Science.gov

Sample records for escape systems

  1. Developing the E-Scape Software System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Derrick, Karim

    2012-01-01

    Most innovations have contextual pre-cursors that prompt new ways of thinking and in their turn help to give form to the new reality. This was the case with the e-scape software development process. The origins of the system existed in software components and ideas that we had developed through previous projects, but the ultimate direction we took…

  2. Launch Pad Escape System Design (Human Spaceflight)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maloney, Kelli

    2011-01-01

    A launch pad escape system for human spaceflight is one of those things that everyone hopes they will never need but is critical for every manned space program. Since men were first put into space in the early 1960s, the need for such an Emergency Escape System (EES) has become apparent. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has made use of various types of these EESs over the past 50 years. Early programs, like Mercury and Gemini, did not have an official launch pad escape system. Rather, they relied on a Launch Escape System (LES) of a separate solid rocket motor attached to the manned capsule that could pull the astronauts to safety in the event of an emergency. This could only occur after hatch closure at the launch pad or during the first stage of flight. A version of a LES, now called a Launch Abort System (LAS) is still used today for all manned capsule type launch vehicles. However, this system is very limited in that it can only be used after hatch closure and it is for flight crew only. In addition, the forces necessary for the LES/LAS to get the capsule away from a rocket during the first stage of flight are quite high and can cause injury to the crew. These shortcomings led to the development of a ground based EES for the flight crew and ground support personnel as well. This way, a much less dangerous mode of egress is available for any flight or ground personnel up to a few seconds before launch. The early EESs were fairly simple, gravity-powered systems to use when thing's go bad. And things can go bad very quickly and catastrophically when dealing with a flight vehicle fueled with millions of pounds of hazardous propellant. With this in mind, early EES designers saw such a passive/unpowered system as a must for last minute escapes. This and other design requirements had to be derived for an EES, and this section will take a look at the safety design requirements had to be derived for an EES, and this section will take a look at

  3. Escape rate scaling in infinite measure preserving systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munday, Sara; Knight, Georgie

    2016-02-01

    We investigate the scaling of the escape rate from piecewise linear dynamical systems displaying intermittency due to the presence of an indifferent fixed point. Strong intermittent behaviour in the dynamics can result in the system preserving an infinite measure. We define a neighbourhood of the indifferent fixed point to be a hole through which points escape and investigate the scaling of the rate of this escape as the length of the hole decreases, both in the finite measure preserving case and infinite measure preserving case. In the infinite measure preserving systems we observe logarithmic corrections to and polynomial scaling of the escape rate with hole length. Finally we conjecture a relationship between the wandering rate and the observed scaling of the escape rate.

  4. Mean escape time in a system with stochastic volatility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonanno, Giovanni; Valenti, Davide; Spagnolo, Bernardo

    2007-01-01

    We study the mean escape time in a market model with stochastic volatility. The process followed by the volatility is the Cox, Ingersoll, and Ross process which is widely used to model stock price fluctuations. The market model can be considered as a generalization of the Heston model, where the geometric Brownian motion is replaced by a random walk in the presence of a cubic nonlinearity. We investigate the statistical properties of the escape time of the returns, from a given interval, as a function of the three parameters of the model. We find that the noise can have a stabilizing effect on the system, as long as the global noise is not too high with respect to the effective potential barrier experienced by a fictitious Brownian particle. We compare the probability density function of the return escape times of the model with those obtained from real market data. We find that they fit very well.

  5. A Generalized Escape System Simulation (GESS) Computer Program: GESS User’s Guide. Version II. Volume 1.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-09-01

    4-14 4-7 Ocupant Alone Variable Fields ......................... 4-15 4-8 Rail Data Variable Fields ............................. 4...civilian management, and Navy personnel with greater ability to: - establish escape system performance requirements, -. . evaluate competitive escape...system proposals, z. evaluate escape system design modifications, ~. monitor escape system test programs, .. prepare fleet information on escape

  6. Lightning tests of the orbiter pyrotechnic escape system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, R.; Schulte, E. H.

    1977-01-01

    An experimental test program was undertaken to demonstrate that the Space Shuttle Orbiter Vehicle pyrotechnics actuated Crew Escape System was not subject to failure resulting from a lightning strike in the vicinity of the cockpit. A test sample representing a full-scale portion of the Orbiter Outer Panel was preheated to 325 F and struck with three different current waveforms to simulate the various effects of lightning: (1) 2 micro sec risetime, to 180 kA pulse to evaluate fast current rise shock effects; (2) a 205 kA, 100 micro sec wide pulse to evaluate full energy shock effects; and (3) a 490 ampere, 370 msec continuing current to evaluate the thermal effects of a lightning strike. These tests show that the Orbiter outer panel pyrotechnics are adequately protected against damage resulting from a lightning strike.

  7. The Solar system's post-main-sequence escape boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veras, Dimitri; Wyatt, Mark C.

    2012-04-01

    The Sun will eventually lose about half of its current mass non-linearly over several phases of post-main-sequence evolution. This mass loss will cause any surviving orbiting body to increase its semimajor axis and perhaps vary its eccentricity. Here, we use a range of solar models spanning plausible evolutionary sequences and assume isotropic mass loss to assess the possibility of escape from the Solar system. We find that the critical semimajor axis in the Solar system within which an orbiting body is guaranteed to remain bound to the dying Sun due to perturbations from stellar mass loss alone is ≈103-104 au. The fate of objects near or beyond this critical semimajor axis, such as the Oort Cloud, outer scattered disc and specific bodies such as Sedna, will significantly depend on their locations along their orbits when the Sun turns off the main sequence. These results are applicable to any exoplanetary system containing a single star with a mass, metallicity and age which are approximately equal to the Sun's, and suggest that few extrasolar Oort Clouds could survive post-main-sequence evolution intact.

  8. Escape dynamics and fractal basin boundaries in the planar Earth-Moon system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Assis, Sheila C.; Terra, Maisa O.

    2014-10-01

    The escape of trajectories of a spacecraft, or comet or asteroid in the presence of the Earth-Moon system is investigated in detail in the context of the planar circular restricted three-body problem, in a scattering region around the Moon. The escape through the necks around the collinear points and as well as the leaking produced by considering collisions with the Moon surface, taking the lunar mean radius into account, were considered. Given that different transport channels are available as a function of the Jacobi constant, four distinct escape regimes are analyzed. Besides the calculation of exit basins and of the spatial distribution of escape time, the qualitative dynamical investigation through Poincaré sections is performed in order to elucidate the escape process. Our analyses reveal the dependence of the properties of the considered escape basins with the energy, with a remarkable presence of fractal basin boundaries along all the escape regimes. Finally, we observe the plentiful presence of stickiness motion near stability islands which plays a remarkable role in the longest escape time behavior. The application of this analysis is important both in space mission design and study of natural systems, given that fractal boundaries are related with high sensitivity to initial conditions, implying in uncertainty between safe and unsafe solutions, as well as between escaping solutions that evolve to different phase space regions.

  9. Time-dependent Kramers escape rate in overdamped system with power-law distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yanjun; Yin, Cangtao

    2016-05-01

    The probability distribution of Brownian particles moving in an overdamped complex system follows the generalized Smoluchowski equation, which can be rigorously proven that the exact time-dependent solution for this equation follows Tsallis form. Time-dependent escape rate in overdamped system with power-law distributions is then established based on the flux over population theory. The stationary state escape rate in overdamped system with power-law distribution which has been obtained before based on mean first passage time theory is recovered from time-dependent escape rate as time toward infinity.

  10. How a system moves in noise-induced escape from a metastable state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhukov, A.; Dykman, M. I.

    2000-03-01

    We provide a theory and results of numerical simulations of noise-induced escape from a metastable state, a phenomenon which underlies numerous processes in physics and biology. Of particular interest is a system's dynamics during escape. Understanding this dynamics is necessary for controlling the escape rate. The escape dynamics can be characterized by the distribution of trajectories along which the escaped system has been moving. This distribution peaks at a certain path, which is the most probable escape path (MPEP). The MPEP displays several characteristic features, including slowing down near the unstable stationary state over which the system goes in escape (e.g., top of the potential barrier). The width of the paths distribution is strongly nonmonotonic as a function of time counted off backward from the time when the system reaches an observation point behind the potential barrier. We investigate the shape of the paths distribution as a function of time and dynamical variables of the system, for a broad range of noise intensities. The data are obtained for a Brownian particle in a potential with a metastable minimum. The results are used to discuss experimental observations on dropout events in semiconductor lasers.

  11. Role of the lateral line mechanosensory system in directionality of goldfish auditory evoked escape response

    PubMed Central

    Mirjany, Mana; Preuss, Thomas; Faber, Donald S.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Goldfish (Carassius auratus) escape responses to sudden auditory stimuli are mediated by a pair of reticulospinal neurons, the Mauthner (M-) cells, which integrate mechanosensory inputs from the inner ear and the lateral line (LL) to initiate a fast directional response away from the aversive stimulus. This behavior is context dependent; when near an obstruction the fish may rather turn towards the sound to avoid hitting the object. Mechanisms underlying this directionality remain unknown. Here we investigate the contribution of the LL system to auditory evoked escapes and provide behavioral evidence that it transmits stimulus – and environmental-dependent information that determines the initial response direction of the escape. We quantified escape latency, probability and directionality following abrupt sound stimuli before and after removal of the entire LL with 0.03 mmol l–1 cobalt chloride (CoCl2), 0.002% gentamicin or selective posterior LL nerve (pLLn) transection. CoCl2 significantly increased escape onset latency without affecting probability and reduced open field directionality from 77% to chance, 52%. This effect on directionality was also observed with gentamicin. Transection of the pLLn had no effect on directionality, indicating the anterior LL nerve (aLLn) afferents are more likely to transmit directional information to the M-cell. When the fish were near a wall, the error rate was quadrupled by both CoCl2 and pLLn transection. Visual elimination had no influence on directionality unless combined with LL elimination. PMID:21957099

  12. STS-26 Pilot Covey during crew escape system (CES) testing in JSC WETF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Pilot Richard O. Covey participates in crew escape system (CES) testing in JSC Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) Bldg 29. Covey, wearing the newly designed (navy blue) launch and entry suit (LES), floats in WETF pool with the aid of an underarm flotation device (modern version of Mae West floats). He awaits the assistance of SCUBA-equipped divers during a simulation of escape and rescue operations utilizing a new CES pole for emergency exit from the Space Shuttle.

  13. STS-26 MS Nelson during Crew escape system (CES) testing in JSC WETF Bldg 29

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Mission Specialist (MS) George D. Nelson participates in crew escape system (CES) testing in JSC Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) Bldg 29. Nelson, wearing the newly designed (navy blue) launch and entry suit (LES), floats in WETF pool with the aid of an underarm flotation device (modern version of Mas West floats). He awaits the assistance of SCUBA-equipped divers during a simulation of escape and rescue operations utilizing a new CES pole for emergency exit from the Space Shuttle.

  14. STS-26 MS Nelson during Crew Escape System (CES) testing in JSC WETF Bldg 29

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Mission Specialist (MS) George D. Nelson participates in crew escape system (CES) testing in JSC Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) Bldg 29. With helmet visor down, Nelson, wearing the newly designed (navy blue) launch and entry suit (LES), floats in WETF pool with the aid of an underarm flotation device (modern version of Mae West floats). He awaits the assistance of SCUBA-equipped divers during a simulation of escape and rescue operations utilizing a new CES pole for emergency exit from the Space Shuttle.

  15. STS-26 MS Lounge during crew escape system (CES) testing in JSC WETF Bldg 29

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Mission Specialist (MS) John M. Lounge participates in crew escape system (CES) testing in JSC Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) Bldg 29. Lounge, wearing the newly designed (navy blue) launch and entry suit (LES), floats in WETF pool with the aid of an underarm flotation device (modern version of Mae West floats). Four SCUBA-equipped divers assist Lounge during the simulation of escape and rescue operations utilizing a new CES pole for emergency exit from the Space Shuttle. Lounge is wearing gear like that each STS-26 crewmember and subsequent crews will carry onboard during launch.

  16. ESCAPE: Eco-Behavioral System for Complex Assessments of Preschool Environments. Research Draft.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carta, Judith J.; And Others

    The manual details an observational code designed to track a child during an entire day in a preschool setting. The Eco-Behavioral System for Complex Assessments of Preschool Environments (ESCAPE) encompasses assessment of the following three major categories of variables with their respective subcategories: (1) ecological variables (designated…

  17. Hypervelocity Technology Escape System Concepts. Volume 1. Development and Evaluation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-07-01

    the areas of virtual instrument technology, helmet-mounted display technology, voice interface technology and tactile data input technology, and...Instrumentation. The voice interface technology allows the pilot to simply talk to the flight director system and avionics system and the craft can respond to

  18. Pluto-Charon system - the escape of Charon's primordial atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Trafton, L.; Stern, S.A.; Gladstone, G.R.

    1988-04-01

    Although Charon seems to have lost its atmosphere and surface volatiles, a lack of heating that would be sufficient to generate melting and consequent separation of the lighter and heavier nonvolatiles has probably resulted in the outer layers' retention of the primordial mix of nonvolatiles. Spectroscopically-determined relative abundances for the Charon surface should accordingly be representative of its entire mass, and thereby constitutes the basis of an understanding of Charon's origin. The study of Charon's exposed nonvolatile ices may ascertain whether the Pluto-Charon system condensed out of the solar nebula directly or from a protoplanetary nebula. 46 references.

  19. Modeling cancer evolution: evolutionary escape under immune system control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korobeinikov, Andrei; Starkov, Konstantin E.; Valle, Paul A.

    2017-02-01

    It can be expected that adequate immune response should be able to annihilate cancer at a very early stage of its appearance. However, in some cases cancer is able to persist avoiding immune response. One can conject that cancer is able to avoid immune response control due to a succession of mutations leading to the development of immune-resistant cells. In order to illustrate this possibility, in this paper we present a 2n–dimensional mathematical model that describes interaction of n subtypes of tumor cells with corresponding genotype-specific immune response. The model postulates that there is a probability for tumor cells of each of n subtype to produce offsprings of other types. Each of the subtypes activates the genotype-specific immune response with a possibility of suppressing cancer cells of other genotypes (the cross-immunity). Numerical simulations show that if cancer cells are able to mutate comparatively fast and if immune response is not strong enough, then, despite immune system pressure, cancer is able to persist.

  20. Approach for Service Life Extension of Explosive Devices for Aircraft Escape Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, L. J.; Schimmel, M. L.

    1985-01-01

    The service life evaluation of explosive devices used in a wide variety of aircraft escape systems is described. The purpose was to develop a service extension approach, supported by tests on candidate devices, to evaluate the effects of service, age, and degradation, and allow responsible, conservative, service life determinations. An overview is given on the recommended approach and experimental procedures for accurate service evaluations with test results on rigid and flexible explosive transfer lines, one-way transfers, and flexible linear shaped charges.

  1. Investigation of Minimum Sized Low-Profile Cockpits (MSLPC) and Crew Escape System Integration.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-09-17

    GLOSSARY OF TERMINOLOGY ABBREVIATIONS, SYMBOLS, a ACRONYMS AMP Aircraft maneuvering parameter ATS Air-to-surface technology evaluation & integration study ...afterburner, if any Lb FSLGVOL Fuselage volume Cubic feet NOAC Number of operational aircraft Integer i’ xv 1. INTRODUCTION Recent study efforts to define...Profile Cockpit (MSLPC) concept and the integra- tion of crew escape system concepts. This study determined the attendant per- formance and effectiveness

  2. Crew escape system test at Naval Weapons Center, China Lake, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    As part of a crew escape system (CES) test program, a lifelike dummy is pulled by a tractor rocket from an airborne Convair-240 (C-240) aircraft at Naval Weapons Center, China Lake, California. A P-3 chase plane accompanies the C-240. The C-240 was modified with a space shuttle side hatch mockup for the tests which will evaluate candidate concepts developed to provide crew egress capability during Space Shuttle controlled gliding flight.

  3. STS-45 payload specialists with crew escape system (CES) mockup at JSC's MAIL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    STS-45 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, payload specialists Byron K. Lichtenberg (left) and Dirk D. Frimout (European Space Agency (ESA) Belgian crewmember) practice crew escape system (CES) pole opeation using a side hatch mockup. Lichtenberg is engaging the handle which extends the CES pole out the side hatch. The payload specialists along with the other STS-45 crewmembers are participating in side hatch emergency egress exercises in JSC's Mockup and Integration Laboratory (MAIL) Bldg 9A.

  4. Using the Two-Burn Escape Maneuver for Fast Transfers in the Solar System and Beyond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Robert B.; Richardson, Georgia A.

    2010-01-01

    The two-burn maneuver to escape the gravitational pull of a central body is described. The maneuver, originally suggested by Hermann Oberth, improves efficiency considerably for a wide range of missions of interest in space exploration and scientific investigation. A clear delineation of when the maneuver is more effective is given, as are methods to extract the most advantage when using the maneuver. Some examples are given of how this maneuver can enable exploration of the outer solar system, near interstellar space, and crewed missions to Mars and beyond. The maneuver has the potential to halve the required infrastructure associated with a crewed mission to Mars and achieve increased solar escape velocities with existing spacecraft technologies.

  5. Expected value analysis for an unmanned expendable launch vehicle payload escape system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Fred E.

    1987-12-01

    Since the beginning of the U.S. Space Program, there have been numerous schemes for humans to escape from spacecraft in distress. This has not been the case for payloads of unmanned, expendable launch vehicles (ELV). The literature review revealed no concepts or design in the U.S. Space Program for saving or salvaging unmanned payloads if an ELV failed during the boost phase. The purpose of this thesis was to develop a methodology to define a mathematical cost relation for a payload escape system (PES). That relation demonstrates when it is economically feasible to use a payload escape system. This methodology draws heavily upon Decision Analysis Techniques, although a classical decision analysis involving a decision maker was not performed. A mathematical relation was developed for two launch cases: the first assumed 100 percent insurance coverage for losses and the other assumed no insurance coverage for losses. The study found that the mathematical relations could be used to develop graphs defining when it is economically feasible to use a PES. The model is flexible and could be modified for use with a particular payload program.

  6. Crossover of the Thermal Escape Problem in Annular Spatially Distributed Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Fedorov, Kirill G.; Pankratov, Andrey L.

    2009-12-31

    The computer simulations of fluctuational dynamics of an annular system governed by the sine-Gordon model with a white noise source are performed. It is demonstrated that the mean escape time (MET) of a phase string for an annular structure can be much larger than for a linear one and has a strongly pronounced maximum as a function of system's length. The location of the MET maximum roughly equals the size of the kink-antikink pair, which leads to evidence of a spatial crossover between two dynamical regimes: when the phase string escapes over the potential barrier as a whole and when the creation of kink-antikink pairs is the main mechanism of the escape process. For large lengths and in the limit of small noise intensity gamma, for both MET and inverse concentration of kinks, we observe the same dependence versus the kink energy E{sub k}: approxexp(2E{sub k}/gamma) for the annular structure and approxexp(E{sub k}/gamma) for the linear one.

  7. THE HYADES CLUSTER: IDENTIFICATION OF A PLANETARY SYSTEM AND ESCAPING WHITE DWARFS

    SciTech Connect

    Zuckerman, B.; Xu, S.; Klein, B.; Jura, M. E-mail: sxu@astro.ucla.edu E-mail: jura@astro.ucla.edu

    2013-06-20

    Recently, some hot DA-type white dwarfs have been proposed to plausibly be escaping members of the Hyades. We used hydrogen Balmer lines to measure the radial velocities of seven such stars and confirm that three, and perhaps two others, are/were indeed cluster members and one is not. The other candidate Hyad is strongly magnetic and its membership status remains uncertain. The photospheres of at least one quarter of field white dwarf stars are ''polluted'' by elements heavier than helium that have been accreted. These stars are orbited by extended planetary systems that contain both debris belts and major planets. We surveyed the seven classical single Hyades white dwarfs and the newly identified (escaping) Hyades white dwarfs and found calcium in the photosphere of LP 475-242 of type DBA (now DBAZ), thus implying the presence of an orbiting planetary system. The spectrum of white dwarf GD 31, which may be, but probably is not, an escaping member of the Hyades, displays calcium absorption lines; these originate either from the interstellar medium or, less likely, from a gaseous circumstellar disk. If GD 31 was once a Hyades member, then it would be the first identified white dwarf Hyad with a cooling age >340 Myr.

  8. Crossover of the thermal escape problem in annular spatially distributed systems.

    PubMed

    Fedorov, Kirill G; Pankratov, Andrey L

    2009-12-31

    The computer simulations of fluctuational dynamics of an annular system governed by the sine-Gordon model with a white noise source are performed. It is demonstrated that the mean escape time (MET) of a phase string for an annular structure can be much larger than for a linear one and has a strongly pronounced maximum as a function of system's length. The location of the MET maximum roughly equals the size of the kink-antikink pair, which leads to evidence of a spatial crossover between two dynamical regimes: when the phase string escapes over the potential barrier as a whole and when the creation of kink-antikink pairs is the main mechanism of the escape process. For large lengths and in the limit of small noise intensity gamma, for both MET and inverse concentration of kinks, we observe the same dependence versus the kink energy E(k): approximately exp(2E(k)/gamma) for the annular structure and approximately exp(E(k)/gamma) for the linear one.

  9. Physical Theory of the Competition that Allows HIV to Escape from the Immune System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guanyu; Deem, Michael W.

    2006-11-01

    Competition within the immune system may degrade immune control of viral infections. We formalize the evolution that occurs in both HIV-1 and the immune system quasispecies. Inclusion of competition in the immune system leads to a novel balance between the immune response and HIV-1, in which the eventual outcome is HIV-1 escape rather than control. The analytical model reproduces the three stages of HIV-1 infection. We propose a vaccine regimen that may be able to reduce competition between T cells, potentially eliminating the third stage of HIV-1.

  10. A Physical Theory of the Competition that Allows HIV to Escape from the Immune System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deem, Michael

    2007-03-01

    Competition within the immune system may degrade immune control of viral infections. We formalize the evolution that occurs in both HIV-1 and the immune system quasispecies [1]. Inclusion of competition in the immune system leads to a novel balance between the immune response and HIV-1, in which the eventual outcome is HIV-1 escape rather than control. The analytical model reproduces the three stages of HIV-1 infection. We propose a vaccine regimen that may be able to reduce competition between T cells, potentially eliminating the third stage of HIV-1. 1) G. Wang and M. W. Deem, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97 (2006) 188106.

  11. A three body dynamic simulation of a seated tractor rocket escape system for the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ondler, R. M.

    1989-01-01

    In the tractor-rocket seated-extraction candidate system for Space Shuttle Orbiter crew escape, the crewmember is pulled from his seat and away from the Orbiter via an elastic pendant, using a system of rails to guide the extraction trajectory through an opening on the window frame for flight deck crew and through the side hatch for the middeck crew. A three-body simulation has been developed to model the flight-mechanics aspects of the concept, where the three bodies are the astronaut (six DOF), the tractor rocket (six DOF), and the Shuttle Orbiter (three DOF); attention is given to crewmembers' clearance of the Orbiter structure and engine plumes.

  12. STS-45 payload specialists with crew escape system (CES) mockup at JSC's MAIL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    STS-45 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, Payload Specialist Dirk D. Frimout (European Space Agency (ESA) Belgian crewmember) (left), backup Payload Specialist Charles R. Chappell (center), and Payload Specialist Byron K. Lichtenberg (right) listen to technician explain the operation of the crew escape system (CES) pole. Frimout is engaging the handle which extends the CES pole out the side hatch. The payload specialists along with the other STS-45 crewmembers are participating in side hatch emergency egress exercises in JSC's Mockup and Integration Laboratory (MAIL) Bldg 9A.

  13. Dust escape from Io

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flandes, Alberto

    2004-08-01

    The Dust ballerina skirt is a set of well defined streams composed of nanometric sized dust particles that escape from the Jovian system and may be accelerated up to >=200 km/s. The source of this dust is Jupiter's moon Io, the most volcanically active body in the Solar system. The escape of dust grains from Jupiter requires first the escape of these grains from Io. This work is basically devoted to explain this escape given that the driving of dust particles to great heights and later injection into the ionosphere of Io may give the particles an equilibrium potential that allow the magnetic field to accelerate them away from Io. The grain sizes obtained through this study match very well to the values required for the particles to escape from the Jovian system.

  14. Age Life Evaluation of Space Shuttle Crew Escape System Pyrotechnic Components Loaded with Hexanitrostilbene (HNS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, William C., III

    1996-01-01

    Determining deterioration characteristics of the Space Shuttle crew escape system pyrotechnic components loaded with hexanitrostilbene would enable us to establish a hardware life-limit for these items, so we could better plan our equipment use and, possibly, extend the useful life of the hardware. We subjected components to accelerated-age environments to determine degradation characteristics and established a hardware life-limit based upon observed and calculated trends. We extracted samples using manufacturing lots currently installed in the Space Shuttle crew escape system and from other NASA programs. Hardware included in the study consisted of various forms and ages of mild detonating fuse, linear shaped charge, and flexible confined detonating cord. The hardware types were segregated into 5 groups. One was subjected to detonation velocity testing for a baseline. Two were first subjected to prolonged 155 F heat exposure, and the other two were first subjected to 255 F, before undergoing detonation velocity testing and/or chromatography analysis. Test results showed no measurable changes in performance to allow a prediction of an end of life given the storage and elevated temperature environments the hardware experiences. Given the lack of a definitive performance trend, coupled with previous tests on post-flight Space Shuttle hardware showing no significant changes in chemical purity or detonation velocity, we recommend a safe increase in the useful life of the hardware to 20 years, from the current maximum limits of 10 and 15 years, depending on the hardware.

  15. Preliminary Study for Manned Spacecraft with Escape System and H-IIB Rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imada, Takane; Ito, Michio; Takata, Shinichi

    HTV (H-II Transfer Vehicle) is the first Japanese un-manned service vehicle that will transport several pieces of equipments to ISS (International Space Station) and support human activities on orbit. HTV will be launched by the first H-IIB rocket in September 2009 and JAXA will have the capability to access LEO (Low Earth Orbit) bases with enough volume/weight as the human transport system. This paper is the preliminary study for developing a manned spacecraft from the HTV design and includes clarification of necessary development items. In addition, missing parts in the current HTV design are identified with some analysis, such as LES (Launch Escape System), which is mandatory for all human transport systems.

  16. Approach for service life extension of explosive devices for aircraft escape systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, L. J.; Schimmel, M. L.

    1985-01-01

    Service life extension of explosive devices used in aircraft escape systems can achieve considerable savings. An overall approach is needed to challenge the logic of explosive component service extension from design to removal from service for evaluation. The purpose of the effort described in this paper was to develop a service-extension approach on explosive devices used in aircraft systems, supported by actual testing of representative candidate devices, to evaluate quantitatively the effects of service, age, and degradation, and allow responsible, conservative service life determinations. Evaluated were five explosive components: rigid and flexible explosive transfer lines, one-way transfers, flexible linear shaped charges, and initiation handles. The service extension approach generated in this effort is summarized by eight recommendations.

  17. PHYSIOLOGICAL EVALUATION OF THE ACED SUBMARINE ESCAPE SUIT-RAFT SYSTEM.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    SUBMARINE ESCAPE, *SEA RESCUE EQUIPMENT), LIFE RAFTS, PROTECTIVE CLOTHING, EXPOSURE(PHYSIOLOGY), WATER, TEMPERATURE, PHYSIOLOGY, TISSUES(BIOLOGY), DAMAGE, MORTALITY RATES , STRESS(PHYSIOLOGY), TOLERANCES(PHYSIOLOGY)

  18. Sensory-Motor Systems of Copepods involved in their Escape from Suction Feeding.

    PubMed

    Yen, Jeannette; Murphy, David W; Fan, Lin; Webster, Donald R

    2015-07-01

    Copepods escape well by detecting minute gradients in the flow field; they react quickly, and swim away strongly. As a key link in the aquatic food web, these small planktonic organisms often encounter suction-feeding fish. Studies have identified certain hydrodynamic features that are created by the approach of this visual predator and the generation of its suction flow for capturing food. Similarly, studies have identified certain hydrodynamic features that evoke the evasive response of copepods. This is a review of the copepod sensory motor system as pertains to understanding their response to suction-feeding fish. Analyses of the reaction time, threshold sensitivity, structure of sensors, and evasive behavior by this key prey of fish can be useful for evaluating the effectiveness of feeding tactics in response to suction flow. To illustrate, we present results comparing a copepod from a fishless lake (Hesperodiaptomus shoshone) to a copepod from a rich fishing ground (Calanus finmarchicus). We designed a flow mimic that produces a realistic mushroom-cap-shaped flow field and realistic accelerations of flow; the copepods treated the mimic as a threat and performed jumps directed up and away from the siphon. Calanus finmarchicus responded at an average threshold strain rate of 18.7/s, escaped at 0.46 m/s, and traveled 5.99 mm, most frequently as a single jump. Hesperodiaptomus shoshone responded at a strain rate of 15.1/s that is not significantly different, escaped more slowly at 0.22 m/s and traveled a shorter distance of 3.01 mm using a series of hops. The high variability noted in the initial angle of the body and the maximum change in body angle suggests that unpredictability in the escape maneuver is another aspect of the tactic of copepods. The speed of the escape by small copepods 2-3 mm long is overwhelmed by the speed of the attack by the much larger, faster fish; if the copepod reacts when it is within the fish's arena of capture (<1.5 mm from mouth

  19. Extension of service life of rigid transfer lines /SMDC/. [explosive components for aircraft escape systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, L. J.; Kayser, E. G.; Schimmel, M. L.

    1982-01-01

    The results of a life evaluation program on rigid explosive transfer lines, which are used to initiate aircraft emergency crew escape functions, are presented in order to provide quantitative information on rigid explosive transfer lines which can contribute to responsible, conservative, service life determinations. The program involved the development of a test methodology, testing of the three types of transfer lines in use in the U.S., testing of these lines following a repeat of the thermal test conducted in the original qualification, and conducting a degradation investigation. Results from the testing of more than 800 components showed that rigid explosive transfer lines were not affected by age, service, or a repeat of the thermal qualification tests on full-service lines. The explosive degradation limits were approximated and the mechanisms examined. It is concluded that the service lives of rigid explosive transfer lines should be considered for extension in order to provide cost savings and increased system reliability.

  20. Atmospheric escape from unmagnetized bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brain, D. A.; Bagenal, F.; Ma, Y.-J.; Nilsson, H.; Stenberg Wieser, G.

    2016-12-01

    The upper atmospheres of unmagnetized solar system bodies interact more directly with their local plasma environment than their counterparts on magnetized bodies such as Earth. One consequence of this interaction is that atmospheric particles can gain energy from the flowing plasma, as well as solar photons, and escape to space. Escape proceeds through a number of different mechanisms that can remove neutral particles (Jeans escape, photochemical escape, and sputtering) and mechanisms that can remove ions (ion pickup, magnetic shear and tension-related escape, and pressure gradients). Here we discuss the plasma interactions and escape processes and rates from five solar system objects spanning 3 orders of magnitude in size: comets, Pluto, Titan, Mars, and Venus. We describe similarities and differences in escape for the different objects and provide four open questions that should be addressed in the coming years.

  1. Mechanisms of tumor escape from immune system: role of mesenchymal stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Poggi, Alessandro; Musso, Alessandra; Dapino, Irene; Zocchi, Maria Raffaella

    2014-01-01

    Tumor microenvironment represents the site where the tumor tries to survive and escape from immune system-mediated recognition. Indeed, to proliferate tumor cells can divert the immune response inducing the generation of myeloid derived suppressor cells and regulatory T cells which can limit the efficiency of effector antitumor lymphocytes in eliminating neoplastic cells. Many components of the tumor microenvironment can serve as a double sword for the tumor and the host. Several types of fibroblast-like cells, which herein we define mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC), secrete extracellular matrix components and surrounding the tumor mass can limit the expansion of the tumor. On the other hand, MSC can interfere with the immune recognition of tumor cells producing immunoregulatory cytokines as transforming growth factor (TGF)ß, releasing soluble ligands of the activating receptors expressed on cytolytic effector cells as decoy molecules, affecting the correct interaction among lymphocytes and tumor cells. MSC can also serve as target for the same anti-tumor effector lymphocytes or simply impede the interaction between these lymphocytes and neoplastic cells. Thus, several evidences point out the role of MSC, both in epithelial solid tumors and hematological malignancies, in regulating tumor cell growth and immune response. Herein, we review these evidences and suggest that MSC can be a suitable target for a more efficient anti-tumor therapy.

  2. Assessing Scientific and Technological Enquiry Skills at Age 11 Using the E-Scape System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Dan; Collier, Chris; Howe, Alan

    2012-01-01

    This article reports on the outcomes from the "e-scape Primary Scientific and Technological Understanding Assessment Project" (2009-2010), which aimed to support primary teachers in developing valid portfolio-based tasks to assess pupils' scientific and technological enquiry skills at age 11. This was part of the wider…

  3. [The Research for Trace Ammonia Escape Monitoring System Based on Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li-fang; Wang, Fei; Yu, Li-bin; Yan, Jian-hua; Cen, Ke-fa

    2015-06-01

    In order to on-line measure the trace ammonia slip of the commercial power plant in the future, this research seeks to measure the trace ammonia by using tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy under ambient temperature and pressure, and at different temperatures, and the measuring temperature is about 650 K in the power plant. In recent years lasers have become commercially available in the near-infrared where the transitions are much stronger, and ammonia's spectroscopy is pretty complicated and the overlapping lines are difficult to resolve. A group of ammonia transitions near 4 433.5 cm(-1) in the v2 +v3 combination band have been thoroughly selected for detecting lower concentration by analyzing its absorption characteristic and considering other absorption interference in combustion gases where H2O and CO2 mole fraction are very large. To illustrate the potential for NH3 concentration measurements, predictions for NH3, H2O and CO2 are simultaneously simulated, NH3 absorption lines near 4 433.5 cm(-1) wavelength meet weaker H2O absorption than the commercial NH3 lines, and there is almost no CO2 absorption, all the parameters are based on the HITRAN database, and an improved detection limit was obtained for interference-free NH3 monitoring, this 2.25 μm band has line strengths several times larger than absorption lines in the 1.53 μm band which was often used by NH3 sensors for emission monitoring and analyzing. The measurement system was developed with a new Herriott cell and a heated gas cell realizing fast absorption measurements of high resolution, and combined with direct absorption and wavelenguh modulation based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy at different temperatures. The lorentzian line shape is dominant at ambient temperature and pressure, and the estimated detectivity is approximately 0.225 x 10(-6) (SNR = 1) for the directed absorption spectroscopy, assuming a noise-equivalent absorbance of 1 x 10(-4). The heated cell

  4. A Biomedical Review of the U.S. Navy Submarine Escape System: 1996.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    navies conducting ascent training in preparation for actual escape STTe- \\a fdy °f thC JapanCSe MaritÜne Self-Defense Force traming, Ikeda and Oiwa...a. Each man hold his nose shut through the hood fabric. b. On the leader’s signal take a deep breath and hold it. c. Inflate the hoods instantly...d. Open the trunk BLOW rapidly and fully. e. Start continuous deep breaths while the trunk is being pressurized. f. Attempt to equalize at each

  5. Testing of a new recovery parachute system for the F111 aircraft crew escape module: An update

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.W.

    1989-01-01

    A new recovery parachute system has been designed for the F111 crew escape module (CEM). The system includes a cluster of three 49-ft-dia ringslot-solid parachutes, a Kevlar deployment bag, and an explosively fired drogue gun to deploy the pilot parachute. Tests have been conducted that indicate the parachute system will meet the rate of descent requirement of 25 ft/sec at 5000 ft pressure altitude. To control the drag load developed by the parachutes, a new central reefing/disreefing system has been developed. Since the recovery parachute system is normally deployed crosswind from the CEM, line sail of the suspension lines during early tests was a problem but has been minimized by a dual pilot parachute system. 6 refs., 7 figs.

  6. Spacecraft Escape Capsule

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Edward A.; Charles, Dingell W.; Bufkin, Ann L.; Rodriggs, Liana M.; Peterson, Wayne; Cuthbert, Peter; Lee, David E.; Westhelle, Carlos

    2006-01-01

    A report discusses the Gumdrop capsule a conceptual spacecraft that would enable the crew to escape safely in the event of a major equipment failure at any time from launch through atmospheric re-entry. The scaleable Gumdrop capsule would comprise a command module (CM), a service module (SM), and a crew escape system (CES). The CM would contain a pressurized crew environment that would include avionic, life-support, thermal control, propulsive attitude control, and recovery systems. The SM would provide the primary propulsion and would also supply electrical power, life-support resources, and active thermal control to the CM. The CES would include a solid rocket motor, embedded within the SM, for pushing the CM away from the SM in the event of a critical thermal-protection-system failure or loss of control. The CM and SM would normally remain integrated with each other from launch through recovery, but could be separated using the CES, if necessary, to enable the safe recovery of the crew in the CM. The crew escape motor could be used, alternatively, as a redundant means of de-orbit propulsion for the CM in the event of a major system failure in the SM.

  7. Quantifying model uncertainty in dynamical systems driven by non-Gaussian Lévy stable noise with observations on mean exit time or escape probability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Ting; Duan, Jinqiao

    2016-10-01

    Complex systems are sometimes subject to non-Gaussian α-stable Lévy fluctuations. A new method is devised to estimate the uncertain parameter α and other system parameters, using observations on mean exit time or escape probability for the system evolution. It is based on solving an inverse problem for a deterministic, nonlocal partial differential equation via numerical optimization. The existing methods for estimating parameters require observations on system state sample paths for long time periods or probability densities at large spatial ranges. The method proposed here, instead, requires observations on mean exit time or escape probability only for an arbitrarily small spatial domain. This new method is beneficial to systems for which mean exit time or escape probability is feasible to observe.

  8. The great escape: An intra-Messinian gas system in the eastern Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazar, Michael; Schattner, Uri; Reshef, Moshe

    2012-10-01

    This study explores, for the first time, the response of the Mediterranean seafloor to desiccation and its affect on climate during the Messinian lowstand. New high-resolution 3-D pre-stack depth migrated seismic reflection data show evidence for gas outflow stemming from pre-Messinian sources. Our results indicate that giant pockmarks formed during this lowstand. Emission continued throughout the Messinian and persisted after it ended as evident by pockmark arrays on the then-seafloor. High reflectivity between the top-Messinian and overlying Pliocene sediments indicates significant gas accumulation immediately below the latter. Attribute analysis show minor chaotic paths through the Plio-Pleistocene, which do not reach the present-day seafloor. Our data indicate that as long as sea level was low there was massive gas escape to the shallow sea and atmosphere. We suggest that this probably resulted in the mid-Messinian climatic shift. Major emissions identified here indicate an indirect cause to negative climatic feedback during this period.

  9. De-submergence responses of antioxidative defense systems in two wetland plants having escape and quiescence strategies.

    PubMed

    Luo, Fang-Li; Thiele, Björn; Janzik, Ingar; Zeng, Bo; Schurr, Ulrich; Matsubara, Shizue

    2012-11-15

    Fast recovery after de-submergence requires efficient protection against oxidative injuries. We investigated whether de-submergence responses of antioxidant systems differ in two wetland plants, Alternanthera philoxeroides and Hemarthria altissima, characterized by 'escape' and 'quiescence' strategies of flood tolerance, respectively. The antioxidant capacity was assessed in the two species during 10d of recovery following 20d of complete submergence (low light+low O(2)) or severe shading (low light+ambient O(2)). The activities of superoxide dismutase and catalase were measured in leaf and root tissues, along with the concentrations of reduced ascorbate, malondialdehyde, and acetaldehyde. In addition, formation of superoxide (O(2)(-)) and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) was detected in leaves by chemical staining. Following de-submergence, plants of A. philoxeroides showed a transient burst of acetaldehyde, while the concentration of acetaldehyde increased slowly and stayed high in leaves of H. altissima. In leaves of A. philoxeroides, the variations in O(2)(-) and H(2)O(2) correlated with the levels of light and O(2), respectively, whereas neither of the two reactive oxygen species was detected in H. altissima. For A. philoxeroides, the antioxidant capacities changed mainly in leaves during the recovery. For H. altissima, changes in reduced ascorbate were found in leaves and those of antioxidant enzyme activities in roots. De-submergence caused some lipid peroxidation in leaves of both species. We conclude that de-submergence responses of the detoxification systems differ between A. philoxeroides and H. altissima, especially in leaves. Dynamic changes were found in A. philoxeroides (having the escape strategy), as opposed to little or slow changes in H. altissima (having the quiescence strategy). Whereas the antioxidant capacities are often strongly influenced by light environments, the toxic compounds and lipid peroxidation indicate harmful effects of changing O(2

  10. In-Flight Operation of the Dawn Ion Propulsion System Through the Preparations for Escape From Vesta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garner, Charles E.; Rayman, Marc D.; Brophy, John R.; Mikes, Steven C.

    2012-01-01

    The Dawn mission, part of NASA's Discovery Program, has as its goal the scientific exploration of the two most massive main-belt asteroids, 4 Vesta, and the dwarf planet 1 Ceres. The Dawn spacecraft was launched from the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station on September 27, 2007 on a Delta-II 7925H-9.5 rocket that placed the 1218-kg spacecraft into an Earth-escape trajectory. On-board the spacecraft is an ion propulsion system (IPS) developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory which will provide a total delta-V of approximately 11 km/s for the heliocentric transfer to Vesta, orbit capture at Vesta, transfer between Vesta science orbits, departure and escape from Vesta, heliocentric transfer to Ceres, orbit capture at Ceres, transfer between Ceres science orbits, and orbit maintenance maneuvers for all Vesta and Ceres science orbits. Full-power thrusting from December 2007 through October 2008 was used to successfully target a Mars gravity assist flyby in February 2009 that provided an additional delta-V of 2.6 km/s. Deterministic thrusting for the heliocentric transfer to Vesta resumed in June 2009 and concluded with orbit capture at Vesta on July 16, 2011. An additional 231 hours of IPS thrusting was used to enter the first Vesta science orbit, called Survey orbit, on August 3, 2011 at an altitude of about 2,735 km. The IPS was then used over the next year to transfer the spacecraft to the other science orbits: a high altitude mapping orbit (HAMO-1) in September 2011 at an altitude of approximately 673 km, a low altitude mapping orbit (LAMO) at approximately 210 km altitude, and a second high altitude mapping orbit (HAMO-2) at approximately 673 km altitude. To date the IPS has been operated for approximately 24,327 hours, consumed approximately 260 kg of xenon, and provided a delta-V of approximately 7 km/s. IPS performance characteristics are very close to the expected performance based on analysis and testing performed pre-launch. Thrusting for escape from Vesta and

  11. Orbiter escape pole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, Winston D. (Inventor); Wesselski, Clarence J. (Inventor); Pelischek, Timothy E. (Inventor); Becker, Bruce H. (Inventor); Kahn, Jon B. (Inventor); Grimaldi, Margaret E. (Inventor); McManamen, John P. (Inventor); Castro, Edgar O. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A Shuttle type of aircraft (10) with an escape hatch (12) has an arcuately shaped pole housing (16) attachable to an interior wall and ceiling with its open end adjacent to the escape hatch. The pole housing 16 contains a telescopically arranged and arcuately shaped primary pole member (22) and extension pole member (23) which are guided by roller assemblies (30,35). The extension pole member (23) is slidable and extendable relative to the primary pole member (22). For actuation, a spring actuated system includes a spring (52) in the pole housing. A locking member (90) engages both pole members (22,23) through notch portions (85,86) in the pole members. The locking member selectively releases the extension pole member (23) and the primary pole member (22). An internal one-way clutch or anti-return mechanism prevents retraction of the extension pole member from an extended position. Shock absorbers (54)(150,152) are for absoring the energy of the springs. A manual backup deployment system is provided which includes a canted ring (104) biased by a spring member (108). A lever member (100) with a slot and pin connection (102) permits the mechanical manipulation of the canted ring to move the primary pole member. The ring (104) also prevents retraction of the main pole. The crew escape mechanism includes a magazine (60) and a number of lanyards (62), each lanyard being mounted by a roller loop (68) over the primary pole member (22). The strap on the roller loop has stitching for controlled release, a protection sheath (74) to prevent tangling and a hook member (69) for attachment to a crew harness.

  12. Expected Value Analysis for an Unmanned Expendable Launch Vehicle Payload Escape System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-01

    68 i V List of Figures Figure Page 2.1 Apollo Spacecraft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 2.2 Paraglider Recovery...few cm/s at the moment of contact" (17t5). Paraglider System. Crawford and MoNerney discuss Space-General Corporation’s study of three applications of... paragliders as recovery systems (4:293). The first, was a paraglider assembly designed to recover the Saturn SI-C 10 I booster. The second, a system

  13. Emergency escape system uses self-braking mechanism on fixed cable

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billings, C. R.; Mc Daris, R. A.; Mc Gough, J. T.; Neal, P. F.

    1966-01-01

    Slide-wire system with a twist level slide device incorporates automatic descent and braking for the safe and rapid evacuation of personnel from tall structures. This device is used on any tall structure that might require emergency evacuation. It is also used to transfer materials and equipment.

  14. Bacteriophage ΦM1 of Pectobacterium evolves to escape two bifunctional Type III toxin-antitoxin and abortive infection systems through mutations in a single viral gene.

    PubMed

    Blower, Tim R; Chai, Ray; Przybilski, Rita; Chindhy, Shahzad; Fang, Xinzhe; Kidman, Samuel E; Tan, Hui; Luisi, Ben F; Fineran, Peter C; Salmond, George P C

    2017-02-03

    Some bacteria, when infected by their viral parasites (bacteriophages), undergo a suicidal response that also terminates productive viral replication (abortive infection; Abi). This response can be viewed as an altruistic act protecting the uninfected bacterial clonal population. Abortive infection can occur through the action of Type III protein-RNA toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems, such as ToxINPa from the phytopathogen, Pectobacterium atrosepticum Rare spontaneous mutants evolved in the generalized transducing phage, ΦM1, which escaped ToxINPa-mediated abortive infection in P. atrosepticum ΦM1 is a member of the Podoviridae and member of the "KMV-like viruses", a subset of the T7 supergroup. Genomic sequencing of ΦM1 escape mutants revealed single-base changes which clustered in a single open reading frame. The "escape" gene product, M1-23, was highly toxic to the host bacterium when over-expressed, but mutations in M1-23 that enabled an escape phenotype caused M1-23 to be less toxic. M1-23 is encoded within the DNA metabolism modular section of the phage genome, and when it was over-expressed, it co-purified with the host nucleotide excision repair protein, UvrA. While the M1-23 protein interacted with UvrA in co-immunoprecipitation assays, a UvrA mutant strain still aborted ΦM1, suggesting that the interaction is not critical for the Type III TA Abi activity. Additionally, ΦM1 escaped a heterologous Type III TA system (TenpINPl) from Photorhabdus luminescens (reconstituted in P. atrosepticum) through mutations in the same protein, M1-23. The mechanistic action of M1-23 is currently unknown but further analysis of this protein could provide insights into the mode of activation of both systems.

  15. Atmospheric escape, redox evolution, and planetary habitability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catling, D. C.; Zahnle, K. J.

    2011-12-01

    Through the greenhouse effect, the presence and composition of an atmosphere is critical for defining a (conventional) circumstellar habitable zone in terms of planetary surface temperatures suitable for liquid water. Lack of knowledge of planetary atmospheres is likely to frustrate attempts to say with any certainty whether detected terrestrial-sized exoplanets may or may not be habitable. Perhaps an underappreciated role in such considerations is the evolutionary effect of atmospheric escape for determining atmospheric composition or whether an atmosphere exists in the first place. Whether atmospheres exist at all on planets is demonstrably connected to the effect of integrated atmospheric escape. When we observe our own Solar System and transiting exoplanets, the existence of an atmosphere is clearly delineated by a relative vulnerability to thermal escape and impact erosion. The prevalence of thermal escape as a key evolutionary determinant for the presence of planetary atmosphere is shown by a relationship between the relative solar (or stellar) heating and the escape velocity. Those bodies with too much stellar heating and too smaller escape velocity end up devoid of atmospheres. Impact erosion is evident in the relationship between impact velocity and escape velocity. Escape due to impacts is particularly important for understanding the large differences in the atmospheres of giant planet moons, such as Ganymede versus Titan. It is also significant for Mars-sized planets. The oxidation state of atmospheres is important for some theories of the origin of life (where an early reducing atmosphere is helpful for organic synthesis) and the evolution of advanced life (where free molecular oxygen is the best source of high energy metabolism). Surfaces on some relatively small planets and moons are observed to have evolved to an oxidized state, which theory and observation can explain through atmospheric escape. There are several examples in the Solar System where a

  16. Escape from Vela X

    SciTech Connect

    Hinton, J.; Funk, S.; Parsons, R.D.; Ohm, S.; /Leicester U. /Leeds U.

    2012-02-15

    While the Vela pulsar and its associated nebula are often considered as the archetype of a system powered by a {approx} 10{sup 4} year old isolated neutron star, many features of the spectral energy distribution of this pulsar wind nebula are both puzzling and unusual. Here we develop a model that for the first time relates the main structures in the system, the extended radio nebula (ERN) and the X-ray cocoon through continuous injection of particles with a fixed spectral shape. We argue that diffusive escape of particles from the ERN can explain the steep Fermi-LAT spectrum. In this scenario Vela X should produce a distinct feature in the locally-measured cosmic ray electron spectrum at very high energies. This prediction can be tested in the future using the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA). If particles are indeed released early in the evolution of PWNe and can avoid severe adiabatic losses, PWN provide a natural explanation for the rising positron fraction in the local CR spectrum.

  17. ESCAPE FROM VELA X

    SciTech Connect

    Hinton, J. A.; Ohm, S.; Funk, S.; Parsons, R. D.

    2011-12-10

    While the Vela pulsar and its associated nebula are often considered as the archetype of a system powered by a {approx}10{sup 4} year old isolated neutron star, many features of the spectral energy distribution of this pulsar wind nebula (PWN) are both puzzling and unusual. Here we develop a model that for the first time relates the main structures in the system, the extended radio nebula (ERN) and the X-ray cocoon through continuous injection of particles with a fixed spectral shape. We argue that diffusive escape of particles from the ERN can explain the steep Fermi-LAT spectrum. In this scenario Vela X should produce a distinct feature in the locally measured cosmic ray (CR) electron spectrum at very high energies. This prediction can be tested in the future using the Cherenkov Telescope Array. If particles are indeed released early in the evolution of PWNe and can avoid severe adiabatic losses, PWN provides a natural explanation for the rising positron fraction in the local CR spectrum.

  18. THERMALLY DRIVEN ATMOSPHERIC ESCAPE

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Robert E.

    2010-06-20

    Accurately determining the escape rate from a planet's atmosphere is critical for determining its evolution. A large amount of Cassini data is now available for Titan's upper atmosphere and a wealth of data is expected within the next decade on escape from Pluto, Mars, and extra-solar planets. Escape can be driven by upward thermal conduction of energy deposited well below the exobase, as well as by nonthermal processes produced by energy deposited in the exobase region. Recent applications of a model for escape driven by upward thermal conduction, called the slow hydrodynamic escape model, have resulted in surprisingly large loss rates for the atmosphere of Titan, Saturn's largest moon. Based on a molecular kinetic simulation of the exobase region, these rates appear to be orders of magnitude too large. Therefore, the slow hydrodynamic model is evaluated here. It is shown that such a model cannot give a reliable description of the atmospheric temperature profile unless it is coupled to a molecular kinetic description of the exobase region. Therefore, the present escape rates for Titan and Pluto must be re-evaluated using the atmospheric model described here.

  19. Light weight escape capsule for fighter aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robert, James A.

    1988-01-01

    Emergency crew escape capabilities have been less than adequate for fighter aircraft since before WW II. From the over-the-side bailout of those days through the current ejection seat with a rocket catapult, escaping from a disabled aircraft has been risky at best. Current efforts are underway toward developing a high-tech, smart ejection seat that will give fighter pilots more room to live in the sky, but an escape capsule is needed to meet current and future fighter envelopes. Escape capsules have a bad reputation due to past examples of high weight, poor performance and great complexity. However, the advantages available demand that a capsule be developed. This capsule concept will minimize the inherent disavantages and incorporate the benefits while integrating all aspects of crew station design. The resulting design is appropriate for a crew station of the year 2010 and includes improved combat acceleration protection, chemical or biological combat capability, improved aircraft to escape system interaction, and the highest level of escape performance achievable. The capsule is compact, which can allow a reduced aircraft size and weighs only 1200 lb. The escape system weight penalty is only 120 lb higher than that for the next ejection seat and the capsule has a corresponding increase in performance.

  20. Exposure to Melan-A/MART-126-35 tumor epitope specific CD8(+)T cells reveals immune escape by affecting the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS).

    PubMed

    Ebstein, Frédéric; Keller, Martin; Paschen, Annette; Walden, Peter; Seeger, Michael; Bürger, Elke; Krüger, Elke; Schadendorf, Dirk; Kloetzel, Peter-M; Seifert, Ulrike

    2016-05-04

    Efficient processing of target antigens by the ubiquitin-proteasome-system (UPS) is essential for treatment of cancers by T cell therapies. However, immune escape due to altered expression of IFN-γ-inducible components of the antigen presentation machinery and consequent inefficient processing of HLA-dependent tumor epitopes can be one important reason for failure of such therapies. Here, we show that short-term co-culture of Melan-A/MART-1 tumor antigen-expressing melanoma cells with Melan-A/MART-126-35-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) led to resistance against CTL-induced lysis because of impaired Melan-A/MART-126-35 epitope processing. Interestingly, deregulation of p97/VCP expression, which is an IFN-γ-independent component of the UPS and part of the ER-dependent protein degradation pathway (ERAD), was found to be essentially involved in the observed immune escape. In support, our data demonstrate that re-expression of p97/VCP in Melan-A/MART-126-35 CTL-resistant melanoma cells completely restored immune recognition by Melan-A/MART-126-35 CTL. In conclusion, our experiments show that impaired expression of IFN-γ-independent components of the UPS can exert rapid immune evasion of tumor cells and suggest that tumor antigens processed by distinct UPS degradation pathways should be simultaneously targeted in T cell therapies to restrict the likelihood of immune evasion due to impaired antigen processing.

  1. Exposure to Melan-A/MART-126-35 tumor epitope specific CD8+T cells reveals immune escape by affecting the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS)

    PubMed Central

    Ebstein, Frédéric; Keller, Martin; Paschen, Annette; Walden, Peter; Seeger, Michael; Bürger, Elke; Krüger, Elke; Schadendorf, Dirk; Kloetzel, Peter-M.; Seifert, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    Efficient processing of target antigens by the ubiquitin-proteasome-system (UPS) is essential for treatment of cancers by T cell therapies. However, immune escape due to altered expression of IFN-γ-inducible components of the antigen presentation machinery and consequent inefficient processing of HLA-dependent tumor epitopes can be one important reason for failure of such therapies. Here, we show that short-term co-culture of Melan-A/MART-1 tumor antigen-expressing melanoma cells with Melan-A/MART-126-35-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) led to resistance against CTL-induced lysis because of impaired Melan-A/MART-126-35 epitope processing. Interestingly, deregulation of p97/VCP expression, which is an IFN-γ-independent component of the UPS and part of the ER-dependent protein degradation pathway (ERAD), was found to be essentially involved in the observed immune escape. In support, our data demonstrate that re-expression of p97/VCP in Melan-A/MART-126-35 CTL-resistant melanoma cells completely restored immune recognition by Melan-A/MART-126-35 CTL. In conclusion, our experiments show that impaired expression of IFN-γ-independent components of the UPS can exert rapid immune evasion of tumor cells and suggest that tumor antigens processed by distinct UPS degradation pathways should be simultaneously targeted in T cell therapies to restrict the likelihood of immune evasion due to impaired antigen processing. PMID:27143649

  2. Polymer escape from a confining potential

    SciTech Connect

    Mökkönen, Harri; Ikonen, Timo; Jónsson, Hannes; Ala-Nissila, Tapio

    2014-02-07

    The rate of escape of polymers from a two-dimensionally confining potential well has been evaluated using self-avoiding as well as ideal chain representations of varying length, up to 80 beads. Long timescale Langevin trajectories were calculated using the path integral hyperdynamics method to evaluate the escape rate. A minimum is found in the rate for self-avoiding polymers of intermediate length while the escape rate decreases monotonically with polymer length for ideal polymers. The increase in the rate for long, self-avoiding polymers is ascribed to crowding in the potential well which reduces the free energy escape barrier. An effective potential curve obtained using the centroid as an independent variable was evaluated by thermodynamic averaging and Kramers rate theory then applied to estimate the escape rate. While the qualitative features are well reproduced by this approach, it significantly overestimates the rate, especially for the longer polymers. The reason for this is illustrated by constructing a two-dimensional effective energy surface using the radius of gyration as well as the centroid as controlled variables. This shows that the description of a transition state dividing surface using only the centroid fails to confine the system to the region corresponding to the free energy barrier and this problem becomes more pronounced the longer the polymer is. A proper definition of a transition state for polymer escape needs to take into account the shape as well as the location of the polymer.

  3. Submarine tower escape decompression sickness risk estimation.

    PubMed

    Loveman, G A M; Seddon, E M; Thacker, J C; Stansfield, M R; Jurd, K M

    2014-01-01

    Actions to enhance survival in a distressed submarine (DISSUB) scenario may be guided in part by knowledge of the likely risk of decompression sickness (DCS) should the crew attempt tower escape. A mathematical model for DCS risk estimation has been calibrated against DCS outcome data from 3,738 exposures of either men or goats to raised pressure. Body mass was used to scale DCS risk. The calibration data included more than 1,000 actual or simulated submarine escape exposures and no exposures with substantial staged decompression. Cases of pulmonary barotrauma were removed from the calibration data. The calibrated model was used to estimate the likelihood of DCS occurrence following submarine escape from the United Kingdom Royal Navy tower escape system. Where internal DISSUB pressure remains at - 0.1 MPa, escape from DISSUB depths < 200 meters is estimated to have DCS risk < 6%. Saturation at raised DISSUB pressure markedly increases risk, with > 60% DCS risk predicted for a 200-meter escape from saturation at 0.21 MPa. Using the calibrated model to predict DCS for direct ascent from saturation gives similar risk estimates to other published models.

  4. PROPERTIES OF QSO METAL-LINE ABSORPTION SYSTEMS AT HIGH REDSHIFTS: NATURE AND EVOLUTION OF THE ABSORBERS AND NEW EVIDENCE ON ESCAPE OF IONIZING RADIATION FROM GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Boksenberg, Alec; Sargent, Wallace L. W.

    2015-05-15

    Using Voigt-profile-fitting procedures on Keck High Resolution Spectrograph spectra of nine QSOs, we identify 1099 C IV absorber components clumped in 201 systems outside the Lyman forest over 1.6 ≲ z ≲ 4.4. With associated Si IV, C II, Si II  and N V where available, we investigate the bulk statistical and ionization properties of the components and systems and find no significant change in redshift for C IV and Si IV while C II, Si II  and N V change substantially. The C IV components exhibit strong clustering, but no clustering is detected for systems on scales from 150 km s{sup –1} out to 50,000 km s{sup –1}. We conclude that the clustering is due entirely to the peculiar velocities of gas present in the circumgalactic media of galaxies. Using specific combinations of ionic ratios, we compare our observations with model ionization predictions for absorbers exposed to the metagalactic ionizing radiation background augmented by proximity radiation from their associated galaxies and find that the generally accepted means of radiative escape by transparent channels from the internal star-forming sites is spectrally not viable for our stronger absorbers. We develop an active scenario based on runaway stars with resulting changes in the efflux of radiation that naturally enable the needed spectral convergence, and in turn provide empirical indicators of morphological evolution in the associated galaxies. Together with a coexisting population of relatively compact galaxies indicated by the weaker absorbers in our sample, the collective escape of radiation is sufficient to maintain the intergalactic medium ionized over the full range 1.9 < z ≲ 4.4.

  5. Properties of QSO Metal-line Absorption Systems at High Redshifts: Nature and Evolution of the Absorbers and New Evidence on Escape of Ionizing Radiation from Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boksenberg, Alec; Sargent, Wallace L. W.

    2015-05-01

    Using Voigt-profile-fitting procedures on Keck High Resolution Spectrograph spectra of nine QSOs, we identify 1099 C IV absorber components clumped in 201 systems outside the Lyman forest over 1.6 <~ z <~ 4.4. With associated Si IV, C II, Si II and N V where available, we investigate the bulk statistical and ionization properties of the components and systems and find no significant change in redshift for C IV and Si IV while C II, Si II and N V change substantially. The C IV components exhibit strong clustering, but no clustering is detected for systems on scales from 150 km s-1 out to 50,000 km s-1. We conclude that the clustering is due entirely to the peculiar velocities of gas present in the circumgalactic media of galaxies. Using specific combinations of ionic ratios, we compare our observations with model ionization predictions for absorbers exposed to the metagalactic ionizing radiation background augmented by proximity radiation from their associated galaxies and find that the generally accepted means of radiative escape by transparent channels from the internal star-forming sites is spectrally not viable for our stronger absorbers. We develop an active scenario based on runaway stars with resulting changes in the efflux of radiation that naturally enable the needed spectral convergence, and in turn provide empirical indicators of morphological evolution in the associated galaxies. Together with a coexisting population of relatively compact galaxies indicated by the weaker absorbers in our sample, the collective escape of radiation is sufficient to maintain the intergalactic medium ionized over the full range 1.9 < z <~ 4.4. The data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck

  6. On ion escape from Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarvinen, R.

    2011-04-01

    This doctoral thesis is about the solar wind influence on the atmosphere of the planet Venus. A numerical plasma simulation model was developed for the interaction between Venus and the solar wind to study the erosion of charged particles from the Venus upper atmosphere. The developed model is a hybrid simulation where ions are treated as particles and electrons are modelled as a fluid. The simulation was used to study the solar wind induced ion escape from Venus as observed by the European Space Agency's Venus Express and NASA's Pioneer Venus Orbiter spacecraft. Especially, observations made by the ASPERA-4 particle instrument onboard Venus Express were studied. The thesis consists of an introductory part and four peer-reviewed articles published in scientific journals. In the introduction Venus is presented as one of the terrestrial planets in the Solar System and the main findings of the work are discussed within the wider context of planetary physics.Venus is the closest neighbouring planet to the Earth and the most earthlike planet in its size and mass orbiting the Sun. Whereas the atmosphere of the Earth consists mainly of nitrogen and oxygen, Venus has a hot carbon dioxide atmosphere, which is dominated by the greenhouse effect. Venus has all of its water in the atmosphere, which is only a fraction of the Earth's total water supply. Since planets developed presumably in similar conditions in the young Solar System, why Venus and Earth became so different in many respects?One important feature of Venus is that the planet does not have an intrinsic magnetic field. This makes it possible for the solar wind, a continuous stream of charged particles from the Sun, to flow close to Venus and to pick up ions from the planet's upper atmosphere. The strong intrinsic magnetic field of the Earth dominates the terrestrial magnetosphere and deflects the solar wind flow far away from the atmosphere. The region around Venus where the planet's atmosphere interacts with the

  7. On ion escape from Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarvinen, Riku

    2011-04-01

    This doctoral thesis is about the solar wind influence on the atmosphere of the planet Venus. A numerical plasma simulation model was developed for the interaction between Venus and the solar wind to study the erosion of charged particles from the Venus upper atmosphere. The developed model is a hybrid simulation where ions are treated as particles and electrons are modelled as a fluid. The simulation was used to study the solar wind induced ion escape from Venus as observed by the European Space Agency's Venus Express and NASA's Pioneer Venus Orbiter spacecraft. Especially, observations made by the ASPERA-4 particle instrument onboard Venus Express were studied. The thesis consists of an introductory part and four peer-reviewed articles published in scientific journals. In the introduction Venus is presented as one of the terrestrial planets in the Solar System and the main findings of the work are discussed within the wider context of planetary physics. Venus is the closest neighbouring planet to the Earth and the most earthlike planet in its size and mass orbiting the Sun. Whereas the atmosphere of the Earth consists mainly of nitrogen and oxygen, Venus has a hot carbon dioxide atmosphere, which is dominated by the greenhouse effect. Venus has all of its water in the atmosphere, which is only a fraction of the Earth's total water supply. Since planets developed presumably in similar conditions in the young Solar System, why Venus and Earth became so different in many respects? One important feature of Venus is that the planet does not have an intrinsic magnetic field. This makes it possible for the solar wind, a continuous stream of charged particles from the Sun, to flow close to Venus and to pick up ions from the planet's upper atmosphere. The strong intrinsic magnetic field of the Earth dominates the terrestrial magnetosphere and deflects the solar wind flow far away from the atmosphere. The region around Venus where the planet's atmosphere interacts with the

  8. Cerebrospinal Fluid HIV Escape from Antiretroviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ferretti, Francesca; Gisslen, Magnus; Cinque, Paola; Price, Richard W

    2015-06-01

    CNS infection is a nearly constant facet of systemic CNS infection and is generally well controlled by suppressive systemic antiretroviral therapy (ART). However, there are instances when HIV can be detected in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) despite suppression of plasma viruses below the clinical limits of measurement. We review three types of CSF viral escape: asymptomatic, neuro-symptomatic, and secondary. The first, asymptomatic CSF escape, is seemingly benign and characterized by lack of discernable neurological deterioration or subsequent CNS disease progression. Neuro-symptomatic CSF escape is an uncommon, but important, entity characterized by new or progressive CNS disease that is critical to recognize clinically because of its management implications. Finally, secondary CSF escape, which may be even more uncommon, is defined by an increase of CSF HIV replication in association with a concomitant non-HIV infection, as a consequence of the local inflammatory response. Understanding these CSF escape settings not only is important for clinical diagnosis and management but also may provide insight into the CNS HIV reservoir.

  9. MAVEN measurements of photochemical escape of oxygen from the Martian atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lillis, R. J.; Deighan, J.; Fox, J. L.; Bougher, S. W.; Cravens, T. E.; Lee, Y.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Benna, M.; Elrod, M. K.; Andersson, L.; McFadden, J.

    2015-10-01

    One of the primary goals of the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution Mission (MAVEN) mission is to characterize rates of atmospheric escape at the present epoch and relate those escape rates to solar drivers [1]. One of the major escape processes is known as photochemical escape, which is broadly defined as a process by which a) an exothermic reaction in the atmosphere/ionosphere results in an upward-traveling neutral particle whose velocity exceeds planetary escape velocity and b) the particle is not prevented from escaping through any subsequent collisions[2].At Mars, photochemical escape of oxygen is expected to be a significant channel for atmospheric escape, particularly in the early solar system when extreme ultraviolet (EUV) fluxes were much higher[3]. Thus characterizing this escape process is central to understanding the role escape to space has played in Mars' climate evolution.

  10. Reconstructing the Alcatraz escape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baart, F.; Hoes, O.; Hut, R.; Donchyts, G.; van Leeuwen, E.

    2014-12-01

    In the night of June 12, 1962 three inmates used a raft made of raincoatsto escaped the ultimate maximum security prison island Alcatraz in SanFrancisco, United States. History is unclear about what happened tothe escapees. At what time did they step into the water, did theysurvive, if so, where did they reach land? The fate of the escapees has been the subject of much debate: did theymake landfall on Angel Island, or did the current sweep them out ofthe bay and into the cold pacific ocean? In this presentation, we try to shed light on this historic case using avisualization of a high-resolution hydrodynamic simulation of the San Francisco Bay, combined with historical tidal records. By reconstructing the hydrodynamic conditions and using a particle based simulation of the escapees we show possible scenarios. The interactive model is visualized using both a 3D photorealistic and web based visualization. The "Escape from Alcatraz" scenario demonstrates the capabilities of the 3Di platform. This platform is normally used for overland flooding (1D/2D). The model engine uses a quad tree structure, resulting in an order of magnitude speedup. The subgrid approach takes detailed bathymetry information into account. The inter-model variability is tested by comparing the results with the DFlow Flexible Mesh (DFlowFM) San Francisco Bay model. Interactivity is implemented by converting the models from static programs to interactive libraries, adhering to the Basic ModelInterface (BMI). Interactive models are more suitable for answeringexploratory research questions such as this reconstruction effort. Although these hydrodynamic simulations only provide circumstantialevidence for solving the mystery of what happened during the foggy darknight of June 12, 1962, it can be used as a guidance and provides aninteresting testcase to apply interactive modelling.

  11. Electronic Escape Trails for Firefighters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgensen, Charles; Schipper, John; Betts, Bradley

    2008-01-01

    A proposed wireless-communication and data-processing system would exploit recent advances in radio-frequency identification devices (RFIDs) and software to establish information lifelines between firefighters in a burning building and a fire chief at a control station near but outside the building. The system would enable identification of trails that firefighters and others could follow to escape from the building, including identification of new trails should previously established trails become blocked. The system would include a transceiver unit and a computer at the control station, portable transceiver units carried by the firefighters in the building, and RFID tags that the firefighters would place at multiple locations as they move into and through the building (see figure). Each RFID tag, having a size of the order of a few centimeters, would include at least standard RFID circuitry and possibly sensors for measuring such other relevant environmental parameters as temperature, levels of light and sound, concentration of oxygen, concentrations of hazardous chemicals in smoke, and/or levels of nuclear radiation. The RFID tags would be activated and interrogated by the firefighters and control-station transceivers. Preferably, RFID tags would be configured to communicate with each other and with the firefighters units and the control station in an ordered sequence, with built-in redundancy. In a typical scenario, as firefighters moved through a building, they would scatter many RFID tags into smoke-obscured areas by use of a compressed-air gun. Alternatively or in addition, they would mark escape trails by dropping RFID tags at such points of interest as mantraps, hot spots, and trail waypoints. The RFID tags could be of different types, operating at different frequencies to identify their functions, and possibly responding by emitting audible beeps when activated by signals transmitted by transceiver units carried by nearby firefighters.

  12. Escape from viscosity: the kinematics and hydrodynamics of copepod foraging and escape swimming.

    PubMed

    van Duren, Luca A; Videler, John J

    2003-01-01

    Feeding and escape swimming in adult females of the calanoid copepod Temora longicornis Müller were investigated and compared. Swimming velocities were calculated using a 3-D filming setup. Foraging velocities ranged between 2 and 6 mm s(-1), while maximum velocities of up to 80 mm s(-1) were reached during escape responses. Foraging took place at Reynolds numbers between 2 and 6, indicating that viscous forces are considerable during this swimming mode. Inertial forces are much more important during escape responses, when Reynolds numbers of more than 100 are reached. High-speed film recordings at 500 frames s(-1) of the motion pattern of the feeding appendages and the escape movement of the swimming legs revealed that the two swimming modes are essentially very different. While foraging, the first three mouth appendages (antennae, mandibular palps and maxillules) create a backwards motion of water with a metachronal beating pattern. During escape movements the mouth appendages stop moving and the swimming legs beat in a very fast metachronal rhythm, accelerating a jet of water backwards. The large antennules are folded backwards, resulting in a streamlined body shape. Particle image velocimetry analysis of the flow around foraging and escaping copepods revealed that during foraging an asymmetrical vortex system is created on the ventral side of the animal. The feeding motion is steady over a long period of time. The rate of energy dissipation due to viscous friction relates directly to the energetic cost of the feeding current. During escape responses a vortex ring appears behind the animal, which dissipates over time. Several seconds after cessation of swimming leg movements, energy dissipation can still be measured. During escape responses the rate of energy dissipation due to viscous friction increases by up to two orders of magnitude compared to the rate when foraging.

  13. How to escape from Haller's rule: Olfactory system complexity in small and large Trichogramma evanescens parasitic wasps.

    PubMed

    van der Woude, Emma; Smid, Hans M

    2016-06-15

    While Haller's rule states that small animals have relatively larger brains, minute Trichogramma evanescens Westwood (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae) parasitic wasps scale brain size linearly with body size. This linear brain scaling allows them to decrease brain size beyond the predictions of Haller's rule, and is facilitated by phenotypic plasticity in brain size. In the present study we addressed whether this plasticity resulted in adaptations to the complexity of the morphology of the olfactory system of small and large T. evanescens. We used confocal laser scanning microscopy to compare size and number of glomeruli in the antennal lobe in the brain, and scanning electron microscopy to compare length and number of olfactory sensilla on the antennae. The results show a similar level of complexity of the olfactory system morphology of small and large wasps. Wasps with a similar genotype but very different brain and body size have similarly sized olfactory sensilla and most of them occur in equal numbers on the antennae. Small and large wasps also have a similar number of glomeruli in the antennal lobe. Glomeruli in small brains are, however, smaller in both absolute and relative volume. These similarities between small and large wasps may indicate that plasticity in brain size does not require plasticity in the gross morphology of the olfactory system. It may be vital for wasps of all sizes to have a large number of olfactory receptor types, to maintain olfactory precision in their search for suitable hosts, and consequently maintain their reproductive success and Darwinian fitness.

  14. The role of immune system exhaustion on cancer cell escape and anti-tumor immune induction after irradiation.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Fernando; Domingues, Cátia; Rodrigues-Santos, Paulo; Abrantes, Ana Margarida; Gonçalves, Ana Cristina; Estrela, Jéssica; Encarnação, João; Pires, Ana Salomé; Laranjo, Mafalda; Alves, Vera; Teixo, Ricardo; Sarmento, Ana Bela; Botelho, Maria Filomena; Rosa, Manuel Santos

    2016-04-01

    Immune surveillance seems to represent an effective tumor suppressor mechanism. However, some cancer cells survive and become variants, being poorly immunogenic and able to enter a steady-state phase. These cells become functionally dormant or remain hidden clinically throughout. Neoplastic cells seem to be able to instruct immune cells to undergo changes promoting malignancy. Radiotherapy may act as a trigger of the immune response. After radiotherapy a sequence of reactions occurs, starting in the damage of oncogenic cells by multiple mechanisms, leading to the immune system positive feedback against the tumor. The link between radiotherapy and the immune system is evident. T cells, macrophages, Natural Killer cells and other immune cells seem to have a key role in controlling the tumor. T cells may be dysfunctional and remain in a state of T cell exhaustion, nonetheless, they often retain a high potential for successful defense against cancer, being able to be mobilized to become highly functional. The lack of clinical trials on a large scale makes data a little robust, in spite of promising information, there are still many variables in the studies relating to radiation and immune system. The clarification of the mechanisms underlying immune response to radiation exposure may contribute to treatment improvement, gain of life quality and span of patients.

  15. Managing Pacific salmon escapements: The gaps between theory and reality

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knudsen, E. Eric; Knudsen, E. Eric; Steward, Cleveland R.; MacDonald, Donald D.; Williams, Jack E.; Reiser, Dudley W.

    1999-01-01

    % of populations. Escapement estimation type (quality of the data resulting from survey methods) was rated as excellent for <1%, good for 30%, fair for 3%, poor for 22%, and nonexistent for 45%. Numerous recommendations for improvements in escapement mangement are made in this chapter. In general, improvements are needed on theoretical escapement management techniques, escapement goal setting methods, and escapement and run size data quality. There is also a need to change managers' and harvesters' expectations to coincide with the natural variation and uncertainty in the abundance of salmon populations. All the recommendations are aimed at optimizing the number of spawners-healthy escapements ensure salmon sustainability by providing eggs for future production, nutrients to the system, and genetic diversity.

  16. Bursty Escape on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubinin, E.; Fraenz, M.; Woch, J.; Lundin, R.; Wei, J.; Barabash, S.

    2011-10-01

    Bursty or filamentary structuring of plasma flows is a typical feature of the Martian space. This phenomenon is revealed during time periods when MEX-ASPERA- 3 is operating in the high temporal resolution mode. Frequency of oscillations is about 10-50 mHz. Amplitude of flux variations reaches a factor of 10-30. Bursty origin of fluxes of oxygen ions can be the important process for solar wind induced escape on Mars. There are several mechanisms which can be responsible for the observed periodic bursts. Large-amplitude coherent pressure pulses generated by ion beams upstream the bow shock impact the magnetosphere and produce periodic pulses in forces pushing planetary plasma. Pressure pulses can arise downstream the bow shock - in the magnetosheath, which becomes to be decomposed into a sequence of periodic compressive waves. A wavy dynamics can also appear due to a multi-ion origin of the interacting plasmas since such a medium behaves as a specific rotator. At last, not at least, K-H or other types of large-scale MHD instabilities probably excited in the interface region can generate surface waves which will also modulate the tension forces. We present the different observations which can be interpreted in a favor of all the above mechanisms implying a complex and diverse plasma wave environment at Mars.

  17. Inconsistent genetic structure among members of a multitrophic system: did bruchid parasitoids (Horismenus spp.) escape the effects of bean domestication?

    PubMed

    Laurin-Lemay, S; Angers, B; Benrey, B; Brodeur, J

    2013-04-01

    Anthropogenic range expansion and cultural practices have modified the distribution, abundance and genetic diversity of domesticated organisms, thereby altering multitrophic assemblages through space and time. The putative Mesoamerican domestication centre of the common bean, Phaseolus vulgaris L., in Mexico allows investigating the effects of plant domestication on the genetic structure of members of a multitrophic system. The aim of this study was to compare the evolutionary history of Horismenus parasitoids (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) to those of their bruchid beetle hosts (Coleoptera: Bruchidae) and their domesticated host plant (P. vulgaris), in the context of traditional agriculture in Mexico. We analyzed the population genetic structure of four Horismenus species in Mexico using mitochondrial COI haplotype data. The two most abundant parasitoid species were Horismenus depressus and Horismenus missouriensis. Horismenus missouriensis were infected by Wolbachia endosymbionts and had little to no population differentiation (F(ST) = 0.06). We suspect the mitochondrial history of H. missouriensis to be blurred by Wolbachia, because differentiation among infected vs. non-infected individuals exists (F(ST) = 0.11). Populations of H. depressus were found to be highly differentiated (F(ST) = 0.34), but the genetic structuring could not be explained by tested spatial components. We then compared the genetic structure observed in this parasitoid species to previously published studies on bruchid beetles and their host plants. Despite extensive human-mediated migration and likely population homogenization of its two Acanthoscelides bruchid beetle hosts, H. depressus populations are structured like its host plant, by a recent dispersal from a diverse ancestral gene pool. Distinct evolutionary dynamics may explain inconsistent patterns among trophic levels. Parasitoids likely migrate from wild bean populations and are poorly adapted to bean storage conditions similar to

  18. Escape behavior and escape circuit activation in juvenile crayfish during prey-predator interactions.

    PubMed

    Herberholz, Jens; Sen, Marjorie M; Edwards, Donald H

    2004-05-01

    The neural systems that control escape behavior have been studied intensively in several animals, including mollusks, fish and crayfish. Surprisingly little is known, however, about the activation and the utilization of escape circuits during prey-predator interactions. To complement the physiological and anatomical studies with a necessary behavioral equivalent, we investigated encounters between juvenile crayfish and large dragonfly nymphs in freely behaving animals using a combination of high-speed video-recordings and measurements of electric field potentials. During attacks, dragonfly nymphs rapidly extended their labium, equipped with short, sharp palps, to capture small crayfish. Crayfish responded to the tactile stimulus by activating neural escape circuits to generate tail-flips directed away from the predator. Tail-flips were the sole defense mechanism in response to an attack and every single strike was answered by tail-flip escape behavior. Crayfish used all three known types of escape tail-flips during the interactions with the dragonfly nymphs. Tail-flips generated by activity in the giant neurons were predominantly observed to trigger the initial escape responses to an attack, but non-giant mediated tail-flips were often generated to attempt escape after capture. Attacks to the front of the crayfish triggered tail-flips mediated either by the medial giant neuron or by non-giant circuitry, whereas attacks to the rear always elicited tail-flips mediated by the lateral giant neuron. Overall, tail flipping was found to be a successful behavior in preventing predation, and only a small percentage of crayfish were killed and consumed.

  19. Survey of space escape/rescue/survivability capabilities.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleisig, R.; Bolger, P. H.; Heath, G. W.

    1971-01-01

    Discussion of preventive or remedial systems to achieve safer space flight operations. Escape, rescue, and survival systems are defined by categories: on board, prepositioned aid, and earth-launched concepts. The survey considers separable escape or survival capsules; standby escape or rescue systems; and earth-launched manned and unmanned rescue systems. Reports covering such systems are listed, and the contents are classified as to scope of investigation, space mission, and design approach. Mission classes considered are earth orbit, lunar, and interplanetary. Results of the space escape, rescue, and survivability investigations are summarized in terms of system features and performance, including apparent voids or limitations in rescue capability. Recovery requirements and resources for space rescue are discussed.

  20. How many ions have escaped the Martian atmosphere?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brain, David; McFadden, James; Halekas, Jasper; Connerney, J. E. P.; Eparvier, Frank; Mitchell, David; Bougher, Stephen W.; Bowers, Charlie; Curry, Shannon; Dong, Chuanfei; Dong, Yaxue; Egan, Hilary; Fang, Xiaohua; Harada, Yuki; Jakosky, Bruce; Lillis, Robert; Luhmann, Janet; Ma, Yingjuan; Modolo, Ronan; Weber, Tristan

    2016-10-01

    The Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) mission has been making science measurements of the Martian upper atmosphere and its escape to space since November 2014. A key part of this effort is the measurement of the escape rates of charged particles (ions) at present and over solar system history. The lack of a global dynamo magnetic field at Mars leaves its upper atmosphere more directly exposed to the impinging solar wind than magnetized planets such as Earth. For this reason it is thought that ion escape at Mars may have played a significant role in long term climate change. MAVEN measures escaping planetary ions directly, with high energy, mass, and time resolution.With nearly two years of observations in hand, we will report the average ion escape rate and the spatial distribution of escaping ions as measured by MAVEN and place them in context with previous measurements of ion loss by other spacecraft (e.g. Phobos 2 and Mars Express). We will then report on the measured variability in ion escape rates with different drivers (e.g. solar EUV, solar wind pressure, etc.). Finally, we will use these results to provide an initial estimate of the total ion escape from Mars over billions of years.

  1. Cross Sections for Planetary Escape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tully, C.

    2001-05-01

    Energetic charged-particle bombardment, dissociative recombination and photodissociation processes produce energetic recoil atoms which heat the thermosphere and can lead to escape from a planet affecting the evolution of the atmosphere. In describing these processes by Monte Carlo methods, many of the critical cross sections are not available in the energy range of interest, a few eV to 1 keV. Here we present our recent results for elastic collision and collisional dissociation cross sections relevant to Titan, Triton, Europa and the terrestrial planets [1,2]. Elastic and diffusion cross sections were calculated using both quantum mechanical techniques and the semiclassical JWKB approximation for the collision of ground state oxygen atoms in the energy range 1-10eV [2]. This involved calculation of phase shifts for each of the 18 molecular energy states of O2 which separate to two ground state O atoms. For an O thermosphere the total elastic cross section is close to that typically assumed but the escape depths are shown to be larger than those typically used. Dissociation cross sections of N + N2 were calculated using a semiclassical method, in the energy range 0-30eV. This required treating the vibrational motion quantum mechanically while the rotational and the relative translational motion were treated classically. The evolution of the system was calculated by simultaneous propagation of the classical as well as the quantal degrees of freedom. The solution to the classical part was carried out by solving Hamilton equations of motion using an effective London-Eyring-Polanyi-Sato potential energy surface, calculated by Laganá et al [3]. Propagation of the quantal wavefunction was carried out by solving the time dependent Schrödinger equation using the split operator technique with the help of the fast fourier transform which was used to calculate the second derivatives arising from the kinetic energy operator. This work was supported by NASA's Planetary

  2. Dissociated neural effects of cortisol depending on threat escapability.

    PubMed

    Montoya, Estrella R; van Honk, Jack; Bos, Peter A; Terburg, David

    2015-11-01

    Evolution has provided us with a highly flexible neuroendocrine threat system which, depending on threat imminence, switches between active escape and passive freezing. Cortisol, the "stress-hormone", is thought to play an important role in both fear behaviors, but the exact mechanisms are not understood. Using pharmacological functional magnetic resonance imaging we investigated how cortisol modulates the brain's fear systems when humans are under virtual-predator attack. We show dissociated neural effects of cortisol depending on whether escape from threat is possible. During inescapable threat cortisol reduces fear-related midbrain activity, whereas in anticipation of active escape cortisol boosts activity in the frontal salience network (insula and anterior cingulate cortex), which is involved in autonomic control, visceral perception and motivated action. Our findings suggest that cortisol adjusts the human neural threat system from passive fear to active escape, which illuminates the hormone's crucial role in the adaptive flexibility of fear behaviors.

  3. Adult Pacific Lamprey Migration Behavior and Escapement in the Bonneville Reservoir and Lower Columbia River Monitored Using the Juvenile Salmonid Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS), 2011

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    Technical Report 2012-4 IDAHO COOPERATIVE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH UNIT ADULT PACIFIC LAMPREY MIGRATION BEHAVIOR AND ESCAPEMENT IN THE...C.C. Caudill, T.S. Clabough, D.C. Joosten, E.L. Johnson, M.L. Keefer, and G.P. Naughton Department of Fish and Wildlife Sciences Idaho...Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844-1136 for U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Portland District

  4. F111 Crew Escape Module pilot parachute

    SciTech Connect

    Tadios, E.L.

    1991-01-01

    A successfully deployment of a parachute system highly depends on the efficiency of the deployment device and/or method. There are several existing methods and devices that may be considered for a deployment system. For the F111 Crew Escape Module (CEM), the recovery parachute system deployment is initiated by the firing of a catapult that ejects the complete system from the CEM. At first motion of the pack, a drogue gun is fired, which deploys the pilot parachute system. The pilot parachute system then deploys the main parachute system, which consists of a cluster of three 49-ft diameter parachutes. The pilot parachute system which extracts the F111 Crew Escape Module recovery parachute system must provide reasonable bag strip velocities throughout the flight envelope (10 psf to 300 psf). The pilot parachute system must, therefore, have sufficient drag area at the lower dynamic pressures and a reduced drag area at the high end of the flight envelope. The final design that was developed was a dual parachute system which consists of a 5-ft diameter guide surface parachute tethered inside a 10-ft diameter flat circular parachute. The high drag area is sustained at the low dynamic pressures by keeping both parachutes intact. The drag area is reduced at the higher extreme by allowing the 10-ft parachute attachment to fail. The discussions to follow describe in detail how the system was developed. 4 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Lyman-Werner UV escape fractions from primordial haloes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schauer, Anna T. P.; Whalen, Daniel J.; Glover, Simon C. O.; Klessen, Ralf S.

    2015-12-01

    Population III (Pop III) stars can regulate star formation in the primordial Universe in several ways. They can ionize nearby haloes, and even if their ionizing photons are trapped by their own haloes, their Lyman-Werner (LW) photons can still escape and destroy H2 in other haloes, preventing them from cooling and forming stars. LW escape fractions are thus a key parameter in cosmological simulations of early reionization and star formation but have not yet been parametrized for realistic haloes by halo or stellar mass. To do so, we perform radiation hydrodynamical simulations of LW UV escape from 9-120 M⊙ Pop III stars in 105-107 M⊙ haloes with ZEUS-MP. We find that photons in the LW lines (i.e. those responsible for destroying H2 in nearby systems) have escape fractions ranging from 0 to 85 per cent. No LW photons escape the most massive halo in our sample, even from the most massive star. Escape fractions for photons elsewhere in the 11.18-13.6 eV energy range, which can be redshifted into the LW lines at cosmological distances, are generally much higher, being above 60 per cent for all but the least massive stars in the most massive haloes. We find that shielding of H2 by neutral hydrogen, which has been neglected in most studies to date, produces escape fractions that are up to a factor of 3 smaller than those predicted by H2 self-shielding alone.

  6. Xenon Fractionation and Archean Hydrogen Escape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahnle, K. J.

    2015-01-01

    Xenon is the heaviest gas found in significant quantities in natural planetary atmospheres. It would seem the least likely to escape. Yet there is more evidence for xenon escape from Earth than for any element other than helium and perhaps neon. The most straightforward evidence is that most of the radiogenic Xe from the decay of (129)I (half-life 15.7 Myr) and (244)Pu (half-life 81 Myr) that is Earth's birthright is missing. The missing xenon is often attributed to the impact erosion of early atmospheres of Earth and its ancestors. It is obvious that if most of the radiogenic xenon were driven off by impacts, most of the rest of the atmophiles fared the same fate. The other line of evidence is in the nonradiogenic isotopes of xenon and its silent partner, krypton. Atmospheric xenon is strongly mass fractionated (at about 4% per amu) compared to any known solar system source (Figure 1). This is in stark contrast to krypton, which may not be fractionated at all: atmospheric Kr is slightly heavier than solar Kr (at about 0.5% per amu), but it is the same as in carbonaceous chondrites. Nonradiogenic xenon is also under abundant relative to krypton (the so-called "missing xenon" problem). Together these observations imply that xenon has been subject to fractionating escape and krypton not.

  7. 42 CFR 84.51 - Entry and escape, or escape only; classification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... during entry into a hazardous atmosphere, and for escape from a hazardous atmosphere; or (b) Escape only. Respirators designed and approved for use only during escape from a hazardous atmosphere....

  8. 42 CFR 84.51 - Entry and escape, or escape only; classification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... during entry into a hazardous atmosphere, and for escape from a hazardous atmosphere; or (b) Escape only. Respirators designed and approved for use only during escape from a hazardous atmosphere....

  9. 42 CFR 84.51 - Entry and escape, or escape only; classification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... during entry into a hazardous atmosphere, and for escape from a hazardous atmosphere; or (b) Escape only. Respirators designed and approved for use only during escape from a hazardous atmosphere....

  10. 42 CFR 84.51 - Entry and escape, or escape only; classification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... during entry into a hazardous atmosphere, and for escape from a hazardous atmosphere; or (b) Escape only. Respirators designed and approved for use only during escape from a hazardous atmosphere....

  11. 42 CFR 84.51 - Entry and escape, or escape only; classification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... during entry into a hazardous atmosphere, and for escape from a hazardous atmosphere; or (b) Escape only. Respirators designed and approved for use only during escape from a hazardous atmosphere....

  12. Lise Meitner's escape from Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sime, Ruth Lewin

    1990-03-01

    Lise Meitner (1878-1968) achieved prominence as a nuclear physicist in Germany; although of Jewish origin, her Austrian citizenship exempted her from Nazi racial laws until the annexation of Austria in 1938 precipitated her dismissal. Forbidden to emigrate, she narrowly escaped to the Netherlands with the help of concerned friends in the international physics community.

  13. Mechanisms of Ionospheric Mass Escape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, T. E.; Khazanov, G. V.

    2010-01-01

    The dependence of ionospheric O+ escape flux on electromagnetic energy flux and electron precipitation into the ionosphere is derived for a hypothetical ambipolar pick-up process, powered the relative motion of plasmas and neutral upper atmosphere, and by electron precipitation, at heights where the ions are magnetized but influenced by photo-ionization, collisions with gas atoms, ambipolar and centrifugal acceleration. Ion pick-up by the convection electric field produces "ring-beam" or toroidal velocity distributions, as inferred from direct plasma measurements, from observations of the associated waves, and from the spectra of incoherent radar echoes. Ring-beams are unstable to plasma wave growth, resulting in rapid relaxation via transverse velocity diffusion, into transversely accelerated ion populations. Ion escape is substantially facilitated by the ambipolar potential, but is only weakly affected by centrifugal acceleration. If, as cited simulations suggest, ion ring beams relax into non-thermal velocity distributions with characteristic speed equal to the local ion-neutral flow speed, a generalized "Jeans escape" calculation shows that the escape flux of ionospheric O+ increases with Poynting flux and with precipitating electron density in rough agreement with observations.

  14. DYNAMICS OF THE ESCAPE RESPONSE.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    requirements. It has been shown that force is a lawful response measure under positive reinforcement (Notterman and Mintz, 1965). Subjects will adjust...concluded that response force in an escape situation is a lawful response measure, and that it operates in a manner similar to force under positive reinforcement .

  15. Escaping from Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Raymond J.; Platt, Jeffrey L.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Those engaged in clinical transplantation and transplantation immunology have always taken as a central objective the elucidation of means to prevent graft rejection by the recipient immune system. Conceptually, such mechanisms stem from the concept of Paul Ehrlich that all organisms can selectively avoid autotoxicity; i.e. they exhibit horror autotoxicus. Some mechanisms of horror autotoxicus now understood. T lymphocytes and B lymphocytes recognize foreign antigens but not some auto-antigens. Clonal deletion generates lacunae in what is otherwise a virtually limitless potential to recognize antigens. We call this mechanism structural tolerance. Where imperfections in structural tolerance allow self-recognition, the full activation of lymphocytes and generation of effector activity depends on delivery of accessory signals generated by infection and/or injury. The absence of accessory signals prevents or even suppresses immunological responses. We call this dichotomy of responsiveness conditional tolerance. When, despite structural and conditional tolerance, effector activity perturbs autologous cells, metabolism changes in ways that protect against injury. We use the term accommodation to refer to this acquired protection against injury. Structural and conditional tolerance and accommodation overlap in such a way that potentially toxic products can be generated to control microorganisms and neutralize toxins without overly damaging adjacent cells. The central challenge in transplantation, then, should be the orchestration of structural and conditional tolerance and accommodation in such a way that toxic products can still be generated for defense while preserving graft function and survival. Since the earliest days of transplantation, immunobiologists have sought means by which to prevent recognition and rejection of foreign tissue. The goal of these strategies is the retention of recipient immune function while selectively avoiding graft injury. While

  16. Blue Origin Conducts Pad Escape Test

    NASA Video Gallery

    Blue Origin conducted a successful pad escape test Oct. 19 at the company's West Texas launch site, firing its pusher escape motor and launching a full-scale suborbital crew capsule from a simulate...

  17. Cold Ion Escape from Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fränz, M.; Dubinin, E.; Wei, Y.; Morgan, D.; Andrews, D.; Barabash, S.; Lundin, R.; Fedorov, A.

    2013-09-01

    It has always been challenging to observe the flux of ions with energies of less than 10eV escaping from the planetary ionospheres. We here report on new measurements of the ionospheric ion flows at Mars by the ASPERA-3 experiment on board Mars Express in combination with the MARSIS radar experiment. We first compare calculations of the mean ion flux observed by ASPERA-3 alone with previously published results. We then combine observations of the cold ion velocity by ASPERA-3 with observations of the cold plasma density by MARSIS since ASPERA-3 misses the cold core of the ion distribution. We show that the mean density of the nightside plasma observed by MARSIS is about two orders higher than observed by ASPERA-3 (Fig.1). Combining both datasets we show that the main escape channel is along the shadow boundary on the tailside of Mars (Fig. 2). At a distance of about 0.5 R_M the flux settles at a constant value (Fig. 3) which indicates that about half of the transterminator ionospheric flow escapes from the planet. Possible mechanism to generate this flux can be the ionospheric pressure gradient between dayside and nightside or momentum transfer from the solar wind via the induced magnetic field since the flow velocity is in the Alfvénic regime.

  18. 46 CFR 108.445 - Alarm and means of escape.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Alarm and means of escape. (a) Each CO2 system that has a supply of more than 136 kilograms (300 pounds) of CO2, except a system that protects a tank, must have an alarm that sounds for at least 20 seconds before the CO2 is released into the space. (b) Each audible alarm for a CO2 system must have the...

  19. 46 CFR 108.445 - Alarm and means of escape.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Alarm and means of escape. (a) Each CO2 system that has a supply of more than 136 kilograms (300 pounds) of CO2, except a system that protects a tank, must have an alarm that sounds for at least 20 seconds before the CO2 is released into the space. (b) Each audible alarm for a CO2 system must have the...

  20. 46 CFR 108.445 - Alarm and means of escape.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Alarm and means of escape. (a) Each CO2 system that has a supply of more than 136 kilograms (300 pounds) of CO2, except a system that protects a tank, must have an alarm that sounds for at least 20 seconds before the CO2 is released into the space. (b) Each audible alarm for a CO2 system must have the...

  1. Malaria Parasites: The Great Escape

    PubMed Central

    Rénia, Laurent; Goh, Yun Shan

    2016-01-01

    Parasites of the genus Plasmodium have a complex life cycle. They alternate between their final mosquito host and their intermediate hosts. The parasite can be either extra- or intracellular, depending on the stage of development. By modifying their shape, motility, and metabolic requirements, the parasite adapts to the different environments in their different hosts. The parasite has evolved to escape the multiple immune mechanisms in the host that try to block parasite development at the different stages of their development. In this article, we describe the mechanisms reported thus far that allow the Plasmodium parasite to evade innate and adaptive immune responses. PMID:27872623

  2. Oxygen or carbogen breathing before simulated submarine escape.

    PubMed

    Gennser, M; Blogg, S L

    2008-01-01

    Raised internal pressure in a distressed submarine increases the risk of bubble formation and decompression illness after submarine escape. The hypothesis that short periods of oxygen breathing before submarine escape would reduce decompression stress was tested, using Doppler-detectable venous gas emboli as a measure. Twelve goats breathed oxygen for 15 min at 0.1 MPa before exposure to a simulated submarine escape profile to and from 2.5 MPa (240 m/seawater), whereas 28 control animals underwent the same dive without oxygen prebreathe. No decompression sickness (DCS) occurred in either of these two groups. Time with high bubble scores (Kisman-Masurel >or=3) was significantly (P < 0.001) shorter in the prebreathe group. In a second series, 30 goats breathed air at 0.2 MPa for 6 h. Fifteen minutes before escape from 2.5 MPa, animals were provided with either air (n = 10), oxygen (n = 12), or carbogen (97.5% O(2) and 2.5% CO(2)) gas (n = 8) as breathing gas. Animals breathed a hyperoxic gas (60% O(2)-40% N(2)) during the escape. Two animals (carbogen group) suffered oxygen convulsions during the escape but recovered on surfacing. Only one case of DCS occurred (carbogen group). The initial bubble score was reduced in the oxygen group (P < 0.001). The period with bubble score of Kisman-Masurel >or=3 was also significantly reduced in the oxygen group (P < 0.001). Oxygen breathing before submarine escape reduces initial bubble scores, although its significance in reducing central nervous system DCS needs to be investigated further.

  3. 46 CFR 108.445 - Alarm and means of escape.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Alarm and means of escape. 108.445 Section 108.445 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Fire Extinguishing Systems Fixed Carbon Dioxide Fire Extinguishing Systems §...

  4. 46 CFR 108.445 - Alarm and means of escape.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Alarm and means of escape. 108.445 Section 108.445 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Fire Extinguishing Systems Fixed Carbon Dioxide Fire Extinguishing Systems §...

  5. Escape of water molecular from Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiaxi; Li, Wenfeng; Zhang, Jianwei

    2014-03-01

    Understanding and controlling the transport of water molecules through nanopores have attracted great interest due to potential applications for designing novel nanofluidic devices, machines and sensors. In this work, we theoretically investigate the effects of an external nonuniform electric field on the escape of water molecules through single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) by using of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. When polar water molecules are placed in the gradient electric field, the electric force is experienced that can drive the water molecules. Molecular dynamics simulations show that the escape probability of water obeys the Boltzmann distribution. Our results show that energy barrier delta E is independent of temperature which indicates that it is a single-barrier system. From the MD results statistics, the key parameters could be determined such that the relationship between energy barrier delta E and diameter of SWNTs and nozzle distance of the charge r would be revealed that could deepen our current theoretical understanding on transport of water molecular inside SWNTs with the nonuniform electric field.

  6. Single-File Escape of Colloidal Particles from Microfluidic Channels.

    PubMed

    Locatelli, Emanuele; Pierno, Matteo; Baldovin, Fulvio; Orlandini, Enzo; Tan, Yizhou; Pagliara, Stefano

    2016-07-15

    Single-file diffusion is a ubiquitous physical process exploited by living and synthetic systems to exchange molecules with their environment. It is paramount to quantify the escape time needed for single files of particles to exit from constraining synthetic channels and biological pores. This quantity depends on complex cooperative effects, whose predominance can only be established through a strict comparison between theory and experiments. By using colloidal particles, optical manipulation, microfluidics, digital microscopy, and theoretical analysis we uncover the self-similar character of the escape process and provide closed-formula evaluations of the escape time. We find that the escape time scales inversely with the diffusion coefficient of the last particle to leave the channel. Importantly, we find that at the investigated microscale, bias forces as tiny as 10^{-15}  N determine the magnitude of the escape time by drastically reducing interparticle collisions. Our findings provide crucial guidelines to optimize the design of micro- and nanodevices for a variety of applications including drug delivery, particle filtering, and transport in geometrical constrictions.

  7. History of oxygen and carbon escape from the Martian atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luhmann, J. G.; Zhang, M. H. G.; Johnson, R. E.; Bougher, S. W.; Nagy, A. F.

    1992-01-01

    A fraction of the oxygen in the Martian atmosphere continually escapes to space because dissociative recombination of the O2(+) ions in the ionosphere can impart sufficient energy to the product O atoms. In addition, ionization of the extended atomic oxygen corona resulting from the above process adds to escape since the solar wind can carry away O(+) ions born above a few hundred km altitude. A further by-product of this ion-pickup by the solar wind is an additional population of escaping oxygen atoms that are sputtered from the atmosphere near the exobase by pickup ions that are on reentry rather than escaping trajectories. This sputtering process can also remove carbon in the form of intact or dissociated CO2 since all atoms and molecules in the 'target' gas are subject to the collisional energy transfer that characterizes sputtering. We have estimated the present rates of escape of oxygen and carbon due to these mechanisms, as well as the rates at several epochs in the history of the solar system.

  8. Single-File Escape of Colloidal Particles from Microfluidic Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Locatelli, Emanuele; Pierno, Matteo; Baldovin, Fulvio; Orlandini, Enzo; Tan, Yizhou; Pagliara, Stefano

    2016-07-01

    Single-file diffusion is a ubiquitous physical process exploited by living and synthetic systems to exchange molecules with their environment. It is paramount to quantify the escape time needed for single files of particles to exit from constraining synthetic channels and biological pores. This quantity depends on complex cooperative effects, whose predominance can only be established through a strict comparison between theory and experiments. By using colloidal particles, optical manipulation, microfluidics, digital microscopy, and theoretical analysis we uncover the self-similar character of the escape process and provide closed-formula evaluations of the escape time. We find that the escape time scales inversely with the diffusion coefficient of the last particle to leave the channel. Importantly, we find that at the investigated microscale, bias forces as tiny as 10-15 N determine the magnitude of the escape time by drastically reducing interparticle collisions. Our findings provide crucial guidelines to optimize the design of micro- and nanodevices for a variety of applications including drug delivery, particle filtering, and transport in geometrical constrictions.

  9. Enhancing endosomal escape for nanoparticle mediated siRNA delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Da

    2014-05-01

    Gene therapy with siRNA is a promising biotechnology to treat cancer and other diseases. To realize siRNA-based gene therapy, a safe and efficient delivery method is essential. Nanoparticle mediated siRNA delivery is of great importance to overcome biological barriers for systemic delivery in vivo. Based on recent discoveries, endosomal escape is a critical biological barrier to be overcome for siRNA delivery. This feature article focuses on endosomal escape strategies used for nanoparticle mediated siRNA delivery, including cationic polymers, pH sensitive polymers, calcium phosphate, and cell penetrating peptides. Work has been done to develop different endosomal escape strategies based on nanoparticle types, administration routes, and target organ/cell types. Also, enhancement of endosomal escape has been considered along with other aspects of siRNA delivery to ensure target specific accumulation, high cell uptake, and low toxicity. By enhancing endosomal escape and overcoming other biological barriers, great progress has been achieved in nanoparticle mediated siRNA delivery.

  10. Wind-Induced Atmospheric Escape: Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartle, Richard; Johnson, Robert; Sittler, Edward, Jr.; Sarantos, Menelaos; Simpson, David

    2012-01-01

    Rapid thermospheric flows can significantly enhance the estimates of the atmospheric loss rate and the structure of the atmospheric corona of a planetary body. In particular, rapid horizontal flow at the exobase can increase the corresponding constituent escape rate. Here we show that such corrections, for both thermal and non-thermal escape, cannot be ignored when calculating the escape of methane from Titan, for which drastically different rates have been proposed. Such enhancements are also relevant to Pluto and exoplanets.

  11. Norethandrolone produces temporary loss of the ability to escape from salt-retaining steroids.

    PubMed

    Zumoff, B

    1989-01-01

    Patients with diseases characterized by salt retention manifest a loss of the normal ability of healthy persons to escape from repeat injections of aldosterone or other salt-retaining steroids. This phenomenon may be a clue to the pathophysiological mechanisms of salt retention. Administration of norethandrolone to a subject who had demonstrated the ability to escape from the salt-retaining effect of corticosteroid administration temporarily and reversibly deleted his ability to escape. Thus norethandrolone administration provides the basis for a model system for exploring the mechanisms of escape (and therefore of salt retention).

  12. Model of a mechanical clock escapement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moline, David; Wagner, John; Volk, Eugene

    2012-07-01

    The mechanical tower clock originated in Europe during the 14th century to sound hourly bells and later display hands on a dial. An important innovation was the escapement mechanism, which converts stored energy into oscillatory motion for fixed time intervals through the pendulum swing. Previous work has modeled the escapement mechanism in terms of inelastic and elastic collisions. We derive and experimentally verify a theoretical model in terms of impulsive differential equations for the Graham escapement mechanism in a Seth Thomas tower clock. The model offers insight into the clock's mechanical behavior and the functionality of the deadbeat escapement mechanism.

  13. Guidance strategies for microburst escape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogan, Atilla

    This study compares three escape guidance laws for microburst encounters during final landing approach: Altitude-Guidance, Dive-Guidance, and Pitch-Guidance from the point of view of safety. It also introduces Modified Altitude- and Dive-Guidance laws. In this study, we use a full, 6-DOF, nonlinear, rigid-body aircraft model, including the effects of windshear and wind vorticity, and a model of microburst with turbulence. We also model the effect of stall prevention on the escape path. We first construct a new safety metric that quantifies the aircraft upward force capability in a microburst encounter. In the absence of turbulence, the safety factor is analytically proven to be a decreasing function of altitude. This suggests that descending to a low altitude may improve safety in the sense that the aircraft will have more upward force capability to maintain its altitude. In the presence of stochastic turbulence, the safety factor is treated as a random variable and its probability distribution function is analytically approximated as a function of altitude. This approximation reveals that the probability of safety factor being less than a given value has a minimum, i.e. safety increases as the altitude decreases up to a certain altitude, then starts decreasing. In the dissertation, two different approaches are used for comparison. (1) In a sample analysis approach, typical samples of the time histories of various variables are analyzed. Additionally, an animation of an aircraft escaping a microburst is produced and the behavior of the aircraft along with its inertial velocity and airspeed vectors are studied. (2) In a statistical approach, the probability distribution of the minimum altitude is estimated by the Monte Carlo Method when the statistical properties of the microburst parameters are known. Both approaches suggest that, within the modeling assumptions of this dissertation, and in the absence of human factors, altitude and dive guidance with low commanded

  14. Inhibition of chaotic escape from a potential well by incommensurate escape-suppressing excitations.

    PubMed

    Chacón, R; Martínez, J A

    2002-03-01

    Theoretical results are presented concerning the reduction of chaotic escape from a potential well by means of a harmonic parametric excitation that satisfies an ultrasubharmonic resonance condition with the escape-inducing excitation. The possibility of incommensurate escape-suppressing excitations is demonstrated by studying rational approximations to the irrational escape-suppressing frequency. The analytical predictions for the suitable amplitudes and initial phases of the escape-suppressing excitation are tested against numerical simulations based on a high-resolution grid of initial conditions. These numerical results indicate that the reduction of escape is reliably achieved for small amplitudes and at, and only at, the predicted initial phases. For the case of irrational escape-suppressing frequencies, the effective escape-reducing initial phases are found to lie close to the accumulation points of the set of suitable initial phases that are associated with the complete series of convergents up to the convergent giving the chosen rational approximation.

  15. Exploring the Escape of Hydrogen Ionizing Photons from Local Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Jesse A.; Rosenberg, Jessica L.; Venkatesan, Aparna; Cannon, John M.; Salzer, John Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Low-mass galaxies dominate the universe by number and many of these systems have large star formation rates per unit mass. Measurements of the escape fraction of ionizing radiation from dwarf galaxies are an important input to cosmological simulations and theoretical studies but are largely unconstrained by observations. As a result, the role of low-mass galaxies in cosmological reionization and the ionization state of the intergalactic medium (IGM) at high and low redshifts remains poorly understood. Here we study a sample of 18 star-forming galaxies (12 from the Lyman-Alpha Reference Sample, Rivera-Thorsen et al. 2015; 6 from the KISS sample, Salzer et al. 2001), some of which are low-mass systems (10 with M_star < 5 x 10^9 M_sun). All of the sample galaxies were observed in the FUV with the HST/COS spectrograph and these measurements were used to derive limits on their escaping Lyman-alpha radiation (Rivera-Thorsen et al. 2015, Wofford et al. 2013). Using the numerical radiative transfer simulations of Yajima et al. 2014, we relate the escape of Lyman-alpha radiation to limits on the fraction of escaping H-ionizing radiation from these galaxies. This correlation is stronger for low-redshift galaxies (Yajima et al. 2014) and these galaxies are more accessible observationally for these studies. Although the Yajima et al. (2014) study focuses on high-mass galaxies, we derive tentative limits on the escape fraction for H-ionizing radiation for all of the galaxies in this sample. From our analysis, we find escape fractions of less than 5% in all but two extreme cases where the escape fractions are greater than 14%. Our sample averaged escape fraction is insufficient for what reionization requires, although our values are likely to be lower limits and the two outliers are two of the lowest mass systems from the LARS sample. We discuss future directions, including further modeling of the radiative transfer and the galaxy's physical conditions, to better understand the

  16. Evolving Project E-Scape for National Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimbell, Richard

    2012-01-01

    In the opening paper in this Special Edition I outlined the major issues that led to the establishment of "project e-scape". The project was intended to develop systems and approaches that enabled learners to build real-time web-based portfolios of their performance (initially) in design & technology and additionally to build systems…

  17. Escape as Reinforcement and Escape Extinction in the Treatment of Feeding Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaRue, Robert H.; Stewart, Victoria; Piazza, Cathleen C.; Volkert, Valerie M.; Patel, Meeta R.; Zeleny, Jason

    2011-01-01

    Given the effectiveness of putative escape extinction as treatment for feeding problems, it is surprising that little is known about the effects of escape as reinforcement for appropriate eating during treatment. In the current investigation, we examined the effectiveness of escape as reinforcement for mouth clean (a product measure of…

  18. Sharks modulate their escape behavior in response to predator size, speed and approach orientation.

    PubMed

    Seamone, Scott; Blaine, Tristan; Higham, Timothy E

    2014-12-01

    Escape responses are often critical for surviving predator-prey interactions. Nevertheless, little is known about how predator size, speed and approach orientation impact escape performance, especially in larger prey that are primarily viewed as predators. We used realistic shark models to examine how altering predatory behavior and morphology (size, speed and approach orientation) influences escape behavior and performance in Squalus acanthias, a shark that is preyed upon by apex marine predators. Predator models induced C-start escape responses, and increasing the size and speed of the models triggered a more intense response (increased escape turning rate and acceleration). In addition, increased predator size resulted in greater responsiveness from the sharks. Among the responses, predator approach orientation had the most significant impact on escapes, such that the head-on approach, as compared to the tail-on approach, induced greater reaction distances and increased escape turning rate, speed and acceleration. Thus, the anterior binocular vision in sharks renders them less effective at detecting predators approaching from behind. However, it appears that sharks compensate by performing high-intensity escapes, likely induced by the lateral line system, or by a sudden visual flash of the predator entering their field of view. Our study reveals key aspects of escape behavior in sharks, highlighting the modulation of performance in response to predator approach.

  19. Decompression illness in goats following simulated submarine escape: 1993-2006.

    PubMed

    Seddon, F M; Thacker, J C; Fisher, A S; Jurd, K M; White, M G; Loveman, G A M

    2014-01-01

    The United Kingdom Ministry of Defence commissioned work to define the relationship between the internal pressure of a distressed submarine (DISSUB), the depth from which escape is made and the risk of decompression illness (DCI). The program of work used an animal model (goat) to define these risks and this paper reports the incidence and type of DCI observed. A total of 748 pressure exposures comprising saturation only, escape only or saturation followed by escape were conducted in the submarine escape simulator between 1993 and 2006. The DCI following saturation exposures was predominantly limb pain, whereas following escape exposures the DCI predominantly involved the central nervous system and was fast in onset. There was no strong relationship between the risk of DCI and the range of escape depths investigated. The risk of DCI incurred from escape following saturation was greater than that obtained by combining the risks for the independent saturation only, and escape only, exposures. The output from this program of work has led to improved advice on the safety of submarine escape.

  20. Escaping in Literature. Teaching in the Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurst, Carol Otis

    1993-01-01

    Explores the "escape" genre of children's literature, and recommends and describes several books that deal with such topics as escape from prison camps, from slavery, from the Holocaust, from war, and from Utopian societies. These books should provoke meaningful classroom discussions and allow children to view their own world from different…

  1. Submarine 'safe to escape' studies in man.

    PubMed

    Jurd, K M; Seddon, F M; Thacker, J C; Blogg, S L; Stansfield, M R D; White, M G; Loveman, G A M

    2014-01-01

    The Royal Navy requires reliable advice on the safe limits of escape from a distressed submarine (DISSUB). Flooding in a DISSUB may cause a rise in ambient pressure, increasing the risk of decompression sickness (DCS) and decreasing the maximum depth from which it is safe to escape. The aim of this study was to investigate the pressure/depth limits to escape following saturation at raised ambient pressure. Exposure to saturation pressures up to 1.6 bar (a) (160 kPa) (n = 38); escapes from depths down to 120 meters of sea water (msw) (n = 254) and a combination of saturation followed by escape (n = 90) was carried out in the QinetiQ Submarine Escape Simulator, Alverstoke, United Kingdom. Doppler ultrasound monitoring was used to judge the severity of decompression stress. The trials confirmed the previously untested advice, in the Guardbook, that if a DISSUB was lying at a depth of 90 msw, then it was safe to escape when the pressure in the DISSUB was 1.5 bar (a), but also indicated that this advice may be overly conservative. This study demonstrated that the upper DISSUB saturation pressure limit to safe escape from 90 msw was 1.6 bar (a), resulting in two cases of DCS.

  2. 30 CFR 57.11051 - Escape routes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Escape routes. 57.11051 Section 57.11051 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE... read direction signs that clearly indicate the ways of escape....

  3. 30 CFR 57.11051 - Escape routes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Escape routes. 57.11051 Section 57.11051 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE... read direction signs that clearly indicate the ways of escape....

  4. Formulation of a Cooperative-Confinement-Escape problem of multiple cooperative defenders against an evader escaping from a circular region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we propose and formulate the Cooperative-Confinement-Escape (CCE) problem of multiple cooperative defenders against an evader escaping from a circular region, in which the defenders are moving on the circle with attempt to prevent possible escape of a single evader who is initially located inside the circle. The main contributions are summarized as follows: (1) we first provide an effective formulation of the CCE problem, which is an emphasis of this paper, with design of two nonlinear control strategies for the cooperative defenders and the adversarial evader, respectively. Particularly, we consider to include a proper interaction between each pair of the nearest-neighbor defenders, and an adaptive trajectory prediction mechanism in the strategies of the defenders to increase the chance of successful confinement. (2) For the first attempt on analyzing the CCE dynamics which is unavoidably strongly nonlinear, we analyze the minimum energy of the evader for possible escape. (3) For understanding of the behaviors of the system under different parameters, (i) we illustrate the effectiveness of the confinement strategy using the adaptive trajectory prediction mechanism, and (ii) the physical roles of the system parameters with respect to the system dynamics, some of which may be unexpected or not straightforward. A separate paper will be presented for systematic analysis of the agents' behaviors with respect to the large intervals of the parameter settings.

  5. Exploitation of an ancient escape circuit by an avian predator: relationships between taxon-specific prey escape circuits and the sensitivity to visual cues from the predator.

    PubMed

    Jabłoński, P G; Strausfeld, N J

    2001-01-01

    The painted redstart Myioborus pictus uses visual displays to flush, pursue, and then capture an abundance of brachyceran Diptera that are equipped with giant fiber escape circuits. This paper investigates the relationships between features of the giant fiber system, the structure of visual stimuli produced by redstarts and their effectiveness in eliciting escape reactions by flies. The results show that dipterous taxa having large-diameter giant fibers extending short distances from the brain to motor neurons involved in escape are flushed at greater distances than taxa with longer and small-diameter giant fibers. The results of behavioral tests show the importance of angular acceleration of expanding image edges on the compound eye in eliciting escape responses. Lateral motion of stimulus profile edges as well as structured visual profiles additionally contribute to the sensitivity of one or more neural systems that trigger escape. Retinal subtense and angular velocity are known to trigger physiological responses in fly giant fiber circuits, but the contributions of edge length and lateral motion in a looming stimulus suggest that escape pathways might also receive inputs from circuits that are tuned to different types of motion. The present results suggest that these several properties of escape pathways have contributed to the evolution of foraging displays and plumage patterns in flush-pursuing birds.

  6. Danger detection and escape behaviour in wood crickets.

    PubMed

    Dupuy, Fabienne; Casas, Jérôme; Body, Mélanie; Lazzari, Claudio R

    2011-07-01

    The wind-sensitive cercal system of Orthopteroid insects that mediates the detection of the approach of a predator is a very sensitive sensory system. It has been intensively analysed from a behavioural and neurobiological point of view, and constitutes a classical model system in neuroethology. The escape behaviour is triggered in orthopteroids by the detection of air-currents produced by approaching objects, allowing these insects to keep away from potential dangers. Nevertheless, escape behaviour has not been studied in terms of success. Moreover, an attacking predator is more than "air movement", it is also a visible moving entity. The sensory basis of predator detection is thus probably more complex than the perception of air movement by the cerci. We have used a piston mimicking an attacking running predator for a quantitative evaluation of the escape behaviour of wood crickets Nemobius sylvestris. The movement of the piston not only generates air movement, but it can be seen by the insect and can touch it as a natural predator. This procedure allowed us to study the escape behaviour in terms of detection and also in terms of success. Our results showed that 5-52% of crickets that detected the piston thrust were indeed touched. Crickets escaped to stimulation from behind better than to a stimulation from the front, even though they detected the approaching object similarly in both cases. After cerci ablation, 48% crickets were still able to detect a piston approaching from behind (compared with 79% of detection in intact insects) and 24% crickets escaped successfully (compared with 62% in the case of intact insects). So, cerci play a major role in the detection of an approaching object but other mechanoreceptors or sensory modalities are implicated in this detection. It is not possible to assure that other sensory modalities participate (in the case of intact animals) in the behaviour; rather, than in the absence of cerci other sensory modalities can

  7. Escape of magnetic toroids from the Sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bieber, John W.; Rust, David M.

    1995-01-01

    Analysis of heliospheric magnetic fields at 1 AU shows that 10(exp 24) Mx of net azimuthal flux escapes from the Sun per solar cycle. This rate is consistent with rates derived from other indicators of flux escape, including coronal mass ejections and filament eruptions. The toroidal flux escape rate is compared with the apparent rate of flux emergence at the solar surface, and it is concluded that escaping toroids will remove at least 20% of the emerging flux, and may remove as much as 100% of emerging flux if multiple eruptions occur on the toroids. The data imply that flux escapes the Sun with an efficiency far exceeding Parker's upper limit estimate of 3%. Toroidal flux escape is almost certainly the source of the observed overwinding of the interplanetary magnetic field spiral. Two mechanisms to facilitate net flux escape are discussed: helicity charging to push open the fields and flux transport with reconnection to close them off. We estimate the Sun will shed approximately 2 x 10(exp 45) of magnetic helicity per solar cycle, leading to a mean helicity density of 100 Mx(exp 2)cm(exp -3) at 1 AU, which agrees well with observations.

  8. Statin escape phenomenon: Fact or fiction?

    PubMed Central

    Barkas, Fotios; Elisaf, Moses; Klouras, Eleftherios; Dimitriou, Theodora; Tentolouris, Nikolaos; Liberopoulos, Evangelos

    2017-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the presence of the so called “statin escape” phenomenon among hyperlipidemic subjects attending a lipid clinic. METHODS This was a retrospective analysis of 1240 hyperlipidemic individuals followed-up for ≥ 3 years. We excluded those individuals meeting one of the following criteria: Use of statin therapy at baseline visit, discontinuation of statin treatment at most recent visit, change in statin treatment during follow-up and poor compliance to treatment. Statin escape phenomenon was defined as an increase in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels at the most recent visit by > 10% compared with the value at 6 mo following initiation of statin treatment. RESULTS Of 181 eligible subjects, 31% exhibited the statin escape phenomenon. No major differences regarding baseline characteristics were found between statin escapers and non-statin escapers. Both escapers and non-escapers had similar baseline LDL-C levels [174 (152-189) and 177 (152-205) mg/dL, respectively]. In comparison with non-escapers, statin escapers demonstrated lower LDL-C levels at 6 mo after treatment initiation [88 (78-97) mg/dL vs 109 (91-129) mg/dL, P < 0.05], but higher levels at the most recent visit [103 (96-118) mg/dL vs 94 (79-114) mg/dL, P < 0.05]. CONCLUSION These data confirm the existence of an escape phenomenon among statin-treated individuals. The clinical significance of this phenomenon remains uncertain. PMID:28261552

  9. Photochemical escape of oxygen from the Martian atmosphere: first results from MAVEN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lillis, Rob; Deigan, Justin; Fox, Jane; Bougher, Steve; Lee, Yuni; Cravens, Thomas; Rahmati, Ali; Jakosky, Bruce

    2015-04-01

    One of the primary goals of the MAVEN mission is to characterize rates of atmospheric escape at the present epoch and relate those escape rates to solar drivers. One of the major escape processes is known as photochemical escape, which is broadly defined as a process by which a) an exothermic reaction in the atmosphere results in an upward-traveling neutral particle whose velocity exceeds planetary escape velocity and b) the particle is not prevented from escaping through any subsequent collisions. At Mars, photochemical escape of oxygen is expected to be a significant channel for atmospheric escape, particularly in the early solar system when extreme ultraviolet (EUV) fluxes were much higher. Thus characterizing this escape process is central to understanding the role escape to space has played in Mars' climate evolution. Because escaping hot atoms cannot easily be directly measured, models of production and transport (through the atmosphere) of such atoms must be used to constrain escape rates. These models require altitude profiles of neutral densities and electron and ion densities and temperatures, as well as compositional information. All the relevant quantities upon which photochemical escape depends will be measured by MAVEN at the relevant altitudes (150-250 km). LPW will measure electron density and temperature, NGIMS will measure neutral and ion density and STATIC will measure ion density and temperature. 4 separate calculations must be made for every altitude profile: Profiles of O2+dissociative recombination (DR) rates will be calculated straightforwardly from electron temperature, electron density and O2+density. Profiles of rotational and vibrational distributions of O2+ ions will be calculated from profiles of CO2, O, O2, O+, CO2+ and CO+ via a lookup table from an empirical model. Profiles of energy distributions of hot O atoms will be calculated from the results of step 2 and from profiles of electron and ion temperatures. Profiles of all neutral

  10. Isotopic Fractionation by Gravitational Escape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lammer, H. S. J.

    2003-04-01

    Present natural data bases for abundances of the isotopic compositions of noble gases, carbon and nitrogen inventories can be found in the Sun, the solar wind, meteorites and the planetary atmospheres and crustal reservoirs. Mass distributions in the various volatile reservoirs provide boundary conditions which must be satisfied in modelling the history of the present atmospheres. Such boundary conditions are constraints posed by comparison of isotopic ratios in primordial volatile sources with the isotopic pattern which was found on the planets and their satellites. Observations from space missions and Earth-based spectroscopic telescope observations of Venus, Mars and Saturn's major satellite Titan show that the atmospheric evolution of these planetary bodies to their present states was affected by processes capable of fractionating their elements and isotopes. The isotope ratios of D/H in the atmospheres of Venus and Mars indicate evidence for their planetary water inventories. Venus' H2O content may have been at least 0.3% of a terrestrial ocean. Analysis of the D/H ratio on Mars imply that a global H2O ocean with a depth of ≤ 30 m was lost since the end of hydrodynamic escape. Calculations of the time evolution of the 15N/14N isotope anomalies in the atmospheres of Mars and Titan show that the Martian atmosphere was at least ≥ 20 times denser than at present and that the mass of Titan's early atmosphere was about 30 times greater than its present value. A detailed study of gravitational fractionation of isotopes in planetary atmospheres furthermore indicates a much higher solar wind mass flux of the early Sun during the first half billion years.

  11. The fast escaping set for quasiregular mappings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergweiler, Walter; Drasin, David; Fletcher, Alastair

    2014-06-01

    The fast escaping set of a transcendental entire function is the set of all points which tend to infinity under iteration as fast as possible compatible with the growth of the function. We study the analogous set for quasiregular mappings in higher dimensions and show, among other things, that various equivalent definitions of the fast escaping set for transcendental entire functions in the plane also coincide for quasiregular mappings. We also exhibit a class of quasiregular mappings for which the fast escaping set has the structure of a spider's web.

  12. The Neuroethology of C. elegans Escape

    PubMed Central

    Pirri, Jennifer K.; Alkema, Mark J.

    2012-01-01

    Escape behaviors are crucial to survive predator encounters. Touch to the head of C. elegans induces an escape response where the animal rapidly backs away from the stimulus and suppresses foraging head movements. The coordination of head and body movements facilitates escape from predacious fungi that cohabitate with nematodes in organic debris. An appreciation of the natural habitat of laboratory organisms, like C. elegans, enables a comprehensive neuroethological analysis of behavior. In this review we discuss the neuronal mechanisms and the ecological significance of the C. elegans touch response. PMID:22226513

  13. Interspecific evaluation of octopus escape behavior.

    PubMed

    Wood, James B; Anderson, Roland C

    2004-01-01

    The well-known ability of octopuses to escape enclosures is a behavior that can be fatal and, therefore, is an animal welfare issue. This study obtained survey data from 38 participants-primarily scientists and public aquarists who work with octopuses-on 25 described species of octopus. The study demonstrates that the likeliness to escape is species specific (p =.001). The study gives husbandry techniques to keep captive octopuses contained. This first interspecific study of octopus escape behavior allows readers to make informed species-specific husbandry choices.

  14. Plasma-induced Escape and Alterations of Planetary Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, R. E.; Tucker, O. J.; Ewrin, J.; Cassidy, T. A.; Leblanc, F.

    2009-12-01

    The atmospheres of planets and planetary satellites are typically imbedded in space plasmas. Depending on the interaction with the induced or intrinsic fields energetic ions can have access to the thermosphere and the corona affecting their composition and thermal structure and causing loss to space. These processes are often lumped together as ‘atmospheric sputtering’ (Johnson 1994). In this talk I will review the results of simulations of the plasma bombardment at a number of solar system bodies and use those data to describe the effect on the upper atmosphere and on escape. Of considerable recent interest is the modeling of escape from Titan. Prior to Cassini’s tour of the Saturnian system, plasma-induced escape was suggested to be the dominant loss process, but recent models of enhanced thermal escape, often referred to as ‘slow hydrodynamic’ escape, have been suggested to lead to much larger Titan atmospheric loss rates (Strobel 2008; Cui et al. 2008). Such a process has been suggested to be active at some point in time on a number of solar system bodies. I will present hybrid fluid/ kinetic models of the upper atmosphere of certain bodies in order to test both the plasma-induced and thermal escape processes. Preliminary results suggest that the loss rates estimated using the ‘slow hydrodynamic’ escape process can be orders of magnitude too large. The implications for Mars, Titan and Pluto will be discussed. Background for this talk is contained in the following papers (Johnson 2004; 2009; Chaufray et al. 2007; Johnson et al. 2008; 2009; Tucker and Johnson 2009). References: Chaufray, J.Y., R. Modolo, F. Leblanc, G. Chanteur, R.E. Johnson, and J.G. Luhmann, Mars Solar Wind interaction: formation of the Martian corona and atmosphric loss to space, JGR 112, E09009, doi:10.1029/2007JE002915 (2007) Cui, J., Yelle, R. V., Volk, K. Distribution and escape of molecular hydrogen in Titan's thermosphere and exosphere. J. Geophys. Res. 113, doi:10

  15. Technical evaluation of the Aerospace Medical Panel Specialists Meeting on Escape Problems and Manoeuvres in Combat Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. L.

    1974-01-01

    A technical evaluation of the papers presented at a conference on escape systems for helicopters and V/STOL aircraft was made. The subjects discussed include the following: (1) bioengineering aspects of spinal injury during ejection, (2) aerodynamic forces acting on crewman during escape, (3) operational practicality of fly away ejection seats, (4) helicopter survivability requirements, (5) ejection experience from V/STOL aircraft, and (6) research projects involving escape and retrieval systems.

  16. Evolutionary dynamics of escape from biomedical intervention.

    PubMed Central

    Iwasa, Yoh; Michor, Franziska; Nowak, Martin A

    2003-01-01

    Viruses, bacteria, eukaryotic parasites, cancer cells, agricultural pests and other inconvenient animates have an unfortunate tendency to escape from selection pressures that are meant to control them. Chemotherapy, anti-viral drugs or antibiotics fail because their targets do not hold still, but evolve resistance. A major problem in developing vaccines is that microbes evolve and escape from immune responses. The fundamental question is the following: if a genetically diverse population of replicating organisms is challenged with a selection pressure that has the potential to eradicate it, what is the probability that this population will produce escape mutants? Here, we use multi-type branching processes to describe the accumulation of mutants in independent lineages. We calculate escape dynamics for arbitrary mutation networks and fitness landscapes. Our theory shows how to estimate the probability of success or failure of biomedical intervention, such as drug treatment and vaccination, against rapidly evolving organisms. PMID:14728779

  17. Biogeochemistry: Nocturnal escape route for marsh gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anthony, Katey Walter; MacIntyre, Sally

    2016-07-01

    A field study of methane emissions from wetlands reveals that more of the gas escapes through diffusive processes than was thought, mostly at night. Because methane is a greenhouse gas, the findings have implications for global warming.

  18. MAVEN in situ measurements of photochemical escape of oxygen from Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lillis, Robert; Deighan, Justin; Fox, Jane; Bougher, Stephen; Lee, Yuni; Cravens, Thomas; Rahmati, Ali; Mahaffy, Paul; Benna, Mehdi; Groller, Hannes; Jakosky, Bruce

    2016-04-01

    One of the primary goals of the MAVEN mission is to characterize rates of atmospheric escape from Mars at the present epoch and relate those escape rates to solar drivers. One of the known escape processes is photochemical escape, where a) an exothermic chemical reaction in the atmosphere results in an upward-traveling neutral particle whose velocity exceeds planetary escape velocity and b) the particle is not prevented from escaping through subsequent collisions. At Mars, photochemical escape of oxygen is expected to be a significant channel for atmospheric escape, particularly in the early solar system when extreme ultraviolet (EUV) fluxes were much higher. Thus characterizing this escape process and its variability with solar drivers is central to understanding the role escape to space has played in Mars' climate evolution. We use near-periapsis (<400 km altitude) data from three MAVEN instruments: the Langmuir Probe and Waves (LPW) instrument measures electron density and temperature, the Suprathermal And Thermal Ion Composition (STATIC) experiment measures ion temperature and the Neutral Gas and Ion Mass Spectrometer (NGIMS) measures neutral and ion densities. For each profile of in situ measurements, we make several calculations, each as a function of altitude. The first uses electron and temperatures and simulates the dissociative recombination of both O2+ and CO2+ to calculate the probability distribution for the initial energies of the resulting hot oxygen atoms. The second is a Monte Carlo hot atom transport model that takes that distribution of initial O energies and the measured neutral density profiles and calculates the probability that a hot atom born at that altitude will escape. The third takes the measured electron and ion densities and electron temperatures and calculates the production rate of hot O atoms. We then multiply together the profiles of hot atom production and escape probability to get profiles of the production rate of escaping atoms

  19. Immune Escape Strategies of Malaria Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Pollyanna S.; Bhardwaj, Jyoti; Rivera-Correa, Juan; Freire-De-Lima, Celio G.; Morrot, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is one of the most life-threatening infectious diseases worldwide. Immunity to malaria is slow and short-lived despite the repeated parasite exposure in endemic areas. Malaria parasites have evolved refined machinery to evade the immune system based on a range of genetic changes that include allelic variation, biomolecular exposure of proteins, and intracellular replication. All of these features increase the probability of survival in both mosquitoes and the vertebrate host. Plasmodium species escape from the first immunological trap in its invertebrate vector host, the Anopheles mosquitoes. The parasites have to pass through various immunological barriers within the mosquito such as anti-microbial molecules and the mosquito microbiota in order to achieve successful transmission to the vertebrate host. Within these hosts, Plasmodium species employ various immune evasion strategies during different life cycle stages. Parasite persistence against the vertebrate immune response depends on the balance among virulence factors, pathology, metabolic cost of the host immune response, and the parasites ability to evade the immune response. In this review we discuss the strategies that Plasmodium parasites use to avoid the vertebrate host immune system and how they promote successful infection and transmission. PMID:27799922

  20. Immune Escape Strategies of Malaria Parasites.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Pollyanna S; Bhardwaj, Jyoti; Rivera-Correa, Juan; Freire-De-Lima, Celio G; Morrot, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is one of the most life-threatening infectious diseases worldwide. Immunity to malaria is slow and short-lived despite the repeated parasite exposure in endemic areas. Malaria parasites have evolved refined machinery to evade the immune system based on a range of genetic changes that include allelic variation, biomolecular exposure of proteins, and intracellular replication. All of these features increase the probability of survival in both mosquitoes and the vertebrate host. Plasmodium species escape from the first immunological trap in its invertebrate vector host, the Anopheles mosquitoes. The parasites have to pass through various immunological barriers within the mosquito such as anti-microbial molecules and the mosquito microbiota in order to achieve successful transmission to the vertebrate host. Within these hosts, Plasmodium species employ various immune evasion strategies during different life cycle stages. Parasite persistence against the vertebrate immune response depends on the balance among virulence factors, pathology, metabolic cost of the host immune response, and the parasites ability to evade the immune response. In this review we discuss the strategies that Plasmodium parasites use to avoid the vertebrate host immune system and how they promote successful infection and transmission.

  1. Gated escaping of ligand out of protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheu, Sheh-Yi; Yang, Dah-Yen

    2000-01-01

    We construct a new gating model and develop a new theory to study the escaping process of a ligand out of a spherical cavity with a puncture (or gate) on the surface. The gate undulation can be regulated by any time-dependent function and the motion of the ligand inside the spherical cavity is mapped into a two-dimensional entropy potential surface. Hence the driving force of our model is entropy only. For a static gate, the escaping process corresponds to climbing a two-dimensional entropy barrier. When the gate open angle is small, the escaping rate is proportional to the square of the opening angle. The prefactor of the escaping rate constant depends on the curvature of the entropy potential surface. For coherent gating, the survival time depends not only on the gate undulation frequency but also on how the initial state is defined. On the escaping from protein, our escaping rate shows it is qualitatively consistent with the experimental result of ligand recombination in myoglobin.

  2. Orbital and escape dynamics in barred galaxies - II. The 3D system: exploring the role of the normally hyperbolic invariant manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Christof; Zotos, Euaggelos E.

    2016-12-01

    A three degrees of freedom (3-dof) barred galaxy model composed of a spherically symmetric nucleus, a bar, a flat disc and a spherically symmetric dark matter halo is used for investigating the dynamics of the system. We use colour-coded plots to demonstrate how the value of the semimajor axis of the bar influences the regular or chaotic dynamics of the 3-dof system. For distinguishing between ordered and chaotic motion, we use the Smaller ALingment Index (SALI) method, a fast yet very accurate tool. Undoubtedly, the most important elements of the dynamics are the normally hyperbolic invariant manifolds (NHIMs) located in the vicinity of the index 1 Lagrange points L2 and L3. These manifolds direct the flow of stars over the saddle points, while they also trigger the formation of rings and spirals. The dynamics in the neighbourhood of the saddle points is visualized by bifurcation diagrams of the Lyapunov orbits as well as by the restriction of the Poincaré map to the NHIMs. In addition, we reveal how the semimajor axis of the bar influences the structure of these manifolds which determine the final stellar structure (rings or spirals). Our numerical simulations suggest that in galaxies with weak bars the formation of R1 rings or R_1^' } pseudo-rings is favoured. In the case of galaxies with intermediate and strong bars, the invariant manifolds seem to give rise to R1R2 rings and twin spiral formations, respectively. We also compare our numerical outcomes with earlier related work and with observational data.

  3. Maturation of escape circuit function during the early adulthood of cockroaches Periplaneta americana.

    PubMed

    Libersat, Frederic; Leung, Vicky; Mizrahi, Adi; Mathenia, Nick; Comer, Christopher

    2005-01-01

    During postembryonic development of insects, sensorimotor pathways, which generate specific behaviors, undergo maturational changes. It is less clear whether such pathways are typically stable, or undergo further maturation, during the adult stage. In the present study, we have examined this issue by multilevel analysis of a simple model system, the escape behavior of the cockroach, from identified synapses to behavior. We show that the escape system is highly responsive immediately after the molt to adulthood, but that the latency of escape responses was not at its typical value immediately after the molt to adult. The latency of escape behavior increased over the first 30 days of adult life, perhaps indicating maturational adjustments of the escape sensorimotor pathway. The first station in the escape circuitry is the synaptic connections between the cercal wind receptors and the giant interneurons. We measured unitary excitatory synaptic potentials between single sensory neurons and an identified giant interneuron (GI(2)). We found a decrease in the synaptic strength between identified cercal hairs from a single column and GI(2) over the first month after the adult molt. Consequently, the latency and the number of action potentials of GI(2) in response to natural stimuli increased and decreased respectively during this time. Thus, we show that both behavioral performance and the wind sensitivity of GI(2) decreased over the first month after molt. We conclude that the cockroach escape system undergoes further sensorimotor maturation over a period of 1 month, and that cellular changes correlate with, or predict, some changes in behavioral performance.

  4. Simple control laws for continuous-thrust escape or capture and their use in optimisation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petropoulos, A. E.; Whiffen, G. J.; Sims, J. A.

    2002-01-01

    Interplanetary missions which use low-thrust, high specific impulse propulsion can further capitalise on the capabilities of the propulsion system by using it to effect escape from the launch body or capture at a target body.

  5. WANDERING STARS: AN ORIGIN OF ESCAPED POPULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Teyssier, Maureen; Johnston, Kathryn V.; Shara, Michael M.

    2009-12-10

    We demonstrate that stars beyond the virial radii of galaxies may be generated by the gravitational impulse received by a satellite as it passes through the pericenter of its orbit around its parent. These stars may become energetically unbound (escaped stars), or may travel to further than a few virial radii for longer than a few Gyr, but still remain energetically bound to the system (wandering stars). Larger satellites (10%-100% the mass of the parent), and satellites on more radial orbits are responsible for the majority of this ejected population. Wandering stars could be observable on Mpc scales via classical novae, and on 100 Mpc scales via Type Ia supernova. The existence of such stars would imply a corresponding population of barely bound, old, high-velocity stars orbiting the Milky Way, generated by the same physical mechanism during the Galaxy's formation epoch. Sizes and properties of these combined populations should place some constraints on the orbits and masses of the progenitor objects from which they came, providing insight into the merging histories of galaxies in general and the Milky Way in particular.

  6. The double-H maze test, a novel, simple, water-escape memory task: acquisition, recall of recent and remote memory, and effects of systemic muscarinic or NMDA receptor blockade during training.

    PubMed

    Pol-Bodetto, Sarah; Jeltsch-David, Hélène; Lecourtier, Lucas; Rusnac, Nathalia; Mam-Lam-Fook, Célia; Cosquer, Brigitte; Geiger, Karin; Cassel, Jean-Christophe

    2011-03-17

    To explore spatial cognition in rodents, research uses maze tasks, which differ in complexity, number of goals and pathways, behavioural flexibility, memory duration, but also in the experimenter's control over the strategy developed to reach a goal (e.g., allocentric vs. egocentric). This study aimed at validating a novel spatial memory test: the double-H maze test. The transparent device made of an alley with two opposite arms at each extremity and two in its centre is flooded. An escape platform is submerged in one arm. For experiments 1-3, rats were released in unpredictable sequences from one of both central arms to favour an allocentric approach of the task. Experiment 1 (3 trials/day over 6 days) demonstrated classical learning curves and evidence for recent and nondegraded remote memory performance. Experiment 2 (2 days, 3 trials/day) showed a dose-dependent alteration of task acquisition/consolidation by muscarinic or NMDA receptor blockade; these drug effects vanished with sustained training (experiment 3; 4 days, 3 trials/day). Experiment 4 oriented rats towards a procedural (egocentric) approach of the task. Memory was tested in a misleading probe trial. Most rats immediately switched from response learning-based to place learning-based behaviour, but only when their initial view on environmental cues markedly differed between training and probe trials. Because this simple task enables the formation of a relatively stable memory trace, it could be particularly adapted to study consolidation processes at a system level or/and the interplay between procedural and declarative-like memory systems.

  7. MEMO: Mars Escape and Magnetic Orbiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chassefiere, E.; Langlais, B.; Leblanc, F.; Sotin, C.; Barabash, S.; Dehant, V.; Dougherty, M.; Lammer, H.; Mandea, M.; Vennerstrom, S.

    There are several reasons to believe that Mars could have become an Earth like planet rather than the present dry and cold planet. In particular, many elements suggest the presence of liquid water at the Martian surface during a relatively short period at an early stage of its history. Since liquid water may have been the birthplace for life on Earth, the fate of Martian water is one of the major key and yet unanswered question to be solved. Mars Escape and Magnetic Orbiter (MEMO) is a low periapsis orbiter of Mars devoted to the measurement of present escape and the characterization of the fossil magnetic field of Mars. The use of a low periapsis altitude orbit (120-150 km) is required to detect and quantify all populations of atoms and molecules involved in escape. It is also required to measure the magnetic field of Mars with an unprecedented spatial resolution that would allow getting a more precise timing of the dynamo and its disappearance. Achieving a full characterization of atmospheric escape, and extrapolating it back to the past requires: (i) to measure escape fluxes of neutral and ion species, and characterize the dynamics and chemistry of the regions of the atmosphere where escape occurs (thermosphere, ionosphere, exosphere), as well as their responses to solar activity, and (ii) to characterize the lateral variations of the magnetic field of lithospheric origin, and by extension, the timing of the Martian dynamo. Of particular interest is the extinction of the dynamo that is thought to have enhanced the atmospheric escape processes still operating today. The proposed low-periapsis orbiter will consist of the following elements: • An "Escape Package" to characterize by both in-situ and remote measurements the thermosphere, ionosphere, exosphere and solar wind interaction regions (from one hundred to several thousand km), including thermal, suprathermal 1 and energetic particles. • A "Magnetic Field Package", to characterize the magnetization of the

  8. Compensatory escape mechanism at low Reynolds number

    PubMed Central

    Gemmell, Brad J.; Sheng, Jian; Buskey, Edward J.

    2013-01-01

    Despite high predation pressure, planktonic copepods remain one of the most abundant groups on the planet. Their escape response provides one of most effective mechanisms to maximize evolutionary fitness. Owing to their small size (100 µm) compared with their predators (>1 mm), increasing viscosity is believed to have detrimental effects on copepods’ fitness at lower temperature. Using high-speed digital holography we acquire 3D kinematics of the nauplius escape including both location and detailed appendage motion. By independently varying temperature and viscosity we demonstrate that at natural thermal extremes, contrary to conventional views, nauplii achieve equivalent escape distance while maintaining optimal velocity. Using experimental results and kinematic simulations from a resistive force theory propulsion model, we demonstrate that a shift in appendage timing creates an increase in power stroke duration relative to recovery stroke duration. This change allows the nauplius to limit losses in velocity and maintain distance during escapes at the lower bound of its natural thermal range. The shift in power stroke duration relative to recovery stroke duration is found to be regulated by the temperature dependence of swimming appendage muscle groups, not a dynamic response to viscosity change. These results show that copepod nauplii have natural adaptive mechanisms to compensate for viscosity variations with temperature but not in situations in which viscosity varies independent of temperature, such as in some phytoplankton blooms. Understanding the robustness of escapes in the wake of environmental changes such as temperature and viscosity has implications in assessing the future health of performance compensation. PMID:23487740

  9. Residential smoke alarms and fire escape plans.

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, P A; Sacks, J J; Ryan, G W; Bender, P F

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the proportion of U.S. homes with installed smoke alarms, smoke alarms on the same floor as occupants' bedrooms, and fire escape plans. METHODS: The authors analyzed data on smoke alarm use and fire escape planning from a 1994 stratified random telephone survey of 5238 U.S. households. RESULTS: Respondents from 91% of surveyed households reported the presence of at least one installed smoke alarm, and 94% of respondents reported having an alarm on the same level of the home as their sleeping area. The prevalence of installed smoke alarms varied by highest education level in the household and income level. Sixty percent of all households had designed or discussed a fire escape plan at least once; only 17% of these households had actually practiced one. CONCLUSIONS: Although overall use of smoke alarms was high, certain population subgroups were less likely to have smoke alarms or to have them installed on the same floor as bedrooms. Fire escape planning, another important safety measure, was somewhat less common, and very few respondents reported having practiced a fire escape plan with the members of their household. PMID:9769771

  10. Genes that escape from X inactivation.

    PubMed

    Berletch, Joel B; Yang, Fan; Xu, Jun; Carrel, Laura; Disteche, Christine M

    2011-08-01

    To achieve a balanced gene expression dosage between males (XY) and females (XX), mammals have evolved a compensatory mechanism to randomly inactivate one of the female X chromosomes. Despite this chromosome-wide silencing, a number of genes escape X inactivation: in women about 15% of X-linked genes are bi-allelically expressed and in mice, about 3%. Expression from the inactive X allele varies from a few percent of that from the active allele to near equal expression. While most genes have a stable inactivation pattern, a subset of genes exhibit tissue-specific differences in escape from X inactivation. Escape genes appear to be protected from the repressive chromatin modifications associated with X inactivation. Differences in the identity and distribution of escape genes between species and tissues suggest a role for these genes in the evolution of sex differences in specific phenotypes. The higher expression of escape genes in females than in males implies that they may have female-specific roles and may be responsible for some of the phenotypes observed in X aneuploidy.

  11. Escape as reinforcement and escape extinction in the treatment of feeding problems.

    PubMed

    LaRue, Robert H; Stewart, Victoria; Piazza, Cathleen C; Volkert, Valerie M; Patel, Meeta R; Zeleny, Jason

    2011-01-01

    Given the effectiveness of putative escape extinction as treatment for feeding problems, it is surprising that little is known about the effects of escape as reinforcement for appropriate eating during treatment. In the current investigation, we examined the effectiveness of escape as reinforcement for mouth clean (a product measure of swallowing), escape as reinforcement for mouth clean plus escape extinction (EE), and EE alone as treatment for the food refusal of 5 children. Results were similar to those of previous studies, in that reinforcement alone did not result in increases in mouth clean or decreases in inappropriate behavior (e.g., Piazza, Patel, Gulotta, Sevin, & Layer, 2003). Increases in mouth clean and decreases in inappropriate behavior occurred when the therapist implemented EE independent of the presence or absence of reinforcement. Results are discussed in terms of the role of negative reinforcement in the etiology and treatment of feeding problems.

  12. Thermal escape from extrasolar giant planets

    PubMed Central

    Koskinen, Tommi T.; Lavvas, Panayotis; Harris, Matthew J.; Yelle, Roger V.

    2014-01-01

    The detection of hot atomic hydrogen and heavy atoms and ions at high altitudes around close-in extrasolar giant planets (EGPs) such as HD209458b implies that these planets have hot and rapidly escaping atmospheres that extend to several planetary radii. These characteristics, however, cannot be generalized to all close-in EGPs. The thermal escape mechanism and mass loss rate from EGPs depend on a complex interplay between photochemistry and radiative transfer driven by the stellar UV radiation. In this study, we explore how these processes change under different levels of irradiation on giant planets with different characteristics. We confirm that there are two distinct regimes of thermal escape from EGPs, and that the transition between these regimes is relatively sharp. Our results have implications for thermal mass loss rates from different EGPs that we discuss in the context of currently known planets and the detectability of their upper atmospheres. PMID:24664923

  13. Thermal escape from extrasolar giant planets.

    PubMed

    Koskinen, Tommi T; Lavvas, Panayotis; Harris, Matthew J; Yelle, Roger V

    2014-04-28

    The detection of hot atomic hydrogen and heavy atoms and ions at high altitudes around close-in extrasolar giant planets (EGPs) such as HD209458b implies that these planets have hot and rapidly escaping atmospheres that extend to several planetary radii. These characteristics, however, cannot be generalized to all close-in EGPs. The thermal escape mechanism and mass loss rate from EGPs depend on a complex interplay between photochemistry and radiative transfer driven by the stellar UV radiation. In this study, we explore how these processes change under different levels of irradiation on giant planets with different characteristics. We confirm that there are two distinct regimes of thermal escape from EGPs, and that the transition between these regimes is relatively sharp. Our results have implications for thermal mass loss rates from different EGPs that we discuss in the context of currently known planets and the detectability of their upper atmospheres.

  14. Statistical theory of asteroid escape rates.

    PubMed

    Jaffé, Charles; Ross, Shane D; Lo, Martin W; Marsden, Jerrold; Farrelly, David; Uzer, T

    2002-07-01

    Transition states in phase space are identified and shown to regulate the rate of escape of asteroids temporarily captured in circumplanetary orbits. The transition states, similar to those occurring in chemical reaction dynamics, are then used to develop a statistical semianalytical theory for the rate of escape of asteroids temporarily captured by Mars. Theory and numerical simulations are found to agree to better than 1%. These calculations suggest that further development of transition state theory in celestial mechanics, as an alternative to large-scale numerical simulations, will be a fruitful approach to mass transport calculations.

  15. Bacillus anthracis factors for phagosomal escape.

    PubMed

    Tonello, Fiorella; Zornetta, Irene

    2012-07-01

    The mechanism of phagosome escape by intracellular pathogens is an important step in the infectious cycle. During the establishment of anthrax, Bacillus anthracis undergoes a transient intracellular phase in which spores are engulfed by local phagocytes. Spores germinate inside phagosomes and grow to vegetative bacilli, which emerge from their resident intracellular compartments, replicate and eventually exit from the plasma membrane. During germination, B. anthracis secretes multiple factors that can help its resistance to the phagocytes. Here the possible role of B. anthracis toxins, phospholipases, antioxidant enzymes and capsules in the phagosomal escape and survival, is analyzed and compared with that of factors of other microbial pathogens involved in the same type of process.

  16. Martian Atmospheric and Ionospheric plasma Escape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundin, Rickard

    2016-04-01

    Solar forcing is responsible for the heating, ionization, photochemistry, and erosion processes in the upper atmosphere throughout the lifetime of the terrestrial planets. Of the four terrestrial planets, the Earth is the only one with a fully developed biosphere, while our kin Venus and Mars have evolved into arid inhabitable planets. As for Mars, there are ample evidences for an early Noachian, water rich period on Mars. The question is, what made Mars evolve so differently compared to the Earth? Various hydrosphere and atmospheric evolution scenarios for Mars have been forwarded based on surface morphology, chemical composition, simulations, semi-empiric (in-situ data) models, and the long-term evolution of the Sun. Progress has been made, but the case is still open regarding the changes that led to the present arid surface and tenuous atmosphere at Mars. This presentation addresses the long-term variability of the Sun, the solar forcing impact on the Martian atmosphere, and its interaction with the space environment - an electromagnetic wave and particle interaction with the upper atmosphere that has implications for its photochemistry, composition, and energization that governs thermal and non-thermal escape. Non-thermal escape implies an electromagnetic upward energization of planetary ions and molecules to velocities above escape velocity, a process governed by a combination of solar EUV radiation (ionization), and energy and momentum transfer by the solar wind. The ion escape issue dates back to the early Soviet and US-missions to Mars, but the first more accurate estimates of escape rates came with the Phobos-2 mission in 1989. Better-quality ion composition measurement results of atmospheric/ionospheric ion escape from Mars, obtained from ESA Mars Express (MEX) instruments, have improved our understanding of the ion escape mechanism. With the NASA MAVEN spacecraft orbiting Mars since Sept. 2014, dual in-situ measurement with plasma instruments are now

  17. On the escape of CH4 from Pluto's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koskinen, T. T.; Erwin, J. T.; Yelle, R. V.

    2015-09-01

    We adapted a multispecies escape model, developed for close-in extrasolar planets, to calculate the escape rates of CH4 and N2 from Pluto. In the absence of escape, CH4 should overtake N2 as the dominant species below the exobase. The CH4 profile depends strongly on the escape rate, however, and the typical escape rates predicted for Pluto lead to a nearly constant mixing ratio of less than 1% below the exobase. In this case the CH4 escape rate is only 5-10% of the N2 escape rate. Observations of the CH4 profile by the New Horizons/ALICE spectrograph can constrain the CH4 escape rate and provide a unique test for escape models.

  18. Escape from Albuquerque: An Apache Memorate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenfeld, Philip J.

    2001-01-01

    Clarence Hawkins, a White Mountain Apache, escaped from the Albuquerque Indian School around 1920. His 300-mile trip home, made with two other boys, exemplifies the reaction of many Indian youths to the American government's plans for cultural assimilation. The tale is told in the form of traditional Apache narrative. (TD)

  19. Nociception and escape behavior in planarians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoetz Collins, Eva-Maria

    2015-03-01

    Planarians are famous and widely studied for their regenerative capabilities. When a moving planarian is cut through the middle, the resulting head and tail pieces instantaneously retract and exhibit a characteristic escape response that differs from normal locomotion. In asexual animals, a similar reaction is observed when the planarian undergoes fission, suggesting that reproduction through self-tearing is a rather traumatic event for the animal. Using a multiscale approach, we unravel the dynamics, mechanics, and functional aspects of the planarian escape response. This musculature-driven gait was found to be a dominating response that supersedes the urge to feed or reproduce and quantitatively differs from other modes of planarian locomotion (gliding, peristalsis). We show that this escape gait constitutes the animal's pain response mediated by TRP like receptors and the neurotransmitter histamine, and that it can be induced through adverse thermal, mechanical, electrical or chemical stimuli. Ultimately, we will examine the neuronal subpopulations involved in mediating escape reflexes in planarians and how they are functionally restored during regeneration, thereby gaining mechanistic insight into the neuronal circuits required for specific behaviors. Supported by BWF CASI and Sloan Foundation.

  20. Centrifugally Stimulated Exospheric Ion Escape at Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delcourt, Dominique; Seki, K.; Terada, N.; Moore, Thomas E.

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the transport of ions in the low-altitude magnetosphere magnetosphere of Mercury. We show that, because of small spatial scales, the centrifugal effect due to curvature of the E B drift paths can lead to significant particle energization in the parallel direction. We demonstrate that because of this effect, ions with initial speed smaller than the escape speed such as those produced via thermal desorption can overcome gravity and escape into the magnetosphere. The escape route of this low-energy exosphere originating material is largely controlled by the magnetospheric convection rate. This escape route spreads over a narrower range of altitudes when the convection rate increases. Bulk transport of low-energy planetary material thus occurs within a limited region of space once moderate magnetospheric convection is established. These results suggest that, via release of material otherwise gravitationally trapped, the E B related centrifugal acceleration is an important mechanism for the net supply of plasma to the magnetosphere of Mercury.

  1. Animal escapology II: escape trajectory case studies

    PubMed Central

    Domenici, Paolo; Blagburn, Jonathan M.; Bacon, Jonathan P.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Escape trajectories (ETs; measured as the angle relative to the direction of the threat) have been studied in many taxa using a variety of methodologies and definitions. Here, we provide a review of methodological issues followed by a survey of ET studies across animal taxa, including insects, crustaceans, molluscs, lizards, fish, amphibians, birds and mammals. Variability in ETs is examined in terms of ecological significance and morpho-physiological constraints. The survey shows that certain escape strategies (single ETs and highly variable ETs within a limited angular sector) are found in most taxa reviewed here, suggesting that at least some of these ET distributions are the result of convergent evolution. High variability in ETs is found to be associated with multiple preferred trajectories in species from all taxa, and is suggested to provide unpredictability in the escape response. Random ETs are relatively rare and may be related to constraints in the manoeuvrability of the prey. Similarly, reports of the effect of refuges in the immediate environment are relatively uncommon, and mainly confined to lizards and mammals. This may be related to the fact that work on ETs carried out in laboratory settings has rarely provided shelters. Although there are a relatively large number of examples in the literature that suggest trends in the distribution of ETs, our understanding of animal escape strategies would benefit from a standardization of the analytical approach in the study of ETs, using circular statistics and related tests, in addition to the generation of large data sets. PMID:21753040

  2. Escape driven by α -stable white noises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dybiec, B.; Gudowska-Nowak, E.; Hänggi, P.

    2007-02-01

    We explore the archetype problem of an escape dynamics occurring in a symmetric double well potential when the Brownian particle is driven by white Lévy noise in a dynamical regime where inertial effects can safely be neglected. The behavior of escaping trajectories from one well to another is investigated by pointing to the special character that underpins the noise-induced discontinuity which is caused by the generalized Brownian paths that jump beyond the barrier location without actually hitting it. This fact implies that the boundary conditions for the mean first passage time (MFPT) are no longer determined by the well-known local boundary conditions that characterize the case with normal diffusion. By numerically implementing properly the set up boundary conditions, we investigate the survival probability and the average escape time as a function of the corresponding Lévy white noise parameters. Depending on the value of the skewness β of the Lévy noise, the escape can either become enhanced or suppressed: a negative asymmetry parameter β typically yields a decrease for the escape rate while the rate itself depicts a non-monotonic behavior as a function of the stability index α that characterizes the jump length distribution of Lévy noise, exhibiting a marked discontinuity at α=1 . We find that the typical factor of 2 that characterizes for normal diffusion the ratio between the MFPT for well-bottom-to-well-bottom and well-bottom-to-barrier-top no longer holds true. For sufficiently high barriers the survival probabilities assume an exponential behavior versus time. Distinct non-exponential deviations occur, however, for low barrier heights.

  3. Service-Life Extension of Explosive Escape Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, L. J.; Schimmel, M. L.

    1987-01-01

    Chemical and functional tests yield conservative service-life estimates. Approach to extension of service lives of explosive devices in aircraft escape system developed, supported by testing of representative candidate devices to evaluate quantitatively effects of service, age, and degradation, and to enable responsible, conservative service-life determinations. Five types of explosive components evaluated: rigid and flexible explosive transfer lines; one-way transfers; flexible, linear-shaped charges; and initiation-handles. Extension of service in realistic manner provides both cost savings and increased system reliability.

  4. Escape of photons from two fixed extreme Reissner-Nordstroem black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, Daniel; Ruiz, Antonia; Sanchez-Hernandez, Manuel

    2008-11-15

    We study the scattering of light (null geodesics) by two fixed extreme Reissner-Nordstroem black holes, in which the gravitational attraction of their masses is exactly balanced with the electrostatic repulsion of their charges, allowing a static spacetime. We identify the set of unstable periodic orbits that form part of the fractal repeller that completely describes the chaotic escape dynamics of photons. In the framework of periodic orbit theory, the analysis of the linear stability of the unstable periodic orbits is used to obtain the main quantities of chaos that characterize the escape dynamics of the photons scattered by the black holes. In particular, the escape rate that is compared with the result obtained from numerical simulations that consider statistical ensembles of photons. We also analyze the dynamics of photons in the proximity of a perturbed black hole and give an analytic estimate of the escape rate in this system.

  5. Escape of asteroids from the main belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granvik, Mikael; Morbidelli, Alessandro; Vokrouhlický, David; Bottke, William F.; Nesvorný, David; Jedicke, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Aims: We locate escape routes from the main asteroid belt, particularly into the near-Earth-object (NEO) region, and estimate the relative fluxes for different escape routes as a function of object size under the influence of the Yarkovsky semimajor-axis drift. Methods: We integrated the orbits of 78 355 known and 14 094 cloned main-belt objects and Cybele and Hilda asteroids (hereafter collectively called MBOs) for 100 Myr and recorded the characteristics of the escaping objects. The selected sample of MBOs with perihelion distance q > 1.3 au and semimajor axis a < 4.1 au is essentially complete, with an absolute magnitude limit ranging from HV < 15.9 in the inner belt (a < 2.5 au) to HV < 14.4 in the outer belt (2.5 au < a < 4.1 au). We modeled the semimajor-axis drift caused by the Yarkovsky force and assigned four different sizes (diameters of 0.1, 0.3, 1.0, and 3.0 km) and random spin obliquities (either 0 deg or 180 deg) for each test asteroid. Results: We find more than ten obvious escape routes from the asteroid belt to the NEO region, and they typically coincide with low-order mean-motion resonances with Jupiter and secular resonances. The locations of the escape routes are independent of the semimajor-axis drift rate and thus are also independent of the asteroid diameter. The locations of the escape routes are likewise unaffected when we added a model for Yarkovsky-O'Keefe-Radzievskii-Paddack (YORP) cycles coupled with secular evolution of the rotation pole as a result of the solar gravitational torque. A Yarkovsky-only model predicts a flux of asteroids entering the NEO region that is too high compared to the observationally constrained flux, and the discrepancy grows larger for smaller asteroids. A combined Yarkovsky and YORP model predicts a flux of small NEOs that is approximately a factor of 5 too low compared to an observationally constrained estimate. This suggests that the characteristic timescale of the YORP cycle is longer than our canonical

  6. 34. VIEW OF SUBMARINE ESCAPE TRAINING TANK PRIOR TO ADDITION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    34. VIEW OF SUBMARINE ESCAPE TRAINING TANK PRIOR TO ADDITION OF BLISTERS IN 1959, LOOKING SOUTHEAST - U.S. Naval Submarine Base, New London Submarine Escape Training Tank, Albacore & Darter Roads, Groton, New London County, CT

  7. 23. VIEW OF ESCAPE TRAINING TANK, LOOKING NORTHWEST, SHOWING TWOLOCK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. VIEW OF ESCAPE TRAINING TANK, LOOKING NORTHWEST, SHOWING TWO-LOCK RECOMPRESSION CHAMBER IN PASSAGEWAY FROM ELEVATOR TO CUPOLA - U.S. Naval Submarine Base, New London Submarine Escape Training Tank, Albacore & Darter Roads, Groton, New London County, CT

  8. 14. DETAIL VIEW OF ESCAPE TRAINING TANK, SHOWING HOLDDOWN RODS, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. DETAIL VIEW OF ESCAPE TRAINING TANK, SHOWING HOLD-DOWN RODS, LOOKING SOUTH - U.S. Naval Submarine Base, New London Submarine Escape Training Tank, Albacore & Darter Roads, Groton, New London County, CT

  9. 15. VIEW OF ESCAPE TRAINING TANK, LOOKING EAST ACROSS MEZZANINE, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. VIEW OF ESCAPE TRAINING TANK, LOOKING EAST ACROSS MEZZANINE, SHOWING ENTRANCE TO SUBMARINE SECTION AT 110-FOOT LEVEL - U.S. Naval Submarine Base, New London Submarine Escape Training Tank, Albacore & Darter Roads, Groton, New London County, CT

  10. 21. VIEW OF ESCAPE TRAINING TANK, SHOWING INTERIOR OF CUPOLA ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. VIEW OF ESCAPE TRAINING TANK, SHOWING INTERIOR OF CUPOLA AND TOP OF THE TANK, LOOKING NORTHEAST - U.S. Naval Submarine Base, New London Submarine Escape Training Tank, Albacore & Darter Roads, Groton, New London County, CT

  11. 18. VIEW OF ESCAPE TRAINING TANK, SHOWING ENCLOSED PASSAGEWAY FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. VIEW OF ESCAPE TRAINING TANK, SHOWING ENCLOSED PASSAGEWAY FROM 50-FOOT LOCK TO ELEVATOR, LOOKING WEST - U.S. Naval Submarine Base, New London Submarine Escape Training Tank, Albacore & Darter Roads, Groton, New London County, CT

  12. 17. VIEW OF ESCAPE TRAINING TANK, SHOWING ENCLOSED PASSAGEWAY FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. VIEW OF ESCAPE TRAINING TANK, SHOWING ENCLOSED PASSAGEWAY FROM ELEVATOR TO 18-FOOT LOCK, LOOKING EAST - U.S. Naval Submarine Base, New London Submarine Escape Training Tank, Albacore & Darter Roads, Groton, New London County, CT

  13. Characterizing Atmospheric Escape from Mars Today and Through Time, with MAVEN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lillis, R. J.; Brain, D. A.; Bougher, S. W.; Leblanc, F.; Luhmann, J. G.; Jakosky, B. M.; Modolo, R.; Fox, J.; Deighan, J.; Fang, X.; Wang, Y. C.; Lee, Y.; Dong, C.; Ma, Y.; Cravens, T.; Andersson, L.; Curry, S. M.; Schneider, N.; Combi, M.; Stewart, I.; Clarke, J.; Grebowsky, J.; Mitchell, D. L.; Yelle, R.; Nagy, A. F.; Baker, D.; Lin, R. P.

    2015-12-01

    Two of the primary goals of the MAVEN mission are to determine how the rate of escape of Martian atmospheric gas to space at the current epoch depends upon solar influences and planetary parameters and to estimate the total mass of atmosphere lost to space over the history of the planet. Along with MAVEN's suite of nine science instruments, a collection of complementary models of the neutral and plasma environments of Mars' upper atmosphere and near-space environment are an indispensable part of the MAVEN toolkit, for three primary reasons. First, escaping neutrals will not be directly measured by MAVEN and so neutral escape rates must be derived, via models, from in situ measurements of plasma temperatures and neutral and plasma densities and by remote measurements of the extended exosphere. Second, although escaping ions will be directly measured, all MAVEN measurements are limited in spatial coverage, so global models are needed for intelligent interpolation over spherical surfaces to calculate global escape rates. Third, MAVEN measurements will lead to multidimensional parameterizations of global escape rates for a range of solar and planetary parameters, but further global models informed by MAVEN data will be required to extend these parameterizations to the more extreme conditions that likely prevailed in the early solar system, which is essential for determining total integrated atmospheric loss. We describe these modeling tools and the strategies for using them in concert with MAVEN measurements to greater constrain the history of atmospheric loss on Mars.

  14. Effects of Serotonergic and Opioidergic Drugs on Escape Behaviors and Social Status of Male Crickets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyakonova, V. E.; Schürmann, F.-W.; Sakharov, D. A.

    We examined the effects of selective serotonin depletion and opioid ligands on social rank and related escape behavior of the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus. Establishment of social rank in a pair of males affected their escape reactions. Losers showed a lower and dominants a higher percentage of jumps in response to tactile cercal stimulation than before a fight. The serotonin-depleting drug α-methyltryptophan (AMTP) caused an activation of the escape reactivity in socially naive crickets. AMTP-treated animals also showed a lower ability to become dominants. With an initial 51.6+/-3.6% of wins in the AMTP group, the percentage decreased to 26+/-1.6% on day 5 after injection. The opiate receptor antagonist naloxone affected fight and escape similarly as AMTP. In contrast to naloxone, the opioid agonist [d-Ala2, N-Me-Phe4, Gly5-ol]-enkephalin decreased escape responsiveness to cercal stimulation in naive and subordinate crickets. We suggest that serotonergic and opioid systems are involved in the dominance induced depression of escape behavior.

  15. Hot oxygen escape from Mars: Simple scaling with solar EUV irradiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cravens, T. E.; Rahmati, A.; Fox, Jane L.; Lillis, R.; Bougher, S.; Luhmann, J.; Sakai, S.; Deighan, J.; Lee, Yuni; Combi, M.; Jakosky, B.

    2017-01-01

    The evolution of the atmosphere of Mars and the loss of volatiles over the lifetime of the solar system is a key topic in planetary science. An important loss process for atomic species, such as oxygen, is ionospheric photochemical escape. Dissociative recombination of O2+ ions (the major ion species) produces fast oxygen atoms, some of which can escape from the planet. Many theoretical hot O models have been constructed over the years, although a number of uncertainties are present in these models, particularly concerning the elastic cross sections of O atoms with CO2. Recently, the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution mission has been rapidly improving our understanding of the upper atmosphere and ionosphere of Mars and its interaction with the external environment (e.g., solar wind), allowing a new assessment of this important loss process. The purpose of the current paper is to take a simple analytical approach to the oxygen escape problem in order to (1) study the role that variations in solar radiation or solar wind fluxes could have on escape in a transparent fashion and (2) isolate the effects of uncertainties in oxygen cross sections on the derived oxygen escape rates. In agreement with several more elaborate numerical models, we find that the escape flux is directly proportional to the incident solar extreme ultraviolet irradiance and is inversely proportional to the backscatter elastic cross section. The amount of O lost due to ion transport in the topside ionosphere is found to be about 5-10% of the total.

  16. Escape of atmospheres and loss of water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunten, D. M.; Donahue, T. M.; Walker, J. C. G.; Kasting, J. F.

    1989-01-01

    The properties and limitations of several loss processes for atmospheric gases are presented and discussed. They include thermal loss (Jeans and hydrodynamic); nonthermal loss (all processes involve charged particles); and impact erosion, including thermal escape from a molten body heated by rapid accretion. Hydrodynamic escape, or 'blowoff', is of particular interest because it offers the prospect of processing large quantities of gas and enriching the remainder in heavy elements and isotopes. In a second part, the water budgets and likely evolutionary histories of Venus, Earth and Mars are assessed. Although it is tempting to associate the great D/H enrichment on Venus with loss of a large initial endowment, a steady state with juvenile water (perhaps from comets) is equally probable.

  17. Fixed-ratio escape reinforcement1

    PubMed Central

    Azrin, N. H.; Holz, W. C.; Hake, D. F.; Ayllon, T.

    1963-01-01

    Escape responses of squirrel monkeys were reinforced according to a fixed-ratio schedule. The reinforcement was a period of safety from a stimulus that signalled the delivery of intermittent pain-shocks. When the frequency of shock was gradually reduced, the performance remained at a high level until the shocks were quite infrequent. Similarly, the duration of the period of safety could be reduced to a few seconds with little loss of behavior. Thus, the responses appeared to be reinforced by even a brief period of safety, the actual degree of shock reduction being fairly slight. The changes in responding during this fixed-ratio escape procedure were comparable to the response changes typically obtained during fixed-ratio food procedures. PMID:13965780

  18. Triton: topside ionosphere and nitrogen escape.

    PubMed

    Yung, Y L; Lyons, J R

    1990-09-01

    The principal ion in the ionosphere of Triton is N+. Energetic electrons of magnetospheric origin are the primary source of ionization, with a smaller contribution due to photoionization. To explain the topside plasma scale height, we postulate that N+ ions escape from Triton. The loss rate is 3.4 x 10(7) cm-2 s-1 or 7.9 x 10(24) ions s-1. Dissociative recombination of N2+ produces neutral exothermic fragments that can escape from Triton. The rate is estimated to be 8.6 x 10(6) N cm-2 s-1 or 2.0 x 10(24) atoms s-1. Implications for the magnetosphere of Neptune and Triton's evolution are discussed.

  19. [Escape mutants of hepatitis B virus].

    PubMed

    Jaramillo, Carlos Mario; Navas, María-Cristina

    2015-04-01

    The hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a public health problem worldwide. Considering HBV morbidity and mortality and the economic consequences .of this infection, policies and strategies to control it have been implemented, especially in regions where HBV infection is endemic, with high rates of vertical and horizontal infection. One of these strategies is the development of the recombinant vaccine. A 92% of the countries in the world have implemented the vaccine with a global coverage of 69%. The escape variants of HBV correspond to isolates with mutations in the sequence coding for the "a" determinant; these mutations result in changes in the amino acid sequence of the surface antigen (HBsAg) that prevent neutralization of viral particles by antibodies generated in response to vaccination or infection. The escape variants can infect vaccinated individuals and have been identified in the population of countries with different epidemiological patterns.

  20. Dynamic Escape Routes for Naval Ships

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    3 o Increase the likelihood of successfully salvaging the ship, and o Increase the likelihood that the crew is rescued safely. It will be possible...spans the period before the event that triggers ship abandonment. Escape routes can be configured based on two factors: 6 o “Crew distribution...crewmembers but the guards are resting in cabins and berthing rooms. This is a plausible scenario at night when the ship is in a non-home port. o

  1. 30 CFR 75.382 - Mechanical escape facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Ventilation § 75.382 Mechanical escape facilities. (a) Mechanical escape facilities shall be provided with overspeed, overwind, and automatic stop... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mechanical escape facilities. 75.382 Section...

  2. 30 CFR 75.382 - Mechanical escape facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Mechanical escape facilities. 75.382 Section 75... HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Ventilation § 75.382 Mechanical escape facilities. (a) Mechanical escape facilities shall be provided with overspeed, overwind, and automatic...

  3. 30 CFR 75.382 - Mechanical escape facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Mechanical escape facilities. 75.382 Section 75... HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Ventilation § 75.382 Mechanical escape facilities. (a) Mechanical escape facilities shall be provided with overspeed, overwind, and automatic...

  4. 30 CFR 75.382 - Mechanical escape facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Mechanical escape facilities. 75.382 Section 75... HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Ventilation § 75.382 Mechanical escape facilities. (a) Mechanical escape facilities shall be provided with overspeed, overwind, and automatic...

  5. 30 CFR 75.382 - Mechanical escape facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Mechanical escape facilities. 75.382 Section 75... HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Ventilation § 75.382 Mechanical escape facilities. (a) Mechanical escape facilities shall be provided with overspeed, overwind, and automatic...

  6. 46 CFR 108.153 - Location of means of escape.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Location of means of escape. 108.153 Section 108.153 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Construction and Arrangement Means of Escape § 108.153 Location of means of escape....

  7. 46 CFR 108.153 - Location of means of escape.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Location of means of escape. 108.153 Section 108.153 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Construction and Arrangement Means of Escape § 108.153 Location of means of escape....

  8. Scrunching: a novel escape gait in planarians.

    PubMed

    Cochet-Escartin, Olivier; Mickolajczyk, Keith J; Collins, Eva-Maria S

    2015-09-10

    The ability to escape a predator or other life-threatening situations is central to animal survival. Different species have evolved unique strategies under anatomical and environmental constraints. In this study, we describe a novel musculature-driven escape gait in planarians, 'scrunching', which is quantitatively different from other planarian gaits, such as gliding and peristalsis. We show that scrunching is a conserved gait among different flatworm species, underlying its importance as an escape mechanism. We further demonstrate that it can be induced by a variety of physical stimuli, including amputation, high temperature, electric shock and low pH. We discuss the functional basis for scrunching as the preferential gait when gliding is impaired due to a disruption of mucus production. Finally, we show that the key mechanical features of scrunching are adequately captured by a simple biomechanical model that is solely based on experimental data from traction force microscopy and tissue rheology without fit parameters. Together, our results form a complete description of this novel form of planarian locomotion. Because scrunching has distinct dynamics, this gait can serve as a robust behavioral readout for studies of motor neuron and muscular functions in planarians and in particular the restoration of these functions during regeneration.

  9. Scrunching: a novel escape gait in planarians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochet-Escartin, Olivier; Mickolajczyk, Keith J.; Collins, Eva-Maria S.

    2015-10-01

    The ability to escape a predator or other life-threatening situations is central to animal survival. Different species have evolved unique strategies under anatomical and environmental constraints. In this study, we describe a novel musculature-driven escape gait in planarians, ‘scrunching’, which is quantitatively different from other planarian gaits, such as gliding and peristalsis. We show that scrunching is a conserved gait among different flatworm species, underlying its importance as an escape mechanism. We further demonstrate that it can be induced by a variety of physical stimuli, including amputation, high temperature, electric shock and low pH. We discuss the functional basis for scrunching as the preferential gait when gliding is impaired due to a disruption of mucus production. Finally, we show that the key mechanical features of scrunching are adequately captured by a simple biomechanical model that is solely based on experimental data from traction force microscopy and tissue rheology without fit parameters. Together, our results form a complete description of this novel form of planarian locomotion. Because scrunching has distinct dynamics, this gait can serve as a robust behavioral readout for studies of motor neuron and muscular functions in planarians and in particular the restoration of these functions during regeneration.

  10. Transfer to near-Earth asteroids from a lunar orbit via Earth flyby and direct escaping trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yamin; Zhang, Yonghe; Qiao, Dong; Mao, Qingyun; Jiang, Jun

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, transfer trajectories from the Moon to near-Earth asteroids with different escaping trajectory options, Earth flyby and direct escaping, are investigated. The former executes an Earth flyby maneuver to increase the orbital energy during the transfer. The latter realizes the transfer by a single impulse at perilune. In this work, these two kinds of escaping orbits in the Earth-Moon planar circular-restricted three-body (PCRTB) system are analyzed firstly. The abilities to achieve the same Earth hyperbolic excess velocity for both orbits with minimum velocity impulse expenditure are calculated and analyzed. Then, the asteroid flyby trajectory in ephemeris model via two types of escaping orbits is designed. Asteroids 4179 Toutatis from Apollo and 3908 Nyx from Amor, represent the small and large transfer energy, respectively, are chosen as targets. The selection strategy of escaping trajectories for small and large-energy transfers is discussed.

  11. Risks incurred by hydrogen escaping from containers and conduits

    SciTech Connect

    Swain, M.R.; Grilliot, E.S.; Swain, M.N.

    1998-08-01

    This paper is a discussion of a method for hydrogen leak classification. Leaks are classified as; gas escapes into enclosed spaces, gas escapes into partially enclosed spaces (vented), and gas escapes into unenclosed spaces. Each of the three enclosure classifications is further divided into two subclasses; total volume of hydrogen escaped and flow rate of escaping hydrogen. A method to aid in risk assessment determination in partially enclosed spaces is proposed and verified for several enclosure geometries. Examples are discussed for additional enclosure geometries.

  12. Slow and Fast Escape for Open Intermittent Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demers, Mark F.; Todd, Mike

    2017-04-01

    If a system mixes too slowly, putting a hole in it can completely destroy the richness of the dynamics. Here we study this instability for a class of intermittent maps with a family of slowly mixing measures. We show that there are three regimes: (1) standard hyperbolic-like behavior where the rate of mixing is faster than the rate of escape through the hole, there is a unique limiting absolutely continuous conditionally invariant measure (accim) and there is a complete thermodynamic description of the dynamics on the survivor set; (2) an intermediate regime, where the rate of mixing and escape through the hole coincide, limiting accims exist, but much of the thermodynamic picture breaks down; (3) a subexponentially mixing regime where the slow mixing means that mass simply accumulates on the parabolic fixed point. We give a complete picture of the transitions and stability properties (in the size of the hole and as we move through the family) in this class of open systems. In particular, we are able to recover a form of stability in the third regime above via the dynamics on the survivor set, even when no limiting accim exists.

  13. Heating and acceleration of escaping planetary ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, Hans

    2010-05-01

    The magnetic field of the Earth acts like a shield against the solar wind, leading to a magnetopause position many planetary radii away from the planet, in contrast to the situation at non- or weakly magnetized planets such as Mars and Venus. Despite this there is significant ion outflow due to solar wind interaction from the cusp and polar cap regions of the Earth's ionosphere. Effective interaction regions form, in particular in the ionospheric projection of the cusp, where ionospheric plasma flows up along the field-lines in response to magnetospheric energy input. Strong wave-particle interaction at altitudes above the ionosphere further accelerates the particles so that gravity is overcome. For the particles to enter a direct escape path they must be accelerated along open magnetic field lines so that they cross the magnetopause or reach a distance beyond the region of return flow in the tail. This return flow may also be either lost to space or returned to the atmosphere. Throughout this transport chain the heating and acceleration experienced by the particles will have an influence on the final fate of the particles. We will present quantitative estimates of centrifugal acceleration and perpendicular heating along the escape path from the cusp, through the high altitude polar cap/mantle, based on Cluster spacecraft data. We will open up for a discussion on the benefits of a ponderomotive force description of the acceleration affecting the ion circulation and escape. Finally we will compare with the situation at the unmagnetized planets Mars and Venus and discuss to what extent a magnetic field protects an atmosphere from loss through solar wind interaction.

  14. Suicide as escape from psychotic panic.

    PubMed

    Goldblatt, Mark J; Ronningstam, Elsa; Schechter, Mark; Herbstman, Benjamin; Maltsberger, John T

    2016-01-01

    Suicides of patients in states of acute persecutory panic may be provoked by a subjective experience of helpless terror threatening imminent annihilation or dismemberment. These patients are literally scared to death and try to run away. They imagine suicide is survivable and desperately attempt to escape from imaginary enemies. These states of terror occur in a wide range of psychotic illnesses and are often associated with command hallucinations and delusions. In this article, the authors consider the subjective experience of persecutory panic and the suicide response as an attempt to flee from danger.

  15. Evolutionary escape from the prisoner's dilemma.

    PubMed

    Worden, Lee; Levin, Simon A

    2007-04-07

    The classic prisoner's dilemma model of game theory is modified by introducing occasional variations on the options available to players. Mutation and selection of game options reliably change the game matrix, gradually, from a prisoner's dilemma game into a byproduct mutualism one, in which cooperation is stable, and "temptation to defect" is replaced by temptation to cooperate. This result suggests that when there are many different potential ways of interacting, exploring those possibilities may make escape from prisoner's dilemmas a common outcome in the world. A consequence is that persistent prisoner's dilemma structures may be less common than one might otherwise expect.

  16. Modeling Fluorescence Escape from Tissue Phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Craig Morris

    1995-01-01

    This dissertation represents a contribution to the field of quantitative fluorescence spectroscopy of biological tissue. The absorption and scattering properties of a turbid medium affect the propagation of fluorescence to the medium surface. Optical properties also affect the amount of light reaching a detector placed to monitor fluorescence non-invasively. These facts have in part limited fluorescence spectroscopy of turbid media to a qualitative science. To study the general characteristics of turbid medium fluorescence, a Monte Carlo algorithm of fluorescence light propagation was developed. Modifications to the general algorithm were made to study several specific light distribution quantities associated with optical fiber fluorescent measurement devices. The Monte Carlo-based studies were also used to develop simple, accurate expressions describing the one -dimensional distribution of excitation light within a turbid medium and the escape of fluorescence from the medium. The expressions have accuracy comparable to solutions of the radiative transport equation. The two expressions were combined to derive a simple expression relating the fluorescence power escaping a turbid medium due to surface excitation, to the medium intrinsic fluorescence coefficient, as a function of the medium optical properties. Based on this expression and a description of the fluorescence escape power intercepted by a distant detector, a method was developed to recover the intrinsic fluorescence coefficient from surface measurements of fluorescence and optical properties. Experiments with water-based, turbid media verified the recovery method. The method used to recover the intrinsic fluorescence coefficient was modified for use with a clinical measurement geometry, specifically a small diameter optical fiber probe. Modification required a calibration method to estimate two optical property variables from two unique surface measurements of diffuse reflectance made with the optical

  17. MAVEN Imaging UV Spectrograph Results on the Mars Atmosphere and Atmospheric Escape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaffin, Michael; Schneider, Nick; McClintock, Bill; Stewart, Ian; Deighan, Justin; Jain, Sonal; Clarke, John; Holsclaw, Greg; Montmessin, Franck; Lefevre, Franck; Chaufray, Jean-Yves; Stiepen, Arnaud; Crismani, Matteo; Mayyasi, Majd; Evans, Scott; Stevens, Mike; Yelle, Roger; Jakosky, Bruce

    2016-04-01

    The Imaging Ultraviolet Spectrograph (IUVS) is one of nine science instruments aboard the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile and EvolutioN (MAVEN) spacecraft, whose payload is dedicated to exploring the upper atmosphere of Mars and understanding the magnitude and drivers of Mars' atmospheric escape rate. IUVS uses ultraviolet light to investigate the lower and upper atmosphere and ionosphere of Mars. The instrument is among the most powerful spectrographs sent to another planet, with several key capabilities: (1) separate Far-UV & Mid-UV channels for stray light control, (2) a high resolution echelle mode to resolve deuterium and hydrogen emission, (3) internal instrument pointing and scanning capabilities to allow complete mapping and nearly continuous operation, and (4) optimization for airglow studies. IUVS, along with other MAVEN instruments, obtains a comprehensive picture of the current state of the Mars upper atmosphere and ionosphere and the processes that control atmospheric escape. We present an overview of selected IUVS results, including (1) the discovery of diffuse aurora at Mars, and its contrast with previously detected discrete aurora localized near crustal magnetic fields; (2) widespread detection of mesospheric clouds; (3) Significant seasonal and short-timescale variability in thermospheric composition; (4) Global ozone maps spanning six months of seasonal evolution; and (5) mapping of the Mars H and O coronas, deriving the escape rates of H and O and their variability. This last is of particular importance for understanding the long term evolution of Mars and its atmosphere, with the observed preset escape of H potentially capable of removing a large fraction of Mars' initial water inventory, and the differential escape of O relative to H potentially providing a net source of oxidizing power to the atmosphere and planet at present, in contrast with a photochemical theory that predicts stoichiometrically balanced escape. The atmospheric and escape

  18. 46 CFR 56.50-25 - Safety and relief valve escape piping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... supported and installed so that no stress is transmitted to the safety valve body. (c) Safety or relief... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Safety and relief valve escape piping. 56.50-25 Section... SYSTEMS AND APPURTENANCES Design Requirements Pertaining to Specific Systems § 56.50-25 Safety and...

  19. The effects of steady swimming on fish escape performance.

    PubMed

    Anwar, Sanam B; Cathcart, Kelsey; Darakananda, Karin; Gaing, Ashley N; Shin, Seo Yim; Vronay, Xena; Wright, Dania N; Ellerby, David J

    2016-06-01

    Escape maneuvers are essential to the survival and fitness of many animals. Escapes are frequently initiated when an animal is already in motion. This may introduce constraints that alter the escape performance. In fish, escape maneuvers and steady, body caudal fin (BCF) swimming are driven by distinct patterns of curvature of the body axis. Pre-existing muscle activity may therefore delay or diminish a response. To quantify the performance consequences of escaping in flow, escape behavior was examined in bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus) in both still-water and during steady swimming. Escapes executed during swimming were kinematically less variable than those made in still-water. Swimming escapes also had increased response latencies and lower peak velocities and accelerations than those made in still-water. Performance was also lower for escapes made up rather than down-stream, and a preference for down-stream escapes may be associated with maximizing performance. The constraints imposed by pre-existing motion and flow, therefore, have the potential to shape predator-prey interactions under field conditions by shifting the optimal strategies for both predators and prey.

  20. Influence of Sae-regulated and Agr-regulated factors on the escape of Staphylococcus aureus from human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Münzenmayer, Lisa; Geiger, Tobias; Daiber, Ellen; Schulte, Berit; Autenrieth, Stella E; Fraunholz, Martin; Wolz, Christiane

    2016-08-01

    Although Staphylococcus aureus is not a classical intracellular pathogen, it can survive within phagocytes and many other cell types. However, the pathogen is also able to escape from cells by mechanisms that are only partially understood. We analysed a series of isogenic S. aureus mutants of the USA300 derivative JE2 for their capacity to destroy human macrophages from within. Intracellular S. aureus JE2 caused severe cell damage in human macrophages and could efficiently escape from within the cells. To obtain this full escape phenotype including an intermittent residency in the cytoplasm, the combined action of the regulatory systems Sae and Agr is required. Mutants in Sae or mutants deficient in the Sae target genes lukAB and pvl remained in high numbers within the macrophages causing reduced cell damage. Mutants in the regulatory system Agr or in the Agr target gene psmα were largely similar to wild-type bacteria concerning cell damage and escape efficiency. However, these strains were rarely detectable in the cytoplasm, emphasizing the role of phenol-soluble modulins (PSMs) for phagosomal escape. Thus, Sae-regulated toxins largely determine damage and escape from within macrophages, whereas PSMs are mainly responsible for the escape from the phagosome into the cytoplasm. Damage of macrophages induced by intracellular bacteria was linked neither to activation of apoptosis-related caspase 3, 7 or 8 nor to NLRP3-dependent inflammasome activation.

  1. Structured Observations Reveal Slow HIV-1 CTL Escape

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Hannah E.; Hurst, Jacob; Robinson, Nicola; Brown, Helen; Flanagan, Peter; Vass, Laura; Fidler, Sarah; Weber, Jonathan; Babiker, Abdel; Phillips, Rodney E.; McLean, Angela R.; Frater, John

    2015-01-01

    The existence of viral variants that escape from the selection pressures imposed by cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTLs) in HIV-1 infection is well documented, but it is unclear when they arise, with reported measures of the time to escape in individuals ranging from days to years. A study of participants enrolled in the SPARTAC (Short Pulse Anti-Retroviral Therapy at HIV Seroconversion) clinical trial allowed direct observation of the evolution of CTL escape variants in 125 adults with primary HIV-1 infection observed for up to three years. Patient HLA-type, longitudinal CD8+ T-cell responses measured by IFN-γ ELISpot and longitudinal HIV-1 gag, pol, and nef sequence data were used to study the timing and prevalence of CTL escape in the participants whilst untreated. Results showed that sequence variation within CTL epitopes at the first time point (within six months of the estimated date of seroconversion) was consistent with most mutations being transmitted in the infecting viral strain rather than with escape arising within the first few weeks of infection. Escape arose throughout the first three years of infection, but slowly and steadily. Approximately one third of patients did not drive any new escape in an HLA-restricted epitope in just under two years. Patients driving several escape mutations during these two years were rare and the median and modal numbers of new escape events in each patient were one and zero respectively. Survival analysis of time to escape found that possession of a protective HLA type significantly reduced time to first escape in a patient (p = 0.01), and epitopes escaped faster in the face of a measurable CD8+ ELISpot response (p = 0.001). However, even in an HLA matched host who mounted a measurable, specific, CD8+ response the average time before the targeted epitope evolved an escape mutation was longer than two years. PMID:25642847

  2. Tectonic escape in the evolution of the continental crust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, K.; Sengor, C.

    1986-01-01

    The continental crust originated by processes similar to those operating today and continents consist of material most of which originated long ago in arc-systems that have later been modified, especially at Andean margins and in continental collisions where crustal thickening is common. Collision-related strike-slip motion is a general process in continental evolution. Because buoyant continental (or arc) material generally moves during collision toward a nearby oceanic margin where less buoyant lithosphere crops out, the process of major strike-slip dominated motion toward a 'free-face' is called 'tectonic escape'. Tectonic escape is and has been an element in continental evolution throughout recorded earth-history. It promotes: (1) rifting and the formation of rift-basins with thinning of thickened crust; (2) pervasive strike-slip faulting late in orogenic history which breaks up mountain belts across strike and may juxtapose unrelated sectors in cross-section; (3) localized compressional mountains and related foreland-trough basins.

  3. Autoimmunity as a result of escape from RNA surveillance.

    PubMed

    Bachmann, Michael P; Bartsch, Holger; Gross, Joanne K; Maier, Shannon M; Gross, Timothy F; Workman, Jennifer L; James, Judith A; Farris, A Darise; Jung, Bettina; Franke, Claudia; Conrad, Karsten; Schmitz, Marc; Büttner, Cordula; Buyon, Jill P; Semsei, Imre; Harley, John B; Rieber, E Peter

    2006-08-01

    In previous studies, we detected a frame shift mutation in the gene encoding the autoantigen La of a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus. The mutant La mRNA contains a premature termination codon. mRNAs that prematurely terminate translation should be eliminated by RNA quality control mechanisms. As we find Abs specific for the mutant La form in approximately 30% of sera from anti-La-positive patients, we expected that mutant La mRNAs circumvent RNA control and the expression of mutant La protein could become harmful. Indeed, real-time PCR, immunostaining, and immunoblotting data of mice transgenic for the mutant La form show that mutant La mRNAs are not repressed in these animals and are translated to mutant La protein. In addition to the mutant La protein, we detected a minor portion of native human La in the mutant La-transgenic mice. Therefore, ribosomal frame shifting may allow the mutant La mRNA to escape from RNA control. Interestingly, expression of the mutant La mRNA results in a lupus-like disease in the experimental mice. Consequently, escape of mutant La mRNA from RNA control can have two effects: it 1) results in the expression of an immunogenic (neo)epitope, and 2) predisposes to autoimmunity.

  4. Autoimmunity as a Result of Escape from RNA Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Bachmann, Michael P.; Bartsch, Holger; Gross, Joanne K.; Maier, Shannon M.; Gross, Timothy F.; Workman, Jennifer L.; James, Judith A.; Farris, A. Darise; Jung, Bettina; Franke, Claudia; Conrad, Karsten; Schmitz, Marc; Büttner, Cordula; Buyon, Jill P.; Semsei, Imre; Harley, John B.; Rieber, E. Peter

    2006-01-01

    In previous studies we detected a frame shift mutation in the gene encoding the autoantigen La of a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus. The mutant La mRNA contains a premature termination codon. mRNAs that prematurely terminate translation should be eliminated by RNA quality control mechanisms. As we find Abs specific for the mutant La form in about 30% of sera from anti-La positive patients we expected that mutant La mRNAs circumvent RNA control and the expression of mutant La protein could become harmful. Indeed, realtime PCR, immunostaining, and immunoblotting data of mice transgenic for the mutant La form show that mutant La mRNAs are not repressed in these animals and are translated to mutant La protein. In addition to the mutant La protein, we detected a minor portion of native human La in the mutant La transgenic mice. Therefore, ribosomal frame shifting may allow the mutant La mRNA to escape from RNA control. Interestingly, expression of the mutant La mRNA results in a lupus like disease in the experimental mice. Consequently, escape of mutant La mRNA from RNA control can have two effects: It (i) results in the expression of an immunogenic (neo)epitope, and (ii) predisposes to autoimmunity. PMID:16849479

  5. Formation and Internal Structure of Terrestrial Planets, and Atmospheric Escape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, S.

    2014-11-01

    As of 2014 April 21, over 1490 confirmed exoplanets and 3705 Kepler candidates have been detected. This implies that exoplanets may be ubiquitous in the universe. In this paper, we focus on the formation, evolution, and internal structure of terrestrial planets, and the atmospheric escape of close-in planets. In chapter 2, we investigate the dynamical evolution of planetary system after the protoplanetary disk has dissipated. We find that in the final assembly stage, the occurrence of terrestrial planets is quite common and in 40% of our simulations finally at least one planet is formed in the habitable zone. We also find that if there is a highly-inclined giant planet in the system, a great many bodies will be either driven out of the system, or collide with the giant planet or the central star. This will lead to the difficulty in planetary accretion. Moreover, our results show that planetary migration can lead to the formation of close-in planets. Besides migration, close-in terrestrial planets can also be formed by a collision-merger mechanism, which means that planetary embryos can kick terrestrial planets directly into orbits that are extremely close to their parent stars. In chapter 3, we construct numerically an internal structure model for terrestrial planets, and provide three kinds of possible internal structures of Europa (Jupiter's moon) based on this model. Then, we calculate the radii of low-mass exoplanets for various mass combinations of core and mantle, and find that some of them are inconsistent with the observed radius of rocky planets. This phenomenon can be explained only if there exists a large amount of water in the core, or they own gaseous envelopes. In chapter 4, we improve our planetary evolution codes using the semi-gray model of Guillot (2010), which includes the incident flux from the host star as a heating source in planetary atmosphere. The updated codes can solve the structure of the top radiative zone of intensely irradiated

  6. The escape problem for mortal walkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grebenkov, D. S.; Rupprecht, J.-F.

    2017-02-01

    We introduce and investigate the escape problem for random walkers that may eventually die, decay, bleach, or lose activity during their diffusion towards an escape or reactive region on the boundary of a confining domain. In the case of a first-order kinetics (i.e., exponentially distributed lifetimes), we study the effect of the associated death rate onto the survival probability, the exit probability, and the mean first passage time. We derive the upper and lower bounds and some approximations for these quantities. We reveal three asymptotic regimes of small, intermediate, and large death rates. General estimates and asymptotics are compared to several explicit solutions for simple domains and to numerical simulations. These results allow one to account for stochastic photobleaching of fluorescent tracers in bio-imaging, degradation of mRNA molecules in genetic translation mechanisms, or high mortality rates of spermatozoa in the fertilization process. Our findings provide a mathematical ground for optimizing storage containers and materials to reduce the risk of leakage of dangerous chemicals or nuclear wastes.

  7. Orbital Effects on Mercury's Escaping Sodium Exosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, Carl A.; Wilson, Jody K.; Baumgardner, Jeffrey; Mendillo, Michael

    2009-01-01

    We present results from coronagraphic imaging of Mercury's sodium tail over a 7 deg field of view. Several sets of observations made at the McDonald Observatory since May 2007 show a tail of neutral sodium atoms stretching more than 1000 Mercury radii (R(sub m)) in length, or a full degree of sky. However, no tail was observed extending beyond 120 R(sub m) during the January 2008 MESSENGER Fly-by period, or during a similar orbital phase of Mercury in July 2008. Large changes in Mercury's heliocentric radial velocity cause Doppler shifts about the Fraunhofer absorption features; the resultant change in solar flux and radiation pressure is the primary cause of the observed variation in tail brightness. Smaller fluctuations in brightness may exist due to changing source rates at the surface, but we have no explicit evidence for such changes in this data set. The effects of radiation pressure on Mercury's escaping atmosphere are investigated using seven observations spanning different orbital phases. Total escape rates of atmospheric sodium are estimated to be between 5 and 13 x 10(exp 23) atoms/s and show a correlation to radiation pressure. Candidate sources of Mercury's sodium exosphere include desorption by UV sunlight, thermal desorption, solar wind channeled along Mercury's magnetic field lines, and micro-meteor impacts. Wide-angle observations of the full extent of Mercury's sodium tail offer opportunities to enhance our understanding of the time histories of these source rates.

  8. Escape mechanisms of dust in Io

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flandes, A.

    The injection of material into the jovian magnetosphere through Io's volcanic activity makes possible the formation of structures such as the plasma torus and the dust ballerina skirt. Io's high temperature volcanism produces spectacular plumes, but even the tallest plumes, as those of Pelen Patera, will not produce enough energy to defeat the gravitational attraction of Io. The fact is that dust escapes from Io, which implies that a second mechanism is acting on the grains. Grains brought to the top of the highest plumes by the volcanic forces are still under Io's gravitational pull, but need only a minimum charge (~10-1 4 C) so that the Lorentz force due to the Jovian magnetic field equilibrates this attraction. In the volcanic vents, the escape velocity of the ejected material and its own density produces enough collisions to create charges. On top of the highest plumes (~500km) charged grains are exposed to the plasma torus that co-rotates rigidly with Jupiter and, due to the relative velocity among Io and the torus, the grains will be dragged away from Io. As it is well known, these dust grains will also be dragged away from Jupiter.

  9. A New Maneuver for Escape Trajectories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Robert B.

    2008-01-01

    This presentation put forth a new maneuver for escape trajectories and specifically sought to find an analytical approximation for medium thrust trajectories. In most low thrust derivations the idea is that escape velocity is best achieved by accelerating along the velocity vector. The reason for this is that change in specific orbital energy is a function of velocity and acceleration. However, Levin (1952) suggested that while this is a locally optimal solution it might not be a globally optimal one. Turning acceleration inward would drop periapse giving a higher velocity later in the trajectory. Acceleration at that point would be dotted against a higher magnitude V giving a greater rate of change of mechanical energy. The author then hypothesized that decelerating from the initial orbit and then accelerating at periapse would not lead to a gain in greater specific orbital energy--however, the hypothesis was incorrect. After considerable derivation it was determined that this new maneuver outperforms a direct burn when the overall DeltaV budget exceeds the initial orbital velocity (the author has termed this the Heinlein maneuver). The author provides a physical explanation for this maneuver and presents optimization analyses.

  10. Effects of escape to alone versus escape to enriched environments on adaptive and aberrant behavior.

    PubMed Central

    Golonka, Z; Wacker, D; Berg, W; Derby, K M; Harding, J; Peck, S

    2000-01-01

    Escape-maintained aberrant behavior may be influenced by two outcomes: (a) a break from the activity and (b) subsequent access to preferred activities. To assess this hypothesis, a treatment was developed that analyzed response allocation across two break options: break alone and break with access to preferred social activities. The break with preferred activities decreased aberrant behavior and increased appropriate behavior. PMID:10885532

  11. Enhanced Endosomal Escape by Light-Fueled Liquid-Metal Transformer.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yue; Lin, Yiliang; Chen, Zhaowei; Hu, Quanyin; Liu, Yang; Yu, Shuangjiang; Gao, Wei; Dickey, Michael D; Gu, Zhen

    2017-03-22

    Effective endosomal escape remains as the "holy grail" for endocytosis-based intracellular drug delivery. To date, most of the endosomal escape strategies rely on small molecules, cationic polymers, or pore-forming proteins, which are often limited by the systemic toxicity and lack of specificity. We describe here a light-fueled liquid-metal transformer for effective endosomal escape-facilitated cargo delivery via a chemical-mechanical process. The nanoscale transformer can be prepared by a simple approach of sonicating a low-toxicity liquid-metal. When coated with graphene quantum dots (GQDs), the resulting nanospheres demonstrate the ability to absorb and convert photoenergy to drive the simultaneous phase separation and morphological transformation of the inner liquid-metal core. The morphological transformation from nanospheres to hollow nanorods with a remarkable change of aspect ratio can physically disrupt the endosomal membrane to promote endosomal escape of payloads. This metal-based nanotransformer equipped with GQDs provides a new strategy for facilitating effective endosomal escape to achieve spatiotemporally controlled drug delivery with enhanced efficacy.

  12. Sputtering at Mars: MAVEN observations of precipitating and escaping oxygen during nominal and extreme conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curry, Shannon; Luhmann, Janet; Dong, Chuanfei; Ma, Yingjuan; Leblanc, Francois; Modolo, Ronan; Brain, David; Gruesbeck, Jacob; Hara, Takuya; Halekas, Jasper; Dong, Yaxue; Williamson, Hayley N.; Johnson, Robert E.; McFadden, James; Espley, Jared R.; Mitchell, David; Connerney, Jack; Eparvier, Frank; Lillis, Robert J.; Jakosky, Bruce

    2016-10-01

    Sputtering is believed to be one of the dominant escape mechanisms during the early epochs of our solar system when the solar activity and EUV intensities were much higher than the present day. Mars lacks a global dynamo magnetic field, which creates a scenario where the solar wind directly interacts with the upper atmosphere and newly created ions can be picked up and swept away by the background convection electric field. These pick-up ions can directly escape or precipitate back into the atmosphere and induce atmospheric sputtering of neutrals.The MAVEN spacecraft has observed the Mars upper atmosphere, ionosphere, magnetic topology and interactions with the Sun and solar wind during numerous Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejection (ICME) impacts spanning from March 2015 to June 2016. ICMEs are associated with enhanced solar wind velocities, densities and magnetic field strength, and often drive heavy ion precipitation at much higher rates than during nominal conditions. Thus, ICMEs provide a unique environment for observing sputtering. We will compare MAVEN observations of heavy ion precipitation during nominal conditions as well as during ICMEs. Additionally, we will present global MHD and test particle simulations of the ICMEs in order to calculate sputtering escape rates for oxygen. Finally, we will use the observed and modeled sputtering escape rates to provide an initial estimate of the total sputtered atmospheric escape from Mars over billions of years.

  13. Bacillus cereus immune escape: a journey within macrophages.

    PubMed

    Tran, Seav-Ly; Ramarao, Nalini

    2013-10-01

    During bacterial infection, professional phagocytes are attracted to the site of infection, where they constitute a first line of host cell defense. Their function is to engulf and destroy the pathogens. Thus, bacteria must withstand the bactericidal activity of professional phagocytes, including macrophages to counteract the host immune system. Bacillus cereus infections are characterized by bacteremia despite the accumulation of inflammatory cells at the site of infection. This implies that the bacteria have developed means of resisting the host immune system. Bacillus cereus spores survive, germinate, and multiply in contact with macrophages, eventually producing toxins that kill these cells. However, the exact mechanism by which B. cereus evades immune attack remains unclear. This review addresses the interaction between B. cereus and macrophages, highlighting, in particular, the ways in which the bacteria escape the microbicidal activities of professional phagocytes.

  14. Some Possible Cases of Escape Mimicry in Neotropical Butterflies.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, C E G; Freitas, A V L

    2014-10-01

    The possibility that escape or evasive mimicry evolved in butterflies and other prey insects in a similar fashion to classical Batesian and Müllerian mimicry has long been advanced in the literature. However, there is a general disagreement among lepidopterists and evolutionary biologists on whether or not escape mimicry exists, as well as in which mimicry rings this form of mimicry has evolved. Here, we review some purported cases of escape mimicry in Neotropical butterflies and suggest new mimicry rings involving several species of Archaeoprepona, Prepona, and Doxocopa (the "bright blue bands" ring) and species of Colobura and Hypna (the "creamy bands" ring) where the palatability of butterflies, their ability to escape predator attacks, geographic distribution, relative abundance, and co-occurrence in the same habitats strongly suggest that escape mimicry is involved. In addition, we also indicate other butterfly taxa whose similarities of coloration patterns could be due to escape mimicry and would constitute important case studies for future investigation.

  15. Strong purifying selection at genes escaping X chromosome inactivation.

    PubMed

    Park, Chungoo; Carrel, Laura; Makova, Kateryna D

    2010-11-01

    To achieve dosage balance of X-linked genes between mammalian males and females, one female X chromosome becomes inactivated. However, approximately 15% of genes on this inactivated chromosome escape X chromosome inactivation (XCI). Here, using a chromosome-wide analysis of primate X-linked orthologs, we test a hypothesis that such genes evolve under a unique selective pressure. We find that escape genes are subject to stronger purifying selection than inactivated genes and that positive selection does not significantly affect the evolution of these genes. The strength of selection does not differ between escape genes with similar versus different expression levels in males versus females. Intriguingly, escape genes possessing Y homologs evolve under the strongest purifying selection. We also found evidence of stronger conservation in gene expression levels in escape than inactivated genes. We hypothesize that divergence in function and expression between X and Y gametologs is driving such strong purifying selection for escape genes.

  16. The atmospheric escape at Mars: complementing the scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lilensten, Jean; Simon, Cyril; Barthélémy, Mathieu; Thissen, Roland; Ehrenreich, David; Gronoff, Guillaume; Witasse, Olivier

    2013-04-01

    In the recent years, the presence of dications in the atmospheres of Mars, Venus, Earth and Titan has been modeled and assessed. These studies also suggested that these ions could participate to the escape of the planetary atmospheres because a large fraction of them is unstable and highly ener- getic. When they dissociate, their internal energy is transformed into kinetic energy which may be larger than the escape energy. This study assesses the impact of the doubly-charged ions in the escape of CO2-dominated planetary atmospheres and to compare it to the escape of thermal photo-ions.We solve a Boltzmann transport equation at daytime taking into account the dissociative states of CO++ for a simplified single constituent atmosphere of a 2 case-study planet. We compute the escape of fast ions using a Beer-Lambert approach. We study three test-cases. On a Mars-analog planet in today's conditions, we retrieve the measured electron escape flux. When comparing the two mechanisms (i.e. excluding solar wind effects, sputtering ...), the escape due to the fast ions issuing from the dissociation of dications may account for up to 6% of the total and the escape of thermal ions for the remaining. We show that these two mechanisms cannot explain the escape of the atmosphere since the magnetic field vanished but complement the other processes and allow writing the scenario of the Mars escape. We show that the atmosphere of a Mars analog planet would empty in another giga years and a half. At Venus orbit, the contribution of the dications in the escape rate is negligible.When simulating the hot Jupiter HD209458b, the two processes cannot explain the measured escape flux of C+.

  17. Feedback regulated escape of ionising radiation from high redshift galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trebitsch, M.; Blaizot, J.

    2016-12-01

    Small galaxies are thought to provide the bulk of the radiation necessary to reionise the Universe by z ˜ 6. Their ionising efficiency is usually quantified by their escape fraction f_{esc}, but it is extremely hard to constrain from observations. With the goal of studying the physical processes that determine the values of the escape fraction, we have run a series of high resolution, cosmological, radiative hydrodynamics simulations centred on three galaxies. We find that the variability of the escape fraction follows that of the star formation rate, and that local feedback is necessary for radiation to escape.

  18. Simulating dynamical features of escape panic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helbing, Dirk; Farkas, Illés; Vicsek, Tamás

    2000-09-01

    One of the most disastrous forms of collective human behaviour is the kind of crowd stampede induced by panic, often leading to fatalities as people are crushed or trampled. Sometimes this behaviour is triggered in life-threatening situations such as fires in crowded buildings; at other times, stampedes can arise during the rush for seats or seemingly without cause. Although engineers are finding ways to alleviate the scale of such disasters, their frequency seems to be increasing with the number and size of mass events. But systematic studies of panic behaviour and quantitative theories capable of predicting such crowd dynamics are rare. Here we use a model of pedestrian behaviour to investigate the mechanisms of (and preconditions for) panic and jamming by uncoordinated motion in crowds. Our simulations suggest practical ways to prevent dangerous crowd pressures. Moreover, we find an optimal strategy for escape from a smoke-filled room, involving a mixture of individualistic behaviour and collective `herding' instinct.

  19. Energy Release, Acceleration, and Escape of Solar Energetic Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Nolfo, G. A.; Ireland, J.; Ryan, J. M.; Young, C. A.

    2013-12-01

    Solar flares are prodigious producers of energetic particles, and thus a rich laboratory for studying particle acceleration. The acceleration occurs through the release of magnetic energy, a significant fraction of which can go into the acceleration of particles. Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) certainly produce shocks that both accelerate particles and provide a mechanism for escape into the interplanetary medium (IP). What is less well understood is whether accelerated particles produced from the flare reconnection process escape, and if so, how these same particles are related to solar energetic particles (SEPs) detected in-situ. Energetic electron SEPs have been shown to be correlated with Type III radio bursts, hard X-ray emission, and EUV jets, making a very strong case for the connection between acceleration at the flare and escape along open magnetic field lines. Because there has not been a clear signature of ion escape, as is the case with the Type III radio emission for electrons, sorting out the avenues of escape for accelerated flare ions and the possible origin of the impulsive SEPs continues to be a major challenge. The key to building a clear picture of particle escape relies on the ability to map signatures of escape such as EUV jets at the Sun and to follow the progression of these escape signatures as they evolve in time. Furthermore, nuclear γ-ray emissions provide critical context relating ion acceleration to that of escape. With the advent observations from Fermi as well as RHESSI and the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), the challenge of ion escape from the Sun can now be addressed. We present a preliminary study of the relationship of EUV jets with nuclear γ-ray emission and Type III radio observations and discuss the implications for possible magnetic topologies that allow for ion escape from deep inside the corona to the interplanetary medium.

  20. STS-100 crew members practice emergency escape from the pad

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. - As part of emergency escape training at Launch Pad 39A, the STS-100 crew climb into slidewire baskets that, during a real emergency, would propel them off the Fixed Service Structure to a landing area away from the pad. The crew is taking part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities that also include a simulated launch countdown. The mission is carrying the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Raffaello and the SSRMS, to the International Space Station. Raffaello carries six system racks and two storage racks for the U.S. Lab. The SSRMS is crucial to the continued assembly of the orbiting complex. Launch of mission STS-100 is scheduled for April 19 at 2:41 p.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A.

  1. STS-100 crew members practice emergency escape from the pad

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. - During emergency escape training at Launch Pad 39A, STS-100 Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby (left) and Commander Kent V. Rominger are in their slidewire basket that, during a real emergency, would propel them off the Fixed Service Structure to a landing area away from the pad. The crew is taking part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities that also include a simulated launch countdown. The mission is carrying the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Raffaello and the SSRMS, to the International Space Station. Raffaello carries six system racks and two storage racks for the U.S. Lab. The SSRMS is crucial to the continued assembly of the orbiting complex. Launch of mission STS-100 is scheduled for April 19 at 2:41 p.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A.

  2. Green Pea Galaxies Reveal Secrets of Lyα Escape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Huan; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Gronke, Max; Rhoads, James E.; Dijkstra, Mark; Jaskot, Anne; Zheng, Zhenya; Wang, Junxian

    2016-04-01

    We analyze archival Lyα spectra of 12 “Green Pea” galaxies observed with the Hubble Space Telescope, model their Lyα profiles with radiative transfer models, and explore the dependence of the Lyα escape fraction on various properties. Green Pea galaxies are nearby compact starburst galaxies with [O iii] λ5007 equivalent widths (EWs) of hundreds of Å. All 12 Green Pea galaxies in our sample show Lyα lines in emission, with an Lyα EW distribution similar to high-redshift Lyα emitters. Combining the optical and UV spectra of Green Pea galaxies, we estimate their Lyα escape fractions and find correlations between Lyα escape fraction and kinematic features of Lyα profiles. The escape fraction of Lyα in these galaxies ranges from 1.4% to 67%. We also find that the Lyα escape fraction depends strongly on metallicity and moderately on dust extinction. We compare their high-quality Lyα profiles with single H i shell radiative transfer models and find that the Lyα escape fraction anticorrelates with the derived H i column densities. Single-shell models fit most Lyα profiles well, but not the ones with the highest escape fractions of Lyα. Our results suggest that low H i column density and low metallicity are essential for Lyα escape and make a galaxy an Lyα emitter.

  3. The Origins and Underpinning Principles of E-Scape

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimbell, Richard

    2012-01-01

    In this article I describe the context within which we developed project e-scape and the early work that laid the foundations of the project. E-scape (e-solutions for creative assessment in portfolio environments) is centred on two innovations. The first concerns a web-based approach to portfolio building; allowing learners to build their…

  4. 46 CFR 116.500 - Means of escape.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... this section, each space accessible to passengers or used by the crew on a regular basis, must have at... escape must be widely separated and, if possible, at opposite ends or sides of the space to minimize the... windows. (d) The number and dimensions of the means of escape from each space must be sufficient for...

  5. 46 CFR 116.500 - Means of escape.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... least two means of escape, one of which must not be a watertight door. (b) The two required means of... clothing, or damage life jackets. (f) The minimum clear opening of a door or passageway used as a means of escape must not be less than 810 millimeters (32 inches) in width, however, doors or passageways...

  6. 7. VIEW OF ESCAPE TRAINING TANK, LOOKING UP SOUTH SIDE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. VIEW OF ESCAPE TRAINING TANK, LOOKING UP SOUTH SIDE FROM 50-FOOT PASSAGEWAY, SHOWING 25-FOOT BLISTER AT LEFT, 18-FOOT PASSAGEWAY AND PLATFORM AT RIGHT - U.S. Naval Submarine Base, New London Submarine Escape Training Tank, Albacore & Darter Roads, Groton, New London County, CT

  7. 22. VIEW OF ESCAPE TRAINING TANK, LOOKING WEST FROM EAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. VIEW OF ESCAPE TRAINING TANK, LOOKING WEST FROM EAST SIDE OF CUPOLA TOWARD ELEVATOR. TWO-LOCK RECOMPRESSION CHAMBER AT REAR - U.S. Naval Submarine Base, New London Submarine Escape Training Tank, Albacore & Darter Roads, Groton, New London County, CT

  8. 29. VIEW OF SUBMARINE ESCAPE TRAINING TANK DURING CONSTRUCTION AT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. VIEW OF SUBMARINE ESCAPE TRAINING TANK DURING CONSTRUCTION AT POINT JUST ABOVE THE SUBMARINE SECTION AT THE 110-FOOT LEVEL 1929-1930 - U.S. Naval Submarine Base, New London Submarine Escape Training Tank, Albacore & Darter Roads, Groton, New London County, CT

  9. 36. VIEW OF CUPOLA, SUBMARINE ESCAPE TRAINING TANK, SHOWING ROVING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    36. VIEW OF CUPOLA, SUBMARINE ESCAPE TRAINING TANK, SHOWING ROVING RESCUE BELL SUSPENDED ABOVE TANK, WITH TWO-LOCK RECOMPRESSION CHAMBER AT REAR, LOOKING WEST. Photo taken after installation of recompression chamber in 1956. - U.S. Naval Submarine Base, New London Submarine Escape Training Tank, Albacore & Darter Roads, Groton, New London County, CT

  10. 35. INTERIOR VIEW OF EQUIPMENT HOUSE, SUBMARINE ESCAPE TRAINING TANK, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    35. INTERIOR VIEW OF EQUIPMENT HOUSE, SUBMARINE ESCAPE TRAINING TANK, PRIOR TO ENLARGEMENT OF ROOM AND INSTALLATION OF TRIPLE-LOCK RECOMPRESSION CHAMBER IN 1957 - U.S. Naval Submarine Base, New London Submarine Escape Training Tank, Albacore & Darter Roads, Groton, New London County, CT

  11. 31. VIEW OF SUBMARINE ESCAPE TRAINING TANK DURING CONSTRUCTION OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. VIEW OF SUBMARINE ESCAPE TRAINING TANK DURING CONSTRUCTION OF THE ELEVATOR AND PASSAGEWAYS TO THE 18- AND 50-FOOT LOCKS AND CUPOLA 1932 - U.S. Naval Submarine Base, New London Submarine Escape Training Tank, Albacore & Darter Roads, Groton, New London County, CT

  12. 33 CFR 143.101 - Means of escape.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Means of escape. 143.101 Section 143.101 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT OCS Facilities § 143.101 Means of escape. (a) “Primary...

  13. 46 CFR 169.313 - Means of escape.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... a hold-back to hold the scuttle in an open position. (e) The required means of escape must not have... escape is acceptable provided that— (1) There is no source of fire in the space, such as a galley stove... back of the ladder; and (4) Except when unavoidable obstructions are encountered, there must be...

  14. Complete mapping of viral escape from neutralizing antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Hensley, Scott E.

    2017-01-01

    Identifying viral mutations that confer escape from antibodies is crucial for understanding the interplay between immunity and viral evolution. We describe a high-throughput approach to quantify the selection that monoclonal antibodies exert on all single amino-acid mutations to a viral protein. This approach, mutational antigenic profiling, involves creating all replication-competent protein variants of a virus, selecting with antibody, and using deep sequencing to identify enriched mutations. We use mutational antigenic profiling to comprehensively identify mutations that enable influenza virus to escape four monoclonal antibodies targeting hemagglutinin, and validate key findings with neutralization assays. We find remarkable mutation-level idiosyncrasy in antibody escape: for instance, at a single residue targeted by two antibodies, some mutations escape both antibodies while other mutations escape only one or the other. Because mutational antigenic profiling rapidly maps all mutations selected by an antibody, it is useful for elucidating immune specificities and interpreting the antigenic consequences of viral genetic variation. PMID:28288189

  15. Split-second escape decisions in blue tits (Parus caeruleus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lind, Johan; Kaby, Ulrika; Jakobsson, Sven

    2002-07-01

    Bird mortality is heavily affected by birds of prey. Under attack, take-off is crucial for survival and even minor mistakes in initial escape response can have devastating consequences. Birds may respond differently depending on the character of the predator's attack and these split-second decisions were studied using a model merlin (Falco columbarius) that attacked feeding blue tits (Parus caeruleus) from two different attack angles in two different speeds. When attacked from a low attack angle they took off more steeply than when attacked from a high angle. This is the first study to show that escape behaviour also depends on predator attack speed. The blue tits responded to a high-speed attack by dodging sideways more often than when attacked at a low speed. Escape speed was not significantly affected by the different treatments. Although they have only a split-second before escaping an attack, blue tits do adjust their escape strategy to the prevailing attack conditions.

  16. Evaluating Melanoma Drug Response and Therapeutic Escape with Quantitative Proteomics*

    PubMed Central

    Rebecca, Vito W.; Wood, Elizabeth; Fedorenko, Inna V.; Paraiso, Kim H. T.; Haarberg, H. Eirik; Chen, Yi; Xiang, Yun; Sarnaik, Amod; Gibney, Geoffrey T.; Sondak, Vernon K.; Koomen, John M.; Smalley, Keiran S. M.

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of cancer therapy into complex regimens with multiple drugs requires novel approaches for the development and evaluation of companion biomarkers. Liquid chromatography-multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry (LC-MRM) is a versatile platform for biomarker measurement. In this study, we describe the development and use of the LC-MRM platform to study the adaptive signaling responses of melanoma cells to inhibitors of HSP90 (XL888) and MEK (AZD6244). XL888 had good anti-tumor activity against NRAS mutant melanoma cell lines as well as BRAF mutant cells with acquired resistance to BRAF inhibitors both in vitro and in vivo. LC-MRM analysis showed HSP90 inhibition to be associated with decreased expression of multiple receptor tyrosine kinases, modules in the PI3K/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin pathway, and the MAPK/CDK4 signaling axis in NRAS mutant melanoma cell lines and the inhibition of PI3K/AKT signaling in BRAF mutant melanoma xenografts with acquired vemurafenib resistance. The LC-MRM approach targeting more than 80 cancer signaling proteins was highly sensitive and could be applied to fine needle aspirates from xenografts and clinical melanoma specimens (using 50 μg of total protein). We further showed MEK inhibition to be associated with signaling through the NFκB and WNT signaling pathways, as well as increased receptor tyrosine kinase expression and activation. Validation studies identified PDGF receptor β signaling as a potential escape mechanism from MEK inhibition, which could be overcome through combined use of AZD6244 and the PDGF receptor inhibitor, crenolanib. Together, our studies show LC-MRM to have unique value as a platform for the systems level understanding of the molecular mechanisms of drug response and therapeutic escape. This work provides the proof-of-principle for the future development of LC-MRM assays for monitoring drug responses in the clinic. PMID:24760959

  17. Escaping the resource curse in China.

    PubMed

    Cao, Shixiong; Li, Shurong; Ma, Hua; Sun, Yutong

    2015-02-01

    Many societies face an income gap between rich regions with access to advanced technology and regions that are rich in natural resources but poorer in technology. This "resource curse" can lead to a Kuznets trap, in which economic inequalities between the rich and the poor increase during the process of socioeconomic development. This can also lead to depletion of natural resources, environmental degradation, social instability, and declining socioeconomic development. These problems will jeopardize China's achievements if the current path continues to be pursued without intervention by the government to solve the problems. To mitigate the socioeconomic development gap between western and eastern China, the government implemented its Western Development Program in 2000. However, recent data suggest that this program has instead worsened the resource curse. Because each region has its own unique strengths and weaknesses, China must escape the resource curse by accounting for this difference; in western China, this can be done by improving education, promoting high-tech industry, adjusting its economic strategy to balance regional development, and seeking more sustainable approaches to socioeconomic development.

  18. Sensitization of the Tritonia escape swim.

    PubMed

    Frost, W N; Brandon, C L; Mongeluzi, D L

    1998-03-01

    When repeatedly elicited, the oscillatory escape swim of the marine mollusc Tritonia diomedea undergoes habituation of the number of cycles per swim. Previous work has shown that this habituation is accompanied by sensitization of another feature of the behavior: latency to swim onset. Here we focused on the behavioral features of sensitization itself. Test swims elicited 5 min after a strong sensitizing head stimulus differed in several ways from control swims: sensitized animals had shorter latencies for gill and rhinophore withdrawal, a shorter latency for swim onset, a lower threshold for swim initiation, and an increased number of cycles per swim. Sensitized animals did not, however, swim any faster (no change in cycle period). A separate experiment found that swim onset latency also sensitized when Tritonia came into contact with one of their natural predators, the seastar Pycnopodia helianthoides, demonstrating the ecological relevance of this form of nonassociative learning. These results define the set of behavioral changes to be explained by cellular studies of sensitization in Tritonia.

  19. Dications and thermal ions in planetary atmospheric escape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lilensten, J.; Simon Wedlund, C.; Barthélémy, M.; Thissen, R.; Ehrenreich, D.; Gronoff, G.; Witasse, O.

    2013-01-01

    In the recent years, the presence of dications in the atmospheres of Mars, Venus, Earth and Titan has been modeled and assessed. These studies also suggested that these ions could participate to the escape of the planetary atmospheres because a large fraction of them is unstable and highly energetic. When they dissociate, their internal energy is transformed into kinetic energy which may be larger than the escape energy. The goal of this study is to assess the impact of the doubly-charged ions in the escape of CO2-dominated planetary atmospheres and to compare it to the escape of thermal photo-ions. We solve a Boltzmann transport equation at daytime taking into account the dissociative states of CO2++ for a simplified single constituent atmosphere of a case-study planet. We compute the escape of fast ions using a Beer-Lambert approach. We study three test-cases. On a Mars-analog planet in today's conditions, we retrieve the measured electron escape flux. When comparing the two mechanisms (i.e. excluding solar wind effects, sputtering, etc.), the escape due to the fast ions issuing from the dissociation of dications may account for up to 6% of the total and the escape of thermal ions for the remaining. We show that these two mechanisms cannot explain the escape of the atmosphere since the magnetic field vanished and even contribute only marginally to this loss. We show that with these two mechanisms, the atmosphere of a Mars analog planet would empty in another giga years and a half. At Venus orbit, the contribution of the dications in the escape rate is negligible. When simulating the hot Jupiter HD 209458 b, the two processes cannot explain the measured escape flux of C+. This study shows that the dications may constitute a source of the escape of planetary atmospheres which had not been taken into account until now. This source, although marginal, is not negligible. The influence of the photoionization is of course large, but cannot explain alone the loss of Mars

  20. Modelling the Evolution and Spread of HIV Immune Escape Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Fryer, Helen R.; Frater, John; Duda, Anna; Roberts, Mick G.; Phillips, Rodney E.; McLean, Angela R.

    2010-01-01

    During infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), immune pressure from cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTLs) selects for viral mutants that confer escape from CTL recognition. These escape variants can be transmitted between individuals where, depending upon their cost to viral fitness and the CTL responses made by the recipient, they may revert. The rates of within-host evolution and their concordant impact upon the rate of spread of escape mutants at the population level are uncertain. Here we present a mathematical model of within-host evolution of escape mutants, transmission of these variants between hosts and subsequent reversion in new hosts. The model is an extension of the well-known SI model of disease transmission and includes three further parameters that describe host immunogenetic heterogeneity and rates of within host viral evolution. We use the model to explain why some escape mutants appear to have stable prevalence whilst others are spreading through the population. Further, we use it to compare diverse datasets on CTL escape, highlighting where different sources agree or disagree on within-host evolutionary rates. The several dozen CTL epitopes we survey from HIV-1 gag, RT and nef reveal a relatively sedate rate of evolution with average rates of escape measured in years and reversion in decades. For many epitopes in HIV, occasional rapid within-host evolution is not reflected in fast evolution at the population level. PMID:21124991

  1. Efficiently estimating salmon escapement uncertainty using systematically sampled data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reynolds, Joel H.; Woody, Carol Ann; Gove, Nancy E.; Fair, Lowell F.

    2007-01-01

    Fish escapement is generally monitored using nonreplicated systematic sampling designs (e.g., via visual counts from towers or hydroacoustic counts). These sampling designs support a variety of methods for estimating the variance of the total escapement. Unfortunately, all the methods give biased results, with the magnitude of the bias being determined by the underlying process patterns. Fish escapement commonly exhibits positive autocorrelation and nonlinear patterns, such as diurnal and seasonal patterns. For these patterns, poor choice of variance estimator can needlessly increase the uncertainty managers have to deal with in sustaining fish populations. We illustrate the effect of sampling design and variance estimator choice on variance estimates of total escapement for anadromous salmonids from systematic samples of fish passage. Using simulated tower counts of sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka escapement on the Kvichak River, Alaska, five variance estimators for nonreplicated systematic samples were compared to determine the least biased. Using the least biased variance estimator, four confidence interval estimators were compared for expected coverage and mean interval width. Finally, five systematic sampling designs were compared to determine the design giving the smallest average variance estimate for total annual escapement. For nonreplicated systematic samples of fish escapement, all variance estimators were positively biased. Compared to the other estimators, the least biased estimator reduced bias by, on average, from 12% to 98%. All confidence intervals gave effectively identical results. Replicated systematic sampling designs consistently provided the smallest average estimated variance among those compared.

  2. The Impacts of Orbital Distance on Exoplanetary Atmospheric Escape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, M.; Guo, J. H.

    2016-11-01

    Driven by the high energy radiation of host stars, atmospheric escape is very important for planet evolution. While the flux drops dramatically with the increase of orbital distance, it is essential to study the impacts of orbital distance on atmospheric escape. We consider the hydrodynamic escape of exoplanets driven by the XUV (X-ray and extreme-ultraviolet) radiation of their host stars. We aim to study the mass-loss rate, the transition of escape mechanism, the structures of temperature and velocity, based on a one-dimensional hydrodynamic model which includes radiative transfer processes and photochemical reactions. As the stellar XUV emission varies with the stellar evolution, we use XSPEC (X-Ray Spectral Fitting Package) to construct the XUV spectra of solar-type stars at different ages. We find that with the increase of orbital distance, the mass-loss rates drop significantly, and when the stellar XUV flux is too small to preserve the hydrodynamic escape, it will turn to Jeans escape. This transition occurs in larger distance for younger and smaller planets. For young planets, hydrodynamic escape can occur in 1-2 au. For very young and close-in planets, the relation between mass-loss rate and stellar flux is not as significant as planets that are not close to their host stars, and the energy-limited equation can lead to large overestimate.

  3. 16. INTERIOR VIEW OF SUBMARINE SECTION AT 110FOOT LEVEL, ESCAPE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. INTERIOR VIEW OF SUBMARINE SECTION AT 110-FOOT LEVEL, ESCAPE TRAINING TANK, SHOWING LADDER TO ESCAPE TANK, LOOKING SOUTH - U.S. Naval Submarine Base, New London Submarine Escape Training Tank, Albacore & Darter Roads, Groton, New London County, CT

  4. Distribution and escape of the major neutral species from Titan's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenishev, Valeriy; Tucker, Orenthal; Borovikov, Dmitry; Combi, Michael R.

    2016-10-01

    Titan possesses the most significant atmosphere among all satellites in the Solar system, and is an important source of material for the Saturn's magnetosphere. Understanding of the neutral species distribution and escape is important for further understanding of the Titan's atmosphere evolution and loss.The first in situ observations of the Titan's atmosphere were performed by Voyager and continued by Cassini, which measured the atmospheric composition, velocity and temperature, as well as the energy spectra of neutral species, ions and electrons. Analysis and interpretation of the acquired data involves coupled modeling of the Saturn magnetosphere and Titan's atmosphere.Having that in mind we have undertaken numerical modeling of the major neutral species (N2 and CH4) in Titan's upper atmosphere to investigate the effect of the solar EUV and magnetospheric ion energy deposition on the neutral species atmospheric distribution and escape. This modeling combines MHD simulation of the Saturn's magnetosphere plasma interacting with Titan's atmosphere, fluid type simulation of the neutral species in Titan's lower atmosphere, and kinetic modeling of the upper atmosphere and exosphere. Here we present estimations of the neutral species escape rate, and discuss the effect of the magnetospheric ion energy deposition on the atmospheric escape concluded from the results of our modeling.This work was supported by NASA Outer Planet Research grant NNX13AL04G.

  5. Autonomous Soft Robotic Fish Capable of Escape Maneuvers Using Fluidic Elastomer Actuators.

    PubMed

    Marchese, Andrew D; Onal, Cagdas D; Rus, Daniela

    2014-03-01

    In this work we describe an autonomous soft-bodied robot that is both self-contained and capable of rapid, continuum-body motion. We detail the design, modeling, fabrication, and control of the soft fish, focusing on enabling the robot to perform rapid escape responses. The robot employs a compliant body with embedded actuators emulating the slender anatomical form of a fish. In addition, the robot has a novel fluidic actuation system that drives body motion and has all the subsystems of a traditional robot onboard: power, actuation, processing, and control. At the core of the fish's soft body is an array of fluidic elastomer actuators. We design the fish to emulate escape responses in addition to forward swimming because such maneuvers require rapid body accelerations and continuum-body motion. These maneuvers showcase the performance capabilities of this self-contained robot. The kinematics and controllability of the robot during simulated escape response maneuvers are analyzed and compared with studies on biological fish. We show that during escape responses, the soft-bodied robot has similar input-output relationships to those observed in biological fish. The major implication of this work is that we show soft robots can be both self-contained and capable of rapid body motion.

  6. Autonomous Soft Robotic Fish Capable of Escape Maneuvers Using Fluidic Elastomer Actuators

    PubMed Central

    Onal, Cagdas D.; Rus, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    Abstract In this work we describe an autonomous soft-bodied robot that is both self-contained and capable of rapid, continuum-body motion. We detail the design, modeling, fabrication, and control of the soft fish, focusing on enabling the robot to perform rapid escape responses. The robot employs a compliant body with embedded actuators emulating the slender anatomical form of a fish. In addition, the robot has a novel fluidic actuation system that drives body motion and has all the subsystems of a traditional robot onboard: power, actuation, processing, and control. At the core of the fish's soft body is an array of fluidic elastomer actuators. We design the fish to emulate escape responses in addition to forward swimming because such maneuvers require rapid body accelerations and continuum-body motion. These maneuvers showcase the performance capabilities of this self-contained robot. The kinematics and controllability of the robot during simulated escape response maneuvers are analyzed and compared with studies on biological fish. We show that during escape responses, the soft-bodied robot has similar input–output relationships to those observed in biological fish. The major implication of this work is that we show soft robots can be both self-contained and capable of rapid body motion. PMID:27625912

  7. 30 CFR 77.1101 - Escape and evacuation; plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... alarm signals, and applicable procedures to be followed in case of fire. (c) Plans for escape and evacuation shall include the designation and proper maintenance of adequate means for exit from all...

  8. 30 CFR 77.1101 - Escape and evacuation; plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... alarm signals, and applicable procedures to be followed in case of fire. (c) Plans for escape and evacuation shall include the designation and proper maintenance of adequate means for exit from all...

  9. 30 CFR 77.1101 - Escape and evacuation; plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... alarm signals, and applicable procedures to be followed in case of fire. (c) Plans for escape and evacuation shall include the designation and proper maintenance of adequate means for exit from all...

  10. Experimental Analysis and Extinction of Self-Injurious Escape Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iwata, Brian A.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Three studies investigated environmental correlates of self-injurious behavior in seven developmentally disabled children and adolescents which were then later used for treatment. Correlates investigated included positive reinforcement, negative reinforcement, automatic reinforcement, and control. "Escape extinction" was successfully…

  11. Pilot Fullerton dons ejection escape suit (EES) on middeck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Pilot Fullerton dons ejection escape suit (EES) (high altitude pressure garment) life preserver unit (LPU) on forward port side of middeck above potable water tank. Fullerton also adjusts lapbelt fitting and helmet holddown strap.

  12. Prey escaping wolves, Canis lupus, despite close proximity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, M.E.; Mech, L.D.

    1993-01-01

    We describe attacks by wolf (Canis lupus) packs in Minnesota on a white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) and a moose (Alces alces) in which wolves were within contact distance of the prey but in which the prey escaped.

  13. 14. View inside Building 802, the "Escape Hatch" at the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. View inside Building 802, the "Escape Hatch" at the rear of the "Sleeping Quarters", facing south. - Naval Air Station Fallon, 100-man Fallout Shelter, 800 Complex, off Carson Road near intersection of Pasture & Berney Roads, Fallon, Churchill County, NV

  14. Electron yields and escape depths from spacecraft materials

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, K.Y.

    1986-01-01

    Secondary electron emission (SEE) characteristics and photoelectron yields were determined for several insulating materials used onboard a space shuttle. These materials are: kapton, teflon, spaceshuttle tiles, and space suit cloth. Secondary electron escape depth and photoelectron escape depth from kapton were calculated from the experimental data. Sternglass' theory and Dionne's method were used in the calculation. Some semi-empirical theories of SEE and three-step theory of photoemission were reviewed. Pulsed beam techniques were used to reduce surface charging problems. Three ..mu..sec pulses of electrons were used in SEE experiments, and 100 msec to 1 sec pulses were used in photoemission experiments. The maximum SEE yields of the materials studied range from 1.75 ro 2.70. The secondary electron escape depth in kapton was calculated to be 55 +/- 5 A. All samples have photoyields lower than 1.0%. The photoelectrons excited by 21-eV photons have 87 +/- 30 A escape depth in kapton.

  15. Oxygen Escape from Venus During High Dynamic Pressure ICMEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEnulty, Tess; Luhmann, J. G.; Brain, D. A.; Fedorov, A.; Jian, L. K.; Russell, C. T.; Zhang, T.; Möstl, C.; Futaana, Y.; de Pater, I.

    2013-10-01

    Previous studies using data from Pioneer Venus suggested that oxygen ion escape flux may be enhanced by orders of magnitude during Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections. However, this large enhancement has been ambiguous in Venus Express ion data - with some analyses showing no flux enhancement or a small enhancement (within 2 times undisturbed cases). One possible explanation is that high escape flux may be due to high dynamic pressure in the solar wind, and the dynamic pressure has been lower during the VEX time period. So, we focus on ICMEs with the largest dynamic pressure and with VEX sampling of the escaping ions during the sheath of the ICMEs (during which the highest dynamic pressures in the solar wind occur). We will show the characteristics of these large events measured by VEX, and compare them to the largest ICMEs measured by PVO. We will then discuss estimates of the oxygen ion escape flux during these events.

  16. Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO) Ionosphere Evidence for Atmospheric Escape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grebowsky, J. M.; Hoegy, W. R.

    2009-12-01

    An early estimate of escape of H2O from Venus [McElroy et al., 1982] using observed hot oxygen densities inferred by Nagy et al. [1981] from PVO OUVS 1304 Å dayglow and using ionization rates from photoionization and electron impact. This resulted in an estimated oxygen ionization rate planet-wide above the plasmapause of 3x1025 atoms/s. Based on the energetic O+ being swept up and removed by solar wind, McElroy et al. [1982] gave an estimate of a loss rate for O of 6x106 atoms/cm2/s. Using a different method of estimating escape based data in the ionotail of Venus, Brace et al. [1987] estimated a total planetary O+ escape rate of 5x1025 ions/s. Their estimate was based on PVO measurements of superthermal O+ (energy range 9-16 eV) in the tail ray plasma between 2000 and 3000 km. Their estimated global mean flux was 107 atoms/cm2/s. The two escape rates are remarkably close considering all the errors involved in such estimates of escape. A study of escape by Luhmann et al. [2008] using VEX observations at low solar activity finds modest escape rates, prompting the authors to reconsider the evidence from both PVO and VEX of the possibility of enhanced escape during extreme interplanetary conditions. We reexamine the variation of escape under different solar wind conditions using ion densities and plasma content in the dayside and nightside of Venus using PVO ionosphere density during times of high solar activity. Citations: Brace, L.H., W. T. Kasprzak, H.A. Taylor, R. F. Theis, C. T. Russess, A. Barnes, J. D. Mihalov, and D. M. Hunten, "The Ionotail of Venus: Its Configuration and Evidence for Ion Escape", J. Geophys. Res. 92, 15-26, 1987. Luhmann, J.G., A. Fedorov, S. Barabash, E. Carlsson, Y. Futaana, T.L. Zhang, C.T. Russell, J.G. Lyon, S.A. Ledvina, and D.A. Brain, “Venus Express observations of atmospheric oxygen escape during the passage of several coronal mass ejections”, J. Geophys. Res., 113, 2008. McElroy, M. B., M. J. Prather, J. M. Rodiquez, " Loss

  17. Stellar wind interaction and pick-up ion escape of the Kepler-11 "super-Earths"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kislyakova, K. G.; Johnstone, C. P.; Odert, P.; Erkaev, N. V.; Lammer, H.; Lüftinger, T.; Holmström, M.; Khodachenko, M. L.; Güdel, M.

    2014-02-01

    Aims: We study the interactions between stellar winds and the extended hydrogen-dominated upper atmospheres of planets. We estimate the resulting escape of planetary pick-up ions from the five "super-Earths" in the compact Kepler-11 system and compare the escape rates with the efficiency of the thermal escape of neutral hydrogen atoms. Methods: Assuming the stellar wind of Kepler-11 is similar to the solar wind, we use a polytropic 1D hydrodynamic wind model to estimate the wind properties at the planetary orbits. We apply a direct simulation Monte Carlo model to model the hydrogen coronae and the stellar wind plasma interaction around Kepler-11b-f within a realistic expected heating efficiency range of 15-40%. The same model is used to estimate the ion pick-up escape from the XUV heated and hydrodynamically extended upper atmospheres of Kepler-11b-f. From the interaction model, we study the influence of possible magnetic moments, calculate the charge exchange and photoionization production rates of planetary ions, and estimate the loss rates of pick-up H+ ions for all five planets. We compare the results between the five "super-Earths" and the thermal escape rates of the neutral planetary hydrogen atoms. Results: Our results show that a huge neutral hydrogen corona is formed around the planet for all Kepler-11b-f exoplanets. The non-symmetric form of the corona changes from planet to planet and is defined mostly by radiation pressure and gravitational effects. Non-thermal escape rates of pick-up ionized hydrogen atoms for Kepler-11 "super-Earths" vary between ~6.4 × 1030 s-1 and ~4.1 × 1031 s-1, depending on the planet's orbital location and assumed heating efficiency. These values correspond to non-thermal mass loss rates of ~1.07 × 107 g s-1 and ~6.8 × 107 g s-1 respectively, which is a few percent of the thermal escape rates.

  18. Photoelectron escape fluxes over the equatorial and midlatitude regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narasingarao, B. C.; Singh, R. N.; Maier, E. J.

    1972-01-01

    Satellite measurements of photoelectron escape flux around noontime made by Explorer 31 in 600-800 km altitude range are reported for the equatorial and midlatitude regions. The pitch angle distributions and the spectral distributions are derived from the data. Analyzed data show that the flux for equatorial regions is lower by a factor 2 to 3 in comparison to that of midlatitude regions. Theoretical calculations are also made to compare with observed escape fluxes.

  19. Ion escape from Venus using statistical distribution functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordstrom, T.; Stenberg, G.; Nilsson, H.; Barabash, S.; Futaana, Y.

    2012-04-01

    We use more than three years of data from the ASPERA-4 instrument onboard Venus Express to compile statistical distribution functions of ion flux in and around induced magnetosphere of Venus. We present samples of statistical distribution functions, as well average flux patterns in the near Venus space based on the statistical distribution functions. The statistical distribution functions allows for a compensation of biased sampling regarding both position and angular coverage of the instrument. Protons and heavy ions (mass/charge > 16) are the major ion species escaping from Venus. The escape is due to acceleration of planetary ions by energy transfer from the solar wind. The ion escape appears to exclusively take place in the induced magnetotail region and no heavy ions are present in the magnetosheath. Protons of solar wind origin are travelling around the planet and penetrating the tail, resulting in a mix of planetary and solar wind protons inside the induced magnetosphere boundary. The escape rates of ions inside the tail agree with results from recent published studies, where other analysis methods have been used. We also compare our results for Venus with a recent study of ion escape from Mars, where the same analysis method has been applied to data from the ASPERA-3 instrument on Mars Express. Both Mars and Venus are unmagnetized planets and are expected to interact similarly with the solar wind. On Mars the heavy ions are seen escaping in both the magnetosheath and tail regions as opposed to Venus where escape only takes place inside the tail. A possible explanation is that the magnetosphere of Mars is smaller compared to the ion gyroradius, making it easier for the ions to pass through the induced magnetosphere boundary. On both planets the escape rates of heavy ions in the tail are constant with increasing tail distance, verifying that the ions are leaving the planet in this region.

  20. GREEN PEA GALAXIES REVEAL SECRETS OF Lyα ESCAPE

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Huan; Wang, Junxian; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Rhoads, James E.; Gronke, Max; Dijkstra, Mark; Jaskot, Anne; Zheng, Zhenya E-mail: huan.y@asu.edu E-mail: James.Rhoads@asu.edu

    2016-04-01

    We analyze archival Lyα spectra of 12 “Green Pea” galaxies observed with the Hubble Space Telescope, model their Lyα profiles with radiative transfer models, and explore the dependence of the Lyα escape fraction on various properties. Green Pea galaxies are nearby compact starburst galaxies with [O iii] λ5007 equivalent widths (EWs) of hundreds of Å. All 12 Green Pea galaxies in our sample show Lyα lines in emission, with an Lyα EW distribution similar to high-redshift Lyα emitters. Combining the optical and UV spectra of Green Pea galaxies, we estimate their Lyα escape fractions and find correlations between Lyα escape fraction and kinematic features of Lyα profiles. The escape fraction of Lyα in these galaxies ranges from 1.4% to 67%. We also find that the Lyα escape fraction depends strongly on metallicity and moderately on dust extinction. We compare their high-quality Lyα profiles with single H i shell radiative transfer models and find that the Lyα escape fraction anticorrelates with the derived H i column densities. Single-shell models fit most Lyα profiles well, but not the ones with the highest escape fractions of Lyα. Our results suggest that low H i column density and low metallicity are essential for Lyα escape and make a galaxy an Lyα emitter.

  1. Ion heating, acceleration and escape at Mars and Venus, similarities and differences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, H.; Stenberg, G.; Diéval, C.; Yamauchi, M.; Barabash, S.; Lundin, R.

    2012-09-01

    Using data from the ASPERA-3 (Mars) and ASPERA- 4 (Venus) instruments we have investigated the heating, acceleration and escape of ionospheric origin ions from Mars and Venus. We have first determined the average flow properties and average ion distributions in the vicinity of the planets, from which a net escape flux as well as spatial asymmetries in the escape fluxes can be determined. One of the main uncertainties concerning the net escape is the possible presence of plasma of too low energy to be observed by the ion spectrometers, but still of sufficient energy to escape. Observations show that there is a clear and efficient heating of outflowing ionospheric ions. The large temporal and spatial variability of both plasma distribution and ion heating still allows for part of this plasma to remain cold. At Earth hot and cold plasma follow different outflow trajectories and are typically found in different regions, with hot outflowing plasma in the cusp / mantle and cold outflowing plasma in the lobes. We discuss whether a similar situation may exist in the more compact induced magnetospheres of Mars and Venus. Finally we show how different the induced magnetosphere boundaries of Mars and Venus are. At Mars there is much more transport across the boundary, with ionospheric origin heavy ions flowing into the magnetosheath. Solar wind plasma consistently, though only sporadically, penetrate the induced magnetosphere boundary of Mars and precipitate. At Venus we find essentially no ionospheric origin heavy ions in the magnetosheath, and solar wind penetration cases are very rare as compared to Mars. Previous studies have shown clear differences between the bow shock regions of the two planets. It appears as if the relatively smaller size of the Mars system in terms of gyro radii of typical solar wind ions lead to a more dynamic magnetosheath and induced magnetosphere boundary, allowing for a different coupling between the solar wind and planetary plasmas as compared

  2. Optimal escapement in stage-structured fisheries with environmental stochasticity.

    PubMed

    Holden, Matthew H; Conrad, Jon M

    2015-11-01

    Stage-structured population models are commonly used to understand fish population dynamics and additionally for stock assessment. Unfortunately, there is little theory on the optimal harvest of stage-structured populations, especially in the presence of stochastic fluctuations. In this paper, we find closed form optimal equilibrium escapement policies for a three-dimensional, discrete-time, stage-structured population model with linear growth, post-harvest nonlinear recruitment, and stage-specific pricing and extend the analytic results to structured populations with environmental stochasticity. When only fishing reproductive adults, stochasticity does not affect optimal escapement policies. However, when harvesting immature fish, the addition of stochasticity can increase or decrease optimal escapement depending on the second and third derivative of the recruitment function. For logistic recruitment, stochasticity reduces optimal immature escapement by a multiplicative factor of one over one plus the variance of the environmental noise. Using hard clam, Mercenaria mercenaria, as an example and assuming Beverton-Holt recruitment, we show that optimal fishing of hard clam targets the immature stage class exclusively and that environmental stochasticity increases optimal escapement for low discount rates and decreases optimal escapement for high discount rates.

  3. Group chase and escape with sight-limited chasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huodong; Han, Wenchen; Yang, Junzhong

    2017-01-01

    We study group chase and escape with sight-limited chasers. Two search strategies, random-walk-strategy and relocation-strategy, are introduced for chasers when escapers are out of their fields of vision. There exist two regimes for the group lifetime of escapers. In the narrow sight regime, the group lifetime is a decreasing function of chasers' sight range. In the wide sight regime, the group lifetime stays at a constant when chasers adopting random-walk-strategy while increases with the sight range when chasers adopting relocation-strategy. The impacts of the two search strategies on group chase and escape are studied by investigating the lifetime distribution of all escapers and the dependence of the minimum lifetime on the number of chasers. We also find that, to reach the most efficient and the lowest energy cost chase for chasers, the ratio between the number of chasers and escapers stays at around 6 under random-walk-strategy. However, the optimal number of chasers vanishes and the energy cost monotonically increases with increasing the number of chasers under relocation-strategy.

  4. Extreme hydrodynamic atmospheric loss near the critical thermal escape regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erkaev, N. V.; Lammer, H.; Odert, P.; Kulikov, Yu. N.; Kislyakova, K. G.

    2015-04-01

    By considering martian-like planetary embryos inside the habitable zone of solar-like stars we study the behaviour of the hydrodynamic atmospheric escape of hydrogen for small values of the Jeans escape parameter β < 3, near the base of the thermosphere, that is defined as a ratio of the gravitational and thermal energy. Our study is based on a 1D hydrodynamic upper atmosphere model that calculates the volume heating rate in a hydrogen-dominated thermosphere due to the absorption of the stellar soft X-ray and extreme ultraviolet (XUV) flux. In case of a monatomic gas, we find that when the β value near the mesopause/homopause level exceeds a critical value of ˜2.5, there exists a steady hydrodynamic solution with a smooth transition from subsonic to supersonic flow. For a fixed XUV flux, the escape rate of the upper atmosphere is an increasing function of the temperature at the lower boundary. Our model results indicate a crucial enhancement of the atmospheric escape rate, when the Jeans escape parameter β decreases to this critical value. When β becomes ≤2.5, there is no stationary hydrodynamic transition from subsonic to supersonic flow. This is the case of a fast non-stationary atmospheric expansion that results in extreme thermal atmospheric escape rates.

  5. Foraging behavior delays mechanically-stimulated escape responses in fish.

    PubMed

    Bohórquez-Herrera, Jimena; Kawano, Sandy M; Domenici, Paolo

    2013-11-01

    Foraging and the evasion of predators are fundamental for the survival of organisms, but they impose contrasting demands that can influence performance in each behavior. Previous studies suggested that foraging organisms may experience decreased vigilance to attacks by predators; however, little is known about the effect of foraging on escape performance with respect to the kinematics and the timing of the response. This study tested the hypothesis that engaging in foraging activities affected escape performance by comparing fast-start escape responses of silver-spotted sculpins Blepsias cirrhosus under three conditions: (1) control (no foraging involved), (2) while targeting prey, and (3) immediately after capture of prey. Escape response variables (non-locomotor and locomotor) were analyzed from high-speed videos. Responsiveness was lower immediately after capturing a prey item compared with the other two treatments, and latency of performance was higher in the control treatment than in the other two. Locomotor variables such as maximum speed, maximum acceleration, and turning rates did not show statistical differences among the three groups. Our results demonstrate that foraging can negatively affect two fundamental components of the escape response: (1) responsiveness and (2) latency of escape, suggesting that engaging in foraging may decrease an individual's ability to successfully evade predators.

  6. Link between intraphagosomal biotin and rapid phagosomal escape in Francisella

    PubMed Central

    Napier, Brooke A.; Meyer, Lena; Bina, James E.; Miller, Mark A.; Sjöstedt, Anders; Weiss, David S.

    2012-01-01

    Cytosolic bacterial pathogens require extensive metabolic adaptations within the host to replicate intracellularly and cause disease. In phagocytic cells such as macrophages, these pathogens must respond rapidly to nutrient limitation within the harsh environment of the phagosome. Many cytosolic pathogens escape the phagosome quickly (15–60 min) and thereby subvert this host defense, reaching the cytosol where they can replicate. Although a great deal of research has focused on strategies used by bacteria to resist antimicrobial phagosomal defenses and transiently pass through this compartment, the metabolic requirements of bacteria in the phagosome are largely uncharacterized. We previously identified a Francisella protein, FTN_0818, as being essential for intracellular replication and involved in virulence in vivo. We now show that FTN_0818 is involved in biotin biosynthesis and required for rapid escape from the Francisella-containing phagosome (FCP). Addition of biotin complemented the phagosomal escape defect of the FTN_0818 mutant, demonstrating that biotin is critical for promoting rapid escape during the short time that the bacteria are in the phagosome. Biotin also rescued the attenuation of the FTN_0818 mutant during infection in vitro and in vivo, highlighting the importance of this process. The key role of biotin in phagosomal escape implies biotin may be a limiting factor during infection. We demonstrate that a bacterial metabolite is required for phagosomal escape of an intracellular pathogen, providing insight into the link between bacterial metabolism and virulence, likely serving as a paradigm for other cytosolic pathogens. PMID:23071317

  7. Trade-offs between performance and variability in the escape responses of bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus)

    PubMed Central

    Hitchcock, Amanda C.; Chen, Tiffany; Connolly, Erin; Darakananda, Karin; Jeong, Janet; Quist, Arbor; Robbins, Allison; Ellerby, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Successful predator evasion is essential to the fitness of many animals. Variation in escape behaviour may be adaptive as it reduces predictability, enhancing escape success. High escape velocities and accelerations also increase escape success, but biomechanical factors likely constrain the behavioural range over which performance can be maximized. There may therefore be a trade-off between variation and performance during escape responses. We have used bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus) escape responses to examine this potential trade-off, determining the full repertoire of escape behaviour for individual bluegill sunfish and linking this to performance as indicated by escape velocity and acceleration. Fish escapes involve an initial C-bend of the body axis, followed by variable steering movements. These generate thrust and establish the escape direction. Directional changes during the initial C-bend were less variable than the final escape angle, and the most frequent directions were associated with high escape velocity. Significant inter-individual differences in escape angles magnified the overall variation, maintaining unpredictability from a predator perspective. Steering in the latter stages of the escape to establish the final escape trajectory also affected performance, with turns away from the stimulus associated with reduced velocity. This suggests that modulation of escape behaviour by steering may also have an associated performance cost. This has important implications for understanding the scope and control of intra- and inter-individual variation in escape behaviour and the associated costs and benefits. PMID:25910940

  8. Investigating the Consequences of Interference between Multiple CD8+ T Cell Escape Mutations in Early HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Victor; Feldman, Marcus W.; Regoes, Roland R.

    2016-01-01

    During early human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection multiple CD8+ T cell responses are elicited almost simultaneously. These responses exert strong selective pressures on different parts of HIV’s genome, and select for mutations that escape recognition and are thus beneficial to the virus. Some studies reveal that the later these escape mutations emerge, the more slowly they go to fixation. This pattern of escape rate decrease(ERD) can arise by distinct mechanisms. In particular, in large populations with high beneficial mutation rates interference among different escape strains –an effect that can emerge in evolution with asexual reproduction and results in delayed fixation times of beneficial mutations compared to sexual reproduction– could significantly impact the escape rates of mutations. In this paper, we investigated how interference between these concurrent escape mutations affects their escape rates in systems with multiple epitopes, and whether it could be a source of the ERD pattern. To address these issues, we developed a multilocus Wright-Fisher model of HIV dynamics with selection, mutation and recombination, serving as a null-model for interference. We also derived an interference-free null model assuming initial neutral evolution before immune response elicitation. We found that interference between several equally selectively advantageous mutations can generate the observed ERD pattern. We also found that the number of loci, as well as recombination rates substantially affect ERD. These effects can be explained by the underexponential decline of escape rates over time. Lastly, we found that the observed ERD pattern in HIV infected individuals is consistent with both independent, interference-free mutations as well as interference effects. Our results confirm that interference effects should be considered when analyzing HIV escape mutations. The challenge in estimating escape rates and mutation-associated selective coefficients posed by

  9. Elliptic Anisotropy ν2 May Be Dominated by Particle Escape instead of Hydrodynamic Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zi-Wei; He, Liang; Edmonds, Terrence; Liu, Feng; Molnar, Denes; Wang, Fuqiang

    2016-12-01

    It is commonly believed that azimuthal anisotropies in relativistic heavy ion collisions are generated by hydrodynamic evolution of the strongly interacting quark-gluon plasma. Here we use transport models to study how azimuthal anisotropies depend on the number of collisions that each parton suffers. We find that the majority of ν2 comes from the anisotropic escape of partons, not from the parton collective flow, for semi-central Au+Au collisions at 200A GeV. As expected, the fraction of ν2 from the anisotropic particle escape is even higher for smaller systems such as d+Au. Our transport model results also confirm that azimuthal anisotropies would be dominated by hydrodynamic flow at unrealistically-high parton cross sections. Our finding thus naturally explains the similarity of azimuthal anisotropies in small and large systems; however, it presents a challenge to the paradigm of anisotropic flow.

  10. Complex Economies Have a Lateral Escape from the Poverty Trap.

    PubMed

    Pugliese, Emanuele; Chiarotti, Guido L; Zaccaria, Andrea; Pietronero, Luciano

    2017-01-01

    We analyze the decisive role played by the complexity of economic systems at the onset of the industrialization process of countries over the past 50 years. Our analysis of the input growth dynamics, considering a further dimension through a recently introduced measure of economic complexity, reveals that more differentiated and more complex economies face a lower barrier (in terms of GDP per capita) when starting the transition towards industrialization. As a consequence, we can extend the classical concept of a one-dimensional poverty trap, by introducing a two-dimensional poverty trap: a country will start the industrialization process if it is rich enough (as in neo-classical economic theories), complex enough (using this new dimension and laterally escaping from the poverty trap), or a linear combination of the two. This naturally leads to the proposal of a Complex Index of Relative Development (CIRD) which shows, when analyzed as a function of the growth due to input, a shape of an upside down parabola similar to that expected from the standard economic theories when considering only the GDP per capita dimension.

  11. Complex Economies Have a Lateral Escape from the Poverty Trap

    PubMed Central

    Pugliese, Emanuele; Chiarotti, Guido L.; Zaccaria, Andrea; Pietronero, Luciano

    2017-01-01

    We analyze the decisive role played by the complexity of economic systems at the onset of the industrialization process of countries over the past 50 years. Our analysis of the input growth dynamics, considering a further dimension through a recently introduced measure of economic complexity, reveals that more differentiated and more complex economies face a lower barrier (in terms of GDP per capita) when starting the transition towards industrialization. As a consequence, we can extend the classical concept of a one-dimensional poverty trap, by introducing a two-dimensional poverty trap: a country will start the industrialization process if it is rich enough (as in neo-classical economic theories), complex enough (using this new dimension and laterally escaping from the poverty trap), or a linear combination of the two. This naturally leads to the proposal of a Complex Index of Relative Development (CIRD) which shows, when analyzed as a function of the growth due to input, a shape of an upside down parabola similar to that expected from the standard economic theories when considering only the GDP per capita dimension. PMID:28072867

  12. Green Pea Galaxies Reveal Secrets of Lyα Escape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Huan; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Gronke, Max; Rhoads, James E.; Jaskot, Anne; Zheng, Zhenya; Dijkstra, Mark; Wang, JunXian

    2016-01-01

    In star-forming galaxies, a lot of Lyα photons were generated in HII regions surrounding massive stars. The escape of Lyα photons from galaxies is a key issue in studying high redshift galaxies and probing cosmic reionization with Lyα. To understand Lyα escape, it is valuable to study high quality Lyα profiles in Lyα emitters. However, such studies are rare due to the faintness of high-z Lyα emitters and the lack of local analogs with high Lyα equivalent width. Here we show that "Green Pea" galaxies are the best local analogs of high-z Lyα emitters and their high quality Lyα profiles demonstrate low HI column density is the key to Lyα escape. The Lyα escape fraction shows correlations with the ratio of Lyα blue peak velocity to Hα line width, the normalized flux density at valley of Lyα profile, and a few other features of Lyα profiles. We compared the Lyα profiles with outflowing HI shell radiative transfer model and found that the best-fit HI column density is anti-correlated with the Lyα escape fraction. We also found an anti-correlation between Lyα escape fraction and galactic metallicity. Our results support that LAEs with high Lyα escape fraction have low metallicity, low HI column density, and mild HI gas outflow.

  13. The Aeronomy of Mars: Characterization by MAVEN of the Upper Atmosphere Reservoir That Regulates Volatile Escape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bougher, S. W.; Cravens, T. E.; Grebowsky, J.; Luhmann, J.

    2015-12-01

    The Mars thermosphere-ionosphere-exosphere (TIE) system constitutes the atmospheric reservoir (i.e. available cold and hot planetary neutral and thermal ion species) that regulates present day escape processes from the planet. The characterization of this TIE system, including its spatial and temporal (e.g., solar cycle, seasonal, diurnal, episodic) variability is needed to determine present day escape rates. Without knowledge of the physics and chemistry creating this TIE region and driving its variations, it is not possible to constrain either the short term or long term histories of atmosphere escape from Mars. MAVEN (Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution Mission) will make both in-situ and remote measurements of the state variables of the Martian TIE system. A full characterization of the thermosphere (˜100-250 km) and ionosphere (˜100-400 km) structure (and its variability) will be conducted with the collection of spacecraft in-situ measurements that systematically span most local times and latitudes, over a regular sampling of Mars seasons, and throughout the bottom half of the solar cycle. Such sampling will far surpass that available from existing spacecraft and ground-based datasets. In addition, remote measurements will provide a systematic mapping of the composition and structure of Mars neutral upper atmosphere and coronae (e.g. H, C, N, O), as well as probe lower altitudes. Such a detailed characterization is a necessary first step toward answering MAVEN's three main science questions (see Jakosky et al. 2014, this issue). This information will be used to determine present day escape rates from Mars, and provide an estimate of integrated loss to space throughout Mars history.

  14. Enhancing Endosomal Escape for Intracellular Delivery of Macromolecular Biologic Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Lönn, Peter; Kacsinta, Apollo D.; Cui, Xian-Shu; Hamil, Alexander S.; Kaulich, Manuel; Gogoi, Khirud; Dowdy, Steven F.

    2016-01-01

    Bioactive macromolecular peptides and oligonucleotides have significant therapeutic potential. However, due to their size, they have no ability to enter the cytoplasm of cells. Peptide/Protein transduction domains (PTDs), also called cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs), can promote uptake of macromolecules via endocytosis. However, overcoming the rate-limiting step of endosomal escape into the cytoplasm remains a major challenge. Hydrophobic amino acid R groups are known to play a vital role in viral escape from endosomes. Here we utilize a real-time, quantitative live cell split-GFP fluorescence complementation phenotypic assay to systematically analyze and optimize a series of synthetic endosomal escape domains (EEDs). By conjugating EEDs to a TAT-PTD/CPP spilt-GFP peptide complementation assay, we were able to quantitatively measure endosomal escape into the cytoplasm of live cells via restoration of GFP fluorescence by intracellular molecular complementation. We found that EEDs containing two aromatic indole rings or one indole ring and two aromatic phenyl groups at a fixed distance of six polyethylene glycol (PEG) units from the TAT-PTD-cargo significantly enhanced cytoplasmic delivery in the absence of cytotoxicity. EEDs address the critical rate-limiting step of endosomal escape in delivery of macromolecular biologic peptide, protein and siRNA therapeutics into cells. PMID:27604151

  15. Enhancing Endosomal Escape for Intracellular Delivery of Macromolecular Biologic Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Lönn, Peter; Kacsinta, Apollo D; Cui, Xian-Shu; Hamil, Alexander S; Kaulich, Manuel; Gogoi, Khirud; Dowdy, Steven F

    2016-09-08

    Bioactive macromolecular peptides and oligonucleotides have significant therapeutic potential. However, due to their size, they have no ability to enter the cytoplasm of cells. Peptide/Protein transduction domains (PTDs), also called cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs), can promote uptake of macromolecules via endocytosis. However, overcoming the rate-limiting step of endosomal escape into the cytoplasm remains a major challenge. Hydrophobic amino acid R groups are known to play a vital role in viral escape from endosomes. Here we utilize a real-time, quantitative live cell split-GFP fluorescence complementation phenotypic assay to systematically analyze and optimize a series of synthetic endosomal escape domains (EEDs). By conjugating EEDs to a TAT-PTD/CPP spilt-GFP peptide complementation assay, we were able to quantitatively measure endosomal escape into the cytoplasm of live cells via restoration of GFP fluorescence by intracellular molecular complementation. We found that EEDs containing two aromatic indole rings or one indole ring and two aromatic phenyl groups at a fixed distance of six polyethylene glycol (PEG) units from the TAT-PTD-cargo significantly enhanced cytoplasmic delivery in the absence of cytotoxicity. EEDs address the critical rate-limiting step of endosomal escape in delivery of macromolecular biologic peptide, protein and siRNA therapeutics into cells.

  16. Multiplexing of Motor Information in the Discharge of a Collision Detecting Neuron during Escape Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Fotowat, Haleh; Harrison, Reid R; Gabbiani, Fabrizio

    2010-01-01

    Locusts possess an identified neuron, the descending contralateral movement detector (DCMD), conveying visual information about impending collision from the brain to thoracic motor centers. We built a telemetry system to simultaneously record, in freely behaving animals, the activity of the DCMD and of motoneurons involved in jump execution. Co-contraction of antagonistic leg muscles, a required preparatory phase, was triggered after the DCMD firing rate crossed a threshold. Thereafter, the number of DCMD spikes predicted precisely motoneuron activity and jump occurrence. Additionally, the time of DCMD peak firing rate predicted that of jump. Ablation experiments suggest that the DCMD, together with a nearly identical ipsilateral descending neuron, is responsible for the timely execution of the escape. Thus, three distinct features that are multiplexed in a single neuron’s sensory response to impending collision – firing rate threshold, peak firing time, and spike count – likely control three distinct motor aspects of escape behaviors. PMID:21220105

  17. Improving the Endosomal Escape of Cell-Penetrating Peptides and Their Cargos: Strategies and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Erazo-Oliveras, Alfredo; Muthukrishnan, Nandhini; Baker, Ryan; Wang, Ting-Yi; Pellois, Jean-Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) can deliver cell-impermeable therapeutic cargos into cells. In particular, CPP-cargo conjugates tend to accumulate inside cells by endocytosis. However, they often remain trapped inside endocytic organelles and fail to reach the cytosolic space of cells efficiently. In this review, the evidence for CPP-mediated endosomal escape is discussed. In addition, several strategies that have been utilized to enhance the endosomal escape of CPP-cargos are described. The recent development of branched systems that display multiple copies of a CPP is presented. The use of viral or synthetic peptides that can disrupt the endosomal membrane upon activation by the low pH of endosomes is also discussed. Finally, we survey how CPPs labeled with chromophores can be used in combination with light to stimulate endosomal lysis. The mechanisms and challenges associated with these intracellular delivery methodologies are discussed. PMID:24223492

  18. Exploitation of an ancient escape circuit by an avian predator: prey sensitivity to model predator display in the field.

    PubMed

    Jabloński, P G; Strausfeld, N J

    2000-08-01

    Certain insectivorous birds, such as the painted redstart (Myioborus pictus), undertake flush pursuit--a characteristic display that elicits an escape reaction by an insect, which the bird then chases in the air and eats. This account describes experiments showing that flush pursuit uses visual displays, which are likely to exploit an ancient neural circuit in dipteran insects, the visual systems of which are well documented as detecting looming stimuli and triggering an escape responses. Using models that decompose components of the redstart display, specific elements of the display were analyzed for their contribution in triggering visually induced escape behavior by dipterous insects. Elements tested were pivoting body movements, patterning on the spread tail and wings, and visual contrast of model redstarts against pale and dark backgrounds. We show that contrasting patterns within the plumage are crucial to foraging success, as is contrast of the bird against a background. Visual motion also significantly contributes to the successful flushing. In contrast, unpatterned models and patterned models that do not contrast with the background are less successful in eliciting escape responses of flies. Natural visual stimuli provided by Myioborus pictus are similar to those known to trigger looming and time-to-collision neurons in the escape circuits of flies and other insects, such as orthopterans. We propose that the tuning properties of these neural pathways might have contributed to the evolution of foraging displays in flush-pursuing birds.

  19. Accounting for escape mortality in fisheries: implications for stock productivity and optimal management.

    PubMed

    Baker, Matthew R; Schindler, Daniel E; Essington, Timothy E; Hilborn, Ray

    2014-01-01

    Few studies have considered the management implications of mortality to target fish stocks caused by non-retention in commercial harvest gear (escape mortality). We demonstrate the magnitude of this previously unquantified source of mortality and its implications for the population dynamics of exploited stocks, biological metrics, stock productivity, and optimal management. Non-retention in commercial gillnet fisheries for Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) is common and often leads to delayed mortality in spawning populations. This represents losses, not only to fishery harvest, but also in future recruitment to exploited stocks. We estimated incidence of non-retention in Alaskan gillnet fisheries for sockeye salmon (O. nerka) and found disentanglement injuries to be extensive and highly variable between years. Injuries related to non-retention were noted in all spawning populations, and incidence of injury ranged from 6% to 44% of escaped salmon across nine river systems over five years. We also demonstrate that non-retention rates strongly correlate with fishing effort. We applied maximum likelihood and Bayesian approaches to stock-recruitment analyses, discounting estimates of spawning salmon to account for fishery-related mortality in escaped fish. Discounting spawning stock estimates as a function of annual fishing effort improved model fits to historical stock-recruitment data in most modeled systems. This suggests the productivity of exploited stocks has been systematically underestimated. It also suggests that indices of fishing effort may be used to predict escape mortality and correct for losses. Our results illustrate how explicitly accounting for collateral effects of fishery extraction may improve estimates of productivity and better inform management metrics derived from estimates of stock-recruitment analyses.

  20. Escape rate and diffusion of a Stochastically Driven particle

    PubMed Central

    Piscitelli, Antonio; Pica Ciamarra, Massimo

    2017-01-01

    The dynamical properties of a tracer repeatedly colliding with heat bath particles can be described within a Langevin framework provided that the tracer is more massive than the bath particles, and that the collisions are frequent. Here we consider the escape of a particle from a potential well, and the diffusion coefficient in a periodic potential, without making these assumptions. We have thus investigated the dynamical properties of a Stochastically Driven particle that moves under the influence of the confining potential in between successive collisions with the heat bath. In the overdamped limit, both the escape rate and the diffusion coefficient coincide with those of a Langevin particle. Conversely, in the underdamped limit the two dynamics have a different temperature dependence. In particular, at low temperature the Stochastically Driven particle has a smaller escape rate, but a larger diffusion coefficient. PMID:28120904

  1. Kramers escape of a self-propelled particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geiseler, Alexander; Hänggi, Peter; Schmid, Gerhard

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the escape rate of an overdamped, self-propelled spherical Brownian particle on a surface from a metastable potential well. Within a modeling in terms of a 1D constant speed of the particle's active dynamics we consider the associated rate using both numerical and analytical approaches. Regarding the properties of the stationary state in the potential well, two major timescales exist, each governing the translational and the rotational dynamics of the particle, respectively. The particle radius is identified to present the essential quantity in charge of regulating the ratio between those timescales. For very small and very large particle radii, approximate analytic expressions for the particle's escape rate can be derived, which, within their respective range of validity, compare favorably with the precise escape numerics of the underlying full two-dimensional Fokker-Planck description.

  2. Coexisting chaotic and periodic dynamics in clock escapements.

    PubMed

    Moon, Francis C; Stiefel, Preston D

    2006-09-15

    This paper addresses the nature of noise in machines. As a concrete example, we examine the dynamics of clock escapements from experimental, historical and analytical points of view. Experiments on two escapement mechanisms from the Reuleaux kinematic collection at Cornell University are used to illustrate chaotic-like noise in clocks. These vibrations coexist with the periodic dynamics of the balance wheel or pendulum. A mathematical model is presented that shows how self-generated chaos in clocks can break the dry friction in the gear train. This model is shown to exhibit a strange attractor in the structural vibration of the clock. The internal feedback between the oscillator and the escapement structure is similar to anti-control of chaos models.

  3. Social escape behaviors in children with fragile X syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hall, Scott; DeBernardis, Marie; Reiss, Allan

    2006-10-01

    Social escape behavior is a common behavioral feature of individuals with fragile X syndrome (fraX). In this observational study, we examined the effect of antecedent social and performance demands on problem behaviors in four conditions: face-to-face interview, silent reading, oral reading and a singing task. Results showed that problem behaviors were significantly more likely to occur during the interview and singing conditions. Higher levels of salivary cortisol were predictive of higher levels of fidgeting behavior and lower levels of eye contact in male participants. There were no associations between level of FMRP expression and social escape behaviors. These data suggest that specific antecedent biological and environmental factors evoke social escape behaviors in fragile X syndrome.

  4. MOLECULAR-KINETIC SIMULATIONS OF ESCAPE FROM THE EX-PLANET AND EXOPLANETS: CRITERION FOR TRANSONIC FLOW

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Robert E.; Volkov, Alexey N.; Erwin, Justin T.

    2013-05-01

    The equations of gas dynamics are extensively used to describe atmospheric loss from solar system bodies and exoplanets even though the boundary conditions at infinity are not uniquely defined. Using molecular-kinetic simulations that correctly treat the transition from the continuum to the rarefied region, we confirm that the energy-limited escape approximation is valid when adiabatic expansion is the dominant cooling process. However, this does not imply that the outflow goes sonic. Rather large escape rates and concomitant adiabatic cooling can produce atmospheres with subsonic flow that are highly extended. Since this affects the heating rate of the upper atmosphere and the interaction with external fields and plasmas, we give a criterion for estimating when the outflow goes transonic in the continuum region. This is applied to early terrestrial atmospheres, exoplanet atmospheres, and the atmosphere of the ex-planet, Pluto, all of which have large escape rates.

  5. Rapid endosomal escape of prickly nanodiamonds: implications for gene delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Zhiqin; Miu, Kaikei; Lung, Pingsai; Zhang, Silu; Zhao, Saisai; Chang, Huan-Cheng; Lin, Ge; Li, Quan

    2015-06-01

    The prickly nanodiamonds easily entered cells via endocytosis followed by unique intracellular translocation characteristics—quick endosomal escape followed by stable residence in cytoplasm. Endosomal membrane rupturing is identified as the major route of nanodiamonds’ escaping the vesicle confinement and to the cytoplasm. Little cytotoxicity is observed to associate with the nanodiamonds’ cytosolic release. Such features enable its application for gene delivery, which requires both effective cellular uptake and cytosolic release of the gene. Taking green fluorescent protein gene as an example, we demonstrate the successful cytosolic delivery and expression of such a gene using the prickly nanodiamonds as carrier.

  6. Case of escape in cassava, Manihot esculenta Crantz.

    PubMed

    Nassar, N M A; Mendonza, M

    2017-02-08

    Two cassava escapes where collected from cultivated fields near natural habitat in Bolivia. They are described morphologically and analyzed cytogenetically in this study. It is suggested that they are the product of backcrosses of cassava interspecific hybrids with the cultigen itself, and that selective conditions have developed in which certain forms of cassava segregates have adapted to grow wildly in natural habitats near cassava fields. These segregates may hybridize with cultivated cassava upon coming in contact with such varieties. Because these escapes have incorporated useful genes from the wild into their genetic structure, they could be used for cassava improvement since their genetic barriers with other forms of cassava are very weak.

  7. Aircrew Automated Escape Systems (AAES) In-Service Usage Data Analyses. Volume 2. Papers Presented at the Annual SAFE Symposium (21st), San Antonio, Texas, 5,6,7,8 November 1983.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-11-05

    Commander, Naval Air Systems Command (AIR-5111C & 531E) the man years and associated cost , cost of materials, travel and cost of contracts awarded for...Contracts to perform all or por of this WUA are hereby authorized within the funding indicated by the cost t Aate. 7. Source and Disposition of Equipment...and ALSS in- service experience. d. Detailed Requirements/ Cost Estimates: (1) The primary effort shall be fo’. establishment of baseline data to aid in

  8. Suppressing escape events in maps of the unit interval with demographic noise.

    PubMed

    Parra-Rojas, César; Challenger, Joseph D; Fanelli, Duccio; McKane, Alan J

    2016-11-01

    We explore the properties of discrete-time stochastic processes with a bounded state space, whose deterministic limit is given by a map of the unit interval. We find that, in the mesoscopic description of the system, the large jumps between successive iterates of the process can result in probability leaking out of the unit interval, despite the fact that the noise is multiplicative and vanishes at the boundaries. By including higher-order terms in the mesoscopic expansion, we are able to capture the non-Gaussian nature of the noise distribution near the boundaries, but this does not preclude the possibility of a trajectory leaving the interval. We propose a number of prescriptions for treating these escape events, and we compare the results with those obtained for the metastable behavior of the microscopic model, where escape events are not possible. We find that, rather than truncating the noise distribution, censoring this distribution to prevent escape events leads to results which are more consistent with the microscopic model. The addition of higher moments to the noise distribution does not increase the accuracy of the final results, and it can be replaced by the simpler Gaussian noise.

  9. Mechanism of escape, extrasystolic, and parasystolic arrhythmias. Study on an electrical analogue.

    PubMed

    Sideris, D A

    1976-01-01

    A simple analogue of the heart consisting of a system of neon relaxation oscillators is presented. The analogue may display rhythm patterns similar to sinus rhythm, escape rhythm, isorrhythmic dissociation with synchronization, atrial extrasystoles, ventricular extrasystoles, and parasystole. The strict rules followed by these arrhythmias, as well as the deviations from the rules commonly followed by the equivalent heart arrhythmias, may be easily reproduced on the analogue. Such features are the Treppe phenomenon and captured beats in escape rhythm, fixed coupling intervals in extrasystoles, partial or complete atrioventricular block in very premature atrial extrasystoles, prolongation of the period following an atrial extrasystole, interpolated premature beats, complete compensatory pause and the rule of bigeminy in ventricular extrasystoles, slight instability of the parasystolic period, multiple length parasystolic periods slightly different from the exact multiples of the parasystolic idioperiod, preference of the parasystoles for certain phase in the sinus cycle, synchronization at a phase difference and fluctuation repeatedly and without interruption from a parasystolic to an extrasystolic rhythm and synchronization in escape rhythm with isorrhythmic dissociation. The mechanisms involved in these phenomena are discussed in detail. The striking similarity between the properties of the cardiac pacemakers and those of the relaxation oscillators on the one hand and betwen the rhythm patterns of the heart and those of the analogue on the other may permit the hypothesis that the mechanisms operating in the analogue may be used in analyzing and understanding heart arrhythmias.

  10. Suppressing escape events in maps of the unit interval with demographic noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parra-Rojas, César; Challenger, Joseph D.; Fanelli, Duccio; McKane, Alan J.

    2016-11-01

    We explore the properties of discrete-time stochastic processes with a bounded state space, whose deterministic limit is given by a map of the unit interval. We find that, in the mesoscopic description of the system, the large jumps between successive iterates of the process can result in probability leaking out of the unit interval, despite the fact that the noise is multiplicative and vanishes at the boundaries. By including higher-order terms in the mesoscopic expansion, we are able to capture the non-Gaussian nature of the noise distribution near the boundaries, but this does not preclude the possibility of a trajectory leaving the interval. We propose a number of prescriptions for treating these escape events, and we compare the results with those obtained for the metastable behavior of the microscopic model, where escape events are not possible. We find that, rather than truncating the noise distribution, censoring this distribution to prevent escape events leads to results which are more consistent with the microscopic model. The addition of higher moments to the noise distribution does not increase the accuracy of the final results, and it can be replaced by the simpler Gaussian noise.

  11. Hubble space telescope emission line galaxies at z ∼ 2: the Lyα escape fraction

    SciTech Connect

    Ciardullo, Robin; Zeimann, Gregory R.; Gronwall, Caryl; Gebhardt, Henry; Schneider, Donald P.; Hagen, Alex; Malz, A. I. E-mail: grzeimann@psu.edu E-mail: gebhardt@psu.edu E-mail: hagen@psu.edu; and others

    2014-11-20

    We compare the Hβ line strengths of 1.90 < z < 2.35 star-forming galaxies observed with the near-IR grism of the Hubble Space Telescope with ground-based measurements of Lyα from the HETDEX Pilot Survey and narrow-band imaging. By examining the line ratios of 73 galaxies, we show that most star-forming systems at this epoch have a Lyα escape fraction below ∼6%. We confirm this result by using stellar reddening to estimate the effective logarithmic extinction of the Hβ emission line (c {sub Hβ} = 0.5) and measuring both the Hβ and Lyα luminosity functions in a ∼100, 000 Mpc{sup 3} volume of space. We show that in our redshift window, the volumetric Lyα escape fraction is at most 4.4{sub −1.2}{sup +2.1}%, with an additional systematic ∼25% uncertainty associated with our estimate of extinction. Finally, we demonstrate that the bulk of the epoch's star-forming galaxies have Lyα emission line optical depths that are significantly greater than that for the underlying UV continuum. In our predominantly [O III] λ5007-selected sample of galaxies, resonant scattering must be important for the escape of Lyα photons.

  12. Low LET radiolysis escape yields for reducing radicals and H2 in pressurized high temperature water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterniczuk, Marcin; Yakabuskie, Pamela A.; Wren, J. Clara; Jacob, Jasmine A.; Bartels, David M.

    2016-04-01

    Low Linear Energy Transfer (LET) radiolysis escape yields (G values) are reported for the sum (G(radH)+G(e-)aq) and for G(H2) in subcritical water up to 350 °C. The scavenger system 1-10 mM acetate/0.001 M hydroxide/0.00048 M N2O was used with simultaneous mass spectroscopic detection of H2 and N2 product. Temperature-dependent measurements were carried out with 2.5 MeV electrons from a van de Graaff accelerator, while room temperature calibration measurements were done with a 60Co gamma source. The concentrations and dose range were carefully chosen so that initial spur chemistry is not perturbed and the N2 product yield corresponds to those reducing radicals that escape recombination in pure water. In comparison with a recent review recommendation of Elliot and Bartels (AECL report 153-127160-450-001, 2009), the measured reducing radical yield is seven percent smaller at room temperature but in fairly good agreement above 150 °C. The H2 escape yield is in good agreement throughout the temperature range with several previous studies that used much larger radical scavenging rates. Previous analysis of earlier high temperature measurements of Gesc(radOH) is shown to be flawed, although the actual G values may be nearly correct. The methodology used in the present report greatly reduces the range of possible error and puts the high temperature escape yields for low-LET radiation on a much firmer quantitative foundation than was previously available.

  13. Alanine mutagenesis of the primary antigenic escape residue cluster, c1, of apical membrane antigen 1.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Sheetij; Dlugosz, Lisa S; Clayton, Joshua W; Pool, Christopher D; Haynes, J David; Gasser, Robert A; Batchelor, Adrian H

    2010-02-01

    Antibodies against apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1) inhibit invasion of Plasmodium merozoites into red cells, and a large number of single nucleotide polymorphisms on AMA1 allow the parasite to escape inhibitory antibodies. The availability of a crystal structure makes it possible to test protein engineering strategies to develop a monovalent broadly reactive vaccine. Previously, we showed that a linear stretch of polymorphic residues (amino acids 187 to 207), localized within the C1 cluster on domain 1, conferred the highest level of escape from inhibitory antibodies, and these were termed antigenic escape residues (AER). Here we test the hypothesis that immunodampening the C1 AER will divert the immune system toward more conserved regions. We substituted seven C1 AER of the FVO strain Plasmodium falciparum AMA1 with alanine residues (ALA). The resulting ALA protein was less immunogenic than the native protein in rabbits. Anti-ALA antibodies contained a higher proportion of cross-reactive domain 2 and domain 3 antibodies and had higher avidity than anti-FVO. No overall enhancement of cross-reactive inhibitory activity was observed when anti-FVO and anti-ALA sera were compared for their ability to inhibit invasion. Alanine mutations at the C1 AER had shifted the immune response toward cross-strain-reactive epitopes that were noninhibitory, refuting the hypothesis but confirming the importance of the C1 cluster as an inhibitory epitope. We further demonstrate that naturally occurring polymorphisms that fall within the C1 cluster can predict escape from cross-strain invasion inhibition, reinforcing the importance of the C1 cluster genotype for antigenic categorization and allelic shift analyses in future phase 2b trials.

  14. Immune Escape Mechanisms are Plasmodium's Secret Weapons Foiling the Success of Potent and Persistently Efficacious Malaria Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Farooq, Fouzia; Bergmann-Leitner, Elke S

    2015-12-01

    Despite decades of active research, an efficacious vaccine mediating long-term protection is still not available. This review highlights various mechanisms and the different facets by which the parasites outsmart the immune system. An understanding of how the parasites escape immune recognition and interfere with the induction of a protective immune response that provides sterilizing immunity will be crucial to vaccine design.

  15. Development of three-layered rumen escapable capsules for cattle

    PubMed Central

    SEYAMA, Tomohiro; HIRAYASU, Hirofumi; YAMAWAKI, Kenji; ADACHI, Takuhiko; SUGIMOTO, Takayuki; KASAI, Koji

    2016-01-01

    A new rumen escapable tool is presented for cattle in prospect of developing medical treatment or supplementing trace elements for disease prevention. This tool consists of a three-layered capsule that dissolves in the lower digestive tract, but not in the rumen. The capsule was manufactured by capsule-forming techniques through the use of liquid surface tension. This method does not involve high-temperature treatment, so the capsule can contain not only lipophilic substances but also hydrophilic or heat-sensitive substances. Furthermore, the capsule has a specific gravity of 1.3 and diameter of 6.0 mm, which were previously shown to be appropriate to avoid rumination. The objective of this study was to confirm the effectiveness of the capsule pertinent to rumen escaping. In order to validate rumen escape, capsules containing 30 g of water-soluble vitamin (thiamine hydrochloride) per head were administered to four lactating cows assigned in a crossover trial. In the group administered encapsulated thiamine hydrochloride, blood thiamine levels increased from 12.4 ± 1.03 ng/ml before administration to 54.8 ± 2.21 ng/ml at 6 hr following administration, whereas the level remained at 13.3 ± 2.05 ng/ml in the control group administered via aqueous solution. This indicates that the three-layered capsules passed through the rumen and dissolved in the lower digestive tract, thus functioning as a rumen escapable tool. PMID:27546371

  16. 46 CFR 177.500 - Means of escape.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... escape must be widely separated and, if possible, at opposite ends or sides of the space to minimize the... elevator enclosures, elevated stages, bars, and cashier stands, but not including slot machines, tables, or... necessary for handling lifesaving equipment, anchor handling equipment, or line handling gear, or in way...

  17. 46 CFR 177.500 - Means of escape.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... escape must be widely separated and, if possible, at opposite ends or sides of the space to minimize the... elevator enclosures, elevated stages, bars, and cashier stands, but not including slot machines, tables, or... necessary for handling lifesaving equipment, anchor handling equipment, or line handling gear, or in way...

  18. 46 CFR 177.500 - Means of escape.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... escape must be widely separated and, if possible, at opposite ends or sides of the space to minimize the... elevator enclosures, elevated stages, bars, and cashier stands, but not including slot machines, tables, or... necessary for handling lifesaving equipment, anchor handling equipment, or line handling gear, or in way...

  19. 46 CFR 177.500 - Means of escape.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... escape must be widely separated and, if possible, at opposite ends or sides of the space to minimize the... elevator enclosures, elevated stages, bars, and cashier stands, but not including slot machines, tables, or... necessary for handling lifesaving equipment, anchor handling equipment, or line handling gear, or in way...

  20. 46 CFR 177.500 - Means of escape.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... escape must be widely separated and, if possible, at opposite ends or sides of the space to minimize the... elevator enclosures, elevated stages, bars, and cashier stands, but not including slot machines, tables, or... necessary for handling lifesaving equipment, anchor handling equipment, or line handling gear, or in way...

  1. 75 FR 61386 - Emergency Escape Breathing Apparatus Standards

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-05

    ...FRA is proposing to amend its regulations related to occupational safety and health in locomotive cabs in three ways. First and foremost, pursuant to a 2008 Congressional mandate, FRA is proposing to include requirements that railroads provide an appropriate atmosphere-supplying emergency escape breathing apparatus (EEBA) to the members of the train crew and certain other employees while they......

  2. Enuresis Control through Fading, Escape, and Avoidance Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Gordon D.

    1979-01-01

    A twin signal device that provides both escape and avoidance conditioning in enuresis control was documented with case studies of two enuretic children (eight and nine years old). In addition, a technique of fading as an adjunct to the process was utilized with one subject. (Author/SBH)

  3. 46 CFR 169.313 - Means of escape.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Means of escape. 169.313 Section 169.313 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Construction... apart, uniform for the length of the ladder; (3) At least 3 inches from the nearest permanent object...

  4. 46 CFR 169.313 - Means of escape.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Means of escape. 169.313 Section 169.313 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Construction... apart, uniform for the length of the ladder; (3) At least 3 inches from the nearest permanent object...

  5. 12. CLOSEUP VIEW FROM NORTHWEST, SHOWING DETAILS OF FIRE ESCAPE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. CLOSE-UP VIEW FROM NORTHWEST, SHOWING DETAILS OF FIRE ESCAPE NEAR CORNER OF MILLS HALL MAIN WING NORTH WALL, AND MILLS HALL NORTH WING WEST WALL. - Mills Hall, Mills College, 5000 MacArthur Boulevard, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  6. Magnetic buoyancy and the escape of magnetic fields from stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, E. N.

    1984-06-01

    Magnetic buoyancy causes the azimuthal magnetic fields of stars to rise rapidly to the surface, from where they are generally assumed to escape freely into space. However, a closer look at the problem reveals the simple fact that disengagement of the field from the gas, and escape into space, require a convoluted field configuration, producing neutral point reconnection of the flux in the tenuous gas above the surface of the star. Only that flux which reconnects can escape. Recent observations of the magnetic fields emerging through the surface of the Sun show that even at sunspot maximum the gaps in longitude between bipolar magnetic regions are so wide as to limit severely the reconnection between regions. We suggest from the observations that no more than perhaps 3% of the flux that is observed to emerge through the surface is able to reconnect and escape. Hence the surface of the Sun approximates to an impenetrable barrier rather than an open surface, with quantitative consequences for theoretical dynamo models. Recent observations of the retraction of bipolar fields at the end of their appearance at the surface suggest active dynamical control by the convection beneath the surface.

  7. Speed kills: ineffective avian escape responses to oncoming vehicles

    PubMed Central

    DeVault, Travis L.; Blackwell, Bradley F.; Seamans, Thomas W.; Lima, Steven L.; Fernández-Juricic, Esteban

    2015-01-01

    Animal–vehicle collisions cause high levels of vertebrate mortality worldwide, and what goes wrong when animals fail to escape and ultimately collide with vehicles is not well understood. We investigated alert and escape behaviours of captive brown-headed cowbirds (Molothrus ater) in response to virtual vehicle approaches of different sizes and at speeds ranging from 60 to 360 km h−1. Alert and flight initiation distances remained similar across vehicle speeds, and accordingly, alert and flight initiation times decreased at higher vehicle speeds. Thus, avoidance behaviours in cowbirds appeared to be based on distance rather than time available for escape, particularly at 60–150 km h−1; however, at higher speeds (more than or equal to 180 km h−1) no trend in response behaviour was discernible. As vehicle speed increased, cowbirds did not have enough time to assess the approaching vehicle, and cowbirds generally did not initiate flight with enough time to avoid collision when vehicle speed exceeded 120 km h−1. Although potentially effective for evading predators, the decision-making process used by cowbirds in our study appears maladaptive in the context of avoiding fast-moving vehicles. Our methodological approach and findings provide a framework to assess how novel management strategies could affect escape rules, and the sensory and cognitive abilities animals use to avoid vehicle collisions. PMID:25567648

  8. Brain size as a driver of avian escape strategy.

    PubMed

    Samia, Diogo S M; Pape Møller, Anders; Blumstein, Daniel T

    2015-07-03

    After detecting an approaching predator, animals make a decision when to flee. Prey will initiate flight soon after detecting a predator so as to minimize attentional costs related to on-going monitoring of the whereabouts of the predator. Such costs may compete with foraging and other maintenance activities and hence be larger than the costs of immediate flight. The drivers of interspecific variation in escape strategy are poorly known. Here we investigated the morphological, life history and natural history traits that correlate with variation in avian escape strategy across a sample of 96 species of birds. Brain mass, body size, habitat structure and group size were the main predictors of escape strategy. The direction of the effect of these traits was consistent with selection for a reduction of monitoring costs. Therefore, attentional costs depend on relative brain size, which determines the ability to monitor the whereabouts of potential predators and the difficulty of this task as reflected by habitat and social complexity. Thus brain size, and the cognitive functions associated with it, constitute a general framework for explaining the effects of body size, habitat structure and sociality identified as determinants of avian escape strategy.

  9. Spatial and Nonspatial Escape Strategies in the Barnes Maze

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Fiona E.; Reiserer, Randall S.; Tomarken, Andrew J.; McDonald, Michael P.

    2006-01-01

    The Barnes maze is a spatial memory task that requires subjects to learn the position of a hole that can be used to escape the brightly lit, open surface of the maze. Two experiments assessed the relative importance of spatial (extra-maze) versus proximal visible cues in solving the maze. In Experiment 1, four groups of mice were trained either…

  10. Seasonal Dependence of the Escape of Martian Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, John

    2013-10-01

    This proposal is to obtain ACS/SBC images and STIS spectra of the extended H Ly alpha and O 1304 emissions from H and O atoms in the atmosphere of Mars to study seasonal changes in the escape rate of H and O atoms, and thereby water. Prior HST observations have revealed a surprising rapid change in the H escape rate in late martian summer following a global dust storm, and have shown that STIS spectra can easily detect superthermal O atoms. The relative degree of influence of seasons and dust storms on the H density and escape flux are not known, and little is known about variations in the hot O density and escape rate. The timing of these observations is key to these scientific goals. Mars is now approaching the Sun, HST can observe Mars over a wide range of seasons from April - Nov 2014, and HST will not be able to observe Mars again until after the prime mission of MAVEN. These observations will provide strong support for the NASA MAVEN mission, scheduled to arrive at Mars in Sept. 2014. This proposal is for a single visit of 3 HST orbits in late sprign 2014 to establish the baseline conditions when Mars is far from the Sun.

  11. Solar forcing and planetary ion escape from Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundin, R.; Barabash, S.; Fedorov, A.; Holmström, M.; Nilsson, H.; Sauvaud, J.-A.; Yamauchi, M.

    2008-05-01

    The variability of planetary ion escape from Mars is studied using data from the Ion Mass Analyzer, IMA, on Mars Express (MEX). 42 orbits were selected during 17 months for different solar wind conditions, focusing on the low energy (~30 - 800 eV) heavy ion (e.g. O+, O2 + and CO2 +) outflow. A strong correlation is found between solar wind forcing of the obstacle, the cross-sectional area enclosing the ion outflow from Mars and the total heavy ion escape flux. The at least one order of magnitude changes of the ion outflow on the short term (hours, days), is directly connected with the variability of solar wind, solar soft x-ray and solar EUV (XEUV). The latter was first inferred from an analysis of how the obstacle size changes with changing solar wind and solar XEUV forcing. The 17-month trend of decreasing ion outflow with EUV during a declining phase of solar cycle 23, the EUV determined from the Neutral Particle Imager (NPI) on MEX, illustrates the influence of solar EUV forcing. On the basis of this we conclude that changes in solar wind- and solar XEUV forcing governs the variable ion escape from Mars. Both forcing terms appear to be equally important for the escape rate. Considering the difference in travel time for XEUV and the solar wind to Mars, the XEUV effect will precede the solar wind effect by several (3-9) days.

  12. 46 CFR 116.500 - Means of escape.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... escape must be widely separated and, if possible, at opposite ends or sides of the space to minimize the... millimeters (0.333 inches) multiplied by the number of passengers for which the space is designed. (g) A dead end passageway, or the equivalent, of more than 6.1 meters (20 feet) in length is prohibited. (h)...

  13. 6. UNDERGROUND FIRING CONTROL ROOM, INTERIOR. Looking southeast to escape ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. UNDERGROUND FIRING CONTROL ROOM, INTERIOR. Looking southeast to escape tunnel. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Firing Control Building, Test Area 1-100, northeast end of Test Area 1-100 Road, Boron, Kern County, CA

  14. Escaping Embarrassment: Face-Work in the Rap Cipher

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Jooyoung

    2009-01-01

    How do individuals escape embarrassing moments in interaction? Drawing from ethnographic fieldwork, in-depth interviews, and video recordings of weekly street corner ciphers (impromptu rap sessions), this paper expands Goffman's theory of defensive and protective face-work. The findings reveal formulaic and indirect dimensions of face-work. First,…

  15. Purinergic inhibition of ENaC produces aldosterone escape.

    PubMed

    Stockand, James D; Mironova, Elena; Bugaj, Vladislav; Rieg, Timo; Insel, Paul A; Vallon, Volker; Peti-Peterdi, Janos; Pochynyuk, Oleh

    2010-11-01

    The mechanisms underlying "aldosterone escape," which refers to the excretion of sodium (Na(+)) during high Na(+) intake despite inappropriately increased levels of mineralocorticoids, are incompletely understood. Because local purinergic tone in the aldosterone-sensitive distal nephron downregulates epithelial Na(+) channel (ENaC) activity, we tested whether this mechanism mediates aldosterone escape. Here, urinary ATP concentration increased with dietary Na(+) intake in mice. Physiologic concentrations of ATP decreased ENaC activity in a dosage-dependent manner. P2Y(2)(-/-) mice, which lack the purinergic receptor, had significantly less increased Na(+) excretion than wild-type mice in response to high-Na(+) intake. Exogenous deoxycorticosterone acetate and deletion of the P2Y(2) receptor each modestly increased the resistance of ENaC to changes in Na(+) intake; together, they markedly increased resistance. Under the latter condition, ENaC could not respond to changes in Na(+) intake. In contrast, as a result of aldosterone escape, wild-type mice had increased Na(+) excretion in response to high-Na(+) intake regardless of the presence of high deoxycorticosterone acetate. These data suggest that control of ENaC by purinergic signaling is necessary for aldosterone escape.

  16. Purinergic Inhibition of ENaC Produces Aldosterone Escape

    PubMed Central

    Mironova, Elena; Bugaj, Vladislav; Rieg, Timo; Insel, Paul A.; Vallon, Volker; Peti-Peterdi, Janos

    2010-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying “aldosterone escape,” which refers to the excretion of sodium (Na+) during high Na+ intake despite inappropriately increased levels of mineralocorticoids, are incompletely understood. Because local purinergic tone in the aldosterone-sensitive distal nephron downregulates epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC) activity, we tested whether this mechanism mediates aldosterone escape. Here, urinary ATP concentration increased with dietary Na+ intake in mice. Physiologic concentrations of ATP decreased ENaC activity in a dosage-dependent manner. P2Y2−/− mice, which lack the purinergic receptor, had significantly less increased Na+ excretion than wild-type mice in response to high-Na+ intake. Exogenous deoxycorticosterone acetate and deletion of the P2Y2 receptor each modestly increased the resistance of ENaC to changes in Na+ intake; together, they markedly increased resistance. Under the latter condition, ENaC could not respond to changes in Na+ intake. In contrast, as a result of aldosterone escape, wild-type mice had increased Na+ excretion in response to high-Na+ intake regardless of the presence of high deoxycorticosterone acetate. These data suggest that control of ENaC by purinergic signaling is necessary for aldosterone escape. PMID:20813869

  17. Plasma amino acid response to graded levels of escape protein.

    PubMed

    Gibb, D J; Klopfenstein, T J; Britton, R A; Lewis, A J

    1992-09-01

    A trial was conducted to examine the potential of using plasma amino acid responses to graded levels of escape protein to determine limiting amino acids in cattle. Growing calves (n = 120; mean BW = 220 +/- 21 kg) were fed a basal diet of corncob:sorghum silage (61:39) and were individually supplemented with distillers' dried grains (DDG), heat-damaged DDG (H-DDG), feather meal (FTH), or urea. The urea supplement was mixed with DDG and H-DDG to allow 0, 20, 35, 50, 65, or 80% of the supplemental CP to come from distillers' protein and maintain an 11.5% CP diet. Urea supplement was mixed with FTH to allow 0, 22, 39, 56, 73, or 90% of the supplemental CP to come from FTH. Dietary CP ranged from 11.5% at the 0% level to 17.3% at the 90% level. Plasma concentration of most essential plasma amino acids responded (P less than .10) linearly and(or) quadratically to increased escape protein. The broken-line response of plasma methionine at low DDG intake suggested that methionine was limiting at low levels of escape protein. An initial decrease followed by a plateau fit by a broken line indicated that histidine became limiting in FTH diets, and lysine eventually became limiting for DDG, H-DDG, and FTH diets before maximum BW gain was reached. Results indicate that plasma amino acid responses may identify amino acids that become limiting with increasing escape protein.

  18. Social Escape Behaviors in Children with Fragile X Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Scott; DeBernardis, Marie; Reiss, Allan

    2006-01-01

    Social escape behavior is a common behavioral feature of individuals with fragile X syndrome (fraX). In this observational study, we examined the effect of antecedent social and performance demands on problem behaviors in four conditions: face-to-face interview, silent reading, oral reading and a singing task. Results showed that problem behaviors…

  19. 46 CFR 28.390 - Means of escape.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Means of escape. 28.390 Section 28.390 Shipping COAST... emergency exits, passageways, stairways, ladders, deck scuttles, and windows. (b) At least one of the means... suitable for use in emergency conditions and must be of rigid construction. (f) A window or windshield...

  20. 46 CFR 28.390 - Means of escape.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Means of escape. 28.390 Section 28.390 Shipping COAST... emergency exits, passageways, stairways, ladders, deck scuttles, and windows. (b) At least one of the means... suitable for use in emergency conditions and must be of rigid construction. (f) A window or windshield...

  1. 2. WEST REAR, WITH PORTHOLE ESCAPE HATCH ABOVE ENTRY DOOR. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. WEST REAR, WITH PORTHOLE ESCAPE HATCH ABOVE ENTRY DOOR. - Edwards Air Force Base, South Base Sled Track, Firing & Control Blockhouse for 10,000-foot Track, South of Sled Track at midpoint of 20,000-foot track, Lancaster, Los Angeles County, CA

  2. HLA-B27 Selects for Rare Escape Mutations that Significantly Impair Hepatitis C Virus Replication and Require Compensatory Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Neumann-Haefelin, Christoph; Oniangue-Ndza, Cesar; Kuntzen, Thomas; Schmidt, Julia; Nitschke, Katja; Sidney, John; Caillet-Saguy, Célia; Binder, Marco; Kersting, Nadine; Kemper, Michael W.; Power, Karen A.; Ingber, Susan; Reyor, Laura L.; Hills-Evans, Kelsey; Kim, Arthur Y.; Lauer, Georg M.; Lohmann, Volker; Sette, Alessandro; Henn, Matthew R.; Bressanelli, Stéphane; Thimme, Robert; Allen, Todd M.

    2011-01-01

    HLA-B27 is associated with spontaneous viral clearance in hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Viral escape within the immunodominant HLA-B27 restricted HCV-specific CD8+ T cell epitope NS5B2841-2849 (ARMILMTHF) has been shown to be limited by viral fitness costs as well as broad T cell cross-recognition, suggesting a potential mechanism of protection by HLA-B27. Here, we studied the subdominant HLA-B27 restricted epitope NS5B2936-2944 (GRAAICGKY) in order to further define the mechanisms of protection by HLA-B27. We identified a unique pattern of escape mutations within this epitope in a large cohort of HCV genotype 1a infected patients. The predominant escape mutations represented conservative substitutions at the main HLA-B27 anchor residue or a T cell receptor contact site, neither of which impaired viral replication capacity as assessed in a subgenomic HCV replicon system. In contrast, however, in a subset of HLA-B27+ subjects rare escape mutations arose at the HLA-B27 anchor residue R2937, which nearly abolished viral replication. Notably, these rare mutations only occurred in conjunction with the selection of two equally rare, and structurally proximal, upstream mutations. Co-expression of these upstream mutations with the rare escape mutations dramatically restored viral replication capacity from <5% to ≥70% of wild-type levels. Conclusion The selection of rare CTL escape mutations in this HLA-B27 restricted epitope dramatically impairs viral replicative fitness unless properly compensated. These data support a role for the targeting of highly-constrained regions by HLA-B27 in its ability to assert immune control of HCV and other highly variable pathogens. PMID:22006856

  3. Unravelling the escape dynamics and the nature of the normally hyperbolic invariant manifolds in tidally limited star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zotos, Euaggelos E.; Jung, Christof

    2017-02-01

    The escape mechanism of orbits in a star cluster rotating around its parent galaxy in a circular orbit is investigated. A three degrees of freedom model is used for describing the dynamical properties of the Hamiltonian system. The gravitational field of the star cluster is represented by a smooth and spherically symmetric Plummer potential. We distinguish between ordered and chaotic orbits as well as between trapped and escaping orbits, considering only unbounded motion for several energy levels. The Smaller ALignment Index (SALI) method is used for determining the regular or chaotic nature of the orbits. The basins of escape are located and they are also correlated with the corresponding escape time of the orbits. Areas of bounded regular or chaotic motion and basins of escape were found to coexist in the (x, z) plane. The properties of the normally hyperbolic invariant manifolds (NHIMs), located in the vicinity of the index-1 Lagrange points L1 and L2, are also explored. These manifolds are of paramount importance as they control the flow of stars over the saddle points, while they also trigger the formation of tidal tails observed in star clusters. Bifurcation diagrams of the Lyapunov periodic orbits as well as restrictions of the Poincaré map to the NHIMs are deployed for elucidating the dynamics in the neighbourhood of the saddle points. The extended tidal tails, or tidal arms, formed by stars with low velocity which escape through the Lagrange points are monitored. The numerical results of this work are also compared with previous related work.

  4. Recording Field Potentials From Zebrafish Larvae During Escape Responses

    PubMed Central

    Monesson-Olson, Bryan D.; Troconis, Eileen L.; Trapani, Josef G.

    2014-01-01

    Among vertebrates, startle responses are a ubiquitous method for alerting, and avoiding or escaping from alarming or dangerous stimuli. In zebrafish larvae, fast escape behavior is easily evoked through either acoustic or tactile stimuli. For example, a light touch to the head will excite trigeminal neurons that in turn excite a large reticulospinal neuron in the hindbrain called the Mauthner cell (M-cell). The M-cell action potential then travels down the contralateral trunk of the larva exciting motoneurons, which subsequently excite the entire axial musculature, producing a large amplitude body bend away from the source of the stimulus. This body conformation is known as the “C-bend” due to the shape of the larva during the behavior. As a result of the semi-synchronized activation of the M-cell, the population of motor neurons, and the axial trunk muscles, a large field potential is generated and can be recorded from free-swimming or fixed-position larvae. Undergraduate laboratories that record field potentials during escape responses in larval zebrafish are relatively simple to setup and allow students to observe and study the escape reflex circuit. Furthermore, by testing hypotheses, analyzing data and writing journal-style laboratory reports, students have multiple opportunities to learn about many neuroscience topics including vertebrate reflexes; sensory transduction; synaptic-, neuro-, and muscle-physiology; the M-cell mediated escape response; and the zebrafish as a model organism. Here, we detail the equipment, software, and recording setup necessary to observe field potentials in an undergraduate teaching lab. Additionally, we discuss potential advanced laboratory exercises and pedagogical outcomes. Finally, we note possible low-cost alternatives for recording field potentials. PMID:25565920

  5. Escape manoeuvres in the spiny dogfish (Squalus acanthias).

    PubMed

    Domenici, Paolo; Standen, Emily M; Levine, Robert P

    2004-06-01

    The locomotor performance of dogfish during escape responses was observed by means of high-speed video. Dogfish show C-type escape responses that are comparable with those shown previously in teleosts. Dogfish show high variability of turning rates of the anterior part of the body (head to centre of mass), i.e. with peak values from 434 to 1023 deg. s(-1). We suggest that this variability may be due to the presence of two types of escape manoeuvres, i.e. responses with high and low turning rates, as previously found in a teleost species. Fast responses (i.e. with high maximum turning rates, ranging between 766 and 1023 deg. s(-1)) showed significantly higher locomotor performance than slow responses (i.e. with low maximum turning rates, ranging between 434 and 593 deg. s(-1)) in terms of distance covered, speed and acceleration, although no differences were found in the turning radius of the centre of mass during the escape manoeuvres. The existence of two types of escape responses would have implications in terms of both neural control and muscular activation patterns. When compared with literature data for the locomotor performance of bony fishes, dogfish showed relatively low speed and acceleration, comparable turning rates and a turning radius that is in the low part of the range when compared with teleosts, indicating relatively high manoeuvrability. The locomotor performance observed in dogfish is consistent with their morphological characteristics: (1) low locomotor performance associated with low thrust developed by their relatively small posterior depth of section and (2) relatively high manoeuvrability associated with their high flexibility.

  6. In situ and remote measurements of ions escaping from Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollmann, P.; Brandt, P. C.

    2013-12-01

    Venus is thought to lose a large fraction of its atmosphere in the form ions, mainly via pickup. The relative loss rate of the exosphere as neutrals or ions is not known, nor is the flux of escaping ions well constrained. Knowledge of these processes will shed light on the role an intrinsic magnetic field has in atmospheric erosion. We use the complementary in-situ plasma and energetic neutral atom (ENA) measurements from the Venus Express (VEx) spacecraft in order to constrain the ion escape. VEx completed about 2500 orbits to date and reached altitudes as low as 200km. The ASPERA/IMA instrument measured directional proton and oxygen ion spectra in the 10eV to 40keV range. We bin the data accumulated over the mission in space and bulk flow direction, yielding a direct measure of the local ion escape flux. While such in-situ measurements provide data without ambiguity, they are limited by the orbital coverage. This is why we include remote ENA measurements from the ASPERA/NPD (100eV to 10keV) instrument to our study. ENAs are created when escaping ions charge exchange with the high atmosphere atoms or molecules. We have done an exhaustive analysis of the data, excluding time periods of instrument contamination. Most ENA emission originates from low altitudes above Venus' limb. These measurements will be compared with the in-situ data, which allows constraining the atmospheric density at high altitudes. Interestingly, there are also ENA emissions from other directions, which were not sampled in-situ. This allows us to put a lower limit to the escape from these regions.

  7. An Empirical Investigation of Time-Out with and without Escape Extinction to Treat Escape-Maintained Noncompliance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Everett, Gregory E.; Olmi, D. Joe; Edwards, Ron P.; Tingstrom, Daniel H.; Sterling-Turner, Heather E.; Christ, Theodore J.

    2007-01-01

    The present study evaluates the effectiveness of two time-out (TO) procedures in reducing escape-maintained noncompliance of 4 children. Noncompliant behavioral function was established via a functional assessment (FA), including indirect and direct descriptive procedures and brief confirmatory experimental analyses. Following FA, parents were…

  8. Rapid vascular escape of arterially injected 16alpha-radioiodo, 17beta-estradiol

    SciTech Connect

    Scharl, A.; Holt, J.A. )

    1993-03-20

    The authors undertook this study because confirmation of a rapid vascular escape and slow release back into the circulatory system suggests that arterial injection of radiohalogenated steroid receptor ligands might provide an efficacious route of administration for imaging or treatment of receptor-rich malignant tumors in peripheral tissues. The authors injected radiolabeled 16alpha-iodo, 17beta-estradiol ([I]-E) into the femoral artery of swine in a solution that contained [[sup 125]I]-E in a known ratio to [[sup 99]Tc]-labeled red blood cells. Fractions of femoral venous blood were collected at short intervals during 10 min. They looked for changes in the ratio of the radiolabeles. [[sup 99m]Tc]-labeled red blood cells are known to remain in the vascular system for an hour or more. After passage of the injectate through the capillary bed of the swine leg, a dramatic decrease of the initial [sup 125]I:[sup 99m]Tc ratio to only 10% was observed in the femoral venous blood. This ratio increased gradually during the next 10 min to approximately 30% of that in the injectate, indicating that a significant portion (approximately 90%) of the [[sup 125]I]-E was initially trapped in the limb and then slowly re-entered the vascular system. To obtain visual confirmation of the rapid vascular escape of iodo-estrogen, they injected either an imageable form of [I]-E ([[sup 123]I]-E) or [[sup 99m]Tc]-labeled red blood cells into the dorsal aorta of superovulated rabbits, whose smaller size allowed whole-body imaging. The biodistributions of these radiopharmaceuticals were surveyed continuously by real-time planar gamma imaging. A large fraction of [I]-E escapes from the vascular system during the first pass through an organ or limb, without regard to the estrogen receptor content of the tissue. 28 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Anatomy of an escape tectonic zone: Western Irian Jaya (Indonesia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pubellier, Manuel; Ego, Frédéric

    2002-07-01

    The western fold-and-thrust belt of New Guinea in Irian Jaya is presently a complex boundary, dominated by the Bird's Head block escape from the collision between the Australian plate and the remnants of volcanic belts carried by the Pacific plate. The escape rate given by geodetic measurements is of the order of 7 cm/yr, and movement is accommodated by a broad shear zone. We analyze this shear pattern using fault slip analyses performed in the field from 1992 to 1996, combined with focal mechanism inversions, moment tensors summations, and surface trace of structures inferred from radar and multispectral satellite images. Time control of the deformation is attained by isotope dating of the recent syntectonic intrusives. The geometry of the macro and microstructures occurred in two stages from the early Pliocene to the Present. The first stage (5 to 2 Ma) is marked by flat-and-ramps structures guided by N60°E lateral ramps associated with a N60°E cleavage, affecting the whole of western Irian Jaya. The second stage (2 Ma to Present) shows the collapse of the western fold-and-thrust belt and the escape of the Bird's Head and the Lengguru belts along N60°E transtensile faults. In the latter stage, the strike-slip offset is distributed on the N60°E schistosity zone along which some fracture planes are reactivated as left-lateral transtensile faults. Shallow earthquakes moment tensors have been inverted for stress and summed to get strain rates to define contrasting structural provinces. The spatial variations in both stress and strain fields from earthquakes and microtectonics show that (1) they are consistent and are assumed to be coeval, (2) they reveal that oblique convergence is partitioned, and (3) they are influenced by the existence of a free boundary. We see no significant rotation of stress axes laterally along the escape zone. Instead, stresses change according to the different orientations of basement structures and thus undergo rapid spatial variations

  10. Verge and Foliot Clock Escapement: A Simple Dynamical System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denny, Mark

    2010-01-01

    The earliest mechanical clocks appeared in Europe in the 13th century. From about 1250 CE to 1670 CE, these simple clocks consisted of a weight suspended from a rope or chain that was wrapped around a horizontal axle. To tell time, the weight must fall with a slow uniform speed, but, under the action of gravity alone, such a suspended weight would…

  11. 20. DETAIL VIEW IN 18FOOT LOCK, ESCAPE TRAINING TANK, SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. DETAIL VIEW IN 18-FOOT LOCK, ESCAPE TRAINING TANK, SHOWING DOOR INTO TANK AT RIGHT - U.S. Naval Submarine Base, New London Submarine Escape Training Tank, Albacore & Darter Roads, Groton, New London County, CT

  12. Escape from the competence state in Streptococcus mutans is governed by the bacterial population density.

    PubMed

    Dufour, D; Villemin, C; Perry, J A; Lévesque, C M

    2016-12-01

    Horizontal gene transfer through natural DNA transformation is an important evolutionary mechanism among bacteria. Transformation requires that the bacteria are physiologically competent to take and incorporate free DNA directly from the environment. Although natural genetic transformation is a remarkable feature of many naturally competent bacteria, the process is energetically expensive for the cells. Consequently, a tight control of the competence state is necessary. The objective of the present work was to help decipher the molecular mechanisms regulating the escape from the competence state in Streptococcus mutans, the principal etiological agent responsible for tooth decay in humans. Our results showed that the cessation of competence in S. mutans was abrupt, and did not involve the accumulation of a competence inhibitor nor the depletion of a competence activator in the extracellular environment. The competence state was repressed at high cell population density via concomitant repression of sigX gene encoding the master regulator of the competence regulon. Co-culture experiments performed with oral and non-oral bacteria showed that S. mutans assesses its own population density and also the microbial density of its surroundings to regulate its competence escape. Interestingly, neither the intra-species and extra-species quorum-sensing systems nor the other 13 two-component regulatory systems identified in S. mutans were involved in the cell-density-dependent escape of the competence state. Altogether, our results suggest a complex mechanism regulating the competence shut-off involving cell-density-dependent repression of sigX through an as yet undefined system, and possibly SigX protein stability.

  13. The production and escape of nitrogen atoms on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, J. L.

    1993-02-01

    Updated rate coefficients and a revised ionosphere-thermosphere model are used to compute the production rates and densities of odd nitrogen species in the Martian atmosphere. Computed density profiles for N(4S), N(2D), N(2P), and NO are presented. The model NO densities are found to be about a factor of 2-3 less than those measured by the Viking 1 mass spectrometer. Revised values for the escape rates of N atoms from dissociative recombination and ionospheric reactions are also computed. Dissociative recombination is found to be comparable in importance to photodissociation at low solar activity, but it is still the most important escape mechanism for N-14 at high solar activity.

  14. The production and escape of nitrogen atoms on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, J. L.

    1993-01-01

    Updated rate coefficients and a revised ionosphere-thermosphere model are used to compute the production rates and densities of odd nitrogen species in the Martian atmosphere. Computed density profiles for N(4S), N(2D), N(2P), and NO are presented. The model NO densities are found to be about a factor of 2-3 less than those measured by the Viking 1 mass spectrometer. Revised values for the escape rates of N atoms from dissociative recombination and ionospheric reactions are also computed. Dissociative recombination is found to be comparable in importance to photodissociation at low solar activity, but it is still the most important escape mechanism for N-14 at high solar activity.

  15. Escape rate of active particles in the effective equilibrium approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, A.; Wittmann, R.; Brader, J. M.

    2017-01-01

    The escape rate of a Brownian particle over a potential barrier is accurately described by the Kramers theory. A quantitative theory explicitly taking the activity of Brownian particles into account has been lacking due to the inherently out-of-equilibrium nature of these particles. Using an effective equilibrium approach [Farage et al., Phys. Rev. E 91, 042310 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevE.91.042310] we study the escape rate of active particles over a potential barrier and compare our analytical results with data from direct numerical simulation of the colored noise Langevin equation. The effective equilibrium approach generates an effective potential that, when used as input to Kramers rate theory, provides results in excellent agreement with the simulation data.

  16. Virus Escape and Manipulation of Cellular Nonsense-Mediated mRNA Decay

    PubMed Central

    Balistreri, Giuseppe; Bognanni, Claudia; Mühlemann, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD), a cellular RNA turnover pathway targeting RNAs with features resulting in aberrant translation termination, has recently been found to restrict the replication of positive-stranded RNA ((+)RNA) viruses. As for every other antiviral immune system, there is also evidence of viruses interfering with and modulating NMD to their own advantage. This review will discuss our current understanding of why and how NMD targets viral RNAs, and elaborate counter-defense strategies viruses utilize to escape NMD. PMID:28124995

  17. Self-Organizing Reactive Fluid Escape from Dehydrating Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, T.; Pluemper, O.; Podladchikov, Y.; Vrijmoed, J. C.; Scambelluri, M.

    2014-12-01

    Water escape from dehydrating rocks within the Earth's interior is a key process for long-term global water and element cycles, eg. at subduction zones a fluid escape mechanism must exist that prevents ocean water to be drained into the mantle. Existing fluid flow models require a priori physical assumptions (eg. preexisting porosity) and cannot resolve the evolution from initial fluid production to flow channelization. In order to develop a model of this evolution, we need to unravel natural laboratories that display the incipient dehydration stages and the micro- to macro-scale fluid escape route evolution. The Erro-Tobbio meta-serpentinites (Italy) provide a unique snapshot into these early dehydration stages, recording the breakdown of hydrous antigorite to anhydrous olivine plus fluid and the formation of an olivine-vein network. We find that dehydration, fluid pooling, and flow initiation are controlled by micro-scale compositional rock differences. Our model starts with a rock in which all water is stored in solid and any preexisting porosity is negligible (zero-porosity case). As the rock descents into the mantle increasing T will initiate dehydration reactions, dividing the rock continuously into a dry solid and a fluid-filled porosity. Spatially variable reaction progress results in dynamically evolving porosity/permeability and heterogeneous fluid-pore pressure distributions. Fluid-pressure gradient relaxation causes fluid flow and its thermodynamic feedback triggers reactions to progress, resulting in a self-amplifying process. Our new thermodynamic-mechanical model for reaction-porosity waves shows that fluid flow occurs solely in the reaction products and self-organizes into channelized fluid escape networks. This holds the key to formulating future quantitative models that address spatiotemporal processes such as the coupling between fluid release at depth and volcanic eruptions and the amounts of structurally bound water transferred into deep Earth.

  18. On the Relative Contributions of Noncontingent Reinforcement and Escape Extinction in the Treatment of Food Refusal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Gregory K.; Piazza, Cathleen C.; Patel, Meeta R.; Layer, Stacy A.; Bachmeyer, Melanie H.; Bethke, Stephanie D.; Gutshall, Katharine A.

    2004-01-01

    In the current investigation, we evaluated the relative effects of noncontingent reinforcement (NCR), escape extinction, and a combination of NCR and escape extinction as treatment for the feeding problems exhibited by 4 children. For each participant, consumption increased only when escape extinction was implemented, independent of whether NCR…

  19. Escape Geography--Developing Middle-School Students' Sense of Place.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Rodney F.; Molina, Laurie E. S.

    1992-01-01

    Suggests a social studies unit on escaping geography. Examines escape from dangerous places including an airliner, hotel fire, or war zone or from a social situation such as a boring speech or party. Describes historic escapes such as the Underground Railroad and the Berlin Wall. Lists learning strategies such as awareness of space and cognitive…

  20. Atmospheric Escape and Climate Evolution of Terrestrial Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, F.; Chassefière, E.; Leblanc, F.; Brain, D.

    The climate of a planet is primarily determined by its orbital distance from its star, the luminosity of the star, the existence of oceans, the pressure of its atmosphere, and the composition of its atmosphere. The last two components are what could be impacted by atmosphere escape. The Sun, as the dominant energy source driving the climate of terrestrial planets, was not always as bright as it is today. Stellar evolution theory predicts that the luminosity of the young Sun was 75% of its present luminosity, at approximately 4 b.y. ago (4 Ga) (Gough, 1981). Although the Sun could have lost some of its mass, thus making the very young Sun somewhat more massive than it is now and therefore could have emitted more energy, most of this mass loss was completed prior to 4 Ga (Wood et al., 2005). Thus the Sun has provided increasingly more energy to solar system planets during the past 4 b.y. Contrary to the evolutionary trend of the total luminosity increasing with time, the young Sun should have emitted much stronger EUV, soft X-ray, and far-UV photons than at present. These photons are from the upper atmosphere of the Sun and are linked to solar magnetic activity. Generally speaking, a young star rotates much faster and thus has stronger magnetic activity. Observations of solar-type stars with different ages show that the EUV energy flux from a 0.5-b.y.-old solar-type star could be as much as 20 times that of the present Sun (Ribas et al., 2005). Accompanying this much-enhanced solar extreme ultraviolet (XUV) radiation is a much stronger solar wind, with mass flux up to 1000 times more intense than the present solar wind flux (Wood et al., 2005). It can be expected that many more energetic-particle events were caused by the young Sun. The fate of the atmospheres of terrestrial planets in such an environment and the consequences for their climates are the focus of this chapter.

  1. Theoretical UV absorption spectra of hydrodynamically escaping O{sub 2}/CO{sub 2}-rich exoplanetary atmospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Gronoff, G.; Mertens, C. J.; Norman, R. B.; Maggiolo, R.; Wedlund, C. Simon; Bell, J.; Bernard, D.; Parkinson, C. J.; Vidal-Madjar, A.

    2014-06-20

    Characterizing Earth- and Venus-like exoplanets' atmospheres to determine if they are habitable and how they are evolving (e.g., equilibrium or strong erosion) is a challenge. For that endeavor, a key element is the retrieval of the exospheric temperature, which is a marker of some of the processes occurring in the lower layers and controls a large part of the atmospheric escape. We describe a method to determine the exospheric temperature of an O{sub 2}- and/or CO{sub 2}-rich transiting exoplanet, and we simulate the respective spectra of such a planet in hydrostatic equilibrium and hydrodynamic escape. The observation of hydrodynamically escaping atmospheres in young planets may help constrain and improve our understanding of the evolution of the solar system's terrestrial planets' atmospheres. We use the dependency of the absorption spectra of the O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} molecules on the temperature to estimate the temperature independently of the total absorption of the planet. Combining two observables (two parts of the UV spectra that have a different temperature dependency) with the model, we are able to determine the thermospheric density profile and temperature. If the slope of the density profile is inconsistent with the temperature, then we infer the hydrodynamic escape. We address the question of the possible biases in the application of the method to future observations, and we show that the flare activity should be cautiously monitored to avoid large biases.

  2. Multifunctional ZnPc-loaded mesoporous silica nanoparticles for enhancement of photodynamic therapy efficacy by endolysosomal escape.

    PubMed

    Tu, Jing; Wang, Tianxiao; Shi, Wei; Wu, Guisen; Tian, Xinhua; Wang, Yuhua; Ge, Dongtao; Ren, Lei

    2012-11-01

    The cellular uptake and localization of photosensitizer-loaded nanoparticles have significant impact on photodynamic therapy (PDT) efficacy due to short lifetime and limited action radius of singlet oxygen. Herein, we develop poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)- and polyethylenimine (PEI)-functionalized zinc(II) phthalocyanine (ZnPc)-loaded mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs), which are able to distribute in the cytosol by endolysosomal escape. In this photosensitizer-carrier system (PEG-PEI-MSNs/ZnPc), ZnPc is a PDT agent; MSNs are the nanocarrier for encapsulating ZnPc; PEI facilitates endosomal escape; and PEG enhances biocompatibility. The as-synthesized PEG-PEI-MSNs/ZnPc have a high escape efficiency from the lysosome to the cytosol due to the "proton sponge" effect of PEI. Compared with the ZnPc-loaded MSNs, the phototoxicity of the PEG-PEI-MSNs/ZnPc is greatly enhanced in vitro. By measuring the mitochondrial membrane potential, a significant loss of >80% Δψm after treatment with PEG-PEI-MSNs/ZnPc-PDT is observed. It is further demonstrated that the ultra-efficient passive tumor targeting and excellent PDT efficacy are achieved in tumor-bearing mice upon intravenous injection of PEG-PEI-MSNs/ZnPc and the followed light exposure. We present here a strategy for enhancement of PDT efficacy by endolysosomal escape and highlight the promise of using multifunctional MSNs for cancer therapy.

  3. CD8 epitope escape and reversion in acute HCV infection.

    PubMed

    Timm, Joerg; Lauer, Georg M; Kavanagh, Daniel G; Sheridan, Isabelle; Kim, Arthur Y; Lucas, Michaela; Pillay, Thillagavathie; Ouchi, Kei; Reyor, Laura L; Schulze zur Wiesch, Julian; Gandhi, Rajesh T; Chung, Raymond T; Bhardwaj, Nina; Klenerman, Paul; Walker, Bruce D; Allen, Todd M

    2004-12-20

    In the setting of acute hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, robust HCV-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses are associated with initial control of viremia. Despite these responses, 70-80% of individuals develop persistent infection. Although viral escape from CD8 responses has been illustrated in the chimpanzee model of HCV infection, the effect of CD8 selection pressure on viral evolution and containment in acute HCV infection in humans remains unclear. Here, we examined viral evolution in an immunodominant human histocompatibility leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B8-restricted NS3 epitope in subjects with acute HCV infection. Development of mutations within the epitope coincided with loss of strong ex vivo tetramer and interferon gamma enzyme-linked immunospot responses, and endogenous expression of variant NS3 sequences suggested that the selected mutations altered processing and presentation of the variant epitope. Analysis of NS3 sequences from 30 additional chronic HCV-infected subjects revealed a strong association between sequence variation within this region and expression of HLA-B8, supporting reproducible allele-specific selection pressures at the population level. Interestingly, transmission of an HLA-B8-associated escape mutation to an HLA-B8 negative subject resulted in rapid reversion of the mutation. Together, these data indicate that viral escape from CD8+ T cell responses occurs during human HCV infection and that acute immune selection pressure is of sufficient magnitude to influence HCV evolution.

  4. Comparison of operant escape and reflex tests of nociceptive sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Vierck, Charles J; Yezierski, Robert P

    2015-04-01

    Testing of reflexes such as flexion/withdrawal or licking/guarding is well established as the standard for evaluating nociceptive sensitivity and its modulation in preclinical investigations of laboratory animals. Concerns about this approach have been dismissed for practical reasons - reflex testing requires no training of the animals; it is simple to instrument; and responses are characterized by observers as latencies or thresholds for evocation. In order to evaluate this method, the present review summarizes a series of experiments in which reflex and operant escape responding are compared in normal animals and following surgical models of neuropathic pain or pharmacological intervention for pain. Particular attention is paid to relationships between reflex and escape responding and information on the pain sensitivity of normal human subjects or patients with pain. Numerous disparities between results for reflex and operant escape measures are described, but the results of operant testing are consistent with evidence from humans. Objective reasons are given for experimenters to choose between these and other methods of evaluating the nociceptive sensitivity of laboratory animals.

  5. Oxygen and carbogen breathing following simulated submarine escape.

    PubMed

    Gennser, Mikael; Loveman, Geoff; Seddon, Fiona; Thacker, Julian; Blogg, S Lesley

    2014-01-01

    Escape from a disabled submarine exposes escapers to a high risk of decompression sickness (DCS). The initial bubble load is thought to emanate from the fast tissues; it is this load that should be lowered to reduce risk of serious neurological DCS. The breathing of oxygen or carbogen (5% CO2, 95% O2) post-surfacing was investigated with regard to its ability to reduce the initial bubble load in comparison to air breathing. Thirty-two goats were subject to a dry simulated submarine escape profile to and from 240 meters (2.5 MPa). On surfacing, they breathed air (control), oxygen or carbogen for 30 minutes. Regular Doppler audio bubble grading was carried out, using the Kisman Masurel (KM) scale. One suspected case of DCS was noted. No oxygen toxicity or arterial gas embolism occurred. No significant difference was found between the groups in terms of the median peak KM grade or the period before the KM grade dropped below III. Time to disappearance of bubbles was significantly different between groups; oxygen showed faster bubble resolution than carbogen and air. This reduction in time to bubble resolution may be beneficial in reducing decompression stress, but probably does not affect the risk of fast-tissue DCS.

  6. The C. elegans touch response facilitates escape from predacious fungi

    PubMed Central

    Maguire, Sean M.; Clark, Christopher M.; Nunnari, John; Pirri, Jennifer K.; Alkema, Mark J.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Predator-prey interactions are vital determinants in the natural selection of behavioral traits. However, we have few insights into both the neural mechanisms and the selective advantage of specific behavioral traits. Gentle touch to the anterior half of the body of Caenorhabditis elegans elicits an escape response in which the animal quickly reverses and suppresses exploratory head movements [1]. Even though the C. elegans touch response has provided one of the rare examples of how neural networks translate sensory input to a coordinated motor output [2], the ecological significance of the escape response is unclear. We investigate predator-prey relationships between C. elegans and predacious fungi that catch nematodes using constricting rings as trapping devices. We show that the constricting rings of Drechslerella doedycoides catch early larval stages with a diameter similar to the trap opening. There is a delay between the ring entry and ring closure, which allows the animal to withdraw from the trap before getting caught. Mutants that fail to suppress head movements in response to touch are caught more efficiently than the wild type in constricting fungal rings. Direct competition experiments show that the suppression of head movements in response to touch is an ecologically relevant behavior that allows the C. elegans to smoothly retract from a fungal noose and evade capture. These results suggest that selective pressures imposed by predacious fungi have shaped the evolution of C. elegans escape behavior. PMID:21802299

  7. Fleeing to refuge: Escape decisions in the race for life.

    PubMed

    Cooper, William E

    2016-10-07

    Economic escape theory that predicts that flight initiation distance (FID=predator-prey distance when a prey begins to flee from an approaching predator) increases as predation risk increases has been overwhelmingly supported. However, the vast majority of empirical tests have focused on effects of single predation risk factors. Even studies that have included multiple risk factors have not predicted how they jointly affect FID. I present a model that predicts joint effects of several predation risk factors that affect the outcome of a race between predator and prey to the prey's refuge. As a prey's distance to refuge and predator attack speed increase, and as the prey's location forces it to flee more toward a predator to reach refuge, FID increases. A published model proposed and experiment showed that FID is longer when prey flee directly toward than directly away from a predator to a refuge. We present a new geometric model that predicts FID for all angles between the prey's and predator's paths to refuge, distance of the prey from refuge when escape begins, predator and prey speeds, and a margin of safety allowing the prey to reach refuge before the predator. The model provides many new, testable predictions about relationships among its variables and FID. Most notably, it predicts that FID increases sigmoidally as the angle between predator and prey paths to refuge increases. Although the model is not economic (cost-benefit), we discuss its relationship to economic escape theory.

  8. A Treatment Package without Escape Extinction to Address Food Selectivity.

    PubMed

    Weber, Jessica; Gutierrez, Anibal

    2015-08-21

    Feeding difficulties and feeding disorders are a commonly occurring problem for young children, particularly children with developmental delays including autism. Behavior analytic interventions for the treatment of feeding difficulties oftentimes include escape extinction as a primary component of treatment. The use of escape extinction, while effective, may be problematic as it is also associated with the emergence of challenging behavior (e.g., extinction burst). Such challenging behavior may be an acceptable side effect in treatment cases where feeding problems are severe and chronic (e.g., failure to thrive). However, in more acute cases (e.g., selective eating), the negative side effect may be unwarranted and undesired. More recent research on the behavioral treatment of food selectivity has begun to evaluate treatments for feeding difficulties that do not include escape extinction (e.g., demand fading, behavioral momentum), with some success. However, research to date reveals individual differences in responsiveness to such treatments and no clear preferable treatment has emerged. This manuscript describes a multi-component treatment package that includes shaping, sequential presentation and simultaneous presentation, for the treatment of food selectivity in four young children with developmental delays. This treatment package extends the literature on the behavioral treatment for food selectivity and offers a multi-component treatment protocol that may be clinically applicable across a range of treatment scenarios and settings.

  9. Lunar mission safety and rescue: Escape/rescue analysis and plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The results are presented of the technical analysis of escape/rescue/survival situations, crew survival techniques, alternate escape/rescue approaches and vehicles, and the advantages and disadvantages of each for advanced lunar exploration. Candidate escape/rescue guidelines are proposed and elements of a rescue plan developed. The areas of discussions include the following: lunar arrival/departure operations, lunar orbiter operations, lunar surface operations, lunar surface base escape/rescue analysis, lander tug location operations, portable airlock, emergency pressure suit, and the effects of no orbiting lunar station, no lunar surface base, and no foreign lunar orbit/surface operations on the escape/rescue plan.

  10. Mechanical properties of the cuticles of three cockroach species that differ in their wind-evoked escape behavior.

    PubMed

    Clark, Andrew J; Triblehorn, Jeffrey D

    2014-01-01

    The structural and material properties of insect cuticle remain largely unexplored, even though they comprise the majority (approximately 80%) of animals. Insect cuticle serves many functions, including protection against predatory attacks, which is especially beneficial to species failing to employ effective running escape responses. Despite recent advances in our understanding of insect escape behaviors and the biomechanics of insect cuticle, there are limited studies on the protective qualities of cuticle to extreme mechanical stresses and strains imposed by predatory attacks, and how these qualities vary between species employing different escape responses. Blattarians (cockroaches) provide an appropriate model system for such studies. Wind-evoked running escape responses are strong in Periplaneta americana, weak in Blaberus craniifer and absent in Gromphodorhina portentosa, putting the latter two species at greater risk of being struck by a predator. We hypothesized that the exoskeletons in these two larger species could provide more protection from predatory strikes relative to the exoskeleton of P. americana. We quantified the protective qualities of the exoskeletons by measuring the puncture resistance, tensile strength, strain energy storage, and peak strain in fresh samples of thoracic and abdominal cuticles from these three species. We found a continuum in puncture resistance, tensile strength, and strain energy storage between the three species, which were greatest in G. portentosa, moderate in B. craniifer, and smallest in P. americana. Histological measurements of total cuticle thickness followed this same pattern. However, peak strain followed a different trend between species. The comparisons in the material properties drawn between the cuticles of G. portentosa, B. craniifer, and P. americana demonstrate parallels between cuticular biomechanics and predator running escape responses.

  11. Mechanical properties of the cuticles of three cockroach species that differ in their wind-evoked escape behavior

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    The structural and material properties of insect cuticle remain largely unexplored, even though they comprise the majority (approximately 80%) of animals. Insect cuticle serves many functions, including protection against predatory attacks, which is especially beneficial to species failing to employ effective running escape responses. Despite recent advances in our understanding of insect escape behaviors and the biomechanics of insect cuticle, there are limited studies on the protective qualities of cuticle to extreme mechanical stresses and strains imposed by predatory attacks, and how these qualities vary between species employing different escape responses. Blattarians (cockroaches) provide an appropriate model system for such studies. Wind-evoked running escape responses are strong in Periplaneta americana, weak in Blaberus craniifer and absent in Gromphodorhina portentosa, putting the latter two species at greater risk of being struck by a predator. We hypothesized that the exoskeletons in these two larger species could provide more protection from predatory strikes relative to the exoskeleton of P. americana. We quantified the protective qualities of the exoskeletons by measuring the puncture resistance, tensile strength, strain energy storage, and peak strain in fresh samples of thoracic and abdominal cuticles from these three species. We found a continuum in puncture resistance, tensile strength, and strain energy storage between the three species, which were greatest in G. portentosa, moderate in B. craniifer, and smallest in P. americana. Histological measurements of total cuticle thickness followed this same pattern. However, peak strain followed a different trend between species. The comparisons in the material properties drawn between the cuticles of G. portentosa, B. craniifer, and P. americana demonstrate parallels between cuticular biomechanics and predator running escape responses. PMID:25101230

  12. Broad CTL Response in Early HIV Infection Drives Multiple Concurrent CTL Escapes.

    PubMed

    Leviyang, Sivan; Ganusov, Vitaly V

    2015-10-01

    Recent studies have highlighted the ability of HIV to escape from cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses that concurrently target multiple viral epitopes. Yet, the viral dynamics involved in such escape are incompletely understood. Previous analyses have made several strong assumptions regarding HIV escape from CTL responses such as independent or non-concurrent escape from individual CTL responses. Using experimental data from evolution of HIV half genomes in four patients we observe concurrent viral escape from multiple CTL responses during early infection (first 100 days of infection), providing confirmation of a recent result found in a study of one HIV-infected patient. We show that current methods of estimating CTL escape rates, based on the assumption of independent escapes, are biased and perform poorly when CTL escape proceeds concurrently at multiple epitopes. We propose a new method for analyzing longitudinal sequence data to estimate the rate of CTL escape across multiple epitopes; this method involves few parameters and performs well in simulation studies. By applying our novel method to experimental data, we find that concurrent multiple escapes occur at rates between 0.03 and 0.4 day(-1), a relatively broad range that reflects uncertainty due to sparse sampling and wide ranges of parameter values. However, we show that concurrent escape at rates 0.1-0.2 day(-1) across multiple epitopes is consistent with our patient datasets.

  13. Tumor escape mechanisms: Potential role of soluble HLA antigens and NK cells activating ligands

    PubMed Central

    Campoli, Michael; Ferrone, Soldano

    2009-01-01

    The crucial role played by HLA antigens and natural killer (NK) cell activating ligands in the interactions of malignant cells with components of the host's immune system has stimulated interest in the characterization of their expression by malignant cells. Convincing evidence generated by the immunohistochemical staining of surgically removed malignant lesions with monoclonal antibodies (mAb) recognizing HLA antigens and NK cell activating ligands indicates that the surface expression of these molecules is frequently altered on malignant cells. These changes appear to have clinical significance, since in some types of malignant disease they are associated with the histopathological characteristics of the lesions as well as with disease free interval and survival. These associations have been suggested to reflect the effect of HLA antigen and NK cell activating ligand abnormalities on the interactions of tumor cells with antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) and with NK cells. Nevertheless, there are examples in which disease progresses in the face of appropriate HLA antigen and/or NK cell activating ligand as well as tumor antigen expression by malignant cells and of functional antigen-specific CTL in the investigated patient. In such scenarios, it is likely that the tumor microenvironment is unfavorable for CTL and NK cell activity and contributes to tumor immune escape. Many distinct escape mechanisms have been shown to protect malignant cells from immune recognition and destruction in the tumor microenvironment. In this paper, following the description of the structural and functional characteristics of soluble HLA antigens and NK cell activating ligands, we will review changes in their serum level in malignant disease and discuss their potential role in the escape mechanisms utilized by tumor cells to avoid recognition and destruction. PMID:18700879

  14. Ultraviolet Escape Fractions from Giant Molecular Clouds during Early Cluster Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Corey; Pudritz, Ralph; Klessen, Ralf

    2017-01-01

    The UV photon escape fraction from molecular clouds is a key parameter for understanding the ionization of the interstellar medium and extragalactic processes such as cosmic reionization. We present the ionizing photon flux and the corresponding photon escape fraction (fesc) arising as a consequence of star cluster formation in a turbulent, 106 M⊙ giant molecular cloud, simulated using the code FLASH. We make use of sink particles to represent young, star-forming clusters coupled with a radiative transfer scheme to calculate the emergent UV flux. We find that the ionizing photon flux across the cloud boundary is highly variable in time and space due to the turbulent nature of the intervening gas. The escaping photon fraction remains at ∼5% for the first 2.5 Myr, followed by two pronounced peaks at 3.25 and 3.8 Myr with a maximum fesc of 30% and 37%, respectively. These peaks are due to the formation of large H ii regions that expand into regions of lower density, some of which reaching the cloud surface. However, these phases are short-lived, and fesc drops sharply as the H ii regions are quenched by the central cluster passing through high-density material due to the turbulent nature of the cloud. We find an average fesc of 15% with factor of two variations over 1 Myr timescales. Our results suggest that assuming a single value for fesc from a molecular cloud is in general a poor approximation, and that the dynamical evolution of the system leads to large temporal variation.

  15. The effects of escape from self and interpersonal relationship on the pathological use of Internet games.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Jung-Hye; Chung, Chung-Suk; Lee, Jung

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine whether Baumeister's escape from self theory may account for the pathological use of Internet games among Korean adolescents. A sample of 1,136 junior high school students completed measures assessing Internet game addiction (IGA), real-ideal self discrepancy, escape from self, current mood, peer relationships, perceived parent-child relationship, and parental supervision. IGA was significantly correlated with all of these variables. Multiple regression analysis showed that escape from self best explained the adolescents' IGA. A path model yielded significant paths from self-discrepancy to negative mood, from negative mood to escape from self, and from escape from self to IGA. These results support the validity of using the escape from self theory to explain the adolescents' IGA, thereby suggesting that adolescents become addicted to Internet games in an attempt to escape from self and reality.

  16. A comparison of positive and negative reinforcement for compliance to treat problem behavior maintained by escape.

    PubMed

    Slocum, Sarah K; Vollmer, Timothy R

    2015-09-01

    Previous research has shown that problem behavior maintained by escape can be treated using positive reinforcement. In the current study, we directly compared functional (escape) and nonfunctional (edible) reinforcers in the treatment of escape-maintained problem behavior for 5 subjects. In the first treatment, compliance produced a break from instructions. In the second treatment, compliance produced a small edible item. Neither treatment included escape extinction. Results suggested that the delivery of a positive reinforcer for compliance was effective for treating escape-maintained problem behavior for all 5 subjects, and the delivery of escape for compliance was ineffective for 3 of the 5 subjects. Implications and future directions related to the use of positive reinforcers in the treatment of escape behavior are discussed.

  17. Photodynamic therapy with simultaneous suppression of multiple treatment escape pathways (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spring, Bryan Q.; Sears, R. Bryan; Zheng, Lei Z.; Mai, Zhiming; Watanabe, Reika; Sherwood, Margaret E.; Schoenfeld, David A.; Pogue, Brian W.; Pereira, Stephen P.; Villa, Elizabeth; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2016-03-01

    We introduce photoactivatable multi-inhibitor nanoliposomes (PMILs) for photodynamic tumor cell and microvessel damage in synchrony with photo-initiation of tumor-confined, multikinase inhibitor release. The PMIL is a biodegradable delivery system comprised of a nanoliposome carrying a photoactivable chromophore (benzoporphyrin derivative monoacid A, BPD) in its bilayer. A multikinase inhibitor-loaded PEG-PLGA nanoparticle is encapsulated within the liposome, which acts a barrier to nanoparticle erosion and drug release. Following intravenous PMIL administration, near infrared irradiation of tumors triggers photodynamic therapy and initiates tumor-confined drug release from the nanoparticle. This talk presents promising preclinical data in mouse models of pancreatic cancer utilizing this concept to suppress the VEGF and MET signaling pathways—both critical to cancer progression, metastasis and treatment escape. A single PMIL treatment using low doses of a multikanse inhibitor (cabozantinib, XL184) achieves sustained tumor reduction and suppresses metastatic escape, whereas combination therapy by co-administration of the individual agents has significantly reduced efficacy. The PMIL concept is amenable to a number of molecular inhibitors and offers new prospects for spatiotemporal synchronization of combination therapies whilst reducing systemic drug exposure and associated toxicities.

  18. Escape erosion and relaxation of craters on Pluto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, S.; Zangari, A.; Stern, A.

    2014-07-01

    Pluto and its major satellite Charon will be the most distant objects ever visited when NASA's New Horizons spacecraft flies past them in mid-2015. Both bodies should have suffered impacts from other transneptunian objects, though those impacts are of much lower velocity than typical on giant-planet satellites. New Horizons will image the illuminated hemispheres of Pluto and Charon seen at closest approach at better than 0.5 km/pix and 1.0 km/pix, respectively. We compare new different predictions of the impactor population on Pluto and Charon, including the effects of escape erosion from Pluto, and examine the crater size distributions those impactors would produce over the range observable to the imagers on New Horizons. The impact distribution models diverge the most for craters smaller than 10 km. We expect the crater size distribution on Charon to be determined by the impactor distribution and the rheology of the surface. Inverting the Charon size distribution seen by New Horizons will then constrain the overall size frequency distribution in the Kuiper belt, and the location of any break in that size frequency distribution. However, owing to escape erosion, craters on Pluto may be much more modified than on Charon. To constrain this modification, we present a range of possible Pluto crater distributions, as a function of impactor distribution, atmospheric escape rate, and surface ice viscosity. Pluto's atmosphere is primarily made of molecular nitrogen and is currently escaping at between 10^{27} and 10^{28} N_2/s according to model estimates. To sustain these escape rates for 3.5 billion years, a global layer of N_2 ice 0.3 to 3 km thick would need to have sublimated from the surface. We show that this gradual mass loss could have erased many of the smaller craters on Pluto, especially craters with diameters smaller than 10 km. This sublimation erosion process does not occur on Charon, which has a water ice surface and no observed atmosphere. We also show

  19. Experimental analysis and extinction of self-injurious escape behavior.

    PubMed

    Iwata, B A; Pace, G M; Kalsher, M J; Cowdery, G E; Cataldo, M F

    1990-01-01

    Three studies are presented in which environmental correlates of self-injurious behavior were systematically examined and later used as the basis for treatment. In Study 1, 7 developmentally disabled subjects were exposed to a series of conditions designed to identify factors that maintain self-injurious behavior: attention contingent on self-injurious behavior (positive reinforcement), escape from or avoidance of demands contingent on self-injurious behaviour (negative reinforcement), alone (automatic reinforcement), and play (control). Results of a multielement design showed that each subject's self-injurious behavior occurred more frequently in the demand condition, suggesting that the behavior served an avoidance or escape function. Six of the 7 subjects participated in Study 2. During educational sessions, "escape extinction" was applied as treatment for their self-injurious behavior in a multiple baseline across subjects design. Results showed noticeable reduction or elimination of self-injurious behavior for each subject and an increase in compliance with instructions in all subjects for whom compliance data were taken. The 7th subject, whose self-injurious behavior during Study 1 occurred in response to medical demands (i.e., physical examinations), participated in Study 3. Treatment was comprised of extinction, as in Study 2, plus reinforcement for tolerance of the examination procedure, and was evaluated in a multiple baseline across settings design. Results showed that the treatment was successful in eliminating self-injurious behavior and that its effects transferred across eight new therapists and three physicians. General implications for the design, interpretation, and uses of assessment studies are discussed.

  20. Advanced Crew Escape Suits (ACES): Particle Impact Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosales, Keisa R.; Stoltzfus, Joel M.

    2009-01-01

    NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) requested NASA JSC White Sands Test Facility to assist in determining the effects of impaired anodization on aluminum parts in advanced crew escape suits (ACES). Initial investigation indicated poor anodization could lead to an increased risk of particle impact ignition, and a lack of data was prevalent for particle impact of bare (unanodized) aluminum; therefore, particle impact tests were performed. A total of 179 subsonic and 60 supersonic tests were performed with no ignition of the aluminum targets. Based on the resulting test data, WSTF found no increased particle impact hazard was present in the ACES equipment.

  1. The age structure of selected countries in the ESCAP region.

    PubMed

    Hong, S

    1982-01-01

    The study objective was to examine the age structure of selected countries in the Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP) region, using available data and frequently applied indices such as the population pyramid, aged-child ratio, and median age. Based on the overall picture of the age structure thus obtained, age trends and their implication for the near future were arrived at. Countries are grouped into 4 types based on the fertility and mortality levels. Except for Japan, Hong Kong, and Singapore, the age structure in the 18 ESCAP region countries changed comparatively little over the 1950-80 period. The largest structural change occurred in Singapore, where the proportion of children under age 15 in the population declined significantly from 41-27%, while that of persons 65 years and older more than doubled. This was due primarily to the marked decline in fertility from a total fertility rate (TFR) of 6.7-1.8 during the period. Hong Kong also had a similar major transformation during the same period: the proportion of the old age population increased 2 1/2 times, from 2.5-6.3%. The age structures of the 18 ESCAP countries varied greatly by country. 10 countries of the 2 high fertility and mortality types showed a similar young age structural pattern, i.e., they have higher dependency ratios, a higher proportion of children under 15 years, a lower proportion of population 65 years and older, lower aged-child ratios, and younger median ages than the average countries in the less developed regions of the world. With minimal changes over the 1950-80 period, the gap between these countries and the average of the less developed regions widened. Unlike these 10 (mostly South Asian) countries, moderately low fertility and mortality countries (China, Korea, and Sri Lanka) are located between the world average and the less developed region in most of the indices, particularly during the last decade. Although their rate of population aging is not

  2. Behavioral momentum in the treatment of escape-motivated stereotypy.

    PubMed Central

    Mace, F C; Belfiore, P

    1990-01-01

    Descriptive and experimental analyses of stereotypy by a woman with severe mental retardation showed that the behavior was maintained by escape from demands. A sequence of high-probability requests issued immediately prior to a task-related request established a momentum of compliance that increased compliance with task-related demands. Increases in compliance were accompanied by collateral reductions in stereotypic behavior. A mechanism of response covariation, called functional incompatibility, and an animal analogue study for testing the validity of this mechanism are proposed. PMID:2074239

  3. Astrophysical bounds on photons escaping into extra dimensions.

    PubMed

    Friedland, A; Giannotti, M

    2008-01-25

    In a class of extra-dimensional models with a warped metric and a single brane the photon can be localized on the brane by gravity only. An intriguing feature of these models is the possibility of the photon escaping into the extra dimensions. The search for this effect has motivated the present round of precision ortho-positronium decay experiments. We point out that in this framework a photon in plasma should be metastable, and we consider what this implies for cooling of globular cluster stars and core-collapse supernovae. The resulting bounds on the model parameter exceed the possible reach of ortho-positronium experiments by many orders of magnitude.

  4. First-passage and escape problems in the Feller process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoliver, Jaume; Perelló, Josep

    2012-10-01

    The Feller process is an one-dimensional diffusion process with linear drift and state-dependent diffusion coefficient vanishing at the origin. The process is positive definite and it is this property along with its linear character that have made Feller process a convenient candidate for the modeling of a number of phenomena ranging from single-neuron firing to volatility of financial assets. While general properties of the process have long been well known, less known are properties related to level crossing such as the first-passage and the escape problems. In this work we thoroughly address these questions.

  5. The Route of HIV Escape from Immune Response Targeting Multiple Sites Is Determined by the Cost-Benefit Tradeoff of Escape Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Batorsky, Rebecca; Sergeev, Rinat A.; Rouzine, Igor M.

    2014-01-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) are a major factor in the control of HIV replication. CTL arise in acute infection, causing escape mutations to spread rapidly through the population of infected cells. As a result, the virus develops partial resistance to the immune response. The factors controlling the order of mutating epitope sites are currently unknown and would provide a valuable tool for predicting conserved epitopes. In this work, we adapt a well-established mathematical model of HIV evolution under dynamical selection pressure from multiple CTL clones to include partial impairment of CTL recognition, , as well as cost to viral replication, . The process of escape is described in terms of the cost-benefit tradeoff of escape mutations and predicts a trajectory in the cost-benefit plane connecting sequentially escaped sites, which moves from high recognition loss/low fitness cost to low recognition loss/high fitness cost and has a larger slope for early escapes than for late escapes. The slope of the trajectory offers an interpretation of positive correlation between fitness costs and HLA binding impairment to HLA-A molecules and a protective subset of HLA-B molecules that was observed for clinically relevant escape mutations in the Pol gene. We estimate the value of from published experimental studies to be in the range (0.01–0.86) and show that the assumption of complete recognition loss () leads to an overestimate of mutation cost. Our analysis offers a consistent interpretation of the commonly observed pattern of escape, in which several escape mutations are observed transiently in an epitope. This non-nested pattern is a combined effect of temporal changes in selection pressure and partial recognition loss. We conclude that partial recognition loss is as important as fitness loss for predicting the order of escapes and, ultimately, for predicting conserved epitopes that can be targeted by vaccines. PMID:25356981

  6. Crew Escape Technologies (CREST) Mission Area Requirements Study Current and Future Crew Escape Requirements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-02-01

    anthropometry and the type and location of the equipment worn by the test suboect. Based upon the data taken In the early nineteen sixties it was...3.1.1 of the CREST Specification describes the system as having -Flow stagnation fence to reduce windblast Induced loads on the head, torso and upper

  7. Serum tolerance and endosomal escape capacity of histidine-modified pDNA-loaded complexes based on polyamidoamine dendrimer derivatives.

    PubMed

    Wen, Yuting; Guo, Zhenhuan; Du, Zhuo; Fang, Rong; Wu, Hongmei; Zeng, Xin; Wang, Chi; Feng, Min; Pan, Shirong

    2012-11-01

    Aiming to aid polyamidoamine (PAMAM, generation 4, PG4) to overcome gene delivery barriers like extrinsic serum inhibition, intrinsic cytotoxicity and lysosome digestion, histidine motifs modified PAMAM was prepared. The histidine activated PAMAM generation 4 (HPG4) was synthesized via aminolysis reaction and characterized by 1H NMR spectrum and MALDI-TOF-MS. Cytotoxicity profiles of HPG4 on MD-MB-231 cells were significantly improved in the form of polymer and polymer/DNA complexes comparing to PG4. The luciferase protein expression level of HPG4 was 20-, 2.7- and 1.2- fold higher than that of PG4, SuperFect and PEI 25k. Most importantly, flow cytometry and gene transfection studies showed that histidine motifs of HPG4 not only acted as enhancer for faster cellular uptake, but also played an important role on enhancing serum tolerance of the system on cellular uptake and transfection. Among the serum concentrations of 10%-50%, HPG4 showed 10-100 folds higher transfection efficiency than PG4. Intracellular fate observation conducted by confocal microscope provided visual and quantitative evidence that endsomal escape efficiency of HPG4 system was higher than that of PG4. Lastly, the endosomal escape mechanism of HPG4 system was analyzed by endosome destabilization and proton pump inhibition treatment. Collectively, compared to PG4/pDNA, HPG4/pDNA showed improvement on cellular uptake, serum tolerance, cytotoxicity profile, and endosomal escape.

  8. A Nuclease from Streptococcus mutans Facilitates Biofilm Dispersal and Escape from Killing by Neutrophil Extracellular Traps

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jia; Sun, Luping; Liu, Wei; Guo, Lihong; Liu, Zhaohui; Wei, Xi; Ling, Junqi

    2017-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans is the primary etiologic agent of dental caries and occasionally infective endocarditis, with the ability to form biofilms and disperse cells into distal sites to exacerbate and spread infection. In this study, we identified a nuclease (DeoC) as a S. mutans biofilm dispersal modulating factor through microarray analysis. In vitro assays revealed a dispersal defect of a deoC deletion mutant, and functional studies with purified protein were indicative of the biofilm dispersal activity of DeoC. Neutrophils are a key host response factor restraining bacterial spreading through the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), which consist of a nuclear DNA backbone associated with antimicrobial peptides. Therefore, we hypothesized that the dispersed S. mutans might utilize DeoC to degrade NETs and escape killing by the immune system. It was found that S. mutans induced NET formation upon contact with neutrophils, while the presence of NETs in turn enhanced the deoC expression of S. mutans. Fluorescence microscopy inspection showed that deoC deletion resulted in a decreased NET degradation ability of S. mutans and enhanced susceptibility to neutrophil killing. Data obtained from this study assigned two important roles for DeoC in S. mutans: contributing to the spread of infection through mediating biofilm dispersal, and facilitating the escape of S. mutans from neutrophil killing through NET degradation.

  9. A photoactivable multi-inhibitor nanoliposome for tumour control and simultaneous inhibition of treatment escape pathways

    PubMed Central

    Spring, Bryan Q.; Sears, R. Bryan; Zheng, Lei Zak; Mai, Zhiming; Watanabe, Reika; Sherwood, Margaret E.; Schoenfeld, David A.; Pogue, Brian W.; Pereira, Stephen P.; Villa, Elizabeth; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2015-01-01

    Nanoscale drug delivery vehicles can facilitate multimodal therapies of cancer by promoting tumour-selective drug release. However, few are effective because cancer cells develop ways to resist and evade treatment. Here, we introduce a photoactivatable multi-inhibitor nanoliposome (PMIL) that imparts light-induced cytotoxicity in synchrony with photo-initiated and sustained release of inhibitors that suppress tumour regrowth and treatment escape signalling pathways. The PMIL consists of a nanoliposome doped with a photoactivatable chromophore (benzoporphyrin derivative, BPD) in the lipid bilayer, and a nanoparticle containing cabozantinib (XL184)—a multikinase inhibitor—encapsulated inside. Near infrared tumour irradiation, following intravenous PMIL administration, triggers photodynamic damage of tumour cells and microvessels, and simultaneously initiates release of XL184 inside the tumour. A single PMIL treatment achieves prolonged tumour reduction in two mouse models and suppresses metastatic escape in an orthotopic pancreatic tumour model. The PMIL offers new prospects for cancer therapy by enabling spatiotemporal control of drug release whilst reducing systemic drug exposure and associated toxicities. PMID:26780659

  10. A photoactivable multi-inhibitor nanoliposome for tumour control and simultaneous inhibition of treatment escape pathways.

    PubMed

    Spring, Bryan Q; Bryan Sears, R; Zheng, Lei Zak; Mai, Zhiming; Watanabe, Reika; Sherwood, Margaret E; Schoenfeld, David A; Pogue, Brian W; Pereira, Stephen P; Villa, Elizabeth; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2016-04-01

    Nanoscale drug delivery vehicles can facilitate multimodal therapies of cancer by promoting tumour-selective drug release. However, few are effective because cancer cells develop ways to resist and evade treatment. Here, we introduce a photoactivable multi-inhibitor nanoliposome (PMIL) that imparts light-induced cytotoxicity in synchrony with a photoinitiated and sustained release of inhibitors that suppress tumour regrowth and treatment escape signalling pathways. The PMIL consists of a nanoliposome doped with a photoactivable chromophore (benzoporphyrin derivative, BPD) in the lipid bilayer, and a nanoparticle containing cabozantinib (XL184)--a multikinase inhibitor--encapsulated inside. Near-infrared tumour irradiation, following intravenous PMIL administration, triggers photodynamic damage of tumour cells and microvessels, and simultaneously initiates release of XL184 inside the tumour. A single PMIL treatment achieves prolonged tumour reduction in two mouse models and suppresses metastatic escape in an orthotopic pancreatic tumour model. The PMIL offers new prospects for cancer therapy by enabling spatiotemporal control of drug release while reducing systemic drug exposure and associated toxicities.

  11. Asymmetry of glia near central synapses favors presynaptically directed glutamate escape.

    PubMed Central

    Lehre, Knut Petter; Rusakov, Dmitri A

    2002-01-01

    Recent findings demonstrate that synaptically released excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate activates receptors outside the immediate synaptic cleft and that the extent of such extrasynaptic actions is regulated by the high affinity glutamate uptake. The bulk of glutamate transporter systems are evenly distributed in the synaptic neuropil, and it is generally assumed that glutamate escaping the cleft affects pre- and postsynaptic receptors to a similar degree. To test whether this is indeed the case, we use quantitative electron microscopy and establish the stochastic pattern of glial occurrence in the three-dimensional (3D) vicinity of two common types of excitatory central synapses, stratum radiatum synapses in hippocampus and parallel fiber synapses in cerebellum. We find that the occurrence of glia postsynaptically is strikingly higher (3-4-fold) than presynaptically, in both types of synapses. To address the functional consequences of this asymmetry, we simulate diffusion and transport of synaptically released glutamate in these two brain areas using a detailed 3D compartmental model of the extracellular space with glutamate transporters arranged unevenly, in accordance with the obtained experimental data. The results predict that glutamate escaping the synaptic cleft is 2-4 times more likely to activate presynaptic compared to postsynaptic receptors. Simulations also show that postsynaptic neuronal transporters (EAAT4 type) at dendritic spines of cerebellar Purkinje cells exaggerate this asymmetry further. Our data suggest that the perisynaptic environment of these common central synapses favors fast presynaptic feedback in the information flow while preserving the specificity of the postsynaptic input. PMID:12080105

  12. A photoactivable multi-inhibitor nanoliposome for tumour control and simultaneous inhibition of treatment escape pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spring, Bryan Q.; Bryan Sears, R.; Zheng, Lei Zak; Mai, Zhiming; Watanabe, Reika; Sherwood, Margaret E.; Schoenfeld, David A.; Pogue, Brian W.; Pereira, Stephen P.; Villa, Elizabeth; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2016-04-01

    Nanoscale drug delivery vehicles can facilitate multimodal therapies of cancer by promoting tumour-selective drug release. However, few are effective because cancer cells develop ways to resist and evade treatment. Here, we introduce a photoactivable multi-inhibitor nanoliposome (PMIL) that imparts light-induced cytotoxicity in synchrony with a photoinitiated and sustained release of inhibitors that suppress tumour regrowth and treatment escape signalling pathways. The PMIL consists of a nanoliposome doped with a photoactivable chromophore (benzoporphyrin derivative, BPD) in the lipid bilayer, and a nanoparticle containing cabozantinib (XL184)—a multikinase inhibitor—encapsulated inside. Near-infrared tumour irradiation, following intravenous PMIL administration, triggers photodynamic damage of tumour cells and microvessels, and simultaneously initiates release of XL184 inside the tumour. A single PMIL treatment achieves prolonged tumour reduction in two mouse models and suppresses metastatic escape in an orthotopic pancreatic tumour model. The PMIL offers new prospects for cancer therapy by enabling spatiotemporal control of drug release while reducing systemic drug exposure and associated toxicities.

  13. A two-component volatile atmosphere for Pluto. I. The bulk hydrodynamic escape regime

    SciTech Connect

    Trafton, L. )

    1990-08-01

    The seasonal effects on Pluto's atmosphere of a simplified system of CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2} saturated over a solid solution are investigated, and the results are compared with previous CH{sub 4} models. It is found that bulk escape occurs for CH{sub 4} mole fractions less than 0.7 of Pluto's volatile reservoir. Greater CH{sub 4} abundance leads to diffusive separation during the escape of both species and an atmospheric mixing ratio of about Xc(0). If Xc(0) is in the range 0.02-0.10, Pluto's atmosphere remains largely intact at aphelion rather than virtually freezing out as it does for Xc(0) greater than 0.3 or less than 0.001, or form an atmosphere with only a single volatile gas. An upper limit for the CH{sub 4} mixing ratio is about 0.07 if N{sub 2} is the second gas. On the other hand, CH{sub 4} is the dominant surface constituent of the volatile deposit if Xc(0) is greater than 0.0001. 29 refs.

  14. Marine mollusc predator-escape behaviour altered by near-future carbon dioxide levels.

    PubMed

    Watson, Sue-Ann; Lefevre, Sjannie; McCormick, Mark I; Domenici, Paolo; Nilsson, Göran E; Munday, Philip L

    2014-01-07

    Ocean acidification poses a range of threats to marine invertebrates; however, the potential effects of rising carbon dioxide (CO2) on marine invertebrate behaviour are largely unknown. Marine gastropod conch snails have a modified foot and operculum allowing them to leap backwards rapidly when faced with a predator, such as a venomous cone shell. Here, we show that projected near-future seawater CO2 levels (961 µatm) impair this escape behaviour during a predator-prey interaction. Elevated-CO2 halved the number of snails that jumped from the predator, increased their latency to jump and altered their escape trajectory. Physical ability to jump was not affected by elevated-CO2 indicating instead that decision-making was impaired. Antipredator behaviour was fully restored by treatment with gabazine, a GABA antagonist of some invertebrate nervous systems, indicating potential interference of neurotransmitter receptor function by elevated-CO2, as previously observed in marine fishes. Altered behaviour of marine invertebrates at projected future CO2 levels could have potentially far-reaching implications for marine ecosystems.

  15. Prey fish escape by sensing the bow wave of a predator.

    PubMed

    Stewart, William J; Nair, Arjun; Jiang, Houshuo; McHenry, Matthew J

    2014-12-15

    Prey fish possess a remarkable ability to sense and evade an attack from a larger fish. Despite the importance of these events to the biology of fishes, it remains unclear how sensory cues stimulate an effective evasive maneuver. Here, we show that larval zebrafish (Danio rerio) evade predators using an escape response that is stimulated by the water flow generated by an approaching predator. Measurements of the high-speed responses of larvae in the dark to a robotic predator suggest that larvae respond to the subtle flows in front of the predator using the lateral line system. This flow, known as the bow wave, was visualized and modeled with computational fluid dynamics. According to the predictions of the model, larvae direct their escape away from the side of their body exposed to more rapid flow. This suggests that prey fish use a flow reflex that enables predator evasion by generating a directed maneuver at high speed. These findings demonstrate a sensory-motor mechanism that underlies a behavior that is crucial to the ecology and evolution of fishes.

  16. Cancer acidity: An ultimate frontier of tumor immune escape and a novel target of immunomodulation.

    PubMed

    Huber, Veronica; Camisaschi, Chiara; Berzi, Angela; Ferro, Simona; Lugini, Luana; Triulzi, Tiziana; Tuccitto, Alessandra; Tagliabue, Elda; Castelli, Chiara; Rivoltini, Licia

    2017-03-06

    The link between cancer metabolism and immunosuppression, inflammation and immune escape has generated major interest in investigating the effects of low pH on tumor immunity. Indeed, microenvironmental acidity may differentially impact on diverse components of tumor immune surveillance, eventually contributing to immune escape and cancer progression. Although the molecular pathways underlying acidity-related immune dysfunctions are just emerging, initial evidence indicates that antitumor effectors such as T and NK cells tend to lose their function and undergo a state of mostly reversible anergy followed by apoptosis, when exposed to low pH environment. At opposite, immunosuppressive components such as myeloid cells and regulatory T cells are engaged by tumor acidity to sustain tumor growth while blocking antitumor immune responses. Local acidity could also profoundly influence bioactivity and distribution of antibodies, thus potentially interfering with the clinical efficacy of therapeutic antibodies including immune checkpoint inhibitors. Hence tumor acidity is a central regulator of cancer immunity that orchestrates both local and systemic immunosuppression and that may offer a broad panel of therapeutic targets. This review outlines the fundamental pathways of acidity-driven immune dysfunctions and sheds light on the potential strategies that could be envisaged to potentiate immune-mediated tumor control in cancer patients.

  17. Inducible renitence limits Listeria monocytogenes escape from vacuoles in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Davis, Michael J; Gregorka, Brian; Gestwicki, Jason E; Swanson, Joel A

    2012-11-01

    Membranes of endolysosomal compartments in macrophages are often damaged by physical or chemical effects of particles ingested through phagocytosis or by toxins secreted by intracellular pathogens. This study identified a novel inducible activity in macrophages that increases resistance of phagosomes, late endosomes, and lysosomes to membrane damage. Pretreatment of murine macrophages with LPS, peptidoglycan, TNF-α, or IFN-γ conferred protection against subsequent damage to intracellular membranes caused by photooxidative chemistries or by phagocytosis of ground silica or silica microspheres. Phagolysosome damage was partially dependent on reactive oxygen species but was independent of the phagocyte oxidase. IFN-γ-stimulated macrophages from mice lacking the phagocyte oxidase inhibited escape from vacuoles by the intracellular pathogen Listeria monocytogenes, which suggested a role for this inducible renitence (resistance to pressure) in macrophage resistance to infection by pathogens that damage intracellular membranes. Renitence and inhibition of L. monocytogenes escape were partially attributable to heat shock protein-70. Thus, renitence is a novel, inducible activity of macrophages that maintains or restores the integrity of endolysosomal membranes.

  18. Numerical simulation of a self-propelled copepod during escape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotiropoulos, Fotis; Borazjani, Iman; Malkiel, Edwin; Katz, Josef

    2008-11-01

    Obtaining the 3D flow field, forces, and power is essential for understanding the high accelerations of a copepod during the escap. We carry out numerical simulations to study a free swimming copepod using the sharp-interface immersed boundary, fluid-structure interaction (FSI) approach of Borazjani et al. (J Compu Phys, 2008, 227, p 7587-7620). We use our previous tethered copepod model with a realistic copepod-like body, including all the appendages with the appendages motion prescribed from high-resolution, cinematic dual digital holography. The simulations are performed in a frame of reference attached to the copepod whose velocity is calculated by considering the forces acting on the copepod. The self-propelled simulations are challenging due to the destabilizing effects of the large added mass resulting from the low copepod mass and fast acceleration during the escape. Strongly-coupled FSI with under-relaxation and the Aitken acceleration technique is used to obtain stable and robust FSI iterations. The computed results for the self-propelled model are analyzed and compared with our earlier results for the tethered model.

  19. Escape of Hot Oxygen Atoms from the Atmosphere of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmati, A.; Croxell, J. A.; Cravens, T.; Pothapragada, S.; Nagy, A. F.; Ledvina, S. A.

    2013-12-01

    The main source of the production of hot oxygen atoms in the Martian atmosphere is the dissociative recombination (DR) reaction of O2+ ions with electrons. In this study, the primary production rate of hot O atoms is found for four energy channels of DR reaction. The one-dimensional energy and altitude dependent up and down flux differential equations are solved using a two-stream transport method, by taking into account the primary, secondary and cascade productions of hot O and also, the interactions with the background atmosphere. The forward and backward scattering probabilities and energy loss coefficients for 12 neutral target species are found using a Monte-Carlo simulation. The neutral target species are H, H2, He, C, N, O, CO, N2, NO, O2, Ar and CO2 for which the density profiles appropriate for Viking landers condition are used. From the up and down fluxes, the energy distribution function of hot O atoms and the escape flux at the exobase of Mars is calculated and by using the Liouville equation, the density profile of hot O is found above the exobase, extending out to several Martian radii. The results are used to study the interaction of escaping hot O atoms with the solar wind and specifically, the fluxes of energetic O+ pickup ions are determined.

  20. Escape of Hydrogen from the Exosphere of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Dolon; Clarke, John T.; Bertaux, Jean-Loup; Chaufray, Jean-Yves; Mayyasi-Matta, Majd A.

    2016-10-01

    After decades of exploration, the martian neutral hydrogen exosphere has remained largely uncharacterized even today. In my dissertation I have attempted to constrain the characteristics of the martian hydrogen exosphere using Hubble Space Telescope observations obtained during October-November 2007 and 2014. These observations reveal short-term seasonal changes exhibited by the martian hydrogen exosphere that are inconsistent with the diffusion-limited escape scenario. This seasonal behavior adds a new element towards backtracking the history of water loss from Mars. Modeling of the data also indicates the likely presence of a superthermal population of hydrogen created by non-thermal processes at Mars, another key element to understand the present-day escape. Exploration of the latitudinal symmetry of the martian exosphere indicates that it is symmetric above 2.5 martian radii and asymmetric below this altitude, which could be due to temperature differences between the day and night sides. Finally, the large uncertainties in determining the characteristics of the martian exosphere after decades of exploration is due to various assumptions about the intrinsic characteristics of the martian exosphere in the modeling process, degeneracy in the two modeling parameters temperature and density of the hydrogen atoms, unaccounted seasonal effects, and uncertainties introduced from spacecraft instrumentation as well as their viewing geometry.

  1. Quantification of Nociceptive Escape Response in C.elegans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Kawai; Mohammadi, Aylia; Ryu, William; Nemenman, Ilya

    2013-03-01

    Animals cannot rank and communicate their pain consciously. Thus in pain studies on animal models, one must infer the pain level from high precision experimental characterization of behavior. This is not trivial since behaviors are very complex and multidimensional. Here we explore the feasibility of C.elegans as a model for pain transduction. The nematode has a robust neurally mediated noxious escape response, which we show to be partially decoupled from other sensory behaviors. We develop a nociceptive behavioral response assay that allows us to apply controlled levels of pain by locally heating worms with an IR laser. The worms' motions are captured by machine vision programming with high spatiotemporal resolution. The resulting behavioral quantification allows us to build a statistical model for inference of the experienced pain level from the behavioral response. Based on the measured nociceptive escape of over 400 worms, we conclude that none of the simple characteristics of the response are reliable indicators of the laser pulse strength. Nonetheless, a more reliable statistical inference of the pain stimulus level from the measured behavior is possible based on a complexity-controlled regression model that takes into account the entire worm behavioral output. This work was partially supported by NSF grant No. IOS/1208126 and HFSP grant No. RGY0084/2011.

  2. Interspecific differences in how habitat degradation affects escape response.

    PubMed

    McCormick, Mark I; Allan, Bridie J M

    2017-03-27

    Degradation of habitats is widespread and a leading cause of extinctions. Our study determined whether the change in the chemical landscape associated with coral degradation affected the way three fish species use olfactory information to optimize their fast-start escape response. Water from degraded coral habitats affected the fast-start response of the three closely-related damselfishes, but its effect differed markedly among species. The Ward's damselfish (Pomacentrus wardi) was most affected by water from degraded coral, and displayed shorter distances covered in the fast-start and slower escape speeds compared to fish in water from healthy coral. In the presence of alarm odours, which indicate an imminent threat, the Ambon damsel (P. amboinensis) displayed enhanced fast-start performance in water from healthy coral, but not when in water from degraded coral. In contrast, while the white-tailed damsel (P. chrysurus) was similarly primed by its alarm odour, the elevation of fast start performance was not altered by water from degraded coral. These species-specific responses to the chemistry of degraded water and alarm odours suggest differences in the way alarm odours interact with the chemical landscape, and differences in the way species balance information about threats, with likely impacts on the survival of affected species in degraded habitats.

  3. On the escape of pollutants from urban street canyons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baik, Jong-Jin; Kim, Jae-Jin

    Pollutant transport from urban street canyons is numerically investigated using a two-dimensional flow and dispersion model. The ambient wind blows perpendicular to the street and passive pollutants are released at the street level. Results from the control experiment with a street aspect ratio of 1 show that at the roof level of the street canyon, the vertical turbulent flux of pollutants is upward everywhere and the vertical flux of pollutants by mean flow is upward or downward. The horizontally integrated vertical flux of pollutants by mean flow at the roof level of the street canyon is downward and its magnitude is much smaller than that by turbulent process. These results indicate that pollutants escape from the street canyon mainly by turbulent process and that the net effect of mean flow is to make some escaped pollutants reenter the street canyon. Further experiments with different inflow turbulence intensities, inflow wind speeds, and street aspect ratio confirm the findings from the control experiment. In the case of two isolated buildings, the horizontally integrated vertical flux of pollutants by mean flow is upward due to flow separation but the other main results are the same as those from the control experiment.

  4. Ultra-fast Escape of a Octopus-inspired Rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weymouth, Gabriel; Triantafyllou, Michael

    2013-11-01

    The octopus, squid, and other cephalopods inflate with water and then release a jet to accelerate in the opposite direction. This escape mechanism is particularly interesting in the octopus because they become initially quite bluff, yet this does not hinder them in achieving impressive bursts of speed. We examine this somewhat paradoxical maneuver using a simple deflating spheroid model in both potential and viscous flow. We demonstrate that the dynamic reduction of the width of the body completely changes the flow and forces acting on the escaping rocket in three ways. First, a body which reduces in size can generate an added mass thrust which counteracts the added mass inertia. Second, the motion of the shrinking wall acts similar to suction on a static wall, reducing separation and drag forces in a viscous fluid, but that this effects depends on the rate of size change. Third, using a combination of these two features it is possible to initially load the fluid with kinetic energy when heavy and bluff and then recover that energy when streamlined and light, enabling ultra-fast accelerations. As a notable example, these mechanisms allow a shrinking spheroid rocket in a heavy inviscid fluid to achieve speeds greater than an identical rocket in the vacuum of space. Southampton Marine and Maritime Institute.

  5. The C. elegans touch response facilitates escape from predacious fungi.

    PubMed

    Maguire, Sean M; Clark, Christopher M; Nunnari, John; Pirri, Jennifer K; Alkema, Mark J

    2011-08-09

    Predator-prey interactions are vital determinants in the natural selection of behavioral traits. Gentle touch to the anterior half of the body of Caenorhabditis elegans elicits an escape response in which the animal quickly reverses and suppresses exploratory head movements [1, 2]. Here, we investigate the ecological significance of the touch response in predator-prey interactions between C. elegans and predacious fungi that catch nematodes using constricting hyphal rings. We show that the constricting rings of Drechslerella doedycoides catch early larval stages with a diameter similar to the trap opening. There is a delay between the ring entry and ring closure, which allows the animal to withdraw from the trap before being caught. Mutants that fail to suppress head movements in response to touch are caught more efficiently than the wild-type. This demonstrates that the coordination of motor programs allows C. elegans to smoothly retract from a fungal noose and evade capture. Our results suggest that selective pressures imposed by predacious fungi have shaped the evolution of C. elegans escape behavior.

  6. Lionfish misidentification circumvents an optimized escape response by prey

    PubMed Central

    McCormick, Mark I.; Allan, Bridie J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Invasive lionfish represent an unprecedented problem in the Caribbean basin, where they are causing major changes to foodwebs and habitats through their generalized predation on fishes and invertebrates. To ascertain what makes the red lionfish (Pterois volitans) such a formidable predator, we examined the reaction of a native damselfish prey, the whitetail damsel (Pomacentrus chrysurus), to a repeatable startle stimulus once they had been forewarned of the sight or smell of lionfish. Fast-start responses were compared with prey forewarned of a predatory rockcod (Cephalopholis microprion), a corallivorous butterflyfish (Chaetodon trifasctiatus) and experimental controls. Forewarning of the sight, smell or a combination of the two cues from a rockcod led to reduced escape latencies and higher response distances, speed and maximal speed compared with controls, suggesting that forewarning primed the prey and enabled a more effective escape response. In contrast, forewarning of lionfish did not affect the fast-start kinematics measured, which were the same as in the control and non-predatory butterflyfish treatments. Lionfish appear to be able to circumvent mechanisms commonly used by prey to identify predators and were misclassified as non-predatory, and this is likely to contribute to their success as predators. PMID:27990292

  7. Naloxone facilitates appetitive extinction and eliminates escape from frustration.

    PubMed

    Norris, Jacob N; Pérez-Acosta, Andrés M; Ortega, Leonardo A; Papini, Mauricio R

    2009-11-01

    Two experiments tested the effects of opioid receptor blockage on behavior. In Experiment 1, rats reinforced for lever pressing with either sucrose or food pellets received treatment with saline, 2, and 10 mg/kg naloxone, i.p. (within-subject design). Naloxone 10 mg/kg increased response latency, but 2 mg/kg had no effect. When shifted to extinction (between-group design), naloxone (2 and 10 mg/kg) facilitated extinction relative to saline animals, after reinforcement with either sucrose or food pellets. In Experiment 2, after 10 sessions of access to 32% sucrose or an empty tube (between-group design), all rats were exposed to the empty tube while allowing them to jump over a barrier into a different compartment. Escape latencies were shorter for downshifted saline than for saline rats always given access to the empty tube. This escape-from-frustration effect was eliminated by naloxone (2 mg/kg, i.p.). Opioid blockage appears to reduce the value of alternative incentives.

  8. Deformation-driven fluid escape in the Levant Basin, offshore southern Israel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eruteya, Ovie Emmanuel; Waldmann, Nicolas; Reshef, Moshe; Ben-Avraham, Zvi

    2016-04-01

    Submarine fluid emissions are global phenomena, which can be inferred from the presence of seafloor morphologies (e.g. pockmarks, mud volcanoes) occurring in various geological settings. However, despite the Levant Basin been a prolific hydrocarbon province, only a paucity of fluid escape morphologies have been identified on the present-day seafloor. In this study, we present a detailed analysis of a newly available high-resolution 3D seismic reflection dataset from offshore southern Israel. Evidences of subsurface fluid plumbing and escape are manifested here as present-day seafloor pockmarks, paleo-pockmarks, pipe structures and enhanced reflectivity patterns. Interestingly, these pockmarks are situated on and around bathymetric highs, which are ridges related to the Palmachim Disturbance. Our initial results show the fluid flow structures are spatially localized above a region of complex evaporites evacuation at depth, and likewise proximal to a shallower region characterized by high amplitude reflectors. The latter may be evidences for a shallow gas system. Our initial hypothesis proposes a dual shallow-source driven focused fluid flow system. Yet, we favour a deeper Messinian plumbing system driving fluid flow across the overburden in the study area. Corroborating this are fault systems characterized near the pipes feeding the seafloor pockmarks and paleo-pockmark, detaching in the upper Messinian evaporite. We further suggest that a combined supra-salt deformation system arising from the evacuation of the Messinian evaporites coupled with gravitational tectonics are in charge of modulating focused fluid flow. Under this scenario the emplaced mass transport complex acts as a transient reservoir for fluid flow, dewatering under deformation and channelling fluids towards the seafloor for expulsion. However, the contributions from microbially-generated methane in the shallow Quaternary overburden associated with the channel-levee complex cannot be neglected.

  9. Apparent AV junctional escape in Wenckebach AV block: markedly slow conduction through the slow AV pathway.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Shinji; Katoh, Takakazu; Hagisawa, Kohsuke; Fukushima, Tsutomu; Ikawa, Shinji

    2009-02-01

    We report here two cases of Wenckebach atrioventricular (AV) block in which apparent AV junctional escape was observed, but most likely resulted from markedly slow conduction through the slow pathway of dual AV junctional pathways. In these cases, it seems that a blocked P-wave was followed by an AV junctional escape beat. However, a blocked P-wave occasionally failed to be followed by an escape beat, and the RR interval containing the blocked P-wave was markedly longer than the above escape interval. In one case, apparent AV junctional escape beats with aberrant ventricular conduction were found, and QRS complexes of the same configuration were also found without the preceding ventricular pause. This strengthens the possibility that apparent AV junctional escape occurred because of markedly slow conduction through the slow AV pathway.

  10. The great escape: Active genes on inactive sex chromosomes and their evolutionary implications.

    PubMed

    Sin, Ho-Su; Namekawa, Satoshi H

    2013-09-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms precisely regulate sex chromosome inactivation as well as genes that escape the silencing process. In male germ cells, DNA damage response factor RNF8 establishes active epigenetic modifications on the silent sex chromosomes during meiosis, and activates escape genes during a state of sex chromosome-wide silencing in postmeiotic spermatids. During the course of evolution, the gene content of escape genes in postmeiotic spermatids recently diverged on the sex chromosomes. This evolutionary feature mirrors the epigenetic processes of sex chromosomes in germ cells. In this article, we describe how epigenetic processes have helped to shape the evolution of sex chromosome-linked genes. Furthermore, we compare features of escape genes on sex chromosomes in male germ cells to escape genes located on the single X chromosome silenced during X-inactivation in females, clarifying the distinct evolutionary implications between male and female escape genes.

  11. The DYNAMO Orbiter Project: High Resolution Mapping of Gravity/Magnetic Fields and In Situ Investigation of Mars Atmospheric Escape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smrekar, S.; Chassefiere, E.; Forget, F.; Reme, H.; Mazelle, C.; Blelly, P. -L.; Acuna, M.; Connerney, J.; Purucker, M.; Lin, R.

    2000-01-01

    /or enhanced effects over the several billion years of the solar system's life. If the detailed history of the Martian internal field could be traced back, and the current escape processes could be understood well enough to model the expected stronger losses under early Sun conditions, one could go a long way toward constraining this part of the mysterious history of Mars' atmosphere.

  12. Elevated atmospheric escape of atomic hydrogen from Mars induced by high-altitude water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaffin, M. S.; Deighan, J.; Schneider, N. M.; Stewart, A. I. F.

    2017-01-01

    Atmospheric loss has controlled the history of Martian habitability, removing most of the planet’s initial water through atomic hydrogen and oxygen escape from the upper atmosphere to space. In standard models, H and O escape in a stoichiometric 2:1 ratio because H reaches the upper atmosphere via long-lived molecular hydrogen, whose abundance is regulated by a photochemical feedback sensitive to atmospheric oxygen content. The relatively constant escape rates these models predict are inconsistent with known H escape variations of more than an order of magnitude on seasonal timescales, variation that requires escaping H to have a source other than H2. The best candidate source is high-altitude water, detected by the Mars Express spacecraft in seasonally variable concentrations. Here we use a one-dimensional time-dependent photochemical model to show that the introduction of high-altitude water can produce a large increase in the H escape rate on a timescale of weeks, quantitatively linking these observations. This H escape pathway produces prompt H loss that is not immediately balanced by O escape, influencing the oxidation state of the atmosphere for millions of years. Martian atmospheric water loss may be dominated by escape via this pathway, which may therefore potentially control the planet’s atmospheric chemistry. Our findings highlight the influence that seasonal atmospheric variability can have on planetary evolution.

  13. On the relative contributions of positive reinforcement and escape extinction in the treatment of food refusal.

    PubMed

    Piazza, Cathleen C; Patel, Meeta R; Gulotta, Charles S; Sevin, Bari M; Layer, Stacy A

    2003-01-01

    We compared the effects of positive reinforcement alone, escape extinction alone, and positive reinforcement with escape extinction in the treatment of the food and fluid refusal of 4 children who had been diagnosed with a pediatric feeding disorder. Consumption did not increase when positive reinforcement was implemented alone. By contrast, consumption increased for all participants when escape extinction was implemented, independent of the presence or absence of positive reinforcement. However, the addition of positive reinforcement to escape extinction was associated with beneficial effects (e.g., greater decreases in negative vocalizations and inappropriate behavior) for some participants.

  14. On the hydrodynamic model of thermal escape from planetary atmospheres and its comparison with kinetic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, A. N.

    2016-06-01

    Parkers' model of thermal escape implies the search of solutions of one-dimensional hydrodynamic equations for an inviscid but thermally conducting gas with a critical point and vanishing temperature far from the source. The properties of solutions of this model are studied for neutral mon- and diatomic gases with the viscosity index varying from 1/2 to 1. The domains of existence and uniqueness of solutions in terms of the source Jeans escape parameter and Knudsen number are established. The solutions are found to exist only in a narrow range of the critical point Jeans parameter. The lower and upper limits of this range correspond to solutions that are dominated by either heat conduction or adiabatic expansion. Thermal escape described by Parker's model occurs in two asymptotic regimes: the low-density (LD) regime, when escape is dominated by heat conduction, and the high-density (HD) regime, when escape is dominated by adiabatic expansion. Expressions for the mass and energy escape rates in these regimes are found theoretically. The comparison of results of hydrodynamic and kinetic simulations performed in identical conditions shows that Parker's model is capable of describing thermal escape only in the HD regime, providing decent agreement with the kinetic model in terms of the atmospheric structure below the exobase and the mass and energy escape rates. In the LD regime, Parker's model predicts a much faster drop in atmospheric temperature and less extended atmospheres, and can both over- and underestimate the escape rates in orders of magnitude.

  15. Experiment for Development of Simple Escape Countermeasures for Frogs Falling into Concrete Canals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watabe, Keiji; Mori, Atsushi; Koizumi, Noriyuki; Takemura, Takeshi; Park, Myeong Soo

    Three prototype escape countermeasures for frogs that can be easily installed in U-shaped canals with widths of 30-50 cm and depths of 30-50 cm were experimentally produced because frogs cannot escape from agricultural canals with deep concrete walls after falling into the canal. The differences of effectiveness of the 3 prototypes in places for the countermeasures (1 and 2) and flow conditions (dry and water running) were investigated for 2 frog species (Tokyo Daruma Pond Frog and Japanese Brown Frog). The brown frogs escaped from the canals more easily than the pond frogs. The brown frogs escaped regardless of their body size, but the small pond frogs escaped more easily than the large pond frogs. The prototype with slopes beside both canal walls and a net spread across the center line of the canal enabled frogs to escape from the canal more easily than the prototypes with only slopes or nets beside both canal walls. Increasing the number of places for the countermeasures enhanced frog escape. The differences in frog escape between dry canals and canals with water running were not significant. Therefore, the prototypes were confirmed sufficient as escape countermeasures that is inexpensive and can be easily placed in and removed from agricultural canals.

  16. How moths escape bats: predicting outcomes of predator-prey interactions.

    PubMed

    Corcoran, Aaron J; Conner, William E

    2016-09-01

    What determines whether fleeing prey escape from attacking predators? To answer this question, biologists have developed mathematical models that incorporate attack geometries, pursuit and escape trajectories, and kinematics of predator and prey. These models have rarely been tested using data from actual predator-prey encounters. To address this problem, we recorded multi-camera infrared videography of bat-insect interactions in a large outdoor enclosure. We documented 235 attacks by four Myotis volans bats on a variety of moths. Bat and moth flight trajectories from 50 high-quality attacks were reconstructed in 3-D. Despite having higher maximum velocity, deceleration and overall turning ability, bats only captured evasive prey in 69 of 184 attacks (37.5%); bats captured nearly all moths not evading attack (50 of 51; 98%). Logistic regression indicated that prey radial acceleration and escape angle were the most important predictors of escape success (44 of 50 attacks correctly classified; 88%). We found partial support for the turning gambit mathematical model; however, it underestimated the escape threshold by 25% of prey velocity and did not account for prey escape angle. Whereas most prey escaping strikes flee away from predators, moths typically escaped chasing bats by turning with high radial acceleration toward 'safety zones' that flank the predator. This strategy may be widespread in prey engaged in chases. Based on these findings, we developed a novel geometrical model of predation. We discuss implications of this model for the co-evolution of predator and prey kinematics and pursuit and escape strategies.

  17. On the relative contributions of noncontingent reinforcement and escape extinction in the treatment of food refusal.

    PubMed

    Reed, Gregory K; Piazza, Cathleen C; Patel, Meeta R; Layer, Stacy A; Bachmeyer, Melanie H; Bethke, Stephanie D; Gutshall, Katharine A

    2004-01-01

    In the current investigation, we evaluated the relative effects of noncontingent reinforcement (NCR), escape extinction, and a combination of NCR and escape extinction as treatment for the feeding problems exhibited by 4 children. For each participant, consumption increased only when escape extinction was implemented, independent of whether NCR was present or absent. These results were consistent with prior research suggesting that positive reinforcement alone is insufficient for increasing consumption, and that escape extinction often is necessary to increase and maintain food acceptance. However, NCR appeared to decrease inappropriate behavior for some participants.

  18. The Great Escape: Viral Strategies to Counter BST-2/Tetherin

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, Janet L.; Gustin, Jean K.; Viswanathan, Kasinath; Mansouri, Mandana; Moses, Ashlee V.; Früh, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    The interferon-induced BST-2 protein has the unique ability to restrict the egress of HIV-1, Kaposi's sarcoma–associated herpesvirus (KSHV), Ebola virus, and other enveloped viruses. The observation that virions remain attached to the surface of BST-2-expressing cells led to the renaming of BST-2 as “tetherin”. However, viral proteins such as HIV-1 Vpu, simian immunodeficiency virus Nef, and KSHV K5 counteract BST-2, thereby allowing mature virions to readily escape from infected cells. Since the anti-viral function of BST-2 was discovered, there has been an explosion of research into several aspects of this intriguing interplay between host and virus. This review focuses on recent work addressing the molecular mechanisms involved in BST-2 restriction of viral egress and the species-specific countermeasures employed by various viruses. PMID:20485522

  19. An Introduction to Survival, Evasion, Resistance, and Escape (SERE) Medicine.

    PubMed

    Smith, Michael B

    2013-01-01

    When an individual finds himself/herself in a survival, evasion, resistance, or escape (SERE) scenario, the ability to treat injuries/illnesses can be the difference between life and death. SERE schools are responsible for preparing military members for these situations, but the concept of SERE medicine is not particularly well defined. To provide a comprehensive working description of SERE medicine, operational and training components were examined. Evidence suggests that SERE medicine is diverse, injury/illness patterns are situationally dependent, and treatment options often differ from conventional clinical medicine. Ideally, medical lessons taught in SERE training are based on actual documented events. Unfortunately, the existing body of literature is dated and does not appear to be expanding. In this article, four distinct facets of SERE medicine are presented to establish a basis for future discussion and research. Recommendations to improve SERE medical curricula and data-gathering processes are also provided.

  20. Can the Martian magnetic anomalies make for the ionosphere escape?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, A.; Barabash, S.; Sauvaud, J.; Ferrier, C.

    2011-12-01

    Looking forward to the MAVEN mission, it seems very useful to return to Mars Express data to refresh an important problem of Martian atmosphere escape: what role the crustal magnetic field may play in this process? There are several publications on this topic with completely opposite conclusions. We are trying to use a new approach to this problem. On the base of a statistical study of the ion and electron distributions in the Martian magnetotail we show that the characteristic accelerated and thermalized distributions are not associated with the magnetic anomalies but only with interplanetary magnetic field clock angle. However the presence of the X-aligned crustal magnetic field provides a channel that can guide the heated plasmasheet electrons toward the ionosphere.

  1. Escaping Antiangiogenic Therapy: Strategies Employed by Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Mauricio P.; Sotomayor, Paula; Carrasco-Avino, Gonzalo; Corvalan, Alejandro H.; Owen, Gareth I.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor angiogenesis is widely recognized as one of the “hallmarks of cancer”. Consequently, during the last decades the development and testing of commercial angiogenic inhibitors has been a central focus for both basic and clinical cancer research. While antiangiogenic drugs are now incorporated into standard clinical practice, as with all cancer therapies, tumors can eventually become resistant by employing a variety of strategies to receive nutrients and oxygen in the event of therapeutic assault. Herein, we concentrate and review in detail three of the principal mechanisms of antiangiogenic therapy escape: (1) upregulation of compensatory/alternative pathways for angiogenesis; (2) vasculogenic mimicry; and (3) vessel co-option. We suggest that an understanding of how a cancer cell adapts to antiangiogenic therapy may also parallel the mechanisms employed in the bourgeoning tumor and isolated metastatic cells delivering responsible for residual disease. Finally, we speculate on strategies to adapt antiangiogenic therapy for future clinical uses. PMID:27608016

  2. Escaping Antiangiogenic Therapy: Strategies Employed by Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Mauricio P; Sotomayor, Paula; Carrasco-Avino, Gonzalo; Corvalan, Alejandro H; Owen, Gareth I

    2016-09-06

    Tumor angiogenesis is widely recognized as one of the "hallmarks of cancer". Consequently, during the last decades the development and testing of commercial angiogenic inhibitors has been a central focus for both basic and clinical cancer research. While antiangiogenic drugs are now incorporated into standard clinical practice, as with all cancer therapies, tumors can eventually become resistant by employing a variety of strategies to receive nutrients and oxygen in the event of therapeutic assault. Herein, we concentrate and review in detail three of the principal mechanisms of antiangiogenic therapy escape: (1) upregulation of compensatory/alternative pathways for angiogenesis; (2) vasculogenic mimicry; and (3) vessel co-option. We suggest that an understanding of how a cancer cell adapts to antiangiogenic therapy may also parallel the mechanisms employed in the bourgeoning tumor and isolated metastatic cells delivering responsible for residual disease. Finally, we speculate on strategies to adapt antiangiogenic therapy for future clinical uses.

  3. Escape behavior in task situations: task versus social antecedents.

    PubMed

    Taylor, J C; Ekdahl, M M; Romanczyk, R G; Miller, M L

    1994-06-01

    We designed an investigation to differentiate two types of challenging behaviors occurring in teaching situations: those evoked by task stimuli (i.e., task avoidance), and those evoked by social stimuli present in teaching situations (i.e., social avoidance). Four students with developmental disabilities who exhibited challenging behaviors in teaching situations were exposed to social interaction in a play situation and task demands in a teaching situation. Results indicated that the students exhibited two distinct behavior patterns. Two of the students exhibited a behavior pattern consistent with task avoidance and the other two students exhibited a behavior pattern consistent with social avoidance. Implications concerning task versus social avoidance and the need for more fine-grained analyses of the stimuli associated with escape behavior are discussed.

  4. Initiating a watch list for Ebola virus antibody escape mutations.

    PubMed

    Miller, Craig R; Johnson, Erin L; Burke, Aran Z; Martin, Kyle P; Miura, Tanya A; Wichman, Holly A; Brown, Celeste J; Ytreberg, F Marty

    2016-01-01

    The 2014 Ebola virus (EBOV) outbreak in West Africa is the largest in recorded history and resulted in over 11,000 deaths. It is essential that strategies for treatment and containment be developed to avoid future epidemics of this magnitude. With the development of vaccines and antibody-based therapies using the envelope glycoprotein (GP) of the 1976 Mayinga strain, one important strategy is to anticipate how the evolution of EBOV might compromise these efforts. In this study we have initiated a watch list of potential antibody escape mutations of EBOV by modeling interactions between GP and the antibody KZ52. The watch list was generated using molecular modeling to estimate stability changes due to mutation. Every possible mutation of GP was considered and the list was generated from those that are predicted to disrupt GP-KZ52 binding but not to disrupt the ability of GP to fold and to form trimers. The resulting watch list contains 34 mutations (one of which has already been seen in humans) at six sites in the GP2 subunit. Should mutations from the watch list appear and spread during an epidemic, it warrants attention as these mutations may reflect an evolutionary response from the virus that could reduce the effectiveness of interventions such as vaccination. However, this watch list is incomplete and emphasizes the need for more experimental structures of EBOV interacting with antibodies in order to expand the watch list to other epitopes. We hope that this work provokes experimental research on evolutionary escape in both Ebola and other viral pathogens.

  5. Convergent evolution of escape from hepaciviral antagonism in primates.

    PubMed

    Patel, Maulik R; Loo, Yueh-Ming; Horner, Stacy M; Gale, Michael; Malik, Harmit S

    2012-01-01

    The ability to mount an interferon response on sensing viral infection is a critical component of mammalian innate immunity. Several viruses directly antagonize viral sensing pathways to block activation of the host immune response. Here, we show that recurrent viral antagonism has shaped the evolution of the host protein MAVS--a crucial component of the viral-sensing pathway in primates. From sequencing and phylogenetic analyses of MAVS from 21 simian primates, we found that MAVS has evolved under strong positive selection. We focused on how this positive selection has shaped MAVS' susceptibility to Hepatitis C virus (HCV). We functionally tested MAVS proteins from diverse primate species for their ability to resist antagonism by HCV, which uses its protease NS3/4A to cleave human MAVS. We found that MAVS from multiple primates are resistant to inhibition by the HCV protease. This resistance maps to single changes within the protease cleavage site in MAVS, which protect MAVS from getting cleaved by the HCV protease. Remarkably, most of these changes have been independently acquired at a single residue 506 that evolved under positive selection. We show that "escape" mutations lower affinity of the NS3 protease for MAVS and allow it to better restrict HCV replication. We further show that NS3 proteases from all other primate hepaciviruses, including the highly divergent GBV-A and GBV-C viruses, are functionally similar to HCV. We conclude that convergent evolution at residue 506 in multiple primates has resulted in escape from antagonism by hepaciviruses. Our study provides a model whereby insights into the ancient history of viral infections in primates can be gained using extant host and virus genes. Our analyses also provide a means by which primates might clear infections by extant hepaciviruses like HCV.

  6. Initiating a watch list for Ebola virus antibody escape mutations

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Erin L.; Burke, Aran Z.; Martin, Kyle P.; Miura, Tanya A.; Wichman, Holly A.; Brown, Celeste J.

    2016-01-01

    The 2014 Ebola virus (EBOV) outbreak in West Africa is the largest in recorded history and resulted in over 11,000 deaths. It is essential that strategies for treatment and containment be developed to avoid future epidemics of this magnitude. With the development of vaccines and antibody-based therapies using the envelope glycoprotein (GP) of the 1976 Mayinga strain, one important strategy is to anticipate how the evolution of EBOV might compromise these efforts. In this study we have initiated a watch list of potential antibody escape mutations of EBOV by modeling interactions between GP and the antibody KZ52. The watch list was generated using molecular modeling to estimate stability changes due to mutation. Every possible mutation of GP was considered and the list was generated from those that are predicted to disrupt GP-KZ52 binding but not to disrupt the ability of GP to fold and to form trimers. The resulting watch list contains 34 mutations (one of which has already been seen in humans) at six sites in the GP2 subunit. Should mutations from the watch list appear and spread during an epidemic, it warrants attention as these mutations may reflect an evolutionary response from the virus that could reduce the effectiveness of interventions such as vaccination. However, this watch list is incomplete and emphasizes the need for more experimental structures of EBOV interacting with antibodies in order to expand the watch list to other epitopes. We hope that this work provokes experimental research on evolutionary escape in both Ebola and other viral pathogens. PMID:26925318

  7. Phenotypic Mismatches Reveal Escape from Arms-Race Coevolution

    PubMed Central

    Hanifin, Charles T; Brodie, Edmund D; Brodie, Edmund D

    2008-01-01

    Because coevolution takes place across a broad scale of time and space, it is virtually impossible to understand its dynamics and trajectories by studying a single pair of interacting populations at one time. Comparing populations across a range of an interaction, especially for long-lived species, can provide insight into these features of coevolution by sampling across a diverse set of conditions and histories. We used measures of prey traits (tetrodotoxin toxicity in newts) and predator traits (tetrodotoxin resistance of snakes) to assess the degree of phenotypic mismatch across the range of their coevolutionary interaction. Geographic patterns of phenotypic exaggeration were similar in prey and predators, with most phenotypically elevated localities occurring along the central Oregon coast and central California. Contrary to expectations, however, these areas of elevated traits did not coincide with the most intense coevolutionary selection. Measures of functional trait mismatch revealed that over one-third of sampled localities were so mismatched that reciprocal selection could not occur given current trait distributions. Estimates of current locality-specific interaction selection gradients confirmed this interpretation. In every case of mismatch, predators were “ahead” of prey in the arms race; the converse escape of prey was never observed. The emergent pattern suggests a dynamic in which interacting species experience reciprocal selection that drives arms-race escalation of both prey and predator phenotypes at a subset of localities across the interaction. This coadaptation proceeds until the evolution of extreme phenotypes by predators, through genes of large effect, allows snakes to, at least temporarily, escape the arms race. PMID:18336073

  8. Searching for a life history approach to salmon escapement management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knudsen, E.E.; Symmes, E.W.; Margraf, F.J.

    2003-01-01

    A number of Pacific salmon populations have already been lost and many others throughout the range are in various states of decline. Recent research has documented that Pacific salmon carcasses serve as a key delivery vector of marine-derived nutrients into the freshwater portions of their ecosystems. This nutrient supply plays a critical biological feedback role in salmon sustainability by supporting juvenile salmon production. We first demonstrate how nutrient feedback potential to juvenile production may be unaccounted for in spawner-recruit models of populations under long-term exploitation. We then present a heuristic, life history-based, spreadsheet survival model that incorporates salmon carcass-driven nutrient feedback to the freshwater components of the salmon ecosystem. The productivity of a hypothetical coho salmon population was simulated using rates from the literature for survival from spawner to egg, egg to fry, fry to smolt, and smolt to adult. The effects of climate variation and nutrient feedback on survival were incorporated, as were density-dependent effects of the numbers of spawners and fry on freshwater survival of eggs and juveniles. The unexploited equilibrium population was subjected to 100 years of 20, 40, 60, and 80% harvest. Each harvest scenario greater than 20% brought the population to a reduced steady state, regardless of generous compensatory survival at low population sizes. Increasing harvest reduced the positive effects of nutrient contributions to population growth. Salmon researchers should further explore this modeling approach for establishing escapement goals. Given the importance of nutrient feedback, managers should strive for generous escapements that support nutrient rebuilding, as well as egg deposition, to ensure strong future salmon production.

  9. Flare Particle Escape in 3D Solar Eruptive Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antiochos, Spiro K.; Masson, Sophie; DeVore, C. R.

    2015-04-01

    Among the most important, but least understood forms of space weather are the so-called Impulsive Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) events, which can be especially hazardous to deep-space astronauts. These energetic particles are generally believed to be produced by the flare reconnection that is the primary driver of solar eruptive events (SEE). A key point is that in the standard model of SEEs, the particles should remain trapped in the coronal flare loops and in the ejected plasmoid, the CME. However, flare-accelerated particles frequently reach the Earth long before the CME does. In previous 2.5D calculations we showed how the external reconnection that is an essential element of the breakout model for CME initiation could lead to the escape of flare-accelerated particles. The problem, however, is that in 2.5D this reconnection also tends to destroy the plasmoid, which disagrees with the observation that SEP events are often associated with well-defined plasmoids at 1 AU known as “magnetic clouds”. Consequently, we have extended our model to a fully 3D topology that includes a multi-polar coronal field suitable for a breakout SEE near a coronal hole region. We performed high-resolution 3D MHD numerical simulations with the Adaptively Refined MHD Solver (ARMS). Our results demonstrate that the model allows for the effective escape of energetic particles from deep within an ejecting well-defined plasmoid. We show how the complex interactions between the flare and breakout reconnection reproduce all the main observational features of SEEs and SEPs. We discuss the implications of our calculations for the upcoming Solar Orbiter and Solar Probe Plus missions, which will measure SEEs and SEPs near the Sun, thereby, mitigating propagation effects.This research was supported, in part, by the NASA SR&T and TR&T Programs.

  10. An improved version of the consequence analysis model for chemical emergencies, ESCAPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukkonen, J.; Nikmo, J.; Riikonen, K.

    2017-02-01

    We present a refined version of a mathematical model called ESCAPE, "Expert System for Consequence Analysis and Preparing for Emergencies". The model has been designed for evaluating the releases of toxic and flammable gases into the atmosphere, their atmospheric dispersion and the effects on humans and the environment. We describe (i) the mathematical treatments of this model, (ii) a verification and evaluation of the model against selected experimental field data, and (iii) a new operational implementation of the model. The new mathematical treatments include state-of-the-art atmospheric vertical profiles and new submodels for dense gas and passive atmospheric dispersion. The model performance was first successfully verified using the data of the Thorney Island campaign, and then evaluated against the Desert Tortoise campaign. For the latter campaign, the geometric mean bias was 1.72 (this corresponds to an underprediction of approximately 70%) and 0.71 (overprediction of approximately 30%) for the concentration and the plume half-width, respectively. The geometric variance was <1.5 (this corresponds to an agreement that is better than a factor of two). These values can be considered to indicate a good agreement of predictions and data, in comparison to values evaluated for a range of other similar models. The model has also been adapted to be able to automatically use the real time predictions and forecasts of the numerical weather prediction model HIRLAM, "HIgh Resolution Limited Area Model". The operational implementation of the ESCAPE modelling system can be accessed anywhere using internet browsers, on laptop computers, tablets and mobile phones. The predicted results can be post-processed using geographic information systems. The model has already proved to be a useful tool of assessment for the needs of emergency response authorities in contingency planning.

  11. Ejaculation induced changes in escape latency in the hot plate test: pharmacological analysis of anxiolytic versus analgesic effect.

    PubMed

    Saldívar-González, A; Fernández-Guasti, A

    1994-02-28

    The possible changes in nociception at various stages of male sexual behaviour were explored in the hot plate test. Although other authors have reported an antinociceptive effect of mating, we failed to find this effect on the hot plate test after several sexual behaviour events. To further explore the possible antinociceptive action of copulation we administered a suboptimal analgesic dose of morphine (0.3 mg/kg i.p.). No change in nociception were observed in animals treated with a subthreshold dose of morphine and tested in the nociception test after ejaculation were observed. Since previous reports have refered that ejaculation produces hypoalgesia when measured in the hot plate test, we attempted to replicate these findings. We found that one ejaculation produces an increase in the latency to escape in male rats previously habituated to the hot plate test. These results suggest a hypoalgesic effect. However, such changes could also be interpreted as alterations in the animals' emotionality. Thus, a group of habituated animals was tested on the switched off plate. An important increase in the escape latency behaviour after ejaculation was observed, while no differences between control animals, without sexual behaviour display, tested on switched on and switched off plate were observed. The participation of the benzodiazepine and opiod systems in the ejaculation effect on the switched off plate was explored. A similar increase in escape latency to that induced by ejaculation was caused by diazepam (1.0 and 2.0 mg/kg). The increase in escape latency induced by ejaculation was prevented by the benzodiazepine antagonist, flumazenil (20.0 mg/kg).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Pi (Spleen)-deficiency syndrome in tumor microenvironment is the pivotal pathogenesis of colorectal cancer immune escape.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xue-Gang; Lin, Xiao-Chang; Diao, Jian-Xin; Yu, Zhi-Ling; Li, Kun

    2016-10-01

    Cancer immunoediting consists of three sequential phases: elimination, equilibrium, and escape. For colorectal adenoma-carcinoma sequence, the adenoma dysplastic progression may represent an equilibrium phase and the cancer stage as escape phase. Immune system eliminates transformed enterocytes by destroying them at first, sculpts them at the same time and selects the variants subsequently that are no longer recognized and insensitive to immune effectors, and finally induces immunosuppressive state within the tumor microenvironment that facilitates immune escape and tumor outgrowth. Immunosuppression and inflammation are the two crucial features of Pi (Spleen)-deficiency. Classic quotations, immune evidence and clinical observations suggest that Spleen (but not other organs) deficiency is the key pathogenesis of colorectal cancer (CRC) microenvironment. Weakness of old age, immunosuppressive cytokines from chronic inflammation, tumor-derived immunosuppressive factors and surrendered immune cells-regulatory T cells, myeloid-derived suppressor cells and tumor associated macrophages (TAMs) constitutes CRC microenvironment of Pi-deficiency. Furthermore, excess in superficiality, such as phlegm stagnation, blood stasis and toxin accumulation are induced by chronic inflammation on the basis of asthenia in origin, an immunosuppressive state. Great masters of Chinese medicine emphasize that strengthen Pi is the chief therapeutic principle for CRC which receives good therapeutic effects. So, Pi-deficiency based syndrome is the pivotal pathogenesis of tumor microenvironment. The immunosuppressive microenvironment facilitates immune escape which play an important role in the transition from adenoma to adenocarcinoma. There are some signs that strengthen Pi based treatment has potential capacity to ameliorate tumor environment. It might be a novel starting point to explore the mechanism of strengthen Pi based therapy in the prevention and treatment of CRC through regulation of

  13. Hybrid fluid/kinetic modeling of Pluto’s escaping atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erwin, Justin; Tucker, O. J.; Johnson, Robert E.

    2013-09-01

    Predicting the rate of escape and thermal structure of Pluto’s upper atmosphere in preparation for the New Horizons Spacecraft encounter in 2015 is important for planning and interpreting the expected measurements. Having a moderate Jeans parameter Pluto’s atmosphere does not fit the classic definition of Jeans escape for light species escaping from the terrestrial planets, nor does it fit the hydrodynamic outflow from comets and certain exoplanets. It has been proposed for some time that Pluto lies in the region of slow hydrodynamic escape. Using a hybrid fluid/molecular-kinetic model, we previously demonstrated the typical implementation of this model fails to correctly describe the appropriate temperature structure for the upper atmosphere for solar minimum conditions. Here we use a time-dependent solver to allow us to extend those simulations to higher heating rates and we examine fluid models in which Jeans-like escape expressions are used for the upper boundary conditions. We compare these to hybrid simulations of the atmosphere under heating conditions roughly representative of solar minimum and mean conditions as these bracket conditions expected during the New Horizon encounter. Although we find escape rates comparable to those previously estimated by the slow hydrodynamic escape model, and roughly consistent with energy limited escape, our model produces a much more extended atmosphere with higher temperatures roughly consistent with recent observations of CO. Such an extended atmosphere will be affected by Charon and will affect Pluto’s interaction with the solar wind at the New Horizon encounter. For the parameter space covered, we also find an inverse relationship between exobase temperature and altitude and the Jeans escape rate that is consistent with the energy limited escape rate. Since we have previously shown that such models can be scaled, these results have implications for modeling exoplanet atmospheres for which the energy limited

  14. Use of escape and reward in the management of young children during dental treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Allen, K D; Stokes, T F

    1987-01-01

    A reinforced practice procedure was used to facilitate cooperative behavior in five children, aged 3 to 6 years, during dental treatment. In a multiple baseline design across subjects, the children were rewarded with escape, inexpensive stickers, and praise for cooperative behavior in the presence of the sights, sounds, and some sensations of the dental instruments prior to actual dental treatment. Direct observations of disruptive behavior via a 15-s interval recording system indicated baseline levels as high as 90% were reduced to less than 15% by the final treatment visit. In addition, the procedure was effective in reducing overall heart rate and blood pressure reactivity to dental treatment. All children were rated by the involved dental professionals as more cooperative and relaxed following exposure to reinforced practice. PMID:3429360

  15. Escape tectonics and the extrusion of Alaska: Past, present, and future

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Redfield, T.F.; Scholl, D. W.; Fitzgerald, P.G.; Beck, M.E.

    2007-01-01

    The North Pacific Rim is a tectonically active plate boundary zone parts of which may be characterized as a laterally moving orogenic stream. Crustal blocks are transported along large-magnitude strike-slip faults in western Canada and central Alaska toward the Aleutian-Bering Sea subduction zones. Throughout much of the Cenozoic, at and west of its Alaskan nexus, the North Pacific Rim orogenic Stream (NPRS) has undergone tectonic escape. During transport, relatively rigid blocks acquired paleomagnetic rotations and fault-juxtaposed boundaries while flowing differentially through the system, from their original point of accretion and entrainment toward the free face defined by the Aleutian-Bering Sea subduction zones. Built upon classical terrane tectonics, the NPRS model provides a new framework with which to view the mobilistic nature of the western North American plate boundary zone. ?? 2007 The Geological Society of America.

  16. On the Moon-to-Earth Trajectories with Gravitational Escape from the Moon Attraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivashkin, V.

    The Moon-to-Earth trajectories of "detour" type are found and studied in frame of the Moon-Earth-Sun-particle system. These trajectories use a passive flight to the Earth from an initial elliptic selenocentric orbit with a high aposelenium and differ from usual ones of a direct flight to the Earth using an initial hyperbolic selenocentric orbit. A qualitative theoretical analysis of these trajectories is performed. The Earth perturbation increases the selenocentric energy from a negative value first to zero and then to a positive one and therefore leads to a passive escape of the particle motion from the Moon attraction near the translunar libration point L2. This results in the particle flight to a distance of ~1.5 million km from the Earth where the Sun gravitation decreases the particle orbit perigee distance to a small value, that leads to the particle approach the Earth vicinity in ~100 days of the flight. A set of the Moon-to-Earth "detour" trajectories for the flight to the Earth-altitude of ~50 km for the atmospheric reentry is defined by a numerical method. The start from both the low orbit of the Moon satellite and the Moon surface is considered. Characteristics of these trajectories are presented. They are compared with the usual trajectories of the direct flight. The "detour" Moon-to-Earth trajectories with initial elliptic orbit and gravitational escape from the Moon attraction are shown to result in essential economy of energy relative to the usual ones with initial hyperbolic orbit. A more exact control system of navigation and correction is required for the Moon-to-the Earth "detour" flight of spacecraft.

  17. Escape of Pluto's Atmosphere: In Situ Measurements from New Horizons and Remote Observations from Chandra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNutt, R. L., Jr.; Hill, M. E.; Kollmann, P.; Krimigis, S. M.; Brown, L. E.; Kusterer, M. B.; Lisse, C. M.; Mitchell, D. G.; Vandegriff, J. D.; McComas, D. J.; Bagenal, F.; Elliott, H. A.; Ennico Smith, K.; Horanyi, M.; Olkin, C.; Piquette, M. R.; Stern, A.; Strobel, D. F.; Szalay, J.; Valek, P. W.; Weaver, H. A., Jr.; Weidner, S.; Young, L. A.; Zirnstein, E.; Wolk, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    The escape rate of Pluto's atmosphere is of significant scientific interest. It is a Group 1 science goal of the New Horizons mission. In addition, a Group 3 science goal of the mission has been to characterize the energetic particle environment of the Pluto system. The Pluto Energetic Particle Spectrometer Science Investigation (PEPSSI) is a compact, energy by time-of-flight (TOF) instrument developed to address both of these science goals. Pluto is known to have an atmosphere, and current models postulate a majority N2 composition with free escape of up to ~1028 molecules/sec. This is very similar to the physical situation of a variety comets observed in the inner heliosphere. However, the gravitational field of Pluto exerts a significant effect on the escaping neutrals, unlike at a comet. The ionization of neutrals emitted from comets results in heavy ions, which are accelerated by the convective solar-wind electric field. The expected major ionization product near Pluto is singly ionized N2 molecules with pickup energies sufficient to be measured with PEPSSI. In the process of measuring the local energetic particle environment, such measurements will also provide constraints on the local density of Pluto's extended atmosphere, which, along with plasma measurements from the Solar Wind Around Pluto (SWAP) instrument also on New Horizons should allow the inference of the strengh and extent of mass-loading of the solar wind due to Pluto's atmosphere. Pluto's neutral atmosphere also provides a source population for charge exchange of highly ionized, minor ions in the solar wind, such as O, C, and N. This process allows these ions to capture one electron and be left in an excited state. That state, in turn decays with the emission of a low-energy (100 eV to 1 keV) X-ray, which can be detected at Earth. Such observations have been made of comets since the X-ray emission discovery in 1996 and used to infer cometary outgassing rates. Similar observatins have been made

  18. The Effects of Fixed-Time Escape on Inappropriate and Appropriate Classroom Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waller, Rachael D.; Higbee, Thomas S.

    2010-01-01

    Few studies have explored the effects of fixed-time (FT) reinforcement on escape-maintained behavior of students in a classroom setting. We measured the effects of an FT schedule on the disruptive and appropriate academic behaviors of 2 junior high students in a public school setting. Results demonstrated that FT escape from tasks resulted in a…

  19. On the thermal process of atomic hydrogen escape from the earth's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pudovkin, M. I.; Golovchanskaia, I. V.

    1983-10-01

    The authors' approach to the problem of the escape of gases from the planetary gravitational field is close to the consideration by Biutner (1958, 1959) which generalizes results obtained by Jones (1923) for the particular cases of the dense and rarefied atmosphere. The choice of the escape layer, the height distribution of the escape probability as well as escape intensity, have been investigated carefully by Biutner when considering the helium isotope escape from the atmosphere. The objects of the present paper include: (1) to take into account the escape of atomic hydrogen from the bulk atmospheric layer (h approximately 100-1000 km) using present-day data on the composition and temperature distribution in the upper atmosphere (Jacchia, 1977), (2) to find the perturbation of the velocity distribution function in energy space under escape conditions when it is not assumed to be Maxwellian or close to it in the whole dissipation layer and (3) to compare the escape rates obtained under such consideration with the production rates of atomic hydrogen in the atmosphere as well as with local values of the fluxes that are observed. The difference between the results obtained and those of Monte Carlo calculations is attributed to the placing of the lower boundary surface at a lower atmospheric level in the present model.

  20. Effects of Visual Information on Wind-Evoked Escape Behavior of the Cricket, Gryllus bimaculatus.

    PubMed

    Kanou, Masamichi; Matsuyama, Akane; Takuwa, Hiroyuki

    2014-09-01

    We investigated the effects of visual information on wind-evoked escape behavior in the cricket, Gryllus bimaculatus. Most agitated crickets were found to retreat into a shelter made of cardboard installed in the test arena within a short time. As this behavior was thought to be a type of escape, we confirmed how a visual image of a shelter affected wind-evoked escape behavior. Irrespective of the brightness of the visual background (black or white) or the absence or presence of a shelter, escape jumps were oriented almost 180° opposite to the source of the air puff stimulus. Therefore, the direction of wind-evoked escape depends solely depended on the direction of the stimulus air puff. In contrast, the turning direction of the crickets during the escape was affected by the position of the visual image of the shelter. During the wind-evoked escape jump, most crickets turned in the direction in which a shelter was presented. This behavioral nature is presumably necessary for crickets to retreat into a shelter within a short time after their escape jump.

  1. Computer Self-Efficacy, Competitive Anxiety and Flow State: Escaping from Firing Online Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, Jon-Chao; Pei-Yu, Chiu; Shih, Hsiao-Feng; Lin, Pei-Shin; Hong, Jon-Chao

    2012-01-01

    Flow state in game playing affected by computer self-efficacy and game competitive anxiety was studied. In order to examine the effect of those constructs with high competition, this study select "Escaping from firing online game" which require college students to escape from fire and rescue people and eliminate the fire damage along the way of…

  2. 8. VIEW OF ESCAPE TRAINING TANK, LOOKING NORTHEAST FROM 50FOOT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. VIEW OF ESCAPE TRAINING TANK, LOOKING NORTHEAST FROM 50-FOOT PASSAGEWAY, SHOWING PORTION OF SPIRAL STAIR AND REPRESENTATIVE FLOOD LIGHT BLISTER - U.S. Naval Submarine Base, New London Submarine Escape Training Tank, Albacore & Darter Roads, Groton, New London County, CT

  3. Assessment of a New Procedure to Prevent Timeout Escape in Preschoolers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeil, Cheryl Bodiford; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Many agencies provide parent training to groups for whom spanking as a response to timeout escape is not an option. An alternative was developed, the "two-chair hold" technique, which showed some success in decreasing timeout escape and improving overall behavior. Discusses clinical issues regarding use of this technique. (LKS)

  4. Competing Contingencies for Escape Behavior: Effects of Negative Reinforcement Magnitude and Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammond, Jennifer L.

    2009-01-01

    Previous research has shown that problem behavior maintained by social-negative reinforcement can be treated without escape extinction by enhancing the quality of positive reinforcement for an appropriate alternative response such as compliance. By contrast, negative reinforcement (escape) for compliance generally has been ineffective in the…

  5. 78 FR 13811 - Safety Zone; Underwater Escape Event, Seaport, East River, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 Safety Zone; Underwater Escape Event, Seaport, East River, NY AGENCY... escape artist event and associated pyrotechnics display. During the enforcement period, no person...

  6. Anticipating and blocking HIV-1 escape by second generation antiviral shRNAs

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background RNA interference (RNAi) is an evolutionary conserved gene silencing mechanism that mediates the sequence-specific breakdown of target mRNAs. RNAi can be used to inhibit HIV-1 replication by targeting the viral RNA genome. However, the error-prone replication machinery of HIV-1 can generate RNAi-resistant variants with specific mutations in the target sequence. For durable inhibition of HIV-1 replication the emergence of such escape viruses must be controlled. Here we present a strategy that anticipates HIV-1 escape by designing 2nd generation short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) that form a complete match with the viral escape sequences. Results To block the two favorite viral escape routes observed when the HIV-1 integrase gene sequence is targeted, the original shRNA inhibitor was combined with two 2nd generation shRNAs in a single lentiviral expression vector. We demonstrate in long-term viral challenge experiments that the two dominant viral escape routes were effectively blocked. Eventually, virus breakthrough did however occur, but HIV-1 evolution was skewed and forced to use new escape routes. Conclusion These results demonstrate the power of the 2nd generation RNAi concept. Popular viral escape routes are blocked by the 2nd generation RNAi strategy. As a consequence viral evolution was skewed leading to new escape routes. These results are of importance for a deeper understanding of HIV-1 evolution under RNAi pressure. PMID:20529316

  7. 50 CFR Figure 13 to Part 223 - Single Grid Hard TED Escape Opening

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Single Grid Hard TED Escape Opening 13 Figure 13 to Part 223 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND.... 223, Fig. 13 Figure 13 to Part 223—Single Grid Hard TED Escape Opening EC01JY91.060...

  8. Spoon Distance Fading with and without Escape Extinction as Treatment for Food Refusal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivas, Kristi D.; Piazza, Cathleen C.; Patel, Meeta R.; Bachmeyer, Melanie H.

    2010-01-01

    Little is known about the characteristics of meals that serve as motivating operations (MOs) for escape behavior. In the current investigation, we showed that the distance at which a therapist held a spoon from a child's lips served as an MO for escape behavior. Based on these results, we implemented spoon distance fading, compared fading with and…

  9. The Efficacy of Noncontingent Escape for Decreasing Children's Disruptive Behavior during Restorative Dental Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Callaghan, Patrick M.; Allen, Keith D.; Powell, Shawn; Salama, Fouad

    2006-01-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness of a dentist-implemented behavioral intervention in which brief escape from dental treatment was provided on a regular basis, independent of the child's behavior. Within a multiple baseline design across subjects, 5 children, ages 4 to 7 years, were provided with temporary escape from dental treatment on a fixed-time…

  10. Evaluating the potential ecological effects of transgene escape and persistence in constructed plant communities

    EPA Science Inventory

    To date, published studies with herbicide tolerant transgenic crops have failed to demonstrate that transgene escape to wild relatives results in more competitive hybrids. However, it is important to consider transgene escape in the context of the types of traits, which will lik...

  11. Identification of genes escaping X inactivation by allelic expression analysis in a novel hybrid mouse model.

    PubMed

    Berletch, Joel B; Ma, Wenxiu; Yang, Fan; Shendure, Jay; Noble, William S; Disteche, Christine M; Deng, Xinxian

    2015-12-01

    X chromosome inactivation (XCI) is a female-specific mechanism that serves to balance gene dosage between the sexes whereby one X chromosome in females is inactivated during early development. Despite this silencing, a small portion of genes escape inactivation and remain expressed from the inactive X (Xi). Little is known about the distribution of escape from XCI in different tissues in vivo and about the mechanisms that control tissue-specific differences. Using a new binomial model in conjunction with a mouse model with identifiable alleles and skewed X inactivation we are able to survey genes that escape XCI in vivo. We show that escape from X inactivation can be a common feature of some genes, whereas others escape in a tissue specific manner. Furthermore, we characterize the chromatin environment of escape genes and show that expression from the Xi correlates with factors associated with open chromatin and that CTCF co-localizes with escape genes. Here, we provide a detailed description of the experimental design and data analysis pipeline we used to assay allele-specific expression and epigenetic characteristics of genes escaping X inactivation. The data is publicly available through the GEO database under ascension numbers GSM1014171, GSE44255, and GSE59779. Interpretation and discussion of these data are included in a previously published study (Berletch et al., 2015) [1].

  12. Vertical T cell immunodominance and epitope entropy determine HIV-1 escape

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Michael K.P.; Hawkins, Natalie; Ritchie, Adam J.; Ganusov, Vitaly V.; Whale, Victoria; Brackenridge, Simon; Li, Hui; Pavlicek, Jeffrey W.; Cai, Fangping; Rose-Abrahams, Melissa; Treurnicht, Florette; Hraber, Peter; Riou, Catherine; Gray, Clive; Ferrari, Guido; Tanner, Rachel; Ping, Li-Hua; Anderson, Jeffrey A.; Swanstrom, Ronald; B, CHAVI Core; Cohen, Myron; Karim, Salim S. Abdool; Haynes, Barton; Borrow, Persephone; Perelson, Alan S.; Shaw, George M.; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Williamson, Carolyn; Korber, Bette T.; Gao, Feng; Self, Steve; McMichael, Andrew; Goonetilleke, Nilu

    2012-01-01

    HIV-1 accumulates mutations in and around reactive epitopes to escape recognition and killing by CD8+ T cells. Measurements of HIV-1 time to escape should therefore provide information on which parameters are most important for T cell–mediated in vivo control of HIV-1. Primary HIV-1–specific T cell responses were fully mapped in 17 individuals, and the time to virus escape, which ranged from days to years, was measured for each epitope. While higher magnitude of an individual T cell response was associated with more rapid escape, the most significant T cell measure was its relative immunodominance measured in acute infection. This identified subject-level or “vertical” immunodominance as the primary determinant of in vivo CD8+ T cell pressure in HIV-1 infection. Conversely, escape was slowed significantly by lower population variability, or entropy, of the epitope targeted. Immunodominance and epitope entropy combined to explain half of all the variability in time to escape. These data explain how CD8+ T cells can exert significant and sustained HIV-1 pressure even when escape is very slow and that within an individual, the impacts of other T cell factors on HIV-1 escape should be considered in the context of immunodominance. PMID:23221345

  13. Reducing Escape Behavior and Increasing Task Completion with Functional Communication Training, Extinction, and Response Chaining.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lalli, Joseph S.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Functional communication training, extinction, and response chaining decreased escape-maintained aberrant behavior and increased task participation of 3 youth, ages 10 through 15, with moderate mental retardation, 2 of whom also had autism. Task escape was contingent on verbally responding and completing task steps. Behavior chaining also…

  14. The use of an escape contingency and a token economy to increase food acceptance.

    PubMed

    Kahng, SungWoo; Boscoe, James H; Byrne, Shannon

    2003-01-01

    Escape (termination of a meal) and token-based differential reinforcement of alternative behavior were used as reinforcement to increase acceptance of food. Using a changing criterion design, the number of bites accepted and consumed was gradually increased to 15 bites per meal. These data suggest that, in some cases, escape may be a potent reinforcer for food acceptance.

  15. 46 CFR 108.155 - Restrictions on means of escape utilized.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Restrictions on means of escape utilized. 108.155 Section 108.155 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Construction and Arrangement Means of Escape § 108.155 Restrictions...

  16. 46 CFR 108.155 - Restrictions on means of escape utilized.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Restrictions on means of escape utilized. 108.155 Section 108.155 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Construction and Arrangement Means of Escape § 108.155 Restrictions...

  17. Treatment of Escape-Maintained Behavior with Positive Reinforcement: The Role of Reinforcement Contingency and Density

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingvarsson, Einar T.; Hanley, Gregory P.; Welter, Katherine M.

    2009-01-01

    Functional analyses suggested that the disruptive behavior of three preschool children was maintained by escape from demands. While keeping the escape contingency intact, we conducted (a) a density analysis in which the children earned preferred items for task completion according to two schedules that varied in reinforcement density, and (b) a…

  18. Historical analysis of sockeye salmon growth among populations affected by the Exxon Valdez oil spill and large spawning escapements. Exxon Valdez oil spill restoration project 86048-BAA: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggerone, G.T.; Rogers, D.E.

    1998-12-01

    Adult sockeye salmon scales, which provide an index of annual salmon growth in fresh and marine waters during 1965--1997, were measured to examine the effects on growth and adult returns of large spawning escapements influenced by the Exxon Valdez oil spill. Scale growth in freshwater was significantly reduced by the large 1989 spawning escapements in the Kenai River system, Red Lake, and Akalura Lake, but not in Chignik Lake. These data suggest that sockeye growth in freshwater may be less stable following the large escapement. Furthermore, the observations of large escapement adversely affecting growth of adjacent brood years of salmon has important implications for stock-recruitment modeling. In Prince William Sound, Coghill Lake sockeye salmon that migrated through oil-contaminated waters did not exhibit noticeably reduced marine growth, but a model was developed that might explain low adult returns in recent years.

  19. Highlights of the Global HIV-1 CSF Escape Consortium Meeting, 9 June 2016, Bethesda, MD, USA.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Jeymohan; Cinque, Paola; Colosi, Deborah; Dravid, Ameet; Ene, Luminita; Fox, Howard; Gabuzda, Dana; Gisslen, Magnus; Beth Joseph, Sarah; Letendre, Scott; Mukerji, Shibani S; Nath, Avindra; Perez-Valero, Ignacio; Persaud, Deborah; Price, Richard W; Rao, Vasudev R; Sacktor, Ned; Swanstrom, Ronald; Winston, Alan; Wojna, Valerie; Wright, Edwina; Spudich, Serena

    2016-10-05

    CSF HIV escape is a recently recognised phenomenon that suggests that despite suppressive treatment, HIV RNA may be detected in the CNS compartment in some individuals. In rare cases this is associated with clinical neurological disease, while in most cases, neurological consequences are not apparent. Attempts at characterising the biological substrates of CSF escape and further investigating the neurological consequences need to be made to better understand the implications of this condition for the HIV cure agenda as well as for clinical outcomes. The Global CSF HIV-1 Escape Consortium meeting, convened by the US National Institute of Mental Health, was a first step to gather investigators from diverse sites to discuss opportunities for future collaborative work on this emerging issue. To better understand CSF HIV escape and allow cross-site data reconciliation, it will be useful to reach a consensus set of definitions of the distinct forms of CSF escape, without which concerted cross-site efforts are difficult.

  20. Noise induced escape from a nonhyperbolic chaotic attractor of a periodically driven nonlinear oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhen; Li, Yang; Liu, Xianbin

    2016-06-01

    Noise induced escape from the domain of attraction of a nonhyperbolic chaotic attractor in a periodically excited nonlinear oscillator is investigated. The general mechanism of the escape in the weak noise limit is studied in the continuous case, and the fluctuational path is obtained by statistical analysis. Selecting the primary homoclinic tangency as the initial condition, the action plot is presented by parametrizing the set of escape trajectories and the global minimum gives rise to the optimal path. Results of both methods show good agreements. The entire process of escape is discussed in detail step by step using the fluctuational force. A structure of hierarchical heteroclinic crossings of stable and unstable manifolds of saddle cycles is found, and the escape is observed to take place through successive jumps through this deterministic hierarchical structure.

  1. Progesterone After Estradiol Modulates Shuttle-Cage Escape by Facilitating Volition

    PubMed Central

    Mayeaux, Darryl J.; Tandle, Sarah M.; Cilano, Sean M.; Fitzharris, Matthew J.

    2015-01-01

    In animal models of depression, depression is defined as performance on a learning task. That task is typically escaping a mild electric shock in a shuttle cage by moving from one side of the cage to the other. Ovarian hormones influence learning in other kinds of tasks, and these hormones are associated with depressive symptoms in humans. The role of these hormones in shuttle-cage escape learning, however, is less clear. This study manipulated estradiol and progesterone in ovariectomized female rats to examine their performance in shuttle-cage escape learning without intentionally inducing a depressive-like state. Progesterone, not estradiol, within four hours of testing affected latencies to escape. The improvement produced by progesterone was in the decision to act, not in the speed of learning or speed of escaping. This parallels depression in humans in that depressed people are slower in volition, in their decisions to take action. PMID:26823653

  2. Plasma Clouds and Snowplows: Bulk Plasma Escape from Mars Observed by MAVEN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halekas, J. S.; Brain, D. A.; Ruhunusiri, S.; McFadden, J. P.; Mitchell, D. L.; Mazelle, C.; Connerney, J. E. P.; Harada, Y.; Hara, T.; Espley, J. R.; DiBraccio, G. A.; Jakosky, B. M.

    2016-01-01

    We present initial Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) observations and preliminary interpretation of bulk plasma loss from Mars. MAVEN particle and field measurements show that planetary heavy ions derived from the Martian atmosphere can escape in the form of discrete coherent structures or "clouds." The ions in these clouds are unmagnetized or weakly magnetized, have velocities well above the escape speed, and lie directly downstream from magnetic field amplifications, suggesting a "snowplow" effect. This postulated escape process, similar to that successfully used to explain the dynamics of active gas releases in the solar wind and terrestrial magnetosheath, relies on momentum transfer from the shocked solar wind protons to the planetary heavy ions, with the electrons and magnetic field acting as intermediaries. Fluxes of planetary ions on the order of 10(exp 7)/sq cm/s can escape by this process, and if it operates regularly, it could contribute 10-20% of the current ion escape from Mars.

  3. Farming-up coastal fish assemblages through a massive aquaculture escape event.

    PubMed

    Toledo-Guedes, Kilian; Sanchez-Jerez, Pablo; Benjumea, María E; Brito, Alberto

    2014-07-01

    We investigated the changes on the mean trophic level of fish assemblages across different spatiotemporal scales, before and after a massive escape event occurred off La Palma (Canary Islands), which resulted in the release of 1.5 million fish (mostly Dicentrarchus labrax) into the wild. The presence of escaped fish altered significantly the mean trophic level of fish assemblages in shallow coastal waters. This alteration was exacerbated by the massive escape. A nearby marine protected area buffered the changes in mean trophic level but exhibited the same temporal patterns as highly fished areas. Moreover, escaped fish exploited natural resources according to their total length and possibly, time since escapement. New concerns arise as a "farming up" process is detected in shallow coastal fish assemblages where marine aquaculture is established.

  4. The pathogen Candida albicans hijacks pyroptosis for escape from macrophages.

    PubMed

    Uwamahoro, Nathalie; Verma-Gaur, Jiyoti; Shen, Hsin-Hui; Qu, Yue; Lewis, Rowena; Lu, Jingxiong; Bambery, Keith; Masters, Seth L; Vince, James E; Naderer, Thomas; Traven, Ana

    2014-03-25

    The fungal pathogen Candida albicans causes macrophage death and escapes, but the molecular mechanisms remained unknown. Here we used live-cell imaging to monitor the interaction of C. albicans with macrophages and show that C. albicans kills macrophages in two temporally and mechanistically distinct phases. Early upon phagocytosis, C. albicans triggers pyroptosis, a proinflammatory macrophage death. Pyroptosis is controlled by the developmental yeast-to-hypha transition of Candida. When pyroptosis is inactivated, wild-type C. albicans hyphae cause significantly less macrophage killing for up to 8 h postphagocytosis. After the first 8 h, a second macrophage-killing phase is initiated. This second phase depends on robust hyphal formation but is mechanistically distinct from pyroptosis. The transcriptional regulator Mediator is necessary for morphogenesis of C. albicans in macrophages and the establishment of the wild-type surface architecture of hyphae that together mediate activation of macrophage cell death. Our data suggest that the defects of the Mediator mutants in causing macrophage death are caused, at least in part, by reduced activation of pyroptosis. A Mediator mutant that forms hyphae of apparently wild-type morphology but is defective in triggering early macrophage death shows a breakdown of cell surface architecture and reduced exposed 1,3 β-glucan in hyphae. Our report shows how Candida uses host and pathogen pathways for macrophage killing. The current model of mechanical piercing of macrophages by C. albicans hyphae should be revised to include activation of pyroptosis by hyphae as an important mechanism mediating macrophage cell death upon C. albicans infection. IMPORTANCE Upon phagocytosis by macrophages, Candida albicans can transition to the hyphal form, which causes macrophage death and enables fungal escape. The current model is that the highly polarized growth of hyphae results in macrophage piercing. This model is challenged by recent

  5. Upper limits to the fractionation of isotopes due to atmospheric escape: Implications for potential 14N/15N in Pluto's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandt, K.; Mousis, O.

    2014-12-01

    Formation and evolution of the solar system is studied in part using stable isotope ratios that are presumed to be primordial, or representative of conditions in the protosolar Nebula. Comets, meteorites and giant planet atmospheres provide measurements that can reasonably be presumed to represent primordial conditions while the terrestrial planets, Pluto and Saturn's moon Titan have atmospheres that have evolved over the history of the solar system. The stable isotope ratios measured in these atmospheres are, therefore, first a valuable tool for evaluating the history of atmospheric escape and once escape is constrained can provide indications of conditions of formation. D/H ratios in the atmosphere of Venus provide indications of the amount of water lost from Venus over the history of the solar system, while several isotope ratios in the atmosphere of Mars provide evidence for long-term erosion of the atmosphere. We have recently demonstrated that the nitrogen ratios, 14N/15N, in Titan's atmosphere cannot evolve significantly over the history of the solar system and that the primordial ratio for Titan must have been similar to the value recently measured for NH3 in comets. This implies that the building blocks for Titan formed in the protosolar nebula rather than in the warmer subnebula surrounding Saturn at the end of its formation. Our result strongly contrasts with works showing that 14N/15N in the atmosphere of Mars can easily fractionate from the terrestrial value to its current value due to escape processes within the lifetime of the solar system. The difference between how nitrogen fractionates in Mars and Titan's atmospheres presents a puzzle for the fractionation of isotopes in an atmosphere due to atmospheric escape. Here, we present a method aiming at determining an upper limit to the amount of fractionation allowed to occur due to escape, which is a function of the escape flux and the column density of the atmospheric constituent. Through this

  6. DR-induced escape of O and C from early Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jinjin; Tian, Feng; Ni, Yufang; Huang, Xiaomeng

    2017-03-01

    Energetic particles produced in Dissociative recombination (DR) reactions could escape planets with low gravity, such as Mars, if they could overcome collisions with the surrounding background gases. In this work, a 3-D Monte Carlo model is developed to study these photochemical escape processes on early Mars. Although the DR reaction rates of O2+, CO2+, and CO+ increase monotonically with solar soft X-ray and extreme ultraviolet (XUV) flux, the peak of the calculated DR-induced escape rates of O is near 3 × XUV, and the DR-induced escape rates of C increase with XUV until 10 × XUV. The non-monotonic behavior can be explained by the increased column densities of background species in high XUV conditions, which can deflect energetic particles through collisions more efficiently. At 20 × XUV, CO+ DR is the main source of escaping O and C, and the escape of secondary particles could contribute to 30∼40% and 10% of the total escape of O and C respectively. The time-integrated DR-induced escape of O and C is equivalent to 1 m of H2O and 20 mbar of CO2 escaping early Mars since 4.5 billion years ago. The accumulated CO2 loss is much lower than what's needed to explain the carbon isotopic ratios on Mars and much lower than the total CO2 needed to warm up early Mars. If more vigorous escape mechanisms were absent on early Mars, substantial inventories of volatiles have not been detected yet.

  7. Photochemical escape of oxygen from the Martian atmosphere: new insights from MAVEN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lillis, R. J.; Deighan, J.; Bougher, S. W.; Cravens, T.; Fox, J. L.; Lee, Y.; Rahmati, A.; McFadden, J. P.; Benna, M.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Elrod, M. K.; Andersson, L.; Fowler, C. M.; Curry, S.; Gröller, H.; Jakosky, B. M.

    2015-12-01

    One of the primary goals of the MAVEN mission is to characterize rates of atmospheric escape from Mars at the present epoch and relate those escape rates to solar drivers. One of the known escape processes is photochemical escape, where a) an exothermic chemical reaction in the atmosphere results in an upward-traveling neutral particle whose velocity exceeds planetary escape velocity and b) the particle is not prevented from escaping through any subsequent collisions. Because escaping hot atoms are not directly measured, models of production and transport (through the atmosphere) of such atoms must be used to constrain photochemical escape rates. These models require altitude profiles of neutral densities and electron and ion densities and temperatures, as well as compositional information, all of which are measured by MAVEN instruments at the relevant altitudes (150-300 km). For every altitude profile: Profiles of O2+ dissociative recombination (DR) rates will be calculated from electron temperature, electron density and O2+ density. Profiles of energy distributions of hot O atoms will be calculated from profiles of electron and ion temperatures. Profiles of all neutral densities will be input into models of hot O transport in order to calculate photochemical escape fluxes from DR of O2+. We will present photochemical escape fluxes as a function of several factors, in particular solar zenith angle and EUV flux. This, combined with further simulations with progressively higher EUV fluxes, will eventually enable a total integrated loss estimate over the course of Martian history and hence a determination of the impact of this loss process on the evolution of the Martian climate.

  8. Modified Advanced Crew Escape Suit Intravehicular Activity Suit for Extravehicular Activity Mobility Evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Richard D.

    2014-01-01

    The use of an intravehicular activity (IVA) suit for a spacewalk or extravehicular activity (EVA) was evaluated for mobility and usability in the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL) environment at the Sonny Carter Training Facility near NASA Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. The Space Shuttle Advanced Crew Escape Suit was modified to integrate with the Orion spacecraft. The first several missions of the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle will not have mass available to carry an EVA-specific suit; therefore, any EVA required will have to be performed by the Modified Advanced Crew Escape Suit (MACES). Since the MACES was not designed with EVA in mind, it was unknown what mobility the suit would be able to provide for an EVA or whether a person could perform useful tasks for an extended time inside the pressurized suit. The suit was evaluated in multiple NBL runs by a variety of subjects, including crewmembers with significant EVA experience. Various functional mobility tasks performed included: translation, body positioning, tool carrying, body stabilization, equipment handling, and tool usage. Hardware configurations included with and without Thermal Micrometeoroid Garment, suit with IVA gloves and suit with EVA gloves. Most tasks were completed on International Space Station mock-ups with existing EVA tools. Some limited tasks were completed with prototype tools on a simulated rocky surface. Major findings include: demonstrating the ability to weigh-out the suit, understanding the need to have subjects perform multiple runs prior to getting feedback, determining critical sizing factors, and need for adjusting suit work envelope. Early testing demonstrated the feasibility of EVA's limited duration and limited scope. Further testing is required with more flight-like tasking and constraints to validate these early results. If the suit is used for EVA, it will require mission-specific modifications for umbilical management or Primary Life Support System integration

  9. Scorpion Sheds ‘Tail’ to Escape: Consequences and Implications of Autotomy in Scorpions (Buthidae: Ananteris)

    PubMed Central

    Mattoni, Camilo I.; García-Hernández, Solimary; Botero-Trujillo, Ricardo; Ochoa, José A.; Ojanguren-Affilastro, Andrés A.; Pinto-da-Rocha, Ricardo; Prendini, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    Autotomy, the voluntary shedding or detachment of a body part at a determined cleavage plane, is a common anti-predation defense mechanism in several animal taxa, including arthropods. Among arachnids, autotomy has been observed in harvestmen, mites, and spiders, always involving the loss of legs. Autotomy of the opisthosoma (abdomen) was recently reported in a single species of the Neotropical buthid scorpion genus Ananteris Thorell, 1891, but few details were revealed. Based on observations in the field and laboratory, examination of material in museum collections, and scanning electron microscopy, we document autotomy of the metasoma (the hind part of the opisthosoma, or ‘tail’) in fourteen species of Ananteris. Autotomy is more common in males than females, and has not been observed in juveniles. When the scorpion is held by the metasoma, it is voluntarily severed at the joints between metasomal segments I and II, II and III, or III and IV, allowing the scorpion to escape. After detachment, the severed metasoma moves (twitches) automatically, much like the severed tail of a lizard or the severed leg of a spider, and reacts to contact, even attempting to sting. The severed surface heals rapidly, scar tissue forming in five days. The lost metasomal segments and telson cannot be regenerated. Autotomy of the metasoma and telson results in permanent loss of the posterior part of the scorpion’s digestive system (the anus is situated posteriorly on metasomal segment V) and the ability to inject venom by stinging. After autotomy, scorpions do not defecate and can only capture small prey items. However, males can survive and mate successfully for up to eight months in the laboratory. In spite of diminished predation ability after autotomy, survival allows males to reproduce. Autotomy in Ananteris therefore appears to be an effective, adaptive, anti-predation escape mechanism. PMID:25629529

  10. The Influence of Dimensionality on the Rate of Diffusive Escape From an Energy Well.

    PubMed

    Freund, L B

    2012-05-01

    A commonly used idealization when describing separation of a chemical bond between molecules is that of an energy well which prescribes the dependence of energy of interaction between the molecules in terms of a reaction coordinate. The energy difference between the peak to be overcome and the root of the well is the so-called activation energy, and the overall shape of the well dictates the kinetics of separation through a constitutive assumption concerning transport. An assumption tacit in this description is that the state of the bond evolves with only a single degree of freedom-the reaction coordinate-as the system explores its energy environment under random thermal excitation. In this discussion we will consider several bonds described by one and the same energy profile. The cases differ in that the energy profile varies along a line extending from the root of the well in the first case, along any radial line in a plane extending from the root of the well in a second case, and along any radial line in space extending from the root of the well in a third case. To focus the discussion we determine the statistical rate of escape of states from the well in each case, requiring that the profile of the well is the same in all three cases. It is found that the rates of escape each depend exponentially on the depth of the well but that the coefficients of the exponential vary with depth of the well differently in the three cases considered.

  11. Scorpion sheds 'tail' to escape: consequences and implications of autotomy in scorpions (Buthidae: Ananteris).

    PubMed

    Mattoni, Camilo I; García-Hernández, Solimary; Botero-Trujillo, Ricardo; Ochoa, José A; Ojanguren-Affilastro, Andrés A; Pinto-da-Rocha, Ricardo; Prendini, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    Autotomy, the voluntary shedding or detachment of a body part at a determined cleavage plane, is a common anti-predation defense mechanism in several animal taxa, including arthropods. Among arachnids, autotomy has been observed in harvestmen, mites, and spiders, always involving the loss of legs. Autotomy of the opisthosoma (abdomen) was recently reported in a single species of the Neotropical buthid scorpion genus Ananteris Thorell, 1891, but few details were revealed. Based on observations in the field and laboratory, examination of material in museum collections, and scanning electron microscopy, we document autotomy of the metasoma (the hind part of the opisthosoma, or 'tail') in fourteen species of Ananteris. Autotomy is more common in males than females, and has not been observed in juveniles. When the scorpion is held by the metasoma, it is voluntarily severed at the joints between metasomal segments I and II, II and III, or III and IV, allowing the scorpion to escape. After detachment, the severed metasoma moves (twitches) automatically, much like the severed tail of a lizard or the severed leg of a spider, and reacts to contact, even attempting to sting. The severed surface heals rapidly, scar tissue forming in five days. The lost metasomal segments and telson cannot be regenerated. Autotomy of the metasoma and telson results in permanent loss of the posterior part of the scorpion's digestive system (the anus is situated posteriorly on metasomal segment V) and the ability to inject venom by stinging. After autotomy, scorpions do not defecate and can only capture small prey items. However, males can survive and mate successfully for up to eight months in the laboratory. In spite of diminished predation ability after autotomy, survival allows males to reproduce. Autotomy in Ananteris therefore appears to be an effective, adaptive, anti-predation escape mechanism.

  12. Cooling Properties of the Shuttle Advanced Crew Escape Spacesuit: Results of an Environmental Chamber Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Douglas; Gillis, David; Bue, Grant; Son, Chan; Norcross, Jason; Kuznetz, Larry; Chapman, Kirt; Chhipwadia, Ketan; McBride, Tim

    2008-01-01

    The shuttle crew wears the Advanced Crew Escape Spacesuit (ACES) to protect themselves from cabin decompression and to support bail out during landing. ACES is cooled by a liquid-cooled garment (LCG) that interfaces to a heat exchanger that dumps heat into the cabin. The ACES outer layer is made of Gore-Tex(Registered TradeMark), permitting water vapor to escape while containing oxygen. The crew can only lose heat via insensible water losses and the LCG. Under nominal landing operations, the average cabin temperature rarely exceeds 75 F, which is adequate for the ACES to function. Problem A rescue shuttle will need to return 11 crew members if the previous mission suffers a thermal protection system failure, preventing it from returning safely to Earth. Initial analysis revealed that 11 crew members in the shuttle will increase cabin temperature at wheel stop above 80 F, which decreases the ACES ability to keep crew members cool. Air flow in the middeck of the shuttle is inhomogeneous and some ACES may experience much higher temperatures that could cause excessive thermal stress to crew members. Methods A ground study was conducted to measure the cooling efficiency of the ACES at 75 F, 85 F, and 95 F at 50% relative humidity. Test subjects representing 5, 50, and 95 percentile body habitus of the astronaut corps performed hand ergometry keeping their metabolic rate at 400, 600, and 800 BTU/hr for one hour. Core temperature was measured by rectal probe and skin, while inside and outside the suit. Environmental chamber wall and cooling unit inlet and outlet temperatures were measured using high-resolution thermistors ( 0.2 C). Conclusions Under these test conditions, the ACES was able to protect the core temperature of all test subjects, however thermal stress due to high insensible losses and skin temperature and skin heat flow may impact crew performance. Further research should be performed to understand the impact on cognitive performance.

  13. mPGES-1 deletion impairs aldosterone escape and enhances sodium appetite.

    PubMed

    Jia, Zhanjun; Aoyagi, Toshinori; Kohan, Donald E; Yang, Tianxin

    2010-07-01

    Aldosterone (Aldo) is a major sodium-retaining hormone that reduces renal sodium excretion and also stimulates sodium appetite. In the face of excess Aldo, the sodium-retaining action of this steroid is overridden by an adaptive regulatory mechanism, a phenomenon termed Aldo escape. The underlying mechanism of this phenomenon is not well defined but appeared to involve a number of natriuretic factors such prostaglandins (PGs). Here, we investigated the role of microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1 (mPGES-1) in the response to excess Aldo. A 14-day Aldo infusion at 0.35 mg x kg(-1) x day(-1) via an osmotic minipump in conjunction with normal salt intake did not produce obvious disturbances in fluid metabolism in WT mice as suggested by normal sodium and water balance, plasma sodium concentration, hematocrit, and body weight, despite the evidence of a transient sodium accumulation on days 1 or 2. In a sharp contrast, the 14-day Aldo treatment in mPGES-1 knockoute (KO) mice led to increased sodium and water balance, persistent reduction of hematocrit, hypernatremia, and body weight gain, all evidence of fluid retention. The escaped wild-type (WT) mice displayed a remarkable increase in urinary PGE(2) excretion in parallel with coinduction of mPGES-1 in the proximal tubules, accompanied by a remarkable, widespread downregulation of renal sodium and water transporters. The increase in urinary PGE(2) excretion together with the downregulation of renal sodium and water transporters were all significantly blocked in the KO mice. Interestingly, compared with WT controls, the KO mice exhibited consistent increases in sodium and water intake during Aldo infusion. Together, these results suggest an important role of mPGES-1 in antagonizing the sodium-retaining action of Aldo at the levels of both the central nervous system and the kidney.

  14. Nosema Tolerant Honeybees (Apis mellifera) Escape Parasitic Manipulation of Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Kurze, Christoph; Le Conte, Yves; Dussaubat, Claudia; Erler, Silvio; Kryger, Per; Lewkowski, Oleg; Müller, Thomas; Widder, Miriam; Moritz, Robin F A

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis is not only pivotal for development, but also for pathogen defence in multicellular organisms. Although numerous intracellular pathogens are known to interfere with the host's apoptotic machinery to overcome this defence, its importance for host-parasite coevolution has been neglected. We conducted three inoculation experiments to investigate in the apoptotic respond during infection with the intracellular gut pathogen Nosema ceranae, which is considered as potential global threat to the honeybee (Apis mellifera) and other bee pollinators, in sensitive and tolerant honeybees. To explore apoptotic processes in the gut epithelium, we visualised apoptotic cells using TUNEL assays and measured the relative expression levels of subset of candidate genes involved in the apoptotic machinery using qPCR. Our results suggest that N. ceranae reduces apoptosis in sensitive honeybees by enhancing inhibitor of apoptosis protein-(iap)-2 gene transcription. Interestingly, this seems not be the case in Nosema tolerant honeybees. We propose that these tolerant honeybees are able to escape the manipulation of apoptosis by N. ceranae, which may have evolved a mechanism to regulate an anti-apoptotic gene as key adaptation for improved host invasion.

  15. Nosema Tolerant Honeybees (Apis mellifera) Escape Parasitic Manipulation of Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Kurze, Christoph; Le Conte, Yves; Dussaubat, Claudia; Erler, Silvio; Kryger, Per; Lewkowski, Oleg; Müller, Thomas; Widder, Miriam; Moritz, Robin F. A.

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis is not only pivotal for development, but also for pathogen defence in multicellular organisms. Although numerous intracellular pathogens are known to interfere with the host’s apoptotic machinery to overcome this defence, its importance for host-parasite coevolution has been neglected. We conducted three inoculation experiments to investigate in the apoptotic respond during infection with the intracellular gut pathogen Nosema ceranae, which is considered as potential global threat to the honeybee (Apis mellifera) and other bee pollinators, in sensitive and tolerant honeybees. To explore apoptotic processes in the gut epithelium, we visualised apoptotic cells using TUNEL assays and measured the relative expression levels of subset of candidate genes involved in the apoptotic machinery using qPCR. Our results suggest that N. ceranae reduces apoptosis in sensitive honeybees by enhancing inhibitor of apoptosis protein-(iap)-2 gene transcription. Interestingly, this seems not be the case in Nosema tolerant honeybees. We propose that these tolerant honeybees are able to escape the manipulation of apoptosis by N. ceranae, which may have evolved a mechanism to regulate an anti-apoptotic gene as key adaptation for improved host invasion. PMID:26445372

  16. Dynamical correlations in the escape strategy of Influenza A virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taggi, L.; Colaiori, F.; Loreto, V.; Tria, F.

    2013-03-01

    The evolutionary dynamics of human Influenza A virus presents a challenging theoretical problem. An extremely high mutation rate allows the virus to escape, at each epidemic season, the host immune protection elicited by previous infections. At the same time, at each given epidemic season a single quasi-species, that is a set of closely related strains, is observed. A non-trivial relation between the genetic (i.e., at the sequence level) and the antigenic (i.e., related to the host immune response) distances can shed light into this puzzle. In this paper we introduce a model in which, in accordance with experimental observations, a simple interaction rule based on spatial correlations among point mutations dynamically defines an immunity space in the space of sequences. We investigate the static and dynamic structure of this space and we discuss how it affects the dynamics of the virus-host interaction. Interestingly we observe a staggered time structure in the virus evolution as in the real Influenza evolutionary dynamics.

  17. Escape of a knot from a DNA molecule in flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renner, Benjamin; Doyle, Patrick

    2014-03-01

    Macroscale knots are an everyday occurrence when trying to unravel an unorganized flexible string (e.g. an iPhone cord taken out of your pocket). In nature, knots are found in proteins and viral capsid DNA, and the properties imbued by their topologies are thought to have biological significance. Unlike their macroscale counterparts, thermal fluctuations greatly influence the dynamics of polymer knots. Here, we use Brownian Dynamics simulations to study knot diffusion along a linear polymer chain. The model is parameterized to dsDNA, a model polymer used in previous simulation and experimental studies of knot dynamics. We have used this model to study the process of knot escape and transport along a dsDNA strand extended by an elongational flow. For a range of knot topologies and flow strengths, we show scalings that result in collapse of the data onto a master curve. We show a topologically mediated mode of transport coincides with observed differences in rates of knot transport, and we provide a simple mechanistic explanation for its effect. We anticipate these results will build on the growing body of fundamental studies of knotted polymers and inform future experimental study. This work is supported by the Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology (SMART) and National Science Foundation (NSF) grant CBET-0852235.

  18. Cellular Adhesion Promotes Prostate Cancer Cells Escape from Dormancy

    PubMed Central

    Ruppender, Nazanin; Larson, Sandy; Lakely, Bryce; Kollath, Lori; Brown, Lisha; Coleman, Ilsa; Coleman, Roger; Nguyen, Holly; Nelson, Peter S.; Corey, Eva; Snyder, Linda A.; Vessella, Robert L.; Morrissey, Colm; Lam, Hung-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Dissemination of prostate cancer (PCa) cells to the bone marrow is an early event in the disease process. In some patients, disseminated tumor cells (DTC) proliferate to form active metastases after a prolonged period of undetectable disease known as tumor dormancy. Identifying mechanisms of PCa dormancy and reactivation remain a challenge partly due to the lack of in vitro models. Here, we characterized in vitro PCa dormancy-reactivation by inducing cells from three patient-derived xenograft (PDX) lines to proliferate through tumor cell contact with each other and with bone marrow stroma. Proliferating PCa cells demonstrated tumor cell-cell contact and integrin clustering by immunofluorescence. Global gene expression analyses on proliferating cells cultured on bone marrow stroma revealed a downregulation of TGFB2 in all of the three proliferating PCa PDX lines when compared to their non-proliferating counterparts. Furthermore, constitutive activation of myosin light chain kinase (MLCK), a downstream effector of integrin-beta1 and TGF-beta2, in non-proliferating cells promoted cell proliferation. This cell proliferation was associated with an upregulation of CDK6 and a downregulation of E2F4. Taken together, our data provide the first clinically relevant in vitro model to support cellular adhesion and downregulation of TGFB2 as a potential mechanism by which PCa cells may escape from dormancy. Targeting the TGF-beta2-associated mechanism could provide novel opportunities to prevent lethal PCa metastasis. PMID:26090669

  19. Habituation of Backward Escape Swimming in the Marbled Crayfish.

    PubMed

    Kasuya, Azusa; Nagayama, Toshiki

    2016-02-01

    In the present study, we performed behavioral analyses of the habituation of backward escape swimming in the marbled crayfish, Procambarus fallax. Application of rapid mechanical stimulation to the rostrum elicited backward swimming following rapid abdominal flexion of crayfish. Response latency was very short-tens of msec-suggesting that backward swimming is mediated by MG neurons. When stimulation was repeated with 10 sec interstimulus intervals the MG-like tailflip did not occur, as the animals showed habituation. Retention of habituation was rather short, with most animals recovering from habituation within 10 min. Previous experience of habituation was remembered and animals habituated faster during a second series of experiments with similar repetitive stimuli. About half the number of stimulus trials was necessary to habituate in the second test compared to the first test. This promotion of habituation was observed in animals with delay periods of rest within 60 min following the first habituation. After 90 min of rest from the first habitation, animals showed a similar time course for the second habituation. With five stimuli at 15 min interval during 90 min of the rest, trained animals showed rapid habituation, indicating reinforcement of the memory of previous experiments. Crayfish also showed dishabituation when mechanical stimulation was applied to the tail following habituation.

  20. Escape response of the crab Neohelice to computer generated looming and translational visual danger stimuli.

    PubMed

    Scarano, Florencia; Tomsic, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Historically, arthropod behavior has been considered to be a collection of simple, automaton-like routines commanded by domain-specific brain modules working independently. Nowadays, it is evident that the extensive behavioral repertoire of these animals and its flexibility necessarily imply far more complex abilities than originally assumed. For example, even what was thought to be a straightforward behavior of crabs, the escape response to visual danger stimuli, proved to involve a number of sequential stages, each of which implying decisions made on the bases of stimulus and contextual information. Inspired in previous observations on how the stimulus trajectory can affect the escape response of crabs in the field, we investigated the escape response to images of objects approaching directly toward the crab (looming stimuli: LS) or moving parallel to it (translational stimuli: TS) in the laboratory. Computer simulations of moving objects were effective to elicit escapes. LS evoked escapes with higher probability and intensity (speed and distance of escape) than TS, but responses started later. In addition to the escape run, TS also evoked a defensive response of the animal with its claws. Repeated presentations of TS or LS were both capable of inducing habituation. Results are discussed in connection with the possibilities offered by crabs to investigate the neural bases of behaviors occurring in the natural environment.

  1. Failure of rats to escape from a potentially lethal microwave field

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, D.R.; Levinson, D.M.; Justesen, D.R.; Clarke, R.L.

    1980-01-01

    Ocularly pigmented rats, all mature females of the Long-Evans strain, were repeatedly presented an opportunity to escape from an intense 918-MHz field (whole-body dose rate . 60 mW/g) to a field of lower intensity (40, 30, 20, or 2 mW/g) by performing a simple locomotor response. Other rats could escape 800-microamperemeter faradic shock to the feet and tail by performing the same response in the same milieu, a multimode cavity. None of 20 irradiated rats learned to associate entry into a visually well-demarcated area of the cavity with immediate reduction of dose rate, in spite of field-induced elevations of body temperature to levels that exceeded 41 degrees C and would have been lethal but for a limit on durations of irradiation. In contrast, all of ten rats motivated by faradic shock rapidly learned to escape. The failure of escape learning by irradiated animals probably arose from deficiencies of motivation and, especially, sensory feedback. Whole-body hyperthermia induced by a multipath field may lack the painful or directional sensory properties that optimally promote the motive to escape. Moreover, a decline of body temperature after an escape-response-contingent reduction of field strength will be relatively slow because of the large thermal time constants of mammalian tissues. Without timely sensory feedback, which is an essential element of negative reinforcement, stimulus-response associability would be imparied, which could retard or preclude learning of an escape response.

  2. Light Primes the Escape Response of the Calanoid Copepod, Calanus finmarchicus

    PubMed Central

    Fields, David M.; Shema, Steven D.; Browman, Howard I.; Browne, Thomas Q.; Skiftesvik, Anne Berit

    2012-01-01

    The timing and magnitude of an escape reaction is often the determining factor governing a copepod’s success at avoiding predation. Copepods initiate rapid and directed escapes in response to fluid signals created by predators; however little is known about how copepods modulate their behavior in response to additional sensory input. This study investigates the effect of light level on the escape behavior of Calanus finmarchicus. A siphon flow was used to generate a consistent fluid signal and the behavioral threshold and magnitude of the escape response was quantified in the dark and in the light. The results show that C. finmarchicus initiated their escape reaction further from the siphon and traveled with greater speed in the light than in the dark. However, no difference was found in the escape distance. These results suggest that copepods use information derived from multiple sensory inputs to modulate the sensitivity and strength of the escape in response to an increase risk of predation. Population and IBM models that predict optimal vertical distributions of copepods in response to visual predators need to consider changes in the copepod's behavioral thresholds when predicting predation risk within the water column. PMID:22761834

  3. Effects of the crustal magnetic fields on the Martian atmospheric ion escape rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramstad, Robin; Barabash, Stas; Futaana, Yoshifumi; Nilsson, Hans; Holmström, Mats

    2016-10-01

    Eight years (2007-2015) of ion flux measurements from Mars Express are used to statistically investigate the influence of the Martian magnetic crustal fields on the atmospheric ion escape rate. We combine all Analyzer of Space Plasmas and Energetic Atoms/Ion Mass Analyzer (ASPERA-3/IMA) measurements taken during nominal upstream solar wind and solar extreme ultraviolet conditions to compute global average ion distribution functions, individually for the north/south hemispheres and for varying solar zenith angles (SZAs) of the strongest crustal magnetic field. Escape rates are subsequently calculated from each of the average distribution functions. The maximum escape rate (4.2 ± 1.2) × 1024s-1 is found for SZA = 60°-80°, while the minimum escape rate (1.7 ± 0.6) × 1024s-1 is found for SZA = 28°-60°, showing that the dayside orientation of the crustal fields significantly affects the global escape rate (p = 97%). However, averaged over time, independent of SZA, we find no statistically significant difference in the escape rates from the two hemispheres (escape from southern hemisphere 46% ± 18% of global rate).

  4. Reporter assay for endo/lysosomal escape of toxin-based therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Gilabert-Oriol, Roger; Thakur, Mayank; von Mallinckrodt, Benedicta; Bhargava, Cheenu; Wiesner, Burkhard; Eichhorst, Jenny; Melzig, Matthias F; Fuchs, Hendrik; Weng, Alexander

    2014-05-22

    Protein-based therapeutics with cytosolic targets are capable of exhibiting their therapeutic effect once they have escaped from the endosomes or lysosomes. In this study, the reporters-horseradish peroxidase (HRP), Alexa Fluor 488 (Alexa) and ricin A-chain (RTA)-were investigated for their capacity to monitor the endo/lysosomal escape of the ribosome-inactivating protein, saporin. The conjugates-saporin-HRP, (Alexa)saporin and saporin-KQ-RTA-were constructed, and the endo/lysosomal escape of these conjugates alone (lack of endo/lysosomal release) or in combination with certain structurally-specific triterpenoidal saponins (efficient endo/lysosomal escape) was characterized. HRP failed in reporting the endo/lysosomal escape of saporin. Contrastingly, Alexa Fluor 488 successfully allowed the report of the process at a toxin concentration of 1000 nM. In addition, single endo/lysosome analysis facilitated the determination of the amount of (Alexa)saporin released from each vesicle. RTA was also successful in reporting the endo/lysosomal escape of the enzymatically inactive mutant, saporin-KQ, but in this case, the sensitivity of the method reached a toxin concentration of 10 nM. In conclusion, the simultaneous usage of Alexa Fluor 488 and RTA as reporters may provide the possibility of monitoring the endo/lysosomal escape of protein-based therapeutics in the concentration range of 10-1000 nM.

  5. Do malaria parasites manipulate the escape behaviour of their avian hosts? An experimental study.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Longoria, Luz; Møller, Anders P; Balbontín, Javier; de Lope, Florentino; Marzal, Alfonso

    2015-12-01

    Escape behaviour is the behaviour that birds and other animals display when already caught by a predator. An individual exhibiting higher intensity of such anti-predator behaviour could have greater probabilities of escape from predators. Parasites are known to affect different aspects of host behaviour to increase their own fitness. Vector-transmitted parasites such as malaria parasites should gain by manipulating their hosts to enhance the probability of transmission. Several studies have shown that malaria parasites can manipulate their vectors leading to increased transmission success. However, little is known about whether malaria parasites can manipulate escape behaviour of their avian hosts thereby increasing the spread of the parasite. Here we used an experimental approach to explore if Plasmodium relictum can manipulate the escape behaviour of one of its most common avian hosts, the house sparrow Passer domesticus. We experimentally tested whether malaria parasites manipulate the escape behaviour of their avian host. We showed a decrease in the intensity of biting and tonic immobility after removal of infection with anti-malaria medication compared to pre-experimental behaviour. These outcomes suggest that infected sparrows performed more intense escape behaviour, which would increase the likelihood of individuals escaping from predators, but also benefit the parasite by increasing its transmission opportunities.

  6. H Escape Rates Inferred from MAVEN/IUVS Observations of the Mars Hydrogen Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaffin, Michael S.; Chaufray, Jean-Yves; Deighan, Justin; Schneider, Nicholas M.; McClintock, William; Stewart, A. Ian F.; Thiemann, E. M.; Clarke, John T.; Holsclaw, Gregory; Jain, Sonal Kumar; Crismani, Matteo; Stiepen, Arnaud; Montmessin, Franck; Eparvier, Francis; Jakosky, Bruce

    2016-10-01

    H escape oxidizes and dessicates the Mars atmosphere and surface, providing a key control on the present-day chemistry and long-term evolution of the planet. Recently, large variations in the escape rate of H as a function of season have been reported by several studies, making continued observation of the variation a high priority. We present escape rates derived from Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) mission Imaging UltraViolet Spectrograph (IUVS) observations of the extended atmosphere of Mars at H Lyman alpha (121.6 nm), which must be interpreted with a coupled density/radiative transfer model owing to the optically thick nature of the emission and the small fraction of H present in the corona on escaping trajectories. We recover densities, temperatures, and escape rates under the assumption of spherical symmetry for multiple periods across MAVEN's mission so far, beginning in December 2014 (escape rates ~4e8/cm2/s). We describe the observed variation and compare it with previously observed seasonal variation in retrieved H escape rates, providing a necessary input for future photochemical modeling studies and estimates of water loss from Mars over its history.

  7. Manipulation of an Innate Escape Response in Drosophila: Photoexcitation of acj6 Neurons Induces the Escape Response

    PubMed Central

    Manoli, Devanand S.; Zhang, Feng; Deisseroth, Karl; Baker, Bruce S.; Scott, Matthew P.

    2009-01-01

    Background The genetic analysis of behavior in Drosophila melanogaster has linked genes controlling neuronal connectivity and physiology to specific neuronal circuits underlying a variety of innate behaviors. We investigated the circuitry underlying the adult startle response, using photoexcitation of neurons that produce the abnormal chemosensory jump 6 (acj6) transcription factor. This transcription factor has previously been shown to play a role in neuronal pathfinding and neurotransmitter modality, but the role of acj6 neurons in the adult startle response was largely unknown. Principal Findings We show that the activity of these neurons is necessary for a wild-type startle response and that excitation is sufficient to generate a synthetic escape response. Further, we show that this synthetic response is still sensitive to the dose of acj6 suggesting that that acj6 mutation alters neuronal activity as well as connectivity and neurotransmitter production. Results/Significance These results extend the understanding of the role of acj6 and of the adult startle response in general. They also demonstrate the usefulness of activity-dependent characterization of neuronal circuits underlying innate behaviors in Drosophila, and the utility of integrating genetic analysis into modern circuit analysis techniques. PMID:19340304

  8. Isotopic constraints on the source of Pluto's nitrogen and the history of atmospheric escape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandt, Kathleen E.; Mousis, Olivier; Luspay-Kuti, Adrienn

    2016-10-01

    The origin and evolution of nitrogen in solar system bodies is an important question for understanding processes that took place during the formation of the planets and solar system bodies. Pluto has an atmosphere that is 99% molecular nitrogen, but it is unclear if this nitrogen is primordial or derived from ammonia in the protosolar nebula. The nitrogen isotope ratio is an important tracer of the origin of nitrogen on solar system bodies, and can be used at Pluto to determine the origin of its nitrogen. After evaluating the potential impact of escape and photochemistry on Pluto's nitrogen isotope ratio (14N/15N), we find that if Pluto's nitrogen originated as N2 the current ratio in Pluto's atmosphere would be greater than 324 while it would be less than 157 if the source of Pluto's nitrogen were NH3. The New Horizons spacecraft successfully visited the Pluto system in July 2015 providing a potential opportunity to measure 14N/15N in N2.

  9. Escape of H and D from Mars' Atmosphere and the Evolution of its Crustal Water Reservoirs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartle, Richard E.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The evolution of water on Mars involves preferential escape of hydrogen over deuterium, producing its deuterium rich atmosphere with a D/H ratio 5.2 times that of terrestrial water. In the past decade, several estimates have been made of the magnitudes of current and ancient crustal water reservoirs on Mars that freely exchange with its atmosphere. Some of the differences in the magnitudes of the reservoirs are influenced by differences in the following basic parameters: composition of H, D, H2 and HD at the exobase; thermal history of the atmosphere; escape mechanisms; and the D/H ratio of earlier epochs as inferred from meteorites. The dominant escape mechanism used in the estimates is Jeans escape. However, the Jeans escape flux is enhanced considerably when atmospheric winds and rotation are applied at the exobase . This constraint is of particular importance because the enhancement of the D escape flux can be an order of magnitude greater than the enhancement of the H escape flux. This preferential enhancement of the D escape flux over that of H means that a great deal more H must escape (than in the case without winds and rotation) to attain the same D/H ratio in the today's atmosphere. Another new constraint on reservoir magnitudes comes from the recent interpretation of Martian meteorite data, which suggests that the D/H ratio was 2 times that of terrestrial water at the end of the heavy bombardment period (1). These two constraints together lead to larger current and ancient crustal water reservoirs. Applying Rayleigh fractionation, new estimates of the sizes of the water reservoirs are made using the above constraints along with plausible values for hydrogen and deuterium densities, temperatures, wind speeds and rotation rates at the exobase.

  10. The Impact of Escaped Farmed Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar L.) on Catch Statistics in Scotland

    PubMed Central

    Green, Darren M.; Penman, David J.; Migaud, Herve; Bron, James E.; Taggart, John B.; McAndrew, Brendan J.

    2012-01-01

    In Scotland and elsewhere, there are concerns that escaped farmed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) may impact on wild salmon stocks. Potential detrimental effects could arise through disease spread, competition, or inter-breeding. We investigated whether there is evidence of a direct effect of recorded salmon escape events on wild stocks in Scotland using anglers' counts of caught salmon (classified as wild or farmed) and sea trout (Salmo trutta L.). This tests specifically whether documented escape events can be associated with reduced or elevated escapes detected in the catch over a five-year time window, after accounting for overall variation between areas and years. Alternate model frameworks were somewhat inconsistent, however no robust association was found between documented escape events and higher proportion of farm-origin salmon in anglers' catch, nor with overall catch size. A weak positive correlation was found between local escapes and subsequent sea trout catch. This is in the opposite direction to what would be expected if salmon escapes negatively affected wild fish numbers. Our approach specifically investigated documented escape events, contrasting with earlier studies examining potentially wider effects of salmon farming on wild catch size. This approach is more conservative, but alleviates some potential sources of confounding, which are always of concern in observational studies. Successful analysis of anglers' reports of escaped farmed salmon requires high data quality, particularly since reports of farmed salmon are a relatively rare event in the Scottish data. Therefore, as part of our analysis, we reviewed studies of potential sensitivity and specificity of determination of farmed origin. Specificity estimates are generally high in the literature, making an analysis of the form we have performed feasible. PMID:22970132

  11. Escape of the martian protoatmosphere and initial water inventory.

    PubMed

    Erkaev, N V; Lammer, H; Elkins-Tanton, L T; Stökl, A; Odert, P; Marcq, E; Dorfi, E A; Kislyakova, K G; Kulikov, Yu N; Leitzinger, M; Güdel, M

    2014-08-01

    Latest research in planet formation indicates that Mars formed within a few million years (Myr) and remained as a planetary embryo that never grew to a more massive planet. It can also be expected from dynamical models that most of Mars' building blocks consisted of material that formed in orbital locations just beyond the ice line which could have contained [Formula: see text] of H2O. By using these constraints, we estimate the nebula-captured and catastrophically outgassed volatile contents during the solidification of Mars' magma ocean and apply a hydrodynamic upper atmosphere model for the study of the soft X-ray and extreme ultraviolet (XUV) driven thermal escape of the martian protoatmosphere during the early active epoch of the young Sun. The amount of gas that has been captured from the protoplanetary disk into the planetary atmosphere is calculated by solving the hydrostatic structure equations in the protoplanetary nebula. Depending on nebular properties such as the dust grain depletion factor, planetesimal accretion rates and luminosities, hydrogen envelopes with masses [Formula: see text] to [Formula: see text] could have been captured from the nebula around early Mars. Depending on the before mentioned parameters, due to the planets low gravity and a solar XUV flux that was [Formula: see text] times stronger compared to the present value, our results indicate that early Mars would have lost its nebular captured hydrogen envelope after the nebula gas evaporated, during a fast period of [Formula: see text]. After the solidification of early Mars' magma ocean, catastrophically outgassed volatiles with the amount of [Formula: see text] H2O and [Formula: see text] CO2 could have been lost during [Formula: see text], if the impact related energy flux of large planetesimals and small embryos to the planet's surface lasted long enough, that the steam atmosphere could have been prevented from condensing. If this was not the case, then our results suggest that

  12. Escape of the martian protoatmosphere and initial water inventory

    PubMed Central

    Erkaev, N.V.; Lammer, H.; Elkins-Tanton, L.T.; Stökl, A.; Odert, P.; Marcq, E.; Dorfi, E.A.; Kislyakova, K.G.; Kulikov, Yu.N.; Leitzinger, M.; Güdel, M.

    2014-01-01

    Latest research in planet formation indicates that Mars formed within a few million years (Myr) and remained as a planetary embryo that never grew to a more massive planet. It can also be expected from dynamical models that most of Mars' building blocks consisted of material that formed in orbital locations just beyond the ice line which could have contained ~0.1–0.2wt.% of H2O. By using these constraints, we estimate the nebula-captured and catastrophically outgassed volatile contents during the solidification of Mars' magma ocean and apply a hydrodynamic upper atmosphere model for the study of the soft X-ray and extreme ultraviolet (XUV) driven thermal escape of the martian protoatmosphere during the early active epoch of the young Sun. The amount of gas that has been captured from the protoplanetary disk into the planetary atmosphere is calculated by solving the hydrostatic structure equations in the protoplanetary nebula. Depending on nebular properties such as the dust grain depletion factor, planetesimal accretion rates and luminosities, hydrogen envelopes with masses ≥3×1019g to ≤6.5×1022g could have been captured from the nebula around early Mars. Depending on the before mentioned parameters, due to the planets low gravity and a solar XUV flux that was ~100 times stronger compared to the present value, our results indicate that early Mars would have lost its nebular captured hydrogen envelope after the nebula gas evaporated, during a fast period of ~0.1–7.5Myr. After the solidification of early Mars' magma ocean, catastrophically outgassed volatiles with the amount of ~50–250bar H2O and ~10–55bar CO2 could have been lost during ~0.4–12Myr, if the impact related energy flux of large planetesimals and small embryos to the planet's surface lasted long enough, that the steam atmosphere could have been prevented from condensing. If this was not the case, then our results suggest that the timescales for H2O condensation and ocean formation may

  13. Escape of the martian protoatmosphere and initial water inventory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erkaev, N. V.; Lammer, H.; Elkins-Tanton, L. T.; Stökl, A.; Odert, P.; Marcq, E.; Dorfi, E. A.; Kislyakova, K. G.; Kulikov, Yu. N.; Leitzinger, M.; Güdel, M.

    2014-08-01

    Latest research in planet formation indicates that Mars formed within a few million years (Myr) and remained as a planetary embryo that never grew to a more massive planet. It can also be expected from dynamical models that most of Mars' building blocks consisted of material that formed in orbital locations just beyond the ice line which could have contained ~ 0.1 - 0.2 wt . % of H2O. By using these constraints, we estimate the nebula-captured and catastrophically outgassed volatile contents during the solidification of Mars' magma ocean and apply a hydrodynamic upper atmosphere model for the study of the soft X-ray and extreme ultraviolet (XUV) driven thermal escape of the martian protoatmosphere during the early active epoch of the young Sun. The amount of gas that has been captured from the protoplanetary disk into the planetary atmosphere is calculated by solving the hydrostatic structure equations in the protoplanetary nebula. Depending on nebular properties such as the dust grain depletion factor, planetesimal accretion rates and luminosities, hydrogen envelopes with masses ≥ 3 ×1019 g to ≤ 6.5 ×1022 g could have been captured from the nebula around early Mars. Depending on the before mentioned parameters, due to the planets low gravity and a solar XUV flux that was ~ 100 times stronger compared to the present value, our results indicate that early Mars would have lost its nebular captured hydrogen envelope after the nebula gas evaporated, during a fast period of ~ 0.1 - 7.5 Myr. After the solidification of early Mars' magma ocean, catastrophically outgassed volatiles with the amount of ~ 50 - 250 bar H2O and ~ 10 - 55 bar CO2 could have been lost during ~ 0.4 - 12 Myr, if the impact related energy flux of large planetesimals and small embryos to the planet's surface lasted long enough, that the steam atmosphere could have been prevented from condensing. If this was not the case, then our results suggest that the timescales for H2O condensation and

  14. Identification of the Energetic Plume Ion Escape Channel at Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, B. C.; Liemohn, M. W.; Fraenz, M.; Barabash, S.

    2013-12-01

    Mars lacks a global dipole magnetic field. The resulting induced magnetosphere arising from Mars' atmosphere's direct interaction with the solar wind differs significantly from that of Venus. The weak gravitational field of Mars creates scale heights so large that the exosphere extends out beyond the Induced Magnetosphere Boundary (IMB), where newly ionized exospheric oxygen is exposed to high speed shocked solar wind flow and the associated strong convective electric field (E). The weaker Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) at Mars, combined with this strong electric field, should be expected to result in heavy pickup ions with gyroradii much larger than the radius of Mars. Test particle models and hybrid models have predicted that these pickup ions create an energetic plume of escaping planetary ions that may have a flux on the same order of magnitude as the flow of planetary ions down the central tail loss channel. This study presents an analysis of data from the Ion Mass Analyzer aboard European Space Agency's Mars Express (MEX) to identify the presence of this energetic ion plume. We searched through the time period when Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) was operating simultaneously with MEX, and selected hundreds of time intervals when IMF proxies from MGS show the convective electric field to be aligned with the orbit of MEX. We then examined plots of the MEX orbit during these intervals and selected times when MEX was positioned on the +E side of Mars and outside the nominal IMB. Finally, from these intervals we identified the cases in which oxygen ions were detected with energies above 2 keV. The result is a set of several direct measurements of the energetic plume.

  15. Molecular control of transgene escape from genetically modified plants.

    PubMed

    Kuvshinov, V; Koivu, K; Kanerva, A; Pehu, E

    2001-02-05

    Potential risks of gene escape from transgenic crops through pollen and seed dispersal are being actively discussed and have slowed down full utilization of gene technology in crop improvement. To ban the transgene flow, barren zones and 'terminator' technology were developed as GMO risk management technologies in transgenic crops. Unfortunately, the technologies have not protected reliably the transgene migration to wild relatives. The present study offers a novel molecular technique to eliminate gene flow from transgenic plants to wild relatives by recoverable block of function (RBF). The RBF consists of a blocking sequence linked to the gene of interest and a recovering sequence, all in one transformable construct. The blocking sequence blocks a certain molecular or physiological function of the host plant. Action of the blocking sequence leads to the death of the host plant or to an alteration in its phenotype resulting in inability for sexual reproduction in nature. The recovering construct recovers the blocked function of the host plant. The recovering construct is regulated externally by a specific chemical or physical treatment of the plants and does not act under natural conditions. In nature, hybrids of the transgenic plants with its wild relatives carrying the RBF will die or be unable to reproduce because of the blocking construct action. A working model of RBF is described in this report as one example of the RBF concept. This RBF example is based on barnase (the blocking construct) and barstar (the recovering construct) gene expression in tobacco under sulfhydryl endopeptidase (SH-EP) and a heat shock (HS) promoter, respectively.

  16. Mathematical modeling and numerical computation of narrow escape problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheviakov, Alexei F.; Reimer, Ashton S.; Ward, Michael J.

    2012-02-01

    The narrow escape problem refers to the problem of calculating the mean first passage time (MFPT) needed for an average Brownian particle to leave a domain with an insulating boundary containing N small well-separated absorbing windows, or traps. This mean first passage time satisfies the Poisson partial differential equation subject to a mixed Dirichlet-Neumann boundary condition on the domain boundary, with the Dirichlet condition corresponding to absorbing traps. In the limit of small total trap size, a common asymptotic theory is presented to calculate the MFPT in two-dimensional domains and in the unit sphere. The asymptotic MFPT formulas depend on mutual trap locations, allowing for global optimization of trap locations. Although the asymptotic theory for the MFPT was developed in the limit of asymptotically small trap radii, and under the assumption that the traps are well-separated, a comprehensive study involving comparison with full numerical simulations shows that the full numerical and asymptotic results for the MFPT are within 1% accuracy even when total trap size is only moderately small, and for traps that may be rather close together. This close agreement between asymptotic and numerical results at finite, and not necessarily asymptotically small, values of the trap size clearly illustrates one of the key side benefits of a theory based on a systematic asymptotic analysis. In addition, for the unit sphere, numerical results are given for the optimal configuration of a collection of traps on the surface of a sphere that minimizes the average MFPT. The case of N identical traps and a pattern of traps with two different sizes are considered. The effect of trap fragmentation on the average MFPT is also discussed.

  17. The Pathogen Candida albicans Hijacks Pyroptosis for Escape from Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Uwamahoro, Nathalie; Verma-Gaur, Jiyoti; Shen, Hsin-Hui; Qu, Yue; Lewis, Rowena; Lu, Jingxiong; Bambery, Keith; Masters, Seth L.; Vince, James E.; Naderer, Thomas; Traven, Ana

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The fungal pathogen Candida albicans causes macrophage death and escapes, but the molecular mechanisms remained unknown. Here we used live-cell imaging to monitor the interaction of C. albicans with macrophages and show that C. albicans kills macrophages in two temporally and mechanistically distinct phases. Early upon phagocytosis, C. albicans triggers pyroptosis, a proinflammatory macrophage death. Pyroptosis is controlled by the developmental yeast-to-hypha transition of Candida. When pyroptosis is inactivated, wild-type C. albicans hyphae cause significantly less macrophage killing for up to 8 h postphagocytosis. After the first 8 h, a second macrophage-killing phase is initiated. This second phase depends on robust hyphal formation but is mechanistically distinct from pyroptosis. The transcriptional regulator Mediator is necessary for morphogenesis of C. albicans in macrophages and the establishment of the wild-type surface architecture of hyphae that together mediate activation of macrophage cell death. Our data suggest that the defects of the Mediator mutants in causing macrophage death are caused, at least in part, by reduced activation of pyroptosis. A Mediator mutant that forms hyphae of apparently wild-type morphology but is defective in triggering early macrophage death shows a breakdown of cell surface architecture and reduced exposed 1,3 β-glucan in hyphae. Our report shows how Candida uses host and pathogen pathways for macrophage killing. The current model of mechanical piercing of macrophages by C. albicans hyphae should be revised to include activation of pyroptosis by hyphae as an important mechanism mediating macrophage cell death upon C. albicans infection. PMID:24667705

  18. Water Vapor Permeability of the Advanced Crew Escape Suit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bue, Grant; Kuzneth, Larry; Gillis, David; Jones, Jeffery; Daniel, Brian; Gernhardt, Michael; Hamilton, Douglas

    2009-01-01

    Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) crewmembers are expected to return to earth wearing a suit similar to the current Advanced Crew Escape Suit (ACES). To ensure optimum cognitive performance, suited crewmembers must maintain their core body temperature within acceptable limits. There are currently several options for thermal maintenance in the post-landing phase. These include the current baseline, which uses an ammonia boiler, purge flow using oxygen in the suit, accessing sea water for liquid cooling garment (LCG) cooling and/or relying on the evaporative cooling capacity of the suit. These options vary significantly in mass, power, engineering and safety factors, with relying on the evaporative cooling capacity of the suit being the least difficult to implement. Data from previous studies indicates that the evaporative cooling capacity of the ACES was much higher than previously expected, but subsequent tests were performed for longer duration and higher metabolic rates to better define the water vapor permeability of the ACES. In these tests five subjects completed a series of tests performing low to moderate level exercise in order to control for a target metabolic rate while wearing the ACES in an environmentally controlled thermal chamber. Four different metabolic profiles at a constant temperature of 95 F and relative humidity of 50% were evaluated. These tests showed subjects were able to reject about twice as much heat in the permeable ACES as they were in an impermeable suit that had less thermal insulation. All of the heat rejection differential is attributed to the increased evaporation capability through the Gortex bladder of the suit.

  19. The oxygen cost of an escape from an underground coal mine

    SciTech Connect

    Kamon, E.

    1983-07-01

    Six 27 to 63-year-old coal miners performed an 'escape' exercise from an underground mine along a passageway that required walking and running erect or stooped, duckwalking or crawling. The miners travelled at different speeds, for each mode of locomotion. The minute pulmonary ventilation, O/sub 2/ uptake and heart ratio, recorded continuously on magnetic tape, indicated similar average and peak values for all modes of locomotion. Compared to the aerobic capacity obtained during graded treadmill test to exhaustion, the average effort of the 'escape' was performed at 64% and the peak effort at 70% of the miners' aerobic capacity for an 'escape' time of 58 min.

  20. Controlling escape from a potential well by reshaping periodic secondary excitations.

    PubMed

    Chacón, R; Martínez, J A

    2011-01-01

    The role of the wave form of periodic secondary excitations at controlling (suppressing and enhancing) escape from a potential well is investigated. We demonstrate analytically (by Melnikov analysis) and numerically that a judicious choice of the excitation's wave form greatly improves the effectiveness of the escape-controlling excitations while keeping their amplitude and period fixed. These predictions are confirmed by an energy-based analysis that provides the same optimal values of the escape-controlling parameters. The example of a dissipative Helmholtz oscillator is used to illustrate the accuracy of these results.

  1. Rapid Endolysosomal Escape and Controlled Intracellular Trafficking of Cell Surface Mimetic Quantum-Dots-Anchored Peptides and Glycopeptides.

    PubMed

    Tan, Roger S; Naruchi, Kentaro; Amano, Maho; Hinou, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Shin-Ichiro

    2015-09-18

    A novel strategy for the development of a high performance nanoparticules platform was established by means of cell surface mimetic quantum-dots (QDs)-anchored peptides/glycopeptides, which was developed as a model system for nanoparticle-based drug delivery (NDD) vehicles with defined functions helping the specific intracellular trafficking after initial endocytosis. In this paper, we proposed a standardized protocol for the preparation of multifunctional QDs that allows for efficient cellular uptake and rapid escaping from the endolysosomal system and subsequent cytoplasmic molecular delivery to the target cellular compartment. Chemoselective ligation of the ketone-functionalized hexahistidine derivative facilitated both efficient endocytic entry and rapid endolysosomal escape of the aminooxy/phosphorylcholine self-assembled monolayer-coated QDs (AO/PCSAM-QDs) to the cytosol in various cell lines such as human normal and cancer cells, while modifications of these QDs with cell-penetrating arginine-rich peptides showed poor cellular uptake and induced self-aggregation of AO/PCSAM-QDs. Combined use of hexahistidylated AO/PCSAM-QDs with serglycine-like glycopeptides, namely synthetic proteoglycan initiators (PGIs), elicited the entry and controlled intracellular trafficking, Golgi localization, and also excretion of these nanoparticles, which suggested that the present approach would provide an ideal platform for the design of high performance NDD systems.

  2. High-Throughput Analysis of Stimulus-Evoked Behaviors in Drosophila Larva Reveals Multiple Modality-Specific Escape Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Ohyama, Tomoko; Jovanic, Tihana; Denisov, Gennady; Dang, Tam C.; Hoffmann, Dominik; Kerr, Rex A.; Zlatic, Marta

    2013-01-01

    All organisms react to noxious and mechanical stimuli but we still lack a complete understanding of cellular and molecular mechanisms by which somatosensory information is transformed into appropriate motor outputs. The small number of neurons and excellent genetic tools make Drosophila larva an especially tractable model system in which to address this problem. We developed high throughput assays with which we can simultaneously expose more than 1,000 larvae per man-hour to precisely timed noxious heat, vibration, air current, or optogenetic stimuli. Using this hardware in combination with custom software we characterized larval reactions to somatosensory stimuli in far greater detail than possible previously. Each stimulus evoked a distinctive escape strategy that consisted of multiple actions. The escape strategy was context-dependent. Using our system we confirmed that the nociceptive class IV multidendritic neurons were involved in the reactions to noxious heat. Chordotonal (ch) neurons were necessary for normal modulation of head casting, crawling and hunching, in response to mechanical stimuli. Consistent with this we observed increases in calcium transients in response to vibration in ch neurons. Optogenetic activation of ch neurons was sufficient to evoke head casting and crawling. These studies significantly increase our understanding of the functional roles of larval ch neurons. More generally, our system and the detailed description of wild type reactions to somatosensory stimuli provide a basis for systematic identification of neurons and genes underlying these behaviors. PMID:23977118

  3. Escape From Monoclonal Antibody Neutralization Affects Henipavirus Fitness In Vitro and In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Borisevich, Viktoriya; Lee, Benhur; Hickey, Andrew; DeBuysscher, Blair; Broder, Christopher C; Feldmann, Heinz; Rockx, Barry

    2016-02-01

    Henipaviruses are zoonotic viruses that can cause severe and acute respiratory diseases and encephalitis in humans. To date, no vaccine or treatments are approved for human use. The presence of neutralizing antibodies is a strong correlate of protection against lethal disease in animals. However, since RNA viruses are prone to high mutation rates, the possibility that these viruses will escape neutralization remains a potential concern. In the present study, we generated neutralization-escape mutants, using 6 different monoclonal antibodies, and studied the effect of these neutralization-escape mutations on in vitro and in vivo fitness. These data provide a mechanism for overcoming neutralization escape by use of cocktails of cross-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies that recognize residues within the glycoprotein that are important for virus replication and virulence.

  4. Escape From Monoclonal Antibody Neutralization Affects Henipavirus Fitness In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Borisevich, Viktoriya; Lee, Benhur; Hickey, Andrew; DeBuysscher, Blair; Broder, Christopher C.; Feldmann, Heinz; Rockx, Barry

    2016-01-01

    Henipaviruses are zoonotic viruses that can cause severe and acute respiratory diseases and encephalitis in humans. To date, no vaccine or treatments are approved for human use. The presence of neutralizing antibodies is a strong correlate of protection against lethal disease in animals. However, since RNA viruses are prone to high mutation rates, the possibility that these viruses will escape neutralization remains a potential concern. In the present study, we generated neutralization-escape mutants, using 6 different monoclonal antibodies, and studied the effect of these neutralization-escape mutations on in vitro and in vivo fitness. These data provide a mechanism for overcoming neutralization escape by use of cocktails of cross-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies that recognize residues within the glycoprotein that are important for virus replication and virulence. PMID:26357909

  5. Behavioral regulation of gravity - Schedule effects under escape-avoidance procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, F. C.; Lange, K. O.; Belleville, R. E.

    1973-01-01

    Squirrel monkeys were restrained in a centrifuge capsule and trained to escape and avoid increases in artificial gravity. During escape-avoidance, lever responses reduced centrifugally simulated gravity or postponed scheduled increases. The effect of variation in the interval of postponement (equal to the duration of decrease produced by escape responses) was studied under a multiple schedule of four components. Three components were gravity escape-avoidance with postponement times of 20, 40, and 60 sec. The fourth component was extinction. Each component was associated with a different auditory stimulus. Rate of responding decreased with increasing postponement time and higher mean g-levels occurred at shorter intervals of postponement. Effects of the schedule parameter on response rate and mean g-level were similar to effects of the schedule on free-operant avoidance and on titration behavior maintained by shock.

  6. Reducing escape behavior and increasing task completion with functional communication training, extinction, and response chaining.

    PubMed

    Lalli, J S; Casey, S; Kates, K

    1995-01-01

    The effects of functional communication training, extinction, and response chaining on 3 subjects' escape-maintained aberrant behavior were evaluated using a multielement design. Functional communication training consisted of teaching subjects a verbal response that was functionally equivalent to their aberrant behavior. Subjects initially were allowed to escape from a task contingent on the trained verbal response. In subsequent treatment phases, escape was contingent on the trained verbal response plus the completion of the specified number of steps in the task (response chaining). The number of steps was increased until a subject completed the task to obtain a break. Results showed that the treatment reduced rates of aberrant behavior and that the chaining procedure was effective in decreasing the availability of escape.

  7. Spoon distance fading with and without escape extinction as treatment for food refusal.

    PubMed

    Rivas, Kristi D; Piazza, Cathleen C; Patel, Meeta R; Bachmeyer, Melanie H

    2010-01-01

    Little is known about the characteristics of meals that serve as motivating operations (MOs) for escape behavior. In the current investigation, we showed that the distance at which a therapist held a spoon from a child's lips served as an MO for escape behavior. Based on these results, we implemented spoon distance fading, compared fading with and without escape extinction (EE), and compared fading plus EE to EE alone. Initially, inappropriate mealtime behavior decreased during fading, but this effect was not maintained as fading progressed. Inappropriate mealtime behavior was lower initially when we combined fading and EE relative to EE alone, but acceptance increased more rapidly with EE than with fading plus EE. These results suggest that a number of mealtime characteristics might function as MOs for escape behavior and that analyses of MOs may be useful for developing treatments for food refusal.

  8. The effects of fixed-time escape on inappropriate and appropriate classroom behavior.

    PubMed

    Waller, Rachael D; Higbee, Thomas S

    2010-03-01

    Few studies have explored the effects of fixed-time (FT) reinforcement on escape-maintained behavior of students in a classroom setting. We measured the effects of an FT schedule on the disruptive and appropriate academic behaviors of 2 junior high students in a public school setting. Results demonstrated that FT escape from tasks resulted in a substantial decrease in disruptive behavior and an increase in time engaged in tasks for both participants.

  9. Influence of throat configuration and fish density on escapement of channel catfish from hoop nets

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Porath, Mark T.; Pape, Larry D.; Richters, Lindsey K.

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, several state agencies have adopted the use of baited, tandemset hoop nets to assess lentic channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus populations. Some level of escapement from the net is expected because an opening exists in each throat of the net, although factors influencing rates of escapement from hoop nets have not been quantified. We conducted experiments to quantify rates of escapement and to determine the influence of throat configuration and fish density within the net on escapement rates. An initial experiment to determine the rate of escapement from each net compartment utilized individually tagged channel catfish placed within the entrance (between the two throats) and cod (within the second throat) compartments of a single hoop net for overnight sets. From this experiment, the mean rate (±SE) of channel catfish escaping was 4.2% (±1.5) from the cod (cod throat was additionally restricted from the traditionally manufactured product), and 74% (±4.2) from the entrance compartments. In a subsequent experiment, channel catfish were placed only in the cod compartment with different throat configurations (restricted or unrestricted) and at two densities (low [6 fish per net] and high [60 fish per net]) for overnight sets to determine the influence of fish density and throat configuration on escapement rates. Escapement rates between throat configurations were doubled at low fish density (13.3 ± 5.4% restricted versus 26.7 ± 5.6% unrestricted) and tripled at high fish density (14.3 ± 4.9% restricted versus 51.9 ± 5.0% unrestricted). These results suggest that retention efficiency is high from cod compartments with restricted throat entrances. However, managers and researchers need to be aware that modification to the cod throats (restrictions) is needed for hoop nets ordered from manufacturers. Managers need to be consistent in their use and reporting of cod end throat configurations when using this gear.

  10. Inhibition of chaotic escape from a potential well using small parametric modulations

    SciTech Connect

    Chacon, R.; Balibrea, F.; Lopez, M.A.

    1996-11-01

    It is shown theoretically for the first time that, depending on its period, amplitude, and initial phase, a periodic parametric modulation can suppress a chaotic escape from a potential well. The instance of the Helmholtz oscillator is used to demonstrate, by means of Melnikov{close_quote}s method, that parametric modulations of the linear or quadratic potential terms inhibit chaotic escape when certain resonance conditions are met. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  11. Choices between positive and negative reinforcement during treatment for escape-maintained behavior.

    PubMed

    DeLeon, I G; Neidert, P L; Anders, B M; Rodriguez-Catter, V

    2001-01-01

    Positive reinforcement was more effective than negative reinforcement in promoting compliance and reducing escape-maintained problem behavior for a child with autism. Escape extinction was then added while the child was given a choice between positive or negative reinforcement for compliance and the reinforcement schedule was thinned. When the reinforcement requirement reached 10 consecutive tasks, the treatment effects became inconsistent and reinforcer selection shifted from a strong preference for positive reinforcement to an unstable selection pattern.

  12. Competition between positive and negative reinforcement in the treatment of escape behavior.

    PubMed

    Lalli, J S; Vollmer, T R; Progar, P R; Wright, C; Borrero, J; Daniel, D; Barthold, C H; Tocco, K; May, W

    1999-01-01

    We compared the effects of reinforcing compliance with either positive reinforcement (edible items) or negative reinforcement (a break) on 5 participants' escape-maintained problem behavior. Both procedures were assessed with or without extinction. Results showed that compliance was higher and problem behavior was lower for all participants when compliance produced an edible item rather than a break. Treatment gains were achieved without the use of extinction. Results are discussed regarding the use of positive reinforcement to treat escape behavior.

  13. The Role of Ionosphere/Thermosphere Coupling Processes in the Escape of Species from Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, J. L.; Bougher, S. W.

    2004-12-01

    We discuss coupled ionosphere/thermosphere models of Mars and implications for the photochemical escape processes of the atomic species O, C and N. Escape also occurs by ion outflow, and the relative rates of ion loss are determined by ion-neutral chemistry. The escape flux of ions has been computed by a number of investigators, including Ma et al. and S. Brecht, and some measurements are available from the Phobos spacecraft. The relative escape rates of ions depend on the composition of the ionosphere, which is determined by ion-neutral chemistry. Photochemical escape of atoms often occurs by processes that involves ions, such as dissociative recombination of O2+, N2+, CO+, and NO+, which yields fragments of various energies, many of which exceed the escape energy for Mars. Ions other than N2+ are formed mostly or partially by ion-molecule reactions. Except for NO+, the ions may be destroyed by ion-molecule reactions also. The ratio of ion-molecule reactions to dissociative recombination depends on the presence or absence of neutral species with which the ions can react. At high altitudes, the densities of neutral species is smaller than at lower altitudes. Therefore, above the ``exobase", dissociative recombination may be more important. Since many ions react with H2, its density profile is important in determining the photochemical escape of heavy ions. Earlier in the history of Mars, the atmosphere may have been more reducing. A larger abundance of H2 would decrease the densities of O+, N2+, CO+, and CO2+, which react with H2. We model the ionosphere and photochemical escape mechanisms for the higher solar fluxes and more reducing atmosphere of early Mars.

  14. A Quantitative Quasispecies Theory-Based Model of Virus Escape Mutation Under Immune Selection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    A quantitative quasispecies theory-based model of virus escape mutation under immune selection Hyung-June Woo and Jaques Reifman1 Biotechnology High...Viral infections involve a complex interplay of the immune response and escape mutation of the virus quasispecies inside a single host. Although...response. The virus quasispecies dynamics are explicitly repre- sented by mutations in the combined sequence space of a set of epitopes within the viral

  15. Choices between positive and negative reinforcement during treatment for escape-maintained behavior.

    PubMed Central

    DeLeon, I G; Neidert, P L; Anders, B M; Rodriguez-Catter, V

    2001-01-01

    Positive reinforcement was more effective than negative reinforcement in promoting compliance and reducing escape-maintained problem behavior for a child with autism. Escape extinction was then added while the child was given a choice between positive or negative reinforcement for compliance and the reinforcement schedule was thinned. When the reinforcement requirement reached 10 consecutive tasks, the treatment effects became inconsistent and reinforcer selection shifted from a strong preference for positive reinforcement to an unstable selection pattern. PMID:11800194

  16. Competition between positive and negative reinforcement in the treatment of escape behavior.

    PubMed Central

    Lalli, J S; Vollmer, T R; Progar, P R; Wright, C; Borrero, J; Daniel, D; Barthold, C H; Tocco, K; May, W

    1999-01-01

    We compared the effects of reinforcing compliance with either positive reinforcement (edible items) or negative reinforcement (a break) on 5 participants' escape-maintained problem behavior. Both procedures were assessed with or without extinction. Results showed that compliance was higher and problem behavior was lower for all participants when compliance produced an edible item rather than a break. Treatment gains were achieved without the use of extinction. Results are discussed regarding the use of positive reinforcement to treat escape behavior. PMID:10513025

  17. Measurements of the nonthermal helium escape from Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barabash, S.; Kallio, E.; Lundin, R.; Koskinen, H.

    1995-11-01

    The automatic space plasma experiment with a rotating analyzer (ASPERA) onboard the Phobos 2 spacecraft has recently revealed the presence of planetary He+ ions at Mars (Barabash and Norberg, 1994). In the present work the analysis is continued in order to estimate the total outflow of the He+ ions which are swept away by the solar wind. For the Phobos epoch the total He+ outflow rate was found to be (1.2+/-0.6)×1024 ions/s. The escape occurs mainly near the Martian magnetopause. Considering extreme errors in the measurements, the maximum helium outflow could range up to 2.4×1024 s-1. From a scaling of the helium profile suggested by Moroz et al. (1990) to obtain the measured loss rate, one can deduce the helium abundance in the Martian upper atmosphere. It turns out that helium is a dominant gas in the Martian exosphere at altitudes between 500 and 1250 km. However, recently reported observations of the weak EUV emissions (108 photons) from the Martian He I suggest an abundance that is 18.5 times lower (Krasnopolsky et al., 1994). Possible reasons for this disagreement are discussed. The helium production rate near Mars can, in turn, be roughly estimated from the production rate for the Earth by using a scaling argument, since the only source of helium in the atmospheres of the terrestrial planets is radioactive decay of certain isotopes of uranium and thorium. Present estimates suggest a degassing rate of 8×1022 atoms/s only (Krasnopolsky et al., 1993). However, under steady state conditions one would expect the production and loss rates to be equal. The discrepancy leads us to the conclusion that either the helium degassing rate should be corrected (or the amount of uranium is higher on Mars than anticipated) or helium may also be delivered on Mars by other sources, for example, as solar wind α particles. The observed high total outflow of ions which are 4 times heavier than protons may result in an effective mass loading. Thus helium may play an important

  18. The relationship between migration and development in the ESCAP region.

    PubMed

    Skeldon, R

    1991-01-01

    The relationship between migration and development in the ESCAP region including southeast and south Asian countries and the Pacific island of Fiji, Papua New Guinea, Vanuatu, Kiribati, Samoa, and the Solomon Islands is discussed in terms of mobility transition and origin and destination factors. The changing patterns of mobility in Asia are further delineated in the discussion of internal movements and international movement. Emigration in the smaller countries of the Pacific are treated separately. Future predictions are that the Asia Pacific region will experience continued fertility decline and stabilization of low rates over the next 20 years. The declines will result in slow labor force growth, and increased demand for labor in traditional core and neocore countries as defined and presented in table form by Friedman will be heightened. International movements are likely to increase in large urban areas within destination countries. Tokyo and Singapore are the principal cities in Asia. Tokyo by restrictive government policy has limited immigration, but future labor shortages of unskilled labor from southeast Asia and China are expected. Singapore is already dependent on foreign labor by 10%. Current labor shortages have led to the creation of a growth triangle between Singapore, Indonesia, and Malaysia. Other cities expected to emerge as primary cities in international regional complexes with spillover into the hinterlands include the Hong Kong, Guangzhou, and Macau triangle in the Pearl River delta, Taipei and Seoul, and possibly Kuala Lumpur. Internal migration is expected to increase in the capital cities of Bangkok, Manila,j and centers such as Shanghai, Beijing, and other large cities of southeast Asia. These cities will be linked through the flows of skilled international migrants, which began in the 1960s and is expected to become a future major flow. Recreational and resource niches will be left in much of the Pacific, the Himalayan Kingdoms, and

  19. Type 1 Interferons and NK Cells Limit Murine Cytomegalovirus Escape from the Lymph Node Subcapsular Sinus

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, Kimberley; Lawler, Clara; Cardin, Rhonda D.

    2016-01-01

    Cytomegaloviruses (CMVs) establish chronic, systemic infections. Peripheral infection spreads via lymph nodes, which are also a focus of host defence. Thus, this is a point at which systemic infection spread might be restricted. Subcapsular sinus macrophages (SSM) captured murine CMV (MCMV) from the afferent lymph and poorly supported its replication. Blocking the type I interferon (IFN-I) receptor (IFNAR) increased MCMV infection of SSM and of the fibroblastic reticular cells (FRC) lining the subcapsular sinus, and accelerated viral spread to the spleen. Little splenic virus derived from SSM, arguing that they mainly induce an anti-viral state in the otherwise susceptible FRC. NK cells also limited infection, killing infected FRC and causing tissue damage. They acted independently of IFN-I, as IFNAR blockade increased NK cell recruitment, and NK cell depletion increased infection in IFNAR-blocked mice. Thus SSM restricted MCMV infection primarily though IFN-I, with NK cells providing a second line of defence. The capacity of innate immunity to restrict MCMV escape from the subcapsular sinus suggested that enhancing its recruitment might improve infection control. PMID:27926941

  20. Noncontingent escape as treatment for self-injurious behavior maintained by negative reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Vollmer, T R; Marcus, B A; Ringdahl, J E

    1995-01-01

    We extended research on the role of noncontingent positive reinforcement following a functional analysis of attention-maintained self-injurious behavior to self-injury maintained by negative reinforcement in 2 young males with developmental disabilities. During a pretreatment functional analysis, each participant's self-injury was shown to be differentially sensitive to escape from instructional activities as negative reinforcement. During noncontingent escape, escape from learning activities was provided on a fixed-time schedule that was not influenced by the participant's behavior. One participant was also exposed to differential negative reinforcement of other behavior. During this condition, escape from instructional activities was provided contingent on the omission of self-injury for prespecified intervals. Results showed that the provision of escape, even when noncontingent, resulted in significant reductions in self-injury. These results are particularly interesting in light of the experimental history of noncontingent reinforcement as a control rather than as a therapeutic procedure. Noncontingent escape is discussed as a form of extinction that may be less likely than other forms of extinction to produce severe side effects.