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Sample records for erythrina speciosa andrews

  1. Principal component and Tucker3 analyses of high performance liquid chromatography with diode-array detection fingerprints of crude extracts of Erythrina speciosa Andrews leaves.

    PubMed

    Soares, Patricia Kaori; Bruns, Roy Edward; Scarminio, Ieda Spacino

    2012-07-29

    Mixtures of ethanol, dichloromethane, hexane and acetone obtained according to a statistical design have been used to extract substances from Erythrina speciosa Andrew leaves for chromatographic fingerprinting. The plant extracts from each mixture were analyzed by HPLC-DAD providing UV-vis spectra for each chromatographic peak. These chromatograms and spectra for the design mixtures were then treated with principal component (PCA), Tucker3 and PARAFAC analyses. PCA indicated the existence of five different chromatographic fingerprints for the leave extracts depending on the solvent mixture composition. Different chromatographic peak areas were strongly correlated with the mixture proportions of acetone, dichloromethane and ethanol. Tucker3 and PARAFAC analyses were very useful for identifying simultaneous correlations between chromatographic peak areas, spectral band absorbances and solvent proportions. The acetone proportion was highly correlated with the area of the 3.69 min retention time peak and the spectral absorbances between 250 and 260 nm, consistent with the presence of natural polyphenols. The dichloromethane mixture proportion was strongly correlated with the 12.19 min chromatographic peak area and a single spectral absorbance at 201 nm. This spectral absorption is characteristic of the electronic structures of terpenes and alkaloids.

  2. Erythrina speciosa (Leguminosae-Papilionoideae) under soil water saturation: morphophysiological and growth responses

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Camilo L.; Sanches, Maria Cristina; Tucci, Maria Luiza S.; Sousa, Carlos A. F.; Cuzzuol, Geraldo Rogério F.; Joly, Carlos A.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims Erythrina speciosa is a Neotropical tree that grows mainly in moist habitats. To characterize the physiological, morphological and growth responses to soil water saturation, young plants of E. speciosa were subjected experimentally to soil flooding. Methods Flooding was imposed from 2 to 4 cm above the soil surface in water-filled tanks for 60 d. Non-flooded (control) plants were well watered, but never flooded. The net CO2 exchange (ACO2), stomatal conductance (gs) and intercellular CO2 concentration (Ci) were assessed for 60 d. Soluble sugar and free amino acid concentrations and the proportion of free amino acids were determined at 0, 7, 10, 21, 28 and 45 d of treatments. After 28, 45 and 60 d, dry masses of leaves, stems and roots were determined. Stem and root cross-sections were viewed using light microscopy. Key Results The ACO2 and gs were severely reduced by flooding treatment, but only for the first 10 d. The soluble sugars and free amino acids increased until the tenth day but decreased subsequently. The content of asparagine in the roots showed a drastic decrease while those of alanine and γ-aminobutyric increased sharply throughout the first 10 d after flooding. From the 20th day on, the flooded plants reached ACO2 and gs values similar to those observed for non-flooded plants. These events were coupled with the development of lenticels, adventitious roots and aerenchyma tissue of honeycomb type. Flooding reduced the growth rate and altered carbon allocation. The biomass allocated to the stem was higher and the root mass ratio was lower for flooded plants when compared with non-flooded plants. Conclusions Erythrina speciosa showed 100 % survival until the 60th day of flooding and was able to recover its metabolism. The recovery during soil flooding seems to be associated with morphological alterations, such as development of hypertrophic lenticels, adventitious roots and aerenchyma tissue, and with the maintenance of neutral amino

  3. Dormancy-breaking requirements of Sophora tomentosa and Erythrina speciosa (Fabaceae) seeds.

    PubMed

    Luzia Delgado, Carolina Maria; Souza de Paula, Alexandre; Santos, Marisa; Silveira Paulilo, Maria Terezinha

    2015-03-01

    The physical dormancy of seeds has been poorly studied in species from tropical forests, such as the Atlantic Forest. This study aimed to examine the effect of moderate alternating temperatures on breaking the physical dormancy of seeds, the morphoanatomy and histochemistry of seed coats, and to locate the structure/region responsible for water entrance into the seed, after breaking the physical dormancy of seeds of two woody Fabaceae (subfamily Faboideae) species that occur in the Brazilian Atlantic Forest: Sophora tomentosa and Erythrina speciosa. To assess temperature effect, seeds were incubated in several temperature values that occur in the Atlantic Forest. For morphological and histochemical studies, sections of fixed seeds were subjected to different reagents, and were observed using light or epifluorescence microscopy, to analyze the anatomy and histochemistry of the seed coat. Treated and nonreated seeds were also analyzed using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) to observe the morphology of the seed coat. To localize the specific site of water entrance, the seeds were blocked with glue in different regions and also immersed in ink. In the present work a maximum temperature fluctuation of 15 degrees C was applied during a period of 20 days and these conditions did not increase the germination of S. tomentosa or E. speciosa. These results may indicate that these seeds require larger fluctuation of temperature than the applied or/and longer period of exposition to the temperature fluctuation. Blocking experiments water inlet combined with SEM analysis of the structures of seed coat for both species showed that besides the lens, the hilum and micropyle are involved in water absorption in seeds scarified with hot water. In seeds of E. speciosa the immersion of scarified seeds into an aniline aqueous solution showed that the solution first entered the seed through the hilum. Both species showed seed morphological and anatomical features for seed coats of the

  4. Ultrastructure and post-floral secretion of the pericarpial nectaries of Erythrina speciosa (Fabaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Paiva, Elder Antônio Sousa

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims The occurrence of nectaries in fruits is restricted to a minority of plant families and consistent reports of their occurrence are not found associated with Fabaceae, mainly showing cellular details. The present study aims to describe the anatomical organization and ultrastructure of the pericarpial nectaries (PNs) in Erythrina speciosa, a bird-pollinated species, discussing functional aspects of these unusual structures. Methods Samples of floral buds, ovaries of flowers at anthesis and fruits at several developmental stages were fixed and processed by the usual methods for studies using light, and scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Nectar samples collected by filter paper wicks were subjected to chemical analysis using thin-layer chromatography. Key Results The PNs are distributed in isolation on the exocarp. Each PN is represented by a single hyaline trichome that consists of a basal cell at epidermal level, stalk cell(s) and a small secretory multicellular head. The apical stalk cell shows inner periclinal and anticlinal walls impregnated by lipids and lignin and has dense cytoplasm with a prevalence of mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum. The secretory cells show voluminous nuclei and dense cytoplasm, which predominantly has dictyosomes, rough endoplasmic reticulum, plastids, mitochondria and free ribosomes. At the secretory stage the periplasmic space is prominent and contains secretion residues. Tests for sugar indicate the presence of non-reducing sugars in the secretory cells. Nectar samples from PNs contained sucrose, glucose and fructose. Conclusions The secretory stage of these PNs extends until fruit maturation and evidence suggests that the energetic source of nectar production is based on pericarp photosynthesis. Patrolling ants were seen foraging on fruits during all stages of fruit development, which suggests that the PNs mediate a symbiotic relationship between ants and plant, similar to the common role of many

  5. Interview with Deborah Andrews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Cynthia

    2005-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Deborah Andrews about her experiences during her editorship of "Business Communication Quarterly." From June 1997 to March 2005, Debby served as editor of the journal, encouraging all readers to ask important questions about their work: How should we define business communication? On which disciplines and…

  6. Andrew W. S. In

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nishimoto, Warren

    2007-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Andrew W. S. In, professor and dean in the University of Hawai'i's College of Education from 1951 to 1984. Born and raised in Honolulu, In attended Royal Elementary, Central Junior High, and McKinley High schools, graduating from McKinley in 1938. He then attended the University of Hawai'i Teachers College…

  7. Andrew: CMU's New Computing Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zabowski, Susan

    1986-01-01

    Reviews the progress and problems associated with the development of Carnegie Mellon University's new computing and communications system, "Andrew." Describes the accomplishments and capacities of the system and provides examples of the programs developed for "Andrew." (ML)

  8. Andrew integrated reservoir description

    SciTech Connect

    Todd, S.P.

    1996-12-31

    The Andrew field is an oil and gas accumulation in Palaeocene deep marine sands in the Central North Sea. It is currently being developed with mainly horizontal oil producers. Because of the field`s relatively small reserves (mean 118 mmbbls), the performance of each of the 10 or so horizontal wells is highly important. Reservoir description work at sanction time concentrated on supporting the case that the field could be developed commercially with the minimum number of wells. The present Integrated Reservoir Description (IRD) is focussed on delivering the next level of detail that will impact the understanding of the local reservoir architecture and dynamic performance of each well. Highlights of Andrew IRD Include: (1) Use of a Reservoir Uncertainty Statement (RUS) developed at sanction time to focus the descriptive effort of both asset, support and contract petrotechnical staff, (2) High resolution biostratigraphic correlation to support confident zonation of the reservoir, (3) Detailed sedimentological analysis of the core including the use of dipmeter to interpret channel/sheet architecture to provide new insights into reservoir heterogeneity; (4) Integrated petrographical and petrophysical investigation of the controls on Sw-Height and relative permeability of water; (5) Fluids description using oil geochemistry and Residual Salt Analysis Sr isotope studies. Andrew IRD has highlighted several important risks to well performance, including the influence of more heterolithic intervals on gas breakthrough and the controls on water coning exerted by suppressed water relative permeability in the transition zone.

  9. Andrew integrated reservoir description

    SciTech Connect

    Todd, S.P.

    1996-01-01

    The Andrew field is an oil and gas accumulation in Palaeocene deep marine sands in the Central North Sea. It is currently being developed with mainly horizontal oil producers. Because of the field's relatively small reserves (mean 118 mmbbls), the performance of each of the 10 or so horizontal wells is highly important. Reservoir description work at sanction time concentrated on supporting the case that the field could be developed commercially with the minimum number of wells. The present Integrated Reservoir Description (IRD) is focussed on delivering the next level of detail that will impact the understanding of the local reservoir architecture and dynamic performance of each well. Highlights of Andrew IRD Include: (1) Use of a Reservoir Uncertainty Statement (RUS) developed at sanction time to focus the descriptive effort of both asset, support and contract petrotechnical staff, (2) High resolution biostratigraphic correlation to support confident zonation of the reservoir, (3) Detailed sedimentological analysis of the core including the use of dipmeter to interpret channel/sheet architecture to provide new insights into reservoir heterogeneity; (4) Integrated petrographical and petrophysical investigation of the controls on Sw-Height and relative permeability of water; (5) Fluids description using oil geochemistry and Residual Salt Analysis Sr isotope studies. Andrew IRD has highlighted several important risks to well performance, including the influence of more heterolithic intervals on gas breakthrough and the controls on water coning exerted by suppressed water relative permeability in the transition zone.

  10. Systemically applied insecticides for treatment of erythrina gall wasp, quadrastichus erythrinae kim hymenoptera: Eulophidae

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doccola, J.J.; Smith, S.L.; Strom, B.L.; Medeiros, A.C.; Von Allmen, E.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The erythrina gall wasp (EGW), believed native to Africa, is a recently described species and now serious invasive pest of Erythrina (coral trees) in tropical and subtropical locales. Erythrina are favored ornamental and landscape trees, as well as native members of threatened ecosystems. The EGW is a tiny, highly mobile, highly invasive wasp that deforms (galls) host trees causing severe defoliation and tree death. The first detection of EGW in the United States was in O'ahu, Hawai'i in April 2005. It quickly spread through the Hawai'ian island chain (U.S.) killing ornamental and native Erythrina in as little as two years. At risk are endemic populations of Erythrinaas well as ornamental landscape species in the same genus, the latter of which have already been killed and removed from O'ahu at a cost of more than USD $1 million. Because EGW are so small and spread so quickly, host injury is usually detected before adult wasps are observed, making prophylactic treatments less likely than therapeutic ones. This study evaluates two stem-injected insecticides, imidacloprid (IMA-jet??) and emamectin benzoate, delivered through Arborjet Tree I.V.?? equipment, for their ability to affect E. sandwicensis (wiliwili) canopy demise under severe EGW exposure. IMA-jet, applied at a rate of 0.16 g AI/cm basal diameter (0.4 g AI/in. dia.), was the only effective treatment for maintaining canopy condition of wiliwili trees. Emamectin benzoate, applied at a rate of -0.1 g AI/cm basal diameter (-0.25 g AI/in. dia.), was not effective in this application, although it was intermediate in effect between IMA-jet and untreated trees. The relatively high concentrations of imidacloprid in leaves, and its durability for at least 13 months in native wiliwili growing on a natural, dryland site, suggest that treatment applications against EGW can impact canopy recovery even under suboptimal site and tree conditions. ?? 2009 International Society of Arboriculture.

  11. Faces of Marshall: Erika Andrews

    NASA Video Gallery

    Several Marshall employees were interviewed as part of Marshall's 50th Anniversary activities. Human Resources Specialist Erika Andrews tells how she came to work at NASA as a specialist in organiz...

  12. Mating behavior of Diabrotica speciosa (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae).

    PubMed

    Nardi, C; Luvizotto, R A; Parra, J R P; Bento, J M S

    2012-06-01

    Diabrotica speciosa (Germar) is an economically important pest of Neotropical cultures and represents a quarantine risk for Neartic and Paleartic Regions. Despite its agricultural importance, few studies have been done on mating behavior and chemical communication, which has delayed the development of behavioral techniques for population management, such as the use of pheromone traps. In this study, we determined 1) the age at first mating; 2) diel rhythm of matings; 3) number of matings over 7 d; 4) the sequence of D. speciosa activities during premating, mating, and postmating; 5) the duration of each activity; and 6) response to male and female conspecific volatiles in Y-tube olfactometer. The first mating occurred between the third and seventh day after adult emergence and the majority of pairs mated on the fourth day after emergence. Pairs of D. speciosa showed a daily rhythm of mating with greater sexual activity between the end of the photophase and the first half of the scotophase. During the 7 d of observation, most pairs mated only once, although 30% mated two, three, or four times. In a Y-tube olfactometer, males were attracted by virgin females as well as by the volatile compounds emitted by females. Neither males nor their volatiles were attractive to either sex. Our observation provide information about mating behavior of D. speciosa, which will be useful in future research in chemical communication, such as identification of the pheromone and development of management techniques for this species using pheromone traps.

  13. Benevolent Builder: Appraising Andrew Carnegie.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deitch, Joseph

    1984-01-01

    Discussion of Andrew Carnegie era in American public library history focuses on library buildings financed and built in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The building design which Carnegie developed, surviving Carnegie libraries in Philadelphia, procedures for obtaining a library, and comparison of architectural attractiveness of Carnegie libraries with…

  14. The McAndrews Leadership Lecture: Origins

    PubMed Central

    Hamm, Anthony W.; Burkhart, Lori A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective This article describes the origins and rationale for the McAndrews Leadership Lecture and explains why the American Chiropractic Association honors George and Jerome McAndrews. Discussion George and Jerome McAndrews’ backgrounds demonstrate their leadership contributions to the chiropractic profession. Jerome McAndrews, a chiropractor, held substantial leadership roles in the chiropractic profession. George McAndrews, a lawyer, administered a permanent injunction forbidding the American Medical Association’s restraint of trade toward the chiropractic profession. Conclusion The American Chiropractic Association has established the McAndrews Leadership Lecture to honor their contributions to the chiropractic profession. PMID:26770176

  15. Samsonia erythrinae gen. nov., sp. nov., isolated from bark necrotic lesions of Erythrina sp., and discrimination of plant-pathogenic Enterobacteriaceae by phenotypic features.

    PubMed

    Sutra, L; Christen, R; Bollet, C; Simoneau, P; Gardan, L

    2001-07-01

    Bacterial strains isolated from diseased erythrina (Erythrina sp.) trees in Martinique (French West Indies) were studied using phenotypic tests, 16S rDNA sequence analysis and DNA-DNA hybridization. Numerical analysis of phenotypic characteristics showed that these strains formed an homogeneous phenon among plant-pathogenic Enterobacteriaceae, and gave useful and updated information for the identification of these bacteria. Results of DNA-DNA hybridization indicated that strains from erythrina belonged to a discrete genomospecies (89-100% hybridization) and had low levels of DNA relatedness (2-33% hybridization) with reference strains of phytopathogenic Erwinia, Brenneria, Pectobacterium, Pantoea and Enterobacter species. 16S rDNA sequence analysis using three different methods revealed that the position of strain CFBP 5236T isolated from erythrina was variable in the different trees, so that strains from erythrina could not be assigned to any recognized genus. It is proposed that these strains are included in a new genus, Samsonia. The name Samsonia erythrinae is proposed for the new species. The G+C content of the DNA of the type strain, CFBP 5236T (= ICMP 13937T), is 57.0 mol%.

  16. The Impeachment of Andrew Johnson. Web Lesson.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Constitutional Rights Foundation, Los Angeles, CA.

    This lesson presents the historical background of Abraham Lincoln's selection of Andrew Johnson as his running mate in the election of 1864. The lesson considers the climate in the U.S. Congress after President Lincoln's assassination. The details of the impeachment and trial of President Andrew Johnson are given. The lesson presents three…

  17. An Assessment of Wound Healing Potential of Argyreia speciosa Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Narayan Prasad; Rawat, Bindu; Rai, Vineet Kumar; Shanker, Karuna; Venkateswara Rao, Chandana

    2014-01-01

    In North India, poultice of young unfolded leaves of Argyreia speciosa Linn. (Convolvulaceae) is used for healing wounds. In order to find scientific evidence for the traditional utilization of leaves of A. speciosa in wound healing, this investigation was carried out. A linear incision wound of about 3 cm in length and 2 mm in depth and circular excision wound of 177 mm2 full thickness were made on the dorsal region of separate groups (n = 5) of anesthetized Swiss albino mice. A simple ointment, developed by including ethanol, ethanol-water, and water extracts (10% each, separately) of A. speciosa, was applied topically to mice once daily for 14 days after wounding. To evaluate the effect of each extract, wound contraction, epithelization period, wound breaking strength, and hydroxyproline content were determined. The water extract of A. speciosa showed accelerated wound healing activity as evidenced by fast wound contraction (96.30 ± 0.52%; P < 0.01), rapid epithelization period (11.40 ± 0.60 days; P < 0.001), greater wound breaking strength (376.56 ± 21.16 g; P < 0.001), and higher hydroxyproline content (16.49 ± 1.12 mg/g; P < 0.05) of granulation tissue. The present report supports the traditional use of Argyreia speciosa leaves for wound healing and signify its relevant therapeutic potential. PMID:24688387

  18. Obituary: Andrew Stephen Wilson, 1947-2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veilleux, Sylvain

    2009-01-01

    On 24 May 2008, Andrew Stephen Wilson passed away at the age of 61, in his home in Silver Spring, Maryland, from complications resulting from a painful spinal illness. Andrew was arguably one of the first truly multi-wavelength astronomers of his generation. His scientific work on active galactic nuclei [AGN] spanned the entire electromagnetic spectrum from the radio to the X-rays. Andrew was born in Doncaster, Yorkshire, England, on 26 March 1947. He was the younger of two brothers whose births were separated by the Second World War. His father, Norman, came from a relatively affluent family who were coal merchants. His mother, Mary, came from a less comfortable background, one of seven children, daughter of a skilled cabinet maker/French polisher, who went through a very hard time during the depression. As a teacher, she placed enormous value on hard work and education as a way of gaining advancement in life. When Andrew was four, the family moved to Skipton, a nice market town in the Yorkshire dales. Andrew went to a small village school until age eleven when he entered Ermysted's Grammar School. He was an enthusiastic soccer and cricket player. He never lost his enthusiasm for soccer and supported the local soccer team, Leeds United, for all his life. Andrew also followed the Yorkshire county cricket team. Andrew's interest in astronomy stemmed from the fact that at Ermysted's Grammar School someone donated a four-inch refracting telescope, so he and his friends used to go back in the evenings to investigate the rings of Saturn, the moons of Jupiter, and various nebulae. While an undergraduate at Cambridge, Andrew joined the astronomy club and ground an 8-inch mirror by hand as a part of a telescope that he set up in the backyard of his parents' house. Andrew spent hours observing with this telescope, and it was the wonder of the family. At Cambridge, Andrew obtained his bachelor's degree with first-class honors in 1969. During a short visit in London with his

  19. Effect of Erythrina velutina and Erythrina mulungu in rats submitted to animal models of anxiety and depression.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, M D; Onusic, G M; Poltronieri, S C; Viana, M B

    2006-02-01

    Erythrina velutina (EV) and Erythrina mulungu (EM), popularly used in Brazil as tranquilizing agents, were studied. The effects of acute and chronic oral treatment with a water:alcohol extract of EV (7:3, plant grounded stem bark; acute = 100, 200, 400 mg/kg; chronic = 50, 100, 200 mg/kg) were evaluated in rats (N = 11-12) submitted to the elevated T-maze (for avoidance and escape measurements) model of anxiety. This model was selected for its presumed capacity to elicit specific subtypes of anxiety disorders recognized in clinical practice: avoidance has been related to generalized anxiety and escape to panic. Additionally, animals were treated with the same doses of EV and EM (water:alcohol 7:3, inflorescence extract) and submitted to the forced swim test for the evaluation of antidepressant activity (N = 7-10). Both treatment regimens with EV impaired elevated T-maze avoidance latencies, without altering escape, in a way similar to the reference drug diazepam (avoidance 1, mean +/- SEM, acute study: 131.1 +/- 45.5 (control), 9.0 +/- 3.3 (diazepam), 12.7 +/- 2.9 (200 mg/kg), 28.8 +/- 15.3 (400 mg/kg); chronic study: 131.7 +/- 46.9 (control), 35.8 +/- 29.7 (diazepam), 24.4 +/- 10.4 (50 mg/kg), 29.7 +/- 11.5 (200 mg/kg)). Neither EV nor EM altered measurements performed in the forced swim test, in contrast to the reference drug imipramine that significantly decreased immobility time after chronic treatment. These results were not due to motor alterations since no significant effects were detected in an open field. These observations suggest that EV exerts anxiolytic-like effects on a specific subset of defensive behaviors which have been associated with generalized anxiety disorder.

  20. In vitro metabolism studies of erythraline, the major spiroalkaloid from Erythrina verna

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Erythrina verna, popularly known as “mulungu”, is a Brazilian medicinal plant used to treat anxiety. Erythrina alkaloids have been described in several species of Erythrina, which have biological and therapeutic properties well known that include anxiolytic and sedative effects. Methods In this work, in vitro metabolism of erythraline (1), the major spirocyclic alkaloid of Erythrina verna, was studied in the pig cecum model and by biomimetic phase I reactions. The biomimetic reactions were performed with Jacobsen catalyst to produce oxidative metabolites and one metabolite was isolated and evaluated against cancer cells, as HL-60 (promyelocytic leukemia), SF-295 (Glioblastoma) and OVCAR-8 (ovarian carcinoma). Results Erythraline exhibited no metabolization by the pig microbiota and a main putative metabolite was formed in a biomimetic model using Jacobsen catalyst. This metabolite was isolated and identified as 8-oxo-erythraline (2). Finally, erythraline and the putative metabolite were tested in MTT model and both compounds showed no important cytotoxic activity against tumor cells. Conclusions The alkaloid erythraline was not metabolized by intestinal microbiota, but it was possible to identify its oxidative metabolite from biomimetic reactions. So these data are interesting and stimulate other studies involving this alkaloid, since it is present in phytomedicine products and there are not reported data about the metabolism of erythrina alkaloids. PMID:24548728

  1. Cell scientist to watch - Andrew Holland.

    PubMed

    2017-02-01

    Andrew received his first degree in natural sciences from the University of Cambridge and a Masters degree from the University of Manchester, followed by a PhD with Stephen Taylor in Manchester. He then moved to California in 2007 with an EMBO long-term fellowship for his postdoctoral research with Don Cleveland at the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research. In 2013, Andrew started his own lab as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, having been named a Kimmel Scholar and a Pew-Stewart Scholar in 2014. Andrew's lab investigates the mechanisms controlling centrosome copy numbers during cell division and the links between centrosome amplification, genome instability and tumorigenesis.

  2. Congruences for the Andrews spt function

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Ken

    2011-01-01

    Ramanujan-type congruences for the Andrews spt(n) partition function have been found for prime moduli 5 ≤ ℓ ≤ 37 in the work of Andrews [Andrews GE, (2008) J Reine Angew Math 624:133–142] and Garvan [Garvan F, (2010) Int J Number Theory 6:1–29]. We exhibit unexpectedly simple congruences for all ℓ≥5. Confirming a conjecture of Garvan, we show that if ℓ≥5 is prime and , then (mod ℓ). This congruence gives (ℓ - 1)/2 arithmetic progressions modulo ℓ3 which support a mod ℓ congruence. This result follows from the surprising fact that the reduction of a certain mock theta function modulo ℓ, for every ℓ≥5, is an eigenform of the Hecke operator T(ℓ2). PMID:21177432

  3. Phenolic compounds from the stem bark Erythrina Orientalis and detection of antimalaria activity by ELISA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tjahjadarie, Tjitjik Srie; Saputri, Ratih Dewi; Tanjung, Mulyadi

    2016-03-01

    Erythrina orientalis has local name "Dadap". This plant has known producing alkaloids, flavonoids, pterocarpans, stilbenes, and arylbenzofurans which are active compounds.Three prenylated flavonoids, 8-prenyl-daidzein (1), alpinumisoflavone (2) and 4'-O-methyl licoflavanone (3) had been isolated from the stem bark of Erythrina Orientalis. The structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic data,which are IR, UV, MS, and NMR 1D (1H-NMR and 13C-NMR) and 2D (COSY, HMQC, and HMBC).

  4. The draft genome of Ruellia speciosa (Beautiful Wild Petunia: Acanthaceae).

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Yongbin; Tripp, Erin A

    2017-01-27

    The genus Ruellia (Wild Petunias; Acanthaceae) is characterized by an enormous diversity of floral shapes and colours manifested among closely related species. Using Illumina platform, we reconstructed the draft genome of Ruellia speciosa, with a scaffold size of 1,021 Mb (or ∼1.02 Gb) and an N50 size of 17,908 bp, spanning ∼93% of the estimated genome (∼1.1 Gb). The draft assembly predicted 40,124 gene models and phylogenetic analyses of four key enzymes involved in anthocyanin colour production [flavanone 3-hydroxylase (F3H), flavonoid 3'-hydroxylase (F3'H), flavonoid 3',5'-hydroxylase (F3'5'H), and dihydroflavonol 4-reductase (DFR)] found that most angiosperms here sampled harboured at least one copy of F3H, F3'H, and DFR. In contrast, fewer than one-half (but including R. speciosa) harboured a copy of F3'5'H, supporting observations that blue flowers and/or fruits, which this enzyme is required for, are less common among flowering plants. Ka/Ks analyses of duplicated copies of F3'H and DFR in R. speciosa suggested purifying selection in the former but detected evidence of positive selection in the latter. The genome sequence and annotation of R. speciosa represents only one of only four families sequenced in the large and important Asterid clade of flowering plants and, as such, will facilitate extensive future research on this diverse group, particularly with respect to floral evolution.

  5. Development of microsatellite markers for Hancornia speciosa Gomes (Apocynaceae).

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, A J L; Yamaguishi, A T; Chaves, L J; Coelho, A S G; Lima, J S; Telles, M P C

    2015-07-03

    Herein, we describe 34 microsatellite loci developed using an enrichment genomic library for the tree species Hancornia speciosa Gomes (Apocynaceae). Thirty-five individuals were genotyped using 34 primers to analyze the polymorphisms at each locus. The number of alleles per locus ranged from 4 to 20. The average number of alleles was 8.11, and the expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.62 to 0.94. These microsatellite primers will be useful in population genetics studies for this species.

  6. Chemical Defense by Erythrolactones in the Euryhaline Ciliated Protist, Pseudokeronopsis erythrina.

    PubMed

    Buonanno, Federico; Anesi, Andrea; Giuseppe, Graziano Di; Guella, Graziano; Ortenzi, Claudio

    2017-02-01

    Pseudokeronopsis erythrina produces three new secondary metabolites, erythrolactones A2, B2 and C2, and their respective sulfate esters (A1, B1, C1), the structures of which have been recently elucidated on the basis of NMR spectroscopic data coupled to high resolution mass measurements (HR-MALDI-TOF). An analysis of the discharge of the protozoan pigment granules revealed that the non-sulfonated erythrolactones are exclusively stored in these cortical organelles, which are commonly used by a number of ciliates as chemical weapons in offense/defense interactions with prey and predators. We evaluated the toxic activity of pigment granule discharge on a panel of free-living ciliates and micro-invertebrates, and the activity of each single purified erythrolactone on three ciliate species. We also observed predator-prey interactions of P. erythrina with unicellular and multicellular predators. Experimental results confirm that only P. erythrina cells with discharged pigment granules were preferentially or exclusively hunted and eaten by at least some of its predators, whereas almost all intact (fully pigmented) cells remained alive. Our results indicate that erythrolactones are very effective as a chemical defense in P. erythrina.

  7. Hancornia speciosa latex for biomedical applications: physical and chemical properties, biocompatibility assessment and angiogenic activity.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Luciane Madureira; Floriano, Juliana Ferreira; Ribeiro, Thuanne Pires; Magno, Lais Nogueira; da Mota, Lígia Souza Lima Silveira; Peixoto, Nei; Mrué, Fátima; Melo-Reis, Paulo; Lino Junior, Ruy de Souza; Graeff, Carlos Frederico de Oliveira; Gonçalves, Pablo José

    2014-09-01

    The latex obtained from Hancornia speciosa is used in folk medicine for treatment of several diseases, such as acne, warts, diabetes, gastritis and inflammation. In this work, we describe the biocompatibility assessment and angiogenic properties of H. speciosa latex and its potential application in medicine. The physical-chemical characterization was carried out following different methodologies (CHN elemental analyses; thermogravimetric analyses and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy). The biocompatibility was evaluated through cytotoxicity and genotoxicity tests in fibroblast mouse cells and the angiogenic properties were evaluated using the chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay model. The physical-chemical results showed that the structure of Hancornia speciosa latex biomembrane is very similar to that of Hevea brasiliensis (commercially available product). Moreover, the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity assays showed that H. speciosa latex is biocompatible with life systems and can be a good biomaterial for medical applications. The CAM test showed the efficient ability of H. speciosa latex in neovascularization of tissues. The histological analysis was in accordance with the results obtained in the CAM assay. Our data indicate that the latex obtained from H. speciosa and eluted in water showed significant angiogenic activity without any cytotoxic or genotoxic effects on life systems. The same did not occur with H. speciosa latex stabilized with ammonia. Addition of ammonia does not have significant effects on the structure of biomembranes, but showed a smaller cell survival and a significant genotoxicity effect. This study contributes to the understanding of the potentialities of H. speciosa latex as a source of new phytomedicines.

  8. Obituary: Andrew Lange (1957-2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamionkowski, Marc

    2011-12-01

    The worlds of physics and astrophysics were stunned to learn on 22 January 2010 that Andrew Lange, the Marvin L. Goldberger Professor of Physics at Caltech, had taken his own life the night before. He had succumbed to the severe depression that he had suffered from for many years, unbeknownst to even his closest colleagues. Lange will perhaps be best remembered as the co-leader of Boomerang, the balloon-borne experiment that provided the first high-angular-resolution map of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). And while this was certainly his most notable achievement, Andrew amassed a record of accomplishment as an instrumentalist, leader, mentor, and communicator that extended much further. Andrew was born in Urbana, Illinois on July 23, 1957, the son of an architect and a librarian, and raised primarily in Connecticut. His family and early friends remember him as a serious and extremely intelligent child and young man. Andrew Lange's lifelong interest in the CMB was nurtured as an undergraduate at Princeton University by David Wilkinson, and he recalled fondly a summer spent working with John Mather at Goddard Space Flight Center. Andrew Lange went to graduate school in physics at Berkeley where he worked in Paul Richards' group. Although his thesis project, the Berkeley-Nagoya rocket experiment, showed an anomalous sub-millimeter excess in the CMB spectrum that was shortly thereafter shown by a later flight of the same rocket and COBE-FIRAS to be incorrect, Lange's talents were recognized by the physics department at Berkeley who appointed him shortly after his PhD (1987) to their faculty. While on the Berkeley faculty, Andrew obtained early detections of the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect, upper limits to small-angle CMB fluctuations, and important infrared constraints to the interstellar medium. He also led a pioneering instrument operating 300 mK detectors for a small infrared satellite experiment. This early work showed high ambition and daring, and it pioneered

  9. The human side of Hurricane Andrew

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, R.; Callander, R.C.

    1994-12-31

    This paper examines the long-term psychological effects of the nation`s worst natural disaster on the employees of the Turkey Point nuclear power plant. It also examines the efforts made by plant personnel and company volunteers to aid employees` families affected by the storm. Despite significant damage at the plant, unit 4 was returned to service 5 weeks after the August 24, 1992, hurricane. Unit 3 was returned to service on December 3, 1992. Unit 3 was originally scheduled to start a refueling outage the day Hurricane Andrew struck. While plant personnel are still recovering from Andrew`s impact, the plant`s performance has never been better. On May 26, 1993, the plant completed a record-breaking 46-day refueling outage - 7 days ahead of schedule and $3 million under budget. Turkey Point`s recovery, return to service, and superior performance would not have been possible without the efforts of hundreds of employees who put their personal tragedies aside and focused on the common goal of the plant`s operation. To help employees with rebuilding their lives, the plant launched extensive assistance programs. Although the plant returned to normal operation, plant personnel continue to struggle in a community whose infrastructure (homes, schools, stores, etc.) have been almost eliminated.

  10. Andrew shortens lifetime of Louisiana Barrier Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, Susan

    Because the Isles Dernieres, a series of four barrier islands off the coast of Louisiana, have one of the most rapidly eroding shorelines in the world, geologists at the U.S. Geological Survey and the Louisiana Geological Survey have been monitoring erosion activity over the last several years, said Jeff Williams of the USGS in Reston, Va. Hurricane Andrew, which struck the state on August 26, caused severe erosional damage to these islands that has shortened their lifetimes.Before Andrew struck, geologists projected that Raccoon Island would disappear below sea level by the year 2001 and that Whiskey Island would disappear by 2016. Now, due to the severe erosion from Hurricane Andrew, the scientists claim that the islands may disappear before the turn of the century, and the other islands in the Dernieres chain are expected to follow suit within 2 decades. Raccoon, Whiskey, Trinity, and East islands make up the Isles Dernieres, which existed as one island, known as the Isle Derniere, before an 1856 hurricane and subsequent erosion.

  11. Argyreia speciosa (Linn. f.) sweet: A comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Galani, V. J.; Patel, B. G.; Patel, N. B.

    2010-01-01

    Argyreia speciosa (Linn. f.) Sweet is a popular Indian medicinal plant, which has long been used in traditional Ayurvedic Indian medicine for various diseases. This plant is pharmacologically studied for nootropic, aphrodisiac, immunomodulatory, hepatoprotective, antioxidant, antiinflammatory, antihyperglycemic, antidiarrheal, antimicrobial, antiviral, nematicidal, antiulcer, anticonvulsant, analgesic and central nervous depressant activities. A wide range of phytochemical constituents have been isolated from this plant. A comprehensive account of the morphology, phytochemical constituents and pharmacological activities reported are included in view of the many recent findings of importance on this plant. PMID:22228958

  12. Molecular docking and analgesic studies of Erythrina variegata׳s derived phytochemicals with COX enzymes.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Mir Muhammad Nasir; Emran, Talha Bin; Mahib, Muhammad Mamunur Rashid; Dash, Raju

    2014-01-01

    Secondary metabolites from plants are a good source for the NSAID drug development. We studied the analgesic activity of ethanolic extract of Erythrina variegata L. (Fabaceae) followed by molecular docking analysis. The analgesic activity of Erythrina variegata L. is evaluated by various methods viz., acetic acid-induced writhing test, hot plate and tail immersion test. Subsequently, molecular docking analysis has been performed to identify compounds having activity against COX-1 and COX-2 enzymes by using GOLD docking fitness. The result of preliminary phytochemical screening revealed that the extract contains alkaloids and flavonoids. In analgesic activity tests, the extract at the doses of 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg body weight (b.w.) produced a increase in pain threshold in a dose dependent manner. In acetic acid induced writhing test, the inhibitory effect was similar to the reference drug diclofenac sodium. The extract showed 18.89% writhing inhibitory effect at the dose 200 mg/kg b.w., whereas diclofenac sodium showed 79.42% inhibition of writhing at a dose of 10 mg/kg b.w. The results of tail immersion and hot plate test also showed potential analgesic activity of the extract which is also comparable to the standard drug morphine (5 mg/kg b.w.). Docking studies shows that phaseollin of Erythrina variegata L. has the best fitness score against the COX-1 which is 56.64 and 59.63 for COX- 2 enzyme. Phaseollin of Erythrina variegata L. detected with significant fitness score and hydrogen bonding against COX-1 and COX-2 is reported for further validation.

  13. A new species of Eurytoma (Hymenoptera: Eurytomidae) attacking, Quadrastichus spp. (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) galling Erythrina spp. (Fabaceae) with a summary of African Eurytoma spp. biology and species checklist

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Eurytoma erythrinae Gates and Delvare, new species, is described and illustrated. This species was reared from field-collected galls induced on Erythrina spp. by Quadrastichus spp. (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae), in Tanzania, Ghana, and South Africa. It is compared to a closely related African species. W...

  14. Intraspecific diversity in Sinningia speciosa (Gesneriaceae: Sinningieae), and possible origins of the cultivated florist's gloxinia

    PubMed Central

    Zaitlin, David

    2012-01-01

    Background and aims The florist's gloxinia is a familiar houseplant in the Gesneriaceae, the botanical family that includes the African violet (Saintpaulia) and other ornamental species. The gloxinia's wild progenitor is Sinningia speciosa (Lodd.) Hiern, a Brazilian endemic. Although it has been cultivated for almost 200 years, little is known about the genetic diversity in S. speciosa, how the wild populations relate to one another or even where the cultivated forms originated. Using available wild collections, preliminary phenetic and phylogenetic investigations were conducted to elucidate the interspecific relationships within S. speciosa and to infer the origins of the cultivars. Methodology Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis was applied to 24 accessions of S. speciosa (17 wild collections, seven cultivars) and one accession each of Sinningia guttata and Sinningia macrophylla. A maximum likelihood (ML) tree was also calculated from an alignment of the nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer sequence from the same 26 accessions. Principal results Dice/UPGMA and principal coordinates analysis of the AFLP data partitioned S. speciosa into several distinct clusters, one of which included S. macrophylla. All cultivated ‘gloxinias’ grouped together in a major cluster with plants from Rio de Janeiro. The AFLP results were compared with a phylogenetic analysis of the ribosomal spacer region, which was informative in S. speciosa. The ML tree generally supported the AFLP results, although several clades lacked strong statistical support. Conclusions Independent analyses of two different data sets show that S. speciosa is a diverse species comprised of several lineages. Genetic distance estimates calculated from the AFLP data were positively correlated with geographic distances between populations, indicating that reproductive isolation could be driving speciation in this taxon. Molecular markers are under development for population genetic

  15. Study on the variations of mineral elements in Swertia speciosa (G. Don).

    PubMed

    Negi, Jagmohan S; Singh, Pramod; nee Pant, Geeta J; Rawat, Mohan S Maniyari

    2010-12-01

    Variations of micro- and macrominerals concentration in Swertia speciosa were determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy. The mineral elements showed significant changes in roots and leaves collected from different altitudes. Among all the elements, highest concentration (more than 2,000 mg/kg) of Ca and K were recorded in S. speciosa and the concentration of other elements analyzed in the study decreased in the order Fe>Na>Zn>Co>Li>Cu>Mn.

  16. 76 FR 48168 - Andrew K. Choi: Debarment Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Andrew K. Choi: Debarment Order AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is issuing an order under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the FD&C Act) debarring Andrew K. Choi, M.D. for 4...

  17. Introduction of Dr. Andrew V Schally

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza-Valdés, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    I first met Dr. Andrew V Schally (PhD, MDhc (Multi), DSc, Distinguished Medical Research Scientist, U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs Professor of Pathology and Department of Medicine,
Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, Miami, Florida, USA) many years ago, probably around the beginning of the 1990's in one of his visits to Mexico City (Figure 1). He has many friends in my country since some of the investigations that led to the development of the LHRH agonists were made in a couple of Mexican hospitals in collaboration with some outstanding Mexican physicians that I will mention later. In that time, I was the head of the Department of Urology of the Mexican National Cancer Institute and our Director, Dr. Jaime de la Garza, invited him for a meeting. I was surprised by his humbleness, intelligence and easy going personality, in spite of being a Nobel Prize scientist. PMID:26112485

  18. Two new Aprostocetus species (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae: Tetrastichinae), fortuitous parasitoids of invasive eulophid gall inducers (Tetrastichinae) on Eucalyptus and Erythrina.

    PubMed

    Yang, Man-Miao; Lin, Yu-Che; Wu, Yaojun; Fisher, Nicole; Saimanee, Titiporn; Sangtongpraow, Benjakhun; Zhu, Chaodong; Chiu, William Chien-Hsien; La Salle, John

    2014-08-01

    Two closely related new species of Aprostocetus Westwood (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae: Tetrastichinae) are described as fortuitous parasitoids of invasive gall inducers in two other genera of Tetrastichinae, Leptocybe Fisher & LaSalle and Quadrastichus Girault. Aprostocetus causalis La Salle & Wu is a parasitoid of Leptocybe invasa Fisher & La Salle on Eucalyptus spp. (Myrtaceae) in China and Thailand, and A. felix La Salle, Yang & Lin is a parasitoid of Quadrastichus erythrinae Kim on Erythrina spp. (Fabaceae) in Taiwan. Epitetrastichus nigriventris Girault, 1913 is removed from synonymy from Aprostocetus gala (Walker), and treated as the valid species A. nigriventris (Girault). 

  19. A postmenopause-like model of ovariectomized Wistar rats to identify active principles of Erythrina lysistemon (Fabaceae).

    PubMed

    Mvondo, M A; Njamen, D; Fomum, S Tanee; Wandji, J; Vollmer, Günter

    2011-10-01

    To determine whether the two major compounds of Erythrina lysistemon are active principles accounting for Erythrina estrogenic effects, we used a postmenopause-like model of ovariectomized Wistar rats to evaluate their effects on some menopausal problems. Ovariectomized rats were orally treated either with compound 1 or compound 2 at 1 and 10 mg/kg BW for 28 days. Estradiol valerate served as the reference substance. As results, compounds 1 and 2 displayed estrogen-like effects on the uterus and the vagina, and reduced atherogenic risks by decreasing the two assessed atherogenic parameters, the total cholesterol/HDL-cholesterol ratio and the atherogenic index of plasma.

  20. Fred Plaut in conversation with Andrew Samuels. Interview by Andrew Samuels.

    PubMed

    Plaut, Fred

    2010-02-01

    This is a reprint of an interview of Fred Plaut (who died in June 2009) conducted by Andrew Samuels in mid-1988 and first published in April 1989 in the Journal, 34, 2, pp. 159-83. The interview covers Plaut's early life, his career, and historical observations of the development of the Society of Analytical Psychology from its beginnings, and of the wider community of Jungian analysis. Plaut reflects uninhibitedly on such topics as the role of leadership in analytical psychology, discussing the parts played by Michael Fordham in London and Hannes Dieckmann in Berlin. Plaut explains his thinking concerning individuation.

  1. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey L. D. Andrew, Photographer Nov. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey L. D. Andrew, Photographer Nov. 27, 1936 FRONT DOORWAY; INTERIOR VIEW - Kilpatrick House, Forrest Hills Road (moved from Greene Street), Augusta, Richmond County, GA

  2. 5. Historic American Buildings Survey L. D. Andrew, Photographer Nov. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Historic American Buildings Survey L. D. Andrew, Photographer Nov. 27, 1936 MANTEL IN RIGHT FRONT ROOM - Kilpatrick House, Forrest Hills Road (moved from Greene Street), Augusta, Richmond County, GA

  3. 5. Historic American Buildings Survey L. D. Andrew, Photographer Aug. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Historic American Buildings Survey L. D. Andrew, Photographer Aug. 2, 1936 DETAIL OF DOUBLE OPENING WITH IRON GRATING IN THIRD STORY REAR ROOM - Emerson & Holmes Building, 556 Mulberry Street, Macon, Bibb County, GA

  4. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey L. D. Andrew, Photographer Aug. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey L. D. Andrew, Photographer Aug. 2, 1936 PANELS AND VAULTED CEILING IN DRAWING ROOM, SECOND FLOOR - Emerson & Holmes Building, 556 Mulberry Street, Macon, Bibb County, GA

  5. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey L. D. Andrew, Photographer Enlarged ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey L. D. Andrew, Photographer Enlarged Photo From photo of Miss Edith Johnston, Savannah, Ga. 1936 VIEW OF FRONT AND RIGHT SIDE (Restoration 1936) - Wild Heron Plantation, Little Ogeechee River Vicinity, Savannah, Chatham County, GA

  6. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey L. D. Andrew, Photographer Enlarged ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey L. D. Andrew, Photographer Enlarged Photo From Photo of Miss Edith Johnston's, Savannah, Ga. 1936 VIEW OF FRONT AND SIDE (Before Restoration, 1936). - Wild Heron Plantation, Little Ogeechee River Vicinity, Savannah, Chatham County, GA

  7. 5. Historic American Buildings Survey L. D. Andrew, Photographer From ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Historic American Buildings Survey L. D. Andrew, Photographer From photograph furnished by Miss Edith D. Johnston, Savannah, Ga. Sept. 5, 1936 RED BRICK CHURCH (FORMER BUILDING 1811- 1837) - Christ Church (Episcopal), 28 Bull Street, Savannah, Chatham County, GA

  8. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey L. D. Andrew, Photographer (Enlarged ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey L. D. Andrew, Photographer (Enlarged by) Aug. 6, 1936 Photographed by Harold Bush-Brown SIDE VIEW - Covered Bridge, Spanning Soap Creek, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  9. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey L. D. Andrew, Photographer Dec. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey L. D. Andrew, Photographer Dec. 30, 1936 VIEW FROM MORRISON'S CAF? (CORNER OF WHITAKER & CONGRESS) SHOWING S. FACADE - Gibbons Block, Congress, Saint Julian, Barnard, Whitaker Streets, Savannah, Chatham County, GA

  10. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey L. D. Andrew, Photographer Dec. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey L. D. Andrew, Photographer Dec. 30, 1936 VIEW FROM CORNER OF WHITAKER AND ST JULIAN SHOWING NORTH FACADE - Gibbons Block, Congress, Saint Julian, Barnard, Whitaker Streets, Savannah, Chatham County, GA

  11. 9. HISTORIC AMERICAN BUILDINGS SURVEY L. D. ANDREW PHOTOGRAPHER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. HISTORIC AMERICAN BUILDINGS SURVEY L. D. ANDREW - PHOTOGRAPHER SEPT. 7, 1936 BEAM, CORNICE, AND CEILING ORNAMENT IN FRONT HALL - Sorrel-Weed House, 6 West Harris Street, Savannah, Chatham County, GA

  12. 7. Historic American Buildings Survey L. D. Andrew, Photographer Dec. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Historic American Buildings Survey L. D. Andrew, Photographer Dec. 30, 1936 CORNER OF WEST FRONT ROOM (SHOWING CORNICE AND WINDOW HEAD) - Wayne-Gordon House, 10 East Oglethorpe Avenue, Savannah, Chatham County, GA

  13. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey L. D. Andrew, Photographer Dec. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey L. D. Andrew, Photographer Dec. 30, 1936 CENTRAL PORTION OF REAR (Showing backsteps, stoop & stairhall, window) - Wayne-Gordon House, 10 East Oglethorpe Avenue, Savannah, Chatham County, GA

  14. 13. Circa 1880 view (from the north) across Andrew Hallidie ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Circa 1880 view (from the north) across Andrew Hallidie suspension bridge. Source: Searles Library, Nevada City, California. - Gault Bridge, Spanning Deer Creek at South Pine Street, Nevada City, Nevada County, CA

  15. Beneficial Insect Attraction to Milkweeds (Asclepias speciosa, Asclepias fascicularis) in Washington State, USA.

    PubMed

    James, David G; Seymour, Lorraine; Lauby, Gerry; Buckley, Katie

    2016-06-29

    Native plant and beneficial insect associations are relatively unstudied yet are important in native habitat restoration programs for improving and sustaining conservation biological control of arthropod pests in agricultural crops. Milkweeds (Asclepias spp.) are currently the focus of restoration programs in the USA aimed at reversing a decline in populations of the milkweed-dependent monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus); however, little is known of the benefits of these plants to other beneficial insects. Beneficial insects (predators, parasitoids, pollinators) attracted to two milkweed species (Asclepias speciosa, Asclepias fascicularis) in central Washington State, WA, USA were identified and counted on transparent sticky traps attached to blooms over five seasons. Combining all categories of beneficial insects, means of 128 and 126 insects per trap were recorded for A. speciosa and A. fascicularis, respectively. Predatory and parasitic flies dominated trap catches for A. speciosa while parasitic wasps were the most commonly trapped beneficial insects on A. fascicularis. Bees were trapped commonly on both species, especially A. speciosa with native bees trapped in significantly greater numbers than honey bees. Beneficial insect attraction to A. speciosa and A. fascicularis was substantial. Therefore, these plants are ideal candidates for habitat restoration, intended to enhance conservation biological control, and for pollinator conservation. In central Washington, milkweed restoration programs for enhancement of D. plexippus populations should also provide benefits for pest suppression and pollinator conservation.

  16. Beneficial Insect Attraction to Milkweeds (Asclepias speciosa, Asclepias fascicularis) in Washington State, USA

    PubMed Central

    James, David G.; Seymour, Lorraine; Lauby, Gerry; Buckley, Katie

    2016-01-01

    Native plant and beneficial insect associations are relatively unstudied yet are important in native habitat restoration programs for improving and sustaining conservation biological control of arthropod pests in agricultural crops. Milkweeds (Asclepias spp.) are currently the focus of restoration programs in the USA aimed at reversing a decline in populations of the milkweed-dependent monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus); however, little is known of the benefits of these plants to other beneficial insects. Beneficial insects (predators, parasitoids, pollinators) attracted to two milkweed species (Asclepias speciosa, Asclepias fascicularis) in central Washington State, WA, USA were identified and counted on transparent sticky traps attached to blooms over five seasons. Combining all categories of beneficial insects, means of 128 and 126 insects per trap were recorded for A. speciosa and A. fascicularis, respectively. Predatory and parasitic flies dominated trap catches for A. speciosa while parasitic wasps were the most commonly trapped beneficial insects on A. fascicularis. Bees were trapped commonly on both species, especially A. speciosa with native bees trapped in significantly greater numbers than honey bees. Beneficial insect attraction to A. speciosa and A. fascicularis was substantial. Therefore, these plants are ideal candidates for habitat restoration, intended to enhance conservation biological control, and for pollinator conservation. In central Washington, milkweed restoration programs for enhancement of D. plexippus populations should also provide benefits for pest suppression and pollinator conservation. PMID:27367733

  17. In vitro anti-oxidant and anti-cancer activity of methanolic extract from Sanchezia speciosa leaves.

    PubMed

    Paydar, Mohammadjavad; Wong, Yi Li; Moharam, Bushra Abdulkarim; Wong, Won Fen; Looi, Chung Yeng

    2013-10-15

    Sanchezia speciosa, is a bushy shrub from Acanthaceae family which commonly grows in tropical areas of South and Central America. In this study, we employed MTT assay to test the cytotoxicity of that methanolic fraction of S. speciosa leaves on MCF-7 human breast cancer, SK-MEL-5 human malignant melanoma and human umbilical vein endothelial cells, HUVEC cells. The extract showed highest activity on MCF-7 and moderate cytotoxicity towards SK-MEL-5. In contrast, the extract demonstrated lowest cell growth inhibition activity on HUVEC cells, indicating better selectivity compare to standard drug, doxorubicin. In addition, we also performed ORAC assay to determine the radical scavenging capacity of methanolic extract of S. speciosa leaves. The extract exhibited nearly similar anti-oxidant activity as quercetin, suggesting S. speciosa leaves as a potential source of natural anti-oxidant. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on anti-oxidant and cytotoxic activity of S. speciosa.

  18. Effect of Erythrina mulungu on anxiety during extraction of third molars

    PubMed Central

    Silveira-Souto, Maria L.; São-Mateus, Carla R.; Groppo, Francisco C.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of Erythrina mulungu on the control of dental anxiety in patients who had under gone bilateral extraction of asymptomatic, impacted mandibular third molars. Material and Methods: In a randomized, double-blind, crossover study, 30 healthy volunteers (5 men and 25 women, over 18 years of age), received either 500mg of E.mulungu (Mulungu Matusa®) or 500 mg of placebo, p.o., one hour before surgical procedure. The level ofanxiety was assessed through questionnaire sand physical parameters, such as blood pressure, heart rate andoxygen saturation. Data were analyzed by Chi-square test, ANOVA (Tukey test) and Friedman with significance level of 5%. Results: A higher preference (Chi-square, p = 0.0062) for E. mulungu was observed for both genders. Volunteers with higher anxiety levels tended to to prefer E. mulungu. No statistically significant differences were verified in blood pressure (one-way ANOVA, p = 0.1259), heart rate (Friedman, p> 0.05) and oxygen saturation (Friedman, p = 0.7664) among periods and types of treatments. Conclusions: E. mulungu showed an anxiolytic effect without significant changes in physiological parameters. It could be considered as an alternative to control the anxiety in adult patients undergoing mandibular thirdmolars surgery. Key words:Anxiety, Erythrina mulungu, third molar, oral surgery. PMID:24880443

  19. Interview: Professor Andrew Feinberg speaks to Epigenomics.

    PubMed

    Feinberg, Andrew

    2009-10-01

    Andrew Feinberg studied mathematics and humanities at Yale University (CT, USA) in the Directed Studies honors program, and he received his BA (1973) and MD (1976) from the accelerated medical program at Johns Hopkins University (MD, USA), as well as an MPH from Johns Hopkins (1981). He performed a postdoctoral fellowship in developmental biology at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD, CA, USA), clinical training in medicine and medical genetics at the University of Pennsylvania (PA, USA) and genetics research with Bert Vogelstein at Johns Hopkins, discovering altered DNA methylation in human cancer. Dr Feinberg continued to perform seminal work in cancer epigenetics as a Howard Hughes investigator at the University of Michigan (MI, USA), discovering human imprinted genes and loss of imprinting in cancer, and the molecular basis of Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome. He returned to John Hopkins in 1994 as King Fahd Professor of Medicine, Molecular Biology & Genetics and Oncology, and he holds an Adjunct Professorship at the Karolinska Institute in Sweden. Dr Feinberg is Director of the Center for Epigenetics, a National Human Genome Research Institute-designated Center of Excellence in Genome Sciences. The Center is pioneering genome-scale tools in molecular, statistical and epidemiological epigenetics, and is applying them to the study of cancer, neuropsychiatric disease and aging. As part of the center, Dr Feinberg has organized a highly innovative program to bring gifted minority high-school students into genetics and genomics. Dr Feinberg has also invented a number of widely used molecular tools, including random priming. His honors include election to the American Society for Clinical Investigation, the Association of American Physicians, the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, as well as membership on the ISI most-cited authors list, a MERIT Award of the National Cancer Institute, a

  20. Evaluation of antiangiogenic and antoxidant properties of Parkia speciosa Hassk extracts.

    PubMed

    Aisha, Abdalrahim F A; Abu-Salah, Khalid M; Alrokayan, Salman A; Ismail, Zhari; Abdulmajid, Amin Malik Shah

    2012-01-01

    Parkia speciosa Hassk is a traditional medicinal plant with strong antioxidant and hypoglycemic properties. This study aims to investigate the total phenolic content, antioxidant, cytotoxic and antiangiogenic effect of eight extracts from P. speciosa empty pods. The extracts were found to contain high levels of total phenols and demonstrated strong antioxidant effect in DPPH scavenging test. In rat aortic rings, P. speciosa extracts significantly inhibited the microvessel outgrowth from aortic tissue explants by more than 50%. The antiangiogenic activity was further confirmed by tube formation on matrigel matrix involving human endothelial cells. Cytotoxic effect was evaluated by XTT test on endothelial cells as a model of angiogenesis versus a panel of human cancer and normal cell lines. Basically the extracts did not show acute cytotoxicity. Morphology examination of endothelial cells indicated induction of autophagy characterized by formation of plenty of cytoplasmic vacuoles. The extracts were found to work by decreasing expression of vascular endothelial growth factor in endothelial cells.

  1. Hepatoprotective and antioxidant effects of Argyreia speciosa in rats.

    PubMed

    Habbu, P V; Shastry, R A; Mahadevan, K M; Joshi, Hanumanthachar; Das, S K

    2008-01-22

    The present study has been designed to evaluate the liver protective and in-vivo antioxidant role of Ethanolic extract (EtAS) and Ethyl acetate extract (EAAS) of roots of Argyreia speciosa, an important 'rasayana' herb in Indian System of medicine, in CCl(4)-induced hepatotoxicity and oxidative stress in rats. Animals were treated with EtAS and EAAS at doses of 200 mg and 400 mg/kg body weight p.o. along with CCl(4) (0.7 ml/kg in olive oil, 1:1 v/v i.p. on every alternate days) for seven days. Serum biochemical parameters such as SGOT, SGPT, ALP, cholesterol, total and direct bilirubin were determined. Antioxidant status in liver was determined by measuring the activities of Super oxide dismutase (SOD), catalase and peroxidase. Histopathological study of isolated liver specimens was also carried out to know the protection offered by the extracts. There was a significant rise in the levels of serum GOT, GPT, and ALP and other biochemical parameters, decrease in the levels of SOD, catalase and peroxidase after administration of CCl(4). Suspensions of EtAS and EAAS (200 and 400 mg/kg) successfully prevented the alterations of these effects in rats (p< 0.001). Histopathological examination demonstrated that CCl(4) treated group induces ballooning degeneration and centrilobular necrosis. Groups treated with EtAS and EAAS showed recovery on ballooning degeneration and centrolobular bridging necrosis was occasionally present. Data also showed that these extracts possessed strong antioxidant activity, and were comparable to Silymarin, a well known liver protecting herbal formulation.

  2. Lagerstroemia speciosa ‘Big Pink’, an improved pink flowered queen’s crape myrtle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Technical Abstract Lagerstroemia speciosa (L.) Pers., commonly called Pride-of-India, queen’s or giant crape myrtle, is a large shrub or small tree widely used as a tropical ornamental, with landscape utility limited to USDA Hardiness Zones 10-11. This paper describes a pink-flowered seedling selec...

  3. Evaluation of cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of Hancornia speciosa latex in Allium cepa root model.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, T P; Sousa, T R; Arruda, A S; Peixoto, N; Gonçalves, P J; Almeida, L M

    2016-02-01

    The latex obtained from Hancornia speciosa Gomes (Mangabeira tree) is widely used in traditional medicine to treat a variety of diseases, including diarrhea, ulcer, gastritis, tuberculosis, acne and warts. In this study, the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity effects of H. speciosa latex on the root meristem cells of Allium cepa were examined. Onion bulbs were exposed to different concentrations of latex and then submitted to microscopic analysis using Giemsa stain. Water was used as a negative control and sodium azide as a positive control. The results showed that, under the testing conditions, the mitotic index (MI) of the onion roots submitted to latex treatment did not differ significantly from the negative control, which suggests that the latex is not cytotoxic. Low incidence of chromosome aberrations in the cells treated with H. speciosa latex was also observed, indicating that the latex does not have genotoxic effect either. The MI and the chromosome aberration frequency responded to the latex concentration, requiring more studies to evaluate the dosage effect on genotoxicity. The results indicate that in tested concentrations H. speciosa latex is probably not harmful to human health and may be potentially used in medicine.

  4. Large-scale demonstration of fuel/chemical feedstock production from showy milkweed (Asclepias speciosa). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-10-01

    The establishment and operation of a 10-acre working farm of Asclepias speciosa, milkweed, are described. Optimal extraction techniques were investigated and economic and product analyses are presented. (MHR)

  5. Molecular evidence of undescribed Ceratonova sp. (Cnidaria: Myxosporea) in the freshwater polychaete, Manayunkia speciosa, from western Lake Erie.

    PubMed

    Malakauskas, David M; Snipes, R Benjamin; Thompson, Ann M; Schloesser, Donald W

    2016-06-01

    We used PCR to screen pooled individuals of Manayunkia speciosa from western Lake Erie, Michigan, USA for myxosporean parasites. Amplicons from positive PCRs were sequenced and showed a Ceratonova species in an estimated 1.1% (95% CI=0.46%, 1.8%) of M. speciosa individuals. We sequenced 18S, ITS1, 5.8S, ITS2 and most of the 28S rDNA regions of this Ceratonova sp., and part of the protein-coding EF2 gene. Phylogenetic analyses of ribosomal and EF2 sequences showed the Lake Erie Ceratonova sp. is most similar to, but genetically distinct from, Ceratonova shasta. Marked interspecific polymorphism in all genes examined, including the ITS barcoding genes, along with geographic location suggests this is an undescribed Ceratonova species. COI sequences showed M. speciosa individuals in Michigan and California are the same species. These findings represent a third parasite in the genus Ceratonova potentially hosted by M. speciosa.

  6. Appreciating Unity in Diversity: An Interview with Andrew Solomon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Dane L.

    2014-01-01

    The theme of the AMS 2014 Annual Conference is "Unity in Diversity," a concept that also describes the work of conference keynote speaker Andrew Solomon. Solomon is a writer and lecturer on psychology and politics; winner of the National Book Award; and an activist for LGBT [lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender] rights, mental health,…

  7. 4. Historic American Buildings Survey L. D. Andrew, Photographer Sept. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Historic American Buildings Survey L. D. Andrew, Photographer Sept. 5, 1936 Photograph from photograph furnished by Miss Edith D. Johnston, Savannah, GA. VIEW OF CHANCEL IN CHRIST CHURCH BEFORE DEMOLITION photo ABOUT 1870 - Christ Church (Episcopal), 28 Bull Street, Savannah, Chatham County, GA

  8. 75 FR 32221 - Whirlpool Corporation, Evansville Division, Including On-Site Leased Workers from Andrews...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-07

    ... this certification to include leased workers from Andrews International, Inc. working on-site at the... Employment and Training Administration Whirlpool Corporation, Evansville Division, Including On-Site Leased Workers from Andrews International, Inc., Evansville, IN; Amended Certification Regarding Eligibility...

  9. The Impact of Global Climate Change on the Geographic Distribution and Sustainable Harvest of Hancornia speciosa Gomes (Apocynaceae) in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Nabout, João Carlos; Magalhães, Mara Rúbia; de Amorim Gomes, Marcos Aurélio; da Cunha, Hélida Ferreira

    2016-04-01

    The global Climate change may affect biodiversity and the functioning of ecosystems by changing the appropriate locations for the development and establishment of the species. The Hancornia speciosa, popularly called Mangaba, is a plant species that has potential commercial value and contributes to rural economic activities in Brazil. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of global climate change on the potential geographic distribution, productivity, and value of production of H. speciosa in Brazil. We used MaxEnt to estimate the potential geographic distribution of the species in current and future (2050) climate scenarios. We obtained the productivity and value of production for 74 municipalities in Brazil. Moreover, to explain the variation the productivity and value of production, we constructed 15 models based on four variables: two ecological (ecological niche model and the presence of Unity of conservation) and two socio-economic (gross domestic product and human developed index). The models were selected using Akaike Information Criteria. Our results suggest that municipalities currently harvesting H. speciosa will have lower harvest rates in the future (mainly in northeastern Brazil). The best model to explain the productivity was ecological niche model; thus, municipalities with higher productivity are inserted in regions with higher environmental suitability (indicated by niche model). Thus, in the future, the municipalities harvesting H. speciosa will produce less because there will be less suitable habitat for H. speciosa, which in turn will affect the H. speciosa harvest and the local economy.

  10. The Impact of Global Climate Change on the Geographic Distribution and Sustainable Harvest of Hancornia speciosa Gomes (Apocynaceae) in Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabout, João Carlos; Magalhães, Mara Rúbia; de Amorim Gomes, Marcos Aurélio; da Cunha, Hélida Ferreira

    2016-04-01

    The global Climate change may affect biodiversity and the functioning of ecosystems by changing the appropriate locations for the development and establishment of the species. The Hancornia speciosa, popularly called Mangaba, is a plant species that has potential commercial value and contributes to rural economic activities in Brazil. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of global climate change on the potential geographic distribution, productivity, and value of production of H. speciosa in Brazil. We used MaxEnt to estimate the potential geographic distribution of the species in current and future (2050) climate scenarios. We obtained the productivity and value of production for 74 municipalities in Brazil. Moreover, to explain the variation the productivity and value of production, we constructed 15 models based on four variables: two ecological (ecological niche model and the presence of Unity of conservation) and two socio-economic (gross domestic product and human developed index). The models were selected using Akaike Information Criteria. Our results suggest that municipalities currently harvesting H. speciosa will have lower harvest rates in the future (mainly in northeastern Brazil). The best model to explain the productivity was ecological niche model; thus, municipalities with higher productivity are inserted in regions with higher environmental suitability (indicated by niche model). Thus, in the future, the municipalities harvesting H. speciosa will produce less because there will be less suitable habitat for H. speciosa, which in turn will affect the H. speciosa harvest and the local economy.

  11. General Plan Environmental Assessment for Joint Base Andrews-Naval Air Facility, Washington, Maryland

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-01

    PROPOSED ACTION ................................. 1-1  1.1  INTRODUCTION ...1 April 2011 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY PURPOSE AND NEED FOR ACTION Introduction The 2010 Andrews General Plan Update documents the existing facilities... INTRODUCTION The General Plan Update for Joint Base Andrews-Naval Air Facility, Washington, Maryland (Andrews) describes the installation’s ability to

  12. Anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities of Chaenomeles speciosa fractions in laboratory animals.

    PubMed

    Li, X; Yang, Y-B; Yang, Q; Sun, L-N; Chen, W-S

    2009-10-01

    The prescription of current existing anti-inflammatory drugs is hampered by their adverse effects over time. Botanical extracts are thought to be a potential source of a natural anti-inflammatory property with fewer adverse effects. Chaenomeles speciosa has long been used as an herbal medicine for treatment of various diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, prosopalgia, and hepatitis. Until now there have been no reports on the specific anti-inflammatory fractions of extract of C. speciosa (ECS). In the present study the anti-inflammatory activities of different fractions of ECS were evaluated using carrageenan-induced paw edema in rats. The 10% ethanol fraction (C3) was found to have stronger anti-inflammatory effects compared with other fractions at the same dose. We also found that chlorogenic acid was one of the active constituents responsible for the anti-inflammatory effect using bioassay-guided fractionation by means of high-performance liquid chromatography. Compared with controls, fraction C3 demonstrated significant anti-inflammatory activity in the xylene-induced ear edema test (P < .01), acetic acid-induced peritoneal capillary permeability test, and the cotton pellet granuloma test in mice or rats (P < .01); it also showed marked analgesic activity in the acetic acid-induced abdominal contraction test and formalin-induced paw licking test in mice and rats (P < .05 or .01). However, fraction C3 showed no significant effect in the hot plate test in mice. These findings justify the use of the C. speciosa for treating pain and inflammation. These results support the proposal of C. speciosa fraction C3 as a potential anti-inflammatory agent.

  13. Alkaloids in Erythrina by UPLC-ESI-MS and In Vivo Hypotensive Potential of Extractive Preparations

    PubMed Central

    Merlugo, Liara; Santos, Marí C.; Sant'Anna, Liane S.; Cordeiro, Everson W. F.; Batista, Luiz A. C.; Miotto, Silvia T. S.; Garcia, Cássia V.; Moreira, Cleci M.; Mendez, Andreas S. L.

    2015-01-01

    Erythrina species are used in popular medicine as sedative, anxiolytic, anti-inflammatory, and antihypertensive. In this work, we investigated the chemical composition of extracts obtained from leaves of E. falcata and E. crista-galli. The hypotensive potential of E. falcata and the mechanism of action were also studied. The extracts were obtained by maceration and infusion. The total content of phenolic compounds and flavonoids was estimated by spectrophotometric methods. The chemical constituents were studied performing a chromatographic analysis by UPLC-ESI-MS. For in vivo protocols, blood pressure and heart rate were measured by the invasive hemodynamic monitoring method. Different concentrations of extracts and drugs such as L-NAME, losartan, hexamethonium, and propranolol were administrated i.v. The results of total phenolic contents for E. falcata and E. crista-galli were 1.3193–1.4989 mgGAE/mL for maceration and 0.8771–0.9506 mgGAE/mL for infusion. In total flavonoids, the content was 7.7829–8.1976 mg RE/g for maceration and 9.3471–10.4765 RE mg/g for infusion. The chemical composition was based on alkaloids, suggesting the presence of erythristemine, 11β-methoxyglucoerysodine, erysothiopine, 11β-hydroxyerysodine-glucose, and 11-hydroxyerysotinone-rhamnoside. A potent dose-dependent hypotensive effect was observed for E. falcata, which may be related to the route of β-adrenergic receptors. PMID:26356581

  14. Water uptake mechanism and germination of Erythrina velutina seeds treated with atmospheric plasma.

    PubMed

    Alves Junior, Clodomiro; de Oliveira Vitoriano, Jussier; da Silva, Dinnara Layza Souza; de Lima Farias, Mikelly; de Lima Dantas, Nadjamara Bandeira

    2016-09-27

    The effect of plasma applied to mulungu (Erythrina velutina) seeds was studied to verify its influence on the germination, water absorption, wettability and structure of the seeds. The plasma jet used in this study was produced by dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) in a helium gas flow of 0.03 L/s at a distance of 13 mm for 60 s. The plasma treatment significantly affected the seed germination rate, which was approximately 5% higher than that of the untreated group. Micropyle and hilum contributed a greater proportion to uptake. When sealed in the hilar or micropyle regions the amount of water absorbed into the seed decreased approximately 75% compared to the unsealed seed. This difference suggests that these two regions together act cooperatively in the water absorption. However, when plasma treated seed was blocked in the micropyle region, water absorption was higher higher than in seeds blocked hilum. This difference suggests that the plasma treatment changed the wettability of the hilum more effectively than it changed the micropyle. These results indicate that plasma can significantly change the hydrophilicity, water absorption and percentage of seed germination in E. velutina.

  15. A comparative framework of the Erythrina velutina tree species in reforested land and native populations.

    PubMed

    Souza, E M S; Pereira, G S; Silva-Mann, R; Álvares-Carvalho, S V; Ferreira, R A

    2016-06-17

    Erythrina velutina Willd. (Fabaceae: Papillionoideae) is a pioneer species found in tropical and subtropical regions of the world that has medicinal properties and that is used in reforestation projects. This species is rare in some areas of northeastern Brazil. This study aimed to characterize and compare genetic structures of natural and restored populations of E. velutina, with a focus on the selection of tree seeds. A total of 108 individuals from five natural populations and one restored population were analyzed using ISSR markers, resulting in 407 polymorphic fragments. A high rate of polymorphism was observed in the restored population. The highest genetic variability was identified within populations (82%). Genetic bottleneck tests were significant for the Carmópolis/Rosário do Catete and Laranjeiras natural populations along with the Laranjeiras restored population. Genetic distances significantly correlated with spatial distance. Only the restored population retained unique alleles. Similarly, increased genetic distance was observed in individuals of the restored populations compared to the other populations. Observed genetic variation in both natural and restored populations of E. velutina was moderate, thus enabling selection of divergent trees from those trees supplying seeds. Environmental protection and management of these areas is necessary for the maintenance of these individuals and subsequent reproduction. We recommend suggestions for E. velutina conservation, since the restoration model adopted in this study did not promote the development of the specimens until the reproductive stage in a fashion that aims to augment the soil seed bank supply, as is suggested for pioneer species.

  16. Antimicrobial, Antioxidant and Cytotoxic Activity of Silver Nanoparticles Synthesized by Leaf Extract of Erythrina suberosa (Roxb.)

    PubMed Central

    Mohanta, Yugal K.; Panda, Sujogya K.; Jayabalan, Rasu; Sharma, Nanaocha; Bastia, Akshaya K.; Mohanta, Tapan K.

    2017-01-01

    In this experiment, biosynthesized silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were synthesized using aqueous leaf extract of Erythrina suberosa (Roxb.). The biosynthesis of silver nanoparticle was continuously followed by UV-vis spectrophotometric analysis. The response of the phytoconstituents resides in E. suberusa during synthesis of stable AgNPs were analyzed by ATR- fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. Further, the size, charge, and polydispersity nature of AgNPs were studied using dynamic light scattering spectroscopy. The morphology of the nanoparticles was determined by scanning electron microscopy. Current result shows core involvement of plant extracts containing glycosides, flavonoids, and phenolic compounds played a crucial role in the biosynthesis of AgNPs. The antimicrobial activities of silver nanoparticles were evaluated against different pathogenic bacterium and fungi. The antioxidant property was studied by radical scavenging (DPPH) assay and cytotoxic activity was evaluated against A-431 osteosarcoma cell line by MTT assay. The characteristics of the synthesized silver nanoparticles suggest their application as a potential antimicrobial and anticancer agent. PMID:28367437

  17. Water uptake mechanism and germination of Erythrina velutina seeds treated with atmospheric plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves Junior, Clodomiro; de Oliveira Vitoriano, Jussier; da Silva, Dinnara Layza Souza; de Lima Farias, Mikelly; de Lima Dantas, Nadjamara Bandeira

    2016-09-01

    The effect of plasma applied to mulungu (Erythrina velutina) seeds was studied to verify its influence on the germination, water absorption, wettability and structure of the seeds. The plasma jet used in this study was produced by dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) in a helium gas flow of 0.03 L/s at a distance of 13 mm for 60 s. The plasma treatment significantly affected the seed germination rate, which was approximately 5% higher than that of the untreated group. Micropyle and hilum contributed a greater proportion to uptake. When sealed in the hilar or micropyle regions the amount of water absorbed into the seed decreased approximately 75% compared to the unsealed seed. This difference suggests that these two regions together act cooperatively in the water absorption. However, when plasma treated seed was blocked in the micropyle region, water absorption was higher higher than in seeds blocked hilum. This difference suggests that the plasma treatment changed the wettability of the hilum more effectively than it changed the micropyle. These results indicate that plasma can significantly change the hydrophilicity, water absorption and percentage of seed germination in E. velutina.

  18. Water uptake mechanism and germination of Erythrina velutina seeds treated with atmospheric plasma

    PubMed Central

    Alves Junior, Clodomiro; de Oliveira Vitoriano, Jussier; da Silva, Dinnara Layza Souza; de Lima Farias, Mikelly; de Lima Dantas, Nadjamara Bandeira

    2016-01-01

    The effect of plasma applied to mulungu (Erythrina velutina) seeds was studied to verify its influence on the germination, water absorption, wettability and structure of the seeds. The plasma jet used in this study was produced by dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) in a helium gas flow of 0.03 L/s at a distance of 13 mm for 60 s. The plasma treatment significantly affected the seed germination rate, which was approximately 5% higher than that of the untreated group. Micropyle and hilum contributed a greater proportion to uptake. When sealed in the hilar or micropyle regions the amount of water absorbed into the seed decreased approximately 75% compared to the unsealed seed. This difference suggests that these two regions together act cooperatively in the water absorption. However, when plasma treated seed was blocked in the micropyle region, water absorption was higher higher than in seeds blocked hilum. This difference suggests that the plasma treatment changed the wettability of the hilum more effectively than it changed the micropyle. These results indicate that plasma can significantly change the hydrophilicity, water absorption and percentage of seed germination in E. velutina. PMID:27670654

  19. Nuclear DNA content in Sinningia (Gesneriaceae); intraspecific genome size variation and genome characterization in S. speciosa.

    PubMed

    Zaitlin, David; Pierce, Andrew J

    2010-12-01

    The Gesneriaceae (Lamiales) is a family of flowering plants comprising >3000 species of mainly tropical origin, the most familiar of which is the cultivated African violet (Saintpaulia spp.). Species of Gesneriaceae are poorly represented in the lists of taxa sampled for genome size estimation; measurements are available for three species of Ramonda and one each of Haberlea, Saintpaulia, and Streptocarpus, all species of Old World origin. We report here nuclear genome size estimates for 10 species of Sinningia, a neotropical genus largely restricted to Brazil. Flow cytometry of leaf cell nuclei showed that holoploid genome size in Sinningia is very small (approximately two times the size of the Arabidopsis genome), and is small compared to the other six species of Gesneriaceae with genome size estimates. We also documented intraspecific genome size variation of 21%-26% within a group of wild Sinningia speciosa (Lodd.) Hiern collections. In addition, we analyzed 1210 genome survey sequences from S. speciosa to characterize basic features of the nuclear genome such as guanine-cytosine content, types of repetitive elements, numbers of protein-coding sequences, and sequences unique to S. speciosa. We included several other angiosperm species as genome size standards, one of which was the snapdragon (Antirrhinum majus L.; Veronicaceae, Lamiales). Multiple measurements on three accessions indicated that the genome size of A. majus is ~633 × 10⁶ base pairs, which is approximately 40% of the previously published estimate.

  20. A pioneer of tropical medicine worldwide: Andrew Balfour, of Khartoum

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This is an archival account of the career of Sir Andrew Balfour in Khartoum, Sudan during the period 1902 to 1913. As the first director of the Wellcome Tropical Research Laboratories in Khartoum during the period, Andrew Balfour was tasked with establishing the laboratories and at the same time he was engaged in founding the health services in Khartoum. Balfour worked in close collaboration and support from Henry Wellcome and Reginald Wingate, the Governor General of the Sudan. The energetic and meticulous sanitary work of Balfour had a remarkable impact, with Khartoum declared mosquito-free by 1910. Establishing a research base in the laboratories was met with many challenges but eventually Balfour managed to recruit a team of dedicated researchers and to produce well-circulated publications in tropical medicine. Balfour’s work in Khartoum later lead him to a distinguished career in tropical medicine. In 1923 he was appointed the first Director of London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. He was also elected President of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (1925–27). Sir Andrew Balfour, KCMG, CB, LL D (1873–1931) PMID:27493361

  1. A pioneer of tropical medicine worldwide: Andrew Balfour, of Khartoum.

    PubMed

    Adeel, Ahmed A A

    2013-01-01

    This is an archival account of the career of Sir Andrew Balfour in Khartoum, Sudan during the period 1902 to 1913. As the first director of the Wellcome Tropical Research Laboratories in Khartoum during the period, Andrew Balfour was tasked with establishing the laboratories and at the same time he was engaged in founding the health services in Khartoum. Balfour worked in close collaboration and support from Henry Wellcome and Reginald Wingate, the Governor General of the Sudan. The energetic and meticulous sanitary work of Balfour had a remarkable impact, with Khartoum declared mosquito-free by 1910. Establishing a research base in the laboratories was met with many challenges but eventually Balfour managed to recruit a team of dedicated researchers and to produce well-circulated publications in tropical medicine. Balfour's work in Khartoum later lead him to a distinguished career in tropical medicine. In 1923 he was appointed the first Director of London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. He was also elected President of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (1925-27). Sir Andrew Balfour, KCMG, CB, LL D (1873 -1931).

  2. Transcriptome Analysis of Storage Roots and Fibrous Roots of the Traditional Medicinal Herb Callerya speciosa (Champ.) ScHot

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Ming; Li, Li; Fu, Yunliu; Wang, Zhunian; Ao, Mengfei; Li, Zhiying

    2016-01-01

    Callerya speciosa (Champ.) ScHot is a woody perennial plant in Fabaceae, the roots of which are used medicinally. The storage roots of C. speciosa are derived from fibrous roots, but not all fibrous roots can develop into storage roots. To detect key genes involved in storage roots formation, we performed Illumina sequencing of the C. speciosa storage roots and fibrous roots. De novo assembly resulted in 161,926 unigenes, which were subsequently annotated by BLAST, GO and KEGG analyses. After expression profiling, 4538 differentially expressed genes were identified. The KEGG pathway enrichment analysis revealed changes in the biosynthesis of cytokinin, phenylpropanoid, starch, sucrose, flavone and other secondary metabolites. Transcription factor-related differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were also identified, including such gene families as GRAS, COL, MIKC, ERF, LBD, and NAC. The DEGs related to light signaling, starch, sugar, photohormones and cell wall-loosening might be involved in the formation of storage roots. This study provides the first transcriptome profiling of C. speciosa roots, data that will facilitate future research of root development and metabolites with medicinal value as well as the breeding of C. speciosa. PMID:27486800

  3. Effects of a chitin binding vicilin from Erythrina velutina seeds on bean bruchid pests (Callosobruchus maculatus and Zabrotes subfasciatus).

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Fabiano M; Oliveira, Adeliana S; Macedo, Leonardo L P; Santos, Elizeu A; de Sales, Mauricio P

    2008-01-01

    Erythrina velutina vicilin, EvV, is a dimeric glycoprotein with Mr of 124.6 kDa. EvV was tested for anti-insect activity against bean bruchid larvae. EvV had LD(50) of 0.10% and ED(50) of 0.14% for Z. subfasciatus and LD(50) of 0.26% and ED(50) of 0.19% for C. maculatus. EvV was not digested by bean larvae enzymes until 12 h of incubation, and at 24 h EvV was more resistant to Z. subfasciatus enzymes.

  4. Differential affinities of Erythrina cristagalli lectin (ECL) toward monosaccharides and polyvalent mammalian structural units.

    PubMed

    Wu, Albert M; Wu, June H; Tsai, Ming-Sung; Yang, Zhangung; Sharon, Nathan; Herp, Anthony

    2007-12-01

    Previous studies on the carbohydrate specificities of Erythrina cristagalli lectin (ECL) were mainly limited to analyzing the binding of oligo-antennary Galbeta1-->4GlcNAc (II). In this report, a wider range of recognition factors of ECL toward known mammalian ligands and glycans were examined by enzyme-linked lectinosorbent and inhibition assays, using natural polyvalent glycotopes, and a glycan array assay. From the results, it is shown that GalNAc was an active ligand, but its polyvalent structural units, in contrast to those of Gal, were poor inhibitors. Among soluble natural glycans tested for 50% molecular mass inhibition, Streptococcus pneumoniae type 14 capsular polysaccharide of polyvalent II was the most potent inhibitor; it was 2.1 x 10(4), 3.9 x 10(3) and 2.4 x 10(3) more active than Gal, tri-antennary II and monomeric II, respectively. Most type II-containing glycoproteins were also potent inhibitors, indicating that special polyvalent II and Galbeta1-related structures play critically important roles in lectin binding. Mapping all information available, it can be concluded that: [a] Galbeta1-->4GlcNAc (II) and some Galbeta1-related oligosaccharides, rather than GalNAc-related oligosaccharides, are the core structures for lectin binding; [b] their polyvalent II forms within macromolecules are a potent recognition force for ECL, while II monomer and oligo-antennary II forms play only a limited role in binding; [c] the shape of the lectin binding domains may correspond to a cavity type with Galbeta1-->4GlcNAc as the core binding site with additional one to four sugars subsites, and is most complementary to a linear trisaccharide, Galbeta1-->4GlcNAcbeta1-->6Gal. These analyses should facilitate the understanding of the binding function of ECL.

  5. In vivo and in vitro estrogenic activity of extracts from Erythrina poeppigiana (Fabaceae).

    PubMed

    Njamen, Dieudonné; Djiogue, Sefirin; Zingue, Stephane; Mvondo, Marie Alfrede; Nkeh-Chungag, Benedicta N

    2013-08-22

    In developing countries, around 80% of the population still resorts on traditional medicine for their primary health care. Erythrina poeppigiana (Walp.) O.F. Cook, one of these medicinal plants, was found to be particularly rich in isoflavonoids which exhibited, individually, significant estrogenic activity in vitro. The possible combined effects of these bioactive isoflavones, as they are naturally found in the crude extracts of E. poeppigiana, prompted us to assess their in vivo estrogenicity. We first tested the ability of the extracts to transactivate estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) in vitro using U2OS human osteosarcoma cells. We next investigated their effects in vivo in an uterotrophic assay, using ovariectomized rats treated with the extracts at the doses of 50, 100, 200, and 400 mg/kg BW/d orally for 3 days. Finally, we assessed their ability to relieve hot flushes, using data loggers. At the end of treatments, animals were sacrificed, and organs (mammary glands, vagina, and uteri) were collected for histo-morphometric analyses. The methanol extract significantly and dose-dependently transactivated ERα at all tested doses. All extracts induced significant increases of vaginal and uterine epithelial heights. Only the dichloromethane extract could significantly relieve hot flushes as estradiol. These results indicate that E. poeppigiana extracts have estrogen-like effects in vivo, suggesting that its active principles act in synergy when they are taken in combination in the crude extract. These findings, therefore, support the traditional use of E. poeppigiana to alleviate some menopausal problems; our previous phytochemical investigations contribute to the standardization of this phytomedicine.

  6. Structural features of the combining site region of Erythrina corallodendron lectin: role of tryptophan 135.

    PubMed Central

    Adar, R.; Moreno, E.; Streicher, H.; Karlsson, K. A.; Angström, J.; Sharon, N.

    1998-01-01

    The role of Trp 135 and Tyr 108 in the combining site of Erythrina corallodendron lectin (ECorL) was investigated by physicochemical characterization of mutants obtained by site-directed mutagenesis, hemagglutination-inhibition studies, and molecular modeling, including dynamics simulations. The findings demonstrate that Trp 135 in ECorL: (1) is required for the tight binding of Ca2+ and Mn2+ to the lectin because mutation of this residue into alanine results in loss of these ions upon dialysis and concomitant reversible inactivation of the mutant; (2) contributes to the high affinity of methyl alpha-N-dansylgalactosaminide (MealphaGalNDns) to the lectin; and (3) is solely responsible for the fluorescence energy transfer between the aromatic residues of the lectin and the dansyl group in the ECorL-MealphaGalNDns complex. Docking of MealphaGalNDns into the combining site of the lectin reveals that the dansyl moiety is parallel with the indole of Trp 135, as required for efficient fluorescence energy transfer, in one of the two possible conformations that this ligand assumes in the bound state. In the W135A mutant, which still binds MealphaGalNDns strongly, the dansyl group may partially insert itself into the place formerly occupied by Trp 135, a process that from dynamics simulations does not appear to be energetically favored unless the loop containing this residue assumes an open conformation. However, a small fraction of the W135A molecules must be able to bind MealphaGalNDns in order to explain the relatively high affinity, as compared to galactose, still remaining for this ligand. A model for the molecular events leading to inactivation of the W135A mutant upon demetallization is also presented in which the cis-trans isomerization of the Ala 88-Asp 89 peptide bond, observed in high-temperature dynamics simulations, appears not to be a required step. PMID:9514259

  7. Evaluation of local energy sources in milk production in a tropical silvopastoral system with Erythrina poeppigiana.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Ferrer, Guillermo; Mendoza-Martínez, Germán; Soto-Pinto, Lorena; Alayón-Gamboa, Armando

    2015-06-01

    An experiment was carried out to determine the effect of four local energy sources (sorghum grain, green banana, polished rice, and sugarcane molasses) fed to dairy cows on intake, milk production and composition, and economic viability in a silvopastoral system in Costa Rica (Turrialba). Twelve grazing cows (Jersey × Central American Milking Creole), with a mean live weight of 332 kg (SD 34), were supplemented with 0.5 kg of dry matter (DM)/100 kg/LW of Erythrina porppigiana fresh foliage daily. Experimental design was a replicated change-over 4 × 4 Latin Square. The pasture composition was 11 and 17 % of star grass (Cynodon niemfuensis), 32 and 28 % of ruzzi grass (Brachiaria rusisiensis), and 45 and 42 % of natural grasses (Axonopus compresus and Paspalum conjugatum) at initial and final times of the essay, respectively. The grass allowance was 30.14 DM/cow/day. Significant differences were found among treatments for variable milk fat content (P < 0.05). Sorghum presented the highest (41.2 g/kg milk) content of milk fat, followed by green banana (39.2 g/kg milk), polished rice (38.3 g/kg milk) and molasses (38.1 g/kg milk). Non-significant differences (P > 0.05) resulted for total milk production (sorghum 9.0 kg/cow/day; green banana 8.9 kg/cow/day; polished rice 8.8 kg/cow/day; molasses 8.6 kg/cow/day) and fat-corrected milk (FCM). The financial analysis showed that all treatments were economically viable; however, supplementation with green bananas and molasses were the most favorable due to the low costs incurred.

  8. Preliminary evaluation of anti-inflammatory and anti-arthritic activity of S. lappa, A. speciosa and A. aspera.

    PubMed

    Gokhale, A B; Damre, A S; Kulkami, K R; Saraf, M N

    2002-07-01

    Saussurea lappa, Argyreia speciosa and Achyranthes aspera are well known Indian medicinal plants used in the indigenous systems of medicine for the treatment of inflammatory conditions. The ethanolic extracts of the plants at the doses of 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg, p.o. were screened for their effect on acute and chronic inflammation induced in mice and rats. S. lappa and A. speciosa were found to significantly inhibit paw edema induced by carrageenan and Freund's complete adjuvant and to prevent accumulation of inflammatory cells in carrageenan-induced peritonitis at doses of 50-200 mg/kg. A. aspera inhibited these inflammatory responses at doses of 100-200 mg/kg. The studies reveal that the ethanolic extracts of S. lappa, A. speciosa and A. aspera possess anti-inflammatory and anti-arthritic activity and support the rationale behind the traditional use of these plants in inflammatory conditions.

  9. ANDREWS MOUNTAIN, MAZOURKA, AND PAIUTE ROADLESS AREAS, CALIFORNIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKee, Edwin H.; Schmauch, Steven W.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of a mineral survey, local areas near and within the Andrews Mountain, Mazourka, and Paiute Roadless Areas, California have probable and substantiated mineral-resource potential. The principal metallic mineral resources in these roadless areas are gold, copper, and silver with lead, zinc, and tungsten, as lesser resources. A zone of probable resource potential for talc, graphite, and marble is identified in the Mazourka Roadless Area. Metallic mineralization occurs mostly in vein deposits in silicic and carbonate metasedimentary rocks peripheral to Mesozoic plutons and locally in granitic rocks as well. There is little promise for the occurrence of fossil fuel resources in the roadless areas.

  10. Invertebrate assemblages in the lower Klamath River, with reference to Manayunkia speciosa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Malakauskas, David M.; Wilzbach, Margaret A.

    2012-01-01

    The freshwater polychaete, Manayunkia speciosa Leidy (Canalipalpata Sabellidae), is the intermediate host for two myxozoan pathogens (Ceratomyxa shasta and Parvicapsula minibicornis) that cause substantial mortalities of juvenile salmon in the Pacific Northwest, particularly in the Klamath River below Iron Gate Dam in California. Information on the distribution of M. speciosa in the Klamath River may facilitate targeted control of polychaete populations to disrupt the parasites that affect fish populations. We sampled invertebrate assemblages in the lower Klamath River in the summer and fall of 2005 and 2006 to estimate distribution patterns of M. speciosa and to characterize assemblage structure of invertebrates in reaches where the polychaete was both collected and not collected. The polychaete was most often found in a reach of river extending 100 km downstream from the Shasta River (river km 185-287). The reach in which it was found supported high taxonomic richness of invertebrates and a high abundance of filtering collectors including marine relicts such as sponges, unioinid mussels, and bryozoans. We suggest that the large, stable substrate on which these were found represents primary, optimal habitat for the polychaete, also a marine relict. Reaches above and below the zone where we collected polychaetes showed a general trend of reduced taxonomic richness as distance away from the polychaete zone increased, and also showed differing relative abundances of non-insect taxa and functional feeding groups. Differences in invertebrate assemblages between years were coincident with large differences in water flows. We suggest flows and food resources may play important roles in invertebrate distribution patterns.

  11. Verbascoside isolated from Lepechinia speciosa has inhibitory activity against HSV-1 and HSV-2 in vitro.

    PubMed

    Martins, Fernanda O; Esteves, Patricia F; Mendes, Gabriella S; Barbi, Nanci S; Menezes, Fabio S; Romanos, Maria T V

    2009-12-01

    Verbascoside has been isolated form L. speciosa after several different chromatographic methods. After its purification, the structure has been unequivocally established using modern spectroscopic techniques. As for the antiviral activity, the maximum non toxic concentration has been established and this concentration has been used in the anti herpes assay, in vitro. Mechanism of action for this molecule regarding the anti-herpes activity has been studied encompassing the following assays: virucidal activity, cellular receptor assay, penetration assay and intracellular assay, in order to understand the activity for this natural product.

  12. Circumscription and synopsis of Eugenia section Speciosae Bünger & Mazine (Myrtaceae)

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira Bünger, Mariana; Mazine, Fiorella Fernanda; Lucas, Eve J.; Stehmann, João Renato

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A new section of Eugenia (Myrtaceae) is described, segregate from Eugenia sect. Phyllocalyx. Phylogenetic studies suggest that Eugenia sect. Phyllocalyx as traditionally delimited is paraphyletic. To maintain the monophyly of each of the sections in Eugenia s.l., we herein opt to circumscribe a new section and recognize six taxa in sect. Speciosae, which has a distribution mostly in southeastern Brazil and northern South America. Nomenclatural notes are made and a taxonomic key is provided for the species of the section. PMID:27081351

  13. Characterization and Pharmacological Properties of a Novel Multifunctional Kunitz Inhibitor from Erythrina velutina Seeds

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Richele J. A.; Monteiro, Norberto K. V.; Migliolo, Ludovico; Silva, Osmar N.; Pinto, Michele F. S.; Oliveira, Adeliana S.; Franco, Octávio L.; Kiyota, Sumika; Bemquerer, Marcelo P.; Uchoa, Adriana F.; Morais, Ana H. A.; Santos, Elizeu A.

    2013-01-01

    Inhibitors of peptidases isolated from leguminous seeds have been studied for their pharmacological properties. The present study focused on purification, biochemical characterization and anti-inflammatory and anticoagulant evaluation of a novel Kunitz trypsin inhibitor from Erythrina velutina seeds (EvTI). Trypsin inhibitors were purified by ammonium sulfate (30–60%), fractionation followed by Trypsin-Sepharose affinity chromatography and reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography. The purified inhibitor showed molecular mass of 19,210.48 Da. Furthermore, a second isoform with 19,228.16 Da was also observed. The inhibitor that showed highest trypsin specificity and enhanced recovery yield was named EvTI (P2) and was selected for further analysis. The EvTI peptide fragments, generated by trypsin and pepsin digestion, were further analyzed by MALDI-ToF-ToF mass spectrometry, allowing a partial primary structure elucidation. EvTI exhibited inhibitory activity against trypsin with IC50 of 2.2×10−8 mol.L−1 and constant inhibition (Ki) of 1.0×10−8 mol.L−1, by a non-competitive mechanism. In addition to inhibit the activity of trypsin, EvTI also inhibited factor Xa and neutrophil elastase, but do not inhibit thrombin, chymotrypsin or peptidase 3. EvTI was investigated for its anti-inflammatory and anti-coagulant properties. Firstly, EvTI showed no cytotoxic effect on human peripheral blood cells. Nevertheless, the inhibitor was able to prolong the clotting time in a dose-dependent manner by using in vitro and in vivo models. Due to anti-inflammatory and anticoagulant EvTI properties, two sepsis models were here challenged. EvTI inhibited leukocyte migration and specifically acted by inhibiting TNF-α release and stimulating IFN-α and IL-12 synthesis. The data presented clearly contribute to a better understanding of the use of Kunitz inhibitors in sepsis as a bioactive agent capable of interfering in blood coagulation and inflammation. PMID

  14. Characterization and pharmacological properties of a novel multifunctional Kunitz inhibitor from Erythrina velutina seeds.

    PubMed

    Machado, Richele J A; Monteiro, Norberto K V; Migliolo, Ludovico; Silva, Osmar N; Pinto, Michele F S; Oliveira, Adeliana S; Franco, Octávio L; Kiyota, Sumika; Bemquerer, Marcelo P; Uchoa, Adriana F; Morais, Ana H A; Santos, Elizeu A

    2013-01-01

    Inhibitors of peptidases isolated from leguminous seeds have been studied for their pharmacological properties. The present study focused on purification, biochemical characterization and anti-inflammatory and anticoagulant evaluation of a novel Kunitz trypsin inhibitor from Erythrina velutina seeds (EvTI). Trypsin inhibitors were purified by ammonium sulfate (30-60%), fractionation followed by Trypsin-Sepharose affinity chromatography and reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography. The purified inhibitor showed molecular mass of 19,210.48 Da. Furthermore, a second isoform with 19,228.16 Da was also observed. The inhibitor that showed highest trypsin specificity and enhanced recovery yield was named EvTI (P2) and was selected for further analysis. The EvTI peptide fragments, generated by trypsin and pepsin digestion, were further analyzed by MALDI-ToF-ToF mass spectrometry, allowing a partial primary structure elucidation. EvTI exhibited inhibitory activity against trypsin with IC50 of 2.2×10(-8) mol.L(-1) and constant inhibition (Ki) of 1.0×10(-8) mol.L(-1), by a non-competitive mechanism. In addition to inhibit the activity of trypsin, EvTI also inhibited factor Xa and neutrophil elastase, but do not inhibit thrombin, chymotrypsin or peptidase 3. EvTI was investigated for its anti-inflammatory and anti-coagulant properties. Firstly, EvTI showed no cytotoxic effect on human peripheral blood cells. Nevertheless, the inhibitor was able to prolong the clotting time in a dose-dependent manner by using in vitro and in vivo models. Due to anti-inflammatory and anticoagulant EvTI properties, two sepsis models were here challenged. EvTI inhibited leukocyte migration and specifically acted by inhibiting TNF-α release and stimulating IFN-α and IL-12 synthesis. The data presented clearly contribute to a better understanding of the use of Kunitz inhibitors in sepsis as a bioactive agent capable of interfering in blood coagulation and inflammation.

  15. 33 CFR 334.761 - Naval Support Activity Panama City; St. Andrews Bay; restricted areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... City; St. Andrews Bay; restricted areas. 334.761 Section 334.761 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS... REGULATIONS § 334.761 Naval Support Activity Panama City; St. Andrews Bay; restricted areas. (a) The areas—(1... in this section shall be enforced by the Commanding Officer, Naval Support Activity, Panama...

  16. A Meta-Analytic Review of the MacAndrew Alcoholism Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper-Hakim, Amy; Viswesvaran, Chockalingam

    2002-01-01

    Using meta analysis, examined the predictive validity of scores on the MacAndrew Alcoholism Scale (C. MacAndrew, 1965). Compared results for 161 studies with results for 63 studies using cut scores. Discusses why the use of continuous measures rather than cut scores is recommended. (SLD)

  17. The Implementation of IAS 16 and IAS 41 at Andrew Peller Limited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lapointe-Antunes, Pascale; Moore, James

    2013-01-01

    This case asks students to play the role of Doug Grodeckie, Manager of Financial Reporting at Andrew Peller Limited (APL). Doug was asked to prepare a report analyzing Andrew Peller Limited's current tangible long-lived assets disclosures and making recommendations on how best to comply with International Accounting Standard (IAS) 16 Property,…

  18. 33 CFR 334.761 - Naval Support Activity Panama City; St. Andrews Bay; restricted areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... City; St. Andrews Bay; restricted areas. 334.761 Section 334.761 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.761 Naval Support Activity Panama City; St. Andrews Bay; restricted areas. (a) The...

  19. Comparative study on the technological properties of latex and natural rubber from Hancornia speciosa Gomes and Hevea brasiliensis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This work reports a systematic comparative study of the properties of natural lattices and rubbers extracted from Hancornia speciosa Gomes and Hevea brasiliensis [(Willd. ex Adr. de Juss.) Muell.-Arg.] (clone RRIM 600) trees from 11 collections in Brazil throughout 2004. Natural rubber latex particl...

  20. First report of downy mildew disease caused by Plasmopara halstedii on the native Rudbeckia fulgida Aiton var. speciosa (Wender.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The showy black-eyed Susan Rudbeckia fulgida Aiton var. speciosa (Wender.) is an important perennial wildflower native to the Northeast and Midwest regions of the United States. Besides its aesthetic value in the landscape, this native plant attracts pollinators and provides seeds for birds during t...

  1. Molecular evidence of undescribed Ceratonova sp. (Cnidaria: Myxosporea) in the freshwater polychaete, Manayunkia speciosa, from western Lake Erie

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Malakauskas, David M.; Snipes, Robert Benjamin; Thompson, Ann M.; Schloesser, Donald W.

    2016-01-01

    We used PCR to screen pooled individuals of Manayunkia speciosa from western Lake Erie, Michigan, USA for myxosporean parasites. Amplicons from positive PCRs were sequenced and showed a Ceratonova species in an estimated 1.1% (95% CI = 0.46%, 1.8%) of M. speciosa individuals. We sequenced 18S, ITS1, 5.8S, ITS2 and most of the 28S rDNA regions of this Ceratonova sp., and part of the protein-coding EF2 gene. Phylogenetic analyses of ribosomal and EF2 sequences showed the Lake Erie Ceratonova sp. is most similar to, but genetically distinct from, Ceratonova shasta. Marked interspecific polymorphism in all genes examined, including the ITS barcoding genes, along with geographic location suggests this is an undescribed Ceratonova species. COI sequences showed M. speciosa individuals in Michigan and California are the same species. These findings represent a third parasite in the genus Ceratonovapotentially hosted by M. speciosa.

  2. Bacterial community associated with the trunk latex of Hancornia speciosa Gomes (Apocynaceae) grown in the northeast of Brazil.

    PubMed

    Silva, Thais Freitas da; Coelho, Marcia Reed Rodrigues; Vollú, Renata Estebanez; de Vasconcelos Goulart, Fátima Regina; Alviano, Daniela Sales; Alviano, Celuta Sales; Seldin, Lucy

    2011-03-01

    Prevention or cure of different illnesses through the use of plant latex is a worldwide known concept. The antifungal activity of Hancornia speciosa latex has been observed against Candida albicans. However, H. speciosa latex is not a sterile plant exudate and secondary metabolites produced by bacteria could be involved in fungal inhibition. In the present study, the bacterial communities of the latex from three H. speciosa trees were characterized using traditional plating and molecular methods. Twelve strains isolated from the latex samples were clustered into four groups by amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA). One representative of each group was sequenced and they were identified as belonging to the genera Bacillus, Klebsiella, Enterobacter and Escherichia. None of the 12 isolates showed antifungal activity against C. albicans. A lack of a microbial origin for the antifungal properties of latex was noted. DGGE profiles generated from each of the three latex samples showed unique patterns. Sequencing of the DGGE bands demonstrated the affiliation with the genera Klebsiella, Pantoea, Enterobacter and Burkholderia. In addition, clone libraries were generated and the phylogenetic distribution of the 50 analyzed clones was similar to that obtained using DGGE. The presence of some potential pathogens should be considered before using H. speciosa latex in folk medicine.

  3. Purification, some properties of a D-galactose-binding leaf lectin from Erythrina indica and further characterization of seed lectin.

    PubMed

    Konozy, Emadeldin H E; Mulay, Ranjana; Faca, Vitor; Ward, Richard John; Greene, Lewis Joel; Roque-Barriera, Maria Cristina; Sabharwal, Sushma; Bhide, Shobhana V

    2002-10-01

    Lectin from a leaf of Erythrina indica was isolated by affinity chromatography on Lactamyl-Seralose 4B. Lectin gave a single band in polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). In SDS-gel electrophoresis under reducing and non-reducing conditions Erythrina indica leaf lectin (EiLL) split into two bands with subunit molecular weights of 30 and 33 kDa, whereas 58 kDa was obtained for the intact lectin by gel filtration on Sephadex G-100. EiLL agglutinated all human RBC types, with a slight preference for the O blood group. Lectin was found to be a glycoprotein with a neutral sugar content of 9.5%. The carbohydrate specificity of lectin was directed towards D-galactose and its derivatives with pronounced preference for lactose. EiLL had pH optima at pH 7.0; above and below this pH lectin lost sugar-binding capability rapidly. Lectin showed broad temperature optima from 25 to 50 degrees C; however, at 55 degrees C EiLL lost more than 90% of its activity and at 60 degrees C it was totally inactivated. The pI of EiLL was found to be 7.6. The amino acid analysis of EiLL indicated that the lectin was rich in acidic as well as hydrophobic amino acids and totally lacked cysteine and methionine. The N-terminal amino acids were Val-Glu-Thr-IIe-Ser-Phe-Ser-Phe-Ser-Glu-Phe-Glu-Ala-Gly-Asn-Asp-X-Leu-Thr-Gln-Glu-Gly-Ala-Ala-Leu-. Chemical modification studies of both EiLL and Erythrina indica seed lectin (EiSL) with phenylglyoxal, DEP and DTNB revealed an absence of arginine, histidine and cysteine, respectively, in or near the ligand-binding site of both lectins. Modification of tyrosine with NAI led to partial inactivation of EiLL and EiSL; however, total inactivation was observed upon NBS-modification of two tryptophan residues in EiSL. Despite the apparent importance of these tryptophan residues for lectin activity they did not seem to have a direct role in binding haptenic sugar as D-galactose did not protect lectin from inactivation by NBS.

  4. Effects of the Aqueous Extract of Eremomastax speciosa (Acanthaceae) on Sexual Behavior in Normal Male Rats.

    PubMed

    Nchegang, B; Mezui, C; Longo, F; Nkwengoua, Z E; Amang, A P; Tan, P V

    2016-01-01

    Objective. We studied prosexual effects of Eremomastax speciosa aqueous extract in male adult rats. Materials and Methods. 100 and 500 mg/kg of extract were administered orally (days 0, 1, 4, 7, 14, and 28 (posttreatment)). The sexual behavior of rats receiving a single dose (500 mg/kg) was also evaluated after pretreatment with Lω-NAME (10 mg/kg), haloperidol (1 mg/kg), or atropine (5 mg/kg). Controls received distilled water or testosterone enanthate (20 mg/kg/day/3 days (s.c.) before the test). Results. The extract (days 1-14) had no significant effect on mount, intromission, and ejaculation frequencies but on day 28 (14 days after treatment), it increased frequency of mounts and intromissions at 500 mg/kg. Mount, intromission, and ejaculation latencies reduced and postejaculatory intervals decreased but the effect did not persist 2 weeks after treatment. Extract prosex effects were greatly reduced by atropine and completely abolished by haloperidol, while Lω-NAME increased mount latency and potentiated extract effect on intromission and ejaculation latencies. Conclusion. In summary, E. speciosa extract can have positive effects on male sexual motivation and performance when administered for two weeks at the dose of 500 mg/kg. The effects (dopaminergic and/or cholinergic dependent) tend to appear during the posttreatment period.

  5. Growth, chemical composition and soil properties of Tipuana speciosa (Benth.) Kuntze seedlings irrigated with sewage effluent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Hayssam M.; Khamis, Mohamed H.; Hassan, Fatma A.

    2012-06-01

    This study was carried out at a greenhouse of Sabahia Horticulture Research Station, Alexandria, Egypt, to study the effect of sewage effluent on the growth and chemical composition of Tipuana speciosa (Benth.) Kuntze seedlings as well as on soil properties for three stages. The irrigation treatments were primary-treated wastewater and secondary-treated wastewater, in addition to tap water as control. Therefore, the treated wastewater was taken from oxidation ponds of New Borg El-Arab City. Results of these study revealed that the primary effluent treatment explored the highest significant values for vegetative growth and biomass, compared to the other treatments. In addition, the higher significant concentration and uptake of chemical composition in different plant parts were obtained from the primary effluent treatment during the three stages of irrigation. It was found that the concentration of heavy metals in either plant or soil was below as compared to the world-recommended levels. These findings suggested that the use of sewage effluent in irrigating T. speciosa seedlings grown in calcareous soil was beneficial for the improvement of soil properties and production of timber trees, and also important for the safe manner of disposal of wastewater.

  6. Effects of the Aqueous Extract of Eremomastax speciosa (Acanthaceae) on Sexual Behavior in Normal Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Nchegang, B.; Mezui, C.; Nkwengoua, Z. E.; Amang, A. P.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. We studied prosexual effects of Eremomastax speciosa aqueous extract in male adult rats. Materials and Methods. 100 and 500 mg/kg of extract were administered orally (days 0, 1, 4, 7, 14, and 28 (posttreatment)). The sexual behavior of rats receiving a single dose (500 mg/kg) was also evaluated after pretreatment with Lω-NAME (10 mg/kg), haloperidol (1 mg/kg), or atropine (5 mg/kg). Controls received distilled water or testosterone enanthate (20 mg/kg/day/3 days (s.c.) before the test). Results. The extract (days 1–14) had no significant effect on mount, intromission, and ejaculation frequencies but on day 28 (14 days after treatment), it increased frequency of mounts and intromissions at 500 mg/kg. Mount, intromission, and ejaculation latencies reduced and postejaculatory intervals decreased but the effect did not persist 2 weeks after treatment. Extract prosex effects were greatly reduced by atropine and completely abolished by haloperidol, while Lω-NAME increased mount latency and potentiated extract effect on intromission and ejaculation latencies. Conclusion. In summary, E. speciosa extract can have positive effects on male sexual motivation and performance when administered for two weeks at the dose of 500 mg/kg. The effects (dopaminergic and/or cholinergic dependent) tend to appear during the posttreatment period. PMID:27525283

  7. A transnational conference romance: Elsie Andrews, Hildegarde Kneeland, and the Pan-Pacific Women's Association.

    PubMed

    Laurie, Alison J

    2009-01-01

    Elsie Andrews, a feminist activist from New Zealand, met Dr. Hildegarde Kneeland, a progressive economist from the United States, at the 1934 Pan-Pacific Women's Association conference in Honolulu. Andrews wrote diaries of her attendance at conferences, and in these writes openly of her attraction and romantic feelings for Kneeland, despite her own long-term domestic partnership back in New Plymouth with Muriel Kirton. This article considers the role conference romances may have played for Andrews and others in encouraging their interest in women's organizations, in the context of literature on romantic friendships and lesbianism.

  8. Responses to simulated nitrogen deposition by the neotropical epiphytic orchid Laelia speciosa

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Álvarez, Edison A.; Lindig-Cisneros, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Potential ecophysiological responses to nitrogen deposition, which is considered to be one of the leading causes for global biodiversity loss, were studied for the endangered endemic Mexican epiphytic orchid, Laelia speciosa, via a shadehouse dose-response experiment (doses were 2.5, 5, 10, 20, 40, and 80 kg N ha−1 yr−1) in order to assess the potential risk facing this orchid given impending scenarios of nitrogen deposition. Lower doses of nitrogen of up to 20 kg N ha yr−1, the dose that led to optimal plant performance, acted as fertilizer. For instance, the production of leaves and pseudobulbs were respectively 35% and 36% greater for plants receiving 20 kg N ha yr−1 than under any other dose. Also, the chlorophyll content and quantum yield peaked at 0.66 ± 0.03 g m−2 and 0.85 ± 0.01, respectively, for plants growing under the optimum dose. In contrast, toxic effects were observed at the higher doses of 40 and 80 kg N ha yr−1. The δ13C for leaves averaged −14.7 ± 0.2‰ regardless of the nitrogen dose. In turn, δ15N decreased as the nitrogen dose increased from 0.9 ± 0.1‰ under 2.5 kg N ha−1yr−1 to −3.1 ± 0.2‰ under 80 kg N ha−1yr−1, indicating that orchids preferentially assimilate NH4+ rather than NO3− of the solution under higher doses of nitrogen. Laelia speciosa showed a clear response to inputs of nitrogen, thus, increasing rates of atmospheric nitrogen deposition can pose an important threat for this species. PMID:26131375

  9. Responses to simulated nitrogen deposition by the neotropical epiphytic orchid Laelia speciosa.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Álvarez, Edison A; Lindig-Cisneros, Roberto; de la Barrera, Erick

    2015-01-01

    Potential ecophysiological responses to nitrogen deposition, which is considered to be one of the leading causes for global biodiversity loss, were studied for the endangered endemic Mexican epiphytic orchid, Laelia speciosa, via a shadehouse dose-response experiment (doses were 2.5, 5, 10, 20, 40, and 80 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1)) in order to assess the potential risk facing this orchid given impending scenarios of nitrogen deposition. Lower doses of nitrogen of up to 20 kg N ha yr(-1), the dose that led to optimal plant performance, acted as fertilizer. For instance, the production of leaves and pseudobulbs were respectively 35% and 36% greater for plants receiving 20 kg N ha yr(-1) than under any other dose. Also, the chlorophyll content and quantum yield peaked at 0.66 ± 0.03 g m(-2) and 0.85 ± 0.01, respectively, for plants growing under the optimum dose. In contrast, toxic effects were observed at the higher doses of 40 and 80 kg N ha yr(-1). The δ (13)C for leaves averaged -14.7 ± 0.2‰ regardless of the nitrogen dose. In turn, δ (15)N decreased as the nitrogen dose increased from 0.9 ± 0.1‰ under 2.5 kg N ha(-1)yr(-1) to -3.1 ± 0.2‰ under 80 kg N ha(-1)yr(-1), indicating that orchids preferentially assimilate NH4 (+) rather than NO3 (-) of the solution under higher doses of nitrogen. Laelia speciosa showed a clear response to inputs of nitrogen, thus, increasing rates of atmospheric nitrogen deposition can pose an important threat for this species.

  10. Antimicrobial activity of flavanoid sulphates and other fractions of Argyreia speciosa (Burm.f) Boj.

    PubMed

    Habbu, P V; Mahadevan, K M; Shastry, R A; Manjunatha, H

    2009-02-01

    Antimicrobial activity of flavanoid sulphates and different fractions of A. speciosa root was studied against bacteria, fungi and Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37 Rv sensitive strain by in vitro and in vivo assays. Flavanoid sulphates such as quercetin 3'7 di-O methyl 3- sulphate and kaempferol 7-O methyl 3-sulphate were isolated from the n-butanol fraction of 80% methanolic extract of the plant. The structures of the isolated flavanoids were confirmed by spectral studies. Ethyl acetate (EAAS) fraction and flavanoid sulphates inhibited the growth of M. tuberculosis Rv sensitive strain at MIC values 50 and 25 microg/ml, respectively. Ethanolic fraction (EtAS) showed significant inhibition of gram positive organism with a MIC of 31.25 microg/ml. More inhibition was observed with a less MIC (2 microg/ml) for flavanoid sulphates against Klebsiella pneumoniae, a gram negative organism and it is almost comparable with the standards. Interestingly, chloroform fraction alone exhibited significant antifungal activity with a MIC of 100 microg/ml. A synergistic effect between flavanoids sulphates and commercially available antitubercular drugs was observed with FIC index of 0.443 +/- 0.245, 0.487 +/- 0.247 for isoniazid and 0.468 +/- 0.333, 0.417 +/- 0.345 for rifampicin, whereas EAAS fraction showed partial synergistic effect. A synergistic effect was observed for EAAS fraction and flavanoids sulphates with FIC index < 0.5 with antibiotics. Hemolysis assay on RBCs suggested that EAAS and flavanoids sulphates exhibited least cellular toxicity to erythrocytes as compared to chloramphenicol. In vivo studies in mice infected with K. pneumoniae demonstrated that on day 10 post treatment of different fractions and isolated compounds of A. speciosa, about 60% of the animals treated with EAAS, 70% of animals treated with flavanoids sulphates and 40% of animals treated with EtAS were survived.

  11. Report: Results of Technical Network Vulnerability Assessment: EPA’s Andrew W. Breidenbach Environmental Research Center

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Report #10-P-0210, September 7, 2010. Vulnerability testing of EPA’s Andrew W. Breidenbach Environmental Research Center network conducted in June 2010 identified Internet Protocol addresses with numerous high-risk and medium-risk vulnerabilities.

  12. ISS Update: RATS Principal Investigator Andrew Abercromby -- 08.29.12

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Brandi Dean talks to the Research And Technology Studies (RATS) Principal Investigator Andrew Abercromby in the Space Vehicle Mock-Up Facility at Johnson Space Center in...

  13. Sequence similarity-based proteomics in insects: characterization of the larvae venom of the Brazilian moth Cerodirphia speciosa.

    PubMed

    Shevchenko, Anna; de Sousa, Mirta Mittelstedt Leal; Waridel, Patrice; Bittencourt, Silvia Tolfo; de Sousa, Marcelo Valle; Shevchenko, Andrej

    2005-01-01

    Using a combination of tandem mass spectrometric sequencing and sequence similarity searches, we characterized the larvae venom of the moth Cerodirphia speciosa, which belongs to the Saturniidae family of the Lepidoptera order. Despite the paucity of available database sequence resources, the approach enabled us to identify 48 out of 58 attempted spots on its two-dimensional gel electrophoresis map, which represented 37 unique proteins, whereas it was only possible to identify 13 proteins by conventional non-error tolerant database searching methods. The majority of cross-species hits were made to proteins from the phylogenetically related Lepidoptera organism, the silk worm Bombyx mori. The protein composition of the venom suggested that envenoming by C. speciosa toxins might proceed through the contact with its hemolymph, similarly to another toxic Lepidoptera organism, Lonomia obliqua.

  14. Do consecutive flower visits within a crown diminish fruit set in mass-flowering Hancornia speciosa (Apocynaceae)?

    PubMed

    Pinto, C E; Oliveira, R; Schlindwein, C

    2008-05-01

    Hancornia speciosa is a self-incompatible, mass-flowering, sphingophilous fruit crop (mangaba) of northeast and central Brazil. The flowers have a precise pollination apparatus, which optimizes pollen transfer between flower and pollinator. While the pollination mechanism avoids self-pollination, mass-flowering promotes geitonogamy. During a flower visit, almost half of the exogenous pollen grains adhering to the proboscis are deposited on the stigma surface. A pollination experiment with a nylon thread simulating six consecutive flower visits within a crown revealed that only the first two flowers visited (positions 1 and 2) are highly likely to set fruit. Super-production of flowers, and consequently obligate low fruit set, seem to be part of the reproductive strategy of the obligate outcrossing plant, Hancornia speciosa.

  15. Freshwater polychaetes (Manayunkia speciosa) near the Detroit River, western Lake Erie: Abundance and life‐history characteristics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schloesser, Donald W.; Malakauskas, David M.; Malakauskas, Sarah J.

    2016-01-01

    Freshwater polychaetes are relatively rare and little-studied members of the benthos of lakes and rivers. We studied one polychaete species (Manayunkia speciosa) in Lake Erie near the mouth of the Detroit River. Abundances at one site were determined between 1961 and 2013 and life‐history characteristics at two sites were determined seasonally (March–November) in 2009–2010 and 2012–2013. Life‐history characteristics included abundances, length‐frequency distributions, presence/absence of constructed tubes, sexual maturity, and number and maturation of young of year (YOY) in tubes. Long-term abundances decreased in successive time periods between 1961 and 2003 (mean range = 57,570 to 2583/m2) but few changes occurred between 2003 and 2013 (mean = 5007/m2; range/y = 2355–8216/m2). Seasonal abundances varied substantially between sites and years, but overall, abundances were low in March–April, high in May–August, and low in September–November. Although reproduction was continuous throughout warmer months, en masse recruitment, as revealed by length–frequency distributions, occurred in a brief period late‐June to mid-July, and possibly in early-September. All life history characteristics, including tube construction, were dependent on water temperatures (> 5 °C in spring and < 15 °C in fall). These results generally agree with and complement laboratory studies of M. speciosa in the Pacific Northwest where M. speciosa hosts parasites that cause substantial fish mortalities. Although abundance ofM. speciosa near the mouth of the Detroit River was 33-fold lower in 2013 than it was in 1961, this population has persisted for five decades and, therefore, has the potential to harbor parasites that may cause fish mortalities in the Great Lakes.

  16. A Novel Interaction between Plant-Beneficial Rhizobacteria and Roots: Colonization Induces Corn Resistance against the Root Herbivore Diabrotica speciosa

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Franciele; Peñaflor, Maria Fernanda G. V.; Paré, Paul W.; Sanches, Patrícia A.; Kamiya, Aline C.; Tonelli, Mateus; Nardi, Cristiane; Bento, José Mauricio S.

    2014-01-01

    A number of soil-borne microorganisms, such as mycorrhizal fungi and rhizobacteria, establish mutualistic interactions with plants, which can indirectly affect other organisms. Knowledge of the plant-mediated effects of mutualistic microorganisms is limited to aboveground insects, whereas there is little understanding of what role beneficial soil bacteria may play in plant defense against root herbivory. Here, we establish that colonization by the beneficial rhizobacterium Azospirillum brasilense affects the host selection and performance of the insect Diabrotica speciosa. Root larvae preferentially orient toward the roots of non-inoculated plants versus inoculated roots and gain less weight when feeding on inoculated plants. As inoculation by A. brasilense induces higher emissions of (E)-β-caryophyllene compared with non-inoculated plants, it is plausible that the non-preference of D. speciosa for inoculated plants is related to this sesquiterpene, which is well known to mediate belowground insect-plant interactions. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study showing that a beneficial rhizobacterium inoculant indirectly alters belowground plant-insect interactions. The role of A. brasilense as part of an integrative pest management (IPM) program for the protection of corn against the South American corn rootworm, D. speciosa, is considered. PMID:25405495

  17. A novel interaction between plant-beneficial rhizobacteria and roots: colonization induces corn resistance against the root herbivore Diabrotica speciosa.

    PubMed

    Santos, Franciele; Peñaflor, Maria Fernanda G V; Paré, Paul W; Sanches, Patrícia A; Kamiya, Aline C; Tonelli, Mateus; Nardi, Cristiane; Bento, José Mauricio S

    2014-01-01

    A number of soil-borne microorganisms, such as mycorrhizal fungi and rhizobacteria, establish mutualistic interactions with plants, which can indirectly affect other organisms. Knowledge of the plant-mediated effects of mutualistic microorganisms is limited to aboveground insects, whereas there is little understanding of what role beneficial soil bacteria may play in plant defense against root herbivory. Here, we establish that colonization by the beneficial rhizobacterium Azospirillum brasilense affects the host selection and performance of the insect Diabrotica speciosa. Root larvae preferentially orient toward the roots of non-inoculated plants versus inoculated roots and gain less weight when feeding on inoculated plants. As inoculation by A. brasilense induces higher emissions of (E)-β-caryophyllene compared with non-inoculated plants, it is plausible that the non-preference of D. speciosa for inoculated plants is related to this sesquiterpene, which is well known to mediate belowground insect-plant interactions. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study showing that a beneficial rhizobacterium inoculant indirectly alters belowground plant-insect interactions. The role of A. brasilense as part of an integrative pest management (IPM) program for the protection of corn against the South American corn rootworm, D. speciosa, is considered.

  18. Human perceptions of landscape change: The case of a monodominant forest of Attalea speciosa Mart ex. Spreng (Northeast Brazil).

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Gabriela M A; Ramos, Marcelo A; Araújo, Elcida L; Baldauf, Cristina; Albuquerque, Ulysses Paulino

    2016-05-01

    From the perception of human populations, we can assess the changes occurring in certain landscapes and the factors that cause those changes. Such studies have proven helpful in increasing the knowledge of the history of a landscape, recognizing past formations and projecting its future. Our research objective was to determine how a landscape dominated by the palm tree Attalea speciosa, a species of ecological, economic, and cultural importance, has been changing over time by synthesizing and comparing historical documents and local perceptions. This study was conducted in Araripe Environmental Protection Area, Northeast Region, Brazil. To understand local landscape change, we interviewed active harvesters in four communities in which A. speciosa use has been documented. Historical documents were evaluated as a complement to the interview data. According to local informants, areas previously used for cultivation and animal husbandry that were abandoned or decimated by droughts in the region may have fostered the expansion of a monodominant A. speciosa forest. Furthermore, other forms of landscape management resulting from human population growth may also have affected the current and past distribution of this forest.

  19. Andrew meets Rensch: sexual size dimorphism and the inverse of Rensch's rule in Andrew's toad (Bufo andrewsi).

    PubMed

    Liao, Wen Bo; Liu, Wen Chao; Merilä, Juha

    2015-02-01

    Variation in sexual size dimorphism (SSD) is a widespread phenomenon and is commonly attributed to variation in sex-specific patterns of selection. According to Rensch's rule, SSD increases with increasing body size when males are the larger sex, and decreases when females are the larger sex. Using data from 17 populations of Andrew's toad (Bufo andrewsi), we tested whether the patterns of SSD conform to Rensch's rule. Using field experiments, we also evaluated the hypothesis that sexual selection favours large male body size and that fecundity selection favours large female body size. The results revealed that the degree of SSD increased with increasing mean size in females, consistent with the inverse of Rensch's rule. Although experiments revealed evidence for a large-male mating advantage, selection for large male size was weak at best, and hence unlikely to be an important source of variation in SSD. However, fecundity selection favouring large females was evident, and likely to explain the observed inverse of Rensch's rule. After correcting male and female body size for age differences, the patterns of SSD remained the same, suggesting that the intra- and interpopulational variation in SSD is not driven by sex differences in age structure. Hence, these findings suggest that the strong fecundity selection favouring large females drives the evolution of female-biased SSD in B. andrewsi, providing an explanation for the inverse of Rensch's rule. As such, the study provides an important addition to the small body of literature that uses an intraspecific approach to demonstrate the inverse of Rensch's rule.

  20. Biology, immature and adult morphology, and molecular characterization of a new species of the genus Entedon (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) associated with the invasive pest Specularius impressithorax (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae, Bruchinae) on Erythrina plants.

    PubMed

    Gumovsky, A V; Ramadan, M M

    2011-12-01

    Entedon erythrinae sp. n. (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae), a gregarious egg-larval endoparasitoid of the Erythrina bruchine Specularius impressithorax, an invasive pest of the coral tree seeds (Erythrina spp.), is described from the Hawaiian Islands and Africa (South Africa, Tanzania and Mozambique). The biology and morphology of preimaginal stages of this new species are described in details.It is remarkable that the early embryo of the parasitoid represents a mass of undifferentiated cells surrounded by a peculiar membrane formed by the peripheral enlarged polygonal cells. The young larva developing inside this membrane corresponds morphologically to the second instar of congeneric species. Various peculiarities of the parasitoid-host relationships in gregarious and solitary Entedon parasitoids are discussed. The DNA sequences of 28S D2 (nuclear), Cytochrome Oxidase I (COI, mitochondrial) and Cytochrome B (CytB, mitochondrial) genes are provided for this new species and compared with the sequences of some other Afrotropical and Palearctic species of the genus.

  1. Antibacterial and cytotoxic effect of biologically synthesized silver nanoparticles using aqueous root extract of Erythrina indica lam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathi Sre, P. R.; Reka, M.; Poovazhagi, R.; Arul Kumar, M.; Murugesan, K.

    2015-01-01

    Simple, yet an effective and rapid approach for the green synthesis of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) using root extract of Erythrina indica and its in vitro antibacterial activity was tried against human pathogenic bacteria and its cytotoxic effect in breast and lung cancer cell lines has been demonstrated in this study. Various instrumental techniques were adopted to characterize the synthesized Ag NPs viz. UV-Vis (Ultra violet), FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared), XRD (X-ray diffraction), DLS (Dynamic light scattering), HR TEM (High-resolution transmission electron microscopy), EDX (Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy). Surface plasmon spectra for Ag NPs are centered nearly at 438 nm with dark brown color. FTIR analysis revealed the presence of terpenes, phenol, flavonols and tannin act as effective reducing and capping agents for converting silver nitrate to Ag NPs. The synthesized Ag NPs were found to be spherical in shape with size in the range of 20-118 nm. Moreover, the synthesized Ag NPs showed potent antibacterial activity against Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria and these biologically synthesized nanoparticles were also proved to exhibit excellent cytotoxic effect on breast and lung cancer cell lines.

  2. Phytochemical Profile of Erythrina variegata by Using High-Performance Liquid Chromatography and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectroscopy Analyses.

    PubMed

    Muthukrishnan, Suriyavathana; Palanisamy, Subha; Subramanian, Senthilkumar; Selvaraj, Sumathi; Mari, Kavitha Rani; Kuppulingam, Ramalingam

    2016-08-01

    Natural products derived from plant sources have been utilized to treat patients with numerous diseases. The phytochemical constituents present in ethanolic leaf extract of Erythrina variegata (ELEV) were identified by using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS) analyses. Shade dried leaves were powdered and extracted with ethanol for analyses through HPLC to identify selected flavonoids and through GC-MS to identify other molecules. The HPLC analysis of ELEV showed the presence of gallic and caffeic acids as the major components at concentrations of 2.0 ppm and 0.1 ppm, respectively, as well as other components. GC-MS analysis revealed the presence of 3-eicosyne; 3,7,11,15-tetramethyl-2-hexadecen-1-ol; butanoic acid, 3-methyl-3,7-dimethyl-6-octenyl ester; phytol; 1,2-benzenedicarboxylic acid, diundecyl ester; 1-octanol, 2-butyl-; squalene; and 2H-pyran, 2-(7-heptadecynyloxy) tetrahydro-derivative. Because pharmacopuncture is a new evolving natural mode that uses herbal extracts for treating patients with various ailments with minimum pain and maximum effect, the results of this study are particularly important and show that ELEV possesses a wide range of phytochemical constituents, as indicated above, as effective active principle molecules that can be used individually or in combination to treat patients with various diseases.

  3. Synthesis of tetravalent LacNAc-glycoclusters as high-affinity cross-linker against Erythrina cristagalli agglutinin.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Makoto; Chuma, Yasushi; Yasumoto, Yoshinori; Onoda, Takashi; Umemura, Myco; Usui, Taichi; Park, Enoch Y

    2016-01-01

    Four kinds of tetravalent double-headed glycoclusters [(LacNAc)4-DHGs] were designed with linkers of varying lengths consisting of alkanedioic carboxyamido groups (C6, C12, C18 and C24) between two bi-antennary LacNAc-glycosides. These glycoclusters served as high-affinity cross-linking ligands for the LacNAc-binding lectin Erythrina cristagalli agglutinin (ECA). The binding activity and cross-linking between each ligand and ECA were characterized by a hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), a quantitative precipitation assay and dynamic light scattering (DLS). For the precipitation assay and DLS measurement, the synthesized (LacNAc)4-DHGs were found to be capable of binding and precipitating the ECA as multivalent ligands. ITC analysis indicated the binding of (LacNAc)4-DHGs was driven by a favorable enthalpy change. Furthermore, the entropy penalty from binding (LacNAc)4-DHGs clearly decreased in a spacer length-dependent manner. The binding affinities of flexible (LacNAc)4-DHGs (C18 and C24) with long spacers were found to be more favorable than those of the clusters having short spacers (C6 and C12). These results were supported by molecular dynamics simulations with explicit water molecules for the tetravalent glycoclusters with ECA. We concluded that the subtle modification in the epitope-presenting scaffolds exerts the significant effect in the recognition efficiency involved in the LacNAc moieties by ECA.

  4. The life of Andrew Boorde, c1490-1549.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Patricia E S

    2002-01-01

    Physician, traveller, writer and spy, Andrew Boorde was born c1490 and became a Carthusian monk after abandoning his medical studies at Oxford. Temperamentally unsuited to the life of a religious, after 20 years at the London Charterhouse he obtained a dispensation to travel to Europe to continue his medical studies. Returning to England he began to practise medicine, treating members of the nobility and, through a meeting with Thomas Cromwell which was to influence the rest of his life, he attended the King, Henry VIII. In 1534, after a second, more extensive, tour of Europe in which he visited many medical schools and universities seeking yet more medical knowledge, he returned to the London Charterhouse which was undergoing a brutal dissolution at the hands of Thomas Cromwell. Boorde reluctantly signed the Oath of Supremacy, an act which was to haunt him for the rest of his life. He was then used by Cromwell to travel abroad again but this time as a spy to gather intelligence for the King while continuing to study medicine. Boorde finally took his MD at the University of Montpellier and was incorporated in the same degree a year later at Oxford. He then gave expression to all he had learnt by writing his legacy, four books which were published in 1547. 'A Compendyous Regyment or a Dyetary of Health' was one of the earliest treatises on the cultivation of health composed in England and stressed the importance of sanitation together with a detailed examination of diet. The 'Brevyary of Health' listed diseases alphabetically together with remedies and treatment, blending sound medical advice with religion and superstition: its companion volume was 'The Principles of Astronomy'. But Boorde's 'Fyrst Boke of the Introduction of Knowledge' was his tour-de-force; it was a comprehensive encyclopaedia of all the European countries he had visited, illustrated by woodcuts. By 1547 Boorde was settled in England, probably Master of the Hospital of St Giles-in-the-Fields in

  5. The McAndrews Leadership Lecture: February 2015, by Dr Scott Haldeman. Challenges of the Past, Challenges of the Present

    PubMed Central

    Haldeman, Scott; McAndrews, George P.; Goertz, Christine; Sportelli, Louis; Hamm, Anthony W.; Johnson, Claire

    2015-01-01

    The McAndrews Leadership Lecture was developed by the American Chiropractic Association to honor the legacy of Jerome F. McAndrews, DC, and George P. McAndrews, JD, and their contributions to the chiropractic profession. This article is a transcription of the presentation made by Dr Scott Haldeman on February 28, 2015, in Washington, DC, at the National Chiropractic Leadership Conference. PMID:26770177

  6. PHYTO-PHARMACOGNOSTICAL INVESTIGATION AND EVALUATION OF ANTI-INFLAMMATORY AND SEDATIVE HYPNOTIC ACTIVITY OF THE LEAVES OF ERYTHRINA INDICA Lam

    PubMed Central

    Verma, S. M.; Amrisha; Prakash, J.; Sah, V.K.

    2005-01-01

    Pharmacognostical investigations were carried out on the Erythrina indica leaves, followed by phytochemical investigation. On the methanolic extract of leaves, TLC was performed and indole alkaloids were identified with selected solvent system. The UV analysis was also performed on the components confirming the presence of the indole nucleus. Anti-inflammatory activity was carried out on albino rats. Further, anti-inflammatory activity was compared to that of the standard drug indomethacin and percent inhibition of oedema was determined. Sedative hypnotic activity was also evaluated using pentobarbital which showed mild sedation. PMID:22557197

  7. Development of indirect competitive ELISA for quantification of mitragynine in Kratom (Mitragyna speciosa (Roxb.) Korth.).

    PubMed

    Limsuwanchote, Supattra; Wungsintaweekul, Juraithip; Keawpradub, Niwat; Putalun, Waraporn; Morimoto, Satoshi; Tanaka, Hiroyuki

    2014-11-01

    Monoclonal antibody (MAb) against mitragynine (MG), an analgesic alkaloid from Kratom leaves (Mitragyna speciosa), was produced. MG was coupled to carrier proteins employing either 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide/N-hydroxysuccinimide (EDC/NHS), a zero-length cross linker or a 5-carbon length glutaraldehyde cross linker. To confirm the immunogenicity, the hapten numbers were determined using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). Preparation of the MAb was accomplished by the electrofusion method. Hybridoma 1A6 that was constructed from the fusion between splenocytes of EDC/NHS conjugate immunized mice and SP2/0-Ag14 myeloma cells was selected, cloned twice and expanded. The cross-reactivities (CRs) of this MAb 1A6 with a series of indole alkaloids were 30.54%, 24.83% and 8.63% for speciogynine, paynantheine and mitraciliatine, respectively. Using this MAb, an indirect competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (icELISA) was developed with a measurement range of 32.92-250 μg/mL. Quantitative analysis of the MG contents in plant samples by icELISA correlated well with the standard high performance liquid chromatography method (R(2)=0.994). The MAb against mitragynine provided a tool for detection of MG in Kratom preparations.

  8. Impact and hardness optimisation of composite materials inspired by the babassu nut (Orbignya speciosa).

    PubMed

    Staufenberg, Gerrit; Graupner, Nina; Müssig, Jörg

    2015-08-20

    The babassu nut is the fruit of the babassu palm Orbignya speciosa. The combination of hardness and impact strength is difficult to acquire for artificial materials, making the babassu nut a promising source for biomimetic inspiration. Unnotched Charpy impact tests, Shore D hardness tests and scanning electron microscopy were used for mechanical and microscopical analysis of the pericarp. Four major principles were found for a biomimetic approach: a hard core ((1); endocarp) is embedded in a soft outer layer of high impact strength ((2); epicarp) and is reinforced with fibres of variable fineness (3), some of which are oriented radial to the core (4). Biomimetic fibre-reinforced composites were produced using abstracted mechanisms of the babassu nut based on regenerated cellulose fibres (lyocell, L) with two different fineness values as reinforcement embedded in a polylactide (PLA) core matrix and polypropylene (PP) based outer layers. The biomimetic fibre composite reaches a significantly higher impact strength that is 1.6 times higher than the reference sample produced from a PLA/PP/L-blend. At the same time the hardness is slightly increased compared to PP/L.

  9. Genetic diversity of the Neotropical tree Hancornia speciosa Gomes in natural populations in Northeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Jimenez, H J; Martins, L S S; Montarroyos, A V V; Silva Junior, J F; Alzate-Marin, A L; Moraes Filho, R M

    2015-12-22

    Mangabeira (Hancornia speciosa Gomes) is a fruit tree of the Apocynaceae family, which is native to Brazil and is a very important food resource for human populations in its areas of occurrence. Mangabeira fruit is collected as an extractive activity, and no domesticated varieties or breeding programs exist. Due to a reduction in the area of ecosystems where it occurs, mangabeira is threatened by genetic erosion in Brazil. The objective of this study was to characterize and evaluate the genetic diversity of 38 mangabeira individuals collected from natural populations in Pernambuco State using inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) molecular markers. The ISSR methodology generated a total of 93 loci; 10 were monomorphic and 83 were polymorphic. The average number of loci per primer was 15.5, ranging from 9 (#UBC 866) to 21 (#UBC 834). The results showed a high level of genetic diversity (0.30), and found that only around 30% of genetic variability is distributed among populations (GST = 0.29, ФST = 0.30), with the remainder (ФCT = 70%) found within each population, as expected for forest outcrossing species. Estimates for historic gene flow (1.18) indicate that there is some isolation of these populations, and some degree of genetic differentiation.

  10. Antidepressant-like effect of mitragynine isolated from Mitragyna speciosa Korth in mice model of depression.

    PubMed

    Idayu, N Farah; Hidayat, M Taufik; Moklas, M A M; Sharida, F; Raudzah, A R Nurul; Shamima, A R; Apryani, Evhy

    2011-03-15

    Mitragyna speciosa Korth. leaves have been used for decades as a traditional medicine to treat diarrhea, diabetes and to improve blood circulation by natives of Malaysia, Thailand and other regions of Southeast Asia. Mitragynine is the major active alkaloid in the plant. To date, the role of mitragynine in psychological disorders such as depression is not scientifically evaluated. Hence, the present investigation evaluates the antidepressant effect of mitragynine in the mouse forced swim test (FST) and tail suspension test (TST), two models predictive of antidepressant activity and the effect of mitragynine towards neuroendocrine system of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis by measuring the corticosterone concentration of mice exposed to FST and TST. An open-field test (OFT) was used to detect any association of immobility in the FST and TST with changes in motor activity of mice treated with mitragynine. In the present study, mitragynine at dose of 10 mg/kg and 30 mg/kg i.p. injected significantly reduced the immobility time of mice in both FST and TST without any significant effect on locomotor activity in OFT. Moreover, mitragynine significantly reduced the released of corticosterone in mice exposed to FST and TST at dose of 10 mg/kg and 30 mg/kg. Overall, the present study clearly demonstrated that mitragynine exerts an antidepressant effect in animal behavioral model of depression (FST and TST) and the effect appears to be mediated by an interaction with neuroendocrine HPA axis systems.

  11. Nanostructured systems containing babassu (Orbignya speciosa) oil as a potential alternative therapy for benign prostatic hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    de Sousa, Valeria Pereira; Crean, Joanne; de Almeida Borges, Vinícius Raphael; Rodrigues, Carlos Rangel; Tajber, Lidia; Boylan, Fabio; Cabral, Lucio Mendes

    2013-01-01

    The oil of babassu tree nuts (Orbignya speciosa) is a potential alternative for treatment and prophylaxis of benign prostatic hyperplasia. Improved results can be obtained by drug vectorization to the hyperplastic tissue. The main objective of this work was the preparation and characterization of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticle and clay nanosystems containing babassu oil (BBS). BBS was extracted from the kernels of babassu tree nuts and characterized by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry as well as 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance. BBS-clay nanosystems were obtained by adding polyvinylpyrrolidone, Viscogel B8®, and BBS at a 2:1:1 mass ratio and characterized by X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis, infrared spectroscopy, and laser diffraction. The PLGA-BBS nanoparticles were prepared by the precipitation-solvent evaporation method. Mean diameter, polydispersity, zeta potential, and scanning electron microscopic images of the nanosystems were analyzed. Thermogravimetric analysis showed successful formation of the nanocomposite. PLGA nanoparticles containing BBS were obtained, with a suitable size that was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. Both nanostructured systems showed active incorporation yields exceeding 90%. The two systems obtained represent a new and potentially efficient therapy for benign prostatic hyperplasia. PMID:23990721

  12. Inhibition of Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin-induced diarrhea by Chaenomeles speciosa.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jaw-Chyun; Chang, Yuan-Shiun; Wu, Shih-Lu; Chao, De-Cheng; Chang, Chih-Shiang; Li, Chia-Cheng; Ho, Tin-Yun; Hsiang, Chien-Yun

    2007-09-05

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is responsible for millions of deaths in developing countries. Heat-labile enterotoxin (LT), the virulence factor of ETEC, induces diarrhea by initially binding to the G(M1) on the surface of intestinal epithelial cells and consequently leading to the massive loss of fluid and ions from cells. Fruit of Chaenomeles (FC), the dried fruit of Chaenomeles speciosa, has been used for diarrhea in China. However, the anti-diarrheal mechanism of FC is still unclear. In this study, we demonstrated that FC extract (FCE) inhibited the LT-induced diarrhea in mice by blocking the binding of the B subunit of LT (LTB) to G(M1). The ethyl acetate (EA) soluble fraction was the most active fraction of FC that significantly abolished the LTB and G(M1) interaction. Furthermore, the oleanolic acid, ursolic acid, and betulinic acid from EA fraction, blocked the toxin binding effects, resulting in the suppression of LT-induced diarrhea. Moreover, by docking techniques, these compounds fitted LTB well via hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic contacts with amino acid residues of LTB. In conclusion, our findings suggested that oleanolic acid, ursolic acid, and betulinic acid were the active constituents from FC and might be considered as lead therapeutic agents in the treatment of LT-induced diarrhea.

  13. Ribosomal DNA identification of Nosema/Vairimorpha in freshwater polychaete, Manayunkia speciosa, from Oregon/California and the Laurentian Great Lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Malakauskas, David M.; Altman, Emory C.; Malakauskas, Sarah J.; Thiem, Suzanne M.; Schloesser, Donald W.

    2015-01-01

    We examined Manayunkia speciosa individuals from the Klamath River, Oregon/California and Lake Erie, Michigan, USA for the presence of Microsporidia. We identified microsporidian spores and sequenced their SSU, ITS, and part of the LSU rDNA. Phylogenetic analysis of SSU rDNA indicated spores from both populations belonged to the Nosema/Vairimorpha clade. PCR showed an infection prevalence in Lake Erie M. speciosa of 0.6% (95% CI = 0.5%, 0.7%). This represents the first known example of molecularly characterized Nosema/Vairimorpha isolates infecting a non-arthropod host.

  14. Andrew's bridge system: an aesthetic and functional option for rehabilitation of compromised maxillary anterior dentition

    PubMed Central

    Tambe, Abhijit; Patil, Sanjayagouda B; Bhat, Sudhakara; Badadare, Mokshada M

    2014-01-01

    Summary A patient with several missing teeth in the anterior aesthetic region along with severe ridge defect poses a greater challenge for prosthodontic rehabilitation. In such cases treatment using fixed partial denture (FPD) may not be feasible because of the extent of edentulous span and the periodontal conditions of the abutment teeth. To present a case of multiple missing maxillary anterior teeth with class III ridge defect rehabilitated using FPD-removable partial denture. A 38-year-old female patient was successfully rehabilitated using Andrew's bridge system in the maxillary anterior region. The fixed-removable Andrew's bridge system provides a good prognosis if diagnosed and planned meticulously. PMID:25035444

  15. Analyzing after-action reports from Hurricanes Andrew and Katrina: repeated, modified, and newly created recommendations.

    PubMed

    Knox, Claire Connolly

    2013-01-01

    Thirteen years after Hurricane Andrew struck Homestead, FL, Hurricane Katrina devastated the Gulf Coast of Mississippi, Alabama, and southeastern Louisiana. Along with all its destruction, the term "catastrophic" was redefined. This article extends the literature on these hurricanes by providing a macrolevel analysis of The Governor's Disaster Planning and Response Review Committee Final Report from Hurricane Andrew and three federal after-action reports from Hurricane Katrina, as well as a cursory review of relevant literature. Results provide evidence that previous lessons have not been learned or institutionalized with many recommendations being repeated or modified. This article concludes with a discussion of these lessons, as well as new issues arising during Hurricane Katrina.

  16. Relationship of DUI recidivism to moral reasoning, sensation seeking, and MacAndrew alcoholism scores.

    PubMed

    Little, G L; Robinson, K D

    1989-12-01

    115 convicted male DUI offenders were treated with Moral Reconation Therapy during their incarceration. Postrelease recidivism status (arrests) was correlated with the pretest, posttest, and change scores on the MacAndrew Alcoholism Scale, Sensation Seeking Scale, Life-purpose scores, and Moral Reasoning scores. Analysis showed that recidivism correlated positively and significantly with the pretest scores on the MacAndrew scale and approached significance with both pre- and posttest scores on the Sensation Seeking Scale. Recidivism status correlated negatively and significantly with scores on the highest levels of moral reasoning (Scale 6 pretest and posttest and Principled Reasoning pretest).

  17. Capacities of template-type platforms in the Gulf of Mexico during hurricane Andrew

    SciTech Connect

    Bea, R.G.; Loch, K.J.; Young, P.L.

    1997-02-01

    This paper details results from nonlinear analyses of the ultimate limit state performance characteristics of four Gulf of Mexico (GOM) platforms subjected to intense loadings from hurricane Andrew. These four platforms were located to the east of the track of hurricane Andrew, and were thus in the most intense portion of the storm (Smith, 1993). The nonlinear analyses are able to replicate details of the observed behavior of the four structures. This replication is very dependent on realistic characterization of the performance characteristics of the pile foundations and on accurate information on the as is condition of the platforms before the storm.

  18. 33 CFR 334.760 - Naval Support Activity Panama City and Alligator Bayou, a tributary of St. Andrew Bay, Fla...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... City and Alligator Bayou, a tributary of St. Andrew Bay, Fla.; naval restricted area. 334.760 Section... Alligator Bayou, a tributary of St. Andrew Bay, Fla.; naval restricted area. (a) The area. The waters within... the south side of the entrance to Alligator Bayou; thence directly across the entrance to a point...

  19. 33 CFR 334.760 - Naval Support Activity Panama City and Alligator Bayou, a tributary of St. Andrew Bay, Fla...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... City and Alligator Bayou, a tributary of St. Andrew Bay, Fla.; naval restricted area. 334.760 Section... Alligator Bayou, a tributary of St. Andrew Bay, Fla.; naval restricted area. (a) The area. The waters within... the south side of the entrance to Alligator Bayou; thence directly across the entrance to a point...

  20. 33 CFR 334.760 - Naval Support Activity Panama City and Alligator Bayou, a tributary of St. Andrew Bay, Fla...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... City and Alligator Bayou, a tributary of St. Andrew Bay, Fla.; naval restricted area. 334.760 Section... Alligator Bayou, a tributary of St. Andrew Bay, Fla.; naval restricted area. (a) The area. The waters within... the south side of the entrance to Alligator Bayou; thence directly across the entrance to a point...

  1. 33 CFR 334.760 - Naval Support Activity Panama City and Alligator Bayou, a tributary of St. Andrew Bay, Fla...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... City and Alligator Bayou, a tributary of St. Andrew Bay, Fla.; naval restricted area. 334.760 Section... Alligator Bayou, a tributary of St. Andrew Bay, Fla.; naval restricted area. (a) The area. The waters within... the south side of the entrance to Alligator Bayou; thence directly across the entrance to a point...

  2. Traversing the Gap: Andrew Wright, John Hick and Critical Religious Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teece, Geoff

    2005-01-01

    This paper discusses aspects of Andrew Wright's version of a liberal, critical religious education and his criticisms of some other views of modern religious education. This is attempted not by examining these "other views" as such but by concentrating on the work of John Hick. The reason for this is that Wright, like Cooling (in his…

  3. Crisis Intervention with Survivors of Natural Disaster: Lessons from Hurricane Andrew.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shelby, Janine S.; Tredinnick, Michael G.

    1995-01-01

    Crisis intervention has typically been conceptualized as seeking a return of clients to a state of equilibrium. Personal work experience with Hurricane Andrew survivors has led to an appreciation of the importance of several considerations. Develops a proactive approach, attempting to recognize and extend clients' preexisting strengths. Offers…

  4. 75 FR 41895 - Whirlpool Corporation, Evansville Division, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Andrews...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-19

    ... Workers From Andrews International, Inc., M.H. Equipment, and Kenco Logistics Services, LLC, Evansville... that workers leased from MH Equipment and Kenco Logistics Services, LLC, were employed on-site at the... from MH Equipment and Kenco Logistics Services, LLC working on-site at the Evansville, Indiana...

  5. 77 FR 2968 - Pomperaug Hydro Project, Andrew Peklo III; Notice Establishing Deadline for Comments and Reply...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Pomperaug Hydro Project, Andrew Peklo III; Notice Establishing Deadline for Comments and Reply Comments On December 15, 2011, the Commission issued notice that Office of Energy Projects staff will hold a site visit...

  6. Because Everyone Has a Story to Tell: Interview with Andrew Wright

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Floris, Flora Debora

    2016-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Andrew Wright, a widely recognized author, illustrator, storyteller, and teacher trainer. Wright has published many ELT books, authored six "Spellbinder" graded readers (1992-1994), and a collection of short stories. As a teacher trainer, Wright worked extensively with both teachers and students in…

  7. Astronauts Mario Runco, Jr. and Andrew S. W. Thomas, both mission specialists, pose for photo while

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    STS-77 ESC VIEW --- Astronauts Mario Runco, Jr. and Andrew S. W. Thomas, both mission specialists, pose for photo while in the mid-deck of the Earth-orbiting Space Shuttle Endeavour. The scene was recorded with an Electronic Still Camera (ESC).

  8. Astronaut Andrew M. Allen, mission commander, sets up systems for a television downlink on the

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    STS-75 ONBOARD VIEW --- Astronaut Andrew M. Allen, mission commander, sets up systems for a television downlink on the flight deck of the Space Shuttle Columbia. Allen was joined by four other astronauts and an international payload specialist for more than 16 days of research aboard Columbia. The photograph was taken with a 70mm handheld camera.

  9. 56. Aerial view looking west; Andrew McLean Company Textile Mill ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    56. Aerial view looking west; Andrew McLean Company Textile Mill at bottom, Dundee Canal at center, Botany Worsted Mills at top - Dundee Canal Industrial Historic District, Beginning at George Street in Passaic & extending north along Dundee Canal approximately 1.2 miles to Canal headgates opposite East Clifton Avenue in Clifton, Passaic, Passaic County, NJ

  10. 30. View looking north from Andrew McLean Company Textile Mill; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. View looking north from Andrew McLean Company Textile Mill; Dundee Canal at center, Botany Worsted Mills in background - Dundee Canal Industrial Historic District, Beginning at George Street in Passaic & extending north along Dundee Canal approximately 1.2 miles to Canal headgates opposite East Clifton Avenue in Clifton, Passaic, Passaic County, NJ

  11. 17. View looking north; Andrew McLean Company Textile Mill, Building ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. View looking north; Andrew McLean Company Textile Mill, Building No. 1, at right, Botany Worsted Mills at left distance - Dundee Canal Industrial Historic District, Beginning at George Street in Passaic & extending north along Dundee Canal approximately 1.2 miles to Canal headgates opposite East Clifton Avenue in Clifton, Passaic, Passaic County, NJ

  12. 31. View looking north from Andrew McLean Company Textile Mill; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. View looking north from Andrew McLean Company Textile Mill; Dundee Canal at center, Botany Worsted Mills in background - Dundee Canal Industrial Historic District, Beginning at George Street in Passaic & extending north along Dundee Canal approximately 1.2 miles to Canal headgates opposite East Clifton Avenue in Clifton, Passaic, Passaic County, NJ

  13. 19. View of Andrew McLean Company Textile Mill looking south; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. View of Andrew McLean Company Textile Mill looking south; Building No. 2 at center, Botany Mills Lanolin Retrieval plant site in foreground - Dundee Canal Industrial Historic District, Beginning at George Street in Passaic & extending north along Dundee Canal approximately 1.2 miles to Canal headgates opposite East Clifton Avenue in Clifton, Passaic, Passaic County, NJ

  14. Amos Kendall's Role in the Election of Andrew Jackson as President of the United States, 1828.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nowell, Bob

    Amos Kendall's place in journalism history rests largely on his service as a journalist turned government official in the two administrations of President Andrew Jackson. Historians have claimed that Kendall was an influential journalist of the "partisan press" era, but they have provided little documentation. That documentation has been…

  15. 22. View of Andrew McLean Company Textile Mill looking north; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. View of Andrew McLean Company Textile Mill looking north; Building No. 1 at left, Building No. 4 at right - Dundee Canal Industrial Historic District, Beginning at George Street in Passaic & extending north along Dundee Canal approximately 1.2 miles to Canal headgates opposite East Clifton Avenue in Clifton, Passaic, Passaic County, NJ

  16. 15. View of Andrew McLean Company Textile Mill looking northeast; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. View of Andrew McLean Company Textile Mill looking northeast; Building No. 1 at left, Building No. 6 at center - Dundee Canal Industrial Historic District, Beginning at George Street in Passaic & extending north along Dundee Canal approximately 1.2 miles to Canal headgates opposite East Clifton Avenue in Clifton, Passaic, Passaic County, NJ

  17. 14. View of Andrew McLean Company Textile Mill looking north; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. View of Andrew McLean Company Textile Mill looking north; Building No. 6 at right, Building No. 1 in background, gateposts in foreground - Dundee Canal Industrial Historic District, Beginning at George Street in Passaic & extending north along Dundee Canal approximately 1.2 miles to Canal headgates opposite East Clifton Avenue in Clifton, Passaic, Passaic County, NJ

  18. 20. View of Andrew McLean Company Textile Mill looking southeast; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. View of Andrew McLean Company Textile Mill looking southeast; Building No. 2 at left, Building No. 3 at right - Dundee Canal Industrial Historic District, Beginning at George Street in Passaic & extending north along Dundee Canal approximately 1.2 miles to Canal headgates opposite East Clifton Avenue in Clifton, Passaic, Passaic County, NJ

  19. 23. View of open firststory passageway of Andrew McLean Company ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. View of open first-story passageway of Andrew McLean Company Textile Mill Building No. 1, looking west - Dundee Canal Industrial Historic District, Beginning at George Street in Passaic & extending north along Dundee Canal approximately 1.2 miles to Canal headgates opposite East Clifton Avenue in Clifton, Passaic, Passaic County, NJ

  20. 16. View of Andrew McLean Company Textile Mill looking southeast; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. View of Andrew McLean Company Textile Mill looking southeast; Building No. 6 at center, roof of Building No. 1 at left - Dundee Canal Industrial Historic District, Beginning at George Street in Passaic & extending north along Dundee Canal approximately 1.2 miles to Canal headgates opposite East Clifton Avenue in Clifton, Passaic, Passaic County, NJ

  1. 18. View of Andrew McLean Company Textile Mill looking north; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. View of Andrew McLean Company Textile Mill looking north; Building No. 3 at center right, Building No. 2 at center distance, Dundee Canal at left - Dundee Canal Industrial Historic District, Beginning at George Street in Passaic & extending north along Dundee Canal approximately 1.2 miles to Canal headgates opposite East Clifton Avenue in Clifton, Passaic, Passaic County, NJ

  2. Flow variation and substrate type affect dislodgement of the freshwater polychaete, Manayunkia speciosa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Malakauskas, David M.; Wilson, Sarah J.; Wilzbach, Margaret A.; Som, Nicholas A.

    2013-01-01

    We quantified microscale flow forces and their ability to entrain the freshwater polychaete, Manayunkia speciosa, the intermediate host for 2 myxozoan parasites (Ceratomyxa shasta and Parvicapsula minibicornis) that cause substantial mortalities in salmonid fishes in the Pacific Northwest. In a laboratory flume, we measured the shear stress associated with 2 mean flow velocities and 3 substrates and quantified associated dislodgement of polychaetes, evaluated survivorship of dislodged polychaetes, and observed behavioral responses of the polychaetes in response to increased flow. We used a generalized linear mixed model to estimate the probability of polychaete dislodgement for treatment combinations of velocity (mean flow velocity  =  55 cm/s with a shear velocity  =  3 cm/s, mean flow velocity  =  140 cm/s with a shear velocity  =  5 cm/s) and substrate type (depositional sediments and analogs of rock faces and the filamentous alga, Cladophora). Few polychaetes were dislodged at shear velocities <3 cm/s on any substrate. Above this level of shear, probability of dislodgement was strongly affected by both substrate type and velocity. After accounting for substrate, odds of dislodgement were 8× greater at the higher flow. After accounting for velocity, probability of dislodgement was greatest from fine sediments, intermediate from rock faces, and negligible from Cladophora. Survivorship of dislodged polychaetes was high. Polychaetes exhibited a variety of behaviors for avoiding increases in flow, including extrusion of mucus, burrowing into sediments, and movement to lower-flow microhabitats. Our findings suggest that polychaete populations probably exhibit high resilience to flow-mediated disturbances.

  3. Genetic variation detected by RAPD markers in natural populations of babassu palm (Attalea speciosa Mart.).

    PubMed

    Santos, M F; Damasceno-Silva, K J; Carvalhaes, M A; Lima, P S C

    2015-06-10

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the effects of management on the genetic structure of natural populations of Attalea speciosa in the State of Piauí, Brazil, using random-amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers. Three babassu populations under different management systems were selected. Polymerase chain reactions were performed for 20 RAPD primers. A total of 146 bands were generated, 141 of which were polymorphic (96.58%), with a variation of 4 and 12 loci and an average of 7 bands per primer. A dendrogram revealed a clear separation between the three populations (0.57). Data reliability and node consistency were verified by bootstrap values and the cophenetic correlation coefficient (88.15%). Coefficients of similarity between pairs of genotypes ranged from 0.26 to 0.86, with a mean of 0.57. Nei's genetic diversity index (HE) value of the population sampled in Teresina was 0.212, of Esperantina it was 0.195, and of José de Freitas it was 0.207. After the HE was decomposed, the complete diversity was found to be 0.3213. Genetic differentiation between populations was 0.362, and the estimation of gene flow between populations was low (0.879). Analysis of molecular variance revealed that 59.52% of the variation was contained within populations, and 40.48% was between populations. RAPD markers were effective for genetic diversity analysis within and between natural babassu populations, and exhibited a high level of polymorphism. Genetic diversity was the highest within populations; variability was lower in the managed populations than in the undisturbed populations.

  4. Anti-Fatigue and Antioxidant Activity of the Polysaccharides Isolated from Millettiae speciosae Champ. Leguminosae

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiao-Ning; Liang, Jia-Li; Chen, Han-Bin; Liang, Ye-Er; Guo, Hui-Zhen; Su, Ze-Ren; Li, Yu-Cui; Zeng, Hui-Fang; Zhang, Xiao-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Millettiae speciosae Champ. Leguminosae (MSC), is a well-known Chinese herb traditionally used as food material and medicine for enhancing physical strength. Our preliminary study found that the aqueous extract of this herb (MSE) had an anti-fatigue effect. In this paper, we further separated MSE into total polysaccharides (MSP) and supernatant (MSS) by alcohol precipitation, and explored which fraction was active for its anti-fatigue effect. Mice were orally administered with MSP or MSS at the doses of 200, 400, and 800 mg/kg for 20 days and the anti-fatigue effect was assessed by exhaustive swimming exercise (ESE). The biochemical parameters related to fatigue after ESE and the in vitro antioxidant activity of active fraction were determined. Our results showed that MSP, instead of MSS, significantly extended the swimming time to exhaustion (p < 0.05), indicating that MSP is responsible for the anti-fatigue effect of MSE. In addition, MSP treatment increased the levels of glucose (Glu) and muscle glycogen, whereas it decreased the accumulations of blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and lactic acid (Lac). Moreover, ESE increased the levels of creatine phosphokinase (CK), lactic dehydrogenase (LDH), and malondialdehyde (MDA) but reduced superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione (GSH) in plasma. In contrast, MSP inhibited all the above changes relating to fatigue. Furthermore, an in vitro antioxidant test revealed that MSP dose-dependently scavenged ·OH and DPPH free radicals. Taken together, these findings strongly suggested that MSP was able to alleviate physical fatigue by increasing energy resources and decreasing accumulation of detrimental metabolites. The antioxidant activity may crucially contribute to the observed anti-fatigue effect of MSP. PMID:26506375

  5. Anti-Fatigue and Antioxidant Activity of the Polysaccharides Isolated from Millettiae speciosae Champ. Leguminosae.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiao-Ning; Liang, Jia-Li; Chen, Han-Bin; Liang, Ye-Er; Guo, Hui-Zhen; Su, Ze-Ren; Li, Yu-Cui; Zeng, Hui-Fang; Zhang, Xiao-Jun

    2015-10-21

    Millettiae speciosae Champ. Leguminosae (MSC), is a well-known Chinese herb traditionally used as food material and medicine for enhancing physical strength. Our preliminary study found that the aqueous extract of this herb (MSE) had an anti-fatigue effect. In this paper, we further separated MSE into total polysaccharides (MSP) and supernatant (MSS) by alcohol precipitation, and explored which fraction was active for its anti-fatigue effect. Mice were orally administered with MSP or MSS at the doses of 200, 400, and 800 mg/kg for 20 days and the anti-fatigue effect was assessed by exhaustive swimming exercise (ESE). The biochemical parameters related to fatigue after ESE and the in vitro antioxidant activity of active fraction were determined. Our results showed that MSP, instead of MSS, significantly extended the swimming time to exhaustion (p < 0.05), indicating that MSP is responsible for the anti-fatigue effect of MSE. In addition, MSP treatment increased the levels of glucose (Glu) and muscle glycogen, whereas it decreased the accumulations of blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and lactic acid (Lac). Moreover, ESE increased the levels of creatine phosphokinase (CK), lactic dehydrogenase (LDH), and malondialdehyde (MDA) but reduced superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione (GSH) in plasma. In contrast, MSP inhibited all the above changes relating to fatigue. Furthermore, an in vitro antioxidant test revealed that MSP dose-dependently scavenged ·OH and DPPH free radicals. Taken together, these findings strongly suggested that MSP was able to alleviate physical fatigue by increasing energy resources and decreasing accumulation of detrimental metabolites. The antioxidant activity may crucially contribute to the observed anti-fatigue effect of MSP.

  6. Identification and characterization of indole and oxindole alkaloids from leaves of mitragyna speciosa korth using liquid chromatography-accurate QToF mass spectrometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alkaloids have been reported to be the major physiologically active constituents in Mitragyna. An analytical method was developed to provide an alternative, fast method for characterization of alkaloids from various Mitragyna speciosa samples. The separation was achieved using a reversed phase (C-8)...

  7. Effects of Mitragynine and a Crude Alkaloid Extract Derived from Mitragyna speciosa Korth. on Permethrin Elimination in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Srichana, Kachamas; Janchawee, Benjamas; Prutipanlai, Sathaporn; Raungrut, Pritsana; Keawpradub, Niwat

    2015-01-01

    Detoxification and elimination of permethrin (PM) are mediated by hydrolysis via carboxylesterase (CES). Mitragyna speciosa (kratom) contains mitragynine (MG) and other bioactive alkaloids. Since PM and MG have the same catalytic site and M. speciosa is usually abused by adding other ingredients such as pyrethroid insecticides, the effects of MG and an alkaloid extract (AE) on the elimination of PM were investigated in rats. Rats were subjected to single and multiple pretreatment with MG and AE prior to receiving a single oral dose (460 mg/kg) of PM. Plasma concentrations of trans-PM and its metabolite phenoxybenzylalcohol (PBAlc) were measured. The elimination rate constant (kel) and the elimination half-life (t1/2 el) of PM were determined, as well as the metabolic ratio (PMR).A single and multiple oral pretreatment with MG and AE altered the plasma concentration-time courses of both trans-PM and PBAlc during 8–22 h, decreased the PMRs, delayed elimination of PM, but enhanced elimination of PBAlc. Results indicated that PM–MG or AE toxicokinetic interactions might have resulted from the MG and AE interfering with PM hydrolysis. The results obtained in rats suggest that in humans using kratom cocktails containing PM, there might be an increased risk of PM toxicity due to inhibition of PM metabolism and elimination. PMID:25825913

  8. Occurrence of an Inhibitor of Tissue-Type Plasminogen Activator in Seeds and in Vitro Cultures of Erythrina caffra Thunb.

    PubMed

    Meyer, H J; van Staden, J

    1991-08-01

    The level of an inhibitor of tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) increased slowly during the early developmental stage of seeds of Erythrina caffra Thunb. Thereafter, the inhibitor increased exponentially until the seeds reached maturity. At maturity, the t-PA inhibitor levels in the cotyledons were 38 times higher than the levels at the onset of seed development. The t-PA inhibitor accumulated at a faster rate than the storage proteins, which reached a concentration 15 times higher than the protein concentration at the onset of seed development. During the imbibition and germination process, the t-PA inhibitor decreased gradually. The inhibitor kept on decreasing during the growth of the seedlings until the 10th day after imbibition, when it leveled off at 4.1% of that of the initial inhibitor concentration. The inhibitor remained at this level until the cotyledons were shed at day 22. The total protein in the cotyledons decreased at a slower rate than the inhibitor and reached a minimum concentration at day 20 of 3.6% of the initial protein concentration in the cotyledons. Callus cultures of root, shoot, leaf, and cotyledonary tissue was established and maintained on Murashige-Skoog medium supplemented with 3% sucrose, 10 micromolar benzyladenine, and 5 micromolar 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid. A shoot cell suspension culture was established on Murashige-Skoog medium supplemented with 3% sucrose, 1 micromolar benzyladenine, and 0.5 micromolar 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (pH 5.7) and shaken at 60 revolutions per minute. The level of t-PA inhibitor in root, shoot, leaf, and cotyledonary callus was substantially lower than in the corresponding intact tissue. The t-PA inhibitor levels in the linear growth phase was higher than in the lag or stationary growth phases of the cell suspension culture. A hydrolysate of the cell walls of tomato and E. caffra Thunb, as well as polyamines and organic acids, did not increase the concentration of t-PA inhibitor in

  9. Impact of an extreme event on the sediment budget: Hurricane Andrew in the Louisiana barrier islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    List, Jeffrey H.; Hansen, Mark E.; Sallenger,, Asbury H.; Jaffe, Bruce E.; Edge, B.L

    1997-01-01

    This paper examines the influence of Hurricane Andrew on the sediment budget of an 80-kilometer section of the Louisiana barrier islands west of the modern Mississippi delta. Because long-term bathymetric change has been extensively studied in this area, excellent baseline data are available for evaluating the impact of Hurricane Andrew. Results show that despite the high intensity of the storm and a storm track optimally positioned to impact the study area, the storm did not have an overwhelming influence on the sediment budget when compared to the changes occurring over the previous 50 years. For the Louisiana barrier islands, a 50-year record appears to be adequate for averaging the long-term contributions of both major and minor storm events to the sediment budget.

  10. 21. View of Andrew McLean Company Textile Mill looking west; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. View of Andrew McLean Company Textile Mill looking west; Building No. 4 at left, Building No. 1 at left center, Building No. 3 at center, Building No. 2 at right center, Building No. 5 at right - Dundee Canal Industrial Historic District, Beginning at George Street in Passaic & extending north along Dundee Canal approximately 1.2 miles to Canal headgates opposite East Clifton Avenue in Clifton, Passaic, Passaic County, NJ

  11. Environmental Assessment of the Privatization of Military Family Housing at Andrews Air Force Base, Maryland

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-01

    congressional legislation. b. Ensures that eligible military members and their families have access to quality, attractive , and affordable housing...average annual temperature at Andrews AFB is 56 degrees Fahrenheit (ºF), the mean annual precipitation is 42.5 inches, the mean average snowfall is...surface water turbidity, which can raise water temperature and impede photosynthetic processes. Sediment runoff into surface water bodies also

  12. Environmental Assessment of Communications Support Facilities Andrews Air Force Base, Maryland

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-12-01

    Anacostia River on the west and the Patuxent River on the east. Land surface elevations on Andrews AFB vary from approximately 215 feet above mean sea...within three significantly diverse watersheds: the Potomac River , Anacostia River , and Patuxent River . These watersheds drain 2.3 17 square miles of...George’s County, while 132,000 acres drain to the Anacostia River (USA F 200 I). The majority of the base lies within the Potomac Ri ver Watershed

  13. Andrew Wyeth and N.C. Wyeth: a psychodynamic perspective on father and son.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Jon A

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the relationship between two extraordinary artists, father and son--N.C. Wyeth (1882-1945) and Andrew Wyeth (1917-2009)--and their art. N.C. Wyeth, the father, the most famous illustrator of his day, painted scenes full of drama and action, often of men engaged in violent life and death struggles. N.C. was unable to separate from his powerful mother and yearned for his iconic father. He thought himself an artistic failure and dedicated himself to raising his children to be geniuses. The youngest son, Andrew Wyeth, who lived a "secret life," painted scenes often characterized by pathos: bleak and barren landscapes, leaden skies, tire tracks, gray framed houses, desiccated fields, and circling buzzards. In the father-son relationship, we often seen three themes perpetuated developmentally: (1) the son's identification with the innermost conflicts of his father; (2) the yearning for the iconic father of his youth; and (3) a continuation and disavowal of his father's life. These themes are played out in the relationship between Andrew Wyeth and his father.

  14. 78 FR 6173 - Diana Del Grosso, Ray Smith, Joseph Hatch, Cheryl Hatch, Kathleen Kelley, Andrew Wilklund, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board Diana Del Grosso, Ray Smith, Joseph Hatch, Cheryl Hatch, Kathleen... Smith, Joseph Hatch, Cheryl Hatch, Kathleen Kelley, Andrew Wilklund, and Richard Kosiba...

  15. Environmental Assessment of Modifications to Building 1535 and Demolition of 3306 at Andrews Air Force Base, Maryland

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-09-01

    100 feet except for moderately steep stream banks. Andrews AFB is located in a level plateau between the Anacostia River on the Andrews AFB, MD...surface water quality also because of the potential to introduce sediments and other contaminants into lakes, rivers , and streams. Storm water...watersheds are the Potomac River , Anacostia , and Patuxent. These watersheds drain 2,317 square miles of the east-central portion of the Chesapeake

  16. Induction and Analysis of the Alkaloid Mitragynine Content of a Mitragyna speciosa Suspension Culture System upon Elicitation and Precursor Feeding

    PubMed Central

    Mohamad Zuldin, Nor Nahazima; Said, Ikram Md.; Mohd Noor, Normah; Zainal, Zamri; Jin Kiat, Chew; Ismail, Ismanizan

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the effects of different concentrations and combinations of the phytohormones 2,4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid (2,4-D), kinetin, 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP), and 1-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA) on callus induction and to demonstrate the role of elicitors and exogenous precursors on the production of mitragynine in a Mitragyna speciosa suspension culture. The best callus induction was achieved from petiole explants cultured on WPM that was supplemented with 4 mg L−1 2, 4-D (70.83%). Calli were transferred to liquid media and agitated on rotary shakers to establish Mitragyna speciosa cell suspension cultures. The optimum settled cell volume was achieved in the presence of WPM that contained 3 mg L−1 2,4-D and 3% sucrose (9.47 ± 0.4667 mL). The treatment of cultures with different concentrations of yeast extract and salicylic acid for different inoculation periods revealed that the highest mitragynine content as determined by HPLC was achieved from the culture treated with 250 mg L−1 yeast extract (9.275 ± 0.082 mg L−1) that was harvested on day 6 of culturing; salicylic acid showed low mitragynine content in all concentrations used. Tryptophan and loganin were used as exogenous precursors; the highest level of mitragynine production was achieved in cultures treated with 3 μM tryptophan and harvested at 6 days (13.226 ± 1.98 mg L−1). PMID:24065873

  17. Induction and analysis of the alkaloid mitragynine content of a Mitragyna speciosa suspension culture system upon elicitation and precursor feeding.

    PubMed

    Mohamad Zuldin, Nor Nahazima; Said, Ikram Md; Mohd Noor, Normah; Zainal, Zamri; Jin Kiat, Chew; Ismail, Ismanizan

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the effects of different concentrations and combinations of the phytohormones 2,4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid (2,4-D), kinetin, 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP), and 1-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA) on callus induction and to demonstrate the role of elicitors and exogenous precursors on the production of mitragynine in a Mitragyna speciosa suspension culture. The best callus induction was achieved from petiole explants cultured on WPM that was supplemented with 4 mg L⁻¹ 2,4-D (70.83%). Calli were transferred to liquid media and agitated on rotary shakers to establish Mitragyna speciosa cell suspension cultures. The optimum settled cell volume was achieved in the presence of WPM that contained 3 mg L⁻¹ 2,4-D and 3% sucrose (9.47 ± 0.4667 mL). The treatment of cultures with different concentrations of yeast extract and salicylic acid for different inoculation periods revealed that the highest mitragynine content as determined by HPLC was achieved from the culture treated with 250 mg L⁻¹ yeast extract (9.275 ± 0.082 mg L⁻¹) that was harvested on day 6 of culturing; salicylic acid showed low mitragynine content in all concentrations used. Tryptophan and loganin were used as exogenous precursors; the highest level of mitragynine production was achieved in cultures treated with 3  μM tryptophan and harvested at 6 days (13.226 ± 1.98 mg L⁻¹).

  18. Antisecretory Action of the Extract of the Aerial Parts of Eremomastax speciosa (Acanthaceae) Occurs through Antihistaminic and Anticholinergic Pathways.

    PubMed

    André Perfusion, Amang; Tan, Paul V; Ernestine, Nkwengoua; Barthélemy, Nyasse

    2014-01-01

    Objective. The objective of this study was to find out the possible antiulcer mechanism of action of Eremomastax speciosa. Method. Carbachol- and histamine-induced hypersecretion, associated with the pylorus ligation technique, were used in rats. Gastric mucosal ulceration, mucus production, pH, gastric volume, and acidity were measured. Results. Histamine and carbachol raised gastric acidity to 86.50 and 84.80 mEq/L, respectively, in the control rats, and the extracts (200 mg/kg) reduced gastric acidity to 34.60 and 39.00 mEq/L, respectively. Intraduodenal aqueous extract (400 mg/kg) in histamine- and carbachol-treated rats produced significant (P < 0.001) decreases in acid secretion to 28.50 and 28.80 mEq/L, respectively, and 100 percent inhibition of gastric ulceration. Augmented histamine-induced gastric acid secretion (90.20 mEq/L) was significantly reduced to 52.60 and 27.50 mEq/L by the 200 and 400 mg/kg doses of the aqueous extract, respectively. The extract significantly reduced (P < 0.001) the volume of gastric secretion and significantly increased mucus production. The ulcer inhibition potential of the extract significantly dropped to 25-44% (oral extract) and to 29-37% (duodenal extract) in carbachol/indomethacin-treated rats. Conclusion. The aqueous extract of E. speciosa has both cytoprotective and antisecretory effects. The antisecretory effect may involve a mechanism common to both cholinergic and histaminergic pathways.

  19. Antioxidant, Antimicrobial and Cytotoxic Properties as Well as the Phenolic Content of the Extract from Hancornia speciosa Gomes

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Uilson P.; Campos, Jaqueline F.; Torquato, Heron Fernandes V.; Paredes-Gamero, Edgar Julian; Carollo, Carlos Alexandre; Estevinho, Leticia M.; de Picoli Souza, Kely

    2016-01-01

    Hancornia speciosa Gomes (Apocynaceae) is a fruit tree, popularly known as mangabeira, and it is widely distributed throughout Brazil. Several parts of the plant are used in folk medicine, and the leaf and bark extracts have anti-inflammatory, antihypertensive, antidiabetic, and antimicrobial properties. In this study, we investigated the chemical composition of the ethanolic extract of Hancornia speciosa leaves (EEHS) and its antioxidant, antimicrobial, and cytotoxic activities as well as the mechanisms involved in cell death. The chemical compounds were identified by liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The antioxidant activity of the EEHS was investigated using the method that involves the scavenging of 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl free radicals as well as the inhibition of oxidative hemolysis and lipid peroxidation induced by 2,2’-azobis (2-amidinopropane) in human erythrocytes. The antimicrobial activity was determined by calculating the minimum inhibitory concentration, minimum bactericidal concentration, minimum fungicidal concentration, and zone of inhibition. Kasumi-1 leukemic cells were used to assess the cytotoxic activity and mechanisms involved in cell death promoted by the EEHS. The chemical compounds identified were quinic acid, chlorogenic acid, catechin, rutin, isoquercitrin, kaempferol-rutinoside, and catechin-pentoside. The EEHS demonstrated antioxidant activity via the sequestration of free radicals, inhibition of hemolysis, and inhibition of lipid peroxidation in human erythrocytes incubated with an oxidizing agent. The antimicrobial activity was observed against American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) and hospital strains of bacteria and fungi, filamentous fungi and dermatophytes. The cytotoxic activity of the EEHS was induced by apoptosis, reduction of the mitochondrial membrane potential, and activation of cathepsins. Together, these results indicate the presence of phenolic compounds and flavonoids in the EEHS

  20. Antisecretory Action of the Extract of the Aerial Parts of Eremomastax speciosa (Acanthaceae) Occurs through Antihistaminic and Anticholinergic Pathways

    PubMed Central

    André Perfusion, Amang; Tan, Paul V.; Ernestine, Nkwengoua; Barthélemy, Nyasse

    2014-01-01

    Objective. The objective of this study was to find out the possible antiulcer mechanism of action of Eremomastax speciosa. Method. Carbachol- and histamine-induced hypersecretion, associated with the pylorus ligation technique, were used in rats. Gastric mucosal ulceration, mucus production, pH, gastric volume, and acidity were measured. Results. Histamine and carbachol raised gastric acidity to 86.50 and 84.80 mEq/L, respectively, in the control rats, and the extracts (200 mg/kg) reduced gastric acidity to 34.60 and 39.00 mEq/L, respectively. Intraduodenal aqueous extract (400 mg/kg) in histamine- and carbachol-treated rats produced significant (P < 0.001) decreases in acid secretion to 28.50 and 28.80 mEq/L, respectively, and 100 percent inhibition of gastric ulceration. Augmented histamine-induced gastric acid secretion (90.20 mEq/L) was significantly reduced to 52.60 and 27.50 mEq/L by the 200 and 400 mg/kg doses of the aqueous extract, respectively. The extract significantly reduced (P < 0.001) the volume of gastric secretion and significantly increased mucus production. The ulcer inhibition potential of the extract significantly dropped to 25–44% (oral extract) and to 29–37% (duodenal extract) in carbachol/indomethacin-treated rats. Conclusion. The aqueous extract of E. speciosa has both cytoprotective and antisecretory effects. The antisecretory effect may involve a mechanism common to both cholinergic and histaminergic pathways. PMID:24695819

  1. [Preliminary Investigation of the Amount, the Molecular Weight and the Activity of Polysaccharides from Chaenomeles Speciosa Fruits in Ethanol Fractional Precipitation].

    PubMed

    Tian, Bing-mei; Xie, Xiao-mei; Shen, Pan-pan; Yang, Mo; Zhang, Sheng-long; Tang, Qing-jiu

    2015-05-01

    Chaenomeles speciosa fruits were extracted using water. The extracts were precipitated with 20%~95% (φ) ethanol, respectively. The amount of total polysaccharide was measured with phenol-sulfuric acid method. A method using high-performance size-exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) equipped with multiangle laser-light-scattering photometry (MALLS) and differential refractometry (RI) was presented for determining the molecular weight and molecular weigh distribution. RAW264.7 macrophage were cultured and stimulated with the polysaccharides in vitro and the production of nitric oxide in the cells was determined by the Griess assay. The aim of the study is to determine the amount and the molecular weight of the polysaccharides from Chaenomeles speciosa fruits, and preliminary investigate the immunomodulatory activity, The study provided the basis datas for the further research of Chaenomeles speciosa fruits. , and provided a simple and system method for the research of natural polysaccharide. The ethanol fractional precipitation showed that the order of total polysaccharide content was 95%>80%>40% ≥60%>20%. The results indicated that most polysaccharide from Chaenomeles speciosa fruits might be precipitated when ethanol concentration was up to 95% (T) and the crude polysaccharide purity had risen from 35. 1% to 45. 0% when the concentration of ethanol increased from 20% to 95%. HPSEC-MALLS-RI system showed that all the polysaccharide samples had the similar compositions. They appeared three chromatographic peaks and the retention time were not apparently different. The Mw were 6. 570 X 10(4) g . mol-1 and 1. 393 X 10(4) g . mol-1 respectively, and one less than 10 000 which was failure to obtain accurate values. The molecular weight of the first two polysaccharide distribution index(Mw/Mn)were 1. 336 and 1. 639 respectively. The polysaccharide samples had not exhibited immunomodulatory activity assessed on the basis of nitric oxide production by RAW264. 7 macrophage

  2. Management of Oro-Nasal Fistula Using Andrew's Bridge: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Harish, P V; Bhojaraju, Nandakishore; Sowmya, G R; Gangaiah, Makam

    2014-09-01

    Oro-nasal fistula is the most common complication following the surgical closure of the cleft palate. Retention is the paramount factor in the successful prosthodontic habilitation of cleft palate patients. Various precision attachments have provided us with the opportunity to make the prosthesis fixed removable type; giving a double advantage to the patient i.e. comfort through fixed type and easy maintenance through removal type. This case report describes a case of oro-nasal fistula habilitated with an obturator attached to Andrew's bridge, which had good retention and esthetics.

  3. Cognition About the Creative Process – Interview With Dr Andrew P. Allen

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Andrew P.; Loughnane, Lynda

    2016-01-01

    What is the relationship between the creative process and cognition and perception? Lynda Loughnane, a master’s student in Art and Process in Crawford College of Art and Design, Cork, Ireland interviewed Dr Andrew P. Allen about the subject. Areas covered include mindfulness, Type 1 and Type 2 thinking, stage theories of creativity, engagement with the art process and the artwork, phenomenology and consciousness with and without self report. The interview was constructed to cover a wide range of subject matter, so as to gather as much information as possible in layman's language about the cognitive process in relation to creativity and interaction with art. PMID:27872674

  4. Pharmacognostical Analysis and Protective Effect of Standardized Extract and Rizonic Acid from Erythrina velutina against 6-Hydroxydopamine-Induced Neurotoxicity in SH-SY5Y Cells

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Aline H.; Fonseca, Francisco Noé; Pimenta, Antônia T. A.; Lima, MaryAnne S.; Silveira, Edilberto Rocha; Viana, Glauce S. B.; Vasconcelos, Silvânia M. M.; Leal, Luzia Kalyne A. M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Erythrina velutina is a tree common in the northeast of Brazil extensively used by traditional medicine for the treatment of central nervous system disorders. Objective: To develop a standardized ethanol extract of E. velutina (EEEV) and to investigate the neuroprotective potential of the extract and rizonic acid (RA) from E. velutina on neuronal cells. Materials and methods: The plant drug of E. velutina previously characterized was used for the production of EEEV. Three methods were evaluated in order to obtain an extract with higher content of phenols. The neuroprotective effect of standardized EEEV (HPLC-PDA) and RA was investigated on SH-SY5Y cell exposure to the neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). Results: The powder of the plant drug was classified as moderately coarse and several quality control parameters were determined. EEEV produced by percolation gave the highest phenol content when related to others extractive methods, and its HPLC-PDA analysis allowed to identify four flavonoids and RA, some reported for the first time for the species. EEEV and RA reduced significantly the neurotoxicity induced by 6-OHDA in SH-SY5Y cells determined by the MTT assay and the nitrite concentration. EEEV also showed a free radical scavenging activity. Conclusion: This is the first pharmacological study about E. velutina which used a controlled standardized extract since the preparation of the herbal drug. This extract and RA, acting as an antioxidant, presents a neuroprotective effect suggesting that they have potential for future development as a therapeutic agent in neurodegenerative disease as Parkinson. SUMMARY The powder of Erythrina velutina was classified as moderately coarse and several quality-control parameters were determined.Ethanolic extract from E. velutina (EEEV) produced by percolation gave the highest phenol content when related to others extractive methods and its HPLC–PDA analysis of EEEV allowed to identify four flavonoids and rizonic

  5. Physical habitat predictors of Manayunkia speciosa distribution in the Klamath River and implications for management of Ceratomyxa shasta, a parasite with a complex life cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, M. S.; Alexander, J. D.; Grant, G. E.; Bartholomew, J. L.

    2011-12-01

    Management strategies for parasites with complex life cycles may target not the parasite itself, but one of the alternate hosts. One approach is to decrease habitat for the alternate host, and in river systems flow manipulations may be employed. Two-dimensional hydraulic models can be powerful tools for predicting the relationship between flow alterations and changes in physical habit, however they require a rigorous definition of physical habitat for the organism of interest. We present habitat characterization data for the case of the alternate host of a salmonid parasite and introduce how it will be used in conjunction with a 2-dimensional hydraulic model. Ceratomyxa shasta is a myxozoan parasite of salmonids that requires a freshwater polychaete Manayunkia speciosa to complete its life cycle. Manayunkia speciosa is a small (3mm) benthic filter-feeding worm that attaches itself perpendicularly to substrate through construction of a flexible tube. In the Klamath River, CA/OR, C. shasta causes significant juvenile salmon mortality, imposing social and economic losses on commercial, sport and tribal fisheries. An interest in manipulating habitat for the polychaete host to decrease the abundance of C. shasta has therefore developed. Unfortunately, there are limited data on the habitat requirements of M. speciosa or the influence of streamflow regime and hydraulics on population dynamics and infection prevalence. This work aims to address these data needs by identifying physical habitat variables that influence the distribution of M. speciosa and determining the relationship between those variables, M. speciosa population density, and C. shasta infection prevalence. Biological samples were collected from nine sites representing three river features (runs, pools, and eddies) within the Klamath River during the summer and fall of 2010 and 2011. Environmental data including depth, velocity, and substrate, were collected at each polychaete sampling location. We tested

  6. Antiviral activity and possible mode of action of ellagic acid identified in Lagerstroemia speciosa leaves toward human rhinoviruses

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Human rhinoviruses (HRVs) are responsible for more than half of all cases of the common cold and cause billions of USD annually in medical visits and school and work absenteeism. An assessment was made of the cytotoxic and antiviral activities and possible mode of action of the tannin ellagic acid from the leaves of Lagerstroemia speciosa toward HeLa cells and three rhinoviruses, HRV-2, -3, and -4. Methods The antiviral property and mechanism of action of ellagic acid were evaluated using a sulforhodamine B assay and real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) with SYBR Green dye. Results were compared with those of the currently used broad-spectrum antiviral agent, ribavirin. Results As judged by 50% inhibitory concentration values, natural ellagic acid was 1.8, 2.3, and 2.2 times more toxic toward HRV-2 (38 μg/mL), HRV-3 (31 μg/mL), and HRV-4 (29 μg/mL) than ribavirin, respectively. The inhibition rate of preincubation with 50 μg/mL ellagic acid was 17%, whereas continuous presence of ellagic acid during infection led to a significant increase in the inhibition (70%). Treatment with 50 μg/mL ellagic acid considerably suppressed HRV-4 infection only when added just after the virus inoculation (0 h) (87% inhibition), but not before -1 h or after 1 h or later (<20% inhibition). These findings suggest that ellagic acid does not interact with the HRV-4 particles and may directly interact with the human cells in the early stage of HRV infections to protect the cells from the virus destruction. Furthermore, RT-PCR analysis revealed that 50 μg/mL ellagic acid strongly inhibited the RNA replication of HRV-4 in HeLa cells, suggesting that ellagic acid inhibits virus replication by targeting on cellular molecules, rather than virus molecules. Conclusions Global efforts to reduce the level of antibiotics justify further studies on L. speciosa leaf-derived materials containing ellagic acid as potential anti-HRV products or a lead molecule for the

  7. Ecological evaluation of proposed dredged material from St. Andrew Bay, Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Mayhew, H.L.; Word, J.Q.; Kohn, N.P.; Pinza, M.R.; Karle, L.M.; Ward, J.A.

    1993-10-01

    The US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Mobile District, requested that the Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) conduct field sampling and chemical and biological testing to determine the suitability of potential dredged material for open ocean disposal. Sediment from St. Andrew Bay was chemically characterized and evaluated for biological toxicity and bioaccumulation of contaminants. The Tier III guidance for ocean disposal testing requires tests of water column effects (following dredged material disposal), deposited sediment toxicity, and bioaccumulation of contaminants from deposited sediment (dredged material). To meet these requirements, the MSL conducted suspended-particulate-phase (SPP) toxicity tests, solid-phase toxicity tests, and bioaccumulation testing on sediment representing potential dredged material from Panama City Harbor. Physical and chemical characterization of sediment to support toxicity and bioaccumulation results was also conducted on both the test and reference sediments. The MSL collected sediment samples from five sites in St. Andrew Bay and one reference site near Lands End Peninsula. The five test sediments and the reference sediment were analyzed for physical and chemical sediment characteristics, SPP chemical contaminants, solid-phase toxicity, SPP toxicity, and bioaccumulation of contaminants.

  8. Delayed tree mortality in the Atchafalaya Basin of Southern Louisiana following Hurricane Andrew

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keeland, B.D.; Gorham, L.E.

    2009-01-01

    Hurricanes can damage trees in forested wetlands, and the potential for mortality related to these storms exists due to the effects of tree damage over time. In August 1992, Hurricane Andrew passed through the forested wetlands of southern Louisiana with winds in excess of 225 kph. Although more than 78 of the basal area was destroyed in some areas, most trees greater than 2.5 cm dbh were alive and resprouting prolifically the following year (98.8). Survival of most tree species was similarly high two years after the hurricane, but mortality rates of some species increased dramatically. For example, Populus heterophylla (swamp cottonwood) mortality increased from 7.8 to 59.2 (n 76) and Salix interior (sandbar willow) mortality increased from 4.5 to 57.1 (n 21). Stem sprouts on many up-rooted hardwood trees of other species were still alive in 1998, 6 years after the hurricane. Due to the understory tree species composition, regeneration, and high levels of resprouting, there was little change in species composition or perhaps a slight shift toward more shade and flood tolerant species six years following the hurricane event. Triadica sebifera (Chinese tallow) was found on some of the sites heavily disturbed by Hurricane Andrew, and may proliferate at the expense of native tree species. ?? 2009 The Society of Wetland Scientists.

  9. Development of pile foundation bias factors using observed behavior of platforms during Hurricane Andrew

    SciTech Connect

    Aggarwal, R.K.; Litton, R.W.; Cornell, C.A.; Tang, W.H.; Chen, J.H.; Murff, J.D.

    1996-12-31

    The performance of more than 3,000 offshore platforms in the Gulf of Mexico was observed during the passage of Hurricane Andrew in August 1992. This event provided an opportunity to test the procedures used for platform analysis and design. A global bias was inferred for overall platform capacity and loads in the Andrew Joint Industry Project (JIP) Phase 1. It was predicted that the pile foundations of several platforms should have failed, but did not. These results indicated that the biases specific to foundation failure modes may be higher than those of jacket failure modes. The biases in predictions of foundation failure modes were therefore investigated further in this study. The work included capacity analysis and calibration of predictions with the observed behavior for 3 jacket platforms and 3 caissons using Bayesian updating. Bias factors for two foundation failure modes, lateral shear and overturning, were determined for each structure. Foundation capacity estimates using conventional methods were found to be conservatively biased overall.

  10. James Gregory, the University observatory and the early acquisition of scientific instruments at the University of St Andrews

    PubMed Central

    Rawson, Helen C.

    2015-01-01

    James Gregory, inventor of the reflecting telescope and Fellow of the Royal Society, was the first Regius Professor of Mathematics of the University of St Andrews, 1668–74. He attempted to establish in St Andrews what would, if completed, have been the first purpose-built observatory in the British Isles. He travelled to London in 1673 to purchase instruments for equipping the observatory and improving the teaching and study of natural philosophy and mathematics in the university, seeking the advice of John Flamsteed, later the first Astronomer Royal. This paper considers the observatory initiative and the early acquisition of instruments at the University of St Andrews, with reference to Gregory's correspondence, inventories made ca. 1699–ca. 1718 and extant instruments themselves, some of which predate Gregory's time. It examines the structure and fate of the university observatory, the legacy of Gregory's teaching and endeavours, and the meridian line laid down in 1748 in the University Library.

  11. Synthesis of the Tetracyclic Framework of the Erythrina Alkaloids Using a [4+2]-Cycloaddition/Rh(I)-Catalyzed Cascade of 2-Imidofurans

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qiu

    2008-01-01

    Several 2-imido substituted furans were found to undergo a rapid intramolecular [4+2]-cycloaddition to deliver oxabicyclo adducts in good to excellent yields. By using a Rh(I)-catalyzed ring opening of the resulting oxabicyclic adduct, it was possible to prepare several highly functionalized tetrahydro-1H-indol-2(3H)-one derivatives which were then used to prepare several erythrina alkaloids. By taking advantage of the Rh(I)-catalyzed reaction, it was possible to convert tert-butyl 3-oxo-5-carbomethoxy-10-oxa-2-azatricyclo[5.2.1.01,5]dec-8-ene-2-carboxylate into the ring opened boronate by reaction with phenylboronic acid. Treatment of the boronate with pinacol/acetic acid afforded the corresponding diol which was used in a successful synthesis of racemic 3-demethoxyerythratidinone. During the course of these studies, several novel rearrangement reactions were encountered while attempting to induce an acid-initiated Pictet Spengler cyclization of a key lactam intermediate. The IMDAF/Rh(I)-catalyzed ring opening cascade sequence was also applied to the total synthesis of (±)-erysotramidine as well as the lycorine type alkaloid (±)-epi-zephyranthine. PMID:16958534

  12. Notes from the Field: Kratom (Mitragyna speciosa) Exposures Reported to Poison Centers - United States, 2010-2015.

    PubMed

    Anwar, Mehruba; Law, Royal; Schier, Josh

    2016-07-29

    Kratom (Mitragyna speciosa) is a plant consumed throughout the world for its stimulant effects and as an opioid substitute (1). It is typically brewed into a tea, chewed, smoked, or ingested in capsules (2). It is also known as Thang, Kakuam, Thom, Ketum, and Biak (3). The Drug Enforcement Administration includes kratom on its Drugs of Concern list (substances that are not currently regulated by the Controlled Substances Act, but that pose risks to persons who abuse them), and the National Institute of Drug Abuse has identified kratom as an emerging drug of abuse (3,4). Published case reports have associated kratom exposure with psychosis, seizures, and deaths (5,6). Because deaths have been attributed to kratom in the United States (7), some jurisdictions have passed or are considering legislation to make kratom use a felony (8). CDC characterized kratom exposures that were reported to poison centers and uploaded to the National Poison Data System (NPDS) during January 2010-December 2015. The NPDS is a national database of information logged by the country's regional poison centers serving all 50 United States, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico and is maintained by the American Association of Poison Control Centers. NPDS case records are the result of call reports made by the public and health care providers.

  13. Overexpression of the cucumber LEAFY homolog CFL and hormone treatments alter flower development in gloxinia (Sinningia speciosa).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ming-Zhe; Ye, Dan; Wang, Li-Lin; Pang, Ji-Liang; Zhang, Yu-Hong; Zheng, Ke; Bian, Hong-Wu; Han, Ning; Pan, Jian-Wei; Wang, Jun-Hui; Zhu, Mu-Yuan

    2008-07-01

    Leafy (LFY) and LFY-like genes control the initiation of floral meristems and regulate MADS-box genes in higher plants. The Cucumber-FLO-LFY (CFL) gene, a LFY homolog in Cucumis sativus L. is expressed in the primordia, floral primordia, and each whirl of floral organs during the early stage of flower development. In this study, functions of CFL in flower development were investigated by overexpressing the CFL gene in gloxinia (Sinningia speciosa). Our results show that constitutive CFL overexpression significantly promote early flowering without gibberellin (GA(3)) supplement, suggesting that CFL can serve functionally as a LFY homolog in gloxinia. Moreover, GA(3) and abscisic acid (ABA) treatments could modulate the expression of MADS-box genes in opposite directions. GA(3) resembles the overexpression of CFL in the expression of MADS-box genes and the regeneration of floral buds, but ABA inhibits the expression of MADS-box genes and flower development. These results suggest that CFL and downstream MADS-box genes involved in flower development are regulated by GA(3) and ABA.

  14. Carcass characteristics and meat quality of lambs fed babassu cake (Orbignya speciosa) as a replacement for elephant grass silage.

    PubMed

    Luz, Janaina Barros; Alves, Kaliandra Souza; Mezzomo, Rafael; Ribeiro Dos Santos Neta, Ernestina; Gomes, Daiany Íris; Sampaio Oliveira, Luis Rennan; Silva, Josiane Costa; Ramos de Carvalho, Francisco Fernando

    2017-01-01

    The study aimed to evaluate the effect of the partial replacement of elephant grass silage with babassu cake (Orbignya speciosa) on the carcass characteristics and meat quality of feedlot lambs. Forty-five castrated male Santa Ines sheep (19.08 ± 0.41 kg) approximately 4 months old were distributed in a completely randomized design, with five treatments 0.0, 12.5, 25.0, 37.5 and 50 % (%DM) replacement of babassu cake with silage forming isoproteic diets formulated at a ratio of 40 % roughage to 60 % concentrate. All of the studied animals were slaughtered at the end of the experiment. The liver weights and yields increased with the inclusion of babassu cake. The weight of the shoulder increased from 2.31 to 2.61 kg, while the loin yield decreased from 7.38 to 6.64 % with the inclusion of babassu cake, both linearly. The body length, thoracic perimeter, rump perimeter and carcass compactness index showed high and positive correlations with the hot and cold carcass weights. The myofibrillar fragmentation index decreased linearly as a function of the inclusion level of babassu cake, but other quality variables were not affected. The replacement of up to 50 % of the elephant grass silage with babassu cake in the diet of lambs does not cause negative effects on carcass characteristics or meat quality.

  15. Facile biosynthesis, characterization, and solar assisted photocatalytic effect of ZnO nanoparticles mediated by leaves of L. speciosa.

    PubMed

    Sai Saraswathi, V; Tatsugi, J; Shin, Paik-Kyun; Santhakumar, K

    2017-02-01

    Synthesis of metal oxide nanoparticles using novel methodologies always attracts great importance in research. The use of plant extract to synthesize nano-particle has been considered as one of the eco-friendly methods. This paper describes the biosynthetic route of preparation of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) from the Lagerstroemia speciosa leaf extract. This approach appears to be low-cost preparation and alternative method to conventional methods. Highly stable and hexagonal phase ZnO NPs with average particle size of 40nm were synthesized and characterized by UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy (surface Plasmon resonance), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (surface functionalities), X-ray Diffraction analysis (crystallinity), TEM and SEM (size and morphology), Energy Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (elemental composition), Thermogravimetric analysis (weight loss) and Zeta potential (stability). The preliminary phytochemical experiments identify the possible chemical groups present in leaves extract. The photocatalytic properties of ZnO NPs were studied using UV-Vis spectroscopy by exposing methyl orange to sunlight and it is found to be degraded up to 93.5% within 2h. The COD values were significantly reduced from 5600mg/L to 374mg/L after 100min of solar radiation. The hemolytic activity of synthesized zinc oxide nanoparticles was performed on human erythrocyte cells. Thus the present study provides a simple and eco-friendly method for the preparation of multifunctional property of ZnO NPs utilizing the biosynthetic route.

  16. The post-disaster negative health legacy: pregnancy outcomes in Louisiana after Hurricane Andrew.

    PubMed

    Antipova, Anzhelika; Curtis, Andrew

    2015-10-01

    Disasters and displacement increasingly affect and challenge urban settings. How do pregnant women fare in the aftermath of a major disaster? This paper investigates the effect of pregnancies in disaster situations. The study tests a hypothesis that pregnant women residing in hurricane-prone areas suffer higher health risks. The setting is Louisiana in the Gulf Coast, United States, a state that continually experiences hurricane impacts. The time period for the analysis is three years following the landfall of Hurricane Andrew in 1992. We analysed low birth weight and preterm deliveries before and after landfall, as a whole and by race. Findings support an association between hazards and health of a community and indicate that pregnant women in the affected area, irrespective of race, are more likely to experience preterm deliveries compared to pre-event births. Results suggest there is a negative health legacy impact in Louisiana as a result of hurricane landfall.

  17. Business closure and relocation: a comparative analysis of the Loma Prieta earthquake and Hurricane Andrew.

    PubMed

    Wasileski, Gabriela; Rodríguez, Havidán; Diaz, Walter

    2011-01-01

    The occurrence of a number of large-scale disasters or catastrophes in recent years, including the Indian Ocean tsunami (2004), the Kashmir earthquake (2005), Hurricane Katrina (2005) and Hurricane Ike (2008), have raised our awareness regarding the devastating effects of disasters on human populations and the importance of developing mitigation and preparedness strategies to limit the consequences of such events. However, there is still a dearth of social science research focusing on the socio-economic impact of disasters on businesses in the United States. This paper contributes to this research literature by focusing on the impact of disasters on business closure and relocation through the use of multivariate logistic regression models, specifically focusing on the Loma Prieta earthquake (1989) and Hurricane Andrew (1992). Using a multivariate model, we examine how physical damage to the infrastructure, lifeline disruption and business characteristics, among others, impact business closure and relocation following major disasters.

  18. STS-89 M.S. Andrew Thomas, poses the day before launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    STS-89 Mission Specialist Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., poses at KSC's Launch Pad 39A wearing a miniature koala bear on the day before the scheduled launch of Space Shuttle Endeavour that will carry him up to the Russian Space Station Mir. Final preparations are under way toward liftoff on Jan. 22 on the eighth mission to dock with Mir. After docking, Dr. Thomas will transfer to the space station, succeeding David Wolf, M.D., who will return to Earth aboard Endeavour. Dr. Thomas, who was born and educated in South Australia, will live and work on Mir until June. STS-89 is scheduled for liftoff at 9:48 p.m. EST.

  19. Children's predisaster functioning as a predictor of posttraumatic stress following Hurricane Andrew.

    PubMed

    La Greca, A M; Silverman, W K; Wasserstein, S B

    1998-12-01

    This study examined (a) children's predisaster behavioral and academic functioning as a predictor of posttraumatic stress (PTS) following Hurricane Andrew and (b) whether children who were exposed to the disaster would display a worsening of prior functioning. Fifteen months before the disaster, 92 4th through 6th graders provided self-reports of anxiety; peers and teachers rated behavior problems (anxiety, inattention, and conduct) and academic skills. Measures were repeated 3 months postdisaster; children also reported PTS symptoms and hurricane-related experiences (i.e., exposure). PTS symptoms were again assessed 7 months postdisaster. At 3 months postdisaster, children's exposure to the disaster, as well as predisaster ratings of anxiety, inattention, and academic skills, predicted PTS symptoms. By 7 months, only exposure, African American ethnicity, and predisaster anxiety predicted PTS. Prior anxiety levels also worsened as a result of exposure to the disaster. The findings have implications for identifying and treating children at risk for stress reactions following a catastrophic disaster.

  20. 33 CFR 334.760 - Naval Support Activity Panama City and Alligator Bayou, a tributary of St. Andrew Bay, Fla...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... City and Alligator Bayou, a tributary of St. Andrew Bay, Fla.; naval restricted area. 334.760 Section... DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.760 Naval Support Activity Panama City and... permission from the Officer in Charge, Naval Support Activity Panama City, Panama City Beach, Florida, or...

  1. Religious Literacy or Spiritual Awareness? Comparative Critique of Andrew Wright's and David Hay's Approaches to Spiritual Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Filipsone, Anta

    2009-01-01

    On the basis of a comparison of the educational approaches of Andrew Wright and David Hay this paper illustrates the persisting problem of dichotomising cognitive and trans-cognitive aspects of spiritual development and education. Even though both Wright and Hay speak of the same topic--spirituality and spiritual education--they define these terms…

  2. The Berrien County Math and Science Center at Andrews University: A University and Local High Schools Consortium Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkins, Gordon; Adkin, Sally

    1995-01-01

    Describes a program at Andrews University developed along with the Berrien County Intermediate School District that utilizes college faculty to provide instruction to talented and motivated high school students. Explains logistics (curriculum design, administrative arrangement, and financial aspects) of the program, challenges, and benefits.…

  3. Should Community College Be Free? Forum. "Education Next" Talks with Sara Goldrick-Rab and Andrew P. Kelly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldrick-Rab, Sara; Kelly, Andrew P.

    2016-01-01

    In this article, "Education Next" talks with Sara Goldrick-Rab and Andrew Kelly. President Obama's proposal for tuition-free community college, seems to have laid down a marker for the Democratic Party. Vermont senator Bernie Sanders is touting his plan for free four-year public college on the primary trail; Massachusetts senator…

  4. [The Andrew Heiskell Library for the Blind and Physically Handicapped.] A Library with a Difference. Projects and Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarkon, Joe; Fitzpatrick, Vicki, Ed.

    This publication describes the Andrew Heiskell Library for the Blind and Physically Handicapped, a regional library for the National Library Service (NLS) example of the creative use of physical space and innovative technology. The publication focuses on the materials-handling system designed for the new facility, including system design…

  5. In Vivo Antioxidant and Antiulcer Activity of Parkia speciosa Ethanolic Leaf Extract against Ethanol-Induced Gastric Ulcer in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Al Batran, Rami; Al-Bayaty, Fouad; Jamil Al-Obaidi, Mazen M.; Abdualkader, Abdualrahman Mohammed; Hadi, Hamid A.; Ali, Hapipah Mohd; Abdulla, Mahmood Ameen

    2013-01-01

    Background The current study was carried out to examine the gastroprotective effects of Parkia speciosa against ethanol-induced gastric mucosa injury in rats. Methodology/Principal Findings Sprague Dawley rats were separated into 7 groups. Groups 1–2 were orally challenged with carboxymethylcellulose (CMC); group 3 received 20 mg/kg omeprazole and groups 4–7 received 50, 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg of ethanolic leaf extract, respectively. After 1 h, CMC or absolute ethanol was given orally to groups 2–7. The rats were sacrificed after 1 h. Then, the injuries to the gastric mucosa were estimated through assessment of the gastric wall mucus, the gross appearance of ulcer areas, histology, immunohistochemistry and enzymatic assays. Group 2 exhibited significant mucosal injuries, with reduced gastric wall mucus and severe damage to the gastric mucosa, whereas reductions in mucosal injury were observed for groups 4–7. Groups 3–7 demonstrated a reversal in the decrease in Periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) staining induced by ethanol. No symptoms of toxicity or death were observed during the acute toxicity tests. Conclusion Treatment with the extract led to the upregulation of heat-shock protein 70 (HSP70) and the downregulation of the pro-apoptotic protein BAX. Significant increases in the levels of the antioxidant defense enzymes glutathione (GSH) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) in the gastric mucosal homogenate were observed, whereas that of a lipid peroxidation marker (MDA) was significantly decreased. Significance was defined as p<0.05 compared to the ulcer control group (Group 2). PMID:23724090

  6. Anticonvulsant profile of the alkaloids (+)-erythravine and (+)-11-α-hydroxy-erythravine isolated from the flowers of Erythrina mulungu Mart ex Benth (Leguminosae-Papilionaceae).

    PubMed

    Faggion, Silmara Aparecida; Cunha, Alexandra Olimpio Siqueira; Fachim, Helene Aparecida; Gavin, Amanda Salomão; dos Santos, Wagner Ferreira; Pereira, Ana Maria Soares; Beleboni, Renê Oliveira

    2011-03-01

    Neural mechanisms underlying the onset and maintenance of epileptic seizures involve alterations in inhibitory and/or excitatory neurotransmitter pathways. Thus, the prospecting of novel molecules from natural products that target both inhibition and excitation systems has deserved interest in the rational design of new anticonvulsants. We isolated the alkaloids (+)-erythravine and (+)-11-α-hydroxy-erythravine from the flowers of Erythrina mulungu and evaluated the action of these compounds against chemically induced seizures in rats. Our results showed that the administration of different doses of (+)-erythravine inhibited seizures evoked by bicuculline, pentylenetetrazole, and kainic acid at maximum of 80, 100, and 100%, respectively, whereas different doses of (+)-11-α-hydroxy-erythravine inhibited seizures at a maximum of 100% when induced by bicuculline, NMDA, and kainic acid, and, to a lesser extent, PTZ (60%). The analysis of mean latency to seizure onset of nonprotected animals, for specific doses of alkaloids, showed that (+)-erythravine increased latencies to seizures induced by bicuculline. Although (+)-erythravine exhibited very weak anticonvulsant action against seizures induced by NMDA, this alkaloid increased the latency in this assay. The increase in latency to onset of seizures promoted by (+)-11-α-hydroxy-erythravine reached a maximum of threefold in the bicuculline test. All animals were protected against death when treated with different doses of (+)-11-α-hydroxy-erythravine in the tests using the four chemical convulsants. Identical results were obtained when using (+)-erythravine in the tests of bicuculline, NMDA, and PTZ, and, to a lesser extent, kainic acid. Therefore, these data validate the anticonvulsant properties of the tested alkaloids, which is of relevance in consideration of the ethnopharmacological/biotechnological potential of E. mulungu.

  7. Supplementation of Superfine Powder Prepared from Chaenomeles speciosa Fruit Increases Endurance Capacity in Rats via Antioxidant and Nrf2/ARE Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ka; You, Jia; Tang, Yong; Zhou, Yong; Liu, Peng; Zou, Dan; Zhou, Qicheng; Zhang, Ting; Zhu, Jundong; Mi, Mantian

    2014-01-01

    Chaenomeles speciosa fruit is a traditional herb medicine widely used in China. In this study, superfine powder of C. speciosa fruit (SCE), ground by supersonic nitrogen airflow at −140°C, was investigated to assess its in vitro antioxidant activity and in vivo antiphysical fatigue activity. SCE was homogenous (d < 10 μm) and rich in antioxidants like polyphenols, saponins, oleanolic acid, ursolic acid, ascorbic acid, and SOD. According to the in vitro experiments, SCE displayed promising antioxidant activity with powerful FARP, SC-DPPH, and SC-SAR activities. According to the in vivo experiments, rats supplemented with SCE had prolonged exhaustive swimming time (57%) compared to the nonsupplemented rats. Meanwhile, compared to the nonsupplemented rats, the SCE-supplemented rats had higher levels of blood glucose and liver and muscular glycogen and lower levels of LA and BUN. Lower MDA, higher antioxidant enzymes (SOD, CAT, and GSH-Px) activities, and upregulated Nrf2/ARE mediated antioxidant enzymes (HO-1, Trx, GCLM, and GCLC) expression were also detected in the supplemented group. This study indicates that SCE is a potent antioxidant and antifatigue agent, and SCE could be a promising raw material for the food and pharmaceutical industries. PMID:25610489

  8. Genomewide scan for adaptive differentiation along altitudinal gradient in the Andrew's toad Bufo andrewsi.

    PubMed

    Guo, Baocheng; Lu, Di; Liao, Wen Bo; Merilä, Juha

    2016-08-01

    Recent studies of humans, dogs and rodents have started to discover the genetic underpinnings of high altitude adaptations, yet amphibians have received little attention in this respect. To identify possible signatures of adaptation to altitude, we performed a genome scan of 15 557 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) obtained with restriction site-associated DNA sequencing of pooled samples from 11 populations of Andrew's toad (Bufo andrewsi) from the edge of the Tibetan Plateau, spanning an altitudinal gradient from 1690 to 2768 m.a.s.l. We discovered significant geographic differentiation among all sites, with an average FST   = 0.023 across all SNPs. Apart from clear patterns of isolation by distance, we discovered numerous outlier SNPs showing strong associations with variation in altitude (1394 SNPs), average annual temperature (1859 SNPs) or both (1051 SNPs). Levels and patterns of genetic differentiation in these SNPs were consistent with the hypothesis that they have been subject to directional selection and reflect adaptation to altitudinal variation among the study sites. Genes with footprints of selection were significantly enriched in binding and metabolic processes. Several genes potentially related to high altitude adaptation were identified, although the identity and functional significance of most genomic targets of selection remain unknown. In general, the results provide genomic support for results of earlier common garden and low coverage genetic studies that have uncovered substantial adaptive differentiation along altitudinal and latitudinal gradients in amphibians.

  9. Storm-tide elevations produced by Hurricane Andrew along the southern Florida coasts, August 24, 1992

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murray, Mitchell H.

    1994-01-01

    On August 24, 1992, Hurricane Andrew crossed southern peninsular Florida. The combined effects of storm surge from the hurricane and astronomical tide, referred to as storm tide, caused flooding over a large part of southern Florida. Subsequent to the flooding, many high-water marks were identified, described, and surveyed along the south- eastern coast of Florida (Miami to Key Largo) and at selected areas along the southwestern coast of Florida (Flamingo to Goodland). Descriptions of these 336 high-water makrs are presented in tabular form in this report and their locations are plotted on nineteen 7.5-minute topographic quadrangle maps. For the southeastern coast, north-south profiles of the high-water makrs along the outher and inner barrier islands and the western shoreline of Biscayne Bay are presented. Average storm-tide elevations (relative to sea level) ranged from 4 to 6 feet in northern Biscayne Bay, were as much as 17 feet on the western shoreline near the center of the bay and ranged from 3 to 6 feet in southern Biscayne Bay and Barnes Sound. Storm-tide elevations along the southwestern coast ranged from 4 to 5 feet at Flamingo and 5 to 7 feet at Goodland in the Ten Thousand Islands area.

  10. Wind damage effects of Hurricane Andrew on mangrove communities along the southwest coast of Florida, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doyle, T.W.; Smith, T. J.; Robblee, M.B.

    1995-01-01

    On August 24, 1992, Hurricane Andrew downed and defoliated an extensive swath of mangrove trees across the lower Florida peninsula. Permanent field sites were established to assess the extent of forest damage and to monitor the rate and process of forest recovery. Canopy trees suffered the highest mortality particularly for sites within and immediately north of the storm's eyewall. The type and extent of site damage, windthrow, branch loss, and defoliation generally decreased exponentially with increasing distance from the storm track. Forest damage was greater for sites in the storm's right quadrant than in the left quadrant tor the same given distance from the storm center. Stand exposure, both horizontally and vertically, increased the susceptibility and probability of forest damage and accounted for much of the local variability. Slight species differences were found. Laguncularia racemosa exceeded Avicennia germinans and Rhizophora mangle in damage tendency under similar wind conditions. Azimuths of downed trees were strongly correlated with maximum wind speed and vector based on a hurricane simulation of the storm. Lateral branch loss and leaf defoliation on sites without windthrow damage indicated a degree of crown thinning and light penetration equivalent to treefall gaps under normally intact forest conditions. Mangrove species and forests are susceptible to catastrophic disturbance by hurricanes; the impacts of which are significant to changes in forest structure and function.

  11. Simulation of Water Balance and Forest Treatment Effects at the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest

    SciTech Connect

    Waichler, Scott R.; Wemple, Beverley C.; Wigmosta, Mark S.

    2005-10-30

    The watershed model DHSVM was applied to the small watersheds WS1,2,3 in H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest (HJA), Oregon and tested for skill in simulating observed forest treatment effects on streamflow. These watersheds in the rain-snow transition zone underwent road and clearcut treatments during 1959-66 and subsequent natural regeneration. DHSVM was applied with 10 m and 1 hr resolution to 1958-98, most of the period of record. Water balance for old-growth WS2 indicated that evapotranspiration and streamflow were unlikely to be the only loss terms, and groundwater recharge was included to account for about 12% of precipitation; this term was assumed zero in previous studies. After limited calibration, overall efficiency in simulating hourly streamflow exceeded 0.7, and mean annual error was less than 10%. Model skill decreased at the margins, with overprediction of low flows and underprediction of high flows. However, statistical analyses of simulated and observed peakflows yielded similar characterizations of treatment effects. Primary simulation weaknesses were snowpack accumulation, snowmelt under rain-on-snow conditions, and production of quickflow. This challenging test of DHSVM moved the model closer to a practical tool for forest management.

  12. Effect of supplementation of a basal diet of maize stover with Erythrina variegata, Gliricidia sepium or Leucaena leucocephala on feed intake and digestibility by goats.

    PubMed

    Aregheore, E M; Perera, D

    2004-02-01

    Two 4 x 4 Latin square design experiments were carried out. In experiment 1, four mature Anglo-Nubian x Fiji local goats, pre-experimental body weight 25.0 +/- 0.6 kg, 22-24 months old, were used to study the effect of supplementation of a basal diet of maize stover with Erythrina variegata (EV), Gliricidia sepium (GS) and Leucaena leucocephala (LL) on dry matter intake (DMI) and nutrient digestibility. Maize stover treated with urea was used as a control diet. E. variegata was higher in crude protein content than LL or GS. The DMI of the urea treated stover diet was significantly lower (p < 0.05) than that of the diets of untreated stover supplemented with forage legumes. The DMI was significantly lower (p < 0.05) in the GS diet than in the EV or LL diets. Significant (p < 0.05) differences existed between the urea-treated stover and the diets of stover supplemented with forage legumes in the digestibility of dry matter (DM), crude protein (CP), neutral detergent fibre (NDF), organic matter (OM) and energy. In experiment 2, four mature goats, pre-experimental body weight 27.0 +/- 0.3 kg, 24-28 months old, were used to measure their response when the urea-treated maize stover and the maize stover and forage legume diets were sprayed with molasses. The intake of the urea-treated stover diet sprayed with molasses was significantly lower (p < 0.05) that that of the maize stover/forage legume diets sprayed with molasses. The DMI of the diets improved with the addition of molasses. The DMI among the goats offered the maize stover/forage legume diets + molasses did not differ significantly. (p > 0.05). Statistically significant (p < 0.05) differences were obtained in this second study between the urea-treated stover and the stover supplemented with forage legumes in the digestibility of DM, CP, NDF, OM and energy. The stover supplemented with forage legumes had a higher (p < 0.05) nutrient digestibility. The present studies demonstrated that the use of forage legumes as

  13. Larvicidal, ovicidal, and adulticidal efficacy of Erythrina indica (Lam.) (Family: Fabaceae) against Anopheles stephensi, Aedes aegypti, and Culex quinquefasciatus (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Govindarajan, Marimuthu; Sivakumar, Rajamohan

    2014-02-01

    Mosquitoes are the major vector for the transmission of malaria, dengue fever, yellow fever, filariasis, schistosomiasis, and Japanese encephalitis. Mosquito control is facing a threat because of the emergence of resistance to synthetic insecticides. Insecticides of botanical origin may serve as suitable alternative biocontrol techniques in the future. In view of the recently increased interest in developing plant origin insecticides as an alternative to chemical insecticide, this study was undertaken to assess the larvicidal, ovicidal, and adulticidal potential of the crude hexane, benzene, chloroform, ethyl acetate, and methanol solvent extracts from the medicinal plant Erythrina indica against the medically important mosquito vectors, Anopheles stephensi, Aedes aegypti, and Culex quinquefasciatus (Diptera: Culicidae). The larval mortality was observed after 24 h of exposure. All extracts showed moderate larvicidal effects; however, the highest larval mortality was found in methanol extract of leaf of E. indica against the larvae of A. stephensi, A. aegypti, and C. quinquefasciatus with the LC50 and LC90 values of 69.43, 75.13, and 91.41 ppm and 125.49, 134.31, and 167.14 ppm, respectively. The mean percent hatchability of the eggs was observed after 48 h post treatment. The percent hatchability was inversely proportional to the concentration of extract and directly proportional to the eggs. All the five solvent extracts showed moderate ovicidal activity; however, the methanol extract showed the highest ovicidal activity. The methanol extract of E. indica against A. stephensi, A. aegypti, and C. quinquefasciatus exerted 100 % mortality (zero hatchability) at 150, 200, and 250 ppm, respectively. Control eggs showed above 99.3-100 % hatchability. The adult mortality was observed after 24 h recovery period. The plant crude extracts showed dose-dependent mortality. At higher concentrations, the adult showed restless movement for some times with abnormal wagging and

  14. A δ(15)N assessment of nitrogen deposition for the endangered epiphytic orchid Laelia speciosa from a city and an oak forest in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Álvarez, Edison A; Reyes-García, Casandra; de la Barrera, Erick

    2016-09-01

    Atmospheric nitrogen deposition poses a major threat to global biodiversity. Tropical epiphytic plants are especially at risk given their reliance on atmospheric sources of nutrients. The leaf, pseudobulb, and root carbon and nitrogen content, C:N ratio, as well as the nitrogen isotopic composition were studied for individuals of Laelia speciosa from a city and from an oak forest in Mexico. The nitrogen content of leaves was similar between the city and the oak forest, reaching 1.3 ± 0.2 % (dry mass). The δ(15)N of leaves, pseudobulbs, and roots reached 5.6 ± 0.2 ‰ in the city, values found in sites exposed to industrial and vehicular activities. The δ(15)N for plant from the oak forest amounted to -3.1 ± 0.3 ‰, which is similar to values measured from sites with low industrial activities. Some orchids such as Laelia speciosa produce a single pseudobulb per year, i.e., a water and nutrient storage organ, so the interannual nitrogen deposition was studied by considering the ten most recent pseudobulbs for plants from either site formed between 2003 and 2012. The C:N ratio of the ten most recent pseudobulbs from the oak forest, as well as that of the pseudobulbs formed before 2010 for plants in the city were indistinguishable from each other, averaging 132.4 ± 6.5, while it was lower for the two most recent pseudobulbs in the city. The δ(15)N values of pseudobulbs from the oak forest averaged ‒4.4 ± 0.1 ‰ for the entire series. The δ(15)N ranged from 0.1 ± 1.6 ‰ for the oldest pseudobulb to 4.7 ± 0.2 ‰ for the pseudobulb formed in the city from 2008 onwards. Isotopic analysis and the C:N ratio for L. speciosa revealed that rates of nitrogen deposition were higher in the city than in the forest. The δ(15)N values of series of pseudobulbs showed that it is possible to track nitrogen deposition over multiple years.

  15. Low-Frequency Response Following the Passage of Hurricane Andrew on the Texas-Louisiana Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, S. M.; Smith, D. C.; Dimarco, S. F.

    2009-12-01

    During August 24th through 27th in 1992, Hurricane Andrew passed through the Gulf Of Mexico almost directly over several moorings on the easternmost Louisiana shelf portion of the Texas-Louisiana Shelf (LATEX) coastal ocean monitoring program. Examination of the current meter time-series showed the existence of fast moving, long shelf waves over the entire Texas-Louisiana shelf west of the storm passage for up to 12 days after direct forcing ceased. The LATEX program featured 31 moorings each with 3 current meters over the 10, 20, 50, and 200 meter isobaths in 5 cross sectional lines with additional coverage on the 200 meter isobath from the Louisiana-Mississippi River delta, to Corpus Christi, Texas. Additionally, several pressure records from LATEX and several NOAA historical coastal tide gauge data from Sabine Pass to Port Isabella, Texas were incorporated. Raw, 3-hour low pass filtered, and 40-hour low pass filtered versions of the current data were analyzed. The pressure data used were detided using a least squares fit, and the tidal records were detided using the NOAA predicted tides for that location. All data were analyzed using a wavelet analysis to determine the spectra over time. The analyzed data shows that the shelf response was largely dominated in the internal Kelvin wave mode. The wave propagated towards the west on the shelf at approximately 400 km/day. These results are contrasted and compared with wave modes predicted for coastal trapped wave solutions. The output of a coastal ocean model simulation using a forced wind field similar to the storm are also contrasted and compared with the observed data.

  16. Damage to unburied flowlines in the Gulf of Mexico during Hurricane Andrew

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, J.I.

    1995-12-31

    The US Minerals Management Service reported that 454 sub-sea pipelines were damaged during Hurricane Andrew. Previously, damage to pipelines and flowlines has been reported in a series of papers by Blumberg (1964). In the present paper a formulation of the hydrodynamic loads acting on a flowline which is lying on the seafloor in the presence of waves and currents is summarized. In general, the line dynamics can be represented by a fourth order differential equation with nonlinear forcing but a method is presented which assumes that the complete response can be broken down into distinct phases from ``early motion`` to ``taut line`` to ``yield and breaking``. The selection of appropriate force coefficients and boundary layer interactions is discussed. The initial stages of pipeline migration across the seafloor is shown to be followed by loading of the flowline once all of the ``slack`` is taken up. The loads are shown to be a function of the current orientation and the maximum tension is approximately proportional to the square of the distance between risers. Comparisons of predicted and observed damages confirm that ``effective`` boundary layer thicknesses at the seafloor and typical drag and lift coefficients which were selected based on available literature are consistent with observed flowline damage. The results of sidescan sonar mosaics of pipeline migrations and reported damage are consistent with the loads predicted by relatively simple hydrodynamic/structural models. The material presented in this paper permits the evaluation of the risk of damage to unburied flowlines using relatively simple tools. Guidelines to the assumptions of force coefficients and flowline responses are provided. 20 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Multi-stage impregnation of the lithospheric mantle at the Andrew Bain FZ (SWIR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paganelli, E.; Brunelli, D.; Bonatti, E.; Cipriani, A.; Ligi, M.

    2008-12-01

    The Southern ridge-transform intersection of Andrew Bain Fracture Zone (ABFZ) is interpreted as a "cold spot" in the mid-ocean ridge system being characterized by a negative thermal anomaly in the oceanic upper mantle. The negative thermal anomaly is associated to the cold-edge effect due to the great age contrast of the active ridge segments. During the oceanic expedition AB06-S23, in 2006, (organized by ISMAR-CNR, Bologna, Italy, and co-financed by PRNA, Italy) with the russian R/V N. Strakhov, several samples of abyssal peridotites have been collected. Textures and modal distribution of the samples have been investigated revealing a multistage impregnation history. Deep spinel-field impregnation assemblages (sp+cpx-ol) are followed by plagioclase-field patches and mineral trails (pl+cpx-ol) and late shallow gabbroic pockets and veins. The major elements mineral chemistry reveals compositional trends of low-P/T subsolidus partial- to-complete re-equilibration undergone by the upper mantle during the upwelling beneath the ridge. These samples have experienced variable degrees of melting and reacted with percolating melts of possible different composition. In particular, samples showing the lowest degrees of melting have interacted with MORB-like melts and pyroxenitic-derived melts in the spinel and plagioclase stability fields. The presence of these two kinds of melts might prove the presence of enriched portions scattered in a normal depleted mantle beneath ocean ridges. MELTS-based runs provide constraints to variable extents of pyroxenitic-derived melt interaction with the mantle source and crystallization at variable depth of the products of such an interaction. Supported by MIUR-PRIN Cofin project 2007

  18. Antioxidant and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Extracts from Cassia alata, Eleusine indica, Eremomastax speciosa, Carica papaya and Polyscias fulva Medicinal Plants Collected in Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Sagnia, Bertrand; Fedeli, Donatella; Casetti, Rita; Montesano, Carla; Falcioni, Giancarlo; Colizzi, Vittorio

    2014-01-01

    Background The vast majority of the population around the world has always used medicinal plants as first source of health care to fight infectious and non infectious diseases. Most of these medicinal plants may have scientific evidence to be considered in general practice. Objective The aim of this work was to investigate the antioxidant capacities and anti-inflammatory activities of ethanol extracts of leaves of Cassia alata, Eleusine indica, Carica papaya, Eremomastax speciosa and the stem bark of Polyscias fulva, collected in Cameroon. Methods Chemiluminescence was used to analyze the antioxidant activities of plant extracts against hydrogen peroxide or superoxide anion. Comet assays were used to analyze the protection against antioxidant-induced DNA damage induced in white blood cells after treating with hydrogen peroxide. Flow cytometry was used to measure γδ T cells proliferation and anti-inflammatory activity of γδ T cells and of immature dendritic cells (imDC) in the presence of different concentrations of plant extracts. Results Ethanol extracts showed strong antioxidant properties against both hydrogen peroxide and superoxide anion. Cassia alata showed the highest antioxidant activity. The effect of plant extracts on γδ T cells and imDC was evidenced by the dose dependent reduction in TNF-α production in the presence of Cassia alata, Carica papaya, Eremomastax speciosa Eleusine indica, and Polyscias fulva. γδ T cells proliferation was affected to the greatest extent by Polyscias fulva. Conclusion These results clearly show the antioxidant capacity and anti-inflammatory activities of plant extracts collected in Cameroon. These properties of leaves and stem bark extracts may contribute to the value for these plants in traditional medicine and in general medical practice. PMID:25090613

  19. Evaluation of Hydraulically Significant Discontinuities in Dockum Group Mudrocks in Andrews County, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, R. M.; Kuszmaul, J. S.; Cao, S.; Powers, D. W.

    2013-12-01

    Triassic mudrocks of the Dockum Group (Cooper Canyon Formation) host four, below-grade landfills at the Waste Control Specialists (WSC) site in Andrews County, Texas, including: a hazardous waste landfill and three radioactive waste landfills. At the study site, the Dockum consists of mudrocks with sparse siltstone/sandstone interbeds that developed in a semi-arid environment from an ephemeral meandering fluvial system. Sedimentary studies reveal that the mudrocks are ancient floodplain vertisols (soils with swelling clays) and siltstone/sandstone interbeds are fluvial channel deposits that were frequently subaerially exposed. Rock discontinuities, including fractures and syndepositional slickensided surfaces, were mapped during the excavation of the WCS radioactive waste landfills along vertical faces prepared by the construction contractor. Face locations were selected to insure a sampled area with nearly complete vertical coverage for each landfill. Individual discontinuities were mapped and their strike, dip, length, roughness, curvature, staining, and evidence of displacement were described. In the three radioactive waste disposal landfills, over 1750 discontinuities across 35 excavated faces were mapped and described, where each face was nominally 8 to 10 ft tall and 50 to 100 ft long. Genetic units related to paleosol development were identified. On average, the orientation of the discontinuities was horizontal, and no other significant trends were observed. Mapping within the landfill excavations shows that most discontinuities within Dockum rocks are horizontal, concave upward, slickensided surfaces that developed in the depositional environment, as repeated wetting and drying cycles led to shrinking and swelling of floodplain vertisols. Fractures that showed staining (a possible indicator of past or present hydraulic activity) are rare, vertical to near-vertical, and occur mainly in, and adjacent to, mechanically stiff siltstone and sandstone interbeds

  20. Effect of Hurricane Andrew on the Turkey Point Nuclear Generating Station from August 20--30, 1992. [Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hebdon, F.J.

    1993-03-01

    On August 24, 1992, Hurricane Andrew, a Category 4 hurricane, struck the Turkey Point Electrical Generating Station with sustained winds of 145 mph (233 km/h). This is the report of the team that the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) jointly sponsored (1) to review the damage that the hurricane caused the nuclear units and the utility`s actions to prepare for the storm and recover from it, and (2) to compile lessons that might benefit other nuclear reactor facilities.

  1. A tale of two storms: Surges and sediment deposition from Hurricanes Andrew and Wilma in Florida’s southwest coast mangrove forests: Chapter 6G in Science and the storms-the USGS response to the hurricanes of 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Thomas J.; Anderson, Gordon H.; Tiling, Ginger

    2007-01-01

    Hurricanes can be very different from each other. Here we examine the impacts that two hurricanes, Andrew and Wilma, had in terms of storm surge and sediment deposition on the southwest coast of Florida. Although Wilma was the weaker storm, it had the greater impact. Wilma had the higher storm surge over a larger area and deposited more sediment than did Andrew. This effect was most likely due to the size of Wilma's eye, which was four times larger than that of Andrew.

  2. Mangroves, hurricanes, and lightning strikes: Assessment of Hurricane Andrew suggests an interaction across two differing scales of disturbance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Thomas J.; Robblee, Michael B.; Wanless, Harold R.; Doyle, Thomas W.

    1994-01-01

    The track of Hurricane Andrew carried it across one of the most extensive mangrove for ests in the New World. Although it is well known that hurricanes affect mangrove forests, surprisingly little quantitative information exists concerning hurricane impact on forest structure, succession, species composition, and dynamics of mangrove-dependent fauna or on rates of eco-system recovery (see Craighead and Gilbert 1962, Roth 1992, Smith 1992, Smith and Duke 1987, Stoddart 1969).After Hurricane Andrew's passage across south Florida, we assessed the environmental damage to the natural resources of the Everglades and Biscayne National Parks. Quantitative data collected during subsequent field trips (October 1992 to July 1993) are also provided. We present measurements of initial tree mortality by species and size class, estimates of delayed (or continuing) tree mortality, and observations of geomorphological changes along the coast and in the forests that could influence the course of forest recovery. We discuss a potential interaction across two differing scales of disturbance within mangrove forest systems: hurricanes and lightning strikes.

  3. Plant-determined variation in the cardenolide content, thin-layer chromatography profiles, and emetic potency of monarch butterflies,Danaus plexippus L. Reared on milkweed plants in California: 2.Asclepias speciosa.

    PubMed

    Brower, L P; Seiber, J N; Nelson, C J; Lynch, S P; Holland, M M

    1984-04-01

    The pattern of variation in gross cardenolide concentration of 111Asclepias speciosa plants collected in six different areas of California is a positively skewed distribution which ranges from 19 to 344 μg of cardenolide per 0.1 g dry weight with a mean of 90 μg per 0.1 g. Butterflies reared individually on these plants in their native habitats ranged from 41 to 547 μg of cardenolide per 0.1 g dry weight with a mean of 179 μg. Total cardenolide per butterfly ranged from 54 to 1279 μg with a mean of 319 μg. Differences in concentrations and total cardenolide contents in the butterflies from the six geographic areas appeared minor, and there were no differences between the males and the females, although the males did weigh significantly more than females. The uptake of cardenolide by the butterflies was found to be a logarithmic function of the plant concentration. This results in regulation: larvae which feed on low-concentration plants produce butterflies with increased cardenolide concentrations relative to those of the plants, and those which feed on high-concentration plants produce butterflies with decreased concentrations. No evidence was adduced that high concentrations of cardenolides in the plants affected the fitness of the butterflies. The mean emetic potencies of the powdered plant and butterfly material were 5.62 and 5.25 blue jay emetic dose fifty units per milligram of cardenolide and the number of ED50 units per butterfly ranged from 0.28 to 6.7 with a mean of 1.67. Monarchs reared onA. speciosa, on average, are only about one tenth as emetic as those reared onA. eriocarpa. UnlikeA. eriocarpa which is limited to California,A. speciosa ranges from California to the Great Plains and is replaced eastwards byA. syriaca L. These two latter milkweed species appear to have a similar array of chemically identical cardenolides, and therefore both must produce butterflies of relatively low emetic potency to birds, with important ecological implications

  4. Distribution and abundance of freshwater polychaetes, Manayunkia speciosa (Polychaeta), in the Great Lakes with a 70-year case history for western Lake Erie

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schloesser, Don W.

    2013-01-01

    Manayunkia speciosa has been a taxonomic curiosity for 150 years with little interest until 1977 when it was identified as an intermediate host of a fish parasite (Ceratomyxa shasta) responsible for fish mortalities (e.g., chinook salmon). Manayunkia was first reported in the Great Lakes in 1929. Since its discovery, the taxon has been reported in 50% (20 of 40 studies) of benthos studies published between 1960 and 2007. When found, Manayunkia comprised 2) and Georgian Bay (1790/m2) than in five other areas (mean = 60 to 553/m2) of the lakes. A 70-year history of Manayunkia in western Lake Erie indicates it was not found in 1930, was most abundant in 1961 (mean = 8039, maximum = 67,748/m2), and decreased in successive periods of 1982 (3529, 49,639/m2), 1993 (1876, 25,332/m2), and 2003 (79, 2583/m2). It occurred at 48% of stations in 1961, 58% in 1982, 52% in 1993, and 6% of stations in 2003. In all years, Manayunkia was distributed primarily near the mouth of the Detroit River. Causes for declines in distribution and abundance are unknown, but may be related to pollution-abatement programs that began in the 1970s, and invasion of dreissenid mussels in the late-1980s which contributed to de-eutrophication of western Lake Erie. At present, importance of the long-term decline of Manayunkia in Lake Erie is unknown.

  5. Mitragyna speciosa Leaf Extract Exhibits Antipsychotic-Like Effect with the Potential to Alleviate Positive and Negative Symptoms of Psychosis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Vijeepallam, Kamini; Pandy, Vijayapandi; Kunasegaran, Thubasni; Murugan, Dharmani D.; Naidu, Murali

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the antipsychotic-like effect of methanolic extract of Mitragyna speciosa leaf (MMS) using in vivo and ex vivo studies. In vivo studies comprised of apomorphine-induced climbing behavior, haloperidol-induced catalepsy, and ketamine-induced social withdrawal tests in mice whereas the ex vivo study was conducted utilizing isolated rat vas deferens preparation. Acute oral administration of MMS (50–500 mg/kg) showed an inverted bell-shaped dose-response in apomorphine-induced cage climbing behavior in mice. The effective inhibitory doses of MMS (75 and 100 mg/kg, p.o.) obtained from the apomorphine study was further tested on haloperidol (subcataleptic dose; 0.1 mg/kg, i.p.)-induced catalepsy in the mouse bar test. MMS (75 and 100 mg/kg, p.o.) significantly potentiated the haloperidol-induced catalepsy in mice. Interestingly, MMS at the same effective doses (75 and 100 mg/kg, p.o.) significantly facilitated the social interaction in ketamine-induced social withdrawal mice. Furthermore, MMS inhibited the dopamine-induced contractile response dose-dependently in the isolated rat vas deferens preparations. In conclusion, this investigation provides first evidence that MMS exhibits antipsychotic-like activity with potential to alleviate positive as well as negative symptoms of psychosis in mice. This study also suggests the antidopaminergic activity of MMS that could be responsible for alleviating positive symptoms of psychosis. PMID:27999544

  6. Photocatalytic activity against azo dye and cytotoxicity on MCF-7 cell lines of zirconium oxide nanoparticle mediated using leaves of Lagerstroemia speciosa.

    PubMed

    Sai Saraswathi, V; Santhakumar, K

    2017-04-01

    Metal oxide nanoparticles are gaining interest in recent years. The present paper explains about the green synthesis of zirconium oxide nanoparticles (ZrO NPs) mediated from the leaves of Lagerstroemia speciosa. The prepared ZrO NPs were characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy, FT-IR, X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA). The photocatalytic activity of ZrO NPs was studied for azo dye by exposing to sunlight. The azo dye was degraded up to 94.58%. Also the ZrO NPs were studied for in vitro cytotoxicity activity against breast cancer cell lines-MCF-7 and evaluated by MTT assay. The cell morphological changes were recorded by light microscope. The cells viability was seen at 500μg/mL when compared against control. Hence the research highlights, that the method was simple, eco-friendly towards environment by phytoremediation activity of the azo dye and cytotoxicity activity against MCF-7 cell lines. Hence the present paper may help to further explore the metal nanoparticle for its potential applications.

  7. Determination of Mitragynine in Mitragyna speciosa Raw Materials and Finished Products by Liquid Chromatography with UV Detection: Single-Laboratory Validation.

    PubMed

    Mudge, Elizabeth M; Brown, Paula N

    2016-10-08

    Mitragyna speciosa (kratom) is a tree indigenous to Southeast Asia, and its leaves are used in herbal formulations because they contain indole alkaloids mitragynine and 7-hydroxy (7-OH) mitragynine. An HPLC method was developed, optimized, and validated using single-laboratory validation guidelines to quantify mitragynine in kratom raw materials and finished products. The method optimization evaluated several extraction parameters including solvent type, solvent volume, time, and extraction method. The separation of the mitragynine alkaloids was achieved in 18 min with a fused-core C18 EVO column using gradient separation with ammonium bicarbonate (pH 9.5) and acetonitrile. The calibration range for mitragynine was 1.0-500 μg/mL with correlation coefficients of ≥99.9% throughout method development and validation. The method detection limit and LOQ were 0.2 and 0.6 μg/mL, respectively for mitragynine. Eight test samples were obtained to evaluate method repeatability. RSDr ranged from 0.4 to 1.0%, whereas intermediate precision ranged from 3.7 to 7.3%, with HorRat values from 0.68 to 1.96. 7-OH mitragynine was below the LOQ for all samples, therefore, spikes repeatability sample RSD values were <1%. The validation data presented meet the Standard Method Performance Requirements as specified by the AOAC INTERNATIONAL Kratom Working Group.

  8. Chemical Composition and Antimicrobial Potential of Palm Leaf Extracts from Babaçu (Attalea speciosa), Buriti (Mauritia flexuosa), and Macaúba (Acrocomia aculeata)

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoud, Talal Suleiman; do Nascimento, Guilherme Nobre L.; da Silva, Juliana Fonseca Moreira

    2016-01-01

    Babaçu (A. speciosa), Buriti (M. flexuosa), and Macaúba (A. aculeata) are palm trees typical of the ecotone area between Cerrado and the Amazon rainforest. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial potential of the extracts prepared from the leaves of those palms as well as determine their chemical compositions. The ethanol extracts were prepared in a Soxhlet apparatus and tested by disk diffusion and agar dilution technique against Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Candida albicans, and Candida parapsilosis. However, there was no significant activity at concentrations of 25, 50, and 100 mg·Ml−1. Moreover, the phytochemical analysis revealed the presence of tannins, flavonoids, catechins, steroids, triterpenes, and saponins. Gas chromatography (GC/MS) analysis also identified organic acids, such as capric (decanoic) acid, lauric (dodecanoic) acid, myristic (tetradecanoic) acid, phthalic (1,2-benzenedicarboxylic) acid, palmitic (hexadecanoic) acid, stearic (octadecanoic) acid, linoleic (9,12-octadecadienoic) acid (omega-6), linolenic (octadecatrienoic) acid (omega-3), and the terpenes citronellol and phytol. Based on the chemical composition in the palm leaf extracts, the palms have the potential to be useful in the food, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical industries. PMID:27529077

  9. Chemical Composition and Antimicrobial Potential of Palm Leaf Extracts from Babaçu (Attalea speciosa), Buriti (Mauritia flexuosa), and Macaúba (Acrocomia aculeata).

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Adriana Idalina Torcato; Mahmoud, Talal Suleiman; do Nascimento, Guilherme Nobre L; da Silva, Juliana Fonseca Moreira; Pimenta, Raphael Sanzio; de Morais, Paula Benevides

    2016-01-01

    Babaçu (A. speciosa), Buriti (M. flexuosa), and Macaúba (A. aculeata) are palm trees typical of the ecotone area between Cerrado and the Amazon rainforest. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial potential of the extracts prepared from the leaves of those palms as well as determine their chemical compositions. The ethanol extracts were prepared in a Soxhlet apparatus and tested by disk diffusion and agar dilution technique against Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Candida albicans, and Candida parapsilosis. However, there was no significant activity at concentrations of 25, 50, and 100 mg·Ml(-1). Moreover, the phytochemical analysis revealed the presence of tannins, flavonoids, catechins, steroids, triterpenes, and saponins. Gas chromatography (GC/MS) analysis also identified organic acids, such as capric (decanoic) acid, lauric (dodecanoic) acid, myristic (tetradecanoic) acid, phthalic (1,2-benzenedicarboxylic) acid, palmitic (hexadecanoic) acid, stearic (octadecanoic) acid, linoleic (9,12-octadecadienoic) acid (omega-6), linolenic (octadecatrienoic) acid (omega-3), and the terpenes citronellol and phytol. Based on the chemical composition in the palm leaf extracts, the palms have the potential to be useful in the food, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical industries.

  10. Plant phenology patterns at three sites on the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest, Oregon, 1987 to 2007.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, D. C.; Creel, C.; Downing, G.; Remillard, S.; O'Connell, K.

    2007-12-01

    Plant phenology data has been collected at three sites on the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest, Oregon since the late 1970's. The sites were visited once every three weeks year-round. Current efforts to clean and archive this data are on-going. Here we present on a 20 year data set from 1987 to 2007. The three sites are located at Watersheds (WS) 10, 8, and 7/6, at an elevation of 466 m, 993 m, and 905/950 m respectively. Forests were old growth (WS 8) and regenerating clearcuts (WS 6, 10), or shelterwood clearcut with overstory removed in 1984 (WS 7) dominated by Douglas-fir, western hemlock, true firs, and western redcedar. One tree (Douglas-fir), two evergreen shrubs, three deciduous shrubs, and four herbs were followed for vegetative and flowering phenology, including bud swell, bud bread, leaf expansion, leaf color change, leaf fall, flower bud swell, blooming, petal loss, fruit formation, and seed dispersal. Weather stations are located at each site and tied into a network of stations in this LTER site. Physical factors such as snow depth, snow coverage, freeze-thaw activity, as well as lichen condition were also noted. We are asking two key questions regarding plant phenology patterns. 1. Has the growing season lengthened in the mountainous watershed of the HJ Andrews, and is this similar for a low elevation site (WS 10) versus a mid elevation site (WS 8, 7/6)? 2. Do snow-pack dynamics influence plant phenology more so than temperature (degree days)?

  11. 33 CFR 334.770 - Gulf of Mexico and St. Andrew Sound, south of East Bay, Fla., Tyndall Drone Launch Corridor...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Sound, south of East Bay, Fla., Tyndall Drone Launch Corridor, Tyndall Air Force Base, Fla.; restricted.... Andrew Sound, south of East Bay, Fla., Tyndall Drone Launch Corridor, Tyndall Air Force Base, Fla... referred to as the “Tyndall Drone Launch Corridor.” (b) The regulations. (1) Military usage of areas...

  12. 78 FR 76812 - In the Matter of: Andrew Vincent O'Donnell, Inmate Number-62355-019, USP Atlanta, U.S...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Bureau of Industry and Security In the Matter of: Andrew Vincent O'Donnell, Inmate Number--62355- 019, USP Atlanta, U.S. Penitentiary, P.O. Box 15060, Atlanta, GA 30315; Order Denying Export Privileges On August 1, 2011, in the U.S. District...

  13. 33 CFR 334.680 - Gulf of Mexico, southeast of St. Andrew Bay East Entrance, small-arms firing range, Tyndall Air...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    .... Andrew Bay East Entrance, small-arms firing range, Tyndall Air Force Base, Fla. 334.680 Section 334.680..., small-arms firing range, Tyndall Air Force Base, Fla. (a) The danger zones—(1) Area No. 1. The waters of... Officer, Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida, and such agencies as he may designate. (Sec. 7, 40 Stat....

  14. 33 CFR 334.680 - Gulf of Mexico, southeast of St. Andrew Bay East Entrance, small-arms firing range, Tyndall Air...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    .... Andrew Bay East Entrance, small-arms firing range, Tyndall Air Force Base, Fla. 334.680 Section 334.680..., small-arms firing range, Tyndall Air Force Base, Fla. (a) The danger zones—(1) Area No. 1. The waters of... Officer, Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida, and such agencies as he may designate. (Sec. 7, 40 Stat....

  15. 33 CFR 334.680 - Gulf of Mexico, southeast of St. Andrew Bay East Entrance, small-arms firing range, Tyndall Air...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    .... Andrew Bay East Entrance, small-arms firing range, Tyndall Air Force Base, Fla. 334.680 Section 334.680..., small-arms firing range, Tyndall Air Force Base, Fla. (a) The danger zones—(1) Area No. 1. The waters of... Officer, Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida, and such agencies as he may designate. (Sec. 7, 40 Stat....

  16. 33 CFR 334.770 - Gulf of Mexico and St. Andrew Sound, south of East Bay, Fla., Tyndall Drone Launch Corridor...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Sound, south of East Bay, Fla., Tyndall Drone Launch Corridor, Tyndall Air Force Base, Fla.; restricted.... Andrew Sound, south of East Bay, Fla., Tyndall Drone Launch Corridor, Tyndall Air Force Base, Fla.... Warnings will be broadcast by the Air Force on Channel 16 (156.80 MHz) and Channel 13 (27.115 MHz)...

  17. 33 CFR 334.770 - Gulf of Mexico and St. Andrew Sound, south of East Bay, Fla., Tyndall Drone Launch Corridor...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Sound, south of East Bay, Fla., Tyndall Drone Launch Corridor, Tyndall Air Force Base, Fla.; restricted.... Andrew Sound, south of East Bay, Fla., Tyndall Drone Launch Corridor, Tyndall Air Force Base, Fla.... Warnings will be broadcast by the Air Force on Channel 16 (156.80 MHz) and Channel 13 (27.115 MHz)...

  18. 33 CFR 334.680 - Gulf of Mexico, southeast of St. Andrew Bay East Entrance, small-arms firing range, Tyndall Air...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    .... Andrew Bay East Entrance, small-arms firing range, Tyndall Air Force Base, Fla. 334.680 Section 334.680..., small-arms firing range, Tyndall Air Force Base, Fla. (a) The danger zones—(1) Area No. 1. The waters of... Officer, Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida, and such agencies as he may designate. (Sec. 7, 40 Stat....

  19. 33 CFR 334.680 - Gulf of Mexico, southeast of St. Andrew Bay East Entrance, small-arms firing range, Tyndall Air...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    .... Andrew Bay East Entrance, small-arms firing range, Tyndall Air Force Base, Fla. 334.680 Section 334.680..., small-arms firing range, Tyndall Air Force Base, Fla. (a) The danger zones—(1) Area No. 1. The waters of... Officer, Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida, and such agencies as he may designate. (Sec. 7, 40 Stat....

  20. 33 CFR 334.770 - Gulf of Mexico and St. Andrew Sound, south of East Bay, Fla., Tyndall Drone Launch Corridor...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Sound, south of East Bay, Fla., Tyndall Drone Launch Corridor, Tyndall Air Force Base, Fla.; restricted.... Andrew Sound, south of East Bay, Fla., Tyndall Drone Launch Corridor, Tyndall Air Force Base, Fla.... Warnings will be broadcast by the Air Force on Channel 16 (156.80 MHz) and Channel 13 (27.115 MHz)...

  1. 33 CFR 334.770 - Gulf of Mexico and St. Andrew Sound, south of East Bay, Fla., Tyndall Drone Launch Corridor...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Sound, south of East Bay, Fla., Tyndall Drone Launch Corridor, Tyndall Air Force Base, Fla.; restricted.... Andrew Sound, south of East Bay, Fla., Tyndall Drone Launch Corridor, Tyndall Air Force Base, Fla.... Warnings will be broadcast by the Air Force on Channel 16 (156.80 MHz) and Channel 13 (27.115 MHz)...

  2. Adaptogenic and in vitro antioxidant activity of flavanoids and other fractions of Argyreia speciosa (Burm.f) Boj. in acute and chronic stress paradigms in rodents.

    PubMed

    Habbu, P V; Mahadevan, K M; Kulkarni, P V; Daulatsingh, C; Veerapur, V P; Shastry, R A

    2010-01-01

    Argyreia speciosa (sweet) (Burm.f.) Boj. is an Ayurvedic rasayana plant used as an adaptogen. The present study reports the investigations done on the adaptogenic property of ethanol (EtAS; 100 and 200 mg/kg; po), ethyl acetate (EAAS; 100 and 200 mg/kg; po) fraction and flavanoids such as quercetin and kaempferol (25 mg/kg; po) of the root. Immobilization induced acute stress (AS; 3 days) and chronic stress (CS; 7 days) and swimming induced stress models were used to screen the anti-stress effect of the plant fractions and isolated flavanoids. The tested doses of EtAS and isolated flavanoids were able to produce significant effects in normalizing altered serum biochemical parameters and the severity of ulcer in both AS and CS models. Higher dose of EtAS, quercetin and kaempferol (25 mg/kg; po) were found to be significant in restoring the hypertrophy of adrenal gland and atrophy of spleen and thymus gland only in CS model. Greater swimming time was noted in the mice pretreated with tested doses of flavanoids and EtAS. In addition, levels of adrenal ascorbic acid and cortisol were restored compared to stress control group. EtAS exhibited significant scavenging effect of DPPH, hydroxyl radical and LPO. Thus, EtAS, quercetin and kaempferol are capable of increasing the capacity to tolerate non-specific stress in experimental animals, as evident from restoration of large number of parameters in the stress models studied. Bioactivity of EtAS may be due to the synergetic action of isolated flavanoids. Improvement in stress markers may be due its prolong effect of resistance to stress and partly due to free radical scavenging activity.

  3. Lessons learned from Hurricane Andrew: recommendations for care of the elderly in long-term care facilities.

    PubMed

    Silverman, M A; Weston, M; Llorente, M; Beber, C; Tam, R

    1995-06-01

    We report on the experience of a 500-bed, long-term care facility in Miami, Fla, which provides housing and nursing care units for patients--ranging from those who are independently ambulatory to those who are acutely ill and feeble--in preparing for, during, and in the immediate aftermath of Hurricane Andrew, which struck on August 24, 1992. The problems encountered included a massive influx of evacuated elderly to the facility, facility isolation, loss of electrical power, loss of running water, special dietary needs, and limited professional staffing due to personal property losses or loss of transportation. Overwhelmed county emergency medical services, limited access to hospitals and patient care, and difficulty in procuring supplies exacerbated the already complicated situation resulting from the storm. As a result of these catastrophic conditions, a number of challenges specific to the care of the elderly were identified. In conjunction with the Florida Department of Elder Affairs, we drafted a comprehensive blueprint that could serve as a disaster plan for other long-term care facilities facing a similar threat during the hurricane season.

  4. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 89-183-2101, Andrew Jackson Junior High School, Cross Lanes, West Virginia

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, L.J.; Baron, S.

    1991-02-01

    In response to a request submitted by teachers and the principal of the Andrew Jackson Junior High School (SIC-8211) in Cross Lanes, West Virginia, an evaluation was undertaken of possible hazardous conditions at the site. The symptoms experienced by the teachers included numbness and tingling of the extremities, upper airway irritation, eye irritation, inability to concentrate, and comfort complaints of too hot and too cold. The single story school building was constructed as an open space classroom configuration. It was heated, cooled and ventilated by nine individual roof mounted air handling units with ducted air supply. The false ceiling space served as the return air duct to the system. During 1981 to 1983 this open space was converted to approximately 30 classroom areas by erecting walls. The heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems were modified only by adding a false ceiling return air plenum to accommodate the space conversion. The school had been treated for termite infestation by sub slab injection of chlordane (57749) and direct in room application of chlorpyrifos (2921882) (Dursban) and Diazinon (333415). Fluorescent light ballast burn outs over several years introduced Aroclor-1254 (11097691) into the building which was not effectively removed by the ventilation system. Several class rooms also registered too high for carbon-dioxide (124389) concentration, temperature and humidity levels. Recommendations were made to reduce the exposure potential to chlordane and Aroclor-1254, improve the ventilation of the classrooms, and improve the indoor air quality of the school.

  5. Environmental Assessment for the Expansion and Consolidation of the Base Exchange at Joint Base Andrews-Naval Air Facility Washington, Prince George’s County, Maryland

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    fine sand, silt, and clay of marine origin estimated to be up to 80 feet in thickness. Other Coastal Plain deposits underlie the Calvert Formation...that upland deposits of non-hydric soils are predominant within the swale and suggest that the existing wetland areas were more a result of the...Contracts (Andrews AFB 2009), the Asbestos Management Program Plan (AFDW 2008), and the Lead-based Paint Management Plan (AFDW 2009b), which collectively

  6. Effects of supplementing Erythrina brucei leaf as a substitute for cotton seed meal on growth performance and carcass characteristics of Sidama goats fed basal diet of natural grass hay.

    PubMed

    Yinnesu, Asmamaw; Nurfeta, Ajebu

    2012-03-01

    The replacement value of dried Erythrina brucei leaf for cotton seed meal (CSM) on growth performance and carcass characteristics was evaluated. Twenty-five yearling buck goats (15.8 ± 1.4 kg) were assigned into five treatments in a randomized complete block design: natural grass hay alone (T1) or supplemented with 100% CSM (T2), 67% CSM + 33% E. brucei (T3), 33% CSM + 67% E. brucei (T4), and 100% E. brucei (T5) on dry matter (DM) basis. Supplemented goats consumed more (P < 0.05) total DM and organic matter (OM) than the non-supplemented group, but the intakes were not influenced (P > 0.05) by the proportion of the supplements. The highest (P < 0.05) crude protein (CP) intake was observed in goats supplemented with CSM alone, whereas the lowest intake was observed in the non-supplemented group. Total CP intake decreased (P < 0.05) with increasing levels of E. brucei in the supplement mixture. The supplemented goats gained more (P < 0.05) weight than the control group. Apparent DM and OM digestibility was higher (P < 0.05) in supplemented goats than in the non-supplemented ones, but similar (P > 0.05) among the supplemented group. The digestibility of CP was higher (P < 0.05) for supplemented goats, except in those goats fed E. brucei alone, than the non-supplemented group. Slaughter weight, empty body weight, hot carcass weight, dressing percentage, rib eye muscle area, and total edible offals were higher (P < 0.05) for supplemented goats than for the non-supplemented ones. It could be concluded that E. brucei could be used as a substitute to CSM under smallholder production systems.

  7. The anticancer potential of flavonoids isolated from the stem bark of Erythrina suberosa through induction of apoptosis and inhibition of STAT signaling pathway in human leukemia HL-60 cells.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sunil; Pathania, Anup Singh; Saxena, A K; Vishwakarma, R A; Ali, Asif; Bhushan, Shashi

    2013-09-25

    Erythrina suberosa is an ornamental tall tree found in India, Pakistan, Nepal, Bhutan, Burma, Thailand and Vietnam. We have isolated four known distinct metabolites designated as α-Hydroxyerysotrine, 4'-Methoxy licoflavanone (MLF), Alpinumisoflavone (AIF) and Wighteone. Among the four isolated metabolites the two flavonoids, MLF and AIF were found to be the most potent cytotoxic agent with IC50 of ∼20μM in human leukemia HL-60 cells. We are reporting first time the anticancer and apoptotic potential of MLF and AIF in HL-60 cells. Both MLF and AIF inhibited HL-60 cell proliferation and induce apoptosis as measured by several biological endpoints. MLF and AIF induce apoptosis bodies formation, enhanced annexinV-FITC binding of the cells, increased sub-G0 cell fraction, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm), release of cytochrome c, Bax, activation of caspase-9, caspase-3 and PARP (poly ADP Ribose polymers) cleavage in HL-60 cells. MLF and AIF also increase the expression of apical death receptor, Fas, with inhibition of anti-apoptotic protein Bid. All the above parameters revealed that these two flavonoids induce apoptosis through both extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways in HL-60 cells. In spite of apoptosis, these two flavonoids significantly inhibit nuclear transcription factor NF-κB and STAT (Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription) signaling pathway, which are highly expressed in leukemia. The present study provide an insight of molecular mechanism of cell death induced by MLF and AIF in HL-60 cells which may be useful in managing and treating leukemia.

  8. Nomina nova in Platyhelminthes pro Macrorhynchus von Graff, 1882 (non [Gmelin, 1801]; non Dunker, 1843), and Leptocleidus Mueller, 1936 (non Andrews, 1922).

    PubMed

    Hornung, Jahn J

    2016-08-19

    Two genus-group names of flat-worms-Leptocleidus Mueller, 1936 and Macrorhynchus von Graff, 1882-are junior homonyms that are preoccupied by fossil diapsid reptile genera-Leptocleidus Andrews, 1922, and Macrorhynchus Dunker, 1843-and an extant teleost fish genus-Macrorhynchus [Gmelin, 1801] ex La Cépède, 1800. These are replaced by nomina nova (Pharyngodytes nom. nov.; Graffiellus nom. nov.). Macrorhynchus [Gmelin, 1801] is an objective senior synonym of Macrorhyncus Dumeríl, 1805 ex La Cépède, 1800 (syn. nov.), and a senior homonym of Macrorhynchus Dunker, 1843, and Macrorhynchus von Graff, 1882.

  9. Enrico Fermi Awards Ceremony for Dr. Allen J. Bard and Dr. Andrew Sessler, February 2014 (Presentations, including remarks by Energy Secretary, Dr. Ernest Moniz)

    SciTech Connect

    Moniz, Ernest

    2014-02-03

    The Fermi Award is a Presidential award and is one of the oldest and most prestigious science and technology honors bestowed by the U.S. Government. On February 3, 2014 it was conferred upon two exceptional scientists. The first to be recognized is Dr. Allen J. Bard, 'for international leadership in electrochemical science and technology, for advances in photoelectrochemistry and photocatalytic materials, processes, and devices, and for discovery and development of electrochemical methods including electrogenerated chemiluminescence and scanning electrochemical microscopy.' The other honoree is Dr. Andrew Sessler, 'for advancing accelerators as powerful tools of scientific discovery, for visionary direction of the research enterprise focused on challenges in energy and the environment, and for championing outreach and freedom of scientific inquiry worldwide.' Dr. Patricia Dehmer opened the ceremony, and Dr. Ernest Moniz presented the awards.

  10. Book Review: Maxwell's Demon 2: Entropy, classical and quantum information, computing. Harvey Leff and Andrew Rex (Eds.); Institute of Physics, Bristol, 2003, 500pp., US 55, ISBN 0750307595

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shenker, Orly R.

    2004-09-01

    In 1867, James Clerk Maxwell proposed a perpetuum mobile of the second kind, that is, a counter example for the Second Law of thermodynamics, which came to be known as "Maxwell's Demon." Unlike any other perpetual motion machine, this one escaped attempts by the best scientists and philosophers to show that the Second Law or its statistical mechanical counterparts are universal after all. "Maxwell's demon lives on. After more than 130 years of uncertain life and at least two pronouncements of death, this fanciful character seems more vibrant than ever." These words of Harvey Leff and Andrew Rex (1990), which open their introduction to Maxwell's Demon 2: Entropy, Classical and Quantum Information, Computing (hereafter MD2) are very true: the Demon is as challenging and as intriguing as ever, and forces us to think and rethink about the foundations of thermodynamics and of statistical mechanics.

  11. Enrico Fermi Awards Ceremony for Dr. Allen J. Bard and Dr. Andrew Sessler, February 2014 (Presentations, including remarks by Energy Secretary, Dr. Ernest Moniz)

    ScienceCinema

    Moniz, Ernest [U.S. Energy Secretary

    2016-07-12

    The Fermi Award is a Presidential award and is one of the oldest and most prestigious science and technology honors bestowed by the U.S. Government. On February 3, 2014 it was conferred upon two exceptional scientists. The first to be recognized is Dr. Allen J. Bard, 'for international leadership in electrochemical science and technology, for advances in photoelectrochemistry and photocatalytic materials, processes, and devices, and for discovery and development of electrochemical methods including electrogenerated chemiluminescence and scanning electrochemical microscopy.' The other honoree is Dr. Andrew Sessler, 'for advancing accelerators as powerful tools of scientific discovery, for visionary direction of the research enterprise focused on challenges in energy and the environment, and for championing outreach and freedom of scientific inquiry worldwide.' Dr. Patricia Dehmer opened the ceremony, and Dr. Ernest Moniz presented the awards.

  12. A survey of culturable aerobic and anaerobic marine bacteria in de novo biofilm formation on natural substrates in St. Andrews Bay, Scotland.

    PubMed

    Finnegan, Lucy; Garcia-Melgares, Manuel; Gmerek, Tomasz; Huddleston, W Ryan; Palmer, Alexander; Robertson, Andrew; Shapiro, Sarah; Unkles, Shiela E

    2011-10-01

    This study reports a novel study of marine biofilm formation comprising aerobic and anaerobic bacteria. Samples of quartz and feldspar, minerals commonly found on the earth, were suspended 5 m deep in the North Sea off the east coast of St. Andrews, Scotland for 5 weeks. The assemblage of organisms attached to these stones was cultivated under aerobic and anaerobic conditions in the laboratory. Bacteria isolated on Marine Agar 2216 were all Gram-negative and identified to genus level by sequencing the gene encoding 16S rRNA. Colwellia, Maribacter, Pseudoaltermonas and Shewanella were observed in aerobically-grown cultures while Vibrio was found to be present in both aerobic and anaerobic cultures. The obligate anaerobic bacterium Psychrilyobacter atlanticus, a recently defined genus, was identified as a close relative of isolates grown anaerobically. The results provide valuable information as to the main players that attach and form de novo biofilms on common minerals in sea water.

  13. Summary of the watershed-landscape analysis workshop: h. j. andrews experimental forest. Held in Blue River, Oregon on February 2-4, 1994. Forest Service general technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, G.; McCain, C.; Cissel, J.

    1994-08-01

    The document summarizes the results of the watershed and landscape analysis workshop held at the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest in February 1994. Five examples of watershed analyses conducted on public and private lands in the Pacific Northwest are described and critiqued, and future direction for watershed analysis on Federal lands is discussed.

  14. An Analysis and Comparison of Two Short Writings: "Inaugural Address at the University of St. Andrew's" by J.S. Mill and "The University of Utopia" by R.M. Hutchins, Based on Five Criteria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poirier, Jeannine M.

    Focusing on the concept of education for work vs. education for living, the author presents a comparative analysis of two works on liberal education, each of which was originally delivered orally to university students: "The Inaugural Address at the University of St. Andrew" by John Stuart Mill and "The University of Utopia" by…

  15. Following “the Roots” of Kratom (Mitragyna speciosa): The Evolution of an Enhancer from a Traditional Use to Increase Work and Productivity in Southeast Asia to a Recreational Psychoactive Drug in Western Countries

    PubMed Central

    Cinosi, Eduardo; Martinotti, Giovanni; Simonato, Pierluigi; Singh, Darshan; Demetrovics, Zsolt; Roman-Urrestarazu, Andres; Bersani, Francesco Saverio; Vicknasingam, Balasingam; Piazzon, Giulia; Li, Jih-Heng; Yu, Wen-Jing; Kapitány-Fövény, Máté; Farkas, Judit; Di Giannantonio, Massimo; Corazza, Ornella

    2015-01-01

    The use of substances to enhance human abilities is a constant and cross-cultural feature in the evolution of humanity. Although much has changed over time, the availability on the Internet, often supported by misleading marketing strategies, has made their use even more likely and risky. This paper will explore the case of Mitragyna speciosa Korth. (kratom), a tropical tree used traditionally to combat fatigue and improve work productivity among farm populations in Southeast Asia, which has recently become popular as novel psychoactive substance in Western countries. Specifically, it (i) reviews the state of the art on kratom pharmacology and identification; (ii) provides a comprehensive overview of kratom use cross-culturally; (iii) explores the subjective experiences of users; (iv) identifies potential risks and side-effects related to its consumption. Finally, it concludes that the use of kratom is not negligible, especially for self-medication, and more clinical, pharmacological, and socioanthropological studies as well as a better international collaboration are needed to tackle this marginally explored phenomenon. PMID:26640804

  16. Antibiofilm efficacy of green synthesized graphene oxide-silver nanocomposite using Lagerstroemia speciosa floral extract: A comparative study on inhibition of gram-positive and gram-negative biofilms.

    PubMed

    Kulshrestha, Shatavari; Qayyum, Shariq; Khan, Asad U

    2017-02-01

    Biofilm architecture provides bacteria with enhanced antibiotic resistance, thus raising the need to search for alternative therapies that can inhibit the bacterial colonization. In the present study, we synthesized graphene oxide-silver nanocomposite (GO-Ag) by non-toxic and eco-friendly route using a floral extract of Legistromia speciosa (L.) Pers. The gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis of plant extract revealed the presence of compounds which can simultaneously act as reducing and capping agents. The sub-inhibitory concentrations of synthesized GO-Ag reduced the biofilm formation in both gram-negative (E. cloacae) and gram-positive (S. mutans) bacterial models. Growth curve assay, membrane integrity assay, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM) revealed different mechanisms of biofilm inhibition in E. cloacae and S. mutans. Moreover, quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) results suggested GO-Ag is acting on S. mutans biofilm formation cascade. Biofilm inhibitory concentrations GO-Ag were also found to be non-toxic against HEK-293 (human embryonic kidney cell line). The whole study highlights the therapeutic potential of GO-Ag to restrain the onset of biofilm formation in bacteria.

  17. Environmental Assessment for the Construction and Operation of a Battalion Headquarters for the U.S. Army Priority Air Transport at Joint Base Andrews-Naval Air Facility Washington, Prince George’s County, Maryland

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-01

    Wastewater Program, and Toxics/Asbestos Program. To learn more about each program click here. Polution Prevention Pollution Prevention The Air Force...PRIORITY AIR TRANSPORT AT JOINT BASE ANDREWS-NAVAL AIR FACILITY W ASillNGTON, MARYLAND INTRODUCTION The attached environmental assessment (EA) examines...the potential impacts on the environment from the Proposed Action to construct and operate a battalion headquarters for the U.S. Army Priority Air

  18. Spatial distribution and compositional variation of APS minerals related to uranium deposits in the Kiggavik-Andrew Lake structural trend, Nunavut, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riegler, Thomas; Quirt, Dave; Beaufort, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    The Kiggavik-Andrew Lake structural trend consists of four mineralized zones, partially outcropping, lying 2 km south of the erosional contact with the unmetamorphosed sandstone and basal conglomerates of the Paleoproterozoic Thelon Formation. The mineralization is controlled by a major E-W fault system associated with illite and sudoite alteration halos developed in the Archean metagraywackes of the Woodburn Lake Group. Aluminum phosphate sulfate (APS) minerals from the alunite group crystallized in association with the clay minerals in the basement alteration halo as well as in the overlying sandstones, which underwent mostly diagenesis. APS minerals are Sr- and S-rich (svanbergite end-member) in the sedimentary cover overlying the unconformity, whereas they are light rare earth elements (LREE)-rich (florencite end-member) in the altered basement rocks below the unconformity. The geochemical signature of each group of APS minerals together with the petrography indicates three distinct generations of APS minerals related to the following: (1) paleoweathering of continental surfaces prior to the basin occurrence, (2) diagenetic processes during the burial history of the lower unit of the Thelon sandstones, and (3) hydrothermal alteration processes which accompanied the uranium deposition in the basement rocks and partially overlap the sedimentary-diagenetic mineral parageneses. In addition, the association of a first generation of APS minerals with both detrital cerium oxide and aluminum oxy-hydroxide highlights the fact that a part of the detrital material of the basal Thelon Formation originated from eroded paleolaterite (allochthonous regolith). The primary rare earth element (REE)-bearing minerals (e.g., monazite, REE carbonates, and allanite) of the host rocks were characterized to identify the potential sources of REE. The REE chemical composition highlights a local re-incorporation of the REE released from the alteration processes in the APS minerals of

  19. Computer Modeling of Hydrology, Weathering, and Isotopic Fractionation in Andrews Creek, Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado for Water Years 1992 through 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, R. M. T.; Parkhurst, D. L.; Mast, A.; Clow, D. W.

    2014-12-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) Water, Energy, and Biogeochemical Model (WEBMOD) was used to simulate hydrology, weathering, and isotopic fractionation in the 1.7 square kilometer Andrews Creek alpine watershed. WEBMOD includes hydrologic modules derived from the USGS Precipitation Runoff Modeling System, the National Weather Service Hydro-17 snow model, and TOPMODEL. PHREEQC, a geochemical reaction model, is coupled with the hydrologic model to simulate the geochemical evolution of waters as they evaporate, mix, and react within the landscape. Major solute concentrations and δ18O were modeled over the period 1992-2012. Variations of chloride and inorganic nitrogen respond almost entirely to variations in atmospheric deposition and preferential elution of snowpack. Both evaporation and melting result in isotopic enrichment of heavy isotopes in the residual snowpack throughout the summer. Magnesium and potassium, derived mostly from weathering with some atmospheric inputs, vary seasonally with uptake during the growing season and release during the fall and winter. The weathering of granitic minerals—oligoclase, biotite, chlorite, pyrite, calcite, and formation of secondary minerals—kaolinite, goethite, gibbsite, and smectite-illite—were selected as primary reactions based on mole-balance modeling of basin outflows. The rates of these reactions were quantified by calibrating WEBMOD to match observed concentrations and loads. Exported annual loads of most weathering products are highly correlated with discharge, whereas silica loads are less correlated with discharge, suggesting a source that is more active during dry years and less active during wet years. Potential sources include net dissolution of kaolinite and smectite-illite or mineralization of colloids with high silica content. WEBMOD is a valuable tool for simulating water quality variations in response to climate change, acid mine drainage, acid rain, biological transformations, and other

  20. Interview with Andrew C. Kadak

    SciTech Connect

    Schabes, D.

    1996-01-01

    This article is an interview with the president and Chief Executive Officer of the Yankee Atomic Electric Company about a wide variety of aspects of the decommissioning of the Yankee Nuclear Power plant. Included are discussions of political aspects, decommissioning schedules, local impacts, technical issues of decommissioning, personnel management during decommissioning, etc.

  1. Spatial and Temporal Trends in the Carbon, Nitrogen, and Sulfur Isotopes of Stream DOM From 10 Watersheds at the HJ Andrews Experimental Forest.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frentress, J.; Kendall, C.; Lajtha, K.; Jones, J.

    2008-12-01

    In order to better understand sources of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in streams from the small to large watershed scales, we initiated a one-year investigation of the chemical and isotopic characteristics of DOM at the HJ Andrews Experimental Forest (HJA) in Blue River, OR. DOM is a biologically significant loss from these watersheds, but its sources (forest floor, mineral soil, riparian zones, stream biota) are debated. Traditional chemical characterizations of DOM like SUVA and FI have been useful in conceptualizing and modeling streamflow sources, however, an improved method for assessing DOM quality is needed to adequately differentiate DOM from sources within the watershed. The isotopic characterization of inorganic molecules like nitrate has provided insight to the role of subsurface and surface processes governing the production and transport of critical nutrients, and yet to date, little work has been done to examine the usefulness of isotopic characterization of organically bound nutrients. We apply the isotopic characterization approach to DOM in order to better understand DOM production, transformation, and transport to streams in a range of watershed sizes. Major questions addressed in this research are: 1) Where in the watershed does stream DOM come from? 2) How do DOM sources vary temporally? 3) How do physical attributes of the watershed mediate DOM quality? A relatively new solid-phase extraction technique using C-18 resin was used to isolate DOM in water samples from 10 watersheds, ranging in size from 10 to 6200 hectares, on 3-week intervals from May 2007 to June 2008. The modified technique allowed for small (1 Liter) sample sizes and short processing times to reduce the costs of analysis. The capacity of carbon, nitrogen and sulfur isotopic characterizations of DOM, as well as traditional methods like SUVA and C:N, to predict physical watershed attributes (i.e. mean residence time, soil depth, elevation, gradient) and land use history (timber

  2. Deep versus shallow melt stagnation in an ultra-slow / ultra-cold ridge segment: the Andrew Bain southern RTI (SWIR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paganelli, E.; Brunelli, D.; Seyler, M.; Bonatti, E.; Cipriani, A.; Ligi, M.

    2011-12-01

    The Andrew Bain Fracture Zone (ABFZ) represents one of the largest transform faults in the ridge system spanning 750 km in length with a characteristic lens-shape structure. The southern Ridge-Transform Intersection represents the deepest sector of the whole South West Indian Ridge system. During the Italian-Russian expedition S23-AB06, the seafloor in the Southern Ridge Transform Intersection (RTI) has been sampled recovering only ultramafic material in the majority of the dredging sites. The sampled spinel and plagioclase peridotites show hybrid textures, characterized either by deep spinel-field impregnation assemblages (sp+cpx±opx±ol) or by plagioclase-field equilibrated patches and mineral trails (pl+cpx±ol) marked by both crystallization of newly formed plagioclase-field equilibrated trails and formation of plagioclase coronas around spinel. The ones collected from ridge axis show also late gabbroic pockets and veins, variably enriched in clinopyroxene. Overall textures account for important melt percolation/stagnation events occurred in the plagioclase and spinel field. Major and trace element distribution in pyroxenes and spinels from spinel-bearing peridotites overall follow a general melting trend accompanied by a progressive re-equilibration to lower P/T facies at all scales. However, only few samples can be linked to near fractional melting, while the majority of them shows REE pattern and trace element concentrations that cannot be reproduced by fractional melting process. Open-system melting (OSM) better reproduces measured REE patterns. Modeling melting in an open system scenario requires high residual porosity to be accounted for along with generally enriched melts to influx the melting parcel at depth. Melting at high residual porosity suggests a near-batch regime in which enriched melts stagnate in the spinel field. Inhibition of melt segregation during melt/rock interaction asks for a permeability barrier to develop in the region where the

  3. Physiology and Anatomy for Nurses and Healthcare Practitioners: A Homeostatic Approach - Third edition Clancy John McVicar Andrew J Physiology and Anatomy for Nurses and Healthcare Practitioners: A Homeostatic Approach - Third edition 768pp Hodder Arnold 9780340967591 0340967595 [Formula: see text].

    PubMed

    2010-02-10

    John Clancy and Andrew McVicar give a fascinating insight into the homeostatic mechanism for health. The content focuses on the body's adaptive responses in health and the maladaptive processes in ill-health. In turn, these processes are linked to the knowledge required by healthcare professionals in restoring health or enhancing the quality of life until death.

  4. Populations of Erythrina velutina Willd. at risk of extinction.

    PubMed

    Melo, M F V; Gonçalves, L O; Rabbani, A R C; Álvares-Carvalho, S V; Pinheiro, J B; Zucchi, M I; Silva-Mann, R

    2015-08-28

    The goal of this study was to characterize the structure of two natural populations of the coral tree using RAPD and ISSR markers. The study evaluated all individuals in two different areas in the northeastern region of Brazil: the first was in the riparian area, 10 km x 100 m along the edge of the lower São Francisco River, and the second was in the municipality of Pinhão, in a semiarid region between the municipalities of Neópolis and Santana do São Francisco. We used all the coral trees present in those two areas (37 individuals). The results of the RAPD and ISSR markers were highly congruent, supporting the reliability of the techniques used. Similarity was estimated using the Jaccard arithmetic complement index. A dendrogram was constructed using the unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean cluster algorithm, and the robustness of the data was bootstrapped with 5000 replicates. A principal coordinate analysis was performed on the basis of Jaccard coefficients. The total genetic variation observed was 21%, corresponding to the variation between the populations, and 79% of the variation was observed within the populations.

  5. A comparison of mercury burdens between St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge and St. Andrew Bay, Florida: Evaluation of fish body burdens and physiological responses in largemouth bass, spotted seatrout, striped mullet, and sunfish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huge, D.H.; Rauschenberger, R.H.; Wieser, F.M.; Hemming, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Musculature from the dorsal region of 130 largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides), 140 sunfish (Lepomis sp.), 41 spotted seatrout (Cynoscion nebulosus) and 67 striped mullet (Mugil cephalus) were collected from five estuarine and five freshwater sites within the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge and two estuarine and two freshwater sites from St. Andrew Bay, Florida, United States of America. Musculature was analyzed for total mercury content, sagittal otoliths were removed for age determination and physiological responses were measured. Largemouth bass and sunfish from the refuge had higher mercury concentrations in musculature than those from the bay. Male spotted seatrout, male striped mullet, male and female sunfish and female largemouth bass had mercury burdens positively correlated with length. The majority of all four species of fish from both study areas contained mercury levels below 1.5 part per million, the limit for safe consumption recommended the Florida Department of Health. In comparison, a significant percentage of largemouth bass and sunfish from several sampled sites, most notably Otter Lake and Lake Renfroe within St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge, had mercury levels consistent with the health department's guidelines of 'limited consumption' or 'no consumption guidelines.'

  6. Sir Henry Solomon Wellcome and Dr Andrew Balfour: an enterprise on the Nile and the early foundation of public health and medical research in the Sudan (1899-1935).

    PubMed

    Elhadd, T A

    2015-01-01

    In Sudan, modern medical practice and medical research began soon after the creation of Anglo-Egyptian Sudan at the turn of the 20th century. The benevolent involvement of Sir Henry Solomon Wellcome, and the ingenious feat of his protégé Sir Andrew Balfour, was crucial to the strong foundation of that establishment. Sir Henry Wellcome provided the financial sponsorship plus influential, logistical and moral support. Dr Balfour put great energy into making the enterprise one of the most amazing medical achievements in colonial medicine. Improvement in the public health of the capital Khartoum was emulated by other doctors working in this vast country. Research was not restricted to tropical medicine; it also encompassed agricultural and chemical research. This helped with the establishment of the first modern medical school in the country in 1924 and resulted in the medical service in Sudan being described as one of the best in the world. Many British doctors flocked to Sudan to make a fortune and to set a path for their career back in Britain.

  7. Erythrocytosis in a child due to Hb Andrew-Minneapolis [β144(HC1)Lys→Asn (AAG>AAT or AAC)] associated with a Spanish (δβ)(0)-thalassemia.

    PubMed

    Ropero, Paloma; González, Fernando A; Cela, Elena; Beléndez, Cristina; Pérez, Beatriz; Seri, Cristina; Fontanes, Emilia; Villegas, Ana; Díaz-Mediavilla, Joaquin

    2013-01-01

    We report a rare association of δβ-thalassemia (δβ-thal) and a hemoglobin (Hb) variant with high oxygen affinity in a Spanish newborn. The proband had no Hb A and showed microcytosis and hypochromia; the peripheral blood smear was compatible with a thalassemia trait. Molecular studies revealed that the proband had a Spanish (δβ)(0)-thal (inherited from his father) and also carried a de novo variant (Hb Andrew-Minneapolis) because from the point of hematology, his mother was quite normal. The hemoglobinopathies with high affinity for oxygen constitute an infrequent cause of secondary congenital erythrocytosis. The degree of erythrocytosis and the resulting clinical manifestations are highly variable, depending on the degree of altered oxygen affinity and the presence of thalassemic genes. Thus, when these variants are associated with β(0)- or δβ-thal, as in our case, the proportion of abnormal Hb is ∼100.0%, which may cause polycythemia, hyperviscosity, and iron deficiency. This type of association is very rare and few have been described, especially in children, as they would normally be detected in adults as the increased packed cell volume (PCV) also increases blood viscosity and causes the typical symptoms (cephalalgia, drowsiness, dizziness). The association of a high oxygen affinity Hb and a δβ-thal presents a greater degree of erythrocytosis than when this same variant is associated with a β(0)-thal, mainly because the Hb F percentage is usually greater in the δβ-thal, and Hb F normally shows a greater affinity for oxygen and a reduced P(50), although one must always take into account the degree of oxygen affinity of the Hb variant. Familial erythrocytosis and an abnormal electrophoresis finding are indicative of a high affinity Hb. However, the absence of these findings does not reject the possibility of hemoglobinopathies, and in these cases, functional and molecular studies would be justified and should be mandatory for the differential

  8. The Future of the Andrew File System

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    The talk will discuss the ten operational capabilities that have made AFS unique in the distributed file system space and how these capabilities are being expanded upon to meet the needs of the 21st century. Derrick Brashear and Jeffrey Altman will present a technical road map of new features and technical innovations that are under development by the OpenAFS community and Your File System, Inc. funded by a U.S. Department of Energy Small Business Innovative Research grant. The talk will end with a comparison of AFS to its modern days competitors.

  9. Hispanos en la EPA: Andrew Almodovar

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    La diversidad de la fuerza laboral es importante para la Agencia de Protección Ambiental de EE.UU. (EPA, por sus siglas en inglés). Los empleados hispanos de la EPA contribuyen diariamente hacia la protección de la salud y el medio ambiente.

  10. Wireless Andrew: Everywhere You Want To Be.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Futhey, Tracy

    2000-01-01

    Describes the wireless local area network at Carnegie Mellon University. Highlights include classroom applications, particularly in the Business School; the use of laptop computers configured with wireless technology; handheld computers, including use for testing; and assuring appropriate uses of wireless technology. (LRW)

  11. Millikan, Robert Andrews (1868-1953)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Physicist, born in Morrison, IL, Nobel prizewinner (1923) for his determination of the charge on the electron by Millikan's oil-drop experiment, and confirmation of Einstein's quantum photoelectric theory. Coined the term `cosmic rays'....

  12. Parameters affecting the early seedling development of four neotropical trees under oxygen deprivation stress.

    PubMed

    Kolb, Rosana Marta; Rawyler, André; Braendle, Roland

    2002-05-01

    Some of the parameters that determine flooding resistance-and consequently habitat zonation-were investigated in four neotropical trees (Schizolobium parahyba, Sebastiania commersoniana, Erythrina speciosa and Sesbania virgata). The constitutive parameters of seeds (size, nature and amount of reserves) only partly influenced resistance to flooding, mainly through a high carbohydrate : size ratio. Parameters describing metabolic efficiency under stress conditions were more important. Among them, fermentation capacity and levels of ATP and of total adenylates played a key role. The highest resistance to anoxia was associated with increased availability of free sugars, elevated alcohol dehydrogenase activity and corresponding mRNA levels, more efficient removal of ethanol and lactate, and higher adenylate levels. Finally, as a lethal consequence of energy shortage, free fatty acids were released on a massive scale in the flooding-sensitive species Schizolobium parahyba, whereas lipid hydrolysis did not occur in the most resistant species Sesbania virgata.

  13. Dormancy as exaptation to protect mimetic seeds against deterioration before dispersal

    PubMed Central

    Brancalion, Pedro H. S.; Novembre, Ana D. L. C.; Rodrigues, Ricardo R.; Marcos Filho, Júlio

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims Mimetic seeds simulate the appearance of fleshy fruits and arilled seeds without producing nutritive tissues as a reward for seed dispersers. In this strategy of seed dispersal, seeds may remain attached to the mother plant for long periods after maturity, increasing their availability to naïve seed dispersers. The hypothesis that seed coat impermeability in many tropical Fabaceae with mimetic seeds serves as an exaptation to protect the seeds from deterioration and rotting while awaiting dispersal was investigated. Methods Seed coat impermeability was evaluated in five mimetic-seeded species of tropical Fabaceae in south-eastern Brazil (Abarema langsdorffii, Abrus precatorius, Adenanthera pavonina, Erythrina velutina and Ormosia arborea) and in Erythrina speciosa, a ‘basal’ species in its genus, which has monochromatic brown seeds and no mimetic displays. Seed hardness was evaluated as a defence against accelerated ageing (humid chamber at 41 °C for 144 h). Seed development and physiological potential of O. arborea was evaluated and the effect of holding mature seeds in pods on the mother plant in the field for a period of 1 year under humid tropical conditions was compared with seeds stored under controlled conditions (15 °C and 40 % relative air humidity). Key Results All five mimetic-seeded species, and E. speciosa, showed strong coat impermeability, which protected the seeds against deterioration in accelerated ageing. Most O. arborea seeds only became dormant 2 months after pod dehiscence. Germination of seeds after 1 year on the plant in a humid tropical climate was 56 %, compared with 80 % for seeds stored in controlled conditions (15 °C, 45 % relative humidity). Seedling shoot length after 1 year did not differ between seed sources. Conclusions Dormancy acts in mimetic-seeded species as an exaptation to reduce seed deterioration, allowing an increase in their effective dispersal period and mitigating the losses incurred by low

  14. A cockspur for the DSS cells: Erythrina crista-galli sensitizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enciso, Paula; Decoppet, Jean-David; Grätzel, Michael; Wörner, Michael; Cabrerizo, Franco M.; Cerdá, María Fernanda

    2017-04-01

    Dye sensitized solar cells were assembled employing a mixture of anthocyanins extracted from red ceibo's flowers. At the literature different extraction procedures are reported to extract anthocyanins from natural products and sensitize the cells. In order to compare them, different methods were followed to set the cells under the same conditions. Assembled cells showed very interesting conversion efficiency values, reaching a 0.73% value for extracts purified using C18 column, in open cells under illumination using a solar light simulator, 1 sun, 1.5 AM. Data reported herein prove that anthocyanins obtained from ceibo's flower, after simple further purification, might represent an excellent, cheap and clean alternative for the development of DSS cells.

  15. A cockspur for the DSS cells: Erythrina crista-galli sensitizers.

    PubMed

    Enciso, Paula; Decoppet, Jean-David; Grätzel, Michael; Wörner, Michael; Cabrerizo, Franco M; Cerdá, María Fernanda

    2017-04-05

    Dye sensitized solar cells were assembled employing a mixture of anthocyanins extracted from red ceibo's flowers. At the literature different extraction procedures are reported to extract anthocyanins from natural products and sensitize the cells. In order to compare them, different methods were followed to set the cells under the same conditions. Assembled cells showed very interesting conversion efficiency values, reaching a 0.73% value for extracts purified using C18 column, in open cells under illumination using a solar light simulator, 1 sun, 1.5 AM. Data reported herein prove that anthocyanins obtained from ceibo's flower, after simple further purification, might represent an excellent, cheap and clean alternative for the development of DSS cells.

  16. General Christopher C. Andrews: Leading the Minnesota Forestry Revolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Anna M.

    2002-01-01

    In the nineteenth century, America's burgeoning population certainly did grab all the timber it could. Vast pine forests stretched from Maine to Dakota, and the lumber industry voraciously consumed them from east to west. In 1800, the Minnesota territory was sparsely sprinkled with fur traders and American Indians. By 1850, its bounteous forests…

  17. A resolution honoring the life of Andrew Wyeth.

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Sen. Casey, Robert P., Jr. [D-PA

    2009-01-27

    01/27/2009 Submitted in the Senate, considered, and agreed to without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (consideration: CR S946-947; text as passed Senate: CR S947; text of measure as introduced: CR S899-900) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  18. Installation Restoration Program. Phase 1. Records Search Andrews AFB. Maryland

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-06-01

    tS PNIISCATA- WAYN of growth include grasses, shrubs and mature deciduous trees including beech, oak and gum. Small stands of Virginia pine occur...Division 208 Carroll Building 8600 LaSalle Road Towson , MD 21204 301/828-1 535 RCRA Enforcement Section Vickie Province, Compliance US Environmental

  19. Subterranean termites in urban forestry: tree preference and management.

    PubMed

    Zorzenon, F J; Campos, A E C

    2015-04-01

    Urban tree deterioration is a common problem all over the world. Inappropriate plant species choice and inadequate planting may lead to micro and macro organism attacks, such as pests and diseases. Subterranean termite damage is common and may promote tree falls. In order to help urban forestry planning, this work was carried out for 9 years on 1477 street trees in a neighborhood in the city of São Paulo, Brazil. Plants were identified to species, grouped as native, exotic plants, and palm trees, and their measures of circumference at breast height (CBH) were taken, in order to evaluate if subterranean termite damages are related to tree size and plant group. Four subterranean termite species were identified infesting up to 27% of the plants, with Coptotermes gestroi (Wasmann) being the most common. Palm trees were not damaged by subterranean termites, while native plants are the most susceptible, especially Caesalpinia pluviosa var. peltophoroides (Fabaceae). Among the native plants monitored C. pluviosa var. peltophoroides, Caesalpinia ferrea var. leiostachya, Erythrina speciosa, Piptadenia gonoacantha (Fabaceae), Gochnatia polymorpha (Asteraceae), Tibouchina granulosa (Melastomataceae), and Handroanthus spp. (Bignoniaceae), the latter was the least damaged. Exotic plants were also susceptible with the exception of Lagerstroemia indica (Lythraceae) and Platanus acerifolia (Platanaceae). Correlation analysis showed that the higher the CBH value, the higher the percentage of internal damage by C. gestroi. Infested trees were treated with imidacloprid and thiamethoxam, and subterranean termites were effectively controlled during the 9-year study.

  20. Screening of some plants used in the Brazilian folk medicine for the treatment of infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Holetz, Fabíola Barbiéri; Pessini, Greisiele Lorena; Sanches, Neviton Rogério; Cortez, Diógenes Aparício Garcia; Nakamura, Celso Vataru; Filho, Benedito Prado Dias

    2002-10-01

    Extracts of 13 Brazilian medicinal plants were screened for their antimicrobial activity against bacteria and yeasts. Of these, 10 plant extracts showed varied levels of antibacterial activity. Piper regnellii presented a good activity against Staphylococus aureus and Bacillus subtilis, a moderate activity on Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and a weak activity against Escherichia coli. Punica granatum showed good activity on S. aureus and was inactive against the other standard strains. Eugenia uniflora presented moderate activity on both S. aureus and E. coli. Psidium guajava,Tanacetum vulgare, Arctium lappa, Mikania glomerata, Sambucus canadensis, Plantago major and Erythrina speciosa presented some degree of antibacterial activity. Spilanthes acmella, Lippia alba, and Achillea millefolium were considered inactive. Five of the plant extracts presented compounds with Rf values similar to the antibacterial compounds visible on bioautogram. Of these, three plants belong to the Asteraceae family. This may mean that the same compounds are responsible for the antibacterial activity in these plants. Anticandidal activity was detected in nine plant extracts (P. guajava, E. uniflora, P. granatum, A. lappa, T. vulgare, M. glomerata, L. alba, P. regnellii, and P. major). The results might explain the ethnobotanical use of the studied species for the treatment of various infectious diseases.

  1. 77 FR 59163 - Andrew Pickens Ranger District; South Carolina; AP Loblolly Pine Removal and Restoration Project

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-26

    ... sprouts and saplings are common in the understory. With a lack of disturbance, the understory is comprised...). Herbicide, manual and mechanical methods would be applied to sprouts/seedlings within 1-2 years after the... sprouts and seedlings of tree species to maintain the woodland condition. Mechanical treatments...

  2. Environmental Assessment of Replacing Building 5015 at Andrews Air Force Base, Maryland

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-09-01

    Federal Implementation Plan FONSI Finding of No Significant Impact FY fiscal year HAP hazardous air pollutant HSWA Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments IICEP...Recovery Act (RCRA), which was further amended by the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA), as any solid, liquid, contained gaseous, or semisolid

  3. Environmental Assessment of Consolidation Activities at Brandywine Receiver Site, Andrews Air Force Base, Maryland

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-09-01

    Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments IICEP Interagency and Intergovernmental Coordination for Environmental Planning INRMP Integrated Natural Resources... Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA), as any solid, liquid, contained gaseous, or semisolid waste, or any combination of wastes that poses a

  4. Additional dates of Sir Andrew Smith's Illustrations of the Zoology of South Africa.

    PubMed

    Low, Martyn E Y; Evenhuis, Neal L

    2014-05-14

    We update the collation of the dates of publication of Smith's Illustrations of the Zoology of South Africa provided by Waterhouse (1880) and Barnard (1950, 1952). In the case of nine parts, we are able to provide more accurate dates of publication (including day-dates for seven of these parts). For workers of invertebrate taxonomy, we provide an accurate date of publication for W. S. Macleay's volume on Annulosa. 

  5. A resolution honoring former Senator and Rear Admiral Jeremiah Andrew Denton, Jr.

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Sessions, Jeff [R-AL

    2014-03-31

    03/31/2014 Submitted in the Senate, considered, and agreed to without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (consideration: CR S1881; text as passed Senate: CR S1874) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  6. Environmental Assessment for Aerial Application of Pesticide for Gypsy Moth Control, Andrews Air Force Base, Maryland

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-01

    a cessation of feeding, and death by starvation. Btk is persistent on foliage for about 7-10 days. Btk formulations are available as flowable ...product for use in IPM programs. Mixing Instructions: Fill the spray tank with half the required amount of water. Begin agitation and add the required

  7. Environmental Assessment for the Upgrade of the Andrews Air Force Base Airfield Security System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-11-01

    Russian olive ( Elaeagnus angustifolia ), beggar-ticks (Bidens polylepis), tall fescue (Festuca elatior), purple loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria...wineberry (Rubus phoenicolasius), tree-of-heaven (Ailanthus altissima), oriental bittersweet (Celastrus orbiculatus), autumn olive ( Elaeagnus umbellata

  8. Casting Net Assessment: Andrew W. Marshall and the Epistemic Community of the Cold War

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    nickname of the diminutive sage for his soft voice and cryptic advice.”7 In contrast to this crude depiction, Marshall’s reputation is quietly... female worker was shot by her forlorn lover in an affair gone awry. On another occasion—when many erroneously assumed victory was inevitable in late...1944 during the heady days preceding the Battle of the Bulge—workers threw a debaucherous Christmas party that ended with a drunken female trying to

  9. Seizing Opportunities: Genie Tyburski--Ballard Spahr Andrews & Ingersoll, LLP, Philadelphia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library Journal, 2004

    2004-01-01

    Genie Tyburski did not set out to be a law librarian. When asked at Drexel's library school what kind of librarian she wanted to be, she was surprised that "a good one" was not one of the options. But six weeks into the semester, she landed a part-time cataloging job at Community Legal Services in Philadelphia; six months later she was…

  10. Detecting Outliers in Marathon Data by Means of the Andrews Plot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stehlík, Milan; Wald, Helmut; Bielik, Viktor; Petrovič, Juraj

    2011-09-01

    For an optimal race performance, it is important, that the runner keeps steady pace during most of the time of the competition. First time runners or athletes without many competitions often experience an "blow out" after a few kilometers of the race. This could happen, because of strong emotional experiences or low control of running intensity. Competition pace of half marathon of the middle level recreational athletes is approximately 10 sec quicker than their training pace. If an athlete runs the first third of race (7 km) at a pace that is 20 sec quicker than is his capacity (trainability), he would experience an "blow out" in the last third of the race. This would be reflected by reducing the running intensity and inability to keep steady pace in the last kilometers of the race and in the final time as well. In sports science, there are many diagnostic methods ([3], [2], [6]) that are used for prediction of optimal race pace tempo and final time. Otherwise there is lacking practical evidence of diagnostics methods and its use in the field (competition, race). One of the conditions that needs to be carried out is that athletes have not only similar final times, but it is important that they keep constant pace as much as possible during whole race. For this reason it is very important to find outliers. Our experimental group consisted of 20 recreational trained athletes (mean age 32,6 years±8,9). Before the race the athletes were instructed to run on the basis of their subjective feeling and previous experience. The data (running pace of each kilometer, average and maximal heart rate of each kilometer) were collected by GPS-enabled personal trainer Forerunner 305.

  11. 33 CFR 334.761 - Naval Support Activity Panama City; St. Andrews Bay; restricted areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) Area AP-1. The area is bounded by a line connecting the following coordinates (listed by latitude, then... Mariners and Broadcast Notice to Mariners. (3) Area AP-1. All persons, vessels, and other craft...

  12. 33 CFR 334.761 - Naval Support Activity Panama City; St. Andrews Bay; restricted areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) Area AP-1. The area is bounded by a line connecting the following coordinates (listed by latitude, then... Mariners and Broadcast Notice to Mariners. (3) Area AP-1. All persons, vessels, and other craft...

  13. 33 CFR 334.761 - Naval Support Activity Panama City; St. Andrews Bay; restricted areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) Area AP-1. The area is bounded by a line connecting the following coordinates (listed by latitude, then... Mariners and Broadcast Notice to Mariners. (3) Area AP-1. All persons, vessels, and other craft...

  14. 76 FR 57043 - Andrew N. Finkel; Analysis of Proposed Consent Order to Aid Public Comment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-15

    ... proposed order. This matter involves the advertising of a mobile software application (``app'') called Acne Pwner which respondent developed and sold in Google's Android Marketplace. Respondent claimed that Acne Pwner effectively treats acne. The instructions for this app directed consumers to hold the...

  15. Involvement of Colonizing Bacillus Isolates in Glucovanillin Hydrolysis during the Curing of Vanilla planifolia Andrews

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yonggan; Li, Jihua; He, Shuzhen; Xu, Fei; Fang, Yiming

    2015-01-01

    Vanilla beans were analyzed using biochemical methods, which revealed that glucovanillin disperses from the inner part to the outer part of the vanilla bean during the curing process and is simultaneously hydrolyzed by β-d-glucosidase. Enzymatic hydrolysis was found to occur on the surface of the vanilla beans. Transcripts of the β-d-glucosidase gene (bgl) of colonizing microorganisms were detected. The results directly indicate that colonizing microorganisms are involved in glucovanillin hydrolysis. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that the colonizing microorganisms mainly belonged to the Bacillus genus. bgl was detected in all the isolates and presented clustering similar to that of the isolate taxonomy. Furthermore, inoculation of green fluorescent protein-tagged isolates showed that the Bacillus isolates can colonize vanilla beans. Glucovanillin was metabolized as the sole source of carbon in a culture of the isolates within 24 h. These isolates presented unique glucovanillin degradation capabilities. Vanillin was the major volatile compound in the culture. Other compounds, such as α-cubebene, β-pinene, and guaiacol, were detected in some isolate cultures. Colonizing Bacillus isolates were found to hydrolyze glucovanillin in culture, indirectly demonstrating the involvement of colonizing Bacillus isolates in glucovanillin hydrolysis during the vanilla curing process. Based on these results, we conclude that colonizing Bacillus isolates produce β-d-glucosidase, which mediates glucovanillin hydrolysis and influences flavor formation. PMID:25979899

  16. 75 FR 10457 - Andrew Pickens Ranger District; South Carolina; AP Loblolly Pine Removal and Restoration Project

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-08

    ... restored to native hardwoods and pines and understory plants more typical of the Chattooga River and Blue... other desired non-native plants (including the federally endangered smooth coneflower, Echinacea... manual and mechanical treatment. Woodlands are forests with relatively low tree densities of...

  17. Sensibility Study of St Andrew Bay Rapid Response System for Naval Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    ballpoint pens , and print shops. 3. Exposure Effects Eating or drinking very large amounts of ethylene glycol can result in death, while large amounts...salinity does not correlate closely with variations of the tidal current, specifically away from the bay entrance. The salinity follows the net flows...A study based on 110 year record (1886-1996) of tropical storm entering the 330 km threat radius around Panama City with specific interest on

  18. Wind and Tiadal Effects on Chemical Spill in St Andrew Bay System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    ingredient in photographic developing solutions, hydraulic brake fluids and in inks used in stamp pads, ballpoint pens , and print shops. 59 5 / P.C...current, specifically away from the bay entrance. The salinity follows the net flows caused by wind driven currents and freshwater inflow events. At...More specifically , it is possible to see the swept area by a floating chemical, as well as the total, absorbed, dissolved and particulate

  19. Pre-Leonardian geology of Midland Farms field area, Andrews County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Mear, C.E.; Dufurrena, C.K.

    1984-01-01

    The Midland Farms (Ellenburger) oil field was discovered on September 16, 1952, with the completion of Anderson-Pritchard's 1 Fasken-24 well, drilled on an indicated single-fold seismic structure. The field produces from vuggy, fractured Ellenburger dolomite with up to 310 ft (94 m) of gross and net pay. The Midland Farms (Ellenburger) field is part of a larger structure which incorporates not only Midland Farms field, but Midland Farms, West (Devonian), Inez (Ellenburger), and parts of the Fasken (Penn) and Block 41 (Wolfcamp) fields. The structure is a complex, uplifted block composed of two doubly plunging, asymmetric anticlines bisected by at least one wrench-type fault and several normal faults. Penecontemporaneous leaching produced oomoldic porosity in the limestones. Ellenburger oil production was established in the Midland Farms area in September 1952, and has amounted to 61.6 million bbl oil and 28.5 bcf of gas from 91 wells to January 1983. Major Fusselman and Wolfcamp oil accumulations were discovered during development of the Ellenburger field. Fusselman oil was first produced in June 1953, and has totaled 10.1 million bbl of oil and 5 bcf of gas from 33 wells to January 1983. Wolfcamp production was established in January 1954 and totals 10.7 million bbl of oil and 1 bcf of gas from 39 wells. Total production from all zones including post-Leonard beds in the Midland Farms field area to date has been 210 million bbl of oil and 84 bcf of gas.

  20. Fascia Research Congress evidence from the 100 year perspective of Andrew Taylor Still.

    PubMed

    Findley, Thomas W; Shalwala, Mona

    2013-07-01

    More than 100 years ago A.T. Still MD founded osteopathic medicine, and specifically described fascia as a covering, with common origins of layers of the fascial system despite diverse names for individual parts. Fascia assists gliding and fluid flow and is highly innervated. Fascia is intimately involved with respiration and with nourishment of all cells of the body, including those of disease and cancer. This paper reviews information presented at the first three International Fascia Research Congresses in 2007, 2009 and 2012 from the perspective of Dr Still, that fascia is vital for organism's growth and support, and it is where disease is sown.

  1. Casting Net Assessment: Andrew W. Marshall and the Epistemic Community of the Cold War

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-01

    Halstead in Essex, England. Farmers, weavers, and cloth makers of English and Belgian descent populated the small town.10 Kitty, as she was...classes devoted to English , art, and the sciences remained stable while that of mathematics and foreign language classes declined; also, social...liability.15 Re- lationships continued to sour until May 1948, when, based on the legal counsel of wealthy San Francisco lawyer and MIT Radiation Lab

  2. A resolution electing Andrew B. Willison as the Sergeant at Arms and Doorkeeper of the Senate.

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Reid, Harry [D-NV

    2014-05-05

    05/05/2014 Submitted in the Senate, considered, and agreed to without amendment by Unanimous Consent. (consideration: CR S2625; text as passed Senate: CR S2649) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  3. 78 FR 78349 - Andrew Peklo III; Notice of Availability of Draft Environmental Assessment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-26

    ... http://www.ferc.gov/docs-filing/esubscription.asp to be notified via email of new filings and issuances....gov/docs-filing/efiling.asp . Commenters can submit brief comments up to 6,000 characters, without prior registration, using the eComment system at http://www.ferc.gov/docs-filing/ecomment.asp . You...

  4. San Andres dolomite reservoir, Emma field, Andrews County, Texas: Depositional facies and diagenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Ruppel, S.C. )

    1987-02-01

    Although nearly 100% (19 million bbl of oil) of the estimated recoverable oil in the Emma San Andres reservoir has been produced, indications are that as much as 15 million bbl of recoverable, movable oil remains. Detailed study of facies and diagenesis in the reservoir reveals considerable lateral and vertical variability, which has important implications for recovery and injection efficiencies in the field. The upper San Andres Formation in the Emma field comprises a shallowing-upward sequence of pervasively dolomitized, shallow-water subtidal to supratidal carbonates that accumulated on a gently east-sloping ramp. The lowermost part of the reservoir interval is composed of laterally extensive fusulinid packstone deposited in an open-marine ramp setting. Abruptly overlying this facies is a sequence of interbedded fusulinid/algal grainstone, formed in a migrating sand-shoal complex, and burrowed, skeletal mudstone deposited on a restricted inner ramp. The grainstone is restricted to the western and central parts of the field. These deposits are overlain by pisolitic and cryptalgal mudstones and terrigenous siliciclastics of supratidal origin. Anydrite is abundant throughout the section. Porosity and permeability are facies controlled. Highest permeabilities are developed in shoal complex grainstone (100 md) and in fusulinid packstone (925-50 md). Lateral and vertical facies variations resulted in considerable reservoir heterogeneity. Trace-element and isotope data indicate that most of the San Andres dolomite and associated sulfate (anhydrite) precipitated from downward-moving, seawater-derived brines during shallow burial in the late Guadalupian. Subsequent anhydrite dissolution has locally enhanced original porosity.

  5. Environmental Assessment, Managing Flight Obstructions to Preserve Safety at Andrews Air Force Base

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-12-01

    highbush blueberry ( Vaccinium corymbosa) and low growing trees such as American holly (Ilex opaca), eastern redbud (Cercis canadensis), and flowering...The shrub layer is composed mainly of acid-loving plants such as blueberries ( Vaccinium sp.), huckleberries (Gaylussacia sp.), mountain laurel (Kalmia...Cornus florida), eastern redbud (Cercis canadensis), blueberries ( Vaccinium sp.), and southern arrowwood (Viburnum dentatum). Tree removal would

  6. Andrews AFB, Washington DC Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO) Parts A-F.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-10-15

    8217 . Obs. me" me. of Now $ Wilk ’rompateteh Ra.. "Io. 0 F 32 -67F _73_ &$POP 93 F TeToi P Itn ~ 0.. P .2.. _ ___.._____m ,~r, GL..BAL CLIMATOLOGY BRANCH U...m. of Homes wIui Tompem.... Rai. Nwe. 5380 69 4614.64 93 sft P 322 -F- 57p .-732P cup .-F-92P- T-1e U, Dy 161b 31408014 5586 60. 7.5 9301 93 W.. 1.1b...25 25 25 2912111/23 25 2 II 9 6 -’ 21 . . :J 1" 3 260 ( > / 19 a * - 8 18 221 Elamen (X) U r Ne. Obs. MAb Ne. of Now @ wim Tem twuo($11 v 32eNu.S0 P

  7. Enhancing Pupils' Aspirations to University: The St Andrews Sutton Trust School Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lasselle, Laurence; Keir, Fraser; Smith, Ian

    2009-01-01

    The Sutton Trust Summer School offers to S5/Year 12 pupils the opportunity to sample student life for a week at one of five selecting universities in the UK. Most of the participants on the Sutton Trust Summer School will be the first generation in their family to attend university and have come from schools which traditionally send low numbers to…

  8. Detectives Nemorin and Andrews Anti-Gun Trafficking Act of 2013

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. King, Peter T. [R-NY-2

    2013-02-14

    04/08/2013 Referred to the Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism, Homeland Security, And Investigations. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  9. A wind-oriented sticky trap for evaluating the behavioural response of diabrotica speciosa (germar) to bitter cucurbit extracts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cucurbitacins attract many species of Luperini leaf beetles, for which they have been studied and applied in traps and toxic baits. Males and females feed avidly on these compounds, but field trials reveal that males are far more attracted to them than females. A wind oriented baited sticky trap was...

  10. Assessing the skill of hydrology models at simulating the water cycle in the HJ Andrews LTER: Assumptions, strengths and weaknesses

    EPA Science Inventory

    Simulated impacts of climate on hydrology can vary greatly as a function of the scale of the input data, model assumptions, and model structure. Four models are commonly used to simulate streamflow in model assumptions, and model structure. Four models are commonly used to simu...

  11. Installation Development Environmental Assessment at Joint Base Andrews-Naval Air Facility Washington Prince George’s County, Maryland

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    minimis thresholds Activity /source CO a NOx VOC SOx PM10 a PM2.5 De minimis threshold ( tpy ) b Exceeds de minimis thresholds? (yes/no) Construction and...unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT JBA proposes a program of targeted construction and demolition activities intended to improve its...proposed activities are  Construct a Helicopter Operations Facility.  Construct a new fitness center and demolish the West Fitness Center

  12. Final Environmental Assessment for FY07-11 BRAC Construction Requirements at Andrews Air Force Base, Maryland

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR( S ) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION...NAME( S ) AND ADDRESS(ES) Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC),8 421 St. John Industrial Drive, Suite 200,St. Louis,MO,63114 8...PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME( S ) AND ADDRESS(ES) 10. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM( S ) 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S

  13. Comparison of four kinds of extraction techniques and kinetics of microwave-assisted extraction of vanillin from Vanilla planifolia Andrews.

    PubMed

    Dong, Zhizhe; Gu, Fenglin; Xu, Fei; Wang, Qinghuang

    2014-04-15

    Vanillin yield, microscopic structure, antioxidant activity and overall odour of vanilla extracts obtained by different treatments were investigated. MAE showed the strongest extraction power, shortest time and highest antioxidant activity. Maceration gave higher vanillin yields than UAE and PAE, similar antioxidant activity with UAE, but longer times than UAE and PAE. Overall odour intensity of different vanilla extracts obtained by UAE, PAE and MAE were similar, while higher than maceration extracts. Then, powered vanilla bean with a sample/solvent ratio of 4 g/100 mL was selected as the optimum condition for MAE. Next, compared with other three equations, two-site kinetic equation with lowest RMSD and highest R²(adj) was shown to be more suitable in describing the kinetics of vanillin extraction. By fitting the parameters C(eq), k₁, k₂, and f, a kinetics model was constructed to describe vanillin extraction in terms of irradiation power, ethanol concentration, and extraction time.

  14. Precision Landing System Mathematical Modeling Study Report for Andrews Air Force Base, Runway 19L, Camp Springs, MD.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-11-01

    aircraft, and terrain. Results are provided as plots illustrating the predicted multipath levels, separation angles, and the resulting error plots from the...worst case contributors. Scenarios were modeled to determine the effects of the multipath sources in the modeled environment. These resulting errors ...were analyzed and compared to error tolerances (FAA-STD-022d) to determine if the errors are acceptable. The effects of the ADW environment were

  15. 78 FR 27126 - East Bay, St. Andrews Bay and the Gulf of Mexico at Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida; Restricted...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-09

    ... at Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida; Restricted Areas AGENCY: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, DoD... (Corps) is proposing to amend its regulations by revising an existing restricted area regulation and establishing six new restricted areas along the Tyndall Air Force Base (AFB) facility shoreline. Tyndall AFB...

  16. 77 FR 15600 - Special Local Regulation; Emerald Coast Super Boat Grand Prix; Saint Andrew Bay; Panama City, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-16

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 RIN 1625-AA08 Special Local Regulation; Emerald Coast Super Boat Grand... crews, vessels, and persons on navigable waters during the Emerald Coast Super Boat Grand Prix high... the Emerald Coast Super Boat Grand Prix high speed boat races. Basis and Purpose On January 31,...

  17. Relationship of Ordovician and Silurian reservoir development to unconformities at Midland farms and Inez fields, Andrews County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Mear, C.E.; Becher, J.W.

    1986-03-01

    Hydrocarbons are being produced at Midland Farms and Inez fields from Ellenburger dolomites and Fusselman limestones. Reservoirs developed there during Ordovician and Silurian periods of minor folding and faulting, followed by regional uplift and subaerial exposure of the carbonates. Vuggy, cavernous, and solution-enlarged fracture porosity was developed in the Lower Ordovician Ellenburger dolomites prior to deposition of the overlying Middle Ordovician shales of the Simpson Group. Vuggy and cavernous porosity developed in the Lower Silurian Fusselman crinoid-ostracod-pellet packstones and grainstones before deposition of the overlying Silurian Wristen shales. Montoya siliceous limestones of Late Ordovician age were truncated during a period of pre-Silurian erosion, but porosity development is not indicated in Montoya rock cuttings. Only minor amounts of porosity developed in the Lower to Middle Devonian Thirty-one packstones and wackestones as a result of uplift and erosion in the Middle Devonian. Regional compression during the post-Mississippian enhanced doubly plunging anticlines now having up to 91 m (300 ft) of closure at the Ellenburger through Thirty-one formations at Midland Farms and Inez fields. Fractures may have developed in Paleozoic limestones during this period of folding, but reservoir enhancement appears to have resulted only in the Ellenburger dolomites. Representative porosity measurements of the Ellenburger and Fusselman pay zones cannot be made from wireline log calculations, due to the fractured, vuggy, and cavernous nature of the porosity.

  18. 76 FR 12094 - Andrew Peklo III; Notice of Application Tendered for Filing With the Commission and Soliciting...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-04

    ....net . i. FERC Contact: Steve Kartalia, (202) 502-6131 or Stephen.kartalia@ferc.gov . j. Cooperating... including constructing a new intake structure with a trashrack; and (2) construct a new fish...

  19. "Show Me Where You Study!"--An Interactive Project between German Language Students in Nottingham and St Andrews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartung, Insa; Reisenleutner, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Interactive projects among students of a Common European Framework of Reference for languages (CEFR) A1+/A2 level seem difficult to set up due to the limited language repertoire of the students. Thus, our aim was to take up the challenge and start a project with the objective of applying their language skills. We chose a collaborative approach to…

  20. Final Environmental Assessment Airfield Storm Drainage System Repair Joint Base Andrews-Naval Air Facility Washington, MD

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    heating -ventilating- cooling systems , lawn maintenance, and general maintenance of streets and sidewalks. Existing noise levels (Leq and DNL) were...effort to rehabilitate JBA facilities including runway demolition and reconstruction. Please consider using solar geothermal systems to utilize...Final Environmental Assessment Airfield Storm Drainage System Repair Joint Base Andrews–Naval Air Facility Washington, Maryland Prepared for

  1. Multiple species of wild tree peonies gave rise to the ‘king of flowers’, Paeonia suffruticosa Andrews

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Shi-Liang; Zou, Xin-Hui; Zhou, Zhi-Qin; Liu, Jing; Xu, Chao; Yu, Jing; Wang, Qiang; Zhang, Da-Ming; Wang, Xiao-Quan; Ge, Song; Sang, Tao; Pan, Kai-Yu; Hong, De-Yuan

    2014-01-01

    The origin of cultivated tree peonies, known as the ‘king of flowers' in China for more than 1000 years, has attracted considerable interest, but remained unsolved. Here, we conducted phylogenetic analyses of explicitly sampled traditional cultivars of tree peonies and all wild species from the shrubby section Moutan of the genus Paeonia based on sequences of 14 fast-evolved chloroplast regions and 25 presumably single-copy nuclear markers identified from RNA-seq data. The phylogeny of the wild species inferred from the nuclear markers was fully resolved and largely congruent with morphology and classification. The incongruence between the nuclear and chloroplast trees suggested that there had been gene flow between the wild species. The comparison of nuclear and chloroplast phylogenies including cultivars showed that the cultivated tree peonies originated from homoploid hybridization among five wild species. Since the origin, thousands of cultivated varieties have spread worldwide, whereas four parental species are currently endangered or on the verge of extinction. The documentation of extensive homoploid hybridization involved in tree peony domestication provides new insights into the mechanisms underlying the origins of garden ornamentals and the way of preserving natural genetic resources through domestication. PMID:25377453

  2. Supplemental Environmental Assessment of the Ambulatory Care Center at Joint Base Andrews-Naval Air Facility Washington, Maryland

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    and MD Route 5 (Branch Avenue). The Patuxent River is approximately seven miles east of the base. The communities of Morningside, Woodyard, Clinton...Creek to the southeast. All of these streams ultimately flow into the Potomac or Patuxent Rivers (AAFB 2010). To manage on-base stormwater runoff...Patuxent River . The new ACC would reduce the area of impervious surfaces that could affect downstream water quality. Adherence to proper engineering

  3. In response to "The Knowledge of Our Knowledge": a reflection on McAndrews' view of epistemology.

    PubMed

    Winterstein, James

    2012-12-01

    This commentary considers one of the articles published in the first volume of this journal and reflects on the status of research and knowledge at that time. The chiropractic profession has witnessed advancement in the use of the scientific method in the past several decades, and scholarly journals have helped support this substantial growth.

  4. 75 FR 81637 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Notice of Availability of the St. Andrew Beach...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-28

    ... feral cats and hogs in beach mouse habitat. 4. In areas with known populations of beach mice (Tyndall... respective adjacent private lands), non-native predators, including free roaming cats and cat colonies, are...) Minimize impacts to dunes in beach mouse habitat due to recreational use. (b) Prohibit free-roaming...

  5. Suppression of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and TCA enzymes in discrete brain regions of mice exposed to high fluoride: amelioration by Panax ginseng (Ginseng) and Lagerstroemia speciosa (Banaba) extracts.

    PubMed

    Mahaboob Basha, P; Saumya, S M

    2013-04-01

    Chronic fluoride intoxication results in pathophysiological complications pertaining to soft tissues, called non-skeletal fluorosis. This study examined whether fluoride-induced alterations in selected parameters that are indicative of mitochondrial dysfunction accompany the toxic effects of fluoride in discrete brain regions in vivo and also explored the possibility of treatment with Ginseng (GE) and Banaba (BLE) either alone or with their co-exposure which is capable of reversing parameters indicative of fluoride-induced impairments in mitochondrial function. Swiss mice, Mus musculus, were given 270 ppm fluoride (600 ppm NaF) in their drinking water for 30 days, while continuing the fluoride exposure, toxicated animals were given differential doses (50-250 mg/kg body wt) of phytoextracts through oral gavage for 2 weeks. Discrete brain regions separated from dissected animals to perform biochemical assessments. Disturbances in mitochondrial enzyme complexes (I-IV) and decrements in TCA enzymes (ICDH, SDH, and aconitase) were noted in discrete brain regions upon F exposure, suggesting mitochondrial dysfunction. In addition, a significant reduction in oxidative stress indices with increased MDA content as well as decrease in reduced glutathione content and increases in catalase and SOD enzyme activity suggests the involvement of severe oxidative stress affecting the mitochondrial function(s). Treatment with either GE or BLE reversed F-induced alterations in augmenting the suppressed complex enzymes followed by TCA enzymes and oxidative stress indices in a dose independent manner. However, the co-exposure of GE and BLE at a dose of 150 mg/kgbw appeared to restore mitochondrial functioning. These results provide in vivo evidence supporting the hypothesis that fluoride induces impairments in mitochondrial function, which can be reversed by treatment with GE and BLE as well their co-exposure at 150 mg/kgbw.

  6. Quantitative analysis of mitragynine, codeine, caffeine, chlorpheniramine and phenylephrine in a kratom (Mitragyna speciosa Korth.) cocktail using high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Chittrakarn, Somsmorn; Penjamras, Pimpimol; Keawpradub, Niwat

    2012-04-10

    A simple HPLC technique for determining mitragynine, codeine, caffeine, chlorpheniramine and phenylephrine in 'kratom cocktail' was developed. The analytical method for mitragynine, codeine and caffeine used an Eclipse XDB-C8 column. A Lichrospher CN column was using for analysing chlorpheniramine and phenylephrine. The correlation coefficient of each standard was between 0.9957 and 0.9993. The precision of the methods were between 0.700 and 7.108% RSD. The concentration of mitragynine, codeine, caffeine, chlorpheniramine and phenylephrine in 'kratom cocktail' was 90.021, 234.174, 73.986, 7.053 and 1.486 mg/L, respectively.

  7. Differential response of male and female Diabrotica speciosa (coleoptera: chrysomelidae) to bitter cucurbit-based toxic baits in relation to the treated area size

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cucurbitacins are fed on by male and female Luperini but field trials reveal that males are far more attracted to them than females. The sex ratio and number of beetles killed by an application of cucurbitacin based toxic baits was assessed at two different scales: small areas of 100 m2, and a large...

  8. A Multi-Week Behavioral Sampling Tag for Sound Effects Studies: Design Trade-Offs and Prototype Evaluation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-30

    and Bernie McConnell (bm8@st-andrews.ac.uk )1 1University of St. Andrews, St. Andrews, Fife KY16 8LB, UK Award Number: N000141210209 LONG...Florida Bernie McConnell, SMRU/U. St. Andrews Len Thomas, CREEM/U. St. Andrews Peter Tyack, SMRU/U. St. Andrews Michael Weise, ONR 4 Given

  9. Caring: some reflections on the impact of the culture care theory by McFarland & Andrews and a conversation with Leininger.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Pamela N; McFarland, Marilyn R; Andrews, Margaret M; Leininger, Madeleine

    2009-07-01

    This column is the first of two with a special focus on the construct of caring. In this dialogue, two Leininger scholars together address the questions related to the global impact on practice and the contribution of the model to scientific development in nursing. Then, in a special conversation, nurse theorist Madeleine Leininger offers her view of the impact of her work as well as some of her early experiences.

  10. Environmental magnetic implications of greigite (Fe3S4) formation in a 3 m.y. lake sediment record from Butte Valley, northern California Andrew

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roberts, P.; Reynolds, R.L.; Verosub, K.L.; Adam, D.P.

    1996-01-01

    Authigenic greigite (Fe3S4) has been identified in several horizons of lake beds in a 102-m core from Butte Valley, northern California, using mineral magnetic methods and x-ray diffraction analysis. The presence of greigite has several implications for the paleoenvironmental record from Butte Valley. First, its occurrence in 2.5 - 3.0 Ma strata confirms that greigite can persist in the geological record for long periods of time. Second, the detrital mineral magnetic record may be partially obscured by the presence of authigenic greigite and care must be taken in interpreting magnetic variations in the greigite-bearing zones as paleoclimate proxies. Third, differences in the timing of remanence acquisition for authigenic and detrital phases may compromise studies of high-frequency geomagnetic field variations. Fourth, greigite may also be significant as a paleoenvironmental indicator of lake and sediment chemistry. The magnetic detection of greigite may therefore provide important information about palcolimnological conditions. Copyright 1996 by the American Geophysical Union.

  11. Environmental Assessment for Taxiway Whiskey Supplemental Projects at Joint Base Andrews-Naval Air Facility Washington, Prince George’s County, Maryland

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    pollutants and the number of exceedances in Prince George’s County in 2014. Table 3-4. Air quality standards and monitored data Pollutant Air quality...stationary sources of air emissions for each of the criteria pollutants of concern and greenhouse gases (GHGs). Monitoring and recordkeeping requirements...the Air Force and any contractors would comply with all applicable air pollution control regulations. Construction dust or emissions from construction

  12. "Catholic Higher Education: Challenges of Discipleship and Citizenship," Presentation at the Andrews McMeel University Annual Service Learning Conference. (South Bend, Indiana, November 4, 2000.)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vale, Carol Jean

    2000-01-01

    Explores the relationship between discipleship and citizenship, discussing ways Catholic educators can teach their students to be faithful to their Catholic ideals as they exercise the rights and responsibilities of citizenship. Service learning provides a means for integrating head and heart for students while working in a real world context.…

  13. Society News: RAS Awards 2012; Prof. Andy Fabian; Prof. John C Brown; Prof. Andrew Fazakerley; Dr. Mike Irwin; Joss Bland-Hawthorn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-02-01

    Each year the RAS recognizes outstanding achievement in astronomy and geophysics by the award of medals and prizes. Candidates are nominated by Fellows and the awards made by a committee of Fellows, ensuring that these scientists have earned the respect and admiration of their peers in the research community.

  14. One World, Many Cultures. Papers from the International Conference on Adult Education and the Arts (4th, St. Andrews, Scotland, July 10-14, 1995).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, David, Ed.; McConnell, Bridget, Ed.; Normie, Gerald, Ed.

    The following papers are included: "Foreword" (Bridget McConnell); "Introduction" (David J. Jones); opening addresses by George Robertson MP, Shadow Scottish Secretary, and by Charlie McConnell, Executive Director, Scottish Community Education Council; and speech by Christine Hamilton, Deputy Director, Scottish Arts Council;…

  15. Depositional and diagenetic controls on porosity permeability and oil production in McFarland/Magutex (Queen) reservoirs, Andrews County, west Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Holtz, M.H. )

    1991-03-01

    The McFarland/Magutex Queen reservoir complex lies along the northeastern edge of the Central basin platform in the west Texas Permian basin and produces oil from the Permian Queen Formation. Current production from this complex totals 42 million stock-tank barrels (MMSTB) of an estimated 219 MMSTB of original oil in place, with an estimated 90 MMSTB of remaining mobile oil (RMO). The gross pay interval contains two parasequences consisting of progradational, 30-ft-thick, upward-shoaling facies packages. Facies include shoreface, mixed tidal channel and intertidal flat, and supratidal. Elongate shoreface facies are characterized by poorly consolidated, massive to thinly laminated sandstones. The supratidal facies, which act as permeability barriers, are characterized by algal-laminated dolostone and nodular, laminated, and massive anhydrite containing halite and gypsum pseudomorphs. Highest production and the largest amount of the 90 MMSTB of RMO is associated with the shoreface and tidal-channel facies. Bulk pore volume storage capacity and permeability are also highest within these two facies. Sandstones are arkosic, containing anhydrite and dolomite cements. Accessory minerals are clays, authigenic feldspar, and dolomite. Three main pore types are recognized: interparticle, moldic and intraconstituent, and micropores. Moldic and intraconstituent porosity is associated with leached feldspars and anhydrite cement dissolution. Microporosity is associated with syndepositional, grain-coating corrensite, dissolution-enhanced feldspar cleavage planes, and authigenic multifaceted dolomite. Microporosity derived from clays and dolomite is formed preferentially in tidal-channel and intertidal flat facies.

  16. NIOSH testimony on Kuwait before the subcommittee on hospitals and health care, committee on veterans' affairs by J. S. Andrews, September 16, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-16

    The testimony summarizes potential adverse health effects related to service in the Persian Gulf as presented by the Department of Health and Human Services. An estimated 9,000 workers from 43 different countries battled the burning oil wells in Kuwait from February 1991 through early November 1991 when the last was capped. Exposures and health effects in US military personnel, Kuwaiti citizens, and fire fighters were described. The hazards to the soldiers were largely dependent on the concentration of the pollutants in the air near the camps. Fortunately, the plume from the fires rose up to 10,000 and 12,000 feet, mixed with the air and then dispersed for several thousand miles downwind over a period of several weeks. The particles and gases contained in the plume were diluted as the plume travelled. Even so, some minor respiratory problems were present among the soldiers. Some of the hydrocarbons measured at low concentrations have been shown to produce cancer in laboratory animals only when present at higher levels of exposure. Based on the exposure information gathered, the author concludes that there will not likely be a detectable increase in lung cancer in Gulf War Veterans as a result of the oil well fires.

  17. Lead and cadmium in leaves of deciduous trees in Beijing, China: development of a metal accumulation index (MAI).

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan-Ju; Zhu, Yong-Guan; Ding, Hui

    2007-01-01

    Lead and cadmium uptake was investigated for common deciduous street trees in Beijing in this study. Species having Cd accumulation included Populus tomentosa, Sophora japonica and Catalpa speciosa. P. tomentosa had the highest ratios between leaf and soil Cd (0.848), followed by S. japonica (0.536), C. speciosa (0.493), Paulownia tomentosa (0.453) and Juglans regia (0.415). Pb levels were high in leaves of C. speciosa, J. regia and Pa. tomentosa. S. japonica had the highest ratio between leaf Pb and soil Pb (0.146), followed by Pa. tomentosa (0.143), Ginko biloba (0.103) and C. speciosa (0.095). A predictive foliar metal accumulation index (MAI) was developed and C. speciosa was calculated to have the highest MAI value (53.8). This suggests that C. speciosa would be a good choice for planting in areas of Beijing where soil contamination with Cd and Pb may be a problem.

  18. 76 FR 70423 - Procurement List Proposed Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-14

    .../Location: Base Supply Center, Joint Base Andrews Naval Air Facility Washington, 1500 West Perimeter Road, Suite 2780, Joint Base Andrews, MD. NPA: Blind Industries & Services of Maryland, Baltimore,...

  19. Environmental Impact Analysis Process. Final Environmental Assessment Construction and Operation of Revised PACBAR III Radar Station Saipan, CNMI

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-25

    Mangifera indica Coral Tree Erythrina veriegata Breadfruit...to be difficult to understand and interpret, inhibiting a thorough evaluation of the pros and cons of each site. In several areas, clarification is

  20. Eliciting maize defense pathways aboveground attracts belowground biocontrol agents

    PubMed Central

    Filgueiras, Camila Cramer; Willett, Denis S.; Pereira, Ramom Vasconcelos; Moino Junior, Alcides; Pareja, Martin; Duncan, Larry W.

    2016-01-01

    Plant defense pathways mediate multitrophic interactions above and belowground. Understanding the effects of these pathways on pests and natural enemies above and belowground holds great potential for designing effective control strategies. Here we investigate the effects of aboveground stimulation of plant defense pathways on the interactions between corn, the aboveground herbivore adult Diabrotica speciosa, the belowground herbivore larval D. speciosa, and the subterranean ento-mopathogenic nematode natural enemy Heterorhabditis amazonensis. We show that adult D. speciosa recruit to aboveground herbivory and methyl salicylate treatment, that larval D. speciosa are relatively indiscriminate, and that H. amazonensis en-tomopathogenic nematodes recruit to corn fed upon by adult D. speciosa. These results suggest that entomopathogenicnematodes belowground can be highly attuned to changes in the aboveground parts of plants and that biological control can be enhanced with induced plant defense in this and similar systems. PMID:27811992

  1. Beginning With the End in Mind: Post-Conflict Operations and Campaign Planning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Military Studies guest speaker program, 2004-05 academic year. 74 Andrew Steel and Andrew Marriot , “Briefing on Peace Support Operations,” (United...truth/interviews/perito.html. Steel, Andrew, Grp Cpt and Marriot , Andrew LTC. Briefing on Peace Support Operations. Ministry of Defence, United

  2. Integration of a Miniaturized Conductivity Sensor into an Animal-Borne Instrument

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    an Animal-Borne Instrument Lars Boehme Sea Mammal Research Unit Scottish Oceans Institute University of St Andrews St Andrews, KY16 8LB United...NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) University of St Andrews, Scottish Oceans Institute,Sea Mammal Research Unit,St Andrews

  3. Making a Bad Situation Worse: An Invasive Species Altering the Balance of Interactions between Local Species

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Biological invasions pose a significant threat to biodiversity, especially on oceanic islands. One of the primary explanations for the success of plant invaders is direct suppression of competitors. However, indirect interactions can also be important, although they are often overlooked in studies on biological invasion. The shrub Leucaena leucocephala is a widespread island invader with putative allelopathic effects on the germination and growth of other species. We quantified the impact of Leucaena on plant communities richness on an oceanic Brazilian island and, through nursery experiments, investigated the potential for allelopathic effects on the germination of Erythrina velutina, a native species that is often absent from stands of Leucaena. Additionally, in a manipulative field experiment, we examined the direct and indirect effects (mediated by the native species Capparis flexuosa) of the invader on the development of Erythrina. The species richness in invaded sites was lower than in uninvaded sites, and Capparis was the only native species that was frequently present in invaded sites. In the nursery experiments, we found no evidence that Leucaena affects the germination of Erythrina. In the field experiments, the odds of Erythrina germination were lower in the presence of Leucaena litter, but higher in the presence of Leucaena trees. However, the survival and growth of Erythrina were considerably inhibited by the presence of Leucaena trees. The isolated effect of native Capparis on the germination and growth of Erythrina varied from positive to neutral. However, when Capparis and Leucaena were both present, their combined negative effects on Erythrina were worse than the effect of Leucaena alone, which may be attributed to indirect effects. This study provides the first empirical evidence that the balance of the interactions between native species can shift from neutral/positive to negative in the presence of an exotic species. PMID:27010846

  4. Making a Bad Situation Worse: An Invasive Species Altering the Balance of Interactions between Local Species.

    PubMed

    Mello, Thayná Jeremias; Oliveira, Alexandre Adalardo de

    2016-01-01

    Biological invasions pose a significant threat to biodiversity, especially on oceanic islands. One of the primary explanations for the success of plant invaders is direct suppression of competitors. However, indirect interactions can also be important, although they are often overlooked in studies on biological invasion. The shrub Leucaena leucocephala is a widespread island invader with putative allelopathic effects on the germination and growth of other species. We quantified the impact of Leucaena on plant communities richness on an oceanic Brazilian island and, through nursery experiments, investigated the potential for allelopathic effects on the germination of Erythrina velutina, a native species that is often absent from stands of Leucaena. Additionally, in a manipulative field experiment, we examined the direct and indirect effects (mediated by the native species Capparis flexuosa) of the invader on the development of Erythrina. The species richness in invaded sites was lower than in uninvaded sites, and Capparis was the only native species that was frequently present in invaded sites. In the nursery experiments, we found no evidence that Leucaena affects the germination of Erythrina. In the field experiments, the odds of Erythrina germination were lower in the presence of Leucaena litter, but higher in the presence of Leucaena trees. However, the survival and growth of Erythrina were considerably inhibited by the presence of Leucaena trees. The isolated effect of native Capparis on the germination and growth of Erythrina varied from positive to neutral. However, when Capparis and Leucaena were both present, their combined negative effects on Erythrina were worse than the effect of Leucaena alone, which may be attributed to indirect effects. This study provides the first empirical evidence that the balance of the interactions between native species can shift from neutral/positive to negative in the presence of an exotic species.

  5. Supplemental Environmental Assessment for the Proposed Construction of Personally Owned Vehicle (POV) Parking for 113th Wing, District of Columbia Air National Guard Joint Base Andrews-Naval Facility, Washington, Prince George’s County, MD

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-01

    Capital Region (NCR). Current parking facilities within the license area afforded to the DC ANG cannot support the present staffing and the present parking...site adjacent to the proposed development area must be identified as a wetland buffer with adjacent wetland, based on observed soil vegetative and...facility outside of the license area which would replace some of the parking removed by the appropriate antiterrorism standards mandate. It should be noted

  6. A bill to designate the Federal building and United States courthouse located at 515 9th Street in Rapid City, South Dakota, as the "Andrew W. Bogue Federal Building and United States Courthouse".

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Sen. Johnson, Tim [D-SD

    2010-06-30

    06/30/2010 Read twice and referred to the Committee on Environment and Public Works. (All Actions) Notes: For further action, see H.R.5651, which became Public Law 111-298 on 12/14/2010. Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  7. A resolution condemning the murder of Army Private William Andrew "Andy" Long and the wounding of Army Private Quinton Ezeagwula, who were shot outside the Army-Navy Career Center in Little Rock, Arkansas on June 1, 2009.

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Sen. Lambert, Blanche M. [D-AR

    2009-06-16

    06/16/2009 Submitted in the Senate, considered, and agreed to without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (consideration: CR S6665-6666; text as passed Senate: CR S6666; text of measure as introduced: CR S6656) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  8. A resolution to authorize testimony and legal representation in City of St. Paul v. Irene Victoria Andrews, Bruce Jerome Berry, John Joseph Braun, David Eugene Luce, and Elizabeth Ann McKenzie.

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Sen. Reid, Harry [D-NV

    2010-12-09

    12/09/2010 Submitted in the Senate, considered, and agreed to without amendment and with a preamble by Unanimous Consent. (consideration: CR S8692; text as passed Senate: CR S8692; text of measure as introduced: CR S8715) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  9. Retraction: 'Number needed to treat with 4-factor prothrombin complex concentrate for urgent warfarin reversal' by Andrew Chua, Vishal Patel, Allison Perrin, Lee Stern, Jenifer Ehreth, Laurel Omert, Christopher Hood, Julie Farley, Michael McGlynn and Liping Huang.

    PubMed

    2017-04-01

    The above abstract from the THSNA 2016 Summit Abstract Proceedings, first published online in the American Journal of Hematology on 20 July 2016 in Wiley OnlineLibrary (www.onlinelibrary.wiley.com), and in Volume 91, Issue 9, p. E427, has been retracted by agreement between the authors, the journal Editor-in-Chief, Carlo Brugnara, and Wiley Periodicals, Inc. The retraction has been agreed due to concerns from the submitting authors that the abstract was inadvertently submitted prior to receiving approval from all authors and proper review of data analytics, thereby rendering it incomplete.

  10. Environmental Assessment for Replacement of Taxiway Sierra, Taxiway Whiskey, Pad 12, and Pad 13 at Joint Base Andrews-Naval Air Facility Washington, Prince George’s County, Maryland

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    daily traffic ACC asphaltic cement concrete AFDW Air Force District of Washington AFI Air Force Instruction AFPD Air Force Policy Directive ANSI...Preservation Officer, Maryland Historic Trust SO2 sulfur dioxide SOx oxides of sulfur TCE trichloroethylene TMDL total maximum daily load tpy tons...PCC) pavement. It has a 25-foot-wide by 4-inch-deep asphaltic cement concrete (ACC) shoulder on the north side and on the south side where the taxiway

  11. Creating a multi-gas proxy for Delta 14C and atmospheric fossil fuel-CO2. Kevin Coakley, John Miller , Scott Lehman, Stephen Montzka, Colm Sweeney, Arlyn Andrews , Ben Miller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coakley, K. J.; Miller, J. B.; Lehman, S.; Montzka, S. A.; Andrews, A. E.; Miller, B. R.

    2013-12-01

    The C14:C12 ratio of atmospheric CO2 (expressed as Delta 14C) is the gold standard measurement to derive the portion of observed atmospheric CO2 gradients resulting from combustion of fossil fuels (CO2-ff). This is because fossil fuels are devoid of 14C, unlike all other sources and sinks that impact atmospheric Delta14C. With enough 14C measurements, independent, 'top-down', estimation of US fossil fuel-CO2 emissions should be possible. However, our ability to make carbon-14 measurements is severely constrained by cost, accessibility to accelerator mass spectrometers (AMS) and the volume of air required to make high precision (~0.2 %) measurements of 14CO2 (mixing ratio is ~ 4e-16 mol/mol). Thus, Delta 14C is currently measured in only a small subset of NOAA/ESRL Global Monitoring Division (GMD) tall-tower and aircraft air samples. Here, we present a Projection Pursuit Regression (PPR) model to predict CO2-ff measured at different times and altitudes in terms of surrogate gases that are more widespread and relatively inexpensive to measure. This method would, in effect, allow expansion of Delta 14C measurements by factor of ~3 or 4 throughout North America. To create a proxy for CO2-ff, we take advantage of the observed correlations between (Delta 14C-derrived) CO2-ff and regional-scale enhancements of a wide array of anthropogenic gases, like CO, SF6, and halo- and hydro-carbons. We select the complexity and form of the PPR model by cross validation where validation data prediction error is minimized. In cross validation, the prediction model is based on the training data and not the validation data. We quantify prediction model performance with test data excluded from the model development process. According to cross validation, the PPR model is superior to a simpler linear model. Comparison with test CO2-ff data shows that CO2-ff can be predicted with a root mean square error of 1.1 ppm, only slightly higher than the Delta 14C-precision limit for CO2-ff of 1 ppm. Applying the PPR model to the large NOAA/ESRL/GMD database of surrogate gases, we can create a large set of synthetic CO2-ff data for the US. Finally, we will discuss the application of this large data set of lower-precision CO2-ff to top down determination of US fossil fuel CO2 emissions by presenting results from an Observation System Simulation Experiment (OSSE).

  12. Installation Restoration Program Phase 2. Confirmation/Quantification Stage 1 for Otis Air National Guard Base, Massachusetts, Air National Guard Support Center, Andrews Air Force Base, Maryland. Volume 2. Appendices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-10-01

    Professional Geologist Ph.D. Doctor of Philosophy degree Podzcls zonal soil having surface layer of mats of organic material overlying gray leached...an aquifer per unit time per unit width of a satu- rated layer under a unit hydraulic gradient. unconfined an aquifer condition in which the water...cyanide, phenol, PCB, iron, copper, cadmium, chromium, lead, arsenic, nickel, and the Safe Drinking Water Act pesticides listed in Attachment 1. f

  13. The Role of Science in Managed Aquifer Recharge--the Equus Beds aquifer near Wichita, Kansas Andrew Ziegler, Director Brian Kelly, Office Chief Michael Jacobs, Manager of Water Planning and Production Debra Ary, Engineer, Water Systems Planning (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, A. C.; Jacobs, M.; Ary, D.; Kelly, B.

    2013-12-01

    Data collection and interpretation using statistical, geochemical, and numerical simulation tools are essential parts of a long-term cooperative study between the city of Wichita, U.S. Geological Survey, and others to describe water quantity and quality conditions in a 165 square-mile part of the Equus Beds aquifer and Arkansas and Little Arkansas Rivers. The Equus Beds aquifer, eastern part of the High Plains Aquifer in south-central Kansas, is a vital water resource for agriculture and city of Wichita. Withdrawals for public supply began in the 1940s and agricultural irrigation began in the 1950-60s. These withdrawals led to water-level declines of up to 40 feet (historic low in 1993), a storage loss of 250,000 acre feet compared to predevelopment, and may enhance movement of chloride contamination from a past oilfield disposal area near Burrton and from natural chloride along the Arkansas River. Monitoring data and modeling show chloride near Burrton moved about 3 miles in 45 years, is about 1 mile away from the nearest public supply wells, and will continue to move for decades to centuries making the water unusable for irrigation or water supply without treatment. These concerns led to development of Wichita's 1993 integrated local water-supply plan that increased use of Cheney Reservoir and implemented aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) within the aquifer using high flows from the Little Arkansas River. ASR benefits include replacing depleted storage and slowing chloride movement. Decreased withdrawals, increased precipitation, and artificial recharge increased water levels and added 100,000 acre feet of storage through 2010, but drought since 2011 has increased withdrawals. A calibrated model will be used to simulate transport of chloride under several withdrawal scenarios using MODFLOW coupled with SEAWAT. Since 1995, water-quality data collection for more than 400 organic and inorganic compounds in surface water, treated source water for artificial recharge, and groundwater identified indicator bacteria, atrazine, chloride, sodium, nitrate, arsenic, iron, and manganese as constituents of concern exceeding water-quality criteria in baseline samples. Techniques were developed to estimate Little Arkansas River water quality in real-time for treatment. Geochemical modeling using PHREEQC and PHAST shows that groundwater quality is not changed if groundwater and recharge water are of similar redox potential. If different, calcite or metal hydroxides may precipitate and decrease water infiltration. A network of 38 locations with shallow and deep wells characterizes the recharge quantities and qualities for the city of Wichita to withdraw when needed from storage. Through 2013, the Demonstration project and Phase 1 and 2 facilities (capacity 40 MGD) have artificially recharged about 2 billion gallons. Total construction costs are about $300,000,000. Data-collection, interpretative geochemical and numerical simulations and water-quality transport modeling tools developed in the past 70 years are a scientific foundation to effectively and objectively manage this aquifer system.

  14. Finding of No Significant Impact and Finding of No Practicable Aleternative for the Environmental Assessment for the 21 Point Enclosed Firing Range at Joint-Base Andrews-Naval Air Facility Washington, Maryland

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-02

    weather difficulties, or bird -aircraft strikes. Bird -aircraft strike hazard (BASH) is defined as the threat of aircraft collision with birds and other...3-3  3.1.9  Bird -Aircraft Strike Hazard (BASH...AQCR Air Quality Control Region AT/FP anti-terrorism/force protection BASH Bird -Aircraft Strike Hazard bgs below ground surface BMPs Best

  15. Installation Restoration Program. Phase 2. Confirmation/Quantification. Stage 1. Problem Confirmation Study: Otis Air National Guard Base, Massachusetts, Air National Guard Support Center, Andrews Air Force Base, Maryland.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-09-04

    3 OTHER AREA WELL LOGS APPENDIX E SITE SAFETY PLAN APPENDIX F CHAIN OF CUSTODY DOCUMENTATION APPENDIX G LABORATORY ANALYTICAL METHODS APPENDIX H...Sites 3-4 3-1-1 Supplementary Analytical Protocol for Phase II Sites 3-5 3-2 Analytical Methods and Required Detection Limits 3-7 3-3 Summary of 1983...provide the Air Force with general engineering , analytical, and hydrogeological services. The Phase I, Problem Identification/Records A Search at the

  16. Letter to the Editor Re: Andrew Turner, Emily R. Kearl, Kevin R. Solman Lead and other toxic metals in playground paints from South West England Science of the Total Environment 544 (2016) 460-466.

    PubMed

    Gottesfeld, Perry; Jacobs, David E

    2016-08-15

    Turner's paper emphasizes "oral bioaccessibility" instead of focusing solely on total lead content. There is no evidence that solubility testing for lead levels in paint correlates with absorption or blood lead levels in exposed children. There are many considerations in determining exposure hazards to paint that are not evaluated in assessing solubility. Although we strongly support the conclusions and recommendations of the study, we are concerned that by reporting "oral bioaccessibility" others will focus on solubility in developing regulatory standards for lead levels in paint or in conducting exposure assessments. Standards for lead in paint should continue to be based on total lead content, not "oral bioaccessibility."

  17. Environmental Assessment for the Construction and Operation of a New Shoppette/Gas Station, Class Six Store, and Name-Brand Fast Food Store at Joint Base Andrews Camp Springs, Prince George’s County, Maryland

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-01

    requirements found in 40 CFR 126.26. Joint Base Andrews’ stormwater drainage system consists of catch basins, culverts, underground storm sewer pipes ...length, approximately 26 years old, and the pipe material consists of polyethylene (USAF 1996). However, in conjunction with two heat plants being shut...down in 2005 numerous boilers and heaters were fitted with new natural gas piping during their installation. 3.4.6 Electricity The Potomac

  18. 20 CFR 416.1232 - Replacement of lost, damaged, or stolen excluded resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    .... Exception: For victims of Hurricane Andrew only, the extension period for good cause may be extended for up... additional extension under the Hurricane Andrew provision) may be extended for a reasonable period up to...

  19. 33 CFR 80.810 - Cape San Blas, FL to Perdido Bay, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Creek as an extension of the general trend of the shoreline to continue across the inlet to St. Andrews... to the shoreline across the east entrance to St. Andrews Bay. (e) A line drawn between the...

  20. Water Ingress Failure Analysis of Whistler II Unit

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-01

    Water Ingress Failure Analysis of Whistler II Unit by Andrew J Bayba ARL-TN-0623 August 2014...Failure Analysis of Whistler II Unit Andrew J Bayba Sensors and Electron Devices Directorate, ARL...Ingress Failure Analysis of Whistler II Unit 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Andrew J Bayba

  1. C-21 Fleet: Base Optimization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    assigned to the operational support airlift mission, located at Andrews Air Force Base, Maryland and Scott Air Force Base, Illinois. The missions flown... Scott and Andrews AFB is the optimal assignment. If nine total assets were optimized, five would be assigned to Scott AFB and four to Andrews AFB

  2. Strength and Fatigue of NT551 Silicon Nitride and NT551 Diesel Exhaust Valves

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, M.J.; Wereszczak, A.A.; Kirkland, T.P.; Breder, K.

    2000-02-01

    The content of this report is excerpted from Mark Andrew's Ph.D. Thesis (Andrews, 1999), which was funded by a DOEYOTT High Temperature Materials Laboratory Graduate Fellowship. It involves the characterization of NT551 and valves fabricated with it. Greater detail of the described issues may be found in that reference or through communications with Andrew Wereszczak.

  3. Impact of the newly arrived seed-predating beetle Specularius impressithorax (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Bruchinae) in Hawai'i

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Medeiros, A.C.; Von Allmen, E.; Fukada, M.; Samuelson, A.; Lau, T.

    2008-01-01

    Prior to 2001, seed predation was virtually absent in the endemic Wiliwili Erythrina sandwicensis (Fabaceae: Degener), dominant tree species of lower-elevation Hawaiian dryland forests. The African bruchine chrysomelid Specularius impressithorax (Pic) (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Bruchinae) was first detected in Hawai'i in 2001 and became established on all main islands within the next two years. The mode of entry for this invasive Erythrina seed predator into Hawai'i is unknown, but likely occurred with the importation of trinket jewelry from Africa containing characteristically brightly-colored Erythrina seeds. The initial establishment of this insect likely occurred on a non-native host, the widely cultivated coral tree E. variegata. Within three years of its first record, S. impressithorax accounted for 77.4% mean seed crop loss in 12 populations of Wiliwili on six main Hawaiian islands. Specularius impressithorax, dispersed through international commerce and established via E. variegata, has become a threat to a unique Hawaiian forest type and may threaten other Erythrina, especially New World representatives.

  4. Molecular Determinants for Competitive Inhibition of α4β2 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Carbone, Annalisa; García-Beltrán, Olimpo; Livingstone, Phil D.; Biggin, Philip C.; Cassels, Bruce K.; Wonnacott, Susan; Zapata-Torres, Gerald; Bermudez, Isabel

    2010-01-01

    The Erythrina alkaloids erysodine and dihydro-β-erythroidine (DHβE) are potent and selective competitive inhibitors of α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), but little is known about the molecular determinants of the sensitivity of this receptor subtype to inhibition by this class of antagonists. We addressed this issue by examining the effects of DHβE and a range of aromatic Erythrina alkaloids on [3H]cytisine binding and receptor function in conjunction with homology models of the α4β2 nAChR, mutagenesis, and functional assays. The lactone group of DHβE and a hydroxyl group at position C-16 in aromatic Erythrina alkaloids were identified as major determinants of potency, which was decreased when the conserved residue Tyr126 in loop A of the α4 subunit was substituted by alanine. Sensitivity to inhibition was also decreased by substituting the conserved aromatic residues α4Trp182 (loop B), α4Tyr230 (loop C), and β2Trp82 (loop D) and the nonconserved β2Thr84; however, only α4Trp182 was predicted to contact bound antagonist, suggesting α4Tyr230, β2Trp82, and β2Thr84 contribute allosterically to the closed state elicited by bound antagonist. In addition, homology modeling predicted strong ionic interactions between the ammonium center of the Erythrina alkaloids and β2Asp196, leading to the uncapping of loop C. Consistent with this, β2D196A abolished sensitivity to inhibition by DHβE or erysodine but not by epierythratidine, which is not predicted to form ionic bonds with β2Asp196. This residue is not conserved in subunits that comprise nAChRs with low sensitivity to inhibition by DHβE or erysodine, which highlights β2Asp196 as a major determinant of the receptor selectivity of Erythrina alkaloids. PMID:20547737

  5. IMPACT OF CRITICAL ANION SOIL SOLUTION CONCENTRATION ON ALUMINUM ACTIVITY IN ALPINE TUNDRA SOIL Andrew Evans, Jr.1 , Michael B. Jacobs2, and Jason R. Janke1, (1) Metropolitan State University of Denver, Dept. of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, (2) Dept. of Chemistry, Denver, CO, United States.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, A.

    2015-12-01

    Soil solution anionic composition can impact both plant and microbial activity in alpine tundra soils by altering biochemical cycling within the soil, either through base cation leaching, or shifts in aluminum controlling solid phases. Although anions play a critical role in the aqueous speciation of metals, relatively few high altitude field studies have examined their impact on aluminum controlling solid phases and aluminum speciation in soil water. For this study, thirty sampling sites were selected on Trail Ridge Road in Rocky Mountain National Park, Estes Park, CO, and sampled during July, the middle of the growing season. Sampling elevations ranged from approximately 3560 - 3710 m. Soil samples were collected to a depth of 15.24 cm, and the anions were extracted using a 2:1 D.I. water to soil ratio. Filtered extracts were analyzed using IC and ICP-MS. Soil solution NO3- concentrations were significantly higher for sampling locations east of Iceberg Pass (EIBP) (mean = 86.94 ± 119.8 mg/L) compared to locations west of Iceberg Pass (WIBP) (mean 1.481 ± 2.444 mg/L). Both F- and PO43- soil solution concentrations, 0.533 and 0.440 mg/L, respectively, were substantially lower, for sampling sites located EIBP, while locations WIBP averaged 0.773 and 0.829 mg/L respectively, for F- and PO43-. Sulfate concentration averaged 3.869 ± 3.059 mg/L for locations EIBP, and 3.891 ± 3.1970 for locations WIBP. Geochemical modeling of Al3+ in the soil solution indicated that a suite of aluminum hydroxyl sulfate minerals controlled Al3+ activity in the alpine tundra soil, with shifts between controlling solid phases occurring in the presence of elevated F- concentrations.

  6. United States History Simulations: 1787-1868: Constitution Convention, Missouri Compromise, Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, The Compromise of 1850, The Kansas/Nebraska Act, Southern Secession from the Union, and the Impeachment and Trial of Andrew Johnson. ETC Simulations Number Two.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hostrop, Richard W.

    This book presents simulation activities for significant events in U.S. history from 1787-1868. Intended for student involvement, the simulations require student research and practice in order to carry out the designated roles. The simulation and role play serve to involve the students actively in their learning, using both the affective and…

  7. A concurrent resolution expressing the sense of Congress that the United States Postal Service should issue a commemorative postage stamp honoring civil rights workers Andrew Goodman, James Chaney, and Michael Schwerner, and the "Freedom Summer" of 1964, and that the Citizens' Stamp Advisory Committee should recommend to the Postmaster General that such a stamp be issued.

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Sen. Schumer, Charles E. [D-NY

    2010-07-12

    07/15/2010 Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs referred to Subcommittee on Federal Financial Management, Government Information, Federal Services, and International Security. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  8. Comment on "Nanosecond laser textured superhydrophobic metallic surfaces and their chemical sensing applications" by Duong V. Ta, Andrew Dunn, Thomas J. Wasley, Robert W. Kay, Jonathan Stringer, Patrick J. Smith, Colm Connaughton, Jonathan D. Shephard (Appl. Surf. Sci. 357 (2015) 248-254)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boinovich, L. B.; Emelyanenko, A. M.; Emelyanenko, K. A.; Domantovsky, A. G.; Shiryaev, A. A.

    2016-08-01

    Nowadays the problem of design of durable ecologically friendly superhydrophobic surfaces is of great importance for science and technology. A recent paper in Applied Surface Science reports the method of fabricating the superhydrophobic metallic surfaces by infrared nanosecond laser surface texturing without using hydrophobic agents. Since this method of surface texturing can be considered as one of the most suitable for various industrial applications, the nature of superhydrophobic state of surfaces produced by laser texturing in the abovementioned paper deserves to be analyzed in detail. Authors of the commented paper attributed the change in wettability to the partial deoxidation of CuO into Cu2O on the surface during storage in atmosphere. However, such interpretation of the results contradicts to the basic notions in the theory of wetting and to more accurate and detailed data. In our Comment we discuss these contradictions point by point.

  9. Targeted Silver Nanoparticles for Dual-Energy Breast X-Ray Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    FOR TEMPORAL SUBTRACTION AND DUAL-ENERGY X-RAY IMAGING, Roshan Karunamuni, Ajlan Al Zaki, Anatoliy V. Popov, E. James Delikatny, Sara Gavenonis, Andrew...imaging Roshan Karunamuni1, Ajlan Al Zaki2, Anatoliy V. Popov1, E. James Delikatny1, Sara Gavenonis1, Andrew Tsourkas2, Andrew D. A. Maidment1...Carton AK, Ullberg C, Lindman K, Acciavati R, Francke T, Maidmenet ADA. Optimization of a dual- energy contrast-enhanced technique for a photon

  10. Constitutional Reform for Conflict Management

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-01

    Regulation,” in Constitutional Design for Divided Societies: Integration or Accommodation? ed. Sujit Choudhry (New York: Oxford University Press , 2008...Conflict Management, and Democracy, ed. Andrew Reynolds (New York: Oxford University Press , 2002): 37-54. Andrew Reynolds and Timothy D. Sisk...ed. Andrew Reynolds (New York: Oxford University Press , 2002): 15-36. Benjamin Reilly, Democracy in Divided Societies: Electoral Engineering for

  11. Multiscaled Mathematics in Defense Research and its Spin-offs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-06

    Sarah Waters, James Oliver, Douglas Cochran, and many others. Air Vehicles led by Malcolm Arthur, with Sergei Timoshin, Andrew Lacey, Stephen Wilson...Luheshi, Roman Novokshanov, Andrew Belyavin, Malcolm Cook, and others. Aspects of impacts led by Richard Purvis, Guo-Xiong Wu, James Oliver, with...Allwright, Robert Bowles, Douglas Cochran, Alistair Fitt, Stephen Glavin, Anthony Hutton , George Klokkaris, Andrew Lacey, Alex Smith, Sarah Waters

  12. Exploratory Visual Analytics of a Dynamically Built Network of Nodes in a WebGL-Enabled Browser

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    Exploratory Visual Analytics of a Dynamically Built Network of Nodes in a WebGL -Enabled Browser by Andrew M. Neiderer ARL-MR-860 January...January 2014 Exploratory Visual Analytics of a Dynamically Built Network of Nodes in a WebGL -Enabled Browser Andrew M. Neiderer...of Nodes in a WebGL -Enabled Browser 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Andrew M. Neiderer 5d

  13. Operations Events Census Report: Volume IV. 1981 through 1985. Sanitized Version.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-04-01

    ZEITZ, JOSEPH J. 0682 ZEMANEK, ROBERT B., JR. 0935 ZERGA, DONALD L. 0918 ZIKA , ANDREW P., III 0837 ZIMMERMAN, DOUGLAS E. 0918 ZIMMERSCHIED, ALAN B...0599 Personnel Dose Information - 1984 SOCIAL GAMMA BETA SECURITY ORG DOSE DOSE NAM & CD MREM ZIKA , ANDREW P., III 0837 ZIMMERMAN, DOUGLAS E. 0918...ROBERT A. 0682 ZBLEWSKI, FRANCIS J. 0954 ZEEMIN, ROBERT R. 0975 ZEMANEK, ROBERT S. 0935 ZIKA , ANDREW P., III 0837 ZIMMERMAN, ADAM P. 0599 ZIMMERMAN

  14. Integration of a Miniaturized Conductivity Sensor into an Animal-borne Instrument

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    animal -borne instrument Lars Boehme Sea Mammal Research Unit Scottish Oceans Institute University of St Andrews St Andrews, KY16 8LB United... Kingdom phone: +44 1334-462677 fax: +44 1334-463443 email: lb284@st-andrews.ac.uk Robin Pascal Sensors Development Group National...Oceanography Centre Southampton, SO14 3ZY United Kingdom phone: +44 2380-596138 fax: +44 2380-593029 email: rwp@nerc.ac.uk Phil Lovell SMRU

  15. 76 FR 73683 - Whirlpool Corporation, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Career Solutions TEC Staffing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-29

    ... Solutions TEC Staffing, Andrews International, IBM Corporation, TEK Systems Penske Logistics, Eurest... Systems, Penske Logistics, Eurest, Canteen, Kelly Services, Inc., Prodriver, and Arkansas Warehouse,...

  16. 77 FR 26477 - Receipt of a Pesticide Petition Filed for Residues of Pesticide Chemicals in or on Various...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-04

    ... INFORMATION CONTACT: Andrew Bryceland, Biopesticides and Pollution Prevention Division (7511P), Office of... Director, Biopesticides and Pollution Prevention Division, Office of Pesticide Programs. BILLING CODE...

  17. 78 FR 45535 - Change in Bank Control Notices; Acquisitions of Shares of a Bank or Bank Holding Company

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-29

    ..., Tampa, Florida; William Andrew Krusen, Jr. SEP IRA, Tampa, Florida; Krusen Limited Partnership, Ltd.... Thompson Krusen, Tampa, Florida; WIT Financial Group, LLC, Tampa, Florida; and WIT Ventures, Ltd.,...

  18. 40 CFR 81.437 - New Brunswick, Canada.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...* Treat's Island* Passamaquoddy Bay* Deer Island* Indian Island* Rouen Island* Cherry Island* Thrumcap...* Deer Island* Passamaquoddy Bay* Old Sow Whirlpool* St. Andrews* Eastport* Friar Roads* Estes...

  19. 40 CFR 81.437 - New Brunswick, Canada.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...* Treat's Island* Passamaquoddy Bay* Deer Island* Indian Island* Rouen Island* Cherry Island* Thrumcap...* Deer Island* Passamaquoddy Bay* Old Sow Whirlpool* St. Andrews* Eastport* Friar Roads* Estes...

  20. 40 CFR 81.437 - New Brunswick, Canada.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...* Treat's Island* Passamaquoddy Bay* Deer Island* Indian Island* Rouen Island* Cherry Island* Thrumcap...* Deer Island* Passamaquoddy Bay* Old Sow Whirlpool* St. Andrews* Eastport* Friar Roads* Estes...

  1. 40 CFR 81.437 - New Brunswick, Canada.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...* Treat's Island* Passamaquoddy Bay* Deer Island* Indian Island* Rouen Island* Cherry Island* Thrumcap...* Deer Island* Passamaquoddy Bay* Old Sow Whirlpool* St. Andrews* Eastport* Friar Roads* Estes...

  2. STS-134 Tribute to Endeavour

    NASA Video Gallery

    STS-134 Commander Mark Kelly pays tribute to space shuttle Endeavour and the spacecraft's contribution to human spaceflight. Mission specialists Andrew Feustel, Mike Fincke, Roberto Vittori, Greg C...

  3. A simple GC-MS method for the screening of betulinic, corosolic, maslinic, oleanolic and ursolic acid contents in commercial botanicals used as food supplement ingredients.

    PubMed

    Caligiani, Augusta; Malavasi, Giulia; Palla, Gerardo; Marseglia, Angela; Tognolini, Massimiliano; Bruni, Renato

    2013-01-15

    The occurrence of triterpene pentacyclic acids in plants is extensive, but little is known about their availability in commercial extracts. A simple GC-MS method for the simultaneous determination of betulinic, corosolic, maslinic, oleanolic and ursolic acids was developed and applied to 38 different commercial plant extracts sold as ingredients for dietary supplements. A suitable protocol was set up to perform routine control of a diverse array of samples with different botanical, chemical and physical characteristics. Remarkable quantities of corosolic acid were found in dried extracts from aerial parts of Lagerstroemia speciosa and Ortosiphon stamineus (14233 and 1132 mg/kg, respectively), while oleanolic acid was abundant in O. stamineus and Crataegus monogyna flowers (2774 and 2339 mg/kg); ursolic was identified in O. stamineus, C. monogyna, L. speciosa and Arctostaphylos uva-ursi leaves (7773, 4165, 2108 and 1034 mg/kg). Only L. speciosa was rich in maslinic acid (4958 mg/kg), while minor amounts of betulinic acid (257 and 80 mg/kg) were detected in L. speciosa and C. monogyna extracts. Lower quantities of triterpenic acids were identified in dried extracts of Harpagophyton procumbens root, propolis, Punica granatum root, Styrax benzoin, Vaccinium myrtillus fruits and Vitis vinifera seeds. Decoctions and fluid extracts lacked or contained very low amounts of triterpenic acids. Results are discussed in terms of quality and safety of these ingredients.

  4. [Scanning electronmicroscopic study of 3 composite filling materials after 1 year's use].

    PubMed

    Triadan, H

    1976-05-01

    This is an in-vivo comparative test of two test materials, composites Compo-Cap and Cosmic against Adaptic on a monkey (Macaca speciosa) over one year. No significant differences could be found and the defects on margins and in the surface was similar. Undubitable secondary caries could--unlike in a previous test with Epoxylite--not be found with these fillings.

  5. Longevity of crapemyrtle pollen stored at different temperatures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Temperatures for storage of crapemyrtle (Lagerstroemia app.) pollen over time were studied using clones of two interspecific hybrids (L. 'Cheyenne' and L. 'Wichita') and five species (L. indica 'Catawba', L. subcostata (NA 40181), L. limii, L. speciosa, and L. fauriei 'Kiowa'). Pollen samples were s...

  6. The effects of water velocity on the Ceratomyxa shasta infectious cycle

    PubMed Central

    Bjork, Sarah J.; Bartholomew, Jerri L.

    2014-01-01

    Ceratomyxa shasta is a myxozoan parasite identified as a contributor to salmon mortality in the Klamath River, USA. The parasite has a complex life cycle involving a freshwater polychaete, Manayunkia speciosa and a salmonid. As part of ongoing research on how environmental parameters influence parasite establishment and replication, we designed a laboratory experiment to examine the effect of water flow (velocity) on completion of the C. shasta infectious cycle. The experiment tested the effect of two water velocities, 0.05 and 0.01 m/s, on survival and infection of M. speciosa as well as transmission to susceptible rainbow trout and comparatively resistant Klamath River Chinook salmon. The faster water velocity facilitated the greatest polychaete densities, but the lowest polychaete infection prevalence. Rainbow trout became infected in all treatments, but at the slower velocity had a shorter mean day to death, indicating a higher infectious dose. Infection was not detected in Chinook salmon even at a dose estimated to be as high as 80,000 actinospores per fish. The higher water velocity resulted in lower C. shasta infection prevalence in M. speciosa and decreased infection severity in fish. Another outcome of our experiment is the description of a system for maintaining and infecting M. speciosa in the laboratory. PMID:18803584

  7. Habitat and host specificity of trematode metacercariae in fiddler crabs from mangrove habitats in Florida.

    PubMed

    Smith, Nancy F; Ruiz, Gregory M; Reed, Sherry A

    2007-10-01

    Fiddler crabs (Uca spp.) are common inhabitants of temperate and tropical coastal communities throughout the world, often occupying specific microenvironments within mangrove and salt marsh habitats. As second intermediate hosts for trematodes, we investigated patterns of host distribution and parasitism for 3 species of sympatric fiddler crabs in mangrove habitats adjacent to the Indian River Lagoon, Florida. Fiddler crab distribution varied among species, with Uca speciosa dominating the low and mid intertidal regions of mangrove banks. This species also exhibited higher prevalence and abundance of Probolocoryphe lanceolata metacercariae compared with Uca rapax, which is relatively more abundant in the high intertidal zone. We conducted a field experiment to test whether U. speciosa was more heavily parasitized by P. lanceolata as a result of its habitat distribution by raising U. speciosa and U. rapax under identical environmental conditions. After exposure to shedding cercariae under the same field conditions, all individuals of U. speciosa became parasitized by P. lanceolata, whereas no U. rapax were parasitized, suggesting that differences in parasitism were driven by host selection.

  8. Novel synthetic products from the common milkweed (Asclepias syriaca L) and their potential in the rural farm economy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The common milkweed is of the family Asclepiadaceae which comprises over 200 genera and 2500 species including Asclepias syriaca L and its near relatives, A. speciosa and A. tuberosa. Asclepias syriaca, or the common milkweed, is a perennial that is native to the Americas and is so named because of...

  9. Evaluation of in vitro absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) properties of mitragynine, 7-hydroxymitragynine, and mitraphylline

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mitragyna speciosa (Kratom) is a popular herb in Southeast Asia which is traditionally used to treat withdrawal symptoms associated with opiate addiction. Mitragynine, 7-hydroxymitragynine and mitraphylline are reported to be the central nervous system (CNS) active alkaloids which bind to the opiat...

  10. Soil phosphorus dynamics in a humid tropical silvopastoral system

    SciTech Connect

    Cooperband, L.R.

    1992-01-01

    In developing countries of the humid tropics, timber exploitation and agricultural expansion frequently result in deforestation. Extensive land management, coupled with inherently low soil fertility invariably produce declines in agricultural/livestock productivity which eventually lead to land abandonment and further deforestation. Phosphorus is often the major nutrient limiting plant growth in tropical soils. Agroforestry systems have been considered as viable alternatives to current land use practices. Several hypotheses suggest that combining trees with crops or pasture, especially leguminous species will improve soil nutrient cycling, soil structure and soil organic matter. In this experiment Erythrina berteroana (an arboreous legume) was grown in native grass pastures in Costa Rica to determine the effects of tree pruning and cattle grazing on soil P availability. I measured soil P fluxes as well as changes in pasture biomass over an 18-month period. In a separate field experiment, I determined decomposition rates and P release characteristics of Erythrina leaves, pasture grass clippings and cattle dung. Erythrina leaves decomposed faster than both pasture grass and cattle dung. Erythrina and pasture residues released 4-5 times less P than dung. Phosphorus fluxes after tree pruning and grazing were highly dynamic for all treatments. Tree pruning increased labile soil P over time when coupled with grazing. Pasture biomass production was greatest in the grazed tree treatment. Pasture biomass P production and concentration was greatest in the non-grazed treatment. Trees and grazing together tended to increase nutrient (P) turnover which stimulated biomass production. In contrast, trees without grazing promoted nutrient (P) accumulation in pasture biomass.

  11. Content of nutrient and antinutrient in edible flowers of wild plants in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Sotelo, Angela; López-García, Semeí; Basurto-Peña, Francisco

    2007-09-01

    Nutrient and antinutritional/toxic factors present in some edible flowers consumed in Mexico were determined. The edible flowers were: Agave salmiana, Aloe vera, Arbutus xalapensis, Cucurbita pepo (cultivated), Erythrina americana, Erythrina caribaea, Euphorbia radians benth and Yucca filifera. The nutrient content in the flowers studied is similar to that of the edible leaves and flowers studied mainly in Africa. The moisture content of the flowers varied from 860 to 932 g kg(-1). Crude protein (CP) was between 113 to 275 g kg(-1) DM, crude fiber, 104 to 177 g kg(-1) DM and the nitrogen free extract, between 425 to 667 g kg(-1) DM. The highest chemical score (CS) was found in E. americana and A. salmiana; in five samples the limiting amino acid was lysine, and in three of them it was tryptophan. Trypsin inhibitors and hemaglutinnins had a very low concentration. Alkaloids were present in both the Erythrina species and the saponins in A. salmiana and Y. filifera. Cyanogenic glucosides were not found in the studied flowers. The traditional process of preparing these specific flowers before consumption is by cooking them and discarding the broth; in this way the toxic substances are diminished or eliminated. These edible flowers from wild plants consumed in local areas of the country play an important role in the diet of the people at least during the short time of the season where they are blooming.

  12. Analysis of the Latin Square Task with Linear Logistic Test Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeuch, Nina; Holling, Heinz; Kuhn, Jorg-Tobias

    2011-01-01

    The Latin Square Task (LST) was developed by Birney, Halford, and Andrews [Birney, D. P., Halford, G. S., & Andrews, G. (2006). Measuring the influence of cognitive complexity on relational reasoning: The development of the Latin Square Task. Educational and Psychological Measurement, 66, 146-171.] and represents a non-domain specific,…

  13. Technology Counts 2007: A Digital Decade

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Week, 2007

    2007-01-01

    "Technology Counts 2007" looks back, and ahead, after a decade of enormous upheaval in the educational technology landscape. This special issue of "Education Week" includes the following articles: (1) A Digital Decade; (2) Getting Up to Speed (Andrew Trotter); (3) E-Rate's Imprint Seen in Schools (Andrew Trotter); (4) Teaching…

  14. Characterization of Marine Mammal Recordings from the Hawaii Range Complex

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-11-01

    Germany. 100 pp. Baumann-Pickering, S., S. M. Wiggins, E. Roth , M. A. Roch, H.-U. Schnitzler, and J. A. Hildebrand. (2010). “Echolocation...Institution Woods Hole, MA Ian Boyd University of St. Andrews St. Andrews, Scotland , UK 1 1 1 1 1

  15. Huggins, martians and exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-02-01

    The RAS Ordinary A & G meeting in November included the Gerald Whitrow Lecture by Prof. Andrew Liddle, while in December Prof. Andrew Collier Cameron gave the George Darwin Lecture. Both will be reported in future issues. Here Sue Bowler summarizes the other talks.

  16. 77 FR 17478 - Change in Bank Control Notices; Acquisitions of Shares of a Bank or Bank Holding Company

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-26

    ..., Illinois 60690-1414: 1. Steven D. Spector, Glenview, Illinois, as an individual and as trustee of the Alan L. Spector GST Family Trust, the Walter W. Spector, Steven D. Spector, Andrew M. Spector, and Nancy... with Steven D. Spector, Walter W. Spector Saratoga, California, Andrew M. Spector, Bexley, Ohio,...

  17. Root Cause Investigation (RCI) Best Practices Guide Product Overview

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-08

    micropac.com Andrew King Boeing andrew.m.king@boeing.com Byron Knight NRO knightby@nro.mil Hans Koenigsmann SpaceX hans.koenigsmann@spacex.com James Koory...ghislain.turgeon@sslmda.com Deborah Valley MIT deborah.valley@ll.mit.edu Fred Van Milligen JDSU fvanmilligen@jdsu.com Marvin VanderWeg SpaceX marvin.vanderwag

  18. Standard/Handbook for Multipactor Breakdown Prevention in Spacecraft Components

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-28

    micropac.com Micopac Andrew King andrew.m.king@boeing.com Boeing Byron Knight knightby@nro.mil NRO Hans Koenigsmann hans.koenigsmann@spacex.c om SpaceX ...VanderWeg marvin.vanderwag@spacex.c om SpaceX Gerrit VanOmmering gerrit.vanommering@sslmda. com SSL Michael Verzuh mverzuh@ball.com Ball John Vilja

  19. Guidelines for Hosted Payload Integration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-06

    Micopac markking@micropac.com Andrew King Boeing andrew.m.king@boeing.com Byron Knight NRO knightby@nro.mil Hans Koenigsmann SpaceX hans.koenigsmann...jdsu.com Marvin VanderWeg SpaceX marvin.vanderwag@spacex.c om Gerrit VanOmmering SSL gerrit.vanommering@sslmda. com Michael Verzuh Ball mverzuh@ball.com

  20. Counterfeit Parts Prevention Strategy Guide Product Overview

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-08

    pwr.utc.com Mark King Micopac markking@micropac.com Andrew King Boeing andrew.m.king@boeing.com Byron Knight NRO knightby@nro.mil Hans Koenigsmann SpaceX ...Marvin VanderWeg SpaceX marvin.vanderwag@spacex.com Gerrit VanOmmering SSL gerrit.vanommering@sslmda.com Michael Verzuh Ball mverzuh@ball.com John Vilja

  1. CrossTalk: The Journal of Defense Software Engineering. Volume 27, Number 5, September/October 2014

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    components. Other work has been done by Young, 1991. Also other work has been done by Andrew Rae , and Colin Fidge [26] to improve Young’s approach by...26. Andrew Rae , Colin Fidge, “Identifying Critical Components During Information Security Evaluation” CrossTalk—September/October 2014 35

  2. Increase of Breakthrough Pressure of Cotton Fabric by Fluoropolymer/Fluoroposs Treatment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-11-29

    Fluoropolymer/Fluoroposs 5b. GRANT NUMBER Treatment 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Kevin R. Lamison, Andrew J. Guenthner , and Joseph M. Mabry 5d...Fabric by l-’luoropolymer/1əuoroposs Treatment Kevin R Lamison’. Andrew.! Guenthner , Joseph M Mabr;l ’ERC Incorporated Edwards AFB, CA 93524

  3. 78 FR 894 - Interim Final Determination To Stay Sanctions, Imperial County Air Pollution Control District

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-07

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Interim Final Determination To Stay Sanctions, Imperial County Air Pollution... of revisions to the Imperial County Air Pollution Control District (ICAPCD) portion of the California...- line instructions. 2. Email: steckel.andrew@epa.gov . 3. Mail or deliver: Andrew Steckel (Air-4),...

  4. Creating a Shared Definition of Good and Bad Writing through Revision Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baer, Allison L.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes how the author, in an effort to build some common language about "good writing" and to teach effective revision strategies, involved her students in an action research project using the Worse/Better Writing Strategy developed by Andrews-Beck. In her dissertation, Andrews-Beck described a worse/better writing strategy that…

  5. Treemaps as a Tool for Social Network Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    Andrews & Heidegger , 1998) over the decade since its origin. The idea was initially conceived to simplify the difficulty of managing file space on a...442, New York City, New York, USA, September 29 - October 2, 2004. Springer-Verlag. Andrews, K., & Heidegger , H. (1998). Information slices

  6. Accountable Information Flow for Java-Based Web Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    Attendees: Andrew Myers. 10. IBM PL Day, May 7, Hawthorne , New York. Presented keynote talk on the Fabric secure persistence layer: “Fabric: a...Languages (POPL), pages 228–241, January 1999. [14] Andrew C. Myers, Lantian Zheng, Steve Zdancewic, Stephen Chong, and Nathaniel Nys- trom. Jif 3.0

  7. Coalition Operations in Afghanistan Post 2014

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-14

    part of the world. Notes 1 Andrew Wegener , A Complex and Changing Dynamic: Afghan...29-60. Rust, Stephen N. “The Nuts and Bolts of Village Stability Operations.” Special Warfare. (Jul-Sep 2011): 28-31. Wegener , Andrew. A

  8. 77 FR 25954 - Receipt of Several Pesticide Petitions Filed for Residues of Pesticide Chemicals in or on Various...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-02

    ... Chemistry Laboratory (ACL). Contact: Andrew Ertman, (703) 308-9367, email address: ertman.andrew@epa.gov . 4...-25958] [FR Doc No: 2012-10321] ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 180 [EPA-HQ-OPP-2012-0001... Various Commodities AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice of filing of...

  9. 77 FR 11476 - Delegation of National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Source Categories; Nevada

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-27

    ....andrew@epa.gov . 3. Mail or deliver: Andrew Steckel (AIR-4), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Region... for this action is available electronically at www.regulations.gov and in hard copy at EPA Region IX... index, some information may be publicly available only at the hard copy location (e.g.,...

  10. Why Play "I spy" When You Can Do Mathematics?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Robert; Andrews, Paul

    2007-01-01

    This article presents a story of Robert Andrew's mental engagement with mathematics. It has been jointly written by Robert, who is a Y8 student, and his father, Paul Andrews, who is a mathematics educator. It starts with Robert who presents the context for the story and is followed by Paul's commentary which draws on what Robert has written.…

  11. Decompression Sickness Risk Versus Time and Altitude

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-11-01

    M, Wiegman J, Pilmanis exposure at 22,500 ft (Fig. 1-2) should raise AA. Prebreathe enhancement with concern since that level of decompression is...Andrew A. P11manis in a research phyniologist 2. Fischer MO, Wiegman JF, McLean SA, Olson Andrew A. ihi ish resiarch poycioo SRM. Evaluation of four

  12. Personal Ethics versus Professional Ethics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-01-01

    Colorado Springs, Colo.: Navpress, 1978). 2. Quoted in Andrew Stark, “What’s the Matter with Business Ethics?” Harvard Business Review , May–June 1993...39. 3. Ibid., 40. 4. Kenneth R. Andrews, “Ethics in Practice,” Harvard Business Review , September–October 1989, 99. 5. Quoted in Perspective: A

  13. An Investigation into the Relationship between Ionospheric Scintillation and Loss of Lock in GNSS Receivers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    and Loss of Lock in GNSS Receivers Robert W. Meggs, Cathryn N. Mitchell and Andrew M . Smith Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering...into the relationship between ionospheric scintillation and loss of lock in GNSS receivers Robert W. Meggs, Cathryn N. Mitchell and Andrew M . Smith Department

  14. Network-Based Approach to Optimize Personnel Recovery for the Joint Force

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-26

    NUMBER Andrew M . Smith , Major, USAF 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES...NETWORK-BASED APPROACH TO OPTIMIZE PERSONNEL RECOVERY FOR THE JOINT FORCE by Andrew M . Smith Major, USAF A paper submitted to the

  15. Edema induced by Bothrops asper (Squamata: Viperidae) snake venom and its inhibition by Costa Rican plant extracts.

    PubMed

    Badilla, Beatriz; Chaves, Fernando; Mora, Gerardo; Poveda, Luis J

    2006-06-01

    We tested the capacity of leaf (Urera baccifera, Loasa speciosa, Urtica leptuphylla, Chaptalia nutans, and Satureja viminea) and root (Uncaria tomentosa) extracts to inhibit edema induced by Bothrops asper snake venom. Edema-forming activity was studied plethysmographically in the rat hind paw model. Groups of rats were injected intraperitoneally with various doses of each extract and, one hour later, venom was injected subcutaneously in the right hind paw. Edema was assessed at various time intervals. The edematogenic activity was inhibited in those animals that received an injection U. tomentosa, C. nutans or L. speciosa extract. The extract of U. baccifera showed a slight inhibition of the venom effect. Extract from S. viminea and, to a lesser extent that of U. leptuphylla, induced a pro-inflammatory effect, increasing the edema at doses of 250 mg/kg at one and two hours.

  16. Effects of CS Agents on Vegetation. II. Field and Screening Studies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-08-01

    10 Brassica rapa L.. turnip 30-50 50-70 Browallia speciosa Hook., browallia 0-10 10-20 Campanula medium L., Canterbury bells 10-20 20-30 Capsicum...Althaea rosea Cay., hollyhock a- 10 10-20 Arachis hypogaea L., peanut 10-20 10-20 Beta ’ulgaris L., beet 10-20 10-20 Brassica oleracea L, cabbage 0-10 0

  17. Complete genome sequences of seven carlavirus and potyvirus isolates from Narcissus and Hippeastrum plants in Australia, and proposals to clarify their naming.

    PubMed

    Wylie, Stephen J; Jones, Michael G K

    2012-08-01

    Complete genome sequences were obtained from two isolates of the carlavirus nerine latent virus from hippeastrum and narcissus plants, two isolates of the potyvirus hippeastrum mosaic virus from a hippeastrum plant, and one isolate each of the potyviruses narcissus degeneration virus, narcissus yellow stripe virus and Vallota speciosa virus from narcissus plants. Proposals are made to clarify the current confusion surrounding the naming of some of these viruses.

  18. Hurricane impacts on the coastal environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sallenger, Abby

    1990-01-01

    In terms of insured losses, Hurricane Andrew is the most severe catastrophe in the Nation's history. Prior to the arrival of Andrew, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Louisiana Geological Survey (LGS), acquired an extensive body of information and data on the behavior and long-term erosion of Louisiana barrier islands. As a result, we have a clear understanding of pre-storm conditions in this area; Andrew provided an opportunity to learn in detail the impact of a very large storm on Louisiana coastal environment.

  19. Phylogenetic analysis, genetic diversity and relationships between the recently segregated species of Corynandra and Cleoserrata from the genus Cleome using DNA barcoding and molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Tamboli, Asif Shabodin; Patil, Swapnil Mahadeo; Gholave, Avinash Ramchandra; Kadam, Suhas Kishor; Kotibhaskar, Shreya Vijaykumar; Yadav, Shrirang Ramchandra; Govindwar, Sanjay Prabhu

    2016-01-01

    Cleome is the largest genus in the family Cleomaceae and it is known for its various medicinal properties. Recently, some species from the Cleome genus (Cleome viscosa, Cleome chelidonii, Cleome felina and Cleome speciosa) are split into genera Corynandra (Corynandra viscosa, Corynandra chelidonii, Corynandra felina), and Cleoserrata (Cleoserrata speciosa). The objective of this study was to obtain DNA barcodes for these species for their accurate identification and determining phylogenetic relationships. Out of 10 screened barcoding regions, rbcL, matK and ITS1 regions showed higher PCR efficiency and sequencing success. This study added matK, rbcL and ITS1 barcodes for the identification of Corynandra chelidonii, Corynandra felina, Cleome simplicifolia and Cleome aspera species in existing barcode data. Corynandra chelidonii and Corynandra felina species belong to the Corynandra genus, but they are not grouped with the Corynandra viscosa species, however clustered with the Cleome species. Molecular marker analysis showed 100% polymorphism among the studied plant samples. Diversity indices for molecular markers were ranged from He=0.1115-0.1714 and I=0.2268-0.2700, which indicates a significant amount of genetic diversity among studied species. Discrimination of the Cleome and Corynandra species from Cleoserrata speciosa was obtained by two RAPD primers (OPA-4 and RAPD-17) and two ISSR primers (ISSR-1 and ISSR-2). RAPD and ISSR markers are useful for the genetic characterization of these studied species. The present investigation will be helpful to understand the relationships of Cleome lineages with Corynandra and Cleoserrata species.

  20. Studies in hawaiian Diptera I: new distributional records for endemic asteia (asteiidae).

    PubMed

    O'Grady, Patrick M; Magnacca, Karl Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    New island records are reported for five species of Asteia endemic to the Hawaiian Islands (Asteiahawaiiensis, Asteiamauiensis, Asteiamolokaiensis, Asteiapalikuensis, Asteiasabroskyi). These new records expand our understanding of distributions in Asteia, change the percentage of single island endemics from 78% to 33%, and have significance in how we view the process of diversification acting in this lineage. We also present a list of the known rearing records for two species in this group. Asteiamontgomeryi has been recorded from Erythrina and Asteiasabroskyi has been reared from Pisonia, Urera, Charpentiera and Hibiscadelphus.

  1. Studies in Hawaiian Diptera I: New Distributional Records for Endemic Asteia (Asteiidae)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract New island records are reported for five species of Asteia endemic to the Hawaiian Islands (Asteia hawaiiensis, Asteia mauiensis, Asteia molokaiensis, Asteia palikuensis, Asteia sabroskyi). These new records expand our understanding of distributions in Asteia, change the percentage of single island endemics from 78% to 33%, and have significance in how we view the process of diversification acting in this lineage. We also present a list of the known rearing records for two species in this group. Asteia montgomeryi has been recorded from Erythrina and Asteia sabroskyi has been reared from Pisonia, Urera, Charpentiera and Hibiscadelphus. PMID:24855434

  2. 76 FR 25301 - Foreign-Trade Zone 141-County of Monroe, New York; Application for Reorganization Under...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-04

    ..., Kathleen Boyce of the FTZ Staff is designated examiner to evaluate and analyze the facts and information..., contact Kathleen Boyce at Kathleen.Boyce@trade.gov or (202) 482-1346. Dated: April 28, 2011. Andrew...

  3. 77 FR 17408 - Foreign-Trade Zone 204-Tri-Cities Area, TN/VA; Application for Reorganization Under Alternative...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-26

    ... no impact on FTZ 204's authorized subzone. In accordance with the Board's regulations, Kathleen Boyce... Kathleen Boyce at Kathleen.Boyce@trade.gov or (202) 482-1346. Dated: March 20, 2012. Andrew...

  4. Advanced Materials and Solids Analysis Research Core (AMSARC)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Advanced Materials and Solids Analysis Research Core (AMSARC), centered at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Andrew W. Breidenbach Environmental Research Center in Cincinnati, Ohio, is the foundation for the Agency's solids and surfaces analysis capabilities. ...

  5. 77 FR 62216 - Proposed Foreign-Trade Zone-Eloy, AZ Comment Period on New Evidence

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-12

    ... evidence is open through November 13, 2012. Submissions shall be addressed to the Board's Executive...: October 5, 2012. Andrew McGilvray, Executive Secretary. [FR Doc. 2012-25166 Filed 10-11-12; 8:45...

  6. 77 FR 54927 - Comment Request for Information Collection for Unemployment Insurance (UI) Benefit Accuracy...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-06

    ... Employment and Training Administration Comment Request for Information Collection for Unemployment Insurance... written comments to Andrew Spisak, Office of Unemployment Insurance, Room S-4524, Employment and Training... UI benefit payments in three programs: State UI, Unemployment Compensation for Federal...

  7. 76 FR 72978 - Whirlpool Corporation Including On-Site Leased Workers From Career Solutions TEC Staffing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-28

    ... Solutions TEC Staffing, Andrews International, IBM Corporation, TEK Systems, Penske Logistics, Eurest, and.... The company reports that workers leased from IBM Corporation, TEK Systems, Penske Logistics, Eurest... to include workers leased from IBM Corporation, TEK Systems, Penske Logistics, Eurest, and...

  8. Aiming high but keeping costs low.

    PubMed

    Hough, Steve; Nicholls, Andrew

    2010-04-01

    Steve Hough, national sales manager, CEP Claddings, and Andrew Nicholls, sales director, CEP Ceilings, explain how modern cladding and ceiling materials can enhance the appearance of modern hospital buildings while offering practical, cost-saving, and environmental advantages.

  9. 7 CFR 319.77-3 - Gypsy moth infested areas in Canada.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    .... Andrews, St. Croix, St. David, St. George, St. James, St. Patrick, and St. Stephen. (2) Kings County. That... District that includes the City of Sudbury and the townships of Baldwin, Dryden, Dunlop, Graham,...

  10. Questions to Ask Your Doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... the News Advocacy Group Helps Patients Cope 15 Mar 2017 MBCN Selects University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute’s ... 000 Metastatic Breast Cancer Research Leadership Award 08 Mar 2017 MBCN Selects Johns Hopkins’ Dr. Andrew Ewald ...

  11. Webb Telescope Backplane Arrives at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Video Gallery

    Webb Telescope's Backplane arrived at Joint Base Andrews on Monday, August 24, 2015 aboard a U.S. Air Force C-5 cargo plane. The Backplane, inside the Space Telescope Transporter for Air Road and S...

  12. RNA interference: unraveling a mystery.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Mary K

    2006-12-01

    Andrew Fire and Craig Mello have won the Nobel Prize in Medicine or Physiology for their discovery of RNA interference. Mary K. Montgomery, then a postdoc in the Fire laboratory, participated in some of the key experiments.

  13. The (nano) entrepreneur's dilemma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maynard, Andrew D.

    2015-03-01

    Emerging technologies need to be developed responsibly if their benefits are to outweigh any potential risks. Yet do entrepreneurs really have the luxury of grappling with future consequences from the get-go, asks Andrew D. Maynard.

  14. 2. VIEW OF SOUTH AND EAST SIDES OF BUILDING #2300 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW OF SOUTH AND EAST SIDES OF BUILDING #2300 FACING NORTHWEST. NOTE CURVED KNEE-BRACES ON SUPPORT POSTS. - Medford Service Center, Covered Storage Building, 1319 McAndrews Road, Medford, Jackson County, OR

  15. Breast skin and nipple changes

    MedlinePlus

    ... treatment. SCALY, FLAKING, ITCHY SKIN This is usually eczema or a bacterial or fungal infection. See your ... Atopic dermatitis, eczema, and noninfectious immunodeficiency disorders. In: James WD, Berger TG, Elston DM, eds. Andrews' Diseases of the Skin: Clinical ...

  16. 78 FR 32553 - Establishment of Class E Airspace; Boothbay, ME

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-31

    ..., Georgia 30320; telephone (404) 305-6364. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: History On March 28, 2013, the FAA... feet or More Above the Surface of the Earth. * * * * * ANE ME E5 Boothbay, ME St. Andrews...

  17. 3. VIEW OF EAST SIDE AND NORTH FRONT OF BUILDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW OF EAST SIDE AND NORTH FRONT OF BUILDING #2205 (AREA CONTAINING VEHICLE REPAIR SHOP AND VEHICLE MANAGEMENT OFFICE), FACING SOUTHWEST. - Medford Service Center, Warehouse, 1319 McAndrews Road, Medford, Jackson County, OR

  18. 78 FR 33394 - Notice To Extend Submittal Date for Scoping Comments for United States Air Force Main Operating...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-04

    ... scoping period will be considered in the preparation of the Draft EIS. Point of Contact: Please direct any.../A7AM, 3501 Fetchet Avenue, Joint Base Andrews, Maryland, 20762- 5157. Henry Williams Jr., Acting...

  19. Saved by Bell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gisin, Nicolas

    2017-01-01

    In John Stewart Bell and Twentieth-Century Physics: Vision and Integrity, fellow physicist Andrew Whitaker tells the story of Bell's life and his revolutionary discovery that not everything in physics can be explained using only local variables.

  20. Effects of Disasters: Risk and Resilience Factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... caused and natural disasters. Disasters may be explosions, earthquakes, floods, hurricanes, tornados, or fires. In a disaster, ... at severe natural disasters, such as the Armenian earthquake, mudslides in Mexico, and Hurricane Andrew in the ...

  1. Magnetotails throughout the solar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forsyth, C.; Milan, S. E.; Walsh, A. P.

    2010-12-01

    MEETING REPORT A key part of heliospheric and planetary physics came under scrutiny at an RAS Specialist Discussion Meeting in October. Colin Forsyth, Chris Arridge, Steve Milan and Andrew Walsh summarize.

  2. Pityriasis rubra pilaris

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pityriasis rubra pilaris - close-up References James WD, Berger TG, Elston DM. Pityriasis rosea, pityriasis rubra pilaris, ... other papulosquamous and hyperkeratotic diseases. In: James WD, Berger TG, Elston DM, eds. Andrews' Diseases of the ...

  3. Radiation from Cardiac Imaging Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... thought you would like to see the Circulation web site. Your Personal Message Send Message Share on Social Media Radiation From Cardiac Imaging Tests Andrew J. Einstein Circulation. 2013; 127: e495-e497 , ...

  4. 76 FR 30109 - Marine Mammals; File No. 15453

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-24

    ... Aquarium, 2777 Kalakaua Avenue Honolulu, HI 96815 (Dr. Andrew Rossiter, Responsible Party), has requested a..., HI 96814-4700; phone (808)944-2200; fax (808)973-2941. Written comments on this application should...

  5. Multiple data sets converge on a geologic structural model for Glass Buttes, Oregon geothermal prospect, Patrick Walsh, et al, 2010 American Geophysical Union Poster Session

    DOE Data Explorer

    Ezra Zemach

    2010-01-01

    Multiple data sets converge on a geologic structural model for Glass Buttes, Oregon geothermal prospect, Patrick Walsh, Brigette Martini, Chet Lide, Darrick Boschmann, John DIlles, Andrew Meigs, 2010 Ormat Nevada, Zonge Geophysical, Oregon State University American Geophysical Union, Poster Session

  6. 78 FR 63459 - Notice of Active Duty Determination

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-24

    ... Affairs. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Mr. Bruce T. Brown, Executive Secretary, DoD Civilian/Military Service Review Board, 1500 West Perimeter Road, Suite 3700, Joint Base Andrews, NAF Washington, MD...

  7. 77 FR 61755 - Performance Review Board Members

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-11

    ... LESLIE LEWIS TERESA LU MICHAEL METTLER ERIK MILLER TERESA MUNTZ DAVID MURPHY JUDITH NOVY STEVEN OLIN... TIMOTHY WILSON LEE ANDREW WOESTELL MEGAN WRIGHT DAVID YOUNG JASON Non-SES Employees Employee last...

  8. When Do Plumped-Up Lips Become 'Too Much'?

    MedlinePlus

    ... quite obvious," said Dr. Andrew Salzberg, chief of plastic surgery for the Mount Sinai Health System. Now, ... researcher Dr. Sang Kim. He is a facial plastic surgeon with Natural Face Clinics in Syracuse, N. ...

  9. Detail of parachute tower showing integration with main roof form, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of parachute tower showing integration with main roof form, facing southwest. - Albrook Air Force Station, Parachute & Armament Building, 200 feet north of Andrews Boulevard, Balboa, Former Panama Canal Zone, CZ

  10. 77 FR 71575 - Initiation of Antidumping and Countervailing Duty Administrative Reviews and Request for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-03

    ... Shoes Plant Shaoxing Andrew Metal Manufactured Shaoxing Dingli Metal Clotheshorse Co., Ltd. Shaoxing... in effect for company/government officials as well as their representatives in all segments of...

  11. The African Women's Protocol: bringing attention to reproductive rights and the MDGs.

    PubMed

    Gerntholtz, Liesl; Gibbs, Andrew; Willan, Samantha

    2011-04-01

    Andrew Gibbs and colleagues discuss the African Women's Protocol, a framework for ensuring reproductive rights are supported throughout the continent and for supporting interventions to improve women's reproductive health, including the MDGs.

  12. Needed: An 'Action Plan' for Kids Prone to Severe Allergic Reactions

    MedlinePlus

    ... safe and very effective," said Dr. J. Andrew Bird, a pediatric allergist at University of Texas Southwestern ... of using it, than not using it," said Bird, who wasn't involved in the AAP reports. ...

  13. UNDERSTANDING PATHWAYS OF TOXICITY: MAKING SENSE OF CHANGING SIGNALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Title:
    Understanding Pathways of Toxicity: Making sense of changing signals
    Authors & affiliations:
    Sid Hunter, Maria Blanton, Edward Karoly, Ellen Rogers, Leonard Mole, Phillip Hartig, James Andrews. Reproductive Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Ef...

  14. DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY OF DI- AND TETRACHLOROETHANE AND DICHLOROPROPANE IN EMBRYO CULTURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY OF DI- AND TETRACHLOROETHANE AND DICHLOROPROPANE IN EMBRYO CULTURE. JE Andrews, H Nichols, and ES Hunter. Reproductive Toxicology Division, NHEERL, USEPA, RTP, NC.

    Disinfection of drinking water with chlorine results in numerous chlorinated byprodu...

  15. Computers, Electronic Networking and Education: Some American Experiences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McConnell, David

    1991-01-01

    Describes new developments in distributed educational computing at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT, "Athena"), Carnegie Mellon University ("Andrew"), Brown University "Intermedia"), Electronic University Network (California), Western Behavioral Sciences Institute (California), and University of California,…

  16. 77 FR 27109 - Certification Related to the Khmer Rouge Tribunal; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-08

    ... of the Independent Counselor and the effect it has had on the perception of the court--that the ECCC... international co-prosecutor, Andrew Cayley, dissatisfied with the amount and depth of evidence, requested...

  17. 47. Jet Lowe, Photographer, June 1978. STAFFORD LOOM, WITH R. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    47. Jet Lowe, Photographer, June 1978. STAFFORD LOOM, WITH R. W. ANDREWS PATENT PATTERN DEVICE, C. 1870, VIEW LOOKING FROM THE FRONT, SECOND FLOOR SOUTH. - Watkins Mill, County Highway MM, Lawson, Ray County, MO

  18. 10. VIEW NORTH FROM FLOOR LEVEL OF DRYDOCK OF TOW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. VIEW NORTH FROM FLOOR LEVEL OF DRY-DOCK OF TOW TANK No. 1, WITH TORPEDO BODY BEING PREPARED FOR TANK TESTING. - NASA Langley Research Center, Seaplane Towing Channel, 108 Andrews Street, Hampton, Hampton, VA

  19. 78 FR 64535 - Notice of Appointment of Individuals To Serve as Members of Performance Review Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-29

    ... Member--Catherine DeFilippo Member-- William E. Dobryzkowski Member --Robert B. Koopman Member--Karen Laney Member--Andrew Martin Member--Margaret D. MacDonald Member--Stephen A. McLaughlin Member--Lyn...

  20. 78 FR 13706 - Notice of Appointment of Individuals To Serve as Members of Performance Review Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-28

    ... Dean A. Pinkert Member--Catherine DeFilippo Member--Robert B. Koopman Member--Karen Laney Member--Bill Dobryzkowski Member--Andrew Martin Member--Stephen A. McLaughlin Member--Lyn M Schlitt FOR FURTHER...

  1. 75 FR 70289 - Notice of Appointment of Individuals to Serve as Members of Performance Review Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-17

    ...Filippo Member: Robert B. Koopman Member: Karen Laney Member: Lynn I. Levine Member: James M. Lyons Member: Stephen A. McLaughlin Member: Lyn M. Schlitt Member: Andrew Martin This notice is published in the...

  2. Autumn MIST 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forsyth, Colin

    2010-02-01

    MEETING REPORT Colin Forsyth, Nicola Longden, Andrew Walsh and Robert Wicks summarize a MIST meeting where ground-based ionospheric science came under the spotlight, amid the broader concerns of the MIST community.

  3. 75 FR 60861 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Renewals; Vision

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-01

    ..., Edwin A. Betz, Donald L. Carman, Mitchell L Carman, Christopher R. Cone, Walter O. Connelly, Stephen B.... Jamison, James A. Jones, Ronnie M. Jones, Andrew C. Kelly, Jason W. King, James T. Leek, Billy J....

  4. 75 FR 44050 - Qualification of Drivers; Exemption Applications; Vision

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-27

    ..., Walter O. Connelly, Stephen B. Copeland, Armando P. D'Angeli, Donald R. Davis, Ivory Davis, Louis A. Di..., Charles S. Huffman, Jesse P. Jamison, James A. Jones, Ronnie M. Jones, Andrew C. Kelly, Jason W....

  5. A Coherent VLSI Design Environment.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    Circuit Grammar for Operational Amplifier Design.’ PhD Thesis, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. MIT. Janu- ary, 1984; also MIT...Andrew L. Ressler, "A Circuit Grammar for Operational Amplifier Design." PhD Thesis, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. MIT...ISA(7HL E tT T O!I VLSI Memo No. 84-211 November 1984 A Circuit Grammar for Operational Amplifier Design* *! Andrew Lewis Ressler** Electrical circuit

  6. Advanced Kinetic-Based Modeling Applied to Plasma and Neutral Flows

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    Advanced Kinetic-Based Modeling Applied to Plasma and Neutral Flows Briefers: Andrew Ketsdever Sergey Gimelshein PIs: Andrew Ketsdever...number. 1. REPORT DATE SEP 2012 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2012 to 00-00-2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Advanced Kinetic-Based Modeling ...magnetic field in opposite direction of applied field Extreme pressure tends to drive plasma out of discharge chamber Difficulties in modeling FRCs High

  7. Silicon-Containing Tri- and Tetra-Functional Cyanate Esters: Synthesis, Cure Kinetics, and Network Properties

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    Correspondence to: Andrew J. Guenthner (E-mail: andrew.guenthner@edwards.af.mil) Additional Supporting Information may be found in the online version...performance. Because the carbon-silicon bond is in general longer and more flexible than a corresponding carbon-   3    carbon bond, the molecular segments... corresponding networks formed from di-functional cyanate esters without silicon. We further show that these advantages are retained when the

  8. Obtaining Cue Rate Estimates for Some Mysticete Species using Existing Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    Roth at the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey. OBJECTIVES An emerging area of study in the field of marine mammal passive acoustics is the...DCLDE Workshop, St. Andrews, Scotland , 12 June. D’Spain, G. L., T. A. Helble, H. H. Batchelor, and D. Rimington (2014). “Statistical mechanics...Campbell, and K. D. Heaney (2013c). “Calibrating call counts from single fixed sensors,” DCLDE Workshop, St. Andrews, Scotland , 14 June. Helble, T. A

  9. Credible Set Estimation, Analysis, and Applications in Synthetic Aperture Radar Canonical Feature Extraction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-26

    CREDIBLE SET ESTIMATION, ANALYSIS, AND APPLICATIONS IN SYNTHETIC APERTURE RADAR CANONICAL FEATURE EXTRACTION THESIS Andrew C. Rexford, 1st Lieutenant...AND APPLICATIONS IN SYNTHETIC APERTURE RADAR CANONICAL FEATURE EXTRACTION THESIS Presented to the Faculty Department of Electrical and Computer...APPLICATIONS IN SYNTHETIC APERTURE RADAR CANONICAL FEATURE EXTRACTION THESIS Andrew C. Rexford, B.S.E.E. 1st Lieutenant, USAF Committee Membership: Dr. Julie

  10. Counterinsurgency: Clear-Hold-Build and the Pashtun Tribes in Afghanistan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-08

    Taliban. The roads allowed access to more remote areas. A statement by General Karl Eikenberry left no doubt about the idea of roads being critical...counterinsurgency_field_manual_afghanistan_edition?page=0,1 (accessed 13 March 2012). 83Andrew Wilder, “Winning Hearts and Minds?” http://afghanistanforum.wordpress.com/tag/ karl -eikenberry...Wilder, Andrew. “Winning Hearts and Minds?” http://afghanistanforum.wordpress.com/tag/ karl - eikenberry/ (accessed 13 March 2012). World Food

  11. Efficient Sensitivity Methods for Probabilistic Lifing and Engine Prognostics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    Garza, D. Wagner, Andrew Bates, and Andy Voorhees University of Texas at San Antonio SEPTEMBER 2010 Final Report Approved...5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 62102F 6. AUTHOR(S) Harry Millwater, Ronald Bagley, Jose Garza, D. Wagner, Andrew Bates, and Andy Voorhees 5d...Development, Volume 1 – POD Analysis, AFRL-ML-WP-TR-2001- 4010, Jan. 2000. 7. Miedlar P, Berens A, Hovey P, Boehnlein T, Loomis J, “PRoF v3 PRobability Of

  12. Post-Vitrification Cure Kinetics of High Temperature Composite Resins: Implications for Characterization and Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-01

    Guenthner , Josiah Reams, Christopher Sahagun, Matthew Davis, Joseph Mabry 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER Q0BG 7...PERFORMANCE Andrew J. Guenthner , 1 Josiah T. Reams, 2 Christopher M. Sahagun, 3 Matthew C. Davis, 4 and Joseph M. Mabry 1 1 Aerospace Systems...6301. 15 5. Reams, Josiah. T., Guenthner , Andrew J., Lamison, Kevin R., Vij, Vandana, Lubin, Lisa M., and Mabry, Joseph M. “Effect of Chemical

  13. Directed Self-Assembly and Morphology of Aryl-Substituted POSS in Polyetherimide Films

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-22

    Substituted POSS in Polyetherimide Films 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Andrew J. Guenthner , Gregory R. Yandek...Assembly and Morphology of Aryl-Substituted POSS in Polyetherimide Films Andrew J. Guenthner ,1 Gregory R. Yandek,1 Kevin R Lamison,2 and Joseph M...Fangchiang, M.-H. J. Poly. Sci., Prt. A: Polym. Chem. 2008, 46(15), 5157-5166. 6. Tomczak, S. J.; Wright, M. E.; Guenthner , A. J.; Petteys, B. J

  14. High-Performance Bio-Based Cyanate Esters with Low Moisture Uptake

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-01

    Uptake 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER In-House 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER Andrew Guenthner , Matthew...release, distribution is unlimited. HIGH-PERFORMANCE BIO-BASED CYANATE ESTER RESINS WITH LOW MOISTURE UPTAKE Andrew J. Guenthner ,1 Matthew C. Davis,2...275. 2. Illicium, pimpinella, and foeniculum. Jodral, M. M., Ed.; CRC Press: Washington, DC, 2004. 3. Guenthner , A. J.; Lamison, K. R.; Vij, V

  15. The Effect of Atomic Oxygen on POSS-Polyimides (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-05-01

    NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) S. Tomczak & J. Mabry (AFRL/RZSM); M. Wright, B. Petteys, & A. Guenthner (NAVAIR- 5d. PROJECT...Sandra J.; Vij, Vandana; Minton, Timothy K.; Brunsvold, Amy L.; Marchant, Darrell; Wright, Michael E.; Petteys, Brian J.; Guenthner , Andrew J.; Yandek...Wright, Michael E.; Petteys, Brian J.; Guenthner , Andrew J.; Svejda, Steven A.; Mabry, Joseph M., “Synthesis and Characterization of Space

  16. Effects of Thin High-z Layers on the Hydrodynamics of Laser-Accelerated Plastic Targets

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    support. We acknowledge very helpful discussions with John Sethian, Andrew Mostovych and Stephen Bodner. We thank Tom Walsh and Ed Hsiegh, Schafer...Kalantar, M.H. Key, B. A. Remington, J. E. Rothenberg, E. Wulfrum, C. P. Verdon , and J. P. Knauer, Phys. Plasmas 4, 1978 (1997). 4 Andrew J. Schmitt, A...823 (1984). 10 Nathan Metzler, Alexander Velikovitch, and John H, Gardner, Phys. Plasmas 8, (1999) 11 M. Desselberger, T. Afshar-rad, F. Khattak, S

  17. Experimental Generation of non-Kolmogorov Turbulence using a Liquid Crystal Spatial Light Modulator

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    performance evaluations. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This research was performed while the author Italo Toselli holds a National Research Council Research...REFERENCES 1. Larry C. Andrews, Ronald L. Phillips. Laser Beam Propagation through Random Media, 2nd ed. (SPIE, 2005). 2. Italo Toselli , Larry C...2008). 3. Italo Toselli , Larry C. Andrews, Ronald L. Phillips, Valter Ferrero. Free space optical system performance for a Gaussian beam propagating

  18. DECAF - Density Estimation for Cetaceans from Passive Acoustic Fixed Sensors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    DECAF – Density Estimation for Cetaceans from passive Acoustic Fixed sensors Len Thomas CREEM, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, Fife, Scotland...REPORT DATE 2010 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2010 to 00-00-2010 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE DECAF - Density Estimation for Cetaceans from...Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 LONG-TERM GOALS Determining the spatial density and distribution of cetacean (whale and dolphin) species is fundamental to

  19. Research in Mathematics and Computer Science: Calculation of the Probability of Undetected Error for Certain Error Detection Codes. Phase 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-31

    pectively. Figure 3. Code Weight Viewor for Dual of Code C2. -9- IQUALCOMM. Inc. Final Technical Repo for the Research in Mafthmatics and Cmputer Sience ...efforts. ANDREW J. VITERBI VICE CHAIRMAN AND CHIEF TECHNICAL OFFICER Education : Andrew J. Viterbi received the S.B. and S.M. degrees in Electrical...Coding, (with J.K. Omura), McGraw-Hill, 1979. JACK K. WOLF ENGINEERING ASSOCIATE Education : Jack Keil Wolf is a chaired professor in the Center for

  20. Using EM to Classify Text from Labeled and Unlabeled Documents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    prolog sec postscript knowledge postscript solution human exam quiz representation solution chapter field assaf ascii Table 2: Lists of the words...examples have used active learning, in which an algorithm iteratively selects an unlabeled example, asks a human labeler for its classification, and...Andrew McCallum, Ronald Rosenfeld. Tom Mitchell, and Andrew Ng. Improving text clasification by shrinkage in a hierarchy of classes. In 1CML-9S, 1998

  1. Adaption of the Air Weather Service Fog Model to Forecast Radiation Fog Events in the Southeast United States

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-03-01

    ADAPTATION OF THE AIR WEATHER SERVICE FO MODEL TO FORECAST RADIATION FOG EVENT IN THE SOUTHEAST UNITED STATES THESIS Andrew C. Goodnite, Captain...ENP/97M-06 ADAPTATION OF THE AIR WEATHER SERVICE FOG MODEL TO FORECAST RADIATION FOG EVENTS IN THE SOUTHEAST UNITED STATES THESIS Andrew C. Goodnite...AIR WEATHER SERVICE FOG MODEL TO FORECAST RADIATION FOG EVENTS IN THE SOUTHEAST UNITED STATES THESIS Presented to the Faculty of the Graduate School of

  2. Summary of the Proceedings of the National Symposium on Fracture Mechanics (17th) Held on 7-9 Aug 84 in Albany, New York.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-12-01

    THE SEVENTEENTH NATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON FRACTURE MECHANICS 00 rN JOHN H. UNDERWOOD DAVID P. WILHEM RICHARD CHAIT WAYNE R. ANDREWS 00 C. WILLIAM SMITH...AUTHOR.s) S. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER(.) John H. Underwood, Richard Chait, C. William Smith, David P. Wilhem , Wayne R. Andrews, and James C. Newman (See...AUTHORS (CONT’D) John H. Underwood U.S. Army Armament Research, Development, and Engineering Center Benet Weapons Laboratory Watervli et, NY Richard

  3. Behavioral Responses of Naive Cuvier’s Beaked Whales in the Ligurian Sea to Playback of Anthropogenic and Natural Sounds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    University of St Andrews,Scottish Oceans Institute,Sea Mammal Research Unit,St Andrews, KY16 8LB United Kingdom , 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT...7m hand-held carbon fiber pole. Tracking and data collection - To visually search for animals in the search phase, and to observe the behavior of...the animals during tagging and tracking, a marine mammal observer platform was installed on the deck of the Aleph. Observers scanned with naked eye

  4. Development of a Team Scenario Content Generation Framework

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    Development of a Team Scenario Content Generation Framework Andrew Morton Barbara D. Adams Project Manager: Barbara D. Adams Contract No. W7711... GENERATION FRAMEWORK by: Andrew Morton and Barbara D. Adams Humansystems® Incorporated 111 Farquhar Street Guelph, ON N1H 3N4 Project... Generation Framework Page i Abstract Web-based software called ELICIT (Experimental Laboratory for the Investigation of Collaboration, Information-sharing

  5. Investigation of Antiangiogenic Mechanisms Using Novel Imaging Techniques

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-01

    Biomed. Opt. 95, 982–994 2004. 6. M. Khurana, E. H. Moriyama, A. Mariampillai, and B. C. Wilson, “ Intravital high-resolution optical imaging of...Mechanisms Using Novel Imaging Techniques PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Andrew Fontanella CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Duke University Durham...Using Novel Imaging Techniques 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-09-1-0113 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER Andrew Fontanella

  6. US Army Europe Integrated Training Area Management (ITAM) Program - Training Support and the Environment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    1UNCLASSIFIED Supporting 7th ArmyReady Thru Training! Integrated Training Area Management Jeff Andrews USAREUR ITAM Operations Coordinator...Jeffrey.a.andrews@us.army.mil Army Sustainable Range Program (SRP) US Army Europe Integrated Training Area Management ( ITAM ) Program – Training Support and...Management ( ITAM ) Program - Training Support and the Environment 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d

  7. US Army Europe: Sharing the ITAM Tenets with Multinational Partners in Africa

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-01

    Any Mission, Anywhere UNCLASSIFIED As of 5 May 2011 USAREUR; Sharing ITAM TenetsUNCLASSIFIED Jeff Andrews USAREUR ITAM Operations Coordinator...Jeffrey.a.andrews@us.army.mil Army Sustainable Range Program (SRP) US Army Europe: Sharing the ITAM Tenets with Multinational Partners in Africa Report...REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2011 to 00-00-2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE US Army Europe: Sharing the ITAM Tenets with Multinational

  8. Sustainability vs. Enhancement: What is the Future Priority of Land Rehabilitation and Maintenance (LRAM)?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-01

    and Maintenance (LRAM)? Jeffrey Andrews US Army Europe ITAM Operations Manager jeffrey.a.andrews@us.army.mil Report Documentation Page Form...Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 Any Mission, Anywhere UNCLASSIFIED As of 29 Apr 2011 UNCLASSIFIED  ITAM is one of two DA G3 “Enabler” programs (RTLP...and ITAM ) that supports the objectives of the Army Sustainable Range Program (SRP) with the goal of maximizing the capability, availability, and

  9. Seeded Fault Bearing Experiments: Methodology and Data Acquisition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    Seeded Fault Bearing Experiments: Methodology and Data Acquisition by Andrew J. Bayba, Derwin Washington, and Kwok Tom ARL-TR-5575 June...TR-5575 June 2011 Seeded Fault Bearing Experiments: Methodology and Data Acquisition Andrew J. Bayba, Derwin Washington, and Kwok Tom...TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) October 2010 to March 2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Seeded Fault Bearing Experiments: Methodology and Data

  10. The Characterization Of The Kinetics Of Chlamydia Muridarum Infection In Defined Regions Of The Murine Genital Tract

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-08-01

    R. R. Ingalls, C. W. Andrews, Jr., A. M. Scurlock, and T. Darville . 2007. Plasmid-deficient Chlamydia muridarum fail to induce immune pathology...and protect against oviduct disease. J. Immunol. 179:4027-4034. 49 8. Darville , T., C. W. Andrews, Jr., and R. G. Rank. 2000. Does inhibition of...Sufficient IFN-gamma to Mediate Robust Protective Immunity against Genital Chlamydia muridarum Infection. J. Immunol. 180:3375-3382. 19. Darville , T

  11. Insights into Surface Structure and Performance of Fluorinated Silicates from Cohesive Energy Studies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-17

    fluorinated silicates from cohesive energy studies 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Andrew J...Insights into surface structure and performance of fluorinated silicates from cohesive energy studies 17 March 2016 Andrew J. Guenthner,1 Timothy...distribution is unlimited. PA Clearance Number 16153 Comparison of Surface Energy Parameters for Fluorosilicates 5 • Typical Surface Energies : -CF3 = 6

  12. Report of Freshwater Mussels Workshop Held at St. Louis, Missouri on 26-27 October 1982.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-10-01

    CHART NATIOfAL B4JREMJ Of STANDARDS- 1963-A %, V C3 C II -~ REPORT OF FRESHWATER MUSSELS WORKSHOP 26-27 October 19820 Andrew C. Miller, Compiler U. S ...Distribution Unlimited AA .. q, Sponsored by Office, Chief of Engineers, U. S . Army Washington, D. C. 20314 Published by U.S. Army Engineer Waterways...Field trip on the Meramec River, Missouri. Times Beach Access, on 27 October 1982. Photograph by Andrew Miller. U. S . Army Engineer Waterways

  13. An Analysis of Freshwater Mussels (Unionidae) in the Lower Ohio River at Two Beds Near Olmsted, Illinois: 1992 Studies.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-02-01

    of Freshwater Mussels (Unionidae) in the Lower Ohio River at Two Beds Near Olmsted, Illinois: 1992 Studies by Barry S . Payne, Andrew C. Miller...1992 Studies by Barry S . Payne, Andrew C. Miller, Deborah Shafer Environmental Laboratory U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Accesion For Waterways...Station Cataloging-in-Publication Data Payne, Barry S . An analysis of freshwater mussels (Unionidae) in the Lower Ohio River at two beds near Olmsted

  14. Germany, the European Union, and the Euro: The Primacy of Politics in Treasure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    12 Andrew C. Sobel , International Political Economy in Context: Individual Choices, Global Effects (Washington, DC: CQ Press...Wadbrook, West German Balance-of-Payments Policy, 54–62. 92 Lynn, Bust, 78. 93 Sobel , International Political Economy in Context, 388. 94 Lynn, Bust...Between Hitler and Stalin. New York: Basic Books, 2010. Sobel , Andrew C. International Political Economy in Context: Individual Choices, Global

  15. Relocation of Joint Munitions Storage Area. Environmental Assessment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-01

    Surface Water Surface waters are located in three significantly diverse watersheds (Potomac, Anacostia , and Patuxent rivers ) that drain 2,317 square...of Prince George’s County, and 132,000 acres drain to the Anacostia River (west of Andrews AFB). The majority of Andrews AFB is located in the...would be prepared by the contractor performing the work. At a minimum, the contractor would prepare a MDE Erosion and Sediment Control Plan and MDE

  16. Contactless Microwave Measurements of Photoconductivity in Silicon Hyperdoped with Chalcogens

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    photocarrier lifetime, hyperdoped silicon David Hutchinson, Thomas Cruson, Anthony DiFranzo, Andrew McAllister, Aurore J. Said, Jeffrey M. Warrender, Daniel...Chalcogens Daniel Recht, David Hutchinson1, Thomas Cruson1, Anthony DiFranzo1, Andrew McAllister1, Aurore J. Said, Jeffrey M. Warrender2, Peter D. Persans1...microwaves emitted by a Millitech Gunn diode pass, via a waveguide , through an isolator to protect the source from reflections. A ‘‘magic tee’’ then

  17. Dynamic Response of an Insonified Sonar Window Interacting with a Tonpilz Transducer Array

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-03

    NUWC-NPT Technical Report 11,781 3 January 2007 Dynamic Response of an Insonified Sonar Window Interacting with a Tonpilz Transducer Array Andrew J...Code 1516) for their discussions on Tonpilz transducer behavior Reviewed and Approved: 3 January 2007 s S. Griffin Head, Autonomous Systems and...FUNDING NUMBERS Dynamic Response of an Insonified Sonar Window Interacting with a Tonpilz Transducer Array 6. AUTHOR(S) Andrew J. Hull 7. PERFORMING

  18. Occurrence of Squash yellow mild mottle virus and Pepper golden mosaic virus in Potential New Hosts in Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Castro, Ruth M; Moreira, Lisela; Rojas, María R; Gilbertson, Robert L; Hernández, Eduardo; Mora, Floribeth; Ramírez, Pilar

    2013-09-01

    Leaf samples of Solanum lycopersicum, Capsicum annuum, Cucurbita moschata, Cucurbita pepo, Sechium edule and Erythrina spp. were collected. All samples were positive for begomoviruses using polymerase chain reaction and degenerate primers. A sequence of ∼1,100 bp was obtained from the genomic component DNA-A of 14 samples. In addition, one sequence of ∼580 bp corresponding to the coat protein (AV1) was obtained from a chayote (S. edule) leaf sample. The presence of Squash yellow mild mottle virus (SYMMoV) and Pepper golden mosaic virus (PepGMV) were confirmed. The host range reported for SYMMoV includes species of the Cucurbitaceae, Caricaceae and Fabaceae families. This report extends the host range of SYMMoV to include the Solanaceae family, and extends the host range of PepGMV to include C. moschata, C. pepo and the Fabaceae Erythrina spp. This is the first report of a begomovirus (PepGMV) infecting chayote in the Western Hemisphere.

  19. Pollen and stigma morphology of some Phaseoleae species (Leguminosae) with different pollinators.

    PubMed

    Basso-Alves, J P; Agostini, K; Teixeira, S de Pádua

    2011-07-01

    Pollen transport to a receptive stigma can be facilitated through different pollinators, which submits the pollen to different selection pressures. This study aimed to associate pollen and stigma morphology with zoophily in species of the tribe Phaseoleae. Species of the genera Erythrina, Macroptilium and Mucuna with different pollinators were chosen. Pollen grains and stigmas were examined under light microscopy (anatomy), scanning electronic microscopy (surface analyses) and transmission electronic microscopy (ultrastructure). The three genera differ in terms of pollen wall ornamentation, pollen size, pollen aperture, thickness of the pollen wall, amount of pollenkitt, pollen hydration status and dominant reserves within the pollen grain, while species within each genus are very similar in most studied characteristics. Most of these features lack relationships to pollinator type, especially in Erythrina and Mucuna. Pollen reserves are discussed on a broad scale, according to the occurrence of protein in the pollen of invertebrate- or vertebrate-pollinated species. Some pollen characteristics are more associated to semi-dry stigma requirements. This apical, compact, cuticularised and secretory stigma occurs in all species investigated. We conclude that data on pollen and stigma structure should be included together with those on floral morphology and pollinator behaviour for the establishment of functional pollination classes.

  20. Occurrence of Squash yellow mild mottle virus and Pepper golden mosaic virus in Potential New Hosts in Costa Rica

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Ruth M.; Moreira, Lisela; Rojas, María R.; Gilbertson, Robert L.; Hernández, Eduardo; Mora, Floribeth; Ramírez, Pilar

    2013-01-01

    Leaf samples of Solanum lycopersicum, Capsicum annuum, Cucurbita moschata, Cucurbita pepo, Sechium edule and Erythrina spp. were collected. All samples were positive for begomoviruses using polymerase chain reaction and degenerate primers. A sequence of ∼1,100 bp was obtained from the genomic component DNA-A of 14 samples. In addition, one sequence of ∼580 bp corresponding to the coat protein (AV1) was obtained from a chayote (S. edule) leaf sample. The presence of Squash yellow mild mottle virus (SYMMoV) and Pepper golden mosaic virus (PepGMV) were confirmed. The host range reported for SYMMoV includes species of the Cucurbitaceae, Caricaceae and Fabaceae families. This report extends the host range of SYMMoV to include the Solanaceae family, and extends the host range of PepGMV to include C. moschata, C. pepo and the Fabaceae Erythrina spp. This is the first report of a begomovirus (PepGMV) infecting chayote in the Western Hemisphere. PMID:25288955