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Sample records for escherichia coli chromosome

  1. Dynamic organization of chromosomal DNA in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Niki, H; Yamaichi, Y; Hiraga, S

    2000-01-15

    We have revealed the subcellular localization of different DNA segments that are located at approximately 230-kb intervals on the Escherichia coli chromosome using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). The series of chromosome segments is localized within the cell in the same order as the chromosome map. The large chromosome region including oriC shows similar localization patterns, which we call the Ori domain. In addition, the localization pattern of the large segment including dif is characteristic of the replication terminus region. The segment also shows similar localization patterns, which we call the Ter domain. In newborn cells, Ori and Ter domains of the chromosome are differentially localized near opposite cell poles. Subsequently, in the B period, the Ori domain moves toward mid-cell before the initiation of replication, and the Ter domain tends to relocate at mid-cell. An inversion mutant, in which the Ter domain is located close to oriC, shows abnormal subcellular localization of ori and dif segments, resulting in frequent production of anucleate cells. These studies thus suggest that the E. coli chromosome is organized to form a compacted ring structure with the Ori and Ter domains; these domains participate in the cell cycle-dependent localization of the chromosome.

  2. Escherichia coli Chromosomal Loci Segregate from Midcell with Universal Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Cass, Julie A; Kuwada, Nathan J; Traxler, Beth; Wiggins, Paul A

    2016-06-21

    The structure of the Escherichia coli chromosome is inherently dynamic over the duration of the cell cycle. Genetic loci undergo both stochastic motion around their initial positions and directed motion to opposite poles of the rod-shaped cell during segregation. We developed a quantitative method to characterize cell-cycle dynamics of the E. coli chromosome to probe the chromosomal steady-state mobility and segregation process. By tracking fluorescently labeled chromosomal loci in thousands of cells throughout the entire cell cycle, our method allows for the statistical analysis of locus position and motion, the step-size distribution for movement during segregation, and the locus drift velocity. The robust statistics of our detailed analysis of the wild-type E. coli nucleoid allow us to observe loci moving toward midcell before segregation occurs, consistent with a replication factory model. Then, as segregation initiates, we perform a detailed characterization of the average segregation velocity of loci. Contrary to origin-centric models of segregation, which predict distinct dynamics for oriC-proximal versus oriC-distal loci, we find that the dynamics of loci were universal and independent of genetic position.

  3. Chromosome segregation by the Escherichia coli Min system

    PubMed Central

    Di Ventura, Barbara; Knecht, Benoît; Andreas, Helena; Godinez, William J; Fritsche, Miriam; Rohr, Karl; Nickel, Walter; Heermann, Dieter W; Sourjik, Victor

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying chromosome segregation in prokaryotes remain a subject of debate and no unifying view has yet emerged. Given that the initial disentanglement of duplicated chromosomes could be achieved by purely entropic forces, even the requirement of an active prokaryotic segregation machinery has been questioned. Using computer simulations, we show that entropic forces alone are not sufficient to achieve and maintain full separation of chromosomes. This is, however, possible by assuming repeated binding of chromosomes along a gradient of membrane-associated tethering sites toward the poles. We propose that, in Escherichia coli, such a gradient of membrane tethering sites may be provided by the oscillatory Min system, otherwise known for its role in selecting the cell division site. Consistent with this hypothesis, we demonstrate that MinD binds to DNA and tethers it to the membrane in an ATP-dependent manner. Taken together, our combined theoretical and experimental results suggest the existence of a novel mechanism of chromosome segregation based on the Min system, further highlighting the importance of active segregation of chromosomes in prokaryotic cell biology. PMID:24022004

  4. Nucleotide sequence of an Escherichia coli chromosomal hemolysin.

    PubMed Central

    Felmlee, T; Pellett, S; Welch, R A

    1985-01-01

    We determined the DNA sequence of an 8,211-base-pair region encompassing the chromosomal hemolysin, molecularly cloned from an O4 serotype strain of Escherichia coli. All four hemolysin cistrons (transcriptional order, C, A, B, and D) were encoded on the same DNA strand, and their predicted molecular masses were, respectively, 19.7, 109.8, 79.9, and 54.6 kilodaltons. The identification of pSF4000-encoded polypeptides in E. coli minicells corroborated the assignment of the predicted polypeptides for hlyC, hlyA, and hlyD. However, based on the minicell results, two polypeptides appeared to be encoded on the hlyB region, one similar in size to the predicted molecular mass of 79.9 kilodaltons, and the other a smaller 46-kilodalton polypeptide. The four hemolysin gene displayed similar codon usage, which is atypical for E. coli. This reflects the low guanine-plus-cytosine content (40.2%) of the hemolysin DNA sequence and suggests the non-E. coli origin of the hemolysin determinant. In vitro-derived deletions of the hemolysin recombinant plasmid pSF4000 indicated that a region between 433 and 301 base pairs upstream of the putative start of hlyC is necessary for hemolysin synthesis. Based on the DNA sequence, a stem-loop transcription terminator-like structure (a 16-base-pair stem followed by seven uridylates) in the mRNA was predicted distal to the C-terminal end of hlyA. A model for the general transcriptional organization of the E. coli hemolysin determinant is presented. Images PMID:3891743

  5. Molecular Evolution of the Escherichia Coli Chromosome. IV. Sequence Comparisons

    PubMed Central

    Milkman, R.; Bridges, M. M.

    1993-01-01

    DNA sequences have been compared in a 4,400-bp region for Escherichia coli K12 and 36 ECOR strains. Discontinuities in degree of similarity, previously inferred, are confirmed in detail. Three clonal frames are described on the basis of the present local high-resolution data, as well as previous analyses of restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and of multilocus enzyme electrophoresis (MLEE) covering small regions more widely dispersed on the chromosome. These three approaches show important consistency. The data illustrate the fact that, in the limited context of intraspecific genomic sequence variation, clonality and homology are synonymous. Two estimable quantitative properties are defined: recency of common ancestry (the reciprocal of the log(10) of the number of generations since the most recent common ancestor), and the number of nucleotide pairs over which a given recency of common ancestry applies. In principle, these parameters are measures of the degree and physical extent of homology. The small size of apparent recombinational replacements, together with the observation that they occasionally occur in discontinuous series, raises the question of whether they result from the superimposition of replacements of much larger size (as expected from an elementary interpretation of conjugation and transduction in experimental E. coli systems) or via an alternative mechanism. Length polymorphisms of several sorts are described. PMID:8095913

  6. Synthetic secondary chromosomes in Escherichia coli based on the replication origin of chromosome II in Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Messerschmidt, Sonja J; Kemter, Franziska S; Schindler, Daniel; Waldminghaus, Torsten

    2015-02-01

    Recent developments in DNA-assembly methods make the synthesis of synthetic chromosomes a reachable goal. However, the redesign of primary chromosomes bears high risks and still requires enormous resources. An alternative approach is the addition of synthetic chromosomes to the cell. The natural secondary chromosome of Vibrio cholerae could potentially serve as template for a synthetic secondary chromosome in Escherichia coli. To test this assumption we constructed a replicon named synVicII based on the replication module of V. cholerae chromosome II (oriII). A new assay for the assessment of replicon stability was developed based on flow-cytometric analysis of unstable GFP variants. Application of this assay to cells carrying synVicII revealed an improved stability compared to a secondary replicon based on E. coli oriC. Cell cycle analysis and determination of cellular copy numbers of synVicII indicate that replication timing of the synthetic replicon in E. coli is comparable to the natural chromosome II (ChrII) in V. cholerae. The presented synthetic biology work provides the basis to use secondary chromosomes in E. coli to answer basic research questions as well as for several biotechnological applications.

  7. Optimization and Characterization of the Synthetic Secondary Chromosome synVicII in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Messerschmidt, Sonja J.; Schindler, Daniel; Zumkeller, Celine M.; Kemter, Franziska S.; Schallopp, Nadine; Waldminghaus, Torsten

    2016-01-01

    Learning by building is one of the core ideas of synthetic biology research. Consequently, building synthetic chromosomes is the way to fully understand chromosome characteristics. The last years have seen exciting synthetic chromosome studies. We had previously introduced the synthetic secondary chromosome synVicII in Escherichia coli. It is based on the replication mechanism of the secondary chromosome in Vibrio cholerae. Here, we present a detailed analysis of its genetic characteristics and a selection approach to optimize replicon stability. We probe the origin diversity of secondary chromosomes from Vibrionaceae by construction of several new respective replicons. Finally, we present a synVicII version 2.0 with several innovations including its full compatibility with the popular modular cloning (MoClo) assembly system. PMID:28066763

  8. Identification and Validation of Novel Chromosomal Integration and Expression Loci in Escherichia coli Flagellar Region 1

    PubMed Central

    Juhas, Mario; Ajioka, James W.

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli is used as a chassis for a number of Synthetic Biology applications. The lack of suitable chromosomal integration and expression loci is among the main hurdles of the E. coli engineering efforts. We identified and validated chromosomal integration and expression target sites within E. coli K12 MG1655 flagellar region 1. We analyzed five open reading frames of the flagellar region 1, flgA, flgF, flgG, flgI, and flgJ, that are well-conserved among commonly-used E. coli strains, such as MG1655, W3110, DH10B and BL21-DE3. The efficiency of the integration into the E. coli chromosome and the expression of the introduced genetic circuit at the investigated loci varied significantly. The integrations did not have a negative impact on growth; however, they completely abolished motility. From the investigated E. coli K12 MG1655 flagellar region 1, flgA and flgG are the most suitable chromosomal integration and expression loci. PMID:25816013

  9. The TGV transgenic vectors for single-copy gene expression from the Escherichia coli chromosome.

    PubMed

    Gumbiner-Russo, L M; Lombardo, M J; Ponder, R G; Rosenberg, S M

    2001-07-25

    Plasmid-based cloning and expression of genes in Escherichia coli can have several problems: plasmid destabilization; toxicity of gene products; inability to achieve complete repression of gene expression; non-physiological overexpression of the cloned gene; titration of regulatory proteins; and the requirement for antibiotic selection. We describe a simple system for cloning and expression of genes in single copy in the E. coli chromosome, using a non-antibiotic selection for transgene insertion. The transgene is inserted into a vector containing homology to the chromosomal region flanking the attachment site for phage lambda. This vector is then linearized and introduced into a recombination-proficient E. coli strain carrying a temperature-sensitive lambda prophage. Selection for replacement of the prophage with the transgene is performed at high temperature. Once in the chromosome, transgenes can be moved into other lysogenic E. coli strains using standard phage-mediated transduction techniques, selecting against a resident prophage. Additional vector constructs provide an arabinose-inducible promoter (P(BAD)), P(BAD) plus a translation-initiation sequence, and optional chloramphenicol-, tetracycline-, or kanamycin-resistance cassettes. These Transgenic E. coli Vectors (TGV) allow drug-free, single-copy expression of genes from the E. coli chromosome, and are useful for genetic studies of gene function.

  10. Persistent super-diffusive motion of Escherichia coli chromosomal loci.

    PubMed

    Javer, Avelino; Kuwada, Nathan J; Long, Zhicheng; Benza, Vincenzo G; Dorfman, Kevin D; Wiggins, Paul A; Cicuta, Pietro; Lagomarsino, Marco Cosentino

    2014-05-30

    The physical nature of the bacterial chromosome has important implications for its function. Using high-resolution dynamic tracking, we observe the existence of rare but ubiquitous 'rapid movements' of chromosomal loci exhibiting near-ballistic dynamics. This suggests that these movements are either driven by an active machinery or part of stress-relaxation mechanisms. Comparison with a null physical model for subdiffusive chromosomal dynamics shows that rapid movements are excursions from a basal subdiffusive dynamics, likely due to driven and/or stress-relaxation motion. Additionally, rapid movements are in some cases coupled with known transitions of chromosomal segregation. They do not co-occur strictly with replication, their frequency varies with growth condition and chromosomal coordinate, and they show a preference for longitudinal motion. These findings support an emerging picture of the bacterial chromosome as off-equilibrium active matter and help developing a correct physical model of its in vivo dynamic structure.

  11. FtsK actively segregates sister chromosomes in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Stouf, Mathieu; Meile, Jean-Christophe; Cornet, François

    2013-07-02

    Bacteria use the replication origin-to-terminus polarity of their circular chromosomes to control DNA transactions during the cell cycle. Segregation starts by active migration of the region of origin followed by progressive movement of the rest of the chromosomes. The last steps of segregation have been studied extensively in the case of dimeric sister chromosomes and when chromosome organization is impaired by mutations. In these special cases, the divisome-associated DNA translocase FtsK is required. FtsK pumps chromosomes toward the dif chromosome dimer resolution site using polarity of the FtsK-orienting polar sequence (KOPS) DNA motifs. Assays based on monitoring dif recombination have suggested that FtsK acts only in these special cases and does not act on monomeric chromosomes. Using a two-color system to visualize pairs of chromosome loci in living cells, we show that the spatial resolution of sister loci is accurately ordered from the point of origin to the dif site. Furthermore, ordered segregation in a region ∼200 kb long surrounding dif depended on the oriented translocation activity of FtsK but not on the formation of dimers or their resolution. FtsK-mediated segregation required the MatP protein, which delays segregation of the dif-surrounding region until cell division. We conclude that FtsK segregates the terminus region of sister chromosomes whether they are monomeric or dimeric and does so in an accurate and ordered manner. Our data are consistent with a model in which FtsK acts to release the MatP-mediated cohesion and/or interaction with the division apparatus of the terminus region in a KOPS-oriented manner.

  12. Static and Dynamic Factors Limit Chromosomal Replication Complexity in Escherichia coli, Avoiding Dangers of Runaway Overreplication

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Sharik R.; Mahaseth, Tulip; Kouzminova, Elena A.; Cronan, Glen E.; Kuzminov, Andrei

    2016-01-01

    We define chromosomal replication complexity (CRC) as the ratio of the copy number of the most replicated regions to that of unreplicated regions on the same chromosome. Although a typical CRC of eukaryotic or bacterial chromosomes is 2, rapidly growing Escherichia coli cells induce an extra round of replication in their chromosomes (CRC = 4). There are also E. coli mutants with stable CRC∼6. We have investigated the limits and consequences of elevated CRC in E. coli and found three limits: the “natural” CRC limit of ∼8 (cells divide more slowly); the “functional” CRC limit of ∼22 (cells divide extremely slowly); and the “tolerance” CRC limit of ∼64 (cells stop dividing). While the natural limit is likely maintained by the eclipse system spacing replication initiations, the functional limit might reflect the capacity of the chromosome segregation system, rather than dedicated mechanisms, and the tolerance limit may result from titration of limiting replication factors. Whereas recombinational repair is beneficial for cells at the natural and functional CRC limits, we show that it becomes detrimental at the tolerance CRC limit, suggesting recombinational misrepair during the runaway overreplication and giving a rationale for avoidance of the latter. PMID:26801182

  13. Conservation of Salmonella typhimurium deoxyribonucleic acid by chromosomal insertion in a partially diploid Escherichia coli hybrid.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, E M; Placek, B P; Snellings, N J; Baron, L S

    1975-01-01

    A partially diploid Escherichia coli hybrid recovered from mating with a Salmonella typhimurium donor was converted to an Hfr strain, designated WR2080, as a means to examine the manner in which the added Salmonella genetic material was conserved in it. The Salmonella argH-+, metB-+, and RHA-+ alleles contained as supernumerary genes in WR2080 were transferred together to E. coli recipients in interrupted mating experiments approximately 25 min after initial parental contact; transfer of the allelic E. coli genes by a haploid Hfr of the same transfer orientation occurred between 23.5 min (argH-+) and 25 min (rha-+) after initial contact. Entry of the E. coli ilv-+ marker of WR2080 in these experiments occurred at 29.5 min, 1.5 min later than the entry time of this marker from the haploid E. coli Hfr. When unselected inheritance of the recessive E. coli argH-minus and rha-minus alleles of WR2080 was examined among ilv-+ selected E. coli recipients in which unselected inheritance of the Salmonella donor genes was shown to be low (8%), inheritance of argH-minus was only 7%, whereas 51% inherited the neighboring rha-minus gene. In a comparative cross employing a haploid E. coli Hfr, in which rha inheritance was similar at 56%, argH inheritance was 41%. It was concluded that the Salmonella genes contained in WR2080 were conserved on a genetic segment about 1.5 min in length chromosomally inserted near the allelic E. coli genes, thus creating a duplication on that region within the hybrid chromosome. PMID:1095545

  14. Replication of Vibrio cholerae chromosome I in Escherichia coli: dependence on dam methylation.

    PubMed

    Koch, Birgit; Ma, Xiaofang; Løbner-Olesen, Anders

    2010-08-01

    We successfully substituted Escherichia coli's origin of replication oriC with the origin region of Vibrio cholerae chromosome I (oriCI(Vc)). Replication from oriCI(Vc) initiated at a similar or slightly reduced cell mass compared to that of normal E. coli oriC. With respect to sequestration-dependent synchrony of initiation and stimulation of initiation by the loss of Hda activity, replication initiation from oriC and oriCI(Vc) were similar. Since Hda is involved in the conversion of DnaA(ATP) (DnaA bound to ATP) to DnaA(ADP) (DnaA bound to ADP), this indicates that DnaA associated with ATP is limiting for V. cholerae chromosome I replication, which similar to what is observed for E. coli. No hda homologue has been identified in V. cholerae yet. In V. cholerae, dam is essential for viability, whereas in E. coli, dam mutants are viable. Replacement of E. coli oriC with oriCI(Vc) allowed us to specifically address the role of the Dam methyltransferase and SeqA in replication initiation from oriCI(Vc). We show that when E. coli's origin of replication is substituted by oriCI(Vc), dam, but not seqA, becomes important for growth, arguing that Dam methylation exerts a critical function at the origin of replication itself. We propose that Dam methylation promotes DnaA-assisted successful duplex opening and replisome assembly at oriCI(Vc) in E. coli. In this model, methylation at oriCI(Vc) would ease DNA melting. This is supported by the fact that the requirement for dam can be alleviated by increasing negative supercoiling of the chromosome through oversupply of the DNA gyrase or loss of SeqA activity.

  15. Production of shikimic acid from Escherichia coli through chemically inducible chromosomal evolution and cofactor metabolic engineering

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Shikimic acid (SA) produced from the seeds of Chinese star anise (Illicium verum) is a key intermediate for the synthesis of neuraminidase inhibitors such as oseltamivir (Tamiflu®), an anti-influenza drug. However, plants cannot deliver a stable supply of SA. To avoid the resulting shortages and price fluctuations, a stable source of affordable SA is required. Although recent achievements in metabolic engineering of Escherichia coli strains have significantly increased SA productivity, commonly-used plasmid-based expression systems are prone to genetic instability and require constant selective pressure to ensure plasmid maintenance. Cofactors also play an important role in the biosynthesis of different fermentation products. In this study, we first constructed an E. coli SA production strain that carries no plasmid or antibiotic marker. We then investigated the effect of endogenous NADPH availability on SA production. Results The pps and csrB genes were first overexpressed by replacing their native promoter and integrating an additional copy of the genes in a double gene knockout (aroK and aroL) of E. coli. The aroG fbr , aroB, aroE and tktA gene cluster was integrated into the above E. coli chromosome by direct transformation. The gene copy number was then evolved to the desired value by triclosan induction. The resulting strain, E. coli SA110, produced 8.9-fold more SA than did the parental strain E. coli (ΔaroKΔaroL). Following qRT-PCR analysis, another copy of the tktA gene under the control of the 5Ptac promoter was inserted into the chromosome of E. coli SA110 to obtain the more productive strain E. coli SA110. Next, the NADPH availability was increased by overexpressing the pntAB or nadK genes, which further enhanced SA production. The final strain, E. coli SA116, produced 3.12 g/L of SA with a yield on glucose substrate of 0.33 mol/mol. Conclusion An SA-producing E. coli strain that carries neither a plasmid nor an antibiotic marker was

  16. Horizontal gene transfer of chromosomal Type II toxin-antitoxin systems of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ramisetty, Bhaskar Chandra Mohan; Santhosh, Ramachandran Sarojini

    2016-02-01

    Type II toxin-antitoxin systems (TAs) are small autoregulated bicistronic operons that encode a toxin protein with the potential to inhibit metabolic processes and an antitoxin protein to neutralize the toxin. Most of the bacterial genomes encode multiple TAs. However, the diversity and accumulation of TAs on bacterial genomes and its physiological implications are highly debated. Here we provide evidence that Escherichia coli chromosomal TAs (encoding RNase toxins) are 'acquired' DNA likely originated from heterologous DNA and are the smallest known autoregulated operons with the potential for horizontal propagation. Sequence analyses revealed that integration of TAs into the bacterial genome is unique and contributes to variations in the coding and/or regulatory regions of flanking host genome sequences. Plasmids and genomes encoding identical TAs of natural isolates are mutually exclusive. Chromosomal TAs might play significant roles in the evolution and ecology of bacteria by contributing to host genome variation and by moderation of plasmid maintenance.

  17. Detection and possible role of two large nondivisible zones on the Escherichia coli chromosome.

    PubMed Central

    Rebollo, J E; François, V; Louarn, J M

    1988-01-01

    Inversion of many predetermined segments of the Escherichia coli chromosome was attempted by using a system for in vivo selection of genomic rearrangements. Two types of constraints on these inversions were observed: (i) a sensitivity to rich medium when the distance between oriC and the 86- to 91-min region (which carries loci essential for transcription and translation) is increased; (ii) a poor viability or inviability of inversions having at least one endpoint in the one-third of the chromosome around replication terminators (with an exception for some inversions ending between these terminators). Although the first constraint is simply explained by a decreased dosage of the region involved, the second one may result from disruption of two long-range chromosomal organizations. The nondivisible zones thus disclosed coincide remarkably well with the two zones that we have previously described, which are polarized with respect to their replication. It is proposed that the two phenomena result from a sequence-dependent and polarized organization of the terminal region of the chromosome, which defines chromosome replication arms and may participate in nucleoid organization. Images PMID:3059345

  18. Escherichia Coli

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodsell, David S.

    2009-01-01

    Diverse biological data may be used to create illustrations of molecules in their cellular context. I describe the scientific results that support a recent textbook illustration of an "Escherichia coli cell". The image magnifies a portion of the bacterium at one million times, showing the location and form of individual macromolecules. Results…

  19. Kinetics of large-scale chromosomal movement during asymmetric cell division in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Männik, Jaana; O’Neill, Jordan C.

    2017-01-01

    Coordination between cell division and chromosome replication is essential for a cell to produce viable progeny. In the commonly accepted view, Escherichia coli realize this coordination via the accurate positioning of its cell division apparatus relative to the nucleoids. However, E. coli lacking proper positioning of its cell division planes can still successfully propagate. Here, we characterize how these cells partition their chromosomes into daughters during such asymmetric divisions. Using quantitative time-lapse imaging, we show that DNA translocase, FtsK, can pump as much as 80% (3.7 Mb) of the chromosome between daughters at an average rate of 1700±800 bp/s. Pauses in DNA translocation are rare, and in no occasions did we observe reversals at experimental time scales of a few minutes. The majority of DNA movement occurs at the latest stages of cell division when the cell division protein ZipA has already dissociated from the septum, and the septum has closed to a narrow channel with a diameter much smaller than the resolution limit of the microscope (~250 nm). Our data suggest that the narrow constriction is necessary for effective translocation of DNA by FtsK. PMID:28234902

  20. Speculations on the initiation of chromosome replication in Escherichia coli: the dualism hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Norris, Vic

    2011-05-01

    The exact nature of the mechanism that triggers initiation of chromosome replication in the best understood of all organisms, Escherichia coli, remains mysterious. Here, I suggest that this mechanism evolved in response to the problems that arise if chromosome replication does not occur. E. coli is now known to be highly structured. This leads me to propose a mechanism for initiation of replication based on the dynamics of large assemblies of molecules and macromolecules termed hyperstructures. In this proposal, hyperstructures and their constituents are put into two classes, non-equilibrium and equilibrium, that spontaneously separate and that are appropriate for life in either good or bad conditions. Maintaining the right ratio(s) of non-equilibrium to equilibrium hyperstructures is therefore a major challenge for cells. I propose that this maintenance entails a major transfer of material from equilibrium to non-equilibrium hyperstructures once per cell and I further propose that this transfer times the cell cycle. More specifically, I speculate that the dialogue between hyperstructures involves the structuring of water and the condensation of cations and that one of the outcomes of ion condensation on ribosomal hyperstructures and decondensation from the origin hyperstructure is the separation of strands at oriC responsible for triggering initiation of replication. The dualism hypothesis that comes out of these speculations may help integrate models for initiation of replication, chromosome segregation and cell division with the 'prebiotic ecology' scenario of the origins of life.

  1. Mismatch repair at stop codons is directed independent of GATC methylation on the Escherichia coli chromosome.

    PubMed

    Sneppen, Kim; Semsey, Szabolcs

    2014-12-05

    The mismatch repair system (MMR) corrects replication errors that escape proofreading. Previous studies on extrachromosomal DNA in Escherichia coli suggested that MMR uses hemimethylated GATC sites to identify the newly synthesized strand. In this work we asked how the distance of GATC sites and their methylation status affect the occurrence of single base substitutions on the E. coli chromosome. As a reporter system we used a lacZ gene containing an early TAA stop codon. We found that occurrence of point mutations at this stop codon is unaffected by GATC sites located more than 115 base pairs away. However, a GATC site located about 50 base pairs away resulted in a decreased mutation rate. This effect was independent of Dam methylation. The reversion rate of the stop codon increased only slightly in dam mutants compared to mutL and mutS mutants. We suggest that unlike on extrachromosomal DNA, GATC methylation is not the only strand discrimination signal for MMR on the E. coli chromosome.

  2. Mismatch repair at stop codons is directed independent of GATC methylation on the Escherichia coli chromosome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sneppen, Kim; Semsey, Szabolcs

    2014-12-01

    The mismatch repair system (MMR) corrects replication errors that escape proofreading. Previous studies on extrachromosomal DNA in Escherichia coli suggested that MMR uses hemimethylated GATC sites to identify the newly synthesized strand. In this work we asked how the distance of GATC sites and their methylation status affect the occurrence of single base substitutions on the E. coli chromosome. As a reporter system we used a lacZ gene containing an early TAA stop codon. We found that occurrence of point mutations at this stop codon is unaffected by GATC sites located more than 115 base pairs away. However, a GATC site located about 50 base pairs away resulted in a decreased mutation rate. This effect was independent of Dam methylation. The reversion rate of the stop codon increased only slightly in dam mutants compared to mutL and mutS mutants. We suggest that unlike on extrachromosomal DNA, GATC methylation is not the only strand discrimination signal for MMR on the E. coli chromosome.

  3. Mismatch repair at stop codons is directed independent of GATC methylation on the Escherichia coli chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Sneppen, Kim; Semsey, Szabolcs

    2014-01-01

    The mismatch repair system (MMR) corrects replication errors that escape proofreading. Previous studies on extrachromosomal DNA in Escherichia coli suggested that MMR uses hemimethylated GATC sites to identify the newly synthesized strand. In this work we asked how the distance of GATC sites and their methylation status affect the occurrence of single base substitutions on the E. coli chromosome. As a reporter system we used a lacZ gene containing an early TAA stop codon. We found that occurrence of point mutations at this stop codon is unaffected by GATC sites located more than 115 base pairs away. However, a GATC site located about 50 base pairs away resulted in a decreased mutation rate. This effect was independent of Dam methylation. The reversion rate of the stop codon increased only slightly in dam mutants compared to mutL and mutS mutants. We suggest that unlike on extrachromosomal DNA, GATC methylation is not the only strand discrimination signal for MMR on the E. coli chromosome. PMID:25475788

  4. The genome-scale interplay amongst xenogene silencing, stress response and chromosome architecture in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Rajalakshmi; Scolari, Vittore Ferdinando; Lagomarsino, Marco Cosentino; Seshasayee, Aswin Sai Narain

    2015-01-01

    The gene expression state of exponentially growing Escherichia coli cells is manifested by high expression of essential and growth-associated genes and low levels of stress-related and horizontally acquired genes. An important player in maintaining this homeostasis is the H-NS-StpA gene silencing system. A Δhns-stpA deletion mutant results in high expression of otherwise-silent horizontally acquired genes, many located in the terminus-half of the chromosome, and an indirect downregulation of many highly expressed genes. The Δhns-stpA double mutant displays slow growth. Using laboratory evolution we address the evolutionary strategies that E. coli would adopt to redress this gene expression imbalance. We show that two global gene regulatory mutations—(i) point mutations inactivating the stress-responsive sigma factor RpoS or σ38 and (ii) an amplification of ∼40% of the chromosome centred around the origin of replication—converge in partially reversing the global gene expression imbalance caused by Δhns-stpA. Transcriptome data of these mutants further show a three-way link amongst the global gene regulatory networks of H-NS and σ38, as well as chromosome architecture. Increasing gene expression around the terminus of replication results in a decrease in the expression of genes around the origin and vice versa; this appears to be a persistent phenomenon observed as an association across ∼300 publicly-available gene expression data sets for E. coli. These global suppressor effects are transient and rapidly give way to more specific mutations, whose roles in reversing the growth defect of H-NS mutations remain to be understood. PMID:25429971

  5. The genome-scale interplay amongst xenogene silencing, stress response and chromosome architecture in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Rajalakshmi; Scolari, Vittore Ferdinando; Lagomarsino, Marco Cosentino; Seshasayee, Aswin Sai Narain

    2015-01-01

    The gene expression state of exponentially growing Escherichia coli cells is manifested by high expression of essential and growth-associated genes and low levels of stress-related and horizontally acquired genes. An important player in maintaining this homeostasis is the H-NS-StpA gene silencing system. A Δhns-stpA deletion mutant results in high expression of otherwise-silent horizontally acquired genes, many located in the terminus-half of the chromosome, and an indirect downregulation of many highly expressed genes. The Δhns-stpA double mutant displays slow growth. Using laboratory evolution we address the evolutionary strategies that E. coli would adopt to redress this gene expression imbalance. We show that two global gene regulatory mutations-(i) point mutations inactivating the stress-responsive sigma factor RpoS or σ38 and (ii) an amplification of ∼40% of the chromosome centred around the origin of replication-converge in partially reversing the global gene expression imbalance caused by Δhns-stpA. Transcriptome data of these mutants further show a three-way link amongst the global gene regulatory networks of H-NS and σ38, as well as chromosome architecture. Increasing gene expression around the terminus of replication results in a decrease in the expression of genes around the origin and vice versa; this appears to be a persistent phenomenon observed as an association across ∼300 publicly-available gene expression data sets for E. coli. These global suppressor effects are transient and rapidly give way to more specific mutations, whose roles in reversing the growth defect of H-NS mutations remain to be understood.

  6. Use of gene fusions to determine the orientation of gene phoA on the Escherichia coli chromosome.

    PubMed Central

    Sarthy, A; Michaelis, S; Beckwith, J

    1981-01-01

    We present genetic evidence which demonstrates that the phoA gene is transcribed in the clockwise direction on the Escherichia coli chromosome, in contrast to an earlier proposal. Our conclusion is based on analysis of various genetic fusions between the lac operon and the phoA gene. PMID:7007316

  7. Chromosomal Fragmentation in "Escherichia Coli": Its Absence in "mutT" Mutants and Its Mechanisms in "seqA" Mutants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rotman, Ella Rose

    2009-01-01

    Chromosomal fragmentation in "Escherichia coli" is a lethal event for the cell unless mended by the recombinational repair proteins RecA, RecBCD, and RuvABC. Certain mutations exacerbate problems that cause the cell to be dependent on the recombinational repair proteins for viability. We tested whether the absence of the MutT protein caused…

  8. Membrane attachment activates dnaA protein, the initiation protein of chromosome replication in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Yung, B.Y.; Kornberg, A.

    1988-10-01

    ADP and ATP are tightly bound to dnaA protein and are crucial to its function in DNA replication; the exchange of these nucleotides is effected specifically by the acidic phospholipids (cardiolipin and phosphatidylglycerol) present in Escherichia coli membranes. We now find that phospholipids derived from membranes lacking an unsaturated fatty acid (e.g., oleic acid) are unable to promote the exchange. This observation correlates strikingly with the long-known effect of 3-decynoyl-N-acetylcysteamine, a ''suicide analog'' that prevents initiation of a cycle of replication in E. coli by inhibiting the synthesis of oleic acid, an inhibition that can be overcome by providing the cells with oleic acid. Profound influences on the specific binding of dnaA protein to phospholipids by temperature, the content of unsaturated fatty acids, and the inclusion of cholesterol can be explained by the need for the phospholipids to be in fluid-phase vesicles. These findings suggest that membrane attachment of dnaA protein is vital for its function in the initiation of chromosome replication in E. coli.

  9. Isolation and quantitation of topoisomerase complexes accumulated on Escherichia coli chromosomal DNA.

    PubMed

    Aedo, Sandra; Tse-Dinh, Yuk-Ching

    2012-11-01

    DNA topoisomerases are important targets in anticancer and antibacterial therapy because drugs can initiate cell death by stabilizing the transient covalent topoisomerase-DNA complex. In this study, we employed a method that uses CsCl density gradient centrifugation to separate unbound from DNA-bound GyrA/ParC in Escherichia coli cell lysates after quinolone treatment, allowing antibody detection and quantitation of the covalent complexes on slot blots. Using these procedures modified from the in vivo complexes of enzyme (ICE) bioassay, we found a correlation between gyrase-DNA complex formation and DNA replication inhibition at bacteriostatic (1× MIC) norfloxacin concentrations. Quantitation of the number of gyrase-DNA complexes per E. coli cell permitted an association between cell death and chromosomal gyrase-DNA complex accumulation at norfloxacin concentrations greater than 1× MIC. When comparing levels of gyrase-DNA complexes to topoisomerase IV-DNA complexes in the absence of drug, we observed that the gyrase-DNA complex level was higher (∼150-fold) than that of the topoisomerase IV-DNA complex. In addition, levels of gyrase and topoisomerase IV complexes reached a significant increase after 30 min of treatment at 1× and 1.7× MIC, respectively. These results are in agreement with gyrase being the primary target for quinolones in E. coli. We further validated the utility of this method for the study of topoisomerase-drug interactions in bacteria by showing the gyrase covalent complex reversibility after removal of the drug from the medium, and the resistant effect of the Ser83Leu gyrA mutation on accumulation of gyrase covalent complexes on chromosomal DNA.

  10. Structure of the chromosomal insertion site for pSAM2: functional analysis in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Raynal, A; Tuphile, K; Gerbaud, C; Luther, T; Guérineau, M; Pernodet, J L

    1998-04-01

    The element pSAM2 from Streptomyces ambofaciens integrates into the chromosome through site-specific recombination between the element (attP) and the chromosomal (attB) sites. These regions share an identity segment of 58bp extending from the anti-codon loop through the 3' end of a tRNA(Pro) gene. To facilitate the study of the attB site, the int and xis genes, expressed from an inducible promoter, and attP from pSAM2 were cloned on plasmids in Escherichia coil. Compatible plasmids carrying the different attB regions to be tested were introduced in these E. coli strains. Under these conditions, Int alone could promote site-specific integration; Int and Xis were both required for site-specific excision. This experimental system was used to study the sequences required in attB for efficient site-specific recombination. A 26 bp sequence, centred on the anti-codon loop region and not completely included in the identity segment, retained all the functionality of attB; shorter sequences allowed integration with lower efficiencies. By comparing the 26-bp-long attB with attP, according to the Lambda model, we propose that B and B', C and C' core-type Int binding sites consist of 9 bp imperfect inverted repeats separated by a 5 bp overlap region.

  11. Many chromosomal genes modulate MarA-mediated multidrug resistance in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Cristian; Levy, Stuart B

    2010-05-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) in clinical isolates of Escherichia coli can be associated with overexpression of marA, a transcription factor that upregulates multidrug efflux and downregulates membrane permeability. Using random transposome mutagenesis, we found that many chromosomal genes and environmental stimuli affected MarA-mediated antibiotic resistance. Seven genes affected resistance mediated by MarA in an antibiotic-specific way; these were mostly genes encoding unrelated enzymes, transporters, and unknown proteins. Other genes affected MarA-mediated resistance to all antibiotics tested. These genes were acrA, acrB, and tolC (which encode the major MarA-regulated multidrug efflux pump AcrAB-TolC), crp, cyaA, hns, and pcnB (four genes involved in global regulation of gene expression), and the unknown gene damX. The last five genes affected MarA-mediated MDR by altering marA expression or MarA function specifically on acrA. These findings demonstrate that MarA-mediated MDR is regulated at multiple levels by different genes and stimuli, which makes it both complex and fine-tuned and interconnects it with global cell regulation and metabolism. Such a regulation could contribute to the adaptation and spread of MDR strains and may be targeted to treat antibiotic-resistant E. coli and related pathogens.

  12. Clonal expansion of Escherichia coli ST38 carrying a chromosomally integrated OXA-48 carbapenemase gene.

    PubMed

    Turton, Jane F; Doumith, Michel; Hopkins, Katie L; Perry, Claire; Meunier, Daniele; Woodford, Neil

    2016-06-01

    Many isolates of Escherichia coli carrying blaOXA-48 referred to Public Health England's national reference laboratory during 2014 and 2015 shared similar pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) profiles, despite coming from patients in multiple different hospitals and regions. Whole genome sequencing on an Illumina platform revealed that these belonged to sequence type (ST) 38. The OXA-48 gene is usually carried on a 62 kb IncL/M plasmid (pOXA48a), but those belonging to this ST appeared either to lack plasmid elements or to have only a partial complement. Two isolates, one belonging to a main cluster sharing identical PFGE profiles and the other having a distinct profile, were further sequenced on a minION. The long reads provided by the nanopore sequencing technology facilitated assembly of a much larger contig around the blaOXA-48 region, showing that both isolates shared a similar arrangement, with a plasmid fragment containing blaOXA-48 flanked by IS1R elements integrated into the chromosome, although the length of the plasmid fragment and the insertion site differed between the two isolates. That belonging to the main cluster contained a 21.9 kb Tn6237 insert, as previously described in E. coli EC-15 from Lebanon, but in a different insertion site. PCR mapping indicated that a further 14/31 representatives of this cluster also contained this insert in the same insertion site, with most of the remainder differing only by having additional E. coli sequence on one side of the insertion. This sub-cluster of ST38 was found from 25 different hospital laboratories, suggesting widespread distribution of a successful type.

  13. Bacteriophage P1 pac sites inserted into the chromosome greatly increase packaging and transduction of Escherichia coli genomic DNA.

    PubMed

    Huang, Haomin; Masters, Millicent

    2014-11-01

    The Escherichia coli bacteriophage P1 packages host chromosome separately from phage DNA, and transfers it to recipient cells at low frequency in a process called generalized transduction. Phage genomes are packaged from concatemers beginning at a specific site, pac. To increase transduction rate, we have inserted pac into the chromosome at up to five equally spaced positions; at least this many are fully tolerated in the absence of P1 infection. A single chromosomal pac greatly increases transduction of downstream markers without decreasing phage yields; 3.5 × as much total chromosomal DNA is packaged. Additional insertions decrease phage yield by > 90% and also decrease phage DNA synthesis, although less dramatically. Packaging of chromosomal markers near to and downstream of each inserted pac site is, at the same time, increased by greater than 10 fold. Transduction of markers near an inserted pac site can be increased by over 1000-fold, potentially allowing identification of such transductants by screening.

  14. Toward a bacterial genome technology: integration of the Escherichia coli prophage lambda genome into the Bacillus subtilis 168 chromosome.

    PubMed

    Itaya, M

    1995-07-22

    A novel approach to the cloning large DNAs in the Bacillus subtilis chromosome was examined. An Escherichia coli prophage lambda DNA (48.5 kb) was assembled in the chromosome of B. subtilis. The lambda DNA was first subcloned in four segments, having partially overlapping regions. Assembly of the complete prophage was achieved by successive transformation using three discrete DNA integration modes: overlap-elongation, Campbell-type integration, and gap-filling. In the B. subtilis chromosome, DNA was elongated, using contiguous DNA segments, via overlap-elongation. Jumping from one end of a contiguous DNA stretch to another segment was achieved by Campbell-type integration. The remaining gap was sealed by gap-filling. The incorporated lambda DNA thus assembled was stably replicated as part of the 4188 kb B. subtilis chromosome under non-selective conditions. The present method can be used to accommodate larger DNAs in the B. subtilis chromosome and possible applications of this technique are discussed.

  15. Scanning the Escherichia coli chromosome by random transposon mutagenesis and multiple phenotypic screening.

    PubMed

    Serina, Stefania; Nozza, Francesca; Nicastro, Giovanna; Faggioni, Federico; Mottl, Harald; Dehò, Gianni; Polissi, Alessandra

    2004-10-01

    Analysis of the complete DNA sequences of many microbial genomes available reveals a fair number of putative ORFs without an identified function. A systematic scan of the Escherichia coli chromosome was achieved by random transposition with a newly developed Tn5 minitransposon derivative carrying the arabinose-inducible araP(BAD) promoter oriented outward at one end (Tn5-araP(BAD)). The transposon insertion mutants obtained were assayed for conditional lethal phenotypes (arabinose dependence or sensitivity), for growth at two temperatures (37 and 15 degrees C) and in different media (rich and minimal medium). The Tn5-araP(BAD)-tagged genes were identified by sequencing the transposon insertion points. In this way we found a new essential gene cluster (yhbN-yhbG), produced conditional lethal (arabinose-dependent) mutations in already known essential genes (folD, frr, plsC, thiL, serS, thrS, and trpS) and provided a new phenotype (cold sensitivity) to other known genes (holD, ahpC, and tolA). Moreover, we identified eight putative ORFs (kch, ycaM, ycbQ, yddA, yddB, ydeK, ydeX, and yliF) that appear to be required in optimum growth conditions (rich medium at 37 degrees C) but not in the cold and in minimal medium.

  16. [Heterologous genes expression on Escherichia coli chromosome lac operon using Red recombination].

    PubMed

    Li, Shanhu; Shi, Qingguo; Huang, Cuifen; Zhou, Jianguang

    2008-04-01

    To achieve efficient and stable expression of heterologous exogenetic protein or antigen in E. coli chromosome, the luciferase report gene was knocked in lacZ site of chromosome lac operon by using Red recombination system and selection-counterselection kan/sacB technology. The quantitative analysis of exogenous gene expression indicated that the target gene could be efficiently expressed at lacZ site of lac operon. The results confirmed the efficient screening and stable expression of heterologous protein or antigen on chromosome by using the recombinant engineering technique. This study demonstrated that the chromosome could be used as a vector for heterologous protein or antigen and the stable expression of exogenous gene on E. coli chromosome had no side effect on the bacterial growth and propagation.

  17. Expansion of a chromosomal repeat in Escherichia coli: roles of replication, repair, and recombination functions

    PubMed Central

    Poteete, Anthony R

    2009-01-01

    Background Previous studies of gene amplification in Escherichia coli have suggested that it occurs in two steps: duplication and expansion. Expansion is thought to result from homologous recombination between the repeated segments created by duplication. To explore the mechanism of expansion, a 7 kbp duplication in the chromosome containing a leaky mutant version of the lac operon was constructed, and its expansion into an amplified array was studied. Results Under selection for lac function, colonies bearing multiple copies of the mutant lac operon appeared at a constant rate of approximately 4 to 5 per million cells plated per day, on days two through seven after plating. Expansion was not seen in a recA strain; null mutations in recBCD and ruvC reduced the rate 100- and 10-fold, respectively; a ruvC recG double mutant reduced the rate 1000-fold. Expansion occurred at an increased rate in cells lacking dam, polA, rnhA, or uvrD functions. Null mutations of various other cellular recombination, repair, and stress response genes had little effect upon expansion. The red recombination genes of phage lambda could substitute for recBCD in mediating expansion. In the red-substituted cells, expansion was only partially dependent upon recA function. Conclusion These observations are consistent with the idea that the expansion step of gene amplification is closely related, mechanistically, to interchromosomal homologous recombination events. They additionally provide support for recently described models of RecA-independent Red-mediated recombination at replication forks. PMID:19236706

  18. A convenient method for multiple insertions of desired genes into target loci on the Escherichia coli chromosome.

    PubMed

    Koma, Daisuke; Yamanaka, Hayato; Moriyoshi, Kunihiko; Ohmoto, Takashi; Sakai, Kiyofumi

    2012-01-01

    We developed a method to insert multiple desired genes into target loci on the Escherichia coli chromosome. The method was based on Red-mediated recombination, flippase and the flippase recognition target recombination, and P1 transduction. Using this method, six copies of the lacZ gene could be simultaneously inserted into different loci on the E. coli chromosome. The inserted lacZ genes were functionally expressed, and β-galactosidase activity increased in proportion to the number of inserted lacZ genes. This method was also used for metabolic engineering to generate overproducers of aromatic compounds. Important genes of the shikimate pathway (aroF (fbr) and tyrA (fbr) or aroF (fbr) and pheA (fbr)) were introduced into the chromosome to generate a tyrosine or a phenylalanine overproducer. Moreover, a heterologous decarboxylase gene was introduced into the chromosome of the tyrosine or phenylalanine overproducer to generate a tyramine or a phenethylamine overproducer, respectively. The resultant strains selectively overproduced the target aromatic compounds. Thus, the developed method is a convenient tool for the metabolic engineering of E. coli for the production of valuable compounds.

  19. Effect of human polymorphonuclear and mononuclear leukocytes on chromosomal and plasmid DNA of Escherichia coli. Role of acid DNase

    SciTech Connect

    Rozenberg-Arska, M.; van Strijp, J.A.; Hoekstra, W.P.; Verhoef, J.

    1984-05-01

    Phagocytosis and killing by polymorphonuclear and mononuclear leukocytes are important host resistance factors against invading microorganisms. Evidence showing that killing is rapidly followed by degradation of bacterial components is limited. Therefore, we studied the fate of Escherichia coli DNA following phagocytosis of E. coli by polymorphonuclear and mononuclear leukocytes. (/sup 3/H)Thymidine-labeled, unencapsulated E. coli PC2166 and E. coli 048K1 were incubated in serum, washed, and added to leukocytes. Uptake and killing of the bacteria and degradation of DNA were measured. Although phagocytosis and killing by mononuclear leukocytes was less efficient than that by polymorphonuclear leukocytes, only mononuclear leukocytes were able to degrade E. coli PC2166 DNA. Within 2 h, 60% of the radioactivity added to mononuclear leukocytes was released into the supernate, of which 40% was acid soluble. DNA of E. coli 048K1 was not degraded. To further analyze the capacity of mononuclear leukocytes to degrade E. coli DNA, chromosomal and plasmid DNA was isolated from ingested bacteria and subjected to agarose gel-electrophoresis. Only chromosomal DNA was degraded after phagocytosis. Plasmid DNA of E. coli carrying a gene coding for ampicillin resistance remained intact for a 2-h period after ingestion, and was still able to transform recipient E. coli cells after this period. Although we observed no DNA degradation during phagocytosis by polymorphonuclear leukocytes, lysates of both polymorphonuclear and mononuclear leukocytes contained acid-DNase activity with a pH optimum of 4.9. However, the DNase activity of mononuclear leukocytes was 20 times higher than that of polymorphonuclear leukocytes. No difference was observed between DNase activity from polymorphonuclear and mononuclear leukocytes from a chronic granulomatous disease patient with DNase activity from control polymorphonuclear and mononuclear leukocytes.

  20. Computational analyses of transcriptomic data reveal the dynamic organization of the Escherichia coli chromosome under different conditions

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Qin; Yin, Yanbin; Schell, Mark A.; Zhang, Han; Li, Guojun; Xu, Ying

    2013-01-01

    The circular chromosome of Escherichia coli has been suggested to fold into a collection of sequentially consecutive domains, genes in each of which tend to be co-expressed. It has also been suggested that such domains, forming a partition of the genome, are dynamic with respect to the physiological conditions. However, little is known about which DNA segments of the E. coli genome form these domains and what determines the boundaries of these domain segments. We present a computational model here to partition the circular genome into consecutive segments, theoretically suggestive of the physically folded supercoiled domains, along with a method for predicting such domains under specified conditions. Our model is based on a hypothesis that the genome of E. coli is partitioned into a set of folding domains so that the total number of unfoldings of these domains in the folded chromosome is minimized, where a domain is unfolded when a biological pathway, consisting of genes encoded in this DNA segment, is being activated transcriptionally. Based on this hypothesis, we have predicted seven distinct sets of such domains along the E. coli genome for seven physiological conditions, namely exponential growth, stationary growth, anaerobiosis, heat shock, oxidative stress, nitrogen limitation and SOS responses. These predicted folding domains are highly stable statistically and are generally consistent with the experimental data of DNA binding sites of the nucleoid-associated proteins that assist the folding of these domains, as well as genome-scale protein occupancy profiles, hence supporting our proposed model. Our study established for the first time a strong link between a folded E. coli chromosomal structure and the encoded biological pathways and their activation frequencies. PMID:23599001

  1. Cloning and deletion mapping of the recF dnaN region of the Escherichia coli chromosome.

    PubMed

    Ream, L W; Clark, A J

    1983-09-01

    By cloning a 3.6-kb EcoRI fragment of the Escherichia coli chromosome with pBR322 we located more precisely recF relative to dnaN. By deletion mapping we localized functional recF to a 1.65-kb region of the cloned fragment and allowed rough mapping of the C terminus of dnaN. Cloned recF+, separated from functional flanking genes dnaN and gyrB, complemented chromosomal recF mutations presumably by coding for a cytodiffusible product. The protein encoded by dnaN was observed as a band on a polyacrylamide gel from minicells. Identification of a recF protein was not made.

  2. An Escherichia coli chromosomal ars operon homolog is functional in arsenic detoxification and is conserved in gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Diorio, C; Cai, J; Marmor, J; Shinder, R; DuBow, M S

    1995-04-01

    Arsenic is a known toxic metalloid, whose trivalent and pentavalent ions can inhibit many biochemical processes. Operons which encode arsenic resistance have been found in multicopy plasmids from both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. The resistance mechanism is encoded from a single operon which typically consists of an arsenite ion-inducible repressor that regulates expression of an arsenate reductase and inner membrane-associated arsenite export system. Using a lacZ transcriptional gene fusion library, we have identified an Escherichia coli operon whose expression is induced by cellular exposure to sodium arsenite at concentrations as low as 5 micrograms/liter. This chromosomal operon was cloned, sequenced, and found to consist of three cistrons which we named arsR, arsB, and arsC because of their strong homology to plasmid-borne ars operons. Mutants in the chromosomal ars operon were found to be approximately 10- to 100-fold more sensitive to sodium arsenate and arsenite exposure than wild-type E. coli, while wild-type E. coli that contained the operon cloned on a ColE1-based plasmid was found to be at least 2- to 10-fold more resistant to sodium arsenate and arsenite. Moreover, Southern blotting and high-stringency hybridization of this operon with chromosomal DNAs from a number of bacterial species showed homologous sequences among members of the family Enterobacteriaceae, and hybridization was detectable even in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. These results suggest that the chromosomal ars operon may be the evolutionary precursor of the plasmid-borne operon, as a multicopy plasmid location would allow the operon to be amplified and its products to confer increased resistance to this toxic metalloid.

  3. Fully efficient chromosome dimer resolution in Escherichia coli cells lacking the integral membrane domain of FtsK

    PubMed Central

    Dubarry, Nelly; Barre, François-Xavier

    2010-01-01

    In bacteria, septum formation frequently initiates before the last steps of chromosome segregation. This is notably the case when chromosome dimers are formed by homologous recombination. Chromosome segregation then requires the activity of a double-stranded DNA transporter anchored at the septum by an integral membrane domain, FtsK. It was proposed that the transmembrane segments of proteins of the FtsK family form pores across lipid bilayers for the transport of DNA. Here, we show that truncated Escherichia coli FtsK proteins lacking all of the FtsK transmembrane segments allow for the efficient resolution of chromosome dimers if they are connected to a septal targeting peptide through a sufficiently long linker. These results indicate that FtsK does not need to transport DNA through a pore formed by its integral membrane domain. We propose therefore that FtsK transports DNA before membrane fusion, at a time when there is still an opening in the constricted septum. PMID:20033058

  4. SOE-LRed: a simple and time-efficient method to localize genes with point mutations onto the Escherichia coli chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Benson, Ryan W.; Cafarelli, Tiziana M.; Godoy, Veronica G.

    2011-01-01

    We report a powerful method to replace wild type genes on the chromosome of Escherichia coli. Employing a unique form of PCR, we generate easily constructible gene fusions bearing single point mutations. Used in conjunction with homologous recombination, this method eliminates cloning procedures previously used for this purpose. PMID:21185880

  5. Location of the unique integration site on an Escherichia coli chromosome by bacteriophage lambda DNA in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Tal, Asaf; Arbel-Goren, Rinat; Costantino, Nina; Court, Donald L.; Stavans, Joel

    2014-01-01

    The search for specific sequences on long genomes is a key process in many biological contexts. How can specific target sequences be located with high efficiency, within physiologically relevant times? We addressed this question for viral integration, a fundamental mechanism of horizontal gene transfer driving prokaryotic evolution, using the infection of Escherichia coli bacteria with bacteriophage λ and following the establishment of a lysogenic state. Following the targeting process in individual live E. coli cells in real time revealed that λ DNA remains confined near the entry point of a cell following infection. The encounter between the 15-bp-long target sequence on the chromosome and the recombination site on the viral genome is facilitated by the directed motion of bacterial DNA generated during chromosome replication, in conjunction with constrained diffusion of phage DNA. Moving the native bacterial integration site to different locations on the genome and measuring the integration frequency in these strains reveals that the frequencies of the native site and a site symmetric to it relative to the origin are similar, whereas both are significantly higher than when the integration site is moved near the terminus, consistent with the replication-driven mechanism we propose. This novel search mechanism is yet another example of the exquisite coevolution of λ with its host. PMID:24799672

  6. A standard vector for the chromosomal integration and characterization of BioBrick™ parts in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The chromosomal integration of biological parts in the host genome enables the engineering of plasmid-free stable strains with single-copy insertions of the desired gene networks. Although different integrative vectors were proposed, no standard pre-assembled genetic tool is available to carry out this task. Synthetic biology concepts can contribute to the development of standardized and user friendly solutions to easily produce engineered strains and to rapidly characterize the desired genetic parts in single-copy context. Results In this work we report the design of a novel integrative vector that allows the genomic integration of biological parts compatible with the RFC10, RFC23 and RFC12 BioBrick™ standards in Escherichia coli. It can also be specialized by using BioBrick™ parts to target the desired integration site in the host genome. The usefulness of this vector has been demonstrated by integrating a set of BioBrick™ devices in two different loci of the E. coli chromosome and by characterizing their activity in single-copy. Construct stability has also been evaluated and compared with plasmid-borne solutions. Conclusions Physical modularity of biological parts has been successfully applied to construct a ready-to-engineer BioBrick™ vector, suitable for a stable chromosomal insertion of standard parts via the desired recombination method, i.e. the bacteriophage integration mechanism or homologous recombination. In contrast with previously proposed solutions, it is a pre-assembled vector containing properly-placed restriction sites for the direct transfer of various formats of BioBrick™ parts. This vector can facilitate the characterization of parts avoiding copy number artefacts and the construction of antibiotic resistance-free engineered microbes, suitable for industrial use. PMID:23663425

  7. Association of Mu-containing plasmids with the Escherichia coli chromosome upon prophage induction

    PubMed Central

    Chaconas, George; Harshey, Rasika M.; Bukhari, Ahmad I.

    1980-01-01

    To determine the structure of a prophage-containing plasmid during Mu transposition, we have monitored the physical state of pSC101[unk]Mucts after thermoinduction. We have also examined the fate of a mini Mu plasmid constructed in vitro by deleting 27 kilobases from the center of the Mu prophage in pSC101[unk]Mucts. At various times after prophage induction, DNA was extracted from Mu or mini Mu plasmid-containing strains and subjected to electrophoresis in low concentration agarose gels followed by transfer of the DNA to nitrocellulose paper. Separate hybridization with 32P-labeled pSC101 and Mu DNA revealed the position of the plasmids and the replication of Mu DNA. At times after induction when Mu replication was clearly visible, Mu and mini Mu plasmids were found to migrate with Escherchia coli DNA. This Mu-specific association requires the phage coded A and B proteins. Electron microscopy has shown that some of the associated DNA is comprised of circular plasmid molecules which appear to be in contact with the chromosomal DNA. These structures may represent intermediates or end products of the replication-integration process. The finding that Mu and mini Mu plasmids do not give rise to any detectable excision products and apparently remain intact during Mu transposition supports our proposal that the predominant event after Mu induction is the replication of Mu DNA in situ to generate integrative intermediates. Images PMID:6246503

  8. in vivo Measurements of Conformational Fluctuations of Chromosomal DNA in Escherichia Coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kafle, Rudra; Meiners, Jens-Christian

    2013-03-01

    The cell is the site of active, motor-driven processes far from thermodynamic equilibrium. Therefore, the intracellular dynamics are complex and subject to a multitude of constraints and forces. We study the conformational fluctuations of chromosomal DNA in vivo in live and dead E. coli cells by Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS). The fluctuations move the DNA-bound fluorophores stochastically into the diffraction-limited excitation volume of a focused laser beam in a confocal microscope. From the time correlation functions of the fluorescence intensity, we obtain the mean square displacements of the DNA on a time scale from microseconds to seconds. We see a substantial decrease in the power spectral density (PSD) of the displacement fluctuations at frequencies below 10 Hz in the dead cells, compared to the live cells. The larger fluctuations in the living cells may indicate that the fluctuations on this time scale may be driven by active processes involving molecular motors that generate forces by ATP hydrolysis. A small difference in PSD between live and dead cells on shorter time scales suggests that the processes on corresponding short length scales rely primarily on thermally-driven diffusive mechanisms.

  9. Localized remodeling of the Escherichia coli chromosome: the patchwork of segments refractory and tolerant to inversion near the replication terminus.

    PubMed Central

    Guijo, M I; Patte, J; del Mar Campos, M; Louarn, J M; Rebollo, J E

    2001-01-01

    The behavior of chromosomal inversions in Escherichia coli depends upon the region they affect. Regions flanking the replication terminus have been termed nondivisible zones (NDZ) because inversions ending in the region were either deleterious or not feasible. This regional phenomenon is further analyzed here. Thirty segments distributed between 23 and 29 min on the chromosome map have been submitted to an inversion test. Twenty-five segments either became deleterious when inverted or were noninvertible, but five segments tolerated inversion. The involvement of polar replication pause sites in this distribution was investigated. The results suggest that the Tus/pause site system may forbid some inversion events, but that other constraints to inversion, unrelated to this system, exist. Our current model for deleterious inversions is that the segments involved carry polar sequences acting in concert with other polar sequences located outside the segments. The observed patchwork of refractory and tolerant segments supports the existence of several NDZs in the 23- to 29-min region. Microscopic observations revealed that deleterious inversions are associated with high frequencies of abnormal nucleoid structure and distribution. Combined with other information, the data suggest that NDZs participate in the organization of the terminal domain of the nucleoid. PMID:11290700

  10. Replication fork progression is paused in two large chromosomal zones flanking the DNA replication origin in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Masahiro Tatsumi; Oshima, Taku; Chumsakul, Onuma; Ishikawa, Shu; Maki, Hisaji

    2016-08-01

    Although the speed of nascent DNA synthesis at individual replication forks is relatively uniform in bacterial cells, the dynamics of replication fork progression on the chromosome are hampered by a variety of natural impediments. Genome replication dynamics can be directly measured from an exponentially growing cell population by sequencing newly synthesized DNA strands that were specifically pulse-labeled with the thymidine analogue 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU). However, a short pulse labeling with BrdU is impracticable for bacteria because of poor incorporation of BrdU into the cells, and thus, the genomewide dynamics of bacterial DNA replication remain undetermined. Using a new thymidine-requiring Escherichia coli strain, eCOMB, and high-throughput sequencing, we succeeded in determining the genomewide replication profile in bacterial cells. We also found that fork progression is paused in two ~200-kb chromosomal zones that flank the replication origin in the growing cells. This origin-proximal obstruction to fork progression was overcome by an increased thymidine concentration in the culture medium and enhanced by inhibition of transcription. These indicate that DNA replication near the origin is sensitive to the impediments to fork progression, namely a scarcity of the DNA precursor deoxythymidine triphosphate and probable conflicts between replication and transcription machineries.

  11. IS1R-mediated plasticity of IncL/M plasmids leads to the insertion of bla OXA-48 into the Escherichia coli Chromosome.

    PubMed

    Beyrouthy, R; Robin, F; Delmas, J; Gibold, L; Dalmasso, G; Dabboussi, F; Hamzé, M; Bonnet, R

    2014-07-01

    The OXA-48 carbapenemase is mainly encoded by ∼ 62-kb IncL/M plasmids. However, chromosome-mediated genes have been observed in Escherichia coli isolates. In this work, we investigated the genetic environment of OXA-48 in members of the family Enterobacteriaceae (n = 22) to understand how the OXA-48-encoding gene is transferred into the E. coli chromosome. The OXA-48-encoding gene was located within intact Tn1999.2 transposons in the ∼ 62-kb plasmids or within a truncated variant of Tn1999.2 for the OXA-48-encoding genes located in the chromosomes of E. coli bacteria. The analysis of the Tn1999.2 genetic environment revealed an inverted orientation of the transposon in five ∼ 62-kb plasmids (5/14 [35%]) and in all chromosome inserts (n = 8). The sequencing of pRA35 plasmid showed that this orientation of Tn1999.2 and the acquisition of an IS1R insertion sequence generated a 21.9-kb IS1R-based composite transposon encoding OXA-48 and designated Tn6237. The sequencing of a chromosomal insert encoding OXA-48 also revealed this new transposon in the E. coli chromosome. PCR mapping showed the presence of this element in all strains harboring an OXA-48-encoding chromosomal insert. However, different insertion sites of this transposon were observed in the E. coli chromosome. Overall, these findings indicate a plasticity of the OXA-48 genetic environment mediated by IS1R insertion sequences. The insertion sequences can induce the transfer of the OXA-encoding gene into E. coli chromosomes and thereby promote its persistence and expression at low levels.

  12. Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Nataro, James P.; Kaper, James B.

    1998-01-01

    Escherichia coli is the predominant nonpathogenic facultative flora of the human intestine. Some E. coli strains, however, have developed the ability to cause disease of the gastrointestinal, urinary, or central nervous system in even the most robust human hosts. Diarrheagenic strains of E. coli can be divided into at least six different categories with corresponding distinct pathogenic schemes. Taken together, these organisms probably represent the most common cause of pediatric diarrhea worldwide. Several distinct clinical syndromes accompany infection with diarrheagenic E. coli categories, including traveler’s diarrhea (enterotoxigenic E. coli), hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic-uremic syndrome (enterohemorrhagic E. coli), persistent diarrhea (enteroaggregative E. coli), and watery diarrhea of infants (enteropathogenic E. coli). This review discusses the current level of understanding of the pathogenesis of the diarrheagenic E. coli strains and describes how their pathogenic schemes underlie the clinical manifestations, diagnostic approach, and epidemiologic investigation of these important pathogens. PMID:9457432

  13. PATHOGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI

    EPA Science Inventory

    Escherichia coli is a bacterial species which inhabits the gastrointestinal tract of man and warm-blooded animals. Because of the ubiquity of this bacterium in the intestinal flora, it serves as an important indicator organism of fecal contamination. E. coli, aside from serving a...

  14. Pathogenic Escherichia coli

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Escherichia coli, a member of the Enterobacteriaceae family, is a part of the normal flora of the intestinal tract of humans and a variety of animals. E. coli strains are classified on the basis of antigenic differences in two surface components (serotyping), the somatic antigen (O) of the lipopoly...

  15. Replication of the Escherichia coli chromosome in RNase HI-deficient cells: multiple initiation regions and fork dynamics.

    PubMed

    Maduike, Nkabuije Z; Tehranchi, Ashley K; Wang, Jue D; Kreuzer, Kenneth N

    2014-01-01

    DNA replication in Escherichia coli is normally initiated at a single origin, oriC, dependent on initiation protein DnaA. However, replication can be initiated elsewhere on the chromosome at multiple ectopic oriK sites. Genetic evidence indicates that initiation from oriK depends on RNA-DNA hybrids (R-loops), which are normally removed by enzymes such as RNase HI to prevent oriK from misfiring during normal growth. Initiation from oriK sites occurs in RNase HI-deficient mutants, and possibly in wild-type cells under certain unusual conditions. Despite previous work, the locations of oriK and their impact on genome stability remain unclear. We combined 2D gel electrophoresis and whole genome approaches to map genome-wide oriK locations. The DNA copy number profiles of various RNase HI-deficient strains contained multiple peaks, often in consistent locations, identifying candidate oriK sites. Removal of RNase HI protein also leads to global alterations of replication fork migration patterns, often opposite to normal replication directions, and presumably eukaryote-like replication fork merging. Our results have implications for genome stability, offering a new understanding of how RNase HI deficiency results in R-loop-mediated transcription-replication conflict, as well as inappropriate replication stalling or blockage at Ter sites outside of the terminus trap region and at ribosomal operons.

  16. Site-specific integration and constitutive expression of key genes into Escherichia coli chromosome increases shikimic acid yields.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xianglei; Lin, Jun; Hu, Haifeng; Zhou, Bin; Zhu, Baoquan

    2016-01-01

    As the key starting material for the chemical synthesis of Oseltamivir, shikimic acid (SA) has captured worldwide attention. Many researchers have tried to improve SA production by metabolic engineering, yet expression plasmids were used generally. In recent years, site-specific integration of key genes into chromosome to increase the yield of metabolites showed considerable advantages. The genes could maintain stably and express constitutively without induction. Herein, crucial genes aroG, aroB, tktA, aroE (encoding 3-deoxy-D-arabinoheptulosonate-7-phosphate synthase, dehydroquinate synthase, transketolase and shikimate dehydrogenase, respectively) of SA pathway and glk, galP (encoding glucokinase and galactose permease) were integrated into the locus of ptsHIcrr (phosphoenolpyruvate: carbohydrate phosphotransferase system operon) in a shikimate kinase genetic defect strain Escherichia coli BW25113 (ΔaroL/aroK, DE3). Furthermore, another key gene ppsA (encoding phosphoenolpyruvate synthase) was integrated into tyrR (encoding Tyr regulator protein). As a result, SA production of the recombinant (SA5/pGBAE) reached to 4.14 g/L in shake flask and 27.41 g/L in a 5-L bioreactor. These data suggested that integration of key genes increased SA yields effectively. This strategy is environmentally friendly for no antibiotic is added, simple to handle without induction, and suitable for industrial production.

  17. Construction of Escherichia coli strains with chromosomally integrated expression cassettes for the synthesis of 2′-fucosyllactose

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The trisaccharide 2′-fucosyllactose (2′-FL) is one of the most abundant oligosaccharides found in human milk. Due to its prebiotic and anti-infective properties, 2′-FL is discussed as nutritional additive for infant formula. Besides chemical synthesis and extraction from human milk, 2′-FL can be produced enzymatically in vitro and in vivo. The most promising approach for a large-scale formation of 2′-FL is the whole cell biosynthesis in Escherichia coli by intracellular synthesis of GDP-L-fucose and subsequent fucosylation of lactose with an appropriate α1,2-fucosyltransferase. Even though whole cell approaches have been demonstrated for the synthesis of 2′-FL, further improvements of the engineered E. coli host are required to increase product yields. Furthermore, an antibiotic-free method of whole cell synthesis of 2′-FL is desirable to simplify product purification and to avoid traces of antibiotics in a product with nutritional purpose. Results Here we report the construction of the first selection marker-free E. coli strain that produces 2′-FL from lactose and glycerol. To construct this strain, recombinant genes of the de novo synthesis pathway for GDP-L-fucose as well as the gene for the H. pylori fucosyltransferase futC were integrated into the chromosome of E. coli JM109 by using the λ-Red recombineering technique. Strains carrying additional copies of the futC gene and/or the gene fkp (from Bacteroides fragilis) for an additional salvage pathway for GDP-L-fucose production were used and shown to further improve production of 2′-FL in shake flask experiments. An increase of the intracellular GDP-L-fucose concentration by expression of fkp gene as well as an additional copy of the futC gene lead to an enhanced formation of 2′-FL. Using an improved production strain, feasibility of large scale 2′-FL production was demonstrated in an antibiotic-free fed-batch fermentation (13 l) with a final 2′-FL concentration of 20.28

  18. Escherichia coli biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Beloin, Christophe; Roux, Agnès; Ghigo, Jean-Marc

    2008-01-01

    Escherichia coli is a predominant species among facultative anaerobic bacteria of the gastrointestinal tract. Both its frequent community lifestyle and the availability of a wide array of genetic tools contributed to establish E. coli as a relevant model organism for the study of surface colonization. Several key factors, including different extracellular appendages, are implicated in E. coli surface colonization and their expression and activity are finely regulated, both in space and time, to ensure productive events leading to mature biofilm formation. This chapter will present known molecular mechanisms underlying biofilm development in both commensal and pathogenic E. coli. PMID:18453280

  19. Lactococcus garvieae carries a chromosomally encoded pentapeptide repeat protein that confers reduced susceptibility to quinolones in Escherichia coli producing a cytotoxic effect.

    PubMed

    Gibello, Alicia; Díaz de Alba, Paula; Blanco, M Mar; Machuca, Jesus; Cutuli, M Teresa; Rodríguez-Martínez, José Manuel

    2014-09-01

    This study characterises a chromosomal gene of Lactococcus garvieae encoding a pentapeptide repeat protein designated as LgaQnr. This gene has been implicated in reduced susceptibility to quinolones in this bacterium, which is of relevance to both veterinary and human medicine. All of the L. garvieae isolates analysed were positive for the lgaqnr gene. The expression of lgaqnr in Escherichia coli reduced the susceptibility to quinolones, producing an adverse effect. The reduced susceptibility to ciprofloxacin was 16-fold in E. coli ATCC 25922 and 32-fold in E. coli DH10B, compared to the control strains. The minimum inhibitory concentration of nalidixic acid was also increased 4 or 5-fold. The effect of the expression of lgaqnr in E. coli was investigated by electron microscopy and was observed to affect the structure of the cell and the inner membrane of the recombinant cells.

  20. Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Tânia A T; Elias, Waldir P; Scaletsky, Isabel C A; Guth, Beatriz E C; Rodrigues, Juliana F; Piazza, Roxane M F; Ferreira, Luís C S; Martinez, Marina B

    2016-12-01

    Most Escherichia coli strains live harmlessly in the intestines and rarely cause disease in healthy individuals. Nonetheless, a number of pathogenic strains can cause diarrhea or extraintestinal diseases both in healthy and immunocompromised individuals. Diarrheal illnesses are a severe public health problem and a major cause of morbidity and mortality in infants and young children, especially in developing countries. E. coli strains that cause diarrhea have evolved by acquiring, through horizontal gene transfer, a particular set of characteristics that have successfully persisted in the host. According to the group of virulence determinants acquired, specific combinations were formed determining the currently known E. coli pathotypes, which are collectively known as diarrheagenic E. coli. In this review, we have gathered information on current definitions, serotypes, lineages, virulence mechanisms, epidemiology, and diagnosis of the major diarrheagenic E. coli pathotypes.

  1. The role of MatP, ZapA and ZapB in chromosomal organization and dynamics in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Männik, Jaana; Castillo, Daniel E.; Yang, Da; Siopsis, George; Männik, Jaan

    2016-01-01

    Despite extensive research over several decades, a comprehensive view of how the Escherichia coli chromosome is organized within the nucleoid, and how two daughter chromosomes segregate has yet to emerge. Here we investigate the role of the MatP, ZapA and ZapB proteins in organizing the replication terminus (Ter) region and in the chromosomal segregation process. Quantitative image analysis of the fluorescently labeled Ter region shows that the replication terminus attaches to the divisome in a single segment along the perimeter of the cell in a MatP, ZapA and ZapB-dependent manner. The attachment does not significantly affect the bulk chromosome segregation in slow growth conditions. With or without the attachment, two chromosomal masses separate from each other at a speed comparable to the cell growth. The separation starts even before the replication terminus region positions itself at the center of the nucleoid. Modeling of the segregation based on conformational entropy correctly predicts the positioning of the replication terminus region within the nucleoid. However, the model produces a distinctly different chromosomal density distribution than the experiment, indicating that the conformational entropy plays a limited role in segregating the chromosomes in the late stages of replication. PMID:26762981

  2. Polymorphism, duplication, and IS1-mediated rearrangement in the chromosomal his-rfb-gnd region of Escherichia coli strains with group IA and capsular K antigens.

    PubMed

    Drummelsmith, J; Amor, P A; Whitfield, C

    1997-05-01

    Individual Escherichia coli strains produce several cell surface polysaccharides. In E. coli E69, the his region of the chromosome contains the rfb (serotype O9 lipopolysaccharide O-antigen biosynthesis) and cps (serotype K30 group IA capsular polysaccharide biosynthesis) loci. Polymorphisms in this region of the Escherichia coli chromosome reflect extensive antigenic diversity in the species. Previously, we reported a duplication of the manC-manB genes, encoding enzymes involved in GDP-mannose formation, upstream of rfb in strain E69 (P. Jayaratne et al., J. Bacteriol. 176:3126-3139, 1994). Here we show that one of the manC-manB copies is flanked by IS1 elements, providing a potential mechanism for the gene duplication. Adjacent to manB1 on the IS1-flanked segment is a further open reading frame (ugd), encoding uridine-5'-diphosphoglucose dehydrogenase. The Ugd enzyme is responsible for the production of UDP-glucuronic acid, a precursor required for K30 antigen synthesis. Construction of a chromosomal ugd::Gm(r) insertion mutation demonstrated the essential role for Ugd in the biosynthesis of the K30 antigen and confirmed that there is no additional functional ugd copy in strain E69. PCR amplification and Southern hybridization were used to examine the distribution of IS1 elements and ugd genes in the vicinity of rfb in other E. coli strains, producing different group IA K antigens. The relative order of genes and, where present, IS1 elements was established in these strains. The regions adjacent to rfb in these strains are highly variable in both size and gene order, but in all cases where a ugd homolog was present, it was found near rfb. The presence of IS1 elements in the rfb regions of several of these strains provides a potential mechanism for recombination and deletion events which could contribute to the antigenic diversity seen in surface polysaccharides.

  3. DNA tandem repeat instability in the Escherichia coli chromosome is stimulated by mismatch repair at an adjacent CAG·CTG trinucleotide repeat

    PubMed Central

    Blackwood, John K.; Okely, Ewa A.; Zahra, Rabaab; Eykelenboom, John K.; Leach, David R. F.

    2010-01-01

    Approximately half the human genome is composed of repetitive DNA sequences classified into microsatellites, minisatellites, tandem repeats, and dispersed repeats. These repetitive sequences have coevolved within the genome but little is known about their potential interactions. Trinucleotide repeats (TNRs) are a subclass of microsatellites that are implicated in human disease. Expansion of CAG·CTG TNRs is responsible for Huntington disease, myotonic dystrophy, and a number of spinocerebellar ataxias. In yeast DNA double-strand break (DSB) formation has been proposed to be associated with instability and chromosome fragility at these sites and replication fork reversal (RFR) to be involved either in promoting or in preventing instability. However, the molecular basis for chromosome fragility of repetitive DNA remains poorly understood. Here we show that a CAG·CTG TNR array stimulates instability at a 275-bp tandem repeat located 6.3 kb away on the Escherichia coli chromosome. Remarkably, this stimulation is independent of both DNA double-strand break repair (DSBR) and RFR but is dependent on a functional mismatch repair (MMR) system. Our results provide a demonstration, in a simple model system, that MMR at one type of repetitive DNA has the potential to influence the stability of another. Furthermore, the mechanism of this stimulation places a limit on the universality of DSBR or RFR models of instability and chromosome fragility at CAG·CTG TNR sequences. Instead, our data suggest that explanations of chromosome fragility should encompass the possibility of chromosome gaps formed during MMR. PMID:21149728

  4. Flagellar region 3b supports strong expression of integrated DNA and the highest chromosomal integration efficiency of the Escherichia coli flagellar regions

    PubMed Central

    Juhas, Mario; Ajioka, James W

    2015-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli is routinely used as the chassis for a variety of biotechnology and synthetic biology applications. Identification and analysis of reliable chromosomal integration and expression target loci is crucial for E. coli engineering. Chromosomal loci differ significantly in their ability to support integration and expression of the integrated genetic circuits. In this study, we investigate E. coli K12 MG1655 flagellar regions 2 and 3b. Integration of the genetic circuit into seven and nine highly conserved genes of the flagellar regions 2 (motA, motB, flhD, flhE, cheW, cheY and cheZ) and 3b (fliE, F, G, J, K, L, M, P, R), respectively, showed significant variation in their ability to support chromosomal integration and expression of the integrated genetic circuit. While not reducing the growth of the engineered strains, the integrations into all 16 target sites led to the loss of motility. In addition to high expression, the flagellar region 3b supports the highest efficiency of integration of all E. coli K12 MG1655 flagellar regions and is therefore potentially the most suitable for the integration of synthetic genetic circuits. PMID:26074421

  5. An Escherichia coli strain with all chromosomal rRNA operons inactivated: complete exchange of rRNA genes between bacteria.

    PubMed

    Asai, T; Zaporojets, D; Squires, C; Squires, C L

    1999-03-02

    Current global phylogenies are built predominantly on rRNA sequences. However, an experimental system for studying the evolution of rRNA is not readily available, mainly because the rRNA genes are highly repeated in most experimental organisms. We have constructed an Escherichia coli strain in which all seven chromosomal rRNA operons are inactivated by deletions spanning the 16S and 23S coding regions. A single E. coli rRNA operon carried by a multicopy plasmid supplies 16S and 23S rRNA to the cell. By using this strain we have succeeded in creating microorganisms that contain only a foreign rRNA operon derived from either Salmonella typhimurium or Proteus vulgaris, microorganisms that have diverged from E. coli about 120-350 million years ago. We also were able to replace the E. coli rRNA operon with an E. coli/yeast hybrid one in which the GTPase center of E. coli 23S rRNA had been substituted by the corresponding domain from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. These results suggest that, contrary to common belief, coevolution of rRNA with many other components in the translational machinery may not completely preclude the horizontal transfer of rRNA genes.

  6. Prophage lambda induces terminal recombination in Escherichia coli by inhibiting chromosome dimer resolution. An orientation-dependent cis-effect lending support to bipolarization of the terminus.

    PubMed Central

    Corre, J; Patte, J; Louarn, J M

    2000-01-01

    A prophage lambda inserted by homologous recombination near dif, the chromosome dimer resolution site of Escherichia coli, is excised at a frequency that depends on its orientation with respect to dif. In wild-type cells, terminal hyper- (TH) recombination is prophage specific and undetectable by a test involving deletion of chromosomal segments between repeats identical to those used for prophage insertion. TH recombination is, however, detected in both excision and deletion assays when Deltadif, xerC, or ftsK mutations inhibit dimer resolution: lack of specialized resolution apparently results in recombinogenic lesions near dif. We also observed that the presence near dif of the prophage, in the orientation causing TH recombination, inhibits dif resolution activity. By its recombinogenic effect, this inhibition explains the enhanced prophage excision in wild-type cells. The primary effect of the prophage is probably an alteration of the dimer resolution regional control, which requires that dif is flanked by suitably oriented (polarized) stretches of DNA. Our model postulates that the prophage inserted near dif in the deleterious orientation disturbs chromosome polarization on the side of the site where it is integrated, because lambda DNA, like the chromosome, is polarized by sequence elements. Candidate sequences are oligomers that display skewed distributions on each oriC-dif chromosome arm and on lambda DNA. PMID:10628967

  7. Lack of the H-NS Protein Results in Extended and Aberrantly Positioned DNA during Chromosome Replication and Segregation in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Helgesen, Emily; Fossum-Raunehaug, Solveig

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The architectural protein H-NS binds nonspecifically to hundreds of sites throughout the chromosome and can multimerize to stiffen segments of DNA as well as to form DNA-protein-DNA bridges. H-NS has been suggested to contribute to the orderly folding of the Escherichia coli chromosome in the highly compacted nucleoid. In this study, we investigated the positioning and dynamics of the origins, the replisomes, and the SeqA structures trailing the replication forks in cells lacking the H-NS protein. In H-NS mutant cells, foci of SeqA, replisomes, and origins were irregularly positioned in the cell. Further analysis showed that the average distance between the SeqA structures and the replisome was increased by ∼100 nm compared to that in wild-type cells, whereas the colocalization of SeqA-bound sister DNA behind replication forks was not affected. This result may suggest that H-NS contributes to the folding of DNA along adjacent segments. H-NS mutant cells were found to be incapable of adopting the distinct and condensed nucleoid structures characteristic of E. coli cells growing rapidly in rich medium. It appears as if H-NS mutant cells adopt a “slow-growth” type of chromosome organization under nutrient-rich conditions, which leads to a decreased cellular DNA content. IMPORTANCE It is not fully understood how and to what extent nucleoid-associated proteins contribute to chromosome folding and organization during replication and segregation in Escherichia coli. In this work, we find in vivo indications that cells lacking the nucleoid-associated protein H-NS have a lower degree of DNA condensation than wild-type cells. Our work suggests that H-NS is involved in condensing the DNA along adjacent segments on the chromosome and is not likely to tether newly replicated strands of sister DNA. We also find indications that H-NS is required for rapid growth with high DNA content and for the formation of a highly condensed nucleoid structure under such

  8. Evolution of carrying capacity in evolution experiments focusing on a single locus on the Escherichia coli chromosome.

    PubMed

    Mori, Kotaro; Kashiwagi, Akiko; Urabe, Itaru; Yomo, Tetsuya

    2009-02-01

    We performed a series of evolution experiments, the results of which illustrated the relationship between mutations and increased carrying capacity (K). Performing an evolution experiment with repeated cycles of mutation by PCR and selection makes it possible to obtain results over shorter culture durations than in methods reported previously relying on spontaneous mutation and selection. We constructed random mutant populations of Escherichia coli in which members differed only in part of the genomic copy of the glutamine synthetase gene and performed daily serial transfer culture where the populations were in K-selected environments. The value of K in this system was increased by 10(5)- to 10(8)-fold relative to the parent clone, which was achieved by four randomly introduced mutations. This method can be applied to any gene and will be useful for analyzing a number of important issues in evolutionary biology.

  9. Hydrophobicity, expressivity and aromaticity are the major trends of amino-acid usage in 999 Escherichia coli chromosome-encoded genes.

    PubMed Central

    Lobry, J R; Gautier, C

    1994-01-01

    Multivariate analysis of the amino-acid compositions of 999 chromosome-encoded proteins from Escherichia coli showed that three main factors influence the variability of amino-acid composition. The first factor was correlated with the global hydrophobicity of proteins, and it discriminated integral membrane proteins from the others. The second factor was correlated with gene expressivity, showing a bias in highly expressed genes towards amino-acids having abundant major tRNAs. Just as highly expressed genes have reduced codon diversity in protein coding sequences, so do they have a reduced diversity of amino-acid choice. This showed that translational constraints are important enough to affect the global amino-acid composition of proteins. The third factor was correlated with the aromaticity of proteins, showing that aromatic amino-acid content is highly variable. PMID:8065933

  10. migS, a cis-acting site that affects bipolar positioning of oriC on the Escherichia coli chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Yamaichi, Yoshiharu; Niki, Hironori

    2004-01-01

    During replication of the Escherichia coli chromosome, the replicated Ori domains migrate towards opposite cell poles, suggesting that a cis-acting site for bipolar migration is located in this region. To identify this cis-acting site, a series of mutants was constructed by splitting subchromosomes from the original chromosome. One mutant, containing a 720 kb subchromosome, was found to be defective in the bipolar positioning of oriC. The creation of deletion mutants allowed the identification of migS, a 25 bp sequence, as the cis-acting site for the bipolar positioning of oriC. When migS was located at the replication terminus, the chromosomal segment showed bipolar positioning. migS was able to rescue bipolar migration of plasmid DNA containing a mutation in the SopABC partitioning system. Interestingly, multiple copies of the migS sequence on a plasmid in trans inhibited the bipolar positioning of oriC. Taken together, these findings indicate that migS plays a crucial role in the bipolar positioning of oriC. In addition, real-time analysis of the dynamic morphological changes of nucleoids in wild-type and migS mutants suggests that bipolar positioning of the replicated oriC contributes to nucleoid organization. PMID:14685268

  11. ANIMAL ENTEROTOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI

    PubMed Central

    Dubreuil, J. Daniel; Isaacson, Richard E.; Schifferli, Dieter M.

    2016-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is the most common cause of E. coli diarrhea in farm animals. ETEC are characterized by the ability to produce two types of virulence factors; adhesins that promote binding to specific enterocyte receptors for intestinal colonization and enterotoxins responsible for fluid secretion. The best-characterized adhesins are expressed in the context of fimbriae, such as the F4 (also designated K88), F5 (K99), F6 (987P), F17 and F18 fimbriae. Once established in the animal small intestine, ETEC produces enterotoxin(s) that lead to diarrhea. The enterotoxins belong to two major classes; heat-labile toxin that consist of one active and five binding subunits (LT), and heat-stable toxins that are small polypeptides (STa, STb, and EAST1). This chapter describes the disease and pathogenesis of animal ETEC, the corresponding virulence genes and protein products of these bacteria, their regulation and targets in animal hosts, as well as mechanisms of action. Furthermore, vaccines, inhibitors, probiotics and the identification of potential new targets identified by genomics are presented in the context of animal ETEC. PMID:27735786

  12. Regulatory and structural properties differentiating the chromosomal and the bacteriophage-associated Escherichia coli O157:H7 Cu, Zn Superoxide Dismutases

    PubMed Central

    D'Orazio, Melania; Scotti, Raffaella; Nicolini, Laura; Cervoni, Laura; Rotilio, Giuseppe; Battistoni, Andrea; Gabbianelli, Roberta

    2008-01-01

    Background Highly virulent enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 strains possess three sodC genes encoding for periplasmic Cu, Zn superoxide dismutases: sodC, which is identical to the gene present in non-pathogenic E. coli strains, and sodC-F1 and sodC-F2, two nearly identical genes located within lambdoid prophage sequences. The significance of this apparent sodC redundancy in E. coli O157:H7 has not yet been investigated. Results We report that strains deleted of one or more sodC genes are less resistant than the wild type strain to a challenge with hydrogen peroxide, thus confirming their involvement in the bacterial antioxidant apparatus. To understand if the different sodC genes have truly overlapping functions, we have carried out a comparison of the functional, structural and regulatory properties of the various E. coli O157:H7 SodC enzymes. We have found that the chromosomal and prophagic sodC genes are differentially regulated in vitro. sodC is exclusively expressed in aerobic cultures grown to the stationary phase. In contrast, sodC-F1 and sodC-F2 are expressed also in the logarithmic phase and in anaerobic cultures. Moreover, the abundance of SodC-F1/SodC-F2 increases with respect to that of SodC in bacteria recovered from infected Caco-2 cells, suggesting higher expression/stability of SodC-F1/SodC-F2 in intracellular environments. This observation correlates with the properties of the proteins. In fact, monomeric SodC and dimeric SodC-F1/SodC-F2 are characterized by sharp differences in catalytic activity, metal affinity, protease resistance and stability. Conclusion Our data show that the chromosomal and bacteriophage-associated E. coli O157:H7 sodC genes have different regulatory properties and encode for proteins with distinct structural/functional features, suggesting that they likely play distinctive roles in bacterial protection from reactive oxygen species. In particular, dimeric SodC-F1 and SodC-F2 possess physico-chemical properties

  13. Characterization of a chromosomally integrated luxCDABE marker for investigation of shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O91:H21 shedding in cattle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Yingying; Mathew, Alan G.

    2011-06-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O91:H21 has been recognized as a potential life-threatening foodborne pathogen and is commonly involved in human infections in European countries. Fecal shedding of the organism by cattle is considered to be the ultimate source for contaminations. Studies examining STEC shedding patterns often include inoculation of strains carrying antibiotic resistance makers for identifiable recovery. However, indigenous intestinal microflora exhibiting similar antibiotic resistance patterns can confound such studies. Such was the case in a study by our group when attempting to characterize shedding patterns of O91:H21 in calves. A chromosomally integrated bioluminescence marker using a luxCDABE cassette from Photorhabdus luminescens was developed in O91:H21 to overcome such shortcomings of antibiotic resistance markers during animal challenge experiment. The marker was validated in various aspects and was shown to have no impact on metabolic reactions, isotype virulence gene patterns, cost to growth, and additionally demonstrated high in vitro stability. Together, the results indicated that a chromosomally integrated luxCDABE based marker may be a superior system for the study of STEC colonization and shedding in cattle.

  14. Genetic improvement of Escherichia coli for ethanol production: Chromosomal integration of Zymomonas mobilis genes encoding pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase II

    SciTech Connect

    Ohta, Kazuyoshi; Beall, D.S.; Mejia, J.P.; Shanmugam, K.T.; Ingram, L.O. )

    1991-04-01

    Zymomonas mobilis genes for pyruvate decarboxylase (pdc) and alcohol dehydrogenase II (adhB) were integrated into the Escherichia coli chromosome within or near the pyruvate formate-lyase gene (pfl). Integration improved the stability of the Z. mobilis genes in E. coli, but further selection was required to increase expression. Spontaneous mutants were selected for resistance to high levels of chloramphenicol that also expressed high levels of the Z. mobilis genes. Analogous mutants were selected for increased expression of alcohol dehydrogenase on aldehyde indicator plates. These mutants were functionally equivalent to the previous plasmid-based strains for the fermentation of xylose and glucose to ethanol. Ethanol concentrations of 54.4 and 41.6 g/liter were obtained from 10% glucose and 8% xylose, respectively. The efficiency of conversion exceeded theoretical limits (0.51 g of ethanol/g of sugar) on the basis of added sugars because of the additional production of ethanol from the catabolism of complex nutrients. Further mutations were introduced to inactivate succinate production (frd) and to block homologous recombination (recA).

  15. Occurrence of chromosome- or plasmid-mediated aerobactin iron transport systems and hemolysin production among clonal groups of human invasive strains of Escherichia coli K1.

    PubMed

    Valvano, M A; Silver, R P; Crosa, J H

    1986-04-01

    The incidence of the aerobactin system and the genetic location of aerobactin genes were investigated in Escherichia coli K1 neonatal isolates belonging to different clonal groups. A functional aerobactin system was found in all members of the O7 MP3, O1 MP5, O1 MP9, and O18 MP9 clonal groups examined and also in K1 strains having O6, O16, and O75 lipopolysaccharide types, which are less frequently associated with neonatal infections. In contrast, the aerobactin system was not detected in strains from the O18 MP6 clone. The combined results of plasmid and colony hybridization experiments showed that the aerobactin genes were located on the chromosome in the majority (75%) of the aerobactin-producing K1 isolates, the genetic location of the aerobactin genes was closely correlated with the outer membrane protein profile rather than the O lipopolysaccharide type, the K1 strains harboring a chromosome-mediated aerobactin system did not possess colicin V genes, and five of six K1 isolates possessing a plasmid-borne aerobactin system contained colicin V genes which were located on the same plasmids carrying the aerobactin genes. The comparison of hemolysin production with possession of the aerobactin system in virulent clones of E. coli K1 strains showed that all of the aerobactin-producing strains from the O18 MP9 and O7 MP3 clonal groups did not synthesize hemolysin, whereas 11 of 12 aerobactin-nonproducing O18 MP6 isolates were hemolytic. Of the K1 strains examined, 92.5% possessed either the aerobactin system or the ability to produce hemolysin or both.

  16. Insights Into Mutagenesis Using Escherichia coli Chromosomal lacZ Strains That Enable Detection of a Wide Spectrum of Mutational Events

    PubMed Central

    Seier, Tracey; Padgett, Dana R.; Zilberberg, Gal; Sutera, Vincent A.; Toha, Noor; Lovett, Susan T.

    2011-01-01

    Strand misalignments at DNA repeats during replication are implicated in mutational hotspots. To study these events, we have generated strains carrying mutations in the Escherichia coli chromosomal lacZ gene that revert via deletion of a short duplicated sequence or by template switching within imperfect inverted repeat (quasipalindrome, QP) sequences. Using these strains, we demonstrate that mutation of the distal repeat of a quasipalindrome, with respect to replication fork movement, is about 10-fold higher than the proximal repeat, consistent with more common template switching on the leading strand. The leading strand bias was lost in the absence of exonucleases I and VII, suggesting that it results from more efficient suppression of template switching by 3′ exonucleases targeted to the lagging strand. The loss of 3′ exonucleases has no effect on strand misalignment at direct repeats to produce deletion. To compare these events to other mutations, we have reengineered reporters (designed by Cupples and Miller 1989) that detect specific base substitutions or frameshifts in lacZ with the reverting lacZ locus on the chromosome rather than an F′ element. This set allows rapid screening of potential mutagens, environmental conditions, or genetic loci for effects on a broad set of mutational events. We found that hydroxyurea (HU), which depletes dNTP pools, slightly elevated templated mutations at inverted repeats but had no effect on deletions, simple frameshifts, or base substitutions. Mutations in nucleotide diphosphate kinase, ndk, significantly elevated simple mutations but had little effect on the templated class. Zebularine, a cytosine analog, elevated all classes. PMID:21441210

  17. RecET driven chromosomal gene targeting to generate a RecA deficient Escherichia coli strain for Cre mediated production of minicircle DNA

    PubMed Central

    Tolmachov, Oleg; Palaszewski, Iwona; Bigger, Brian; Coutelle, Charles

    2006-01-01

    Background Minicircle DNA is the non-replicating product of intramolecular site-specific recombination within a bacterial minicircle producer plasmid. Minicircle DNA can be engineered to contain predominantly human sequences which have a low content of CpG dinucleotides and thus reduced immunotoxicity for humans, whilst the immunogenic bacterial origin and antibiotic resistance marker gene sequences are entirely removed by site-specific recombination. This property makes minicircle DNA an excellent vector for non-viral gene therapy. Large-scale production of minicircle DNA requires a bacterial strain expressing tightly controlled site-specific recombinase, such as Cre recombinase. As recombinant plasmids tend to be more stable in RecA-deficient strains, we aimed to construct a recA- bacterial strain for generation of minicircle vector DNA with less chance of unwanted deletions. Results We describe here the construction of the RecA-deficient minicircle DNA producer Escherichia coli HB101Cre with a chromosomally located Cre recombinase gene under the tight control of the araC regulon. The Cre gene expression cassette was inserted into the chromosomal lacZ gene by creating transient homologous recombination proficiency in the recA- strain HB101 using plasmid-born recET genes and homology-mediated chromosomal "pop-in, pop-out" of the plasmid pBAD75Cre containing the Cre gene and a temperature sensitive replication origin. Favourably for the Cre gene placement, at the "pop-out" step, the observed frequency of RecET-led recombination between the proximal regions of homology was 10 times higher than between the distal regions. Using the minicircle producing plasmid pFIXluc containing mutant loxP66 and loxP71 sites, we isolated pure minicircle DNA from the obtained recA- producer strain HB101Cre. The minicircle DNA preparation consisted of monomeric and, unexpectedly, also multimeric minicircle DNA forms, all containing the hybrid loxP66/71 site 5'-TACCGTTCGT ATAATGTATG

  18. A cloning vector for creation of Escherichia coli lacZ translational fusions and generation of linear template for chromosomal integrations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A novel cloning vector to aid in the construction of ß-galactosidase reporter systems for gene expression studies in lactose metabolizing strains of Shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli is described. The plasmid allows construction of translational fusions of cloned gene promoters with a short seg...

  19. An integrated database to support research on Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Baehr, A.; Dunham, G.; Matsuda, Hideo; Michaels, G.; Taylor, R.; Overbeek, R.; Rudd, K.E.; Ginsburg, A.; Joerg, D.; Kazic, T.; Hagstrom, R.; Zawada, D.; Smith, C.; Yoshida, Kaoru

    1992-01-01

    We have used logic programming to design and implement a prototype database of genomic information for the model bacterial organism Escherichia coli. This report presents the fundamental database primitives that can be used to access and manipulate data relating to the E. coli genome. The present system, combined with a tutorial manual, provides immediate access to the integrated knowledge base for E. coli chromosome data. It also serves as the foundation for development of more user-friendly interfaces that have the same retrieval power and high-level tools to analyze complex chromosome organization.

  20. Comparison of clinical categories for Escherichia coli harboring specific qnr and chromosomal-mediated fluoroquinolone resistance determinants according to CLSI and EUCAST.

    PubMed

    Machuca, Jesús; Briales, Alejandra; Díaz-de-Alba, Paula; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Rodríguez-Martínez, José-Manuel; Pascual, Álvaro

    2016-03-01

    EUCAST breakpoints are more restrictive than those defined by CLSI. This study highlights the discrepancies between CLSI and EUCAST in a well characterized isogenic Escherichia coli collection and their correlations with specific quinolone resistance mechanisms. The greatest number of discrepancies was observed in strains containing 2-4 resistance mechanisms (MIC values on the borderline of clinical resistance). Bearing in mind that quinolones are concentration dependent antimicrobial agents, small changes in MIC may have relevant consequences for treatment outcomes.

  1. Exonuclease IX of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Shafritz, K M; Sandigursky, M; Franklin, W A

    1998-01-01

    The bacteria Escherichia coli contains several exonucleases acting on both double- and single-stranded DNA and in both a 5'-->3' and 3'-->5' direction. These enzymes are involved in replicative, repair and recombination functions. We have identified a new exonuclease found in E.coli, termed exonuclease IX, that acts preferentially on single-stranded DNA as a 3'-->5' exonuclease and also functions as a 3'-phosphodiesterase on DNA containing 3'-incised apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites to remove the product trans -4-hydroxy-2-pentenal 5-phosphate. The enzyme showed essentially no activity as a deoxyribophosphodiesterase acting on 5'-incised AP sites. The activity was isolated as a glutathione S-transferase fusion protein from a sequence of the E.coli genome that was 60% identical to a 260 bp region of the small fragment of the DNA polymerase I gene. The protein has a molecular weight of 28 kDa and is free of AP endonuclease and phosphatase activities. Exonuclease IX is expressed in E.coli , as demonstrated by reverse transcription-PCR, and it may function in the DNA base excision repair and other pathways. PMID:9592142

  2. Synergistic effects of chromosomal ispB deletion and dxs overexpression on coenzyme Q(10) production in recombinant Escherichia coli expressing Agrobacterium tumefaciens dps gene.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jin-Ho; Ryu, Yeon-Woo; Park, Yong-Cheol; Seo, Jin-Ho

    2009-10-12

    For biotechnological production of coenzyme Q(10) (CoQ(10)) in recombinant Escherichia coli, three genetic manipulations were performed: heterologous expression of decaprenyl diphosphate synthase (Dps) from Agrobacterium tumefaciens, deletion of endogenous octaprenyl diphosphate synthase (IspB), and overexpression of 1-deoxy-d-xylulose synthase (Dxs). Expression of the dps gene and deletion of the ispB gene in E. coli BL21(DE3)DeltaispB/pAP1 allowed production of CoQ(10) only. Furthermore, coexpression of the dxs gene increased the specific content of CoQ(10) from 0.55-0.89mgg(-1) to 1.40mgg(-1). For mass production of CoQ(10), fed-batch fermentation of E. coli BL21(DE3)DeltaispB/pAP1+pDXS was carried out in a defined medium with 20gl(-1) initial glucose and by the glucose-feeding strategy of pH-stat. Finally, 99.4mgl(-1) CoQ(10) concentration, 1.41mgg(-1) specific CoQ(10) content and 3.11mgl(-1)h(-1) productivity were obtained in 33h of the fermentation, which were 78, 1.9, and 19 times higher than those for E. coli BL21(DE3)/pAP1 without the ispB deletion and dxs overexpression.

  3. Recombination of synthetic oligonucleotides with prokaryotic chromosomes: substrate requirements of the Escherichia coli/lambdaRed and Sulfolobus acidocaldarius recombination systems.

    PubMed

    Grogan, Dennis W; Stengel, Kristy R

    2008-09-01

    In order to reveal functional properties of recombination involving short ssDNAs in hyperthermophilic archaea, we evaluated oligonucleotide-mediated transformation (OMT) in Sulfolobus acidocaldarius and Escherichia coli as a function of the molecular properties of the ssDNA substrates. Unmodified ssDNAs as short as 20-22 nt yielded recombinants in both organisms, as did longer DNAs forming as few as 2-5 base pairs on one side of the genomic mutation. The two OMT systems showed similar responses to certain end modifications of the oligonucleotides, but E. coli was found to require a 5' phosphate on 5'-limited ssDNA whereas this requirement was not evident in S. acidocaldarius. The ability of both E. coli and S. acidocaldarius to incorporate short, mismatched ssDNAs into their genomes raises questions about the biological significance of this capability, including its phylogenetic distribution among microorganisms and its impact on genome stability. These questions seem particularly relevant for S. acidocaldarius, as this archaeon has natural competence for OMT, encodes no MutSL homologues and thrives under environmental conditions that accelerate DNA decomposition.

  4. Independence of replisomes in Escherichia coli chromosomalreplication

    SciTech Connect

    Breier, Adam M.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.; Cozzarelli, Nicholas R.

    2005-03-13

    In Escherichia coli DNA replication is carried out by the coordinated action of the proteins within a replisome. After replication initiation, the two bidirectionally oriented replisomes from a single origin are colocalized into higher-order structures termed replication factories. The factory model postulated that the two replisomes are also functionally coupled. We tested this hypothesis by using DNA combing and whole-genome microarrays. Nascent DNA surrounding oriC in single, combed chromosomes showed instead that one replisome, usually the leftward one, was significantly ahead of the other 70% of the time. We next used microarrays to follow replication throughout the genome by measuring DNA copy number. We found in multiple E. coli strains that the replisomes are independent, with the leftward replisome ahead of the rightward one. The size of the bias was strain-specific, varying from 50 to 130 kb in the array results. When we artificially blocked one replisome, the other continued unabated, again demonstrating independence. We suggest an improved version of the factory model that retains the advantages of threading DNA through colocalized replisomes at about equal rates, but allows the cell flexibility to overcome obstacles encountered during elongation.

  5. Structure of Escherichia Coli Tryptophanase

    SciTech Connect

    Ku,S.; Yip, P.; Howell, P.

    2006-01-01

    Pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) dependent tryptophanase has been isolated from Escherichia coli and its crystal structure has been determined. The structure shares the same fold with and has similar quaternary structure to Proteus vulgaris tryptophanase and tyrosine-phenol lyase, but is found in a closed conformation when compared with these two enzymes. The tryptophanase structure, solved in its apo form, does not have covalent PLP bound in the active site, but two sulfate ions. The sulfate ions occupy the phosphoryl-binding site of PLP and the binding site of the {alpha}-carboxyl of the natural substrate tryptophan. One of the sulfate ions makes extensive interactions with both the transferase and PLP-binding domains of the protein and appears to be responsible for holding the enzyme in its closed conformation. Based on the sulfate density and the structure of the P. vulgaris enzyme, PLP and the substrate tryptophan were modeled into the active site. The resulting model is consistent with the roles of Arg419 in orienting the substrate to PLP and acidifying the {alpha}-proton of the substrate for {beta}-elimination, Lys269 in the formation and decomposition of the PLP quinonoid intermediate, Arg230 in orienting the substrate-PLP intermediates in the optimal conformation for catalysis, and His463 and Tyr74 in determining substrate specificity and suggests that the closed conformation observed in the structure could be induced by substrate binding and that significant conformational changes occur during catalysis. A catalytic mechanism for tryptophanase is proposed. Since E. coli tryptophanase has resisted forming diffraction-quality crystals for many years, the molecular surface of tryptophanase has been analyzed in various crystal forms and it was rationalized that strong crystal contacts occur on the flat surface of the protein and that the size of crystal contact surface seems to correlate with the diffraction quality of the crystal.

  6. Structure of Escherichia coli tryptophanase.

    PubMed

    Ku, Shao Yang; Yip, Patrick; Howell, P Lynne

    2006-07-01

    Pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) dependent tryptophanase has been isolated from Escherichia coli and its crystal structure has been determined. The structure shares the same fold with and has similar quaternary structure to Proteus vulgaris tryptophanase and tyrosine-phenol lyase, but is found in a closed conformation when compared with these two enzymes. The tryptophanase structure, solved in its apo form, does not have covalent PLP bound in the active site, but two sulfate ions. The sulfate ions occupy the phosphoryl-binding site of PLP and the binding site of the alpha-carboxyl of the natural substrate tryptophan. One of the sulfate ions makes extensive interactions with both the transferase and PLP-binding domains of the protein and appears to be responsible for holding the enzyme in its closed conformation. Based on the sulfate density and the structure of the P. vulgaris enzyme, PLP and the substrate tryptophan were modeled into the active site. The resulting model is consistent with the roles of Arg419 in orienting the substrate to PLP and acidifying the alpha-proton of the substrate for beta-elimination, Lys269 in the formation and decomposition of the PLP quinonoid intermediate, Arg230 in orienting the substrate-PLP intermediates in the optimal conformation for catalysis, and His463 and Tyr74 in determining substrate specificity and suggests that the closed conformation observed in the structure could be induced by substrate binding and that significant conformational changes occur during catalysis. A catalytic mechanism for tryptophanase is proposed. Since E. coli tryptophanase has resisted forming diffraction-quality crystals for many years, the molecular surface of tryptophanase has been analyzed in various crystal forms and it was rationalized that strong crystal contacts occur on the flat surface of the protein and that the size of crystal contact surface seems to correlate with the diffraction quality of the crystal.

  7. The chromosomal nature of LT-II enterotoxins solved: a lambdoid prophage encodes both LT-II and one of two novel pertussis-toxin-like toxin family members in type II enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Jobling, Michael G.

    2016-01-01

    Heat-labile enterotoxins (LT) of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are structurally and functionally related to cholera toxin (CT). LT-I toxins are plasmid-encoded and flanked by IS elements, while LT-II toxins of type II ETEC are chromosomally encoded with flanking genes that appear phage related. Here, I determined the complete genomic sequence of the locus for the LT-IIa type strain SA53, and show that the LT-IIa genes are encoded by a 51 239 bp lambdoid prophage integrated at the rac locus, the site of a defective prophage in E. coli K12 strains. Of 50 LT-IIa and LT-IIc, 46 prophages also encode one member of two novel two-gene ADP-ribosyltransferase toxin families that are both related to pertussis toxin, which I named eplBA or ealAB, respectively. The eplBA and ealAB genes are syntenic with the Shiga toxin loci in their lambdoid prophages of the enteric pathogen enterohemorrhagic E. coli. These novel AB5 toxins show pertussis-toxin-like activity on tissue culture cells, and like pertussis toxin bind to sialic acid containing glycoprotein ligands. Type II ETEC are the first mucosal pathogens known to simultaneously produce two ADP-ribosylating toxins predicted to act on and modulate activity of both stimulatory and inhibitory alpha subunits of host cell heterotrimeric G-proteins. PMID:26755534

  8. The chromosomal nature of LT-II enterotoxins solved: a lambdoid prophage encodes both LT-II and one of two novel pertussis-toxin-like toxin family members in type II enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Jobling, Michael G

    2016-04-01

    Heat-labile enterotoxins (LT) of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are structurally and functionally related to cholera toxin (CT). LT-I toxins are plasmid-encoded and flanked by IS elements, while LT-II toxins of type II ETEC are chromosomally encoded with flanking genes that appear phage related. Here, I determined the complete genomic sequence of the locus for the LT-IIa type strain SA53, and show that the LT-IIa genes are encoded by a 51 239 bp lambdoid prophage integrated at the rac locus, the site of a defective prophage in E. coli K12 strains. Of 50 LT-IIa and LT-IIc, 46 prophages also encode one member of two novel two-gene ADP-ribosyltransferase toxin families that are both related to pertussis toxin, which I named eplBA or ealAB, respectively. The eplBA and ealAB genes are syntenic with the Shiga toxin loci in their lambdoid prophages of the enteric pathogen enterohemorrhagic E. coli. These novel AB(5) toxins show pertussis-toxin-like activity on tissue culture cells, and like pertussis toxin bind to sialic acid containing glycoprotein ligands. Type II ETEC are the first mucosal pathogens known to simultaneously produce two ADP-ribosylating toxins predicted to act on and modulate activity of both stimulatory and inhibitory alpha subunits of host cell heterotrimeric G-proteins.

  9. Succinate production in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Thakker, Chandresh; Martínez, Irene; San, Ka-Yiu; Bennett, George N.

    2012-01-01

    Succinate has been recognized as an important platform chemical that can be produced from biomass. While a number of organisms are capable of succinate production naturally, this review focuses on the engineering of Escherichia coli for production of the four-carbon dicarboxylic acid. Important features of a succinate production system are to achieve optimal balance of reducing equivalents generated by consumption of the feedstock, while maximizing the amount of carbon that is channeled to the product. Aerobic and anaerobic production strains have been developed and applied to production from glucose as well as other abundant carbon sources. Metabolic engineering methods and strain evolution have been used and supplemented by the recent application of systems biology and in silico modeling tools to construct optimal production strains. The metabolic capacity of the production strain, as well as the requirement for efficient recovery of succinate and the reliability of the performance under scale-up are important in the overall process. The costs of the overall biorefinery compatible process will determine the economical commercialization of succinate and its impact in larger chemical markets. PMID:21932253

  10. Strategies for Protein Overproduction in Escherichia coli.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mott, John E.

    1984-01-01

    Examines heterologous expression in Escherichia coli and the role of regulatory sequences which control gene expression at transcription resulting in abundant production of messenger RNA and regulatory sequences in mRNA which promote efficient translation. Also examines the role of E. coli cells in stabilizing mRNA and protein that is…

  11. Escherichia coli survival in waters: Temperature dependence

    EPA Science Inventory

    Knowing the survival rates of water-borne Escherichia coli is important in evaluating microbial contamination and making appropriate management decisions. E. coli survival rates are dependent on temperature, a dependency that is routinely expressed using an analogue of the Q10 mo...

  12. 21 CFR 866.3255 - Escherichia coli serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Escherichia coli serological reagents. 866.3255... coli serological reagents. (a) Identification. Escherichia coli serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens and antisera used in serological tests to identify Escherichia coli from...

  13. 21 CFR 866.3255 - Escherichia coli serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Escherichia coli serological reagents. 866.3255... coli serological reagents. (a) Identification. Escherichia coli serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens and antisera used in serological tests to identify Escherichia coli from...

  14. 21 CFR 866.3255 - Escherichia coli serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Escherichia coli serological reagents. 866.3255... coli serological reagents. (a) Identification. Escherichia coli serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens and antisera used in serological tests to identify Escherichia coli from...

  15. 21 CFR 866.3255 - Escherichia coli serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Escherichia coli serological reagents. 866.3255... coli serological reagents. (a) Identification. Escherichia coli serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens and antisera used in serological tests to identify Escherichia coli from...

  16. 21 CFR 866.3255 - Escherichia coli serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Escherichia coli serological reagents. 866.3255... coli serological reagents. (a) Identification. Escherichia coli serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens and antisera used in serological tests to identify Escherichia coli from...

  17. Endonuclease IV (nfo) mutant of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, R P; Saporito, S M; Spitzer, S G; Weiss, B

    1986-01-01

    A cloned gene, designated nfo, caused overproduction of an EDTA-resistant endonuclease specific for apurinic-apyrimidinic sites in DNA. The sedimentation coefficient of the enzyme was similar to that of endonuclease IV. An insertion mutation was constructed in vitro and transferred from a plasmid to the Escherichia coli chromosome. nfo mutants had an increased sensitivity to the alkylating agents methyl methanesulfonate and mitomycin C and to the oxidants tert-butyl hydroperoxide and bleomycin. The nfo mutation enhanced the killing of xth (exonuclease III) mutants by methyl methanesulfonate, H2O2, tert-butyl hydroperoxide, and gamma rays, and it enhanced their mutability by methyl methanesulfonate. It also increased the temperature sensitivity of an xth dut (dUTPase) mutant that is defective in the repair of uracil-containing DNA. These results are consistent with earlier findings that endonuclease IV and exonuclease III both cleave DNA 5' to an apurinic-apyrimidinic site and that exonuclease III is more active. However, nfo mutants were more sensitive to tert-butyl hydroperoxide and to bleomycin than were xth mutants, suggesting that endonuclease IV might recognize some lesions that exonuclease III does not. The mutants displayed no marked increase in sensitivity to 254-nm UV radiation, and the addition of an nth (endonuclease III) mutation to nfo or nfo xth mutants did not significantly increase their sensitivity to any of the agents tested. Images PMID:2430946

  18. Clinical Implications of Enteroadherent Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Arenas-Hernández, Margarita M.P.; Martínez-Laguna, Ygnacio; Torres, Alfredo G.

    2012-01-01

    Pathogenic Escherichia coli that colonize the small intestine primarily cause gastrointestinal illness in infants and travelers. The main categories of pathogenic E. coli that colonize the epithelial lining of the small intestine are enterotoxigenic E. coli enteropathogenic E. coli and enteroaggregative E. coli. These organisms accomplish their pathogenic process by a complex, coordinated multistage strategy, including non-intimate adherence mediated by various adhesins. These so called “enteroadherent E. coli ” categories subsequently produced toxins or effector proteins that are either secreted to the milieu or injected to the host cell. Finally, destruction of the intestinal microvilli results from the intimate adherence or the toxic effect exerted over the epithelia, resulting in water secretion and diarrhea. In this review, we summarize the current state of knowledge regarding these enteroadherent E. coli strains and the present clinical understanding of how these organisms colonize the human intestine and cause disease. PMID:22798032

  19. Chromosomal and plasmid-mediated fluoroquinolone resistance mechanisms among broad-spectrum-cephalosporin-resistant Escherichia coli isolates recovered from companion animals in the USA

    PubMed Central

    Shaheen, Bashar W.; Nayak, Rajesh; Foley, Steven L.; Boothe, Dawn M.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To determine the prevalence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) determinants and investigate mutations in gyrase and topoisomerase genes that may contribute to increased fluoroquinolone resistance in canine and feline Escherichia coli isolates in the USA that displayed reduced susceptibility to extended-spectrum cephalosporins. This study was undertaken because previous epidemiological studies identified a potential correlation between extended-spectrum cephalosporins and fluoroquinolone resistance. Methods Isolates (n = 54) with reduced susceptibility to ceftazidime or cefotaxime were screened by PCR for the presence of PMQR determinants and gyrase and topoisomerase genes were sequenced. Isolates were further characterized by conjugation and phylogenetic analyses. Results PMQR determinants aac(6′)-Ib-cr, qnrS and qepA were identified in 30, 23 and 5 isolates, respectively. Multiple mutations were identified in the quinolone resistance-determining region, including the novel substitutions of Glu-84 → Ala and Leu-88 → Gln in ParC and Arg-432 → Ser and Glu-460 → Val in ParE. The isolate that exhibited the highest level of enrofloxacin resistance (MIC > 256 mg/L) had a double mutation in gyrA (Ser-83 → Leu and Asp-87 → Asn) and a triple mutation in parC (Ser-80 → Ile, Glu-84 → Gly and a novel mutation, Leu-88 → Gln). The presence of PMQR genes increased the ciprofloxacin MIC values 4-fold to 8-fold in transconjugants relative to the recipient strain. Approximately 39% of the isolates belonged to phylogenetic group D and 30% to group B2, which typically contain an increased number of virulence determinants compared with other groups. Conclusions Novel mutations in topoisomerase genes and PMQR determinants aac(6′)-Ib-cr, qnrS and qepA genes were detected among extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing E. coli in the USA. PMID:23302578

  20. Inversions between ribosomal RNA genes of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Hill, C W; Harnish, B W

    1981-01-01

    It might be anticipated that the presence of redundant but oppositely oriented sequences in a chromosome could allow inversion of the intervening material through homologous recombination. For example, the ribosomal RNA gene rrnD of Escherichia coli has the opposite orientation fro rrnB and rrnE and is separated from these genes by roughly 20% of the chromosome. Starting with a derivative of Cavalli Hfr, we have constructed mutants that have an inversion of the segment between rrnD and either rrnB or rrnE. These mutants are generally quite viable but do exhibit a slight reduction in growth rate relative to the parental strain. A major line of laboratory E. coli, W3110 and its derivatives, also has an inversion between rrnD and rrnE, probably created directly by a recombinational event between these highly homologous genes. Images PMID:6273909

  1. In-stream Escherichia coli Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, P.; Soupir, M.

    2013-12-01

    Elevated levels of pathogenic bacteria indicators such as Escherichia coli (E. coli) in streams are a serious concern. Controlling E. coli levels in streams requires improving our existing understanding of fate and transport of E. coli at watershed scale. In-stream E. coli concentrations are potentially linked to non-point pollution sources (i.e., agricultural land). Water of a natural stream can receive E. coli by either through overland flow (via runoff from cropland) or resuspension from the streambed to the water column. Calculating in-stream total E. coli loads requires estimation of particle attached bacteria as well free floating E. coli transport. Currently water quality models commonly used for predicting E. coli levels in stream water have limited capability for predicting E. coli levels in the water column as well as in the streambed sediment. The challenges in calculating in-stream E. coli levels include difficulties in modeling the complex interactions between sediment particles and E. coli. Here we have developed a watershed scale model (integrated with Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT)), which involves calculation of particle attached E. coli, to predict in-stream E. coli concentrations. The proposed model predicts E. coli levels in streambed bed sediment as well as in the water column. An extensive in-stream E. coli monitoring was carried out to verify the model predictions, and results indicate that the model performed well. The study proposed here will improve understanding on in-stream bacterial contamination, and help improving existing water quality models for predicting pathogenic bacteria levels in ambient water bodies.

  2. Native valve Escherichia coli endocarditis following urosepsis.

    PubMed

    Rangarajan, D; Ramakrishnan, S; Patro, K C; Devaraj, S; Krishnamurthy, V; Kothari, Y; Satyaki, N

    2013-05-01

    Gram-negative organisms are a rare cause of infective endocarditis. Escherichia coli, the most common cause of urinary tract infection and gram-negative septicemia involves endocardium rarely. In this case report, we describe infection of native mitral valve by E. coli following septicemia of urinary tract origin in a diabetic male; subsequently, he required prosthetic tissue valve replacement indicated by persistent sepsis and congestive cardiac failure.

  3. 77 FR 9888 - Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-21

    ... Food Safety and Inspection Service Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli in Certain Raw Beef Products... manufacturing trimmings for six non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) serogroups (O26, O45..., non-intact product, that are contaminated with Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O26,...

  4. In vitro construction of bacteriophage lambda carrying segments of the Escherichia coli chromosome: selection of hybrids containing the gene for DNA ligase.

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, J R; Panasenko, S M; Lehman, I R; Davis, R W

    1975-01-01

    DNA from lambdagt-lambdaB bacteriophage was cleaved with EcoRI endonuclease and fragments from EcoRI-digested E. coli DNA were inserted. This DNA was used to infect E. coli, and phages containing the gene for DNA ligase were isolated by genetic selection. Two different hybrids were found with the same E. coli segment inserted in opposite orientations. Both hybrids produced similar levels of ligase as measured in crude extracts of infected cells. Images PMID:1103146

  5. Escherichia Coli--Key to Modern Genetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bregegere, Francois

    1982-01-01

    Mid-nineteenth century work by Mendel on plant hybrids and by Pasteur on fermentation gave birth by way of bacterial genetics to modern-day molecular biology. The bacterium Escherichia Coli has occupied a key position in genetic studies leading from early gene identification with DNA to current genetic engineering using recombinant DNA technology.…

  6. Escherichia coli and Sudden Infant Death Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bettelheim, Karl A.; Goldwater, Paul N.

    2015-01-01

    This review examines the association of strains of Escherichia coli with sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and the possible role these bacteria play in this enigmatic condition. The review addresses evidence for E. coli in SIDS infants, potential sources of E. coli in the environment, colonization by commensal and pathogenic strains, the variety of currently accepted pathotypes, and how these pathotypes could compromise intestinal integrity and induce inflammation. Both intestinal and extraintestinal pathotypes are compared in relation to the apparent liability in which virulence traits can be gained or lost by strains of E. coli. The way in which E. coli infections fit with current views on infant sleeping position and other SIDS risk factors is highlighted. PMID:26191064

  7. Transcription of foreign DNA in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Warren, René L; Freeman, John D; Levesque, Roger C; Smailus, Duane E; Flibotte, Stephane; Holt, Robert A

    2008-11-01

    Propagation of heterologous DNA in E. coli host cells is central to molecular biology. DNA constructs are often engineered for expression of recombinant protein in E. coli, but the extent of incidental transcription arising from natural regulatory sequences in cloned DNA remains underexplored. Here, we have used programmable microarrays and RT-PCR to measure, comprehensively, the transcription of H. influenzae, P. aeruginosa, and human DNA propagating in E. coli as bacterial artificial chromosomes. We find evidence that at least half of all H. influenzae genes are transcribed in E. coli. Highly transcribed genes are principally involved in energy metabolism, and their proximal promoter regions are significantly enriched with E. coli sigma(70) (also known as RpoD) binding sites. H. influenzae genes acquired from an ancient bacteriophage Mu insertion are also highly transcribed. Compared with H. influenzae, a smaller proportion of P. aeruginosa genes are transcribed in E. coli, and in E. coli there is punctuated transcription of human DNA. The presence of foreign DNA in E. coli disturbs the host transcriptional profile, with expression of the E. coli phage shock protein operon and the flagellar gene cluster being particularly strongly up-regulated. While cross-species transcriptional activation is expected to be enabling for horizontal gene transfer in bacteria, incidental expression of toxic genes can be problematic for DNA cloning. Ongoing characterization of cross-expression will help inform the design of biosynthetic gene clusters and synthetic microbial genomes.

  8. Electrophoretic Mobilities of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Wild-Type Escherichia coli Strains

    PubMed Central

    Lytle, Darren A.; Rice, Eugene W.; Johnson, Clifford H.; Fox, Kim R.

    1999-01-01

    The electrophoretic mobilities (EPMs) of a number of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and wild-type E. coli strains were measured. The effects of pH and ionic strength on the EPMs were investigated. The EPMs of E. coli O157:H7 strains differed from those of wild-type strains. As the suspension pH decreased, the EPMs of both types of strains increased. PMID:10388724

  9. Characterization of a second lysine decarboxylase isolated from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Kikuchi, Y; Kojima, H; Tanaka, T; Takatsuka, Y; Kamio, Y

    1997-01-01

    We report here on the existence of a new gene for lysine decarboxylase in Escherichia coli K-12. The hybridization experiments with a cadA probe at low stringency showed that the homologous region of cadA was located in lambda Kohara phage clone 6F5 at 4.7 min on the E. coli chromosome. We cloned the 5.0-kb HindIII fragment of this phage clone and sequenced the homologous region of cadA. This region contained a 2,139-nucleotide open reading frame encoding a 713-amino-acid protein with a calculated molecular weight of 80,589. Overexpression of the protein and determination of its N-terminal amino acid sequence defined the translational start site of this gene. The deduced amino acid sequence showed 69.4% identity to that of lysine decarboxylase encoded by cadA at 93.7 min on the E. coli chromosome. In addition, the level of lysine decarboxylase activity increased in strains carrying multiple copies of the gene. Therefore, the gene encoding this lysine decarboxylase was designated Idc. Analysis of the lysine decarboxylase activity of strains containing cadA, ldc, or cadA ldc mutations indicated that ldc was weakly expressed under various conditions but is a functional gene in E. coli. PMID:9226257

  10. Hydrogen production by recombinant Escherichia coli strains

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Toshinari; Sanchez‐Torres, Viviana; Wood, Thomas K.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The production of hydrogen via microbial biotechnology is an active field of research. Given its ease of manipulation, the best‐studied bacterium Escherichia coli has become a workhorse for enhanced hydrogen production through metabolic engineering, heterologous gene expression, adaptive evolution, and protein engineering. Herein, the utility of E. coli strains to produce hydrogen, via native hydrogenases or heterologous ones, is reviewed. In addition, potential strategies for increasing hydrogen production are outlined and whole‐cell systems and cell‐free systems are compared. PMID:21895995

  11. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli-Associated Exotoxins.

    PubMed

    Welch, Rodney A

    2016-06-01

    Escherichia coli are a common cause of infectious disease outside of the gastrointestinal tract. Several independently evolved E. coli clades are common causes of urinary tract and bloodstream infections. There is ample epidemiological and in vitro evidence that several different protein toxins common to many, but not all, of these strains are likely to aid the colonization and immune-evasion ability of these bacteria. This review discusses our current knowledge and areas of ignorance concerning the contribution of the hemolysin; cytotoxic-necrotizing factor-1; and the autotransporters, Sat, Pic, and Vat, to extraintestinal human disease.

  12. The evolution of the Escherichia coli phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Roy R; Henderson, Ian R

    2012-03-01

    Escherichia coli is familiar to biologists as a classical model system, ubiquitous in molecular biology laboratories around the world. Outside of the laboratory, E. coli strains exist as an almost universal component of the lower-gut flora of humans and animals. Although usually a commensal, E. coli has an alter ego as a pathogen, and is associated with diarrhoeal disease and extra-intestinal infections. The study of E. coli diversity predates the availability of molecular data, with strains initially distinguished by serotyping and metabolic profiling, and genomic diversity illustrated by DNA hybridisation. The quantitative study of E. coli diversity began with the application of multi-locus enzyme electrophoresis (MLEE), and has progressed with the accumulation of nucleotide sequence data, from single genes through multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) to whole genome sequencing. Phylogenetic methods have shed light on the processes of genomic evolution in this extraordinarily diverse species, and revealed the origins of pathogenic E. coli strains, including members of the phylogenetically indistinguishable "genus"Shigella. In May and June 2011, an outbreak of haemorrhagic uraemic syndrome in Germany was linked to a strain of enterohaemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) O104:H4. Application of high-throughput sequencing technologies allowed the genome and origins of the outbreak strain to be characterised in real time as the outbreak was in progress.

  13. A new Escherichia coli cell division gene, ftsK.

    PubMed Central

    Begg, K J; Dewar, S J; Donachie, W D

    1995-01-01

    A mutation in a newly discovered Escherichia coli cell division gene, ftsK, causes a temperature-sensitive late-stage block in division but does not affect chromosome replication or segregation. This defect is specifically suppressed by deletion of dacA, coding for the peptidoglycan DD-carboxypeptidase, PBP 5. FtsK is a large polypeptide (147 kDa) consisting of an N-terminal domain with several predicted membrane-spanning regions, a proline-glutamine-rich domain, and a C-terminal domain with a nucleotide-binding consensus sequence. FtsK has extensive sequence identity with a family of proteins from a wide variety of prokaryotes and plasmids. The plasmid proteins are required for intercellular DNA transfer, and one of the bacterial proteins (the SpoIIIE protein of Bacillus subtilis) has also been implicated in intracellular chromosomal DNA transfer. PMID:7592387

  14. Automatic tracking of Escherichia coli bacteria.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jun; Khan, Shahid; Shah, Mubarak

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we present an automatic method for estimating the trajectories of Escherichia coli bacteria from in vivo phase-contrast microscopy videos. To address the low-contrast boundaries in cellular images, an adaptive kernel-based technique is applied to detect cells in sequence of frames. Then a novel matching gain measure is introduced to cope with the challenges such as dramatic changes of cells' appearance and serious overlapping and occlusion. For multiple cell tracking, an optimal matching strategy is proposed to improve the handling of cell collision and broken trajectories. The results of successful tracking of Escherichia coli from various phase-contrast sequences are reported and compared with manually-determined trajectories, as well as those obtained from existing tracking methods. The stability of the algorithm with different parameter values is also analyzed and discussed.

  15. Systems Metabolic Engineering of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kyeong Rok; Shin, Jae Ho; Cho, Jae Sung; Yang, Dongsoo; Lee, Sang Yup

    2017-03-01

    Systems metabolic engineering, which recently emerged as metabolic engineering integrated with systems biology, synthetic biology, and evolutionary engineering, allows engineering of microorganisms on a systemic level for the production of valuable chemicals far beyond its native capabilities. Here, we review the strategies for systems metabolic engineering and particularly its applications in Escherichia coli. First, we cover the various tools developed for genetic manipulation in E. coli to increase the production titers of desired chemicals. Next, we detail the strategies for systems metabolic engineering in E. coli, covering the engineering of the native metabolism, the expansion of metabolism with synthetic pathways, and the process engineering aspects undertaken to achieve higher production titers of desired chemicals. Finally, we examine a couple of notable products as case studies produced in E. coli strains developed by systems metabolic engineering. The large portfolio of chemical products successfully produced by engineered E. coli listed here demonstrates the sheer capacity of what can be envisioned and achieved with respect to microbial production of chemicals. Systems metabolic engineering is no longer in its infancy; it is now widely employed and is also positioned to further embrace next-generation interdisciplinary principles and innovation for its upgrade. Systems metabolic engineering will play increasingly important roles in developing industrial strains including E. coli that are capable of efficiently producing natural and nonnatural chemicals and materials from renewable nonfood biomass.

  16. Interaction between Escherichia coli and lunar fines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johansson, K. R.

    1983-01-01

    A sample of mature lunar fines (10084.151) was solubilized to a high degree (about 17 percent) by the chelating agent salicylic acid (0.01. M). The neutralized (pH adjusted to 7.0) leachate was found to inhibit the growth of Escherichia coli (ATCC 259922) in a minimial mineral salts glucose medium; however, the inhibition was somewhat less than that caused by neutralized salicylic acid alone. The presence of lunar fines in the minimal medium was highly stimulatory to growth of E. coli following an early inhibitory response. The bacterium survived less well in the lunar leachate than in distilled water, no doubt because of the salicylate. It was concluded that the sample of lunar soil tested has nutritional value to E. coli and that certain products of fermentation helped to solubilize the lunar soil.

  17. Production of curcuminoids in engineered Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Ji; Cha, Mi Na; Kim, Bog-Gyu; Ahn, Joong-Hoon

    2017-03-09

    Curcumin, a hydrophobic polyphenol derived from the rhizome of the herb Curcuma longa, possesses diverse pharmacological properties including anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antiproliferative and antiangiogenic activity. Two curcuminoids (dicinnamoylmethane and bisdemethoxycurcumin) were synthesized from glucose in Escherichia coli. PAL (phenylalanine ammonia lyase) or TAL (tyrosine ammonia lyase), along with Os4CL (p-coumaroyl-CoA ligase) and CUS (curcumin synthase), were introduced in to E. coli, and each strain produced dicinnamoylmethane or bisdemethoxycurcumin, respectively. In order to increase the production of curcuminoids in E. coli, the shikimic acid biosynthesis pathway which increases the substrates for curcuminoid biosynthesis, was engineered. Using engineered strains, the production of bisdemethoxycurcumin increased from 0.32 to 4.63 mg/L, and that of dicinnamoylmethane from 1.24 mg/L and 6.95 mg/L.

  18. Frequency-Dependent Escherichia coli Chemotaxis Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xuejun; Si, Guangwei; Deng, Nianpei; Ouyang, Qi; Wu, Tailin; He, Zhuoran; Jiang, Lili; Luo, Chunxiong; Tu, Yuhai

    2012-03-01

    We study Escherichia coli chemotaxis behavior in environments with spatially and temporally varying attractant sources by developing a unique microfluidic system. Our measurements reveal a frequency-dependent chemotaxis behavior. At low frequency, the E. coli population oscillates in synchrony with the attractant. In contrast, in fast-changing environments, the population response becomes smaller and out of phase with the attractant waveform. These observations are inconsistent with the well-known Keller-Segel chemotaxis equation. A new continuum model is proposed to describe the population level behavior of E. coli chemotaxis based on the underlying pathway dynamics. With the inclusion of a finite adaptation time and an attractant consumption rate, our model successfully explains the microfluidic experiments at different stimulus frequencies.

  19. Thymineless death in Escherichia coli: strain specificity.

    PubMed

    Cummings, D J; Mondale, L

    1967-06-01

    Thymineless death of various ultraviolet (UV)-sensitive strains of Escherichia coli B and K-12 was investigated. It was found that E. coli B, B(s-12), K-12 rec-21, and possibly K-12 Lon(-), all sensitive to UV, were also sensitive to thymine starvation. However, other UV-sensitive strains of E. coli were found to display the typical resistant-type kinetics of thymineless death. The correlation of these results with various other cellular processes suggested that the filament-forming ability of the bacteria might be involved in the mechanism of thymineless death. It was apparent from the present results that capacity for host-cell reactivation, recombination ability, thymine dimer excision, and probably induction of a defective prophage had little to do with determining sensitivity to thymine deprivation.

  20. Thymineless Death in Escherichia coli: Strain Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, Donald J.; Mondale, Lee

    1967-01-01

    Thymineless death of various ultraviolet (UV)-sensitive strains of Escherichia coli B and K-12 was investigated. It was found that E. coli B, Bs−12, K-12 rec-21, and possibly K-12 Lon−, all sensitive to UV, were also sensitive to thymine starvation. However, other UV-sensitive strains of E. coli were found to display the typical resistant-type kinetics of thymineless death. The correlation of these results with various other cellular processes suggested that the filament-forming ability of the bacteria might be involved in the mechanism of thymineless death. It was apparent from the present results that capacity for host-cell reactivation, recombination ability, thymine dimer excision, and probably induction of a defective prophage had little to do with determining sensitivity to thymine deprivation. Images PMID:5337772

  1. Diversity of CRISPR loci in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Díez-Villaseñor, C; Almendros, C; García-Martínez, J; Mojica, F J M

    2010-05-01

    CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) and CAS (CRISPR-associated sequence) proteins are constituents of a novel genetic barrier that limits horizontal gene transfer in prokaryotes by means of an uncharacterized mechanism. The fundamental discovery of small RNAs as the guides of the defence apparatus arose as a result of Escherichia coli studies. However, a survey of the system diversity in this species in order to further contribute to the understanding of the CRISPR mode of action has not yet been performed. Here we describe two CRISPR/CAS systems found in E. coli, following the analysis of 100 strains representative of the species' diversity. Our results substantiate different levels of activity between loci of both CRISPR types, as well as different target preferences and CRISPR relevances for particular groups of strains. Interestingly, the data suggest that the degeneration of one CRISPR/CAS system in E. coli ancestors could have been brought about by self-interference.

  2. Prodigiosin - A Multifaceted Escherichia coli Antimicrobial Agent

    PubMed Central

    Zorec, Maša; Stopar, David

    2016-01-01

    Despite a considerable interest in prodigiosin, the mechanism of its antibacterial activity is still poorly understood. In this work, Escherichia coli cells were treated with prodigiosin to determine its antimicrobial effect on bacterial physiology. The effect of prodigiosin was concentration dependent. In prodigiosin treated cells above MIC value no significant DNA damage or cytoplasmic membrane disintegration was observed. The outer membrane, however, becomes leaky. Cells had severely decreased respiration activity. In prodigiosin treated cells protein and RNA synthesis were inhibited, cells were elongated but could not divide. Pre-treatment with prodigiosin improved E. coli survival rate in media containing ampicillin, kanamycin and erythromycin but not phleomycin. The results suggest that prodigiosin acts as a bacteriostatic agent in E. coli cells. If prodigiosin was diluted, cells resumed growth. The results indicate that prodigiosin has distinct mode of antibacterial action in different bacteria. PMID:27612193

  3. Biodegradation of Aromatic Compounds by Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Díaz, Eduardo; Ferrández, Abel; Prieto, María A.; García, José L.

    2001-01-01

    Although Escherichia coli has long been recognized as the best-understood living organism, little was known about its abilities to use aromatic compounds as sole carbon and energy sources. This review gives an extensive overview of the current knowledge of the catabolism of aromatic compounds by E. coli. After giving a general overview of the aromatic compounds that E. coli strains encounter and mineralize in the different habitats that they colonize, we provide an up-to-date status report on the genes and proteins involved in the catabolism of such compounds, namely, several aromatic acids (phenylacetic acid, 3- and 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid, phenylpropionic acid, 3-hydroxyphenylpropionic acid, and 3-hydroxycinnamic acid) and amines (phenylethylamine, tyramine, and dopamine). Other enzymatic activities acting on aromatic compounds in E. coli are also reviewed and evaluated. The review also reflects the present impact of genomic research and how the analysis of the whole E. coli genome reveals novel aromatic catabolic functions. Moreover, evolutionary considerations derived from sequence comparisons between the aromatic catabolic clusters of E. coli and homologous clusters from an increasing number of bacteria are also discussed. The recent progress in the understanding of the fundamentals that govern the degradation of aromatic compounds in E. coli makes this bacterium a very useful model system to decipher biochemical, genetic, evolutionary, and ecological aspects of the catabolism of such compounds. In the last part of the review, we discuss strategies and concepts to metabolically engineer E. coli to suit specific needs for biodegradation and biotransformation of aromatics and we provide several examples based on selected studies. Finally, conclusions derived from this review may serve as a lead for future research and applications. PMID:11729263

  4. Biodegradation of aromatic compounds by Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Díaz, E; Ferrández, A; Prieto, M A; García, J L

    2001-12-01

    Although Escherichia coli has long been recognized as the best-understood living organism, little was known about its abilities to use aromatic compounds as sole carbon and energy sources. This review gives an extensive overview of the current knowledge of the catabolism of aromatic compounds by E. coli. After giving a general overview of the aromatic compounds that E. coli strains encounter and mineralize in the different habitats that they colonize, we provide an up-to-date status report on the genes and proteins involved in the catabolism of such compounds, namely, several aromatic acids (phenylacetic acid, 3- and 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid, phenylpropionic acid, 3-hydroxyphenylpropionic acid, and 3-hydroxycinnamic acid) and amines (phenylethylamine, tyramine, and dopamine). Other enzymatic activities acting on aromatic compounds in E. coli are also reviewed and evaluated. The review also reflects the present impact of genomic research and how the analysis of the whole E. coli genome reveals novel aromatic catabolic functions. Moreover, evolutionary considerations derived from sequence comparisons between the aromatic catabolic clusters of E. coli and homologous clusters from an increasing number of bacteria are also discussed. The recent progress in the understanding of the fundamentals that govern the degradation of aromatic compounds in E. coli makes this bacterium a very useful model system to decipher biochemical, genetic, evolutionary, and ecological aspects of the catabolism of such compounds. In the last part of the review, we discuss strategies and concepts to metabolically engineer E. coli to suit specific needs for biodegradation and biotransformation of aromatics and we provide several examples based on selected studies. Finally, conclusions derived from this review may serve as a lead for future research and applications.

  5. Epidemiological and clinical complexity of amoxicillin-clavulanate-resistant Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Baño, Jesús; Oteo, Jesús; Ortega, Adriana; Villar, Macarena; Conejo, M Carmen; Bou, Germán; Aranzamendi-Zaldumbide, Maitane; Cercenado, Emilia; Gurguí, Mercè; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Merino, María; Rivera, Alba; Oliver, Antonio; Weber, Irene; Pascual, Alvaro; Bartolomé, Rosa M; Gónzalez-López, Juan José; Campos, José

    2013-07-01

    Two hundred twelve patients with colonization/infection due to amoxicillin-clavulanate (AMC)-resistant Escherichia coli were studied. OXA-1- and inhibitor-resistant TEM (IRT)-producing strains were associated with urinary tract infections, while OXA-1 producers and chromosomal AmpC hyperproducers were associated with bacteremic infections. AMC resistance in E. coli is a complex phenomenon with heterogeneous clinical implications.

  6. Epidemiological and Clinical Complexity of Amoxicillin-Clavulanate-Resistant Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Oteo, Jesús; Ortega, Adriana; Villar, Macarena; Conejo, M. Carmen; Bou, Germán; Aranzamendi-Zaldumbide, Maitane; Cercenado, Emilia; Gurguí, Mercè; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Merino, María; Rivera, Alba; Oliver, Antonio; Weber, Irene; Pascual, Alvaro; Bartolomé, Rosa M.; Gónzalez-López, Juan José; Campos, José

    2013-01-01

    Two hundred twelve patients with colonization/infection due to amoxicillin-clavulanate (AMC)-resistant Escherichia coli were studied. OXA-1- and inhibitor-resistant TEM (IRT)-producing strains were associated with urinary tract infections, while OXA-1 producers and chromosomal AmpC hyperproducers were associated with bacteremic infections. AMC resistance in E. coli is a complex phenomenon with heterogeneous clinical implications. PMID:23637303

  7. The 503nm pigment of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Kamitakahara, Joyce R.; Polglase, W. J.

    1970-01-01

    The yield of cell protein was one-third less for streptomycin-dependent Escherichia coli B than for the wild-type parent strain when both were grown aerobically on a medium with limiting glucose, but anaerobically the yield of protein was similar for both strains. The transient pigment absorbing at 503nm that is known to be present in E. coli and other organisms was not detectable in streptomycin-dependent mutants nor in a non-dependent (energy-deficient) revertant. When wild-type E. coli B was grown on limiting glucose–salts medium containing 2,4 dinitrophenol, the yield of cell protein was decreased and formation of the 503nm pigment was inhibited. Fumarase, aconitase and glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase were de-repressed in E. coli B cells grown with excess of glucose in a medium containing 2,4-dinitrophenol. In air-oxidized, wild-type E. coli B cells, the 503nm pigment appeared before reduced cytochromes when gluconate was the substrate but failed to appear when succinate was the substrate. The results provide evidence for a role of the 503nm pigment in aerobic energy metabolism, possibly as an electron acceptor from NADPH. PMID:4395501

  8. ELECTROPHORETIC MOBILITIES OF ESCHERICHIA COLI 0157:H7 AND WILD-TYPE ESCHERICHIA COLI STRAINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The electrophoretic mobility (EPM) of a number of human-virulent and "wild-type" Escherichia coli strains in phosphate buffered water was measured. The impact of pH, ionic strength, cation type (valence) and concentration, and bacterial strain on the EPM was investigated. Resul...

  9. Designed phosphoprotein recognition in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Sawyer, Nicholas; Gassaway, Brandon M; Haimovich, Adrian D; Isaacs, Farren J; Rinehart, Jesse; Regan, Lynne

    2014-11-21

    Protein phosphorylation is a central biological mechanism for cellular adaptation to environmental changes. Dysregulation of phosphorylation signaling is implicated in a wide variety of diseases. Thus, the ability to detect and quantify protein phosphorylation is highly desirable for both diagnostic and research applications. Here we present a general strategy for detecting phosphopeptide-protein interactions in Escherichia coli. We first redesign a model tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) protein to recognize phosphoserine in a sequence-specific fashion and characterize the interaction with its target phosphopeptide in vitro. We then combine in vivo site-specific incorporation of phosphoserine with split mCherry assembly to observe the designed phosphopeptide-protein interaction specificity in E. coli. This in vivo strategy for detecting and characterizing phosphopeptide-protein interactions has numerous potential applications for the study of natural interactions and the design of novel ones.

  10. Escherichia coli growth under modeled reduced gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Paul W.; Meyer, Michelle L.; Leff, Laura G.

    2004-01-01

    Bacteria exhibit varying responses to modeled reduced gravity that can be simulated by clino-rotation. When Escherichia coli was subjected to different rotation speeds during clino-rotation, significant differences between modeled reduced gravity and normal gravity controls were observed only at higher speeds (30-50 rpm). There was no apparent affect of removing samples on the results obtained. When E. coli was grown in minimal medium (at 40 rpm), cell size was not affected by modeled reduced gravity and there were few differences in cell numbers. However, in higher nutrient conditions (i.e., dilute nutrient broth), total cell numbers were higher and cells were smaller under reduced gravity compared to normal gravity controls. Overall, the responses to modeled reduced gravity varied with nutrient conditions; larger surface to volume ratios may help compensate for the zone of nutrient depletion around the cells under modeled reduced gravity.

  11. Detection of Escherichia coli enterotoxins in stools.

    PubMed Central

    Merson, M H; Yolken, R H; Sack, R B; Froehlich, J L; Greenberg, H B; Huq, I; Black, R W

    1980-01-01

    We determined whether enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli diarrhea could be diagnosed by direct examination of stools for heat-labile (LT) and heat-stable (ST) enterotoxins. The Y-1 adrenal cell and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) detected LT in 85 and 93%, respectively, of stool specimens obtained from adults with acute diarrhea from whom an LT- and ST-producing organism had been isolated. Furthermore, the ELISA assay detected LT in 8 of 35 stool specimens from which no LT-producing E. coli had been isolated. The infant mouse assay was utilized to detect ST in these stool specimens and was found to be an insensitive method, showing positive results in only 36% of the specimens from which an ST-producing organism was isolated. Further studies are warranted to determine the diagnostic value of direct detection of LT in stools, especially by the ELISA method. PMID:6995331

  12. Escherichia coli O157:H7.

    PubMed

    Mead, P S; Griffin, P M

    1998-10-10

    Escherichia coli O157 was first identified as a human pathogen in 1982. One of several Shiga toxin-producing serotypes known to cause human illness, the organism probably evolved through horizontal acquisition of genes for Shiga toxins and other virulence factors. E. coli O157 is found regularly in the faeces of healthy cattle, and is transmitted to humans through contaminated food, water, and direct contact with infected people or animals. Human infection is associated with a wide range of clinical illness, including asymptomatic shedding, non-bloody diarrhoea, haemorrhagic colitis, haemolytic uraemic syndrome, and death. Since laboratory practices vary, physicians need to know whether laboratories in their area routinely test for E. coli O157 in stool specimens. Treatment with antimicrobial agents remains controversial: some studies suggest that treatment may precipitate haemolytic uraemic syndrome, and other studies suggest no effect or even a protective effect. Physicians can help to prevent E. coli O157 infections by counselling patients about the hazards of consuming undercooked ground meat or unpasteurised milk products and juices, and about the importance of handwashing to prevent the spread of diarrhoeal illness, and by informing public-health authorities when they see unusual numbers of cases of bloody diarrhoea or haemolytic uraemic syndrome.

  13. Transport proteins promoting Escherichia coli pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Tang, Fengyi; Saier, Milton H

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli is a genetically diverse species infecting hundreds of millions of people worldwide annually. We examined seven well-characterized E. coli pathogens causing urinary tract infections, gastroenteritis, pyelonephritis and haemorrhagic colitis. Their transport proteins were identified and compared with each other and a non-pathogenic E. coli K12 strain to identify transport proteins related to pathogenesis. Each pathogen possesses a unique set of protein secretion systems for export to the cell surface or for injecting effector proteins into host cells. Pathogens have increased numbers of iron siderophore receptors and ABC iron uptake transporters, but the numbers and types of low-affinity secondary iron carriers were uniform in all strains. The presence of outer membrane iron complex receptors and high-affinity ABC iron uptake systems correlated, suggesting co-evolution. Each pathovar encodes a different set of pore-forming toxins and virulence-related outer membrane proteins lacking in K12. Intracellular pathogens proved to have a characteristically distinctive set of nutrient uptake porters, different from those of extracellular pathogens. The results presented in this report provide information about transport systems relevant to various types of E. coli pathogenesis that can be exploited in future basic and applied studies.

  14. Transport proteins promoting Escherichia coli pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Fengyi; Saier, Milton H.

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli is a genetically diverse species infecting hundreds of millions of people worldwide annually. We examined seven well-characterized E. coli pathogens causing urinary tract infections, gastroenteritis, pyelonephritis and haemorrhagic colitis. Their transport proteins were identified and compared with each other and a non-pathogenic E. coli K12 strain to identify transport proteins related to pathogenesis. Each pathogen possesses a unique set of protein secretion systems for export to the cell surface or for injecting effector proteins into host cells. Pathogens have increased numbers of iron siderophore receptors and ABC iron uptake transporters, but the numbers and types of low-affinity secondary iron carriers were uniform in all strains. The presence of outer membrane iron complex receptors and high-affinity ABC iron uptake systems correlated, suggesting co-evolution. Each pathovar encodes a different set of pore-forming toxins and virulence-related outer membrane proteins lacking in K12. Intracellular pathogens proved to have a characteristically distinctive set of nutrient uptake porters, different from those of extracellular pathogens. The results presented in this report provide information about transport systems relevant to various types of E. coli pathogenesis that can be exploited in future basic and applied studies. PMID:24747185

  15. Extracellular recombinant protein production from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ni, Ye; Chen, Rachel

    2009-11-01

    Escherichia coli is the most commonly used host for recombinant protein production and metabolic engineering. Extracellular production of enzymes and proteins is advantageous as it could greatly reduce the complexity of a bioprocess and improve product quality. Extracellular production of proteins is necessary for metabolic engineering applications in which substrates are polymers such as lignocelluloses or xenobiotics since adequate uptake of these substrates is often an issue. The dogma that E. coli secretes no protein has been challenged by the recognition of both its natural ability to secrete protein in common laboratory strains and increased ability to secrete proteins in engineered cells. The very existence of this review dedicated to extracellular production is a testimony for outstanding achievements made collectively by the community in this regard. Four strategies have emerged to engineer E. coli cells to secrete recombinant proteins. In some cases, impressive secretion levels, several grams per liter, were reached. This secretion level is on par with other eukaryotic expression systems. Amid the optimism, it is important to recognize that significant challenges remain, especially when considering the success cannot be predicted a priori and involves much trials and errors. This review provides an overview of recent developments in engineering E. coli for extracellular production of recombinant proteins and an analysis of pros and cons of each strategy.

  16. Engineering Escherichia coli for methanol conversion.

    PubMed

    Müller, Jonas E N; Meyer, Fabian; Litsanov, Boris; Kiefer, Patrick; Potthoff, Eva; Heux, Stéphanie; Quax, Wim J; Wendisch, Volker F; Brautaset, Trygve; Portais, Jean-Charles; Vorholt, Julia A

    2015-03-01

    Methylotrophic bacteria utilize methanol and other reduced one-carbon compounds as their sole source of carbon and energy. For this purpose, these bacteria evolved a number of specialized enzymes and pathways. Here, we used a synthetic biology approach to select and introduce a set of "methylotrophy genes" into Escherichia coli based on in silico considerations and flux balance analysis to enable methanol dissimilation and assimilation. We determined that the most promising approach allowing the utilization of methanol was the implementation of NAD-dependent methanol dehydrogenase and the establishment of the ribulose monophosphate cycle by expressing the genes for hexulose-6-phosphate synthase (Hps) and 6-phospho-3-hexuloisomerase (Phi). To test for the best-performing enzymes in the heterologous host, a number of enzyme candidates from different donor organisms were selected and systematically analyzed for their in vitro and in vivo activities in E. coli. Among these, Mdh2, Hps and Phi originating from Bacillus methanolicus were found to be the most effective. Labeling experiments using (13)C methanol with E. coli producing these enzymes showed up to 40% incorporation of methanol into central metabolites. The presence of the endogenous glutathione-dependent formaldehyde oxidation pathway of E. coli did not adversely affect the methanol conversion rate. Taken together, the results of this study represent a major advancement towards establishing synthetic methylotrophs by gene transfer.

  17. Engineering Escherichia coli to bind to cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zijian; Meng, Liuyi; Ni, Congjian; Yao, Lanqiu; Zhang, Fengyu; Jin, Yuji; Mu, Xuelang; Zhu, Shiyu; Lu, Xiaoyu; Liu, Shiyu; Yu, Congyu; Wang, Chenggong; Zheng, Pu; Wu, Jie; Kang, Li; Zhang, Haoqian M; Ouyang, Qi

    2017-03-01

    We engineered Escherichia coli cells to bind to cyanobacteria by heterologously producing and displaying lectins of the target cyanobacteria on their surface. To prove the efficacy of our approach, we tested this design on Microcystis aeruginosa with microvirin (Mvn), the lectin endogenously produced by this cyanobacterium. The coding sequence of Mvn was C-terminally fused to the ice nucleation protein NC (INPNC) gene and expressed in E. coli. Results showed that E. coli cells expressing the INPNC::Mvn fusion protein were able to bind to M. aeruginosa and the average number of E. coli cells bound to each cyanobacterial cell was enhanced 8-fold. Finally, a computational model was developed to simulate the binding reaction and help reconstruct the binding parameters. To our best knowledge, this is the first report on the binding of two organisms in liquid culture mediated by the surface display of lectins and it may serve as a novel approach to mediate microbial adhesion.

  18. Compilation of DNA sequences of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Kröger, Manfred

    1989-01-01

    We have compiled the DNA sequence data for E.coli K12 available from the GENBANK and EMBO databases and over a period of several years independently from the literature. We have introduced all available genetic map data and have arranged the sequences accordingly. As far as possible the overlaps are deleted and a total of 940,449 individual bp is found to be determined till the beginning of 1989. This corresponds to a total of 19.92% of the entire E.coli chromosome consisting of about 4,720 kbp. This number may actually be higher by some extra 2% derived from the sequence of lysogenic bacteriophage lambda and the various insertion sequences. This compilation may be available in machine readable form from one of the international databanks in some future. PMID:2654890

  19. Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli an emergent pathogen with different virulence properties.

    PubMed

    Villaseca, J M; Hernández, U; Sainz-Espuñes, T R; Rosario, C; Eslava, C

    2005-01-01

    Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) is an emergent bacterial pathogen. The first studies in developing countries with EAEC strains, showed that this bacterium was associated with persistent diarrhea. However, new studies showed that EAEC may be associated also with acute diarrhea, with both nosocomial and community outbreaks worldwide, and as an important pathogen of diarrheal disease in human immunodeficiency virus-infected adults. EAEC strains are recognized by their characteristic aggregative adherence or "stacked-brick" pattern to epithelial cells. Although the pathogenesis of EAEC infection is not well understood, cellular changes observed in animal models and in vitro assays, suggested that the alterations in the intestinal mucosa during EAEC infection are associated with adherence factors and toxins production. The damage has been associated with the release of inflammatory mediators, which may contribute also to the intestinal illness. The dissemination of the high pathogenicity island from Yersinia pestis evolutionary group to EAEC has been show; different studies suggest that it may contribute to the virulence of EAEC strains. Molecular methods to investigate the presence of plasmid and chromosomal EAEC-associated virulence markers, have been used for the characterization and epidemiological studies of EAEC strains. Although the clinical and epidemiological importance of EAEC have been demonstrated in different studies, Escherichia coli strains with adherent agreggative phenotype are commonly isolated from healthy children and environmental sources. This support the necessity to study virulence factors no related with the cells adherence pattern, that show the specific EAEC pathogenic clones associated whit intestinal disease.

  20. Low Ubiquinone Content in Escherichia coli Causes Thiol Hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, H.; Snavely, I.; Zamorano, P.; Javor, G. T.

    1998-01-01

    Thiol hypersensitivity in a mutant of Escherichia coli (IS16) was reversed by complementation with a plasmid that carried the ubiX gene. The mutant had low ubiquinone content. Complementation elevated the ubiquinone level and eliminated thiol hypersensitivity. Analysis of chromosomal ubiX genes indicated that both parent and mutant strains were ubiX mutants. The low ubiquinone content of IS16 was possibly caused by a ubiD ubiX genotype. A ubiA mutant also exhibited thiol hypersensitivity. Neither IS16 nor the ubiA mutant strain could produce alkaline phosphatase (in contrast to their parent strains) after 2 h of induction, thus showing Dsb− phenotypes. The phenomena of thiol hypersensitivity and low ubiquinone content may be linked by their connections to the periplasmic disulfide bond redox machinery. PMID:9658014

  1. Arabidopsis alternative oxidase sustains Escherichia coli respiration.

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, A M; Söll, D

    1992-01-01

    Glutamyl-tRNA reductase, encoded by the hemA gene, is the first enzyme in porphyrin biosynthesis in many organisms. Hemes, important porphyrin derivatives, are essential components of redox enzymes, such as cytochromes. Thus a hemA Escherichia coli strain (SASX41B) is deficient in cytochrome-mediated aerobic respiration. Upon complementation of this strain with an Arabidopsis thaliana cDNA library, we isolated a clone which permitted the SASX41B strain to grow aerobically. The clone encodes the gene for Arabidopsis alternative oxidase, whose deduced amino acid sequence was found to have 71% identity with that of the enzyme from the voodoo lily, Sauromatum guttatum. The Arabidopsis protein is expressed as a 31-kDa protein in E. coli and confers on this organism cyanide-resistant growth, which in turn is sensitive to salicylhydroxamate. This implies that a single polypeptide is sufficient for alternative oxidase activity. Based on these observations we propose that a cyanide-insensitive respiratory pathway operates in the transformed E. coli hemA strain. Introduction of this pathway now opens the way to genetic/molecular biological investigations of alternative oxidase and its cofactor. Images PMID:1438286

  2. Role of Escherichia coli in Biofuel Production

    PubMed Central

    Koppolu, Veerendra; Vasigala, Veneela KR

    2016-01-01

    Increased energy consumption coupled with depleting petroleum reserves and increased greenhouse gas emissions have renewed our interest in generating fuels from renewable energy sources via microbial fermentation. Central to this problem is the choice of microorganism that catalyzes the production of fuels at high volumetric productivity and yield from cheap and abundantly available renewable energy sources. Microorganisms that are metabolically engineered to redirect renewable carbon sources into desired fuel products are contemplated as best choices to obtain high volumetric productivity and yield. Considering the availability of vast knowledge in genomic and metabolic fronts, Escherichia coli is regarded as a primary choice for the production of biofuels. Here, we reviewed the microbial production of liquid biofuels that have the potential to be used either alone or in combination with the present-day fuels. We specifically highlighted the metabolic engineering and synthetic biology approaches used to improve the production of biofuels from E. coli over the past few years. We also discussed the challenges that still exist for the biofuel production from E. coli and their possible solutions. PMID:27441002

  3. Regulation of alcohol fermentation by Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.P.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to elucidate the way in which the fermentative synthesis of ethanol is regulated in the facultative anaerobe Escherichia coli. We are also investigating the control of other genes required for fermentation and anaerobic growth. We have isolated both structural and regulatory mutations affecting the expression of alcohol dehydrogenase, the enzyme responsible for the final step in alcohol synthesis. Some of these regulatory mutations also affect other anaerobically induced genes. The adh gene has been cloned and sequenced. The ADH protein is one of the largest highly expressed proteins in E. coli and requires approximately 2700bp of DNA for its cloning sequence. We have also isolated mutations affecting the fermentative lactate dehydrogenase. In consequence it is now possible to construct E. coli strains defective in the production of any one or more of their normal fermentation products (i.e. formate, acetate, lactate, ethanol and succinate). The factors affecting the ratio of fermentation products are being investigated by in vivo NMR spectroscopy.

  4. Regulation of alcohol fermentation by Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.P.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to elucidate the way in which the synthesis of ethanol and related fermentation products are regulated in the facultative anaerobe Escherichia coli. We are also investigating the control of other genes required for anaerobic growth. We have isolated both structural and regulatory mutations affecting the expression of alcohol dehydrogenase, the enzyme responsible for the final step in alcohol synthesis. Some of these regulatory mutations also affect other anaerobically induced genes. The adh gene has been cloned and sequenced. The ADH protein is one of the largest highly expressed proteins in E. coli and requires approximately 2700bp of DNA for its coding sequence. We have also isolated mutations affecting the fermentative lactate dehydrogenase and have recently cloned the ldh gene. In consequence it is now possible to construct E. coli strains defective in the production of any one or more of their normal fermentation products (i.e. formate, acetate, lactate, ethanol and succinate). The factors affecting ratio of fermentation products are being investigated by in vivo NMR spectroscopy.

  5. Long term effects of Escherichia coli mastitis.

    PubMed

    Blum, Shlomo E; Heller, Elimelech D; Leitner, Gabriel

    2014-07-01

    Escherichia coli is one of the most frequently diagnosed causes of bovine mastitis, and is typically associated with acute, clinical mastitis. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the long term effects of intramammary infections by E. coli on milk yield and quality, especially milk coagulation. Twenty-four Israeli Holstein cows diagnosed with clinical mastitis due to intramammary infection by E. coli were used in this study. Mean lactation number, days in milk (DIM) and daily milk yield (DMY) at the time of infection was 3.3 ± 1.3, 131.7 days ± 78.6 and 45.7 L ± 8.4, respectively. DMY, milk constituents, somatic cells count (SCC), differential leukocytes count and coagulation parameters were subsequently assessed. Two patterns of inflammation were identified: 'short inflammation', characterized by <15% decrease in DMY and <30 days until return to normal (n = 5), and 'long inflammation', characterized by >15% decrease in DMY and >30 days to reach a new maximum DMY (n = 19). The estimated mean loss of marketable milk during the study was 200 L/cow for 'short inflammation' cases, and 1,500 L/cow for 'long inflammation' ones. Significant differences between 'short' and 'long inflammation' effects were found in almost all parameters studied. Long-term detrimental effects on milk quality were found regardless of clinical or bacteriological cure of affected glands.

  6. Global regulation of gene expression in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, S E; Daniels, D L; Blattner, F R

    1993-01-01

    Global transcription responses of Escherichia coli to various stimuli or genetic defects were studied by measuring mRNA levels in about 400 segments of the genome. Measuring mRNA levels was done by analyzing hybridization to DNA dot blots made with overlapping lambda clones spanning the genome of E. coli K-12. Conditions examined included isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) induction, heat shock, osmotic shock, starvation for various nutrients, entrance of cells into the stationary phase of growth, anaerobic growth in a tube, growth in the gnotobiotic mouse gut, and effects of pleiotropic mutations rpoH, himA, topA, and crp. Most mapped genes known to be regulated by a particular situation were successfully detected. In addition, many chromosomal regions containing no previously known regulated genes were discovered that responded to various stimuli. This new method for studying globally regulated genetic systems in E. coli combines detection, cloning, and physical mapping of a battery of coregulated genes in one step. Images PMID:8458845

  7. WGS accurately predicts antimicrobial resistance in Escherichia coli

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objectives: To determine the effectiveness of whole-genome sequencing (WGS) in identifying resistance genotypes of multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli (E. coli) and whether these correlate with observed phenotypes. Methods: Seventy-six E. coli strains were isolated from farm cattle and measured f...

  8. Ultraviolet-Sensitive Mutator Strain of Escherichia coli K-12

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Eli C.

    1973-01-01

    An ultraviolet (UV)-sensitive mutator gene, mutU, was identified in Escherichia coli K-12. The mutation mutU4 is very close to uvrD, between metE and ilv, on the E. coli chromosome. It was recessive as a mutator and as a UV-sensitive mutation. The frequency of reversion of trpA46 on an F episome was increased by mutU4 on the chromosome. The mutator gene did not increase mutation frequencies in virulent phages or in lytically grown phage λ. The mutU4 mutation predominantly induced transitional base changes. Mutator strains were normal for recombination and host-cell reactivation of UV-irradiated phage T1. They were normally resistant to methyl methanesulfonate and were slightly more sensitive to gamma irradiation than Mut+ strains. UV irradiation induced mutations in a mutU4 strain, and phage λ was UV-inducible. Double mutants containing mutU4 and recA, B, or C were extremely sensitive to UV irradiation; a mutU4 uvrA6 double mutant was only slightly more sensitive than a uvrA6 strain. The mutU4 uvrA6 and mutU4 recA, B, or C double mutants had mutation rates similar to that of a mutU4 strain. Two UV-sensitive mutators, mut-9 and mut-10, isolated by Liberfarb and Bryson in E. coli B/UV, were found to be co-transducible with ilv in the same general region as mutU4. PMID:4345920

  9. Mechanism of Escherichia coli Resistance to Pyrrhocoricin

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Shalini; Modak, Joyanta K.; Ryan, Catherine S.; Garcia-Bustos, Jose; Davies, John K.

    2014-01-01

    Due to their lack of toxicity to mammalian cells and good serum stability, proline-rich antimicrobial peptides (PR-AMPs) have been proposed as promising candidates for the treatment of infections caused by antimicrobial-resistant bacterial pathogens. It has been hypothesized that these peptides act on multiple targets within bacterial cells, and therefore the likelihood of the emergence of resistance was considered to be low. Here, we show that spontaneous Escherichia coli mutants resistant to pyrrhocoricin arise at a frequency of approximately 6 × 10−7. Multiple independently derived mutants all contained a deletion in a nonessential gene that encodes the putative peptide uptake permease SbmA. Sensitivity could be restored to the mutants by complementation with an intact copy of the sbmA gene. These findings question the viability of the development of insect PR-AMPs as antimicrobials. PMID:24590485

  10. Animal models of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli infection

    PubMed Central

    Philipson, Casandra W.; Bassaganya-Riera, Josep; Hontecillas, Raquel

    2013-01-01

    Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) has been acknowledged as an emerging cause of gastroenteritis worldwide for over two decades. Epidemiologists are revealing the role of EAEC in diarrheal outbreaks as a more common occurrence than ever suggested before. EAEC induced diarrhea is most commonly associated with travelers, children and immunocompromised individuals however its afflictions are not limited to any particular demographic. Many attributes have been discovered and characterized surrounding the capability of EAEC to provoke a potent pro-inflammatory immune response, however cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying initiation, progression and outcomes are largely unknown. This limited understanding can be attributed to heterogeneity in strains and the lack of adequate animal models. This review aims to summarize current knowledge about EAEC etiology, pathogenesis and clinical manifestation. Additionally, current animal models and their limitations will be discussed along with the value of applying systems-wide approaches such as computational modeling to study host-EAEC interactions. PMID:23680797

  11. An overview of atypical enteropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Hernandes, Rodrigo T; Elias, Waldir P; Vieira, Mônica A M; Gomes, Tânia A T

    2009-08-01

    The enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) pathotype is currently divided into two groups, typical EPEC (tEPEC) and atypical EPEC (aEPEC). The property that distinguishes these two groups is the presence of the EPEC adherence factor plasmid, which is only found in tEPEC. aEPEC strains are emerging enteropathogens that have been detected worldwide. Herein, we review the serotypes, virulence properties, genetic relationships, epidemiology, reservoir and diagnosis of aEPEC, including those strains not belonging to the classical EPEC serogroups (nonclassical EPEC serogroups). The large variety of serotypes and genetic virulence properties of aEPEC strains from nonclassical EPEC serogroups makes it difficult to determine which strains are truly pathogenic.

  12. Escherichia coli fliAZY operon.

    PubMed Central

    Mytelka, D S; Chamberlin, M J

    1996-01-01

    We have cloned the Escherichia coli fliAZY operon, which contains the fliA gene (the alternative sigma factor sigma F) and two novel genes, fliZ and fliY. Transcriptional mapping of this operon shows two start sites, one of which is preceded by a canonical E sigma F-dependent consensus and is dependent on sigma F for expression in vivo and in vitro. We have overexpressed and purified sigma F and demonstrated that it can direct core polymerase to E sigma F-dependent promoters. FliZ and FliY are not required for motility but may regulate sigma F activity, perhaps in response to a putative cell density signal that may be detected by FliY, a member of the bacterial extracellular solute-binding protein family 3. PMID:8550423

  13. Combining Genes from Multiple Phages for Improved Cell Lysis and DNA Transfer from Escherichia coli to Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Juhas, Mario; Wong, Christine; Ajioka, James W.

    2016-01-01

    The ability to efficiently and reliably transfer genetic circuits between the key synthetic biology chassis, such as Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis, constitutes one of the major hurdles of the rational genome engineering. Using lambda Red recombineering we integrated the thermosensitive lambda repressor and the lysis genes of several bacteriophages into the E. coli chromosome. The lysis of the engineered autolytic cells is inducible by a simple temperature shift. We improved the lysis efficiency by introducing different combinations of lysis genes from bacteriophages lambda, ΦX174 and MS2 under the control of the thermosensitive lambda repressor into the E. coli chromosome. We tested the engineered autolytic cells by transferring plasmid and bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)-borne genetic circuits from E. coli to B. subtilis. Our engineered system combines benefits of the two main synthetic biology chassis, E. coli and B. subtilis, and allows reliable and efficient transfer of DNA edited in E. coli into B. subtilis. PMID:27798678

  14. Short-time movement of E. coli chromosomal loci depends on coordinate and subcellular localization.

    PubMed

    Javer, Avelino; Long, Zhicheng; Nugent, Eileen; Grisi, Marco; Siriwatwetchakul, Kamin; Dorfman, Kevin D; Cicuta, Pietro; Cosentino Lagomarsino, Marco

    2013-01-01

    In bacteria, chromosomal architecture shows strong spatial and temporal organization, and regulates key cellular functions, such as transcription. Tracking the motion of chromosomal loci at short timescales provides information related to both the physical state of the nucleo-protein complex and its local environment, independent of large-scale motions related to genome segregation. Here we investigate the short-time (0.1-10 s) dynamics of fluorescently labelled chromosomal loci in Escherichia coli at different growth rates. At these timescales, we observe for the first time a dependence of the loci's apparent diffusion on both their subcellular localization and chromosomal coordinate, and we provide evidence that the properties of the chromosome are similar in the tested growth conditions. Our results indicate that either non-equilibrium fluctuations due to enzyme activity or the organization of the genome as a polymer-protein complex vary as a function of the distance from the origin of replication.

  15. Expanding ester biosynthesis in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Gabriel M; Tashiro, Yohei; Atsumi, Shota

    2014-04-01

    To expand the capabilities of whole-cell biocatalysis, we have engineered Escherichia coli to produce various esters. The alcohol O-acyltransferase (ATF) class of enzyme uses acyl-CoA units for ester formation. The release of free CoA upon esterification with an alcohol provides the free energy to facilitate ester formation. The diversity of CoA molecules found in nature in combination with various alcohol biosynthetic pathways allows for the biosynthesis of a multitude of esters. Small to medium volatile esters have extensive applications in the flavor, fragrance, cosmetic, solvent, paint and coating industries. The present work enables the production of these compounds by designing several ester pathways in E. coli. The engineered pathways generated acetate esters of ethyl, propyl, isobutyl, 2-methyl-1-butyl, 3-methyl-1-butyl and 2-phenylethyl alcohols. In particular, we achieved high-level production of isobutyl acetate from glucose (17.2 g l(-1)). This strategy was expanded to realize pathways for tetradecyl acetate and several isobutyrate esters.

  16. [Enteroinvasive Escherichia coli. Pathogenesis and epidemiology].

    PubMed

    Prats, G; Llovet, T

    1995-03-01

    Enteroinvasive Escherichia coli (EIEC) is an intestinal pathogen causing enteritis, with a similar pathogenic mechanism to that of Shigella, which causes an epithelial invasion of the large bowel leading to inflammation and ulceration of the mucosa. The patients often develop the symptoms of bacillary dysentery. The EIEC strains are atypical in their biochemical reactions and may ferment lactose late or not at all, are lysine decarboxilase negative, and non motile. In addition, most EIEC strains express somatic antigens which are either strongly related or identical to Shigella antigens. EIEC invasion is mediated by a large plasmid (140 MDa) coding for the production of several outer membrane proteins involved in invasiveness. These strains have been isolated with some regularity in South America, the Extreme Orient, and Eastern Europe. In Spain the incidence of enteroinvasive E. coli is extraordinarily low (0.2%), the serogroup O124 being the most frequently isolated. EIEC enteritis has been associated to sporadic cases occurring in travellers. Occasional outbreaks related to ingestion of contaminated water or food and person to person have been reported.

  17. Nucleotide excision repair in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Van Houten, B

    1990-01-01

    One of the best-studied DNA repair pathways is nucleotide excision repair, a process consisting of DNA damage recognition, incision, excision, repair resynthesis, and DNA ligation. Escherichia coli has served as a model organism for the study of this process. Recently, many of the proteins that mediate E. coli nucleotide excision have been purified to homogeneity; this had led to a molecular description of this repair pathway. One of the key repair enzymes of this pathway is the UvrABC nuclease complex. The individual subunits of this enzyme cooperate in a complex series of partial reactions to bind to and incise the DNA near a damaged nucleotide. The UvrABC complex displays a remarkable substrate diversity. Defining the structural features of DNA lesions that provide the specificity for damage recognition by the UvrABC complex is of great importance, since it represents a unique form of protein-DNA interaction. Using a number of in vitro assays, researchers have been able to elucidate the action mechanism of the UvrABC nuclease complex. Current research is devoted to understanding how these complex events are mediated within the living cell. PMID:2181258

  18. Chemotaxis Toward Sugars in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Julius; Hazelbauer, Gerald L.; Dahl, M. M.

    1973-01-01

    Using a quantitative assay for measuring chemotaxis, we tested a variety of sugars and sugar derivatives for their ability to attract Escherichia coli bacteria. The most effective attractants, i.e., those that have thresholds near 10−5 M or below, are N-acetyl-d-glucosamine, 6-deoxy-d-glucose, d-fructose, d-fucose, 1-d-glycerol-β-d-galactoside, galactitol, d-galactose, d-glucosamine, d-glucose, α-d-glucose-1-phosphate, lactose, maltose, d-mannitol, d-mannose, methyl-β-d-galactoside, methyl-β-d-glucoside, d-ribose, d-sorbitol, and trehalose. Lactose, and probably d-glucose-1-phosphate, are attractive only after conversion to the free monosaccharide, while the other attractants do not require breakdown for taxis. Nine different chemoreceptors are involved in detecting these various attractants. They are called the N-acetyl-glucosamine, fructose, galactose, glucose, maltose, mannitol, ribose, sorbitol, and trehalose chemoreceptors; the specificity of each was studied. The chemoreceptors, with the exception of the one for d-glucose, are inducible. The galactose-binding protein serves as the recognition component of the galactose chemoreceptor. E. coli also has osmotically shockable binding activities for maltose and d-ribose, and these appear to serve as the recognition components for the corresponding chemoreceptors. PMID:4580570

  19. Expanding ester biosynthesis in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Gabriel M; Tashiro, Yohei; Atsumi, Shota

    2015-01-01

    To expand the capabilities of whole-cell biocatalysis, we have engineered Escherichia coli to produce various esters. The alcohol O-acyltransferase (ATF) class of enzyme uses acyl-CoA units for ester formation. The release of free CoA upon esterification with an alcohol provides the free energy to facilitate ester formation. The diversity of CoA molecules found in nature in combination with various alcohol biosynthetic pathways allows for the biosynthesis of a multitude of esters. Small to medium volatile esters have extensive applications in the flavor, fragrance, cosmetic, solvent, paint and coating industries. The present work enables the production of these compounds by designing several ester pathways in E. coli. The engineered pathways generated acetate esters of ethyl, propyl, isobutyl, 2-methyl-1-butyl, 3-methyl-1-butyl and 2-phenylethyl alcohols. In particular, we achieved high-level production of isobutyl acetate from glucose (17.2 g l−1). This strategy was expanded to realize pathways for tetradecyl acetate and several isobutyrate esters. PMID:24609358

  20. The thermal impulse response of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Paster, Eli; Ryu, William S.

    2008-01-01

    Swimming Escherichia coli responds to changes in temperature by modifying its motor behavior. Previous studies using populations of cells have shown that E. coli accumulate in spatial thermal gradients, but these experiments did not cleanly separate thermal responses from chemotactic responses. Here we have isolated the thermal response by studying the behavior of single, tethered cells. The motor output of cells grown at 33°C was measured at constant temperature, from 10° to 40°C, and in response to small, impulsive increases in temperature, from 23° to 43°C. The thermal impulse response at temperatures < 31°C is similar to the chemotactic impulse response: Both follow a similar time course, share the same directionality, and show biphasic characteristics. At temperatures > 31°C, some cells show an inverted response, switching from warm- to cold-seeking behavior. The fraction of inverted responses increases nonlinearly with temperature, switching steeply at the preferred temperature of 37°C. PMID:18385380

  1. Linkage map of Escherichia coli K-12, edition 8.

    PubMed Central

    Bachmann, B J

    1990-01-01

    The linkage map of Escherichia coli K-12 depicts the arrangement of genes on the circular chromosome of this organism. The basic units of the map are minutes, determined by the time-of-entry of markers from Hfr into F- strains in interrupted-conjugation experiments. The time-of-entry distances have been refined over the years by determination of the frequency of cotransduction of loci in transduction experiments utilizing bacteriophage P1, which transduces segments of DNA approximately 2 min in length. In recent years, the relative positions of many genes have been determined even more precisely by physical techniques, including the mapping of restriction fragments and the sequencing of many small regions of the chromosome. On the whole, the agreement between results obtained by genetic and physical methods has been remarkably good considering the different levels of accuracy to be expected of the methods used. There are now few regions of the map whose length is still in some doubt. In some regions, genetic experiments utilizing different mutant strains give different map distances. In other regions, the genetic markers available have not been close enough to give accurate cotransduction data. The chromosome is now known to contain several inserted elements apparently derived from lambdoid phages and other sources. The nature of the region in which the termination of replication of the chromosome occurs is now known to be much more complex than the picture given in the previous map. The present map is based upon the published literature through June of 1988. There are now 1,403 loci placed on the linkage group, which may represent between one-third and one-half of the genes in this organism. PMID:2194094

  2. Cyclomodulins in urosepsis strains of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Dubois, Damien; Delmas, Julien; Cady, Anne; Robin, Frédéric; Sivignon, Adeline; Oswald, Eric; Bonnet, Richard

    2010-06-01

    Determinants of urosepsis in Escherichia coli remain incompletely defined. Cyclomodulins (CMs) are a growing functional family of toxins that hijack the eukaryotic cell cycle. Four cyclomodulin types are actually known in E. coli: cytotoxic necrotizing factors (CNFs), cycle-inhibiting factor (Cif), cytolethal distending toxins (CDTs), and the pks-encoded toxin. In the present study, the distribution of CM-encoding genes and the functionality of these toxins were investigated in 197 E. coli strains isolated from patients with community-acquired urosepsis (n = 146) and from uninfected subjects (n = 51). This distribution was analyzed in relation to the phylogenetic background, clinical origin, and antibiotic resistance of the strains. It emerged from this study that strains harboring the pks island and the cnf1 gene (i) were strongly associated with the B2 phylogroup (P, <0.001), (ii) frequently harbored both toxin-encoded genes in phylogroup B2 (33%), and (iii) were predictive of a urosepsis origin (P, <0.001 to 0.005). However, the prevalences of the pks island among phylogroup B2 strains, in contrast to those of the cnf1 gene, were not significantly different between fecal and urosepsis groups, suggesting that the pks island is more important for the colonization process and the cnf1 gene for virulence. pks- or cnf1-harboring strains were significantly associated with susceptibility to antibiotics (amoxicillin, cotrimoxazole, and quinolones [P, <0.001 to 0.043]). Otherwise, only 6% and 1% of all strains harbored the cdtB and cif genes, respectively, with no particular distribution by phylogenetic background, antimicrobial susceptibility, or clinical origin.

  3. The extracellular RNA complement of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Ghosal, Anubrata; Upadhyaya, Bimal Babu; Fritz, Joëlle V; Heintz-Buschart, Anna; Desai, Mahesh S; Yusuf, Dilmurat; Huang, David; Baumuratov, Aidos; Wang, Kai; Galas, David; Wilmes, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The secretion of biomolecules into the extracellular milieu is a common and well-conserved phenomenon in biology. In bacteria, secreted biomolecules are not only involved in intra-species communication but they also play roles in inter-kingdom exchanges and pathogenicity. To date, released products, such as small molecules, DNA, peptides, and proteins, have been well studied in bacteria. However, the bacterial extracellular RNA complement has so far not been comprehensively characterized. Here, we have analyzed, using a combination of physical characterization and high-throughput sequencing, the extracellular RNA complement of both outer membrane vesicle (OMV)-associated and OMV-free RNA of the enteric Gram-negative model bacterium Escherichia coli K-12 substrain MG1655 and have compared it to its intracellular RNA complement. Our results demonstrate that a large part of the extracellular RNA complement is in the size range between 15 and 40 nucleotides and is derived from specific intracellular RNAs. Furthermore, RNA is associated with OMVs and the relative abundances of RNA biotypes in the intracellular, OMV and OMV-free fractions are distinct. Apart from rRNA fragments, a significant portion of the extracellular RNA complement is composed of specific cleavage products of functionally important structural noncoding RNAs, including tRNAs, 4.5S RNA, 6S RNA, and tmRNA. In addition, the extracellular RNA pool includes RNA biotypes from cryptic prophages, intergenic, and coding regions, of which some are so far uncharacterised, for example, transcripts mapping to the fimA-fimL and ves-spy intergenic regions. Our study provides the first detailed characterization of the extracellular RNA complement of the enteric model bacterium E. coli. Analogous to findings in eukaryotes, our results suggest the selective export of specific RNA biotypes by E. coli, which in turn indicates a potential role for extracellular bacterial RNAs in intercellular communication. PMID:25611733

  4. Escherichia coli survival in waters: temperature dependence.

    PubMed

    Blaustein, R A; Pachepsky, Y; Hill, R L; Shelton, D R; Whelan, G

    2013-02-01

    Knowing the survival rates of water-borne Escherichia coli is important in evaluating microbial contamination and making appropriate management decisions. E. coli survival rates are dependent on temperature, a dependency that is routinely expressed using an analogue of the Q₁₀ model. This suggestion was made 34 years ago based on 20 survival curves taken from published literature, but has not been revisited since then. The objective of this study was to re-evaluate the accuracy of the Q₁₀ equation, utilizing data accumulated since 1978. We assembled a database of 450 E. coli survival datasets from 70 peer-reviewed papers. We then focused on the 170 curves taken from experiments that were performed in the laboratory under dark conditions to exclude the effects of sunlight and other field factors that could cause additional variability in results. All datasets were tabulated dependencies "log concentration vs. time." There were three major patterns of inactivation: about half of the datasets had a section of fast log-linear inactivation followed by a section of slow log-linear inactivation; about a quarter of the datasets had a lag period followed by log-linear inactivation; and the remaining quarter were approximately linear throughout. First-order inactivation rate constants were calculated from the linear sections of all survival curves and the data grouped by water sources, including waters of agricultural origin, pristine water sources, groundwater and wells, lakes and reservoirs, rivers and streams, estuaries and seawater, and wastewater. Dependency of E. coli inactivation rates on temperature varied among the water sources. There was a significant difference in inactivation rate values at the reference temperature between rivers and agricultural waters, wastewaters and agricultural waters, rivers and lakes, and wastewater and lakes. At specific sites, the Q₁₀ equation was more accurate in rivers and coastal waters than in lakes making the value of

  5. Polymorphisms in the umuDC region of Escherichia species. [Escherichia coli; Escherichia alkalescens; Escherichia dispar; Escherichia aurescens

    SciTech Connect

    Sedgwick, S.G.; Robson, M.; Malik, F.

    1988-04-01

    The umuDC operon of Escherichia coli encodes mutagenic DNA repair. The umuDC regions of multiple isolates of E. coli, E. alkalescens, and E. dispar and a single stock of E. aurescens were mapped by nucleotide hybridization. umuDC is located at one end of a conserved tract of restriction endonuclease sites either 12.5 or 14 kilobase pairs long. Rearrangements, including possible deletions, were seen in the polymorphic DNA flanking the conserved tract. Restriction site polymorphisms were not found around the DNA repair gene recA or polA. The junctions of the conserved region contain direct repeats of nucleotide sequences resembling the termini of the Tn3 group of transposons. Possible mechanisms for the generation of these variants are discussed.

  6. Cloning and expression in Escherichia coli of genes involved in the lysine pathway of Brevibacterium lactofermentum.

    PubMed Central

    Márquez, G; Sousa, J M; Sánchez, F

    1985-01-01

    The Brevibacterium lactofermentum genes which complement Escherichia coli lysA and asd-1 mutants were identified, respectively, as a 1.9-kilobase PstI-ClaI fragment and a 2.5-kilobase PstI fragment by cloning into pBR325. Southern blot transfers show hybridization to chromosomal fragments of identical size. The putative B. lactofermentum asd and lysA products are 44 and 48 kilodaltons, respectively. Images PMID:2864331

  7. TRIMETHOPRIM-SULFAMETHOXAZOLE RESISTANCE IN SEWAGE ISOLATES OF ESCHERICHIA COLI

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sewage samples from seven locations in the United States were analyzed for Escherichia coli isolates which were resistant to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (SXT). The prevalence rate of SXT resistant organisms varied between the different geographical locales. The majority of th...

  8. Genome Sequence of Escherichia coli Tailed Phage Utah

    PubMed Central

    Leavitt, Justin C.; Heitkamp, Alexandra J.; Bhattacharjee, Ananda S.; Gilcrease, Eddie B.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Escherichia coli bacteriophage Utah is a member of the chi-like tailed phage cluster in the Siphoviridae family. We report here the complete 59,024-bp sequence of the genome of phage Utah. PMID:28360173

  9. Shigella strains are not clones of Escherichia coli but sister species in the genus Escherichia.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Guanghong; Xu, Zhao; Hao, Bailin

    2013-02-01

    Shigella species and Escherichia coli are closely related organisms. Early phenotyping experiments and several recent molecular studies put Shigella within the species E. coli. However, the whole-genome-based, alignment-free and parameter-free CVTree approach shows convincingly that four established Shigella species, Shigella boydii, Shigella sonnei, Shigella felxneri and Shigella dysenteriae, are distinct from E. coli strains, and form sister species to E. coli within the genus Escherichia. In view of the overall success and high resolution power of the CVTree approach, this result should be taken seriously. We hope that the present report may promote further in-depth study of the Shigella-E. coli relationship.

  10. ENERGY REQUIREMENT FOR THYMINELESS DEATH IN CELLS OF ESCHERICHIA COLI.

    PubMed

    FREIFELDER, D; MAALOE, O

    1964-10-01

    Freifelder, David (University of California, Berkeley), and Ole Maaløe. Energy requirement for thymineless death in cells of Escherichia coli. J. Bacteriol. 88:987-990. 1964.-Thymineless death in thymine-requiring Escherichia coli is arrested immediately and reversibly by nitrogenation if the bacterial population is growing in a medium containing a carbon source that can only be metabolized aerobically. The mechanism of death, therefore, involves a metabolic process.

  11. ENERGY REQUIREMENT FOR THYMINELESS DEATH IN CELLS OF ESCHERICHIA COLI

    PubMed Central

    Freifelder, David; Maaløe, Ole

    1964-01-01

    Freifelder, David (University of California, Berkeley), and Ole Maaløe. Energy requirement for thymineless death in cells of Escherichia coli. J. Bacteriol. 88:987–990. 1964.—Thymineless death in thymine-requiring Escherichia coli is arrested immediately and reversibly by nitrogenation if the bacterial population is growing in a medium containing a carbon source that can only be metabolized aerobically. The mechanism of death, therefore, involves a metabolic process. PMID:14219063

  12. Comparative sequence analysis of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli heat-stable enterotoxin 1 identified in Korean and Japanese Escherichia coli strains.

    PubMed

    Seo, Dong Joo; Choi, SunKeum; Jeon, Su Been; Jeong, Suntak; Park, Hyunkyung; Lee, Bog-Hieu; Kim, Geun-Bae; Yang, Soo-Jin; Nishikawa, Yoshikazu; Choi, Changsun

    2017-02-21

    The aim of this study was to compare the sequence of the astA gene found in 8 Korean and 11 Japanese Escherichia coli isolates. Conventional PCR was used to amplify the astA gene from the chromosomal and plasmid DNA preparation samples of each isolate using commercial DNA extraction kits. Cloning of the PCR products, sequence analysis, and pulse field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) were sequentially performed. An identical copy of astA in each isolate were found for 8 Korean and 8 Japanese E. coli strains isolated from bovine, porcine, and healthy human carriers. Among these, 1 Korean and 4 Japanese isolates carried a stop mutation at residue 16. Three Japanese outbreak strains (V199, V638, and 96-127-23) carried multiple clones of astA gene with multiple amino acids changes at residues 11, 16, 20, 23, 30, 33, and 34. Compared with the non-diarrheal isolates, clonal diversity and sequence variations of the astA gene in outbreak isolates may be associated with virulence potential of EAST1.

  13. Escherichia coli Unsaturated Fatty Acid Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Youjun; Cronan, John E.

    2009-01-01

    Although the unsaturated fatty acid (UFA) synthetic pathway of Escherichia coli is the prototype of such pathways, several unresolved issues have accumulated over the years. The key players are the fabA and fabB genes. Earlier studies of fabA transcription showed that the gene was transcribed from two promoters, with one being positively regulated by the FadR protein. The other weaker promoter (which could not be mapped with the technology then available) was considered constitutive because its function was independent of FadR. However, the FabR negative regulator was recently shown to represses fabA transcription. We report that the weak promoter overlaps the FadR-dependent promoter and is regulated by FabR. This promoter is strictly conserved in all E. coli and Salmonella enterica genomes sequenced to date and is thought to provide insurance against inappropriate regulation of fabA transcription by exogenous saturated fatty acids. Also, the fabAup promoter, a mutant promoter previously isolated by selection for increased FabA activity, was shown to be a promoter created de novo by a four-base deletion within the gene located immediately upstream of fabA. Demonstration of the key UFA synthetic reaction catalyzed by FabB has been elusive, although it was known to catalyze an elongation reaction. Strains lacking FabB are UFA auxotrophs indicating that the enzyme catalyzes an essential step in UFA synthesis. Using thioesterases specific for hydrolysis of short chain acyl-ACPs, the intermediates of the UFA synthetic pathway have been followed in vivo for the first time. These experiments showed that a fabB mutant strain accumulated less cis-5-dodecenoic acid than the parental wild-type strain. These data indicate that the key reaction in UFA synthesis catalyzed by FabB is elongation of the cis-3-decenoyl-ACP produced by FabA. PMID:19679654

  14. Mono and diterpene production in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Reiling, K Kinkead; Yoshikuni, Yasuo; Martin, Vincent J J; Newman, Jack; Bohlmann, Jörg; Keasling, Jay D

    2004-07-20

    Mono- and diterpenoids are of great industrial and medical value as specialty chemicals and pharmaceuticals. Production of these compounds in microbial hosts, such as Escherichia coli, can be limited by intracellular levels of the polyprenyl diphosphate precursors, geranyl diphosphate (GPP), and geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGPP). To alleviate this limitation, we constructed synthetic operons that express three key enzymes for biosynthesis of these precursors: (1). DXS,1-deoxy-d-xylulose-5-phosphate synthase; (2). IPPHp, IPP isomerase from Haematococcus pluvialis; and (3). one of two variants of IspA, FPP synthase that produces either GPP or GGPP. The reporter plasmids pAC-LYC and pACYC-IB, which encode enzymes that convert either FPP or GGPP, respectively, to the pigment lycopene, were used to demonstrate that at full induction, the operon encoding the wild-type FPP synthase and mutant GGPP synthase produced similar levels of lycopene. To synthesize di- or monoterpenes in E. coli using the GGPP and GPP encoding operons either a diterpene cyclase [casbene cyclase (Ricinus communis L) and ent-kaurene cyclase (Phaeosphaeria sp. L487)] or a monoterpene cyclase [3-carene cyclase (Picea abies)] was coexpressed with their respective precursor production operon. Analysis of culture extracts or headspace by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry confirmed the in vivo production of the diterpenes casbene, kaur-15-ene, and kaur-16-ene and the monoterpenes alpha-pinene, myrcene, sabinene, 3-carene, alpha-terpinene, limonene, beta-phellandrene, alpha-terpinene, and terpinolene. Construction and functional expression of GGPP and GPP operons provides an in vivo precursor platform host for the future engineering of di- and monoterpene cyclases and the overproduction of terpenes in bacteria.

  15. Microdiesel: Escherichia coli engineered for fuel production.

    PubMed

    Kalscheuer, Rainer; Stölting, Torsten; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2006-09-01

    Biodiesel is an alternative energy source and a substitute for petroleum-based diesel fuel. It is produced from renewable biomass by transesterification of triacylglycerols from plant oils, yielding monoalkyl esters of long-chain fatty acids with short-chain alcohols such as fatty acid methyl esters and fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs). Despite numerous environmental benefits, a broader use of biodiesel is hampered by the extensive acreage required for sufficient production of oilseed crops. Therefore, processes are urgently needed to enable biodiesel production from more readily available bulk plant materials like sugars or cellulose. Toward this goal, the authors established biosynthesis of biodiesel-adequate FAEEs, referred to as Microdiesel, in metabolically engineered Escherichia coli. This was achieved by heterologous expression in E. coli of the Zymomonas mobilis pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase and the unspecific acyltransferase from Acinetobacter baylyi strain ADP1. By this approach, ethanol formation was combined with subsequent esterification of the ethanol with the acyl moieties of coenzyme A thioesters of fatty acids if the cells were cultivated under aerobic conditions in the presence of glucose and oleic acid. Ethyl oleate was the major constituent of these FAEEs, with minor amounts of ethyl palmitate and ethyl palmitoleate. FAEE concentrations of 1.28 g l(-1) and a FAEE content of the cells of 26 % of the cellular dry mass were achieved by fed-batch fermentation using renewable carbon sources. This novel approach might pave the way for industrial production of biodiesel equivalents from renewable resources by employing engineered micro-organisms, enabling a broader use of biodiesel-like fuels in the future.

  16. The Escherichia coli Peripheral Inner Membrane Proteome*

    PubMed Central

    Papanastasiou, Malvina; Orfanoudaki, Georgia; Koukaki, Marina; Kountourakis, Nikos; Sardis, Marios Frantzeskos; Aivaliotis, Michalis; Karamanou, Spyridoula; Economou, Anastassios

    2013-01-01

    Biological membranes are essential for cell viability. Their functional characteristics strongly depend on their protein content, which consists of transmembrane (integral) and peripherally associated membrane proteins. Both integral and peripheral inner membrane proteins mediate a plethora of biological processes. Whereas transmembrane proteins have characteristic hydrophobic stretches and can be predicted using bioinformatics approaches, peripheral inner membrane proteins are hydrophilic, exist in equilibria with soluble pools, and carry no discernible membrane targeting signals. We experimentally determined the cytoplasmic peripheral inner membrane proteome of the model organism Escherichia coli using a multidisciplinary approach. Initially, we extensively re-annotated the theoretical proteome regarding subcellular localization using literature searches, manual curation, and multi-combinatorial bioinformatics searches of the available databases. Next we used sequential biochemical fractionations coupled to direct identification of individual proteins and protein complexes using high resolution mass spectrometry. We determined that the proposed cytoplasmic peripheral inner membrane proteome occupies a previously unsuspected ∼19% of the basic E. coli BL21(DE3) proteome, and the detected peripheral inner membrane proteome occupies ∼25% of the estimated expressed proteome of this cell grown in LB medium to mid-log phase. This value might increase when fleeting interactions, not studied here, are taken into account. Several proteins previously regarded as exclusively cytoplasmic bind membranes avidly. Many of these proteins are organized in functional or/and structural oligomeric complexes that bind to the membrane with multiple interactions. Identified proteins cover the full spectrum of biological activities, and more than half of them are essential. Our data suggest that the cytoplasmic proteome displays remarkably dynamic and extensive communication with

  17. Cloning of the gene encoding streptococcal immunoglobulin A protease and its expression in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, J V; Plaut, A G; Fishman, Y; Wright, A

    1988-01-01

    We have identified and cloned a 6-kilobase-pair segment of chromosomal DNA from Streptococcus sanguis ATCC 10556 that encodes immunoglobulin A (IgA) protease activity when cloned into Escherichia coli. The enzyme specified by the iga gene in plasmid pJG1 accumulates in the periplasm of E. coli MM294 cells and has a substrate specificity for human IgA1 identical to that of native S. sanguis protease. Hybridization experiments with probes from within the encoding DNA showed no detectable homology at the nucleotide sequence level with chromosomal DNA of gram-negative bacteria that excrete IgA protease. Moreover, the S. sanguis iga gene probes showed no detectable hybridization with chromosomal DNA of S. pneumoniae, although the IgA proteases of these two streptococcal species cleaved the identical peptide bond in the human IgA1 heavy-chain hinge region. Images PMID:3294181

  18. [Production of coenzyme Q10 by metabolically engineered Escherichia coli].

    PubMed

    Dai, Guanping; Miao, Liangtian; Sun, Tao; Li, Qingyan; Xiao, Dongguang; Zhang, Xueli

    2015-02-01

    Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is a lipophilic antioxidant that improves human immunity, delays senility and enhances the vitality of the human body and has wide applications in pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. Microbial fermentation is a sustainable way to produce CoQ10, and attracts increased interest. In this work, the native CoQ8 synthetic pathway of Escherichia coli was replaced by the CoQ10 synthetic pathway through integrating decaprenyl diphosphate synthase gene (dps) from Rhodobacter sphaeroides into chromosome of E. coli ATCC 8739, followed by deletion of the native octaprenyl diphosphate synthase gene (ispB). The resulting strain GD-14 produced 0.68 mg/L CoQ10 with a yield of 0.54 mg/g DCW. Modulation of dxs and idi genes of the MEP pathway and ubiCA genes in combination led to 2.46-fold increase of CoQ10 production (from 0.54 to 1.87 mg/g DCW). Recruiting glucose facilitator protein of Zymomonas mobilis to replace the native phosphoenolpyruvate: carbohydrate phosphotransferase systems (PTS) further led to a 16% increase of CoQ10 yield. Finally, fed-batch fermentation of the best strain GD-51 was performed, which produced 433 mg/L CoQ10 with a yield of 11.7 mg/g DCW. To the best of our knowledge, this was the highest CoQ10 titer and yield obtained for engineered E. coli.

  19. Regulation of Glutamine Transport in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Willis, R C; Iwata, K K; Furlong, C E

    1975-01-01

    The formation of the high-affinity (Km equal to 0.2 muM) L-glutamine transport system of Escherichia coli strain 7 (Lin) appears to be subject to the same major control as the glutamine synthetase (EC 6.3.1.2) of this gram-negative organism. Culture of cells under nitrogen-limited conditions provides maximum derepression of both the glutamine synthetase and the glutamine transport system. Nutritional conditions providing a rich supply of ammonium salts or available sources of nitrogen, i.e., conditions which repress the formation of glutamine synthetase, provide three- and 20-fold repression, respectively, of the glutamine transport system. Culture of cells with glutamine supplements of 2 mM does not increase the repression of high-affinity glutamine transport system beyond the level observed in the absence of glutamine. A second kinetically distinct low-affinity component of glutamine. A second kinetically distinct low-affinity component of glutamine uptake is observed in cells cultured with a glutamine-depleted nutrient broth. This second component is associated with the appearance of glutaminase A (EC 3.5.1.2) and asparaginase I (EC 3.5.1.1), a periplasmic enzyme. Parallel changes were observed in the levels of the high-affinity glutamine transport system and the glutamine synthetase when cells were cultured with the carbon sources: glucose, glycerol, or succinate. PMID:238938

  20. ESCHERICHIA COLI Gene Induction by Alkylation Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Volkert, Michael R.; Nguyen, Dinh C.; Beard, K. Christopher

    1986-01-01

    Searches for alkylation-inducible (aid) genes of Escherichia coli have been conducted by screening random fusions of the Mu-dl(ApR lac) phage for fusions showing increased β-galactosidase activity after treatment with methylating agents, but not after treatments with UV-irradiation. In this report we describe gene fusions that are specifically induced by alkylation treatments. Nine new mutants are described, and their properties are compared with the five mutants described previously. The total of 14 fusion mutants map at five distinct genetic loci. They can be further subdivided on the basis of their induction by methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG). alkA, aidB and aidD are induced by both agents and appear to be regulated by ada. Neither aidC nor aidI is regulated by ada. Moreover, since aidC is induced only by MNNG and aidI is induced only by MMS, these two genes are likely to be individually regulated. Thus, there appear to be at least three different regulatory mechanisms controlling aid genes. PMID:3080354

  1. Escherichia coli gene induction by alkylation treatment.

    PubMed

    Volkert, M R; Nguyen, D C; Beard, K C

    1986-01-01

    Searches for alkylation-inducible (aid) genes of Escherichia coli have been conducted by screening random fusions of the Mu-dl(ApR lac) phage for fusions showing increased beta-galactosidase activity after treatment with methylating agents, but not after treatments with UV-irradiation. In this report we describe gene fusions that are specifically induced by alkylation treatments. Nine new mutants are described, and their properties are compared with the five mutants described previously. The total of 14 fusion mutants map at five distinct genetic loci. They can be further subdivided on the basis of their induction by methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and N-methyl-N' -nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG). alkA, aidB and aidD are induced by both agents and appear to be regulated by ada. Neither aidC nor aidI is regulated by ada. Moreover, since aidC is induced only by MNNG and aidI is induced only by MMS, these two genes are likely to be individually regulated. Thus, there appear to be at least three different regulatory mechanisms controlling aid genes.

  2. Regulation of alcohol fermentation by Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.P.

    1986-03-01

    The purpose of this project is to elucidate the way in which the fermentative synthesis of ethanol is regulated in the facultative anaerobe Escherichia coli. Focus is on the two final steps in alcohol synthesis, which are catalyzed by alcohol dehydrogenase and acetaldehyde CoA dehydrogenase. We have isolated a series of mutations affecting the expression of these enzymes. Some of these mutations are in the structural genes for these enzymes; others affect the regulation of the adh operon. We have recently cloned the genes coding for these enzymes and are now studying the effect of multiple copies of the adh gene on fermentative growth and its regulation. A recently invented technique, proton suicide has allowed the selection of a variety of novel mutants affecting fermentation which are presently being characterized. We have isolated a comprehensive collection of operon fusions in which the lacZ structural gene is fused to promoters that are inactive aerobically but active anaerobically. Although these genes (like adh) are only expressed under anaerobic conditions, the level of induction varies from two-fold to nearly 100-fold. The nitrogen source, medium pH, nature of the buffer, presence of alternative electron acceptors (e.g., nitrate), and other factors exert a great effect on the expression of many of these genes. In the near future we will investigate control mechanisms common to the adh operon and other anaerobically regulated genes.

  3. Antimicrobial-resistant Invasive Escherichia coli, Spain

    PubMed Central

    Oteo, Jesús; Lázaro, Edurne; de Abajo, Francisco J.; Baquero, Fernando; Campos, José

    2005-01-01

    To address the public health problem of antimicrobial resistance, the European Union founded the European Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance System. A network of 32 Spanish hospitals, serving ≈9.6 million persons, submitted antimicrobial-susceptibility data on 7,098 invasive Escherichia coli species (2001–2003). Resistance to ampicillin, cotrimoxazole, ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, and tobramycin was found at rates of 59.9%, 32.6%, 19.3%, 6.8%, and 5.3%, respectively. Resistance to multiple drugs increased from 13.8% in 2001 to 20.6% in 2003 (p <0.0001). Antimicrobial consumption data were obtained from the Spanish National Health System. In spite of decreased cephalosporin and β-lactam use, overall extended-spectrum β-lactamase production increased from 1.6% (2001) to 4.1% (2003) (p <0.0001), mainly due to the rising prevalence of cefotaximases. Resistance to ciprofloxacin significantly increased, mostly in community-onset infections, which coincided with a rise in community quinolone use. Cotrimoxazole resistance remained stable at ≈30%, even though its use was dramatically reduced. PMID:15829192

  4. Genotoxicity of Graphene in Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Ananya

    Rapid advances in nanotechnology necessitate assessment of the safety of nanomaterials in the resulting products and applications. One key nanomaterial attracting much interest in many areas of science and technology is graphene. Graphene is a one atom thick carbon allotrope arranged in a two-dimensional honeycomb lattice. In addition to being extremely thin, graphene has several extraordinary physical properties such as its exceptional mechanical strength, thermal stability, and high electrical conductivity. Graphene itself is relatively chemically inert and therefore pristine graphene must undergo a process called functionalization, which is combination of chemical and physical treatments that change the properties of graphene, to make it chemically active. Functionalization of graphene is of crucial importance as the end application of graphene depends on proper functionalization. In the field of medicine, graphene is currently a nanomaterial of high interest for building biosensors, DNA transistors, and probes for cancer detection. Despite the promising applications of graphene in several areas of biomedicine, there have been only few studies in recent years that focus on evaluating cytotoxicity of graphene on cells, and almost no studies that investigate how graphene exposure affects cellular genetic material. Therefore, in this study we used a novel approach to evaluate the genotoxicity, i.e., the effects of graphene on DNA, using Escherichia coli as a prokaryotic model organism.

  5. Oligosaccharide Binding in Escherichia coli Glycogen Synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, Fang; Yep, Alejandra; Feng, Lei; Preiss, Jack; Geiger, James H.

    2010-11-17

    Glycogen/starch synthase elongates glucan chains and is the key enzyme in the synthesis of glycogen in bacteria and starch in plants. Cocrystallization of Escherichia coli wild-type glycogen synthase (GS) with substrate ADPGlc and the glucan acceptor mimic HEPPSO produced a closed form of GS and suggests that domain-domain closure accompanies glycogen synthesis. Cocrystallization of the inactive GS mutant E377A with substrate ADPGlc and oligosaccharide results in the first oligosaccharide-bound glycogen synthase structure. Four bound oligosaccharides are observed, one in the interdomain cleft (G6a) and three on the N-terminal domain surface (G6b, G6c, and G6d). Extending from the center of the enzyme to the interdomain cleft opening, G6a mostly interacts with the highly conserved N-terminal domain residues lining the cleft of GS. The surface-bound oligosaccharides G6c and G6d have less interaction with enzyme and exhibit a more curled, helixlike structural arrangement. The observation that oligosaccharides bind only to the N-terminal domain of GS suggests that glycogen in vivo probably binds to only one side of the enzyme to ensure unencumbered interdomain movement, which is required for efficient, continuous glucan-chain synthesis.

  6. Biochemistry of homologous recombination in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Kowalczykowski, S C; Dixon, D A; Eggleston, A K; Lauder, S D; Rehrauer, W M

    1994-01-01

    Homologous recombination is a fundamental biological process. Biochemical understanding of this process is most advanced for Escherichia coli. At least 25 gene products are involved in promoting genetic exchange. At present, this includes the RecA, RecBCD (exonuclease V), RecE (exonuclease VIII), RecF, RecG, RecJ, RecN, RecOR, RecQ, RecT, RuvAB, RuvC, SbcCD, and SSB proteins, as well as DNA polymerase I, DNA gyrase, DNA topoisomerase I, DNA ligase, and DNA helicases. The activities displayed by these enzymes include homologous DNA pairing and strand exchange, helicase, branch migration, Holliday junction binding and cleavage, nuclease, ATPase, topoisomerase, DNA binding, ATP binding, polymerase, and ligase, and, collectively, they define biochemical events that are essential for efficient recombination. In addition to these needed proteins, a cis-acting recombination hot spot known as Chi (chi: 5'-GCTGGTGG-3') plays a crucial regulatory function. The biochemical steps that comprise homologous recombination can be formally divided into four parts: (i) processing of DNA molecules into suitable recombination substrates, (ii) homologous pairing of the DNA partners and the exchange of DNA strands, (iii) extension of the nascent DNA heteroduplex; and (iv) resolution of the resulting crossover structure. This review focuses on the biochemical mechanisms underlying these steps, with particular emphases on the activities of the proteins involved and on the integration of these activities into likely biochemical pathways for recombination. Images PMID:7968921

  7. Ribonuclease Sensitivity of Escherichia coli Ribosomes

    PubMed Central

    Santer, Melvin; Smith, Josephine R.

    1966-01-01

    Santer, Melvin (Haverford College, Haverford, Pa.), and Josephine R. Smith. Ribonuclease sensitivity of Escherichia coli ribosomes. J. Bacteriol. 92:1099–1110. 1966.—The ribonucleic acid (RNA) contained in 70S ribosomes and in 50S and 30S subunits was hydrolyzed by pancreatic ribonuclease. A 7% amount of the RNA was removed from the 70S particle; at 10−4m magnesium concentration, a maximum of 24 and 30% of the RNA in the 50S and the 30S fractions, respectively, was removed by ribonuclease. At the two lower magnesium ion concentrations, 50S ribosomes did not lose any protein, whereas 30S ribosomes lost protein as a result of ribonuclease treatment. A number of proteins were removed from the 30S particles by ribonuclease, and these proteins were antigenically related to proteins present in 50S ribosomes. The differential effect of ribonuclease on 50S and 30S ribosomes suggested that they have structural dissimilarities. Images PMID:5332866

  8. Type II toxin-antitoxin systems are unevenly distributed among Escherichia coli phylogroups.

    PubMed

    Fiedoruk, Krzysztof; Daniluk, Tamara; Swiecicka, Izabela; Sciepuk, Malgorzata; Leszczynska, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    Type II toxin-antitoxin systems (TAs) are bicistronic operons ubiquitous in prokaryotic genomes, displaying multilevel association with cell physiology. Various possible functions have been assigned to TAs, ranging from beneficial for their hosts, such as a stress response, dormancy and protection against genomic parasites, to detrimental or useless functions, such as selfish alleles. As there is a link between several Escherichia coli features (e.g. virulence, lifestyle) and the phylogeny of this species, we hypothesized a similar association with TAs. Using PCR we studied the distribution of 15 chromosomal and plasmidic type II TA loci in 84 clinical E. coli isolates in relation to their main phylogenetic groups (A, B1, B2 and D). In addition, we performed in silico searching of these TA loci in 60 completely sequenced E. coli genomes deposited in GenBank. The highest number of TA loci per strain was observed in group A (mean 8.2, range 5-12) and the lowest in group B2 (mean 4.2, range 2-8). Moreover, significant differences in the prevalence of nine chromosomal TAs among E. coli phylogroups were noted. In conclusion, the presence of some chromosomal TAs in E. coli is phylogroup-related rather than a universal feature of the species. In addition, their limited collection in group B2 clearly distinguish it from the other E. coli phylogroups.

  9. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Multilocus Sequence Types in Guatemala and Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Klena, John; Rodas, Claudia; Bourgeois, August Louis; Torres, Olga; Svennerholm, Ann-Mari; Sjöling, Åsa

    2010-01-01

    The genetic backgrounds of 24 enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains from Mexico and Guatemala expressing heat-stable toxin (ST) and coli surface antigen 6 (CS6) were analyzed. US travelers to these countries and resident children in Guatemala were infected by ETEC strains of sequence type 398, expressing STp and carrying genetically identical CS6 sequences. PMID:20031063

  10. Characterization of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli on veal hides and carcasses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) are Shiga toxin–producing Escherichia coli (STEC) associated with the most severe forms of foodborne illnesses. The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Food Safety Inspection Service (FSIS) has identified a higher percentage of non-O157 EHEC compared to E....

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Strain NB8

    PubMed Central

    Mi, Zu-huang; Wang, Chun-xin; Zhu, Jian-ming

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli NB8 is a clinical pyelonephritis isolate. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of uropathogenic E. coli NB8, which contains drug resistance genes encoding resistance to beta-lactams, aminoglycosides, quinolones, macrolides, colistin, sulfonamide-trimethoprim, and tetracycline. NB8 infects the kidney and bladder, making it an important tool for studying E. coli pathogenesis. PMID:27609920

  12. Soil solarization reduces Escherichia coli O157:H7 and total Escherichia coli on cattle feedlot pen surfaces

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Feedlot pen soils are a source for transmission of Escherichia coli O157:H7, and therefore a target for preharvest strategies to reduce this pathogen in cattle. The objective of this study was to determine the ability of soil solarization to reduce E. coli O157:H7 in feedlot surface material (FSM)....

  13. Free RNA polymerase in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Patrick, Michael; Dennis, Patrick P; Ehrenberg, Mans; Bremer, Hans

    2015-12-01

    The frequencies of transcription initiation of regulated and constitutive genes depend on the concentration of free RNA polymerase holoenzyme [Rf] near their promoters. Although RNA polymerase is largely confined to the nucleoid, it is difficult to determine absolute concentrations of [Rf] at particular locations within the nucleoid structure. However, relative concentrations of free RNA polymerase at different growth rates, [Rf]rel, can be estimated from the activities of constitutive promoters. Previous studies indicated that the rrnB P2 promoter is constitutive and that [Rf]rel in the vicinity of rrnB P2 increases with increasing growth rate. Recently it has become possible to directly visualize Rf in growing Escherichia coli cells. Here we examine some of the important issues relating to gene expression based on these new observations. We conclude that: (i) At a growth rate of 2 doublings/h, there are about 1000 free and 2350 non-specifically DNA-bound RNA polymerase molecules per average cell (12 and 28%, respectively, of 8400 total) which are in rapid equilibrium. (ii) The reversibility of the non-specific binding generates more than 1000 free RNA polymerase molecules every second in the immediate vicinity of the DNA. Of these, most rebind non-specifically to the DNA within a few ms; the frequency of non-specific binding is at least two orders of magnitude greater than specific binding and transcript initiation. (iii) At a given amount of RNA polymerase per cell, [Rf] and the density of non-specifically DNA-bound RNA polymerase molecules along the DNA both vary reciprocally with the amount of DNA in the cell. (iv) At 2 doublings/h an E. coli cell contains, on the average, about 1 non-specifically bound RNA polymerase per 9 kbp of DNA and 1 free RNA polymerase per 20 kbp of DNA. However some DNA regions (i.e. near active rRNA operons) may have significantly higher than average [Rf].

  14. Urinary Tract Physiological Conditions Promote Ciprofloxacin Resistance in Low-Level-Quinolone-Resistant Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Martín-Gutiérrez, Guillermo; Rodríguez-Beltrán, Jerónimo; Rodríguez-Martínez, José Manuel; Costas, Coloma; Aznar, Javier; Pascual, Álvaro; Blázquez, Jesús

    2016-07-01

    Escherichia coli isolates carrying chromosomally encoded low-level-quinolone-resistant (LLQR) determinants are frequently found in urinary tract infections (UTIs). LLQR mutations are considered the first step in the evolutionary pathway producing high-level fluoroquinolone resistance. Therefore, their evolution and dissemination might influence the outcome of fluoroquinolone treatments of UTI. Previous studies support the notion that low urine pH decreases susceptibility to ciprofloxacin (CIP) in E. coli However, the effect of the urinary tract physiological parameters on the activity of ciprofloxacin against LLQR E. coli strains has received little attention. We have studied the activity of ciprofloxacin under physiological urinary tract conditions against a set of well-characterized isogenic E. coli derivatives carrying the most prevalent chromosomal mutations (ΔmarR, gyrA-S83L, gyrA-D87N, and parC-S80R and some combinations). The results presented here demonstrate that all the LLQR strains studied became resistant to ciprofloxacin (according to CLSI guidelines) under physiological conditions whereas the control strain lacking LLQR mutations did not. Moreover, the survival of some LLQR E. coli variants increased up to 100-fold after challenge with a high concentration of ciprofloxacin under UTI conditions compared to the results seen with Mueller-Hinton broth. These selective conditions could explain the high prevalence of LLQR mutations in E. coli Furthermore, our data strongly suggest that recommended methods for MIC determination produce poor estimations of CIP activity against LLQR E. coli in UTIs.

  15. Urinary Tract Physiological Conditions Promote Ciprofloxacin Resistance in Low-Level-Quinolone-Resistant Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Martínez, José Manuel; Costas, Coloma; Aznar, Javier; Pascual, Álvaro

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli isolates carrying chromosomally encoded low-level-quinolone-resistant (LLQR) determinants are frequently found in urinary tract infections (UTIs). LLQR mutations are considered the first step in the evolutionary pathway producing high-level fluoroquinolone resistance. Therefore, their evolution and dissemination might influence the outcome of fluoroquinolone treatments of UTI. Previous studies support the notion that low urine pH decreases susceptibility to ciprofloxacin (CIP) in E. coli. However, the effect of the urinary tract physiological parameters on the activity of ciprofloxacin against LLQR E. coli strains has received little attention. We have studied the activity of ciprofloxacin under physiological urinary tract conditions against a set of well-characterized isogenic E. coli derivatives carrying the most prevalent chromosomal mutations (ΔmarR, gyrA-S83L, gyrA-D87N, and parC-S80R and some combinations). The results presented here demonstrate that all the LLQR strains studied became resistant to ciprofloxacin (according to CLSI guidelines) under physiological conditions whereas the control strain lacking LLQR mutations did not. Moreover, the survival of some LLQR E. coli variants increased up to 100-fold after challenge with a high concentration of ciprofloxacin under UTI conditions compared to the results seen with Mueller-Hinton broth. These selective conditions could explain the high prevalence of LLQR mutations in E. coli. Furthermore, our data strongly suggest that recommended methods for MIC determination produce poor estimations of CIP activity against LLQR E. coli in UTIs. PMID:27139482

  16. Integrated Genomic Map from Uropathogenic Escherichia coli J96

    PubMed Central

    Melkerson-Watson, Lyla J.; Rode, Christopher K.; Zhang, Lixin; Foxman, Betsy; Bloch, Craig A.

    2000-01-01

    Escherichia coli J96 is a uropathogen having both broad similarities to and striking differences from nonpathogenic, laboratory E. coli K-12. Strain J96 contains three large (>100-kb) unique genomic segments integrated on the chromosome; two are recognized as pathogenicity islands containing urovirulence genes. Additionally, the strain possesses a fourth smaller accessory segment of 28 kb and two deletions relative to strain K-12. We report an integrated physical and genetic map of the 5,120-kb J96 genome. The chromosome contains 26 NotI, 13 BlnI, and 7 I-CeuI macrorestriction sites. Macrorestriction mapping was rapidly accomplished by a novel transposon-based procedure: analysis of modified minitransposon insertions served to align the overlapping macrorestriction fragments generated by three different enzymes (each sharing a common cleavage site within the insert), thus integrating the three different digestion patterns and ordering the fragments. The resulting map, generated from a total of 54 mini-Tn10 insertions, was supplemented with auxanography and Southern analysis to indicate the positions of insertionally disrupted aminosynthetic genes and cloned virulence genes, respectively. Thus, it contains not only physical, macrorestriction landmarks but also the loci for eight housekeeping genes shared with strain K-12 and eight acknowledged urovirulence genes; the latter confirmed clustering of virulence genes at the large unique accessory chromosomal segments. The 115-kb J96 plasmid was resolved by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis in NotI digests. However, because the plasmid lacks restriction sites for the enzymes BlnI and I-CeuI, it was visualized in BlnI and I-CeuI digests only of derivatives carrying plasmid inserts artificially introducing these sites. Owing to an I-SceI site on the transposon, the plasmid could also be visualized and sized from plasmid insertion mutants after digestion with this enzyme. The insertional strains generated in construction of

  17. The Melibiose Transporter of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Fuerst, Oliver; Lin, Yibin; Granell, Meritxell; Leblanc, Gérard; Padrós, Esteve; Lórenz-Fonfría, Víctor A.; Cladera, Josep

    2015-01-01

    We examine the role of Lys-377, the only charged residue in helix XI, on the functional mechanism of the Na+-sugar melibiose symporter from Escherichia coli. Intrinsic fluorescence, FRET, and Fourier transform infrared difference spectroscopy reveal that replacement of Lys-377 with either Cys, Val, Arg, or Asp disables both Na+ and melibiose binding. On the other hand, molecular dynamics simulations extending up to 200–330 ns reveal that Lys-377 (helix XI) interacts with the anionic side chains of two of the three putative ligands for cation binding (Asp-55 and Asp-59 in helix II). When Asp-59 is protonated during the simulations, Lys-377 preferentially interacts with Asp-55. Interestingly, when a Na+ ion is positioned in the Asp-55-Asp-59 environment, Asp-124 in helix IV (a residue essential for melibiose binding) reorients and approximates the Asp-55-Asp-59 pair, and all three acidic side chains act as Na+ ligands. Under these conditions, the side chain of Lys-377 interacts with the carboxylic moiety of these three Asp residues. These data highlight the crucial role of the Lys-377 residue in the spatial organization of the Na+ binding site. Finally, the analysis of the second-site revertants of K377C reveals that mutation of Ile-22 (in helix I) preserves Na+ binding, whereas that of melibiose is largely abolished according to spectroscopic measurements. This amino acid is located in the border of the sugar-binding site and might participate in sugar binding through apolar interactions. PMID:25971963

  18. Novel Mechanism of Escherichia coli Porin Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Castillo-Keller, Maria; Vuong, Phu; Misra, Rajeev

    2006-01-01

    A novel mechanism of Escherichia coli porin regulation was discovered from multicopy suppressors that permitted growth of cells expressing a mutant OmpC protein in the absence of DegP. Analyses of two suppressors showed that both substantially lowered OmpC expression. Suppression activities were confined to a short DNA sequence, which we designated ipeX for inhibition of porin expression, and to DNA containing a 3′-truncated ompR gene. The major effect of ipeX on ompC expression was exerted posttranscriptionally, whereas the truncated OmpR protein reduced ompC transcription. ipeX was localized within an untranslated region of 247 base pairs between the stop codon of nmpC—a remnant porin gene from the cryptic phage qsr′ (DLP12) genome—and its predicted Rho-independent transcriptional terminator. Interestingly, another prophage, PA-2, which encodes a porin similar to NmpC, known as Lc, has sequences downstream from lc identical to that of ipeX. PA-2 lysogenization leads to Lc expression and OmpC inhibition. Our data show that the synthesis of the lc transcript, whose 3′ end contains the corresponding ipeX sequence, inhibits OmpC expression. Overexpression of ipeX RNA inhibited both OmpC and OmpF expression but not that of OmpA. ompC-phoA chimeric gene constructs revealed a 248-bp untranslated region of ompC required for ipeX-mediated inhibition. However, no sequence complementarity was found between ipeX and this region of ompC, indicating that inhibition may not involve simple base pairing between the two RNA molecules. The effect of ipeX on ompC, but not on ompF, was independent of the RNA chaperone Hfq. PMID:16385048

  19. Serogroups of Escherichia coli from drinking water.

    PubMed

    Ramteke, P W; Tewari, Suman

    2007-07-01

    Fifty seven isolates of thermotolerant E. coli were recovered from 188 drinking water sources, 45 (78.9%) were typable of which 15 (26.3%) were pathogenic serotypes. Pathogenic serogroup obtained were 04 (Uropathogenic E. coli, UPEC), 025 (Enterotoxigenic E. coli, ETEC), 086 (Enteropathogenic E. coli, EPEC), 0103 (Shiga-toxin producing E. coli, STEC), 0157 (Shiga-toxin producing E. coli, STEC), 08 (Enterotoxigenic E. coli, ETEC) and 0113 (Shiga-toxin producing E. coli, STEC). All the pathogenic serotypes showed resistance to bacitracin and multiple heavy metal ions. Resistance to streptomycin and cotrimazole was detected in two strains whereas resistance to cephaloridine, polymixin-B and ampicillin was detected in one strain each. Transfer of resistances to drugs and metallic ions was observed in 9 out of 12 strains studied. Resistances to bacitracin were transferred in all nine strains. Among heavy metals resistance to As(3+) followed by Cr(6+) were transferred more frequently.

  20. Escherichia coli induces DNA damage in vivo and triggers genomic instability in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Cuevas-Ramos, Gabriel; Petit, Claude R.; Marcq, Ingrid; Boury, Michèle; Oswald, Eric; Nougayrède, Jean-Philippe

    2010-01-01

    Escherichia coli is a normal inhabitant of the human gut. However, E. coli strains of phylogenetic group B2 harbor a genomic island called “pks” that codes for the production of a polyketide-peptide genotoxin, Colibactin. Here we report that in vivo infection with E. coli harboring the pks island, but not with a pks isogenic mutant, induced the formation of phosphorylated H2AX foci in mouse enterocytes. We show that a single, short exposure of cultured mammalian epithelial cells to live pks+ E. coli at low infectious doses induced a transient DNA damage response followed by cell division with signs of incomplete DNA repair, leading to anaphase bridges and chromosome aberrations. Micronuclei, aneuploidy, ring chromosomes, and anaphase bridges persisted in dividing cells up to 21 d after infection, indicating occurrence of breakage–fusion–bridge cycles and chromosomal instability. Exposed cells exhibited a significant increase in gene mutation frequency and anchorage-independent colony formation, demonstrating the infection mutagenic and transforming potential. Therefore, colon colonization with these E. coli strains harboring the pks island could contribute to the development of sporadic colorectal cancer. PMID:20534522

  1. Environmental Escherichia coli: Ecology and public health implications - A review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jang, Jeonghwan; Hur, Hor-Gil; Sadowsky, Michael J.; Byappanahalli, Muruleedhara; Yan, Tao; Ishii, Satoshi

    2017-01-01

    Escherichia coli is classified as a rod-shaped, Gram-negative bacterium in the family Enterobacteriaceae. The bacterium mainly inhabits the lower intestinal tract of warm-blooded animals, including humans, and is often discharged into the environment through feces or wastewater effluent. The presence of E. coli in environmental waters has long been considered as an indicator of recent fecal pollution. However, numerous recent studies have reported that some specific strains of E. coli can survive for long periods of time, and potentially reproduce, in extra-intestinal environments. This indicates that E. coli can be integrated into indigenous microbial communities in the environment. This naturalization phenomenon calls into question the reliability of E. coli as a fecal indicator bacterium (FIB). Recently, many studies reported that E. coli populations in the environment are affected by ambient environmental conditions affecting their long-term survival. Large-scale studies of population genetics provide the diversity and complexity of E. coli strains in various environments, affected by multiple environmental factors. This review examines the current knowledge on the ecology of E. coli strains in various environments in regards to its role as a FIB and as a naturalized member of indigenous microbial communities. Special emphasis is given on the growth of pathogenic E. coli in the environment, and the population genetics of environmental members of the genus Escherichia. The impact of environmental E. coli on water quality and public health is also discussed.

  2. Investigation of ’Escherichia coli’ Enterotoxins

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-05-01

    E . coli diarrheal disease in man and domestic animals. Fundamentally, the design of the vaccine is based on the well- documented ability of cholera antitoxin to neutralize both cholera and heat- labile E . coli enterotoxins and on the ability of certain E . coli antigens to enhance the immune response to cholera toxoid and possibly whole-cell Cholera Vaccine, as

  3. Inhibiting translation elongation can aid genome duplication in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Myka, Kamila K; Hawkins, Michelle; Syeda, Aisha H; Gupta, Milind K; Meharg, Caroline; Dillingham, Mark S; Savery, Nigel J; Lloyd, Robert G; McGlynn, Peter

    2016-12-11

    Conflicts between replication and transcription challenge chromosome duplication. Escherichia coli replisome movement along transcribed DNA is promoted by Rep and UvrD accessory helicases with Δrep ΔuvrD cells being inviable under rapid growth conditions. We have discovered that mutations in a tRNA gene, aspT, in an aminoacyl tRNA synthetase, AspRS, and in a translation factor needed for efficient proline-proline bond formation, EF-P, suppress Δrep ΔuvrD lethality. Thus replication-transcription conflicts can be alleviated by the partial sacrifice of a mechanism that reduces replicative barriers, namely translating ribosomes that reduce RNA polymerase backtracking. Suppression depends on RelA-directed synthesis of (p)ppGpp, a signalling molecule that reduces replication-transcription conflicts, with RelA activation requiring ribosomal pausing. Levels of (p)ppGpp in these suppressors also correlate inversely with the need for Rho activity, an RNA translocase that can bind to emerging transcripts and displace transcription complexes. These data illustrate the fine balance between different mechanisms in facilitating gene expression and genome duplication and demonstrate that accessory helicases are a major determinant of this balance. This balance is also critical for other aspects of bacterial survival: the mutations identified here increase persistence indicating that similar mutations could arise in naturally occurring bacterial populations facing antibiotic challenge.

  4. Anaerobically expressed Escherichia coli genes identified by operon fusion techniques.

    PubMed Central

    Choe, M; Reznikoff, W S

    1991-01-01

    Genes that are expressed under anaerobic conditions were identified by operon fusion techniques with a hybrid bacteriophage of lambda and Mu, lambda placMu53, which creates transcriptional fusions to lacZY. Cells were screened for anaerobic expression on XG medium. Nine strains were selected, and the insertion point of the hybrid phage in each strain was mapped on the Escherichia coli chromosome linkage map. The anaerobic and aerobic expression levels of these genes were measured by beta-galactosidase assays in different medium conditions and in the presence of three regulatory mutations (fnr, narL, and rpoN). The anaerobically expressed genes (aeg) located at minute 99 (aeg-99) and 75 (aeg-75) appeared to be partially regulated by fnr, and aeg-93 is tightly regulated by fnr. aeg-60 requires a functional rpoN gene for its anaerobic expression. aeg-46.5 is repressed by narL. aeg-65A and aeg-65C are partially controlled by fnr but only in media containing nitrate or fumarate. aeg-47.5 and aeg-48.5 were found to be anaerobically induced only in rich media. The effects of a narL mutation on aeg-46.5 expression were observed in all medium conditions regardless of the presence or absence of nitrate. This suggests that narL has a regulatory function in the absence of exogenously added nitrate. PMID:1917846

  5. Genetic method to analyze essential genes of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Hupert-Kocurek, Katarzyna; Sage, Jay M; Makowska-Grzyska, Magdalena; Kaguni, Jon M

    2007-11-01

    The genetic analysis of essential genes has been generally restricted to the use of conditional mutations, or inactivating chromosomal mutations, which require a complementing plasmid that must either be counterselected or lost to measure a phenotype. These approaches are limited because they do not permit the analysis of mutations suspected to affect a specific function of a protein, nor do they take advantage of the increasing abundance of structural and bioinformatics data for proteins. Using the dnaC gene as an example, we developed a genetic method that should permit the mutational analysis of other essential genes of Escherichia coli and related enterobacteria. The method consists of using a strain carrying a large deletion of the dnaC gene, which is complemented by a wild-type copy expressed from a plasmid that requires isopropyl-beta-d-thiogalactopyranoside for maintenance. Under conditions in which this resident plasmid is lost, the method measures the function of a dnaC mutation encoded by a second plasmid. This methodology should be widely applicable to the genetic analysis of other essential genes.

  6. Rapid Sterilization of Escherichia coli by Solution Plasma Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreeva, Nina; Ishizaki, Takahiro; Baroch, Pavel; Saito, Nagahiro

    2012-12-01

    Solution plasma (SP), which is a discharge in the liquid phase, has the potential for rapid sterilization of water without chemical agents. The discharge showed a strong sterilization performance against Escherichia coli bacteria. The decimal value (D value) of the reduction time for E. coli by this system with an electrode distance of 1.0 mm was estimated to be approximately 1.0 min. Our discharge system in the liquid phase caused no physical damage to the E. coli and only a small increase in the temperature of the aqueous solution. The UV light generated by the discharge was an important factor in the sterilization of E. coli.

  7. Sonodynamic action of curcumin on foodborne bacteria Bacillus cereus and Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xinna; Ip, Margaret; Leung, Albert Wingnang; Yang, Zhengrong; Wang, Pan; Zhang, Baoting; Ip, Siupo; Xu, Chuanshan

    2015-09-01

    Bacterial contamination is an important cause of foodborne diseases. The present study aimed to investigate sonodynamic action of curcumin on foodborne bacteria Bacillus cereus (B. cereus) and Escherichia coli (E. coli). The uptake of curcumin was measured for optimizing the concentration incubation time before ultrasound sonication, and colony forming units (CFU) were counted after ultrasound treatment. The chromosomal DNA fragmentation of bacteria was analyzed and the effect of hypoxic condition on the antibacterial efficacy of sonodynamic action of curcumin was also assessed in this study. The results showed that the maximum uptake of curcumin in B. cereus and E. coli occurred in 50min after curcumin incubation. Curcumin had sonodynamic bactericidal activity in a curcumin dose-dependent manner, and 5.6-log reduction in CFU of B. cereus was observed after curcumin treatment (2.0μM), however, only 2-log reduction in CFU of E. coli after 40μM curcumin treatment. No significant change in chromosomal DNA was found after the combined treatment of curcumin and ultrasound. The survival of B. cereus and E. coli after sonodynamic treatment in hypoxic group was significantly higher than that in normal oxygen group. These findings indicated that sonodynamic action of curcumin had significant inactivation effect on foodborne bacteria, and B. cereus was more sensitive to sonodynamic treatment of curcumin than E. coli. Sonodynamic antibacterial activity of curcumin might be dependent on the oxygen environment.

  8. Infection by verocytotoxin-producing Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Karmali, M A

    1989-01-01

    Verocytotoxin (VT)-producing Escherichia coli (VTEC) are a newly recognized group of enteric pathogens which are increasingly being recognized as common causes of diarrhea in some geographic settings. Outbreak studies indicate that most patients with VTEC infection develop mild uncomplicated diarrhea. However, a significant risk of two serious and potentially life-threatening complications, hemorrhagic colitis and the hemolytic uremic syndrome, makes VTEC infection a public health problem of serious concern. The main reservoirs of VTEC appear to be the intestinal tracts of animals, and foods of animal (especially bovine) origin are probably the principal sources for human infection. The term VT refers to a family of subunit exotoxins with high biological activity. Individual VTEC strains elaborate one or both of at least two serologically distinct, bacteriophage-mediated VTs (VT1 and VT2) which are closely related to Shiga toxin and are thus also referred to as Shiga-like toxins. The holotoxins bind to cells, via their B subunits, to a specific receptor which is probably the glycolipid, globotriosyl ceramide (Gb3). Binding is followed by internalization of the A subunit, which, after it is proteolytically nicked and reduced to the A1 fragment, inhibits protein synthesis in mammalian cells by inactivating 60S ribosomal subunits through selective structural modification of 28S ribosomal ribonucleic acid. The mechanism of VTEC diarrhea is still controversial, and the relative roles of locally acting VT and "attaching and effacing adherence" of VTEC to the mucosa have yet to be resolved. There is increasing evidence that hemolytic uremic syndrome and possibly hemorrhagic colitis result from the systemic action of VT on vascular endothelial cells. The role of antitoxic immunity in preventing the systemic complications of VTEC infection is being explored. Antibiotics appear to be contraindicated in the treatment of VTEC infection. The most common VTEC serotype associated

  9. Intestinal Colonization by Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-01

    E . coli is mediated by specific types of pili. These pili are antigenic and can be used in diagnosing enterotoxigenic E . coli infections. They are also good protective antigens. When pregnant dams are vaccinated parenterally or orally with pili on live piliated bacteria, they secrete antibodies against the pili in their milk. Neonates suckling dams so vaccinated are passively protected against fatal challenge by enterotoxigenic E . coli . Pili are also good candidate protective antigens for the development of vaccines to protect by

  10. Plasmid Diversity and Adaptation Analyzed by Massive Sequencing of Escherichia coli Plasmids.

    PubMed

    de Toro, María; Garcilláon-Barcia, M Pilar; De La Cruz, Fernando

    2014-12-01

    Whole-genome sequencing is revolutionizing the analysis of bacterial genomes. It leads to a massive increase in the amount of available data to be analyzed. Bacterial genomes are usually composed of one main chromosome and a number of accessory chromosomes, called plasmids. A recently developed methodology called PLACNET (for plasmid constellation networks) allows the reconstruction of the plasmids of a given genome. Thus, it opens an avenue for plasmidome analysis on a global scale. This work reviews our knowledge of the genetic determinants for plasmid propagation (conjugation and related functions), their diversity, and their prevalence in the variety of plasmids found by whole-genome sequencing. It focuses on the results obtained from a collection of 255 Escherichia coli plasmids reconstructed by PLACNET. The plasmids found in E. coli represent a nonaleatory subset of the plasmids found in proteobacteria. Potential reasons for the prevalence of some specific plasmid groups will be discussed and, more importantly, additional questions will be posed.

  11. Recurrent Hemolytic and Uremic Syndrome Induced by Escherichia Coli

    PubMed Central

    Commereuc, Morgane; Weill, Francois-Xavier; Loukiadis, Estelle; Gouali, Malika; Gleizal, Audrey; Kormann, Raphaël; Ridel, Christophe; Frémeaux-Bacchi, Véronique; Rondeau, Eric; Hertig, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A widespread belief is that typical hemolytic and uremic syndrome (HUS) does not recur. We report the case of a patient infected twice with raw milk taken from his own cow and containing a Shiga toxin–producing Escherichia coli O174:H21 that induced recurrent HUS causing severe renal and cerebral disorders. A genomic comparison of the human and bovine Shiga toxin–producing Escherichia coli O174:H21 isolates revealed that they were identical. Typical HUS may recur. Since milk from this animal was occasionally distributed locally, thereby posing a serious threat for the whole village, this particular cow was destroyed. PMID:26735524

  12. [Expression of Photobacterium leiognathi bioluminescence system genes in Escherichia coli].

    PubMed

    Ptitsyn, L R; Fatova, M A; Stepanov, A I

    1990-02-01

    Expression of Photobacterium leiognathi bioluminescence genes under the control of lac, tac, tet promoters in Escherichia coli cells has been studied. The position of the genes for aliphatic aldehyde biosynthesis and for the synthesis of luciferase subunits was identified. The plasmid pBRPL1 has been constructed containing the system of bioluminescence genes devoid of promoter following the polylinker DNA fragment. The plasmid can be used for selection of promoter containing DNA sequences as well as for studying the promoters regulation in process of Escherichia coli cells growth.

  13. Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli in Children from Costa Rica

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Cristian; Gómez-Duarte, Oscar G.; Arias, María L.

    2010-01-01

    More than 5,000 diarrheal cases per year receive medical care at the National Children's Hospital of Costa Rica, and nearly 5% of them require hospitalization. A total of 173 Escherichia coli strains isolated from children with diarrhea were characterized at the molecular, serologic, and phenotypic level. Multiplex and duplex polymerase chain reactions were used to detect the six categories of diarrheagenic E. coli. Thirty percent (n = 52) of the strains were positive, indicating a high prevalence among the pediatric population. Enteropathogenic E. coli and enteroinvasive E. coli pathotypes were the most prevalent (21% and 19%, respectively). Pathogenic strains were distributed among the four E. coli phylogenetic groups A, B1, B2, and D, with groups A and B1 the most commonly found. This study used molecular typing to evaluate the prevalence of diarrheagenic E. coli reported in Costa Rica and demonstrated the importance of these pathotypes in the pediatric population. PMID:20682870

  14. Large Surface Blebs on Escherichia coli Heated to Inactivating Temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Scheie, Paul; Ehrenspeck, Susan

    1973-01-01

    Large surface blebs were observed with phase-contrast optics on Escherichia coli B/r and Bs-1 heated to temperatures at which colony-forming ability was lost. Characterization of such blebs was consistent with the view that they were formed by a physical process and were bounded by the outer membrane of the cell. A hypothesis for thermal inactivation of E. coli is presented that places membrane damage near the primary lethal event. Images PMID:4196258

  15. Expression of staphylococcal enterotoxin C1 in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Bohach, G A; Schlievert, P M

    1987-01-01

    The structural gene encoding staphylococcal enterotoxin C1 was cloned into Escherichia coli and localized on a 1.5-kilobase HindIII-ClaI DNA fragment by subcloning. The toxin was partially purified from E. coli clones and shown to be immunologically identical to enterotoxin C1 from Staphylococcus aureus. The cloned toxin also had the same molecular weight (26,000) and charge heterogeneity as staphylococcus-derived enterotoxin. Toxins from both sources were equally biologically active. Images PMID:3542834

  16. Engineering of a plasmid-free Escherichia coli strain for improved in vivo biosynthesis of astaxanthin

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The xanthophyll astaxanthin is a high-value compound with applications in the nutraceutical, cosmetic, food, and animal feed industries. Besides chemical synthesis and extraction from naturally producing organisms like Haematococcus pluvialis, heterologous biosynthesis in non-carotenogenic microorganisms like Escherichia coli, is a promising alternative for sustainable production of natural astaxanthin. Recent achievements in the metabolic engineering of E. coli strains have led to a significant increase in the productivity of carotenoids like lycopene or β-carotene by increasing the metabolic flux towards the isoprenoid precursors. For the heterologous biosynthesis of astaxanthin in E. coli, however, the conversion of β-carotene to astaxanthin is obviously the most critical step towards an efficient biosynthesis of astaxanthin. Results Here we report the construction of the first plasmid-free E. coli strain that produces astaxanthin as the sole carotenoid compound with a yield of 1.4 mg/g cdw (E. coli BW-ASTA). This engineered E. coli strain harbors xanthophyll biosynthetic genes from Pantoea ananatis and Nostoc punctiforme as individual expression cassettes on the chromosome and is based on a β-carotene-producing strain (E. coli BW-CARO) recently developed in our lab. E. coli BW-CARO has an enhanced biosynthesis of the isoprenoid precursor isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) and produces β-carotene in a concentration of 6.2 mg/g cdw. The expression of crtEBIY along with the β-carotene-ketolase gene crtW148 (NpF4798) and the β-carotene-hydroxylase gene (crtZ) under controlled expression conditions in E. coli BW-ASTA directed the pathway exclusively towards the desired product astaxanthin (1.4 mg/g cdw). Conclusions By using the λ-Red recombineering technique, genes encoding for the astaxanthin biosynthesis pathway were stably integrated into the chromosome of E. coli. The expression levels of chromosomal integrated recombinant biosynthetic genes were

  17. 76 FR 72331 - Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli in Certain Raw Beef Products

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-23

    ... Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli in Certain Raw Beef Products AGENCY: Food Safety and Inspection Service... methods for controlling non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli in raw, intact and non-intact beef... Escherichia coli in raw, intact and non-intact beef products and product components on or before December...

  18. Genes on a Wire: The Nucleoid-Associated Protein HU Insulates Transcription Units in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Michael; Gerganova, Veneta; Berger, Petya; Rapiteanu, Radu; Lisicovas, Viktoras; Dobrindt, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    The extent to which chromosomal gene position in prokaryotes affects local gene expression remains an open question. Several studies have shown that chromosomal re-positioning of bacterial transcription units does not alter their expression pattern, except for a general decrease in gene expression levels from chromosomal origin to terminus proximal positions, which is believed to result from gene dosage effects. Surprisingly, the question as to whether this chromosomal context independence is a cis encoded property of a bacterial transcription unit, or if position independence is a property conferred by factors acting in trans, has not been addressed so far. For this purpose, we established a genetic test system assessing the chromosomal positioning effects by means of identical promoter-fluorescent reporter gene fusions inserted equidistantly from OriC into both chromosomal replichores of Escherichia coli K-12. Our investigations of the reporter activities in mutant cells lacking the conserved nucleoid associated protein HU uncovered various drastic chromosomal positional effects on gene transcription. In addition we present evidence that these positional effects are caused by transcriptional activity nearby the insertion site of our reporter modules. We therefore suggest that the nucleoid-associated protein HU is functionally insulating transcription units, most likely by constraining transcription induced DNA supercoiling. PMID:27545593

  19. Control of Initiation of DNA Replication in Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Jameson, Katie H.; Wilkinson, Anthony J.

    2017-01-01

    Initiation of DNA Replication is tightly regulated in all cells since imbalances in chromosomal copy number are deleterious and often lethal. In bacteria such as Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli, at the point of cytokinesis, there must be two complete copies of the chromosome to partition into the daughter cells following division at mid-cell during vegetative growth. Under conditions of rapid growth, when the time taken to replicate the chromosome exceeds the doubling time of the cells, there will be multiple initiations per cell cycle and daughter cells will inherit chromosomes that are already undergoing replication. In contrast, cells entering the sporulation pathway in B. subtilis can do so only during a short interval in the cell cycle when there are two, and only two, chromosomes per cell, one destined for the spore and one for the mother cell. Here, we briefly describe the overall process of DNA replication in bacteria before reviewing initiation of DNA replication in detail. The review covers DnaA-directed assembly of the replisome at oriC and the multitude of mechanisms of regulation of initiation, with a focus on the similarities and differences between E. coli and B. subtilis. PMID:28075389

  20. Characterization of multi-antibiotic-resistant Escherichia coli Isolated from beef cattle in Japan.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Shiori; Nakano, Motoki; Kitagawa, Wataru; Tanaka, Michiko; Sone, Teruo; Hirai, Katsuya; Asano, Kozo

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of multiple-antibiotic-resistance bacteria is increasing, which is a particular concern on livestock farms. We previously isolated 1,347 antimicrobial-resistant (AMR) Escherichia coli strains from the feces of beef cattle on 14 Japanese farms. In the present study, the genetic backgrounds and phylogenetic relationships of 45 AMR isolates were characterized by the chromosome phylotype, AMR phenotype, AMR genotype, and plasmid type. These isolates were classified into five chromosome phylotypes, which were closely linked to the farms from which they were isolated, suggesting that each farm had its own E. coli phylotype. AMR phenotype and plasmid type analyses yielded 8 and 14 types, all of which were associated with the chromosomal phylotype and, thus, to the original farms. AMR genotype analysis revealed more variety, with 16 types, indicating both inter- and intra-farm diversity. Different phylotype isolates from the same farm shared highly similar plasmid types, which indicated that plasmids with AMR genes could be transferred between phylotypes, thereby generating multi-antibiotic-resistant microorganisms. This ecological study demonstrated that the chromosome phylotype was strongly correlated with the farm from which they were isolated, while the AMR phenotype, genotype, and plasmid type were generally correlated with the chromosome phylotype and farm source.

  1. Multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli in Asia: epidemiology and management.

    PubMed

    Sidjabat, Hanna E; Paterson, David L

    2015-05-01

    Escherichia coli has become multiresistant by way of production of a variety of β-lactamases. The prevalence of CTX-M-producing E. coli has reached 60-79% in certain parts of Asia. The acquisition of CTX-M plasmids by E. coli sequence type 131, a successful clone of E. coli, has caused further dissemination of CTX-M-producing E. coli. The prevalence of carbapenemase-producing E. coli, especially Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase, and New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase (NDM)-producing E. coli has been increasing in Asia. K. pneumoniae carbapenemase and NDM have now been found in E. coli sequence type 131. The occurrence of NDM-producing E. coli is a major concern particularly in the Indian subcontinent, but now elsewhere in Asia as well. There are multiple reasons why antibiotic resistance in E. coli in Asia has reached such extreme levels. Approaches beyond antibiotic therapy, such as prevention of antibiotic resistance by antibiotic stewardship and protecting natural microbiome, are strategies to avoid further spread of antibiotic resistance.

  2. The quantitative and condition-dependent Escherichia coli proteome

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Alexander; Kochanowski, Karl; Vedelaar, Silke; Ahrné, Erik; Volkmer, Benjamin; Callipo, Luciano; Knoops, Kèvin; Bauer, Manuel; Aebersold, Ruedi; Heinemann, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Measuring precise concentrations of proteins can provide insights into biological processes. Here, we use efficient protein extraction and sample fractionation and state-of-the-art quantitative mass spectrometry techniques to generate a comprehensive, condition-dependent protein abundance map of Escherichia coli. We measure cellular protein concentrations for 55% of predicted E. coli genes (>2300 proteins) under 22 different experimental conditions and identify methylation and N-terminal protein acetylations previously not known to be prevalent in bacteria. We uncover system-wide proteome allocation, expression regulation, and post-translational adaptations. These data provide a valuable resource for the systems biology and broader E. coli research communities. PMID:26641532

  3. YeeO from Escherichia coli exports flavins.

    PubMed

    McAnulty, Michael J; Wood, Thomas K

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) proteins help maintain cellular homeostasis by secreting metabolic wastes. Flavins may occur as cellular waste products, with their production and secretion providing potential benefit for industrial applications related to biofuel cells. Here we find that MATE protein YeeO from Escherichia coli exports both flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD). Significant amounts of flavins were trapped intracellularly when YeeO was produced indicating transport limits secretion of flavins. Wild-type E. coli secreted 3 flavins (riboflavin, FMN, and FAD), so E. coli likely produces additional flavin transporters.

  4. Heat-stable Escherichia coli enterotoxin production in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Whipp, S C; Moon, H W; Lyon, N C

    1975-01-01

    Hysterectomy-derived, colostrum-deprived piglets were infected with enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli on day 4 of life. Samples of feces and intestinal contents were collected and tested in infant mice for enterotoxic activity. Positive enterotoxic responses were observed in mice given filtrates of feces and intestinal contents from piglets infected withe enterotoxigenic E. coli known to produce heat-stable enterotoxin but not heat-liabile enterotoxin in vitro. It is concluded that heat-stable enterotoxigenic E. coli induce diarrhea by production of heat-stable enterotoxin in vivo. PMID:1097335

  5. Reassessing Escherichia coli as a cell factory for biofuel production.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chonglong; Pfleger, Brian F; Kim, Seon-Won

    2017-03-11

    Via metabolic engineering, industrial microorganisms have the potential to convert renewable substrates into a wide range of biofuels that can address energy security and environmental challenges associated with current fossil fuels. The user-friendly bacterium, Escherichia coli, remains one of the most frequently used hosts for demonstrating production of biofuel candidates including alcohol-, fatty acid- and terpenoid-based biofuels. In this review, we summarize the metabolic pathways for synthesis of these biofuels and assess enabling technologies that assist in regulating biofuel synthesis pathways and rapidly assembling novel E. coli strains. These advances maintain E. coli's position as a prominent host for developing cell factories for biofuel production.

  6. Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli Serotypes and Endemic Diarrhea in Infants

    PubMed Central

    Toledo, M. Regina F.; Alvariza, M. do Carmo B.; Murahovschi, Jayme; Ramos, Sonia R. T. S.; Trabulsi, Luiz R.

    1983-01-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli serotypes were searched for in feces of 550 children with endemic diarrhea and in 129 controls, in São Paulo, in 1978 and 1979; serotypes O111ab:H−, O111ab:H2, and O119:H6 were significantly associated with diarrhea in children 0 to 5 months old and were the most frequent agents of diarrhea in this age group as compared with enterotoxigenic and enteroinvasive E. coli, Salmonella sp., Shigella sp., and Yersinia enterocolitica. It is concluded that various enteropathogenic E. coli serotypes may be agents of endemic infantile diarrhea. PMID:6339384

  7. Occurrence of homologs of the Escherichia coli lytB gene in gram-negative bacterial species.

    PubMed

    Potter, S; Yang, X; Boulanger, M J; Ishiguro, E E

    1998-04-01

    The Escherichia coli LytB protein regulates the activity of guanosine 3',5'-bispyrophosphate synthetase I (RelA). A Southern blot analysis of chromosomal DNA with the E. coli lytB gene as a probe revealed the presence of lytB homologs in all of the gram-negative bacterial species examined but not in gram-positive species. The lytB homologs from Enterobacter aerogenes and Pseudomonas fluorescens complemented the E. coli lytB44 mutant allele.

  8. Sources of Escherichia coli in a Coastal Subtropical Environment

    PubMed Central

    Solo-Gabriele, Helena M.; Wolfert, Melinda A.; Desmarais, Timothy R.; Palmer, Carol J.

    2000-01-01

    Sources of Escherichia coli in a coastal waterway located in Ft. Lauderdale, Fla., were evaluated. The study consisted of an extensive program of field measurements designed to capture spatial and temporal variations in E. coli concentrations as well as experiments conducted under laboratory-controlled conditions. E. coli from environmental samples was enumerated by using a defined substrate technology (Colilert-18). Field sampling tasks included sampling the length of the North Fork to identify the river reach contributing high E. coli levels, autosampler experiments at two locations, and spatially intense sampling efforts at hot spots. Laboratory experiments were designed to simulate tidal conditions within the riverbank soils. The results showed that E. coli entered the river in a large pulse during storm conditions. After the storm, E. coli levels returned to baseline levels and varied in a cyclical pattern which correlated with tidal cycles. The highest concentrations were observed during high tide, whereas the lowest were observed at low tide. This peculiar pattern of E. coli concentrations between storm events was caused by the growth of E. coli within riverbank soils which were subsequently washed in during high tide. Laboratory analysis of soil collected from the riverbanks showed increases of several orders of magnitude in soil E. coli concentrations. The ability of E. coli to multiply in the soil was found to be a function of soil moisture content, presumably due to the ability of E. coli to outcompete predators in relatively dry soil. The importance of soil moisture in regulating the multiplication of E. coli was found to be critical in tidally influenced areas due to periodic wetting and drying of soils in contact with water bodies. Given the potential for growth in such systems, E. coli concentrations can be artificially elevated above that expected from fecal impacts alone. Such results challenge the use of E. coli as a suitable indicator of water

  9. Chromosomal location of the fosA3 and blaCTX-M genes in Proteus mirabilis and clonal spread of Escherichia coli ST117 carrying fosA3-positive IncHI2/ST3 or F2:A-:B- plasmids in a chicken farm.

    PubMed

    He, Dandan; Liu, Lanping; Guo, Baowei; Wu, Shengjun; Chen, Xiaojie; Wang, Jing; Zeng, Zhenling; Liu, Jian-Hua

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the spread and location of the fosA3 gene among Enterobacteriaceae from diseased broiler chickens. Twenty-nine Escherichia coli and seven Proteus mirabilis isolates recovered from one chicken farm were screened for the presence of plasmid-mediated fosfomycin resistance genes by PCR. The clonal relatedness of fosA3-positive isolates, the transferability and location of fosA3, and the genetic context of the fosA3 gene were determined. Seven P. mirabilis isolates with three different pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns and five E. coli isolates belonging to sequence type 117 (ST117) and phylogenetic group D were positive for fosA3 and all carried the blaCTX-M gene. In E. coli, the genetic structures IS26-ISEcp1-blaCTX-M-65-IS26-fosA3-1758 bp-IS26 and IS26-ISEcp1-blaCTX-M-3-blaTEM-1-IS26-fosA3-1758 bp-IS26 were present on transferable IncHI2/ST3 and F2:A-:B- plasmids, respectively. However, fosA3 was located on the chromosome of the seven P. mirabilis isolates. IS26-ISEcp1-blaCTX-M-65-IS26-fosA3-1758 bp-IS26 and IS26-blaCTX-M-14-611 bp-fosA3-1222 bp-IS26 were detected in three and four P. mirabilis isolates, respectively. Minicircles that contained both fosA3 and blaCTX-M-65 were shared between E. coli and P. mirabilis. This is the first report of the fosA3 gene integrated into the chromosome of P. mirabilis isolates with the blaCTX-M gene. The emergence and clonal spread of avian pathogenic E. coli ST117 with the feature of multidrug resistance and high virulence are a serious problem.

  10. Structure of Water in Escherichia Coli B

    DTIC Science & Technology

    structure broadening of the NMR water spectrum. Using bacteria grown in the special chemically defined medium, we showed that the water in E. coli B was highly ordered and was very different from ’free’ water and from polywater .

  11. Slugs: Potential Novel Vectors of Escherichia coli O157

    PubMed Central

    Sproston, Emma L.; Macrae, M.; Ogden, Iain D.; Wilson, Michael J.; Strachan, Norval J. C.

    2006-01-01

    Field and laboratory studies were performed to determine whether slugs could act as novel vectors for pathogen (e.g., Escherichia coli O157) transfer from animal feces to salad vegetables. Escherichia coli O157 was isolated from 0.21% of field slugs from an Aberdeenshire sheep farm. These isolates carried the verocytotoxin genes (vt1 and vt2) and the attaching and effacing gene (eae), suggesting that they are potentially pathogenic to humans. Strain typing using multilocus variable number tandem repeats analysis showed that slug and sheep isolates were indistinguishable. Laboratory experiments using an E. coli mutant resistant to nalidixic acid showed that the ubiquitous slug species Deroceras reticulatum could carry viable E. coli on its external surface for up to 14 days. Slugs that had been fed E. coli shed viable bacteria in their feces with numbers showing a short but statistically significant linear log decline. Further, it was found that E. coli persisted for up to 3 weeks in excreted slug feces, and hence, we conclude that slugs have the potential to act as novel vectors of E. coli O157. PMID:16391036

  12. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli and Vibrio cholerae diarrhea, Bangladesh, 2004.

    PubMed

    Qadri, Firdausi; Khan, Ashraful I; Faruque, Abu Syed G; Begum, Yasmin Ara; Chowdhury, Fahima; Nair, Gopinath B; Salam, Mohammed A; Sack, David A; Svennerholm, Ann-Mari

    2005-07-01

    Flooding in Dhaka in July 2004 caused epidemics of diarrhea. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) was almost as prevalent as Vibrio cholerae O1 in diarrheal stools. ETEC that produced heat-stable enterotoxin alone was most prevalent, and 78% of strains had colonization factors. Like V. cholerae O1, ETEC can cause epidemic diarrhea.

  13. armA and aminoglycoside resistance in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    González-Zorn, Bruno; Teshager, Tirushet; Casas, María; Porrero, María C; Moreno, Miguel A; Courvalin, Patrice; Domínguez, Lucas

    2005-06-01

    We report armA in an Escherichia coli pig isolate from Spain. The resistance gene was borne by self-transferable IncN plasmid pMUR050. Molecular analysis of the plasmid and of the armA locus confirmed the spread of this resistance determinant.

  14. armA and Aminoglycoside Resistance in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    González-Zorn, Bruno; Teshager, Tirushet; Casas, María; Porrero, María C.; Courvalin, Patrice; Domínguez, Lucas

    2005-01-01

    We report armA in an Escherichia coli pig isolate from Spain. The resistance gene was borne by self-transferable IncN plasmid pMUR050. Molecular analysis of the plasmid and of the armA locus confirmed the spread of this resistance determinant. PMID:15963296

  15. Escherichia coli as other Enterobacteriaceae: food poisoning and health effects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many Escherichia coli strains are harmless, and they are an important commensal in the intestinal microflora; however, pathogenic strains also exist. The pathogenic strains can be divided into diarrhea-inducing strains and strains that reside in the intestines but only cause disease in bodily sites...

  16. Escherichia coli growth studied by dual-parameter flow cytophotometry.

    PubMed Central

    Steen, H B; Boye, E

    1981-01-01

    The growth of Escherichia coli cells has been analyzed for the first time by dual-parameter flow cytophotometry, in which the deoxyribonucleic acid and protein contents of single bacteria have been measured simultaneously with an accuracy of a few percent and at a rate of 3,000 cells/s. PMID:7007339

  17. More than a locomotive organelle: flagella in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Mingxu; Yang, Yang; Chen, Panlin; Hu, Huijie; Hardwidge, Philip R; Zhu, Guoqiang

    2015-11-01

    The flagellum is a locomotive organelle that allows bacteria to respond to chemical gradients. This review summarizes the current knowledge regarding Escherichia coli flagellin variants and the role of flagella in bacterial functions other than motility, including the relationship between flagella and bacterial virulence.

  18. Genome Sequence of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Strain FMU073332.

    PubMed

    Saldaña-Ahuactzi, Zeus; Cruz-Córdova, Ariadnna; Rodea, Gerardo E; Porta, Helena; Navarro-Ocaña, Armando; Eslava-Campos, Carlos; Cevallos, Miguel A; Xicohtencatl-Cortes, Juan

    2017-02-23

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is an important cause of bacterial diarrheal illness, affecting practically every population worldwide, and was estimated to cause 120,800 deaths in 2010. Here, we report the genome sequence of ETEC strain FMU073332, isolated from a 25-month-old girl from Tlaltizapán, Morelos, México.

  19. Stringent control of FLP recombinase in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Bowden, Steven D; Palani, Nagendra P; Libourel, Igor G L

    2017-02-01

    Site specific recombinases are invaluable tools in molecular biology, and are emerging as powerful recorders of cellular events in synthetic biology. We have developed a stringently controlled FLP recombinase system in Escherichia coli using an arabinose inducible promoter combined with a weak ribosome binding site.

  20. Enteroinvasive Escherichia coli severe dysentery complicated by rotavirus gastroenteritis.

    PubMed

    Pacheco-Gil, Leova; Ochoa, Theresa J; Flores-Romo, Leopoldo; DuPont, Herbert L; Estrada-Garcia, Teresa

    2006-11-01

    Enteroinvasive Escherichia coli (EIEC) is an important agent of pediatric diarrhea and dysentery in developing countries. We report a life-threatening severe dysentery case due to EIEC in a malnourished 4-month-old male, native Indian infant co-infected with rotavirus. The severe gastrointestinal bleeding anemia and hypovolemic shock was successfully treated with IV blood transfusions, rehydration and antibiotic therapy.

  1. TRIMETHOPRIM-SULFAMETHOXAZOLE RESISTANCE IN SEWAGE ISOLATES OF ESCHERICHIA COLI

    EPA Science Inventory

    The increase in resistance rates to trimehtoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP/SMX) in isolates of Escherichia coli has become a matter of increasing concern. This has been particularly true in reference to community acquired urinary tract infections (UTI). This study utilized sewage i...

  2. Escherichia coli and other Enterobacteriaceae: Food poisoning and health effects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The family Enterobactericeae consists of rod-shaped, Gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, non-spore forming bacteria and also includes the food-borne pathogens, Cronobacter spp., Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica, Shigella spp., and Yersinia spp. Illness caused by these pathogens is acquired...

  3. Genome Sequence of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Strain FMU073332

    PubMed Central

    Saldaña-Ahuactzi, Zeus; Cruz-Córdova, Ariadnna; Rodea, Gerardo E.; Porta, Helena; Navarro-Ocaña, Armando; Eslava-Campos, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT   Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is an important cause of bacterial diarrheal illness, affecting practically every population worldwide, and was estimated to cause 120,800 deaths in 2010. Here, we report the genome sequence of ETEC strain FMU073332, isolated from a 25-month-old girl from Tlaltizapán, Morelos, México. PMID:28232434

  4. New types of Escherichia coli recombination-deficient mutants.

    PubMed

    Freifelder, D

    1976-11-01

    A set of Escherichia coli mutants deficient in intramolecular recombination and different from those previously found is described. All have temperature-sensitive lethal mutations. The mutants have been characterized with respect to the following properties: the Pap phenotype, deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis, sensitivity to ultraviolet light, ability to support the growth of phage lambda, filament formation, and mutation frequency.

  5. New types of Escherichia coli recombination-deficient mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Freifelder, D

    1976-01-01

    A set of Escherichia coli mutants deficient in intramolecular recombination and different from those previously found is described. All have temperature-sensitive lethal mutations. The mutants have been characterized with respect to the following properties: the Pap phenotype, deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis, sensitivity to ultraviolet light, ability to support the growth of phage lambda, filament formation, and mutation frequency. PMID:789362

  6. Inactivation of Escherichia coli by titanium dioxide photocatalytic oxidation.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Titanium dioxide in the anatase crystalline form was used as a photocatalyst to generate hydroxyl radicals in a flowthrough water reactor. Experiments were performed on pure cultures of Escherichia coli in dechlorinated tap water and a surface water sample to evaluate the disinfe...

  7. rRNA transcription rate in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Gotta, S L; Miller, O L; French, S L

    1991-01-01

    The rate of in vivo transcription elongation for Escherichia coli rRNA operons was determined by electron microscopy following addition of rifampin to log-phase cultures. Direct observation of RNA polymerase positions along rRNA operons 30, 40, and 70 s after inhibition of transcription initiation yielded a transcription elongation rate of 42 nucleotides per s. Images FIG. 1 PMID:1717439

  8. Multidrug-Resistant Escherichia coli in Bovine Animals, Europe

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, Evan; Martins, Marta; McCusker, Matthew P.; Wang, Juan; Alves, Bruno Martins; Hurley, Daniel; El Garch, Farid; Woehrlé, Frédérique; Miossec, Christine; McGrath, Leisha; Srikumar, Shabarinath; Wall, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Of 150 Escherichia coli strains we cultured from specimens taken from cattle in Europe, 3 had elevated MICs against colistin. We assessed all 3 strains for the presence of the plasmid-mediated mcr-1 gene and identified 1 isolate as mcr-1–positive and co-resistant to β-lactam, florfenicol, and fluoroquinolone antimicrobial compounds. PMID:27533105

  9. EcoCyc: Encyclopedia of Escherichia coli genes and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Karp, P D; Riley, M; Paley, S M; Pellegrini-Toole, A; Krummenacker, M

    1998-01-01

    The encyclopedia of Escherichia coli genes and metabolism (EcoCyc) is a database that combines information about the genome and the intermediary metabolism of E.coli. The database describes 3030 genes of E.coli , 695 enzymes encoded by a subset of these genes, 595 metabolic reactions that occur in E.coli, and the organization of these reactions into 123 metabolic pathways. The EcoCyc graphical user interface allows scientists to query and explore the EcoCyc database using visualization tools such as genomic-map browsers and automatic layouts of metabolic pathways. EcoCyc can be thought of as an electronic review article because of its copious references to the primary literature, and as a (qualitative) computational model of E.coli metabolism. EcoCyc is available at URL http://ecocyc.PangeaSystems.com/ecocyc/

  10. Phylogenetic Group Determination of Escherichia coli Isolated from Animals Samples

    PubMed Central

    Morcatti Coura, Fernanda; Diniz, Soraia de Araújo; Silva, Marcos Xavier; Mussi, Jamili Maria Suhet; Barbosa, Silvia Minharro; Lage, Andrey Pereira; Heinemann, Marcos Bryan

    2015-01-01

    This study analyzes the occurrence and distribution of phylogenetic groups of 391 strains of Escherichia coli isolated from poultry, cattle, and water buffalo. The frequency of the phylogroups was A = 19%, B1 = 57%, B2 = 2.3%, C = 4.6%, D = 2.8%, E = 11%, and F = 3.3%. Phylogroups A (P < 0.001) and F (P = 0.018) were associated with E. coli strains isolated from poultry, phylogroups B1 (P < 0.001) and E (P = 0.002) were associated with E. coli isolated from cattle, and phylogroups B2 (P = 0.003) and D (P = 0.017) were associated with E. coli isolated from water buffalo. This report demonstrated that some phylogroups are associated with the host analyzed and the results provide knowledge of the phylogenetic composition of E. coli from domestic animals. PMID:26421310

  11. Glycerol elicits energy taxis of Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Zhulin, I B; Rowsell, E H; Johnson, M S; Taylor, B L

    1997-05-01

    Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium show positive chemotaxis to glycerol, a chemical previously reported to be a repellent for E. coli. The threshold of the attractant response in both species was 10(-6) M glycerol. Glycerol chemotaxis was energy dependent and coincident with an increase in membrane potential. Metabolism of glycerol was required for chemotaxis, and when lactate was present to maintain energy production in the absence of glycerol, the increases in membrane potential and chemotactic response upon addition of glycerol were abolished. Methylation of a chemotaxis receptor was not required for positive glycerol chemotaxis in E. coli or S. typhimurium but is involved in the negative chemotaxis of E. coli to high concentrations of glycerol. We propose that positive chemotaxis to glycerol in E. coli and S. typhimurium is an example of energy taxis mediated via a signal transduction pathway that responds to changes in the cellular energy level.

  12. Mutations in Escherichia coli that effect sensitivity to oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Jamison, C.S.; Adler, H.I.

    1987-11-01

    Fifteen oxygen-sensitive (Oxy/sup s/) mutants of Escherichia coli were isolated after exposure to UV light. The mutants did not form macroscopic colonies when plated aerobically. They did form macroscopic colonies anaerobically. Oxygen, introduced during log phase, inhibited the growth of liquid cultures. The degree of inhibition was used to separate the mutants into three classes. Class I mutants did not grow after exposure to oxygen. Class II mutants were able to grow, but at a reduced rate and to a reduced final titer, when compared with the wild-type parent. Class III mutants formed filaments in response to oxygen. Genetic experiments indicated that the mutations map to six different chromosomal regions. The results of enzymatic assays indicated that 7 of the 10 class I mutants have low levels of catalase, peroxidase, superoxide dismutase, and respiratory enzymes when compared with the wild-type parent. Mutations in five of the seven class I mutants which have the low enzyme activities mapped within the region 8 to 13.5 min. P1 transduction data indicated that mutations in three of these five mutants, Oxy/sup s/-6, Oxy/sup s/-14, and Oxy/sup s/-17, mapped to 8.4 min. The correlation of low enzyme levels and mapping data suggest that a single gene may regulate several enzymes in response to oxygen. The remaining three class I mutants had wild-type levels of catalase, peroxidase, and superoxide dismutase, but decreased respiratory activity. The class II and III mutants had enzyme activities similar to those of the wild-type parent.

  13. Characterization of a cytoplasmic trehalase of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Horlacher, R; Uhland, K; Klein, W; Ehrmann, M; Boos, W

    1996-11-01

    Escherichia coli can synthesize trehalose in response to osmotic stress and is able to utilize trehalose as a carbon source. The pathway of trehalose utilization is different at low and high osmolarity. At high osmolarity, a periplasmic trehalase (TreA) is induced that hydrolyzes trehalose in the periplasm to glucose. Glucose is then taken up by the phosphotransferase system. At low osmolarity, trehalose is taken up by a trehalose-specific enzyme II of the phosphotransferase system as trehalose-6-phosphate and then is hydrolyzed to glucose and glucose-6-phosphate. Here we report a novel cytoplasmic trehalase that hydrolyzes trehalose to glucose. treF, the gene encoding this enzyme, was cloned under ara promoter control. The enzyme (TreF) was purified from extracts of an overexpressing strain and characterized biochemically. It is specific for trehalose exhibiting a Km of 1.9 mM and a Vmax of 54 micromol of trehalose hydrolyzed per min per mg of protein. The enzyme is monomeric, exhibits a broad pH optimum at 6.0, and shows no metal dependency. TreF has a molecular weight of 63,703 (549 amino acids) and is highly homologous to TreA. The nonidentical amino acids of TreF are more polar and more acidic than those of TreA. The expression of treF as studied by the expression of a chromosomal treF-lacZ fusion is weakly induced by high osmolarity of the medium and is partially dependent on RpoS, the stationary-phase sigma factor. Mutants producing 17-fold more TreF than does the wild type were isolated.

  14. Polyerositis and Arthritis Due to Escherichia coli in Gnotobiotic Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Waxler, G. L.; Britt, A. L.

    1972-01-01

    Forty gnotobiotic pigs from six litters were exposed orally to Escherichia coli 083:K·:NM at 69 to 148 hours of age, while 17 pigs from the same litters served as unexposed controls. Clinical signs of infection included fever, anorexia, diarrhea, lameness, and reluctance to move. Eighty-four percent of the exposed pigs in four litters died, while only 13% in two litters died. Gross and microscopic lesions included serofibrinous to fibrinopurulent polyserositis in 96% of the exposed pigs in four litters and 33% of the exposed pigs in two litters. A few pigs had gross and/or microscopic lesions of arthritis. Escherichia coli was routinely isolated from the serous and synovial cavities of infected pigs. Anti-hog cholera serum administered orally as a colostrum substitute gave partial protection against E. coli infection. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 2.Fig. 3.Fig. 4.Fig. 5.Fig. 6.Fig. 7.Fig. 8. PMID:4261837

  15. Cytotoxic Escherichia coli strains encoding colibactin colonize laboratory mice.

    PubMed

    García, Alexis; Mannion, Anthony; Feng, Yan; Madden, Carolyn M; Bakthavatchalu, Vasudevan; Shen, Zeli; Ge, Zhongming; Fox, James G

    2016-12-01

    Escherichia coli strains have not been fully characterized in laboratory mice and are not currently excluded from mouse colonies. Colibactin (Clb), a cytotoxin, has been associated with inflammation and cancer in humans and animals. We performed bacterial cultures utilizing rectal swab, fecal, and extra intestinal samples from clinically unaffected or affected laboratory mice. Fifty-one E. coli were isolated from 45 laboratory mice, identified biochemically, and selected isolates were serotyped. The 16S rRNA gene was amplified and sequenced for specific isolates, PCR used for clbA and clbQ gene amplification, and phylogenetic group identification was performed on all 51 E. coli strains. Clb genes were sequenced and selected E. coli isolates were characterized using a HeLa cell cytotoxicity assay. Forty-five of the 51 E. coli isolates (88%) encoded clbA and clbQ and belonged to phylogenetic group B2. Mouse E. coli serotypes included: O2:H6, O-:H-, OM:H+, and O22:H-. Clb-encoding O2: H6 mouse E. coli isolates were cytotoxic in vitro. A Clb-encoding E. coli was isolated from a clinically affected genetically modified mouse with cystic endometrial hyperplasia. Our findings suggest that Clb-encoding E. coli colonize laboratory mice and may induce clinical and subclinical diseases that may impact experimental mouse models.

  16. Using zebra mussels to monitor Escherichia coli in environmental waters.

    PubMed

    Selegean, J P; Kusserow, R; Patel, R; Heidtke, T M; Ram, J L

    2001-01-01

    Use of the zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) as an indicator of previously elevated bacteria concentrations in a watershed was examined. The ability of the zebra mussel to accumulate and purge Escherichia coli over several days was investigated in both laboratory and field experiments. In laboratory experiments, periodic enumeration of E. coli in mussels that had been exposed to a dilute solution of raw sewage demonstrated that (i) maximum concentrations of E. coli are reached within a few hours of exposure to sewage, (ii) the tissue concentration attained is higher than the concentration in the ambient water, and (iii) the E. coli concentrations take several days to return to preexposure concentrations when mussels are subsequently placed in sterile water. In field experiments conducted in southeast Michigan in the Clinton River watershed, brief increases in E. coli concentrations in the water were accompanied by increases in mussel concentrations of E. coli that lasted 2 or 3 d. The ability of mussels to retain and to concentrate E. coli made it possible to detect E. coli in the environment under conditions that conventional monitoring may often miss. Sampling caged mussels in a river and its tributaries may enable watershed managers to reduce the sampling frequency normally required to identify critical E. coli sources, thereby providing a more cost-effective river monitoring strategy for bacterial contamination.

  17. Lytic bacteriophages reduce Escherichia coli O157

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Sean; Roberts, Cheryl; Handy, Eric; Sharma, Manan

    2013-01-01

    The role of lytic bacteriophages in preventing cross contamination of produce has not been evaluated. A cocktail of three lytic phages specific for E. coli O157:H7 (EcoShield™) or a control (phosphate buffered saline, PBS) was applied to lettuce by either; (1) immersion of lettuce in 500 ml of EcoShield™ 8.3 log PFU/ml or 9.8 log PFU/ml for up to 2 min before inoculation with E. coli O157:H7; (2) spray-application of EcoShield™ (9.3 log PFU/ml) to lettuce after inoculation with E. coli O157:H7 (4.10 CFU/cm2) following exposure to 50 μg/ml chlorine for 30 sec. After immersion studies, lettuce was spot-inoculated with E. coli O157:H7 (2.38 CFU/cm2). Phage-treated, inoculated lettuce pieces were stored at 4°C for and analyzed for E. coli O157:H7 populations for up to 7 d. Immersion of lettuce in 9.8 log PFU/ml EcoShield™ for 2 min significantly (p < 0.05) reduced E. coli O157:H7 populations after 24 h when stored at 4°C compared with controls. Immersion of lettuce in suspensions containing high concentrations of EcoShield™ (9.8 log PFU/ml) resulted in the deposition of high concentrations (7.8 log log PFU/cm2) of bacteriophages on the surface of fresh cut lettuce, potentially contributing to the efficacy of the lytic phages on lettuce. Spraying phages on to inoculated fresh cut lettuce after being washed in hypochlorite solution was significantly more effective in reducing E. coli O157:H7 populations (2.22 log CFU/cm2) on day 0 compared with control treatments (4.10 log CFU/cm2). Both immersion and spray treatments provided protection from E. coli O157:H7 contamination on lettuce, but spray application of lytic bacteriophages to lettuce was more effective in immediately reducing E. coli O157:H7 populations fresh cut lettuce. PMID:23819106

  18. Genetic engineering of probiotic Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 for clinical application.

    PubMed

    Ou, Bingming; Yang, Ying; Tham, Wai Liang; Chen, Lin; Guo, Jitao; Zhu, Guoqiang

    2016-10-01

    Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917 (EcN) has been used as a probiotic. Genetic engineering has enhanced the utility of EcN in several vaccine and pharmaceutical preparations. We discuss in this mini review the genetics and physical properties of EcN. We also discuss the numerous genetic engineering strategies employed for EcN-based vaccine development, including recombinant plasmid transfer, genetic engineering of cryptic plasmids or the EcN chromosome, EcN bacterial ghosts and its outer membrane vesicles. We also provide a current update on the progress and the challenges regarding the use of EcN in vaccine development.

  19. Experimental Escherichia coli O157:H7 carriage in calves.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, C A; Harmon, B G; Zhao, T; Doyle, M P

    1997-01-01

    Nine weaned calves (6 to 8 weeks of age) were given 10(10) CFU of a five-strain mixture of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 by oral-gastric intubation. After an initial brief period of pyrexia in three calves and transient mild diarrhea in five calves, calves were clinically normal throughout the 13- to 27-day study. The population of E. coli O157:H7 in the faces decreased dramatically in all calves during the first 2 weeks after inoculation. Thereafter, small populations of E. coli O157:H7 persisted in all calves, where they were detected intermittently in the feces and rumen contents. While withholding food increased fecal shedding of E. coli O157:H7 by 1 to 2 log10/g in three of four calves previously shedding small populations of E. coli O157:H7, the effect of fasting on fecal shedding of E. coli O157:H7 was variable in calves shedding larger populations. At necropsy, E. coli O157:H7 was not isolated from sites outside the alimentary tract. E. coli O157:H7 was isolated from the forestomach or colon of all calves at necropsy. Greater numbers of E. coli O157:H7 were present in the gastrointestinal contents than in the corresponding mucosal sections, and there was no histologic or immunohistochemical evidence of E. coli O157:H7 adhering to the mucosa. In conclusion, under these experimental conditions, E. coli O157:H7 is not pathogenic in weaned calves, and while it does not appear to colonize mucosal surfaces for extended periods, E. coli O157:H7 persists in the contents of the rumen and colon as a source for fecal shedding. PMID:8979335

  20. Travelers' diarrhea and toxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Gorbach, S L; Kean, B H; Evans, D G; Evans, D J; Bessudo, D

    1975-05-01

    In a group of 133 United States students studied for 18 days after arriving in Mexico, diarrhea developed in 38 (29 per cent). Diarrhea rarely began before the fourth day, and the mean onset was 13 days after arrival. Symptoms lasted an average of 3.4 days but persisted in 21 per cent of sick students. Heat-labile enterotoxin-producing Escheria coli was found in the stools of 72 per cent of sick and 15 per cent of healthy students. None had heat-labile Esch. coli when they entered Mexico. The incubation period was short, generally 24 to 48 hours, and the carrier state was five days or less in 82 per cent of students surveyed. Entamoeba histolytica was found in 6 per cent of cases of diarrhea, but not salmonella, shigella or penetrating Esch. coli. These studies suggest that approximately 70 per cent of travelers' diarrhea in Mexico is associated with heat-labile toxigenic strains of Esch. coli.

  1. Genomic Comparative Study of Bovine Mastitis Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Kempf, Florent; Slugocki, Cindy; Blum, Shlomo E.; Leitner, Gabriel; Germon, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli, one of the main causative agents of bovine mastitis, is responsible for significant losses on dairy farms. In order to better understand the pathogenicity of E. coli mastitis, an accurate characterization of E. coli strains isolated from mastitis cases is required. By using phylogenetic analyses and whole genome comparison of 5 currently available mastitis E. coli genome sequences, we searched for genotypic traits specific for mastitis isolates. Our data confirm that there is a bias in the distribution of mastitis isolates in the different phylogenetic groups of the E. coli species, with the majority of strains belonging to phylogenetic groups A and B1. An interesting feature is that clustering of strains based on their accessory genome is very similar to that obtained using the core genome. This finding illustrates the fact that phenotypic properties of strains from different phylogroups are likely to be different. As a consequence, it is possible that different strategies could be used by mastitis isolates of different phylogroups to trigger mastitis. Our results indicate that mastitis E. coli isolates analyzed in this study carry very few of the virulence genes described in other pathogenic E. coli strains. A more detailed analysis of the presence/absence of genes involved in LPS synthesis, iron acquisition and type 6 secretion systems did not uncover specific properties of mastitis isolates. Altogether, these results indicate that mastitis E. coli isolates are rather characterized by a lack of bona fide currently described virulence genes. PMID:26809117

  2. [Acute diarrheal disease caused by enteropathogenic Escherichia coli in Colombia].

    PubMed

    Gómez-Duarte, Oscar G

    2014-10-01

    Intestinal Escherichia coli pathogens are leading causes of acute diarrheal disease in children less than 5 years in Latin America, Africa and Asia and a leading cause of death in children living in poorest communities in Africa and South East Asia. Studies on the role of E. coli pathogens in childhood diarrhea in Colombia and other countries in Latin America are limited due to the lack of detection assays in clinical laboratories at the main urban medical centers. Recent studies report that enterotoxigenic E. coli is the most common E. coli pathogens associated with diarrhea in children less than 5 years of age. Other E. coli pathotypes have been detected in children with diarrhea including enteropathogenic, enteroaggregative, shiga-toxin producing and diffusely adherent E. coli. It was also found that meat and vegetables at retail stores are contaminated with Shiga-toxin producing E. coli and enteroaggregative E. coli, suggesting that food products are involved in transmission and infection of the susceptible host. More studies are necessary to evaluate the mechanisms of transmission, the impact on the epidemiology of diarrheal disease, and management strategies and prevention of these pathogens affecting the pediatric population in Colombia.

  3. Introduction of quinolone resistant Escherichia coli to Swedish broiler population by imported breeding animals.

    PubMed

    Börjesson, Stefan; Guillard, Thomas; Landén, Annica; Bengtsson, Björn; Nilsson, Oskar

    2016-10-15

    During recent years a rapid increase of quinolone resistant Escherichia coli have been noted in the Swedish broiler population, despite the lack of a known selective pressure. The current study wanted to investigate if imported breeding birds could be a source for the quinolone resistant E. coli. The occurrence of quinolone resistant E. coli was investigated, using selective cultivation with nalidixic acid, in grand-parent birds on arrival to Sweden and their progeny. In addition, sampling in hatcheries and empty cleaned poultry houses was performed. Clonality of isolates was investigated using a 10-loci multiple-locus variable number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA). To identify the genetic basis for the resistance isolates were also analysed for occurrence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) determinants and characterization of chromosomal mutations. E. coli resistant to nalidixic acid occurred in grandparent birds imported to Sweden for breeding purposes. Four predominant MLVA types were identified in isolates from grandparent birds, parent birds and broilers. However, resistant E. coli with identical MLVA patterns were also present in hatcheries and poultry houses suggesting that the environment plays a role in the occurrence. Nalidixic acid resistance was due to a mutation in the gyrA gene and no PMQR could be identified. The occurrence of identical clones in all levels of the production pyramid points to that quinolone resistant E. coli can be introduced through imported breeding birds and spread by vertical transmission to all levels of the broiler production pyramid.

  4. Interaction of Type IV Toxin/Antitoxin Systems in Cryptic Prophages of Escherichia coli K-12

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Zhongling; Wang, Pengxia; Sun, Chenglong; Guo, Yunxue; Wang, Xiaoxue

    2017-01-01

    Toxin/antitoxin (TA) systems are widespread in prokaryotic chromosomes and in mobile genetic elements including plasmids and prophages. The first characterized Type IV TA system CbtA/CbeA was found in cryptic prophage CP4-44 in Escherichia coli K-12. Two homologous TA loci of CbtA/CbeA also reside in cryptic prophages of E. coli K-12, YkfI/YafW in CP4-6 and YpjF/YfjZ in CP4-57. In this study, we demonstrated that YkfI and YpjF inhibited cell growth and led to the formation of “lemon-shaped” cells. Prolonged overproduction of YkfI led to the formation of “gourd-shaped” cells and immediate cell lysis. YafW and YfjZ can neutralize the toxicity of YkfI or YpjF. Furthermore, we found that YkfI and YpjF interacted with cell division protein FtsZ in E. coli, but ectopic expression in Pseudomonas and Shewanella did not cause the formation of “lemon-shaped” cells. Moreover, deletion of all of the three toxin genes together decreased resistance to oxidative stress and deletion of the antitoxin genes increased early biofilm formation. Collectively, these results demonstrated that the homologous Type IV TA systems in E. coli may target cell division protein FtsZ in E. coli and may have different physiological functions in E. coli. PMID:28257056

  5. Antimicrobial resistance of Escherichia coli isolates from canine urinary tract infections

    PubMed Central

    CHANG, Shao-Kuang; LO, Dan-Yuan; WEI, Hen-Wei; KUO, Hung-Chih

    2014-01-01

    This study determined the antimicrobial resistance profiles of Escherichia coli isolates from dogs with a presumptive diagnosis of urinary tract infection (UTI). Urine samples from 201 dogs with UTI diagnosed through clinical examination and urinalysis were processed for isolation of Escherichia coli. Colonies from pure cultures were identified by biochemical reactions (n=114) and were tested for susceptibility to 18 antimicrobials. The two most frequent antimicrobials showing resistance in Urinary E. coli isolates were oxytetracycline and ampicillin. Among the resistant isolates, 17 resistance patterns were observed, with 12 patterns involving multidrug resistance (MDR). Of the 69 tetracycline-resistant E. coli isolates, tet(B) was the predominant resistance determinant and was detected in 50.9% of the isolates, whereas the remaining 25.5% isolates carried the tet(A) determinant. Most ampicillin and/or amoxicillin-resistant E. coli isolates carried blaTEM-1 genes. Class 1 integrons were prevalent (28.9%) and contained previously described gene cassettes that are implicated primarily in resistance to aminoglycosides and trimethoprim (dfrA1, dfrA17-aadA5). Of the 44 quinolone-resistant E. coli isolates, 38 were resistant to nalidixic acid, and 6 were resistant to nalidixic acid, ciprofloxacin and enrofloxacin. Chromosomal point mutations were found in the GyrA (Ser83Leu) and ParC (Ser80Ile) genes. Furthermore, the aminoglycoside resistance gene aacC2, the chloramphenicol resistant gene cmlA and the florfenicol resistant gene floR were also identified. This study revealed an alarming rate of antimicrobial resistance among E. coli isolates from dogs with UTIs. PMID:25720807

  6. Proton-linked D-xylose transport in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Lam, V M; Daruwalla, K R; Henderson, P J; Jones-Mortimer, M C

    1980-01-01

    The addition of xylose to energy-depleted cells of Escherichia coli elicited an alkaline pH change which failed to appear in the presence of uncoupling agents. Accumulation of [14C]xylose by energy-replete cells was also inhibited by uncoupling agents, but not by fluoride or arsenate. Subcellular vesicles of E. coli accumulated [14C]xylose provided that ascorbate plus phenazine methosulfate were present for respiration, and this accumulation was inhibited by uncoupling agents or valinomycin. Therefore, the transport of xylose into E. coli appears to be energized by a proton-motive force, rather than by a phosphotransferase or directly energized mechanism. Its specificity for xylose as inducer and substrate and the genetic location of a xylose-H+ transport-negative mutation near mtl showed that the xylose-H+ system is distinct from other proton-linked sugar transport systems of E. coli. PMID:6995439

  7. Biosynthesis of Two Flavones, Apigenin and Genkwanin, in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyejin; Kim, Bong Gyu; Kim, Mihyang; Ahn, Joong-Hoon

    2015-09-01

    The flavonoid apigenin and its O-methyl derivative, genkwanin, have various biological activities and can be sourced from some vegetables and fruits. Microorganisms are an alternative for the synthesis of flavonoids. Here, to synthesize genkwanin from tyrosine, we first synthesized apigenin from p-coumaric acid using four genes (4CL, CHS, CHI, and FNS) in Escherichia coli. After optimization of different combinations of constructs, the yield of apigenin was increased from 13 mg/l to 30 mg/l. By introducing two additional genes (TAL and POMT7) into an apigenin-producing E. coli strain, we were able to synthesize 7-O-methyl apigenin (genkwanin) from tyrosine. In addition, the tyrosine content in E. coli was modulated by overexpressing aroG and tyrA. The engineered E. coli strain synthesized approximately 41 mg/l genkwanin.

  8. [Escherichia coli R live vaccine Suicolplex "Dessau"].

    PubMed

    Michael-Meese, M; Klie, H; Schöll, W

    1980-01-01

    Immunisation of pregnant sows prior to parturition has long proved to be a good method to forestall coli dysentery in piglets before weaning. Inactivated vaccines of the pathogenetically important E. coli serogroups with and without adjuvant so far were primarily used at international level. A vaccine of that kind has become available in the GDR more than eight years ago. Its name is Coliporc "Dessau". A live vaccine has been developed from two R-mutants at the authors' institute. The effectiveness of that live vaccine on laboratory animals and in field experiments is reported in this paper together with possibilities of differential diagnosis to distinguish wild strains from the mutants. The live vaccine was commercially registered under the name of Suicolpex "Dessau", in spring 1976.

  9. Genotypic Characterization of Egypt Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Isolates Expressing Coli Surface Antigen 6

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-01

    USA Abstract Introduction: One approach to control enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) infections has been to develop vaccines focused on...results show a lack of clonality among Egypt CS6 E. coli isolates and supports the use and the further research on vaccines targeting this cell surface...has received considerable attention as a target for vaccine development [11-14]. CS6 is immunogenic in humans both after natural infection and

  10. Metabolic engineering of Escherichia coli for 1-butanol production.

    PubMed

    Atsumi, Shota; Cann, Anthony F; Connor, Michael R; Shen, Claire R; Smith, Kevin M; Brynildsen, Mark P; Chou, Katherine J Y; Hanai, Taizo; Liao, James C

    2008-11-01

    Compared to ethanol, butanol offers many advantages as a substitute for gasoline because of higher energy content and higher hydrophobicity. Typically, 1-butanol is produced by Clostridium in a mixed-product fermentation. To facilitate strain improvement for specificity and productivity, we engineered a synthetic pathway in Escherichia coli and demonstrated the production of 1-butanol from this non-native user-friendly host. Alternative genes and competing pathway deletions were evaluated for 1-butanol production. Results show promise for using E. coli for 1-butanol production.

  11. Functional role of bdm during flagella biogenesis in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-Sun; Kim, Yu Jin; Seo, Sojin; Seong, Maeng-Je; Lee, Kangseok

    2015-03-01

    The biofilm-dependent modulation gene (bdm) has recently been shown to play a role in osmotic-induced formation of biofilm in Escherichia coli. In this study, we demonstrated that deletion of bdm results in down-regulation of flagella biosynthesis genes and, consequently, a defect in E. coli motility. In addition, we employed atomic force microscopy to confirm the absence of flagella-like structures on the surface of bdm-null cells. These findings indicate that bdm plays a key role in regulatory pathway for the formation of flagella.

  12. PROPERTIES OF A BACTERIOPHAGE DERIVED FROM ESCHERICHIA COLI K235

    PubMed Central

    Jesaitis, Margeris A.; Hutton, John J.

    1963-01-01

    A temperate bacteriophage was isolated from the colicinogenic strain of Escherichia coli K235 and characterized. This phage, termed PK, is related to P2 virus morphologically, serologically, and, possibly, genetically and it bears no relationship to the T-even phages. It was also demonstrated that PK virus and colicine K differ both in their host range and in their immunological specificity, and that PK prophage does not induce the colicinogenesis in its host bacterium. It was concluded that the formation of colicine K. and PK phage in E. coli K235 are controlled by different genetic determinants. PMID:14029160

  13. Nitric oxide donor-mediated killing of bioluminescent Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Virta, M; Karp, M; Vuorinen, P

    1994-01-01

    The antimicrobial activities of two nitric oxide-releasing compounds against Escherichia coli were investigated by using recombinant E. coli cloned with a luciferase gene from Pyrophorus plagiophthalamus. Since luciferase uses intracellular ATP to generate visible light which can be measured from living cells in real time, we wanted to compare the extent to which cell viability parallels light emission. Results from luminescence measurements and CFU counts were in good agreement, and the decrease in light emission was shown to provide a rapid and more sensitive indication of cytotoxicity. PMID:7695261

  14. Accelerated glycerol fermentation in Escherichia coli using methanogenic formate consumption.

    PubMed

    Richter, Katrin; Gescher, Johannes

    2014-06-01

    Escherichia coli can ferment glycerol anaerobically only under very defined restrictive conditions. Hence, it was the aim of this study to overcome this limitation via a co-cultivation approach. Anaerobic glycerol fermentation by a pure E. coli culture was compared to a co-culture that also contained the formate-oxidizing methanogen Methanobacterium formicicum. Co-cultivation of the two strains led to a more than 11-fold increased glycerol consumption. Furthermore, it supported a constantly neutral pH and a shift from ethanol to succinate production. Moreover, M. formicicum was analyzed for its ability to grow on different standard media and a surprising versatility could be demonstrated.

  15. Bacterial self-defence: how Escherichia coli evades serum killing.

    PubMed

    Miajlovic, Helen; Smith, Stephen G

    2014-05-01

    The ability to survive the bactericidal action of serum is advantageous to extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli that gain access to the bloodstream. Evasion of the innate defences present in serum, including complement and antimicrobial peptides, involves multiple factors. Serum resistance mechanisms utilized by E. coli include the production of protective extracellular polysaccharide capsules and expression of factors that inhibit or interfere with the complement cascade. Recent studies have also highlighted the importance of structural integrity of the cell envelope in serum survival. These survival strategies are outlined in this review with particular attention to novel findings and recent insights into well-established resistance mechanisms.

  16. Escherichia coli as a model active colloid: A practical introduction.

    PubMed

    Schwarz-Linek, Jana; Arlt, Jochen; Jepson, Alys; Dawson, Angela; Vissers, Teun; Miroli, Dario; Pilizota, Teuta; Martinez, Vincent A; Poon, Wilson C K

    2016-01-01

    The flagellated bacterium Escherichia coli is increasingly used experimentally as a self-propelled swimmer. To obtain meaningful, quantitative results that are comparable between different laboratories, reproducible protocols are needed to control, 'tune' and monitor the swimming behaviour of these motile cells. We critically review the knowledge needed to do so, explain methods for characterising the colloidal and motile properties of E. coli cells, and propose a protocol for keeping them swimming at constant speed at finite bulk concentrations. In the process of establishing this protocol, we use motility as a high-throughput probe of aspects of cellular physiology via the coupling between swimming speed and the proton motive force.

  17. Inducible repair of oxidative DNA damage in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Demple, B; Halbrook, J

    Hydrogen peroxide is lethal to many cell types, including the bacterium Escherichia coli. Peroxides yield transient radical species that can damage DNA and cause mutations. Such partially reduced oxygen species are occasionally released during cellular respiration and are generated by lethal and mutagenic ionizing radiation. Because cells live in an environment where the threat of oxidative DNA damage is continual, cellular mechanisms may have evolved to avoid and repair this damage. Enzymes are known which evidently perform these functions. We report here that resistance to hydrogen peroxide toxicity can be induced in E. coli, that this novel induction is specific and occurs, in part, at the level of DNA repair.

  18. Sedimentation and gravitational instability of Escherichia coli Suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douarche, Carine; Salin, Dominique; Collaboration between Laboratory FAST; LPS Collaboration

    2016-11-01

    The successive run and tumble of Escherichia coli bacteria provides an active matter suspension of rod-like particles with a large swimming diffusion. As opposed to inactive elongated particles, this diffusion prevents clustering and instability in the gravity field. We measure the time dependent E . coli concentration profile during their sedimentation. After some hours, due to the dioxygen consumption, a motile / non-motile front forms leading to a Rayleigh-Taylor type gravitational instability. Analyzing both sedimentation and instability in the framework of active particle suspensions, we can measure the relevant bacteria hydrodynamic characteristics such as its single particle sedimentation velocity and its hindrance volume.

  19. SCO-1, a novel plasmid-mediated class A beta-lactamase with carbenicillinase characteristics from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Papagiannitsis, C C; Loli, A; Tzouvelekis, L S; Tzelepi, E; Arlet, G; Miriagou, V

    2007-06-01

    A novel class A beta-lactamase (SCO-1) encoded by an 80-kb self-transferable plasmid from Escherichia coli is described. The interaction of SCO-1 with beta-lactams was similar to that of the CARB-type enzymes. Also, SCO-1 exhibited a 51% amino acid sequence identity with the RTG subgroup of chromosomal carbenicillinases (RTG-1, CARB-5, and CARB-8).

  20. Advances in molecular serotyping and subtyping of Escherichia coli

    DOE PAGES

    Fratamico, Pina M.; DebRoy, Chitrita; Liu, Yanhong; ...

    2016-05-03

    Escherichia coli plays an important role as a member of the gut microbiota; however, pathogenic strains also exist, including various diarrheagenic E. coli pathotypes and extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli that cause illness outside of the GI-tract. E. coli have traditionally been serotyped using antisera against the ca. 186 O-antigens and 53 H-flagellar antigens. Phenotypic methods, including bacteriophage typing and O- and H- serotyping for differentiating and characterizing E. coli have been used for many years; however, these methods are generally time consuming and not always accurate. Advances in next generation sequencing technologies have made it possible to develop genetic-based subtypingmore » and molecular serotyping methods for E. coli, which are more discriminatory compared to phenotypic typing methods. Furthermore, whole genome sequencing (WGS) of E. coli is replacing established subtyping methods such as pulsedfield gel electrophoresis, providing a major advancement in the ability to investigate food-borne disease outbreaks and for trace-back to sources. Furthermore, a variety of sequence analysis tools and bioinformatic pipelines are being developed to analyze the vast amount of data generated by WGS and to obtain specific information such as O- and H-group determination and the presence of virulence genes and other genetic markers.« less

  1. Gentamicin resistance among Escherichia coli strains isolated in neonatal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Hasvold, J; Bradford, L; Nelson, C; Harrison, C; Attar, M; Stillwell, T

    2013-01-01

    Neonatal sepsis is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality among term and preterm infants. Ampicillin and gentamicin are standard empiric therapy for early onset sepsis. Four cases of neonatal sepsis secondary to Escherichia coli (E. coli) found to be gentamicin resistant occurred within a five week period in one neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). To determine whether these cases could be tied to a single vector of transmission, and to more broadly evaluate the incidence of gentamicin resistant strains of E. coli in the neonatal population at our institution compared to other centers, we reviewed the charts of the four neonates (Infants A through D) and their mothers. The E. coli isolates were sent for Pulse Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE) to evaluate for genetic similarity between strains. We also reviewed all positive E. coli cultures from one NICU over a two year period. Infants A and B had genetically indistinguishable strains which matched that of urine and placental cultures of Infant B's mother. Infant C had a genetically distinct organism. Infant D, the identical twin of Infant C, did not have typing performed. Review of all cultures positive for E. coli at our institution showed a 12.9 percent incidence of gentamicin-resistance. A review of other studies showed that rates of resistance vary considerably by institution. We conclude that gentamicin-resistant E. coli is a relatively uncommon cause of neonatal sepsis, but should remain a consideration in patients who deteriorate despite initiation of empiric antibiotics.

  2. Inactivation of Escherichia coli using atmospheric-pressure plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwahata, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Takeshi; Ohyama, Ryu-ichiro; Ito, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    An atmospheric-pressure argon (Ar) plasma jet was applied to the inactivation of Escherichia coli. The Ar plasma jet was generated at a frequency of 10 kHz, an applied voltage of 10 kV, and an Ar gas flow rate of 10 L/min at atmospheric pressure. E. coli cells seeded on an agar medium in a Petri dish were inactivated by Ar plasma jet irradiation for 1 s. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed that E. coli cells were killed because their cell wall and membrane were disrupted. To determine the causes of the disruption of the cell wall and membrane of E. coli, we performed the following experiments: the measurement of the surface temperature of an agar medium using a thermograph, the analysis of an emission spectrum of a plasma jet obtained using a multichannel spectrometer, and the determination of the distribution of the concentration of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) generated on an agar medium by plasma jet irradiation using semiquantitative test strips. Moreover, H2O2 solutions of different concentrations were dropped onto an agar medium seeded with E. coli cells to examine the contribution of H2O2 to the death of E. coli. The results of these experiments showed that the cell wall and membrane of E. coli were disrupted by electrons in the plasma jet, as well as by electroneutral excited nitrogen molecules (N2) and hydroxyl (OH) radicals in the periphery of the plasma jet.

  3. Biosynthesis of phosphatidyl glycerophosphate in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Chang, Y Y; Kennedy, E P

    1967-09-01

    An enzyme (L-glycerol 3-phosphate: CMP phosphatidyltransferase) catalyzing the synthesis of phosphatidyl glycerophosphate from CDP-diglyceride and L-glycerol 3-phosphate has been rendered soluble by treatment of the particulate, membrane-containing fraction of E. coli with Triton X-100 and has been partially purified. The enzyme, devoid of phosphatidyl glycerophosphatase activity, is specific for L-glycerol 3-phosphate and is completely dependent upon added Mg(++) or Mn(++) for activity. It has high affinity for CDP-diglyceride and can be used for the assay of this nucleotide. Other properties of the enzyme are also described.

  4. Preferential cytoplasmic location of FtsZ, a protein essential for Escherichia coli septation.

    PubMed

    Pla, J; Sánchez, M; Palacios, P; Vicente, M; Aldea, M

    1991-07-01

    An ftsZ thermonull mutant has been constructed in which the ftsZ gene has been deleted from the Escherichia coli chromosome while maintaining a wild-type copy of the gene in a thermosensitive plasmid. Under conditions in which the ftsZ+ allele is unable to be replicated at the same pace as the chromosome, the cells become non-viable and grow as filaments, indicating that, contrary to other reports, FtsZ performs a function essential for cell survival. Antibodies raised against FtsZ have been used to detect the cellular location of FtsZ and its contents per cell. Fractionation experiments indicate that most of the total FtsZ present in the cell stays in the cytoplasm.

  5. Growth and Division of Filamentous Forms of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Adler, H I; Hardigree, A A

    1965-07-01

    Adler, Howard I. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tenn.), and Alice A. Hardigree. Growth and division of filamentous forms of Escherichia coli. J. Bacteriol. 90:223-226. 1965.-Cells of certain mutant strains of Escherichia coli grow into long multinucleate filaments after exposure to radiation. Deoxyribonucleic acid, ribonucleic acid, and protein synthesis proceed, but cytokinesis does not occur. Cytokinesis (cross-septation) can be initiated by exposure of the filaments to pantoyl lactone or a temperature of 42 C. If growing filaments are treated with mitomycin C, nuclear division does not occur, and nuclear material is confined to the central region of the filament. Cytokinesis cannot be induced in mitomycin C-treated filaments by pantoyl lactone or treatment at 42 C.

  6. Mechanobiology of Antimicrobial Resistant Escherichia coli and Listeria innocua.

    PubMed

    Tajkarimi, Mehrdad; Harrison, Scott H; Hung, Albert M; Graves, Joseph L

    2016-01-01

    A majority of antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections in the United States are associated with biofilms. Nanoscale biophysical measures are increasingly revealing that adhesive and viscoelastic properties of bacteria play essential roles across multiple stages of biofilm development. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) applied to strains with variation in antimicrobial resistance enables new opportunities for investigating the function of adhesive forces (stickiness) in biofilm formation. AFM force spectroscopy analysis of a field strain of Listeria innocua and the strain Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655 revealed differing adhesive forces between antimicrobial resistant and nonresistant strains. Significant increases in stickiness were found at the nanonewton level for strains of Listeria innocua and Escherichia coli in association with benzalkonium chloride and silver nanoparticle resistance respectively. This advancement in the usage of AFM provides for a fast and reliable avenue for analyzing antimicrobial resistant cells and the molecular dynamics of biofilm formation as a protective mechanism.

  7. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli infection in captive black-footed ferrets.

    PubMed

    Bradley, G A; Orr, K; Reggiardo, C; Glock, R D

    2001-07-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli with genes for heat stabile toxins Sta and STb was isolated from the gastrointestinal tract and multiple visceral organs of three adult and three juvenile black-footed ferrets (Mustela nigripes) that died in a captive breeding colony between 24 May 1998 and 2 July 1998. Similar isolates were obtained from rectal swabs of one adult and one juvenile that were clinically ill. All were fed a diet composed of mink chow, raw rabbit meat, beef liver powder, blood meal and lard. Escherichia coli of the same toxin genotype was isolated from the mixed ration. Clinical signs included sudden death, dehydration, anorexia and diarrhea. Necropsy lesions included acute enteritis with large numbers of rod shaped bacteria microscopically visible on intestinal villi.

  8. Mechanobiology of Antimicrobial Resistant Escherichia coli and Listeria innocua

    PubMed Central

    Tajkarimi, Mehrdad; Harrison, Scott H.; Hung, Albert M.; Graves, Joseph L.

    2016-01-01

    A majority of antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections in the United States are associated with biofilms. Nanoscale biophysical measures are increasingly revealing that adhesive and viscoelastic properties of bacteria play essential roles across multiple stages of biofilm development. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) applied to strains with variation in antimicrobial resistance enables new opportunities for investigating the function of adhesive forces (stickiness) in biofilm formation. AFM force spectroscopy analysis of a field strain of Listeria innocua and the strain Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655 revealed differing adhesive forces between antimicrobial resistant and nonresistant strains. Significant increases in stickiness were found at the nanonewton level for strains of Listeria innocua and Escherichia coli in association with benzalkonium chloride and silver nanoparticle resistance respectively. This advancement in the usage of AFM provides for a fast and reliable avenue for analyzing antimicrobial resistant cells and the molecular dynamics of biofilm formation as a protective mechanism. PMID:26914334

  9. Thiolases of Escherichia coli: purification and chain length specificities.

    PubMed Central

    Feigenbaum, J; Schulz, H

    1975-01-01

    The presence of only one thiolase (EC 2.3.1.9) in wild-type Escherichia coli induced for enzymes of beta oxidation was demonstrated. A different thiolase was shown to be present in a mutant constitutive for the enzymes of butyrate degradation. The two thiolases were purified to near homogeneity by a simple two-step procedure and were found to be associated with different proteins as shown by gel electrophoresis. The thiolase isolated from induced wild-type Escherichia coli cell was active on beta-ketoacyl-coenzyme A derivatives containing 4 to 16 carbons, but exhibited optimal activity with medium-chain substrates. In contrast, the thiolase isolated from the constitutive mutant was shown to be specific for acetoacetyl-coenzyme A. PMID:236278

  10. TRYPTOPHANASE-TRYPTOPHAN SYNTHETASE SYSTEMS IN ESCHERICHIA COLI III.

    PubMed Central

    Freundlich, Martin; Lichstein, Herman C.

    1962-01-01

    Freundlich, Martin (University of Minnesota, Minneapolis) and Herman C. Lichstein. Tryptophanase-tryptophan synthetase systems in Escherichia coli. III. Requirements for enzyme synthesis. J. Bacteriol. 84:996–1006. 1962.—The requirements for the formation of tryptophanase and tryptophan synthetase in Escherichia coli during repression release were studied. The kinetics of the formation of tryptophan synthetase differed in the two strains examined; this was attributed to differences in the endogenous level of tryptophan in the bacterial cells. The formation of both enzymes was inhibited by chloramphenicol, and by the absence of arginine in an arginine-requiring mutant. These results are indicative of a requirement for protein synthesis for enzyme formation. Requirements for nucleic acid synthesis were examined by use of a uracil- and thymine-requiring mutant, and with purine and pyrimidine analogues. The results obtained suggest that some type of ribonucleic acid synthesis was necessary for the formation of tryptophanase and tryptophan synthetase. PMID:13959620

  11. A simple and effective method for construction of Escherichia coli strains proficient for genome engineering.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Young Shin; Biswas, Rajesh Kumar; Shin, Kwangsu; Parisutham, Vinuselvi; Kim, Suk Min; Lee, Sung Kuk

    2014-01-01

    Multiplex genome engineering is a standalone recombineering tool for large-scale programming and accelerated evolution of cells. However, this advanced genome engineering technique has been limited to use in selected bacterial strains. We developed a simple and effective strain-independent method for effective genome engineering in Escherichia coli. The method involves introducing a suicide plasmid carrying the λ Red recombination system into the mutS gene. The suicide plasmid can be excised from the chromosome via selection in the absence of antibiotics, thus allowing transient inactivation of the mismatch repair system during genome engineering. In addition, we developed another suicide plasmid that enables integration of large DNA fragments into the lacZ genomic locus. These features enable this system to be applied in the exploitation of the benefits of genome engineering in synthetic biology, as well as the metabolic engineering of different strains of E. coli.

  12. Fosfomycin resistance plasmids do not affect fosfomycin transport into Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    León, J; García-Lobo, J M; Ortiz, J M

    1982-01-01

    Escherichia coli cells carrying fosfomycin resistance plasmids were able to take up fosfomycin from the medium to the same extent as plasmid-free bacteria. The antibiotic entered the plasmid-harboring cells by means of the glpT and uhp transport systems, as is the case with susceptible bacteria. Active fosfomycin could be detected in soluble extracts of cells which had previously been incubated in the presence of the antibiotic. Furthermore, fosfomycin resistance plasmids did not confer on E. coli cells resistance to the novel antibiotic FR-31564, which is incorporated by the same transport systems as fosfomycin. We conclude that, in contrast to chromosomal resistance mutants, altered transport does not play a role in the plasmid-encoded fosfomycin resistance mechanism. PMID:7044304

  13. Afa, a diffuse adherence fibrillar adhesin associated with enteropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Keller, Rogéria; Ordoñez, Juana G; de Oliveira, Rosana R; Trabulsi, Luiz R; Baldwin, Thomas J; Knutton, Stuart

    2002-05-01

    O55 is one of the most frequent enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) O serogroups implicated in infantile diarrhea in developing countries. Multilocus enzyme electrophoresis analysis showed that this serogroup includes two major electrophoretic types (ET), designated ET1 and ET5. ET1 corresponds to typical EPEC, whilst ET5 comprises strains with different combinations of virulence genes, including those for localized adherence (LA) and diffuse adherence (DA). Here we report that ET5 DA strains possess a DA adhesin, designated EPEC Afa. An 11.6-kb chromosomal region including the DA adhesin operon from one O55:H(-) ET5 EPEC strain was sequenced and found to encode a protein with 98% identity to AfaE-1, an adhesin associated with uropathogenic E. coli. Although described as an afimbrial adhesin, we show that both AfaE-1 and EPEC Afa possess fine fibrillar structures. This is the first characterization and demonstration of an Afa adhesin associated with EPEC.

  14. A novel fermentation pathway in an Escherichia coli mutant producing succinic acid, acetic acid, and ethanol.

    SciTech Connect

    Donnelly, M. I.; Millard, C. S.; Clark, D. P.; Chen, M. J.; Rathke, J. W.; Southern Illinois Univ.

    1998-04-01

    Escherichia coli strain NZN111, which is unable to grow fermentatively because of insertional inactivation of the genes encoding pyruvate: formate lyase and the fermentative lactate dehydrogenase, gave rise spontaneously to a chromosomal mutation that restored its ability to ferment glucose. The mutant strain, named AFP111, fermented glucose more slowly than did its wild-type ancestor, strain W1485, and generated a very different spectrum of products. AFP111 produced succinic acid, acetic acid, and ethanol in proportions of approx 2:1:1. Calculations of carbon and electron balances accounted fully for the observed products; 1 mol of glucose was converted to 1 mol of succinic acid and 0.5 mol each of acetic acid and ethanol. The data support the emergence in E.coli of a novel succinic acid:acetic acid:ethanol fermentation pathway.

  15. Low-molecular-weight DNA replication intermediates in Escherichia coli: mechanism of formation and strand specificity.

    PubMed

    Amado, Luciana; Kuzminov, Andrei

    2013-11-15

    Chromosomal DNA replication intermediates, revealed in ligase-deficient conditions in vivo, are of low molecular weight (LMW) independently of the organism, suggesting discontinuous replication of both the leading and the lagging DNA strands. Yet, in vitro experiments with purified enzymes replicating sigma-structured substrates show continuous synthesis of the leading DNA strand in complete absence of ligase, supporting the textbook model of semi-discontinuous DNA replication. The discrepancy between the in vivo and in vitro results is rationalized by proposing that various excision repair events nick continuously synthesized leading strands after synthesis, producing the observed LMW intermediates. Here, we show that, in an Escherichia coli ligase-deficient strain with all known excision repair pathways inactivated, new DNA is still synthesized discontinuously. Furthermore, hybridization to strand-specific targets demonstrates that the LMW replication intermediates come from both the lagging and the leading strands. These results support the model of discontinuous leading strand synthesis in E. coli.

  16. Antisuppressor mutation in Escherichia coli defective in biosynthesis of 5-methylaminomethyl-2-thiouridine.

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, M A; Cannon, J F; Webb, F H; Bock, R M

    1985-01-01

    Mutations in three Escherichia coli K-12 genes were isolated that reduce the efficiency of the lysine-inserting nonsense suppressor supL. These antisuppressor mutations asuD, asuE, and asuF map at 61.9, 25.3, and 76.3 min, respectively, on the E. coli chromosome. Biochemical and genetic analysis of the mutant strains revealed the reason for the antisuppressor phenotype for two of these genes. The activity of lysyl-tRNA synthetase was reduced in strains with asuD mutations. The modification of 5-methylaminomethyl-2-thiouridine, the wobble base of tRNALys, was impaired in asuE mutant strains, presumably at the 2-thiolation step. Images PMID:3881393

  17. Shear alters motility of Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molaei, Mehdi; Jalali, Maryam; Sheng, Jian

    2013-11-01

    Understanding of locomotion of microorganisms in shear flows drew a wide range of interests in microbial related topics such as biological process including pathogenic infection and biophysical interactions like biofilm formation on engineering surfaces. We employed microfluidics and digital holography microscopy to study motility of E. coli in shear flows. We controlled the shear flow in three different shear rates: 0.28 s-1, 2.8 s-1, and 28 s-1 in a straight channel with the depth of 200 μm. Magnified holograms, recorded at 15 fps with a CCD camera over more than 20 minutes, are analyzed to obtain 3D swimming trajectories and subsequently used to extract shear responses of E.coli. Thousands of 3-D bacterial trajectories are tracked. The change of bacteria swimming characteristics including swimming velocity, reorientation, and dispersion coefficient are computed directly for individual trajectory and ensemble averaged over thousands of realizations. The results show that shear suppresses the bacterial dispersions in bulk but promote dispersions near the surface contrary to those in quiescent flow condition. Ongoing analyses are focusing to quantify effect of shear rates on tumbling frequency and reorientation of cell body, and its implication in locating the hydrodynamic mechanisms for shear enhanced angular scattering. NIH, NSF, GoMRI.

  18. Some factors affecting cyclopropane acid formation in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Knivett, V. A.; Cullen, Julia

    1965-01-01

    1. The fatty acid composition of the extractable lipids of Escherichia coli varied with growth conditions. 2. The principal fatty acids were palmitic acid, hexadecenoic acid, octadecenoic acid and the cyclopropane acids, methylenehexadecanoic acid and methyleneoctadecanoic acid. 3. Cyclopropane acid formation from monoenoic acids was increased by acid media, poor oxygen supply, or high growth temperature. 4. Cyclopropane acid formation was decreased by alkaline media, well oxygenated conditions, the presence of citrate, or lack of Mg2+. PMID:5324304

  19. Characterization of Aspergillus oryzae aspartyl aminopeptidase expressed in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Jun; Tanaka, Hisaki; Akagawa, Takumi; Mogi, Yoshinobu; Yamazaki, Tatsuo

    2007-10-01

    To characterize aspartyl aminopeptidase from Aspergillus oryzae, the recombinant enzyme was expressed in Escherichia coli. The enzyme cleaves N-terminal acidic amino acids. About 30% activity was retained in 20% NaCl. Digestion of defatted soybean by the enzyme resulted in an increase in the glutamic acid content, suggesting that the enzyme is potentially responsible for the release of glutamic acid in soy sauce mash.

  20. Polymorphous crystallization and diffraction of threonine deaminase from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, D T; Eisenstein, E; Fisher, K E; Zondlo, J; Chinchilla, D; Yu, H D; Dill, J; Winborne, E; Ducote, K; Xiao, G; Gilliland, G L

    1998-05-01

    The biosynthetic threonine deaminase from Escherichia coli, an allosteric tetramer with key regulatory functions, has been crystallized in several crystal forms. Two distinct forms, both belonging to either space group P3121 or P3221, with different sized asymmetric units that both contain a tetramer, grow under identical conditions. Diffraction data sets to 2.8 A resolution (native) and 2. 9 A resolution (isomorphous uranyl derivative) have been collected from a third crystal form in space group I222.

  1. Positive regulation of the Escherichia coli glycine cleavage enzyme system.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, R L; Steiert, P S; Stauffer, G V

    1993-01-01

    A new mutation in Escherichia coli, designated gcvA1, that results in noninducible expression of both gcv and a gcvT-lacZ gene fusion was isolated. A plasmid carrying the wild-type gcvA gene complemented the mutation and restored glycine-inducible gcv and gcvT-lacZ gene expression. These results suggest that gcvA encodes a positive-acting regulatory protein that acts in trans to increase expression of gcv. PMID:8423160

  2. Division pattern of a round mutant of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, S

    1997-01-01

    A round mutant of Escherichia coli, when grown in Methocel medium, forms chains of cells and does not form tetrads. This implies that successive division planes of the round mutant are parallel rather than perpendicular. These results differ from a previous proposal that division planes in this round mutant are perpendicular to the prior division plane (W. D. Donachie, S. Addinall, and K. Begg, Bioessays 17:569-576, 1995). PMID:9287016

  3. Antibacterial efficacy of silver nanoparticles against Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pattabi, Rani M.; Thilipan, G. Arun Kumar; Bhat, Vinayachandra; Sridhar, K. R.; Pattabi, Manjunatha

    2013-02-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) synthesized by subjecting an aqueous solution of AgNO3 and polyvinyl alcohol to irradiation from an UV lamp has been studied for its antibacterial potential against Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli). The diameter of the zone of inhibition is found to depend on both the irradiation time and the nanoparticle concentration. As the synthesis method adopted uses no toxic reagents, these particles may serve as promising candidates in the search for better antibacterial agents.

  4. Electric field induced bacterial flocculation of Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli 042

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Aloke; Mortensen, Ninell P; Mukherjee, Partha P; Retterer, Scott T; Doktycz, Mitchel John

    2011-01-01

    A response of the aggregation dynamics of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli under low magnitude steady and oscillating electric fields is presented. The presence of uniform electric fields hampered microbial adhesion and biofilm formation on a transverse glass surface, but instead promoted the formation of flocs. Extremely heterogeneous distribution of live and dead cells was observed among the flocs. Moreover, floc formation was largely observed to be independent of the frequency of alternating electric fields.

  5. Role for the female in bacterial conjugation in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Freifelder, D

    1967-08-01

    Hfr and F' Lac male strains of Escherichia coli were mated with purine-requiring females which had been starved for purine. These females formed mating pairs with the males. However, a mating in the absence of purine markedly reduced the yield of recombinants. Transfer of F' Lac or of lambda prophage also occurred infrequently. It was concluded that deoxyribonucleic acid transfer from male to female requires some, as yet unknown, function of the female.

  6. Role for the Female in Bacterial Conjugation in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Freifelder, David

    1967-01-01

    Hfr and F′ Lac male strains of Escherichia coli were mated with purine-requiring females which had been starved for purine. These females formed mating pairs with the males. However, a mating in the absence of purine markedly reduced the yield of recombinants. Transfer of F′ Lac or of λ prophage also occurred infrequently. It was concluded that deoxyribonucleic acid transfer from male to female requires some, as yet unknown, function of the female. PMID:5341864

  7. Current perspectivesin pathogenesis and antimicrobial resistance of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kong, Haishen; Hong, Xiaoping; Li, Xuefen

    2015-08-01

    Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) is an emerging pathogen that causes acute and persistent diarrhea in children and adults. While the pathogenic mechanisms of EAEC intestinal colonization have been uncovered (including bacterial adhesion, enterotoxin and cytotoxin secretion, and stimulation of mucosal inflammation), those of severe extraintestinal infections remain largely unknown. The recent emergence of multidrug resistant EAEC represents an alarming public health threat and clinical challenge, and research on the molecular mechanisms of resistance is urgently needed.

  8. Lipophilic chelator inhibition of electron transport in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Crane, R T; Sun, I L; Crane, F L

    1975-01-01

    The lipophilic chelator bathophenanthroline inhibits electron transport in membranes from Escherichia coli. The less lipophilic 1,10-phenanthroline, bathophenanthroline sulfonate, and alpha,alpha-dipyridyl have little effect. Reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide oxidase is more sensitive to bathophenanthroline inhibition than lactate oxidase activity. Evidence for two sites of inhibition comes from the fact that both reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide menadione reductase and duroquinol oxidase activities are inhibited. Addition of uncouplers of phosphorylation before bathophenanthroline protects against inhibition. PMID:1092663

  9. Effects of Acridine Orange on the Growth of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Southwick, Frederick S.; Carr, Howard S.; Carden, George A.; D'Alisa, Rose M.; Rosenkranz, Herbert S.

    1972-01-01

    Exposure of Escherichia coli to critical acridine orange (AO) concentrations did not result in loss of viability. However, the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) of cells exposed to such agents was rapidly degraded and repolymerized. On the other hand, a bacterium deficient in DNA repair (pol A1−, lacking DNA polymerase) was sensitive to the action of AO. The DNA of such cells was also degraded but it was not repaired. PMID:4553001

  10. Two Forms of d-Glycerate Kinase in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Ornston, M. K.; Ornston, L. N.

    1969-01-01

    Escherichia coli K-12 synthesizes two chromatographically distinct forms of glycerate kinase which differ both in their thermolability and in the dependence of their activity upon pH. One enzymatic form, GK I, is found in cells grown with glycerate, glucarate, or glycolate. Of these compounds, glycolate is the only carbon source that elicits the synthesis of the second enzymatic form, GK II. PMID:4887503

  11. Preparation of Soluble Proteins from Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Wingfield, Paul T.

    2014-01-01

    Purification of human IL-1β is used in this unit as an example of the preparation of soluble proteins from E. coli. Bacteria containing IL-1β are lysed, and IL-1 β in the resulting supernatant is purified by anion-exchange chromatography, salt precipitation and cation-exchange chromatography, and then concentrated. Finally, the IL-1 β protein is applied to a gel-filtration column to separate it from remaining higher- and lower-molecular-weight contaminants, the purified protein is stored frozen or is lyophilized. The purification protocol described is typical for a protein that is expressed in fairly high abundance (i.e., >5% total protein) and accumulates in a soluble state. Also, the purification procedure serves as an example of how use classical protein purifications methods which may also be used in conjunction with the affinity-based methods now more commonly used. PMID:25367009

  12. Fluorogenic assays for immediate confirmation of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Feng, P C; Hartman, P A

    1982-01-01

    Rapid assays for Escherichia coli were developed by using the compound 4-methylumbelliferone glucuronide (MUG), which is hydrolyzed by glucuronidase to yield a fluorogenic product. The production of glucuronidase was limited to strains of E. coli and some Salmonella and Shigella strains in the family Enterobacteriaceae. For immediate confirmation of the presence of E. coli in most-probable-number tubes, MUG was incorporated into lauryl tryptose broth at a final concentration of 100 micrograms/ml. Results of both the presumptive test (gas production) and the confirmed test (fluorescence) for E. coli were obtained from a variety of food, water, and milk samples after incubation for only 24 h at 35 degrees C. Approximately 90% of the tubes showing both gas production and fluorescence contained fecal coliforms (they were positive in EC broth incubated at 45 degrees C). Few false-positive reactions were observed. The lauryl tryptose broth-MUG-most-probable-number assay was superior to violet red bile agar for the detection of heat- and chlorine-injured E. coli cells. Anaerogenic strains produced positive reactions, and small numbers of E. coli could be detected in the presence of large numbers of competing bacteria. The fluorogenic assay was sensitive and rapid; the presence of one viable cell was detected within 20 h. E. coli colonies could be distinguished from other coliforms on membrane filters and plates of violet red bile agar if MUG was incorporated into the culture media. A rapid confirmatory test for E. coli that is amenable to automation was developed by using microtitration plates filled with a nonselective medium containing MUG. Pure or mixed cultures containing E. coli produced fluorescence within 4 h (most strains) to 24 h (a few weakly positive strains). Images PMID:7049088

  13. Prevalence of Escherichia coli in apple cider manufactured in Connecticut.

    PubMed

    Dingman, D W

    1999-06-01

    Cider samples obtained from 11 cider mills operating in Connecticut during the 1997 to 1998 production season were tested for the presence of Escherichia coli. Cider production began in mid August and continued through March, with peak production in September and October. Of 314 cider samples tested, 11 (4%) were found to contain E. coli. Of the 11 mills, 6 (55%) tested positive for E. coli in the cider at least once during the production year. E. coli was first observed in cider samples produced in mid to late October and was not detected in samples made after January. A trend was observed for cider to decrease in acidity and increase in Brix (soluble sugars) throughout the production season. No correlation between pH and soluble sugars of cider and the presence of E. coli was detected. Eight mills used both dropped apples and tree-picked apples, whereas three mills used tree-picked apples only. The use of dropped apples in cider production began 5 weeks before the first detection of E. coli in cider. E. coli was isolated from cider samples produced using dropped apples and from samples produced using only tree-picked apples. No direct correlation between the use of dropped apples or tree-picked apples and the presence of E. coli in the cider was observed. An association between the time of apple harvest and the appearance of E. coli in cider was noted. For mills providing adequate records, all contaminated cider was produced from apples harvested between mid October and mid November.

  14. Thymineless Death in Escherichia coli: Inactivation and Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, Donald J.; Kusy, Alvin R.

    1969-01-01

    The effects of chloramphenicol (CAP) on the progress of thymineless death (TLD), nalidixic acid (NA) inactivation, ultraviolet (UV) irradiation, and mitomycin C (MC) inactivation were studied in Escherichia coli B, Bs−1, Bs−3, Bs−12, and B/r. This was done before, during, and after inactivation. During the progress of inactivation, it was found that at 10 to 20 μg of CAP per ml, up to 50% of the UV-sensitive bacteria survived TLD and about 10% survived NA. In E. coli B/r, at these concentrations of CAP, about 10 to 15% of the cells survived TLD and about 20 to 25% survived NA. Concentrations of CAP greater than 25 μg/ml actually increased the sensitivity of E. coli B, Bs−1, Bs−3, and Bs−12 to inactivation by either TLD or NA; at 150 μg of CAP per ml, the sensitivity of E. coli B/r to inactivation also increased. When E. coli B cells were incubated in CAP prior to inactivation, the longer the preincubation the longer onset of TLD was delayed; NA inactivation was also affected in that the rate of inactivation after CAP incubation was greatly decreased. Preincubation of E. coli B/r with CAP had much less effect on the progress of inactivation. After thymineless death, incubation in CAP plus thymine led to a rapid and almost complete recovery of E. coli B and Bs−12. Lesser recoveries were observed after inactivation due to UV, NA, or MC inactivation. E. coli Bs−1 and B/r did not recover viability after any mode of inactivation, and E. coli Bs−3 and Bs−12 recovered from UV to about 20% of the initial titer. It was suggested that protein synthesis, in particular proteins involved in deoxyribonucleic synthesis, was a determining factor in these inactivating and recovery events. PMID:4897115

  15. Cloning and properties of the Salmonella typhimurium tricarboxylate transport operon in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Widenhorn, K.A.; Boos, W.; Somers, J.M.; Kay, W.W.

    1988-02-01

    The tricarboxylate transport operon (tctI) was cloned in Escherichia coli as a 12-kilobase (kb) fragment from an EcoRI library of the Salmonella typhimurium chromosome in lambdagtWES. It was further subcloned as a 12-kb fragment into pACYC184 and as an 8-kb fragment into pBR322. By insertional mutagenesis mediated by lambdaTn5, restriction mapping, and phenotypic testing, the tctI operon was localized to a 4.5-kb region. The tctC gene which encodes a periplasmic binding protein (C-protein) was located near the center of the insert. E. coli/tctI clones on either multicopy or single-copy vectors grew on the same tricarboxylates as S. typhimurium, although unusually long growth lags were observed. E. coli/tctI clones exhibited similar (/sup 14/C) fluorocitrate transport kinetics to those of S. typhimurium, whereas E. coli alone was virtually impermeable to (/sup 14/C) fluorocitrate. The periplasmic C proteins (C1 and C2 isoelectric forms) were produced in prodigious quantities from the cloned strains. Motile E. coli/tctI clones were not chemotactic toward citrate, whereas tctI deletion mutants of S. typhimurium were. Taken together, these observations indicate that tctI is not an operon involved in chemotaxis.

  16. Use of optical mapping to sort uropathogenic Escherichia coli strains into distinct subgroups

    PubMed Central

    Schwan, William R.; Briska, Adam; Stahl, Buffy; Wagner, Trevor K.; Zentz, Emily; Henkhaus, John; Lovrich, Steven D.; Agger, William A.; Callister, Steven M.; DuChateau, Brian; Dykes, Colin W.

    2010-01-01

    Optical maps were generated for 33 uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) isolates. For individual genomes, the NcoI restriction fragments aligned into a unique chromosome map for each individual isolate, which was then compared with the in silico restriction maps of all of the sequenced E. coli and Shigella strains. All of the UPEC isolates clustered separately from the Shigella strains as well as the laboratory and enterohaemorrhagic E. coli strains. Moreover, the individual strains appeared to cluster into distinct subgroups based on the dendrogram analyses. Phylogenetic grouping of these 33 strains showed that 32/33 were the B2 subgroup and 1/33 was subgroup A. To further characterize the similarities and differences among the 33 isolates, pathogenicity island (PAI), haemolysin and virulence gene comparisons were performed. A strong correlation was observed between individual subgroups and virulence factor genes as well as haemolysis activity. Furthermore, there was considerable conservation of sequenced-strain PAIs in the specific subgroups. Strains with different antibiotic-resistance patterns also appeared to sort into separate subgroups. Thus, the optical maps distinguished the UPEC strains from other E. coli strains and further subdivided the strains into distinct subgroups. This optical mapping procedure holds promise as an alternative way to subgroup all E. coli strains, including those involved in infections outside of the intestinal tract and epidemic strains with distinct patterns of antibiotic resistance. PMID:20378655

  17. Interaction of Escherichia coli and Soil Particles in Runoff

    PubMed Central

    Muirhead, Richard William; Collins, Robert Peter; Bremer, Philip James

    2006-01-01

    A laboratory-scale model system was developed to investigate the transport mechanisms involved in the horizontal movement of bacteria in overland flow across saturated soils. A suspension of Escherichia coli and bromide tracer was added to the model system, and the bromide concentration and number of attached and unattached E. coli cells in the overland flow were measured over time. Analysis of the breakthrough curves indicated that the E. coli and bromide were transported together, presumably by the same mechanism. This implied that the E. coli was transported by advection with the flowing water. Overland-flow transport of E. coli could be significantly reduced if the cells were preattached to large soil particles (>45 μm). However, when unattached cells were inoculated into the system, the E. coli appeared to attach predominantly to small particles (<2 μm) and hence remained unattenuated during transport. These results imply that in runoff generated by saturation-excess conditions, bacteria are rapidly transported across the surface and have little opportunity to interact with the soil matrix. PMID:16672484

  18. Measuring Escherichia coli Gene Expression during Human Urinary Tract Infections

    PubMed Central

    Mobley, Harry L. T.

    2016-01-01

    Extraintestinal Escherichia coli (E. coli) evolved by acquisition of pathogenicity islands, phage, plasmids, and DNA segments by horizontal gene transfer. Strains are heterogeneous but virulent uropathogenic isolates more often have specific fimbriae, toxins, and iron receptors than commensal strains. One may ask whether it is the virulence factors alone that are required to establish infection. While these virulence factors clearly contribute strongly to pathogenesis, bacteria must survive by metabolizing nutrients available to them. By constructing mutants in all major metabolic pathways and co-challenging mice transurethrally with each mutant and the wild type strain, we identified which major metabolic pathways are required to infect the urinary tract. We must also ask what else is E. coli doing in vivo? To answer this question, we examined the transcriptome of E. coli CFT073 in the murine model of urinary tract infection (UTI) as well as for E. coli strains collected and analyzed directly from the urine of patients attending either a urology clinic or a university health clinic for symptoms of UTI. Using microarrays and RNA-seq, we measured in vivo gene expression for these uropathogenic E. coli strains, identifying genes upregulated during murine and human UTI. Our findings allow us to propose a new definition of bacterial virulence. PMID:26784237

  19. Regulation of arabinose and xylose metabolism in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Desai, Tasha A; Rao, Christopher V

    2010-03-01

    Bacteria such as Escherichia coli will often consume one sugar at a time when fed multiple sugars, in a process known as carbon catabolite repression. The classic example involves glucose and lactose, where E. coli will first consume glucose, and only when it has consumed all of the glucose will it begin to consume lactose. In addition to that of lactose, glucose also represses the consumption of many other sugars, including arabinose and xylose. In this work, we characterized a second hierarchy in E. coli, that between arabinose and xylose. We show that, when grown in a mixture of the two pentoses, E. coli will consume arabinose before it consumes xylose. Consistent with a mechanism involving catabolite repression, the expression of the xylose metabolic genes is repressed in the presence of arabinose. We found that this repression is AraC dependent and involves a mechanism where arabinose-bound AraC binds to the xylose promoters and represses gene expression. Collectively, these results demonstrate that sugar utilization in E. coli involves multiple layers of regulation, where cells will consume first glucose, then arabinose, and finally xylose. These results may be pertinent in the metabolic engineering of E. coli strains capable of producing chemical and biofuels from mixtures of hexose and pentose sugars derived from plant biomass.

  20. Escherichia coli sequence type 131: epidemiology and challenges in treatment.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Zubair A; Doi, Yohei

    2014-05-01

    Escherichia coli ST131 has emerged as a global epidemic, multidrug-resistant clone of E. coli causing extra-intestinal infections. It is now highly prevalent among fluoroquinolone-resistant and CTX-M ESBL-producing E. coli isolates worldwide. Humans are likely the primary reservoir of ST131. Factors associated with its acquisition include residence in long-term care facilities and recent receipt of antimicrobial agents. E. coli ST131 causes a wide array of infections ranging from cystitis to life-threatening sepsis. Fluoroquinolones and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole are no longer adequate options for empiric therapy when E. coli ST131 is suspected from risk factors and local epidemiology. Expanded-spectrum cephalosporins, piperacillin-tazobactam and carbapenems are options to treat serious non-ESBL-producing E. coli ST131 infections, while carbapenems are indicated for ESBL-producing infections. There is a growing interest in reevaluating oral agents including fosfomycin and pivmecillinam for less serious infections such as uncomplicated cystitis.

  1. Characterization of Shiga toxigenic Escherichia coli isolated from foods.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Aida Juliana; Bossio, Carolina Paba; Durango, Adriana Coral; Vanegas, Maria Consuelo

    2007-12-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize Shiga toxigenic Escherichia coli (STEC) by PCR using strains isolated from ham, beef, and cattle in Colombia. A total of 189 E. coli strains were tested for the presence of the uidA, stx1, and stx2 genes, and identification was confirmed by the automated PCR BAX system for E. coli O157:H7. Genes encoding Shiga-like toxins (stx) were found in eight (6.06%) of 132 strains previously isolated from minced beef; four (50%) of these strains yielded amplification products for both toxin genes (stx1 and stx2), and four (50%) yielded products only for the stx2 toxin. None of the strains analyzed were positive by PCR for the presence of the single base-pair mutation in the uidA gene from E. coli O157:H7; these results were confirmed by the BAX system analysis. A multiplex PCR assay was standardized for the three genes. Results from this study confirmed previous data about the low prevalence of E. coli O157:H7 and Shiga-like toxins in Colombia and is the first known report of the prevalence of non-O157 enterohemorrhagic E. coli in this country.

  2. Molecular cloning of the Escherichia coli B L-fucose-D-arabinose gene cluster.

    PubMed Central

    Elsinghorst, E A; Mortlock, R P

    1994-01-01

    To metabolize the uncommon pentose D-arabinose, enteric bacteria often recruit the enzymes of the L-fucose pathway by a regulatory mutation. However, Escherichia coli B can grow on D-arabinose without the requirement of a mutation, using some of the L-fucose enzymes and a D-ribulokinase that is distinct from the L-fuculokinase of the L-fucose pathway. To study this naturally occurring D-arabinose pathway, we cloned and partially characterized the E. coli B L-fucose-D-arabinose gene cluster and compared it with the L-fucose gene cluster of E. coli K-12. The order of the fucA, -P, -I, and -K genes was the same in the two E. coli strains. However, the E. coli B gene cluster contained a 5.2-kb segment located between the fucA and fucP genes that was not present in E. coli K-12. This segment carried the darK gene, which encodes the D-ribulokinase needed for growth on D-arabinose by E. coli B. The darK gene was not homologous with any of the L-fucose genes or with chromosomal DNA from other D-arabinose-utilizing bacteria. D-Ribulokinase and L-fuculokinase were purified to apparent homogeneity and partially characterized. The molecular weights, substrate specificities, and kinetic parameters of these two enzymes were very dissimilar, which together with DNA hybridization analysis, suggested that these enzymes are not related. D-Arabinose metabolism by E. coli B appears to be the result of acquisitive evolution, but the source of the darK gene has not been determined. Images PMID:7961494

  3. [Escherichia coli, a pathogen under fire from the news].

    PubMed

    Cohen, R; Raymond, J; Gendrel, D; Bingen, E

    2012-11-01

    Escherichia coli is both a gastrointestinal tract commensal and a major pathogen. In recent years, E. coli is under fire from the news due to a better understanding of pathogenic factors, outbreaks of infections caused by enterohaemorrhagic strains, and last but not least, the worrying development of antibiotic resistance. Due to the absence of new compounds active against these strains, producing extended-spectrum ß-lactamases (ESBL) and frequently multiresistant to other antibiotics, their emergence will pose therapeutic problems for practitioners of all pediatric specialties. The gold standard treatment for severe infections due to ESBL-E. coli family is the penem class. The frequent use of penems promotes the emergence of strains resistant to carbapenems. Sparing carbapenems should be a clear objective for non life-threatening infections.

  4. Functions of the gene products of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Riley, M

    1993-01-01

    A list of currently identified gene products of Escherichia coli is given, together with a bibliography that provides pointers to the literature on each gene product. A scheme to categorize cellular functions is used to classify the gene products of E. coli so far identified. A count shows that the numbers of genes concerned with small-molecule metabolism are on the same order as the numbers concerned with macromolecule biosynthesis and degradation. One large category is the category of tRNAs and their synthetases. Another is the category of transport elements. The categories of cell structure and cellular processes other than metabolism are smaller. Other subjects discussed are the occurrence in the E. coli genome of redundant pairs and groups of genes of identical or closely similar function, as well as variation in the degree of density of genetic information in different parts of the genome. PMID:7508076

  5. Incidence of Escherichia coli in Black Walnut Meats

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Melvin T.; Vaughn, Reese H.

    1969-01-01

    Examination of commercially shelled black walnut meats showed inconsistent numbers of total aerobic bacteria, coliforms, and Escherichia coli; variation occurred among different meat sizes and within each meat size. The incidence of E. coli on meats of commercially hulled black walnuts depended on the physical condition of the nuts. Apparently tightly sealed ones contained only a few or none, whereas those with visibly separated sutures and spoiled meats yielded the most. This contamination was in part correlated to a hulling operation. Large numbers of E. coli on the husk of the walnuts contaminated the hulling water, subsequently also contaminating the meats by way of separated sutures. Chlorination of the hulling wash water was ineffective. Attempts were made to decontaminate the walnut meats without subsequent deleterious changes in flavor or texture. A treatment in coconut oil at 100 C followed by removal of excess surface oil by centrifugation was best. PMID:4905608

  6. Quantitative method for enumeration of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Calderon, R L; Levin, M A

    1981-01-01

    A rapid method was developed to quantify toxigenic Escherichia coli, using a membrane filter procedure. After filtration of samples, the membrane filter was first incubated on a medium selective for E. coli (24 h, 44 degrees C) and then transferred to tryptic soy agar (3%; 6 h, 37 degrees C). To assay for labile toxin-producing colonies, the filter was then transferred to a monolayer of Y-1 cells, the E. coli colonies were marked on the bottom of the petri dish, and the filter was removed after 15 min. The monolayer was observed for a positive rounding effect after a 15- to 24-h incubation. The method has an upper limit of detecting 30 toxigenic colonies per plate and can detect as few as one toxigenic colony per plate. A preliminary screening for these enterotoxigenic strains in polluted waters and known positive fecal samples was performed, and positive results were obtained with fecal samples only. PMID:7007415

  7. Mechanisms of the radioprotective effect of cysteamine in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Korystov, Yu.N.; Vexler, F.B.

    1988-06-01

    The values of the oxygen effect (m) and the maximal protective effect of cysteamine (DMF*) were estimated for four Escherichia coli strains: AB1157 (wild type), AB1886 (uvrA), AB2463 (recA), and p3478 (polA). A correlation made between DMF* and m as well as the kinetics of the increase of DMF with oxygen depletion showed that the protective effect of cysteamine is realized by three mechanisms: (i) anoxia achieved by oxygen reduction, with the DMF varying from 2.2 to 4.2 for different E. coli strains (this protection is the major contribution to the entire mechanism); (ii) lowering of the indirect radiation effect; i.e., for 50 mM cysteamine DMF does not exceed 1.1; and (iii) increase of the efficiency of enzymatic repair. The latter effect of cysteamine is registered only with the wild-type E. coli, the DMF being not less than 1.4.

  8. Chemotaxis towards autoinducer 2 mediates autoaggregation in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Laganenka, Leanid; Colin, Remy; Sourjik, Victor

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria communicate by producing and sensing extracellular signal molecules called autoinducers. Such intercellular signalling, known as quorum sensing, allows bacteria to coordinate and synchronize behavioural responses at high cell densities. Autoinducer 2 (AI-2) is the only known quorum-sensing molecule produced by Escherichia coli but its physiological role remains elusive, although it is known to regulate biofilm formation and virulence in other bacterial species. Here we show that chemotaxis towards self-produced AI-2 can mediate collective behaviour—autoaggregation—of E. coli. Autoaggregation requires motility and is strongly enhanced by chemotaxis to AI-2 at physiological cell densities. These effects are observed regardless whether cell–cell interactions under particular growth conditions are mediated by the major E. coli adhesin (antigen 43) or by curli fibres. Furthermore, AI-2-dependent autoaggregation enhances bacterial stress resistance and promotes biofilm formation. PMID:27687245

  9. Engineering Escherichia coli K12 MG1655 to use starch

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To attain a sustainable bioeconomy, fuel, or valuable product, production must use biomass as substrate. Starch is one of the most abundant biomass resources and is present as waste or as a food and agroindustry by-product. Unfortunately, Escherichia coli, one of the most widely used microorganisms in biotechnological processes, cannot use starch as a carbon source. Results We engineered an E. coli strain capable of using starch as a substrate. The genetic design employed the native capability of the bacterium to use maltodextrins as a carbon source plus expression and secretion of its endogenous α-amylase, AmyA, in an adapted background. Biomass production improved using 35% dissolved oxygen and pH 7.2 in a controlled bioreactor. Conclusion The engineered E. coli strain can use starch from the milieu and open the possibility of optimize the process to use agroindustrial wastes to produce biofuels and other valuable chemicals. PMID:24886307

  10. Ciprofloxacin-resistant, CTX-M-15-producing Escherichia coli ST131 clone in extraintestinal infections in Italy.

    PubMed

    Cerquetti, M; Giufrè, M; García-Fernández, A; Accogli, M; Fortini, D; Luzzi, I; Carattoli, A

    2010-10-01

    Quinolone and β-lactam resistance mechanisms and clonal relationships were characterized among Escherichia coli isolates resistant to ciprofloxacin and extended-spectrum cephalosporins associated with human extra-intestinal infections in Rome. The E. coli. ST131 clone was found to be prevalent. This clone invariably carried a specific pattern of substitutions in the topoisomerase genes and all isolates but one produced CTX-M-15. One ST131 isolate produced SHV-12. The new ST131 variant described here is of particular concern because it combines fluoroquinolone resistance and chromosomally encoded CTX-M-15.

  11. Expression of the cloned Escherichia coli O9 rfb gene in various mutant strains of Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed Central

    Sugiyama, T; Kido, N; Komatsu, T; Ohta, M; Kato, N

    1991-01-01

    To investigate the effect of chromosomal mutation on the synthesis of rfe-dependent Escherichia coli O9 lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the cloned E. coli O9 rfb gene was introduced into Salmonella typhimurium strains defective in various genes involved in the synthesis of LPS. When E. coli O9 rfb was introduced into S. typhimurium strains possessing defects in rfb or rfc, they synthesized E. coli O9 LPS on their cell surfaces. The rfe-defective mutant of S. typhimurium synthesized only very small amounts of E. coli O9 LPS after the introduction of E. coli O9 rfb. These results confirmed the widely accepted idea that the biosynthesis of E. coli O9-specific polysaccharide does not require rfc but requires rfe. By using an rfbT mutant of the E. coli O9 rfb gene, the mechanism of transfer of the synthesized E. coli O9-specific polysaccharide from antigen carrier lipid to the R-core of S. typhimurium was investigated. The rfbT mutant of the E. coli O9 rfb gene failed to direct the synthesis of E. coli O9 LPS in the rfc mutant strain of S. typhimurium, in which rfaL and rfbT functions are intact, but directed the synthesis of the precursor. Because the intact E. coli O9 rfb gene directed the synthesis of E. coli O9 LPS in the same strain, it was suggested that the rfaL product of S. typhimurium and rfbT product of E. coli O9 cooperate to synthesize E. coli O9 LPS in S. typhimurium. Images PMID:1987133

  12. Characterization of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and other Shiga toxin-producing E. coli serotypes isolated from sheep.

    PubMed Central

    Kudva, I T; Hatfield, P G; Hovde, C J

    1997-01-01

    The isolation and characterization of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) strains from sheep are described. One flock was investigated for E. coli O157:H7 over a 16-month period that spanned two summer and two autumn seasons. Variation in the occurrence of E. coli O157:H7-positive sheep was observed, with animals being culture positive only in the summer months but not in the spring, autumn, or winter. E. coli O157:H7 isolates were distinguished by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) of chromosomal DNA and toxin gene restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis. Ten PFGE patterns and five RFLP patterns, identified among the isolates, showed that multiple E. coli O157:H7 strains were isolated from one flock, that a single animal simultaneously shed multiple E. coli O157:H7 strains, and that the strains shed by individuals changed over time. E. coli O157:H7 was isolated only by selective enrichment culture off 10 g of ovine feces. In contrast, strains of eight STEC serotypes other than O157:H7 were cultured from feces of sheep from a separate flock without enrichment. The predominant non-O157 STEC serotype found was O91:NM (NM indicates nonmotile), and others included O128:NM, O88:NM, O6:H49, and O5:NM. Irrespective of serotype, 98% of the ovine STEC isolates possessed various combinations of the virulence-associated genes for Shiga toxin(s) and the attaching-and-effacing lesion (stx1, stx2, and eae), suggesting their potential for human pathogenicity. The most common toxin-eae genotype was positive for stx1, stx2, and eae. A Vero cell cytotoxicity assay demonstrated that 90% of the representative STEC isolates tested expressed the toxin gene. The report demonstrates that sheep transiently shed a variety of STEC strains, including E. coli O157:H7, that have potential as human pathogens. PMID:9157149

  13. Effect of tannins on the in viro growth of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and in vivo growth of generic Escherichia coli excreted from steers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of commercially available chestnut and mimosa tannins in vitro (experiment 1) or in vivo (experiment 2) on the growth or recovery of Escherichia coli O157:H7 or generic fecal E. coli was evaluated. In experiment 1, the mean growth rate of E. coli O157:H7, determined via the measurement o...

  14. Effective medicinal plants against enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7.

    PubMed

    Voravuthikunchai, Supayang; Lortheeranuwat, Amornrat; Jeeju, Wanpen; Sririrak, Trechada; Phongpaichit, Souwalak; Supawita, Thanomjit

    2004-09-01

    The stimulating effect of subinhibitory concentrations of antibiotics on the production of verocytotoxin (VT) by enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 has been claimed. The purpose of this study was to find an alternative, but bioactive medicine for the treatment of this organism. Fifty-eight preparations of aqueous and ethanolic extracts of 38 medicinal plant species commonly used in Thailand to cure gastrointestinal infections were tested for their antibacterial activity against different strains of Escherichia coli, including 6 strains of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Escherichia coli O26:H11, Escherichia coli O111:NM, Escherichia coli O22; 5 strains of Escherichia coli isolated from bovine; and Escherichia coli ATCC 25922. Inhibition of growth was primarily tested by the paper disc agar diffusion method. Among the medicinal plants tested, only 8 species (21.05%) exhibited antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli O157:H7. Acacia catechu, Holarrhena antidysenterica, Peltophorum pterocarpum, Psidium guajava, Punica granatum, Quercus infectoria, Uncaria gambir, and Walsura robusta demonstrated antibacterial activity with inhibition zones ranging from 7 to 17 mm. The greatest inhibition zone against Escherichia coli O157:H7 (RIMD 05091083) was produced from the ethanolic extract of Quercus infectoria. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC) were determined by the agar microdilution method and agar dilution method in petri dishes with millipore filter. Both aqueous and ethanolic extracts of Quercus infectoria and aqueous extract of Punica granatum were highly effective against Escherichia coli O157:H7 with the best MIC and MBC values of 0.09, 0.78, and 0.19, 0.39 mg/ml, respectively. These plant species may provide alternative but bioactive medicines for the treatment of Escherichia coli O157:H7 infection.

  15. Soil solarization reduces Escherichia coli O157:H7 and total Escherichia coli on cattle feedlot pen surfaces.

    PubMed

    Berry, Elaine D; Wells, James E

    2012-01-01

    Feedlot pen soil is a source for transmission of Escherichia coli O157:H7, and therefore a target for preharvest strategies to reduce this pathogen in cattle. The objective of this study was to determine the ability of soil solarization to reduce E. coli O157:H7 in feedlot surface material (FSM). A feedlot pen was identified in which naturally occurring E. coli O157:H7 was prevalent and evenly distributed in the FSM. Forty plots 3 by 3 m were randomly assigned such that five plots of each of the solarization times of 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, and 10 weeks were examined. Temperature loggers were placed 7.5 cm below the surface of each plot, and plots to be solarized were covered with clear 6-mil polyethylene. At each sampling time, five FSM samples were collected from each of five solarized and five unsolarized plots. E. coli concentrations and E. coli O157:H7 presence by immunomagnetic separation and plating were determined for each FSM sample. Initial percentages of E. coli O157:H7-positive samples in control and solarized FSM were 84 and 80%, respectively, and did not differ (P > 0.05). E. coli O157:H7 was no longer detectable by 8 weeks of solarization, but was still detected in unsolarized FSM at 10 weeks. The average initial concentration of E. coli in FSM was 5.56 log CFU/g and did not differ between treatments (P > 0.05). There was a 2.0-log decrease of E. coli after 1 week of solarization, and a >3.0-log reduction of E. coli by week 6 of solarization (P, 0.05). E. coli levels remained unchanged in unsolarized FSM (P > 0.05). Daily peak FSM temperatures were on average 8.7°C higher for solarized FSM compared with unsolarized FSM, and reached temperatures as high as 57°C. Because soil solarization reduces E. coli O157:H7, this technique may be useful for reduction of persistence and transmission of this pathogen in cattle production, in addition to remediation of E. coli O157:H7-contaminated soil used to grow food crops.

  16. Cross-Reactive Protection against Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli Infection by Enteropathogenic E. coli in a Mouse Model ▿

    PubMed Central

    Calderon Toledo, Carla; Arvidsson, Ida; Karpman, Diana

    2011-01-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) and enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) are related attaching and effacing (A/E) pathogens. The genes responsible for the A/E pathology are carried on a chromosomal pathogenicity island termed the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE). Both pathogens share a high degree of homology in the LEE and additional O islands. EHEC prevalence is much lower in areas where EPEC is endemic. This may be due to the development of antibodies against common EPEC and EHEC antigens. This study investigated the hypothesis that EPEC infections may protect against EHEC infections. We used a mouse model to inoculate BALB/c mice intragastrically, first with EPEC and then with EHEC (E. coli O157:H7). Four control groups received either a nonpathogenic E. coli (NPEC) strain followed by EHEC (NPEC/EHEC), phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) followed by EHEC (PBS/EHEC), EPEC/PBS, or PBS/PBS. Mice were monitored for weight loss and symptoms. EPEC colonized the intestine after challenge, and mice developed serum antibodies to intimin and E. coli secreted protein B (encoded in the LEE). Prechallenge with an EPEC strain had a protective effect after EHEC infection, as only a few mice developed mild symptoms, from which they recovered. These mice had an increase in body weight similar to that in control animals, and tissue morphology exhibited mild intestinal changes and normal renal histology. All mice that were not prechallenged with the EPEC strain developed mild to severe symptoms after EHEC infection, with weight loss as well as intestinal and renal histopathological changes. These data suggest that EPEC may protect against EHEC infection in this mouse model. PMID:21402761

  17. 77 FR 26725 - Changes to FSIS Traceback, Recall Procedures for Escherichia coli O157:H7 Positive Raw Beef...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-07

    ... Food Safety and Inspection Service Changes to FSIS Traceback, Recall Procedures for Escherichia coli... find raw ground beef presumptive positive for Escherichia coli (E. coli) O157:H7. This methodology will... Escherichia coli O157:H7'' and requested comments on these documents. FSIS also held a public meeting...

  18. Antibiotic Resistance in Urinary Isolates of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Abduzaimovic, Amila; Aljicevic, Mufida; Rebic, Velma; Vranic, Sabina Mahmutovic; Abduzaimovic, Kadrija; Sestic, Sabina

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to examine the presence of antimicrobial resistance / susceptibility strains of Escherichia coli in inpatients and outpatients. Materials and methods: It is a retrospective study carried out at the Department of Microbiology, Parasitology and Virology Faculty of Medicine, University of Sarajevo. In cooperation with the Microbiological laboratory of the Cantonal Hospital Zenica and the Microbiological laboratory of the General Hospital Tesanj, 3863 urine samples were processed in the period from March 1st to March 31st 2016. Results: Our study showed that E. coli had the highest antimicrobial resistance to trimethoprim / sulfamethoxazole (38.61%), followed by amoxicillin / clavulanic acid (19.62%), ciprofloxacin (9.49%), gentamicin (8.86%), cephalexin (8.23%), nitrofurantoin (8.23%), cefuroxime (7.52%), ceftazidime (6.33%), cefuroxime (89.87%), amikacin (4.43%). Conclusions: The isolated strains of E. coli showed the highest resistance to trimethoprim / sulfamethoxazole and amoxicillin / clavulanic acid. The isolated strains of E. coli showed the greatest susceptibility to amikacin and ceftazidime. Gender distribution of positive E. coli isolates showed statistically significant differences in favor of females. PMID:28144190

  19. Antibiotic Resistance of Escherichia coli Serotypes from Cochin Estuary

    PubMed Central

    Sukumaran, Divya P.; Durairaj, Srinivasan; Abdulla, Mohamed Hatha

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed at detecting the prevalence of antibiotic-resistant serotypes of Escherichia coli in Cochin estuary, India. E. coli strains were isolated during the period January 2010–December 2011 from five different stations set at Cochin estuary. Water samples from five different stations in Cochin estuary were collected on a monthly basis for a period of two years. Isolates were serotyped, antibiogram-phenotyped for twelve antimicrobial agents, and genotyped by polymerase chain reaction for uid gene that codes for β-D-glucuronidase. These E. coli strains from Cochin estuary were tested against twelve antibiotics to determine the prevalence of multiple antibiotic resistance among them. The results revealed that more than 53.33% of the isolates were multiple antibiotic resistant. Thirteen isolates showed resistance to sulphonamides and two of them contained the sul 1 gene. Class 1 integrons were detected in two E. coli strains which were resistant to more than seven antibiotics. In the present study, O serotyping, antibiotic sensitivity, and polymerase chain reaction were employed with the purpose of establishing the present distribution of multiple antibiotic-resistant serotypes, associated with E. coli isolated from different parts of Cochin estuary. PMID:23008708

  20. Escherichia coli ST131, an Intriguing Clonal Group

    PubMed Central

    Bertrand, Xavier; Madec, Jean-Yves

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY In 2008, a previously unknown Escherichia coli clonal group, sequence type 131 (ST131), was identified on three continents. Today, ST131 is the predominant E. coli lineage among extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) isolates worldwide. Retrospective studies have suggested that it may originally have risen to prominence as early as 2003. Unlike other classical group B2 ExPEC isolates, ST131 isolates are commonly reported to produce extended-spectrum β-lactamases, such as CTX-M-15, and almost all are resistant to fluoroquinolones. Moreover, ST131 E. coli isolates are considered to be truly pathogenic, due to the spectrum of infections they cause in both community and hospital settings and the large number of virulence-associated genes they contain. ST131 isolates therefore seem to contradict the widely held view that high levels of antimicrobial resistance are necessarily associated with a fitness cost leading to a decrease in pathogenesis. Six years after the first description of E. coli ST131, this review outlines the principal traits of ST131 clonal group isolates, based on the growing body of published data, and highlights what is currently known and what we need to find out to provide public health authorities with better information to help combat ST131. PMID:24982321

  1. Recent Advances in Understanding Enteric Pathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Croxen, Matthew A.; Law, Robyn J.; Scholz, Roland; Keeney, Kristie M.; Wlodarska, Marta

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Although Escherichia coli can be an innocuous resident of the gastrointestinal tract, it also has the pathogenic capacity to cause significant diarrheal and extraintestinal diseases. Pathogenic variants of E. coli (pathovars or pathotypes) cause much morbidity and mortality worldwide. Consequently, pathogenic E. coli is widely studied in humans, animals, food, and the environment. While there are many common features that these pathotypes employ to colonize the intestinal mucosa and cause disease, the course, onset, and complications vary significantly. Outbreaks are common in developed and developing countries, and they sometimes have fatal consequences. Many of these pathotypes are a major public health concern as they have low infectious doses and are transmitted through ubiquitous mediums, including food and water. The seriousness of pathogenic E. coli is exemplified by dedicated national and international surveillance programs that monitor and track outbreaks; unfortunately, this surveillance is often lacking in developing countries. While not all pathotypes carry the same public health profile, they all carry an enormous potential to cause disease and continue to present challenges to human health. This comprehensive review highlights recent advances in our understanding of the intestinal pathotypes of E. coli. PMID:24092857

  2. The Escherichia coli Proteome: Past, Present, and Future Prospects†

    PubMed Central

    Han, Mee-Jung; Lee, Sang Yup

    2006-01-01

    Proteomics has emerged as an indispensable methodology for large-scale protein analysis in functional genomics. The Escherichia coli proteome has been extensively studied and is well defined in terms of biochemical, biological, and biotechnological data. Even before the entire E. coli proteome was fully elucidated, the largest available data set had been integrated to decipher regulatory circuits and metabolic pathways, providing valuable insights into global cellular physiology and the development of metabolic and cellular engineering strategies. With the recent advent of advanced proteomic technologies, the E. coli proteome has been used for the validation of new technologies and methodologies such as sample prefractionation, protein enrichment, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, protein detection, mass spectrometry (MS), combinatorial assays with n-dimensional chromatographies and MS, and image analysis software. These important technologies will not only provide a great amount of additional information on the E. coli proteome but also synergistically contribute to other proteomic studies. Here, we review the past development and current status of E. coli proteome research in terms of its biological, biotechnological, and methodological significance and suggest future prospects. PMID:16760308

  3. Fumarate-Mediated Persistence of Escherichia coli against Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jun-Seob; Cho, Da-Hyeong; Heo, Paul; Jung, Suk-Chae; Park, Myungseo; Oh, Eun-Joong; Sung, Jaeyun; Kim, Pan-Jun; Lee, Suk-Chan; Lee, Dae-Hee; Lee, Sarah; Lee, Choong Hwan; Shin, Dongwoo

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial persisters are a small fraction of quiescent cells that survive in the presence of lethal concentrations of antibiotics. They can regrow to give rise to a new population that has the same vulnerability to the antibiotics as did the parental population. Although formation of bacterial persisters in the presence of various antibiotics has been documented, the molecular mechanisms by which these persisters tolerate the antibiotics are still controversial. We found that amplification of the fumarate reductase operon (FRD) in Escherichia coli led to a higher frequency of persister formation. The persister frequency of E. coli was increased when the cells contained elevated levels of intracellular fumarate. Genetic perturbations of the electron transport chain (ETC), a metabolite supplementation assay, and even the toxin-antitoxin-related hipA7 mutation indicated that surplus fumarate markedly elevated the E. coli persister frequency. An E. coli strain lacking succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), thereby showing a lower intracellular fumarate concentration, was killed ∼1,000-fold more effectively than the wild-type strain in the stationary phase. It appears that SDH and FRD represent a paired system that gives rise to and maintains E. coli persisters by producing and utilizing fumarate, respectively. PMID:26810657

  4. Escherichia coli β-Lactamases: What Really Matters

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, Priyanka; Singh, Nambram S.; Virdi, Jugsharan S.

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli strains belonging to diverse pathotypes have increasingly been recognized as a major public health concern. The β-lactam antibiotics have been used successfully to treat infections caused by pathogenic E. coli. However, currently, the utility of β-lactams is being challenged severely by a large number of hydrolytic enzymes – the β-lactamases expressed by bacteria. The menace is further compounded by the highly flexible genome of E. coli, and propensity of resistance dissemination through horizontal gene transfer and clonal spread. Successful management of infections caused by such resistant strains requires an understanding of the diversity of β-lactamases, their unambiguous detection, and molecular mechanisms underlying their expression and spread with regard to the most relevant information about individual bacterial species. Thus, this review comprises first such effort in this direction for E. coli, a bacterial species known to be associated with production of diverse classes of β-lactamases. The review also highlights the role of commensal E. coli as a potential but under-estimated reservoir of β-lactamases-encoding genes. PMID:27065978

  5. Effects of Escherichia coli hemolysin on endothelial cell function.

    PubMed Central

    Suttorp, N; Flöer, B; Schnittler, H; Seeger, W; Bhakdi, S

    1990-01-01

    Escherichia coli hemolysin is considered an important virulence factor in extraintestinal E. coli infections. The present study demonstrates that cultured pulmonary artery endothelial cells are susceptible to attack by low concentrations of E. coli hemolysin (greater than or equal to 0.05 hemolytic units/ml; greater than or equal to 5 ng/ml). Sublytic amounts of hemolysin increased the permeability of endothelial cell monolayers in a time- and dose-dependent manner. The hydraulic conductivity increased approximately 30-fold and the reflection coefficient for large molecules dropped from 0.71 to less than 0.05, indicating a toxin-induced loss of endothelial barrier function. The alterations of endothelial monolayer permeability were accompanied by cell retraction and interendothelial gap formation. In addition, E. coli hemolysin stimulated prostacyclin synthesis in endothelial cells. This effect was strictly dependent on the presence of extracellular Ca2+ but not of Mg2+. An enhanced passive influx of 45Ca2+ and 3H-sucrose but not of tritiated inulin and dextran was noted in toxin-treated cells, indicating that small transmembrane pores comparable to those detected in rabbit erythrocytes had been generated in endothelial cell membranes. These pores may act as nonphysiologic Ca2+ gates, thereby initiating different Ca2+-dependent cellular processes. We conclude that endothelial cells are highly susceptible to E. coli hemolysin and that two major endothelial cell functions are altered by very low concentrations of hemolysin. Images PMID:2121650

  6. The Genetic Basis of Escherichia coli Pathoadaptation to Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Miskinyte, Migla; Sousa, Ana; Ramiro, Ricardo S.; de Sousa, Jorge A. Moura; Kotlinowski, Jerzy; Caramalho, Iris; Magalhães, Sara; Soares, Miguel P.; Gordo, Isabel

    2013-01-01

    Antagonistic interactions are likely important driving forces of the evolutionary process underlying bacterial genome complexity and diversity. We hypothesized that the ability of evolved bacteria to escape specific components of host innate immunity, such as phagocytosis and killing by macrophages (MΦ), is a critical trait relevant in the acquisition of bacterial virulence. Here, we used a combination of experimental evolution, phenotypic characterization, genome sequencing and mathematical modeling to address how fast, and through how many adaptive steps, a commensal Escherichia coli (E. coli) acquire this virulence trait. We show that when maintained in vitro under the selective pressure of host MΦ commensal E. coli can evolve, in less than 500 generations, virulent clones that escape phagocytosis and MΦ killing in vitro, while increasing their pathogenicity in vivo, as assessed in mice. This pathoadaptive process is driven by a mechanism involving the insertion of a single transposable element into the promoter region of the E. coli yrfF gene. Moreover, transposition of the IS186 element into the promoter of Lon gene, encoding an ATP-dependent serine protease, is likely to accelerate this pathoadaptive process. Competition between clones carrying distinct beneficial mutations dominates the dynamics of the pathoadaptive process, as suggested from a mathematical model, which reproduces the observed experimental dynamics of E. coli evolution towards virulence. In conclusion, we reveal a molecular mechanism explaining how a specific component of host innate immunity can modulate microbial evolution towards pathogenicity. PMID:24348252

  7. Unusual "flesh-eating" strains of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Shaked, Hila; Samra, Zmira; Paul, Michal; Madar-Shapiro, Liora; Cohen, Jonathan; Pitlik, Silvio; Bishara, Jihad

    2012-12-01

    Monomicrobial necrotizing fasciitis (type II) is typically caused by group A streptococcus alone or in combination with Staphylococcus aureus. Escherichia coli has been isolated from polymicrobial or Fournier's gangrene but has rarely been reported in monomicrobial necrotizing fasciitis. We describe the clinical characteristics and outcomes of seven cases of monomicrobial E. coli necrotizing fasciitis and/or severe soft tissue infection diagnosed at a single institution during an 18-month period. Four isolates from three patients and two isolates from two patients with type I polymicrobial severe soft tissue infection (controls) were assayed by the randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis for fingerprinting and PCR amplification of primers in order to detect cytotoxic necrotizing factor 1 and 2 (cnf1 and cnf2) genes. All patients had some type of immune suppression. The limb was the most commonly involved organ. In all cases, E. coli was isolated as a monomicrobial pathogen from blood, fascia, or both. All patients died during hospitalization, three within the first 48 h. The RAPD amplification assay showed a high degree of genetic diversity among the "flesh-eating" strains and controls. The cnf1 toxin gene was identified in two out of three cases, but not in the controls. cnf2 was not detected in any of the patients. E. coli may be responsible for life-threatening necrotizing fasciitis. Further research is needed to reveal relevant risk factors, reservoirs, and modes of transmission of cnf1 E. coli.

  8. Escherichia coli exports cyclic AMP via TolC.

    PubMed

    Hantke, Klaus; Winkler, Karin; Schultz, Joachim E

    2011-03-01

    In Escherichia coli more than 180 genes are regulated by the cyclic AMP (cAMP)-cAMP receptor protein (CRP) complex. However, more than 90% of cAMP that is made by intracellular adenylyl cyclases is found in the culture medium. How is cAMP exported from E. coli? In a tolC mutant, 0.03 mM IPTG (isopropyl-β-d-thiogalactopyranoside) was sufficient to induce β-galactosidase compared to 0.1 mM IPTG in the parent strain. In a cya mutant unable to produce cAMP about 1 mM extracellular cAMP was required to induce β-galactosidase, whereas in a cya tolC mutant 0.1 mM cAMP was sufficient. When cAMP in E. coli cya was generated intracellularly by a recombinant, weakly active adenylyl cyclase from Corynebacterium glutamicum, the critical level of cAMP necessary for induction of maltose degradation was only achieved in a tolC mutant and not in the parent strain. Deletion of a putative cAMP phosphodiesterase of E. coli, CpdA, resulted in a slightly similar, yet more diffuse phenotype. The data demonstrate that export of cAMP via TolC is a most efficient way of E. coli to lower high concentrations of cAMP in the cell and maintain its sensitivity in changing metabolic environments.

  9. Selective detection of Escherichia coli DNA using fluorescent carbon spindles.

    PubMed

    Roy, Anurag; Chatterjee, Sabyasachi; Pramanik, Srikrishna; Devi, Parukuttyamma Sujatha; Suresh Kumar, Gopinatha

    2016-04-28

    We investigate the interaction of hydrophilic blue emitting carbon spindles with various deoxyribonucleic acids (DNA) having different base pair compositions, such as Herring testes (HT), calf thymus (CT), Escherichia coli (EC) and Micrococcus lysodeikticus (ML) DNA, to understand the mode of interaction. Interestingly, the fluorescent carbon spindles selectively interacted with E. coli DNA resulting in enhanced fluorescence of the former. Interaction of the same carbon with other DNAs exhibited insignificant changes in fluorescence. In addition, in the presence of EC DNA, the D band in the Raman spectrum attributed to the defect state completely disappeared, resulting in enhanced crystallinity. Microscopy images confirmed the wrapping of DNA on the carbon spindles leading to the assembly of spindles in the form of flowers. Dissociation of double-stranded DNA occurred upon interaction with carbon spindles, resulting in selective E. coli DNA interaction. The carbon spindles also exhibited a similar fluorescence enhancement upon treating with E. coli bacteria. These results confirm the possibility of E. coli detection in water and other liquid foods using such fluorescent carbon.

  10. Salmonella typhimurium intercepts Escherichia coli signaling to enhance antibiotic tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Vega, Nicole M.; Allison, Kyle R.; Samuels, Amanda N.; Klempner, Mark S.; Collins, James J.

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial communication plays an important role in many population-based phenotypes and interspecies interactions, including those in host environments. These interspecies interactions may prove critical to some infectious diseases, and it follows that communication between pathogenic bacteria and commensal bacteria is a subject of growing interest. Recent studies have shown that Escherichia coli uses the signaling molecule indole to increase antibiotic tolerance throughout its population. Here, we show that the intestinal pathogen Salmonella typhimurium increases its antibiotic tolerance in response to indole, even though S. typhimurium does not natively produce indole. Increased antibiotic tolerance can be induced in S. typhimurium by both exogenous indole added to clonal S. typhimurium populations and indole produced by E. coli in mixed-microbial communities. Our data show that indole-induced tolerance in S. typhimurium is mediated primarily by the oxidative stress response and, to a lesser extent, by the phage shock response, which were previously shown to mediate indole-induced tolerance in E. coli. Further, we find that indole signaling by E. coli induces S. typhimurium antibiotic tolerance in a Caenorhabditis elegans model for gastrointestinal infection. These results suggest that the intestinal pathogen S. typhimurium can intercept indole signaling from the commensal bacterium E. coli to enhance its antibiotic tolerance in the host intestine. PMID:23946425

  11. Nonthermal atmospheric argon plasma jet effects on Escherichia coli biomacromolecules.

    PubMed

    Hosseinzadeh Colagar, Abasalt; Memariani, Hamed; Sohbatzadeh, Farshad; Valinataj Omran, Azadeh

    2013-12-01

    Nonthermal atmospheric plasma jet, a promising technology based on ionized gas at low temperatures, can be applied for disinfection of contaminated surfaces. In this study, Escherichia coli cells and their macromolecules were exposed to the nonthermal atmospheric argon plasma jet for different time durations. Total protein, genomic DNA, and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels of E. coli were assessed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and silver staining; agarose gel electrophoresis; and measurement of absorbance at 534 nm, respectively. After exposure, the spectroscopic results of liquid samples indicated that the survival reduction of E. coli can reach to 100 % in an exposure time of 600 s. Moreover, inactivation zones of E. coli, DNA degradation, and MDA levels were significantly increased. Additionally, banding patterns of total protein were changed and amino acid concentrations increased following ninhydrin test. The experimental results suggest that the nonthermal plasma could serve as an effective instrument for both sterilizing E. coli and degrading macromolecules from the surface of the objects being sterilized.

  12. Paper-based ELISA to rapidly detect Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Shih, Cheng-Min; Chang, Chia-Ling; Hsu, Min-Yen; Lin, Jyun-Yu; Kuan, Chen-Meng; Wang, Hsi-Kai; Huang, Chun-Te; Chung, Mu-Chi; Huang, Kui-Chou; Hsu, Cheng-En; Wang, Chun-Yuan; Shen, Ying-Cheng; Cheng, Chao-Min

    2015-12-01

    Escherichia coli is a generic indicator of fecal contamination, and certain serotypes cause food- and water-borne illness such as O157:H7. In the clinic, detection of bacteriuria, which is often due to E. coli, is critical before certain surgical procedures or in cases of nosocomial infection to prevent further adverse events such as postoperative infection or sepsis. In low- and middle-income countries, where insufficient equipment and facilities preclude modern methods of detection, a simple, low-cost diagnostic device to detect E. coli in water and in the clinic will have significant impact. We have developed a simple paper-based colorimetric platform to detect E. coli contamination in 5h. On this platform, the mean color intensity for samples with 10(5)cells/mL is 0.118±0.002 (n=4), and 0.0145±0.003 (P<0.01⁎⁎) for uncontaminated samples. This technique is less time-consuming, easier to perform, and less expensive than conventional methods. Thus, paper-based ELISA is an innovative point-of-care diagnostic tool to rapidly detect E. coli, and possibly other pathogens when customized as appropriate, especially in areas that lack advanced clinical equipment.

  13. Pulsed-Plasma Disinfection of Water Containing Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satoh, Kohki; MacGregor, Scott J.; Anderson, John G.; Woolsey, Gerry A.; Fouracre, R. Anthony

    2007-03-01

    The disinfection of water containing the microorganism, Escherichia coli (E. coli) by exposure to a pulsed-discharge plasma generated above the water using a multineedle electrode (plasma-exposure treatment), and by sparging the off-gas of the pulsed plasma into the water (off-gas-sparging treatment), is performed in the ambient gases of air, oxygen, and nitrogen. For the off-gas-sparging treatment, bactericidal action is observed only when oxygen is used as the ambient gas, and ozone is found to generate the bactericidal action. For the plasma-exposure treatment, the density of E. coli bacteria decreases exponentially with plasma-exposure time for all the ambient gases. It may be concluded that the main contributors to E. coli inactivation are particle species produced by the pulsed plasma. For the ambient gases of air and nitrogen, the influence of acidification of the water in the system, as a result of pulsed-plasma exposure, may also contribute to the decay of E. coli density.

  14. Susceptibility of Gnotobiotic Swine to Escherichia coli Isolated from Nonenteric Human Infections

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, R. C.; Rhoades, H. E.; Simon, J.

    1972-01-01

    Newborn, germfree piglets were susceptible to Escherichia coli associated with human, nonenteric infections and should provide a useful model in the study of generalized E. coli infections. PMID:4557565

  15. Fate of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 in bovine feces.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, G; Zhao, T; Doyle, M P

    1996-01-01

    Dairy cattle have been identified as a principal reservoir of Escherichia coli O157:H7. The fate of this pathogen in bovine feces at 5, 22, and 37 degrees C was determined. Two levels of inocula (10(3) and 10(5) CFU/g) of a mixture of five nalidixic acid-resistant E. coli O157:H7 strains were used. E. coli O157:H7 survived at 37 degrees C for 42 and 49 days with low and high inocula, respectively, and at 22 degrees C for 49 and 56 days with low and high inocula, respectively. Fecal samples at both temperatures had low moisture contents (about 10%) and water activities ( < 0.5) near the end of the study. E. coli O157:H7 at 5 degrees C survived for 63 to 70 days, with the moisture content (74%) of feces remaining high through the study. Chromosomal DNA fingerprinting of E. coli O157:H7 isolates surviving near the completion of the study revealed that the human isolate strain 932 was the only surviving strain at 22 or 37 degrees C. All five strains were isolated near the end of incubation from feces held at 5 degrees C. Isolates at each temperature were still capable of producing both verotoxin 1 and verotoxin 2. Results indicate that E. coli O157:H7 can survive in feces for a long period of time and retain its ability to produce verotoxins. Hence, bovine feces are a potential vehicle for transmitting E. coli O157:H7 to cattle, food, and the environment. Appropriate handling of bovine feces is important to control the spread of this pathogen. PMID:8779595

  16. Diarrhea, bacteremia and multiorgan dysfunction due to an extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli strain with enteropathogenic E. coli genes.

    PubMed

    Kessler, Robert; Nisa, Shahista; Hazen, Tracy H; Horneman, Amy; Amoroso, Anthony; Rasko, David A; Donnenberg, Michael S

    2015-11-01

    A 55-year-old man with well-controlled HIV had severe diarrhea for 3 weeks and developed multiorgan dysfunction and bacteremia due to Escherichia coli. The genome of the patient's isolate had features characteristic of extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli and genes distantly related to those defining enteropathogenic E. coli.

  17. Role of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli virulence factors in uropathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Boll, Erik J; Struve, Carsten; Boisen, Nadia; Olesen, Bente; Stahlhut, Steen G; Krogfelt, Karen A

    2013-04-01

    A multiresistant clonal Escherichia coli O78:H10 strain qualifying molecularly as enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) was recently shown to be the cause of a community-acquired outbreak of urinary tract infection (UTI) in greater Copenhagen, Denmark, in 1991. This marks the first time EAEC has been associated with an extraintestinal disease outbreak. Importantly, the outbreak isolates were recovered from the urine of patients with symptomatic UTI, strongly implying urovirulence. Here, we sought to determine the uropathogenic properties of the Copenhagen outbreak strain and whether these properties are conferred by the EAEC-specific virulence factors. We demonstrated that through expression of aggregative adherence fimbriae, the principal adhesins of EAEC, the outbreak strain exhibited pronouncedly increased adherence to human bladder epithelial cells compared to prototype uropathogenic strains. Moreover, the strain was able to produce distinct biofilms on abiotic surfaces, including urethral catheters. These findings suggest that EAEC-specific virulence factors increase uropathogenicity and may have played a significant role in the ability of the strain to cause a community-acquired outbreak of UTI. Thus, inclusion of EAEC-specific virulence factors is warranted in future detection and characterization of uropathogenic E. coli.

  18. Enhanced integration of large DNA into E. coli chromosome by CRISPR/Cas9.

    PubMed

    Chung, Mu-En; Yeh, I-Hsin; Sung, Li-Yu; Wu, Meng-Ying; Chao, Yun-Peng; Ng, I-Son; Hu, Yu-Chen

    2017-01-01

    Metabolic engineering often necessitates chromosomal integration of multiple genes but integration of large genes into Escherichia coli remains difficult. CRISPR/Cas9 is an RNA-guided system which enables site-specific induction of double strand break (DSB) and programmable genome editing. Here, we hypothesized that CRISPR/Cas9-triggered DSB could enhance homologous recombination and augment integration of large DNA into E. coli chromosome. We demonstrated that CRISPR/Cas9 system was able to trigger DSB in >98% of cells, leading to subsequent cell death, and identified that mutagenic SOS response played roles in the cell survival. By optimizing experimental conditions and combining the λ-Red proteins and linear dsDNA, CRISPR/Cas9-induced DSB enabled homologous recombination of the donor DNA and replacement of lacZ gene in the MG1655 strain at efficiencies up to 99%, and allowed high fidelity, scarless integration of 2.4, 3.9, 5.4, and 7.0 kb DNA at efficiencies approaching 91%, 92%, 71%, and 61%, respectively. The CRISPR/Cas9-assisted gene integration also functioned in different E. coli strains including BL21 (DE3) and W albeit at different efficiencies. Taken together, our methodology facilitated precise integration of dsDNA as large as 7 kb into E. coli with efficiencies exceeding 60%, thus significantly ameliorating the editing efficiency and overcoming the size limit of integration using the commonly adopted recombineering approach. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 172-183. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Genotyping and virulence factors assessment of bovine mastitis Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Blum, Shlomo E; Leitner, Gabriel

    2013-05-03

    Escherichia coli is a major agent of bovine mastitis worldwide. However, specific E. coli virulence factors associated to pathogenicity during intra-mammary infections are yet unknown and this pathotype remains uncharacterized. The objectives of the present work were to assess the presence of a wide range of known virulence factors in a large set of E. coli strains isolated from bovine mastitis (mastitis set) and to study the genotypic distribution of strains in the mastitis set in comparison to a set of strains isolated from cows' environment in dairy farms (environmental set). Virulence factors were assessed by DNA hybridization microarray. The three most prevalent virulence factors found in the mastitis set were lpfA (long polar fimbriae), iss (increased serum resistance) and astA (enteroaggregative E. coli heat-stable enterotoxin 1). None, however, characterized the majority of these strains. Genotyping was assessed by ECOR phylogenetic grouping, multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Strains in the mastitis and environmental sets were differentially distributed into ECOR phylogenetic groups; groups A and B1 being the most prevalent ones. Multiple MLST strain types were found in the two sets of strains, but only a few were common to both, and diversity was higher in the environmental set. A variety of PFGE patterns were found in the mastitis and environmental sets. Two clusters comprising mostly highly similar mastitis strains were identified. The results confirm that mastitis E. coli strains mostly lack known E. coli virulence factors. In addition, it is shown that the genotypic diversity of mastitis strains does not reflect the diversity found in the environmental E. coli population.

  20. Distribution of core oligosaccharide types in lipopolysaccharides from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Amor, K; Heinrichs, D E; Frirdich, E; Ziebell, K; Johnson, R P; Whitfield, C

    2000-03-01

    In the lipopolysaccharides of Escherichia coli there are five distinct core oligosaccharide (core OS) structures, designated K-12 and R1 to R4. The objective of this work was to determine the prevalences of these core OS types within the species. Unique sequences in the waa (core OS biosynthesis) gene operon were used to develop a PCR-based system that facilitated unequivocal determination of the core OS types in isolates of E. coli. This system was applied to the 72 isolates in the E. coli ECOR collection, a compilation of isolates that is considered to be broadly representative of the genetic diversity of the species. Fifty (69. 4%) of the ECOR isolates contained the R1 core OS, 8 (11.1%) were representatives of R2, 8 (11.1%) were R3, 2 (2.8%) were R4, and only 4 (5.6%) were K-12. R1 is the only core OS type found in all four major phylogenetic groups (A, B1, B2, and D) in the ECOR collection. Virulent extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli isolates tend to be closely related to group B2 and, to a lesser extent, group D isolates. All of the ECOR representatives from the B2 and D groups had the R1 core OS. In contrast, commensal E. coli isolates are more closely related to group A, which contains isolates representing each of the five core OS structures. R3 was the only core OS type found in 38 verotoxigenic E. coli (VTEC) isolates from humans and cattle belonging to the common enterohemorrhagic E. coli serogroups O157, O111, and O26. Although isolates from other VTEC serogroups showed more core OS diversity, the R3 type (83.1% of all VTEC isolates) was still predominant. When non-VTEC commensal isolates from cattle were analyzed, it was found that most possessed the R1 core OS type.

  1. Reduction of verotoxigenic Escherichia coli in production of fermented sausages.

    PubMed

    Holck, Askild L; Axelsson, Lars; Rode, Tone Mari; Høy, Martin; Måge, Ingrid; Alvseike, Ole; L'abée-Lund, Trine M; Omer, Mohamed K; Granum, Per Einar; Heir, Even

    2011-11-01

    After a number of foodborne outbreaks of verotoxigenic Escherichia coli involving fermented sausages, some countries have imposed regulations on sausage production. For example, the US Food Safety and Inspection Service requires a 5 log(10) reduction of E. coli in fermented products. Such regulations have led to a number of studies on the inactivation of E. coli in fermented sausages by changing processing and post-processing conditions. Several factors influence the survival of E. coli such as pre-treatment of the meat, amount of NaCl, nitrite and lactic acid, water activity, pH, choice of starter cultures and addition of antimicrobial compounds. Also process variables like fermentation temperature and storage time play important roles. Though a large variety of different production processes of sausages exist, generally the reduction of E. coli caused by production is in the range 1-2 log(10). In many cases this may not be enough to ensure microbial food safety. By optimising ingredients and process parameters it is possible to increase E. coli reduction to some extent, but in some cases still other post process treatments may be required. Such treatments may be storage at ambient temperatures, specific heat treatments, high pressure processing or irradiation. HACCP analyses have identified the quality of the raw materials, low temperature in the batter when preparing the sausages and a rapid pH drop during fermentation as critical control points in sausage production. This review summarises the literature on the reduction verotoxigenic E. coli in production of fermented sausages.

  2. Persistence of Escherichia coli in batch and continuous vermicomposting systems.

    PubMed

    Hénault-Ethier, Louise; Martin, Vincent J J; Gélinas, Yves

    2016-10-01

    Vermicomposting is a biooxidation process in which epigeicearthworms act in synergy with microbial populations to degrade organic matter. Vermicomposting does not go through a thermophilic stage as required by North American legislations for pathogen eradication. We examined the survival of a Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) labeled Escherichia coli MG1655 as a model for the survival of pathogenic bacteria in both small-scale batch and medium-scale continuously-operated systems to discern the influence of the earthworm Eisenia fetida, nutrient content and the indigenous vermicompost microbial community on pathogen abundance. In batch systems, the microbial community had the greatest influence on the rapid decline of E. coli populations, and the effect of earthworms was only visible in microbially-impoverishedvermicomposts. No significant earthworm density-dependent relationship was observed on E. coli survival under continuous operation. E. coli numbers decreased below the US EPA compost sanitation guidelines of 10(3)Colony Forming Units (CFU)/g (dry weight) within 18-21days for both the small-scale batch and medium-scale continuous systems, but it took up to 51days without earthworms and with an impoverished microbial community to reach the legal limit. Nutrient replenishment (i.e. organic carbon) provided by continuous feed input did not appear to extend E. coli survival. In fact, longer survival of E. coli was noticed in treatments where less total and labile sugars were available, suggesting that sugars may support potentially antagonist bacteria in the vermicompost. Total N, pH and humidity did not appear to affect E. coli survival. Several opportunistic human pathogens may be found in vermicompost, and their populations are likely kept in check by antagonists.

  3. Transcription of the Escherichia coli fliC gene is regulated by metal ions

    SciTech Connect

    Guzzo, A.; Diorio, C.; DuBow, M.S. )

    1991-08-01

    luxAB gene fusions in the Escherichia coli genome were used to screen for clones displaying transcriptional changes in the presence of aluminum. One clone was found that contained a luciferase gene fusion in which transcription was increased in the presence of aluminum and which was subsequently shown to be induced by copper, iron, and nickel. Cloning of the metal-regulated gene, hybridization to the ordered phage {lambda} bank of the E. coli chromosome, and sequencing of DNA adjacent to the luxAB fusion revealed that the insertion occurred within the fliC (hag) gene of E. coli. This gene encodes flagellin the filament subunit of the bacterial motility organ, and is under the control of several regulatory cascades. These results suggest that environmental metals may play a role in the regulation of the motility potential of E. coli and that this bioluminescent gene fusion clone (or derivatives thereof) may be used to prepare a biosensor for the rapid detection of metal contamination in water samples.

  4. Diarrhea, Urosepsis and Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome Caused by the Same Heteropathogenic Escherichia coli Strain.

    PubMed

    Ang, C Wim; Bouts, Antonia H M; Rossen, John W A; Van der Kuip, Martijn; Van Heerde, Marc; Bökenkamp, Arend

    2016-09-01

    We describe an 8-month-old girl with diarrhea, urosepsis and hemolytic uremic syndrome caused by Escherichia coli. Typing of cultured E. coli strains from urine and blood revealed the presence of virulence factors from multiple pathotypes of E. coli. This case exemplifies the genome plasticity of E. coli and the resulting heteropathogenic strains.

  5. Genome Sequence of the Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli Bacteriophage UFV-AREG1.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Maryoris E Soto; Batalha, Laís Silva; Vidigal, Pedro Marcus Pereira; Albino, Luiz Augusto A; Boggione, Delaine Meireles Gouveia; Gontijo, Marco Tulio Pardini; Bazzolli, Denise M Soares; Mendonca, Regina C Santos

    2016-10-13

    Here, we present the genome sequence of the Escherichia coli bacteriophage UFV-AREG1. This phage was isolated from cowshed wastewater and showed specificity for enterohemorrhagic E. coli O157:H7 (ATCC 43895), E. coli 0111 (CDC O11ab) and E. coli (ATCC 23229).

  6. Genome Sequence of the Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli Bacteriophage UFV-AREG1

    PubMed Central

    Batalha, Laís Silva; Albino, Luiz Augusto A.; Boggione, Delaine Meireles Gouveia; Gontijo, Marco Tulio Pardini; Bazzolli, Denise M. Soares; Mendonca, Regina C. Santos

    2016-01-01

    Here, we present the genome sequence of the Escherichia coli bacteriophage UFV-AREG1. This phage was isolated from cowshed wastewater and showed specificity for enterohemorrhagic E. coli O157:H7 (ATCC 43895), E. coli 0111 (CDC O11ab) and E. coli (ATCC 23229). PMID:27738021

  7. Multiplex PCR for Diagnosis of Enteric Infections Associated with Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Vidal, Roberto; Vidal, Maricel; Lagos, Rossana; Levine, Myron; Prado, Valeria

    2004-01-01

    A multiplex PCR for detection of three categories of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli was developed. With this method, enterohemorrhagic E. coli, enteropathogenic E. coli, and enterotoxigenic E. coli were identified in fecal samples from patients with hemorrhagic colitis, watery diarrhea, or hemolytic-uremic syndrome and from food-borne outbreaks. PMID:15071051

  8. Persistent colonization of sheep by Escherichia coli O157:H7 and other E. coli pathotypes.

    PubMed

    Cornick, N A; Booher, S L; Casey, T A; Moon, H W

    2000-11-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) is an important cause of food-borne illness in humans. Ruminants appear to be more frequently colonized by STEC than are other animals, but the reason(s) for this is unknown. We compared the frequency, magnitude, duration, and transmissibility of colonization of sheep by E. coli O157:H7 to that by other pathotypes of E. coli. Young adult sheep were simultaneously inoculated with a cocktail consisting of two strains of E. coli O157:H7, two strains of enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC), and one strain of enteropathogenic E. coli. Both STEC strains and ETEC 2041 were given at either 10(7) or 10(10) CFU/strain/animal. The other strains were given only at 10(10) CFU/strain. We found no consistent differences among pathotypes in the frequency, magnitude, and transmissibility of colonization. However, the STEC strains tended to persist to 2 weeks and 2 months postinoculation more frequently than did the other pathotypes. The tendency for persistence of the STEC strains was apparent following an inoculation dose of either 10(7) or 10(10) CFU. One of the ETEC strains also persisted when inoculated at 10(10) CFU. However, in contrast to the STEC strains, it did not persist when inoculated at 10(7) CFU. These results support the hypothesis that STEC is better adapted to persist in the alimentary tracts of sheep than are other pathotypes of E. coli.

  9. Effect of bile on growth, peritoneal absorption, and blood clearance of Escherichia coli in E coli peritonitis

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson, R.; Schalen, C.; Tranberg, K.G. )

    1991-06-01

    The effect of intraperitoneal bile on growth, peritoneal absorption, and clearance of Escherichia coli was determined in E coli peritonitis in the rat. In E coli peritonitis, intraperitoneal bacterial counts gradually decreased, whereas they increased (after 2 hours) with subsequent development of bacteremia in E coli plus bile peritonitis. After an intraperitoneal injection of labeled bacteria, blood radioactivity was only initially lower in E coli plus bile peritonitis compared with E coli peritonitis. Clearance from blood was lower in E coli plus bile peritonitis than in E coli peritonitis. Organ localization was similar in E coli peritonitis and E coli plus bile peritonitis with decreased splenic, increased pulmonary, and unchanged hepatic uptakes compared with controls. Impaired peritoneal absorption of bacteria, together with impaired local host defense, is likely to enhance the noxious effect of bile in E coli peritonitis.

  10. Genome-Wide Transcriptional Regulation and Chromosome Structural Arrangement by GalR in E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Zhong; Trostel, Andrei; Lewis, Dale E. A.; Lee, Sang Jun; He, Ximiao; Stringer, Anne M.; Wade, Joseph T.; Schneider, Thomas D.; Durfee, Tim; Adhya, Sankar

    2016-01-01

    The regulatory protein, GalR, is known for controlling transcription of genes related to D-galactose metabolism in Escherichia coli. Here, using a combination of experimental and bioinformatic approaches, we identify novel GalR binding sites upstream of several genes whose function is not directly related to D-galactose metabolism. Moreover, we do not observe regulation of these genes by GalR under standard growth conditions. Thus, our data indicate a broader regulatory role for GalR, and suggest that regulation by GalR is modulated by other factors. Surprisingly, we detect regulation of 158 transcripts by GalR, with few regulated genes being associated with a nearby GalR binding site. Based on our earlier observation of long-range interactions between distally bound GalR dimers, we propose that GalR indirectly regulates the transcription of many genes by inducing large-scale restructuring of the chromosome. PMID:27900321

  11. Structure of the Escherichia coli S10 ribosomal protein operon.

    PubMed Central

    Zurawski, G; Zurawski, S M

    1985-01-01

    The complete structure of the Escherichia coli S10 ribosomal protein operon is presented. Based on the DNA sequence, the deduced order of the 11 genes in the operon is rpsJ, rplC, rplD, rplW, rplB, rpsS, rplV, rpsC, rplP, rpmC, rpsQ. The estimated transcribed length of the operon is 5181 base pairs. Putative sequences involved in ribosome binding are discussed. The DNA sequence data corrects several errors in previously determined protein sequence data. PMID:3892488

  12. Genome-scale genetic engineering in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jaehwan; Cho, Namjin; Jung, Daehee; Bang, Duhee

    2013-11-01

    Genome engineering has been developed to create useful strains for biological studies and industrial uses. However, a continuous challenge remained in the field: technical limitations in high-throughput screening and precise manipulation of strains. Today, technical improvements have made genome engineering more rapid and efficient. This review introduces recent advances in genome engineering technologies applied to Escherichia coli as well as multiplex automated genome engineering (MAGE), a recent technique proposed as a powerful toolkit due to its straightforward process, rapid experimental procedures, and highly efficient properties.

  13. Antitermination of transcription from an Escherichia coli ribosomal RNA promoter.

    PubMed

    Holben, W E; Morgan, E A

    1984-11-01

    The Escherichia coli lac and ara promoters and rrnC ribosomal RNA promoter-leader region were fused to lacZYA. Transcription termination signals were introduced into the lac genes of these fusions by Tn9 and IS1 insertions. Measurement of lac enzymes from upstream and downstream of the insertions showed that termination signals resulting from these insertions are very efficient when transcription begins at lac or ara promoters but are very inefficient when transcription begins at the rrnC promoter-leader region. The rrnC promoter-leader region must, therefore, modify RNA polymerase to enable it to read through transcription termination signals.

  14. Regulation of the L-arabinose operon of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Schleif, R

    2000-12-01

    Over forty years of research on the L-arabinose operon of Escherichia coli have provided insights into the mechanism of positive regulation of gene activity. This research also discovered DNA looping and the mechanism by which the regulatory protein changes its DNA-binding properties in response to the presence of arabinose. As is frequently seen in focused research on biological subjects, the initial studies were primarily genetic. Subsequently, the genetic approaches were augmented by physiological and then biochemical studies. Now biophysical studies are being conducted at the atomic level, but genetics still has a crucial role in the study of this system.

  15. Studies on the Chick-lethal Toxin of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Truscott, R. B.

    1973-01-01

    A toxin which is lethal for two week old chicks has been recovered from strains of Escherichia coli O78:K80 of bovine and avian origin and from avian isolates of serogroups O2, O45 and O109. The toxin is heat-labile, antigenic, high in protein, inactivated by pronase, trypsin, amylase, and pancreatic lipase. The toxin may be precipitated by ammonium sulfate or TCA treatment from the supernatant obtained by repeated centrifugation of sonicated cells. Considerable purification has been obtained by column chromatography using Sepharose 6B. PMID:4270809

  16. Compilation and analysis of Escherichia coli promoter DNA sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Hawley, D K; McClure, W R

    1983-01-01

    The DNA sequence of 168 promoter regions (-50 to +10) for Escherichia coli RNA polymerase were compiled. The complete listing was divided into two groups depending upon whether or not the promoter had been defined by genetic (promoter mutations) or biochemical (5' end determination) criteria. A consensus promoter sequence based on homologies among 112 well-defined promoters was determined that was in substantial agreement with previous compilations. In addition, we have tabulated 98 promoter mutations. Nearly all of the altered base pairs in the mutants conform to the following general rule: down-mutations decrease homology and up-mutations increase homology to the consensus sequence. PMID:6344016

  17. [Hemolytic uremic syndrome caused by enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli].

    PubMed

    Ibarra, Cristina; Goldstein, Jorge; Silberstein, Claudia; Zotta, Elsa; Belardo, Marcela; Repetto, Horacio A

    2008-10-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is characterized by microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, plaquetopenia and kidney damage. It is the leading cause of acute renal failure in pediatric age and the second for chronic renal failure. Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) is the first etiologic agent of HUS being its main reservoir cattle and transmitted via contaminated food. At present, there is no specific treatment to reduce the progression of HUS. The study of the mechanisms by which STEC infects and Shiga toxin induces HUS can help to find new strategies to prevent this disease.

  18. Microcin 25, a novel antimicrobial peptide produced by Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Salomón, R A; Farías, R N

    1992-01-01

    Microcin 25, a peptide antibiotic excreted by an Escherichia coli strain isolated from human feces, was purified to homogeneity and characterized. Composition analysis and data from gel filtration indicated that microcin 25 may contain 20 amino acid residues. It has a blocked amino-terminal end. Microcin synthesis and immunity are plasmid determined, and the antibiotic was produced in minimal medium when the cultures entered the stationary phase of growth. The peptide appears to interfere with cell division, since susceptible cells filamented when exposed to it. This response does not seem to be mediated by the SOS system. Images PMID:1429464

  19. Interaction of the exr and lon Genes in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Donch, John; Green, Michael H. L.; Greenberg, Joseph

    1968-01-01

    Strains of Escherichia coli carrying the gene lon typically produced excess capsular polysaccharide, and were sensitive to ultraviolet light (UV) irradiation, thymine starvation, and nalidixic acid, forming long filaments after these treatments. Sensitivity was reduced by a number of posttreatments. In the presence of a second UV sensitivity gene, exr, some of these properties were suppressed: long filaments were not formed, the effect of lon on UV and nalidixic acid sensitivity was greatly reduced, and irradiation posttreatments gave an enhancement of survival characteristic of exr rather than lon strains. Production of capsular polysaccharide was not affected by the exr gene. PMID:4882020

  20. CRISPR adaptation in Escherichia coli subtypeI-E system.

    PubMed

    Kiro, Ruth; Goren, Moran G; Yosef, Ido; Qimron, Udi

    2013-12-01

    The CRISPRs (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) and their associated Cas (CRISPR-associated) proteins are a prokaryotic adaptive defence system against foreign nucleic acids. The CRISPR array comprises short repeats flanking short segments, called 'spacers', which are derived from foreign nucleic acids. The process of spacer insertion into the CRISPR array is termed 'adaptation'. Adaptation allows the system to rapidly evolve against emerging threats. In the present article, we review the most recent studies on the adaptation process, and focus primarily on the subtype I-E CRISPR-Cas system of Escherichia coli.

  1. Synthesis of calf prochymosin (prorennin) in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Emtage, J S; Angal, S; Doel, M T; Harris, T J; Jenkins, B; Lilley, G; Lowe, P A

    1983-01-01

    A gene for calf prochymosin (prorennin) has been reconstructed from chemically synthesized oligodeoxyribonucleotides and cloned DNA copies of preprochymosin mRNA. This gene has been inserted into a bacterial expression plasmid containing the Escherichia coli tryptophan promoter and a bacterial ribosome binding site. Induction of transcription from the tryptophan promoter results in prochymosin synthesis at a level of up to 5% of total protein. The enzyme has been purified from bacteria by extraction with urea and chromatography on DEAE-cellulose and converted to enzymatically active chymosin by acidification and neutralization. Bacterially produced chymosin is as effective in clotting milk as the natural enzyme isolated from calf stomach. Images PMID:6304731

  2. DNA probes for identification of enteroinvasive Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, T A; Toledo, M R; Trabulsi, L R; Wood, P K; Morris, J G

    1987-01-01

    Eighty-one Escherichia coli strains belonging to all known invasive O serogroups were tested with two distinct invasiveness probes (pMR17 and pSF55). All 54 Sereny test-positive strains and 5 strains that lost Sereny positivity during storage hybridized with both probes. Probe-positive strains carried a 120- to 140-megadalton plasmid, did not produce lysine decarboxylase, and, with the exception of certain serotypes, were nonmotile. Motile strains of serotype O144:H25 were for the first time characterized as invasive by hybridization with the probes. PMID:3312292

  3. Electric dipole moments of Escherichia coli HB 101.

    PubMed

    Stoylov, Stoyl P; Gyurova, Anna Y; Bunin, Viktor; Angersbach, Alexander; Georgieva, Ralitsa N; Danova, Svetla T

    2009-04-01

    The theoretical and experimental studies of the particles' electric dipole moments in the microscopic and submicroscopic size range show that in the case of polar and conductive media the interfacial components of the dipole moments are of greatest importance. While in the range of manometer's sizes there seems to be no important problems in the identification and in the estimation of the values of the dipole moments at present, in the micrometer range there are serious problems. In this communication these problems are considered and illustrated by electro-optic investigations of Escherichia coli HB 101.

  4. Infected abdominal aortic aneurysm due to Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Bouzas, Miguel; Tchana-Sato, Vincent; Lavigne, Jean Paul

    2016-10-19

    Early diagnosis of infected abdominal aortic aneurysm (IAAA) is still a medical challenge due to its diverse and non-specific symptoms and signs. The most common responsible pathogens are Salmonella, Staphylococcus, Campylobacter and Streptococcus species. The authors report the case of a 67-year-old man, admitted for high fever and finally diagnosed with Escherichia coli (E.coli)-related IAAA. The IAAA ruptured during the general anaesthesia induction, leading to an emergency surgery. The authors successfully proceeded to an open aneurysmectomy with extensive debridement and in situ graft replacement. This case emphasizes the potential for rapid IAAA expansion, its high-rupture risk and the importance of computed tomography as a diagnostic tool.

  5. Impact of cranberry on Escherichia coli cellular surface characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Brandy J.; Malanoski, Anthony P.; Ligler, Frances S.

    2008-12-19

    The anti-adhesive effects of cranberry have been attributed to both interactions of its components with the surface of bacterial cells and to inhibition of p-fimbriae expression. Previous reports also suggested that the presence of cranberry juice changed the Gram stain characteristics of Escherichia coli. Here, we show that the morphology of E. coli is changed when grown in the presence of juice or extract from Vaccinium macrocarpon (cranberry). Gene expression analysis indicates the down regulation of flagellar basal body rod and motor proteins. Consistent with this finding and previous reports, the SEM images indicate a decrease in the visible p-fimbriae. The iodine used in Gram-staining protocols was found to interact differently with the bacterial membrane when cells were cultured in spiked media. Slight alterations in the Gram stain protocol demonstrated that culturing in the presence of cranberry juice does not change the Gram stain characteristics contradicting other reports.

  6. Avian pathogenic Escherichia coli bind fibronectin and laminin.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, Rosa María; Almanza, Yolanda; González, Rafael; García, Santos; Heredia, Norma

    2009-04-01

    Avian colisepticemia frequently occurs after respiratory tract damage, the primary site for infection allows bacteria to encounter an exposed basement membrane, where laminin and fibronectin are important components. We investigated the ability of an isolate of avian pathogenic Escherichia coli to bind fibronectin and laminin. Using Far-western dot blot analysis, we demonstrated the ability of this microorganism to bind basement membrane proteins fibronectin and laminin. Results from an ELISA-based approach indicate that the binding to these membrane proteins was bacterial-dose dependent. Furthermore, two specific E. coli polypeptides, of 32 kDa and 130 kDa, reacted with laminin and fibronectin, respectively. Further evaluation of these potential bacterial adhesins may provide insights into the pathogenesis of colibacillosis.

  7. Allostery and cooperativity in Escherichia coli aspartate transcarbamoylase.

    PubMed

    Kantrowitz, Evan R

    2012-03-15

    The allosteric enzyme aspartate transcarbamoylase (ATCase) from Escherichia coli has been the subject of investigations for approximately 50 years. This enzyme controls the rate of pyrimidine nucleotide biosynthesis by feedback inhibition, and helps to balance the pyrimidine and purine pools by competitive allosteric activation by ATP. The catalytic and regulatory components of the dodecameric enzyme can be separated and studied independently. Many of the properties of the enzyme follow the Monod, Wyman Changeux model of allosteric control thus E. coli ATCase has become the textbook example. This review will highlight kinetic, biophysical, and structural studies which have provided a molecular level understanding of how the allosteric nature of this enzyme regulates pyrimidine nucleotide biosynthesis.

  8. Purification of recombinant ovalbumin from inclusion bodies of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, Vaibhav; Singh, Anupam; Panda, Amulya K

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant ovalbumin expressed in bacterial host is essentially free from post-translational modifications and can be useful in understanding the structure-function relationship of the protein. In this study, ovalbumin was expressed in Escherichia coli in the form of inclusion bodies. Ovalbumin inclusion bodies were solubilized using urea and refolded by decreasing the urea concentration by dilution. Refolded protein was purified by anion exchange chromatography. Overall recovery of purified recombinant ovalbumin from inclusion bodies was about 30% with 98% purity. Purified recombinant ovalbumin was characterized by mass spectrometry, circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy. Recombinant ovalbumin was shown to be resistant to trypsin using protease resistance assay. This indicated proper refolding of ovalbumin from inclusion bodies of E. coli. This method provides a simple way of producing ovalbumin free of post-translational modifications.

  9. SILVER NANOPARTICLES-DISK DIFFUSION TEST AGAINST Escherichia coli ISOLATES.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Francisco Afrânio; Maia, Kamila Rocha; Mallman, Eduardo José Jucá; Cunha, Maria da Conceição Dos Santos Oliveira; Maciel, Antonio Auberson Martins; Souza, Ieda Pereira de; Menezes, Everardo Albuquerque; Fechine, Pierre Basílio Almeida

    2016-09-22

    Nanotechnology can be a valuable ally in the treatment of infections. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are structures that have antimicrobial activity. The aim of this study was to produce AgNPs by green methods, characterize these structures, and assess their antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli associated with the antibiotic ciprofloxacin. AgNPs were characterized by spectroscopic and microscopic techniques. Antimicrobial activity was evaluated by the disk diffusion method against 10 strains of E. coli. The synthesized AgNPs showed a spherical shape and a size of 85.07 ± 12.86 nm (mean ± SD). AgNPs increased the activity of ciprofloxacin by 40% and may represent a new therapeutic option for the treatment of bacterial infections.

  10. Continuous-sterilization system that uses photosemiconductor powders. [Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Matsunaga, T.; Tomoda, R.; Nakajima, T.; Nakamura, N.; Komine, T.

    1988-06-01

    We report a novel photochemical sterilization system in which Escherichia coli cells were sterilized with photosemiconductor powders (titanium oxide). For sterilization that could be used in practice, it was necessary to separate the TiO/sub 2/ powders from the cell suspension. Therefore, semiconductor powders were immobilized on acetylcellulose membranes. We constructed a continuous-sterilization system consisting of TiO/sub 2/-immobilized acetylcellulose membrane reactor, a mercury lamp, and a masterflex pump. As a result, under the various sterilization conditions examined, E.coli (10/sup 2/ cells per ml) was sterilized to < 1% survival when the cell suspension flowed in this system at a mean residence time of 16.0 min under irradiation (1800 microeinsteins/m/sup 2/ per s). We found that this system was reusable.

  11. Detecting the Significant Flux Backbone of Escherichia coli metabolism.

    PubMed

    Güell, Oriol; Sagués, Francesc; Serrano, M Ángeles

    2017-04-09

    The heterogeneity of computationally predicted reaction fluxes in metabolic networks within a single flux state can be exploited to detect their significant flux backbone. Here, we disclose the backbone of Escherichia coli, and compare it with the backbones of other bacteria. We find that, in general, the core of the backbones is mainly composed of reactions in energy metabolism corresponding to ancient pathways. In E. coli, the synthesis of nucleotides and the metabolism of lipids form smaller cores which rely critically on energy metabolism. Moreover, the consideration of different media leads to the identification of pathways sensitive to environmental changes. The metabolic backbone of an organism is thus useful for tracing, simultaneously, both its evolution and adaptation fingerprints. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  12. The SIGNAL experiment in BIORACK: Escherichia coli in microgravity.

    PubMed

    Thévenet, D; D'Ari, R; Bouloc, P

    1996-06-27

    Microgravity affects certain physical properties of fluids, such as convection movement and surface tension. As a consequence, cells and living organisms may exhibit different behaviour in space, which may result from differences in the immediate environment of the cell or changes in the structure of the membrane in microgravity. Two experiments to examine the effects of microgravity on cell microenvironment and signal transduction through membranes were performed using a well-characterized system with different strains of the non-pathogenic Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli. Our results indicate that (i) microgravity appears to reduce the lag period of a non-motile culture of E. coli, and (ii) the ompC gene, regulated by the two-component system EnvZ-OmpR, is induced as well or better in microgravity than in ground controls.

  13. Mounting of Escherichia coli spheroplasts for AFM imaging.

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, Claretta J; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L; Allison, David P; Doktycz, Mitchel John

    2005-11-01

    The cytoplasmic membrane of Escherichia coli (E. coli) is the location of numerous, chemically specific transporters and recognition elements. Investigation of this membrane in vivo by atomic force microscopy (AFM) requires removal of the cell wall and stable immobilization of the spheroplast. AFM images demonstrate that spheroplasts can be secured with warm gelatin applied to the mica substrate just before the addition of a spheroplast suspension. The resulting preparation can be repeatedly imaged by AFM over the course of several hours. Confocal fluorescence imaging confirms the association of the spheroplasts with the gelatin layer. Gelatin molecules are known to reorder into a network after heating. Entrapment within this gelatin network is believed to be responsible for the immobilization of spheroplasts on mica.

  14. The action of beta-galactosidase (Escherichia coli) on allolactose.

    PubMed

    Huber, R E; Wallenfels, K; Kurz, G

    1975-09-01

    The parameters involved in the action of beta-galactosidase (EC 3.2.1.23) (Escherichia coli) on allolactose, the natural inducer of lac operon in E. coli, were studied. At low allolactose concentrations only galactose and glucose were formed, while at high allolactose concentrations transgalactolytic oligosaccharides were also produced. Detectable amounts of lactose were not formed. The V and Km values (49.6 U/mg and 0.00120 M, respectively) indicated that allolactose is as good if not a better substrate of beta-galactosidase as lactose. The pH optimum with allolactose (7.8-7.9) as well as its activation by K+ (as compared to activation by Na+) were similar to the case with lactose as substrate. The alpha-anomer of allolactose was hydrolyzed about two times as rapidly as was the beta-anomer.

  15. In Vivo study of naturally deformed Escherichia coli bacteria.

    PubMed

    Tavaddod, Sharareh; Naderi-Manesh, Hossein

    2016-06-01

    A combination of light-microscopy and image processing has been applied to study naturally deformed Escherichia coli under in vivo condition and at the order of sub-pixel high-resolution accuracy. To classify deflagellated non-dividing E. coli cells to the rod-shape and bent-shape, a geometrical approach has been applied. From the analysis of the geometrical data which were obtained of image processing, we estimated the required effective energy for shaping a rod-shape to a bent-shape with the same size. We evaluated the energy of deformation in the naturally deformed bacteria with minimum cell manipulation, under in vivo condition, and with minimum influence of any external force, torque and pressure. Finally, we have also elaborated on the possible scenario to explain how naturally deformed bacteria are formed from initial to final-stage.

  16. SILVER NANOPARTICLES-DISK DIFFUSION TEST AGAINST Escherichia coli ISOLATES

    PubMed Central

    CUNHA, Francisco Afrânio; MAIA, Kamila Rocha; MALLMAN, Eduardo José Jucá; CUNHA, Maria da Conceição dos Santos Oliveira; MACIEL, Antonio Auberson Martins; de SOUZA, Ieda Pereira; MENEZES, Everardo Albuquerque; FECHINE, Pierre Basílio Almeida

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Nanotechnology can be a valuable ally in the treatment of infections. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are structures that have antimicrobial activity. The aim of this study was to produce AgNPs by green methods, characterize these structures, and assess their antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli associated with the antibiotic ciprofloxacin. AgNPs were characterized by spectroscopic and microscopic techniques. Antimicrobial activity was evaluated by the disk diffusion method against 10 strains of E. coli. The synthesized AgNPs showed a spherical shape and a size of 85.07 ± 12.86 nm (mean ± SD). AgNPs increased the activity of ciprofloxacin by 40% and may represent a new therapeutic option for the treatment of bacterial infections. PMID:27680178

  17. Mutational analysis of UMP kinase from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Bucurenci, N; Serina, L; Zaharia, C; Landais, S; Danchin, A; Bârzu, O

    1998-02-01

    UMP kinase from Escherichia coli is one of the four regulatory enzymes involved in the de novo biosynthetic pathway of pyrimidine nucleotides. This homohexamer, with no counterpart in eukarya, might serve as a target for new antibacterial drugs. Although the bacterial enzyme does not show sequence similarity with any other known nucleoside monophosphate kinase, two segments between amino acids 35 to 78 and 145 to 194 exhibit 28% identity with phosphoglycerate kinase and 30% identity with aspartokinase, respectively. Based on these similarities, a number of residues of E. coli UMP kinase were selected for site-directed mutagenesis experiments. Biochemical, kinetic, and spectroscopic analysis of the modified proteins identified residues essential for catalysis (Asp146), binding of UMP (Asp174), and interaction with the allosteric effectors, GTP and UTP (Arg62 and Asp77).

  18. Identification, expression, and characterization of Escherichia coli guanine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Maynes, J T; Yuan, R G; Snyder, F F

    2000-08-01

    Using the human cDNA sequence corresponding to guanine deaminase, the Escherichia coli genome was scanned using the Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST), and a corresponding 439-residue open reading frame of unknown function was identified as having 36% identity to the human protein. The putative gene was amplified, subcloned into the pMAL-c2 vector, expressed, purified, and characterized enzymatically. The 50.2-kDa protein catalyzed the conversion of guanine to xanthine, having a K(m) of 15 microM with guanine and a k(cat) of 3.2 s(-1). The bacterial enzyme shares a nine-residue heavy metal binding site with human guanine deaminase, PG[FL]VDTHIH, and was found to contain approximately 1 mol of zinc per mol of subunit of protein. The E. coli guanine deaminase locus is 3' from an open reading frame which shows homology to a bacterial purine base permease.

  19. Identification, Expression, and Characterization of Escherichia coli Guanine Deaminase

    PubMed Central

    Maynes, Jason T.; Yuan, Richard G.; Snyder, Floyd F.

    2000-01-01

    Using the human cDNA sequence corresponding to guanine deaminase, the Escherichia coli genome was scanned using the Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST), and a corresponding 439-residue open reading frame of unknown function was identified as having 36% identity to the human protein. The putative gene was amplified, subcloned into the pMAL-c2 vector, expressed, purified, and characterized enzymatically. The 50.2-kDa protein catalyzed the conversion of guanine to xanthine, having a Km of 15 μM with guanine and a kcat of 3.2 s−1. The bacterial enzyme shares a nine-residue heavy metal binding site with human guanine deaminase, PG[FL]VDTHIH, and was found to contain approximately 1 mol of zinc per mol of subunit of protein. The E. coli guanine deaminase locus is 3′ from an open reading frame which shows homology to a bacterial purine base permease. PMID:10913105

  20. Effect of various nonionic surfactants on growth of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Rose, M J; Aron, S A; Janicki, B W

    1966-05-01

    Rose, Michael J., Jr. (Veterans Administration Hospital, Washington, D.C.), Stephen A. Aron, and Bernard W. Janicki. Effect of various nonionic surfactants on growth of Escherichia coli. J. Bacteriol. 91:1863-1868. 1966.-Escherichia coli cultivated in media containing 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, or 4.0% concentrations of surface-active polyoxyethylene derivatives of formaldehyde polymers of octyl phenol (Triton WR-1339; Macrocyclon) or of sorbitan mono-fatty acid esters (Tween 20, 40, 60, and 80) exhibited significantly retarded growth only at the highest concentration. To determine the mechanism of bacteriostasis, certain derivatives and compounds related to the surfactants were investigated. Experiments with compounds related to the Triton-type agents demonstrated that incorporation of monomeric substances (Triton X-205, X-305, Igepal CA-730, or Dowfax 9N20) into the medium at a concentration of 4.0% did not inhibit the growth of E. coli. It was concluded that the formaldehyde polymer was essential for growth inhibition by the polyoxyethylene derivatives of octyl phenol. The inhibitory activity of the Tween compounds, in contrast, appeared to result from the unesterified fatty acids which contaminate the commercial preparations. Polyol (60), the sorbitan polyoxyethylene derivative of Tween 60 and the basic structural unit of all the Tween-type compounds, and a Tween 80 preparation which was purified by extraction of the unesterified oleic acid, were not inhibitory. Moreover, the amount of free oleic acid present as a contaminant of Tween 80 was found to be sufficient to cause significant growth inhibition. These results and the observation that E. coli does not appear to hydrolyze the esterified fatty acid of Tween 80 led to the conclusion that growth inhibition obtained with various Tween compounds probaby is a function of their respective fatty acid contaminants.

  1. Adhesive Escherichia coli in inflammatory bowel disease and infective diarrhoea.

    PubMed Central

    Burke, D. A.; Axon, A. T.

    1988-01-01

    The clinical features of ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease are similar to those of infections of the bowel, although their cause is uncertain. Many bacteria that cause intestinal diseases adhere to the gut mucosa, and adhesion of pathogenic Escherichia coli is resistant to D-mannose. The adhesive properties of isolates of E coli were assessed by assay of adhesion to buccal epithelial cells with mannose added. The isolates were obtained from patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (50 with a relapse of ulcerative colitis, nine with ulcerative colitis in remission, 13 with Crohn's disease, and 11 with infectious diarrhoea not due to E coli) and 22 controls. The median index of adhesion to buccal epithelial cells (the proportion of cells with more than 50 adherent bacteria) for E coli from patients with ulcerative colitis in relapse was significantly higher (43%) than that for controls (5%) and patients with infectious diarrhoea (14%). The index was not significantly different among isolates from patients with ulcerative colitis in relapse, Crohn's disease (53%), and ulcerative colitis in remission (30%). If an index of adhesion of greater than 25% is taken as indicating an adhesive strain 86% of isolates of E coli from patients with inflammatory bowel disease were adhesive compared with 27% from patients with infective diarrhoea and none from controls. The adhesive properties of the isolates from patients with inflammatory bowel disease were similar to those of pathogenic intestinal E coli, raising the possibility that they may have a role in the pathogenesis of the condition; the smaller proportion of adhesive isolates in patients with infective diarrhoea due to other bacteria suggests that the organism may be of primary importance rather than arising secondarily. Images a PMID:3044496

  2. Pathogenic Escherichia coli in rural household container waters.

    PubMed

    Jagals, P; Barnard, T G; Mokoena, M M; Ashbolt, N; Roser, D J

    2013-01-01

    Plastic containers in the range of 5-20 L are widely used - especially in rural African settings - to collect, transport and store water for domestic use, including drinking, bathing and hygiene. The pathogen content of the waters in these containers has not been adequately characterized as yet. This paper presents the primary findings of a synoptic survey of drinking water quality samples from these containers and involved collection of bacterial indicator and pathogenicity gene data. In total, 571 samples of a variety of waters were taken in rural communities in South Africa and the Escherichia coli numbers measured. Of the E. coli positive samples, 46% (n = 148) were screened for the presence of E. coli pathogen gene markers. Though synoptic, the survey provided many insights into the issues that drove the study. Container use markedly degraded water quality as judged by indicator counts, even where improved water supply services were in place. Household container use also appeared to promote regrowth or contamination of containers with pathogenic E. coli strains. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis also showed that the diversity of potential pathogenic E. coli carrying virulence genes was great. All seven genes screened for (Ial, Stx1, Stx2, EaeA, Eagg, ST, LT) were found in the waters, alone or as mixtures (number of different combinations = 31) including those characteristic of the more dangerous invasive and haemorrhagic E. coli strains. Given the central role of containers in the management of water supply to rural communities, it is clear the microbiology of these waters requires much further characterization.

  3. Dynamic regulation of extracellular ATP in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Cora Lilia; Corradi, Gerardo; Lauri, Natalia; Marginedas-Freixa, Irene; Leal Denis, María Florencia; Enrique, Nicolás; Mate, Sabina María; Milesi, Verónica; Ostuni, Mariano Anibal; Herlax, Vanesa; Schwarzbaum, Pablo Julio

    2017-04-04

    We studied the kinetics of extracellular ATP (ATPe) in Escherichia coli and their outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) stimulated with amphipatic peptides melittin (MEL) and mastoparan 7 (MST7). Real-time luminometry was used to measure ATPe kinetics, ATP release, and ATPase activity. The latter was also determined by following [(32)P]Pi released from [γ-(32)P]ATP. E. coli was studied alone, co-incubated with Caco-2 cells, or in rat jejunum segments. In E. coli, the addition of [γ-(32)P]ATP led to the uptake and subsequent hydrolysis of ATPe. Exposure to peptides caused an acute 3-fold (MST7) and 7-fold (MEL) increase in [ATPe]. In OMVs, ATPase activity increased linearly with [ATPe] (0.1-1 µM). Exposure to MST7 and MEL enhanced ATP release by 3-7 fold, with similar kinetics to that of bacteria. In Caco-2 cells, the addition of ATP to the apical domain led to a steep [ATPe] increase to a maximum, with subsequent ATPase activity. The addition of bacterial suspensions led to a 6-7 fold increase in [ATPe], followed by an acute decrease. In perfused jejunum segments, exposure to E. coli increased luminal ATP 2 fold. ATPe regulation of E. coli depends on the balance between ATPase activity and ATP release. This balance can be altered by OMVs, which display their own capacity to regulate ATPe. E. coli can activate ATP release from Caco-2 cells and intestinal segments, a response which in vivo might lead to intestinal release of ATP from the gut lumen.

  4. Expression of a synthetic pertussis toxin operon in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Pozza, T D; Yan, H; Walker, M J

    1997-06-01

    Bordetella pertussis is the causative agent of whooping cough, a severe disease of infants characterised by repeated of paroxysmal coughing. Pertussis toxin (PT) is a major virulence factor of B. pertussis and is a typical A/B bacterial toxin consisting of five subunits S1-S5 in a ratio of 1:1:1:2:1. The PT subunit genes are organized into an operon which is not expressed in Escherichia coli, thus hampering the use of this organism for vaccine production. We have expressed the five PT subunits individually in E. coli by replacing the wild-type transcriptional and translational signals, and in the case of the S4 subunit the leader peptide has been exchanged with a modified E. coli beta-lactamase leader sequence. We have developed a stepwise cloning method to construct a synthetic PT operon which simultaneously expresses the five PT subunits in E. coli. Western blot analysis indicated that in E. coli KS476 containing the synthetic PT operon, S4 and S5 were completely processed, S1 was partially processed, whilst the majority of S2 and S3 remained unprocessed. Periplasmic extracts contained soluble S1 and S3; however, the processed form of S2, S4 and S5 were not detected, suggesting that these subunits may be membrane associated or in an insoluble form. This work should allow an investigation of the potential of E. coli to produce detoxified PT in a background free of other pertussis virulence factors that may contribute to the side-effects of some vaccine preparations currently in use.

  5. A structural view of the dissociation of Escherichia coli tryptophanase.

    PubMed

    Green, Keren; Qasim, Nasrin; Gdaelvsky, Garik; Kogan, Anna; Goldgur, Yehuda; Parola, Abraham H; Lotan, Ofra; Almog, Orna

    2015-12-01

    Tryptophanase (Trpase) is a pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent homotetrameric enzyme which catalyzes the degradation of L-tryptophan. Trpase is also known for its cold lability, which is a reversible loss of activity at low temperature (2°C) that is associated with the dissociation of the tetramer. Escherichia coli Trpase dissociates into dimers, while Proteus vulgaris Trpase dissociates into monomers. As such, this enzyme is an appropriate model to study the protein-protein interactions and quaternary structure of proteins. The aim of the present study was to understand the differences in the mode of dissociation between the E. coli and P. vulgaris Trpases. In particular, the effect of mutations along the molecular axes of homotetrameric Trpase on its dissociation was studied. To answer this question, two groups of mutants of the E. coli enzyme were created to resemble the amino-acid sequence of P. vulgaris Trpase. In one group, residues 15 and 59 that are located along the molecular axis R (also termed the noncatalytic axis) were mutated. The second group included a mutation at position 298, located along the molecular axis Q (also termed the catalytic axis). Replacing amino-acid residues along the R axis resulted in dissociation of the tetramers into monomers, similar to the P. vulgaris Trpase, while replacing amino-acid residues along the Q axis resulted in dissociation into dimers only. The crystal structure of the V59M mutant of E. coli Trpase was also determined in its apo form and was found to be similar to that of the wild type. This study suggests that in E. coli Trpase hydrophobic interactions along the R axis hold the two monomers together more strongly, preventing the dissociation of the dimers into monomers. Mutation of position 298 along the Q axis to a charged residue resulted in tetramers that are less susceptible to dissociation. Thus, the results indicate that dissociation of E. coli Trpase into dimers occurs along the molecular Q axis.

  6. Genomic analysis of extra-intestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli urosepsis.

    PubMed

    McNally, A; Alhashash, F; Collins, M; Alqasim, A; Paszckiewicz, K; Weston, V; Diggle, M

    2013-08-01

    Urosepsis is a bacteraemia infection caused by an organism previously causing an infection in the urinary tract of a patient, a diagnosis which has been classically confirmed by culture of the same species of bacteria from both blood and urine samples. Given the new insights afforded by sequencing technologies into the complicated population structures of infectious agents affecting humans, we sought to investigate urosepsis by comparing the genome sequences of blood and urine isolates of Escherichia coli from five patients with urosepsis. The results confirm the classical urosepsis hypothesis in four of the five cases, but also show the complex nature of extra-intestinal E. coli infection in the fifth case, where three distinct strains caused two distinct infections. Additionally, we show there is little to no variation in the bacterial genome as it progressed from urine to blood, and also present a minimal set of virulence genes required for bacteraemia in E. coli based on gene association. These suggest that most E. coli have the genetic propensity to cause bacteraemia.

  7. A second DNA methyltransferase repair enzyme in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Rebeck, G W; Coons, S; Carroll, P; Samson, L

    1988-01-01

    The Escherichia coli ada-alkB operon encodes a 39-kDa protein (Ada) that is a DNA-repair methyltransferase and a 27-kDa protein (AlkB) of unknown function. By DNA blot hybridization analysis we show that the alkylation-sensitive E. coli mutant BS23 [Sedgwick, B. & Lindahl, T. (1982) J. Mol. Biol. 154, 169-175] is a deletion mutant lacking the entire ada-alkB operon. Despite the absence of the ada gene and its product, the cells contain detectable levels of a DNA-repair methyltransferase activity. We conclude that the methyltransferase in BS23 cells is the product of a gene other than ada. A similar activity was detected in extracts of an ada-10::Tn10 insertion mutant of E. coli AB1157. This DNA methyltransferase has a molecular mass of about 19 kDa and transfers the methyl groups from O6-methylguanine and O4-methylthymine in DNA, but not those from methyl phosphotriester lesions. This enzyme was not induced by low doses of alkylating agent and is expressed at low levels in ada+ and a number of ada- E. coli strains. Images PMID:3283737

  8. Redefining the requisite lipopolysaccharide structure in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Meredith, Timothy C; Aggarwal, Parag; Mamat, Uwe; Lindner, Buko; Woodard, Ronald W

    2006-02-17

    Gram-negative bacteria possess an asymmetric lipid bilayer surrounding the cell wall, the outer membrane (OM). The OM inner leaflet is primarily composed of various glycerophospholipids, whereas the outer leaflet predominantly contains the unique amphiphilic macromolecule, lipopolysaccharide (LPS or endotoxin). The majority of all gram-negative bacteria elaborate LPS containing at least one 2-keto 3-deoxy-D-manno-octulosonate (Kdo) molecule. The minimal LPS structure required for growth of Escherichia coli has long been recognized as two Kdo residues attached to lipid A, inextricably linking viability to toxicity. Here we report the construction and characterization of the nonconditional E. coli K-12 suppressor strain KPM22 that lacks Kdo and is viable despite predominantly elaborating the endotoxically inactive LPS precursor lipid IV(A). Our results challenge the established E. coli Kdo2-lipid A dogma, indicating that the previously observed and well-documented dependence of cell viability on the synthesis of Kdo stems from a lethal pleiotropy precipitated after the depletion of the carbohydrate, rather than an inherent need for the Kdo molecule itself as an indispensable structural component of the OM LPS layer. Inclusion of the inner membrane LPS transporter MsbA on a multicopy plasmid partially suppresses the lethal deltaKdo phenotype directly in the auxotrophic parent strain, suggesting increased rates of nonglycosylated lipid A transport can, in part, compensate for Kdo depletion. The unprecedented nature of a lipid IV(A) OM redefines the requisite LPS structure for viability in E. coli.

  9. Resistance patterns of Escherichia coli causing urinary tract infection

    PubMed Central

    Ferdosi-Shahandashti, Elaheh; Javanian, Mostafa; Moradian-Kouchaksaraei, Masoomeh; Yeganeh, Babak; Bijani, Ali; Motevaseli, Elahe; Moradian- Kouchaksaraei, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the most prevalent infectious diseases and Escherichia coli is its common cause. The aim of this study was to assess the resistance patterns of E.coli in urinary tract infections and to determine the susceptibility of E.coli to commonly used antimicrobials and also to evaluate the options for empirical treatment of UTI. Methods: This study was conducted in the Ayatollah Rouhani Teaching Hospital of Babol Medical Sciences University in North of Iran. Between January of 2013 to December 2013, antimicrobial susceptibility tests were done by disk diffusion and microdilution method. Growth of >=105 cfu/ml was considered as positive urine test. Ten commonly used antibiotics were examined for susceptibility test. Data and the results were collected and analyzed. Results: E.coli grew in 57 urine samples. Imipenem, ofloxacin, ciprofloxacin were the most sensitive antibiotics at 87.7%, 87.7% and 78.9% respectively. Whereas, cotrimoxazole, cefexime, cefotaxcime and ceftriaxone were the most resistant antibiotics. Antibiotic sensitivity of disk diffusion compared minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) detected by microdilution had the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of 82%, 98%, 99% and 74%, respectively. Conclusion: Imipenem, ofloxacin and ciprofloxacin should be used in empirical therapy of UTI. PMID:26644881

  10. Curli fimbria: an Escherichia coli adhesin associated with human cystitis.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, Melina Aparecida; Werle, Catierine Hirsch; Milanez, Guilherme Paier; Yano, Tomomasa

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli is the major causative agent of human cystitis. In this study, a preliminary molecular analysis carried out by PCR (polymerase chain reaction) demonstrated that 100% of 31 E. coli strains isolated from patients with recurrent UTIs (urinary tract infections) showed the presence of the curli fimbria gene (csgA). Curli fimbria is known to be associated with bacterial biofilm formation but not with the adhesion of human cystitis-associated E. coli. Therefore, this work aimed to study how curli fimbria is associated with uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) as an adhesion factor. For this purpose, the csgA gene was deleted from strain UPEC-4, which carries three adhesion factor genes (csgA, fimH and ompA). The wild-type UPEC-4 strain and its mutant (ΔcsgA) were analyzed for their adhesion ability over HTB-9 (human bladder carcinoma), Vero (kidney cells of African green monkey) and HUVEC (human umbilical vein) cells in the presence of α-d-mannose. All the wild-type UPEC strains tested (100%) were able to adhere to all three cell types, while the UPEC-4 ΔcsgA mutant lost its adherence to HTB-9 but continued to adhere to the HUVEC and Vero cells. The results suggest that curli fimbria has an important role in the adhesion processes associated with human UPEC-induced cystitis.

  11. Magnetically-Actuated Escherichia coli System for Micro Lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauback, S.; Brown, E.; Pérez-Guzman, L.; Peace, C.; Pierce, C.; Lower, B. H.; Lower, S. K.; Sooryakumar, R.

    2015-03-01

    Technologies that control matter at the nano- and micro-scale are crucial for developing new engineered materials and devices. While the more traditional approaches for such manipulations often depend on lithographic fabrication, they can be expanded upon by taking advantage of the biological systems within a living cell which also operate on the nano- and micro- scale. In this study, a system is being developed to functionalize a targeted location on the surface of a chip with the protein AmCyan from transformed Escherichia coli cells. Using established methods in molecular biology where a plasmid with the amcyan gene sequence is inserted into the cell, E. coli are engineered to express the AmCyan protein on their outer surface. In order to transport the cells to the targeted location, the transformed E. coli are labeled with superparamagnetic micro-beads which exert directed forces on the cells in an external field. Preliminary results of the protein expression on E. coli, the transport of the cell through weak magnetic fields to targeted locations and the potential to transfer protein from the cell to the chip surface will be presented.

  12. Production of 3-O-xylosyl quercetin in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Ramesh Prasad; Malla, Sailesh; Simkhada, Dinesh; Kim, Byung-Gee; Sohng, Jae Kyung

    2013-03-01

    Quercetin, a flavonol aglycone, is one of the most abundant flavonoids with high medicinal value. The bioavailability and pharmacokinetic properties of quercetin are influenced by the type of sugars attached to the molecule. To efficiently diversify the therapeutic uses of quercetin, Escherichia coli was harnessed as a production factory by the installation of various plant and bacterial UDP-xylose sugar biosynthetic genes. The genes encoding for the UDP-xylose pathway enzymes phosphoglucomutase (nfa44530), glucose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (galU), UDP-glucose dehydrogenase (calS8), and UDP-glucuronic acid decarboxylase (calS9) were overexpressed in E. coli BL21 (DE3) along with a glycosyltransferase (arGt-3) from Arabidopsis thaliana. Furthermore, E. coli BL21(DE3)/∆pgi, E. coli BL21(DE3)/∆zwf, E. coli BL21(DE3)/∆pgi∆zwf, and E. coli BL21(DE3)/∆pgi∆zwf∆ushA mutants carrying the aforementioned UDP-xylose sugar biosynthetic genes and glycosyltransferase and the galU-integrated E. coli BL21(DE3)/∆pgi host harboring only calS8, calS9, and arGt-3 were constructed to enhance whole-cell bioconversion of exogeneously supplied quercetin into 3-O-xylosyl quercetin. Here, we report the highest production of 3-O-xylosyl quercetin with E. coli BL21 (DE3)/∆pgi∆zwf∆ushA carrying UDP-xylose sugar biosynthetic genes and glycosyltransferase. The maximum concentration of 3-O-xylosyl quercetin achieved was 23.78 mg/L (54.75 μM), representing 54.75 % bioconversion, which was an ~4.8-fold higher bioconversion than that shown by E. coli BL21 (DE3) with the same set of genes when the reaction was carried out in 5-mL culture tubes with 100 μM quercetin under optimized conditions. Bioconversion was further improved by 98 % when the reaction was scaled up in a 3-L fermentor at 36 h.

  13. Extraintestinal Escherichia coli carrying virulence genes in coastal marine sediments.

    PubMed

    Luna, G M; Vignaroli, C; Rinaldi, C; Pusceddu, A; Nicoletti, L; Gabellini, M; Danovaro, R; Biavasco, F

    2010-09-01

    Despite the recognized potential of long-term survival or even growth of fecal indicators bacteria (FIB) in marine sediments, this compartment is largely ignored by health protection authorities. We conducted a large-scale study over approximately 50 km of the Marche coasts (Adriatic Sea) at depths ranging from 2 to 5 m. Total and fecal coliforms (FC) were counted by culture-based methods. Escherichia coli was also quantified using fluorescence in situ hybridization targeting specific 16S rRNA sequences, which yielded significantly higher abundances than culture-based methods, suggesting the potential importance of viable but nonculturable E. coli cells. Fecal coliforms displayed high abundances at most sites and showed a prevalence of E. coli. FC isolates (n = 113) were identified by API 20E, additional biochemical tests, and internal transcribed spacer-PCR. E. coli strains, representing 96% of isolates, were then characterized for genomic relatedness and phylogenetic group (A, B1, B2, and D) of origin by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA and multiplex-PCR. The results indicated that E. coli displayed a wide genotypic diversity, also among isolates from the same station, and that 44 of the 109 E. coli isolates belonged to groups B2 and D. Further characterization of B2 and D isolates for the presence of 11 virulence factor genes (pap, sfa/foc, afa, eaeA, ibeA, traT, hlyA, stx(1), stx(2), aer, and fyuA) showed that 90% of B2 and 65% of D isolates were positive for at least one of these. Most of the variance of both E. coli abundance and assemblage composition (>62%) was explained by a combination of physical-chemical and trophic variables. These findings indicate that coastal sediments could represent a potential reservoir for commensal and pathogenic E. coli and that E. coli distribution in marine coastal sediments largely depends upon the physical and trophic status of the sediment. We conclude that future sampling designs aimed at monitoring the microbiological

  14. Improved thermostability and acetic acid tolerance of Escherichia coli via directed evolution of homoserine o-succinyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Mordukhova, Elena A; Lee, Hee-Soon; Pan, Jae-Gu

    2008-12-01

    In Escherichia coli, growth is limited at elevated temperatures mainly because of the instability of a single enzyme, homoserine o-succinyltransferase (MetA), the first enzyme in the methionine biosynthesis pathway. The metA gene from the thermophile Geobacillus kaustophilus cloned into the E. coli chromosome was found to enhance the growth of the host strain at elevated temperature (44 degrees C), thus confirming the limited growth of E. coli due to MetA instability. In order to improve E. coli growth at higher temperatures, we used random mutagenesis to obtain a thermostable MetA(E. coli) protein. Sequencing of the thermotolerant mutant showed five amino acid substitutions: S61T, E213V, I229T, N267D, and N271K. An E. coli strain with the mutated metA gene chromosomally inserted showed accelerated growth over a temperature range of 34 to 44 degrees C. We used the site-directed metA mutants to identify two amino acid residues responsible for the sensitivity of MetA(E. coli) to both heat and acids. Replacement of isoleucine 229 with threonine and asparagine 267 with aspartic acid stabilized the protein. The thermostable MetA(E. coli) enzymes showed less aggregation in vivo at higher temperature, as well as upon acetic acid treatment. The data presented here are the first to show improved E. coli growth at higher temperatures solely due to MetA stabilization and provide new knowledge for designing E. coli strains that grow at higher temperatures, thus reducing the cooling cost of bioprocesses.

  15. Functional genetic expression of eukaryotic DNA in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Struhl, K; Cameron, J R; Davis, R W

    1976-01-01

    We have isolated a segment of DNA from the eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae (baker's yeast) as a viable molecular hybrid of bacteriophage lambda DNA which, when integrated into the chromosome of an E. coli histidine auxotroph, allows this bacterium to grow in the absence of histidine. The nonrevertable, histidine auxotroph lacks the enzymatic activity of imidazole glycerol phosphate (IGP) dehydratase (EC 4.2.1.19). From genetic experiments, we conclude that expression of the segment of yeast DNA results in the production of a diffusible substance and that transcription necessary for the complementation is most likely initiated from the segment of eukaryotic DNA. Images PMID:775490

  16. Quantitative assessment of faecal shedding of β-lactam-resistant Escherichia coli and enterococci in dogs.

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Gongora, Carmen; Shah, Syed Qaswar Ali; Jessen, Lisbeth Rem; Bortolaia, Valeria; Langebæk, Rikke; Bjørnvad, Charlotte Reinhard; Guardabassi, Luca

    2015-12-31

    Quantitative data on faecal shedding of antimicrobial resistant bacteria are crucial to assess the risk of transmission from dogs to other animals as well as humans. In this study we investigated prevalence and concentrations of β-lactam-resistant Escherichia coli and enterococci in the faeces of 108 dogs presenting at a veterinary hospital in Denmark. The dogs had not been treated with antimicrobials for 4 weeks prior to the study. Total E. coli and enterococci were quantified by counts on MacConkey and Slanetz-Bartley, respectively. Resistant E. coli and enterococci were counted on the same media containing relevant antibiotic concentrations, followed by species identification using MALDI-TOF. Ampicillin- and cefotaxime-resistant E. coli were detected in 40% and 8% of the dogs, respectively, whereas approximately 15% carried ampicillin-resistant enterococci, mainly Enterococcus faecium. In the faeces of the carriers, the proportion of resistant strains in the total bacterial species population was on average 15% for both ampicillin-resistant E. coli (median faecal load 3.2×10(4)cfu/g) and E. faecium (5.8×10(2) cfu/g), and 4.6% for cefotaxime-resistant E. coli (8.6×10(3) cfu/g). Cefotaxime resistance was associated with the presence of blaCTX-M-1 (n=4), blaCMY-2 (n=4) or multiple mutations in the promoter and coding region of chromosomal ampC (n=1). Altogether the results indicate that the risks of zoonotic transmission of β-lactam-resistant bacteria via human exposure to canine faeces greatly vary amongst individual dogs and are influenced by unidentified factors other than recent antimicrobial use.

  17. Role of Intraspecies Recombination in the Spread of Pathogenicity Islands within the Escherichia coli Species

    PubMed Central

    Schubert, Sören; Darlu, Pierre; Clermont, Olivier; Wieser, Andreas; Magistro, Giuseppe; Hoffmann, Christiane; Weinert, Kirsten; Tenaillon, Olivier; Matic, Ivan; Denamur, Erick

    2009-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer is a key step in the evolution of bacterial pathogens. Besides phages and plasmids, pathogenicity islands (PAIs) are subjected to horizontal transfer. The transfer mechanisms of PAIs within a certain bacterial species or between different species are still not well understood. This study is focused on the High-Pathogenicity Island (HPI), which is a PAI widely spread among extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli and serves as a model for horizontal transfer of PAIs in general. We applied a phylogenetic approach using multilocus sequence typing on HPI-positive and -negative natural E. coli isolates representative of the species diversity to infer the mechanism of horizontal HPI transfer within the E. coli species. In each strain, the partial nucleotide sequences of 6 HPI–encoded genes and 6 housekeeping genes of the genomic backbone, as well as DNA fragments immediately upstream and downstream of the HPI were compared. This revealed that the HPI is not solely vertically transmitted, but that recombination of large DNA fragments beyond the HPI plays a major role in the spread of the HPI within E. coli species. In support of the results of the phylogenetic analyses, we experimentally demonstrated that HPI can be transferred between different E. coli strains by F-plasmid mediated mobilization. Sequencing of the chromosomal DNA regions immediately upstream and downstream of the HPI in the recipient strain indicated that the HPI was transferred and integrated together with HPI–flanking DNA regions of the donor strain. The results of this study demonstrate for the first time that conjugative transfer and homologous DNA recombination play a major role in horizontal transfer of a pathogenicity island within the species E. coli. PMID:19132082

  18. Identification of the phoM gene product and its regulation in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed Central

    Ludtke, D; Bernstein, J; Hamilton, C; Torriani, A

    1984-01-01

    Plasmids containing the chromosome region of Escherichia coli encoding phoM, whose product is a positive regulator of alkaline phosphatase expression, were isolated from the Clarke and Carbon plasmid bank. A 9.9-kilobase EcoRI fragment of plasmid pLC17-39 (subcloned into pBR322) was able to complement both phoM and thrB mutations. Restriction endonuclease analysis and in vitro mutagenesis of the hybird plasmids enabled the localization of the phoM gene locus to 3 kilobases of the cloned chromosomal fragment. The phoM gene product was identified, with maxicell techniques, as a protein with an approximate molecular weight of 55,000. A phoM-lacZ protein fusion was constructed by using a plasmid carrying the phoM gene and a derivative of phage lambda, lambda plac Mu2. Restriction endonuclease analysis of the plasmid carrying the fusion indicated that phoM is transcribed in a clockwise direction on the circular E. coli chromosome. Analysis of strains bearing the fusion on a multiple-copy plasmid or integrated at the lambda attachment site of the chromosome indicated that the synthesis of the phoM gene product was unaffected by phosphate limitation of growth. The expression of the phoM gene was studied in strains with mutations in genes encoding effectors of the pho regulon. A threefold increase in phoM expression was seen in a phoU strain in comparison with the wild-type strain. Images PMID:6330029

  19. Compilation of DNA sequences of Escherichia coli (update 1992)

    PubMed Central

    Kröger, Manfred; Wahl, Ralf; Schachtel, Gabriel; Rice, Peter

    1992-01-01

    We have compiled the DNA sequence data for E.coli available from the GENBANK and EMBL data libraries and over a period of several years independently from the literature. This is the fourth listing replacing and increasing the former listings substantially. However, in order to save space this printed version contains DNA sequence information only, if they are publically available in electronic form. The complete compilation including a full set of genetic map data and the E.coli protein index can be obtained in machine readable form from the EMBL data library (ECD release 10) or from the CD-ROM version of this supplement issue directly. After deletion of all detected overlaps a total of 1 820 237 individual bp is found to be determined till the beginning of 1992. This corresponds to a total of 38.56% of the entire E.coli chromosome consisting of about 4,720 kbp. This number may actually be higher by some extra 2,5% derived from lysogenic bacteriophage lambda and various DNA sequences already received for other strains of E.coli. PMID:1598239

  20. Compilation of DNA sequences of Escherichia coli (update 1993).

    PubMed Central

    Kröger, M; Wahl, R; Rice, P

    1993-01-01

    We have compiled the DNA sequence data for E. coli available from the GENBANK and EMBL data libraries and over a period of several years independently from the literature. This is the fifth listing replacing and increasing the former listings substantially. However, in order to save space this printed version contains DNA sequence information only, if they are publically available in electronic form. The complete compilation including a full set of genetic map data and the E. coli protein index can be obtained in machine readable form from the EMBL data library (ECD release 15) as a part of the CD-ROM issue of the EMBL sequence database, released and updated every three months. After deletion of all detected overlaps a total of 2,353,635 individual bp is found to be determined till the end of April 1993. This corresponds to a total of 49.87% of the entire E. coli chromosome consisting of about 4,720 kbp. This number may actually be higher by 9161 bp derived from other strains of E. coli. PMID:8332520

  1. Characterization of a Novel Microcin That Kills Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 and O26

    PubMed Central

    Eberhart, Lauren J.; Deringer, James R.; Brayton, Kelly A.; Sawant, Ashish A.; Besser, Thomas E.

    2012-01-01

    A novel phenotype was recently identified in which specific strains of Escherichia coli inhibit competing E. coli strains via a mechanism that was designated “proximity-dependent inhibition” (PDI). PDI-expressing (PDI+) E. coli is known to inhibit susceptible (PDI−) E. coli strains, including several enterohemorrhagic (EHEC) and enterotoxigenic (ETEC) E. coli strains. In this study, every strain from a genetically diverse panel of E. coli O157:H7 (n = 25) and additional strains of E. coli serovar O26 were susceptible to the PDI phenotype. LIVE/DEAD staining was consistent with inhibition by killing of susceptible cells. Comparative genome analysis identified the genetic component of PDI, which is composed of a plasmid-borne (Incl1) operon encoding a putative microcin and associated genes for transport, immunity, and microcin activation. Transfer of the plasmid to a PDI− strain resulted in transfer of the phenotype, and deletion of the genes within the operon resulted in loss of the inhibition phenotype. Deletion of chromosomally encoded tolC also resulted in loss of the inhibitory phenotype, and this confirmed that the putative microcin is most likely secreted via a type I secretion pathway. Deletion of an unrelated plasmid gene did not affect the PDI phenotype. Quantitative reverse transcription (RT)-PCR demonstrated that microcin expression is correlated with logarithmic-phase growth. The ability to inhibit a diversity of E. coli strains indicates that this microcin may influence gut community composition and could be useful for control of important enteric pathogens. PMID:22773653

  2. Comparative Genomics and Characterization of Hybrid Shigatoxigenic and Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (STEC/ETEC) Strains

    PubMed Central

    Nyholm, Outi; Halkilahti, Jani; Wiklund, Gudrun; Okeke, Uche; Paulin, Lars; Auvinen, Petri; Haukka, Kaisa; Siitonen, Anja

    2015-01-01

    Background Shigatoxigenic Escherichia coli (STEC) and enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) cause serious foodborne infections in humans. These two pathogroups are defined based on the pathogroup-associated virulence genes: stx encoding Shiga toxin (Stx) for STEC and elt encoding heat-labile and/or est encoding heat-stable enterotoxin (ST) for ETEC. The study investigated the genomics of STEC/ETEC hybrid strains to determine their phylogenetic position among E. coli and to define the virulence genes they harbor. Methods The whole genomes of three STEC/ETEC strains possessing both stx and est genes were sequenced using PacBio RS sequencer. Two of the strains were isolated from the patients, one with hemolytic uremic syndrome, and one with diarrhea. The third strain was of bovine origin. Core genome analysis of the shared chromosomal genes and comparison with E. coli and Shigella spp. reference genomes was performed to determine the phylogenetic position of the STEC/ETEC strains. In addition, a set of virulence genes and ETEC colonization factors were extracted from the genomes. The production of Stx and ST were studied. Results The human STEC/ETEC strains clustered with strains representing ETEC, STEC, enteroaggregative E. coli, and commensal and laboratory-adapted E. coli. However, the bovine STEC/ETEC strain formed a remote cluster with two STECs of bovine origin. All three STEC/ETEC strains harbored several other virulence genes, apart from stx and est, and lacked ETEC colonization factors. Two STEC/ETEC strains produced both toxins and one strain Stx only. Conclusions This study shows that pathogroup-associated virulence genes of different E. coli can co-exist in strains originating from different phylogenetic lineages. The possibility of virulence genes to be associated with several E. coli pathogroups should be taken into account in strain typing and in epidemiological surveillance. Development of novel hybrid E. coli strains may cause a new public health risk, which

  3. More precise mapping of the replication origin in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Louarn, J; Funderburgh, M; Bird, R E

    1974-10-01

    The origin of replication in Escherichia coli K-12 was mapped by determining the rate of marker replication during a synchronous round of replication. Four isogenic strains were made lysogenic for lambdaind(-) and for phage Mu-1, with Mu-1 integrated into a different chromosomal location in each strain. Cultures were starved for amino acids to allow completion of chromosome replication cycles and then starved for thymine in the presence of amino acids, and a synchronous cycle of replication was initiated by the addition of thymine. Samples were exposed to radioactive thymidine at intervals, deoxyribonucleic acid was extracted, and the rate of marker replication was determined by deoxyribonucleic acid-deoxyribonucleic acid hybridization to filters containing Mu-1, lambda, and E. coli deoxyribonucleic acid. The results confirm that the origin of replication is near ilv. The travel times of the replication forks, calculated from the data obtained for cultures with doubling times of approximately 40 and 61 min, are 40 and 52 min, respectively.

  4. DNA Replication Control Is Linked to Genomic Positioning of Control Regions in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Frimodt-Møller, Jakob; Charbon, Godefroid; Krogfelt, Karen A.; Løbner-Olesen, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome replication in Escherichia coli is in part controlled by three non-coding genomic sequences, DARS1, DARS2, and datA that modulate the activity of the initiator protein DnaA. The relative distance from oriC to the non-coding regions are conserved among E. coli species, despite large variations in genome size. Here we use a combination of i) site directed translocation of each region to new positions on the bacterial chromosome and ii) random transposon mediated translocation followed by culture evolution, to show genetic evidence for the importance of position. Here we provide evidence that the genomic locations of these regulatory sequences are important for cell cycle control and bacterial fitness. In addition, our work shows that the functionally redundant DARS1 and DARS2 regions play different roles in replication control. DARS1 is mainly involved in maintaining the origin concentration, whether DARS2 is also involved in maintaining single cell synchrony. PMID:27589233

  5. The majority of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli strains produce the E. coli common pilus when adhering to cultured epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Avelino, Fabiola; Saldaña, Zeus; Islam, Sohidul; Monteiro-Neto, Valerio; Dall'Agnol, Monique; Eslava, Carlos A; Girón, Jorge A

    2010-11-01

    Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) have emerged as a significant worldwide cause of chronic diarrhea in the pediatric population and in HIV patients. The vast majority of EAEC strains do not produce the aggregative adherence fimbriae I-III (AAFs) so far reported and thus, what adherence factors are present in these strains remains unknown. Here, we investigated the prevalence of the chromosomal E. coli common pilus (ECP) genes and ECP production amongst 130 EAEC strains of diverse origin as well as the role of ECP in EAEC adherence. Through multiplex PCR analysis we found that 96% of EAEC strains contained the ecpA structural pilin gene whereas only 3.1% and 5.4% were positive for AAF fimbrial genes aggA or aafA, respectively. Among the ecpA(+) strains, 63% produced ECP when adhering to cultured epithelial cells. An ecpA mutant derived from prototypic strain 042 (AAF/II(+)) was not altered in adherence suggesting that the AAF/II, and not ECP, plays a major role in this strain. In contrast, strain 278-1 (AAF(-)) deleted of the ecpA gene was significantly reduced in adherence to cultured epithelial cells. In all, these data indicate a potential role of ECP in adherence for EAEC strains lacking the known AAFs and that in association with other adhesive determinants, ECP may contribute to their survival and persistence within the host and in the environment.

  6. Protein turnover in the cell cycle of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Nishi, A; Kogoma, T

    1965-10-01

    Nishi, Arasuke (University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan), and Tokio Kogoma. Protein turnover in the cell cycle of Escherichia coli. J. Bacteriol. 90:884-890. 1965.-Protein metabolism and enzyme formation throughout the cell cycle were investigated in synchronized cultures of Escherichia coli. The cells showed a temporary cessation of the net increase of bulk protein and of constitutive beta-galactosidase activity during the division period. By contrast, when tested by short-term experiments performed with cells at different growth stages, the bacteria displayed a constant incorporation of labeled protein precursors into the protein fraction, even during the fission period. Similar results were obtained with respect to the capacities for induced enzyme formation. On the other hand, when the cells were previously labeled and then subjected to synchronization in a nonradioactive medium, the radioactivity of the protein fraction decreased temporarily by nearly 10% during the fission period and then regained its previous level at the beginning of the ensuing phase of growth. This indicates that the products of partial degradation of protein were again utilized for protein synthesis in the next cell cycle. It was concluded that the temporary lagging of net increase of bulk protein may be due to the partial breakdown of protein occurring during the fission period.

  7. DNA-damaging activity of patulin in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, K S; Röschenthaler, R J

    1986-01-01

    At a concentration of 10 micrograms/ml, patulin caused single-strand DNA breaks in living cells of Escherichia coli. At 50 micrograms/ml, double-strand breaks were observed also. Single-strand breaks were repaired in the presence of 10 micrograms of patulin per ml within 90 min when the cells were incubated at 37 degrees C in M9-salts solution without a carbon source. The same concentration also induced temperature-sensitive lambda prophage and a prophage of Bacillus megaterium. When an in vitro system with permeabilized Escherichia coli cells was used, patulin at 10 micrograms/ml induced DNA repair synthesis and inhibited DNA replication. The in vivo occurrence of DNA strand breaks and DNA repair correlated with the in vitro induction of repair synthesis. In vitro the RNA synthesis was less affected, and overall protein synthesis was not inhibited at 10 micrograms/ml. Only at higher concentrations (250 to 500 micrograms/ml) was inhibition of in vitro protein synthesis observed. Thus, patulin must be regarded as a mycotoxin with selective DNA-damaging activity. PMID:2431653

  8. TRYPTOPHANASE-TRYPTOPHAN SYNTHETASE SYSTEMS IN ESCHERICHIA COLI I.

    PubMed Central

    Freundlich, Martin; Lichstein, Herman C.

    1962-01-01

    Freundlich, Martin (University of Minnesota, Minneapolis) and Herman C. Lichstein. Tryptophanase-tryptophan synthetase systems in Escherichia coli. I. Effect of tryptophan and related compounds. J. Bacteriol. 84:979–987. 1962.—The effect of tryptophan and related compounds on tryptophanase and tryptophan synthetase formation in Escherichia coli was determined. Several of these compounds stimulated the formation of tryptophanase while concomitantly decreasing the production of synthetase. A number of tryptophan analogues were found to inhibit growth. The possible mode of action of these substances was examined further. 5-Hydroxytryptophan greatly inhibited the formation of synthetase and also reduced growth. Its inhibitory action on growth was attributed, at least partially, to the false feedback inhibition of anthranilic acid formation. Tryptamine was found to be a potent inhibitor of the activity of synthetase, as well as of the enzyme(s) involved in the synthesis of anthranilic acid from shikimic acid. However, growth reduction was only partially reversed by tryptophan. Indole-3-acetic acid and indole-3-propionic acid decreased growth and increased the formation of synthetase six- to eightfold. The action of these compounds was ascribed to their ability to block the endogenous formation of tryptophan. PMID:13959621

  9. Translocation and thermal inactivation of Shiga-toxin producing Escherichia coli in non-intact beef

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We compared translocation of genetically-marked strains of serotype O157:H7 Escherichia coli (ECOH) to non-O157:H7 Shiga-Toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC) following blade tenderization of beef subprimals and the subsequent lethality of these pathogens following cooking of steaks prepared from ...

  10. F'-plasmid transfer from Escherichia coli to Pseudomonas fluorescens.

    PubMed Central

    Mergeay, M; Gerits, J

    1978-01-01

    Various F' plasmids of Escherichia coli K-12 could be transferred into mutants of the soil strain 6.2, classified herein as a Pseudomonas fluorescens biotype IV. This strain was previously found to receive Flac plasmid (N. Datta and R.W. Hedges, J. Gen Microbiol. 70:453-460, 1972). ilv, leu, met, arg, and his auxotrophs were complemented by plasmids carrying isofunctional genes; trp mutants were not complemented or were very poorly complemented. The frequency of transfer was 10(-5). Subsequent transfer into other P. fluorescens recipients was of the same order of magnitude. Some transconjugants were unable to act as donors, and these did not lose the received information if subcultured on nonselective media. Use of F' plasmids helped to discriminate metabolic blocks in P. fluorescens. In particular, metA, metB, and argH mutants were so distinguished. In addition, F131 plasmid carrying the his operon and a supD mutation could partially relieve the auxotrophy of thr, ilv, and metA13 mutants, suggesting functional expression of E. coli tRNA in P. fluorescens. In P. fluorescens metA Rifr mutants carrying the F110 plasmid, which carried the E. coli metA gene and the E. coli rifs allele, sensitivity to rifampin was found to be dominant at least temporarily over resistance. This suggests interaction of E. coli and P. fluorescens subunits of RNA polymerase. his mutations were also complemented by composite P plasmids containing the his-nif region of Klebsiella pneumoniae (plasmids FN68 and RP41). nif expression could be detected by acetylene reduction in some his+ transconjugants. The frequency of transfer of these P plasmids was 5 X 10(-4). PMID:97267

  11. Genomic and Phenomic Study of Mammary Pathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Shlomo E.; Heller, Elimelech D.; Sela, Shlomo; Elad, Daniel; Edery, Nir; Leitner, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli is a major etiological agent of intra-mammary infections (IMI) in cows, leading to acute mastitis and causing great economic losses in dairy production worldwide. Particular strains cause persistent IMI, leading to recurrent mastitis. Virulence factors of mammary pathogenic E. coli (MPEC) involved pathogenesis of mastitis as well as those differentiating strains causing acute or persistent mastitis are largely unknown. This study aimed to identify virulence markers in MPEC through whole genome and phenome comparative analysis. MPEC strains causing acute (VL2874 and P4) or persistent (VL2732) mastitis were compared to an environmental strain (K71) and to the genomes of strains representing different E. coli pathotypes. Intra-mammary challenge in mice confirmed experimentally that the strains studied here have different pathogenic potential, and that the environmental strain K71 is non-pathogenic in the mammary gland. Analysis of whole genome sequences and predicted proteomes revealed high similarity among MPEC, whereas MPEC significantly differed from the non-mammary pathogenic strain K71, and from E. coli genomes from other pathotypes. Functional features identified in MPEC genomes and lacking in the non-mammary pathogenic strain were associated with synthesis of lipopolysaccharide and other membrane antigens, ferric-dicitrate iron acquisition and sugars metabolism. Features associated with cytotoxicity or intra-cellular survival were found specifically in the genomes of strains from severe and acute (VL2874) or persistent (VL2732) mastitis, respectively. MPEC genomes were relatively similar to strain K-12, which was subsequently shown here to be possibly pathogenic in the mammary gland. Phenome analysis showed that the persistent MPEC was the most versatile in terms of nutrients metabolized and acute MPEC the least. Among phenotypes unique to MPEC compared to the non-mammary pathogenic strain were uric acid and D-serine metabolism. This study

  12. Discovery of Escherichia coli CRISPR sequences in an undergraduate laboratory.

    PubMed

    Militello, Kevin T; Lazatin, Justine C

    2016-09-28

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) represent a novel type of adaptive immune system found in eubacteria and archaebacteria. CRISPRs have recently generated a lot of attention due to their unique ability to catalog foreign nucleic acids, their ability to destroy foreign nucleic acids in a mechanism that shares some similarity to RNA interference, and the ability to utilize reconstituted CRISPR systems for genome editing in numerous organisms. In order to introduce CRISPR biology into an undergraduate upper-level laboratory, a five-week set of exercises was designed to allow students to examine the CRISPR status of uncharacterized Escherichia coli strains and to allow the discovery of new repeats and spacers. Students started the project by isolating genomic DNA from E. coli and amplifying the iap CRISPR locus using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The PCR products were analyzed by Sanger DNA sequencing, and the sequences were examined for the presence of CRISPR repeat sequences. The regions between the repeats, the spacers, were extracted and analyzed with BLASTN searches. Overall, CRISPR loci were sequenced from several previously uncharacterized E. coli strains and one E. coli K-12 strain. Sanger DNA sequencing resulted in the discovery of 36 spacer sequences and their corresponding surrounding repeat sequences. Five of the spacers were homologous to foreign (non-E. coli) DNA. Assessment of the laboratory indicates that improvements were made in the ability of students to answer questions relating to the structure and function of CRISPRs. Future directions of the laboratory are presented and discussed. © 2016 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 2016.

  13. Anaerobic respiration of Escherichia coli in the mouse intestine.

    PubMed

    Jones, Shari A; Gibson, Terri; Maltby, Rosalie C; Chowdhury, Fatema Z; Stewart, Valley; Cohen, Paul S; Conway, Tyrrell

    2011-10-01

    The intestine is inhabited by a large microbial community consisting primarily of anaerobes and, to a lesser extent, facultative anaerobes, such as Escherichia coli, which we have shown requires aerobic respiration to compete successfully in the mouse intestine (S. A. Jones et al., Infect. Immun. 75:4891-4899, 2007). If facultative anaerobes efficiently lower oxygen availability in the intestine, then their sustained growth must also depend on anaerobic metabolism. In support of this idea, mutants lacking nitrate reductase or fumarate reductase have extreme colonization defects. Here, we further explore the role of anaerobic respiration in colonization using the streptomycin-treated mouse model. We found that respiratory electron flow is primarily via the naphthoquinones, which pass electrons to cytochrome bd oxidase and the anaerobic terminal reductases. We found that E. coli uses nitrate and fumarate in the intestine, but not nitrite, dimethyl sulfoxide, or trimethylamine N-oxide. Competitive colonizations revealed that cytochrome bd oxidase is more advantageous than nitrate reductase or fumarate reductase. Strains lacking nitrate reductase outcompeted fumarate reductase mutants once the nitrate concentration in cecal mucus reached submillimolar levels, indicating that fumarate is the more important anaerobic electron acceptor in the intestine because nitrate is limiting. Since nitrate is highest in the absence of E. coli, we conclude that E. coli is the only bacterium in the streptomycin-treated mouse large intestine that respires nitrate. Lastly, we demonstrated that a mutant lacking the NarXL regulator (activator of the NarG system), but not a mutant lacking the NarP-NarQ regulator, has a colonization defect, consistent with the advantage provided by NarG. The emerging picture is one in which gene regulation is tuned to balance expression of the terminal reductases that E. coli uses to maximize its competitiveness and achieve the highest possible population in

  14. A Novel Putrescine Exporter SapBCDF of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Yuta; Nakamura, Atsuo; Matsumoto, Mitsuharu; Kanbe, Ayaka; Sakanaka, Mikiyasu; Higashi, Kyohei; Igarashi, Kazuei; Katayama, Takane; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Kurihara, Shin

    2016-12-16

    Recent research has suggested that polyamines (putrescine, spermidine, and spermine) in the intestinal tract impact the health of animals either negatively or positively. The concentration of polyamines in the intestinal tract results from the balance of uptake and export of the intestinal bacteria. However, the mechanism of polyamine export from bacterial cells to the intestinal lumen is still unclear. In Escherichia coli, PotE was previously identified as a transporter responsible for putrescine excretion in an acidic growth environment. We observed putrescine concentration in the culture supernatant was increased from 0 to 50 μm during growth of E. coli under neutral conditions. Screening for the unidentified putrescine exporter was performed using a gene knock-out collection of E. coli, and deletion of sapBCDF significantly decreased putrescine levels in the culture supernatant. Complementation of the deletion mutant with the sapBCDF genes restored putrescine levels in the culture supernatant. Additionally, the ΔsapBCDF strain did not facilitate uptake of putrescine from the culture supernatant. Quantification of stable isotope-labeled putrescine derived from stable isotope-labeled arginine supplemented in the medium revealed that SapBCDF exported putrescine from E. coli cells to the culture supernatant. It was previously reported that SapABCDF of Salmonella enterica sv. typhimurium and Haemophilus influenzae conferred resistance toantimicrobial peptides; however, the E. coli ΔsapBCDF strain did not affect resistance to antimicrobial peptide LL-37. These results strongly suggest that the natural function of the SapBCDF proteins is the export of putrescine.

  15. Genetic determinants of heat resistance in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Mercer, Ryan G.; Zheng, Jinshui; Garcia-Hernandez, Rigoberto; Ruan, Lifang; Gänzle, Michael G.; McMullen, Lynn M.

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli AW1.7 is a heat resistant food isolate and the occurrence of pathogenic strains with comparable heat resistance may pose a risk to food safety. To identify the genetic determinants of heat resistance, 29 strains of E. coli that differed in their of heat resistance were analyzed by comparative genomics. Strains were classified as highly heat resistant strains, exhibiting a D60-value of more than 6 min; moderately heat resistant strains, exhibiting a D60-value of more than 1 min; or as heat sensitive. A ~14 kb genomic island containing 16 predicted open reading frames encoding putative heat shock proteins and proteases was identified only in highly heat resistant strains. The genomic island was termed the locus of heat resistance (LHR). This putative operon is flanked by mobile elements and possesses >99% sequence identity to genomic islands contributing to heat resistance in Cronobacter sakazakii and Klebsiella pneumoniae. An additional 41 LHR sequences with >87% sequence identity were identified in 11 different species of β- and γ-proteobacteria. Cloning of the full length LHR conferred high heat resistance to the heat sensitive E. coli AW1.7ΔpHR1 and DH5α. The presence of the LHR correlates perfectly to heat resistance in several species of Enterobacteriaceae and occurs at a frequency of 2% of all E. coli genomes, including pathogenic strains. This study suggests the LHR has been laterally exchanged among the β- and γ-proteobacteria and is a reliable indicator of high heat resistance in E. coli. PMID:26441869

  16. [The directed modification of Escherichia coli MG1655 to obtain histidine-producing mutants].

    PubMed

    Doroshenko, V G; Lobanov, A O; Fedorina, E A

    2013-01-01

    Strain MG 1655+hisGr hisL'-Delta, purR, which produces histidine with a weight yield of approximately 12% from glucose, was constructed through directed chromosomal modifications of the laboratory Escherichia coli strain MG 1655+, which has a known genome sequence. A feedback-resistant ATP-phosphoribosyl transferase encoded by the mutant hisGr (E271 K) was the main determinant of histidine production. A further increase in histidine production was achieved by the expression enhance of a mutant his operon containing hisGr through the deleting attenuator region (hisL'-Delta). An increase in the expression of the wildtype his operon did not result in histidine accumulation. Deletion of the transcriptional regulator gene purR increased the biomass produced and maintained the level of histidine production per cell under the fermentation conditions used.

  17. Isolation of gene fusions (soi::lacZ) inducible by oxidative stress in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Kogoma, T; Farr, S B; Joyce, K M; Natvig, D O

    1988-01-01

    Mu dX phage was used to isolate three gene fusions to the lacZ gene (soi::lacZ; soi for superoxide radical inducible) that were induced by treatment with superoxide radical anion generators such as paraquat and plumbagin. The induction of beta-galactosidase in these fusion strains with the superoxide radical generating agents required aerobic metabolism. Hyperoxygenation (i.e., bubbling of cultures with oxygen gas) also induced the fusions. On the other hand, hydrogen peroxide did not induce the fusions at concentrations that are known to invoke an adaptive response. Introduction of oxyR, htpR, or recA mutations did not affect the induction. Two of the fusion strains exhibited increased sensitivity to paraquat but not to hydrogen peroxide. The third fusion strain showed no increased sensitivity to either agent. All three fusions were located in the 45- to 61-min region of the Escherichia coli chromosome. PMID:2838846

  18. Gene replacement without selection: regulated suppression of amber mutations in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Herring, Christopher D; Glasner, Jeremy D; Blattner, Frederick R

    2003-06-05

    We have developed a method called "gene gorging" to make precise mutations in the Escherichia coli genome at frequencies high enough (1-15%) to allow direct identification of mutants by PCR or other screen rather than by selection. Gene gorging begins by establishing a donor plasmid carrying the desired mutation in the target cell. This plasmid is linearized by in vivo expression of the meganuclease I-SceI, providing a DNA substrate for lambda Red mediated recombination. This results in efficient replacement of the wild type allele on the chromosome with the modified sequence. We demonstrate gene gorging by introducing amber stop codons into the genes xylA, melA, galK, fucI, citA, ybdO, and lacZ. To compliment this approach we developed an arabinose inducible amber suppressor tRNA. Controlled expression mediated by the suppressor was demonstrated for the lacZ and xylA amber mutants.

  19. Growth rate regulation of lac operon expression in Escherichia coli is cyclic AMP dependent.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Jong-Tar; Chang, Yu-Jen; Tseng, Ching-Ping

    2003-10-23

    In contrast to the ribosomal RNA gene expression increasing with growth rate, transcription of the lac operon is downregulated by cell growth rate. In continuous culture, growth rate regulation of lac promoter was independent of carbon substrate used and its location on the chromosome. Since the lac operon is activated by cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), which decreases with increasing cell growth rate, expression of plac-lacZ reporter fusion was analyzed in cya mutant under various growth conditions. The results demonstrated that expression of plac-lacZ in cya mutant was both lower and growth rate independent. In addition, ppGpp (guanosine tetraphosphate) was not involved in the mechanism of growth rate regulation of the lac promoter. Thus, the results of this study indicate that cAMP mediates the growth rate-dependent regulation of lac operon expression in Escherichia coli.

  20. Genetic and biochemical analysis of peptide transport in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    E. coli peptide transport mutants have been isolated based on their resistance to toxic tripeptides. These genetic defects were found to map in two distinct chromosomal locations. The transport systems which require expression of the trp-linked opp genes and the oppE gene(s) for activity were shown to have different substrate preferences. Growth of E. coli in medium containing leucine results in increased entry of exogenously supplied tripeptides into the bacterial cell. This leucine-mediated elevation of peptide transport required expression of the trp-linked opp operon and was accompanied by increased sensitivity to toxic tripeptides, by an enhanced capacity to utilize nutritional peptides, and by an increase in both the velocity and apparent steady-state level of L-(U-/sup 14/C)alanyl-L-alanyl-L-alanine accumulation for E. coli grown in leucine-containing medium relative to these parameters of peptide transport measured with bacteria grown in media lacking leucine. Direct measurement of opp operon expression by pulse-labeling experiments demonstrated that growth of E. coli in the presence of leucine resulted in increased synthesis of the oppA-encoded periplasmic binding protein. The transcriptional regulation of the trp-linked opp operon of E. coli was investigated using lambda placMu51-generated lac operon fusions. Synthesis of ..beta..-galactosidase by strains harboring oppA-lac, oppB-lac, and oppD-lac fusions occurred at a basal level when the fusion-containing strains were grown in minimal medium.

  1. FILAMENT FORMATION BY ESCHERICHIA COLI AT INCREASED HYDROSTATIC PRESSURES1

    PubMed Central

    Zobell, Claude E.; Cobet, Andre B.

    1964-01-01

    ZoBell, Claude E. (University of California, La Jolla), and Andre B. Cobet. Filament formation by Escherichia coli at increased hydrostatic pressures. J. Bacteriol. 87:710–719. 1964.—The reproduction as well as the growth of Escherichia coli is retarded by hydrostatic pressures ranging from 200 to 500 atm. Reproduction was indicated by an increase in the number of cells determined by plating on EMB Agar as well as by direct microscopic counts. Growth, which is not necessarily synonymous with reproduction, was indicated by increase in dry weight and protein content of the bacterial biomass. At increased pressures, cells of three different strains of E. coli tended to form long filaments. Whereas most normal cells of E. coli that developed at 1 atm were only about 2 μ long, the mean length of those that developed at 475 atm was 2.93 μ for strain R4, 3.99 μ for strain S, and 5.82 μ for strain B cells. Nearly 90% of the bacterial biomass produced at 475 atm by strain B was found in filaments exceeding 5 μ in length; 74.7 and 16.4% of the biomass produced at 475 atm by strains S and R4, respectively, occurred in such filaments. Strain R4 formed fewer and shorter (5 to 35 μ) filaments than did the other two strains, whose filaments ranged in length from 5 to >100 μ. The bacterial biomass produced at all pressures had approximately the same content of protein and nucleic acids. But at increased pressures appreciably more ribonucleic acid (RNA) and proportionately less deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) was found per unit of biomass. Whereas the RNA content per cell increased with cell length, the amount of DNA was nearly the same in long filaments formed at increased pressure as in cells of normal length formed at 1 atm. The inverse relationship between the concentration of DNA and cell length in all three strains of E. coli suggests that the failure of DNA to replicate at increased pressure may be responsible for a repression of cell division and consequent filament

  2. Metabolic self-organization of bioluminescent Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Simkus, Remigijus; Baronas, Romas

    2011-01-01

    A possible reason for the complexity of the signals produced by bioluminescent biosensors might be self-organization of the cells. In order to verify this possibility, bioluminescence images of cultures of lux gene reporter Escherichia coli were recorded for several hours after being placed into 8-10 mm diameter cylindrical containers. It was found that luminous cells distribute near the three-phase contact line, forming irregular azimuthal waves. As we show, space-time plots of quasi-one-dimensional bioluminescence measured along the contact line can be simulated by reaction-diffusion-chemotaxis equations, in which the reaction term for the cells is a logistic (autocatalytic) growth function. It was found that the growth rate of the luminous cells (~0.02 s(-1)) is >100 times higher than the growth rate of E. coli. We provide an explanation for this result by assuming that E. coli exhibits considerable respiratory flexibility (the ability of oxygen-induced switching from one metabolic pathway to another). According to the simple two-state model presented here, the number of oxic (luminous) cells grows at the expense of anoxic (dark) cells, whereas the total number of (oxic and anoxic) cells remains unchanged. It is conjectured that the corresponding reaction-diffusion-chemotaxis model for bioluminescence pattern formation can be considered as a model for the energy-taxis and metabolic self-organization in the population of the metabolically flexible bacteria under hypoxic conditions.

  3. Properties of a Clostridium thermocellum Endoglucanase Produced in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, Wolfgang H.; Gräbnitz, Folke; Staudenbauer, Walter L.

    1986-01-01

    A cellulase gene of Clostridium thermocellum was transferred to Escherichia coli by molecular cloning with bacteriophage lambda and plasmid vectors and shown to be indentical with the celA gene. The celA gene product was purified from extracts of plasmid-bearing E. coli cells by heat treatment and chromatography on DEAE-Trisacryl. It was characterized as a thermophilic endo-β-1,4-glucanase, the properties of which closely resemble those of endoglucanase A previously isolated from C. thermocellum supernatants. On sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis the enzyme purified from E. coli exhibited two protein bands with molecular weights of 49,000 and 52,000. It had a temperature optimum at 75°C and was stable for several hours at 60°C. Endoglucanase activity was optimal between pH 5.5 and 6.5. The enzyme was insensitive against end product inhibition by glucose and cellobiose and remarkably resistant to the denaturing effects of detergents and organic solvents. It was capable of degrading, in addition to cellulosic substrates, glucans with alternating β-1,4 and β-1,3 linkages such as barley β-glucan and lichenan. PMID:16347088

  4. Comprehensive Mapping of the Escherichia coli Flagellar Regulatory Network

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, Devon M.; Bonocora, Richard P.; Wade, Joseph T.

    2014-01-01

    Flagellar synthesis is a highly regulated process in all motile bacteria. In Escherichia coli and related species, the transcription factor FlhDC is the master regulator of a multi-tiered transcription network. FlhDC activates transcription of a number of genes, including some flagellar genes and the gene encoding the alternative Sigma factor FliA. Genes whose expression is required late in flagellar assembly are primarily transcribed by FliA, imparting temporal regulation of transcription and coupling expression to flagellar assembly. In this study, we use ChIP-seq and RNA-seq to comprehensively map the E. coli FlhDC and FliA regulons. We define a surprisingly restricted FlhDC regulon, including two novel regulated targets and two binding sites not associated with detectable regulation of surrounding genes. In contrast, we greatly expand the known FliA regulon. Surprisingly, 30 of the 52 FliA binding sites are located inside genes. Two of these intragenic promoters are associated with detectable noncoding RNAs, while the others either produce highly unstable RNAs or are inactive under these conditions. Together, our data redefine the E. coli flagellar regulatory network, and provide new insight into the temporal orchestration of gene expression that coordinates the flagellar assembly process. PMID:25275371

  5. Identification of phosphatidylserylglutamate: a novel minor lipid in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Garrett, Teresa A.; Raetz, Christian R. H.; Richardson, Travis; Kordestani, Reza; Son, Jennifer D.; Rose, Rebecca L.

    2009-01-01

    Advances in mass spectrometry have facilitated the identification of novel lipid structures. In this work, we fractionated the lipids of Escherichia coli B and analyzed the fractions using negative-ion electrospray ionization mass spectrometry to reveal unknown lipid structures. Analysis of a fraction eluting with high salt from DEAE cellulose revealed a series of ions not corresponding to any of the known lipids of E. coli. The ions, with m/z 861.5, 875.5, 887.5, 889.5, and 915.5, were analyzed using collision-induced dissociation mass spectrometry (MS/MS) and yielded related fragmentation patterns consistent with a novel diacylated glycerophospholipid. Product ions arising by neutral loss of 216 mass units were observed with all of the unknowns. A corresponding negative product ion was also observed at m/z 215.0. Additional ions at m/z 197.0, 171.0, 146.0, and 128.0 were used to propose the novel structure phosphatidylserylglutamate (PSE). The hypothesized structure was confirmed by comparison with the MS/MS spectrum of a synthetic standard. Normal phase liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis further showed that the endogenous PSE and synthetic PSE eluted with the same retention times. PSE was also observed in the equivalent anion exchange fractions of total lipids extracted from the wild-type E. coli K-12 strain MG1655. PMID:19096047

  6. Improving alkane synthesis in Escherichia coli via metabolic engineering.

    PubMed

    Song, Xuejiao; Yu, Haiying; Zhu, Kun

    2016-01-01

    Concerns about energy security and global petroleum supply have made the production of renewable biofuels an industrial imperative. The ideal biofuels are n-alkanes in that they are chemically and structurally identical to the fossil fuels and can "drop in" to the transportation infrastructure. In this work, an Escherichia coli strain that produces n-alkanes was constructed by heterologous expression of acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) reductase (AAR) and aldehyde deformylating oxygenase (ADO) from Synechococcus elongatus PCC7942. The accumulation of alkanes ranged from 3.1 to 24.0 mg/L using different expressing strategies. Deletion of yqhD, an inherent aldehyde reductase in E. coli, or overexpression of fadR, an activator for fatty acid biosynthesis, exhibited a nearly twofold increase in alkane titers, respectively. Combining yqhD deletion and fadR overexpression resulted in a production titer of 255.6 mg/L in E. coli, and heptadecene was the most abundant product.

  7. Production of 2-methyl-1-butanol in engineered Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Cann, Anthony F; Liao, James C

    2008-11-01

    Recent progress has been made in the production of higher alcohols by harnessing the power of natural amino acid biosynthetic pathways. Here, we describe the first strain of Escherichia coli developed to produce the higher alcohol and potential new biofuel 2-methyl-1-butanol (2MB). To accomplish this, we explored the biodiversity of enzymes catalyzing key parts of the isoleucine biosynthetic pathway, finding that AHAS II (ilvGM) from Salmonella typhimurium and threonine deaminase (ilvA) from Corynebacterium glutamicum improve 2MB production the most. Overexpression of the native threonine biosynthetic operon (thrABC) on plasmid without the native transcription regulation also improved 2MB production in E. coli. Finally, we knocked out competing pathways upstream of threonine production (DeltametA, Deltatdh) to increase its availability for further improvement of 2MB production. This work led to a strain of E. coli that produces 1.25 g/L 2MB in 24 h, a total alcohol content of 3 g/L, and with yields of up to 0.17 g 2MB/g glucose.

  8. Reductive transformation of TNT by Escherichia coli: pathway description.

    PubMed

    Yin, Hong; Wood, Thomas K; Smets, Barth F

    2005-05-01

    The reductive transformation of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) was studied using aerobically grown Escherichia coli cultures. In the absence of an external carbon or energy source, E. coli resting cells transformed TNT to hydroxylaminodinitrotoluenes (2HADNT, 4HADNT, with 4HADNT as the dominant isomer), aminodinitrotoluenes (4ADNT, with sporadic detection of 2ADNT), 2,4-di(hydroxylamino)-6-nitrotoluene (24D(HA)6NT), 2,4-diamino-6-nitrotoluene (24DA6NT), and an additional compound which was tentatively identified as a (hydroxylamino)aminonitrotoluene isomer via gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy and spectral analysis. The resting cell assay, performed in an oxygen-free atmosphere, avoided formation of azoxy dimers and provided good mass balances. Significant preference for reduction in the para versus ortho position was detected. The formation of 24D(HA)6NT, but not ADNT, appeared inhibited by the presence of TNT. The rate and extent of TNT reduction were significantly enhanced at higher cell densities, or by supplying an exogenous reducing power source, revealing the importance of enzyme concentration and reducing power. Whether the oxygen-insensitive E. coli nitroreductases, encoded by nfsA and nfsB, directly catalyze the TNT reduction or account for the complete TNT transformation pathway, remains to be determined.

  9. Structure of Escherichia coli Flavodiiron Nitric Oxide Reductase.

    PubMed

    Romão, Célia V; Vicente, João B; Borges, Patrícia T; Victor, Bruno L; Lamosa, Pedro; Silva, Elísio; Pereira, Luís; Bandeiras, Tiago M; Soares, Cláudio M; Carrondo, Maria A; Turner, David; Teixeira, Miguel; Frazão, Carlos

    2016-11-20

    Flavodiiron proteins (FDPs) are present in organisms from all domains of life and have been described so far to be involved in the detoxification of oxygen or nitric oxide (NO), acting as O2 and/or NO reductases. The Escherichia coli FDP, named flavorubredoxin (FlRd), is the most extensively studied FDP. Biochemical and in vivo studies revealed that FlRd is involved in NO detoxification as part of the bacterial defense mechanisms against reactive nitrogen species. E. coli FlRd has a clear preference for NO as a substrate in vitro, exhibiting a very low reactivity toward O2. To contribute to the understanding of the structural features defining this substrate selectivity, we determined the crystallographic structure of E. coli FlRd, both in the isolated and reduced states. The overall tetrameric structure revealed a highly conserved flavodiiron core domain, with a metallo-β-lactamase-like domain containing a diiron center, and a flavodoxin domain with a flavin mononucleotide cofactor. The metal center in the oxidized state has a μ-hydroxo bridge coordinating the two irons, while in the reduced state, this moiety is not detected. Since only the flavodiiron domain was observed in these crystal structures, the structure of the rubredoxin domain was determined by NMR. Tunnels for the substrates were identified, and through molecular dynamics simulations, no differences for O2 or NO permeation were found. The present data represent the first structure for a NO-selective FDP.

  10. Identification of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli strains from avian organic fertilizers.

    PubMed

    Puño-Sarmiento, Juan; Gazal, Luis Eduardo; Medeiros, Leonardo P; Nishio, Erick K; Kobayashi, Renata K T; Nakazato, Gerson

    2014-08-28

    The Brazilian poultry industry generates large amounts of organic waste, such as chicken litter, which is often used in agriculture. Among the bacteria present in organic fertilizer are members of the Enterobacteriaceae family. The objective of this study was to detect the presence of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli (DEC) strains in avian organic fertilizer, and assess the potential damage they can cause in humans due to antimicrobial resistance. The presence of DEC pathotypes and phylogenetic groups were detected by multiplex-PCR. Phenotypic assays, such as tests for adhesion, cytotoxicity activity, biofilm formation and especially antimicrobial susceptibility, were performed. Fifteen DEC strains from 64 E. coli were isolated. Among these, four strains were classified as enteropathogenic (EPEC; 6.2%), three strains as Shiga toxin-producing (STEC; 4.7%), 10 strains as enteroaggregative (EAEC; 12.5%), but two of these harbored the eaeA gene too. The low number of isolated strains was most likely due to the composting process, which reduces the number of microorganisms. These strains were able to adhere to HEp-2 and HeLa cells and produce Shiga-toxins and biofilms; in addition, some of the strains showed antimicrobial resistance, which indicates a risk of the transfer of resistance genes to human E. coli. These results showed that DEC strains isolated from avian organic fertilizers can cause human infections.

  11. Heterologous biosynthesis and manipulation of alkanes in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Cao, Ying-Xiu; Xiao, Wen-Hai; Zhang, Jin-Lai; Xie, Ze-Xiong; Ding, Ming-Zhu; Yuan, Ying-Jin

    2016-11-01

    Biosynthesis of alkanes in microbial foundries offers a sustainable and green supplement to traditional fossil fuels. The dynamic equilibrium of fatty aldehydes, key intermediates, played a critical role in microbial alkanes production, due to the poor catalytic capability of aldehyde deformylating oxygenase (ADO). In our study, exploration of competitive pathway together with multi-modular optimization was utilized to improve fatty aldehydes balance and consequently enhance alkanes formation in Escherichia coli. Endogenous fatty alcohol formation was supposed to be competitive with alkane production, since both of the two routes consumed the same intermediate-fatty aldehyde. Nevertheless, in our case, alkanes production in E. coli was enhanced from trace amount to 58.8mg/L by the facilitation of moderate fatty alcohol biosynthesis, which was validated by deletion of endogenous aldehyde reductase (AHR), overexpression of fatty alcohol oxidase (FAO) and consequent transcriptional assay of aar, ado and adhP genes. Moreover, alkanes production was further improved to 81.8mg/L, 86.6mg/L or 101.7mg/L by manipulation of fatty acid biosynthesis, lipids degradation or electron transfer system modules, which directly referenced to fatty aldehydes dynamic pools. A titer of 1.31g/L alkanes was achieved in 2.5L fed-batch fermentation, which was the highest reported titer in E. coli. Our research has offered a reference for chemical overproduction in microbial cell factories facilitated by exploring competitive pathway.

  12. Recombinant expression of Streptococcus pneumoniae capsular polysaccharides in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Kay, Emily J.; Yates, Laura E.; Terra, Vanessa S.; Cuccui, Jon; Wren, Brendan W.

    2016-01-01

    Currently, Streptococcus pneumoniae is responsible for over 14 million cases of pneumonia worldwide annually, and over 1 million deaths, the majority of them children. The major determinant for pathogenesis is a polysaccharide capsule that is variable and is used to distinguish strains based on their serotype. The capsule forms the basis of the pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV23) that contains purified capsular polysaccharide from 23 serotypes, and the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13), containing 13 common serotypes conjugated to CRM197 (mutant diphtheria toxin). Purified capsule from S. pneumoniae is required for pneumococcal conjugate vaccine production, and costs can be prohibitively high, limiting accessibility of the vaccine in low-income countries. In this study, we demonstrate the recombinant expression of the capsule-encoding locus from four different serotypes of S. pneumoniae within Escherichia coli. Furthermore, we attempt to identify the minimum set of genes necessary to reliably and efficiently express these capsules heterologously. These E. coli strains could be used to produce a supply of S. pneumoniae serotype-specific capsules without the need to culture pathogenic bacteria. Additionally, these strains could be applied to synthetic glycobiological applications: recombinant vaccine production using E. coli outer membrane vesicles or coupling to proteins using protein glycan coupling technology. PMID:27110302

  13. Characterization of the YdeO regulon in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Yuki; Oshima, Taku; Ishihama, Akira; Yamamoto, Kaneyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Enterobacteria are able to survive under stressful conditions within animals, such as acidic conditions in the stomach, bile salts during transfer to the intestine and anaerobic conditions within the intestine. The glutamate-dependent (GAD) system plays a major role in acid resistance in Escherichia coli, and expression of the GAD system is controlled by the regulatory cascade consisting of EvgAS > YdeO > GadE. To understand the YdeO regulon in vivo, we used ChIP-chip to interrogate the E. coli genome for candidate YdeO binding sites. All of the seven operons identified by ChIP-chip as being potentially regulated by YdeO were confirmed as being under the direct control of YdeO using RT-qPCR, EMSA, DNaseI-footprinting and reporter assays. Within this YdeO regulon, we identified four stress-response transcription factors, DctR, NhaR, GadE, and GadW and enzymes for anaerobic respiration. Both GadE and GadW are involved in regulation of the GAD system and NhaR is an activator for the sodium/proton antiporter gene. In conjunction with co-transcribed Slp, DctR is involved in protection against metabolic endoproducts under acidic conditions. Taken all together, we suggest that YdeO is a key regulator of E. coli survival in both acidic and anaerobic conditions.

  14. Baicalin Protects Mice from Lethal Infection by Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Qi, Zhimin; Liu, Yan; He, Wenqi; Yang, Cheng; Wang, Quan; Dong, Jing; Deng, Xuming

    2017-01-01

    Shiga-like toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O157:H7 poses grave challenges to public health by its ability to cause severe colonic diseases and renal failure in both human and animals. Shiga-like toxins are the major pathogenic factor for some highly virulent E. coli expecially Shiga-like toxin 2. Conventional treatments such as antibiotics can facilitate the release of the toxin thus potentially exacerbate the diseases. Small molecule inhibitors and antibodies capable of neutralizing the toxins are the two major venues for the development of therapeutics against enterohemorrhagic serotype E. coli infection. While promising and potentially effective at clinical settings, these approaches need to overcome obstacles such as the limited routes of administration, responses from the host immune system, which are known to differ greatly among individuals. Our previous studies demonstrate that Baicalin (BAI), a flavonoid compound isolated from Scutellaria baicalensis protects against rStx2-induced cell cytotoxicity and also protects mice from lethal rStx2 challenges by inducing Stx2 to form inactive oligomers. In this manuscript, we present some exciting work showing that baicalin is an effective agent for therapeutic treatment of STEC O157:H7 infection.

  15. Microaerobic conversion of glycerol to ethanol in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Wong, Matthew S; Li, Mai; Black, Ryan W; Le, Thao Q; Puthli, Sharon; Campbell, Paul; Monticello, Daniel J

    2014-05-01

    Glycerol has become a desirable feedstock for the production of fuels and chemicals due to its availability and low price, but many barriers to commercialization remain. Previous investigators have made significant improvements in the yield of ethanol from glycerol. We have developed a fermentation process for the efficient microaerobic conversion of glycerol to ethanol by Escherichia coli that presents solutions to several other barriers to commercialization: rate, titer, specific productivity, use of inducers, use of antibiotics, and safety. To increase the rate, titer, and specific productivity to commercially relevant levels, we constructed a plasmid that overexpressed glycerol uptake genes dhaKLM, gldA, and glpK, as well as the ethanol pathway gene adhE. To eliminate the cost of inducers and antibiotics from the fermentation, we used the adhE and icd promoters from E. coli in our plasmid, and we implemented glycerol addiction to retain the plasmid. To address the safety issue of off-gas flammability, we optimized the fermentation process with reduced-oxygen sparge gas to ensure that the off-gas remained nonflammable. These advances represent significant progress toward the commercialization of an E. coli-based glycerol-to-ethanol process.

  16. The D-allose operon of Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, C; Song, S; Park, C

    1997-01-01

    Escherichia coli K-12 can utilize D-allose, an all-cis hexose, as a sole carbon source. The operon responsible for D-allose metabolism was localized at 92.8 min of the E. coli linkage map. It consists of six genes, alsRBACEK, which are inducible by D-allose and are under the control of the repressor gene alsR. This operon is also subject to catabolite repression. Three genes, alsB, alsA, and alsC, appear to be necessary for transport of D-allose. D-Allose-binding protein, encoded by alsB, is a periplasmic protein that has an affinity for D-allose, with a Kd of 0.33 microM. As was found for other binding-protein-mediated ABC transporters, the allose transport system includes an ATP-binding component (AlsA) and a transmembrane protein (AlsC). It was found that AlsE (a putative D-allulose-6-phosphate 3-epimerase), but not AlsK (a putative D-allose kinase), is necessary for allose metabolism. During this study, we observed that the D-allose transporter is partially responsible for the low-affinity transport of D-ribose and that strain W3110, an E. coli prototroph, has a defect in the transport of D-allose mediated by the allose permease. PMID:9401019

  17. Escherichia coli bacteria detection by using graphene-based biosensor.

    PubMed

    Akbari, Elnaz; Buntat, Zolkafle; Afroozeh, Abdolkarim; Zeinalinezhad, Alireza; Nikoukar, Ali

    2015-10-01

    Graphene is an allotrope of carbon with two-dimensional (2D) monolayer honeycombs. A larger detection area and higher sensitivity can be provided by graphene-based nanosenor because of its 2D structure. In addition, owing to its special characteristics, including electrical, optical and physical properties, graphene is known as a more suitable candidate compared to other materials used in the sensor application. A novel model employing a field-effect transistor structure using graphene is proposed and the current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of graphene are employed to model the sensing mechanism. This biosensor can detect Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria, providing high levels of sensitivity. It is observed that the graphene device experiences a drastic increase in conductance when exposed to E. coli bacteria at 0-10(5) cfu/ml concentration. The simple, fast response and high sensitivity of this nanoelectronic biosensor make it a suitable device in screening and functional studies of antibacterial drugs and an ideal high-throughput platform which can detect any pathogenic bacteria. Artificial neural network and support vector regression algorithms have also been used to provide other models for the I-V characteristic. A satisfactory agreement has been presented by comparison between the proposed models with the experimental data.

  18. Butyrate production under aerobic growth conditions by engineered Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Naoya; Vangnai, Alisa S; Pongtharangkul, Thunyarat; Yakushi, Toshiharu; Matsushita, Kazunobu

    2017-01-11

    Butyrate is an important industrial platform chemical. Although several groups have reported butyrate production under oxygen-limited conditions by a native producer, Clostridium tyrobutylicum, and by a metabolically engineered Escherichia coli, efforts to produce butyrate under aerobic growth conditions have met limited success. Here, we constructed a novel butyrate synthetic pathway that functions under aerobic growth conditions in E. coli, by modifying the 1-butanol synthetic pathway reported previously. The pathway consists of phaA (acetyltransferase) and phaB (NADPH-dependent acetoacetyl-CoA reductase) from Ralstonia eutropha, phaJ ((R)-specific enoyl-CoA hydratase) from Aeromonas caviae, ter (trans-enoyl-CoA reductase) from Treponema denticola, and endogenous thioesterase(s) of E. coli. To evaluate the potential of this pathway for butyrate production, culture conditions, including pH, oxygen supply, and concentration of inorganic nitrogen sources, were optimized in a mini-jar fermentor. Under the optimal conditions, butyrate was produced at a concentration of up to 140 mM (12.3 g/L in terms of butyric acid) after 54 h of fed-batch culture.

  19. Dissecting the Escherichia coli periplasmic chaperone network using differential proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Vertommen, Didier; Silhavy, Thomas J.; Collet, Jean-Francois

    2013-01-01

    β-barrel proteins, or outer membrane proteins (OMPs), perform many essential functions in Gram-negative bacteria, but questions remain about the mechanism by which they are assembled into the outer membrane (OM). In Escherichia coli, β-barrels are escorted across the periplasm by chaperones, most notably SurA and Skp. However, the contributions of these two chaperones to the assembly of the OM proteome remained unclear. We used differential proteomics to determine how the elimination of Skp and SurA affects the assembly of many OMPs. We have shown that removal of Skp has no impact on the levels of the 63 identified OM proteins. However, depletion of SurA in the skp strain has a marked impact on the OM proteome, diminishing the levels of almost all β-barrel proteins. Our results are consistent with a model in which SurA plays a primary chaperone role in E. coli. Furthermore, they suggest that while no OMPs prefer the Skp chaperone pathway in wild-type cells, most can use Skp efficiently when SurA is absent. Our data, which provide a unique glimpse into the protein content of the non-viable surA skp mutant, clarify the roles of the periplasmic chaperones in E. coli. PMID:22589188

  20. Rotational tumbling of Escherichia coli aggregates under shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portela, R.; Patrício, P.; Almeida, P. L.; Sobral, R. G.; Franco, J. M.; Leal, C. R.

    2016-12-01

    Growing living cultures of Escherichia coli bacteria are investigated using real-time in situ rheology and rheoimaging measurements. In the early stages of growth (lag phase) and when subjected to a constant stationary shear, the viscosity slowly increases with the cell's population. As the bacteria reach the exponential phase of growth, the viscosity increases rapidly, with sudden and temporary abrupt decreases and recoveries. At a certain stage, corresponding grossly to the late phase of growth, when the population stabilizes, the viscosity also keeps its maximum constant value, with drops and recoveries, for a long period of time. This complex rheological behavior, which is observed to be shear strain dependent, is a consequence of two coupled effects: the cell density continuous increase and its changing interacting properties. Particular attention is given to the late phase of growth of E. coli populations under shear. Rheoimaging measurements reveal, near the static plate, a rotational motion of E. coli aggregates, collectively tumbling and flowing in the shear direction. This behavior is interpreted in the light of a simple theoretical approach based on simple rigid body mechanics.

  1. Microaerobic Conversion of Glycerol to Ethanol in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Matthew S.; Li, Mai; Black, Ryan W.; Le, Thao Q.; Puthli, Sharon; Campbell, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Glycerol has become a desirable feedstock for the production of fuels and chemicals due to its availability and low price, but many barriers to commercialization remain. Previous investigators have made significant improvements in the yield of ethanol from glycerol. We have developed a fermentation process for the efficient microaerobic conversion of glycerol to ethanol by Escherichia coli that presents solutions to several other barriers to commercialization: rate, titer, specific productivity, use of inducers, use of antibiotics, and safety. To increase the rate, titer, and specific productivity to commercially relevant levels, we constructed a plasmid that overexpressed glycerol uptake genes dhaKLM, gldA, and glpK, as well as the ethanol pathway gene adhE. To eliminate the cost of inducers and antibiotics from the fermentation, we used the adhE and icd promoters from E. coli in our plasmid, and we implemented glycerol addiction to retain the plasmid. To address the safety issue of off-gas flammability, we optimized the fermentation process with reduced-oxygen sparge gas to ensure that the off-gas remained nonflammable. These advances represent significant progress toward the commercialization of an E. coli-based glycerol-to-ethanol process. PMID:24584248

  2. Engineering Escherichia coli for Microbial Production of Butanone

    PubMed Central

    Srirangan, Kajan; Liu, Xuejia; Akawi, Lamees; Bruder, Mark; Moo-Young, Murray

    2016-01-01

    To expand the chemical and molecular diversity of biotransformation using whole-cell biocatalysts, we genetically engineered a pathway in Escherichia coli for heterologous production of butanone, an important commodity ketone. First, a 1-propanol-producing E. coli host strain with its sleeping beauty mutase (Sbm) operon being activated was used to increase the pool of propionyl-coenzyme A (propionyl-CoA). Subsequently, molecular heterofusion of propionyl-CoA and acetyl-CoA was conducted to yield 3-ketovaleryl-CoA via a CoA-dependent elongation pathway. Lastly, 3-ketovaleryl-CoA was channeled into the clostridial acetone formation pathway for thioester hydrolysis and subsequent decarboxylation to form butanone. Biochemical, genetic, and metabolic factors affecting relative levels of ketogenesis, acidogenesis, and alcohologenesis under selected fermentative culture conditions were investigated. Using the engineered E. coli strain for batch cultivation with 30 g liter−1 glycerol as the carbon source, we achieved coproduction of 1.3 g liter−1 butanone and 2.9 g liter−1 acetone. The results suggest that approximately 42% of spent glycerol was utilized for ketone biosynthesis, and thus they demonstrate potential industrial applicability of this microbial platform. PMID:26896132

  3. Baicalin Protects Mice from Lethal Infection by Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong; Qi, Zhimin; Liu, Yan; He, Wenqi; Yang, Cheng; Wang, Quan; Dong, Jing; Deng, Xuming

    2017-01-01

    Shiga-like toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O157:H7 poses grave challenges to public health by its ability to cause severe colonic diseases and renal failure in both human and animals. Shiga-like toxins are the major pathogenic factor for some highly virulent E. coli expecially Shiga-like toxin 2. Conventional treatments such as antibiotics can facilitate the release of the toxin thus potentially exacerbate the diseases. Small molecule inhibitors and antibodies capable of neutralizing the toxins are the two major venues for the development of therapeutics against enterohemorrhagic serotype E. coli infection. While promising and potentially effective at clinical settings, these approaches need to overcome obstacles such as the limited routes of administration, responses from the host immune system, which are known to differ greatly among individuals. Our previous studies demonstrate that Baicalin (BAI), a flavonoid compound isolated from Scutellaria baicalensis protects against rStx2-induced cell cytotoxicity and also protects mice from lethal rStx2 challenges by inducing Stx2 to form inactive oligomers. In this manuscript, we present some exciting work showing that baicalin is an effective agent for therapeutic treatment of STEC O157:H7 infection. PMID:28337193

  4. Characterization of an emergent clone of enteroinvasive Escherichia coli circulating in Europe.

    PubMed

    Michelacci, V; Prosseda, G; Maugliani, A; Tozzoli, R; Sanchez, S; Herrera-León, S; Dallman, T; Jenkins, C; Caprioli, A; Morabito, S

    2016-03-01

    Enteroinvasive Escherichia coli (EIEC) cause intestinal illness indistinguishable from that caused by Shigella, mainly in developing countries. Recently an upsurge of cases of EIEC infections has been observed in Europe, with two large outbreaks occurring in Italy and in the United Kingdom. We have characterized phenotypically and genotypically the strains responsible for these epidemics together with an additional isolate from a sporadic case isolated in Spain. The three isolates belonged to the same rare serotype O96:H19 and were of sequence type ST-99, never reported before in EIEC or Shigella. The EIEC strains investigated possessed all the virulence genes harboured on the large plasmid conferring the invasive phenotype to EIEC and Shigella while showing only some of the known chromosomal virulence genes and none of the described pathoadaptative mutations. At the same time, they displayed motility abilities and biochemical requirements resembling more closely those of the non-pathogenic E. coli rather than the EIEC and Shigella strains used as reference. Our observations suggested that the O96:H19 strains belong to an emerging EIEC clone, which could be the result of a recent event of acquisition of the invasion plasmid by commensal E. coli.

  5. Functional cooperation of the dnaE and dnaN gene products in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Kuwabara, N; Uchida, H

    1981-01-01

    A system was designed to isolate second-site intergenic suppressors of a thermosensitive mutation of the dnaE gene of Escherichia coli. The dnaE gene codes for the alpha subunit of DNA polymerase III [McHenry, C. S. & Crow, W. (1979) J. Biol. Chem. 254, 1748-1753]. One such suppressor, named sueA77, was finely mapped and found to be located at 82 min on the E. coli chromosome, between dnaA and recF, and within the dnaN gene [Sakakibara, Y. & Mizukami, T. (1980) Mol. Gen. Genet. 178, 541-553]. The dnaN gene codes for the beta subunit of DNA polymerase III holoenzyme [Burgers, P. M. J., Kornberg, A. & Sakakibara, Y. (1981) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 78, 5391-5395]. The sueA77 mutation was trans-dominant over its wild-type allele, and it suppressed different thermosensitive mutations of dnaE with different maximal permissive temperature. These properties were interpreted as providing genetic evidence for interaction of the dnaE and dnaN gene products in E. coli. Images PMID:6458043

  6. Functional cooperation of the dnaE and dnaN gene products in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kuwabara, N; Uchida, H

    1981-09-01

    A system was designed to isolate second-site intergenic suppressors of a thermosensitive mutation of the dnaE gene of Escherichia coli. The dnaE gene codes for the alpha subunit of DNA polymerase III [McHenry, C. S. & Crow, W. (1979) J. Biol. Chem. 254, 1748-1753]. One such suppressor, named sueA77, was finely mapped and found to be located at 82 min on the E. coli chromosome, between dnaA and recF, and within the dnaN gene [Sakakibara, Y. & Mizukami, T. (1980) Mol. Gen. Genet. 178, 541-553]. The dnaN gene codes for the beta subunit of DNA polymerase III holoenzyme [Burgers, P. M. J., Kornberg, A. & Sakakibara, Y. (1981) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 78, 5391-5395]. The sueA77 mutation was trans-dominant over its wild-type allele, and it suppressed different thermosensitive mutations of dnaE with different maximal permissive temperature. These properties were interpreted as providing genetic evidence for interaction of the dnaE and dnaN gene products in E. coli.

  7. RNA polymerase supply and flux through the lac operon in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Sendy, Bandar; Lee, David J.; Bryant, Jack A.

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin immunoprecipitation, followed by quantification of immunoprecipitated DNA, can be used to measure RNA polymerase binding to any DNA segment in Escherichia coli. By calibrating measurements against the signal from a single RNA polymerase bound at a single promoter, we can calculate both promoter occupancy levels and the flux of transcribing RNA polymerase through transcription units. Here, we have applied the methodology to the E. coli lactose operon promoter. We confirm that promoter occupancy is limited by recruitment and that the supply of RNA polymerase to the lactose operon promoter depends on its location in the E. coli chromosome. Measurements of RNA polymerase binding to DNA segments within the lactose operon show that flux of RNA polymerase through the operon is low, with, on average, over 18 s elapsing between the passage of transcribing polymerases. Similar low levels of flux were found when semi-synthetic promoters were used to drive transcript initiation, even when the promoter elements were changed to ensure full occupancy of the promoter by RNA polymerase. This article is part of the themed issue ‘The new bacteriology’. PMID:27672157

  8. Dairy farm age and resistance to antimicrobial agents in Escherichia coli isolated from dairy topsoil.

    PubMed

    Jones, Suzanna E; Burgos, Jonathan M; Lutnesky, Marvin M F; Sena, Johnny A; Kumar, Sanath; Jones, Lindsay M; Varela, Manuel F

    2011-04-01

    Antimicrobial agent usage is common in animal agriculture for therapeutic and prophylactic purposes. Selective pressure exerted by these antimicrobials on soil bacteria could result in the selection of strains that are resistant due to chromosomal- or plasmid-derived genetic components. Multiple antimicrobial resistances in Escherichia coli and the direct relationship between antimicrobial agent use over time has been extensively studied, yet the relationship between the age of an animal agriculture environment such as a dairy farm and antibiotic resistance remains unclear. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that antimicrobial-resistance profiles of E. coli isolated from dairy farm topsoil correlate with dairy farm age. E. coli isolated from eleven dairy farms of varying ages within Roosevelt County, NM were used for MIC determinations to chloramphenicol, nalidixic acid, penicillin, tetracycline, ampicillin, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, gentamicin, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, cefotaxime, and ciprofloxacin. The minimum inhibitory concentration values of four antibiotics ranged 0.75 to >256 μg/ml, 1 to >256 μg/ml, 12 to >256 μg/ml, and 0.75 to >256 μg/ml for chloramphenicol, nalidixic acid, penicillin, and tetracycline, respectively. The study did not show a direct relationship between antibiotic resistance and the age of dairy farms.

  9. Integration of an [FeFe]-hydrogenase into the anaerobic metabolism of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Ciarán L.; Pinske, Constanze; Murphy, Bonnie J.; Parkin, Alison; Armstrong, Fraser; Palmer, Tracy; Sargent, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Biohydrogen is a potentially useful product of microbial energy metabolism. One approach to engineering biohydrogen production in bacteria is the production of non-native hydrogenase activity in a host cell, for example Escherichia coli. In some microbes, hydrogenase enzymes are linked directly to central metabolism via diaphorase enzymes that utilise NAD+/NADH cofactors. In this work, it was hypothesised that heterologous production of an NAD+/NADH-linked hydrogenase could connect hydrogen production in an E. coli host directly to its central metabolism. To test this, a synthetic operon was designed and characterised encoding an apparently NADH-dependent, hydrogen-evolving [FeFe]-hydrogenase from Caldanaerobacter subterranus. The synthetic operon was stably integrated into the E. coli chromosome and shown to produce an active hydrogenase, however no H2 production was observed. Subsequently, it was found that heterologous co-production of a pyruvate::ferredoxin oxidoreductase and ferredoxin from Thermotoga maritima was found to be essential to drive H2 production by this system. This work provides genetic evidence that the Ca.subterranus [FeFe]-hydrogenase could be operating in vivo as an electron-confurcating enzyme. PMID:26839796

  10. Thermosensitive omsA mutation of Escherichia coli that causes thermoregulated release of periplasmic proteins.

    PubMed

    Tsuruoka, T; Ito, M; Tomioka, S; Hirata, A; Matsuhashi, M

    1988-11-01

    A mutant of Escherichia coli with a thermosensitive defect, possibly in the outer membrane (omsA mutant), was isolated from E. coli K-12 by mutagenization and selection for thermosensitivity and beta-lactam supersensitivity of growth. The mutant also showed very high sensitivity to other antibiotics, such as macarbomycin, midecamycin, rifampin, and bacitracin. The mutation was recessive to the wild type and was mapped at about 4 min on the E. coli chromosome between fhuA and metD. The mutation caused rapid release into the medium of periplasmic enzymes such as RTEM penicillinase but practically no cytoplasmic enzyme when cells grown at 30 degrees C were transferred to 37 or 42 degrees C. Electron microscopic observations showed many large double-layered vesicles attached to the surface of cells incubated at 42 degrees C. We conclude that the mutant had a mutation that caused a temperature-dependent defect in the outer membrane structure or its assembly (named an oms mutation). The omsA mutant may be useful for production of periplasmic proteins, which it releases into the culture medium on shift up of temperature.

  11. Efficient hammerhead ribozyme and antisense RNA targeting in a slow ribosome Escherichia coli mutant.

    PubMed

    Chen, H; Ferbeyre, G; Cedergren, R

    1997-05-01

    We have evaluated inhibition of the plasmid-born chloramphenicol acetyl transferase gene (CAT) by the hammerhead ribozyme and antisense RNA in Escherichia coli where the translation and transcription rates have been modified. Whereas neither antisense nor the hammerhead had an inhibitory effect on CAT activity in wild-type E. coli, both reduced the level of the messenger RNA and the activity of the CAT gene by almost 60% in a slow ribosome mutant. Streptomycin, which increases the speed of translation in this mutant strain, restored full CAT activity. The level of CAT activity expressed from a T7 RNA polymerase promoter was not affected by the presence of either antisense RNA or the hammerhead ribozyme. When the target gene was expressed from a chromosomal locus in wild-type E. coli, both antisense RNA and the hammerhead ribozyme showed some inhibitory activity, but the level of inhibition was significantly increased in the slow ribosome strain. This bacterial system offers a unique entry to the study of cellular factors which mediate the activity of ribozymes in vivo.

  12. Aromatic amino acid biosynthesis: regulation of shikimate kinase in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed Central

    Ely, B; Pittard, J

    1979-01-01

    Starvation of cells of Escherichia coli K-12 for the aromatic amino acids results in an increased rate of synthesis of shikimate kinase activity. The two controlling amino acids are tyrosine and tryptophan, and starvation for both results in derepression. The product of the regulator gene tyrR also participates in this control, and shikimate kinase synthesis was depressed in tyrR mutants. Chromatography of cell extracts on diethylaminoethyl-Sephadex allowed partial separation of two shikimate kinase enzymes and demonstrated that only one of these subject to specific repression control involving tyrR. By contrast, chromatography of cell extracts with G-75 or G-200 columns revealed a singl-molecular-weight species of shikimate kinase activity with an apparent molecular weight of 20,000. The levels of shikimate kinase in a series of partial diploid strains indicated that aroL, the structural gene for the tyrR-controlled shikimate kinase enzyme, is located on the E. coli chromosome between the structural genes proC and purE. By means of localized mutagenesis, an aroL mutant of E. coli was isolated. The mutant was an aromatic prototroph and, by the criterion of column chromatography, appeared to have only a single functional species of shikimate kinase enzyme. PMID:222728

  13. RNA polymerase supply and flux through the lac operon in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Sendy, Bandar; Lee, David J; Busby, Stephen J W; Bryant, Jack A

    2016-11-05

    Chromatin immunoprecipitation, followed by quantification of immunoprecipitated DNA, can be used to measure RNA polymerase binding to any DNA segment in Escherichia coli By calibrating measurements against the signal from a single RNA polymerase bound at a single promoter, we can calculate both promoter occupancy levels and the flux of transcribing RNA polymerase through transcription units. Here, we have applied the methodology to the E. coli lactose operon promoter. We confirm that promoter occupancy is limited by recruitment and that the supply of RNA polymerase to the lactose operon promoter depends on its location in the E. coli chromosome. Measurements of RNA polymerase binding to DNA segments within the lactose operon show that flux of RNA polymerase through the operon is low, with, on average, over 18 s elapsing between the passage of transcribing polymerases. Similar low levels of flux were found when semi-synthetic promoters were used to drive transcript initiation, even when the promoter elements were changed to ensure full occupancy of the promoter by RNA polymerase.This article is part of the themed issue 'The new bacteriology'.

  14. Genomewide Dam Methylation in Escherichia coli during Long-Term Stationary Phase.

    PubMed

    Westphal, Lacey L; Sauvey, Peter; Champion, Matthew M; Ehrenreich, Ian M; Finkel, Steven E

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation in prokaryotes is widespread. The most common modification of the genome is the methylation of adenine at the N-6 position. In Escherichia coli K-12 and many gammaproteobacteria, this modification is catalyzed by DNA adenine methyltransferase (Dam) at the GATC consensus sequence and is known to modulate cellular processes including transcriptional regulation of gene expression, initiation of chromosomal replication, and DNA mismatch repair. While studies thus far have focused on the motifs associated with methylated adenine (meA), the frequency of meA across the genome, and temporal dynamics during early periods of incubation, here we conduct the first study on the temporal dynamics of adenine methylation in E. coli by Dam throughout all five phases of the bacterial life cycle in the laboratory. Using single-molecule real-time sequencing, we show that virtually all GATC sites are significantly methylated over time; nearly complete methylation of the chromosome was confirmed by mass spectroscopy analysis. However, we also detect 66 sites whose methylation patterns change significantly over time within a population, including three sites associated with sialic acid transport and catabolism, suggesting a potential role for Dam regulation of these genes; differential expression of this subset of genes was confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR. Further, we show significant growth defects of the dam mutant during long-term stationary phase (LTSP). Together these data suggest that the cell places a high premium on fully methylating the chromosome and that alterations in methylation patterns may have significant impact on patterns of transcription, maintenance of genetic fidelity, and cell survival. IMPORTANCE While it has been shown that methylation remains relatively constant into early stationary phase of E. coli, this study goes further through death phase and long-term stationary phase, a unique time in the bacterial life cycle due to nutrient

  15. Genomewide Dam Methylation in Escherichia coli during Long-Term Stationary Phase

    PubMed Central

    Westphal, Lacey L.; Sauvey, Peter; Champion, Matthew M.; Ehrenreich, Ian M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT DNA methylation in prokaryotes is widespread. The most common modification of the genome is the methylation of adenine at the N-6 position. In Escherichia coli K-12 and many gammaproteobacteria, this modification is catalyzed by DNA adenine methyltransferase (Dam) at the GATC consensus sequence and is known to modulate cellular processes including transcriptional regulation of gene expression, initiation of chromosomal replication, and DNA mismatch repair. While studies thus far have focused on the motifs associated with methylated adenine (meA), the frequency of meA across the genome, and temporal dynamics during early periods of incubation, here we conduct the first study on the temporal dynamics of adenine methylation in E. coli by Dam throughout all five phases of the bacterial life cycle in the laboratory. Using single-molecule real-time sequencing, we show that virtually all GATC sites are significantly methylated over time; nearly complete methylation of the chromosome was confirmed by mass spectroscopy analysis. However, we also detect 66 sites whose methylation patterns change significantly over time within a population, including three sites associated with sialic acid transport and catabolism, suggesting a potential role for Dam regulation of these genes; differential expression of this subset of genes was confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR. Further, we show significant growth defects of the dam mutant during long-term stationary phase (LTSP). Together these data suggest that the cell places a high premium on fully methylating the chromosome and that alterations in methylation patterns may have significant impact on patterns of transcription, maintenance of genetic fidelity, and cell survival. IMPORTANCE While it has been shown that methylation remains relatively constant into early stationary phase of E. coli, this study goes further through death phase and long-term stationary phase, a unique time in the bacterial life cycle due to

  16. Characterization of Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli on Veal Hides and Carcasses.

    PubMed

    Bosilevac, Joseph M; Wang, Rong; Luedtke, Brandon E; Hinkley, Susanne; Wheeler, Tommy L; Koohmaraie, Mohammad

    2017-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) are Shiga toxin-producing E. coli associated with the most severe forms of foodborne illnesses. The U.S. Department of Agriculture, Food Safety and Inspection Service has identified a higher percentage of non-O157 EHEC compared with E. coli O157:H7-positive samples collected from veal trimmings than from products produced from other cattle slaughter classes. Therefore samples were collected from hides and preevisceration carcasses at five veal processors to assess E. coli O157:H7 and non-O157 EHEC contamination during bob veal and formula-fed veal dressing procedures. E. coli O157:H7 prevalence was measured by culture isolation and found to be on 20.3% of hides and 6.7% of carcasses. In contrast, a non-O157 EHEC molecular screening assay identified 90.3% of hides and 68.2% of carcasses as positive. Only carcass samples were taken forward to culture confirmation and 38.7% yielded one or more non-O157 EHEC isolates. The recovery of an EHEC varied by plant and sample collection date; values ranged from 2.1 to 87.8% among plants and from 4.2 to 64.2% within the same plant. Three plants were resampled after changes were made to sanitary dressing procedures. Between the two collection times at the three plants, hide-to-carcass transfer of E. coli O157:H7 and non-O157 EHEC was significantly reduced. All adulterant EHEC serogroups (O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, and O145) were isolated from veal carcasses as well as four other potentially pathogenic serogroups (O5, O84, O118, and O177). Bob veal was found to have a greater culture prevalence of E. coli O157:H7 and greater positive molecular screens for non-O157 EHEC than formula-fed veal (P < 0.05), but the percentage of culture-confirmed non-O157 EHEC was not different (P > 0.05) between the two types of calves. EHEC-O26, -O111, and -O121 were found more often in bob veal (P < 0.05), whereas EHEC-O103 was found more often in formula-fed veal (P < 0.05).

  17. 40 CFR 180.1301 - Escherichia coli O157:H7 specific bacteriophages; temporary exemption from the requirement of a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Escherichia coli O157:H7 specific... PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1301 Escherichia coli O157:H7 specific... Escherichia coli O157:H7, sequence negative for shiga toxins I and II, and grown on atoxigenic host...

  18. 40 CFR 180.1301 - Escherichia coli O157:H7 specific bacteriophages; temporary exemption from the requirement of a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Escherichia coli O157:H7 specific... PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1301 Escherichia coli O157:H7 specific... Escherichia coli O157:H7, sequence negative for shiga toxins I and II, and grown on atoxigenic host...

  19. 40 CFR 180.1301 - Escherichia coli O157:H7 specific bacteriophages; temporary exemption from the requirement of a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Escherichia coli O157:H7 specific... PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1301 Escherichia coli O157:H7 specific... Escherichia coli O157:H7, sequence negative for shiga toxins I and II, and grown on atoxigenic host...

  20. 40 CFR 180.1301 - Escherichia coli O157:H7 specific bacteriophages; temporary exemption from the requirement of a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Escherichia coli O157:H7 specific... PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1301 Escherichia coli O157:H7 specific... Escherichia coli O157:H7, sequence negative for shiga toxins I and II, and grown on atoxigenic host...

  1. High-resolution mapping of architectural DNA binding protein facilitation of a DNA repression loop in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Becker, Nicole A; Maher, L James

    2015-06-09

    Double-stranded DNA is a locally inflexible polymer that resists bending and twisting over hundreds of base pairs. Despite this, tight DNA bending is biologically important for DNA packaging in eukaryotic chromatin and tight DNA looping is important for gene repression in prokaryotes. We and others have previously shown that sequence nonspecific DNA kinking proteins, such as Escherichia coli heat unstable and Saccharomyces cerevisiae non-histone chromosomal protein 6A (Nhp6A), facilitate lac repressor (LacI) repression loops in E. coli. It has been unknown if this facilitation involves direct protein binding to the tightly bent DNA loop or an indirect effect promoting global negative supercoiling of DNA. Here we adapt two high-resolution in vivo protein-mapping techniques to demonstrate direct binding of the heterologous Nhp6A protein at a LacI repression loop in living E. coli cells.

  2. TLA-1: a New Plasmid-Mediated Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase from Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Silva, J.; Aguilar, C.; Ayala, G.; Estrada, M. A.; Garza-Ramos, U.; Lara-Lemus, R.; Ledezma, L.

    2000-01-01

    Escherichia coli R170, isolated from the urine of an infected patient, was resistant to expanded-spectrum cephalosporins, aztreonam, ciprofloxacin, and ofloxacin but was susceptible to amikacin, cefotetan, and imipenem. This particular strain contained three different plasmids that encoded two β-lactamases with pIs of 7.0 and 9.0. Resistance to cefotaxime, ceftazidime, aztreonam, trimethoprim, and sulfamethoxazole was transferred by conjugation from E. coli R170 to E. coli J53-2. The transferred plasmid, RZA92, which encoded a single β-lactamase, was 150 kb in length. The cefotaxime resistance gene that encodes the TLA-1 β-lactamase (pI 9.0) was cloned from the transconjugant by transformation to E. coli DH5α. Sequencing of the blaTLA-1 gene revealed an open reading frame of 906 bp, which corresponded to 301 amino acid residues, including motifs common to class A β-lactamases: 70SXXK, 130SDN, and 234KTG. The amino acid sequence of TLA-1 shared 50% identity with the CME-1 chromosomal class A β-lactamase from Chryseobacterium (Flavobacterium) meningosepticum; 48.8% identity with the VEB-1 class A β-lactamase from E. coli; 40 to 42% identity with CblA of Bacteroides uniformis, PER-1 of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and PER-2 of Salmonella typhimurium; and 39% identity with CepA of Bacteroides fragilis. The partially purified TLA-1 β-lactamase had a molecular mass of 31.4 kDa and a pI of 9.0 and preferentially hydrolyzed cephaloridine, cefotaxime, cephalothin, benzylpenicillin, and ceftazidime. The enzyme was markedly inhibited by sulbactam, tazobactam, and clavulanic acid. TLA-1 is a new extended-spectrum β-lactamase of Ambler class A. PMID:10722503

  3. TLA-1: a new plasmid-mediated extended-spectrum beta-lactamase from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Silva, J; Aguilar, C; Ayala, G; Estrada, M A; Garza-Ramos, U; Lara-Lemus, R; Ledezma, L

    2000-04-01

    Escherichia coli R170, isolated from the urine of an infected patient, was resistant to expanded-spectrum cephalosporins, aztreonam, ciprofloxacin, and ofloxacin but was susceptible to amikacin, cefotetan, and imipenem. This particular strain contained three different plasmids that encoded two beta-lactamases with pIs of 7.0 and 9.0. Resistance to cefotaxime, ceftazidime, aztreonam, trimethoprim, and sulfamethoxazole was transferred by conjugation from E. coli R170 to E. coli J53-2. The transferred plasmid, RZA92, which encoded a single beta-lactamase, was 150 kb in length. The cefotaxime resistance gene that encodes the TLA-1 beta-lactamase (pI 9.0) was cloned from the transconjugant by transformation to E. coli DH5alpha. Sequencing of the bla(TLA-1) gene revealed an open reading frame of 906 bp, which corresponded to 301 amino acid residues, including motifs common to class A beta-lactamases: (70)SXXK, (130)SDN, and (234)KTG. The amino acid sequence of TLA-1 shared 50% identity with the CME-1 chromosomal class A beta-lactamase from Chryseobacterium (Flavobacterium) meningosepticum; 48.8% identity with the VEB-1 class A beta-lactamase from E. coli; 40 to 42% identity with CblA of Bacteroides uniformis, PER-1 of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and PER-2 of Salmonella typhimurium; and 39% identity with CepA of Bacteroides fragilis. The partially purified TLA-1 beta-lactamase had a molecular mass of 31.4 kDa and a pI of 9.0 and preferentially hydrolyzed cephaloridine, cefotaxime, cephalothin, benzylpenicillin, and ceftazidime. The enzyme was markedly inhibited by sulbactam, tazobactam, and clavulanic acid. TLA-1 is a new extended-spectrum beta-lactamase of Ambler class A.

  4. Production of bioactive chicken follistatin315 in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Beum; Choi, Rocky; Park, Sung Kwon; Kim, Yong Soo

    2014-12-01

    Follistatin (FST) binds to myostatin (MSTN), a potent negative regulator of skeletal muscle growth. Inhibition of MSTN activity by FST treatment has shown to enhance muscle growth as well as ameliorate symptoms of muscular dystrophy in animal models, illustrating the potential of FST as an agent to enhance muscle growth in animal agriculture or to treat muscle wasting conditions or disease in humans. Therefore, we designed a study to produce biologically active recombinant chicken FST315 (chFST315) in an Escherichia coli host. Since FST contains multiple intramolecular disulfide bonds, we expressed chFST315 protein in either a system that utilizes a periplasmic expression strategy, or a genetically modified E. coli system (SHuffle strain) that is capable of disulfide bond formation in the cytoplasm. Periplasmic expression of chFST315 using the pMAL-p5x vector system, which was designed to express maltose-binding protein (MBP) fusion protein, failed to produce a soluble recombinant protein. However, cytoplasmic expression of chFST315 using pMAL-c5x vector in SHuffle E. coli strain resulted in a soluble expression of the recombinant protein (MBP-chFST315). Combination of heparin and amylose resin affinity chromatography yielded about 6 mg/L purified MBP-chFST315. The purified MBP-chFST315 showed binding affinity to MSTN and activin in a pull-down assay, as well as inhibited MSTN and activin activity in an in vitro reporter gene assay. In conclusion, results of the study demonstrate that for the first time a recombinant, biologically active FST molecule can be produced in a soluble form in E. coli. The ability to produce FST in a cost-effective system is expected to allow us to investigate the potentials of FST as an agent to improve skeletal muscle growth of meat producing animals via suppression of MSTN.

  5. Characterization of three novel mechanosensitive channel activities in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Michelle D; Black, Susan; Rasmussen, Tim; Rasmussen, Akiko; Stokes, Neil R; Stephen, Terri-Leigh; Miller, Samantha; Booth, Ian R

    2012-01-01

    Mechanosensitive channels sense elevated membrane tension that arises from rapid water influx occurring when cells move from high to low osmolarity environments (hypoosmotic shock). These non-specific channels in the cytoplasmic membrane release osmotically-active solutes and ions. The two major mechanosensitive channels in Escherichia coli are MscL and MscS. Deletion of both proteins severely compromises survival of hypoosmotic shock. However, like many bacteria, E. coli cells possess other MscS-type genes (kefA, ybdG, ybiO, yjeP and ynaI). Two homologs, MscK (kefA) and YbdG, have been characterized as mechanosensitive channels that play minor roles in maintaining cell integrity. Additional channel openings are occasionally observed in patches derived from mutants lacking MscS, MscK and MscL. Due to their rare occurrence, little is known about these extra pressure-induced currents or their genetic origins. Here we complete the identification of the remaining E. coli mechanosensitive channels YnaI, YbiO and YjeP. The latter is the major component of the previously described MscM activity (~300 pS), while YnaI (~100 pS) and YbiO (~1000 pS) were previously unknown. Expression of native YbiO is NaCl-specific and RpoS-dependent. A Δ7 strain was created with all seven E. coli mechanosensitive channel genes deleted. High level expression of YnaI, YbiO or YjeP proteins from a multicopy plasmid in the Δ7 strain (MJFGH) leads to substantial protection against hypoosmotic shock. Purified homologs exhibit high molecular masses that are consistent with heptameric assemblies. This work reveals novel mechanosensitive channels and discusses the regulation of their expression in the context of possible additional functions.

  6. Azorean wild rabbits as reservoirs of antimicrobial resistant Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Marinho, Catarina; Igrejas, Gilberto; Gonçalves, Alexandre; Silva, Nuno; Santos, Tiago; Monteiro, Ricardo; Gonçalves, David; Rodrigues, Tiago; Poeta, Patrícia

    2014-12-01

    Antibiotic resistance in bacteria is an increasing problem that is not only constrained to the clinical setting but also to other environments that can lodge antibiotic resistant bacteria and therefore they may serve as reservoirs of genetic determinants of antibiotic resistance. One hundred and thirty-six faecal samples from European wild rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus algirus) were collected on São Jorge Island in Azores Archipelago, and analysed for Escherichia coli isolates. Seventy-seven isolates (56.6%) were recovered and studied for antimicrobial resistance, one isolate per positive sample. Thirteen (16.9%), 19 (24.7%), 25 (32.4%) and 20 (26%) isolates were ascribed to A, B1, B2 and D phylogenetic groups, respectively, by specific primer polymerase chain reaction. Different E. coli isolates were found to be resistant to ampicillin (16.9%), tetracycline (1.3%), streptomycin (42.9%), sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim (1.3%), amikacin (1.3%), tobramycin (2.6%) and nalidixic acid (1.3%). Additionally, the blaTEM, tetA, strA/strB, aadA, sul1, intI, intI2 and qacEΔ+sul1 genes were found in most resistant isolates. This study showed that E. coli from the intestinal tract of wild rabbits from Azores Archipelago are resistant to widely prescribed antibiotics in medicine and they constitute a reservoir of antimicrobial resistant genes, which may play a significant role in the spread of antimicrobial resistance. Therefore, antibiotic resistant E. coli from Azorean wild rabbits may represent an ecological and public health problem.

  7. Characterization of fimbriae produced by enteropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Girón, J A; Ho, A S; Schoolnik, G K

    1993-01-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) express rope-like bundles of filaments, termed bundle-forming pili (BFP) (J. A. Girón, A. S. Y. Ho, and G. K. Schoolnik, Science 254:710-713, 1991). Expression of BFP is associated with localized adherence to HEp-2 cells and the presence of the EPEC adherence factor plasmid. In this study, we describe the identification of rod-like fimbriae and fibrillae expressed simultaneously on the bacterial surface of three prototype EPEC strains. Upon fimbrial extraction from EPEC B171 (O111:NM), three fimbrial subunits with masses of 16.5, 15.5, and 14.7 kDa were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Their N-terminal amino acid sequence showed homology with F9 and F7(2) fimbriae of uropathogenic E. coli and F1845 of diffuse-adhering E. coli, respectively. The mixture of fimbrial subunits (called FB171) exhibited mannose-resistant agglutination of human erythrocytes only, and this activity was not inhibited by alpha-D-Gal(1-4)-beta-Gal disaccharide or any other described receptor analogs for P, S, F, M, G, and Dr hemagglutinins of uropathogenic E. coli, which suggests a different receptor specificity. Hemagglutination was inhibited by extracellular matrix glycoproteins, i.e., collagen type IV, laminin, and fibronectin, and to a lesser extent by gangliosides, fetuin, and asialofetuin. Scanning electron microscopic studies performed on clusters of bacteria adhering to HEp-2 cells revealed the presence of structures resembling BFP and rod-like fimbriae linking bacteria to bacteria and bacteria to the eukaryotic cell membrane. We suggest a role of these surface appendages in the interaction of EPEC with eukaryotic cells as well as in the overall pathogenesis of intestinal disease caused by EPEC. Images PMID:7901197

  8. Inactivation kinetics of Escherichia coli by pulsed electron beam.

    PubMed

    Chalise, P R; Hotta, E; Matak, K E; Jaczynski, J

    2007-09-01

    A novel and compact low-energy (keV) high-power pulsed electron beam (e-beam) that utilizes a secondary emission electron gun (SEEG) was designed and constructed. Escherichia coli JM 109 at a concentration of 10(6) CFU/mL was spread-plated on Luria-Bertani (LB) medium and subjected to the SEEG e-beam. The e-beam was administered as 1 or 5 pulses. The duration of a single pulse was constant at 5 micros, e-beam current density was constant at 25 mA/cm2, and e-beam energy varied between 60 and 82.5 keV. Following treatment with the SEEG e-beam, survivors of the irradiated E. coli samples were enumerated by a standard 10-fold dilution and spread-plated. The survivor curves were plotted on logarithmic scale as a function of e-beam dose. The D10-values were calculated as a negative reciprocal of the slope of the survivor curves. The D10-values for E. coli inactivated with 1- and 5-pulse SEEG e-beam were 0.0026 and 0.0217 Gy, respectively. These D10-values were considerably lower than published D10-values for E. coli inactivated with conventional high-energy continuous e-beam, likely due to shorter exposure time (t), greater current density (J), and a pulse mode of the SEEG e-beam. The SEEG e-beam showed promising results for microbial inactivation in a nonthermal manner; however, due to low energy of the SEEG e-beam, current applications are limited to surface decontamination. The SEEG e-beam may be an efficient processing step for surface inactivation of food-borne pathogens on ready-to-eat products, including fresh and leafy vegetables.

  9. [Sensitivity to drugs of Escherichia coli strains isolated from poultry with coli septicemia].

    PubMed

    Giurov, B

    1985-01-01

    Investigations were carried out into the susceptibility of a total of 223 strains of Escherichia coli to therapeutic agents with the employment of the disk diffusion method. The organisms were isolated from internal organs and bone marrow of birds died of coli septicaemia. The serologic classification of the strains was defined with the use of 88 anti-group OK-agglutinating sera obtained through hyperimmunization of rabbits with the following Escherichia coli serotypes: 01-063, 068, 071, 073, 075, 078, 086, 0101, 0103, 0111-0114, 0119, 0124, 0129, 0135-0141, 0146, 0147, and 0149. It was found that serologically the strains referred as follows: 01-41 strains, 02-70 strains, 04-2 strains, 08-3 strains, 026-1 strain, 078-70 strains, 0111-2 strains, 0103-1 strain, 0141-1 strain. The number of untypable strains amounted to 32. Highest number of strains proved sensitive to colistin--96.06%, the remaining drugs following in a descending order: flumequine--95.65%, apramycin - 95.5%, gentamycin--93.72%, amoxicillin--93,8%, amikacin--88.57%, carbenicillin--86.88%, furazolidone--83,13%, and kanamycin--79.36%. High was the percent of strains resistant to tetracycline--66.17%, spectinomycin--61.67%, ampicillin--51.12%, chloramphenicol--50.23%, and streptomycin--44.84%.

  10. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli are less likely than paired fecal E. coli to have CRISPR loci.

    PubMed

    Dang, Trang Nguyen Doan; Zhang, Lixin; Zöllner, Sebastian; Srinivasan, Usha; Abbas, Khadija; Marrs, Carl F; Foxman, Betsy

    2013-10-01

    CRISPRs (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats) are short fragments of DNA that act as an adaptive immune system protecting bacteria against invasion by phages, plasmids or other forms of foreign DNA. Bacteria without a CRISPR locus may more readily adapt to environmental changes by acquiring foreign genetic material. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) live in a number of environments suggesting an ability to rapidly adapt to new environments. If UPEC are more adaptive than commensal E. coli we would expect that UPEC would have fewer CRISPR loci, and--if loci are present--that they would harbor fewer spacers than CRISPR loci in fecal E. coli. We tested this in vivo by comparing the number of CRISPR loci and spacers, and sensitivity to antibiotics (resistance is often obtained via plasmids) among 81 pairs of UPEC and fecal E. coli isolated from women with urinary tract infection. Each pair included one uropathogen and one commensal (fecal) sample from the same female patient. Fecal isolates had more repeats (p=0.009) and more unique spacers (p<0.0001) at four CRISPR loci than uropathogens. By contrast, uropathogens were more likely than fecal E. coli to be resistant to ampicillin, cefazolin and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole. However, no consistent association between CRISPRs and antibiotic resistance was identified. To our knowledge, this is the first study to compare fecal E. coli and pathogenic E. coli from the same individuals, and to test the association of CRISPR loci with antibiotic resistance. Our results suggest that the absence of CRISPR loci may make UPEC more susceptible to infection by phages or plasmids and allow them to adapt more quickly to various environments.

  11. Colonization with extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli among nursing home residents and its relationship to fluoroquinolone resistance.

    PubMed

    Maslow, Joel N; Lautenbach, Ebbing; Glaze, Thomas; Bilker, Warren; Johnson, James R

    2004-09-01

    In a cross-sectional fecal prevalence survey involving 49 residents of a Veterans Affairs nursing home, 59% of subjects were colonized with extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC), 22% were colonized with adhesin-positive E. coli, and 51% were colonized with fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli. Among 80 unique isolates, adhesins correlated negatively and aerobactin correlated positively with fluoroquinolone resistance.

  12. A glimpse of Escherichia coli O157:H7 survival in soils from eastern China

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Escherichia coli O157:H7 (E. coli O157:H7) is an important food-borne pathogen, which continues to be a major public health concern worldwide. It is known that E. coli O157:H7 survive in soil environment might result in the contamination of fresh produce or water source. To investigate how the soils...

  13. Escherichia coli strain diversity: Selecting isolates for use as pathogen surrogates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background Escherichia coli (E. coli) is commonly used as a surrogate for pathogens in research to identify sources of agricultural contamination and to characterize how pathogens persist on plant surfaces. However, E. coli strains are highly diverse, exhibiting differences in physical, chemical and...

  14. Mouse in vivo neutralization of Escherichia coli Shiga toxin 2 with monoclonal antibodies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Escherichia coli (E. coli) food contaminations pose serious health and food safety concerns, and have been the subject of massive food recalls. Shiga toxin 2 (Stx2)-producing E. coli has been identified as the major cause of hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), the most severe di...

  15. Detection of Escherichia Coli O157:H7 in Fecal Samples in Meat Goats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mobley, Ray; Madden, Uford; Brooks-Walter, Alexis

    2004-01-01

    Studies have reported the isolation of Escherichia coli (E. coli)O157:H7 from pork, lamb and poultry products, and from other animals including deer, horses, dogs, birds and humans. There is limited or no information on the presence of the organism in goats. The objectives of this study were to determine if E. coli O157:H7 was naturally occurring…

  16. Resistance of various shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli to electrolyzed oxidizing water

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The resistance of thirty two strains of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and six major serotypes of non-O157 Shiga toxin- producing E. coli (STEC) plus E. coli O104 was tested against Electrolyzed oxidizing (EO) water using two different methods; modified AOAC 955.16 sequential inoculation method and minim...

  17. Mechanisms of antibiotic resistance to enrofloxacin in uropathogenic Escherichia coli in dog

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Escherichia coli (E. coli) urinary tract infections (UTIs) are becoming a serious problem both for pets and humans (zoonosis) due to the close contact and to the increasing resistance to antibiotics. Canine E. coli represents a good experimental model useful to study this pathology. Moreover, as des...

  18. A homolog of an Escherichia coli phosphate-binding protein gene from Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, C. M.; White, F. F.; Heaton, L. A.; Guikema, J. A.; Leach, J. E.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    A Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae gene with sequence similarity to an Escherichia coli phosphate-binding protein gene (phoS) produces a periplasmic protein of apparent M(r) 35,000 when expressed in E. coli. Amino terminal sequencing revealed that a signal peptide is removed during transport to the periplasm in E. coli.

  19. Comparison of whole genome sequences from human and non-human Escherichia coli O26 strains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O26 is the second leading E. coli serogroup responsible for human illness outbreaks behind E. coli O157:H7. Recent outbreaks have been linked to emerging pathogenic O26:H11 strains harboring stx2 only. Cattle have been recognized as an important reserv...

  20. SURVIVAL OF ESCHERICHIA COLI 0157:H7 IN DAIRY CATTLE FEED WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cattle feed waters from two dairy farms were used in a study to determine the survival characteristics of the bacterial pathogen Escherichia coli )157:H7 and wild-type E. coli. The E. coli 0157:H7 inoculum consisted of a consortium of isolates obtained from dairy cattle. Fresh ma...