERM-related cytoskeletal interactions, and diminishes cell motility. These effects may be relevant to the purported in vivo tumor-suppressive activity of Hyal2.

  11. Transcriptional attenuation control of ermK, a macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B resistance determinant from Bacillus licheniformis.

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, J H; Choi, E C; Weisblum, B

    1991-01-01

    ermK instructs bacteria to synthesize an erythromycin-inducible 23S rRNA methylase that confers resistance to the macrolide, lincosamide, and streptogramin B antibiotics. Expression of ermK is regulated by transcriptional attenuation, in contrast to other inducible erm genes, previously described, which are regulated translationally. The ermK mRNA leader sequence has a total length of 357 nucleotides and encodes a 14-amino-acid leader peptide together with its ribosome binding site. Additionally, the mRNA leader sequence can fold in either of two mutually exclusive conformations, one of which is postulated to form in the absence of induction and to contain two rho factor-independent terminators. Truncated transcription products ca. 210 and 333 nucleotides long were synthesized in the absence of induction, both in vivo and in vitro, as predicted by the transcriptional attenuation model; run-off transcription in vitro with rITP favored the synthesis of the full-length run-off transcript over that of the 210- and 333-nucleotide truncated products. Northern (RNA) blot analysis of transcripts synthesized in vivo in the absence of erythromycin indicated that transcription terminated at either of the two inverted complementary repeat sequences in the leader that were postulated to serve as rho factor-independent terminators; moreover, no full-length transcripts were detectable in the uninduced samples. In contrast, full-length (ca. 1,200-nucleotide) transcripts were only detected in RNA samples synthesized in vivo in the presence of erythromycin. Full-length transcripts formed in the absence of induction from transcriptional readthrough past the two proposed transcription terminators would fold in a way that would sequester the ribosome binding site together with the first two codons of the ErmK methylase, reducing its efficiency in translation. This feature could therefore provide additional control of expression in the absence of induction; however, such regulation, if

  12. Prevalence of mef and ermB genes in invasive pediatric erythromycin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates from Argentina.

    PubMed

    Corso, A; Faccone, D; Gagetti, P; Pace, J; Regueira, M; Pace, Julio

    2009-01-01

    During the period 1993-2001, a total of 1,499 pneumococci isolates were recovered through the Argentinean surveillance of Streptococcus pneumoniae causing invasive disease in children under 6 years of age, 3.5% of which were erythromycin resistant. Among the 50 erythromycin-resistant strains available, 58% (n=29) harbored mefA/E genes (15 mefA, 30%; and 14 mefE, 28%), 34% (n=17) ermB, and 6% (n=3) both mefA/E plus ermB genes, while one isolate was negative for all the acquired genes studied. The England14-9 (42%), Poland6B-20 (20%) and Spain9V-3 (16%) clones were responsible for the emergence of pneumococcal macrolide resistance in pediatric population from Argentina.

  13. Dissecting the immune pathways stimulated following injection vaccination of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) against enteric redmouth disease (ERM).

    PubMed

    Wangkahart, Eakapol; Secombes, Christopher J; Wang, Tiehui

    2017-07-27

    Enteric redmouth disease (ERM or yersiniosis) is one of the most important diseases of salmonids and leads to significant economic losses. It is caused by the Gram-negative bacterium Yersinia ruckeri but can be controlled by bacterin vaccination. The first commercial ERM vaccine was licenced in 1976 and is one of the most significant and successful health practices within the aquaculture industry. Although ERM vaccination provides complete protection, knowledge of the host immune response to the vaccine and the molecular mechanisms that underpin the protection elicited is limited. In this report, we analysed the expression in spleen and gills of a large set of genes encoding for cytokines, acute phase proteins (APPs) and antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) in response to ERM vaccination in rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss. Many immune genes in teleost fish are known to have multiple paralogues that can show differential responses to ERM vaccination, highlighting the necessity to determine whether all of the genes present react in a similar manner. ERM vaccination immediately activated a balanced inflammatory response with correlated expression of both pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines (eg IL-1β1-2, TNF-α1-3, IL-6, IL-8 and IL-10A etc.) in the spleen. The increase of pro-inflammatory cytokines may explain the systemic upregulation of APPs (eg serum amyloid A protein and serum amyloid protein P) and AMPs (eg cathelicidins and hepcidin) seen in both spleen and gills. We also observed an upregulation of all the α-chains but only one β-chain (p40B2) of the IL-12 family cytokines, that suggests specific IL-12 and IL-23 isoforms with distinct functions might be produced in the spleen of vaccinated fish. Notably the expression of Th1 cytokines (IFN-γ1-2) and a Th17 cytokine (IL-17A/F1a) was also up-regulated and correlated with enhanced expression of the IL-12 family α-chains, and the majority of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, APPs and AMPs. These expression

  14. Methylation of 23S rRNA caused by tlrA (ermSF), a tylosin resistance determinant from Streptomyces fradiae.

    PubMed Central

    Zalacain, M; Cundliffe, E

    1989-01-01

    Ribosomes from Streptomyces griseofuscus expressing tlrA, a resistance gene isolated from the tylosin producer Streptomyces fradiae, are resistant to macrolide and lincosamide antibiotics in vitro. The tlrA product was found to be a methylase that introduces two methyl groups into a single base within 23S rRNA, generating N6,N6-dimethyladenine at position 2058. This activity is therefore similar to the ermE resistance mechanism in Saccharopolyspora erythraea (formerly Streptomyces erythraeus). Images PMID:2753855

  15. Molecular analysis of constitutively expressed erm(C) genes selected in vitro in the presence of the non-inducers pirlimycin, spiramycin and tylosin.

    PubMed

    Lüthje, Petra; Schwarz, Stefan

    2007-01-01

    As known from other lincosamides and 16-membered macrolides, the antimicrobial agents pirlimycin, spiramycin and tylosin, which are frequently used for the therapy of bovine mastitis, cannot induce the expression of the resistance gene erm(C). The aim of this study was to confirm the ability of these three non-inducers to select for constitutively expressed erm(C) mutants in Staphylococcus aureus. A S. aureus strain carrying an inducibly expressed erm(C) gene was incubated on agar plates containing inhibitory concentrations of each of the three antimicrobial agents. The erm(C) regulatory region of mutants obtained after overnight incubation was amplified by PCR; selected amplicons were sequenced and compared with the wild-type sequence. Mutants developed in the presence of each of the three antimicrobial agents. Constitutive expression of erm(C) was due to variations in the erm(C) regulatory region. A total of 10 different types of deletions ranging in size between 16 and 121 bp as well as 20 different types of duplications ranging between 24 and 602 bp were detected. The frequencies by which sequence alterations occurred as well as the types of alterations detected varied with regard to the antimicrobial agents used for selection. All sequence alterations observed explained constitutive erm(C) gene expression by functional inactivation of translational attenuation. In order to prevent the development of constitutively resistant isolates under therapy, the results of this study support the recommendation not to use lincosamides or 16-membered macrolides for the control of staphylococcal infections caused by strains harbouring inducibly expressed erm(C) genes.

  16. Polyclonal population structure of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates in Spain carrying mef and mef plus erm(B).

    PubMed

    de la Pedrosa, Elia Gómez G; Morosini, María-Isabel; van der Linden, Mark; Ruiz-Garbajosa, Patricia; Galán, Juan Carlos; Baquero, Fernando; Reinert, Ralf René; Cantón, Rafael

    2008-06-01

    The population structure (serotypes, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis [PFGE] types, and multilocus sequencing types) of 45 mef-positive Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates [carrying mef alone (n = 17) or with the erm(B) gene n = 28)] were studied. They were selected from among all erythromycin-resistant isolates (n = 244) obtained from a collection of 712 isolates recovered from different Spanish geographic locations in the prevaccination period from 1999 to 2003. The overall rates of resistance (according to the criteria of the CLSI) among the 45 mef-positive isolates were as follows: penicillin G, 82.2%; cefotaxime, 22.2%; clindamycin, 62.2%; and tetracycline, 68.8% [mainly in isolates carrying erm(B) plus mef(E); P < 0.001]. No levofloxacin or telithromycin resistance was found. Macrolide resistance phenotypes (as determined by the disk diffusion approximation test) were 37.7% for macrolide resistance [with all but one due to mef(E)] and 62.2% for constitutive macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B resistance [cMLS(B); with all due to mef(E) plus erm(B)]. Serotypes 14 (22.2%), 6B (17.7%), 19A (13.3%), and 19F (11.1%) were predominant. Twenty-five different DNA patterns (PFGE types) were observed. Our mef-positive isolates were grouped (by eBURST analysis) into four clonal complexes (n = 18) and 19 singleton clones (n = 27). With the exception of clone Spain(9V)-3, all clonal complexes (clonal complexes 6B, Spain(6B)-2, and Sweden(15A)-25) and 73.6% of singleton clones carried both the erm(B) and the mef(E) genes. The international multiresistant clones Spain(23F)-1 and Poland(6B)-20 were represented as singleton clones. A high proportion of mef-positive S. pneumoniae isolates presented the erm(B) gene, with all isolates expressing the cMLS(B) phenotype. A polyclonal population structure was demonstrated within our Spanish mef-positive S. pneumoniae isolates, with few clonal complexes overrepresented within this collection.

  17. ERM protein moesin is phosphorylated by advanced glycation end products and modulates endothelial permeability.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaohua; Wang, Lingjun; Chen, Bo; Li, Qiang; Wang, Jiping; Zhao, Ming; Wu, Wei; Zhu, Ping; Huang, Xuliang; Huang, Qiaobing

    2009-07-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) accumulated in different pathological conditions have the potent capacity to alter cellular properties that include endothelial structural and functional regulations. The disruption of endothelial barrier integrity may contribute to AGE-induced microangiopathy and macrovasculopathy. Previous studies have shown that AGEs induced the rearrangement of actin and subsequent hyperpermeability in endothelial cells (ECs). However, the mechanisms involved in this AGE-evoked EC malfunction are not well understood. This study directly evaluated the involvement of moesin phosphorylation in AGE-induced alterations and the effects of the RhoA and p38 MAPK pathways on this process. Using immortalized human dermal microvascular ECs (HMVECs), we first confirmed that the ezrin/radixin/moesin (ERM) protein moesin is required in AGE-induced F-actin rearrangement and hyperpermeability responses in ECs by knockdown of moesin protein expression with small interfering RNA. We then detected AGE-induced moesin phosphorylation by Western blot analysis. The mechanisms involved in moesin phosphorylation were analyzed by blocking AGE receptor binding and inhibiting Rho and MAPK pathways. AGE-treated HMVECs exhibited time- and dose-dependent increases in the Thr(558) phosphorylation of moesin. The increased moesin phosphorylation was attenuated by preadministrations of AGE receptor antibody, Rho kinase (ROCK), or p38 inhibitor. Suppression of p38 activation via the expression of dominant negative mutants with Ad.MKK6b or Ad.p38alpha also decreased moesin phosphorylation. The activation of the p38 pathway by transfection of HMVECs with an adenoviral construct of dominant active MKK6b resulted in moesin phosphorylation. These results suggest a critical role of moesin phosphorylation in AGE-induced EC functional and morphological regulations. Activation of the ROCK and p38 pathways is required in moesin phosphorylation.

  18. Advanced order management in ERM systems: the tic-tac-toe algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badell, Mariana; Fernandez, Elena; Puigjaner, Luis

    2000-10-01

    The concept behind improved enterprise resource planning systems (ERP) systems is the overall integration of the whole enterprise functionality into the management systems through financial links. Converting current software into real management decision tools requires crucial changes in the current approach to ERP systems. This evolution must be able to incorporate the technological achievements both properly and in time. The exploitation phase of plants needs an open web-based environment for collaborative business-engineering with on-line schedulers. Today's short lifecycles of products and processes require sharp and finely tuned management actions that must be guided by scheduling tools. Additionally, such actions must be able to keep track of money movements related to supply chain events. Thus, the necessary outputs require financial-production integration at the scheduling level as proposed in the new approach of enterprise management systems (ERM). Within this framework, the economical analysis of the due date policy and its optimization become essential to manage dynamically realistic and optimal delivery dates with price-time trade-off during the marketing activities. In this work we propose a scheduling tool with web-based interface conducted by autonomous agents when precise economic information relative to plant and business actions and their effects are provided. It aims to attain a better arrangement of the marketing and production events in order to face the bid/bargain process during e-commerce. Additionally, management systems require real time execution and an efficient transaction-oriented approach capable to dynamically adopt realistic and optimal actions to support marketing management. To this end the TicTacToe algorithm provides sequence optimization with acceptable tolerances in realistic time.

  19. MIG-15 and ERM-1 promote growth cone directional migration in parallel to UNC-116 and WVE-1

    PubMed Central

    Teulière, Jérôme; Gally, Christelle; Garriga, Gian; Labouesse, Michel; Georges-Labouesse, Elisabeth

    2011-01-01

    Neurons require precise targeting of their axons to form a connected network and a functional nervous system. Although many guidance receptors have been identified, much less is known about how these receptors signal to direct growth cone migration. We used Caenorhabditis elegans motoneurons to study growth cone directional migration in response to a repellent UNC-6 (netrin homolog) guidance cue. The evolutionarily conserved kinase MIG-15 [homolog of Nck-interacting kinase (NIK)] regulates motoneuron UNC-6-dependent repulsion through unknown mechanisms. Using genetics and live imaging techniques, we show that motoneuron commissural axon morphology defects in mig-15 mutants result from impaired growth cone motility and subsequent failure to migrate across longitudinal obstacles or retract extra processes. To identify new genes acting with mig-15, we screened for genetic enhancers of the mig-15 commissural phenotype and identified the ezrin/radixin/moesin ortholog ERM-1, the kinesin-1 motor UNC-116 and the actin regulator WVE-1 complex. Genetic analysis indicates that mig-15 and erm-1 act in the same genetic pathway to regulate growth cone migration and that this pathway functions in parallel to the UNC-116/WVE-1 pathway. Further, time-lapse imaging of growth cones in mutants suggests that UNC-116 might be required to stimulate protrusive activity at the leading edge, whereas MIG-15 and ERM-1 maintain low activity at the rear edge. Together, these results support a model in which the MIG-15 kinase and the UNC-116–WVE-1 complex act on opposite sides of the growth cone to promote robust directional migration. PMID:21937599

  20. MIG-15 and ERM-1 promote growth cone directional migration in parallel to UNC-116 and WVE-1.

    PubMed

    Teulière, Jérôme; Gally, Christelle; Garriga, Gian; Labouesse, Michel; Georges-Labouesse, Elisabeth

    2011-10-01

    Neurons require precise targeting of their axons to form a connected network and a functional nervous system. Although many guidance receptors have been identified, much less is known about how these receptors signal to direct growth cone migration. We used Caenorhabditis elegans motoneurons to study growth cone directional migration in response to a repellent UNC-6 (netrin homolog) guidance cue. The evolutionarily conserved kinase MIG-15 [homolog of Nck-interacting kinase (NIK)] regulates motoneuron UNC-6-dependent repulsion through unknown mechanisms. Using genetics and live imaging techniques, we show that motoneuron commissural axon morphology defects in mig-15 mutants result from impaired growth cone motility and subsequent failure to migrate across longitudinal obstacles or retract extra processes. To identify new genes acting with mig-15, we screened for genetic enhancers of the mig-15 commissural phenotype and identified the ezrin/radixin/moesin ortholog ERM-1, the kinesin-1 motor UNC-116 and the actin regulator WVE-1 complex. Genetic analysis indicates that mig-15 and erm-1 act in the same genetic pathway to regulate growth cone migration and that this pathway functions in parallel to the UNC-116/WVE-1 pathway. Further, time-lapse imaging of growth cones in mutants suggests that UNC-116 might be required to stimulate protrusive activity at the leading edge, whereas MIG-15 and ERM-1 maintain low activity at the rear edge. Together, these results support a model in which the MIG-15 kinase and the UNC-116-WVE-1 complex act on opposite sides of the growth cone to promote robust directional migration.

  1. Induction of ermAMR from a Clinical Strain of Enterococcus faecalis by 16-Membered-Ring Macrolide Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Tae-Gwon; Kwon, Ae-Ran; Choi, Eung-Chil

    1998-01-01

    We cloned the MLSB resistance determinant by PCR from a clinical isolate of Enterococcus faecalis 373, which is induced more strongly by a 16-membered-ring macrolide, tylosin, than by erythromycin. To elucidate the molecular basis of resistance of E. faecalis 373, we analyzed the cloned gene, designated ermAMR, by site-directed mutagenesis and reporter gene assay. Our results showed that an arginine-to-cysteine change in the seventh codon of the putative leader peptide endowed tylosin with resistance inducibility and that TAAA duplication enabled the control region to express the downstream methylase gene at a drastically increased level. PMID:9791136

  2. A combined cryo-EM and molecular dynamics approach reveals the mechanism of ErmBL-mediated translation arrest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arenz, Stefan; Bock, Lars V.; Graf, Michael; Innis, C. Axel; Beckmann, Roland; Grubmüller, Helmut; Vaiana, Andrea C.; Wilson, Daniel N.

    2016-07-01

    Nascent polypeptides can induce ribosome stalling, regulating downstream genes. Stalling of ErmBL peptide translation in the presence of the macrolide antibiotic erythromycin leads to resistance in Streptococcus sanguis. To reveal this stalling mechanism we obtained 3.6-Å-resolution cryo-EM structures of ErmBL-stalled ribosomes with erythromycin. The nascent peptide adopts an unusual conformation with the C-terminal Asp10 side chain in a previously unseen rotated position. Together with molecular dynamics simulations, the structures indicate that peptide-bond formation is inhibited by displacement of the peptidyl-tRNA A76 ribose from its canonical position, and by non-productive interactions of the A-tRNA Lys11 side chain with the A-site crevice. These two effects combine to perturb peptide-bond formation by increasing the distance between the attacking Lys11 amine and the Asp10 carbonyl carbon. The interplay between drug, peptide and ribosome uncovered here also provides insight into the fundamental mechanism of peptide-bond formation.

  3. A combined cryo-EM and molecular dynamics approach reveals the mechanism of ErmBL-mediated translation arrest

    PubMed Central

    Arenz, Stefan; Bock, Lars V.; Graf, Michael; Innis, C. Axel; Beckmann, Roland; Grubmüller, Helmut; Vaiana, Andrea C.; Wilson, Daniel N.

    2016-01-01

    Nascent polypeptides can induce ribosome stalling, regulating downstream genes. Stalling of ErmBL peptide translation in the presence of the macrolide antibiotic erythromycin leads to resistance in Streptococcus sanguis. To reveal this stalling mechanism we obtained 3.6-Å-resolution cryo-EM structures of ErmBL-stalled ribosomes with erythromycin. The nascent peptide adopts an unusual conformation with the C-terminal Asp10 side chain in a previously unseen rotated position. Together with molecular dynamics simulations, the structures indicate that peptide-bond formation is inhibited by displacement of the peptidyl-tRNA A76 ribose from its canonical position, and by non-productive interactions of the A-tRNA Lys11 side chain with the A-site crevice. These two effects combine to perturb peptide-bond formation by increasing the distance between the attacking Lys11 amine and the Asp10 carbonyl carbon. The interplay between drug, peptide and ribosome uncovered here also provides insight into the fundamental mechanism of peptide-bond formation. PMID:27380950

  4. The protective role of MLCP-mediated ERM dephosphorylation in endotoxin-induced lung injury in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kovacs-Kasa, Anita; Gorshkov, Boris A; Kim, Kyung-Mi; Kumar, Sanjiv; Black, Stephen M; Fulton, David J; Dimitropoulou, Christiana; Catravas, John D; Verin, Alexander D

    2016-12-15

    The goal of this study was to investigate the role of MLC phosphatase (MLCP) in a LPS model of acute lung injury (ALI). We demonstrate that ectopic expression of a constitutively-active (C/A) MLCP regulatory subunit (MYPT1) attenuates the ability of LPS to increase endothelial (EC) permeability. Down-regulation of MYPT1 exacerbates LPS-induced expression of ICAM1 suggesting an anti-inflammatory role of MLCP. To determine whether MLCP contributes to LPS-induced ALI in vivo, we utilized a nanoparticle DNA delivery method to specifically target lung EC. Expression of a C/A MYPT1 reduced LPS-induced lung inflammation and vascular permeability. Further, increased expression of the CS1β (MLCP catalytic subunit) also reduced LPS-induced lung inflammation, whereas the inactive CS1β mutant increased vascular leak. We next examined the role of the cytoskeletal targets of MLCP, the ERM proteins (Ezrin/Radixin/Moesin), in mediating barrier dysfunction. LPS-induced increase in EC permeability was accompanied by PKC-mediated increase in ERM phosphorylation, which was more prominent in CS1β-depleted cells. Depletion of Moesin and Ezrin, but not Radixin attenuated LPS-induced increases in permeability. Further, delivery of a Moesin phospho-null mutant into murine lung endothelium attenuated LPS-induced lung inflammation and vascular leak suggesting that MLCP opposes LPS-induced ALI by mediating the dephosphorylation of Moesin and Ezrin.

  5. The protective role of MLCP-mediated ERM dephosphorylation in endotoxin-induced lung injury in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kovacs-Kasa, Anita; Gorshkov, Boris A.; Kim, Kyung-Mi; Kumar, Sanjiv; Black, Stephen M.; Fulton, David J.; Dimitropoulou, Christiana; Catravas, John D.; Verin, Alexander D.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the role of MLC phosphatase (MLCP) in a LPS model of acute lung injury (ALI). We demonstrate that ectopic expression of a constitutively-active (C/A) MLCP regulatory subunit (MYPT1) attenuates the ability of LPS to increase endothelial (EC) permeability. Down-regulation of MYPT1 exacerbates LPS-induced expression of ICAM1 suggesting an anti-inflammatory role of MLCP. To determine whether MLCP contributes to LPS-induced ALI in vivo, we utilized a nanoparticle DNA delivery method to specifically target lung EC. Expression of a C/A MYPT1 reduced LPS-induced lung inflammation and vascular permeability. Further, increased expression of the CS1β (MLCP catalytic subunit) also reduced LPS-induced lung inflammation, whereas the inactive CS1β mutant increased vascular leak. We next examined the role of the cytoskeletal targets of MLCP, the ERM proteins (Ezrin/Radixin/Moesin), in mediating barrier dysfunction. LPS-induced increase in EC permeability was accompanied by PKC-mediated increase in ERM phosphorylation, which was more prominent in CS1β-depleted cells. Depletion of Moesin and Ezrin, but not Radixin attenuated LPS-induced increases in permeability. Further, delivery of a Moesin phospho-null mutant into murine lung endothelium attenuated LPS-induced lung inflammation and vascular leak suggesting that MLCP opposes LPS-induced ALI by mediating the dephosphorylation of Moesin and Ezrin. PMID:27976727

  6. Manual curation and reannotation of the genomes of Clostridium difficile 630Δerm and Clostridium difficile 630.

    PubMed

    Dannheim, Henning; Riedel, Thomas; Neumann-Schaal, Meina; Bunk, Boyke; Schober, Isabel; Spröer, Cathrin; Chibani, Cynthia Maria; Gronow, Sabine; Liesegang, Heiko; Overmann, Jörg; Schomburg, Dietmar

    2017-01-09

    We resequenced the genome of Clostridium difficile 630Δerm (DSM 28645), a model strain commonly used for the generation of insertion mutants. The genome sequence was obtained by a combination of single-molecule real-time (SMRT) and Illumina sequencing technology. Detailed manual curation and comparison to the previously published genomic sequence revealed sequence differences including inverted regions and the presence of plasmid pCD630. Manual curation of our previously deposited genome sequence of the parental strain 630 (DSM 27543) led to an improved genome sequence. In addition, the sequence of the transposon Tn5397 was completely identified. We manually revised the current manual annotation of the initial sequence of strain 630 and modified either gene names, gene product names or assigned EC numbers of 57 % of genes. The number of hypothetical and conserved hypothetical proteins was reduced by 152. This annotation was used as a template to annotate the most recent genome sequences of the strains 630Δerm and 630. Based on the genomic analysis, several new metabolic features of C. difficile are proposed and could be supported by literature and subsequent experiments.

  7. Transformation of Arthrobacter and studies on the transcription of the Arthrobacter ermA gene in Streptomyces lividans and Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, A N; Barnett, L; Brenner, S

    1987-01-01

    We report the development of a plasmid-mediated transformation system for Arthrobacter sp. NRRLB3381, using the Streptomyces cloning vector pIJ702. Our procedure gives a transformation frequency of 10(3)/micrograms of plasmid DNA. In addition we have explored the expression of the Arthrobacter ermA gene in Streptomyces lividans and Escherichia coli, and shown that the ermA promoter is recognized in S. lividans not E. coli. The relationship between Arthrobacter, Streptomyces and E. coli promoters is discussed. Images Fig. 1. PMID:2443127

  8. Transformation of Arthrobacter and studies on the transcription of the Arthrobacter ermA gene in Streptomyces lividans and Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Roberts, A N; Barnett, L; Brenner, S

    1987-04-15

    We report the development of a plasmid-mediated transformation system for Arthrobacter sp. NRRLB3381, using the Streptomyces cloning vector pIJ702. Our procedure gives a transformation frequency of 10(3)/micrograms of plasmid DNA. In addition we have explored the expression of the Arthrobacter ermA gene in Streptomyces lividans and Escherichia coli, and shown that the ermA promoter is recognized in S. lividans not E. coli. The relationship between Arthrobacter, Streptomyces and E. coli promoters is discussed.

  9. Genotypes of macrolide-resistant pneumococci from children in southwestern Japan: raised incidence of strains that have both erm(B) and mef(A) with serotype 6B clones.

    PubMed

    Ikenaga, Masaaki; Kosowska-Shick, Klaudia; Gotoh, Kenji; Hidaka, Hidenobu; Koga, Hiroyasu; Masunaga, Kenji; Nagai, Kensuke; Tsumura, Naoki; Appelbaum, Peter C; Matsuishi, Toyojiro

    2008-09-01

    MICs of penicillin G, erythromycin, clarithromycin, clindamycin, azithromycin, and telithromycin were tested for 189 clinical isolates collected during 2002 to 2005 from children in southwestern Japan. Serotyping and polymerase chain reaction for presence of erm(B) and mef(A) were performed. All strains with erm(B) + mef(A) were analyzed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and compared to 3 global clones: Spain(23F)-1; Spain(9V)-3 and its variant -14; a South Korean strain same as Taiwan (19F)-14 clone and 5 strains with erm(B) + mef(A) from other countries. Of the 173 macrolide-resistant (erythromycin MIC > or =0.5 microg/mL) strains, 104 (60.1%) had erm(B), 47 (27.2%) had mef(A), and 22 (12.7%) had erm(B) + mef(A). Strains expressing erm(B) or both erm(B) and mef(A) had high macrolide MIC(90)s (>64 microg/mL), except telithromycin (MIC(90), 0.25 microg/mL). Of the 22 erm(B) + mef(A) strains, 10 had 4 distinct PFGE patterns and were mainly serotype 6B clones, which differed from those described in previous reports; 5 other strains had unique profiles.

  10. A Self-deleting Cre-lox-ermAM Cassette, CHESHIRE, for marker-less gene deletion in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Liming; Biswas, Indranil; Morrison, Donald A.

    2009-01-01

    Although targeted mutagenesis of Streptococcus pneumoniae is readily accomplished with the aid of natural genetic transformation and chimeric donor DNA constructs assembled in vitro, the drug resistance markers often employed for selection of recombinant products can themselves be undesirable by-products of the genetic manipulation. A new cassette carrying the erythromycin-resistance marker ermAM is described that can be used as a temporary marker for selection of desired recombinants. The cassette may subsequently be removed at will by virtue of an embedded fucose-regulated Cre recombinase gene and terminal lox66 and lox71 Cre recognition sites, with retention of 34 bp from the cassette as an inert residual double-mutant lox72 site. PMID:19850089

  11. Internalization of Met requires the co-receptor CD44v6 and its link to ERM proteins.

    PubMed

    Hasenauer, Susanne; Malinger, Dieter; Koschut, David; Pace, Giuseppina; Matzke, Alexandra; von Au, Anja; Orian-Rousseau, Véronique

    2013-01-01

    Receptor Tyrosine Kinases (RTKs) are involved in many cellular processes and play a major role in the control of cell fate. For these reasons, RTK activation is maintained under tight control. Met is an essential RTK that induces proliferation, differentiation, migration, survival and branching morphogenesis. Deregulation of Met by overexpression, amplification or lack of effective degradation leads to cancer and metastasis. We have shown that Met relies on CD44v6 for its activation and for signaling in several cancer cell lines and also in primary cells. In this paper, we show that internalization of Met is dependent on CD44v6 and the binding of Ezrin to the CD44v6 cytoplasmic domain. Both CD44v6 and Met are co-internalized upon Hepatocyte Growth Factor induction suggesting that Met-induced signaling from the endosomes relies on its collaboration with CD44v6 and the link to the cytoskeleton provided by ERM proteins.

  12. Assessment of trace metals pollution in estuarine sediments using SEM-AVS and ERM-ERL predictions.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Carlos Alexandre Borges; Passos, Elisangela de Andrade; Alves, José do Patrocínio Hora

    2011-10-01

    This paper presents the distributions of the investigation of trace metals geochemistry in surface sediments of the Sergipe river estuary, northeast Brazil. Analyses were carried out by Flame or electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS or ETAAS). Principal component analysis was applied to results to identify any groupings among the different sampling sites. In order to determine the extent of contamination, taking into account natural variability within the region, metal concentrations were normalized relative to aluminium. Cr, Cu, Ni and Zn contamination was observed in sediments from the area receiving highest inputs of domestic wastes, while cadmium contamination occurred in sediments from the region affected by highest inflows of industrial effluents. Possible toxicity related to these metals was examined using the relationship simultaneously extracted metals/acid volatile sulfide and by comparing sediment chemical data with sediment quality guidelines ERL-ERM values. Results obtained using the two methods were in agreement and indicated that adverse effects on aquatic biota should rarely occur.

  13. A novel member of the NF2/ERM/4.1 superfamily with growth suppressing properties in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Tran, Y K; Bögler, O; Gorse, K M; Wieland, I; Green, M R; Newsham, I F

    1999-01-01

    A novel putative tumor suppressor gene and member of the NF2/ERM/ 4.1 superfamily was isolated using Differential Display PCR (DDPCR) on primary lung tumors. When reintroduced into nonexpressing non-small cell lung carcinoma cell lines, this gene, named DAL-1 (for Differentially expressed in Adenocarcinoma of the Lung), was shown to suppress growth. In addition, significantly reduced expression (>50%) of DAL-1 was measured in 39 primary non-small cell lung carcinoma tumors as compared with patient-matched normal lung tissue. Immunocytochemical staining with a polyclonal anti-DAL-1 antibody localized the protein to the plasma membrane, particularly at cell-cell contact points, a pattern reminiscent of other members of the protein 4.1 superfamily including ezrin and NF2. The data suggest DAL-1 is a novel membrane-associated protein with potential to play an important role in the origin and progression of lung cancer.

  14. An In Vivo EGF Receptor Localization Screen in C. elegans Identifies the Ezrin Homolog ERM-1 as a Temporal Regulator of Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Walser, Michael; Yang, Qiutan; Langouët, Maeva; Kradolfer, David; Fröhli, Erika; Herrmann, Christina J.; Hajnal, Alex; Escobar-Restrepo, Juan M.

    2014-01-01

    The subcellular localization of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in polarized epithelial cells profoundly affects the activity of the intracellular signaling pathways activated after EGF ligand binding. Therefore, changes in EGFR localization and signaling are implicated in various human diseases, including different types of cancer. We have performed the first in vivo EGFR localization screen in an animal model by observing the expression of the EGFR ortholog LET-23 in the vulval epithelium of live C. elegans larvae. After systematically testing all genes known to produce an aberrant vulval phenotype, we have identified 81 genes regulating various aspects of EGFR localization and expression. In particular, we have found that ERM-1, the sole C. elegans Ezrin/Radixin/Moesin homolog, regulates EGFR localization and signaling in the vulval cells. ERM-1 interacts with the EGFR at the basolateral plasma membrane in a complex distinct from the previously identified LIN-2/LIN-7/LIN-10 receptor localization complex. We propose that ERM-1 binds to and sequesters basolateral LET-23 EGFR in an actin-rich inactive membrane compartment to restrict receptor mobility and signaling. In this manner, ERM-1 prevents the immediate activation of the entire pool of LET-23 EGFR and permits the generation of a long-lasting inductive signal. The regulation of receptor localization thus serves to fine-tune the temporal activation of intracellular signaling pathways. PMID:24785082

  15. An in vivo EGF receptor localization screen in C. elegans Identifies the Ezrin homolog ERM-1 as a temporal regulator of signaling.

    PubMed

    Haag, Andrea; Gutierrez, Peter; Bühler, Alessandra; Walser, Michael; Yang, Qiutan; Langouët, Maeva; Kradolfer, David; Fröhli, Erika; Herrmann, Christina J; Hajnal, Alex; Escobar-Restrepo, Juan M

    2014-05-01

    The subcellular localization of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in polarized epithelial cells profoundly affects the activity of the intracellular signaling pathways activated after EGF ligand binding. Therefore, changes in EGFR localization and signaling are implicated in various human diseases, including different types of cancer. We have performed the first in vivo EGFR localization screen in an animal model by observing the expression of the EGFR ortholog LET-23 in the vulval epithelium of live C. elegans larvae. After systematically testing all genes known to produce an aberrant vulval phenotype, we have identified 81 genes regulating various aspects of EGFR localization and expression. In particular, we have found that ERM-1, the sole C. elegans Ezrin/Radixin/Moesin homolog, regulates EGFR localization and signaling in the vulval cells. ERM-1 interacts with the EGFR at the basolateral plasma membrane in a complex distinct from the previously identified LIN-2/LIN-7/LIN-10 receptor localization complex. We propose that ERM-1 binds to and sequesters basolateral LET-23 EGFR in an actin-rich inactive membrane compartment to restrict receptor mobility and signaling. In this manner, ERM-1 prevents the immediate activation of the entire pool of LET-23 EGFR and permits the generation of a long-lasting inductive signal. The regulation of receptor localization thus serves to fine-tune the temporal activation of intracellular signaling pathways.

  16. The ermC leader peptide: amino acid alterations leading to differential efficiency of induction by macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B antibiotics.

    PubMed Central

    Mayford, M; Weisblum, B

    1990-01-01

    The inducibility of ermC by erythromycin, megalomicin, and celesticetin was tested with both wild-type ermC and several regulatory mutants altered in the 19-amino-acid-residue leader peptide, MGIFSIFVISTVHYQP NKK. In the model test system that was used, the ErmC methylase was translationally fused to beta-galactosidase. Mutational alterations that mapped in the interval encoding Phe-4 through Ile-9 of the leader peptide not only affected induction by individual antibiotics, but did so differentially. The subset of mutations that affected inducibility by the two macrolides erythromycin and megalomicin overlapped and were distinct from the subset of mutations that affected induction by celesticetin. These studies provide a model system for experimentally varying the relative efficiencies with which different antibiotics induce the expression of ermC. The possibility that antibiotics with inducing activity interact directly with the nascent leader peptide was tested by using a chemically synthesized decapeptide, MGIFSIFVIS--, attached at its C-terminus to a solid-phase support. This peptide, however, failed to bind erythromycin in vitro. PMID:2113911

  17. Analysis of transcriptional modulation of the presenilin 1 gene promoter by ZNF237, a candidate binding partner of the Ets transcription factor ERM

    PubMed Central

    Pastorcic, Martine; Das, Hriday K.

    2007-01-01

    DNA sequences required for the expression of the human presenilin 1 (PS1) gene have been identified between -118 and +178 flanking the major initiation site (+1) mapped in SK-N-SH cells. Several Ets sites are located both upstream as well as downstream from the +1 site, including an Ets motif present at -10 that controls 90% of transcription in SK-N-SH cells. However in SH-SY5Y cells transcription initiates further downstream and requires an alternative set of promoter elements including a +90 Ets motif. Ets2, ER81, ERM and Elk1 were identified by yeast one-hybrid selection in a human brain cDNA library using the -10 Ets motif as a bait. We have shown that ERM recognizes specifically Ets motifs on the PS1 promoter located at -10 as well as downstream at +90, +129 and +165 and activates PS1 transcription with promoter fragments whether or not they contain the -10 Ets site. We have now searched for ERM interacting proteins by yeast two-hybrid selection in a human brain cDNA library using the C-terminal 415 amino acid of ERM as a bait. One of the interacting proteins was ZNF237, a member of the MYM gene family. It is widely expressed in different tissues in eukaryotes under several forms derived by alternative splicing, including a large 382 amino acid form containing a single MYM domain, and 2 shorter forms of 208 and 213 amino acids respectively that do not. We show that both the 382 as well as the 208 amino acid forms are expressed in SK-N-SH cells but not in SH-SY5Y cells. Both forms interact with ERM and repress the transcription of PS1 in SH-SY5Y cells. The effect of both C-terminal and N-terminal deletions indicate that the N-terminal 120 amino acid region is required for interaction with ERM in yeast and furthermore single amino acid mutations show that residues 112 and 114 play an important role. The repression of transcription in SH-SY5Y cells also appears to require the N-terminal potion of ZNF237 and was affected by mutation of the amino acid 112. Data

  18. Analysis of transcriptional modulation of the presenilin 1 gene promoter by ZNF237, a candidate binding partner of the Ets transcription factor ERM.

    PubMed

    Pastorcic, Martine; Das, Hriday K

    2007-01-12

    DNA sequences required for the expression of the human presenilin 1 (PS1) gene have been identified between -118 and +178 flanking the major initiation site (+1) mapped in SK-N-SH cells. Several Ets sites are located both upstream as well as downstream from the +1 site, including an Ets motif present at -10 that controls 90% of transcription in SK-N-SH cells. However, in SH-SY5Y cells, transcription initiates further downstream and requires an alternative set of promoter elements including a +90 Ets motif. Ets2, ER81, ERM and Elk1 were identified by yeast one-hybrid selection in a human brain cDNA library using the -10 Ets motif as a bait. We have shown that ERM recognizes specifically Ets motifs on the PS1 promoter located at -10 as well as downstream at +90, +129 and +165 and activates PS1 transcription with promoter fragments whether or not they contain the -10 Ets site. We have now searched for ERM interacting proteins by yeast two-hybrid selection in a human brain cDNA library using the C-terminal 415 amino acid of ERM as a bait. One of the interacting proteins was ZNF237, a member of the MYM gene family. It is widely expressed in different tissues in eukaryotes under several forms derived by alternative splicing, including a large 382 amino acid form containing a single MYM domain, and 2 shorter forms of 208 and 213 amino acids respectively that do not. We show that both the 382 as well as the 208 amino acid forms are expressed in SK-N-SH cells but not in SH-SY5Y cells. Both forms interact with ERM and repress the transcription of PS1 in SH-SY5Y cells. The effect of both C-terminal and N-terminal deletions indicates that the N-terminal 120 amino acid region is required for interaction with ERM in yeast, and furthermore single amino acid mutations show that residues 112 and 114 play an important role. The repression of transcription in SH-SY5Y cells also appears to require the N-terminal potion of ZNF237 and was affected by mutation of the amino acid 112. Data

  19. p38MAPK, Rho/ROCK and PKC pathways are involved in influenza-induced cytoskeletal rearrangement and hyperpermeability in PMVEC via phosphorylating ERM.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chenyue; Wu, Ying; Xuan, Zinan; Zhang, Shujing; Wang, Xudan; Hao, Yu; Wu, Jun; Zhang, Shu

    2014-11-04

    Severe influenza infections are featured by acute lung injury, a syndrome of pulmonary microvascular leak. A growing number of evidences have shown that the pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (PMVEC) are critical target of influenza virus, promoting microvascular leak. It is reported that there are multiple mechanisms by which influenza virus could elicit increased pulmonary endothelial permeability, in both direct and indirect manners. Ezrin/radixin/moesin family proteins, the linkers between plasma membrane and actin cytoskeleton, have been reported to be involved in cell adhesion, motility and may modulate endothelial permeability. Studies have also shown that ERM is phosphorylated in response to various stimuli via p38MAPK, Rho/ROCK or PKC pathways. However, it is unclear that whether influenza infection could induce ERM phosphorylation and its relocalization. In the present study, we have found that there are cytoskeletal reorganization and permeability increases in the course of influenza virus infection, accompanied by upregulated levels of p-ERM. p-ERM's aggregation along the periphery of PMVEC upon influenza virus infection was detected via confocal microscopy. Furthermore, we sought to determine the role of p38MAPK, Rho/ROCK and PKC pathways in ERM phosphorylation as well as their involvement in influenza virus-induced endothelial malfunction. The activation of p38MAPK, Rho/ROCK and PKC pathways upon influenza virus stimulation were observed, as evidenced by the evaluation of phosphorylated p38 (p-p38), phosphorylated MKK (p-MKK) in p38MAPK pathway, ROCK1 in Rho/ROCK pathway and phosphorylated PKC (p-PKC) in PKC pathway. We also showed that virus-induced ERM phosphorylation was reduced by using p38MAPK inhibitor, SB203580 (20 μM), Rho/ROCK inhibitor, Y27632 (20 μM), PKC inhibitor, LY317615 (10 μM). Additionally, influenza virus-induced F-actin reorganization and hyperpermeability were attenuated by pretreatment with SB203580, Y27632 and LY317615

  20. Distribution of macrolide resistance genes erm(B) and mef(A) among 160 penicillin-intermediate clinical isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolated in southern France.

    PubMed

    Marchandin, H; Jean-Pierre, H; Jumas-Bilak, E; Isson, L; Drouillard, B; Darbas, H; Carrière, C

    2001-09-01

    Two prevalent mechanisms of macrolide resistance are currently described in pneumococci: production of rRNA methylase that modify 23S ribosomal RNA resulting in MLSB phenotype, and an active efflux system resulting in M-phenotype. These two mechanisms are mediated by erm(B) and mef(A) genes respectively. Several studies reported a predominance of mef(A) gene in United-States and Canada. In European countries, erm(B) determinant is prevalent and mef(A)-mediated erythromycin resistance was recently reported in about 10% of strains in Belgium and Italy. In order to evaluate implication of mef(A) gene in pneumococci erythromycin resistance, 160 clinical isolates of S. pneumoniae with low-level of penicillin resistance and resistance to macrolides recovered between April 1999 and April 2000 were collected. These isolates were tested for their macrolide susceptibility by disc diffusion method, 155 showed the MLSB phenotype and 5 the M phenotype. Genotypic analysis was performed by erm(B) and mef(A) specific-mediated PCR: erm(B) gene was detected in 154 isolates, mef(A) gene in 5 isolates, and both genes in one strain. The phenotype seems to be well correlated to the genotyping result except for strain harboring both resistance determinants. Molecular typing of isolates harboring mef(A) gene performed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) after restriction by Smal shows these strains to be epidemiologically unrelated. Our results show the predominance of the erm(B) gene in erythromycin resistant S. pneumoniae isolates. mef(A)-mediated resistance is effective in Southern France (3.7%) but this rate is the lowest published from European countries.

  1. Two different erm(C)-carrying plasmids in the same methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus CC398 isolate from a broiler farm.

    PubMed

    Wendlandt, Sarah; Kadlec, Kristina; Feßler, Andrea T; van Duijkeren, Engeline; Schwarz, Stefan

    2014-07-16

    During a study on plasmid-borne antimicrobial resistance among methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates from broiler farms, an MRSA isolate was identified which carried multiple plasmids. This MRSA isolate belonged to CC398 and exhibited spa type t3015 and dru type dt11a. Plasmid profiling revealed the presence of one large and two small plasmids. The resistance genes tet(L) (tetracycline resistance), dfrK (trimethoprim resistance) and aadD (kanamycin/neomycin resistance) were located on the large plasmid. Both small plasmids, designated pSWS371 and pSWS372, carried only an erm(C) gene for macrolide/lincosamide resistance. Sequence analysis revealed that the 2458-bp plasmid pSWS371 carried only a repL gene for plasmid replication in addition to the erm(C) gene. In contrast, the 3882-bp plasmid pSWS372 harbored - in addition to the erm(C) gene - three more genes: a repF gene for plasmid replication, a cop-6 gene for a small protein potentially involved in copy number control of the plasmid and a novel pre/mob gene for a protein involved in plasmid recombination and mobilization. The erm(C) genes of both small plasmids exhibited constitutive erm(C) gene expression and analysis of the respective translational attenuators identified deletions of 16 bp and 74 bp which explain the constitutive expression. The simultaneous presence of two small plasmids that carry the same resistance gene in the same MRSA isolate is a rare observation. The fact that both plasmids belong to different incompatibility groups as specified by the different rep genes, repL and repF, explains why they can stably coexist in the same bacterial cell. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Listeria monocytogenes isolates from food and food environment harbouring tetM and ermB resistance genes.

    PubMed

    Haubert, L; Mendonça, M; Lopes, G V; de Itapema Cardoso, M R; da Silva, W P

    2016-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne pathogen that has become an important cause of human and animal diseases worldwide. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the serotypes, virulence potential, antimicrobial resistance profile, and genetic relationships of 50 L. monocytogenes isolates from food and food environment in southern Brazil. In this study, the majority of L. monocytogenes isolates belonged to the serotypes 1/2b (42%) and 4b (26%), which are the main serotypes associated with human listeriosis. In addition, all isolates harboured internalin genes (inlA, inlC, inlJ), indicating a virulence potential. The isolates were sensitive to most of the antimicrobial compounds analysed, and five isolates (10%) were multi-resistant. Two isolates harboured antimicrobial resistance genes (tetM and ermB) and in one of them, the gene was present in the plasmid. Moreover, according to the pulsed field gel electrophoresis assay, two multi-resistant isolates were a single clone isolated from food and the processing plant. The isolates were susceptible to the most frequently used antibiotics for listeriosis treatment. However, the presence of multidrug-resistant isolates and antimicrobial resistance genes including in the plasmid could even be transferred between bacterial species, suggesting a potential health risk to consumers and a potential risk of spreading multi-resistance genes to other bacteria. Listeria monocytogenes is an important agent of foodborne diseases. The results of this study suggest a potential capacity of L. monocytogenes isolates from food and food environment to cause human infections. Antimicrobial multi-resistance profiles were detected in 10%, and two isolates harboured tetM and ermB resistance genes. Moreover, the present research can help to build up a better knowledge about antimicrobial resistance of L. monocytogenes. Additionally, we found one isolate carrying tetM resistance gene in a plasmid, that suggests a possible transmission

  3. Characterisation of the main clones of Streptococcus pyogenes carrying the ermA (subclass TR) gene in Spain.

    PubMed

    Montes, Milagrosa; Orden, Beatriz; Tamayo, Esther; Alos, Juan-Ignacio; Pérez-Trallero, Emilio

    2006-11-01

    Seventy-four Streptococcus pyogenes isolates showing the macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B (MLS(B)) resistance phenotype carrying the ermA gene (72 of which showed the inducible resistance phenotype) were obtained between 1999 and 2004. Seven different sequence types (STs) and emm types were detected: emm22/ST46 (n=33); emm77/ST63 (n=22); emm73/ST331 (n=10); emm94/ST89 (n=6); and one isolate each of emm28/ST52, emm11/ST403 and emm4/ST38. All ST46 isolates were susceptible to tetracycline and almost all reacted against the T12 type (all agglutinated into the T-pattern 3/12/13/B3264). Resistance to tetracycline was observed in all ST63 (tetO+) and ST89 (tetM+) isolates. Most of the ST63 isolates reacted against the T28 type (all agglutinated into the T-pattern 9/13/28). The 74 isolates were grouped into eight pulsed-field gel electrophoresis pulsotypes (one cluster for each emm/ST type, except for emm77/ST63).

  4. Clostridioides difficile 630Δerm in silico and in vivo - quantitative growth and extensive polysaccharide secretion.

    PubMed

    Dannheim, Henning; Will, Sabine E; Schomburg, Dietmar; Neumann-Schaal, Meina

    2017-04-01

    Antibiotic-associated infections with Clostridioides difficile are a severe and often lethal risk for hospitalized patients, and can also affect populations without these classical risk factors. For a rational design of therapeutical concepts, a better knowledge of the metabolism of the pathogen is crucial. Metabolic modeling can provide a simulation of quantitative growth and usage of metabolic pathways, leading to a deeper understanding of the organism. Here, we present an elaborate genome-scale metabolic model of C. difficile 630Δerm. The model iHD992 includes experimentally determined product and substrate uptake rates and is able to simulate the energy metabolism and quantitative growth of C. difficile. Dynamic flux balance analysis was used for time-resolved simulations of the quantitative growth in two different media. The model predicts oxidative Stickland reactions and glucose degradation as main sources of energy, while the resulting reduction potential is mostly used for acetogenesis via the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway. Initial modeling experiments did not reproduce the observed growth behavior before the production of large quantities of a previously unknown polysaccharide was detected. Combined genome analysis and laboratory experiments indicated that the polysaccharide is an acetylated glucose polymer. Time-resolved simulations showed that polysaccharide secretion was coupled to growth even during unstable glucose uptake in minimal medium. This is accomplished by metabolic shifts between active glycolysis and gluconeogenesis which were also observed in laboratory experiments.

  5. Novel erm(T)-Carrying Multiresistance Plasmids from Porcine and Human Isolates of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus ST398 That Also Harbor Cadmium and Copper Resistance Determinants

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Sanz, Elena; Kadlec, Kristina; Feßler, Andrea T.; Zarazaga, Myriam; Schwarz, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    This study describes three novel erm(T)-carrying multiresistance plasmids that also harbor cadmium and copper resistance determinants. The plasmids, designated pUR1902, pUR2940, and pUR2941, were obtained from porcine and human methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) of the clonal lineage ST398. In addition to the macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B (MLSB) resistance gene erm(T), all three plasmids also carry the tetracycline resistance gene tet(L). Furthermore, plasmid pUR2940 harbors the trimethoprim resistance gene dfrK and the MLSB resistance gene erm(C), while plasmids pUR1902 and pUR2941 possess the kanamycin/neomycin resistance gene aadD. Sequence analysis of approximately 18.1 kb of the erm(T)-flanking region from pUR1902, 20.0 kb from pUR2940, and 20.8 kb from pUR2941 revealed the presence of several copies of the recently described insertion sequence ISSau10, which is probably involved in the evolution of the respective plasmids. All plasmids carried a functional cadmium resistance operon with the genes cadD and cadX, in addition to the multicopper oxidase gene mco and the ATPase copper transport gene copA, which are involved in copper resistance. The comparative analysis of S. aureus RN4220 and the three S. aureus RN4220 transformants carrying plasmid pUR1902, pUR2940, or pUR2941 revealed an 8-fold increase in CdSO4 and a 2-fold increase in CuSO4 MICs. The emergence of multidrug resistance plasmids that also carry heavy metal resistance genes is alarming and requires further surveillance. The colocalization of antimicrobial resistance genes and genes that confer resistance to heavy metals may facilitate their persistence, coselection, and dissemination. PMID:23629701

  6. Anchoring of Protein Kinase A by ERM (Ezrin-Radixin-Moesin) Proteins Is Required for Proper Netrin Signaling through DCC (Deleted in Colorectal Cancer)*

    PubMed Central

    Deming, Paula B.; Campbell, Shirley L.; Stone, Jamie B.; Rivard, Robert L.; Mercier, Alison L.; Howe, Alan K.

    2015-01-01

    Netrin-1, acting through its principal receptor DCC (deleted in colorectal cancer), serves as an axon guidance cue during neural development and also contributes to vascular morphogenesis, epithelial migration, and the pathogenesis of some tumors. Several lines of evidence suggest that netrin-DCC signaling can regulate and be regulated by the cAMP-dependent protein kinase, PKA, although the molecular details of this relationship are poorly understood. Specificity in PKA signaling is often achieved through differential subcellular localization of the enzyme by interaction with protein kinase A anchoring proteins (AKAPs). Here, we show that AKAP function is required for DCC-mediated activation of PKA and phosphorylation of cytoskeletal regulatory proteins of the Mena/VASP (vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein) family. Moreover, we show that DCC and PKA physically interact and that this association is mediated by the ezrin-radixin-moesin (ERM) family of plasma membrane-actin cytoskeleton cross-linking proteins. Silencing of ERM protein expression inhibits DCC-PKA interaction, DCC-mediated PKA activation, and phosphorylation of Mena/VASP proteins as well as growth cone morphology and neurite outgrowth. Finally, although expression of wild-type radixin partially rescued growth cone morphology and tropism toward netrin in ERM-knockdown cells, expression of an AKAP-deficient mutant of radixin did not fully rescue growth cone morphology and switched netrin tropism from attraction to repulsion. These data support a model in which ERM-mediated anchoring of PKA activity to DCC is required for proper netrin/DCC-mediated signaling. PMID:25575591

  7. Erythromycin- and copper-resistant Enterococcus hirae from marine sediment and co-transfer of erm(B) and tcrB to human Enterococcus faecalis.

    PubMed

    Pasquaroli, Sonia; Di Cesare, Andrea; Vignaroli, Carla; Conti, Giulia; Citterio, Barbara; Biavasco, Francesca

    2014-09-01

    An erythromycin-, copper- and cadmium-resistant isolate of Enterococcus hirae from marine sediment was shown to harbor the plasmid pRE25 and to co-transfer erm(B) and tcrB to Enterococcus faecalis JH2-2. These data highlight the scope for antibiotic resistance selection by the marine environment through heavy metals and its possible involvement in antibiotic-resistant enterococcal infections.

  8. Analysis of mutations in Neurospora crassa ERMES components reveals specific functions related to β-barrel protein assembly and maintenance of mitochondrial morphology.

    PubMed

    Wideman, Jeremy G; Lackey, Sebastian W K; Srayko, Martin A; Norton, Kacie A; Nargang, Frank E

    2013-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum mitochondria encounter structure (ERMES) tethers the er to mitochondria and contains four structural components: Mmm1, Mdm12, Mdm10, and Mmm2 (Mdm34). The Gem1 protein may play a role in regulating ERMES function. Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Neurospora crassa strains lacking any of Mmm1, Mdm12, or Mdm10 are known to show a variety of phenotypic defects including altered mitochondrial morphology and defects in the assembly of β-barrel proteins into the mitochondrial outer membrane. Here we examine ERMES complex components in N. crassa and show that Mmm1 is an ER membrane protein containing a Cys residue near its N-terminus that is conserved in the class Sordariomycetes. The residue occurs in the ER-lumen domain of the protein and is involved in the formation of disulphide bonds that give rise to Mmm1 dimers. Dimer formation is required for efficient assembly of Tom40 into the TOM complex. However, no effects are seen on porin assembly or mitochondrial morphology. This demonstrates a specificity of function and suggests a direct role for Mmm1 in Tom40 assembly. Mutation of a highly conserved region in the cytosolic domain of Mmm1 results in moderate defects in Tom40 and porin assembly, as well as a slight morphological phenotype. Previous reports have not examined the role of Mmm2 with respect to mitochondrial protein import and assembly. Here we show that absence of Mmm2 affects assembly of β-barrel proteins and that lack of any ERMES structural component results in defects in Tom22 assembly. Loss of N. crassa Gem1 has no effect on the assembly of these proteins but does affect mitochondrial morphology.

  9. Anchoring of protein kinase A by ERM (ezrin-radixin-moesin) proteins is required for proper netrin signaling through DCC (deleted in colorectal cancer).

    PubMed

    Deming, Paula B; Campbell, Shirley L; Stone, Jamie B; Rivard, Robert L; Mercier, Alison L; Howe, Alan K

    2015-02-27

    Netrin-1, acting through its principal receptor DCC (deleted in colorectal cancer), serves as an axon guidance cue during neural development and also contributes to vascular morphogenesis, epithelial migration, and the pathogenesis of some tumors. Several lines of evidence suggest that netrin-DCC signaling can regulate and be regulated by the cAMP-dependent protein kinase, PKA, although the molecular details of this relationship are poorly understood. Specificity in PKA signaling is often achieved through differential subcellular localization of the enzyme by interaction with protein kinase A anchoring proteins (AKAPs). Here, we show that AKAP function is required for DCC-mediated activation of PKA and phosphorylation of cytoskeletal regulatory proteins of the Mena/VASP (vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein) family. Moreover, we show that DCC and PKA physically interact and that this association is mediated by the ezrin-radixin-moesin (ERM) family of plasma membrane-actin cytoskeleton cross-linking proteins. Silencing of ERM protein expression inhibits DCC-PKA interaction, DCC-mediated PKA activation, and phosphorylation of Mena/VASP proteins as well as growth cone morphology and neurite outgrowth. Finally, although expression of wild-type radixin partially rescued growth cone morphology and tropism toward netrin in ERM-knockdown cells, expression of an AKAP-deficient mutant of radixin did not fully rescue growth cone morphology and switched netrin tropism from attraction to repulsion. These data support a model in which ERM-mediated anchoring of PKA activity to DCC is required for proper netrin/DCC-mediated signaling.

  10. Novel erm(T)-carrying multiresistance plasmids from porcine and human isolates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus ST398 that also harbor cadmium and copper resistance determinants.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Sanz, Elena; Kadlec, Kristina; Feßler, Andrea T; Zarazaga, Myriam; Torres, Carmen; Schwarz, Stefan

    2013-07-01

    This study describes three novel erm(T)-carrying multiresistance plasmids that also harbor cadmium and copper resistance determinants. The plasmids, designated pUR1902, pUR2940, and pUR2941, were obtained from porcine and human methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) of the clonal lineage ST398. In addition to the macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B (MLSB) resistance gene erm(T), all three plasmids also carry the tetracycline resistance gene tet(L). Furthermore, plasmid pUR2940 harbors the trimethoprim resistance gene dfrK and the MLSB resistance gene erm(C), while plasmids pUR1902 and pUR2941 possess the kanamycin/neomycin resistance gene aadD. Sequence analysis of approximately 18.1 kb of the erm(T)-flanking region from pUR1902, 20.0 kb from pUR2940, and 20.8 kb from pUR2941 revealed the presence of several copies of the recently described insertion sequence ISSau10, which is probably involved in the evolution of the respective plasmids. All plasmids carried a functional cadmium resistance operon with the genes cadD and cadX, in addition to the multicopper oxidase gene mco and the ATPase copper transport gene copA, which are involved in copper resistance. The comparative analysis of S. aureus RN4220 and the three S. aureus RN4220 transformants carrying plasmid pUR1902, pUR2940, or pUR2941 revealed an 8-fold increase in CdSO4 and a 2-fold increase in CuSO4 MICs. The emergence of multidrug resistance plasmids that also carry heavy metal resistance genes is alarming and requires further surveillance. The colocalization of antimicrobial resistance genes and genes that confer resistance to heavy metals may facilitate their persistence, coselection, and dissemination.

  11. Analysis of Mutations in Neurospora crassa ERMES Components Reveals Specific Functions Related to β-Barrel Protein Assembly and Maintenance of Mitochondrial Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Wideman, Jeremy G.; Lackey, Sebastian W. K.; Srayko, Martin A.; Norton, Kacie A.; Nargang, Frank E.

    2013-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum mitochondria encounter structure (ERMES) tethers the ER to mitochondria and contains four structural components: Mmm1, Mdm12, Mdm10, and Mmm2 (Mdm34). The Gem1 protein may play a role in regulating ERMES function. Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Neurospora crassa strains lacking any of Mmm1, Mdm12, or Mdm10 are known to show a variety of phenotypic defects including altered mitochondrial morphology and defects in the assembly of β-barrel proteins into the mitochondrial outer membrane. Here we examine ERMES complex components in N. crassa and show that Mmm1 is an ER membrane protein containing a Cys residue near its N-terminus that is conserved in the class Sordariomycetes. The residue occurs in the ER-lumen domain of the protein and is involved in the formation of disulphide bonds that give rise to Mmm1 dimers. Dimer formation is required for efficient assembly of Tom40 into the TOM complex. However, no effects are seen on porin assembly or mitochondrial morphology. This demonstrates a specificity of function and suggests a direct role for Mmm1 in Tom40 assembly. Mutation of a highly conserved region in the cytosolic domain of Mmm1 results in moderate defects in Tom40 and porin assembly, as well as a slight morphological phenotype. Previous reports have not examined the role of Mmm2 with respect to mitochondrial protein import and assembly. Here we show that absence of Mmm2 affects assembly of β-barrel proteins and that lack of any ERMES structural component results in defects in Tom22 assembly. Loss of N. crassa Gem1 has no effect on the assembly of these proteins but does affect mitochondrial morphology. PMID:23940790

  12. Rise of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates containing both erm(B) and mef(E) genes from an adult tertiary care community hospital system.

    PubMed

    DiPersio, Linda P; DiPersio, Joseph R; Beach, Jacqueline A; DeFine, Linda A

    2006-08-01

    The emergence of macrolide- and lincosamide-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae is a worldwide concern. Of particular interest is the increasing prevalence of erythromycin and clindamycin-resistant isolates containing both erm(B) and mef genes. This study determined the prevalence of erythromycin and clindamycin resistance in 596 clinical S. pneumoniae isolates from 2 adult tertiary care hospitals over a 4-year period (2001-2004). Erythromycin resistance increased from 24% to 34%, but S. pneumoniae isolates resistant to clindamycin as well as to erythromycin increased from 3% in 2001 to 15.5% in 2004 (5-fold increase). Among erythromycin-resistant isolates, those also resistant to clindamycin (MLS(B) phenotype) increased 3-fold (12.8-45%). Of forty-one erythromycin/clindamycin-resistant S. pneumoniae isolates tested, 29 (71%) contained both erm(B) and mef(E) genes. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis performed on 28 erm(B) + mef(E) positive isolates identified 2 predominant and possibly related clones, which made up 64% of the isolates.

  13. MRSA Pediatric clone expressing ermC plus lnuA genes causing nosocomial transmission and healthcare workers colonization in a neonatal intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Faccone, Diego; Togneri, Ana M; Podesta, Laura; Perez, Marcela; Gagetti, Paula; Sanchez, Susana; Romero, Graciela; Corso, Alejandra

    2014-07-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a major cause of both nosocomial and community-acquired infections. We describe an outbreak caused by the MRSA Pediatric clone expressing an unusual lincosamide resistant phenotype. Between January and May 2006, an MRSA outbreak was detected at the Neonatal Unit of Hospital Interzonal General de Agudos "Evita", Buenos Aires Province, Argentina that affected ten patients. Seven isolates from seven patients plus five MRSA recovered from health care workers (nasal carriage) were studied. Two phenotypes were observed: (i) ELCi (10), resistance to erythromycin and lincomycin and inducible resistance to clindamycin; (ii) ELiCi (2), resistance to erythromycin and inducible resistance to lincomycin and clindamycin. All 12 MRSA were resistant to oxacillin, erythromycin and gentamicin. Isolates expressing the ELCi-phenotype showed lincomycin MIC values between 16 and 32mg/L, while the remaining 2 isolates with ELiCi-phenotype presented a MIC value of 0.5mg/L. No differences were observed between the clindamycin MIC values in both phenotypes, ranging 0.25-0.5mg/L. Isolates showing ELCi-phenotype harbored ermC plus lnuA genes, and the other two only ermC gene. All 12 isolates were genetically related and belonged to the Pediatric clone (ST100) harboring a new variant of SCCmecIV. This is the first MRSA outbreak expressing an unusual ELCi phenotype due to a combination of ermC plus lnuA genes.

  14. Summary Describing Integration of ERM Methodology into Supervisory Control Framework with Software Package Documentation; Advanced Reactor Technology Milestone: M4AT-16PN2301052

    SciTech Connect

    Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Hirt, Evelyn H.; Dib, Gerges; Veeramany, Arun; Bonebrake, Christopher A.; Roy, Surajit

    2016-09-20

    This project involved the development of enhanced risk monitors (ERMs) for active components in Advanced Reactor (AdvRx) designs by integrating real-time information about equipment condition with risk monitors. Health monitoring techniques in combination with predictive estimates of component failure based on condition and risk monitors can serve to indicate the risk posed by continued operation in the presence of detected degradation. This combination of predictive health monitoring based on equipment condition assessment and risk monitors can also enable optimization of maintenance scheduling with respect to the economics of plant operation. This report summarizes PNNL’s multi-year project on the development and evaluation of an ERM concept for active components while highlighting FY2016 accomplishments. Specifically, this report provides a status summary of the integration and demonstration of the prototypic ERM framework with the plant supervisory control algorithms being developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and describes additional case studies conducted to assess sensitivity of the technology to different quantities. Supporting documentation on the software package to be provided to ONRL is incorporated in this report.

  15. Presence of the tet(O) gene in erythromycin- and tetracycline-resistant strains of Streptococcus pyogenes and linkage with either the mef(A) or the erm(A) gene.

    PubMed

    Giovanetti, Eleonora; Brenciani, Andrea; Lupidi, Remo; Roberts, Marilyn C; Varaldo, Pietro E

    2003-09-01

    Sixty-three recent Italian clinical isolates of Streptococcus pyogenes resistant to both erythromycin (MICs >or=1 microg/ml) and tetracycline (MICs >or= 8 microg/ml) were genotyped for macrolide and tetracycline resistance genes. We found 19 isolates carrying the mef(A) and the tet(O) genes; 25 isolates carrying the erm(A) and tet(O) genes; and 2 isolates carrying the erm(A), tet(M), and tet(O) genes. The resistance of all erm(A)-containing isolates was inducible, but the isolates could be divided into two groups on the basis of erythromycin MICs of either >128 or 1 to 4 microg/ml. The remaining 17 isolates included 15 isolates carrying the erm(B) gene and 2 isolates carrying both the erm(B) and the mef(A) genes, with all 17 carrying the tet(M) gene. Of these, 12 carried Tn916-Tn1545-like conjugative transposons. Conjugal transfer experiments demonstrated that the tet(O) gene moved with and without the erm(A) gene and with the mef(A) gene. These studies, together with the results of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis experiments and hybridization assays with DNA probes specific for the tet(O), erm(A), and mef(A) genes, suggested a linkage of tet(O) with either erm(A) or mef(A) in erythromycin- and tetracycline-resistant S. pyogenes isolates. By amplification and sequencing experiments, we detected the tet(O) gene ca. 5.5 kb upstream from the mef(A) gene. This is the first report demonstrating the presence of the tet(O) gene in S. pyogenes and showing that it may be linked with another gene and can be moved by conjugation from one chromosome to another.

  16. ERM Ideas and Innovations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Kari

    2012-01-01

    In this column, the author discusses how the management of e-books has introduced, at many libraries and in varying degrees, the challenges of maintaining effective technical services workflows. Four different e-book workflows are identified and explored, and the author takes a closer look at how particular variables for each are affected, such as…

  17. ERM Ideas and Innovations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Kari

    2012-01-01

    In this column, the author discusses how the management of e-books has introduced, at many libraries and in varying degrees, the challenges of maintaining effective technical services workflows. Four different e-book workflows are identified and explored, and the author takes a closer look at how particular variables for each are affected, such as…

  18. Development and application of real-time PCR assays for quantification of erm genes conferring resistance to macrolides-lincosamides-streptogramin B in livestock manure and manure management systems.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Yu, Zhongtang; Michel, Frederick C; Wittum, Thomas; Morrison, Mark

    2007-07-01

    Erythromycin and tylosin are commonly used in animal production, and such use is perceived to contribute to the overall antimicrobial resistance (AR) reservoirs. Quantitative measurements of this type of AR reservoir in microbial communities are required to understand AR ecology (e.g., emergence, persistence, and dissemination). We report here the development, validation, and use of six real-time PCR assays for quantifying six classes of erm genes (classes A through C, F, T, and X) that encode the major mechanism of resistance to macrolides-lincosamides-streptogramin B (MLS(B)). These real-time PCR assays were validated and used in quantifying the six erm classes in five types of samples, including those from bovine manure, swine manure, compost of swine manure, swine waste lagoons, and an Ekokan upflow biofilter system treating hog house effluents. The bovine manure samples were found to contain much smaller reservoirs of each of the six erm classes than the swine manure samples. Compared to the swine manure samples, the composted swine manure samples had substantially reduced erm gene abundances (by up to 7.3 logs), whereas the lagoon or the biofilter samples had similar erm gene abundances. These preliminary results suggest that the methods of manure storage and treatment probably have a substantial impact on the persistence and decline of MLS(B) resistance originating from food animals, thus likely affecting the dissemination of such resistance genes into the environment. The abundances of these erm genes appeared to be positively correlated with those of the tet genes determined previously among these samples. These real-time PCR assays provide a rapid, quantitative, and cultivation-independent measurement of six major classes of erm genes, which should be useful for ecological studies of AR.

  19. Development and Application of Real-Time PCR Assays for Quantification of erm Genes Conferring Resistance to Macrolides-Lincosamides-Streptogramin B in Livestock Manure and Manure Management Systems▿

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jing; Yu, Zhongtang; Michel, Frederick C.; Wittum, Thomas; Morrison, Mark

    2007-01-01

    Erythromycin and tylosin are commonly used in animal production, and such use is perceived to contribute to the overall antimicrobial resistance (AR) reservoirs. Quantitative measurements of this type of AR reservoir in microbial communities are required to understand AR ecology (e.g., emergence, persistence, and dissemination). We report here the development, validation, and use of six real-time PCR assays for quantifying six classes of erm genes (classes A through C, F, T, and X) that encode the major mechanism of resistance to macrolides-lincosamides-streptogramin B (MLSB). These real-time PCR assays were validated and used in quantifying the six erm classes in five types of samples, including those from bovine manure, swine manure, compost of swine manure, swine waste lagoons, and an Ekokan upflow biofilter system treating hog house effluents. The bovine manure samples were found to contain much smaller reservoirs of each of the six erm classes than the swine manure samples. Compared to the swine manure samples, the composted swine manure samples had substantially reduced erm gene abundances (by up to 7.3 logs), whereas the lagoon or the biofilter samples had similar erm gene abundances. These preliminary results suggest that the methods of manure storage and treatment probably have a substantial impact on the persistence and decline of MLSB resistance originating from food animals, thus likely affecting the dissemination of such resistance genes into the environment. The abundances of these erm genes appeared to be positively correlated with those of the tet genes determined previously among these samples. These real-time PCR assays provide a rapid, quantitative, and cultivation-independent measurement of six major classes of erm genes, which should be useful for ecological studies of AR. PMID:17496134

  20. Cortical Mechanics and Meiosis II Completion in Mammalian Oocytes Are Mediated by Myosin-II and Ezrin-Radixin-Moesin (ERM) Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Stephanie M.; Lee, Hyo J.; Hung, Pei-hsuan; Matthews, Lauren M.

    2010-01-01

    Cell division is inherently mechanical, with cell mechanics being a critical determinant governing the cell shape changes that accompany progression through the cell cycle. The mechanical properties of symmetrically dividing mitotic cells have been well characterized, whereas the contribution of cellular mechanics to the strikingly asymmetric divisions of female meiosis is very poorly understood. Progression of the mammalian oocyte through meiosis involves remodeling of the cortex and proper orientation of the meiotic spindle, and thus we hypothesized that cortical tension and stiffness would change through meiotic maturation and fertilization to facilitate and/or direct cellular remodeling. This work shows that tension in mouse oocytes drops about sixfold during meiotic maturation from prophase I to metaphase II and then increases ∼1.6-fold upon fertilization. The metaphase II egg is polarized, with tension differing ∼2.5-fold between the cortex over the meiotic spindle and the opposite cortex, suggesting that meiotic maturation is accompanied by assembly of a cortical domain with stiffer mechanics as part of the process to achieve asymmetric cytokinesis. We further demonstrate that actin, myosin-II, and the ERM (Ezrin/Radixin/Moesin) family of proteins are enriched in complementary cortical domains and mediate cellular mechanics in mammalian eggs. Manipulation of actin, myosin-II, and ERM function alters tension levels and also is associated with dramatic spindle abnormalities with completion of meiosis II after fertilization. Thus, myosin-II and ERM proteins modulate mechanical properties in oocytes, contributing to cell polarity and to completion of meiosis. PMID:20660156

  1. The Corynebacterium xerosis composite transposon Tn5432 consists of two identical insertion sequences, designated IS1249, flanking the erythromycin resistance gene ermCX.

    PubMed

    Tauch, A; Kassing, F; Kalinowski, J; Pühler, A

    1995-09-01

    Analysis of the 50-kb R-plasmid pTP10 from the clinical isolate Corynebacterium xerosis M82B revealed that the erythromycin resistance gene, ermCX, is located on a 4524-bp composite transposable element, Tn5432. The ends of Tn5432 are identical, direct repeats of an insertion sequence, designated IS1249, encoding a putative transposase of the IS256 family. IS1249 consists of 1385 bp with 45/42 imperfect terminal inverted repeats. The nucleotide sequence of the 1754-bp Tn5432 central region is 99% identical to the previously sequenced erythromycin resistance region of the Corynebacterium diphtheriae plasmid pNG2. It encodes the erythromycin resistance gene, ermCX, and an ORF homologous to the amino-terminal end of the transposase of IS31831 from Corynebacterium glutamicum. Transposons with regions flanking the insertion sites were recovered from the C. glutamicum chromosome by a plasmid rescue technique. Insertion of Tn5432 created 8-bp target site duplications. A Tn5432-induced isoleucine/valine-auxotrophic mutant was found to carry the transposon in the 5' region of the ilvBNC cluster; in pTP10 the transposon is inserted in a region similar to replication and partitioning functions of the Enterococcus faecalis plasmid pAD1 and the Agrobacterium tumefaciens plasmid pTAR.

  2. Detection of mecA and ermA genes and simultaneous identification of Staphylococcus aureus using triplex real-time PCR from Malaysian S. aureus strain collections.

    PubMed

    Sabet, Negar Shafiei; Subramaniam, Geetha; Navaratnam, Parasakthi; Sekaran, Shamala Devi

    2007-05-01

    A triplex real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was used for the simultaneous detection of mecA (methicillin resistance), ermA (erythromycin resistance) and femA (Staphylococcus aureus identification) genes in a single assay. Among 93 clinical S. aureus hospital isolates, there were 48 methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and 45 methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) isolates. Screening the isolates using the triplex real-time PCR assay, the mecA, ermA and femA genes were detected in all MRSA isolates. The triplex real-time PCR assay was completed within 3h and is a useful genotypic method for detecting the resistance determinants as well as for the identification of S. aureus isolates. These findings will assist the clinical laboratory in identifying these resistance genes and S. aureus rapidly, thus benefiting patient therapy. This study represents a valuable source of information for researchers to study the local antibiotic resistance pattern, which can increase our knowledge of the antibiotic resistance profile, using real-time PCR technology.

  3. Phylogeography of Yersinia ruckeri reveals effects of past evolutionary events on the current strain distribution and explains variations in the global transmission of enteric redmouth (ERM) disease

    PubMed Central

    Bastardo, Asmine; Ravelo, Carmen; Romalde, Jesús L.

    2015-01-01

    Phylogeographic patterns and population genetic structure of Yersinia ruckeri, the pathological agent of enteric redmouth disease (ERM) in salmonids, were investigated on the basis of concatenated multiloci sequences from isolates of different phenotypes obtained between 1965 and 2009 from diverse areas and hosts. Sequence analyses revealed genetic differentiation among subpopulations with the largest genetic distance occurring between subpopulations of Europe and Canada and/or South America. Bayesian analysis indicated the presence of three ancestral population clusters. Mismatch distribution displayed signatures characteristic of changes in size due to demographic and spatial expansions in the overall Y. ruckeri population, and also in the geographically separate subpopulations. Furthermore, a weak signal of isolation by distance was determined. A significant positive correlation between genetic and geographical distances was observed. These results revealed that the population of Y. ruckeri has undergone both ancient and recent population changes that were probably induced by biogeography forces in the past and, much more recently, by adaptive processes forced by aquaculture expansion. These findings have important implications for future studies on Y. ruckeri population dynamics, on the potential role of genetic structure to explain variations in ERM transmission, and on the effect of past evolutionary events on current estimations of gene flow. PMID:26579104

  4. Phylogeography of Yersinia ruckeri reveals effects of past evolutionary events on the current strain distribution and explains variations in the global transmission of enteric redmouth (ERM) disease.

    PubMed

    Bastardo, Asmine; Ravelo, Carmen; Romalde, Jesús L

    2015-01-01

    Phylogeographic patterns and population genetic structure of Yersinia ruckeri, the pathological agent of enteric redmouth disease (ERM) in salmonids, were investigated on the basis of concatenated multiloci sequences from isolates of different phenotypes obtained between 1965 and 2009 from diverse areas and hosts. Sequence analyses revealed genetic differentiation among subpopulations with the largest genetic distance occurring between subpopulations of Europe and Canada and/or South America. Bayesian analysis indicated the presence of three ancestral population clusters. Mismatch distribution displayed signatures characteristic of changes in size due to demographic and spatial expansions in the overall Y. ruckeri population, and also in the geographically separate subpopulations. Furthermore, a weak signal of isolation by distance was determined. A significant positive correlation between genetic and geographical distances was observed. These results revealed that the population of Y. ruckeri has undergone both ancient and recent population changes that were probably induced by biogeography forces in the past and, much more recently, by adaptive processes forced by aquaculture expansion. These findings have important implications for future studies on Y. ruckeri population dynamics, on the potential role of genetic structure to explain variations in ERM transmission, and on the effect of past evolutionary events on current estimations of gene flow.

  5. Addressing Analytical Challenges of the Environmental Monitoring for the Water Framework Directive: ERM-CE100, a New Biota Certified Reference Material.

    PubMed

    Dosis, Ioannis; Ricci, Marina; Majoros, Laszlo; Lava, Roberto; Emteborg, Håkan; Held, Andrea; Emons, Hendrik

    2017-02-21

    In the context of supporting the EU Member States in the implementation of the EU Water Framework Directive (WFD), a project for the production of a fish reference material (ERM-CE100) certified for its content of the two priority substances hexachlorobenzene (HCB) and hexachlorobutadiene (HCBD) was carried out at the Joint Research Centre (JRC) of the European Commission. The starting material was naturally contaminated Wels catfish (Silurus glanis), caught in the Ebro River (Spain). A novel approach for the processing of the fish was tested that resulted in a homogeneous and stable reference material in the form of a wet paste. The fresh-like texture of the matrix enhances the comparability of this material toward routinely analyzed environmental biota samples and facilitates its use as a quality assurance tool given that the WFD environmental quality standards (EQS) for biota are expressed as wet weight. Certified values for the mass fractions of HCB and HCBD were assigned with 120 ± 8 and 36 ± 4 μg/kg, respectively. The related interlaboratory comparison involved 13 expert laboratories applying a range of analytical methodologies. It is the first biota CRM ever available for HCBD. ERM-CE100 can be used to assess the performance of analytical methods employed in the mandatory monitoring of water bodies under the WFD, thus, providing a benchmark for establishing comparability among measurement results.

  6. 23S rRNA domain V, a fragment that can be specifically methylated in vitro by the ErmSF (TlrA) methyltransferase.

    PubMed Central

    Kovalic, D; Giannattasio, R B; Jin, H J; Weisblum, B

    1994-01-01

    The DNA sequence that encodes 23S rRNA domain V of Bacillus subtilis, nucleotides 2036 to 2672 (C. J. Green, G. C. Stewart, M. A. Hollis, B. S. Vold, and K. F. Bott, Gene 37:261-266, 1985), was cloned and used as a template from which to transcribe defined domain V RNA in vitro. The RNA transcripts served as a substrate in vitro for specific methylation of B. subtilis adenine 2085 (adenine 2058 in Escherichia coli 23S rRNA) by the ErmSF methyltransferase, an enzyme that confers resistance to the macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B group of antibiotics on Streptomyces fradiae NRRL 2702, the host from which it was cloned. Thus, neither RNA sequences belonging to domains other than V nor the association of 23S rRNA with ribosomal proteins is needed for the specific methylation of adenine that confers resistance to the macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B group of antibiotics. Images PMID:7961463

  7. ERM 593 Applied Project_Guidance for Reviewing and Approving a Waste Stream Profile in the Waste Compliance and Tracking System_Final_05-05-15

    SciTech Connect

    Elicio, Andy U.

    2015-05-05

    My ERM 593 applied project will provide guidance for the Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste Stream Profile reviewer (i.e. RCRA reviewer) in regards to Reviewing and Approving a Waste Stream Profile in the Waste Compliance and Tracking System. The Waste Compliance and Tracking system is called WCATS. WCATS is a web-based application that “supports the generation, characterization, processing and shipment of LANL radioactive, hazardous, and industrial waste.” The LANL generator must characterize their waste via electronically by filling out a waste stream profile (WSP) in WCATS. Once this process is completed, the designated waste management coordinator (WMC) will perform a review of the waste stream profile to ensure the generator has completed their waste stream characterization in accordance with applicable state, federal and LANL directives particularly P930-1, “LANL Waste Acceptance Criteria,” and the “Waste Compliance and Tracking System User's Manual, MAN-5004, R2,” as applicable. My guidance/applied project will describe the purpose, scope, acronyms, definitions, responsibilities, assumptions and guidance for the WSP reviewer as it pertains to each panel and subpanel of a waste stream profile.

  8. A rare case of Mycobacterium abscessus subspecies abscessus prosthetic valve endocarditis and the clinical importance of inducible erm(41) gene testing.

    PubMed

    Beatty, Norman; Brown, Craig; Zangeneh, Tirdad; Al Mohajer, Mayar

    2017-06-13

    A 56-year-old man with a history of injection drug use and two prior episodes of native valve infective endocarditis presented with dyspnoea on exertion. Our preliminary work-up revealed bacteraemia with reported growth of 'Mycobacterium abscessus group' on multiple blood cultures. The patient was later found to have eustachian valve and prosthetic pulmonic valve endocarditis. Initially, he responded to standard antimycobacterial therapy for rapidly growing mycobacteria (RGM) with supporting laboratory susceptibilities. However, he later developed refractory disease and persistent bacteraemia in the setting of these alleged susceptible antibiotics. Further molecular testing revealed a functional and inducible erm(41) gene which confers macrolide resistance. A subspecies analysis of the M abscessus group revealed the subspecies to be abscessus We present a challenging case of M abscessus subsp. abscessus bacteraemia and prosthetic valve endocarditis with further discussion on treatment and management of this infection along with the taxonomic complexity of this ubiquitous RGM. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  9. Resistin, a fat-derived secretory factor, promotes metastasis of MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells through ERM activation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Ok; Kim, Nami; Lee, Hye Jeong; Lee, Yong Woo; Kim, Su Jin; Park, Sun Hwa; Kim, Hyeon Soo

    2016-01-05

    Resistin, an adipocyte-secreted factor, is known to be elevated in breast cancer patients. However, the molecular mechanism by which resistin acts is not fully understood. The aim of this study was to investigate whether resistin could stimulate invasion and migration of breast cancer cells. Here, we report that resistin stimulated invasion and migration of breast cancer cells as well as phosphorylation of c-Src. Inhibition of c-Src blocked resistin-induced breast cancer cell invasion. Resistin increased intracellular calcium concentration, and chelation of intracellular calcium blocked resistin-mediated activation of Src. Resistin also induced phosphorylation of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A). Inhibition of c-Src blocked resistin-mediated PP2A phosphorylation. In addition, resistin increased phosphorylation of PKCα. Inhibition of PP2A enhanced resistin-induced PKCα phosphorylation, demonstrating that PP2A activity is critical for PKCα phosphorylation. Resistin also increased phosphorylation of ezrin, radixin, and moesin (ERM). Additionally, ezrin interacted with PKCα, and resistin promoted co-localization of ezrin and PKCα. Either inhibition of c-Src and PKCα or knock-down of ezrin blocked resistin-induced breast cancer cells invasion. Moreover, resistin increased expression of vimentin, a key molecule for cancer cell invasion. Knock-down of ezrin abrogated resistin-induced vimentin expression. These results suggest that resistin play as a critical regulator of breast cancer metastasis.

  10. Resistin, a fat-derived secretory factor, promotes metastasis of MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells through ERM activation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung Ok; Kim, Nami; Lee, Hye Jeong; Lee, Yong Woo; Kim, Su Jin; Park, Sun Hwa; Kim, Hyeon Soo

    2016-01-01

    Resistin, an adipocyte-secreted factor, is known to be elevated in breast cancer patients. However, the molecular mechanism by which resistin acts is not fully understood. The aim of this study was to investigate whether resistin could stimulate invasion and migration of breast cancer cells. Here, we report that resistin stimulated invasion and migration of breast cancer cells as well as phosphorylation of c-Src. Inhibition of c-Src blocked resistin-induced breast cancer cell invasion. Resistin increased intracellular calcium concentration, and chelation of intracellular calcium blocked resistin-mediated activation of Src. Resistin also induced phosphorylation of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A). Inhibition of c-Src blocked resistin-mediated PP2A phosphorylation. In addition, resistin increased phosphorylation of PKCα. Inhibition of PP2A enhanced resistin-induced PKCα phosphorylation, demonstrating that PP2A activity is critical for PKCα phosphorylation. Resistin also increased phosphorylation of ezrin, radixin, and moesin (ERM). Additionally, ezrin interacted with PKCα, and resistin promoted co-localization of ezrin and PKCα. Either inhibition of c-Src and PKCα or knock-down of ezrin blocked resistin-induced breast cancer cells invasion. Moreover, resistin increased expression of vimentin, a key molecule for cancer cell invasion. Knock-down of ezrin abrogated resistin-induced vimentin expression. These results suggest that resistin play as a critical regulator of breast cancer metastasis. PMID:26729407

  11. Characterization of a plasmid carrying cat, ermB and tetS genes in a foodborne Listeria monocytogenes strain and uptake of the plasmid by cariogenic Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Li, Lili; Olsen, Rikke Heidemann; Shi, Lei; Ye, Lei; He, Jianhua; Meng, Hecheng

    2016-12-05

    A multi-drug resistant (MDR) Listeria monocytogenes isolate (serotype 1/2c) was recovered from a quick-frozen rice flour product collected from Langfang city in northern China. PCR screening identified the presence of cat, ermB and tetS genes. The plasmid profile of the strain showed the presence of an approximately 22.4-kb plasmid. Curing of this plasmid resulted in the loss of cat, ermB and tetS genes and increased susceptibility to several antibiotics, suggesting the involvement of the plasmid in multiple antibiotic resistances. Moreover, the plasmid was able to be uptaken by human oral pathogen Streptococcus mutans by natural transformation and resulted in the acquiring of multiple resistances in the transconjugants. This study contributes to our knowledge on acquired multi-drug resistance in foodborne pathogenic L.monocytogenes, which will add to a better understanding of effective clinical management of listeriosis.

  12. Pharmacodynamic modeling of clarithromycin against macrolide-resistant [PCR-positive mef(A) or erm(B)] Streptococcus pneumoniae simulating clinically achievable serum and epithelial lining fluid free-drug concentrations.

    PubMed

    Noreddin, Ayman M; Roberts, Danielle; Nichol, Kim; Wierzbowski, Aleksandra; Hoban, Daryl J; Zhanel, George G

    2002-12-01

    The association between macrolide resistance mechanisms and clinical outcomes remains understudied. The present study, using an in vitro pharmacodynamic model, assessed clarithromycin (CLR) activity against mef(A)-positive and erm(B)-negative Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates by simulating free-drug concentrations in serum and both total (protein-bound and free) and free drug in epithelial lining fluid (ELF). Five mef(A)-positive and erm(B)-negative strains, one mef(A)-negative and erm(B)-positive strain, and a control [mef(A)-negative and erm(B)-negative] strain of S. pneumoniae were tested. CLR was modeled using a one-compartment model, simulating a dosage of 500 mg, per os, twice a day (in serum, free-drug C(p) maximum of 2 micro g/ml, t(1/2) of 6 h; in ELF, C(ELF(total)) maximum of 35 micro g/ml, t(1/2) of 6 h; C(ELF(free)) maximum of 14 micro g/ml, t(1/2) of 6 h). Starting inocula were 10(6) CFU/ml in Mueller-Hinton broth with 2% lysed horse blood. With sampling at 0, 4, 8, 12, 20, and 24 h, the extent of bacterial killing was assessed. Achieving CLR T/MIC values of > or =90% (AUC(0-24)/MIC ratio, > or =61) resulted in bacterial eradication, while T>MIC values of 40 to 56% (AUC(0-24)/MIC ratios of > or =30.5 to 38) resulted in a 1.2 to 2.0 log(10) CFU/ml decrease at 24 h compared to that for the initial inoculum. CLR T/MIC values of < or =8% (AUC(0-24)/MIC ratio, < or =17.3) resulted in a static effect or bacterial regrowth. The high drug concentrations in ELF that were obtained clinically with CLR may explain the lack of clinical failures with mef(A)-producing S. pneumoniae strains, with MICs up to 8 micro g/ml. However, mef(A) isolates for which MICs are > or =16 micro g/ml along with erm(B) may result in bacteriological failures.

  13. Pharmacodynamic Modeling of Clarithromycin against Macrolide-Resistant [PCR-Positive mef(A) or erm(B)] Streptococcus pneumoniae Simulating Clinically Achievable Serum and Epithelial Lining Fluid Free-Drug Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Noreddin, Ayman M.; Roberts, Danielle; Nichol, Kim; Wierzbowski, Aleksandra; Hoban, Daryl J.; Zhanel, George G.

    2002-01-01

    The association between macrolide resistance mechanisms and clinical outcomes remains understudied. The present study, using an in vitro pharmacodynamic model, assessed clarithromycin (CLR) activity against mef(A)-positive and erm(B)-negative Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates by simulating free-drug concentrations in serum and both total (protein-bound and free) and free drug in epithelial lining fluid (ELF). Five mef(A)-positive and erm(B)-negative strains, one mef(A)-negative and erm(B)-positive strain, and a control [mef(A)-negative and erm(B)-negative] strain of S. pneumoniae were tested. CLR was modeled using a one-compartment model, simulating a dosage of 500 mg, per os, twice a day (in serum, free-drug Cp maximum of 2 μg/ml, t1/2 of 6 h; in ELF, CELF(total) maximum of 35μg/ml, t1/2 of 6 h; CELF(free) maximum of 14 μg/ml, t1/2 of 6 h). Starting inocula were 106 CFU/ml in Mueller-Hinton broth with 2% lysed horse blood. With sampling at 0, 4, 8, 12, 20, and 24 h, the extent of bacterial killing was assessed. Achieving CLR T/MIC values of ≥90% (AUC0-24/MIC ratio, ≥61) resulted in bacterial eradication, while T>MIC values of 40 to 56% (AUC0-24/MIC ratios of ≥30.5 to 38) resulted in a 1.2 to 2.0 log10 CFU/ml decrease at 24 h compared to that for the initial inoculum. CLR T/MIC values of ≤8% (AUC0-24/MIC ratio, ≤17.3) resulted in a static effect or bacterial regrowth. The high drug concentrations in ELF that were obtained clinically with CLR may explain the lack of clinical failures with mef(A)-producing S. pneumoniae strains, with MICs up to 8 μg/ml. However, mef(A) isolates for which MICs are ≥16 μg/ml along with erm(B) may result in bacteriological failures. PMID:12435719

  14. C. difficile 630Δerm Spo0A Regulates Sporulation, but Does Not Contribute to Toxin Production, by Direct High-Affinity Binding to Target DNA

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbusch, Katharina E.; Bakker, Dennis; Kuijper, Ed J.; Smits, Wiep Klaas

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a Gram positive, anaerobic bacterium that can form highly resistant endospores. The bacterium is the causative agent of C. difficile infection (CDI), for which the symptoms can range from a mild diarrhea to potentially fatal pseudomembranous colitis and toxic megacolon. Endospore formation in Firmicutes, including C. difficile, is governed by the key regulator for sporulation, Spo0A. In Bacillus subtilis, this transcription factor is also directly or indirectly involved in various other cellular processes. Here, we report that C. difficile Spo0A shows a high degree of similarity to the well characterized B. subtilis protein and recognizes a similar binding sequence. We find that the laboratory strain C. difficile 630Δerm contains an 18bp-duplication near the DNA-binding domain compared to its ancestral strain 630. In vitro binding assays using purified C-terminal DNA binding domain of the C. difficile Spo0A protein demonstrate direct binding to DNA upstream of spo0A and sigH, early sporulation genes and several other putative targets. In vitro binding assays suggest that the gene encoding the major clostridial toxin TcdB may be a direct target of Spo0A, but supernatant derived from a spo0A negative strain was no less toxic towards Vero cells than that obtained from a wild type strain, in contrast to previous reports. These results identify for the first time direct (putative) targets of the Spo0A protein in C. difficile and make a positive effect of Spo0A on production of the large clostridial toxins unlikely. PMID:23119071

  15. Certification of new Pb iCRM (Candidate ERM-38xx series) via Gravimetric Isotope Mixtures and MC-ICP-MS Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponzevera, E.; Quetel, C. R.

    2008-12-01

    Lead is known to be a particularly toxic chemical element. Mining and smelting of Pb and its domestic use over the centuries have contaminated the surface of Earth and jeopardized the health of humans, domestic animals and wildlife. Omnipresence of Pb has however an advantage. It can be used as an isotopic tracer of pollution sources and pathways in the environment. Pb isotopic Certified Reference Materials (iCRM) with undisputed characteristics are then required to validate Pb isotope ratio measurements. The materials currently available worldwide were produced in the 1960's by the National Bureau of Standards (now NIST, USA) and are now the object of polemics regarding the accuracy of some of the accompanying certified values. Moreover, new materials with lower relative uncertainty statements are demanded by users. This presentation is centred on the production and the certification at the EC-JRC-Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements of a new series of Pb iCRM (candidate ERM-38xx series). The production included six Pb gravimetric isotope mixtures, a common Pb material dedicated to routine calibration work and a series of four 207Pb slightly enriched natural-like Pb materials for the validation of the δ-scale method below 0.01%. The gravimetric isotope mixtures method, originally supported by mass spectrometry measurements performed on GS-MS or TI-MS instruments, was applied successfully to MC-ICP-MS. The measurements and certification methods we developed were validated in several ways, including a systematic investigation on possible significant sources of uncertainty and comparisons of results obtained by different laboratories on identical samples. Relative uncertainties on isotope ratios obtained for the newly produced Pb iCRM are as low as 0.017%, which is between 2 and 4 times smaller than the uncertainties carried by the NIST-981 material. Going below 0.01% was not possible mainly because of uncompressible uncertainties coming from the

  16. Aurora-B and Rho-kinase/ROCK, the two cleavage furrow kinases, independently regulate the progression of cytokinesis: possible existence of a novel cleavage furrow kinase phosphorylates ezrin/radixin/moesin (ERM).

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Tomoya; Goto, Hidemasa; Izawa, Ichiro; Mizutani, Hitoshi; Inagaki, Masaki

    2005-02-01

    Cytokinesis is regulated by several protein kinases, such as Aurora-B and Rho-kinase/ROCK. We have indicated that these two kinases are the cleavage furrow (CF) kinases that accumulate at the cleavage furrow and phosphorylate several intermediate filament (IF) proteins into two daughter cells. It has been reported that Aurora-B phosphorylates MgcRacGAP to functionally convert to a RhoGAP during cytokinesis. Therefore, we investigated here the relationship between Aurora-B and Rho-kinase/ROCK in cytokinesis, by using small interfering RNA (siRNA) technique. Aurora-B depletion did not alter the cleavage furrow-specific localization of Rho-kinase/ROCK and vice versa. Treatment of Aurora-B or Rho-kinase/ROCK siRNA increased multinucleate cells, and the effect of double depletion was additive. Aurora-B depletion induced the reduction of cleavage furrow-specific phosphorylation of vimentin at Ser72 but not vimentin at Ser71, myosin light chain (MLC) at Ser19, and myosin binding subunit of myosin phosphatase (MBS) at Ser852. In contrast, Rho-kinase/ROCK depletion led to the reduction of cleavage furrow-specific phosphorylation of MLC at Ser19, MBS at Ser852, and vimentin at Ser71 but not vimentin at Ser72. Cleavage furrow-specific ezrin/radixin/moesin (ERM) phosphorylation was not altered in the Aurora-B- and/or Rho-kinase/ROCK-depleted cells. In addition, C3 or toxin B treatment did not abolish ERM phosphorylation at the cleavage furrow in cells attaining cytokinesis. These results suggest that Aurora-B and Rho-kinase/ROCK regulate the progression of cytokinesis without communicating to each other, and there may exist a novel protein kinase which phosphorylates ERM at the cleavage furrow.

  17. A 7 ke-SD-FWC 1.2 e-RMS Temporal Random Noise 128×256 Time-Resolved CMOS Image Sensor With Two In-Pixel SDs for Biomedical Applications.

    PubMed

    Seo, Min-Woong; Kawahito, Shoji

    2017-09-21

    A large full well capacity (FWC) for wide signal detection range and low temporal random noise for high sensitivity lock-in pixel CMOS image sensor (CIS) embedded with two in-pixel storage diodes (SDs) has been developed and presented in this paper. For fast charge transfer from photodiode to SDs, a lateral electric field charge modulator (LEFM) is used for the developed lock-in pixel. As a result, the time-resolved CIS achieves a very large SD-FWC of approximately 7ke-, low temporal random noise of 1.2e-rms at 20 fps with true correlated double sampling operation and fast intrinsic response less than 500 ps at 635 nm. The proposed imager has an effective pixel array of [Formula: see text] and a pixel size of [Formula: see text]. The sensor chip is fabricated by Dongbu HiTek 1P4M 0.11 [Formula: see text] CIS process.

  18. Rationale, Design, and Baseline Characteristics of the EPICOR Asia Study (Long-tErm follow-uP of antithrombotic management patterns In Acute CORonary Syndrome patients in Asia).

    PubMed

    Huo, Yong; Lee, Stephen W-L; Sawhney, Jitendra P S; Kim, Hyo-Soo; Krittayaphong, Rungroj; Nhan, Vo T; Alonso-Garcia, Angeles; Han, Ya Ling; Ge, Junbo; Chin, Chee Tang; Ong, Tiong K; Jan, Stephen; Itoh, Yohji; Vega, Ana Maria; Pocock, Stuart

    2015-09-01

    In-hospital and postdischarge mortality for acute coronary syndromes (ACS) vary across Asia and remain generally poorer than globally. The relationship between real-life antithrombotic management patterns (AMPs) and ACS-related outcomes in Asia is unclear. EPICOR Asia (Long-tErm follow-uP of antithrombotic management patterns In acute CORonary syndrome patients in Asia) (NCT01361386) is a prospective, multinational, observational study of patients discharged after hospitalization for an ACS, with 2-year follow-up. The aim is to describe short- and long-term (up to 2 years post-index event) AMPs in patients hospitalized for ACS and to record clinical outcomes, healthcare resource use, and self-reported health status. Pre- and in-hospital management, AMPs, and associated outcomes, with particular focus on ischemic and bleeding events, will be recorded during the 2-year follow up. Between June 2011 and May 2012, 13 005 patients were enrolled. From these, 12 922 patients surviving an ACS (6616 with STEMI, 2570 with NSTEMI, and 3736 with UA) were eligible for inclusion from 219 hospitals across 8 countries and regions in Asia: China (n = 8214), Hong Kong (n = 177), India (n = 2468), Malaysia (n = 100), Singapore (n = 93), South Korea (n = 705), Thailand (n = 957), and Vietnam (n = 208). EPICOR Asia will provide information regarding clinical management and AMPs for ACS patients in Asia. Impact of AMPs on clinical outcomes, healthcare resource use, and self-reported health status both during hospitalization and up to 2 years after discharge will also be described. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Characterisation of a novel integrative and conjugative element ICESsD9 carrying erm(B) and tet(O) resistance determinants in Streptococcus suis, and the distribution of ICESsD9-like elements in clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kaisong; Song, Yajing; Zhang, Qiang; Zhang, Anding; Jin, Meilin

    2016-12-01

    This study identified a novel integrative and conjugative element (ICESsD9) carrying erm(B) and tet(O) resistance determinants in Streptococcus suis D9 and determined its prevalence in clinical isolates. Comparative genome analysis was performed using Mauve and Artemis Comparison Tool visualisation programs. Inverse PCR was utilised to detect its circular intermediate. The transfer capacity of ICESsD9 was evaluated by mating assays using S. suis A7 and Enterococcus faecalis JH2-2 as recipients. A genome walking approach was employed to analyse the characteristics of integration sites in transconjugants. A total of 118 clinical S. suis isolates were tested by PCR mapping assays to detect ICESsD9-like elements. MLST was performed on isolates containing ICESsD9 variants to determine their clonal relatedness. This 55 683-bp element can actively excise from the chromosome. Additionally, it was capable of transferring both into S. suis and E. faecalis with frequencies of 1.2×10(-4) and 5.8×10(-6) per donor, respectively. When investigating integration site features, it was found that ICESsD9 can enter S. suis and E. faecalis chromosomes by different sites, generating 15-bp and 3-bp direct repeat sequences, respectively. Twelve isolates mainly belonging to sequence types ST1, ST7 and ST28 were confirmed to harbour ICESsD9-like elements. In conclusion, this study provides the first description of an ICE in S. suis that is capable of transferring both into S. suis and E. faecalis. The presence of different ICESsD9 variants in clinical isolates suggests already wide dissemination of this family element in S. suis in China. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Chemotherapy of Infection and Cancer. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Predictors of one-year mortality at hospital discharge after acute coronary syndromes: A new risk score from the EPICOR (long-tErm follow uP of antithrombotic management patterns In acute CORonary syndrome patients) study

    PubMed Central

    Pocock, Stuart; Bueno, Héctor; Licour, Muriel; Medina, Jesús; Zhang, Lin; Annemans, Lieven; Danchin, Nicholas; Huo, Yong; Van de Werf, Frans

    2015-01-01

    Aims: A reliable prediction tool is needed to identify acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients with high mortality risk after their initial hospitalization. Methods: EPICOR (long-tErm follow uP of antithrombotic management patterns In acute CORonary syndrome patients: NCT01171404) is a prospective cohort study of 10,568 consecutive hospital survivors after an ACS event (4943 ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and 5625 non-ST-elevation ACS (NSTE-ACS)). Of these cases, 65.1% underwent percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and 2.5% coronary artery bypass graft (CABG). Post-discharge mortality was recorded for up to two years. From over 50 potential predictor variables a new risk score for one-year mortality was developed using forward stepwise Cox regression, and examined for goodness-of-fit, discriminatory power, and external validation. Results: A total of 407 patients (3.9%) died within one year of discharge. We identified 12 highly significant independent predictors of mortality (in order of predictive strength): age, lower ejection fraction, poorer EQ-5D quality of life, elevated serum creatinine, in-hospital cardiac complications, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, elevated blood glucose, male gender, no PCI/CABG after NSTE-ACS, low hemoglobin, peripheral artery disease, on diuretics at discharge. When combined into a new risk score excellent discrimination was achieved (c-statistic=0.81) and this was also validated on a large similar cohort (9907 patients) in Asia (c=0.78). For both STEMI and NSTE-ACS there was a steep gradient in one-year mortality ranging from 0.5% in the lowest quintile to 18.2% in the highest decile. NSTE-ACS contributes over twice as many high-risk patients as STEMI. Conclusions: Post-discharge mortality for ACS patients remains of concern. Our new user-friendly risk score available on www.acsrisk.org can readily identify who is at high risk. PMID:25301783

  1. Factors responsible for subclinical mastitis in cows caused by Staphylococcus chromogenes and its susceptibility to antibiotics based on bap, fnbA, eno, mecA, tetK, and ermA genes.

    PubMed

    Bochniarz, M; Adaszek, Ł; Dzięgiel, B; Nowaczek, A; Wawron, W; Dąbrowski, R; Szczubiał, M; Winiarczyk, S

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to recognize selected factors of virulence determining the adhesion of Staphylococcus chromogenes to cows' udder tissues in subclinical mastitis and to evaluate the susceptibility of this pathogen to antibiotics. The subjects of the study were 38 isolates of Staph. chromogenes from 335 samples of milk from cows with subclinical coagulase-negative staphylococci mastitis. Somatic cell count ranged between 216,000 and 568,000/mL of milk (average 356,000/mL of milk). We confirmed the ability to produce slime in 24 isolates (63.2%), and the ability to produce protease in 29 isolates (76.3%). In each slime-producing isolate, the bap gene was not found, and the fnbA and eno genes were not detected. In vitro tests showed that ceftiofur had the highest effectiveness against Staph. chromogenes (89.5% of susceptible isolates). Minimum inhibitory concentrations ranged from 0.06 to 2µg/mL for susceptible isolates. The minimum concentrations required to inhibit growth of 90 and 50% of the isolates for ceftiofur were at or below the cutoffs recommended by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (2 and 0.06µg/mL, respectively). A significant percentage of the isolates were susceptible to other β-lactam antibiotics: amoxicillin with clavulanic acid (84.2%) and ampicillin (81.6%). The lowest effectiveness among β-lactams was for penicillin (73.7% of susceptible isolates), and the minimum inhibitory concentration for penicillin ranged from <0.06 to 8µg/mL. None of the examined isolates had the mecA gene, but β-lactamase was detected in 4 isolates (10.5%). Erythromycin and oxytetracycline exhibited the lowest activity against Staph. chromogenes (71.1 and 63.2% of susceptible isolates, respectively). The genes tetK (6 isolates) and ermA (1 isolate) were also detected. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A type 2 A/C2 plasmid carrying the aacC4 apramycin resistance gene and the erm(42) erythromycin resistance gene recovered from two Salmonella enterica serovars.

    PubMed

    Harmer, Christopher J; Holt, Kathryn E; Hall, Ruth M

    2015-04-01

    To determine the relationships between RepA/C2 plasmids carrying several antibiotic resistance genes found in isolates of Salmonella enterica serovars Ohio and Senftenberg from pigs. Illumina HiSeq was used to sequence seven S. enterica isolates. BLAST searches identified relevant A/C2 plasmid contigs and contigs were assembled using PCR. Two serovar Ohio isolates were ST329 and the five Senftenberg isolates were ST210. The A/C2 plasmids recovered from the seven isolates belong to type 2 and contain two resistance islands. Their backbones are closely related, differing by five or fewer SNPs. The sul2-containing resistance island ARI-B is 19.9 kb and also contains the kanamycin and neomycin resistance gene aphA1, the tetracycline resistance gene tetA(D) and an erythromycin resistance gene, erm(42), not previously seen in A/C2 plasmids. A second 30.3 kb resistance island, RI-119, is in a unique location in the A/C2 backbone 8.2 kb downstream of rhs. RI-119 contained genes conferring resistance to apramycin, netilmicin and tobramycin (aacC4), hygromycin (hph), sulphonamides (sul1) and spectinomycin and streptomycin (aadA2). In one of the seven plasmids, this resistance region contained two IS26-mediated deletions. A discrete 5.7 kb segment containing the aacC4 and hph genes and bounded by IS26 on one side and the inverted repeat of Tn5393 on the other was identified. The presence of almost identical A/C2 plasmids in two serovars indicates a common origin. Type 2 A/C2 plasmids continue to evolve via addition of new resistance regions such as RI-119 and evolution of existing ones. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. A Locally Created ERM: How and Why We Did It

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doering, William; Chilton, Galadriel

    2008-01-01

    The University of Wisconsin-La Crosse's Murphy Library provides access to approximately 200 subscription databases. As with many academic libraries, methods and tools for managing these resources were sorely needed. However, the budget has been cut repeatedly over the past few years--thus the possibility of purchasing a commercial electronic…

  4. A Locally Created ERM: How and Why We Did It

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doering, William; Chilton, Galadriel

    2008-01-01

    The University of Wisconsin-La Crosse's Murphy Library provides access to approximately 200 subscription databases. As with many academic libraries, methods and tools for managing these resources were sorely needed. However, the budget has been cut repeatedly over the past few years--thus the possibility of purchasing a commercial electronic…

  5. Histology, fusion status, and outcome in metastatic rhabdomyosarcoma: A report from the Children's Oncology Group.

    PubMed

    Rudzinski, Erin R; Anderson, James R; Chi, Yueh-Yun; Gastier-Foster, Julie M; Astbury, Caroline; Barr, Frederic G; Skapek, Stephen X; Hawkins, Douglas S; Weigel, Brenda J; Pappo, Alberto; Meyer, William H; Arnold, Michael A; Teot, Lisa A; Parham, David M

    2017-05-18

    Distinguishing alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma (ARMS) from embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (ERMS) has historically been of prognostic and therapeutic importance. However, classification has been complicated by shifting histologic criteria required for an ARMS diagnosis. Children's Oncology Group (COG) studies after IRS-IV, which included the height of this diagnostic shift, showed both an increased number of ARMS and an increase in the proportion of fusion-negative ARMS. Following diagnostic standardization and histologic re-review of ARMS cases enrolled during this era, analysis of low-risk (D9602) and intermediate-risk (D9803) rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) studies showed that fusion status rather than histology best predicts prognosis for patients with RMS. This analysis remains to be completed for patients with high-risk RMS. We re-reviewed cases on high-risk COG studies D9802 and ARST0431 with an enrollment diagnosis of ARMS. We compared the event-free survival (EFS) and overall survival by histology, PAX-FOXO1 fusion, and clinical risk factors (Oberlin score) for patients with metastatic RMS using the log-rank test. Histology re-review resulted in reclassification as ERMS for 12% of D9802 cases and 5% of ARST0431 cases. Fusion-negative RMS had a superior EFS to fusion-positive RMS; however, poorer outcome for metastatic RMS was most related to clinical risk factors including age, primary site, and number of metastatic sites. In contrast to low- or intermediate-risk RMS, in metastatic RMS, clinical risk factors have the most impact on patient outcome. PAX-FOXO1 fusion is more common in patients with a high Oberlin score, but fusion status is not an independent biomarker of prognosis. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Barriers to Electronic Records Management (ERM): An Exploratory Case Study Investigating ERM in the Deployed Environment During Operations Enduring Freedom and Iraqi Freedom

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    committee members, Dr . Dennis Strouble and Maj (Ret.) Dale Long for their many contributions to improve the quality, rigor, and readability of this...Professor of Information Resource Management Department of Systems and Engineering Management //signed// 16 March 2005 DENNIS D... STROUBLE , Ph.D. (Committee Member) Date Assistant Professor of Information Resource Management Department of Systems and Engineering Management

  7. Tylosin-resistant Enterococci, erm genes, and tylosin in drained fields receiving swine manure

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The use of tylosin at subtherapeutic levels by the swine industry provides selective pressure for the development of antibiotic resistance in gastrointestinal bacteria. The land application of swine manure to drained agricultural fields might introduce elevated levels of total and tylosin-resistant ...

  8. Note: Focus error detection device for thermal expansion-recovery microscopy (ThERM).

    PubMed

    Domené, E A; Martínez, O E

    2013-01-01

    An innovative focus error detection method is presented that is only sensitive to surface curvature variations, canceling both thermoreflectance and photodefelection effects. The detection scheme consists of an astigmatic probe laser and a four-quadrant detector. Nonlinear curve fitting of the defocusing signal allows the retrieval of a cutoff frequency, which only depends on the thermal diffusivity of the sample and the pump beam size. Therefore, a straightforward retrieval of the thermal diffusivity of the sample is possible with microscopic lateral resolution and high axial resolution (~100 pm).

  9. Are ERM (ezrin/radixin/moesin) proteins targets for autoantibodies in demyelinating neuropathies?

    PubMed

    Miyaji, Kazuki; Shahrizaila, Nortina; Umapathi, Thirugnanam; Chan, Yee-Cheun; Hirata, Koichi; Yuki, Nobuhiro

    2014-11-01

    Ezrin, radixin and moesin, which are strongly expressed in the Schwann cell microvilli, are putative targets for autoantibodies in acute or chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (AIDP or CIDP). An association between anti-moesin IgG antibodies and cytomegalovirus-related AIDP has been postulated. None of 41 AIDP patients, including 8 cytomegalovirus-related AIDP patients, and 23 CIDP had IgG or IgM antibodies to ezrin, radixin and moesin; whereas, one patient with cytomegalovirus-related AIDP had anti-ezrin IgM antibodies. Ezrin, radixin and moesin are unlikely targets for autoantibodies in AIDP and CIDP, and the association of anti-moesin antibodies with cytomegalovirus-related AIDP was not confirmed.

  10. An Initial Model for Generative Design Research: Bringing Together Generative Focus Group (GFG) and Experience Reflection Modelling (ERM)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakirlioglu, Yekta; Ogur, Dilruba; Dogan, Cagla; Turhan, Senem

    2016-01-01

    Understanding people's experiences and the context of use of a product at the earliest stages of the design process has in the last decade become an important aspect of both the design profession and design education. Generative design research helps designers understand user experiences, while also throwing light on their current needs,…

  11. Efficacy testing of a 35 year old commercially produced Yersinia ruckeri bacterin for the control of Enteric Redmouth ERM) Disease

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In 1976 the United States Department of Agriculture, Veterinary Services, granted the first veterinary product license for a biologic to be administered to fish. That license was issued for Enteric Redmouth Bacterin (Yerisina ruckeri) to the first commercial fish vaccine company, Wildlife Vaccines. ...

  12. Assessment of altered binding specificity of bacteriophage for ciprofloxacin-induced antibiotic-resistant Salmonella Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeongjin; Jo, Ara; Ding, Tian; Lee, Hyeon-Yong; Ahn, Juhee

    2016-08-01

    This study describes a new effort toward understanding the interaction mechanisms between antibiotic-resistant Salmonella Typhimurium and phages. The antibiotic susceptibility, β-lactamase activity, bacterial motility, gene expression, and lytic activity were evaluated in ciprofloxacin-induced antibiotic-sensitive Salmonella Typhimurium (ASST(CIP)) and ciprofloxacin-induced antibiotic-resistant S. Typhimurium (ARST(CIP)), which were compared to the wild-type strains (ASST(WT) and ARST(WT)). The MIC values of ampicillin, norfloxacin, chloramphenicol, and tetracycline were significantly increased to > 512, 16, 16, and 256 μg/ml, respectively, in the ARST(CIP). The lowest and highest extracellular lactamase activities were observed in ASST(WT) (6.85 μmol/min/ml) and ARST(CIP) (48.83 μmol/min/ml), respectively. The acrA, lpfE, and hilA genes were significantly upregulated by more than tenfold in both ASST(CIP) and ARST(CIP). The induction of multiple antibiotic resistance resulted from the increased efflux pump activity (AcrAB-TolC). The highest phage adsorption rates were more than 95 % for ASST(WT), ASST(CIP), and ARST(WT), while the lowest adsorption rate was 52 % for ARST(CIP) at 15 min of infection. The least lytic activity of phage was 20 % against the ARST(CIP), followed by ASST(CIP) (30 %). The adsorption rate of phage against ARST(CIP) was 52 % at 15 min of infection, which resulted in the decrease in lytic activity (12 %). Understanding the interaction of phage and bacteria is essential for the practical application of phage to control and detect antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The results provide useful information for understanding the binding specificity of phages for multiple antibiotic-resistant pathogens.

  13. A simplified erythromycin resistance cassette for Treponema denticola mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Goetting-Minesky, M. Paula; Fenno, J. Christopher

    2010-01-01

    The primary selectable marker for genetic studies of Treponema denticola is a hybrid gene cassette containing both ermF and ermAM (ermB) genes. ErmB functions in Escherichia coli, while ErmF has been assumed to confer resistance in T. denticola. We demonstrate here that ErmB is sufficient for erythromycin selection in T. denticola and that the native ermB promoter drives ErmB expression. PMID:20691222

  14. Trimming the threshold dispersion below 10 e-rms in a large area readout IC working in a single photon counting mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kmon, P.; Maj, P.; Gryboś, P.; Szczygieł, R.

    2016-01-01

    We present a new method of an in-pixel threshold dispersion correction implemented in a prototype readout integrated circuit (IC) operating in a single photon counting mode. The new threshold correction method was implemented in a readout IC of area 9.6× 14.9 mm2 containing 23552 square pixels with the pitch of 75 μm designed and fabricated in CMOS 130 nm technology. Each pixel of the IC consists of a charge sensitive amplifier, a shaper, two discriminators, two 14-bit counters and a low-area trim DACs for threshold correction. The user can either control the range of the trim DAC globally for all the pixels in the integrated circuit or modify the trim DACs characteristics locally in each pixel independently. Using a simulation tool based on the Monte-Carlo methods, we estimated how much we could improve the offset trimming by increasing the number of bits in the trim DACs or implementing additional bits in a pixel to modify the characteristics of the trim DACs. The measurements of our IC prototype show that it is possible to reduce the effective threshold dispersion in large-area single-photon counting chips below 10 electrons rms.

  15. Increasing Range and Lethality of Extended-Range Munitions (ERMS) using Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) and the AUV Workbench to Compute a Ballistic Correction (BALCOR)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-01

    one-kilometer base elevation GPS global positioning system GRIB gridded binary data format GTL gun target line GTRAJ3 general trajectory model...Integrated Weapons Systems PE potential energy PVLS peripheral vertical launch system q dynamic pressure R gas constant rad radian RAOBs...airframe, rocket motor components, fin stabilizing assembly, obturator (which holds the gas behind the projectile until it leaves the muzzle), steering

  16. Cost minimization analysis of two treatment regimens for low-risk rhabdomyosarcoma in children: a report from the Children's Oncology Group.

    PubMed

    Russell, Heidi; Swint, J Michael; Lal, Lincy; Meza, Jane; Walterhouse, David; Hawkins, Douglas S; Okcu, M Fatih

    2014-06-01

    Recent Children's Oncology Group trials for low-risk rhabdomyosarcoma attempted to reduce therapy while maintaining excellent outcomes. D9602 delivered 45 weeks of outpatient vincristine and dactinomycin (VA) for patients in Subgroup A. ARST0331 reduced the duration of therapy to 22 weeks but added four doses of cyclophosphamide to VA for patients in Subset 1. Failure-free survival was similar. We undertook a cost minimization comparison to help guide future decision-making. Addressing the costs of treatment from the healthcare perspective we modeled a simple decision-analytic model from aggregate clinical trial data. Medical care inputs and probabilities were estimated from trial reports and focused chart review. Costs of radiation, surgery and off-therapy surveillance were excluded. Unit costs were obtained from literature and national reimbursement and inpatient utilization databases and converted to 2012 US dollars. Model uncertainty was assessed with first-order sensitivity analysis. Direct medical costs were $46,393 for D9602 and $43,261 for ARST0331 respectively, making ARST0331 the less costly strategy. Dactinomycin contributed the most to D9602 total costs but varied with age (42-69%). Chemotherapy administration costs accounted for the largest proportion of ARST0331 total costs (39-57%). ARST0331 incurred fewer costs than D9602 under most alternative distributive models and alternative clinical practice assumptions. Cost analysis suggests that ARST0331 may incur fewer costs than D9602 from the healthcare system's perspective. Attention to the services driving the costs provides directions for future efficiency improvements. Future studies should prospectively consider the patient and family's perspective. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. The VLTI and Its Subsystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glindemann, A.; Algomedo, J.; Amestica, R.; Ballester, P.; Bauvir, B.; Bugueño, E.; Correia, S.; Delgado, F.; Delplancke, F.; Derie, F.; Duhoux, Ph.; di Folco, E.; Gennai, A.; Gilli, B.; Giordano, P.; Gitton, Ph.; Guisard, S.; Housen, N.; Huxley, A.; Kervella, P.; Kiekebusch, M.; Koehler, B.; Lévêque, S.; Longinotti, A.; Ménardi, S.; Morel, S.; Paresce, F.; Phan Duc, T.; Richichi, A.; Schöller, M.; Tarenghi, M.; Wallander, A.; Wittkowski, M.; Wilhelm, R.

    2003-03-01

    The Very Large Telescope (VLT) Observatory on Cerro Paranal (2635 m) in Northern Chile is approaching completion. After the four 8-m Unit Telescopes (UT) individually saw ~Arst light in the last years, two of them were combined for the ~Arst time on October 30, 2001 to form a stellar interferometer, the VLT Interferometer. The remaining two UTs will be integrated into the interferometric array later this year, so that any two UTs can be used for interferometry. In this article, we will describe the subsystems of the VLTI and the planning for the following years.

  18. Automatic Radiated Susceptibility Test System for Payload Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ngo, Hoai T.; Sturman, John C.; Sargent, Noel B.

    1995-01-01

    An automatic radiated susceptibility test system (ARSTS) was developed for NASA Lewis Research Center's Electro-magnetic Interference laboratory. According to MSFC-SPEC 521B, any electrical or electronic equipment that will be transported by the spacelab and space shuttle must be tested for susceptibility to electromagnetic interference. This state-of-the-art automatic test system performs necessary calculations; analyzes, processes, and records a great quantity of measured data; and monitors the equipment being tested in real-time and with minimal user intervention. ARSTS reduces costly test time, increases test accuracy, and provides reliable test results.

  19. Antibiotic Susceptibility and Mechanisms of Erythromycin Resistance in Clinical Isolates of Streptococcus agalactiae: French Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    De Mouy, Dany; Cavallo, Jean-Didier; Leclercq, Roland; Fabre, Roland

    2001-01-01

    Among 126 Streptococcus agalactiae isolates collected in 10 French laboratories in 1999, 27 (21.4%) had macrolide resistance related to the presence of erm(B) (11 strains), erm(A) subclass erm(TR) (10 strains), and mef(A) genes (2 strains) and the presence of combinations of erm(B) and erm(A) genes or mef(A) genes (3 strains). PMID:11451709

  20. Comparative molecular analysis of erythromycin-resistance determinants in staphylococcal isolates of poultry and human origin.

    PubMed

    Nawaz, M S; Khan, S A; Khan, A A; Khambaty, F M; Cerniglia, C E

    2000-10-01

    The ermA, ermB, ermC and msrA/msrB genes were detected in multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus spp. strains by PCR. Among 25 human clinical staphylococcal isolates the ermA, ermB, ermC and the msrA/msrB genes were detected in 88, 72, 4 and 100% of the strains, respectively. Among 24 poultry isolates the ermA, ermB, ermC and the msrA/msrB genes were detected in 100, 16.6, 50 and 12.5% of the strains, respectively. The ermA gene was found exclusively on the chromosome, whereas the ermC gene was found on 2.4-4.2 kb plasmids. Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of the ermA gene with Eco RI revealed five patterns (25.0, 21.0, 10.5, 6.2 and 4. 8 kb) for the clinical strains and two (8.0 and 6.2 kb) for the poultry strains. The 6.2 kb RFLP pattern, in both the poultry and human clinical isolates, indicates a common lineage for the ermA gene. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  1. The Expression of Antibiotic Resistance Methyltransferase Correlates with mRNA Stability Independently of Ribosome Stalling

    PubMed Central

    Dzyubak, Ekaterina

    2016-01-01

    Members of the Erm methyltransferase family modify 23S rRNA of the bacterial ribosome and render cross-resistance to macrolides and multiple distantly related antibiotics. Previous studies have shown that the expression of erm is activated when a macrolide-bound ribosome stalls the translation of the leader peptide preceding the cotranscribed erm. Ribosome stalling is thought to destabilize the inhibitory stem-loop mRNA structure and exposes the erm Shine-Dalgarno (SD) sequence for translational initiation. Paradoxically, mutations that abolish ribosome stalling are routinely found in hyper-resistant clinical isolates; however, the significance of the stalling-dead leader sequence is largely unknown. Here, we show that nonsense mutations in the Staphylococcus aureus ErmB leader peptide (ErmBL) lead to high basal and induced expression of downstream ErmB in the absence or presence of macrolide concomitantly with elevated ribosome methylation and resistance. The overexpression of ErmB is associated with the reduced turnover of the ermBL-ermB transcript, and the macrolide appears to mitigate mRNA cleavage at a site immediately downstream of the ermBL SD sequence. The stabilizing effect of antibiotics on mRNA is not limited to ermBL-ermB; cationic antibiotics representing a ribosome-stalling inducer and a noninducer increase the half-life of specific transcripts. These data unveil a new layer of ermB regulation and imply that ErmBL translation or ribosome stalling serves as a “tuner” to suppress aberrant production of ErmB because methylated ribosome may impose a fitness cost on the bacterium as a result of misregulated translation. PMID:27645242

  2. Fate and transport of tylosin-resistant bacteria and macrolide resistance genes in artificially drained agricultural fields receiving swine manure

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Application of manure from swine treated with antibiotics introduces antibiotics and antibiotic resistance genes to soil with the potential for further movement in drainage water. Manure concentrations for ermB, ermC and ermF were all >109 copy g-1. Manure contained 1.76 x 105 CFUg-1 enterococci w...

  3. Charting a Course through CORAL: Texas A&M University Libraries' Experience Implementing an Open-Source Electronic Resources Management System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartnett, Eric; Beh, Eugenia; Resnick, Taryn; Ugaz, Ana; Tabacaru, Simona

    2013-01-01

    In 2010, after two previous unsuccessful attempts at electronic resources management system (ERMS) implementation, Texas A&M University (TAMU) Libraries set out once again to find an ERMS that would fit its needs. After surveying the field, TAMU Libraries selected the University of Notre Dame Hesburgh Libraries-developed, open-source ERMS,…

  4. Inhibition of cell adhesion by phosphorylated Ezrin/Radixin/Moesin.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, Kouichi; Haghparast, Seyed Mohammad Ali; Miyake, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Altered phosphorylation status of the C-terminal Thr residues of Ezrin/Radixin/Moesin (ERM) is often linked to cell shape change. To determine the role of phophorylated ERM, we modified phosphorylation status of ERM and investigated changes in cell adhesion and morphology. Treatment with Calyculin-A (Cal-A), a protein phosphatase inhibitor, dramatically augmented phosphorylated ERM (phospho-ERM). Cal-A-treatment or expression of phospho-mimetic Moesin mutant (Moesin-TD) induced cell rounding in adherent cells. Moreover, reattachment of detached cells to substrate was inhibited by either treatment. Phospho-ERM, Moesin-TD and actin cytoskeleton were observed at the plasma membrane of such round cells. Augmented cell surface rigidity was also observed in both cases. Meanwhile, non-adherent KG-1 cells were rather rich in phospho-ERM. Treatment with Staurosporine, a protein kinase inhibitor that dephosphorylates phospho-ERM, up-regulated the integrin-dependent adhesion of KG-1 cells to substrate. These findings strongly suggest the followings: (1) Phospho-ERM inhibit cell adhesion, and therefore, dephosphorylation of ERM proteins is essential for cell adhesion. (2) Phospho-ERM induce formation and/or maintenance of spherical cell shape. (3) ERM are constitutively both phosphorylated and dephosphorylated in cultured adherent and non-adherent cells.

  5. Embryonal Rhabdomyosarcoma Occurring on Mandibular Gingiva in an Adult

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Gururaj; Halawar, Sangamesh; Sagari, Shitalkumar; Babannavar, Roopa; Purohit, Sharad

    2013-01-01

    An embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (ERMS) is a primitive, malignant, soft tissue sarcoma that recapitulates the phenotypic and biological features of embryonic skeletal muscles. Occurrence of intraoral ERMS in adults is extremely rare. This unique case report highlights the clinical, radiographic, histopathological and immunohistochemical findings of an intraoral ERMS. PMID:24179953

  6. Charting a Course through CORAL: Texas A&M University Libraries' Experience Implementing an Open-Source Electronic Resources Management System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartnett, Eric; Beh, Eugenia; Resnick, Taryn; Ugaz, Ana; Tabacaru, Simona

    2013-01-01

    In 2010, after two previous unsuccessful attempts at electronic resources management system (ERMS) implementation, Texas A&M University (TAMU) Libraries set out once again to find an ERMS that would fit its needs. After surveying the field, TAMU Libraries selected the University of Notre Dame Hesburgh Libraries-developed, open-source ERMS,…

  7. Biochemical and molecular characterization of erthromycin-resistant avian Staphylococcus spp. isolated from chickens.

    PubMed

    Nawaz, M S; Khan, A A; Khan, S A; Paine, D D; Pothuluri, J V; Cerniglia, C E

    1999-08-01

    The epidemiology of the two common erythromycin-resistant methylase (erm) genes ermC and ermA was analyzed in 12 coagulase-negative Staphylococcus spp. and 34 coagulase-positive Staphylococcus spp. isolated from chicken. Southern hybridization indicated that only 2 of the 12 coagulase-negative Staphylococcus spp. strains contained the ermC gene on the plasmid; 1 strain of Staphylococcus xylosus harbored the ermC gene on a 2.5-kb plasmid, and 1 strain of Staphylococcus cohnii harbored the gene on a 4.0-kb plasmid. Twelve of the 34 strains of Staphylococcus aureus contained the ermC gene. Eleven of these strains had the ermC gene on a 2.5-kb plasmid, and 1 strain had the gene on a 4.0-kb plasmid. Ten of the 12 coagulase-negative Staphylococcus spp. and 22 of the 34 coagulase-positive Staphylococcus spp. harbored the ermA gene exclusively on the chromosome. Two different ermA EcoRI restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP) were identified. A majority of the isolates was found to have two chromosomal inserts (8.0- and 6.2-kb EcoRI fragments) of ermA. One strain of S. aureus had different chromosomal inserts (6.4- and 5.8-kb EcoRI fragments) of ermA. Our results indicate that either the ermC or ermA gene, homologous to those described in human isolates, was present in all avian Staphylococcus spp. and that ermA was the predominant gene in coagulase-negative and coagulase-positive avian Staphylococcus spp. The size and copy numbers of the ermA gene were different from its human counterpart.

  8. [The correlation between phenotypes and genotypes of macrolides, lincosamides and streptogramins B resistance in Staphylococcus aureus].

    PubMed

    Młynarczyk, Grazyna; Młynarczyk, Andrzej; Szymanek, Ksenia; Bilewska, Agata; Luczak, Mirosław

    2007-01-01

    For 31 clinical strains of S. aureus the correlation between phenotype and genotype of resistance to macrolides, lincosamides and streptogramins B (MLSB) was established.. Phenotypes were determined on the basis of: susceptibility to erythromycin and clindamycin and the ability to an induction of the resistance (phenotypes S, susceptible; R , constitutive resistant, D, resistant after induction with erythromycin, D+, resistant after induction with erythromycin and with a presence of the small colonies inside inhibition zone between erythromycin and clindamycin discs), and on the basis of the resistance to spectinomycin (spR, resistant, spS, susceptible). Among examined S. aureus strains eight phenotypes of resistance to MLSB were recognized (the corresponding genotypes are given in brackets). Six phenotypes were typical: SspS (lack of MLS-B resistance genes), NEGspS (msrA/B, 1 strain), D+spS (ermCi, 4 strains),. DspR (ermAi, 11 strains and ermAi + msrA/B, 2 strains), RspR (ermAc, 4 strains and ermA + msrA/B,1 strain and ermA + ermC, 1 strain) and RspS (ermCc, 6 strains and ermB, 1 strain). Two rare phenotypes in two single strains were observed: SspR (ermAi, the strain with altered inducibility, inductor other than erythromycin) and DspS (ermAi, presumably mutation or lack of spc in Tn554).

  9. Characterization of Erythromycin-Resistant Isolates of Staphylococcus aureus Recovered in the United States from 1958 through 1969

    PubMed Central

    Nicola, Federico G.; McDougal, Linda K.; Biddle, James W.; Tenover, Fred C.

    1998-01-01

    We tested 16 erythromycin-resistant clinical isolates of S. aureus, recovered from patients hospitalized in the United States from 1958 to 1969, for the presence of ermA, ermB, and ermC by using PCR. Fifteen of 16 isolates contained at least one copy of ermA; the remaining isolate, which was also clindamycin resistant, contained ermB. Eight of the 15 isolates harboring ermA, all of which were inducible, contained a single copy of the gene in the chromosome, while the remaining seven isolates had two copies of the gene. ermB was plasmid encoded and mediated constitutive resistance to erythromycin. PMID:9797248

  10. DICER1 Mutations in Embryonal Rhabdomyosarcomas from Children With and Without Familial PPB-Tumor Predisposition Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Doros, Leslie; Yang, Jiandong; Dehner, Louis; Rossi, Christopher T.; Skiver, Kerry; Jarzembowski, Jason; Messinger, Yoav; Schultz, Kris Ann; Williams, Gretchen; Hill, D. Ashley

    2013-01-01

    Embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (ERMS) is the most common sarcoma of childhood and is a component of the familial Pleuropulmonary Blastoma (PPB)-predisposition syndrome. Using the PPB model, we hypothesized that DICER1 mutations would be found in familial and sporadic forms of ERMS. Blood samples from four children with familial PPB and ERMS, and an additional 52 sporadic ERMS tumors were tested for DICER1 mutations. DICER1 mutations were found in all 4 patients with familial PPB and in 2 of 52 (3.8%) patients with sporadic ERMS. Our findings confirm the pathogenetic relationship between ERMS and PPB and suggest that ERMS may result from abnormal miRNA regulation. PMID:22180160

  11. Epiretinal membrane: optical coherence tomography-based diagnosis and classification

    PubMed Central

    Stevenson, William; Prospero Ponce, Claudia M; Agarwal, Daniel R; Gelman, Rachel; Christoforidis, John B

    2016-01-01

    Epiretinal membrane (ERM) is a disorder of the vitreomacular interface characterized by symptoms of decreased visual acuity and metamorphopsia. The diagnosis and classification of ERM has traditionally been based on clinical examination findings. However, modern optical coherence tomography (OCT) has proven to be more sensitive than clinical examination for the diagnosis of ERM. Furthermore, OCT-derived findings, such as central foveal thickness and inner segment ellipsoid band integrity, have shown clinical relevance in the setting of ERM. To date, no OCT-based ERM classification scheme has been widely accepted for use in clinical practice and investigation. Herein, we review the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and classification of ERMs and propose an OCT-based ERM classification system. PMID:27099458

  12. Epiretinal membrane: optical coherence tomography-based diagnosis and classification.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, William; Prospero Ponce, Claudia M; Agarwal, Daniel R; Gelman, Rachel; Christoforidis, John B

    2016-01-01

    Epiretinal membrane (ERM) is a disorder of the vitreomacular interface characterized by symptoms of decreased visual acuity and metamorphopsia. The diagnosis and classification of ERM has traditionally been based on clinical examination findings. However, modern optical coherence tomography (OCT) has proven to be more sensitive than clinical examination for the diagnosis of ERM. Furthermore, OCT-derived findings, such as central foveal thickness and inner segment ellipsoid band integrity, have shown clinical relevance in the setting of ERM. To date, no OCT-based ERM classification scheme has been widely accepted for use in clinical practice and investigation. Herein, we review the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and classification of ERMs and propose an OCT-based ERM classification system.

  13. Separating mitochondrial protein assembly and endoplasmic reticulum tethering by selective coupling of Mdm10.

    PubMed

    Ellenrieder, Lars; Opaliński, Łukasz; Becker, Lars; Krüger, Vivien; Mirus, Oliver; Straub, Sebastian P; Ebell, Katharina; Flinner, Nadine; Stiller, Sebastian B; Guiard, Bernard; Meisinger, Chris; Wiedemann, Nils; Schleiff, Enrico; Wagner, Richard; Pfanner, Nikolaus; Becker, Thomas

    2016-10-10

    The endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondria encounter structure (ERMES) connects the mitochondrial outer membrane with the ER. Multiple functions have been linked to ERMES, including maintenance of mitochondrial morphology, protein assembly and phospholipid homeostasis. Since the mitochondrial distribution and morphology protein Mdm10 is present in both ERMES and the mitochondrial sorting and assembly machinery (SAM), it is unknown how the ERMES functions are connected on a molecular level. Here we report that conserved surface areas on opposite sides of the Mdm10 β-barrel interact with SAM and ERMES, respectively. We generated point mutants to separate protein assembly (SAM) from morphology and phospholipid homeostasis (ERMES). Our study reveals that the β-barrel channel of Mdm10 serves different functions. Mdm10 promotes the biogenesis of α-helical and β-barrel proteins at SAM and functions as integral membrane anchor of ERMES, demonstrating that SAM-mediated protein assembly is distinct from ER-mitochondria contact sites.

  14. An ethanol extract of Ramulus mori improves blood circulation by inhibiting platelet aggregation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jiyun; Kwon, Gayeung; Park, Jieun; Kim, Jeong-Keun; Choe, Soo Young; Seo, Yoonhee; Lim, Young-Hee

    2016-07-01

    Inappropriate platelet aggregation can cause blood coagulation and thrombosis. In this study, the effect of an ethanol extract of Ramulus mori (ERM) on blood circulation was investigated. The antithrombotic activity of ERM on rat carotid arterial thrombosis was evaluated in vivo, and the effect of ERM on platelet aggregation and blood coagulation time was evaluated ex vivo. To evaluate the safety of ERM, its cytotoxicity to platelets and its effect on tail bleeding time were assessed; ERM was not toxic to rat platelets and did not prolong bleeding time. Moreover, administering ERM to rats had a significant preventive effect on carotid arterial thrombosis in vivo, and significantly inhibited adenosine diphosphate- and collagen-induced platelet aggregation ex vivo, whereas it did not prolong coagulation periods, such as prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time. The results suggest that ERM is effective in improving blood circulation via antiplatelet activity rather than anticoagulation activity.

  15. Fate and transport of tylosin-resistant bacteria and macrolide resistance genes in artificially drained agricultural fields receiving swine manure.

    PubMed

    Luby, Elizabeth M; Moorman, Thomas B; Soupir, Michelle L

    2016-04-15

    Application of manure from swine treated with antibiotics introduces antibiotics and antibiotic resistance genes to soil with the potential for further movement in drainage water, which may contribute to the increase in antibiotic resistance in non-agricultural settings. We compared losses of antibiotic-resistant Enterococcus and macrolide-resistance (erm and msrA) genes in water draining from plots with or without swine manure application under chisel plow and no till conditions. Concentrations of ermB, ermC and ermF were all >10(9)copies g(-1) in manure from tylosin-treated swine, and application of this manure resulted in short-term increases in the abundance of these genes in soil. Abundances of ermB, ermC and ermF in manured soil returned to levels identified in non-manured control plots by the spring following manure application. Tillage practices yielded no significant differences (p>0.10) in enterococci or erm gene concentrations in drainage water and were therefore combined for further analysis. While enterococci and tylosin-resistant enterococci concentrations in drainage water showed no effects of manure application, ermB and ermF concentrations in drainage water from manured plots were significantly higher (p<0.01) than concentrations coming from non-manured plots. ErmB and ermF were detected in 78% and 44%, respectively, of water samples draining from plots receiving manure. Although ermC had the highest concentrations of the three genes in drainage water, there was no effect of manure application on ermC abundance. MsrA was not detected in manure, soil or water. This study is the first to report significant increases in abundance of resistance genes in waters draining from agricultural land due to manure application. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Spontaneous release of epiretinal membrane in a young weight-lifting athlete by presumed central rupture and centrifugal pull

    PubMed Central

    Mansour, Ahmad M; Mansour, Hana A; Arevalo, J Fernando

    2014-01-01

    This patient presented for surgery at the age of 32 years, 14 months after his initial complaint of metamorphopsia and visual loss in the right eye. Past tests demonstrated a whitish epiretinal membrane (ERM) with translucent stress lines over a thickened macula. Visual acuity was found on last presentation to be normal with minimal alteration on Amsler grid testing. A torn ERM was found in the center with left-over ERM temporally and rolled-over ERM nasally at the site of the epicenter with no posterior vitreous detachment. Visual recovery occurred gradually over several days 2 months prior to presentation apparently following heavy weight-lifting with a sensation of severe eye pressure. Sequential funduscopy and optical coherence tomography scans demonstrated the peeling of an ERM accompanied by normalization of foveal thickness. Valsalva maneuver had put excessive tension on ERM which tore in its center at the weakest line with gradual contraction of the ERM away from the fovea towards the peripapillary area. This is a new mechanism of self-separation of ERM induced by Valsalva. ERM in young subjects is subject to rupture and subsequent separation by tangential traction. There are three mechanisms for spontaneous separation of ERM: 1) posterior vitreous detachment with pulling of ERM by detaching vitreous (most common in adults); 2) the contracting forces of the immature ERM become stronger than its adhesions to the retina resulting in slow tangential traction on the edges of the ERM and gradual separation from the edges towards the center (remodeling common in youngsters); and 3) acute tearing of ERM at its weakest central point and retraction of part of the membrane towards the epicenter (current case report). PMID:25484573

  17. [Effects of Thermophilic Composting on Antibiotic Resistance Genes (ARGs) of Swine Manure Source].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ning-guo; Huang, Nan; Wang, Wei-wei; Yu, Man; Chen, Xiao-yang; Yao, Yan-lai; Wang, Wei-ping; Hong, Chun-lai

    2016-05-15

    To investigate the effects of thermophilic composting process on antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) of swine manure source at a field scale, the abundance of four erythromycin resistance genes (ermA, ermB, ermC and ermF), three β-lactam resistance genes (blaTEM, blaCTX and blaSHV) and two quinolone resistance genes (qnrA and qnrS) were quantified by quantitative PCR ( qPCR) during the composting process. The results suggested that the erm genes' copy numbers were significantly higher than those of the bla and qnr genes in the early stage of composting (P < 0.01). The maximum abundance of erm genes was ermB (9.88 x 10⁸ copies · g⁻¹), following by ermF (9.4 x 10⁸ copies · g⁻¹). At the end of the composting process, bla and qnr genes were at low levels, while erm genes were still at high levels. Even through ermF was proliferated comparing with the initial copies. These results indicated that thermophilic composting process could not effectively remove all ARGs. For some ARGs, compost may be a good bioreactor resulting in their proliferation. Application of composting products on farmland may cause transference of ARGs.

  18. Comparison of Gene Expression Profile of Epiretinal Membranes Obtained from Eyes with Proliferative Vitreoretinopathy to That of Secondary Epiretinal Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Asato, Ryo; Yoshida, Shigeo; Ogura, Atsushi; Nakama, Takahito; Ishikawa, Keijiro; Nakao, Shintaro; Sassa, Yukio; Enaida, Hiroshi; Oshima, Yuji; Ikeo, Kazuho; Gojobori, Takashi; Kono, Toshihiro; Ishibashi, Tatsuro

    2013-01-01

    Background Proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) is a destructive complication of retinal detachment and vitreoretinal surgery which can lead to severe vision reduction by tractional retinal detachments. The purpose of this study was to determine the gene expression profile of epiretinal membranes (ERMs) associated with a PVR (PVR-ERM) and to compare it to the expression profile of less-aggressive secondary ERMs. Methodology/Principal Findings A PCR-amplified complementary DNA (cDNA) library was constructed using the RNAs isolated from ERMs obtained during vitrectomy. The sequence from the 5′ end was obtained for randomly selected clones and used to generate expressed sequence tags (ESTs). We obtained 1116 nonredundant clusters representing individual genes expressed in PVR-ERMs, and 799 clusters representing the genes expressed in secondary ERMs. The transcriptome of the PVR-ERMs was subdivided by functional subsets of genes related to metabolism, cell adhesion, cytoskeleton, signaling, and other functions, by FatiGo analysis. The genes highly expressed in PVR-ERMs were compared to those expressed in the secondary ERMs, and these were subdivided by cell adhesion, proliferation, and other functions. Querying 10 cell adhesion-related genes against the STRING database yielded 70 possible physical relationships to other genes/proteins, which included an additional 60 genes that were not detected in the PVR-ERM library. Of these, soluble CD44 and soluble vascular cellular adhesion molecule-1 were significantly increased in the vitreous of patients with PVR. Conclusions/Significance Our results support an earlier hypothesis that a PVR-ERM, even from genomic points of view, is an aberrant form of wound healing response. Genes preferentially expressed in PVR-ERMs may play an important role in the progression of PVR and could be served as therapeutic targets. PMID:23372684

  19. Relationship between Antibiotic Susceptibility and Genotype in Mycobacterium abscessus Clinical Isolates.

    PubMed

    Li, Bing; Yang, Shiyi; Chu, Haiqing; Zhang, Zhemin; Liu, Weijia; Luo, Liulin; Ma, Wei; Xu, Xiaogang

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the antibiotic susceptibility and resistance related genotypes of Mycobacterium abscessus. One hundred sixty-two clinical isolates were collected. Genomic data were obtained by whole genome sequencing. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis was conducted using the NCBI GenBank database and BLAST algorithm. The following genes were of interest: erm(41), rrl and rrs. Erm(41) was further divided into 3 sequevars: erm(41)C28, erm(41)T28, and M type [erm(41) with deletions in nucleotides 64 and 65, or 159 through 432]. Antibiotic susceptibility was assessed at 3 days (early reading time, ERT) and 14 days (late reading time, LRT) after clarithromycin (CLA) treatment. Three patterns of CLA resistance were observed. (1) Fifty-five (acquired resistance) isolates [45 erm(41)T28, 1 erm(41)C28 and 9 M type] exhibited MIC ≥8 mg/L at ERT; among these isolates, 10 had an rrl 2058/2059 mutation. (2) Sixty-two subsp. abscessus and 2 subsp. massiliense (induced resistance) isolates exhibited MIC ≤4 mg/L at ERT, but ≥8 mg/L at LRT. (3) Forty-three (sensitive and intermediate) isolates [14 erm(41)C28, 1 erm(41)T28, and 28 M type] exhibited MIC ≤4 mg/L at both ERT and LRT. No rrs 1408 mutation or other meaningful SNP was found in 3 amikacin-resistant isolates. No correlation was found between rrl, erm(41) or rrs and susceptibility to the 8 other antibiotics tested. The rrl and erm(41) genotypes could predict the CLA resistance of M. abscessus clinical isolates. China has a large number of CLA-resistant M. abscessus isolates with erm(41)T28 sequevar. Treatment of M. abscessus infections should be based upon a comprehensive consideration of factors that include genotype and geographic location.

  20. Identifying risks in the realm of enterprise risk management.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Roberta

    2016-01-01

    An enterprise risk management (ERM) discipline is comprehensive and organization-wide. The effectiveness of ERM is governed in part by the strength and breadth of its practices and processes. An essential element in decision making is a thorough process by which organizational risks and value opportunities can be identified. This article will offer identification techniques that go beyond those used in traditional risk management programs and demonstrate how these techniques can be used to identify risks and opportunity in the ERM environment.

  1. Paternal uniparental disomy with segmental loss of heterozygosity of chromosome 11 are hallmark characteristics of syndromic and sporadic embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Katherine M; Stabley, Deborah L; Holbrook, Jennifer; Sahraoui, Rebecca; Sadreameli, Alexa; Conard, Katrina; Baker, Laura; Gripp, Karen W; Sol-Church, Katia

    2016-12-01

    Costello syndrome (CS) arises from a typically paternally derived germline mutation in the proto-oncogene HRAS, and is considered a rasopathy. CS results in failure-to-thrive, intellectual disabilities, short stature, coarse facial features, skeletal abnormalities, congenital heart disease, and a predisposition for cancer, most commonly embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (ERMS). The goal of this study was to characterize CS ERMS at the molecular level and to determine how divergent it is from sporadic ERMS. We characterized eleven ERMS tumors from eight unrelated CS patients, carrying paternally derived HRAS c.34G>A (p.Gly12Ser; 6) or c.35G>C (p.Gly12Ala; 2) mutations. Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) was evaluated in all CS ERMS by microarray and/or short tandem repeat (STR) markers spanning the entire chromosome 11. Eight CS ERMS tumors displayed complete paternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 11 (pUPD11), whereas two displayed UPD only at 11p and a second primary ERMS tumor showed UPD limited to 11p15.5, the classical hallmark for ERMS. Three sporadic ERMS cell lines (RD, Rh36, Rh18) and eight formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) ERMS tumors were also analyzed for RAS mutations and LOH status. We found a higher than anticipated frequency of RAS mutations (HRAS or NRAS; 50%) in sporadic ERMS cell lines/tumors. Unexpectedly, complete uniparental disomy (UPD11) was observed in five specimens, while the other six showed LOH extending across the p and q arms of chromosome 11. In this study, we are able to clearly demonstrate complete UPD11 in both syndromic and sporadic ERMS. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Paternal Uniparental Disomy with Segmental Loss of Heterozygosity of Chromosome 11 are Hallmark Characteristics of Syndromic and Sporadic Embryonal Rhabdomyosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, Katherine M.; Stabley, Deborah L.; Holbrook, Jennifer; Sahraoui, Rebecca; Sadreameli, Alexa; Conard, Katrina; Baker, Laura; Gripp, Karen W.; Sol-Church, Katia

    2016-01-01

    Costello syndrome (CS) arises from a typically paternally derived germline mutation in the proto-oncogene HRAS, and is considered a rasopathy. CS results in failure-to-thrive, intellectual disabilities, short stature, coarse facial features, skeletal abnormalities, congenital heart disease, and a predisposition for cancer, most commonly embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (ERMS). The goal of this study was to characterize CS ERMS at the molecular level and to determine how divergent it is from sporadic ERMS. We characterized eleven ERMS tumors from eight unrelated CS patients, carrying paternally derived HRAS c.34G>A (p.Gly12Ser; 6) or c.35G>C (p.Gly12Ala; 2) mutations. Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) was evaluated in all CS ERMS by microarray and/or short tandem repeat (STR) markers spanning the entire chromosome 11. Eight CS ERMS tumors displayed complete paternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 11 (pUPD11), whereas two displayed UPD only at 11p and a second primary ERMS tumor showed UPD limited to 11p15.5, the classical hallmark for ERMS. Three sporadic ERMS cell lines (RD, Rh36, Rh18) and eight formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) ERMS tumors were also analyzed for RAS mutations and LOH status. We found a higher than anticipated frequency of RAS mutations (HRAS or NRAS; 50%) in sporadic ERMS cell lines/tumors. Unexpectedly, complete uniparental disomy (UPD11) was observed in five specimens, while the other six showed LOH extending across the p and q arms of chromosome 11. In this study, we are able to clearly demonstrate complete UPD11 in both syndromic and sporadic ERMS. PMID:27589201

  3. Myc oncogene expression and nude mouse tumorigenicity and metastasis formation are higher in alveolar than embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Kouraklis, G; Triche, T J; Wesley, R; Tsokos, M

    1999-04-01

    Accumulated clinical evidence suggests that alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma (ARMS) is more aggressive than embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (ERMS). Here, we study six childhood rhabdomyosarcoma cell lines, three ERMS and three ARMS. We have assayed the ability of the tumor cells to grow in culture and in nude mice as well as their propensity for pulmonary metastasis formation by tail vein injection. We also compared levels of c- and N-myc oncogene expression and DNA copy number. We find no correlation of histologic tumor type (i.e. ERMS versus ARMS) with growth rate in culture, but we do find suggestive correlations of histologic type with tumorigenicity (mean tumor diameter in millimeters at 6 wk: ARMS 30, ERMS 10; p1 = 0.1) and metastasis formation (ARMS 12, ERMS 0; p1 = 0.1). These properties also correlate with uniform greater overexpression of c-myc in ARMS (mean 39.3-fold, range 16-83) compared with ERMS (mean 5.3, range 4-8) (p1 = 0.05, control fibroblasts = 1). Although c-myc was often amplified in vitro (four of six lines), there was no correlation with histologic type (2/3 ARMS, 2/3 ERMS). These data on rhabdomyosarcoma cell lines derived from verified ERMS and ARMS tumors support the impression from previous clinicopathologic observations that ARMS is a more malignant form of rhabdomyosarcoma than ERMS.

  4. Molecular epidemiology of macrolides-lincosamides-streptogramin B resistance in Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci.

    PubMed Central

    Thakker-Varia, S; Jenssen, W D; Moon-McDermott, L; Weinstein, M P; Dubin, D T

    1987-01-01

    Macrolides-lincosamides-streptogramin B (MLS) resistance is commonly found in Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci (22 and 45%, respectively, among isolates from three New Jersey hospitals). We have examined representative subsets of 107 MLS-resistant isolates for the molecular nature of the resistance determinant, the erm gene, by dot blot and Southern hybridization analysis. All of 35 S. aureus isolates examined and 39 of 42 coagulase-negative isolates examined were found to harbor the ermA or ermC evolutionary variant. Genes of the ermC class occurred exclusively on a small plasmid similar to or indistinguishable from one (pNE131) previously described in S. epidermidis. Genes of the ermA class occurred exclusively in the chromosome, and restriction patterns indicated that they were part of a transposon, Tn554, characteristic of the classical S. aureus ermA strain. Unlike S. aureus ermA strains examined previously, which harbor Tn554 at a single specific (primary) site, four of our S. aureus isolates had second inserts at different chromosomal sites. The majority of our coagulase-negative isolates had two or more inserts, neither of which occurred at the classical primary site and many of which differed from one another in location (as inferred from restriction patterns). Coagulase-negative staphylococci constitute a large reservoir of the ermA and ermC class of determinants, with clear potential for interspecies spread. Images PMID:3038007

  5. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors Antagonize Distinct Pathways to Suppress Tumorigenesis of Embryonal Rhabdomyosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Vleeshouwer-Neumann, Terra; Phelps, Michael; Bammler, Theo K.; MacDonald, James W.; Jenkins, Isaac; Chen, Eleanor Y.

    2015-01-01

    Embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (ERMS) is the most common soft tissue cancer in children. The prognosis of patients with relapsed or metastatic disease remains poor. ERMS genomes show few recurrent mutations, suggesting that other molecular mechanisms such as epigenetic regulation might play a major role in driving ERMS tumor biology. In this study, we have demonstrated the diverse roles of histone deacetylases (HDACs) in the pathogenesis of ERMS by characterizing effects of HDAC inhibitors, trichostatin A (TSA) and suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA; also known as vorinostat) in vitro and in vivo. TSA and SAHA suppress ERMS tumor growth and progression by inducing myogenic differentiation as well as reducing the self-renewal and migratory capacity of ERMS cells. Differential expression profiling and pathway analysis revealed downregulation of key oncogenic pathways upon HDAC inhibitor treatment. By gain-of-function, loss-of-function, and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) studies, we show that Notch1- and EphrinB1-mediated pathways are regulated by HDACs to inhibit differentiation and enhance migratory capacity of ERMS cells, respectively. Our study demonstrates that aberrant HDAC activity plays a major role in ERMS pathogenesis. Druggable targets in the molecular pathways affected by HDAC inhibitors represent novel therapeutic options for ERMS patients. PMID:26636678

  6. [Association of epiretinal membranes with macular edema in pars planitis].

    PubMed

    Salcedo-Villanueva, G; Arellanes-García, L; Fromow-Guerra, J; Hernández-Quintela, E

    2014-01-01

    Pars planitis (PP) is a form of intermediate uveitis that manifests with several posterior segment complications, including cystoid macular edema (CME) and epiretinal membrane formation (ERM). On the presence of CME the patient is usually treated with anti-inflammatory and/or immunosuppressive drugs. However the presence of CME may coexist with ERM formation, and therefore the treatment could be different. To determine the association between ERM and CME in PP. Case control series. The charts of patients diagnosed with PP were retrospectively reviewed. All patients had fluorescein angiogram (FA) and spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Presence of ERM was determined by SD-OCT, while CME was determined by FA. Contingency tables were used to determine the risk of developing CME with ERM. 31 eyes presented ERM. 16 eyes presented CME. Relative risk to have CME and ERM was 0.971, with a P value of 0.77 (χ(2)). There is no association between ERM formation and the development of CME. There is no evidence to suggest a surgical approach as first line of treatment with the presence of ERM in PP. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  7. Reduction of Human Embryonal Rhabdomyosarcoma Tumor Growth by Inhibition of the Hedgehog Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Tostar, Ulrica; Toftgård, Rune; Zaphiropoulos, Peter G.; Shimokawa, Takashi

    2010-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is the most frequent soft-tissue sarcoma in children. Embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (E-RMS) represents the most common RMS subtype, but the molecular events driving this tumor are still largely unknown. The hedgehog (HH) pathway, a major signal transduction cascade, is linked with many cancers, including RMS. As we previously have detected loss of heterozygosity of PTCH1 in E-RMS, we now examined 8 E-RMS tumor samples and 5 E-RMS cell lines for the presence of PTCH1 mutations, but none was detected. However, in the E-RMS cell lines, a variable pattern of up-regulated expression of certain HH signaling target genes, including HHIP, PTCH1, SFRP1, and GLI1, was observed. Moreover, treatment with the small molecule HH signaling inhibitors cyclopamine and GANT61 inhibited cell proliferation in all E-RMS cell lines analyzed. Interestingly, GANT61 was more effective, and this was accompanied by increased apoptosis, while cyclopamine promoted necrotic events. Specific knockdown of SMO had no effect on the proliferation of E-RMS cells, indicating the presence of an SMO-independent HH signaling pathway in the E-RMS cell lines. Furthermore, in an in vivo xenograft model, tumor growth was significantly reduced by GANT61 treatment of E-RMS cells. Additionally, siRNA experiments provided evidence that inhibition of GLI1 or GLI3 but not GLI2 was sufficient to reduce proliferation of these cell lines. As GANT61 is known to block GLI1/GLI2 transcriptional activity, the inhibition of E-RMS growth by GANT61 is likely to be mediated through GLI1. In conclusion, our findings implicate that GLI1 could constitute an effective therapeutic target in pediatric E-RMS. PMID:21779473

  8. Molecular Basis of Intrinsic Macrolide Resistance in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex

    PubMed Central

    Buriánková, Karolína; Doucet-Populaire, Florence; Dorson, Olivier; Gondran, Anne; Ghnassia, Jean-Claude; Weiser, Jaroslav; Pernodet, Jean-Luc

    2004-01-01

    The intrinsic resistance of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC) to most antibiotics, including macrolides, is generally attributed to the low permeability of the mycobacterial cell wall. However, nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are much more sensitive to macrolides than members of the MTC. A search for macrolide resistance determinants within the genome of M. tuberculosis revealed the presence of a sequence encoding a putative rRNA methyltransferase. The deduced protein is similar to Erm methyltransferases, which confer macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin (MLS) resistance by methylation of 23S rRNA, and was named ErmMT. The corresponding gene, ermMT (erm37), is present in all members of the MTC but is absent in NTM species. Part of ermMT is deleted in some vaccine strains of Mycobacterium bovis BCG, such as the Pasteur strain, which lack the RD2 region. The Pasteur strain was susceptible to MLS antibiotics, whereas MTC species harboring the RD2 region were resistant to them. The expression of ermMT in the macrolide-sensitive Mycobacterium smegmatis and BCG Pasteur conferred MLS resistance. The resistance patterns and ribosomal affinity for erythromycin of Mycobacterium host strains expressing ermMT, srmA (monomethyltransferase from Streptomyces ambofaciens), and ermE (dimethyltransferase from Saccharopolyspora erythraea) were compared, and the ones conferred by ErmMT were similar to those conferred by SrmA, corresponding to the MLS type I phenotype. These results suggest that ermMT plays a major role in the intrinsic macrolide resistance of members of the MTC and could be the first example of a gene conferring resistance by target modification in mycobacteria. PMID:14693532

  9. Molecular basis of intrinsic macrolide resistance in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex.

    PubMed

    Buriánková, Karolína; Doucet-Populaire, Florence; Dorson, Olivier; Gondran, Anne; Ghnassia, Jean-Claude; Weiser, Jaroslav; Pernodet, Jean-Luc

    2004-01-01

    The intrinsic resistance of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC) to most antibiotics, including macrolides, is generally attributed to the low permeability of the mycobacterial cell wall. However, nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are much more sensitive to macrolides than members of the MTC. A search for macrolide resistance determinants within the genome of M. tuberculosis revealed the presence of a sequence encoding a putative rRNA methyltransferase. The deduced protein is similar to Erm methyltransferases, which confer macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin (MLS) resistance by methylation of 23S rRNA, and was named ErmMT. The corresponding gene, ermMT (erm37), is present in all members of the MTC but is absent in NTM species. Part of ermMT is deleted in some vaccine strains of Mycobacterium bovis BCG, such as the Pasteur strain, which lack the RD2 region. The Pasteur strain was susceptible to MLS antibiotics, whereas MTC species harboring the RD2 region were resistant to them. The expression of ermMT in the macrolide-sensitive Mycobacterium smegmatis and BCG Pasteur conferred MLS resistance. The resistance patterns and ribosomal affinity for erythromycin of Mycobacterium host strains expressing ermMT, srmA (monomethyltransferase from Streptomyces ambofaciens), and ermE (dimethyltransferase from Saccharopolyspora erythraea) were compared, and the ones conferred by ErmMT were similar to those conferred by SrmA, corresponding to the MLS type I phenotype. These results suggest that ermMT plays a major role in the intrinsic macrolide resistance of members of the MTC and could be the first example of a gene conferring resistance by target modification in mycobacteria.

  10. Seasonal variation and removal efficiency of antibiotic resistance genes during wastewater treatment of swine farms.

    PubMed

    Sui, Qianwen; Zhang, Junya; Tong, Juan; Chen, Meixue; Wei, Yuansong

    2017-04-01

    The seasonal variation and removal efficiency of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs), including tetracycline resistance genes (tetG, tetM, and tetX) and macrolide (ermB, ermF, ereA, and mefA), were investigated in two typical swine wastewater treatment systems in both winter and summer. ARGs, class 1 integron gene, and 16S rRNA gene were quantified using real-time polymerase chain reaction assays. There was a 0.31-3.52 log variation in ARGs in raw swine wastewater, and the abundance of ARGs in winter was higher than in summer. tetM, tetX, ermB, ermF, and mefA were highly abundant. The abundance of ARGs was effectively reduced by most individual treatment process and the removal efficiencies of ARGs were higher in winter than in summer. However, when examining relative abundance, the fate of ARGs was quite variable. Anaerobic digestion reduced the relative abundance of tetX, ermB, ermF, and mefA, while lagoon treatment decreased tetM, ermB, ermF, and mefA. Sequencing batch reactor (SBR) decreased tetM, ermB, and ermF, but biofilters and wetlands did not display consistent removal efficiency on ARGs in two sampling seasons. As far as the entire treatment system is concerned, ermB and mefA were effectively reduced in both winter and summer in both total and relative abundance. The relative abundances of tetG and ereA were significantly correlated with intI1 (p < 0.01), and both tetG and ereA increased after wastewater treatment. This may pose a great threat to public health.

  11. Positive everyday experiences interact with social support to predict depression in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Gray A; Arnett, Peter A

    2010-11-01

    Both social support and stress predict depression in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. Little work has been done on the relationship between positive life experiences and depression in this group. Ninety MS patients completed the Social Support Questionnaire (SSQ), the Hassles and Uplifts Scale (HUS), the Chicago Multiscale Depression Inventory (CMDI), and the Affective Reading Span Task (ARST). The Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) was also used. Separate regression analyses were conducted with the EDSS entered at step 1, ARST memory bias score at step 2, SSQ at step 3, either Hassles or Uplifts at step 4, and the interaction term at step 5 to predict depression. Uplifts interacted significantly with social support to predict depression, but hassles did not. After considering disability level, memory bias, and social support and uplifts main effects, the interaction of uplifts and social support accounted for nearly 5% independent variance in depression (p < .05). These results suggest that the absence of uplifts, combined with low levels of social support, is related to depression in MS patients. More generally, these data indicate that it is important to study the absence of positive experiences along with stress and negative experiences in this population.

  12. Long-term clinical and radiologic documentation of a maxillary odontogenic myxoma from early clinical signs to implant-supported prosthodontic rehabilitation: Case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Berger, Sebastian; Hakl, Paul; Meier, Marius; Sutter, Walter; Kielbassa, Andrej M; Turhani, Dritan

    2017-01-01

    Odontogenic myxoma (OM) is a non-metastasizing neoplasm of mesenchymal origin, arising in the tooth-bearing areas of the jaws. When regarding the whole spectrum of differential diagnoses for osteolytic jaw lesions, OM constitutes a benign tumor rarely located in the maxilla. Radiographically, displacement of teeth and frequent involvement of the sinus will be found with advanced maxillary OM. The tumor can be removed by means of several techniques, ranging from conservative measures to extended surgical procedures that differ according to type of bone resection and reconstruction of the defect. This report documents 10 years of follow-up in a patient suffering from a Type IV lesion of maxillary OM; with a radiographically proven growth extending into the right maxillary sinus, the patient underwent a segmental maxillectomy. After a tumor-free period of 5 years, the alveolar ridge splitting technique (ARST) was modified to insert dental implants into the horizontally deficient alveolar ridge of the maxilla, and final rehabilitation by means of a conditionally removable prosthetic reconstruction followed. In this paper, the most striking clinical signs of OM with which the dentist should be familiar are reviewed, and we discuss the advantages of segmental maxillectomy in case of an OM, along with the possibility of using ARST, aiming at prosthetic rehabilitation by placement of dental implants in cases of moderate alveolar ridge deficiency after tumor resection.

  13. Cognitive architectures and autonomy: Commentary and Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-11-01

    Editors: Włodzisław Duch / Ah-Hwee Tan / Stan Franklin Autonomy for AGI Cristiano Castelfranchi 31 Are Disembodied Agents Really Autonomous? Antonio Chella 33 The Perception-…-Action Cycle Cognitive Architecture and Autonomy: the View from the Brain Vassilis Cutsuridis 36 Autonomy Requires Creativity and Meta-Learning Włodzisław Duch 39 Meta Learning, Change of Internal Workings, and LIDA Ryan McCall / Stan Franklin 42 An Appeal for Declaring Research Goals Brandon Rohrer 45 The Development of Cognition as the Basis for Autonomy Frank van der Velde 47 Autonomy and Intelligence Pei Wang 49 Autonomy, Isolation, and Collective Intelligence Nikolaos Mavridis 51 Response to Comments Kristinn R. Thórisson / Helgi Páll Helgasson 56

  14. Thinking beyond "the Way We've Always Done It"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohler, Lila

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the future potential of electronic resources management (ERM) organization, within the development of the next-generation integrated library systems (ILS), as a very promising strategy. This also presents enormous challenges to ERM librarians though, especially on how to determine standards and workflows. The…

  15. "They Will Post a Law about Playing Soccer" and Other Ethnic/Racial Microaggressions in Organized Activities Experienced by Mexican-Origin Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Alex R.; Menjívar, Cecilia; Vest Ettekal, Andrea; Simpkins, Sandra D.; Gaskin, Erin R.; Pesch, Annelise

    2016-01-01

    Organized activities have been found to provide positive experiences for Latino adolescents to develop confidence and learn critical life skills; however, these programs are sometimes a context where youth encounter negative experiences related to ethnic/racial microaggressions (ERMs). This qualitative study explores the types of ERMs that…

  16. [Rapid detection of oxacillin and erythromycin resistance genes in Staphylococcus aureus using multiplex PCR].

    PubMed

    Huang, Ge; Zhou, Xiao-hong; Jiang, Wen-ling; Rong, Ka-bin; Zhao, Yin

    2008-04-01

    To establish a rapid multiplex PCR (MPCR) detection system of oxacillin and erythromycin resistance genes in Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and evaluate the genotype distribution of the genes associated to mecA, ermA and ermC resistance in Guangzhou. The S. aureus strains were identified and susceptibility tests were performed using VITEK-60 or PHOENIX-100 system. The inducible resistance to clindamycin of strains with of erythromycin resistance was conducted using D-test, and the MPCR system of for detecting the antibiotic resistance genes was optimized. The MPCR assay for detecting the resistance genes was constructed successfully. According to the results of MPCR, the positivity rates for mecA, ermA and ermC genes among the 124 strains of S. aureus isolated from clinical samples were 56.5%, 50% and 33.9%, respectively. Good correlation was observed between the antibiotic resistance phenotypes and the S. aureus genotypes. mecA were detected in all the methicillin-resistant S. aureus strains, and ermA and/or ermC in 97.7% of the S. aureus strains with erythromycin resistance. This MPCR system allows rapid and reliable analysis of antibiotic resistance genotypes of S. aureus isolated from clinical samples. mecA, ermA, and ermC genes are among the predominant genetic determinants for the resistance to oxacillin and erythromycin in S. aureus isolates in Guangzhou.

  17. Transfer of Erythromycin Resistance from Poultry to Human Clinical Strains of Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Saeed A.; Nawaz, Mohamed S.; Khan, Ashraf A.; Cerniglia, Carl E.

    2000-01-01

    The transfer of ermA and ermC genes, the two most common resistance determinants of erythromycin resistance, was studied with Luria-Bertani broth in the absence of additional Ca2+ or Mg2+ ions. Fifteen human and five poultry isolates of Staphylococcus aureus, which were resistant to erythromycin but carried different genetic markers for erythromycin resistance, were used for conjugation. Since both the donors (Amps-Tetr) and recipients (Ampr-Tets) were resistant to erythromycin, the transconjugants were initially picked up as ampicillin- and tetracycline-resistant colonies. The resistance transfer mechanisms of the chromosomally located erythromycin rRNA methylase gene ermA and the plasmid-borne ermC gene were monitored by a multiplex PCR and gene-specific internal probing assay. Four groups of transconjugants, based upon the transfer of the ermA and/or ermC gene, were distinguished from each other by the use of this method. Selective antibiotic screening revealed only one type of transconjugant that was resistant to ampicillin and tetracycline. A high frequency of transfer (4.5 × 10−3) was observed in all of the 23 transconjugants obtained, and the direction of tetracycline and erythromycin resistance marker transfer was determined to be from poultry to clinical isolates. The transfers of the ermA and ermC genes were via transposition and transformation, respectively. PMID:10790109

  18. Emergent Motivation to Read in Prekindergarten Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zheng, Guoguo; Schwanenflugel, Paula J.; Rogers, Samantha M.

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to develop and validate a measure of emergent reading motivation designed for prekindergarten children, called the Emergent Reading Motivation Scale (ERMS). The development of the ERMS was to overcome the limitation that current existing reading motivation measures are not developmentally appropriate for young children. Fifty-six…

  19. Enterprise Risk Management Solutions: A Case Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-01

    MARKETING MIX .......................................................................................37...product, pricing, distribution, and communications, marketing mix and research [10]. B. BUSINESS OBJECTIVES The first task that faces ERMS as it...Mailers may have to be eliminated if Albert finds that the value they bring to ERMS is not significant. 37 F. MARKETING MIX After determining

  20. Multicenter Study of the Mechanisms of Resistance and Clonal Relationships of Streptococcus agalactiae Isolates Resistant to Macrolides, Lincosamides, and Ketolides in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, J. J.; Andreu, A.

    2005-01-01

    Macrolide, lincosamide, and ketolide mechanisms of resistance and clonal relationships were characterized in a collection of 79 resistant group B streptococcus isolates obtained from neonates or pregnant women. The erm(B), erm(TR), and mef(A) genes were present in 62%, 30.4%, and 3.8% of the isolates, respectively. There was considerable clonal diversity among them. PMID:15917563

  1. The conserved GTPase Gem1 regulates endoplasmic reticulum–mitochondria connections

    PubMed Central

    Kornmann, Benoît; Osman, Christof; Walter, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondria are connected to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) through specialized protein complexes. We recently identified the ER–mitochondria encounter structure (ERMES) tethering complex, which plays a role in phospholipid exchange between the two organelles. ERMES also has been implicated in the coordination of mitochondrial protein import, mitochondrial DNA replication, and mitochondrial dynamics, suggesting that these interorganelle contact sites play central regulatory roles in coordinating various aspects of the physiology of the two organelles. Here we purified ERMES complexes and identified the Ca2+-binding Miro GTPase Gem1 as an integral component of ERMES. Gem1 regulates the number and size of the ERMES complexes. In vivo, association of Gem1 to ERMES required the first of Gem1’s two GTPase domains and the first of its two functional Ca2+-binding domains. In contrast, Gem1’s second GTPase domain was required for proper ERMES function in phospholipid exchange. Our results suggest that ERMES is not a passive conduit for interorganellar lipid exchange, but that it can be regulated in response to physiological needs. Furthermore, we provide evidence that the metazoan Gem1 ortholog Miro-1 localizes to sites of ER–mitochondrial contact, suggesting that some of the features ascribed to Gem1 may be evolutionarily conserved. PMID:21825164

  2. Regulation of flagellum biosynthesis within the fish pathogen Yersinia ruckeri

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Yersinia ruckeri, a Gram negative Enterobacterium, is the causative agent of enteric red mouth disease (ERM) within farmed rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss, Walbaum). There has been an increase of ERM outbreaks in previously vaccinated trout caused by a recently emerged, non-motile variant of Y. r...

  3. Improving monitoring of erythromycin ribosome methylase genes in swine and cattle manures with gene targeted approaches

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Macrolide antibiotics are often used in feed for animal industry to prevent diseases. Resistance to these antibiotics is associated with erythromycin ribosome methylase genes (erm genes), which were first discovered in Staphylococcus aureus. The erm gene confers resistance by methylating rRNA at the...

  4. Presence and distribution of Macrolides-Lincosamide-Streptogramin resistance genes and potential indicator ARGs in the university ponds in Guangzhou, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mianzhi; Sun, Jing; Zhong, Weixin; Xiong, Wenguang; Zeng, Zhenling; Sun, Yongxue

    2016-11-01

    This study aimed to determine the occurrence, abundance, and variation of seven Macrolides-Lincosamide-Streptogramin (MLS) resistance genes (ereB, ermA, ermB, ermF, mefA, vatB, mphA) and six potential indicator ARGs (tet (B), sul1, qnrS, fexA, IntI1, ermB) from three ponds at university by quantitative PCR and assess the impacts on the surroundings. Solid samples (fish feces, soil and sediment) and water samples were tested. All the genes were found at low levels in soil samples. For the MLS resistance genes, only two MLS genes (ermB, ermF) were detected in all samples and significant correlations between ermB and Σ MLS (R = 0.91 in solid samples; R = 0.86 in water samples, p < 0.01) were found. For the potential indicators, intl1 and sul1 were present at high levels in the three different ponds while the other genes showed varying levels. These findings show that the ermB gene can probably be served as an indicator to evaluate the overall level of MLS resistance genes. The fairly low abundance of all the tested resistance genes in soil samples and the moderate levels in other samples suggests that the university ponds kept a good state and did not have a significant impact on their surroundings.

  5. "They Will Post a Law about Playing Soccer" and Other Ethnic/Racial Microaggressions in Organized Activities Experienced by Mexican-Origin Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Alex R.; Menjívar, Cecilia; Vest Ettekal, Andrea; Simpkins, Sandra D.; Gaskin, Erin R.; Pesch, Annelise

    2016-01-01

    Organized activities have been found to provide positive experiences for Latino adolescents to develop confidence and learn critical life skills; however, these programs are sometimes a context where youth encounter negative experiences related to ethnic/racial microaggressions (ERMs). This qualitative study explores the types of ERMs that…

  6. Ericoid mycorrhizal root fungi and their multicopper oxidases from a temperate forest shrub

    PubMed Central

    Wurzburger, Nina; Higgins, Brian P; Hendrick, Ronald L

    2012-01-01

    Ericoid mycorrhizal fungi (ERM) may specialize in capturing nutrients from their host's litter as a strategy for regulating nutrient cycles in terrestrial ecosystems. In spite of their potential significance, we know little about the structure of ERM fungal communities and the genetic basis of their saprotrophic traits (e.g., genes encoding extracellular enzymes). Rhododendron maximum is a model ERM understory shrub that influences the nutrient cycles of montane hardwood forests in the southern Appalachians (North Carolina, USA). We sampled ERM roots of R. maximum from organic and mineral soil horizons and identified root fungi by amplifying and sequencing internal transcribed spacer (ITS) ribosomal DNA (rDNA) collected from cultures and clones. We observed 71 fungal taxa on ERM roots, including known symbionts Rhizoscyphus ericae and Oidiodendron maius, putative symbionts from the Helotiales, Chaetothyriales, and Sebacinales, ectomycorrhizal symbionts, and saprotrophs. Supporting the idea that ERM fungi are adept saprotrophs, richness of root-fungi was greater in organic than in mineral soil horizons. To study the genetic diversity of oxidative enzymes that contribute to decomposition, we amplified and sequenced a portion of genes encoding multicopper oxidases (MCOs) from ERM ascomycetes. Most fungi possessed multiple copies of MCO sequences with strong similarities to known ferroxidases and laccases. Our findings indicate that R. maximum associates with a taxonomically and ecologically diverse fungal community. The study of MCO gene diversity and expression may be useful for understanding how ERM root fungi regulate the cycling of nutrients between the host plant and the soil environment. PMID:22408727

  7. Think Locally: A Prudent Approach to Electronic Resource Management Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gustafson-Sundell, Nat

    2011-01-01

    A few articles have drawn some amount of attention specifically to the local causes of the success or failure of electronic resource management system (ERMS) implementations. In fact, it seems clear that local conditions will largely determine whether any given ERMS implementation will succeed or fail. This statement might seem obvious, but the…

  8. Tools, Techniques, and Training: Results of an E-Resources Troubleshooting Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rathmel, Angela; Mobley, Liisa; Pennington, Buddy; Chandler, Adam

    2015-01-01

    A primary role of any e-resources librarian or staff is troubleshooting electronic resources (e-resources). While much progress has been made in many areas of e-resources management (ERM) to understand the ERM lifecycle and to manage workflows, troubleshooting access remains a challenge. This collaborative study is the result of the well-received…

  9. Leveraging Enterprise Risk Management: Opportunity for Greater Relevance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abraham, Janice M.; Baird, Robert; Neugebauer, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Enterprise Risk Management (ERM) gained a foothold in higher education during the first decade of the 21st century. College and university governing board members came to their board service with the perspective and experience of having served on corporate boards and in corporate leadership positions where ERM was in active use. Trustees asked…

  10. Molecular ecology of macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B methylases in waste lagoons and subsurface waters associated with swine production.

    PubMed

    Koike, Satoshi; Aminov, Rustam I; Yannarell, A C; Gans, Holly D; Krapac, Ivan G; Chee-Sanford, Joanne C; Mackie, Roderick I

    2010-04-01

    RNA methylase genes are common antibiotic resistance determinants for multiple drugs of the macrolide, lincosamide, and streptogramin B (MLS(B)) families. We used molecular methods to investigate the diversity, distribution, and abundance of MLS(B) methylases in waste lagoons and groundwater wells at two swine farms with a history of tylosin (a macrolide antibiotic structurally related to erythromycin) and tetracycline usage. Phylogenetic analysis guided primer design for quantification of MLS(B) resistance genes found in tylosin-producing Streptomyces (tlr(B), tlr(D)) and commensal/pathogenic bacteria (erm(A), erm(B), erm(C), erm(F), erm(G), erm(Q)). The near absence of tlr genes at these sites suggested a lack of native antibiotic-producing organisms. The gene combination erm(ABCF) was found in all lagoon samples analyzed. These four genes were also detected with high frequency in wells previously found to be contaminated by lagoon leakage. A weak correlation was found between the distribution of erm genes and previously reported patterns of tetracycline resistance determinants, suggesting that dissemination of these genes into the environment is not necessarily linked. Considerations of gene origins in history (i.e., phylogeny) and gene distributions in the landscape provide a useful "molecular ecology" framework for studying environmental spread of antibiotic resistance.

  11. Leveraging Enterprise Risk Management: Opportunity for Greater Relevance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abraham, Janice M.; Baird, Robert; Neugebauer, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Enterprise Risk Management (ERM) gained a foothold in higher education during the first decade of the 21st century. College and university governing board members came to their board service with the perspective and experience of having served on corporate boards and in corporate leadership positions where ERM was in active use. Trustees asked…

  12. Emergent Motivation to Read in Prekindergarten Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zheng, Guoguo; Schwanenflugel, Paula J.; Rogers, Samantha M.

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to develop and validate a measure of emergent reading motivation designed for prekindergarten children, called the Emergent Reading Motivation Scale (ERMS). The development of the ERMS was to overcome the limitation that current existing reading motivation measures are not developmentally appropriate for young children. Fifty-six…

  13. Acquired macrolide resistance genes in Haemophilus influenzae?

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Christopher T; Kunde, Dale A; Tristram, Stephen G

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of specific acquired macrolide resistance genes previously reported as present in clinical isolates of Haemophilus influenzae. A collection of 172 clinical respiratory isolates of H. influenzae, including 59 isolates from cystic fibrosis patients and 27 from non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis patients with significant prior macrolide use, was established. This collection was tested for azithromycin susceptibility using Etest and screened for the presence of erm(A), erm(B), erm(C), erm(F), mef(A) and mef(E) using locked nucleic acid dual-labelled hydrolysis probes. The azithromycin MICs ranged from 0.09 to >256 mg/L, with 2 (1.2%) isolates susceptible, 163 (94.8%) intermediate and 7 (4%) resistant according to EUCAST breakpoints (susceptible, ≤0.12 mg/L; resistant, >4 mg/L). None of the acquired macrolide resistance genes erm(A), erm(B), erm(C), erm(F), mef(A) or mef(E) was detected in any of the isolates. The specific acquired macrolide resistance genes are not widespread in H. influenzae and the high prevalence of these genes previously reported might be unique to the specific circumstances of that study. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Vitiating Vulnerability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abraham, Janice M.

    2007-01-01

    Enterprise Risk Management (ERM) is an institutionwide approach to identifying and responding to risks that threaten an institution's ability to achieve its objectives. Board members may use ERM to clarify the role of governance in risk management and decide whether the institution should take on new risks or reduce its current risks. Establishing…

  15. Tools, Techniques, and Training: Results of an E-Resources Troubleshooting Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rathmel, Angela; Mobley, Liisa; Pennington, Buddy; Chandler, Adam

    2015-01-01

    A primary role of any e-resources librarian or staff is troubleshooting electronic resources (e-resources). While much progress has been made in many areas of e-resources management (ERM) to understand the ERM lifecycle and to manage workflows, troubleshooting access remains a challenge. This collaborative study is the result of the well-received…

  16. Vitiating Vulnerability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abraham, Janice M.

    2007-01-01

    Enterprise Risk Management (ERM) is an institutionwide approach to identifying and responding to risks that threaten an institution's ability to achieve its objectives. Board members may use ERM to clarify the role of governance in risk management and decide whether the institution should take on new risks or reduce its current risks. Establishing…

  17. Extra-pair copulation and extra-range movements in Flammulated Owls

    Treesearch

    Richard T. Reynolds; Brian D. Linkhart

    1990-01-01

    We report an extra-pair copulation (EPC) in the Flammulated Owl (Otus flammeolus), the first in strigiforms, and document 21 cases of extra-range movements (ERMs) in this species. Extra-range movements occurred throughout nesting with both sexes participating: males anytime during nesting and females only after their young fledged. Males appear to make ERMs to...

  18. Internal Limiting Membrane Peeling to Prevent Post-vitrectomy Epiretinal Membrane Development in Retinal Detachment.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Kunihiko; Fujinami, Kaoru; Watanabe, Ken; Tsunoda, Kazushige; Noda, Toru

    2016-11-01

    To determine the efficacy of internal limiting membrane (ILM) peeling during vitrectomy for rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD) regarding post-vitrectomy epiretinal membrane (ERM) development and visual outcomes. Retrospective, interventional, comparative case series. Setting: Institutional. One hundred and two consecutive eyes with RRD treated with vitrectomy and followed for at least 6 months. ILM was peeled without using dye such as indocyanine green (ICG). Observational Procedures: Patients were divided into 2 groups based on postoperative ERM development: Group 1, 81 eyes without ERM formation; Group 2, 21 eyes with ERM development. Patients also were divided into 2 subgroups: those with and without ILM peeling (58 and 44 eyes, respectively). Statistical analyses were performed between the 2 groups with/without ERM formation and between the 2 subgroups with/without ILM peeling for 5 preoperative factors including foveal involvement of the RRD, 4 intraoperative factors including ILM peeling, baseline best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), and final BCVA. An association of ILM peeling with ERM prevention and the influence of ILM peeling on visual outcomes. ILM peeling was significantly (P < .001) associated with ERM prevention. There was no significant difference in the final BCVA between subgroups with and without ILM peeling. ILM peeling without ICG staining during the initial vitrectomy for RRDs may prevent postoperative ERM formation with favorable visual outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Characterization of MLS(b) resistance among Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis isolates carrying different SCCmec types.

    PubMed

    Teodoro, Cristiane R S; Mattos, Cláudio S; Cavalcante, Fernanda S; Pereira, Eliezer M; dos Santos, Kátia R N

    2012-09-01

    This work characterizes MLS(b) resistance in 39 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and 32 Staphylococcus epidermidis (MRSE) isolates. Of 21 erm(A) gene encoding MRSA isolates, 71.4% carried SCCmecIII, whereas of 12 isolates carrying the erm(C) gene, 83.3% carried SCCmecIV. Among the 25 MRSE isolates positive for the erm(C) gene, 80% had SCCmecIV or nontypeable cassettes. Isolates carrying these genes had MIC(90) ≥ 256 μg/mL to erythromycin and clindamycin. The msr(A) gene was associated with a low MIC(90) to these drugs. The erm(A) gene was associated with SCCmecIII in MRSA isolates, whereas the erm(C) gene was associated with SCCmecIV in both MRSA and MRSE isolates. © 2012 The Societies and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  20. Identification of multi-copy suppressors for endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondria tethering proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Rieko; Kajiura, Shu; Sesaki, Hiromi; Endo, Toshiya; Tamura, Yasushi

    2016-09-01

    In yeast, the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-mitochondria encounter structure (ERMES) tethers the ER to mitochondria, but its primary function remains unclear. To gain insight into ERMES functions, we screened multi-copy suppressors of the growth-defective phenotype of mmm1∆ cells, which lack a core component of ERMES, and identified MCP1, MGA2, SPT23, and YGR250C (termed RIE1). Spt23 and Mga2 are homologous transcription factors known to activate transcription of the OLE1 gene, which encodes the fatty acid ∆9 desaturase. We found that Ole1 partially relieves the growth defects of ERMES-lacking cells, thus uncovering a relationship between fatty acid metabolism and ERMES functions. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  1. Microarray analysis of erythromycin resistance determinants.

    PubMed

    Volokhov, D; Chizhikov, V; Chumakov, K; Rasooly, A

    2003-01-01

    To develop a DNA microarray for analysis of genes encoding resistance determinants to erythromycin and the related macrolide, lincosamide and streptogramin B (MLS) compounds. We developed an oligonucleotide microarray containing seven oligonucleotide probes (oligoprobes) for each of the six genes (ermA, ermB, ermC, ereA, ereB and msrA/B) that account for more than 98% of MLS resistance in Staphylococcus aureus clinical isolates. The microarray was used to test reference and clinical S. aureus and Streptococcus pyrogenes strains. Target genes from clinical strains were amplified and fluorescently labelled using multiplex PCR target amplification. The microarray assay correctly identified the MLS resistance genes in the reference strains and clinical isolates of S. aureus, and the results were confirmed by direct DNA sequence analysis. Of 18 S. aureus clinical strains tested, 11 isolates carry MLS determinants. One gene (ermC) was found in all 11 clinical isolates tested, and two others, ermA and msrA/B, were found in five or more isolates. Indeed, eight (72%) of 11 clinical isolate strains contained two or three MLS resistance genes, in one of the three combinations (ermA with ermC, ermC with msrA/B, ermA with ermC and msrA/B). Oligonucleotide microarray can detect and identify the six MLS resistance determinants analysed in this study. Our results suggest that microarray-based detection of microbial antibiotic resistance genes might be a useful tool for identifying antibiotic resistance determinants in a wide range of bacterial strains, given the high homology among microbial MLS resistance genes.

  2. High Prevalence of Inducible Erythromycin Resistance among Streptococcus bovis Isolates in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Lee-Jene; Hsueh, Po-Ren; Ho, Shen-Wu; Luh, Kwen-Tay

    2001-01-01

    Susceptibilities to 13 antimicrobial agents were determined by measurement of MICs for 60 isolates of Streptococcus bovis from blood cultures. Thirty-eight isolates (63.3%) had high-level resistance to erythromycin (MICs, ≥128 μg/ml). Among the 38 erythromycin-resistant strains, 21 isolates (55%) had inducible resistance to macrolides-lincosamides-streptogramin B (iMLS isolates) and 17 (45%) had constitutive resistance to macrolides-lincosamides-streptogramin B (cMLS isolates). Tetracycline resistance was also found among all of the erythromycin-resistant strains. None of the strains displayed resistance to penicillin, chloramphenicol, or vancomycin. Detection of erythromycin resistance genes by PCR and sequencing indicated that all 17 cMLS isolates were positive for the ermB gene and that 7 of 21 iMLS isolates carried the ermB gene and the remaining 14 iMLS isolates carried the ermT gene. Sequence analysis of amplified partial ermB fragments (594 bp) from S. bovis isolates revealed a 99.8% nucleotide identity and a 100% amino acid homology compared with the sequences from gene banks. The sequences of amplified fragments with primers targeted for ermC were shown to be very similar to that of ermGT (ermT) from Lactobacillus reuteri (98.5% nucleotide identity). This is the first report to describe the detection of the ermT class of erythromycin resistance determinants in S. bovis. The high rate of inducible erythromycin resistance among S. bovis isolates in Taiwan was not reported before. The iMLS S. bovis isolates were shown to be heterogeneous by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA analysis. These results indicate that the prevalence of inducible erythromycin resistance in S. bovis in Taiwan is very high and that most of the resistant strains carry the ermT or the ermB gene. PMID:11709309

  3. Emergence of Multidrug-Resistant Campylobacter Species Isolates with a Horizontally Acquired rRNA Methylase

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang; Zhang, Maojun; Deng, Fengru; Shen, Zhangqi; Wu, Congming; Zhang, Jianzhong

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotic-resistant Campylobacter constitutes a serious threat to public health, and resistance to macrolides is of particular concern, as this class of antibiotics is the drug of choice for clinical therapy of campylobacteriosis. Very recently, a horizontally transferrable macrolide resistance mediated by the rRNA methylase gene erm(B) was reported in a Campylobacter coli isolate, but little is known about the dissemination of erm(B) among Campylobacter isolates and the association of erm(B)-carrying isolates with clinical disease. To address this question and facilitate the control of antibiotic-resistant Campylobacter, we determined the distribution of erm(B) in 1,554 C. coli and Campylobacter jejuni isolates derived from food-producing animals and clinically confirmed human diarrheal cases. The results revealed that 58 of the examined isolates harbored erm(B) and exhibited high-level resistance to macrolides, and most were recent isolates, derived in 2011-2012. In addition, the erm(B)-positive isolates were all resistant to fluoroquinolones, another clinically important antibiotic used for treating campylobacteriosis. The erm(B) gene is found to be associated with chromosomal multidrug resistance genomic islands (MDRGIs) of Gram-positive origin or with plasmids of various sizes. All MDRGIs were transferrable to macrolide-susceptible C. jejuni by natural transformation under laboratory conditions. Molecular typing of the erm(B)-carrying isolates by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) identified diverse genotypes and outbreak-associated diarrheal isolates. Molecular typing also suggested zoonotic transmission of erm(B)-positive Campylobacter. These findings reveal an emerging and alarming trend of dissemination of erm(B) and MDRGIs in Campylobacter and underscore the need for heightened efforts to control their further spread. PMID:24982085

  4. An in vivo whole-plant experimental system for the analysis of gene expression in extraradical mycorrhizal mycelium.

    PubMed

    Pepe, Alessandra; Sbrana, Cristiana; Ferrol, Nuria; Giovannetti, Manuela

    2017-06-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) establish beneficial mutualistic symbioses with land plants, receiving carbon in exchange for mineral nutrients absorbed by the extraradical mycelium (ERM). With the aim of obtaining in vivo produced ERM for gene expression analyses, a whole-plant bi-dimensional experimental system was devised and tested with three host plants and three fungal symbionts. In such a system, Funneliformis mosseae in symbiosis with Cichorium intybus var. foliosum, Lactuca sativa, and Medicago sativa produced ERM whose lengths ranged from 9.8 ± 0.8 to 20.8 ± 1.2 m per plant. Since ERM produced in symbiosis with C. intybus showed the highest values for the different structural parameters assessed, this host was used to test the whole-plant system with F. mosseae, Rhizoglomus irregulare, and Funneliformis coronatus. The whole-plant system yielded 1-7 mg of ERM fresh biomass per plant per harvest, and continued producing new ERM for 6 months. Variable amounts of high-quality and intact total RNA, ranging from 15 to 65 μg RNA/mg ERM fresh weight, were extracted from the ERM of the three AMF isolates. Ammonium transporter gene expression was successfully determined in the cDNAs obtained from ERM of the three fungal symbionts by RT-qPCR using gene-specific primers designed on available (R. irregulare) and new (F. mosseae and F. coronatus) ammonium transporter gene sequences. The whole-plant experimental system represents a useful research tool for large production and easy collection of ERM for morphological, physiological, and biochemical analyses, suitable for a wide variety of AMF species, for a virtually limitless range of host plants and for studies involving diverse symbiotic interactions.

  5. Association Between Aqueous Flare and Epiretinal Membrane in Retinitis Pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Kohta; Ikeda, Yasuhiro; Murakami, Yusuke; Nakatake, Shunji; Tachibana, Takashi; Yoshida, Noriko; Nakao, Shintaro; Hisatomi, Toshio; Yoshida, Shigeo; Yoshitomi, Takeshi; Sonoda, Koh-Hei; Ishibashi, Tatsuro

    2016-08-01

    Epiretinal membrane (ERM) is a frequent macular complication in patients with retinitis pigmentosa (RP). The etiology of ERM formation in RP is largely unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between aqueous flare, a surrogate index of intraocular inflammation, and ERM secondary to RP. We retrospectively studied a total of 206 eyes of 117 patients who were diagnosed with typical RP. Aqueous flare values were measured consecutively in 2012 and 2013 using a laser flare cell meter. Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography images and fundus photographs taken on the same day of the aqueous flare measurements were analyzed for ERM detection. The mean values of aqueous flare, age, and frequency of male sex were significantly higher in the RP patients with ERM compared with the RP patients without ERM (P < 0.0001, P = 0.007, and P = 0.004, respectively). After adjustment for age and sex, the eyes in the highest quartile of aqueous flare had significantly higher odds of having ERM than those in the lowest quartile (odds ratio [OR], 2.68; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.04-6.93), and the linear trend across flare levels was significant (P = 0.005). In addition, each 1-log-transformed increase in flare values was associated with an elevation of the likelihood of having ERM (OR, 2.59; 95% CI, 1.33-5.06). Our analysis demonstrated that elevated aqueous flare is associated with ERM secondary to RP, suggesting that inflammation may be implicated in the pathogenesis of ERM formation in RP.

  6. Surgical outcomes after epiretinal membrane peeling combined with cataract surgery.

    PubMed

    Yiu, Glenn; Marra, Kyle V; Wagley, Sushant; Krishnan, Sheela; Sandhu, Harpal; Kovacs, Kyle; Kuperwaser, Mark; Arroyo, Jorge G

    2013-09-01

    To compare functional and anatomical outcomes after idiopathic epiretinal membrane (ERM) peeling combined with phacoemulsification and intraocular lens implantation versus ERM peeling alone. A retrospective, non-randomised comparative case series study was conducted of 81 eyes from 79 patients who underwent ERM peeling at the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center between 2001 and 2010. Eyes that underwent combined surgery for ERM and cataracts (group 1) were compared with those that had ERM peeling alone (group 2) with respect to best-corrected visual acuity at 6 months and 1 year after surgery, postoperative central macular thickness (CMT) as measured on optical coherence tomography, and rates of complications, including elevated intraocular pressure (IOP), ERM recurrence and need for reoperation. Mean logMAR visual acuity improved significantly in both groups at 6 months (p<0.001) and 1 year (p<0.001) after surgery. There was no statistical difference between the two groups in visual acuity improvement at 6 months (p=0.108) or 1 year (p=0.094). Mean CMT of both groups also significantly decreased after surgery (p=0.002), with no statistical difference in CMT reduction between the two groups, but a trend toward less CMT reduction in group 1 (p=0.061). The rates of complications, including IOP elevation, ERM recurrence and frequency of reoperation, were similar in the two groups, with non-statistical trends toward greater ERM recurrence (p=0.084) and need for reoperation (p=0.096) in those that had combined surgery. Combined surgery for ERMs and cataracts may potentially be as effective as membrane peeling alone with respect to visual and anatomical outcomes. Further studies are necessary to determine if there may be greater ERM recurrence or need for reoperation after combined surgery.

  7. [Investigation of macrolide, lincosamide and streptogramin B resistance in Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from clinical samples by phenotypical and genotypical methods].

    PubMed

    Aydeniz Ozansoy, Fatma; Cevahir, Nural; Kaleli, İlknur

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most common cause of both community and healthcare-associated infections. As staphylococci have developed resistance to various antibiotics, initially to penicillins then to methicillin and glycopeptides and have the ability to cause epidemics, they continue to be a major problem from past to present. Methicillin resistance gave rise to the use of alternative antibiotics such as macrolides, however worldwide development of macrolide resistance limited the use of these antibiotics. Macrolide resistance occurs either through target site modification (MLS(B) phenotype, encoded by erm genes), efflux pumps (MS phenotype, encoded by msrA/B genes) or decreased cell wall permeability. The aim of this study was to investigate the MLS(B) resistance of clinical S.aureus strains with phenotypic and genotypic methods. A total of 404 S.aureus strains isolated from different clinical samples (50% wound, 15% tracheal aspirate and 35% other samples) of inpatients (93.3%) and outpatients (6.7%) were included in the study. Double disc synergy test (D-test) was used for the phenotypical research and PCR was used for the genotypical research of MLS(B) resistance of isolates. One hundred fifty eight (39.1%) of the S.aureus isolates were methicillin-resistant (MRSA), and 246 (60.9%) were methicillin-susceptible (MSSA). By the use of D-test, constitutive (cMLS(B)) and inducible (iMLS(B)) clindamycin resistance were detected in 19 and 111 isolates, respectively, while five isolates were MS phenotype and 268 isolates were S phenotype (susceptible to erythromycin and clindamycin). The resistance genes of 136 isolates with MLS(B) resistance phenotype were determined genotypically and among 111 isolates showing iMLS(B) phenotype ermA gene was found in 81.9% (83 MRSA, 8 MSSA), ermC gene in 10.8% (7 MRSA, 5 MSSA), msrA gene in 10.8% (11 MRSA, 1 MSSA), msrB gene in 1.8% (2 MRSA) and ermB gene in 0.9% (1 MRSA). Among 19 strains with cMLS(B) phenotype, ermA was

  8. Distribution of Genes Encoding Resistance to Macrolides Among Staphylococci Isolated From the Nasal Cavity of Hospital Employees in Khorramabad, Iran.

    PubMed

    Goudarzi, Gholamreza; Tahmasbi, Farzad; Anbari, Khatereh; Ghafarzadeh, Masoumeh

    2016-02-01

    Epidemiological data on antibiotic susceptibility of Staphylococcus strains isolated from nasal carriers in each region can be helpful to select appropriate drugs to eradicate carriage states, control nosocomial infections and also treat patients. The current study aimed to investigate the antibiotic resistance profile and the molecular prevalence of the ermA, ermB, ermC and msrA genes among Staphylococcus strains isolated from the anterior nares of hospital employees. In this cross-sectional study, a total of 100 Staphylococcus isolates, 51 Staphylococcus aureus, 49 coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) were isolated from the anterior nares of hospital employees in Khorramabad, Iran. Susceptibility pattern to macrolide antibiotics were determined using the disk diffusion method. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was applied to determine the major erythromycin-resistant genes (ermA, ermB, ermC and msrA). Fifty-three (53%) isolates were simultaneously resistant to erythromycin, azithromycin and clarithromycin (cross-resistance); while 8 (8%) isolates had variable macrolide susceptibility pattern. Among the S. aureus isolates, the difference in prevalence of resistance to erythromycin between males and females was significant (P = 0.011). The frequency of ermA, ermB, ermC, and msrA genes were 3%, 5%, 33% and 20%, respectively. It was also found that out of 53 isolates resistant to erythromycin, 44 (83%) isolates (eight S. aureus and thirty-six CoNS strains) carried at least one of the four tested genes. Eight (8%) isolates had intermediate phenotype to erythromycin, in which 4 (50%) isolates carried ermB or ermC genes. In addition, out of 39 erythromycin-susceptible isolates, 3 (7.7%) isolates were positive for ermB or ermC genes. No entire association was found between genotype and phenotype methods to detect macrolides-resistant isolates. In addition, distribution of genetically erythromycin-resistant isolates is geographically different among

  9. Distribution of Genes Encoding Resistance to Macrolides Among Staphylococci Isolated From the Nasal Cavity of Hospital Employees in Khorramabad, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Goudarzi, Gholamreza; Tahmasbi, Farzad; Anbari, Khatereh; Ghafarzadeh, Masoumeh

    2016-01-01

    Background Epidemiological data on antibiotic susceptibility of Staphylococcus strains isolated from nasal carriers in each region can be helpful to select appropriate drugs to eradicate carriage states, control nosocomial infections and also treat patients. Objectives The current study aimed to investigate the antibiotic resistance profile and the molecular prevalence of the ermA, ermB, ermC and msrA genes among Staphylococcus strains isolated from the anterior nares of hospital employees. Patients and Methods In this cross-sectional study, a total of 100 Staphylococcus isolates, 51 Staphylococcus aureus, 49 coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) were isolated from the anterior nares of hospital employees in Khorramabad, Iran. Susceptibility pattern to macrolide antibiotics were determined using the disk diffusion method. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was applied to determine the major erythromycin-resistant genes (ermA, ermB, ermC and msrA). Results Fifty-three (53%) isolates were simultaneously resistant to erythromycin, azithromycin and clarithromycin (cross-resistance); while 8 (8%) isolates had variable macrolide susceptibility pattern. Among the S. aureus isolates, the difference in prevalence of resistance to erythromycin between males and females was significant (P = 0.011). The frequency of ermA, ermB, ermC, and msrA genes were 3%, 5%, 33% and 20%, respectively. It was also found that out of 53 isolates resistant to erythromycin, 44 (83%) isolates (eight S. aureus and thirty-six CoNS strains) carried at least one of the four tested genes. Eight (8%) isolates had intermediate phenotype to erythromycin, in which 4 (50%) isolates carried ermB or ermC genes. In addition, out of 39 erythromycin-susceptible isolates, 3 (7.7%) isolates were positive for ermB or ermC genes. Conclusions No entire association was found between genotype and phenotype methods to detect macrolides-resistant isolates. In addition, distribution of genetically erythromycin

  10. A New Approach for the Determination of Dose Rate and Radioactivity for Detected Gamma Nuclides Using an Environmental Radiation Monitor Based on an NaI(Tl) Detector.

    PubMed

    Ji, Young-Yong; Kim, Chang-Jong; Lim, Kyo-Sun; Lee, Wanno; Chang, Hyon-Sock; Chung, Kun Ho

    2017-10-01

    To expand the application of dose rate spectroscopy to the environment, the method using an environmental radiation monitor (ERM) based on a 3' × 3' NaI(Tl) detector was used to perform real-time monitoring of the dose rate and radioactivity for detected gamma nuclides in the ground around an ERM. Full-energy absorption peaks in the energy spectrum for dose rate were first identified to calculate the individual dose rates of Bi, Ac, Tl, and K distributed in the ground through interference correction because of the finite energy resolution of the NaI(Tl) detector used in an ERM. The radioactivity of the four natural radionuclides was then calculated from the in situ calibration factor-that is, the dose rate per unit curie-of the used ERM for the geometry of the ground in infinite half-space, which was theoretically estimated by Monte Carlo simulation. By an intercomparison using a portable HPGe and samples taken from the ground around an ERM, this method to calculate the dose rate and radioactivity of four nuclides using an ERM was experimentally verified and finally applied to remotely monitor them in real-time in the area in which the ERM had been installed.

  11. Changes in turnover rather than production regulate biomass of ectomycorrhizal fungal mycelium across a Pinus sylvestris chronosequence.

    PubMed

    Hagenbo, Andreas; Clemmensen, Karina E; Finlay, Roger D; Kyaschenko, Julia; Lindahl, Björn D; Fransson, Petra; Ekblad, Alf

    2017-04-01

    In boreal forest soils, ectomycorrhizal fungi are fundamentally important for carbon (C) dynamics and nutrient cycling. Although their extraradical mycelium (ERM) is pivotal for processes such as soil organic matter build-up and nitrogen cycling, very little is known about its dynamics and regulation. In this study, we quantified ERM production and turnover, and examined how these two processes together regulated standing ERM biomass in seven sites forming a chronosequence of 12- to 100-yr-old managed Pinus sylvestris forests. This was done by determining ERM biomass, using ergosterol as a proxy, in sequentially harvested in-growth mesh bags and by applying mathematical models. Although ERM production declined with increasing forest age from 1.2 to 0.5 kg ha(-1)  d(-1) , the standing biomass increased from 50 to 112 kg ha(-1) . This was explained by a drastic decline in mycelial turnover from seven times to one time per year with increasing forest age, corresponding to mean residence times from 25 d up to 1 yr. Our results demonstrate that ERM turnover is the main factor regulating biomass across differently aged forest stands. Explicit inclusion of ERM parameters in forest ecosystem C models may significantly improve their capacity to predict responses of mycorrhiza-mediated processes to management and environmental changes. © 2016 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2016 New Phytologist Trust.

  12. Changes in Retinal Thickness after Vitrectomy for Epiretinal Membrane with and without Internal Limiting Membrane Peeling.

    PubMed

    Obata, Shumpei; Fujikawa, Masato; Iwasaki, Keisuke; Kakinoki, Masashi; Sawada, Osamu; Saishin, Yoshitsugu; Kawamura, Hajime; Ohji, Masahito

    2017-01-01

    To investigate anatomic changes in retinal thickness (RT) and functional changes after vitrectomy for idiopathic epiretinal membranes (ERMs) with and without internal limiting membrane (ILM) peeling. The medical records of 100 eyes of 96 patients with ERM who underwent vitrectomy and ERM removal were reviewed retrospectively. The RT was measured by optical coherence tomography, and the area was divided into 9 sections. The best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), 9 RT areas, and incidence rates of recurrent ERM were compared between the groups with and without ILM peeling before the operation and 12 months postoperatively. Thirty-nine eyes that underwent vitrectomy with ILM peeling and 61 eyes that underwent vitrectomy without ILM peeling met the inclusion criteria. There were no significant differences between the groups in the BCVA and any of the RTs before the operation and 12 months postoperatively. The ERMs recurred in 8 (20.5%) of 39 eyes and 26 (42.6%) of 61 eyes in the groups with and without ILM peeling, respectively, with a difference that reached significance (p = 0.02) 12 months postoperatively. Vitrectomy for ERM affects the BCVA or the RTs 12 months postoperatively. Additional ILM peeling does not affect them, but it might reduce the ERM recurrence rate. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Detection of macrolide and disinfectant resistance genes in clinical Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Staphylococcus aureus and Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) are a major source of infections associated with indwelling medical devices. Many antiseptic agents are used in hygienic handwash to prevent nosocomial infections by Staphylococci. Our aim was to determine the antibiotic susceptibility and resistance to quaternary ammonium compound of 46 S. aureus strains and 71 CoNS. Methods S. aureus (n = 46) isolated from auricular infection and CoNS (n = 71), 22 of the strains isolated from dialysis fluids and 49 of the strains isolated from needles cultures were investigated. Erythromycin resistance genes (ermA, ermB, ermC, msrA and mef) were analysed by multiplex PCR and disinfectant-resistant genes (qacA, qacB, and qacC) were studied by PCR-RFLP. Results The frequency of erythromycin resistance genes in S. aureus was: ermA+ 7.7%, ermB+ 13.7%, ermC+ 6% and msrA+ 10.2%. In addition, the number of positive isolates in CoNS was respectively ermA+ (9.4%), ermB+ (11.1%), ermC+ (27.4%), and msrA+ (41%). The MIC analyses revealed that 88 isolates (74%) were resistant to quaternary ammonium compound-based disinfectant benzalkonium chloride (BC). 56% of the BC-resistant staphylococcus isolates have at least one of the three resistant disinfectants genes (qacA, qacB and qacC). Nine strains (7.7%) among the CoNS species and two S. aureus strains (2%) harboured the three-qac genes. In addition, the qacC were detected in 41 strains. Conclusions Multi-resistant strains towards macrolide and disinfectant were recorded. The investigation of antibiotics and antiseptic-resistant CoNS may provide crucial information on the control of nosocomial infections. PMID:22032892

  14. Prevalence and mechanisms of erythromycin resistance in Streptococcus agalactiae from healthy pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Sandra; Radhouani, Hajer; Coelho, Céline; Gonçalves, Alexandre; Carvalho, Eulália; Carvalho, José António; Ruiz-Larrea, Fernanda; Torres, Carmen; Igrejas, Gilberto; Poeta, Patrícia

    2009-06-01

    We sought to determine the resistance phenotypes for erythromycin and clindamycin and the mechanisms implicated in 93 Streptococcus agalactiae isolates recovered from healthy pregnant women. Susceptibility testing for erythromycin, clindamycin, penicillin, cefotaxime, vancomycin, quinupristin-dalfopristin, choramphenicol, ofloxacin, and meropenen was carried out by disc-diffusion test, and the E-test was also applied for erythromycin and clindamycin. The constitutive MLS(B) resistance (cMLS(B)) and inducible MLS(B) resistance (iMLS(B)) phenotypes, respectively, as well as the M resistance phenotype were determined by the erythromycin-clindamycin double-disc test. The presence of ermA, ermB, ermC, msrA, and mef(A/E) macrolide resistance genes was studied by PCR. Resistance to erythromycin and clindamycin was found in 15% and 9.6% of the isolates, respectively. The resistance phenotypes detected among the 14 erythromycin-resistant isolates were as follows (number of isolates): cMLS(B) (9), iMLS(B) (3), and M (2). The MICs for erythromycin and clindamycin were as follows: cMLS(B) isolates (128-256 and >or=32 mg/L, respectively), iMLS(B) isolates (16-256 and 1 mg/L), and M isolates (2-8 and 1 mg/L). The following combination of genes were detected among isolates with cMLS(B) or iMLS(B) phenotypes: erm(B) (6 isolates), ermA + ermTR (3), ermA + ermB + ermTR (1), and none of these genes (2). The two isolates with M phenotype harbored the mef(A/E), and msrA gene was also found in one of them.

  15. Detection of macrolide and disinfectant resistance genes in clinical Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci.

    PubMed

    Zmantar, Tarek; Kouidhi, Bochra; Miladi, Hanene; Bakhrouf, Amina

    2011-10-27

    Staphylococcus aureus and Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) are a major source of infections associated with indwelling medical devices. Many antiseptic agents are used in hygienic handwash to prevent nosocomial infections by Staphylococci. Our aim was to determine the antibiotic susceptibility and resistance to quaternary ammonium compound of 46 S. aureus strains and 71 CoNS. S. aureus (n = 46) isolated from auricular infection and CoNS (n = 71), 22 of the strains isolated from dialysis fluids and 49 of the strains isolated from needles cultures were investigated. Erythromycin resistance genes (ermA, ermB, ermC, msrA and mef) were analysed by multiplex PCR and disinfectant-resistant genes (qacA, qacB, and qacC) were studied by PCR-RFLP. The frequency of erythromycin resistance genes in S. aureus was: ermA+ 7.7%, ermB+ 13.7%, ermC+ 6% and msrA+ 10.2%. In addition, the number of positive isolates in CoNS was respectively ermA+ (9.4%), ermB+ (11.1%), ermC+ (27.4%), and msrA+ (41%). The MIC analyses revealed that 88 isolates (74%) were resistant to quaternary ammonium compound-based disinfectant benzalkonium chloride (BC). 56% of the BC-resistant staphylococcus isolates have at least one of the three resistant disinfectants genes (qacA, qacB and qacC). Nine strains (7.7%) among the CoNS species and two S. aureus strains (2%) harboured the three-qac genes. In addition, the qacC were detected in 41 strains. Multi-resistant strains towards macrolide and disinfectant were recorded. The investigation of antibiotics and antiseptic-resistant CoNS may provide crucial information on the control of nosocomial infections.

  16. Frequency of genes encoding erythromycin ribosomal methylases among Staphylococcus aureus clinical isolates with different D-phenotypes in Tehran, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, Sareh Sadat; Niakan, Mohammad; Saderi, Horieh; Motallebi, Mitra; Taherikalani, Morovat; Asadollahi, Khairollah; Emaneini, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Macrolide, lincosamide and streptogramin type B (MLSB) antibiotics are important in the treatment of Staphylococcus aureus infections and existence of isolates with ability to resist against MLSB antibiotics is worrisome. Materials and Methods: In this cross sectional study, 101 S. aureus isolates were collected from patients of five selected hospitals in Tehran over a period of five months. Disk diffusion tests and differentiation between constitutive and inducible resistances were carried out by D-test. The presence of mecA, msrA, ermA and ermC genes were detected using PCR or multiplex PCR. Results: Out of 101 S. aureus isolates, 58 (57.4%) were methicillin resistant and 57 (56.4%) expressed resistance to erythromycin. The prevalence of constitutive MLSB (cMLSB), inducible MLSB (iMLSB) and MS (Negative) phenotype in all erythromycin resistant isolates were 71.9, 26.3 and 1.7%, respectively. Out of all the erythromycin resistant isolates, 57.8% harbored both ermA and ermC genes which possessed constitutive resistance. 8.7% of the isolates contained ermA gene alone which possessed inducible resistance with D phenotype and 5.2% of isolates just contained ermC gene which had inducible resistance with D+ phenotype. msrA gene was detected in 3.5% of the erythromycin resistant S. aureus isolates with constitutive resistance. None of the genes were detected among MS phenotypes. Conclusion: In this study, most of S. aureus isolates carried both ermA and ermC genes and there was a significant relationship (P value ≤ 0.05) between different resistance phenotypes and erm genes. PMID:27928482

  17. Macrolide Resistance Genes in Enterococcus spp.

    PubMed Central

    Portillo, Aránzazu; Ruiz-Larrea, Fernanda; Zarazaga, Myriam; Alonso, Ana; Martinez, Jose Luis; Torres, Carmen

    2000-01-01

    Seventy-eight isolates of different Enterococcus species (E. faecalis, n = 27; E. faecium, n = 23; E. durans, n = 8; E. avium, n = 6; E. hirae, n = 9; E. gallinarum, n = 3; and E. casseliflavus, n = 2) with a variety of erythromycin resistance phenotypes were examined for the presence of macrolide resistance genes (ermA, ermB, ermC, ermTR, mefA/E, and msrA). Positive PCR amplifications of ermB were obtained for 39 of 40 highly erythromycin-resistant Enterococcus isolates (MICs, >128 μg/ml) of different species; the remaining highly resistant E. faecium isolate was positive for PCR amplification of ermA but was negative for PCR amplification of the ermB and ermC genes. For all enterococcal strains for which erythromycin MICs were ≤32 μg/ml PCRs were negative for erm methylase genes. For all E. faecium isolates PCR amplified products of the expected size of 400 bp were obtained when msrA primers were used, with the results being independent of the erythromycin resistance phenotype. All the other enterococcal species gave negative results by msrA PCRs. Sequencing of the msrA PCR products from either erythromycin-susceptible, low-level-resistant, or highly resistant E. faecium strains showed that the amplicons did not correspond to the msrA gene described for Staphylococcus epidermidis but corresponded to a new putative efflux determinant, which showed 62% identity with the msrA gene at the DNA level and 72% similarity at the amino acid level. This new gene was named msrC. PMID:10722498

  18. Frequency of genes encoding erythromycin ribosomal methylases among Staphylococcus aureus clinical isolates with different D-phenotypes in Tehran, Iran.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Sareh Sadat; Niakan, Mohammad; Saderi, Horieh; Motallebi, Mitra; Taherikalani, Morovat; Asadollahi, Khairollah; Emaneini, Mohammad

    2016-06-01

    Macrolide, lincosamide and streptogramin type B (MLSB) antibiotics are important in the treatment of Staphylococcus aureus infections and existence of isolates with ability to resist against MLSB antibiotics is worrisome. In this cross sectional study, 101 S. aureus isolates were collected from patients of five selected hospitals in Tehran over a period of five months. Disk diffusion tests and differentiation between constitutive and inducible resistances were carried out by D-test. The presence of mecA, msrA, ermA and ermC genes were detected using PCR or multiplex PCR. Out of 101 S. aureus isolates, 58 (57.4%) were methicillin resistant and 57 (56.4%) expressed resistance to erythromycin. The prevalence of constitutive MLSB (cMLSB), inducible MLSB (iMLSB) and MS (Negative) phenotype in all erythromycin resistant isolates were 71.9, 26.3 and 1.7%, respectively. Out of all the erythromycin resistant isolates, 57.8% harbored both ermA and ermC genes which possessed constitutive resistance. 8.7% of the isolates contained ermA gene alone which possessed inducible resistance with D phenotype and 5.2% of isolates just contained ermC gene which had inducible resistance with D(+) phenotype. msrA gene was detected in 3.5% of the erythromycin resistant S. aureus isolates with constitutive resistance. None of the genes were detected among MS phenotypes. In this study, most of S. aureus isolates carried both ermA and ermC genes and there was a significant relationship (P value ≤ 0.05) between different resistance phenotypes and erm genes.

  19. [Fate of ARB and ARGs During Wastewater Treatment Process of Spiramycin Production].

    PubMed

    Qin, Cai-xia; Tong, Juan; Shen, Pei-hong; Wei, Yuan-song

    2015-09-01

    Antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB) and antibiotic resistance gene(ARG) pose great risk to both environment and human health. This study aimed to investigate the fate of macrolide resistant bacteria, six macrolide resistance genes ermB, ermF, ermX, mefA, ereA, mphB and three transfer elements ISCR1, intIl and Tn916/1545 during wastewater biological treatment processes of spiramycin production. Samples were collected from an antibiotic wastewater treatment station in different seasons. Results showed that the total heterotrophs and Enterococci were mostly removed during wastewater biological treatment, with the reduction of 1. 6-2. 1 logs for total heterotrophs and of 3. 7 logs for Enterococci, respectively. For 94 antibiotic resistant Enterococci individually isolated from four different treatment units including adjusting tank, anaerobic tank, anoxic tank, and aerobic tank, all of these strains showed resistance to spiramycin, azithromycin, erythromycin, and clarithromycin; moreover, the antibiotic resistance rates was not reduced in the effluent. Results of PCR and quantitative PCR showed that 80% of antibiotic resistant Enterococci were positive for PCR amplification of erAB, but negative for PCR amplification of other genes. Concentrations of ermB and ermF were peaked in the spring and autumn samples. Resistance genes of ermB, ermF, mefA, ereA, mphB and transfer element of Tn916/1545 were reduced to some degree during antibiotic production wastewater treatment, but concentrations of ermX, intIl, ISCRl in the effluent were higher than those in the influent. The abundance of mefA, ereA and Tn916/1545 were reduced during wastewater treatment process, and the better removal performance for mefA, ereA, Tn916/1545 occurred in spring than in autumn; however, the abundance of ermX, intI1 and ISCR1 were increased.

  20. Molecular basis of resistance to macrolides, lincosamides and streptogramins in Staphylococcus hominis strains isolated from clinical specimens.

    PubMed

    Szczuka, Ewa; Makowska, Nicoletta; Bosacka, Karolina; Słotwińska, Anna; Kaznowski, Adam

    2016-03-01

    Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) are the most frequently isolated bacteria from the blood and the predominant cause of nosocomial infections. Macrolides, lincosamides and streptogramin B (MLSB) antibiotics, especially erythromycin and clindamycin, are important therapeutic agents in the treatment of methicillin-resistant staphylococci infections. Among CoNS, Staphylococcus hominis represents the third most common organism. In spite of its clinical significance, very little is known about its mechanisms of resistance to antibiotics, especially MLSB. Fifty-five S. hominis isolates from the blood and the surgical wounds of hospitalized patients were studied. The erm(C) gene was predominant in erythromycin-resistant S. hominis isolates. The methylase genes, erm(A) and erm(B), were present in 15 and 25% of clinical isolates, respectively. A combination of various erythromycin resistance methylase (erm) genes was detected in 15% S. hominis isolates. The efflux gene msr(A) was detected in 18% of isolates, alone in four isolates, and in different combinations in a further six. The lnu(A) gene, responsible for enzymatic inactivation of lincosamides was carried by 31% of the isolates. No erythromycin resistance that could not be attributed to the genes erm(A), erm(B), erm(C) and msr(A) was detected. In S. hominis, 75 and 84%, respectively, were erythromycin resistant and clindamycin susceptible. Among erythromycin-resistant S. hominis isolates, 68% of these strains showed the inducible MLSB phenotype. Four isolates harbouring the msr(A) genes alone displayed the MSB phenotype. These studies indicated that resistance to MLSB in S. hominis is mostly based on the ribosomal target modification mechanism mediated by erm genes, mainly the erm(C), and enzymatic drug inactivation mediated by lnu(A).

  1. Ezrin, radixin, and moesin are phosphorylated in response to 2-methoxyestradiol and modulate endothelial hyperpermeability.

    PubMed

    Bogatcheva, Natalia V; Zemskova, Marina A; Gorshkov, Boris A; Kim, Kyung Mi; Daglis, Gregory A; Poirier, Christophe; Verin, Alexander D

    2011-12-01

    We showed previously that microtubule disruptor 2-methoxyestradiol (2ME) induces hyperpermeability of the endothelial monolayer via mechanisms that include the activation of p38 and Rho kinase (ROCK) and rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton. Using the protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors Ro-31-7549 and Ro-32-0432, we show in vitro and in vivo that 2ME-induced barrier dysfunction is also PKC-dependent. The known PKC substrates ezrin, radixin, and moesin (ERM) were recently implicated in the regulation of endothelial permeability. This study tested the hypotheses that ERM proteins are phosphorylated in response to 2ME, and that this phosphorylation is involved in 2ME-induced barrier dysfunction. We show that the application of 2ME leads to a dramatic increase in the level of ERM phosphorylation. This increase is attenuated in cells pretreated with the microtubule stabilizer taxol. In human pulmonary artery endothelial cells (HPAECs), the phosphorylation of ERM occurs in a p38-dependent and PKC-dependent manner. The activation of p38 appears to occur upstream from the activation of PKC, in response to 2ME. Phosphorylated ERM are localized at the cell periphery during the early phase of response to 2ME (15 minutes), and colocalize with F-actin branching points during the later phase of response (60 minutes). Using the short interfering RNA approach, we also showed that individual ERM depletion significantly attenuates 2ME-induced hyperpermeability. HPAEC monolayers, depleted of ERM proteins and monolayers, overexpressing phosphorylation-deficient ERM mutants, exhibit less attenuation of 2ME-induced barrier disruption in response to the PKC inhibitor Ro-31-7549. These results suggest a critical role of PKC activation in response to microtubule-disrupting agents, and implicate the phosphorylation of ERM in the barrier dysfunction induced by 2ME.

  2. Cytotoxicity of Zardaverine in Embryonal Rhabdomyosarcoma from a Costello Syndrome Patient.

    PubMed

    Cartledge, Donna M; Robbins, Katherine M; Drake, Katherine M; Sternberg, Rachel; Stabley, Deborah L; Gripp, Karen W; Kolb, E Anders; Sol-Church, Katia; Napper, Andrew D

    2017-01-01

    Costello syndrome (CS) patients suffer from a very high 10% incidence of embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (ERMS). As tools to discover targeted therapeutic leads, we used a CS patient-derived ERMS cell line (CS242 ERMS) harboring a homozygous p.G12A mutation in HRAS, and a control cell line derived from the same patient comprising non-malignant CS242 fibroblasts with a heterozygous p.G12A HRAS mutation. A library of 2,000 compounds with known pharmacological activities was screened for their effect on CS242 ERMS cell viability. Follow-up testing in a panel of cell lines revealed that various compounds originally developed for other indications were remarkably selective; notably, the phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitor zardaverine was at least 1,000-fold more potent in CS242 ERMS than in the patient-matched non-malignant CS242 fibroblasts, other ERMS, or normal fibroblasts. Chronic treatment with zardaverine led to the emergence of resistant cells, consistent with CS242 ERMS comprising a mixed population of cells. Many PDE inhibitors in addition to zardaverine were tested on CS242 ERMS, but almost all had no effect. Interestingly, zardaverine and analogs showed a similar cytotoxicity profile in CS242 ERMS and cervical carcinoma-derived HeLa cells, suggesting a mechanism of action common to both cell types that does not require the presence of an HRAS mutation (HeLa contains wild type HRAS). Two recent studies presented possible mechanistic explanations for the cytotoxicity of zardaverine in HeLa cells. One revealed that zardaverine inhibited a HeLa cell-based screen measuring glucocorticoid receptor (GR) activation; however, using engineered HeLa cells, we ruled out a specific effect of zardaverine on signaling through the GR. The second attributed zardaverine toxicity in HeLa cells to promotion of the interaction of phosphodiesterase 3A and the growth regulatory protein Schlafen 12. We speculate that this work may provide a possible mechanism for zardaverine action in CS

  3. Positive esophageal proximal resection margin: an important prognostic factor for esophageal cancer that warrants adjuvant therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yun-Cang; Deng, Han-Yu; Wang, Wen-Ping; He, Du; Ni, Peng-Zhi; Hu, Wei-Peng; Wang, Zhi-Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Background Positive esophageal proximal resection margin (ERM+) following esophagectomy was considered as incomplete or R1 resection. The clinicopathological data and long-term prognosis of esophageal cancer (EC) patients with ERM+ after esophagectomy were still unknown. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the clinical significance of ERM+ and its therapeutic option. Methods From November 2008 to December 2014, 3,594 patients with histologically confirmed EC underwent radical resection in our department. Among them there were 37 patients (1.03%) who had ERM+. ERM+ was defined as carcinoma or atypical hyperplasia (severe or moderate) at the residual esophageal margin in our study. For comparison, another 74 patients with negative esophageal proximal resection margin (ERM−) were propensity-matched at a ratio of 1:2 as control group according to sex, age, tumor location and TNM staging. The relevant prognostic factors were investigated by univariate and multivariate regression analysis. Results In this large cohort of patients, the rate of ERM+ was 1.03%. The median survival time was 35.000 months in patients with ERM+, significantly worse than 68.000 months in those with ERM− (Chi-square =4.064, P=0.044). Survival in patients with esophageal residual atypical hyperplasia (severe or moderate) was similar to those with esophageal residual carcinoma. Survival rate in stage I–II was higher than that in stage III–IV (Chi-square =27.598, P=0.000) in ERM−; But there was no difference between the two subgroups of patients in ERM+. Furthermore, in those patients with ERM+, survival was better in those who having adjuvant therapy, compared to those without adjuvant therapy (Chi-square =5.480, P=0.019). And the average survival time which was improved to a well situation for ERM+ patients who have adjuvant therapy was 68.556 months which is comparable to average survival time (65.815 months) of ERM− for those patients who are at earlier stages

  4. Co-location of the multiresistance gene cfr and the fosfomycin resistance gene fosD on a novel plasmid in Staphylococcus arlettae from chicken farm.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bi-Hui; Lei, Chang-Wei; Zhang, An-Yun; Pan, Yun; Kong, Ling-Han; Xiang, Rong; Wang, Yong-Xiang; Yang, Yan-Xian; Wang, Hong-Ning

    2017-09-18

    A novel 63,558-bp plasmid pSA-01 harbouring nine antibiotic resistance genes, including cfr, erm(C), tet(L), erm(T), aadD, fosD, fexB, aacA-aphD and erm(B), was characterized in Staphylococcus arlettae strain SA-01 isolated from chicken farm in China. The co-location of cfr and fosD genes was detected for the first time in S. arlettae plasmid. The detection of two IS431-mediated circular forms containing resistance genes in SA-01 suggested that IS431 may facilitate dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  5. Extendable retractable telescopic mast for deployable structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, M.; Aguirre, M.

    1986-01-01

    The Extendable and Retractable Mast (ERM) which is presently developed by Dornier in the frame of an ESA-contract, will be used to deploy and retract large foldable structures. The design is based on a telescopic carbon-fiber structure with high stiffness, strength and pointing accuracy. To verify the chosen design, a breadboard model of an ERM was built and tested under thermal vacuum (TV)-conditions. It is planned as a follow-on development to manufacture and test an Engineering Model Mast. The Engineering Model will be used to establish the basis for an ERM-family covering a wide range of requirements.

  6. Combined Epiretinal and Internal Limiting Membrane Peeling Facilitated by High Dilution Indocyanine Green Negative Staining.

    PubMed

    Kaehr, Mark M; Apte, Rajendra S

    2015-01-01

    We describe the utilization of indocyanine green (ICG) dye to facilitate combined/en bloc removal of epiretinal membranes (ERM) along with internal limiting membranes (ILM). The method utilizes a highly diluted preparation of ICG in dextrose water solvent (D5W). Elimination of fluid air exchange step facilitating staining in the fluid phase and low intensity lighting help minimize potential ICG toxicity. The technique demonstrates how ICG facilitates negative staining of ERMs and how ILM peeling concomitantly can allow complete and efficient ERM removal minimizing surgical time and the necessity for dual or sequential staining.

  7. Mechanism of resistance to macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin antibiotics in Streptococcus thermophilus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Resistance to macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin (MLS) group antibiotics in the dairy bacterium Streptococcus thermophilus (ST) is documented but the mechanism of resistance has not been elucidated. MIC values for erythromycin (Erm), azithromycin (Azm), tylosin (Tyl), spiramycin (Spm), pristinamyci...

  8. Amniotic fluid

    MedlinePlus

    Burton GJ, Sibley CP, Jauniaux ERM. Placental anatomy and physiology. In: Gabbe SG, Niebyl JR, Simpson JL, et al, eds. Obstetrics: Normal and Problem Pregnancies . 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2017:chap 1. ...

  9. Sheehan syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Burton GJ, Sibley CP, Jauniaux ERM. Placental anatomy and physiology. In: Gabbe SG, Niebyl JR, Simpson JL, et al, eds. Obstetrics: Normal and Problem Pregnancies . 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2017:chap 1. ...

  10. A Case of Secondary Epiretinal Membrane Spontaneous Release

    PubMed Central

    Andreev, Andrey N.; Bushuev, Alexey V.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To report a rare case of secondary epiretinal membrane (ERM) spontaneous separation with subsequent visual restoration. Case Summary. We are reporting a case with the history of branch retinal vein occlusion, peripheral retinal neovascularization, and retinal photocoagulation. Our examination revealed secondary ERM associated with relatively high visual acuity (0.6), and a watchful waiting strategy was chosen. During the follow-up, slight visual deterioration, progressive deformation of the retinal profile, and an increase in diffuse retinal edema were observed. No surgical or laser treatment was performed. On the next visit, the spontaneous ERM separation with residual parapapillary fixation, the increase in visual acuity (0.9), and the decrease in retinal thickness were revealed. Conclusion. Such cases present additional evidence to a deferral surgical strategy for the management of patients with ERM and relatively high visual acuity. PMID:27872778

  11. Environmental Enterprise Risk Management Benefits for a Government Contractor

    SciTech Connect

    Linda Guinn

    2012-05-01

    An often overlooked advantage that an Environmental Enterprise Risk Management System (ERMS) has to organizations is the added protection from the Civil False Claims Act (FCA) for activities under a government contract.

  12. Development of a risk-based environmental management tool for drilling discharges. Summary of a four-year project.

    PubMed

    Singsaas, Ivar; Rye, Henrik; Frost, Tone Karin; Smit, Mathijs G D; Garpestad, Eimund; Skare, Ingvild; Bakke, Knut; Veiga, Leticia Falcao; Buffagni, Melania; Follum, Odd-Arne; Johnsen, Ståle; Moltu, Ulf-Einar; Reed, Mark

    2008-04-01

    This paper briefly summarizes the ERMS project and presents the developed model by showing results from environmental fates and risk calculations of a discharge from offshore drilling operations. The developed model calculates environmental risks for the water column and sediments resulting from exposure to toxic stressors (e.g., chemicals) and nontoxic stressors (e.g., suspended particles, sediment burial). The approach is based on existing risk assessment techniques described in the European Union technical guidance document on risk assessment and species sensitivity distributions. The model calculates an environmental impact factor, which characterizes the overall potential impact on the marine environment in terms of potentially impacted water volume and sediment area. The ERMS project started in 2003 and was finalized in 2007. In total, 28 scientific reports and 9 scientific papers have been delivered from the ERMS project (http://www.sintef.no/erms).

  13. Combined EMD-sLORETA Analysis of EEG Data Collected during a Contour Integration Task

    PubMed Central

    Al-Subari, Karema; Tomé, Ana Maria; Volberg, Gregor; Ludwig, Bernd; Lang, Elmar W.

    2016-01-01

    Lately, Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition (EEMD) techniques receive growing interest in biomedical data analysis. Event-Related Modes (ERMs) represent features extracted by an EEMD from electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings. We present a new approach for source localization of EEG data based on combining ERMs with inverse models. As the first step, 64 channel EEG recordings are pooled according to six brain areas and decomposed, by applying an EEMD, into their underlying ERMs. Then, based upon the problem at hand, the most closely related ERM, in terms of frequency and amplitude, is combined with inverse modeling techniques for source localization. More specifically, the standardized low resolution brain electromagnetic tomography (sLORETA) procedure is employed in this work. Accuracy and robustness of the results indicate that this approach deems highly promising in source localization techniques for EEG data. PMID:27936219

  14. Mean Sea Surface and Variability of the Gulf of Mexico Using Geosat Altimetry Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-03-15

    Geosat Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) altimetric measurements of the sea surface height in the Gulf of Mexico are used to determine the mean sea surface... Gulf of Mexico . Keywords: Altimetry; Mesoscale oceanography; Ocean forecasting; Reprints.

  15. Efficacy of vitrectomy and epiretinal membrane peeling in eyes with dry age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Mason, John O; Patel, Shyam A

    2015-01-01

    To study the efficacy of epiretinal membrane (ERM) peeling in eyes with dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD). We retrospectively analyzed patient charts on 17 eyes (16 patients) that underwent ERM peeling with a concurrent diagnosis of dry AMD. Eyes with concurrent dry AMD and with a good preoperative best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) (better than or equal to 20/50) had a statistically significant mean BCVA improvement at 6 months after ERM peeling. There was a statistical increase in mean BCVA from 20/95 to 20/56 in dry AMD eyes, and no eyes showed worsening in BCVA at 6 months or at most recent follow-up. Five/seventeen (29.4%) eyes had cataract formation or progression. There were no other complications, reoperations, or reoccurrences. ERM peeling in eyes with dry AMD may show significant improvement, especially in eyes with good preoperative BCVA. The procedure is relatively safe with low complications and reoccurrences.

  16. Adaptor protein cerebral cavernous malformation 3 (CCM3) mediates phosphorylation of the cytoskeletal proteins ezrin/radixin/moesin by mammalian Ste20-4 to protect cells from oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Fidalgo, Miguel; Guerrero, Ana; Fraile, María; Iglesias, Cristina; Pombo, Celia M; Zalvide, Juan

    2012-03-30

    While studying the functions of CCM3/PDCD10, a gene encoding an adaptor protein whose mutation results in vascular malformations, we have found that it is involved in a novel response to oxidative stress that results in phosphorylation and activation of the ezrin/radixin/moesin (ERM) family of proteins. This phosphorylation protects cells from accidental cell death induced by oxidative stress. We also present evidence that ERM phosphorylation is performed by the GCKIII kinase Mst4, which is activated and relocated to the cell periphery after oxidative stress. The cellular levels of Mst4 and its activation after oxidative stress depend on the presence of CCM3, as absence of the latter impairs the phosphorylation of ERM proteins and enhances death of cells exposed to reactive oxygen species. These findings shed new light on the response of cells to oxidative stress and identify an important pathophysiological situation in which ERM proteins and their phosphorylation play a significant role.

  17. Examining Agencies' Satisfaction with Electronic Record Management Systems in e-Government: A Large-Scale Survey Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Fang-Ming; Hu, Paul Jen-Hwa; Chen, Hsinchun; Hu, Han-Fen

    While e-government is propelling and maturing steadily, advanced technological capabilities alone cannot guarantee agencies’ realizing the full benefits of the enabling computer-based systems. This study analyzes information systems in e-government settings by examining agencies’ satisfaction with an electronic record management system (ERMS). Specifically, we investigate key satisfaction determinants that include regulatory compliance, job relevance, and satisfaction with support services for using the ERMS. We test our model and the hypotheses in it, using a large-scale survey that involves a total of 1,652 government agencies in Taiwan. Our results show significant effects of regulatory compliance on job relevance and satisfaction with support services, which in turn determine government agencies’ satisfaction with an ERMS. Our data exhibit a reasonably good fit to our model, which can explain a significant portion of the variance in agencies’ satisfaction with an ERMS. Our findings have several important implications to research and practice, which are also discussed.

  18. Novel root-fungus symbiosis in Ericaceae: sheathed ericoid mycorrhiza formed by a hitherto undescribed basidiomycete with affinities to Trechisporales.

    PubMed

    Vohník, Martin; Sadowsky, Jesse J; Kohout, Petr; Lhotáková, Zuzana; Nestby, Rolf; Kolařík, Miroslav

    2012-01-01

    Ericaceae (the heath family) are widely distributed calcifuges inhabiting soils with inherently poor nutrient status. Ericaceae overcome nutrient limitation through symbiosis with ericoid mycorrhizal (ErM) fungi that mobilize nutrients complexed in recalcitrant organic matter. At present, recognized ErM fungi include a narrow taxonomic range within the Ascomycota, and the Sebacinales, basal Hymenomycetes with unclamped hyphae and imperforate parenthesomes. Here we describe a novel type of basidiomycetous ErM symbiosis, termed 'sheathed ericoid mycorrhiza', discovered in two habitats in mid-Norway as a co-dominant mycorrhizal symbiosis in Vaccinium spp. The basidiomycete forming sheathed ErM possesses clamped hyphae with perforate parenthesomes, produces 1- to 3-layer sheaths around terminal parts of hair roots and colonizes their rhizodermis intracellularly forming hyphal coils typical for ErM symbiosis. Two basidiomycetous isolates were obtained from sheathed ErM and molecular and phylogenetic tools were used to determine their identity; they were also examined for the ability to form sheathed ErM and lignocellulolytic potential. Surprisingly, ITS rDNA of both conspecific isolates failed to amplify with the most commonly used primer pairs, including ITS1 and ITS1F + ITS4. Phylogenetic analysis of nuclear LSU, SSU and 5.8S rDNA indicates that the basidiomycete occupies a long branch residing in the proximity of Trechisporales and Hymenochaetales, but lacks a clear sequence relationship (>90% similarity) to fungi currently placed in these orders. The basidiomycete formed the characteristic sheathed ErM symbiosis and enhanced growth of Vaccinium spp. in vitro, and degraded a recalcitrant aromatic substrate that was left unaltered by common ErM ascomycetes. Our findings provide coherent evidence that this hitherto undescribed basidiomycete forms a morphologically distinct ErM symbiosis that may occur at significant levels under natural conditions, yet remain

  19. Novel Root-Fungus Symbiosis in Ericaceae: Sheathed Ericoid Mycorrhiza Formed by a Hitherto Undescribed Basidiomycete with Affinities to Trechisporales

    PubMed Central

    Vohník, Martin; Sadowsky, Jesse J.; Kohout, Petr; Lhotáková, Zuzana; Nestby, Rolf; Kolařík, Miroslav

    2012-01-01

    Ericaceae (the heath family) are widely distributed calcifuges inhabiting soils with inherently poor nutrient status. Ericaceae overcome nutrient limitation through symbiosis with ericoid mycorrhizal (ErM) fungi that mobilize nutrients complexed in recalcitrant organic matter. At present, recognized ErM fungi include a narrow taxonomic range within the Ascomycota, and the Sebacinales, basal Hymenomycetes with unclamped hyphae and imperforate parenthesomes. Here we describe a novel type of basidiomycetous ErM symbiosis, termed ‘sheathed ericoid mycorrhiza’, discovered in two habitats in mid-Norway as a co-dominant mycorrhizal symbiosis in Vaccinium spp. The basidiomycete forming sheathed ErM possesses clamped hyphae with perforate parenthesomes, produces 1- to 3-layer sheaths around terminal parts of hair roots and colonizes their rhizodermis intracellularly forming hyphal coils typical for ErM symbiosis. Two basidiomycetous isolates were obtained from sheathed ErM and molecular and phylogenetic tools were used to determine their identity; they were also examined for the ability to form sheathed ErM and lignocellulolytic potential. Surprisingly, ITS rDNA of both conspecific isolates failed to amplify with the most commonly used primer pairs, including ITS1 and ITS1F + ITS4. Phylogenetic analysis of nuclear LSU, SSU and 5.8S rDNA indicates that the basidiomycete occupies a long branch residing in the proximity of Trechisporales and Hymenochaetales, but lacks a clear sequence relationship (>90% similarity) to fungi currently placed in these orders. The basidiomycete formed the characteristic sheathed ErM symbiosis and enhanced growth of Vaccinium spp. in vitro, and degraded a recalcitrant aromatic substrate that was left unaltered by common ErM ascomycetes. Our findings provide coherent evidence that this hitherto undescribed basidiomycete forms a morphologically distinct ErM symbiosis that may occur at significant levels under natural conditions, yet remain

  20. Genotyping of erythromycin resistant group C & G streptococci isolated in Chennai, south India

    PubMed Central

    Prabu, D.; Menon, Thangam

    2013-01-01

    Background & objectives: Increasing resistance to erythromycin has been observed worldwide in group C and group G streptococci (GCS/GGS). The information available from India is scanty. The aim of the study was to identify erythromycin resistant GCS/GGS isolates in Chennai, south India, and to compare erythromycin resistant genotypes with emm types. Methods: One hundred and thirty one GCS/GGS isolates were tested for erythromycin resistance by disc diffusion and agar dilution methods. Erythromycin resistance genotypes [erm(A), erm(B) and mef(A)] were determined by a multiplex PCR. emm types of erythromycin resistant GCS/GGS isolates was also assessed using emm gene sequencing method. Results: Sixteen of the 131 isolates (12.21%) were resistant to erythromycin. Majority of the isolates were GGS (15/16). Eight of the 16 (50%) were S. dysgalactiae subsps. equisimilis. Twelve isolates (75%) were MLSB phenotype and four (25%) were M phenotype. Of the 12 isolates which exhibited MLSB resistance, seven showed cMLSB phenotype and were positive for erm(B) gene. The remaining five were iMLSB phenotype of which three were positive for erm(A) gene and two for erm(B) gene. erm(A) was common among carriers whereas erm(B) was common among clinical isolates. Interpretation & conclusions: MLSB was the predominant phenotype and erm(B) was the common genotype in the present study. The emm type stC1400.0 was frequently associated with erythromycin resistant GCS/GGS in our study. PMID:23481067

  1. Phenotypic and genotypic study of macrolide, lincosamide and streptogramin B (MLSB) resistance in clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus in Tehran, Iran.

    PubMed

    Saderi, Horieh; Emadi, Behzad; Owlia, Parviz

    2011-02-01

    Resistance to antimicrobial agents among Staphylococcus aureus is an increasing problem. Two common genes responsible for resistance to macrolide, lincosamide and streptogramin B (MLSB) antibiotics are the ermA and ermC genes. Three resistance phenotypes have been detected to these antibiotics: strains containing cMLSB (constitutive MLSB) and iMLSB (inducible MLSB), which are resistant to macrolide, lincosamide and streptogramin B antibiotics, and MS, which is only resistant to macrolide and streptogramin B antibiotics. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of MLSB phenotypes and genotypes in erythromycin-resistant strains of S. aureus isolated from patients in 4 university hospitals in Tehran, Iran. S. aureus strains were isolated from various clinical specimens and identified by routine phenotypic methods and PCR for nuc gene. Erythromycin resistance was determined by disk diffusion testing. Prevalence of MLSB phenotypes was determined by use of the D-test. ermA and ermC genes were detected by PCR. Altogether, 126 erythromycin-resistant strains of S. aureus were detected. Prevalence of cMLSB, iMLSB and MS resistance phenotypes were 92.8%, 6.4%, and 0.8%, respectively; 60.3% of strains had ermA gene and 54.8% ermC gene; 61 strains (48.4%) contained 2 studied erm genes and 42 strains (33.3%) did not have any studied erm genes. Due to the high prevalence of clindamycin resistance among S. aureus isolated from patients in Iran, we recommend clindamycin therapy only after proper antimicrobial susceptibility testing.

  2. Telithromycin Susceptibility and Genomic Diversity of Macrolide-Resistant Serotype III Group B Streptococci Isolated in Perinatal Infections

    PubMed Central

    Bingen, Edouard; Doit, Catherine; Bidet, Philippe; Brahimi, Naima; Deforche, Dominique

    2004-01-01

    We studied the telithromycin, erythromycin, azithromycin, and clindamycin susceptibilities of serotype III macrolide-resistant group B streptococci, together with genetic mechanisms of resistance and genomic diversity. ermB, ermA, and mefA were found in, respectively, 57, 32, and 9% of isolates. The telithromycin MIC at which 90% of isolates were inhibited was 0.5 μg/ml. Macrolide resistance was associated with dissemination of resistance determinants among isolates of different genetic backgrounds. PMID:14742237

  3. Phenotypic and genotypic study of macrolide, lincosamide and streptogramin B (MLSB) resistance in clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus in Tehran, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Saderi, Horieh; Emadi, Behzad; Owlia, Parviz

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Resistance to antimicrobial agents among Staphylococcus aureus is an increasing problem. Two common genes responsible for resistance to macrolide, lincosamide and streptogramin B (MLSB) antibiotics are the ermA and ermC genes. Three resistance phenotypes have been detected to these antibiotics: strains containing cMLSB (constitutive MLSB) and iMLSB (inducible MLSB), which are resistant to macrolide, lincosamide and streptogramin B antibiotics, and MS, which is only resistant to macrolide and streptogramin B antibiotics. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of MLSB phenotypes and genotypes in erythromycin-resistant strains of S. aureus isolated from patients in 4 university hospitals in Tehran, Iran. Material/Methods S. aureus strains were isolated from various clinical specimens and identified by routine phenotypic methods and PCR for nuc gene. Erythromycin resistance was determined by disk diffusion testing. Prevalence of MLSB phenotypes was determined by use of the D-test. ermA and ermC genes were detected by PCR. Results Altogether, 126 erythromycin-resistant strains of S. aureus were detected. Prevalence of cMLSB, iMLSB and MS resistance phenotypes were 92.8%, 6.4%, and 0.8%, respectively; 60.3% of strains had ermA gene and 54.8% ermC gene; 61 strains (48.4%) contained 2 studied erm genes and 42 strains (33.3%) did not have any studied erm genes. Conclusions Due to the high prevalence of clindamycin resistance among S. aureus isolated from patients in Iran, we recommend clindamycin therapy only after proper antimicrobial susceptibility testing. PMID:21278685

  4. Macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B resistant phenotypes and genotypes for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Turkey, from 2003 to 2006.

    PubMed

    Gul, H Cem; Kilic, Abdullah; Guclu, Aylin Uskudar; Bedir, Orhan; Orhon, Mustafa; Basustaoglu, A Celal

    2008-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains with inducible macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B (iMLS(B)) resistance phenotype may lead to clinical failure during clindamycin (CLI) therapy. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of MLS(B) phenotypes by using D-test method and genotypes by using multiplex real-time PCR method in MRSA strains. A total of 265 MRSA strains were obtained from clinical samples from hospitalized and outpatients. Of the MRSA isolates, 225 (84.9%) were resistant to erythromycin (ERT), and 170 (64.1%) to CLI. Among the 225 ERT-resistant MRSA strains, the constitutive MLS(B) (cMLS(B)) rate was found in 49.3%, iMLS(B) in 39.1% and the M phenotype in 11.5%. Overall, ermA, ermC, ermA+ermC, msrA, ermC+msrA, and ermA+ermC+msrA genes were detected in 85 (37.7%), 60 (26.6%), 42 (18.6%), 26 (11.5%), 11 (4.8%), and 1 (0.4%) isolates, respectively. Most prevalent resistance determinant in MRSA strains was ermA, which was detected in 37.7% of the isolates. The 26 MRSA strains with M phenotype harboured only msrA gene. In conclusion, due to aware of the potential of CLI treatment failure, D-test should be performed and reported in MRSA strains in clinical laboratories. The multiplex real-time PCR method is easy to perform, fast and reliable method for the detection of MLS(B) resistance genotypes.

  5. Toward Determination of Venous Thrombosis Ages by Using Fuzzy Logic and Supervised Bayes Classification

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Lim1,3, R. Debon1, B. Solaiman1, L. Bressollette2, B. Guias2, C. Roux1, H.T. Chuah3 1Département I.T.I, LaTIM ERM-0102, ENST Bretagne , BP 832, 29285...Departement I.T.I LaTIM ERM-0102 ENST Bretagne , BP 832 29285 Brest Cedex, France Performing Organization Report Number Sponsoring/Monitoring Agency Name(s

  6. Mobile elements and chromosomal changes associated with MLS resistance phenotypes of invasive pneumococci recovered in the United States.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Paulina A; Chochua, Sopio; Jackson, Delois; Beall, Bernard; McGee, Lesley

    2015-04-01

    Pneumococcal macrolide resistance is usually expressed as one of two phenotypes: the M phenotype conferred by the mef gene or the MLSB phenotype caused by modification of ribosomal targets, most commonly mediated by an erm methylase. Target-site modification leading to antibiotic resistance can also occur due to sequence mutations within the 23S rRNA or the L4 and L22 riboproteins. We screened 4,535 invasive isolates resistant to erythromycin and 18 invasive isolates nonsusceptible to quinupristin-dalfopristin (Q-D) to deduce the potential mechanisms involved. Of 4,535 erythromycin-resistant isolates, 66.2% were polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-positive for mef alone, 17.8% for ermB alone, and 15.1% for both mef and ermB. Thirty-seven isolates (0.9%) were PCR negative for both determinants. Of these, 3 were positive for ermA (subclass ermTR) and 25 had chromosomal mutations. No chromosomal mutations (in 23S rRNA, rplD, or rplV) nor any of the macrolides/lincosamides/streptogramin (MLS) resistance genes screened for (ermT, ermA, cfr, lsaC, and vgaA) were found in the remaining nine isolates. Of 18 Q-D nonsusceptible isolates, 14 had chromosomal mutations and one carried both mef and ermB; no chromosomal mutations or other resistance genes were found in 3 isolates. Overall, we found 28 mutations, 13 of which have not been previously described in Streptococcus pneumoniae. The role of these mutations remains to be confirmed by transformation assays.

  7. Distribution of genes encoding erythromycin ribosomal methylases and an erythromycin efflux pump in epidemiologically distinct groups of staphylococci.

    PubMed

    Eady, E A; Ross, J I; Tipper, J L; Walters, C E; Cove, J H; Noble, W C

    1993-02-01

    Erythromycin-resistant staphylococci can be divided into two phenotypic classes based on their pattern of cross-resistance to other macrolides, lincosamides and type B streptogramins. Strains inducibly or constitutively resistant to all MLS antibiotics possess erythromycin ribosomal methylase (erm) genes, whereas strains inducibly resistant to only 14 and 15-membered ring macrolides and type B streptogramins harbour msrA, which encodes an ATP-dependent efflux pump. Dot-blot hybridization was used to study the distribution of ermA, ermB, ermC and msrA in five epidemiologically distinct groups of staphylococci. The most widely-distributed resistance determinant was ermC, which was detected in 112 (50.6%) of 221 isolates, alone in 106 isolates and in combination with a second erythromycin resistance determinant in six strains. MsrA was detected in 73 (33%) of isolates, alone in 65 and in combination with a methylase gene in eight strains. This determinant was responsible for erythromycin resistance in over one-third (36.4%) of clinical isolates of coagulase-negative staphylococci. ErmA and ermB were present in only a minority of isolates (5.9 and 7.2% of strains, respectively). The resistance determinants present in ten strains did not hybridize to any of the four probes although, in all cases, their resistance phenotype was consistent with the possession of a methylase gene. Interestingly, ermB was found exclusively in animal isolates of Staphylococcus intermedius, Staphylococcus xylosus and Staphylococcus hyicus, but not in coagulase-negative staphylococci of human origin. This determinant has previously only been found in a small number of epidemiologically related strains of Staphylococcus aureus.

  8. Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Bacillus Strains Isolated from Primary Starters for African Traditional Bread Production and Characterization of the Bacitracin Operon and Bacitracin Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Sørensen, Kim I.; Thorsen, Line; Stuer-Lauridsen, Birgitte; Abdelgadir, Warda S.; Nielsen, Dennis S.; Derkx, Patrick M. F.; Jespersen, Lene

    2012-01-01

    Bacillus spp. are widely used as feed additives and probiotics. However, there is limited information on their resistance to various antibiotics, and there is a growing concern over the transfer of antibiotic resistance genes. The MIC for 8 antibiotics was determined for 85 Bacillus species strains, Bacillus subtilis subsp. subtilis (n = 29), Bacillus licheniformis (n = 38), and Bacillus sonorensis (n = 18), all of which were isolated from starters for Sudanese bread production. All the strains were sensitive to tetracycline (8.0 mg/liter), vancomycin (4.0 mg/liter), and gentamicin (4.0 mg/liter) but resistant to streptomycin. Sensitivity to clindamycin, chloramphenicol, and kanamycin was species specific. The erythromycin resistance genes ermD and ermK were detected by PCR in all of the erythromycin-resistant (MIC, ≥16.0 mg/liter) B. licheniformis strains and one erythromycin-sensitive (MIC, 4.0 mg/liter) B. licheniformis strain. Several amino acid changes were present in the translated ermD and ermK nucleotide sequences of the erythromycin-sensitive strain, which could indicate ErmD and ErmK protein functionalities different from those of the resistance strains. The ermD and ermK genes were localized on an 11.4-kbp plasmid. All of the B. sonorensis strains harbored the bacitracin synthetase gene, bacA, and the transporter gene bcrA, which correlated with their observed resistance to bacitracin. Bacitracin was produced by all the investigated species strains (28%), as determined by ultra-high-definition quadrupole time-of-flight liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (UHD-QTOF LC/MS). The present study has revealed species-specific variations in the antimicrobial susceptibilities of Bacillus spp. and provides new information on MIC values, as well as the occurrence of resistance genes in Bacillus spp., including the newly described species B. sonorensis. PMID:22941078

  9. High rates of erythromycin and clindamycin resistance among OBGYN isolates of group B Streptococcus.

    PubMed

    DiPersio, Linda P; DiPersio, Joseph R

    2006-01-01

    In vitro susceptibility testing on 200 Streptococcus agalactiae strains isolated during a 4-year period from vaginal/rectal specimens demonstrated a very high resistance rate for both erythromycin (54%) and clindamycin (33%). Methylase genes erm(B) and erm(TR) and efflux genes mef(E) and mef(A) were detected. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis showed evidence of both clonal spread and multiclonal dissemination of resistant strains. All but 3 of 200 isolates were susceptible to telithromycin.

  10. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Bacillus strains isolated from primary starters for African traditional bread production and characterization of the bacitracin operon and bacitracin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Adimpong, David B; Sørensen, Kim I; Thorsen, Line; Stuer-Lauridsen, Birgitte; Abdelgadir, Warda S; Nielsen, Dennis S; Derkx, Patrick M F; Jespersen, Lene

    2012-11-01

    Bacillus spp. are widely used as feed additives and probiotics. However, there is limited information on their resistance to various antibiotics, and there is a growing concern over the transfer of antibiotic resistance genes. The MIC for 8 antibiotics was determined for 85 Bacillus species strains, Bacillus subtilis subsp. subtilis (n = 29), Bacillus licheniformis (n = 38), and Bacillus sonorensis (n = 18), all of which were isolated from starters for Sudanese bread production. All the strains were sensitive to tetracycline (8.0 mg/liter), vancomycin (4.0 mg/liter), and gentamicin (4.0 mg/liter) but resistant to streptomycin. Sensitivity to clindamycin, chloramphenicol, and kanamycin was species specific. The erythromycin resistance genes ermD and ermK were detected by PCR in all of the erythromycin-resistant (MIC, ≥16.0 mg/liter) B. licheniformis strains and one erythromycin-sensitive (MIC, 4.0 mg/liter) B. licheniformis strain. Several amino acid changes were present in the translated ermD and ermK nucleotide sequences of the erythromycin-sensitive strain, which could indicate ErmD and ErmK protein functionalities different from those of the resistance strains. The ermD and ermK genes were localized on an 11.4-kbp plasmid. All of the B. sonorensis strains harbored the bacitracin synthetase gene, bacA, and the transporter gene bcrA, which correlated with their observed resistance to bacitracin. Bacitracin was produced by all the investigated species strains (28%), as determined by ultra-high-definition quadrupole time-of-flight liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (UHD-QTOF LC/MS). The present study has revealed species-specific variations in the antimicrobial susceptibilities of Bacillus spp. and provides new information on MIC values, as well as the occurrence of resistance genes in Bacillus spp., including the newly described species B. sonorensis.

  11. Heterogeneity of macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B resistance phenotypes in enterococci.

    PubMed

    Min, Yu-Hong; Jeong, Jae-Hee; Choi, Yun-Jeong; Yun, Hee-Jeong; Lee, Kyungwon; Shim, Mi-Ja; Kwak, Jin-Hwan; Choi, Eung-Chil

    2003-11-01

    We determined the macrolide resistance phenotypes of 241 clinical isolates of erythromycin-resistant enterococci (MICs, > or = 1 microg/ml), including 147 Enterococcus faecalis strains and 94 Enterococcus faecium strains, collected from a hospital in Seoul, Korea, between 1999 and 2000. By the erythromycin (40 micro g)-josamycin (100 microg) double-disk test, 93 strains were assigned to the constitutive macrolide, lincosamide, and streptogramin B (MLS(B)) resistance (cMLS(B)) phenotype, and the remaining 148 strains were assigned to the inducible MLS(B) resistance (iMLS(B)) phenotype. Of the strains with the iMLS(B) phenotype, 36 exhibited a reversibly inducible MLS(B) (riMLS(B)) phenotype, i.e., blunting of the erythromycin zone of inhibition, which indicates that the 16-membered-ring macrolide josamycin is a more effective inducer than the 14-membered-ring macrolide erythromycin. Sequence analysis of the regulatory regions of the erm(B) genes from all of the strains exhibiting the riMLS(B) phenotype revealed not only erm(Bv) [where v represents variant; previously erm(AMR)] (n = 13), as reported previously, but also three kinds of erm(B) variants, which were designated erm(Bv1) (n = 17), erm(Bv2) (n = 3), and erm(Bv3) (n = 3), respectively. In lacZ reporter gene assays of these variants, the 16-membered-ring macrolide tylosin had stronger inducibility than erythromycin at > or = 0.1 microg/ml. These findings highlight the versatility of erm(B) in induction specificity.

  12. Organization of a cluster of erythromycin genes in Saccharopolyspora erythraea.

    PubMed Central

    Weber, J M; Leung, J O; Maine, G T; Potenz, R H; Paulus, T J; DeWitt, J P

    1990-01-01

    We used a series of gene disruptions and gene replacements to mutagenically characterize 30 kilobases of DNA in the erythromycin resistance gene (ermE) region of the Saccharopolyspora erythraea chromosome. Five previously undiscovered loci involved in the biosynthesis of erythromycin were found, eryBI, eryBII, eryCI, eryCII, and eryH; and three known loci, eryAI, eryG, and ermE, were further characterized. The new Ery phenotype, EryH, was marked by (i) the accumulation of the intermediate 6-deoxyerythronolide B (DEB), suggesting a defect in the operation of the C-6 hydroxylase system, and (ii) a block in the synthesis or addition reactions for the first sugar group. Analyses of ermE mutants indicated that ermE is the only gene required for resistance to erythromycin, and that it is not required for production of the intermediate erythronolide B (EB) or for conversion of the intermediate 3-alpha-mycarosyl erythronolide B (MEB) to erythromycin. Mutations in the eryB and eryC loci were similar to previously reported chemically induced eryB and eryC mutations blocking synthesis or attachment of the two erythromycin sugar groups. Insertion mutations in eryAI, the macrolactone synthetase, defined the largest (at least 9-kilobase) transcription unit of the cluster. These mutants help to define the physical organization of the erythromycin gene cluster, and the eryH mutants provide a source for the production of the intermediate DEB. Images PMID:2185216

  13. In human T cells mifepristone antagonizes glucocorticoid non-genomic rapid responses in terms of Na(+)/H(+)-exchange 1 activity, but not ezrin/radixin/moesin phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Chien, Eileen Jea; Hsu, Ching-Hui; Chang, Vincent Han-Jhih; Lin, Enoch Pin-Yi; Kuo, Trista Pin-Tsun; Chien, Chau-Heng; Lin, Hsiao-Yi

    2016-07-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) and progesterone have been employed as immunosuppressive agents during pregnancy for many years. Intracellular acidification by GCs is due to a rapid non-genomic inhibition of membrane Na(+)/H(+)-exchange 1 (NHE1) activity and is followed by immunosuppression of PHA-stimulated proliferation. NHE1 is tethered to the cortical actin cytoskeleton through ezrin/radixin/moesin (ERM) proteins within lipid rafts; these regulate cell shape, migration and resistance to apoptosis. We explored whether mifepristone (RU486), an antagonist of GCs in T cells, is able to completely block rapid non-genomic responses, namely NHE1 activity and the phosphorylation C-terminal residues of ERM proteins at threonine (cp-ERM). GCs stimulate a rapid non-genomic cp-ERM response in cells within 5min. RU486 antagonized the GC-induced rapid decrease in NHE1 activity, and arrested PHA-stimulated T cells at G0/G1 phase but had no effect on the rapid increase in cp-ERM, which persisted for 24h. However, the cp-ERM response was blocked by staurosporine in both resting and GC stimulated cells. The results of RU486 antagonized the GC induced rapid decrease in NHE1 ion transport activity, but not the increase cp-ERM. This suggests that RU486 in T cells exerts its antagonistic effects at NHE1 containing plasma membrane sites and not where cp-ERM links lipid rafts to cortical cytoskeletons. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Community Environmental Response Facilitation Act (CERFA) Report, Former Army Reserve Center, Gaithersburg, Maryland

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-04-01

    ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND AOORESS(ES) L PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUNSII ERM, Inc. 855 Springdale Drive N/ A Exton, PA 19341 9. SPONqSORING...Unlimited I& A &STRACT (Maamu, 200wow) . This report presents the results of the Community Environmental Response Facilitation Act (CERFA) investigation...conducted by Environmental Resources Management (ERM) at the former Army Reserve Center, Gaithersburg (ARC), a U.S. Government property selected for

  15. Notch maintains Drosophila type II neuroblasts by suppressing expression of the Fez transcription factor Earmuff.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaosu; Xie, Yonggang; Zhu, Sijun

    2016-07-15

    Notch signaling is crucial for maintaining neural stem cell (NSC) self-renewal and heterogeneity; however, the underlying mechanism is not well understood. In Drosophila, loss of Notch prematurely terminates the self-renewal of larval type II neuroblasts (NBs, the Drosophila NSCs) and transforms type II NBs into type I NBs. Here, we demonstrate that Notch maintains type II NBs by suppressing the activation of earmuff (erm) by Pointed P1 (PntP1). We show that loss of Notch or components of its canonical pathway leads to PntP1-dependent ectopic Erm expression in type II NBs. Knockdown of Erm significantly rescues the loss-of-Notch phenotypes, and misexpression of Erm phenocopies the loss of Notch. Ectopically expressed Erm promotes the transformation of type II NBs into type I NBs by inhibiting PntP1 function and expression in type II NBs. Our work not only elucidates a key mechanism of Notch-mediated maintenance of type II NB self-renewal and identity, but also reveals a novel function of Erm.

  16. Multiplex PCR detection of the antibiotic resistance genes in Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from auricular infections.

    PubMed

    Zmantar, T; Chaieb, K; Ben Abdallah, F; Ben Kahla-Nakbi, A; Ben Hassen, A; Mahdouani, K; Bakhrouf, A

    2008-01-01

    Thirty-five Staphylococcus aureus strains from auricular infections were isolated. The identification of strains was confirmed by Api ID 32 Staph strips, the antibiotic susceptibility test was performed using ATB Staph kit. PCR assay was used to detect the oxacillin resistance gene (mecA) and the erythromycin genes (ermA, ermB, ermC, msrA and mef). The susceptibility profile of all strains revealed a low resistance level to oxacillin and erythromycin. The PCR results show that 60 % of the strains are mecA positive. The frequency of erythromycin genes was: ermA (+) 22.8 %, ermB (+) 45.7, ermC (+) 17.1, msrA (+) 28.6. The mef gene was not detected in any strain. No correlations between genotypic and phenotypic methods for the determination of oxacillin and erythromycin resistance was found. However, multiplex PCR technique was shown to be a fast, practical and economic technique for the detection of methicillin-and erythromycin-resistant staphylococci.

  17. Antibiotic resistance genes detected by multiplex PCR assays in Staphylococcus epidermidis strains isolated from dialysis fluid and needles in a dialysis service.

    PubMed

    Chaieb, Kamel; Zmantar, Tarek; Chehab, Olfa; Bouchami, Ons; Ben Hasen, Assia; Mahdouani, Kacem; Bakhrouf, Amina

    2007-07-01

    The rate of the onset of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis infections is increasing in Tunisia. We have isolated 32 S. epidermidis strains from dialysis fluid and needle cultures in dialysis service. The strains were identified by classic methods (colonial morphology, Gram staining, catalase test, coagulase test, and DNase test) as well as by API ID32 Staph. Susceptibilities to 18 antibiotics were tested with the ATB Staph kit. Most of the tested strains were resistant to penicillin. In addition, the presence of multidrug resistant strains that showed resistance to different antibiotics was recorded. We have characterized these strains by multiplex PCR assay to identify intercellular adhesion genes icaA/icaD associated with the adhesiveness of staphylococci in biomaterials, and to identify representative resistant genes: oxacillin resistance, mecA; erythromycin methylase (ermA, ermB, and ermC), and macrolide efflux gene (msrA and mef). The frequency of the carriage of these genes was icaA/icaD (71.9%), mecA (78.1%), ermA (12.5%), ermB (31.3%), ermC (53.1%), msrA (68.8%), and mef (O%). Although the carriage of the genes and the results of susceptibility testing did not match exactly, it could be judged that the PCR identification of antibiotic resistance genes is rapid and supplementary methods for identifying staphylococci or epidemiological study used for the control of nosocomial infection.

  18. A high prevalence of tylosin resistance among Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from bovine mastitis.

    PubMed

    Bahraminia, Farhad; Emadi, Seyed Reza; Emaneini, Mohammad; Farzaneh, Nima; Rad, Mehrnaz; Khoramian, Babak

    2017-01-01

    The macrolides appear to have considerable effects for treatment of bovine mastitis because of excellent diffusion into the mammary gland, long half-life, low protein binding, high intracellular concentration and lipid solubility. Acquired resistance to macrolides in Staphylococcus aureus is primarily related to target-site modification through acquisition of an erm gene. In the present study the prevalence of both phenotypic and genotypic tylosin resistance in S. aureus isolates (n = 103) from subclinical mastitis in nine dairy farms belonging to three different province of Iran were investigated. Overall, ermA, ermB and ermC was found in 7.80%, 32.00%, and 20.40% of S.aureus isolates, respectively. A very high percent of isolates (56.90%) were resistant to tylosin. MIC90 and MIC50 values were 64 and 32 µg mL(-1), respectively. Most of tylosin resistant isolates did not harbour any erm gene but ermB was dominant gene among 58 tylosin resistant isolates of S. aureus. In overall, tylosin resistance was prevalent in S. aureus isolates obtained from bovine mastitis in Iran.

  19. A high prevalence of tylosin resistance among Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from bovine mastitis

    PubMed Central

    Bahraminia, Farhad; Emadi, Seyed Reza; Emaneini, Mohammad; Farzaneh, Nima; Rad, Mehrnaz; Khoramian, Babak

    2017-01-01

    The macrolides appear to have considerable effects for treatment of bovine mastitis because of excellent diffusion into the mammary gland, long half-life, low protein binding, high intracellular concentration and lipid solubility. Acquired resistance to macrolides in Staphylococcus aureus is primarily related to target-site modification through acquisition of an erm gene. In the present study the prevalence of both phenotypic and genotypic tylosin resistance in S. aureus isolates (n = 103) from subclinical mastitis in nine dairy farms belonging to three different province of Iran were investigated. Overall, ermA, ermB and ermC was found in 7.80%, 32.00%, and 20.40% of S.aureus isolates, respectively. A very high percent of isolates (56.90%) were resistant to tylosin. MIC90 and MIC50 values were 64 and 32 µg mL-1, respectively. Most of tylosin resistant isolates did not harbour any erm gene but ermB was dominant gene among 58 tylosin resistant isolates of S. aureus. In overall, tylosin resistance was prevalent in S. aureus isolates obtained from bovine mastitis in Iran. PMID:28785387

  20. A high prevalence of mupirocin and macrolide resistance determinant among Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from burnt patients.

    PubMed

    Shahsavan, Shadi; Emaneini, Mohammad; Noorazar Khoshgnab, Behshad; Khoramian, Babak; Asadollahi, Parisa; Aligholi, Marzieh; Jabalameli, Fereshteh; Eslampour, Mohammad Amin; Taherikalani, Morovat

    2012-05-01

    Infections due to Staphylococcus aureus have become increasingly common among burn patients. The antibiotic resistance profile of S. aureus isolates and inducible resistance against clindamycin were investigated in this study. The presence of mecA gene, mupA gene and macrolide resistance genes were detected using PCR and multiplex-PCR. The resistance rate to methicillin, erythromycin and mupirocin were 58.5%, 58% and 40%, respectively. The prevalence of constitutive and inducible resistance among macrolide resistant isolates was 75% and 25%, respectively. Ninety five percent of the isolates were positive for one or more erm genes. The most common genes were ermA (75%), ermC (72%) and ermB (69%), respectively. The ermA gene predominated in the strains with the inducible phenotype, while ermC was more common in the isolates with the constitutive phenotype. The msrA gene was only found in one MRSA isolate with the constitutive phenotype. A total of 27 isolates (25%) carried the mupA gene. All the mupirocin resistant isolates and almost all the erythromycin resistant isolates were also resistant against methicillin which may indicate an outbreak of MRSA isolates with high-level mupirocin and erythromycin resistance in the burn unit assessed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  1. Functional and Molecular Characterization of Ex Vivo Cultured Epiretinal Membrane Cells from Human Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Veréb, Zoltán; Lumi, Xhevat; Andjelic, Sofija; Globocnik-Petrovic, Mojca; Urbancic, Mojca; Hawlina, Marko; Facskó, Andrea; Petrovski, Goran

    2013-01-01

    Characterization of the cell surface marker phenotype of ex vivo cultured cells growing out of human fibrovascular epiretinal membranes (fvERMs) from proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) can give insight into their function in immunity, angiogenesis, and retinal detachment. FvERMs from uneventful vitrectomies due to PDR were cultured adherently ex vivo. Surface marker analysis, release of immunity- and angiogenesis-pathway-related factors upon TNFα activation and measurement of the intracellular calcium dynamics upon mechano-stimulation using fluorescent dye Fura-2 were all performed. FvERMs formed proliferating cell monolayers when cultured ex vivo, which were negative for endothelial cell markers (CD31, VEGFR2), partially positive for hematopoietic- (CD34, CD47) and mesenchymal stem cell markers (CD73, CD90/Thy-1, and PDGFRβ), and negative for CD105. CD146/MCAM and CD166/ALCAM, previously unreported in cells from fvERMs, were also expressed. Secretion of 11 angiogenesis-related factors (DPPIV/CD26, EG-VEGF/PK1, ET-1, IGFBP-2 and 3, IL-8/CXCL8, MCP-1/CCL2, MMP-9, PTX3/TSG-14, Serpin E1/PAI-1, Serpin F1/PEDF, TIMP-1, and TSP-1) were detected upon TNFα activation of fvERM cells. Mechano-stimulation of these cells induced intracellular calcium propagation representing functional viability and role of these cells in tractional retinal detachment, thus serving as a model for studying tractional forces present in fvERMs in PDR ex vivo. PMID:24195074

  2. Functional and molecular characterization of ex vivo cultured epiretinal membrane cells from human proliferative diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Veréb, Zoltán; Lumi, Xhevat; Andjelic, Sofija; Globocnik-Petrovic, Mojca; Urbancic, Mojca; Hawlina, Marko; Facskó, Andrea; Petrovski, Goran

    2013-01-01

    Characterization of the cell surface marker phenotype of ex vivo cultured cells growing out of human fibrovascular epiretinal membranes (fvERMs) from proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) can give insight into their function in immunity, angiogenesis, and retinal detachment. FvERMs from uneventful vitrectomies due to PDR were cultured adherently ex vivo. Surface marker analysis, release of immunity- and angiogenesis-pathway-related factors upon TNF α activation and measurement of the intracellular calcium dynamics upon mechano-stimulation using fluorescent dye Fura-2 were all performed. FvERMs formed proliferating cell monolayers when cultured ex vivo, which were negative for endothelial cell markers (CD31, VEGFR2), partially positive for hematopoietic- (CD34, CD47) and mesenchymal stem cell markers (CD73, CD90/Thy-1, and PDGFR β ), and negative for CD105. CD146/MCAM and CD166/ALCAM, previously unreported in cells from fvERMs, were also expressed. Secretion of 11 angiogenesis-related factors (DPPIV/CD26, EG-VEGF/PK1, ET-1, IGFBP-2 and 3, IL-8/CXCL8, MCP-1/CCL2, MMP-9, PTX3/TSG-14, Serpin E1/PAI-1, Serpin F1/PEDF, TIMP-1, and TSP-1) were detected upon TNF α activation of fvERM cells. Mechano-stimulation of these cells induced intracellular calcium propagation representing functional viability and role of these cells in tractional retinal detachment, thus serving as a model for studying tractional forces present in fvERMs in PDR ex vivo.

  3. Phenotypes of staphylococcal resistance to macrolides, lincosamides and streptogramin B (MLS) in a Turkish university hospital.

    PubMed

    Tunçkanat, F; Arikan, S

    2000-01-01

    Resistance to macrolides, lincosamides and streptogramin B (MLS) which is expressed either constitutively or inducibly, is mediated by erm genes (erm A, erm B, and erm C in staphylococci). The transposon TN 554, harbouring the erm A gene also encodes spectinomycin resistance. In Turkey, data related to MLS resistance phenotypes of staphylococci are not available. In this study, we screened 500 consecutive clinical isolates of staphylococci isolated in Hacettepe University Hospital, for MLS and spectinomycin resistance by the standard disk diffusion method. All MLS-resistant isolates were further tested for spectinomycin susceptibility by the agar screening method. Of 500 staphylococcal isolates, 368 (73.6%) were susceptible and 132 (26.4%) were resistant to MLS antibiotics. Ninety-one (18.2%) of the resistant isolates exhibited a constitutive resistance pattern, whereas 40 were inducibly resistant. MS (resistance to macrolides and lincosamides only) resistance was detected in only one isolate (0.2%). Of 40 inducibly resistant isolates, 21 were found to be resistant to spectinomycin by both the disk diffusion and agar screening tests, probably indicating a presence of the erm A gene. These results suggest that MLS resistance has been considerably high among clinical isolates of staphylococci in our hospital. On the whole, constitutive resistance was the pattern most frequently encountered. In contrast, MS resistance was very rare. Further epidemiological and molecular investigations are required for clarification of the data presented.

  4. The ER-mitochondria encounter structure contributes to hyphal growth, mitochondrial morphology and virulence of the pathogenic mold Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    Geißel, Bernadette; Penka, Mirjam; Neubauer, Michael; Wagener, Johannes

    2017-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is an opportunistic fungal pathogen and the primary causative species of invasive aspergillosis, a systemic disease associated with high mortality rates. Treatment of invasive fungal infection relies on a very limited number of antifungal drug classes. In order to extend the spectrum of antifungal drugs novel target structures have to be identified. The ER-mitochondria encounter structure (ERMES), a recently discovered tether that links mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum, is a potential drug target based on its absence in Metazoa. Very recently, it was shown that ERMES is important for the fitness and immune evasion of the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans. We studied the role of the four ERMES core components Mdm10, Mdm12, Mdm34 and Mmm1 in the pathogenic mold A. fumigatus. By construction and characterizing conditional mutants of all four core components and deletion mutants of mdm10 and mdm12, we show that each component is of significant importance for growth of the fungal pathogen. While markedness of the individual mutant phenotypes differed slightly, all components are important for maintenance of the mitochondrial morphology and the intra-organellar distribution of nucleoids. Characterization of the Mmm1 ERMES mutant in a Galleria mellonella infection model indicates that ERMES contributes to virulence of A. fumigatus. Our results demonstrate that pharmacologic inhibition of ERMES could exert antifungal activity against this important pathogen.

  5. Defective RAGE activity in embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma cells results in high PAX7 levels that sustain migration and invasiveness.

    PubMed

    Chiappalupi, Sara; Riuzzi, Francesca; Fulle, Stefania; Donato, Rosario; Sorci, Guglielmo

    2014-10-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma is a muscle-derived malignant tumor mainly affecting children. The most frequent variant, embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (ERMS) is characterized by overexpression of the transcription factor, PAX7 which prevents ERMS cells from exiting the cell cycle and terminally differentiating. However, a role for PAX7 in the invasive properties of ERMS cells has not been investigated in detail thus far. Here we show that ectopic expression of receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) in human ERMS cells results in the activation of a RAGE/myogenin axis which downregulates PAX7 by transcriptional and post-translational mechanisms, as in normal myoblasts, and reduces metastasis formation. High PAX7 sustains migration and invasiveness in ERMS cells by upregulating EPHA3 and EFNA1 and downregulating NCAM1 thus decreasing the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM)/polysialylated-NCAM ratio. Microarray gene expression analysis shows that compared with the RAGE(-ve) TE671/WT cells and similarly to primary human myoblasts, TE671/RAGE cells show upregulation of genes involved in muscle differentiation and cell adhesion, and downregulation of cell migration related and major histocompatibility complex class I genes. Our data reveal a link between PAX7 and metastasis occurrence in ERMSs, and support a role for the RAGE/myogenin axis in metastasis suppression. Thus, low RAGE expression in ERMS primary tumors may be predictive of metastatic behavior. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Transferable Antibiotic Resistances in Marketed Edible Grasshoppers (Locusta migratoria migratorioides).

    PubMed

    Osimani, Andrea; Garofalo, Cristiana; Aquilanti, Lucia; Milanović, Vesna; Cardinali, Federica; Taccari, Manuela; Pasquini, Marina; Tavoletti, Stefano; Clementi, Francesca

    2017-03-24

    Grasshoppers are the most commonly eaten insects by humans worldwide, as they are rich in proteins and micronutrients. This study aimed to assess the occurrence of transferable antibiotic resistance genes in commercialized edible grasshoppers. To this end, the prevalence of 12 selected genes [aac(6')-Ie aph(2″)-Ia, blaZ, erm(A), erm(B), erm(C), mecA, tet(M), tet(O), tet(S), tet(K), vanA, vanB] coding for resistance to antibiotics conventionally used in clinical practice was determined. The majority of samples were positive for tet(M) (70.0%), tet(K) (83.3%) and blaZ (83.3%). A low percentage of samples were positive for erm(B) (16.7%), erm(C) (26.7%), and aac(6')-Ie aph(2″)-Ia (13.3%), whereas no samples were positive for erm(A), vanA, vanB, tet(O), and mecA. Cluster analysis identified 4 main clusters, allowing a separation of samples on the basis of their country of origin.

  7. Endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondria junction is required for iron homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Xue, Yong; Schmollinger, Stefan; Attar, Narsis; Campos, Oscar A; Vogelauer, Maria; Carey, Michael F; Merchant, Sabeeha S; Kurdistani, Siavash K

    2017-08-11

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-mitochondria encounter structure (ERMES) is a protein complex that physically tethers the two organelles to each other and creates the physical basis for communication between them. ERMES functions in lipid exchange between the ER and mitochondria, protein import into mitochondria, and maintenance of mitochondrial morphology and genome. Here, we report that ERMES is also required for iron homeostasis. Loss of ERMES components activates an Aft1-dependent iron deficiency response even in iron-replete conditions, leading to accumulation of excess iron inside the cell. This function is independent of known ERMES roles in calcium regulation, phospholipid biosynthesis, or effects on mitochondrial morphology. A mutation in the vacuolar protein sorting 13 (VPS13) gene that rescues the glycolytic phenotype of ERMES mutants suppresses the iron deficiency response and iron accumulation. Our findings reveal that proper communication between the ER and mitochondria is required for appropriate maintenance of cellular iron levels. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. High clonal diversity in erythromycin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae invasive isolates in Madrid, Spain (2000-07).

    PubMed

    de la Pedrosa, Elia Gómez G; Baquero, Fernando; Loza, Elena; Nadal-Serrano, José-María; Fenoll, Asunción; Del Campo, Rosa; Cantón, Rafael

    2009-12-01

    Erythromycin resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae is still increasing worldwide. All 78 erythromycin-resistant S. pneumoniae isolates collected from blood cultures in our hospital (2000-07) were studied and the population structure was analysed by using different mathematical diversity indexes. Erythromycin resistance determinants were screened by PCR. The population structure, including multilocus sequence typing, was analysed by using quantitative clonal diversity (diversity ratio, Simpson, Selander-Levin and Shannon mathematical indexes). The leading resistance gene was erm(B) (74.3% of the isolates), followed by the erm(B) plus mef(A) combination (17.9%) and mef(A) alone (7.7%). The most frequent serotypes were 14 (18%), 19A (15.4%) and 6B (11.5%). A polyclonal structure was detected in resistant strains, including the Spain(9V)-3, Spain(6B)-2 and Denmark(14)-32 international clones. Both genetic diversity and genetic distribution were high, particularly among clones containing erm(B) and erm(B) plus mef(A) determinants. The resistance determinants erm(B) and the combination of erm(B) plus mef(A) were observed within multiple S. pneumoniae bacteraemic clones. The preservation of a polyclonal structure might provide a suitable background for further evolution of antibiotic resistance.

  9. Caspase Cleavages of the Lymphocyte-oriented Kinase Prevent Ezrin, Radixin, and Moesin Phosphorylation during Apoptosis*

    PubMed Central

    Leroy, Catherine; Belkina, Natalya V.; Long, Thavy; Deruy, Emeric; Dissous, Colette; Shaw, Stephen; Tulasne, David

    2016-01-01

    The lymphocyte-oriented kinase (LOK), also called serine threonine kinase 10 (STK10), is synthesized mainly in lymphocytes. It is involved in lymphocyte migration and polarization and can phosphorylate ezrin, radixin, and moesin (the ERM proteins). In a T lymphocyte cell line and in purified human lymphocytes, we found LOK to be cleaved by caspases during apoptosis. The first cleavage occurs at aspartic residue 332, located between the kinase domain and the coiled-coil regulation domain. This cleavage generates an N-terminal fragment, p50 N-LOK, containing the kinase domain and a C-terminal fragment, which is further cleaved during apoptosis. Although these cleavages preserve the entire kinase domain, p50 N-LOK displays no kinase activity. In apoptotic lymphocytes, caspase cleavages of LOK are concomitant with a decrease in ERM phosphorylation. When non-apoptotic lymphocytes from mice with homozygous and heterozygous LOK knockout were compared, the latter showed a higher level of ERM phosphorylation, but when apoptosis was induced, LOK−/− and LOK+/− lymphocytes showed the same low level, confirming in vivo that LOK-induced ERM phosphorylation is prevented during lymphocyte apoptosis. Our results demonstrate that cleavage of LOK during apoptosis abolishes its kinase activity, causing a decrease in ERM phosphorylation, crucial to the role of the ERM proteins in linking the plasma membrane to actin filaments. PMID:26945071

  10. Effect of internal limiting membrane peeling on the development of epiretinal membrane after pars plana vitrectomy for primary rhegmatogenous retinal detachment.

    PubMed

    Nam, Ki Yup; Kim, Jung Yeul

    2015-05-01

    To investigate the difference in the occurrence of postoperative epiretinal membranes (ERMs) in vitrectomy for rhegmatogenous retinal detachment with and without peeling of the internal limiting membrane (ILM). The medical records of the 135 patients, who underwent vitrectomy for primary rhegmatogenous retinal detachment from November 2007 to August 2011, were analyzed retrospectively. Of the subjects, 70 patients underwent ILM peeling during the surgery and 65 did not. The best-corrected visual acuity, fundus photograph, and optical coherence tomography were collected 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively. The relationship between ILM peeling and the preoperative findings of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment and development of a postoperative ERM was analyzed. No ERM occurred in the ILM peeling group, whereas an ERM occurred in 14 of 65 patients who underwent vitrectomy without ILM peeling (21.5%). This difference was significant (P < 0.001). The occurrence of a postoperative ERM was not significantly correlated with other preoperative factors. In the macular-on group, the overall mean best-corrected visual acuity was better in the ILM peeling group and was significantly higher 12 months postoperatively (P = 0.03). Internal limiting membrane peeling seems to prevent the occurrence of a postoperative ERM in patients with primary rhegmatogenous retinal detachment.

  11. [Optical coherence tomography and microperimetry after internal limiting membrane peeling for epiretinal membrane].

    PubMed

    Grimbert, P; Lebreton, O; Weber, M

    2014-06-01

    To evaluate the anatomical and functional consequences of internal limiting membrane (ILM) peeling in epiretinal membrane (ERM) surgery. Retrospective single-center study including consecutive patients operated on for idiopathic ERM. The integrity of the ILM was assessed by ILM Blue® staining after removal of the ERM: either the peeling was spontaneous (group 1) or a complementary peeling was required (group 2). Pre- and post-operatively (1 and 6 months), all patients were analyzed using visual acuity, SD-OCT (Spectralis HRA OCT, Heidelberg, Germany) and microperimetry (OPKO/OTI, Miami, USA). Twenty-one eyes of 21 patients were included: 12 "active ILM peelings" and 9 "spontaneous peelings". In both groups, visual acuity increased significantly after surgery. Microperimetry revealed more microscotomata at 1 and 6 months for active peeling (P<0.05). Their location corresponded more often to the site where the ERM or ILM was grasped, based on surgical videos (P<0.05), and with the appearance of inner retinal defects using en face OCT. ILM peeling is frequently performed to reduce ERM recurrence. Despite lack of effect on visual acuity, active ILM peeling increases the incidence of microscotomas related to the site where the ERM or ILM is grasped. Active ILM peeling may be responsible for postoperative visual discomfort related to microscopic trauma during peeling. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF RETINAL REATTACHMENT SURGERY WITH OR WITHOUT INTERNAL LIMITING MEMBRANE PEELING TO PREVENT POSTOPERATIVE MACULAR PUCKER.

    PubMed

    Forlini, Matteo; Date, Purva; Ferrari, Luisa Micelli; Lorusso, Massimo; Lecce, Gabriella; Verdina, Tommaso; Neri, Giovanni; Benatti, Caterina; Rossini, Paolo; Bratu, Adriana; DʼEliseo, Domenico; Ferrari, Tommaso Micelli; Cavallini, Gian Maria

    2017-07-18

    To determine whether internal limiting membrane (ILM) peeling during pars plana vitrectomy for rhegmatogenous retinal detachment reduces the incidence of epiretinal membrane (ERM) formation. In this retrospective study, preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative data from all eyes undergoing pars plana vitrectomy for rhegmatogenous retinal detachment between January 2007 and December 2013 was analyzed. All cases with at least 1-year of follow-up were included. Data collection included vision, intraoperative complications, occurrence of ERM, and spectral domain optical coherence tomography characteristics. The OCTs were retrieved for all eyes and were graded by a single masked grader. Out of 159 eyes recruited, ILM peeling was done in 78 eyes (49%). Overall occurrence of ERM was 20%. Seven eyes (9%) in ILM peeling group and 25 eyes in the non-ILM peeling group (31%) showed ERM (P = 0.001). Postoperative vision was significantly better in eyes that had ILM peeling (0.48 ± 0.4 logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution [20/63] vs. 0.77 ± 0.6 logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution [20/125], P = 0.003). In multivariable models adjusting for type of tamponade, ILM peeling reduced the likelihood of ERM formation by 75% (P = 0.01). Internal limiting membrane peeling during pars plana vitrectomy for rhegmatogenous retinal detachment significantly reduces ERM formation in the postoperative period and is associated with better visual and anatomical outcomes.

  13. Ovarian embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma is a rare manifestation of the DICER1 syndrome.

    PubMed

    de Kock, Leanne; Druker, Harriet; Weber, Evan; Hamel, Nancy; Traubici, Jeffrey; Malkin, David; Arseneau, Jocelyne; Stewart, Colin J R; Bouron-Dal Soglio, Dorothée; Priest, John R; Foulkes, William D

    2015-06-01

    Embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (ERMS), a soft tissue sarcoma, is one of the most common pediatric cancers. Certain ERMSs are associated with the DICER1 syndrome, a tumor predisposition syndrome caused by germ-line DICER1 mutations. Characteristic somatic mutations have also been identified in DICER1-associated tumor types. These "hotspot" mutations affect the catalytic activity of the DICER1 ribonuclease IIIb domain. Primary ovarian ERMS (oERMS) is extremely rare. We present a case of a 6-year-old girl with an oERMS harboring 2 DICER1 mutations. The girl also exhibited other DICER1 phenotypes: cystic nephroma (CN) and multinodular goiter. Somatic investigations of the CN identified a hotspot DICER1 mutation different from that in the oERMS. Significantly, the CN presented at 12 years of age, which is much older than the previously reported age range of susceptibility. This report documents the occurrence of DICER1 mutations in a case of oERMS, expanding the spectrum of DICER1-associated tumors.

  14. Change in refraction after lens-sparing vitrectomy for rhegmatogenous retinal detachment and epiretinal membrane.

    PubMed

    Iwase, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Kentaro; Yanagida, Kosei; Kobayashi, Misato; Ra, Eimei; Murotani, Kenta; Terasaki, Hiroko

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare changes in refraction following lens-sparing vitrectomy between patients with rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD) and epiretinal membrane (ERM) and to investigate factors associated with the change in refraction.We reviewed medical records of 49 eyes of 49 patients with RRD (53.6 ± 7.8 years, mean ± standard deviation) and 24 eyes of 24 patients with ERM (50.9 ± 15.7 years) who underwent lens-sparing vitrectomy. Spherical equivalent refractive power was evaluated before and up to 18 months after surgery. The relationship between the change in refraction and several parameters was evaluated.A significant progressive myopic shift in refractive power was observed after vitrectomy in operated RRD and ERM eyes (P < 0.001, P = 0.016, respectively), with no significant difference in fellow eyes. The refraction values observed at ≥3 and ≥12 months following vitrectomy were significantly different as compared with those observed at baseline in the RRD group (P < 0.001) and the ERM group (P < 0.05), respectively. The change in refraction between the RRD and ERM groups was significant (P = 0.030). The multiple linear regression analysis showed that only age was significantly correlated with the change in refraction in RRD (P = 0.018) and ERM (P < 0.001) groups. The change in refraction was significantly and positively correlated with age in RRD (r = -0.461, P = 0.001) and ERM (r = -0.687, P < 0.001) groups. Following lens-sparing vitrectomy, cataract surgery was performed on 30 eyes after 0.89 ± 0.26 years in the RRD group and on 10 eyes after 1.11 ± 0.14 years in the ERM group; there was a significant difference in time to cataract surgery between the groups (P = 0.007). Kaplan-Meier survival analysis demonstrated that there was a significant difference in the rate of cataract surgeries between the RRD and ERM groups (P = 0.022).Following lens

  15. Phenotypic and molecular characterization of resistance to macrolides, lincosamides and type B streptogramin of clinical isolates of Staphylococcus spp. of a university hospital in Recife, Pernambuco, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Jussyêgles Niedja da Paz; Rabelo, Marcelle Aquino; Lima, Jailton Lobo da Costa; Neto, Armando Monteiro Bezerra; Lopes, Ana Catarina de Souza; Maciel, Maria Amélia Vieira

    2016-01-01

    There is a mechanism of macrolide resistance in Staphylococcus spp. which also affects the lincosamides and type B streptogramins characterizing the so-called MLSB resistance, whose expression can be constitutive (cMLSB) or inducible (iMLSB) and is encoded mainly by ermA and ermC genes. The cMLSB resistance is easily detected by susceptibility testing used in the laboratory routine, but iMLSB resistance is not. Therapy with clindamycin in cases of infection with isolated iMLSB resistance may fail. To characterize the phenotypic (occurrence of cMLSB and iMLSB phenotypes) and molecular (occurrence of ermA and ermC genes) profiles of MLSB resistance of clinical isolates of susceptible and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and CNS (coagulase-negative Staphylococcus) from patients of a university hospital, in Pernambuco. The antimicrobial susceptibility of 103 isolates was determined by the disk diffusion technique in Mueller-Hinton agar followed by oxacillin screening. The iMLSB phenotype was detected by D test. Isolates with cMLSB and iMLSB phenotypes were subjected to polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the detection of ermA and ermC genes. The cMLSB and iMLSB phenotypes were respectively identified in 39 (37.9%) and five (4.9%) isolates. The iMLSB phenotype was found only in four (10.8%) methicillin-susceptible S. aureus and one (4.5%) methicillin-resistant S. aureus. In the 44 isolates subjected to PCR, four (9.1%) only ermA gene was detected, a lower frequency when compared to only ermC 17 (38.6%) gene and to one (2.3%) isolate presenting both genes. In the Staphylococcus spp. analyzed, the ermC gene was found more often than the ermA, although the iMLSB phenotype had been less frequent than the cMLSB. It was important to perform the D test for its detection to guide therapeutic approaches. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  16. Change in refraction after lens-sparing vitrectomy for rhegmatogenous retinal detachment and epiretinal membrane

    PubMed Central

    Iwase, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Kentaro; Yanagida, Kosei; Kobayashi, Misato; Ra, Eimei; Murotani, Kenta; Terasaki, Hiroko

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to compare changes in refraction following lens-sparing vitrectomy between patients with rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD) and epiretinal membrane (ERM) and to investigate factors associated with the change in refraction. We reviewed medical records of 49 eyes of 49 patients with RRD (53.6 ± 7.8 years, mean ± standard deviation) and 24 eyes of 24 patients with ERM (50.9 ± 15.7 years) who underwent lens-sparing vitrectomy. Spherical equivalent refractive power was evaluated before and up to 18 months after surgery. The relationship between the change in refraction and several parameters was evaluated. A significant progressive myopic shift in refractive power was observed after vitrectomy in operated RRD and ERM eyes (P < 0.001, P = 0.016, respectively), with no significant difference in fellow eyes. The refraction values observed at ≥3 and ≥12 months following vitrectomy were significantly different as compared with those observed at baseline in the RRD group (P < 0.001) and the ERM group (P < 0.05), respectively. The change in refraction between the RRD and ERM groups was significant (P = 0.030). The multiple linear regression analysis showed that only age was significantly correlated with the change in refraction in RRD (P = 0.018) and ERM (P < 0.001) groups. The change in refraction was significantly and positively correlated with age in RRD (r = −0.461, P = 0.001) and ERM (r = −0.687, P < 0.001) groups. Following lens-sparing vitrectomy, cataract surgery was performed on 30 eyes after 0.89 ± 0.26 years in the RRD group and on 10 eyes after 1.11 ± 0.14 years in the ERM group; there was a significant difference in time to cataract surgery between the groups (P = 0.007). Kaplan–Meier survival analysis demonstrated that there was a significant difference in the rate of cataract surgeries between the RRD and ERM groups (P = 0

  17. New Real-Time PCR Assays for Detection of Inducible and Acquired Clarithromycin Resistance in the Mycobacterium abscessus Group

    PubMed Central

    Shallom, Shamira J.; Moura, Natalia S.; Olivier, Kenneth N.; Sampaio, Elizabeth P.; Holland, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    Members of the Mycobacterium abscessus group (MAG) cause lung, soft tissue, and disseminated infections. The oral macrolides clarithromycin and azithromycin are commonly used for treatment. MAG can display clarithromycin resistance through the inducible erm(41) gene or via acquired mutations in the rrl (23S rRNA) gene. Strains harboring a truncation or a T28C substitution in erm(41) lose the inducible resistance trait. Phenotypic detection of clarithromycin resistance requires extended incubation (14 days), highlighting the need for faster methods to detect resistance. Two real-time PCR-based assays were developed to assess inducible and acquired clarithromycin resistance and tested on a total of 90 clinical and reference strains. A SYBR green assay was designed to distinguish between a full-length and truncated erm(41) gene by temperature shift in melting curve analysis. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) allele discrimination assays were developed to distinguish T or C at position 28 of erm(41) and 23S rRNA rrl gene mutations at position 2058 and/or 2059. Truncated and full-size erm(41) genes were detected in 21/90 and 69/90 strains, respectively, with 64/69 displaying T at nucleotide position 28 and 5/69 containing C at that position. Fifteen isolates showed rrl mutations conferring clarithromycin resistance, including A2058G (11 isolates), A2058C (3 isolates), and A2059G (1 isolate). Targeted sequencing and phenotypic assessment of resistance concurred with molecular assay results. Interestingly, we also noted cooccurring strains harboring an active erm(41), inactive erm(41), and/or acquired mutational resistance, as well as slowly growing MAG strains and also strains displaying an inducible resistance phenotype within 5 days, long before the recommended 14-day extended incubation. PMID:26269619

  18. miRNAs in the vitreous humor of patients affected by idiopathic epiretinal membrane and macular hole

    PubMed Central

    Ragusa, Marco; Barbagallo, Cristina; Longo, Antonio; Avitabile, Teresio; Uva, Maurizio G.; Bonfiglio, Vincenza; Toro, Mario D.; Caltabiano, Rosario; Mariotti, Cesare; Boscia, Francesco; Romano, Mario; Di Pietro, Cinzia; Barbagallo, Davide; Purrello, Michele; Reibaldi, Michele

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the present study was to assess the expression of miRNAs in the Vitreous Humor (VH) of patients with Macular Hole (MH) and Epiretinal Membrane (ERM) compared to a control group. Methods In this prospective, comparative study, 2-ml of VH was extracted from the core of the vitreous chamber in consecutive patients who underwent standard vitrectomy for ERM and MH. RNA was extracted and TaqMan® Low Density Arrays (TLDAs) were used to profile the transcriptome of 754 miRNAs. Results were validated by single TaqMan® assays. Finally, we created a biological network of differentially expressed miRNA targets and their nearest neighbors. Results Overall 10 eyes with MH, 16 eyes with idiopathic ERM and 6 controls were enrolled in the study. Profiling data identified 5 miRNAs differentially expressed in patients affected by MH and ERM with respect to controls. Four were downregulated (miR-19b, miR-24, miR-155, miR-451) and 1 was downregulated (miR-29a); TaqMan® assays of the VH of patients affected by MH and ERM, with respect to controls, showed that the most differentially expressed were miR-19b (FC -9.13, p:<0.00004), mir-24 (FC -7.52, p:<0.004) and miR-142-3p (FC -5.32, p:<0.011). Our network data showed that deregulation of differentially expressed miRNAs induces an alteration of several pathways associated with genes involved in both MH and ERM. Conclusion The present study suggests that disregulation of miR-19b, miR-24 and miR-142-3p, might be related to the alterations that characterize patients affected by MH and ERM. PMID:28328945

  19. Antimicrobial susceptibility and resistance mechanisms of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolated from 12 Hospitals in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Yıldız, Ömer; Çoban, Ahmet Yılmaz; Şener, Aslı Gamze; Coşkuner, Seher Ayten; Bayramoğlu, Gülçin; Güdücüoğlu, Hüseyin; Özyurt, Mustafa; Tatman-Otkun, Müşerref; Karabiber, Nihal; Özkütük, Nuri; Aktepe, Orhan; Öncü, Serkan; Arslan, Uğur; Bozdoğan, Bülent

    2014-09-16

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is one of the most important nosocomial pathogens and is also emerging in Turkish hospitals. The aim of this study was to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility profiles of MRSA isolated from Turkish hospitals. A total of 397 MRSA strains isolated from 12 hospitals in Turkey were included to present study. Antimicrobial susceptibilities were tested using agar dilution method. Presence of ermA, ermB, ermC, msrA, tetM, tetK, linA and aac-aph genes were studied by PCR. All strains were susceptible to vancomycin and linezolid. The susceptibility rates for fusidic acid, lincomycin, erythromycin, tetracyclin, gentamycin, kanamycin, and, ciprofloxacin were 91.9%, 41.1%, 27.2%, 11.8%, 8.5%, 8.3% and 6.8%, respectively. Lincomycin inactivation was positive for 3 isolates. Of 225 erythromycin resistant isolates 48 had ermA, 20 had ermC, and 128 had ermA-C. PCR was negative for 15 strains. Of 3 isolates with lincomycin inactivation one had linA and msrA. Of 358 gentamycin resistant isolates 334 had aac-aph and 24 were negatives. Among 350 tetracyclin resistant isolates 314 had tetM. Of 36 tetM negative isolates 10 had tetK. MRSA isolates from Turkish hospitals were multiresistant to antimicrobials. Quinolone and gentamycin resistance levels were high and macrolide and lincosamide resistance were relatively low. Susceptibility rates for fusidic asid were high. Linezolide and vancomycin resistance are not emerged. The most common resistance genes were ermA, tetM and aac-aph. Evolution of antimicrobial susceptibilities and resistance genes profiles of MRSA isolates should be surveyed at regional and national level for accurate treatment of patients and to control dissemination of resistance genes.

  20. Genetic basis of resistance waves among methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates recovered from milk and meat products in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Ammar, A M; Attia, A M; Abd El-Hamid, M I; El-Shorbagy, I M; Abd El-Kader, S A

    2016-08-31

    Antimicrobial resistance of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) poses a serious problem for clinicians worldwide. The present study attempted to evaluate the susceptibility patterns of MRSA to various antimicrobials and the prevalence of inducible clindamycin resistance as well as the relevant antibiotic and antiseptic resistance genes among these isolates. Totally, 40 MRSA isolates were recovered from examined milk and meat product samples (18.60%). Multi-drug resistance (MDR) was remarkably observed among 85% of these isolates. There was a good correlation between phenotypic determination of methicillin, amoxicillin/clavulinic acid and tetracycline resistances and PCR detections of mecA, blaZ and tet(K) genes, respectively, but norA gene was not detected in the four ciprofloxacin resistant isolates. Although, 55% of MRSA expressed resistance to benzalkonium chloride (BC), neither qacA/B nor smr gene was detected. Of 20 isolates exhibiting erythromycin- clindamycin discordant resistance pattern, 8 displayed positive double disk diffusion (D-zone) test denoting inducible macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B (MLSB) resistance phenotype with the inducibly expressed erm(A) and erm(C) genes in 87.5% of these isolates. Besides, the remaining 12 isolates showed MS phenotype (resistant to macrolides and type B streptogramins only) with a variety of erm(A), mph(C), msr(A) or a combination of these genes including erm(C). Finally, the constitutive MLSB phenotype with the constitutive expression of erm(A), erm(B) and erm(C) genes was comprised in 2 isolates with higher minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values for erythromycin (512 and 1024 µg/ml) and clindamycin (16 and 32 µg/ml). These findings suggested the importance of monitoring the evolution of MRSA resistance.

  1. The epidemiology of sports and exercise related injury in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed Central

    Nicholl, J P; Coleman, P; Williams, B T

    1995-01-01

    A national study of exercise related morbidity (ERM) in England and Wales was carried out using a postal questionnaire sent to 28,857 adults aged 16-45 years. The questionnaire asked about regular participation in sports or other recreational fitness activities involving physical exercise, and for details of any injuries occurring during a 28 d reference period. A return rate of 68% was achieved. Comparisons with other national data sources indicated that the information obtained was reliable. It is estimated that each year there are 29 million incidents resulting in new or recurrent injuries, however minor, of which 9.8 million (95% confidence interval 8.1 to 11.4 million) result in new 'substantive' injuries which are potentially serious, result in treatment, or in participants being unable to take part in their usual activities. Soccer accounted for more than 25% of all ERM, but the risk of a substantive injury in rugby was three times that in soccer. Over one third of ERM occurred in men aged 16-25 years. The most frequently reported injuries were sprains and strains of the lower limbs. Treatment was sought in approximately 25% of ERM incidents and 7% of all new ERM incidents involved attendance at a hospital accident and emergency department. The treatment provider most likely to be consulted was a general practitioner, but physiotherapists and complementary medicine practitioners were also consulted frequently. To maximize the health benefits of exercise, research strategies to reduce the volume and severity of ERM and to identify the most appropriate ways of managing ERM should be set. PMID:8808535

  2. Prevalence and Risk Factors for Epiretinal Membranes in a Multi-Ethnic United States Population

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Ching Hui; Cheung, Ning; Wang, Jie Jin; Islam, Amirul FM; Kawasaki, Ryo; Meuer, Stacy M; Cotch, Mary Frances; Klein, Barbara EK; Klein, Ronald; Wong, Tien Yin

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To describe the prevalence of and risk factors for epiretinal membrane (ERM) in a multi-ethnic population and to evaluate possible racial/ethnic differences. Design Cross-sectional study. Participants Participants of the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA), examined at the second visit of the MESA when retinal photography was performed. Methods Data on 5960 participants aged 45 to 84 years from MESA, including white, blacks, Hispanic and Chinese from six United States communities, were analysed. ERM was assessed from digital non-stereoscopic fundus photographs and defined as cellophane macular reflex (CMR) without retinal folds or pre-retinal macular fibrosis (PMF) with retinal folds. Risk factors were assessed from standardized interviews, clinical examinations, and laboratory investigations. Main outcome measures ERM prevalence by ethnic/racial group, and risk factors associated with ERM. Results The prevalence of any ERM was 28.9%, of which 25.1% were CMR and 3.8% were PMF. The prevalence of ERM was significantly higher in Chinese (39.0%), compared to Hispanics (29.3%), whites (27.5%), and blacks (26.2%), p<0.001. In multivariable models, increasing age (odds ratio [OR] 1.19, 95% confidence intervals [CI], 1.06, 1.34, per year increase in age), diabetes (OR 1.92, 95% CI, 1.39, 2.65) and hypercholesterolemia (OR 1.33, 95% CI, 1.04, 1.69) were significantly associated with CMR. Conclusions This study showed that ERM was significantly more common in Chinese persons compared to whites, blacks and Hispanics. Risk factors for epiretinal membrane were increasing age, presence of diabetes and hypercholesterolemia. PMID:21035863

  3. Phylogenetic relatedness determined between antibiotic resistance and 16S rRNA genes in actinobacteria.

    PubMed

    Sagova-Mareckova, Marketa; Ulanova, Dana; Sanderova, Petra; Omelka, Marek; Kamenik, Zdenek; Olsovska, Jana; Kopecky, Jan

    2015-04-01

    Distribution and evolutionary history of resistance genes in environmental actinobacteria provide information on intensity of antibiosis and evolution of specific secondary metabolic pathways at a given site. To this day, actinobacteria producing biologically active compounds were isolated mostly from soil but only a limited range of soil environments were commonly sampled. Consequently, soil remains an unexplored environment in search for novel producers and related evolutionary questions. Ninety actinobacteria strains isolated at contrasting soil sites were characterized phylogenetically by 16S rRNA gene, for presence of erm and ABC transporter resistance genes and antibiotic production. An analogous analysis was performed in silico with 246 and 31 strains from Integrated Microbial Genomes (JGI_IMG) database selected by the presence of ABC transporter genes and erm genes, respectively. In the isolates, distances of erm gene sequences were significantly correlated to phylogenetic distances based on 16S rRNA genes, while ABC transporter gene distances were not. The phylogenetic distance of isolates was significantly correlated to soil pH and organic matter content of isolation sites. In the analysis of JGI_IMG datasets the correlation between phylogeny of resistance genes and the strain phylogeny based on 16S rRNA genes or five housekeeping genes was observed for both the erm genes and ABC transporter genes in both actinobacteria and streptomycetes. However, in the analysis of sequences from genomes where both resistance genes occurred together the correlation was observed for both ABC transporter and erm genes in actinobacteria but in streptomycetes only in the erm gene. The type of erm resistance gene sequences was influenced by linkage to 16S rRNA gene sequences and site characteristics. The phylogeny of ABC transporter gene was correlated to 16S rRNA genes mainly above the genus level. The results support the concept of new specific secondary metabolite

  4. NHERF-1 knockout mice have an attenuated hepatic inflammatory response and are protected from cholestatic liver injury

    PubMed Central

    Li, Man; Mennone, Albert; Soroka, Carol J.; Hagey, Lee R.; Ouyang, Xinshou; Weinman, Edward J.; Boyer, James L.

    2015-01-01

    The intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) is induced in mouse liver after bile duct ligation (BDL) and plays a key role in neutrophil-mediated liver injury in BDL mice. ICAM-1 has been shown to interact with the cytoskeletal ezrin-radixin-moesin (ERM) proteins that also interact with the PDZ protein, Na+/H+ exchanger regulatory factor 1 (NHERF-1/EBP50). In NHERF-1−/− mice, ERM proteins are significantly reduced in brush border membranes from kidney and small intestine. ERM knockdown reduces ICAM-1 expression in response to TNF-α. Here we show that NHERF-1 assembles ERM proteins, ICAM-1 and F-actin into a macromolecule complex that is increased in mouse liver after BDL. Compared with wild-type (WT) mice, both sham-operated and BDL NHERF-1−/− mice have lower levels of activated ERM and ICAM-1 protein in the liver accompanied by significantly reduced hepatic neutrophil accumulation, serum ALT, and attenuated liver injury after BDL. However, total bile acid concentrations in the serum and liver of sham and BDL NHERF-1−/− mice were not significantly different from the WT controls, although hepatic tetrahydroxylated bile acids and Cyp3a11 mRNA levels were higher in NHERF-1−/− BDL mice. Conclusion NHERF-1 participates in the inflammatory response that is associated with BDL induced liver injury. Deletion of NHERF-1 in mice leads to disruption of the formation of ICAM-1-ERM-NHERF-1 complex and reduction of hepatic ERM proteins and ICAM-1, molecules that are up-regulated and are essential for neutrophil-mediated liver injury in cholestasis. Further study of the role of NHERF-1 in the inflammatory response in cholestasis and other forms of liver injury should lead to discovery of new therapeutic targets in hepatic inflammatory diseases. PMID:26108984

  5. Predictions of sediment toxicity using a database for Hyalella azteca and Chironomus riparius

    SciTech Connect

    Haverland, P.S.; Dwyer, F.J.; Henke, C.E.; Ingersoll, C.G.; Mount, D.R.; Field, J.; MacDonald, D.D.; Smith, S.L.

    1995-12-31

    A database was developed for calculating sediment effect concentrations (SECS) for various contaminants Associated with field-collected sediment using laboratory toxicity data for the amphipod H. azteca and the midge C. riparius. Three types of SECs were calculated: (1) Effect Range Low (ERL) and Effect Range Median (ERM), (2) Threshold Effect Level (TEL) and Probable Effect Level (PEL), and (3) No Effect Concentration (NEC). The predictive abilities of SECs were evaluated using independent toxicity data sets. For example, the predictive ability of ERMs was evaluated by first calculating ERMs using just the Great Lakes (GL) portion of the database. These GL ERMs were then used to predict responses in independent H. azteca 28-d tests and C. riparius 1 4-d tests with Clark Fork River sediments. About 70 to 90% of the samples were correctly classified at 1 to 2 exceedances of GL ERMS. At 1 to 2 exceedances of GL ERMS, Type 2 error (false negatives) was < 10% and Type 1 error (false positives) was 10 to 30%. Evaluations using GL PELs and GL NECs resulted in similar predictive ability compared to GL ERMS. When SECs are used to conduct a preliminary screening to predict the potential for toxicity in the absence of actual toxicity testing, a low number of SEC exceedances should be used to minimize the potential for false negatives; however, the risk of accepting higher false positives is increased. The authors are currently using SECs calculated from the entire database to predict the response of H. azteca and C. riparius in a variety of independent data sets generated by other laboratories.

  6. EFFECTS OF INTERNAL LIMITING MEMBRANE PEELING COMBINED WITH REMOVAL OF IDIOPATHIC EPIRETINAL MEMBRANE: A Systematic Review of Literature and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Kunihiro; Ueta, Takashi; Eguchi, Shuichiro; Aihara, Makoto

    2017-10-01

    To evaluate the effects on postoperative prognosis of internal limiting membrane (ILM) peeling in conjunction with removal of idiopathic epiretinal membranes (ERMs). MEDLINE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), and EMBASE were systematically searched for studies that compared ILM peeling with no ILM peeling in surgery to remove idiopathic ERM. Outcome measures were best-corrected visual acuity, central macular thickness, and ERM recurrence. Studies that compared ILM peeling with no ILM peeling for the treatment of idiopathic ERM were selected. Sixteen studies that included 1,286 eyes were selected. All the included studies were retrospective or prospective comparative studies; no randomized controlled study was identified. Baseline preoperative best-corrected visual acuity and central macular thickness were equal between ILM peeling and no ILM peeling groups. Postoperatively, there was no statistically significant difference in best-corrected visual acuity (mean difference 0.01 logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution [equivalent to 0.5 Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study letter]; 95% CI -0.05 to 0.07 [-3.5 to 2.5 Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study letters]; P = 0.83) or central macular thickness (mean difference 13.13 μm; 95% CI -10.66 to 36.93; P = 0.28). However, the recurrence rate of ERM was significantly lower with ILM peeling than with no ILM peeling (odds ratio 0.25; 95% CI 0.12-0.49; P < 0.0001). Currently available evidence in the literature indicates that additional ILM peeling in vitrectomy for idiopathic ERM could result in a significantly lower ERM recurrence rate, but it does not significantly influence postoperative best-corrected visual acuity and central macular thickness.

  7. Gene Expression Analysis of the Irrigation Solution Samples Collected during Vitrectomy for Idiopathic Epiretinal Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Myojin, Sayaka; Yoshida, Shigeo; Takeda, Atsunobu; Murakami, Yusuke; Kawano, Yoichi; Oshima, Yuji; Ishibashi, Tatsuro; Sonoda, Koh-Hei

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The analysis of gene expression in idiopathic epiretinal membranes (iERMs) may help elucidate ERM formation and its pathology. Here, we conducted a case-control study, in order to determine the expression levels of cytokines and other genes in eyes with macular hole (MH) or iERM. Methods Twenty eyes, obtained from seven male and 13 female patients, were included in the study. The average age of the study subjects was 69.1 ± 7.67 years, and 15 eyes had iERM, while five eyes had MH. Irrigation solution samples were collected during vitrectomy, centrifuged, and the levels of cytokine and other mRNAs in the sediment were assessed using real-time PCR. The expression level of 11 cytokine genes, four transcription factor genes, two cytoskeletal genes, and genes encoding two extracellular matrix proteins in eyes with MH or iERM were determined and compared. Results The expression levels of interleukin 6 (IL6), tumor growth factor B2 (TGFB2), vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA), chemokine C-X-C motif ligand 1 (CXCL1), v-rel avian reticuloendotheliosis viral oncogene homolog A (RELA), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and tenascin C (TNC) were significantly higher in eyes with iERM than in eyes with MH. The expression of these genes was not associated with the preoperative visual acuity of the investigated patients. Conclusions The obtained results indicate that real-time PCR analysis of irrigation solution samples collected during vitrectomy can help assess the expression levels of several genes, and that iERM is associated with the expression of pro-inflammatory genes and the genes expressed during angiogenesis and wound healing process (IL6, TGFB2, VEGFA, CXCL1, RELA, GFAP, and TNC). PMID:27736918

  8. PAX-FOXO1 fusion status drives unfavorable outcome for children with rhabdomyosarcoma: a children's oncology group report.

    PubMed

    Skapek, Stephen X; Anderson, James; Barr, Frederic G; Bridge, Julia A; Gastier-Foster, Julie M; Parham, David M; Rudzinski, Erin R; Triche, Timothy; Hawkins, Douglas S

    2013-09-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is divided into two major histological subtypes: alveolar (ARMS) and embryonal (ERMS), with most ARMS expressing one of two oncogenic genes fusing PAX3 or PAX7 with FOXO1 (P3F and P7F, respectively). The Children's Oncology Group (COG) carried out a multi-institutional clinical trial to evaluate the prognostic value of PAX-FOXO1 fusion status. Study participants were treated on COG protocol D9803 for intermediate risk ARMS or ERMS using multi-agent chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and surgery. Central diagnostic pathology review and molecular testing for fusion genes were carried out on prospectively collected specimens. Event-free (EFS) and overall survival (OS) at 5 years were correlated with histological subtype and PAX-FOXO1 status. Of 616 eligible D9803 enrollees, 434 cases had adequate clinical, molecular, and pathology data for definitive classification as ERMS, ARMS P3F+ or P7F+, or ARMSn (without detectable fusion). EFS was worse for those with ARMS P3F+ (54%) and P7F+ (65%) than those with ERMS (77%; P < 0.001). EFS for ARMSn and ERMS were not statistically different (90% vs. 77%, P = 0.15). ARMS P3F+ had poorer OS (64%) than ARMS P7F+ (87%), ARMSn (89%), and ERMS (82%; P = 0.006). ARMSn has an outcome similar to ERMS and superior EFS compared to ARMS with either P3F or P7F, when given therapy designed for children with intermediate risk RMS. This prospective analysis supports incorporation of PAX-FOXO1 fusion status into risk stratification and treatment allocation. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Epidermal growth factor-induced cellular invasion requires sphingosine-1-phosphate/sphingosine-1-phosphate 2 receptor-mediated ezrin activation

    PubMed Central

    Orr Gandy, K. Alexa; Adada, Mohamad; Canals, Daniel; Carroll, Brittany; Roddy, Patrick; Hannun, Yusuf A.; Obeid, Lina M.

    2013-01-01

    Ezrin, radixin, and moesin (ERM) proteins link cortical actin to the plasma membrane and coordinate cellular events that require cytoskeletal rearrangement, including cell division, migration, and invasion. While ERM proteins are involved in many important cellular events, the mechanisms regulating their function are not completely understood. Our laboratory previously identified reciprocal roles for the sphingolipids ceramide and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) in the regulation of ERM proteins. We recently showed that ceramide-induced activation of PP1α leads to dephosphorylation and inactivation of ERM proteins, while S1P results in phosphorylation and activation of ERM proteins. Following these findings, we aimed to examine known inducers of the SK/S1P pathway and evaluate their ability to regulate ERM proteins. We examined EGF, a known inducer of the SK/S1P pathway, for its ability to regulate the ERM family of proteins. We found that EGF induces ERM c-terminal threonine phosphorylation via activation of the SK/S1P pathway, as this was prevented by siRNA knockdown or pharmacological inhibition of SK. Using pharmacological, as well as genetic, knockdown approaches, we determined that EGF induces ERM phosphorylation via activation of S1PR2. In addition, EGF led to cell polarization in the form of lamellipodia, and this occurred through a mechanism involving S1PR2-mediated phosphorylation of ezrin T567. EGF-induced cellular invasion was also found to be dependent on S1PR2-induced T567 ezrin phosphorylation, such that S1PR2 antagonist, JTE-013, and expression of a dominant-negative ezrin mutant prevented cellular invasion toward EGF. In this work, a novel mechanism of EGF-stimulated invasion is unveiled, whereby S1P-mediated activation of S1PR2 and phosphorylation of ezrin T567 is required.—Orr Gandy, K. A., Adada, M., Canals, D., Carroll, B., Roddy, P., Hannun, Y. A., Obeid, L. M. Epidermal growth factor-induced cellular invasion requires sphingosine-1-phosphate

  10. Technical note: Occurrence in fecal microbiota of genes conferring resistance to both macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B and tetracyclines concomitant with feeding of beef cattle with tylosin.

    PubMed

    Chen, J; Fluharty, F L; St-Pierre, N; Morrison, M; Yu, Z

    2008-09-01

    Development of antimicrobial resistance in food animals receiving antimicrobials has been well documented among bacterial isolates, especially pathogens, but information on development of antimicrobial resistance at the microbial community level during long-term feeding of antimicrobials is lacking. The objective of this study was to examine the association between inclusion of tylosin in feed and occurrence of resistance to macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B (MLS(B)) in the entire fecal microbial communities of beef cattle over a feeding study of 168 d. A completely randomized design included 6 pens housed together in 1 barn, with each pen housing 10 to 11 steers. The control and tylosin groups each had 3 pens, with the former receiving no antimicrobial whereas the latter received both tylosin and monensin (11 and 29.9 mg/ kg of feed, respectively, DM) in feed. The abundance of genes conferring resistance to MLS(B) (erm genes) and tetracyclines (tet genes) were quantified using class-specific, real-time PCR assays. The abundances of erm and tet genes were analyzed with pens as experimental units using the MIXED procedure of SAS. Correlations between abundance of different resistance genes were calculated using the CORR procedure of SAS. We identified 4 classes (B, F, T, and X) of erm genes in fresh fecal samples collected at wk 2, 17, and 21 of feeding. From wk 2 to 17, the abundance of erm(T) and erm(X) increased (P < 0.05), whereas that of erm(B) and erm(F) did not. The abundance of the erm genes did not further change from wk 17 to 21. The tet(A/C), tet(G), and tet gene variants encoding ribosomal protection proteins (including classes M, O, P, Q, S, T, and W) appeared to be co-selected by tylosin feeding. Such co-selection of multiresistance at community level by one antimicrobial drug used in animals has the important implication that future studies should examine resistance to not only the antimicrobials used in animals, but also other antimicrobials

  11. Pharmacological targeting of the ephrin receptor kinase signalling by GLPG1790 in vitro and in vivo reverts oncophenotype, induces myogenic differentiation and radiosensitizes embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Megiorni, Francesca; Gravina, Giovanni Luca; Camero, Simona; Ceccarelli, Simona; Del Fattore, Andrea; Desiderio, Vincenzo; Papaccio, Federica; McDowell, Heather P; Shukla, Rajeev; Pizzuti, Antonio; Beirinckx, Filip; Pujuguet, Philippe; Saniere, Laurent; der Aar, Ellen Van; Maggio, Roberto; De Felice, Francesca; Marchese, Cinzia; Dominici, Carlo; Tombolini, Vincenzo; Festuccia, Claudio; Marampon, Francesco

    2017-10-06

    EPH (erythropoietin-producing hepatocellular) receptors are clinically relevant targets in several malignancies. This report describes the effects of GLPG1790, a new potent pan-EPH inhibitor, in human embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (ERMS) cell lines. EPH-A2 and Ephrin-A1 mRNA expression was quantified by real-time PCR in 14 ERMS tumour samples and in normal skeletal muscle (NSM). GLPG1790 effects were tested in RD and TE671 cell lines, two in vitro models of ERMS, by performing flow cytometry analysis, Western blotting and immunofluorescence experiments. RNA interfering experiments were performed to assess the role of specific EPH receptors. Radiations were delivered using an x-6 MV photon linear accelerator. GLPG1790 (30 mg/kg) in vivo activity alone or in combination with irradiation (2 Gy) was determined in murine xenografts. Our study showed, for the first time, a significant upregulation of EPH-A2 receptor and Ephrin-A1 ligand in ERMS primary biopsies in comparison to NSM. GLPG1790 in vitro induced G1-growth arrest as demonstrated by Rb, Cyclin A and Cyclin B1 decrease, as well as by p21 and p27 increment. GLPG1790 reduced migratory capacity and clonogenic potential of ERMS cells, prevented rhabdosphere formation and downregulated CD133, CXCR4 and Nanog stem cell markers. Drug treatment committed ERMS cells towards skeletal muscle differentiation by inducing a myogenic-like phenotype and increasing MYOD1, Myogenin and MyHC levels. Furthermore, GLPG1790 significantly radiosensitized ERMS cells by impairing the DNA double-strand break repair pathway. Silencing of both EPH-A2 and EPH-B2, two receptors preferentially targeted by GLPG1790, closely matched the effects of the EPH pharmacological inhibition. GLPG1790 and radiation combined treatments reduced tumour mass by 83% in mouse TE671 xenografts. Taken together, our data suggest that altered EPH signalling plays a key role in ERMS development and that its pharmacological inhibition might represent a potential

  12. Vitrectomy with or without internal limiting membrane peeling for idiopathic epiretinal membrane: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chin; Lee, Cho-Hao; Sung, Tzu-Ling; Tung, Tao-Hsin

    2017-01-01

    Background Studies on vitrectomy with and without internal limiting membrane (ILM) peeling for idiopathic epiretinal membrane (ERM) have yielded uncertain results regarding clinical outcomes and recurrence rates. Objective To compare the clinical outcomes of vitrectomy with and without ILM peeling for idiopathic ERM. Methods Databases, including PubMed, Embase, Cochrane, Web of Science, Google Scholar, CNKI databases, FDA.gov, and ClinicalTrials.gov, published until July 2016, were searched to identify studies comparing the clinical outcomes following vitrectomy with ERM and ILM peeling and with only ERM peeling, for treating idiopathic ERM. Studies with sufficient data were selected. Pooled results were expressed as mean differences (MDs) and risk ratios (RRs) with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI) for vitrectomy with and without ILM peeling with regard to postoperative best corrected visual acuity (BCVA), central retinal thickness (CRT), and ERM recurrence rate. Results Eleven retrospective studies and one randomized controlled trial involving 756 eyes were identified. This demonstrated that the postoperative BCVA within 12 months was significantly better in the non-ILM peeling group (MD = 0.04, 95% CI: 0.00 to 0.08; P = 0.0460), but that the patients in the ILM peeling group had significantly better postoperative BCVA after 18 months (MD = −0.13, 95% CI: −0.23 to −0.04; P = 0.0049) than did those in the non-ILM peeling group. The non-ILM peeling group exhibited a higher reduction in postoperative CRT (MD = 51.55, 95% CI:−84.23 to −18.88; P = 0.0020) and a higher recurrence rate of ERM (RR = 0.34, 95% CI:0.16 to 0.72; P = 0.0048) than did the ILM peeling group. However, the improvement rates of BCVA (RR = 1.03, 95% CI:0.72 to 1.47; P = 0.8802) and postoperative CRTs (MD = 18.15, 95% CI:−2.29 to 38.60; P = 0.0818) were similar between the two groups. Conclusions Vitrectomy with ILM peeling results in better visual improvement in long

  13. Vitrectomy with or without internal limiting membrane peeling for idiopathic epiretinal membrane: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wei-Cheng; Lin, Chin; Lee, Cho-Hao; Sung, Tzu-Ling; Tung, Tao-Hsin; Liu, Jorn-Hon

    2017-01-01

    Studies on vitrectomy with and without internal limiting membrane (ILM) peeling for idiopathic epiretinal membrane (ERM) have yielded uncertain results regarding clinical outcomes and recurrence rates. To compare the clinical outcomes of vitrectomy with and without ILM peeling for idiopathic ERM. Databases, including PubMed, Embase, Cochrane, Web of Science, Google Scholar, CNKI databases, FDA.gov, and ClinicalTrials.gov, published until July 2016, were searched to identify studies comparing the clinical outcomes following vitrectomy with ERM and ILM peeling and with only ERM peeling, for treating idiopathic ERM. Studies with sufficient data were selected. Pooled results were expressed as mean differences (MDs) and risk ratios (RRs) with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI) for vitrectomy with and without ILM peeling with regard to postoperative best corrected visual acuity (BCVA), central retinal thickness (CRT), and ERM recurrence rate. Eleven retrospective studies and one randomized controlled trial involving 756 eyes were identified. This demonstrated that the postoperative BCVA within 12 months was significantly better in the non-ILM peeling group (MD = 0.04, 95% CI: 0.00 to 0.08; P = 0.0460), but that the patients in the ILM peeling group had significantly better postoperative BCVA after 18 months (MD = -0.13, 95% CI: -0.23 to -0.04; P = 0.0049) than did those in the non-ILM peeling group. The non-ILM peeling group exhibited a higher reduction in postoperative CRT (MD = 51.55, 95% CI:-84.23 to -18.88; P = 0.0020) and a higher recurrence rate of ERM (RR = 0.34, 95% CI:0.16 to 0.72; P = 0.0048) than did the ILM peeling group. However, the improvement rates of BCVA (RR = 1.03, 95% CI:0.72 to 1.47; P = 0.8802) and postoperative CRTs (MD = 18.15, 95% CI:-2.29 to 38.60; P = 0.0818) were similar between the two groups. Vitrectomy with ILM peeling results in better visual improvement in long-term follow-ups and lower ERM recurrence rates, and vitrectomy with

  14. Enhanced proliferation, attachment and osteopontin expression by porcine periodontal cells exposed to Emdogain.

    PubMed

    Rincon, J C; Xiao, Y; Young, W G; Bartold, P M

    2005-12-01

    Emdogain (EMD) is an enamel matrix derivative extracted from developing porcine teeth with demonstrated periodontal regenerative potential. EMD has been shown to influence a number of properties of periodontal ligament cells including proliferation, cell attachment and matrix synthesis. To date, the effect of EMD on the epithelial cell rests of Malassez (ERM) is unknown. In this study, periodontal ligament fibroblasts, ERM, alveolar bone cells and gingival fibroblasts were obtained from porcine periodontal ligament, alveolar bone and gingiva. This study investigated, in vitro, the effect of EMD at three concentrations on proliferation, cell attachment and expression of mRNA for two mineralised tissue-related proteins (osteopontin and bone sialoprotein). As for other periodontal cells, the ERM proliferative response was enhanced by EMD. Attachment assays revealed a highly significant increase for ERM and gingival fibroblasts after EMD treatment at all concentrations. This study has also shown that EMD stimulated expression of osteopontin mRNA by ERM and alveolar bone cells. The results from this study provide evidence that EMD enhanced cellular events related with proliferation, attachment and osteopontin mRNA expression by porcine periodontal cells, in a manner consistent with its role in periodontal regenerative therapy.

  15. Impact of subtherapeutic administration of tylosin and chlortetracycline on antimicrobial resistance in farrow-to-finish swine.

    PubMed

    Holman, Devin B; Chénier, Martin R

    2013-07-01

    The use of antimicrobial agents in swine production at subtherapeutic concentrations for the purpose of growth promotion remains controversial due to the potential impact on public health. Beginning at weaning (3 weeks), pigs received either nonmedicated feed or feed supplemented with subtherapeutic levels of either tylosin (11-44 ppm) or chlortetracycline (5.5 ppm). After only 3 weeks, pigs given feed supplemented with tylosin had significantly higher levels of tylosin-resistant anaerobes (P < 0.0001) compared with the control group, increasing from 11.8% to 89.6%, a level which was stable for the duration of the study, even after a 2-week withdrawal prior to slaughter. Tylosin-fed pigs had a higher incidence of detection for erm(A), erm(F), and erm(G), as well as significantly (P < 0.001) higher concentrations of erm(B) in their feces. The continuous administration of chlortetracycline-supplemented feed, however, had no significant effect on the population of chlortetracycline-resistant anaerobes in comparison with nontreated pigs (P > 0.05). The resistance genes tet(O), tet(Q), and erm(B) were detected in all pigs at each sampling time, while tet(G), tet(L), and tet(M) were also frequently detected. Neither chlortetracycline nor tylosin increased the growth rate of pigs. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Effects of Tylosin Use on Erythromycin Resistance in Enterococci Isolated from Swine

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Charlene R.; Fedorka-Cray, Paula J.; Barrett, John B.; Ladely, Scott R.

    2004-01-01

    The effect of tylosin on erythromycin-resistant enterococci was examined on three farms; farm A used tylosin for growth promotion, farm B used tylosin for treatment of disease, and farm C did not use tylosin for either growth promotion or disease treatment. A total of 1,187 enterococci were isolated from gestation, farrowing, suckling, nursery, and finishing swine from the farms. From a subset of those isolates (n = 662), 59% (124 out of 208), 28% (80 out of 281), and 2% (4 out of 170) were resistant to erythromycin (MIC ≥ 8 μg/ml) from farms A, B, and C, respectively. PCR analysis and Southern blotting revealed that 95% (65 out of 68) of isolates chosen from all three farms for further study were positive for ermB, but all were negative for ermA and ermC. By using Southern blotting, ermB was localized to the chromosome in 56 of the isolates while 9 isolates from farms A and B contained ermB on two similar-sized plasmid bands (12 to 16 kb). Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis revealed that the isolates were genetically diverse and represented a heterogeneous population of enterococci. This study suggests that although there was resistance to a greater number of enterococcal isolates on a farm where tylosin was used as a growth promotant, resistant enterococci also existed on a farm where no antimicrobial agents were used. PMID:15240302

  17. Aniseikonia associated with epiretinal membranes

    PubMed Central

    Ugarte, M; Williamson, T H

    2005-01-01

    Aims: To determine whether the computerised version of the new aniseikonia test (NAT) is a valid, reliable method to measure aniseikonia and establish whether aniseikonia occurs in patients with epiretinal membranes (ERM) with preserved good visual acuity. Methods: With a computerised version of the NAT, horizontal and vertical aniseikonia was measured in 16 individuals (mean 47 (SD 16.46) years) with no ocular history and 14 patients (mean 67.7 (14.36) years) with ERM. Test validity was evaluated by inducing aniseikonia with size lenses. Test reliability was assessed by the test-retest method. Results: In normal individuals, the mean percentage (SD) aniseikonia was −0.24% (0.71) horizontal and 0% (0.59) vertical. Validity studies revealed mean (SD) 0.990 (0.005) horizontal and 0.991 (0.004) vertical correlation coefficients, 0.985 (0.111) horizontal and 0.989 (0.102) vertical slope. Repeatability coefficients were 1.04 horizontal and 0.88 vertical. Aniseikonia in patients with ERM ranged from 4% to 14%. Eight patients showed 2% or more size difference between horizontal and vertical meridians. Conclusions: The aniseikonia test used in this study can be considered a simple, fast, valid and reliable method to measure the difference in image size perceived by each eye. Aniseikonia does occur in symptomatic patients with ERM. The effect of ERM on image size is heterogeneous across the retinal area affected. PMID:16299133

  18. Phenotypical and genotypical characteristics of invasive group B Streptococcus isolates in Western Sydney 2000-2005.

    PubMed

    Darbar, Archie A; Gilbert, Gwendolyn L

    2007-12-01

    To analyse antimicrobial susceptibility and serotypes of group B streptococcus (GBS) bloodstream isolates from different patient groups. Susceptibility to penicillin, erythromycin and clindamycin was measured for 99 bloodstream GBS isolates collected between October 2000 and July 2005. Multiplex PCR-based reverse line blot (mPCR/RLB) assays were used to identify macrolide resistance genes and capsular serotype for each isolate. Clinical correlation was obtained from chart review. Adult bacteraemia accounted for 84 of 99 (85%) isolates, and were usually associated with underlying diseases such as diabetes, malignancy and renal failure. Overall mortality was 10%. Known macrolide resistance genes [ermB (2), ermA/TR (3) and mefA/E (2)] were detected in seven of eight erythromycin resistance isolates. Four of these isolates expressed MLSB phenotype, two with constitutive (ermB) and two with inducible (ermA/TR) clindamycin resistance. Of four M phenotype isolates, two had mefA/E, one had ermA/TR and one had no detectable macrolide resistance genes. Serotype III was significantly more common in neonatal isolates; serotype V was more common among adult isolates and was associated with increased mortality. mPCR/RLB is a rapid molecular method to identify GBS serotype and macrolide resistance genes. This is the first major study correlating these characteristics with demographic data for invasive isolates.

  19. Macrolide resistance in Streptococcus pyogenes isolates from throat infections in the region of Aachen, Germany.

    PubMed

    Brandt, C M; Honscha, M; Truong, N D; Holland, R; Hövener, B; Bryskier, A; Lütticken, R; Reinert, R R

    2001-01-01

    Macrolide-resistance was assessed in 216 consecutive Streptococcus pyogenes isolates from throat infections in the region of Aachen, Germany. Seventeen isolates were resistant to erythromycin: 12 isolates revealed a macrolide (M) phenotype and harbored mefA, and five strains expressed an inducible macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B (MLSB) phenotype of which four strains harbored ermA(TR) and one strain contained ermB(AM). Telithromycin (HMR 3647) and quinupristin/dalfopristin remained active particularly against the ermA(TR)-containing S. pyogenes isolates studied. Random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis identified multiple clones among erythromycin-resistant strains, but did not discriminate beyond the emm-type. mefA was present in three isolates either with emm2, emm12, or emm75, and in nine isolates with emm4. All four strains with ermA(TR) contained emm77, and the single strain with ermB(AM) harbored emm1. Despite the relative low rate of macrolide-resistance, these data suggest that at least three different macrolide-resistance determinants are prevalent in Germany and that mefA has spread rapidly into multiple clones of S. pyogenes.

  20. Variability in the Gulf of Alaska from Geosat altimetry data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhaskaran, Shyam; Lagerloef, Gary S. E.; Born, George H.; Emery, W. J.; Leben, Robert R.

    1993-01-01

    Satellite altimetry was used to examine annual and interannual variability in the Gulf of Alaska region. Crossover data from the Geosat Geodetic Mission (GM) and collinear data from the Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) were processed separately to form sea surface height anomalies at grid points. The time series from the GM and ERM were then combined to produce a 3.75-year data set. The time series from the ERM data set agreed fairly well with hydrographic dynamic heights at several locations, with an average correlation of 0.70 between the two data sets. The combined and ERM altimetric data sets were analyzed using empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs). These revealed variability that occurs primarily on annual and interannual time scales. A comparison with EOF analysis of the atmospheric pressure field during the same time periods showed that the annual variation in pressure seemed to be reflected in both the combined and ERM altimetric data sets. The amplitude time series of the first mode in the combined data set was very similar to the North Pacific pressure index during the 1985-1989 time frame. The maximum correlation was at a lag of 250 days. Finally, an interannual mode was present in all three data sets which was closely linked to the baroclinic variations measured by the hydrographic data.

  1. Prevalence and mechanism of resistance against macrolides and lincosamides in Streptococcus suis isolates.

    PubMed

    Martel, A; Baele, M; Devriese, L A; Goossens, H; Wisselink, H J; Decostere, A; Haesebrouck, F

    2001-11-26

    Eighty-seven Streptococcus suis isolates recovered in 1999-2000 from diseased pigs, all from different farms, were screened for resistance against macrolide and lincosamide antibiotics by the disk diffusion and agar dilution test and a PCR assay, amplifying the ermB gene and the mefA/E gene. Seventy-one percent of the isolates showed constitutive resistance to macrolide and lincosamide antibiotics (MLS(B)-phenotype). All these isolates were positive for the ermB gene in the PCR, but negative for the mefA/E gene. For all strains minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) against five other antimicrobial agents were determined. All strains were susceptible to penicillin. Ninety-nine percent of the isolates were susceptible to enrofloxacin and tiamulin. Eighty-five percent of the strains were resistant to doxycycline. A 540bp fragment of the ermB genes of eight S. suis strains was sequenced and compared with ermB genes of five S. pneumoniae and five S. pyogenes strains of human origin. A 100% homology was found between these fragments in seven S. suis, one S. pneumoniae and three of the S. pyogenes isolates. This study demonstrates that resistance against macrolides, lincosamides and streptogramin B is widespread in S. suis and mediated by ribosome methylation, encoded by the ermB gene.

  2. The macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B resistance phenotypes characterized by using a specifically deleted, antibiotic-sensitive strain of Streptomyces lividans.

    PubMed Central

    Pernodet, J L; Fish, S; Blondelet-Rouault, M H; Cundliffe, E

    1996-01-01

    Genes conferring resistance to macrolide, lincosamide, and streptogramin B (MLS) antibiotics via ribosomal modification are widespread in bacteria, including clinical isolates and MLS-producing actinomycetes. Such erm-type genes encode enzymes that mono- or dimethylate residue A-2058 of 23S rRNA. The different phenotypes resulting from monomethylation (MLS-I phenotype, conferred by erm type I genes) or dimethylation (MLS-II phenotype due to erm type II genes) have been characterized by introducing tlrD or ermE, respectively, into an MLS-sensitive derivative of Streptomyces lividans TK21. This strain (designated OS456) was generated by specific replacement of the endogenous resistance genes lrm and mgt. The MLS-I phenotype is characterized by high-level resistance to lincomycin with only marginal resistance to macrolides such as chalcomycin or tylosin, whereas the MLS-II phenotype involves high-level resistance to all MLS drugs. Mono- and dimethylated ribosomes were introduced into a cell-free protein-synthesizing system prepared from S. lividans and compared with unmodified particles in their response to antibiotics. There was no simple correlation between the relative potencies of MLS drugs at the level of the target site (i.e., the ribosome) and their antibacterial activities expressed as MICs. PMID:8851574

  3. The macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B resistance phenotypes characterized by using a specifically deleted, antibiotic-sensitive strain of Streptomyces lividans.

    PubMed

    Pernodet, J L; Fish, S; Blondelet-Rouault, M H; Cundliffe, E

    1996-03-01

    Genes conferring resistance to macrolide, lincosamide, and streptogramin B (MLS) antibiotics via ribosomal modification are widespread in bacteria, including clinical isolates and MLS-producing actinomycetes. Such erm-type genes encode enzymes that mono- or dimethylate residue A-2058 of 23S rRNA. The different phenotypes resulting from monomethylation (MLS-I phenotype, conferred by erm type I genes) or dimethylation (MLS-II phenotype due to erm type II genes) have been characterized by introducing tlrD or ermE, respectively, into an MLS-sensitive derivative of Streptomyces lividans TK21. This strain (designated OS456) was generated by specific replacement of the endogenous resistance genes lrm and mgt. The MLS-I phenotype is characterized by high-level resistance to lincomycin with only marginal resistance to macrolides such as chalcomycin or tylosin, whereas the MLS-II phenotype involves high-level resistance to all MLS drugs. Mono- and dimethylated ribosomes were introduced into a cell-free protein-synthesizing system prepared from S. lividans and compared with unmodified particles in their response to antibiotics. There was no simple correlation between the relative potencies of MLS drugs at the level of the target site (i.e., the ribosome) and their antibacterial activities expressed as MICs.

  4. CLIC proteins, ezrin, radixin, moesin and the coupling of membranes to the actin cytoskeleton: a smoking gun?

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lele; Phang, Juanita M; Yu, Jiang; Harrop, Stephen J; Sokolova, Anna V; Duff, Anthony P; Wilk, Krystyna E; Alkhamici, Heba; Breit, Samuel N; Valenzuela, Stella M; Brown, Louise J; Curmi, Paul M G

    2014-02-01

    The CLIC proteins are a highly conserved family of metazoan proteins with the unusual ability to adopt both soluble and integral membrane forms. The physiological functions of CLIC proteins may include enzymatic activity in the soluble form and anion channel activity in the integral membrane form. CLIC proteins are associated with the ERM proteins: ezrin, radixin and moesin. ERM proteins act as cross-linkers between membranes and the cortical actin cytoskeleton. Both CLIC and ERM proteins are controlled by Rho family small GTPases. CLIC proteins, ERM and Rho GTPases act in a concerted manner to control active membrane processes including the maintenance of microvillar structures, phagocytosis and vesicle trafficking. All of these processes involve the interaction of membranes with the underlying cortical actin cytoskeleton. The relationships between Rho GTPases, CLIC proteins, ERM proteins and the membrane:actin cytoskeleton interface are reviewed. Speculative models are proposed involving the formation of localised multi-protein complexes on the membrane surface that assemble via multiple weak interactions. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Reciprocal influences between cell cytoskeleton and membrane channels, receptors and transporters. Guest Editor: Jean Claude Hervé.

  5. Role of pars plana vitrectomy and membrane peel in vitreomacular traction associated with retinal vasoproliferative tumors

    PubMed Central

    Castro-Navarro, Verónica; Saktanasate, Jarin; Say, Emil Anthony T.; Chiang, Allen; Shields, Carol Lally

    2016-01-01

    To report a case of retinal vasoproliferative tumor (VPT) with secondary epiretinal membrane (ERM) formation and vitreo-macular traction managed by pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) and membrane peel. A 29-year-old male was referred for management of decreased vision in the right eye (OD) for 1 week. Presenting visual acuity was 20/50 Snellen feet (ft) OD, and fundus examination showed an ERM associated with a reddish-yellow mass in the inferotemporal quadrant with overlying exudation, hemorrhage, and subretinal fluid consistent with VPT, and cryotherapy was recommended. Two months later, there was complete tumor regression, but there was decreased vision from progressive vitreomacular traction to 20/400 ft. PPV with combined ERM and internal limiting membrane (ILM) peel were performed with resolution of vitreomacular traction and improvement of visual acuity to 20/50 ft at 6 months. PPV with combined ERM and ILM peel is effective for vision loss secondary to ERM and vitreomacular traction associated with retinal VPT. PMID:27843233

  6. Distribution of Genes Encoding Resistance to Macrolides, Lincosamides, and Streptogramins among Staphylococci

    PubMed Central

    Lina, Gerard; Quaglia, Alain; Reverdy, Marie-Elisabeth; Leclercq, Roland; Vandenesch, François; Etienne, Jerome

    1999-01-01

    The relative frequency of 10 determinants of resistance to macrolides, lincosamides, and streptogramins was investigated by PCR in a series of 294 macrolide-, lincosamide-, and/or streptogramin-resistant clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci isolated in 1995 from 32 French hospitals. Resistance was mainly due to the presence of ermA or ermC genes, which were detected in 259 strains (88%), in particular those resistant to methicillin (78% of the strains). Macrolide resistance due to msrA was more prevalent in coagulase-negative staphylococci (14.6%) than in S. aureus (2.1%). Genes related to linA/linA′ and conferring resistance to lincomycin were detected in one strain of S. aureus and seven strains of coagulase-negative staphylococci. Resistance to pristinamycin and quinupristin-dalfopristin was phenotypically detected in 10 strains of S. aureus and in three strains of coagulase-negative staphylococci; it was always associated with resistance to type A streptogramins encoded by vat or vatB genes and occurred in association with erm genes. The vga gene conferring decreased susceptibility to type A streptogramins was present alone in three strains of coagulase-negative staphylococci and in combination with erm genes in 10 strains of coagulase-negative staphylococci. A combination of vga-vgb-vat and ermA genes was found in a single strain of S. epidermidis. PMID:10223914

  7. A Patient-Derived Xenograft Model of Parameningeal Embryonal Rhabdomyosarcoma for Preclinical Studies

    PubMed Central

    Hooper, Jody E.; Cantor, Emma L.; Ehlen, Macgregor S.; Banerjee, Avirup; Malempati, Suman; Stenzel, Peter; Woltjer, Randy L.; Gandour-Edwards, Regina; Goodwin, Neal C.; Yang, Yan; Kaur, Pali; Bult, Carol J.; Airhart, Susan D.; Keller, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (eRMS) is one of the most common soft tissue sarcomas in children and adolescents. Parameningeal eRMS is a variant that is often more difficult to treat than eRMS occurring at other sites. A 14-year-old female with persistent headaches and rapid weight loss was diagnosed with parameningeal eRMS. She progressed and died despite chemotherapy with vincristine, actinomycin-D, and cyclophosphamide plus 50.4 Gy radiation therapy to the primary tumor site. Tumor specimens were acquired by rapid autopsy and tumor tissue was transplanted into immunodeficient mice to create a patient-derived xenograft (PDX) animal model. As autopsy specimens had an ALK R1181C mutation, PDX tumor bearing animals were treated with the pan-kinase inhibitor lestaurtinib but demonstrated no decrease in tumor growth, suggesting that single agent kinase inhibitor therapy may be insufficient in similar cases. This unique parameningeal eRMS PDX model is publicly available for preclinical study. PMID:26696773

  8. A Patient-Derived Xenograft Model of Parameningeal Embryonal Rhabdomyosarcoma for Preclinical Studies.

    PubMed

    Hooper, Jody E; Cantor, Emma L; Ehlen, Macgregor S; Banerjee, Avirup; Malempati, Suman; Stenzel, Peter; Woltjer, Randy L; Gandour-Edwards, Regina; Goodwin, Neal C; Yang, Yan; Kaur, Pali; Bult, Carol J; Airhart, Susan D; Keller, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (eRMS) is one of the most common soft tissue sarcomas in children and adolescents. Parameningeal eRMS is a variant that is often more difficult to treat than eRMS occurring at other sites. A 14-year-old female with persistent headaches and rapid weight loss was diagnosed with parameningeal eRMS. She progressed and died despite chemotherapy with vincristine, actinomycin-D, and cyclophosphamide plus 50.4 Gy radiation therapy to the primary tumor site. Tumor specimens were acquired by rapid autopsy and tumor tissue was transplanted into immunodeficient mice to create a patient-derived xenograft (PDX) animal model. As autopsy specimens had an ALK R1181C mutation, PDX tumor bearing animals were treated with the pan-kinase inhibitor lestaurtinib but demonstrated no decrease in tumor growth, suggesting that single agent kinase inhibitor therapy may be insufficient in similar cases. This unique parameningeal eRMS PDX model is publicly available for preclinical study.

  9. Identification and characterization of proliferative retinopathy-related long noncoding RNAs

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Rong-Mei; Wang, Xiao-Qun; Yao, Jin; Shen, Yi; Chen, Sai-Nan; Yang, Hong; Jiang, Qin; Yan, Biao

    2015-09-25

    Proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) is a serious complication of retinal detachment and vitreoretinal surgery, which can lead to severe vision reduction. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) play critical roles in many biological processes and disease development. We attempted to determine the role of lncRNAs in the setting of PVR. Microarray analysis revealed that 78 lncRNAs were abnormally expressed in the epiretinal membranes (ERMs) of PVR patients, including 48 up-regulated and 30 down-regulated lncRNA transcripts. We subsequently focus on one lncRNA, MALAT1, and investigated its expression pattern in the biofluid of PVR patients. MALAT1 was significantly up-regulated in the cellular and plasma fraction of peripheral blood in PVR patients. MALAT1 expression was obviously reduced after PVR operation. In vitro experiments revealed the role of MALAT1 in regulating RPE proliferation and migration, which is critical for ERMs formation. This study suggests that lncRNAs are the potential regulators of PVR pathology. MALAT1 is a potential prognostic indicator and a target for the diagnosis and gene therapy for PVR diseases. - Highlights: • 78 lncRNAs are differentially expressed between PVR-ERMs and secondary ERMs. • MALAT1 level is elevated in the ERMs of PVR patients. • Circulating MALAT1 level is up-regulated in PVR patients. • MALAT1 knockdown regulates RPE proliferation and migration.

  10. Quantification of contrast recognizability in sequential epiretinal membrane removal and internal limiting membrane peeling in trypan blue-assisted macular surgery.

    PubMed

    Henrich, Paul B; Priglinger, Siegfried G; Haritoglou, Christos; Schumann, Ricarda G; Strauss, Rupert W; Schneider, Ulrike; Josifova, Tatjana; Cattin, Philippe C

    2013-04-01

    To evaluate the selectivity and strength of intraoperative trypan blue staining during removal of epiretinal membranes (ERMs) and the internal limiting membrane. Based on intraoperative videos, 51 consecutive chromovitrectomies in 51 patients with macular holes, macular pucker, vitreomacular traction syndromes, or persistent macular edema were retrospectively studied. Fifteen subjects underwent trypan blue, 14 indocyanine green, and 22 brilliant blue G chromovitrectomy. The main outcome measure was the color contrast between stained internal limiting membrane or ERM and the underlying unstained tissue by means of objective, quantitative, semiautomated chromaticity difference measurements. Trypan blue stains both ERM and the internal limiting membrane (average chromaticity scores 8.51 and 7.09, respectively; P = 0.48). Internal limiting membrane chromaticity scores were similar for trypan blue (7.09) and brilliant blue G (6.81; P = 0.71) but clearly higher for indocyanine green (15.81; P = 2.45 × 10). Under the premises of our study, trypan blue stains both ERM and the internal limiting membrane. Trypan blue's staining capacity of the internal limiting membrane is similar to that of brilliant blue G but significantly inferior compared with indocyanine green. Trypan blue, thus, represents a useful vital dye for chromovitrectomy, particularly in the presence of ERM, where it allows a sequential approach.

  11. Sphingolipid regulation of ezrin, radixin, and moesin proteins family: implications for cell dynamics.

    PubMed

    Adada, Mohamad; Canals, Daniel; Hannun, Yusuf A; Obeid, Lina M

    2014-05-01

    A key but poorly studied domain of sphingolipid functions encompasses endocytosis, exocytosis, cellular trafficking, and cell movement. Recently, the ezrin, radixin and moesin (ERM) family of proteins emerged as novel potent targets regulated by sphingolipids. ERMs are structural proteins linking the actin cytoskeleton to the plasma membrane, also forming a scaffold for signaling pathways that are used for cell proliferation, migration and invasion, and cell division. Opposing functions of the bioactive sphingolipid ceramide and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), contribute to ERM regulation. S1P robustly activates whereas ceramide potently deactivates ERM via phosphorylation/dephosphorylation, respectively. This recent dimension of cytoskeletal regulation by sphingolipids opens up new avenues to target cell dynamics, and provides further understanding of some of the unexplained biological effects mediated by sphingolipids. In addition, these studies are providing novel inroads into defining basic mechanisms of regulation and action of bioactive sphingolipids. This review describes the current understanding of sphingolipid regulation of the cytoskeleton, it also describes the biologies in which ERM proteins have been involved, and finally how these two large fields have started to converge. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled New Frontiers in Sphingolipid Biology.

  12. Control of adipogenesis by ezrin, radixin and moesin-dependent biomechanics remodeling.

    PubMed

    Titushkin, Igor; Sun, Shan; Paul, Amit; Cho, Michael

    2013-02-01

    We have recently shown that altered stem cell biomechanics can regulate the lineage commitment through a family of the membrane-cytoskeleton linker proteins (ERM; ezrin, radixin, moesin). The ERM proteins not only modulate the cell stiffness and actin cytoskeleton organization, but also rearrange focal adhesions and therefore influence the biochemically-directed stem cell differentiation. Combining silencing RNA, atomic force microscopy, and fluorescence microscopy, the role of the ERM proteins involved in the regulation of stem cell biomechanics and adipogenic differentiation was quantitatively determined. Transient ERM knockdown by RNAi caused disassembly of actin stress fibers and focal adhesions and a decrease in the cell stiffness. The silencing RNA treatment not only induced mechanical changes in stem cells but impaired adipogenesis in a time-dependent manner. While siRNA ERM treatment at day 0 substantially interfered with adipogenesis, the same treatment at day 3 of adipogenic differentiation significantly facilitated adipogenesis, as assessed by the expression of adipocyte-specific markers. The intact biomechanics homeostasis appears to be critical for the adipogenic induction. These findings may lead to potential biomechanical intervention techniques and methodologies to control the fate and extent of adipogenesis that would likely be involved in stem cell-based therapeutics for soft tissue repair and regeneration.

  13. Moesin-deficient mice reveal a non-redundant role for moesin in lymphocyte homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Takako; Nomachi, Akira; Tohya, Kazuo; Miyasaka, Masayuki; Tsukita, Sachiko; Watanabe, Takeshi; Narumiya, Shuh

    2012-11-01

    Moesin is a member of the ezrin-radixin-moesin (ERM) family of cytoskeletal proteins. These proteins organize membrane domains by interacting with plasma membrane proteins and the actin cytoskeleton. Because of their high sequence similarity, ERM proteins are usually thought to be functionally redundant. Lymphocytes express two ERM proteins, ezrin and moesin. Whether each ERM plays a specialized role in lymphocytes, particularly in vivo, remains unknown. Here, we show that moesin has a crucial, non-redundant role in lymphocyte homeostasis. Moesin-deficient mice exhibited decreases in both T and B cells in the peripheral blood and lymph nodes, but not in the spleen. This phenotype was recapitulated in bone marrow (BM) chimeras with a hematopoietic moesin deficiency. Although the T and B cells apparently developed without major defects in the moesin-deficient mice, T cell egress from the thymus and immature B cell egress from the BM were impaired. In the periphery, both T and B cells showed delayed egress from lymphoid organs. We showed that moesin is the primary phosphorylated ERM subject to dynamic regulation during cell shape changes and migration. Our findings identify a previously unknown, non-redundant function of moesin in lymphocyte homeostasis in regulating lymphocyte egress from lymphoid organs.

  14. Diversity of antimicrobial resistance and virulence genes in methicillin-resistant non-Staphylococcus aureus staphylococci from veal calves.

    PubMed

    Argudín, M Angeles; Vanderhaeghen, Wannes; Butaye, Patrick

    2015-04-01

    In this study we determined whether methicillin-resistant non-Staphylococcus aureus (MRNAS) from veal calves may be a potential reservoir of antimicrobial-resistance and virulence genes. Fifty-eight MRNAS were studied by means of DNA-microarray and PCR for detection of antimicrobial resistance and virulence genes. The isolates carried a variety of antimicrobial-resistance genes [aacA-aphD, aadD, aph3, aadE, sat, spc, ampA, erm(A), erm(B), erm(C), erm(F), erm(T), lnu(A), msr(A)-msr(B), vga(A), mph(C), tet(K), tet(M), tet(L), cat, fexA, dfrA, dfrD, dfrG, dfrK, cfr, fusB, fosB, qacA, qacC, merA-merB]. Some isolates carried resistance genes without showing the corresponding resistance phenotype. Most MRNAS carried typical S. aureus virulence factors like proteases (sspP) and enterotoxins (seg) genes. Most Staphylococcus epidermidis isolates carried the arginine catabolic element, and nearly 40% of the Staphylococcus sciuri isolates carried leukocidins, and/or fibronectin-binding protein genes. MRNAS were highly multi-resistant and represent an important reservoir of antimicrobial resistance and virulence genes.

  15. Identification of Ezrin-Radixin-Moesin proteins as novel regulators of pathogenic B cell receptor signaling and tumor growth in diffuse large B cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Pore, Debasis; Bodo, Juraj; Danda, Avinash; Yan, Di; Phillips, James G.; Lindner, Daniel; Hill, Brian T.; Smith, Mitchell R.; Hsi, Eric D.; Gupta, Neetu

    2015-01-01

    Diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is a hematological cancer associated with an aggressive clinical course. The predominant subtypes of DLBCL display features of chronic or tonic B cell antigen receptor (BCR) signaling. However, it is not known if the spatial organization of the BCR contributes to regulation of pro-survival signaling pathways and cell growth. Here, we show that primary DLBCL tumors and patient-derived DLBCL cell lines contain high levels of phosphorylated Ezrin-Radixin-Moesin (ERM) proteins. The surface BCRs in both activated B cell and germinal B cell subtype DLBCL cells co-segregate with phosphoERM suggesting that the cytoskeletal network may support localized BCR signaling and contribute to pathogenesis. Indeed, ablation of membrane-cytoskeletal linkages by dominant negative mutants, pharmacological inhibition and knockdown of ERM proteins disrupted cell surface BCR organization, inhibited proximal and distal BCR signaling, and reduced the growth of DLBCL cell lines. In vivo administration of the ezrin inhibitor retarded the growth of DLBCL tumor xenografts, concomitant with reduction in intratumor phosphoERM levels, dampened pro-survival signaling and induction of apoptosis. Our results reveal a novel ERM-based spatial mechanism that is coopted by DLBCL cells to sustain tumor cell growth and survival. PMID:25801911

  16. [Internal limiting membrane peeling as prophylaxis of epimacular membrane formation in eyes undergoing vitrectomy for rhegmatogenous retinal detachement].

    PubMed

    Hejsek, L; Dusová, J; Stepanov, A; Rozsíval, P

    2014-06-01

    Rhegmatogenous retinal detachment is a serious condition that can significantly impair visual function, even after a successful surgery. One of the complications that can significantly impair visual acuity in the postoperative period is a development of the epimacular membrane (ERM). The aim of this work is to monitor the effect of peeling of the internal limiting membrane (ILM) in the macula at the anatomical and functional results in the postoperative period, especially with regard to the development of ERM. Prospective study of 21 eyes, which underwent peeling of ILM during pars plana vitrectomy for rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (on detached macula). The ILM peeling was done without using decalin during this procedure. We tested best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) and followed fundus biomicroscopic findings. Proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) was evaluated according to the recommendations of the Retina Society Terminology Committee. To exclude the development of ERM in the macula optical coherence tomography (OCT) was performed at the end of the 18-month follow-up period. In total, the results of 21 eyes of 21 patients who underwent PPV for rhegmatogenous retinal detachment were evaluated. In all of them was during PPV performed ILM peeling on detached macula, these are followed prospectively. ILM peeling without using decalin was sufficient in all eyes. All eyes with ILM peeling did not develop ERM at the end of the follow-up period. ILM peeling during PPV for rhegmatogenous retinal detachment reduces the risk of developing secondary ERM.

  17. An Hdac1/Rpd3-Poised Circuit Balances Continual Self-Renewal and Rapid Restriction of Developmental Potential during Asymmetric Stem Cell Division.

    PubMed

    Janssens, Derek H; Hamm, Danielle C; Anhezini, Lucas; Xiao, Qi; Siller, Karsten H; Siegrist, Sarah E; Harrison, Melissa M; Lee, Cheng-Yu

    2017-02-27

    How the developmental potential of differentiating stem cell progeny becomes rapidly and stably restricted following asymmetric stem cell division is unclear. In the fly larval brain, earmuff (erm) uniquely functions to restrict the developmental potential of intermediate neural progenitors (INPs) generated by asymmetrically dividing neural stem cells (neuroblasts). Here we demonstrate that the histone deacetylase Hdac1/Rpd3 functions together with self-renewal transcriptional repressors to maintain the erm immature INP enhancer in an inactive but poised state in neuroblasts. Within 2 hr of immature INP birth, downregulation of repressor activities alleviates Rpd3-mediated repression on the erm enhancer, enabling acetylation of multiple histone proteins and activating Erm expression. Erm restricts the developmental potential in immature INPs by repressing genes encoding neuroblast transcriptional activators. We propose that poising the fast-activating enhancers of master regulators of differentiation through continual histone deacetylation in stem cells enables self-renewal and rapid restriction of developmental potential following asymmetric division. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Different levels of hyphal self-incompatibility modulate interconnectedness of mycorrhizal networks in three arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi within the Glomeraceae.

    PubMed

    Pepe, Alessandra; Giovannetti, Manuela; Sbrana, Cristiana

    2016-05-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) live in symbiosis with most plant species and produce underground extraradical hyphal networks functional in the uptake and translocation of mineral nutrients from the soil to host plants. This work investigated whether fungal genotype can affect patterns of interconnections and structural traits of extraradical mycelium (ERM), by comparing three Glomeraceae species growing in symbiosis with five plant hosts. An isolate of Funneliformis coronatus consistently showed low ability to form interconnected ERM and self-incompatibility that represented up to 21% of hyphal contacts. The frequency of post-fusion self-incompatible interactions, never detected before in AMF extraradical networks, was 8.9%. In F. coronatus ERM, the percentage of hyphal contacts leading to perfect hyphal fusions was 1.2-7.7, while it ranged from 25.8-48 to 35.6-53.6 in Rhizophagus intraradices and Funneliformis mosseae, respectively. Low interconnectedness of F. coronatus ERM resulted also from a very high number of non-interacting contacts (83.2%). Such findings show that AMF genotypes in Glomeraceae can differ significantly in anastomosis behaviour and that ERM interconnectedness is modulated by the fungal symbiont, as F. coronatus consistently formed poorly interconnected networks when growing in symbiosis with five different host plants and in the asymbiotic stage. Structural traits, such as extent, density and hyphal self-compatibility/incompatibility, may represent key factors for the differential performance of AMF, by affecting fungal absorbing surface and foraging ability and thus nutrient flow from soil to host roots.

  19. Prototypic Enhanced Risk Monitor Framework and Evaluation - Advanced Reactor Technology Milestone: M3AT-15PN2301054

    SciTech Connect

    Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Hirt, Evelyn H.; Veeramany, Arun; Bonebrake, Christopher A.; Ivans, William J.; Coles, Garill A.; Coble, Jamie B.; Liu, X.; Wootan, David W.; Mitchell, Mark R.; Brass, Mary F.

    2015-09-24

    This research report summaries the development and evaluation of a prototypic enhanced risk monitor (ERM) methodology (framework) that includes alternative risk metrics and uncertainty analysis. This updated ERM methodology accounts for uncertainty in the equipment condition assessment (ECA), the prognostic result, and the probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) model. It is anticipated that the ability to characterize uncertainty in the estimated risk and update the risk estimates in real time based on equipment condition assessment (ECA) will provide a mechanism for optimizing plant performance while staying within specified safety margins. These results (based on impacting active component O&M using real-time equipment condition information) are a step towards ERMs that, if integrated with AR supervisory plant control systems, can help control O&M costs and improve affordability of advanced reactors.

  20. Hepatocyte Growth Factor-mediated satellite cells niche perturbation promotes development of distinct sarcoma subtypes.

    PubMed

    Morena, Deborah; Maestro, Nicola; Bersani, Francesca; Forni, Paolo Emanuele; Lingua, Marcello Francesco; Foglizzo, Valentina; Šćepanović, Petar; Miretti, Silvia; Morotti, Alessandro; Shern, Jack F; Khan, Javed; Ala, Ugo; Provero, Paolo; Sala, Valentina; Crepaldi, Tiziana; Gasparini, Patrizia; Casanova, Michela; Ferrari, Andrea; Sozzi, Gabriella; Chiarle, Roberto; Ponzetto, Carola; Taulli, Riccardo

    2016-03-17

    Embryonal Rhabdomyosarcoma (ERMS) and Undifferentiated Pleomorphic Sarcoma (UPS) are distinct sarcoma subtypes. Here we investigate the relevance of the satellite cell (SC) niche in sarcoma development by using Hepatocyte Growth Factor (HGF) to perturb the niche microenvironment. In a Pax7 wild type background, HGF stimulation mainly causes ERMS that originate from satellite cells following a process of multistep progression. Conversely, in a Pax7 null genotype ERMS incidence drops, while UPS becomes the most frequent subtype. Murine EfRMS display genetic heterogeneity similar to their human counterpart. Altogether, our data demonstrate that selective perturbation of the SC niche results in distinct sarcoma subtypes in a Pax7 lineage-dependent manner, and define a critical role for the Met axis in sarcoma initiation. Finally, our results provide a rationale for the use of combination therapy, tailored on specific amplifications and activated signaling pathways, to minimize resistance emerging from sarcomas heterogeneity.

  1. Precise orbit computation for the Geosat Exact Repeat Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, Bruce J.; Born, George H.; Rosborough, George W.; Marsh, James G.; Williamson, Ronald G.

    1990-01-01

    Results are reported from an extensive investigation of orbit-determination strategies for the Geosat Exact Repeat Mission (ERM). The goal is to establish optimum geodetic parameters and procedures for the computation of the most accurate Geosat orbits possible and to apply these procedures for routine computation during the ERM for the following purposes: (1) to enhance the value of the Geosat oceanographic investigations by providing the user community with improved ephemerides, (2) to develop orbit determination techniques for the upcoming altimetric mission Topex/Poseidon, and (3) to assess the radial orbit accuracy obtainable with recently developed gravity models. To this end, ephemerides for the entire first year of the ERM have been computed using the GEODYN II orbit program on the Cyber 205 supercomputer system at the NASA Goddard.

  2. [Investigation of macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B (MLS(B)) and telithromycin resistance in clinical strains of staphylococci].

    PubMed

    Saribaş, Zeynep; Tunçkanat, Ferda; Ozçakir, Olcay; Ercis, Serpil

    2010-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B (MLS(B)) resistance and also to search for telithromycin resistance in staphylococcus strains isolated at Hacettepe University Hospital, Ankara, Turkey. A total of 381 Staphylococcus aureus isolates and 94 coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) were tested by disc approximation method. Methicillin resistance of these isolates was searched by disc diffusion test using 30 microg cefoxitin discs. Distribution of erm genes was detected by PCR method. Of 381 isolates 112 (29.4%) S. aureus and 58 (61.7%) CNS were found to be resistant to erythromycin. Among these, the inducible MLS(B) (iMLS(B)) resistance was the most prevalent pattern, being 56.2% and 41.4% among S. aureus and CNS isolates, respectively. The frequency of constitutive MLS(B) resistance (cMLS(B)) was 40.2% for S. aureus and 34.5% for CNS. Macrolide-streptogramin B (MS(B)) resistance pattern was detected only in CNS isolates (24.1%). In 4 (3.6%) of S. aureus isolates mixed pattern demonstrating both inducible and constitutive patterns was detected. None of the isolates susceptible to erythromycin showed resistance to telithromycin. As a remarkable finding of this study D-shaped inhibition zones around the telithromycin discs was observed in all of the isolates with iMLS(B) and macrolide-streptogramin B (MS(B)) resistance phenotypes. The isolates showing cMLS(B) pattern were also resistant to telithromycin (no zone of inhibition around the telithromycin discs). A total of 170 erythromycin resistant staphylococcal isolates were tested for the presence of erm and msrA genes. Among the S. aureus isolates with iMLS(B) and cMLS(B) phenoypes, the most common findings were the detection of ermA (44/63) and ermA + ermC (35/45) genes, respectively. All of the four isolates with mixed phenotype harboured ermA gene. With respect to CNS isolates, the most frequently detected gene was ermC (37/58); whereas iMLS(B) and c

  3. A mouse model of rhabdomyosarcoma originating from the adipocyte lineage

    PubMed Central

    Hatley, Mark E.; Tang, Wei; Garcia, Matthew R.; Finkelstein, David; Millay, Douglas P.; Liu, Ning; Graff, Jonathan; Galindo, Rene L.; Olson, Eric N.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is an aggressive skeletal muscle-lineage tumor composed of malignant myoblasts that fail to exit the cell cycle and are blocked from fusing into syncytial muscle. Rhabdomyosarcoma includes two histolopathologic subtypes: alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma, driven by the fusion protein PAX3-FOXO1 or PAX7-FOXO1, and embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (ERMS), which is genetically heterogeneous. Here, we show that adipocyte-restricted activation of Sonic Hedgehog signaling through expression of a constitutively active Smoothened allele in mice gives rise to aggressive skeletal muscle tumors that display the histologic and molecular characteristics of human ERMS with high penetrance. Our findings suggest that adipocyte progenitors can be a cell of origin for Sonic Hedgehog-driven ERMS, showing that RMS can originate from non-skeletal muscle precursors. PMID:23079662

  4. Vps13-Mcp1 interact at vacuole-mitochondria interfaces and bypass ER-mitochondria contact sites.

    PubMed

    John Peter, Arun T; Herrmann, Beatrice; Antunes, Diana; Rapaport, Doron; Dimmer, Kai Stefan; Kornmann, Benoît

    2017-10-02

    Membrane contact sites between endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria, mediated by the ER-mitochondria encounter structure (ERMES) complex, are critical for mitochondrial homeostasis and cell growth. Defects in ERMES can, however, be bypassed by point mutations in the endosomal protein Vps13 or by overexpression of the mitochondrial protein Mcp1. How this bypass operates remains unclear. Here we show that the mitochondrial outer membrane protein Mcp1 functions in the same pathway as Vps13 by recruiting it to mitochondria and promoting its association to vacuole-mitochondria contacts. Our findings support a model in which Mcp1 and Vps13 work as functional effectors of vacuole-mitochondria contact sites, while tethering is mediated by other factors, including Vps39. Tethered and functionally active vacuole-mitochondria interfaces then compensate for the loss of ERMES-mediated ER-mitochondria contact sites. © 2017 John Peter et al.

  5. Evidence for an Unanticipated Relationship Between Undifferentiated Pleomorphic Sarcoma and Embryonal Rhabdomyosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, Brian P.; Nishijo, Koichi; Chen, Hung-I Harry; Yi, Xiaolan; Schuetze, David P.; Pal, Ranadip; Prajapati, Suresh I.; Abraham, Jinu; Arenkiel, Benjamin R.; Chen, Qing-Rong; Davis, Sean; McCleish, Amanda T.; Capecchi, Mario R.; Michalek, Joel E.; Zarzabal, Lee Ann; Khan, Javed; Yu, Zhongxin; Parham, David M.; Barr, Frederic G.; Meltzer, Paul S.; Chen, Yidong; Keller, Charles

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (eRMS) shows the most myodifferentiation amongst sarcomas, yet the precise cell of origin remains undefined. Using Ptch1, p53 and/or Rb1 conditional mouse models and controlling prenatal or postnatal myogenic cell of origin, we demonstrate that eRMS and undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma (UPS) lie in a continuum, with satellite cells predisposed to giving rise to UPS. Conversely, p53 loss in maturing myoblasts gives rise to eRMS, which have the highest myodifferentiation potential. Irrespective of origin, Rb1 loss modifies tumor phenotype to mimic UPS. In human sarcomas that lack pathognomic chromosomal translocations, p53 loss of function is prevalent whereas Shh or Rb1 alterations likely act primarily as modifiers. Thus, sarcoma phenotype is strongly influenced by cell of origin and mutational profile. PMID:21316601

  6. Pursuing enterprise risk management: a local road map for Canadian healthcare leaders.

    PubMed

    Haney, James R; Church, John; Cockerill, Rhonda

    2013-01-01

    An in-depth analysis of organizational risk management in healthcare, and in particular the concepts of Enterprise Risk Management (ERM), has identified a 5-part model that can be used by Canadian healthcare leaders as an evidence-supported approach to successful organizational risk management. The Model for Organizational Risk Management, termed "the Model," has been developed as a basis for linking the components of an ERM Framework into a Canadian health organization to overcome the barriers that commonly disrupt strategic risk management. The Model addresses how an ERM Framework can fit within an existing health organization by building off and enhancing existing processes and resources to ensure familiarity, acceptance, and sustainability of the risk management program. By approaching the Model in a stepwise fashion (based on individual organizational context), healthcare leaders are provided with a road map from which to advance their own organizational risk management program.

  7. Integrin-linked kinase: both Jekyll and Hyde in rhabdomyosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Paul C.; Dedhar, Shoukat; Keller, Charles

    2009-01-01

    Although the molecular differences between embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (ERMS) and alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma (ARMS) have been extensively interrogated, effective therapies tailored to a particular rhabdomyosarcoma subtype have yet to emerge. Patients with ERMS have shown incremental improvement using current multimodal therapy, but survival rates for metastatic ARMS remain poor. In this issue of the JCI, Durbin and colleagues demonstrate that integrin-linked kinase (ILK) acts as a tumor suppressor in ERMS and as a proto-oncogene in ARMS, and that the opposing functions of this enzyme are dependent on the JNK1 signaling pathway (see the related article beginning on page 1558). Their findings suggest that targeting ILK may represent a focused therapeutic strategy for the treatment of ARMS. PMID:19504719

  8. Understanding the external pressure and behavior of commercial banks' environmental risk management: an empirical study undertaken in the Yangtze River delta of China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong; Lin, Zhongguo

    2014-04-01

    The present study employed a quantitative survey to ascertain whether the external pressure of environmental risk management (ERM) on commercial banks was a contributing factor to their ERM behavior. Data was obtained using questionnaires from 204 branches of commercial banks located in the Yangtze River Delta of China. The relationship between external pressure and behavior was tested using a linear structural relations model through path analysis. The results revealed that external pressure of ERM was significantly and positively related to the behavior and that pressure from governmental regulations was the most important contributing factor in the passive feedback behavior and preventive behavior of commercial banks. The pressure from markets was the most important contributing factor in banks' active participation behavior; the pressure from community and NGOs was the most important contributing factor in their enthusiastic behavior.

  9. Protection against methoxyacetic-acid-induced spermatocyte apoptosis with calcium channel blockers in cultured rat seminiferous tubules: possible mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Li, L H; Wine, R N; Miller, D S; Reece, J M; Smith, M; Chapin, R E

    1997-05-01

    A calcium-mediated mechanism underlying spermatocyte apoptosis induced by 2-methoxyethanol (2-ME) has been previously proposed. This hypothesis was tested in vitro in the present study using cultured juvenile (25 days old) and adult rat seminiferous tubules (JRST and ARST, respectively) with methoxyacetic acid (MAA, the active metabolite of 2-ME). In JRST, spermatocyte degeneration was morphologically obvious 19 hr after a 5-hr exposure to 5 mM MAA. The lesion was unaffected by the presence or absence of extratubular Ca2+. However, MAA-induced cell death was significantly prevented by cotreatment with the dihydropyridines (DHP) nifedipine (50 microM) and nicardipine (20 microM), as well as verapamil (50 microM) and TMB-8 (50 microM), all of which are able to inhibit calcium movement through plasma membranes. However, neither ryanodine, dantrolene, nor cyclosporin A and ruthenium red, which inhibit Ca2+ mobilization from intracellular stores (endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria), affected the MAA-induced cell death. Inhibition of calcium mobilization through IP3-sensitive pathways by blocking the product of IP3 with manoalide, neomycin, and U73122 did not block the MAA-induced lesion. The protective effects of 50 microM nifedipine and 50 microM TMB-8 were also observed in ARSTs treated with 10 mM MAA for 5 hr. However, when rat testicular sections were immunohistochemically stained with monoclonal antibodies specific for the alpha 1 (the DHP receptor) or the alpha 2 subunits of DHP-sensitive calcium channels, no positive staining was found. Finally, in an attempt to see whether the intracellular free calcium concentrations ([Ca2+]i) in germ cells were increased after the MAA treatment, intact seminiferous tubules were loaded with indo-1 and were measured using laser-scanning confocal microscopy. No detectable increase in the signal in MA A-sensitive spermatocytes was observed, while a 34-54% increase in the signal could be detected in the same cell types when

  10. The Prevalence and Incidence of Epiretinal Membranes in Eyes With Inactive Extramacular CMV Retinitis

    PubMed Central

    Kozak, Igor; Vaidya, Vijay; Van Natta, Mark L.; Pak, Jeong W.; May, K. Patrick; Thorne, Jennifer E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To determine the prevalence and incidence of epiretinal membranes (ERM) in eyes with inactive extramacular cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis in patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Methods. A case–control report from a longitudinal multicenter observational study by the Studies of the Ocular Complications of AIDS (SOCA) Research Group. A total of 357 eyes of 270 patients with inactive CMV retinitis and 1084 eyes of 552 patients with no ocular opportunistic infection (OOI) were studied. Stereoscopic views of the posterior pole from fundus photographs were assessed at baseline and year 5 visits for the presence of macular ERM. Generalized estimating equations (GEE) logistic regression was used to compare the prevalence and 5-year incidence of ERM in eyes with and without CMV retinitis at enrollment. Crude and adjusted logistic regression was performed adjusting for possible confounders. Main outcome measures included the prevalence, incidence, estimated prevalence, and incidence odds ratios. Results. The prevalence of ERM at enrollment was 14.8% (53/357) in eyes with CMV retinitis versus 1.8% (19/1084) in eyes with no OOI. The incidence of ERM at 5 years was 18.6% (16/86) in eyes with CMV retinitis versus 2.4% (6/253) in eyes with no OOI. The crude odds ratio (OR) (95% confidence interval, CI) for prevalence was 9.8 (5.5–17.5) (P < 0.01). The crude OR (95% CI) for incidence was 9.4 (3.2–27.9) (P < 0.01). Conclusions. A history of extramacular CMV retinitis is associated with increased prevalence and incidence of ERM formation compared to what is seen in eyes without ocular opportunistic infections in AIDS patients. PMID:24925880

  11. In vivo spread of macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B (MLSB) resistance--a model study in chickens.

    PubMed

    Marosevic, D; Cervinkova, D; Vlkova, H; Videnska, P; Babak, V; Jaglic, Z

    2014-07-16

    The influence of specific and non-specific antibiotic pressure on in vivo spread of macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B (MLSB) resistance was evaluated in this study. Chickens repeatedly inoculated with Enterococcus faecalis harbouring the plasmid pAMβ1 carrying the erm(B) gene were perorally treated for one week with tylosin, lincomycin (both specific antibiotic pressure) and chlortetracycline (non-specific antibiotic pressure). Antibiotic non-treated but E. faecalis inoculated chickens served as a control. To quantify the erm(B) gene and characterise intestinal microflora, faecal DNA was analysed by qPCR and 454-pyrosequencing. Under the pressure of antibiotics, a significant increase in erm(B) was observed by qPCR. However, at the final stage of the experiment, an increase in erm(B) was also observed in two out of five non-treated chickens. In chickens treated with tylosin and chlortetracycline, the increase in erm(B) was accompanied by an increase in enterococci. However, E. faecalis was at the limit of detection in all animals. This suggests that the erm(B) gene spread among the gut microbiota other than E. faecalis. Pyrosequencing results indicated that, depending on the particular antibiotic pressure, different bacteria could be responsible for the spread of MLSB resistance. Different species of MLSB-resistant enterococci and streptococci were isolated from cloacal swabs during and after the treatment. PFGE analysis of MLSB-resistant enterococci revealed four clones, all differing from the challenge strain. All of the MLSB-resistant isolates harboured a plasmid of the same size as pAMβ1. This study has shown that MLSB resistance may spread within the gut microbiota under specific and non-specific pressure and even in the absence of any antimicrobial pressure. Finally, depending on the particular antibiotic pressure, different bacterial species seems to be involved in the spread of MLSB resistance.

  12. A Novel Notch-YAP Circuit Drives Stemness and Tumorigenesis in Embryonal Rhabdomyosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Slemmons, Katherine K; Crose, Lisa E S; Riedel, Stefan; Sushnitha, Manuela; Belyea, Brian C; Linardic, Corinne M

    2017-09-18

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS), a cancer characterized by skeletal muscle features, is the most common soft tissue sarcoma of childhood. While low and intermediate-risk groups have seen improved outcomes, high-risk patients still face a 5-year survival of <30%, a statistic that has not changed in over 40 years. Understanding the biologic underpinnings of RMS is critical. The developmental pathways of Notch and YAP have been identified as potent but independent oncogenic signals that support the embryonal variant of RMS (eRMS). Here, the cross-talk between these pathways and the impact on eRMS tumorigenesis is reported. Using human eRMS cells grown as 3D rhabdospheres, which enriches in stem cells, it was found that Notch signaling transcriptionally upregulates YAP1 gene expression and YAP activity. Reciprocally, YAP transcriptionally upregulates the Notch ligand genes JAG1 and DLL1 and the core Notch transcription factor RBPJ. This bidirectional circuit boosts expression of key stem cell genes including SOX2, which is functionally required for eRMS spheres. Silencing this circuit for therapeutic purposes may be challenging, since the inhibition of one node (for example pharmacologic Notch blockade) can be rescued by upregulation of another (constitutive YAP expression). Instead, dual inhibition of Notch and YAP is necessary. Finally, supporting the existence of this circuit beyond a model system, nuclear Notch and YAP protein expression are correlated in human eRMS tumors, and YAP suppression in vivo decreases Notch signaling and SOX2 expression. This study identifies a novel oncogenic signaling circuit driving eRMS stemness and tumorigenesis, and provides evidence and rationale for combination therapies co-targeting Notch and YAP. Copyright ©2017, American Association for Cancer Research.

  13. [Phenotypes and genetic mechanisms of resistance to macrolides and lincosamides in viridans group streptococci].

    PubMed

    Artiles Campelo, F; Horcajada Herrera, I; Alamo Antúnez, I; Cãnas Pedrosa, A; Lafarga Capuz, B

    2007-09-01

    Viridans group streptococci (VGS) are part of the oropharyngeal, intestinal and genital flora, but they may cause endocarditis and bacteremia in susceptible patients. Penicillin- and macrolide-resistant strains are increasing every year. The aim of this study was to investigate genetic mechanisms of resistance to macrolides in clinically relevant isolates. We identified 85 isolates from January 2004 to June 2006. Susceptibility to penicillin, cefotaxime, erythromycin, clindamycin and gentamycin was determined. A resistance phenotype was assigned according to the disk approximation test (erythromycin-clindamycin). The mechanism of resistance was determined by PCR for the following genes: ermB, ermA, ermC, ermA (TR) and mefA/E. We identified 51 isolates belonging to Streptococcus anginosus species, most of which were obtained from abdominal abscesses, and 34 isolates belonging to other species, most of which were obtained from blood cultures. The macrolide resistance rate was 28.2% (24/85). The MLS(B) phenotype was observed in 66.7% of the isolates, primarily in the S. anginosus group. The M phenotype was predominant in S. mitis and S. oralis. Isolates that expressed the constitutive MLS(B) phenotype carried the ermB gene, and those that expressed the inducible MLSB phenotype carried the ermA gene. Isolates that expressed the M phenotype carried the mefA/E gene. There was coresistance with penicillin in 20.8% (5/24) of the isolates. Coresistance with penicillin was low. These results suggest that screening for macrolide resistance in VGS would be desirable because of the potential transmission of resistance genes to other pathogenic streptococci.

  14. Clindamycin Resistance among Staphylococcus Aureus Isolated at Mbarara Regional Referral Hospital, in South Western Uganda.

    PubMed

    Mwambi, Bashir; Iramiot, Jacob; Bwanga, Freddie; Nakaye, Marthae; Itabangi, Herbert; Bazira, Joel

    2014-12-01

    The study was conducted to determine the prevalence of Clindamycin (CL) resistance and antimicrobial susceptibility among clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) from Mbarara Regional Referral Hospital (MRRH) in Southwestern Uganda. Laboratory based cross sectional study. The study was conducted at the Microbiology department of Mbarara Regional referral hospital between November 2012 and December 2013. In our study, we recruited 300 S. aureus isolates that were stored in the laboratory and were obtained from different clinical samples. The isolates were tested for antimicrobial susceptibility by phenotypic methods and for the genotypic expression of Macrolide Lincosamide StreptograminB (MLSB) resistance genes (ermA, ermB, ermC, and msrA). The D-test was also performed. Phenotypically, a total of 109 (36%) S. aureus isolates were resistant to CL, of which 9 (3%) were constitutively resistant while 100 (33.3%) were inducibly resistant. Genotypicaly, 134/300 (44.7%) isolates possessed at least one of the MLSB resistance genes. 23/300 (7.7%) tested positive for ermB, 98/300 (32.7%) tested positive for the ermC and 43/300 (14.3%) tested positive for the msrA genes with none possessing the ermA gene. Isolates were highly resistant to Sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim, Erythromycin and Oxacillin with moderate resistance to Vancomycin and Imipenem and least resistance to Linezolid. S. aureus resistance to CL was high in this set up. There was also high resistance to Sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim, Erythromycin and Oxacillin but low resistance to Linezolid.

  15. High macrolide resistance in Streptococcus pyogenes strains isolated from children with pharyngitis in China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaorong; Shen, Xuzhuang; Chang, Hesheng; Huang, Guoying; Fu, Zhou; Zheng, Yuejie; Wang, Libo; Li, Chengrong; Liu, Lan; Shen, Ying; Yang, Yonghong

    2009-05-01

    To assess the macrolide resistance, phenotype, and genotypic characterization of Streptococcus pyogenes isolated from Chinese children with pharyngitis. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) with nine antibiotics was determined on 188 isolates of S. pyogenes collected from outpatients with pharyngitis in four children's hospitals in different regions of China in 2007. MICs of penicillin, chloramphenicol, cefradine, levofloxacin, macrolide (erythromycin, clarithromycin, azithromycin,), clindamycin, and tetracycline were determined by the microdilution method. The macrolide resistant phenotypes of isolates were determined through a double-disk. The macrolide-resistant genes (mefA, ermB, and ermA) were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Over 95% were resistant to macrolides, while 92.0% were resistant to tetracycline. We also found that all isolates were sensitive to penicillin, chloramphenicol, cefradine, and levofloxacin. Among the 173 erythromycin resistant strains, 171 (98.8%) were assigned to the cMLS phenotype, while the remaining 2 (1.2%) were assigned to the iMLS phenotype. Among the 171 cMLS isolates, 168 isolates (98.2%) had the ermB gene accounting for 98.2%. Meanwhile, 2 iMLS isolates had the ermA gene. Macrolides were highly resistant to ermB positive strains (MIC(90) > 256 microg/ml). Neither the M-phenotype nor the mefA gene was detected. Meanwhile, our studies of multiple centers showed that consumption of macrolides from 2000 to 2006 was very high. The main phenotype is cMLS, and the ermB gene code is the main resistance mechanism against macrolides in S. pyogenes. The high rate of macrolide resistance to S. pyogenes was observed, which may be correlated with the overuse of these antibiotics in China. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Practical Disk Diffusion Method for Detection of Inducible Clindamycin Resistance in Staphylococcus aureus and Coagulase-Negative Staphylococci

    PubMed Central

    Fiebelkorn, K. R.; Crawford, S. A.; McElmeel, M. L.; Jorgensen, J. H.

    2003-01-01

    Resistance to macrolides in staphylococci may be due to active efflux (encoded by msrA) or ribosomal target modification (macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B [MLSB] resistance; usually encoded by ermA or ermC). MLSB resistance is either constitutive or inducible following exposure to a macrolide. Induction tests utilize closely approximated erythromycin and clindamycin disks; the flattening of the clindamycin zone adjacent to the erythromycin disk indicates inducible MLSB resistance. The present study reassessed the reliability of placing erythromycin and clindamycin disks in adjacent positions (26 to 28 mm apart) in a standard disk dispenser, compared to distances of 15 or 20 mm. A group of 130 clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus and 100 isolates of erythromycin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) were examined by disk approximation; all CNS isolates and a subset of S. aureus isolates were examined by PCR for ermA, ermC, and msrA. Of 114 erythromycin-resistant S. aureus isolates, 39 demonstrated constitutive resistance to clindamycin, while 33 showed inducible resistance by disk approximation at all three distances. Only one isolate failed to clearly demonstrate induction at 26 mm. Of 82 erythromycin-resistant CNS isolates that contained ermA or ermC, 57 demonstrated constitutive clindamycin resistance, and 25 demonstrated inducible resistance, at 20 and 26 mm. None of the 42 S. aureus isolates or 18 CNS isolates containing only msrA and none of the erythromycin-susceptible isolates yielded positive disk approximation tests. Simple placement of erythromycin and clindamycin disks at a distance achieved with a standard disk dispenser allowed detection of 97% of S. aureus strains and 100% of CNS strains with inducible MLSB resistance in this study. PMID:14532213

  17. Clindamycin Resistance among Staphylococcus Aureus Isolated at Mbarara Regional Referral Hospital, in South Western Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Mwambi, Bashir; Iramiot, Jacob; Bwanga, Freddie; Nakaye, Marthae; Itabangi, Herbert; Bazira, Joel

    2015-01-01

    Aims The study was conducted to determine the prevalence of Clindamycin (CL) resistance and antimicrobial susceptibility among clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) from Mbarara Regional Referral Hospital (MRRH) in Southwestern Uganda. Study Design Laboratory based cross sectional study. Place and Duration of the Study The study was conducted at the Microbiology department of Mbarara Regional referral hospital between November 2012 and December 2013. Methodology In our study, we recruited 300 S. aureus isolates that were stored in the laboratory and were obtained from different clinical samples. The isolates were tested for antimicrobial susceptibility by phenotypic methods and for the genotypic expression of Macrolide Lincosamide StreptograminB (MLSB) resistance genes (ermA, ermB, ermC, and msrA). The D-test was also performed. Results Phenotypically, a total of 109 (36%) S. aureus isolates were resistant to CL, of which 9 (3%) were constitutively resistant while 100 (33.3%) were inducibly resistant. Genotypicaly, 134/300 (44.7%) isolates possessed at least one of the MLSB resistance genes. 23/300 (7.7%) tested positive for ermB, 98/300 (32.7%) tested positive for the ermC and 43/300 (14.3%) tested positive for the msrA genes with none possessing the ermA gene. Isolates were highly resistant to Sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim, Erythromycin and Oxacillin with moderate resistance to Vancomycin and Imipenem and least resistance to Linezolid Conclusion S. aureus resistance to CL was high in this set up. There was also high resistance to Sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim, Erythromycin and Oxacillin but low resistance to Linezolid. PMID:26046016

  18. Antibiotic resistance genes & susceptibility patterns in staphylococci.

    PubMed

    Duran, Nizami; Ozer, Burcin; Duran, Gulay Gulbol; Onlen, Yusuf; Demir, Cemil

    2012-03-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate the association between the antibiotic susceptibility patterns and the antibiotic resistance genes in staphylococcal isolates obtained from various clinical samples of patients attending a teaching hospital in Hatay, Turkey. A total of 298 staphylococci clinical isolates were subjected to antimicrobial susceptibility testing. The genes implicated in resistance to oxacillin (mecA), gentamicin (aac(6')/aph(2''), aph(3')-IIIa, ant(4')-Ia), erythromycin (ermA, ermB, ermC, and msrA), tetracyclin (tetK, tetM), and penicillin (blaZ) were amplified using multiplex PCR method. Methicillin resistance rate among 139 Staphlococcus aureus isolates was 16.5 and 25.9 per cent of S. aureus carried mecA gene. Of the 159 CoNS isolates, methicillin resistance rate was 18.9 and 29.6 per cent carried mecA gene. Ninety four isolates identified as gentamicin resistant phenotypically, contained at least one of the gentamicin resistance genes [aac(6')/aph(2''), aph(3')-IIIa, ant(4')-Ia], 17 gentamicin-susceptible isolates were found as positive in terms of one or more resistance genes [aac(6')/aph(2''), aph(3')-IIIa, ant(4')-Ia] by multiplex PCR. A total of 165 isolates were resistant to erythromycin, and contained at least one of the erythromycin resistance genes (ermA, ermB, ermC and msrA). Phenotypically, 106 staphylococcal isolates were resistant to tetracycline, 121 isolates carried either tetK or tetM or both resistance genes. The majority of staphylococci tested possessed the blaZ gene (89.9%). The present results showed that the phenotypic antibiotic susceptibility patterns were not similar to those obtained by genotyping done by multiplex PCR. Rapid and reliable methods for antibiotic susceptibility are important to determine the appropriate therapy decisions. Multiplex PCR can be used for confirmation of the results obtained by conventional phenotypic methods, when needed.

  19. Ibuprofen Protects Ventilator-Induced Lung Injury by Downregulating Rho-Kinase Activity in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chien-Huang; Chou, Hsiu-Chu

    2014-01-01

    Background. Ventilator-induced lung injury-(VILI-) induced endothelial permeability is regulated through the Rho-dependent signaling pathway. Ibuprofen inhibits Rho activation in animal models of spinal-cord injury and Alzheimer's disease. The study aims to investigate ibuprofen effects on high tidal volume associated VILI. Methods. Twenty-eight adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized to receive a ventilation strategy with three different interventions for 2 h: (1) a high-volume zero-positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) (HVZP) group; (2) an HVZP + ibuprofen 15 mg/kg group; and (3) an HVZP + ibuprofen 30 mg/kg group. A fourth group without ventilation served as the control group. Rho-kinase activity was determined by ratio of phosphorylated ezrin, radixin, and moesin (p-ERM), substrates of Rho-kinase, to total ERM. VILI was characterized by increased pulmonary protein leak, wet-to-dry weight ratio, cytokines level, and Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF-H1), RhoA activity, p-ERM/total ERM, and p-myosin light chain (MLC) protein expression. Results. Ibuprofen pretreatment significantly reduced the HVZP ventilation-induced increase in pulmonary protein leak, wet-to-dry weight ratio, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid interleukin-6 and RANTES levels, and lung GEF-H1, RhoA activity, p-ERM/total ERM, and p-MLC protein expression. Conclusion. Ibuprofen attenuated high tidal volume induced pulmonary endothelial hyperpermeability. This protective effect was associated with a reduced Rho-kinase activity. PMID:25019086

  20. Surgical Outcome of Idiopathic Epiretinal Membranes with Intraretinal Cystic Spaces

    PubMed Central

    Shiode, Yusuke; Morizane, Yuki; Toshima, Shinji; Kimura, Shuhei; Kumase, Fumiaki; Hosokawa, Mio; Hirano, Masayuki; Doi, Shinichiro; Takahashi, Kosuke; Hosogi, Mika; Fujiwara, Atsushi; Shiraga, Fumio

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the occurrence ratio, localization, and surgical outcomes of intraretinal cystic spaces in idiopathic epiretinal membranes (ERMs). Methods We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 432 eyes of 398 consecutive patients with idiopathic ERM who underwent vitrectomy and ERM peeling from January 2012 to September 2015. We selected cases with intraretinal cystic space prior to surgery, detected by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography. We then evaluated the effects of ERM peeling on intraretinal cystic spaces, best corrected visual acuity, and central retinal thickness at 6 months after surgery. Results Twenty-four eyes (5.5%) showed intraretinal cystic spaces before surgery, present in the inner retinal layer (the inner group) in 9 eyes, in the outer retinal layer (the outer group) in 6 eyes, and in both the inner and the outer retinal layers (the combined group) in 9 eyes. Additionally, 30 eyes with ERM but without any presence of intraretinal cystic space were selected randomly and classified as the no cyst group. At 6 months after surgery, the disappearance rate of cystic spaces was significantly greater for the outer group than for the inner group (83.3% and 11.1%, respectively, P = 0.011). The mean best corrected visual acuity improved significantly after surgery in the inner group, the outer group, and the no cyst group (P < 0.05 for all three groups) but did not improve in the combined group (P = 0.58). The mean central retinal thickness decreased significantly after surgery in the inner group, the combined group, and the no cyst group (P < 0.05). Conclusions Intraretinal cystic spaces were observed in 5.5% of preoperative idiopathic ERM cases. Following surgery, the cystic spaces in the outer retinal layer disappeared at higher rates than those in the inner retinal layer, suggesting that the pathophysiologies of these cystic spaces are different. PMID:27992520

  1. Earmuff restricts progenitor cell potential by attenuating the competence to respond to self-renewal factors

    PubMed Central

    Janssens, Derek H.; Komori, Hideyuki; Grbac, Daniel; Chen, Keng; Koe, Chwee Tat; Wang, Hongyan; Lee, Cheng-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Despite expressing stem cell self-renewal factors, intermediate progenitor cells possess restricted developmental potential, which allows them to give rise exclusively to differentiated progeny rather than stem cell progeny. Failure to restrict the developmental potential can allow intermediate progenitor cells to revert into aberrant stem cells that might contribute to tumorigenesis. Insight into stable restriction of the developmental potential in intermediate progenitor cells could improve our understanding of the development and growth of tumors, but the mechanisms involved remain largely unknown. Intermediate neural progenitors (INPs), generated by type II neural stem cells (neuroblasts) in fly larval brains, provide an in vivo model for investigating the mechanisms that stably restrict the developmental potential of intermediate progenitor cells. Here, we report that the transcriptional repressor protein Earmuff (Erm) functions temporally after Brain tumor (Brat) and Numb to restrict the developmental potential of uncommitted (immature) INPs. Consistently, endogenous Erm is detected in immature INPs but undetectable in INPs. Erm-dependent restriction of the developmental potential in immature INPs leads to attenuated competence to respond to all known neuroblast self-renewal factors in INPs. We also identified that the BAP chromatin-remodeling complex probably functions cooperatively with Erm to restrict the developmental potential of immature INPs. Together, these data led us to conclude that the Erm-BAP-dependent mechanism stably restricts the developmental potential of immature INPs by attenuating their genomic responses to stem cell self-renewal factors. We propose that restriction of developmental potential by the Erm-BAP-dependent mechanism functionally distinguishes intermediate progenitor cells from stem cells, ensuring the generation of differentiated cells and preventing the formation of progenitor cell-derived tumor-initiating stem cells. PMID

  2. Impacts of coexisting antibiotics, antibacterial residues, and heavy metals on the occurrence of erythromycin resistance genes in urban wastewater.

    PubMed

    Gao, Pin; He, Shi; Huang, Shenglin; Li, Kanzhu; Liu, Zhenhong; Xue, Gang; Sun, Weimin

    2015-05-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a global challenge and represents a growing threat on human health worldwide. Wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) are generally considered as hotspots for control and/or dissemination of antibiotic resistance. The role of antibiotics, antibacterial residues, and heavy metals played on the evolution and spread of antibiotic resistance is still not well understood. Here, the occurrence of antibiotics (i.e., macrolides, tetracyclines, sulfonamides, and quinolones), antibacterial residues (i.e., triclosan), as well as heavy metals (i.e., cadmium, chromium, copper, zinc, lead, and nickel) in urban wastewater was investigated. Also, the abundances of erythromycin resistance genes (ERY-ARGs) including ere(A), ere(B), mef(A)/mef(E), erm(A), erm(B), erm(C), and msr(A)/msr(B) genes were screened. A relationship between certain antibiotics, antibacterial residues, and heavy metals and ERY-ARGs was demonstrated. ERY presented significant correlations (0.883 < r < 0.929, P < 0.05) with ere(A), ere(B), and mef(A)/mef(E) genes, while tetracycline exhibited a significant correlation (r = 0.829, P < 0.05) with erm(B) genes. It is noteworthy that triclosan correlated significantly (0.859 < r < 0.956, P < 0.05) with ere(A), ere(B), mef(A)/mef(E), and erm(B) genes. In addition, significantly positive correlations (0.823 < r < 0.871, P < 0.05) were observed between zinc and lead and certain ERY-ARGs (i.e., ere(B), mef(A)/mef(E), erm(B), etc.). Further investigations should be involved to elucidate the co-selection and/or cross-selection mechanisms due to co-existence of these selective factors in urban wastewater.

  3. Antibiotic susceptibility pattern and erythromycin resistance mechanisms in beta-hemolytic group G Streptococcus dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis isolates from central Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lo, Hsueh-Hsia; Nien, Hao-Hsiang; Cheng, Ya-Yu; Su, Fang-Yi

    2015-12-01

    Information concerning antibiotics susceptibilities of beta-hemolytic group G Streptococcus dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis (SDSE) clinical isolates in central Taiwan was limited. Totally, 246 SDSE isolates were collected from mainly five regional hospitals, from February 2007 to August 2011. Disk diffusion method, broth microdilution method, and clindamycin induction test (D test) were respectively performed according to the guidelines of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. Polymerase chain reaction was used to detect the corresponding erythromycin resistance genes. All isolates were susceptible to penicillin, cefotaxime, and vancomycin. The rate of erythromycin resistance was 24.0% (59/246), whereas that of clindamycin resistance was 12.2% (30/246). The resistance rates of isolates from different hospitals varied from 15.0% to 45.5% for erythromycin and from 7.1% to 36.4% for clindamycin. For erythromycin-resistant SDSE isolates, three different phenotypes with resistance to macrolides (M), lincosamides (L), and type B streptogramins (SB) were observed: M (49.2%), constitutive MLSB (cMLSB, 35.6%), and inducible MLSB (iMLSB, 15.3%). All M phenotypic isolates carried mefA. The most prevalent genotypes among cMLSB and iMLSB phenotypic isolates were ermB, followed by ermTR. One isolate with cMLSB phenotype carried both ermB and ermTR, whereas one isolate with iMLSB phenotype carried both ermB and ermC. This is the first trial investigating the antimicrobial susceptibility pattern and erythromycin resistance mechanisms of beta-hemolytic group G SDSE isolates in central Taiwan. The resistance rates for both erythromycin and clindamycin varied significantly among hospitals located in this area and should be monitored continuously in the future. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Effect of various sludge digestion conditions on sulfonamide, macrolide, and tetracycline resistance genes and class I integrons.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yanjun; Wilson, Christopher A; Novak, John T; Riffat, Rumana; Aynur, Sebnem; Murthy, Sudhir; Pruden, Amy

    2011-09-15

    Wastewater treatment processes are of growing interest as a potential means to limit the dissemination of antibiotic resistance. This study examines the response of nine representative antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) encoding resistance to sulfonamide (sulI, sulII), erythromycin (erm(B), erm(F)), and tetracycline (tet(O), tet(W), tet(C), tet(G), tet(X)) to various laboratory-scale sludge digestion processes. The class I integron gene (intI1) was also monitored as an indicator of horizontal gene transfer potential and multiple antibiotic resistance. Mesophilic anaerobic digestion at both 10 and 20 day solids retention times (SRTs) significantly reduced sulI, suII, tet(C), tet(G), and tet(X) with longer SRT exhibiting a greater extent of removal; however, tet(W), erm(B) and erm(F) genes increased relative to the feed. Thermophilic anaerobic digesters operating at 47 °C, 52 °C, and 59 °C performed similarly to each other and provided more effective reduction of erm(B), erm(F), tet(O), and tet(W) compared to mesophilic digestion. However, thermophilic digestion resulted in similar or poorer removal of all other ARGs and intI1. Thermal hydrolysis pretreatment drastically reduced all ARGs, but they generally rebounded during subsequent anaerobic and aerobic digestion treatments. To gain insight into potential mechanisms driving ARG behavior in the digesters, the dominant bacterial communities were compared by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. The overall results suggest that bacterial community composition of the sludge digestion process, as controlled by the physical operating characteristics, drives the distribution of ARGs present in the produced biosolids, more so than the influent ARG composition.

  5. The prevalence and incidence of epiretinal membranes in eyes with inactive extramacular CMV retinitis.

    PubMed

    Kozak, Igor; Vaidya, Vijay; Van Natta, Mark L; Pak, Jeong W; May, K Patrick; Thorne, Jennifer E

    2014-06-12

    To determine the prevalence and incidence of epiretinal membranes (ERM) in eyes with inactive extramacular cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis in patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). A case-control report from a longitudinal multicenter observational study by the Studies of the Ocular Complications of AIDS (SOCA) Research Group. A total of 357 eyes of 270 patients with inactive CMV retinitis and 1084 eyes of 552 patients with no ocular opportunistic infection (OOI) were studied. Stereoscopic views of the posterior pole from fundus photographs were assessed at baseline and year 5 visits for the presence of macular ERM. Generalized estimating equations (GEE) logistic regression was used to compare the prevalence and 5-year incidence of ERM in eyes with and without CMV retinitis at enrollment. Crude and adjusted logistic regression was performed adjusting for possible confounders. Main outcome measures included the prevalence, incidence, estimated prevalence, and incidence odds ratios. The prevalence of ERM at enrollment was 14.8% (53/357) in eyes with CMV retinitis versus 1.8% (19/1084) in eyes with no OOI. The incidence of ERM at 5 years was 18.6% (16/86) in eyes with CMV retinitis versus 2.4% (6/253) in eyes with no OOI. The crude odds ratio (OR) (95% confidence interval, CI) for prevalence was 9.8 (5.5-17.5) (P < 0.01). The crude OR (95% CI) for incidence was 9.4 (3.2-27.9) (P < 0.01). A history of extramacular CMV retinitis is associated with increased prevalence and incidence of ERM formation compared to what is seen in eyes without ocular opportunistic infections in AIDS patients. Copyright 2014 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  6. Inducible and Acquired Clarithromycin Resistance in the Mycobacterium abscessus Complex

    PubMed Central

    Rubio, Marc; March, Francesca; Garrigó, Montserrat; Moreno, Carmen; Español, Montserrat; Coll, Pere

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Clarithromycin was considered the cornerstone for the treatment of Mycobacterium abscessus complex infections. Genetic resistance mechanisms have been described and many experts propose amikacin as an alternative. Nevertheless, clarithromycin has several advantages; therefore, it is necessary to identify the non-functional erm(41) allele to determine the most suitable treatment. The aims of this study were to characterize the molecular mechanisms of clarithromycin resistance in a collection of Mycobacterium abscessus complex isolates and to verify the relationship between these mechanisms and the antibiogram. Materials and Methods Clinical isolates of M. abscessus complex (n = 22) from 16 patients were identified using four housekeeping genes (rpoB, secA1, sodA and hsp65), and their genetic resistance was characterized by studying erm(41) and rrl genes. Nine strains were recovered from the clinical isolates and subjected to E-test and microdilution clarithromycin susceptibility tests, with readings at 3, 7 and 14 days. Results We classified 11/16 (68.8%) M. abscessus subsp. abscessus, 4/16 (25.0%) M. abscessus subsp. bolletii, and 1/16 (6.3%) M. abscessus subsp. massiliense. T28 erm(41) allele was observed in 8 Mycobacterium abscessus subps. abscessus and 3 Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. bolletii. One strain of M. abscessus subsp. bolletii had an erm(41) gene truncated and was susceptible to clarithromycin. No mutations were observed in rrl gene first isolates. In three patients, follow-up of initial rrl wild-type strains showed acquired resistance. Conclusions Most clinical isolates of M. abscessus complex had inducible resistance to clarithromycin and total absence of constitutive resistance. Our findings showed that the acquisition of resistance mutations in rrl gene was associated with functional and non-functional erm(41) gene. Caution is needed when using erm(41) sequencing alone to identify M. abscessus subspecies. This study reports an acquired

  7. Visualizing Macular Structures During Membrane Peeling Surgery With an Intraoperative Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography Device.

    PubMed

    Leisser, Christoph; Hackl, Christoph; Hirnschall, Nino; Luft, Nikolaus; Döller, Birgit; Draschl, Petra; Rigal, Karl; Findl, Oliver

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the quality of intraoperative visualization of the posterior hyaloid, epiretinal membrane (ERM), inner limiting membrane (ILM), and hyporeflective subfoveal zone with a commercially available, microscope-integrated spectral-domain OCT setup (mi-SD-OCT) (Rescan 700; Carl Zeiss Meditec AG, Germany). Twenty patients prospectively scheduled for pars plana vitrectomy with membrane peeling due to an idiopathic ERM were included. Standard 23-gauge, three-port pars plana vitrectomy with membrane peeling and staining of the ERM with a trypan blue-based chromovitrectomy dye was performed in all cases. Intraoperative SD-OCT was performed before and after peeling and visualization of the posterior hyaloid, ERM, ILM, and presence of subfoveal hyporeflective zones were examined. OCT follow-ups were performed 2 days and 3 months after surgery. The study was approved by the local ethics committee of the city of Vienna. Successful intraoperative visualization of ERM by mi-SD-OCT was possible in all cases. The posterior hyaloid and ILM could not be seen in the mi-SD-OCT scans, whereas an intraoperative subfoveal hyporeflective zone presented in 35% of cases. In 12.5% an independent subfoveal hyporeflective zone presented postoperatively. Visual acuity improved in 93.8% of patients after surgery. mi-SD-OCT appears to be a valuable tool for intraoperative visualization of the ERM and offers immediate visualization of retinal anatomy during peeling. Therefore, it adds to the understanding of intraoperative traumatic changes due to the peeling procedure. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  8. Statin medication in patients with epiretinal membrane is associated with low intravitreal EPO, TGF-beta-1, and VEGF levels

    PubMed Central

    Tuuminen, Raimo; Loukovaara, Sirpa

    2016-01-01

    Background In eyes with idiopathic epiretinal membrane (iERM), the intravitreal growth factor and cytokine levels may associate with postvitrectomy outcomes. Here, we have analyzed the perioperative intravitreal protein levels of potent vasoactive, proinflammatory, and extracellular matrix-remodeling factors in iERM eyes and evaluated the postvitrectomy outcomes. Methods This was an institutional, observational study. Eyes operated on for iERM (n=26) were analyzed according to the use of statin medication. Vitreous samples were subjected to protein measurements of angiopoietin-1 and -2, erythropoietin, transforming growth factor-β1, and vascular endothelial growth factor by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -9 by gelatin zymography. One-month visual outcomes and 1-year revitrectomy rates were recorded. Results In iERM eyes of patients taking statins, intravitreal levels of erythropoietin (mean ± standard deviation, 10.8±4.9 vs 82.9±119.5 mIU/mg, P=0.003), transforming growth factor-β1 (2.3±4.7 vs 15.8±16.3 pg/mg, P=0.035), and vascular endothelial growth factor (5.5±9.9 vs 236.6±491.6 pg/mg, P=0.006) were lower than in nonstatin-treated patients. At 1-month, visual gain did not significantly differ between iERM eyes of patients with statins and those without (improvement 0.27±0.20 vs 0.16±0.38 logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution units, P=0.118). Conclusion Systemic statin therapy might have a favorable effect on intravitreal factors involved in vascular permeability, inflammation, and fibroproliferation in aging human iERM eyes. PMID:27284236

  9. A Novel Erythromycin Resistance Plasmid from Bacillus Sp. Strain HS24, Isolated from the Marine Sponge Haliclona Simulans

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Dara; Morrissey, John P.; Adams, Claire; Dobson, Alan D. W.; O’Gara, Fergal

    2014-01-01

    A better understanding of the origin and natural reservoirs of resistance determinants is fundamental to efficiently tackle antibiotic resistance. This paper reports the identification of a novel 5.8 kb erythromycin resistance plasmid, from Bacillus sp. HS24 isolated from the marine sponge Haliclona simulans. pBHS24B has a mosaic structure and carries the erythromycin resistance gene erm(T). This is the first report of an erythromycin resistance plasmid from a sponge associated bacteria and of the Erm(T) determinant in the genus Bacillus. PMID:25548909

  10. Serotypes and antibiotic resistance in Group B streptococcus isolated from patients at the Maternity Hospital, Kuwait.

    PubMed

    Boswihi, Samar S; Udo, Edet E; Al-Sweih, Noura

    2012-01-01

    A total of 143 group B streptococcus (GBS) isolates collected from mothers at the Maternity Hospital in Kuwait were investigated for their serotypes and antibiotic resistance, and screened by PCR for the carriage of genes for resistance to tetracycline (tetk, tetM, tetL, tetO), erythromycin (ermA, ermB, ermC, ermTR, ermM, mefA, mefE, msrA) and aminoglycosides (aph3, ant4, ant6). All isolates were serotyped using a latex agglutination test. Most of the isolates belonged to serotypes V (38.5 %), III (20.9 %), Ia (7.7 %) and II (11.2 %). Sixteen isolates (11.2 %) were nontypable. All isolates were susceptible to penicillin, ampicillin and cefotaxime (MICs 0.016-0.094 µg ml(-1)) but were resistant to trimethoprim (92.3 %), tetracycline (89.5 %), minocycline (89.5 %), high-level kanamycin (76.9 %), chloramphenicol (30.0 %), erythromycin (12.6 %), clindamycin (7.0 %), high-level streptomycin (3.5 %) and ciprofloxacin (0.7 %). The tetracycline-resistant isolates contained tetM (94.5 %), tetO (3.9 %), tetL (1.6 %) and tetK (0.8 %). The erythromycin-resistant isolates contained ermB (61.1 %), ermTR (38.9 %), ermA (5.5 %), mefA (5.5 %) and mefE (11 %). All high-level kanamycin-resistant isolates contained aph3. One of the high-level streptomycin-resistant isolates contained ant6. Partial DNA sequencing of aph3 revealed sequences with 99 % similarity to aph3 found in Enterococcus faecium, Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis, suggesting that the GBS isolates could have acquired aph3 from other Gram-positive cocci. The high proportion of isolates with resistance to tetracycline, high-level kanamycin and trimethoprim, and the increase in the prevalence of erythromycin resistance, represents an emerging public health concern that needs further surveillance.

  11. Prevalence of Resistance Mechanisms against Macrolides and Lincosamides in Methicillin-Resistant Coagulase-Negative Staphylococci in the Czech Republic and Occurrence of an Undefined Mechanism of Resistance to Lincosamides

    PubMed Central

    Novotna, Gabriela; Adamkova, Václava; Janata, Jiri; Melter, Oto; Spizek, Jaroslav

    2005-01-01

    High occurrence of the non-macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B resistance genes msrA (53%) and linA/linA′ (30%) was found among 98 methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci additionally resistant to macrolides and/or lincosamides. The gene msrA predominated in Staphylococcus haemolyticus (43 of 62 isolates). In Staphylococcus epidermidis, it was present in 7 of 27 isolates. A novel mechanism of resistance to lincosamides appears to be present in 10 genetically related isolates of S. haemolyticus in the absence of ermA, ermC, msrA, and linA/linA′. PMID:16048992

  12. Prevalence of resistance mechanisms against macrolides and lincosamides in methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci in the Czech Republic and occurrence of an undefined mechanism of resistance to lincosamides.

    PubMed

    Novotna, Gabriela; Adamkova, Václava; Janata, Jiri; Melter, Oto; Spizek, Jaroslav

    2005-08-01

    High occurrence of the non-macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B resistance genes msrA (53%) and linA/linA' (30%) was found among 98 methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci additionally resistant to macrolides and/or lincosamides. The gene msrA predominated in Staphylococcus haemolyticus (43 of 62 isolates). In Staphylococcus epidermidis, it was present in 7 of 27 isolates. A novel mechanism of resistance to lincosamides appears to be present in 10 genetically related isolates of S. haemolyticus in the absence of ermA, ermC, msrA, and linA/linA'.

  13. Phage ϕC2 Mediates Transduction of Tn6215, Encoding Erythromycin Resistance, between Clostridium difficile Strains

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Shan; Hussain, Haitham; Chang, Barbara J.; Emmett, Warren; Riley, Thomas V.; Mullany, Peter

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT In this work, we show that Clostridium difficile phage ϕC2 transduces erm(B), which confers erythromycin resistance, from a donor to a recipient strain at a frequency of 10−6 per PFU. The transductants were lysogenic for ϕC2 and contained the erm(B) gene in a novel transposon, Tn6215. This element is 13,008 bp in length and contains 17 putative open reading frames (ORFs). It could also be transferred at a lower frequency by filter mating. PMID:24255122

  14. Isolation of Genes Involved in Rac Induced Invasion and Metastasis of Breast Carcinoma Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-08-01

    IQGAP Par-6 Dia - tLC LIM-I M- MLC- a-catenin kinase #phosphAr2/ z-catenin Par- Arp2/3 P-catenin aPKCs MLC-P cofilin adducin ERM NHE1 profilin E...a include MLC, the myosin-binding subunit of MLC sixth ROK substrate, namely NHE1 , is a ubiquitous phosphatase, LIM-kinase, adducin, the ERM (ezrin...Na÷/H’ exchange protein which potentiates stress fi- radixin/moesin) family of proteins, and a Na÷/IHI ex- ber formation [103]. change protein ( NHE1

  15. Integrierte Segmentierung und Trajektorienberechnung mittels diffeomorpher Registrierung in räumlich-zeitlichen CT-Bildfolgen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt-Richberg, Alexander; Ehrhardt, Jan; Werner, René; Handels, Heinz

    Verfahren zur integrierten Segmentierung und Registrierung von 4D-Bilddaten ermöglichen die Berücksichtigung der gegenseitigen Abhängigkeiten beider Komponenten. Bestehende Ansätze konzentrieren sich dabei meist auf die Betrachtung zweier 3D-Bilder und lassen sich nicht direkt auf vollständige Bildfolgen übertragen. In dieser Arbeit wird ein Verfahren vorgestellt, in dem ein diffeomorpher Registrierungsansatz verwendet wird, um eine integrierte Berechnung von Segmentierungen und 3D-Voxeltrajektorien in 4D-Daten zu ermöglichen.

  16. Implementation of an enterprise risk-management program in a community teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Behamdouni, Genefer; Millar, Kathy

    2010-01-01

    As the complexity of healthcare and expectations of comprehensive and transparent public accountability heighten, so too must a hospital's approach to assessing and managing risk. Over a period of two years, the area of patient safety and risk at our hospital has moved from a traditional focus on clinical risk management to an enterprise-wide risk management approach. One of the first community hospitals to embrace enterprise risk management (ERM), St. Joseph's Health Centre, in Toronto, Ontario, has seen early benefits in this transformational journey. This article discusses our approach to the development of an ERM program, tools used and lessons learned.

  17. [The rare genes related to resistance to macrolide-lincosamide and streptogramin B group antibiotics among coagulase-negative staphylococci].

    PubMed

    Sakar, Havva; Mumcuoğlu, Ipek; Aksu, Neriman; Karahan, Zeynep Ceren; Kurşun, Senol; Kuştimur, Semra

    2012-04-01

    Macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B (MLSB) group antibiotics are recommended as first choice in the treatment of staphylococcal infections. All of those drugs bind to the 50S subunit of bacterial ribosomes, thus cross-resistance is a major concern in this group of drugs. The mechanisms associated to resistance are (a) ribosomal methylation due to the methylases encoded by erm genes, (b) active drug efflux due to msrA, msrB, vga, vgb gene activity, (c) enzymatic inactivation of the drug due to the activity of linA, vat, vatB genes. While the most common resistance genes are ermA, ermB, ermC, msrA and msrB genes; linA, vga, vgb, vat and vatB genes have also been found in some studies. In this study it was aimed to investigate the presence of the rare MLSB resistance genes and their coexistence with erm and msr genes in 454 clinical isolates of coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS). Of them 46.5% (n= 211) were S.hominis, 30.8% (n= 140) were S.epidermidis, 12.1% (n= 55) were S.haemolyticus, 3.5% (n= 16) were S.warnerii and 7% (n= 32) were the other coagulase-negative staphylococcal species. Resistance phenotypes were determined by using D-test method according to the recommendation of Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI). With the D-test 107 (23.6%) strains were determined as M phenotype (resistant to erythromycin and inducible clindamycin resistance was not detected), 92 (20.3%) were iMLSB phenotype (inducible clindamycin resistance was detected by the D-test) and 110 (24.2%) were cMLSB phenotype (constitutive erythromycin and clindamycin resistance was detected). linA, vga, vgb, vat, vatB, ermA, ermB, ermC, msrA, msrB genes were investigated by polymerase chain reaction in all strains showing iMLSB (n= 92) and cMLSB (n= 110) phenotypes and 46 randomly selected strains among 107 strains exhibiting the M phenotype. linA gene was found in 91 (20%) strains as single gene or in combination with erm or msr genes, and vga gene was found in 19 (4.2%) strains

  18. Automated Information Systems Plan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-10-01

    XNS-TCP/IP = Xerox Network Service-Transmission Control Protocol/ Internet Protocol 35 APPENDIX A SUMMARY OF USER SURVEY RESPONSES This appendix is...COVERED 14 DATE OF REPORT (Year, Month, Day) IS PAGE COUNT Fi FROM _____ _____ October 1989 40 16 53PPEMEN-AR’Y NOTATON 7 COSA -I CODES 13 SUBECT rERMS

  19. Synthesis and structure-activity relationships of novel lincomycin derivatives. Part 4: synthesis of novel lincomycin analogs modified at the 6- and 7-positions and their potent antibacterial activities.

    PubMed

    Wakiyama, Yoshinari; Kumura, Ko; Umemura, Eijiro; Ueda, Kazutaka; Watanabe, Takashi; Yamada, Keiko; Okutomi, Takafumi; Ajito, Keiichi

    2017-07-01

    To modify lincomycin (LCM) at the C-6 and the C-7 positions, we firstly prepared various substituted proline intermediates (7, 11-15 and 17). These proline intermediates were coupled with methyl 1-thio-α-lincosamide and tetrakis-O-trimethylsilylation followed by selective deprotection of the TMS group at the 7-position gave a wide variety of key intermediates (23-27, 47 and 50). Then, we synthesized a variety of novel LCM analogs modified at the 7-position in application of the Mitsunobu reaction, an SN2 reaction, and a Pd-catalyzed cross-coupling reaction. Compounds 34 and 35 (1'-NH derivatives) exhibited enhanced antibacterial activities against resistant pathogens with erm gene compared with the corresponding 1'-N-methyl derivatives (3 and 37). On the basis of reported SAR, we modified the 4'-position of LCM derivatives possessing a 5-(2-nitrophenyl)-1,3,4-thiadiazol-2-yl group at the C-7 position. Compound 56 showed significantly potent antibacterial activities against S. pneumoniae and S. pyogenes with erm gene, and its activities against S. pneumoniae with erm gene were improved compared with those of 34 and 57. Although we synthesized novel analogs by transformation of a C-7 substituent focusing on the 1'-demethyl framework to prepare very potent analogs 73 and 75, it was impossible to generate novel derivatives exhibiting stronger antibacterial activities against S. pneumoniae with erm gene compared with 56.

  20. Resistance to macrolides in Streptococcus pyogenes in France in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Bingen, E; Fitoussi, F; Doit, C; Cohen, R; Tanna, A; George, R; Loukil, C; Brahimi, N; Le Thomas, I; Deforche, D

    2000-06-01

    A total of 1,500 recent throat isolates of Streptococcus pyogenes collected between 1996 and 1999 from children throughout France were tested for their susceptibility to erythromycin, azithromycin, josamycin, clindamycin, and streptogramin B. The erythromycin-resistant isolates were further studied for their genetic mechanism of resistance, by means of PCR. The clonality of these strains was also investigated by means of serotyping and ribotyping. In all, 6.2% of the strains were erythromycin resistant, and 3.4 and 2.8% expressed the constitutive MLS(B) and M resistance phenotypes and harbored the ermB and mefA genes, respectively; ermTR was recovered from one isolate which also harbored the ermB gene. Ten serotypes and 8 ribotypes were identified, but we identified 17 strains by combining serotyping with ribotyping. Among the eight ribotypes, the mefA gene was recovered from six clusters, one being predominant, while the ermB gene was recovered from four clusters, of which two were predominant.

  1. Antibiotic resistant enterococci and staphylococci isolated from flies collected near confined poultry feeding operations.

    PubMed

    Graham, Jay P; Price, Lance B; Evans, Sean L; Graczyk, Thaddeus K; Silbergeld, Ellen K

    2009-04-01

    Use of antibiotics as feed additives in poultry production has been linked to the presence of antibiotic resistant bacteria in farm workers, consumer poultry products and the environs of confined poultry operations. There are concerns that these resistant bacteria may be transferred to communities near these operations; however, environmental pathways of exposure are not well documented. We assessed the prevalence of antibiotic resistant enterococci and staphylococci in stored poultry litter and flies collected near broiler chicken houses. Drug resistant enterococci and staphylococci were isolated from flies caught near confined poultry feeding operations in the summer of 2006. Susceptibility testing was conducted on isolates using antibiotics selected on the basis of their importance to human medicine and use in poultry production. Resistant isolates were then screened for genetic determinants of antibiotic resistance. A total of 142 enterococcal isolates and 144 staphylococcal isolates from both fly and poultry litter samples were identified. Resistance genes erm(B), erm(A), msr(C), msr(A/B) and mobile genetic elements associated with the conjugative transposon Tn916, were found in isolates recovered from both poultry litter and flies. Erm(B) was the most common resistance gene in enterococci, while erm(A) was the most common in staphylococci. We report that flies collected near broiler poultry operations may be involved in the spread of drug resistant bacteria from these operations and may increase the potential for human exposure to drug resistant bacteria.

  2. Multiple independent emergence of biotype 2 Yersinia ruckeri in the United States and Europe

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Biotype 2 (BT2) variants of the bacterium Yersinia ruckeri are an emerging disease problem in US and European salmonid aquaculture. The emergence of this biotype has been associated with an increased frequency of enteric redmouth disease (ERM) outbreaks in previously vaccinated salmonid fish. We use...

  3. Temporal and pathogen-load dependent changes in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) immune response traits following challenge with biotype 2 Yersinia ruckeri

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rainbow trout infected with Yersinia ruckeri, the causative agent of enteric redmouth disease (ERM), produce a pro-inflammatory and acute-phase response attributed in part to the innate recognition of bacterial-produced flagellin. Recently, variants of Yersinia ruckeri have been identified that lac...

  4. Checklist Manifesto for Electronic Resources: Getting Ready for the Fiscal Year and Beyond

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    England, Lenore; Fu, Li; Miller, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Organization of electronic resources workflow is critical in the increasingly complicated and complex world of library management. A simple organizational tool that can be readily applied to electronic resources management (ERM) is the use of checklists. Based on the principles discussed in The Checklist Manifesto: How to Get Things Right, the…

  5. Teaching Electronic Records Management in the Archival Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Electronic records management has been incorporated into the archival curriculum in North America since the 1990s. This study reported in this paper provides a systematic analysis of the content of electronic records management (ERM) courses currently taught in archival education programs. Through the analysis of course combinations and their…

  6. Transport of tylosin and tylosin-resistance genes in subsurface drainage water from manured fields

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Animal agriculture appears to contribute to the spread of antibiotic resistance genes, but few studies have quantified gene transport in agricultural fields. The transport of tylosin, tylosin-resistance genes (erm B, F, A) and tylosin-resistant Enterococcus were measured in tile drainage water from ...

  7. Fate of antimicrobials and antimicrobial resistance genes in simulated swine manure storage

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The behavior of three antibiotics (bacitracin, chlortetracycline, and tylosin) and two classes of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs), tet and erm, were monitored in swine manure slurry under anaerobic conditions. First-order decay rates were determined for each antibiotic with half-lives ranging fr...

  8. Messtechnik

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burg, Heinz; Moser, Andreas; Steffan, Hermann

    Mit der allgemeinen Verringerung der Kosten elektronischer Bauteile sind auch Messgeräte in Preiskategorien gerutscht, die es dem Sachverständigen ermöglichen, sich solche Messgeräte anzuschaffen. Das bringt viele Vorteile mit sich, denn es ist jetzt leicht möglich geworden, auch komplizierte Fahrmanöver nachzufahren und messtechnisch zu erfassen.

  9. Correlation of agar dilution and VITEK2 system for detection of resistance to macrolides, lincosamides and pristinamycin among Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis: association with genotypes.

    PubMed

    Bémer, P; Juvin, M-E; Corvec, S; Ros, A; Drugeon, H

    2005-08-01

    The performance of the VITEK2 system was evaluated against the agar dilution reference procedure for testing susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis to macrolides, lincosamides and streptogramins (MLS). Eighty clinical isolates were selected according to their resistance phenotype and genotype. Results for erythromycin and clindamycin showed 100% agreement; results for lincomycin showed agreement of 78%, with one very major error and 17 minor errors; and results for pristinamycin showed agreement of 46%, with one major error and 43 minor errors. Most isolates resistant to lincomycin and streptogramin A (L SgAr phenotype) were falsely susceptible to lincomycin, and intermediately-resistant or resistant to pristinamycin, with the VITEK2 system. No resistance gene was detected. Most (80%) isolates resistant constitutively to MLS (MLS(r)BC phenotype) were falsely intermediately-resistant to pristinamycin with the VITEK2 system. The erm(A) gene was more common than erm(C) in MLS(r)BC strains. Resistance to pristinamycin alone (SgA SgB PTr phenotype), or associated with either lincomycin resistance (L SgA SgB PTr phenotype) or constitutive MLS(B) resistance (MLS(BC) SgA PTr phenotype), was well-characterised without discordant results. Resistance to pristinamycin was always associated with resistance to streptogramin A, encoded by the vga(A), vga(B), vgb(A) and vat(A) genes in association with the erm(A) or erm(C) genes.

  10. Prostate embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma in adults: Case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Ciammella, Patrizia; Galeandro, Maria; D’Abbiero, Nunziata; Palmieri, Tamara; Donini, Elisa; Iotti, Cinzia

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Prostate embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (ERMS) is a common tumour in infants and children, with a median occurrence age of 5 years, but it is rare in adults. It is characterized by a high degree of malignancy, both local rapid growth with formation of large pelvic masses, often leading to renal failure due to urethral obstruction, and systemic spread, commonly to the lungs, liver and bone. Several therapeutic approaches have been employed in the effort to treat prostate ERMS, but all of them have failed to gain a significant survival benefit in adult patients. Case report We report on a case of a stage IV prostate ERMS, approached with combined-modality treatment, with the administration of 5 courses of doxorubicin, ifosfamide and 2-mercaptoethane sulfonate sodium (mesna), and, subsequent radiotherapy to the prostatic bed (60 Gy/30 fxs). The patient remained free of progression of disease for about 1 year to finally experience a systemic relapse with multiple lung metastases and pleural effusion. The patient died for metastatic disease 27 months following the initial diagnosis. Conclusion While it remains questionable which therapeutic approach for prostate ERMS in adults is the most appropriate, our report demonstrates that a chemo-radiation combined treatment can control the prostate disease, reducing the symptoms and improving the quality of life of these patients, for the most part destined to die for systemic progression of disease. PMID:24416569

  11. Draft Genome Sequences of the Two Unrelated Macrolide-Resistant Corynebacterium argentoratense Strains CNM 463/05 and CNM 601/08, Isolated from Patients in the University Hospital of León, Spain

    PubMed Central

    Soriano, Francisco; Acedo, Alberto; Hernandez, Marta; Tauch, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Corynebacterium argentoratense has been associated mainly with infections in the human respiratory tract. Genome sequencing of two unrelated clinical macrolide-resistant strains, CNM 463/05 and CNM 601/08, revealed the presence of the antibiotic resistance gene erm(X) allocated to a specific genomic region with 100% similarity to the widely distributed transposable element Tn5432. PMID:26159536

  12. Fate of antimicrobials and antimicrobial resistance genes in simulated swine manure storage.

    PubMed

    Joy, Stacey R; Li, Xu; Snow, Daniel D; Gilley, John E; Woodbury, Bryan; Bartelt-Hunt, Shannon L

    2014-05-15

    The behavior of three antibiotics (bacitracin, chlortetracycline, and tylosin) and two classes of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs), tet and erm, were monitored in swine manure slurry under anaerobic conditions. First-order decay rates were determined for each antibiotic with half-lives ranging from 1 day (chlortetracycline) to 10 days (tylosin). ARGs were monitored in the swine manure slurry, and losses of approximately 1 to 3 orders of magnitude in relative abundance were observed during the 40 day storage period. First-order degradation profiles were observed for chlortetracycline and its corresponding resistance genes, tet(X) and tet(Q). Tylosin was degraded to approximately 10% of the starting concentration by day 40; however, the relative abundance of erm(B) remained at 50-60% of the initial relative abundance while the relative abundance of erm(F) decreased by 80-90%, consistent with tylosin. These results indicate that tet resistance genes respond primarily to chlortetracycline antimicrobials, and may be lost when the parent tetracycline compound is degraded. In contrast, erm(B) resistance gene may respond to a range of antimicrobials in animal manure, and may persist despite losses of tylosin.

  13. Somewhere over the Verde Rainbow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekart, Donna F.

    2008-01-01

    When the electronic resource management system (ERM) at Kansas State University Libraries suffered a horrible data loss, the "contract db" presented a challenge for the librarians responsible for electronic resources. It was a decent data repository, but it had no ability to manage the tangled process of licensing, acquiring, activating,…

  14. Checklist Manifesto for Electronic Resources: Getting Ready for the Fiscal Year and Beyond

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    England, Lenore; Fu, Li; Miller, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Organization of electronic resources workflow is critical in the increasingly complicated and complex world of library management. A simple organizational tool that can be readily applied to electronic resources management (ERM) is the use of checklists. Based on the principles discussed in The Checklist Manifesto: How to Get Things Right, the…

  15. A comparison of sediment quality guidelines for toxicity assessment in the Sunderban wetlands (Bay of Bengal, India).

    PubMed

    Binelli, Andrea; Sarkar, Santosh Kumar; Chatterjee, Mousumi; Riva, Consuelo; Parolini, Marco; Bhattacharya, Bhaskar deb; Bhattacharya, Asok Kumar; Satpathy, Kamala Kanta

    2008-10-01

    The aim of this paper was to obtain the first screening ecotoxicological risk evaluation in the Sunderban wetlands, the largest prograding delta in the estuarine phase of the River Ganges. The characterization of exposure was conducted by means of an extensive survey of several persistent organic pollutants (PAHs, PCBs, DDTs, PBDEs, HCHs, HCB) measured in seven core sediments from the Sunderban wetlands, obtaining a dataset with more than 2200 analyses. The pollutant effects were assessed by the use of three different sediment quality guidelines (SQGs) previously developed in the literature to evaluate toxicity induced in sediment-dwelling organisms. The three different approaches chosen for risk assessment of the Sunderban were the consensus SQGs obtained by TEC (threshold effect concentration), PEC (probable effect concentration) and EEC (extreme effect concentration), the threshold/probable effect level (TEL/PEL) approach and, finally, the ERL-ERM guidelines, including the m-ERM-Q (mean ERM quotient). The evaluation of the toxicity induced by a mixture of the target pollutants indicated the importance of gamma-HCH contamination in the Sunderban sediments despite the very low concentrations measured in core sediments. A different sensitivity for toxicity assessment due to quality guidelines was obtained, as the consensus SQGs based on TEC were less conservative and protective than the TEL and ERL approaches, while the use of m-ERM-Q seems to be the most powerful tool to predict the toxicity related to a contaminant mixture.

  16. 78 FR 18855 - World Trade Center Health Program Eligibility Requirements for Shanksville, Pennsylvania and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-28

    ... Salvation Army personnel provided food and water, and civilian and military groups collaborated to address... civilian contractor. The Administrator's review of the available literature found that contamination from... contracted by United Airlines to document soil and water quality at the site. ERM compared the...

  17. Observations on continuously growing roots of the sloth and the K14-Eda transgenic mice indicate that epithelial stem cells can give rise to both the ameloblast and root epithelium cell lineage creating distinct tooth patterns.

    PubMed

    Tummers, Mark; Thesleff, Irma

    2008-01-01

    Root development is traditionally associated with the formation of Hertwig's epithelial root sheath (HERS), whose fragments give rise to the epithelial cell rests of Malassez (ERM). The HERS is formed by depletion of the core of stellate reticulum cells, the putative stem cells, in the cervical loop, leaving only a double layer of the basal epithelium with limited growth capacity. The continuously growing incisor of the rodent is subdivided into a crown analog half on the labial side, with a cervical loop containing a large core of stellate reticulum, and its progeny gives rise to enamel producing. The lingual side is known as the root analog and gives rise to ERM. We show that the lingual cervical loop contains a small core of stellate reticulum cells and suggest that it acts as a functional stem cell niche. Similarly we show that continuously growing roots represented by the sloth molar and K14-Eda transgenic incisor maintain a cervical loop with a small core of stellate reticulum cells around the entire circumference of the tooth and do not form a HERS, and still give rise to ERM. We propose that HERS is not a necessary structure to initiate root formation. Moreover, we conclude that crown vs. root formation, i.e. the production of enamel vs. cementum, and the differentiation of the epithelial cells into ameloblasts vs. ERM, can be regulated independently from the regulation of stem cell maintenance. This developmental flexibility may underlie the developmental and evolutionary diversity in tooth patterning.

  18. Negotiating with the North Vietnamese: A Military Perspective

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-06-06

    advancing toward national reunification and socialism . With regard to etruggle, we otand for Joint political end ermed etruggle, that Is to say, the...fighting. While nego- tiating, we will continue fighting the enemy more viqoroualy. It is poaaible that the North conducta nagatiatians while the South

  19. Meeting the Challenges of Enterprise Risk Management in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattie, John

    2007-01-01

    In the summer of 2007, the Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges (AGB) and the National Association of College and University Business Officers (NACUBO) held a summit on enterprise risk management (ERM) in Washington DC with senior officers and trustees from several leading colleges and universities. Approximately 40…

  20. A consolidated environmental monitoring plan for Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    SciTech Connect

    Ebinger, M.H.; Hansen, W.R.

    1997-04-01

    The US Army operates facilities in Edgewood and Aberdeen under several licenses from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Compliance with each license is time consuming and could potentially result in duplicated efforts to demonstrate compliance with existing environmental regulations. The goal of the ERM plan is to provide the sampling necessary to ensure that operations at Edgewood and Aberdeen are within applicable regulatory guidelines and to provide a means of ensuring that adverse effects to the environment are minimized. Existing sampling plans and environmental data generated from those plans are briefly reviewed as part of the development of the present ERM plan. The new ERM plan was designed to provide data that can be used for assessing risks to the environment and to humans using Aberdeen and Edgewood areas. Existing sampling is modified and new sampling is proposed based on the results of the long-term DU fate study. In that study, different environmental pathways were identified that would show transport of DU at Aberdeen. Those pathways would also be impacted by other radioactive constituents from Aberdeen and Edgewood areas. The ERM plan presented in this document includes sampling from Edgewood and Aberdeen facilities. The main radioactive constituents of concern at Edgewood are C, P, N, S, H, I, Co, Cs, Ca, Sr and U that are used in radiolabeling different compounds and tracers for different reactions and syntheses. Air and water sampling are the thrust of efforts at the Edgewood area.

  1. mef(A) is the predominant macrolide resistance determinant in Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus pyogenes in Germany.

    PubMed

    Bley, Christine; van der Linden, Mark; Reinert, Ralf René

    2011-05-01

    In this study, macrolide-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus pyogenes isolates from Germany were carefully characterised by susceptibility testing, phenotyping, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequencing of macrolides resistance genes, and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Of 2045 S. pneumoniae and 352 S. pyogenes isolates, 437 (21.4%) and 29 (8.2%), respectively, were found to be macrolide-resistant. Amongst the S. pneumoniae isolates, the most prevalent resistance marker was mef(A) (57.7%) followed by erm(B) (27.0%) and mef(E) (11.2%). Of note, the dual resistance mechanism mef(E)+erm(B) was found in a relatively high proportion (4.1%) of pneumococcal isolates. Amongst the S. pyogenes isolates, 31.0% carried mef(A), 34.5% erm(B) and 13.8% erm(A). Dissemination of a single clone [mef(A)-positive England(14)-9] has significantly contributed to the emergence of macrolide resistance amongst pneumococci in Germany.

  2. A screening model for depleted uranium testing using environmental radiation monitoring data

    SciTech Connect

    Dunfrund, F.L.; Ebinger, M.H.; Hansen, W.R.

    1996-06-01

    Information from an ecological risk assessment of depleted uranium test areas at Yuma Proving Ground (YPG) was used to update the required environmental radiation monitoring (ERM) plan. Data to be collected for the ERM can also be used to evaluate the potential for adverse radiological and toxicological effects to terrestrial reptiles and mammals in the affected areas. We developed a spreadsheet-based screening model that incorporates the ERM data and associated uncertainties. The purpose of the model is to provide a conservative estimate of radiological exposure of terrestrial, biota to DU using the ERM data. The uncertainty in the estimate is also predicted so that the variation in the radiological exposure can be used in assessing potential adverse effects from DU testing. Toxicological effects are evaluated as well as radiological effects in the same program using the same data. Our presentation shows an example data set, model calculations, and the report of expected radiation dose rates and probable kidney burdens of select mammals and reptiles. The model can also be used in an inverse mode to calculate the soil concentration required to give either a radiological dose that would produce a potential adverse effect such as fatal cancer or a toxicological dose that would result in nephrotoxic effects in mammals.

  3. Flagella biosynthesis and regulation by the Rcs pathway within the fish pathogen Yersinia ruckeri during infection

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The gram-negative Enterobacterium Yersinia ruckeri is the etiologic agent of enteric redmouth disease (ERM) within farmed rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss, Walbaum). Over the past decade, there has been an increase in the prevalence of non-motile variants of Y. ruckeri and the appearance of these ...

  4. Usability Testing for e-Resource Discovery: How Students Find and Choose e-Resources Using Library Web Sites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fry, Amy; Rich, Linda

    2011-01-01

    In early 2010, library staff at Bowling Green State University (BGSU) in Ohio designed and conducted a usability study of key parts of the library web site, focusing on the web pages generated by the library's electronic resources management system (ERM) that list and describe the library's databases. The goal was to discover how users find and…

  5. E-Resource Statistics: What to Do when You Have No Money

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Mary

    2009-01-01

    Libraries are moving toward electronic resource management systems (ERMSs) to track their usage statistics, but these can be expensive to purchase and maintain. For some libraries, an ERMS can be cost-prohibitive, but they still need to justify the renewal of databases and e-journals to their budget officers or determine which e-resources should…

  6. Soil Identification using Field Electrical Resistivity Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazreek, Z. A. M.; Rosli, S.; Chitral, W. D.; Fauziah, A.; Azhar, A. T. S.; Aziman, M.; Ismail, B.

    2015-06-01

    Geotechnical site investigation with particular reference to soil identification was important in civil engineering works since it reports the soil condition in order to relate the design and construction of the proposed works. In the past, electrical resistivity method (ERM) has widely being used in soil characterization but experienced several black boxes which related to its results and interpretations. Hence, this study performed a field electrical resistivity method (ERM) using ABEM SAS (4000) at two different types of soils (Gravelly SAND and Silty SAND) in order to discover the behavior of electrical resistivity values (ERV) with type of soils studied. Soil basic physical properties was determine thru density (p), moisture content (w) and particle size distribution (d) in order to verify the ERV obtained from each type of soil investigated. It was found that the ERV of Gravelly SAND (278 Ωm & 285 Ωm) was slightly higher than SiltySAND (223 Ωm & 199 Ωm) due to the uncertainties nature of soils. This finding has showed that the results obtained from ERM need to be interpreted based on strong supported findings such as using direct test from soil laboratory data. Furthermore, this study was able to prove that the ERM can be established as an alternative tool in soil identification provided it was being verified thru other relevance information such as using geotechnical properties.

  7. Flagellar regulation in Yersinia ruckeri during infection

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The gram-negative Enterobacterium Yersinia ruckeri is the etiologic agent of enteric redmouth disease (ERM), a septicemia affecting primarily farmed rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss, Walbaum). Over the past decade, there has been an increase in the prevalence of non-motile variants of Y. ruckeri a...

  8. Enteric Redmouth Disease

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Yersinia ruckeri, the causative agent of Enteric Redmouth Disease (ERM), is a disease of salmonid fish species that is endemic in areas of the world where salmonids are intensively cultured. The disease causes a chronic to acute hemorrhagic septicemia which can lead to high rates of mortality partic...

  9. Antimicrobial Susceptibilities of Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, and Prevotella nigrescens spp. Isolated in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Andrés, María T.; Chung, Whasun O.; Roberts, Marilyn C.; Fierro, José F.

    1998-01-01

    The susceptibilities of 143 Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, and Prevotella nigrescens isolates to 18 antimicrobial agents were tested. All P. gingivalis isolates were susceptible. In contrast, some Prevotella spp. (17%) were resistant to β-lactams, erythromycin, clindamycin, or tetracycline and carried resistance genes, ermF or tetQ, or β-lactamases. PMID:9797247

  10. Antimicrobial Drug Use and Macrolide-Resistant Streptococcus pyogenes, Belgium

    PubMed Central

    Van Heirstraeten, Liesbet; Coenen, Samuel; Lammens, Christine; Hens, Niel; Goossens, Herman

    2012-01-01

    In Belgium, decreasing macrolide, lincosamide, streptogramins B, and tetracycline use during 1997–2007 correlated significantly with decreasing macrolide-resistant Streptococcus pyogenes during 1999–2009. Maintaining drug use below a critical threshold corresponded with low-level macrolide-resistant S. pyogenes and an increased number of erm(A)-harboring emm77 S. pyogenes with low fitness costs. PMID:22932671

  11. Spatial patterns of antimicrobial resistance genes in a cross-sectional sample of pig farms with indoor non-organic production of finishers.

    PubMed

    Birkegård, A C; Ersbøll, A K; Halasa, T; Clasen, J; Folkesson, A; Vigre, H; Toft, N

    2017-05-01

    Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in pig populations is a public health concern. There is a lack of information of spatial distributions of AMR genes in pig populations at large scales. The objective of the study was to describe the spatial pattern of AMR genes in faecal samples from pig farms and to test if the AMR genes were spatially randomly distributed with respect to the geographic distribution of the pig farm population at risk. Faecal samples from 687 Danish pig farms were collected in February and March 2015. DNA was extracted and the levels of seven AMR genes (ermB, ermF, sulI, sulII, tet(M), tet(O) and tet(W)) were quantified on a high-throughput real-time PCR array. Spatial differences for the levels of the AMR genes measured as relative quantities were evaluated by spatial cluster analysis and creating of risk maps using kriging analysis and kernel density estimation. Significant spatial clusters were identified for ermB, ermF, sulII and tet(W). The broad spatial trends in AMR resistance evident in the risk maps were in agreement with the results of the cluster analysis. However, they also showed that there were only small scale spatial differences in the gene levels. We conclude that the geographical location of a pig farm is not a major determinant of the presence or high levels of AMR genes assessed in this study.

  12. The prevalence of genotypes that determine resistance to macrolides, lincosamides, and streptogramins B compared with spiramycin susceptibility among erythromycin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis

    PubMed Central

    Juda, Marek; Chudzik-Rzad, Beata; Malm, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Coagulase-negative staphylococci, particularly Staphylococcus epidermidis, can be regarded as potential reservoirs of resistance genes for pathogenic strains, e.g., Staphylococcus aureus. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of different resistance phenotypes to macrolide, lincosamide, and streptogramins B (MLSB) antibiotics among erythromycin-resistant S. epidermidis, together with the evaluation of genes promoting the following different types of MLSB resistance:ermA, ermB, ermC,msrA, mphC, and linA/A’. Susceptibility to spiramycin was also examined. Among 75 erythromycin-resistantS. epidermidis isolates, the most frequent phenotypes were macrolides and streptogramins B (MSB) and constitutive MLSB (cMLSB). Moreover, all strains with the cMLSB phenotype and the majority of inducible MLSB (iMLSB) isolates were resistant to spiramycin, whereas strains with the MSB phenotype were sensitive to this antibiotic. The D-shape zone of inhibition around the clindamycin disc near the spiramycin disc was found for some spiramycin-resistant strains with the iMLSB phenotype, suggesting an induction of resistance to clindamycin by this 16-membered macrolide. The most frequently isolated gene was ermC, irrespective of the MLSB resistance phenotype, whereas the most often noted gene combination wasermC, mphC, linA/A’. The results obtained showed that the genes responsible for different mechanisms of MLSB resistance in S. epidermidis generally coexist, often without the phenotypic expression of each of them. PMID:27008373

  13. Investigation of drug-drug interaction via mechanism-based inhibition of cytochrome P450 3A by macrolides in dexamethasone-treated female rats.

    PubMed

    Kanazu, Takushi; Sato, Norihito; Kadono, Kyoko; Touchi, Akira; Takeda, Yuri; Yamaguchi, Yoshitaka; Baba, Takahiko

    2012-05-01

    The in vitro and in vivo inhibition of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A with mechanism-based inhibition (MBI) by macrolides was investigated using dexamethasone-treated female rats (DEX-female rats). In the in vitro CYP inhibition studies using erythromycin (ERM) and clarithromycin (CAM), similar inhibition responses were observed between human and DEX-female rat liver microsomes, however, there were fewer effects in intact male rats. The ex vivo study showed that midazolam (MDZ) metabolism in liver microsomes of DEX-female rats was reduced by ERM administration and the inhibitory effect was increased with increasing ERM doses, indicating that metabolite intermediate complex formation caused irreversible inhibition of CYP3A activity in DEX-female rats as well as in humans. In the in vivo studies, ERM and CAM significantly increased the area under the plasma concentration-time curve of MDZ and decreased the total clearance in DEX-female rats. It was concluded that the DDIs via MBI of CYP3A following macrolide administration in humans could be reproduced in female rats, suggesting that DEX-female rats can serve as an in vivo model for assessing this DDI in humans.

  14. Europäisches Organ der Festkörperforschung und DDR-Devisenbringer Die Zeitschrift Physica Status Solidi im Kalten Krieg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Dieter

    Mit dem Ziele, ein einheitliches internationales Organ der Festkörperphysik für den europäischen Raum zu schaffen, das eine rasche Publikation der für das Festkörpergebiet repräsentative Arbeiten ermöglicht, wird durch ein internationales Herausgebergremium eine neue wissenschaftliche Zeitschrift gegründet.

  15. Differentiation of mouse iPS cells into ameloblast-like cells in cultures using medium conditioned by epithelial cell rests of Malassez and gelatin-coated dishes.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Koki; Sato, Jun; Takai, Rie; Uehara, Osamu; Kurashige, Yoshihito; Nishimura, Michiko; Chiba, Itsuo; Saitoh, Masato; Abiko, Yoshihiro

    2015-09-01

    Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are generated from adult cells and are potentially of great value in regenerative medicine. Recently, it was shown that iPS cells can differentiate into ameloblast-like cells in cultures using feeder cells. In the present study, we sought to induce differentiation of ameloblast-like cells from iPS cells under feeder-free conditions using medium conditioned by cultured epithelial cell rests of Malassez (ERM) cells and gelatin-coated dishes. Two culture conditions were compared: co-cultures of iPS cells and ERM cells; and, culture of iPS cells in ERM cell-conditioned medium. Differentiation of ameloblast-like cells in the cultures was assessed using real-time RT-PCR assays of expression of the marker genes keratin 14, amelogenin, and ameloblastin and by immunocytochemical staining for amelogenin. We found greater evidence of ameloblast-like cell differentiation in the cultures using the conditioned medium. In the latter, the level of amelogenin expression increased daily and was significantly higher than controls on the 7th, 10th, and 14th days. Expression of ameloblastin also increased daily and was significantly higher than controls on the 14th day. The present study demonstrates that mouse iPS cells can be induced to differentiate into ameloblast-like cells in feeder-free cell cultures using ERM cell-conditioned medium and gelatin-coated dishes.

  16. Addressing risk in the design of new healthcare services: a step-by-step methodology.

    PubMed

    Remus, Beth

    2008-01-01

    New service design can be done effectively through enterprise risk management (ERM) by identifying the clinical and administrative risks within the new service design. This article proposes a 10-step process describing the business team's tasks and integrating risk management, quality management and patient safety concepts.

  17. Quantitation of Bacillus clausii in biological samples by real-time polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Perotti, Mario; Mancini, Nicasio; Cavallero, Annalisa; Carletti, Silvia; Canducci, Filippo; Burioni, Roberto; Clementi, Massimo

    2006-06-01

    A real-time PCR assay targeting the highly specific erm34 sequence of Bacillus clausii DNA was developed and optimized. The quantitative assay showed a sensitivity level of 10(2) CFU/microl of sample. The method may represent a useful tool for monitoring the role of B. clausii as probiotic in vivo.

  18. Streptococcus pneumoniae Isolates Resistant to Telithromycin

    PubMed Central

    Rantala, M.; Haanperä-Heikkinen, M.; Lindgren, M.; Seppälä, H.; Huovinen, P.; Jalava, J.

    2006-01-01

    The telithromycin susceptibility of 210 erythromycin-resistant pneumococci was tested with the agar diffusion method. Twenty-six erm(B)-positive isolates showed heterogeneous resistance to telithromycin, which was manifested by the presence of colonies inside the inhibition zone. When these cells were cultured and tested, they showed stable, homogeneous, and high-level resistance to telithromycin. PMID:16641460

  19. [The Educational Resources Management System: Application of PPBES Concepts to Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of School Business Officials, Chicago, IL.

    This document reports the results of a survey of school business officials to determine the status of Educational Resource Management Systems (ERMS) or Planning-Programing-Budgeting-Evaluating Systems (PPBES) in school districts and colleges in the United States and Canada. Though the actual number of school districts developing management systems…

  20. Mariner-based transposon mutagenesis for Bacteroides species.

    PubMed

    Ichimura, Minoru; Uchida, Keiko; Nakayama-Imaohji, Haruyuki; Hirakawa, Hideki; Tada, Tomoyo; Morita, Hidetoshi; Yasutomo, Koji; Okazaki, Katsuichiro; Kuwahara, Tomomi

    2014-06-01

    Bacteroides is one of the most predominant groups of human gut microbiota. Recent metagenomic analyses and studies on gnotobiotic mice demonstrated the tight association of Bacteroides with epithelial function, the gut immune system and systemic metabolism in the host. The mariner family transposon shows relatively low target site specificity and has hosts ranging from prokaryotes to eukaryotes. Thereby, random mutagenesis using the mariner family transposon is expected to identify key molecules for human-Bacteroides symbiosis. In this study, we constructed the plasmid pMI07 to deliver the gene cassette (ermF/ITR), which harbors the erythromycin resistant marker (ermF) and the inverted repeat sequences (ITRs) recognized by Himar1 transposase, to Bacteroides via electrotransformation. pMI07 successfully delivered ermF/ITR to the Bacteroides genomes and generated thousands of insertion mutants/μg of pMI07 in B. thetaiotaomicron, B. fragilis, B. ovatus, and also, although to a lesser extent, B. vulgatus. Analyses of the ermF/ITR insertion sites in B. thetaiotaomicron and B. vulgatus revealed that the cassette targeted the dinucleotide TA and integrated into the genomes in an unbiased manner. The data reported here will provide useful information for transposon mutagenesis in Bacteroides species, which will enable identification of the genes responsible for their unique phenotypes. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Expression of ezrin in subventricular zone neural stem cells and their progeny in adult and developing mice.

    PubMed

    Moon, Younghye; Kim, Joo Yeon; Choi, So Yoen; Cho, Hyo Min; Kim, Hyun; Sun, Woong

    2013-03-01

    Ezrin is a member of the ezrin-radixin-moesin (ERM) family of proteins, which link the cytoskeleton and cell membrane. ERM proteins are involved in pivotal cellular functions including cell-matrix recognition, cell-cell communication, and cell motility. Several recent studies have shown that ERM proteins are expressed in specific cell types of the adult rostral migratory stream (RMS). In this study, we found that ERM proteins are expressed highly in the early postnatal RMS and the ventricular zone of embryonic cerebral cortex, suggesting that these proteins may be expressed by neural progenitors. Furthermore, whereas ezrin previously was found to be expressed exclusively by astrocytes of the adult RMS, we found that ezrin-expressing cells also expressed the markers for indicating neuroblasts in vivo and in vitro, and that ezrin expression by neuroblasts decreases progressively as neuroblasts migrate. Using in vitro differentiation of adult neural stem cells, we found that ezrin is expressed by neural stem cells and their progeny (neuroblasts and astrocytes), but not by oligodendrocytic progeny. Collectively our findings demonstrate that adult neural stem cells and neuroblasts express ezrin and that ezrin may be involved in intracellular actin remodeling.

  2. Getting insight into the prevalence of antibiotic resistance genes in specimens of marketed edible insects.

    PubMed

    Milanović, Vesna; Osimani, Andrea; Pasquini, Marina; Aquilanti, Lucia; Garofalo, Cristiana; Taccari, Manuela; Cardinali, Federica; Riolo, Paola; Clementi, Francesca

    2016-06-16

    This study was aimed at investigating the occurrence of 11 transferable antibiotic resistance (AR) genes [erm(A), erm(B), erm(C), vanA, vanB, tet(M), tet(O), tet(S), tet(K), mecA, blaZ] in 11 species of marketed edible insects (small crickets powder, small crickets, locusts, mealworm larvae, giant waterbugs, black ants, winged termite alates, rhino beetles, mole crickets, silkworm pupae, and black scorpions) in order to provide a first baseline for risk assessment. Among the AR genes under study, tet(K) occurred with the highest frequency, followed by erm(B), tet(S) and blaZ. A high variability was seen among the samples, in terms of occurrence of different AR determinants. Cluster Analysis and Principal Coordinates Analysis allowed the 11 samples to be grouped in two main clusters, one including all but one samples produced in Thailand and the other including those produced in the Netherlands. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Desert Storm’s Siren Song; Examining Revolution in Warfare

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-05-27

    develop a force structure which is unable to deal with the full gamut of twenty- first century threats. 14. SuluECT T1ERMS DeetRvlto nWraeIS. NUMBER Of...War a revolution could lead the U.S. military to develop a force structure which is unable to deal with the full gamut of twenty-first century

  4. Electronic Resource Management 2.0: Using Web 2.0 Technologies as Cost-Effective Alternatives to an Electronic Resource Management System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Adam

    2008-01-01

    Designed to assist with the management of e-resources, electronic resource management (ERM) systems are time- and fund-consuming to purchase and maintain. Questions of system compatibility, data population, and workflow design/redesign can be difficult to answer; sometimes those answers are not what we'd prefer to hear. The two primary functions…

  5. 77 FR 37038 - Clean Air Act Operating Permit Program; Petition for Objection to State Operating Permit for CF&I...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-20

    ... Permit Program; Petition for Objection to State Operating Permit for CF&I Steel, L.P. dba EVRAZ Rocky... December 28, 2010 Permit (Permit) issued to CF&I Steel, L.P. dba EVRAZ Rocky Mountain Steel (ERMS or EVRAZ... should make an appointment at least 24 hours in advance. Additionally, the final Order for CF&I Steel, L...

  6. The prevalence of genotypes that determine resistance to macrolides, lincosamides, and streptogramins B compared with spiramycin susceptibility among erythromycin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    PubMed

    Juda, Marek; Chudzik-Rzad, Beata; Malm, Anna

    2016-03-01

    Coagulase-negative staphylococci, particularly Staphylococcus epidermidis, can be regarded as potential reservoirs of resistance genes for pathogenic strains, e.g., Staphylococcus aureus. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of different resistance phenotypes to macrolide, lincosamide, and streptogramins B (MLSB) antibiotics among erythromycin-resistant S. epidermidis, together with the evaluation of genes promoting the following different types of MLSB resistance:ermA, ermB, ermC,msrA, mphC, and linA/A'. Susceptibility to spiramycin was also examined. Among 75 erythromycin-resistantS. epidermidis isolates, the most frequent phenotypes were macrolides and streptogramins B (MSB) and constitutive MLSB (cMLSB). Moreover, all strains with the cMLSB phenotype and the majority of inducible MLSB (iMLSB) isolates were resistant to spiramycin, whereas strains with the MSB phenotype were sensitive to this antibiotic. The D-shape zone of inhibition around the clindamycin disc near the spiramycin disc was found for some spiramycin-resistant strains with the iMLSB phenotype, suggesting an induction of resistance to clindamycin by this 16-membered macrolide. The most frequently isolated gene was ermC, irrespective of the MLSB resistance phenotype, whereas the most often noted gene combination wasermC, mphC, linA/A'. The results obtained showed that the genes responsible for different mechanisms of MLSB resistance in S. epidermidis generally coexist, often without the phenotypic expression of each of them.

  7. Effect of air and sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) tamponade on visual acuity after epiretinal membrane surgery: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Chabot, Guillaume; Bourgault, Serge; Cinq-Mars, Benoit; Tourville, Éric; Caissie, Mathieu

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare visual acuity improvement after epiretinal membrane (ERM) surgery using air and sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) tamponade. Secondary objectives were to evaluate Visual Function Questionnaire (VFQ) scores and central retinal thickness (CRT) changes. This was a prospective, randomized study. Thirty-two patients were prospectively randomized, 19 to the air group and 13 to the SF6 group. This study has enrolled patients with ERM from clinical practice of 4 vitreoretinal surgeons. Preoperative and postoperative data included best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) with the use of the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) chart, VFQ scores, CRT, and cataract staging. Pars plana vitrectomy with ERM peeling was performed on all patients, either with partial air tamponade or with complete SF6 tamponade. Mean BCVA improved by 0.07 logMAR (3.5 ETDRS letters) in the air group and by 0.09 logMAR (4.5 ETDRS letters) in the SF6 group (p = 0.58). There was no statistically significant difference between the groups with regard to BCVA, VFQ scores, and CRT. The groups had similar rates of cataract progression and adverse events. ERM peeling with partial air tamponade or with complete SF6 tamponade have similar outcomes in terms of BCVA, VFQ scores, CRT, cataract development, and adverse events. Copyright © 2017 Canadian Ophthalmological Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Molecular Classification of Rhabdomyosarcoma—Genotypic and Phenotypic Determinants of Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Davicioni, Elai; Anderson, Michael J.; Finckenstein, Friedrich Graf; Lynch, James C.; Qualman, Stephen J.; Shimada, Hiroyuki; Schofield, Deborah E.; Buckley, Jonathan D.; Meyer, William H.; Sorensen, Poul H.B.; Triche, Timothy J.

    2009-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) in children occurs as two major histological subtypes, embryonal (ERMS) and alveolar (ARMS). ERMS is associated with an 11p15.5 loss of heterozygosity (LOH) and may be confused with nonmyogenic, non-RMS soft tissue sarcomas. ARMS expresses the product of a genomic translocation that fuses FOXO1 (FKHR) with either PAX3 or PAX7 (P-F); however, at least 25% of cases lack these translocations. Here, we describe a genomic-based classification scheme that is derived from the combined gene expression profiling and LOH analysis of 160 cases of RMS and non-RMS soft tissue sarcomas that is at variance with conventional histopathological schemes. We found that gene expression profiles and patterns of LOH of ARMS cases lacking P-F translocations are indistinguishable from conventional ERMS cases. A subset of tumors that has been histologically classified as RMS lack myogenic gene expression. However, classification based on gene expression is possible using as few as five genes with an estimated error rate of less than 5%. Using immunohistochemistry, we characterized two markers, HMGA2 and TFAP2ß, which facilitate the differential diagnoses of ERMS and P-F RMS, respectively, using clinical material. These objectively derived molecular classes are based solely on genomic analysis at the time of diagnosis and are highly reproducible. Adoption of these molecular criteria may offer a more clinically relevant diagnostic scheme, thus potentially improving patient management and therapeutic RMS outcomes. PMID:19147825

  9. In vitro activity of beta-lactams, macrolides, telithromycin, and fluoroquinolones against clinical isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae: correlation between drug resistance and genetic characteristics.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Toshiyuki; Hashikita, Giichi; Takahashi, Shun; Itabashi, Akira; Yamazaki, Tsutomu; Maesaki, Shigefumi

    2005-10-01

    The in vitro activity of antimicrobial agents against Streptococcus pneumoniae was determined using 16 strains of penicillin-susceptible S. pneumoniae (PSSP) and 26 strains of penicillin intermediately resistant S. pneumoniae (PISP) + penicillin-resistant S. pneumoniae (PRSP) in Japan. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of potent antibiotics, including eight beta-lactams (benzylpenicillin, ampicillin, cefotiam, cefepime, cefditoren, faropenem, panipenem, and biapenem), three macrolides (erythromycin, clarithromycin, and azithromycin), telithromycin, and three fluoroquinolones (ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, and gatifloxacin), were determined. Twenty-three strains exhibited genetic variations at pbp1a + pbp2x + pbp2b, which are genetic-PRSP (g-PRSP). g-PISP strains accounted for 62.5% (10/16) of the PSSP strains. The existence of an abnormal pbp gene conferred not only penicillin resistance but resistance to cephems; however, panipenem and biapenem had potent in vitro efficacy against alterations. Regarding the macrolide resistance mechanisms (mefA or ermB): 16 isolates had only mefA, 18 isolates had ermB, and 2 isolates had both mefA and ermB. There was no correlation between the existence of an abnormal pbp gene and the existence of the mefA gene or the ermB gene.

  10. Indocyanine green-assisted epiretinal membrane peeling evaluated by optical coherence tomography and multifocal electroretinography

    PubMed Central

    Koutsandrea, Chryssanthi N; Apostolopoulos, Michael N; Alonistiotis, Dimitrios A; Moschos, Marilita M; Georgiadou, Efstratia; Kyriaki, Theodora E; Georgopoulos, Gerasimos T; Moschos, Michael N

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the anatomical and functional outcome in eyes with indocyanine green (ICG)-assisted idiopathic epiretinal membrane (ERM) peeling by optical coherence tomography (OCT) and multifocal electroretinogram (MFERG). Design: Prospective, interventional, noncomparative case series. Methods: Twenty eyes of 20 patients with idiopathic ERM underwent pars plana vitrectomy and ICG-assisted ERM and internal limiting membrane (ILM) removal. Visual acuity (VA), OCT, and MFERG measurements were performed preoperatively and postoperatively at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months. Results: Best-corrected VA (BCVA) improved ≥2 Snellen lines in 70% of our patients at the 12th postoperative month. Mean VA increased from 20/100 preoperatively to 20/40 at 12 months. VA increased significantly at all postoperative examinations, compared to preoperative VA. Foveal thickness measured by OCT decreased significantly at all postoperative examinations. OCT mean values dropped from 472.3 μm preoperatively, to 249.2 μm at 12 months. Preoperative MFERG values significantly improved only at 12 months. OCT measurements and MFERG values did not correlate at any time. OCT values correlated with VA values only preoperatively while MFERG measurements correlated with VA at 12 months. Conclusions: In our series of eyes with ERM surgery, OCT measurements and VA improved gradually throughout the first postoperative year, while MFERG values showed significant improvement at 12 months. PMID:19668533

  11. Linear Logistic Test Modeling with R

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baghaei, Purya; Kubinger, Klaus D.

    2015-01-01

    The present paper gives a general introduction to the linear logistic test model (Fischer, 1973), an extension of the Rasch model with linear constraints on item parameters, along with eRm (an R package to estimate different types of Rasch models; Mair, Hatzinger, & Mair, 2014) functions to estimate the model and interpret its parameters. The…

  12. Community Environmental Response Facilitation Act (CERFA) report. New Orleans Military Ocean Terminal (NOMOT), New Orleans, LA. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Crossman, M.; Ward, L.

    1994-04-11

    This report presents the results of the Community Environmental Response Facilitation Act (CERFA) investigation conducted by Environmental Resources Management (ERM) at New Orleans Military Ocean Terminal (NOMOT), a U.S. Government property selected for closure by the Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) Commission under Public Laws 100-526 and 101-510. Under CERFA (Public Law 102-426), Federal agencies are required to identify expeditiously real property that can be immediately reused and redeveloped. Satisfying this objective requires the identification of real property where no hazardous substances or petroleum products, regulated by the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), were stored for one year or more, known to have been released, or disposed NOMOT is a 17.6-acre site located in New Orleans, Louisiana. NOMOT has been used for warehousing and shipping of equipment since 1919. Environmentally significant operations include routine maintenance and hazardous material handling. ERM reviewed existing investigation documents; U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) , State, and county regulatory records; environmental data bases; and title documents pertaining to NOMOT during this investigation. In addition, ERM conducted interviews and visual inspections of NOMOT as well as visual inspections of and data base searches for the surrounding properties. Information in this CERFA report was current as of the site visit by ERM in October 1993. This information was used to divide the installation into two categories of parcels: CERFA Disqualified Parcels and CERFA Parcels, as defined by the Army. New Orleans military ocean terminal, CERF.

  13. A Computer Simulation of an Adaptive Noise Canceler with a Single Input

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-06-01

    parameter values needed to cause the canceler to attenuate the strong signal to a user specified level and pass the weak signal. This study was...10 dBm. (continued) 71 rn -: - , erm utut at the kth interation X k - PTF tap amplptu2u vector at the kth iteration. When the input interfering

  14. Engineering of plant-specific phenylpropanoids biosynthesis in Streptomyces venezuelae.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung Ryeol; Yoon, Jin A; Paik, Ji Hye; Park, Je Won; Jung, Won Seok; Ban, Yeon-Hee; Kim, Eun Ji; Yoo, Young Ji; Han, Ah Reum; Yoon, Yeo Joon

    2009-05-20

    Phenylpropanoids, including flavonoids and stilbenes, are plant secondary metabolites with potential pharmacological and nutraceutical properties. To expand the applicability of Streptomyces venezuelae as a heterologous host to plant polyketide production, flavonoid and stilbene biosynthetic genes were expressed in an engineered strain of S. venezuelae DHS2001 bearing a deletion of native pikromycin polyketide synthase gene. A plasmid expressing the 4-coumarate/cinnamate:coenzyme A ligase from Streptomyces coelicolor (ScCCL) and the chalcone synthase from Arabidopsis thaliana (atCHS) under the control of a single ermE* promoter was constructed and introduced into S. venezuelae DHS2001. The resulting strain produced racemic naringenin and pinocembrin from 4-coumaric acid and cinnamic acid, respectively. Placement of an additional ermE* promoter upstream of the codon-optimized atCHS (atCHS(op)) gene significantly increased the yield of both flavanones. Expression of codon-optimized chalcone isomerase gene from Medicago sativa, together with ScCCL and atCHS(op) genes led to production of (2S)-flavanones, but the yield was reduced. On the other hand, a recombinant strain harboring the ScCCL and codon-optimized stilbene synthase gene from Arachis hypogaea generated stilbenes such as resveratrol and pinosylvin. This is the first report on the heterologous expression of plant phenylpropanoid biosynthetic pathways in Streptomyces genus.

  15. Macrolide-Resistant Streptococcus pyogenes in Norway: Population Structure and Resistance Determinants

    PubMed Central

    Littauer, P.; Caugant, D. A.; Sangvik, M.; Høiby, E. A.; Sundsfjord, A.; Simonsen, G. S.

    2006-01-01

    A 2.7% prevalence of macrolide resistance in 1,657 Norwegian clinical Streptococcus pyogenes isolates was primarily due to erm(TR) (59%) and mef(A) (20%). Four clonal complexes comprised 75% of the strains. Macrolide resistance in S. pyogenes in Norway is imported as resistant strains or locally selected in internationally disseminated susceptible clones. PMID:16641473

  16. Somewhere over the Verde Rainbow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekart, Donna F.

    2008-01-01

    When the electronic resource management system (ERM) at Kansas State University Libraries suffered a horrible data loss, the "contract db" presented a challenge for the librarians responsible for electronic resources. It was a decent data repository, but it had no ability to manage the tangled process of licensing, acquiring, activating,…

  17. Linear Logistic Test Modeling with R

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baghaei, Purya; Kubinger, Klaus D.

    2015-01-01

    The present paper gives a general introduction to the linear logistic test model (Fischer, 1973), an extension of the Rasch model with linear constraints on item parameters, along with eRm (an R package to estimate different types of Rasch models; Mair, Hatzinger, & Mair, 2014) functions to estimate the model and interpret its parameters. The…

  18. Ezrin and moesin expression within the developing human cerebrum and tuberous sclerosis-associated cortical tubers.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Michael W; Miyata, Hajime; Vinters, Harry V

    2002-08-01

    The ERM (ezrin, radixin, and moesin) proteins belong to the band-4.1 superfamily of membrane-cytoskeleton-linking proteins which bind to the actin cytoskeleton via their C-terminal sequences and bind ERM binding membrane proteins (ERMBMPs). We investigated the immunohistochemical expression of two of the ERM proteins (ezrin and moesin) in developing human cerebral cortex and in cortical tubers from patients with tuberous sclerosis (TSC), to assess possible consequences of TSC gene product malfunction or inactivation in the developing brain in relation to ERM protein expression. Ezrin is abundantly expressed within radial glia and migrating cells in the intermediate zone in the prenatal human cerebrum, while moesin is primarily expressed in vascular endothelial cells in developing and adult human brain and scattered microglia in adult brain. In addition, both ezrin and moesin are abundantly co-expressed with hamartin and tuberin within a population of abnormal cells in TSC-associated cortical tubers. The expression of these two proteins--primarily ezrin--suggests that they are developmentally regulated and abundantly expressed in germinal matrix and/or migrating cells during cerebral cortical development. In TSC-associated cortical tubers, both proteins appeared to be up-regulated and are co-localized within a population of abnormal neuroglial cells typical of those seen in tubers. Expression of these proteins and their co-localization with tuberin and hamartin in these cells may suggest a compensatory up-regulation in response to TSC gene mutation.

  19. Moesin is a glioma progression marker that induces proliferation and Wnt/β-catenin pathway activation via interaction with CD44.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaoping; Morales, Fabiana C; Agarwal, Nitin Kumar; Dogruluk, Turgut; Gagea, Mihai; Georgescu, Maria-Magdalena

    2013-02-01

    Moesin is an ERM family protein that connects the actin cytoskeleton to transmembrane receptors. With the identification of the ERM family protein NF2 as a tumor suppressor in glioblastoma, we investigated roles for other ERM proteins in this malignancy. Here, we report that overexpression of moesin occurs generally in high-grade glioblastoma in a pattern correlated with the stem cell marker CD44. Unlike NF2, moesin acts as an oncogene by increasing cell proliferation and stem cell neurosphere formation, with its ectopic overexpression sufficient to shorten survival in an orthotopic mouse model of glioblastoma. Moesin was the major ERM member activated by phosphorylation in glioblastoma cells, where it interacted and colocalized with CD44 in membrane protrusions. Increasing the levels of moesin competitively displaced NF2 from CD44, increasing CD44 expression in a positive feedback loop driven by the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. Therapeutic targeting of the moesin-CD44 interaction with the small-molecule inhibitor 7-cyanoquinocarcinol (DX-52-1) or with a CD44-mimetic peptide specifically reduced the proliferation of glioblastoma cells overexpressing moesin, where the Wnt/β-catenin pathway was activated. Our findings establish moesin and CD44 as progression markers and drugable targets in glioblastoma, relating their oncogenic effects to activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway.

  20. Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry Can Accurately Differentiate between Mycobacterium masilliense (M. abscessus subspecies bolletti) and M. abscessus (Sensu Stricto)

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Shih-Hua; Chen, Chung-Ming; Lee, Meng-Rui; Lee, Tai-Fen; Chien, Kun-Yi; Teng, Lee-Jene

    2013-01-01

    Among 36 Mycobacterium masilliense and 22 M. abscessus isolates identified by erm(41) PCR and sequencing analysis of rpoB and 23S rRNA genes, the rate of accurate differentiation between these two subspecies was 100% by cluster analysis of spectra generated by Bruker Biotyper matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry. PMID:23824775

  1. EDRMS for Academic Records Management: A Design Study in a Malaysian University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miah, Shah Jahan; Samsudin, Ahmad Zam Hariro

    2017-01-01

    Higher education institutes such as universities suffer from a range of issues in managing their academic records and relevant digital contents. Many universities nowadays use specific software applications for their effective mechanism in records management. The effective provision of enterprises records management (ERM) software for managing…

  2. Dynamic relocalization of NHERF1 mediates chemotactic migration of ovarian cancer cells toward lysophosphatidic acid stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Yong-Seok; Heo, Kyun; Kim, Eung-Kyun; Jang, Jin-Hyeok; Bae, Sun Sik; Park, Jong Bae; Kim, Yun Hee; Song, Minseok; Kim, Sang Ryong; Ryu, Sung Ho; Kim, In-Hoo; Suh, Pann-Ghill

    2017-01-01

    NHERF1/EBP50 (Na+/H+ exchanger regulating factor 1; Ezrin-binding phosphoprotein of 50 kDa) organizes stable protein complexes beneath the apical membrane of polar epithelial cells. By contrast, in cancer cells without any fixed polarity, NHERF1 often localizes in the cytoplasm. The regulation of cytoplasmic NHERF1 and its role in cancer progression remain unclear. In this study, we found that, upon lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) stimulation, cytoplasmic NHERF1 rapidly translocated to the plasma membrane, and subsequently to cortical protrusion structures, of ovarian cancer cells. This movement depended on direct binding of NHERF1 to C-terminally phosphorylated ERM proteins (cpERMs). Moreover, NHERF1 depletion downregulated cpERMs and further impaired cpERM-dependent remodeling of the cell cortex, suggesting reciprocal regulation between these proteins. The LPA-induced protein complex was highly enriched in migratory pseudopodia, whose formation was impaired by overexpression of NHERF1 truncation mutants. Consistent with this, NHERF1 depletion in various types of cancer cells abolished chemotactic cell migration toward a LPA gradient. Taken together, our findings suggest that the high dynamics of cytosolic NHERF1 provide cancer cells with a means of controlling chemotactic migration. This capacity is likely to be essential for ovarian cancer progression in tumor microenvironments containing LPA. PMID:28684865

  3. Characterisation of geographically and temporally diverse Yersinia ruckeri isolates: evidence that UK and mainland European biotype 2 isolates represent different clonal groups

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    There have been increased reports of outbreaks of Enteric Redmouth Disease (ERM) caused by Yersinia ruckeri in previously-vaccinated salmonids in Europe, with some of these outbreaks attributed to emergent non-motile, Tween 80 negative, biotype 2 isolates. To gain information about their likely orig...

  4. Teaching Electronic Records Management in the Archival Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Electronic records management has been incorporated into the archival curriculum in North America since the 1990s. This study reported in this paper provides a systematic analysis of the content of electronic records management (ERM) courses currently taught in archival education programs. Through the analysis of course combinations and their…

  5. Yersinia ruckeri lipopolysaccharide is necessary and sufficient for eliciting a protective immune response in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss, Walbaum)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Enteric redmouth disease (ERM), caused by Yersinia ruckeri, has been controlled successfully using immersion-applied bacterin vaccines for several decades. While the host response to vaccination and the mechanism of protection of this vaccine have been elucidated, the bacterial components eliciting ...

  6. Molecular subtyping and erythromycin resistance of Campylobacter in China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, A; Song, L; Liang, H; Gu, Y; Zhang, C; Liu, X; Zhang, J; Zhang, M

    2016-07-01

    To investigate the erythromycin resistance patterns and mechanism for Campylobacter isolates in China. The minimum inhibitory concentrations of erythromycin on 858 Chinese Campylobacter isolates were analysed. PCR and DNA sequencing were used to identify mutations in the 23S rRNA and the presence of the ermB gene in the 158 erythromycin resistance isolates (18·4%). About 83% (131/158) had A2075G mutation in their 23S rRNA; no A2074C/G mutants were found. The ermB gene was identified in 30 Campylobacter coli isolates (19%). Four types of multidrug-resistant gene islands (MDRGIs) were found. Fifty-three types were identified by multilocus sequence typing among the resistant isolates. All isolates of STs 6322 and 1145 had the ermB gene. The erythromycin resistance rate of Camp. coli (58·56%) was much higher than Campylobacter jejuni (0·67%). The insertion sites between cadF and CCO1582 and between nfsB and cinA on the chromosome might be hot spots for MDRGI transformation. Point mutation in domain V of the 23S rRNA and the ermB gene accounted for 100% of the erythromycin resistance of Campylobacter in China. Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  7. Electronic Resource Management 2.0: Using Web 2.0 Technologies as Cost-Effective Alternatives to an Electronic Resource Management System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Adam

    2008-01-01

    Designed to assist with the management of e-resources, electronic resource management (ERM) systems are time- and fund-consuming to purchase and maintain. Questions of system compatibility, data population, and workflow design/redesign can be difficult to answer; sometimes those answers are not what we'd prefer to hear. The two primary functions…

  8. Principles for Information Technology Investment in U.S. Federal Electronic Records Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Wingen, Rachel Senner; Hathorn, Fred; Sprehe, J. Timothy

    1999-01-01

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) underwent a business process reengineering (BPR) exercise with respect to future co-location of previously separate regulatory docket facilities. Their experience suggests that future mandatory electronic records management (ERM) requirements will cause federal agencies to take a more…

  9. Checks and Balances: Rpd3 Issues Executive Orders in Developmental Enhancer Regulation.

    PubMed

    Martire, Sara; Banaszynski, Laura

    2017-02-27

    Stem cells use poised enhancers of developmental regulators to maintain pluripotency and for subsequent activation in differentiating progeny. In this issue of Developmental Cell, Janssens et al. (2017) demonstrate that the erm enhancer is maintained in a poised state in neural stem cells by the histone deacetylase Hdac1/Rpd3. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Selection of Resistance to Clarithromycin in Mycobacterium abscessus Subspecies.

    PubMed

    Mougari, Faiza; Bouziane, Feriel; Crockett, Flora; Nessar, Rachid; Chau, Françoise; Veziris, Nicolas; Sapriel, Guillaume; Raskine, Laurent; Cambau, Emmanuelle

    2017-01-01

    Mycobacterium abscessus is an emerging pathogen against which clarithromycin is the main drug used. Clinical failures are commonly observed and were first attributed to acquired mutations in rrl encoding 23S rRNA but were then attributed to the intrinsic production of the erm(41) 23S RNA methylase. Since strains of M. abscessus were recently distributed into subspecies and erm(41) sequevars, we investigated acquired clarithromycin resistance mechanisms in mutants selected in vitro from four representative strains. Mutants were sequenced for rrl, erm(41), whiB, rpIV, and rplD and studied for seven antibiotic MICs. For mutants obtained from strain M. abscessus subsp. abscessus erm(41) T28 sequevar and strain M. abscessus subsp. bolletii, which are both known to produce effective methylase, rrl was mutated in only 19% (4/21) and 32.5% (13/40) of mutants, respectively, at position 2058 (A2058C, A2058G) or position 2059 (A2059C, A2059G). No mutations were observed in any of the other genes studied, and resistance to other antibiotics (amikacin, cefoxitin, imipenem, tigecycline, linezolid, and ciprofloxacin) was mainly unchanged. For M. abscessus subsp. abscessus erm(41) C28 sequevar and M. abscessus subsp. massiliense, not producing effective methylase, 100% (26/26) and 97.5% (39/40) of mutants had rrl mutations at position 2058 (A2058C, A2058G, A2058T) or position 2059 (A2059C, A2059G). The remaining M. abscessus subsp. massiliense mutant showed an 18-bp repeat insertion in rpIV, encoding the L22 protein. Our results showed that acquisition of clarithromycin resistance is 100% mediated by structural 50S ribosomal subunit mutations for M. abscessus subsp. abscessus erm(41) C28 and M. abscessus subsp. massiliense, whereas it is less common for M. abscessus subsp. abscessus erm(41) T28 sequevar and M. abscessus subsp. bolletii, where other mechanisms may be responsible for failure. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Microbiology.

  11. Evolution and origin of merlin, the product of the Neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) tumor-suppressor gene

    PubMed Central

    Golovnina, Kseniya; Blinov, Alexander; Akhmametyeva, Elena M; Omelyanchuk, Leonid V; Chang, Long-Sheng

    2005-01-01

    Background Merlin, the product of the Neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) tumor suppressor gene, belongs to the ezrin-radixin-moesin (ERM) subgroup of the protein 4.1 superfamily, which links cell surface glycoproteins to the actin cytoskeleton. While merlin's functional activity has been examined in mammalian and Drosophila models, little is understood about its evolution, diversity, and overall distribution among different taxa. Results By combining bioinformatic and phylogenetic approaches, we demonstrate that merlin homologs are present across a wide range of metazoan lineages. While the phylogenetic tree shows a monophyletic origin of the ERM family, the origin of the merlin proteins is robustly separated from that of the ERM proteins. The derivation of merlin is thought to be in early metazoa. We have also observed the expansion of the ERM-like proteins within the vertebrate clade, which occurred after its separation from Urochordata (Ciona intestinalis). Amino acid sequence alignment reveals the absence of an actin-binding site in the C-terminal region of all merlin proteins from various species but the presence of a conserved internal binding site in the N-terminal domain of the merlin and ERM proteins. In addition, a more conserved pattern of amino acid residues is found in the region containing the so-called "Blue Box," although some amino acid substitutions in this region exist in the merlin sequences of worms, fish, and Ciona. Examination of sequence variability at functionally significant sites, including the serine-518 residue, the phosphorylation of which modulates merlin's intra-molecular association and function as a tumor suppressor, identifies several potentially important sites that are conserved among all merlin proteins but divergent in the ERM proteins. Secondary structure prediction reveals the presence of a conserved α-helical domain in the central to C-terminal region of the merlin proteins of various species. The conserved residues and

  12. Retinal thickness after vitrectomy and internal limiting membrane peeling for macular hole and epiretinal membrane.

    PubMed

    Kumagai, Kazuyuki; Ogino, Nobuchika; Furukawa, Mariko; Hangai, Masanori; Kazama, Shigeyasu; Nishigaki, Shirou; Larson, Eric

    2012-01-01

    To determine the retinal thickness (RT), after vitrectomy with internal limiting membrane (ILM) peeling, for an idiopathic macular hole (MH) or an epiretinal membrane (ERM). Also, to investigate the effect of a dissociated optic nerve fiber layer (DONFL) appearance on RT. A non-randomized, retrospective chart review was performed for 159 patients who had successful closure of a MH, with (n = 148), or without (n = 11), ILM peeling. Also studied were 117 patients who had successful removal of an ERM, with (n = 104), or without (n = 13), ILM peeling. The RT of the nine Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study areas was measured by spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). In the MH-with-ILM peeling and ERM-with-ILM peeling groups, the RT of the operated eyes was compared to the corresponding areas of normal fellow eyes. The inner temporal/inner nasal ratio (TNR) was used to assess the effect of ILM peeling on RT. The effects of DONFL appearance on RT were evaluated in only the MH-with-ILM peeling group. In the MH-with-ILM peeling group, the central, inner nasal, and outer nasal areas of the retina of operated eyes were significantly thicker than the corresponding areas of normal fellow eyes. In addition, the inner temporal, outer temporal, and inner superior retina was significantly thinner than in the corresponding areas of normal fellow eyes. Similar findings were observed regardless of the presence of a DONFL appearance. In the ERM-with-ILM peeling group, the retina of operated eyes was significantly thicker in all areas, except the inner and outer temporal areas. In the MH-with-ILM peeling group, the TNR was 0.86 in operated eyes, and 0.96 in fellow eyes (P < 0.001). In the ERM-with-ILM peeling group, the TNR was 0.84 in operated eyes, and 0.95 in fellow eyes (P < 0.001). TNR in operated eyes of the MH-without-ILM peeling group was 0.98, which was significantly greater than that of the MH-with-ILM peeling group (P < 0.001). TNR in the operated eyes

  13. Retinal thickness after vitrectomy and internal limiting membrane peeling for macular hole and epiretinal membrane

    PubMed Central

    Kumagai, Kazuyuki; Ogino, Nobuchika; Furukawa, Mariko; Hangai, Masanori; Kazama, Shigeyasu; Nishigaki, Shirou; Larson, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To determine the retinal thickness (RT), after vitrectomy with internal limiting membrane (ILM) peeling, for an idiopathic macular hole (MH) or an epiretinal membrane (ERM). Also, to investigate the effect of a dissociated optic nerve fiber layer (DONFL) appearance on RT. Methods A non-randomized, retrospective chart review was performed for 159 patients who had successful closure of a MH, with (n = 148), or without (n = 11), ILM peeling. Also studied were 117 patients who had successful removal of an ERM, with (n = 104), or without (n = 13), ILM peeling. The RT of the nine Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study areas was measured by spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). In the MH-with-ILM peeling and ERM-with-ILM peeling groups, the RT of the operated eyes was compared to the corresponding areas of normal fellow eyes. The inner temporal/inner nasal ratio (TNR) was used to assess the effect of ILM peeling on RT. The effects of DONFL appearance on RT were evaluated in only the MH-with-ILM peeling group. Results In the MH-with-ILM peeling group, the central, inner nasal, and outer nasal areas of the retina of operated eyes were significantly thicker than the corresponding areas of normal fellow eyes. In addition, the inner temporal, outer temporal, and inner superior retina was significantly thinner than in the corresponding areas of normal fellow eyes. Similar findings were observed regardless of the presence of a DONFL appearance. In the ERM-with-ILM peeling group, the retina of operated eyes was significantly thicker in all areas, except the inner and outer temporal areas. In the MH-with-ILM peeling group, the TNR was 0.86 in operated eyes, and 0.96 in fellow eyes (P < 0.001). In the ERM-with-ILM peeling group, the TNR was 0.84 in operated eyes, and 0.95 in fellow eyes (P < 0.001). TNR in operated eyes of the MH-without-ILM peeling group was 0.98, which was significantly greater than that of the MH-with-ILM peeling group (P < 0

  14. Intraoperative extraocular Indocyanine Green (IE-ICG) dye test: a new method of detecting a peeled internal limiting membrane.

    PubMed

    Park, K H; Hwang, J-M; Kim, J H; Yu, H G; Yu, Y S; Chung, H

    2008-03-01

    To develop an intraoperative, extraocular Indocyanine Green dye staining test (IE-ICG) for the differentiation of a peeled ILM from a thin epiretinal membrane, and to evaluate its efficacy. This was a consecutive observational case and laboratory observational series. We performed ILM peeling in patients with an idiopathic macular hole (MH, n = 10) and diabetic macular oedema (DME, n = 10) without vital dye staining such as ICG or Trypan Blue. We also performed membrane peeling in patients with an idiopathic epiretinal membrane (ERM, n = 10). Then, the peeled membranes were stained with ICG (1.25 mg/ml) beyond the operation field and examined under a light microscope. After this examination, membranes were fixed with glutaraldehyde, and an electron microscope was used to confirm whether they were ILMs or thin ERM. The concordance rates between surgeon's intraoperative impression of membranes (SI), IE-ICG results (IT) and histological findings (HF) of peeled membranes were evaluated to reveal the efficacy of IE-ICG. The ILMs were homogenously stained with ICG dye (positive IE-ICG), and the ERMs were not stained at all by ICG dye (negative IE-ICG). The concordance rate between IT and HF was 100% in all three groups of patients. However, concordance rates between SI and IT were 100% in MH, 80% in DME and 50% in ERM, respectively. The surgeon's impression of the membrane is inaccurate, especially in patients with idiopathic epiretinal membrane. Considering the cost, difficulties of tissue preparation, and the time-consuming process of histological confirmation of an ILM, IE-ICG may be a useful alternative for the differentiation of a peeled ILM and a thin ERM.

  15. Increased rho kinase activity in temporal artery biopsies from patients with giant cell arteritis.

    PubMed

    Lally, Lindsay; Pernis, Alessandra; Narula, Navneet; Huang, Wei-Ti; Spiera, Robert

    2015-03-01

    Aberrant rho kinase (ROCK) activity is implicated in the pathogenesis of several vascular diseases and is associated with Th17 differentiation. Th17 immune response is recognized in the pathogenesis of GCA. The aim of this study was to assess ROCK activity in GCA. All patients who underwent temporal artery biopsy (TAB) at a tertiary care centre over 5 years were identified and charts reviewed. Subjects were categorized into three groups: TAB-positive GCA, TAB-negative GCA and age- and sex-matched controls. TABs were stained for phosphorylated ezrin/radixin/moesin (pERM), a surrogate of ROCK activity, and reviewed by a pathologist blinded to clinical status. Three areas were scored for staining intensity on a scale of 0-2, with a maximum possible score of 6. Nineteen subjects with TAB-positive GCA, 17 with TAB-negative GCA and 18 controls were analysed. Compared with controls, GCA subjects with either positive or negative TABs had significantly higher pERM intensity scores (P = 0.0109). Adjusting for diabetes, hypertension, prednisone and statin use, GCA subjects still had higher pERM scores [odds ratio 7.3 (95% CI 1.9, 25.9), P = 0.0046]. The high pERM score had a sensitivity of 90% and a negative predictive value of 91% for the diagnosis of GCA in those with a negative TAB, compared with 51% sensitivity for histopathology alone. Subjects with GCA had more intense pERM staining in TAB specimens compared with age- and sex-matched controls, regardless of whether TAB was positive or negative by routine histopathology, suggesting increased ROCK activity in GCA. The ROCK pathway warrants further investigation in GCA, as it may have diagnostic significance in enhancing the sensitivity of TAB. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Genetic Environment and Stability of cfr in Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus CM05

    PubMed Central

    Locke, Jeffrey B.; Rahawi, Shahad; LaMarre, Jacqueline; Mankin, Alexander S.

    2012-01-01

    The Cfr methyltransferase confers resistance to many 50S ribosomal subunit-targeted antibiotics, including linezolid (LZD), via methylation of the 23S rRNA base A2503 in the peptidyl transferase center. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain CM05 is the first clinical isolate documented to carry cfr. While cfr is typically plasmid borne, in CM05 it is located on the chromosome and is coexpressed with ermB as part of the mlr operon. Here we evaluated the chromosomal locus, association with mobile genetic elements, and stability of the cfr insertion region in CM05. The cfr-containing mlr operon is located within a 15.5-kb plasmid-like insertion into 23S rRNA allele 4. The region surrounding the cfr gene has a high degree of sequence similarity to the broad-host-range toxin/antitoxin multidrug resistance plasmid pSM19035, including a second ermB gene downstream of the mlr locus and istAS-istBS. Analysis of several individual CM05 colonies revealed two distinct populations for which LZD MICs were either 8 or 2 μg/ml. In the LZDs colonies (designated CM05Δ), a recombination event involving the two ermB genes had occurred, resulting in the deletion of cfr and the 3′ flanking region (cfr-istAS-istBS-ermB). The fitness advantage of CM05Δ over CM05 (though not likely due to the cfr deletion itself) results in the predominance of CM05Δ in the absence of selective pressure. Minicircles resulting from the ermB recombination event and the novel association of cfr with the pSM19035 plasmid system support the potential for the continued dissemination of cfr. PMID:22024827

  17. Accuracy of the GEM-T2 geopotential from Geosat and ERS 1 crossover altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, C. A.; Klokočník, J.

    1994-05-01

    Extensive analyses of altimetrically determined sea height differences at crossovers have been used to assess the accuracy of the GEM-T2 geopotential. The orbits used were determined with GEM-T2 for Geosat in its 17-day Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) in 1986-1989 and ERS 1 in both its 3-day ERM in 1991-1992 and its 35-day ERM in 1992. The data examined are completely independent of the data used in GEM-T2's development though GEM-T2 had considerable use of Doppler tracking information on Geosat. The test of the radial accuracy of the ERS 1 orbit (98.5° inclination) is especially significant because it is not ``close'' to any other orbit well represented in GEM-T2. The assessment consists of a comparison of observed mean height differences at thousands of distinct geographic locations with error projections from the GEM-T2 covariance matrix which was estimated from other data sources. This first comprehensive, independent test of the purely radial accuracy of an orbit-geopotential model clearly shows that the covariant predictions for GEM-T2 are broadly reliable for this purpose. Thus, the agreement of crossover predictions and observations suggests that the total radial errors for these ERMs, due to only to GEM-T2 (but excluding the effects of initial state error) are about 23 cm for Geosat and 115 cm (rms) for ERS 1. However, there is little detailed agreement of measurements and predictions for ERS 1 and only partial agreement in detail for Geosat. Our 30,000 mean crossover discrepancies for Geosat (derived from ERM cycles 1-44) are also shown to reduce substantially the crossover height differences in cycles 45-61, almost exactly as predicted if these are the true GEM-T2 errors for this orbit.

  18. Tylosin susceptibility of Staphylococci from bovine mastitis.

    PubMed

    Entorf, Monika; Feßler, Andrea T; Kadlec, Kristina; Kaspar, Heike; Mankertz, Joachim; Peters, Thomas; Schwarz, Stefan

    2014-07-16

    Although the 16-membered macrolide tylosin is commonly used for the treatment of bovine mastitis, little information is currently available about the susceptibility of mastitis pathogens to tylosin. In the present study, 112 Staphylococcus aureus and 110 coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (CoNS) spp. isolates from cases of bovine mastitis were tested by broth microdilution and agar disk diffusion with 30 μg tylosin disks. Susceptibility to erythromycin was tested by broth microdilution and disk diffusion using 15 μg disks. Both test populations showed bimodal distributions of minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and zone diameters with eleven S. aureus and eight CoNS isolates showing tylosin MICs of ≥ 256 μg/ml and no zones of growth inhibition around the tylosin 30 μg disks. All 19 isolates with tylosin MICs of ≥ 256 μg/ml were also resistant to erythromycin. For six additional erythromycin-resistant isolates, tylosin MICs of 1-8 μg/ml were observed. One S. aureus and two CoNS isolates showed inducible macrolide resistance. PCR analysis of the 25 erythromycin-resistant staphylococcal isolates identified the resistance genes erm(A), erm(B), erm(C), erm(T), mph(C) and msr(A) alone or in different combinations. An excellent correlation between the results of the different tylosin susceptibility tests (broth microdilution versus disk diffusion) was seen for S. aureus and CoNS isolates. Since tylosin does not induce the expression of the aforementioned erm genes, isolates with an inducible resistance phenotype may - if only tylosin is tested - be falsely classified as tylosin-susceptible. Thus, erythromycin should be tested in parallel and tylosin should only be used for the treatment of infections caused by erythromycin-susceptible staphylococci. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Antimicrobial susceptibility and molecular subtypes of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from pig tonsils and cow’s milk in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chunping; Song, Li; Chen, Huijuan; Liu, Yang; Qin, Yuling; Ning, Yibao

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated and compared the antimicrobial resistance patterns and ribotypes of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from pig tonsils and cow’s milk in China. A total of 90 isolates of S. aureus was included: 42 strains were isolated from tonsils of pigs and 48 from half-udder milk. The broth microdilution method and the double-disc diffusion test (D test) were used for antimicrobial susceptibility testing. The mecA gene for methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and the ermA, ermB, ermC, and msrA genes for erythromycin-resistant strains were detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The isolates were ribotyped with the Riboprinter system. The highest frequency of resistance was observed with clindamycin (91.1%), followed by penicillin (90.0%), and erythromycin (85.6%). All strains were susceptible to vancomycin and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. The D test showed that 54.5% (42/77) of erythromycin-resistant isolates had the constitutive resistance phenotype and 45.5% (35/77) had the inducible resistance phenotype to clindamycin. A higher proportion of resistance to cephalosporins, macrolides, fluoroquinolones, and pleuromutilins was observed in pig isolates than in milk isolates (P < 0.05). The mecA gene was detected in all MRSA isolates; 89.6% of erythromycin-resistant strains harbored the ermC gene and 16.9% harbored the ermB gene. A total of 35 different ribogroups was found among the isolates investigated; 83.3% of pig strains belonged to 1 cluster with a similarity coefficient of 0.84. In contrast, 3 main clusters were observed among 68.8% of milk strains, which indicates a high degree of host specificity. PMID:23543952

  20. Prevalence of high-level gentamicin-resistant Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium in an Iranian hospital.

    PubMed

    Emaneini, M; Khoramian, B; Jabalameli, F; Beigverdi, R; Asadollahi, K; Taherikalani, M; Lari, A R

    2016-12-01

    This study was designed to determine the molecular characteristics and antimicrobial resistance of enterococcal strains isolated from patients admitted to an Iranian Hospital. Enterococcal strains were isolated from the burn patients. All strains were screened for genes encoding resistance to aminoglycoside [aac(6')-Ie-aph(2'')-Ia, aph (3'), ant (4')], resistance to vancomycin (vanA, vanB), resistance to tetracycline (tetK, tetL, tetM, tetO), and resistance to erythromycin (ermA, ermB, ermC) by PCR and multiplex PCR-based methods. Genetic diversity was evaluated via Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-PCR. All enterococcal isolates showed complete sensitivity to vancomycin with MIC ≤ 0.5μg/ml. Resistance to gentamicin, tetracycline, erythromycin, ciprofloxacin or quinopristin-dalfopristin was detected, whilst more than 96.2% of isolates were high-level gentamicinresistant (HLGR) and multiple drug resistant. The most prevalent aminoglycoside resistance gene was aac(6')-Ie-aph(2'')-Ia, that was found in 96.2% (26/27) of the isolates. The most prevalent tetracycline resistance genes were tetM, found in 85.1% (23/27) followed by tetL and tetO found in 7.4% (2/27) of the isolates. The ermA and ermB genes were detected in 33.3% (9/27) and 44.4% (12/27) of the isolates respectively. RAPD-PCR analysis yielded 17 distinct profiles among 27 investigated isolates. One cluster of isolates shared the same RAPD pattern, while 16 isolates had unique RAPD pattern. Our study showed that during the examination time period one RAPD genotype was the common type and was disseminated among patients in the burn unit. Interestingly, most of these strains had an identical or very similar antibiotic and gene resistance pattern.

  1. Dominance of clonal complex 10 among the levofloxacin-resistant Streptococcus agalactiae isolated from bacteremic patients in a Korean hospital.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Hyejin; Park, Yeon-Joon; Kim, Yong-Kyun; Chang, Jiyoung; Yu, Jin Kyung

    2014-08-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae has emerged as an important cause of invasive infection in adults. Forty-nine S. agalactiae isolates (41 from adults and 8 from neonates) were collected during a 4-year period (2010-2013) and analyzed by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Antibiotic susceptibility to erythromycin, clindamycin and levofloxacin was determined and the determinants of resistance (ermA, ermB, ermC, mefA, lnuB) were detected by PCR and mutation in gyrA, gyrB, parC and parE gene was investigated by sequence analysis. They were resolved into 14 sequence types (STs) and belonged to five clonal complexes (CCs). The distribution of CC was significantly different according to the age group; CC1 (18/41) and CC10 (13/41) was the most common among the adult isolates but CC19 (5/8) was predominant among the neonatal isolates. The resistance rate to erythromycin, clindamycin was 18.4% and 24.5%, respectively. Among the 13 strains resistant to erythromycin and/or clindamycin, two isolates harbored ermA and 10 isolates harbored ermB. The levofloxacin resistance rate was very high (32.7%) and was significantly higher in CC10 (71.4%). All the levofloxacin-resistant isolates had identical gyrA substitution (Ser81Leu) but parC substitution was different according to the CCs. The additional mutation in parE (His221Tyr) was found only in CC19. Continuous monitoring of the fluoroquinolone resistance and genotypic distribution among S. agalactiae is needed. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. PubMed Central

    KHORAMIAN, B.; JABALAMELI, F.; BEIGVERDI, R.; ASADOLLAHI, K.; TAHERIKALANI, M.; LARI, A.R.

    2016-01-01

    Summary This study was designed to determine the molecular characteristics and antimicrobial resistance of enterococcal strains isolated from patients admitted to an Iranian Hospital. Enterococcal strains were isolated from the burn patients. All strains were screened for genes encoding resistance to aminoglycoside [aac(6')-Ie-aph(2'')-Ia, aph (3'), ant (4')], resistance to vancomycin (vanA, vanB), resistance to tetracycline (tetK, tetL, tetM, tetO), and resistance to erythromycin (ermA, ermB, ermC) by PCR and multiplex PCR-based methods. Genetic diversity was evaluated via Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-PCR. All enterococcal isolates showed complete sensitivity to vancomycin with MIC ≤ 0.5μg/ml. Resistance to gentamicin, tetracycline, erythromycin, ciprofloxacin or quinopristin-dalfopristin was detected, whilst more than 96.2% of isolates were high-level gentamicinresistant (HLGR) and multiple drug resistant. The most prevalent aminoglycoside resistance gene was aac(6')-Ie-aph(2'')-Ia, that was found in 96.2% (26/27) of the isolates. The most prevalent tetracycline resistance genes were tetM, found in 85.1% (23/27) followed by tetL and tetO found in 7.4% (2/27) of the isolates. The ermA and ermB genes were detected in 33.3% (9/27) and 44.4% (12/27) of the isolates respectively. RAPD-PCR analysis yielded 17 distinct profiles among 27 investigated isolates. One cluster of isolates shared the same RAPD pattern, while 16 isolates had unique RAPD pattern. Our study showed that during the examination time period one RAPD genotype was the common type and was disseminated among patients in the burn unit. Interestingly, most of these strains had an identical or very similar antibiotic and gene resistance pattern. PMID:28167856

  3. Mechanisms of resistance for Streptococcus pyogenes in northern Utah.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Ryan A; Stephenson, Ryan M; East, Destry L; Wright, Scott

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to (1) determine the rates of penicillin and erythromycin resistance among Streptococcus pyogenes isolates in northern Utah, and (2) determine the genotype of the erythromycin resistant strains, thereby providing information regarding the mechanism of the resistance. Seven hundred thirty-nine isolates of S. pyogenes were identified on 5% Sheep Blood Agar. Susceptibility to erythromycin and penicillin was performed using Muller-Hinton blood agar. All isolates resistant to erythromycin were then genotyped using PCR primers specific to one of the following: mefA gene, indicating the mechanism of resistance was an efflux pump; ermA gene, in which the mechanism was inducible methylation of the ribosomes; and ermB indicating constitutive methylation of the ribosomes. This study was conducted at Weber State University, in the Department of Clinical Laboratory Sciences. Samples were collected from 9 clinics ranging from North Ogden to Taylorsville, Utah. All samples were previously tested positive for S. pyogenes by the clinic from where the samples were collected. Of the 739 S. pyogenes isolates tested, 2.4% were resistant to erythromycin with no resistance observed to penicillin. Of the strains that displayed some degree of resistance, the gene frequencies observed were as follows: 48.1% mefA, 26.0% ermA, 3.7% ermB, and 22.2% multiple genes. The most common genotype was mefA, indicating that the efflux pump (M phenotype) is the most common mechanism in the surveyed area, followed by ermA, which produces the inducible methylating enzyme. A significant number of isolates was also observed to express both the efflux pump and the constitutive methylating enzyme.

  4. Global 3D Imaging of Yersinia ruckeri Bacterin Uptake in Rainbow Trout Fry

    PubMed Central

    Ohtani, Maki; Villumsen, Kasper Rømer; Koppang, Erling Olaf; Raida, Martin Kristian

    2015-01-01

    Yersinia ruckeri is the causative agent of enteric redmouth disease (ERM) in rainbow trout, and the first commercially available fish vaccine was an immersion vaccine against ERM consisting of Y. ruckeri bacterin. The ERM immersion vaccine has been successfully used in aquaculture farming of salmonids for more than 35 years. The gills and the gastrointestinal (GI) tract are believed to be the portals of antigen uptake during waterborne vaccination against ERM; however, the actual sites of bacterin uptake are only partly understood. In order to obtain insight into bacterin uptake during waterborne vaccination, optical projection tomography (OPT) together with immunohistochemistry (IHC) was applied to visualize bacterin uptake and processing in whole rainbow trout fry. Visualization by OPT revealed that the bacterin was initially taken up via gill lamellae from within 30 seconds post vaccination. Later, bacterin uptake was detected on other mucosal surfaces such as skin and olfactory bulb from 5 to 30 minutes post vaccination. The GI tract was found to be filled with a complex of bacterin and mucus at 3 hours post vaccination and the bacterin remained in the GI tract for at least 24 hours. Large amounts of bacterin were present in the blood, and an accumulation of bacterin was found in filtering lymphoid organs such as spleen and trunk kidney where the bacterin accumulates 24 hours post vaccination as demonstrated by OPT and IHC. These results suggest that bacterin is taken up via the gill epithelium in the earliest phases of the bath exposure and from the GI tract in the later phase. The bacterin then enters the blood circulatory system, after which it is filtered by spleen and trunk kidney, before finally accumulating in lymphoid organs where adaptive immunity against ERM is likely to develop. PMID:25658600

  5. Genetic environment and stability of cfr in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus CM05.

    PubMed

    Locke, Jeffrey B; Rahawi, Shahad; Lamarre, Jacqueline; Mankin, Alexander S; Shaw, Karen Joy

    2012-01-01

    The Cfr methyltransferase confers resistance to many 50S ribosomal subunit-targeted antibiotics, including linezolid (LZD), via methylation of the 23S rRNA base A2503 in the peptidyl transferase center. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain CM05 is the first clinical isolate documented to carry cfr. While cfr is typically plasmid borne, in CM05 it is located on the chromosome and is coexpressed with ermB as part of the mlr operon. Here we evaluated the chromosomal locus, association with mobile genetic elements, and stability of the cfr insertion region in CM05. The cfr-containing mlr operon is located within a 15.5-kb plasmid-like insertion into 23S rRNA allele 4. The region surrounding the cfr gene has a high degree of sequence similarity to the broad-host-range toxin/antitoxin multidrug resistance plasmid pSM19035, including a second ermB gene downstream of the mlr locus and istAS-istBS. Analysis of several individual CM05 colonies revealed two distinct populations for which LZD MICs were either 8 or 2 μg/ml. In the LZD(s) colonies (designated CM05Δ), a recombination event involving the two ermB genes had occurred, resulting in the deletion of cfr and the 3' flanking region (cfr-istAS-istBS-ermB). The fitness advantage of CM05Δ over CM05 (though not likely due to the cfr deletion itself) results in the predominance of CM05Δ in the absence of selective pressure. Minicircles resulting from the ermB recombination event and the novel association of cfr with the pSM19035 plasmid system support the potential for the continued dissemination of cfr.

  6. Short-term chromium (VI) exposure increases phosphorus uptake by the extraradical mycelium of the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Rhizophagus irregularis MUCL 41833.

    PubMed

    Gil-Cardeza, María Lourdes; Calonne-Salmon, Maryline; Gómez, Elena; Declerck, Stéphane

    2017-11-01

    Hexavalent chromium is a potent carcinogen, while phosphorus is an essential nutrient. The role of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) in the uptake of P is well known and was also reported, at low levels, for Cr. However, it is unclear whether the uptake of Cr can impact the short-term uptake dynamics of P since both elements have a similar chemical structure and may thus potentially compete with each other during the uptake process. This study investigated the impact of Cr(VI) on short-term P uptake by the AMF Rhizophagus irregularis MUCL 41833 in Medicago truncatula. Bi-compartmented Petri plates were used to spatially separate a root compartment (RC) from a hyphal compartment (HC) using a whole plant in vitro culture system. The HC was supplemented with Cr(VI). Chromium(VI) as well as total Cr and P were monitored during 16 h within the HC and their concentrations determined by the end of the experiment within roots and shoots. Our results indicated that the uptake and translocation of Cr from hyphae to roots was a fast process: roots in which the extraradical mycelium (ERM) was exposed to Cr(VI) accumulated more Cr than roots of which the ERM was not exposed to Cr(VI) or was dead. Our results further confirmed that dead ERM immobilized more Cr than alive ERM. Finally our results demonstrated that the short exposure to Cr(VI) was sufficient to stimulate P uptake by the ERM and that the stimulation process began within the first 4 h of exposure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Antimicrobial Resistance and Molecular Characteristics of Nasal Staphylococcus aureus Isolates From Newly Admitted Inpatients.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xu; Sun, Kangde; Dong, Danfeng; Luo, Qingqiong; Peng, Yibing; Chen, Fuxiang

    2016-05-01

    Staphylococcus aureus, or methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), is a significant pathogen in both nosocomial and community infections. Community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA) strains tend to be multi-drug resistant and to invade hospital settings. This study aimed to assess the antimicrobial resistance and molecular characteristicsof nasal S. aureus among newlyadmitted inpatients.In the present study, 66 S. aureus isolates, including 10 healthcare-associated MRSA (HA-MRSA), 8 CA-MRSA, and 48 methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) strains, were found in the nasal cavities of 62 patients by screening 292 newlyadmitted patients. Antimicrobial resistance and molecular characteristics of these isolates, including spa-type, sequence type (ST) and SCCmec type, were investigated. All isolates were sensitive to linezolid, teicoplanin, and quinupristin/dalfopristin, but high levels of resistance to penicillin and erythromycin were detected. According to D-test and erm gene detection results, the cMLS(B) and iMLS(B) phenotypes were detected in 24 and 16 isolates, respectively. All 10 HA-MRSA strains displayed the cMLS(B) phenotypemediated by ermA or ermA/ermC, while the cMLS(B) CA-MRSA and MSSA strains carried the ermB gene. Molecular characterization revealedall 10 HA-MRSA strains were derived from the ST239-SCCmec III clone, and four out of eight CA-MRSA strains were t437-ST59-SCCmec V. The results suggest that patients play an indispensable role in transmitting epidemic CA-MRSA and HA-MRSA strains.

  8. Correlations between M-CHARTS and PHP findings and subjective perception of metamorphopsia in patients with macular diseases.

    PubMed

    Arimura, Eiko; Matsumoto, Chota; Nomoto, Hiroki; Hashimoto, Shigeki; Takada, Sonoko; Okuyama, Sachiko; Shimomura, Yoshikazu

    2011-01-05

    To assess the correlations between a patient's subjective perception of metamorphopsia and the clinical measurements of metamorphopsia by M-CHARTS and PreView PHP (PHP). The authors designed a 10-item questionnaire focusing on the symptoms of metamorphopsia and verified its validity with a Rasch analysis. M-CHARTS measured the minimum visual angle of a dotted line needed to detect metamorphopsia, and PHP used the hyperacuity function for detection. Subjects were 39 patients with idiopathic epiretinal membrane (ERM), 22 patients with idiopathic macular hole (M-hole), 19 patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD), and 51 healthy controls. Rasch analysis suggested the elimination of one question. The nine-item questionnaire score significantly correlated to the M-CHARTS score in ERM (r = 0.59; P = 0.0004) but not in M-hole and to the PHP result in AMD (r = -0.29; P = 0.04) but not in ERM. Eighty percent of ERM patients with greater horizontal M-CHARTS score subjectively perceived horizontal metamorphopsia more often. M-CHARTS showed better sensitivities than PHP in both ERM (89% vs. 42%) and AMD (74% vs. 68%) and better specificity (100% vs. 71%) in healthy controls. Rasch analysis indicated that the present form of the questionnaire is better suited for moderate to severe cases of metamorphopsia than for mild cases. The questionnaire appears to be a valid assessment of patient subjective perception of metamorphopsia and can be used to supplement the clinical measurements of metamorphopsia by M-CHARTS and PHP in patients with macular diseases.

  9. Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of multidrug-resistant Bacteroides, Parabacteroides spp., and Pseudoflavonifractor from a Costa Rican hospital.

    PubMed

    Molina, José; Barrantes, Gloriana; Quesada-Gómez, Carlos; Rodríguez, César; Rodríguez-Cavallini, Evelyn

    2014-10-01

    Multidrug resistance in Bacteroides spp. and related genera is uncommon and has not been described in Latin America until now. We studied phenotypically and genotypically the multidrug resistance of 10 clinical strains of Bacteroides, two of Parabacteroides distasonis, and one of Pseudoflavonifractor capillosus recovered in a national hospital between 2006 and 2010. To this end, we determined minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of amoxicillin, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, cefotaxime, imipenem, clindamycin, ciprofloxacin, tetracycline, and metronidazole using E-tests, evaluated the isolates for β-lactamases with nitrocefin hydrolysis tests, performed a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based screening of erm, tet, and nim genes, obtained partial gyrA sequences, and studied the effect of tazobactam and efflux pump inhibitors (EPI) on the MIC of cefotaxime, clindamycin, and ciprofloxacin. Three isolates were resistant to four different classes of antibiotics and 10 were resistant to three. β-lactam resistance was in most cases due to β-lactamases susceptible of partial inhibition by tazobactam. Ten isolates were cfxA-positive and two isolates had cepA. Twelve isolates were highly resistant to clindamycin and nine were highly resistant to ciprofloxacin. However, these phenotypes were not linked to ermA, ermB, ermF, and ermG or mutations in gyrA. Addition of EPI lowered the MICs of clindamycin and ciprofloxacin of one and four isolates, respectively. Twelve isolates had tetQ and four were positive for tetM. In both cases, genes of the two-component system RteAB accompanied tet genes. Although metronidazole susceptibility was universal, nim genes were not present. To our knowledge, this is the first report of multidrug resistance due to less commonly identified or alternative mechanisms in strains of Bacteroides and related species from a developing country.

  10. Abundance and distribution of Macrolide-Lincosamide-Streptogramin resistance genes in an anaerobic-aerobic system treating spiramycin production wastewater.

    PubMed

    Liu, Miaomiao; Ding, Ran; Zhang, Yu; Gao, Yingxin; Tian, Zhe; Zhang, Tong; Yang, Min

    2014-10-15

    The behaviors of the Macrolide-Lincosamide-Streptogramin (MLS) resistance genes were investigated in an anaerobic-aerobic pilot-scale system treating spiramycin (SPM) production wastewater. After screening fifteen typical MLS resistance genes with different mechanisms using conventional PCR, eight detected genes were determined by quantitative PCR, together with three mobile elements. Aerobic sludge in the pilot system exhibited a total relative abundance of MLS resistance genes (per 16S rRNA gene) 2.5 logs higher than those in control samples collected from sewage and inosine wastewater treatment systems (P < 0.05), implying the presence of SPM could induce the production of MLS resistance genes. However, the total relative gene abundance in anaerobic sludge (4.3 × 10(-1)) was lower than that in aerobic sludge (3.7 × 10(0)) despite of the higher SPM level in anaerobic reactor, showing the advantage of anaerobic treatment in reducing the production of MLS resistance genes. The rRNA methylase genes (erm(B), erm(F), erm(X)) were the most abundant in the aerobic sludge (5.3 × 10(-1)-1.7 × 10(0)), followed by esterase gene ere(A) (1.3 × 10(-1)) and phosphorylase gene mph(B) (5.7 × 10(-2)). In anaerobic sludge, erm(B), erm(F), ere(A), and msr(D) were the major ones (1.2 × 10(-2)-3.2 × 10(-1)). These MLS resistance genes (except for msr(D)) were positively correlated with Class 1 integron (r(2) = 0.74-0.93, P < 0.05), implying the significance of horizontal transfer in their proliferation.

  11. Effect of steam-flaked corn and soybeans on muscle and intramuscular fatty acid composition in Holstein calves.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y Q; He, D C; Meng, Q X; Wang, D C

    2015-12-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of steam-flaked corn grains and soybeans on muscle fatty acid composition. Thirty Holstein bull calves (21 ± 3 d) were divided into 3 groups according to birth date and BW and were randomly assigned to receive fresh milk and a commercial pelleted starter diet containing extruded corn and soybean (ECS), steam-flaked corn and soybean (SFCS), or ground corn and raw soybean (GCS). The calves were fed the designated diet from 3 to 13 wk of age, after which they were slaughtered. The supraspinatus (CTM), longissimus lumborum (RLM), and spinalis dorsi (ERM) were analyzed to determine the chemical and intramuscular fatty acid composition. The fatty acid composition of muscle and its deposition differed among calves fed different starter feeds. Medium-chain fatty acid levels of the RLM and CTM were greater in GCS-fed calves than in ECS- and SFCS-fed calves ( < 0.05). Extruded processing increased the content of linoleic, linolenic, and arachidonic acids of the RLM ( < 0.05). The palmitoleic and -vaccenic acid content of the ERM were greater in GCS-fed calves than in ECS- or SFCS-fed calves ( < 0.05). No significant differences were observed among the 3 diets with respect to the stearic, oleic, linoleic, -9 -11 CLA, or arachidonic acid content of the ERM ( > 0.05). The levels of -3 and -6 fatty acids were similar among the 3 groups; a lower -6:-3 PUFA ratio was observed in GCS-fed calves ( < 0.05). The cereal processing method of the calf starter feed had no significant effect on the chemical composition of the CTM, RLM, or ERM. Therefore, different methods of processing corn and soybean in calf starter feeds had no effect on the chemical composition of the RLM, CTM, or ERM but had a significant effect on the intramuscular fatty acid composition.

  12. Staphylococcus aureus nasal carriage, virulence traits, antibiotic resistance mechanisms, and genetic lineages in healthy humans in Spain, with detection of CC398 and CC97 strains.

    PubMed

    Lozano, Carmen; Gómez-Sanz, Elena; Benito, Daniel; Aspiroz, Carmen; Zarazaga, Myriam; Torres, Carmen

    2011-08-01

    S. aureus nasal carriage was investigated in 278 healthy humans, determining the antibiotic resistance mechanisms, virulence traits, and genetic lineages of recovered iso