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Sample records for escalated prostate radiotherapy

  1. The Impact of Dose Escalation on Secondary Cancer Risk After Radiotherapy of Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, Uwe . E-mail: uwe.schneider@psi.ch; Lomax, Antony; Besserer, Juergen; Pemler, Peter; Lombriser, Norbert; Kaser-Hotz, Barbara D.V.M.

    2007-07-01

    Purpose: To estimate secondary cancer risk due to dose escalation in patients treated for prostatic carcinoma with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), intensity-modulated RT (IMRT), and spot-scanned proton RT. Methods and Materials: The organ equivalent dose (OED) concept with a linear-exponential, a plateau, and a linear dose-response curve was applied to dose distributions of 23 patients who received RT of prostate cancer. Conformal RT was used in 7 patients, 8 patients received IMRT with 6- and 15-MV photons, and 8 patients were treated with spot-scanned protons. We applied target doses ranging from 70 Gy to 100 Gy. Cancer risk was estimated as a function of target dose and tumor control probability. Results: At a 100-Gy target dose the secondary cancer risk relative to the 3D treatment plan at 70 Gy was +18.4% (15.0% for a plateau model, 22.3% for a linear model) for the 6-MV IMRT plan, +25.3% (17.0%, 14.1%) for the 15-MV IMRT plan, and -40.7% (-41.3%, -40.0%) for the spot-scanned protons. The increasing risk of developing a radiation-associated malignancy after RT with increasing dose was balanced by the enhanced cure rates at a larger dose. Conclusions: Cancer risk after dose escalation for prostate RT is expected to be equal to or lower than for conventional 3D treatment at 70 Gy, independent of treatment modality or dose-response model. Spot-scanned protons are the treatment of choice for dose escalation because this therapy can halve the risk of secondary cancers.

  2. Update of Dutch Multicenter Dose-Escalation Trial of Radiotherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Mamgani, Abrahim Putten, Wim L.J. van; Heemsbergen, Wilma D.; Leenders, Geert J.L.H. van; Slot, Annerie; Dielwart, Michel F.H.; Incrocci, Luca; Lebesque, Joos V.

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: To update the analysis of the Dutch dose-escalation trial of radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Patients and Methods: A total of 669 patients with localized prostate cancer were randomly assigned to receive 68 or 78 Gy. The patients were stratified by age, institution, use of neoadjuvant or adjuvant hormonal therapy, and treatment group. The primary endpoint was freedom from failure (FFF), with failure defined as clinical or biochemical failure. Two definitions of biochemical failure were used: the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology definition (three consecutive increases in prostate-specific antigen level) and the Phoenix definition (nadir plus 2 {mu}g/L). The secondary endpoints were freedom from clinical failure, overall survival, and genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity. Results: After a median follow-up of 70 months, the FFF using the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology definition was significantly better in the 78-Gy arm than in the 68-Gy arm (7-year FFF rate, 54% vs. 47%, respectively; p = 0.04). The FFF using the Phoenix definition was also significantly better in the 78-Gy arm than in the 68-Gy arm (7-year FFF rate, 56% vs. 45%, respectively; p = 0.03). However, no differences in freedom from clinical failure or overall survival were observed. The incidence of late Grade 2 or greater genitourinary toxicity was similar in both arms (40% and 41% at 7 years; p = 0.6). However, the cumulative incidence of late Grade 2 or greater gastrointestinal toxicity was increased in the 78-Gy arm compared with the 68-Gy arm (35% vs. 25% at 7 years; p = 0.04). Conclusion: The results of our study have shown a statistically significant improvement in FFF in prostate cancer patients treated with 78 Gy but with a greater rate of late gastrointestinal toxicity.

  3. Prospective evaluation of a hydrogel spacer for rectal separation in dose-escalated intensity-modulated radiotherapy for clinically localized prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background As dose-escalation in prostate cancer radiotherapy improves cure rates, a major concern is rectal toxicity. We prospectively assessed an innovative approach of hydrogel injection between prostate and rectum to reduce the radiation dose to the rectum and thus side effects in dose-escalated prostate radiotherapy. Methods Acute toxicity and planning parameters were prospectively evaluated in patients with T1-2 N0 M0 prostate cancer receiving dose-escalated radiotherapy after injection of a hydrogel spacer. Before and after hydrogel injection, we performed MRI scans for anatomical assessment of rectal separation. Radiotherapy was planned and administered to 78 Gy in 39 fractions. Results From eleven patients scheduled for spacer injection the procedure could be performed in ten. In one patient hydrodissection of the Denonvillier space was not possible. Radiation treatment planning showed low rectal doses despite dose-escalation to the target. In accordance with this, acute rectal toxicity was mild without grade 2 events and there was complete resolution within four to twelve weeks. Conclusions This prospective study suggests that hydrogel injection is feasible and may prevent rectal toxicity in dose-escalated radiotherapy of prostate cancer. Further evaluation is necessary including the definition of patients who might benefit from this approach. Trial registration: German Clinical Trials Register DRKS00003273. PMID:23336502

  4. Sexual Function After Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer: Results From a Dose-Escalation Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Wielen, Gerard J. van der . E-mail: g.vanderwielen@erasmusmc.nl; Putten, Wim van; Incrocci, Luca

    2007-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to provide information about sexual function (SF) after three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for prostate cancer while taking important factors into account that influence SF. Methods and Materials: Between June 1997 and February 2003, a total of 268 patients from a randomized dose-escalation trial comparing 68 Gy and 78 Gy agreed to participate in an additional part of the trial that evaluated SF. Results: At baseline 28% of patients had erectile dysfunction (ED). After 1 year, 27% of the pretreatment potent patients had developed ED. After 2 years this percentage had increased to 36%. After 3 years it almost stabilized at 38%. Satisfaction with sexual life was significantly correlated with ED. After 2 years one third of the pre-treatment potent patients still had considerable to very much sexual desire and found sex (very) important. No significant differences were found between the two dose-arms. Potency aids were used on a regular base by 14% of the patients. Conclusion: By taking adjuvant hormonal therapy (HT), HT during follow-up and potency aids into account, we found a lower percentage of ED after 3D-CRT than reported in previous prospective studies. A large group of patients still had sexual desire, considered sex important and 14% used potency aids after 3D-CRT.

  5. Lack of Benefit for the Addition of Androgen Deprivation Therapy to Dose-Escalated Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Intermediate- and High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Krauss, Daniel; Kestin, Larry; Ye, Hong; Brabbins, Donald; Ghilezan, Michel; Gustafson, Gary; Vicini, Frank; Martinez, Alvaro

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: Assessment of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) benefits for prostate cancer treated with dose-escalated radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: From 1991 to 2004, 1,044 patients with intermediate- (n = 782) or high-risk (n = 262) prostate cancer were treated with dose-escalated RT at William Beaumont Hospital. Patients received external-beam RT (EBRT) alone, brachytherapy (high or low dose rate), or high dose rate brachytherapy plus pelvic EBRT. Intermediate-risk patients had Gleason score 7, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) 10.0-19.9 ng/mL, or Stage T2b-T2c. High-risk patients had Gleason score 8-10, PSA {>=}20, or Stage T3. Patients were additionally divided specifically by Gleason score, presence of palpable disease, and PSA level to further define subgroups benefitting from ADT. Results: Median follow-up was 5 years; 420 patients received ADT + dose-escalated RT, and 624 received dose-escalated RT alone. For all patients, no advantages in any clinical endpoints at 8 years were associated with ADT administration. No differences in any endpoints were associated with ADT administration based on intermediate- vs. high-risk group or RT modality when analyzed separately. Patients with palpable disease plus Gleason {>=}8 demonstrated improved clinical failure rates and a trend toward improved survival with ADT. Intermediate-risk patients treated with brachytherapy alone had improved biochemical control when ADT was given. Conclusion: Benefits of ADT in the setting of dose-escalated RT remain poorly defined. This question must continue to be addressed in prospective study.

  6. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy as Primary Therapy for Prostate Cancer: Report on Acute Toxicity After Dose Escalation With Simultaneous Integrated Boost to Intraprostatic Lesion

    SciTech Connect

    Fonteyne, Valerie Villeirs, Geert; Speleers, Bruno; Neve, Wilfried de; Wagter, Carlos de; Lumen, Nicolas; Meerleer, Gert de

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: To report on the acute toxicity of a third escalation level using intensity-modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer (PCa) and the acute toxicity resulting from delivery of a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) to an intraprostatic lesion (IPL) detected on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), with or without spectroscopy. Methods and Materials: Between January 2002 and March 2007, we treated 230 patients with intensity-modulated radiotherapy to a third escalation level as primary therapy for prostate cancer. If an IPL (defined by MRI or MRI plus spectroscopy) was present, a SIB was delivered to the IPL. To report on acute toxicity, patients were seen weekly during treatment and 1 and 3 months after treatment. Toxicity was scored using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group toxicity scale, supplemented by an in-house-developed scoring system. Results: The median dose to the planning target volume was 78 Gy. An IPL was found in 118 patients. The median dose to the MRI-detected IPL and MRI plus spectroscopy-detected IPL was 81 Gy and 82 Gy, respectively. No Grade 3 or 4 acute gastrointestinal toxicity developed. Grade 2 acute gastrointestinal toxicity was present in 26 patients (11%). Grade 3 genitourinary toxicity was present in 15 patients (7%), and 95 patients developed Grade 2 acute genitourinary toxicity (41%). No statistically significant increase was found in Grade 2-3 acute gastrointestinal or genitourinary toxicity after a SIB to an IPL. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that treatment-induced acute toxicity remains low when intensity-modulated radiotherapy to 80 Gy as primary therapy for prostate cancer is used. In addition, a SIB to an IPL did not increase the severity or incidence of acute toxicity.

  7. Percentage of Cancer Volume in Biopsy Cores Is Prognostic for Prostate Cancer Death and Overall Survival in Patients Treated With Dose-Escalated External Beam Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Vance, Sean M.; Stenmark, Matthew H.; Blas, Kevin; Halverson, Schulyer; Hamstra, Daniel A.; Feng, Felix Y.

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To investigate the prognostic utility of the percentage of cancer volume (PCV) in needle biopsy specimens for prostate cancer patients treated with dose-escalated external beam radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: The outcomes were analyzed for 599 men treated for localized prostate cancer with external beam radiotherapy to a minimal planning target volume dose of 75 Gy (range, 75-79.2). We assessed the effect of PCV and the pretreatment and treatment-related factors on the freedom from biochemical failure, freedom from metastasis, cause-specific survival, and overall survival. Results: The median number of biopsy cores was 7 (interquartile range, 6-12), median PCV was 10% (interquartile range, 2.5-25%), and median follow-up was 62 months. The PCV correlated with the National Comprehensive Cancer Network risk group and individual risk features, including T stage, prostate-specific antigen level, Gleason score, and percentage of positive biopsy cores. On log-rank analysis, the PCV stratified by quartile was prognostic for all endpoints, including overall survival. In addition, the PCV was a stronger prognostic factor than the percentage of positive biopsy cores when the two metrics were analyzed together. On multivariate analysis, the PCV predicted a worse outcome for all endpoints, including freedom from biochemical failure, (hazard ratio, 1.9; p = .0035), freedom from metastasis (hazard ratio, 1.7, p = .09), cause-specific survival (hazard ratio, 3.9, p = .014), and overall survival (hazard ratio, 1.8, p = .02). Conclusions: For patients treated with dose-escalated external beam radiotherapy, the volume of cancer in the biopsy specimen adds prognostic value for clinically relevant endpoints, particularly in intermediate- and high-risk patients. Although the PCV determination is more arduous than the percentage of positive biopsy cores, it provides superior risk stratification.

  8. Dose Escalation and Quality of Life in Patients With Localized Prostate Cancer Treated With Radiotherapy: Long-Term Results of the Dutch Randomized Dose-Escalation Trial (CKTO 96-10 Trial)

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Mamgani, Abrahim; Putten, Wim L.J. van; Wielen, Gerard J. van der; Levendag, Peter C.; Incrocci, Luca

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: To assess the impact of dose escalation of radiotherapy on quality of life (QoL) in prostate cancer patients. Patients and Methods: Three hundred prostate cancer patients participating in the Dutch randomized trial (CKTO 69-10) comparing 68 Gy with 78 Gy were the subject of this analysis. These patients filled out the SF-36 QoL questionnaire before radiotherapy (baseline) and 6, 12, 24, and 36 months thereafter. Changes in QoL over time of {>=}10 points were considered clinically relevant. Repeated-measures regression analyses were applied to estimate and test the QoL changes over time, the differences between the two arms, and for association with a number of covariates. Results: At 3-year follow-up, the summary score physical health was 73.2 for the 68-Gy arm vs. 71.6 for the 78-Gy arm (p = 0.81), and the summary score mental health was 76.7 for the 68-Gy arm vs. 76.1 for the 78-Gy arm (p = 0.97). Statistically significant (p < 0.01) deterioration in QoL scores over time was registered in both arms in six scales. The deterioration over time was more pronounced in the high-dose arm for most scales. However, clinically relevant deterioration (>10 points) was seen for only two scales. None of the tested covariates were significantly correlated with QoL scores. Conclusion: Dose escalation did not result in significant deterioration of QoL in prostate cancer patients. In both randomization arms, statistically significant decreases in QoL scores over time were seen in six scales. The deterioration of QoL was more pronounced in the physical than in the mental health domain and in some scales more in the high- than in the low-dose arm, but the differences between arms were not statistically significant.

  9. Dose-Volume Parameters of the Corpora Cavernosa Do Not Correlate With Erectile Dysfunction After External Beam Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer: Results From a Dose-Escalation Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Wielen, Gerard J. van der Hoogeman, Mischa S.; Dohle, Gert R.; Putten, Wim L.J. van; Incrocci, Luca

    2008-07-01

    Purpose: To analyze the correlation between dose-volume parameters of the corpora cavernosa and erectile dysfunction (ED) after external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between June 1997 and February 2003, a randomized dose-escalation trial comparing 68 Gy and 78 Gy was conducted. Patients at our institute were asked to participate in an additional part of the trial evaluating sexual function. After exclusion of patients with less than 2 years of follow-up, ED at baseline, or treatment with hormonal therapy, 96 patients were eligible. The proximal corpora cavernosa (crura), the superiormost 1-cm segment of the crura, and the penile bulb were contoured on the planning computed tomography scan and dose-volume parameters were calculated. Results: Two years after EBRT, 35 of the 96 patients had developed ED. No statistically significant correlations between ED 2 years after EBRT and dose-volume parameters of the crura, the superiormost 1-cm segment of the crura, or the penile bulb were found. The few patients using potency aids typically indicated to have ED. Conclusion: No correlation was found between ED after EBRT for prostate cancer and radiation dose to the crura or penile bulb. The present study is the largest study evaluating the correlation between ED and radiation dose to the corpora cavernosa after EBRT for prostate cancer. Until there is clear evidence that sparing the penile bulb or crura will reduce ED after EBRT, we advise to be careful in sparing these structures, especially when this involves reducing treatment margins.

  10. 70 Gy Versus 80 Gy in Localized Prostate Cancer: 5-Year Results of GETUG 06 Randomized Trial;Prostate cancer; Dose escalation; Conformal radiotherapy; Randomized trial

    SciTech Connect

    Beckendorf, Veronique; Guerif, Stephane; Le Prise, Elisabeth; Cosset, Jean-Marc; Bougnoux, Agnes; Chauvet, Bruno; Salem, Naji; Chapet, Olivier; Bourdain, Sylvain; Bachaud, Jean-Marc; Maingon, Philippe; Hannoun-Levi, Jean-Michel; Malissard, Luc; Simon, Jean-Marc; Pommier, Pascal; Hay, Men; Dubray, Bernard; Lagrange, Jean-Leon; Luporsi, Elisabeth; Bey, Pierre

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: To perform a randomized trial comparing 70 and 80 Gy radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Patients and Methods: A total of 306 patients with localized prostate cancer were randomized. No androgen deprivation was allowed. The primary endpoint was biochemical relapse according to the modified 1997-American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology and Phoenix definitions. Toxicity was graded using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 1991 criteria and the late effects on normal tissues-subjective, objective, management, analytic scales (LENT-SOMA) scales. The patients' quality of life was scored using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire 30-item cancer-specific and 25-item prostate-specific modules. Results: The median follow-up was 61 months. According to the 1997-American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology definition, the 5-year biochemical relapse rate was 39% and 28% in the 70- and 80-Gy arms, respectively (p = .036). Using the Phoenix definition, the 5-year biochemical relapse rate was 32% and 23.5%, respectively (p = .09). The subgroup analysis showed a better biochemical outcome for the higher dose group with an initial prostate-specific antigen level >15 ng/mL. At the last follow-up date, 26 patients had died, 10 of their disease and none of toxicity, with no differences between the two arms. According to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale, the Grade 2 or greater rectal toxicity rate was 14% and 19.5% for the 70- and 80-Gy arms (p = .22), respectively. The Grade 2 or greater urinary toxicity was 10% at 70 Gy and 17.5% at 80 Gy (p = .046). Similar results were observed using the LENT-SOMA scale. Bladder toxicity was more frequent at 80 Gy than at 70 Gy (p = .039). The quality-of-life questionnaire results before and 5 years after treatment were available for 103 patients with no differences found between the 70- and 80-Gy arms. Conclusion: High-dose radiotherapy provided a

  11. The Percent of Positive Biopsy Cores Improves Prediction of Prostate Cancer-Specific Death in Patients Treated With Dose-Escalated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Qian Yushen; Feng, Felix Y.; Halverson, Schuyler; Blas, Kevin; Sandler, Howard M.; Hamstra, Daniel A.

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: To examine the prognostic utility of the percentage of positive cores (PPC) at the time of prostate biopsy for patients treated with dose-escalated external beam radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective analysis of patients treated at University of Michigan Medical Center to at least 75 Gy. Patients were stratified according to PPC by quartile, and freedom from biochemical failure (nadir + 2 ng/mL), freedom from metastasis (FFM), cause-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival (OS) were assessed by log-rank test. Receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was used to determine the optimal cut point for PPC stratification. Finally, Cox proportional hazards multivariate regression was used to assess the impact of PPC on clinical outcome when adjusting for National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) risk group and androgen deprivation therapy. Results: PPC information was available for 651 patients. Increasing-risk features including T stage, prostate-specific antigen, Gleason score, and NCCN risk group were all directly correlated with increasing PPC. On log-rank evaluation, all clinical endpoints, except for OS, were associated with PPC by quartile, with worse clinical outcomes as PPC increased, with the greatest impact seen in the highest quartile (>66.7% of cores positive). ROC curve analysis confirmed that a cut point using two-thirds positive cores was most closely associated with CSS (p = 0.002; area under ROC curve, 0.71). On univariate analysis, stratifying patients according to PPC less than or equal to 66.7% vs. PPC greater than 66.7% was prognostic for freedom from biochemical failure (p = 0.0001), FFM (p = 0.0002), and CSS (p = 0.0003) and marginally prognostic for OS (p = 0.055). On multivariate analysis, after adjustment for NCCN risk group and androgen deprivation therapy use, PPC greater than 66.7% increased the risk for biochemical failure (p = 0.0001; hazard ratio [HR], 2.1 [95% confidence

  12. Dose-Escalated Radiotherapy for High-Risk Prostate Cancer: Outcomes in Modern Era With Short-Term Androgen Deprivation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Liauw, Stanley L.; Stadler, Walter M.; Correa, David B.S.; Weichselbaum, Ralph R.; Jani, Ashesh B.

    2010-05-01

    Purpose: Randomized data have supported the use of long-term androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) combined with radiotherapy (RT) for men with high-risk prostate cancer. The present study reviewed the outcomes of intermediate- and high-risk men treated with RT and short-term ADT. Materials and Methods: A total of 184 men with any single risk factor of prostate-specific antigen >=10 ng/mL, clinical Stage T2b or greater, or Gleason score >=7 were treated with primary external beam RT for nonmetastatic adenocarcinoma of the prostate. The median radiation dose was 74 Gy; 55% were treated with intensity-modulated RT. All patients received ADT for 1 to 6 months (median, 4), consisting of a gonadotropin-releasing hormone analog. Univariate and multivariable analyses were performed for risk factors, including T stage, Gleason score, radiation dose, and prostate-specific antigen level. Results: With a median follow-up of 51 months, the 4-year freedom from biochemical failure (FFBF) using the nadir plus 2 ng/mL definition was 83% for all patients. Clinical Stage T3 disease was the only variable tested associated with FFBF on univariate (4-year FFBF rate, 46% vs. 87% for Stage T1-T2c disease; p = .0303) and multivariable analysis (hazard ratio, 3.9; p = .0016). On a subset analysis of high-risk patients (National Comprehensive Cancer Network criteria), those with clinical Stage T3 disease (4-year FFBF rate, 46% vs. 80%; p = .0303) and a radiation dose <74 Gy (4-year FFBF rate, 64% vs. 80%) had a poorer outcome on univariate analysis. However, clinical Stage T3 disease and radiation dose were not significant on multivariable analysis, although a statistical multivariable trend was seen for both (p = .0650 and p = .0597, respectively). Conclusion: Short-term ADT and RT might be acceptable for men with intermediate- and high-risk prostate cancer, especially for clinically localized disease treated with doses of >=74 Gy.

  13. [Prostate cancer external beam radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    de Crevoisier, R; Pommier, P; Latorzeff, I; Chapet, O; Chauvet, B; Hennequin, C

    2016-09-01

    The prostate external beam radiotherapy techniques are described, when irradiating the prostate or after prostatectomy, with and without pelvic lymph nodes. The following parts are presented: indications of radiotherapy, total dose and fractionation, planning CT image acquisition, volume of interest delineation (target volumes and organs at risk) and margins, Intensity modulated radiotherapy planning and corresponding dose-volume constraints, and finally Image guided radiotherapy. PMID:27516051

  14. SU-C-BRA-01: 18F-NaF PET/CT-Directed Dose Escalation in Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Spine Oligometastases From Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, L; Zhang, W; Li, M; Peng, X; Xie, L; Lin, Z; Kwee, S; Wang, H; Kuang, Y

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the technical feasibility of SBRT dose painting using {sup 18}F-NaF positron emission tomography (PET) scans guidance in patients with spine oligometastases from prostate cancer. Methods: As a proof of concept, six patients with 14 spine oligometastatic lesions from prostate cancer who had {sup 18}F-NaF PET/CT scan prior to treatment were retrospectively included. GTV{sub reg} was delineated according to the regular tumor boundary shown on PET and/or CT images; and GTV{sub MATV} was contoured based on a net metabolically active tumor volume (MATV) defined by 60% of the SUV{sub max} values on {sup 18}F-NaF PET images. The PTVs (PTV{sub reg} and PTV{sub MATV}) were defined as respective GTVs (plus involved entire vertebral body for PTV{sub reg}) with a 3-mm isotropic expansion margin. Three 1-fraction SBRT plans using VMAT technique along with 10 MV FFF beams (Plan{sub 24Gy}, Plan{sub 24–27Gy}, and Plan{sub 24–30Gy}) were generated for each patient. All plans included a dose of 24 Gy prescribed to PTV{sub reg}. The Plan{sub 24–27Gy} and Plan{sub 24–30Gy} also included a simultaneous boost dose of 27 Gy or 30 Gy prescribed to the PTV{sub MATV}, respectively. The feasibility of 18F-NaF PET-guided SBRT dose escalation was evaluated by its ability to achieve the prescription dose objectives while adhering to organ-at-risk (OAR) dose constraints. The normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCP) calculated by radiological models were also compared between the plans. Results: In all 33 SBRT plans generated, the planning objectives and dose constraints were met without exception. Plan{sub 24–27Gy} and Plan{sub 24–30Gy} had a significantly higher dose in PTV{sub MATV} than Plan{sub 24Gy} (p < 0.05), respectively, while maintaining a similar OAR sparing profile and NTCP values. Conclusion: Using VMAT with FFF beams to incorporate a simultaneous {sup 18}F-NaF PET-guided radiation boost dose up to 30 Gy into a SBRT plan is technically

  15. Phase II Trial of Radiation Dose Escalation With Conformal External Beam Radiotherapy and High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Combined With Long-Term Androgen Suppression in Unfavorable Prostate Cancer: Feasibility Report

    SciTech Connect

    Valero, Jeanette; Cambeiro, Mauricio; Galan, Carlos; Teijeira, Mercedes; Romero, Pilar; Zudaire, Javier; Moreno, Marta; Ciervide, Raquel; Aristu, Jose Javier; Martinez-Monge, Rafael

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility of combined long-term luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist-based androgen suppressive therapy (AST) and dose escalation with high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy for high-risk (HRPC) or very-high-risk prostate cancer (VHRPC). Methods and Materials: Between January 2001 and October 2006, 134 patients (median age, 70 years) with either National Comprehensive Cancer Network criteria-defined HRPC (n = 47, 35.1%) or VHRPC (n = 87, 64.9%) were prospectively enrolled in this Phase II trial. Tumor characteristics included a median pretreatment prostate-specific antigen level of 14.6 ng/mL, a median clinical stage of T2c, and a median Gleason score of 7. Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (54 Gy in 30 fractions) was followed by HDR brachytherapy (19 Gy in 4 b.i.d. treatments). Androgen suppressive therapy started 0-3 months before three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and continued for 2 years. Results: One implant was repositioned with a new procedure (0.7%). Five patients (3.7%) discontinued AST at a median of 13 months (range, 6-18 months) because of disease progression (n = 1), hot flashes (n = 2), fatigue (n = 1), and impotence (n = 1). After a median follow-up of 37.4 months (range, 24-90 months), the highest Radiation Therapy Oncology Group-defined late urinary toxicities were Grade 0 in 47.8%, Grade 1 in 38.1%, Grade 2 in 7.5%, and Grade 3 in 6.7% of patients. Maximal late gastrointestinal toxicities were Grade 0 in 73.1%, Grade 1 in 16.4%, Grade 2 in 7.5%, and Grade 3 in 2.9% of patients. There were no Grade 4 or 5 events. Conclusions: Intermediate-term results show that dose escalation with HDR brachytherapy combined with long-term AST is feasible and has a toxicity profile similar to that reported by previous HDR brachytherapy studies.

  16. Dose-escalation using intensity-modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer - evaluation of quality of life with and without 18F-choline PET-CT detected simultaneous integrated boost

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In comparison to the conventional whole-prostate dose escalation, an integrated boost to the macroscopic malignant lesion might potentially improve tumor control rates without increasing toxicity. Quality of life after radiotherapy (RT) with vs. without 18F-choline PET-CT detected simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) was prospectively evaluated in this study. Methods Whole body image acquisition in supine patient position followed 1 h after injection of 178-355MBq 18F-choline. SIB was defined by a tumor-to-background uptake value ratio > 2 (GTVPET). A dose of 76Gy was prescribed to the prostate (PTVprostate) in 2Gy fractions, with or without SIB up to 80Gy. Patients treated with (n = 46) vs. without (n = 21) SIB were surveyed prospectively before (A), at the last day of RT (B) and a median time of two (C) and 19 month (D) after RT to compare QoL changes applying a validated questionnaire (EPIC - expanded prostate cancer index composite). Results With a median cut-off standard uptake value (SUV) of 3, a median GTVPET of 4.0 cm3 and PTVboost (GTVPET with margins) of 17.3 cm3 was defined. No significant differences were found for patients treated with vs. without SIB regarding urinary and bowel QoL changes at times B, C and D (mean differences ≤3 points for all comparisons). Significantly decreasing acute urinary and bowel score changes (mean changes > 5 points in comparison to baseline level at time A) were found for patients with and without SIB. However, long-term urinary and bowel QoL (time D) did not differ relative to baseline levels - with mean urinary and bowel function score changes < 3 points in both groups (median changes = 0 points). Only sexual function scores decreased significantly (> 5 points) at time D. Conclusions Treatment planning with 18F-choline PET-CT allows a dose escalation to a macroscopic intraprostatic lesion without significantly increasing toxicity. PMID:22289620

  17. External beam radiotherapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Budiharto, Tom; Haustermans, Karin; Kovacs, Gyoergy

    2010-05-01

    External beam radiotherapy (EBRT) constitutes an important management option for prostate cancer (PCa). Radiation doses >or=74 Gy are warranted. Dose escalation of EBRT using three-dimensional-conformal radiotherapy (RT) or intensity-modulated RT improves the therapeutic index by minimizing normal tissue complication probability and increasing tumor control probability. Although higher doses are associated with better biochemical disease-free survival, no impact on local recurrence or overall survival has been demonstrated. Hypofractionation for PCa may be an attractive therapeutic option, but toxicity data need to be confirmed in randomized phase III trials. Advances in RT technology, such as volumetric modulated arc therapy and image-guided RT, could facilitate the introduction of dose escalation and hypofractionation into clinical practice. Particle beam irradiation and more specific carbon ion RT are also very promising new techniques that are under investigation. Ultimately, these techniques may lead to focal dose escalation by selective boosting of dominant intraprostatic lesions, which is currently under investigation as a solution to overcome increased toxicity of homogenous dose escalation. This review will give a comprehensive overview of all the recent advances in these new radiation therapy techniques.

  18. Recent advancements in toxicity prediction following prostate cancer radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ospina, J D; Fargeas, A; Dréan, G; Simon, A; Acosta, O; de Crevoisier, R

    2015-01-01

    In external beam radiotherapy for prostate cancer limiting toxicities for dose escalation are bladder and rectum toxicities. Normal tissue complication probability models aim at quantifying the risk of developping adverse events following radiotherapy. These models, originally proposed in the context of uniform irradiation, have evolved to implementations based on the state-of-the-art classification methods which are trained using empirical data. Recently, the use of image processing techniques combined with population analysis methods has led to a new generation of models to understand the risk of normal tissue complications following radiotherapy. This paper overviews those methods in the case of prostate cancer radiation therapy and propose some lines of future research.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging for prostate cancer radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Dinh, Cuong V; Steenbergen, Peter; Ghobadi, Ghazaleh; Heijmink, Stijn W T J P; Pos, Floris J; Haustermans, Karin; van der Heide, Uulke A

    2016-03-01

    For radiotherapy of prostate cancer, MRI is used increasingly for delineation of the prostate gland. For focal treatment of low-risk prostate cancer or focal dose escalation for intermediate and high-risk cancer, delineation of the tumor is also required. While multi-parametric MRI is well established for detection of tumors and for staging of the disease, delineation of the tumor inside the prostate is not common practice. Guidelines, such as the PI-RADS classification, exist for tumor detection and staging, but no such guidelines are available for tumor delineation. Indeed, interobserver studies show substantial variation in tumor contours. Computer-aided tumor detection and delineation may help improve the robustness of the interpretation of multi-parametric MRI data. Comparing the performance of an earlier developed model for tumor segmentation with expert delineations, we found a significant correlation between tumor probability in a voxel and the number of experts identifying this voxel as tumor. This suggests that the model agrees with 'the wisdom of the crowd', and thus could serve as a reference for individual physicians in their decision making. With multi-parametric MRI it becomes feasible to revisit the GTV-CTV concept in radiotherapy of prostate cancer. While detection of index lesions is quite reliable, contouring variability and the low sensitivity to small lesions suggest that the remainder of the prostate should be treated as CTV. Clinical trials that investigate the options for dose differentiation, for example with dose escalation to the visible tumor or dose reduction to the CTV, are therefore warranted.

  20. Prostate Radiotherapy in the Era of Advanced Imaging and Precision Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Dulaney, Caleb R.; Osula, Daniel O.; Yang, Eddy S.; Rais-Bahrami, Soroush

    2016-01-01

    Tremendous technological advancements in prostate radiotherapy have decreased treatment toxicity and improved clinical outcomes for men with prostate cancer. While these advances have allowed for significant treatment volume reduction and whole-organ dose escalation, further improvement in prostate radiotherapy has been limited by classic techniques for diagnosis and risk stratification. Developments in prostate imaging, image-guided targeted biopsy, next-generation gene expression profiling, and targeted molecular therapies now provide information to stratify patients and select treatments based on tumor biology. Image-guided targeted biopsy improves detection of clinically significant cases of prostate cancer and provides important information about the biological behavior of intraprostatic lesions which can further guide treatment decisions. We review the evolution of prostate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and MRI-ultrasound fusion-guided prostate biopsy. Recent advancements in radiation therapy including dose escalation, moderate and extreme hypofractionation, partial prostate radiation therapy, and finally dose escalation by simultaneous integrated boost are discussed. We also review next-generation sequencing and discuss developments in targeted molecular therapies. Last, we review ongoing clinical trials and future treatment paradigms that integrate targeted biopsy, molecular profiling and therapy, and prostate radiotherapy. PMID:27022486

  1. MRI-guided prostate adaptive radiotherapy - A systematic review.

    PubMed

    McPartlin, A J; Li, X A; Kershaw, L E; Heide, U; Kerkmeijer, L; Lawton, C; Mahmood, U; Pos, F; van As, N; van Herk, M; Vesprini, D; van der Voort van Zyp, J; Tree, A; Choudhury, A

    2016-06-01

    Dose escalated radiotherapy improves outcomes for men with prostate cancer. A plateau for benefit from dose escalation using EBRT may not have been reached for some patients with higher risk disease. The use of increasingly conformal techniques, such as step and shoot IMRT or more recently VMAT, has allowed treatment intensification to be achieved whilst minimising associated increases in toxicity to surrounding normal structures. To support further safe dose escalation, the uncertainties in the treatment target position will need be minimised using optimal planning and image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). In particular the increasing usage of profoundly hypo-fractionated stereotactic therapy is predicated on the ability to confidently direct treatment precisely to the intended target for the duration of each treatment. This article reviews published studies on the influences of varies types of motion on daily prostate position and how these may be mitigated to improve IGRT in future. In particular the role that MRI has played in the generation of data is discussed and the potential role of the MR-Linac in next-generation IGRT is discussed. PMID:27162159

  2. Penile bulb dose and impotence after three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer on RTOG 9406: Findings from a prospective, multi-institutional, phase I/II dose-escalation study

    SciTech Connect

    Roach, Mack . E-mail: roach@radonc17.ucsf.edu; Winter, Kathryn; Michalski, Jeffrey M.; Cox, James D.; Purdy, James A.; Bosch, Walter; Lin Xiao; Shipley, William S.

    2004-12-01

    Purpose: To assess the relationship between the dose to the bulb of the penis and the risk of impotence in men treated on Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 9406. Methods and materials: Men enrolled on a Phase I/II dose-escalation study, RTOG 9406, who were reported to be potent at entry and evaluable (n = 158) were selected for inclusion. Follow-up evaluations were scheduled every 3, 4, and 6 months for the first, second, and the third through fifth years, then annually. At each follow-up visit an assessment of potency status was made. Penile structures were defined by a single observer blinded to the potency status, using Web-based, on-line software. The dosimetry for penile structures was calculated at the Quality Assurance Center at Washington University and provided to RTOG Statistical Headquarters to determine whether there was a relationship between dose and impotence. Results: Patients whose median penile dose was {>=}52.5 Gy had a greater risk of impotence compared with those receiving <52.5 Gy (p = 0.039). In a multivariate analysis neither age, the dose to the prostate, nor the use of hormonal therapy correlated with the risk of impotence. Conclusions: Dose to the bulb of the penis seems to be associated with the risk of radiation-induced impotence.

  3. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy in the treatment of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Bauman, G; Rumble, R B; Chen, J; Loblaw, A; Warde, P

    2012-09-01

    Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) as the primary treatment for prostate cancer has improved outcomes compared with conventional radiotherapy, but with an associated increase in toxicity due to radiation effects on the bladder and rectum. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is a newer method of radiotherapy that uses intensity-modulated beams that can provide multiple intensity levels for any single beam direction and any single source position allowing concave dose distributions and dose gradients with narrower margins than those possible using conventional methods. IMRT is ideal for treating complex treatment volumes and avoiding close proximity organs at risk that may be dose limiting and provides increased tumour control through an escalated dose and reduces normal tissue complications through organ at risk sparing. Given the potential advantages of IMRT and the availability of IMRT-enabled treatment planning systems and linear accelerators, IMRT has been introduced in a number of disease sites, including prostate cancer. This systematic review examined the evidence for IMRT in the treatment of prostate cancer in order to quantify the potential benefits of this new technology and to make recommendations for radiation treatment programmes considering adopting this technique. The findings were in favour of recommending IMRT over 3DCRT in the radical treatment of localised prostate cancer where doses greater than 70 Gy are required, based on a review of 11 published reports including 4559 patients. There were insufficient data to recommend IMRT over 3DCRT in the postoperative setting. Future research should examine image-guided IMRT in the post-prostatectomy setting, with altered fractionation, and in combination with hormone and chemotherapy.

  4. Intensified autophagy compromises the efficacy of radiotherapy against prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Koukourakis, Michael I.

    2015-05-29

    Introduction: Radiotherapy is an equivalent alternative or complement to radical prostatectomy, with high therapeutic efficacy. High risk patients, however, experience high relapse rates, so that research on radio-sensitization is the most evident route to improve curability of this common disease. Materials and methods: In the current study we investigated the autophagic activity in a series of patients with localized prostate tumors treated with radical radiotherapy, using the LC3A and the LAMP2a proteins as markers of autophagosome and lysosome cellular content, respectively. The role of autophagy on prostate cancer cell line resistance to radiation was also examined. Results: Using confocal microscopy on tissue biopsies, we showed that prostate cancer cells have, overall, high levels of LC3A and low levels of LAMP2a compared to normal prostate glands. Tumors with a ‘highLC3A/lowLAMP2a’ phenotype, suggestive of intensified lysosomal consumption, had a significantly poorer biochemical relapse free survival. The PC3 radioresistant cell line sustained remarkably its autophagic flux ability after radiation, while the DU145 radiosensitive one experiences a prolonged blockage of the autophagic process. This was assessed with aggresome accumulation detection and LC3A/LAMP2a double immunofluorescence, as well as with sequestrosome/p62 protein detection. By silencing the LC3A or LAMP2a expression, both cell lines became more sensitive to escalated doses of radiation. Conclusions: High base line autophagy activity and cell ability to sustain functional autophagy define resistance of prostate cancer cells to radiotherapy. This can be reversed by blocking up-regulated components of the autophagy pathway, which may prove of importance in the field of clinical radiotherapy. - Highlights: • High LC3A and low LAMP2a levels is a frequent expression pattern of prostate carcinoma. • This pattern of intensified autophagic flux relates with high relapse rates after

  5. Can we avoid dose escalation for intermediate-risk prostate cancer in the setting of short-course neoadjuvant androgen deprivation?

    PubMed Central

    Shakespeare, Thomas P; Wilcox, Shea W; Aherne, Noel J

    2016-01-01

    Background Both dose-escalated external beam radiotherapy (DE-EBRT) and androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) improve the outcomes in patients with intermediate-risk prostate cancer. Despite this, there are only few reports evaluating DE-EBRT for patients with intermediate-risk prostate cancer receiving neoadjuvant ADT, and virtually no studies investigating dose escalation >74 Gy in this setting. We aimed to determine whether DE-EBRT >74 Gy improved the outcomes for patients with intermediate-risk prostate cancer who received neoadjuvant ADT. Findings In our institution, patients with intermediate-risk prostate cancer were treated with neoadjuvant ADT and DE-EBRT, with doses sequentially increasing from 74 Gy to 76 Gy and then to 78 Gy between 2006 and 2012. We identified 435 patients treated with DE-EBRT and ADT, with a median follow-up of 70 months. For the 74 Gy, 76 Gy, and 78 Gy groups, five-year biochemical disease-free survival rates were 95.0%, 97.8%, and 95.3%, respectively; metastasis-free survival rates were 99.1%, 100.0%, and 98.6%, respectively; and prostate cancer-specific survival rate was 100% for all three dose levels. There was no significant benefit for dose escalation either on univariate or multivariate analysis for any outcome. Conclusion There was no benefit for DE-EBRT >74 Gy in our cohort of intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant ADT. Given the higher risks of toxicity associated with dose escalation, it may be feasible to omit dose escalation in this group of patients. Randomized studies evaluating dose de-escalation should be considered. PMID:27073327

  6. Dosimetric Impact and Theoretical Clinical Benefits of Fiducial Markers for Dose Escalated Prostate Cancer Radiation Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Gauthier, Isabelle Carrier, Jean-Francois; Beliveau-Nadeau, Dominic; Fortin, Bernard; Taussky, Daniel

    2009-07-15

    Purpose: To assess the impact of fiducial markers and daily kilovoltage imaging (FM-kV) on dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters and normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCPs) for the rectum and bladder during prostate cancer radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Two different setup scenarios were compared for 20 patients treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for localized prostate cancer to a total dose of 76 Gy: a traditional setup with planning target volume (PTV) margins associated with skin mark alignment vs. another setup using FM-kV. Various DVH parameters were compared, including Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) dose-volume constraints for the rectum and bladder. Analysis of NTCPs was also performed according to the Lyman model. Results: With the traditional setup, 85% of patients had rectal V70{sub Gy} >25% compared with 45% with FM-kV. Moreover, 30% of patients with traditional setup vs. 5% with FM-kV did not fulfill at least 3 RTOG constraint parameters for the rectum. Mean rectal and bladder dose were 4.7 Gy and 6.7 Gy less, respectively, with FM-kV. The NTCP for the rectum was 11.5% with the traditional setup and 9% with FM-kV. This indicates that with FM-kV, the prescription dose could be increased by 2.1 Gy while keeping the same level of late rectal toxicity as with the traditional setup. Conclusions: Use of FM-kV is an efficient way of lowering the proportion of patients not fulfilling RTOG rectal and bladder dose-volume constraints. The results of the NTCP analysis suggest that the PTV margin reduction allowed by FM-kV should decrease the rate of late rectal toxicities or may allow moderate dose escalation.

  7. Increasing Use of Dose-Escalated External Beam Radiation Therapy for Men With Nonmetastatic Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Swisher-McClure, Samuel; Mitra, Nandita; Woo, Kaitlin; Smaldone, Marc; Uzzo, Robert; Bekelman, Justin E.

    2014-05-01

    Purpose: To examine recent practice patterns, using a large national cancer registry, to understand the extent to which dose-escalated external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) has been incorporated into routine clinical practice for men with prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We conducted a retrospective observational cohort study using the National Cancer Data Base, a nationwide oncology outcomes database in the United States. We identified 98,755 men diagnosed with nonmetastatic prostate cancer between 2006 and 2011 who received definitive EBRT and classified patients into National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) risk groups. We defined dose-escalated EBRT as total prescribed dose of ≥75.6 Gy. Using multivariable logistic regression, we examined the association of patient, clinical, and demographic characteristics with the use of dose-escalated EBRT. Results: Overall, 81.6% of men received dose-escalated EBRT during the study period. The use of dose-escalated EBRT did not vary substantially by NCCN risk group. Use of dose-escalated EBRT increased from 70.7% of patients receiving treatment in 2006 to 89.8% of patients receiving treatment in 2011. On multivariable analysis, year of diagnosis and use of intensity modulated radiation therapy were significantly associated with receipt of dose-escalated EBRT. Conclusions: Our study results indicate that dose-escalated EBRT has been widely adopted by radiation oncologists treating prostate cancer in the United States. The proportion of patients receiving dose-escalated EBRT increased nearly 20% between 2006 and 2011. We observed high utilization rates of dose-escalated EBRT within all disease risk groups. Adoption of intensity modulated radiation therapy was strongly associated with use of dose-escalated treatment.

  8. Prostate cancer radiotherapy 2002: the way forward.

    PubMed

    Lukka, Himu; Pickles, Tom; Morton, Gerard; Catton, Charles; Souhami, Luis; Warde, Padraig

    2005-02-01

    In November 2000, the GU Radiation Oncologists of Canada had their first meeting, "Controversies in prostate cancer radiotherapy: consensus development". The success of this meeting prompted a second meeting, held in December 2002 to discuss "The Way Forward" in prostate radiotherapy. Radiation oncologists from across Canada were brought together and integrated with key opinion leaders in prostate cancer treatment from throughout North America. The group debated current controversies including: intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), external beam hypofractionation, high dose-rate brachytherapy, and hormone therapy in the management of prostate cancer. The meeting also sought to identify and prioritize clinical trial opportunities and to highlight steps required to achieve these research goals. In summary, advances involving IMRT have enabled the use of higher radiation doses without increasing morbidity. With renewed interest in hypofractionated radiation schedules, the value of hypofractionation using IMRT was discussed and initial results from ongoing clinical trials were presented. The emerging role for high dose-rate brachytherapy in higher risk patients was also discussed. Based on existing preliminary evidence the group expressed enthusiasm for further investigation of the role for brachytherapy in intermediate to high-risk patients. Despite significant advances in radiotherapy, hormone therapy continues to play an important role in prostate cancer treatment for patients with intermediate and high-risk disease. Although evidence supports the effectiveness of hormone therapy, the optimal timing, and duration of hormonal treatment are unclear. Results from ongoing clinical trials will provide insight into these questions and will assist in the design of future clinical trials.

  9. Phase I Trial of Pelvic Nodal Dose Escalation With Hypofractionated IMRT for High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Adkison, Jarrod B.; McHaffie, Derek R.; Bentzen, Soren M.; Patel, Rakesh R.; Khuntia, Deepak; Petereit, Daniel G.; Hong, Theodore S.; Tome, Wolfgang; Ritter, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Toxicity concerns have limited pelvic nodal prescriptions to doses that may be suboptimal for controlling microscopic disease. In a prospective trial, we tested whether image-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) can safely deliver escalated nodal doses while treating the prostate with hypofractionated radiotherapy in 5 Vulgar-Fraction-One-Half weeks. Methods and Materials: Pelvic nodal and prostatic image-guided IMRT was delivered to 53 National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) high-risk patients to a nodal dose of 56 Gy in 2-Gy fractions with concomitant treatment of the prostate to 70 Gy in 28 fractions of 2.5 Gy, and 50 of 53 patients received androgen deprivation for a median duration of 12 months. Results: The median follow-up time was 25.4 months (range, 4.2-57.2). No early Grade 3 Radiation Therapy Oncology Group or Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v.3.0 genitourinary (GU) or gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities were seen. The cumulative actuarial incidence of Grade 2 early GU toxicity (primarily alpha blocker initiation) was 38%. The rate was 32% for Grade 2 early GI toxicity. None of the dose-volume descriptors correlated with GU toxicity, and only the volume of bowel receiving {>=}30 Gy correlated with early GI toxicity (p = 0.029). Maximum late Grades 1, 2, and 3 GU toxicities were seen in 30%, 25%, and 2% of patients, respectively. Maximum late Grades 1 and 2 GI toxicities were seen in 30% and 8% (rectal bleeding requiring cautery) of patients, respectively. The estimated 3-year biochemical control (nadir + 2) was 81.2 {+-} 6.6%. No patient manifested pelvic nodal failure, whereas 2 experienced paraaortic nodal failure outside the field. The six other clinical failures were distant only. Conclusions: Pelvic IMRT nodal dose escalation to 56 Gy was delivered concurrently with 70 Gy of hypofractionated prostate radiotherapy in a convenient, resource-efficient, and well-tolerated 28-fraction schedule. Pelvic nodal dose

  10. Dose Escalation for Prostate Cancer Using the Three-Dimensional Conformal Dynamic Arc Technique: Analysis of 542 Consecutive Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara A. Vavassori, Andrea; Fodor, Cristiana; Santoro, Luigi; Zerini, Dario; Cattani, Federica; Garibaldi, Cristina; Cambria, Raffaella; Fodor, Andrei; Boboc, Genoveva Ionela; Vitolo, Viviana; Ivaldi, Giovanni Battista; Musi, Gennaro; De Cobelli, Ottavio; Orecchia, Roberto

    2008-07-01

    Purpose: To present the results of dose escalation using three-dimensional conformal dynamic arc radiotherapy (3D-ART) for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Five hundred and forty two T1-T3N0M0 prostate cancer patients were treated with 3D-ART. Dose escalation (from 76 Gy/38 fractions to 80 Gy/40 fractions) was introduced in September 2003; 32% of patients received 80 Gy. In 366 patients, androgen deprivation was added to 3D-ART. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer criteria and Houston definition (nadir + 2) were used for toxicity and biochemical failure evaluation, respectively. Median follow-up was 25 months. Results: Acute toxicity included rectal (G1-2 28.9%; G3 0.5%) and urinary events (G1-2 57.9%; G3-4 2.4%). Late toxicity included rectal (G1-2 15.8%; G3-4 3.1%) and urinary events (G1-2 26.9%; G3-4 1.6%). Two-year failure-free survival and overall survival rates were 94.1% and 97.9%, respectively. Poor prognostic group (GS, iPSA, T), transurethral prostate resection, and dose >76 Gy showed significant association to high risk of progression in multivariate analysis (p = 0.014, p = 0.045, and p 0.04, respectively). The negative effect of dose >76 Gy was not observed (p 0.10), when the analysis was limited to 353 patients treated after September 2003 (when dose escalation was introduced). Higher dose was not associated with higher late toxicity. Conclusions: Three-dimensional-ART is a feasible modality allowing for dose escalation (no increase in toxicity has been observed with higher doses). However, the dose increase from 76 to 80 Gy was not associated with better tumor outcome. Further investigation is warranted for better understanding of the dose effect for prostate cancer.

  11. Predictors for Chronic Urinary Toxicity After the Treatment of Prostate Cancer With Adaptive Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy: Dose-Volume Analysis of a Phase II Dose-Escalation Study

    SciTech Connect

    Harsolia, Asif; Vargas, Carlos; Yan Di; Brabbins, Donald; Lockman, David; Liang Jian; Gustafson, Gary; Vicini, Frank; Martinez, Alvaro; Kestin, Larry L.

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: To identify factors predictive for chronic urinary toxicity secondary to high-dose adaptive three-dimensional conformal radiation. Methods and Materials: From 1999 to 2002, 331 consecutive patients with clinical Stage II-III prostate cancer were prospectively treated (median dose, 75.6 Gy). The bladder was contoured, and the bladder wall was defined as the outer 3 mm of the bladder solid volume. Toxicity was quantified according to the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria 2.0. Median follow-up was 1.6 years. Results: The 3-year rates of Grade {>=}2 and Grade 3 chronic urinary toxicity were 17.0% and 3.6%, respectively. Prostate volume, confidence-limited patient-specific planning target volume, bladder wall volume, and acute urinary toxicity were all found to be accurate predictors for chronic urinary toxicity. The volume of bladder wall receiving {>=}30 Gy (V30) and {>=}82 Gy (V82), along with prostate volume, were all clinically useful predictors of Grade {>=}2 and Grade 3 chronic urinary toxicity and chronic urinary retention. Both Grade {>=}2 (p = 0.001) and Grade 3 (p = 0.03) acute urinary toxicity were predictive for the development of Grade {>=}2 (p = 0.001, p = 0.03) and Grade 3 (p = 0.05, p < 0.001) chronic urinary toxicity. On Cox multivariate analysis the development of acute toxicity was independently predictive for the development of both Grade {>=}2 and Grade 3 chronic urinary toxicity. Conclusions: Acute urinary toxicity and bladder wall dose-volume endpoints are strong predictors for the development of subsequent chronic urinary toxicity. Our recommendation is to attempt to limit the bladder wall V30 to <30 cm{sup 3} and the V82 to <7 cm{sup 3} when possible. If bladder wall information is not available, bladder solid V30 and V82 may be used.

  12. Pelvic Nodal Radiotherapy in Patients With Unfavorable Intermediate and High-Risk Prostate Cancer: Evidence, Rationale, and Future Directions

    SciTech Connect

    Morikawa, Lisa K.; Roach, Mack

    2011-05-01

    Over the past 15 years, there have been three major advances in the use of external beam radiotherapy in the management of men with clinically localized prostate made. They include: (1) image guided (IG) three-dimensional conformal/intensity modulated radiotherapy; (2) radiation dose escalation; and (3) androgen deprivation therapy. To date only the last of these three advances have been shown to improve overall survival. The presence of occult pelvic nodal involvement could explain the failure of increased conformality and dose escalation to prolong survival, because the men who appear to be at the greatest risk of death from clinically localized prostate cancer are those who are likely to have lymph node metastases. This review discusses the evidence for prophylactic pelvic nodal radiotherapy, including the key trials and controversies surrounding this issue.

  13. Online Adaptive Replanning Method for Prostate Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ahunbay, Ergun E.; Peng Cheng; Holmes, Shannon; Godley, Andrew; Lawton, Colleen; Li, X. Allen

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: To report the application of an adaptive replanning technique for prostate cancer radiotherapy (RT), consisting of two steps: (1) segment aperture morphing (SAM), and (2) segment weight optimization (SWO), to account for interfraction variations. Methods and Materials: The new 'SAM+SWO' scheme was retroactively applied to the daily CT images acquired for 10 prostate cancer patients on a linear accelerator and CT-on-Rails combination during the course of RT. Doses generated by the SAM+SWO scheme based on the daily CT images were compared with doses generated after patient repositioning using the current planning target volume (PTV) margin (5 mm, 3 mm toward rectum) and a reduced margin (2 mm), along with full reoptimization scans based on the daily CT images to evaluate dosimetry benefits. Results: For all cases studied, the online replanning method provided significantly better target coverage when compared with repositioning with reduced PTV (13% increase in minimum prostate dose) and improved organ sparing when compared with repositioning with regular PTV (13% decrease in the generalized equivalent uniform dose of rectum). The time required to complete the online replanning process was 6 {+-} 2 minutes. Conclusion: The proposed online replanning method can be used to account for interfraction variations for prostate RT with a practically acceptable time frame (5-10 min) and with significant dosimetric benefits. On the basis of this study, the developed online replanning scheme is being implemented in the clinic for prostate RT.

  14. Big Data Analytics for Prostate Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Coates, James; Souhami, Luis; El Naqa, Issam

    2016-01-01

    Radiation therapy is a first-line treatment option for localized prostate cancer and radiation-induced normal tissue damage are often the main limiting factor for modern radiotherapy regimens. Conversely, under-dosing of target volumes in an attempt to spare adjacent healthy tissues limits the likelihood of achieving local, long-term control. Thus, the ability to generate personalized data-driven risk profiles for radiotherapy outcomes would provide valuable prognostic information to help guide both clinicians and patients alike. Big data applied to radiation oncology promises to deliver better understanding of outcomes by harvesting and integrating heterogeneous data types, including patient-specific clinical parameters, treatment-related dose-volume metrics, and biological risk factors. When taken together, such variables make up the basis for a multi-dimensional space (the "RadoncSpace") in which the presented modeling techniques search in order to identify significant predictors. Herein, we review outcome modeling and big data-mining techniques for both tumor control and radiotherapy-induced normal tissue effects. We apply many of the presented modeling approaches onto a cohort of hypofractionated prostate cancer patients taking into account different data types and a large heterogeneous mix of physical and biological parameters. Cross-validation techniques are also reviewed for the refinement of the proposed framework architecture and checking individual model performance. We conclude by considering advanced modeling techniques that borrow concepts from big data analytics, such as machine learning and artificial intelligence, before discussing the potential future impact of systems radiobiology approaches.

  15. Hypofractionated radiotherapy for organ-confined prostate cancer: is less more?

    PubMed

    Arcangeli, Stefano; Greco, Carlo

    2016-07-01

    Moderate hypofractionation of radiotherapy is widely considered a viable alternative to conventional fractionation for the treatment of patients with organ-confined prostate cancer, but stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is rapidly emerging as a novel treatment modality for this disease. Advances in treatment planning, image guidance, target position reproducibility and on-line tracking, coupled with a compelling radiobiological rationale, have promoted SBRT as a safe and effective treatment. Dose escalation to the tumour tissue through a decreased number of radiation fractions improves patient comfort and convenience, as well as treatment cost-effectiveness, compared with conventional radiotherapy regimens. Several clinical trials have investigated moderate and extreme hypofractionation of radiotherapy in patients with prostate cancer. Evidence is accumulating which suggests that the use of moderately hypofractionated radiotherapy can be recommended regardless of cancer risk group. Regimens of extremely hypofractionated radiotherapy have shown very good short-term efficacy and safety outcomes, but appropriately designed trials with extended follow-up monitoring are required to confirm long-term outcomes. PMID:27296648

  16. Evolving Paradigm of Radiotherapy for High-Risk Prostate Cancer: Current Consensus and Continuing Controversies

    PubMed Central

    Juloori, Aditya; Shah, Chirag; Stephans, Kevin; Vassil, Andrew; Tendulkar, Rahul

    2016-01-01

    High-risk prostate cancer is an aggressive form of the disease with an increased risk of distant metastasis and subsequent mortality. Multiple randomized trials have established that the combination of radiation therapy and long-term androgen deprivation therapy improves overall survival compared to either treatment alone. Standard of care for men with high-risk prostate cancer in the modern setting is dose-escalated radiotherapy along with 2-3 years of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). There are research efforts directed towards assessing the efficacy of shorter ADT duration. Current research has been focused on assessing hypofractionated and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) techniques. Ongoing randomized trials will help assess the utility of pelvic lymph node irradiation. Research is also focused on multimodality therapy with addition of a brachytherapy boost to external beam radiation to help improve outcomes in men with high-risk prostate cancer. PMID:27313896

  17. Big Data Analytics for Prostate Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Coates, James; Souhami, Luis; El Naqa, Issam

    2016-01-01

    Radiation therapy is a first-line treatment option for localized prostate cancer and radiation-induced normal tissue damage are often the main limiting factor for modern radiotherapy regimens. Conversely, under-dosing of target volumes in an attempt to spare adjacent healthy tissues limits the likelihood of achieving local, long-term control. Thus, the ability to generate personalized data-driven risk profiles for radiotherapy outcomes would provide valuable prognostic information to help guide both clinicians and patients alike. Big data applied to radiation oncology promises to deliver better understanding of outcomes by harvesting and integrating heterogeneous data types, including patient-specific clinical parameters, treatment-related dose–volume metrics, and biological risk factors. When taken together, such variables make up the basis for a multi-dimensional space (the “RadoncSpace”) in which the presented modeling techniques search in order to identify significant predictors. Herein, we review outcome modeling and big data-mining techniques for both tumor control and radiotherapy-induced normal tissue effects. We apply many of the presented modeling approaches onto a cohort of hypofractionated prostate cancer patients taking into account different data types and a large heterogeneous mix of physical and biological parameters. Cross-validation techniques are also reviewed for the refinement of the proposed framework architecture and checking individual model performance. We conclude by considering advanced modeling techniques that borrow concepts from big data analytics, such as machine learning and artificial intelligence, before discussing the potential future impact of systems radiobiology approaches. PMID:27379211

  18. Big Data Analytics for Prostate Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Coates, James; Souhami, Luis; El Naqa, Issam

    2016-01-01

    Radiation therapy is a first-line treatment option for localized prostate cancer and radiation-induced normal tissue damage are often the main limiting factor for modern radiotherapy regimens. Conversely, under-dosing of target volumes in an attempt to spare adjacent healthy tissues limits the likelihood of achieving local, long-term control. Thus, the ability to generate personalized data-driven risk profiles for radiotherapy outcomes would provide valuable prognostic information to help guide both clinicians and patients alike. Big data applied to radiation oncology promises to deliver better understanding of outcomes by harvesting and integrating heterogeneous data types, including patient-specific clinical parameters, treatment-related dose-volume metrics, and biological risk factors. When taken together, such variables make up the basis for a multi-dimensional space (the "RadoncSpace") in which the presented modeling techniques search in order to identify significant predictors. Herein, we review outcome modeling and big data-mining techniques for both tumor control and radiotherapy-induced normal tissue effects. We apply many of the presented modeling approaches onto a cohort of hypofractionated prostate cancer patients taking into account different data types and a large heterogeneous mix of physical and biological parameters. Cross-validation techniques are also reviewed for the refinement of the proposed framework architecture and checking individual model performance. We conclude by considering advanced modeling techniques that borrow concepts from big data analytics, such as machine learning and artificial intelligence, before discussing the potential future impact of systems radiobiology approaches. PMID:27379211

  19. Feasibility of IMRT to Cover Pelvic Nodes While Escalating the Dose to the Prostate Gland: Dosimetric Data on 35 Consecutive Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Bayouth, John E. Pena, John; Culp, Laura; Brack, Collin; Sanguineti, Giuseppe

    2008-10-01

    Utilizing available dosimetric and acute toxicity data, we confirm the feasibility of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) to include treatment of the pelvic nodes (PN) while escalating the dose to the prostate. Data were obtained from 35 consecutive patients with prostate cancer with {>=}15% risk of PN involvement. Patients received an initial boost to the prostate, delivering 16 Gy over 8 fractions using a 6-field conformal technique, followed by an 8-field coplanar inverse planning IMRT technique delivering an additional 60 Gy over 30 fractions to the prostate (76 Gy total) and 54 Gy over 30 fractions to the seminal vesicles (SV) and PN. Dose-volume histogram analysis was performed for planning target volumes and organs at risk. Acute toxicity (RTOG/EORTC scale) was prospectively and independently scored weekly for each patient. The maximum, mean, minimum dose, and D95 to each planning target volume is provided: prostate (82.2, 78.2, 72.6, 75.2 Gy), SV (79.0, 72.5, 56.9, 61.1 Gy), and PN (80.4, 59.7, 46.5, 53.3 Gy), respectively. The percent volume receiving a dose at or above 'x' Gy (Vx) was recorded for V75, V70, V65, V60, and V50 as: bladder (14%, 24%, 32%, 39%, and 54%) and rectum (3%, 18%, 26%, 34%, and 51%), respectively. Acute toxicity was as follows: 54% grade 2+ GI (n = 19), 25% grade 2+ GU (n = 9). IMRT enables treatment of pelvic nodes while escalating dose to the prostate and is clinically feasible with acute toxicity within expected ranges.

  20. Predicting toxicity in radiotherapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Landoni, Valeria; Fiorino, Claudio; Cozzarini, Cesare; Sanguineti, Giuseppe; Valdagni, Riccardo; Rancati, Tiziana

    2016-03-01

    This comprehensive review addresses most organs at risk involved in planning optimization for prostate cancer. It can be considered an update of a previous educational review that was published in 2009 (Fiorino et al., 2009). The literature was reviewed based on PubMed and MEDLINE database searches (from January 2009 up to September 2015), including papers in press; for each section/subsection, key title words were used and possibly combined with other more general key-words (such as radiotherapy, dose-volume effects, NTCP, DVH, and predictive model). Publications generally dealing with toxicity without any association with dose-volume effects or correlations with clinical risk factors were disregarded, being outside the aim of the review. A focus was on external beam radiotherapy, including post-prostatectomy, with conventional fractionation or moderate hypofractionation (<4Gy/fraction); extreme hypofractionation is the topic of another paper in this special issue. Gastrointestinal and urinary toxicity are the most investigated endpoints, with quantitative data published in the last 5years suggesting both a dose-response relationship and the existence of a number of clinical/patient related risk factors acting as dose-response modifiers. Some results on erectile dysfunction, bowel toxicity and hematological toxicity are also presented. PMID:27068274

  1. Hypofractionated Boost With High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy and Open Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Guided Implants for Locally Aggressive Prostate Cancer: A Sequential Dose-Escalation Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Ares, Carmen; Popowski, Youri; Pampallona, Sandro; Nouet, Philippe; Dipasquale, Giovanna; Bieri, Sabine; Ozsoy, Orhan; Rouzaud, Michel; Khan, Haleem; Miralbell, Raymond

    2009-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility, tolerance, and preliminary outcome of an open MRI-guided prostate partial-volume high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) schedule in a group of selected patients with nonmetastatic, locally aggressive prostatic tumors. Methods and Materials: After conventional fractionated three-dimensional conformal external radiotherapy to 64-64.4 Gy, 77 patients with nonmetastatic, locally aggressive (e.g., perineural invasion and/or Gleason score 8-10) prostate cancer were treated from June 2000 to August 2004, with HDR-BT using temporary open MRI-guided {sup 192}Ir implants, to escalate the dose in the boost region. Nineteen, 21, and 37 patients were sequentially treated with 2 fractions of 6 Gy, 7 Gy, and 8 Gy each, respectively. Neoadjuvant androgen deprivation was given to 62 patients for 6-24 months. Acute and late toxicity were scored according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer scoring system. Results: All 77 patients completed treatment as planned. Only 2 patients presented with Grade >=3 acute urinary toxicity. The 3-year probability of Grade >=2 late urinary and low gastrointestinal toxicity-free survival was 91.4% +- 3.4% and 94.4% +- 2.7%, respectively. Rates of 3-year biochemical disease-free survival (bDFS) and disease-specific survival were 87.1% +- 4.1% and 100%, respectively. Conclusions: Boosting a partial volume of the prostate with hypofractionated HDR-BT for aggressive prostate cancer was feasible and showed limited long-term toxicity, which compared favorably with other dose-escalation methods in the literature. Preliminary bDFS was encouraging if one considers the negatively selected population of high-risk patients in this study.

  2. Improved survival with the addition of radiotherapy to androgen deprivation: questions answered and a review of current controversies in radiotherapy for non-metastatic prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kavanagh, Brian D.; Rusthoven, Chad G.

    2016-01-01

    The contemporary standard of care for locally advanced high-risk prostate cancer includes a combination of dose-escalated radiotherapy (RT) plus androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT). However, 20 years ago, at the inception of the National Cancer Institute of Canada (NCIC) led study (NCIC Clinical Trials Group PR.3/Medical Research Council PR07/Intergroup T94-0110), the survival impact of prostate RT for high-risk disease was uncertain. Recently, Mason, Warde and colleagues presented the final results of this NCIC/MRC study (PMID: 25691677) randomizing 1,205 high-risk prostate cancer patients to ADT + RT vs. ADT alone. These updated results confirm substantial improvements with the addition of RT to ADT for the endpoints of overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS), and biochemical recurrence. Close examination of subtleties of this trial’s design highlight some of the most salient controversies in the field of prostate RT, including the risk-stratified roles of ADT, optimal ADT duration, and RT field design in the dose-escalated and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) era. PMID:26855950

  3. Transitioning from conventional radiotherapy to intensity-modulated radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer: changing focus from rectal bleeding to detailed quality of life analysis.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Hideya; Nakamura, Satoaki; Nishimura, Takuya; Yoshida, Ken; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Koizumi, Masahiko; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2014-11-01

    With the advent of modern radiation techniques, we have been able to deliver a higher prescribed radiotherapy dose for localized prostate cancer without severe adverse reactions. We reviewed and analyzed the change of toxicity profiles of external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) from the literature. Late rectal bleeding is the main adverse effect, and an incidence of >20% of Grade ≥2 adverse events was reported for 2D conventional radiotherapy of up to 70 Gy. 3D conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) was found to reduce the incidence to ∼10%. Furthermore, intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) reduced it further to a few percentage points. However, simultaneously, urological toxicities were enhanced by dose escalation using highly precise external radiotherapy. We should pay more attention to detailed quality of life (QOL) analysis, not only with respect to rectal bleeding but also other specific symptoms (such as urinary incontinence and impotence), for two reasons: (i) because of the increasing number of patients aged >80 years, and (ii) because of improved survival with elevated doses of radiotherapy and/or hormonal therapy; age is an important prognostic factor not only for prostate-specific antigen (PSA) control but also for adverse reactions. Those factors shift the main focus of treatment purpose from survival and avoidance of PSA failure to maintaining good QOL, particularly in older patients. In conclusion, the focus of toxicity analysis after radiotherapy for prostate cancer patients is changing from rectal bleeding to total elaborate quality of life assessment. PMID:25204643

  4. Transitioning from conventional radiotherapy to intensity-modulated radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer: changing focus from rectal bleeding to detailed quality of life analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yamazaki, Hideya; Nakamura, Satoaki; Nishimura, Takuya; Yoshida, Ken; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Koizumi, Masahiko; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-01

    With the advent of modern radiation techniques, we have been able to deliver a higher prescribed radiotherapy dose for localized prostate cancer without severe adverse reactions. We reviewed and analyzed the change of toxicity profiles of external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) from the literature. Late rectal bleeding is the main adverse effect, and an incidence of >20% of Grade ≥2 adverse events was reported for 2D conventional radiotherapy of up to 70 Gy. 3D conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) was found to reduce the incidence to ∼10%. Furthermore, intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) reduced it further to a few percentage points. However, simultaneously, urological toxicities were enhanced by dose escalation using highly precise external radiotherapy. We should pay more attention to detailed quality of life (QOL) analysis, not only with respect to rectal bleeding but also other specific symptoms (such as urinary incontinence and impotence), for two reasons: (i) because of the increasing number of patients aged >80 years, and (ii) because of improved survival with elevated doses of radiotherapy and/or hormonal therapy; age is an important prognostic factor not only for prostate-specific antigen (PSA) control but also for adverse reactions. Those factors shift the main focus of treatment purpose from survival and avoidance of PSA failure to maintaining good QOL, particularly in older patients. In conclusion, the focus of toxicity analysis after radiotherapy for prostate cancer patients is changing from rectal bleeding to total elaborate quality of life assessment. PMID:25204643

  5. [Clinical to planning target volume margins in prostate cancer radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Ramiandrisoa, F; Duvergé, L; Castelli, J; Nguyen, T D; Servagi-Vernat, S; de Crevoisier, R

    2016-10-01

    The knowledge of inter- and intrafraction motion and deformations of the intrapelvic target volumes (prostate, seminal vesicles, prostatectomy bed and lymph nodes) as well as the main organs at risk (bladder and rectum) allow to define rational clinical to planning target volume margins, depending on the different radiotherapy techniques and their uncertainties. In case of image-guided radiotherapy, prostate margins and seminal vesicles margins can be between 5 and 10mm. The margins around the prostatectomy bed vary from 10 to 15mm and those around the lymph node clinical target volume between 7 and 10mm. Stereotactic body radiotherapy allows lower margins, which are 3 to 5mm around the prostate. Image-guided and stereotactic body radiotherapy with adequate margins allow finally moderate or extreme hypofractionation. PMID:27614515

  6. Clinical Outcome of Dose-Escalated Image-Guided Radiotherapy for Spinal Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Guckenberger, Matthias; Goebel, Joachim; Wilbert, Juergen; Baier, Kurt; Richter, Anne; Sweeney, Reinhart A.; Bratengeier, Klaus; Flentje, Michael

    2009-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcomes after dose-escalated radiotherapy (RT) for spinal metastases and paraspinal tumors. Methods and Materials: A total of 14 patients, 12 with spinal metastases and a long life expectancy and 2 with paraspinal tumors, were treated for 16 lesions with intensity-modulated, image-guided RT. A median biologic effective dose of 74 Gy{sub 10} (range, 55-86) in a median of 20 fractions (range, 3-34) was prescribed to the target volume. The spinal canal was treated to 40 Gy in 20 fractions using a second intensity-modulated RT dose level in the case of epidural involvement. Results: After median follow-up of 17 months, one local recurrence was observed, for an actuarial local control rate of 88% after 2 years. Local control was associated with rapid and long-term pain relief. Of 11 patients treated for a solitary spinal metastasis, 6 developed systemic disease progression. The actuarial overall survival rate for metastatic patients was 85% and 63% after 1 and 2 years, respectively. Acute Grade 2-3 skin toxicity was seen in 2 patients with no late toxicity greater than Grade 2. No radiation-induced myelopathy was observed. Conclusion: Dose-escalated irradiation of spinal metastases was safe and resulted in excellent local control. Oligometastatic patients with a long life expectancy and epidural involvement are considered to benefit the most from fractionated RT.

  7. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: A Dose-Escalation Planning Study

    SciTech Connect

    Lievens, Yolande; Nulens, An; Gaber, Mousa Amr; Defraene, Gilles; De Wever, Walter; Stroobants, Sigrid; Van den Heuvel, Frank

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the potential for dose escalation with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in positron emission tomography-based radiotherapy planning for locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC). Methods and Materials: For 35 LA-NSCLC patients, three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and IMRT plans were made to a prescription dose (PD) of 66 Gy in 2-Gy fractions. Dose escalation was performed toward the maximal PD using secondary endpoint constraints for the lung, spinal cord, and heart, with de-escalation according to defined esophageal tolerance. Dose calculation was performed using the Eclipse pencil beam algorithm, and all plans were recalculated using a collapsed cone algorithm. The normal tissue complication probabilities were calculated for the lung (Grade 2 pneumonitis) and esophagus (acute toxicity, grade 2 or greater, and late toxicity). Results: IMRT resulted in statistically significant decreases in the mean lung (p <.0001) and maximal spinal cord (p = .002 and 0005) doses, allowing an average increase in the PD of 8.6-14.2 Gy (p {<=}.0001). This advantage was lost after de-escalation within the defined esophageal dose limits. The lung normal tissue complication probabilities were significantly lower for IMRT (p <.0001), even after dose escalation. For esophageal toxicity, IMRT significantly decreased the acute NTCP values at the low dose levels (p = .0009 and p <.0001). After maximal dose escalation, late esophageal tolerance became critical (p <.0001), especially when using IMRT, owing to the parallel increases in the esophageal dose and PD. Conclusion: In LA-NSCLC, IMRT offers the potential to significantly escalate the PD, dependent on the lung and spinal cord tolerance. However, parallel increases in the esophageal dose abolished the advantage, even when using collapsed cone algorithms. This is important to consider in the context of concomitant chemoradiotherapy schedules using IMRT.

  8. Internal fiducial markers can assist dose escalation in treatment of prostate cancer: result of organ motion simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, M.; Moiseenko, V.; Liu, M.; Craig, T.

    2006-01-01

    Use of internal fiducial markers and electronic portal imaging (EPI) to realign patients has been shown to significantly reduce positioning uncertainties in prostate radiation treatment. This creates the possibility of improving the treatment by decreasing the planning target volume (PTV) margin added to the clinical target volume (CTV), which in turn may allow dose escalation. Conformal treatment plans for three prostate cancer patients were evaluated by using different PTV margins with dose prescription of 70 Gy/35 fr initially. Two beam arrangements, 4-field-box (4FB) and 4-field-oblique (4FO), were used. Then, two dose escalation schemes, 74 Gy and 78 Gy, with tighter PTV margins, were chosen from the first simulation and were tested. A Monte Carlo model was developed to simulate the daily geometric uncertainty and calculate the dose to each organ. After the whole treatment, dose-volume histograms were produced and tumour control probability, prostate equivalent uniform dose and the effective dose to critical organs were calculated. By comparing these radiobiological metrics, optimized dose escalation schemes were found. The results show that using internal fiducial markers and EPI, the prescription dose can be escalated to 78 Gy/39 fr with a 4 mm PTV margin. Based on the available dose-response data for intermediate risk prostate patients, this is estimated to result in a 20% increase of local control and significantly reduced rectal complications.

  9. [Radiotherapy in prostate cancer: data from ASTRO 2008].

    PubMed

    Coquard, R

    2009-05-01

    The annual convention of the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) took place in Boston, MA, 21-25 September 2008. On the occasion of this meeting, in which the past year's main advances in radiation oncology have been highlighted, results from clinical studies that may significantly impact the standard clinical practice were presented, particularly in the fields of locally advanced prostate cancer treated with non surgical approaches, and pT3 and/or R1 prostate cancer managed with radical prostatectomy. Randomized studies that emphasize the role of dose escalation have been updated.

  10. Prostate motion during standard radiotherapy as assessed by fiducial markers.

    PubMed

    Crook, J M; Raymond, Y; Salhani, D; Yang, H; Esche, B

    1995-10-01

    From November 1993 to August 1994, 55 patients with localized prostate carcinoma had three gold seeds placed in the prostate under transrectal ultrasound guidance prior to the start of radiotherapy in order to track prostate motion. Patients had a planning CT scan before initial simulation and again at about 40 Gy, just prior to simulation of a field reduction. Seed position relative to fixed bony landmarks (pubic symphysis and both ischial tuberosities) was digitized from each pair of orthogonal films from the initial and boost simulation using the Nucletron brachytherapy planning system. Vector analysis was performed to rule out the possibility of independent seed migration within the prostate between the time of initial and boost simulation. Prostate motion was seen in the posterior (mean: 0.56 cm; SD: 0.41 cm) and inferior directions (mean: 0.59 cm; SD: 0.45 cm). The base of the prostate was displaced more than 1 cm posteriorly in 30% of patients and in 11% in the inferior direction. Prostate position is related to rectal and bladder filling. Distension of these organs displaces the prostate in an anterosuperior direction, with lesser degrees of filling allowing the prostate to move posteriorly and inferiorly. Conformal therapy planning must take this motion into consideration. Changes in prostate position of this magnitude preclude the use of standard margins. PMID:8539455

  11. Parameters Favorable to Intraprostatic Radiation Dose Escalation in Men With Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Housri, Nadine; Ning, Holly; Ondos, John; Choyke, Peter; Camphausen, Kevin; Citrin, Deborah; Arora, Barbara; Shankavaram, Uma; Kaushal, Aradhana

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: To identify , within the framework of a current Phase I trial, whether factors related to intraprostatic cancer lesions (IPLs) or individual patients predict the feasibility of high-dose intraprostatic irradiation. Methods and Materials: Endorectal coil MRI scans of the prostate from 42 men were evaluated for dominant IPLs. The IPLs, prostate, and critical normal tissues were contoured. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy plans were generated with the goal of delivering 75.6 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions to the prostate, with IPLs receiving a simultaneous integrated boost of 3.6 Gy per fraction to a total dose of 151.2 Gy, 200% of the prescribed dose and the highest dose cohort in our trial. Rectal and bladder dose constraints were consistent with those outlined in current Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocols. Results: Dominant IPLs were identified in 24 patients (57.1%). Simultaneous integrated boosts (SIB) to 200% of the prescribed dose were achieved in 12 of the 24 patients without violating dose constraints. Both the distance between the IPL and rectum and the hip-to-hip patient width on planning CT scans were associated with the feasibility to plan an SIB (p = 0.002 and p = 0.0137, respectively). Conclusions: On the basis of this small cohort, the distance between an intraprostatic lesion and the rectum most strongly predicted the ability to plan high-dose radiation to a dominant intraprostatic lesion. High-dose SIB planning seems possible for select intraprostatic lesions.

  12. Decision Regret in Men Undergoing Dose-Escalated Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Steer, Anna N.; Aherne, Noel J.; Gorzynska, Karen; Hoffman, Matthew; Last, Andrew; Hill, Jacques; Shakespeare, Thomas P.

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: Decision regret (DR) is a negative emotion associated with medical treatment decisions, and it is an important patient-centered outcome after therapy for localized prostate cancer. DR has been found to occur in up to 53% of patients treated for localized prostate cancer, and it may vary depending on treatment modality. DR after modern dose-escalated radiation therapy (DE-RT) has not been investigated previously, to our knowledge. Our primary aim was to evaluate DR in a cohort of patients treated with DE-RT. Methods and Materials: We surveyed 257 consecutive patients with localized prostate cancer who had previously received DE-RT, by means of a validated questionnaire. Results: There were 220 responses (85.6% response rate). Image-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy was given in 85.0% of patients and 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy in 15.0%. Doses received included 73.8 Gy (34.5% patients), 74 Gy (53.6%), and 76 Gy (10.9%). Neoadjuvant androgen deprivation (AD) was given in 51.8% of patients and both neoadjuvant and adjuvant AD in 34.5%. The median follow-up time was 23 months (range, 12-67 months). In all, 3.8% of patients expressed DR for their choice of treatment. When asked whether they would choose DE-RT or AD again, only 0.5% probably or definitely would not choose DE-RT again, compared with 8.4% for AD (P<.01). Conclusion: Few patients treated with modern DE-RT express DR, with regret appearing to be lower than in previously published reports of patients treated with radical prostatectomy or older radiation therapy techniques. Patients experienced more regret with the AD component of treatment than with the radiation therapy component, with implications for informed consent. Further research should investigate regret associated with individual components of modern therapy, including AD, radiation therapy and surgery.

  13. Impact of conventional fractionated RT to pelvic lymph nodes and dose-escalated hypofractionated RT to prostate gland using IMRT treatment delivery in high-risk prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pervez, Nadeem

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer among Canadian men. The standard treatment in high-risk category is radical radiation, with androgen suppression treatment (AST). Significant disease progression is reported despite this approach. Radiation dose escalation has been shown to improve disease-free survival; however, it results in higher toxicities. Hypofractionated radiation schedules (larger dose each fraction in shorter overall treatment time) are expected to deliver higher biological doses. A hypofractionated scheme was used in this study to escalate radiation doses with AST. Treatment was well tolerated acutely. Early results of self-administered quality of life reported by patients shows a decrease in QOL which is comparable to other treatment schedules. Significant positional variation of the prostate was observed during treatment. Therefore, we suggest daily target verification to avoid a target miss. Initial late effects are reasonable and early treatment outcomes are promising. Longer follow-up is required for full outcomes assessments.

  14. Volumetric Arc Therapy and Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Primary Prostate Radiotherapy With Simultaneous Integrated Boost to Intraprostatic Lesion With 6 and 18 MV: A Planning Comparison Study

    SciTech Connect

    Ost, Piet; Speleers, Bruno; De Meerleer, Gert; De Neve, Wilfried; Fonteyne, Valerie; Villeirs, Geert; De Gersem, Werner

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: The aim of the present study was to compare intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with volumetric arc therapy (VMAT), in the treatment of prostate cancer with maximal dose escalation to the intraprostatic lesion (IPL), without violating the organ-at-risk constraints. Additionally, the use of 6-MV photons was compared with 18-MV photons for all techniques. Methods and Materials: A total of 12 consecutive prostate cancer patients with an IPL on magnetic resonance imaging were selected for the present study. Plans were made for three IMRT field setups (three, five, and seven fields) and one VMAT field setup (single arc). First, optimal plans were created for every technique using biologic and physical planning aims. Next, an additional escalation to the IPL was planned as high as possible without violating the planning aims of the first step. Results: No interaction between the technique and photon energy (p = .928) occurred. No differences were found between the 6- and 18-MV photon beams, except for a reduction in the number of monitor units needed for 18 MV (p < .05). All techniques, except for three-field IMRT, allowed for dose escalation to a median dose of {>=}93 {+-} 6 Gy (mean {+-} standard deviation) to the IPL. VMAT was superior to IMRT for rectal volumes receiving 20-50 Gy (p < .05). Conclusion: VMAT allowed for dose escalation to the IPL with better sparing of the rectum than static three-, five-, and seven-field IMRT setups. High-energy photons had no advantage over low-energy photons.

  15. Perineural Invasion Predicts Increased Recurrence, Metastasis, and Death From Prostate Cancer Following Treatment With Dose-Escalated Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Felix Y.; Qian Yushen; Stenmark, Matthew H.; Halverson, Schuyler; Blas, Kevin; Vance, Sean; Sandler, Howard M.; Hamstra, Daniel A.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To assess the prognostic value of perineural invasion (PNI) for patients treated with dose-escalated external-beam radiation therapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Outcomes were analyzed for 651 men treated for prostate cancer with EBRT to a minimum dose {>=}75 Gy. We assessed the impact of PNI as well as pretreatment and treatment-related factors on freedom from biochemical failure (FFBF), freedom from metastasis (FFM), cause-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival. Results: PNI was present in 34% of specimens at biopsy and was significantly associated with higher Gleason score (GS), T stage, and prostate-specific antigen level. On univariate and multivariate analysis, the presence of PNI was associated with worse FFBF (hazard ratio = 1.7, p <0.006), FFM (hazard ratio = 1.8, p <0.03), and CSS (HR = 1.4, p <0.05) compared with absence of PNI; there was no difference in overall survival. Seven-year rates of FFBF, FFM, and CCS were 64% vs. 80%, 84% vs. 92%, and 91% vs. 95% for those patients with and without PNI, respectively. On recursive partitioning analysis, PNI predicted for worse FFM and CSS in patients with GS 8-10, with FFM of 67% vs. 89% (p <0.02), and CSS of 69% vs. 91%, (p <0.04) at 7 years for those with and without PNI, respectively. Conclusions: The presence of PNI in the prostate biopsy predicts worse clinical outcome for patients treated with dose-escalated external-beam radiation therapy. Particularly in patients with GS 8-10 disease, the presence of PNI suggests an increased risk of metastasis and prostate cancer death.

  16. Positron Emission Tomography-Guided, Focal-Dose Escalation Using Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Madani, Indira . E-mail: indira@krtkg1.ugent.be; Duthoy, Wim; Derie, Cristina R.N.; De Gersem, Werner Ir.; Boterberg, Tom; Saerens, Micky; Jacobs, Filip Ir.; Gregoire, Vincent; Lonneux, Max; Vakaet, Luc; Vanderstraeten, Barbara; Bauters, Wouter; Bonte, Katrien; Thierens, Hubert; Neve, Wilfried de

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) using positron emission tomography (PET)-guided dose escalation, and to determine the maximum tolerated dose in head and neck cancer. Methods and Materials: A Phase I clinical trial was designed to escalate the dose limited to the [{sup 18}-F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography ({sup 18}F-FDG-PET)-delineated subvolume within the gross tumor volume. Positron emission tomography scanning was performed in the treatment position. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy with an upfront simultaneously integrated boost was employed. Two dose levels were planned: 25 Gy (level I) and 30 Gy (level II), delivered in 10 fractions. Standard IMRT was applied for the remaining 22 fractions of 2.16 Gy. Results: Between 2003 and 2005, 41 patients were enrolled, with 23 at dose level I, and 18 at dose level II; 39 patients completed the planned therapy. The median follow-up for surviving patients was 14 months. Two cases of dose-limiting toxicity occurred at dose level I (Grade 4 dermitis and Grade 4 dysphagia). One treatment-related death at dose level II halted the study. Complete response was observed in 18 of 21 (86%) and 13 of 16 (81%) evaluated patients at dose levels I and II (p < 0.7), respectively, with actuarial 1-year local control at 85% and 87% (p n.s.), and 1-year overall survival at 82% and 54% (p = 0.06), at dose levels I and II, respectively. In 4 of 9 patients, the site of relapse was in the boosted {sup 18}F-FDG-PET-delineated region. Conclusions: For head and neck cancer, PET-guided dose escalation appears to be well-tolerated. The maximum tolerated dose was not reached at the investigated dose levels.

  17. Feasibility of dose escalation using intensity-modulated radiotherapy in posthysterectomy cervical carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    D'Souza, Warren D. . E-mail: wdsou001@umaryland.edu; Ahamad, Anesa A.; Iyer, Revathy B.; Salehpour, Mohammad R.; Jhingran, Anuja; Eifel, Patricia J.

    2005-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate retrospectively the utility of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in reducing the volume of normal tissues receiving radiation at varying dose levels when the female pelvis after hysterectomy is treated to doses of 50.4 Gy and 54 Gy. Methods and materials: Computed tomography scans from 10 patients who had previously undergone conventional postoperative RT were selected. The clinical tumor volume (vaginal apex and iliac nodes) and organs at risk were contoured. Margins were added to generate the planning tumor volume. The Pinnacle and Corvus planning systems were used to develop conventional and IMRT plans, respectively. Conventional four-field plans were prescribed to deliver 45 Gy (4F{sub 45Gy}) or 50.4 Gy; eight-field IMRT plans were prescribed to deliver 50.4 Gy (IMRT{sub 50.4Gy}) or 54 Gy (IMRT{sub 54Gy}) to the planning tumor volume. All plans were normalized so that {>=}97% of the planning tumor volume received the prescribed dose. Student's t test was used to compare the volumes of organs at risk receiving the same doses with different plans. Results: The mean volume of bowel receiving {>=}45 Gy was lower with the IMRT{sub 50.4Gy} (33% lower) and IMRT{sub 54Gy} (18% lower) plans than with the 4F{sub 45Gy} plan. The mean volume of rectum receiving {>=}45 Gy or {>=}50 Gy was also significantly reduced with the IMRT plans despite an escalation of the prescribed dose from 45 Gy with the conventional plans to 54 Gy with IMRT. The mean volume of bladder treated to 45 Gy was the same or slightly lower with the IMRT{sub 50.4Gy} and IMRT{sub 54Gy} plans compared with the 4F{sub 45Gy} plan. Compared with the 4F{sub 45Gy} plan, the IMRT{sub 50.4Gy} plan resulted in a smaller volume of bowel receiving 35-45 Gy and a larger volume of bowel receiving 50-55 Gy. Compared with the 4F{sub 45Gy} plan, the IMRT{sub 54Gy} plan resulted in smaller volumes of bowel receiving 45-50 Gy; however, small volumes of bowel received 55-60 Gy with the IMRT plan

  18. Acute Toxicity in High-Risk Prostate Cancer Patients Treated With Androgen Suppression and Hypofractionated Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Pervez, Nadeem; Small, Cormac; MacKenzie, Marc; Yee, Don; Parliament, Matthew; Ghosh, Sunita; Mihai, Alina; Amanie, John; Murtha, Albert; Field, Colin; Murray, David; Fallone, Gino; Pearcey, Robert

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: To report acute toxicity resulting from radiotherapy (RT) dose escalation and hypofractionation using intensity-modulated RT (IMRT) treatment combined with androgen suppression in high-risk prostate cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Sixty patients with a histological diagnosis of high-risk prostatic adenocarcinoma (having either a clinical Stage of >=T3a or an initial prostate-specific antigen [PSA] level of >=20 ng/ml or a Gleason score of 8 to 10 or a combination of a PSA concentration of >15 ng/ml and a Gleason score of 7) were enrolled. RT prescription was 68 Gy in 25 fractions (2.72 Gy/fraction) over 5 weeks to the prostate and proximal seminal vesicles. The pelvic lymph nodes and distal seminal vesicles concurrently received 45 Gy in 25 fractions. The patients were treated with helical TomoTherapy-based IMRT and underwent daily megavoltage CT image-guided verification prior to each treatment. Acute toxicity scores were recorded weekly during RT and at 3 months post-RT, using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group acute toxicity scales. Results: All patients completed RT and follow up for 3 months. The maximum acute toxicity scores were as follows: 21 (35%) patients had Grade 2 gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity; 4 (6.67%) patients had Grade 3 genitourinary (GU) toxicity; and 30 (33.33%) patients had Grade 2 GU toxicity. These toxicity scores were reduced after RT; there were only 8 (13.6%) patients with Grade 1 GI toxicity, 11 (18.97%) with Grade 1 GU toxicity, and 5 (8.62%) with Grade 2 GU toxicity at 3 months follow up. Only the V60 to the rectum correlated with the GI toxicity. Conclusion: Dose escalation using a hypofractionated schedule to the prostate with concurrent pelvic lymph node RT and long-term androgen suppression therapy is well tolerated acutely. Longer follow up for outcome and late toxicity is required.

  19. Radiation dose escalation by simultaneous modulated accelerated radiotherapy combined with chemotherapy for esophageal cancer: a phase II study

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Tiantian; Chang, Daniel; Chen, Zhijian; Huang, Ruihong; Zhang, Wuzhe; Lin, Kun; Guo, Longjia; Zhou, Mingzhen; Li, Dongsheng; Li, Derui; Chen, Chuangzhen

    2016-01-01

    The outcomes for patients with esophageal cancer (EC) underwent standard-dose radical radiotherapy were still disappointing. This phase II study investigated the feasibility, safety and efficacy of radiation dose escalation using simultaneous modulated accelerated radiotherapy (SMART) combined with chemotherapy in 60 EC patients. Radiotherapy consisted of 66Gy at 2.2 Gy/fraction to the gross tumor and 54Gy at 1.8 Gy/fraction to subclinical diseases simultaneously. Chemotherapy including cisplatin and 5fluorouracil were administered to all patients during and after radiotherapy. The data showed that the majority of patients (98.3%) completed the whole course of radiotherapy and concurrent chemotherapy. The most common ≥ grade 3 acute toxicities were neutropenia (16.7%), followed by esophagitis (6.7%) and thrombopenia (5.0%). With a median follow-up of 24 months (5-38) for all patients and 30 months (18-38) for those still alive, 11 patients (18.3%) developed ≥ Grade 3 late toxicities and 2 (3.3%) of them died subsequently due to esophageal hemorrhage. The 1- and 2-year local-regional control, distant metastasis-free survival, disease-free survival and overall survival rates were 87.6% and 78.6%, 86.0% and 80.5%, 75.6% and 64.4%, 86.7% and 72.7%, respectively. SMART combined with concurrent chemotherapy is feasible in EC patients with tolerable acute toxicities. They showed a trend of significant improvements in local-regional control and overall survival. Further follow-up is needed to evaluate the late toxicities. PMID:26992206

  20. Prostate Bed Motion During Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Klayton, Tracy; Price, Robert; Buyyounouski, Mark K.; Sobczak, Mark; Greenberg, Richard; Li, Jinsheng; Keller, Lanea; Sopka, Dennis; Kutikov, Alexander; Horwitz, Eric M.

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Conformal radiation therapy in the postprostatectomy setting requires accurate setup and localization of the prostatic fossa. In this series, we report prostate bed localization and motion characteristics, using data collected from implanted radiofrequency transponders. Methods and Materials: The Calypso four-dimensional localization system uses three implanted radiofrequency transponders for daily target localization and real-time tracking throughout a course of radiation therapy. We reviewed the localization and tracking reports for 20 patients who received ultrasonography-guided placement of Calypso transponders within the prostate bed prior to a course of intensity-modulated radiation therapy at Fox Chase Cancer Center. Results: At localization, prostate bed displacement relative to bony anatomy exceeded 5 mm in 9% of fractions in the anterior-posterior (A-P) direction and 21% of fractions in the superior-inferior (S-I) direction. The three-dimensional vector length from skin marks to Calypso alignment exceeded 1 cm in 24% of all 652 fractions with available setup data. During treatment, the target exceeded the 5-mm tracking limit for at least 30 sec in 11% of all fractions, generally in the A-P or S-I direction. In the A-P direction, target motion was twice as likely to move posteriorly, toward the rectum, than anteriorly. Fifteen percent of all treatments were interrupted for repositioning, and 70% of patients were repositioned at least once during their treatment course. Conclusion: Set-up errors and motion of the prostatic fossa during radiotherapy are nontrivial, leading to potential undertreatment of target and excess normal tissue toxicity if not taken into account during treatment planning. Localization and real-time tracking of the prostate bed via implanted Calypso transponders can be used to improve the accuracy of plan delivery.

  1. Does Family History Of Prostate Cancer Affect Outcomes Following Radiotherapy?

    PubMed Central

    Bagshaw, Hilary; Ruth, Karen; Horwitz, Eric M.; Chen, David Y.T.; Buyyounouski, Mark K.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine family history (FH) as a prognostic factor following radiotherapy (RT). Materials and Methods Between 1989 and 2007, 1,711 men with clinically localized prostate cancer and complete family history who had received RT (median RT dose = 74 Gy) without androgen deprivation therapy were analyzed. FH was defined as any prostate cancer in a first degree relative. For the biochemical failure (BF) outcome, this sample size has 85% power to detect a hazard ratio of 1.56 for positive versus negative FH. Results With a median follow-up of 71 months, there was no significant difference in the distribution of Gleason score (GS) or prostate specific antigen (PSA) based on FH. A positive FH was not an independent predictor of BF, distant metastasis (DM), prostate cancer specific mortality (PCSM), or overall mortality (OM) in Cox proportional multivariable analysis. On further analysis in a Cox proportional multivariable analysis, men with two or more first degree relatives with prostate cancer had a significantly higher likelihood of BF and DM than those with no FH, although there was no difference in PCSM or OM. Men with a positive FH (23%) were more likely to be younger, have a lower PSA, and non-palpable disease. There was no interaction between a positive FH and neither race nor treatment era (pre-PSA vs. PSA era). Conclusions A positive FH is not a prognostic factor following RT and should not alter standard treatment recommendations. Patients with two or more first degree relatives with prostate cancer had a higher likelihood of BF and DM, but there was no effect on survival. There was no interaction between a positive FH and African American race or treatment era. A positive FH was however, associated with more favorable PSA values and T-stage that may be the result of earlier screening. PMID:24560758

  2. Is Androgen Deprivation Therapy Necessary in All Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer Patients Treated in the Dose Escalation Era?

    SciTech Connect

    Castle, Katherine O.; Hoffman, Karen E.; Levy, Lawrence B.; Lee, Andrew K.; Choi, Seungtaek; Nguyen, Quynh N.; Frank, Steven J.; Pugh, Thomas J.; McGuire, Sean E.; Kuban, Deborah A.

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: The benefit of adding androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) to dose-escalated radiation therapy (RT) for men with intermediate-risk prostate cancer is unclear; therefore, we assessed the impact of adding ADT to dose-escalated RT on freedom from failure (FFF). Methods: Three groups of men treated with intensity modulated RT or 3-dimensional conformal RT (75.6-78 Gy) from 1993-2008 for prostate cancer were categorized as (1) 326 intermediate-risk patients treated with RT alone, (2) 218 intermediate-risk patients treated with RT and ≤6 months of ADT, and (3) 274 low-risk patients treated with definitive RT. Median follow-up was 58 months. Recursive partitioning analysis based on FFF using Gleason score (GS), T stage, and pretreatment PSA concentration was applied to the intermediate-risk patients treated with RT alone. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate 5-year FFF. Results: Based on recursive partitioning analysis, intermediate-risk patients treated with RT alone were divided into 3 prognostic groups: (1) 188 favorable patients: GS 6, ≤T2b or GS 3+4, ≤T1c; (2) 71 marginal patients: GS 3+4, T2a-b; and (3) 68 unfavorable patients: GS 4+3 or T2c disease. Hazard ratios (HR) for recurrence in each group were 1.0, 2.1, and 4.6, respectively. When intermediate-risk patients treated with RT alone were compared to intermediate-risk patients treated with RT and ADT, the greatest benefit from ADT was seen for the unfavorable intermediate-risk patients (FFF, 74% vs 94%, respectively; P=.005). Favorable intermediate-risk patients had no significant benefit from the addition of ADT to RT (FFF, 94% vs 95%, respectively; P=.85), and FFF for favorable intermediate-risk patients treated with RT alone approached that of low-risk patients treated with RT alone (98%). Conclusions: Patients with favorable intermediate-risk prostate cancer did not benefit from the addition of ADT to dose-escalated RT, and their FFF was nearly as good as patients with low-risk disease

  3. Automatic localization of the prostate for on-line or off-line image-guided radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Smitsmans, Monique H.P.; Wolthaus, Jochem W.H.; Artignan, Xavier; Bois, Josien de; Jaffray, David A.; Lebesque, Joos V.; Herk, Marcel van . E-mail: portal@nki.nl

    2004-10-01

    Purpose: With higher radiation dose, higher cure rates have been reported in prostate cancer patients. The extra margin needed to account for prostate motion, however, limits the level of dose escalation, because of the presence of surrounding organs at risk. Knowledge of the precise position of the prostate would allow significant reduction of the treatment field. Better localization of the prostate at the time of treatment is therefore needed, e.g. using a cone-beam computed tomography (CT) system integrated with the linear accelerator. Localization of the prostate relies upon manual delineation of contours in successive axial CT slices or interactive alignment and is fairly time-consuming. A faster method is required for on-line or off-line image-guided radiotherapy, because of prostate motion, for patient throughput and efficiency. Therefore, we developed an automatic method to localize the prostate, based on 3D gray value registration. Methods and materials: A study was performed on conventional repeat CT scans of 19 prostate cancer patients to develop the methodology to localize the prostate. For each patient, 8-13 repeat CT scans were made during the course of treatment. First, the planning CT scan and the repeat CT scan were registered onto the rigid bony structures. Then, the delineated prostate in the planning CT scan was enlarged by an optimum margin of 5 mm to define a region of interest in the planning CT scan that contained enough gray value information for registration. Subsequently, this region was automatically registered to a repeat CT scan using 3D gray value registration to localize the prostate. The performance of automatic prostate localization was compared to prostate localization using contours. Therefore, a reference set was generated by registering the delineated contours of the prostates in all scans of all patients. Gray value registrations that showed large differences with respect to contour registrations were detected with a {chi

  4. Image-guided adaptive radiation therapy (IGART): Radiobiological and dose escalation considerations for localized carcinoma of the prostate

    SciTech Connect

    Song, William; Schaly, Bryan; Bauman, Glenn; Battista, Jerry; Van Dyk, Jake

    2005-07-15

    The goal of this work was to evaluate the efficacy of various image-guided adaptive radiation therapy (IGART) techniques to deliver and escalate dose to the prostate in the presence of geometric uncertainties. Five prostate patients with 15-16 treatment CT studies each were retrospectively analyzed. All patients were planned with an 18 MV, six-field conformal technique with a 10 mm margin size and an initial prescription of 70 Gy in 35 fractions. The adaptive strategy employed in this work for patient-specific dose escalation was to increase the prescription dose in 2 Gy-per-fraction increments until the rectum normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) reached a level equal to that of the nominal plan NTCP (i.e., iso-NTCP dose escalation). The various target localization techniques simulated were: (1) daily laser-guided alignment to skin tattoo marks that represents treatment without image-guidance, (2) alignment to bony landmarks with daily portal images, and (3) alignment to the clinical target volume (CTV) with daily CT images. Techniques (1) and (3) were resimulated with a reduced margin size of 5 mm to investigate further dose escalation. When delivering the original clinical prescription dose of 70 Gy in 35 fractions, the 'CTV registration' technique yielded the highest tumor control probability (TCP) most frequently, followed by the 'bone registration' and 'tattoo registration' techniques. However, the differences in TCP among the three techniques were minor when the margin size was 10 mm ({<=}1.1%). Reducing the margin size to 5 mm significantly degraded the TCP values of the 'tattoo registration' technique in two of the five patients, where a large difference was found compared to the other techniques ({<=}11.8%). The 'CTV registration' technique, however, did maintain similar TCP values compared to their 10 mm margin counterpart. In terms of normal tissue sparing, the technique producing the lowest NTCP varied from patient to patient. Reducing the

  5. Dosimetric uncertainty in prostate cancer proton radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lin Liyong; Vargas, Carlos; Hsi Wen; Indelicato, Daniel; Slopsema, Roelf; Li Zuofeng; Yeung, Daniel; Horne, Dave; Palta, Jatinder

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: The authors we evaluate the uncertainty in proton therapy dose distribution for prostate cancer due to organ displacement, varying penumbra width of proton beams, and the amount of rectal gas inside the rectum. Methods and Materials: Proton beam treatment plans were generated for ten prostate patients with a minimum dose of 74.1 cobalt gray equivalent (CGE) to the planning target volume (PTV) while 95% of the PTV received 78 CGE. Two lateral or lateral oblique proton beams were used for each plan. The authors we investigated the uncertainty in dose to the rectal wall (RW) and the bladder wall (BW) due to organ displacement by comparing the dose-volume histograms (DVH) calculated with the original or shifted contours. The variation between DVHs was also evaluated for patients with and without rectal gas in the rectum for five patients who had 16 to 47 cc of visible rectal gas in their planning computed tomography (CT) imaging set. The uncertainty due to the varying penumbra width of the delivered protons for different beam setting options on the proton delivery system was also evaluated. Results: For a 5 mm anterior shift, the relative change in the RW volume receiving 70 CGE dose (V{sub 70}) was 37.9% (5.0% absolute change in 13.2% of a mean V{sub 70}). The relative change in the BW volume receiving 70 CGE dose (V{sub 70}) was 20.9% (4.3% absolute change in 20.6% of a mean V{sub 70}) with a 5 mm inferior shift. A 2 mm penumbra difference in beam setting options on the proton delivery system resulted in the relative variations of 6.1% (0.8% absolute change) and 4.4% (0.9% absolute change) in V{sub 70} of RW and BW, respectively. The data show that the organ displacements produce absolute DVH changes that generally shift the entire isodose line while maintaining the same shape. The overall shape of the DVH curve for each organ is determined by the penumbra and the distance of the target in beam's eye view (BEV) from the block edge. The beam setting option

  6. Intrafractional Motion of the Prostate During Hypofractionated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Xie Yaoqin; Djajaputra, David; King, Christopher R.; Hossain, Sabbir; Ma Lijun; Xing Lei

    2008-09-01

    Purpose: To report the characteristics of prostate motion as tracked by the stereoscopic X-ray images of the implanted fiducials during hypofractionated radiotherapy with CyberKnife. Methods and Materials: Twenty-one patients with prostate cancer who were treated with CyberKnife between January 2005 and September 2007 were selected for this retrospective study. The CyberKnife uses a stereoscopic X-ray system to obtain the position of the prostate target through the monitoring of implanted gold fiducial markers. If there is a significant deviation, the treatment is paused while the patient is repositioned by moving the couch. The deviations calculated from X-ray images acquired within the time interval between two consecutive couch motions constitute a data set. Results: Included in the analysis were 427 data sets and 4,439 time stamps of X-ray images. The mean duration for each data set was 697 sec. At 30 sec, a motion >2 mm exists in about 5% of data sets. The percentage is increased to 8%, 11%, and 14% at 60 sec, 90 sec, and 120 sec, respectively. A similar trend exists for other values of prostate motion. Conclusions: With proper monitoring and intervention during treatment, the prostate shifts observed among patients can be kept within the tracking range of the CyberKnife. On average, a sampling rate of {approx}40 sec between consecutive X-rays is acceptable to ensure submillimeter tracking. However, there is significant movement variation among patients, and a higher sampling rate may be necessary in some patients.

  7. Temporal compartmental dosing effects for robotic prostate stereotactic body radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiao, Stephen L.; Sahgal, Arjun; Hu, Weigang; Jabbari, Siavash; Chuang, Cynthia; Descovich, Martina; Hsu, I.-Chow; Gottschalk, Alexander R.; Roach, Mack, III; Ma, Lijun

    2011-12-01

    The rate of dose accumulation within a given area of a target volume tends to vary significantly for non-isocentric delivery systems such as Cyberknife stereotactic body radiotherapy. In this study, we investigated whether intra-target temporal dose distributions produce significant variations in the biological equivalent dose. For the study, time courses of ten patients were reconstructed and calculation of a biologically equivalent uniform dose (EUD) was performed using a formula derived from the linear quadratic model (α/β = 3 for prostate cancer cells). The calculated EUD values obtained for the actual patient treatments were then compared with theoretical EUD values for delivering the same physical dose distribution except that the whole target being irradiated continuously (e.g. large-field ‘dose-bathing’ type of delivery). For all the case, the EUDs for the actual treatment delivery were found to correlate strongly with the EUDs for the large-field delivery: a linear correlation coefficient of R2 = 0.98 was obtained and the average EUD for the actual Cyberknife delivery was somewhat higher (5.0 ± 4.7%) than that for the large-field delivery. However, no statistical significance was detected between the two types of delivery (p = 0.21). We concluded that non-isocentric small-field Cyberknife delivery produced consistent biological dosing that tracked well with the constant-dose-rate, large-field-type delivery for prostate stereotactic body radiotherapy.

  8. Conformal external radiotherapy of prostatic carcinoma: requirements and experimental results.

    PubMed

    Troccaz, J; Menguy, Y; Bolla, M; Cinquin, P; Vassal, P; Laieb, N; Desbat, L; Dusserre, A; Dal Soglio, S

    1993-11-01

    The aim of conformal radiotherapy is to deliver, with high precision, a specific dose (which may be a high dose) to a planning target volume, concurrently with irradiating as little as possible healthy tissue and organs at risk. Radiation therapy may suffer from a number of problems that result in both over- or under-sizing the irradiation fields, making over-rough simplifications of the irradiation ballistics and delivering an insufficient tumoral dose (to spare critical organs and reduce toxicity). One of these problems lies in the accurate positioning of the planning target volume with respect to the irradiation system, thence in the correct execution of the ballistics. In this paper, we describe a system aiming at achieving a higher overall accuracy in the delivery of prostatic boost for carcinoma of the prostate. The system is based on the use of ultrasonic images for measuring the actual position of the prostate just before irradiation. Since these images are registered with pre-operative (CT or MR) images, the position and orientation of the planning target volume is computed with respect to the irradiation system, and can be corrected accordingly. First experiments have been performed on dummies, and the results are discussed.

  9. Results of the Phase I Dose-Escalating Study of Motexafin Gadolinium With Standard Radiotherapy in Patients With Glioblastoma Multiforme

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, Judith M. Seiferheld, Wendy; Alger, Jeffrey R.; Wu, Genevieve; Endicott, Thyra J.; Mehta, Minesh; Curran, Walter; Phan, See-Chun

    2007-11-01

    Purpose: Motexafin gadolinium (MGd) is a putative radiation enhancer initially evaluated in patients with brain metastases. This Phase I trial studied the safety and tolerability of a 2-6-week course (10-22 doses) of MGd with radiotherapy for glioblastoma multiforme. Methods and Materials: A total of 33 glioblastoma multiforme patients received one of seven MGd regimens starting at 10 doses of 4 mg/kg/d MGd and escalating to 22 doses of 5.3 mg/kg/d MGd (5 or 10 daily doses then three times per week). The National Cancer Institute Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program toxicity and stopping rules were applied. Results: The maximal tolerated dose was 5.0 mg/kg/d MGd (5 d/wk for 2 weeks, then three times per week) for 22 doses. The dose-limiting toxicity was reversible transaminase elevation. Adverse reactions included rash/pruritus (45%), chills/fever (30%), and self-limiting vesiculobullous rash of the thumb and fingers (42%). The median survival of 17.6 months prompted a case-matched analysis. In the case-matched analysis, the MGd patients had a median survival of 16.1 months (n = 31) compared with the matched Radiation Therapy Oncology Group database patients with a median survival of 11.8 months (hazard ratio, 0.43; 95% confidence interval, 0.20-0.94). Conclusion: The maximal tolerated dose of MGd with radiotherapy for glioblastoma multiforme in this study was 5 mg/kg/d for 22 doses (daily for 2 weeks, then three times weekly). The baseline survival calculations suggest progression to Phase II trials is appropriate, with the addition of MGd to radiotherapy with concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide.

  10. An Endorectal Balloon Reduces Intrafraction Prostate Motion During Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Smeenk, Robert Jan; Louwe, Robert J.W.; Langen, Katja M.; Shah, Amish P.; Kupelian, Patrick A.; Lin, Emile N.J.Th. van; Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M.

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of endorectal balloons (ERBs) on intrafraction and interfraction prostate motion during radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Thirty patients were treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy, to a total dose of 80 Gy in 40 fractions. In 15 patients, a daily-inserted air-filled ERB was applied. Prostate motion was tracked, in real-time, using an electromagnetic tracking system. Interfraction displacements, measured before each treatment, were quantified by calculating the systematic and random deviations of the center of mass of the implanted transponders. Intrafraction motion was analyzed in timeframes of 150 s, and displacements >1 mm, >3 mm, >5 mm, and >7 mm were determined in the anteroposterior, left-right, and superoinferior direction, and for the three-dimensional (3D) vector. Manual table corrections, made during treatment sessions, were retrospectively undone. Results: A total of 576 and 567 tracks have been analyzed in the no-ERB group and ERB group, respectively. Interfraction variation was not significantly different between both groups. After 600 s, 95% and 98% of the treatments were completed in the respective groups. Significantly fewer table corrections were performed during treatment fractions with ERB: 88 vs. 207 (p = 0.02). Intrafraction motion was significantly reduced with ERB. During the first 150 s, only negligible deviations were observed, but after 150 s, intrafraction deviations increased with time. This resulted in cumulative percentages of 3D-vector deviations >1 mm, >3 mm, >5 mm, and >7 mm that were 57.7%, 7.0%, 0.7%, and 0.3% in the ERB-group vs. 70.2%, 18.1%, 4.6%, and 1.4% in the no-ERB group after 600 s. The largest reductions in the ERB group were observed in the AP direction. These data suggest that a 5 mm CTV-to-PTV margin is sufficient to correct for intrafraction prostate movements when using an ERB. Conclusions: ERB significantly reduces intrafraction prostate motion, but not interfraction

  11. The Effect of Changing Technique, Dose, and PTV Margin on Therapeutic Ratio During Prostate Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Shaohui; Catton, Charles; Jezioranski, John M.Math.; Bayley, Andrew; Rose, Stuart; Rosewall, Tara

    2008-07-15

    Purpose: To quantify the dosimetric and radiobiological changes seen when using intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or planning target volume (PTV) margin reduction with consistent planning parameters in a representative sample of localized prostate cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Twenty patients were randomly selected from a cohort that received 79.8 Gy using six-field conformal radiotherapy. Using the clinical contours, PTV margin, planning system, and dose constraints, five-field IMRT plans were generated for 79.8, 83.8, and 88.0 Gy. The 88.0-Gy IMRT plan was then reoptimized with a PTV margin reduced to 3 mm. These plans were then compared using various dosimetric and radiobiological endpoints calculated for various {alpha}/{beta}. Results: Intensity-modulated RT resulted in greater conformity to the PTV (p < 0.001). No improvement in mean normal tissue complication probabilities in the rectal wall (NTCPrw) was seen, and the modified therapeutic ratio (TR{sub mod}) was largely unchanged between six-field conformal and IMRT for the majority of the patients. When IMRT was used to escalate dose, NTCPrw increased by 9% at each 5% prescription increase (p < 0.001). Reducing the posterior PTV margin from 7 mm to 3 mm for an IMRT plan reduced the mean NTCPrw by 12% (p < 0.001) and resulted in a trend toward increased TR{sub mod}(p = 0.005). Changes in TR{sub mod} between conformal and IMRT planning or PTV reduction showed large interpatient variability. Conclusions: Changing from conformal to IMRT, or from PTV{sub 10-7} to PTV{sub 3}, did not produce a uniform interpatient increase in TR{sub mod}when the CTV contained the prostate alone. Radiobiological benefits of these two methods seem to be dependent on the particular anatomy of individual patients, supporting the use of patient-specific margin, planning, and dose prescription strategies.

  12. [Role of radiotherapy in the management of node-positive prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Supiot, S; Doré, M; Rio, E; Cellier, P; Mesguez-Nebout, N; Goineau, A

    2016-10-01

    Node-positive prostate cancer patients represent a small proportion of all prostate cancers for whom limited prospective information is available. Most retrospective or cohort data strongly suggest however that radiotherapy combined with androgen-depriving therapies is the preferable treatment in this setting. Only randomized clinical trials would be able to better define both radiotherapy (dose? volume? fractionation?) and androgen-depriving therapies (duration? role of novel androgen-depriving therapy?) modalities. PMID:27575537

  13. Superiority of helical tomotherapy on liver sparing and dose escalation in hepatocellular carcinoma: a comparison study of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qianqian; Wang, Renben; Zhu, Jian; Jin, Linzhi; Zhu, Kunli; Xu, Xiaoqing; Feng, Rui; Jiang, Shumei; Qi, Zhonghua; Yin, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose To compare the difference of liver sparing and dose escalation between three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and helical tomotherapy (HT) for hepatocellular carcinoma. Patients and methods Sixteen unresectable HCC patients were enrolled in this study. First, some evaluation factors of 3DCRT, IMRT, and HT plans were calculated with prescription dose at 50 Gy/25 fractions. Then, the doses were increased using HT or IMRT independently until either the plans reached 70 Gy or any normal tissue reached the dose limit according to quantitative analysis of normal tissue effects in the clinic criteria. Results The conformal index of 3DCRT was lower than that of IMRT (P<0.001) or HT (P<0.001), and the homogeneity index of 3DCRT was higher than that of IMRT (P<0.001) or HT (P<0.001). HT took the longest treatment time (P<0.001). For V50% (fraction of normal liver treated to at least 50% of the isocenter dose) of the normal liver, there was a significant difference: 3DCRT > IMRT > HT (P<0.001). HT had a lower Dmean (mean dose) and V20 (Vn, the percentage of organ volume receiving ≥n Gy) of liver compared with 3DCRT (P=0.005 and P=0.005, respectively) or IMRT (P=0.508 and P=0.007, respectively). Dmean of nontarget normal liver and V30 of liver were higher for 3DCRT than IMRT (P=0.005 and P=0.005, respectively) or HT (P=0.005 and P=0.005, respectively). Seven patients in IMRT (43.75%) and nine patients in HT (56.25%) reached the isodose 70 Gy, meeting the dose limit of the organs at risk. Conclusion HT may provide significantly better liver sparing and allow more patients to achieve higher prescription dose in HCC radiotherapy. PMID:27445485

  14. Local prostate cancer radiotherapy after prostate-specific antigen progression during primary hormonal therapy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The outcome of patients after radiotherapy (RT) for localized prostate cancer in case of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) progression during primary hormonal therapy (HT) is not well known. Methods A group of 27 patients presenting with PSA progression during primary HT for local prostate cancer RT was identified among patients who were treated in the years 2000–2004 either using external-beam RT (EBRT; 70.2Gy; n=261) or Ir-192 brachytherapy as a boost to EBRT (HDR-BT; 18Gy + 50.4Gy; n=71). The median follow-up period after RT was 68 months. Results Median biochemical recurrence free (BRFS), disease specific (DSS) and overall survival (OS) for patients with PSA progression during primary HT was found to be only 21, 54 and 53 months, respectively, with a 6-year BRFS, DSS and OS of 19%, 41% and 26%. There were no significant differences between different RT concepts (6-year OS of 27% after EBRT and 20% after EBRT with HDR-BT). Considering all 332 patients in multivariate Cox regression analysis, PSA progression during initial HT, Gleason score>6 and patient age were found to be predictive for lower OS (p<0.001). The highest hazard ratio resulted for PSA progression during initial HT (7.2 in comparison to patients without PSA progression during primary HT). PSA progression and a nadir >0.5 ng/ml during initial HT were both significant risk factors for biochemical recurrence. Conclusions An unfavourable prognosis after PSA progression during initial HT needs to be considered in the decision process before local prostate radiotherapy. Results from other centres are needed to validate our findings. PMID:23227960

  15. SU-E-T-183: Feasibility of Extreme Dose Escalation for Glioblastoma Multiforme Using 4π Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, D; Rwigema, J; Yu, V; Kaprealian, T; Kupelian, P; Selch, M; Low, D; Sheng, K

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: GBM recurrence primarily occurs inside or near the high-dose radiation field of original tumor site requiring greater than 100 Gy to significantly improve local control. We utilize 4π non-coplanar radiotherapy to test the feasibility of planning target volume (PTV) margin expansions or extreme dose escalations without incurring additional radiation toxicities. Methods: 11 GBM patients treated with VMAT to a prescription dose of 59.4 Gy or 60 Gy were replanned with 4π. Original VMAT plans were created with 2 to 4 coplanar or non-coplanar arcs using 3 mm hi-res MLC. The 4π optimization, using 5 mm MLC, selected and inverse optimized 30 beams from a candidate pool of 1162 beams evenly distributed through 4π steradians. 4π plans were first compared to clinical plans using the same prescription dose. Two more studies were then performed to respectively escalate the GTV and PTV doses to 100 Gy, followed by a fourth plan expanding the PTV by 5 mm and maintaining the prescription dose. Results: The standard 4π plan significantly reduced (p<0.01) max and mean doses to critical structures by a range of 47.0–98.4% and 61.0–99.2%, respectively. The high dose PTV/high dose GTV/expanded PTV studies showed a reduction (p<0.05) or unchanged* (p>0.05) maximum dose of 72.1%/86.7%/77.1% (chiasm), 7.2%*/27.7%*/30.7% (brainstem), 39.8%*/84.2%/51.9%* (spinal cord), 69.0%/87.0%/66.9% (L eye), 76.2%/88.1%/84.1% (R eye), 95.0%/98.6%/97.5% (L lens), 93.9%/98.8%/97.6% (R lens), 74.3%/88.5%/72.4% (L optical nerve), 80.4%/91.3%/75.7% (R optical nerve), 64.8%/84.2%/44.9%* (L cochlea), and 85.2%/93.0%/78.0% (R cochlea), respectively. V30 and V36 for both brain and (brain - PTV) were reduced for all cases except the high dose PTV plan. PTV dose coverage increased for all 4π plans. Conclusion: Extreme dose escalation or further margin expansion is achievable using 4π, maintaining or reducing OAR doses. This study indicates that clinical trials employing 4π delivery using

  16. Integral dose: Comparison between four techniques for prostate radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ślosarek, Krzysztof; Osewski, Wojciech; Grządziel, Aleksandra; Radwan, Michał; Dolla, Łukasz; Szlag, Marta; Stąpór-Fudzińska, Małgorzata

    2014-01-01

    Aim Comparisons of integral dose delivered to the treatment planning volume and to the whole patient body during stereotactic, helical and intensity modulated radiotherapy of prostate. Background Multifield techniques produce large volumes of low dose inside the patient body. Delivered dose could be the result of the cytotoxic injuries of the cells even away from the treatment field. We calculated the total dose absorbed in the patient body for four radiotherapy techniques to investigate whether some methods have a potential to reduce the exposure to the patient. Materials and methods We analyzed CyberKnife plans for 10 patients with localized prostate cancer. Five alternative plans for each patient were calculated with the VMAT, IMRT and TomoTherapy techniques. Alternative dose distributions were calculated to achieve the same coverage for PTV. Integral Dose formula was used to calculate the total dose delivered to the PTV and whole patient body. Results Analysis showed that the same amount of dose was deposited to the treated volume despite different methods of treatment delivery. The mean values of total dose delivered to the whole patient body differed significantly for each treatment technique. The highest integral dose in the patient's body was at the TomoTherapy and CyberKnife treatment session. VMAT was characterized by the lowest integral dose deposited in the patient body. Conclusions The highest total dose absorbed in normal tissue was observed with the use of a robotic radiosurgery system and TomoTherapy. These results demonstrate that the exposure of healthy tissue is a dosimetric factor which differentiates the dose delivery methods. PMID:25859398

  17. Interdisciplinary consensus statement on indication and application of a hydrogel spacer for prostate radiotherapy based on experience in more than 250 patients

    PubMed Central

    Mischinger, Johannes; Klotz, Theodor; Gagel, Bernd; Habl, Gregor; Hatiboglu, Gencay; Pinkawa, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background The aim of the study was to reach a consensus on indication and application of a hydrogel spacer based on multicentre experience and give new users important information to shorten the learning curve for this innovative technique. Methods The interdisciplinary meeting was attended by radiation oncologists and urologists, each with experience of 23 – 138 hydrogel injections (SpaceOAR®) in prostate cancer patients before dose-escalated radiotherapy. User experience was discussed and questions were defined to comprise practical information relevant for successful hydrogel injection and treatment. Answers to the defined key questions were generated. Hydrogel-associated side effects were collected to estimate the percentage, treatment and prognosis of potential risks. Results The main indication for hydrogel application was dose-escalated radiotherapy for histologically confirmed low or intermediate risk prostate cancer. It was not recommended in locally advanced prostate cancer. The injection or implantation was performed under transrectal ultrasound guidance via the transperineal approach after prior hydrodissection. The rate of injection-related G2-toxicity was 2% (n = 5) in a total of 258 hydrogel applications. The most frequent complication (n = 4) was rectal wall penetration, diagnosed at different intervals after hydrogel injection and treated conservatively. Conclusions A consensus was reached on the application of a hydrogel spacer. Current experience demonstrated feasibility, which could promote initiation of this method in more centres to reduce radiation-related gastrointestinal toxicity of dose-escalated IGRT. However, a very low rate of a potential serious adverse event could not be excluded. Therefore, the application should carefully be discussed with the patient and be balanced against potential benefits.

  18. Interdisciplinary consensus statement on indication and application of a hydrogel spacer for prostate radiotherapy based on experience in more than 250 patients

    PubMed Central

    Mischinger, Johannes; Klotz, Theodor; Gagel, Bernd; Habl, Gregor; Hatiboglu, Gencay; Pinkawa, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background The aim of the study was to reach a consensus on indication and application of a hydrogel spacer based on multicentre experience and give new users important information to shorten the learning curve for this innovative technique. Methods The interdisciplinary meeting was attended by radiation oncologists and urologists, each with experience of 23 – 138 hydrogel injections (SpaceOAR®) in prostate cancer patients before dose-escalated radiotherapy. User experience was discussed and questions were defined to comprise practical information relevant for successful hydrogel injection and treatment. Answers to the defined key questions were generated. Hydrogel-associated side effects were collected to estimate the percentage, treatment and prognosis of potential risks. Results The main indication for hydrogel application was dose-escalated radiotherapy for histologically confirmed low or intermediate risk prostate cancer. It was not recommended in locally advanced prostate cancer. The injection or implantation was performed under transrectal ultrasound guidance via the transperineal approach after prior hydrodissection. The rate of injection-related G2-toxicity was 2% (n = 5) in a total of 258 hydrogel applications. The most frequent complication (n = 4) was rectal wall penetration, diagnosed at different intervals after hydrogel injection and treated conservatively. Conclusions A consensus was reached on the application of a hydrogel spacer. Current experience demonstrated feasibility, which could promote initiation of this method in more centres to reduce radiation-related gastrointestinal toxicity of dose-escalated IGRT. However, a very low rate of a potential serious adverse event could not be excluded. Therefore, the application should carefully be discussed with the patient and be balanced against potential benefits. PMID:27679550

  19. Short-term Androgen-Deprivation Therapy Improves Prostate Cancer-Specific Mortality in Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer Patients Undergoing Dose-Escalated External Beam Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Zumsteg, Zachary S.; Spratt, Daniel E.; Pei, Xin; Yamada, Yoshiya; Kalikstein, Abraham; Kuk, Deborah; Zhang, Zhigang; Zelefsky, Michael J.

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: We investigated the benefit of short-term androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) in patients with intermediate-risk prostate cancer (PC) receiving dose-escalated external beam radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: The present retrospective study comprised 710 intermediate-risk PC patients receiving external beam radiation therapy with doses of ≥81 Gy at a single institution from 1992 to 2005, including 357 patients receiving neoadjuvant and concurrent ADT. Prostate-specific antigen recurrence-free survival (PSA-RFS) and distant metastasis (DM) were compared using the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox proportional hazards models. PC-specific mortality (PCSM) was assessed using competing-risks analysis. Results: The median follow-up was 7.9 years. Despite being more likely to have higher PSA levels, Gleason score 4 + 3 = 7, multiple National Comprehensive Cancer Network intermediate-risk factors, and older age (P≤.001 for all comparisons), patients receiving ADT had improved PSA-RFS (hazard ratio [HR], 0.598; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.435-0.841; P=.003), DM (HR, 0.424; 95% CI, 0.219-0.819; P=.011), and PCSM (HR, 0.380; 95% CI, 0.157-0.921; P=.032) on univariate analysis. Using multivariate analysis, ADT was an even stronger predictor of improved PSA-RFS (adjusted HR [AHR], 0.516; 95% CI, 0.360-0.739; P<.001), DM (AHR, 0.347; 95% CI, 0.176-0.685; P=.002), and PCSM (AHR, 0.297; 95% CI, 0.128-0.685; P=.004). Gleason score 4 + 3 = 7 and ≥50% positive biopsy cores were other independent predictors of PCSM. Conclusions: Short-term ADT improves PSA-RFS, DM, and PCSM in patients with intermediate-risk PC undergoing dose-escalated external beam radiation therapy.

  20. Ultrasonographic changes in the normal and malignant prostate after definitive radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Egawa, S.; Carter, S.S.; Wheeler, T.M.; Scardino, P.T. )

    1989-11-01

    As treatments for early localized prostate cancer come under closer scrutiny, the fundamental problem of documenting the success of radiotherapy becomes more obvious. Currently, no satisfactory method exists to determine tumor viability after radiotherapy. Transrectal ultrasonography is particularly valuable for monitoring the response of prostate cancer to radiotherapy. Persistent cancer retains its hypoechoic appearance after definitive radiotherapy. Hypoechoic lesions greater than 5 mm in diameter found more than 12 months after radiotherapy should be suspected of representing persistent local disease. In our study, albeit in a selected group of patients undergoing salvage radical prostatectomy, 92 per cent of such findings were associated with what we interpreted as viable tumor by light microscopy. Ultrasound-guided biopsy should be considered in such circumstances. The persistence of hypoechoic lesions in more than 65 per cent of patients 12 to 36 months after radiotherapy also suggests that local treatment failure may be underestimated by digital rectal examination and random digitally guided biopsy. Serial measurement of the diameter of hypoechoic lesions may provide a valuable indicator of progress in an individual patient. Patients with enlarging foci of tumor within the prostate after radiotherapy might be selected for biopsy and further treatment. If such a policy is employed, it is likely that a higher incidence of persistent cancer will be found after radiotherapy than has previously been discovered by random digitally guided biopsy.

  1. Real-Time Study of Prostate Intrafraction Motion During External Beam Radiotherapy With Daily Endorectal Balloon

    SciTech Connect

    Both, Stefan; Wang, Ken Kang-Hsin; Plastaras, John P.; Deville, Curtiland; Bar Ad, Voika; Tochner, Zelig; Vapiwala, Neha

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To prospectively investigate intrafraction prostate motion during radiofrequency-guided prostate radiotherapy with implanted electromagnetic transponders when daily endorectal balloon (ERB) is used. Methods and Materials: Intrafraction prostate motion from 24 patients in 787 treatment sessions was evaluated based on three-dimensional (3D), lateral, cranial-caudal (CC), and anterior-posterior (AP) displacements. The mean percentage of time with 3D, lateral, CC, and AP prostate displacements >2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, and 10 mm in 1 minute intervals was calculated for up to 6 minutes of treatment time. Correlation between the mean percentage time with 3D prostate displacement >3 mm vs. treatment week was investigated. Results: The percentage of time with 3D prostate movement >2, 3, and 4 mm increased with elapsed treatment time (p < 0.05). Prostate movement >5 mm was independent of elapsed treatment time (p = 0.11). The overall mean time with prostate excursions >3 mm was 5%. Directional analysis showed negligible lateral prostate motion; AP and CC motion were comparable. The fraction of time with 3D prostate movement >3 mm did not depend on treatment week of (p > 0.05) over a 4-minute mean treatment time. Conclusions: Daily endorectal balloon consistently stabilizes the prostate, preventing clinically significant displacement (>5 mm). A 3-mm internal margin may sufficiently account for 95% of intrafraction prostate movement for up to 6 minutes of treatment time. Directional analysis suggests that the lateral internal margin could be further reduced to 2 mm.

  2. Whole pelvic radiotherapy for prostate cancer using 3D conformal and intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ashman, Jonathan B.; Zelefsky, Michael J. . E-mail: zelefskm@mskcc.org; Hunt, Margie S.; Leibel, Steven A.; Fuks, Zvi

    2005-11-01

    Purpose: To investigate the correlations between observed clinical morbidity and dosimetric parameters for whole pelvic radiotherapy (WPRT) for prostate cancer using either three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) or intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Between December 1996 and January 2002, 27 patients with prostate adenocarcinoma were treated with conformal WPRT as part of their definitive treatment. WPRT was delivered with 3D-CRT in 14 patients and with IMRT in 13 patients. For each of the patients treated with IMRT, optimized conventional two-dimensional (2D) and 3D-CRT plans were retrospectively generated for the whole pelvic phase of the treatment. Dose-volume histograms for the bowel, bladder, and rectum were compared for the three techniques. Acute toxicities were evaluated for all 27 patients, and late toxicities were evaluated for 25 patients with sufficient follow-up. Toxicities were scored according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group morbidity grading scales. Median follow-up was 30 months. Results: Three-dimensional-CRT resulted in a 40% relative reduction (p < 0.001) in the volume of bowel receiving 45 Gy compared with 2D, and IMRT provided a further 60% reduction relative to 3D-CRT (p < 0.001). Compared with either 2D or 3D-CRT, IMRT reduced the volume of rectum receiving 45 Gy by 90% (p < 0.001). Overall, 9 patients (33%) experienced acute Grade 2 gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity, and only 1 of these patients was treated with IMRT. Antidiarrhea medication was required for 6 patients (22%). However, 5 of these 6 patients also received chemotherapy, and none were treated with IMRT. No Grade 3 or higher acute or late GI toxicities were observed. No cases of late radiation enteritis were observed. Acute and late genitourinary toxicity did not appear significantly increased by the addition of conformal WPRT. Conclusions: Compared to conventional 2D planning, conformal planning for WPRT resulted in significant

  3. The Missing Pieces in Reporting of Randomized Controlled Trials of External Beam Radiation Therapy Dose Escalation for Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Zaorsky, Nicholas G; Egleston, Brian L; Horwitz, Eric M; Dicker, Adam P; Nguyen, Paul L; Showalter, Timothy N; Den, Robert B

    2016-08-01

    Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are the most rigorous way of determining whether a cause-effect relation exists between treatment and outcome and for assessing the cost-effectiveness of a treatment. For many patients, cancer is a chronic illness; RCTs evaluating treatments for indolent cancers must evolve to facilitate medical decision-making, as "concrete" patient outcomes (eg, survival) will likely be excellent independent of the intervention, and detecting a difference between trial arms may be impossible. In this commentary, we articulate 9 recommendations that we hope future clinical trialists and funding agencies (including those under the National Cancer Institute) will take into consideration when planning RCTs to help guide subsequent interpretation of results and clinical decision making, based on RCTs of external beam radiation therapy dose escalation for the most common indolent cancer in men, that is, prostate cancer. We recommend routinely reporting: (1) race; (2) medical comorbidities; (3) psychiatric comorbidities; (4) insurance status; (5) education; (6) marital status; (7) income; (8) sexual orientation; and (9) facility-related characteristics (eg, number of centers involved, type of facilities, yearly hospital volumes). We discuss how these factors independently affect patient outcomes and toxicities; future clinicians and governing organizations should consider this information to plan RCTs accordingly (to maximize patient accrual and total n), select appropriate endpoints (eg, toxicity, quality of life, sexual function), actively monitor RCTs, and report results so as to identify the optimal treatment among subpopulations. PMID:27322694

  4. PSA Response to Neoadjuvant Androgen Deprivation Therapy Is a Strong Independent Predictor of Survival in High-Risk Prostate Cancer in the Dose-Escalated Radiation Therapy Era

    SciTech Connect

    McGuire, Sean E.; Lee, Andrew K.; Cerne, Jasmina Z.; Munsell, Mark F.; Levy, Lawrence B.; Kudchadker, Rajat J.; Choi, Seungtaek L.; Nguyen, Quynh N.; Hoffman, Karen E.; Pugh, Thomas J.; Frank, Steven J.; Corn, Paul G.; Logothetis, Christopher J.; Kuban, Deborah A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the study was to evaluate the prognostic value of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) response to neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) prior to dose-escalated radiation therapy (RT) and long-term ADT in high-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the charts of all patients diagnosed with high-risk prostate cancer and treated with a combination of long-term ADT (median, 24 months) and dose-escalated (median, 75.6 Gy) RT between 1990 and 2007. The associations among patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics with biochemical response to neoadjuvant ADT and their effects on failure-free survival (FFS), time to distant metastasis (TDM), prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM) and overall survival (OS) were examined. Results: A total of 196 patients met criteria for inclusion. Median follow-up time for patients alive at last contact was 7.0 years (range, 0.5-18.1 years). Multivariate analysis identified the pre-RT PSA concentration (<0.5 vs {>=}0.5 ng/mL) as a significant independent predictor of FFS (P=.021), TDM (P=.009), PCSM (P=.039), and OS (P=.037). On multivariate analysis, pretreatment PSA (iPSA) and African-American race were significantly associated with failure to achieve a pre-RT PSA of <0.5 ng/mL. Conclusions: For high-risk prostate cancer patients treated with long-term ADT and dose-escalated RT, a pre-RT PSA level {>=}0.5 ng/mL after neoadjuvant ADT predicts for worse survival measures. Both elevated iPSA and African-American race are associated with increased risk of having a pre-RT PSA level {>=}0.5 ng/mL. These patients should be considered for clinical trials that test newer, more potent androgen-depleting therapies such as abiraterone and MDV3100 in combination with radiation.

  5. Genomic and Histopathological Tissue Biomarkers That Predict Radiotherapy Response in Localised Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, Anna; Dearnaley, David; Somaiah, Navita

    2015-01-01

    Localised prostate cancer, in particular, intermediate risk disease, has varied survival outcomes that cannot be predicted accurately using current clinical risk factors. External beam radiotherapy (EBRT) is one of the standard curative treatment options for localised disease and its efficacy is related to wide ranging aspects of tumour biology. Histopathological techniques including immunohistochemistry and a variety of genomic assays have been used to identify biomarkers of tumour proliferation, cell cycle checkpoints, hypoxia, DNA repair, apoptosis, and androgen synthesis, which predict response to radiotherapy. Global measures of genomic instability also show exciting capacity to predict survival outcomes following EBRT. There is also an urgent clinical need for biomarkers to predict the radiotherapy fraction sensitivity of different prostate tumours and preclinical studies point to possible candidates. Finally, the increased resolution of next generation sequencing (NGS) is likely to enable yet more precise molecular predictions of radiotherapy response and fraction sensitivity. PMID:26504789

  6. Peripheral lymphocyte subset variation predicts prostate cancer carbon ion radiotherapy outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Ze-Liang; Li, Bing-Xin; Wu, Xian-Wei; Li, Ping; Zhang, Qing; Wei, Xun-Bin; Fu, Shen

    2016-01-01

    The immune system plays a complementary role in the cytotoxic activity of radiotherapy. Here, we examined changes in immune cell subsets after heavy ion therapy for prostate cancer. The lymphocyte counts were compared with acute radiotherapy-related toxicity, defined according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, and short-term local efficacy, defined based on prostate-specific antigen concentrations. Confirmed prostate cancer patients who had not received previous radiotherapy were administered carbon ion radiotherapy (CIR) in daily fractions of 2.74 GyE with a total dose of 63-66 GyE. Lymphocyte subset counts were investigated before, during and after radiotherapy, and at a 1 month follow-up. Most notable among our findings, the CD4/CD8 ratio and CD19+ cell counts were consistently higher in patients with a complete response (CR) or partial response (PR) to CIR than in those classified in the stable disease (SD) group (P<0.05 for both). But CD3+ and CD8+ cell counts were lower in the CR and PR groups than in the SD group. These results indicate that variations in peripheral lymphocyte subpopulations are predictive of outcome after CIR for prostate cancer. PMID:27029063

  7. Evaluating changes in tumor volume using magnetic resonance imaging during the course of radiotherapy treatment of high-grade gliomas: Implications for conformal dose-escalation studies

    SciTech Connect

    Tsien, Christina . E-mail: ctsien@umich.edu; Gomez-Hassan, Diana; Haken, Randall K. ten; Tatro, Daniel C.; Junck, L.; Chenevert, T.L.; Lawrence, T.

    2005-06-01

    tumors had tumor progression, based on MRI obtained during Week 3 of radiotherapy. Median increase in GTV (Week 3) was 11.7 cc (range, 9.8-21.3). Retrospective DVH analysis of PTV (Pre-Rx) and PTV (Week 3) demonstrated a decrease in V{sub 95%}(PTV volume receiving 95% of the prescribed dose) in those 3 cases. Conclusions: Routine MR imaging during radiotherapy may be essential in ensuring tumor coverage if highly conformal radiotherapy techniques such as stereotactic boost and intensity-modulated radiotherapy are used in dose-escalation trials that utilize smaller treatment margins.

  8. Method comparison of ultrasound and kilovoltage x-ray fiducial marker imaging for prostate radiotherapy targeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, Clifton David; Thomas, Charles R., Jr.; Schwartz, Scott; Golden, Nanalei; Ting, Joe; Wong, Adrian; Erdogmus, Deniz; Scarbrough, Todd J.

    2006-10-01

    Several measurement techniques have been developed to address the capability for target volume reduction via target localization in image-guided radiotherapy; among these have been ultrasound (US) and fiducial marker (FM) software-assisted localization. In order to assess interchangeability between methods, US and FM localization were compared using established techniques for determination of agreement between measurement methods when a 'gold-standard' comparator does not exist, after performing both techniques daily on a sequential series of patients. At least 3 days prior to CT simulation, four gold seeds were placed within the prostate. FM software-assisted localization utilized the ExacTrac X-Ray 6D (BrainLab AG, Germany) kVp x-ray image acquisition system to determine prostate position; US prostate targeting was performed on each patient using the SonArray (Varian, Palo Alto, CA). Patients were aligned daily using laser alignment of skin marks. Directional shifts were then calculated by each respective system in the X, Y and Z dimensions before each daily treatment fraction, previous to any treatment or couch adjustment, as well as a composite vector of displacement. Directional shift agreement in each axis was compared using Altman-Bland limits of agreement, Lin's concordance coefficient with Partik's grading schema, and Deming orthogonal bias-weighted correlation methodology. 1019 software-assisted shifts were suggested by US and FM in 39 patients. The 95% limits of agreement in X, Y and Z axes were ±9.4 mm, ±11.3 mm and ±13.4, respectively. Three-dimensionally, measurements agreed within 13.4 mm in 95% of all paired measures. In all axes, concordance was graded as 'poor' or 'unacceptable'. Deming regression detected proportional bias in both directional axes and three-dimensional vectors. Our data suggest substantial differences between US and FM image-guided measures and subsequent suggested directional shifts. Analysis reveals that the vast majority of

  9. Relationship between delay in radiotherapy and biochemical control in prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kwan, Winkle . E-mail: wkwan@bccancer.bc.ca; Pickles, Tom; Duncan, Graeme; Liu, Mitchell; Paltiel, Chuck

    2006-11-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate whether a delay in radiotherapy is associated with a poorer biochemical control for prostate cancer. Methods: The time to treatment (TTT) from diagnosis of prostate cancer to radiotherapy was analyzed with respect to prostate-specific antigen (PSA) control in 1024 hormone-naive patients. The Kaplan-Meier PSA control curves for patients with TTT less than the median were compared with those for patients with TTT greater than the median in 3 predefined risk groups. Statistical significant differences in PSA control were further analyzed using Cox multivariate analysis with pretreatment PSA, Gleason score, T stage, and radiotherapy dose as covariates. Results: The median TTT and median follow-up are 3.7 months and 49 months respectively. Patients with a longer TTT have a statistically significant better PSA control than patients with a shorter TTT if they have intermediate- or high-risk disease. However in multivariate analysis TTT was not found to be significant in predicting PSA control, with pretreatment PSA and Gleason score emerging as highly significant in predicting PSA failure in both intermediate- and high-risk disease. Conclusion: In this study in prostate cancer patients in British Columbia, there was no evidence that a longer time interval between diagnosis and radiotherapy was associated with poorer PSA control.

  10. Outcome analysis of 300 prostate cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant androgen deprivation and hypofractionated radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, Geoffrey S. . E-mail: geoffrey.higgins@luht.scot.nhs.uk; McLaren, Duncan B.; Kerr, Gillian R.; Elliott, Tony; Howard, Grahame

    2006-07-15

    Purpose: Neoadjuvant androgen deprivation and radical radiotherapy is an established treatment for localized prostate carcinoma. This study sought to analyze the outcomes of patients treated with relatively low-dose hypofractionated radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Three hundred patients with T1-T3 prostate cancer were treated between 1996 and 2001. Patients were prescribed 3 months of neoadjuvant androgen deprivation before receiving 5250 cGy in 20 fractions. Patients' case notes and the oncology database were used to retrospectively assess outcomes. Median follow-up was 58 months. Results: Patients presented with prostate cancer with poorer prognostic indicators than that reported in other series. At 5 years, the actuarial cause-specific survival rate was 83.2% and the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) relapse rate was 57.3%. Metastatic disease had developed in 23.4% of patients. PSA relapse continued to occur 5 years from treatment in all prognostic groups. Independent prognostic factors for relapse included treatment near the start of the study period, neoadjuvant oral anti-androgen monotherapy rather than neoadjuvant luteinizing hormone releasing hormone therapy, and diagnosis through transurethral resection of the prostate rather than transrectal ultrasound. Conclusion: This is the largest reported series of patients treated with neoadjuvant androgen deprivation and hypofractionated radiotherapy in the United Kingdom. Neoadjuvant hormonal therapy did not appear to adequately compensate for the relatively low effective radiation dose used.

  11. Potential of Adaptive Radiotherapy to Escalate the Radiation Dose in Combined Radiochemotherapy for Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Guckenberger, Matthias; Wilbert, Juergen; Richter, Anne; Baier, Kurt; Flentje, Michael

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the potential of adaptive radiotherapy (ART) for advanced-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in terms of lung sparing and dose escalation. Methods and Materials: In 13 patients with locally advanced NSCLC, weekly CT images were acquired during radio- (n = 1) or radiochemotherapy (n = 12) for simulation of ART. Three-dimensional (3D) conformal treatment plans were generated: conventionally fractionated doses of 66 Gy were prescribed to the planning target volume without elective lymph node irradiation (Plan{sub 3}D). Using a surface-based algorithm of deformable image registration, accumulated doses were calculated in the CT images acquired during the treatment course (Plan{sub 4}D). Field sizes were adapted to tumor shrinkage once in week 3 or 5 and twice in weeks 3 and 5. Results: A continuous tumor regression of 1.2% per day resulted in a residual gross tumor volume (GTV) of 49% {+-} 15% after six weeks of treatment. No systematic differences between Plan{sub 3}D and Plan{sub 4}D were observed regarding doses to the GTV, lung, and spinal cord. Plan adaptation to tumor shrinkage resulted in significantly decreased lung doses without compromising GTV coverage: single-plan adaptation in Week 3 or 5 and twice-plan adaptation in Weeks 3 and 5 reduced the mean lung dose by 5.0% {+-} 4.4%, 5.6% {+-} 2.9% and 7.9% {+-} 4.8%, respectively. This lung sparing with twice ART allowed an iso-mean lung dose escalation of the GTV dose from 66.8 Gy {+-} 0.8 Gy to 73.6 Gy {+-} 3.8 Gy. Conclusions: Adaptation of radiotherapy to continuous tumor shrinkage during the treatment course reduced doses to the lung, allowed significant dose escalation and has the potential of increased local control.

  12. Hypofractionated intensity-modulated radiotherapy in patients with localized prostate cancer: a preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hye Jin; Son, Seok Hyun; Kim, Myungsoo; Jo, In Young; Lee, So Jung; Lee, Dong Hwan; Suh, Hong Jin; Choi, Yong Sun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this work was to assess the efficacy and tolerability of hypofractionated intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in patients with localized prostate cancer. Materials and Methods Thirty-nine patients who received radical hypofractionated IMRT were retrospectively reviewed. Based on a pelvic lymph node involvement risk of 15% as the cutoff value, we decided whether to deliver treatment prostate and seminal vesicle only radiotherapy (PORT) or whole pelvis radiotherapy (WPRT). Sixteen patients (41%) received PORT with prostate receiving 45 Gy in 4.5 Gy per fraction in 2 weeks and the other 23 patients (59%) received WPRT with the prostate receiving 72 Gy in 2.4 Gy per fraction in 6 weeks. The median equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions to the prostate was 79.9 Gy based on the assumption that the α/β ratio is 1.5 Gy. Results The median follow-up time was 38 months (range, 4 to 101 months). The 3-year biochemical failure-free survival rate was 88.2%. The 3-year clinical failure-free and overall survival rates were 94.5% and 96.3%, respectively. The rates of grade 2 acute genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities were 20.5% and 12.8%, respectively. None of the patients experienced grade ≥3 acute GU and GI toxicities. The grade 2-3 late GU and GI toxicities were found in 8.1% and 5.4% of patients, respectively. No fatal late toxicity was observed. Conclusion Favorable biochemical control with low rates of toxicity was observed after hypofractionated IMRT, suggesting that our radiotherapy schedule can be an effective treatment option in the treatment of localized prostate cancer. PMID:27104166

  13. Radiotherapy Combined With Androgen Deprivation for Bone Oligometastases After Primary Curative Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jun-Xin; Lin, Li-Mei; He, Jun-Yan; Hong, Liang; Li, Jin-Luan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To evaluate the effects and toxicity of radiotherapy (RT) combined with androgen deprivation (AD) for bone oligometastases after primary curative RT for prostate cancer (PCa). We retrospectively analyzed 30 consecutively treated PCa patients with bone oligometastases from April 2005 to July 2014. All patients underwent RT combined with AD for oligometastatic bones after curative RT for PCa. Measured outcomes included overall survival (OS) rate, local control (LC), progression-free survival (PFS), pain relief, and toxicities. Statistical analysis was performed with SPSS17.0. The median follow-up was 32.5 months (range, 0.6–50.3). The 3-year PFS and OS rates were 22.8% (95% CI, 13.4–37.5%) and 69% (95% CI, 51.7–81.1%), respectively. The number of bone oligometastases and RT schedule were found to be significantly associated with OS on univariate analysis (P < 0.05, respectively). The 3-year OS for patients with 1 and >1 metastases was 78.8% versus 42.2%, respectively (P = 0.037). The long-course RT was associated with better 3-year OS compared with short-course (76.4% vs 44.1%, P = 0.03). A total of 15 (83.3%, 15/18) patients achieved pain relief. No grade 3 toxicity was observed. Long-course RT combined with ADT was effective and well-tolerated in PCa patients with bone oligometastases after curative RT for PCa. Further randomized controlled trials are needed to corroborate the findings. PMID:26871838

  14. High-Dose Radiotherapy With or Without Androgen Deprivation Therapy for Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer: Cancer Control and Toxicity Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Edelman, Scott; Liauw, Stanley L.; Rossi, Peter J.; Cooper, Sherrie; Jani, Ashesh B.

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of short-course androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) on cancer control outcomes and toxicity in intermediate-risk prostate cancer treated with dose-escalated external beam radiotherapy (high-dose radiotherapy [HDRT]). Methods and Materials: Demographic, disease, and treatment characteristics of prostate cancer patients at 2 institution consortiums were charted. Of 296 men with intermediate-risk prostate cancer (defined as {>=}T2b, prostate-specific antigen level >10 ng/mL, or Gleason score [GS] of 7, with none of the following: {>=}T3, prostate-specific antigen level >20 ng/mL, GS {>=}8, or positive nodes) treated with HDRT to a dose of 72 Gy or greater, 123 received short-course ADT and 173 did not. Univariate and multivariate analyses on biochemical failure-free survival (BFFS) (including subset analysis by disease factors) and on overall survival (OS) were performed, as were comparisons of gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicity rates. Results: For the whole group, the median dose was 75.6 Gy; the minimum follow-up was 2 years, and the median follow-up was 47.4 months. For ADT vs. no ADT, the 5-year BFFS rate was 86% vs. 79% (p = 0.138) and the 5-year OS rate was 87% vs. 80% (p = 0.159). On multivariate analysis, percent positive cores (PPC) (p = 0.002) and GS (p = 0.008) were significantly associated with BFFS, with ADT showing a trend (p = 0.055). The impact of ADT was highest in the subsets with PPC greater than 50% (p = 0.019), GS 4+3 (p = 0.078), and number of risk factors greater than 1 (p = 0.022). Only intensity-modulated radiotherapy use (p = 0.012) and GS (p = 0.023) reached significance for OS, and there were no significant differences in GU or GI toxicity. Conclusions: Although the use of ADT with HDRT did not influence BFFS, our study suggests a benefit in patients with PPC greater than 50%, GS 4+3, or multiple risk factors. No OS benefit was shown, and ADT was not associated with additional radiotherapy

  15. Effects of Prostate-Rectum Separation on Rectal Dose From External Beam Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Susil, Robert C.; McNutt, Todd R.; DeWeese, Theodore L.; Song, Danny

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: In radiotherapy for prostate cancer, the rectum is the major dose-limiting structure. Physically separating the rectum from the prostate (e.g., by injecting a spacer) can reduce the rectal radiation dose. Despite pilot clinical studies, no careful analysis has been done of the risks, benefits, and dosimetric effects of this practice. Methods and Materials: Using cadaveric specimens, 20 mL of a hydrogel was injected between the prostate and rectum using a transperineal approach. Imaging was performed before and after spacer placement, and the cadavers were subsequently dissected. Ten intensity-modulated radiotherapy plans were generated (five before and five after separation), allowing for characterization of the rectal dose reduction. To quantify the amount of prostate-rectum separation needed for effective rectal dose reduction, simulations were performed using nine clinically generated intensity-modulated radiotherapy plans. Results: In the cadaveric studies, an average of 12.5 mm of prostate-rectum separation was generated with the 20-mL hydrogel injections (the seminal vesicles were also separated from the rectum). The average rectal volume receiving 70 Gy decreased from 19.9% to 4.5% (p < .05). In the simulation studies, a prostate-rectum separation of 10 mm was sufficient to reduce the mean rectal volume receiving 70 Gy by 83.1% (p <.05). No additional reduction in the average rectal volume receiving 70 Gy was noted after 15 mm of separation. In addition, spacer placement allowed for increased planning target volume margins without exceeding the rectal dose tolerance. Conclusion: Prostate-rectum spacers can allow for reduced rectal toxicity rates, treatment intensification, and/or reduced dependence on complex planning and treatment delivery techniques.

  16. Learning image context for segmentation of the prostate in CT-guided radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Liao, Shu; Feng, Qianjin; Chen, Wufan; Shen, Dinggang

    2012-03-01

    Accurate segmentation of the prostate is the key to the success of external beam radiotherapy of prostate cancer. However, accurate segmentation of the prostate in computer tomography (CT) images remains challenging mainly due to three factors: (1) low image contrast between the prostate and its surrounding tissues, (2) unpredictable prostate motion across different treatment days and (3) large variations of intensities and shapes of the bladder and rectum around the prostate. In this paper, an online-learning and patient-specific classification method based on the location-adaptive image context is presented to deal with all these challenging issues and achieve the precise segmentation of the prostate in CT images. Specifically, two sets of location-adaptive classifiers are placed, respectively, along the two coordinate directions of the planning image space of a patient, and further trained with the planning image and also the previous-segmented treatment images of the same patient to jointly perform prostate segmentation for a new treatment image (of the same patient). In particular, each location-adaptive classifier, which itself consists of a set of sequential sub-classifiers, is recursively trained with both the static image appearance features and the iteratively updated image context features (extracted at different scales and orientations) for better identification of each prostate region. The proposed learning-based prostate segmentation method has been extensively evaluated on 161 images of 11 patients, each with more than nine daily treatment three-dimensional CT images. Our method achieves the mean Dice value 0.908 and the mean ± SD of average surface distance value 1.40 ± 0.57 mm. Its performance is also compared with three prostate segmentation methods, indicating the best segmentation accuracy by the proposed method among all methods under comparison.

  17. The importance of prostate bed tilt during postprostatectomy intensity-modulated radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Bell, Linda J; Cox, Jennifer; Eade, Thomas; Rinks, Marianne; Kneebone, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Variations in rectal and bladder filling can create a tilt of the prostate bed, which generates the potential for a geographic miss during postprostatectomy radiotherapy. The aim of this study is to assess the effect that bladder and rectum filling has on planning target volume angle, to determine a method to assess prostate bed tilt leading to potential geographic miss, and to discuss possible implementation issues. The cone-beam computed tomography images (n = 377) of 40 patients who received postprostatectomy radiotherapy with intensity-modulated radiotherapy were reviewed. The amount of tilt in the prostate bed was defined as the angle change between 2 surgical clips, one in the upper prostate bed and another in the lower. A potential geographic miss was defined as movement of any clip of more than 1cm in any direction or 0.5 cm posteriorly when aligned to bone anatomy. Variations in bladder and rectum size were correlated with the degree of prostate bed tilt, and the rate of potential geographic miss was determined. A possible clinical use of prostate bed tilt was then assessed for different imaging techniques. A tilt of more than 10° was seen in 20.2% of images, which resulted in a 57.9% geographic miss rate of the superior clip. When tilt remained within 10°, there was only a 9% rate of geographic miss. Potential geographic miss of the inferior surgical clip was rare, occurring in only 1.9% of all images reviewed. The most common occurrence when the prostate bed tilt increased by more than 10° was a smaller bladder and larger rectum (6.4% of all images). The most common occurrence when the prostate bed tilt decreased by more than 10° was a larger bladder and smaller rectum (1.3% of all images). Significant prostate bed tilt (>± 10°) occurred in more than 20% of images, creating a 58% rate of geographic miss. Greatest prostate bed tilt occurred when the bladder size increased or reduced by more than 2 cm or the superior rectum size increased by more

  18. The importance of prostate bed tilt during postprostatectomy intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, Linda J.; Cox, Jennifer; Eade, Thomas; Rinks, Marianne; Kneebone, Andrew

    2014-10-01

    Variations in rectal and bladder filling can create a tilt of the prostate bed, which generates the potential for a geographic miss during postprostatectomy radiotherapy. The aim of this study is to assess the effect that bladder and rectum filling has on planning target volume angle, to determine a method to assess prostate bed tilt leading to potential geographic miss, and to discuss possible implementation issues. The cone-beam computed tomography images (n = 377) of 40 patients who received postprostatectomy radiotherapy with intensity-modulated radiotherapy were reviewed. The amount of tilt in the prostate bed was defined as the angle change between 2 surgical clips, one in the upper prostate bed and another in the lower. A potential geographic miss was defined as movement of any clip of more than 1 cm in any direction or 0.5 cm posteriorly when aligned to bone anatomy. Variations in bladder and rectum size were correlated with the degree of prostate bed tilt, and the rate of potential geographic miss was determined. A possible clinical use of prostate bed tilt was then assessed for different imaging techniques. A tilt of more than 10° was seen in 20.2% of images, which resulted in a 57.9% geographic miss rate of the superior clip. When tilt remained within 10°, there was only a 9% rate of geographic miss. Potential geographic miss of the inferior surgical clip was rare, occurring in only 1.9% of all images reviewed. The most common occurrence when the prostate bed tilt increased by more than 10° was a smaller bladder and larger rectum (6.4% of all images). The most common occurrence when the prostate bed tilt decreased by more than 10° was a larger bladder and smaller rectum (1.3% of all images). Significant prostate bed tilt (>± 10°) occurred in more than 20% of images, creating a 58% rate of geographic miss. Greatest prostate bed tilt occurred when the bladder size increased or reduced by more than 2 cm or the superior rectum size increased by more

  19. Prostate position variability and dose-volume histograms in radiotherapy for prostate cancer with full and empty bladder

    SciTech Connect

    Pinkawa, Michael . E-mail: mpinkawa@ukaachen.de; Asadpour, Branka; Gagel, Bernd; Piroth, Marc D.; Holy, Richard; Eble, Michael J.

    2006-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate prostate position variability and dose-volume histograms in prostate radiotherapy with full bladder (FB) and empty bladder (EB). Methods and Materials: Thirty patients underwent planning computed tomography scans in a supine position with FB and EB before and after 4 and 8 weeks of radiation therapy. The scans were matched by alignment of pelvic bones. Displacements of the prostate/seminal vesicle organ borders and center of mass were determined. Treatment plans (FB vs. EB) were compared. Results: Compared with the primary scan, FB volume varied more than EB volume (standard deviation, 106 cm{sup 3} vs. 47 cm{sup 3}), but the prostate/seminal vesicle center of mass position variability was the same (>3 mm deviation in right-left, anterior-posterior, and superior-inferior directions in 0, 41%, and 33%, respectively, with FB vs. 0, 44%, and 33% with EB). The bladder volume treated with 90% of the prescription dose was significantly larger with EB (39% {+-} 14% vs. 22% {+-} 10%; p < 0.01). Bowel loops received {>=}90% of prescription dose in 37% (3% with FB; p < 0.01). Conclusion: Despite the larger variability of bladder filling, prostate position stability was the same with FB compared with EB. An increased amount of bladder volume in the high-dose region and a higher dose to bowel loops result from treatment plans with EB.

  20. Radiation-induced complications in prostate cancer patients treated with radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Azuddin, A. Yusof; Rahman, I. Abdul; Mohamed, F.; Siah, N. J.; Saadc, M.; Ismail, F.

    2014-09-03

    The purpose of the study is to determine the relationship between radiation-induced complications with dosimetric and radiobiological parameters for prostate cancer patients that underwent the conformal radiotherapy treatment. 17 prostate cancer patients that have been treated with conformal radiotherapy were retrospectively analysed. The dosimetric data was retrieved in the form of dose-volume histogram (DVH) from Radiotherapy Treatment Planning System. The DVH was utilised to derived Normal Tissue Complication Probability (NTCP) in radiobiological data. Follow-up data from medical records were used to grade the occurrence of acute gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) complications using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) scoring system. The chi-square test was used to determine the relationship between radiation-induced complication with dosimetric and radiobiological parameters. 8 (47%) and 7 (41%) patients were having acute GI and GU complications respectively. The acute GI complication can be associated with V60{sub rectum}, rectal mean dose and NTCP{sub rectum} with p-value of 0.016, 0.038 and 0.049 respectively. There are no significant relationships of acute GU complication with dosimetric and radiobiological variables. Further study can be done by increase the sample size and follow up duration for deeper understanding of the factors that effecting the GU and GI complication in prostate cancer radiotherapy.

  1. Radiation-induced complications in prostate cancer patients treated with radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azuddin, A. Yusof; Rahman, I. Abdul; Siah, N. J.; Mohamed, F.; Saadc, M.; Ismail, F.

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of the study is to determine the relationship between radiation-induced complications with dosimetric and radiobiological parameters for prostate cancer patients that underwent the conformal radiotherapy treatment. 17 prostate cancer patients that have been treated with conformal radiotherapy were retrospectively analysed. The dosimetric data was retrieved in the form of dose-volume histogram (DVH) from Radiotherapy Treatment Planning System. The DVH was utilised to derived Normal Tissue Complication Probability (NTCP) in radiobiological data. Follow-up data from medical records were used to grade the occurrence of acute gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) complications using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) scoring system. The chi-square test was used to determine the relationship between radiation-induced complication with dosimetric and radiobiological parameters. 8 (47%) and 7 (41%) patients were having acute GI and GU complications respectively. The acute GI complication can be associated with V60rectum, rectal mean dose and NTCPrectum with p-value of 0.016, 0.038 and 0.049 respectively. There are no significant relationships of acute GU complication with dosimetric and radiobiological variables. Further study can be done by increase the sample size and follow up duration for deeper understanding of the factors that effecting the GU and GI complication in prostate cancer radiotherapy.

  2. Cross-Linked Hyaluronan Gel Reduces the Acute Rectal Toxicity of Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wilder, Richard B.; Barme, Greg A.; Gilbert, Ronald F.; Holevas, Richard E.; Kobashi, Luis I.; Reed, Richard R.; Solomon, Ronald S.; Walter, Nancy L.; Chittenden, Lucy; Mesa, Albert V.; Agustin, Jeffrey; Lizarde, Jessica; Macedo, Jorge; Ravera, John; Tokita, Kenneth M.

    2010-07-01

    Purpose: To prospectively analyze whether cross-linked hyaluronan gel reduces the mean rectal dose and acute rectal toxicity of radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between September 2008 and March 2009, we transperitoneally injected 9mL of cross-linked hyaluronan gel (Hylaform; Genzyme Corporation, Cambridge, MA) into the anterior perirectal fat of 10 early-stage prostate cancer patients to increase the separation between the prostate and rectum by 8 to 18mm at the start of radiotherapy. Patients then underwent high-dose rate brachytherapy to 2,200cGy followed by intensity-modulated radiation therapy to 5,040cGy. We assessed acute rectal toxicity using the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0 grading scheme. Results: Median follow-up was 3 months. The anteroposterior dimensions of Hylaform at the start and end of radiotherapy were 13 {+-} 3mm (mean {+-} SD) and 10 {+-} 4mm, respectively. At the start of intensity-modulated radiation therapy, daily mean rectal doses were 73 {+-} 13cGy with Hylaform vs. 106 {+-} 20cGy without Hylaform (p = 0.005). There was a 0% incidence of National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0 Grade 1, 2, or 3 acute diarrhea in 10 patients who received Hylaform vs. a 29.7% incidence (n = 71) in 239 historical controls who did not receive Hylaform (p = 0.04). Conclusions: By increasing the separation between the prostate and rectum, Hylaform decreased the mean rectal dose. This led to a significant reduction in the acute rectal toxicity of radiotherapy for prostate cancer.

  3. Geometric-model-based segmentation of the prostate and surrounding structures for image-guided radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xiaoli; Jeong, Yongwon; Radke, Richard J.; Chen, George T. Y.

    2004-01-01

    We present a computer vision tool to improve the clinical outcome of patients undergoing radiation therapy for prostate cancer by improving irradiation technique. While intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) allows one to irradiate a specific region in the body with high accuracy, it is still difficult to know exactly where to aim the radiation beam on every day of the 30~40 treatments that are necessary. This paper presents a geometric model-based technique to accurately segment the prostate and other surrounding structures in a daily serial CT image, compensating for daily motion and shape variation. We first acquire a collection of serial CT scans of patients undergoing external beam radiotherapy, and manual segmentation of the prostate and other nearby structures by radiation oncologists. Then we train shape and local appearance models for the structures of interest. When new images are available, an iterative algorithm is applied to locate the prostate and surrounding structures automatically. Our experimental results show that excellent matches can be given to the prostate and surrounding structure. Convergence is declared after 10 iterations. For 256 x 256 images, the mean distance between the hand-segmented contour and the automatically estimated contour is about 1.5 pixels (2.44 mm), with variance about 0.6 pixel (1.24 mm).

  4. Does Hormone Therapy Reduce Disease Recurrence in Prostate Cancer Patients Receiving Dose-Escalated Radiation Therapy? An Analysis of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 94-06

    SciTech Connect

    Valicenti, Richard K.; Bae, Kwounghwa; Michalski, Jeff; Sandler, Howard; Shipley, William; Lin, Alex; Cox, James

    2011-04-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect on freedom from biochemical failure (bNED) or disease-free survival (DFS) by adding hormone therapy (HT) to dose-escalated radiation therapy (HDRT). Methods and Materials: We used 883 analyzable prostate cancer patients who enrolled on Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 94-06, a Phase I/II dose escalation trial, and whose mean planning target volume dose exceeded 73.8 Gy (mean, 78.5 Gy; maximum, 84.3 Gy). We defined biochemical failure according to the Phoenix definition. Results: A total of 259 men started HT 2 to 3 months before HDRT, but not longer than 6 months, and 66 men with high-risk prostate cancer received HT for a longer duration. At 5 years, the biochemical failure rates after HDRT alone were 12%, 18%, and 29% for low-, intermediate-, and high-risk patients, respectively (p < 0.0001). Cox proportional hazards regression analysis adjusted for covariates revealed that pretreatment PSA level was a significant factor, whereas risk group, Gleason score, T-stage, and age were not. When the patients were stratified by risk groups, the Cox proportion hazards regression model (after adjusting for pretreatment PSA, biopsy Gleason score, and T stage) did not reveal a significant effect on bNED or DFS by adding HT to HDRT Conclusion: The addition of HT did not significantly improve bNED survival or DFS in all prostate cancer patients receiving HDRT, but did approach significance in high-risk patient subgroup. The result of this study is hypothesis generating and requires testing in a prospective randomized trial.

  5. Influence of Antiflatulent Dietary Advice on Intrafraction Motion for Prostate Cancer Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lips, Irene M.; Kotte, Alexis N.T.J.; Gils, Carla H. van; Leerdam, Monique E. van; Heide, Uulke A. van der; Vulpen, Marco van

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of an antiflatulent dietary advice on the intrafraction prostate motion in patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between February 2002 and December 2009, 977 patients received five-beam IMRT for prostate cancer to a dose of 76 Gy in 35 fractions combined with fiducial markers for position verification. In July 2008, the diet, consisting of dietary guidelines to obtain regular bowel movements and to reduce intestinal gas by avoiding certain foods and air swallowing, was introduced to reduce the prostate motion. The intrafraction prostate movement was determined from the portal images of the first segment of all five beams. Clinically relevant intrafraction motion was defined as {>=}50% of the fractions with an intrafraction motion outside a range of 3 mm. Results: A total of 739 patients were treated without the diet and 105 patients were treated with radiotherapy after introduction of the diet. The median and interquartile range of the average intrafraction motion per patient was 2.53 mm (interquartile range, 2.2-3.0) without the diet and 3.00 mm (interquartile range, 2.4-3.5) with the diet (p < .0001). The percentage of patients with clinically relevant intrafraction motion increased statistically significant from 19.1% without diet to 42.9% with a diet (odds ratio, 3.18; 95% confidence interval, 2.07-4.88; p < .0001). Conclusions: The results of the present study suggest that antiflatulent dietary advice for patients undergoing IMRT for prostate cancer does not reduce the intrafraction movement of the prostate. Therefore, antiflatulent dietary advice is not recommended in clinical practice for this purpose.

  6. MR-CT registration using a Ni-Ti prostate stent in image-guided radiotherapy of prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Korsager, Anne Sofie; Ostergaard, Lasse Riis; Carl, Jesper

    2013-06-15

    Purpose: In image-guided radiotherapy of prostate cancer defining the clinical target volume often relies on magnetic resonance (MR). The task of transferring the clinical target volume from MR to standard planning computed tomography (CT) is not trivial due to prostate mobility. In this paper, an automatic local registration approach is proposed based on a newly developed removable Ni-Ti prostate stent.Methods: The registration uses the voxel similarity measure mutual information in a two-step approach where the pelvic bones are used to establish an initial registration for the local registration.Results: In a phantom study, the accuracy was measured to 0.97 mm and visual inspection showed accurate registration of all 30 data sets. The consistency of the registration was examined where translation and rotation displacements yield a rotation error of 0.41 Degree-Sign {+-} 0.45 Degree-Sign and a translation error of 1.67 {+-} 2.24 mm.Conclusions: This study demonstrated the feasibility for an automatic local MR-CT registration using the prostate stent.

  7. Predictors of Rectal Tolerance Observed in a Dose-Escalated Phase 1-2 Trial of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, D.W. Nathan; Cho, L. Chinsoo; Straka, Christopher; Christie, Alana; Lotan, Yair; Pistenmaa, David; Kavanagh, Brian D.; Nanda, Akash; Kueplian, Patrick; Brindle, Jeffrey; Cooley, Susan; Perkins, Alida; Raben, David; Xie, Xian-Jin; Timmerman, Robert D.

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: To convey the occurrence of isolated cases of severe rectal toxicity at the highest dose level tested in 5-fraction stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for localized prostate cancer; and to rationally test potential causal mechanisms to guide future studies and experiments to aid in mitigating or altogether avoiding such severe bowel injury. Methods and Materials: Clinical and treatment planning data were analyzed from 91 patients enrolled from 2006 to 2011 on a dose-escalation (45, 47.5, and 50 Gy in 5 fractions) phase 1/2 clinical study of SBRT for localized prostate cancer. Results: At the highest dose level, 6.6% of patients treated (6 of 91) developed high-grade rectal toxicity, 5 of whom required colostomy. Grade 3+ delayed rectal toxicity was strongly correlated with volume of rectal wall receiving 50 Gy >3 cm{sup 3} (P<.0001), and treatment of >35% circumference of rectal wall to 39 Gy (P=.003). Grade 2+ acute rectal toxicity was significantly correlated with treatment of >50% circumference of rectal wall to 24 Gy (P=.010). Conclusion: Caution is advised when considering high-dose SBRT for treatment of tumors near bowel structures, including prostate cancer. Threshold dose constraints developed from physiologic principles are defined, and if respected can minimize risk of severe rectal toxicity.

  8. A Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Randomized Clinical Trial With Magnesium Oxide to Reduce Intrafraction Prostate Motion for Prostate Cancer Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lips, Irene M.; Gils, Carla H. van; Kotte, Alexis N.T.J.; Leerdam, Monique E. van; Franken, Stefan P.G.; Heide, Uulke A. van der; Vulpen, Marco van

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether magnesium oxide during external-beam radiotherapy for prostate cancer reduces intrafraction prostate motion in a double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized trial. Methods and Materials: At the Department of Radiotherapy, prostate cancer patients scheduled for intensity-modulated radiotherapy (77 Gy in 35 fractions) using fiducial marker-based position verification were randomly assigned to receive magnesium oxide (500 mg twice a day) or placebo during radiotherapy. The primary outcome was the proportion of patients with clinically relevant intrafraction prostate motion, defined as the proportion of patients who demonstrated in {>=}50% of the fractions an intrafraction motion outside a range of 2 mm. Secondary outcome measures included quality of life and acute toxicity. Results: In total, 46 patients per treatment arm were enrolled. The primary endpoint did not show a statistically significant difference between the treatment arms with a percentage of patients with clinically relevant intrafraction motion of 83% in the magnesium oxide arm as compared with 80% in the placebo arm (p = 1.00). Concerning the secondary endpoints, exploratory analyses demonstrated a trend towards worsened quality of life and slightly more toxicity in the magnesium oxide arm than in the placebo arm; however, these differences were not statistically significant. Conclusions: Magnesium oxide is not effective in reducing the intrafraction prostate motion during external-beam radiotherapy, and therefore there is no indication to use it in clinical practice for this purpose.

  9. Postoperative Radiotherapy in Prostate Cancer: The Case of the Missing Target

    SciTech Connect

    Croke, Jennifer; Malone, Shawn; Roustan Delatour, Nicolas; Belanger, Eric; Avruch, Leonard; Morash, Christopher; Kayser, Cathleen; Underhill, Kathryn; Spaans, Johanna

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: Postoperative radiotherapy (XRT) increases survival in high-risk prostate cancer patients. Approximately 50% of patients on long-term follow-up relapse despite adjuvant XRT and the predominant site of failure remains local. Four consensus guidelines define postoperative clinical target volume (CTV) in prostate cancer. We explore the possibility that inadequate CTV coverage is an important cause of local failure. This study evaluates the utility of preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in defining prostate bed CTV. Methods and Materials: Twenty prostate cancer patients treated with postoperative XRT who also had preoperative staging MRI were included. The four guidelines were applied and the CTVs were expanded to create planning target volumes (PTVs). Preoperative MRIs were fused with postoperative planning CT scans. MRI-based prostate and gross visible tumors were contoured. Three-dimensional (3D) conformal four- and six-field XRT plans were developed and dose-volume histograms analyzed. Subtraction analysis was conducted to assess the adequacy of prostate/gross tumor coverage. Results: Gross tumor was visible in 18 cases. In all 20 cases, the consensus CTVs did not fully cover the MRI-defined prostate. On average, 35% of the prostate volume and 32% of the gross tumor volume were missed using six-field 3D treatment plans. The entire MRI-defined gross tumor volume was completely covered in only two cases (six-field plans). The expanded PTVs did not cover the entire prostate bed in 50% of cases. Prostate base and mid-zones were the predominant site of inadequate coverage. Conclusions: Current postoperative CTV guidelines do not adequately cover the prostate bed and/or gross tumor based on preoperative MRI imaging. Additionally, expanded PTVs do not fully cover the prostate bed in 50% of cases. Inadequate CTV definition is likely a major contributing factor for the high risk of relapse despite adjuvant XRT. Preoperative imaging may lead to more

  10. Planning of External Beam Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer Guided by PET/CT.

    PubMed

    von Eyben, Finn Edler; Kairemo, Kalevi; Kiljunen, Timo; Joensuu, Timo

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we give an overview of articles on non-choline tracers for PET/CT for patients with prostate cancer and planning of radiotherapy guided by PET/CT. Nineteen articles described (11)C-Acetate PET/CT. Of 629 patients 483 (77%, 95% CI 74% - 80%) had positive (11)C-Acetate PET/CT scans. Five articles described (18)F-FACBC PET/CT. Of 174 patients, 127 (73%, 95% CI 68% - 78%) had positive scans. Both tracers detected local lesions, lesions in regional lymph nodes, and distant organs. Ten articles described (18)F-NaF PET/CT and found that 1289 of 3918 patients (33%) had positive reactive lesions in bones. PET/CT scan can guide external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) planning for patients with loco-regional prostate cancer. In six studies with 178 patients with localized prostate cancer, PET/CT pointed out dominant intraprostatic lesions (DIL). Oncologists gave EBRT to the whole prostate and a simultaneously integrated boost to the DIL. Four studies with 254 patients described planning of EBRT for patients with PETpositive lymph nodes. After the EBRT, 15 of 29 node-positive patients remained in remission for median 28 months (range 14 to 50 months). Most articles describe (11)C- and (18)F-Choline PET/CT. However, (11)C-Acetate and (18)F-FACBC may also be useful tracers for PET/CT. Planning of radiotherapy guided by MRI or PET/CT is an investigational method for localized prostate cancer. Current clinical controlled trials evaluate whether the method improves overall survival.

  11. Assessment of Planning Target Volume Margins for Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy of the Prostate Gland: Role of Daily Inter- and Intrafraction Motion

    SciTech Connect

    Tanyi, James A.; He, Tongming; Summers, Paige A.; Mburu, Ruth G.; Kato, Catherine M.; Rhodes, Stephen M.; Hung, Arthur Y.; Fuss, Martin

    2010-12-01

    Purpose: To determine planning target volume margins for prostate intensity-modulated radiotherapy based on inter- and intrafraction motion using four daily localization techniques: three-point skin mark alignment, volumetric imaging with bony landmark registration, volumetric imaging with implanted fiducial marker registration, and implanted electromagnetic transponders (beacons) detection. Methods and Materials: Fourteen patients who underwent definitive intensity-modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer formed the basis of this study. Each patient was implanted with three electromagnetic transponders and underwent a course of 39 treatment fractions. Daily localization was based on three-point skin mark alignment followed by transponder detection and patient repositioning. Transponder positioning was verified by volumetric imaging with cone-beam computed tomography of the pelvis. Relative motion between the prostate gland and bony anatomy was quantified by offline analyses of daily cone-beam computed tomography. Intratreatment organ motion was monitored continuously by the Calypso (registered) System for quantification of intrafraction setup error. Results: As expected, setup error (that is, inter- plus intrafraction motion, unless otherwise stated) was largest with skin mark alignment, requiring margins of 7.5 mm, 11.4 mm, and 16.3 mm, in the lateral (LR), longitudinal (SI), and vertical (AP) directions, respectively. Margin requirements accounting for intrafraction motion were smallest for transponder detection localization techniques, requiring margins of 1.4 mm (LR), 2.6 mm (SI), and 2.3 mm (AP). Bony anatomy alignment required 2.1 mm (LR), 9.4 mm (SI), and 10.5 mm (AP), whereas image-guided marker alignment required 2.8 mm (LR), 3.7 mm (SI), and 3.2 mm (AP). No marker migration was observed in the cohort. Conclusion: Clinically feasible, rapid, and reliable tools such as the electromagnetic transponder detection system for pretreatment target localization

  12. Boost in radiotherapy: external beam sunset, brachytherapy sunrise

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Radiobiological limitations for dose escalation in external radiotherapy are presented. Biological and clinical concept of brachytherapy boost to increase treatment efficacy is discussed, and different methods are compared. Oncentra Prostate 3D conformal real-time ultrasound-guided brachytherapy is presented as a solution for boost or sole therapy.

  13. Retrospective Evaluation Reveals That Long-term Androgen Deprivation Therapy Improves Cause-Specific and Overall Survival in the Setting of Dose-Escalated Radiation for High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Felix Y.; Blas, Kevin; Olson, Karin; Stenmark, Matthew; Sandler, Howard; Hamstra, Daniel A.

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the role of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) and duration for high-risk prostate cancer patients treated with dose-escalated radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: A retrospective analysis of high-risk prostate cancer patients treated with dose-escalated RT (minimum 75 Gy) with or without ADT was performed. The relationship between ADT use and duration with biochemical failure (BF), metastatic failure (MF), prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM), non-prostate cancer death (NPCD), and overall survival (OS) was assessed as a function of pretreatment characteristics, comorbid medical illness, and treatment using Fine and Gray's cumulative incidence methodology. Results: The median follow-up time was 64 months. In men with National Comprehensive Cancer Network defined high-risk prostate cancer treated with dose-escalated RT, on univariate analysis, both metastasis (P<.0001; hazard ratio 0.34; 95% confidence interval 0.18-0.67; cumulative incidence at 60 months 13% vs 35%) and PCSM (P=.015; hazard ratio 0.41; 95% confidence interval 0.2-1.0; cumulative incidence at 60 months 6% vs 11%) were improved with the use of ADT. On multivariate analysis for all high-risk patients, Gleason score was the strongest negative prognostic factor, and long-term ADT (LTAD) improved MF (P=.002), PCSM (P=.034), and OS (P=.001). In men with prostate cancer and Gleason scores 8 to 10, on multivariate analysis after adjustment for other risk features, there was a duration-dependent improvement in BF, metastasis, PCSM, and OS, all favoring LTAD in comparison with STAD or RT alone. Conclusion: For men with high-risk prostate cancer treated with dose-escalated EBRT, this retrospective study suggests that the combination of LTAD and RT provided a significant improvement in clinical outcome, which was especially true for those with Gleason scores of 8 to 10.

  14. Dosimetric comparison of four target alignment methods for prostate cancer radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    O'Daniel, Jennifer C.; Dong Lei . E-mail: ldong@mdanderson.org; Zhang Lifei; Crevoisier, Renaud de; Wang He; Lee, Andrew K.; Cheung, Rex; Tucker, Susan L.; Kudchadker, Rajat J.; Bonnen, Mark D.; Cox, James D.; Mohan, Radhe; Kuban, Deborah A.

    2006-11-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to compare the dosimetric consequences of 4 treatment delivery techniques for prostate cancer patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: During an 8-week course of radiotherapy, 10 patients underwent computed tomography (CT) scans 3 times per week (243 total) before daily treatment with a CT-linear accelerator. Treatment delivery was simulated by realigning a fixed-margin treatment plan on each CT scan and calculating doses. The alignment methods were those based on the following: skin marks, bony registration, ultrasonography (United States), and in-room CT. For the last two methods, prostate was the alignment target. The dosimetric effects of these alignment methods on the prostate, seminal vesicles, rectum, and bladder were compared. The average daily minimum dose to 0.1 cm{sup 3} was used as the metric for target coverage. Results: Skin and bone alignments provided acceptable prostate coverage for only 70% of patients, US alignment for 90%, and CT alignment for 100%. CT-based alignment of the prostate provided seminal vesicle (SV) coverage of {>=}69 Gy for all patients; US and bone alignments provided SV coverage of {>=}60 Gy. This SV coverage may be acceptable for early-stage cancer (equivalent SV dose = 55.8 Gy at 1.8 Gy per fraction), but unacceptable for late-stage cancer (SV dose = 75.6 Gy). At 75.6 Gy, the acceptable rate for SV coverage was 40% for skin and bone alignments, 70% for US, and 80% for CT. Conclusions: Direct target alignment methods (US and CT) provided better target coverage. CT-guided alignment provided the best and most consistent dosimetric coverage. A larger planning target volume margin is needed for SV coverage when the alignment target is the prostate.

  15. Calcifications Are Potential Surrogates for Prostate Localization in Image-Guided Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Grace G. McGowan, Tom S.; Larsen, Tessa M.; Bruce, Lisa M.; Moran, Natasha K.; Tsao, Jonathan R.; MacPherson, Miller S.

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of using calcifications as surrogates for the prostate position during cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) image-guided radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: The twice-weekly CBCT images taken during the treatment course of 4 patients were retrospectively studied for the stability of the calcifications. The geometric center of three fiducial markers was used as the reference. The planning CT images of 131 prostate patients recently treated with external beam radiotherapy at our center were reviewed to estimate the calcification occurrence rate. Analysis was conducted using the Varian Eclipse treatment planning system. Two patients were treated using prostate calcifications as the landmark in on-line registration. Both the Varian standard and the low-dose CBCT modes were used for imaging. Results: The calcifications were found to be stable during the treatment course. At the 95% confidence interval, the difference between the distance from an identified calcification to the fiducial markers on CBCT and the distance on the planning CT scans was 0.2 {+-} 2.0 mm, 0.8 {+-} 2.2 mm, and 0.4 {+-} 2.4 mm in the left-right, anteroposterior, and superoinferior direction, respectively. Of the 131 patients, 46 (35%) had well-defined calcifications either inside the prostate or near the borders. Our experience in treating the first 2 patients demonstrated that the calcifications are easily distinguished on low-dose scans and that calcification registration can be precisely performed. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that calcifications can be reliable markers of prostate position and allow for precise image guidance with a low-imaging dose. With this approach, potentially about one-third of prostate patients could benefit from precise image guidance without the invasive use of markers.

  16. Reduction of Prostate Motion by Removal of Gas in Rectum During Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ogino, Ichiro Uemura, Hiroji; Inoue, Tomio; Kubota, Yoshinobu; Nomura, Kazuto R.T.T.; Okamoto, Naoyuki

    2008-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the prostate and seminal vesicle motion in patients during both simulation and radiotherapy by rectal gas removal. Methods and Materials: A total of 34 patients were treated in a whole pelvic radiotherapy (WPRT) arm and 42 patients in a non-WPRT arm. Of the 76 patients, 42 (26 in the non-WPRT arm and 16 in the WPRT arm) were instructed to insert their index finger and wash their rectums to evacuate their rectal gas. In addition to the planning computed tomography scan, three subsequent computed tomography scans were obtained during RT. The organs were outlined on each computed tomography image. Changes in the position of the prostate and seminal vesicles were analyzed using the center of mass (COM) coordinate system. The time trend, overall variations, systematic variations, and random variations were analyzed. Results: The average cross-sectional area in the rectal gas removal group was significantly smaller than in all patients and in the WPRT arm. The vector of the prostate and seminal vesicle displacement for the rectal gas removal group was significantly smaller than in all patients. With rectal gas removal, the 95% confidence limit of the prostate displacement vector was reduced by 2.3 mm in the non-WPRT arm and 2.9 mm in the WPRT arm. The 95% confidence limit of the seminal vesicle displacement vector was reduced by 0.3 mm in the non-WPRT arm and 4.4 mm in the WPRT arm. Conclusions: Using rectal gas removal, the cross-sectional area could be decreased, resulting in reduced motion and margins for the prostate and seminal vesicles. This is especially important for WPRT patients who require RT to the prostate, seminal vesicles, and pelvic lymph nodes.

  17. Dose-escalated intensity-modulated radiotherapy and irradiation of subventricular zones in relation to tumor control outcomes of patients with glioblastoma multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Kusumawidjaja, Grace; Gan, Patricia Zhun Hong; Ong, Whee Sze; Teyateeti, Achiraya; Dankulchai, Pittaya; Tan, Daniel Yat Harn; Chua, Eu Tiong; Chua, Kevin Lee Min; Tham, Chee Kian; Wong, Fuh Yong; Chua, Melvin Lee Kiang

    2016-01-01

    Background Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most aggressive primary brain tumor with high relapse rate. In this study, we aimed to determine if dose-escalated (DE) radiotherapy improved tumor control and survival in GBM patients. Methods We conducted a retrospective analysis of 49 and 23 newly-diagnosed histology-proven GBM patients, treated with DE radiotherapy delivered in 70 Gy (2.33 Gy per fraction) and conventional doses (60 Gy), respectively, between 2007 and 2013. Clinical target volumes for 70 and 60 Gy were defined by 0.5 and 2.0 cm expansion of magnetic resonance imaging T1-gadolinium-enhanced tumor/surgical cavity, respectively. Bilateral subventricular zones (SVZ) were contoured on a co-registered pre-treatment magnetic resonance imaging and planning computed tomography dataset as a 5 mm wide structure along the lateral margins of the lateral ventricles. Survival outcomes of both cohorts were compared using log-rank test. Radiation dose to SVZ in the DE cohort was evaluated. Results Median follow-up was 13.6 and 15.1 months for the DE- and conventionally-treated cohorts, respectively. Median overall survival (OS) of patients who received DE radiotherapy was 15.2 months (95% confidence interval [CI] =11.0–18.6), while median OS of the latter cohort was 18.4 months (95% CI =12.5–31.4, P=0.253). Univariate analyses of clinical and dosimetric parameters among the DE cohort demonstrated a trend of longer progression-free survival, but not OS, with incremental radiation doses to the ipsilateral SVZ (hazard ratio [HR] =0.95, 95% CI =0.90–1.00, P=0.052) and proportion of ipsilateral SVZ receiving 50 Gy (HR =0.98, 95% CI =0.97–1.00, P=0.017). Conclusion DE radiotherapy did not improve survival in patients with GBM. Incorporation of ipsilateral SVZ as a radiotherapy target volume for patients with GBM requires prospective validation. PMID:27042103

  18. Radiobiological comparison of two radiotherapy treatment techniques for high-risk prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Trinitat García; González, Aurora Vicedo; Peidro, Jorge Pastor; Ferrando, Juan V. Roselló; González, Luis Brualla; Cabañero, Domingo Granero; Torrecilla, José López

    2013-01-01

    Background To make a radiobiological comparison, for high risk prostate cancer (T3a, PSA > 20 ng/ml or Gleason > 7) of two radiotherapy treatment techniques. One technique consists of a treatment in three phases of the pelvic nodes, vesicles and prostate using a conventional fractionation scheme of 2 Gy/fraction (SIMRT). The other technique consists of a treatment in two phases that gives simultaneously different dose levels in each phase, 2 Gy/fraction, 2.25 Gy/fraction and 2.5 Gy/fraction to the pelvic nodes, vesicles and prostate, respectively (SIBIMRT). Materials and methods The equivalent dose at fractionation of 2 Gy (EQD2), calculated using the linear quadratic model with α/βprostate = 1.5 Gy, was the same for both treatment strategies. For comparison the parameters employed were D95, mean dose and Tumour Control Probabilities for prostate PTV and D15, D25, D35, D50, mean dose and Normal Tissue Complication Probabilities for the rectum and bladder, with physical doses converted to EQD2. Parameters were obtained for α/βprostate = 1.5, 3 and 10 Gy and for α/βoar = 1, 2, 3, 4, 6 and 8. Results For prostate PTV, both treatment strategies are equivalent for α/βprostate = 1.5 Gy but for higher α/βprostate, EQD2 and TCP, decrease for the SIBIMRT technique. For the rectum and bladder when α/βoar ≤ 2 Gy, EQD2 and NTCP are lower for the SIMRT technique or equal in both techniques. For α/βoar ≥ 2–3 Gy, EQD2 and NTCP increase for the SIMRT treatment. Conclusions A comparison between two radiotherapy techniques is presented. The SIBIMRT technique reduces EQD2 and NTCP for α/βoar from 2 to 8 Gy. PMID:24416563

  19. Strategies for Online Organ Motion Correction for Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy of Prostate Cancer: Prostate, Rectum, and Bladder Dose Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Rijkhorst, Erik-Jan; Lakeman, Annemarie; Nijkamp, Jasper; Bois, Josien de; Herk, Marcel van; Lebesque, Joos V.; Sonke, Jan-Jakob

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: To quantify and evaluate the accumulated prostate, rectum, and bladder dose for several strategies including rotational organ motion correction for intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) of prostate cancer using realistic organ motion data. Methods and Materials: Repeat computed tomography (CT) scans of 19 prostate patients were used. Per patient, two IMRT plans with different uniform margins were created. To quantify prostate and seminal vesicle motion, repeat CT clinical target volumes (CTVs) were matched onto the planning CTV using deformable registration. Four different strategies, from online setup to full motion correction, were simulated. Rotations were corrected for using gantry and collimator angle adjustments. Prostate, rectum, and bladder doses were accumulated for each patient, plan, and strategy. Minimum CTV dose (D{sub min}), rectum equivalent uniform dose (EUD, n = 0.13), and bladder surface receiving >=78 Gy (S78), were calculated. Results: With online CTV translation correction, a 7-mm margin was sufficient (i.e., D{sub min} >= 95% of the prescribed dose for all patients). A 4-mm margin required additional rotational correction. Margin reduction lowered the rectum EUD(n = 0.13) by approx2.6 Gy, and the bladder S78 by approx1.9%. Conclusions: With online correction of both translations and rotations, a 4-mm margin was sufficient for 15 of 19 patients, whereas the remaining four patients had an underdosed CTV volume <1%. Margin reduction combined with online corrections resulted in a similar or lower dose to the rectum and bladder. The more advanced the correction strategy, the better the planned and accumulated dose agreed.

  20. Inverse Relationship Between Biochemical Outcome and Acute Toxicity After Image-Guided Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Vesprini, Danny; Catton, Charles; Jacks, Lindsay; Lockwood, Gina; Rosewall, Tara; Bayley, Andrew; Chung, Peter; Gospodarowicz, Mary; Menard, Cynthia; Milosevic, Michael; Nichol, Alan; Skala, Marketa; Warde, Padraig; Bristow, Robert G.

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: Prostate cancer patients exhibit variability in normal tissue reactions and biochemical failure. With the use of image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT), there is a greater likelihood that the differences in normal tissue and tumor response are due to biological rather than physical factors. We tested the hypothesis that prospectively scored acute toxicity is associated with biochemical failure-free rate (BFFR) in prostate cancer patients treated with IGRT. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively analyzed BFFR in 362 patients with localized prostate cancer treated with IGRT. We compared BFFR with prospectively collected Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) maximum acute gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicity scores. Median follow-up for all patients was 58.3 months after total radiotherapy doses of 75.6-79.8 Gy. Results: Patients reporting RTOG acute GU or GI toxicity scores of {>=}2 were considered 'sensitive' (n = 141, 39%) and patients reporting scores <2 were considered 'nonsensitive' (n = 221, 61%). When calculating biochemical failure (BF) using the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology definition at 5 years, 76% (CI 70-82%) of the 'nonsensitive' patients were failure free, compared with only 53% (CI 43-62%) of the 'sensitive' patients (log-rank test, p < 0.0001). This difference was also observed using the Phoenix definition; 'nonsensitive' 5-year BFFR was 81% (CI 74-86%) vs. 'sensitive' BFFR was 68% (CI 58-76%; log-rank test p = 0.0012). The difference in BF between cohorts remained significant when controlled for radiation dose (75.6 vs. 79.8 Gy), prognostic stratification (T category, prostate-specific antigen, and Gleason score), and prostate volume. Conclusions: This study unexpectedly shows that prostate cancer patients who develop {>=}Grade 2 RTOG acute toxicity during radiotherapy are less likely to remain BFF at 5 years. These results deserve further study and, if validated in other large IGRT cohorts

  1. Stereotactic hypofractionated accurate radiotherapy of the prostate (SHARP), 33.5 Gy in five fractions for localized disease: First clinical trial results

    SciTech Connect

    Madsen, Berit L. . E-mail: ronblm@vmmc.org; Hsi, R. Alex; Pham, Huong T.; Fowler, Jack F.; Esagui, Laura C.; Corman, John

    2007-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility and toxicity of stereotactic hypofractionated accurate radiotherapy (SHARP) for localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: A Phase I/II trial of SHARP performed for localized prostate cancer using 33.5 Gy in 5 fractions, calculated to be biologically equivalent to 78 Gy in 2 Gy fractions ({alpha}/{beta} ratio of 1.5 Gy). Noncoplanar conformal fields and daily stereotactic localization of implanted fiducials were used for treatment. Genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity were evaluated by American Urologic Association (AUA) score and Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC). Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) values and self-reported sexual function were recorded at specified follow-up intervals. Results: The study includes 40 patients. The median follow-up is 41 months (range, 21-60 months). Acute toxicity Grade 1-2 was 48.5% (GU) and 39% (GI); 1 acute Grade 3 GU toxicity. Late Grade 1-2 toxicity was 45% (GU) and 37% (GI). No late Grade 3 or higher toxicity was reported. Twenty-six patients reported potency before therapy; 6 (23%) have developed impotence. Median time to PSA nadir was 18 months with the majority of nadirs less than 1.0 ng/mL. The actuarial 48-month biochemical freedom from relapse is 70% for the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology definition and 90% by the alternative nadir + 2 ng/mL failure definition. Conclusions: SHARP for localized prostate cancer is feasible with minimal acute or late toxicity. Dose escalation should be possible.

  2. Causes of Mortality After Dose-Escalated Radiation Therapy and Androgen Deprivation for High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Tendulkar, Rahul D.; Hunter, Grant K.; Reddy, Chandana A.; Stephans, Kevin L.; Ciezki, Jay P.; Abdel-Wahab, May; Stephenson, Andrew J.; Klein, Eric A.; Mahadevan, Arul; Kupelian, Patrick A.

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: Men with high-risk prostate cancer have other competing causes of mortality; however, current risk stratification schema do not account for comorbidities. We aim to identify the causes of death and factors predictive for mortality in this population. Methods and Materials: A total of 660 patients with high-risk prostate cancer were treated with definitive high-dose external beam radiation therapy (≥74 Gy) and androgen deprivation (AD) between 1996 and 2009 at a single institution. Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was conducted to determine factors predictive of survival. Results: The median radiation dose was 78 Gy, median duration of AD was 6 months, and median follow-up was 74 months. The 10-year overall survival (OS) was 60.6%. Prostate cancer was the leading single cause of death, with 10-year mortality of 14.1% (95% CI 10.7-17.6), compared with other cancers (8.4%, 95% CI 5.7-11.1), cardiovascular disease (7.3%, 95% CI 4.7-9.9), and all other causes (10.4%, 95% CI 7.2-13.6). On multivariate analysis, older age (HR 1.55, P=.002) and Charlson comorbidity index score (CS) ≥1 (HR 2.20, P<.0001) were significant factors predictive of OS, whereas Gleason score, T stage, prostate-specific antigen, duration of AD, radiation dose, smoking history, and body mass index were not. Men younger than 70 years of age with CS = 0 were more likely to die of prostate cancer than any other cause, whereas older men or those with CS ≥1 more commonly suffered non-prostate cancer death. The cumulative incidences of prostate cancer-specific mortality were similar regardless of age or comorbidities (P=.60). Conclusions: Men with high-risk prostate cancer are more likely to die of causes other than prostate cancer, except for the subgroup of men younger than 70 years of age without comorbidities. Only older age and presence of comorbidities significantly predicted for OS, whereas prostate cancer- and treatment-related factors did not.

  3. Intraoperative Radiotherapy During Radical Prostatectomy for Locally Advanced Prostate Cancer: Technical and Dosimetric Aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Krengli, Marco; Terrone, Carlo; Ballare, Andrea; Loi, Gianfranco; Tarabuzzi, Roberto; Marchioro, Giansilvio; Beldi, Debora; Mones, Eleonora; Bolchini, Cesare R.T.; Volpe, Alessandro; Frea, Bruno

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: To analyze the feasibility of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) in patients with high-risk prostate cancer and candidates for radical prostatectomy. Methods and Materials: A total of 38 patients with locally advanced prostate cancer were enrolled. No patients had evidence of lymph node or distant metastases, probability of organ-confined disease >25%, or risk of lymph node involvement >15% according to the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center Nomogram. The IORT was delivered after exposure of the prostate by a dedicated linear accelerator with beveled collimators using electrons of 9 to 12 MeV to a total dose of 10-12 Gy. Rectal dose was measured in vivo by radiochromic films placed on a rectal probe. Administration of IORT was followed by completion of radical prostatectomy and regional lymph node dissection. All cases with extracapsular extension and/or positive margins were scheduled for postoperative radiotherapy. Patients with pT3 to pT4 disease or positive nodes received adjuvant hormonal therapy. Results: Mean dose detected by radiochromic films was 3.9 Gy (range, 0.4-8.9 Gy) to the anterior rectal wall. The IORT procedure lasted 31 min on average (range, 15-45 min). No major intra- or postoperative complications occurred. Minor complications were observed in 10/33 (30%) of cases. Of the 27/31 patients who completed the postoperative external beam radiotherapy, 3/27 experienced Grade 2 rectal toxicity and 1/27 experienced Grade 2 urinary toxicity. Conclusions: Use of IORT during radical prostatectomy is feasible and allows safe delivery of postoperative external beam radiotherapy to the tumor bed without relevant acute rectal toxicity.

  4. Accuracy of Life Tables in Predicting Overall Survival in Candidates for Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Walz, Jochen; Gallina, Andrea; Hutterer, Georg; Perrotte, Paul; Shariat, Shahrokh F.; Graefen, Markus; McCormack, Michael; Benard, Francois; Valiquette, Luc; Saad, Fred; Karakiewicz, Pierre I.

    2007-09-01

    Purpose: To test the accuracy of life tables (LTs) in predicting survival in men treated with radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We selected the records of 3,176 patients treated with radiotherapy and who had no clinical evidence of disease relapse. Life table-derived life expectancy (LE) was defined for every individual using a population-specific LT. Age, Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI), and LT-derived LE were then used as predictors of overall mortality in Cox regression models. Predictive accuracy (PA) was estimated with the Harrell's concordance index and was internally validated with 200 bootstrap resamples. Results: The actuarial median survival was 4.7 years (mean, 6.4 years). At radiotherapy, median age was 70.6 years, median CCI was 2, and median LT-derived LE was 12 years. All variables were statistically significant predictors of overall mortality (all p values <0.001). Age (PA, 60.2%), CCI (PA, 60.1%), and LT-derived LE (PA, 60.2%) were equally accurate. Finally, when age and CCI were combined (PA, 63.2%), both variables provided more accurate mortality predictions than either variable alone (all p values = 0.01). Conclusions: Life tables have a limited ability to predict LE in patients treated with radiotherapy for prostate cancer. We, therefore, recommend the use of multivariate prognostic models that integrate several variables, such as at least age and comorbidities, to estimate LE. This might help to improve LE estimation during prostate cancer treatment decision making.

  5. Sexual Function After Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer: Results of a Prospective Clinical Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Wiegner, Ellen A.; King, Christopher R.

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: To study the sexual quality of life for prostate cancer patients after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: Using the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC)-validated quality-of-life questionnaire, the sexual function of 32 consecutive patients who received prostate SBRT in a prospective Phase II clinical trial were analyzed at baseline, and at median times of 4, 12, 20, and 50 months after treatment. SBRT consisted of 36.25 Gy in five fractions of 7.25 Gy using the Cyberknife. No androgen deprivation therapy was given. The use of erectile dysfunction (ED) medications was monitored. A comprehensive literature review for radiotherapy-alone modalities based on patient self-reported questionnaires served as historical comparison. Results: Median age at treatment was 67.5 years, and median follow-up was 35.5 months (minimum 12 months). The mean EPIC sexual domain summary score, sexual function score, and sexual bother score decreased by 45%, 49%, and 25% respectively at 50 months follow-up. These differences reached clinical relevance by 20 months after treatment. Baseline ED rate was 38% and increased to 71% after treatment (p = 0.024). Use of ED medications was 3% at baseline and progressed to 25%. For patients aged <70 years at follow-up, 60% maintained satisfactory erectile function after treatment compared with only 12% aged {>=}70 years (p = 0.008). Penile bulb dose was not associated with ED. Conclusions: The rates of ED after treatment appear comparable to those reported for other modalities of radiotherapy. Given the modest size of this study and the uncertainties in the physiology of radiotherapy-related ED, these results merit further investigations.

  6. Intrafractional prostate motion during external beam radiotherapy monitored by a real-time target localization system.

    PubMed

    Tong, Xu; Chen, Xiaoming; Li, Jinsheng; Xu, Qianqian; Lin, Mu-Han; Chen, Lili; Price, Robert A; Ma, Chang-Ming

    2015-03-08

    This paper investigates the clinical significance of real-time monitoring of intrafractional prostate motion during external beam radiotherapy using a commercial 4D localization system. Intrafractional prostate motion was tracked during 8,660 treatment fractions for 236 patients. The following statistics were analyzed: 1) the percentage of fractions in which the prostate shifted 2-7 mm for a certain duration; 2) the proportion of the entire tracking time during which the prostate shifted 2-7mm; and 3) the proportion of each minute in which the shift exceeded 2-7 mm. The ten patients exhibiting maximum intrafractional-motion patterns were analyzed separately. Our results showed that the percentage of fractions in which the prostate shifted by > 2, 3, 5, and 7 mm off the baseline in any direction for > 30 s was 56.8%, 27.2%, 4.6%, and 0.7% for intact prostate and 68.7%, 35.6%, 10.1%, and 1.8% for postprostatectomy patients, respectively. For the ten patients, these percentages were 91.3%, 72.4%, 36.3%, and 6%, respectively. The percentage of tracking time during which the prostate shifted > 2, 3, 5, and 7 mm was 27.8%, 10.7%, 1.6%, and 0.3%, respectively, and it was 56.2%, 33.7%, 11.2%, and 2.1%, respectively, for the ten patients. The percentage of tracking time for a > 3 mm posterior motion was four to five times higher than that in other directions. For treatments completed in 5 min (VMAT) and 10 min (IMRT), the proportion for the prostate to shift by > 3mm was 4% and 12%, respectively. Although intrafractional prostate motion was generally small, caution should be taken for patients who exhibit frequent large intrafractional motion. For those patients, adjustment of patient positioning may be necessary or a larger treatment margin may be used. After the initial alignment, the likelihood of prostate motion increases with time. Therefore, it is favorable to use advanced techniques (e.g., VMAT) that require less delivery time in order to reduce the treatment

  7. Fractionated changes in prostate cancer radiotherapy using cone-beam computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Tzung-Chi; Chou, Kuei-Ting; Yang, Shih-Neng; Chang, Chih-Kai; Liang, Ji-An; Zhang, Geoffrey

    2015-10-01

    The high mobility of the bladder and the rectum causes uncertainty in radiation doses prescribed to patients with prostate cancer who undergo radiotherapy (RT) multifraction treatments. The purpose of this study was to estimate the dose received by the bladder, rectum, and prostate from multifraction treatments using daily cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Overall, 28 patients with prostate cancer who planned to receive radiation treatments were enrolled in the study. The acquired CBCT before the treatment delivery was registered with the planning CT to map the dose distribution used in the treatment plan for estimating the received dose during clinical treatment. For all 28 patients with 112 data sets, the mean percentage differences (± standard deviation) in the volume and radiation dose were 44% (± 41) and 18% (± 17) for the bladder, 20% (± 21) and 2% (± 2) for the prostate, and 36% (± 29) and 22% (± 15) for the rectum, respectively. Substantial differences between the volumes and radiation dose and those specified in treatment plans were observed. Besides the use of image-guided RT to improve patient setup accuracy, further consideration of large changes in bladder and rectum volumes is strongly suggested when using external beam radiation for prostate cancer.

  8. External Beam Radiotherapy for Clinically Localized Hormone-Refractory Prostate Cancer: Clinical Significance of Nadir Prostate-Specific Antigen Value Within 12 Months

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Kazuhiko Nakamura, Katsumasa; Sasaki, Tomonari; Onishi, Hiroshi; Koizumi, Masahiko; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Araya, Masayuki; Mukumoto, Nobutaka M.S.; Mitsumori, Michihide; Teshima, Teruki

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: To analyze retrospectively the results of external beam radiotherapy for clinically localized hormone-refractory prostate cancer and investigate the clinical significance of nadir prostate-specific antigen (PSA) value within 12 months (nPSA12) as an early estimate of clinical outcomes after radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Eighty-four patients with localized hormone-refractory prostate cancer treated with external beam radiotherapy were retrospectively reviewed. The total radiation doses ranged from 30 to 76 Gy (median, 66 Gy), and the median follow-up period for all 84 patients was 26.9 months (range, 2.7-77.3 months). Results: The 3-year actuarial overall survival, progression-free survival (PFS), and local control rates in all 84 patients after radiotherapy were 67%, 61%, and 93%, respectively. Although distant metastases and/or regional lymph node metastases developed in 34 patients (40%) after radiotherapy, local progression was observed in only 5 patients (6%). Of all 84 patients, the median nPSA12 in patients with clinical failure and in patients without clinical failure was 3.1 ng/mL and 0.5 ng/mL, respectively. When dividing patients according to low (<0.5 ng/mL) and high ({>=}0.5 ng/mL) nPSA12 levels, the 3-year PFS rate in patients with low nPSA12 and in those with high nPSA12 was 96% and 44%, respectively (p < 0.0001). In univariate analysis, nPSA12 and pretreatment PSA value had a significant impact on PFS, and in multivariate analysis nPSA12 alone was an independent prognostic factor for PFS after radiotherapy. Conclusions: External beam radiotherapy had an excellent local control rate for clinically localized hormone-refractory prostate cancer, and nPSA12 was predictive of clinical outcomes after radiotherapy.

  9. Characterizing Interfraction Variations and Their Dosimetric Effects in Prostate Cancer Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Peng Cheng; Ahunbay, Ergun; Chen Guangpei; Anderson, Savannah; Lawton, Colleen; Li, X. Allen

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: To quantitatively characterize the interfraction variations and their dosimetric effects in radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 486 daily computed tomography (CT) sets acquired for 20 prostate cancer patients treated with daily CT-guided repositioning using a linear accelerator and CT-on-rail combination were analyzed. The prostate, rectum, and bladder, delineated on each daily CT data set, were compared with those from the planning CT scan. Several quantities, including Dice's coefficient and the maximal overlapping rate, were used to characterize the interfraction variations. The delivered dose was reconstructed by applying the original plan to the daily CT scan with consideration of proper repositioning. Results: The mean prostate Dice's coefficient and maximal overlapping rate after bony registration was 69.7% {+-} 13.8% (standard deviation) and 85.6% {+-} 7.8% (standard deviation), respectively. The daily delivered dose distributions were generally inferior to the planned dose distribution for target coverage and/or normal structure sparing. For example, for approximately 5% of the treatment fractions, the prostate volume receiving 100% of the prescription dose decreased dramatically (15-20%) compared with its planned value. The magnitudes of the interfraction variations and their dosimetric effects indicated that, statistically, current standard repositioning using prostate alignment might be adequate for two-thirds of the fractions, but for the rest of the fractions, better on-line correction strategies, such as on-line replanning, are needed. Conclusion: Different adaptive correction schemes for prostatic interfraction changes can be used according to the anatomic changes, as quantified by the organ displacement and deformation parameters. On-line replanning is needed for approximately one-third of the treatment fractions.

  10. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer: Interim Results of a Prospective Phase II Clinical Trial

    SciTech Connect

    King, Christopher R. Brooks, James D.; Gill, Harcharan; Pawlicki, Todd; Cotrutz, Cristian; Presti, Joseph C.

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: The radiobiology of prostate cancer favors a hypofractionated dose regimen. We report results of a prospective Phase II clinical trial of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Forty-one low-risk prostate cancer patients with 6 months' minimum follow-up received 36.25 Gy in five fractions of 7.25 Gy with image-guided SBRT alone using the CyberKnife. The early (<3 months) and late (>6 months) urinary and rectal toxicities were assessed using validated quality of life questionnaires (International Prostate Symptom Score, Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite) and the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) toxicity criteria. Patterns of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) response are analyzed. Results: The median follow-up was 33 months. There were no RTOG Grade 4 acute or late rectal/urinary complications. There were 2 patients with RTOG Grade 3 late urinary toxicity and none with RTOG Grade 3 rectal complications. A reduced rate of severe rectal toxicities was observed with every-other-day vs. 5 consecutive days treatment regimen (0% vs. 38%, p = 0.0035). A benign PSA bounce (median, 0.4 ng/mL) was observed in 12 patients (29%) occurring at 18 months (median) after treatment. At last follow-up, no patient has had a PSA failure regardless of biochemical failure definition. Of 32 patients with 12 months minimum follow-up, 25 patients (78%) achieved a PSA nadir {<=}0.4 ng/mL. A PSA decline to progressively lower nadirs up to 3 years after treatment was observed. Conclusions: The early and late toxicity profile and PSA response for prostate SBRT are highly encouraging. Continued accrual and follow-up will be necessary to confirm durable biochemical control rates and low toxicity profiles.

  11. Inter- and Intrafraction Uncertainty in Prostate Bed Image-Guided Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Kitty; Palma, David A.; Scott, Danielle; McGregor, Danielle; Gaede, Stewart; Yartsev, Slav; Bauman, Glenn; Louie, Alexander V.; Rodrigues, George

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: The goals of this study were to measure inter- and intrafraction setup error and prostate bed motion (PBM) in patients undergoing post-prostatectomy image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) and to propose appropriate population-based three-dimensional clinical target volume to planning target volume (CTV-PTV) margins in both non-IGRT and IGRT scenarios. Methods and Materials: In this prospective study, 14 patients underwent adjuvant or salvage radiotherapy to the prostate bed under image guidance using linac-based kilovoltage cone-beam CT (kV-CBCT). Inter- and intrafraction uncertainty/motion was assessed by offline analysis of three consecutive daily kV-CBCT images of each patient: (1) after initial setup to skin marks, (2) after correction for positional error/immediately before radiation treatment, and (3) immediately after treatment. Results: The magnitude of interfraction PBM was 2.1 mm, and intrafraction PBM was 0.4 mm. The maximum inter- and intrafraction prostate bed motion was primarily in the anterior-posterior direction. Margins of at least 3-5 mm with IGRT and 4-7 mm without IGRT (aligning to skin marks) will ensure 95% of the prescribed dose to the clinical target volume in 90% of patients. Conclusions: PBM is a predominant source of intrafraction error compared with setup error and has implications for appropriate PTV margins. Based on inter- and estimated intrafraction motion of the prostate bed using pre- and post-kV-CBCT images, CBCT IGRT to correct for day-to-day variances can potentially reduce CTV-PTV margins by 1-2 mm. CTV-PTV margins for prostate bed treatment in the IGRT and non-IGRT scenarios are proposed; however, in cases with more uncertainty of target delineation and image guidance accuracy, larger margins are recommended.

  12. Dose-Escalated Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Is Feasible and May Improve Locoregional Control and Laryngeal Preservation in Laryngo-Hypopharyngeal Cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Miah, Aisha B.; Bhide, Shreerang A.; Guerrero-Urbano, M. Teresa; Clark, Catharine; Bidmead, A. Margaret; St Rose, Suzanne; Barbachano, Yolanda; A'Hern, Roger; Tanay, Mary; Hickey, Jennifer; Nicol, Robyn; Newbold, Kate L.; Harrington, Kevin J.; Nutting, Christopher M.

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To determine the safety and outcomes of induction chemotherapy followed by dose-escalated intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with concomitant chemotherapy in locally advanced squamous cell cancer of the larynx and hypopharynx (LA-SCCL/H). Methods and Materials: A sequential cohort Phase I/II trial design was used to evaluate moderate acceleration and dose escalation. Patients with LA-SCCL/H received IMRT at two dose levels (DL): DL1, 63 Gy/28 fractions (Fx) to planning target volume 1 (PTV1) and 51.8 Gy/28 Fx to PTV2; DL2, 67.2 Gy/28 Fx and 56 Gy/28 Fx to PTV1 and PTV2, respectively. Patients received induction cisplatin/5-fluorouracil and concomitant cisplatin. Acute and late toxicities and tumor control rates were recorded. Results: Between September 2002 and January 2008, 60 patients (29 DL1, 31 DL2) with Stage III (41% DL1, 52% DL2) and Stage IV (52% DL1, 48% DL2) disease were recruited. Median (range) follow-up for DL1 was 51.2 (12.1-77.3) months and for DL2 was 36.2 (4.2-63.3) months. Acute Grade 3 (G3) dysphagia was higher in DL2 (87% DL2 vs. 59% DL1), but other toxicities were equivalent. One patient in DL1 required dilatation of a pharyngeal stricture (G3 dysphagia). In DL2, 2 patients developed benign pharyngeal strictures at 1 year. One underwent a laryngo-pharyngectomy and the other a dilatation. No other G3/G4 toxicities were reported. Overall complete response was 79% (DL1) and 84% (DL2). Two-year locoregional progression-free survival rates were 64.2% (95% confidence interval, 43.5-78.9%) in DL1 and 78.4% (58.1-89.7%) in DL2. Two-year laryngeal preservation rates were 88.7% (68.5-96.3%) in DL1 and 96.4% (77.7-99.5%) in DL2. Conclusions: At a mean follow-up of 36 months, dose-escalated chemotherapy-IMRT at DL2 has so far been safe to deliver. In this study, DL2 delivered high rates of locoregional control, progression-free survival, and organ preservation and has been selected as the experimental arm in a Cancer Research UK Phase III

  13. Radiobiologically optimized couch shift: A new localization paradigm using cone-beam CT for prostate radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Yimei Gardner, Stephen J.; Wen, Ning; Zhao, Bo; Gordon, James; Brown, Stephen; Chetty, Indrin J.

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: To present a novel positioning strategy which optimizes radiation delivery by utilizing radiobiological response knowledge and evaluate its use during prostate external beam radiotherapy. Methods: Five patients with low or intermediate risk prostate cancer were evaluated retrospectively in this IRB-approved study. For each patient, a VMAT plan with one 358° arc was generated on the planning CT (PCT) to deliver 78 Gy in 39 fractions. Five representative pretreatment cone beam CTs (CBCT) were selected for each patient. The CBCT images were registered to PCT by a human observer, which consisted of an initial automated registration with three degrees-of-freedom, followed by manual adjustment for agreement at the prostate/rectal wall interface. To determine the optimal treatment position for each CBCT, a search was performed centering on the observer-matched position (OM-position) utilizing a score function based on radiobiological and dosimetric indices (EUD{sub prostate}, D99{sub prostate}, NTCP{sub rectum}, and NTCP{sub bladder}) for the prostate, rectum, and bladder. We termed the optimal treatment position the radiobiologically optimized couch shift position (ROCS-position). Results: The dosimetric indices, averaged over the five patients’ treatment plans, were (mean ± SD) 79.5 ± 0.3 Gy (EUD{sub prostate}), 78.2 ± 0.4 Gy (D99{sub prostate}), 11.1% ± 2.7% (NTCP{sub rectum}), and 46.9% ± 7.6% (NTCP{sub bladder}). The corresponding values from CBCT at the OM-positions were 79.5 ± 0.6 Gy (EUD{sub prostate}), 77.8 ± 0.7 Gy (D99{sub prostate}), 12.1% ± 5.6% (NTCP{sub rectum}), and 51.6% ± 15.2% (NTCP{sub bladder}), respectively. In comparison, from CBCT at the ROCS-positions, the dosimetric indices were 79.5 ± 0.6 Gy (EUD{sub prostate}), 77.3 ± 0.6 Gy (D99{sub prostate}), 8.0% ± 3.3% (NTCP{sub rectum}), and 46.9% ± 15.7% (NTCP{sub bladder}). Excessive NTCP{sub rectum} was observed on Patient 5 (19.5% ± 6.6%) corresponding to localization at OM

  14. How to identify rectal sub-regions likely involved in rectal bleeding in prostate cancer radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dréan, G.; Acosta, O.; Ospina, J. D.; Voisin, C.; Rigaud, B.; Simon, A.; Haigron, P.; de Crevoisier, R.

    2013-11-01

    Nowadays, the de nition of patient-speci c constraints in prostate cancer radiotherapy planning are solely based on dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters. Nevertheless those DVH models lack of spatial accuracy since they do not use the complete 3D information of the dose distribution. The goal of the study was to propose an automatic work ow to de ne patient-speci c rectal sub-regions (RSR) involved in rectal bleeding (RB) in case of prostate cancer radiotherapy. A multi-atlas database spanning the large rectal shape variability was built from a population of 116 individuals. Non-rigid registration followed by voxel-wise statistical analysis on those templates allowed nding RSR likely correlated with RB (from a learning cohort of 63 patients). To de ne patient-speci c RSR, weighted atlas-based segmentation with a vote was then applied to 30 test patients. Results show the potentiality of the method to be used for patient-speci c planning of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT).

  15. Estimation of effective imaging dose for kilovoltage intratreatment monitoring of the prostate position during cancer radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, J. A.; Booth, J.; Poulsen, P.; Kuncic, Z.; Keall, P. J.

    2013-09-01

    Kilovoltage intratreatment monitoring (KIM) is a novel real-time localization modality where the tumor position is continuously measured during intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or intensity modulated arc therapy (IMAT) by a kilovoltage (kV) x-ray imager. Adding kV imaging during therapy adds radiation dose. The additional effective dose is quantified for prostate radiotherapy and compared to dose from other localization modalities. The software PCXMC 2.0 was used to calculate the effective dose delivered to a phantom as a function of imager angle and field size for a Varian On-Board Imager. The average angular effective dose was calculated for a field size of 6 cm × 6 cm. The average angular effective dose was used in calculations for different treatment scenarios. Treatment scenarios considered were treatment type and fractionation. For all treatment scenarios, (i.e. conventionally fractionated and stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT), IMRT and IMAT), the total KIM dose at 1 Hz ranged from 2-10 mSv. This imaging dose is less than the Navotek radioactive implant dose (64 mSv) and a standard SBRT cone beam computed tomography pretreatment scan dose (22 mSv) over an entire treatment regime. KIM delivers an acceptably low effective dose for daily use as a real-time image-guidance method for prostate radiotherapy.

  16. Antibody mass escalation study in patients with castration resistant prostate cancer using 111I-J591: Lesion detectability and dosimetric projections for 90Y radioimmunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Pandit-Taskar, Neeta; O’Donoghue, Joseph A.; Morris, Michael J; Wills, Eze A.; Schwartz, Lawrence H.; Gonen, Mithat; Scher, Howard I.; Larson, Steven M.; Divgi, Chaitanya R.

    2009-01-01

    Background J591, a monoclonal antibody that targets the external domain of the prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA), has potential as an agent for radioimmunotherapy. A pilot trial was carried out in patients with prostate cancer using repetitive administrations of escalating masses of J591. An analysis was carried out to assess (1) lesion detectability by 111InJ591 gamma camera imaging compared to standard imaging methods and (2) the effect of increasing antibody mass on lesion detectability, biodistribution and dosimetry. Methods Fourteen patients with metastatic prostate cancer received escalating amounts (10, 25, 50 and 100 mg) of J591 in a series of administrations each separated by 3 weeks. All antibody administrations included a fixed amount of radiolabeled antibody 111In-DOTA-J591 (2mg of J591 labeled with 185MBq (5 mCi) of 111In via the chelating agent DOTA). Three whole body gamma camera scans with at least one SPECT scan together with multiple whole body count-rate measurements and serum activity concentration measurements were obtained in all patients. Images were analyzed for distribution and lesion targeting. Estimates of clearance rates and liver and lesion uptake were made for each treatment cycle. These estimates were used to generate dosimetric projections for radioimmunotherapy with 90Y-labeled J591. Results A total of 80 lesions in 14 patients were detected. Both skeletal and soft tissue disease was targeted by the antibody as seen on 111In-J591 scans. Antibody localized to 93.7% of skeletal lesions detected by conventional imaging. Clearance of radioactivity from whole body, serum and liver was dependent on antibody mass. Normalized average values of the ratio of residence times between lesion and liver for 10, 25, 50 and 100mg of antibody were 1.0, 1.9, 3.2 and 4.0 respectively. Dosimetric projections for radioimmunotherapy with 90Y-labeled J591 suggested similar absorbed doses to lesions, for treatment at the maximally tolerated activity

  17. Prostate cancer radiation therapy: A physician's perspective.

    PubMed

    Dal Pra, Alan; Souhami, Luis

    2016-03-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer in men and a major cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Ionizing radiation has played a substantial role in the curative treatment of this disease. The historical evolution of radiotherapy techniques through 3D-conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) has allowed more accurate and precise treatments toward significant improvements in the therapeutic ratio. The addition of androgen deprivation therapy has significantly improved overall survival becoming the standard therapy for intermediate- and high-risk disease. Many randomized controlled trials have shown improved local control with dose escalation, and hypofractionated RT has been consolidated with proven efficacy and safe clinical results. However, several questions remain open in the radiotherapeutic management of prostate cancer patients and hopefully ongoing studies will shed light on these uncertainties. More individualized approaches are essential through better prognostic and novel predictive biomarkers of prostate radiotherapy response. Clinicians should critically interpret the evolving technologies in prostate cancer radiotherapy with important optimism but balancing the costs and the actual magnitude of clinical benefit. This article provides an overview of the basic aspects of radiotherapy treatment in localized prostate cancer from a physician's perspective. PMID:27056435

  18. Dosimetric Study of Pelvic Proton Radiotherapy for High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chera, Bhishamjit S.; Vargas, Carlos; Morris, Christopher G.; Louis, Debbie; Flampouri, Stella; Yeung, Daniel; Duvvuri, Srividya; Li Zuofeng; Mendenhall, Nancy Price

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: To compare dose distributions in targeted tissues (prostate, seminal vesicles, pelvic regional nodes) and nontargeted tissues in the pelvis with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and forward-planned, double-scattered, three-dimensional proton radiotherapy (3D-PRT). Methods and Materials: IMRT, IMRT followed by a prostate 3D-PRT boost (IMRT/3D-PRT), and 3D-PRT plans were created for 5 high-risk prostate cancer patients (n = 15 plans). A 78-CGE/Gy dose was prescribed to the prostate and proximal seminal vesicles and a 46-CGE/Gy was prescribed to the pelvic nodes. Various dosimetric endpoints were compared. Results: Target coverage of the prostate and nodal planning target volumes was adequate for all three plans. Compared with the IMRT and IMRT/3D-PRT plans, the 3D-PRT plans reduced the mean dose to the rectum, rectal wall, bladder, bladder wall, small bowel, and pelvis. The relative benefit of 3D-PRT (vs IMRT) at reducing the rectum and rectal wall V5-V40 was 53% to 71% (p < 0.05). For the bladder and bladder wall, the relative benefit for V5 to V40 CGE/Gy was 40% to 63% (p < 0.05). The relative benefit for reducing the volume of small bowel irradiated from 5 to 30 CGE/Gy in the 3D-PRT ranged from 62% to 69% (p < 0.05). Use of 3D-PRT did not produce the typical low-dose 'bath' of radiation to the pelvis seen with IMRT. Femoral head doses were higher for the 3D-PRT. Conclusions: Use of 3D-PRT significantly reduced the dose to normal tissues in the pelvis while maintaining adequate target coverage compared with IMRT or IMRT/3D-PRT. When treating the prostate, seminal vesicles, and pelvic lymph nodes in prostate cancer, proton therapy may improve the therapeutic ratio beyond what is possible with IMRT.

  19. Daily variations in delivered doses in patients treated with radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kupelian, Patrick A. . E-mail: patrick.kupelian@orhs.org; Langen, Katja M.; Zeidan, Omar A.; Meeks, Sanford L.; Willoughby, Twyla R.; Wagner, Thomas H.; Jeswani, Sam; Ruchala, Kenneth J.; Haimerl, Jason; Olivera, Gustavo H.

    2006-11-01

    Purpose: The aim of this work was to study the variations in delivered doses to the prostate, rectum, and bladder during a full course of image-guided external beam radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Ten patients with localized prostate cancer were treated with helical tomotherapy to 78 Gy at 2 Gy per fraction in 39 fractions. Daily target localization was performed using intraprostatic fiducials and daily megavoltage pelvic computed tomography (CT) scans, resulting in a total of 390 CT scans. The prostate, rectum, and bladder were manually contoured on each CT by a single physician. Daily dosimetric analysis was performed with dose recalculation. The study endpoints were D95 (dose to 95% of the prostate), rV2 (absolute rectal volume receiving 2 Gy), and bV2 (absolute bladder volume receiving 2 Gy). Results: For the entire cohort, the average D95 ({+-}SD) was 2.02 {+-} 0.04 Gy (range, 1.79-2.20 Gy). The average rV2 ({+-}SD) was 7.0 {+-} 8.1 cc (range, 0.1-67.3 cc). The average bV2 ({+-}SD) was 8.7 {+-} 6.8 cc (range, 0.3-36.8 cc). Unlike doses for the prostate, there was significant daily variation in rectal and bladder doses, mostly because of variations in volume and shape of these organs. Conclusion: Large variations in delivered doses to the rectum and bladder can be documented with daily megavoltage CT scans. Image guidance for the targeting of the prostate, even with intraprostatic fiducials, does not take into account the variation in actual rectal and bladder doses. The clinical impact of techniques that take into account such dosimetric parameters in daily patient set-ups should be investigated.

  20. Role of Intra- or Periprostatic Calcifications in Image-Guided Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hanna, Samir Abdallah; Neves-Junior, Wellington Furtado Pimenta; Marta, Gustavo Nader; Haddad, Cecilia Maria Kalil; Fernandes da Silva, Joao Luis

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) allows more precise localization of the prostate, thus minimizing errors resulting from organ motion and set-up during treatment of prostate cancer. Using megavoltage cone-beam computed tomography (MVCBCT), references such as bones, the prostate itself or implanted fiducial markers can be used as surrogates to correct patient positioning immediately before each treatment fraction. However, the use of fiducials requires an invasive procedure and may increase costs. We aimed to assess whether intra- or periprostatic calcifications (IPC) could be used as natural fiducials. Methods and Materials: Data on patients treated with IGRT for prostate cancer with clearly visible IPC and implanted fiducials in both planning CT and MVCBCT images were reviewed. IPC were classified as central when inside the prostate and peripheral when within the planning target volume. Daily deviations in lateral, longitudinal, and vertical directions from baseline positioning using fiducials and using IPC were compared. Results: A total of 287 MVCBCT images were obtained and analyzed from 10 patients. The mean {+-} standard deviation daily deviation (mm) in the lateral, longitudinal, and vertical coordinates were 0.55 {+-} 3.11, 0.58 {+-} 3.45, and -0.54 {+-} 4.03, respectively, for fiducials, and 0.72 {+-} 3.22, 0.63 {+-} 3.58, and -0.69 {+-} 4.26, for IPC. The p values for comparisons (fiducials vs. IPC) were 0.003, 0.653, and 0.078 for lateral, longitudinal, and vertical coordinates, respectively. When cases with central IPC were analyzed (n = 7), no significant difference was found in such comparisons. Central IPC and fiducials exhibited a similar pattern of displacement during treatment, with equal values for daily displacements in the three directions for more than 90% of measurements. Conclusions: Our data suggest that centrally located IPC may be used as natural fiducials for treatment positioning during IGRT for prostate cancer, with potential

  1. Patient-reported complications from fiducial marker implantation for prostate image-guided radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Gill, S; Li, J; Thomas, J; Bressel, M; Thursky, K; Styles, C; Tai, K H; Duchesne, G M; Foroudi, F

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To report on complications from transrectal ultrasound-guided insertion of fiducial markers for prostate image-guided radiotherapy. Methods 234 patients who underwent transrectal fiducial marker insertion for prostate cancer image-guided radiotherapy were assessed retrospectively by questionnaire with regard to the duration and severity of eight symptoms experienced following the procedure. Pain during the implantation procedure was assessed according to the Wong–Baker faces pain scale. Results Of 234 patients, 32% had at least one new symptom after the procedure. The commonest new symptom following the procedure was urinary frequency affecting 16% of patients who had not been troubled by frequency beforehand. Haematuria, rectal bleeding, dysuria and haematospermia affected 9–13% of patients, mostly at Grade 1 or 2. Pain, obstruction, and fever and shivers affected 3–4% of patients. Grade 3 rectal bleeding, haematuria, fever and shivers, and urinary frequency affected 0.5–1.5% of patients. Only one patient had a Grade 4 complication (i.e. fever and shivers). Overall, 9% of patients had symptoms lasting more than 2 weeks. The commonest symptoms that lasted more than 2 weeks were frequency, dysuria, obstructive symptoms and rectal bleeding. Mean pain score during the procedure was 1.1 (range 0–5). Conclusion Transrectal ultrasound-guided fiducial marker insertion for image-guided radiotherapy is well tolerated in the majority of prostate cancer patients. Most symptoms were Grade 1 or 2 in severity. Symptoms in the majority of patients last under 2 weeks. The most serious complication was sepsis in our study. PMID:22253345

  2. Dose Escalation for Locally Advanced Lung Cancer using Adaptive Radiotherapy with Simultaneous Integrated Volume-Adapted Boost

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Elisabeth; Fatyga, Mirek; Wu, Yan; Dogan, Nesrin; Balik, Salim; Sleeman, William; Hugo, Geoffrey

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Test the feasibility of a planned phase I study of image-guided adaptive radiotherapy in locally advanced lung cancer. Methods and Materials Weekly 4D FBCTs of ten lung cancer patients undergoing concurrent radiochemotherapy were used to simulate adaptive radiotherapy: After an initial IMRT plan (0–30 Gy/2 Gy), adaptive replanning was performed on week 2 (30 to 50 Gy/2 Gy) and week 4 scans (50 to 66 Gy/2 Gy) to adjust for volume and shape changes of primary tumors and lymph nodes. Week 2 and 4 clinical target volumes (CTV) were deformably warped from the initial planning scan to adjust for anatomical changes. On week 4 scan a simultaneous integrated volume-adapted boost was created to the shrunken PT with dose increases in five 0.4 Gy steps from 66 Gy to 82 Gy in two scenarios: Plan A. lung isotoxicity and B. normal tissue tolerance. Cumulative dose was assessed by deformably mapping and accumulating biologically equivalent dose normalized to 2 Gy-fractions (EQD2). Results The 82 Gy level was achieved in 1/10 patients in scenario A resulting in a 13.4 Gy EQD2 increase and a 22.1% increase in tumor control probability (TCP) compared to the 66 Gy plan. In scenario B, 2 patients reached the 82 Gy level with a 13.9 Gy EQD2 and 23.4% TCP increase. Conclusions The tested IGART strategy enabled relevant increases in EQD2 and TCP. Normal tissue was often dose limiting, indicating a need to modify the present study design prior to clinical implementation. PMID:23523321

  3. Deriving margins in prostate cancer radiotherapy treatment: comparison of neural network and fuzzy logic models.

    PubMed

    Mzenda, Bongile; Gegov, Alexander; Brown, David J; Petrov, Nedyalko

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the feasibility of using Artificial Neural Network (ANN) and fuzzy logic based techniques to select treatment margins for dynamically moving targets in the radiotherapy treatment of prostate cancer. The use of data from 15 patients relating error effects to the Tumour Control Probability (TCP) and Normal Tissue Complication Probability (NTCP) radiobiological indices was contrasted against the use of data based on the prostate volume receiving 99% of the prescribed dose (V99%) and the rectum volume receiving more than 60Gy (V60). For the same input data, the results of the ANN were compared to results obtained using a fuzzy system, a fuzzy network and current clinically used statistical techniques. Compared to fuzzy and statistical methods, the ANN derived margins were found to be up to 2 mm larger at small and high input errors and up to 3.5 mm larger at medium input error magnitudes.

  4. [Surveillance after prostate cancer radiotherapy: Evaluation and management of toxicity and relapse].

    PubMed

    Dupic, G; Hennequin, C

    2015-10-01

    Prostate cancer is the most frequent cancer among European males with a high survival rate. The economic impact of treatments and follow-up are significant. The objectives of the follow-up after prostate radiotherapy is multiple: diagnosis and treatment of side-effects, early detection of biochemical recurrence, with the aim of proposing a second local treatment to improve quality of life or overall survival and feedback of the treatment results to better inform patients at the beginning of the disease. This article reports incidence of main side-effects (digestive, urinary and sexual) with their treatments and guidelines for clinical and biological follow-up with strategies of imaging studies and salvage treatments. PMID:26278989

  5. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck: Results of a Phase I Dose-Escalation Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Heron, Dwight E.; Ferris, Robert L.; Karamouzis, Michalis; Andrade, Regiane S.; Deeb, Erin L.; Burton, Steven; Gooding, William E.; Branstetter, Barton F.; Mountz, James M.; Johnson, Jonas T.; Argiris, Athanassios; Grandis, Jennifer R.; Lai, Stephen Y.

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in previously irradiated patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). Patients and Methods: In this Phase I dose-escalation clinical trial, 25 patients were treated in five dose tiers up to 44 Gy, administered in 5 fractions over a 2-week course. Response was assessed according to the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors and [{sup 18}F]-fluorodeoxyglucose standardized uptake value change on positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT). Results: No Grade 3/4 or dose-limiting toxicities occurred. Four patients had Grade 1/2 acute toxicities. Four objective responses were observed, for a response rate of 17% (95% confidence interval 2%-33%). The maximum duration of response was 4 months. Twelve patients had stable disease. Median time to disease progression was 4 months, and median overall survival was 6 months. Self-reported quality of life was not significantly affected by treatment. Fluorodeoxyglucose PET was a more sensitive early-measure response to treatment than CT volume changes. Conclusion: Reirradiation up to 44 Gy using SBRT is well tolerated in the acute setting and warrants further evaluation in combination with conventional and targeted therapies.

  6. Common genetic variation associated with increased susceptibility to prostate cancer does not increase risk of radiotherapy toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Mahbubl; Dorling, Leila; Kerns, Sarah; Fachal, Laura; Elliott, Rebecca; Partliament, Matt; Rosenstein, Barry S; Vega, Ana; Gómez-Caamaño, Antonio; Barnett, Gill; Dearnaley, David P; Hall, Emma; Sydes, Matt; Burnet, Neil; Pharoah, Paul D P; Eeles, Ros; West, Catharine M L

    2016-01-01

    Background: Numerous germline single-nucleotide polymorphisms increase susceptibility to prostate cancer, some lying near genes involved in cellular radiation response. This study investigated whether prostate cancer patients with a high genetic risk have increased toxicity following radiotherapy. Methods: The study included 1560 prostate cancer patients from four radiotherapy cohorts: RAPPER (n=533), RADIOGEN (n=597), GenePARE (n=290) and CCI (n=150). Data from genome-wide association studies were imputed with the 1000 Genomes reference panel. Individuals were genetically similar with a European ancestry based on principal component analysis. Genetic risks were quantified using polygenic risk scores. Regression models tested associations between risk scores and 2-year toxicity (overall, urinary frequency, decreased stream, rectal bleeding). Results were combined across studies using standard inverse-variance fixed effects meta-analysis methods. Results: A total of 75 variants were genotyped/imputed successfully. Neither non-weighted nor weighted polygenic risk scores were associated with late radiation toxicity in individual studies (P>0.11) or after meta-analysis (P>0.24). No individual variant was associated with 2-year toxicity. Conclusion: Patients with a high polygenic susceptibility for prostate cancer have no increased risk for developing late radiotherapy toxicity. These findings suggest that patients with a genetic predisposition for prostate cancer, inferred by common variants, can be safely treated using current standard radiotherapy regimens. PMID:27070714

  7. Target Definition in Salvage Radiotherapy for Recurrent Prostate Cancer: The Role of Advanced Molecular Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Amzalag, Gaël; Rager, Olivier; Tabouret-Viaud, Claire; Wissmeyer, Michael; Sfakianaki, Electra; de Perrot, Thomas; Ratib, Osman; Miralbell, Raymond; Giovacchini, Giampiero; Garibotto, Valentina; Zilli, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Salvage radiotherapy (SRT) represents the main treatment option for relapsing prostate cancer in patients after radical prostatectomy. Several open questions remain unanswered in terms of target volumes definition and delivered doses for SRT: the effective dose necessary to achieve biochemical control in the SRT setting may be different if the tumor recurrence is micro- or macroscopic. At the same time, irradiation of only the prostatic bed or of the whole pelvis will depend on the localization of the recurrence, local or locoregional. In the “theragnostic imaging” era, molecular imaging using positron emission tomography (PET) constitutes a useful tool for clinicians to define the site of the recurrence, the extent of disease, and individualize salvage treatments. The best option currently available in clinical routine is the combination of radiolabeled choline PET imaging and multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), associating the nodal and distant metastases identification based on PET with the local assessment by MRI. A new generation of targeted tracers, namely, prostate-specific membrane antigen, show promising results, with a contrast superior to choline imaging and a higher detection rate even for low prostate-specific antigen levels; validation studies are ongoing. Finally, imaging targeting bone remodeling, using whole-body SPECT–CT, is a relevant complement to molecular/metabolic PET imaging when bone involvement is suspected. PMID:27065024

  8. Impact of Body Mass Index on Outcomes After Conformal Radiotherapy in Patients With Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Geinitz, Hans; Thamm, Reinhard; Mueller, Tobias; Jess, Kerstin; Zimmermann, Frank B.; Molls, Michael; Nieder, Carsten

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: Several retrospective analyses have suggested that obese men with prostate cancer treated with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) have outcomes inferior to those of normal-weight men. However, a recently presented analysis for the first time challenged this association between body mass index (BMI) and treatment failure. It is therefore important to provide further data on this issue. Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective analysis of 564 men treated with risk-adapted conformal EBRT at a single institution. Low-risk patients received EBRT alone, and the other patients received EBRT plus endocrine treatment. In addition, high-risk patients were treated to higher EBRT doses (74 Gy). A rectal balloon catheter for internal immobilization, which can be identified on portal images, was used in 261 patients (46%). Thus, localization did not rely on bony landmarks alone in these cases. Results: The median BMI was 26, and 15% of patients had BMI {>=}30. Neither univariate nor multivariate analyses detected any significant impact of BMI on biochemical relapse, prostate cancer-specific survival, or overall survival. The 5-year biochemical relapse rate was 21% and prostate cancerspecific survival 96%. Conclusions: The present analysis of a large cohort of consecutively treated patients suggests that efforts to reduce prostate movement and geographic miss might result in comparable outcomes in obese and normal-weight patients.

  9. Failure to Achieve a PSA Level {<=}1 ng/mL After Neoadjuvant LHRHA Therapy Predicts for Lower Biochemical Control Rate and Overall Survival in Localized Prostate Cancer Treated With Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Darren M. McAleese, Jonathan; Park, Richard M.; Stewart, David P.; Stranex, Stephen; Eakin, Ruth L.; Houston, Russell F.; O'Sullivan, Joe M.

    2007-12-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether failure to suppress the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level to {<=}1 ng/mL after {>=}2 months of neoadjuvant luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist therapy in patients scheduled to undergo external beam radiotherapy for localized prostate carcinoma is associated with reduced biochemical failure-free survival. Methods and Materials: A retrospective case note review of consecutive patients with intermediate- or high-risk localized prostate cancer treated between January 2001 and December 2002 with neoadjuvant hormonal deprivation therapy, followed by concurrent hormonal therapy and radiotherapy was performed. Patient data were divided for analysis according to whether the PSA level in Week 1 of radiotherapy was {<=}1.0 ng/mL. Biochemical failure was determined using the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (Phoenix) definition. Results: A total of 119 patients were identified. The PSA level after neoadjuvant hormonal deprivation therapy was {<=}1 ng/mL in 67 patients and >1 ng/mL in 52. At a median follow-up of 49 months, the 4-year actuarial biochemical failure-free survival rate was 84% vs. 60% (p = 0.0016) in favor of the patients with a PSA level after neoadjuvant hormonal deprivation therapy of {<=}1 ng/mL. The overall survival rate was 94% vs. 77.5% (p = 0.0045), and the disease-specific survival rate at 4 years was 98.5% vs. 82.5%. Conclusions: The results of our study have shown that patients with a PSA level >1 ng/mL at the beginning of external beam radiotherapy after {>=}2 months of neoadjuvant luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist therapy have a significantly greater rate of biochemical failure and lower survival rate compared with those with a PSA level of {<=}1 ng/mL. Patients without adequate PSA suppression should be considered a higher risk group and considered for dose escalation or the use of novel treatments.

  10. Impact of Image Guidance on Outcomes After External Beam Radiotherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kupelian, Patrick A. Willoughby, Twyla R.; Reddy, Chandana A.; Klein, Eric A.; Mahadevan, Arul

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: To verify whether rectal distention at the time of planning impacts outcomes in patients with localized prostate cancer treated with daily image guidance. Methods and Materials: Between 1998 and 2002, a total of 488 prostate cancer patients were treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy. The radiation dose was 70 Gy delivered at 2.5 Gy per fraction in all cases. All cases were treated with a 4-mm margin posteriorly. In all cases the total rectal volume documented on the CT scan was used for treatment planning. No special bowel preparation instructions were given, either for the simulation or the daily treatments. Before each daily treatment, alignment of the prostate was performed with the B-mode acquisition and targeting (BAT) transabdominal ultrasound system. The median follow-up for all 488 patients was 60 months (range, 24-96 months). Results: For all patients the biochemical relapse-free survival (bRFS) rate at 5 years was 86%. The 5-year bRFS rate for the rectal distention <50 cm{sup 3}, 50 to <100 cm{sup 3}, and {>=}100 cm{sup 3} groups was 90%, 83%, and 85%, respectively (p = 0.18). To adjust for other potential variables affecting bRFS rates, a multivariate time-to-failure analysis using the Cox proportional hazards model was performed. Rectal distention was not an independent predictor of biochemical failure on multivariate analysis (p = 0.80). Rectal distention was not a predictor of rectal or urinary toxicity. Conclusion: The use of daily image guidance eliminates errors such as rectal distention at the initial planning stage that can affect outcomes after radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer.

  11. Nursing interventions to improve the health of men with prostate cancer undergoing radiotherapy: a review.

    PubMed

    Tärnhuvud, Marie; Wändel, Cilla; Willman, Ania

    2007-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate what nurses do to improve the health of men who are receiving radiotherapy treatment due to prostate cancer. The method was a literature review using a systematic approach. The Cochrane Library, Medline and CINAHL databases were used in a search that covered the period from January 1994 to April 2006. The screening of 200 abstracts resulted in 14 articles corresponding to the research question, which were assessed according to scientific quality. Two independent reviewers performed the screening and quality assessment process using specific protocols. Two themes emerged: nurse-led care related to radiotherapy treatment and patients' experiences of radiotherapy treatment. The results show that there is strong scientific support for nurse-led follow-up care aimed at assisting patients by means of providing information on how to manage side effects (evidence grade A). In addition, there is moderate scientific support for the need to ensure that this information is structured, objective and concrete and that it can be provided by means of audiotapes or over the phone (evidence grade B) as well as weak scientific support for reporting patients' experiences of radiotherapy treatment (evidence grade C).

  12. Risk of Late Toxicity in Men Receiving Dose-Escalated Hypofractionated Intensity Modulated Prostate Radiation Therapy: Results From a Randomized Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, Karen E. Voong, K. Ranh; Pugh, Thomas J.; Skinner, Heath; Levy, Lawrence B.; Takiar, Vinita; Choi, Seungtaek; Du, Weiliang; Frank, Steven J.; Johnson, Jennifer; Kanke, James; Kudchadker, Rajat J.; Lee, Andrew K.; Mahmood, Usama; McGuire, Sean E.; Kuban, Deborah A.

    2014-04-01

    Objective: To report late toxicity outcomes from a randomized trial comparing conventional and hypofractionated prostate radiation therapy and to identify dosimetric and clinical parameters associated with late toxicity after hypofractionated treatment. Methods and Materials: Men with localized prostate cancer were enrolled in a trial that randomized men to either conventionally fractionated intensity modulated radiation therapy (CIMRT, 75.6 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions) or to dose-escalated hypofractionated IMRT (HIMRT, 72 Gy in 2.4-Gy fractions). Late (≥90 days after completion of radiation therapy) genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity were prospectively evaluated and scored according to modified Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria. Results: 101 men received CIMRT and 102 men received HIMRT. The median age was 68, and the median follow-up time was 6.0 years. Twenty-eight percent had low-risk, 71% had intermediate-risk, and 1% had high-risk disease. There was no difference in late GU toxicity in men treated with CIMRT and HIMRT. The actuarial 5-year grade ≥2 GU toxicity was 16.5% after CIMRT and 15.8% after HIMRT (P=.97). There was a nonsignificant numeric increase in late GI toxicity in men treated with HIMRT compared with men treated with CIMRT. The actuarial 5-year grade ≥2 GI toxicity was 5.1% after CIMRT and 10.0% after HIMRT (P=.11). In men receiving HIMRT, the proportion of rectum receiving 36.9 Gy, 46.2 Gy, 64.6 Gy, and 73.9 Gy was associated with the development of late GI toxicity (P<.05). The 5-year actuarial grade ≥2 GI toxicity was 27.3% in men with R64.6Gy ≥ 20% but only 6.0% in men with R64.6Gy < 20% (P=.016). Conclusions: Dose-escalated IMRT using a moderate hypofractionation regimen (72 Gy in 2.4-Gy fractions) can be delivered safely with limited grade 2 or 3 late toxicity. Minimizing the proportion of rectum that receives moderate and high dose decreases the risk of late rectal toxicity after this

  13. [Salvage radical prostatectomy after external radiotherapy for prostate cancer: indications, morbidity and results. Review from CCAFU prostate section].

    PubMed

    Paparel, P; Soulie, M; Mongiat-Artus, P; Cornud, F; Borgogno, C

    2010-05-01

    Local recurrence after external radiotherapy for prostate cancer occurs in 30 to 50 % and is often diagnosed by a rising PSA. The absence of local control after radiotherapy is a risk factor of metastases and specific mortality. There are several therapeutic options to treat these patients: surveillance, hormonotherapy and salvage therapies (radical prostatectomy, cystoprostatectomy, brachytherapy, high intensity focused ultrasound [HIFU] and cryotherapy). Hormonotherapy is not a curative treatment and after a couple of years, the disease will progress again. Local salvage therapies are the only treatment to have the potential to cure these patients with the condition of very strict inclusion criteria. Among these therapies, only radical prostatectomy demonstrated his efficacity with a follow-up of 10 years on specific survival and survival without biological progression respectively from 70 to 77 % and from 30 to 43 %. During last decade, morbidity of RP has strongly decreased with a percentage of rectal and ureteral injury at 3 %. Nevertheless, percentage of urinary incontinence remains high from 29 to 50 %. Salvage mini-invasive therapies (cryotherapy, HIFU and cryotherapy) are under constant evolution due to progress of technology. Functional and oncological results are better with last generation devices but need to be evaluated and compared with radical prostatectomy.

  14. A hybrid strategy of offline adaptive planning and online image guidance for prostate cancer radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Yu; Wu, Qiuwen

    2010-04-01

    Offline adaptive radiotherapy (ART) has been used to effectively correct and compensate for prostate motion and reduce the required margin. The efficacy depends on the characteristics of the patient setup error and interfraction motion through the whole treatment; specifically, systematic errors are corrected and random errors are compensated for through the margins. In online image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) of prostate cancer, the translational setup error and inter-fractional prostate motion are corrected through pre-treatment imaging and couch correction at each fraction. However, the rotation and deformation of the target are not corrected and only accounted for with margins in treatment planning. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the offline ART strategy is necessary for an online IGRT protocol and to evaluate the benefit of the hybrid strategy. First, to investigate the rationale of the hybrid strategy, 592 cone-beam-computed tomography (CBCT) images taken before and after each fraction for an online IGRT protocol from 16 patients were analyzed. Specifically, the characteristics of prostate rotation were analyzed. It was found that there exist systematic inter-fractional prostate rotations, and they are patient specific. These rotations, if not corrected, are persistent through the treatment fraction, and rotations detected in early fractions are representative of those in later fractions. These findings suggest that the offline adaptive replanning strategy is beneficial to the online IGRT protocol with further margin reductions. Second, to quantitatively evaluate the benefit of the hybrid strategy, 412 repeated helical CT scans from 25 patients during the course of treatment were included in the replanning study. Both low-risk patients (LRP, clinical target volume, CTV = prostate) and intermediate-risk patients (IRP, CTV = prostate + seminal vesicles) were included in the simulation. The contours of prostate and seminal vesicles were

  15. Salvage Radiotherapy for Rising Prostate-Specific Antigen Levels After Radical Prostatectomy for Prostate Cancer: Dose-Response Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, Johnny Ray; Buskirk, Steven J.; Heckman, Michael G.; Diehl, Nancy N.; Ko, Stephen J.; Macdonald, Orlan K.; Schild, Steven E.; Pisansky, Thomas M.

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: To investigate the association between external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) dose and biochemical failure (BcF) of prostate cancer in patients who received salvage prostate bed EBRT for a rising prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level after radical prostatectomy. Methods and Materials: We evaluated patients with a rising PSA level after prostatectomy who received salvage EBRT between July 1987 and October 2007. Patients receiving pre-EBRT androgen suppression were excluded. Cox proportional hazards models were used to investigate the association between EBRT dose and BcF. Dose was considered as a numeric variable and as a categoric variable (low, <64.8 Gy; moderate, 64.8-66.6 Gy; high, >66.6 Gy). Results: A total of 364 men met study selection criteria and were followed up for a median of 6.0 years (range, 0.1-19.3 years). Median pre-EBRT PSA level was 0.6 ng/mL. The estimated cumulative rate of BcF at 5 years after EBRT was 50% overall and 57%, 46%, and 39% for the low-, moderate-, and high-dose groups, respectively. In multivariable analysis adjusting for potentially confounding variables, there was evidence of a linear trend between dose and BcF, with risk of BcF decreasing as dose increased (relative risk [RR], 0.77 [5.0-Gy increase]; p = 0.05). Compared with the low-dose group, there was evidence of a decreased risk of BcF for the high-dose group (RR, 0.60; p = 0.04), but no difference for the moderate-dose group (RR, 0.85; p = 0.41). Conclusions: Our results suggest a dose response for salvage EBRT. Doses higher than 66.6 Gy result in decreased risk of BcF.

  16. Adaptive Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer Using Kilovoltage Cone-Beam Computed Tomography: First Clinical Results

    SciTech Connect

    Nijkamp, Jasper; Pos, Floris J. Nuver, Tonnis T.; Jong, Rianne de; Remeijer, Peter; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Lebesque, Joos V.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the first clinical results of an off-line adaptive radiotherapy (ART) protocol for prostate cancer using kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in combination with a diet and mild laxatives. Methods and Materials: Twenty-three patients began treatment with a planning target volume (PTV) margin of 10 mm. The CBCT scans acquired during the first six fractions were used to generate an average prostate clinical target volume (AV-CTV), and average rectum (AV-Rect). Using these structures, a new treatment plan was generated with a 7-mm PTV margin. Weekly CBCT scans were used to monitor the CTV coverage. A diet and mild laxatives were introduced to improve image quality and reduce prostate motion. Results: Twenty patients were treated with conform ART protocol. For these patients, 91% of the CBCT scans could be used to calculate the AV-CTV and AV-Rect. In 96% of the follow-up CBCT scans, the CTV was located within the average PTV. In the remaining 4%, the prostate extended the PTV by a maximum of 1 mm. Systematic and random errors for organ motion were reduced by a factor of two compared with historical data without diet and laxatives. An average PTV reduction of 29% was achieved. The volume of the AV-Rect that received >65 Gy was reduced by 19%. The mean dose to the anal wall was reduced on average by 4.8 Gy. Conclusions: We safely reduced the high-dose region by 29%. The reduction in irradiated volume led to a significant reduction in the dose to the rectum. The diet and laxatives improved the image quality and tended to reduce prostate motion.

  17. Practical Method of Adaptive Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer Using Real-Time Electromagnetic Tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, Jeffrey R.; Noel, Camille E.; Baker, Kenneth; Santanam, Lakshmi; Michalski, Jeff M.; Parikh, Parag J.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: We have created an automated process using real-time tracking data to evaluate the adequacy of planning target volume (PTV) margins in prostate cancer, allowing a process of adaptive radiotherapy with minimal physician workload. We present an analysis of PTV adequacy and a proposed adaptive process. Methods and Materials: Tracking data were analyzed for 15 patients who underwent step-and-shoot multi-leaf collimation (SMLC) intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with uniform 5-mm PTV margins for prostate cancer using the Calypso Registered-Sign Localization System. Additional plans were generated with 0- and 3-mm margins. A custom software application using the planned dose distribution and structure location from computed tomography (CT) simulation was developed to evaluate the dosimetric impact to the target due to motion. The dose delivered to the prostate was calculated for the initial three, five, and 10 fractions, and for the entire treatment. Treatment was accepted as adequate if the minimum delivered prostate dose (D{sub min}) was at least 98% of the planned D{sub min}. Results: For 0-, 3-, and 5-mm PTV margins, adequate treatment was obtained in 3 of 15, 12 of 15, and 15 of 15 patients, and the delivered D{sub min} ranged from 78% to 99%, 96% to 100%, and 99% to 100% of the planned D{sub min}. Changes in D{sub min} did not correlate with magnitude of prostate motion. Treatment adequacy during the first 10 fractions predicted sufficient dose delivery for the entire treatment for all patients and margins. Conclusions: Our adaptive process successfully used real-time tracking data to predict the need for PTV modifications, without the added burden of physician contouring and image analysis. Our methods are applicable to other uses of real-time tracking, including hypofractionated treatment.

  18. First Clinical Release of an Online, Adaptive, Aperture-Based Image-Guided Radiotherapy Strategy in Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy to Correct for Inter- and Intrafractional Rotations of the Prostate

    SciTech Connect

    Deutschmann, Heinz; Kametriser, Gerhard; Steininger, Philipp; Scherer, Philipp; Schoeller, Helmut; Gaisberger, Christoph; Mooslechner, Michaela; Mitterlechner, Bernhard; Weichenberger, Harald; Fastner, Gert; Wurstbauer, Karl; Jeschke, Stephan; Forstner, Rosemarie; Sedlmayer, Felix

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: We developed and evaluated a correction strategy for prostate rotations using direct adaptation of segments in intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Method and Materials: Implanted fiducials (four gold markers) were used to determine interfractional translations, rotations, and dilations of the prostate. We used hybrid imaging: The markers were automatically detected in two pretreatment planar X-ray projections; their actual position in three-dimensional space was reconstructed from these images at first. The structure set comprising prostate, seminal vesicles, and adjacent rectum wall was transformed accordingly in 6 degrees of freedom. Shapes of IMRT segments were geometrically adapted in a class solution forward-planning approach, derived within seconds on-site and treated immediately. Intrafractional movements were followed in MV electronic portal images captured on the fly. Results: In 31 of 39 patients, for 833 of 1013 fractions (supine, flat couch, knee support, comfortably full bladder, empty rectum, no intraprostatic marker migrations >2 mm of more than one marker), the online aperture adaptation allowed safe reduction of margins clinical target volume-planning target volume (prostate) down to 5 mm when only interfractional corrections were applied: Dominant L-R rotations were found to be 5.3 Degree-Sign (mean of means), standard deviation of means {+-}4.9 Degree-Sign , maximum at 30.7 Degree-Sign . Three-dimensional vector translations relative to skin markings were 9.3 {+-} 4.4 mm (maximum, 23.6 mm). Intrafractional movements in 7.7 {+-} 1.5 min (maximum, 15.1 min) between kV imaging and last beam's electronic portal images showed further L-R rotations of 2.5 Degree-Sign {+-} 2.3 Degree-Sign (maximum, 26.9 Degree-Sign ), and three-dimensional vector translations of 3.0 {+-}3.7 mm (maximum, 10.2 mm). Addressing intrafractional errors could further reduce margins to 3 mm. Conclusion: We demonstrated the clinical feasibility of an online

  19. Intermittent androgen ablation in patients with biochemical failure after pelvic radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Cury, Fabio L.B.; Souhami, Luis . E-mail: luis.souhami@muhc.mcgill.ca; Rajan, Raghu; Tanguay, Simon; Gagnon, Bruno; Duclos, Marie; Shenouda, George; Faria, Sergio L.; David, Marc; Freeman, Carolyn R.

    2006-03-01

    Purpose: To assess the efficacy of intermittent androgen ablation (IAA) in patients with biochemical failure after radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Thirty-nine patients received a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone analog every 2 months for a total of 4 doses. IAA was then discontinued if serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) fell to a normal level with a castrate level of testosterone. Therapy was restarted when the serum PSA level reached {>=}10 ng/mL and was discontinued if hormone resistance or unacceptable toxicity occurred. Results: Median PSA was 9.1 ng/mL at the time of first IAA. The median time between the first and the second cycles was 20.1 months, decreasing to 15.5 months between the third and fourth cycles. Two patients discontinued the treatment because of severe hot flushes. Four patients developed hormone resistance. With a median follow-up of 56.4 months, 5-year survival is 92.3%. Three patients died of unrelated causes. The incidence of distant metastasis is 6.8%. Conclusions: The use of IAA seems to be a safe and effective treatment for patients with biochemical failure post radiotherapy and no evidence of metastatic disease. The use of IAA limits hormone-related side effects and health care costs without an apparent increase in the risk for the development of metastatic disease.

  20. A deformable image registration method to handle distended rectums in prostate cancer radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Song; Zhang Lifei; Wang He; Crevoisier, Renaud de; Kuban, Deborah D.; Mohan, Radhe; Dong Lei

    2006-09-15

    In image-guided adaptive radiotherapy, it is important to have the capability to automatically and accurately delineate the rectal wall, which is a major dose-limiting organ in prostate cancer radiotherapy. As image registration is a process to find the spatial correspondence between two images, a major challenge in intensity-based deformable image registration is to deal with the situation where no correspondence exists for some objects between the two images to be registered. One example is the variation of rectal contents due to the presence and absence of bowel gas. The intensity-based deformable image registration methods alone cannot create the correct spatial transformation if there is no correspondence between the source and target images. In this study we implemented an automatic image intensity modification procedure to create artificial gas pockets in the planning computed tomography (CT) images. A diffusion-based deformable image registration algorithm was developed to use an adaptive smoothing algorithm to better handle large organ deformations. The process was tested in 15 prostate cancer cases and 30 daily CT images containing the largest distended rectums. The manually delineated rectums agreed well with the autodelineated rectums when using the image-intensity modification procedure.

  1. An arranged marriage for precision medicine: hypoxia and genomic assays in localized prostate cancer radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Bristow, R G; Berlin, A; Dal Pra, A

    2014-03-01

    Prostate cancer (CaP) is the most commonly diagnosed malignancy in males in the Western world with one in six males diagnosed in their lifetime. Current clinical prognostication groupings use pathologic Gleason score, pre-treatment prostatic-specific antigen and Union for International Cancer Control-TNM staging to place patients with localized CaP into low-, intermediate- and high-risk categories. These categories represent an increasing risk of biochemical failure and CaP-specific mortality rates, they also reflect the need for increasing treatment intensity and justification for increased side effects. In this article, we point out that 30-50% of patients will still fail image-guided radiotherapy or surgery despite the judicious use of clinical risk categories owing to interpatient heterogeneity in treatment response. To improve treatment individualization, better predictors of prognosis and radiotherapy treatment response are needed to triage patients to bespoke and intensified CaP treatment protocols. These should include the use of pre-treatment genomic tests based on DNA or RNA indices and/or assays that reflect cancer metabolism, such as hypoxia assays, to define patient-specific CaP progression and aggression. More importantly, it is argued that these novel prognostic assays could be even more useful if combined together to drive forward precision cancer medicine for localized CaP.

  2. Salvage High-intensity Focused Ultrasound for the Recurrent Prostate Cancer after Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Shoji, S.; Nakano, M.; Omata, T.; Harano, Y.; Nagata, Y.; Uchida, T.; Usui, Y.; Terachi, T.

    2010-03-09

    To investigate the use of minimally invasive high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) as a salvage therapy in men with localized prostate cancer recurrence following external beam radiotherapy (EBRT), brachytherapy or proton therapy. A review of 20 cases treated using the Sonablate registered 500 HIFU device, between August 28, 2002 and September 1, 2009, was carried out. All men had presumed organ-confined, histologically confirmed recurrent prostate adenocarcinoma following radiation therapy. All men with presumed, organ-confined, recurrent disease following EBRT in 8 patients, brachytherapy in 7 patients or proton therapy in 5 patients treated with salvage HIFU were included. The patients were followed for a mean (range) of 16.0 (3-80) months. Biochemical disease-free survival (bDFS) rates in patients with low-intermediate and high risk groups were 86% and 50%, respectively. Side-effects included urethral stricture in 2 of the 16 patients (13%), urinary tract infection or dysuria syndrome in eight (26%), and urinary incontinence in one (6%). Recto-urethral fistula occurred in one patient (6%). Transrectal HIFU is an effective treatment for recurrence after radiotherapy especially in patients with low- and intermediate risk groups.

  3. Salvage High-intensity Focused Ultrasound for the Recurrent Prostate Cancer after Radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoji, S.; Nakano, M.; Omata, T.; Harano, Y.; Nagata, Y.; Usui, Y.; Terachi, T.; Uchida, T.

    2010-03-01

    To investigate the use of minimally invasive high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) as a salvage therapy in men with localized prostate cancer recurrence following external beam radiotherapy (EBRT), brachytherapy or proton therapy. A review of 20 cases treated using the Sonablate® 500 HIFU device, between August 28, 2002 and September 1, 2009, was carried out. All men had presumed organ-confined, histologically confirmed recurrent prostate adenocarcinoma following radiation therapy. All men with presumed, organ-confined, recurrent disease following EBRT in 8 patients, brachytherapy in 7 patients or proton therapy in 5 patients treated with salvage HIFU were included. The patients were followed for a mean (range) of 16.0 (3-80) months. Biochemical disease-free survival (bDFS) rates in patients with low-intermediate and high risk groups were 86% and 50%, respectively. Side-effects included urethral stricture in 2 of the 16 patients (13%), urinary tract infection or dysuria syndrome in eight (26%), and urinary incontinence in one (6%). Recto-urethral fistula occurred in one patient (6%). Transrectal HIFU is an effective treatment for recurrence after radiotherapy especially in patients with low- and intermediate risk groups.

  4. An arranged marriage for precision medicine: hypoxia and genomic assays in localized prostate cancer radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Berlin, A; Dal Pra, A

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer (CaP) is the most commonly diagnosed malignancy in males in the Western world with one in six males diagnosed in their lifetime. Current clinical prognostication groupings use pathologic Gleason score, pre-treatment prostatic-specific antigen and Union for International Cancer Control-TNM staging to place patients with localized CaP into low-, intermediate- and high-risk categories. These categories represent an increasing risk of biochemical failure and CaP-specific mortality rates, they also reflect the need for increasing treatment intensity and justification for increased side effects. In this article, we point out that 30–50% of patients will still fail image-guided radiotherapy or surgery despite the judicious use of clinical risk categories owing to interpatient heterogeneity in treatment response. To improve treatment individualization, better predictors of prognosis and radiotherapy treatment response are needed to triage patients to bespoke and intensified CaP treatment protocols. These should include the use of pre-treatment genomic tests based on DNA or RNA indices and/or assays that reflect cancer metabolism, such as hypoxia assays, to define patient-specific CaP progression and aggression. More importantly, it is argued that these novel prognostic assays could be even more useful if combined together to drive forward precision cancer medicine for localized CaP. PMID:24588670

  5. Robotic Image-Guided Stereotactic Radiotherapy, for Isolated Recurrent Primary, Lymph Node or Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara Alicja; Beltramo, Giancarlo; Fariselli, Laura; Fodor, Cristiana; Santoro, Luigi; Vavassori, Andrea; Zerini, Dario; Gherardi, Federica; Ascione, Carmen; Bossi-Zanetti, Isa; Mauro, Roberta; Bregantin, Achille; Bianchi, Livia Corinna; De Cobelli, Ottavio; Orecchia, Roberto

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcome of robotic CyberKnife (Accuray, Sunnyvale, CA)-based stereotactic radiotherapy (CBK-SRT) for isolated recurrent primary, lymph node, or metastatic prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between May 2007 and December 2009, 34 consecutive patients/38 lesions were treated (15 patients reirradiated for local recurrence [P], 4 patients reirradiated for anastomosis recurrence [A], 16 patients treated for single lymph node recurrence [LN], and 3 patients treated for single metastasis [M]). In all but 4 patients, [{sup 11}C]choline positron emission tomography/computed tomography was performed. CBK-SRT consisted of reirradiation and first radiotherapy in 27 and 11 lesions, respectively. The median CBK-SRT dose was 30 Gy in 4.5 fractions (P, 30 Gy in 5 fractions; A, 30 Gy in 5 fractions; LN, 33 Gy in 3 fractions; and M, 36 Gy in 3 fractions). In 18 patients (21 lesions) androgen deprivation was added to CBK-SRT (median duration, 16.6 months). Results: The median follow-up was 16.9 months. Acute toxicity included urinary events (3 Grade 1, 2 Grade 2, and 2 Grade 3 events) and rectal events (1 Grade 1 event). Late toxicity included urinary events (3 Grade 1, 2 Grade 2, and 2 Grade 3 events) and rectal events (1 Grade 1 event and 1 Grade 2 event). Biochemical response was observed in 32 of 38 evaluable lesions. Prostate-specific antigen stabilization was seen for 4 lesions, and in 2 cases prostate-specific antigen progression was reported. The 30-month progression-free survival rate was 42.6%. Disease progression was observed for 14 lesions (5, 2, 5, and 2 in Groups P, A, LN, and M respectively). In only 3 cases, in-field progression was seen. At the time of analysis (May 2010), 19 patients are alive with no evidence of disease and 15 are alive with disease. Conclusions: CyberKnife-based stereotactic radiotherapy is a feasible approach for isolated recurrent primary, lymph node, or metastatic prostate cancer, offering excellent in-field tumor

  6. Rhodium-105 Bombesin Analogs for Prostate Cancer Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Silvia S. Jurisson, PhD

    2005-12-31

    Over the period of this grant (11/01/2001 to 12/31/2005), the consistent and reproducible production of Rh-105, synthesis and evaluation of three new chelate systems based on hydroxymethyl phosphines, development of a new non-hydroxymethyl phosphine N{sub 2}P{sub 2} chelate system, conjugation of two of the chelates to the bombesin peptide analog BBN[7-14]NH{sub 2}, evaluation of the bombesin conjugates and their Rh-105 complexes for stability, cell binding affinity, and in vivo biodistribution in normal mice has been developed. The BBN analogs bind to GRP receptors that are overexpressed on PC-3 prostate tumor cells. A dedicated glove box is used for the separation and isolation of {sup 105}Rh from the target ({sup 104}Ru). All tubing/connections/valves from the point of the Cl{sub 2} tank are made of Teflon to minimize/eliminate the introduction of any metal into the process (e.g., iron from stainless steel corrosion). The separation of {sup 105}Rh produced from the enriched {sup 104}Ru target involves oxidation of the enriched {sup 104}Ru metal target to ruthenium tetroxide with chlorine gas and sodium hydroxide solution to generate hypochlorite in situ. The RuO4 is removed by distillation and the {sup 105}Rh remaining in the reaction vial is converted into {sup 105}Rh-chloride by acidification with hydrochloric acid and heating. The {sup 105}Rh production process has become reproducible over the past year to consistently make 10-30 mCi of {sup 105}Rh from 1-3 mg of an enriched (99.21%) {sup 104}Ru target. The process itself involves irradiation of the enriched {sup 104}Ru target in the core of the reactor (University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR)) for one week to yield 16-40 mCi of {sup 105}Rh. The irradiated target is processed to separate the Rh-105 in high specific activity from the {sup 104}Ru target. The irradiated target is dissolved in NaOH (2M, 3 mL) by bubbling Cl{sub 2} gas through the solution (generating NaOCl in situ) to generate RuO{sub 4

  7. A Statistical Evaluation of Rules for Biochemical Failure After Radiotherapy in Men Treated for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bellera, Carine A.; Hanley, James A.; Joseph, Lawrence; Albertsen, Peter C.

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: The 'PSA nadir + 2 rule,' defined as any rise of 2 ng/ml above the current prostate-specific antigen (PSA) nadir, has replaced the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) rule, defined as three consecutive PSA rises, to indicate biochemical failure (BF) after radiotherapy in patients treated for prostate cancer. We propose an original approach to evaluate BF rules based on the PSAdt as the gold standard rule and on a simulation process allowing us to evaluate the BF rules under multiple settings (different frequency, duration of follow-up, PSA doubling time [PSAdt]). Methods and Materials: We relied on a retrospective, population-based cohort of individuals identified by the Connecticut Tumor Registry and treated for localized prostate cancer with radiotherapy. We estimated the 470 underlying true PSA trajectories, including the PSAdt, using a Bayesian hierarchical changepoint model. Next, we simulated realistic, sophisticated data sets that accurately reflect the systematic and random variations observed in PSA series. We estimated the sensitivity and specificity by comparing the simulated PSA series to the underlying true PSAdt. Results: For follow-up of more than 3 years, the specificity of the PSA nadir + 2 rule was systematically greater than that of the ASTRO criterion. In few settings, the nadir + 2 rule had a lower sensitivity than the ASTRO. The PSA nadir + 2 rule appeared less dependent on the frequency and duration of follow-up than the ASTRO. Conclusions: Our results provide some refinements to earlier findings as the BF rules were evaluated according to various parameters. In most settings, the PSA nadir + 2 rule outperforms the ASTRO criterion.

  8. A self-adaptive case-based reasoning system for dose planning in prostate cancer radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, Nishikant; Petrovic, Sanja; Sundar, Santhanam

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in the male population. Radiotherapy is often used in the treatment for prostate cancer. In radiotherapy treatment, the oncologist makes a trade-off between the risk and benefit of the radiation, i.e., the task is to deliver a high dose to the prostate cancer cells and minimize side effects of the treatment. The aim of our research is to develop a software system that will assist the oncologist in planning new treatments. Methods: A nonlinear case-based reasoning system is developed to capture the expertise and experience of oncologists in treating previous patients. Importance (weights) of different clinical parameters in the dose planning is determined by the oncologist based on their past experience, and is highly subjective. The weights are usually fixed in the system. In this research, the weights are updated automatically each time after generating a treatment plan for a new patient using a group based simulated annealing approach. Results: The developed approach is analyzed on the real data set collected from the Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust, City Hospital Campus, UK. Extensive experiments show that the dose plan suggested by the proposed method is coherent with the dose plan prescribed by an experienced oncologist or even better. Conclusions: The developed case-based reasoning system enables the use of knowledge and experience gained by the oncologist in treating new patients. This system may play a vital role to assist the oncologist in making a better decision in less computational time; it utilizes the success rate of the previously treated patients and it can also be used in teaching and training processes.

  9. Analysis of Prostate Bed Motion Using Daily Cone-Beam Computed Tomography During Postprostatectomy Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ost, Piet; De Meerleer, Gert; De Gersem, Werner; Impens, Aline; De Neve, Wilfried

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To report on the interfraction total positioning error of the postoperative prostate bed and to quantify its components (bony misalignment [BM]and prostate bed motion [PBM]) using daily kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). The role of an adaptive radiotherapy schedule (ART) was investigated. Methods and Materials: A total of 547 daily CBCT images from 15 consecutive patients who had been treated with prostate bed radiotherapy were retrospectively analyzed. The positioning error was measured by rigid co-registration of the daily CBCT with pretreatment CT planning scan. The total positioning error was quantified by co-registration of the CBCT with the CT planning scan to match the anterior rectal wall. Automatic bony pelvis co-registration was performed to separate BM and PBM. The ART was determined by the average total positioning error from the first 5 CBCT images. Results: The systematic error for the total positioning error in the left-right, superoinferior, and anteroposterior direction was 2.69, 2.00, and 2.65 mm with a random error of 1.99, 1.49, and 2.25 mm, resulting in a planning target volume margin of 8, 6, and 8 mm, respectively. ART reduced the margin by 54%, 44%, and 40%, respectively. Systematic errors in the left-right, superoinferior, and anteroposterior direction for BM was 2.66, 1.83, and 2.60 mm and for PBM was 0.44, 0.92, and 2.50 mm with a random error of 1.88, 1.24, and 1.77 mm for BM and 0.99, 1.38, and 2.32 mm for PBM, respectively. Conclusion: Without treatment verifications, 6-8-mm planning target volume margins are required because of PBM and BM. The anteroposterior PBM was significant. An ART protocol can reduce these planning target volume margins.

  10. Disturbed Colonic Motility Contributes to Anorectal Symptoms and Dysfunction After Radiotherapy for Carcinoma of the Prostate

    SciTech Connect

    Yeoh, Eric K.; Bartholomeusz, Dylan L.; Holloway, Richard H.; Fraser, Robert J.; Botten, Rochelle; Di Matteo, Addolorata; Moore, James W.; Schoeman, Mark N.

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the role of colonic motility in the pathogenesis of anorectal symptoms and dysfunction after radiotherapy (RT) for carcinoma of the prostate. Patients and Methods: Thirty-eight patients, median age 71 (range, 50-81) years with localized prostate carcinoma randomized to one of two radiation dose schedules underwent colonic transit scintigraphy and assessment of anorectal symptoms (questionnaire), anorectal function (manometry), and anal sphincteric morphology (endoanal ultrasound) before and at 1 month and 1 year after RT. Results: Whole and distal colonic transit increased 1 month after RT, with faster distal colonic transit only persisting at 1 year. Frequency and urgency of defecation, fecal incontinence, and rectal bleeding increased 1 month after RT and persisted at 1 year. Basal anal pressures remained unchanged, but progressive reductions occurred in anal squeeze pressures and responses to increased intra-abdominal pressure. Rectal compliance decreased progressively in the patients, although no changes in anorectal sensory function ensued. Radiotherapy had no effect on the morphology of the internal and external anal sphincters. Distal colonic retention was weakly related to rectal compliance at 1 month, but both faster colonic transit and reduced rectal compliance were more frequent with increased fecal urgency. At 1 year, a weak inverse relationship existed between colonic half-clearance time and frequency of defecation, although both faster whole-colonic transit and reduced rectal compliance occurred more often with increased stool frequency. Conclusion: Colonic dysmotility contributes to anorectal dysfunction after RT for carcinoma of the prostate. This has implications for improving the management of anorectal radiation sequelae.

  11. Longitudinal Study of Intestinal Symptoms and Fecal Continence in Patients With Conformal Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Geinitz, Hans; Thamm, Reinhard; Keller, Monika; Astner, Sabrina T.; Heinrich, Christine; Scholz, Christian; Pehl, Christian; Kerndl, Simone; Prause, Nina; Busch, Raymonde; Molls, Michael; Zimmermann, Frank B.

    2011-04-01

    Purpose: To prospectively assess the intestinal symptoms and fecal continence in patients who had undergone conformal radiotherapy (CRT) for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 78 men who had undergone definitive CRT for prostate cancer were evaluated. The patients were assessed before, during (treatment Weeks 4 and 6), and 2, 12, and 24 months after CRT completion. The intestinal symptoms and fecal continence were evaluated with comprehensive standardized questionnaires. Results: The intestinal symptoms were mostly intermittent, with only a small minority of patients affected daily. Defecation pain, fecal urge, and rectal mucous discharge increased significantly during therapy. Defecation pain and rectal mucous discharge had returned to baseline levels within 8 weeks and 1 year after CRT, respectively. However, fecal urge remained significantly elevated for {<=}1 year and then returned toward the pretreatment values. The prevalence of rectal bleeding was significantly elevated 2 years after CRT. Fecal continence deteriorated during CRT and remained impaired at 1 year after treatment. Incontinence was mostly minor, occurring less than once per week and predominantly affecting incontinence for gas. Conclusion: Intestinal symptoms and fecal incontinence increased during prostate CRT. Except for rectal bleeding, the intestinal symptoms, including fecal incontinence, returned to baseline levels within 1-2 years after CRT. Thus, the rate of long-term late radiation-related intestinal toxicity was low.

  12. Variation in Use of Androgen Suppression With External-Beam Radiotherapy for Nonmetastatic Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Swisher-McClure, Samuel; Pollack, Craig E.; Christodouleas, John P.; Guzzo, Thomas J.; Haas, Naomi B.; Vapiwala, Neha; Bekelman, Justin E.

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To describe practice patterns associated with androgen suppression (AS) stratified by disease risk group in patients undergoing external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We identified 2,184 low-risk, 2,339 intermediate-risk, and 2,897 high-risk patients undergoing EBRT for nonmetastatic prostate cancer diagnosed between January 1, 2004, and December 31, 2005, in the linked Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare database. We examined the association of patient, clinical, and demographic characteristics with AS use by multivariate logistic regression. Results: The proportions of patients receiving AS for low-risk, intermediate-risk, and high-risk prostate cancer were 32.2%, 56.3%, and 81.5%, respectively. AS use among men in the low-risk disease category varied widely, ranging from 13.6% in Detroit to 47.8% in Kentucky. We observed a significant decline in AS use between 2004 and 2005 within all three disease risk categories. Men aged {>=}75 years or with elevated comorbidity levels were more likely to receive AS. Conclusion: Our results identified apparent overuse and underuse of AS among men within the low-risk and high-risk disease categories, respectively. These results highlight the need for clinician and patient education regarding the appropriate use of AS. Practice patterns among intermediate-risk patients reflect the clinical heterogeneity of this population and underscore the need for better evidence to guide the treatment of these patients.

  13. Second Primary Cancer After Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer-A SEER Analysis of Brachytherapy Versus External Beam Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-Wahab, May Reis, Isildinha M.; Hamilton, Kara

    2008-09-01

    Purpose: To determine the incidence of second primary cancers (SPCs) and radiotherapy-induced SPCs (RTSPCs). Patients and Methods: The incidence of SPCs and RTSPCs was compared among four treatment groups with locoregional prostate adenocarcinoma in the 1973-2002 Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database. These groups were no radiotherapy (RT), no surgery (Group 1); external beam RT (EBRT) (Group 2); brachytherapy (Group 3); and a combination of EBRT and brachytherapy (Group 4). Results: The age-adjusted estimates of SPCs were greater with EBRT than with brachytherapy (2,178 vs. 1,901 SPCs/100,000; p = 0.025) or with the no RT, no surgery group (1,971 SPCs/100,000; p <0.0001). The age-adjusted rate of late SPC ({>=}5 years) for EBRT (2,425 SPCs/100,000) was only significantly greater (p <0.0001) than that for no RT, no surgery (1,950 SPCs/100,000). The hazard ratio adjusted for age, race/ethnicity, and grade was constant at 1.263 for EBRT compared with no RT, no surgery (p <0.0001) but varied with the length of follow-up in both the brachytherapy (0.721 at 5 years to 1.200 at 9 years) and combination (0.920 at 5 years to 1.317 at 9 years) groups. The incidence of RTSPCs was only significantly different between the no RT, no surgery group and the EBRT group, with an increase of 162 cases/100,000 or a 0.16% increased SPC risk (p = 0.023). No significant differences in the incidence of RTSPC were seen between the RT groups. Conclusion: No significant differences were seen in the incidence of RTSPCs between the RT groups. The initial smaller relative risk of overall SPCs in the brachytherapy group increased with time until the curves converged, suggesting that the effect had resulted from patient selection bias.

  14. Age and Comorbid Illness Are Associated With Late Rectal Toxicity Following Dose-Escalated Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hamstra, Daniel A.; Stenmark, Matt H.; Ritter, Tim; Litzenberg, Dale; Jackson, William; Johnson, Skyler; Albrecht-Unger, Liesel; Donaghy, Alex; Phelps, Laura; Blas, Kevin; Halverson, Schuyler; Marsh, Robin; Olson, Karin; Feng, Felix Y.

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To assess the impacts of patient age and comorbid illness on rectal toxicity following external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) for prostate cancer and to assess the Qualitative Analysis of Normal Tissue Effects in the Clinic (QUANTEC) normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model in this context. Methods and Materials: Rectal toxicity was analyzed in 718 men previously treated for prostate cancer with EBRT (≥75 Gy). Comorbid illness was scored using the Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCMI), and the NTCP was evaluated with the QUANTEC model. The influence of clinical and treatment-related parameters on rectal toxicity was assessed by Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards models. Results: The cumulative incidence of rectal toxicity grade ≥2 was 9.5% and 11.6% at 3 and 5 years and 3.3% and 3.9% at 3 and 5 years for grade ≥3 toxicity, respectively. Each year of age predicted an increasing relative risk of grade ≥2 (P<.03; hazard ratio [HR], 1.04 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.01-1.06]) and ≥3 rectal toxicity (P<.0001; HR, 1.14 [95% CI,1.07-1.22]). Increasing CCMI predicted rectal toxicity where a history of either myocardial infarction (MI) (P<.0001; HR, 5.1 [95% CI, 1.9-13.7]) or congestive heart failure (CHF) (P<.0006; HR, 5.4 [95% CI, 0.6-47.5]) predicted grade ≥3 rectal toxicity, with lesser correlation with grade ≥2 toxicity (P<.02 for MI, and P<.09 for CHF). An age comorbidity model to predict rectal toxicity was developed and confirmed in a validation cohort. The use of anticoagulants increased toxicity independent of age and comorbidity. NTCP was prognostic for grade ≥3 (P=.015) but not grade ≥2 (P=.49) toxicity. On multivariate analysis, age, MI, CHF, and an NTCP >20% all correlated with late rectal toxicity. Conclusions: Patient age and a history of MI or CHF significantly impact rectal toxicity following EBRT for the treatment of prostate cancer, even after controlling for NTCP.

  15. Gleason Pattern 5 Is the Greatest Risk Factor for Clinical Failure and Death From Prostate Cancer After Dose-Escalated Radiation Therapy and Hormonal Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Sabolch, Aaron; Feng, Felix Y.; Daignault-Newton, Stephanie; Halverson, Schuyler; Blas, Kevin; Phelps, Laura; Olson, Karin B.; Sandler, Howard M.; Hamstra, Daniel A.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: The division of Gleason score (GS) into three categories (2-6, 7, 8-10) may not fully use its prognostic power, as revealed by recent reports demonstrating the presence of Gleason Pattern 5 (GP5) as a strong predictor for biochemical recurrence. Therefore, we analyzed the clinical outcomes in patients treated with dose-escalated radiation therapy (RT) based on the presence or absence of GP5. Methods and Materials: Outcomes were analyzed for 718 men treated for localized prostate cancer with external-beam RT to a minimum planning target volume dose of at least 75 Gy. We assessed the impact of GP5 and that of pretreatment- and treatment-related factors on freedom from biochemical failure, freedom from metastasis (FFM), cause-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival (OS). Results: At biopsy, 89% of patients had no GP5, and 11% (76/718) had GP5. There were no differences in age, comorbid illness, T stage, prostate-specific antigen, or the use or duration of androgen deprivation therapy between GS8 without GP5 and GS8-10 with GP5. The presence of GP5 predicted lower FFM (p < 0.002; hazard ratio [HR] 3.4 [1.7-7.1]); CSS (p < 0.0001; HR 12.9 [5.4-31]); and OS (p < 0.0001; HR 3.6 [2.0-6.5]) in comparison with GS8 (without GP5). The 8-year FFM, CSS, and OS were 89%, 98%, and 57%, respectively, for those with Gleason 8 prostate cancer without GP5 in comparison with 61%, 55%, and 31%, respectively, for those with GP5. In addition, both FFM and CSS were strongly influenced by androgen deprivation therapy given concurrently with RT. On multivariate analysis, GP5 was the strongest prognostic factor for all clinical endpoints, including OS. Conclusion: The presence of GP5 predicts for worse clinical behavior, which therefore needs to be accounted for by risk stratification schemes. Further intensification of local and/or systemic therapy may be appropriate for such patients.

  16. Forward-planning intensity-modulated radiotherapy technique for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Metwaly, Mohamed; Awaad, Awaad Mousa; El-Sayed, El-Sayed Mahmoud; Sallam, Abdel Sattar Mohamed

    2007-11-05

    In this study, we present an intensity-modulated radiotherapy technique based on forward planning dose calculations to provide a concave dose distribution to the prostate and seminal vesicles by means of modified dynamic arc therapy (M-DAT). Dynamic arcs (350 degrees) conforming to the beam's eye view of the prostate and seminal vesicles while shielding the rectum, combined with two lateral oblique conformal fields (15 degrees with respect to laterals) fitting the prostate only,were applied to deliver doses of 78 Gy and 61.23 Gy in 39 fractions to the prostate and seminal vesicles respectively. Dynamic wedges (45 degrees of thick end, anteriorly oriented) were used with conformal beams to adjust the dose homogeneity to the prostate, although in some cases, hard wedges (30 degrees of thick part,inferiorly oriented) were used with arcs to adjust the dose coverage to the seminal vesicles. The M-DAT was applied to 10 patients in supine and 10 patients in prone positioning to determine the proper patient positioning for optimum protection of the rectum. The M-DAT was compared with the simplified intensity-modulated arc therapy (SIMAT) technique, composed of three phases of bilateral dynamic arcs. The mean rectal dose in M-DAT for prone patients was 22.5 +/- 5.1 Gy; in M-DAT and SIMAT for supine patients, it was 30.2 +/- 5.1 Gy and 39.4 +/- 6.0 Gy respectively. The doses to 15%, 25%, 35%, and 50% of the rectum volume in M-DAT for prone patients were 44.5 +/- 10.2 Gy, 33.0 +/- 8.2 Gy, 25.3 +/- 6.4 Gy, and 16.3 +/- 5.6 Gy respectively. These values were lower than those in M-DAT and in SIMAT for supine patients by 7.7%, 18.2%, 22.4%, and 28.5% and by 25.0%, 32.1%, 34.9%, and 41.9% of the prescribed dose (78 Gy) respectively. Ion chamber measurements showed good agreement of the calculated and measured isocentric dose (maximum deviation of 3.5%). Accuracy of the dose distribution calculation was evaluated by film dosimetry using a gamma index, allowing 3% dose variation and

  17. Hypofractionated Versus Conventionally Fractionated Radiotherapy for Prostate Carcinoma: Final Results of Phase III Randomized Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Yeoh, Eric E.; Botten, Rochelle J.; Butters, Julie; Di Matteo, Addolorata C.; Holloway, Richard H.; Fowler, Jack

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the long-term efficacy and toxicity of a hypofractionated (55 Gy in 20 fractions within 4 weeks) vs. a conventionally fractionated (64 Gy in 32 fractions within 6.5 weeks) dose schedule for radiotherapy (RT) for localized carcinoma of the prostate. Methods and Materials: A total of 217 patients were randomized to either the hypofractionated (n = 108) or the conventional (n = 109) dose schedule. Most patients (n = 156) underwent RT planning and RT using a two-dimensional computed tomography method. Efficacy using the clinical, radiologic, and prostate-specific antigen data in each patient was evaluated before RT and at predetermined intervals after RT until death. Gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity using the modified Late Effect in Normal Tissue - Subjective Objective Management Analytic (LENT-SOMA) scales was also evaluated before and at intervals after RT to 60 months. Results: The whole group has now been followed for a median of 90 months (range, 3-138). Of the 217 patients, 85 developed biochemical relapse (nadir prostate-specific antigen level + 2 {mu}g/L), 36 in the hypofractionated and 49 in the conventional group. The biochemical relapse-free, but not overall, survival at 90 months was significantly better with the hypofractionated (53%) than with the conventional (34%) schedule. Gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity persisted 60 months after RT and did not differ between the two dose schedules. Multivariate analyses revealed that the conventional schedule was of independent prognostic significance, not only for biochemical failure, but also for an increased risk of worse genitourinary symptoms at 4 years. Conclusions: A therapeutic advantage of the hypofractionated compared with the conventional dose schedule for RT of prostate cancer was evident at 90 months in the present study.

  18. Outcomes After Intensity-Modulated Versus Conformal Radiotherapy in Older Men With Nonmetastatic Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bekelman, Justin E.; Mitra, Nandita; Efstathiou, Jason; Liao Kaijun; Sunderland, Robert; Yeboa, Deborah N.; Armstrong, Katrina

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: There is little evidence comparing complications after intensity-modulated (IMRT) vs. three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (CRT) for prostate cancer. The study objective was to test the hypothesis that IMRT, compared with CRT, is associated with a reduction in bowel, urinary, and erectile complications in elderly men with nonmetastatic prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We undertook an observational cohort study using registry and administrative claims data from the SEER-Medicare database. We identified men aged 65 years or older diagnosed with nonmetastatic prostate cancer in the United States between 2002 and 2004 who received IMRT (n = 5,845) or CRT (n = 6,753). The primary outcome was a composite measure of bowel complications. Secondary outcomes were composite measures of urinary and erectile complications. We also examined specific subsets of bowel (proctitis/hemorrhage) and urinary (cystitis/hematuria) events within the composite complication measures. Results: IMRT was associated with reductions in composite bowel complications (24-month cumulative incidence 18.8% vs. 22.5%; hazard ratio [HR] 0.86; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.79-0.93) and proctitis/hemorrhage (HR 0.78; 95% CI, 0.64-0.95). IMRT was not associated with rates of composite urinary complications (HR 0.93; 95% CI, 0.83-1.04) or cystitis/hematuria (HR 0.94; 95% CI, 0.83-1.07). The incidence of erectile complications involving invasive procedures was low and did not differ significantly between groups, although IMRT was associated with an increase in new diagnoses of impotence (HR 1.27, 95% CI, 1.14-1.42). Conclusion: IMRT is associated with a small reduction in composite bowel complications and proctitis/hemorrhage compared with CRT in elderly men with nonmetastatic prostate cancer.

  19. The novel Akt inhibitor Palomid 529 (P529) enhances the effect of radiotherapy in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, R; Nguewa, P A; Diaz-Gonzalez, J A; Hamel, E; Gonzalez-Moreno, O; Catena, R; Serrano, D; Redrado, M; Sherris, D; Calvo, A

    2009-01-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) is a common treatment for localised prostate cancer, but can cause important side effects. The therapeutic efficacy of RT can be enhanced by pharmacological compounds that target specific pathways involved in cell survival. This would elicit a similar therapeutic response using lower doses of RT and, in turn, reducing side effects. This study describes the antitumour activity of the novel Akt inhibitor 8-(1-Hydroxy-ethyl)-2-methoxy-3-(4-methoxy-benzyloxy)-benzo[c]chromen-6-one (Palomid 529 or P529) as well as its ability to decrease radiation-activated phospho-Akt (p-Akt) signalling in a prostate cancer model. P529 showed a potent antiproliferative activity in the NCI-60 cell lines panel, with growth inhibitory 50 (GI50) <35 μM. In addition, P529 significantly enhanced the antiproliferative effect of radiation in prostate cancer cells (PC-3). Analysis of signalling pathways targeted by P529 exhibited a decrease in p-Akt, VEGF, MMP-2, MMP-9, and Id-1 levels after radiation treatment. Moreover, the Bcl-2/Bax ratio was also reduced. Treatment of PC-3 tumour-bearing mice with 20 mg kg−1 P529 or 6 Gy radiation dose decreased tumour size by 42.9 and 53%, respectively. Combination of both treatments resulted in 77.4% tumour shrinkage. Decreased tumour growth was due to reduced proliferation and increased apoptosis (as assessed by PCNA and caspase-3 immunostaining). Our results show the antitumour efficacy of P529 alone, and as a radiosensitiser, and suggest that this compound could be used in the future to treat human prostate cancer. PMID:19240717

  20. Long-Term Results After High-Dose Radiotherapy and Adjuvant Hormones in Prostate Cancer: How Curable Is High-Risk Disease?

    SciTech Connect

    Zapatero, Almudena; Garcia-Vicente, Feliciano; Martin de Vidales, Carmen; Cruz Conde, Alfonso; Ibanez, Yamile; Fernandez, Inmaculada; Rabadan, Mariano

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To analyze long-term outcome and prognostic factors for high-risk prostate cancer defined by National Comprehensive Cancer Network criteria treated with high-dose radiotherapy and androgen deprivation in a single institution. Methods and Materials: A total of 306 patients treated between 1995 and 2007 in a radiation dose-escalation program fulfilled the National Comprehensive Cancer Network high-risk criteria. Median International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements radiation dose was 78 Gy (range, 66.0-84.1 Gy). Long-term androgen deprivation (LTAD) was administered in 231 patients, short-term androgen deprivation (STAD) in 59 patients, and no hormones in 16 patients. The Phoenix (nadir plus 2 ng/mL) consensus definition was used for biochemical control. Multivariate analysis was performed to determine the independent prognostic impact of clinical and treatment factors. Median follow-up time was 64 months (range, 24-171 months). Results: The actuarial overall survival at 5 and 10 years was 95.7% and 89.8%, respectively, and the corresponding biochemical disease-free survival (bDFS) was 89.5% and 67.2%, respectively. Fourteen patients (4.6%) developed distant metastasis. Multivariate analysis showed that Gleason score >7 (p = 0.001), pretreatment prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level >20 ng/mL (p = 0.037), higher radiation dose (p = 0.005), and the use of adjuvant LTAD vs. STAD (p = 0.011) were independent prognostic factors affecting bDFS in high-risk disease. The 5-year bDFS for patients treated with LTAD plus radiotherapy dose >78 Gy was 97%. Conclusions: For high-risk patients the present series showed that the use of LTAD in conjunction with higher doses (>78 Gy) of radiotherapy was associated with improved biochemical tumor control. We observed that the presence of Gleason sum >7 and pretreatment PSA level >20 ng/mL in the same patient represents a 6.8 times higher risk of PSA failure. These men could be considered for clinical trials with

  1. ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles as radiosensitizers in radiotherapy of human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Meidanchi, Alireza; Akhavan, Omid; Khoei, Samideh; Shokri, Ali A; Hajikarimi, Zahra; Khansari, Nakisa

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles of high-Z elements exhibit stronger photoelectric effects than soft tissues under gamma irradiation. Hence, they can be used as effective radiosensitizers for increasing the efficiency of current radiotherapy. In this work, superparamagnetic zinc ferrite spinel (ZnFe2O4) nanoparticles were synthesized by a hydrothermal reaction method and used as radiosensitizers in cancer therapy. The magnetic nanoparticles showed fast separation from solutions (e.g., ~1 min for 2 mg mL(-1) of the nanoparticles in ethanol) by applying an external magnetic field (~1T). The ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles were applied in an in vitro radiotherapy of lymph node carcinoma of prostate cells (as high radioresistant cells) under gamma irradiation of (60)Co source. The nanoparticles exhibited no significant effects on the cancer cells up to the high concentration of 100 μg mL(-1), in the absence of gamma irradiation. The gamma irradiation alone (2Gy dose) also showed no significant effects on the cells. However, gamma irradiation in the presence of 100 μg mL(-1) ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles resulted in ~53% inactivation of the cells (~17 times higher than the inactivation that occurred under gamma irradiation alone) after 24h. The higher cell inactivation was assigned to interaction of gamma radiation with nanoparticles (photoelectric effect), resulting in a high level electron release in the media of the radioresistant cells. Our results indicated that ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles not only can be applied in increasing the efficiency of radiotherapy, but also can be easily separated from the cell environment by using an external magnetic field after the radiotherapy.

  2. ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles as radiosensitizers in radiotherapy of human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Meidanchi, Alireza; Akhavan, Omid; Khoei, Samideh; Shokri, Ali A; Hajikarimi, Zahra; Khansari, Nakisa

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles of high-Z elements exhibit stronger photoelectric effects than soft tissues under gamma irradiation. Hence, they can be used as effective radiosensitizers for increasing the efficiency of current radiotherapy. In this work, superparamagnetic zinc ferrite spinel (ZnFe2O4) nanoparticles were synthesized by a hydrothermal reaction method and used as radiosensitizers in cancer therapy. The magnetic nanoparticles showed fast separation from solutions (e.g., ~1 min for 2 mg mL(-1) of the nanoparticles in ethanol) by applying an external magnetic field (~1T). The ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles were applied in an in vitro radiotherapy of lymph node carcinoma of prostate cells (as high radioresistant cells) under gamma irradiation of (60)Co source. The nanoparticles exhibited no significant effects on the cancer cells up to the high concentration of 100 μg mL(-1), in the absence of gamma irradiation. The gamma irradiation alone (2Gy dose) also showed no significant effects on the cells. However, gamma irradiation in the presence of 100 μg mL(-1) ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles resulted in ~53% inactivation of the cells (~17 times higher than the inactivation that occurred under gamma irradiation alone) after 24h. The higher cell inactivation was assigned to interaction of gamma radiation with nanoparticles (photoelectric effect), resulting in a high level electron release in the media of the radioresistant cells. Our results indicated that ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles not only can be applied in increasing the efficiency of radiotherapy, but also can be easily separated from the cell environment by using an external magnetic field after the radiotherapy. PMID:25492003

  3. Segmenting CT prostate images using population and patient-specific statistics for radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Qianjin; Foskey, Mark; Chen Wufan; Shen Dinggang

    2010-08-15

    Purpose: In the segmentation of sequential treatment-time CT prostate images acquired in image-guided radiotherapy, accurately capturing the intrapatient variation of the patient under therapy is more important than capturing interpatient variation. However, using the traditional deformable-model-based segmentation methods, it is difficult to capture intrapatient variation when the number of samples from the same patient is limited. This article presents a new deformable model, designed specifically for segmenting sequential CT images of the prostate, which leverages both population and patient-specific statistics to accurately capture the intrapatient variation of the patient under therapy. Methods: The novelty of the proposed method is twofold: First, a weighted combination of gradient and probability distribution function (PDF) features is used to build the appearance model to guide model deformation. The strengths of each feature type are emphasized by dynamically adjusting the weight between the profile-based gradient features and the local-region-based PDF features during the optimization process. An additional novel aspect of the gradient-based features is that, to alleviate the effect of feature inconsistency in the regions of gas and bone adjacent to the prostate, the optimal profile length at each landmark is calculated by statistically investigating the intensity profile in the training set. The resulting gradient-PDF combined feature produces more accurate and robust segmentations than general gradient features. Second, an online learning mechanism is used to build shape and appearance statistics for accurately capturing intrapatient variation. Results: The performance of the proposed method was evaluated on 306 images of the 24 patients. Compared to traditional gradient features, the proposed gradient-PDF combination features brought 5.2% increment in the success ratio of segmentation (from 94.1% to 99.3%). To evaluate the effectiveness of online

  4. The Benefits of Including Clinical Factors in Rectal Normal Tissue Complication Probability Modeling After Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Defraene, Gilles; Van den Bergh, Laura; Al-Mamgani, Abrahim; Haustermans, Karin; Heemsbergen, Wilma; Van den Heuvel, Frank; Lebesque, Joos V.

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To study the impact of clinical predisposing factors on rectal normal tissue complication probability modeling using the updated results of the Dutch prostate dose-escalation trial. Methods and Materials: Toxicity data of 512 patients (conformally treated to 68 Gy [n = 284] and 78 Gy [n = 228]) with complete follow-up at 3 years after radiotherapy were studied. Scored end points were rectal bleeding, high stool frequency, and fecal incontinence. Two traditional dose-based models (Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) and Relative Seriality (RS) and a logistic model were fitted using a maximum likelihood approach. Furthermore, these model fits were improved by including the most significant clinical factors. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was used to compare the discriminating ability of all fits. Results: Including clinical factors significantly increased the predictive power of the models for all end points. In the optimal LKB, RS, and logistic models for rectal bleeding and fecal incontinence, the first significant (p = 0.011-0.013) clinical factor was 'previous abdominal surgery.' As second significant (p = 0.012-0.016) factor, 'cardiac history' was included in all three rectal bleeding fits, whereas including 'diabetes' was significant (p = 0.039-0.048) in fecal incontinence modeling but only in the LKB and logistic models. High stool frequency fits only benefitted significantly (p = 0.003-0.006) from the inclusion of the baseline toxicity score. For all models rectal bleeding fits had the highest AUC (0.77) where it was 0.63 and 0.68 for high stool frequency and fecal incontinence, respectively. LKB and logistic model fits resulted in similar values for the volume parameter. The steepness parameter was somewhat higher in the logistic model, also resulting in a slightly lower D{sub 50}. Anal wall DVHs were used for fecal incontinence, whereas anorectal wall dose best described the other two endpoints. Conclusions: Comparable

  5. Aplastic anemia associated with severe hemorrhagic cystitis following radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    NAKANO, TAITO; IZUMI, KOUJI; MAOLAKE, AERKEN; NATSAGDORJI, ARIUNBOLD; IWAMOTO, HIROAKI; KITAGAWA, YASUHIDE; KADONO, YOSHIFUMI; KONAKA, HIROYUKI; MIZOKAMI, ATSUSHI; NAMIKI, MIKIO

    2016-01-01

    Hemorrhagic cystitis is a rare complication following radiotherapy for intrapelvic cancer types, including cervical cancer, bladder cancer and prostate cancer. The severity of hemorrhagic cystitis is different in each case, although symptoms improve spontaneously in certain cases, and often significant morbidity requiring numerous interventions occurs. Since no treatment strategy exists with high evidences for such severe hemorrhagic cystitis, urologists have difficulty in solving the bleeding and pain, which the patients suffer. Aplastic anemia is a rare blood disorder, with an incidence reported as 2/1 million individuals annually. Patients have a risk of diffuse bleeding for presentation with anemia, thrombocytopenia and neutropenia. The present report presented a case of severe hemorrhagic cystitis remitted successfully by the treatment for underlying aplastic anemia. PMID:27123281

  6. Phase II Trial of Hypofractionated Image-Guided Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Localized Prostate Adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Jarad M.; Rosewall, Tara; Bayley, Andrew; Bristow, Robert; Chung, Peter; Crook, Juanita; Gospodarowicz, Mary; McLean, Michael; Menard, Cynthia; Milosevic, Michael; Warde, Padraig; Catton, Charles

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: To assess in a prospective trial the feasibility and late toxicity of hypofractionated radiotherapy (RT) for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients had clinical stage T1c-2cNXM0 disease. They received 60 Gy in 20 fractions over 4 weeks with intensity-modulated radiotherapy including daily on-line image guidance with intraprostatic fiducial markers. Results: Between June 2001 and March 2004, 92 patients were treated with hypofractionated RT. The cohort had a median prostate-specific antigen value of 7.06 ng/mL. The majority had Gleason grade 5-6 (38%) or 7 (59%) disease, and 82 patients had T1c-T2a clinical staging. Overall, 29 patients had low-risk, 56 intermediate-risk, and 7 high-risk disease. Severe acute toxicity (Grade 3-4) was rare, occurring in only 1 patient. Median follow-up was 38 months. According to the Phoenix definition for biochemical failure, the rate of biochemical control at 14 months was 97%. According to the previous American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology definition, biochemical control at 3 years was 76%. The incidence of late toxicity was low, with no severe (Grade {>=}3) toxicity at the most recent assessment. Conclusions: Hypofractionated RT using 60 Gy in 20 fractions over 4 weeks with image guidance is feasible and is associated with low rates of late bladder and rectal toxicity. At early follow-up, biochemical outcome is comparable to that reported for conventionally fractionated controls. The findings are being tested in an ongoing, multicenter, Phase III trial.

  7. Implementing intensity modulated radiotherapy to the prostate bed: Dosimetric study and early clinical results

    SciTech Connect

    Riou, Olivier; Laliberté, Benoit; Azria, David; Menkarios, Cathy; Llacer Moscardo, Carmen; Dubois, Jean-Bernard; Aillères, Norbert; Fenoglietto, Pascal

    2013-07-01

    Salvage intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) to the prostate bed has hardly been studied so far. We present here a feasibility study and early clinical results for 10 patients. These patients were selected on the basis of having either a biochemical relapse or high risk histology after prostatectomy. They were treated using “sliding-window” IMRT to 68 Gy in 34 fractions. Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) plans were generated using the same planning computed tomography data set. Dose coverage of planning target volumes (PTVs) and of organs-at-risk (OAR, namely: rectum, bladder, and femoral heads) were compared. Acute toxicity and chronic toxicity were measured using the Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0 scale. IMRT significantly reduces the dose above the prescription dose given to the PTV1 (mean dose: IMRT 67.2 Gy vs 3D-CRT 67.7 Gy (p = 0.0137)), without altering dose coverage for PTV2 (mean dose: IMRT 68.1 Gy vs 3D-CRT 68.0 Gy (p = 0.3750)). Doses to OAR were lower with IMRT and differences were statistically significant (mean dose: IMRT 51.4 Gy vs 3D-CRT 56.6 Gy for rectum (p = 0.002), IMRT 45.1 Gy vs 3D-CRT 53.1 Gy for bladder (p = 0.002), and IMRT 26.1 Gy vs 3D-CRT 28.4 Gy for femoral heads (p = 0.0059)). There was no acute or chronic genitourinary or gastrointestinal toxicity >1 with a median follow-up of 38 months. IMRT to the prostatic fossa is feasible and reduces dose to OAR, with consequential limited toxicity.

  8. Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy for Delivery of Prostate Radiotherapy: Comparison With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy and Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Palma, David Vollans, Emily; James, Kerry; Nakano, Sandy; Moiseenko, Vitali; Shaffer, Richard; McKenzie, Michael; Morris, James; Otto, Karl

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) is a novel form of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) optimization that allows the radiation dose to be delivered in a single gantry rotation of up to 360{sup o}, using either a constant dose rate (cdr-VMAT) or variable dose rate (vdr-VMAT) during rotation. The goal of this study was to compare VMAT prostate RT plans with three-dimensional conformal RT (3D-CRT) and IMRT plans. Patients and Methods: The 3D-CRT, five-field IMRT, cdr-VMAT, and vdr-VMAT RT plans were created for 10 computed tomography data sets from patients undergoing RT for prostate cancer. The parameters evaluated included the doses to organs at risk, equivalent uniform doses, dose homogeneity and conformality, and monitor units required for delivery of a 2-Gy fraction. Results: The IMRT and both VMAT techniques resulted in lower doses to normal critical structures than 3D-CRT plans for nearly all dosimetric endpoints analyzed. The lowest doses to organs at risk and most favorable equivalent uniform doses were achieved with vdr-VMAT, which was significantly better than IMRT for the rectal and femoral head dosimetric endpoints (p < 0.05) and significantly better than cdr-VMAT for most bladder and rectal endpoints (p < 0.05). The vdr-VMAT and cdr-VMAT plans required fewer monitor units than did the IMRT plans (relative reduction of 42% and 38%, respectively; p = 0.005) but more than for the 3D-CRT plans (p = 0.005). Conclusion: The IMRT and VMAT techniques achieved highly conformal treatment plans. The vdr-VMAT technique resulted in more favorable dose distributions than the IMRT or cdr-VMAT techniques, and reduced the monitor units required compared with IMRT.

  9. Randomized Trial of Hypofractionated External-Beam Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pollack, Alan; Walker, Gail; Horwitz, Eric M.; Price, Robert; Feigenberg, Steven; Konski, Andre A.; Stoyanova, Radka; Movsas, Benjamin; Greenberg, Richard E.; Uzzo, Robert G.; Ma, Charlie; Buyyounouski, Mark K.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To determine if escalated radiation dose using hypofractionation significantly reduces biochemical and/or clinical disease failure (BCDF) in men treated primarily for prostate cancer. Patients and Methods Between June 2002 and May 2006, men with favorable- to high-risk prostate cancer were randomly allocated to receive 76 Gy in 38 fractions at 2.0 Gy per fraction (conventional fractionation intensity-modulated radiation therapy [CIMRT]) versus 70.2 Gy in 26 fractions at 2.7 Gy per fraction (hypofractionated IMRT [HIMRT]); the latter was estimated to be equivalent to 84.4 Gy in 2.0 Gy fractions. High-risk patients received long-term androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), and some intermediate-risk patients received short-term ADT. The primary end point was the cumulative incidence of BCDF. Secondarily, toxicity was assessed. Results There were 303 assessable patients with a median follow-up of 68.4 months. No significant differences were seen between the treatment arms in terms of the distribution of patients by clinicopathologic or treatment-related (ADT use and length) factors. The 5-year rates of BCDF were 21.4% (95% CI, 14.8% to 28.7%) for CIMRT and 23.3% (95% CI, 16.4% to 31.0%) for HIMRT (P = .745). There were no statistically significant differences in late toxicity between the arms; however, in subgroup analysis, patients with compromised urinary function before enrollment had significantly worse urinary function after HIMRT. Conclusion The hypofractionation regimen did not result in a significant reduction in BCDF; however, it is delivered in 2.5 fewer weeks. Men with compromised urinary function before treatment may not be ideal candidates for this approach. PMID:24101042

  10. Brachytherapy or Conformal External Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer: A Single-Institution Matched-Pair Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Pickles, Tom; Keyes, Mira; Morris, W. James

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: In the absence of randomized study data, institutional case series have shown brachytherapy (BT) to produce excellent biochemical control (bNED) in patients with localized prostate cancer compared with alternative curative treatments. This study was designed to overcome some of the limitations of case series studies by using a matched-pair design in patients treated contemporaneously with BT and external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) at a single institution. Methods and Materials: Six hundred one eligible patients treated between 1998 and 2001 were prospectively followed up in our institutional databases and matched on a 1:1 basis for the following known prognostic variables: prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level, Gleason score, T stage, the use and duration of neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy, and the percentage of positive tissue core samples. Two hundred seventy-eight perfect matches of patients (139 in each group) with low- and intermediate-risk cancer were further analyzed. bNED (Phoenix definition) was the primary endpoint. Other endpoints were toxicity, PSA kinetics, and the secondary use of androgen deprivation therapy. Results: The 5-year bNED rates were 95% (BT) and 85% (EBRT) (p < 0.001). After 7 years, the BT bNED result was unchanged, but the rate in EBRT patients had fallen to 75%. The median posttreatment PSA nadirs were 0.04 ng/mL (BT) and 0.62 ng/mL (EBRT, p < 0.001), which predicted a higher ongoing treatment failure rate in association with EBRT use than with BT use. Late urinary toxicity and rectal/bowel toxicity were worse in patients treated with BT and EBRT, respectively. Conclusions: BT for both low-risk and selected intermediate-risk cancers achieves exceptional cure rates. Even with dose escalation, it will be difficult for EBRT to match the proven track record of BT seen over the past decade.

  11. Defining biochemical failure after radiotherapy with and without androgen deprivation for prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Buyyounouski, Mark K. . E-mail: mark.buyyounouski@fccc.edu; Hanlon, Alexandra L.; Eisenberg, Debra F.; Horwitz, Eric M.; Feigenberg, Steven J.; Uzzo, Robert G.; Pollack, Alan

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: To compare several characteristics of alternative definitions of biochemical failure (BF) in men with extended follow-up after radiotherapy (RT) with or with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: From December 1, 1991, to April 30, 1998, 688 men with Stage T1c-T3NX-N0M0 prostate cancer received RT alone (n = 586) or RT plus ADT (n = 102) with a minimal follow-up of 4 years and five or more 'ADT-free' posttreatment prostate-specific antigen levels. BF was defined by three methods: (1) the ASTRO definition (three consecutive rises in prostate-specific antigen level); (2) a modified American Society for Therapeutic Radiology Oncology (ASTRO) definition requiring two additional consecutive rises when a decline immediately subsequent to three consecutive rises occurred; and (3) the 'Houston' or nadir plus 2-ng/mL definition (a rise of at least 2 ng/mL greater than the nadir). The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and overall accuracy were determined for each using clinical progression as the endpoint. Furthermore, the misclassification rates for a steadily rising prostate-specific antigen level, ability to satisfy the proportional hazards (RT with or without ADT), effects of short follow-up, and intervals to the diagnosis of BF were compared. Results: The misclassification rate for BF using the nadir plus 2-ng/mL definition was 2% for RT alone and 0% for RT plus ADT compared with 0% and 0% for the modified ASTRO definition, and 5% and 23% for the ASTRO definition, respectively. The hazard rates for RT alone and RT plus ADT were proportional only for the nadir plus 2 ng/mL definition and seemingly unaffected by the length of follow-up. For RT with or without ADT, the nadir plus 2 ng/mL definition was the most specific (RT, 80% vs. RT plus ADT, 75%) with the greatest positive predictive value (RT, 36% vs. RT plus ADT, 25%) and overall accuracy (RT, 81% vs. RT plus ADT, 77%). A

  12. Radiotherapy Treatment Plans With RapidArc for Prostate Cancer Involving Seminal Vesicles and Lymph Nodes

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Sua; Wu, Q. Jackie; Lee, W. Robert; Yin Fangfang

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: Dosimetric results and treatment delivery efficiency of RapidArc plans to those of conventional intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans were compared using the Eclipse treatment planning system for high-risk prostate cancer. Materials and Methods: This study included 10 patients. The primary planning target volume (PTV{sub P}) contained prostate, seminal vesicles, and pelvic lymph nodes with a margin. The boost PTV (PTV{sub B}) contained prostate and seminal vesicles with a margin. The total prescription dose was 75.6 Gy (46.8 Gy to PTV{sub P} and an additional 28.8 Gy to PTV{sub B}; 1.8 Gy/fraction). Three plans were generated for each PTV: Multiple-field IMRT, one-arc RapidArc (1ARC), and two-arc RapidArc (2ARC). Results: In the primary IMRT with PTV{sub P}, average mean doses to bladder, rectum and small bowel were lower by 5.9%, 7.7% and 4.3%, respectively, than in the primary 1ARC and by 3.6%, 4.8% and 3.1%, respectively, than in the primary 2ARC. In the boost IMRT with PTV{sub B}, average mean doses to bladder and rectum were lower by 2.6% and 4.8% than with the boost 1ARC and were higher by 0.6% and 0.2% than with the boost 2ARC. Integral doses were 7% to 9% higher with RapidArc than with IMRT for both primary and boost plans. Treatment delivery time was reduced by 2-7 minutes using RapidArc. Conclusion: For PTVs including prostate, seminal vesicles, and lymph nodes, IMRT performed better in dose sparing for bladder, rectum, and small bowel than did RapidArc. For PTVs including prostate and seminal vesicles, RapidArc with two arcs provided plans comparable to those for IMRT. The treatment delivery is more efficient with RapidArc.

  13. Dosimetry verification on VMAT and IMRT radiotherapy techniques: In the case of prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maulana, A.; Pawiro, S. A.

    2016-03-01

    Radiotherapy treatment depends on the accuracy of the dose delivery to patients, the purpose of the study is to verify the dose in IMRT and VMAT technique in prostate cancer cases correspond to TPS dose using phantom base on ICRU No.50. The dose verification of the target and OAR was performed by placing the TLD Rod LiF100 and EBT2 Gafchromic film at slab hole of pelvic part of the Alderson RANDO phantom for prostate cancer simulation. The Exposed TLDs was evaluated using the TLD Reader Harshaw while EBT2 film was scanned using Epson scanner. The point dose measurements were compared between planned dose and measured dose at target volume and OAR. The result is the dose difference at target volume, bladder and rectum for IMRT and VMAT are less than 5%. On the other hand, the dose difference at the Femoral head is more than 5% for both techniques because the location of OAR already in low gradient dose. Furthermore, the difference dose of the target volume for IMRT technique tends to be smaller than VMAT either for TLD and EBT2 film detectors. From the measurement showed that the delivered dose on the phantom simulation match with ICRU No.50 criteria.

  14. Time of Decline in Sexual Function After External Beam Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Siglin, Joshua; Kubicek, Gregory J.; Leiby, Benjamin; Valicenti, Richard K.

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: Erectile dysfunction is one of the most concerning toxicities for patients in the treatment of prostate cancer. The inconsistent evaluation of sexual function (SF) and limited follow-up data have necessitated additional study to clarify the rate and timing of erectile dysfunction after external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 143 men completed baseline data on SF before treatment and at the subsequent follow-up visits. A total of 1187 validated SF inventories were analyzed from the study participants. Multiple domains of SF (sex drive, erectile function, ejaculatory function, and overall satisfaction) were analyzed for <=8 years of follow-up. Results: The median follow-up was 4.03 years. The strongest predictor of SF after EBRT was SF before treatment. For all domains of SF, the only statistically significant decrease in function occurred in the first 24 months after EBRT. SF stabilized 2 years after treatment completion, with no statistically significant change in any area of SF >2 years after the end of EBRT. Conclusion: These data suggest that SF does not have a continuous decline after EBRT. Instead, SF decreases maximally within the first 24 months after EBRT, with no significant changes thereafter.

  15. Reducing stray radiation dose to patients receiving passively scattered proton radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Taddei, Phillip J; Fontenot, Jonas D; Zheng, Yuanshui; Mirkovic, Dragan; Lee, Andrew K; Titt, Uwe; Newhauser, Wayne D

    2014-01-01

    Proton beam radiotherapy exposes healthy tissue to stray radiation emanating from the treatment unit and secondary radiation produced within the patient. These exposures provide no known benefit and may increase a patient's risk of developing a radiogenic second cancer. The aim of this study was to explore strategies to reduce stray radiation dose to a patient receiving a 76 Gy proton beam treatment for cancer of the prostate. The whole-body effective dose from stray radiation, E, was estimated using detailed Monte Carlo simulations of a passively scattered proton treatment unit and an anthropomorphic phantom. The predicted value of E was 567 mSv, of which 320 mSv was attributed to leakage from the treatment unit; the remainder arose from scattered radiation that originated within the patient. Modest modifications of the treatment unit reduced E by 212 mSv. Surprisingly, E from a modified passive-scattering device was only slightly higher (109 mSv) than from a nozzle with no leakage, e.g., that which may be approached with a spot-scanning technique. These results add to the body of evidence supporting the suitability of passively scattered proton beams for the treatment of prostate cancer, confirm that the effective dose from stray radiation was not excessive, and, importantly, show that it can be substantially reduced by modest enhancements to the treatment unit. PMID:18369278

  16. Early Proctoscopy is a Surrogate Endpoint of Late Rectal Toxicity in Prostate Cancer Treated With Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ippolito, Edy; Massaccesi, Mariangela; Digesu, Cinzia; Deodato, Francesco; Macchia, Gabriella; Pirozzi, Giuseppe Antonio; Cilla, Savino; Cuscuna, Daniele; Di Lallo, Alessandra; Mattiucci, Gian Carlo; Mantini, Giovanna; Pacelli, Fabio; Valentini, Vincenzo; Cellini, Numa; Ingrosso, Marcello; Morganti, Alessio Giuseppe

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To predict the grade and incidence of late clinical rectal toxicity through short-term (1 year) mucosal alterations. Methods and Materials: Patients with prostate adenocarcinoma treated with curative or adjuvant radiotherapy underwent proctoscopy a year after the course of radiotherapy. Mucosal changes were classified by the Vienna Rectoscopy Score (VRS). Late toxicity data were analyzed according to the Kaplan-Meier method. Comparison between prognosis groups was performed by log-rank analysis. Results: After a median follow-up time of 45 months (range, 18-99), the 3-year incidence of grade {>=}2 rectal late toxicity according to the criteria of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer and the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group was 24%, with all patients (24/24; 100%) experiencing rectal bleeding. The occurrence of grade {>=}2 clinical rectal late toxicity was higher in patients with grade {>=}2 (32% vs. 15 %, p = 0.02) or grade {>=}3 VRS telangiectasia (47% vs. 17%, p {<=} 0.01) and an overall VRS score of {>=}2 (31% vs. 16 %, p = 0.04) or {>=}3 (48% vs. 17%, p = 0.01) at the 1-year proctoscopy. Conclusions: Early proctoscopy (1 year) predicts late rectal bleeding and therefore can be used as a surrogate endpoint for late rectal toxicity in studies aimed at reducing this frequent complication.

  17. NBN gain is predictive for adverse outcome following image-guided radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sykes, Jenna; Zafarana, Gaetano; Chu, Kenneth C.; Ramnarine, Varune R.; Ishkanian, Adrian; Sendorek, Dorota H.S.; Pasic, Ivan; Lam, Wan L.; Jurisica, Igor; van der Kwast, Theo; Milosevic, Michael; Boutros, Paul C.; Bristow, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the use of clinical prognostic factors (PSA, T-category and Gleason score), 20-60% of localized prostate cancers (PCa) fail primary local treatment. Herein, we determined the prognostic importance of main sensors of the DNA damage response (DDR): MRE11A, RAD50, NBN, ATM, ATR and PRKDC. We studied copy number alterations in DDR genes in localized PCa treated with image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT; n=139) versus radical prostatectomy (RadP; n=154). In both cohorts, NBN gains were the most frequent genomic alteration (14.4 and 11% of cases, respectively), and were associated with overall tumour genomic instability (p<0.0001). NBN gains were the only significant predictor of 5yrs biochemical relapse-free rate (bRFR) following IGRT (46% versus 77%; p=0.00067). On multivariate analysis, NBN gain remained a significant independent predictor of bRFR after adjusting for known clinical prognostic variables (HR=3.28, 95% CI 1.56–6.89, Wald p-value=0.0017). No DDR-sensing gene was prognostic in the RadP cohort. In vitro studies correlated NBN gene overexpression with PCa cells radioresistance. In conclusion, NBN gain predicts for decreased bRFR in IGRT, but not in RadP patients. If validated independently, Nibrin gains may be the first PCa predictive biomarker to facilitate local treatment decisions using precision medicine approaches with surgery or radiotherapy. PMID:25415046

  18. Evaluation of volume change in rectum and bladder during application of image-guided radiotherapy for prostate carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luna, J. A.; Rojas, J. I.

    2016-07-01

    All prostate cancer patients from Centro Médico Radioterapia Siglo XXI receive Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT). This therapy uses image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) with the Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT). This study compares the planned dose in the reference CT image against the delivered dose recalculate in the CBCT image. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the anatomic changes and related dosimetric effect based on weekly CBCT directly for patients with prostate cancer undergoing volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment. The collected data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA.

  19. Concurrent Androgen Deprivation Therapy During Salvage Prostate Radiotherapy Improves Treatment Outcomes in High-Risk Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Soto, Daniel E.; Passarelli, Michael N.; Daignault, Stephanie; Sandler, Howard M.

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To determine whether concurrent androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) during salvage radiotherapy (RT) improves prostate cancer treatment outcomes. Methods and Materials: A total of 630 postprostatectomy patients were retrospectively identified who were treated with three-dimensional conformal RT. Of these, 441 were found to be treated for salvage indications. Biochemical failure was defined as prostate-specific antigen (PSA) of 0.2 ng/mL or greater above nadir with another PSA increase or the initiation of salvage ADT. Progression-free survival (PFS) was defined as the absence of biochemical failure, continued PSA rise despite salvage therapy, initiation of systemic therapy, clinical progression, or distant failure. Multivariate-adjusted Cox proportional hazards modeling was performed to determine which factors predict PFS. Results: Low-, intermediate-, and high-risk patients made up 10%, 24%, and 66% of patients, respectively. The mean RT dose was 68 Gy. Twenty-four percent of patients received concurrent ADT (cADT). Regional pelvic nodes were treated in 16% of patients. With a median follow-up of 3 years, the 3-year PFS was 4.0 years for cADT vs. 3.4 years for cADT patients (p = 0.22). Multivariate analysis showed that concurrent ADT (p = 0.05), Gleason score (p < 0.001), and pre-RT PSA (p = 0.03) were independent predictors of PFS. When patients were stratified by risk group, the benefits of cADT (hazard ratio, 0.65; p = 0.046) were significant only for high-risk patients. Conclusions: This retrospective study showed a PFS benefit of concurrent ADT during salvage prostate RT. This benefit was observed only in high-risk patients.

  20. Voxel-based population analysis for correlating local dose and rectal toxicity in prostate cancer radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acosta, Oscar; Drean, Gael; Ospina, Juan D.; Simon, Antoine; Haigron, Pascal; Lafond, Caroline; de Crevoisier, Renaud

    2013-04-01

    The majority of current models utilized for predicting toxicity in prostate cancer radiotherapy are based on dose-volume histograms. One of their main drawbacks is the lack of spatial accuracy, since they consider the organs as a whole volume and thus ignore the heterogeneous intra-organ radio-sensitivity. In this paper, we propose a dose-image-based framework to reveal the relationships between local dose and toxicity. In this approach, the three-dimensional (3D) planned dose distributions across a population are non-rigidly registered into a common coordinate system and compared at a voxel level, therefore enabling the identification of 3D anatomical patterns, which may be responsible for toxicity, at least to some extent. Additionally, different metrics were employed in order to assess the quality of the dose mapping. The value of this approach was demonstrated by prospectively analyzing rectal bleeding (⩾Grade 1 at 2 years) according to the CTCAE v3.0 classification in a series of 105 patients receiving 80 Gy to the prostate by intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Within the patients presenting bleeding, a significant dose excess (6 Gy on average, p < 0.01) was found in a region of the anterior rectal wall. This region, close to the prostate (1 cm), represented less than 10% of the rectum. This promising voxel-wise approach allowed subregions to be defined within the organ that may be involved in toxicity and, as such, must be considered during the inverse IMRT planning step.

  1. Postoperative Prostate-Specific Antigen Velocity Independently Predicts for Failure of Salvage Radiotherapy After Prostatectomy

    SciTech Connect

    King, Christopher R. Presti, Joseph C.; Brooks, James D.; Gill, Harcharan; Spiotto, Michael T.

    2008-04-01

    Purpose: Identification of patients most likely to benefit from salvage radiotherapy (RT) using postoperative (postop) prostate-specific antigen (PSA) kinetics. Methods and Materials: From 1984 to 2004, 81 patients who fit the following criteria formed the study population: undetectable PSA after radical prostatectomy (RP); pathologically negative nodes; biochemical relapse defined as a persistently detectable PSA; salvage RT; and two or more postop PSAs available before salvage RT. Salvage RT included the whole pelvic nodes in 55 patients and 4 months of total androgen suppression in 56 patients. The median follow-up was >5 years. All relapses were defined as a persistently detectable PSA. Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards multivariable analysis were performed for all clinical, pathological, and treatment factors predicting for biochemical relapse-free survival (bRFS). Results: There were 37 biochemical relapses observed after salvage RT. The 5-year bRFS after salvage RT for patients with postop prostate-specific antigen velocity {<=}1 vs. >1 ng/ml/yr was 59% vs. 29%, p = 0.002. In multivariate analysis, only postop PSAV (p = 0.0036), pre-RT PSA level {<=}1 (p = 0.037) and interval-to-relapse >10 months (p = 0.012) remained significant, whereas pelvic RT, hormone therapy, and RT dose showed a trend (p = {approx}0.06). PSAV, but not prostate-specific antigen doubling time, predicted successful salvage RT, suggesting an association of zero-order kinetics with locally recurrent disease. Conclusions: Postoperative PSA velocity independently predicts for the failure of salvage RT and can be considered in addition to high-risk features when selecting patients in need of systemic therapy following biochemical failure after RP. For well-selected patients, salvage RT can achieve high cure rates.

  2. Salvage high-intensity focused ultrasound for the recurrent prostate cancer after radiotherapy in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoji, S.; Nakano, M.; Nagata, Y.; Uchida, T.

    2012-10-01

    Aim: to investigate the use of minimally invasive high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) as a salvage therapy in men with localized prostate cancer recurrence following external beam radiotherapy (EBRT), brachytherapy or proton therapy. A review of 22 cases treated using the Sonablate® 500 HIFU device, between August 28, 2002 and April 1, 2010, was carried out. All men had presumed organ-confined, histologically confirmed recurrent prostate adenocarcinoma following radiation therapy. The mean (range) age was 65 (52-80) years with a mean PSA level before radiation therapy of 14.3 (5.7-118) ng/mL. The mean (range) period after radiation therapy to HIFU was 36 (4-96) months. All men with presumed, organ-confined, recurrent disease following EBRT in 14 patients, brachytherapy in 5 patients (4 patients with high-dose brachytherapy with In192 and 1 with low-dose brachytherapy with Au98) or proton therapy in 3 patients treated with salvage HIFU were included. The patients were followed for a mean (range) of 24 months. Biochemical disease-free survival (bDFS) rates in patients with low-, intermediate-and high risk groups were 100%, 86%, and 14%, respectively. All nine patients who received a post HIFU prostate biopsy showed no malignancy. Side-effects included urethral stricture in 4 of the 25 patients (16%) and urinary incontinence in 4 of the 25 patients (16%). Recto-urethral fistula occurred in one patient (4%). Salvage HIFU is a minimally invasive for patients with low-and intermediate risk group with comparable morbidity to other forms of salvage treatment.

  3. Salvage High-intensity Focused Ultrasound for the Recurrent Prostate Cancer after Radiotherapy in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoji, S.; Nakano, M.; Nagata, Y.; Uchida, T.

    2011-09-01

    To investigate the use of minimally invasive high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) as a salvage therapy in men with localized prostate cancer recurrence following external beam radiotherapy (EBRT), brachytherapy or proton therapy. A review of 20 cases treated using the Sonablate® 500 HIFU device, between August 28, 2002 and June 1, 2010, was carried out. All men had presumed organ-confined, histologically confirmed recurrent prostate adenocarcinoma following radiation therapy. The mean (range) age was 65 (52-80) years with a mean PSA level before radiation therapy of 26.6 (4.8-118) ng/mL. The mean (range) period after radiation therapy to HIFU was 41 (4-96) months. All men with presumed, organ-confined, recurrent disease following EBRT in 13 patients, brachytherapy in 5 patients (4 patients with high-dose brachytherapy with In192 and 1 with low-dose brachytherapy with Au98) or proton therapy in 4 patients treated with salvage HIFU were included. The patients were followed for a mean (range) of 21 months. Biochemical disease-free survival (bDFS) rates in patients with low-, intermediate- and high risk groups were 100%, 85.7%, and 18.2%, respectively. All nine patients who received a post HIFU prostate biopsy showed no malignancy. Side-effects included urethral stricture in 4 of the 22 patients (18%) and urinary incontinence in 4 of the 22 patients (18%). Recto-urethral fistula occurred in one patient (5%). Salvage HIFU is a minimally invasive for patients with low-and intermediate risk group with comparable morbidity to other forms of salvage treatment.

  4. Dosimetry and preliminary acute toxicity in the first 100 men treated for prostate cancer on a randomized hypofractionation dose escalation trial

    SciTech Connect

    Pollack, Alan . E-mail: Alan.Pollack@FCCC.edu; Hanlon, Alexandra L.; Horwitz, Eric M.; Feigenberg, Steven J.; Konski, Andre A.; Movsas, Benjamin; Greenberg, Richard E.; Uzzo, Robert G.; Ma, C.-M. Charlie; McNeeley, Shawn W.; Buyyounouski, Mark K.; Price, Robert A.

    2006-02-01

    Purpose: The {alpha}/{beta} ratio for prostate cancer is postulated to be between 1 and 3, giving rise to the hypothesis that there may be a therapeutic advantage to hypofractionation. The dosimetry and acute toxicity are described in the first 100 men enrolled in a randomized trial. Patients and Methods: The trial compares 76 Gy in 38 fractions (Arm I) to 70.2 Gy in 26 fractions (Arm II) using intensity modulated radiotherapy. The planning target volume (PTV) margins in Arms I and II were 5 mm and 3 mm posteriorly and 8 mm and 7 mm in all other dimensions. The PTV D95% was at least the prescription dose. Results: The mean PTV doses for Arms I and II were 81.1 and 73.8 Gy. There were no differences in overall maximum acute gastrointestinal (GI) or genitourinary (GU) toxicity acutely. However, there was a slight but significant increase in Arm II GI toxicity during Weeks 2, 3, and 4. In multivariate analyses, only the combined rectal DVH parameter of V65 Gy/V50 Gy was significant for GI toxicity and the bladder volume for GU toxicity. Conclusion: Hypofractionation at 2.7 Gy per fraction to 70.2 Gy was well tolerated acutely using the planning conditions described.

  5. Clinical Application of High-Dose, Image-Guided Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy in High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bayley, Andrew; Rosewall, Tara; Craig, Tim; Bristow, Rob; Chung, Peter; Gospodarowicz, Mary; Menard, Cynthia; Milosevic, Michael; Warde, Padraig; Catton, Charles

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: To report the feasibility and early toxicity of dose-escalated image-guided IMRT to the pelvic lymph nodes (LN), prostate (P), and seminal vesicles (SV). Methods and Materials: A total of 103 high-risk prostate cancer patients received two-phase, dose-escalated, image-guided IMRT with 3 years of androgen deprivation therapy. Clinical target volumes (CTVs) were delineated using computed tomography/magnetic resonance co-registration and included the prostate, portions of the SV, and the LN. Planning target volume margins (PTV) used were as follows: P (10 mm, 7 mm posteriorly), SV (10 mm), and LN (5 mm). Organs at risk (OaR) were the rectal and bladder walls, femoral heads, and large and small bowel. The IMRT was planned with an intended dose of 55.1 Gy in 29 fractions to all CTVs (Phase 1), with P+SV consecutive boost of 24.7 Gy in 13 fractions. Daily online image guidance was performed using bony landmarks and intraprostatic markers. Feasibility criteria included delivery of intended doses in 80% of patients, 95% of CTV displacements incorporated within PTV during Phase 1, and acute toxicity rate comparable to that of lower-dose pelvic techniques. Results: A total of 91 patients (88%) received the total prescription dose. All patients received at least 72 Gy. In Phase 1, 63 patients (61%) received the intended 55.1 Gy, whereas 87% of patients received at least 50 Gy. Dose reductions were caused by small bowel and rectal wall constraints. All CTVs received the planned dose in >95% of treatment fractions. There were no Radiation Therapy Oncology Group acute toxicities greater than Grade 3, although there were five incidences equivalent to Grade 3 within a median follow-up of 23 months. Conclusion: These results suggest that dose escalation to the PLN+P+SV using IMRT is feasible, with acceptable rates of acute toxicity.

  6. Customizable radiotherapy enhancement (CuRE) for prostate cancer using platinum based nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cifter, Gizem

    New approach to prostate cancer (PCa) therapy titled "Customizable Radiotherapy Enhancement (CuRE)" employs cisplatin (C), carboplatin (Ca) and oxaliplatin (O) nanoparticles (CNPs, CaNPs and ONPs) as adjuvants to brachytherapy and external beam radiation therapy (EBRT), with the CNPs/CaNPs/ONPs released in situ from either brachytherapy spacers or fudicials loaded with the nanoparticles. The chemotherapy dose from the nanoparticles released in situ from within the prostate capsule, is enhanced by the physical dose due to photon interactions with the nanoparticles. The physical dose enhancement is due to low energy photons from the brachytherapy and EBRT sources interacting with the high-Z platinum component of the nanoparticles, causing emission of short-range photoelectrons to boost dose to the tumor. By varying the nanoparticle parameters, such as size, initial concentration, functionalization, location of spacer or fiducial, and intra-tumor biodistribution, the dose enhancement can be customized to maximize dose to tumor cells while minimizing toxicity to healthy cells. The hypothesis is that the CuRE approach will be a more efficacious method for concomitant cisplatin/carboplatin/oxaliplatin and radiotherapy treatment of localized prostate cancer due to significant dose boost to the PCa cells with minimal toxicity to healthy tissue. To investigate this hypothesis, microdosimetry calculations employing the energy loss formula of Cole were used to calculate the dose enhancement to the PCa cells from the CNPs/CaNPs/OPNs. The dose enhancement ratio (DEF) representing the ratio of the overall dose in the presence of CNPs/CaNPs/ONPs to the dose without CNPs/CaNPs/ONPs was determined for a range of CNP/CaNP/OPN concentrations up to their FDA approved limits. The dose enhancement to endothelial cells with (EDEF) with single concentration of cisplatin (42.8 mg/g) was found 2.6 with Pd-103. When EBRT source was used with single concentration of cisplatin, with 10cm x 10

  7. Acute and late gastrointestinal toxicity after radiotherapy in prostate cancer patients: Consequential late damage

    SciTech Connect

    Heemsbergen, Wilma D. . E-mail: w.heemsbergen@nki.nl; Peeters, Stephanie T.H.; Koper, Peter; Hoogeman, Mischa S.; Lebesque, Joos V.

    2006-09-01

    Purpose: Late gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity after radiotherapy can be partly explained by late effects of acute toxicity (consequential late damage). We studied whether there is a direct relationship between acute and late GI toxicity. Patients and Methods: A total of 553 evaluable patients from the Dutch dose escalation trial (68 Gy vs. 78 Gy) were included. We defined three outcomes for acute reactions: 1) maximum Radiation Therapy Oncology Group acute toxicity, 2) maximum acute mucous discharge (AMD), and 3) maximum acute proctitis. Within a multivariable model, late endpoints (overall toxicity and five toxicity indicators) were studied as a function of acute toxicity, pretreatment symptoms, and relevant dose parameters. Results: At multivariable analysis, AMD and acute proctitis were strong predictors for overall toxicity, 'intermittent bleeding,' and 'incontinence pads' (p {<=} 0.01). For 'stools {>=}6/day' all three were strong predictors. No significant associations were found for 'severe bleeding' and 'use of steroids.' The predictive power of the dose parameters remained at the same level or became weaker for most late endpoints. Conclusions: Acute GI toxicity is an independent significant predictor of late GI toxicity. This suggests a significant consequential component in the development of late GI toxicity.

  8. Outcome After Conformal Salvage Radiotherapy in Patients With Rising Prostate-Specific Antigen Levels After Radical Prostatectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Geinitz, Hans; Riegel, Martina G.; Thamm, Reinhard; Astner, Sabrina T.; Lewerenz, Carolin; Zimmermann, Frank; Molls, Michael; Nieder, Carsten

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: This study attempts to improve our understanding of the role of salvage radiotherapy (SRT) in patients with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) relapse after radical prostatectomy with regard to biochemical control, rate of distant metastasis, and survival. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective analysis of 96 men treated with conformal prostate bed SRT (median, 64.8 Gy) at a single institution (median follow-up, 70 months). The majority had intermediate- or high-risk prostate cancer. Fifty-four percent underwent a resection with positive margins (R1 resection). The median time interval between surgery and SRT was 22 months. Results: After SRT, 66% of patients reached a PSA nadir of less than 0.2 ng/mL. However, the 5-year biochemical no evidence of disease rate was 35%. Seminal vesicle involvement was predictive for a significantly lower biochemical no evidence of disease rate. All patients with a preoperative PSA level greater than 50 ng/mL relapsed biochemically within 2 years. The 5-year distant metastasis rate was 18%, the 5-year prostate cancer-specific survival rate was 90%, and the 5-year overall survival rate was 88%. Significantly more distant metastases developed in patients with a PSA nadir greater than 0.05 ng/mL after SRT, and they had significantly inferior prostate cancer-specific and overall survival rates. Resection status (R1 vs. R0) was not predictive for any of the endpoints. Conclusions: Men with postoperative PSA relapse can undergo salvage treatment by prostate bed radiotherapy, but durable PSA control is maintained only in about one-third of the patients. Despite a high biochemical failure rate after SRT, prostate cancer-specific survival does not decrease rapidly.

  9. Improving Positioning in High-Dose Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer: Safety and Visibility of Frequently Used Gold Fiducial Markers

    SciTech Connect

    Fonteyne, Valerie; Ost, Piet; Villeirs, Geert; Oosterlinck, Willem; Impens, Aline; De Gersem, Werner; De Wagter, Carlos; De Meerleer, Gert

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: The use of gold fiducial markers (GFMs) for prostate positioning in high-dose radiotherapy is gaining interest. The purpose of this study was to compare five GFMs regarding feasibility of ultrasound-based implantation in the prostate and intraprostatic lesion (IPL); toxicity; visibility on transabdominal ultrasound (TU) and cone-beam CT (CBCT); reliability of automatic, soft tissue, and GFM-based CBCT patient positioning by comparing manual and automatic fusion CBCT. Methods and Materials: Twenty-five patients were included. Pain and toxicity were scored after implantation and high-dose radiotherapy. Fisher exact test was used to evaluate the correlation of patients' characteristics and prostatitis. Positioning was evaluated on TU and kilovoltage CBCT images. CBCT fusion was performed automatically (Elekta XVI technology, release 3.5.1 b27, based on grey values) and manually on soft tissue and GFMs. Pearson correlation statistics and Bland-Altman evaluation were used. Five GFMs were compared. Results: Twenty percent of the patients developed prostatitis despite antibiotic prophylaxis. Cigarette smoking was significantly correlated with prostatitis. The visualization of all GFMs on TU was disappointing. Consequently we cannot recommend the use of these GFMs for TU-based prostate positioning. For all GFMs, there was only fair to poor linear correlation between automatic and manual CBCT images, indicating that even when GFMs are used, an operator evaluation is imperative. However, when GFMs were analyzed individually, a moderate to very strong correlation between automatic and manual positioning was found for larger GFMs in all directions. Conclusion: The incidence of prostatitis in our series was high. Further research is imperative to define the ideal preparation protocol preimplantation and to select patients. Automatic fusion is more reliable with larger GFMs at the cost of more scatter. The stability of all GFMs was proven.

  10. A dynamic compensation strategy to correct patient-positioning errors in conformal prostate radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lauve, A D; Siebers, J V; Crimaldi, A J; Hagan, M P; Kealla, P J

    2006-06-01

    Traditionally, pretreatment detected patient-positioning errors have been corrected by repositioning the couch to align the patient to the treatment beam. We investigated an alternative strategy: aligning the beam to the patient by repositioning the dynamic multileaf collimator and adjusting the beam weights, termed dynamic compensation. The purpose of this study was to determine the geometric range of positioning errors for which the dynamic compensation method is valid in prostate cancer patients treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. Twenty-five previously treated prostate cancer patients were replanned using a four-field technique to deliver 72 Gy to 95% of the planning target volume (PTV). Patient-positioning errors were introduced by shifting the patient reference frame with respect to the treatment isocenter. Thirty-six randomly selected isotropic displacements with magnitudes of 1.0, 2.0, 4.0, 6.0, 8.0, and 10.0 cm were sampled for each patient, for a total of 5400 errors. Dynamic compensation was used to correct each of these errors by conforming the beam apertures to the new target position and adjusting the monitor units using inverse-square and off-axis factor corrections. The dynamic compensation plans were then compared with the original treatment plans via dose-volume histogram (DVH) analysis. Changes of more than 5% of the prescription dose, 3.6 Gy, were deemed significant. Compared with the original treatment plans, dynamic compensation produced small discrepancies in isodose distributions and DVH analyses. These differences increased with the magnitudes of the initial patient-positioning errors. Coverage of the PTV was excellent: D95 and Dmean were not increased or decreased by more than 5% of the prescription dose, and D5 was not decreased by more than 5% of the prescription dose for any of the 5400 simulated positioning errors. D5 was increased by more than 5% of the prescription dose in only three of the 5400 positioning errors

  11. A dynamic compensation strategy to correct patient-positioning errors in conformal prostate radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lauve, A. D.; Siebers, J. V.; Crimaldi, A. J.; Hagan, M. P.; Keall, P. J.

    2006-06-15

    Traditionally, pretreatment detected patient-positioning errors have been corrected by repositioning the couch to align the patient to the treatment beam. We investigated an alternative strategy: aligning the beam to the patient by repositioning the dynamic multileaf collimator and adjusting the beam weights, termed dynamic compensation. The purpose of this study was to determine the geometric range of positioning errors for which the dynamic compensation method is valid in prostate cancer patients treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. Twenty-five previously treated prostate cancer patients were replanned using a four-field technique to deliver 72 Gy to 95% of the planning target volume (PTV). Patient-positioning errors were introduced by shifting the patient reference frame with respect to the treatment isocenter. Thirty-six randomly selected isotropic displacements with magnitudes of 1.0, 2.0, 4.0, 6.0, 8.0, and 10.0 cm were sampled for each patient, for a total of 5400 errors. Dynamic compensation was used to correct each of these errors by conforming the beam apertures to the new target position and adjusting the monitor units using inverse-square and off-axis factor corrections. The dynamic compensation plans were then compared with the original treatment plans via dose-volume histogram (DVH) analysis. Changes of more than 5% of the prescription dose, 3.6 Gy, were deemed significant. Compared with the original treatment plans, dynamic compensation produced small discrepancies in isodose distributions and DVH analyses. These differences increased with the magnitudes of the initial patient-positioning errors. Coverage of the PTV was excellent: D{sub 95} and D{sub mean} were not increased or decreased by more than 5% of the prescription dose, and D{sub 5} was not decreased by more than 5% of the prescription dose for any of the 5400 simulated positioning errors. D{sub 5} was increased by more than 5% of the prescription dose in only three of the

  12. Dosimetric and geometric evaluation of a hybrid strategy of offline adaptive planning and online image guidance for prostate cancer radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Han; Wu, Qiuwen

    2011-08-01

    For prostate cancer patients, online image-guided (IG) radiotherapy has been widely used in clinic to correct the translational inter-fractional motion at each treatment fraction. For uncertainties that cannot be corrected online, such as rotation and deformation of the target volume, margins are still required to be added to the clinical target volume (CTV) for the treatment planning. Offline adaptive radiotherapy has been implemented to optimize the treatment for each individual patient based on the measurements at early stages of treatment process. It has been shown that offline adaptive radiotherapy can effectively reduce the required margin. Recently a hybrid strategy of offline adaptive replanning and online IG was proposed and the geometric evaluation was performed. It was found that the planning margins can further be reduced by 1-2 mm compared to online IG only strategy. The purpose of this study was to investigate the dosimetric benefits of such a hybrid strategy on the target and organs at risk. A total of 420 repeated helical computed tomography scans from 28 patients were included in the study. Both low-risk patients (LRP, CTV = prostate) and intermediate-risk patients (IRP, CTV = prostate + seminal vesicles, SV) were included in the simulation. Two registration methods, based on center-of-mass shift of prostate only and prostate plus SV, were performed for IRP. The intensity-modulated radiotherapy was used in the simulation. Criteria on both cumulative and fractional doses were evaluated. Furthermore, the geometric evaluation was extended to investigate the optimal number of fractions necessary to construct the internal target volume (ITV) for the hybrid strategy. The dosimetric margin improvement was smaller than its geometric counterpart and was in the range of 0-1 mm. The optimal number of fractions necessary for the ITV construction is 2 for LRPs and 3-4 for IRPs in a hypofractionation protocol. A new cumulative index of target volume was proposed

  13. Health-Related Quality of Life 2 Years After Treatment With Radical Prostatectomy, Prostate Brachytherapy, or External Beam Radiotherapy in Patients With Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrer, Montserrat Suarez, Jose Francisco; Guedea, Ferran; Fernandez, Pablo; Macias, Victor; Marino, Alfonso; Hervas, Asuncion; Herruzo, Ismael; Ortiz, Maria Jose; Villavicencio, Humberto; Craven-Bratle, Jordi; Garin, Olatz; Aguilo, Ferran

    2008-10-01

    Purpose: To compare treatment impact on health-related quality of life (HRQL) in patients with localized prostate cancer, from before treatment to 2 years after the intervention. Methods and Materials: This was a longitudinal, prospective study of 614 patients with localized prostate cancer treated with radical prostatectomy (134), three-dimensional external conformal radiotherapy (205), and brachytherapy (275). The HRQL questionnaires administered before and after treatment (months 1, 3, 6, 12, and 24) were the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form, the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy (General and Prostate Specific), the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC), and the American Urological Association Symptom Index. Differences between groups were tested by analysis of variance and within-group changes by univariate repeated-measures analysis of variance. Generalized estimating equations (GEE) models were constructed to assess between-group differences in HRQL at 2 years of follow-up after adjusting for clinical variables. Results: In each treatment group, HRQL initially deteriorated after treatment with subsequent partial recovery. However, some dimension scores were still significantly lower after 2 years of treatment. The GEE models showed that, compared with the brachytherapy group, radical prostatectomy patients had worse EPIC sexual summary and urinary incontinence scores (-20.4 and -14.1; p < 0.001), and external radiotherapy patients had worse EPIC bowel, sexual, and hormonal summary scores (-3.55, -5.24, and -1.94; p < 0.05). Prostatectomy patients had significantly better EPIC urinary irritation scores than brachytherapy patients (+4.16; p < 0.001). Conclusions: Relevant differences between treatment groups persisted after 2 years of follow-up. Radical prostatectomy had a considerable negative effect on sexual functioning and urinary continence. Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy had a moderate negative impact on bowel

  14. Quality of Life After Hypofractionated Concomitant Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Boost for High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Quon, Harvey; Cheung, Patrick C.F.; Loblaw, D. Andrew; Morton, Gerard; Pang, Geordi; Szumacher, Ewa; Danjoux, Cyril; Choo, Richard; Kiss, Alex; Mamedov, Alexandre; Deabreu, Andrea

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the change in health-related quality of life (QOL) of patients with high-risk prostate cancer treated using hypofractionated radiotherapy combined with long-term androgen deprivation therapy. Methods and Materials: A prospective Phase I-II study enrolled patients with any of the following: clinical Stage T3 disease, prostate-specific antigen level {>=}20 ng/mL, or Gleason score 8-10. Radiotherapy consisted of 45 Gy (1.8 Gy per fraction) to the pelvic lymph nodes with a concomitant 22.5 Gy intensity-modulated radiotherapy boost to the prostate, for a total of 67.5 Gy (2.7 Gy per fraction) in 25 fractions over 5 weeks. Daily image guidance was performed using three gold seed fiducials. Quality of life was measured using the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC), a validated tool that assesses four primary domains (urinary, bowel, sexual, and hormonal). Results: From 2004 to 2007, 97 patients were treated. Median follow-up was 39 months. Compared with baseline, at 24 months there was no statistically significant change in the mean urinary domain score (p = 0.99), whereas there were decreases in the bowel (p < 0.01), sexual (p < 0.01), and hormonal (p < 0.01) domains. The proportion of patients reporting a clinically significant difference in EPIC urinary, bowel, sexual, and hormonal scores at 24 months was 27%, 31%, 55%, and 60%, respectively. However, moderate and severe distress related to these symptoms was minimal, with increases of only 3% and 5% in the urinary and bowel domains, respectively. Conclusions: Hypofractionated radiotherapy combined with long-term androgen deprivation therapy was well tolerated. Although there were modest rates of clinically significant patient-reported urinary and bowel toxicity, most of this caused only mild distress, and moderate and severe effects on QOL were limited. Additional follow-up is ongoing to characterize long-term QOL.

  15. TGFB1 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms Are Associated With Adverse Quality of Life in Prostate Cancer Patients Treated With Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Christopher A. Stock, Richard G.; Cesaretti, Jamie A.; Atencio, David P.; Peters, Sheila B.A.; Burri, Ryan J.; Stone, Nelson N.; Ostrer, Harry; Rosenstein, Barry S.

    2008-03-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether the presence of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located within TGFB1 might be predictive for the development of adverse quality-of-life outcomes in prostate cancer patients treated with radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 141 prostate cancer patients treated with radiotherapy were screened for SNPs in TGFB1 using DNA sequencing. Three quality-of-life outcomes were investigated: (1) prospective decline in erectile function, (2) urinary quality of life, and (3) rectal bleeding. Median follow-up was 51.3 months (range, 12-138 months; SD, 24.4 months). Results: Those patients who possessed either the T/T genotype at position -509, the C/C genotype at position 869 (pro/pro, codon 10) or the G/C genotype at position 915 (arg/pro, codon 25) were significantly associated with the development of a decline in erectile function compared with those who did not have these genotypes: 56% (9 of 16) vs. 24% (11 of 45) (p = 0.02). In addition, patients with the -509 T/T genotype had a significantly increased risk of developing late rectal bleeding compared with those who had either the C/T or C/C genotype at this position: 55% (6 of 11) vs. 26% (34 of 130) (p = 0.05). Conclusions: Possession of certain TGFB1 genotypes is associated with the development of both erectile dysfunction and late rectal bleeding in patients treated with radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Therefore, identification of patients harboring these genotypes may represent a means to predict which men are most likely to suffer from poor quality-of-life outcomes after radiotherapy for prostate cancer.

  16. Automatic Segmentation of Pelvic Structures From Magnetic Resonance Images for Prostate Cancer Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Pasquier, David . E-mail: d-pasquier@o-lambret.fr; Lacornerie, Thomas; Vermandel, Maximilien; Rousseau, Jean; Lartigau, Eric; Betrouni, Nacim

    2007-06-01

    Purpose: Target-volume and organ-at-risk delineation is a time-consuming task in radiotherapy planning. The development of automated segmentation tools remains problematic, because of pelvic organ shape variability. We evaluate a three-dimensional (3D), deformable-model approach and a seeded region-growing algorithm for automatic delineation of the prostate and organs-at-risk on magnetic resonance images. Methods and Materials: Manual and automatic delineation were compared in 24 patients using a sagittal T2-weighted (T2-w) turbo spin echo (TSE) sequence and an axial T1-weighted (T1-w) 3D fast-field echo (FFE) or TSE sequence. For automatic prostate delineation, an organ model-based method was used. Prostates without seminal vesicles were delineated as the clinical target volume (CTV). For automatic bladder and rectum delineation, a seeded region-growing method was used. Manual contouring was considered the reference method. The following parameters were measured: volume ratio (Vr) (automatic/manual), volume overlap (Vo) (ratio of the volume of intersection to the volume of union; optimal value = 1), and correctly delineated volume (Vc) (percent ratio of the volume of intersection to the manually defined volume; optimal value 100). Results: For the CTV, the Vr, Vo, and Vc were 1.13 ({+-}0.1 SD), 0.78 ({+-}0.05 SD), and 94.75 ({+-}3.3 SD), respectively. For the rectum, the Vr, Vo, and Vc were 0.97 ({+-}0.1 SD), 0.78 ({+-}0.06 SD), and 86.52 ({+-}5 SD), respectively. For the bladder, the Vr, Vo, and Vc were 0.95 ({+-}0.03 SD), 0.88 ({+-}0.03 SD), and 91.29 ({+-}3.1 SD), respectively. Conclusions: Our results show that the organ-model method is robust, and results in reproducible prostate segmentation with minor interactive corrections. For automatic bladder and rectum delineation, magnetic resonance imaging soft-tissue contrast enables the use of region-growing methods.

  17. Tadalafil for Prevention of Erectile Dysfunction After Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group [0831] Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Pisansky, Thomas M.; Pugh, Stephanie L.; Greenberg, Richard E.; Pervez, Nadeem; Reed, Daniel R.; Rosenthal, Seth A.; Mowat, Rex B.; Raben, Adam; Buyyounouski, Mark K.; Kachnic, Lisa A.; Bruner, Deborah W.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Tadalafil is used to treat erectile dysfunction after prostate cancer treatment, but its role as a preventive agent is undefined. OBJECTIVES To determine primarily whether tadalafil preserved erectile function in men treated with radiotherapy for prostate cancer, and secondarily to determine whether participant- or partner-reported overall sexual function and sexual and marital satisfaction were affected. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Stratified, placebo-controlled, double-blind, parallel-group study with 1:1 randomization at 76 community-based and tertiary medical sites in the United States and Canada. Two hundred forty-two participants with intact erectile function scheduled to receive radiotherapy for prostate cancer were recruited between November 2009 and February 2012 with follow-up through March 2013. INTERVENTIONS One hundred twenty-one participants were assigned 5 mg of tadalafil daily and 121 were assigned placebo for 24 weeks starting with external radiotherapy (63%) or brachytherapy (37%). Participant-reported International Index of Erectile Function response before radiotherapy and at weeks 2 and 4, between weeks 20 and 24, between weeks 28 and 30, and 1 year thereafter. Participants and partners could respond also to the Sexual Adjustment Questionnaire and to the Locke Marital Adjustment Test before radiotherapy, between weeks 20 and 24 and weeks 28 and 30, and at 1 year. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Primary outcome was off-drug spontaneous erectile function 28 to 30 weeks after radiotherapy started. Secondary end points were spontaneous erection at 1 year; overall sexual function and satisfaction; marital adjustment; and partner-reported satisfaction and marital adjustment at 28 to 30 weeks and 1 year, predictors of tadalafil response; and adverse events. RESULTS Among 221 evaluable participants, 80 (79%; 95% CI, 70%–88%) assigned to receive tadalafil retained erectile function between weeks 28 and 30 compared with 61 (74%; 95% CI, 63

  18. Long-Term Outcomes From a Prospective Trial of Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Low-Risk Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    King, Christopher R.; Brooks, James D.; Gill, Harcharan; Presti, Joseph C.

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: Hypofractionated radiotherapy has an intrinsically different normal tissue and tumor radiobiology. The results of a prospective trial of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for prostate cancer with long-term patient-reported toxicity and tumor control rates are presented. Methods and Materials: From 2003 through 2009, 67 patients with clinically localized low-risk prostate cancer were enrolled. Treatment consisted of 36.25 Gy in 5 fractions using SBRT with the CyberKnife as the delivery technology. No patient received hormone therapy. Patient self-reported bladder and rectal toxicities were graded on the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale (RTOG). Results: Median follow-up was 2.7 years. There were no grade 4 toxicities. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 3, 2, and 1 bladder toxicities were seen in 3% (2 patients), 5% (3 patients), and 23% (13 patients) respectively. Dysuria exacerbated by urologic instrumentation accounted for both patients with Grade 3 toxicity. Urinary incontinence, complete obstruction, or persistent hematuria was not observed. Rectal Grade 3, 2, and 1 toxicities were seen in 0, 2% (1 patient), and 12.5% (7 patients), respectively. Persistent rectal bleeding was not observed. Low-grade toxicities were substantially less frequent with QOD vs. QD dose regimen (p = 0.001 for gastrointestinal and p = 0.007 for genitourinary). There were two prostate-specific antigen (PSA), biopsy-proven failures with negative metastatic workup. Median PSA at follow-up was 0.5 {+-} 0.72 ng/mL. The 4-year Kaplan-Meier PSA relapse-free survival was 94% (95% confidence interval, 85%-102%). Conclusion: Significant late bladder and rectal toxicities from SBRT for prostate cancer are infrequent. PSA relapse-free survival compares favorably with other definitive treatments. The current evidence supports consideration of stereotactic body radiotherapy among the therapeutic options for localized prostate cancer.

  19. Dose-distance metric that predicts late rectal bleeding in patients receiving radical prostate external-beam radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Richard; Chan, Elisa K.; Kosztyla, Robert; Liu, Mitchell; Moiseenko, Vitali

    2012-12-01

    The relationship between rectal dose distribution and the incidence of late rectal complications following external-beam radiotherapy has been previously studied using dose-volume histograms or dose-surface histograms. However, they do not account for the spatial dose distribution. This study proposes a metric based on both surface dose and distance that can predict the incidence of rectal bleeding in prostate cancer patients treated with radical radiotherapy. One hundred and forty-four patients treated with radical radiotherapy for prostate cancer were prospectively followed to record the incidence of grade ≥2 rectal bleeding. Radiotherapy plans were used to evaluate a dose-distance metric that accounts for the dose and its spatial distribution on the rectal surface, characterized by a logistic weighting function with slope a and inflection point d0. This was compared to the effective dose obtained from dose-surface histograms, characterized by the parameter n which describes sensitivity to hot spots. The log-rank test was used to determine statistically significant (p < 0.05) cut-off values for the dose-distance metric and effective dose that predict for the occurrence of rectal bleeding. For the dose-distance metric, only d0 = 25 and 30 mm combined with a > 5 led to statistical significant cut-offs. For the effective dose metric, only values of n in the range 0.07-0.35 led to statistically significant cut-offs. The proposed dose-distance metric is a predictor of rectal bleeding in prostate cancer patients treated with radiotherapy. Both the dose-distance metric and the effective dose metric indicate that the incidence of grade ≥2 rectal bleeding is sensitive to localized damage to the rectal surface.

  20. Incidence of late rectal bleeding in high-dose conformal radiotherapy of prostate cancer using equivalent uniform dose-based and dose-volume-based normal tissue complication probability models

    SciTech Connect

    Soehn, Matthias . E-mail: Matthias.Soehn@med.uni-tuebingen.de; Yan Di; Liang Jian; Meldolesi, Elisa; Vargas, Carlos; Alber, Markus

    2007-03-15

    Purpose: Accurate modeling of rectal complications based on dose-volume histogram (DVH) data are necessary to allow safe dose escalation in radiotherapy of prostate cancer. We applied different equivalent uniform dose (EUD)-based and dose-volume-based normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) models to rectal wall DVHs and follow-up data for 319 prostate cancer patients to identify the dosimetric factors most predictive for Grade {>=} 2 rectal bleeding. Methods and Materials: Data for 319 patients treated at the William Beaumont Hospital with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) under an adaptive radiotherapy protocol were used for this study. The following models were considered: (1) Lyman model and (2) logit-formula with DVH reduced to generalized EUD (3) serial reconstruction unit (RU) model (4) Poisson-EUD model, and (5) mean dose- and (6) cutoff dose-logistic regression model. The parameters and their confidence intervals were determined using maximum likelihood estimation. Results: Of the patients, 51 (16.0%) showed Grade 2 or higher bleeding. As assessed qualitatively and quantitatively, the Lyman- and Logit-EUD, serial RU, and Poisson-EUD model fitted the data very well. Rectal wall mean dose did not correlate to Grade 2 or higher bleeding. For the cutoff dose model, the volume receiving > 73.7 Gy showed most significant correlation to bleeding. However, this model fitted the data more poorly than the EUD-based models. Conclusions: Our study clearly confirms a volume effect for late rectal bleeding. This can be described very well by the EUD-like models, of which the serial RU- and Poisson-EUD model can describe the data with only two parameters. Dose-volume-based cutoff-dose models performed wor0008.

  1. The effect of concurrent androgen deprivation and 3D conformal radiotherapy on prostate volume and clinical organ doses during treatment for prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Onal, C; Topkan, E; Efe, E; Yavuz, M; Arslan, G; Yavuz, A

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the shrinking effect of concurrent three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and androgen deprivation (AD) on prostate volume, and its possible impact on the dose received by the rectum and bladder during the course of 3D-CRT. The difference between the prostatic volumes determined on pre-treatment planning CT (PL-CT) and post-treatment CT (PT-CT) following a 3D-CRT course was assessed in 52 patients with localised prostate carcinoma. The changes in mean prostate volume when compared with PL-CT and PT-CT-based measurements were assessed. The pre- and post-treatment mean prostate volumes for the whole study population were 49.7 cm3 and 41.0 cm3 (p _ 0.02), respectively. The study cohort was divided into two groups depending on the duration of neoadjuvant androgen deprivation (NAD): 23 patients (44.7%) were designated as “short NAD” (≤3 months; SNAD) and the remaining 29 (55.3%) as “long NAD” (>3 months; LNAD). Patients on SNAD experienced a significantly greater reduction in prostate volume compared with those on LNAD (14.1% vs 5.1%; p _ 0.03). A significant increase in rectum V40–60 values in PT-CT compared with PL-CT was demonstrated. LNAD patients had significantly higher rectal V50–70 values at PT-CT compared with the SNAD group. There was a significant decline in V30–V75 bladder values in PT-CT compared with PL-CT in the SNAD group. In conclusion, a higher prostate volume reduction during 3D-CRT was demonstrated when RT planning was performed within 3 months of NAD. However, this reduction and daily organ motion may lead to an unpredictable increase in rectal doses. PMID:19581310

  2. Tumor lysis syndrome during radiotherapy for prostate cancer with bone and bone marrow metastases without visceral metastasis.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Muhammet Ali; Kucukoner, Mehmet; Alpagat, Gulistan; Isikdogan, Abdurrahman

    2012-01-01

    A 60-year-old male patient presented to our clinic with metastatic (bone and bone marrow) prostate cancer. Radiotherapy (RT) with a total of 30 Gy was planned in 10 fractions for the painful left shoulder region. On the 6th day of RT, urinary output decreased suddenly and dyspnea developed. Laboratory findings suggested tumor lysis syndrome (TLS). The patient, who showed improvement in overall status and had no requirement for hemodialysis up to this time, developed sudden impairment in overall status, dyspnea, and hypotension on the 11th day of follow-up. Thirty minutes after the development of these symptoms, the patient had a cardiopulmonary arrest and died. At the time of writing this was the fourth case of TLS during RT for solid tumors in adults, the first case of TLS during RT for prostate cancer and the fifth among total cases of prostate cancer in published reports.

  3. Failure-Free Survival and Radiotherapy in Patients With Newly Diagnosed Nonmetastatic Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    James, Nicholas D.; Spears, Melissa R.; Clarke, Noel W.; Dearnaley, David P.; Mason, Malcolm D.; Parker, Christopher C.; Ritchie, Alastair W. S.; Russell, J. Martin; Schiavone, Francesca; Attard, Gerhardt; de Bono, Johann S.; Birtle, Alison; Engeler, Daniel S.; Elliott, Tony; Matheson, David; O’Sullivan, Joe; Pudney, Delia; Srihari, Narayanan; Wallace, Jan; Barber, Jim; Syndikus, Isabel; Parmar, Mahesh K. B.; Sydes, Matthew R.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE The natural history of patients with newly diagnosed high-risk nonmetastatic (M0) prostate cancer receiving hormone therapy (HT) either alone or with standard-of-care radiotherapy (RT) is not well documented. Furthermore, no clinical trial has assessed the role of RT in patients with node-positive (N+) M0 disease. The STAMPEDE Trial includes such individuals, allowing an exploratory multivariate analysis of the impact of radical RT. OBJECTIVE To describe survival and the impact on failure-free survival of RT by nodal involvement in these patients. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Cohort study using data collected for patients allocated to the control arm (standard-of-care only) of the STAMPEDE Trial between October 5, 2005, and May 1, 2014. Outcomes are presented as hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% CIs derived from adjusted Cox models; survival estimates are reported at 2 and 5 years. Participants were high-risk, hormone-naive patients with newly diagnosed M0 prostate cancer starting long-term HT for the first time. Radiotherapy is encouraged in this group, but mandated for patients with node-negative (N0) M0 disease only since November 2011. EXPOSURES Long-term HT either alone or with RT, as per local standard. Planned RT use was recorded at entry. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Failure-free survival (FFS) and overall survival. RESULTS A total of 721 men with newly diagnosed M0 disease were included: median age at entry, 66 (interquartile range [IQR], 61-72) years, median (IQR) prostate-specific antigen level of 43 (18-88) ng/mL. There were 40 deaths (31 owing to prostate cancer) with 17 months’ median follow-up. Two-year survival was 96% (95% CI, 93%-97%) and 2-year FFS, 77% (95% CI, 73%-81%). Median (IQR) FFS was 63 (26 to not reached) months. Time to FFS was worse in patients with N+ disease (HR, 2.02 [95% CI, 1.46-2.81]) than in those with N0 disease. Failure-free survival outcomes favored planned use of RT for patients with both N0M0 (HR, 0.33 [95% CI

  4. Technical Note: MRI only prostate radiotherapy planning using the statistical decomposition algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Siversson, Carl; Nordström, Fredrik; Nilsson, Terese; Nyholm, Tufve; Jonsson, Joakim; Gunnlaugsson, Adalsteinn; Olsson, Lars E.

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: In order to enable a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) only workflow in radiotherapy treatment planning, methods are required for generating Hounsfield unit (HU) maps (i.e., synthetic computed tomography, sCT) for dose calculations, directly from MRI. The Statistical Decomposition Algorithm (SDA) is a method for automatically generating sCT images from a single MR image volume, based on automatic tissue classification in combination with a model trained using a multimodal template material. This study compares dose calculations between sCT generated by the SDA and conventional CT in the male pelvic region. Methods: The study comprised ten prostate cancer patients, for whom a 3D T2 weighted MRI and a conventional planning CT were acquired. For each patient, sCT images were generated from the acquired MRI using the SDA. In order to decouple the effect of variations in patient geometry between imaging modalities from the effect of uncertainties in the SDA, the conventional CT was nonrigidly registered to the MRI to assure that their geometries were well aligned. For each patient, a volumetric modulated arc therapy plan was created for the registered CT (rCT) and recalculated for both the sCT and the conventional CT. The results were evaluated using several methods, including mean average error (MAE), a set of dose-volume histogram parameters, and a restrictive gamma criterion (2% local dose/1 mm). Results: The MAE within the body contour was 36.5 ± 4.1 (1 s.d.) HU between sCT and rCT. Average mean absorbed dose difference to target was 0.0% ± 0.2% (1 s.d.) between sCT and rCT, whereas it was −0.3% ± 0.3% (1 s.d.) between CT and rCT. The average gamma pass rate was 99.9% for sCT vs rCT, whereas it was 90.3% for CT vs rCT. Conclusions: The SDA enables a highly accurate MRI only workflow in prostate radiotherapy planning. The dosimetric uncertainties originating from the SDA appear negligible and are notably lower than the uncertainties

  5. Dose-Effect Relationships for Individual Pelvic Floor Muscles and Anorectal Complaints After Prostate Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Smeenk, Robert Jan; Hoffmann, Aswin L.; Hopman, Wim P.M.; Lin, Emile N.J. Th. van; Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M.

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To delineate the individual pelvic floor muscles considered to be involved in anorectal toxicity and to investigate dose-effect relationships for fecal incontinence-related complaints after prostate radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: In 48 patients treated for localized prostate cancer, the internal anal sphincter (IAS) muscle, the external anal sphincter (EAS) muscle, the puborectalis muscle (PRM), and the levator ani muscles (LAM) in addition to the anal wall (Awall) and rectal wall (Rwall) were retrospectively delineated on planning computed tomography scans. Dose parameters were obtained and compared between patients with and without fecal urgency, incontinence, and frequency. Dose-effect curves were constructed. Finally, the effect of an endorectal balloon, which was applied in 28 patients, was investigated. Results: The total volume of the pelvic floor muscles together was about three times that of the Awall. The PRM was exposed to the highest RT dose, whereas the EAS received the lowest dose. Several anal and rectal dose parameters, as well as doses to all separate pelvic floor muscles, were associated with urgency, while incontinence was associated mainly with doses to the EAS and PRM. Based on the dose-effect curves, the following constraints regarding mean doses could be deduced to reduce the risk of urgency: {<=}30 Gy to the IAS; {<=}10 Gy to the EAS; {<=}50 Gy to the PRM; and {<=}40 Gy to the LAM. No dose-effect relationships for frequency were observed. Patients treated with an endorectal balloon reported significantly less urgency and incontinence, while their treatment plans showed significantly lower doses to the Awall, Rwall, and all pelvic floor muscles. Conclusions: Incontinence-related complaints show specific dose-effect relationships to individual pelvic floor muscles. Dose constraints for each muscle can be identified for RT planning. When only the Awall is delineated, substantial components of the continence apparatus are

  6. Variation in Adherence to External Beam Radiotherapy Quality Measures Among Elderly Men With Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bekelman, Justin E. Zelefsky, Michael J.; Jang, Thomas L.; Basch, Ethan M.; Schrag, Deborah

    2007-12-01

    Purpose: To characterize the variation in adherence to quality measures of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for localized prostate cancer and its relation to patient and provider characteristics in a population-based, representative sample of U.S. men. Methods and Materials: We evaluated EBRT quality measures proposed by a RAND expert panel of physicians among men aged {>=}65 years diagnosed between 2000 and 2002 with localized prostate cancer and treated with primary EBRT using data from the linked Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare program. We assessed the adherence to five EBRT quality measures that were amenable to analysis using SEER-Medicare data: (1) use of conformal RT planning; (2) use of high-energy (>10-MV) photons; (3) use of custom immobilization; (4) completion of two follow-up visits with a radiation oncologist in the year after therapy; and (5) radiation oncologist board certification. Results: Of the 11,674 patients, 85% had received conformal RT planning, 75% had received high-energy photons, and 97% had received custom immobilization. One-third of patients had completed two follow-up visits with a radiation oncologist, although 91% had at least one visit with a urologist or radiation oncologist. Most patients (85%) had been treated by a board-certified radiation oncologist. Conclusions: The overall high adherence to EBRT quality measures masked substantial variation in geography, socioeconomic status in the area of residence, and teaching affiliation of the RT facility. Future research should examine the reasons for the variations in these measures and whether the variation is associated with important clinical outcomes.

  7. Pathological Predictors for Site of Local Recurrence After Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, Supriya; Toi, Ants; Taback, Nathan; Evans, Andrew; Haider, Masoom A.; Milosevic, Michael; Bristow, Robert G.; Chung, Peter; Bayley, Andrew; Morton, Gerard; Vesprini, Danny; Warde, Padraig; Catton, Charles; Menard, Cynthia

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: Rational design of targeted radiotherapy (RT) in prostate cancer (Pca) hinges on a better understanding of spatial patterns of recurrence. We sought to identify pathological factors predictive for site of local recurrence (LR) after external beam RT. Methods and Materials: Prospective databases were reviewed to identify men with LR after RT from 1997 through 2009. Patients with biochemical failure and biopsy-confirmed Pca more than 2 years after RT were evaluated. Prediction for site of recurrence based on the following pretreatment factors was determined on independent and cluster-sextant basis: presence of malignancy, dominant vs. nondominant percentage core length (PCL) involvement, PCL {>=} or <40%, and Gleason score. Sites of dominant PCL were defined as sextants with peak PCL involvement minus 10%, and >5% for each patient. Results: Forty-one patients with low-intermediate risk Pca constituted the study cohort. Median time to biopsy after RT was 51 months (range, 24-145). Of 246 sextants, 74 were involved with tumor at baseline. When sextants are treated as independent observations the presence of malignancy (77% vs. 22%, p = 0.0001), dominant PCL (90% vs. 46%, p = 0.0001), and PCL {>=}40% (89% vs. 68 %, p = 0.04) were found to be significant predictors for LR, although PCL {>=}40% did not retain statistical significance if sextants were considered correlated. The vast majority of patients (95%) recurred at the original site of dominant PCL or PCL {>=}40%, and 44% also recurred in regions of nondominant PCL <40% (n = 8) and/or benign sampling (n = 14) at baseline. Conclusions: LR after RT predominantly occurs in regions bearing higher histological tumor burden but are not isolated to these sites. Our data highlights the value of spatially resolved baseline pathological sampling and may assist in the design of clinical trials tailoring RT dose prescriptions to subregions of the prostate gland.

  8. SU-E-J-83: CBCT Based Rectum and Bladder Dose Tracking in the Prostate Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Z; Wang, J; Yang, Z; Hu, W

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to monitor the volume changes of bladder and rectum and evaluate the dosimetric changes of bladder and rectum using daily cone-beam CT for prostate radiotherapy. Methods: The data of this study were obtained from 12 patients, totally 222 CBCTs. All the volume of the bladder and the rectum on the CBCT were normalized to the bladder and the rectum on their own original CT to monitory the volume changes. To evaluate dose delivered to the OARs, volumes that receive 70Gy (V70Gy), 60Gy, 50Gy, 40Gy and 30Gy are calculated for the bladder and the rectum, V20Gy and V10Gy for rectum additionally. And the deviation of the mean dose to the bladder and the rectum are also chosen as the evaluation parameter. Linear regression analysis was performed to identify the mean dose change of the volume change using SPSS 19. Results: The results show that the variances of the normalize volume of the bladder and the rectum are 0.15–0.58 and 0.13–0.50. The variances of V70Gy, V60Gy, V50Gy, V40Gy and V30Gy of bladder are bigger than rectum for 11 patients. The linear regression analysis indicated a negative correlation between the volume and the mean dose of the bladder (p < 0.05). A 10% increase in bladder volume will cause 5.1% (±4.3%) reduction in mean dose. Conclusion: The bladder volume change is more significant than that for rectum for the prostate cancer patient. The volume changes of rectum are not significant except air gap in the rectum. Bladder volume varies will cause significant dose change. The bladder volume monitoring before fractional treatment delivery would be crucial for accuracy dose delivery.

  9. Celastrol Potentiates Radiotherapy by Impairment of DNA Damage Processing in Human Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Dai Yao; DeSano, Jeffrey T.; Meng Yang; J, Qing; Ljungman, Mats; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Xu Liang

    2009-07-15

    Purpose: Celastrol is an active ingredient of traditional herbal medicine and has recently been identified as a potent natural proteasome inhibitor. In the present study, we evaluated the radiosensitizing potential of celastrol in the human prostate cancer PC-3 model. Methods and Materials: Clonogenic assays were performed to determine the radiosensitizing effect of celastrol. Apoptosis was examined by flow cytometry using Annexin V and propidium iodide staining and by a caspase-3 activation assay. DNA damage processing was examined by immunofluorescent staining and Western blot for phosphorylated H2AX ({gamma}H2AX). The PC-3 xenograft model in the athymic nude mouse was used for the determination of the in vivo efficacy of celastrol combined with radiotherapy. The tumor samples were also analyzed for apoptosis and angiogenesis. Results: Celastrol sensitized PC-3 cells to ionizing radiation (IR) in a dose- and schedule-dependent manner, in which pretreatment with celastrol for 1 h followed by IR achieved maximal radiosensitization. Celastrol significantly prolonged the presence of IR-induced {gamma}H2AX and increased IR-induced apoptosis. Celastrol, combined with fractionated radiation, significantly inhibited PC-3 tumor growth in vivo without obvious systemic toxicity. The combination treatment increased {gamma}H2AX levels and apoptosis, induced cleavage of poly(adenosine diphosphate-ribose)polymerase and Mcl-1, and reduced angiogenesis in vivo compared with either treatment alone. Conclusion: Celastrol sensitized PC-3 cells to radiation both in vitro and in vivo by impairing DNA damage processing and augmenting apoptosis. Celastrol might represent a promising new adjuvant regimen for the treatment of hormone-refractory prostate cancer.

  10. Radiotherapy treatment of early stage prostate cancer with IMRT and protons: a treatment planning comparison

    PubMed Central

    Trofimov, Alexei; Nguyen, Paul L.; Coen, John J.; Doppke, Karen P.; Schneider, Robert J.; Adams, Judith A.; Bortfeld, Thomas R.; Zietman, Anthony L.; DeLaney, Thomas F.; Shipley, William U.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To compare intensity-modulated photon radiotherapy (IMRT) with 3D-conformal proton therapy (3D-CPT) for early stage prostate cancer, and explore the potential utility of intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT). Methods Ten patients were planned with both 3D-CPT (2 parallel-opposed lateral fields) and IMRT (7 equally spaced coplanar fields). Prescribed dose was 79.2 Gy (or cobalt Gray-equivalent, CGE for protons) to the prostate gland. Dose-volume histograms, dose conformity, and equivalent uniform dose (EUD) were compared. Additionally, plans were optimized for 3D-CPT with non-standard beam configuration, and for IMPT assuming delivery with beam scanning. Results At least 98% of the PTV received the prescription dose. IMRT plans yielded better dose conformity to the target, while proton plans achieved higher dose homogeneity, and better sparing of rectum and bladder in the range below 30 Gy/CGE. Bladder volumes receiving over 70 Gy/CGE (V70) were reduced, on average, by 34% with IMRT vs. 3D-CPT, while rectal V70 were equivalent. EUD from 3D-CPT and IMRT plans were indistinguishable within uncertainties, for both bladder and rectum. With the use of small-angle lateral-oblique fields in 3D-CPT and IMPT, the rectal V70 was reduced by up to 35% compared to the standard lateral configuration, while the bladder V70 increased by less than 10%. Conclusions In the range over 60 Gy/CGE, IMRT achieved significantly better sparing of the bladder, while rectal sparing was similar with 3D-CPT and IMRT. Dose to healthy tissues in the range below 50% of the target prescription was substantially lower with proton therapy. PMID:17513063

  11. A survival model for fractionated radiotherapy with an application to prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaider, Marco; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Hanin, Leonid G.; Tsodikov, Alexander D.; Yakovlev, Andrei Y.; Leibel, Steven A.

    2001-10-01

    time decreases (41, 28.5, 26.2 and 14.7 months for dose groups 1-4, respectively). This analysis confirms that, in terms of cure rate, dose escalation has a significant positive effect only in the intermediate and unfavourable groups. It was found that progression time is inversely proportional to dose, which means that patients recurring in higher dose groups have shorter recurrence times, yet these groups have better survival, particularly long-term. The explanation for this seemingly illogical observation lies in the fact that less aggressive tumours, potentially recurring after a long period of time, are cured by higher doses and do not contribute to the recurrence pattern. As a result, patients in higher dose groups are less likely to recur; however, if they do, they tend to recur earlier. The estimated hazard rates for prostate cancer pass through a clear-cut maximum, thus revealing a time period with especially high values of instantaneous cancer-specific risk; the estimates appear to be nonproportional across dose strata.

  12. Quality assessment for VMAT prostate radiotherapy planning based on data envelopment analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Kuan-Min; Simpson, John; Sasso, Giuseppe; Raith, Andrea; Ehrgott, Matthias

    2013-08-01

    The majority of commercial radiotherapy treatment planning systems requires planners to iteratively adjust the plan parameters in order to find a satisfactory plan. This iterative trial-and-error nature of radiotherapy treatment planning results in an inefficient planning process and in order to reduce such inefficiency, plans can be accepted without achieving the best attainable quality. We propose a quality assessment method based on data envelopment analysis (DEA) to address this inefficiency. This method compares a plan of interest to a set of past delivered plans and searches for evidence of potential further improvement. With the assistance of DEA, planners will be able to make informed decisions on whether further planning is required and ensure that a plan is only accepted when the plan quality is close to the best attainable one. We apply the DEA method to 37 prostate plans using two assessment parameters: rectal generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) as the input and D95 (the minimum dose that is received by 95% volume of a structure) of the planning target volume (PTV) as the output. The percentage volume of rectum overlapping PTV is used to account for anatomical variations between patients and is included in the model as a non-discretionary output variable. Five plans that are considered of lesser quality by DEA are re-optimized with the goal to further improve rectal sparing. After re-optimization, all five plans improve in rectal gEUD without clinically considerable deterioration of the PTV D95 value. For the five re-optimized plans, the rectal gEUD is reduced by an average of 1.84 Gray (Gy) with only an average reduction of 0.07 Gy in PTV D95. The results demonstrate that DEA can correctly identify plans with potential improvements in terms of the chosen input and outputs.

  13. A monte carlo comparison of three different media for contrast enhanced radiotherapy of the prostate.

    PubMed

    Garnica-Garza, H M

    2010-06-01

    Contrast-enhanced radiotherapy makes use of a kilovoltage X-ray beam, either from a diagnostic X-ray tube or modified megavoltage linear accelerator, in conjunction with a high-Z contrast medium deposited into the target volume to enhance the absorption of radiation. In this work, using the Monte Carlo code PENELOPE and the voxelized Zubal phantom to model a prostate radiotherapy treatment, a comparison between the physical absorbed dose distributions rendered by three different enhancing agents namely bismuth, gadolinium, and iodine is performed. It is assumed that there exists a concentration of 10 mg of enhancing agent per 1 g of tissue in the target volume while in the background a concentration of 1.5 mg per 1 g of tissue is present. The X-ray beam energy spectrum was obtained by means of Monte Carlo simulation of a tungsten target upon which a 220 keV mono-energetic electron pencil beam is made to impinge, and the resultant photon beam is heavily filtrated by 0.2 cm of copper. The treatment delivery is simulated as a 3608 arc collimated to conform to the target from every direction. Cumulative dose-volume histograms and isodose curves are presented for the target as well as five organs-at-risk, namely rectal wall, bladder, femoral heads, skin, and bone marrow. It is shown that under these conditions clinically acceptable treatment plans are obtained for all three contrast agents. A 72 Gy dose to 100% of the target volume results in maximum absorbed doses to the above mentioned organs-at-risk of 65, 56, 44, 32 and 65 Gy respectively when bismuth is used as the contrast agent, but the results obtained with gadolinium follow closely.

  14. Effectiveness of Educational Intervention on the Congruence of Prostate and Rectal Contouring as Compared With a Gold Standard in Three-Dimensional Radiotherapy for Prostate

    SciTech Connect

    Szumacher, Ewa; Harnett, Nicole; Warner, Saar; Kelly, Valerie; Danjoux, Cyril; Barker, Ruth; Woo, Milton; Mah, Kathy; Ackerman, Ida; Dubrowski, Adam; Rose, Stuart; Crook, Juanita

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: To examine effects of a teaching intervention on precise delineation of the prostate and rectum during planning of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: A pretest, posttest, randomized controlled group design was used. During pretest all participants contoured prostate and rectum on planning CT. Afterward, they participated in two types of workshops. The experimental group engaged in an interactive teaching session focused on prostate and rectum MR anatomy compared with CT anatomy. The control group focused on 3D-CRT planning without mention of prostate or rectal contouring. The experimental group practiced on fused MR-CT images, whereas the control group practiced on CT images. All participants completed the posttest. Results: Thirty-one trainees (12 male, 19 female) were randomly assigned to two groups, 17 in the experimental arm, and 14 in the control group. Seventeen felt familiar or very familiar with pelvic organ contouring, 12 somewhat, and 2 had never done it. Thirteen felt confident with organ contouring, 13 somewhat, and 5 not confident. The demographics and composition of groups were analyzed with chi{sup 2} and repeated-measures analysis of variance with the two groups (experimental or control) and two tests (pre- or posttest) as factors. Satisfaction with the course and long-term effects of the course on practice were assessed with immediate and delayed surveys. All performance variables showed a similar pattern of results. Conclusions: The training sessions improved the technical performance similarly in both groups. Participants were satisfied with the course content, and the delayed survey reflected that cognitively participants felt more confident with prostate and rectum contouring and would investigate opportunities to learn more about organ contouring.

  15. The proportion of prostate biopsy tissue with Gleason pattern 4 or 5 predicts for biochemical and clinical outcome after radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    D'Ambrosio, David J.; Hanlon, Alexandra L.; Al-Saleem, Tahseen; Feigenberg, Steven J.; Horwitz, Eric M.; Uzzo, Robert G.; Pollack, Alan; Buyyounouski, Mark K. . E-mail: mark.buyyounouski@fccc.edu

    2007-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate the prognostic utility of the proportion of prostate biopsy tissue containing Gleason pattern 4 or 5 (GP4/5) after definitive radiotherapy (RT) for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 568 patients with T1c-3 Nx/0 prostate cancer who received three-dimensional conformal RT alone between May 1989 and August 2001 were studied. There were 161 men with Gleason score 7-10 disease. The GP4/5 was defined as the percentage of biopsy tissue containing Gleason pattern 4 or 5. A Cox proportional hazards model was used for univariate and multivariate analyses (MVA) for biochemical failure (BF) (American Society of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology definition) and distant metastasis (DM). A recursive partitioning analysis was done using the results of the MVA to identify a cutpoint for GP4/5. Results: The median follow-up was 46 (range, 13-114) months and median RT dose was 76 (range, 65-82) Gy. On MVA, increasing initial prostate-specific antigen (p = 0.0248) decreasing RT dose (continuous, p = 0.0022), T stage (T1/2 vs. T3) (p = 0.0136) and GP4/5 (continuous, p < 0.0001) were significant predictors of BF in a model also containing GS. GP4/5 was the only significant predictor of DM in the same model (p < 0.0001). Conclusion: The GP4/5 in prostate biopsy specimens is a predictor of BF and DM after RT independent of Gleason score. This parameter should be reported by the pathologist when reviewing prostatic biopsy specimens.

  16. Concurrent segmentation of the prostate on MRI and CT via linked statistical shape models for radiotherapy planning

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhury, Najeeb; Toth, Robert; Chappelow, Jonathan; Kim, Sung; Motwani, Sabin; Punekar, Salman; Lin Haibo; Both, Stefan; Vapiwala, Neha; Hahn, Stephen; Madabhushi, Anant

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: Prostate gland segmentation is a critical step in prostate radiotherapy planning, where dose plans are typically formulated on CT. Pretreatment MRI is now beginning to be acquired at several medical centers. Delineation of the prostate on MRI is acknowledged as being significantly simpler to perform, compared to delineation on CT. In this work, the authors present a novel framework for building a linked statistical shape model (LSSM), a statistical shape model (SSM) that links the shape variation of a structure of interest (SOI) across multiple imaging modalities. This framework is particularly relevant in scenarios where accurate boundary delineations of the SOI on one of the modalities may not be readily available, or difficult to obtain, for training a SSM. In this work the authors apply the LSSM in the context of multimodal prostate segmentation for radiotherapy planning, where the prostate is concurrently segmented on MRI and CT. Methods: The framework comprises a number of logically connected steps. The first step utilizes multimodal registration of MRI and CT to map 2D boundary delineations of the prostate from MRI onto corresponding CT images, for a set of training studies. Hence, the scheme obviates the need for expert delineations of the gland on CT for explicitly constructing a SSM for prostate segmentation on CT. The delineations of the prostate gland on MRI and CT allows for 3D reconstruction of the prostate shape which facilitates the building of the LSSM. In order to perform concurrent prostate MRI and CT segmentation using the LSSM, the authors employ a region-based level set approach where the authors deform the evolving prostate boundary to simultaneously fit to MRI and CT images in which voxels are classified to be either part of the prostate or outside the prostate. The classification is facilitated by using a combination of MRI-CT probabilistic spatial atlases and a random forest classifier, driven by gradient and Haar features

  17. A population-based model to describe geometrical uncertainties in radiotherapy: applied to prostate cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budiarto, E.; Keijzer, M.; Storchi, P. R.; Hoogeman, M. S.; Bondar, L.; Mutanga, T. F.; de Boer, H. C. J.; Heemink, A. W.

    2011-02-01

    Local motions and deformations of organs between treatment fractions introduce geometrical uncertainties into radiotherapy. These uncertainties are generally taken into account in the treatment planning by enlarging the radiation target by a margin around the clinical target volume. However, a practical method to fully include these uncertainties is still lacking. This paper proposes a model based on the principal component analysis to describe the patient-specific local probability distributions of voxel motions so that the average values and variances of the dose distribution can be calculated and fully used later in inverse treatment planning. As usually only a very limited number of data for new patients is available; in this paper the analysis is extended to use population data. A basic assumption (which is justified retrospectively in this paper) is that general movements and deformations of a specific organ are similar despite variations in the shapes of the organ over the population. A proof of principle of the method for deformations of the prostate and the seminal vesicles is presented.

  18. The Role of Radiotherapy After Radical Prostatectomy in Patients with Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Gandaglia, Giorgio; Cozzarini, Cesare; Mottrie, Alexandre; Bossi, Alberto; Fossati, Nicola; Montorsi, Francesco; Briganti, Alberto

    2015-12-01

    A non-negligible proportion of prostate cancer (PCa) patients undergoing radical prostatectomy (RP) harbors aggressive disease. These individuals are at higher risk of experiencing recurrence after surgery. Results from prospective, randomized trials support the efficacy of adjuvant radiotherapy (aRT) on cancer control in selected patients with adverse disease features at RP. However, only one of these randomized trials found a significant benefit of aRT on survival. Although such a level of evidence is not currently available for salvage RT, retrospective studies demonstrated that this approach leads to excellent outcomes if administered at the earliest sign of PSA recurrence. Prognostic models might help clinicians in identifying patients who would benefit the most from adjuvant and/or salvage RT. This individualized approach would allow sparing the risk of short- and long-term toxicity in a substantial proportion of patients. Nonetheless, results from randomized trials are still awaited to compare the efficacy of (early) salvage and aRT. PMID:26449841

  19. Planning Target Margin Calculations for Prostate Radiotherapy Based on Intrafraction and Interfraction Motion Using Four Localization Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Beltran, Chris Herman, Michael G.; Davis, Brian J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To determine planning target volume (PTV) margins for prostate radiotherapy based on the internal margin (IM) (intrafractional motion) and the setup margin (SM) (interfractional motion) for four daily localization methods: skin marks (tattoo), pelvic bony anatomy (bone), intraprostatic gold seeds using a 5-mm action threshold, and using no threshold. Methods and Materials: Forty prostate cancer patients were treated with external radiotherapy according to an online localization protocol using four intraprostatic gold seeds and electronic portal images (EPIs). Daily localization and treatment EPIs were obtained. These data allowed inter- and intrafractional analysis of prostate motion. The SM for the four daily localization methods and the IM were determined. Results: A total of 1532 fractions were analyzed. Tattoo localization requires a SM of 6.8 mm left-right (LR), 7.2 mm inferior-superior (IS), and 9.8 mm anterior-posterior (AP). Bone localization requires 3.1, 8.9, and 10.7 mm, respectively. The 5-mm threshold localization requires 4.0, 3.9, and 3.7 mm. No threshold localization requires 3.4, 3.2, and 3.2 mm. The intrafractional prostate motion requires an IM of 2.4 mm LR, 3.4 mm IS and AP. The PTV margin using the 5-mm threshold, including interobserver uncertainty, IM, and SM, is 4.8 mm LR, 5.4 mm IS, and 5.2 mm AP. Conclusions: Localization based on EPI with implanted gold seeds allows a large PTV margin reduction when compared with tattoo localization. Except for the LR direction, bony anatomy localization does not decrease the margins compared with tattoo localization. Intrafractional prostate motion is a limiting factor on margin reduction.

  20. Radical External Beam Radiotherapy for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer in Japan: Changing Trends in the Patterns of Care Process Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Kazuhiko; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Sasaki, Tomonari; Onishi, Hiroshi; Koizumi, Masahiko; Araya, Masayuki; Mukumoto, Nobutaka; Teshima, Teruki; Mitsumori, Michihide

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To delineate changing trends in radical external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for prostate cancer in Japan. Methods and Materials: Data from 841 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer treated with EBRT in the Japanese Patterns of Care Study (PCS) from 1996 to 2005 were analyzed. Results: Significant increases in the proportions of patients with stage T1 to T2 disease and decrease in prostate-specific antigen values were observed. Also, there were significant increases in the percentages of patients treated with radiotherapy by their own choice. Median radiation doses were 65.0 Gy and 68.4 Gy from 1996 to 1998 and from 1999 to 2001, respectively, increasing to 70 Gy from 2003 to 2005. Moreover, conformal therapy was more frequently used from 2003 to 2005 (84.9%) than from 1996 to 1998 (49.1%) and from 1999 to 2001 (50.2%). On the other hand, the percentage of patients receiving hormone therapy from 2003 to 2005 (81.1%) was almost the same as that from 1996 to 1998 (86.3%) and from 1999 to 2001 (89.7%). Compared with the PCS in the United States, patient characteristics and patterns of treatments from 2003 to 2005 have become more similar to those in the United States than those from 1996 to 1998 and those from 1999 to 2001. Conclusions: This study indicates a trend toward increasing numbers of patients with early-stage disease and increasing proportions of patients treated with higher radiation doses with advanced equipment among Japanese prostate cancer patients treated with EBRT during 1996 to 2005 survey periods. Patterns of care for prostate cancer in Japan are becoming more similar to those in the United States.

  1. Long-Term Outcome and Toxicity of Salvage Brachytherapy for Local Failure After Initial Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Burri, Ryan J.; Stone, Nelson N.; Unger, Pam; Stock, Richard G.

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: To describe long-term outcomes and toxicity after salvage brachytherapy (BT) for local failure after initial radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between 1994 and 2008, 37 men with local failure after initial prostate radiotherapy (32 external-beam radiation therapy [EBRT] and 5 BT) underwent salvage BT with {sup 103}Pd or {sup 125}I. Estimates of freedom from biochemical failure (FFbF, Phoenix definition) and cause-specific survival (CSS) were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Toxicities were graded using CTCv3.0. Results: Median follow-up was 86 months (range, 2-156). The median dose to 90% of the prostate volume was 122 Gy (range, 67-166). The 10-year FFbF and CSS were 54% and 96%, respectively. On univariate analysis, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) >10 ng/mL at initial diagnosis was significantly associated with FFbF (p = 0.01), and there were trends for both age <70 years (p = 0.08) and PSA <6 ng/mL (p = 0.08) at the time of salvage BT. On multivariate analysis, only presalvage PSA <6 ng/mL (p = 0.046) was significantly associated with improved FFbF. There were three Grade 3 toxicities and one Grade 4 toxicity. Pelvic lymph node dissection before salvage BT was the only variable significantly associated with Grade {>=}2 toxicity (p = 0.03). Conclusion: With a median follow-up of 86 months, salvage prostate BT was associated with a 10-year FFbF of 54% and CSS of 96%. Improved FFbF was associated with a presalvage PSA <6 ng/mL. Toxicity was worse in patients who had undergone pelvic lymph node dissection before salvage BT. Careful patient selection for salvage BT may result in improved outcomes and reduced toxicity.

  2. Radiotherapy Doses of 80 Gy and Higher Are Associated With Lower Mortality in Men With Gleason Score 8 to 10 Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Pahlajani, Niraj; Ruth, Karen J.; Buyyounouski, Mark K.; Chen, David Y.T.; Horwitz, Eric M.; Hanks, Gerald E.; Price, Robert A.; Pollack, Alan

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: Men with Gleason score (GS) 8-10 prostate cancer (PCa) are assumed to have a high risk of micrometastatic disease at presentation. However, local failure is also a major problem. We sought to establish the importance of more aggressive local radiotherapy (RT) to {>=}80 Gy. Methods and Materials: There were 226 men treated consecutively with RT {+-} ADT from 1988 to 2002 for GS 8-10 PCa. Conventional, three-dimensional conformal or intensity-modulated (IM) RT was used. Radiation dose was divided into three groups: (1) <75 Gy (n = 50); (2) 75-79.9 Gy (n = 60); or (3) {>=}80 Gy (n = 116). The endpoints examined included biochemical failure (BF; nadir + 2 definition), distant metastasis (DM), cause-specific mortality, and overall mortality (OM). Results: Median follow-up was 66, 71, and 58 months for Groups 1, 2, and 3. On Fine and Gray's competing risk regression analysis, significant predictors of reduced BF were RT dose {>=}80 Gy (p = 0.011) and androgen deprivation therapy duration {>=}24 months (p = 0.033). In a similar model of DM, only RT dose {>=}80 Gy was significant (p = 0.007). On Cox regression analysis, significant predictors of reduced OM were RT dose {>=}80 Gy (p = 0.035) and T category (T3/4 vs. T1, p = 0.041). Dose was not a significant determinant of cause-specific mortality. Results for RT dose were similar in a model with RT dose and ADT duration as continuous variables. Conclusion: The results indicate that RT dose escalation to {>=}80 Gy is associated with lower risks of BF, DM, and OM in men with GS 8-10 PCa, independently of androgen deprivation therapy.

  3. CSF1R signaling blockade stanches tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells and improves the efficacy of radiotherapy in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jingying; Escamilla, Jemima; Mok, Stephen; David, John; Priceman, Saul; West, Brian; Bollag, Gideon; McBride, William; Wu, Lily

    2013-05-01

    Radiotherapy is used to treat many types of cancer, but many treated patients relapse with local tumor recurrence. Tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells (TIM), including CD11b (ITGAM)(+)F4/80 (EMR1)+ tumor-associated macrophages (TAM), and CD11b(+)Gr-1 (LY6G)+ myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC), respond to cancer-related stresses and play critical roles in promoting tumor angiogenesis, tissue remodeling, and immunosuppression. In this report, we used a prostate cancer model to investigate the effects of irradiation on TAMs and MDSCs in tumor-bearing animals. Unexpectedly, when primary tumor sites were irradiated, we observed a systemic increase of MDSCs in spleen, lung, lymph nodes, and peripheral blood. Cytokine analysis showed that the macrophage colony-stimulating factor CSF1 increased by two-fold in irradiated tumors. Enhanced macrophage migration induced by conditioned media from irradiated tumor cells was completely blocked by a selective inhibitor of CSF1R. These findings were confirmed in patients with prostate cancer, where serum levels of CSF1 increased after radiotherapy. Mechanistic investigations revealed the recruitment of the DNA damage-induced kinase ABL1 into cell nuclei where it bound the CSF1 gene promoter and enhanced CSF1 gene transcription. When added to radiotherapy, a selective inhibitor of CSF1R suppressed tumor growth more effectively than irradiation alone. Our results highlight the importance of CSF1/CSF1R signaling in the recruitment of TIMs that can limit the efficacy of radiotherapy. Furthermore, they suggest that CSF1 inhibitors should be evaluated in clinical trials in combination with radiotherapy as a strategy to improve outcomes.

  4. Monte Carlo Simulations for Dosimetry in Prostate Radiotherapy with Different Intravesical Volumes and Planning Target Volume Margins

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Wei; Yu, Dong; He, Hengda; Liu, Qian

    2016-01-01

    In prostate radiotherapy, the influence of bladder volume variation on the dose absorbed by the target volume and organs at risk is significant and difficult to predict. In addition, the resolution of a typical medical image is insufficient for visualizing the bladder wall, which makes it more difficult to precisely evaluate the dose to the bladder wall. This simulation study aimed to quantitatively investigate the relationship between the dose received by organs at risk and the intravesical volume in prostate radiotherapy. The high-resolution Visible Chinese Human phantom and the finite element method were used to construct 10 pelvic models with specific intravesical volumes ranging from 100 ml to 700 ml to represent bladders of patients with different bladder filling capacities during radiotherapy. This series of models was utilized in six-field coplanar 3D conformal radiotherapy simulations with different planning target volume (PTV) margins. Each organ’s absorbed dose was calculated using the Monte Carlo method. The obtained bladder wall displacements during bladder filling were consistent with reported clinical measurements. The radiotherapy simulation revealed a linear relationship between the dose to non-targeted organs and the intravesical volume and indicated that a 10-mm PTV margin for a large bladder and a 5-mm PTV margin for a small bladder reduce the effective dose to the bladder wall to similar degrees. However, larger bladders were associated with evident protection of the intestines. Detailed dosimetry results can be used by radiation oncologists to create more accurate, individual water preload protocols according to the patient’s anatomy and bladder capacity. PMID:27441944

  5. Monte Carlo Simulations for Dosimetry in Prostate Radiotherapy with Different Intravesical Volumes and Planning Target Volume Margins.

    PubMed

    Lv, Wei; Yu, Dong; He, Hengda; Liu, Qian

    2016-01-01

    In prostate radiotherapy, the influence of bladder volume variation on the dose absorbed by the target volume and organs at risk is significant and difficult to predict. In addition, the resolution of a typical medical image is insufficient for visualizing the bladder wall, which makes it more difficult to precisely evaluate the dose to the bladder wall. This simulation study aimed to quantitatively investigate the relationship between the dose received by organs at risk and the intravesical volume in prostate radiotherapy. The high-resolution Visible Chinese Human phantom and the finite element method were used to construct 10 pelvic models with specific intravesical volumes ranging from 100 ml to 700 ml to represent bladders of patients with different bladder filling capacities during radiotherapy. This series of models was utilized in six-field coplanar 3D conformal radiotherapy simulations with different planning target volume (PTV) margins. Each organ's absorbed dose was calculated using the Monte Carlo method. The obtained bladder wall displacements during bladder filling were consistent with reported clinical measurements. The radiotherapy simulation revealed a linear relationship between the dose to non-targeted organs and the intravesical volume and indicated that a 10-mm PTV margin for a large bladder and a 5-mm PTV margin for a small bladder reduce the effective dose to the bladder wall to similar degrees. However, larger bladders were associated with evident protection of the intestines. Detailed dosimetry results can be used by radiation oncologists to create more accurate, individual water preload protocols according to the patient's anatomy and bladder capacity.

  6. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Causes Fewer Side Effects than Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy When Used in Combination With Brachytherapy for the Treatment of Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Forsythe, Kevin; Blacksburg, Seth; Stone, Nelson; Stock, Richard G.

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To measure the benefits of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) compared with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) when used in combination with brachytherapy for the treatment of prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We conducted a retrospective review of all patients with localized prostate cancer who received external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) in combination with brachytherapy with at least 1 year follow-up (n = 812). Combination therapy consisted of {sup 103}Pd or {sup 125}I implant, followed by a course of EBRT. From 1993 to March 2003 521 patients were treated with 3D-CRT, and from April 2003 to March 2009 291 patients were treated with IMRT. Urinary symptoms were prospectively measured with the International Prostate Symptom Score questionnaire with a single quality of life (QOL) question; rectal bleeding was assessed per the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Late Radiation Morbidity Scoring Schema. The Pearson {chi}{sup 2} test was used to compare toxicities experienced by patients who were treated with either IMRT or 3D-CRT. Logistic regression analyses were also performed to rule out possible confounding factors. Results: Within the first 3 months after treatment, patients treated with 3D-CRT scored their urinary symptoms as follows: 19% mild, 44% moderate, and 37% severe; patients treated with IMRT scored their urinary symptoms as follows: 36% mild, 47% moderate, and 17% severe (p < 0.001). The 3D-CRT patients rated their QOL as follows: 35% positive, 20% neutral, and 45% negative; IMRT patients rated their QOL as follows: 51% positive, 18% neutral, and 31% negative (p < 0.001). After 1 year of follow-up there was no longer any difference in urinary morbidity between the two groups. Logistic regression confirmed the differences in International Prostate Symptom Score and QOL in the acute setting (p < 0.001 for both). Grade {>=}2 rectal bleeding was reported by 11% of 3D

  7. Effect of intrafractional prostate motion on simultaneous boost intensity-modulated radiotherapy to the prostate: a simulation study based on intrafractional motion in the prone position.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Itaru; Mizowaki, Takashi; Ono, Tomohiro; Yamada, Masahiro; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Monzen, Hajime; Yano, Shinsuke; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    Although the prostate displacement of patients in the prone position is affected by respiration-induced motion, the effect of intrafractional prostate motion in the prone position during "simultaneous integrated boost intensity-modulated radiotherapy" (SIB-IMRT) is unclear. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the dosimetric effects of intrafractional motion on SIB-IMRT to a dominant intraprostatic lesion (IPL) using measured motion data of patients in a prone position, fixed with a thermoplastic shell. We obtained 2 orthogonal x-ray fluoroscopic images at the same moment every 0.2 seconds for 30 seconds before and after treatment, once weekly, from 7 patients with localized prostate cancer with detectable prostatic calcification. Prostate displacements in the left-right (LR), anteroposterior (AP), and superoinferior (SI) directions were calculated using the prostatic calcification as a fiducial marker. We defined the displacement between pretreatment and posttreatment as baseline drift (BD). An SIB-IMRT plan was generated in which each IPL + 3mm received a dose of 94.5Gy, whereas the remainder of the prostate + 7mm received a dose of 75.6Gy in 9 fields. A simulated plan of dose blurring was generated by the convolution of isocenter-shifted plans using measured motion data in 30 seconds and motion in 30 seconds + distance between pretreatment and posttreatment position (BD) for each of the 7 patients. The motion in 30 seconds mainly reflected respiration-induced motion. The mean displacements of BD were 1.4mm (- 3.1 to 8.2mm), - 2.2mm (- 9.1 to 1.5mm), and - 0.3mm (- 5.0 to 1.8mm) in the AP, SI, and LR directions, respectively. The differences in the target coverage with V90% of the IPL and V100% of the prostate between the simulated plan and original plan were - 3.9% to - 0.3% and - 0.6% to 1.1% for respiration-induced motion and 3.1% to - 67.8% and 3.6% to - 13.3% for BD with respiration-induced motion, respectively. The large motion of BD resulted in an

  8. Three-dimensional conformal external beam radiotherapy compared with permanent prostate implantation in low-risk prostate cancer based on endorectal magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging and prostate-specific antigen level

    SciTech Connect

    Pickett, Barby . E-mail: pickett@radonc17.ucsf.edu; Kurhanewicz, John; Pouliot, Jean; Weinberg, Vivian; Shinohara, Katsuto; Coakley, Fergus; Roach, Mack

    2006-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the metabolic response by comparing the time to resolution of spectroscopic abnormalities (TRSA) and the time to prostate-specific antigen level in low-risk prostate cancer patients after treatment with three-dimensional conformal external beam radiotherapy (3D-CRT) compared with permanent prostate implantation (PPI). Recent studies have suggested that the treatment of low-risk prostate cancer yields similar results for patients treated with 3D-CRT or PPI. Methods and Materials: A total of 50 patients, 25 in each group, who had been treated with 3D-CRT or PPI, had undergone endorectal magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging before and/or at varying times after therapy. The 3D-CRT patients had received radiation doses of {>=}72 Gy compared with 144 Gy for the PPI patients. The spectra from all usable voxels were examined for detectable levels of metabolic signal, and the percentages of atrophic and cancerous voxels were tabulated. Results: The median time to resolution of the spectroscopic abnormalities was 32.2 and 24.8 months and the time to the nadir prostate-specific antigen level was 52.4 and 38.0 months for the 3D-CRT and PPI patients, respectively. Of the 3D-CRT patients, 92% achieved negative endorectal magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging findings, with 40% having complete metabolic atrophy. All 25 PPI patients had negative endorectal magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging findings, with 60% achieving complete metabolic atrophy. Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that metabolic and biochemical responses of the prostate are more pronounced after PPI. Our results have not proved PPI is more effective at curing prostate cancer, but they have demonstrated that it may be more effective at destroying prostate metabolism.

  9. SU-E-J-79: Evaluation of Prostate Volume Changes During Radiotherapy Using Implanted Markers and On-Board Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Ispir, B; Akdeniz, Y; Ugurluer, G; Eken, A; Arpaci, T; Serin, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate prostate volume changes during radiation therapy using implanted gold markers and on-board imaging. Methods: Twenty-five patients were included who underwent an implantation of three gold markers. Cartesian coordinates of markers were assessed in kV-images. The coordinates of centers of two markers were measured on kV-images from the center of the marker at the apex which was reference. The distances between the markers were extrapolated from the coordinates using the Euclid formula. The radius of the sphere through markers was calculated using sinus theorem. The prostate volume for the first and last fraction was substituted with a sphere model and was calculated for each patient. The t-test was used for analysis. Results: The mean prostate volume for first and last fraction was 24.65 and 20.87 cc, respectively (p≤0.05). The prostate volume was smaller for 23 patients, whereas there was an expansion for 2 patients. Fifteen patients had androgen deprivation during radiotherapy (H group) and ten did not (NH group). The mean prostate volume for the first and last fraction for the NH group was 30.73 cc and 24.89 cc and for the H group 20.84 cc and 18.19 cc, respectively. There was a 15.8% volume change during treatment for the NH group and 12.2% for the H group, but the difference was not statistically significant. The radius difference of the theoretical sphere for the first and last fraction was 0.98 mm (range, 0.09–2.95 mm) and remained below 2 mm in 88% of measurements. Conclusion: There was a significant volume change during prostate radiotherapy. The difference between H group and NH group was not significant. The radius changes did not exceed 3 mm and it was below adaptive treatment requirements. Our results indicate that prostate volume changes during treatment should be taken into account during contouring and treatment planning.

  10. An assessment of PTV margin based on actual accumulated dose for prostate cancer radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Ning; Kumarasiri, Akila; Nurushev, Teamour; Burmeister, Jay; Xing, Lei; Liu, Dezhi; Glide-Hurst, Carri; Kim, Jinkoo; Zhong, Hualiang; Movsas, Benjamin; Chetty, Indrin J.

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this work is to present the results of a margin reduction study involving dosimetric and radiobiologic assessment of cumulative dose distributions, computed using an image guided adaptive radiotherapy based framework. Eight prostate cancer patients, treated with 7-9, 6 MV, intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) fields, were included in this study. The workflow consists of cone beam CT (CBCT) based localization, deformable image registration of the CBCT to simulation CT image datasets (SIM-CT), dose reconstruction and dose accumulation on the SIM-CT, and plan evaluation using radiobiological models. For each patient, three IMRT plans were generated with different margins applied to the CTV. The PTV margin for the original plan was 10 mm and 6 mm at the prostate/anterior rectal wall interface (10/6 mm) and was reduced to: (a) 5/3 mm, and (b) 3 mm uniformly. The average percent reductions in predicted tumor control probability (TCP) in the accumulated (actual) plans in comparison to the original plans over eight patients were 0.4%, 0.7% and 11.0% with 10/6 mm, 5/3 mm and 3 mm uniform margin respectively. The mean increase in predicted normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) for grades 2/3 rectal bleeding for the actual plans in comparison to the static plans with margins of 10/6, 5/3 and 3 mm uniformly was 3.5%, 2.8% and 2.4% respectively. For the actual dose distributions, predicted NTCP for late rectal bleeding was reduced by 3.6% on average when the margin was reduced from 10/6 mm to 5/3 mm, and further reduced by 1.0% on average when the margin was reduced to 3 mm. The average reduction in complication free tumor control probability (P+) in the actual plans in comparison to the original plans with margins of 10/6, 5/3 and 3 mm was 3.7%, 2.4% and 13.6% correspondingly. The significant reduction of TCP and P+ in the actual plan with 3 mm margin came from one outlier, where individualizing patient treatment plans through margin adaptation

  11. Matched Cohort Analysis of Outcomes of Definitive Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Positive Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Kahn, Shannon; Jani, Ashesh; Edelman, Scott; Rossi, Peter; Godette, Karen; Landry, Jerome; Anderson, Cynthia

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To compare the biochemical outcome and toxicity scores of men with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and prostate cancer with a matched control population with negative or unknown HIV status when treated with external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Methods and Materials: A single-institution database of men with prostate cancer treated with EBRT from 1999 to 2009 was reviewed. Thirteen men with HIV were identified and matched to 2 control patients according to age, race, T stage, prostate-specific antigen level, Gleason score, RT dose, intensity-modulated RT vs. three-dimensional conformal RT, and whole-pelvis vs. prostate-only RT, for a total of 39 cases. The median follow-up time was 39 months (range, 3-110 months). Results: The 4-year biochemical failure (BF)-free survival rate was 87% in the HIV-positive group vs. 89% in the controls (p = 0.94). Pre- and post-RT viral loads were found to be predictive of BF (p = 0.04 and p = 0.04, respectively). No men with HIV died, whereas 2 in the control group died of causes unrelated to prostate cancer. Acute and chronic genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity were less in the HIV-positive patients than in controls (p < 0.001, p < 0.001, p = 0.003, and p < 0.001, respectively). The HIV-positive men experienced an average decline in CD4 count of 193 cells/mm{sup 3}. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that men with HIV treated with EBRT have a similar risk of BF; however, high viral loads may contribute to an increased risk. This analysis supports that HIV-positive men with prostate cancer can be treated with definitive EBRT with similar disease control and toxicity outcomes as in the general population.

  12. Poster — Thur Eve — 59: Atlas Selection for Automated Segmentation of Pelvic CT for Prostate Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mallawi, A; Farrell, T; Diamond, K; Wierzbicki, M

    2014-08-15

    Automated atlas-based segmentation has recently been evaluated for use in planning prostate cancer radiotherapy. In the typical approach, the essential step is the selection of an atlas from a database that best matches the target image. This work proposes an atlas selection strategy and evaluates its impact on the final segmentation accuracy. Prostate length (PL), right femoral head diameter (RFHD), and left femoral head diameter (LFHD) were measured in CT images of 20 patients. Each subject was then taken as the target image to which all remaining 19 images were affinely registered. For each pair of registered images, the overlap between prostate and femoral head contours was quantified using the Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC). Finally, we designed an atlas selection strategy that computed the ratio of PL (prostate segmentation), RFHD (right femur segmentation), and LFHD (left femur segmentation) between the target subject and each subject in the atlas database. Five atlas subjects yielding ratios nearest to one were then selected for further analysis. RFHD and LFHD were excellent parameters for atlas selection, achieving a mean femoral head DSC of 0.82 ± 0.06. PL had a moderate ability to select the most similar prostate, with a mean DSC of 0.63 ± 0.18. The DSC obtained with the proposed selection method were slightly lower than the maximums established using brute force, but this does not include potential improvements expected with deformable registration. Atlas selection based on PL for prostate and femoral diameter for femoral heads provides reasonable segmentation accuracy.

  13. Influence of image slice thickness on rectal dose-response relationships following radiotherapy of prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsson, C.; Thor, M.; Liu, M.; Moissenko, V.; Petersen, S. E.; Høyer, M.; Apte, A.; Deasy, J. O.

    2014-07-01

    When pooling retrospective data from different cohorts, slice thicknesses of acquired computed tomography (CT) images used for treatment planning may vary between cohorts. It is, however, not known if varying slice thickness influences derived dose-response relationships. We investigated this for rectal bleeding using dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of the rectum and rectal wall for dose distributions superimposed on images with varying CT slice thicknesses. We used dose and endpoint data from two prostate cancer cohorts treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy to either 74 Gy (N = 159) or 78 Gy (N = 159) at 2 Gy per fraction. The rectum was defined as the whole organ with content, and the morbidity cut-off was Grade ≥2 late rectal bleeding. Rectal walls were defined as 3 mm inner margins added to the rectum. DVHs for simulated slice thicknesses from 3 to 13 mm were compared to DVHs for the originally acquired slice thicknesses at 3 and 5 mm. Volumes, mean, and maximum doses were assessed from the DVHs, and generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) values were calculated. For each organ and each of the simulated slice thicknesses, we performed predictive modeling of late rectal bleeding using the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) model. For the most coarse slice thickness, rectal volumes increased (≤18%), whereas maximum and mean doses decreased (≤0.8 and ≤4.2 Gy, respectively). For all a values, the gEUD for the simulated DVHs were ≤1.9 Gy different than the gEUD for the original DVHs. The best-fitting LKB model parameter values with 95% CIs were consistent between all DVHs. In conclusion, we found that the investigated slice thickness variations had minimal impact on rectal dose-response estimations. From the perspective of predictive modeling, our results suggest that variations within 10 mm in slice thickness between cohorts are unlikely to be a limiting factor when pooling multi-institutional rectal dose data that include slice thickness

  14. Complete PSA Response Following Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy for a Bony Metastasis in the Setting of Castrate-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, George

    2015-01-01

    A majority of patients with castrate-resistant prostate cancer ultimately develop distant metastases, with bone being the most common site of spread. Classically, systemic therapy has been considered the standard of care for patients with metastatic cancer. Emerging evidence, however, suggests that an intermediate oligometastatic state, between limited disease and widespread metastases, exists; theoretically, with locally ablative treatment, patients may be curable. We describe a complete PSA response following aggressive management, using stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT), of an oligometastatic spine lesion in the setting of castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). This case report supports the use of SBRT in oligometastatic CRPC and suggests that management of limited metastases may provide good long-term outcomes in well-selected patients. PMID:26623220

  15. Meta-analysis of Genome Wide Association Studies Identifies Genetic Markers of Late Toxicity Following Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kerns, Sarah L; Dorling, Leila; Fachal, Laura; Bentzen, Søren; Pharoah, Paul D P; Barnes, Daniel R; Gómez-Caamaño, Antonio; Carballo, Ana M; Dearnaley, David P; Peleteiro, Paula; Gulliford, Sarah L; Hall, Emma; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Carracedo, Ángel; Sia, Michael; Stock, Richard; Stone, Nelson N; Sydes, Matthew R; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Ahmed, Shahana; Parliament, Matthew; Ostrer, Harry; Rosenstein, Barry S; Vega, Ana; Burnet, Neil G; Dunning, Alison M; Barnett, Gillian C; West, Catharine M L

    2016-08-01

    Nearly 50% of cancer patients undergo radiotherapy. Late radiotherapy toxicity affects quality-of-life in long-term cancer survivors and risk of side-effects in a minority limits doses prescribed to the majority of patients. Development of a test predicting risk of toxicity could benefit many cancer patients. We aimed to meta-analyze individual level data from four genome-wide association studies from prostate cancer radiotherapy cohorts including 1564 men to identify genetic markers of toxicity. Prospectively assessed two-year toxicity endpoints (urinary frequency, decreased urine stream, rectal bleeding, overall toxicity) and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) associations were tested using multivariable regression, adjusting for clinical and patient-related risk factors. A fixed-effects meta-analysis identified two SNPs: rs17599026 on 5q31.2 with urinary frequency (odds ratio [OR] 3.12, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.08-4.69, p-value 4.16×10(-8)) and rs7720298 on 5p15.2 with decreased urine stream (OR 2.71, 95% CI 1.90-3.86, p-value=3.21×10(-8)). These SNPs lie within genes that are expressed in tissues adversely affected by pelvic radiotherapy including bladder, kidney, rectum and small intestine. The results show that heterogeneous radiotherapy cohorts can be combined to identify new moderate-penetrance genetic variants associated with radiotherapy toxicity. The work provides a basis for larger collaborative efforts to identify enough variants for a future test involving polygenic risk profiling. PMID:27515689

  16. Correlation Between Acute and Late Toxicity in 973 Prostate Cancer Patients Treated With Three-Dimensional Conformal External Beam Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara A.; Zerini, Dario; Fodor, Cristiana

    2010-09-01

    Purpose: To analyze the correlation between acute and late injury in 973 prostate cancer patients treated with radiotherapy and to evaluate the effect of patient-, tumor-, and treatment-related variables on toxicity. Methods and Materials: Of the 973 patients, 542 and 431 received definitive or postprostatectomy radiotherapy, respectively. Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy included a six-field technique and two-dynamic arc therapy. Toxicity was classified according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer criteria. The correlation between acute and late toxicity (incidence and severity) was assessed. Results: Multivariate analysis showed that age {<=}65 years (p = .06) and use of the three-dimensional, six-field technique (p <.0001) correlated significantly with greater acute rectal toxicity. The three-dimensional, six-field technique (p = .0002), dose >70 Gy (p = .014), and radiotherapy duration (p = .05) correlated with greater acute urinary toxicity. Acute rectal toxicity (p <.0001) was the only factor that correlated with late rectal injury on multivariate analysis. Late urinary toxicity correlated with acute urinary events (p <.0001) and was inversely related to the use of salvage radiotherapy (p = .018). A highly significant correlation was found between the incidence of acute and late events for both rectal (p <.001) and urinary (p <.001) reactions. The severity of acute toxicity (Grade 2 or greater) was predictive for the severity of late toxicity for both rectal and urinary events (p <.001). Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that the risk of acute reactions depends on both patient-related (age) and treatment-related (dose, technique) factors. Acute toxicity was an independent significant predictor of late toxicity. These findings might help to predict and prevent late radiotherapy-induced complications.

  17. Clinical applications of IMRT to adenocarcinoma of the prostate: Portal dose verification and intensity modulated neutron radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Santanam, Lakshmi

    2005-01-01

    Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) provides an improvement in the conformality of radiotherapy dose distributions. Its application to photon radiotherapy for prostate adenocarcinoma is well established. A quality assurance tool for verifying photon IMRT treatment and the potential application of intensity modulation to neutron radiotherapy (IMNRT) to prostate cancer are investigated here. This study evaluates the use of an amorphous silicon flat panel imager for dose verification of photon IMRT fields. Various correction factors were developed to allow accurate estimation of the absorbed dose using this portal imager. The ratio of the dose measured with the portal imager to that measured using an ionization chamber was found to be 0.991{+-}0.026 for 23 measured IMRT fields. The study also yielded an accurate estimate of the relative beamlet intensity (fluence) at the plane of the detector. The raw difference between the relative beamlet intensity predicted by the EPID and that of the planning system for 23 IMRT fields was found to be -0.65{+-}2.69. These results demonstrate the capabilities of this imager as a robust IMRT quality assurance tool. An in-house optimization algorithm was used to optimize forward planned segments for the treatment of prostate cancer using IMNRT. The applicability of two different algorithms was investigated for IMNRT dose calculation, namely, the differential scatter air ratio (DSAR) and the finite size pencil beam (FSPB) algorithms. Measured profiles and absolute point doses were compared to results calculated by the treatment planning system. Dual ion-chamber measurements were performed to determine the individual neutron and gamma doses and to estimate the whole body dose equivalent. IMNRT plans retrospectively calculated for five prostate cancer patients provided dose distributions superior to conventional fast neutron therapy. When normalized to provide equivalent target coverage, the volume of the rectum and bladder receiving

  18. Prognostic Significance of Neuroendocrine Differentiation in Patients With Gleason Score 8-10 Prostate Cancer Treated With Primary Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Krauss, Daniel J.; Hayek, Sylvia; Amin, Mitual; Ye Hong; Kestin, Larry L.; Zadora, Steven; Vicini, Frank A.; Cotant, Matthew; Brabbins, Donald S.; Ghilezan, Michel I.; Gustafson, Gary S.; Martinez, Alvaro A.

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: To determine the prognostic significance of neuroendocrine differentiation (NED) in Gleason score 8-10 prostate cancer treated with primary radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Chromogranin A (CgA) staining was performed and overseen by a single pathologist on core biopsies from 176 patients from the William Beaumont prostate cancer database. A total of 143 had evaluable biopsy material. Staining was quantified as 0%, <1%, 1-10%, or >10% of tumor cells. Patients received external beam RT alone or together with high-dose-rate brachytherapy. Cox regression and Kaplan-Meier estimates determined if the presence/frequency of neuroendocrine cells correlated with clinical endpoints. Results: Median follow-up was 5.5 years. Forty patients (28%) had at least focal positive CgA staining (<1% n = 21, 1-10% n = 11, >10% n = 8). No significant differences existed between patients with or without staining in terms of age, pretreatment prostate-specific antigen, tumor stage, hormone therapy administration, % biopsy core involvement, mean Gleason score, or RT dose/modality. CgA staining concentration independently predicted for biochemical and clinical failure, distant metastases (DM), and cause-specific survival (CSS). For patients with <1% vs. >1% staining, 10-year DM rates were 13.4% vs. 55.3%, respectively (p = 0.001), and CSS was 91.7% vs. 58.9% (p < 0.001). As a continuous variable, increasing CgA staining concentration predicted for inferior rates of DM, CSS, biochemical control, and any clinical failure. No differences in outcomes were appreciated for patients with 0% vs. <1% NED. Conclusions: For Gleason score 8-10 prostate cancer, >1% NED is associated with inferior clinical outcomes for patients treated with radiotherapy. This relates most directly to an increase in distant disease failure.

  19. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy of Pelvic Lymph Nodes in Locally Advanced Prostate Cancer: Planning Procedures and Early Experiences

    SciTech Connect

    Muren, Ludvig Paul Wasbo, Ellen; Helle, Svein Inge; Hysing, Liv Bolstad; Karlsdottir, Asa; Odland, Odd Harald; Valen, Harald; Ekerold, Randi; Johannessen, Dag Clement

    2008-07-15

    Purpose: We present planning and early clinical outcomes of a study of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for locally advanced prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 43 patients initially treated with an IMRT plan delivering 50 Gy to the prostate, seminal vesicles, and pelvic lymph nodes, followed by a conformal radiotherapy (CRT) plan delivering 20 Gy to the prostate and seminal vesicles, were studied. Dose-volume histogram (DVH) data for the added plans were compared with dose-volume histogram data for the sum of two CRT plans for 15 cases. Gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicity, based on the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scoring system, was recorded weekly throughout treatment as well as 3 to 18 months after treatment and are presented. Results: Treatment with IMRT both reduced normal tissue doses and increased the minimum target doses. Intestine volumes receiving more than 40 and 50 Gy were significantly reduced (e.g., at 50 Gy, from 81 to 19 cm{sup 3}; p = 0.026), as were bladder volumes above 40, 50, and 60 Gy, rectum volumes above 30, 50, and 60 Gy, and hip joint muscle volumes above 20, 30, and 40 Gy. During treatment, Grade 2 GI toxicity was reported by 12 of 43 patients (28%), and Grade 2 to 4 GU toxicity was also observed among 12 patients (28%). With 6 to 18 months of follow-up, 2 patients (5%) experienced Grade 2 GI effects and 7 patients (16%) experienced Grade 2 GU effects. Conclusions: Use of IMRT for pelvic irradiation in prostate cancer reduces normal tissue doses, improves target coverage, and has a promising toxicity profile.

  20. Retrospective evaluation of dosimetric quality for prostate carcinomas treated with 3D conformal, intensity modulated and volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Crowe, Scott B; Kairn, Tanya; Middlebrook, Nigel; Hill, Brendan; Christie, David R H; Knight, Richard T; Kenny, John; Langton, Christian M; Trapp, Jamie V

    2013-12-15

    This study examines and compares the dosimetric quality of radiotherapy treatment plans for prostate carcinoma across a cohort of 163 patients treated across five centres: 83 treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT), 33 treated with intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and 47 treated with volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Treatment plan quality was evaluated in terms of target dose homogeneity and organs at risk (OAR), through the use of a set of dose metrics. These included the mean, maximum and minimum doses; the homogeneity and conformity indices for the target volumes; and a selection of dose coverage values that were relevant to each OAR. Statistical significance was evaluated using two-tailed Welch's T-tests. The Monte Carlo DICOM ToolKit software was adapted to permit the evaluation of dose metrics from DICOM data exported from a commercial radiotherapy treatment planning system. The 3DCRT treatment plans offered greater planning target volume dose homogeneity than the other two treatment modalities. The IMRT and VMAT plans offered greater dose reduction in the OAR: with increased compliance with recommended OAR dose constraints, compared to conventional 3DCRT treatments. When compared to each other, IMRT and VMAT did not provide significantly different treatment plan quality for like-sized tumour volumes. This study indicates that IMRT and VMAT have provided similar dosimetric quality, which is superior to the dosimetric quality achieved with 3DCRT.

  1. The Effect of Registration Surrogate and Patient Factors on the Interobserver Variability of Electronic Portal Image Guidance During Prostate Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Vickie Lockwood, Gina; Yan Jing; Catton, Charles; Chung, Peter; Bayley, Andrew; Rosewall, Tara

    2011-01-01

    Intraprostatic fiducial markers (IPM) and electronic portal imaging (EPI) are commonly used to identify and correct for prostate motion during radiotherapy. However, little data is available on the precision of this image-guidance technique. This study quantified impact of different registration surrogates and patient factors on the interobserver variability of manual EPI alignment during prostate radiotherapy. For 50 prostate radiotherapy patients previously implanted with 3 IPM, five observers manually aligned 150 pairs of orthogonal EPI to the reference digital reconstructed radiograph using Varian Vision EPI analysis software. Images were aligned using: Bony anatomy (BA), single mid-prostate IPM (SM); and 2 strategies using 3 IPM: center of mass (COM) and rotate and translate (R and T). Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) were calculated to quantify interobserver variability. The absolute displacements measured using SM and R and T were compared with those using COM. The impact of patients' pelvic diameter and adjuvant hormone therapy on interobserver variability were also evaluated. Twelve thousand displacement values were collected for analysis. The maximum discrepancy between the 5 observers was >2 mm in 47% of measurements using BA, 5% using SM, 4% using R and T, and 3% using COM. Both of the 3 IPM alignment strategies demonstrated lower interobserver variability than the single IPM strategy (ICC 0.94-0.97 vs. 0.82-0.94). BA had the highest interobserver variability (ICC = 0.43-0.90). Pelvic diameter and hormone therapy had no discernible impact on interobserver variability. Compared with COM, the absolute displacements measured using the other IPM strategies were statistically different (p < 0.001), but 95% of the absolute magnitude of differences between the strategies were {<=}1 mm. The high reproducibility among the observers demonstrated the precision of prostate localization using multiple IPM and EPI, which was not influenced by the patient

  2. Localized volume effects for late rectal and anal toxicity after radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Peeters, Stephanie T.H.; Lebesque, Joos V. . E-mail: j.lebesque@nki.nl; Heemsbergen, Wilma D.; Putten, Wim L.J. van; Slot, Annerie; Dielwart, Michel F.H.; Koper, Peter C.M.

    2006-03-15

    Purpose: To identify dosimetric parameters derived from anorectal, rectal, and anal wall dose distributions that correlate with different late gastrointestinal (GI) complications after three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: In this analysis, 641 patients from a randomized trial (68 Gy vs. 78 Gy) were included. Toxicity was scored with adapted Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for the Research and Treatment of Cancer (RTOG/EORTC) criteria and five specific complications. The variables derived from dose-volume histogram of anorectal, rectal, and anal wall were as follows: % receiving {>=}5-70 Gy (V5-V70), maximum dose (D{sub max}), and mean dose (D{sub mean}). The anus was defined as the most caudal 3 cm of the anorectum. Statistics were done with multivariate Cox regression models. Median follow-up was 44 months. Results: Anal dosimetric variables were associated with RTOG/EORTC Grade {>=}2 (V5-V40, D{sub mean}) and incontinence (V5-V70, D{sub mean}). Bleeding correlated most strongly with anorectal V55-V65, and stool frequency with anorectal V40 and D{sub mean}. Use of steroids was weakly related to anal variables. No volume effect was seen for RTOG/EORTC Grade {>=}3 and pain/cramps/tenesmus. Conclusion: Different volume effects were found for various late GI complications. Therefore, to evaluate the risk of late GI toxicity, not only intermediate and high doses to the anorectal wall volume should be taken into account, but also the dose to the anal wall.

  3. Radiotherapy and Survival in Prostate Cancer Patients: A Population-Based Study

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Esther H. Ellis, Rodney J.; Cherullo, Edward; Colussi, Valdir; Xu Fang; Chen Weidong; Gupta, Sanjay; Whalen, Christopher C.; Bodner, Donald; Resnick, Martin I.; Rimm, Alfred A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the association of overall and disease-specific survival with the five standard treatment modalities for prostate cancer (CaP): radical prostatectomy (RP), brachytherapy (BT), external beam radiotherapy, androgen deprivation therapy, and no treatment (NT) within 6 months after CaP diagnosis. Methods and Materials: The study population included 10,179 men aged 65 years and older with incident CaP diagnosed between 1999 and 2001. Using the linked Ohio Cancer Incidence Surveillance System, Medicare, and death certificate files, overall and disease-specific survival through 2005 among the five clinically accepted therapies were analyzed. Results: Disease-specific survival rates were 92.3% and 23.9% for patients with localized vs. distant disease at 7 years, respectively. Controlling for age, race, comorbidities, stage, and Gleason score, results from the Cox multiple regression models indicated that the risk of CaP-specific death was significantly reduced in patients receiving RP or BT, compared with NT. For localized disease, compared with NT, in the monotherapy cohort, RP and BT were associated with reduced hazard ratios (HR) of 0.25 and 0.45 (95% confidence intervals 0.13-0.48 and 0.23-0.87, respectively), whereas in the combination therapy cohort, HR were 0.40 (0.17-0.94) and 0.46 (0.27-0.80), respectively. Conclusions: The present population-based study indicates that RP and BT are associated with improved survival outcomes. Further studies are warranted to improve clinical determinates in the selection of appropriate management of CaP and to improve predictive modeling for which patient subsets may benefit most from definitive therapy vs. conservative management and/or observation.

  4. Improved biochemical outcome with adjuvant radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer with poor pathologic features

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas, Carlos; Kestin, Larry L. . E-mail: lkestin@beaumont.edu; Weed, Dan W.; Krauss, Daniel; Vicini, Frank A.; Martinez, Alvaro A.

    2005-03-01

    Purpose: The indications for adjuvant external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) after radical prostatectomy (RP) are poorly defined. We performed a retrospective comparison of our institution's experience treating prostate cancer with RP vs. RP followed by adjuvant EBRT. Methods and materials: Between 1987 and 1998, 617 patients with clinical Stage T1-T2N0M0 prostate cancer underwent RP. Patients who underwent preoperative androgen deprivation and those with positive lymph nodes were excluded. Of the 617 patients, 34 (5.5%) with an undetectable postoperative prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level underwent adjuvant prostatic fossa RT at a median of 0.25 year (range, 0.1-0.6) postoperatively because of poor pathologic features. The median total dose was 59.4 Gy (range, 50.4-66.6 Gy) in 1.8-2.0-Gy fractions. These 34 RP+RT patients were compared with the remaining 583 RP patients. Biochemical failure was defined as any postoperative PSA level {>=}0.1 ng/mL and any postoperative PSA level {>=}0.3 ng/mL (at least 30 days after surgery). Administration of androgen deprivation was also scored as biochemical failure when applying either definition. The median clinical follow-up was 8.2 years (range, 0.1-11.2 years) for RP and 8.4 years (range, 0.3-13.8 years) for RP+RT. Results: Radical prostatectomy + radiation therapy patients had a greater pathologic Gleason score (mean, 7.3 vs. 6.5; p < 0.01) and pathologic T stage (median, T3a vs. T2c; p < 0.01). Age (median, 65.7 years) and pretreatment PSA level (median, 7.9 ng/mL) were similar between the treatment groups. Extracapsular extension was present in 72% of RP+RT patients vs. 27% of RP patients (p < 0.01). The RP+RT patients were more likely to have seminal vesicle invasion (29% vs. 9%, p < 0.01) and positive margins (73% vs. 36%, p < 0.01). Despite these poor pathologic features, the 5-year biochemical control (BC) rate (PSA < 0.1 ng/mL) was 57% for RP+RT and 47% for RP (p = 0.28). For patients with extracapsular extension, the

  5. Two-Stage Phase I Dose-Escalation Study of Intratumoral Reovirus Type 3 Dearing and Palliative Radiotherapy in Patients with Advanced Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Harrington, Kevin J.; Karapanagiotou, Eleni M.; Roulstone, Victoria; Twigger, Katie R.; White, Christine L.; Vidal, Laura; Beirne, Debbie; Prestwich, Robin; Newbold, Kate; Ahmed, Merina; Thway, Khin; Nutting, Christopher M.; Coffey, Matt; Harris, Dean; Vile, Richard G.; Pandha, Hardev S.; DeBono, Johann S.; Melcher, Alan A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To determine the safety and feasibility of combining intratumoral reovirus and radiotherapy in patients with advanced cancer and to assess viral biodistribution, reoviral replication in tumors, and antiviral immune responses. Experimental Design Patients with measurable disease amenable to palliative radiotherapy were enrolled. In the first stage, patients received radiotherapy (20 Gy in five fractions) plus two intratumoral injections of RT3D at doses between 1 × 108 and 1 × 1010 TCID50. In the second stage, the radiotherapy dose was increased (36 Gy in 12 fractions) and patients received two, four, or six doses of RT3D at 1 × 1010 TCID50. End points were safety, viral replication, immunogenicity, and antitumoral activity. Results Twenty-three patients with various solid tumors were treated. Dose-limiting toxicity was not seen. The most common toxicities were grade 2 (or lower) pyrexia, influenza-like symptoms, vomiting, asymptomatic lymphopenia, and neutropenia. There was no exacerbation of the acute radiation reaction. Reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) studies of blood, urine, stool, and sputum were negative for viral shedding. In the low-dose (20 Gy in five fractions) radiation group, two of seven evaluable patients had a partial response and five had stable disease. In the high-dose (36 Gy in 12 fractions) radiation group, five of seven evaluable patients had partial response and two stable disease. Conclusions The combination of intratumoral RT3D and radiotherapy was well tolerated. The favorable toxicity profile and lack of vector shedding means that this combination should be evaluated in newly diagnosed patients receiving radiotherapy with curative intent. PMID:20484020

  6. SU-E-J-39: Dosimetric Benefit of Implanted Marker-Based CBCT Setup for Definitive Prostatic Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhen, H; Wu, Z; Bluemenfeld, P; Chu, J; Wang, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose Daily setup for definitive prostatic radiotherapy is challenged by suboptimal visibility of the prostate boundary and daily variation of rectum shape and position. For patients with improved bowel preparation, we conducted a dosimetric comparison between prostate implanted marker (IM)-based daily setup and anterior rectal wall (ARW)-based setup, with the hypothesis that the former leads to adequate target coverage with better rectal sparing. Methods Five IMRT/VMAT prostate cases with implanted markers were selected for analysis. Daily CBCT showed improvement of the rectal volume compared to planning CT. For each patient, the prostate and rectum were contoured on three CBCT images (fraction 5/15/25) with subsequent physician review. The CBCTs were then registered to a planning CT using IM-based registration. The deviation of ARW positions from planning CT to CBCT were analyzed at various sup-inf levels (−1.8 cm to 1.8 cm from level of prostate center). To estimate the potential dosimetric impact from ARW-based setup, the treatment plans were recalculated using A-P shifts ranging from −1mm to +6mm. Clinically important rectum DVH values including Dmax, D3cc and Dmean were computed. Results For the studied patients, we observed on average 32% rectum volume reduction from planning CT to CBCT. As a Results, the ARW on average shifts posteriorly by −1mm to +5mm, depending on the sup-inf level of observation, with larger shifts observed at more superior levels. Recalculation shows that when ARW shifts 1mm posteriorly, ARW-based CBCT setup leads to a 1.0%, 4.2%, and 3.2% increase in rectum Dmax, D3cc, and Dmean, respectively, compared to IM-based setup. The dosimetric deviations increase to 4.7%, 25.8% and 24.7% when ARW shifts 6mm posteriorly. No significant prostate-only dose difference was observed. Conclusion For patients with improved bowel preparation, IM-based CBCT setup leads to accurate prostate coverage along with significantly lower rectal dose

  7. CyberKnife Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy as an Option of Treatment for Patients With Prostate Cancer Having Oligometastatic Lymph Nodes: Single-Center Study Outcome Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Napieralska, Aleksandra; Miszczyk, Leszek; Stąpór-Fudzińska, Małgorzata

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of CyberKnife-based stereotactic ablative radiotherapy on prostate cancer lymph node metastases. Our material consisted of 18 patients with 31 metastatic lymph nodes irradiated between 2011 and 2014 using CyberKnife-based stereotactic ablative radiotherapy. Patients were irradiated using fraction dose varied from 6 to 15 Gy (median 10), to the total dose of 24 to 45 Gy (median 30). Irradiated lymph node size varied from 0.4 to 4.0 cm. In all, 9 patients had single lymph node metastasis and 9 patients had metastases of 2 to 4 lymph nodes. Prostate-specific antigen concentration before radiotherapy varied from 0.01 to 15.58 (mean 6.97; median 4.66). All patients at the time of radiotherapy and follow-up received androgen deprivation therapy. Mann-Whitney U, Kaplan-Meier method, and log-rank tests were used in statistical analysis. We obtained the following results: after CyberKnife stereotactic ablative radiotherapy, prostate-specific antigen concentration dropped in majority of cases and during the last control varied from 0.00 to 258.00 (median 2.5), and was lower in patients without dissemination to other organs (P = .01). Complete regression was found in 12 lesions, stable disease in 13, and progression in 4. In 7 patients, the dissemination to other organs occurred. Our results allow us to conclude that CyberKnife stereotactic ablative radiotherapy of prostate cancer lymph node oligometastases gives good local control and relatively good prostate-specific antigen response.

  8. Competing-Risks Mortality After Radiotherapy vs. Observation for Localized Prostate Cancer: A Population-based Study

    SciTech Connect

    Abdollah, Firas; Sun, Maxine; Schmitges, Jan; Thuret, Rodolphe; Tian, Zhe; Shariat, Shahrokh F.; Briganti, Alberto; Jeldres, Claudio; Perrotte, Paul; Montorsi, Francesco; Karakiewicz, Pierre I.

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Contemporary patients with localized prostate cancer (PCa) are more frequently treated with radiotherapy. However, there are limited data on the effect of this treatment on cancer-specific mortality (CSM). Our objective was to test the relationship between radiotherapy and survival in men with localized PCa and compare it with those treated with observation. Methods: A population-based cohort identified 68,797 men with cT1-T2 PCa treated with radiotherapy or observation between the years 1992 and 2005. Propensity-score matching was used to minimize potential bias related to treatment assignment. Competing-risks analyses tested the effect of treatment type (radiotherapy vs. observation) on CSM, after accounting to other-cause mortality. All analyses were carried out within PCa risk, baseline comorbidity status, and age groups. Results: Radiotherapy was associated with more favorable 10-year CSM rates than observation in patients with high-risk PCa (8.8 vs. 14.4%, hazard ratio [HR]: 0.59, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.50-0.68). Conversely, the beneficial effect of radiotherapy on CSM was not evident in patients with low-intermediate risk PCa (3.7 vs. 4.1%, HR: 0.91, 95% CI: 0.80-1.04). Radiotherapy was beneficial in elderly patients (5.6 vs. 7.3%, HR: 0.70, 95% CI: 0.59-0.80). Moreover, it was associated with improved CSM rates among patients with no comorbidities (5.7 vs. 6.5%, HR: 0.81, 95% CI: 0.67-0.98), one comorbidity (4.6 vs. 6.0%, HR: 0.87, 95% CI: 0.75-0.99), and more than two comorbidities (4.2 vs. 5.0%, HR: 0.79, 95% CI: 0.65-0.96). Conclusions: Radiotherapy substantially improves CSM in patients with high-risk PCa, with little or no benefit in patients with low-/intermediate-risk PCa relative to observation. These findings must be interpreted within the context of the limitations of observational data.

  9. Retrospective Comparison of External Beam Radiotherapy and Radical Prostatectomy in High-Risk, Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Arcangeli, Giorgio; Strigari, Lidia; Arcangeli, Stefano; Petrongari, Maria Grazia; Saracino, Biancamaria; Gomellini, Sara; Papalia, Rocco; Simone, Giuseppe; De Carli, Piero; Gallucci, Michele

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: Because of the lack of conclusive and well-conducted randomized studies, the optimal therapy for prostate tumors remains controversial. The aim of this study was to retrospectively compare the results of radical surgery vs. a conservative approach such as external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) plus androgen deprivation therapy using an intent-to-treat analysis on two pretreatment defined, concurrently treated, high-risk patient populations. Methods and Materials: Between January 2003 and December 2007, 162 patients with high-risk prostate cancer underwent an EBRT plus androgen deprivation therapy program at the RT department of our institute. In the same period, 122 patients with the same high-risk disease underwent radical prostatectomy (RP) at the urologic department of our institute. Patients with adverse pathologic factors also underwent adjuvant EBRT with or without androgen deprivation therapy. The primary endpoint was freedom from biochemical failure. Results: The two groups of high-risk patients were homogeneous in terms of freedom from biochemical failure on the basis of the clinical T stage, biopsy Gleason score, and initial prostate-specific antigen level. The median follow-up was 38.6 and 33.8 months in the EBRT and RP groups, respectively. The actuarial analysis of the freedom from biochemical failure showed a 3-year rate of 86.8% and 69.8% in the EBRT and RP group, respectively (p = .001). Multivariate analysis of the whole group revealed the initial prostate-specific antigen level and treatment type (EBRT vs. RP) as significant covariates. Conclusion: This retrospective intention-to-treat analysis showed a significantly better outcome after EBRT than after RP in patients with high-risk prostate cancer, although a well-conducted randomized comparison would be the best procedure to confirm these results.

  10. A Phase I/II Trial of Gefitinib Given Concurrently With Radiotherapy in Patients With Nonmetastatic Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Joensuu, Greetta; Joensuu, Timo; Nokisalmi, Petri

    2010-09-01

    Purpose: To estimate the safety and tolerability of daily administration of 250 mg of gefitinib given concurrently with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for patients with nonmetastatic prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 42 patients with T2-T3N0M0 tumors were treated in a nonrandomized single-center study. A prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level of <20 and a good performance status (WHO, 0-1) were required. Adjuvant or neoadjuvant hormone treatments were not allowed. A daily regimen of 250 mg of gefitinib was started 1 week before radiation therapy began and lasted for the duration of radiation therapy. A dose of 50.4 Gy (1.8 Gy/day) was administered to the tumor, prostate, and seminal vesicles, followed by a 22-Gy booster (2 Gy/day) for a total dose of 72.4 Gy. Correlative studies included analysis of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), EGFRvIII, and phosphorylated EGFR in tumors and tumor necrosis factor, interleukin-1{alpha} (IL-1{alpha}), and IL-6 in serum. Results: Maximum tolerated dose was not reached in phase I (12 patients), and 30 additional patients were treated in phase II. Thirty (71.4%) patients completed trial medication. Dose-limiting toxicities were recorded for 16 (38.1%) patients, the most common of which was a grade 3 to 4 increase in transaminase (6 patients). After a median follow-up of 38 months, there were no deaths due to prostate cancer. The estimated PSA relapse-free survival rate at 4 years (Kaplan-Meier) was 97%, the salvage therapy-free survival rate was 91%, and the overall survival rate was 87%. These figures compared favorably with those of matched patients treated with radiation only at higher doses. Conclusions: The combination of gefitinib and radiation is reasonably well tolerated and has promising activity against nonmetastatic prostate cancer.

  11. A prospective comparison of acute intestinal toxicity following whole pelvic versus small field intensity-modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeon Joo; Park, Jin-hong; Yun, In-Ha; Kim, Young Seok

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To compare the acute intestinal toxicity of whole pelvic (WP) and small field (SF) intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for prostate cancer using dosimetric and metabolic parameters as well as clinical findings. Methods Patients who received IMRT in either a definitive or postoperative setting were prospectively enrolled. Target volume and organs at risk including intestinal cavity (IC) were delineated in every patient by a single physician. The IC volume that received a 10–50 Gy dose at 5-Gy intervals (V10–V50) and the percentage of irradiated volume as a fraction of total IC volume were calculated. Plasma citrulline levels, as an objective biological marker, were checked at three time points: baseline and after exposure to 30 Gy and 60 Gy. Results Of the 41 patients, only six experienced grade 1 acute intestinal toxicity. Although all dose–volume parameters were significantly worse following WP than SF IMRT, there was no statistically significant relationship between these dosimetric parameters and clinical symptoms. Plasma citrulline levels did not show a serial decrease by radiotherapy volume difference (WP versus SF) and were not relevant to the irradiated doses. Conclusion Given that WP had comparable acute intestinal toxicities to those associated with SF, WP IMRT appears to be a feasible approach for the treatment of prostate cancer despite dosimetric disadvantages. PMID:27022287

  12. Phase II Study of Vinorelbine and Estramustine in Combination With Conformational Radiotherapy for Patients With High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Carles, Joan; Nogue, Miguel; Sole, Josep M.; Foro, Palmira; Domenech, Montserrat; Suarez, Marta; Gallardo, Enrique; Garcia, Dario; Ferrer, Ferran; Gelabert-Mas, Antoni; Gayo, Javier; Fabregat, Xavier

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and safety profile of vinorelbine and estramustine in combination with three-dimensional conformational radiotherapy (3D-CRT) in patients with localized high-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Fifty patients received estramustine, 600 mg/m{sup 2} daily, and vinorelbine, 25 mg/m{sup 2}, on days 1 and 8 of a 21-day cycle for three cycles in combination with 8 weeks of 3D-CRT (total dose of 70.2 gray [Gy] at 1.8-Gy fractions or 70 Gy at 2.0-Gy fractions). Additionally, patients received luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone analogs for 3 years. Results: All patients were evaluated for response and toxicity. Progression-free survival at 5 years was 72% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 52-86). All patients who relapsed had only biochemical relapse. The most frequent severe toxicities were cystitis (16% of patients), leucopenia (10% of patients), diarrhea (10% of patients), neutropenia (8% of patients), and proctitis (8% of patients). Six patients (12%) did not complete study treatment due to the patient's decision (n = 1) and to adverse events such as hepatotoxicity, proctitis, paralytic ileus, and acute myocardial infarction. Conclusions: Vinorelbine and estramustine in combination with 3D-CRT is a safe and effective regimen for patients with localized high-risk prostate cancer. A randomized trial is needed to determine whether the results of this regimen are an improvement over the results obtained with radiotherapy and androgen ablation.

  13. Hormone therapy and radiotherapy for early prostate cancer: A utility-adjusted number needed to treat (NNT) analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Jani, Ashesh B.; Kao, Johnny; Heimann, Ruth; Hellman, Samuel . E-mail: s-hellman@uchicago.edu

    2005-03-01

    Purpose: To quantify, using the number needed to treat (NNT) methodology, the benefit of short-term ({<=}6 months) hormone therapy adjuvant to radiotherapy in the group of patients with early (clinical stage T1-T2c) prostate cancer. Methods and materials: The absolute biochemical control benefit for the use of hormones adjuvant to radiotherapy in early-stage disease was determined by literature review. A model was developed to estimate the utility-adjusted survival detriment due to the side effects of hormone therapy. The NNTs before and after the incorporation of hormone sequelae were computed; the sign and magnitude of the NNTs were used to gauge the effect of the hormones. Results: The absolute NNT analysis, based on summarizing the results of 8 reports including a total of 3652 patients, demonstrated an advantage to the addition of hormones for the general early-stage prostate cancer population as well as for all prognostic groups. After adjustment for hormone-induced functional loss, the advantage of hormones remained considerable in the high- and intermediate-risk groups, with the utility-adjusted NNT becoming weakened in the low-risk group when the utility compromise from complications of hormones was assumed to be considerable. Conclusions: Short-term hormone therapy seems to be beneficial for selected early-stage prostate cancer patients. The advantage seems to be greatest in the intermediate- and high-risk groups; with current follow-up, the side effects of hormones may outweigh their benefit in certain clinical situations in the favorable group. The present investigation demonstrates the significant role of the NNT technique for oncologic and radiotherapeutic management decisions when treatment complications need to be considered and balanced with the beneficial effects of the treatment.

  14. Enteric-coated, highly standardized cranberry extract reduces risk of UTIs and urinary symptoms during radiotherapy for prostate carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Bonetta, Alberto; Di Pierro, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Background Cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) proanthocyanidins can interfere with adhesion of bacteria to uroepithelial cells, potentially preventing lower urinary tract infections (LUTIs). Because LUTIs are a common side effect of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for prostate cancer, we evaluated the clinical efficacy of enteric-coated tablets containing highly standardized V. msacrocarpon (ecVM) in this condition. Methods A total of 370 consecutive patients were entered into this study. All patients received intensity-modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer; 184 patients were also treated with ecVM while 186 served as controls. Cranberry extract therapy started on the simulation day, at which time a bladder catheterization was performed. During EBRT (over 6–7 weeks), all patients underwent weekly examination for urinary tract symptoms, including regular urine cultures during the treatment period. Results Compliance was excellent, with no adverse effects or allergic reactions being observed, apart from gastric pain in two patients. In the cranberry cohort (n = 184), 16 LUTIs (8.7%) were observed, while in the control group (n = 186) 45 LUTIs (24.2%) were recorded. This difference was statistically significant. Furthermore, lower rates of nocturia, urgency, micturition frequency, and dysuria were observed in the group that received cranberry extract. Conclusion Cranberry extracts have been reported to reduce the incidence of LUTIs significantly in women and children. Our data extend these results to patients with prostate cancer undergoing irradiation to the pelvis, who had a significant reduction in LUTIs compared with controls. These results were accompanied by a statistically significant reduction in urinary tract symptoms (dysuria, nocturia, urinary frequency, urgency), suggesting a generally protective effect of cranberry extract on the bladder mucosa. PMID:22977312

  15. Mathematical Model for Evaluating Incidence of Acute Rectal Toxicity During Conventional or Hypofractionated Radiotherapy Courses for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Strigari, Lidia Arcangeli, Giorgio; Arcangeli, Stefano; Benassi, Marcello

    2009-04-01

    Purpose: To describe the radiation-induced acute rectal toxicity (ART) using a modified Lyman-Kutcher-Burman normal tissue complication probability model and parameters set, taking into account the overall treatment time. Methods and Materials: A total of 160 patients underwent three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy to the prostate and seminal vesicles and were randomized to receive 80 Gy in 40 fractions within 8 weeks (Group A) or 62 Gy in 20 fractions within 5 weeks, 4 d/wk (Group B). An additional 52 patients (Group C) underwent intensity-modulated radiotherapy with a hypofractionation schedule consisting of 56 Gy, delivered in 16 fractions (4/wk) of 3.5 Gy. Patients were followed for ART weekly during treatment. The overall treatment time, rectal dose-volume histograms, and ART status, defined as Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 2 or greater gastrointestinal toxicity, were used to determine the modified Lyman-Kutcher-Burman model parameters. The m and n values were obtained from the cohort, and the tolerance doses for 50% complication probability for uniform irradiation [TD{sub 50}(1){sub k}] were obtained for each fractionation schedule indicated with k. Results: Of 212 patients treated with localized prostate radiotherapy, 65 developed Grade for {>=}1 week during treatment. The m and n value was 0.17 and 0.08, respectively. The TD{sub 50}(1){sub k} parameter was 79, 62.5, and 53 Gy, respectively for Group A, B, and C. Conclusion: The optimized modified Lyman-Kutcher-Burman normal tissue complication probability model allowed us to describe the ART data from conventional and hypofractionated regimens, using the dose-volume histograms and overall treatment time. This model could prove useful in designing hypofractionation schedules to reduce the incidence of ART.

  16. SU-D-9A-06: 3D Localization of Neurovascular Bundles Through MR-TRUS Registration in Prostate Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, X; Rossi, P; Ogunleye, T; Jani, A; Curran, W; Liu, T

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Erectile dysfunction (ED) is the most common complication of prostate-cancer radiotherapy (RT) and the major mechanism is radiation-induced neurovascular bundle (NVB) damage. However, the localization of the NVB remains challenging. This study's purpose is to accurately localize 3D NVB by integrating MR and transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) images through MR-TRUS fusion. Methods: T1 and T2-weighted MR prostate images were acquired using a Philips 1.5T MR scanner and a pelvic phase-array coil. The 3D TRUS images were captured with a clinical scanner and a 7.5 MHz biplane probe. The TRUS probe was attached to a stepper; the B-mode images were captured from the prostate base to apex at a 1-mm step and the Doppler images were acquired in a 5-mm step. The registration method modeled the prostate tissue as an elastic material, and jointly estimated the boundary condition (surface deformation) and the volumetric deformations under elastic constraint. This technique was validated with a clinical study of 7 patients undergoing RT treatment for prostate cancer. The accuracy of our approach was assessed through the locations of landmarks, as well as previous ultrasound Doppler images of patients. Results: MR-TRUS registration was successfully performed for all patients. The mean displacement of the landmarks between the post-registration MR and TRUS images was 1.37±0.42 mm, which demonstrated the precision of the registration based on the biomechanical model; and the NVB volume Dice Overlap Coefficient was 92.1±3.2%, which demonstrated the accuracy of the NVB localization. Conclusion: We have developed a novel approach to improve 3D NVB localization through MR-TRUS fusion for prostate RT, demonstrated its clinical feasibility, and validated its accuracy with ultrasound Doppler data. This technique could be a useful tool as we try to spare the NVB in prostate RT, monitor NBV response to RT, and potentially improve post-RT potency outcomes.

  17. A phase I dose-escalation study of oral BR-DIM (BioResponse 3,3′- Diindolylmethane) in castrate-resistant, non-metastatic prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Heath, Elisabeth I; Heilbrun, Lance K; Li, Jing; Vaishampayan, Ulka; Harper, Felicity; Pemberton, Pam; Sarkar, Fazlul H

    2010-01-01

    3, 3′-diindolylmethane (DIM) modulates estrogen metabolism and acts as an anti-androgen which down-regulates the androgen receptor and prostate specific antigen (PSA). We conducted a dose-escalation, phase I study of BioResponse (BR)-DIM with objectives to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), toxicity profile, and phar-macokinetics (PK) of BR-DIM, and to assess its effects on serum PSA and quality of life (QoL). Patients and Methods: Cohorts of 3-6 patients received escalating doses of twice daily oral BR-DIM providing DIM at 75 mg, then 150 mg, 225 mg, and 300 mg. Toxicity was evaluated monthly. Serum PSA and QoL were measured at baseline, monthly during treatment, and at end of study. Results: 12 patients with castrate-resistant, non-metastatic, PSA relapse prostate cancer were treated over 4 dose cohorts; 2 patients (at 150 mg and 225 mg, respectively) underwent intra-patient dose escalation, by one dose level. After oral administration of the first dose of BR-DIM, the plasma exposure to DIM appeared dose proportional at doses ranging from 75 to 300 mg, with the mean Cmax and mean AUClast increasing from 41.6 to 236.4 ng/ml and from 192.0 to 899.0 ng/ml*h, respectively. Continued relatively stable systemic exposure to DIM was achieved following twice daily oral administration of BR-DIM. Minimal toxicity was observed. Two of the four patients treated at 300 mg had grade 3 asymptomatic hyponatremia (AH) discovered on routine blood work. The other 2 patients at this dose had no AH. Therefore, the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) was deemed to be 300 mgand the recommended phase II dose (RP2D) of BR-DIM was 225 mg twice daily. One patient without AH at 225 mg experienced a 50% PSA decline. One patient with BR-DIM dose of 225 mg had PSA stabilization. The other 10 patients had an initial deceleration of their PSA rise (decrease in slope), but eventually progressed based on continual PSA rise or evidence of metastatic disease. Ten patients completed monthly Qo

  18. Magnitude of speed of sound aberration corrections for ultrasound image guided radiotherapy for prostate and other anatomical sites

    SciTech Connect

    Fontanarosa, Davide; Meer, Skadi van der; Bloemen-van Gurp, Esther; Stroian, Gabriela; Verhaegen, Frank

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work is to assess the magnitude of speed of sound (SOS) aberrations in three-dimensional ultrasound (US) imaging systems in image guided radiotherapy. The discrepancy between the fixed SOS value of 1540 m/s assumed by US systems in human soft tissues and its actual nonhomogeneous distribution in patients produces small but systematic errors of up to a few millimeters in the positions of scanned structures. Methods: A correction, provided by a previously published density-based algorithm, was applied to a set of five prostate, five liver, and five breast cancer patients. The shifts of the centroids of target structures and the change in shape were evaluated. Results: After the correction the prostate cases showed shifts up to 3.6 mm toward the US probe, which may explain largely the reported positioning discrepancies in the literature on US systems versus other imaging modalities. Liver cases showed the largest changes in volume of the organ, up to almost 9%, and shifts of the centroids up to more than 6 mm either away or toward the US probe. Breast images showed systematic small shifts of the centroids toward the US probe with a maximum magnitude of 1.3 mm. Conclusions: The applied correction in prostate and liver cancer patients shows positioning errors of several mm due to SOS aberration; the errors are smaller in breast cancer cases, but possibly becoming more important when breast tissue thickness increases.

  19. Predictive Factors for Late Genitourinary and Gastrointestinal Toxicity in Patients With Prostate Cancer Treated With Adjuvant or Salvage Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Mary; Hanlon, Alexandra L.; Pisansky, Thomas M.; Kuban, Deborah; Catton, Charles N.; Michalski, Jeff M.; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Kupelian, Patrick A.; Pollack, Alan; Kestin, Larry L.; Valicenti, Richard K.; De Weese, Theodore L.; Sandler, Howard M. . E-mail: hsandler@med.umich.edu

    2007-08-01

    Purpose: To determine the rate and magnitude of late genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities after salvage or adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) for prostate cancer, and to determine predictive factors for these toxicities. Methods and Materials: A large multi-institutional database that included 959 men who received postoperative RT after radical prostatectomy (RP) was analyzed: 19% received adjuvant RT, 81% received salvage RT, 78% were treated to the prostate bed only, and 22% received radiation to the pelvis. Results: The median follow-up time was 55 months. At 5 years, 10% of patients had Grade 2 late GU toxicity and 1% had Grade 3 late GU toxicity, while 4% of patients had Grade 2 late GI toxicity and 0.4% had Grade 3 late GI toxicity. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that adjuvant RT (p = 0.03), androgen deprivation (p < 0.0001), and prostate bed-only RT (p = 0.007) predicted for Grade 2 or higher late GU toxicity. For GI toxicity, although adjuvant RT was significant in the univariate analysis, no significant factors were found in the multivariate analysis. Conclusions: Overall, the number of high-grade toxicities for postoperative RT was low. Therefore, adjuvant and salvage RT can safely be used in the appropriate settings.

  20. Ultrasound-Guided Transrectal Implantation of Gold Markers for Prostate Localization During External Beam Radiotherapy: Complication Rate and Risk Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Langenhuijsen, Johan F.; Lin, Emile N.J.T. van Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Vight, Lisette P. van der; McColl, Gill; Visser, Andries G.; Witjes, J. Alfred

    2007-11-01

    Purpose: To report the complication rate and risk factors of transrectally implanted gold markers, used for prostate position verification and correction procedures. Methods and Materials: In 209 consecutive men with localized prostate cancer, four gold markers (1 x 7 mm) were inserted under ultrasound guidance in an outpatient setting, and the toxicity was analyzed. All patients received a questionnaire regarding complications after marker implantation. The complications and risk factors were further evaluated by reviewing the medical charts. Results: Of the 209 men, 13 (6.2%) had a moderate complication, consisting of pain and fever that resolved after treatment with oral medication. In 1.9% of the men, minor voiding complaints were observed. Other minor transient complications, defined as hematuria lasting >3 days, hematospermia, and rectal bleeding, occurred in 3.8%, 18.5%, and 9.1% of the patients, respectively. These complications were seen more often in patients with advanced tumor stage, younger age, and shorter duration of hormonal therapy. Conclusion: Transrectal gold marker implantation for high-precision prostate radiotherapy is a safe and well-tolerated procedure.

  1. MR-guided pulsed high intensity focused ultrasound enhancement of docetaxel combined with radiotherapy for prostate cancer treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Zhaomei; Ma, C.-M.; Chen, Xiaoming; Cvetkovic, Dusica; Pollack, Alan; Chen, Lili

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of the enhancement of docetaxel by pulsed focused ultrasound (pFUS) in combination with radiotherapy (RT) for treatment of prostate cancer in vivo. LNCaP cells were grown in the prostates of male nude mice. When the tumors reached a designated volume by MRI, tumor bearing mice were randomly divided into seven groups (n = 5): (1) pFUS alone; (2) RT alone; (3) docetaxel alone; (4) docetaxel + pFUS (5) docetaxel + RT (6) docetaxel + pFUS + RT, and (7) control. MR-guided pFUS treatment was performed using a focused ultrasound treatment system (InSightec ExAblate 2000) with a 1.5T GE MR scanner. Animals were treated once with pFUS, docetaxel, RT or their combinations. Docetaxel was given by i.v. injection at 5 mg kg-1 before pFUS. RT was given 2 Gy after pFUS. Animals were euthanized 4 weeks after treatment. Tumor volumes were measured on MRI at 1 and 4 weeks post-treatment. Results showed that triple combination therapies of docetaxel, pFUS and RT provided the most significant tumor growth inhibition among all groups, which may have potential for the treatment of prostate cancer due to an improved therapeutic ratio.

  2. Radiation-induced second primary cancer risks from modern external beam radiotherapy for early prostate cancer: impact of stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR), volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and flattening filter free (FFF) radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Louise J.; Thompson, Christopher M.; Lilley, John; Cosgrove, Vivian; Franks, Kevin; Sebag-Montefiore, David; Henry, Ann M.

    2015-02-01

    Risks of radiation-induced second primary cancer following prostate radiotherapy using 3D-conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), flattening filter free (FFF) and stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) were evaluated. Prostate plans were created using 10 MV 3D-CRT (78 Gy in 39 fractions) and 6 MV 5-field IMRT (78 Gy in 39 fractions), VMAT (78 Gy in 39 fractions, with standard flattened and energy-matched FFF beams) and SABR (42.7 Gy in 7 fractions with standard flattened and energy-matched FFF beams). Dose-volume histograms from pelvic planning CT scans of three prostate patients, each planned using all 6 techniques, were used to calculate organ equivalent doses (OED) and excess absolute risks (EAR) of second rectal and bladder cancers, and pelvic bone and soft tissue sarcomas, using mechanistic, bell-shaped and plateau models. For organs distant to the treatment field, chamber measurements recorded in an anthropomorphic phantom were used to calculate OEDs and EARs using a linear model. Ratios of OED give relative radiation-induced second cancer risks. SABR resulted in lower second cancer risks at all sites relative to 3D-CRT. FFF resulted in lower second cancer risks in out-of-field tissues relative to equivalent flattened techniques, with increasing impact in organs at greater distances from the field. For example, FFF reduced second cancer risk by up to 20% in the stomach and up to 56% in the brain, relative to the equivalent flattened technique. Relative to 10 MV 3D-CRT, 6 MV IMRT or VMAT with flattening filter increased second cancer risks in several out-of-field organs, by up to 26% and 55%, respectively. For all techniques, EARs were consistently low. The observed large relative differences between techniques, in absolute terms, were very low, highlighting the importance of considering absolute risks alongside the corresponding relative risks, since when absolute

  3. Radiation-induced second primary cancer risks from modern external beam radiotherapy for early prostate cancer: impact of stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR), volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and flattening filter free (FFF) radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Murray, Louise J; Thompson, Christopher M; Lilley, John; Cosgrove, Vivian; Franks, Kevin; Sebag-Montefiore, David; Henry, Ann M

    2015-02-01

    Risks of radiation-induced second primary cancer following prostate radiotherapy using 3D-conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), flattening filter free (FFF) and stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) were evaluated. Prostate plans were created using 10 MV 3D-CRT (78 Gy in 39 fractions) and 6 MV 5-field IMRT (78 Gy in 39 fractions), VMAT (78 Gy in 39 fractions, with standard flattened and energy-matched FFF beams) and SABR (42.7 Gy in 7 fractions with standard flattened and energy-matched FFF beams). Dose-volume histograms from pelvic planning CT scans of three prostate patients, each planned using all 6 techniques, were used to calculate organ equivalent doses (OED) and excess absolute risks (EAR) of second rectal and bladder cancers, and pelvic bone and soft tissue sarcomas, using mechanistic, bell-shaped and plateau models. For organs distant to the treatment field, chamber measurements recorded in an anthropomorphic phantom were used to calculate OEDs and EARs using a linear model. Ratios of OED give relative radiation-induced second cancer risks. SABR resulted in lower second cancer risks at all sites relative to 3D-CRT. FFF resulted in lower second cancer risks in out-of-field tissues relative to equivalent flattened techniques, with increasing impact in organs at greater distances from the field. For example, FFF reduced second cancer risk by up to 20% in the stomach and up to 56% in the brain, relative to the equivalent flattened technique. Relative to 10 MV 3D-CRT, 6 MV IMRT or VMAT with flattening filter increased second cancer risks in several out-of-field organs, by up to 26% and 55%, respectively. For all techniques, EARs were consistently low. The observed large relative differences between techniques, in absolute terms, were very low, highlighting the importance of considering absolute risks alongside the corresponding relative risks, since when absolute

  4. Residual Prostate Cancer in Patients Treated With Endocrine Therapy With or Without Radical Radiotherapy: A Side Study of the SPCG-7 Randomized Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Solberg, Arne; Haugen, Olav A.; Viset, Trond; Bergh, Anders; Ahlgren, Goeran; Widmark, Anders; Angelsen, Anders

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: The Scandinavian Prostate Cancer Group-7 randomized trial demonstrated a survival benefit of combined endocrine therapy and external-beam radiotherapy over endocrine therapy alone in patients with high-risk prostate cancer. In a subset of the study population, the incidence and clinical implications of residual prostate cancer in posttreatment prostate biopsy specimens was evaluated. Methods and Materials: Biopsy specimens were obtained from 120 of 875 men in the Scandinavian Prostate Cancer Group-7 study. Results: Biopsies were performed at median of 45 months follow-up. In 63 patients receiving endocrine treatment only and 57 patients receiving combined treatment, residual cancer was found in 66% (n = 41) and 22% (n = 12), respectively (p < 0.0001). The vast majority of residual tumors were poorly differentiated (Gleason score {>=}8). Endocrine therapy alone was predictive of residual prostate cancer: odds ratio 7.49 (3.18-17.7), p < 0.0001. In patients with positive vs. negative biopsy the incidences of clinical events were as follows: biochemical recurrence 74% vs. 27% (p < 0.0001), local progression 26% vs. 4.7% (p = 0.002), distant recurrence 17% vs. 9.4% (p = 0.27), clinical recurrence 36% vs. 13% (p = 0.006), cancer-specific death 19% vs. 9.7% (p = 0.025). In multivariable analysis, biochemical recurrence was significantly associated with residual cancer: hazard ratio 2.69 (1.45-4.99), p = 0.002, and endocrine therapy alone hazard ratio 3.45 (1.80-6.62), p < 0.0001. Conclusions: Radiotherapy combined with hormones improved local tumor control in comparison with endocrine therapy alone. Residual prostate cancer was significantly associated with serum prostate-specific antigen recurrence, local tumor progression, clinical recurrence, and cancer-specific death in univariable analysis. Residual cancer was predictive of prostate-specific antigen recurrence in multivariable analysis.

  5. Improved Biochemical Outcomes With Statin Use in Patients With High-Risk Localized Prostate Cancer Treated With Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kollmeier, Marisa A.; Katz, Matthew S.; Mak, Kimberley; Yamada, Yoshiya; Feder, David J.; Zhang Zhigang; Jia Xiaoyu; Shi Weiji; Zelefsky, Michael J.

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: To investigate the association between 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins) and biochemical and survival outcomes after high-dose radiotherapy (RT) for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 1711 men with clinical stage T1-T3 prostate cancer were treated with conformal RT to a median dose of 81 Gy during 1995-2007. Preradiotherapy medication data were available for 1681 patients. Three hundred eighty-two patients (23%) were taking a statin medication at diagnosis and throughout RT. Nine hundred forty-seven patients received a short-course of neoadjuvant and concurrent androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) with RT. The median follow-up was 5.9 years. Results: The 5- and 8-year PSA relapse-free survival (PRFS) rates for statin patients were 89% and 80%, compared with 83% and 74% for those not taking statins (p = 0.002). In a multivariate analysis, statin use (hazard ratio [HR]0.69, p = 0.03), National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) low-risk group, and ADT use were associated with improved PRFS. Only high-risk patients in the statin group demonstrated improvement in PRFS (HR 0.52, p = 0.02). Across all groups, statin use was not associated with improved distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) (p = 0.51). On multivariate analysis, lower NCCN risk group (p = 0.01) and ADT use (p = 0.005) predicted improved DMFS. Conclusions: Statin use during high-dose RT for clinically localized prostate cancer was associated with a significant improvement in PRFS in high-risk patients. These data suggest that statins have anticancer activity and possibly provide radiosensitization when used in conjunction with RT in the treatment of prostate cancer.

  6. Use of Local {sup 111}In-Capromab Pendetide Scan Results to Predict Outcome After Salvage Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Koontz, Bridget F. Mouraviev, Vladimir; Johnson, Jeffrey L.; Mayes, Janice; Chen, Stephanie H.; Wong, Terence Z.; Anscher, Mitchell S.; Sun, Leon; Moul, Judd; Polascik, Thomas J.

    2008-06-01

    Purpose: The {sup 111}In-capromab pendetide scan (ProstaScint; Cytogen Corp., Princeton NJ) is approved by the Food and Drug Administration to evaluate increasing prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels after radical prostatectomy. This study evaluated the role of prostate bed {sup 111}In-capromab pendetide scan findings to predict response to salvage radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Forty patients who had PSA recurrence after radical prostatectomy and a {sup 111}In-capromab pendetide scan immediately before salvage prostate bed RT (median, 66 Gy) were identified from the Duke Prostate Center database. Patients with distant uptake of capromab pendetide or long-term androgen deprivation therapy were excluded. Median follow-up after salvage RT was 2.7 years. Patient demographic, clinical, and pathologic characteristics; PSA values; and {sup 111}In-capromab pendetide scan results were retrospectively analyzed. A PSA failure after salvage RT was defined as PSA level greater than 0.2 ng/ml. Data were combined with other published results in a secondary pooled analysis of 106 patients. Results: {sup 111}In-Capromab pendetide findings included 20 patients with negative scan results and 20 with locally positive scan results. Two-year progression-free survival rates were 60% for patients with a negative scan result and 74% for those with a locally positive scan result (p = 0.49). Combined analysis did not show a difference in outcome based on local {sup 111}In-capromab pendetide scan result. Conclusion: For patients without distant signal detected by using {sup 111}In-capromab pendetide scan, patients with locally positive scan findings did not have statistically different progression-free survival than those with a negative scan result, suggesting that salvage RT may be successful in patients with either a locally positive or negative {sup 111}In-capromab pendetide scan result.

  7. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Localization of Recurrent Prostate Cancer After External Beam Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Haider, Masoom A. Chung, Peter; Sweet, Joan; Toi, Ants; Jhaveri, Kartik; Menard, Cynthia; Warde, Padraig; Trachtenberg, John; Lockwood, Gina M.Math.; Milosevic, Michael

    2008-02-01

    Purpose: To compare the performance of T2-weighted (T2w) imaging and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the prostate gland in the localization of recurrent prostate cancer in patients with biochemical failure after external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Methods and Materials: T2-weighted imaging and DCE MRI were performed in 33 patients with suspected relapse after EBRT. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI was performed with a temporal resolution of 95 s. Voxels enhancing at 46 s after injection to a greater degree than the mean signal intensity of the prostate at 618 s were considered malignant. Results from MRI were correlated with biopsies from six regions in the peripheral zone (PZ) (base, mid, and apex). The percentage of biopsy core positive for malignancy from each region was correlated with the maximum diameter of the tumor on DCE MRI with a linear regression model. Results: On a sextant basis, DCE MRI had significantly better sensitivity (72% [21of 29] vs. 38% [11 of 29]), positive predictive value (46% [21 of 46] vs. 24% [11 of 45]) and negative predictive value (95% [144 of 152] vs. 88% [135 of 153] than T2w imaging. Specificities were high for both DCE MRI and T2w imaging (85% [144 of 169] vs. 80% [135 of 169]). There was a linear relationship between tumor diameters on DCE MRI and the percentage of cancer tissue in the corresponding biopsy core (r = 0.9, p < 0.001), with a slope of 1.2. Conclusions: Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI performs better than T2w imaging in the detection and localization of prostate cancer in the peripheral zone after EBRT. This may be helpful in the planning of salvage therapy.

  8. Interfractional Prostate Shifts: Review of 1870 Computed Tomography (CT) Scans Obtained During Image-Guided Radiotherapy Using CT-on-Rails for the Treatment of Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, James R. Gao Zhanrong; Uematsu, Minoru; Merrick, Scott; Machernis, Nolan P.; Chen, Timothy; Cheng, C.W.

    2008-12-01

    Purpose: To review 1870 CT scans of interfractional prostate shift obtained during image-guided radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 1870 pretreatment CT scans were acquired with CT-on-rails, and the corresponding shift data for 329 patients with prostate cancer were analyzed. Results: Of the 1870 scans reviewed, 44% required no setup adjustments in the anterior-posterior (AP) direction, 14% had shifts of 3-5 mm, 29% had shifts of 6-10 mm, and 13% had shifts of >10 mm. In the superior-inferior direction, 81% had no adjustments, 2% had shifts of 3-5 mm, 15% had shifts of 6-10 mm, and 2% had shifts of >10 mm. In the left-right direction, 65% had no adjustment, 13% had shifts of 3-5 mm, 17% had shifts of 6-10 mm, and 5% had shifts of >10 mm. Further analysis of the first 66 consecutive patients divided into three groups according to body mass index indicates that the shift in the AP direction for the overweight subgroup was statistically larger than those for the control and obese subgroups (p < 0.05). The interfractional shift in the lateral direction for the obese group (1 SD, 5.5 mm) was significantly larger than those for the overweight and control groups (4.1 and 2.9 mm, respectively) (p < 0.001). Conclusions: These data demonstrate that there is a significantly greater shift in the AP direction than in the lateral and superior-inferior directions for the entire patient group. Overweight and obese patient groups show a significant difference from the control group in terms of prostate shift.

  9. Improvement in toxicity in high risk prostate cancer patients treated with image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy compared to 3D conformal radiotherapy without daily image guidance

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) facilitates the delivery of a very precise radiation dose. In this study we compare the toxicity and biochemical progression-free survival between patients treated with daily image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) and 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) without daily image guidance for high risk prostate cancer (PCa). Methods A total of 503 high risk PCa patients treated with radiotherapy (RT) and endocrine treatment between 2000 and 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. 115 patients were treated with 3DCRT, and 388 patients were treated with IG-IMRT. 3DCRT patients were treated to 76 Gy and without daily image guidance and with 1–2 cm PTV margins. IG-IMRT patients were treated to 78 Gy based on daily image guidance of fiducial markers, and the PTV margins were 5–7 mm. Furthermore, the dose-volume constraints to both the rectum and bladder were changed with the introduction of IG-IMRT. Results The 2-year actuarial likelihood of developing grade > = 2 GI toxicity following RT was 57.3% in 3DCRT patients and 5.8% in IG-IMRT patients (p < 0.001). For GU toxicity the numbers were 41.8% and 29.7%, respectively (p = 0.011). On multivariate analysis, 3DCRT was associated with a significantly increased risk of developing grade > = 2 GI toxicity compared to IG-IMRT (p < 0.001, HR = 11.59 [CI: 6.67-20.14]). 3DCRT was also associated with an increased risk of developing GU toxicity compared to IG-IMRT. The 3-year actuarial biochemical progression-free survival probability was 86.0% for 3DCRT and 90.3% for IG-IMRT (p = 0.386). On multivariate analysis there was no difference in biochemical progression-free survival between 3DCRT and IG-IMRT. Conclusion The difference in toxicity can be attributed to the combination of the IMRT technique with reduced dose to organs-at-risk, daily image guidance and margin reduction. PMID:24495815

  10. [Use of gold radionuclide markers implanted into the prostate for image-guided radiotherapy in prostate cancer: side effects caused by the marker implantation].

    PubMed

    Kliton, Jorgo; Ágoston, Péter; Szabó, Zoltán; Major, Tibor; Polgár, Csaba

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of the study was to introduce the use of the gold radiopaque markers implanted into the prostate for image-guided radiotherapy of prostate cancer patients and to present the side effects caused by the marker implantation. Between November 2011 and November 2013, three radiopaque, gold-plated markers (Best Medical International, Springfield, VA, USA, 1.0 mm x 3.0 mm) were implanted transperineally into the prostate of 60 patients under transrectal ultrasound guidance. Local anaesthesia was performed in all patients. A week after the procedure the patients filled in a questionnaire regarding the pain, dysuria, urinary frequency, nycturia, rectal bleeding, haematuria, haematospermia or fever symptoms caused by the implantation. The pain caused by the intervention was scored on a 1-10 scale, where 1 was a very weak and 10 was an unbearable pain. Ten days after the implantation a treatment planning CT was performed and subsequently patients started intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) within one week. During the treatments markers were used for daily verification and correction of patient's setup. No patients experienced fever or infection. Based on the questionnaires nobody experienced dysuria or rectal bleeding after implantation. Among the 60 patients studied, five (8 %) had haematospermia, nine (15 %) haematuria, which lasted in average of 3.4 and 1.8 days, respectively. The average pain score on 1-10 scale was 4.2 (range: 0-9). After the marker implantation 18 patients (30%) reported less, 10 patients (17%) more, and 27 patients (45%) equal amount of pain compared to biopsy. Five patients, who had a biopsy performed under general anaesthesia, did not answer this question. None of the patients needed analgesics after implantation. The gold marker implantation implemented for image-guided radiotherapy was well tolerated under a local anaesthesia. The complications were limited, rate and frequency of perioperative pain was comparable to the pain

  11. Carbon-ion radiotherapy for locally advanced or unfavorably located choroidal melanoma: A Phase I/II dose-escalation study

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuji, Hiroshi . E-mail: h_tsuji@nirs.go.jp; Ishikawa, Hitoshi; Yanagi, Takeshi; Hirasawa, Naoki; Kamada, Tadashi; Mizoe, Jun-Etsu; Kanai, Tatsuaki; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Ohnishi, Yoshitaka

    2007-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the applicability of carbon ion beams for the treatment of choroidal melanoma with regard to normal tissue morbidity and local tumor control. Methods and Materials: Between January 2001 and February 2006, 59 patients with locally advanced or unfavorably located choroidal melanoma were enrolled in a Phase I/II clinical trial of carbon-ion radiotherapy at the National Institute of Radiologic Sciences. The primary endpoint of this study was normal tissue morbidity, and secondary endpoints were local tumor control and patient survival. Of the 59 subjects enrolled, 57 were followed >6 months and analyzed. Results: Twenty-three patients (40%) developed neovascular glaucoma, and three underwent enucleation for eye pain due to elevated intraocular pressure. Incidence of neovascular glaucoma was dependent on tumor size and site. Five patients had died at analysis, three of distant metastasis and two of concurrent disease. All but one patient, who developed marginal recurrence, were controlled locally. Six patients developed distant metastasis, five in the liver and one in the lung. Three-year overall survival, disease-free survival, and local control rates were 88.2%, 84.8%, and 97.4%, respectively. No apparent dose-response relationship was observed in either tumor control or normal tissue morbidity at the dose range applied. Conclusion: Carbon-ion radiotherapy can be applied to choroidal melanoma with an acceptable morbidity and sufficient antitumor effect, even with tumors of unfavorable size or site.

  12. Health-Related Quality of Life in Patients With Locally Advanced Prostate Cancer After 76 Gy Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy vs. 70 Gy Conformal Radiotherapy in a Prospective and Longitudinal Study

    SciTech Connect

    Lips, Irene Dehnad, Human; Kruger, Arto Boeken; Moorselaar, Jeroen van; Heide, Uulke van; Battermann, Jan; Vulpen, Marco van

    2007-11-01

    Purpose: To compare quality of life (QoL) after 70 Gy conformal radiotherapy with QoL after 76 Gy intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in patients with locally advanced prostate carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Seventy-eight patients with locally advanced prostate cancer were treated with 70 Gy three-field conformal radiotherapy, and 92 patients received 76 Gy IMRT with fiducial markers for position verification. Quality of life was measured by RAND-36, the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer core questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-C30(+3)), and the prostate-specific EORTC QLQ-PR25, before radiotherapy (baseline) and 1 month and 6 months after treatment. Quality of life changes in time (baseline vs. 1 month and baseline vs. 6 months) of {>=}10 points were considered clinically relevant. Results: Differences between the treatment groups for QoL changes over time occurred in several QoL domains. The 76-Gy group revealed no significant deterioration in QoL compared with the 70-Gy group. The IMRT 76-Gy group even demonstrated a significantly better change in QoL from baseline to 1 month in several domains. The conformal 70-Gy group revealed temporary deterioration in pain, role functioning, and urinary symptoms; for the IMRT 76-Gy group a better QoL in terms of change in health existed after 1 month, which persisted after 6 months. For both treatment groups temporary deterioration in physical role restriction occurred after 1 month, and an improvement in emotional role restriction occurred after 6 months. Sexual activity was reduced after treatment for both groups and remained decreased after 6 months. Conclusions: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy and accurate position verification seem to provide a possibility to increase the radiation dose for prostate cancer without deterioration in QoL.

  13. High-Dose Conformal Radiotherapy Reduces Prostate Cancer-Specific Mortality: Results of a Meta-analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Viani, Gustavo Arruda; Godoi Bernardes da Silva, Lucas; Stefano, Eduardo Jose

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To determine in a meta-analysis whether prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM), biochemical or clinical failure (BCF), and overall mortality (OM) in men with localized prostate cancer treated with conformal high-dose radiotherapy (HDRT) are better than those in men treated with conventional-dose radiotherapy (CDRT). Methods and Materials: The MEDLINE, Embase, CANCERLIT, and Cochrane Library databases, as well as the proceedings of annual meetings, were systematically searched to identify randomized, controlled studies comparing conformal HDRT with CDRT for localized prostate cancer. Results: Five randomized, controlled trials (2508 patients) that met the study criteria were identified. Pooled results from these randomized, controlled trials showed a significant reduction in the incidence of PCSM and BCF rates at 5 years in patients treated with HDRT (p = 0.04 and p < 0.0001, respectively), with an absolute risk reduction (ARR) of PCSM and BCF at 5 years of 1.7% and 12.6%, respectively. Two trials evaluated PCSM with 10 years of follow up. The pooled results from these trials showed a statistical benefit for HDRT in terms of PCSM (p = 0.03). In the subgroup analysis, trials that used androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) showed an ARR for BCF of 12.9% (number needed to treat = 7.7, p < 0.00001), whereas trials without ADT had an ARR of 13.6% (number needed to treat = 7, p < 0.00001). There was no difference in the OM rate at 5 and 10 years (p = 0.99 and p = 0.11, respectively) between the groups receiving HDRT and CDRT. Conclusions: This meta-analysis is the first study to show that HDRT is superior to CDRT in preventing disease progression and prostate cancer-specific death in trials that used conformational technique to increase the total dose. Despite the limitations of our study in evaluating the role of ADT and HDRT, our data show no benefit for HDRT arms in terms of BCF in trials with or without ADT.

  14. Proton Radiotherapy for Pediatric Bladder/Prostate Rhabdomyosarcoma: Clinical Outcomes and Dosimetry Compared to Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Cotter, Shane E.; Herrup, David A.; Friedmann, Alison; Macdonald, Shannon M.; Pieretti, Raphael V.; Robinson, Gregoire; Adams, Judith; Tarbell, Nancy J.; Yock, Torunn I.

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: In this study, we report the clinical outcomes of 7 children with bladder/prostate rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) treated with proton radiation and compare proton treatment plans with matched intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans, with an emphasis on dose savings to reproductive and skeletal structures. Methods and Materials: Follow-up consisted of scheduled clinic appointments at our institution or direct communication with the treating physicians for referred patients. Each proton radiotherapy plan used for treatment was directly compared to an IMRT plan generated for the study. Clinical target volumes and normal tissue volumes were held constant to facilitate dosimetric comparisons. Each plan was optimized for target coverage and normal tissue sparing. Results: Seven male patients were treated with proton radiotherapy for bladder/prostate RMS at the Massachusetts General Hospital between 2002 and 2008. Median age at treatment was 30 months (11-70 months). Median follow-up was 27 months (10-90 months). Four patients underwent a gross total resection prior to radiation, and all patients received concurrent chemotherapy. Radiation doses ranged from 36 cobalt Gray equivalent (CGE) to 50.4 CGE. Five of 7 patients were without evidence of disease and with intact bladders at study completion. Target volume dosimetry was equivalent between the two modalities for all 7 patients. Proton radiotherapy led to a significant decrease in mean organ dose to the bladder (25.1 CGE vs. 33.2 Gy; p = 0.03), testes (0.0 CGE vs. 0.6 Gy; p = 0.016), femoral heads (1.6 CGE vs. 10.6 Gy; p = 0.016), growth plates (21.7 CGE vs. 32.4 Gy; p = 0.016), and pelvic bones (8.8 CGE vs. 13.5 Gy; p = 0.016) compared to IMRT. Conclusions: This study provides evidence of significant dose savings to normal structures with proton radiotherapy compared to IMRT and is well tolerated in this patient population. The long-term impact of these reduced doses can be tested in future studies

  15. An adaptive MR-CT registration method for MRI-guided prostate cancer radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Hualiang; Wen, Ning; Gordon, James J.; Elshaikh, Mohamed A.; Movsas, Benjamin; Chetty, Indrin J.

    2015-04-01

    Magnetic Resonance images (MRI) have superior soft tissue contrast compared with CT images. Therefore, MRI might be a better imaging modality to differentiate the prostate from surrounding normal organs. Methods to accurately register MRI to simulation CT images are essential, as we transition the use of MRI into the routine clinic setting. In this study, we present a finite element method (FEM) to improve the performance of a commercially available, B-spline-based registration algorithm in the prostate region. Specifically, prostate contours were delineated independently on ten MRI and CT images using the Eclipse treatment planning system. Each pair of MRI and CT images was registered with the B-spline-based algorithm implemented in the VelocityAI system. A bounding box that contains the prostate volume in the CT image was selected and partitioned into a tetrahedral mesh. An adaptive finite element method was then developed to adjust the displacement vector fields (DVFs) of the B-spline-based registrations within the box. The B-spline and FEM-based registrations were evaluated based on the variations of prostate volume and tumor centroid, the unbalanced energy of the generated DVFs, and the clarity of the reconstructed anatomical structures. The results showed that the volumes of the prostate contours warped with the B-spline-based DVFs changed 10.2% on average, relative to the volumes of the prostate contours on the original MR images. This discrepancy was reduced to 1.5% for the FEM-based DVFs. The average unbalanced energy was 2.65 and 0.38 mJ cm-3, and the prostate centroid deviation was 0.37 and 0.28 cm, for the B-spline and FEM-based registrations, respectively. Different from the B-spline-warped MR images, the FEM-warped MR images have clear boundaries between prostates and bladders, and their internal prostatic structures are consistent with those of the original MR images. In summary, the developed adaptive FEM method preserves the prostate volume

  16. Coplanar intensity-modulated radiotherapy class solution for patients with prostate cancer with bilateral hip prostheses with and without nodal involvement

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Young K.; McVey, Gerard P.; South, Chris P.; Dearnaley, David P.

    2013-07-01

    Dose distributions for prostate radiotherapy are difficult to predict in patients with bilateral hip prostheses in situ, due to image distortions and difficulty in dose calculation. The feasibility of delivering curative doses to prostate using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in patients with bilateral hip prostheses was evaluated. Planning target volumes for prostate only (PTV1) and pelvic nodes (PTV2) were generated from data on 5 patients. PTV1 and PTV2 dose prescriptions were 70 Gy and 60 Gy, respectively, in 35 fractions, and an additional nodal boost of 65 Gy was added for 1 plan. Rectum, bladder, and bowel were also delineated. Beam angles and segments were chosen to best avoid entering through the prostheses. Dose-volume data were assessed with respect to clinical objectives. The plans achieved the required prescription doses to the PTVs. Five-field IMRT plans were adequate for patients with relatively small prostheses (head volumes<60 cm{sup 3}) but 7-field plans were required for patients with larger prostheses. Bowel and bladder doses were clinically acceptable for all patients. Rectal doses were deemed clinically acceptable, although the V{sub 50} {sub Gy} objective was not met for 4/5 patients. We describe an IMRT solution for patients with bilateral hip prostheses of varying size and shape, requiring either localized or whole pelvic radiotherapy for prostate cancer.

  17. Avascular Necrosis of the Femoral Head After Palliative Radiotherapy in Metastatic Prostate Cancer: Absence of a Dose Threshold?

    PubMed Central

    Daoud, Alia M; Hudson, Mack; Magnus, Kenneth G; Huang, Fleur; Danielson, Brita L; Venner, Peter; Saluja, Ronak; LeGuerrier, Bronwen; Daly, Helene; Emmenegger, Urban

    2016-01-01

    Avascular necrosis (AVN) is the final common pathway resulting from insufficient blood supply to bone, commonly the femoral head. There are many postulated etiologies of non-traumatic AVN, including corticosteroids, bisphosphonates, and radiotherapy (RT). However, it is unclear whether there is a dose threshold for the development of RT-induced AVN. In this case report, we describe a patient with prostate cancer metastatic to bone diagnosed with AVN after receiving single-fraction palliative RT to the left femoral head. Potential contributing factors are discussed, along with a review of other reported cases. At present, the RT dose threshold below which there is no risk for AVN is unknown, and therefore detrimental impact from the RT cannot be excluded. Given the possibility that RT-induced AVN is a stochastic effect, it is important to be aware of the possibility of this diagnosis in any patient with a painful hip who has received RT to the femoral head. PMID:27081582

  18. Interfraction rotation of the prostate as evaluated by kilovoltage X-ray fiducial marker imaging in intensity-modulated radiotherapy of localized prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Graf, Reinhold; Boehmer, Dirk; Budach, Volker; Wust, Peter

    2012-01-01

    To quantify the daily rotation of the prostate during a radiotherapy course using stereoscopic kilovoltage (kV) x-ray imaging and intraprostatic fiducials for localization and positioning correction. From 2005 to 2009, radio-opaque fiducial markers were inserted into 38 patients via perineum into the prostate. The ExacTrac/Novalis Body X-ray 6-day image acquisition system (ET/NB; BrainLab AG, Feldkirchen, Germany) was used to determine and correct the target position. During the first period in 10 patients we recorded all rotation errors but used only Y (table) for correction. For the next 28 patients we used for correction all rotational coordinates, i.e., in addition Z (superior-inferior [SI] or roll) and X (left-right [LR] or tilt/pitch) according to the fiducial marker position by use of the Robotic Tilt Module and Varian Exact Couch. Rotation correction was applied above a threshold of 1 Degree-Sign displacement. The systematic and random errors were specified. Overall, 993 software-assisted rotational corrections were performed. The interfraction rotation errors of the prostate as assessed from the radiodense surrogate markers around the three axes Y, Z, and X were on average 0.09, -0.52, and -0.01 Degree-Sign with standard deviations of 2.01, 2.30, and 3.95 Degree-Sign , respectively. The systematic uncertainty per patient for prostate rotation was estimated with 2.30, 1.56, and 4.13 Degree-Sign and the mean random components with 1.81, 2.02, and 3.09 Degree-Sign . The largest rotational errors occurred around the X-axis (pitch), but without preferring a certain orientation. Although the error around Z (roll) can be compensated on average by a transformation with 4 coordinates, a significant error around X remains and advocates the full correction with 6 coordinates. Rotational errors as assessed via daily stereoscopic online imaging are significant and dominate around X. Rotation possibly degrades the dosimetric coverage of the target volume and may require

  19. Dose Escalation to the Dominant Intraprostatic Lesion Defined by Sextant Biopsy in a Permanent Prostate I-125 Implant: A Prospective Comparative Toxicity Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gaudet, Marc; Vigneault, Eric; Aubin, Sylviane; Varfalvy, Nicolas; Harel, Francois; Beaulieu, L.; Martin, Andre-Guy

    2010-05-01

    Purpose: Using real-time intraoperative inverse-planned permanent seed prostate implant (RTIOP/PSI), multiple core biopsy maps, and three-dimensional ultrasound guidance, we planned a boost volume (BV) within the prostate to which hyperdosage was delivered selectively. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential negative effects of such a procedure. Methods and Materials: Patients treated with RTIOP/PSI for localized prostate cancer with topographic biopsy results received an intraprostatic boost (boost group [BG]). They were compared with patients treated with a standard plan (reference group [RG]). Plans were generated using a simulated annealing inverse planning algorithm. Prospectively recorded urinary, rectal, and sexual toxicities and dosimetric parameters were compared between groups. Results: The study included 120 patients treated with boost technique who were compared with 70 patients treated with a standard plan. Boost technique did not significantly change the number of seeds (55.1/RG vs. 53.6/BG). The intraoperative prostate V150 was slightly higher in BG (75.2/RG vs. 77.2/BG, p = 0.039). Urethra V100, urethra D90, and rectal D50 were significantly lower in the BG. No significant differences were seen in acute or late urinary, rectal, or sexual toxicities. Conclusions: Because there were no differences between the groups in acute and late toxicities, we believe that BV can be planned and delivered to the dominant intraprostatic lesion without increasing toxicity. It is too soon to say whether a boost technique will ultimately increase local control.

  20. Multivariate analysis of factors predicting prostate dose in intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Tomita, Tsuneyuki; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Hirose, Yoshinori; Kitsuda, Kenji; Notogawa, Takuya; Miki, Katsuhito; Nakamura, Kiyonao; Ishigaki, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a multivariate analysis to determine relationships between prostate radiation dose and the state of surrounding organs, including organ volumes and the internal angle of the levator ani muscle (LAM), based on cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images after bone matching. We analyzed 270 CBCT data sets from 30 consecutive patients receiving intensity-modulated radiation therapy for prostate cancer. With patients in the supine position on a couch with the HipFix system, data for center of mass (COM) displacement of the prostate and the state of individual organs were acquired and compared between planning CT and CBCT scans. Dose distributions were then recalculated based on CBCT images. The relative effects of factors on the variance in COM, dose covering 95% of the prostate volume (D{sub 95%}), and percentage of prostate volume covered by the 100% isodose line (V{sub 100%}) were evaluated by a backward stepwise multiple regression analysis. COM displacement in the anterior-posterior direction (COM{sub AP}) correlated significantly with the rectum volume (δVr) and the internal LAM angle (δθ; R = 0.63). Weak correlations were seen for COM in the left-right (R = 0.18) and superior-inferior directions (R = 0.31). Strong correlations between COM{sub AP} and prostate D{sub 95%} and V{sub 100%} were observed (R ≥ 0.69). Additionally, the change ratios in δVr and δθ remained as predictors of prostate D{sub 95%} and V{sub 100%}. This study shows statistically that maintaining the same rectum volume and LAM state for both the planning CT simulation and treatment is important to ensure the correct prostate dose in the supine position with bone matching.

  1. Dosimetric and radiobiologic comparison of 3D conformal versus intensity modulated planning techniques for prostate bed radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Koontz, Bridget F; Das, Shiva; Temple, Kathy; Bynum, Sigrun; Catalano, Suzanne; Koontz, Jason I; Montana, Gustavo S; Oleson, James R

    2009-01-01

    Adjuvant radiotherapy for locally advanced prostate cancer improves biochemical and clinical disease-free survival. While comparisons in intact prostate cancer show a benefit for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) over 3D conformal planning, this has not been studied for post-prostatectomy radiotherapy (RT). This study compares normal tissue and target dosimetry and radiobiological modeling of IMRT vs. 3D conformal planning in the postoperative setting. 3D conformal plans were designed for 15 patients who had been treated with IMRT planning for salvage post-prostatectomy RT. The same computed tomography (CT) and target/normal structure contours, as well as prescription dose, was used for both IMRT and 3D plans. Normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCPs) were calculated based on the dose given to the bladder and rectum by both plans. Dose-volume histogram and NTCP data were compared by paired t-test. Bladder and rectal sparing were improved with IMRT planning compared to 3D conformal planning. The volume of the bladder receiving at least 75% (V75) and 50% (V50) of the dose was significantly reduced by 28% and 17%, respectively (p = 0.002 and 0.037). Rectal dose was similarly reduced, V75 by 33% and V50 by 17% (p = 0.001 and 0.004). While there was no difference in the volume of rectum receiving at least 65 Gy (V65), IMRT planning significant reduced the volume receiving 40 Gy or more (V40, p = 0.009). Bladder V40 and V65 were not significantly different between planning modalities. Despite these dosimetric differences, there was no significant difference in the NTCP for either bladder or rectal injury. IMRT planning reduces the volume of bladder and rectum receiving high doses during post-prostatectomy RT. Because of relatively low doses given to the bladder and rectum, there was no statistically significant improvement in NTCP between the 3D conformal and IMRT plans.

  2. Image-guided radiotherapy of the prostate using daily CBCT: the feasibility and likely benefit of implementing a margin reduction

    PubMed Central

    Benson, R J; Fairfoul, J; Cook, J; Huddart, R; Poynter, A

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether planning target volume (PTV) margins may be safely reduced in radiotherapy of localized prostate cancer incorporating daily online tube potential-cone beam CT (CBCT) image guidance and the anticipated benefit in predicted rectal toxicity. Methods: The prostate-only clinical target volume (CTV2) and rectum were delineated on 1 pre-treatment CBCT each week in 18 randomly selected patients. By transposing these contours onto the original plan, dose–volume histograms (DVHs) for CTV2 and the rectum were each calculated and combined, for each patient, to produce a single mean DVH representative of the dose delivered over the treatment course. Plans were reoptimized using reduced CTV2 to PTV2 margins and the consequent radiobiological impact modelled by the tumour control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) of the rectum. Results: All CBCT images were deemed of sufficient quality to identify the CTV and rectum. No loss of TCP was observed when plans using the standard 5-mm CTV2 to PTV2 margin of the centre were reoptimized with a 4- or 3-mm margin. Margin reduction was associated with a significant decrease in rectal NTCP (5–4 mm; p < 0.05 and 5–3 mm; p < 0.01). Conclusion: Using daily online image guidance with CBCT, a reduction in CTV2 to PTV2 margins to 3 mm is achievable without compromising tumour control. The consequent sparing of surrounding normal tissues is associated with reduced anticipated rectal toxicity. Advances in knowledge: Margin reduction is feasible and potentially beneficial. Centres with image-guided radiotherapy capability should consider assessing whether margin reduction is possible within their institutes. PMID:25354015

  3. A Phase II Trial of Arc-Based Hypofractionated Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy in Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lock, Michael; Best, Lara; Wong, Eugene; Bauman, Glenn; D'Souza, David; Venkatesan, Varagur; Sexton, Tracy; Ahmad, Belal; Izawa, Jonathan; Rodrigues, George

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate acute and late genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity and biochemical control of hypofractionated, image-guided (fiducial markers or ultrasound guidance), simplified intensity-modulated arc therapy for localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: This Phase II prospective clinical trial for T1a-2cNXM0 prostate cancer enrolled 66 patients who received 63.2 Gy in 20 fractions over 4 weeks. Fiducial markers were used for image guidance in 30 patients and daily ultrasound for the remainder. Toxicity was scored according to the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Results: Median follow-up was 36 months. Acute Phase Grade 2 and 3 toxicity was 34% and 9% for GU vs. 25% and 10% for GI symptoms. One Grade 4 acute GI toxicity occurred in a patient with unrecognized Crohn's disease. Late Grade 2 and 3 toxicity for GU was 14% and 5%, and GI toxicity was 25% and 3%. One late GI Grade 4 toxicity was observed in a patient with significant comorbidities (anticoagulation, vascular disease). Acute GI toxicity {>=}Grade 2 was shown to be a predictor for late toxicity Grade {>=}2 (p < 0.001). The biochemical disease-free survival at 3 years was 95%. Conclusions: Hypofractionated simplified intensity-modulated arc therapy radiotherapy given as 63.2 Gy in 20 fractions demonstrated promising biochemical control rates; however, higher rates of acute Grade 3 GU and GI toxicity and higher late Grade 2 GU and GI toxicity were noted. Ongoing randomized controlled trials should ultimately clarify issues regarding patient selection and the true rate of severe toxicity that can be directly attributed to hypofractionated radiotherapy.

  4. Long-term cancer-related fatigue outcomes in patients with locally advanced prostate cancer after intensity-modulated radiotherapy combined with hormonal therapy

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Hua-Chun; Lei, Yong; Cheng, Hui-Hua; Fu, Zhi-Chao; Liao, Shao-Guang; Feng, Jing; Yin, Qin; Chen, Qun-Hua; Lin, Gui-Shan; Zhu, Jin-Feng; Xu, Jian-Feng; Wang, Dian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of our study was to investigate the relationship between cancer-related fatigue and clinical parameters, and the effect factors of fatigue for the prostate cancer patients. Long-term follow-up is performed using the Fatigue Symptom Inventory before treatment (A), at the end of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (B), and 3 months (C), 12 months (D), 24 months (E), 36 months (F), and 48 months (G) after the end of intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Three dimensions of fatigue are assessed during follow-up: severity, perceived interference with quality of life, and duration in the past week. In all, 97 patients with locally advanced prostate cancer were enrolled in the study. Median follow-up time was 43.9 months. The fatigue index was significantly higher in the prostate-specific antigen >20 ng/mL, Gleason score >8, the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group scores, and the higher education. The most severe fatigue occurred at time points B and C. The score for duration of fatigue fluctuated across the time points, with significantly increased scores at time points D, E, and F. In conclusion, we show that cancer-related fatigue is the important symptom which affects the quality of life for the prostate cancer patients. For patients with locally advanced prostate cancer with a high Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group score, a Gleason score of >8 points, prostate-specific antigen levels of >20 ng/mL, and high education, attention should be paid to the interference of fatigue with quality of life, especially general level of activity, ability to concentrate, and mood, after radiotherapy combined with hormonal therapy. PMID:27336890

  5. Determination of action thresholds for electromagnetic tracking system-guided hypofractionated prostate radiotherapy using volumetric modulated arc therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Pengpeng; Mah, Dennis; Happersett, Laura; Cox, Brett; Hunt, Margie; Mageras, Gig

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: Hypofractionated prostate radiotherapy may benefit from both volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) due to shortened treatment time and intrafraction real-time monitoring provided by implanted radiofrequency(RF) transponders. The authors investigate dosimetrically driven action thresholds (whether treatment needs to be interrupted and patient repositioned) in VMAT treatment with electromagnetic (EM) tracking. Methods: VMAT plans for five patients are generated for prescription doses of 32.5 and 42.5 Gy in five fractions. Planning target volume (PTV) encloses the clinical target volume (CTV) with a 3 mm margin at the prostate-rectal interface and 5 mm elsewhere. The VMAT delivery is modeled using 180 equi-spaced static beams. Intrafraction prostate motion is simulated in the plan by displacing the beam isocenter at each beam assuming rigid organ motion according to a previously recorded trajectory of the transponder centroid. The cumulative dose delivered in each fraction is summed over all beams. Two sets of 57 prostate motion trajectories were randomly selected to form a learning and a testing dataset. Dosimetric end points including CTV D95%, rectum wall D1cc, bladder wall D1cc, and urethra Dmax, are analyzed against motion characteristics including the maximum amplitude of the anterior-posterior (AP), superior-inferior (SI), and left-right components. Action thresholds are triggered when intrafraction motion causes any violations of dose constraints to target and organs at risk (OAR), so that treatment is interrupted and patient is repositioned. Results: Intrafraction motion has a little effect on CTV D95%, indicating PTV margins are adequate. Tight posterior and inferior action thresholds around 1 mm need to be set in a patient specific manner to spare organs at risk, especially when the prescription dose is 42.5 Gy. Advantages of setting patient specific action thresholds are to reduce false positive alarms by 25% when prescription dose is low, and

  6. Developing a class solution for Prostate Stereotactic Ablative Body Radiotherapy (SABR) using Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT)

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Louise J.; Cosgrove, Vivian; Lilley, John; Sykes, Jonathan; Thompson, Christopher M.; Franks, Kevin; Sebag-Montefiore, David; Henry, Ann M.

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose To develop a class solution for prostate Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy (SABR) using Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT). Materials and methods Seven datasets were used to compare plans using one 360° arc (1FA), one 210° arc (1PA), two full arcs and two partial arcs. Subsequently using 1PA, fifteen datasets were compared using (i) 6 mm CTV–PTV margins, (ii) 8 mm CTV–PTV margins and (iii) including the proximal SV within the CTV. Monaco™ 3.2 (Elekta™) was used for planning with the Agility™ MLC system (Elekta™). Results Highly conformal plans were produced using all four arc arrangements. Compared to 1FA, 1PA resulted in significantly reduced rectal doses, and monitor units and estimated delivery times were reduced in six of seven cases. Using 6 mm CTV–PTV margins, planning constraints were met for all fifteen datasets. Using 8 mm margins required relaxation of the uppermost bladder constraint in three cases to achieve adequate coverage, and, compared to 6 mm margins, rectal and bladder doses significantly increased. Including the proximal SV required relaxation of the uppermost bladder and rectal constraints in two cases, and rectal and bladder doses significantly increased. Conclusions Prostate SABR VMAT is optimal using 1PA. 6 mm CTV–PTV margins, compatible with daily fiducial-based IGRT, are consistently feasible in terms of target objectives and OAR constraints. PMID:24332021

  7. Split-Course, High-Dose Palliative Pelvic Radiotherapy for Locally Progressive Hormone-Refractory Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Gogna, Nirdosh Kumar; Baxi, Siddhartha; Hickey, Brigid; Baumann, Kathryn; Burmeister, Elizabeth; Holt, Tanya

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: Local progression, in patients with hormone-refractory prostate cancer, often causes significant morbidity. Pelvic radiotherapy (RT) provides effective palliation in this setting, with most published studies supporting the use of high-dose regimens. The aim of the present study was to examine the role of split-course hypofractionated RT used at our institution in treating this group of patients. Methods and Materials: A total of 34 men with locoregionally progressive hormone-refractory prostate cancer, treated with a split course of pelvic RT (45-60 Gy in 18-24 fractions) between 2000 and 2008 were analyzed. The primary endpoints were the response rate and actuarial locoregional progression-free survival. Secondary endpoints included overall survival, compliance, and acute and late toxicity. Results: The median age was 71 years (range, 53-88). Treatment resulted in an overall initial response rate of 91%, a median locoregional progression-free survival of 43 months, and median overall survival of 28 months. Compliance was excellent and no significant late toxicity was reported. Conclusions: The split course pelvic RT described has an acceptable toxicity profile, is effective, and compares well with other high-dose palliative regimens that have been previously reported.

  8. A Matched Control Analysis of Adjuvant and Salvage High-Dose Postoperative Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ost, Piet; De Troyer, Bart; Fonteyne, Valerie; Oosterlinck, Willem; De Meerleer, Gert

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: It is unclear whether immediate adjuvant radiotherapy for high-risk disease at prostatectomy (capsule perforation, seminal vesicle invasion, and/or positive surgical margins) is equivalent to delayed salvage radiotherapy at biochemical recurrence. We performed a matched case analysis comparing high-dose adjuvant intensity modulated radiotherapy (A-IMRT) with salvage IMRT (S-IMRT). Methods and Materials: One hundred forty-four patients with high-risk disease at prostatectomy were referred for A-IMRT, and 134 patients with high-risk disease were referred at biochemical recurrence (rising prostate-specific antigen [PSA], following prostatectomy, above 0.2 ng/ml) for S-IMRT. Patients were matched in a 1:1 ratio according to preoperative PSA level, Gleason score, and pT stage. Median doses of 74 Gy and 76 Gy were prescribed for A-IMRT and S-IMRT, respectively. We report biochemical relapse free survival (bRFS) rates using the Kaplan-Meier method. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to examine tumour- and treatment-related factors. Results: A total of 178 patients were matched (89:89). From the end of radiotherapy, the median follow-up was 36 months for both groups. The 3-year bRFS rate for the A-IMRT group was 90% compared to 65% for the S-IMRT group (p < 0.05). On multivariate analysis, S-IMRT, Gleason grades of {>=}4+3, perineural invasion, preoperative PSA level of {>=}10 ng/ml, and omission of androgen deprivation (AD) were independent predictors for a reduced bRFS (p < 0.05). From the date of surgery, the median follow-up was 43 and 60 months for A-IMRT and S-IMRT, respectively. The 3-year bRFS rate for A-IMRT was 91% compared to 79% for S-IMRT (p < 0.05). On multivariate analysis, Gleason grades of {>=}4+3, perineural invasion, and omission of AD were independent predictors for a reduced bRFS (p < 0.05). S-IMRT was no longer an independent prognostic factor (p = 0.08). Conclusions: High-dose A-IMRT significantly improves 3-year bRFS compared to

  9. Effect of external shielding for neutrons during radiotherapy for prostate cancer, considering the 2300 CD linear accelerator and voxel phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thalhofer, J. L.; Roque, H. S.; Rebello, W. F.; Correa, S. A.; Silva, A. X.; Souza, E. M.; Batita, D. V. S.; Sandrini, E. S.

    2014-02-01

    Photoneutron production occurs when high energy photons, greater than 6.7 MeV, interact with linear accelerator head structures. In Brazil, the National Cancer Institute, one of the centers of reference in cancer treatment, uses radiation at 4 angles (0°, 90°, 180° and 270°) as treatment protocol for prostate cancer. With the objective of minimizing the dose deposited in the patient due to photoneutrons, this study simulated radiotherapy treatment using MCNPX, considering the most realistic environment; simulating the radiotherapy room, the Linac 2300 head, the MAX phantom and the treatment protocol with the accelerator operating at 18 MV. In an attempt to reduce the dose deposited by photoneutrons, an external shielding was added to the Linac 2300. Results show that the equivalent dose due to photoneutrons deposited in the patient diminished. The biggest reduction was seen in bone structures, such as the tibia and fibula, and mandible, at approximately 75%. Besides that, organs such as the brain, pancreas, small intestine, lungs and thyroid revealed a reduction of approximately 60%. It can be concluded that the shielding developed by our research group is efficient in neutron shielding, reducing the dose for the patient, and thus, the risk of secondary cancer, and increasing patient survival rates.

  10. Red bone marrow dose calculations in radiotherapy of prostate cancer based on the updated VCH adult male phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, Jinqin; Xie, Tianwu; Sun, Wenjuan; Liu, Qian

    2014-04-01

    Red bone marrow (RBM) is an important dose-limiting tissue that has high radiosensitivity but is difficult to identify on clinical medical images. In this study, we investigated dose distribution in RBM for prostate cancer radiotherapy. Four suborgans were identified in the skeleton of the visible Chinese human phantom: cortical bone (CB), trabecular bone (TB), RBM, and yellow bone marrow (YBM). Dose distributions in the phantom were evaluated by the Monte Carlo method. When the left os coxae was taken as the organ-at-risk (OAR), the difference in absorbed dose between RBM and each CB and TB was up to 20%, but was much less (≤3.1%) between RBM and YBM. When the left os coxae and entire bone were both taken as OARs, RBM dose also increased with increasing planning target volume size. The results indicate the validity of using dose to homogeneous bone marrow mixture for estimating dose to RBM when RBM is not available in computational phantoms. In addition, the human skeletal system developed in this study provides a model for considering RBM dose in radiotherapy planning.

  11. Differences in toxicity and outcome associated with circadian variations between patients undergoing daytime and evening radiotherapy for prostate adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Feng-Ming; Hou, Wei-Hsien; Huang, Chao-Yuan; Wang, Chia-Chun; Tsai, Chiao-Ling; Tsai, Yu-Chieh; Yu, Hong-Jeng; Pu, Yeong-Shiau; Cheng, Jason Chia-Hsien

    2016-01-01

    This retrospective study tested the hypothesis that disease control and treatment-related toxicity in patients undergoing high-dose radiotherapy (HDRT) for prostate cancer varies in a circadian manner. Patients with localized prostate adenocarcinoma receiving HDRT (median 78 Gy) to the prostate and involved seminal vesicle(s) without elective pelvic irradiation were divided into a daytime treatment (before 5 PM) group (n = 267) and evening treatment (after 5 PM) group (n = 142). Biochemical failure (Phoenix definition), acute and late gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary toxicities (Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4), biochemical failure-free survival (BFFS) and freedom from late toxicity were assessed. Analyses were performed by binary logistic regression and Cox proportional hazard regression. The median follow-up was 68 months, and 75% of patients were ≥70 years old. Evening HDRT was significantly associated with worse freedom from ≥grade 2 late GI complications (hazard ratio = 2.96; p < 0.001). The detrimental effect of evening HDRT was significant in patients older than 70 years old (p < 0.001) but not in younger patients (p = 0.63). In a subgroup of propensity score-matched cohort with T2b-T3 disease (n = 154), the 5-year BFFS was worse in the evening group than the daytime group (72% vs. 85%, hazard ratio = 1.95, p = 0.05). Our study indicates that evening HDRT may lead to more GI complications, especially in older patients, and worse BFFS in patients with T2b-T3 disease. PMID:26818960

  12. Analysis of prostate bed motion using an endorectal balloon and cone beam computed tomography during postprostatectomy radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Ji Hyeon; Kim, Yeon Joo; Kim, Young Seok; Cho, Young Pil; Lee, Ho Yeon; Jeong, Chang Young; Kwak, Jungwon; Cho, Byung Chul

    2016-01-01

    Background The authors conducted this prospective study to analyze the amount of interfractional prostate bed motion (PBM) and quantify its components with the use of an endorectal balloon (ERB). Methods A total of 1,348 cone beam computed tomography images from 46 patients who underwent postprostatectomy radiotherapy were analyzed. For the pilot image, electronic portal imaging, guided by skin marks was performed to ensure proper positioning and inflation of the ERB. Then, for bone matching, manual or automatic registration of the planning and each cone beam computed tomography was performed, based on the bony anatomy of the pelvis. Shifts (bony misalignment [BM]) in three directions were recorded at each treatment session. For prostate bed matching, manual matching was conducted based on the anterior rectal wall and the shift (PBM) was recorded. Total setup error was defined as the shift from the skin mark to the prostate bed matching, based on anterior rectal wall stretched by the ERB. PBM was defined as the difference between the total setup error and BM. Results Systematic errors for the total setup error were 1.0, 1.3, and 1.0 mm in the right–left, anterior–posterior, and superior–inferior directions, with random errors of 1.9, 2.4, and 1.9 mm, respectively. Systematic errors were 1.6, 1.6, and 0.3 mm for BM and 0.8, 1.1, and 0.9 mm for PBM, with random errors of 2.4, 2.5, and 1.1 mm for BM and 1.8, 2.2, and 1.9 mm for PBM. Conclusion The BM was the main component of the total setup error, suggesting that interfractional PBM was well controlled by the ERB device. Planning target volume margins of <5 mm were needed to include 95% of the interfractional variations when using an ERB. PMID:27307750

  13. Application of a Novel Dose-Uncertainty Model for Dose-Uncertainty Analysis in Prostate Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Jin Hosang; Palta, Jatinder R.; Kim, You-Hyun; Kim, Siyong

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: To analyze dose uncertainty using a previously published dose-uncertainty model, and to assess potential dosimetric risks existing in prostate intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: The dose-uncertainty model provides a three-dimensional (3D) dose-uncertainty distribution in a given confidence level. For 8 retrospectively selected patients, dose-uncertainty maps were constructed using the dose-uncertainty model at the 95% CL. In addition to uncertainties inherent to the radiation treatment planning system, four scenarios of spatial errors were considered: machine only (S1), S1 + intrafraction, S1 + interfraction, and S1 + both intrafraction and interfraction errors. To evaluate the potential risks of the IMRT plans, three dose-uncertainty-based plan evaluation tools were introduced: confidence-weighted dose-volume histogram, confidence-weighted dose distribution, and dose-uncertainty-volume histogram. Results: Dose uncertainty caused by interfraction setup error was more significant than that of intrafraction motion error. The maximum dose uncertainty (95% confidence) of the clinical target volume (CTV) was smaller than 5% of the prescribed dose in all but two cases (13.9% and 10.2%). The dose uncertainty for 95% of the CTV volume ranged from 1.3% to 2.9% of the prescribed dose. Conclusions: The dose uncertainty in prostate IMRT could be evaluated using the dose-uncertainty model. Prostate IMRT plans satisfying the same plan objectives could generate a significantly different dose uncertainty because a complex interplay of many uncertainty sources. The uncertainty-based plan evaluation contributes to generating reliable and error-resistant treatment plans.

  14. SU-E-J-20: Adaptive Aperture Morphing for Online Correction for Prostate Cancer Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Sandhu, R; Qin, A; Yan, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Online adaptive aperture morphing is desirable over translational couch shifts to accommodate not only the target position variation but also anatomic changes (rotation, deformation, and relation of target to organ-atrisks). We proposed quick and reliable method for adapting segment aperture leaves for IMRT treatment of prostate. Methods: The proposed method consists of following steps: (1) delineate the contours of prostate, SV, bladder and rectum on kV-CBCT; (2) determine prostate displacement from the rigid body registration of the contoured prostate manifested on the reference CT and the CBCT; (3) adapt the MLC segment apertures obtained from the pre-treatment IMRT planning to accommodate the shifts as well as anatomic changes. The MLC aperture adaptive algorithm involves two steps; first move the whole aperture according to prostate translational/rotational shifts, and secondly fine-tune the aperture shape to maintain the spatial relationship between the planning target contour and the MLC aperture to the daily target contour. Feasibility of this method was evaluated retrospectively on a seven-field IMRT treatment of prostate cancer patient by comparing dose volume histograms of the original plan and the aperture-adjusted plan, with/without additional segments weight optimization (SWO), on two daily treatment CBCTs selected with relative large motion and rotation. Results: For first daily treatment, the prostate rotation was significant (12degree around lateral-axis). With apertureadjusted plan, the D95 to the target was improved 25% and rectum dose (D30, D40) was reduced 20% relative to original plan on daily volumes. For second treatment-fraction, (lateral shift = 6.7mm), after adjustment target D95 improved by 3% and bladder dose (D30, maximum dose) was reduced by 1%. For both cases, extra SWO did not provide significant improvement. Conclusion: The proposed method of adapting segment apertures is promising in treatment position correction

  15. Image-guided adaptive radiotherapy for prostate and head-and-neck cancers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Daniel, Jennifer C.

    In the current practice of radiation therapy, daily patient alignments have been based on external skin marks or on bone. However, internal organ variation (both motion and volumetric changes) between treatment fractions can displace the treatment target, causing target underdosage and normal tissue overdosage. In order to deliver the radiation treatment as planned, more accurate knowledge of the daily internal anatomy was needed. Additionally, treatments needed to adapt to these variations by either shifting the patient to account for the daily target position or by altering the treatment plan. In this dissertation, the question of whether inter-fractional variations in internal patient anatomy combined with external set-up uncertainties produced measurable differences between planned and delivered doses for prostate and head-and-neck cancer patients was investigated. Image-guided adaptive treatment strategies to improve tumor coverage and/or reduce normal tissue dose were examined. Treatment deliveries utilizing various alignment procedures for ten prostate cancer patients and eleven head-and-neck cancer patients, each of whom received multiple CT scans over the course of treatment, were simulated. The largest prostate dose losses between planning and delivery were correlated with anterior/posterior and superior/inferior prostate displacement. Daily bone alignment sufficiently maintained target coverage for 70% of patients, ultrasound for 90%, and CT for 100%. A no-action-level correction protocol, which corrected the daily bone alignment for the systematic internal displacement of the prostate based on a pre-determined number of CT image sets, successfully improved the prostate and seminal vesicle dosimetric coverage. Three CT image sets were sufficient to accurately correct the bone alignment scheme for the prostate internal systematic shifts. For head-and-neck cancer patient treatment, setup uncertainties and internal organ variations did not greatly affect

  16. Predicting Rectal and Bladder Overdose During the Course of Prostate Radiotherapy Using Dose-Volume Data From Initial Treatment Fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Murthy, Vedang; Shukla, Pragya; Adurkar, Pranjal; Master, Zubin; Mahantshetty, Umesh; Shrivastava, Shyamkishore

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate whether information from the initial fractions can determine which patients are likely to consistently exceed their planning dose-volume constraints during the course of radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Ten patients with high-risk prostate cancer were treated with helical tomotherapy to a dose of 60 Gy in 20 fractions. The prostate, rectum, and bladder were recontoured on their daily megavoltage computed tomography scans and the dose was recalculated. The bladder and rectal volumes (in mL) receiving {>=}100% and {>=}70% of the prescribed dose in each fraction and in the original plans were recorded. A fraction for which the difference between planned and delivered was more than 2 mL was considered a volume failure. Similarly if the difference in the planned and delivered maximum dose (D{sub max}) was {>=}1% for the rectum and bladder, the fraction was considered a dose failure. Each patient's first 3 to 5 fractions were analyzed to determine if they correctly identified those patients who would consistently fail (i.e., {>=}20% of fractions) during the course of their radiotherapy. Results: Six parameters were studied; the rectal volume (RV) and bladder volumes (BV) (in mL) received {>=}100% and {>=}70% of the prescribed dose and maximum dose to 2 mL of the rectum and bladder. This was given by RV{sub 100}, RV{sub 70}, BV{sub 100}, BV{sub 70}, RD{sub max}, and BD{sub max}, respectively. When more than 1 of the first 3 fractions exceed the planning constraint as defined, it accurately predicts consistent failures through the course of the treatment. This method is able to correctly identify the consistent failures about 80% (RV{sub 70}, BV{sub 100}, and RV{sub 100}), 90% (BV{sub 70}), and 100% (RD{sub max} and BD{sub max}) of the times. Conclusions: This study demonstrates the feasibility of a method accurately identifying patients who are likely to consistently exceed the planning constraints during the course of their

  17. SU-E-T-34: An in Vivo Study On Pulsed Low Dose-Rate Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, B; Cvetkovic, D; Chen, L; Ma, C; Chen, X; Zhang, P; Zhang, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Re-irradiation with conventional radiotherapy techniques (CRT) may pose significant risks due to high accumulative radiation doses. Pulsed low dose-rate radiotherapy (PLDR) has been used in clinical trials for recurrent cancer treatment. In our previous studies, PLDR irradiation showed significantly lower toxicity than CRT, resulting in much longer survival of mice after PLDR total body irradiation (TBI) than conventional TBI. The purpose of this study was to investigate tumor control efficacy of PLDR treatment for prostate cancer with an animal model of prostate cancer LNCaP. Methods: We used an orthotopic murine model of LNCaP cell line for this study. LNCaP cells were implanted into immune-suppressed male nude mice via surgery. We monitored the tumor growth with MRI. The tumor-bearing mice were allocated into a PLDR(n=9), CRT(n=7), and control group(n=7) randomly. The mice in the PLDR and CRT groups were irradiated with 2Gy dose for one time. For the CRT treatment, the mice received 2Gy at a dose-rate of 300 MU/minute. For the PLDR treatment, the 2Gy dose was further divided into ten pulses of 0.2Gy at the same dose-rate with an interval of 3 minutes between the pulses. Results: Sizable tumor growth delays were observed for the PLDR and CRT groups through weekly MRI scans. The mean values of the normalized tumor volumes (± standard deviation of the mean) were 1.53±0.07, 1.53±0.14, and 1.81±0.09 at one week after treatment, 2.28±0.13, 2.19±0.16, and 3.04±0.25 at two weeks after treatment, and 3.31±0.23, 3.14±0.24 and 4.62±0.49 at three weeks after treatment, for the PLDR, CRT, and control groups, respectively. Conclusion: The PLDR and CRT treatments showed comparable tumor control rates in this study. Our in vivo results indicate that PLDR may be a viable option for treating recurrent prostate cancer due to its equivalent tumor control but low normal tissue toxocities.

  18. SU-E-J-144: MRI Visualization of a Metallic Fiducial Marker Used for Image Guided Prostate Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yee, S; Krauss, D; Yan, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Unlike on the daily CBCT used for the image-guided radiation therapy, the visualization of an implantable metallic fiducial marker on the planning MRI images has been a challenge due to the inherent insensitivity of metal in MRI, and very thin (∼ 1 mm or less) diameter. Here, an MRI technique to visualize a marker used for prostate cancer radiotherapy is reported. Methods: During the MRI acquisitions, a multi-shot turbo spin echo (TSE) technique (TR=3500 ms, TE=8.6 ms, ETL=17, recon voxel=0.42x0.42x3.5 mm3) was acquired in Philips 3T Ingenia together with a T2-weighted multi-shot TSE (TR=5381 ms, TE=110 ms, ETL=17, recon voxel=0.47×0.47×3 mm3) and a balanced turbo field echo (bTFE, flip angle 60, TR=2.76 ms, TE=1.3 ms, 0.85×0.85×3 mm3, NSA=4). In acquiring the MRI to visualize the fiducial marker, a particular emphasis was made to improve the spatial resolution and visibility in the generally dark, inhomogeneous prostate area by adjusting the slice profile ordering and TE values of TSE acquisition (in general, the lower value of TE in TSE acquisition generates a brighter signal but at the cost of high spatial resolution since the k-space, responsible for high spatial resolution, is filled with noisier data). Results: While clearly visible in CT, the marker was not visible in either T2-weighted TSE or bTFE, although the image qualities of both images were superior. In the new TSE acquisition (∼ a proton-density weighted image) adjusted by changing the profile ordering and the TE value, the marker was visible as a negative (but clear) contrast in the magnitude MRI, and as a positive contrast in the imaginary image of the phase-sensitive MRI. Conclusion: A metallic fiducial marker used for image guidance before prostate cancer radiotherapy can be made visible in MRI, which may facilitate more use of MRI in planning and guiding such radiation therapy.

  19. Early Changes in Apparent Diffusion Coefficient From Diffusion-Weighted MR Imaging During Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sung Yoon; Kim, Chan Kyo; Park, Byung Kwan; Park, Won; Park, Hee Chul; Han, Deok Hyun; Kim, Bohyun

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) as an early and reproducible change indicator in patients receiving radiotherapy for prostate cancer (PC). Methods and Materials: Eight consecutive patients with biopsy-proven PC underwent DWI at 3T. All patients who received external-beam radiotherapy had four serial MR scans, as follows: before therapy (PreTx); after 1 week of therapy (PostT1); after 3 weeks of therapy (PostT2); and 1 month after the completion of therapy (PostT3). At each time, the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) was measured in tumors and normal tissues. For reproducibility of the ADC measurement, five patients also had two separate pretreatment DWI scans at an interval of <2 weeks. Serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels were evaluated at the same time as MR scans. Results: Thirteen tumors (peripheral zone = 10; transition zone = 3) were found. The mean ADC values for the tumors from PreTx to PostT3 were 0.86, 1.03, 1.15, and 1.26 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s in sequence, respectively. Compared with PreTx, PostT1 (p = 0.005), PostT2 (p = 0.003), and PostT3 (p < 0.001) showed a significant increase in ADC values. The mean ADC values of the benign tissues from PreTx to PostT3 were 1.60, 1.58, 1.47, and 1.46 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s in sequence, respectively. Reproducibility of ADC measurements was confirmed with a mean difference in ADC of -0.04 in peripheral zone and -0.017 in transition zone between two separate pretreatment MR scans. The mean PSA levels from PreTx to PostT3 were 9.05, 9.18, 9.25, and 4.11 ng/mL in sequence, respectively. Conclusions: DWI, as a reproducible biomarker, has the potential to evaluate the early therapeutic changes of PC to radiotherapy.

  20. Development of Late Toxicity and International Prostate Symptom Score Resolution After External-Beam Radiotherapy Combined With Pulsed Dose Rate Brachytherapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Pieters, Bradley R.; Rezaie, Elisa; Geijsen, Elisabeth D.; Koedooder, Kees; Grient, Johan N.B. van der; Blank, Leo E.C.M.; Reijke, Theo M. de; Koning, Caro C.E.

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: To investigate the development of gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity, genitourinary (GU) toxicity, erectile dysfunction, and International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) resolution in a cohort of patients treated with external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) followed by a brachytherapy pulsed dose rate (PDR) boost. Methods and Materials: Between 2002 and 2008, 110 patients were treated with 46-Gy EBRT followed by PDR brachytherapy (24.96-28.80 Gy). The investigated outcome variables, GI toxicity, GU toxicity, erectile dysfunction, and IPSS were prospectively scored at several time points during follow-up. Association between time (as continuous and categorical variable) and the outcome variables was assessed using generalized linear models. Results: No statistically significant association was found between time (continuous) and GI toxicity (odds ratio [OR], 0.97; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.89-1.06), GU toxicity (OR, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.91-1.03), erectile dysfunction (OR, 1.06; 95% CI, 0.99-1.11), and IPSS (-0.11; 95% CI, -0.41-0.20). Also, no statistically significant association was found between these variables and time as a categorical variable. GU toxicity was associated with IPSS resolution (OR, 1.16; 95% CI, 1.09-1.24). Posttreatment IPSS was associated with pretreatment IPSS (0.52; 95% CI, 0.25-0.79). Conclusions: No accumulation of high-grade toxicity over time could be established for a group of patients treated with EBRT and PDR brachytherapy for prostate cancer, probably because high-grade late toxicity resolves with time. Also, differences in IPSS values among patients are smaller after treatment than before treatment.

  1. Dosimetric and radiobiological characterizations of prostate intensity-modulated radiotherapy and volumetric-modulated arc therapy: A single-institution review of ninety cases

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Muhammad Isa; Jiang, Runqing; Kiciak, Alexander; ur Rehman, Jalil; Afzal, Muhammad; Chow, James C. L.

    2016-01-01

    This study reviewed prostate volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans after prostate IMRT technique was replaced by VMAT in an institution. Characterizations of dosimetry and radiobiological variation in prostate were determined based on treatment plans of 40 prostate IMRT patients (planning target volume = 77.8–335 cm3) and 50 VMAT patients (planning target volume = 120–351 cm3) treated before and after 2013, respectively. Both IMRT and VMAT plans used the same dose-volume criteria in the inverse planning optimization. Dose-volume histogram, mean doses of target and normal tissues (rectum, bladder and femoral heads), dose-volume points (D99% of planning target volume; D30%, D50%, V30 Gy and V35 Gy of rectum and bladder; D5%, V14 Gy, V22 Gy of femoral heads), conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI), gradient index (GI), prostate tumor control probability (TCP), and rectal normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) based on the Lyman-Burman-Kutcher algorithm were calculated for each IMRT and VMAT plan. From our results, VMAT plan was found better due to its higher (1.05%) CI, lower (0.83%) HI and (0.75%) GI than IMRT. Comparing doses in normal tissues between IMRT and VMAT, it was found that IMRT mostly delivered higher doses of about 1.05% to the normal tissues than VMAT. Prostate TCP and rectal NTCP were found increased (1%) for VMAT than IMRT. It is seen that VMAT technique can decrease the dose-volume evaluation criteria for the normal tissues. Based on our dosimetric and radiobiological results in treatment plans, it is concluded that our VMAT implementation could produce comparable or slightly better target coverage and normal tissue sparing with a faster treatment time in prostate radiotherapy. PMID:27651562

  2. Dosimetric and radiobiological characterizations of prostate intensity-modulated radiotherapy and volumetric-modulated arc therapy: A single-institution review of ninety cases.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muhammad Isa; Jiang, Runqing; Kiciak, Alexander; Ur Rehman, Jalil; Afzal, Muhammad; Chow, James C L

    2016-01-01

    This study reviewed prostate volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans after prostate IMRT technique was replaced by VMAT in an institution. Characterizations of dosimetry and radiobiological variation in prostate were determined based on treatment plans of 40 prostate IMRT patients (planning target volume = 77.8-335 cm(3)) and 50 VMAT patients (planning target volume = 120-351 cm(3)) treated before and after 2013, respectively. Both IMRT and VMAT plans used the same dose-volume criteria in the inverse planning optimization. Dose-volume histogram, mean doses of target and normal tissues (rectum, bladder and femoral heads), dose-volume points (D99% of planning target volume; D30%, D50%, V30 Gy and V35 Gy of rectum and bladder; D5%, V14 Gy, V22 Gy of femoral heads), conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI), gradient index (GI), prostate tumor control probability (TCP), and rectal normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) based on the Lyman-Burman-Kutcher algorithm were calculated for each IMRT and VMAT plan. From our results, VMAT plan was found better due to its higher (1.05%) CI, lower (0.83%) HI and (0.75%) GI than IMRT. Comparing doses in normal tissues between IMRT and VMAT, it was found that IMRT mostly delivered higher doses of about 1.05% to the normal tissues than VMAT. Prostate TCP and rectal NTCP were found increased (1%) for VMAT than IMRT. It is seen that VMAT technique can decrease the dose-volume evaluation criteria for the normal tissues. Based on our dosimetric and radiobiological results in treatment plans, it is concluded that our VMAT implementation could produce comparable or slightly better target coverage and normal tissue sparing with a faster treatment time in prostate radiotherapy.

  3. Dosimetric and radiobiological characterizations of prostate intensity-modulated radiotherapy and volumetric-modulated arc therapy: A single-institution review of ninety cases.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muhammad Isa; Jiang, Runqing; Kiciak, Alexander; Ur Rehman, Jalil; Afzal, Muhammad; Chow, James C L

    2016-01-01

    This study reviewed prostate volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans after prostate IMRT technique was replaced by VMAT in an institution. Characterizations of dosimetry and radiobiological variation in prostate were determined based on treatment plans of 40 prostate IMRT patients (planning target volume = 77.8-335 cm(3)) and 50 VMAT patients (planning target volume = 120-351 cm(3)) treated before and after 2013, respectively. Both IMRT and VMAT plans used the same dose-volume criteria in the inverse planning optimization. Dose-volume histogram, mean doses of target and normal tissues (rectum, bladder and femoral heads), dose-volume points (D99% of planning target volume; D30%, D50%, V30 Gy and V35 Gy of rectum and bladder; D5%, V14 Gy, V22 Gy of femoral heads), conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI), gradient index (GI), prostate tumor control probability (TCP), and rectal normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) based on the Lyman-Burman-Kutcher algorithm were calculated for each IMRT and VMAT plan. From our results, VMAT plan was found better due to its higher (1.05%) CI, lower (0.83%) HI and (0.75%) GI than IMRT. Comparing doses in normal tissues between IMRT and VMAT, it was found that IMRT mostly delivered higher doses of about 1.05% to the normal tissues than VMAT. Prostate TCP and rectal NTCP were found increased (1%) for VMAT than IMRT. It is seen that VMAT technique can decrease the dose-volume evaluation criteria for the normal tissues. Based on our dosimetric and radiobiological results in treatment plans, it is concluded that our VMAT implementation could produce comparable or slightly better target coverage and normal tissue sparing with a faster treatment time in prostate radiotherapy. PMID:27651562

  4. Dosimetric and radiobiological characterizations of prostate intensity-modulated radiotherapy and volumetric-modulated arc therapy: A single-institution review of ninety cases

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Muhammad Isa; Jiang, Runqing; Kiciak, Alexander; ur Rehman, Jalil; Afzal, Muhammad; Chow, James C. L.

    2016-01-01

    This study reviewed prostate volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans after prostate IMRT technique was replaced by VMAT in an institution. Characterizations of dosimetry and radiobiological variation in prostate were determined based on treatment plans of 40 prostate IMRT patients (planning target volume = 77.8–335 cm3) and 50 VMAT patients (planning target volume = 120–351 cm3) treated before and after 2013, respectively. Both IMRT and VMAT plans used the same dose-volume criteria in the inverse planning optimization. Dose-volume histogram, mean doses of target and normal tissues (rectum, bladder and femoral heads), dose-volume points (D99% of planning target volume; D30%, D50%, V30 Gy and V35 Gy of rectum and bladder; D5%, V14 Gy, V22 Gy of femoral heads), conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI), gradient index (GI), prostate tumor control probability (TCP), and rectal normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) based on the Lyman-Burman-Kutcher algorithm were calculated for each IMRT and VMAT plan. From our results, VMAT plan was found better due to its higher (1.05%) CI, lower (0.83%) HI and (0.75%) GI than IMRT. Comparing doses in normal tissues between IMRT and VMAT, it was found that IMRT mostly delivered higher doses of about 1.05% to the normal tissues than VMAT. Prostate TCP and rectal NTCP were found increased (1%) for VMAT than IMRT. It is seen that VMAT technique can decrease the dose-volume evaluation criteria for the normal tissues. Based on our dosimetric and radiobiological results in treatment plans, it is concluded that our VMAT implementation could produce comparable or slightly better target coverage and normal tissue sparing with a faster treatment time in prostate radiotherapy.

  5. Escalator design features evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, W. F.; Deshpande, G. K.

    1982-01-01

    Escalators are available with design features such as dual speed (90 and 120 fpm), mat operation and flat steps. These design features were evaluated based on the impact of each on capital and operating costs, traffic flow, and safety. A human factors engineering model was developed to analyze the need for flat steps at various speeds. Mat operation of escalators was found to be cost effective in terms of energy savings. Dual speed operation of escalators with the higher speed used during peak hours allows for efficient operation. A minimum number of flat steps required as a function of escalator speed was developed to ensure safety for the elderly.

  6. Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy in the treatment of prostate cancer in Australia and New Zealand: Report on a survey of radiotherapy centres and the proceedings of a consensus workshop.

    PubMed

    Tai, K-H; Duchesne, G; Turner, S; Kneebone, A; See, A; Gogna, K; Berry, M

    2004-12-01

    There is an increasing use of 3-D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) in the radiotherapeutic management of prostate cancer. The Faculty of Radiation Oncology Genito-Urinary Group carried out a survey of Australian and New Zealand radiotherapy centres in the preparation of a consensus workshop. Of the 19 centres that were represented, there were 24 radiation oncologists, 16 radiation therapists and 12 medical physicists. The survey collected demographic information and data on the practices undertaken at those centres when delivering curative radiotherapy in the treatment of prostate cancer. There was much variation in the delivery of treatment in the areas of patient set-up, contouring of target volumes and organs of interest during computer planning, the techniques and the dose constraints used in these techniques, the use of adjuvant androgen deprivation therapy and the quality assurance processes used in monitoring effects of treatment. This variability reflects the range of data in the published literature. Emerging trends of practices were also identified. This is a first report on a multi-disciplinary approach to the development of guidelines in 3DCRT of prostate cancer.

  7. Quality of Life After Whole Pelvic Versus Prostate-Only External Beam Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer: A Matched-Pair Comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Pinkawa, Michael; Piroth, Marc D.; Holy, Richard; Fischedick, Karin; Klotz, Jens; Szekely-Orban, Dalma; Eble, Michael J.

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: Comparison of health-related quality of life after whole pelvic (WPRT) and prostate-only (PORT) external beam radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: A group of 120 patients (60 in each group) was surveyed prospectively before radiation therapy (RT) (time A), at the last day of RT (time B), at a median time of 2 months (time C) and >1 year after RT (time D) using a validated questionnaire (Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite). All patients were treated with 1.8- to 2.0-Gy fractions up to 70.2 to 72.0 Gy with or without WPRT up to 45 to 46 Gy. Pairs were matched according to the following criteria: age {+-} 5years, planning target volume {+-} 10 cc (considering planning target volume without pelvic nodes for WPRT patients), urinary/bowel/sexual function score before RT {+-} 10, and use of antiandrogens. Results: With the exception of prognostic risk factors, both groups were well balanced with respect to baseline characteristics. No significant differences were found with regard to urinary and sexual score changes. Mean bladder function scores reached baseline levels in both patient subgroups after RT. However, bowel function scores decreased significantly more for patients after WPRT than in those receiving PORT at all times (p < 0.01, respectively). Significant differences were found for most items in the bowel domain in the acute phase. At time D, patients after WPRT reported rectal urgency (>once a day in 15% vs. 3%; p = 0.03), bloody stools ({>=}half the time in 7% vs. 0%; p = 0.04) and frequent bowel movements (>two on a typical day in 32% vs. 7%; p < 0.01) more often than did patients after PORT. Conclusion: In comparison to PORT, WPRT (larger bladder and rectum volumes in medium dose levels, but similar volumes in high dose levels) was associated with decreased bowel quality of life in the acute and chronic phases after treatment but remained without adverse long-term urinary effects.

  8. Helical intensity-modulated Radiotherapy of the Pelvic Lymph Nodes with Integrated Boost to the Prostate Bed - Initial Results of the PLATIN 3 Trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Adjuvant and salvage radiotherapy of the prostate bed are established treatment options for prostate cancer. While the benefit of an additional radiotherapy of the pelvic lymph nodes is still under debate, the PLATIN 3 prospective phase II clinical trial was initiated to substantiate toxicity data on postoperative IMRT of the pelvic lymph nodes and the prostate bed. Methods From 2009 to 2011, 40 patients with high-risk prostate cancer after prostatectomy with pT3 R0/1 M0 or pT2 R1 M0 or a PSA recurrence and either > 20% risk of lymph node involvement and inadequate lymphadenectomy or pN + were enrolled. Patients received two months of antihormonal treatment (AT) before radiotherapy. AT continuation was mandatory during radiotherapy and was recommended for another two years. IMRT of the pelvic lymph nodes (51.0 Gy) with a simultaneous integrated boost to the prostate bed (68.0 Gy) was performed in 34 fractions. PSA level, prostate-related symptoms and quality of life were assessed at regular intervals for 24 months. Results Of the 40 patients enrolled, 39 finished treatment as planned. Overall acute toxicity rates were low and no acute grade 3/4 toxicity occurred. Only 22.5% of patients experienced acute grade 2 gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicity. During follow-up, 10.0% late grade 2 GI and 5.0% late grade 2 GU toxicity occurred, and one patient developed late grade 3 proctitis and enteritis. After a median observation time of 24 months the PLATIN 3 trial has shown in 97.5% of all patients sufficient safety and thus met its prospectively defined aims. After a median of 24 months, 34/38 patients were free of a PSA recurrence. Conclusions Postoperative whole-pelvis IMRT with an integrated boost to the prostate bed can be performed safely and without excessive toxicity. Trial registration Trial Numbers: ARO 2009–05, ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01903408. PMID:24422782

  9. Androgen suppression adjuvant to definitive radiotherapy in prostate carcinoma-long-term results of phase III RTOG 85-31

    SciTech Connect

    Pilepich, Miljenko V. . E-mail: mpilepich@mednet.ucla.edu; Winter, Kathryn; Lawton, Colleen A.; Krisch, Robert E.; Wolkov, Harvey B.; Movsas, Benjamin; Hug, Eugen B.; Asbell, Sucha O.; Grignon, David

    2005-04-01

    Purpose: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocol 85-31 was designed to evaluate the effectiveness of adjuvant androgen suppression, using goserelin, in unfavorable prognosis carcinoma of the prostate treated with definitive radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Eligible patients were those with palpable primary tumor extending beyond the prostate (clinical Stage T3) or those with regional lymphatic involvement. Patients who had undergone prostatectomy were eligible if penetration through the prostatic capsule to the margin of resection and/or seminal vesicle involvement was documented histologically. Stratification was based on histologic differentiation, nodal status, acid phosphatase status, and prior prostatectomy. The patients were randomized to either RT and adjuvant goserelin (Arm I) or RT alone followed by observation and application of goserelin at relapse (Arm II). In Arm I, the drug was to be started during the last week of RT and was to be continued indefinitely or until signs of progression. Results: Between 1987 and 1992, when the study was closed, 977 patients were entered: 488 to Arm I and 489 to Arm II. As of July 2003, the median follow-up for all patients was 7.6 years and for living patients was 11 years. At 10 years, the absolute survival rate was significantly greater for the adjuvant arm than for the control arm: 49% vs. 39%, respectively (p = 0.002). The 10-year local failure rate for the adjuvant arm was 23% vs. 38% for the control arm (p <0.0001). The corresponding 10-year rates for the incidence of distant metastases and disease-specific mortality was 24% vs. 39% (p <0.001) and 16% vs. 22% (p = 0.0052), respectively, both in favor of the adjuvant arm. Conclusion: In a population of patients with unfavorable prognosis carcinoma of the prostate, androgen suppression applied as an adjuvant after definitive RT was associated not only with a reduction in disease progression but in a statistically significant improvement in absolute

  10. Prevention of Gynecomastia and Breast Pain Caused by Androgen Deprivation Therapy in Prostate Cancer: Tamoxifen or Radiotherapy?

    SciTech Connect

    Arruda Viani, Gustavo; Bernardes da Silva, Lucas Godoi; Stefano, Eduardo Jose

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To determine, in a meta-analysis, whether gynecomastia and breast pain rates in men with prostate cancer treated with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) are reduced if treated with prophylactic radiotherapy (RT) or tamoxifen (TMX). Methods and Materials: The MEDLINE, EMBASE, CANCERLIT, and Cochrane Library databases, as well as proceedings of annual meetings, were systematically searched to identify randomized, controlled studies comparing RT or TMX with observation for men with prostate cancer using ADT. Results: Six RCTs (three RT trials and three TMX trials, N = 777 patients total) were identified that met the study criteria. Pooled results from these RCTs comparing RT vs. observation showed a significant reduction in the incidence of gynecomastia and breast pain rates in patients treated with RT (odds ratio [OR] = 0.21, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.12-0.37, p < 0.0001, and OR = 0.34, 95% CI 0.20-0.57, p < 0.0001, respectively). Use of RT resulted in an absolute risk reduction (ARR) of 29.4% and 19.9%, with a number needed to treat (NNT) of 3.4 and 5 to avoid one case of gynecomastia and breast pain, respectively. Pooled results from trials comparing TMX vs. observation showed a statistical benefit for breast pain and gynecomastia in favor of TMX arms (OR = 0.04, 95% CI = 0.02-0.08, p < 0.0001 and OR = 0.07, 95% CI = 0.0-0.14, p < 0.00001). TMX resulted in an ARR = 64.1% and 47.6%, with an NNT of 1.56 and 2.1 to avoid one case of gynecomastia and breast pain, respectively. Considering adverse effects, TMX was 6 times more adverse effects than RT. Conclusions: Our data have shown that both TMX and RT prevented gynecomastia and breast pain in patients with prostate cancer receiving ADT for prostate cancer. Although TMX was two times more effective in preventing gynecomastia, RT should represent an effective and safe treatment option, to take into account mainly in patients with cardiovascular risk factors or thrombotic diathesis.

  11. Prolongation of Total Treatment Time Because of Infrequently Missed Days of Treatment Is Not Associated With Inferior Biochemical Outcome After Dose-Escalated Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Liauw, Stanley L.; Liauw, Sun H.

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: Prolongation of treatment time with radiation therapy (RT) is associated with inferior disease control for many rapidly proliferating tumors, but it is uncertain whether the same effect is seen in prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: 596 patients underwent with curative-intent RT for adenocarcinoma of the prostate. By National Comprehensive Cancer Network criteria, men were classified as having low-risk (30%), medium-risk (40%), or high-risk (30%) disease. The median RT dose was 72 Gy. Androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) was used in 45%. The idealized treatment time was defined as the total elapsed time (including weekends) to complete treatment if started on a Monday. Missed days of treatment, defined as the number of days beyond the idealized treatment time, was recorded for all patients. Missed days were added to the end of therapy resulting in a longer treatment time. Analysis was conducted for missed days and other standard prognostic variables against freedom from biochemical failure (FFBF). Results: The median number of missed days was 2 (range, -3 to 22). With a median follow-up of 51 months, men with 5 or more missed days had similar 4-year FFBF rates (79% vs. 83% in men with <5 missed days, p = 0.0809), especially in the subset of men receiving 74 Gy or greater (89% for both groups, p = 0.8008). Analysis of missed days was performed for the subsets of dose, ADT, and risk category. Men without ADT had a lower FFBF rate with more missed days (p = 0.0030), but this association was not seen in men treated to a dose of 74 Gy or greater (p = 0.7425). On multivariate analysis, dose (p = 0.0010), T stage (p = 0.0145), and prostate-specific antigen level (p < 0.0001) were associated with FFBF, but Gleason score (p = 0.1351) and missed days (p = 0.3767) were not. Conclusions: Slight prolongation of treatment time (e.g., {<=}7 days) was not associated with inferior FFBF, especially in men receiving an RT dose of 74 Gy or greater.

  12. Total Androgen Blockade Versus a Luteinizing Hormone-Releasing Hormone Agonist Alone in Men With High-Risk Prostate Cancer Treated With Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Nanda, Akash; Moran, Brian J.; Braccioforte, Michelle H.; Dosoretz, Daniel; Salenius, Sharon; Katin, Michael; Ross, Rudi; D'Amico, Anthony V.

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: To assess whether short-course total androgen blockade vs. a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) agonist alone affects the risk of prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM) in men with localized but high-risk disease treated with radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: The study cohort comprised 628 men with T1-T4, N0, M0 prostate cancer with high-risk disease (prostate-specific antigen level >20 ng/mL, Gleason score >=8, or clinical category >=T3) treated with 45 Gy of external beam radiotherapy followed by a brachytherapy boost in addition to receiving a median of 4.3 (interquartile range [IQR], 3.6-6.4) months of hormonal blockade with an LHRH agonist plus an antiandrogen or monotherapy with an LHRH agonist. Fine and Gray's multivariable regression analysis was used to determine whether combination androgen suppression therapy (AST) vs. monotherapy affected the risk of PCSM, adjusting for treatment year, duration of AST, age, and known prognostic factors. Results: After a median follow-up of 4.9 (IQR, 3.5-6.5) years, men receiving combination AST had a lower risk of PCSM than those treated with monotherapy (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR], 0.18; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.04-0.90; p = 0.04). An increasing prostate-specific antigen level (AHR, 2.70; 95% CI, 1.64-4.45; p < 0.001) and clinical category T3/4 disease (AHR, 29.6; 95% CI, 2.88-303.5; p = 0.004) were also associated with an increased risk of PCSM. Conclusions: In men with localized but high-risk prostate cancer treated with external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy, short-course AST with an LHRH agonist plus an antiandrogen is associated with a decreased risk of PCSM when compared with monotherapy with an LHRH agonist.

  13. A Randomized Trial (Irish Clinical Oncology Research Group 97-01) Comparing Short Versus Protracted Neoadjuvant Hormonal Therapy Before Radiotherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, John G.; Gillham, Charles M.; Dunne, Mary T.; Fitzpatrick, David A.; Finn, Marie A.; Cannon, Mairin E.; Taylor, Judy C.; O'Shea, Carmel M.; Buckney, Steven J.; Thirion, Pierre G.

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: To examine the long-term outcomes of a randomized trial comparing short (4 months; Arm 1) and long (8 months; Arm 2) neoadjuvant hormonal therapy before radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between 1997 and 2001, 276 patients were enrolled and the data from 261 were analyzed. The stratification risk factors were prostate-specific antigen level >20 ng/mL, Gleason score {>=}7, and Stage T3 or more. The intermediate-risk stratum had one factor and the high-risk stratum had two or more. Staging was done from the bone scan and computed tomography findings. The primary endpoint was biochemical failure-free survival. Results: The median follow-up was 102 months. The overall survival, biochemical failure-free survival. and prostate cancer-specific survival did not differ significantly between the two treatment arms, overall or at 5 years. The cumulative probability of overall survival at 5 years was 90% (range, 87-92%) in Arm 1 and 83% (range, 80-86%) in Arm 2. The biochemical failure-free survival rate at 5 years was 66% (range, 62-71%) in Arm 1 and 63% (range, 58-67%) in Arm 2. Conclusion: No statistically significant difference was found in biochemical failure-free survival between 4 months and 8 months of neoadjuvant hormonal therapy before radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer.

  14. Evaluations of an adaptive planning technique incorporating dose feedback in image-guided radiotherapy of prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Han; Wu Qiuwen

    2011-12-15

    treatment course, then 11 patients fail. If the same criteria is assessed at the end of each week (every five fractions), then 14 patients fail, with three patients failing the 1st or 2nd week but passing at the end. The average dose deficit from these 14 patients was 4.4%. They improved to 2% after the weekly compensation. Out of these 14 patients who needed dose compensation, ten passed the dose criterion after weekly dose compensation, three patients failed marginally, and one patient still failed the criterion significantly (10% deficit), representing 3.6% of the patient population. A more aggressive compensation frequency (every three fractions) could successfully reduce the dose deficit to the acceptable level for this patient. The average number of required dose compensation re-planning per patient was 0.82 (0.79) per patient for schedule A (B) delivery strategy. The doses to OARs were not significantly different from the online IG only plans without dose compensation. Conclusions: We have demonstrated the effectiveness of offline dose compensation technique in image-guided radiotherapy for prostate cancer. It can effectively account for residual uncertainties which cannot be corrected through online IG. Dose compensation allows further margin reduction and critical organs sparing.

  15. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy as Monotherapy or Post-External Beam Radiotherapy Boost for Prostate Cancer: Technique, Early Toxicity, and PSA Response

    SciTech Connect

    Jabbari, Siavash; Weinberg, Vivian K.; Kaprealian, Tania; Hsu, I-Chow; Ma Lijun; Chuang, Cynthia; Descovich, Martina; Shiao, Stephen; Shinohara, Katsuto; Roach, Mack; Gottschalk, Alexander R.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: High dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy has been established as an excellent monotherapy or after external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) boost treatment for prostate cancer (PCa). Recently, dosimetric studies have demonstrated the potential for achieving similar dosimetry with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) compared with HDR brachytherapy. Here, we report our technique, PSA nadir, and acute and late toxicity with SBRT as monotherapy and post-EBRT boost for PCa using HDR brachytherapy fractionation. Patients and Methods: To date, 38 patients have been treated with SBRT at University of California-San Francisco with a minimum follow-up of 12 months. Twenty of 38 patients were treated with SBRT monotherapy (9.5 Gy Multiplication-Sign 4 fractions), and 18 were treated with SBRT boost (9.5 Gy Multiplication-Sign 2 fractions) post-EBRT and androgen deprivation therapy. PSA nadir to date for 44 HDR brachytherapy boost patients with disease characteristics similar to the SBRT boost cohort was also analyzed as a descriptive comparison. Results: SBRT was well tolerated. With a median follow-up of 18.3 months (range, 12.6-43.5), 42% and 11% of patients had acute Grade 2 gastrourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity, respectively, with no Grade 3 or higher acute toxicity to date. Two patients experienced late Grade 3 GU toxicity. All patients are without evidence of biochemical or clinical progression to date, and favorably low PSA nadirs have been observed with a current median PSA nadir of 0.35 ng/mL (range, <0.01-2.1) for all patients (0.47 ng/mL, range, 0.2-2.1 for the monotherapy cohort; 0.10 ng/mL, range, 0.01-0.5 for the boost cohort). With a median follow-up of 48.6 months (range, 16.4-87.8), the comparable HDR brachytherapy boost cohort has achieved a median PSA nadir of 0.09 ng/mL (range, 0.0-3.3). Conclusions: Early results with SBRT monotherapy and post-EBRT boost for PCa demonstrate acceptable PSA response and minimal toxicity. PSA nadir with SBRT boost

  16. Comparison of Automated Atlas-Based Segmentation Software for Postoperative Prostate Cancer Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Delpon, Grégory; Escande, Alexandre; Ruef, Timothée; Darréon, Julien; Fontaine, Jimmy; Noblet, Caroline; Supiot, Stéphane; Lacornerie, Thomas; Pasquier, David

    2016-01-01

    Automated atlas-based segmentation (ABS) algorithms present the potential to reduce the variability in volume delineation. Several vendors offer software that are mainly used for cranial, head and neck, and prostate cases. The present study will compare the contours produced by a radiation oncologist to the contours computed by different automated ABS algorithms for prostate bed cases, including femoral heads, bladder, and rectum. Contour comparison was evaluated by different metrics such as volume ratio, Dice coefficient, and Hausdorff distance. Results depended on the volume of interest showed some discrepancies between the different software. Automatic contours could be a good starting point for the delineation of organs since efficient editing tools are provided by different vendors. It should become an important help in the next few years for organ at risk delineation. PMID:27536556

  17. Comparison of Automated Atlas-Based Segmentation Software for Postoperative Prostate Cancer Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Delpon, Grégory; Escande, Alexandre; Ruef, Timothée; Darréon, Julien; Fontaine, Jimmy; Noblet, Caroline; Supiot, Stéphane; Lacornerie, Thomas; Pasquier, David

    2016-01-01

    Automated atlas-based segmentation (ABS) algorithms present the potential to reduce the variability in volume delineation. Several vendors offer software that are mainly used for cranial, head and neck, and prostate cases. The present study will compare the contours produced by a radiation oncologist to the contours computed by different automated ABS algorithms for prostate bed cases, including femoral heads, bladder, and rectum. Contour comparison was evaluated by different metrics such as volume ratio, Dice coefficient, and Hausdorff distance. Results depended on the volume of interest showed some discrepancies between the different software. Automatic contours could be a good starting point for the delineation of organs since efficient editing tools are provided by different vendors. It should become an important help in the next few years for organ at risk delineation. PMID:27536556

  18. Sci—Thur AM: YIS - 02: Radiogenomic Modeling of Normal Tissue Toxicities in Prostate Cancer Patients Receiving Hypofractionated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Coates, J; Jeyaseelan, K; Ybarra, N; David, M; Faria, S; Souhami, L; Cury, F; Duclos, M; El Naqa, I

    2014-08-15

    Inter-patient radiation sensitivity variability has recently been shown to have a genetic component. This genetic component may play a key role in explaining the fluctuating rates of radiation-induced toxicities (RITs). Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have thus far yielded inconsistent results in delineating RITs while copy number variations (CNVs) have not yet been investigated for such purposes. We explore a radiogenomic modeling approach to investigate the association of CNVs and SNPs, along with clinical and dosimetric variables, in radiation induced rectal bleeding (RB) and erectile dysfunction (ED) in prostate cancer patients treated with curative hypofractionated irradiation. A cohort of 62 prostate cancer patients who underwent hypofractionated radiotherapy (66 Gy in 22 fractions) between 2002 to 2010 were retrospectively genotyped for CNV and SNP rs5489 in the xrcc1 DNA repair gene. Late toxicity rates for RB grade 2 and 3 and grade 3 alone were 29.0% and 12.9%, respectively. ED toxicity was found to be 62.9%. Radiogenomic model performance was evaluated using receiver operating characteristic area under the curve (AUC) and resampling by cross-validation. Binary variables were evaluated using Chi-squared contingency table analysis and multivariate models by Spearman's rank correlation coefficient (rs). Ten patients were found to have three copies of xrcc1 CNV (RB: χ{sup 2}=14.6, p<0.001 and ED: χ{sup 2}=4.88, p=0.0272) and twelve had heterozygous rs25489 SNP (RB: χ{sup 2}=0.278, p=0.599 and ED: χ{sup 2}=0.112, p=0.732). Radiogenomic modeling yielded significant, cross-validated NTCP models for RB (AUC=0.665) and ED (AUC=0.754). These results indicate that CNVs may be potential predictive biomarkers of both late ED and RB.

  19. Comparison of composite prostate radiotherapy plan doses with dependent and independent boost phases.

    PubMed

    Narayanasamy, Ganesh; Avila, Gabrielle; Mavroidis, Panayiotis; Papanikolaou, Niko; Gutierrez, Alonso; Baacke, Diana; Shi, Zheng; Stathakis, Sotirios

    2016-09-01

    Prostate cases commonly consist of dual phase planning with a primary plan followed by a boost. Traditionally, the boost phase is planned independently from the primary plan with the risk of generating hot or cold spots in the composite plan. Alternatively, boost phase can be planned taking into account the primary dose. The aim of this study was to compare the composite plans from independently and dependently planned boosts using dosimetric and radiobiological metrics. Ten consecutive prostate patients previously treated at our institution were used to conduct this study on the Raystation™ 4.0 treatment planning system. For each patient, two composite plans were developed: a primary plan with an independently planned boost and a primary plan with a dependently planned boost phase. The primary plan was prescribed to 54 Gy in 30 fractions to the primary planning target volume (PTV1) which includes prostate and seminal vesicles, while the boost phases were prescribed to 24 Gy in 12 fractions to the boost planning target volume (PTV2) that targets only the prostate. PTV coverage, max dose, median dose, target conformity, dose homogeneity, dose to OARs, and probabilities of benefit, injury, and complication-free tumor control (P+) were compared. Statistical significance was tested using either a 2-tailed Student's t-test or Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Dosimetrically, the composite plan with dependent boost phase exhibited smaller hotspots, lower maximum dose to the target without any significant change to normal tissue dose. Radiobiologically, for all but one patient, the percent difference in the P+ values between the two methods was not significant. A large percent difference in P+ value could be attributed to an inferior primary plan. The benefits of considering the dose in primary plan while planning the boost is not significant unless a poor primary plan was achieved.

  20. Use of Implanted Markers and Interportal Adjustment With Real-Time Tracking Radiotherapy System to Reduce Intrafraction Prostate Motion

    SciTech Connect

    Shimizu, Shinichi; Osaka, Yasuhiro; Shinohara, Nobuo; Sazawa, Ataru; Nishioka, Kentaro; Suzuki, Ryusuke; Onimaru, Rikiya; Shirato, Hiroki

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Interportal adjustment was applied to patients with prostate cancer using three fiducial markers and two sets of fluoroscopy in a real-time tumor-tracking radiotherapy (RTRT) system. The incidence of table position adjustment required to keep intrafractional uncertainty within 2.0 mm was investigated in this study. Methods and Materials: The coordinates of the center of gravity of the three fiducial markers were measured at the start of every portal irradiation in intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with seven ports. The table position was adjusted to the planned position if the discrepancy was larger than 2.0 mm in the anterior-posterior (AP), cranial-caudal (CC), or left-right (LR) directions. In total, we analyzed 4,541 observations in 20 patients who received 70 Gy in 30 fractions (7.6 times a day on average). Results: The incidence of table position adjustment at 10 minutes from the initial setup of each treatment was 14.2%, 12.3%, and 5.0% of the observations in the AP, CC, and LR directions, respectively. The accumulated incidence of the table position adjustment was significantly higher at 10 minutes than at 2 minutes for AP (p = 0.0033) and CC (p = 0.0110) but not LR (p = 0.4296). An adjustment greater than 5 mm was required at least once in the treatment period in 11 (55%) patients. Conclusions: Interportal adjustment of table position was required in more than 10% of portal irradiations during the 10-minute period after initial setup to maintain treatment accuracy within 2.0 mm.

  1. A comparison of proton therapy and IMRT treatment plans for prostate radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Dowdell, S J; Metcalfe, P E; Morales, J E; Jackson, M; Rosenfeld, A B

    2008-12-01

    Proton therapy (PT) is becoming a more widely available treatment option on the world stage and there is some interest in investment in this treatment option in Australia. The benefit of PT has been shown for a number of tumour sites, particularly for paediatric patients. The workload from these patients may not completely fill the maximum yearly workload of a machine. This work aims to ascertain if prostate cancer would be a suitable candidate to fill the rest of the workload at an Australian PT facility. Passive and intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plans were generated for a prostate patient. These were compared to 7 field sliding window and step and shoot IMRT plans. All plans used a prescription dose of 78 CGE. IMRT and IMPT plans used inverse planning for optimisation. Homogeneity in the PTV was best for the IMPT plan. IMPT also gave the best rectal sparing. The bladder and femoral heads were exposed to less dose in both proton plans. Proton plans exposed normal tissue outside the PTV to less than 50% of the dose given by the IMRT plans. PT, particularly IMPT, is a suitable treatment option for the prostate cancer patient presented here. PMID:19239059

  2. Hypofractionated radiotherapy versus conventionally fractionated radiotherapy for patients with intermediate-risk localised prostate cancer: 2-year patient-reported outcomes of the randomised, non-inferiority, phase 3 CHHiP trial

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, Anna; Mossop, Helen; Syndikus, Isabel; Khoo, Vincent; Bloomfield, David; Parker, Chris; Logue, John; Scrase, Christopher; Patterson, Helen; Birtle, Alison; Staffurth, John; Malik, Zafar; Panades, Miguel; Eswar, Chinnamani; Graham, John; Russell, Martin; Kirkbride, Peter; O'Sullivan, Joe M; Gao, Annie; Cruickshank, Clare; Griffin, Clare; Dearnaley, David; Hall, Emma

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) might detect more toxic effects of radiotherapy than do clinician-reported outcomes. We did a quality of life (QoL) substudy to assess PROs up to 24 months after conventionally fractionated or hypofractionated radiotherapy in the Conventional or Hypofractionated High Dose Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy in Prostate Cancer (CHHiP) trial. Methods The CHHiP trial is a randomised, non-inferiority phase 3 trial done in 71 centres, of which 57 UK hospitals took part in the QoL substudy. Men with localised prostate cancer who were undergoing radiotherapy were eligible for trial entry if they had histologically confirmed T1b–T3aN0M0 prostate cancer, an estimated risk of seminal vesicle involvement less than 30%, prostate-specific antigen concentration less than 30 ng/mL, and a WHO performance status of 0 or 1. Participants were randomly assigned (1:1:1) to receive a standard fractionation schedule of 74 Gy in 37 fractions or one of two hypofractionated schedules: 60 Gy in 20 fractions or 57 Gy in 19 fractions. Randomisation was done with computer-generated permuted block sizes of six and nine, stratified by centre and National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) risk group. Treatment allocation was not masked. UCLA Prostate Cancer Index (UCLA-PCI), including Short Form (SF)-36 and Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Prostate (FACT-P), or Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC) and SF-12 quality-of-life questionnaires were completed at baseline, pre-radiotherapy, 10 weeks post-radiotherapy, and 6, 12, 18, and 24 months post-radiotherapy. The CHHiP trial completed accrual on June 16, 2011, and the QoL substudy was closed to further recruitment on Nov 1, 2009. Analysis was on an intention-to-treat basis. The primary endpoint of the QoL substudy was overall bowel bother and comparisons between fractionation groups were done at 24 months post-radiotherapy. The CHHiP trial is registered with ISRCTN registry

  3. Conformal Postoperative Radiotherapy in Patients With Positive Resection Margins and/or pT3-4 Prostate Adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Bellavita, Rita; Massetti, Michela; Abraha, Iosief; Lupattelli, Marco; Mearini, Luigi; Falcinelli, Lorenzo; Farneti, Alessia; Palumbo, Isabella; Porena, Massimo; Aristei, Cynthia

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate outcome and toxicity of high-dose conformal radiotherapy (RT) after radical prostatectomy. Methods and Materials: Between August 1998 and December 2007, 182 consecutive patients with positive resection margins and/or pT3-4, node-negative prostate adenocarcinoma underwent postoperative conformal RT. The prescribed median dose to the prostate/seminal vesicle bed was 66.6 Gy (range 50-70). Hormone therapy (a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone analogue and/or antiandrogen) was administered to 110/182 (60.5%) patients with high-risk features. Biochemical relapse was defined as an increase of more than 0.2 ng/mL over the lowest postoperative prostate-specific antigen (PSA) value measured on 3 occasions, each at least 2 weeks apart. Results: Median follow-up was 55.6 months (range 7.6-141.9 months). The 3- and 5-year probability of biochemical relapse-free survival were 87% and 81%, respectively. In univariate analysis, more advanced T stages, preoperative PSA values {>=}10 ng/mL, and RT doses <70 Gy were significant factors for biochemical relapse. Pre-RT PSA values >0.2 ng/mL were significant for distant metastases. In multivariate analysis, risk factors for biochemical relapse were higher preoperative and pre-RT PSA values, hormone therapy for under 402 days and RT doses of <70 Gy. Higher pre-RT PSA values were the only independent predictor of distant metastases. Acute genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities occurred in 72 (39.6%) and 91 (50%) patients, respectively. There were 2 cases of Grade III GI toxicity but no cases of Grade IV. Late GU and GI toxicities occurred in 28 (15.4%) and 14 (7.7%) patients, respectively: 11 cases of Grade III toxicity: 1 GI (anal stenosis) and 10 GU, all urethral strictures requiring endoscopic urethrotomy. Conclusions: Postoperative high-dose conformal RT in patients with high-risk features was associated with a low risk of biochemical relapse as well as minimal morbidity.

  4. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy: supportive data for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Cahlon, Oren; Hunt, Margie; Zelefsky, Michael J

    2008-01-01

    Since its introduction into clinical use in the mid-1990s, intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has emerged as the most effective and widely used form of external-beam radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer. Multiple studies have confirmed the importance of delivering sufficiently high doses to the prostate to achieve cure. The dosimetric superiority of IMRT over conventional techniques to produce conformal dose distributions that allow for organ sparing has been shown. A growing number of reports have confirmed that IMRT is the safest way to deliver high doses of external-beam irradiation to the prostate and the regional lymph nodes. Advances in imaging and onboard verification systems continue to advance the capabilities of IMRT and have potential implications with regards to further dose escalation and hypofractionated regimens. The clinical data in support of IMRT and the associated technical aspects of IMRT treatment planning and implementation are highlighted in this review.

  5. Pretreatment Endorectal Coil Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings Predict Biochemical Tumor Control in Prostate Cancer Patients Treated With Combination Brachytherapy and External-Beam Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Riaz, Nadeem; Afaq, Asim; Akin, Oguz; Pei Xin; Kollmeier, Marisa A.; Cox, Brett; Hricak, Hedvig; Zelefsky, Michael J.

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To investigate the utility of endorectal coil magenetic resonance imaging (eMRI) in predicting biochemical relapse in prostate cancer patients treated with combination brachytherapy and external-beam radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Between 2000 and 2008, 279 men with intermediate- or high-risk prostate cancer underwent eMRI of their prostate before receiving brachytherapy and supplemental intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Endorectal coil MRI was performed before treatment and retrospectively reviewed by two radiologists experienced in genitourinary MRI. Image-based variables, including tumor diameter, location, number of sextants involved, and the presence of extracapsular extension (ECE), were incorporated with other established clinical variables to predict biochemical control outcomes. The median follow-up was 49 months (range, 1-13 years). Results: The 5-year biochemical relapse-free survival for the cohort was 92%. Clinical findings predicting recurrence on univariate analysis included Gleason score (hazard ratio [HR] 3.6, p = 0.001), PSA (HR 1.04, p = 0.005), and National Comprehensive Cancer Network risk group (HR 4.1, p = 0.002). Clinical T stage and the use of androgen deprivation therapy were not correlated with biochemical failure. Imaging findings on univariate analysis associated with relapse included ECE on MRI (HR 3.79, p = 0.003), tumor size (HR 2.58, p = 0.04), and T stage (HR 1.71, p = 0.004). On multivariate analysis incorporating both clinical and imaging findings, only ECE on MRI and Gleason score were independent predictors of recurrence. Conclusions: Pretreatment eMRI findings predict for biochemical recurrence in intermediate- and high-risk prostate cancer patients treated with combination brachytherapy and external-beam radiotherapy. Gleason score and the presence of ECE on MRI were the only significant predictors of biochemical relapse in this group of patients.

  6. [Patient positioning using in-room kV CT for image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) of prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Kliton, Jorgo; Agoston, Péter; Major, Tibor; Polgár, Csaba

    2012-09-01

    automatic and manual image registrations were 0.31 cm and 0.26 cm in LAT, 0.27 cm and 0.27 cm in LONG and 0.24 cm and 0.33 cm in VERT directions, respectively. In case of manual image co-registration, the required PTV to CTV margins to cover at least 95% of the CTVs with at least 95% percent of the prescribed dose were calculated to 0.93 cm in LAT, 0.65 cm in LONG, and 0.89 cm in VERT directions. Patients set up can be verified with manual image co-registration based on soft tissues around the prostate using a kV CT-on-rails system installed in the treatment room. The difference between automatic and manual image co-registration was significant in LAT direction. A PTV to CTV margin <1 cm seems to be appropriate to cover the CTVs in image-guided prostate radiotherapy. These findings support our recent clinical protocol.

  7. Image-Guided Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer: A Prospective Trial of Concomitant Boost Using Indium-111-Capromab Pendetide (ProstaScint) Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, William W.; Schild, Steven E.; Vora, Sujay A.; Ezzell, Gary A.; Nguyen, Ba D.; Ram, Panol C.; Roarke, Michael C.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate, in a prospective study, the use of {sup 111}In-capromab pendetide (ProstaScint) scan to guide the delivery of a concomitant boost to intraprostatic region showing increased uptake while treating the entire gland with intensity-modulated radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: From September 2002 to November 2005, 71 patients were enrolled. Planning pelvic CT and {sup 111}In-capromab pendetide scan images were coregistered. The entire prostate gland received 75.6 Gy/42 fractions, whereas areas of increased uptake in {sup 111}In-capromab pendetide scan received 82 Gy. For patients with T3/T4 disease, or Gleason score {>=}8, or prostate-specific antigen level >20 ng/mL, 12 months of adjuvant androgen deprivation therapy was given. In January 2005 the protocol was modified to give 6 months of androgen deprivation therapy to patients with a prostate-specific antigen level of 10-20 ng/mL or Gleason 7 disease. Results: Thirty-one patients had low-risk, 30 had intermediate-risk, and 10 had high-risk disease. With a median follow-up of 66 months, the 5-year biochemical control rates were 94% for the entire cohort and 97%, 93%, and 90% for low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups, respectively. Maximum acute and late urinary toxicities were Grade 2 for 38 patients (54%) and 28 patients (39%) and Grade 3 for 1 and 3 patients (4%), respectively. One patient had Grade 4 hematuria. Maximum acute and late gastrointestinal toxicities were Grade 2 for 32 patients (45%) and 15 patients (21%), respectively. Most of the side effects improved with longer follow-up. Conclusion: Concomitant boost to areas showing increased uptake in {sup 111}In-capromab pendetide scan to 82 Gy using intensity-modulated radiotherapy while the entire prostate received 75.6 Gy was feasible and tolerable, with 94% biochemical control rate at 5 years.

  8. Before escalation: behavioral and affective forecasting in escalation of commitment.

    PubMed

    Ku, Gillian

    2008-11-01

    This research examines preinvestment forecasting processes in escalation of commitment, considering two questions: whether individuals are able to accurately predict their behavior and affect in escalation situations and how forecasting processes may be linked to actual escalation. Three experiments demonstrated that individuals underpredicted their escalation and overpredicted their postescalation regret. Two of the experiments also indicated that the less individuals predicted being entrapped, the more they escalated. Counter to expectations, anticipated regret did not predict escalation. The discussion focuses on the theoretical and practical importance of forecasting on escalation and on the importance of understanding both behavioral and affective forecasting effects simultaneously.

  9. A Treatment Planning and Acute Toxicity Comparison of Two Pelvic Nodal Volume Delineation Techniques and Delivery Comparison of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Versus Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy for Hypofractionated High-Risk Prostate Cancer Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Myrehaug, Sten; Chan, Gordon; Craig, Tim; Weinberg, Vivian; Cheng, Chun; Roach, Mack; Cheung, Patrick; Sahgal, Arjun

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To perform a comparison of two pelvic lymph node volume delineation strategies used in intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for high risk prostate cancer and to determine the role of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Methods and Materials: Eighteen consecutive patients accrued to an ongoing clinical trial were identified according to either the nodal contouring strategy as described based on lymphotropic nanoparticle-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging technology (9 patients) or the current Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) consensus guidelines (9 patients). Radiation consisted of 45 Gy to prostate, seminal vesicles, and lymph nodes, with a simultaneous integrated boost to the prostate alone, to a total dose of 67.5 Gy delivered in 25 fractions. Prospective acute genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicities were compared at baseline, during radiotherapy, and 3 months after radiotherapy. Each patient was retrospectively replanned using the opposite method of nodal contouring, and plans were normalized for dosimetric comparison. VMAT plans were also generated according to the RTOG method for comparison. Results: RTOG plans resulted in a significantly lower rate of genitourinary frequency 3 months after treatment. The dosimetric comparison showed that the RTOG plans resulted in both favorable planning target volume (PTV) coverage and lower organs at risk (OARs) and integral (ID) doses. VMAT required two to three arcs to achieve adequate treatment plans, we did not observe consistent dosimetric benefits to either the PTV or the OARs, and a higher ID was observed. However, treatment times were significantly shorter with VMAT. Conclusion: The RTOG guidelines for pelvic nodal volume delineation results in favorable dosimetry and acceptable acute toxicities for both the target and OARs. We are unable to conclude that VMAT provides a benefit compared with IMRT.

  10. Early clinical experience of radiotherapy of prostate cancer with volumetric modulated arc therapy

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background To report about initial clinical experience in radiation treatment of carcinoma of prostate with volumetric modulated arcs with the RapidArc (RA) technology. Methods Forty-five patients with a median age of 72 ± 3, affected by prostate carcinoma (T1c: 22 patients, T2a-b: 17 patients, T3a-b: 6 patients. N0: 43 patients, N1-Nx: 2 patients, all M0), with initial PSA of 10.0 ± 3.0 ng/mL, were treated with RapidArc in a feasibility study. All patients were treated with single arc using 6MV photons. Dose prescription ranged between 76 (7 patients) and 78 Gy (38 patients) in 2Gy/fraction. Plan quality was assessed by means of Dose Volume Histogram (DVH) analysis. Technical parameters of arcs and pre-treatment quality assurance results (Gamma Agreement Index, GAI) are reported to describe delivery features. Early toxicity was scored (according to the Common Terminology Criteria of Adverse Effects scale, CTCAE, scale) at the end of treatment together with biochemical outcome (PSA). Results From DVH data, target coverage was fulfilling planning objectives: V95% was in average higher than 98% and V107%~0.0% (D2%~104.0% in average). Homogeneity D5%-D95% ranged between 6.2 ± 1.0% to 6.7 ± 1.3%. For rectum, all planning objectives were largely met (e.g. V70Gy = 10.7 ± 5.5% against an objective of < 25%) similarly for bladder (e.g. D2% = 79.4 ± 1.2Gy against an objective of 80.0Gy). Maximum dose to femurs was D2% = 36.7 ± 5.4Gy against an objective of 47Gy. Monitor Units resulted: MU/Gy = 239 ± 37. Average beam on time was 1.24 ± 0.0 minutes. Pre-treatment GAI resulted in 98.1 ± 1.1%. Clinical data were recorded as PSA at 6 weeks after RT, with median values of 0.4 ± 0.4 ng/mL. Concerning acute toxicity, no patient showed grade 2-3 rectal toxicity; 5/42 (12%) patients experienced grade 2 dysuria; 18/41 (44%) patients preserved complete or partial erectile function. Conclusion RapidArc proved to be a safe, qualitative and advantageous treatment modality for

  11. Contouring variability of human- and deformable-generated contours in radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Stephen J.; Wen, Ning; Kim, Jinkoo; Liu, Chang; Pradhan, Deepak; Aref, Ibrahim; Cattaneo, Richard, II; Vance, Sean; Movsas, Benjamin; Chetty, Indrin J.; Elshaikh, Mohamed A.

    2015-06-01

    This study was designed to evaluate contouring variability of human-and deformable-generated contours on planning CT (PCT) and CBCT for ten patients with low-or intermediate-risk prostate cancer. For each patient in this study, five radiation oncologists contoured the prostate, bladder, and rectum, on one PCT dataset and five CBCT datasets. Consensus contours were generated using the STAPLE method in the CERR software package. Observer contours were compared to consensus contour, and contour metrics (Dice coefficient, Hausdorff distance, Contour Distance, Center-of-Mass [COM] Deviation) were calculated. In addition, the first day CBCT was registered to subsequent CBCT fractions (CBCTn: CBCT2-CBCT5) via B-spline Deformable Image Registration (DIR). Contours were transferred from CBCT1 to CBCTn via the deformation field, and contour metrics were calculated through comparison with consensus contours generated from human contour set. The average contour metrics for prostate contours on PCT and CBCT were as follows: Dice coefficient—0.892 (PCT), 0.872 (CBCT-Human), 0.824 (CBCT-Deformed); Hausdorff distance—4.75 mm (PCT), 5.22 mm (CBCT-Human), 5.94 mm (CBCT-Deformed); Contour Distance (overall contour)—1.41 mm (PCT), 1.66 mm (CBCT-Human), 2.30 mm (CBCT-Deformed); COM Deviation—2.01 mm (PCT), 2.78 mm (CBCT-Human), 3.45 mm (CBCT-Deformed). For human contours on PCT and CBCT, the difference in average Dice coefficient between PCT and CBCT (approx. 2%) and Hausdorff distance (approx. 0.5 mm) was small compared to the variation between observers for each patient (standard deviation in Dice coefficient of 5% and Hausdorff distance of 2.0 mm). However, additional contouring variation was found for the deformable-generated contours (approximately 5.0% decrease in Dice coefficient and 0.7 mm increase in Hausdorff distance relative to human-generated contours on CBCT). Though deformable contours provide a reasonable starting point for contouring on

  12. Inhibition of N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase V enhances sensitivity of radiotherapy in human prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Huiyi; Chen, Wenxia; Liu, Qiulian; Wei, Ting; Zhu, Weiliang; Meng, Hui; Guo, Linlang; Zhang, Jian

    2014-08-29

    Highlights: • We first evaluated the effect of GnT-V on radiation sensitivity of prostate cancer. • Higher level of GnT-V was detected more frequently in the PCa advanced tumors. • Attenuation of GnT-V inhibited cell proliferation, migration and increased apoptosis. • Knockdown of GnT-V could decrease radiation-induced G2/M arrest and NF-κB activity. • Inhibition of GnT-V may be involved in increasing radiation sensitivity of PCa cells. - Abstract: The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase V (GnT-V) and radiation sensitivity of prostate cancer (PCa) cells both in vitro and in vivo. Firstly, the GnT-V expression was studied in 84 cases of PCa tissues, in which higher level of GnT-V was detected more frequently in the advanced tumors. Secondly, the GnT-V stably suppressed cell lines PCa/1079 (Lncap/1079 and PC3/1079) were constructed from PCa cell lines (Lncap and PC3) in vitro. Attenuation of GnT-V inhibited cell proliferation, migration and increased apoptosis, which resulted in enhanced radiation sensitivity of PCa cells. The underlying mechanism may be relevant to the increasing ratio of Bax/Bcl-2, the blocking transcription of NF-κB and the reduction of cell cycle G2-M arrest. Finally, in in vivo study, compared with control groups, the irradiated PCa xenograft nude mice of PCa/1079 indicated to reduce tumor-growth rate and enhance survival time. Summary, our studies showed that inhibition of GnT-V probably improved PCa cells’ radiation sensitivity.

  13. Final Report of the Intergroup Randomized Study of Combined Androgen-Deprivation Therapy Plus Radiotherapy Versus Androgen-Deprivation Therapy Alone in Locally Advanced Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Malcolm D.; Parulekar, Wendy R.; Sydes, Matthew R.; Brundage, Michael; Kirkbride, Peter; Gospodarowicz, Mary; Cowan, Richard; Kostashuk, Edmund C.; Anderson, John; Swanson, Gregory; Parmar, Mahesh K.B.; Hayter, Charles; Jovic, Gordana; Hiltz, Andrea; Hetherington, John; Sathya, Jinka; Barber, James B.P.; McKenzie, Michael; El-Sharkawi, Salah; Souhami, Luis; Hardman, P.D. John; Chen, Bingshu E.; Warde, Padraig

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We have previously reported that radiotherapy (RT) added to androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) improves survival in men with locally advanced prostate cancer. Here, we report the prespecified final analysis of this randomized trial. Patients and Methods NCIC Clinical Trials Group PR.3/Medical Research Council PR07/Intergroup T94-0110 was a randomized controlled trial of patients with locally advanced prostate cancer. Patients with T3-4, N0/Nx, M0 prostate cancer or T1-2 disease with either prostate-specific antigen (PSA) of more than 40 μg/L or PSA of 20 to 40 μg/L plus Gleason score of 8 to 10 were randomly assigned to lifelong ADT alone or to ADT+RT. The RT dose was 64 to 69 Gy in 35 to 39 fractions to the prostate and pelvis or prostate alone. Overall survival was compared using a log-rank test stratified for prespecified variables. Results One thousand two hundred five patients were randomly assigned between 1995 and 2005, 602 to ADT alone and 603 to ADT+RT. At a median follow-up time of 8 years, 465 patients had died, including 199 patients from prostate cancer. Overall survival was significantly improved in the patients allocated to ADT+RT (hazard ratio [HR], 0.70; 95% CI, 0.57 to 0.85; P < .001). Deaths from prostate cancer were significantly reduced by the addition of RT to ADT (HR, 0.46; 95% CI, 0.34 to 0.61; P < .001). Patients on ADT+RT reported a higher frequency of adverse events related to bowel toxicity, but only two of 589 patients had grade 3 or greater diarrhea at 24 months after RT. Conclusion This analysis demonstrates that the previously reported benefit in survival is maintained at a median follow-up of 8 years and firmly establishes the role of RT in the treatment of men with locally advanced prostate cancer. PMID:25691677

  14. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI for prostate cancer localization.

    PubMed

    Jackson, A S N; Reinsberg, S A; Sohaib, S A; Charles-Edwards, E M; Jhavar, S; Christmas, T J; Thompson, A C; Bailey, M J; Corbishley, C M; Fisher, C; Leach, M O; Dearnaley, D P

    2009-02-01

    Radiotherapy dose escalation improves tumour control in prostate cancer but with increased toxicity. Boosting focal tumour only may allow dose escalation with acceptable toxicity. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy can deliver this, but visualization of the tumour remains limiting. CT or conventional MRI techniques are poor at localizing tumour, but dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) may be superior. 18 patients with prostate cancer had T(2) weighted (T2W) and DCE-MRI prior to prostatectomy. The prostate was sectioned meticulously so as to achieve accurate correlation between imaging and pathology. The accuracy of DCE-MRI for cancer detection was calculated by a pixel-by-pixel correlation of quantitative DCE-MRI parameter maps and pathology. In addition, a radiologist interpreted the DCE-MRI and T2W images. The location of tumour on imaging was compared with histology, and the accuracy of DCE-MRI and T2W images was then compared. Pixel-by-pixel comparison of quantitative parameter maps showed a significant difference between the benign peripheral zone and tumour for the parameters K(trans), v(e) and k(ep). Calculation of areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve showed that the pharmacokinetic parameters were only "fair" discriminators between cancer and benign gland. Interpretation of DCE-MRI and T2W images by a radiologist showed DCE-MRI to be more sensitive than T2W images for tumour localization (50% vs 21%; p = 0.006) and similarly specific (85% vs 81%; p = 0.593). The superior sensitivity of DCE-MRI compared with T2W images, together with its high specificity, is arguably sufficient for its use in guiding radiotherapy boosts in prostate cancer.

  15. Outcomes of high-dose intensity-modulated radiotherapy alone with 1 cm planning target volume posterior margin for localized prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Clinically localized prostate cancer may be treated by different approaches of radiation therapy. The aim of this study was to report the results of disease control and toxicity in patients with clinically localized prostate cancer treated with high dose IMRT alone with 1 cm PTV posterior margin. Methods From September 2001 to April 2008, 140 patients with localized prostate cancer were treated with definitive IMRT (dose ≥ 74 Gy) without hormone therapy. Outcomes were measured from the conclusion of radiotherapy. Biochemical failure was defined as PSA nadir + 2.0 ng/dL. Toxicities were assessed using the NCI-CTCAE-version 3.0. Median follow-up was 58 months. Results Biochemical failure occurred in 13.6% of patients. Actuarial 5-year biochemical control rates were 91.7%, 82.5% and 85.9% for low-, intermediate-, and high-risk patients, respectively. Stage T2 patients presented a risk of biochemical failure almost three times higher than stage T1 (RR = 2.91; 95% CI: 1.04; 8.17). Distant metastases occurred in 3 (2%) patients. Five-year metastasis-free and overall survivals were 96% and 97.5%, respectively. Late grade 3 genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity rates were, respectively, 1.6% and 3%. Conclusion High-dose IMRT alone with 1 cm posterior PTV margin was effective and safe for patients with localized prostate cancer. PMID:24314072

  16. A novel approach for establishing benchmark CBCT/CT deformable image registrations in prostate cancer radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jinkoo; Kumar, Sanath; Liu, Chang; Zhong, Hualiang; Pradhan, Deepak; Shah, Mira; Cattaneo, Richard; Yechieli, Raphael; Robbins, Jared R.; Elshaikh, Mohamed A.; Chetty, Indrin J.

    2013-11-01

    Deformable image registration (DIR) is an integral component for adaptive radiation therapy. However, accurate registration between daily cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and treatment planning CT is challenging, due to significant daily variations in rectal and bladder fillings as well as the increased noise levels in CBCT images. Another significant challenge is the lack of ‘ground-truth’ registrations in the clinical setting, which is necessary for quantitative evaluation of various registration algorithms. The aim of this study is to establish benchmark registrations of clinical patient data. Three pairs of CT/CBCT datasets were chosen for this institutional review board approved retrospective study. On each image, in order to reduce the contouring uncertainty, ten independent sets of organs were manually delineated by five physicians. The mean contour set for each image was derived from the ten contours. A set of distinctive points (round natural calcifications and three implanted prostate fiducial markers) were also manually identified. The mean contours and point features were then incorporated as constraints into a B-spline based DIR algorithm. Further, a rigidity penalty was imposed on the femurs and pelvic bones to preserve their rigidity. A piecewise-rigid registration approach was adapted to account for the differences in femur pose and the sliding motion between bones. For each registration, the magnitude of the spatial Jacobian (|JAC|) was calculated to quantify the tissue compression and expansion. Deformation grids and finite-element-model-based unbalanced energy maps were also reviewed visually to evaluate the physical soundness of the resultant deformations. Organ DICE indices (indicating the degree of overlap between registered organs) and residual misalignments of the fiducial landmarks were quantified. Manual organ delineation on CBCT images varied significantly among physicians with overall mean DICE index of only 0.7 among redundant

  17. Image-Guided Radiotherapy (IGRT) for Prostate Cancer Comparing kV Imaging of Fiducial Markers With Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT)

    SciTech Connect

    Barney, Brandon M.; Lee, R. Jeffrey; Handrahan, Diana; Welsh, Keith T.; Cook, J. Taylor; Sause, William T.

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: To present our single-institution experience with image-guided radiotherapy comparing fiducial markers and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) for daily localization of prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: From April 2007 to October 2008, 36 patients with prostate cancer received intensity-modulated radiotherapy with daily localization by use of implanted fiducials. Orthogonal kilovoltage (kV) portal imaging preceded all 1244 treatments. Cone-beam computed tomography images were also obtained before 286 treatments (23%). Shifts in the anterior-posterior (AP), superior-inferior (SI), and left-right (LR) dimensions were made from kV fiducial imaging. Cone-beam computed tomography shifts based on soft tissues were recorded. Shifts were compared by use of Bland-Altman limits of agreement. Mean and standard deviation of absolute differences were also compared. A difference of 5 mm or less was acceptable. Subsets including start date, body mass index, and prostate size were analyzed. Results: Of 286 treatments, 81 (28%) resulted in a greater than 5.0-mm difference in one or more dimensions. Mean differences in the AP, SI, and LR dimensions were 3.4 {+-} 2.6 mm, 3.1 {+-} 2.7 mm, and 1.3 {+-} 1.6 mm, respectively. Most deviations occurred in the posterior (fiducials, 78%; CBCT, 59%), superior (79%, 61%), and left (57%, 63%) directions. Bland-Altman 95% confidence intervals were -4.0 to 9.3 mm for AP, -9.0 to 5.3 mm for SI, and -4.1 to 3.9 mm for LR. The percentages of shift agreements within {+-}5 mm were 72.4% for AP, 72.7% for SI, and 97.2% for LR. Correlation between imaging techniques was not altered by time, body mass index, or prostate size. Conclusions: Cone-beam computed tomography and kV fiducial imaging are similar; however, more than one-fourth of CBCT and kV shifts differed enough to affect target coverage. This was even more pronounced with smaller margins (3 mm). Fiducial imaging requires less daily physician input, is less time-consuming, and is

  18. Quality assurance for radiotherapy in prostate cancer: Point dose measurements in intensity modulated fields with large dose gradients

    SciTech Connect

    Escude, Lluis . E-mail: lluis.escude@gmx.net; Linero, Dolors; Molla, Meritxell; Miralbell, Raymond

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: We aimed to evaluate an optimization algorithm designed to find the most favorable points to position an ionization chamber (IC) for quality assurance dose measurements of patients treated for prostate cancer with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and fields up to 10 cm x 10 cm. Methods and Materials: Three cylindrical ICs (PTW, Freiburg, Germany) were used with volumes of 0.6 cc, 0.125 cc, and 0.015 cc. Dose measurements were made in a plastic phantom (PMMA) at 287 optimized points. An algorithm was designed to search for points with the lowest dose gradient. Measurements were made also at 39 nonoptimized points. Results were normalized to a reference homogeneous field introducing a dose ratio factor, which allowed us to compare measured vs. calculated values as percentile dose ratio factor deviations {delta}F (%). A tolerance range of {delta}F (%) of {+-}3% was considered. Results: Half of the {delta}F (%) values obtained at nonoptimized points were outside the acceptable range. Values at optimized points were widely spread for the largest IC (i.e., 60% of the results outside the tolerance range), whereas for the two small-volume ICs, only 14.6% of the results were outside the tolerance interval. No differences were observed when comparing the two small ICs. Conclusions: The presented optimization algorithm is a useful tool to determine the best IC in-field position for optimal dose measurement conditions. A good agreement between calculated and measured doses can be obtained by positioning small volume chambers at carefully selected points in the field. Large chambers may be unreliable even in optimized points for IMRT fields {<=}10 cm x 10 cm.

  19. Impact of hormonal treatment duration in combination with radiotherapy for locally advanced prostate cancer: Meta-analysis of randomized trials

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Hormone therapy plus radiotherapy significantly decreases recurrences and mortality of patients affected by locally advanced prostate cancer. In order to determine if difference exists according to the hormonal treatment duration, a literature-based meta-analysis was performed. Methods Relative risks (RR) were derived through a random-effect model. Differences in primary (biochemical failure, BF; cancer-specific survival, CSS), and secondary outcomes (overall survival, OS; local or distant recurrence, LR/DM) were explored. Absolute differences (AD) and the number needed to treat (NNT) were calculated. Heterogeneity, a meta-regression for clinic-pathological predictors and a correlation test for surrogates were conducted. Results Five trials (3,424 patients) were included. Patient population ranged from 267 to 1,521 patients. The longer hormonal treatment significantly improves BF (with significant heterogeneity) with an absolute benefit of 10.1%, and a non significant trend in CSS. With regard to secondary end-points, the longer hormonal treatment significantly decrease both the LR and the DM with an absolute difference of 11.7% and 11.5%. Any significant difference in OS was observed. None of the three identified clinico-pathological predictors (median PSA, range 9.5-20.35, Gleason score 7-10, 27-55% patients/trial, and T3-4, 13-77% patients/trial), did significantly affect outcomes. At the meta-regression analysis a significant correlation between the overall treatment benefit in BF, CSS, OS, LR and DM, and the length of the treatment was found (p≤0.03). Conclusions Although with significant heterogeneity (reflecting different patient' risk stratifications), a longer hormonal treatment duration significantly decreases biochemical, local and distant recurrences, with a trend for longer cancer specific survival. PMID:21143897

  20. Dose-Volume Constraints to Reduce Rectal Side Effects From Prostate Radiotherapy: Evidence From MRC RT01 Trial ISRCTN 47772397

    SciTech Connect

    Gulliford, Sarah L.; Foo, Kerwyn; Morgan, Rachel C.; Aird, Edwin G.; Bidmead, A. Margaret; Critchley, Helen; Evans, Philip M. D.Phil.; Gianolini, Stefano; Mayles, W. Philip; Moore, A. Rollo; Sanchez-Nieto, Beatriz; Partridge, Mike; Sydes, Matthew R. C.Stat; Webb, Steve; Dearnaley, David P.

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: Radical radiotherapy for prostate cancer is effective but dose limited because of the proximity of normal tissues. Comprehensive dose-volume analysis of the incidence of clinically relevant late rectal toxicities could indicate how the dose to the rectum should be constrained. Previous emphasis has been on constraining the mid-to-high dose range (>=50 Gy). Evidence is emerging that lower doses could also be important. Methods and Materials: Data from a large multicenter randomized trial were used to investigate the correlation between seven clinically relevant rectal toxicity endpoints (including patient- and clinician-reported outcomes) and an absolute 5% increase in the volume of rectum receiving the specified doses. The results were quantified using odds ratios. Rectal dose-volume constraints were applied retrospectively to investigate the association of constraints with the incidence of late rectal toxicity. Results: A statistically significant dose-volume response was observed for six of the seven endpoints for at least one of the dose levels tested in the range of 30-70 Gy. Statistically significant reductions in the incidence of these late rectal toxicities were observed for the group of patients whose treatment plans met specific proposed dose-volume constraints. The incidence of moderate/severe toxicity (any endpoint) decreased incrementally for patients whose treatment plans met increasing numbers of dose-volume constraints from the set of V30<=80%, V40<=65%, V50<=55%, V60<=40%, V65<=30%, V70<=15%, and V75<=3%. Conclusion: Considering the entire dose distribution to the rectum by applying dose-volume constraints such as those tested here in the present will reduce the incidence of late rectal toxicity.

  1. Gold nanoparticle sensitize radiotherapy of prostate cancer cells by regulation of the cell cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roa, Wilson; Zhang, Xiaojing; Guo, Linghong; Shaw, Andrew; Hu, Xiuying; Xiong, Yeping; Gulavita, Sunil; Patel, Samir; Sun, Xuejun; Chen, Jie; Moore, Ronald; Xing, James Z.

    2009-09-01

    Glucose-capped gold nanoparticles (Glu-GNPs) have been used to improve cellular targeting and radio-sensitization. In this study, we explored the mechanism of Glu-GNP enhanced radiation sensitivity in radiation-resistant human prostate cancer cells. Cell survival and proliferation were measured using MTT and clonogenic assay. Flow cytometry with staining by propidium iodide (PI) was performed to study the cell cycle changes induced by Glu-GNPs, and western blotting was used to determine the expression of p53 and cyclin proteins that correlated to cell cycle regulation. With 2 Gy of ortho-voltage irradiation, Glu-GNP showed a 1.5-2.0 fold enhancement in growth inhibition when compared to x-rays alone. Comparing the cell cycle change, Glu-GNPs induced acceleration in the G0/G1 phase and accumulation of cells in the G2/M phase at 29.8% versus 18.4% for controls at 24 h. G2/M arrest was accompanied by decreased expression of p53 and cyclin A, and increased expression of cyclin B1 and cyclin E. In conclusion, Glu-GNPs trigger activation of the CDK kinases leading to cell cycle acceleration in the G0/G1 phase and accumulation in the G2/M phase. This activation is accompanied by a striking sensitization to ionizing radiation, which may have clinical implications.

  2. SU-E-J-29: Automatic Image Registration Performance of Three IGRT Systems for Prostate Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Barber, J; Sykes, J; Holloway, L; Thwaites, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To compare the performance of an automatic image registration algorithm on image sets collected on three commercial image guidance systems, and explore its relationship with imaging parameters such as dose and sharpness. Methods: Images of a CIRS Virtually Human Male Pelvis phantom (VHMP) were collected on the CBCT systems of Varian TrueBeam/OBI and Elekta Synergy/XVI linear accelerators, across a range of mAs settings; and MVCT on a Tomotherapy Hi-ART accelerator with a range of pitch. Using the 6D correlation ratio algorithm of XVI, each image was registered to a mask of the prostate volume with a 5 mm expansion. Registrations were repeated 100 times, with random initial offsets introduced to simulate daily matching. Residual registration errors were calculated by correcting for the initial phantom set-up error. Automatic registration was also repeated after reconstructing images with different sharpness filters. Results: All three systems showed good registration performance, with residual translations <0.5mm (1σ) for typical clinical dose and reconstruction settings. Residual rotational error had larger range, with 0.8°, 1.2° and 1.9° for 1σ in XVI, OBI and Tomotherapy respectively. The registration accuracy of XVI images showed a strong dependence on imaging dose, particularly below 4mGy. No evidence of reduced performance was observed at the lowest dose settings for OBI and Tomotherapy, but these were above 4mGy. Registration failures (maximum target registration error > 3.6 mm on the surface of a 30mm sphere) occurred in 5% to 10% of registrations. Changing the sharpness of image reconstruction had no significant effect on registration performance. Conclusions: Using the present automatic image registration algorithm, all IGRT systems tested provided satisfactory registrations for clinical use, within a normal range of acquisition settings.

  3. Volume effects of late term normal tissue toxicity in prostate cancer radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonta, Dacian Viorel

    Modeling of volume effects for treatment toxicity is paramount for optimization of radiation therapy. This thesis proposes a new model for calculating volume effects in gastro-intestinal and genito-urinary normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) following radiation therapy for prostate carcinoma. The radiobiological and the pathological basis for this model and its relationship to other models are detailed. A review of the radiobiological experiments and published clinical data identified salient features and specific properties a biologically adequate model has to conform to. The new model was fit to a set of actual clinical data. In order to verify the goodness of fit, two established NTCP models and a non-NTCP measure for complication risk were fitted to the same clinical data. The method of fit for the model parameters was maximum likelihood estimation. Within the framework of the maximum likelihood approach I estimated the parameter uncertainties for each complication prediction model. The quality-of-fit was determined using the Aikaike Information Criterion. Based on the model that provided the best fit, I identified the volume effects for both types of toxicities. Computer-based bootstrap resampling of the original dataset was used to estimate the bias and variance for the fitted parameter values. Computer simulation was also used to estimate the population size that generates a specific uncertainty level (3%) in the value of predicted complication probability. The same method was used to estimate the size of the patient population needed for accurate choice of the model underlying the NTCP. The results indicate that, depending on the number of parameters of a specific NTCP model, 100 (for two parameter models) and 500 patients (for three parameter models) are needed for accurate parameter fit. Correlation of complication occurrence in patients was also investigated. The results suggest that complication outcomes are correlated in a patient, although

  4. Residual Seminal Vesicle Displacement in Marker-Based Image-Guided Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer and the Impact on Margin Design

    SciTech Connect

    Smitsmans, Monique H.P.; Bois, Josien de; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Catton, Charles N.; Jaffray, David A.; Lebesque, Joos V.; Herk, Marcel van

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: The objectives of this study were to quantify residual interfraction displacement of seminal vesicles (SV) and investigate the efficacy of rotation correction on SV displacement in marker-based prostate image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). We also determined the effect of marker registration on the measured SV displacement and its impact on margin design. Methods and Materials: SV displacement was determined relative to marker registration by using 296 cone beam computed tomography scans of 13 prostate cancer patients with implanted markers. SV were individually registered in the transverse plane, based on gray-value information. The target registration error (TRE) for the SV due to marker registration inaccuracies was estimated. Correlations between prostate gland rotations and SV displacement and between individual SV displacements were determined. Results: The SV registration success rate was 99%. Displacement amounts of both SVs were comparable. Systematic and random residual SV displacements were 1.6 mm and 2.0 mm in the left-right direction, respectively, and 2.8 mm and 3.1 mm in the anteroposterior (AP) direction, respectively. Rotation correction did not reduce residual SV displacement. Prostate gland rotation around the left-right axis correlated with SV AP displacement (R{sup 2} = 42%); a correlation existed between both SVs for AP displacement (R{sup 2} = 62%); considerable correlation existed between random errors of SV displacement and TRE (R{sup 2} = 34%). Conclusions: Considerable residual SV displacement exists in marker-based IGRT. Rotation correction barely reduced SV displacement, rather, a larger SV displacement was shown relative to the prostate gland that was not captured by the marker position. Marker registration error partly explains SV displacement when correcting for rotations. Correcting for rotations, therefore, is not advisable when SV are part of the target volume. Margin design for SVs should take these uncertainties into

  5. Inhibition of EZH2 by chemo- and radiotherapy agents and small molecule inhibitors induces cell death in castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Wu, Changping; Jin, Xin; Yang, Jing; Yang, Yinhui; He, Yundong; Ding, Liya; Pan, Yunqian; Chen, Shuai; Jiang, Jingting; Huang, Haojie

    2016-01-19

    Androgen deprivation therapy is the mainstay of treatment of advanced prostate cancer (PCa). However, a significant portion of patients experience disease relapse and tumors ultimately evolve into castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), for which there is no cure in the clinic. The Polycomb protein enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) is frequently overexpressed in CRPC. It is unclear whether EZH2 can be a therapeutic target in CRPC. Here, we demonstrated that chemo- and radiotherapy agents such as camptothecin (CPT) and γ irradiation decrease EZH2 expression in various PCa cell lines. We provided evidence that functional p53 and RB proteins are required for CPT- and irradiation-induced downregulation of EZH2 in CRPC cells. We demonstrated that EZH2-specific small molecule inhibitors mitigate CRPC cell growth. We further showed that the EZH2 inhibitor GSK126 inhibits both Polycomb-dependent and -independent functions of EZH2 in PCa cells. Importantly, we found that inhibition of EZH2 by genetic and pharmacological means sensitizes CRPC cells to CPT-induced apoptotic death and growth inhibition in culture and in mice. Our data suggest that concomitant administration of small molecule inhibitors of EZH2 may significantly increase the anti-tumor efficacy of conventional chemo- and radiotherapies in CRPC. PMID:26657505

  6. Different rectal toxicity tolerance with and without simultaneous conventionally-fractionated pelvic lymph node treatment in patients receiving hypofractionated prostate radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To investigate added morbidity associated with the addition of pelvic elective nodal irradiation (ENI) to hypofractionated radiotherapy to the prostate. Methods and materials Two-hundred twelve patients, treated with hypofractionated radiotherapy to the prostate between 2004 and 2011, met the inclusion criteria for the analysis. All patients received 70 Gy to the prostate delivered over 28 fractions and 103 (49%) received ENI consisting of 50.4 Gy to the pelvic lymphatics delivered simultaneously in 1.8 Gy fractions. The mean dose-volume histograms were compared between the two subgroups defined by use of ENI, and various dose-volume parameters were analyzed for effect on late lower gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicity. Results Acute grade 2 lower GI toxicity occurred in 38 (37%) patients receiving ENI versus 19 (17%) in those who did not (p = 0.001). The Kaplan-Meier estimate of grade ≥ 2 lower GI toxicity at 3 years was 15.3% for patients receiving ENI versus 5.3% for those who did not (p = 0.026). Each rectal isodose volume was increased for patients receiving ENI up to 50 Gy (p ≤ 0.021 for each 5 Gy increment). Across all patients, the absolute V70 of the rectum was the only predictor of late GI toxicity. When subgroups, defined by the use of ENI, were analyzed separately, rectal V70 was only predictive of late GI toxicity for patients who received ENI. For patients receiving ENI, V70 > 3 cc was associated with an increased risk of late GI events. Conclusions Elective nodal irradiation increases the rates of acute and late GI toxicity when delivered simultaneously with hypofractioanted prostate radiotherapy. The use of ENI appears to sensitize the rectum to hot spots, therefore we recommend added caution to minimize the volume of rectum receiving 100% of the prescription dose in these patients. PMID:24893842

  7. Atlas Based Segmentation and Mapping of Organs at Risk from Planning CT for the Development of Voxel-Wise Predictive Models of Toxicity in Prostate Radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acosta, Oscar; Dowling, Jason; Cazoulat, Guillaume; Simon, Antoine; Salvado, Olivier; de Crevoisier, Renaud; Haigron, Pascal

    The prediction of toxicity is crucial to managing prostate cancer radiotherapy (RT). This prediction is classically organ wise and based on the dose volume histograms (DVH) computed during the planning step, and using for example the mathematical Lyman Normal Tissue Complication Probability (NTCP) model. However, these models lack spatial accuracy, do not take into account deformations and may be inappropiate to explain toxicity events related with the distribution of the delivered dose. Producing voxel wise statistical models of toxicity might help to explain the risks linked to the dose spatial distribution but is challenging due to the difficulties lying on the mapping of organs and dose in a common template. In this paper we investigate the use of atlas based methods to perform the non-rigid mapping and segmentation of the individuals' organs at risk (OAR) from CT scans. To build a labeled atlas, 19 CT scans were selected from a population of patients treated for prostate cancer by radiotherapy. The prostate and the OAR (Rectum, Bladder, Bones) were then manually delineated by an expert and constituted the training data. After a number of affine and non rigid registration iterations, an average image (template) representing the whole population was obtained. The amount of consensus between labels was used to generate probabilistic maps for each organ. We validated the accuracy of the approach by segmenting the organs using the training data in a leave one out scheme. The agreement between the volumes after deformable registration and the manually segmented organs was on average above 60% for the organs at risk. The proposed methodology provides a way to map the organs from a whole population on a single template and sets the stage to perform further voxel wise analysis. With this method new and accurate predictive models of toxicity will be built.

  8. Biochemical Control With Radiotherapy Improves Overall Survival in Intermediate and High-Risk Prostate Cancer Patients Who Have an Estimated 10-Year Overall Survival of >90%

    SciTech Connect

    Herbert, Christopher; Liu, Mitchell; Tyldesley, Scott; Morris, W. James; Joffres, Michel; Khaira, Mandip; Kwan, Winkle; Moiseenko, Vitali; Pickles, Thomas

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To identify subgroups of patients with carcinoma of the prostate treated with radical radiotherapy that have improved overall survival when disease is biochemically controlled. Methods and Materials: A cohort of 1,060 prostate cancer patients treated with radical radiotherapy was divided into nine subgroups based on National Comprehensive Cancer Network risk category and estimated 10-year overall survival (eOS 10y) derived from the age adjusted Charlson Comorbidity Index. Patients with and without biochemical control were compared with respect to overall survival. Actuarial estimates of overall survival were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards models were used for analysis of overall survival. Results: Median follow-up was 125 months (range, 51-176 months). Only the subgroups with high or intermediate risk disease and an eOS 10y of >90% had a statistically significantly improved overall survival when prostate cancer was biochemically controlled. In all other groups, biochemical control made no significant difference to overall survival. In the subgroup with high-risk disease and eOS 10y >90%, actuarial overall survival was 86.3% (95% confidence interval [CI] 78.5%-94.1%) and 62.1% (95% CI 52.9%-71.3%) for patients with biochemical control and biochemical relapse respectively (p = 0.002). In the intermediate risk group with eOS >90%, actuarial overall survival was 95.3% (95% CI 89.0%-100%) and 79.8% (95% CI 68.0%-91.6%) for biochemically controlled and biochemically relapsed patients (p = 0.033). On multivariate analysis, National Comprehensive Cancer Network risk group (p = 0.005), biochemical control (p = 0.033) and eOS 10y (p < 0.001) were statistically significant. Conclusion: Biochemical control translates into improved overall survival in patients with high or intermediate risk disease and an estimated 10-year overall survival of >90%.

  9. SU-E-T-620: Dosimetric Compliance Study for a New Prostate Protocol of Combined High Dose Rate Brachytherapy and Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, C; Giaddui, T; Den, R; Harrison, A; Yu, Y

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the adherence of treatment plans of prostate cancer patients with the dosimetric compliance criteria of the new in house phase I trial of high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy combined with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for intermediate risk prostate cancer patients. Methods: Ten prostate cancer patients were treated using this trial. They received one fraction of HDR to 15Gy, followed by external beam(EB) boost of 3.2Gy(Level 1, five patients) or 3.94Gy(level 2, five patients) per fraction for 10 or 7 fractions, respectively, both equivalent to EB treatments of 113.5Gy in 2Gy fractions. The EB plans were either IMRT or VMAT plans. DVH analysis was performed to verify the adherence of treatment plans to the dosimetric criteria of the trial. Results: For Level 1 patients, target coverage were adequate, with CTV V32Gy(%) of 99.0±1.0 (mean ± 1 standard deviation), and PTV V31Gy(%) of 99.6±0.3. PTV V32.9Gy(%) is 1.4±3.1 and PTVmax is 32.9±0.2Gy. Rectum, bladder and femoral heads sparing were well within protocol criteria. For Level 2 patients, CTV V27.6Gy(%) is 98.7±1.8; PTV V26.7Gy(%) is 99.0±1.4. PTV V28.4Gy(%) is 1.3±1.4, with three patients having minor deviation from protocol. Again critical structures were spared compliant to the protocol. The analysis of HDR plans show similar results, with adequate dose coverage to the prostate and sparing of critical structures including urethra and rectum. V100(%) and V90(%) of prostate are 96.0±1.1 and 98.9±0.5. Urethra D10(%) is 113.1±2.9. Rectum V80(cc) is 1.4±0.5. Hotspot in prostate is substantially higher than what the protocol specifies. But the criteria for hotspot are only guidelines, serving to lower the dose to urethra . Conclusion: This new high biological equivalent dose prostate trial has been carried out successfully for ten patients. Based on dosimetric analysis, all HDR and external plans were compliant to the protocol criteria, with only minor deviations.

  10. SU-E-T-547: A Method to Correlate Treatment Planning Issue with Clinical Analysis for Prostate Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT)

    SciTech Connect

    Li, K; Jung, E; Newton, J; Cornell, D; Able, A

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: In this study, the algorithms and calculation setting effect and contribution weighing on prostate Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) based SBRT were evaluated for clinical analysis. Methods: A low risk prostate patient under SBRT was selected for the treatment planning evaluation. The treatment target was divided into low dose prescription target volume (PTV) and high Dose PTV. Normal tissue constraints include urethra and femur head, and rectum was separated into anterior, lateral and posterior parts. By varying the constraint limit of treatment plan calculation setting and algorithms, the effect on dose coverage and normal tissue dose constraint parameter carried effective comparison for the nominal prescription and constraint. For each setting, their percentage differences to the nominal value were calculated with geometric mean and harmonic mean. Results: In the arbitrary prostate SBRT case, 14 variables were selected for this evaluation by using nominal prescription and constraint. Six VMAT planning settings were anisotropic analytic algorithm stereotactic beam with and without couch structure in grid size of 1mm and 2mm, non stereotactic beam, Acuros algorithm . Their geometry means of the variable sets for these plans were 112.3%, 111.9%, 112.09%, 111.75%, 111.28%, and 112.05%. And the corresponding harmonic means were 2.02%, 2.16%, 3.15%, 4.74%, 5.47% and 5.55%. Conclusions: In this study, the algorithm difference shows relatively larger harmonic mean between prostate SBRT VMAT plans. This study provides a methodology to find sensitive combined variables related to clinical analysis, and similar approach could be applied to the whole treatment procedure from simulation to treatment in radiotherapy for big clinical data analysis.

  11. Long-term follow-up of {sup 111}In-capromab pendetide (ProstaScint) scan as pretreatment assessment in patients who undergo salvage radiotherapy for rising prostate-specific antigen after radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Nagda, Suneel N. . E-mail: snagda@gmail.com; Mohideen, Najeeb; Lo, Simon S.; Khan, Usman B.S.; Dillehay, Gary; Wagner, Robert; Campbell, Steven; Flanigan, Robert

    2007-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the long-term failure patterns in patients who underwent an {sup 111}In-capromab pendetide (ProstaScint) scan as part of their pretreatment assessment for a rising prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level after prostatectomy and subsequently received local radiotherapy (RT) to the prostate bed. Methods: Fifty-eight patients were referred for evaluation of a rising PSA level after radical prostatectomy. All patients had negative findings for metastatic disease after abdominal/pelvis imaging with CT and isotope bone scans. All patients underwent a capromab pendetide scan, and the sites of uptake were noted. All patients were treated with local prostate bed RT (median dose 66.6 Gy). Results: Of the 58 patients, 20 had biochemical failure (post-RT PSA level >0.2 ng/mL or a rise to greater than the nadir PSA), including 6 patients with positive uptake outside the bed (positive elsewhere). The 4-year biochemical relapse-free survival (bRFS) rates for patients with negative (53%), positive in the prostate bed alone (45%), or positive elsewhere (74%) scan findings did not differ significantly (p = 0.51). The positive predictive value of the capromab pendetide scan in detecting disease outside the bed was 27%. The capromab pendetide scan status had no effect on bRFS. Those with a pre-RT PSA level of <1 ng/mL had improved bRFS (p = 0.003). Conclusion: The capromab pendetide scan has a low positive predictive value in patients with positive elsewhere uptake and the 4-year bRFS was similar to that for those who did not exhibit positive elsewhere uptake. Therefore, patients with a postprostatectomy rising PSA level should considered for local RT on the basis of clinicopathologic factors.

  12. Dosimetric implications of residual seminal vesicle motion in fiducial-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Stenmark, Matthew H.; Vineberg, Karen; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Hamstra, Daniel A.; Feng, Mary

    2012-10-01

    To determine whether residual interfraction seminal vesicle (SV) displacement necessitates specific planning target volume (PTV) margins during fiducial-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) of the prostate. A planning computed tomography (CT) scan and 2 subsequent CT scans were prospectively obtained for 20 prostate cancer patients with intraprostatic fiducial markers. After CT registration, SV displacement relative to the prostate was quantified as a function of margin size for both the proximal (1 cm) SV (PSV) and the full SV (FSV). Two IMRT plans were simulated for each patient (prostate + PSV and prostate + FSV) both with a uniform 5-mm PTV margin. Minimum clinical target volume (CTV) dose (D{sub min}) and the volume of SV receiving 95% of the prescription dose (V{sub 95%}) were assessed during treatment and compared with the initial plan. In all cases, SV displacement with respect to the prostate was greater for the FSV compared with the PSV. To ensure at least 95% geometrical coverage of the CTV for 90% of patients, margins of 5 and 8 mm were required for the PSV and FSV, respectively. Dosimetrically, residual SV displacement had minimal impact on PSV coverage compared with FSV coverage. For the PSV D{sub min} was {>=}95% of the prescribed dose in 90% of patients with an overall mean V{sub 95%} of 99.6 {+-} 0.8%; for the FSV D{sub min} was {>=}95% of the prescribed dose in only 45% of patients with a mean V{sub 95%} of 97.9 {+-} 2.4%. The SVs move differentially from the prostate and exhibit greater variation with increasing distance from the prostate. For plans targeting just the prostate and PSVs, 5-mm PTV expansions are adequate. However, despite daily localization of the prostate, larger PTV margins are required for cases where the intent is to completely cover the FSV.

  13. Simultaneous integrated boost plan comparison of volumetric-modulated arc therapy and sliding window intensity-modulated radiotherapy for whole pelvis irradiation of locally advanced prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Riou, Olivier; Regnault de la Mothe, Pauline; Azria, David; Aillères, Norbert; Dubois, Jean-Bernard; Fenoglietto, Pascal

    2013-07-08

    Concurrent radiotherapy to the pelvis plus a prostate boost with long-term androgen deprivation is a standard of care for locally advanced prostate cancer. IMRT has the ability to deliver highly conformal dose to the target while lowering irradiation of critical organs around the prostate. Volumetric-modulated arc therapy is able to reduce treatment time, but its impact on organ sparing is still controversial when compared to static gantry IMRT. We compared the two techniques in simultaneous integrated boost plans. Ten patients with locally advanced prostate cancer were included. The planning target volume (PTV) 1 was defined as the pelvic lymph nodes, the prostate, and the seminal vesicles plus setup margins. The PTV2 consisted of the prostate with setup margins. The prescribed doses to PTV1 and PTV2 were 54 Gy in 37 fractions and 74 Gy in 37 fractions, respectively. We compared simultaneous integrated boost plans by means of either a seven coplanar static split fields IMRT, or a one-arc (RA1) and a two-arc (RA2) RapidArc planning. All three techniques allowed acceptable homogeneity and PTV coverage. Static IMRT enabled a better homogeneity for PTV2 than RapidArc techniques. Sliding window IMRT and VMAT permitted to maintain doses to OAR within acceptable levels with a low risk of side effects for each organ. VMAT plans resulted in a clinically and statistically significant reduction in doses to bladder (mean dose IMRT: 50.1 ± 4.6Gy vs. mean dose RA2: 47.1 ± 3.9 Gy, p = 0.037), rectum (mean dose IMRT: 44± 4.5 vs. mean dose RA2: 41.6 ± 5.5 Gy, p = 0.006), and small bowel (V30 IMRT: 76.47 ± 14.91% vs. V30 RA2: 47.49 ± 16.91%, p = 0.002). Doses to femoral heads were higher with VMAT but within accepted constraints. Our findings suggest that simultaneous integrated boost plans using VMAT and sliding window IMRT allow good OAR sparing while maintaining PTV coverage within acceptable levels.

  14. CT Simulation to Evaluate of Pelvic Lymph Node Coverage in Conventional Radiotherapy Fields Based on Bone and Vessels Landmarks in Prostate Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Yousefi Kashi, Amir Shahram; Khaledi, Samira; Houshyari, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background Radiotherapy is the gold standard for treatment of prostrate cancer as it can cover an adequate area of tissues at risk for metastasis. Objectives We evaluated the Pelvic lymph node coverage of conventional radiotherapy fields based on bone and vessels landmarks using computed tomography (CT) simulation in patients with prostate cancer referred to Shohada-e-Tajrish hospital. Patients and Methods In this cross sectional study, 40 patients with prostate cancer at the Stage T1c to T3b were studied. Pelvic lymph nodes were contoured by using pelvic vessels as surrogate markers. The distances were measured at different points of anterior-posterior (AP) and lateral fields and distances > 5 mm or more between the contoured nodes and the field borders. Results Mean and standard deviation of the aortic bifurcation from the superior border was 4.73 ± 1.16 cm, the distance of common iliac bifurcation from the superior border was 1.11 ± 1.25 cm, the mean (SD) distance of right external iliac from the lateral border of AP field was 2.06 ± 0.48 cm and for left external iliac artery was 1.90 ± 0.56 cm. The distance of the external iliac artery from the anterior border of the lateral field was 2.30 ± 0.74 cm. The distance of the external iliac artery from pelvic rim was 0.59 ± 0.59 cm, distance of bifurcation of iliac from sacroiliac joint was 0.82 ± 1.01 cm, the size of the pelvic rim was 12.30 ± 0.64 cm, sacral width was 8.29 ± 1.01 cm, anterior promontory symphysis distance was 12.02 ± 0.92 cm and posterior promontory symphysis distance was 10.98 ± 0.73 cm. Conclusions We observed that conventional radiotherapy using CT simulation based on bone and vessels landmarks provided adequate coverage of pelvic lymph nodes in our patients with prostate cancer.

  15. Health-Related Quality of Life After Single-Fraction High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy and Hypofractionated External Beam Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Morton, Gerard C.; Loblaw, D. Andrew; Chung, Hans; Tsang, Gail; Sankreacha, Raxa; Deabreu, Andrea; Zhang Liying; Mamedov, Alexandre; Cheung, Patrick; Batchelar, Deidre; Danjoux, Cyril; Szumacher, Ewa

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: To investigate the change in health-related quality of life for men after high-dose-rate brachytherapy and external beam radiotherapy for prostate cancer and the factors associated with this change. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients had clinically localized intermediate-risk prostate cancer. The patients received high-dose-rate brachytherapy as a single 15-Gy implant, followed by external beam radiotherapy to 37.5 Gy in 15 fractions. The patients were monitored prospectively for toxicity (Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0) and health-related quality of life (Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite [EPIC]). The proportion of patients developing a clinically significant difference in the EPIC domain score (minimally important difference of >0.5 standard deviation) was determined and correlated with the baseline clinical and dosimetric factors. The study accrued 125 patients, with a median follow-up of 24 months. Results: By 24 months, 23% had Grade 2 urinary toxicity and only 5% had Grade 2 bowel toxicity, with no Grade 3 toxicity. The proportion of patients reporting a significant decrease in EPIC urinary, bowel, sexual, and hormonal domain scores was 53%, 51%, 45%, and 40% at 12 months and 57%, 65%, 51%, and 30% at 24 months, respectively. The proportion with a >1 standard deviation decrease in the EPIC urinary, bowel, sexual, and hormonal domain scores was 38%, 36%, 24%, and 20% at 12 months and 46%, 48%, 19%, and 8% at 24 months, respectively. On multivariate analysis, the dose to 10% of the urethra was associated with a decreasing EPIC urinary domain score (p = .0089) and, less strongly (p = .0312) with a decreasing hormonal domain score. No association was found between the prostate volume, bladder dose, or high-dose volume and urinary health-related quality of life. A high baseline International Index of Erectile Function score was associated (p = .0019) with a decreasing sexual domain score. The optimal maximal dose

  16. A comparison of CT- and ultrasound-based imaging to localize the prostate for external beam radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    McNair, Helen A. . E-mail: Helen.McNair@rmh.nhs.uk; Mangar, Stephen A.; Coffey, Jerome; Shoulders, Beverley; Hansen, Vibeke N.; Norman, Andrew; Staffurth, John; Sohaib, S. Aslam; Warrington, Alan P.; Dearnaley, David P.

    2006-07-01

    Purpose: This study assesses the accuracy of NOMOS B-mode acquisition and targeting system (BAT) compared with computed tomography (CT) in localizing the prostate. Methods and Materials: Twenty-six patients were CT scanned, and the prostate was localized by 3 observers using the BAT system. The BAT couch shift measurements were compared with the CT localization. Six of the patients had gold markers present in the prostate, and the prostate movement determined by BAT was compared with the movement determined by the gold markers. Results: Using the BAT system, the 3 observers determined the prostate position to be a mean of 1-5 mm over all directions with respect to the CT. The proportion of readings with a difference >3 mm between the observers was in the range of 25% to 44%. The prostate movement based on gold markers was an average of 3-5 mm different from that measured by BAT. The literature assessing the accuracy and reproducibility on BAT is summarized and compared with our findings. Conclusions: We have found that there are systematic differences between the BAT-defined prostate position compared with that estimated on CT using gold grain marker seeds.

  17. Implanted Dosimeters Identify Radiation Overdoses During IMRT for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Den, Robert B.; Nowak, Kamila; Buzurovic, Ivan; Cao Junsheng; Harrison, Amy S.; Lawrence, Yaacov R.; Dicker, Adam P.; Showalter, Timothy N.

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: Image-guided dose-escalated radiotherapy is the standard of care for the treatment of prostate cancer. Although many published methods are available that account for prostate motion during delivery, evidence demonstrating that the planned dose is actually delivered on a daily basis is lacking. We report our initial clinical experience using implantable dosimeters to quantify and adjust the dose received during intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: A total of 20 patients undergoing IMRT with cone-beam computed tomography (CT) image guidance for prostate cancer had the dose verification system with radiopaque metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor dosimeters implanted before treatment planning. All patients underwent planning with CT simulation in the supine position with custom immobilization, and the implanted dosimeters were located in the IMRT plans. The predicted dose for each dosimeter was defined and compared with the wireless readings before and after each treatment session. Investigations by physicians and medical physicists were initiated for two or more discrepancies >6% for any five consecutive fractions or for any discrepancy {>=}10%. Results: Using implanted in vivo dosimeters, dose measurements consistently >6% greater than the predicted values were observed during treatment for 3 of 20 prostate cancer patients who received IMRT with daily image guidance. A review of the daily cone-beam CT images revealed acceptable alignment of the prostate target volumes and implanted dosimeters but identified significant anatomic changes within the treated region. Repeat CT simulation and RT planning was performed, with resolution of the dose discrepancies in all 3 cases with the adoption of a new IMRT plan. Conclusions: Our report illustrates the potential effect of implanted in vivo dosimetry for prostate IMRT and emphasizes the importance of careful planning and delivery with attention to systematic shifts or anatomic

  18. Timing of High-Dose Rate Brachytherapy With External Beam Radiotherapy in Intermediate and High-Risk Localized Prostate CAncer (THEPCA) Patients and Its Effects on Toxicity and Quality of Life: Protocol of a Randomized Feasibility Trial

    PubMed Central

    Palvai, Sreekanth; Harrison, Michael; Shibu Thomas, Sharon; Hayden, Karen; Green, James; Anderson, Oliver; Romero, Lavinia; Lodge, Richard; Burns, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Background Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in males in the UK and affects around 105 men for every 100,000. The role of radiotherapy in the management of prostate cancer significantly changed over the last few decades with developments in brachytherapy, external beam radiotherapy (EBRT), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). One of the challenging factors of radiotherapy treatment of localized prostate cancer is the development of acute and late genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicities. The recent European guidelines suggest that there is no consensus regarding the timing of high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy and EBRT. The schedules vary in different institutions where an HDR boost can be given either before or after EBRT. Few centers deliver HDR in between the fractions of EBRT. Objective Assessment of acute genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicities at various time points to better understand if the order in which treatment modality is delivered (ie, HDR brachytherapy or EBRT first) has an effect on the toxicity profile. Methods Timing of HDR brachytherapy with EBRT in Prostate CAncer (THEPCA) is a single-center, open, randomized controlled feasibility trial in patients with intermediate and high-risk localized prostate cancer. A group of 50 patients aged 18 years old and over with histological diagnosis of prostate cancer (stages T1b-T3BNOMO), will be randomized to one of two treatment arms (ratio 1:1), following explanation of the study and informed consent. Patients in both arms of the study will be treated with HDR brachytherapy and EBRT, however, the order in which they receive the treatments will vary. In Arm A, patients will receive HDR brachytherapy before EBRT. In Arm B (control arm), patients will receive EBRT before HDR brachytherapy. Study outcomes will look at prospective assessment of genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicities. The primary endpoint will be grade 3 genitourinary toxicity

  19. Development of UK guidance on the management of erectile dysfunction resulting from radical radiotherapy and androgen deprivation therapy for prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    White, I D; Wilson, J; Aslet, P; Baxter, A B; Birtle, A; Challacombe, B; Coe, J; Grover, L; Payne, H; Russell, S; Sangar, V; Van As, N; Kirby, M

    2015-01-01

    Aim To develop a management strategy (rehabilitation programme) for erectile dysfunction (ED) after radiotherapy (RT) or androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) for prostate cancer that is suitable for use in a UK NHS healthcare context. Methods PubMed literature searches of ED management in this patient group together with a survey of 28 experts in the management of treatment-induced ED from across the UK were conducted. Results Data from 19 articles and completed questionnaires were collated. The findings discussed in this article confirm that RT/ADT for prostate cancer can significantly impair erectile function. While many men achieve erections through PDE5-I use, others need combined management incorporating exercise and lifestyle modifications, psychosexual counselling and other erectile aids. This article offers a comprehensive treatment algorithm to manage patients with ED associated with RT/ADT. Conclusion Based on published research literature and survey analysis, recommendations are proposed for the standardisation of management strategies employed for ED after RT/ADT. In addition to implementing the algorithm, understanding the rationale for the type and timing of ED management strategies is crucial for clinicians, men and their partners. PMID:25283500

  20. Gaps between Evidence and Practice in Postoperative Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer: Focus on Toxicities and the Effects on Health-Related Quality of Life

    PubMed Central

    Raziee, Hamid; Berlin, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    Adjuvant radiotherapy (ART) after prostatectomy for patients with high-risk features [extracapsular extension (ECE), seminal vesicle invasion (SVI), and positive margin] has been shown to be associated with improved biochemical disease-free survival in three large randomized trials and with improved overall survival in one. Similarly, salvage radiotherapy (SRT) can effectively achieve biochemical control in a significant proportion of patients with a rising PSA after surgery. Nonetheless, both approaches of postoperative RT remain highly underutilized. This might be partly due to concerns with overtreatment inherent to adjuvant approaches, and/or hesitance about causing radiation toxicities and their subsequent effects on the patient’s quality of life. Herein, we review the literature lending evidence to these arguments. We show recent series of ART/SRT and their low rates of acute and long-term toxicities, translating only in transient decline in quality-of-life (QoL) outcomes. We conclude that concerns with side effects should not preclude the recommendation of an effective and curative-intent therapy for men with prostate cancer initially treated with radical surgery. PMID:27047800

  1. Gaps between Evidence and Practice in Postoperative Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer: Focus on Toxicities and the Effects on Health-Related Quality of Life.

    PubMed

    Raziee, Hamid; Berlin, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    Adjuvant radiotherapy (ART) after prostatectomy for patients with high-risk features [extracapsular extension (ECE), seminal vesicle invasion (SVI), and positive margin] has been shown to be associated with improved biochemical disease-free survival in three large randomized trials and with improved overall survival in one. Similarly, salvage radiotherapy (SRT) can effectively achieve biochemical control in a significant proportion of patients with a rising PSA after surgery. Nonetheless, both approaches of postoperative RT remain highly underutilized. This might be partly due to concerns with overtreatment inherent to adjuvant approaches, and/or hesitance about causing radiation toxicities and their subsequent effects on the patient's quality of life. Herein, we review the literature lending evidence to these arguments. We show recent series of ART/SRT and their low rates of acute and long-term toxicities, translating only in transient decline in quality-of-life (QoL) outcomes. We conclude that concerns with side effects should not preclude the recommendation of an effective and curative-intent therapy for men with prostate cancer initially treated with radical surgery.

  2. High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy of a Single Implant With Two Fractions Combined With External Beam Radiotherapy for Hormone-Naive Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Morio Mori, Takashi; Shirai, Shintaro; Kishi, Kazushi; Inagaki, Takeshi; Hara, Isao

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the preliminary outcomes of high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy of a single implant with two fractions and external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for hormone-naive prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between March 2000 and Sept 2003, a total of 53 patients with tumor Stage T1c-T3b N0 M0 prostate cancer were treated with HDR brachytherapy boost doses (7.5 Gy/fraction) and 50-Gy EBRT during a 5.5-week period. Median follow-up was 61 months. Patients were divided into groups with localized (T1c-T2b) and advanced disease (T3a-T3b). We used the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) definition for biochemical failure. According to recommendations of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group-ASTRO Phoenix Consensus Conference, biochemical failure-free control rates (BF-FCRs) at 3 years were investigated as 2 years short of the median follow-up. Results: Between April 2000 and Sept 2007, Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events Version 2.0 late Grade 2 genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity rates were 0% and 3.8%, respectively. Erectile preservation was 25% at 5 years. Overall survival was 88.1% and cause-specific survival was 100%. At 3 years, ASTRO BF-FCRs of the localized and advanced groups were 100% and 42%, respectively (p = 0.001). Conclusions: The HDR brachytherapy of a single implant with two fractions plus EBRT is effective in treating patients with localized hormone-naive prostate cancer, with the least genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicities; however, longer median BF-FCR follow-up is required to assess these findings.

  3. THE IMPORTANCE OF LOCAL CONTROL IN EARLY STAGE PROSTATE CANCER: OUTCOMES OF PATIENTS WITH A POSITIVE POST-RADIOTHERAPY BIOPSY TREATED ON RTOG 9408

    PubMed Central

    Krauss, Daniel J.; Hu, Chen; Bahary, Jean-Paul; Souhami, Luis; Gore, Elizabeth M.; Chafe, Susan Maria Jacinta; Leibenhaut, Mark H.; Narayan, Samir; Torres-Roca, Javier; Michalski, Jeff; Zeitzer, Kenneth L.; Donavanik, Viroon; Sandler, Howard; McGowan, David G.; Jones, Christopher U.; Shipley, William U.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To assess the association of positive post-radiotherapy (RT) biopsy with subsequent clinical outcomes in men with localized prostate cancer. Methods RTOG 94-08 analyzed 1979 men with stage T1b-T2b, PSA ≤ 20 prostate cancer testing whether 4 months of total androgen suppression (TAS) added to RT improved survival over RT alone. Patients randomized to TAS received flutamide with leutenizing hormone releasing hormone (LHRH) agonist. Per protocol, patients without evidence of clinical recurrence or initiation of additional endocrine therapy underwent repeat prostate biopsy 2 years following RT completion. Statistical analysis was performed to evaluate the impact of positive post-RT biopsies on clinical outcomes. Results 831 patients underwent post-RT biopsy, 398 treated with RT alone and 433 RT + TAS. Patients with positive post-RT biopsies had higher rates of biochemical failure (BCF) [HR=1.7; 95% CI 1.3–2.1] and distant metastasis (DM) [HR=2.4; 95% CI 1.3–4.4] as well as inferior disease specific survival (DSS) [HR=3.8; 95% CI 1.9–7.5]. Positive biopsy remained predictive of such outcomes after correction for potential confounders such as Gleason score, tumor stage, and TAS administration. Prior TAS did not prevent elevated risk of adverse outcome in the setting of post-RT positive biopsy. Patients with Gleason score ≥ 7 with a positive biopsy additionally had inferior overall survival compared to those with a negative biopsy [HR=1.56; 95% CI 1.04–2.35]. Conclusions Positive post-RT biopsy is associated with increased rates of DM and inferior DSS in patients treated with definitive RT and was associated with inferior OS for patients with high-grade tumors. PMID:26104939

  4. High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy and External-Beam Radiotherapy for Hormone-Naieve Low- and Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer: A 7-Year Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Aluwini, Shafak; Rooij, Peter H. van; Kirkels, Wim J.; Jansen, Peter P.; Praag, John O.; Bangma, Chris H.; Kolkman-Deurloo, Inger-Karine K.

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To report clinical outcomes and early and late complications in 264 hormone-naieve patients with low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer treated with high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) in combination with external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Methods and Materials: Between February 2000 and July 2007, 264 patients underwent HDR-BT in combination with EBRT as a treatment for their low- to intermediate-risk prostate cancer. The HDR-BT was performed using ultrasound-based implantation. The total HDR-BT dose was 18 Gy in 3 fractions within 24 h, with a 6-h minimum interval. The EBRT started 2 weeks after HDR-BT and was delivered in 25 fractions of 1.8 Gy to 45 Gy within 5 weeks. Results: After a mean follow-up of 74.5 months, 4 patients (1.5%) showed prostate-specific antigen progression according to the American Society for Radiation Oncology definition and 8 patients (3%) according to the Phoenix definition. A biopsy-proven local recurrence was registered in 1 patient (0.4%), and clinical progression (bone metastases) was documented in 2 patients (0.7%). Seven-year actuarial freedom from biochemical failure was 97%, and 7-year disease-specific survival and overall survival were 100% and 91%, respectively. Toxicities were comparable to other series. Conclusions: Treatment with interstitial HDR-BT plus EBRT shows a low incidence of late complications and a favorable oncologic outcome after 7 years follow-up.

  5. SU-E-J-221: A Novel Expansion Method for MRI Based Target Delineation in Prostate Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ruiz, B; Feng, Y; Shores, R; Fung, C

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To compare a novel bladder/rectum carveout expansion method on MRI delineated prostate to standard CT and expansion based methods for maintaining prostate coverage while providing superior bladder and rectal sparing. Methods: Ten prostate cases were planned to include four trials: MRI vs CT delineated prostate/proximal seminal vesicles, and each image modality compared to both standard expansions (8mm 3D expansion and 5mm posterior, i.e. ∼8mm) and carveout method expansions (5mm 3D expansion, 4mm posterior for GTV-CTV excluding expansion into bladder/rectum followed by additional 5mm 3D expansion to PTV, i.e. ∼1cm). All trials were planned to total dose 7920 cGy via IMRT. Evaluation and comparison was made using the following criteria: QUANTEC constraints for bladder/rectum including analysis of low dose regions, changes in PTV volume, total control points, and maximum hot spot. Results: ∼8mm MRI expansion consistently produced the most optimal plan with lowest total control points and best bladder/rectum sparing. However, this scheme had the smallest prostate (average 22.9% reduction) and subsequent PTV volume, consistent with prior literature. ∼1cm MRI had an average PTV volume comparable to ∼8mm CT at 3.79% difference. Bladder QUANTEC constraints were on average less for the ∼1cm MRI as compared to the ∼8mm CT and observed as statistically significant with 2.64% reduction in V65. Rectal constraints appeared to follow the same trend. Case-by-case analysis showed variation in rectal V30 with MRI delineated prostate being most favorable regardless of expansion type. ∼1cm MRI and ∼8mm CT had comparable plan quality. Conclusion: MRI delineated prostate with standard expansions had the smallest PTV leading to margins that may be too tight. Bladder/rectum carveout expansion method on MRI delineated prostate was found to be superior to standard CT based methods in terms of bladder and rectal sparing while maintaining prostate coverage

  6. SU-E-J-14: A Novel Approach to Evaluate the Dosimetric Effect of Rectal Variation During Image Guided Prostate Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, J; McQuaid, D; Dunlop, A; Nill, S; Gulliford, S; Buettner, F; Hall, E; Dearnaley, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Deformable registration establishes the spatial correspondence back to the reference image in order to accumulate dose. However, in prostate radiotherapy the changing shape and volume of the rectum present a challenge to accurate deformable registration and consequently calculation of delivered dose. We explored an alternative approach to calculating accumulated dose to the rectum, independent of deformable registration. Methods: This study was performed on three patients who received online image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) with daily CBCT (XVI-system,Elekta) and target localization using intraprostatic fiducials. On each CBCT, the rectum was manually contoured and bulk density assignments were made allowing dose to be calculated for each fraction. Dose-surface maps (DSM) were generated (MATLAB,Mathworks,Natick,MA) by considering the rectum as a cylinder and sampling the dose at 21-equispaced points on each CT slice. The cylinder was “cut” at the posterior-most position on each CT and unfolded to generate a DSM. These were normalised in the longitudinal direction by interpolation creating maps of 21×21 pixels. A DSM was produced for each CBCT and the dose was accumulated. Results: The mean accumulated delivered rectal surface dose was on average 7.5(+/−3.5)% lower than the planned dose. The dose difference maps consistently show that the greatest variation in dose between planned and delivered dose is away from where the rectal surface is adjacent to the prostate. Conclusion: Estimation of dose accumulation using DSM provides an alternative method for determining actual delivered dose to the rectum. The dose difference is greatest in areas away from the region where the rectal surface abuts the prostate, the region where set-up is verified. The change in size and shape of the rectum was shown to resultin a change in the accumulated dose compared to the planned dose and this will have an impact on determining the relationships between dose delivered

  7. Image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer: Dose constraints for the anterior rectal wall to minimize rectal toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Jennifer L.; Buskirk, Steven J.; Heckman, Michael G.; Diehl, Nancy N.; Bernard, Johnny R.; Tzou, Katherine S.; Casale, Henry E.; Bellefontaine, Louis P.; Serago, Christopher; Kim, Siyong; Vallow, Laura A.; Daugherty, Larry C.; Ko, Stephen J.

    2014-04-01

    Rectal adverse events (AEs) are a major concern with definitive radiotherapy (RT) treatment for prostate cancer. The anterior rectal wall is at the greatest risk of injury as it lies closest to the target volume and receives the highest dose of RT. This study evaluated the absolute volume of anterior rectal wall receiving a high dose to identify potential ideal dose constraints that can minimize rectal AEs. A total of 111 consecutive patients with Stage T1c to T3a N0 M0 prostate cancer who underwent image-guided intensity-modulated RT at our institution were included. AEs were graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0. The volume of anterior rectal wall receiving 5 to 80 Gy in 2.5-Gy increments was determined. Multivariable Cox regression models were used to identify cut points in these volumes that led to an increased risk of early and late rectal AEs. Early AEs occurred in most patients (88%); however, relatively few of them (13%) were grade ≥2. At 5 years, the cumulative incidence of late rectal AEs was 37%, with only 5% being grade ≥2. For almost all RT doses, we identified a threshold of irradiated absolute volume of anterior rectal wall above which there was at least a trend toward a significantly higher rate of AEs. Most strikingly, patients with more than 1.29, 0.73, or 0.45 cm{sup 3} of anterior rectal wall exposed to radiation doses of 67.5, 70, or 72.5 Gy, respectively, had a significantly increased risk of late AEs (relative risks [RR]: 2.18 to 2.72; p ≤ 0.041) and of grade ≥ 2 early AEs (RR: 6.36 to 6.48; p = 0.004). Our study provides evidence that definitive image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) for prostate cancer is well tolerated and also identifies dose thresholds for the absolute volume of anterior rectal wall above which patients are at greater risk of early and late complications.

  8. Expo 86: An Escalation Prototype.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Jerry; Staw, Barry M.

    1986-01-01

    British Columbia remained committed to its decision to host a world's fair (Expo 86) despite rapidly increasing deficit projections. Expo is examined as a prototypical example of the escalation of commitment. Theory is proposed that integrates determinants of escalation from several levels of analysis over time. (CJH)

  9. Radiotherapy After Prostatectomy: Improved Biochemical Relapse-Free Survival With Whole Pelvic Compared With Prostate Bed Only for High-Risk Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Spiotto, Michael T.; Hancock, Steven L.; King, Christopher R.

    2007-09-01

    Purpose: To compare the biochemical relapse-free survival (bRFS) among patients receiving whole pelvic radiotherapy (WPRT) vs. prostate bed RT (PBRT) after radical prostatectomy. Methods and Materials: Between 1985 and 2005, 160 patients underwent adjuvant or salvage RT after radical prostatectomy. A short course of total androgen suppression was also given concurrently to 87 patients. Of the 160 patients, 114 were considered at high risk of lymph node involvement because they had a pathologic Gleason score of {>=}8, a preoperative prostate-specific antigen level >20 ng/mL, seminal vesicle or prostate capsule involvement, or pathologic lymph node involvement. Of this group, 72 underwent WPRT and 42 underwent PBRT. The median follow-up was >5 years for all patient subsets. Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards multivariate analyses were performed for all clinical, pathologic, and treatment factors predicting for bRFS. Results: Whole pelvic RT resulted in superior bRFS compared with PBRT (p = 0.03). The advantage of WPRT was limited to high-risk patients, with a 5-year bRFS rate of 47% (95% confidence interval, 35-59%) after WPRT vs. 21% (95% confidence interval, 8-35%) after PBRT (p = 0.008). For low-risk patients, no difference (p = 0.9) was found. On multivariate analysis, only WPRT (p = 0.02) and a preoperative prostate-specific antigen level <1.0 ng/mL (p = 0.002) were significantly associated with bRFS. The benefit from total androgen suppression with postoperative RT was only observed when given concurrently with WPRT (p 0.04) and not with PBRT (p = 0.4). Conclusion: The results of our study have indicated that WPRT confers superior bRFS compared with PBRT for high-risk patients receiving adjuvant or salvage RT after radical prostatectomy. This advantage was observed only with concurrent TAS. These results are analogous to the benefit from WPRT seen in the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 94-13 study.

  10. Incidence of Secondary Cancer Development After High-Dose Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy and Image-Guided Brachytherapy for the Treatment of Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Zelefsky, Michael J.; Housman, Douglas M.; Pei Xin; Alicikus, Zumre; Magsanoc, Juan Martin; Dauer, Lawrence T.; St Germain, Jean; Yamada, Yoshiya; Kollmeier, Marisa; Cox, Brett; Zhang Zhigang

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To report the incidence and excess risk of second malignancy (SM) development compared with the general population after external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and brachytherapy to treat prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between 1998 and 2001, 1,310 patients with localized prostate cancer were treated with EBRT (n = 897) or brachytherapy (n = 413). We compared the incidence of SMs in our patients with that of the general population extracted from the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results data set combined with the 2000 census data. Results: The 10-year likelihood of SM development was 25% after EBRT and 15% after brachytherapy (p = .02). The corresponding 10-year likelihood for in-field SM development in these groups was 4.9% and 1.6% (p = .24). Multivariate analysis showed that EBRT vs. brachytherapy and older age were the only significant predictors for the development of all SMs (p = .037 and p = .030), with a trend for older patients to develop a SM. The increased incidence of SM for EBRT patients was explained by the greater incidence of skin cancer outside the radiation field compared with that after brachytherapy (10.6% and 3.3%, respectively, p = .004). For the EBRT group, the 5- and 10-year mortality rate was 1.96% and 5.1% from out-of field cancer, respectively; for in-field SM, the corresponding mortality rates were 0.1% and 0.7%. Among the brachytherapy group, the 5- and 10-year mortality rate related to out-of field SM was 0.8% and 2.7%, respectively. Our observed SM rates after prostate RT were not significantly different from the cancer incidence rates in the general population. Conclusions: Using modern sophisticated treatment techniques, we report low rates of in-field bladder and rectal SM risks after prostate cancer RT. Furthermore, the likelihood of mortality secondary to a SM was unusual. The greater rate of SM observed with EBRT vs. brachytherapy was related to a small, but significantly increased

  11. Prostate biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... prostate biopsy; Fine needle biopsy of the prostate; Core biopsy of the prostate; Targeted prostate biopsy; Prostate biopsy - transrectal ultrasound (TRUS); Stereotactic transperineal prostate biopsy (STPB)

  12. International prostate symptom score (IPSS) change and changing factor in intensity-modulated radiotherapy combined with androgen deprivation therapy for prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tomita, Natsuo; Oze, Isao; Shimizu, Hidetoshi; Yoshida, Maiko; Kimura, Kana; Takehana, Keiichi; Shimizu, Arisa; Makita, Chiyoko; Tachibana, Hiroyuki; Kodaira, Takeshi; Soga, Norihito; Ogura, Yuji; Hayashi, Norio

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The purposes of this study on prostate cancer are to demonstrate the time course of International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) after intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) combined with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) and to examine the factor associated with the IPSS change. This study included 216 patients treated with IMRT between 2006 and 2010. Patients were evaluated in three groups according to baseline IPSS as defined by the American Urological Association classification, where IPSSs of 0 to 7, 8 to 19, and 20 to 35 represent mild (n = 124), moderate (n = 70), and severe (n = 22) symptom groups, respectively. The average IPSSs ± standard deviation at baseline vs. those at 24 months after IMRT were 3.5 ± 2.1 vs. 5.1 ± 3.6 in the mild group (P < 0.001), 12.6 ± 3.4 vs. 10.0 ± 6.0 in the moderate group (P = 0.0015), and 23.8 ± 2.9 vs. 14.4 ± 9.1 in the severe group (P < 0.001). Among factors of patient and treatment characteristics, age, IPSS classification, pretreatment GU medications, and positive biopsy rates were associated with the IPSS difference between baseline and 24 months (P = 0.023, < 0.001, 0.044, and 0.028, respectively). In conclusion, patients with moderate to severe urinary symptoms can exhibit improvement in urinary function after IMRT, whereas patients with mild symptoms may have slightly worsened functions. Age, baseline IPSS, GU medications, and tumor burden in the prostate can have an effect on the IPSS changes. PMID:26663942

  13. International prostate symptom score (IPSS) change and changing factor in intensity-modulated radiotherapy combined with androgen deprivation therapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Natsuo; Oze, Isao; Shimizu, Hidetoshi; Yoshida, Maiko; Kimura, Kana; Takehana, Keiichi; Shimizu, Arisa; Makita, Chiyoko; Tachibana, Hiroyuki; Kodaira, Takeshi; Soga, Norihito; Ogura, Yuji; Hayashi, Norio

    2015-11-01

    The purposes of this study on prostate cancer are to demonstrate the time course of International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) after intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) combined with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) and to examine the factor associated with the IPSS change. This study included 216 patients treated with IMRT between 2006 and 2010. Patients were evaluated in three groups according to baseline IPSS as defined by the American Urological Association classification, where IPSSs of 0 to 7, 8 to 19, and 20 to 35 represent mild (n = 124), moderate (n = 70), and severe (n = 22) symptom groups, respectively. The average IPSSs ± standard deviation at baseline vs. those at 24 months after IMRT were 3.5 ± 2.1 vs. 5.1 ± 3.6 in the mild group (P < 0.001), 12.6 ± 3.4 vs. 10.0 ± 6.0 in the moderate group (P = 0.0015), and 23.8 ± 2.9 vs. 14.4 ± 9.1 in the severe group (P < 0.001). Among factors of patient and treatment characteristics, age, IPSS classification, pretreatment GU medications, and positive biopsy rates were associated with the IPSS difference between baseline and 24 months (P = 0.023, < 0.001, 0.044, and 0.028, respectively). In conclusion, patients with moderate to severe urinary symptoms can exhibit improvement in urinary function after IMRT, whereas patients with mild symptoms may have slightly worsened functions. Age, baseline IPSS, GU medications, and tumor burden in the prostate can have an effect on the IPSS changes.

  14. Comparison of High-Dose Proton Radiotherapy and Brachytherapy in Localized Prostate Cancer: A Case-Matched Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Coen, John J.; Zietman, Anthony L.; Rossi, Carl J.; Grocela, Joseph A.; Efstathiou, Jason A.; Yan, Yan; Shipley, William U.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To report a case-matched analysis comparing high-dose external-beam radiation (EBRT) for prostate cancer delivered on Proton Radiation Oncology Group (PROG) 95-09, a randomized trial, with permanent prostate brachytherapy over the same era. Methods: From 1996 to 1999, 196 patients were accrued to the high-dose arm (79.2 Gray equivalent (GyE) using photons and protons) of PROG 95-09 at the Massachusetts General Hospital and Loma Linda University Medical Center. Entry criteria specified T1-2 and prostate-specific antigen {<=}15 ng/mL. When Gleason score >7 was excluded, 177 men were left for case matching. At Massachusetts General Hospital, 203 similar patients were treated by a single brachytherapist from 1997 to 2002. Minimum follow-up was 3 years. Case matching, based on T stage, Gleason score, prostate-specific antigen, and age resulted in 141 matches (282 patients). Median follow-up was 8.6 and 7.4 years for EBRT and brachytherapy, respectively. The primary endpoint was biochemical failure (BF). Results: Using the Phoenix definition, the 8-year BF rates were 7.7% and 16.1% for EBRT and brachytherapy, respectively (p = 0.42). A stratified analysis was performed by risk group. In the EBRT group, 113 and 28 patients were low and intermediate risk, respectively. In the brachytherapy group, 118 and 23 were. When stratified by risk group, the BF rates were similar by either technique. Conclusions: High-dose EBRT and brachytherapy result in similar BF rates for men with localized prostate cancer. Comparative quality-of-life and cost-effectiveness studies are warranted.

  15. Dosimetric effect of Elekta Beam Modulator micromultileaf in three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Carosi, Alessandra Ingrosso, Gianluca; Ponti, Elisabetta; Tolu, Barbara; Murgia, Alessandra; Cristino, Daniela di; Santoni, Riccardo

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze the dosimetric effect of Elekta Beam Modulator in 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) and in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for localized prostate cancer. We compared treatment plans developed with 2 different Elekta multileaf collimators (MLC): Beam Modulator micro-MLC (mMLC) (4-mm leaf width at the isocenter) and standard MLC (10-mm leaf width at the isocenter). The comparison was performed for 15 patients with localized prostate cancer in 3DCRT and IMRT delivery; a total of 60 treatment plans were processed. The dose-volume histograms were used to provide the quantitative comparison between plans. In particular, we analyzed differences between rectum and bladder sparing in terms of a set of appropriate Vx (percentage of organ at risk [OAR] volume receiving the x dose) and differences between target conformity and coverage in terms of coverage factor and conformation number. Our analysis demonstrates that in 3DCRT there is an advantage in the use of Elekta Beam Modulator mMLC in terms of organ sparing; in particular, a significant decrease in rectal V{sub 60} and V{sub 50} (p = 0.001) and in bladder V{sub 70} and V{sub 65} (p = 0.007 and 0.002, respectively) was found. Moreover, a better target dose conformity was obtained (p = 0.002). IMRT plans comparison demonstrated no significant differences between the use of the 4 or 10-mm MLCs. Our analysis shows that in 3DCRT the use of the Elekta Beam Modulator mMLC gives a gain in target conformity and in OARs dose sparing whereas in IMRT plans there is no advantage.

  16. SU-E-T-504: Usefulness of CT-MR Fusion in Radiotherapy Planning for Prostate Cancer Patient with Bilateral Hip Replacements

    SciTech Connect

    He, R.; Giri, Shankar; Kumar, P.; Hu, Y.; Suggs, J.; Yang, C.

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Target localization of prostate for Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) in patients with bilateral hip replacements is difficult due to artifacts in Computed Tomography (CT) images generated from the prostheses high Z materials. In this study, Magnetic Resonance (MR) images fused with CT images are tested as a solution. Methods: CT images of 2.5 mm slice thickness were acquired on a GE Lightspeed scanner with a flat-topped couch for a prostate cancer patient with bilateral hip replacements. T2 weighted images of 5 mm separation were acquired on a MR Scanner. After the MR-CT registration on a radiotherapy treatment planning system (Eclipse, Varian), the target volumes were defined by the radiation oncologists on MR images and then transferred to CT images for planning and dose calculation. The CT Hounsfield Units (HU) was reassigned to zero (as water) for artifacts. The Varian flat panel treatment couch was modeled for dose calculation accuracy with heterogeneity correction. A Volume Matrix Arc Therapy (VMAT) and a seven-field IMRT plans were generated, each avoiding any beam transversing the prostheses; the two plans were compared. The superior VMAT plan was used for treating the patient. In-vivo dosimetry was performed using MOSFET (Best Canada) placed in a surgical tube inserted into the patient rectum during therapy. The measured dose was compared with planned dose for MOSFET location. Results: The registration of MR-CT images and the agreement of target volumes were confirmed by three physicians. VMAT plan was deemed superior to IMRT based on dose to critical nearby structures and overall conformality of target dosing. In-vivo measured dose compared with calculated dose was -4.5% which was likely due to attenuation of the surgical tube surrounding MOSFET. Conclusion: When artifacts are present on planning CT due to bilateral hip prostheses, MR-CT image fusion is a feasible solution for target delineation.

  17. Megavoltage Cone Beam Computed Tomography Dose and the Necessity of Reoptimization for Imaging Dose-Integrated Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Akino, Yuichi; Koizumi, Masahiko; Sumida, Iori; Takahashi, Yutaka; Ogata, Toshiyuki; Ota, Seiichi; Isohashi, Fumiaki; Konishi, Koji; Yoshioka, Yasuo

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: Megavoltage cone beam computed tomography (MV-CBCT) dose can be integrated with the patient's prescription. Here, we investigated the effects of imaging dose and the necessity for additional optimization when using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) to treat prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: An arc beam mimicking MV-CBCT was generated using XiO (version 4.50; Elekta, Stockholm, Sweden). The monitor units (MU) for dose calculation were determined by conforming the calculated dose to the dose measured using an ionization chamber. IMRT treatment plans of 22 patients with prostate cancer were retrospectively analyzed. Arc beams of 3, 5, 8, and 15 MU were added to the IMRT plans, and the dose covering 95% of the planning target volume (PTV) was normalized to the prescribed dose with (reoptimization) or without optimization (compensation). Results: PTV homogeneity and conformality changed negligibly with MV-CBCT integration. For critical organs, an imaging dose-dependent increase was observed for the mean rectal/bladder dose (D{sub mean}), and reoptimization effectively suppressed the D{sub mean} elevations. The bladder generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) increased with imaging dose, and reoptimization suppressed the gEUD elevation when 5- to 15-MU CBCT were added, although rectal gEUD changed negligibly with any imaging dose. Whereas the dose elevation from the simple addition of the imaging dose uniformly increased rectal and bladder dose, the rectal D{sub mean} increase of compensation plans was due mainly to low-dose volumes. In contrast, bladder high-dose volumes were increased by integrating the CBCT dose, and reoptimization reduced them when 5- to 15-MU CBCT were added. Conclusion: Reoptimization is clearly beneficial for reducing dose to critical organs, elevated by addition of high-MU CBCT, especially for the bladder. For low-MU CBCT aimed at bony structure visualization, compensation is sufficient.

  18. Dosimetric Effect of Intrafraction Motion and Residual Setup Error for Hypofractionated Prostate Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy With Online Cone Beam Computed Tomography Image Guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, Justus; Wu Qiuwen; Yan Di

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: To quantify the dosimetric effect and margins required to account for prostate intrafractional translation and residual setup error in a cone beam computed tomography (CBCT)-guided hypofractionated radiotherapy protocol. Methods and Materials: Prostate position after online correction was measured during dose delivery using simultaneous kV fluoroscopy and posttreatment CBCT in 572 fractions to 30 patients. We reconstructed the dose distribution to the clinical tumor volume (CTV) using a convolution of the static dose with a probability density function (PDF) based on the kV fluoroscopy, and we calculated the minimum dose received by 99% of the CTV (D{sub 99}). We compared reconstructed doses when the convolution was performed per beam, per patient, and when the PDF was created using posttreatment CBCT. We determined the minimum axis-specific margins to limit CTV D{sub 99} reduction to 1%. Results: For 3-mm margins, D{sub 99} reduction was {<=}5% for 29/30 patients. Using post-CBCT rather than localizations at treatment delivery exaggerated dosimetric effects by {approx}47%, while there was no such bias between the dose convolved with a beam-specific and patient-specific PDF. After eight fractions, final cumulative D{sub 99} could be predicted with a root mean square error of <1%. For 90% of patients, the required margins were {<=}2, 4, and 3 mm, with 70%, 40%, and 33% of patients requiring no right-left (RL), anteroposterior (AP), and superoinferior margins, respectively. Conclusions: For protocols with CBCT guidance, RL, AP, and SI margins of 2, 4, and 3 mm are sufficient to account for translational errors; however, the large variation in patient-specific margins suggests that adaptive management may be beneficial.

  19. Hypofractionated Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy (70 Gy at 2.5 Gy Per Fraction) for Localized Prostate Cancer: Cleveland Clinic Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Kupelian, Patrick A. . E-mail: patrick.kupelian@orhs.org; Willoughby, Twyla R.; Reddy, Chandana A.; Klein, Eric A.; Mahadevan, Arul

    2007-08-01

    Purpose: To study the outcomes in patients treated for localized prostate cancer with 70 Gy delivered at 2.5-Gy/fraction within 5 weeks. Methods and Materials: The study sample included all 770 consecutive patients with localized prostate cancer treated with hypofractionated intensity-modulated radiotherapy at the Cleveland Clinic between 1998 and 2005. The median follow-up was 45 months (maximum, 86). Both American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) biochemical failure definition and the alternate nadir + 2 ng/mL definition were used. Results: The overall 5-year ASTRO biochemical relapse-free survival rate was 82% (95% confidence interval, 79-85%), and the 5-year nadir + 2 ng/mL rate was 83% (95% confidence interval, 79-86%). For patients with low-risk, intermediate-risk, and high-risk disease, the 5-year ASTRO rate was 95%, 85%, and 68%, respectively. The 5-year nadir + 2 ng/mL rate for patients with low-, intermediate-, and high-risk disease was 94%, 83%, and 72%, respectively. The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group acute rectal toxicity scores were 0 in 51%, 1 in 40%, and 2 in 9% of patients. The acute urinary toxicity scores were 0 in 33%, 1 in 48%, 2 in 18%, and 3 in 1% of patients. The late rectal toxicity scores were 0 in 89.6%, 1 in 5.9%, 2 in 3.1%, 3 in 1.3%, and 4 in 0.1% (1 patient). The late urinary toxicity scores were 0 in 90.5%, 1 in 4.3%, 2 in 5.1%, and 3 in 0.1% (1 patient). Conclusion: The outcomes after high-dose hypofractionation were acceptable in the entire cohort of patients treated with the schedule of 70 at 2.5 Gy/fraction.

  20. Timing of Salvage Hormonal Therapy in Prostate Cancer Patients With Unfavorable Prognosis Treated With Radiotherapy: A Secondary Analysis of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 85-31

    SciTech Connect

    Souhami, Luis; Bae, Kyounghwa; Pilepich, Miljenko; Sandler, Howard

    2010-12-01

    Purpose: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 85-31 was a randomized trial comparing radiotherapy (RT) alone vs. RT plus adjuvant androgen suppression for life in unfavorable-prognosis carcinoma of the prostate. We examined the impact of early initiation of salvage hormonal therapy (HT) in relapsing patients randomized to RT alone arm. Methods and Materials: Patients were divided into two groups: early salvage HT and late salvage HT. The early salvage group was defined as receiving HT with a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level of less than 10 ng/mL, and the late salvage HT group had a PSA level of 10 ng/mL or greater. The outcomes were overall survival (OS), cause-specific mortality (CSM), and local failure (LF). The Kaplan-Meier estimation and log-rank test were used for OS, and the cumulative incidence estimation and Gray's test were used for CSM and LF. Proportional hazards regression models were used to compare the outcomes adjusted for other covariates. Results: The median follow-up times of surviving patients in the early and late salvage HT groups were about 11 and 13 years, respectively. The late salvage HT group had significantly more post-prostatectomy patients and patients with high Gleason scores. After adjustment for all covariates, OS was significantly longer in the early salvage HT group (hazard ratio, 1.5; p = 0.01). However, there were no statistically significant differences in LF or CSM between the groups. Conclusions: The early introduction of salvage HT resulted in improved OS but not improved CSM and LF. A randomized trial to define the optimal salvage hormonal timing is warranted in this group of patients with PSA recurrence after RT.

  1. Prognostic Value of Abnormal p53 Expression in Locally Advanced Prostate Cancer Treated With Androgen Deprivation and Radiotherapy: A Study Based on RTOG 9202

    SciTech Connect

    Che Mingxin DeSilvio, Michelle; Pollack, Alan; Grignon, David J.; Venkatesan, Varagur Mohan; Hanks, Gerald E.; Sandler, Howard M.

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to verify the significance of p53 as a prognostic factor in Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9202, which compared short-term androgen deprivation (STAD) with radiation therapy (RT) to long-term androgen deprivation + RT in men with locally advanced prostate cancer (Pca). Methods and Materials: Tumor tissue was sufficient for p53 analysis in 777 cases. p53 status was determined by immunohistochemistry. Abnormal p53 expression was defined as 20% or more tumor cells with positive nuclei. Univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards models were used to evaluate the relationships of p53 status to patient outcomes. Results: Abnormal p53 was detected in 168 of 777 (21.6%) cases, and was significantly associated with cause-specific mortality (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] = 1.89; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.14 - 3.14; p = 0.014) and distant metastasis (adjusted HR = 1.72; 95% CI 1.13-2.62; p = 0.013). When patients were divided into subgroups according to assigned treatment, only the subgroup of patients who underwent STAD + RT showed significant correlation between p53 status and cause-specific mortality (adjusted HR = 2.43; 95% CI = 1.32-4.49; p = 0.0044). When patients were divided into subgroups according to p53 status, only the subgroup of patients with abnormal p53 showed significant association between assigned treatment and cause-specific mortality (adjusted HR = 3.81; 95% CI 1.40-10.37; p = 0.0087). Conclusions: Abnormal p53 is a significant prognostic facto