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Sample records for escherichia coli chromosome

  1. Profiling of Escherichia coli Chromosome database.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Yukiko; Niki, Hironori; Kato, Jun-ichi

    2008-01-01

    The Profiling of Escherichia coli Chromosome (PEC) database (http://www.shigen.nig.ac.jp/ecoli/pec/) is designed to allow E. coli researchers to efficiently access information from functional genomics studies. The database contains two principal types of data: gene essentiality and a large collection of E. coli genetic research resources. The essentiality data are based on data compilation from published single-gene essentiality studies and on cell growth studies of large-deletion mutants. Using the circular and linear viewers for both whole genomes and the minimal genome, users can not only gain an overview of the genome structure but also retrieve information on contigs, gene products, mutants, deletions, and so forth. In particular, genome-wide exhaustive mutants are an essential resource for studying E. coli gene functions. Although the genomic database was constructed independently from the genetic resources database, users may seamlessly access both types of data. In addition to these data, the PEC database also provides a summary of homologous genes of other bacterial genomes and of protein structure information, with a comprehensive interface. The PEC is thus a convenient and useful platform for contemporary E. coli researchers. PMID:18392982

  2. Molecular Evolution of the Escherichia Coli Chromosome. II. Clonal Segments

    PubMed Central

    Milkman, R.; Stoltzfus, A.

    1988-01-01

    Remarkable sequence similarities in the trp region among Escherichia coli strains of diverse natural origins imply the existence of worldwide clones of very recent origin. This in turn implies a low rate of fixation of new universally favorable alleles, which carry adjacent stretches of chromosome to high frequency. These clonal segments begin as entire chromosomes; recombination shortens them progressively by substituting less closely related homologous DNA. The rate of this recombination, comprising the introduction of a homologous chromosomal fragment to a cell and the replacement of part of the original chromosome, is estimated from observations. PMID:3058547

  3. Dynamics of Escherichia coli chromosome segregation during multifork replication.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Henrik J; Youngren, Brenda; Hansen, Flemming G; Austin, Stuart

    2007-12-01

    Slowly growing Escherichia coli cells have a simple cell cycle, with replication and progressive segregation of the chromosome completed before cell division. In rapidly growing cells, initiation of replication occurs before the previous replication rounds are complete. At cell division, the chromosomes contain multiple replication forks and must be segregated while this complex pattern of replication is still ongoing. Here, we show that replication and segregation continue in step, starting at the origin and progressing to the replication terminus. Thus, early-replicated markers on the multiple-branched chromosomes continue to separate soon after replication to form separate protonucleoids, even though they are not segregated into different daughter cells until later generations. The segregation pattern follows the pattern of chromosome replication and does not follow the cell division cycle. No extensive cohesion of sister DNA regions was seen at any growth rate. We conclude that segregation is driven by the progression of the replication forks.

  4. Dynamics of Escherichia coli Chromosome Segregation during Multifork Replication▿

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Henrik J.; Youngren, Brenda; Hansen, Flemming G.; Austin, Stuart

    2007-01-01

    Slowly growing Escherichia coli cells have a simple cell cycle, with replication and progressive segregation of the chromosome completed before cell division. In rapidly growing cells, initiation of replication occurs before the previous replication rounds are complete. At cell division, the chromosomes contain multiple replication forks and must be segregated while this complex pattern of replication is still ongoing. Here, we show that replication and segregation continue in step, starting at the origin and progressing to the replication terminus. Thus, early-replicated markers on the multiple-branched chromosomes continue to separate soon after replication to form separate protonucleoids, even though they are not segregated into different daughter cells until later generations. The segregation pattern follows the pattern of chromosome replication and does not follow the cell division cycle. No extensive cohesion of sister DNA regions was seen at any growth rate. We conclude that segregation is driven by the progression of the replication forks. PMID:17905986

  5. Transcription mapping of the Escherichia coli chromosome by electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    French, S L; Miller, O L

    1989-08-01

    The distinctive double Christmas tree morphology of rRNA operons as visualized by electron microscopy makes them easy to recognize in chromatin spreads from Escherichia coli. On the basis of the pattern of nascent transcripts on nearby transcription units and the relative distances of the operons from one another and the replication origin, we are now able to specifically identify five of the seven rRNA operons in E. coli. The use of rRNA operons as markers of both position and distance has resulted in the morphological mapping of a significant portion of the E. coli chromosome; over 600 kilobase pairs in the 84- to 90-min and 72-min regions can now be recognized. Since individual rRNA operons could be identified, direct comparisons could be made of their transcriptional activities. As judged by the densities of RNA polymerases along the operons, rrnA, rrnB, rrnC, rrnD, and rrnE were all transcribed at similar levels, with one RNA polymerase every 85 base pairs. The ability to recognize individual operons and specific regions of the chromosome allows direct comparisons of various genetic parameters.

  6. Depletion of acidic phospholipids influences chromosomal replication in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Fingland, Nicholas; Flåtten, Ingvild; Downey, Christopher D; Fossum-Raunehaug, Solveig; Skarstad, Kirsten; Crooke, Elliott

    2012-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, coordinated activation and deactivation of DnaA allows for proper timing of the initiation of chromosomal synthesis at the origin of replication (oriC) and assures initiation occurs once per cell cycle. In vitro, acidic phospholipids reactivate DnaA, and in vivo depletion of acidic phospholipids, results in growth arrest. Growth can be restored by the expression of a mutant form of DnaA, DnaA(L366K), or by oriC-independent DNA synthesis, suggesting acidic phospholipids are required for DnaA- and oriC-dependent replication. We observe here that when acidic phospholipids were depleted, replication was inhibited with a concomitant reduction of chromosomal content and cell mass prior to growth arrest. This global shutdown of biosynthetic activity was independent of the stringent response. Restoration of acidic phospholipid synthesis resulted in a resumption of DNA replication prior to restored growth, indicating a possible cell-cycle-specific growth arrest had occurred with the earlier loss of acidic phospholipids. Flow cytometry, thymidine uptake, and quantitative polymerase chain reaction data suggest that a deficiency in acidic phospholipids prolonged the time required to replicate the chromosome. We also observed that regardless of the cellular content of acidic phospholipids, expression of mutant DnaA(L366K) altered the DNA content-to-cell mass ratio. PMID:23233230

  7. Chromosomal organization and expression of Escherichia coli pabA.

    PubMed Central

    Tran, P V; Bannor, T A; Doktor, S Z; Nichols, B P

    1990-01-01

    The pabA gene in Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium encodes the glutamine amidotransferase subunit of para-aminobenzoate synthase, which catalyzes the first reaction in the conversion of chorismate to para-aminobenzoate (PABA). We have determined the nucleotide sequences of 1,362 base pairs preceding E. coli pabA and of 981 base pairs preceding S. typhimurium pabA. The nucleotide sequences suggest the presence of two protein-coding regions immediately upstream of pabA, designated orf1 and fic. Transcription analysis indicates that E. coli pabA is encoded by two overlapping transcriptional units. The polycistronic transcriptional unit includes orf1-fic-pabA and is initiated by the promoter designated P2. The monocistronic unit includes only pabA and is initiated by the promoter designated P1, which is located in the fic-coding region. Both promoters transcribe pabA to about the same steady-state level. However, expression analysis using chromosomal pabA-lacZ translational fusions indicated that P1 expressed PabA at least 50-fold more efficiently than P2. pabA-dependent growth rate analysis indicates that P1 is essential and P2 is dispensable for PABA metabolism. In the absence of P1, growth was reduced as a result of insufficient PabA expressed from P2. The significance of these results and possible posttranscriptional control mechanisms which affect PabA expression from the P2-initiated polycistronic unit are discussed. Images FIG. 6 FIG. 7 PMID:2403545

  8. Chromosome Replication in Escherichia coli: Life on the Scales

    PubMed Central

    Norris, Vic; Amar, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    At all levels of Life, systems evolve on the 'scales of equilibria'. At the level of bacteria, the individual cell must favor one of two opposing strategies and either take risks to grow or avoid risks to survive. It has been proposed in the Dualism hypothesis that the growth and survival strategies depend on non-equilibrium and equilibrium hyperstructures, respectively. It has been further proposed that the cell cycle itself is the way cells manage to balance the ratios of these types of hyperstructure so as to achieve the compromise solution of living on the two scales. Here, we attempt to re-interpret a major event, the initiation of chromosome replication in Escherichia coli, in the light of scales of equilibria. This entails thinking in terms of hyperstructures as responsible for intensity sensing and quantity sensing and how this sensing might help explain the role of the DnaA protein in initiation of replication. We outline experiments and an automaton approach to the cell cycle that should test and refine the scales concept. PMID:25371267

  9. A cis-acting sequence involved in chromosome segregation in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Fekete, Richard A; Chattoraj, Dhruba K

    2005-01-01

    Eukaryotic chromosomes contain a locus, the centromere, at which force is applied to separate replicated chromosomes. A centromere analogue is also found in some bacterial plasmids and chromosomes, although not yet identified in the well-studied Escherichia coli chromosome. We aimed to identify centromere-like sequences in E. coli with the premise that such sequences would be the first to migrate towards the cell poles, away from the cell centre where DNA replication is believed to occur. We have labelled different loci on the chromosome by integrating arrays of binding sites for LacI-EYFP and phage lambdacI-ECFP and supplying these fusion proteins in trans. Comparison of such pairs of loci suggests the presence of a centromere-like site close to the origin of replication. Polar migration of the site was dependent on migS, a locus recently implicated in chromosome migration, thus providing strong support for migS being the E. coli centromere.

  10. Synthetic secondary chromosomes in Escherichia coli based on the replication origin of chromosome II in Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Messerschmidt, Sonja J; Kemter, Franziska S; Schindler, Daniel; Waldminghaus, Torsten

    2015-02-01

    Recent developments in DNA-assembly methods make the synthesis of synthetic chromosomes a reachable goal. However, the redesign of primary chromosomes bears high risks and still requires enormous resources. An alternative approach is the addition of synthetic chromosomes to the cell. The natural secondary chromosome of Vibrio cholerae could potentially serve as template for a synthetic secondary chromosome in Escherichia coli. To test this assumption we constructed a replicon named synVicII based on the replication module of V. cholerae chromosome II (oriII). A new assay for the assessment of replicon stability was developed based on flow-cytometric analysis of unstable GFP variants. Application of this assay to cells carrying synVicII revealed an improved stability compared to a secondary replicon based on E. coli oriC. Cell cycle analysis and determination of cellular copy numbers of synVicII indicate that replication timing of the synthetic replicon in E. coli is comparable to the natural chromosome II (ChrII) in V. cholerae. The presented synthetic biology work provides the basis to use secondary chromosomes in E. coli to answer basic research questions as well as for several biotechnological applications.

  11. Identification and Validation of Novel Chromosomal Integration and Expression Loci in Escherichia coli Flagellar Region 1

    PubMed Central

    Juhas, Mario; Ajioka, James W.

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli is used as a chassis for a number of Synthetic Biology applications. The lack of suitable chromosomal integration and expression loci is among the main hurdles of the E. coli engineering efforts. We identified and validated chromosomal integration and expression target sites within E. coli K12 MG1655 flagellar region 1. We analyzed five open reading frames of the flagellar region 1, flgA, flgF, flgG, flgI, and flgJ, that are well-conserved among commonly-used E. coli strains, such as MG1655, W3110, DH10B and BL21-DE3. The efficiency of the integration into the E. coli chromosome and the expression of the introduced genetic circuit at the investigated loci varied significantly. The integrations did not have a negative impact on growth; however, they completely abolished motility. From the investigated E. coli K12 MG1655 flagellar region 1, flgA and flgG are the most suitable chromosomal integration and expression loci. PMID:25816013

  12. Spatial coordination between chromosomes and cell division proteins in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Männik, Jaan; Bailey, Matthew W

    2015-01-01

    To successfully propagate, cells need to coordinate chromosomal replication and segregation with cell division to prevent formation of DNA-less cells and cells with damaged DNA. Here, we review molecular systems in Escherichia coli that are known to be involved in positioning the divisome and chromosome relative to each other. Interestingly, this well-studied micro-organism has several partially redundant mechanisms to achieve this task; none of which are essential. Some of these systems determine the localization of the divisome relative to chromosomes such as SlmA-dependent nucleoid occlusion, some localize the chromosome relative to the divisome such as DNA translocation by FtsK, and some are likely to act on both systems such as the Min system and newly described Ter linkage. Moreover, there is evidence that E. coli harbors other divisome-chromosome coordination systems in addition to those known. The review also discusses the minimal requirements of coordination between chromosomes and cell division proteins needed for cell viability. Arguments are presented that cells can propagate without any dedicated coordination between their chromosomes and cell division machinery at the expense of lowered fitness. PMID:25926826

  13. Spatial coordination between chromosomes and cell division proteins in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Männik, Jaan; Bailey, Matthew W.

    2015-01-01

    To successfully propagate, cells need to coordinate chromosomal replication and segregation with cell division to prevent formation of DNA-less cells and cells with damaged DNA. Here, we review molecular systems in Escherichia coli that are known to be involved in positioning the divisome and chromosome relative to each other. Interestingly, this well-studied micro-organism has several partially redundant mechanisms to achieve this task; none of which are essential. Some of these systems determine the localization of the divisome relative to chromosomes such as SlmA-dependent nucleoid occlusion, some localize the chromosome relative to the divisome such as DNA translocation by FtsK, and some are likely to act on both systems such as the Min system and newly described Ter linkage. Moreover, there is evidence that E. coli harbors other divisome-chromosome coordination systems in addition to those known. The review also discusses the minimal requirements of coordination between chromosomes and cell division proteins needed for cell viability. Arguments are presented that cells can propagate without any dedicated coordination between their chromosomes and cell division machinery at the expense of lowered fitness. PMID:25926826

  14. Control of cyclic chromosome replication in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Bremer, H; Churchward, G

    1991-01-01

    The biochemical basis for cyclic initiation of bacterial chromosome replication is reviewed to define the processes involved and to focus on the putative oscillator mechanism which generates the replication clock. The properties required for a functional oscillator are defined, and their implications are discussed. We show that positive control models, but not negative ones, can explain cyclic initiation. In particular, the widely accepted idea that DnaA protein controls the timing of initiation is examined in detail. Our analysis indicates that DnaA protein is not involved in the oscillator mechanism. We conclude that the generations of a single leading to cyclic initiation is separate from the initiation process itself and propose a heuristic model to focus attention on possible oscillator mechanisms. PMID:1943997

  15. Chromosomal evolution of Escherichia coli for the efficient production of lycopene

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Plasmid-based overexpression of genes has been the principal strategy for metabolic engineering. However, for biotechnological applications, plasmid-based expression systems are not suitable because of genetic instability, and the requirement for constant selective pressure to ensure plasmid maintenance. Results To overcome these drawbacks, we constructed an Escherichia coli lycopene production strain that does not carry a plasmid or an antibiotic marker. This was achieved using triclosan-induced chromosomal evolution, a high gene copy expression system. The engineered strain demonstrated high genetic stability in the absence of the selective agent during fermentation. The replacement of native appY promoter with a T5 promoter, and the deletion of the iclR gene in E. coli CBW 12241 further improved lycopene production. The resulting strain, E. coli CBW 12241(ΔiclR, PT5-appY), produced lycopene at 33.43 mg per gram of dry cell weight. Conclusions A lycopene hyper-producer E. coli strain that does not carry a plasmid or antibiotic marker was constructed using triclosan-induced chromosomal evolution. The methods detailed in this study can be used to engineer E. coli to produce other metabolites. PMID:23356604

  16. The molecular toolbox for chromosomal heterologous multiprotein expression in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Richter, Katrin; Gescher, Johannes

    2012-12-01

    Heterologous multiprotein expression is the tool to answer a number of questions in basic science as well as to convert strains into producers and/or consumers of certain compounds in applied sciences. Multiprotein expression can be driven by plasmids with the disadvantages that the gene dosage might, in some cases, lead to toxic effects and that the continuous addition of antibiotics is undesirable. Stable genomic expression of proteins can forgo these problems and is a helpful and promising tool in synthetic biology. In the present paper, we provide an extract of methods from the toolbox for chromosome-based heterologous expression in Escherichia coli. PMID:23176458

  17. Cloning and expression in Escherichia coli of chromosomal mercury resistance genes from a Bacillus sp

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.; Mahler, I.; Levinson, H.S.; Halvorson, H.O.

    1987-10-01

    A 7.9-kilobase (kb) chromosomal fragment was cloned from a mercury-resistant Bacillus sp. In Escherichia coli, in the presence of a second plasmid carrying functional transport genes, resistance to HgCl/sub 2/ and to phenylmercury acetate (PMA) was expressed. Shortening the cloned fragment to 3.8 kb abolished resistance to PMA but not to HgCl/sub 2/. In Bacillus subtilis, the 3.8-kb fragment produced mercuric reductase constitutively but did not produce resistance to HgCl/sub 2/ or to PMA.

  18. Physical modeling of chromosome segregation in escherichia coli reveals impact of force and DNA relaxation.

    PubMed

    Lampo, Thomas J; Kuwada, Nathan J; Wiggins, Paul A; Spakowitz, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    The physical mechanism by which Escherichia coli segregates copies of its chromosome for partitioning into daughter cells is unknown, partly due to the difficulty in interpreting the complex dynamic behavior during segregation. Analysis of previous chromosome segregation measurements in E. coli demonstrates that the origin of replication exhibits processive motion with a mean displacement that scales as t(0.32). In this work, we develop a model for segregation of chromosomal DNA as a Rouse polymer in a viscoelastic medium with a force applied to a single monomer. Our model demonstrates that the observed power-law scaling of the mean displacement and the behavior of the velocity autocorrelation function is captured by accounting for the relaxation of the polymer chain and the viscoelastic environment. We show that the ratio of the mean displacement to the variance of the displacement during segregation events is a critical metric that eliminates the compounding effects of polymer and medium dynamics and provides the segregation force. We calculate the force of oriC segregation in E. coli to be ∼0.49 pN.

  19. Chromosome position effects on gene expression in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Jack A; Sellars, Laura E; Busby, Stephen J W; Lee, David J

    2014-10-01

    In eukaryotes, the location of a gene on the chromosome is known to affect its expression, but such position effects are poorly understood in bacteria. Here, using Escherichia coli K-12, we demonstrate that expression of a reporter gene cassette, comprised of the model E. coli lac promoter driving expression of gfp, varies by ∼300-fold depending on its precise position on the chromosome. At some positions, expression was more than 3-fold higher than at the natural lac promoter locus, whereas at several other locations, the reporter cassette was completely silenced: effectively overriding local lac promoter control. These effects were not due to differences in gene copy number, caused by partially replicated genomes. Rather, the differences in gene expression occur predominantly at the level of transcription and are mediated by several different features that are involved in chromosome organization. Taken together, our findings identify a tier of gene regulation above local promoter control and highlight the importance of chromosome position effects on gene expression profiles in bacteria.

  20. Chromosome position effects on gene expression in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Jack A; Sellars, Laura E; Busby, Stephen J W; Lee, David J

    2014-10-01

    In eukaryotes, the location of a gene on the chromosome is known to affect its expression, but such position effects are poorly understood in bacteria. Here, using Escherichia coli K-12, we demonstrate that expression of a reporter gene cassette, comprised of the model E. coli lac promoter driving expression of gfp, varies by ∼300-fold depending on its precise position on the chromosome. At some positions, expression was more than 3-fold higher than at the natural lac promoter locus, whereas at several other locations, the reporter cassette was completely silenced: effectively overriding local lac promoter control. These effects were not due to differences in gene copy number, caused by partially replicated genomes. Rather, the differences in gene expression occur predominantly at the level of transcription and are mediated by several different features that are involved in chromosome organization. Taken together, our findings identify a tier of gene regulation above local promoter control and highlight the importance of chromosome position effects on gene expression profiles in bacteria. PMID:25209233

  1. Dynamic distribution of seqa protein across the chromosome of escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Romero, María Antonia; Busby, Stephen J W; Dyer, Nigel P; Ott, Sascha; Millard, Andrew D; Grainger, David C

    2010-05-18

    The bacterial SeqA protein binds to hemi-methylated GATC sequences that arise in newly synthesized DNA upon passage of the replication machinery. In Escherichia coli K-12, the single replication origin oriC is a well-characterized target for SeqA, which binds to multiple hemi-methylated GATC sequences immediately after replication has initiated. This sequesters oriC, thereby preventing reinitiation of replication. However, the genome-wide DNA binding properties of SeqA are unknown, and hence, here, we describe a study of the binding of SeqA across the entire Escherichia coli K-12 chromosome, using chromatin immunoprecipitation in combination with DNA microarrays. Our data show that SeqA binding correlates with the frequency and spacing of GATC sequences across the entire genome. Less SeqA is found in highly transcribed regions, as well as in the ter macrodomain. Using synchronized cultures, we show that SeqA distribution differs with the cell cycle. SeqA remains bound to some targets after replication has ceased, and these targets locate to genes encoding factors involved in nucleotide metabolism, chromosome replication, and methyl transfer.

  2. Consequences of Cas9 cleavage in the chromosome of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Lun; Bikard, David

    2016-01-01

    The RNA-guided Cas9 nuclease from CRISPR-Cas systems has emerged as a powerful biotechnological tool. The specificity of Cas9 can be reprogrammed to cleave desired sequences in a cell's chromosome simply by changing the sequence of a small guide RNA. Unlike in most eukaryotes, Cas9 cleavage in the chromosome of bacteria has been reported to kill the cell. However, the mechanism of cell death remains to be investigated. Bacteria mainly rely on homologous recombination (HR) with sister chromosomes to repair double strand breaks. Here, we show that the simultaneous cleavage of all copies of the Escherichia coli chromosome at the same position cannot be repaired, leading to cell death. However, inefficient cleavage can be tolerated through continuous repair by the HR pathway. In order to kill cells reliably, HR can be blocked using the Mu phage Gam protein. Finally, the introduction of the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) pathway from Mycobacterium tuberculosis was not able to rescue the cells from Cas9-mediated killing, but did introduce small deletions at a low frequency. This work provides a better understanding of the consequences of Cas9 cleavage in bacterial chromosomes which will be instrumental in the development of future CRISPR tools. PMID:27060147

  3. Escherichia Coli

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodsell, David S.

    2009-01-01

    Diverse biological data may be used to create illustrations of molecules in their cellular context. I describe the scientific results that support a recent textbook illustration of an "Escherichia coli cell". The image magnifies a portion of the bacterium at one million times, showing the location and form of individual macromolecules. Results…

  4. Mismatch repair at stop codons is directed independent of GATC methylation on the Escherichia coli chromosome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sneppen, Kim; Semsey, Szabolcs

    2014-12-01

    The mismatch repair system (MMR) corrects replication errors that escape proofreading. Previous studies on extrachromosomal DNA in Escherichia coli suggested that MMR uses hemimethylated GATC sites to identify the newly synthesized strand. In this work we asked how the distance of GATC sites and their methylation status affect the occurrence of single base substitutions on the E. coli chromosome. As a reporter system we used a lacZ gene containing an early TAA stop codon. We found that occurrence of point mutations at this stop codon is unaffected by GATC sites located more than 115 base pairs away. However, a GATC site located about 50 base pairs away resulted in a decreased mutation rate. This effect was independent of Dam methylation. The reversion rate of the stop codon increased only slightly in dam mutants compared to mutL and mutS mutants. We suggest that unlike on extrachromosomal DNA, GATC methylation is not the only strand discrimination signal for MMR on the E. coli chromosome.

  5. Chromosomal Fragmentation in "Escherichia Coli": Its Absence in "mutT" Mutants and Its Mechanisms in "seqA" Mutants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rotman, Ella Rose

    2009-01-01

    Chromosomal fragmentation in "Escherichia coli" is a lethal event for the cell unless mended by the recombinational repair proteins RecA, RecBCD, and RuvABC. Certain mutations exacerbate problems that cause the cell to be dependent on the recombinational repair proteins for viability. We tested whether the absence of the MutT protein caused…

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of Escherichia coli S51, a Chicken Isolate Harboring a Chromosomally Encoded mcr-1 Gene.

    PubMed

    Zurfluh, Katrin; Tasara, Taurai; Poirel, Laurent; Nordmann, Patrice; Stephan, Roger

    2016-01-01

    We present the draft genome of Escherichia coli S51, a colistin-resistant extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing strain isolated in 2015 from raw chicken meat imported from Germany. Assembly and annotation of this draft genome resulted in a 4,994,918-bp chromosome and revealed a chromosomally encoded mcr-1 gene responsible for the colistin resistance of the strain. PMID:27491979

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of Escherichia coli S51, a Chicken Isolate Harboring a Chromosomally Encoded mcr-1 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Zurfluh, Katrin; Tasara, Taurai; Poirel, Laurent; Nordmann, Patrice

    2016-01-01

    We present the draft genome of Escherichia coli S51, a colistin-resistant extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing strain isolated in 2015 from raw chicken meat imported from Germany. Assembly and annotation of this draft genome resulted in a 4,994,918-bp chromosome and revealed a chromosomally encoded mcr-1 gene responsible for the colistin resistance of the strain. PMID:27491979

  8. Membrane attachment activates dnaA protein, the initiation protein of chromosome replication in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Yung, B.Y.; Kornberg, A.

    1988-10-01

    ADP and ATP are tightly bound to dnaA protein and are crucial to its function in DNA replication; the exchange of these nucleotides is effected specifically by the acidic phospholipids (cardiolipin and phosphatidylglycerol) present in Escherichia coli membranes. We now find that phospholipids derived from membranes lacking an unsaturated fatty acid (e.g., oleic acid) are unable to promote the exchange. This observation correlates strikingly with the long-known effect of 3-decynoyl-N-acetylcysteamine, a ''suicide analog'' that prevents initiation of a cycle of replication in E. coli by inhibiting the synthesis of oleic acid, an inhibition that can be overcome by providing the cells with oleic acid. Profound influences on the specific binding of dnaA protein to phospholipids by temperature, the content of unsaturated fatty acids, and the inclusion of cholesterol can be explained by the need for the phospholipids to be in fluid-phase vesicles. These findings suggest that membrane attachment of dnaA protein is vital for its function in the initiation of chromosome replication in E. coli.

  9. Effects of chromosomal inversion on cell fitness in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Hill, C W; Gray, J A

    1988-08-01

    In an effort to learn what factors might mitigate the establishment of Escherichia coli variants bearing major chromosomal rearrangements, we have examined the effects on cell growth of two inversions between rRNA operons. One of these inversions, IN(rrnD-rrnE), had been propagated in a commonly used subline of E. coli K-12 for approximately 30 yr before its discovery, a fact that illustrates the absence of obvious detrimental effects associated with the inversion. We found that culturing under conditions requiring repeated transition from stationary phase to rapid growth led to the replacement of IN(rrnD-rrnE) cells by cells that had undergone either of two types of additional chromosomal inversion: one type fully restored the wild-type order, while the other partially restored it. The partial reinversion was also between rrn operons, but it left a small transposition. The tendency for overgrowth by these revertants persisted through several rounds of periodic selection. In contrast, the other inversion, IN(rrnG-rrnE), was associated with severe, detrimental effects. The effects of IN(rrnG-rrnE) were also alleviated by full or partial reinversion. The probable relationship between the severity of the effects caused by the inversions and the degree of displacement of the replication origin is discussed. Spontaneous inversion events between rrn operons separated by 18% of the chromosome were estimated to occur at a frequency of roughly 10(-5). If extended to natural situations, the growth disadvantage together with the relatively high frequency of reinversion suggest that clones of cells with an inversion between these rrn operons would be readily overgrown by revertants.

  10. Constraints in chromosomal inversions in Escherichia coli are not explained by replication pausing at inverted terminator-like sequences.

    PubMed

    François, V; Louarn, J; Patte, J; Rebollo, J E; Louarn, J M

    1990-04-01

    Regions close to the replication terminus of the Escherichia coli chromosome are strongly refractory to genomic inversions. Since these regions also harbour polar replication terminator-like sequences or pause sites, we have investigated the possibility that slowing of replication as a result of pausing at inverted pause sites is responsible for inability to isolate stable inversions affecting these regions. A mutation in the tus gene is known to abolish replication pausing at terminators. We show here that the distribution of invertible and noninvertible segments along the chromosome is not affected by tus mutations. This observation eliminates replication pausing as a cause for the reduced fitness of bacteria harbouring certain chromosomal inversions.

  11. Quantifying Impact of Chromosome Copy Number on Recombination in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, T Steele; Gill, Ryan T

    2015-07-17

    The ability to precisely and efficiently recombineer synthetic DNA into organisms of interest in a quantitative manner is a key requirement in genome engineering. Even though considerable effort has gone into the characterization of recombination in Escherichia coli, there is still substantial variability in reported recombination efficiencies. We hypothesized that this observed variability could, in part, be explained by the variability in chromosome copy number as well as the location of the replication forks relative to the recombination site. During rapid growth, E. coli cells may contain several pairs of open replication forks. While recombineered forks are resolving and segregating within the population, changes in apparent recombineering efficiency should be observed. In the case of dominant phenotypes, we predicted and then experimentally confirmed that the apparent recombination efficiency declined during recovery until complete segregation of recombineered and wild-type genomes had occurred. We observed the reverse trend for recessive phenotypes. The observed changes in apparent recombination efficiency were found to be in agreement with mathematical calculations based on our proposed mechanism. We also provide a model that can be used to estimate the total segregated recombination efficiency based on an initial efficiency and growth rate. These results emphasize the importance of employing quantitative strategies in the design of genome-scale engineering efforts.

  12. Molecular evolution of the Escherichia coli chromosome. VI. Two regions of high effective recombination.

    PubMed Central

    Milkman, Roger; Jaeger, Erich; McBride, Ryan D

    2003-01-01

    Two 6- to 8-min regions, centered respectively near 45 min (O-antigen region) and 99 min (restriction-modification region) on the Escherichia coli chromosome, display unusually high variability among 11 otherwise very similar strains. This variation, revealed by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and nucleotide sequence comparisons, appears to be due to a great local increase in the retention frequency of recombinant replacements. We infer a two-step mechanism. The first step is the acquisition of a small stretch of DNA from a phylogenetically distant source. The second is the successful retransmission of the imported DNA, together with flanking native DNA, to other strains of E. coli. Each cell containing the newly transferred DNA has a very high selective advantage until it reaches a high frequency and (in the O-antigen case) is recognized by the new host's immune system. A high selective advantage increases the probability of retention greatly; the effective recombination rate is the product of the basic recombination rate and the probability of retention. Nearby nucleotide sequences clockwise from the O-antigen (rfb) region are correlated with specific O antigens, confirming local hitchhiking. Comparable selection involving imported restriction endonuclease genes is proposed for the region near 99 min. PMID:12618387

  13. Exchange of chromosomal and plasmid alleles in Escherichia coli by selection for loss of a dominant antibiotic sensitivity marker.

    PubMed Central

    Russell, C B; Dahlquist, F W

    1989-01-01

    Transfer of an allele from a donor DNA to a recipient DNA molecule was selected by the loss of a dominant conditional lethal mutation previously incorporated ito the gene of interest in the recipient DNA. Both the Escherichia coli chromosome and plasmids carrying E. coli genes were used successfully as donor molecules. Recipient molecules for these exchanges were constructed in vitro by using the rpsL gene, which confers sensitivity to streptomycin, to replace segments of specific E. coli genes located either on multicopy plasmids or in the E. coli chromosome. Plasmids carrying such replacements were capable of acquiring chromosomal alleles of the gene(s) of interest, and strains carrying rpsL replacements in the chromosome were capable of acquiring plasmid-encoded alleles at the sight of the rpsL replacement. In both situations, these allele transfers resulted in loss of the rpsL gene from the recipient DNA molecule. The desired transfer events constituted a large percentage of these events, which gave rise to viable colonies when appropriate donor-recipient pairs were subjected to streptomycin selection. Thus, this is a useful approach for transferring alleles of interest from plasmids to the E. coli chromosome and vice versa. PMID:2651409

  14. Clonal expansion of Escherichia coli ST38 carrying a chromosomally integrated OXA-48 carbapenemase gene.

    PubMed

    Turton, Jane F; Doumith, Michel; Hopkins, Katie L; Perry, Claire; Meunier, Daniele; Woodford, Neil

    2016-06-01

    Many isolates of Escherichia coli carrying blaOXA-48 referred to Public Health England's national reference laboratory during 2014 and 2015 shared similar pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) profiles, despite coming from patients in multiple different hospitals and regions. Whole genome sequencing on an Illumina platform revealed that these belonged to sequence type (ST) 38. The OXA-48 gene is usually carried on a 62 kb IncL/M plasmid (pOXA48a), but those belonging to this ST appeared either to lack plasmid elements or to have only a partial complement. Two isolates, one belonging to a main cluster sharing identical PFGE profiles and the other having a distinct profile, were further sequenced on a minION. The long reads provided by the nanopore sequencing technology facilitated assembly of a much larger contig around the blaOXA-48 region, showing that both isolates shared a similar arrangement, with a plasmid fragment containing blaOXA-48 flanked by IS1R elements integrated into the chromosome, although the length of the plasmid fragment and the insertion site differed between the two isolates. That belonging to the main cluster contained a 21.9 kb Tn6237 insert, as previously described in E. coli EC-15 from Lebanon, but in a different insertion site. PCR mapping indicated that a further 14/31 representatives of this cluster also contained this insert in the same insertion site, with most of the remainder differing only by having additional E. coli sequence on one side of the insertion. This sub-cluster of ST38 was found from 25 different hospital laboratories, suggesting widespread distribution of a successful type.

  15. Bacteriophage P1 pac sites inserted into the chromosome greatly increase packaging and transduction of Escherichia coli genomic DNA.

    PubMed

    Huang, Haomin; Masters, Millicent

    2014-11-01

    The Escherichia coli bacteriophage P1 packages host chromosome separately from phage DNA, and transfers it to recipient cells at low frequency in a process called generalized transduction. Phage genomes are packaged from concatemers beginning at a specific site, pac. To increase transduction rate, we have inserted pac into the chromosome at up to five equally spaced positions; at least this many are fully tolerated in the absence of P1 infection. A single chromosomal pac greatly increases transduction of downstream markers without decreasing phage yields; 3.5 × as much total chromosomal DNA is packaged. Additional insertions decrease phage yield by > 90% and also decrease phage DNA synthesis, although less dramatically. Packaging of chromosomal markers near to and downstream of each inserted pac site is, at the same time, increased by greater than 10 fold. Transduction of markers near an inserted pac site can be increased by over 1000-fold, potentially allowing identification of such transductants by screening.

  16. Replication fork movement and methylation govern SeqA binding to the Escherichia coli chromosome.

    PubMed

    Waldminghaus, Torsten; Weigel, Christoph; Skarstad, Kirsten

    2012-07-01

    In Escherichia coli, the SeqA protein binds specifically to GATC sequences which are methylated on the A of the old strand but not on the new strand. Such hemimethylated DNA is produced by progression of the replication forks and lasts until Dam methyltransferase methylates the new strand. It is therefore believed that a region of hemimethylated DNA covered by SeqA follows the replication fork. We show that this is, indeed, the case by using global ChIP on Chip analysis of SeqA in cells synchronized regarding DNA replication. To assess hemimethylation, we developed the first genome-wide method for methylation analysis in bacteria. Since loss of the SeqA protein affects growth rate only during rapid growth when cells contain multiple replication forks, a comparison of rapid and slow growth was performed. In cells with six replication forks per chromosome, the two old forks were found to bind surprisingly little SeqA protein. Cell cycle analysis showed that loss of SeqA from the old forks did not occur at initiation of the new forks, but instead occurs at a time point coinciding with the end of SeqA-dependent origin sequestration. The finding suggests simultaneous origin de-sequestration and loss of SeqA from old replication forks.

  17. Escherichia coli frameshift mutation rate depends on the chromosomal context but not on the GATC content near the mutation site.

    PubMed

    Martina, Mariana A; Correa, Elisa M E; Argaraña, Carlos E; Barra, José L

    2012-01-01

    Different studies have suggested that mutation rate varies at different positions in the genome. In this work we analyzed if the chromosomal context and/or the presence of GATC sites can affect the frameshift mutation rate in the Escherichia coli genome. We show that in a mismatch repair deficient background, a condition where the mutation rate reflects the fidelity of the DNA polymerization process, the frameshift mutation rate could vary up to four times among different chromosomal contexts. Furthermore, the mismatch repair efficiency could vary up to eight times when compared at different chromosomal locations, indicating that detection and/or repair of frameshift events also depends on the chromosomal context. Also, GATC sequences have been proved to be essential for the correct functioning of the E. coli mismatch repair system. Using bacteriophage heteroduplexes molecules it has been shown that GATC influence the mismatch repair efficiency in a distance- and number-dependent manner, being almost nonfunctional when GATC sequences are located at 1 kb or more from the mutation site. Interestingly, we found that in E. coli genomic DNA the mismatch repair system can efficiently function even if the nearest GATC sequence is located more than 2 kb away from the mutation site. The results presented in this work show that even though frameshift mutations can be efficiently generated and/or repaired anywhere in the genome, these processes can be modulated by the chromosomal context that surrounds the mutation site.

  18. Segregation of chromosome arms in growing and non-growing Escherichia coli cells

    PubMed Central

    Woldringh, Conrad L.; Hansen, Flemming G.; Vischer, Norbert O. E.; Atlung, Tove

    2015-01-01

    In slow-growing Escherichia coli cells the chromosome is organized with its left (L) and right (R) arms lying separated in opposite halves of the nucleoid and with the origin (O) in-between, giving the pattern L-O-R. During replication one of the arms has to pass the other to obtain the same organization in the daughter cells: L-O-R L-O-R. To determine the movement of arms during segregation six strains were constructed carrying three colored loci: the left and right arms were labeled with red and cyan fluorescent-proteins, respectively, on loci symmetrically positioned at different distances from the central origin, which was labeled with green-fluorescent protein. In non-replicating cells with the predominant spot pattern L-O-R, initiation of replication first resulted in a L-O-O-R pattern, soon changing to O-L-R-O. After replication of the arms the predominant spot patterns were, L-O-R L-O-R, O-R-L R-O-L or O-L-R L-O-R indicating that one or both arms passed an origin and the other arm. To study the driving force for these movements cell growth was inhibited with rifampicin allowing run-off DNA synthesis. Similar spot patterns were obtained in growing and non-growing cells, indicating that the movement of arms is not a growth-sustained process, but may result from DNA synthesis itself. The distances between loci on different arms (LR-distances) and between duplicated loci (LL- or RR-distances) as a function of their distance from the origin, indicate that in slow-growing cells DNA is organized according to the so-called sausage model and not according to the doughnut model. PMID:26029188

  19. Molecular characterisation of acquired and overproduced chromosomal blaAmpC in Escherichia coli clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Noemí; Miró, Elisenda; Pascual, Vanesa; Rivera, Alba; Simó, Maria; Garcia, Maria Consol; Xercavins, Mariona; Morera, Maria Antonia; Espejo, Elena; Gurguí, Mercè; Pérez, Josefa; Rodríguez-Carballeira, Mònica; Garau, Javier; Calbo, Esther; Navarro, Ferran; Mirelis, Beatriz; Coll, Pere

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli recovered from three hospitals in Barcelona (Spain) were studied to determine the prevalence of isolates with acquired AmpC (ac-AmpC) and/or overproduced chromosomal AmpC (c-AmpC). Mechanisms involved in blac-AmpC overexpression, blaac-AmpC and the plasmids associated with their distribution as well as the prevalence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) in AmpC-producing isolates were also determined. Isolates were selected according to their resistance phenotype. blaac-AmpC, alterations in the blac-AmpC promoter/attenuator, and PMQR genes [qnrA, qnrB, qnrS, aac(6')-Ib-cr and qepA] were characterised by PCR and sequencing. blac-AmpC expression was determined by qRT-PCR. Population structure analysis was performed using PFGE, MLST and phylogenetic group PCR. Plasmids carrying blaac-AmpC were characterised by PCR-based replicon typing and S1-PFGE. IncI1 and IncF plasmids were also analysed by plasmid MLST and replicon sequence typing, respectively. Among 21563 E. coli isolates, 240 (1.1%) overproduced AmpC β-lactamases, including 180 (75.0%) harbouring ac-AmpC (132 CMY-2 variants and 48 DHA-1) and 60 (25.0%) c-AmpC enzymes. Three mutation profiles in the blac-AmpC promoter/attenuator were associated with a 72.5-, 19.9- and 5.8-fold increased expression, respectively. Moreover, 63.3% of ac-AmpC and 43.3% of c-AmpC isolates belonged to B2, D, E or F phylogenetic groups. PMQR was found in 31% of ac-AmpC isolates [38 qnrB4, 8 aac(6')-Ib-cr, 6 qnrS1 and 3 qnrB19] and in 10% of c-AmpC isolates [5 aac(6')-Ib-cr and 1 qnrS1]. IncI1-ST12 and IncF were associated with blaCMY-2 and blaDHA-1, respectively. These results suggest that ac-AmpC β-lactamases were the main mechanism of AmpC production. Isolates and plasmids both showed high genetic diversity.

  20. Effect of human polymorphonuclear and mononuclear leukocytes on chromosomal and plasmid DNA of Escherichia coli. Role of acid DNase

    SciTech Connect

    Rozenberg-Arska, M.; van Strijp, J.A.; Hoekstra, W.P.; Verhoef, J.

    1984-05-01

    Phagocytosis and killing by polymorphonuclear and mononuclear leukocytes are important host resistance factors against invading microorganisms. Evidence showing that killing is rapidly followed by degradation of bacterial components is limited. Therefore, we studied the fate of Escherichia coli DNA following phagocytosis of E. coli by polymorphonuclear and mononuclear leukocytes. (/sup 3/H)Thymidine-labeled, unencapsulated E. coli PC2166 and E. coli 048K1 were incubated in serum, washed, and added to leukocytes. Uptake and killing of the bacteria and degradation of DNA were measured. Although phagocytosis and killing by mononuclear leukocytes was less efficient than that by polymorphonuclear leukocytes, only mononuclear leukocytes were able to degrade E. coli PC2166 DNA. Within 2 h, 60% of the radioactivity added to mononuclear leukocytes was released into the supernate, of which 40% was acid soluble. DNA of E. coli 048K1 was not degraded. To further analyze the capacity of mononuclear leukocytes to degrade E. coli DNA, chromosomal and plasmid DNA was isolated from ingested bacteria and subjected to agarose gel-electrophoresis. Only chromosomal DNA was degraded after phagocytosis. Plasmid DNA of E. coli carrying a gene coding for ampicillin resistance remained intact for a 2-h period after ingestion, and was still able to transform recipient E. coli cells after this period. Although we observed no DNA degradation during phagocytosis by polymorphonuclear leukocytes, lysates of both polymorphonuclear and mononuclear leukocytes contained acid-DNase activity with a pH optimum of 4.9. However, the DNase activity of mononuclear leukocytes was 20 times higher than that of polymorphonuclear leukocytes. No difference was observed between DNase activity from polymorphonuclear and mononuclear leukocytes from a chronic granulomatous disease patient with DNase activity from control polymorphonuclear and mononuclear leukocytes.

  1. Identification of a Copper-Responsive Two-Component System on the Chromosome of Escherichia coli K-12

    PubMed Central

    Munson, George P.; Lam, Deborah L.; Outten, F. Wayne; O'Halloran, Thomas V.

    2000-01-01

    Using a genetic screen we have identified two chromosomal genes, cusRS (ylcA ybcZ), from Escherichia coli K-12 that encode a two-component, signal transduction system that is responsive to copper ions. This regulatory system is required for copper-induced expression of pcoE, a plasmid-borne gene from the E. coli copper resistance operon pco. The closest homologs of CusR and CusS are plasmid-borne two-component systems that are also involved in metal responsive gene regulation: PcoR and PcoS from the pco operon of E. coli; CopR and CopS from the cop operon, which provides copper resistance to Pseudomonas syringae; and SilR and SilS from the sil locus, which provides silver ion resistance to Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. The genes cusRS are also required for the copper-dependent expression of at least one chromosomal gene, designated cusC (ylcB), which is allelic to the recently identified virulence gene ibeB in E. coli K1. The cus locus may comprise a copper ion efflux system, because the expression of cusC is induced by high concentrations of copper ions. Furthermore, the translation products of cusC and additional downstream genes are homologous to known metal ion antiporters. PMID:11004187

  2. Functional polarization of the Escherichia coli chromosome terminus: the dif site acts in chromosome dimer resolution only when located between long stretches of opposite polarity.

    PubMed

    Pérals, K; Cornet, F; Merlet, Y; Delon, I; Louarn, J M

    2000-04-01

    In Escherichia coli, chromosome dimers are generated by recombination between circular sister chromosomes. Dimers are lethal unless resolved by a system that involves the XerC, XerD and FtsK proteins acting at a site (dif) in the terminus region. Resolution fails if dif is moved from its normal position. To analyse this positional requirement, dif was transplaced to a variety of positions, and deletions and inversions of portions of the dif region were constructed. Resolution occurs only when dif is located at the convergence of multiple, oppositely polarized DNA sequence elements, inferred to lie in the terminus region. These polar elements may position dif at the cell septum and be general features of chromosome organization with a role in nucleoid dynamics.

  3. Role of Escherichia coli DNA Polymerase I in chromosomal DNA replication fidelity

    PubMed Central

    Makiela-Dzbenska, Karolina; Jaszczur, Malgorzata; Banach-Orlowska, Magdalena; Jonczyk, Piotr; Schaaper, Roel M.; Fijalkowska, Iwona J.

    2009-01-01

    Summary We have investigated the possible role of E. coli DNA polymerase I in chromosomal replication fidelity. This was done by substituting the chromosomal polA gene by the polAexo variant containing an inactivated 3'→5' exonuclease, which serves as a proofreader for this enzyme's misinsertion errors. Using this strain, activities of Pol I during DNA replication might be detectable as increases in the bacterial mutation rate. Using a series of defined lacZ reversion alleles in two orientations on the chromosome as markers for mutagenesis, 1.5- to 4-fold increases in mutant frequencies were observed. In general, these increases were largest for lac orientations favoring events during lagging strand DNA replication. Further analysis of these effects in strains affected in other E. coli DNA replication functions indicated that this polAexo mutator effect is best explained by an effect that is additive compared to other error-producing events at the replication fork. No evidence was found that Pol I participates in the polymerase switching between Pol II, III and IV at the fork. Instead, our data suggest that the additional errors produced by polAexo are created during the maturation of Okazaki fragments in the lagging strand. PMID:19843230

  4. Shaping the landscape of the Escherichia coli chromosome: replication-transcription encounters in cells with an ectopic replication origin

    PubMed Central

    Ivanova, Darja; Taylor, Toni; Smith, Sarah L.; Dimude, Juachi U.; Upton, Amy L.; Mehrjouy, Mana M.; Skovgaard, Ole; Sherratt, David J.; Retkute, Renata; Rudolph, Christian J.

    2015-01-01

    Each cell division requires the unwinding of millions of DNA base pairs to allow chromosome duplication and gene transcription. As DNA replication and transcription share the same template, conflicts between both processes are unavoidable and head-on collisions are thought to be particularly problematic. Surprisingly, a recent study reported unperturbed cell cycle progression in Escherichia coli cells with an ectopic replication origin in which highly transcribed rrn operons were forced to be replicated opposite to normal. In this study we have re-generated a similar strain and found the doubling time to be twice that of normal cells. Replication profiles of this background revealed significant deviations in comparison to wild-type profiles, particularly in highly transcribed regions and the termination area. These deviations were alleviated by mutations that either inactivate the termination area or destabilise RNA polymerase complexes and allow their easier displacement by replication forks. Our data demonstrate that head-on replication-transcription conflicts are highly problematic. Indeed, analysis of the replication profile of the previously published E. coli construct revealed a chromosomal rearrangement that alleviates replication-transcription conflicts in an intriguingly simple way. Our data support the idea that avoiding head-on collisions has significantly contributed to shaping the distinct architecture of bacterial chromosomes. PMID:26160884

  5. Location of the unique integration site on an Escherichia coli chromosome by bacteriophage lambda DNA in vivo.

    PubMed

    Tal, Asaf; Arbel-Goren, Rinat; Costantino, Nina; Court, Donald L; Stavans, Joel

    2014-05-20

    The search for specific sequences on long genomes is a key process in many biological contexts. How can specific target sequences be located with high efficiency, within physiologically relevant times? We addressed this question for viral integration, a fundamental mechanism of horizontal gene transfer driving prokaryotic evolution, using the infection of Escherichia coli bacteria with bacteriophage λ and following the establishment of a lysogenic state. Following the targeting process in individual live E. coli cells in real time revealed that λ DNA remains confined near the entry point of a cell following infection. The encounter between the 15-bp-long target sequence on the chromosome and the recombination site on the viral genome is facilitated by the directed motion of bacterial DNA generated during chromosome replication, in conjunction with constrained diffusion of phage DNA. Moving the native bacterial integration site to different locations on the genome and measuring the integration frequency in these strains reveals that the frequencies of the native site and a site symmetric to it relative to the origin are similar, whereas both are significantly higher than when the integration site is moved near the terminus, consistent with the replication-driven mechanism we propose. This novel search mechanism is yet another example of the exquisite coevolution of λ with its host. PMID:24799672

  6. Relationship between chromosome replication and cell division in a thymineless mutant of Escherichia coli B/r.

    PubMed

    Meacock, P A; Pritchard, R H

    1975-06-01

    The relationship between chromosome replication and cell division was investigated in a thymineless mutant of Escherichia coli B/r. Examination of the changes in average cell mass and DNA content of exponential cultures resulting from changes in the thymine concentration in the growth medium suggested that as the replication time (C) is increased there is a decrease in the period between termination of a round of replication and the subsequent cell division (D). Observations on the pattern of DNA synthesis during the division cycle were consistent with this relationship. Nevertheless, the kinetics of transition of exponential cultures moving between steady states of growth with differing replication velocities provided evidence to support the view that the time of cell division is determined by termination of rounds of replication under steady-state conditions.

  7. Localized remodeling of the Escherichia coli chromosome: the patchwork of segments refractory and tolerant to inversion near the replication terminus.

    PubMed

    Guijo, M I; Patte, J; del Mar Campos, M; Louarn, J M; Rebollo, J E

    2001-04-01

    The behavior of chromosomal inversions in Escherichia coli depends upon the region they affect. Regions flanking the replication terminus have been termed nondivisible zones (NDZ) because inversions ending in the region were either deleterious or not feasible. This regional phenomenon is further analyzed here. Thirty segments distributed between 23 and 29 min on the chromosome map have been submitted to an inversion test. Twenty-five segments either became deleterious when inverted or were noninvertible, but five segments tolerated inversion. The involvement of polar replication pause sites in this distribution was investigated. The results suggest that the Tus/pause site system may forbid some inversion events, but that other constraints to inversion, unrelated to this system, exist. Our current model for deleterious inversions is that the segments involved carry polar sequences acting in concert with other polar sequences located outside the segments. The observed patchwork of refractory and tolerant segments supports the existence of several NDZs in the 23- to 29-min region. Microscopic observations revealed that deleterious inversions are associated with high frequencies of abnormal nucleoid structure and distribution. Combined with other information, the data suggest that NDZs participate in the organization of the terminal domain of the nucleoid.

  8. IS1R-mediated plasticity of IncL/M plasmids leads to the insertion of bla OXA-48 into the Escherichia coli Chromosome.

    PubMed

    Beyrouthy, R; Robin, F; Delmas, J; Gibold, L; Dalmasso, G; Dabboussi, F; Hamzé, M; Bonnet, R

    2014-07-01

    The OXA-48 carbapenemase is mainly encoded by ∼ 62-kb IncL/M plasmids. However, chromosome-mediated genes have been observed in Escherichia coli isolates. In this work, we investigated the genetic environment of OXA-48 in members of the family Enterobacteriaceae (n = 22) to understand how the OXA-48-encoding gene is transferred into the E. coli chromosome. The OXA-48-encoding gene was located within intact Tn1999.2 transposons in the ∼ 62-kb plasmids or within a truncated variant of Tn1999.2 for the OXA-48-encoding genes located in the chromosomes of E. coli bacteria. The analysis of the Tn1999.2 genetic environment revealed an inverted orientation of the transposon in five ∼ 62-kb plasmids (5/14 [35%]) and in all chromosome inserts (n = 8). The sequencing of pRA35 plasmid showed that this orientation of Tn1999.2 and the acquisition of an IS1R insertion sequence generated a 21.9-kb IS1R-based composite transposon encoding OXA-48 and designated Tn6237. The sequencing of a chromosomal insert encoding OXA-48 also revealed this new transposon in the E. coli chromosome. PCR mapping showed the presence of this element in all strains harboring an OXA-48-encoding chromosomal insert. However, different insertion sites of this transposon were observed in the E. coli chromosome. Overall, these findings indicate a plasticity of the OXA-48 genetic environment mediated by IS1R insertion sequences. The insertion sequences can induce the transfer of the OXA-encoding gene into E. coli chromosomes and thereby promote its persistence and expression at low levels. PMID:24752261

  9. Genetic analysis of chromosomal mutations in the polysialic acid gene cluster of Escherichia coli K1.

    PubMed Central

    Vimr, E R; Aaronson, W; Silver, R P

    1989-01-01

    The kps gene cluster of Escherichia coli K1 encodes functions for sialic acid synthesis, activation, polymerization, and possibly translocation of polymer to the cell surface. The size and complexity of this membrane polysaccharide biosynthetic cluster have hindered genetic mapping and functional descriptions of the kps genes. To begin a detailed investigation of the polysialic acid synthetic mechanism, acapsular mutants were characterized to determine their probable defects in polymer synthesis. The mutants were tested for complementation with kps fragments subcloned from two separately isolated, functionally intact kps gene clusters. Complementation was assayed by immunological and biochemical methods and by sensitivity to the K1-specific bacteriophage K1F. The kps cluster consisted of a central 5.8-kilobase region that contained at least two genes coding for sialic acid synthetic enzymes, a gene encoding the sialic acid-activating enzyme, and a gene encoding the sialic acid polymerase. This biosynthetic region is flanked on one side by an approximately 2.8-kilobase region that contains a potential regulatory locus and at least one structural gene for a polypeptide that appears to function in polysialic acid assembly. Flanking the biosynthetic region on the opposite side is a 6- to 8.4-kilobase region that codes for at least three proteins which may also function in polymer assembly and possibly in translocating polymer to the outer cell surface. Results of transduction crosses supported these conclusions and indicated that some of the kps genes flanking the central biosynthetic region may not function directly in transporting polymer to the cell surface. The results also demonstrate that the map position and probable function of most of the kps cluster genes have been identified. Images PMID:2644224

  10. Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Nataro, James P.; Kaper, James B.

    1998-01-01

    Escherichia coli is the predominant nonpathogenic facultative flora of the human intestine. Some E. coli strains, however, have developed the ability to cause disease of the gastrointestinal, urinary, or central nervous system in even the most robust human hosts. Diarrheagenic strains of E. coli can be divided into at least six different categories with corresponding distinct pathogenic schemes. Taken together, these organisms probably represent the most common cause of pediatric diarrhea worldwide. Several distinct clinical syndromes accompany infection with diarrheagenic E. coli categories, including traveler’s diarrhea (enterotoxigenic E. coli), hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic-uremic syndrome (enterohemorrhagic E. coli), persistent diarrhea (enteroaggregative E. coli), and watery diarrhea of infants (enteropathogenic E. coli). This review discusses the current level of understanding of the pathogenesis of the diarrheagenic E. coli strains and describes how their pathogenic schemes underlie the clinical manifestations, diagnostic approach, and epidemiologic investigation of these important pathogens. PMID:9457432

  11. PATHOGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI

    EPA Science Inventory

    Escherichia coli is a bacterial species which inhabits the gastrointestinal tract of man and warm-blooded animals. Because of the ubiquity of this bacterium in the intestinal flora, it serves as an important indicator organism of fecal contamination. E. coli, aside from serving a...

  12. Full-Genome Sequence of Escherichia coli K-15KW01, a Uropathogenic E. coli B2 Sequence Type 127 Isolate Harboring a Chromosomally Carried blaCTX-M-15 Gene.

    PubMed

    Zurfluh, Katrin; Tasara, Taurai; Stephan, Roger

    2016-01-01

    We present here the full-genome sequence of Escherichia coli K-15KW01, an extended-spectrum-β-lactamase-producing uropathogenic strain. Assembly and annotation of the draft genome resulted in a 5,154,641-bp chromosome and revealed a chromosomally contained blaCTX-M-15 gene embedded at the right-hand extremity of an ISEcp1 element in a plasmid-like structure (36,907 bp). PMID:27587831

  13. Full-Genome Sequence of Escherichia coli K-15KW01, a Uropathogenic E. coli B2 Sequence Type 127 Isolate Harboring a Chromosomally Carried blaCTX-M-15 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Zurfluh, Katrin; Tasara, Taurai

    2016-01-01

    We present here the full-genome sequence of Escherichia coli K-15KW01, an extended-spectrum-β-lactamase-producing uropathogenic strain. Assembly and annotation of the draft genome resulted in a 5,154,641-bp chromosome and revealed a chromosomally contained blaCTX-M-15 gene embedded at the right-hand extremity of an ISEcp1 element in a plasmid-like structure (36,907 bp). PMID:27587831

  14. Replication of the Escherichia coli chromosome in RNase HI-deficient cells: multiple initiation regions and fork dynamics.

    PubMed

    Maduike, Nkabuije Z; Tehranchi, Ashley K; Wang, Jue D; Kreuzer, Kenneth N

    2014-01-01

    DNA replication in Escherichia coli is normally initiated at a single origin, oriC, dependent on initiation protein DnaA. However, replication can be initiated elsewhere on the chromosome at multiple ectopic oriK sites. Genetic evidence indicates that initiation from oriK depends on RNA-DNA hybrids (R-loops), which are normally removed by enzymes such as RNase HI to prevent oriK from misfiring during normal growth. Initiation from oriK sites occurs in RNase HI-deficient mutants, and possibly in wild-type cells under certain unusual conditions. Despite previous work, the locations of oriK and their impact on genome stability remain unclear. We combined 2D gel electrophoresis and whole genome approaches to map genome-wide oriK locations. The DNA copy number profiles of various RNase HI-deficient strains contained multiple peaks, often in consistent locations, identifying candidate oriK sites. Removal of RNase HI protein also leads to global alterations of replication fork migration patterns, often opposite to normal replication directions, and presumably eukaryote-like replication fork merging. Our results have implications for genome stability, offering a new understanding of how RNase HI deficiency results in R-loop-mediated transcription-replication conflict, as well as inappropriate replication stalling or blockage at Ter sites outside of the terminus trap region and at ribosomal operons.

  15. On the Process of Cellular Division in Escherichia coli: Replication of the Bacterial Chromosome Under Control of Prophage P2*

    PubMed Central

    Lindahl, Gunnar; Hirota, Yukinori; Jacob, François

    1971-01-01

    The temperature-sensitive mutant CRT46 of Escherichia coli K12 is unable to initiate new rounds of DNA replication at 42°C. Mutants of bacteriophage P2 have been isolated, which, in the prophage state, allow mutant CRT46 to grow at 42°C. The lysogenic bacteria that grow at 42°C are apparently replicating under the control of prophage P2, which substitutes for the bacterial initiation system. The ability of prophage P2 cause this suppression phenomenon depends on the position of the prophage on the bacterial chromosome. Those lysogenic strains that are able to grow at 42°C all carry the prophage close to metE. The P2 mutants that allow CRT46 to grow at 42°C have insertions in the early region of the P2 genome. The suppression requires the cis-acting protein formed by gene A of P2. Images PMID:4944622

  16. Construction of Escherichia coli strains with chromosomally integrated expression cassettes for the synthesis of 2′-fucosyllactose

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The trisaccharide 2′-fucosyllactose (2′-FL) is one of the most abundant oligosaccharides found in human milk. Due to its prebiotic and anti-infective properties, 2′-FL is discussed as nutritional additive for infant formula. Besides chemical synthesis and extraction from human milk, 2′-FL can be produced enzymatically in vitro and in vivo. The most promising approach for a large-scale formation of 2′-FL is the whole cell biosynthesis in Escherichia coli by intracellular synthesis of GDP-L-fucose and subsequent fucosylation of lactose with an appropriate α1,2-fucosyltransferase. Even though whole cell approaches have been demonstrated for the synthesis of 2′-FL, further improvements of the engineered E. coli host are required to increase product yields. Furthermore, an antibiotic-free method of whole cell synthesis of 2′-FL is desirable to simplify product purification and to avoid traces of antibiotics in a product with nutritional purpose. Results Here we report the construction of the first selection marker-free E. coli strain that produces 2′-FL from lactose and glycerol. To construct this strain, recombinant genes of the de novo synthesis pathway for GDP-L-fucose as well as the gene for the H. pylori fucosyltransferase futC were integrated into the chromosome of E. coli JM109 by using the λ-Red recombineering technique. Strains carrying additional copies of the futC gene and/or the gene fkp (from Bacteroides fragilis) for an additional salvage pathway for GDP-L-fucose production were used and shown to further improve production of 2′-FL in shake flask experiments. An increase of the intracellular GDP-L-fucose concentration by expression of fkp gene as well as an additional copy of the futC gene lead to an enhanced formation of 2′-FL. Using an improved production strain, feasibility of large scale 2′-FL production was demonstrated in an antibiotic-free fed-batch fermentation (13 l) with a final 2′-FL concentration of 20.28

  17. Genetic recombination. [Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Stahl, F.W.

    1987-02-01

    The molecular pathways of gene recombination are explored and compared in studies of the model organisms, Escherichia coli and phase lambda. In the discussion of data from these studies it seems that recombination varies with the genetic idiosyncrasies of the organism and may also vary within a single organism.

  18. The role of MatP, ZapA and ZapB in chromosomal organization and dynamics in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Männik, Jaana; Castillo, Daniel E.; Yang, Da; Siopsis, George; Männik, Jaan

    2016-01-01

    Despite extensive research over several decades, a comprehensive view of how the Escherichia coli chromosome is organized within the nucleoid, and how two daughter chromosomes segregate has yet to emerge. Here we investigate the role of the MatP, ZapA and ZapB proteins in organizing the replication terminus (Ter) region and in the chromosomal segregation process. Quantitative image analysis of the fluorescently labeled Ter region shows that the replication terminus attaches to the divisome in a single segment along the perimeter of the cell in a MatP, ZapA and ZapB-dependent manner. The attachment does not significantly affect the bulk chromosome segregation in slow growth conditions. With or without the attachment, two chromosomal masses separate from each other at a speed comparable to the cell growth. The separation starts even before the replication terminus region positions itself at the center of the nucleoid. Modeling of the segregation based on conformational entropy correctly predicts the positioning of the replication terminus region within the nucleoid. However, the model produces a distinctly different chromosomal density distribution than the experiment, indicating that the conformational entropy plays a limited role in segregating the chromosomes in the late stages of replication. PMID:26762981

  19. Flagellar region 3b supports strong expression of integrated DNA and the highest chromosomal integration efficiency of the Escherichia coli flagellar regions

    PubMed Central

    Juhas, Mario; Ajioka, James W

    2015-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli is routinely used as the chassis for a variety of biotechnology and synthetic biology applications. Identification and analysis of reliable chromosomal integration and expression target loci is crucial for E. coli engineering. Chromosomal loci differ significantly in their ability to support integration and expression of the integrated genetic circuits. In this study, we investigate E. coli K12 MG1655 flagellar regions 2 and 3b. Integration of the genetic circuit into seven and nine highly conserved genes of the flagellar regions 2 (motA, motB, flhD, flhE, cheW, cheY and cheZ) and 3b (fliE, F, G, J, K, L, M, P, R), respectively, showed significant variation in their ability to support chromosomal integration and expression of the integrated genetic circuit. While not reducing the growth of the engineered strains, the integrations into all 16 target sites led to the loss of motility. In addition to high expression, the flagellar region 3b supports the highest efficiency of integration of all E. coli K12 MG1655 flagellar regions and is therefore potentially the most suitable for the integration of synthetic genetic circuits. PMID:26074421

  20. DpiA binding to the replication origin of Escherichia coli plasmids and chromosomes destabilizes plasmid inheritance and induces the bacterial SOS response.

    PubMed

    Miller, Christine; Ingmer, Hanne; Thomsen, Line Elnif; Skarstad, Kirsten; Cohen, Stanley N

    2003-10-01

    The dpiA and dpiB genes of Escherichia coli, which are orthologs of genes that regulate citrate uptake and utilization in Klebsiella pneumoniae, comprise a two-component signal transduction system that can modulate the replication of and destabilize the inheritance of pSC101 and certain other plasmids. Here we show that perturbed replication and inheritance result from binding of the effector protein DpiA to A+T-rich replication origin sequences that resemble those in the K. pneumoniae promoter region targeted by the DpiA ortholog, CitB. Consistent with its ability to bind to A+T-rich origin sequences, overproduction of DpiA induced the SOS response in E. coli, suggesting that chromosomal DNA replication is affected. Bacteria that overexpressed DpiA showed an increased amount of DNA per cell and increased cell size-both also characteristic of the SOS response. Concurrent overexpression of the DNA replication initiation protein, DnaA, or the DNA helicase, DnaB-both of which act at A+T-rich replication origin sequences in the E. coli chromosome and DpiA-targeted plasmids-reversed SOS induction as well as plasmid destabilization by DpiA. Our finding that physical and functional interactions between DpiA and sites of replication initiation modulate DNA replication and plasmid inheritance suggests a mechanism by which environmental stimuli transmitted by these gene products can regulate chromosomal and plasmid dynamics.

  1. Time-dependent effects of transcription- and translation-halting drugs on the spatial distributions of the Escherichia coli chromosome and ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Bakshi, Somenath; Choi, Heejun; Mondal, Jagannath; Weisshaar, James C

    2014-11-01

    Previously observed effects of rifampicin and chloramphenicol indicate that transcription and translation activity strongly affect the coarse spatial organization of the bacterial cytoplasm. Single-cell, time-resolved, quantitative imaging of chromosome and ribosome spatial distributions and ribosome diffusion in live Escherichia coli provides insight into the underlying mechanisms. Monte Carlo simulations of model DNA-ribosome mixtures support a novel nucleoid-ribosome mixing hypothesis. In normal conditions, 70S-polysomes and the chromosomal DNA segregate, while 30S and 50S ribosomal subunits are able to penetrate the nucleoids. Growth conditions and drug treatments determine the partitioning of ribosomes into 70S-polysomes versus free 30S and 50S subunits. Entropic and excluded volume effects then dictate the resulting chromosome and ribosome spatial distributions. Direct observation of radial contraction of the nucleoids 0-5 min after treatment with either transcription- or translation-halting drugs supports the hypothesis that simultaneous transcription, translation, and insertion of proteins into the membrane ('transertion') exerts an expanding force on the chromosomal DNA. Breaking of the DNA-RNA polymerase-mRNA-ribosome-membrane chain in either of two ways causes similar nucleoid contraction on a similar timescale. We suggest that chromosomal expansion due to transertion enables co-transcriptional translation throughout the nucleoids.

  2. A cloning vector for creation of Escherichia coli lacZ translational fusions and generation of linear template for chromosomal integration.

    PubMed

    Uhlich, Gaylen A; Chen, Chin-Yi

    2012-05-01

    A novel cloning vector to aid in the construction of single copy β-galactosidase reporter systems for gene expression studies in lactose metabolizing Escherichia coli strains, including STEC, is described. The plasmid allows construction of translational fusions of cloned gene promoters to a short segment of E. coli lacZ. A selectable spectinomycin resistance marker flanked by a short lacI segment is positioned 5' to the cloning site. PCR amplification using opposing primers complementary to the upstream lacI fragment and the downstream lacZ fragment generates a linear template suitable for integration using pRedET recombination. Integration of linear template derived from the recombinant plasmid into host strains replaces the entire native lacZ promoter and fuses the promoter of interest in-frame with the lacZ gene, thus simultaneously producing a single-copy, chromosomal reporter system and eliminating background lacZ expression. Studies comparing ahpC expression from a chromosomal fusion in the lac open with that on a plasmid in E. coli strain EDL933 are shown. PMID:22197962

  3. Bipolar localization of the group II intron Ll.LtrB is maintained in Escherichia coli deficient in nucleoid condensation, chromosome partitioning and DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Beauregard, Arthur; Chalamcharla, Venkata R; Piazza, Carol Lyn; Belfort, Marlene; Coros, Colin J

    2006-11-01

    Group II introns are mobile genetic elements that invade their cognate intron-minus alleles via an RNA intermediate, in a process known as retrohoming. They can also retrotranspose to ectopic sites at low frequency. In Escherichia coli, retrotransposition of the lactococcal group II intron, Ll.LtrB, occurs preferentially within the Ori and Ter macrodomains of the E. coli chromosome. These macrodomains migrate towards the poles of the cell, where the intron-encoded protein, LtrA, localizes. Here we investigate whether alteration of nucleoid condensation, chromosome partitioning and replication affect retrotransposition frequencies, as well as bipolar localization of the Ll.LtrB intron integration and LtrA distribution in E. coli. We thus examined these properties in the absence of the nucleoid-associated proteins H-NS, StpA and MukB, in variants of partitioning functions including the centromere-like sequence migS and the actin homologue MreB, as well as in the replication mutants DeltaoriC, seqA, tus and topoIV (ts). Although there were some dramatic fluctuations in retrotransposition levels in these hosts, bipolar localization of integration events was maintained. LtrA was consistently found in nucleoid-free regions, with its localization to the cellular poles being largely preserved in these hosts. Together, these results suggest that bipolar localization of group II intron retrotransposition results from the residence of the intron-encoded protein at the poles of the cell.

  4. Visualizing the proteome of Escherichia coli: an efficient and versatile method for labeling chromosomal coding DNA sequences (CDSs) with fluorescent protein genes

    PubMed Central

    Watt, Rory M.; Wang, Jing; Leong, Meikid; Kung, Hsiang-fu; Cheah, Kathryn S.E.; Liu, Depei; Huang, Jian-Dong

    2007-01-01

    To investigate the feasibility of conducting a genomic-scale protein labeling and localization study in Escherichia coli, a representative subset of 23 coding DNA sequences (CDSs) was selected for chromosomal tagging with one or more fluorescent protein genes (EGFP, EYFP, mRFP1, DsRed2). We used λ-Red recombination to precisely and efficiently position PCR-generated DNA targeting cassettes containing a fluorescent protein gene and an antibiotic resistance marker, at the C-termini of the CDSs of interest, creating in-frame fusions under the control of their native promoters. We incorporated cre/loxP and flpe/frt technology to enable multiple rounds of chromosomal tagging events to be performed sequentially with minimal disruption to the target locus, thus allowing sets of proteins to be co-localized within the cell. The visualization of labeled proteins in live E. coli cells using fluorescence microscopy revealed a striking variety of distributions including: membrane and nucleoid association, polar foci and diffuse cytoplasmic localization. Fifty of the fifty-two independent targeting experiments performed were successful, and 21 of the 23 selected CDSs could be fluorescently visualized. Our results show that E. coli has an organized and dynamic proteome, and demonstrate that this approach is applicable for tagging and (co-) localizing CDSs on a genome-wide scale. PMID:17272300

  5. Detection of chromosomal blaCTX-M-15 in Escherichia coli O25b-B2-ST131 isolates from the Kinki region of Japan.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Itaru; Fukui, Naoki; Taguchi, Masumi; Yamauchi, Kou; Nakamura, Tatsuya; Okano, Sho; Yamamoto, Yoshimasa

    2013-12-01

    Escherichia coli O25b-B2-ST131 isolates harbouring bla(CTX-M-15) are distributed worldwide. The bla(CTX-M-15) transposition unit has often been found on plasmids and the genetic contexts have been examined; however, less is known about the frequency and contexts of the bla(CTX-M-15) transposition unit on the chromosome. This study was performed to determine the chromosomal location of the bla(CTX-M-15) transposition unit and to analyse the molecular structure of the region surrounding the bla(CTX-M-15) transposition unit in E. coli O25b-B2-ST131 isolates. Twenty-two E. coli O25b-B2-ST131 strains harbouring bla(CTX-M-15) that had been isolated from university hospital patients and nursing home residents in the Kinki region of Japan were examined. Inverse PCR (iPCR) targeting bla(CTX-M-15) was performed to classify the molecular structure of the region surrounding the bla(CTX-M-15) transposition unit. The isolates were classified into nine types (types A-I) considering the iPCR results; type A was the most prevalent type (13/22 isolates). Sequences of the iPCR-amplified DNA fragments showed that the bla(CTX-M-15) transposition unit consisted of ISEcp1, bla(CTX-M-15) and orf477Δ. A homology search of the obtained sequences showed that the bla(CTX-M-15) transposition unit was inserted into different chromosomal regions in eight of the nine classified types. Although 21 of the 22 E. coli isolates possessed chromosomally located bla(CTX-M-15) transposition units, clonal spread was not evident on pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis. Taken together, these data indicate that certain E. coli O25b-B2-ST131 strains harbouring chromosomal bla(CTX-M-15) have emerged and spread in the Kinki region of Japan. PMID:24091130

  6. Lack of the H-NS Protein Results in Extended and Aberrantly Positioned DNA during Chromosome Replication and Segregation in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Helgesen, Emily; Fossum-Raunehaug, Solveig

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The architectural protein H-NS binds nonspecifically to hundreds of sites throughout the chromosome and can multimerize to stiffen segments of DNA as well as to form DNA-protein-DNA bridges. H-NS has been suggested to contribute to the orderly folding of the Escherichia coli chromosome in the highly compacted nucleoid. In this study, we investigated the positioning and dynamics of the origins, the replisomes, and the SeqA structures trailing the replication forks in cells lacking the H-NS protein. In H-NS mutant cells, foci of SeqA, replisomes, and origins were irregularly positioned in the cell. Further analysis showed that the average distance between the SeqA structures and the replisome was increased by ∼100 nm compared to that in wild-type cells, whereas the colocalization of SeqA-bound sister DNA behind replication forks was not affected. This result may suggest that H-NS contributes to the folding of DNA along adjacent segments. H-NS mutant cells were found to be incapable of adopting the distinct and condensed nucleoid structures characteristic of E. coli cells growing rapidly in rich medium. It appears as if H-NS mutant cells adopt a “slow-growth” type of chromosome organization under nutrient-rich conditions, which leads to a decreased cellular DNA content. IMPORTANCE It is not fully understood how and to what extent nucleoid-associated proteins contribute to chromosome folding and organization during replication and segregation in Escherichia coli. In this work, we find in vivo indications that cells lacking the nucleoid-associated protein H-NS have a lower degree of DNA condensation than wild-type cells. Our work suggests that H-NS is involved in condensing the DNA along adjacent segments on the chromosome and is not likely to tether newly replicated strands of sister DNA. We also find indications that H-NS is required for rapid growth with high DNA content and for the formation of a highly condensed nucleoid structure under such

  7. A Multicenter Study of Beta-Lactamase Resistant Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae Reveals High Level Chromosome Mediated Extended Spectrum β Lactamase Resistance in Ogun State, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Adeyankinnu, Folasoge A.; Motayo, Babatunde O.; Akinduti, Akinniyi; Akinbo, John; Ogiogwa, Joseph I.; Aboderin, Bukola W.; Agunlejika, R. A.

    2014-01-01

    As a result of the ever increasing problem of multiresistant bacteria, we instituted a surveillance program with the aim of identifying the basic molecular properties of ESBL in our environment. About 197 isolates of Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae were selected and tested for ESBL production and antimicrobial susceptibility. Plasmid profiles were determined and curing ability was tested. ESBL prevalence was 26.4% for all isolates tested, with E. coli having a greater proportion. There was absolute resistance to ampicilin, tetracycline, and co-trimaxole among tested isolates. There was above average susceptibility to the 2nd and 3rd generation cephalosporins. Plasmid profiles of tested isolates ranged from 9 kbp to 26 kbp with average of 14.99 ± 2.3 kbp for E. coli and 20.98 ± 1.8 kbp K. pneumoniae, 9.6% of ESBL positive E. coli plasmids were cured, while 3.9% of K. pneumoniae plasmids were cured after treatment. The present study shows an upsurge in ESBL acquisition by gram negative bacteria and evidence of cocirculation of varying subtypes of ESBL with both plasmid transmissible and chromosome encoded subtypes. This calls for universal surveillance and more effort towards molecular epidemiology of this public health treatment. PMID:24790598

  8. Aging of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Clifton, C. E.

    1966-01-01

    Clifton, C. E. (Stanford University, Stanford, Calif.). Aging of Escherichia coli. J. Bacteriol. 92:905–912. 1966.—The rates of endogenous and exogenous (glucose) respiration decreased much more rapidly than did the viable count during the first 24 hr of aging of washed, C14-labeled cells of Escherichia coli K-12 suspended in a basal salt medium devoid of ammonium salts. The rates of decrease of respiration and of death approached each other as the age of the cells increased, but death was not the only factor involved in decreased respiratory activity of the suspensions. The greatest decrease in cellular contents with aging was noted in the ribonucleic acid fraction, of which the ribose appeared to be oxidized, while uracil accumulated in the suspension medium. The viable count and respiratory activities remained higher in glucose-fed than in nonfed suspensions. Proline-labeled cells fed glucose tended to lose more of their proline and to convert more proline into C14O2 than in unfed controls. On the other hand, uracil-labeled cells fed glucose retained more of the uracil than did nonfed cells, but glucose elicited some oxidation of uracil. An exogenous energy source such as glucose aided in the maintenance of a population, but it was not the only factor needed for such maintenance. PMID:5332874

  9. Correlative super-resolution imaging of RNA polymerase distribution and dynamics, bacterial membrane and chromosomal structure in Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spahn, Christoph; Cella-Zannacchi, Francesca; Endesfelder, Ulrike; Heilemann, Mike

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate correlative super-resolution PALM, PAINT and dSTORM imaging of RNA polymerase, membrane and chromosomal DNA in fixed E. coli. This protocol allows the combination of precise structural information of the nucleoid (dSTORM) with quantitative super-resolution imaging (PALM) of interacting proteins. The spatial distribution and organization of RNA polymerase and DNA are visualized in bacterial cells grown at doubling times of 25 or 44 min. We observe that RNA polymerase is concentrated at the edge of the highly structured nucleoid during fast growth, whereas it is found more evenly distributed during medium-fast growth. In both conditions, the nucleoid shows densely packed areas which appear to be inaccessible to RNA polymerase. This finding is confirmed by live-cell tracking of RNA polymerase and subsequent imaging of the respective nucleoids using a protocol for fast fixation on-the-slide.

  10. [Markerless DNA deletion based on Red recombination and in vivo I-Sec I endonuclease cleavage in Escherichia coli chromosome].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Meiqin; Yu, Jian; Zhou, Changlin; Fang, Hongqing

    2016-01-01

    Red-based recombineering has been widely used in Escherichia coli genome modification through electroporating PCR fragments into electrocompetent cells to replace target sequences. Some mutations in the PCR fragments may be brought into the homologous regions near the target. To solve this problem in markeless gene deletion we developed a novel method characterized with two-step recombination and a donor plasmid. First, generated by PCR a linear DNA cassette which comprises a I-Sec I site-containing marker gene and homologous arms was electroporated into cells for marker-substitution deletion of the target sequence. Second, after a donor plasmid carrying the I-Sec I site-containing fusion homologous arm was chemically transformed into the marker-containing cells, the fusion arms and the marker was simultaneously cleaved by I-Sec I endonuclease and the marker-free deletion was stimulated by double-strand break-mediated intermolecular recombination. Eleven nonessential regions in E. coli DH1 genome were sequentially deleted by our method, resulting in a 10.59% reduced genome size. These precise deletions were also verified by PCR sequencing and genome resequencing. Though no change in the growth rate on the minimal medium, we found the genome-reduced strains have some alteration in the acid resistance and for the synthesis of lycopene. PMID:27363204

  11. [Markerless DNA deletion based on Red recombination and in vivo I-Sec I endonuclease cleavage in Escherichia coli chromosome].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Meiqin; Yu, Jian; Zhou, Changlin; Fang, Hongqing

    2016-01-01

    Red-based recombineering has been widely used in Escherichia coli genome modification through electroporating PCR fragments into electrocompetent cells to replace target sequences. Some mutations in the PCR fragments may be brought into the homologous regions near the target. To solve this problem in markeless gene deletion we developed a novel method characterized with two-step recombination and a donor plasmid. First, generated by PCR a linear DNA cassette which comprises a I-Sec I site-containing marker gene and homologous arms was electroporated into cells for marker-substitution deletion of the target sequence. Second, after a donor plasmid carrying the I-Sec I site-containing fusion homologous arm was chemically transformed into the marker-containing cells, the fusion arms and the marker was simultaneously cleaved by I-Sec I endonuclease and the marker-free deletion was stimulated by double-strand break-mediated intermolecular recombination. Eleven nonessential regions in E. coli DH1 genome were sequentially deleted by our method, resulting in a 10.59% reduced genome size. These precise deletions were also verified by PCR sequencing and genome resequencing. Though no change in the growth rate on the minimal medium, we found the genome-reduced strains have some alteration in the acid resistance and for the synthesis of lycopene.

  12. The Localization and Action of Topoisomerase IV in Escherichia coli Chromosome Segregation Is Coordinated by the SMC Complex, MukBEF.

    PubMed

    Zawadzki, Pawel; Stracy, Mathew; Ginda, Katarzyna; Zawadzka, Katarzyna; Lesterlin, Christian; Kapanidis, Achillefs N; Sherratt, David J

    2015-12-22

    The type II topoisomerase TopoIV, which has an essential role in Escherichia coli chromosome decatenation, interacts with MukBEF, an SMC (structural maintenance of chromosomes) complex that acts in chromosome segregation. We have characterized the intracellular dynamics of individual TopoIV molecules and the consequences of their interaction with MukBEF clusters by using photoactivated-localization microscopy. We show that ~15 TopoIV molecules per cell are associated with MukBEF clusters that are preferentially localized to the replication origin region (ori), close to the long axis of the cell. A replication-dependent increase in the fraction of immobile molecules, together with a proposed catalytic cycle of ~1.8 s, is consistent with the majority of active TopoIV molecules catalyzing decatenation, with a minority maintaining steady-state DNA supercoiling. Finally, we show that the MukB-ParC interaction is crucial for timely decatenation and segregation of newly replicated ori DNA.

  13. migS, a cis-acting site that affects bipolar positioning of oriC on the Escherichia coli chromosome.

    PubMed

    Yamaichi, Yoshiharu; Niki, Hironori

    2004-01-14

    During replication of the Escherichia coli chromosome, the replicated Ori domains migrate towards opposite cell poles, suggesting that a cis-acting site for bipolar migration is located in this region. To identify this cis-acting site, a series of mutants was constructed by splitting subchromosomes from the original chromosome. One mutant, containing a 720 kb subchromosome, was found to be defective in the bipolar positioning of oriC. The creation of deletion mutants allowed the identification of migS, a 25 bp sequence, as the cis-acting site for the bipolar positioning of oriC. When migS was located at the replication terminus, the chromosomal segment showed bipolar positioning. migS was able to rescue bipolar migration of plasmid DNA containing a mutation in the SopABC partitioning system. Interestingly, multiple copies of the migS sequence on a plasmid in trans inhibited the bipolar positioning of oriC. Taken together, these findings indicate that migS plays a crucial role in the bipolar positioning of oriC. In addition, real-time analysis of the dynamic morphological changes of nucleoids in wild-type and migS mutants suggests that bipolar positioning of the replicated oriC contributes to nucleoid organization.

  14. Regulatory and structural properties differentiating the chromosomal and the bacteriophage-associated Escherichia coli O157:H7 Cu, Zn Superoxide Dismutases

    PubMed Central

    D'Orazio, Melania; Scotti, Raffaella; Nicolini, Laura; Cervoni, Laura; Rotilio, Giuseppe; Battistoni, Andrea; Gabbianelli, Roberta

    2008-01-01

    Background Highly virulent enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 strains possess three sodC genes encoding for periplasmic Cu, Zn superoxide dismutases: sodC, which is identical to the gene present in non-pathogenic E. coli strains, and sodC-F1 and sodC-F2, two nearly identical genes located within lambdoid prophage sequences. The significance of this apparent sodC redundancy in E. coli O157:H7 has not yet been investigated. Results We report that strains deleted of one or more sodC genes are less resistant than the wild type strain to a challenge with hydrogen peroxide, thus confirming their involvement in the bacterial antioxidant apparatus. To understand if the different sodC genes have truly overlapping functions, we have carried out a comparison of the functional, structural and regulatory properties of the various E. coli O157:H7 SodC enzymes. We have found that the chromosomal and prophagic sodC genes are differentially regulated in vitro. sodC is exclusively expressed in aerobic cultures grown to the stationary phase. In contrast, sodC-F1 and sodC-F2 are expressed also in the logarithmic phase and in anaerobic cultures. Moreover, the abundance of SodC-F1/SodC-F2 increases with respect to that of SodC in bacteria recovered from infected Caco-2 cells, suggesting higher expression/stability of SodC-F1/SodC-F2 in intracellular environments. This observation correlates with the properties of the proteins. In fact, monomeric SodC and dimeric SodC-F1/SodC-F2 are characterized by sharp differences in catalytic activity, metal affinity, protease resistance and stability. Conclusion Our data show that the chromosomal and bacteriophage-associated E. coli O157:H7 sodC genes have different regulatory properties and encode for proteins with distinct structural/functional features, suggesting that they likely play distinctive roles in bacterial protection from reactive oxygen species. In particular, dimeric SodC-F1 and SodC-F2 possess physico-chemical properties

  15. Characterization of a chromosomally integrated luxCDABE marker for investigation of shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O91:H21 shedding in cattle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Yingying; Mathew, Alan G.

    2011-06-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O91:H21 has been recognized as a potential life-threatening foodborne pathogen and is commonly involved in human infections in European countries. Fecal shedding of the organism by cattle is considered to be the ultimate source for contaminations. Studies examining STEC shedding patterns often include inoculation of strains carrying antibiotic resistance makers for identifiable recovery. However, indigenous intestinal microflora exhibiting similar antibiotic resistance patterns can confound such studies. Such was the case in a study by our group when attempting to characterize shedding patterns of O91:H21 in calves. A chromosomally integrated bioluminescence marker using a luxCDABE cassette from Photorhabdus luminescens was developed in O91:H21 to overcome such shortcomings of antibiotic resistance markers during animal challenge experiment. The marker was validated in various aspects and was shown to have no impact on metabolic reactions, isotype virulence gene patterns, cost to growth, and additionally demonstrated high in vitro stability. Together, the results indicated that a chromosomally integrated luxCDABE based marker may be a superior system for the study of STEC colonization and shedding in cattle.

  16. Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Smith, James L; Fratamico, Pina M; Gunther, Nereus W

    2007-01-01

    Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) possesses virulence traits that allow it to invade, colonize, and induce disease in bodily sites outside of the gastrointestinal tract. Human diseases caused by ExPEC include urinary tract infections, neonatal meningitis, sepsis, pneumonia, surgical site infections, as well as infections in other extraintestinal locations. ExPEC-induced diseases represent a large burden in terms of medical costs and productivity losses. In addition to human illnesses, ExPEC strains also cause extraintestinal infections in domestic animals and pets. A commonality of virulence factors has been demonstrated between human and animal ExPEC, suggesting that the organisms are zoonotic pathogens. ExPEC strains have been isolated from food products, in particular from raw meats and poultry, indicating that these organisms potentially represent a new class of foodborne pathogens. This review discusses various aspects of ExPEC, including its presence in food products, in animals used for food or as companion pets; the diseases ExPEC can cause; and the virulence factors and virulence mechanisms that cause disease.

  17. Genetic improvement of Escherichia coli for ethanol production: chromosomal integration of Zymomonas mobilis genes encoding pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase II.

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, K; Beall, D S; Mejia, J P; Shanmugam, K T; Ingram, L O

    1991-01-01

    Zymomonas mobilis genes for pyruvate decarboxylase (pdc) and alcohol dehydrogenase II (adhB) were integrated into the Escherichia coli chromosome within or near the pyruvate formate-lyase gene (pfl). Integration improved the stability of the Z. mobilis genes in E. coli, but further selection was required to increase expression. Spontaneous mutants were selected for resistance to high level of chloramphenicol that also expressed high levels of the Z. mobilis genes. Analogous mutants were selected for increased expression of alcohol dehydrogenase on aldehyde indicator plates. These mutants were functionally equivalent to the previous plasmid-based strains for the fermentation of xylose and glucose to ethanol. Ethanol concentrations of 54.4 and 41.6 g/liter were obtained from 10% glucose and 8% xylose, respectively. The efficiency of conversion exceeded theoretical limits (0.51 g of ethanol/g of sugar) on the basis of added sugars because of the additional production of ethanol from the catabolism of complex nutrients. Further mutations were introduced to inactivate succinate production (frd) and to block homologous recombination (recA). PMID:2059047

  18. A novel plasmid vector designed for chromosomal gene integration and expression: use for developing a genetically stable Escherichia coli melanin production strain.

    PubMed

    Sabido, Andrea; Martínez, Luz María; de Anda, Ramón; Martínez, Alfredo; Bolívar, Francisco; Gosset, Guillermo

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant Escherichia coli strains for the production of valuable products are usually generated by transformation with plasmid expression vectors. However, in spite of their usefulness, common problems associated with plasmid use include segregrational and structural instability as well as undesired copy-number effects. A viable alternative to plasmid use is chromosomal gene integration. With the purpose of facilitating the process of stable strain generation, a novel chromosomal integration vector was developed and tested. We describe the construction and use of novel expression vector pLoxGentrc that contains the strong trc promoter (P(trc)), a multiple cloning site, the T1 and T2 rrnB terminator sequences, the lacI(q) gene and the aacC1 gene conferring gentamicin resistance flanked by two loxP sites. As a demonstration of utility, melanin-producing strains of E. coli were generated employing this vector. Melanin is a polymer synthesized by the enzyme tyrosinase using l-tyrosine as substrate. The melA gene encoding a tyrosinase from Rhizobium etli was ligated to pLoxGentrc to generate pLoxGentrcmelA. This plasmid was transformed into E. coli W3110 to generate a melanin-producing strain. A region from this plasmid including P(trc)melA, T1 and T2 rrnB and the aacC1 gene was amplified by PCR employing primers with 45 b regions of homology to the lacZ gene. The PCR product was electroporated into strain W3110 that expressed the λ-Red enzymes. From this experiment, strain W3110P(tr)(c)melA, was obtained having the melA gene inserted in the lacZ locus. Fermentor cultures with strain W3110/pLoxGentrcmelA grown in the presence and absence of gentamicin as well as W3110P(tr)(c)melA without antibiotic revealed that the latter displays high genetic stability as well as the highest melanin titer. Vector pLoxGentrc should be useful during strain generation processes, enabling direct comparison of plasmid and chromosome-based production systems. PMID:22884755

  19. A novel plasmid vector designed for chromosomal gene integration and expression: use for developing a genetically stable Escherichia coli melanin production strain.

    PubMed

    Sabido, Andrea; Martínez, Luz María; de Anda, Ramón; Martínez, Alfredo; Bolívar, Francisco; Gosset, Guillermo

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant Escherichia coli strains for the production of valuable products are usually generated by transformation with plasmid expression vectors. However, in spite of their usefulness, common problems associated with plasmid use include segregrational and structural instability as well as undesired copy-number effects. A viable alternative to plasmid use is chromosomal gene integration. With the purpose of facilitating the process of stable strain generation, a novel chromosomal integration vector was developed and tested. We describe the construction and use of novel expression vector pLoxGentrc that contains the strong trc promoter (P(trc)), a multiple cloning site, the T1 and T2 rrnB terminator sequences, the lacI(q) gene and the aacC1 gene conferring gentamicin resistance flanked by two loxP sites. As a demonstration of utility, melanin-producing strains of E. coli were generated employing this vector. Melanin is a polymer synthesized by the enzyme tyrosinase using l-tyrosine as substrate. The melA gene encoding a tyrosinase from Rhizobium etli was ligated to pLoxGentrc to generate pLoxGentrcmelA. This plasmid was transformed into E. coli W3110 to generate a melanin-producing strain. A region from this plasmid including P(trc)melA, T1 and T2 rrnB and the aacC1 gene was amplified by PCR employing primers with 45 b regions of homology to the lacZ gene. The PCR product was electroporated into strain W3110 that expressed the λ-Red enzymes. From this experiment, strain W3110P(tr)(c)melA, was obtained having the melA gene inserted in the lacZ locus. Fermentor cultures with strain W3110/pLoxGentrcmelA grown in the presence and absence of gentamicin as well as W3110P(tr)(c)melA without antibiotic revealed that the latter displays high genetic stability as well as the highest melanin titer. Vector pLoxGentrc should be useful during strain generation processes, enabling direct comparison of plasmid and chromosome-based production systems.

  20. EXTRAINTESTINAL PATHOGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI (EXPEC)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) possess virulence traits that allow them to invade, colonize, and induce disease in bodily sites outside of the gastrointestinal tract. Human diseases caused by ExPEC include urinary tract infections, neonatal meningitis, sepsis, pneumonia, surgic...

  1. Lambda transducing bacteriophage carrying deletions of the argCBH-rpoBC region of the Escherichia coli chromosome.

    PubMed Central

    Linn, T; Goman, M; Scaife, J

    1979-01-01

    Deletions in the rpoBC region have been transferred to phage lambda and characterized in detail by genetic, structural, and functional tests. We thus extend and confirm knowledge of the organization of this part of the chromosome. The new phages are useful tools for studying the genes for the bacterial transcription and translation machinery. Images PMID:159290

  2. A cloning vector for creation of Escherichia coli lacZ translational fusions and generation of linear template for chromosomal integrations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A novel cloning vector to aid in the construction of ß-galactosidase reporter systems for gene expression studies in lactose metabolizing strains of Shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli is described. The plasmid allows construction of translational fusions of cloned gene promoters with a short seg...

  3. The FIS protein binds and bends the origin of chromosomal DNA replication, oriC, of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Gille, H; Egan, J B; Roth, A; Messer, W

    1991-01-01

    The FIS protein (factor for inversion stimulation) is known to stimulate site-specific recombination processes, such as the inversion of the G segment of bacteriophage Mu, by binding to specific enhancer sequences. It has also been shown to activate transcription from rRNA promoters both in vitro and in vivo. We have identified a specific binding site for FIS in the center of the origin of chromosomal DNA replication, oriC. The DNA bends upon FIS binding. Occupation of the FIS site and binding of DnaA, the initiator protein, to its adjacent binding site (R3) are mutually exclusive. A fis mutant strain can not be efficiently transformed with plasmids which carry and replicate from oriC, suggesting that FIS is required for minichromosome replication. Images PMID:1870971

  4. Shiga Toxin Producing Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Bryan, Allen; Youngster, Ilan; McAdam, Alexander J

    2015-06-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) is among the common causes of foodborne gastroenteritis. STEC is defined by the production of specific toxins, but within this pathotype there is a diverse group of organisms. This diversity has important consequences for understanding the pathogenesis of the organism, as well as for selecting the optimum strategy for diagnostic testing in the clinical laboratory. This review includes discussions of the mechanisms of pathogenesis, the range of manifestations of infection, and the several different methods of laboratory detection of Shiga toxin-producing E coli.

  5. An integrated database to support research on Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Baehr, A.; Dunham, G.; Matsuda, Hideo; Michaels, G.; Taylor, R.; Overbeek, R.; Rudd, K.E. ); Ginsburg, A.; Joerg, D.; Kazic, T. . Dept. of Genetics); Hagstrom, R.; Zawada, D. ); Smith, C.; Yoshida, Kaoru )

    1992-01-01

    We have used logic programming to design and implement a prototype database of genomic information for the model bacterial organism Escherichia coli. This report presents the fundamental database primitives that can be used to access and manipulate data relating to the E. coli genome. The present system, combined with a tutorial manual, provides immediate access to the integrated knowledge base for E. coli chromosome data. It also serves as the foundation for development of more user-friendly interfaces that have the same retrieval power and high-level tools to analyze complex chromosome organization.

  6. The eclipse period of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    von Freiesleben, U; Krekling, M A; Hansen, F G; Løbner-Olesen, A

    2000-11-15

    The minimal time between successive initiations on the same origin (the eclipse) in Escherichia coli was determined to be approximately 25-30 min. An inverse relationship was found between the length of the eclipse and the amount of Dam methyltransferase in the cell, indicating that the eclipse corresponds to the period of origin hemimethylation. The SeqA protein was absolutely required for the eclipse, and DnaA titration studies suggested that the SeqA protein prevented the binding of multiple DnaA molecules on oriC (initial complex formation). No correlation between the amount of SeqA and eclipse length was revealed, but increased SeqA levels affected chromosome partitioning and/or cell division. This was corroborated further by an aberrant nucleoid distribution in SeqA-deficient cells. We suggest that the SeqA protein's role in maintaining the eclipse is tied to a function in chromosome organization.

  7. Gene Regulation by H-NS as a Function of Growth Conditions Depends on Chromosomal Position in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Brambilla, Elisa; Sclavi, Bianca

    2015-01-01

    Cellular adaptation to changing environmental conditions requires the coordinated regulation of expression of large sets of genes by global regulatory factors such as nucleoid associated proteins. Although in eukaryotic cells genomic position is known to play an important role in regulation of gene expression, it remains to be established whether in bacterial cells there is an influence of chromosomal position on the efficiency of these global regulators. Here we show for the first time that genome position can affect transcription activity of a promoter regulated by the histone-like nucleoid-structuring protein (H-NS), a global regulator of bacterial transcription and genome organization. We have used as a local reporter of H-NS activity the level of expression of a fluorescent reporter protein under control of an H-NS−regulated promoter (Phns) at different sites along the genome. Our results show that the activity of the Phns promoter depends on whether it is placed within the AT-rich regions of the genome that are known to be bound preferentially by H-NS. This modulation of gene expression moreover depends on the growth phase and the growth rate of the cells, reflecting the changes taking place in the relative abundance of different nucleoid proteins and the inherent heterogeneous organization of the nucleoid. Genomic position can thus play a significant role in the adaptation of the cells to environmental changes, providing a fitness advantage that can explain the selection of a gene’s position during evolution. PMID:25701587

  8. Phylogenetic Analysis of Enteroaggregative and Diffusely Adherent Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Czeczulin, John R.; Whittam, Thomas S.; Henderson, Ian R.; Navarro-Garcia, Fernando; Nataro, James P.

    1999-01-01

    The phylogenetics of the various pathotypes of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli are not completely understood. In this study, we identified several plasmid and chromosomal genes in the pathogenic enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC) prototype strain 042 and determined the prevalence of these loci among EAEC and diffusely adherent E. coli strains. The distribution of these genes is analyzed within an evolutionary framework provided by the characterization of allelic variation in housekeeping genes via multilocus enzyme electrophoresis. Our data reveal that EAEC strains are heterogeneous with respect to chromosomal and plasmid-borne genes but that the majority harbor a member of a conserved family of virulence plasmids. Comparison of plasmid and chromosomal relatedness of strains suggests clonality of chromosomal markers and a limited transfer model of plasmid distribution. PMID:10338471

  9. gltBDF operon of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Castaño, I; Bastarrachea, F; Covarrubias, A A

    1988-01-01

    A 2.0-kilobase DNA fragment carrying antibiotic resistance markers was inserted into the gltB gene of Escherichia coli previously cloned in a multicopy plasmid. Replacement of the chromosomal gltB+ gene by the gltB225::omega mutation led to cells unable to synthesize glutamate synthase, utilize growth rate-limiting nitrogen sources, or derepress their glutamine synthetase. The existence of a gltBDF operon encoding the large (gltB) and small (gltD) subunits of glutamate synthase and a regulatory peptide (gltF) at 69 min of the E. coli linkage map was deduced from complementation analysis. A plasmid carrying the entire gltB+D+F+ operon complemented cells for all three of the mutant phenotypes associated with the polar gltB225::omega mutation in the chromosome. By contrast, plasmids carrying gltB+ only complemented cells for glutamate synthase activity. A major tricistronic mRNA molecule was detected from Northern (RNA blot) DNA-RNA hybridization experiments with DNA probes containing single genes of the operon. A 30,200-dalton polypeptide was identified as the gltF product, the lack of which was responsible for the inability of cells to use nitrogen-limiting sources associated with gltB225::omega. Images PMID:2448295

  10. Novel antigens for enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli vaccines.

    PubMed

    Fleckenstein, James; Sheikh, Alaullah; Qadri, Firdausi

    2014-05-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are the most common bacterial pathogens causing diarrhea in developing countries where they lead to hundreds of thousands of deaths, mostly in children. These organisms are a leading cause of diarrheal illness in travelers to endemic countries. ETEC pathogenesis, and consequently vaccine approaches, have largely focused on plasmid-encoded enterotoxins or fimbrial colonization factors. To date these approaches have not yielded a broadly protective vaccine. However, recent studies suggest that ETEC pathogenesis is more complex than previously appreciated and involves additional plasmid and chromosomally encoded virulence molecules that can be targeted in vaccines. Here, we review recent novel antigen discovery efforts, potential contribution of these proteins to the molecular pathogenesis of ETEC and protective immunity, and the potential implications for development of next generation vaccines for important pathogens. These proteins may help to improve the effectiveness of future vaccines by making them simpler and possibly broadly protective because of their conserved nature. PMID:24702311

  11. Nonchemotactic Mutants of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, John B.; Adler, Julius; Dahl, Margaret M.

    1967-01-01

    We have isolated 40 mutants of Escherichia coli which are nonchemotactic as judged by their failure to swarm on semisolid tryptone plates or to make bands in capillary tubes containing tryptone broth. All the mutants have normal flagella, a fact shown by their shape and reaction with antiflagella serum. All are fully motile under the microscope and all are sensitive to the phage chi. Unlike its parent, one of the mutants, studied in greater detail, failed to show chemotaxis toward oxygen, glucose, serine, threonine, or aspartic acid. The failure to exhibit chemotaxis does not result from a failure to use the chemicals. The swimming of this mutant was shown to be random. The growth rate was normal under several conditions, and the growth requirements were unchanged. Images PMID:5335897

  12. Peptidoglycan Hydrolases of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    van Heijenoort, Jean

    2011-01-01

    Summary: The review summarizes the abundant information on the 35 identified peptidoglycan (PG) hydrolases of Escherichia coli classified into 12 distinct families, including mainly glycosidases, peptidases, and amidases. An attempt is also made to critically assess their functions in PG maturation, turnover, elongation, septation, and recycling as well as in cell autolysis. There is at least one hydrolytic activity for each bond linking PG components, and most hydrolase genes were identified. Few hydrolases appear to be individually essential. The crystal structures and reaction mechanisms of certain hydrolases having defined functions were investigated. However, our knowledge of the biochemical properties of most hydrolases still remains fragmentary, and that of their cellular functions remains elusive. Owing to redundancy, PG hydrolases far outnumber the enzymes of PG biosynthesis. The presence of the two sets of enzymes acting on the PG bonds raises the question of their functional correlations. It is difficult to understand why E. coli keeps such a large set of PG hydrolases. The subtle differences in substrate specificities between the isoenzymes of each family certainly reflect a variety of as-yet-unidentified physiological functions. Their study will be a far more difficult challenge than that of the steps of the PG biosynthesis pathway. PMID:22126997

  13. Eclipse period without sequestration in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Jan; Dasgupta, Santanu; Berg, Otto G; Nordström, Kurt

    2002-06-01

    The classical Meselson-Stahl density shift experiment was used to determine the length of the eclipse period in Escherichia coli, the minimum time period during which no new initiation is allowed from a newly replicated origin of chromosome replication, oriC. Populations of bacteria growing exponentially in heavy ((15)NH(4)+ and (13)C(6)-glucose) medium were shifted to light ((14)NH(4)+ and (12)C(6)-glucose) medium. The HH-, HL- and LL-DNA were separated by CsCl density gradient centrifugation, and their relative amounts were determined using radioactive gene-specific probes. The eclipse period, estimated from the kinetics of conversion of HH-DNA to HL- and LL-DNA, turned out to be 0.60 generation times for the wild-type strain. This was invariable for widely varying doubling times (35, 68 and 112 min) and was independent of the chromosome locus at which the eclipse period was measured. For strains with seqA, dam and damseqA mutants, the length of the eclipse period was 0.16, 0.40 and 0.32 generation times respectively. Thus, initiations from oriC were repressed for a considerable proportion of the generation time even when the sequestration function seemed to be severely compromised. The causal relationship between the length of the eclipse period and the synchrony of initiations from oriC is discussed.

  14. Independence of replisomes in Escherichia coli chromosomalreplication

    SciTech Connect

    Breier, Adam M.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.; Cozzarelli, Nicholas R.

    2005-03-13

    In Escherichia coli DNA replication is carried out by the coordinated action of the proteins within a replisome. After replication initiation, the two bidirectionally oriented replisomes from a single origin are colocalized into higher-order structures termed replication factories. The factory model postulated that the two replisomes are also functionally coupled. We tested this hypothesis by using DNA combing and whole-genome microarrays. Nascent DNA surrounding oriC in single, combed chromosomes showed instead that one replisome, usually the leftward one, was significantly ahead of the other 70% of the time. We next used microarrays to follow replication throughout the genome by measuring DNA copy number. We found in multiple E. coli strains that the replisomes are independent, with the leftward replisome ahead of the rightward one. The size of the bias was strain-specific, varying from 50 to 130 kb in the array results. When we artificially blocked one replisome, the other continued unabated, again demonstrating independence. We suggest an improved version of the factory model that retains the advantages of threading DNA through colocalized replisomes at about equal rates, but allows the cell flexibility to overcome obstacles encountered during elongation.

  15. The reactivation of DnaA(L366K) requires less acidic phospholipids supporting their role in the initiation of chromosome replication in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Aranovich, Alexander; Parola, Abraham H; Fishov, Itzhak

    2007-09-18

    DnaA(L366K), in concert with a wild-type DnaA (wtDnaA) protein, restores the growth of Escherichia coli cells arrested in the absence of adequate levels of cellular acidic phospholipids. In vitro and in vivo studies showed that DnaA(L366K) alone does not induce the initiation of replication, and wtDnaA must also be present. Hitherto the different behavior of wt and mutant DnaA were not understood. We now demonstrate that this mutant may be activated at significantly lower concentrations of acidic phospholipids than the wild-type protein, and this may explain the observed growth restoration in vivo. PMID:17719583

  16. Complementation analysis of eleven tryptophanase mutations in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    White, M K; Yudkin, M D

    1979-10-01

    Nine independent mutants deficient in tryptophanase activity were isolated. Each mutation was transferred to a specialized transducing phage that carries the tryptophanase region of the Escherichia coli chromosome. The nine phages thus produced, and a tenth carrying a previously characterized tryptophanase mutation, were used to lysogenize a bacterial strain harbouring a mutation in the tryptophanase structural gene and also a suppressor of polarity. In no case was complementation observed; we conclude that there is no closely linked positive regulatory gene for tryptophanase.

  17. Structure of Escherichia coli tryptophanase.

    PubMed

    Ku, Shao Yang; Yip, Patrick; Howell, P Lynne

    2006-07-01

    Pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) dependent tryptophanase has been isolated from Escherichia coli and its crystal structure has been determined. The structure shares the same fold with and has similar quaternary structure to Proteus vulgaris tryptophanase and tyrosine-phenol lyase, but is found in a closed conformation when compared with these two enzymes. The tryptophanase structure, solved in its apo form, does not have covalent PLP bound in the active site, but two sulfate ions. The sulfate ions occupy the phosphoryl-binding site of PLP and the binding site of the alpha-carboxyl of the natural substrate tryptophan. One of the sulfate ions makes extensive interactions with both the transferase and PLP-binding domains of the protein and appears to be responsible for holding the enzyme in its closed conformation. Based on the sulfate density and the structure of the P. vulgaris enzyme, PLP and the substrate tryptophan were modeled into the active site. The resulting model is consistent with the roles of Arg419 in orienting the substrate to PLP and acidifying the alpha-proton of the substrate for beta-elimination, Lys269 in the formation and decomposition of the PLP quinonoid intermediate, Arg230 in orienting the substrate-PLP intermediates in the optimal conformation for catalysis, and His463 and Tyr74 in determining substrate specificity and suggests that the closed conformation observed in the structure could be induced by substrate binding and that significant conformational changes occur during catalysis. A catalytic mechanism for tryptophanase is proposed. Since E. coli tryptophanase has resisted forming diffraction-quality crystals for many years, the molecular surface of tryptophanase has been analyzed in various crystal forms and it was rationalized that strong crystal contacts occur on the flat surface of the protein and that the size of crystal contact surface seems to correlate with the diffraction quality of the crystal.

  18. Succinate production in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Thakker, Chandresh; Martínez, Irene; San, Ka-Yiu; Bennett, George N.

    2012-01-01

    Succinate has been recognized as an important platform chemical that can be produced from biomass. While a number of organisms are capable of succinate production naturally, this review focuses on the engineering of Escherichia coli for production of the four-carbon dicarboxylic acid. Important features of a succinate production system are to achieve optimal balance of reducing equivalents generated by consumption of the feedstock, while maximizing the amount of carbon that is channeled to the product. Aerobic and anaerobic production strains have been developed and applied to production from glucose as well as other abundant carbon sources. Metabolic engineering methods and strain evolution have been used and supplemented by the recent application of systems biology and in silico modeling tools to construct optimal production strains. The metabolic capacity of the production strain, as well as the requirement for efficient recovery of succinate and the reliability of the performance under scale-up are important in the overall process. The costs of the overall biorefinery compatible process will determine the economical commercialization of succinate and its impact in larger chemical markets. PMID:21932253

  19. Murein segregation in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    de Pedro, M A; Quintela, J C; Höltje, J V; Schwarz, H

    1997-01-01

    Peptidoglycan (murein) segregation has been studied by means of a new labeling method. The method relies on the ability of Escherichia coli cells to incorporate D-Cys into macromolecular murein. The incorporation depends on a periplasmic amino acid exchange reaction. At low concentrations, D-Cys is innocuous to the cell. The distribution of modified murein in purified sacculi can be traced and visualized by immunodetection of the -SH groups by fluorescence and electron microscopy techniques. Analysis of murein segregation in wild-type and cell division mutant strains revealed that murein in polar caps is metabolically inert and is segregated in a conservative fashion. Elongation of the sacculus apparently occurs by diffuse insertion of precursors over the cylindrical part of the cell surface. At the initiation of cell division, there is a FtsZ-dependent localized activation of murein synthesis at the potential division sites. Penicillin-binding protein 3 and the products of the division genes ftsA and ftsQ are dispensable for the activation of division sites. As a consequence, under restrictive conditions ftsA,ftsI,or ftsQ mutants generate filamentous sacculi with rings of all-new murein at the positions where septa would otherwise develop. PMID:9139895

  20. Escherichia coli survival in waters: Temperature dependence

    EPA Science Inventory

    Knowing the survival rates of water-borne Escherichia coli is important in evaluating microbial contamination and making appropriate management decisions. E. coli survival rates are dependent on temperature, a dependency that is routinely expressed using an analogue of the Q10 mo...

  1. Strategies for Protein Overproduction in Escherichia coli.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mott, John E.

    1984-01-01

    Examines heterologous expression in Escherichia coli and the role of regulatory sequences which control gene expression at transcription resulting in abundant production of messenger RNA and regulatory sequences in mRNA which promote efficient translation. Also examines the role of E. coli cells in stabilizing mRNA and protein that is…

  2. Fosfomycin Resistance in Escherichia coli, Pennsylvania, USA.

    PubMed

    Alrowais, Hind; McElheny, Christi L; Spychala, Caressa N; Sastry, Sangeeta; Guo, Qinglan; Butt, Adeel A; Doi, Yohei

    2015-11-01

    Fosfomycin resistance in Escherichia coli is rare in the United States. An extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing E. coli clinical strain identified in Pennsylvania, USA, showed high-level fosfomycin resistance caused by the fosA3 gene. The IncFII plasmid carrying this gene had a structure similar to those found in China, where fosfomycin resistance is commonly described.

  3. A DNA structural atlas for Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, A G; Jensen, L J; Brunak, S; Staerfeldt, H H; Ussery, D W

    2000-06-16

    We have performed a computational analysis of DNA structural features in 18 fully sequenced prokaryotic genomes using models for DNA curvature, DNA flexibility, and DNA stability. The structural values that are computed for the Escherichia coli chromosome are significantly different from (and generally more extreme than) that expected from the nucleotide composition. To aid this analysis, we have constructed tools that plot structural measures for all positions in a long DNA sequence (e.g. an entire chromosome) in the form of color-coded wheels (http://www.cbs.dtu. dk/services/GenomeAtlas/). We find that these "structural atlases" are useful for the discovery of interesting features that may then be investigated in more depth using statistical methods. From investigation of the E. coli structural atlas, we discovered a genome-wide trend, where an extended region encompassing the terminus displays a high of level curvature, a low level of flexibility, and a low degree of helix stability. The same situation is found in the distantly related Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis, suggesting that the phenomenon is biologically relevant. Based on a search for long DNA segments where all the independent structural measures agree, we have found a set of 20 regions with identical and very extreme structural properties. Due to their strong inherent curvature, we suggest that these may function as topological domain boundaries by efficiently organizing plectonemically supercoiled DNA. Interestingly, we find that in practically all the investigated eubacterial and archaeal genomes, there is a trend for promoter DNA being more curved, less flexible, and less stable than DNA in coding regions and in intergenic DNA without promoters. This trend is present regardless of the absolute levels of the structural parameters, and we suggest that this may be related to the requirement for helix unwinding during initiation of transcription, or perhaps to the previously observed

  4. Growth rate of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Marr, A G

    1991-01-01

    It should be possible to predict the rate of growth of Escherichia coli of a given genotype in a specified environment. The idea that the rate of synthesis of ATP determines the rate of growth and that the yield of ATP determines the yield of growth is entrenched in bacterial physiology, yet this idea is inconsistent with experimental results. In minimal media the growth rate and yield vary with the carbon source in a manner independent of the rate of formation and yield of ATP. With acetate as the carbon source, anapleurotic reactions, not ATP synthesis, limit the growth rate. For acetate and other gluconeogenic substrates the limiting step appears to be the formation of triose phosphate. I conclude that the rate of growth is controlled by the rate of formation of a precursor metabolite and, thus, of monomers such as amino acids derived from it. The protein-synthesizing system is regulated according to demand for protein synthesis. I examine the conjecture that the signal for this regulation is the ratio of uncharged tRNA to aminoacyl-tRNA, that this signal controls the concentration of guanosine tetraphosphate, and that the concentration of guanosine tetraphosphate controls transcription of rrn genes. Differential equations describing this system were solved numerically for steady states of growth; the computed values of ribosomes and guanosine tetraphosphate and the maximal growth rate agree with experimental values obtained from the literature of the past 35 years. These equations were also solved for dynamical states corresponding to nutritional shifts up and down. PMID:1886524

  5. Clinical Implications of Enteroadherent Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Arenas-Hernández, Margarita M.P.; Martínez-Laguna, Ygnacio; Torres, Alfredo G.

    2012-01-01

    Pathogenic Escherichia coli that colonize the small intestine primarily cause gastrointestinal illness in infants and travelers. The main categories of pathogenic E. coli that colonize the epithelial lining of the small intestine are enterotoxigenic E. coli enteropathogenic E. coli and enteroaggregative E. coli. These organisms accomplish their pathogenic process by a complex, coordinated multistage strategy, including non-intimate adherence mediated by various adhesins. These so called “enteroadherent E. coli ” categories subsequently produced toxins or effector proteins that are either secreted to the milieu or injected to the host cell. Finally, destruction of the intestinal microvilli results from the intimate adherence or the toxic effect exerted over the epithelia, resulting in water secretion and diarrhea. In this review, we summarize the current state of knowledge regarding these enteroadherent E. coli strains and the present clinical understanding of how these organisms colonize the human intestine and cause disease. PMID:22798032

  6. Infection strategies of enteric pathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Clements, Abigail; Young, Joanna C.; Constantinou, Nicholas; Frankel, Gad

    2012-01-01

    Enteric Escherichia coli (E. coli) are both natural flora of humans and important pathogens causing significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Traditionally enteric E. coli have been divided into 6 pathotypes, with further pathotypes often proposed. In this review we suggest expansion of the enteric E. coli into 8 pathotypes to include the emerging pathotypes of adherent invasive E. coli (AIEC) and Shiga-toxin producing enteroaggregative E. coli (STEAEC). The molecular mechanisms that allow enteric E. coli to colonize and cause disease in the human host are examined and for two of the pathotypes that express a type 3 secretion system (T3SS) we discuss the complex interplay between translocated effectors and manipulation of host cell signaling pathways that occurs during infection. PMID:22555463

  7. Clinical implications of enteroadherent Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Arenas-Hernández, Margarita M P; Martínez-Laguna, Ygnacio; Torres, Alfredo G

    2012-10-01

    Pathogenic Escherichia coli that colonize the small intestine primarily cause gastrointestinal illness in infants and travelers. The main categories of pathogenic E. coli that colonize the epithelial lining of the small intestine are enterotoxigenic E. coli, enteropathogenic E. coli, and enteroaggregative E. coli. These organisms accomplish their pathogenic process by a complex, coordinated multistage strategy, including nonintimate adherence mediated by various adhesins. These so called "enteroadherent E. coli" categories subsequently produce toxins or effector proteins that are either secreted to the milieu or injected to the host cell. Finally, destruction of the intestinal microvilli results from the intimate adherence or the toxic effect exerted over the epithelia, resulting in water secretion and diarrhea. In this review, we summarize the current state of knowledge regarding these enteroadherent E. coli strains and the present clinical understanding of how these organisms colonize the human intestine and cause disease. PMID:22798032

  8. The ars operon of Escherichia coli confers arsenical and antimonial resistance.

    PubMed Central

    Carlin, A; Shi, W; Dey, S; Rosen, B P

    1995-01-01

    The chromosomally encoded arsenical resistance (ars) operon subcloned into a multicopy plasmid was found to confer a moderate level of resistance to arsenite and antimonite in Escherichia coli. When the operon was deleted from the chromosome, the cells exhibited hypersensitivity to arsenite, antimonite, and arsenate. Expression of the ars genes was inducible by arsenite. By Southern hybridization, the operon was found in all strains of E. coli examined but not in Salmonella typhimurium, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, or Bacillus subtilis. PMID:7860609

  9. Conversion of the Salmonella phase 1 flagellin gene fliC to the phase 2 gene fljB on the Escherichia coli K-12 chromosome.

    PubMed Central

    Okazaki, N; Matsuo, S; Saito, K; Tominaga, A; Enomoto, M

    1993-01-01

    The Escherichia coli-Salmonella typhimurium-Salmonella abortus-equi hybrid strain EJ1420 has the two Salmonella flagellin genes fliC (antigenic determinant i) and fljB (determinant e,n,x) at the same loci as in the Salmonella strains and constitutively expresses the fliC gene because of mutations in the genes mediating phase variation. Selection for motility in semisolid medium containing anti-i flagellum serum yielded 11 motile mutants, which had the active fliC(e,n,x) and silent fljB(e,n,x) genes. Genetic analysis and Southern hybridization indicated that they had mutations only in the fliC gene, not in the fljB gene or the control elements for phase variation. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the fliC(e,n,x) genes from four representative mutants showed that the minimum 38% (565 bp) and maximum 68% (1,013 bp) sequences of the fliC(i) gene are replaced with the corresponding sequences of the fljB(e,n,x) gene. One of the conversion endpoints between the two genes lies somewhere in the 204-bp homologous sequence in the 5' constant region, and the other lies in the short homologous sequence of 6, 8, or 38 bp in the 3' constant region. The conversions include the whole central variable region of the fljB gene, resulting in fliC(e,n,x) genes with the same number of nucleotides (1,503 bp) as the fljB gene. We discuss the mechanisms for gene conversion between the two genes and also some intriguing aspects of flagellar antigenic specificities in various Salmonella serovars from the viewpoint of gene conversion. Images PMID:8423149

  10. Native valve Escherichia coli endocarditis following urosepsis

    PubMed Central

    Rangarajan, D.; Ramakrishnan, S.; Patro, K. C.; Devaraj, S.; Krishnamurthy, V.; Kothari, Y.; Satyaki, N.

    2013-01-01

    Gram-negative organisms are a rare cause of infective endocarditis. Escherichia coli, the most common cause of urinary tract infection and gram-negative septicemia involves endocardium rarely. In this case report, we describe infection of native mitral valve by E. coli following septicemia of urinary tract origin in a diabetic male; subsequently, he required prosthetic tissue valve replacement indicated by persistent sepsis and congestive cardiac failure. PMID:23814428

  11. Fosfomycin Resistance in Escherichia coli, Pennsylvania, USA

    PubMed Central

    Alrowais, Hind; McElheny, Christi L.; Spychala, Caressa N.; Sastry, Sangeeta; Guo, Qinglan; Butt, Adeel A.

    2015-01-01

    Fosfomycin resistance in Escherichia coli is rare in the United States. An extended-spectrum β-lactamase–producing E. coli clinical strain identified in Pennsylvania, USA, showed high-level fosfomycin resistance caused by the fosA3 gene. The IncFII plasmid carrying this gene had a structure similar to those found in China, where fosfomycin resistance is commonly described. PMID:26488485

  12. Integration of bacteriophage. lambda. into the cryptic lambdoid prophages of Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Lichens-Park, A. ); Smith, C.L. ); Syvanen, M. )

    1990-05-01

    Bacteriophage lambda missing its chromosomal attachment site will integrate into recA{sup +} Escherichia coli K-12 and C at the site of cryptic prophages. The specific regions in which these recombination events occur were identified in both lambda and the bacterial chromosomes. A NotI restriction site on the prophage allowed its physical mapping. This allowed them to identify the locations of Rac, Qin, and Qsr{prime} cryptic prophages on the NotI map of E. coli K-12 and, by analogy, to identify the cryptic prophage in E. coli C as Qin. No new cryptic prophages were detected in E. coli K-12.

  13. Escherichia coli kgtP encodes an. alpha. -ketoglutarate transporter

    SciTech Connect

    Seol, Wongi; Shatkin, A.J. )

    1991-05-01

    The witA gene located between pss and rrnG on the Escherichia coli chromosome encodes a 432-amino acid protein. It is homologous to a human hepatoma glucose transporter and to E. coli membrane proteins that transport citrate (CitA), arabinose (AraE), and xylose (XylE), and, like these carrier proteins, WitA also contains 12 highly hydrophobic putative membrane-spanning regions. Gene disruption mutants constructed in two E. coli strains grew slowly or not at all, depending on genetic background, in M9 minimal medium containing {alpha}-ketoglutarate and uptake of {alpha}-({sup 14}C)ketoglutarate were restored by transformation with plasmids containing witA. These complementation studies indicate that WitA is an {alpha}-ketoglutarate transporter and should be renamed kgtP({alpha}-ketoglutarate permease).

  14. Engineering of Escherichia coli for Lycopene Production Through Promoter Engineering.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hong-Jie; Hu, Jin-Jing; Li, Xi-Ran; Liu, Jian-Zhong

    2015-01-01

    The control of gene expression is critical for metabolic engineering. The multi-copy plasmids has been widely used for high-level expression of genes. However, plasmid-based expression systems are liable to genetic instability and require a selective pressure to assure plasmid stability. In this study, we first constructed a lycopene producer Escherichia coli through promoter engineering. Saccharomyces cerevisiae mevalonate (MEV) pathway was also optimized to balance expression of the top and bottom MEV pathway by using the different strength promoters. The chromosomal heterologous expression of the optimized S. cerevisiae MEV pathway can further improved lycopene production. The final engineered strain, E. coli LYCOP 20, produced lycopene of 529.45 mg/L and 20.25 mg per gram of dry cell weight in the fed-batch culture. The engineered strain does not have a plasmid or antibiotic marker. This strategy used in this study can be applied in pathway engineering of E. coli and other bacteria.

  15. Attachment sites for bacteriophage P2 on the Escherichia coli chromosome: DNA sequences, localization on the physical map, and detection of a P2-like remnant in E. coli K-12 derivatives.

    PubMed

    Barreiro, V; Haggård-Ljungquist, E

    1992-06-01

    Integration of bacteriophage P2 into the Escherichia coli genome involves recombination between two attachment sites, attP and attB, one on the phage and one on the host genome, respectively. At least 10 different attB sites have been identified over the years. In E. coli C, one site, called locI, is preferred, being occupied before any of the others. In E. coli K-12, no such preference is seen (reviewed in L. E. Bertani and E. W. Six, p. 73-143, in R. Calendar, ed., The Bacteriophages, vol. 2, 1988). The DNA sequence of locI has been determined, and it shows a core sequence of 27 nucleotides identical to attP (A. Yu, L. E. Bertani, and E. Haggård-Ljungquist, Gene 80:1-12, 1989). By inverse polymerase chain reactions, the prophage-host junctions of DNA extracted from P2 lysogenic strains have been amplified, cloned, and sequenced. By combining the attL and attR sequences, the attB sequences of locations II, III, and H have been deduced. The core sequence of location II had 20 matches to the 27-nucleotide core sequence of attP; the sequences of locations III and H had 17 matches. Thus, the P2 integrase accepts at least up to 37% mismatches within the core sequence. The E. coli K-12 strains examined all contain a 639-nucleotide-long cryptic remnant of P2 at a site with a sequence similar to that of locI but that may have a different map position. The P2 remnant consists of the C-terminal part of gene D, all of gene ogr, and attR. Locations II, III, and H have been located on Kohara's physical map to positions 3670, 1570 to 1575, and 2085, respectively.

  16. In vitro construction of bacteriophage lambda carrying segments of the Escherichia coli chromosome: selection of hybrids containing the gene for DNA ligase.

    PubMed

    Cameron, J R; Panasenko, S M; Lehman, I R; Davis, R W

    1975-09-01

    DNA from lambdagt-lambdaB bacteriophage was cleaved with EcoRI endonuclease and fragments from EcoRI-digested E. coli DNA were inserted. This DNA was used to infect E. coli, and phages containing the gene for DNA ligase were isolated by genetic selection. Two different hybrids were found with the same E. coli segment inserted in opposite orientations. Both hybrids produced similar levels of ligase as measured in crude extracts of infected cells.

  17. In vitro construction of bacteriophage lambda carrying segments of the Escherichia coli chromosome: selection of hybrids containing the gene for DNA ligase.

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, J R; Panasenko, S M; Lehman, I R; Davis, R W

    1975-01-01

    DNA from lambdagt-lambdaB bacteriophage was cleaved with EcoRI endonuclease and fragments from EcoRI-digested E. coli DNA were inserted. This DNA was used to infect E. coli, and phages containing the gene for DNA ligase were isolated by genetic selection. Two different hybrids were found with the same E. coli segment inserted in opposite orientations. Both hybrids produced similar levels of ligase as measured in crude extracts of infected cells. Images PMID:1103146

  18. Escherichia Coli--Key to Modern Genetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bregegere, Francois

    1982-01-01

    Mid-nineteenth century work by Mendel on plant hybrids and by Pasteur on fermentation gave birth by way of bacterial genetics to modern-day molecular biology. The bacterium Escherichia Coli has occupied a key position in genetic studies leading from early gene identification with DNA to current genetic engineering using recombinant DNA technology.…

  19. Cleaving yeast and Escherichia coli genomes at a single site

    SciTech Connect

    Koob, M.; Szybalski, W. )

    1990-10-12

    The 15-megabase pair Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the 4.7-megabase pair Escherichia coli genomes were completely cleaved at a single predetermined site by means of the Achilles' heel cleavage (AC) procedure. The symmetric lac operator (lacO{sub s}) was introduced into the circular Escherichia coli genome and into one of the 16 yeast chromosomes. Intact chromosomes from the resulting strains were prepared in agarose microbeads and methylated with Hha I (5{prime}-GCGC) methyltransferase (M{center dot}Hha I) in the presence of lac repressor (LacI). All Hae II sites ({prime}-{sub G}{sup A}GCGC{sub C}{sup T}) with the exception of the one in lacO{sub s}, which was protected by LacI, were modified and thus no longer recognized by Hae II. After inactivation of M{center dot}Hha I and LacI, Hae II was used to completely cleave the chromosomes specifically at the inserted lacO{sub s}. These experiments demonstrate the feasibility of using the AC approach to efficiently extend the specificity of naturally occurring restriction enzymes and create new tools for the mapping and precise molecular dissection of multimegabase genomes.

  20. Escherichia coli in Europe: an overview.

    PubMed

    Allocati, Nerino; Masulli, Michele; Alexeyev, Mikhail F; Di Ilio, Carmine

    2013-11-25

    Escherichia coli remains one of the most frequent causes of several common bacterial infections in humans and animals. E. coli is the prominent cause of enteritis, urinary tract infection, septicaemia and other clinical infections, such as neonatal meningitis. E. coli is also prominently associated with diarrhoea in pet and farm animals. The therapeutic treatment of E. coli infections is threatened by the emergence of antimicrobial resistance. The prevalence of multidrug-resistant E. coli strains is increasing worldwide principally due to the spread of mobile genetic elements, such as plasmids. The rise of multidrug-resistant strains of E. coli also occurs in Europe. Therefore, the spread of resistance in E. coli is an increasing public health concern in European countries. This paper summarizes the current status of E. coli strains clinically relevant in European countries. Furthermore, therapeutic interventions and strategies to prevent and control infections are presented and discussed. The article also provides an overview of the current knowledge concerning promising alternative therapies against E. coli diseases.

  1. Survival of Escherichia coli in stormwater biofilters.

    PubMed

    Chandrasena, G I; Deletic, A; McCarthy, D T

    2014-04-01

    Biofilters are widely adopted in Australia for stormwater treatment, but the reported removal of common faecal indicators (such as Escherichia coli (E. coli)) varies from net removal to net leaching. Currently, the underlying mechanisms that govern the faecal microbial removal in the biofilters are poorly understood. Therefore, it is important to study retention and subsequent survival of faecal microorganisms in the biofilters under different biofilter designs and operational characteristics. The current study investigates how E. coli survival is influenced by temperature, moisture content, sunlight exposure and presence of other microorganisms in filter media and top surface sediment. Soil samples were taken from two different biofilters to investigate E. coli survival under controlled laboratory conditions. Results revealed that the presence of other microorganisms and temperature are vital stressors which govern the survival of E. coli captured either in the top surface sediment or filter media, while sunlight exposure and moisture content are important for the survival of E. coli captured in the top surface sediment compared to that of the filter media. Moreover, increased survival was found in the filter media compared to the top sediment, and sand filter media was found be more hostile than loamy sand filter media towards E. coli survival. Results also suggest that the contribution from the tested environmental stressors on E. coli survival in biofilters will be greatly affected by the seasonality and may vary from one site to another.

  2. Escherichia coli in retail processed food.

    PubMed

    Pinegar, J A; Cooke, E M

    1985-08-01

    Four thousand two hundred and forty six samples of retail processed food were examined for the presence of Escherichia coli. Overall 12% of samples contained this organism, cakes and confectionery being more frequently contaminated (28%) than meat and meat based products (9%). Contamination was more frequent in the summer months than in the colder weather and 27% of the contaminated foods contained greater than 10(3) E. coli/g. E. coli from meat and meat based products were more commonly resistant to one or more antibiotics (14%) than were confectionery strains (1%). The significance of these findings in relation to the E. coli population of the human bowel is discussed. PMID:3894508

  3. Hydrogen production by recombinant Escherichia coli strains

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Toshinari; Sanchez‐Torres, Viviana; Wood, Thomas K.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The production of hydrogen via microbial biotechnology is an active field of research. Given its ease of manipulation, the best‐studied bacterium Escherichia coli has become a workhorse for enhanced hydrogen production through metabolic engineering, heterologous gene expression, adaptive evolution, and protein engineering. Herein, the utility of E. coli strains to produce hydrogen, via native hydrogenases or heterologous ones, is reviewed. In addition, potential strategies for increasing hydrogen production are outlined and whole‐cell systems and cell‐free systems are compared. PMID:21895995

  4. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli-Associated Exotoxins.

    PubMed

    Welch, Rodney A

    2016-06-01

    Escherichia coli are a common cause of infectious disease outside of the gastrointestinal tract. Several independently evolved E. coli clades are common causes of urinary tract and bloodstream infections. There is ample epidemiological and in vitro evidence that several different protein toxins common to many, but not all, of these strains are likely to aid the colonization and immune-evasion ability of these bacteria. This review discusses our current knowledge and areas of ignorance concerning the contribution of the hemolysin; cytotoxic-necrotizing factor-1; and the autotransporters, Sat, Pic, and Vat, to extraintestinal human disease. PMID:27337488

  5. Studies of Escherichia coli Infection in Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Truscott, R. B.; Lopez-Alvarez, J.; Pettit, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    The pathogenesis of infection with Escherichia coli was studied in chickens using live O78:K80 cells and a heat-labile chick lethal toxin. The results obtained were compared with those observed in field outbreaks. The common histological findings of subepicardial edema and congestion, focal necrosis in the spleen and focal necrosis, congestion, edema and accumulation of fibrin in the liver support an active role for chick lethal toxin in the pathogenesis of E. coli disease. ImagesFig. 3.Fig. 4.Fig. 5.Fig. 6.Fig. 7. PMID:4274822

  6. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli-associated exotoxins

    PubMed Central

    Welch, Rodney A.

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli are a common cause of infectious disease outside of the gastrointestinal tract. Several independently evolved E. coli clades are common causes of urinary tract and blood stream infections. There is ample epidemiological and in vitro evidence that several different protein toxins common to many but not all of these strains are likely to aid the colonization and immune evasion ability of these bacteria. This review discusses our current knowledge and areas of ignorance concerning the contribution of the hemolysin, cytotoxic necrotizing factor-1 and the autotransporters, Sat, Pic and Vat to extraintestinal human disease. PMID:27337488

  7. Alteration of Escherichia coli topoisomerase IV to novobiocin resistance.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Christine D; Cozzarelli, Nicholas R

    2003-03-01

    DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV (topo IV) are the two essential type II topoisomerases of Escherichia coli. Gyrase is responsible for maintaining negative supercoiling of the bacterial chromosome, whereas topo IV's primary role is in disentangling daughter chromosomes following DNA replication. Coumarins, such as novobiocin, are wide-spectrum antimicrobial agents that primarily interfere with DNA gyrase. In this work we designed an alteration in the ParE subunit of topo IV at a site homologous to that which confers coumarin resistance in gyrase. This parE mutation renders the encoded topo IV approximately 40-fold resistant to inhibition by novobiocin in vitro and imparts a similar resistance to inhibition of topo IV-mediated relaxation of supercoiled DNA in vivo. We conclude that topo IV is a secondary target of novobiocin and that it is very likely to be inhibited by the same mechanism as DNA gyrase.

  8. ELECTRON MICROSCOPY OF PLASMOLYSIS IN ESCHERICHIA COLI.

    PubMed

    COTA-ROBLES, E H

    1963-03-01

    Cota-Robles, Eugene H. (University of California, Riverside). Electron microscopy of plasmolysis in Escherichia coli. J. Bacteriol. 85:499-503. 1963.-Escherichia coli cells plasmolyzed in 0.35 m sucrose reveal plasmolysis at one tip of a cell or in the center of dividing cells in which protoplast partition has been complete. Central plasmolysis reveals that protoplast separation can be completed before the invagination of the cell wall is complete. These studies support the concept that these cells divide by constriction. The strength of the union between cell wall and cytoplasm is not uniform around the entire cell. It is strongest along the sides of these rod-shaped cells and weakest at one tip of the single cell. Thus, a single cell generally forms one cup-shaped vacuole in which the cytoplasm has collapsed away from one tip of the cell.

  9. Involvement of DNA superhelicity in minichromosome maintenance in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, A C; Whitford, W G; Helmstetter, C E

    1985-01-01

    Evidence is presented that Escherichia coli minichromosomes are harbored at superhelical densities which are lower than those measured for other E. coli plasmids but are comparable to that of the chromosome. When introduced into gyrB decreased-supercoiling mutants, minichromosomes were much more unstable than in strains with normal or increased supercoiling properties; in fact, certain minichromosome derivatives could not be introduced into top gyrB decreased-supercoiling mutants. These observations were unique to minichromosomes, since the maintenance of plasmids which did not replicate from oriC was not altered in these mutants. Analyses of minichromosomes of identical sizes but with different restriction fragment orientations suggested that supercoiling-dependent alterations in promoter-terminator functions, as well as direct effects of supercoiling on replication, may play a role in the observed minichromosome instability. Images PMID:2981821

  10. Characteristics of verotoxigenic Escherichia coli from pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Gannon, V P; Gyles, C L; Friendship, R W

    1988-01-01

    Porcine verotoxigenic Escherichia coli were characterized with respect to frequency of occurrence, serogroup, and association with disease, weaning, and selected properties of the bacterium. Of 668 strains of E. coli from southern Ontario pigs with enteric disease, 32 (4.8%) produced verotoxin at 10(3)-10(7) cytotoxic doses per mL of culture supernatant. Of 22 isolates which belonged to O serogroups 138, 139 and 141, 15 produced verotoxin. Among other enterotoxigenic types of E. coli, two of 57 isolates of O157:K"V17" and two of 96 isolates of O149:K91 were verotoxigenic. The remaining 13 verotoxigenic E. coli belonged to O groups 2, 107, 120, 121 and 130. An additional 21 verotoxigenic E. coli belonging to O groups 138, 139 and 141 and three to O157:K"V17" were identified in a collection of 47 E. coli recovered from weaned pigs with enteric disease. Verotoxigenic E. coli were associated with postweaning diarrhea, bloody stools, sudden death and edema disease. They were isolated at similar frequencies (14%) from healthy weaned pigs, and from weaned pigs with enteric disease. Isolation rates from neonates were low and significantly different from rates in weaned pigs. Neutralizing antibody to verotoxin was not detected in the sera of 45 pigs, which included pigs from herds with a history of edema disease. Verotoxin was not associated with production of colicin, hemolysin, or enterotoxins or with any of 23 biochemical properties of the organisms. The serological data indicate that porcine verotoxigenic E. coli are not a common source of verotoxigenic E. coli for humans. Porcine verotoxin may play a role in postweaning diarrhea and absence of detectable neutralizing antibody in serum may be an important aspect of pathogenesis. PMID:3048621

  11. Systems Metabolic Engineering of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kyeong Rok; Shin, Jae Ho; Cho, Jae Sung; Yang, Dongsoo; Lee, Sang Yup

    2016-05-01

    Systems metabolic engineering, which recently emerged as metabolic engineering integrated with systems biology, synthetic biology, and evolutionary engineering, allows engineering of microorganisms on a systemic level for the production of valuable chemicals far beyond its native capabilities. Here, we review the strategies for systems metabolic engineering and particularly its applications in Escherichia coli. First, we cover the various tools developed for genetic manipulation in E. coli to increase the production titers of desired chemicals. Next, we detail the strategies for systems metabolic engineering in E. coli, covering the engineering of the native metabolism, the expansion of metabolism with synthetic pathways, and the process engineering aspects undertaken to achieve higher production titers of desired chemicals. Finally, we examine a couple of notable products as case studies produced in E. coli strains developed by systems metabolic engineering. The large portfolio of chemical products successfully produced by engineered E. coli listed here demonstrates the sheer capacity of what can be envisioned and achieved with respect to microbial production of chemicals. Systems metabolic engineering is no longer in its infancy; it is now widely employed and is also positioned to further embrace next-generation interdisciplinary principles and innovation for its upgrade. Systems metabolic engineering will play increasingly important roles in developing industrial strains including E. coli that are capable of efficiently producing natural and nonnatural chemicals and materials from renewable nonfood biomass. PMID:27223822

  12. Interaction between Escherichia coli and lunar fines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johansson, K. R.

    1983-01-01

    A sample of mature lunar fines (10084.151) was solubilized to a high degree (about 17 percent) by the chelating agent salicylic acid (0.01. M). The neutralized (pH adjusted to 7.0) leachate was found to inhibit the growth of Escherichia coli (ATCC 259922) in a minimial mineral salts glucose medium; however, the inhibition was somewhat less than that caused by neutralized salicylic acid alone. The presence of lunar fines in the minimal medium was highly stimulatory to growth of E. coli following an early inhibitory response. The bacterium survived less well in the lunar leachate than in distilled water, no doubt because of the salicylate. It was concluded that the sample of lunar soil tested has nutritional value to E. coli and that certain products of fermentation helped to solubilize the lunar soil.

  13. Prodigiosin - A Multifaceted Escherichia coli Antimicrobial Agent

    PubMed Central

    Zorec, Maša; Stopar, David

    2016-01-01

    Despite a considerable interest in prodigiosin, the mechanism of its antibacterial activity is still poorly understood. In this work, Escherichia coli cells were treated with prodigiosin to determine its antimicrobial effect on bacterial physiology. The effect of prodigiosin was concentration dependent. In prodigiosin treated cells above MIC value no significant DNA damage or cytoplasmic membrane disintegration was observed. The outer membrane, however, becomes leaky. Cells had severely decreased respiration activity. In prodigiosin treated cells protein and RNA synthesis were inhibited, cells were elongated but could not divide. Pre-treatment with prodigiosin improved E. coli survival rate in media containing ampicillin, kanamycin and erythromycin but not phleomycin. The results suggest that prodigiosin acts as a bacteriostatic agent in E. coli cells. If prodigiosin was diluted, cells resumed growth. The results indicate that prodigiosin has distinct mode of antibacterial action in different bacteria. PMID:27612193

  14. Thymineless Death in Escherichia coli: Strain Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, Donald J.; Mondale, Lee

    1967-01-01

    Thymineless death of various ultraviolet (UV)-sensitive strains of Escherichia coli B and K-12 was investigated. It was found that E. coli B, Bs−12, K-12 rec-21, and possibly K-12 Lon−, all sensitive to UV, were also sensitive to thymine starvation. However, other UV-sensitive strains of E. coli were found to display the typical resistant-type kinetics of thymineless death. The correlation of these results with various other cellular processes suggested that the filament-forming ability of the bacteria might be involved in the mechanism of thymineless death. It was apparent from the present results that capacity for host-cell reactivation, recombination ability, thymine dimer excision, and probably induction of a defective prophage had little to do with determining sensitivity to thymine deprivation. Images PMID:5337772

  15. Prodigiosin - A Multifaceted Escherichia coli Antimicrobial Agent.

    PubMed

    Danevčič, Tjaša; Borić Vezjak, Maja; Zorec, Maša; Stopar, David

    2016-01-01

    Despite a considerable interest in prodigiosin, the mechanism of its antibacterial activity is still poorly understood. In this work, Escherichia coli cells were treated with prodigiosin to determine its antimicrobial effect on bacterial physiology. The effect of prodigiosin was concentration dependent. In prodigiosin treated cells above MIC value no significant DNA damage or cytoplasmic membrane disintegration was observed. The outer membrane, however, becomes leaky. Cells had severely decreased respiration activity. In prodigiosin treated cells protein and RNA synthesis were inhibited, cells were elongated but could not divide. Pre-treatment with prodigiosin improved E. coli survival rate in media containing ampicillin, kanamycin and erythromycin but not phleomycin. The results suggest that prodigiosin acts as a bacteriostatic agent in E. coli cells. If prodigiosin was diluted, cells resumed growth. The results indicate that prodigiosin has distinct mode of antibacterial action in different bacteria. PMID:27612193

  16. Prodigiosin - A Multifaceted Escherichia coli Antimicrobial Agent.

    PubMed

    Danevčič, Tjaša; Borić Vezjak, Maja; Zorec, Maša; Stopar, David

    2016-01-01

    Despite a considerable interest in prodigiosin, the mechanism of its antibacterial activity is still poorly understood. In this work, Escherichia coli cells were treated with prodigiosin to determine its antimicrobial effect on bacterial physiology. The effect of prodigiosin was concentration dependent. In prodigiosin treated cells above MIC value no significant DNA damage or cytoplasmic membrane disintegration was observed. The outer membrane, however, becomes leaky. Cells had severely decreased respiration activity. In prodigiosin treated cells protein and RNA synthesis were inhibited, cells were elongated but could not divide. Pre-treatment with prodigiosin improved E. coli survival rate in media containing ampicillin, kanamycin and erythromycin but not phleomycin. The results suggest that prodigiosin acts as a bacteriostatic agent in E. coli cells. If prodigiosin was diluted, cells resumed growth. The results indicate that prodigiosin has distinct mode of antibacterial action in different bacteria.

  17. Biodegradation of Aromatic Compounds by Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Díaz, Eduardo; Ferrández, Abel; Prieto, María A.; García, José L.

    2001-01-01

    Although Escherichia coli has long been recognized as the best-understood living organism, little was known about its abilities to use aromatic compounds as sole carbon and energy sources. This review gives an extensive overview of the current knowledge of the catabolism of aromatic compounds by E. coli. After giving a general overview of the aromatic compounds that E. coli strains encounter and mineralize in the different habitats that they colonize, we provide an up-to-date status report on the genes and proteins involved in the catabolism of such compounds, namely, several aromatic acids (phenylacetic acid, 3- and 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid, phenylpropionic acid, 3-hydroxyphenylpropionic acid, and 3-hydroxycinnamic acid) and amines (phenylethylamine, tyramine, and dopamine). Other enzymatic activities acting on aromatic compounds in E. coli are also reviewed and evaluated. The review also reflects the present impact of genomic research and how the analysis of the whole E. coli genome reveals novel aromatic catabolic functions. Moreover, evolutionary considerations derived from sequence comparisons between the aromatic catabolic clusters of E. coli and homologous clusters from an increasing number of bacteria are also discussed. The recent progress in the understanding of the fundamentals that govern the degradation of aromatic compounds in E. coli makes this bacterium a very useful model system to decipher biochemical, genetic, evolutionary, and ecological aspects of the catabolism of such compounds. In the last part of the review, we discuss strategies and concepts to metabolically engineer E. coli to suit specific needs for biodegradation and biotransformation of aromatics and we provide several examples based on selected studies. Finally, conclusions derived from this review may serve as a lead for future research and applications. PMID:11729263

  18. Epidemiological and clinical complexity of amoxicillin-clavulanate-resistant Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Baño, Jesús; Oteo, Jesús; Ortega, Adriana; Villar, Macarena; Conejo, M Carmen; Bou, Germán; Aranzamendi-Zaldumbide, Maitane; Cercenado, Emilia; Gurguí, Mercè; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Merino, María; Rivera, Alba; Oliver, Antonio; Weber, Irene; Pascual, Alvaro; Bartolomé, Rosa M; Gónzalez-López, Juan José; Campos, José

    2013-07-01

    Two hundred twelve patients with colonization/infection due to amoxicillin-clavulanate (AMC)-resistant Escherichia coli were studied. OXA-1- and inhibitor-resistant TEM (IRT)-producing strains were associated with urinary tract infections, while OXA-1 producers and chromosomal AmpC hyperproducers were associated with bacteremic infections. AMC resistance in E. coli is a complex phenomenon with heterogeneous clinical implications. PMID:23637303

  19. Epidemiological and Clinical Complexity of Amoxicillin-Clavulanate-Resistant Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Oteo, Jesús; Ortega, Adriana; Villar, Macarena; Conejo, M. Carmen; Bou, Germán; Aranzamendi-Zaldumbide, Maitane; Cercenado, Emilia; Gurguí, Mercè; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Merino, María; Rivera, Alba; Oliver, Antonio; Weber, Irene; Pascual, Alvaro; Bartolomé, Rosa M.; Gónzalez-López, Juan José; Campos, José

    2013-01-01

    Two hundred twelve patients with colonization/infection due to amoxicillin-clavulanate (AMC)-resistant Escherichia coli were studied. OXA-1- and inhibitor-resistant TEM (IRT)-producing strains were associated with urinary tract infections, while OXA-1 producers and chromosomal AmpC hyperproducers were associated with bacteremic infections. AMC resistance in E. coli is a complex phenomenon with heterogeneous clinical implications. PMID:23637303

  20. Redesigning Escherichia coli metabolism for anaerobic production of isobutanol.

    PubMed

    Trinh, Cong T; Li, Johnny; Blanch, Harvey W; Clark, Douglas S

    2011-07-01

    Fermentation enables the production of reduced metabolites, such as the biofuels ethanol and butanol, from fermentable sugars. This work demonstrates a general approach for designing and constructing a production host that uses a heterologous pathway as an obligately fermentative pathway to produce reduced metabolites, specifically, the biofuel isobutanol. Elementary mode analysis was applied to design an Escherichia coli strain optimized for isobutanol production under strictly anaerobic conditions. The central metabolism of E. coli was decomposed into 38,219 functional, unique, and elementary modes (EMs). The model predictions revealed that during anaerobic growth E. coli cannot produce isobutanol as the sole fermentative product. By deleting 7 chromosomal genes, the total 38,219 EMs were constrained to 12 EMs, 6 of which can produce high yields of isobutanol in a range from 0.29 to 0.41 g isobutanol/g glucose under anaerobic conditions. The remaining 6 EMs rely primarily on the pyruvate dehydrogenase enzyme complex (PDHC) and are typically inhibited under anaerobic conditions. The redesigned E. coli strain was constrained to employ the anaerobic isobutanol pathways through deletion of 7 chromosomal genes, addition of 2 heterologous genes, and overexpression of 5 genes. Here we present the design, construction, and characterization of an isobutanol-producing E. coli strain to illustrate the approach. The model predictions are evaluated in relation to experimental data and strategies proposed to improve anaerobic isobutanol production. We also show that the endogenous alcohol/aldehyde dehydrogenase AdhE is the key enzyme responsible for the production of isobutanol and ethanol under anaerobic conditions. The glycolytic flux can be controlled to regulate the ratio of isobutanol to ethanol production.

  1. Logarithmic Sensing in Escherichia coli Bacterial Chemotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Kalinin, Yevgeniy V.; Jiang, Lili; Tu, Yuhai; Wu, Mingming

    2009-01-01

    We studied the response of swimming Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria in a comprehensive set of well-controlled chemical concentration gradients using a newly developed microfluidic device and cell tracking imaging technique. In parallel, we carried out a multi-scale theoretical modeling of bacterial chemotaxis taking into account the relevant internal signaling pathway dynamics, and predicted bacterial chemotactic responses at the cellular level. By measuring the E. coli cell density profiles across the microfluidic channel at various spatial gradients of ligand concentration grad[L] and the average ligand concentration [L]¯near the peak chemotactic response region, we demonstrated unambiguously in both experiments and model simulation that the mean chemotactic drift velocity of E. coli cells increased monotonically with grad [L]/[L]¯ or ∼grad(log[L])—that is E. coli cells sense the spatial gradient of the logarithmic ligand concentration. The exact range of the log-sensing regime was determined. The agreements between the experiments and the multi-scale model simulation verify the validity of the theoretical model, and revealed that the key microscopic mechanism for logarithmic sensing in bacterial chemotaxis is the adaptation kinetics, in contrast to explanations based directly on ligand occupancy. PMID:19289068

  2. A stochastic killing system for biological containment of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Klemm, P; Jensen, L B; Molin, S

    1995-01-01

    Bacteria with a stochastic conditional lethal containment system have been constructed. The invertible switch promoter located upstream of the fimA gene from Escherichia coli was inserted as expression cassette in front of the lethal gef gene deleted of its own natural promoter. The resulting fusion was placed on a plasmid and transformed to E. coli. The phenotype connected with the presence of such a plasmid was to reduce the population growth rate with increasing significance as the cell growth rate was reduced. In very fast growing cells, there was no measurable effect on growth rate. When a culture of E. coli harboring the plasmid comprising the containment system is left as stationary cells in suspension without nutrients, viability drops exponentially over a period of several days, in contrast to the control cells, which maintain viability nearly unaffected during the same period of time. Similar results were obtained with a strain in which the killing cassette was inserted in the chromosome. In competition with noncontained cells during growth, the contained cells are always outcompeted. Stochastic killing obtained by the fim-gef fusion is at present relevant only as a containment approach for E. coli, but the model may be mimicked in other organisms by using species-specific stochastic expression systems. PMID:7574584

  3. Mutant of Escherichia coli with Anomalous Cell Division and Ability to Decrease Episomally and Chromosomally Mediated Resistance to Ampicillin and Several Other Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Normark, Staffan; Boman, Hans G.; Matsson, Eva

    1969-01-01

    In a mutation experiment with a rough, ampicillin-resistant strain, we isolated two smooth mutants which were both sensitive to ampicillin and carried defects in the cell envelope. One of the strains (with the envA gene) is hindered in its completion of septa and forms chains of cells. The envA gene has been mapped to a position between leu and proB, at 2 to 4 min. The envA gene decreased the resistance mediated by both episomal and chromosomal genes for resistance to several antibiotics. During growth the envA mutant was characterized by abnormal ratios between viable count or cell count and optical density. The ratio between viable count and optical density was affected during shift-up and shift-down experiments. When compared to the parent strain, the envA mutant was found to be more resistant to ultraviolet irradiation on plates. Prestarvation for tryptophan had a protective effect against irradiation both on the parent strain and the envA mutant. Images PMID:4887513

  4. Hda-mediated inactivation of the DnaA protein and dnaA gene autoregulation act in concert to ensure homeostatic maintenance of the Escherichia coli chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Riber, Leise; Olsson, Jan A.; Jensen, Rasmus B.; Skovgaard, Ole; Dasgupta, Santanu; Marinus, Martin G.; Løbner-Olesen, Anders

    2006-01-01

    Initiation of DNA replication in Eschericia coli requires the ATP-bound form of the DnaA protein. The conversion of DnaA–ATP to DnaA–ADP is facilitated by a complex of DnaA, Hda (homologous to DnaA), and DNA-loaded β-clamp proteins in a process termed RIDA (regulatory inactivation of DnaA). Hda-deficient cells initiate replication at each origin mainly once per cell cycle, and the rare reinitiation events never coincide with the end of the origin sequestration period. Therefore, RIDA is not the predominant mechanism to prevent immediate reinitiation from oriC. The cellular level of Hda correlated directly with dnaA gene expression such that Hda deficiency led to reduced dnaA gene expression, and overproduction of Hda led to DnaA overproduction. Hda-deficient cells were very sensitive to variations in the cellular level of DnaA, and DnaA overproduction led to uncontrolled initiation of replication from oriC, causing severe growth retardation or cell death. Based on these observations, we propose that both RIDA and dnaA gene autoregulation are required as homeostatic mechanisms to ensure that initiation of replication occurs at the same time relative to cell mass in each cell cycle. PMID:16882985

  5. ELECTROPHORETIC MOBILITIES OF ESCHERICHIA COLI 0157:H7 AND WILD-TYPE ESCHERICHIA COLI STRAINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The electrophoretic mobility (EPM) of a number of human-virulent and "wild-type" Escherichia coli strains in phosphate buffered water was measured. The impact of pH, ionic strength, cation type (valence) and concentration, and bacterial strain on the EPM was investigated. Resul...

  6. [Recombinant protein production in Escherichia coli].

    PubMed

    Nuc, Przemysław; Nuc, Katarzyna

    2006-01-01

    Growing needs for efficient recombinant production pose new challenges; starting from cell growth optimization under overexpression conditions, improving vectors, gene and protein sequence to suit them to protein biosynthesis machinery of the host, through extending the knowledge of protein folding, fusion protein construction, and coexpression systems, to improvements in protein purification and renaturation technologies. Hitherto Escherichia coli is the most defined and the cheapest protein biosynthesis system. With its wealth of available mutants tested is the best suited to economically test new gene constructs and to scale up the recombinant protein production.

  7. Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli: foe or innocent bystander?

    PubMed

    Hu, J; Torres, A G

    2015-08-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) remain one the most important pathogens infecting children and they are one of the main causes of persistent diarrhoea worldwide. Historically, typical EPEC (tEPEC), defined as those isolates with the attaching and effacement (A/E) genotype (eae(+)), which possess bfpA(+) and lack the stx(-) genes are found strongly associated with diarrhoeal cases. However, occurrence of atypical EPEC (aEPEC; eae(+)bfpA(-)stx(-)) in diarrhoeal and asymptomatic hosts has made investigators question the role of these pathogens in human disease. Current epidemiological data are helping to answer the question of whether EPEC is mainly a foe or an innocent bystander during infection.

  8. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli: Orchestrated host engagement.

    PubMed

    Fleckenstein, James M; Munson, George M; Rasko, David A

    2013-01-01

    The enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli are a pervasive cause of serious diarrheal illness in developing countries. Presently, there is no vaccine to prevent these infections, and many features of the basic pathogenesis of these organisms remain poorly understood. Until very recently most pathogenesis studies had focused almost exclusively on a small subset of known "classical" virulence genes, namely fimbrial colonization factors and the heat-labile (LT) and heat stable (ST) enterotoxins. However, recent investigations of pathogen-host interactions reveal a surprisingly complex and intricately orchestrated engagement involving the interplay of classical and "novel" virulence genes, as well as participation of genes highly conserved in the E. coli species. These studies may inform further rational approaches to vaccine development for these important pathogens. PMID:23892244

  9. Escherichia coli growth under modeled reduced gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Paul W.; Meyer, Michelle L.; Leff, Laura G.

    2004-01-01

    Bacteria exhibit varying responses to modeled reduced gravity that can be simulated by clino-rotation. When Escherichia coli was subjected to different rotation speeds during clino-rotation, significant differences between modeled reduced gravity and normal gravity controls were observed only at higher speeds (30-50 rpm). There was no apparent affect of removing samples on the results obtained. When E. coli was grown in minimal medium (at 40 rpm), cell size was not affected by modeled reduced gravity and there were few differences in cell numbers. However, in higher nutrient conditions (i.e., dilute nutrient broth), total cell numbers were higher and cells were smaller under reduced gravity compared to normal gravity controls. Overall, the responses to modeled reduced gravity varied with nutrient conditions; larger surface to volume ratios may help compensate for the zone of nutrient depletion around the cells under modeled reduced gravity.

  10. Engineering the Escherichia coli Fermentative Metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orencio-Trejo, M.; Utrilla, J.; Fernández-Sandoval, M. T.; Huerta-Beristain, G.; Gosset, G.; Martinez, A.

    Fermentative metabolism constitutes a fundamental cellular capacity for industrial biocatalysis. Escherichia coli is an important microorganism in the field of metabolic engineering for its well-known molecular characteristics and its rapid growth. It can adapt to different growth conditions and is able to grow in the presence or absence of oxygen. Through the use of metabolic pathway engineering and bioprocessing techniques, it is possible to explore the fundamental cellular properties and to exploit its capacity to be applied as industrial biocatalysts to produce a wide array of chemicals. The objective of this chapter is to review the metabolic engineering efforts carried out with E. coli by manipulating the central carbon metabolism and fermentative pathways to obtain strains that produce metabolites with high titers, such as ethanol, alanine, lactate and succinate.

  11. Escherichia coli as a bioreporter in ecotoxicology.

    PubMed

    Robbens, Johan; Dardenne, Freddy; Devriese, Lisa; De Coen, Wim; Blust, Ronny

    2010-11-01

    Ecotoxicological assessment relies to a large extent on the information gathered with surrogate species and the extrapolation of test results across species and different levels of biological organisation. Bacteria have long been used as a bioreporter for genotoxic testing and general toxicity. Today, it is clear that bacteria have the potential for screening of other toxicological endpoints. Escherichia coli has been studied for years; in-depth knowledge of its biochemistry and genetics makes it the most proficient prokaryote for the development of new toxicological assays. Several assays have been designed with E. coli as a bioreporter, and the recent trend to develop novel, better advanced reporters makes bioreporter development one of the most dynamic in ecotoxicology. Based on in-depth knowledge of E. coli, new assays are being developed or existing ones redesigned, thanks to the availability of new reporter genes and new or improved substrates. The technological evolution towards easier and more sensitive detection of different gene products is another important aspect. Often, this requires the redesign of the bacterium to make it compatible with the novel measuring tests. Recent advances in surface chemistry and nanoelectronics open the perspective for advanced reporter based on novel measuring platforms and with an online potential. In this article, we will discuss the use of E. coli-based bioreporters in ecotoxicological applications as well as some innovative sensors awaited for the future.

  12. Escherichia coli O157:H7.

    PubMed

    Mead, P S; Griffin, P M

    1998-10-10

    Escherichia coli O157 was first identified as a human pathogen in 1982. One of several Shiga toxin-producing serotypes known to cause human illness, the organism probably evolved through horizontal acquisition of genes for Shiga toxins and other virulence factors. E. coli O157 is found regularly in the faeces of healthy cattle, and is transmitted to humans through contaminated food, water, and direct contact with infected people or animals. Human infection is associated with a wide range of clinical illness, including asymptomatic shedding, non-bloody diarrhoea, haemorrhagic colitis, haemolytic uraemic syndrome, and death. Since laboratory practices vary, physicians need to know whether laboratories in their area routinely test for E. coli O157 in stool specimens. Treatment with antimicrobial agents remains controversial: some studies suggest that treatment may precipitate haemolytic uraemic syndrome, and other studies suggest no effect or even a protective effect. Physicians can help to prevent E. coli O157 infections by counselling patients about the hazards of consuming undercooked ground meat or unpasteurised milk products and juices, and about the importance of handwashing to prevent the spread of diarrhoeal illness, and by informing public-health authorities when they see unusual numbers of cases of bloody diarrhoea or haemolytic uraemic syndrome.

  13. Engineering Escherichia coli for methanol conversion.

    PubMed

    Müller, Jonas E N; Meyer, Fabian; Litsanov, Boris; Kiefer, Patrick; Potthoff, Eva; Heux, Stéphanie; Quax, Wim J; Wendisch, Volker F; Brautaset, Trygve; Portais, Jean-Charles; Vorholt, Julia A

    2015-03-01

    Methylotrophic bacteria utilize methanol and other reduced one-carbon compounds as their sole source of carbon and energy. For this purpose, these bacteria evolved a number of specialized enzymes and pathways. Here, we used a synthetic biology approach to select and introduce a set of "methylotrophy genes" into Escherichia coli based on in silico considerations and flux balance analysis to enable methanol dissimilation and assimilation. We determined that the most promising approach allowing the utilization of methanol was the implementation of NAD-dependent methanol dehydrogenase and the establishment of the ribulose monophosphate cycle by expressing the genes for hexulose-6-phosphate synthase (Hps) and 6-phospho-3-hexuloisomerase (Phi). To test for the best-performing enzymes in the heterologous host, a number of enzyme candidates from different donor organisms were selected and systematically analyzed for their in vitro and in vivo activities in E. coli. Among these, Mdh2, Hps and Phi originating from Bacillus methanolicus were found to be the most effective. Labeling experiments using (13)C methanol with E. coli producing these enzymes showed up to 40% incorporation of methanol into central metabolites. The presence of the endogenous glutathione-dependent formaldehyde oxidation pathway of E. coli did not adversely affect the methanol conversion rate. Taken together, the results of this study represent a major advancement towards establishing synthetic methylotrophs by gene transfer.

  14. Transport proteins promoting Escherichia coli pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Fengyi; Saier, Milton H.

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli is a genetically diverse species infecting hundreds of millions of people worldwide annually. We examined seven well-characterized E. coli pathogens causing urinary tract infections, gastroenteritis, pyelonephritis and haemorrhagic colitis. Their transport proteins were identified and compared with each other and a non-pathogenic E. coli K12 strain to identify transport proteins related to pathogenesis. Each pathogen possesses a unique set of protein secretion systems for export to the cell surface or for injecting effector proteins into host cells. Pathogens have increased numbers of iron siderophore receptors and ABC iron uptake transporters, but the numbers and types of low-affinity secondary iron carriers were uniform in all strains. The presence of outer membrane iron complex receptors and high-affinity ABC iron uptake systems correlated, suggesting co-evolution. Each pathovar encodes a different set of pore-forming toxins and virulence-related outer membrane proteins lacking in K12. Intracellular pathogens proved to have a characteristically distinctive set of nutrient uptake porters, different from those of extracellular pathogens. The results presented in this report provide information about transport systems relevant to various types of E. coli pathogenesis that can be exploited in future basic and applied studies. PMID:24747185

  15. Compilation of DNA sequences of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Kröger, Manfred

    1989-01-01

    We have compiled the DNA sequence data for E.coli K12 available from the GENBANK and EMBO databases and over a period of several years independently from the literature. We have introduced all available genetic map data and have arranged the sequences accordingly. As far as possible the overlaps are deleted and a total of 940,449 individual bp is found to be determined till the beginning of 1989. This corresponds to a total of 19.92% of the entire E.coli chromosome consisting of about 4,720 kbp. This number may actually be higher by some extra 2% derived from the sequence of lysogenic bacteriophage lambda and the various insertion sequences. This compilation may be available in machine readable form from one of the international databanks in some future. PMID:2654890

  16. GLYCOLATE METABOLISM IN ESCHERICHIA COLI1

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Robert W.; Hayashi, James A.

    1962-01-01

    Hansen, Robert W. (University of Illinois College of Medicine, Chicago) and James A. Hayashi. Glycolate metabolism in Escherichia coli. J. Bacteriol. 83:679–687. 1962.—This study of glycolate-adapted Escherichia coli indicates that the most probable route for utilization of the substrate includes glyceric acid, 3-phosphoglyceric acid, and the tricarboxylic acid cycle. A glyceric acid dehydrogenase, which reduces tartronic semialdehyde to glycerate in the presence of reduced diphosphopyridine nucleotide, and a kinase, which catalyzes the formation of 3-phosphoglycerate from glyceric acid and adenosine triphosphate, were shown to be present. Carbon recoveries in growing cultures and manometric data obtained with resting cells showed the complete oxidation of glycolate to carbon dioxide. Measurements of the oxidation of tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates indicated that these compounds are oxidized without lag and at a rate commensurate with the rate of glycolate oxidation. Assays of the enzymes characteristic of known pathways of terminal oxidation, such as isocitratase, malate synthetase, isocitric dehydrogenase, and condensing enzyme, provided further evidence for an operating tricarboxylic acid cycle. A postulated pathway for the utilization of glycolic acid is as follows: glycolate → glycerate → 3-phosphoglycerate → pyruvate → tricarboxylic acid cycle. PMID:13904441

  17. Production of glycoprotein vaccines in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Conjugate vaccines in which polysaccharide antigens are covalently linked to carrier proteins belong to the most effective and safest vaccines against bacterial pathogens. State-of-the art production of conjugate vaccines using chemical methods is a laborious, multi-step process. In vivo enzymatic coupling using the general glycosylation pathway of Campylobacter jejuni in recombinant Escherichia coli has been suggested as a simpler method for producing conjugate vaccines. In this study we describe the in vivo biosynthesis of two novel conjugate vaccine candidates against Shigella dysenteriae type 1, an important bacterial pathogen causing severe gastro-intestinal disease states mainly in developing countries. Results Two different periplasmic carrier proteins, AcrA from C. jejuni and a toxoid form of Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin were glycosylated with Shigella O antigens in E. coli. Starting from shake flask cultivation in standard complex medium a lab-scale fed-batch process was developed for glycoconjugate production. It was found that efficiency of glycosylation but not carrier protein expression was highly susceptible to the physiological state at induction. After induction glycoconjugates generally appeared later than unglycosylated carrier protein, suggesting that glycosylation was the rate-limiting step for synthesis of conjugate vaccines in E. coli. Glycoconjugate synthesis, in particular expression of oligosaccharyltransferase PglB, strongly inhibited growth of E. coli cells after induction, making it necessary to separate biomass growth and recombinant protein expression phases. With a simple pulse and linear feed strategy and the use of semi-defined glycerol medium, volumetric glycoconjugate yield was increased 30 to 50-fold. Conclusions The presented data demonstrate that glycosylated proteins can be produced in recombinant E. coli at a larger scale. The described methodologies constitute an important step towards cost-effective in vivo

  18. A series of template plasmids for Escherichia coli genome engineering.

    PubMed

    Deb, Shalini S; Reshamwala, Shamlan M S; Lali, Arvind M

    2016-06-01

    Metabolic engineering strategies often employ multi-copy episomal vectors to overexpress genes. However, chromosome-based overexpression is preferred as it avoids the use of selective pressure and reduces metabolic burden on the cell. We have constructed a series of template plasmids for λ Red-mediated Escherichia coli genome engineering. The template plasmids allow construction of genome integrating cassettes that can be used to integrate single copies of DNA sequences at predetermined sites or replace promoter regions. The constructed cassettes provide flexibility in terms of expression levels achieved and antibiotics used for selection, as well as allowing construction of marker-free strains. The modular design of the template plasmids allows replacement of genetic parts to construct new templates. Gene integration and promoter replacement using the template plasmids are illustrated. PMID:27071533

  19. Methane production from kitchen waste using Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Jayalakshmi, S; Joseph, Kurian; Sukumaran, V

    2007-04-01

    Escherichia coli (E. coli) strain isolated from biogas plant sludge was examined for its ability to enhance biogas from kitchen waste during solid phase anaerobic digestion. The laboratory experiments were conducted for total solid concentrations of 20% and 22%. Kitchen waste was characterized for physico-chemical parameters and laboratory experiments were conducted with and without E. coli strain. It was found that the reactor with E. coli produced 17% more biogas than the reactors that are operated without E. coli strain.

  20. Colibri: a functional data base for the Escherichia coli genome.

    PubMed Central

    Médigue, C; Viari, A; Hénaut, A; Danchin, A

    1993-01-01

    Several data libraries have been created to organize all the data obtained worldwide about the Escherichia coli genome. Because the known data now amount to more than 40% of the whole genome sequence, it has become necessary to organize the data in such a way that appropriate procedures can associate knowledge produced by experiments about each gene to its position on the chromosome and its relation to other relevant genes, for example. In addition, global properties of genes, affected by the introduction of new entries, should be present as appropriate description fields. A data base, implemented on Macintosh by using the data base management system 4th Dimension, is described. It is constructed around a core constituted by known contigs of E. coli sequences and links data collected in general libraries (unmodified) to data associated with evolving knowledge (with modifiable fields). Biologically significant results obtained through the coupling of appropriate procedures (learning or statistical data analysis) are presented. The data base is available through a 4th Dimension runtime and through FTP on Internet. It has been regularly updated and will be systematically linked to other E. coli data bases (M. Kroger, R. Wahl, G. Schachtel, and P. Rice, Nucleic Acids Res. 20(Suppl.):2119-2144, 1992; K. E. Rudd, W. Miller, C. Werner, J. Ostell, C. Tolstoshev, and S. G. Satterfield, Nucleic Acids Res. 19:637-647, 1991) in the near future. Images PMID:8246843

  1. DNA sequence of the Escherichia coli tonB gene.

    PubMed Central

    Postle, K; Good, R F

    1983-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of a cloned section of the Escherichia coli chromosome containing the tonB gene has been determined. Transcription initiation and termination sites for tonB RNA have been determined by S1 nuclease mapping. The tonB promoter and terminator resemble other E. coli promoters and terminators; the sequence of the tonB terminator region suggests that it may function bidirectionally. The DNA sequence specifies an open translation reading frame between the 5' and 3' RNA termini whose location is consistent with the position of previously isolated tonB::IS1 mutations. The DNA sequence predicts a proline-rich protein with a calculated size of 26.1-26.6 kilodaltons (239-244 amino acids), depending on which of three potential initiation codons is utilized. The predicted NH2 terminus of tonB protein resembles the proteolytically cleaved signal sequences of E. coli periplasmic and outer membrane proteins; the overall hydrophilic character of the protein sequence suggests that the bulk of the tonB protein is not embedded within the inner or outer membrane. A significant discrepancy exists between the calculated size of tonB protein and the apparent size of 36 kilodaltons determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Images PMID:6310567

  2. The rnh gene is essential for growth of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Kanaya, S; Crouch, R J

    1984-01-01

    We have determined that a functional gene coding for ribonuclease H seems to be essential for cell growth in Escherichia coli. A strain was made with two copies of the rnh gene by lysogenizing an E. coli strain with a lambda phage bearing a copy of the rnh gene. Inactivation of one of the two copies of the rnh gene was accomplished by transformation with a linear DNA molecule that had the gene for chloramphenicol acetyltransferase inserted near the middle of the rnh gene. In recombinants that had an inactive gene replacing the normal chromosomal rnh gene, the lambda rnh prophage supplies an intact functional copy of the rnh gene. Curing the cells of the lambda rnh prophage left the cell with an inactive rnh gene and resulted in cell death. An intact functional rnh gene provided on a plasmid permits normal curing, and cured survivors were readily obtained. The technique described is probably generally applicable for assessing the requirement for other E. coli genes. Images PMID:6233609

  3. Regulation of alcohol fermentation by Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.P.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to elucidate the way in which the synthesis of ethanol and related fermentation products are regulated in the facultative anaerobe Escherichia coli. We are also investigating the control of other genes required for anaerobic growth. We have isolated both structural and regulatory mutations affecting the expression of alcohol dehydrogenase, the enzyme responsible for the final step in alcohol synthesis. Some of these regulatory mutations also affect other anaerobically induced genes. The adh gene has been cloned and sequenced. The ADH protein is one of the largest highly expressed proteins in E. coli and requires approximately 2700bp of DNA for its coding sequence. We have also isolated mutations affecting the fermentative lactate dehydrogenase and have recently cloned the ldh gene. In consequence it is now possible to construct E. coli strains defective in the production of any one or more of their normal fermentation products (i.e. formate, acetate, lactate, ethanol and succinate). The factors affecting ratio of fermentation products are being investigated by in vivo NMR spectroscopy.

  4. Characterization of molybdenum cofactor from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Amy, N K; Rajagopalan, K V

    1979-01-01

    Molybdenum cofactor activity was found in the soluble fraction of cell-free extracts of Escherichia coli grown aerobically in media supplemented with molybdate. Cofactor was detected by its ability to complement the nitrate reductase-deficient mutant of Neurospora crossa, nit-1, resulting in the vitro formation of nitrate reductase activity. Acid treatment of E. coli extracts was not required for release of cofactor activity. Cofactor was able to diffuse through a membrane of nominal 2,000-molecular-weight cutoff and was insensitive to trypsin. The cofactor was associated with a carrier molecule (approximately 40,000 daltons) during gel filtration and sucrose gradient centrifugation, but was easily removed from the carrier by dialysis. The carrier molecule protected the cofactor from inactivation by heat or oxygen. E. coli grown in molybdenum-free media, without and with tungsten, synthesized a metal-free "empty" cofactor and its tungsten analog, respectively, both of which were subsequently activated by the addition of molybdate. Empty and tungsten-containing cofactor complemented the nitrate reductase subunits in the nit-1 extract, forming inactive, but intact, 7.9S nitrate reductase. Addition of molybdate to the enzyme complemented in this manner restored nitrate reductase activity. PMID:387715

  5. Role of Escherichia coli in Biofuel Production

    PubMed Central

    Koppolu, Veerendra; Vasigala, Veneela KR

    2016-01-01

    Increased energy consumption coupled with depleting petroleum reserves and increased greenhouse gas emissions have renewed our interest in generating fuels from renewable energy sources via microbial fermentation. Central to this problem is the choice of microorganism that catalyzes the production of fuels at high volumetric productivity and yield from cheap and abundantly available renewable energy sources. Microorganisms that are metabolically engineered to redirect renewable carbon sources into desired fuel products are contemplated as best choices to obtain high volumetric productivity and yield. Considering the availability of vast knowledge in genomic and metabolic fronts, Escherichia coli is regarded as a primary choice for the production of biofuels. Here, we reviewed the microbial production of liquid biofuels that have the potential to be used either alone or in combination with the present-day fuels. We specifically highlighted the metabolic engineering and synthetic biology approaches used to improve the production of biofuels from E. coli over the past few years. We also discussed the challenges that still exist for the biofuel production from E. coli and their possible solutions. PMID:27441002

  6. Role of Escherichia coli in Biofuel Production.

    PubMed

    Koppolu, Veerendra; Vasigala, Veneela Kr

    2016-01-01

    Increased energy consumption coupled with depleting petroleum reserves and increased greenhouse gas emissions have renewed our interest in generating fuels from renewable energy sources via microbial fermentation. Central to this problem is the choice of microorganism that catalyzes the production of fuels at high volumetric productivity and yield from cheap and abundantly available renewable energy sources. Microorganisms that are metabolically engineered to redirect renewable carbon sources into desired fuel products are contemplated as best choices to obtain high volumetric productivity and yield. Considering the availability of vast knowledge in genomic and metabolic fronts, Escherichia coli is regarded as a primary choice for the production of biofuels. Here, we reviewed the microbial production of liquid biofuels that have the potential to be used either alone or in combination with the present-day fuels. We specifically highlighted the metabolic engineering and synthetic biology approaches used to improve the production of biofuels from E. coli over the past few years. We also discussed the challenges that still exist for the biofuel production from E. coli and their possible solutions. PMID:27441002

  7. Role of Escherichia coli in Biofuel Production.

    PubMed

    Koppolu, Veerendra; Vasigala, Veneela Kr

    2016-01-01

    Increased energy consumption coupled with depleting petroleum reserves and increased greenhouse gas emissions have renewed our interest in generating fuels from renewable energy sources via microbial fermentation. Central to this problem is the choice of microorganism that catalyzes the production of fuels at high volumetric productivity and yield from cheap and abundantly available renewable energy sources. Microorganisms that are metabolically engineered to redirect renewable carbon sources into desired fuel products are contemplated as best choices to obtain high volumetric productivity and yield. Considering the availability of vast knowledge in genomic and metabolic fronts, Escherichia coli is regarded as a primary choice for the production of biofuels. Here, we reviewed the microbial production of liquid biofuels that have the potential to be used either alone or in combination with the present-day fuels. We specifically highlighted the metabolic engineering and synthetic biology approaches used to improve the production of biofuels from E. coli over the past few years. We also discussed the challenges that still exist for the biofuel production from E. coli and their possible solutions.

  8. Distinct signatures for mutator sensitivity of lacZ reversions and for the spectrum of lacI/lacO forward mutations on the chromosome of nondividing Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Bharatan, Shanti M; Reddy, Manjula; Gowrishankar, J

    2004-01-01

    A conditional lethal galE(Ts)-based strategy was employed in Escherichia coli, first to eliminate all growth-associated chromosomal reversions in lacZ or forward mutations in lacI/lacO by incubation at the restrictive temperature and subsequently to recover (as papillae) spontaneous mutations that had arisen in the population of nondividing cells after shift to the permissive temperature. Data from lacZ reversion studies in mutator strains indicated that the products of all genes for mismatch repair (mutHLS, dam, uvrD), of some for oxidative damage repair (mutMT), and of that for polymerase proofreading (dnaQ) are required in dividing cells; some others for oxidative damage repair (mutY, nth nei) are required in both dividing and nondividing cells; and those for alkylation damage repair (ada ogt) are required in nondividing cells. The spectrum of lacI/lacO mutations in nondividing cells was distinguished both by lower frequencies of deletions and IS1 insertions and by the unique occurrence of GC-to-AT transitions at lacO +5. In the second approach to study mutations that had occurred in nondividing cells, lacI/lacO mutants were selected as late-arising papillae from the lawn of a galE+ strain; once again, transitions at lacO +5 were detected among the mutants that had been obtained from populations initially grown on poor carbon sources such as acetate, palmitate, or succinate. Our results indicate that the lacO +5 site is mutable only in nondividing cells, one possible mechanism for which might be that random endogenous alkylation (or oxidative) damage to DNA in these cells is efficiently corrected by the Ada Ogt (or Nth Nei) repair enzymes at most sites but not at lacO +5. Furthermore, the late-arising papillae from the second approach were composed almost exclusively of dominant lacI/lacO mutants. This finding lends support to "instantaneous gratification" models in which a spontaneous lesion, occurring at a random site in DNA of a nondividing cell, is most

  9. Verocytotoxin-producing Escherichia coli (VTEC).

    PubMed

    Karmali, Mohamed A; Gannon, Victor; Sargeant, Jan M

    2010-01-27

    Escherichia coli O157:H7 and other Verocytotoxin-producing E. coli (VTEC) are zoonotic pathogens associated with food and waterborne illness around the world. E. coli O157:H7 has been implicated in large outbreaks as well as in sporadic cases of haemorrhagic colitis and the sometimes fatal haemolytic uremic syndrome. VTs produced by these bacteria are thought to damage host endothelial cells in small vessels of the intestine, kidney and brain resulting in thrombotic microangiopathy. All VTs have the same subunit structure, glycolipid cell receptor and inhibit protein synthesis. During VTEC infection, it is thought one or more bacterial adhesins initiates colonization and establishes intimate attachment and is responsible for the translocation of a variety of effectors which alter the structure and function of host cells. VTEC are widespread in animals but ruminants are thought to be their natural reservoir. E. coli O157:H7 colonizes the terminal colon of cattle and can be shed in very large numbers by specific herdmates known as "supershedders". Faeces containing these organisms act as a source of contamination for a variety of foods and the environment. Many VTEC control efforts have been investigated along the "farm to fork" continuum including, vaccination of cattle with colonization factors, and the use of novel antimicrobials, such as bacteriocins, chloral hydrate, bacteriophage and substances which disrupt quorum sensing. In addition, many barriers have been developed for use in the slaughter and food processing industry such as steam pasteurization and irradiation. Despite these efforts many scientific, technical and regulatory challenges remain in the control and prevention of VTEC-associated human illness.

  10. WGS accurately predicts antimicrobial resistance in Escherichia coli

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objectives: To determine the effectiveness of whole-genome sequencing (WGS) in identifying resistance genotypes of multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli (E. coli) and whether these correlate with observed phenotypes. Methods: Seventy-six E. coli strains were isolated from farm cattle and measured f...

  11. Efficient production of indigoidine in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fuchao; Gage, David; Zhan, Jixun

    2015-08-01

    Indigoidine is a bacterial natural product with antioxidant and antimicrobial activities. Its bright blue color resembles the industrial dye indigo, thus representing a new natural blue dye that may find uses in industry. In our previous study, an indigoidine synthetase Sc-IndC and an associated helper protein Sc-IndB were identified from Streptomyces chromofuscus ATCC 49982 and successfully expressed in Escherichia coli BAP1 to produce the blue pigment at 3.93 g/l. To further improve the production of indigoidine, in this work, the direct biosynthetic precursor L-glutamine was fed into the fermentation broth of the engineered E. coli strain harboring Sc-IndC and Sc-IndB. The highest titer of indigoidine reached 8.81 ± 0.21 g/l at 1.46 g/l L-glutamine. Given the relatively high price of L-glutamine, a metabolic engineering technique was used to directly enhance the in situ supply of this precursor. A glutamine synthetase gene (glnA) was amplified from E. coli and co-expressed with Sc-indC and Sc-indB in E. coli BAP1, leading to the production of indigoidine at 5.75 ± 0.09 g/l. Because a nitrogen source is required for amino acid biosynthesis, we then tested the effect of different nitrogen-containing salts on the supply of L-glutamine and subsequent indigoidine production. Among the four tested salts including (NH4)2SO4, NH4Cl, (NH4)2HPO4 and KNO3, (NH4)2HPO4 showed the best effect on improving the titer of indigoidine. Different concentrations of (NH4)2HPO4 were added to the fermentation broths of E. coli BAP1/Sc-IndC+Sc-IndB+GlnA, and the titer reached the highest (7.08 ± 0.11 g/l) at 2.5 mM (NH4)2HPO4. This work provides two efficient methods for the production of this promising blue pigment in E. coli.

  12. Animal models of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli infection

    PubMed Central

    Philipson, Casandra W.; Bassaganya-Riera, Josep; Hontecillas, Raquel

    2013-01-01

    Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) has been acknowledged as an emerging cause of gastroenteritis worldwide for over two decades. Epidemiologists are revealing the role of EAEC in diarrheal outbreaks as a more common occurrence than ever suggested before. EAEC induced diarrhea is most commonly associated with travelers, children and immunocompromised individuals however its afflictions are not limited to any particular demographic. Many attributes have been discovered and characterized surrounding the capability of EAEC to provoke a potent pro-inflammatory immune response, however cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying initiation, progression and outcomes are largely unknown. This limited understanding can be attributed to heterogeneity in strains and the lack of adequate animal models. This review aims to summarize current knowledge about EAEC etiology, pathogenesis and clinical manifestation. Additionally, current animal models and their limitations will be discussed along with the value of applying systems-wide approaches such as computational modeling to study host-EAEC interactions. PMID:23680797

  13. Mechanism of Escherichia coli Resistance to Pyrrhocoricin

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Shalini; Modak, Joyanta K.; Ryan, Catherine S.; Garcia-Bustos, Jose; Davies, John K.

    2014-01-01

    Due to their lack of toxicity to mammalian cells and good serum stability, proline-rich antimicrobial peptides (PR-AMPs) have been proposed as promising candidates for the treatment of infections caused by antimicrobial-resistant bacterial pathogens. It has been hypothesized that these peptides act on multiple targets within bacterial cells, and therefore the likelihood of the emergence of resistance was considered to be low. Here, we show that spontaneous Escherichia coli mutants resistant to pyrrhocoricin arise at a frequency of approximately 6 × 10−7. Multiple independently derived mutants all contained a deletion in a nonessential gene that encodes the putative peptide uptake permease SbmA. Sensitivity could be restored to the mutants by complementation with an intact copy of the sbmA gene. These findings question the viability of the development of insect PR-AMPs as antimicrobials. PMID:24590485

  14. Direct Upstream Motility in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Kaya, Tolga; Koser, Hur

    2012-01-01

    We provide an experimental demonstration of positive rheotaxis (rapid and continuous upstream motility) in wild-type Escherichia coli freely swimming over a surface. This hydrodynamic phenomenon is dominant below a critical shear rate and robust against Brownian motion and cell tumbling. We deduce that individual bacteria entering a flow system can rapidly migrate upstream (>20 μm/s) much faster than a gradually advancing biofilm. Given a bacterial population with a distribution of sizes and swim speeds, local shear rate near the surface determines the dominant hydrodynamic mode for motility, i.e., circular or random trajectories for low shear rates, positive rheotaxis for moderate flow, and sideways swimming at higher shear rates. Faster swimmers can move upstream more rapidly and at higher shear rates, as expected. Interestingly, we also find on average that both swim speed and upstream motility are independent of cell aspect ratio. PMID:22500751

  15. REPRESSION OF TRYPTOPHANASE SYNTHESIS IN ESCHERICHIA COLI.

    PubMed

    BEGGS, W H; LICHSTEIN, H C

    1965-04-01

    Beggs, William H. (University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio), and Herman C. Lichstein. Repression of tryptophanase synthesis in Escherichia coli. J. Bacteriol. 89:996-1004. 1965.-The nature of the glucose effect on tryptophanase in Escherichia coli (Crookes) was investigated to test the catabolite-repression hypothesis. Under static conditions of growth in the presence of 0.005 m glucose, tryptophanase was repressed and remained so upon continued static incubation subsequent to glucose exhaustion. Aeration following glucose exhaustion under static cultural conditions resulted in rapid enzyme synthesis. In the absence of glucose, certain amino acids repressed tryptophanase synthesis early in the growth cycle under aerated conditions. An inverse relationship was observed between the concentration of acid-hydrolyzed casein and the level of tryptophanase. At 3 hr, enzyme activity in cells grown in media containing 0.05% acid-hydrolyzed casein was at least five times that of cells grown in the presence of 1% casein. Addition of 0.005 m d- or l-serine to a 0.05% acid-hydrolyzed casein medium rendered the medium capable of strongly repressing tryptophanase. Glucose-expended medium was prepared by allowing cells to grow and exhaust glucose in static culture. When this expended medium was recovered and inoculated with fresh cells not previously exposed to glucose, tryptophanase synthesis was repressed for a short period in shake culture, but in static culture enzyme synthesis was only slightly affected. When the expended medium was prepared from shake cultures, fresh cells were not repressed strongly when subsequent incubation was carried out aerobically. The tryptophan pool in glucose-repressed cells grown in shake culture was appreciably less than in cells grown in the absence of glucose or in cells undergoing synthesis of tryptophanase after exhaustion of the sugar.

  16. The crystal structure Escherichia coli Spy.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Eunju; Kim, Dong Young; Gross, Carol A; Gross, John D; Kim, Kyeong Kyu

    2010-11-01

    Escherichia coli spheroplast protein y (EcSpy) is a small periplasmic protein that is homologous with CpxP, an inhibitor of the extracytoplasmic stress response. Stress conditions such as spheroplast formation induce the expression of Spy via the Cpx or the Bae two-component systems in E. coli, though the function of Spy is unknown. Here, we report the crystal structure of EcSpy, which reveals a long kinked hairpin-like structure of four α-helices that form an antiparallel dimer. The dimer contains a curved oval shape with a highly positively charged concave surface that may function as a ligand binding site. Sequence analysis reveals that Spy is highly conserved over the Enterobacteriaceae family. Notably, three conserved regions that contain identical residues and two LTxxQ motifs are placed at the horizontal end of the dimer structure, stabilizing the overall fold. CpxP also contains the conserved sequence motifs and has a predicted secondary structure similar to Spy, suggesting that Spy and CpxP likely share the same fold.

  17. Linkage map of Escherichia coli K-12, edition 8.

    PubMed Central

    Bachmann, B J

    1990-01-01

    The linkage map of Escherichia coli K-12 depicts the arrangement of genes on the circular chromosome of this organism. The basic units of the map are minutes, determined by the time-of-entry of markers from Hfr into F- strains in interrupted-conjugation experiments. The time-of-entry distances have been refined over the years by determination of the frequency of cotransduction of loci in transduction experiments utilizing bacteriophage P1, which transduces segments of DNA approximately 2 min in length. In recent years, the relative positions of many genes have been determined even more precisely by physical techniques, including the mapping of restriction fragments and the sequencing of many small regions of the chromosome. On the whole, the agreement between results obtained by genetic and physical methods has been remarkably good considering the different levels of accuracy to be expected of the methods used. There are now few regions of the map whose length is still in some doubt. In some regions, genetic experiments utilizing different mutant strains give different map distances. In other regions, the genetic markers available have not been close enough to give accurate cotransduction data. The chromosome is now known to contain several inserted elements apparently derived from lambdoid phages and other sources. The nature of the region in which the termination of replication of the chromosome occurs is now known to be much more complex than the picture given in the previous map. The present map is based upon the published literature through June of 1988. There are now 1,403 loci placed on the linkage group, which may represent between one-third and one-half of the genes in this organism. PMID:2194094

  18. The extracellular RNA complement of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Ghosal, Anubrata; Upadhyaya, Bimal Babu; Fritz, Joëlle V; Heintz-Buschart, Anna; Desai, Mahesh S; Yusuf, Dilmurat; Huang, David; Baumuratov, Aidos; Wang, Kai; Galas, David; Wilmes, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The secretion of biomolecules into the extracellular milieu is a common and well-conserved phenomenon in biology. In bacteria, secreted biomolecules are not only involved in intra-species communication but they also play roles in inter-kingdom exchanges and pathogenicity. To date, released products, such as small molecules, DNA, peptides, and proteins, have been well studied in bacteria. However, the bacterial extracellular RNA complement has so far not been comprehensively characterized. Here, we have analyzed, using a combination of physical characterization and high-throughput sequencing, the extracellular RNA complement of both outer membrane vesicle (OMV)-associated and OMV-free RNA of the enteric Gram-negative model bacterium Escherichia coli K-12 substrain MG1655 and have compared it to its intracellular RNA complement. Our results demonstrate that a large part of the extracellular RNA complement is in the size range between 15 and 40 nucleotides and is derived from specific intracellular RNAs. Furthermore, RNA is associated with OMVs and the relative abundances of RNA biotypes in the intracellular, OMV and OMV-free fractions are distinct. Apart from rRNA fragments, a significant portion of the extracellular RNA complement is composed of specific cleavage products of functionally important structural noncoding RNAs, including tRNAs, 4.5S RNA, 6S RNA, and tmRNA. In addition, the extracellular RNA pool includes RNA biotypes from cryptic prophages, intergenic, and coding regions, of which some are so far uncharacterised, for example, transcripts mapping to the fimA-fimL and ves-spy intergenic regions. Our study provides the first detailed characterization of the extracellular RNA complement of the enteric model bacterium E. coli. Analogous to findings in eukaryotes, our results suggest the selective export of specific RNA biotypes by E. coli, which in turn indicates a potential role for extracellular bacterial RNAs in intercellular communication. PMID:25611733

  19. Escherichia coli and the Emergence of Molecular Biology.

    PubMed

    Ullmann, Agnes

    2011-12-01

    The creation of the "Phage group" by M. Delbrück, S. E. Luria, and A. D. Hershey in 1940 at Cold Spring Harbor played a crucial role in the development of molecular biology. In the 1940s, working with Escherichia coli and its viruses, Luria and Delbrück discovered the spontaneous nature of bacterial mutations and Hershey described recombination in bacteriophages and demonstrated with M. Chase that the genetic material that infects bacteria is DNA. At the same time, S. Benzer defined the structure of a functional genetic unit and J. Lederberg and E. Tatum discovered sexual recombination between bacteria. Some years later, Lederberg's group discovered extrachromosomal particles, the plasmids, and a novel way of genetic transfer through bacteriophages, called transduction. In 1949, at the Pasteur Institute in Paris, A. Lwoff uncovered the mechanism of lysogeny. Shortly afterwards, F. Jacob and E. Wollman unraveled the mechanism of the sexual process in E. coli and established the circularity of the bacterial chromosome. In the 1960s, J. Monod and F. Jacob, by genetic analysis of the E. coli lactose system, proposed the operon model for gene regulation and introduced the concept of messenger RNA. The elucidation of the double helix structure of DNA in 1953 by F. Crick and J. Watson had major consequences: the establishment of the copying mechanism (Meselson and Stahl), the discovery of the nature of the genetic code (S. Brenner) leading to its deciphering. E. coli and its phages were instrumental in the development of recombinant DNA technology based on the discovery of the restriction-modification system by W. Arber. PMID:26442505

  20. Escherichia coli and the Emergence of Molecular Biology.

    PubMed

    Ullmann, Agnes

    2011-12-01

    The creation of the "Phage group" by M. Delbrück, S. E. Luria, and A. D. Hershey in 1940 at Cold Spring Harbor played a crucial role in the development of molecular biology. In the 1940s, working with Escherichia coli and its viruses, Luria and Delbrück discovered the spontaneous nature of bacterial mutations and Hershey described recombination in bacteriophages and demonstrated with M. Chase that the genetic material that infects bacteria is DNA. At the same time, S. Benzer defined the structure of a functional genetic unit and J. Lederberg and E. Tatum discovered sexual recombination between bacteria. Some years later, Lederberg's group discovered extrachromosomal particles, the plasmids, and a novel way of genetic transfer through bacteriophages, called transduction. In 1949, at the Pasteur Institute in Paris, A. Lwoff uncovered the mechanism of lysogeny. Shortly afterwards, F. Jacob and E. Wollman unraveled the mechanism of the sexual process in E. coli and established the circularity of the bacterial chromosome. In the 1960s, J. Monod and F. Jacob, by genetic analysis of the E. coli lactose system, proposed the operon model for gene regulation and introduced the concept of messenger RNA. The elucidation of the double helix structure of DNA in 1953 by F. Crick and J. Watson had major consequences: the establishment of the copying mechanism (Meselson and Stahl), the discovery of the nature of the genetic code (S. Brenner) leading to its deciphering. E. coli and its phages were instrumental in the development of recombinant DNA technology based on the discovery of the restriction-modification system by W. Arber.

  1. Mutants of Escherichia coli deficient in the fermentative lactate dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Mat-Jan, F.; Alam, K.Y.; Clark, D.P. )

    1989-01-01

    Mutants of Escherichia coli deficient in the fermentative NAD-linked lactate dehydrogenase (ldh) have been isolated. These mutants showed no growth defects under anaerobic conditions unless present together with a defect in pyruvate formate lyase (pfl). Double mutants (pfl ldh) were unable to grow anaerobically on glucose or other sugars even when supplemented with acetate, whereas pfl mutants can do so. The ldh mutation was found to map at 30.5 min on the E. coli chromosome. The ldh mutant FMJ39 showed no detectable lactate dehydrogenase activity and produced no lactic acid from glucose under anaerobic conditions as estimated by in vivo nuclear magnetic resonance measurements. We also found that in wild-type strains the fermentative lactate dehydrogenase was conjointly induced by anaerobic conditions and an acidic pH. Despite previous findings that phosphate concentrations affect the proportion of lactic acid produced during fermentation, we were unable to find any intrinsic effect of phosphate on lactate dehydrogenase activity, apart from the buffering effect of this ion.

  2. Enhanced Deletion Formation by Aberrant DNA Replication in Escherichia Coli

    PubMed Central

    Saveson, C. J.; Lovett, S. T.

    1997-01-01

    Repeated genes and sequences are prone to genetic rearrangements including deletions. We have investigated deletion formation in Escherichia coli strains mutant for various replication functions. Deletion was selected between 787 base pair tandem repeats carried either on a ColE1-derived plasmid or on the E. coli chromosome. Only mutations in functions associated with DNA Polymerase III elevated deletion rates in our assays. Especially large increases were observed in strains mutant in dnaQ, the ε editing subunit of Pol III, and dnaB, the replication fork helicase. Mutations in several other functions also altered deletion formation: the α polymerase (dnaE), the γ clamp loader complex (holC, dnaX), and the β clamp (dnaN) subunits of Pol III and the primosomal proteins, dnaC and priA. Aberrant replication stimulated deletions through several pathways. Whereas the elevation in dnaB strains was mostly recA- and lexA-dependent, that in dnaQ strains was mostly recA- and lexA-independent. Deletion product analysis suggested that slipped mispairing, producing monomeric replicon products, may be preferentially increased in a dnaQ mutant and sister-strand exchange, producing dimeric replicon products, may be elevated in dnaE mutants. We conclude that aberrant Polymerase III replication can stimulate deletion events through several mechanisms of deletion and via both recA-dependent and independent pathways. PMID:9177997

  3. [Production of D-mannitol by metabolically engineered Escherichia coli].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaofang; Chen, Jing; Liu, Pingping; Xu, Hongtao; Yu, Peng; Zhang, Xueli

    2013-10-01

    D-Mannitol has wide applications in food, pharmaceutical, and chemical industries. In this study, we constructed a genetically stable Escherichia coli strain for D-mannitol production by integrating mannitol dehydrogenase (mdh) and fructose permease (fupL) genes of Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides ATCC 12291 into chromosome of E. coli ATCC 8739 and inactivating other fermentation pathways (including pyruvate formate-lyase, lactate dehydrogenase, fumarate reductase, alcohol dehydrogenase, methylglyoxal synthase and pyruvate oxidase). Using mineral salts medium with glucose and fructose as carbon sources, the engineered strain could produce 1.2 mmol/L D-mannitol after anaerobic fermentation for 6 days. Based on the coupling of cell growth and D-mannitol production, metabolic evolution was used to improve D-mannitol production. After evolution for 80 generations, D-mannitol titer increased 2.6-fold and mannitol dehydrogenase activity increased 2.8-fold. Genetically stable strains constructed in this work could ferment sugars to produce D-mannitol without the addition of antibiotics, inducers and formate, which was favorable for industrial production.

  4. Escherichia coli survival in waters: temperature dependence.

    PubMed

    Blaustein, R A; Pachepsky, Y; Hill, R L; Shelton, D R; Whelan, G

    2013-02-01

    Knowing the survival rates of water-borne Escherichia coli is important in evaluating microbial contamination and making appropriate management decisions. E. coli survival rates are dependent on temperature, a dependency that is routinely expressed using an analogue of the Q₁₀ model. This suggestion was made 34 years ago based on 20 survival curves taken from published literature, but has not been revisited since then. The objective of this study was to re-evaluate the accuracy of the Q₁₀ equation, utilizing data accumulated since 1978. We assembled a database of 450 E. coli survival datasets from 70 peer-reviewed papers. We then focused on the 170 curves taken from experiments that were performed in the laboratory under dark conditions to exclude the effects of sunlight and other field factors that could cause additional variability in results. All datasets were tabulated dependencies "log concentration vs. time." There were three major patterns of inactivation: about half of the datasets had a section of fast log-linear inactivation followed by a section of slow log-linear inactivation; about a quarter of the datasets had a lag period followed by log-linear inactivation; and the remaining quarter were approximately linear throughout. First-order inactivation rate constants were calculated from the linear sections of all survival curves and the data grouped by water sources, including waters of agricultural origin, pristine water sources, groundwater and wells, lakes and reservoirs, rivers and streams, estuaries and seawater, and wastewater. Dependency of E. coli inactivation rates on temperature varied among the water sources. There was a significant difference in inactivation rate values at the reference temperature between rivers and agricultural waters, wastewaters and agricultural waters, rivers and lakes, and wastewater and lakes. At specific sites, the Q₁₀ equation was more accurate in rivers and coastal waters than in lakes making the value of

  5. Cloning and expression in Escherichia coli of genes involved in the lysine pathway of Brevibacterium lactofermentum.

    PubMed Central

    Márquez, G; Sousa, J M; Sánchez, F

    1985-01-01

    The Brevibacterium lactofermentum genes which complement Escherichia coli lysA and asd-1 mutants were identified, respectively, as a 1.9-kilobase PstI-ClaI fragment and a 2.5-kilobase PstI fragment by cloning into pBR325. Southern blot transfers show hybridization to chromosomal fragments of identical size. The putative B. lactofermentum asd and lysA products are 44 and 48 kilodaltons, respectively. Images PMID:2864331

  6. Tight linkage of genes that encode the two glutamate synthase subunits of Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed Central

    Lozoya, E; Sanchez-Pescador, R; Covarrubias, A; Vichido, I; Bolivar, F

    1980-01-01

    A hybrid deoxyribonucleic acid molecule, plasmid pRSP20, which was isolated from the Clarke and Carbon Escherichia coli gene bank, was shown to complement the gltB31 mutation, which affects the synthesis of glutamate synthase in E. coli strain PA340. We present evidence which demonstrates that plasmid pRSP20 carries an 8-megadalton E. coli chromosomal fragment, including the genes encoding the two unequal glutamate synthase subunits. Polypeptides with molecular weights of about 135,000 and 53,000, which comigrated with purified E. coli glutamate synthase subunit polypeptides and immunoprecipitated with antibodies to E. coli glutamate synthase, were synthesized by minicells carrying the pRSP20 plasmid. Images PMID:6107287

  7. TRIMETHOPRIM-SULFAMETHOXAZOLE RESISTANCE IN SEWAGE ISOLATES OF ESCHERICHIA COLI

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sewage samples from seven locations in the United States were analyzed for Escherichia coli isolates which were resistant to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (SXT). The prevalence rate of SXT resistant organisms varied between the different geographical locales. The majority of th...

  8. The Escherichia coli Peripheral Inner Membrane Proteome*

    PubMed Central

    Papanastasiou, Malvina; Orfanoudaki, Georgia; Koukaki, Marina; Kountourakis, Nikos; Sardis, Marios Frantzeskos; Aivaliotis, Michalis; Karamanou, Spyridoula; Economou, Anastassios

    2013-01-01

    Biological membranes are essential for cell viability. Their functional characteristics strongly depend on their protein content, which consists of transmembrane (integral) and peripherally associated membrane proteins. Both integral and peripheral inner membrane proteins mediate a plethora of biological processes. Whereas transmembrane proteins have characteristic hydrophobic stretches and can be predicted using bioinformatics approaches, peripheral inner membrane proteins are hydrophilic, exist in equilibria with soluble pools, and carry no discernible membrane targeting signals. We experimentally determined the cytoplasmic peripheral inner membrane proteome of the model organism Escherichia coli using a multidisciplinary approach. Initially, we extensively re-annotated the theoretical proteome regarding subcellular localization using literature searches, manual curation, and multi-combinatorial bioinformatics searches of the available databases. Next we used sequential biochemical fractionations coupled to direct identification of individual proteins and protein complexes using high resolution mass spectrometry. We determined that the proposed cytoplasmic peripheral inner membrane proteome occupies a previously unsuspected ∼19% of the basic E. coli BL21(DE3) proteome, and the detected peripheral inner membrane proteome occupies ∼25% of the estimated expressed proteome of this cell grown in LB medium to mid-log phase. This value might increase when fleeting interactions, not studied here, are taken into account. Several proteins previously regarded as exclusively cytoplasmic bind membranes avidly. Many of these proteins are organized in functional or/and structural oligomeric complexes that bind to the membrane with multiple interactions. Identified proteins cover the full spectrum of biological activities, and more than half of them are essential. Our data suggest that the cytoplasmic proteome displays remarkably dynamic and extensive communication with

  9. Isolation and mapping of a mutation in Escherichia coli with altered levels of ribonuclease H.

    PubMed Central

    Carl, P L; Bloom, L; Crouch, R J

    1980-01-01

    A mutant of Escherichia coli with altered levels of ribonuclease (RNase) H was isolated after mutagenesis with ethyl methane sulfonate. A procedure for assaying RNase H in partially purified extracts was used to screen approximately 1,500 colonies for variations in RNase H activity. Confirmation of a lower level of RNase H in the mutant was accomplished by analysis of RNase H in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels. By Hfr, F', and P1 transduction mapping, the genetic locus responsible for the lower levels of RNase H was located at 5.1 min on the E. coli chromosome. This mutation (rnh) represents a new locus on the E. coli chromosome. The only phenotypic characteristic of this mutation which has been observed to date is the lower level of RNase H (30% of parental values). Images PMID:6998952

  10. Regulation of alcohol fermentation by Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.P.

    1986-03-01

    The purpose of this project is to elucidate the way in which the fermentative synthesis of ethanol is regulated in the facultative anaerobe Escherichia coli. Focus is on the two final steps in alcohol synthesis, which are catalyzed by alcohol dehydrogenase and acetaldehyde CoA dehydrogenase. We have isolated a series of mutations affecting the expression of these enzymes. Some of these mutations are in the structural genes for these enzymes; others affect the regulation of the adh operon. We have recently cloned the genes coding for these enzymes and are now studying the effect of multiple copies of the adh gene on fermentative growth and its regulation. A recently invented technique, proton suicide has allowed the selection of a variety of novel mutants affecting fermentation which are presently being characterized. We have isolated a comprehensive collection of operon fusions in which the lacZ structural gene is fused to promoters that are inactive aerobically but active anaerobically. Although these genes (like adh) are only expressed under anaerobic conditions, the level of induction varies from two-fold to nearly 100-fold. The nitrogen source, medium pH, nature of the buffer, presence of alternative electron acceptors (e.g., nitrate), and other factors exert a great effect on the expression of many of these genes. In the near future we will investigate control mechanisms common to the adh operon and other anaerobically regulated genes.

  11. Genotoxicity of Graphene in Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Ananya

    Rapid advances in nanotechnology necessitate assessment of the safety of nanomaterials in the resulting products and applications. One key nanomaterial attracting much interest in many areas of science and technology is graphene. Graphene is a one atom thick carbon allotrope arranged in a two-dimensional honeycomb lattice. In addition to being extremely thin, graphene has several extraordinary physical properties such as its exceptional mechanical strength, thermal stability, and high electrical conductivity. Graphene itself is relatively chemically inert and therefore pristine graphene must undergo a process called functionalization, which is combination of chemical and physical treatments that change the properties of graphene, to make it chemically active. Functionalization of graphene is of crucial importance as the end application of graphene depends on proper functionalization. In the field of medicine, graphene is currently a nanomaterial of high interest for building biosensors, DNA transistors, and probes for cancer detection. Despite the promising applications of graphene in several areas of biomedicine, there have been only few studies in recent years that focus on evaluating cytotoxicity of graphene on cells, and almost no studies that investigate how graphene exposure affects cellular genetic material. Therefore, in this study we used a novel approach to evaluate the genotoxicity, i.e., the effects of graphene on DNA, using Escherichia coli as a prokaryotic model organism.

  12. Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Etcheverría, Analía Inés; Padola, Nora Lía

    2013-01-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) cause hemorrhagic colitis (HC) and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) in humans. Outbreaks are linked to bovine food sources. STEC O157:H7 has been responsible for the most severe outbreaks worldwide. However, non-O157 serotypes have emerged as important enteric pathogens in several countries. The main virulence factor of STEC is the production of Shiga toxins 1 and 2. Additional virulence markers are a plasmid-encoded enterohemolysin (ehxA), an autoagglutinating adhesin (Saa), a catalase-peroxidase (katP), an extracellular serine protease (espP), a zinc metalloprotease (stcE), a subtilase cytotoxin (subAB), among others. Other virulence factors are intimin and adhesins that had a roll in the adherence of STEC to bovine colon. This review focuses on the virulence traits of STEC and especially on those related to the adhesion to bovine colon. The known of the interaction between STEC and the bovine host is crucial to develop strategies to control cattle colonization. PMID:23624795

  13. A surprising sweetener from enteropathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Jaclyn S; Hartland, Elizabeth L

    2014-01-01

    Infections with enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) are remarkably devoid of gut inflammation and necrotic damage compared to infections caused by invasive pathogens such as Salmonella and Shigella. Recently, we observed that EPEC blocks cell death using the type III secretion system (T3SS) effector NleB. NleB mediated post-translational modification of death domain containing adaptor proteins by the covalent attachment of N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) to a conserved arginine in the death domain.  N-linked glycosylation of arginine has not previously been reported in mammalian cell biology and the precise biochemistry of this modification is not yet defined. Although the addition of a single GlcNAc to arginine is a seemingly slight alteration, the impact of NleB is considerable as arginine in this location is critical for death domain interactions and death receptor induced apoptosis. Hence, by blocking cell death, NleB promotes enterocyte survival and thereby prolongs EPEC attachment to the gut epithelium. PMID:25536377

  14. A surprising sweetener from enteropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Jaclyn S; Hartland, Elizabeth L

    2014-01-01

    Infections with enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) are remarkably devoid of gut inflammation and necrotic damage compared to infections caused by invasive pathogens such as Salmonella and Shigella. Recently, we observed that EPEC blocks cell death using the type III secretion system (T3SS) effector NleB. NleB mediated post-translational modification of death domain containing adaptor proteins by the covalent attachment of N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) to a conserved arginine in the death domain.  N-linked glycosylation of arginine has not previously been reported in mammalian cell biology and the precise biochemistry of this modification is not yet defined. Although the addition of a single GlcNAc to arginine is a seemingly slight alteration, the impact of NleB is considerable as arginine in this location is critical for death domain interactions and death receptor induced apoptosis. Hence, by blocking cell death, NleB promotes enterocyte survival and thereby prolongs EPEC attachment to the gut epithelium.

  15. Colonization factors of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Madhavan, T P Vipin; Sakellaris, Harry

    2015-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a major cause of life-threatening diarrheal disease around the world. The major aspects of ETEC virulence are colonization of the small intestine and the secretion of enterotoxins which elicit diarrhea. Intestinal colonization is mediated, in part, by adhesins displayed on the bacterial cell surface. As colonization of the intestine is the critical first step in the establishment of an infection, it represents a potential point of intervention for the prevention of infections. Therefore, colonization factors (CFs) have been important subjects of research in the field of ETEC virulence. Research in this field has revealed that ETEC possesses a large array of serologically distinct CFs that differ in composition, structure, and function. Most ETEC CFs are pili (fimbriae) or related fibrous structures, while other adhesins are simple outer membrane proteins lacking any macromolecular structure. This chapter reviews the genetics, structure, function, and regulation of ETEC CFs and how such studies have contributed to our understanding of ETEC virulence and opened up potential opportunities for the development of preventive and therapeutic interventions. PMID:25596032

  16. Biochemistry of homologous recombination in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Kowalczykowski, S C; Dixon, D A; Eggleston, A K; Lauder, S D; Rehrauer, W M

    1994-01-01

    Homologous recombination is a fundamental biological process. Biochemical understanding of this process is most advanced for Escherichia coli. At least 25 gene products are involved in promoting genetic exchange. At present, this includes the RecA, RecBCD (exonuclease V), RecE (exonuclease VIII), RecF, RecG, RecJ, RecN, RecOR, RecQ, RecT, RuvAB, RuvC, SbcCD, and SSB proteins, as well as DNA polymerase I, DNA gyrase, DNA topoisomerase I, DNA ligase, and DNA helicases. The activities displayed by these enzymes include homologous DNA pairing and strand exchange, helicase, branch migration, Holliday junction binding and cleavage, nuclease, ATPase, topoisomerase, DNA binding, ATP binding, polymerase, and ligase, and, collectively, they define biochemical events that are essential for efficient recombination. In addition to these needed proteins, a cis-acting recombination hot spot known as Chi (chi: 5'-GCTGGTGG-3') plays a crucial regulatory function. The biochemical steps that comprise homologous recombination can be formally divided into four parts: (i) processing of DNA molecules into suitable recombination substrates, (ii) homologous pairing of the DNA partners and the exchange of DNA strands, (iii) extension of the nascent DNA heteroduplex; and (iv) resolution of the resulting crossover structure. This review focuses on the biochemical mechanisms underlying these steps, with particular emphases on the activities of the proteins involved and on the integration of these activities into likely biochemical pathways for recombination. Images PMID:7968921

  17. Oligosaccharide Binding in Escherichia coli Glycogen Synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, Fang; Yep, Alejandra; Feng, Lei; Preiss, Jack; Geiger, James H.

    2010-11-17

    Glycogen/starch synthase elongates glucan chains and is the key enzyme in the synthesis of glycogen in bacteria and starch in plants. Cocrystallization of Escherichia coli wild-type glycogen synthase (GS) with substrate ADPGlc and the glucan acceptor mimic HEPPSO produced a closed form of GS and suggests that domain-domain closure accompanies glycogen synthesis. Cocrystallization of the inactive GS mutant E377A with substrate ADPGlc and oligosaccharide results in the first oligosaccharide-bound glycogen synthase structure. Four bound oligosaccharides are observed, one in the interdomain cleft (G6a) and three on the N-terminal domain surface (G6b, G6c, and G6d). Extending from the center of the enzyme to the interdomain cleft opening, G6a mostly interacts with the highly conserved N-terminal domain residues lining the cleft of GS. The surface-bound oligosaccharides G6c and G6d have less interaction with enzyme and exhibit a more curled, helixlike structural arrangement. The observation that oligosaccharides bind only to the N-terminal domain of GS suggests that glycogen in vivo probably binds to only one side of the enzyme to ensure unencumbered interdomain movement, which is required for efficient, continuous glucan-chain synthesis.

  18. Regulation of Glutamine Transport in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Willis, R C; Iwata, K K; Furlong, C E

    1975-01-01

    The formation of the high-affinity (Km equal to 0.2 muM) L-glutamine transport system of Escherichia coli strain 7 (Lin) appears to be subject to the same major control as the glutamine synthetase (EC 6.3.1.2) of this gram-negative organism. Culture of cells under nitrogen-limited conditions provides maximum derepression of both the glutamine synthetase and the glutamine transport system. Nutritional conditions providing a rich supply of ammonium salts or available sources of nitrogen, i.e., conditions which repress the formation of glutamine synthetase, provide three- and 20-fold repression, respectively, of the glutamine transport system. Culture of cells with glutamine supplements of 2 mM does not increase the repression of high-affinity glutamine transport system beyond the level observed in the absence of glutamine. A second kinetically distinct low-affinity component of glutamine. A second kinetically distinct low-affinity component of glutamine uptake is observed in cells cultured with a glutamine-depleted nutrient broth. This second component is associated with the appearance of glutaminase A (EC 3.5.1.2) and asparaginase I (EC 3.5.1.1), a periplasmic enzyme. Parallel changes were observed in the levels of the high-affinity glutamine transport system and the glutamine synthetase when cells were cultured with the carbon sources: glucose, glycerol, or succinate. PMID:238938

  19. Curli expression of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Szabó, E; Skedsmo, A; Sonnevend, A; Al-Dhaheri, K; Emody, L; Usmani, A; Pál, T

    2005-01-01

    One hundred and four enterotoxin producing Escherichia coli strains of wide geographical origin were tested for the expression of curli fimbriae by transmission electronmicroscopy and by ELISA using curli-specific antibodies, as well as for the presence of curli-specific gene sequences by PCR. All isolates, irrespective of the production of the fimbriae, carried sequences specific for the structure (csgA) and for one of the regulator genes (crl) of curli expression, respectively. Curli fimbriae were detected in 56 strains (53.8 %). Thirty-six strains expressed curli only when growing at 30 degrees C, 4 isolates were weakly curliated at 37 degrees C only, while on 16 strains curli was observed at both temperatures. On isolates carrying curli at both temperatures the expression of the fimbria was significantly stronger at 30 degrees C than at 37 degrees C. Curli proficiency significantly, but not completely, correlated with the binding of the Congo Red dye. The expression of curli did not confer epithelial cell invasiveness to ETEC strains but, once expressed at 30 degrees C, it facilitated the adherence of the bacteria to plastic surfaces. Curli present in more than half of the ETEC strains and expressed preferentially at low temperatures could be a factor facilitating the environmental survival of this food- and water-borne pathogen.

  20. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli multilocus sequence types in Guatemala and Mexico.

    PubMed

    Nicklasson, Matilda; Klena, John; Rodas, Claudia; Bourgeois, August Louis; Torres, Olga; Svennerholm, Ann Mari; Sjoling, Asa

    2010-01-01

    The genetic backgrounds of 24 enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains from Mexico and Guatemala expressing heat-stable toxin (ST) and coli surface antigen 6 (CS6) were analyzed. US travelers to these countries and resident children in Guatemala were infected by ETEC strains of sequence type 398, expressing STp and carrying genetically identical CS6 sequences.

  1. Complete Draft Genome Sequence of Escherichia coli JF733

    PubMed Central

    Kleiner, Gabriele R. M.; Wibberg, Daniel; Winkler, Anika; Wertz, John E.; Friehs, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli JF733 is a strain with a long history in research on membrane proteins and processes. However, tracing back the strain development raises some questions concerning the correct genotype of JF733. Here, we present the complete draft genome of E. coli JF733 in order to resolve any remaining uncertainties. PMID:27103723

  2. Nisin stimulates oxygen consumption by Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Carneiro de Melo, A M; Cook, G M; Miles, R J; Poole, R K

    1996-01-01

    Nisin stimulated oxygen consumption by nongrowing, glucose-metabolizing Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli cells, indicating a protonophore mode of action. A similar stimulation in E. coli cells osmotically stressed to disrupt the outer cell membrane confirmed the cytoplasmic membrane as the site of nisin action and showed that nisin uptake was not prevented by the outer membrane. PMID:8633884

  3. Draft Genome Sequence of Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Strain NB8

    PubMed Central

    Mi, Zu-huang; Wang, Chun-xin; Zhu, Jian-ming

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli NB8 is a clinical pyelonephritis isolate. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of uropathogenic E. coli NB8, which contains drug resistance genes encoding resistance to beta-lactams, aminoglycosides, quinolones, macrolides, colistin, sulfonamide-trimethoprim, and tetracycline. NB8 infects the kidney and bladder, making it an important tool for studying E. coli pathogenesis. PMID:27609920

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Strain NB8.

    PubMed

    Weng, Xing-Bei; Mi, Zu-Huang; Wang, Chun-Xin; Zhu, Jian-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli NB8 is a clinical pyelonephritis isolate. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of uropathogenic E. coli NB8, which contains drug resistance genes encoding resistance to beta-lactams, aminoglycosides, quinolones, macrolides, colistin, sulfonamide-trimethoprim, and tetracycline. NB8 infects the kidney and bladder, making it an important tool for studying E. coli pathogenesis. PMID:27609920

  5. Urinary Tract Physiological Conditions Promote Ciprofloxacin Resistance in Low-Level-Quinolone-Resistant Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Martín-Gutiérrez, Guillermo; Rodríguez-Beltrán, Jerónimo; Rodríguez-Martínez, José Manuel; Costas, Coloma; Aznar, Javier; Pascual, Álvaro; Blázquez, Jesús

    2016-07-01

    Escherichia coli isolates carrying chromosomally encoded low-level-quinolone-resistant (LLQR) determinants are frequently found in urinary tract infections (UTIs). LLQR mutations are considered the first step in the evolutionary pathway producing high-level fluoroquinolone resistance. Therefore, their evolution and dissemination might influence the outcome of fluoroquinolone treatments of UTI. Previous studies support the notion that low urine pH decreases susceptibility to ciprofloxacin (CIP) in E. coli However, the effect of the urinary tract physiological parameters on the activity of ciprofloxacin against LLQR E. coli strains has received little attention. We have studied the activity of ciprofloxacin under physiological urinary tract conditions against a set of well-characterized isogenic E. coli derivatives carrying the most prevalent chromosomal mutations (ΔmarR, gyrA-S83L, gyrA-D87N, and parC-S80R and some combinations). The results presented here demonstrate that all the LLQR strains studied became resistant to ciprofloxacin (according to CLSI guidelines) under physiological conditions whereas the control strain lacking LLQR mutations did not. Moreover, the survival of some LLQR E. coli variants increased up to 100-fold after challenge with a high concentration of ciprofloxacin under UTI conditions compared to the results seen with Mueller-Hinton broth. These selective conditions could explain the high prevalence of LLQR mutations in E. coli Furthermore, our data strongly suggest that recommended methods for MIC determination produce poor estimations of CIP activity against LLQR E. coli in UTIs. PMID:27139482

  6. The function of ubiquinone in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Cox, G. B.; Newton, N. A.; Gibson, F.; Snoswell, A. M.; Hamilton, J. A.

    1970-01-01

    1. The function of ubiquinone in Escherichia coli was studied by using whole cells and membrane preparations of normal E. coli and of a mutant lacking ubiquinone. 2. The mutant lacking ubiquinone, strain AN59 (Ubi−), when grown under aerobic conditions, gave an anaerobic type of growth yield and produced large quantities of lactic acid, indicating that ubiquinone plays a vital role in electron transport. 3. NADH and lactate oxidase activities in membranes from strain AN59 (Ubi−) were greatly impaired and activity was restored by the addition of ubiquinone (Q-1). 4. Comparison of the percentage reduction of flavin, cytochrome b1 and cytochrome a2 in the aerobic steady state in membranes from the normal strain (AN62) and strain AN59 (Ubi−) and the effect of respiratory inhibitors on these percentages in membranes from strain AN62 suggest that ubiquinone functions at more than one site in the electron-transport chain. 5. Membranes from strain AN62, in the absence of substrate, showed an electron-spin-resonance signal attributed to ubisemiquinone. The amount of reduced ubiquinone (50%) found after rapid solvent extraction is consistent with the existence of ubiquinone in membranes as a stabilized ubisemiquinone. 6. The effects of piericidin A on membranes from strain AN62 suggest that this inhibitor acts at the ubiquinone sites: thus inhibition of electron transport is reversed by ubiquinone (Q-1); the aerobic steady-state oxidation–reduction levels of flavins and cytochrome b1 in the presence of the inhibitor are raised to values approximating those found in the membranes of strain AN59 (Ubi−); the inhibitor rapidly eliminates the electron-spin-resonance signal attributed to ubisemiquinone and allows slow oxidation of endogenous ubiquinol in the absence of substrate and prevents reduction of ubiquinone in the presence of substrate. It is concluded that piericidin A separates ubiquinone from the remainder of the electron-transport chain. 7. A scheme is

  7. Lysis of Escherichia coli mutants by lactose.

    PubMed

    Alexander, J K

    1979-11-01

    Growth of Escherichia coli strain MM6-13 (ptsI suc lacI sup), which as a suppressor of the succinate-negative phenotype, was inhibited by lactose. Cells growing in yeast extract-tryptone-sodium chloride medium (LB broth) were lysed upon the addition of lactose. In Casamino Acids-salts medium, lactose inhibited growth, but due to the high K+ content no lysis occurred. Lysis required high levels of beta-galctosidase and lactose transport activity. MM6, the parental strain of MM6-13, has lower levels of both of these activities and was resistant to lysis under these conditions. When MM6 was grown in LB broth with exogenous cyclic adenosine monophosphate, however, beta-galactosidase and lactose transport activities were greatly increased, and lysis occurred upon the addition of lactose. Resting cells of both MM6 and MM6-13 were lysed by lactose in buffers containing suitable ions. In the presence of MG2+, lysis was enhanced by 5 mM KCl and 100 mM NaCl. Higher slat concentrations (50 mM KCl or 200 mM NaCl) provided partial protection from lysis. In the absence of Mg2+, lysis occurred without KCl. Lactose-dependent lysis occurred in buffers containing anions such as sulafte, chloride, phosphate, or citrate; however, thiocyanate or acetate protected the cells from lysis. These data indicate that both cations and anions, as well as the levels of lactose transport and beta-galactosidase activity, are important in lysis.

  8. Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Smith, James L; Fratamico, Pina M; Gunther, Nereus W

    2014-01-01

    In the United States, it is estimated that non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) cause more illnesses than STEC O157:H7, and the majority of cases of non-O157 STEC infections are due to serogroups O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, and O145, referred to as the top six non-O157 STEC. The diseases caused by non-O157 STEC are generally milder than those induced by O157 STEC; nonetheless, non-O157 STEC strains have also been associated with serious illnesses such as hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic uremic syndrome, as well as death. Ruminants, particularly cattle, are reservoirs for both O157 and non-O157 STEC, which are transmitted to humans by person-to-person or animal contact and by ingestion of food or water contaminated with animal feces. Improved strategies to control STEC colonization and shedding in cattle and contamination of meat and produce are needed. In general, non-O157 STEC respond to stresses such as acid, heat, and other stresses induced during food preparation similar to O157 STEC. Similar to O157:H7, the top six non-O157 STEC are classified as adulterants in beef by the USDA Food Safety and Inspection Service, and regulatory testing for these pathogens began in June 2012. Due to the genetic and phenotypic variability of non-O157 STEC strains, the development of accurate and reliable methods for detection and isolation of these pathogens has been challenging. Since the non-O157 STEC are responsible for a large portion of STEC-related illnesses, more extensive studies on their physiology, genetics, pathogenicity, and evolution are needed in order to develop more effective control strategies.

  9. Systematic Mutagenesis of the Escherichia coli Genome†

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Yisheng; Durfee, Tim; Glasner, Jeremy D.; Qiu, Yu; Frisch, David; Winterberg, Kelly M.; Blattner, Frederick R.

    2004-01-01

    A high-throughput method has been developed for the systematic mutagenesis of the Escherichia coli genome. The system is based on in vitro transposition of a modified Tn5 element, the Sce-poson, into linear fragments of each open reading frame. The transposon introduces both positive (kanamycin resistance) and negative (I-SceI recognition site) selectable markers for isolation of mutants and subsequent allele replacement, respectively. Reaction products are then introduced into the genome by homologous recombination via the λRed proteins. The method has yielded insertion alleles for 1976 genes during a first pass through the genome including, unexpectedly, a number of known and putative essential genes. Sce-poson insertions can be easily replaced by markerless mutations by using the I-SceI homing endonuclease to select against retention of the transposon as demonstrated by the substitution of amber and/or in-frame deletions in six different genes. This allows a Sce-poson-containing gene to be specifically targeted for either designed or random modifications, as well as permitting the stepwise engineering of strains with multiple mutations. The promiscuous nature of Tn5 transposition also enables a targeted gene to be dissected by using randomly inserted Sce-posons as shown by a lacZ allelic series. Finally, assessment of the insertion sites by an iterative weighted matrix algorithm reveals that these hyperactive Tn5 complexes generally recognize a highly degenerate asymmetric motif on one end of the target site helping to explain the randomness of Tn5 transposition. PMID:15262929

  10. Very slow growth of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Chesbro, W; Evans, T; Eifert, R

    1979-01-01

    A recycling fermentor (a chemostat with 100% biomass feedback) was used to study glucose-limited behavior of Escherichia coli B. The expectation from mass transfer analysis that growth would asymptotically approach a limit mass determined by the glucose provision rate (GPR) and the culture's maintenance requirement was not met. Instead, growth proceeded at progressively lower rates through three distinct phases. After the fermentor was seeded, but before glucose became limiting, growth followed the usual, exponential path (phase 1). About 12 h postseeding, residual glucose in the fermentor fell below 1 microgram . ml-1 and the growth rate (dx/dt) became constant and a linear function of GPR (phase 2). The specific growth rate, mu, therefore fell continuously throughout the phase. Biomass yield and glucose assimilation (13%) were near the level for exponential growth, however, and independent of GPR over a broad range. At a critical specific growth rate (0.04 h-1 for this strain), phase 2 ended abruptly and phase 3 commenced. In phase 3, the growth rate was again constant, although lower than in phase 2, so that mu continued to fall, but growth rates and yields were praboloid functions of GPR. They were never zero, however, at any positive value of GPR. By inference, the fraction of metabolic energy used for maintenance functions is constant for a given GPR, although different for phases 2 and 3, and independent of biomass. In both phases 2 and 3, orcinol, diphenylamine, and Lowry reactive materials were secreted at near-constant rates such that over 50% as much biosynthetic mass was secreted as was retained by the cells. Images PMID:378981

  11. The Melibiose Transporter of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Fuerst, Oliver; Lin, Yibin; Granell, Meritxell; Leblanc, Gérard; Padrós, Esteve; Lórenz-Fonfría, Víctor A.; Cladera, Josep

    2015-01-01

    We examine the role of Lys-377, the only charged residue in helix XI, on the functional mechanism of the Na+-sugar melibiose symporter from Escherichia coli. Intrinsic fluorescence, FRET, and Fourier transform infrared difference spectroscopy reveal that replacement of Lys-377 with either Cys, Val, Arg, or Asp disables both Na+ and melibiose binding. On the other hand, molecular dynamics simulations extending up to 200–330 ns reveal that Lys-377 (helix XI) interacts with the anionic side chains of two of the three putative ligands for cation binding (Asp-55 and Asp-59 in helix II). When Asp-59 is protonated during the simulations, Lys-377 preferentially interacts with Asp-55. Interestingly, when a Na+ ion is positioned in the Asp-55-Asp-59 environment, Asp-124 in helix IV (a residue essential for melibiose binding) reorients and approximates the Asp-55-Asp-59 pair, and all three acidic side chains act as Na+ ligands. Under these conditions, the side chain of Lys-377 interacts with the carboxylic moiety of these three Asp residues. These data highlight the crucial role of the Lys-377 residue in the spatial organization of the Na+ binding site. Finally, the analysis of the second-site revertants of K377C reveals that mutation of Ile-22 (in helix I) preserves Na+ binding, whereas that of melibiose is largely abolished according to spectroscopic measurements. This amino acid is located in the border of the sugar-binding site and might participate in sugar binding through apolar interactions. PMID:25971963

  12. An adhesive protein capsule of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Orskov, I; Birch-Andersen, A; Duguid, J P; Stenderup, J; Orskov, F

    1985-01-01

    The nature of the adhesive capacity of three hemagglutinating Escherichia coli strains that had earlier been described as nonfimbriated was studied. The strains that were isolated from human disease adhered to human buccal and urinary tract epithelial cells, an adhesion that was not inhibited by D-mannose. By crossed immunoelectrophoresis it was shown that the three strains produced a common antigen, Z1, developed after growth at 37 degrees C but not 18 degrees C. One of the strains produced an additional antigen, Z2, of almost the same electrophoretic mobility in crossed immunoelectrophoresis. A mutant of this strain deficient of its polysaccharide K antigen had maintained the adhesive capacity, indicating that the K antigen was not responsible for adhesion. A further mutant of the acapsular mutant produced a strongly reduced amount of the Z antigens and had lost the ability to adhere. The Z1 (and Z2?) antigens were therefore deemed to be responsible for adhesion. In sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of extracts of cells of the three strains, a heavy Coomassie-blue stained line was seen, indicating the presence of a protein subunit of molecular weight slightly above 14,400. By immunoblotting with absorbed antiserum, it was shown that this protein was the same as that detected by crossed immunoelectrophoresis. Protease from Streptomyces griseus, but not trypsin, digested the protein. Heating to 100 degrees C did not affect it. By immunoelectron microscopy of embedded and sectioned bacteria that had first been treated with specific antisera and ferritin-labeled antirabbit immunoglobulin, the protein adhesin-antibody complex was found to surround the bacteria as a heavy capsule. After negative staining with uranylacetate (pH approximately 4), the capsule appeared as a mesh of very fine filaments. The possible role of this capsule in the pathogenesis of disease is discussed. Images PMID:2856913

  13. Anaerobically expressed Escherichia coli genes identified by operon fusion techniques.

    PubMed Central

    Choe, M; Reznikoff, W S

    1991-01-01

    Genes that are expressed under anaerobic conditions were identified by operon fusion techniques with a hybrid bacteriophage of lambda and Mu, lambda placMu53, which creates transcriptional fusions to lacZY. Cells were screened for anaerobic expression on XG medium. Nine strains were selected, and the insertion point of the hybrid phage in each strain was mapped on the Escherichia coli chromosome linkage map. The anaerobic and aerobic expression levels of these genes were measured by beta-galactosidase assays in different medium conditions and in the presence of three regulatory mutations (fnr, narL, and rpoN). The anaerobically expressed genes (aeg) located at minute 99 (aeg-99) and 75 (aeg-75) appeared to be partially regulated by fnr, and aeg-93 is tightly regulated by fnr. aeg-60 requires a functional rpoN gene for its anaerobic expression. aeg-46.5 is repressed by narL. aeg-65A and aeg-65C are partially controlled by fnr but only in media containing nitrate or fumarate. aeg-47.5 and aeg-48.5 were found to be anaerobically induced only in rich media. The effects of a narL mutation on aeg-46.5 expression were observed in all medium conditions regardless of the presence or absence of nitrate. This suggests that narL has a regulatory function in the absence of exogenously added nitrate. PMID:1917846

  14. relA Enhances the Adherence of Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Spira, Beny; Ferreira, Gerson Moura; de Almeida, Luiz Gustavo

    2014-01-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) is a known causative agent of diarrhea in children. In the process of colonization of the small intestine, EPEC synthesizes two types of adhesins, the bundle-forming pilus (BFP) and intimin. The BFP pilus is an adhesin associated with the initial stages of adherence of EPEC to epithelial cells, while the outer membrane protein intimin carries out the intimate adherence that takes place at the third stage of infection. BFP is encoded by the bfp operon located in plasmid EAF, present only in typical EPEC isolates, while eae, the gene that encodes intimin is situated in the LEE, a chromosomal pathogenicity island. Transcription of bfp and eae is regulated by the products of the perABC operon, also present in plasmid EAF. Here we show that deletion of relA, that encodes a guanosine penta and tetraphosphate synthetase impairs EPEC adherence to epithelial cells in vitro. In the absence of relA, the transcription of the regulatory operon perABC is reduced, resulting in lower levels of BFP and intimin. Bacterial adherence, BFP and intimin synthesis and perABC expression are restored upon complementation with the wild-type relA allele. PMID:24643076

  15. Drinking water and diarrhoeal disease due to Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Paul R

    2003-06-01

    Escherichia coli has had a central place in water microbiology for decades as an indicator of faecal pollution. It is only relatively recently that the role of E. coli as pathogen, rather than indicator, in drinking water has begun to be stressed. Interest in the role of E. coli as a cause of diarrhoeal disease has increased because of the emergence of E. coli O157:H7 and other enterohaemorrhagic E. coli, due to the severity of the related disease. There are enterotoxigenic, enteropathogenic, enterohaemorrhagic, enteroinvasive, enteroaggregative and diffusely adherent strains of E. coli. Each type of E. coli causes diarrhoeal disease through different mechanisms and each causes a different clinical presentation. Several of the types cause diarrhoea by the elaboration of one or more toxins, others by some other form of direct damage to epithelial cells. This paper discusses each of these types in turn and also describes their epidemiology, with particular reference to whether they are waterborne or not.

  16. Escherichia coli and the French School of Molecular Biology.

    PubMed

    Ullmann, Agnes

    2010-09-01

    André Lwoff, Jacques Monod, and François Jacob, the leaders of the French school of molecular biology, greatly contributed between 1937 and 1965 to its development and triumph. The main discovery of Lwoff was the elucidation of the mechanism of bacteriophage induction, the phenomenon of lysogeny, that led to the model of genetic regulation uncovered later by Jacob and Monod. Working on bacterial growth, Monod discovered in 1941 the phenomenon of diauxy and uncovered the nature of enzyme induction. By combining genetic and biochemical approaches, Monod brought to light the structure and functions of the Escherichia coli lactose system, comprising the genes necessary for lactose metabolism, i.e., β-galactosidase and lactose permease, a pump responsible for accumulation of galactosides into the cells. An additional genetic factor (the i gene) determines the inducibility and constitutivity of enzyme synthesis. Around the same time, François Jacob and Elie Wollman dissected the main events of bacterial conjugation that enabled them to construct a map of the E. coli chromosome and to demonstrate its circularity. The genetic analysis of the lactose system led Monod and Jacob to elucidate the mechanism of the regulation of gene expression and to propose the operon model: a unit of coordinate transcription. One of the new concepts that emerged from the operon model was messenger RNA. In 1963, Monod developed one of the most elegant concepts of molecular biology, the theory of allostery. In 1965, Lwoff, Monod and Jacob were awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. PMID:26443784

  17. Escherichia coli and the French School of Molecular Biology.

    PubMed

    Ullmann, Agnes

    2010-09-01

    André Lwoff, Jacques Monod, and François Jacob, the leaders of the French school of molecular biology, greatly contributed between 1937 and 1965 to its development and triumph. The main discovery of Lwoff was the elucidation of the mechanism of bacteriophage induction, the phenomenon of lysogeny, that led to the model of genetic regulation uncovered later by Jacob and Monod. Working on bacterial growth, Monod discovered in 1941 the phenomenon of diauxy and uncovered the nature of enzyme induction. By combining genetic and biochemical approaches, Monod brought to light the structure and functions of the Escherichia coli lactose system, comprising the genes necessary for lactose metabolism, i.e., β-galactosidase and lactose permease, a pump responsible for accumulation of galactosides into the cells. An additional genetic factor (the i gene) determines the inducibility and constitutivity of enzyme synthesis. Around the same time, François Jacob and Elie Wollman dissected the main events of bacterial conjugation that enabled them to construct a map of the E. coli chromosome and to demonstrate its circularity. The genetic analysis of the lactose system led Monod and Jacob to elucidate the mechanism of the regulation of gene expression and to propose the operon model: a unit of coordinate transcription. One of the new concepts that emerged from the operon model was messenger RNA. In 1963, Monod developed one of the most elegant concepts of molecular biology, the theory of allostery. In 1965, Lwoff, Monod and Jacob were awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine.

  18. Identification of a glycoprotein produced by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Lindenthal, C; Elsinghorst, E A

    1999-08-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strain H10407 is capable of invading epithelial cell lines derived from the human ileocecum and colon in vitro. Two separate chromosomally encoded invasion loci (tia and tib) have been cloned from this strain. These loci direct nonadherent and noninvasive laboratory strains of E. coli to adhere to and invade cultured human intestinal epithelial cells. The tib locus directs the synthesis of TibA, a 104-kDa outer membrane protein that is directly correlated with the adherence and invasion phenotypes. TibA is synthesized as a 100-kDa precursor (preTibA) that must be modified for biological activity. Outer membranes of recombinant E. coli expressing TibA or preTibA were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and blotted to nitrocellulose. The presence of glycoproteins was detected by oxidization of carbohydrates with periodate and labeling with hydrazide-conjugated digoxigenin. Only TibA could be detected as a glycoprotein. Complementation experiments with tib deletion mutants of ETEC strain H10407 demonstrate that the TibA glycoprotein is expressed in H10407, that the entire tib locus is required for TibA synthesis, and that TibA is the only glycoprotein produced by H10407. Protease treatment of intact H10407 cells removes the carbohydrates on TibA, suggesting that they are surface exposed. TibA shows homology with AIDA-I from diffuse-adhering E. coli and with pertactin precursor from Bordetella pertussis. Both pertactin and AIDA-I are members of the autotransporter family of outer membrane proteins and are afimbrial adhesins that play an important role in the virulence of these organisms. Analysis of the predicted TibA amino acid sequence indicates that TibA is also an autotransporter. Analysis of the tib locus DNA sequence revealed an open reading frame with similarity to RfaQ, a glycosyltransferase. The product of this tib locus open reading frame is proposed to be responsible for Tib

  19. Identification of a Glycoprotein Produced by Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Lindenthal, Christoph; Elsinghorst, Eric A.

    1999-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strain H10407 is capable of invading epithelial cell lines derived from the human ileocecum and colon in vitro. Two separate chromosomally encoded invasion loci (tia and tib) have been cloned from this strain. These loci direct nonadherent and noninvasive laboratory strains of E. coli to adhere to and invade cultured human intestinal epithelial cells. The tib locus directs the synthesis of TibA, a 104-kDa outer membrane protein that is directly correlated with the adherence and invasion phenotypes. TibA is synthesized as a 100-kDa precursor (preTibA) that must be modified for biological activity. Outer membranes of recombinant E. coli expressing TibA or preTibA were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and blotted to nitrocellulose. The presence of glycoproteins was detected by oxidization of carbohydrates with periodate and labeling with hydrazide-conjugated digoxigenin. Only TibA could be detected as a glycoprotein. Complementation experiments with tib deletion mutants of ETEC strain H10407 demonstrate that the TibA glycoprotein is expressed in H10407, that the entire tib locus is required for TibA synthesis, and that TibA is the only glycoprotein produced by H10407. Protease treatment of intact H10407 cells removes the carbohydrates on TibA, suggesting that they are surface exposed. TibA shows homology with AIDA-I from diffuse-adhering E. coli and with pertactin precursor from Bordetella pertussis. Both pertactin and AIDA-I are members of the autotransporter family of outer membrane proteins and are afimbrial adhesins that play an important role in the virulence of these organisms. Analysis of the predicted TibA amino acid sequence indicates that TibA is also an autotransporter. Analysis of the tib locus DNA sequence revealed an open reading frame with similarity to RfaQ, a glycosyltransferase. The product of this tib locus open reading frame is proposed to be responsible for Tib

  20. Rapid Sterilization of Escherichia coli by Solution Plasma Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreeva, Nina; Ishizaki, Takahiro; Baroch, Pavel; Saito, Nagahiro

    2012-12-01

    Solution plasma (SP), which is a discharge in the liquid phase, has the potential for rapid sterilization of water without chemical agents. The discharge showed a strong sterilization performance against Escherichia coli bacteria. The decimal value (D value) of the reduction time for E. coli by this system with an electrode distance of 1.0 mm was estimated to be approximately 1.0 min. Our discharge system in the liquid phase caused no physical damage to the E. coli and only a small increase in the temperature of the aqueous solution. The UV light generated by the discharge was an important factor in the sterilization of E. coli.

  1. Analysis of Genome Plasticity in Pathogenic and Commensal Escherichia coli Isolates by Use of DNA Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Dobrindt, Ulrich; Agerer, Franziska; Michaelis, Kai; Janka, Andreas; Buchrieser, Carmen; Samuelson, Martin; Svanborg, Catharina; Gottschalk, Gerhard; Karch, Helge; Hacker, Jörg

    2003-01-01

    Genomes of prokaryotes differ significantly in size and DNA composition. Escherichia coli is considered a model organism to analyze the processes involved in bacterial genome evolution, as the species comprises numerous pathogenic and commensal variants. Pathogenic and nonpathogenic E. coli strains differ in the presence and absence of additional DNA elements contributing to specific virulence traits and also in the presence and absence of additional genetic information. To analyze the genetic diversity of pathogenic and commensal E. coli isolates, a whole-genome approach was applied. Using DNA arrays, the presence of all translatable open reading frames (ORFs) of nonpathogenic E. coli K-12 strain MG1655 was investigated in 26 E. coli isolates, including various extraintestinal and intestinal pathogenic E. coli isolates, 3 pathogenicity island deletion mutants, and commensal and laboratory strains. Additionally, the presence of virulence-associated genes of E. coli was determined using a DNA “pathoarray” developed in our laboratory. The frequency and distributional pattern of genomic variations vary widely in different E. coli strains. Up to 10% of the E. coli K-12-specific ORFs were not detectable in the genomes of the different strains. DNA sequences described for extraintestinal or intestinal pathogenic E. coli are more frequently detectable in isolates of the same origin than in other pathotypes. Several genes coding for virulence or fitness factors are also present in commensal E. coli isolates. Based on these results, the conserved E. coli core genome is estimated to consist of at least 3,100 translatable ORFs. The absence of K-12-specific ORFs was detectable in all chromosomal regions. These data demonstrate the great genome heterogeneity and genetic diversity among E. coli strains and underline the fact that both the acquisition and deletion of DNA elements are important processes involved in the evolution of prokaryotes. PMID:12618447

  2. The Biology of the Escherichia coli Extracellular Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Hufnagel, David A.; DePas, William H.; Chapman, Matthew R.

    2015-01-01

    Chapter Summary Escherichia coli (E. coli) is one of the world’s best-characterized organisms, as it has been extensively studied for over a century. However, most of this work has focused on E. coli grown under laboratory conditions that do not faithfully simulate its natural environments. Therefore, the historical perspectives on E. coli physiology and life cycle are somewhat skewed toward experimental systems that feature E. coli growing logarithmically in a test tube. Typically a commensal bacterium, E. coli resides in the lower intestines of a slew of animals. Outside of the lower intestine, E. coli can adapt and survive in a very different set of environmental conditions. Biofilm formation allows E. coli to survive, and even thrive, in environments that do not support the growth of planktonic populations. E. coli can form biofilms virtually everywhere; in the bladder during a urinary tract infection, on in-dwelling medical devices, and outside of the host on plants and in the soil. The E. coli extracellular matrix, primarily composed of the protein polymer named curli and the polysaccharide cellulose, promotes adherence to organic and inorganic surfaces, and resistance to desiccation, the host immune system and other antimicrobials. The pathways that govern E. coli biofilm formation, cellulose production, and curli biogenesis will be discussed in this book chapter, which concludes with insights into the future of E. coli biofilm research and potential therapies. PMID:26185090

  3. Binding studies of antimicrobial peptides to Escherichia coli cells.

    PubMed

    Avitabile, Concetta; D'Andrea, Luca D; Saviano, Michele; Olivieri, Michele; Cimmino, Amelia; Romanelli, Alessandra

    2016-09-01

    Understanding the mechanism of action of antimicrobial peptides is pivotal to the design of new and more active peptides. In the last few years it has become clear that the behavior of antimicrobial peptides on membrane model systems does not always translate to cells; therefore the need to develop methods aimed at capturing details of the interactions of peptides with bacterial cells is compelling. In this work we analyzed binding of two peptides, namely temporin B and TB_KKG6A, to Escherichia coli cells and to Escherichia coli LPS. Temporin B is a natural peptide active against Gram positive bacteria but inactive against Gram negative bacteria, TB_KKG6A is an analogue of temporin B showing activity against both Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria. We found that binding to cells occurs only for the active peptide TB_KKG6A; stoichiometry and affinity constant of this peptide toward Escherichia coli cells were determined.

  4. Binding studies of antimicrobial peptides to Escherichia coli cells.

    PubMed

    Avitabile, Concetta; D'Andrea, Luca D; Saviano, Michele; Olivieri, Michele; Cimmino, Amelia; Romanelli, Alessandra

    2016-09-01

    Understanding the mechanism of action of antimicrobial peptides is pivotal to the design of new and more active peptides. In the last few years it has become clear that the behavior of antimicrobial peptides on membrane model systems does not always translate to cells; therefore the need to develop methods aimed at capturing details of the interactions of peptides with bacterial cells is compelling. In this work we analyzed binding of two peptides, namely temporin B and TB_KKG6A, to Escherichia coli cells and to Escherichia coli LPS. Temporin B is a natural peptide active against Gram positive bacteria but inactive against Gram negative bacteria, TB_KKG6A is an analogue of temporin B showing activity against both Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria. We found that binding to cells occurs only for the active peptide TB_KKG6A; stoichiometry and affinity constant of this peptide toward Escherichia coli cells were determined. PMID:27450805

  5. Infection by verocytotoxin-producing Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Karmali, M A

    1989-01-01

    Verocytotoxin (VT)-producing Escherichia coli (VTEC) are a newly recognized group of enteric pathogens which are increasingly being recognized as common causes of diarrhea in some geographic settings. Outbreak studies indicate that most patients with VTEC infection develop mild uncomplicated diarrhea. However, a significant risk of two serious and potentially life-threatening complications, hemorrhagic colitis and the hemolytic uremic syndrome, makes VTEC infection a public health problem of serious concern. The main reservoirs of VTEC appear to be the intestinal tracts of animals, and foods of animal (especially bovine) origin are probably the principal sources for human infection. The term VT refers to a family of subunit exotoxins with high biological activity. Individual VTEC strains elaborate one or both of at least two serologically distinct, bacteriophage-mediated VTs (VT1 and VT2) which are closely related to Shiga toxin and are thus also referred to as Shiga-like toxins. The holotoxins bind to cells, via their B subunits, to a specific receptor which is probably the glycolipid, globotriosyl ceramide (Gb3). Binding is followed by internalization of the A subunit, which, after it is proteolytically nicked and reduced to the A1 fragment, inhibits protein synthesis in mammalian cells by inactivating 60S ribosomal subunits through selective structural modification of 28S ribosomal ribonucleic acid. The mechanism of VTEC diarrhea is still controversial, and the relative roles of locally acting VT and "attaching and effacing adherence" of VTEC to the mucosa have yet to be resolved. There is increasing evidence that hemolytic uremic syndrome and possibly hemorrhagic colitis result from the systemic action of VT on vascular endothelial cells. The role of antitoxic immunity in preventing the systemic complications of VTEC infection is being explored. Antibiotics appear to be contraindicated in the treatment of VTEC infection. The most common VTEC serotype associated

  6. Dimensions of Escherichia coli at various growth rates: model for envelope growth.

    PubMed Central

    Pierucci, O

    1978-01-01

    The duplication of Escherichia coli B/r is described based on two independent sequences, the replication of the genome and the growth of the envelope. It is proposed that (i) new envelope growth zones are activated coincident with the initiation of new rounds of chromosome replication; (ii) each zone is active in envelope synthesis from the time of its inauguration to the division which follows the completion of the round of chromosome replication (that is, for C + D min); and (iii) the rate of envelope synthesis at each site is constant, independent of the growth rate. Measurements of the surface areas of two E. coli B/r substrains growing at a variety of rates and during nutritional transitions are consistent with the predictions of the model. PMID:355233

  7. Plasmid Diversity and Adaptation Analyzed by Massive Sequencing of Escherichia coli Plasmids.

    PubMed

    de Toro, María; Garcilláon-Barcia, M Pilar; De La Cruz, Fernando

    2014-12-01

    Whole-genome sequencing is revolutionizing the analysis of bacterial genomes. It leads to a massive increase in the amount of available data to be analyzed. Bacterial genomes are usually composed of one main chromosome and a number of accessory chromosomes, called plasmids. A recently developed methodology called PLACNET (for plasmid constellation networks) allows the reconstruction of the plasmids of a given genome. Thus, it opens an avenue for plasmidome analysis on a global scale. This work reviews our knowledge of the genetic determinants for plasmid propagation (conjugation and related functions), their diversity, and their prevalence in the variety of plasmids found by whole-genome sequencing. It focuses on the results obtained from a collection of 255 Escherichia coli plasmids reconstructed by PLACNET. The plasmids found in E. coli represent a nonaleatory subset of the plasmids found in proteobacteria. Potential reasons for the prevalence of some specific plasmid groups will be discussed and, more importantly, additional questions will be posed.

  8. Recurrent Hemolytic and Uremic Syndrome Induced by Escherichia Coli

    PubMed Central

    Commereuc, Morgane; Weill, Francois-Xavier; Loukiadis, Estelle; Gouali, Malika; Gleizal, Audrey; Kormann, Raphaël; Ridel, Christophe; Frémeaux-Bacchi, Véronique; Rondeau, Eric; Hertig, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A widespread belief is that typical hemolytic and uremic syndrome (HUS) does not recur. We report the case of a patient infected twice with raw milk taken from his own cow and containing a Shiga toxin–producing Escherichia coli O174:H21 that induced recurrent HUS causing severe renal and cerebral disorders. A genomic comparison of the human and bovine Shiga toxin–producing Escherichia coli O174:H21 isolates revealed that they were identical. Typical HUS may recur. Since milk from this animal was occasionally distributed locally, thereby posing a serious threat for the whole village, this particular cow was destroyed. PMID:26735524

  9. Recent advances in adherence and invasion of pathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Kalita, Anjana; Hu, Jia; Torres, Alfredo G.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Colonization of the host epithelia by pathogenic Escherichia coli is influenced by the ability of the bacteria to interact with host surfaces. Because the initial step of an E. coli infection is to adhere, invade, and persist within host cells, some strategies used by intestinal and extra-intestinal E. coli to infect host cell are presented. Recent findings This review highlights recent progress understanding how extra-intestinal pathogenic E. coli strains express specific adhesins/invasins that allow colonization of the urinary tract or the meninges, while intestinal E. coli strains are able to colonize different regions of the intestinal tract using other specialized adhesins/invasins. Finally, evaluation of, different diets and environmental conditions regulating the colonization of these pathogens is discussed. Summary Discovery of new interactions between pathogenic E. coli and the host epithelial cells unravels the need of more mechanistic studies that can provide new clues in how to combat these infections. PMID:25023740

  10. The Biology of the Escherichia coli Extracellular Matrix.

    PubMed

    Hufnagel, David A; Depas, William H; Chapman, Matthew R

    2015-06-01

    Escherichia coli is one of the world's best-characterized organisms, because it has been extensively studied for over a century. However, most of this work has focused on E. coli grown under laboratory conditions that do not faithfully simulate its natural environments. Therefore, the historical perspectives on E. coli physiology and life cycle are somewhat skewed toward experimental systems that feature E. coli growing logarithmically in a test tube. Typically a commensal bacterium, E. coli resides in the lower intestines of a slew of animals. Outside of the lower intestine, E. coli can adapt and survive in a very different set of environmental conditions. Biofilm formation allows E. coli to survive, and even thrive, in environments that do not support the growth of planktonic populations. E. coli can form biofilms virtually everywhere: in the bladder during a urinary tract infection, on in-dwelling medical devices, and outside of the host on plants and in the soil. The E. coli extracellular matrix (ECM), primarily composed of the protein polymer named curli and the polysaccharide cellulose, promotes adherence to organic and inorganic surfaces and resistance to desiccation, the host immune system, and other antimicrobials. The pathways that govern E. coli biofilm formation, cellulose production, and curli biogenesis will be discussed in this article, which concludes with insights into the future of E. coli biofilm research and potential therapies. PMID:26185090

  11. Genes and proteins of Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Riley, M

    1998-01-01

    GenProtEC is a database of Escherichia coli genes and their gene products, classified by type of function and physiological role and with citations to the literature for each. Also present are data on sequence similarities among E.coli proteins, representing groups of paralogous genes, with PAM values, percent identity of amino acids, length of alignment and percent aligned. GenProtEC can be accessed at the URL http://www.mbl.edu/html/ecoli.html PMID:9399799

  12. Engineering of a plasmid-free Escherichia coli strain for improved in vivo biosynthesis of astaxanthin

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The xanthophyll astaxanthin is a high-value compound with applications in the nutraceutical, cosmetic, food, and animal feed industries. Besides chemical synthesis and extraction from naturally producing organisms like Haematococcus pluvialis, heterologous biosynthesis in non-carotenogenic microorganisms like Escherichia coli, is a promising alternative for sustainable production of natural astaxanthin. Recent achievements in the metabolic engineering of E. coli strains have led to a significant increase in the productivity of carotenoids like lycopene or β-carotene by increasing the metabolic flux towards the isoprenoid precursors. For the heterologous biosynthesis of astaxanthin in E. coli, however, the conversion of β-carotene to astaxanthin is obviously the most critical step towards an efficient biosynthesis of astaxanthin. Results Here we report the construction of the first plasmid-free E. coli strain that produces astaxanthin as the sole carotenoid compound with a yield of 1.4 mg/g cdw (E. coli BW-ASTA). This engineered E. coli strain harbors xanthophyll biosynthetic genes from Pantoea ananatis and Nostoc punctiforme as individual expression cassettes on the chromosome and is based on a β-carotene-producing strain (E. coli BW-CARO) recently developed in our lab. E. coli BW-CARO has an enhanced biosynthesis of the isoprenoid precursor isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) and produces β-carotene in a concentration of 6.2 mg/g cdw. The expression of crtEBIY along with the β-carotene-ketolase gene crtW148 (NpF4798) and the β-carotene-hydroxylase gene (crtZ) under controlled expression conditions in E. coli BW-ASTA directed the pathway exclusively towards the desired product astaxanthin (1.4 mg/g cdw). Conclusions By using the λ-Red recombineering technique, genes encoding for the astaxanthin biosynthesis pathway were stably integrated into the chromosome of E. coli. The expression levels of chromosomal integrated recombinant biosynthetic genes were

  13. Replication forks of Escherichia coli are not the preferred sites for lysogenic integration of bacteriophage Mu.

    PubMed Central

    Sivan, S; Zaritsky, A; Kagan-Zur, V

    1988-01-01

    The question of whether bacteriophage Mu prefers replication forks for lysogenic integration into Escherichia coli chromosomes was tested by using two different systems. In the first, inactivation of genes was scored in synchronized cultures infected by Mu at various times. No increase in the mutation frequency of a gene was found after infection at the time of its replication. In the second, the composition of colonies formed by bacteria lysogenized by Mu was determined; the newly formed lysogens should give rise to mixed colonies (containing lysogenized as well as nonlysogenized bacteria), uniform colonies, or both, depending on the mode of integration. Both types of colonies were found, and the fraction of uniform colonies was proportional to the relative length of the unreplicated segment of an average chromosome in the culture. The results in both systems clearly preclude the possibility that a lysogenizing Mu integrates with high preference at the chromosome replication forks. PMID:2968339

  14. Genes on a Wire: The Nucleoid-Associated Protein HU Insulates Transcription Units in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Berger, Michael; Gerganova, Veneta; Berger, Petya; Rapiteanu, Radu; Lisicovas, Viktoras; Dobrindt, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    The extent to which chromosomal gene position in prokaryotes affects local gene expression remains an open question. Several studies have shown that chromosomal re-positioning of bacterial transcription units does not alter their expression pattern, except for a general decrease in gene expression levels from chromosomal origin to terminus proximal positions, which is believed to result from gene dosage effects. Surprisingly, the question as to whether this chromosomal context independence is a cis encoded property of a bacterial transcription unit, or if position independence is a property conferred by factors acting in trans, has not been addressed so far. For this purpose, we established a genetic test system assessing the chromosomal positioning effects by means of identical promoter-fluorescent reporter gene fusions inserted equidistantly from OriC into both chromosomal replichores of Escherichia coli K-12. Our investigations of the reporter activities in mutant cells lacking the conserved nucleoid associated protein HU uncovered various drastic chromosomal positional effects on gene transcription. In addition we present evidence that these positional effects are caused by transcriptional activity nearby the insertion site of our reporter modules. We therefore suggest that the nucleoid-associated protein HU is functionally insulating transcription units, most likely by constraining transcription induced DNA supercoiling. PMID:27545593

  15. Genes on a Wire: The Nucleoid-Associated Protein HU Insulates Transcription Units in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Michael; Gerganova, Veneta; Berger, Petya; Rapiteanu, Radu; Lisicovas, Viktoras; Dobrindt, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    The extent to which chromosomal gene position in prokaryotes affects local gene expression remains an open question. Several studies have shown that chromosomal re-positioning of bacterial transcription units does not alter their expression pattern, except for a general decrease in gene expression levels from chromosomal origin to terminus proximal positions, which is believed to result from gene dosage effects. Surprisingly, the question as to whether this chromosomal context independence is a cis encoded property of a bacterial transcription unit, or if position independence is a property conferred by factors acting in trans, has not been addressed so far. For this purpose, we established a genetic test system assessing the chromosomal positioning effects by means of identical promoter-fluorescent reporter gene fusions inserted equidistantly from OriC into both chromosomal replichores of Escherichia coli K-12. Our investigations of the reporter activities in mutant cells lacking the conserved nucleoid associated protein HU uncovered various drastic chromosomal positional effects on gene transcription. In addition we present evidence that these positional effects are caused by transcriptional activity nearby the insertion site of our reporter modules. We therefore suggest that the nucleoid-associated protein HU is functionally insulating transcription units, most likely by constraining transcription induced DNA supercoiling. PMID:27545593

  16. Strain engineering to prevent norleucine incorporation during recombinant protein production in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Veeravalli, Karthik; Laird, Michael W; Fedesco, Mark; Zhang, Yu; Yu, X Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Incorporation of norleucine in place of methionine residues during recombinant protein production in Escherichia coli is well known. Continuous feeding of methionine is commonly used in E. coli recombinant protein production processes to prevent norleucine incorporation. Although this strategy is effective in preventing norleucine incorporation, there are several disadvantages associated with continuous feeding. Continuous feeding increases the operational complexity and the overall cost of the fermentation process. In addition, the continuous feed leads to undesirable dilution of the fermentation medium possibly resulting in lower cell densities and recombinant protein yields. In this work, the genomes of three E. coli hosts were engineered by introducing chromosomal mutations that result in methionine overproduction in the cell. The recombinant protein purified from the fermentations using the methionine overproducing hosts had no norleucine incorporation. Furthermore, these studies demonstrated that the fermentations using one of the methionine overproducing hosts exhibited comparable fermentation performance as the control host in three different recombinant protein production processes. PMID:25315437

  17. A mutant of Escherichia coli defective in penicillin-binding protein 5 and lacking D-alanine carboxypeptidase IA.

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Y; Suzuki, H; Hirota, Y; Park, J T

    1980-01-01

    A mutant of Escherichia coli defective in penicillin-binding protein 5 activity was isolated. The mutation (pfv) was shown to be located at 14.0 min on the E. coli chromosome map. Loss of penicillin-binding protein 5 in the pfv mutant was associated with the loss of D-alanine carboxypeptidase IA activity and increased sensitivity to beta-lactam antibiotics. We conclude that penicillin-binding protein 5 catalyzes the major D-alanine carboxypeptidase IA activity and that the enzyme activity, in vivo, protects E. coli cells from killing by low inhibitory concentrations of beta-lactam antibiotics. PMID:6995448

  18. YeeO from Escherichia coli exports flavins

    PubMed Central

    McAnulty, Michael J; Wood, Thomas K

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) proteins help maintain cellular homeostasis by secreting metabolic wastes. Flavins may occur as cellular waste products, with their production and secretion providing potential benefit for industrial applications related to biofuel cells. Here we find that MATE protein YeeO from Escherichia coli exports both flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD). Significant amounts of flavins were trapped intracellularly when YeeO was produced indicating transport limits secretion of flavins. Wild-type E. coli secreted 3 flavins (riboflavin, FMN, and FAD), so E. coli likely produces additional flavin transporters. PMID:25482085

  19. YeeO from Escherichia coli exports flavins.

    PubMed

    McAnulty, Michael J; Wood, Thomas K

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) proteins help maintain cellular homeostasis by secreting metabolic wastes. Flavins may occur as cellular waste products, with their production and secretion providing potential benefit for industrial applications related to biofuel cells. Here we find that MATE protein YeeO from Escherichia coli exports both flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD). Significant amounts of flavins were trapped intracellularly when YeeO was produced indicating transport limits secretion of flavins. Wild-type E. coli secreted 3 flavins (riboflavin, FMN, and FAD), so E. coli likely produces additional flavin transporters. PMID:25482085

  20. Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli Serotypes and Endemic Diarrhea in Infants

    PubMed Central

    Toledo, M. Regina F.; Alvariza, M. do Carmo B.; Murahovschi, Jayme; Ramos, Sonia R. T. S.; Trabulsi, Luiz R.

    1983-01-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli serotypes were searched for in feces of 550 children with endemic diarrhea and in 129 controls, in São Paulo, in 1978 and 1979; serotypes O111ab:H−, O111ab:H2, and O119:H6 were significantly associated with diarrhea in children 0 to 5 months old and were the most frequent agents of diarrhea in this age group as compared with enterotoxigenic and enteroinvasive E. coli, Salmonella sp., Shigella sp., and Yersinia enterocolitica. It is concluded that various enteropathogenic E. coli serotypes may be agents of endemic infantile diarrhea. PMID:6339384

  1. Molecular characterization of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli from Libya.

    PubMed

    Ali, Mostafa Mohamed M; Mohamed, Zienat Kamel; Klena, John D; Ahmed, Salwa Fouad; Moussa, Tarek A A; Ghenghesh, Khalifa Sifaw

    2012-05-01

    Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli (DEC) are important enteric pathogens that cause a wide variety of gastrointestinal diseases, particularly in children. Escherichia coli isolates cultured from 243 diarrheal stool samples obtained from Libyan children and 50 water samples were screened by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for genes characteristic of enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC), enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC), enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC), and enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC). The DEC were detected in 21 (8.6%) children with diarrhea; 10 (4.1%) cases were identified as EAEC, 3 (1.2%) as EPEC, and 8 (3.3%) were ETEC; EHEC, and EIEC were not detected. All DEC were grouped phylogenetically by PCR with the majority (> 70%) identified as phylogenetic groups A and B1. The EAEC isolates were also tested for eight genes associated with virulence using PCR. Multi-virulence (≥ 3 virulence factors) was found in 50% of EAEC isolates. Isolated EAEC possessed different virulence traits and belonged to different phylogenetic groups indicating their heterogeneity.

  2. Plasmolysis of Escherichia coli B-r with sucrose.

    PubMed

    Scheie, P O

    1969-05-01

    Escherichia coli B/r cells were plasmolyzed in sucrose solutions and observed under phase contrast. The prevalence of plasmolysis under various conditions was noted, and the degree of plasmolysis was categorized as slight, extensive, or severe. The presence of ions reduced the prevalence of plasmolysis. Survival curves showed that extensive plasmolysis was not lethal to colony-forming ability.

  3. TRIMETHOPRIM-SULFAMETHOXAZOLE RESISTANCE IN SEWAGE ISOLATES OF ESCHERICHIA COLI

    EPA Science Inventory

    The increase in resistance rates to trimehtoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP/SMX) in isolates of Escherichia coli has become a matter of increasing concern. This has been particularly true in reference to community acquired urinary tract infections (UTI). This study utilized sewage i...

  4. Enteroinvasive Escherichia coli severe dysentery complicated by rotavirus gastroenteritis.

    PubMed

    Pacheco-Gil, Leova; Ochoa, Theresa J; Flores-Romo, Leopoldo; DuPont, Herbert L; Estrada-Garcia, Teresa

    2006-11-01

    Enteroinvasive Escherichia coli (EIEC) is an important agent of pediatric diarrhea and dysentery in developing countries. We report a life-threatening severe dysentery case due to EIEC in a malnourished 4-month-old male, native Indian infant co-infected with rotavirus. The severe gastrointestinal bleeding anemia and hypovolemic shock was successfully treated with IV blood transfusions, rehydration and antibiotic therapy.

  5. Genotypic Characterization of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Strains Causing Traveler's Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Fulton P.; Medina, Anicia M.; Aldasoro, Edelweiss; Sangil, Anna; Gascon, Joaquim; Ochoa, Theresa J.; Vila, Jordi

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to characterize the presence of virulence factors of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) causing traveler's diarrhea. Among 52 ETEC isolates, the most common toxin type was STh, and the most frequent colonization factors (CFs) were CS21, CS6, and CS3. On the other hand, the nonclassical virulence factors EAST1 and EatA were frequently present. PMID:23224092

  6. armA and aminoglycoside resistance in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    González-Zorn, Bruno; Teshager, Tirushet; Casas, María; Porrero, María C; Moreno, Miguel A; Courvalin, Patrice; Domínguez, Lucas

    2005-06-01

    We report armA in an Escherichia coli pig isolate from Spain. The resistance gene was borne by self-transferable IncN plasmid pMUR050. Molecular analysis of the plasmid and of the armA locus confirmed the spread of this resistance determinant.

  7. armA and Aminoglycoside Resistance in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    González-Zorn, Bruno; Teshager, Tirushet; Casas, María; Porrero, María C.; Courvalin, Patrice; Domínguez, Lucas

    2005-01-01

    We report armA in an Escherichia coli pig isolate from Spain. The resistance gene was borne by self-transferable IncN plasmid pMUR050. Molecular analysis of the plasmid and of the armA locus confirmed the spread of this resistance determinant. PMID:15963296

  8. Escherichia coli and other Enterobacteriaceae: Food poisoning and health effects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The family Enterobactericeae consists of rod-shaped, Gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, non-spore forming bacteria and also includes the food-borne pathogens, Cronobacter spp., Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica, Shigella spp., and Yersinia spp. Illness caused by these pathogens is acquired...

  9. Multidrug-Resistant Escherichia coli in Bovine Animals, Europe

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, Evan; Martins, Marta; McCusker, Matthew P.; Wang, Juan; Alves, Bruno Martins; Hurley, Daniel; El Garch, Farid; Woehrlé, Frédérique; Miossec, Christine; McGrath, Leisha; Srikumar, Shabarinath; Wall, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Of 150 Escherichia coli strains we cultured from specimens taken from cattle in Europe, 3 had elevated MICs against colistin. We assessed all 3 strains for the presence of the plasmid-mediated mcr-1 gene and identified 1 isolate as mcr-1–positive and co-resistant to β-lactam, florfenicol, and fluoroquinolone antimicrobial compounds. PMID:27533105

  10. 21 CFR 866.3255 - Escherichia coli serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Escherichia coli serological reagents. 866.3255 Section 866.3255 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3255...

  11. 21 CFR 866.3255 - Escherichia coli serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Escherichia coli serological reagents. 866.3255 Section 866.3255 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3255...

  12. 21 CFR 866.3255 - Escherichia coli serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Escherichia coli serological reagents. 866.3255 Section 866.3255 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3255...

  13. 21 CFR 866.3255 - Escherichia coli serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Escherichia coli serological reagents. 866.3255 Section 866.3255 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3255...

  14. 21 CFR 866.3255 - Escherichia coli serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Escherichia coli serological reagents. 866.3255 Section 866.3255 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3255...

  15. Multidrug-Resistant Escherichia coli in Bovine Animals, Europe.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Evan; Martins, Marta; McCusker, Matthew P; Wang, Juan; Alves, Bruno Martins; Hurley, Daniel; El Garch, Farid; Woehrlé, Frédérique; Miossec, Christine; McGrath, Leisha; Srikumar, Shabarinath; Wall, Patrick; Fanning, Séamus

    2016-09-01

    Of 150 Escherichia coli strains we cultured from specimens taken from cattle in Europe, 3 had elevated MICs against colistin. We assessed all 3 strains for the presence of the plasmid-mediated mcr-1 gene and identified 1 isolate as mcr-1-positive and co-resistant to β-lactam, florfenicol, and fluoroquinolone antimicrobial compounds. PMID:27533105

  16. Inactivation of Escherichia coli by titanium dioxide photocatalytic oxidation.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Titanium dioxide in the anatase crystalline form was used as a photocatalyst to generate hydroxyl radicals in a flowthrough water reactor. Experiments were performed on pure cultures of Escherichia coli in dechlorinated tap water and a surface water sample to evaluate the disinfe...

  17. Cell surface growth in Escherichia coli: distribution of matrix protein.

    PubMed Central

    Begg, K J

    1978-01-01

    Autoradiography of cell envelope "ghosts" from Escherichia coli was used to demonstrate that newly synthesized molecules of "matrix" protein are inserted at random locations over the entire surface of the outer membrane and that, once inserted, these molecules are not thereafter conserved in any fixed spatial location. Images PMID:355219

  18. Genome Sequence of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Strain B2C.

    PubMed

    Madhavan, T P Vipin; Steen, Jason A; Hugenholtz, Philip; Sakellaris, Harry

    2014-04-10

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a major cause of diarrheal disease around the globe, causing an estimated 380,000 deaths annually. The disease is caused by a wide variety of strains. Here, we report the genome sequence of ETEC strain B2C, which was isolated from an American soldier in Vietnam.

  19. Escherichia coli as other Enterobacteriaceae: food poisoning and health effects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many Escherichia coli strains are harmless, and they are an important commensal in the intestinal microflora; however, pathogenic strains also exist. The pathogenic strains can be divided into diarrhea-inducing strains and strains that reside in the intestines but only cause disease in bodily sites...

  20. Escherichia coli Minicell Membranes Are Enriched in Cardiolipin

    PubMed Central

    Koppelman, Cecile-Marie; Den Blaauwen, Tanneke; Duursma, Marc C.; Heeren, Ron M. A.; Nanninga, Nanne

    2001-01-01

    The phospholipid composition of Escherichia coli minicells has been studied as a model for the cell division site. Minicells appeared to be enriched in cardiolipin at the expense of phosphatidylglycerol. Mass spectrometry showed no differences between the gross acyl chain compositions of minicells and wild-type cells. PMID:11567016

  1. Phylogenetic Group Determination of Escherichia coli Isolated from Animals Samples.

    PubMed

    Coura, Fernanda Morcatti; Diniz, Soraia de Araújo; Silva, Marcos Xavier; Mussi, Jamili Maria Suhet; Barbosa, Silvia Minharro; Lage, Andrey Pereira; Heinemann, Marcos Bryan

    2015-01-01

    This study analyzes the occurrence and distribution of phylogenetic groups of 391 strains of Escherichia coli isolated from poultry, cattle, and water buffalo. The frequency of the phylogroups was A = 19%, B1 = 57%, B2 = 2.3%, C = 4.6%, D = 2.8%, E = 11%, and F = 3.3%. Phylogroups A (P < 0.001) and F (P = 0.018) were associated with E. coli strains isolated from poultry, phylogroups B1 (P < 0.001) and E (P = 0.002) were associated with E. coli isolated from cattle, and phylogroups B2 (P = 0.003) and D (P = 0.017) were associated with E. coli isolated from water buffalo. This report demonstrated that some phylogroups are associated with the host analyzed and the results provide knowledge of the phylogenetic composition of E. coli from domestic animals. PMID:26421310

  2. Phylogenetic Group Determination of Escherichia coli Isolated from Animals Samples

    PubMed Central

    Morcatti Coura, Fernanda; Diniz, Soraia de Araújo; Silva, Marcos Xavier; Mussi, Jamili Maria Suhet; Barbosa, Silvia Minharro; Lage, Andrey Pereira; Heinemann, Marcos Bryan

    2015-01-01

    This study analyzes the occurrence and distribution of phylogenetic groups of 391 strains of Escherichia coli isolated from poultry, cattle, and water buffalo. The frequency of the phylogroups was A = 19%, B1 = 57%, B2 = 2.3%, C = 4.6%, D = 2.8%, E = 11%, and F = 3.3%. Phylogroups A (P < 0.001) and F (P = 0.018) were associated with E. coli strains isolated from poultry, phylogroups B1 (P < 0.001) and E (P = 0.002) were associated with E. coli isolated from cattle, and phylogroups B2 (P = 0.003) and D (P = 0.017) were associated with E. coli isolated from water buffalo. This report demonstrated that some phylogroups are associated with the host analyzed and the results provide knowledge of the phylogenetic composition of E. coli from domestic animals. PMID:26421310

  3. EcoCyc: Encyclopedia of Escherichia coli genes and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Karp, P D; Riley, M; Paley, S M; Pellegrini-Toole, A; Krummenacker, M

    1998-01-01

    The encyclopedia of Escherichia coli genes and metabolism (EcoCyc) is a database that combines information about the genome and the intermediary metabolism of E.coli. The database describes 3030 genes of E.coli , 695 enzymes encoded by a subset of these genes, 595 metabolic reactions that occur in E.coli, and the organization of these reactions into 123 metabolic pathways. The EcoCyc graphical user interface allows scientists to query and explore the EcoCyc database using visualization tools such as genomic-map browsers and automatic layouts of metabolic pathways. EcoCyc can be thought of as an electronic review article because of its copious references to the primary literature, and as a (qualitative) computational model of E.coli metabolism. EcoCyc is available at URL http://ecocyc.PangeaSystems.com/ecocyc/

  4. Phylogenetic Group Determination of Escherichia coli Isolated from Animals Samples.

    PubMed

    Coura, Fernanda Morcatti; Diniz, Soraia de Araújo; Silva, Marcos Xavier; Mussi, Jamili Maria Suhet; Barbosa, Silvia Minharro; Lage, Andrey Pereira; Heinemann, Marcos Bryan

    2015-01-01

    This study analyzes the occurrence and distribution of phylogenetic groups of 391 strains of Escherichia coli isolated from poultry, cattle, and water buffalo. The frequency of the phylogroups was A = 19%, B1 = 57%, B2 = 2.3%, C = 4.6%, D = 2.8%, E = 11%, and F = 3.3%. Phylogroups A (P < 0.001) and F (P = 0.018) were associated with E. coli strains isolated from poultry, phylogroups B1 (P < 0.001) and E (P = 0.002) were associated with E. coli isolated from cattle, and phylogroups B2 (P = 0.003) and D (P = 0.017) were associated with E. coli isolated from water buffalo. This report demonstrated that some phylogroups are associated with the host analyzed and the results provide knowledge of the phylogenetic composition of E. coli from domestic animals.

  5. Mutations in Escherichia coli that effect sensitivity to oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Jamison, C.S.; Adler, H.I.

    1987-11-01

    Fifteen oxygen-sensitive (Oxy/sup s/) mutants of Escherichia coli were isolated after exposure to UV light. The mutants did not form macroscopic colonies when plated aerobically. They did form macroscopic colonies anaerobically. Oxygen, introduced during log phase, inhibited the growth of liquid cultures. The degree of inhibition was used to separate the mutants into three classes. Class I mutants did not grow after exposure to oxygen. Class II mutants were able to grow, but at a reduced rate and to a reduced final titer, when compared with the wild-type parent. Class III mutants formed filaments in response to oxygen. Genetic experiments indicated that the mutations map to six different chromosomal regions. The results of enzymatic assays indicated that 7 of the 10 class I mutants have low levels of catalase, peroxidase, superoxide dismutase, and respiratory enzymes when compared with the wild-type parent. Mutations in five of the seven class I mutants which have the low enzyme activities mapped within the region 8 to 13.5 min. P1 transduction data indicated that mutations in three of these five mutants, Oxy/sup s/-6, Oxy/sup s/-14, and Oxy/sup s/-17, mapped to 8.4 min. The correlation of low enzyme levels and mapping data suggest that a single gene may regulate several enzymes in response to oxygen. The remaining three class I mutants had wild-type levels of catalase, peroxidase, and superoxide dismutase, but decreased respiratory activity. The class II and III mutants had enzyme activities similar to those of the wild-type parent.

  6. Using zebra mussels to monitor Escherichia coli in environmental waters.

    PubMed

    Selegean, J P; Kusserow, R; Patel, R; Heidtke, T M; Ram, J L

    2001-01-01

    Use of the zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) as an indicator of previously elevated bacteria concentrations in a watershed was examined. The ability of the zebra mussel to accumulate and purge Escherichia coli over several days was investigated in both laboratory and field experiments. In laboratory experiments, periodic enumeration of E. coli in mussels that had been exposed to a dilute solution of raw sewage demonstrated that (i) maximum concentrations of E. coli are reached within a few hours of exposure to sewage, (ii) the tissue concentration attained is higher than the concentration in the ambient water, and (iii) the E. coli concentrations take several days to return to preexposure concentrations when mussels are subsequently placed in sterile water. In field experiments conducted in southeast Michigan in the Clinton River watershed, brief increases in E. coli concentrations in the water were accompanied by increases in mussel concentrations of E. coli that lasted 2 or 3 d. The ability of mussels to retain and to concentrate E. coli made it possible to detect E. coli in the environment under conditions that conventional monitoring may often miss. Sampling caged mussels in a river and its tributaries may enable watershed managers to reduce the sampling frequency normally required to identify critical E. coli sources, thereby providing a more cost-effective river monitoring strategy for bacterial contamination.

  7. Complete genome sequence of the gram-negative probiotic Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917.

    PubMed

    Reister, Marten; Hoffmeier, Klaus; Krezdorn, Nicolas; Rotter, Bjoern; Liang, Chunguang; Rund, Stefan; Dandekar, Thomas; Sonnenborn, Ulrich; Oelschlaeger, Tobias A

    2014-10-10

    Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917 (EcN) is the active principle of a probiotic preparation (trade name Mutaflor(®)) used for the treatment of patients with intestinal diseases such as ulcerative colitis and diarrhea. It has GRAS (generally recognized as save) status and has been shown to be a therapeutically effective drug (Sonnenborn and Schulze, 2009). The complete genomic DNA sequence will help in identifying genes and their products which are essential for the strains probiotic nature. Genbank/EMBL/DDBJ accession number: CP007799 (chromosome). PMID:25093936

  8. Genetic engineering of probiotic Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 for clinical application.

    PubMed

    Ou, Bingming; Yang, Ying; Tham, Wai Liang; Chen, Lin; Guo, Jitao; Zhu, Guoqiang

    2016-10-01

    Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917 (EcN) has been used as a probiotic. Genetic engineering has enhanced the utility of EcN in several vaccine and pharmaceutical preparations. We discuss in this mini review the genetics and physical properties of EcN. We also discuss the numerous genetic engineering strategies employed for EcN-based vaccine development, including recombinant plasmid transfer, genetic engineering of cryptic plasmids or the EcN chromosome, EcN bacterial ghosts and its outer membrane vesicles. We also provide a current update on the progress and the challenges regarding the use of EcN in vaccine development.

  9. Genetic engineering of probiotic Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 for clinical application.

    PubMed

    Ou, Bingming; Yang, Ying; Tham, Wai Liang; Chen, Lin; Guo, Jitao; Zhu, Guoqiang

    2016-10-01

    Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917 (EcN) has been used as a probiotic. Genetic engineering has enhanced the utility of EcN in several vaccine and pharmaceutical preparations. We discuss in this mini review the genetics and physical properties of EcN. We also discuss the numerous genetic engineering strategies employed for EcN-based vaccine development, including recombinant plasmid transfer, genetic engineering of cryptic plasmids or the EcN chromosome, EcN bacterial ghosts and its outer membrane vesicles. We also provide a current update on the progress and the challenges regarding the use of EcN in vaccine development. PMID:27640192

  10. Genetic Changes Accompanying Increased Fitness in Evolving Populations of Escherichia Coli

    PubMed Central

    Modi, R. I.; Castilla, L. H.; Puskas-Rozsa, S.; Helling, R. B.; Adams, J.

    1992-01-01

    Two populations of Escherichia coli, each initiated with a single clone containing a derivative of the plasmid pBR322, were maintained for long periods in glucose-limited continuous culture. In both populations, after an extensive number of generations had elapsed, clones were isolated in which the transposon Tn3 from the plasmid had integrated into the bacterial chromosome. In both cases examined, the transpositions were shown to increase relative fitness approximately 6-7%, in the environment in which the populations were maintained. The loci of integration were mapped to ~13.2 min (population 1) and ~32.8 min (population 2). PMID:1311694

  11. Lytic bacteriophages reduce Escherichia coli O157

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Sean; Roberts, Cheryl; Handy, Eric; Sharma, Manan

    2013-01-01

    The role of lytic bacteriophages in preventing cross contamination of produce has not been evaluated. A cocktail of three lytic phages specific for E. coli O157:H7 (EcoShield™) or a control (phosphate buffered saline, PBS) was applied to lettuce by either; (1) immersion of lettuce in 500 ml of EcoShield™ 8.3 log PFU/ml or 9.8 log PFU/ml for up to 2 min before inoculation with E. coli O157:H7; (2) spray-application of EcoShield™ (9.3 log PFU/ml) to lettuce after inoculation with E. coli O157:H7 (4.10 CFU/cm2) following exposure to 50 μg/ml chlorine for 30 sec. After immersion studies, lettuce was spot-inoculated with E. coli O157:H7 (2.38 CFU/cm2). Phage-treated, inoculated lettuce pieces were stored at 4°C for and analyzed for E. coli O157:H7 populations for up to 7 d. Immersion of lettuce in 9.8 log PFU/ml EcoShield™ for 2 min significantly (p < 0.05) reduced E. coli O157:H7 populations after 24 h when stored at 4°C compared with controls. Immersion of lettuce in suspensions containing high concentrations of EcoShield™ (9.8 log PFU/ml) resulted in the deposition of high concentrations (7.8 log log PFU/cm2) of bacteriophages on the surface of fresh cut lettuce, potentially contributing to the efficacy of the lytic phages on lettuce. Spraying phages on to inoculated fresh cut lettuce after being washed in hypochlorite solution was significantly more effective in reducing E. coli O157:H7 populations (2.22 log CFU/cm2) on day 0 compared with control treatments (4.10 log CFU/cm2). Both immersion and spray treatments provided protection from E. coli O157:H7 contamination on lettuce, but spray application of lytic bacteriophages to lettuce was more effective in immediately reducing E. coli O157:H7 populations fresh cut lettuce. PMID:23819106

  12. An Escherichia coli Mutant That Makes Exceptionally Long Cells

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Elaine B.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although Escherichia coli is a very small (1- to 2-μm) rod-shaped cell, here we describe an E. coli mutant that forms enormously long cells in rich media such as Luria broth, as long indeed as 750 μm. These extremely elongated (eel) cells are as long as the longest bacteria known and have no internal subdivisions. They are metabolically competent, elongate rapidly, synthesize DNA, and distribute cell contents along this length. They lack only the ability to divide. The concentration of the essential cell division protein FtsZ is reduced in these eel cells, and increasing this concentration restores division. IMPORTANCE Escherichia coli is usually a very small bacterium, 1 to 2 μm long. We have isolated a mutant that forms enormously long cells, 700 times longer than the usual E. coli cell. E. coli filaments that form under other conditions usually die within a few hours, whereas our mutant is fully viable even when it reaches such lengths. This mutant provides a useful tool for the study of aspects of E. coli physiology that are difficult to investigate with small cells. PMID:25691528

  13. Genomic Comparative Study of Bovine Mastitis Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kempf, Florent; Slugocki, Cindy; Blum, Shlomo E; Leitner, Gabriel; Germon, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli, one of the main causative agents of bovine mastitis, is responsible for significant losses on dairy farms. In order to better understand the pathogenicity of E. coli mastitis, an accurate characterization of E. coli strains isolated from mastitis cases is required. By using phylogenetic analyses and whole genome comparison of 5 currently available mastitis E. coli genome sequences, we searched for genotypic traits specific for mastitis isolates. Our data confirm that there is a bias in the distribution of mastitis isolates in the different phylogenetic groups of the E. coli species, with the majority of strains belonging to phylogenetic groups A and B1. An interesting feature is that clustering of strains based on their accessory genome is very similar to that obtained using the core genome. This finding illustrates the fact that phenotypic properties of strains from different phylogroups are likely to be different. As a consequence, it is possible that different strategies could be used by mastitis isolates of different phylogroups to trigger mastitis. Our results indicate that mastitis E. coli isolates analyzed in this study carry very few of the virulence genes described in other pathogenic E. coli strains. A more detailed analysis of the presence/absence of genes involved in LPS synthesis, iron acquisition and type 6 secretion systems did not uncover specific properties of mastitis isolates. Altogether, these results indicate that mastitis E. coli isolates are rather characterized by a lack of bona fide currently described virulence genes.

  14. Genomic Comparative Study of Bovine Mastitis Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Kempf, Florent; Slugocki, Cindy; Blum, Shlomo E.; Leitner, Gabriel; Germon, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli, one of the main causative agents of bovine mastitis, is responsible for significant losses on dairy farms. In order to better understand the pathogenicity of E. coli mastitis, an accurate characterization of E. coli strains isolated from mastitis cases is required. By using phylogenetic analyses and whole genome comparison of 5 currently available mastitis E. coli genome sequences, we searched for genotypic traits specific for mastitis isolates. Our data confirm that there is a bias in the distribution of mastitis isolates in the different phylogenetic groups of the E. coli species, with the majority of strains belonging to phylogenetic groups A and B1. An interesting feature is that clustering of strains based on their accessory genome is very similar to that obtained using the core genome. This finding illustrates the fact that phenotypic properties of strains from different phylogroups are likely to be different. As a consequence, it is possible that different strategies could be used by mastitis isolates of different phylogroups to trigger mastitis. Our results indicate that mastitis E. coli isolates analyzed in this study carry very few of the virulence genes described in other pathogenic E. coli strains. A more detailed analysis of the presence/absence of genes involved in LPS synthesis, iron acquisition and type 6 secretion systems did not uncover specific properties of mastitis isolates. Altogether, these results indicate that mastitis E. coli isolates are rather characterized by a lack of bona fide currently described virulence genes. PMID:26809117

  15. [Acute diarrheal disease caused by enteropathogenic Escherichia coli in Colombia].

    PubMed

    Gómez-Duarte, Oscar G

    2014-10-01

    Intestinal Escherichia coli pathogens are leading causes of acute diarrheal disease in children less than 5 years in Latin America, Africa and Asia and a leading cause of death in children living in poorest communities in Africa and South East Asia. Studies on the role of E. coli pathogens in childhood diarrhea in Colombia and other countries in Latin America are limited due to the lack of detection assays in clinical laboratories at the main urban medical centers. Recent studies report that enterotoxigenic E. coli is the most common E. coli pathogens associated with diarrhea in children less than 5 years of age. Other E. coli pathotypes have been detected in children with diarrhea including enteropathogenic, enteroaggregative, shiga-toxin producing and diffusely adherent E. coli. It was also found that meat and vegetables at retail stores are contaminated with Shiga-toxin producing E. coli and enteroaggregative E. coli, suggesting that food products are involved in transmission and infection of the susceptible host. More studies are necessary to evaluate the mechanisms of transmission, the impact on the epidemiology of diarrheal disease, and management strategies and prevention of these pathogens affecting the pediatric population in Colombia.

  16. A Commensal Gone Bad: Complete Genome Sequence of the Prototypical Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Strain H10407▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Crossman, Lisa C.; Chaudhuri, Roy R.; Beatson, Scott A.; Wells, Timothy J.; Desvaux, Mickael; Cunningham, Adam F.; Petty, Nicola K.; Mahon, Vivienne; Brinkley, Carl; Hobman, Jon L.; Savarino, Stephen J.; Turner, Susan M.; Pallen, Mark J.; Penn, Charles W.; Parkhill, Julian; Turner, A. Keith; Johnson, Timothy J.; Thomson, Nicholas R.; Smith, Stephen G. J.; Henderson, Ian R.

    2010-01-01

    In most cases, Escherichia coli exists as a harmless commensal organism, but it may on occasion cause intestinal and/or extraintestinal disease. Enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) is the predominant cause of E. coli-mediated diarrhea in the developing world and is responsible for a significant portion of pediatric deaths. In this study, we determined the complete genomic sequence of E. coli H10407, a prototypical strain of enterotoxigenic E. coli, which reproducibly elicits diarrhea in human volunteer studies. We performed genomic and phylogenetic comparisons with other E. coli strains, revealing that the chromosome is closely related to that of the nonpathogenic commensal strain E. coli HS and to those of the laboratory strains E. coli K-12 and C. Furthermore, these analyses demonstrated that there were no chromosomally encoded factors unique to any sequenced ETEC strains. Comparison of the E. coli H10407 plasmids with those from several ETEC strains revealed that the plasmids had a mosaic structure but that several loci were conserved among ETEC strains. This study provides a genetic context for the vast amount of experimental and epidemiological data that have been published. PMID:20802035

  17. Antimicrobial resistance of Escherichia coli isolates from canine urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shao-Kuang; Lo, Dan-Yuan; Wei, Hen-Wei; Kuo, Hung-Chih

    2015-01-01

    This study determined the antimicrobial resistance profiles of Escherichia coli isolates from dogs with a presumptive diagnosis of urinary tract infection (UTI). Urine samples from 201 dogs with UTI diagnosed through clinical examination and urinalysis were processed for isolation of Escherichia coli. Colonies from pure cultures were identified by biochemical reactions (n=114) and were tested for susceptibility to 18 antimicrobials. The two most frequent antimicrobials showing resistance in Urinary E. coli isolates were oxytetracycline and ampicillin. Among the resistant isolates, 17 resistance patterns were observed, with 12 patterns involving multidrug resistance (MDR). Of the 69 tetracycline-resistant E. coli isolates, tet(B) was the predominant resistance determinant and was detected in 50.9% of the isolates, whereas the remaining 25.5% isolates carried the tet(A) determinant. Most ampicillin and/or amoxicillin-resistant E. coli isolates carried blaTEM-1 genes. Class 1 integrons were prevalent (28.9%) and contained previously described gene cassettes that are implicated primarily in resistance to aminoglycosides and trimethoprim (dfrA1, dfrA17-aadA5). Of the 44 quinolone-resistant E. coli isolates, 38 were resistant to nalidixic acid, and 6 were resistant to nalidixic acid, ciprofloxacin and enrofloxacin. Chromosomal point mutations were found in the GyrA (Ser83Leu) and ParC (Ser80Ile) genes. Furthermore, the aminoglycoside resistance gene aacC2, the chloramphenicol resistant gene cmlA and the florfenicol resistant gene floR were also identified. This study revealed an alarming rate of antimicrobial resistance among E. coli isolates from dogs with UTIs. PMID:25720807

  18. Antimicrobial resistance of Escherichia coli isolates from canine urinary tract infections

    PubMed Central

    CHANG, Shao-Kuang; LO, Dan-Yuan; WEI, Hen-Wei; KUO, Hung-Chih

    2014-01-01

    This study determined the antimicrobial resistance profiles of Escherichia coli isolates from dogs with a presumptive diagnosis of urinary tract infection (UTI). Urine samples from 201 dogs with UTI diagnosed through clinical examination and urinalysis were processed for isolation of Escherichia coli. Colonies from pure cultures were identified by biochemical reactions (n=114) and were tested for susceptibility to 18 antimicrobials. The two most frequent antimicrobials showing resistance in Urinary E. coli isolates were oxytetracycline and ampicillin. Among the resistant isolates, 17 resistance patterns were observed, with 12 patterns involving multidrug resistance (MDR). Of the 69 tetracycline-resistant E. coli isolates, tet(B) was the predominant resistance determinant and was detected in 50.9% of the isolates, whereas the remaining 25.5% isolates carried the tet(A) determinant. Most ampicillin and/or amoxicillin-resistant E. coli isolates carried blaTEM-1 genes. Class 1 integrons were prevalent (28.9%) and contained previously described gene cassettes that are implicated primarily in resistance to aminoglycosides and trimethoprim (dfrA1, dfrA17-aadA5). Of the 44 quinolone-resistant E. coli isolates, 38 were resistant to nalidixic acid, and 6 were resistant to nalidixic acid, ciprofloxacin and enrofloxacin. Chromosomal point mutations were found in the GyrA (Ser83Leu) and ParC (Ser80Ile) genes. Furthermore, the aminoglycoside resistance gene aacC2, the chloramphenicol resistant gene cmlA and the florfenicol resistant gene floR were also identified. This study revealed an alarming rate of antimicrobial resistance among E. coli isolates from dogs with UTIs. PMID:25720807

  19. Purification of penicillin-binding protein 2 of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, S J; Strominger, J L

    1981-01-01

    Penicillin-binding protein 2 (PBP-2) of Escherichia coli K-12 was purified by covalent affinity chromatography using 6-aminopenicillanic acid covalently coupled to carboxymethyl-Sepharose (6-APA-CM-Sepharose). Purification of PBP-2 was accomplished by prebinding the methoxy cephalosporin, cefoxitin, to the Triton X-100-solubilized PBPs of E. coli and then incubating the PBPs with 6-APA-CM-Sepharose. Cefoxitin readily binds to all the E. coli PBPs except PBP-2 and, thus, in the presence of cefoxitin, only PBP-2 could bind to the 6-APA-CM-Sepharose. The purification of a mixture of all of the PBPs of E. coli by affinity chromatography is also described. Images PMID:7007320

  20. EcoCyc: Enyclopedia of Escherichia coli Genes and Metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Karp, P D; Riley, M; Paley, S M; Pellegrini-Toole, A; Krummenacker, M

    1997-01-01

    The Encyclopedia of Genes and Metabolism (EcoCyc) is a database that combines information about the genome and the intermediary metabolism of Escherichia coli. It describes 2970 genes of E.coli, 547 enzymes encoded by these genes, 702 metabolic reactions that occur in E.coli and the organization of these reactions into 107 metabolic pathways. The EcoCyc graphical user interface allows scientists to query and explore the EcoCyc database using visualization tools such as genomic-map browsers and automatic layouts of metabolic pathways. EcoCyc spans the space from sequence to function to allow scientists to investigate an unusually broad range of questions. EcoCyc can be thought of as both an electronic review article because of its copious references to the primary literature, and as an in silicio model of E.coli metabolism that can be probed and analyzed through computational means. PMID:9016502

  1. EcoCyc: Enyclopedia of Escherichia coli Genes and Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Karp, P D; Riley, M; Paley, S M; Pellegrini-Toole, A; Krummenacker, M

    1997-01-01

    The Encyclopedia of Genes and Metabolism (EcoCyc) is a database that combines information about the genome and the intermediary metabolism of Escherichia coli. It describes 2970 genes of E.coli, 547 enzymes encoded by these genes, 702 metabolic reactions that occur in E.coli and the organization of these reactions into 107 metabolic pathways. The EcoCyc graphical user interface allows scientists to query and explore the EcoCyc database using visualization tools such as genomic-map browsers and automatic layouts of metabolic pathways. EcoCyc spans the space from sequence to function to allow scientists to investigate an unusually broad range of questions. EcoCyc can be thought of as both an electronic review article because of its copious references to the primary literature, and as an in silicio model of E.coli metabolism that can be probed and analyzed through computational means.

  2. The different ecological niches of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Gonzales-Siles, Lucia; Sjöling, Åsa

    2016-03-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a water and food-borne pathogen that infects the small intestine of the human gut and causes diarrhoea. Enterotoxigenic E. coli adheres to the epithelium by means of colonization factors and secretes two enterotoxins, the heat labile toxin and/or the heat stable toxin that both deregulate ion channels and cause secretory diarrhoea. Enterotoxigenic E. coli as all E. coli, is a versatile organism able to survive and grow in different environments. During transmission and infection, ETEC is exposed to various environmental cues that have an impact on survivability and virulence. The ability to cope with exposure to different stressful habitats is probably shaping the pool of virulent ETEC strains that cause both endemic and epidemic infections. This review will focus on the ecology of ETEC in its different habitats and interactions with other organisms as well as abiotic factors. PMID:26522129

  3. Eco Cyc: encyclopedia of Escherichia coli genes and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Karp, P D; Riley, M; Paley, S M; Pellegrini-Toole, A; Krummenacker, M

    1999-01-01

    The EcoCyc database describes the genome and gene products of Escherichia coli, its metabolic and signal-transduction pathways, and its tRNAs. The database describes 4391 genes of E.coli, 695 enzymes encoded by a subset of these genes, 904 metabolic reactions that occur in E.coli, and the organization of these reactions into 129 metabolic pathways. The EcoCyc graphical user interface allows scientists to query and explore the EcoCyc database using visualization tools such as genomic-map browsers and automatic layouts of metabolic pathways. EcoCyc has many references to the primary literature, and is a (qualitative) computational model of E. coli metabolism. EcoCyc is available at URL http://ecocyc. PangeaSystems.com/ecocyc/

  4. The different ecological niches of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Gonzales-Siles, Lucia; Sjöling, Åsa

    2016-03-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a water and food-borne pathogen that infects the small intestine of the human gut and causes diarrhoea. Enterotoxigenic E. coli adheres to the epithelium by means of colonization factors and secretes two enterotoxins, the heat labile toxin and/or the heat stable toxin that both deregulate ion channels and cause secretory diarrhoea. Enterotoxigenic E. coli as all E. coli, is a versatile organism able to survive and grow in different environments. During transmission and infection, ETEC is exposed to various environmental cues that have an impact on survivability and virulence. The ability to cope with exposure to different stressful habitats is probably shaping the pool of virulent ETEC strains that cause both endemic and epidemic infections. This review will focus on the ecology of ETEC in its different habitats and interactions with other organisms as well as abiotic factors.

  5. SCO-1, a novel plasmid-mediated class A beta-lactamase with carbenicillinase characteristics from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Papagiannitsis, C C; Loli, A; Tzouvelekis, L S; Tzelepi, E; Arlet, G; Miriagou, V

    2007-06-01

    A novel class A beta-lactamase (SCO-1) encoded by an 80-kb self-transferable plasmid from Escherichia coli is described. The interaction of SCO-1 with beta-lactams was similar to that of the CARB-type enzymes. Also, SCO-1 exhibited a 51% amino acid sequence identity with the RTG subgroup of chromosomal carbenicillinases (RTG-1, CARB-5, and CARB-8). PMID:17353248

  6. SCO-1, a novel plasmid-mediated class A beta-lactamase with carbenicillinase characteristics from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Papagiannitsis, C C; Loli, A; Tzouvelekis, L S; Tzelepi, E; Arlet, G; Miriagou, V

    2007-06-01

    A novel class A beta-lactamase (SCO-1) encoded by an 80-kb self-transferable plasmid from Escherichia coli is described. The interaction of SCO-1 with beta-lactams was similar to that of the CARB-type enzymes. Also, SCO-1 exhibited a 51% amino acid sequence identity with the RTG subgroup of chromosomal carbenicillinases (RTG-1, CARB-5, and CARB-8).

  7. Escherichia coli as a model active colloid: A practical introduction.

    PubMed

    Schwarz-Linek, Jana; Arlt, Jochen; Jepson, Alys; Dawson, Angela; Vissers, Teun; Miroli, Dario; Pilizota, Teuta; Martinez, Vincent A; Poon, Wilson C K

    2016-01-01

    The flagellated bacterium Escherichia coli is increasingly used experimentally as a self-propelled swimmer. To obtain meaningful, quantitative results that are comparable between different laboratories, reproducible protocols are needed to control, 'tune' and monitor the swimming behaviour of these motile cells. We critically review the knowledge needed to do so, explain methods for characterising the colloidal and motile properties of E. coli cells, and propose a protocol for keeping them swimming at constant speed at finite bulk concentrations. In the process of establishing this protocol, we use motility as a high-throughput probe of aspects of cellular physiology via the coupling between swimming speed and the proton motive force. PMID:26310235

  8. Cloning of a Thiobacillus ferrooxidans plasmid in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, D.S.; Lobos, J.H.; Bopp, L.H.; Welch, G.C.

    1984-01-01

    Three separate plasmids of 6, 7, 16, and >23 kilobases were purified from a single clone of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans ATCC 33020 grown in the presence of uranium. The 6.7-kilobase plasmid (pTfl) was cloned separately into the HindIII or BamHI site of Escherichia coli plasmid pBR322. Restriction maps of the recombinant plasmids, termed pTf100 and pTf110, respectively, were constructed, creating potential cloning vehicles for exchanging genetic information between E. coli and T. ferrooxidans. Evidence from restriction enzyme analysis and Southern blot DNA-DNA hybridization indicates that the three native plasmids share little sequence homology.

  9. Genes and proteins of Escherichia coli (GenProtEc).

    PubMed

    Riley, M; Space, D B

    1996-01-01

    GenProtEc is a database of Escherichia coli genes and their gene products, classified by type of function and physiological role and with citations to the literature for each. Also present are data on sequence similarities among E.coli proteins with PAM values, percent identity of amino acids, length of alignment and percent aligned. The database is available as a PKZip file by ftp from mbl.edu/pub/ecoli.exe. The program runs under MS-DOS on IMB-compatible machines. GenProtEc can also be accessed through the World Wide Web at URL http://mbl.edu/html/ecoli.html. PMID:8594596

  10. Recombinant protein expression in Escherichia coli: advances and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Rosano, Germán L.; Ceccarelli, Eduardo A.

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli is one of the organisms of choice for the production of recombinant proteins. Its use as a cell factory is well-established and it has become the most popular expression platform. For this reason, there are many molecular tools and protocols at hand for the high-level production of heterologous proteins, such as a vast catalog of expression plasmids, a great number of engineered strains and many cultivation strategies. We review the different approaches for the synthesis of recombinant proteins in E. coli and discuss recent progress in this ever-growing field. PMID:24860555

  11. Escherichia coli as a model active colloid: A practical introduction.

    PubMed

    Schwarz-Linek, Jana; Arlt, Jochen; Jepson, Alys; Dawson, Angela; Vissers, Teun; Miroli, Dario; Pilizota, Teuta; Martinez, Vincent A; Poon, Wilson C K

    2016-01-01

    The flagellated bacterium Escherichia coli is increasingly used experimentally as a self-propelled swimmer. To obtain meaningful, quantitative results that are comparable between different laboratories, reproducible protocols are needed to control, 'tune' and monitor the swimming behaviour of these motile cells. We critically review the knowledge needed to do so, explain methods for characterising the colloidal and motile properties of E. coli cells, and propose a protocol for keeping them swimming at constant speed at finite bulk concentrations. In the process of establishing this protocol, we use motility as a high-throughput probe of aspects of cellular physiology via the coupling between swimming speed and the proton motive force.

  12. Advances in Molecular Serotyping and Subtyping of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Fratamico, Pina M; DebRoy, Chitrita; Liu, Yanhong; Needleman, David S; Baranzoni, Gian Marco; Feng, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli plays an important role as a member of the gut microbiota; however, pathogenic strains also exist, including various diarrheagenic E. coli pathotypes and extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli that cause illness outside of the GI-tract. E. coli have traditionally been serotyped using antisera against the ca. 186 O-antigens and 53 H-flagellar antigens. Phenotypic methods, including bacteriophage typing and O- and H- serotyping for differentiating and characterizing E. coli have been used for many years; however, these methods are generally time consuming and not always accurate. Advances in next generation sequencing technologies have made it possible to develop genetic-based subtyping and molecular serotyping methods for E. coli, which are more discriminatory compared to phenotypic typing methods. Furthermore, whole genome sequencing (WGS) of E. coli is replacing established subtyping methods such as pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, providing a major advancement in the ability to investigate food-borne disease outbreaks and for trace-back to sources. A variety of sequence analysis tools and bioinformatic pipelines are being developed to analyze the vast amount of data generated by WGS and to obtain specific information such as O- and H-group determination and the presence of virulence genes and other genetic markers.

  13. Advances in molecular serotyping and subtyping of Escherichia coli

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fratamico, Pina M.; DebRoy, Chitrita; Liu, Yanhong; Needleman, David S.; Baranzoni, Gian Marco; Feng, Peter

    2016-05-03

    Escherichia coli plays an important role as a member of the gut microbiota; however, pathogenic strains also exist, including various diarrheagenic E. coli pathotypes and extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli that cause illness outside of the GI-tract. E. coli have traditionally been serotyped using antisera against the ca. 186 O-antigens and 53 H-flagellar antigens. Phenotypic methods, including bacteriophage typing and O- and H- serotyping for differentiating and characterizing E. coli have been used for many years; however, these methods are generally time consuming and not always accurate. Advances in next generation sequencing technologies have made it possible to develop genetic-based subtypingmore » and molecular serotyping methods for E. coli, which are more discriminatory compared to phenotypic typing methods. Furthermore, whole genome sequencing (WGS) of E. coli is replacing established subtyping methods such as pulsedfield gel electrophoresis, providing a major advancement in the ability to investigate food-borne disease outbreaks and for trace-back to sources. Furthermore, a variety of sequence analysis tools and bioinformatic pipelines are being developed to analyze the vast amount of data generated by WGS and to obtain specific information such as O- and H-group determination and the presence of virulence genes and other genetic markers.« less

  14. Gentamicin resistance among Escherichia coli strains isolated in neonatal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Hasvold, J; Bradford, L; Nelson, C; Harrison, C; Attar, M; Stillwell, T

    2013-01-01

    Neonatal sepsis is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality among term and preterm infants. Ampicillin and gentamicin are standard empiric therapy for early onset sepsis. Four cases of neonatal sepsis secondary to Escherichia coli (E. coli) found to be gentamicin resistant occurred within a five week period in one neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). To determine whether these cases could be tied to a single vector of transmission, and to more broadly evaluate the incidence of gentamicin resistant strains of E. coli in the neonatal population at our institution compared to other centers, we reviewed the charts of the four neonates (Infants A through D) and their mothers. The E. coli isolates were sent for Pulse Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE) to evaluate for genetic similarity between strains. We also reviewed all positive E. coli cultures from one NICU over a two year period. Infants A and B had genetically indistinguishable strains which matched that of urine and placental cultures of Infant B's mother. Infant C had a genetically distinct organism. Infant D, the identical twin of Infant C, did not have typing performed. Review of all cultures positive for E. coli at our institution showed a 12.9 percent incidence of gentamicin-resistance. A review of other studies showed that rates of resistance vary considerably by institution. We conclude that gentamicin-resistant E. coli is a relatively uncommon cause of neonatal sepsis, but should remain a consideration in patients who deteriorate despite initiation of empiric antibiotics. PMID:24246520

  15. Inactivation of Escherichia coli using atmospheric-pressure plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwahata, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Takeshi; Ohyama, Ryu-ichiro; Ito, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    An atmospheric-pressure argon (Ar) plasma jet was applied to the inactivation of Escherichia coli. The Ar plasma jet was generated at a frequency of 10 kHz, an applied voltage of 10 kV, and an Ar gas flow rate of 10 L/min at atmospheric pressure. E. coli cells seeded on an agar medium in a Petri dish were inactivated by Ar plasma jet irradiation for 1 s. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed that E. coli cells were killed because their cell wall and membrane were disrupted. To determine the causes of the disruption of the cell wall and membrane of E. coli, we performed the following experiments: the measurement of the surface temperature of an agar medium using a thermograph, the analysis of an emission spectrum of a plasma jet obtained using a multichannel spectrometer, and the determination of the distribution of the concentration of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) generated on an agar medium by plasma jet irradiation using semiquantitative test strips. Moreover, H2O2 solutions of different concentrations were dropped onto an agar medium seeded with E. coli cells to examine the contribution of H2O2 to the death of E. coli. The results of these experiments showed that the cell wall and membrane of E. coli were disrupted by electrons in the plasma jet, as well as by electroneutral excited nitrogen molecules (N2) and hydroxyl (OH) radicals in the periphery of the plasma jet.

  16. Thiolases of Escherichia coli: purification and chain length specificities.

    PubMed Central

    Feigenbaum, J; Schulz, H

    1975-01-01

    The presence of only one thiolase (EC 2.3.1.9) in wild-type Escherichia coli induced for enzymes of beta oxidation was demonstrated. A different thiolase was shown to be present in a mutant constitutive for the enzymes of butyrate degradation. The two thiolases were purified to near homogeneity by a simple two-step procedure and were found to be associated with different proteins as shown by gel electrophoresis. The thiolase isolated from induced wild-type Escherichia coli cell was active on beta-ketoacyl-coenzyme A derivatives containing 4 to 16 carbons, but exhibited optimal activity with medium-chain substrates. In contrast, the thiolase isolated from the constitutive mutant was shown to be specific for acetoacetyl-coenzyme A. PMID:236278

  17. Biogenesis of inner membrane proteins in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Luirink, Joen; Yu, Zhong; Wagner, Samuel; de Gier, Jan-Willem

    2012-06-01

    The inner membrane proteome of the model organism Escherichia coli is composed of inner membrane proteins, lipoproteins and peripherally attached soluble proteins. Our knowledge of the biogenesis of inner membrane proteins is rapidly increasing. This is in particular true for the early steps of biogenesis - protein targeting to and insertion into the membrane. However, our knowledge of inner membrane protein folding and quality control is still fragmentary. Furthering our knowledge in these areas will bring us closer to understand the biogenesis of individual inner membrane proteins in the context of the biogenesis of the inner membrane proteome of Escherichia coli as a whole. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biogenesis/Assembly of Respiratory Enzyme Complexes.

  18. Mechanobiology of Antimicrobial Resistant Escherichia coli and Listeria innocua.

    PubMed

    Tajkarimi, Mehrdad; Harrison, Scott H; Hung, Albert M; Graves, Joseph L

    2016-01-01

    A majority of antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections in the United States are associated with biofilms. Nanoscale biophysical measures are increasingly revealing that adhesive and viscoelastic properties of bacteria play essential roles across multiple stages of biofilm development. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) applied to strains with variation in antimicrobial resistance enables new opportunities for investigating the function of adhesive forces (stickiness) in biofilm formation. AFM force spectroscopy analysis of a field strain of Listeria innocua and the strain Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655 revealed differing adhesive forces between antimicrobial resistant and nonresistant strains. Significant increases in stickiness were found at the nanonewton level for strains of Listeria innocua and Escherichia coli in association with benzalkonium chloride and silver nanoparticle resistance respectively. This advancement in the usage of AFM provides for a fast and reliable avenue for analyzing antimicrobial resistant cells and the molecular dynamics of biofilm formation as a protective mechanism.

  19. Mechanobiology of Antimicrobial Resistant Escherichia coli and Listeria innocua.

    PubMed

    Tajkarimi, Mehrdad; Harrison, Scott H; Hung, Albert M; Graves, Joseph L

    2016-01-01

    A majority of antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections in the United States are associated with biofilms. Nanoscale biophysical measures are increasingly revealing that adhesive and viscoelastic properties of bacteria play essential roles across multiple stages of biofilm development. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) applied to strains with variation in antimicrobial resistance enables new opportunities for investigating the function of adhesive forces (stickiness) in biofilm formation. AFM force spectroscopy analysis of a field strain of Listeria innocua and the strain Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655 revealed differing adhesive forces between antimicrobial resistant and nonresistant strains. Significant increases in stickiness were found at the nanonewton level for strains of Listeria innocua and Escherichia coli in association with benzalkonium chloride and silver nanoparticle resistance respectively. This advancement in the usage of AFM provides for a fast and reliable avenue for analyzing antimicrobial resistant cells and the molecular dynamics of biofilm formation as a protective mechanism. PMID:26914334

  20. Mechanobiology of Antimicrobial Resistant Escherichia coli and Listeria innocua

    PubMed Central

    Tajkarimi, Mehrdad; Harrison, Scott H.; Hung, Albert M.; Graves, Joseph L.

    2016-01-01

    A majority of antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections in the United States are associated with biofilms. Nanoscale biophysical measures are increasingly revealing that adhesive and viscoelastic properties of bacteria play essential roles across multiple stages of biofilm development. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) applied to strains with variation in antimicrobial resistance enables new opportunities for investigating the function of adhesive forces (stickiness) in biofilm formation. AFM force spectroscopy analysis of a field strain of Listeria innocua and the strain Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655 revealed differing adhesive forces between antimicrobial resistant and nonresistant strains. Significant increases in stickiness were found at the nanonewton level for strains of Listeria innocua and Escherichia coli in association with benzalkonium chloride and silver nanoparticle resistance respectively. This advancement in the usage of AFM provides for a fast and reliable avenue for analyzing antimicrobial resistant cells and the molecular dynamics of biofilm formation as a protective mechanism. PMID:26914334

  1. Identification of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) clades with long-term global distribution.

    PubMed

    von Mentzer, Astrid; Connor, Thomas R; Wieler, Lothar H; Semmler, Torsten; Iguchi, Atsushi; Thomson, Nicholas R; Rasko, David A; Joffre, Enrique; Corander, Jukka; Pickard, Derek; Wiklund, Gudrun; Svennerholm, Ann-Mari; Sjöling, Åsa; Dougan, Gordon

    2014-12-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC), a major cause of infectious diarrhea, produce heat-stable and/or heat-labile enterotoxins and at least 25 different colonization factors that target the intestinal mucosa. The genes encoding the enterotoxins and most of the colonization factors are located on plasmids found across diverse E. coli serogroups. Whole-genome sequencing of a representative collection of ETEC isolated between 1980 and 2011 identified globally distributed lineages characterized by distinct colonization factor and enterotoxin profiles. Contrary to current notions, these relatively recently emerged lineages might harbor chromosome and plasmid combinations that optimize fitness and transmissibility. These data have implications for understanding, tracking and possibly preventing ETEC disease. PMID:25383970

  2. Current perspectivesin pathogenesis and antimicrobial resistance of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kong, Haishen; Hong, Xiaoping; Li, Xuefen

    2015-08-01

    Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) is an emerging pathogen that causes acute and persistent diarrhea in children and adults. While the pathogenic mechanisms of EAEC intestinal colonization have been uncovered (including bacterial adhesion, enterotoxin and cytotoxin secretion, and stimulation of mucosal inflammation), those of severe extraintestinal infections remain largely unknown. The recent emergence of multidrug resistant EAEC represents an alarming public health threat and clinical challenge, and research on the molecular mechanisms of resistance is urgently needed.

  3. Electric field induced bacterial flocculation of Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli 042

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Aloke; Mortensen, Ninell P; Mukherjee, Partha P; Retterer, Scott T; Doktycz, Mitchel John

    2011-01-01

    A response of the aggregation dynamics of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli under low magnitude steady and oscillating electric fields is presented. The presence of uniform electric fields hampered microbial adhesion and biofilm formation on a transverse glass surface, but instead promoted the formation of flocs. Extremely heterogeneous distribution of live and dead cells was observed among the flocs. Moreover, floc formation was largely observed to be independent of the frequency of alternating electric fields.

  4. Escherichia coli and Salmonella 2000: the View From Here

    PubMed Central

    Schaechter, Moselio

    2001-01-01

    Five years after the publication of the second edition of the reference book Escherichia coli and Salmonella: Cellular and Molecular Biology, and on the eve of launching a successor venture, the editors and colleagues examine where we stand in our quest for an understanding of these organisms. The main areas selected for this brief inquiry are genomics, evolution, molecular multifunctionality, functional backups, regulation of gene expression, cell biology, sensing of the environment, and ecology. PMID:11238988

  5. Shear alters motility of Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molaei, Mehdi; Jalali, Maryam; Sheng, Jian

    2013-11-01

    Understanding of locomotion of microorganisms in shear flows drew a wide range of interests in microbial related topics such as biological process including pathogenic infection and biophysical interactions like biofilm formation on engineering surfaces. We employed microfluidics and digital holography microscopy to study motility of E. coli in shear flows. We controlled the shear flow in three different shear rates: 0.28 s-1, 2.8 s-1, and 28 s-1 in a straight channel with the depth of 200 μm. Magnified holograms, recorded at 15 fps with a CCD camera over more than 20 minutes, are analyzed to obtain 3D swimming trajectories and subsequently used to extract shear responses of E.coli. Thousands of 3-D bacterial trajectories are tracked. The change of bacteria swimming characteristics including swimming velocity, reorientation, and dispersion coefficient are computed directly for individual trajectory and ensemble averaged over thousands of realizations. The results show that shear suppresses the bacterial dispersions in bulk but promote dispersions near the surface contrary to those in quiescent flow condition. Ongoing analyses are focusing to quantify effect of shear rates on tumbling frequency and reorientation of cell body, and its implication in locating the hydrodynamic mechanisms for shear enhanced angular scattering. NIH, NSF, GoMRI.

  6. Biomolecular Mechanisms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Laverty, Garry; Gorman, Sean P.; Gilmore, Brendan F.

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli are the most prevalent Gram-negative biofilm forming medical device associated pathogens, particularly with respect to catheter associated urinary tract infections. In a similar manner to Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative biofilm formation is fundamentally determined by a series of steps outlined more fully in this review, namely adhesion, cellular aggregation, and the production of an extracellular polymeric matrix. More specifically this review will explore the biosynthesis and role of pili and flagella in Gram-negative adhesion and accumulation on surfaces in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli. The process of biofilm maturation is compared and contrasted in both species, namely the production of the exopolysaccharides via the polysaccharide synthesis locus (Psl), pellicle Formation (Pel) and alginic acid synthesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and UDP-4-amino-4-deoxy-l-arabinose and colonic acid synthesis in Escherichia coli. An emphasis is placed on the importance of the LuxR homologue sdiA; the luxS/autoinducer-II; an autoinducer-III/epinephrine/norepinephrine and indole mediated Quorum sensing systems in enabling Gram-negative bacteria to adapt to their environments. The majority of Gram-negative biofilms consist of polysaccharides of a simple sugar structure (either homo- or heteropolysaccharides) that provide an optimum environment for the survival and maturation of bacteria, allowing them to display increased resistance to antibiotics and predation. PMID:25438014

  7. Biomolecular Mechanisms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli Biofilm Formation.

    PubMed

    Laverty, Garry; Gorman, Sean P; Gilmore, Brendan F

    2014-07-18

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli are the most prevalent Gram-negative biofilm forming medical device associated pathogens, particularly with respect to catheter associated urinary tract infections. In a similar manner to Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative biofilm formation is fundamentally determined by a series of steps outlined more fully in this review, namely adhesion, cellular aggregation, and the production of an extracellular polymeric matrix. More specifically this review will explore the biosynthesis and role of pili and flagella in Gram-negative adhesion and accumulation on surfaces in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli. The process of biofilm maturation is compared and contrasted in both species, namely the production of the exopolysaccharides via the polysaccharide synthesis locus (Psl), pellicle Formation (Pel) and alginic acid synthesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and UDP-4-amino-4-deoxy-l-arabinose and colonic acid synthesis in Escherichia coli. An emphasis is placed on the importance of the LuxR homologue sdiA; the luxS/autoinducer-II; an autoinducer-III/epinephrine/norepinephrine and indole mediated Quorum sensing systems in enabling Gram-negative bacteria to adapt to their environments. The majority of Gram-negative biofilms consist of polysaccharides of a simple sugar structure (either homo- or heteropolysaccharides) that provide an optimum environment for the survival and maturation of bacteria, allowing them to display increased resistance to antibiotics and predation.

  8. Cloning and properties of the Salmonella typhimurium tricarboxylate transport operon in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Widenhorn, K.A.; Boos, W.; Somers, J.M.; Kay, W.W.

    1988-02-01

    The tricarboxylate transport operon (tctI) was cloned in Escherichia coli as a 12-kilobase (kb) fragment from an EcoRI library of the Salmonella typhimurium chromosome in lambdagtWES. It was further subcloned as a 12-kb fragment into pACYC184 and as an 8-kb fragment into pBR322. By insertional mutagenesis mediated by lambdaTn5, restriction mapping, and phenotypic testing, the tctI operon was localized to a 4.5-kb region. The tctC gene which encodes a periplasmic binding protein (C-protein) was located near the center of the insert. E. coli/tctI clones on either multicopy or single-copy vectors grew on the same tricarboxylates as S. typhimurium, although unusually long growth lags were observed. E. coli/tctI clones exhibited similar (/sup 14/C) fluorocitrate transport kinetics to those of S. typhimurium, whereas E. coli alone was virtually impermeable to (/sup 14/C) fluorocitrate. The periplasmic C proteins (C1 and C2 isoelectric forms) were produced in prodigious quantities from the cloned strains. Motile E. coli/tctI clones were not chemotactic toward citrate, whereas tctI deletion mutants of S. typhimurium were. Taken together, these observations indicate that tctI is not an operon involved in chemotaxis.

  9. Survival of Escherichia coli on strawberries grown under greenhouse conditions.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Angela Laury; Svoboda, Amanda; Jie, Beatrice; Nonnecke, Gail; Mendonca, Aubrey

    2015-04-01

    Strawberries are soft fruit that are not recommended to have a post-harvest wash due to quality concerns. Escherichia coli O157:H7 has been linked to outbreaks with strawberries but little is known about the survival of E. coli during the growth cycle of strawberries. The survival of E. coli on strawberry plants during growing under greenhouses conditions was evaluated. Soil, leaves, and strawberries (if present) were artificially contaminated with an E. coli surrogate either at the time of planting, first runner removal (4 wk), second runner removal (8 wk), or one week prior to harvest. At harvest E. coli was recovered from the leaves, soil, and strawberries regardless of the contamination time. Time of contamination influenced (P < 0.05) numbers of viable E. coli on the plant. The highest survival of E. coli (P < 0.0001) was detected in soil that was contaminated at planting (4.27 log10 CFU g soil(-1)), whereas, the survival of E. coli was maximal at later contamination times (8 wk and 1 wk prior to harvest) for the leaves (4.40 and 4.68 log10 CFU g leaves(-1)) and strawberries (3.37 and 3.53 log10 CFU strawberry(-1)). Cross contamination from leaves to fruit was observed during this study, with the presence of E. coli on strawberries which had not been present at the time of contamination. These results indicate that good agricultural best practices to avoid contamination are necessary to minimize the risk of contamination of these popular fruit with enteric pathogens. Practices should include soil testing prior to harvest and avoiding contamination of the leaves.

  10. Fluorogenic assays for immediate confirmation of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Feng, P C; Hartman, P A

    1982-06-01

    Rapid assays for Escherichia coli were developed by using the compound 4-methylumbelliferone glucuronide (MUG), which is hydrolyzed by glucuronidase to yield a fluorogenic product. The production of glucuronidase was limited to strains of E. coli and some Salmonella and Shigella strains in the family Enterobacteriaceae. For immediate confirmation of the presence of E. coli in most-probable-number tubes, MUG was incorporated into lauryl tryptose broth at a final concentration of 100 micrograms/ml. Results of both the presumptive test (gas production) and the confirmed test (fluorescence) for E. coli were obtained from a variety of food, water, and milk samples after incubation for only 24 h at 35 degrees C. Approximately 90% of the tubes showing both gas production and fluorescence contained fecal coliforms (they were positive in EC broth incubated at 45 degrees C). Few false-positive reactions were observed. The lauryl tryptose broth-MUG-most-probable-number assay was superior to violet red bile agar for the detection of heat- and chlorine-injured E. coli cells. Anaerogenic strains produced positive reactions, and small numbers of E. coli could be detected in the presence of large numbers of competing bacteria. The fluorogenic assay was sensitive and rapid; the presence of one viable cell was detected within 20 h. E. coli colonies could be distinguished from other coliforms on membrane filters and plates of violet red bile agar if MUG was incorporated into the culture media. A rapid confirmatory test for E. coli that is amenable to automation was developed by using microtitration plates filled with a nonselective medium containing MUG. Pure or mixed cultures containing E. coli produced fluorescence within 4 h (most strains) to 24 h (a few weakly positive strains).

  11. Survival of Escherichia coli on strawberries grown under greenhouse conditions.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Angela Laury; Svoboda, Amanda; Jie, Beatrice; Nonnecke, Gail; Mendonca, Aubrey

    2015-04-01

    Strawberries are soft fruit that are not recommended to have a post-harvest wash due to quality concerns. Escherichia coli O157:H7 has been linked to outbreaks with strawberries but little is known about the survival of E. coli during the growth cycle of strawberries. The survival of E. coli on strawberry plants during growing under greenhouses conditions was evaluated. Soil, leaves, and strawberries (if present) were artificially contaminated with an E. coli surrogate either at the time of planting, first runner removal (4 wk), second runner removal (8 wk), or one week prior to harvest. At harvest E. coli was recovered from the leaves, soil, and strawberries regardless of the contamination time. Time of contamination influenced (P < 0.05) numbers of viable E. coli on the plant. The highest survival of E. coli (P < 0.0001) was detected in soil that was contaminated at planting (4.27 log10 CFU g soil(-1)), whereas, the survival of E. coli was maximal at later contamination times (8 wk and 1 wk prior to harvest) for the leaves (4.40 and 4.68 log10 CFU g leaves(-1)) and strawberries (3.37 and 3.53 log10 CFU strawberry(-1)). Cross contamination from leaves to fruit was observed during this study, with the presence of E. coli on strawberries which had not been present at the time of contamination. These results indicate that good agricultural best practices to avoid contamination are necessary to minimize the risk of contamination of these popular fruit with enteric pathogens. Practices should include soil testing prior to harvest and avoiding contamination of the leaves. PMID:25475285

  12. Preparation of Soluble Proteins from Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Wingfield, Paul T.

    2014-01-01

    Purification of human IL-1β is used in this unit as an example of the preparation of soluble proteins from E. coli. Bacteria containing IL-1β are lysed, and IL-1 β in the resulting supernatant is purified by anion-exchange chromatography, salt precipitation and cation-exchange chromatography, and then concentrated. Finally, the IL-1 β protein is applied to a gel-filtration column to separate it from remaining higher- and lower-molecular-weight contaminants, the purified protein is stored frozen or is lyophilized. The purification protocol described is typical for a protein that is expressed in fairly high abundance (i.e., >5% total protein) and accumulates in a soluble state. Also, the purification procedure serves as an example of how use classical protein purifications methods which may also be used in conjunction with the affinity-based methods now more commonly used. PMID:25367009

  13. Preparation of Soluble Proteins from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Wingfield, Paul T

    2014-01-01

    Purification of human IL-1β is used in this unit as an example of the preparation of a soluble protein from E. coli. Bacteria containing IL-1β are lysed, and IL-1 β in the resulting supernatant is purified by anion-exchange chromatography, salt precipitation, and cation-exchange chromatography, and then concentrated. Finally, the IL-1 β protein is applied to a gel-filtration column to separate it from remaining higher- and lower-molecular-weight contaminants, the purified protein is stored frozen or is lyophilized. The purification protocol described is typical for a protein that is expressed in fairly high abundance (i.e., >5% total protein) and accumulates in a soluble state. In addition, the purification procedure serves as an example of how to use classical protein purifications methods, which may also be used in conjunction with the affinity-based methods now more commonly used. PMID:25367009

  14. EcoCyc: A comprehensive view of Escherichia coli biology

    PubMed Central

    Keseler, Ingrid M.; Bonavides-Martínez, César; Collado-Vides, Julio; Gama-Castro, Socorro; Gunsalus, Robert P.; Johnson, D. Aaron; Krummenacker, Markus; Nolan, Laura M.; Paley, Suzanne; Paulsen, Ian T.; Peralta-Gil, Martin; Santos-Zavaleta, Alberto; Shearer, Alexander Glennon; Karp, Peter D.

    2009-01-01

    EcoCyc (http://EcoCyc.org) provides a comprehensive encyclopedia of Escherichia coli biology. EcoCyc integrates information about the genome, genes and gene products; the metabolic network; and the regulatory network of E. coli. Recent EcoCyc developments include a new initiative to represent and curate all types of E. coli regulatory processes such as attenuation and regulation by small RNAs. EcoCyc has started to curate Gene Ontology (GO) terms for E. coli and has made a dataset of E. coli GO terms available through the GO Web site. The curation and visualization of electron transfer processes has been significantly improved. Other software and Web site enhancements include the addition of tracks to the EcoCyc genome browser, in particular a type of track designed for the display of ChIP-chip datasets, and the development of a comparative genome browser. A new Genome Omics Viewer enables users to paint omics datasets onto the full E. coli genome for analysis. A new advanced query page guides users in interactively constructing complex database queries against EcoCyc. A Macintosh version of EcoCyc is now available. A series of Webinars is available to instruct users in the use of EcoCyc. PMID:18974181

  15. Measuring Escherichia coli Gene Expression during Human Urinary Tract Infections

    PubMed Central

    Mobley, Harry L. T.

    2016-01-01

    Extraintestinal Escherichia coli (E. coli) evolved by acquisition of pathogenicity islands, phage, plasmids, and DNA segments by horizontal gene transfer. Strains are heterogeneous but virulent uropathogenic isolates more often have specific fimbriae, toxins, and iron receptors than commensal strains. One may ask whether it is the virulence factors alone that are required to establish infection. While these virulence factors clearly contribute strongly to pathogenesis, bacteria must survive by metabolizing nutrients available to them. By constructing mutants in all major metabolic pathways and co-challenging mice transurethrally with each mutant and the wild type strain, we identified which major metabolic pathways are required to infect the urinary tract. We must also ask what else is E. coli doing in vivo? To answer this question, we examined the transcriptome of E. coli CFT073 in the murine model of urinary tract infection (UTI) as well as for E. coli strains collected and analyzed directly from the urine of patients attending either a urology clinic or a university health clinic for symptoms of UTI. Using microarrays and RNA-seq, we measured in vivo gene expression for these uropathogenic E. coli strains, identifying genes upregulated during murine and human UTI. Our findings allow us to propose a new definition of bacterial virulence. PMID:26784237

  16. Transformation of Escherichia coli and protein expression using lipoplex mimicry.

    PubMed

    Yun, Chul-Ho; Bae, Chun-Sik; Ahn, Taeho

    2016-11-01

    We investigated a "one-step" method for transformation of and protein expression in Escherichia coli (E. coli) using a complex of n-stearylamine, a cationic lipid, and plasmid DNA, which mimics lipoplex-based approaches. When E. coli cells were treated with the cationic lipid-plasmid complex, the transformation efficiencies were in the range of approximately 2-3 × 10(6) colony-forming units. Further increase in the efficiency was obtained by co-treatment with calcium chloride (or rubidium chloride) and the complexes. Moreover, after DNA transfer, E. coli cells successfully expressed plasmid-encoded proteins such as cytochrome P450s and glutathione-S-transferase without overnight incubation of the cells to form colonies, an indispensable step in other bacterial transformation methods. In this study, we provide a simple method for E. coli transformation, which does not require the preparation of competent cells. The present method also shortens the overall procedures for transformation and gene expression in E. coli by omitting the colony-forming step. PMID:27416742

  17. Biochemical characteristic of biofilm of uropathogenic Escherichia coli Dr(+) strains.

    PubMed

    Zalewska-Piątek, Beata; Wilkanowicz, Sabina; Bruździak, Piotr; Piątek, Rafał; Kur, Józef

    2013-07-19

    Urinary tract infections caused by Escherichia coli are very common health problem in the developed countries. The virulence of the uropathogenic E. coli Dr(+) IH11128 is determined by Dr fimbriae, which are homopolymeric structures composed of DraE subunits with the DraD protein capping the fiber. In this study, we have analyzed the structural and biochemical properties of biofilms developed by E. coli strains expressing Dr fimbriae with or without the DraD tip subunit and the surface-exposed DraD protein. We have also demonstrated that these E. coli strains form biofilms on an abiotic surface in a nutrient-dependent fashion. We present evidence that Dr fimbriae are necessary during the first stage of bacterial interaction with the abiotic surface. In addition, we reveal that the DraD alone is also sufficient for the initial surface attachment at an even higher level than Dr fimbriae and that chloramphenicol is able to reduce the normal attachment of the analyzed E. coli. The action of chloramphenicol also shows that protein synthesis is required for the early events of biofilm formation. Additionally, we have identified reduced exopolysaccharide coverage in E. coli that express only Dr fimbrial polyadhesins at the cell surface with or without the DraD capping subunit.

  18. Bacterial chemotaxis differences in Escherichia coli isolated from different hosts.

    PubMed

    Dzinic, Sijana H; Luercio, Marcella; Ram, Jeffrey L

    2008-12-01

    The mechanisms mediating the association between Escherichia coli and specific hosts are unknown. This study investigates the hypothesis that the host-specific associations of E. coli strains are mediated in part by differences in chemotaxis. To test this hypothesis, chemotactic responses of E. coli strains isolated from different host groups (carnivores, herbivores, and omnivores) were tested with various attractants. In low-density agar chemotaxis assays, the average motility of E. coli in response to aspartate, serine, and ribose among the different groups was not significantly different; however, strains from carnivores responded significantly more to aspartate, relative to their responses to serine, in comparison with strains from herbivores, which responded equally or better to serine than to aspartate. The relatively greater chemotactic response of strains from carnivores to aspartate than to serine was confirmed in a subset of strains by capillary chemotaxis assay. Differences in responses to serine and aspartate were not due to growth differences, as determined by comparison of 24 h growth curves with glycerol, aspartate, and serine carbon sources. The differences in chemotactic behavior of E. coli strains isolated from herbivores and carnivores support the hypothesis that host-specific associations of E. coli strains are mediated in part by differences in chemotactic behavior.

  19. Transformation of Escherichia coli and protein expression using lipoplex mimicry.

    PubMed

    Yun, Chul-Ho; Bae, Chun-Sik; Ahn, Taeho

    2016-11-01

    We investigated a "one-step" method for transformation of and protein expression in Escherichia coli (E. coli) using a complex of n-stearylamine, a cationic lipid, and plasmid DNA, which mimics lipoplex-based approaches. When E. coli cells were treated with the cationic lipid-plasmid complex, the transformation efficiencies were in the range of approximately 2-3 × 10(6) colony-forming units. Further increase in the efficiency was obtained by co-treatment with calcium chloride (or rubidium chloride) and the complexes. Moreover, after DNA transfer, E. coli cells successfully expressed plasmid-encoded proteins such as cytochrome P450s and glutathione-S-transferase without overnight incubation of the cells to form colonies, an indispensable step in other bacterial transformation methods. In this study, we provide a simple method for E. coli transformation, which does not require the preparation of competent cells. The present method also shortens the overall procedures for transformation and gene expression in E. coli by omitting the colony-forming step.

  20. Double-strand end repair via the RecBC pathway in Escherichia coli primes DNA replication

    PubMed Central

    Kuzminov, Andrei; Stahl, Franklin W.

    1999-01-01

    To study the relationship between homologous recombination and DNA replication in Escherichia coli, we monitored the behavior of phage λ chromosomes, repressed or not for λ gene activities. Recombination in our system is stimulated both by DNA replication and by experimentally introduced double-strand ends, supporting the idea that DNA replication generates occasional double-strand ends. We report that the RecBC recombinational pathway of E. coli uses double-strand ends to prime DNA synthesis, implying a circular relationship between DNA replication and recombination and suggesting that the primary role of recombination is in the repair of disintegrated replication forks arising during vegetative reproduction. PMID:9990858

  1. Ciprofloxacin-resistant, CTX-M-15-producing Escherichia coli ST131 clone in extraintestinal infections in Italy.

    PubMed

    Cerquetti, M; Giufrè, M; García-Fernández, A; Accogli, M; Fortini, D; Luzzi, I; Carattoli, A

    2010-10-01

    Quinolone and β-lactam resistance mechanisms and clonal relationships were characterized among Escherichia coli isolates resistant to ciprofloxacin and extended-spectrum cephalosporins associated with human extra-intestinal infections in Rome. The E. coli. ST131 clone was found to be prevalent. This clone invariably carried a specific pattern of substitutions in the topoisomerase genes and all isolates but one produced CTX-M-15. One ST131 isolate produced SHV-12. The new ST131 variant described here is of particular concern because it combines fluoroquinolone resistance and chromosomally encoded CTX-M-15.

  2. Biofilm modifies expression of ribonucleotide reductase genes in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Cendra, Maria del Mar; Juárez, Antonio; Torrents, Eduard

    2012-01-01

    Ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) is an essential enzyme for all living organisms since is the responsible for the last step in the synthesis of the four deoxyribonucleotides (dNTPs) necessary for DNA replication and repair. In this work, we have investigated the expression of the three-RNR classes (Ia, Ib and III) during Escherichia coli biofilm formation. We show the temporal and spatial importance of class Ib and III RNRs during this process in two different E. coli wild-type strains, the commensal MG1655 and the enteropathogenic and virulent E2348/69, the prototype for the enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC). We have established that class Ib RNR, so far considered cryptic, play and important role during biofilm formation. The implication of this RNR class under the specific growth conditions of biofilm formation is discussed. PMID:23050019

  3. Incidence of Escherichia coli in black walnut meats.

    PubMed

    Meyer, M T; Vaughn, R H

    1969-11-01

    Examination of commercially shelled black walnut meats showed inconsistent numbers of total aerobic bacteria, coliforms, and Escherichia coli; variation occurred among different meat sizes and within each meat size. The incidence of E. coli on meats of commercially hulled black walnuts depended on the physical condition of the nuts. Apparently tightly sealed ones contained only a few or none, whereas those with visibly separated sutures and spoiled meats yielded the most. This contamination was in part correlated to a hulling operation. Large numbers of E. coli on the husk of the walnuts contaminated the hulling water, subsequently also contaminating the meats by way of separated sutures. Chlorination of the hulling wash water was ineffective. Attempts were made to decontaminate the walnut meats without subsequent deleterious changes in flavor or texture. A treatment in coconut oil at 100 C followed by removal of excess surface oil by centrifugation was best.

  4. Reconstruction of a chromatic response system in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Sugie, Yoshimi; Hori, Mayuko; Oka, Shunsuke; Ohtsuka, Hokuto; Aiba, Hirofumi

    2016-07-14

    Two-component signal transduction systems (TCS) are involved in widespread cellular responses to diverse signals from bacteria to plants. Cyanobacteria have evolved photoperception systems for efficient photosynthesis, and some histidine kinases are known to function as photosensors. In this study, we attempt to reconstruct the photoperception system in Escherichia coli to make an easily controllable ON/OFF switch for gene expressions. For this purpose, a CcaS-CcaR two-component system from Nostoc punctiforme was expressed with phycocyanobilin (PCB) producing enzymes in E. coli which carries a G-box-controlled reporter gene. We succeeded to endow E. coli with a gene activation switch that is regulated in a light-color dependent manner. The possibility of such a switch for the development of synthetic biology is pointed out. PMID:27246537

  5. Chemotaxis towards autoinducer 2 mediates autoaggregation in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Laganenka, Leanid; Colin, Remy; Sourjik, Victor

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria communicate by producing and sensing extracellular signal molecules called autoinducers. Such intercellular signalling, known as quorum sensing, allows bacteria to coordinate and synchronize behavioural responses at high cell densities. Autoinducer 2 (AI-2) is the only known quorum-sensing molecule produced by Escherichia coli but its physiological role remains elusive, although it is known to regulate biofilm formation and virulence in other bacterial species. Here we show that chemotaxis towards self-produced AI-2 can mediate collective behaviour—autoaggregation—of E. coli. Autoaggregation requires motility and is strongly enhanced by chemotaxis to AI-2 at physiological cell densities. These effects are observed regardless whether cell–cell interactions under particular growth conditions are mediated by the major E. coli adhesin (antigen 43) or by curli fibres. Furthermore, AI-2-dependent autoaggregation enhances bacterial stress resistance and promotes biofilm formation. PMID:27687245

  6. Functions of the gene products of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Riley, M

    1993-01-01

    A list of currently identified gene products of Escherichia coli is given, together with a bibliography that provides pointers to the literature on each gene product. A scheme to categorize cellular functions is used to classify the gene products of E. coli so far identified. A count shows that the numbers of genes concerned with small-molecule metabolism are on the same order as the numbers concerned with macromolecule biosynthesis and degradation. One large category is the category of tRNAs and their synthetases. Another is the category of transport elements. The categories of cell structure and cellular processes other than metabolism are smaller. Other subjects discussed are the occurrence in the E. coli genome of redundant pairs and groups of genes of identical or closely similar function, as well as variation in the degree of density of genetic information in different parts of the genome. PMID:7508076

  7. Engineering Escherichia coli K12 MG1655 to use starch

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To attain a sustainable bioeconomy, fuel, or valuable product, production must use biomass as substrate. Starch is one of the most abundant biomass resources and is present as waste or as a food and agroindustry by-product. Unfortunately, Escherichia coli, one of the most widely used microorganisms in biotechnological processes, cannot use starch as a carbon source. Results We engineered an E. coli strain capable of using starch as a substrate. The genetic design employed the native capability of the bacterium to use maltodextrins as a carbon source plus expression and secretion of its endogenous α-amylase, AmyA, in an adapted background. Biomass production improved using 35% dissolved oxygen and pH 7.2 in a controlled bioreactor. Conclusion The engineered E. coli strain can use starch from the milieu and open the possibility of optimize the process to use agroindustrial wastes to produce biofuels and other valuable chemicals. PMID:24886307

  8. Escherichia coli minichromosomes: random segregation and absence of copy number control.

    PubMed

    Jensen, M R; Løbner-Olesen, A; Rasmussen, K V

    1990-09-20

    Minichromosomes, i.e. plasmids that can replicate from an integrated oriC, have been puzzling because of their high copy numbers compared to that of the chromosomal oriC, their lack of incompatibility with the chromosome and their high loss frequencies. Using single cell resistance to tetracycline or ampicillin as an indicator of copy number we followed the development of minichromosome distributions in Escherichia coli cells transformed with minichromosomes and then allowed to grow towards the steady state. The final copy number distribution was not reached within 15 to 20 generations. If the minichromosome carried the sop (partitioning) genes from plasmid F, the development of the copy number distribution was further drastically delayed. We conclude that E. coli cells have no function that directly controls minichromosomal copy numbers, hence the absence of incompatibility in the sense of shared copy number control. We suggest that minichromosomes are subject to the same replication control as the chromosome but segregate randomly in the absence of integrated partitioning genes. This, combined with evidence that the lowest copy number classes are normally present despite high average copy numbers, can account for the high loss frequencies.

  9. Construction of a novel phenol synthetic pathway in Escherichia coli through 4-hydroxybenzoate decarboxylation.

    PubMed

    Miao, Liangtian; Li, Qingyan; Diao, Aipo; Zhang, Xueli; Ma, Yanhe

    2015-06-01

    Phenol is a bulk chemical with lots of applications in the chemical industry. Fermentative production of phenol had been realized in both Pseudomonas putida and Escherichia coli by recruiting tyrosine phenol-lyase (TPL). The TPL pathway needs tyrosine as the direct precursor for phenol production. In this work, a novel phenol synthetic pathway was created in E. coli by recruiting 4-hydroxybenzoate decarboxylase, which can convert 4-hydroxybenzoate to phenol and carbon dioxide. Activating 3-deoxy-D-arabino-heptulosonate-7-phosphate (DAHP) synthase and chorismate pyruvate lyase (UbiC) through plasmid overexpression led to 7- and 69-fold increase of phenol production, respectively, demonstrating that these two enzymes were the rate-limiting steps for phenol production. Genetically stable strains were then obtained by gene integration and gene modulation directly in chromosome. Phenol titer increased 147-fold (from 1.7 to 250 mg/L) after modulating the DAHP synthase, UbiC, and 4-hydroxybenzoate decarboxylase genes in chromosome. Five solvents were tested for two-phase extractive fermentation to eliminate phenol toxicity to E. coli cells. Tributyrin and dibutyl phthalate were the best two solvents for improving phenol production, leading to 23 and 30 % increase of total phenol production, respectively. Two-phase fed-batch fermentation of the best strain Phe009 was performed in a 7 L fermentor, which produced 9.51 g/L phenol with a yield of 0.061 g/g glucose.

  10. Global dissemination of a multidrug resistant Escherichia coli clone

    PubMed Central

    Petty, Nicola K.; Ben Zakour, Nouri L.; Stanton-Cook, Mitchell; Skippington, Elizabeth; Totsika, Makrina; Forde, Brian M.; Phan, Minh-Duy; Gomes Moriel, Danilo; Peters, Kate M.; Davies, Mark; Rogers, Benjamin A.; Dougan, Gordon; Rodriguez-Baño, Jesús; Pascual, Alvaro; Pitout, Johann D. D.; Upton, Mathew; Paterson, David L.; Walsh, Timothy R.; Schembri, Mark A.; Beatson, Scott A.

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli sequence type 131 (ST131) is a globally disseminated, multidrug resistant (MDR) clone responsible for a high proportion of urinary tract and bloodstream infections. The rapid emergence and successful spread of E. coli ST131 is strongly associated with several factors, including resistance to fluoroquinolones, high virulence gene content, the possession of the type 1 fimbriae FimH30 allele, and the production of the CTX-M-15 extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL). Here, we used genome sequencing to examine the molecular epidemiology of a collection of E. coli ST131 strains isolated from six distinct geographical locations across the world spanning 2000–2011. The global phylogeny of E. coli ST131, determined from whole-genome sequence data, revealed a single lineage of E. coli ST131 distinct from other extraintestinal E. coli strains within the B2 phylogroup. Three closely related E. coli ST131 sublineages were identified, with little association to geographic origin. The majority of single-nucleotide variants associated with each of the sublineages were due to recombination in regions adjacent to mobile genetic elements (MGEs). The most prevalent sublineage of ST131 strains was characterized by fluoroquinolone resistance, and a distinct virulence factor and MGE profile. Four different variants of the CTX-M ESBL–resistance gene were identified in our ST131 strains, with acquisition of CTX-M-15 representing a defining feature of a discrete but geographically dispersed ST131 sublineage. This study confirms the global dispersal of a single E. coli ST131 clone and demonstrates the role of MGEs and recombination in the evolution of this important MDR pathogen. PMID:24706808

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of Shiga Toxin-Negative Escherichia coli O157:H7 Strain C1-057, Isolated from Feedlot Cattle.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hua; Carlson, Brandon; Geornaras, Ifigenia; Woerner, Dale; Sofos, John; Belk, Keith

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli O157:H7 is one of the major foodborne pathogens in the United States. We isolated a variant Shiga toxin-negative E. coli O157:H7 strain from feedlot cattle. We report here the draft genome sequence of this isolate, consisting of a chromosome of ~4.8 Mb and two plasmids of ~96 kb and ~14 kb. PMID:26941140

  12. Cloning of the two pyruvate kinase isoenzyme structural genes from Escherichia coli: the relative roles of these enzymes in pyruvate biosynthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Ponce, E; Flores, N; Martinez, A; Valle, F; Bolívar, F

    1995-01-01

    We report the cloning of the pykA and pykF genes from Escherichia coli, which code for the two pyruvate kinase isoenzymes (ATP:pyruvate 2-O-phosphotransferases; EC 2.7.1.40) in this microorganism. These genes were insertionally inactivated with antibiotic resistance markers and utilized to interrupt one or both pyk genes in the E. coli chromosome. With these constructions, we were able to study the role of these isoenzymes in pyruvate biosynthesis. PMID:7559366

  13. Cross-Reactive Protection against Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli Infection by Enteropathogenic E. coli in a Mouse Model ▿

    PubMed Central

    Calderon Toledo, Carla; Arvidsson, Ida; Karpman, Diana

    2011-01-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) and enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) are related attaching and effacing (A/E) pathogens. The genes responsible for the A/E pathology are carried on a chromosomal pathogenicity island termed the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE). Both pathogens share a high degree of homology in the LEE and additional O islands. EHEC prevalence is much lower in areas where EPEC is endemic. This may be due to the development of antibodies against common EPEC and EHEC antigens. This study investigated the hypothesis that EPEC infections may protect against EHEC infections. We used a mouse model to inoculate BALB/c mice intragastrically, first with EPEC and then with EHEC (E. coli O157:H7). Four control groups received either a nonpathogenic E. coli (NPEC) strain followed by EHEC (NPEC/EHEC), phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) followed by EHEC (PBS/EHEC), EPEC/PBS, or PBS/PBS. Mice were monitored for weight loss and symptoms. EPEC colonized the intestine after challenge, and mice developed serum antibodies to intimin and E. coli secreted protein B (encoded in the LEE). Prechallenge with an EPEC strain had a protective effect after EHEC infection, as only a few mice developed mild symptoms, from which they recovered. These mice had an increase in body weight similar to that in control animals, and tissue morphology exhibited mild intestinal changes and normal renal histology. All mice that were not prechallenged with the EPEC strain developed mild to severe symptoms after EHEC infection, with weight loss as well as intestinal and renal histopathological changes. These data suggest that EPEC may protect against EHEC infection in this mouse model. PMID:21402761

  14. Redesigning Escherichia coli Metabolism for Anaerobic Production of Isobutanol▿†

    PubMed Central

    Trinh, Cong T.; Li, Johnny; Blanch, Harvey W.; Clark, Douglas S.

    2011-01-01

    Fermentation enables the production of reduced metabolites, such as the biofuels ethanol and butanol, from fermentable sugars. This work demonstrates a general approach for designing and constructing a production host that uses a heterologous pathway as an obligately fermentative pathway to produce reduced metabolites, specifically, the biofuel isobutanol. Elementary mode analysis was applied to design an Escherichia coli strain optimized for isobutanol production under strictly anaerobic conditions. The central metabolism of E. coli was decomposed into 38,219 functional, unique, and elementary modes (EMs). The model predictions revealed that during anaerobic growth E. coli cannot produce isobutanol as the sole fermentative product. By deleting 7 chromosomal genes, the total 38,219 EMs were constrained to 12 EMs, 6 of which can produce high yields of isobutanol in a range from 0.29 to 0.41 g isobutanol/g glucose under anaerobic conditions. The remaining 6 EMs rely primarily on the pyruvate dehydrogenase enzyme complex (PDHC) and are typically inhibited under anaerobic conditions. The redesigned E. coli strain was constrained to employ the anaerobic isobutanol pathways through deletion of 7 chromosomal genes, addition of 2 heterologous genes, and overexpression of 5 genes. Here we present the design, construction, and characterization of an isobutanol-producing E. coli strain to illustrate the approach. The model predictions are evaluated in relation to experimental data and strategies proposed to improve anaerobic isobutanol production. We also show that the endogenous alcohol/aldehyde dehydrogenase AdhE is the key enzyme responsible for the production of isobutanol and ethanol under anaerobic conditions. The glycolytic flux can be controlled to regulate the ratio of isobutanol to ethanol production. PMID:21642415

  15. Two pathogenicity islands in uropathogenic Escherichia coli J96: cosmid cloning and sample sequencing.

    PubMed

    Swenson, D L; Bukanov, N O; Berg, D E; Welch, R A

    1996-09-01

    Many of the virulence genes of pathogenic strains of Escherichia coli are carried in large multigene chromosomal segments called pathogenicity islands (PAIs) that are absent from normal fecal and laboratory K-12 strains of this bacterium. We are studying PAIs in order to better understand factors that govern virulence and to assess how such DNA segments are gained or lost during evolution. The isolation and sample sequencing of a set of 11 cosmid clones that cover all of one and much of a second large PAI in the uropathogenic E. coli J96 are described. These PAIs were mapped to the 64- and 94-min regions of the E. coli K-12 chromosome, which differ from the locations of three PAIs identified in other pathogenic E. coli strains. Analysis of the junction sequences with E. coli K-12-like DNAs showed that the insert at 94 min is within the 3' end of a phenylalanine tRNA gene, pheR, and is flanked by a 135-bp imperfect direct repeat. Analysis of the one junction recovered from the insert at 64 min indicated that it lies near another tRNA gene, pheV. To identify possible genes unique to these PAIs, 100 independent subclones of the cosmids were made by PstI digestion and ligation into a pBS+ plasmid and used in one-pass sample DNA sequencing from primer binding sites at the cloning site in the vector DNA. Database searches of the J96 PAI-specific sequences identified numerous instances in which the cloned DNAs shared significant sequence similarities to adhesins, toxins, and other virulence determinants of diverse pathogens. Several likely insertion sequence elements (IS100, IS630, and IS911) and conjugative R1 plasmid and P4 phage genes were also found. We propose that such mobile genetic elements may have facilitated the spread of virulence determinants within PAIs among bacteria.

  16. Escherichia coli β-Lactamases: What Really Matters

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, Priyanka; Singh, Nambram S.; Virdi, Jugsharan S.

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli strains belonging to diverse pathotypes have increasingly been recognized as a major public health concern. The β-lactam antibiotics have been used successfully to treat infections caused by pathogenic E. coli. However, currently, the utility of β-lactams is being challenged severely by a large number of hydrolytic enzymes – the β-lactamases expressed by bacteria. The menace is further compounded by the highly flexible genome of E. coli, and propensity of resistance dissemination through horizontal gene transfer and clonal spread. Successful management of infections caused by such resistant strains requires an understanding of the diversity of β-lactamases, their unambiguous detection, and molecular mechanisms underlying their expression and spread with regard to the most relevant information about individual bacterial species. Thus, this review comprises first such effort in this direction for E. coli, a bacterial species known to be associated with production of diverse classes of β-lactamases. The review also highlights the role of commensal E. coli as a potential but under-estimated reservoir of β-lactamases-encoding genes. PMID:27065978

  17. Escherichia coli ST131, an Intriguing Clonal Group

    PubMed Central

    Bertrand, Xavier; Madec, Jean-Yves

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY In 2008, a previously unknown Escherichia coli clonal group, sequence type 131 (ST131), was identified on three continents. Today, ST131 is the predominant E. coli lineage among extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) isolates worldwide. Retrospective studies have suggested that it may originally have risen to prominence as early as 2003. Unlike other classical group B2 ExPEC isolates, ST131 isolates are commonly reported to produce extended-spectrum β-lactamases, such as CTX-M-15, and almost all are resistant to fluoroquinolones. Moreover, ST131 E. coli isolates are considered to be truly pathogenic, due to the spectrum of infections they cause in both community and hospital settings and the large number of virulence-associated genes they contain. ST131 isolates therefore seem to contradict the widely held view that high levels of antimicrobial resistance are necessarily associated with a fitness cost leading to a decrease in pathogenesis. Six years after the first description of E. coli ST131, this review outlines the principal traits of ST131 clonal group isolates, based on the growing body of published data, and highlights what is currently known and what we need to find out to provide public health authorities with better information to help combat ST131. PMID:24982321

  18. Paper-based ELISA to rapidly detect Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Shih, Cheng-Min; Chang, Chia-Ling; Hsu, Min-Yen; Lin, Jyun-Yu; Kuan, Chen-Meng; Wang, Hsi-Kai; Huang, Chun-Te; Chung, Mu-Chi; Huang, Kui-Chou; Hsu, Cheng-En; Wang, Chun-Yuan; Shen, Ying-Cheng; Cheng, Chao-Min

    2015-12-01

    Escherichia coli is a generic indicator of fecal contamination, and certain serotypes cause food- and water-borne illness such as O157:H7. In the clinic, detection of bacteriuria, which is often due to E. coli, is critical before certain surgical procedures or in cases of nosocomial infection to prevent further adverse events such as postoperative infection or sepsis. In low- and middle-income countries, where insufficient equipment and facilities preclude modern methods of detection, a simple, low-cost diagnostic device to detect E. coli in water and in the clinic will have significant impact. We have developed a simple paper-based colorimetric platform to detect E. coli contamination in 5h. On this platform, the mean color intensity for samples with 10(5)cells/mL is 0.118±0.002 (n=4), and 0.0145±0.003 (P<0.01⁎⁎) for uncontaminated samples. This technique is less time-consuming, easier to perform, and less expensive than conventional methods. Thus, paper-based ELISA is an innovative point-of-care diagnostic tool to rapidly detect E. coli, and possibly other pathogens when customized as appropriate, especially in areas that lack advanced clinical equipment.

  19. Heterologous production of ribostamycin derivatives in engineered Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kurumbang, Nagendra Prasad; Park, Je Won; Yoon, Yeo Joon; Liou, Kwangkyoung; Sohng, Jae Kyung

    2010-09-01

    Aminoglycosides are a class of important antibiotic compounds used for various therapeutic indications. In recent times, their efficacy has been curtailed due to the rapid development of bacterial resistance. There is a need to develop novel derivatives with an improved spectrum of activity and higher sensitivity against pathogenic bacteria. Although efforts have been focused on the development of newer therapeutic agents by chemical synthesis, to our knowledge, there has been no attempt to harness the potential of microorganisms for this purpose. Escherichia coli affords a widely studied cellular system that could be utilized not only for understanding but also for attempting to engineer the biosynthetic pathway of secondary metabolites. The primary metabolic pathway of E. coli can be engineered to divert the precursor pool required for the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites. Utilizing this approach previously, we engineered E. coli host and generated E. coli M1. Here, we produced a ribostamycin derivative in the engineered host by heterologous expression of the recombinants constructed from the genes encoding the biosynthetic pathway in aminoglycoside-producing strains. The products obtained from the transformants were isolated, analyzed and verified to be ribostamycin derivatives. The study further demonstrated the importance of E. coli as surrogate antibiotic producer and also offered future possibility for the production of other aminoglycoside derivatives through genetic engineering and expression in a heterologous background.

  20. Recent Advances in Understanding Enteric Pathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Croxen, Matthew A.; Law, Robyn J.; Scholz, Roland; Keeney, Kristie M.; Wlodarska, Marta

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Although Escherichia coli can be an innocuous resident of the gastrointestinal tract, it also has the pathogenic capacity to cause significant diarrheal and extraintestinal diseases. Pathogenic variants of E. coli (pathovars or pathotypes) cause much morbidity and mortality worldwide. Consequently, pathogenic E. coli is widely studied in humans, animals, food, and the environment. While there are many common features that these pathotypes employ to colonize the intestinal mucosa and cause disease, the course, onset, and complications vary significantly. Outbreaks are common in developed and developing countries, and they sometimes have fatal consequences. Many of these pathotypes are a major public health concern as they have low infectious doses and are transmitted through ubiquitous mediums, including food and water. The seriousness of pathogenic E. coli is exemplified by dedicated national and international surveillance programs that monitor and track outbreaks; unfortunately, this surveillance is often lacking in developing countries. While not all pathotypes carry the same public health profile, they all carry an enormous potential to cause disease and continue to present challenges to human health. This comprehensive review highlights recent advances in our understanding of the intestinal pathotypes of E. coli. PMID:24092857

  1. Hierarchically imprinted polymer substrates for enhanced attachment of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fengxiang; Li, Hongzhe; Wang, Xin; Low, Hong Yee; Li, Xu

    2010-03-01

    Escherichia coli (E. coli) detection is important for ensuring human health and public security. One critical step in most detection methods is to have the E. coli cells attach to the substrate or transducer of a biosensor before they can be detected and/or identified. In this context, a chemical or physical enhancement effect arising from the substrate will help to achieve a high sensitivity of bacterial detection. This work makes use of hierarchically imprinted surface structures to demonstrate such effect using quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). Specifically, hierarchical structures are imprinted on polystyrene coated resonance crystals of QCM; such crystals, after incubation in an E. coli suspension of reduced concentration (1x10(4) colony forming units/mL), exhibit improved resonance frequency shifts, which are 1-2 orders of magnitude higher than those without the hierarchical structures. The enhancement effect is attributed to the enlarged surface area of the substrate and the way it immobilizes the bacteria. As revealed by scanning electron microscopy, the hierarchical substrates immobilize the E. coli cells by both trapping them in the micro-trenches and having them adhere to the nano-protrusions, while the single-level imprinted structures accommodate the cells mainly in the trenches or over the protrusions, instead of both.

  2. Pulsed-Plasma Disinfection of Water Containing Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satoh, Kohki; MacGregor, Scott J.; Anderson, John G.; Woolsey, Gerry A.; Fouracre, R. Anthony

    2007-03-01

    The disinfection of water containing the microorganism, Escherichia coli (E. coli) by exposure to a pulsed-discharge plasma generated above the water using a multineedle electrode (plasma-exposure treatment), and by sparging the off-gas of the pulsed plasma into the water (off-gas-sparging treatment), is performed in the ambient gases of air, oxygen, and nitrogen. For the off-gas-sparging treatment, bactericidal action is observed only when oxygen is used as the ambient gas, and ozone is found to generate the bactericidal action. For the plasma-exposure treatment, the density of E. coli bacteria decreases exponentially with plasma-exposure time for all the ambient gases. It may be concluded that the main contributors to E. coli inactivation are particle species produced by the pulsed plasma. For the ambient gases of air and nitrogen, the influence of acidification of the water in the system, as a result of pulsed-plasma exposure, may also contribute to the decay of E. coli density.

  3. Fumarate-Mediated Persistence of Escherichia coli against Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jun-Seob; Cho, Da-Hyeong; Heo, Paul; Jung, Suk-Chae; Park, Myungseo; Oh, Eun-Joong; Sung, Jaeyun; Kim, Pan-Jun; Lee, Suk-Chan; Lee, Dae-Hee; Lee, Sarah; Lee, Choong Hwan; Shin, Dongwoo

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial persisters are a small fraction of quiescent cells that survive in the presence of lethal concentrations of antibiotics. They can regrow to give rise to a new population that has the same vulnerability to the antibiotics as did the parental population. Although formation of bacterial persisters in the presence of various antibiotics has been documented, the molecular mechanisms by which these persisters tolerate the antibiotics are still controversial. We found that amplification of the fumarate reductase operon (FRD) in Escherichia coli led to a higher frequency of persister formation. The persister frequency of E. coli was increased when the cells contained elevated levels of intracellular fumarate. Genetic perturbations of the electron transport chain (ETC), a metabolite supplementation assay, and even the toxin-antitoxin-related hipA7 mutation indicated that surplus fumarate markedly elevated the E. coli persister frequency. An E. coli strain lacking succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), thereby showing a lower intracellular fumarate concentration, was killed ∼1,000-fold more effectively than the wild-type strain in the stationary phase. It appears that SDH and FRD represent a paired system that gives rise to and maintains E. coli persisters by producing and utilizing fumarate, respectively. PMID:26810657

  4. The Escherichia coli Proteome: Past, Present, and Future Prospects†

    PubMed Central

    Han, Mee-Jung; Lee, Sang Yup

    2006-01-01

    Proteomics has emerged as an indispensable methodology for large-scale protein analysis in functional genomics. The Escherichia coli proteome has been extensively studied and is well defined in terms of biochemical, biological, and biotechnological data. Even before the entire E. coli proteome was fully elucidated, the largest available data set had been integrated to decipher regulatory circuits and metabolic pathways, providing valuable insights into global cellular physiology and the development of metabolic and cellular engineering strategies. With the recent advent of advanced proteomic technologies, the E. coli proteome has been used for the validation of new technologies and methodologies such as sample prefractionation, protein enrichment, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, protein detection, mass spectrometry (MS), combinatorial assays with n-dimensional chromatographies and MS, and image analysis software. These important technologies will not only provide a great amount of additional information on the E. coli proteome but also synergistically contribute to other proteomic studies. Here, we review the past development and current status of E. coli proteome research in terms of its biological, biotechnological, and methodological significance and suggest future prospects. PMID:16760308

  5. Nonthermal atmospheric argon plasma jet effects on Escherichia coli biomacromolecules.

    PubMed

    Hosseinzadeh Colagar, Abasalt; Memariani, Hamed; Sohbatzadeh, Farshad; Valinataj Omran, Azadeh

    2013-12-01

    Nonthermal atmospheric plasma jet, a promising technology based on ionized gas at low temperatures, can be applied for disinfection of contaminated surfaces. In this study, Escherichia coli cells and their macromolecules were exposed to the nonthermal atmospheric argon plasma jet for different time durations. Total protein, genomic DNA, and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels of E. coli were assessed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and silver staining; agarose gel electrophoresis; and measurement of absorbance at 534 nm, respectively. After exposure, the spectroscopic results of liquid samples indicated that the survival reduction of E. coli can reach to 100 % in an exposure time of 600 s. Moreover, inactivation zones of E. coli, DNA degradation, and MDA levels were significantly increased. Additionally, banding patterns of total protein were changed and amino acid concentrations increased following ninhydrin test. The experimental results suggest that the nonthermal plasma could serve as an effective instrument for both sterilizing E. coli and degrading macromolecules from the surface of the objects being sterilized.

  6. Selective detection of Escherichia coli DNA using fluorescent carbon spindles.

    PubMed

    Roy, Anurag; Chatterjee, Sabyasachi; Pramanik, Srikrishna; Devi, Parukuttyamma Sujatha; Suresh Kumar, Gopinatha

    2016-04-28

    We investigate the interaction of hydrophilic blue emitting carbon spindles with various deoxyribonucleic acids (DNA) having different base pair compositions, such as Herring testes (HT), calf thymus (CT), Escherichia coli (EC) and Micrococcus lysodeikticus (ML) DNA, to understand the mode of interaction. Interestingly, the fluorescent carbon spindles selectively interacted with E. coli DNA resulting in enhanced fluorescence of the former. Interaction of the same carbon with other DNAs exhibited insignificant changes in fluorescence. In addition, in the presence of EC DNA, the D band in the Raman spectrum attributed to the defect state completely disappeared, resulting in enhanced crystallinity. Microscopy images confirmed the wrapping of DNA on the carbon spindles leading to the assembly of spindles in the form of flowers. Dissociation of double-stranded DNA occurred upon interaction with carbon spindles, resulting in selective E. coli DNA interaction. The carbon spindles also exhibited a similar fluorescence enhancement upon treating with E. coli bacteria. These results confirm the possibility of E. coli detection in water and other liquid foods using such fluorescent carbon. PMID:27081680

  7. Catabolism and nitrogen control in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Berberich, M A

    1985-01-01

    It would appear from these studies that nitrogen control reflects the catabolic capacity of the cell and that utilizable nitrogen sources and some carbon sources are, to some extent, in competition for this capacity. The series of catabolic events initiated by addition of D-amino acids or by growth on aldol sugars, in the presence of ammonia nitrogen in the growth medium, provide an opportunity for study of the positive aspect of nitrogen control under conditions where negative control predominates. This approach may eventually clarify the apparent interactions between the modification cascade components, PII and UT/UR, with the nitrogen regulatory gene, glnG. The utilization of nutrients by E. coli seems less a matter of energy than of expeditious use of whatever is offered in the diet. A comparison of the rate of increase of GS on cultural downshift with the rate of increase following D-glutamate addition would suggest that control by nitrogen limitation is about eight times more effective than positive activation by D-glutamate in the presence of ammonia nitrogen. This observation is consistent with the finding of an additive effect for the D-amino acids which can function as positive activators in GS regulation. It has been demonstrated for the wild-type organism that the increase in GS level generated by a mixture of D-glutamate, D-lysine, D-threonine, and glycine approximates the increase in GS level observed during step-down of the culture from an ammonia-sufficient to an ammonia-limited condition. This observation further supports the physiologic relevance of the effect of D-amino acids in nitrogen control and suggests that the apparent derepression of GS observed upon exhaustion of the ammonia nitrogen supply represents a composite of positive activation generated as alternative catabolic functions assume a greater importance. As might be expected, addition of D-glutamate to cells at the point of ammonia exhaustion had no additional positive effect

  8. Isolation of a Citrobacter freundii strain which carries the Escherichia coli O157 antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Bettelheim, K A; Evangelidis, H; Pearce, J L; Sowers, E; Strockbine, N A

    1993-01-01

    A biochemically typical strain of Citrobacter freundii which carries the Escherichia coli O157 antigen is described. The significance of differentiating such strains from typical E. coli O157 strains is stressed. PMID:7681442

  9. Diarrhea, bacteremia and multiorgan dysfunction due to an extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli strain with enteropathogenic E. coli genes

    PubMed Central

    Kessler, Robert; Nisa, Shahista; Hazen, Tracy H.; Horneman, Amy; Amoroso, Anthony; Rasko, David A.; Donnenberg, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    A 55-year-old man with well-controlled HIV had severe diarrhea for 3 weeks and developed multiorgan dysfunction and bacteremia due to Escherichia coli. The genome of the patient's isolate had features characteristic of extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli and genes distantly related to those defining enteropathogenic E. coli. PMID:26410828

  10. Risk Factors for Infection with Escherichia coli in Nursing Home Residents Colonized with Fluoroquinolone-Resistant E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Manning, Sara; Lautenbach, Ebbing; Tolomeo, Pam; Han, Jennifer H.

    2015-01-01

    A case-control study to determine risk factors for clinical infection with Escherichia coli was conducted among nursing home residents colonized with fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli. Among 94 subjects, 11 (12%) developed infections with E. coli. Risk factors included the presence of a urinary catheter or tracheostomy, diabetes mellitus, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole exposure. PMID:25880678

  11. Isolation and characterization of a gene involved in hemagglutination by an avian pathogenic Escherichia coli strain.

    PubMed Central

    Provence, D L; Curtiss, R

    1994-01-01

    In this article, we report the isolation and characterization of a gene that may be important in the adherence of avian pathogenic Escherichia coli to the avian respiratory tract. The E. coli strain HB101, which is unable to agglutinate chicken erythrocytes, was transduced with cosmid libraries from the avian pathogenic E. coli strain chi 7122. Enrichment of transductants that could agglutinate chicken erythrocytes yielded 19 colonies. These isolates contained cosmids that encompassed four nonoverlapping regions of the E. coli chromosome. Only one group of cosmids, represented by pYA3104, would cause E. coli CC118 to agglutinate chicken erythrocytes. A 10-kb fragment of this cosmid was subcloned in pACYC184. Transposon mutagenesis of this fragment with Tn5seq1 indicated that a contiguous 4.4-kb region of cloned DNA was required for hemagglutination. In vitro transcription/translation assays indicated that this 4.4-kb region of DNA encoded one protein of approximately 140 kDa. The nucleotide sequence of this region was determined and found to encode one open reading frame of 4,134 nucleotides that would encode a protein of 1,377 amino acids with a deduced molecular weight of 148,226. This gene confers on E. coli K-12 a temperature-sensitive hemagglutination phenotype that is best expressed when cells are grown at 26 degrees C, and we have designated this gene tsh and the deduced gene product Tsh. Insertional mutagenesis of the chromosomal tsh gene in chi 7122 had no effect on hemagglutination titers. The deduced protein was found to contain significant homology to the Haemophilus influenzae and Neisseria gonorrhoeae immunoglobulin A1 proteases. These data indicate that (i) a single gene isolated from the avian pathogenic E. coli strain chi 7122 will confer on E. coli K-12 a hemagglutination-positive phenotype, (ii) chi 7122 contains at least two distinct mechanisms to allow hemagglutination to occur, and (iii) the hemagglutinin Tsh has homology with a class of

  12. Escherichia coli mediated urinary tract infections: are there distinct uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) pathotypes?

    PubMed

    Marrs, Carl F; Zhang, Lixin; Foxman, Betsy

    2005-11-15

    A variety of virulence genes are associated with Escherichia coli mediated urinary tract infections. Particular sets of virulence factors shared by bacterial strains directing them through a particular pathogenesis process are called a "pathotype." Comparison of co-occurrence of potential urinary tract infection (UTI) virulence genes among different E. coli isolates from fecal and UTI collections provides evidence for multiple pathotypes of uropathogenic E. coli, but current understanding of critical genetic differences defining the pathotypes is limited. Discovery of additional E. coli genes involved in uropathogenesis and determination of their distribution and co-occurrences will further define UPEC pathotypes and allow for a more detailed analysis of how these pathotypes might differ in how they cause disease.

  13. Role of Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli Virulence Factors in Uropathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Boll, Erik J.; Struve, Carsten; Boisen, Nadia; Olesen, Bente; Stahlhut, Steen G.

    2013-01-01

    A multiresistant clonal Escherichia coli O78:H10 strain qualifying molecularly as enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) was recently shown to be the cause of a community-acquired outbreak of urinary tract infection (UTI) in greater Copenhagen, Denmark, in 1991. This marks the first time EAEC has been associated with an extraintestinal disease outbreak. Importantly, the outbreak isolates were recovered from the urine of patients with symptomatic UTI, strongly implying urovirulence. Here, we sought to determine the uropathogenic properties of the Copenhagen outbreak strain and whether these properties are conferred by the EAEC-specific virulence factors. We demonstrated that through expression of aggregative adherence fimbriae, the principal adhesins of EAEC, the outbreak strain exhibited pronouncedly increased adherence to human bladder epithelial cells compared to prototype uropathogenic strains. Moreover, the strain was able to produce distinct biofilms on abiotic surfaces, including urethral catheters. These findings suggest that EAEC-specific virulence factors increase uropathogenicity and may have played a significant role in the ability of the strain to cause a community-acquired outbreak of UTI. Thus, inclusion of EAEC-specific virulence factors is warranted in future detection and characterization of uropathogenic E. coli. PMID:23357383

  14. Persistence of Escherichia coli in batch and continuous vermicomposting systems.

    PubMed

    Hénault-Ethier, Louise; Martin, Vincent J J; Gélinas, Yves

    2016-10-01

    Vermicomposting is a biooxidation process in which epigeicearthworms act in synergy with microbial populations to degrade organic matter. Vermicomposting does not go through a thermophilic stage as required by North American legislations for pathogen eradication. We examined the survival of a Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) labeled Escherichia coli MG1655 as a model for the survival of pathogenic bacteria in both small-scale batch and medium-scale continuously-operated systems to discern the influence of the earthworm Eisenia fetida, nutrient content and the indigenous vermicompost microbial community on pathogen abundance. In batch systems, the microbial community had the greatest influence on the rapid decline of E. coli populations, and the effect of earthworms was only visible in microbially-impoverishedvermicomposts. No significant earthworm density-dependent relationship was observed on E. coli survival under continuous operation. E. coli numbers decreased below the US EPA compost sanitation guidelines of 10(3)Colony Forming Units (CFU)/g (dry weight) within 18-21days for both the small-scale batch and medium-scale continuous systems, but it took up to 51days without earthworms and with an impoverished microbial community to reach the legal limit. Nutrient replenishment (i.e. organic carbon) provided by continuous feed input did not appear to extend E. coli survival. In fact, longer survival of E. coli was noticed in treatments where less total and labile sugars were available, suggesting that sugars may support potentially antagonist bacteria in the vermicompost. Total N, pH and humidity did not appear to affect E. coli survival. Several opportunistic human pathogens may be found in vermicompost, and their populations are likely kept in check by antagonists.

  15. Contamination of beef chucks with Escherichia coli during carcass breaking.

    PubMed

    Gill, C O; McGinnis, J C; Bryant, J

    2001-11-01

    Samples were obtained by swabbing the whole of the chuck portion on each of the first 500 sides that entered a beef carcass breaking process and the whole of the outer surface of each of the chuck primal cuts that were prepared from those portions. Swabs obtained from groups of 10 sides or cuts that entered or emerged from the process consecutively were combined, and the coliforms and Escherichia coli recovered from each group were enumerated. Coliforms and E. coli were recovered only sporadically from groups of sides at log total numbers of 4.0 and 3.5 log CFU/500 sides, respectively. Coliforms were recovered from three and E. coli from none of the first six groups of cuts. Coliforms and E. coli were recovered from all subsequent groups of cuts, initially at log numbers mostly <3 log CFU/10 cuts, but ultimately at log numbers mostly >3 log CFU/10 cuts. The log total numbers of coliforms and E. coli recovered from cuts were >6.0 and 5.5 log CFU/500 cuts, respectively. After the breaking of about 600 sides, samples were obtained by swabbing a table onto which the part of the side that included the chuck portion was deposited after it was cut from the hanging side, and the belt that was used for conveying chucks. The numbers of coliforms and E. coli recovered from the table and conveyor belt were comparable with the numbers recovered from sides and cuts, respectively. Those findings show that most of the coliforms and E. coli recovered from the cuts were not present on carcass sides but that they originated largely from the cut conveying equipment. PMID:11726167

  16. Persistence of Escherichia coli in batch and continuous vermicomposting systems.

    PubMed

    Hénault-Ethier, Louise; Martin, Vincent J J; Gélinas, Yves

    2016-10-01

    Vermicomposting is a biooxidation process in which epigeicearthworms act in synergy with microbial populations to degrade organic matter. Vermicomposting does not go through a thermophilic stage as required by North American legislations for pathogen eradication. We examined the survival of a Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) labeled Escherichia coli MG1655 as a model for the survival of pathogenic bacteria in both small-scale batch and medium-scale continuously-operated systems to discern the influence of the earthworm Eisenia fetida, nutrient content and the indigenous vermicompost microbial community on pathogen abundance. In batch systems, the microbial community had the greatest influence on the rapid decline of E. coli populations, and the effect of earthworms was only visible in microbially-impoverishedvermicomposts. No significant earthworm density-dependent relationship was observed on E. coli survival under continuous operation. E. coli numbers decreased below the US EPA compost sanitation guidelines of 10(3)Colony Forming Units (CFU)/g (dry weight) within 18-21days for both the small-scale batch and medium-scale continuous systems, but it took up to 51days without earthworms and with an impoverished microbial community to reach the legal limit. Nutrient replenishment (i.e. organic carbon) provided by continuous feed input did not appear to extend E. coli survival. In fact, longer survival of E. coli was noticed in treatments where less total and labile sugars were available, suggesting that sugars may support potentially antagonist bacteria in the vermicompost. Total N, pH and humidity did not appear to affect E. coli survival. Several opportunistic human pathogens may be found in vermicompost, and their populations are likely kept in check by antagonists. PMID:27499290

  17. Comparative Genomics Provides Insight into the Diversity of the Attaching and Effacing Escherichia coli Virulence Plasmids

    PubMed Central

    Hazen, Tracy H.; Kaper, James B.; Nataro, James P.

    2015-01-01

    Attaching and effacing Escherichia coli (AEEC) strains are a genomically diverse group of diarrheagenic E. coli strains that are characterized by the presence of the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE) genomic island, which encodes a type III secretion system that is essential to virulence. AEEC strains can be further classified as either enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC), typical enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), or atypical EPEC, depending on the presence or absence of the Shiga toxin genes or bundle-forming pilus (BFP) genes. Recent AEEC genomic studies have focused on the diversity of the core genome, and less is known regarding the genetic diversity and relatedness of AEEC plasmids. Comparative genomic analyses in this study demonstrated genetic similarity among AEEC plasmid genes involved in plasmid replication conjugative transfer and maintenance, while the remainder of the plasmids had sequence variability. Investigation of the EPEC adherence factor (EAF) plasmids, which carry the BFP genes, demonstrated significant plasmid diversity even among isolates within the same phylogenomic lineage, suggesting that these EAF-like plasmids have undergone genetic modifications or have been lost and acquired multiple times. Global transcriptional analyses of the EPEC prototype isolate E2348/69 and two EAF plasmid mutants of this isolate demonstrated that the plasmid genes influence the expression of a number of chromosomal genes in addition to the LEE. This suggests that the genetic diversity of the EAF plasmids could contribute to differences in the global virulence regulons of EPEC isolates. PMID:26238712

  18. Comparative Genomics Provides Insight into the Diversity of the Attaching and Effacing Escherichia coli Virulence Plasmids.

    PubMed

    Hazen, Tracy H; Kaper, James B; Nataro, James P; Rasko, David A

    2015-10-01

    Attaching and effacing Escherichia coli (AEEC) strains are a genomically diverse group of diarrheagenic E. coli strains that are characterized by the presence of the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE) genomic island, which encodes a type III secretion system that is essential to virulence. AEEC strains can be further classified as either enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC), typical enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), or atypical EPEC, depending on the presence or absence of the Shiga toxin genes or bundle-forming pilus (BFP) genes. Recent AEEC genomic studies have focused on the diversity of the core genome, and less is known regarding the genetic diversity and relatedness of AEEC plasmids. Comparative genomic analyses in this study demonstrated genetic similarity among AEEC plasmid genes involved in plasmid replication conjugative transfer and maintenance, while the remainder of the plasmids had sequence variability. Investigation of the EPEC adherence factor (EAF) plasmids, which carry the BFP genes, demonstrated significant plasmid diversity even among isolates within the same phylogenomic lineage, suggesting that these EAF-like plasmids have undergone genetic modifications or have been lost and acquired multiple times. Global transcriptional analyses of the EPEC prototype isolate E2348/69 and two EAF plasmid mutants of this isolate demonstrated that the plasmid genes influence the expression of a number of chromosomal genes in addition to the LEE. This suggests that the genetic diversity of the EAF plasmids could contribute to differences in the global virulence regulons of EPEC isolates.

  19. Transcription of the Escherichia coli fliC gene is regulated by metal ions

    SciTech Connect

    Guzzo, A.; Diorio, C.; DuBow, M.S. )

    1991-08-01

    luxAB gene fusions in the Escherichia coli genome were used to screen for clones displaying transcriptional changes in the presence of aluminum. One clone was found that contained a luciferase gene fusion in which transcription was increased in the presence of aluminum and which was subsequently shown to be induced by copper, iron, and nickel. Cloning of the metal-regulated gene, hybridization to the ordered phage {lambda} bank of the E. coli chromosome, and sequencing of DNA adjacent to the luxAB fusion revealed that the insertion occurred within the fliC (hag) gene of E. coli. This gene encodes flagellin the filament subunit of the bacterial motility organ, and is under the control of several regulatory cascades. These results suggest that environmental metals may play a role in the regulation of the motility potential of E. coli and that this bioluminescent gene fusion clone (or derivatives thereof) may be used to prepare a biosensor for the rapid detection of metal contamination in water samples.

  20. MultiFun, a multifunctional classification scheme for Escherichia coli K-12 gene products.

    PubMed

    Serres, M H; Riley, M

    2000-01-01

    An enriched classification system for cellular functions of gene products of Escherichia coli K-12 was developed based on the initial classification by Riley. In the new classification scheme, MultiFun, cellular functions are divided into 10 major categories: Metabolism, Information Transfer, Regulation, Transport, Cell Processes, Cell Structure, Location, Extra-chromosomal Origin, DNA Site, and Cryptic Gene. These major categories are further sub-divided into a hierarchical scheme. Two thousand nine hundred twenty-two gene products of E. coli K-12 were assigned to one or more functions depending on the role they play in the cell. Functional assignments were made to 66% of E. coli gene products, ranging from 1 to 16 assignments per gene product. The expansion of cellular function categories and the assignment to more than one category (multifunction) provides a more complete description of the gene products and their roles and hence better reflects the functional complexity of organisms. We believe this classification system will be useful in the field of genome analysis, both for annotation purposes and for comparative studies. The functional classification scheme and the cellular function assignments made to E. coli gene products can be accessed from the web at the databases GenProtEC (http://genprotec.mbl.edu) and EcoCyc (http://www.ecocyc.org).

  1. Genome Sequence of the Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli Bacteriophage UFV-AREG1

    PubMed Central

    Batalha, Laís Silva; Albino, Luiz Augusto A.; Boggione, Delaine Meireles Gouveia; Gontijo, Marco Tulio Pardini; Bazzolli, Denise M. Soares; Mendonca, Regina C. Santos

    2016-01-01

    Here, we present the genome sequence of the Escherichia coli bacteriophage UFV-AREG1. This phage was isolated from cowshed wastewater and showed specificity for enterohemorrhagic E. coli O157:H7 (ATCC 43895), E. coli 0111 (CDC O11ab) and E. coli (ATCC 23229). PMID:27738021

  2. Non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli: detection and characterization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Escherichia coli strains that produce Shiga toxins, referred to as Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) or verotoxigenic E. coli (VTEC) are important food-borne pathogens that cause hemorrhagic colitis (HC) and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). E. coli O157:H7 is a common cause of STEC infection; ho...

  3. Diarrhea, Urosepsis and Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome Caused by the Same Heteropathogenic Escherichia coli Strain.

    PubMed

    Ang, C Wim; Bouts, Antonia H M; Rossen, John W A; Van der Kuip, Martijn; Van Heerde, Marc; Bökenkamp, Arend

    2016-09-01

    We describe an 8-month-old girl with diarrhea, urosepsis and hemolytic uremic syndrome caused by Escherichia coli. Typing of cultured E. coli strains from urine and blood revealed the presence of virulence factors from multiple pathotypes of E. coli. This case exemplifies the genome plasticity of E. coli and the resulting heteropathogenic strains.

  4. A putative, novel coli surface antigen 8B (CS8B) of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Njoroge, Samuel M.; Boinett, Christine J.; Madé, Laure F.; Ouko, Tom T.; Fèvre, Eric M.; Thomson, Nicholas R.; Kariuki, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains harbor multiple fimbriae and pili to mediate host colonization, including the type IVb pilus, colonization factor antigen III (CFA/III). Not all colonization factors are well characterized or known in toxin positive ETEC isolates, which may have an impact identifying ETEC isolates based on molecular screening of these biomarkers. We describe a novel coli surface antigen (CS) 8 subtype B (CS8B), a family of CFA/III pilus, in a toxin producing ETEC isolate from a Kenyan collection. In highlighting the existence of this putative CS, we provide the sequence and specific primers, which can be used alongside other ETEC primers previously described. PMID:26187892

  5. A putative, novel coli surface antigen 8B (CS8B) of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Njoroge, Samuel M; Boinett, Christine J; Madé, Laure F; Ouko, Tom T; Fèvre, Eric M; Thomson, Nicholas R; Kariuki, Samuel

    2015-10-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains harbor multiple fimbriae and pili to mediate host colonization, including the type IVb pilus, colonization factor antigen III (CFA/III). Not all colonization factors are well characterized or known in toxin positive ETEC isolates, which may have an impact identifying ETEC isolates based on molecular screening of these biomarkers. We describe a novel coli surface antigen (CS) 8 subtype B (CS8B), a family of CFA/III pilus, in a toxin producing ETEC isolate from a Kenyan collection. In highlighting the existence of this putative CS, we provide the sequence and specific primers, which can be used alongside other ETEC primers previously described. PMID:26187892

  6. A putative, novel coli surface antigen 8B (CS8B) of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Njoroge, Samuel M; Boinett, Christine J; Madé, Laure F; Ouko, Tom T; Fèvre, Eric M; Thomson, Nicholas R; Kariuki, Samuel

    2015-10-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains harbor multiple fimbriae and pili to mediate host colonization, including the type IVb pilus, colonization factor antigen III (CFA/III). Not all colonization factors are well characterized or known in toxin positive ETEC isolates, which may have an impact identifying ETEC isolates based on molecular screening of these biomarkers. We describe a novel coli surface antigen (CS) 8 subtype B (CS8B), a family of CFA/III pilus, in a toxin producing ETEC isolate from a Kenyan collection. In highlighting the existence of this putative CS, we provide the sequence and specific primers, which can be used alongside other ETEC primers previously described.

  7. Posttranslational Modifications of Ribosomal Proteins in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Nesterchuk, M V; Sergiev, P V; Dontsova, O A

    2011-04-01

    А number of ribosomal proteins inEscherichia coliundergo posttranslational modifications. Six ribosomal proteins are methylated (S11, L3, L11, L7/L12, L16, and L33), three proteins are acetylated (S5, S18, and L7), and protein S12 is methylthiolated. Extra amino acid residues are added to protein S6. С-terminal amino acid residues are partially removed from protein L31. The functional significance of these modifications has remained unclear. These modifications are not vital to the cells, and it is likely that they have regulatory functions. This paper reviews all the known posttranslational modifications of ribosomal proteins inEscherichia coli. Certain enzymes responsible for the modifications and mechanisms of enzymatic reactions are also discussed.

  8. coliBASE: an online database for Escherichia coli, Shigella and Salmonella comparative genomics.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Roy R; Khan, Arshad M; Pallen, Mark J

    2004-01-01

    We have constructed coliBASE, a database for Escherichia coli, Shigella and Salmonella comparative genomics available online at http://colibase. bham.ac.uk. Unlike other E.coli databases, which focus on the laboratory model strain K12, coliBASE is intended to reflect the full diversity of E.coli and its relatives. The database contains comparative data including whole genome alignments and lists of putative orthologous genes, together with numerous analytical tools and links to existing online resources. The data are stored in a relational database, accessible by a number of user-friendly search methods and graphical browsers. The database schema is generic and can easily be applied to other bacterial genomes. Two such databases, CampyDB (for the analysis of Campylobacter spp.) and ClostriDB (for Clostridium spp.) are also available at http://campy.bham.ac.uk and http://clostri. bham.ac.uk, respectively. An example of the power of E.coli comparative analyses such as those available through coliBASE is presented. PMID:14681417

  9. Development of functionalised polyelectrolyte capsules using filamentous Escherichia coli cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Escherichia coli is one of the best studied microorganisms and finds multiple applications especially as tool in the heterologous production of interesting proteins of other organisms. The heterologous expression of special surface (S-) layer proteins caused the formation of extremely long E. coli cells which leave transparent tubes when they divide into single E. coli cells. Such natural structures are of high value as bio-templates for the development of bio-inorganic composites for many applications. In this study we used genetically modified filamentous Escherichia coli cells as template for the design of polyelectrolyte tubes that can be used as carrier for functional molecules or particles. Diversity of structures of biogenic materials has the potential to be used to construct inorganic or polymeric superior hybrid materials that reflect the form of the bio-template. Such bio-inspired materials are of great interest in diverse scientific fields like Biology, Chemistry and Material Science and can find application for the construction of functional materials or the bio-inspired synthesis of inorganic nanoparticles. Results Genetically modified filamentous E. coli cells were fixed in 2% glutaraldehyde and coated with alternating six layers of the polyanion polyelectrolyte poly(sodium-4styrenesulfonate) (PSS) and polycation polyelectrolyte poly(allylamine-hydrochloride) (PAH). Afterwards we dissolved the E. coli cells with 1.2% sodium hypochlorite, thus obtaining hollow polyelectrolyte tubes of 0.7 μm in diameter and 5–50 μm in length. For functionalisation the polyelectrolyte tubes were coated with S-layer protein polymers followed by metallisation with Pd(0) particles. These assemblies were analysed with light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Conclusion The thus constructed new material offers possibilities for diverse applications like novel catalysts or metal

  10. Overexpression of the Replicative Helicase in Escherichia coli Inhibits Replication Initiation and Replication Fork Reloading.

    PubMed

    Brüning, Jan-Gert; Myka, Kamila Katarzyna; McGlynn, Peter

    2016-03-27

    Replicative helicases play central roles in chromosome duplication and their assembly onto DNA is regulated via initiators and helicase loader proteins. The Escherichia coli replicative helicase DnaB and the helicase loader DnaC form a DnaB6-DnaC6 complex that is required for loading DnaB onto single-stranded DNA. Overexpression of dnaC inhibits replication by promoting continual rebinding of DnaC to DnaB and consequent prevention of helicase translocation. Here we show that overexpression of dnaB also inhibits growth and chromosome duplication. This inhibition is countered by co-overexpression of wild-type DnaC but not of a DnaC mutant that cannot interact with DnaB, indicating that a reduction in DnaB6-DnaC6 concentration is responsible for the phenotypes associated with elevated DnaB concentration. Partial defects in the oriC-specific initiator DnaA and in PriA-specific initiation away from oriC during replication repair sensitise cells to dnaB overexpression. Absence of the accessory replicative helicase Rep, resulting in increased replication blockage and thus increased reinitiation away from oriC, also exacerbates DnaB-induced defects. These findings indicate that elevated levels of helicase perturb replication initiation not only at origins of replication but also during fork repair at other sites on the chromosome. Thus, imbalances in levels of the replicative helicase and helicase loader can inhibit replication both via inhibition of DnaB6-DnaC6 complex formation with excess DnaB, as shown here, and promotion of formation of DnaB6-DnaC6 complexes with excess DnaC [Allen GC, Jr., Kornberg A. Fine balance in the regulation of DnaB helicase by DnaC protein in replication in Escherichia coli. J. Biol. Chem. 1991;266:22096-22101; Skarstad K, Wold S. The speed of the Escherichia coli fork in vivo depends on the DnaB:DnaC ratio. Mol. Microbiol. 1995;17:825-831]. Thus, there are two mechanisms by which an imbalance in the replicative helicase and its associated

  11. Overexpression of the Replicative Helicase in Escherichia coli Inhibits Replication Initiation and Replication Fork Reloading

    PubMed Central

    Brüning, Jan-Gert; Myka, Kamila Katarzyna; McGlynn, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Replicative helicases play central roles in chromosome duplication and their assembly onto DNA is regulated via initiators and helicase loader proteins. The Escherichia coli replicative helicase DnaB and the helicase loader DnaC form a DnaB6–DnaC6 complex that is required for loading DnaB onto single-stranded DNA. Overexpression of dnaC inhibits replication by promoting continual rebinding of DnaC to DnaB and consequent prevention of helicase translocation. Here we show that overexpression of dnaB also inhibits growth and chromosome duplication. This inhibition is countered by co-overexpression of wild-type DnaC but not of a DnaC mutant that cannot interact with DnaB, indicating that a reduction in DnaB6–DnaC6 concentration is responsible for the phenotypes associated with elevated DnaB concentration. Partial defects in the oriC-specific initiator DnaA and in PriA-specific initiation away from oriC during replication repair sensitise cells to dnaB overexpression. Absence of the accessory replicative helicase Rep, resulting in increased replication blockage and thus increased reinitiation away from oriC, also exacerbates DnaB-induced defects. These findings indicate that elevated levels of helicase perturb replication initiation not only at origins of replication but also during fork repair at other sites on the chromosome. Thus, imbalances in levels of the replicative helicase and helicase loader can inhibit replication both via inhibition of DnaB6–DnaC6 complex formation with excess DnaB, as shown here, and promotion of formation of DnaB6–DnaC6 complexes with excess DnaC [Allen GC, Jr., Kornberg A. Fine balance in the regulation of DnaB helicase by DnaC protein in replication in Escherichia coli. J. Biol. Chem. 1991;266:22096–22101; Skarstad K, Wold S. The speed of the Escherichia coli fork in vivo depends on the DnaB:DnaC ratio. Mol. Microbiol. 1995;17:825–831]. Thus, there are two mechanisms by which an imbalance in the replicative helicase and its

  12. Advances in Escherichia coli production of therapeutic proteins.

    PubMed

    Swartz, J R

    2001-04-01

    Escherichia coli offers a means for the rapid and economical production of recombinant proteins. These advantages, coupled with a wealth of biochemical and genetic knowledge, have enabled the production of such economically sensitive products as insulin and bovine growth hormone. Although significant progress has been made in transcription, translation and secretion, one of the major challenges is obtaining the product in a soluble and bioactive form. Recent progress in oxidative cytoplasmic folding and cell-free protein synthesis offers attractive alternatives to standard expression methods.

  13. Evolution of Escherichia coli during Growth in a Constant Environment

    PubMed Central

    Helling, Robert B.; Vargas, Christopher N.; Adams, Julian

    1987-01-01

    Populations of Escherichia coli, initiated with a single clone and maintained for long periods in glucose-limited continuous culture, developed extensive polymorphisms. In one population, examined after 765 generations, two majority and two minority types were identified. Stable mixed populations were reestablished from the isolated strains. Factors involved in the development of this polymorphism included differences in the maximum specific growth rate and in the transport of glucose, and excretion of metabolites by some clones which were utilized by minority clones. PMID:3301527

  14. Origin and Dissemination of Antimicrobial Resistance among Uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Nolan, Lisa K; Li, Ganwu; Logue, Catherine M

    2015-10-01

    Antimicrobial agents of various types have important bearing on the outcomes of microbial infections. These agents may be bacteriostatic or -cidal, exert their impact via various means, originate from a living organism or a laboratory, and appropriately be used in or on living tissue or not. Though the primary focus of this chapter is on resistance to the antimicrobial agents used to treat uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC)-caused urinary tract infections (UTIs), some attention will be given to UPEC's resistance to silver-containing antiseptics, which may be incorporated into catheters to prevent foreign body-associated UTIs. PMID:26542043

  15. Membrane Protein Production in Escherichia coli: Protocols and Rules.

    PubMed

    Angius, Federica; Ilioaia, Oana; Uzan, Marc; Miroux, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Functional and structural studies on membrane proteins are limited by the difficulty to produce them in large amount and in a functional state. In this review, we provide protocols to achieve high-level expression of membrane proteins in Escherichia coli. The T7 RNA polymerase-based expression system is presented in detail and protocols to assess and improve its efficiency are discussed. Protocols to isolate either membrane or inclusion bodies and to perform an initial qualitative test to assess the solubility of the recombinant protein are also included. PMID:27485328

  16. Causes, prevention and treatment of Escherichia coli infections.

    PubMed

    Gould, Dinah

    Escherichia coli is a normal inhabitant of the human gastrointestinal tract and can cause healthcare-associated infections. The organism is most frequently responsible for urinary tract infections and it is the bacterium most often implicated in the cause of diarrhoea in people travelling overseas. In recent years, a strain called Ecoli O157 has gained notoriety for causing foodborne infection, which can have severe health consequences, especially in young children. This article describes the range of different infections caused by Ecoli in healthcare settings and the community and discusses the characteristics of the different strains of the bacteria that explain variations in their pathogenicity. PMID:20441035

  17. Membrane Protein Production in Escherichia coli: Protocols and Rules.

    PubMed

    Angius, Federica; Ilioaia, Oana; Uzan, Marc; Miroux, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Functional and structural studies on membrane proteins are limited by the difficulty to produce them in large amount and in a functional state. In this review, we provide protocols to achieve high-level expression of membrane proteins in Escherichia coli. The T7 RNA polymerase-based expression system is presented in detail and protocols to assess and improve its efficiency are discussed. Protocols to isolate either membrane or inclusion bodies and to perform an initial qualitative test to assess the solubility of the recombinant protein are also included.

  18. Hydrogen exchange of disordered proteins in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Smith, Austin E; Zhou, Larry Z; Pielak, Gary J

    2015-05-01

    A truly disordered protein lacks a stable fold and its backbone amide protons exchange with solvent at rates predicted from studies of unstructured peptides. We have measured the exchange rates of two model disordered proteins, FlgM and α-synuclein, in buffer and in Escherichia coli using the NMR experiment, SOLEXSY. The rates are similar in buffer and cells and are close to the rates predicted from data on small, unstructured peptides. This result indicates that true disorder can persist inside the crowded cellular interior and that weak interactions between proteins and macromolecules in cells do not necessarily affect intrinsic rates of exchange.

  19. Biochemical and cultural characteristics of invasive Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Silva, R M; Toledo, M R; Trabulsi, L R

    1980-01-01

    The biochemical characteristics of 97 invasive Escherichia coli strains of different O serogroups were studied. Considered as a group, the behavior of the strains was quite variable. However, none of them decarboxylated lysine and all but seven strains, belonging to the O124 serogroup, were nonmotile. The growth of 25 strains obtained on MacConkey, salmonella-shigella, xylose-lysine-desoxycholate, and Hektoen enteric agars was compared. MacConkey and Hektoen enteric agars yielded the highest average growth for these strains, whereas salmonella-shigella agar had the lowest average counts. PMID:6991526

  20. Regulation of the L-arabinose operon of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Schleif, R

    2000-12-01

    Over forty years of research on the L-arabinose operon of Escherichia coli have provided insights into the mechanism of positive regulation of gene activity. This research also discovered DNA looping and the mechanism by which the regulatory protein changes its DNA-binding properties in response to the presence of arabinose. As is frequently seen in focused research on biological subjects, the initial studies were primarily genetic. Subsequently, the genetic approaches were augmented by physiological and then biochemical studies. Now biophysical studies are being conducted at the atomic level, but genetics still has a crucial role in the study of this system.

  1. Dual genetic selection of synthetic riboswitches in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Yoko; Yokobayashi, Yohei

    2014-01-01

    This chapter describes a genetic selection strategy to engineer synthetic riboswitches that can chemically regulate gene expression in Escherichia coli. Riboswitch libraries are constructed by randomizing the nucleotides that potentially comprise an expression platform and fused to the hybrid selection/screening marker tetA-gfpuv. Iterative ON and OFF selections are performed under appropriate conditions that favor the survival or the growth of the cells harboring the desired riboswitches. After the selection, rapid screening of individual riboswitch clones is performed by measuring GFPuv fluorescence without subcloning. This optimized dual genetic selection strategy can be used to rapidly develop synthetic riboswitches without detailed computational design or structural knowledge. PMID:24549616

  2. CRISPR adaptation in Escherichia coli subtypeI-E system.

    PubMed

    Kiro, Ruth; Goren, Moran G; Yosef, Ido; Qimron, Udi

    2013-12-01

    The CRISPRs (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) and their associated Cas (CRISPR-associated) proteins are a prokaryotic adaptive defence system against foreign nucleic acids. The CRISPR array comprises short repeats flanking short segments, called 'spacers', which are derived from foreign nucleic acids. The process of spacer insertion into the CRISPR array is termed 'adaptation'. Adaptation allows the system to rapidly evolve against emerging threats. In the present article, we review the most recent studies on the adaptation process, and focus primarily on the subtype I-E CRISPR-Cas system of Escherichia coli.

  3. Butyrate production in engineered Escherichia coli with synthetic scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Baek, Jang-Mi; Mazumdar, Suman; Lee, Sang-Woo; Jung, Moo-Young; Lim, Jae-Hyung; Seo, Sang-Woo; Jung, Gyoo-Yeol; Oh, Min-Kyu

    2013-10-01

    Butyrate pathway was constructed in recombinant Escherichia coli using the genes from Clostridium acetobutylicum and Treponema denticola. However, the pathway constructed from exogenous enzymes did not efficiently convert carbon flux to butyrate. Three steps of the productivity enhancement were attempted in this study. First, pathway engineering to delete metabolic pathways to by-products successfully improved the butyrate production. Second, synthetic scaffold protein that spatially co-localizes enzymes was introduced to improve the efficiency of the heterologous pathway enzymes, resulting in threefold improvement in butyrate production. Finally, further optimizations of inducer concentrations and pH adjustment were tried. The final titer of butyrate was 4.3 and 7.2 g/L under batch and fed-batch cultivation, respectively. This study demonstrated the importance of synthetic scaffold protein as a useful tool for optimization of heterologous butyrate pathway in E. coli.

  4. SILVER NANOPARTICLES-DISK DIFFUSION TEST AGAINST Escherichia coli ISOLATES

    PubMed Central

    CUNHA, Francisco Afrânio; MAIA, Kamila Rocha; MALLMAN, Eduardo José Jucá; CUNHA, Maria da Conceição dos Santos Oliveira; MACIEL, Antonio Auberson Martins; de SOUZA, Ieda Pereira; MENEZES, Everardo Albuquerque; FECHINE, Pierre Basílio Almeida

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Nanotechnology can be a valuable ally in the treatment of infections. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are structures that have antimicrobial activity. The aim of this study was to produce AgNPs by green methods, characterize these structures, and assess their antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli associated with the antibiotic ciprofloxacin. AgNPs were characterized by spectroscopic and microscopic techniques. Antimicrobial activity was evaluated by the disk diffusion method against 10 strains of E. coli. The synthesized AgNPs showed a spherical shape and a size of 85.07 ± 12.86 nm (mean ± SD). AgNPs increased the activity of ciprofloxacin by 40% and may represent a new therapeutic option for the treatment of bacterial infections. PMID:27680178

  5. Polarity effects in the lactose operon of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Li, Yong; Altman, Sidney

    2004-05-21

    An intergenic RNA segment between lacY and lacA of the lactose operon in Escherichia coli is cleaved by RNase P, an endoribonuclease. The cleavage of the intergenic RNA was ten times less efficient than cleavage of a tRNA precursor in vitro. Fragments of the RNase P cleavage product are detectable in vivo in the wild-type strain but not in a mutant strain at the restrictive temperature. The cleavage product that contains lacA in the wild-type strain was quickly degraded. When this intergenic segment was cloned upstream of a reporter gene, the expression of the reporter gene was also inhibited substantially in wild-type E.coli, but not in a temperature sensitive mutant strain in RNase P at the restrictive temperature. These results support data regarding the natural polarity between lacZ versus lacA, the downstream gene. PMID:15123418

  6. Engineering Escherichia coli for improved ethanol production from gluconate.

    PubMed

    Hildebrand, Amanda; Schlacta, Theresa; Warmack, Rebeccah; Kasuga, Takao; Fan, Zhiliang

    2013-10-10

    We report on engineering Escherichia coli to produce ethanol at high yield from gluconic acid (gluconate). Knocking out genes encoding for the competing pathways (l-lactate dehydrogenase and pyruvate formate lyase A) in E. coli KO11 eliminated lactate production, lowered the carbon flow toward acetate production, and improved the ethanol yield from 87.5% to 97.5% of the theoretical maximum, while the growth rate of the mutant strain was about 70% of the wild type. The corresponding genetic modifications led to a small improvement of ethanol yield from 101.5% to 106.0% on glucose. Deletion of the pyruvate dehydrogenase gene (pdh) alone improved the ethanol yield from 87.5% to 90.4% when gluconate was a substrate. The growth rate of the mutant strain was identical to that of the wild type. The corresponding genetic modification led to no improvements on ethanol yield on glucose.

  7. Impact of cranberry on Escherichia coli cellular surface characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Brandy J.; Malanoski, Anthony P.; Ligler, Frances S.

    2008-12-19

    The anti-adhesive effects of cranberry have been attributed to both interactions of its components with the surface of bacterial cells and to inhibition of p-fimbriae expression. Previous reports also suggested that the presence of cranberry juice changed the Gram stain characteristics of Escherichia coli. Here, we show that the morphology of E. coli is changed when grown in the presence of juice or extract from Vaccinium macrocarpon (cranberry). Gene expression analysis indicates the down regulation of flagellar basal body rod and motor proteins. Consistent with this finding and previous reports, the SEM images indicate a decrease in the visible p-fimbriae. The iodine used in Gram-staining protocols was found to interact differently with the bacterial membrane when cells were cultured in spiked media. Slight alterations in the Gram stain protocol demonstrated that culturing in the presence of cranberry juice does not change the Gram stain characteristics contradicting other reports.

  8. Impact of cranberry on Escherichia coli cellular surface characteristics.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Brandy J; Lin, Baochuan; Dinderman, Michael A; Rubin, Robert A; Malanoski, Anthony P; Ligler, Frances S

    2008-12-19

    The anti-adhesive effects of cranberry have been attributed to both interactions of its components with the surface of bacterial cells and to inhibition of p-fimbriae expression. Previous reports also suggested that the presence of cranberry juice changed the Gram stain characteristics of Escherichia coli. Here, we show that the morphology of E. coli is changed when grown in the presence of juice or extract from Vaccinium macrocarpon (cranberry). Gene expression analysis indicates the down regulation of flagellar basal body rod and motor proteins. Consistent with this finding and previous reports, the SEM images indicate a decrease in the visible p-fimbriae. The iodine used in Gram-staining protocols was found to interact differently with the bacterial membrane when cells were cultured in spiked media. Slight alterations in the Gram stain protocol demonstrated that culturing in the presence of cranberry juice does not change the Gram stain characteristics contradicting other reports.

  9. Production and purification of active snowdrop lectin in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Longstaff, M; Powell, K S; Gatehouse, J A; Raemaekers, R; Newell, C A; Hamilton, W D

    1998-02-15

    Recombinant snowdrop lectin was produced in Escherichia coli from a cDNA clone encoding mature Galanthus nivalis agglutinin. After induction with isopropylthio-beta-D-galactoside, inclusion bodies from E. coli were solubilised and the G. nivalis agglutinin purified by metal-affinity chromatography using a carboxy-terminal hexahistidine tag. The protein was refolded on the metal-affinity column prior to elution. After purification, the recombinant G. nivalis agglutinin agglutinated rabbit erythrocytes to a dilution similar to that determined for 'native' lectin purified from snowdrop, and showed similar specific binding to mannose. The toxicity of the recombinant G. nivalis agglutinin towards rice brown planthopper (Nilaparvata lugens) was shown to be similar to that of 'native' G. nivalis agglutinin when incorporated into an artificial diet. The recombinant G. nivalis agglutinin is thus functionally similar to 'native' snowdrop lectin.

  10. Two proline porters in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed Central

    Stalmach, M E; Grothe, S; Wood, J M

    1983-01-01

    Escherichia coli mutants defective at putP and putA lack proline transport via proline porter I and proline dehydrogenase activity, respectively. They retain a proline uptake system (proline porter II) that is induced during tryptophan-limited growth and are sensitive to the toxic L-proline analog, 3,4-dehydroproline. 3,4-Dehydroproline-resistant mutants derived from a putP putA mutant lack proline porter II. Auxotrophic derivatives derived from putP+ or putP bacteria can grow if provided with proline at low concentration (25 microM); those derived from the 3,4-dehydroproline-resistant mutants require high proline for growth (2.5 mM). We conclude that E. coli, like Salmonella typhimurium, possesses a second proline porter that is inactivated by mutations at the proP locus. PMID:6355059

  11. The complete genome sequence of Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Blattner, F R; Plunkett, G; Bloch, C A; Perna, N T; Burland, V; Riley, M; Collado-Vides, J; Glasner, J D; Rode, C K; Mayhew, G F; Gregor, J; Davis, N W; Kirkpatrick, H A; Goeden, M A; Rose, D J; Mau, B; Shao, Y

    1997-09-01

    The 4,639,221-base pair sequence of Escherichia coli K-12 is presented. Of 4288 protein-coding genes annotated, 38 percent have no attributed function. Comparison with five other sequenced microbes reveals ubiquitous as well as narrowly distributed gene families; many families of similar genes within E. coli are also evident. The largest family of paralogous proteins contains 80 ABC transporters. The genome as a whole is strikingly organized with respect to the local direction of replication; guanines, oligonucleotides possibly related to replication and recombination, and most genes are so oriented. The genome also contains insertion sequence (IS) elements, phage remnants, and many other patches of unusual composition indicating genome plasticity through horizontal transfer. PMID:9278503

  12. Nanomechanical motion of Escherichia coli adhered to a surface.

    PubMed

    Lissandrello, C; Inci, F; Francom, M; Paul, M R; Demirci, U; Ekinci, K L

    2014-09-15

    Nanomechanical motion of bacteria adhered to a chemically functionalized silicon surface is studied by means of a microcantilever. A non-specific binding agent is used to attach Escherichia coli (E. coli) to the surface of a silicon microcantilever. The microcantilever is kept in a liquid medium, and its nanomechanical fluctuations are monitored using an optical displacement transducer. The motion of the bacteria couples efficiently to the microcantilever well below its resonance frequency, causing a measurable increase in the microcantilever fluctuations. In the time domain, the fluctuations exhibit large-amplitude low-frequency oscillations. In corresponding frequency-domain measurements, it is observed that the mechanical energy is focused at low frequencies with a 1/f(α) -type power law. A basic physical model is used for explaining the observed spectral distribution of the mechanical energy. These results lay the groundwork for understanding the motion of microorganisms adhered to surfaces and for developing micromechanical sensors for bacteria.

  13. Cellulosic hydrolysate toxicity and tolerance mechanisms in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Tirzah Y; Sandoval, Nicholas R; Gill, Ryan T

    2009-01-01

    The sustainable production of biofuels will require the efficient utilization of lignocellulosic biomass. A key barrier involves the creation of growth-inhibitory compounds by chemical pretreatment steps, which ultimately reduce the efficiency of fermentative microbial biocatalysts. The primary toxins include organic acids, furan derivatives, and phenolic compounds. Weak acids enter the cell and dissociate, resulting in a drop in intracellular pH as well as various anion-specific effects on metabolism. Furan derivatives, dehydration products of hexose and pentose sugars, have been shown to hinder fermentative enzyme function. Phenolic compounds, formed from lignin, can disrupt membranes and are hypothesized to interfere with the function of intracellular hydrophobic targets. This review covers mechanisms of toxicity and tolerance for these compounds with a specific focus on the important industrial organism Escherichia coli. Recent efforts to engineer E. coli for improved tolerance to these toxins are also discussed. PMID:19832972

  14. Nanomechanical motion of Escherichia coli adhered to a surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lissandrello, C.; Inci, F.; Francom, M.; Paul, M. R.; Demirci, U.; Ekinci, K. L.

    2014-09-01

    Nanomechanical motion of bacteria adhered to a chemically functionalized silicon surface is studied by means of a microcantilever. A non-specific binding agent is used to attach Escherichia coli (E. coli) to the surface of a silicon microcantilever. The microcantilever is kept in a liquid medium, and its nanomechanical fluctuations are monitored using an optical displacement transducer. The motion of the bacteria couples efficiently to the microcantilever well below its resonance frequency, causing a measurable increase in the microcantilever fluctuations. In the time domain, the fluctuations exhibit large-amplitude low-frequency oscillations. In corresponding frequency-domain measurements, it is observed that the mechanical energy is focused at low frequencies with a 1/fα-type power law. A basic physical model is used for explaining the observed spectral distribution of the mechanical energy. These results lay the groundwork for understanding the motion of microorganisms adhered to surfaces and for developing micromechanical sensors for bacteria.

  15. Mounting of Escherichia coli spheroplasts for AFM imaging.

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, Claretta J; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L; Allison, David P; Doktycz, Mitchel John

    2005-11-01

    The cytoplasmic membrane of Escherichia coli (E. coli) is the location of numerous, chemically specific transporters and recognition elements. Investigation of this membrane in vivo by atomic force microscopy (AFM) requires removal of the cell wall and stable immobilization of the spheroplast. AFM images demonstrate that spheroplasts can be secured with warm gelatin applied to the mica substrate just before the addition of a spheroplast suspension. The resulting preparation can be repeatedly imaged by AFM over the course of several hours. Confocal fluorescence imaging confirms the association of the spheroplasts with the gelatin layer. Gelatin molecules are known to reorder into a network after heating. Entrapment within this gelatin network is believed to be responsible for the immobilization of spheroplasts on mica.

  16. Purification of recombinant ovalbumin from inclusion bodies of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, Vaibhav; Singh, Anupam; Panda, Amulya K

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant ovalbumin expressed in bacterial host is essentially free from post-translational modifications and can be useful in understanding the structure-function relationship of the protein. In this study, ovalbumin was expressed in Escherichia coli in the form of inclusion bodies. Ovalbumin inclusion bodies were solubilized using urea and refolded by decreasing the urea concentration by dilution. Refolded protein was purified by anion exchange chromatography. Overall recovery of purified recombinant ovalbumin from inclusion bodies was about 30% with 98% purity. Purified recombinant ovalbumin was characterized by mass spectrometry, circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy. Recombinant ovalbumin was shown to be resistant to trypsin using protease resistance assay. This indicated proper refolding of ovalbumin from inclusion bodies of E. coli. This method provides a simple way of producing ovalbumin free of post-translational modifications.

  17. Genomic anatomy of Escherichia coli O157:H7 outbreaks.

    PubMed

    Eppinger, Mark; Mammel, Mark K; Leclerc, Joseph E; Ravel, Jacques; Cebula, Thomas A

    2011-12-13

    The rapid emergence of Escherichia coli O157:H7 from an unknown strain in 1982 to the dominant hemorrhagic E. coli serotype in the United States and the cause of widespread outbreaks of human food-borne illness highlights a need to evaluate critically the extent to which genomic plasticity of this important enteric pathogen contributes to its pathogenic potential and its evolution as well as its adaptation in different ecological niches. Aimed at a better understanding of the evolution of the E. coli O157:H7 pathogenome, the present study presents the high-quality sequencing and comparative phylogenomic analysis of a comprehensive panel of 25 E. coli O157:H7 strains associated with three nearly simultaneous food-borne outbreaks of human disease in the United States. Here we present a population genetic analysis of more than 200 related strains recovered from patients, contaminated produce, and zoonotic sources. High-resolution phylogenomic approaches allow the dynamics of pathogenome evolution to be followed at a high level of phylogenetic accuracy and resolution. SNP discovery and study of genome architecture and prophage content identified numerous biomarkers to assess the extent of genetic diversity within a set of clinical and environmental strains. A total of 1,225 SNPs were identified in the present study and are now available for typing of the E. coli O157:H7 lineage. These data should prove useful for the development of a refined phylogenomic framework for forensic, diagnostic, and epidemiological studies to define better risk in response to novel and emerging E. coli O157:H7 resistance and virulence phenotypes. PMID:22135463

  18. Escherichia coli Mutants that Synthesize Dephosphorylated Lipid A Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Ingram, Brian O.; Masoudi, Ali; Raetz, Christian R. H.

    2010-01-01

    The lipid A moiety of Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide is a hexa-acylated disaccharide of glucosamine that is phosphorylated at the 1 and 4′ positions. Expression of the Francisella novicida lipid A 1-phosphatase FnLpxE in E. coli results in dephosphorylation of the lipid A proximal unit. Co-expression of FnLpxE and the Rhizobium leguminosarum lipid A oxidase RlLpxQ in E. coli converts much of the proximal glucosamine to 2-amino-2-deoxy-gluconate. Expression of the F. novicida lipid A 4′-phosphatase FnLpxF in wild-type E. coli has no effect because FnLpxF cannot dephosphorylate hexa-acylated lipid A. However, expression of FnLpxF in E. coli lpxM mutants, which synthesize penta-acylated lipid A lacking the secondary 3′-myristate chain, causes extensive 4′-dephosphorylation. Co-expression of FnLpxE and FnLpxF in lpxM mutants results in massive accumulation of lipid A species lacking both phosphate groups, and introduction of RlLpxQ generates phosphate-free lipid A variants containing 2-amino-2-deoxy-gluconate. The proposed lipid A structures were confirmed by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. Strains with 4′-dephosphorylated lipid A display increased polymyxin resistance. Heptose-deficient mutants of E. coli lacking both the 1- and 4′-phosphate moieties are viable on plates but sensitive to CaCl2. Our methods for re-engineering lipid A structure may be useful for generating novel vaccines and adjuvants. PMID:20795687

  19. A structural view of the dissociation of Escherichia coli tryptophanase.

    PubMed

    Green, Keren; Qasim, Nasrin; Gdaelvsky, Garik; Kogan, Anna; Goldgur, Yehuda; Parola, Abraham H; Lotan, Ofra; Almog, Orna

    2015-12-01

    Tryptophanase (Trpase) is a pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent homotetrameric enzyme which catalyzes the degradation of L-tryptophan. Trpase is also known for its cold lability, which is a reversible loss of activity at low temperature (2°C) that is associated with the dissociation of the tetramer. Escherichia coli Trpase dissociates into dimers, while Proteus vulgaris Trpase dissociates into monomers. As such, this enzyme is an appropriate model to study the protein-protein interactions and quaternary structure of proteins. The aim of the present study was to understand the differences in the mode of dissociation between the E. coli and P. vulgaris Trpases. In particular, the effect of mutations along the molecular axes of homotetrameric Trpase on its dissociation was studied. To answer this question, two groups of mutants of the E. coli enzyme were created to resemble the amino-acid sequence of P. vulgaris Trpase. In one group, residues 15 and 59 that are located along the molecular axis R (also termed the noncatalytic axis) were mutated. The second group included a mutation at position 298, located along the molecular axis Q (also termed the catalytic axis). Replacing amino-acid residues along the R axis resulted in dissociation of the tetramers into monomers, similar to the P. vulgaris Trpase, while replacing amino-acid residues along the Q axis resulted in dissociation into dimers only. The crystal structure of the V59M mutant of E. coli Trpase was also determined in its apo form and was found to be similar to that of the wild type. This study suggests that in E. coli Trpase hydrophobic interactions along the R axis hold the two monomers together more strongly, preventing the dissociation of the dimers into monomers. Mutation of position 298 along the Q axis to a charged residue resulted in tetramers that are less susceptible to dissociation. Thus, the results indicate that dissociation of E. coli Trpase into dimers occurs along the molecular Q axis.

  20. The reduction of nitrous oxide to dinitrogen by Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kaldorf, M; Linne von Berg, K H; Meier, U; Servos, U; Bothe, H

    1993-01-01

    Escherichia coli K12 reduces nitrous oxide stoichiometrically to molecular nitrogen with rates of 1.9 mumol/h x mg protein. The activity is induced by anaerobiosis and nitrate. N2-formation from N2O is inhibited by C2H2 (Ki approximately 0.03 mM in the medium) and nitrite (Ki = 0.3 mM) but not by azide. A mutant defective in FNR synthesis is unable to reduce N2O to N2. The reaction in the wild type could routinely be followed by gas chromatography and alternatively by mass spectrometry measuring the formation of 15N2 from 15N2O. The enzyme catalyzing N2O-reduction in E. coli could not be identified; it is probably neither nitrate reductase nor nitrogenase. E. coli does not grow with N2O as sole respiratory electron acceptor. N2O-reduction might not have a physiological role in E. coli, and the enzyme involved might catalyze something else in nature, as it has a low affinity for the substrate N2O (apparent Km approximately 3.0 mM). The capability for N2O-reduction to N2 is not restricted to E. coli but is also demonstrable in Yersinia kristensenii and Buttiauxella agrestis of the Enterobacteriaceae. E. coli is able to produce NO and N2O from nitrite by nitrate reductase, depending on the assay conditions. In such experiments NO2- is not reduced to N2 because of the high demand for N2O of N2O-reduction and the inhibitory effect of NO2- on this reaction.

  1. Genomic anatomy of Escherichia coli O157:H7 outbreaks

    PubMed Central

    Eppinger, Mark; Mammel, Mark K.; Leclerc, Joseph E.; Ravel, Jacques; Cebula, Thomas A.

    2011-01-01

    The rapid emergence of Escherichia coli O157:H7 from an unknown strain in 1982 to the dominant hemorrhagic E. coli serotype in the United States and the cause of widespread outbreaks of human food-borne illness highlights a need to evaluate critically the extent to which genomic plasticity of this important enteric pathogen contributes to its pathogenic potential and its evolution as well as its adaptation in different ecological niches. Aimed at a better understanding of the evolution of the E. coli O157:H7 pathogenome, the present study presents the high-quality sequencing and comparative phylogenomic analysis of a comprehensive panel of 25 E. coli O157:H7 strains associated with three nearly simultaneous food-borne outbreaks of human disease in the United States. Here we present a population genetic analysis of more than 200 related strains recovered from patients, contaminated produce, and zoonotic sources. High-resolution phylogenomic approaches allow the dynamics of pathogenome evolution to be followed at a high level of phylogenetic accuracy and resolution. SNP discovery and study of genome architecture and prophage content identified numerous biomarkers to assess the extent of genetic diversity within a set of clinical and environmental strains. A total of 1,225 SNPs were identified in the present study and are now available for typing of the E. coli O157:H7 lineage. These data should prove useful for the development of a refined phylogenomic framework for forensic, diagnostic, and epidemiological studies to define better risk in response to novel and emerging E. coli O157:H7 resistance and virulence phenotypes. PMID:22135463

  2. Modeling Escherichia coli removal in constructed wetlands under pulse loading.

    PubMed

    Hamaamin, Yaseen A; Adhikari, Umesh; Nejadhashemi, A Pouyan; Harrigan, Timothy; Reinhold, Dawn M

    2014-03-01

    Manure-borne pathogens are a threat to water quality and have resulted in disease outbreaks globally. Land application of livestock manure to croplands may result in pathogen transport through surface runoff and tile drains, eventually entering water bodies such as rivers and wetlands. The goal of this study was to develop a robust model for estimating the pathogen removal in surface flow wetlands under pulse loading conditions. A new modeling approach was used to describe Escherichia coli removal in pulse-loaded constructed wetlands using adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference systems (ANFIS). Several ANFIS models were developed and validated using experimental data under pulse loading over two seasons (winter and summer). In addition to ANFIS, a mechanistic fecal coliform removal model was validated using the same sets of experimental data. The results showed that the ANFIS model significantly improved the ability to describe the dynamics of E. coli removal under pulse loading. The mechanistic model performed poorly as demonstrated by lower coefficient of determination and higher root mean squared error compared to the ANFIS models. The E. coli concentrations corresponding to the inflection points on the tracer study were keys to improving the predictability of the E. coli removal model.

  3. Characterization of lipopolysaccharides from Escherichia coli K-12 mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Boman, H G; Monner, D A

    1975-01-01

    Chemical analyses of the carbohydrate composition of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) from a number of LPS mutants were used to propose a schematic composition for the LPS from Escherichia coli K-12. The formula contains four regions: the first consists of lipid A, ketodeoxyoctonoic acid, and a phosphorous component; the second contains only heptose; the third only glucose; and the fourth additional glucose, galactose, and rhamnose. LPS from E. coli B may have a similar composition but lacks the galactose and rhamnose units. A set of LPS-specific bacteriophages were used for comparing three mutants of Salmonella with a number of LPS mutants of E. coli K-12. The results confirm that there are basic similarities in the first and second regions of the LPS structure; they also support the four region divisions of the LPS formula. Paper chromatography was used for characterization of 32-P-labeled LPS from different strains of E. coli and Salmonella. The Rf values for LPS varied from 0.27 to 0.75 depending on the amounts of carbohydrates in the molecule. LPS from all strains studied was homogenous except for strain D31 which produced two types of LPS. Mild acid hydrolysis of labeled LPS liberated lipid A and two other components with phosphate, one of which was assigned to the first region. It is suggested that paper chromatography can be used in biosynthetic studies concerning regions 2 to 4. Images PMID:1089628

  4. Modeling Escherichia coli removal in constructed wetlands under pulse loading.

    PubMed

    Hamaamin, Yaseen A; Adhikari, Umesh; Nejadhashemi, A Pouyan; Harrigan, Timothy; Reinhold, Dawn M

    2014-03-01

    Manure-borne pathogens are a threat to water quality and have resulted in disease outbreaks globally. Land application of livestock manure to croplands may result in pathogen transport through surface runoff and tile drains, eventually entering water bodies such as rivers and wetlands. The goal of this study was to develop a robust model for estimating the pathogen removal in surface flow wetlands under pulse loading conditions. A new modeling approach was used to describe Escherichia coli removal in pulse-loaded constructed wetlands using adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference systems (ANFIS). Several ANFIS models were developed and validated using experimental data under pulse loading over two seasons (winter and summer). In addition to ANFIS, a mechanistic fecal coliform removal model was validated using the same sets of experimental data. The results showed that the ANFIS model significantly improved the ability to describe the dynamics of E. coli removal under pulse loading. The mechanistic model performed poorly as demonstrated by lower coefficient of determination and higher root mean squared error compared to the ANFIS models. The E. coli concentrations corresponding to the inflection points on the tracer study were keys to improving the predictability of the E. coli removal model. PMID:24231031

  5. Accumulation and efflux of polychlorinated biphenyls in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Geng, Shen; Fang, Jun; Turner, Kendrick B; Daunert, Sylvia; Wei, Yinan

    2012-06-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are environmental pollutants that have been associated with numerous adverse health effects in human and animals. Hydroxylated PCBs (HPCBs) are the product of the oxidative metabolism of PCBs. The presence of hydroxyl groups in HPCBs makes these compounds more hydrophilic than the parent PCBs. One of the best approaches to break down and remove these contaminants is bioremediation; an environmentally friendly process that uses microorganisms to degrade hazardous chemicals into non-toxic ones. In this study, we investigated the cellular accumulation and toxicity of selected PCBs and HPCBs in Gram-negative bacteria, using Escherichia coli as a model organism. We found that none of the five PCBs tested were toxic to E. coli, presumably due to their limited bioavailability. Nevertheless, different HPCBs tested showed different levels of toxicity. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the primary multidrug efflux system in E. coli, AcrAB-TolC, facilitated the efflux of HPCBs out of the cell. Since AcrAB-TolC is constitutively expressed in E. coli and is conserved in all sequenced Gram-negative bacterial genomes, our results suggest that the efflux activities of multidrug resistant pumps may affect the accumulation and degradation of PCBs in Gram-negative bacteria.

  6. Respiration of Escherichia coli in the mouse intestine.

    PubMed

    Jones, Shari A; Chowdhury, Fatema Z; Fabich, Andrew J; Anderson, April; Schreiner, Darrel M; House, Anetra L; Autieri, Steven M; Leatham, Mary P; Lins, Jeremy J; Jorgensen, Mathias; Cohen, Paul S; Conway, Tyrrell

    2007-10-01

    Mammals are aerobes that harbor an intestinal ecosystem dominated by large numbers of anaerobic microorganisms. However, the role of oxygen in the intestinal ecosystem is largely unexplored. We used systematic mutational analysis to determine the role of respiratory metabolism in the streptomycin-treated mouse model of intestinal colonization. Here we provide evidence that aerobic respiration is required for commensal and pathogenic Escherichia coli to colonize mice. Our results showed that mutants lacking ATP synthase, which is required for all respiratory energy-conserving metabolism, were eliminated by competition with respiratory-competent wild-type strains. Mutants lacking the high-affinity cytochrome bd oxidase, which is used when oxygen tensions are low, also failed to colonize. However, the low-affinity cytochrome bo(3) oxidase, which is used when oxygen tension is high, was found not to be necessary for colonization. Mutants lacking either nitrate reductase or fumarate reductase also had major colonization defects. The results showed that the entire E. coli population was dependent on both microaerobic and anaerobic respiration, consistent with the hypothesis that the E. coli niche is alternately microaerobic and anaerobic, rather than static. The results indicate that success of the facultative anaerobes in the intestine depends on their respiratory flexibility. Despite competition for relatively scarce carbon sources, the energy efficiency provided by respiration may contribute to the widespread distribution (i.e., success) of E. coli strains as commensal inhabitants of the mammalian intestine. PMID:17698572

  7. Dynamic Transcriptional Response of Escherichia coli to Inclusion Body Formation

    PubMed Central

    Baig, Faraz; Fernando, Lawrence P.; Salazar, Mary Alice; Powell, Rhonda R.; Bruce, Terri F.; Harcum, Sarah W.

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli is used intensively for recombinant protein production, but one key challenge with recombinant E. coli is the tendency of recombinant proteins to misfold and aggregate into insoluble inclusion bodies (IBs). IBs contain high concentrations of inactive recombinant protein that require recovery steps to salvage a functional recombinant protein. Currently, no universally effective method exists to prevent IB formation in recombinant E. coli. In this study, DNA microarrays were used to compare the E. coli gene expression response dynamics to soluble and insoluble recombinant protein production. As expected and previously reported, the classical heat-shock genes had increased expression due to IB formation, including protein folding chaperones and proteases. Gene expression levels for protein synthesis-related and energy-synthesis pathways were also increased. Many transmembrane transporter and corresponding catabolic pathways genes had decreased expression for substrates not present in the culture medium. Additionally, putative genes represented over one-third of the genes identified to have significant expression changes due to IB formation, indicating many important cellular responses to IB formation still need to be characterized. Interestingly, cells grown in 3% ethanol had significantly reduced gene expression responses due to IB formation. Taken together, these results indicate that IB formation is complex, stimulates the heat-shock response, increases protein and energy synthesis needs, and streamlines transport and catabolic processes, while ethanol diminished all of these responses. PMID:24338599

  8. Magnetically-Actuated Escherichia coli System for Micro Lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauback, S.; Brown, E.; Pérez-Guzman, L.; Peace, C.; Pierce, C.; Lower, B. H.; Lower, S. K.; Sooryakumar, R.

    2015-03-01

    Technologies that control matter at the nano- and micro-scale are crucial for developing new engineered materials and devices. While the more traditional approaches for such manipulations often depend on lithographic fabrication, they can be expanded upon by taking advantage of the biological systems within a living cell which also operate on the nano- and micro- scale. In this study, a system is being developed to functionalize a targeted location on the surface of a chip with the protein AmCyan from transformed Escherichia coli cells. Using established methods in molecular biology where a plasmid with the amcyan gene sequence is inserted into the cell, E. coli are engineered to express the AmCyan protein on their outer surface. In order to transport the cells to the targeted location, the transformed E. coli are labeled with superparamagnetic micro-beads which exert directed forces on the cells in an external field. Preliminary results of the protein expression on E. coli, the transport of the cell through weak magnetic fields to targeted locations and the potential to transfer protein from the cell to the chip surface will be presented.

  9. Detection of Escherichia coli in meat with an electrochemical biochip.

    PubMed

    Heidenreich, Bernd; Pöhlmann, Christopher; Sprinzl, Mathias; Gareis, Manfred

    2010-11-01

    Detection of foodborne pathogenic and spoilage bacteria by RNA-DNA hybridization is an alternative to traditional microbiological procedures. To achieve high sensitivity with RNA-DNA-based methods, efficient bacterial lysis and release of nucleic acids from bacteria are needed. Here we report the specific detection of the hygiene indicator microorganism Escherichia coli in meat by use of electrochemical biochips. We improved RNA isolation from bacteria in meat juice from pork and beef. Samples, either naturally or artificially contaminated by E. coli, were enriched by incubation in full or minimal medium. A combined treatment of the samples with lysozyme, proteinase K, and sonication resulted in efficient cell disruption and high total RNA yields. Together with optimization of enrichment time, this ensures high sensitivity of electrochemical measurements on biochips. A short enrichment period and the triple-lysis regimen in combination with electrochemical biochip measurement were tested with 25 meat samples. The lower limit of detection of the biochip was approximately 2,000 CFU of E. coli per ml. The entire analysis procedure (5 h of enrichment, triple lysis, and biochip detection) has a lower limit of detection of 1 CFU of E. coli per ml within a total time needed for analysis of 7 h.

  10. Insights into the biology of Escherichia coli through structural proteomics.

    PubMed

    Matte, Allan; Jia, Zongchao; Sunita, S; Sivaraman, J; Cygler, Miroslaw

    2007-09-01

    Escherichia coli has historically been an important organism for understanding a multitude of biological processes, and represents a model system as we attempt to simulate the workings of living cells. Many E. coli strains are also important human and animal pathogens for which new therapeutic strategies are required. For both reasons, a more complete and comprehensive understanding of the protein structure complement of E. coli is needed at the genome level. Here, we provide examples of insights into the mechanism and function of bacterial proteins that we have gained through the Bacterial Structural Genomics Initiative (BSGI), focused on medium-throughput structure determination of proteins from E. coli. We describe the structural characterization of several enzymes from the histidine biosynthetic pathway, the structures of three pseudouridine synthases, enzymes that synthesize one of the most abundant modified bases in RNA, as well as the combined use of protein structure and focused functional analysis to decipher functions for hypothetical proteins. Together, these results illustrate the power of structural genomics to contribute to a deeper biological understanding of bacterial processes.

  11. Low intensity infrared laser induces filamentation in Escherichia coli cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca, A. S.; Presta, G. A.; Geller, M.; Paoli, F.

    2011-10-01

    Low intensity continuous wave and pulsed emission modes laser is used in treating many diseases and the resulting biostimulative effect on tissues has been described, yet the photobiological basis is not well understood. The aim of this wok was to evaluate, using bacterial filamentation assay, effects of laser on Escherichia coli cultures in exponential and stationary growth phase. E. coli cultures, proficient and deficient on DNA repair, in exponential and stationary growth phase, were exposed to low intensity infrared laser, aliquots were spread onto microscopic slides, stained by Gram method, visualized by optical microscopy, photographed and percentage of bacterial filamentation were determined. Low intensity infrared laser with therapeutic fluencies and different emission modes can induce bacterial filamentation in cultures of E. coli wild type, fpg/ mutM, endonuclease III and exonuclease III mutants in exponential and stationary growth phase. This study showed induction of bacterial, filamentation in E. coli cultures expose to low intensity infrared laser and attention to laser therapy protocols, which should take into account fluencies, wavelengths, tissue conditions, and genetic characteristics of cells before beginning treatment.

  12. Curli fimbria: an Escherichia coli adhesin associated with human cystitis.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, Melina Aparecida; Werle, Catierine Hirsch; Milanez, Guilherme Paier; Yano, Tomomasa

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli is the major causative agent of human cystitis. In this study, a preliminary molecular analysis carried out by PCR (polymerase chain reaction) demonstrated that 100% of 31 E. coli strains isolated from patients with recurrent UTIs (urinary tract infections) showed the presence of the curli fimbria gene (csgA). Curli fimbria is known to be associated with bacterial biofilm formation but not with the adhesion of human cystitis-associated E. coli. Therefore, this work aimed to study how curli fimbria is associated with uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) as an adhesion factor. For this purpose, the csgA gene was deleted from strain UPEC-4, which carries three adhesion factor genes (csgA, fimH and ompA). The wild-type UPEC-4 strain and its mutant (ΔcsgA) were analyzed for their adhesion ability over HTB-9 (human bladder carcinoma), Vero (kidney cells of African green monkey) and HUVEC (human umbilical vein) cells in the presence of α-d-mannose. All the wild-type UPEC strains tested (100%) were able to adhere to all three cell types, while the UPEC-4 ΔcsgA mutant lost its adherence to HTB-9 but continued to adhere to the HUVEC and Vero cells. The results suggest that curli fimbria has an important role in the adhesion processes associated with human UPEC-induced cystitis.

  13. Correlation of a subset of the pLC plasmids to the physical map of Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, A; Akiyama, K; Kohara, Y; Horiuchi, K

    1992-01-01

    We determined map positions of the Escherichia coli K-12 portions of a subset of the hybrid E. coli-ColE1 plasmids constructed by Clarke and Carbon. The probe DNA of pLC plasmids was labeled with digoxigenine-dUTP, hybridized to the 476 phage clones of the E. coli ordered clone bank miniset, which was adsorbed on a strip of nylon membrane filters, and detected by enzyme-linked immunoassay and a subsequent enzyme-catalyzed color reaction. The total number of Clarke-Carbon plasmids we analyzed was 518, for which chromosomal locations of 297 clones were newly determined in the present study. Another 180 plasmids gave results that agreed with those reported previously, and the remaining 41 plasmids gave map positions different from those described in the previous report. A chromosome map of E. coli which shows the locations of 518 pLC plasmids on it is presented, as well as a table which correlates the pLC plasmids with the clones of the E. coli ordered clone bank miniset on the basis of the hybridization data. We estimate that approximately one-half of the entire genome of E. coli was covered by the pLC plasmids used in this study. Images PMID:1579107

  14. Production of 3-O-xylosyl quercetin in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Ramesh Prasad; Malla, Sailesh; Simkhada, Dinesh; Kim, Byung-Gee; Sohng, Jae Kyung

    2013-03-01

    Quercetin, a flavonol aglycone, is one of the most abundant flavonoids with high medicinal value. The bioavailability and pharmacokinetic properties of quercetin are influenced by the type of sugars attached to the molecule. To efficiently diversify the therapeutic uses of quercetin, Escherichia coli was harnessed as a production factory by the installation of various plant and bacterial UDP-xylose sugar biosynthetic genes. The genes encoding for the UDP-xylose pathway enzymes phosphoglucomutase (nfa44530), glucose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (galU), UDP-glucose dehydrogenase (calS8), and UDP-glucuronic acid decarboxylase (calS9) were overexpressed in E. coli BL21 (DE3) along with a glycosyltransferase (arGt-3) from Arabidopsis thaliana. Furthermore, E. coli BL21(DE3)/∆pgi, E. coli BL21(DE3)/∆zwf, E. coli BL21(DE3)/∆pgi∆zwf, and E. coli BL21(DE3)/∆pgi∆zwf∆ushA mutants carrying the aforementioned UDP-xylose sugar biosynthetic genes and glycosyltransferase and the galU-integrated E. coli BL21(DE3)/∆pgi host harboring only calS8, calS9, and arGt-3 were constructed to enhance whole-cell bioconversion of exogeneously supplied quercetin into 3-O-xylosyl quercetin. Here, we report the highest production of 3-O-xylosyl quercetin with E. coli BL21 (DE3)/∆pgi∆zwf∆ushA carrying UDP-xylose sugar biosynthetic genes and glycosyltransferase. The maximum concentration of 3-O-xylosyl quercetin achieved was 23.78 mg/L (54.75 μM), representing 54.75 % bioconversion, which was an ~4.8-fold higher bioconversion than that shown by E. coli BL21 (DE3) with the same set of genes when the reaction was carried out in 5-mL culture tubes with 100 μM quercetin under optimized conditions. Bioconversion was further improved by 98 % when the reaction was scaled up in a 3-L fermentor at 36 h. PMID:23053089

  15. Compilation of DNA sequences of Escherichia coli (update 1990)

    PubMed Central

    Kröger, Manfred; Wahl, Ralf; Rice, Peter

    1990-01-01

    We have compiled the DNA sequence data for E.coli available from the GENBANK and EMBL data libraries and over a period of several years independently from the literature. This is the second listing replacing and increasing the former listing roughly by one third. After deletion of all detected overlaps a total of 1 248 696 individual bp is found to be determined till the beginning of 1990. This corresponds to a total of 26.46% of the entire E.coli chromosome consisting of about 4,720 kbp. This number may actually be higher by some extra 2% derived from the sequence of lysogenic bacteriophage lambda and various insertion sequences. This compilation is now available in machine readable form from the EMBL data library. PMID:2185457

  16. Quantitative assessment of faecal shedding of β-lactam-resistant Escherichia coli and enterococci in dogs.

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Gongora, Carmen; Shah, Syed Qaswar Ali; Jessen, Lisbeth Rem; Bortolaia, Valeria; Langebæk, Rikke; Bjørnvad, Charlotte Reinhard; Guardabassi, Luca

    2015-12-31

    Quantitative data on faecal shedding of antimicrobial resistant bacteria are crucial to assess the risk of transmission from dogs to other animals as well as humans. In this study we investigated prevalence and concentrations of β-lactam-resistant Escherichia coli and enterococci in the faeces of 108 dogs presenting at a veterinary hospital in Denmark. The dogs had not been treated with antimicrobials for 4 weeks prior to the study. Total E. coli and enterococci were quantified by counts on MacConkey and Slanetz-Bartley, respectively. Resistant E. coli and enterococci were counted on the same media containing relevant antibiotic concentrations, followed by species identification using MALDI-TOF. Ampicillin- and cefotaxime-resistant E. coli were detected in 40% and 8% of the dogs, respectively, whereas approximately 15% carried ampicillin-resistant enterococci, mainly Enterococcus faecium. In the faeces of the carriers, the proportion of resistant strains in the total bacterial species population was on average 15% for both ampicillin-resistant E. coli (median faecal load 3.2×10(4)cfu/g) and E. faecium (5.8×10(2) cfu/g), and 4.6% for cefotaxime-resistant E. coli (8.6×10(3) cfu/g). Cefotaxime resistance was associated with the presence of blaCTX-M-1 (n=4), blaCMY-2 (n=4) or multiple mutations in the promoter and coding region of chromosomal ampC (n=1). Altogether the results indicate that the risks of zoonotic transmission of β-lactam-resistant bacteria via human exposure to canine faeces greatly vary amongst individual dogs and are influenced by unidentified factors other than recent antimicrobial use.

  17. Role of intraspecies recombination in the spread of pathogenicity islands within the Escherichia coli species.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Sören; Darlu, Pierre; Clermont, Olivier; Wieser, Andreas; Magistro, Giuseppe; Hoffmann, Christiane; Weinert, Kirsten; Tenaillon, Olivier; Matic, Ivan; Denamur, Erick

    2009-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer is a key step in the evolution of bacterial pathogens. Besides phages and plasmids, pathogenicity islands (PAIs) are subjected to horizontal transfer. The transfer mechanisms of PAIs within a certain bacterial species or between different species are still not well understood. This study is focused on the High-Pathogenicity Island (HPI), which is a PAI widely spread among extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli and serves as a model for horizontal transfer of PAIs in general. We applied a phylogenetic approach using multilocus sequence typing on HPI-positive and -negative natural E. coli isolates representative of the species diversity to infer the mechanism of horizontal HPI transfer within the E. coli species. In each strain, the partial nucleotide sequences of 6 HPI-encoded genes and 6 housekeeping genes of the genomic backbone, as well as DNA fragments immediately upstream and downstream of the HPI were compared. This revealed that the HPI is not solely vertically transmitted, but that recombination of large DNA fragments beyond the HPI plays a major role in the spread of the HPI within E. coli species. In support of the results of the phylogenetic analyses, we experimentally demonstrated that HPI can be transferred between different E. coli strains by F-plasmid mediated mobilization. Sequencing of the chromosomal DNA regions immediately upstream and downstream of the HPI in the recipient strain indicated that the HPI was transferred and integrated together with HPI-flanking DNA regions of the donor strain. The results of this study demonstrate for the first time that conjugative transfer and homologous DNA recombination play a major role in horizontal transfer of a pathogenicity island within the species E. coli.

  18. Compilation of DNA sequences of Escherichia coli (update 1993).

    PubMed Central

    Kröger, M; Wahl, R; Rice, P

    1993-01-01

    We have compiled the DNA sequence data for E. coli available from the GENBANK and EMBL data libraries and over a period of several years independently from the literature. This is the fifth listing replacing and increasing the former listings substantially. However, in order to save space this printed version contains DNA sequence information only, if they are publically available in electronic form. The complete compilation including a full set of genetic map data and the E. coli protein index can be obtained in machine readable form from the EMBL data library (ECD release 15) as a part of the CD-ROM issue of the EMBL sequence database, released and updated every three months. After deletion of all detected overlaps a total of 2,353,635 individual bp is found to be determined till the end of April 1993. This corresponds to a total of 49.87% of the entire E. coli chromosome consisting of about 4,720 kbp. This number may actually be higher by 9161 bp derived from other strains of E. coli. PMID:8332520

  19. Compilation of DNA sequences of Escherichia coli (update 1992)

    PubMed Central

    Kröger, Manfred; Wahl, Ralf; Schachtel, Gabriel; Rice, Peter

    1992-01-01

    We have compiled the DNA sequence data for E.coli available from the GENBANK and EMBL data libraries and over a period of several years independently from the literature. This is the fourth listing replacing and increasing the former listings substantially. However, in order to save space this printed version contains DNA sequence information only, if they are publically available in electronic form. The complete compilation including a full set of genetic map data and the E.coli protein index can be obtained in machine readable form from the EMBL data library (ECD release 10) or from the CD-ROM version of this supplement issue directly. After deletion of all detected overlaps a total of 1 820 237 individual bp is found to be determined till the beginning of 1992. This corresponds to a total of 38.56% of the entire E.coli chromosome consisting of about 4,720 kbp. This number may actually be higher by some extra 2,5% derived from lysogenic bacteriophage lambda and various DNA sequences already received for other strains of E.coli. PMID:1598239

  20. Engineering furfural tolerance in Escherichia coli improves the fermentation of lignocellulosic sugars into renewable chemicals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuan; Yomano, Lorraine P; Lee, James Y; York, Sean W; Zheng, Huabao; Mullinnix, Michael T; Shanmugam, K T; Ingram, Lonnie O

    2013-03-01

    Pretreatments such as dilute acid at elevated temperature are effective for the hydrolysis of pentose polymers in hemicellulose and also increase the access of enzymes to cellulose fibers. However, the fermentation of resulting syrups is hindered by minor reaction products such as furfural from pentose dehydration. To mitigate this problem, four genetic traits have been identified that increase furfural tolerance in ethanol-producing Escherichia coli LY180 (strain W derivative): increased expression of fucO, ucpA, or pntAB and deletion of yqhD. Plasmids and integrated strains were used to characterize epistatic interactions among traits and to identify the most effective combinations. Furfural resistance traits were subsequently integrated into the chromosome of LY180 to construct strain XW129 (LY180 ΔyqhD ackA::PyadC'fucO-ucpA) for ethanol. This same combination of traits was also constructed in succinate biocatalysts (Escherichia coli strain C derivatives) and found to increase furfural tolerance. Strains engineered for resistance to furfural were also more resistant to the mixture of inhibitors in hemicellulose hydrolysates, confirming the importance of furfural as an inhibitory component. With resistant biocatalysts, product yields (ethanol and succinate) from hemicellulose syrups were equal to control fermentations in laboratory media without inhibitors. The combination of genetic traits identified for the production of ethanol (strain W derivative) and succinate (strain C derivative) may prove useful for other renewable chemicals from lignocellulosic sugars.

  1. Engineering furfural tolerance in Escherichia coli improves the fermentation of lignocellulosic sugars into renewable chemicals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuan; Yomano, Lorraine P; Lee, James Y; York, Sean W; Zheng, Huabao; Mullinnix, Michael T; Shanmugam, K T; Ingram, Lonnie O

    2013-03-01

    Pretreatments such as dilute acid at elevated temperature are effective for the hydrolysis of pentose polymers in hemicellulose and also increase the access of enzymes to cellulose fibers. However, the fermentation of resulting syrups is hindered by minor reaction products such as furfural from pentose dehydration. To mitigate this problem, four genetic traits have been identified that increase furfural tolerance in ethanol-producing Escherichia coli LY180 (strain W derivative): increased expression of fucO, ucpA, or pntAB and deletion of yqhD. Plasmids and integrated strains were used to characterize epistatic interactions among traits and to identify the most effective combinations. Furfural resistance traits were subsequently integrated into the chromosome of LY180 to construct strain XW129 (LY180 ΔyqhD ackA::PyadC'fucO-ucpA) for ethanol. This same combination of traits was also constructed in succinate biocatalysts (Escherichia coli strain C derivatives) and found to increase furfural tolerance. Strains engineered for resistance to furfural were also more resistant to the mixture of inhibitors in hemicellulose hydrolysates, confirming the importance of furfural as an inhibitory component. With resistant biocatalysts, product yields (ethanol and succinate) from hemicellulose syrups were equal to control fermentations in laboratory media without inhibitors. The combination of genetic traits identified for the production of ethanol (strain W derivative) and succinate (strain C derivative) may prove useful for other renewable chemicals from lignocellulosic sugars. PMID:23431191

  2. Engineering furfural tolerance in Escherichia coli improves the fermentation of lignocellulosic sugars into renewable chemicals

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuan; Yomano, Lorraine P.; Lee, James Y.; York, Sean W.; Zheng, Huabao; Mullinnix, Michael T.; Shanmugam, K. T.; Ingram, Lonnie O.

    2013-01-01

    Pretreatments such as dilute acid at elevated temperature are effective for the hydrolysis of pentose polymers in hemicellulose and also increase the access of enzymes to cellulose fibers. However, the fermentation of resulting syrups is hindered by minor reaction products such as furfural from pentose dehydration. To mitigate this problem, four genetic traits have been identified that increase furfural tolerance in ethanol-producing Escherichia coli LY180 (strain W derivative): increased expression of fucO, ucpA, or pntAB and deletion of yqhD. Plasmids and integrated strains were used to characterize epistatic interactions among traits and to identify the most effective combinations. Furfural resistance traits were subsequently integrated into the chromosome of LY180 to construct strain XW129 (LY180 ΔyqhD ackA::PyadC′fucO-ucpA) for ethanol. This same combination of traits was also constructed in succinate biocatalysts (Escherichia coli strain C derivatives) and found to increase furfural tolerance. Strains engineered for resistance to furfural were also more resistant to the mixture of inhibitors in hemicellulose hydrolysates, confirming the importance of furfural as an inhibitory component. With resistant biocatalysts, product yields (ethanol and succinate) from hemicellulose syrups were equal to control fermentations in laboratory media without inhibitors. The combination of genetic traits identified for the production of ethanol (strain W derivative) and succinate (strain C derivative) may prove useful for other renewable chemicals from lignocellulosic sugars. PMID:23431191

  3. Pathogenicity island sequences of pyelonephritogenic Escherichia coli CFT073 are associated with virulent uropathogenic strains.

    PubMed

    Kao, J S; Stucker, D M; Warren, J W; Mobley, H L

    1997-07-01

    Urinary tract infection is the most frequently diagnosed kidney and urologic disease, and Escherichia coli is by far the most common etiologic agent. Defined blocks of DNA termed pathogenicity islands have been found in uropathogenic strains to carry genes not generally found in fecal strains. We have identified one of these regions of DNA within the chromosome of the highly virulent E. coli CFT073, isolated from the blood and urine of a woman with acute pyelonephritis. This strain, which is cytotoxic for cultured renal cells and causes acute pyelonephritis in transurethrally infected CBA mice, contains two distinct copies of the pap operon and is hemolytic. One pap operon was localized on a cosmid clone which was used to identify three overlapping cosmid clones. By using restriction mapping, DNA hybridization, sequencing, and PCR amplification, a region of approximately 50 kb was found to be present in this uropathogenic strain and to have no corresponding sequences in E. coli K-12. This gene block also carries hemolysin genes hlyCABD. The pathogenicity island begins 7 bp downstream of dadX (catabolic alanine racemase; 26.55 min) and ends at a position in the K-12 genome 75 bp downstream of the metV tRNA gene (62.74 min); this suggests that a chromosomal rearrangement has occurred relative to the K-12 linkage map. The junctions of the pathogenicity island were verified by PCR amplification directly from the genomic DNA of strain CFT073. DNA sequencing within the boundaries of the junctions revealed genes not previously identified in E. coli or in some cases bearing no known homologs. When used as probes for DNA hybridization, these sequences were found significantly more often in strains associated with the clinical syndromes of cystitis (82%) and acute pyelonephritis (79%) than in fecal strains (19%; P < 0.001).

  4. Double-strand-break repair recombination in Escherichia coli: physical evidence for a DNA replication mechanism in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Motamedi, Mohammad R.; Szigety, Susan K.; Rosenberg, Susan M.

    1999-01-01

    DNA double-strand-break repair (DSBR) is, in many organisms, accomplished by homologous recombination. In Escherichia coli DSBR was thought to result from breakage and reunion of parental DNA molecules, assisted by known endonucleases, the Holliday junction resolvases. Under special circumstances, for example, SOS induction, recombination forks were proposed to initiate replication. We provide physical evidence that this is a major alternative mechanism in which replication copies information from one chromosome to another generating recombinant chromosomes in normal cells in vivo. This alternative mechanism can occur independently of known Holliday junction cleaving proteins, requires DNA polymerase III, and produces recombined DNA molecules that carry newly replicated DNA. The replicational mechanism underlies about half the recombination of linear DNA in E. coli; the other half occurs by breakage and reunion, which we show requires resolvases, and is replication-independent. The data also indicate that accumulation of recombination intermediates promotes replication dramatically. PMID:10557215

  5. Characterization of a Novel Microcin That Kills Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 and O26

    PubMed Central

    Eberhart, Lauren J.; Deringer, James R.; Brayton, Kelly A.; Sawant, Ashish A.; Besser, Thomas E.

    2012-01-01

    A novel phenotype was recently identified in which specific strains of Escherichia coli inhibit competing E. coli strains via a mechanism that was designated “proximity-dependent inhibition” (PDI). PDI-expressing (PDI+) E. coli is known to inhibit susceptible (PDI−) E. coli strains, including several enterohemorrhagic (EHEC) and enterotoxigenic (ETEC) E. coli strains. In this study, every strain from a genetically diverse panel of E. coli O157:H7 (n = 25) and additional strains of E. coli serovar O26 were susceptible to the PDI phenotype. LIVE/DEAD staining was consistent with inhibition by killing of susceptible cells. Comparative genome analysis identified the genetic component of PDI, which is composed of a plasmid-borne (Incl1) operon encoding a putative microcin and associated genes for transport, immunity, and microcin activation. Transfer of the plasmid to a PDI− strain resulted in transfer of the phenotype, and deletion of the genes within the operon resulted in loss of the inhibition phenotype. Deletion of chromosomally encoded tolC also resulted in loss of the inhibitory phenotype, and this confirmed that the putative microcin is most likely secreted via a type I secretion pathway. Deletion of an unrelated plasmid gene did not affect the PDI phenotype. Quantitative reverse transcription (RT)-PCR demonstrated that microcin expression is correlated with logarithmic-phase growth. The ability to inhibit a diversity of E. coli strains indicates that this microcin may influence gut community composition and could be useful for control of important enteric pathogens. PMID:22773653

  6. The SOS response is permitted in Escherichia coli strains deficient in the expression of the mazEF pathway.

    PubMed

    Kalderon, Ziva; Kumar, Sathish; Engelberg-Kulka, Hanna

    2014-01-01

    The Escherichia coli (E. coli) SOS response is the largest, most complex, and best characterized bacterial network induced by DNA damage. It is controlled by a complex network involving the RecA and LexA proteins. We have previously shown that the SOS response to DNA damage is inhibited by various elements involved in the expression of the E. coli toxin-antitoxin mazEF pathway. Since the mazEF module is present on the chromosomes of most E. coli strains, here we asked: Why is the SOS response found in so many E. coli strains? Is the mazEF module present but inactive in those strains? We examined three E. coli strains used for studies of the SOS response, strains AB1932, BW25113, and MG1655. We found that each of these strains is either missing or inhibiting one of several elements involved in the expression of the mazEF-mediated death pathway. Thus, the SOS response only takes place in E. coli cells in which one or more elements of the E. coli toxin-antitoxin module mazEF or its downstream pathway is not functioning.

  7. Comparative Genomics and Characterization of Hybrid Shigatoxigenic and Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (STEC/ETEC) Strains

    PubMed Central

    Nyholm, Outi; Halkilahti, Jani; Wiklund, Gudrun; Okeke, Uche; Paulin, Lars; Auvinen, Petri; Haukka, Kaisa; Siitonen, Anja

    2015-01-01

    Background Shigatoxigenic Escherichia coli (STEC) and enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) cause serious foodborne infections in humans. These two pathogroups are defined based on the pathogroup-associated virulence genes: stx encoding Shiga toxin (Stx) for STEC and elt encoding heat-labile and/or est encoding heat-stable enterotoxin (ST) for ETEC. The study investigated the genomics of STEC/ETEC hybrid strains to determine their phylogenetic position among E. coli and to define the virulence genes they harbor. Methods The whole genomes of three STEC/ETEC strains possessing both stx and est genes were sequenced using PacBio RS sequencer. Two of the strains were isolated from the patients, one with hemolytic uremic syndrome, and one with diarrhea. The third strain was of bovine origin. Core genome analysis of the shared chromosomal genes and comparison with E. coli and Shigella spp. reference genomes was performed to determine the phylogenetic position of the STEC/ETEC strains. In addition, a set of virulence genes and ETEC colonization factors were extracted from the genomes. The production of Stx and ST were studied. Results The human STEC/ETEC strains clustered with strains representing ETEC, STEC, enteroaggregative E. coli, and commensal and laboratory-adapted E. coli. However, the bovine STEC/ETEC strain formed a remote cluster with two STECs of bovine origin. All three STEC/ETEC strains harbored several other virulence genes, apart from stx and est, and lacked ETEC colonization factors. Two STEC/ETEC strains produced both toxins and one strain Stx only. Conclusions This study shows that pathogroup-associated virulence genes of different E. coli can co-exist in strains originating from different phylogenetic lineages. The possibility of virulence genes to be associated with several E. coli pathogroups should be taken into account in strain typing and in epidemiological surveillance. Development of novel hybrid E. coli strains may cause a new public health risk, which

  8. Cloning and expression of the Pasteurella multocida toxin gene, toxA, in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, S K; Foged, N T

    1989-01-01

    A chromosomal DNA library of a toxigenic type D strain of Pasteurella multocida subsp. multocida was established in Escherichia coli. From this library two clones, SPE308 and SPE312, were identified by using a monoclonal antibody against the osteoclast-stimulating P. multocida toxin (PMT). Extracts of these clones showed cytopathic activity identical to that of extracts of toxigenic P. multocida. The recombinant plasmids, pSPE308 and pSPE312, directed the synthesis of a protein with an apparent molecular weight of 143,000 which could be specifically detected by anti-PMT antibody. The recombinant toxin, which was located in the cytoplasm of E. coli, was purified by affinity chromatography with immobilized monoclonal antibody and was shown to react in a manner identical to that of PMT in a quantitative structural test using a series of monoclonal antibodies as well as in all quantitative functional tests used, i.e., tests for dermonecrotic activity and mouse lethality and the embryonic bovine lung cell test for cytopathic activity. The gene encoding this toxic activity was named toxA and was found to be present in the chromosome of toxigenic strains only of P. multocida. A probe spanning the toxA gene therefore has potential in the diagnosis and surveillance of progressive atrophic rhinitis in pigs. Images PMID:2680987

  9. DNA Replication Control Is Linked to Genomic Positioning of Control Regions in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Frimodt-Møller, Jakob; Charbon, Godefroid; Krogfelt, Karen A.; Løbner-Olesen, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome replication in Escherichia coli is in part controlled by three non-coding genomic sequences, DARS1, DARS2, and datA that modulate the activity of the initiator protein DnaA. The relative distance from oriC to the non-coding regions are conserved among E. coli species, despite large variations in genome size. Here we use a combination of i) site directed translocation of each region to new positions on the bacterial chromosome and ii) random transposon mediated translocation followed by culture evolution, to show genetic evidence for the importance of position. Here we provide evidence that the genomic locations of these regulatory sequences are important for cell cycle control and bacterial fitness. In addition, our work shows that the functionally redundant DARS1 and DARS2 regions play different roles in replication control. DARS1 is mainly involved in maintaining the origin concentration, whether DARS2 is also involved in maintaining single cell synchrony. PMID:27589233

  10. DNA Replication Control Is Linked to Genomic Positioning of Control Regions in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Frimodt-Møller, Jakob; Charbon, Godefroid; Krogfelt, Karen A; Løbner-Olesen, Anders

    2016-09-01

    Chromosome replication in Escherichia coli is in part controlled by three non-coding genomic sequences, DARS1, DARS2, and datA that modulate the activity of the initiator protein DnaA. The relative distance from oriC to the non-coding regions are conserved among E. coli species, despite large variations in genome size. Here we use a combination of i) site directed translocation of each region to new positions on the bacterial chromosome and ii) random transposon mediated translocation followed by culture evolution, to show genetic evidence for the importance of position. Here we provide evidence that the genomic locations of these regulatory sequences are important for cell cycle control and bacterial fitness. In addition, our work shows that the functionally redundant DARS1 and DARS2 regions play different roles in replication control. DARS1 is mainly involved in maintaining the origin concentration, whether DARS2 is also involved in maintaining single cell synchrony. PMID:27589233

  11. Mild gut inflammation modulates the proteome of intestinal Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Schumann, Sara; Alpert, Carl; Engst, Wolfram; Klopfleisch, Robert; Loh, Gunnar; Bleich, André; Blaut, Michael

    2014-09-01

    Using interleukin 10-deficient (IL-10(-/-) ) and wild-type mice monoassociated with either the adherent-invasive Escherichia coli UNC or the probiotic E. coli Nissle, the effect of a mild intestinal inflammation on the bacterial proteome was studied. Within 8 weeks, IL-10(-/-) mice monoassociated with E. coli UNC exhibited an increased expression of several proinflammatory markers in caecal mucosa. Escherichia coli Nissle-associated IL-10(-/-) mice did not do so. As observed previously for E. coli from mice with acute colitis, glycolytic enzymes were downregulated in intestinal E. coli UNC from IL-10(-/-) mice. In addition, the inhibitor of vertebrate C-type lysozyme, Ivy, was upregulated on messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein level in E. coli Nissle from IL-10(-/-) mice compared with E. coli UNC from these mice. Higher expression of Ivy in E. coli Nissle correlated with an improved growth of this probiotic strain in the presence of lysozyme-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). By overexpressing Ivy, we demonstrated that Ivy contributes to a higher lysozyme resistance of E. coli, supporting the role of Ivy as a potential fitness factor. However, deletion of Ivy did not alter the growth phenotype of E. coli Nissle in the presence of lysozyme-EDTA, suggesting the existence of additional lysozyme inhibitors that can take over the function of Ivy. PMID:23855897

  12. KINETICS OF THE ACTION OF AMPICILLIN ON ESCHERICHIA COLI.

    PubMed

    SELIGMAN, S J; HEWITT, W L

    1963-05-01

    Seligman, Stephen J. (University of California, Los Angeles) and William L. Hewitt. Kinetics of the action of ampicillin on Escherichia coli. J. Bacteriol. 85:1160-1164. 1963.-The curve of the number of viable Escherichia coli after exposure to ampicillin can be divided into three phases: a lag phase, a rapid bactericidal phase, and a slow bactericidal phase. Some of the variables affecting the magnitude of the first two of these phases were investigated. Progressive lowering of drug concentration resulted in prolongation of the lag phase and decrease in slope and extent of the rapid bactericidal phase. The production of elongated gram-negative forms and the emergence of a mutant with increased penicillinase activity complicated interpretation of the lower dose curves. With sufficient drug concentration, the length of the lag phase and the slope of the rapid bactericidal curve were independent of the size of inoculum up to 10(8) organisms. Varying pH revealed that maximal activity, as measured by the shortest lag phase and steepest slope of the rapid bactericidal phase, was present at slightly acid pH levels. Increasing pH resulted principally in prolongation of lag phase. With greater acidity, decrease in slope of the rapid bactericidal phase was more prominent. Cultures studied under conditions of lessened metabolic activity exhibited prolonged lag phase and decreased slope and extent of rapid bactericidal phase. PMID:14044010

  13. Production L-tryptophan by Escherichia coli cells.

    PubMed

    Bang, W G; Lang, S; Sahm, H; Wagner, F

    1983-04-01

    Whole cells of Escherichia coli B 10 having high tryptophan synthetase activity were used directly as an enzyme source to produce L-tryptophan from indole and L- or D,L-serine. This strain is tryptophan auxotrophic, which is tryptophanase negative and, in addition, L- and D-serine deaminase negative under production conditions. To avoid inhibition of tryptophan synthetase by a high concentration of indole, nonaqueous organic solvents, Amberlite XAD-2 adsorbent, and nonionic detergents were used as reservoirs of indole in the reaction mixture for the production of L-tryptophan. As a result, different effects were observed on the production of L-tryptophan. Particularly, among the nonionic detergents, Triton X-100 was very efficient. Using Triton X-100 for production of L-tryptophan from indole and L- or D,L-serine by whole cells of Escherichia coli B 10, 14.14 g/100 mL and 14.2 g/100 mL of L-tryptophan were produced at 37 degrees C for 60 h.

  14. Anaerobic respiration of Escherichia coli in the mouse intestine.

    PubMed

    Jones, Shari A; Gibson, Terri; Maltby, Rosalie C; Chowdhury, Fatema Z; Stewart, Valley; Cohen, Paul S; Conway, Tyrrell

    2011-10-01

    The intestine is inhabited by a large microbial community consisting primarily of anaerobes and, to a lesser extent, facultative anaerobes, such as Escherichia coli, which we have shown requires aerobic respiration to compete successfully in the mouse intestine (S. A. Jones et al., Infect. Immun. 75:4891-4899, 2007). If facultative anaerobes efficiently lower oxygen availability in the intestine, then their sustained growth must also depend on anaerobic metabolism. In support of this idea, mutants lacking nitrate reductase or fumarate reductase have extreme colonization defects. Here, we further explore the role of anaerobic respiration in colonization using the streptomycin-treated mouse model. We found that respiratory electron flow is primarily via the naphthoquinones, which pass electrons to cytochrome bd oxidase and the anaerobic terminal reductases. We found that E. coli uses nitrate and fumarate in the intestine, but not nitrite, dimethyl sulfoxide, or trimethylamine N-oxide. Competitive colonizations revealed that cytochrome bd oxidase is more advantageous than nitrate reductase or fumarate reductase. Strains lacking nitrate reductase outcompeted fumarate reductase mutants once the nitrate concentration in cecal mucus reached submillimolar levels, indicating that fumarate is the more important anaerobic electron acceptor in the intestine because nitrate is limiting. Since nitrate is highest in the absence of E. coli, we conclude that E. coli is the only bacterium in the streptomycin-treated mouse large intestine that respires nitrate. Lastly, we demonstrated that a mutant lacking the NarXL regulator (activator of the NarG system), but not a mutant lacking the NarP-NarQ regulator, has a colonization defect, consistent with the advantage provided by NarG. The emerging picture is one in which gene regulation is tuned to balance expression of the terminal reductases that E. coli uses to maximize its competitiveness and achieve the highest possible population in

  15. Genetic determinants of heat resistance in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Mercer, Ryan G.; Zheng, Jinshui; Garcia-Hernandez, Rigoberto; Ruan, Lifang; Gänzle, Michael G.; McMullen, Lynn M.

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli AW1.7 is a heat resistant food isolate and the occurrence of pathogenic strains with comparable heat resistance may pose a risk to food safety. To identify the genetic determinants of heat resistance, 29 strains of E. coli that differed in their of heat resistance were analyzed by comparative genomics. Strains were classified as highly heat resistant strains, exhibiting a D60-value of more than 6 min; moderately heat resistant strains, exhibiting a D60-value of more than 1 min; or as heat sensitive. A ~14 kb genomic island containing 16 predicted open reading frames encoding putative heat shock proteins and proteases was identified only in highly heat resistant strains. The genomic island was termed the locus of heat resistance (LHR). This putative operon is flanked by mobile elements and possesses >99% sequence identity to genomic islands contributing to heat resistance in Cronobacter sakazakii and Klebsiella pneumoniae. An additional 41 LHR sequences with >87% sequence identity were identified in 11 different species of β- and γ-proteobacteria. Cloning of the full length LHR conferred high heat resistance to the heat sensitive E. coli AW1.7ΔpHR1 and DH5α. The presence of the LHR correlates perfectly to heat resistance in several species of Enterobacteriaceae and occurs at a frequency of 2% of all E. coli genomes, including pathogenic strains. This study suggests the LHR has been laterally exchanged among the β- and γ-proteobacteria and is a reliable indicator of high heat resistance in E. coli. PMID:26441869

  16. The Model [NiFe]-Hydrogenases of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Sargent, F

    2016-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, hydrogen metabolism plays a prominent role in anaerobic physiology. The genome contains the capability to produce and assemble up to four [NiFe]-hydrogenases, each of which are known, or predicted, to contribute to different aspects of cellular metabolism. In recent years, there have been major advances in the understanding of the structure, function, and roles of the E. coli [NiFe]-hydrogenases. The membrane-bound, periplasmically oriented, respiratory Hyd-1 isoenzyme has become one of the most important paradigm systems for understanding an important class of oxygen-tolerant enzymes, as well as providing key information on the mechanism of hydrogen activation per se. The membrane-bound, periplasmically oriented, Hyd-2 isoenzyme has emerged as an unusual, bidirectional redox valve able to link hydrogen oxidation to quinone reduction during anaerobic respiration, or to allow disposal of excess reducing equivalents as hydrogen gas. The membrane-bound, cytoplasmically oriented, Hyd-3 isoenzyme is part of the formate hydrogenlyase complex, which acts to detoxify excess formic acid under anaerobic fermentative conditions and is geared towards hydrogen production under those conditions. Sequence identity between some Hyd-3 subunits and those of the respiratory NADH dehydrogenases has led to hypotheses that the activity of this isoenzyme may be tightly coupled to the formation of transmembrane ion gradients. Finally, the E. coli genome encodes a homologue of Hyd-3, termed Hyd-4, however strong evidence for a physiological role for E. coli Hyd-4 remains elusive. In this review, the versatile hydrogen metabolism of E. coli will be discussed and the roles and potential applications of the spectrum of different types of [NiFe]-hydrogenases available will be explored. PMID:27134027

  17. Characteristics of human intestinal Escherichia coli with changing environments.

    PubMed

    Skurnik, David; Bonnet, Daniel; Bernède-Bauduin, Claire; Michel, Rémy; Guette, Christian; Becker, Jean-Marie; Balaire, Corinne; Chau, Françoise; Mohler, Jacqueline; Jarlier, Vincent; Boutin, Jean-Paul; Moreau, Brigitte; Guillemot, Didier; Denamur, Erick; Andremont, Antoine; Ruimy, Raymond

    2008-08-01

    To investigate if the characteristics of human intestinal Escherichia coli are changing with the environment of the host, we studied intestinal E. coli from subjects having recently migrated from a temperate to a tropical area. We determined the phylogenetic group, the prevalence of the antibiotic resistance, the presence of integrons and the strain diversity in faecal isolates from 25 subjects originally from metropolitan France and expatriated to French Guyana. These characteristics were compared with those of 25 previously studied Wayampi Amerindian natives of French Guyana and from 25 metropolitan French residents. The three groups of subjects were matched for age and sex, had not taken antibiotics for at least 1 month, nor had been hospitalized within the past year. In all, the characteristics of intestinal E. coli from Expatriates were intermediate between those found in residents from metropolitan France and those found in natives of French Guyana. Prevalence of carriage of resistant Gram-negative bacteria in Expatriates was intermediate between French residents and Wayampi as were the prevalence of integrons in E. coli (12.3% versus 16.3% and 7.8% respectively), and the intra-host diversity of E. coli (2.3 strains/subject versus 1.9 and 3.1, respectively); lastly, in Expatriates, the prevalence of carriage of phylogenetic group B2 strains was lower than in French residents (16% versus 56%, P = 0.005), while carriage of phylogenetic group A strains was lower than in Wayampi (56% versus 88%, P = 0.03). Our results suggest that the composition of the commensal intestinal flora of humans is not static but changes dynamically in response to new environmental conditions.

  18. Genomic and Phenomic Study of Mammary Pathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Shlomo E.; Heller, Elimelech D.; Sela, Shlomo; Elad, Daniel; Edery, Nir; Leitner, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli is a major etiological agent of intra-mammary infections (IMI) in cows, leading to acute mastitis and causing great economic losses in dairy production worldwide. Particular strains cause persistent IMI, leading to recurrent mastitis. Virulence factors of mammary pathogenic E. coli (MPEC) involved pathogenesis of mastitis as well as those differentiating strains causing acute or persistent mastitis are largely unknown. This study aimed to identify virulence markers in MPEC through whole genome and phenome comparative analysis. MPEC strains causing acute (VL2874 and P4) or persistent (VL2732) mastitis were compared to an environmental strain (K71) and to the genomes of strains representing different E. coli pathotypes. Intra-mammary challenge in mice confirmed experimentally that the strains studied here have different pathogenic potential, and that the environmental strain K71 is non-pathogenic in the mammary gland. Analysis of whole genome sequences and predicted proteomes revealed high similarity among MPEC, whereas MPEC significantly differed from the non-mammary pathogenic strain K71, and from E. coli genomes from other pathotypes. Functional features identified in MPEC genomes and lacking in the non-mammary pathogenic strain were associated with synthesis of lipopolysaccharide and other membrane antigens, ferric-dicitrate iron acquisition and sugars metabolism. Features associated with cytotoxicity or intra-cellular survival were found specifically in the genomes of strains from severe and acute (VL2874) or persistent (VL2732) mastitis, respectively. MPEC genomes were relatively similar to strain K-12, which was subsequently shown here to be possibly pathogenic in the mammary gland. Phenome analysis showed that the persistent MPEC was the most versatile in terms of nutrients metabolized and acute MPEC the least. Among phenotypes unique to MPEC compared to the non-mammary pathogenic strain were uric acid and D-serine metabolism. This study

  19. Genomic and Phenomic Study of Mammary Pathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Blum, Shlomo E; Heller, Elimelech D; Sela, Shlomo; Elad, Daniel; Edery, Nir; Leitner, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli is a major etiological agent of intra-mammary infections (IMI) in cows, leading to acute mastitis and causing great economic losses in dairy production worldwide. Particular strains cause persistent IMI, leading to recurrent mastitis. Virulence factors of mammary pathogenic E. coli (MPEC) involved pathogenesis of mastitis as well as those differentiating strains causing acute or persistent mastitis are largely unknown. This study aimed to identify virulence markers in MPEC through whole genome and phenome comparative analysis. MPEC strains causing acute (VL2874 and P4) or persistent (VL2732) mastitis were compared to an environmental strain (K71) and to the genomes of strains representing different E. coli pathotypes. Intra-mammary challenge in mice confirmed experimentally that the strains studied here have different pathogenic potential, and that the environmental strain K71 is non-pathogenic in the mammary gland. Analysis of whole genome sequences and predicted proteomes revealed high similarity among MPEC, whereas MPEC significantly differed from the non-mammary pathogenic strain K71, and from E. coli genomes from other pathotypes. Functional features identified in MPEC genomes and lacking in the non-mammary pathogenic strain were associated with synthesis of lipopolysaccharide and other membrane antigens, ferric-dicitrate iron acquisition and sugars metabolism. Features associated with cytotoxicity or intra-cellular survival were found specifically in the genomes of strains from severe and acute (VL2874) or persistent (VL2732) mastitis, respectively. MPEC genomes were relatively similar to strain K-12, which was subsequently shown here to be possibly pathogenic in the mammary gland. Phenome analysis showed that the persistent MPEC was the most versatile in terms of nutrients metabolized and acute MPEC the least. Among phenotypes unique to MPEC compared to the non-mammary pathogenic strain were uric acid and D-serine metabolism. This study

  20. [The directed modification of Escherichia coli MG1655 to obtain histidine-producing mutants].

    PubMed

    Doroshenko, V G; Lobanov, A O; Fedorina, E A

    2013-01-01

    Strain MG 1655+hisGr hisL'-Delta, purR, which produces histidine with a weight yield of approximately 12% from glucose, was constructed through directed chromosomal modifications of the laboratory Escherichia coli strain MG 1655+, which has a known genome sequence. A feedback-resistant ATP-phosphoribosyl transferase encoded by the mutant hisGr (E271 K) was the main determinant of histidine production. A further increase in histidine production was achieved by the expression enhance of a mutant his operon containing hisGr through the deleting attenuator region (hisL'-Delta). An increase in the expression of the wildtype his operon did not result in histidine accumulation. Deletion of the transcriptional regulator gene purR increased the biomass produced and maintained the level of histidine production per cell under the fermentation conditions used.

  1. Contribution of the highly conserved EaeH surface protein to enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, Alaullah; Luo, Qingwei; Roy, Koushik; Shabaan, Salwa; Kumar, Pardeep; Qadri, Firdausi; Fleckenstein, James M

    2014-09-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains are among the most common causes of diarrheal illness worldwide. These pathogens disproportionately afflict children in developing countries, where they cause substantial morbidity and are responsible for hundreds of thousands of deaths each year. Although these organisms are important targets for enteric vaccines, most development efforts to date have centered on a subset of plasmid-encoded fimbrial adhesins known as colonization factors and heat-labile toxin (LT). Emerging data suggest that ETEC undergoes considerable changes in its surface architecture, sequentially deploying a number of putative adhesins during its interactions with the host. We demonstrate here that one putative highly conserved, chromosomally encoded adhesin, EaeH, engages the surfaces of intestinal epithelial cells and contributes to bacterial adhesion, LT delivery, and colonization of the small intestine. PMID:24935979

  2. Biosynthetic pathway for acrylic acid from glycerol in recombinant Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Tong, Wenhua; Xu, Ying; Xian, Mo; Niu, Wei; Guo, Jiantao; Liu, Huizhou; Zhao, Guang

    2016-06-01

    Acrylic acid is an important industrial feedstock. In this study, a de novo acrylate biosynthetic pathway from inexpensive carbon source glycerol was constructed in Escherichia coli. The acrylic acid was produced from glycerol via 3-hydroxypropionaldehyde, 3-hydroxypropionyl-CoA, and acrylyl-CoA. The acrylate production was improved by screening and site-directed mutagenesis of key enzyme enoyl-CoA hydratase and chromosomal integration of some exogenous genes. Finally, our recombinant strain produced 37.7 mg/L acrylic acid under shaking flask conditions. Although the acrylate production is low, our study shows feasibility of engineering an acrylate biosynthetic pathway from inexpensive carbon source. Furthermore, the reasons for limited acrylate production and further strain optimization that should be performed in the future were also discussed. PMID:26782744

  3. Characterization of hybrid plasmids carrying individual ribosomal ribonucleic acid transcription units of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Kenerley, M E; Morgan, E A; Post, L; Lindahl, L; Nomura, M

    1977-01-01

    We have screened the strains with ColE1 hybrid plasmids constructed by Clarke and Carbon (Cell 9:91-99, 1976) for the presence of ribosomal ribonucleic acid (rRNA) genes on the plasmids and identified 16 strains whose plasmids carry rRNA genes. The structures of these 16 plasmids were compared by heteroduplex analysis, and the plasmids were classified into six groups on the basis of their chromosomal origins. Homology with known transducing-phage deoxyribonucleic acids and genetic mapping have assigned locations on the Escherichia coli chromosome to three of the six groups. These are rrnB near rif at 88 min, rrnC near ilvE at 83 min, and rrnD near aroE at 71 min. A fourth group is probably rrnA at 85 min (T. Ikemura and M. Nomura, Cell, 11:779-793, 1977). We conclude that the minimum number of rRNA transcription units per haploid chromosomes is seven, that is, the six groups identified in this work plus a known operon (rrnE near metA at 89 min) that we failed to find among the hybrid plasmids. This heteroduplex analysis also suggests that there are only two kinds of rRNA operons with respect to their spacer region; three of the six rRNA operon groups studied here have one kind, whereas the remaining three have the other kind. Images PMID:336613

  4. Cell cycle-dependent transcription from the gid and mioC promoters of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, T; Okazaki, T

    1994-01-01

    Transcription from the gid and mioC promoters, which neighbor the origin of replication of the Escherichia coli chromosome (oriC), has been implicated in the control of initiation of replication of minichromosomes. The amounts of transcripts from these two promoters on the chromosome were quantified at various times in a synchronized culture of a temperature-sensitive dnaC mutant strain. Transcription from the gid promoter was most active before the initiation of replication and was inhibited after initiation, during the time corresponding to the period of sequestration of the oriC region from the dam methyltransferase. On the other hand, transcription from the mioC promoter was inhibited before initiation and the inhibition was relieved after initiation prior to the recovery of gid transcription. The strict regulation of transcription from the gid and mioC promoters may be involved in positive and negative control of chromosomal replication, respectively, as has been suggested for minichromosome replication. The DnaA protein was involved in repression of mioC transcription, indicating that the activity of the DnaA protein changes during the cell cycle. Images PMID:8132454

  5. Coliphage P1-mediated transduction of cloned DNA from Escherichia coli to Myxococcus xanthus: use for complementation and recombinational analyses.

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, K A; Zusman, D R

    1983-01-01

    We have found that coliphage P1 can be used to transduce cloned DNA from Escherichia coli to Myxococcus xanthus. Transduction occurred at a high efficiency, and no evidence for DNA restriction was observed. The analysis of the transductants showed that they fall into three general categories: (i) haploid cells which contain portions of the cloned DNA substituted for homologous chromosomal DNA; (ii) heterozygous merodiploids which contain the recombinant plasmid integrated into the chromosome at a region of homology; and (iii) homozygous merodiploids which contain two copies of a portion of the cloned DNA with the loss of the chromosomal copy of the genes. The merodiploids, once formed, are relatively stable. They were used to analyze two genes necessary for aggregation and thus fruiting body formation. P1 transduction also permits the reintroduction and substitution of mutated regions of cloned DNA into M. xanthus for the analysis of the role of the DNA in cellular physiology and development. Images PMID:6305916

  6. Probing genomic diversity and evolution of Escherichia coli O157 by single nucleotide polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Qi, Weihong; Albert, Thomas J.; Motiwala, Alifiya S.; Alland, David; Hyytia-Trees, Eija K.; Ribot, Efrain M.; Fields, Patricia I.; Whittam, Thomas S.; Swaminathan, Bala

    2006-01-01

    Infections by Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O157:H7 (STEC O157) are the predominant cause of bloody diarrhea and hemolytic uremic syndrome in the United States. In silico comparison of the two complete STEC O157 genomes (Sakai and EDL933) revealed a strikingly high level of sequence identity in orthologous protein-coding genes, limiting the use of nucleotide sequences to study the evolution and epidemiology of this bacterial pathogen. To systematically examine single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at a genome scale, we designed comparative genome sequencing microarrays and analyzed 1199 chromosomal genes (a total of 1,167,948 bp) and 92,721 bp of the large virulence plasmid (pO157) of eleven outbreak-associated STEC O157 strains. We discovered 906 SNPs in 523 chromosomal genes and observed a high level of DNA polymorphisms among the pO157 plasmids. Based on a uniform rate of synonymous substitution for Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica (4.7 × 10−9 per site per year), we estimate that the most recent common ancestor of the contemporary β-glucuronidase-negative, non-sorbitolfermenting STEC O157 strains existed ca. 40 thousand years ago. The phylogeny of the STEC O157 strains based on the informative synonymous SNPs was compared to the maximum parsimony trees inferred from pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and multilocus variable numbers of tandem repeats analysis. The topological discrepancies indicate that, in contrast to the synonymous mutations, parts of STEC O157 genomes have evolved through different mechanisms with highly variable divergence rates. The SNP loci reported here will provide useful genetic markers for developing high-throughput methods for fine-resolution genotyping of STEC O157. Functional characterization of nucleotide polymorphisms should shed new insights on the evolution, epidemiology, and pathogenesis of STEC O157 and related pathogens. PMID:16606700

  7. Dairy farm age and resistance to antimicrobial agents in Escherichia coli isolated from dairy topsoil.

    PubMed

    Jones, Suzanna E; Burgos, Jonathan M; Lutnesky, Marvin M F; Sena, Johnny A; Kumar, Sanath; Jones, Lindsay M; Varela, Manuel F

    2011-04-01

    Antimicrobial agent usage is common in animal agriculture for therapeutic and prophylactic purposes. Selective pressure exerted by these antimicrobials on soil bacteria could result in the selection of strains that are resistant due to chromosomal- or plasmid-derived genetic components. Multiple antimicrobial resistances in Escherichia coli and the direct relationship between antimicrobial agent use over time has been extensively studied, yet the relationship between the age of an animal agriculture environment such as a dairy farm and antibiotic resistance remains unclear. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that antimicrobial-resistance profiles of E. coli isolated from dairy farm topsoil correlate with dairy farm age. E. coli isolated from eleven dairy farms of varying ages within Roosevelt County, NM were used for MIC determinations to chloramphenicol, nalidixic acid, penicillin, tetracycline, ampicillin, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, gentamicin, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, cefotaxime, and ciprofloxacin. The minimum inhibitory concentration values of four antibiotics ranged 0.75 to >256 μg/ml, 1 to >256 μg/ml, 12 to >256 μg/ml, and 0.75 to >256 μg/ml for chloramphenicol, nalidixic acid, penicillin, and tetracycline, respectively. The study did not show a direct relationship between antibiotic resistance and the age of dairy farms. PMID:21153729

  8. RNA polymerase supply and flux through the lac operon in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Sendy, Bandar; Lee, David J; Busby, Stephen J W; Bryant, Jack A

    2016-11-01

    Chromatin immunoprecipitation, followed by quantification of immunoprecipitated DNA, can be used to measure RNA polymerase binding to any DNA segment in Escherichia coli By calibrating measurements against the signal from a single RNA polymerase bound at a single promoter, we can calculate both promoter occupancy levels and the flux of transcribing RNA polymerase through transcription units. Here, we have applied the methodology to the E. coli lactose operon promoter. We confirm that promoter occupancy is limited by recruitment and that the supply of RNA polymerase to the lactose operon promoter depends on its location in the E. coli chromosome. Measurements of RNA polymerase binding to DNA segments within the lactose operon show that flux of RNA polymerase through the operon is low, with, on average, over 18 s elapsing between the passage of transcribing polymerases. Similar low levels of flux were found when semi-synthetic promoters were used to drive transcript initiation, even when the promoter elements were changed to ensure full occupancy of the promoter by RNA polymerase.This article is part of the themed issue 'The new bacteriology'. PMID:27672157

  9. RNA polymerase supply and flux through the lac operon in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Sendy, Bandar; Lee, David J.; Bryant, Jack A.

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin immunoprecipitation, followed by quantification of immunoprecipitated DNA, can be used to measure RNA polymerase binding to any DNA segment in Escherichia coli. By calibrating measurements against the signal from a single RNA polymerase bound at a single promoter, we can calculate both promoter occupancy levels and the flux of transcribing RNA polymerase through transcription units. Here, we have applied the methodology to the E. coli lactose operon promoter. We confirm that promoter occupancy is limited by recruitment and that the supply of RNA polymerase to the lactose operon promoter depends on its location in the E. coli chromosome. Measurements of RNA polymerase binding to DNA segments within the lactose operon show that flux of RNA polymerase through the operon is low, with, on average, over 18 s elapsing between the passage of transcribing polymerases. Similar low levels of flux were found when semi-synthetic promoters were used to drive transcript initiation, even when the promoter elements were changed to ensure full occupancy of the promoter by RNA polymerase. This article is part of the themed issue ‘The new bacteriology’. PMID:27672157

  10. Integration of an [FeFe]-hydrogenase into the anaerobic metabolism of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Ciarán L.; Pinske, Constanze; Murphy, Bonnie J.; Parkin, Alison; Armstrong, Fraser; Palmer, Tracy; Sargent, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Biohydrogen is a potentially useful product of microbial energy metabolism. One approach to engineering biohydrogen production in bacteria is the production of non-native hydrogenase activity in a host cell, for example Escherichia coli. In some microbes, hydrogenase enzymes are linked directly to central metabolism via diaphorase enzymes that utilise NAD+/NADH cofactors. In this work, it was hypothesised that heterologous production of an NAD+/NADH-linked hydrogenase could connect hydrogen production in an E. coli host directly to its central metabolism. To test this, a synthetic operon was designed and characterised encoding an apparently NADH-dependent, hydrogen-evolving [FeFe]-hydrogenase from Caldanaerobacter subterranus. The synthetic operon was stably integrated into the E. coli chromosome and shown to produce an active hydrogenase, however no H2 production was observed. Subsequently, it was found that heterologous co-production of a pyruvate::ferredoxin oxidoreductase and ferredoxin from Thermotoga maritima was found to be essential to drive H2 production by this system. This work provides genetic evidence that the Ca.subterranus [FeFe]-hydrogenase could be operating in vivo as an electron-confurcating enzyme. PMID:26839796

  11. RNA polymerase supply and flux through the lac operon in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Sendy, Bandar; Lee, David J; Busby, Stephen J W; Bryant, Jack A

    2016-11-01

    Chromatin immunoprecipitation, followed by quantification of immunoprecipitated DNA, can be used to measure RNA polymerase binding to any DNA segment in Escherichia coli By calibrating measurements against the signal from a single RNA polymerase bound at a single promoter, we can calculate both promoter occupancy levels and the flux of transcribing RNA polymerase through transcription units. Here, we have applied the methodology to the E. coli lactose operon promoter. We confirm that promoter occupancy is limited by recruitment and that the supply of RNA polymerase to the lactose operon promoter depends on its location in the E. coli chromosome. Measurements of RNA polymerase binding to DNA segments within the lactose operon show that flux of RNA polymerase through the operon is low, with, on average, over 18 s elapsing between the passage of transcribing polymerases. Similar low levels of flux were found when semi-synthetic promoters were used to drive transcript initiation, even when the promoter elements were changed to ensure full occupancy of the promoter by RNA polymerase.This article is part of the themed issue 'The new bacteriology'.

  12. Plasmid cloning vectors for the conjugal transfer of DNA from Escherichia coli to Streptomyces spp.

    PubMed

    Bierman, M; Logan, R; O'Brien, K; Seno, E T; Rao, R N; Schoner, B E

    1992-07-01

    We have constructed cloning vectors for the conjugal transfer of DNA from Escherichia coli to Streptomyces spp. All vectors contain the 760-bp oriT fragment from the IncP plasmid, RK2. Transfer functions need to be supplied in trans by the E. coli donor strain. We have incorporated into these vectors selectable antibiotic-resistance markers (AmR, ThR, SpR) that function in Streptomyces spp. and other features that should allow for: (i) integration via homologous recombination between cloned DNA and the Streptomyces spp. chromosome, (ii) autonomous replication, or (iii) site-specific integration at the bacteriophage phi C31 attachment site. Shuttle cosmids for constructing genomic libraries and bacteriophage P1 cloning vector capable of accepting approx. 100-kb fragments are also described. A simple mating procedure has been developed for the conjugal transfer of these vectors from E. coli to Streptomyces spp. that involves plating of the donor strain and either germinated spores or mycelial fragments of the recipient strain. We have shown that several of these vectors can be introduced into Streptomyces fradiae, a strain that is notoriously difficult to transform by PEG-mediated protoplast transformation.

  13. Engineering Escherichia coli into a Protein Delivery System for Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Many Gram-negative pathogens encode type 3 secretion systems, sophisticated nanomachines that deliver proteins directly into the cytoplasm of mammalian cells. These systems present attractive opportunities for therapeutic protein delivery applications; however, their utility has been limited by their inherent pathogenicity. Here, we report the reengineering of a laboratory strain of Escherichia coli with a tunable type 3 secretion system that can efficiently deliver heterologous proteins into mammalian cells, thereby circumventing the need for virulence attenuation. We first introduced a 31 kB region of Shigella flexneri DNA that encodes all of the information needed to form the secretion nanomachine onto a plasmid that can be directly propagated within E. coli or integrated into the E. coli chromosome. To provide flexible control over type 3 secretion and protein delivery, we generated plasmids expressing master regulators of the type 3 system from either constitutive or inducible promoters. We then constructed a Gateway-compatible plasmid library of type 3 secretion sequences to enable rapid screening and identification of sequences that do not perturb function when fused to heterologous protein substrates and optimized their delivery into mammalian cells. Combining these elements, we found that coordinated expression of the type 3 secretion system and modified target protein substrates produces a nonpathogenic strain that expresses, secretes, and delivers heterologous proteins into mammalian cells. This reengineered system thus provides a highly flexible protein delivery platform with potential for future therapeutic applications. PMID:25853840

  14. Engineering Escherichia coli into a protein delivery system for mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Analise Z; Spears, William E; Du, Juan; Tan, Kah Yong; Wagers, Amy J; Lesser, Cammie F

    2015-05-15

    Many Gram-negative pathogens encode type 3 secretion systems, sophisticated nanomachines that deliver proteins directly into the cytoplasm of mammalian cells. These systems present attractive opportunities for therapeutic protein delivery applications; however, their utility has been limited by their inherent pathogenicity. Here, we report the reengineering of a laboratory strain of Escherichia coli with a tunable type 3 secretion system that can efficiently deliver heterologous proteins into mammalian cells, thereby circumventing the need for virulence attenuation. We first introduced a 31 kB region of Shigella flexneri DNA that encodes all of the information needed to form the secretion nanomachine onto a plasmid that can be directly propagated within E. coli or integrated into the E. coli chromosome. To provide flexible control over type 3 secretion and protein delivery, we generated plasmids expressing master regulators of the type 3 system from either constitutive or inducible promoters. We then constructed a Gateway-compatible plasmid library of type 3 secretion sequences to enable rapid screening and identification of sequences that do not perturb function when fused to heterologous protein substrates and optimized their delivery into mammalian cells. Combining these elements, we found that coordinated expression of the type 3 secretion system and modified target protein substrates produces a nonpathogenic strain that expresses, secretes, and delivers heterologous proteins into mammalian cells. This reengineered system thus provides a highly flexible protein delivery platform with potential for future therapeutic applications. PMID:25853840

  15. Identification of the Serratia marcescens hemolysin determinant by cloning into Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, V.; Neuss, B.; Ruan, Y.; Schiebel, E.; Schoeffler, H.; Jander, G.

    1987-05-01

    A cosmid bank of Serratia marcescens was established from which DNA fragments were cloned into the plasmid pBR322, which conferred the chromosomally encoded hemolytic activity to Escherichia coli K-12. By transposon mutagenesis with Tn1000 and Tn5 IS50/sub L/::phoA (TnphoA), the coding region was assigned to a DNA fragment, designated hyl, comprising approximately 7 kilobases. Two proteins with molecular weights of 61,000 (61K protein) and 160,000 (160K protein) were expressed by the pBR322 derivatives and by a plasmid which contained the hly genes under the control of a phage T7 promoter and the T7 RNA polymerase. When strongly overexpressed the 160K protein was released by E. coli cells into the extracellular medium concomitant with hemolytic activity. The genes encoding the 61K and the 160K proteins were transcribed in the same direction. Mutants expressing a 160K protein truncated at the carboxyl-terminal end were partially hemolytic. Hemolysis was progressively inhibited by saccharides with increasing molecular weights from maltotriose (M/sub r/ 504) to maltoheptaose (M/sub r/ 1152) and as totally abolished by dextran 4 (M/sub r/ 4000). This result and the observed influx of (/sup 14/C)sucrose into erythrocytes in the presence of hemolytic E. coli transformants under osmotically protective conditions suggest the formation of defined transmembrane channels by the hemolysin.

  16. Model of Transcriptional Activation By MarA in Escherichia Coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wall, Michael E.; Markowitz, David A.; Rosner, Judah L.; Martin, Robert G.

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a mathematical model of transcriptional activation by MarA in Escherichia coli, and used the model to analyze measurements of MarA-dependent activity of the marRAB, sodA, and micF promoters in mar-rob- cells. The model rationalizes an unexpected poor correlation between the mid-point of in vivo promoter activity profiles and in vitro equilibrium constants for MarA binding to promoter sequences. Analysis of the promoter activity data using the model yielded the following predictions regarding activation mechanisms: (1) MarA activation of the marRAB, sodA, and micF promoters involves a net acceleration of the kinetics of transitions after RNA polymerase binding, up to and including promoter escape and message elongation; (2) RNA polymerase binds to these promoters with nearly unit occupancy in the absence of MarA, making recruitment of polymerase an insignificant factor in activation of these promoters; and (3) instead of recruitment, activation of the micF promoter might involve a repulsion of polymerase combined with a large acceleration of the kinetics of polymerase activity. These predictions are consistent with published chromatin immunoprecipitation assays of interactions between polymerase and the E. coli chromosome. A lack of recruitment in transcriptional activation represents an exception to the textbook description of activation of bacterial sigma-70 promoters. However, use of accelerated polymerase kinetics instead of recruitment might confer a competitive advantage to E. coli by decreasing latency in gene regulation.

  17. Construction of a dihydrofolate reductase-deficient mutant of Escherichia coli by gene replacement.

    PubMed Central

    Howell, E E; Foster, P G; Foster, L M

    1988-01-01

    The dihydrofolate reductase (fol) gene in Escherichia coli has been deleted and replaced by a selectable marker. Verification of the delta fol::kan strain has been accomplished using genetic and biochemical criteria, including Southern analysis of the chromosomal DNA. The delta fol::kan mutation is stable in E. coli K549 [thyA polA12 (Ts)] and can be successfully transduced to other E. coli strains providing they have mutations in their thymidylate synthetase (thyA) genes. A preliminary investigation of the relationship between fol and thyA gene expression suggests that a Fol- cell (i.e., a dihydrofolate reductase deficiency phenotype) is not viable unless thymidylate synthetase activity is concurrently eliminated. This observation indicates that either the nonproductive accumulation of dihydrofolate or the depletion of tetrahydrofolate cofactor pools is lethal in a Fol- ThyA+ strain. Strains containing the thyA delta fol::kan lesions require the presence of Fol end products for growth, and these lesions typically increase the doubling time of the strain by a factor of 2.5 in rich medium. Images PMID:2838456

  18. Binding of type 1-piliated Escherichia coli to vaginal mucus.

    PubMed Central

    Venegas, M F; Navas, E L; Gaffney, R A; Duncan, J L; Anderson, B E; Schaeffer, A J

    1995-01-01

    To better understand the interactions involved in bacterial adherence and the role of mucus in the pathogenesis of urinary tract infections, we developed a system to study the binding of a recombinant Escherichia coli strain, HB101/pWRS1-17, expressing type 1 pili, to vaginal mucus collected from 28 women. Bacteria bound to differing extents to all specimens examined, and preincubation of bacteria with mannose inhibited binding by 50 to 89%. Additionally, all mucus samples showed reactivity with anti-mannose antibody, and the levels of reactivity correlated with the levels of bacterial binding, suggesting that the mannose-terminal saccharides present on these glycoproteins are the receptors for the binding of type 1-piliated bacteria. Mucus specimens collected over periods of 5 days and 12 weeks exhibited significant variation in bacterial binding, indicating temporal differences in the ability of vaginal mucus to act as a receptor for type 1-piliated E. coli. The results show that vaginal mucus can bind bacteria and may thus influence the initial attachment and subsequent colonization of the vaginal and urinary tract epithelium by E. coli. PMID:7822005

  19. Recombinant expression of Streptococcus pneumoniae capsular polysaccharides in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Kay, Emily J.; Yates, Laura E.; Terra, Vanessa S.; Cuccui, Jon; Wren, Brendan W.

    2016-01-01

    Currently, Streptococcus pneumoniae is responsible for over 14 million cases of pneumonia worldwide annually, and over 1 million deaths, the majority of them children. The major determinant for pathogenesis is a polysaccharide capsule that is variable and is used to distinguish strains based on their serotype. The capsule forms the basis of the pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV23) that contains purified capsular polysaccharide from 23 serotypes, and the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13), containing 13 common serotypes conjugated to CRM197 (mutant diphtheria toxin). Purified capsule from S. pneumoniae is required for pneumococcal conjugate vaccine production, and costs can be prohibitively high, limiting accessibility of the vaccine in low-income countries. In this study, we demonstrate the recombinant expression of the capsule-encoding locus from four different serotypes of S. pneumoniae within Escherichia coli. Furthermore, we attempt to identify the minimum set of genes necessary to reliably and efficiently express these capsules heterologously. These E. coli strains could be used to produce a supply of S. pneumoniae serotype-specific capsules without the need to culture pathogenic bacteria. Additionally, these strains could be applied to synthetic glycobiological applications: recombinant vaccine production using E. coli outer membrane vesicles or coupling to proteins using protein glycan coupling technology. PMID:27110302

  20. Fitness, Stress Resistance, and Extraintestinal Virulence in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Bleibtreu, Alexandre; Gros, Pierre-Alexis; Laouénan, Cédric; Clermont, Olivier; Le Nagard, Hervé; Picard, Bertrand; Tenaillon, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    The extraintestinal virulence of Escherichia coli is dependent on numerous virulence genes. However, there is growing evidence for a role of the metabolic properties and stress responses of strains in pathogenesis. We assessed the respective roles of these factors in strain virulence by developing phenotypic assays for measuring in vitro individual and competitive fitness and the general stress response, which we applied to 82 commensal and extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli strains previously tested in a mouse model of sepsis. Individual fitness properties, in terms of maximum growth rates in various media (Luria-Bertani broth with and without iron chelator, minimal medium supplemented with gluconate, and human urine) and competitive fitness properties, estimated as the mean relative growth rate per generation in mixed cultures with a reference fluorescent E. coli strain, were highly diverse between strains. The activity of the main general stress response regulator, RpoS, as determined by iodine staining of the colonies, H2O2 resistance, and rpoS sequencing, was also highly variable. No correlation between strain fitness and stress resistance and virulence in the mouse model was found, except that the maximum growth rate in urine was higher for virulent strains. Multivariate analysis showed that the number of virulence factors was the only independent factor explaining the virulence in mice. At the species level, growth capacity and stress resistance are heterogeneous properties that do not contribute significantly to the intrinsic virulence of the strains. PMID:23690401

  1. Engineered biosynthesis of medium-chain esters in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Tai, Yi-Shu; Xiong, Mingyong; Zhang, Kechun

    2015-01-01

    Medium-chain esters such as isobutyl acetate (IBAc) and isoamyl acetate (IAAc) are high-volume solvents, flavors and fragrances. In this work, we engineered synthetic metabolic pathways in Escherichia coli for the total biosynthesis of IBAc and IAAc directly from glucose. Our pathways harnessed the power of natural amino acid biosynthesis. In particular, the native valine and leucine pathways in E. coli were utilized to supply the precursors. Then alcohol acyltransferases from various organisms were investigated on their capability to catalyze esterification reactions. It was discovered that ATF1 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae was the best enzyme for the formation of both IBAc and IAAc in E. coli. In vitro biochemical characterization of ATF1 confirmed the fermentation results and provided rational guidance for future enzyme engineering. We also performed strain improvement by removing byproduct pathways (Δldh, ΔpoxB, Δpta) and increased the production of both target chemicals. Then the best IBAc producing strain was used for scale-up fermentation in a 1.3-L benchtop bioreactor. 36g/L of IBAc was produced after 72h fermentation. This work demonstrates the feasibility of total biosynthesis of medium-chain esters as renewable chemicals. PMID:25447641

  2. Improving alkane synthesis in Escherichia coli via metabolic engineering.

    PubMed

    Song, Xuejiao; Yu, Haiying; Zhu, Kun

    2016-01-01

    Concerns about energy security and global petroleum supply have made the production of renewable biofuels an industrial imperative. The ideal biofuels are n-alkanes in that they are chemically and structurally identical to the fossil fuels and can "drop in" to the transportation infrastructure. In this work, an Escherichia coli strain that produces n-alkanes was constructed by heterologous expression of acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) reductase (AAR) and aldehyde deformylating oxygenase (ADO) from Synechococcus elongatus PCC7942. The accumulation of alkanes ranged from 3.1 to 24.0 mg/L using different expressing strategies. Deletion of yqhD, an inherent aldehyde reductase in E. coli, or overexpression of fadR, an activator for fatty acid biosynthesis, exhibited a nearly twofold increase in alkane titers, respectively. Combining yqhD deletion and fadR overexpression resulted in a production titer of 255.6 mg/L in E. coli, and heptadecene was the most abundant product. PMID:26476644

  3. Biofilm formation by Escherichia coli in hypertonic sucrose media.

    PubMed

    Kawarai, Taketo; Furukawa, Soichi; Narisawa, Naoki; Hagiwara, Chisato; Ogihara, Hirokazu; Yamasaki, Makari

    2009-06-01

    High osmotic environments produced by NaCl or sucrose have been used as reliable and traditional methods of food preservation. We tested, Escherichia coli as an indicator of food-contaminating bacterium, to determine if it can form biofilm in a hyperosmotic environment. E. coli K-12 IAM1264 did not form biofilm in LB broth that contained 1 M NaCl. However, the bacterium formed biofilm in LB broth that contained 1 M sucrose, although the planktonic growth was greatly suppressed. The biofilm, formed on solid surfaces, such as titer-plate well walls and glass slides, solely around the air-liquid interface. Both biofilm forming cells and planktonic cells in the hypertonic medium adopted a characteristic, fat and filamentous morphology with no FtsZ rings, which are a prerequisite for septum formation. Biofilm forming cells were found to be alive based on propidium iodide staining. The presence of 1 M sucrose in the food environment is not sufficient to prevent biofilm formation by E. coli. PMID:19447340

  4. [Determination of antibiotics using luminescent Escherichia coli and serum].

    PubMed

    Vlasova, I I; Asrieli, T V; Gavrilova, E M; Danilov, V S

    2007-01-01

    The methodical bases for detecting antibiotics using a bioluminescent assay and blood serum are briefed. Antibiotics inhibit the luminescence of a genetically engineered Escherichia coli strain. The degree of inhibition depended on the type of antibiotic, its concentration, and the time of cell incubation with antibiotic. The highest cell sensitivity was recorded towards the aminoglycoside antibiotics, which amounted to 85 +/- 10 ng/ml for gentamicin and streptomycin. The sensitivity of this system to a number of antibiotics essentially increased when the cells were previously activated with blood serum. The sensitivity of this method for gentamicin and streptomycin in the presence of blood serum amounted to 2.5 +/- 0.5 ng/ml; for tetracycline, 45 +/- 8 ng/ml. Use of the sera containing specific antibodies to the antibiotic detected provided a high sensitivity of the biosensor tested. Comparison of the luminescences of E. coli cells activated with normal and specific antisera upon incubation with an antibiotic allows the type of antibiotic and its quantitative content in the sample to be determined. Characteristic of the analysis of antibiotics with the help of recombinant E. coli are a high accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, simplicity, and a short time needed for measurement.

  5. Metabolic engineering of Escherichia coli to produce zeaxanthin.

    PubMed

    Li, Xi-Ran; Tian, Gui-Qiao; Shen, Hong-Jie; Liu, Jian-Zhong

    2015-04-01

    Zeaxanthin is a high-value carotenoid that is used in nutraceuticals, cosmetics, food, and animal feed industries. Zeaxanthin is chemically synthesized or purified from microorganisms as a natural product; however, increasing demand requires development of alternative sources such as heterologous biosynthesis by recombinant bacteria. For this purpose, we molecularly engineered Escherichia coli to optimize the synthesis of zeaxanthin from lycopene using fusion protein-mediated substrate channeling as well as by the introduction of tunable intergenic regions. The tunable intergenic regions approach was more efficient compared with protein fusion for coordinating expression of lycopene β-cyclase gene crtY and β-carotene 3-hydroxylase gene crtZ. The influence of the substrate channeling effect suggests that the reaction catalyzed by CrtZ is the rate-limiting step in zeaxanthin biosynthesis. Then Pantoea ananatis, Pantoea agglomerans and Haematococcus pluvialis crtZ were compared. Because P. ananatis crtZ is superior to that of P. agglomerans or H. pluvialis for zeaxanthin production, we used it to generate a recombinant strain of E. coli BETA-1 containing pZSPBA-2(P37-crtZPAN) that produced higher amounts of zeaxanthin (11.95 ± 0.21 mg/g dry cell weight) than other engineered E. coli strains described in the literature.

  6. Starved Escherichia coli preserve reducing power under nitric oxide stress.

    PubMed

    Gowers, Glen-Oliver F; Robinson, Jonathan L; Brynildsen, Mark P

    2016-07-15

    Nitric oxide (NO) detoxification enzymes, such as NO dioxygenase (NOD) and NO reductase (NOR), are important to the virulence of numerous bacteria. Pathogens use these defense systems to ward off immune-generated NO, and they do so in environments that contain additional stressors, such as reactive oxygen species, nutrient deprivation, and acid stress. NOD and NOR both use reducing equivalents to metabolically deactivate NO, which suggests that nutrient deprivation could negatively impact their functionality. To explore the relationship between NO detoxification and nutrient deprivation, we examined the ability of Escherichia coli to detoxify NO under different levels of carbon source availability in aerobic cultures. We observed failure of NO detoxification under both carbon source limitation and starvation, and those failures could have arisen from inabilities to synthesize Hmp (NOD of E. coli) and/or supply it with sufficient NADH (preferred electron donor). We found that when limited quantities of carbon source were provided, NO detoxification failed due to insufficient NADH, whereas starvation prevented Hmp synthesis, which enabled cells to maintain their NADH levels. This maintenance of NADH levels under starvation was confirmed to be dependent on the absence of Hmp. Intriguingly, these data show that under NO stress, carbon-starved E. coli are better positioned with regard to reducing power to cope with other stresses than cells that had consumed an exhaustible amount of carbon. PMID:27207837

  7. Escherichia coli lipoprotein binds human plasminogen via an intramolecular domain

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Tammy; Gaultney, Robert A.; Floden, Angela M.; Brissette, Catherine A.

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli lipoprotein (Lpp) is a major cellular component that exists in two distinct states, bound-form and free-form. Bound-form Lpp is known to interact with the periplasmic bacterial cell wall, while free-form Lpp is localized to the bacterial cell surface. A function for surface-exposed Lpp has yet to be determined. We hypothesized that the presence of C-terminal lysinses in the surface-exposed region of Lpp would facilitate binding to the host zymogen plasminogen (Plg), a protease commandeered by a number of clinically important bacteria. Recombinant Lpp was synthesized and the binding of Lpp to Plg, the effect of various inhibitors on this binding, and the effects of various mutations of Lpp on Lpp–Plg interactions were examined. Additionally, the ability of Lpp-bound Plg to be converted to active plasmin was analyzed. We determined that Lpp binds Plg via an atypical domain located near the center of mature Lpp that may not be exposed on the surface of intact E. coli according to the current localization model. Finally, we found that Plg bound by Lpp can be converted to active plasmin. While the consequences of Lpp binding Plg are unclear, these results prompt further investigation of the ability of surface exposed Lpp to interact with host molecules such as extracellular matrix components and complement regulators, and the role of these interactions in infections caused by E. coli and other bacteria. PMID:26500634

  8. Rapid Method for Escherichia coli in the Cuyahoga River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brady, Amie M.G.

    2007-01-01

    This study is a continuation of a previous U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) project in cooperation with the National Park Service at Cuyahoga Valley National Park in Brecksville, Ohio. A rapid (1-hour) method for detecting Escherichia coli (E. coli) in water was tested and compared to the standard (24-hour) method for determining E. coli concentrations. Environmental data were collected to determine turbidity, rainfall, and streamflow at the time of sampling. In the previous study (2004-5), data collected were used to develop predictive models to determine recreational water quality in the river at two sites within the park. Data collected during this continued study (2006) were used to test these models. At Jaite, a centrally located site within the park, the model correctly predicted exceedances or nonexceedances of the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency maximum for recreational water quality in 80 percent of samples. At Old Portage, a site near the upstream boundary of the park, the model correctly predicted recreational water quality in 58 percent of samples. All of the data collected in 2004-6 will be used to develop more accurate models for use in future studies. Analysis and discussion of model results are scheduled to be included in an upcoming USGS Scientific Investigations Report.

  9. Improving alkane synthesis in Escherichia coli via metabolic engineering.

    PubMed

    Song, Xuejiao; Yu, Haiying; Zhu, Kun

    2016-01-01

    Concerns about energy security and global petroleum supply have made the production of renewable biofuels an industrial imperative. The ideal biofuels are n-alkanes in that they are chemically and structurally identical to the fossil fuels and can "drop in" to the transportation infrastructure. In this work, an Escherichia coli strain that produces n-alkanes was constructed by heterologous expression of acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) reductase (AAR) and aldehyde deformylating oxygenase (ADO) from Synechococcus elongatus PCC7942. The accumulation of alkanes ranged from 3.1 to 24.0 mg/L using different expressing strategies. Deletion of yqhD, an inherent aldehyde reductase in E. coli, or overexpression of fadR, an activator for fatty acid biosynthesis, exhibited a nearly twofold increase in alkane titers, respectively. Combining yqhD deletion and fadR overexpression resulted in a production titer of 255.6 mg/L in E. coli, and heptadecene was the most abundant product.

  10. Expression of the Streptomyces enzyme endoglycosidase H in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Robbins, P W; Wirth, D F; Hering, C

    1981-10-25

    Endoglycosidase H is one of a large number of enzymes secreted by Streptomyces plicatus and other Streptomyces species. When the structural gene for this enzyme is introduced into Escherichia coli attached to the plasmid pBR-322 or Charon 4 phage, the enzyme is synthesized and is found in the periplasmic space, culture medium, and cells. Attachment of the UV-5 lac promoter to a site in the plasmid adjacent to the Streptomyces insert stimulates enzyme synthesis as much as 100-fold. This result demonstrates that transcription of the Streptomyces gene can be initiated from sequences outside of the Streptomyces insert. Initiation of transcription on a Streptomyces promoter is also a suggested but unproven possibility. In contrast to the situation in Streptomyces, where the enzyme has a molecular weight of 27,000, the enzyme made in E. coli has a molecular weight of approximately 30,000. Possible explanations for this difference in size are lack of cleavage of the Streptomyces secretion "signal sequence" in E. coli or protein "processing" by enzymes secreted into the medium by STreptomyces.

  11. Microaerobic Conversion of Glycerol to Ethanol in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Matthew S.; Li, Mai; Black, Ryan W.; Le, Thao Q.; Puthli, Sharon; Campbell, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Glycerol has become a desirable feedstock for the production of fuels and chemicals due to its availability and low price, but many barriers to commercialization remain. Previous investigators have made significant improvements in the yield of ethanol from glycerol. We have developed a fermentation process for the efficient microaerobic conversion of glycerol to ethanol by Escherichia coli that presents solutions to several other barriers to commercialization: rate, titer, specific productivity, use of inducers, use of antibiotics, and safety. To increase the rate, titer, and specific productivity to commercially relevant levels, we constructed a plasmid that overexpressed glycerol uptake genes dhaKLM, gldA, and glpK, as well as the ethanol pathway gene adhE. To eliminate the cost of inducers and antibiotics from the fermentation, we used the adhE and icd promoters from E. coli in our plasmid, and we implemented glycerol addiction to retain the plasmid. To address the safety issue of off-gas flammability, we optimized the fermentation process with reduced-oxygen sparge gas to ensure that the off-gas remained nonflammable. These advances represent significant progress toward the commercialization of an E. coli-based glycerol-to-ethanol process. PMID:24584248

  12. Metabolic engineering of Escherichia coli to produce zeaxanthin.

    PubMed

    Li, Xi-Ran; Tian, Gui-Qiao; Shen, Hong-Jie; Liu, Jian-Zhong

    2015-04-01

    Zeaxanthin is a high-value carotenoid that is used in nutraceuticals, cosmetics, food, and animal feed industries. Zeaxanthin is chemically synthesized or purified from microorganisms as a natural product; however, increasing demand requires development of alternative sources such as heterologous biosynthesis by recombinant bacteria. For this purpose, we molecularly engineered Escherichia coli to optimize the synthesis of zeaxanthin from lycopene using fusion protein-mediated substrate channeling as well as by the introduction of tunable intergenic regions. The tunable intergenic regions approach was more efficient compared with protein fusion for coordinating expression of lycopene β-cyclase gene crtY and β-carotene 3-hydroxylase gene crtZ. The influence of the substrate channeling effect suggests that the reaction catalyzed by CrtZ is the rate-limiting step in zeaxanthin biosynthesis. Then Pantoea ananatis, Pantoea agglomerans and Haematococcus pluvialis crtZ were compared. Because P. ananatis crtZ is superior to that of P. agglomerans or H. pluvialis for zeaxanthin production, we used it to generate a recombinant strain of E. coli BETA-1 containing pZSPBA-2(P37-crtZPAN) that produced higher amounts of zeaxanthin (11.95 ± 0.21 mg/g dry cell weight) than other engineered E. coli strains described in the literature. PMID:25533633

  13. Escherichia coli Meningitis after Rotavirus Gastroenteritis in an Infant

    PubMed Central

    Vermezoglu, Oznur; Ocal Topcu, Didem; Karbuz, Adem; Hacihamdioglu, Bulent

    2016-01-01

    Although rotavirus gastroenteritis is quite common in the pediatric population, secondary bacterial sepsis following rotavirus infection is a rare clinical entity. Gram-negative bacilli are the fifth most common cause of meningitis in infants but this infection rarely occurs after gastroenteritis. Here, we report a 2.5-month-old infant who developed Escherichia coli (E. coli) meningitis after acute rotavirus gastroenteritis. The 2.5-month-old male infant with fever, vomiting, and watery diarrhea that started 1 day earlier was admitted to the hospital. Rotavirus antigen in stool sample was positive. He was hospitalized, and fever was measured at 39.5°C on the second day. Lumbar puncture was done for suspicion of meningitis, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) findings suggested meningitis. Intravenous vancomycin and cefotaxime were started empirically. Since E. coli reproduction was seen in blood culture and CSF culture, treatment was continued with cefotaxime. The patient was discharged with minimal midlevel hydrocephalus findings in cranial ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging following 21 days of antibiotics treatment. Septicemia development following rotavirus gastroenteritis is an extremely rare clinical condition. It is vital to start prompt antibiotic treatment as soon as the diagnosis of secondary bacterial infection is made because of high mortality and morbidity rates. PMID:27738536

  14. Rapid microarray-based DNA genoserotyping of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Geue, Lutz; Monecke, Stefan; Engelmann, Ines; Braun, Sascha; Slickers, Peter; Ehricht, Ralf

    2014-02-01

    In this study, an improvement in the oligonucleotide-based DNA microarray for the genoserotyping of Escherichia coli is presented. Primer and probes for additional 70 O antigen groups were developed. The microarray was transferred to a new platform, the ArrayStrip format, which allows high through-put tests in 96-well formats and fully automated microarray analysis. Thus, starting from a single colony, it is possible to determine within a few hours and a single experiment, 94 of the over 180 known O antigen groups as well as 47 of the 53 different H antigens. The microarray was initially validated with a set of defined reference strains that had previously been serotyped by conventional agglutination in various reference centers. For further validation of the microarray, 180 clinical E. coli isolates of human origin (from urine samples, blood cultures, bronchial secretions, and wound swabs) and 53 E. coli isolates from cattle, pigs, and poultry were used. A high degree of concordance between the results of classical antibody-based serotyping and DNA-based genoserotyping was demonstrated during validation of the new 70 O antigen groups as well as for the field strains of human and animal origin. Therefore, this oligonucleotide array is a diagnostic tool that is user-friendly and more efficient than classical serotyping by agglutination. Furthermore, the tests can be performed in almost every routine lab and are easily expanded and standardized.

  15. Methods for enumerating Escherichia coli in subtropical waters.

    PubMed

    Cheung, W H; Ha, D K; Yeung, K Y; Hung, R P

    1991-04-01

    The standard membrane filtration method of the UK has been modified in order to improve its specificity for enumerating Escherichia coli in the subtropical waters of Hong Kong. This involves incorporating into the membrane lauryl sulphate (mLS) method either an in situ urease test (the mLS-UA method), or an in situ beta-glucuronidase test (the mLS-GUD method). The false-positive errors of the mLS-UA and mLS-GUD methods are low, ranging from 3-5%. A comparison between the membrane filtration (mLS-UA) method and the multiple tube technique in testing E. coli in subtropical beach-waters has demonstrated that the former can give much more precise counts, and is the method of choice for such a purpose. The mLS-GUD method, for which automated counting of E. coli colonies is possible, is a good alternative to mLS-UA in routine enumeration of this bacterial indicator in environmental waters.

  16. Biofilm and fluoroquinolone resistance of canine Escherichia coli uropathogenic isolates

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Escherichia coli is the most common uropathogen involved in urinary tract infection (UTI). Virulence of strains may differ, and may be enhanced by antimicrobial resistance and biofilm formation, resulting in increased morbidity and recurrent infections. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro biofilm forming capacity of E. coli isolates from dogs with UTI, by using fluorescent in situ hybridization, and its association with virulence genes and antimicrobial resistance. Findings The proportion of biofilm-producing isolates significantly increased with the length of incubation time (P < 0.05). Biofilm production was significantly associated with fluoroquinolone resistance at all incubation time points and was independent of the media used (P < 0.05). Biofilm production was not associated with cnf1, hly, pap and sfa genes (P > 0.05), but was significantly associated with afa, aer and the β-lactamase genes (P < 0.05). Conclusions To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report showing significant association between biofilm production and fluoroquinolone resistance in E. coli isolates from dogs with UTI. Biofilm formation may contribute to UTI treatment failure in dogs, through the development of bacterial reservoirs inside bladder cells, allowing them to overcome host immune defenses and to establish recurrent infections. PMID:25099929

  17. Comprehensive Mapping of the Escherichia coli Flagellar Regulatory Network

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, Devon M.; Bonocora, Richard P.; Wade, Joseph T.

    2014-01-01

    Flagellar synthesis is a highly regulated process in all motile bacteria. In Escherichia coli and related species, the transcription factor FlhDC is the master regulator of a multi-tiered transcription network. FlhDC activates transcription of a number of genes, including some flagellar genes and the gene encoding the alternative Sigma factor FliA. Genes whose expression is required late in flagellar assembly are primarily transcribed by FliA, imparting temporal regulation of transcription and coupling expression to flagellar assembly. In this study, we use ChIP-seq and RNA-seq to comprehensively map the E. coli FlhDC and FliA regulons. We define a surprisingly restricted FlhDC regulon, including two novel regulated targets and two binding sites not associated with detectable regulation of surrounding genes. In contrast, we greatly expand the known FliA regulon. Surprisingly, 30 of the 52 FliA binding sites are located inside genes. Two of these intragenic promoters are associated with detectable noncoding RNAs, while the others either produce highly unstable RNAs or are inactive under these conditions. Together, our data redefine the E. coli flagellar regulatory network, and provide new insight into the temporal orchestration of gene expression that coordinates the flagellar assembly process. PMID:25275371

  18. Reduction of aerobic acetate production by Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Farmer, W R; Liao, J C

    1997-01-01

    Acetate excretion by Escherichia coli during aerobic growth on glucose is a major obstacle to enhanced recombinant protein production. We report here that the fraction of carbon flux through the anaplerotic pathways is one of the factors influencing acetate excretion. Flux analysis of E. coli central metabolic pathways predicts that increasing the fraction of carbon flux through the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PPC) pathway and the glyoxylate bypass reduces acetate production. We tested this prediction by overexpressing PPC and deregulating the glyoxylate bypass by using a fadR strain. Results show that the acetate yield by the fadR strain with PPC overexpression is decreased more than fourfold compared to the control, while the biomass yield is relatively unaffected. Apparently, the fraction of carbon flux through the anaplerotic pathways is one of the factors that influence acetate excretion. These results confirm the prediction of our flux analysis and further suggest that E. coli is not fully optimized for efficient utilization of glucose. PMID:9251207

  19. Shiga Toxin (Verotoxin)-Producing Escherichia coli in Japan.

    PubMed

    Terajima, Jun; Iyoda, Sunao; Ohnishi, Makoto; Watanabe, Haruo

    2014-10-01

    A series of outbreaks of infection with Shiga toxin (verocytotoxin)-producing Escherichia coli or enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) O157:H7 occurred in Japan in 1996, the largest outbreak occurring in primary schools in Sakai City, Osaka Prefecture, where more than 7,500 cases were reported. Although the reason for the sudden increase in the number of reports of EHEC isolates in 1996 is not known, the number of reports has grown to more than 3,000 cases per year since 1996, from an average of 105 reports each year during the previous 5-year period (1991-1995). Despite control measures instituted since 1996, including designating Shiga toxin-producing E. coli infection as a notifiable disease, and nationwide surveillance effectively monitoring the disease, the number of reports remains high, around 3,800 cases per year. Serogroup O157 predominates over other EHEC serogroups, but isolation frequency of non-O157 EHEC has gone up slightly over the past few years. Non-O157 EHEC has recently caused outbreaks where consumption of a raw beef dish was the source of the infection, and some fatal cases occurred. Laboratory surveillance comprised prefectural and municipal public health institutes, and the National Institute of Infectious Diseases has contributed to finding not only multiprefectural outbreaks but recognizing sporadic cases that could have been missed as an outbreak without the aid of molecular subtyping of EHEC isolates. This short overview presents recent information on the surveillance of EHEC infections in Japan. PMID:26104366

  20. Identification of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli strains from avian organic fertilizers.

    PubMed

    Puño-Sarmiento, Juan; Gazal, Luis Eduardo; Medeiros, Leonardo P; Nishio, Erick K; Kobayashi, Renata K T; Nakazato, Gerson

    2014-08-28

    The Brazilian poultry industry generates large amounts of organic waste, such as chicken litter, which is often used in agriculture. Among the bacteria present in organic fertilizer are members of the Enterobacteriaceae family. The objective of this study was to detect the presence of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli (DEC) strains in avian organic fertilizer, and assess the potential damage they can cause in humans due to antimicrobial resistance. The presence of DEC pathotypes and phylogenetic groups were detected by multiplex-PCR. Phenotypic assays, such as tests for adhesion, cytotoxicity activity, biofilm formation and especially antimicrobial susceptibility, were performed. Fifteen DEC strains from 64 E. coli were isolated. Among these, four strains were classified as enteropathogenic (EPEC; 6.2%), three strains as Shiga toxin-producing (STEC; 4.7%), 10 strains as enteroaggregative (EAEC; 12.5%), but two of these harbored the eaeA gene too. The low number of isolated strains was most likely due to the composting process, which reduces the number of microorganisms. These strains were able to adhere to HEp-2 and HeLa cells and produce Shiga-toxins and biofilms; in addition, some of the strains showed antimicrobial resistance, which indicates a risk of the transfer of resistance genes to human E. coli. These results showed that DEC strains isolated from avian organic fertilizers can cause human infections.

  1. Engineering Escherichia coli for Microbial Production of Butanone

    PubMed Central

    Srirangan, Kajan; Liu, Xuejia; Akawi, Lamees; Bruder, Mark; Moo-Young, Murray

    2016-01-01

    To expand the chemical and molecular diversity of biotransformation using whole-cell biocatalysts, we genetically engineered a pathway in Escherichia coli for heterologous production of butanone, an important commodity ketone. First, a 1-propanol-producing E. coli host strain with its sleeping beauty mutase (Sbm) operon being activated was used to increase the pool of propionyl-coenzyme A (propionyl-CoA). Subsequently, molecular heterofusion of propionyl-CoA and acetyl-CoA was conducted to yield 3-ketovaleryl-CoA via a CoA-dependent elongation pathway. Lastly, 3-ketovaleryl-CoA was channeled into the clostridial acetone formation pathway for thioester hydrolysis and subsequent decarboxylation to form butanone. Biochemical, genetic, and metabolic factors affecting relative levels of ketogenesis, acidogenesis, and alcohologenesis under selected fermentative culture conditions were investigated. Using the engineered E. coli strain for batch cultivation with 30 g liter−1 glycerol as the carbon source, we achieved coproduction of 1.3 g liter−1 butanone and 2.9 g liter−1 acetone. The results suggest that approximately 42% of spent glycerol was utilized for ketone biosynthesis, and thus they demonstrate potential industrial applicability of this microbial platform. PMID:26896132

  2. 40 CFR 180.1301 - Escherichia coli O157:H7 specific bacteriophages; temporary exemption from the requirement of a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Escherichia coli O157:H7 specific... PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1301 Escherichia coli O157:H7 specific... Escherichia coli O157:H7, sequence negative for shiga toxins I and II, and grown on atoxigenic host...

  3. 40 CFR 180.1301 - Escherichia coli O157:H7 specific bacteriophages; temporary exemption from the requirement of a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Escherichia coli O157:H7 specific... PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1301 Escherichia coli O157:H7 specific... Escherichia coli O157:H7, sequence negative for shiga toxins I and II, and grown on atoxigenic host...

  4. 40 CFR 180.1301 - Escherichia coli O157:H7 specific bacteriophages; temporary exemption from the requirement of a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Escherichia coli O157:H7 specific... PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1301 Escherichia coli O157:H7 specific... Escherichia coli O157:H7, sequence negative for shiga toxins I and II, and grown on atoxigenic host...

  5. Escherichia coli: a brief review of diarrheagenic pathotypes and their role in diarrheal diseases in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Jafari, A; Aslani, MM; Bouzari, S

    2012-01-01

    Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli have developed different strategies for establishment of infection in their host. Understanding these pathogenic mechanisms has led to the development of specific diagnostic tools for identification and categorization of E. coli strains into different pathotypes. This review aims to provide an overview of the various categories of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli and the data obtained in Iran pertaining to these pathotypes. PMID:23066484

  6. Molecular characterization of the tia invasion locus from enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Fleckenstein, J M; Kopecko, D J; Warren, R L; Elsinghorst, E A

    1996-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) shares with other diarrheal pathogens the capacity to invade epithelial cell lines originating from the human ileum or colon, although the role of invasion in ETEC pathogenesis remains undefined. Two distinct loci (tia and tib) that direct noninvasive E. coli to adhere to and invade intestinal epithelial cell lines have previously been isolated from cosmid libraries of the classical ETEC strain H10407. Here, we report the molecular characterization of the tia locus. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis of cellular fractions of E. coli DH5alpha carrying the tia-positive cosmids and recombinant plasmid subclones revealed that this locus directs the production of a 25-kDa protein (the Tia protein) that is localized to the outer membrane. The tia locus was subcloned to a maximum of 2 kb and mutagenized with bacteriophage Mud. Synthesis of this protein was directly correlated with the ability of subclones and Mud transposon mutants to adhere to and invade epithelial cells. Sequencing of the tia locus identified a 756-bp open reading frame. All transposon insertions resulting in an invasion-negative phenotype mapped to this open reading frame. The open reading frame was amplified and directionally cloned behind the lac promoter of pHG165. This construct directed DHalpha to express a 25-kDa protein and to adhere to and invade epithelial cells. The role of the tia gene in directing epithelial adherence and invasion was further assessed by the construction of chromosomal tia deletion derivatives of the parent ETEC strain, H10407. These tia deletion strains were noninvasive and lacked the ability to adhere to human ileocecal cells. The tia gene shares limited homology with the Yersinia ail locus and significant homology with the hra1 agglutinin gene cloned from a porcine ETEC strain. Additionally, tia probes hybridized to geographically diverse ETEC strains, as well as some enteropathogenic E. coli

  7. Probiotic Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 reduces growth, Shiga toxin expression, release and thus cytotoxicity of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Mohsin, Mashkoor; Guenther, Sebastian; Schierack, Peter; Tedin, Karsten; Wieler, Lothar H

    2015-01-01

    Due to increased release or production of Shiga toxin by Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) after exposure to antimicrobial agents, the role of antimicrobial agents in EHEC mediated infections remains controversial. Probiotics are therefore rapidly gaining interest as an alternate therapeutic option. The well-known probiotic strain Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 (EcN) was tested in vitro to determine its probiotic effects on growth, Shiga toxin (Stx) gene expression, Stx amount and associated cytotoxicity on the most important EHEC strains of serotype O104:H4 and O157:H7. Following co-culture of EcN:EHEC in broth for 4 and 24 h, the probiotic effects on EHEC growth, toxin gene expression, Stx amount and cytotoxicity were determined using quantitative real time-PCR, Stx-ELISA and Vero cytotoxicity assays. Probiotic EcN strongly reduced EHEC numbers (cfu) of O104:H4 up to (68%) and O157:H7 to (72.2%) (p<0.05) in LB broth medium whereas the non-probiotic E. coli strain MG1655 had no effect on EHEC growth. The level of stx expression was significantly down-regulated, particularly for the stx2a gene. The stx down-regulation in EcN co-culture was not due to reduced numbers of EHEC. A significant inhibition in Stx amounts and cytotoxicity were also observed in sterile supernatants of EcN:EHEC co-cultures. These findings indicate that probiotic EcN displays strong inhibitory effects on growth, Shiga toxin gene expression, amount and cytotoxicity of EHEC strains. Thus, EcN may be considered as a putative therapeutic candidate, in particular against EHEC O104:H4 and O157:H7. PMID:25465158

  8. [Sensitivity to drugs of Escherichia coli strains isolated from poultry with coli septicemia].

    PubMed

    Giurov, B

    1985-01-01

    Investigations were carried out into the susceptibility of a total of 223 strains of Escherichia coli to therapeutic agents with the employment of the disk diffusion method. The organisms were isolated from internal organs and bone marrow of birds died of coli septicaemia. The serologic classification of the strains was defined with the use of 88 anti-group OK-agglutinating sera obtained through hyperimmunization of rabbits with the following Escherichia coli serotypes: 01-063, 068, 071, 073, 075, 078, 086, 0101, 0103, 0111-0114, 0119, 0124, 0129, 0135-0141, 0146, 0147, and 0149. It was found that serologically the strains referred as follows: 01-41 strains, 02-70 strains, 04-2 strains, 08-3 strains, 026-1 strain, 078-70 strains, 0111-2 strains, 0103-1 strain, 0141-1 strain. The number of untypable strains amounted to 32. Highest number of strains proved sensitive to colistin--96.06%, the remaining drugs following in a descending order: flumequine--95.65%, apramycin - 95.5%, gentamycin--93.72%, amoxicillin--93,8%, amikacin--88.57%, carbenicillin--86.88%, furazolidone--83,13%, and kanamycin--79.36%. High was the percent of strains resistant to tetracycline--66.17%, spectinomycin--61.67%, ampicillin--51.12%, chloramphenicol--50.23%, and streptomycin--44.84%.

  9. Azorean wild rabbits as reservoirs of antimicrobial resistant Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Marinho, Catarina; Igrejas, Gilberto; Gonçalves, Alexandre; Silva, Nuno; Santos, Tiago; Monteiro, Ricardo; Gonçalves, David; Rodrigues, Tiago; Poeta, Patrícia

    2014-12-01

    Antibiotic resistance in bacteria is an increasing problem that is not only constrained to the clinical setting but also to other environments that can lodge antibiotic resistant bacteria and therefore they may serve as reservoirs of genetic determinants of antibiotic resistance. One hundred and thirty-six faecal samples from European wild rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus algirus) were collected on São Jorge Island in Azores Archipelago, and analysed for Escherichia coli isolates. Seventy-seven isolates (56.6%) were recovered and studied for antimicrobial resistance, one isolate per positive sample. Thirteen (16.9%), 19 (24.7%), 25 (32.4%) and 20 (26%) isolates were ascribed to A, B1, B2 and D phylogenetic groups, respectively, by specific primer polymerase chain reaction. Different E. coli isolates were found to be resistant to ampicillin (16.9%), tetracycline (1.3%), streptomycin (42.9%), sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim (1.3%), amikacin (1.3%), tobramycin (2.6%) and nalidixic acid (1.3%). Additionally, the blaTEM, tetA, strA/strB, aadA, sul1, intI, intI2 and qacEΔ+sul1 genes were found in most resistant isolates. This study showed that E. coli from the intestinal tract of wild rabbits from Azores Archipelago are resistant to widely prescribed antibiotics in medicine and they constitute a reservoir of antimicrobial resistant genes, which may play a significant role in the spread of antimicrobial resistance. Therefore, antibiotic resistant E. coli from Azorean wild rabbits may represent an ecological and public health problem.

  10. Specific electromagnetic effects of microwave radiation on Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Shamis, Yury; Taube, Alex; Mitik-Dineva, Natasa; Croft, Rodney; Crawford, Russell J; Ivanova, Elena P

    2011-05-01

    The present study investigated the effects of microwave (MW) radiation applied under a sublethal temperature on Escherichia coli. The experiments were conducted at a frequency of 18 GHz and at a temperature below 40°C to avoid the thermal degradation of bacterial cells during exposure. The absorbed power was calculated to be 1,500 kW/m(3), and the electric field was determined to be 300 V/m. Both values were theoretically confirmed using CST Microwave Studio 3D Electromagnetic Simulation Software. As a negative control, E. coli cells were also thermally heated to temperatures up to 40°C using Peltier plate heating. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis performed immediately after MW exposure revealed that the E. coli cells exhibited a cell morphology significantly different from that of the negative controls. This MW effect, however, appeared to be temporary, as following a further 10-min elapsed period, the cell morphology appeared to revert to a state that was identical to that of the untreated controls. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) revealed that fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-conjugated dextran (150 kDa) was taken up by the MW-treated cells, suggesting that pores had formed within the cell membrane. Cell viability experiments revealed that the MW treatment was not bactericidal, since 88% of the cells were recovered after radiation. It is proposed that one of the effects of exposing E. coli cells to MW radiation under sublethal temperature conditions is that the cell surface undergoes a modification that is electrokinetic in nature, resulting in a reversible MW-induced poration of the cell membrane.

  11. Regulation of fatty acid biosynthesis in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Magnuson, K; Jackowski, S; Rock, C O; Cronan, J E

    1993-01-01

    Our understanding of fatty acid biosynthesis in Escherichia coli has increased greatly in recent years. Since the discovery that the intermediates of fatty acid biosynthesis are bound to the heat-stable protein cofactor termed acyl carrier protein, the fatty acid synthesis pathway of E. coli has been studied in some detail. Interestingly, many advances in the field have aided in the discovery of analogous systems in other organisms. In fact, E. coli has provided a paradigm of predictive value for the synthesis of fatty acids in bacteria and plants and the synthesis of bacterial polyketide antibiotics. In this review, we concentrate on four major areas of research. First, the reactions in fatty acid biosynthesis and the proteins catalyzing these reactions are discussed in detail. The genes encoding many of these proteins have been cloned, and characterization of these genes has led to a better understanding of the pathway. Second, the function and role of the two essential cofactors in fatty acid synthesis, coenzyme A and acyl carrier protein, are addressed. Finally, the steps governing the spectrum of products produced in synthesis and alternative destinations, other than membrane phospholipids, for fatty acids in E. coli are described. Throughout the review, the contribution of each portion of the pathway to the global regulation of synthesis is examined. In no other organism is the bulk of knowledge regarding fatty acid metabolism so great; however, questions still remain to be answered. Pursuing such questions should reveal additional regulatory mechanisms of fatty acid synthesis and, hopefully, the role of fatty acid synthesis and other cellular processes in the global control of cellular growth. PMID:8246839

  12. Resistance of various shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli to electrolyzed oxidizing water

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The resistance of thirty two strains of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and six major serotypes of non-O157 Shiga toxin- producing E. coli (STEC) plus E. coli O104 was tested against Electrolyzed oxidizing (EO) water using two different methods; modified AOAC 955.16 sequential inoculation method and minim...

  13. Finished Genome Sequence of Escherichia coli K-12 Strain HMS174 (ATCC 47011).

    PubMed

    Mairhofer, Juergen; Krempl, Peter M; Thallinger, Gerhard G; Striedner, Gerald

    2014-11-20

    Escherichia coli strain K-12 substrain HMS174 is an engineered descendant of the E. coli K-12 wild-type strain. Like its ancestor, it is an important organism in biotechnological research and is used in fermentation processes for heterologous protein production. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of E. coli HMS174 (ATCC 47011).

  14. Persistence of Escherichia coli O157 and non-O157 strains in agricultural soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli O157 and non-O157 serogroups are known to cause serious diseases in human. However, research on the persistence of E. coli non-O157 serogroups in preharvest environment is limited. In the current study, we compared the survival behavior of E. coli O157 to that ...

  15. SURVIVAL OF ESCHERICHIA COLI 0157:H7 IN DAIRY CATTLE FEED WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cattle feed waters from two dairy farms were used in a study to determine the survival characteristics of the bacterial pathogen Escherichia coli )157:H7 and wild-type E. coli. The E. coli 0157:H7 inoculum consisted of a consortium of isolates obtained from dairy cattle. Fresh ma...

  16. Detection of Escherichia Coli O157:H7 in Fecal Samples in Meat Goats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mobley, Ray; Madden, Uford; Brooks-Walter, Alexis

    2004-01-01

    Studies have reported the isolation of Escherichia coli (E. coli)O157:H7 from pork, lamb and poultry products, and from other animals including deer, horses, dogs, birds and humans. There is limited or no information on the presence of the organism in goats. The objectives of this study were to determine if E. coli O157:H7 was naturally occurring…

  17. A homolog of an Escherichia coli phosphate-binding protein gene from Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, C. M.; White, F. F.; Heaton, L. A.; Guikema, J. A.; Leach, J. E.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    A Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae gene with sequence similarity to an Escherichia coli phosphate-binding protein gene (phoS) produces a periplasmic protein of apparent M(r) 35,000 when expressed in E. coli. Amino terminal sequencing revealed that a signal peptide is removed during transport to the periplasm in E. coli.

  18. Proteomic differences between Escherichia coli strains that cause transient versus persistent intramammary infections [abstract

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Escherichia coli is a leading cause of bacterial mastitis in dairy cattle. Typically this infection is transient in nature and lasts 2-3 days. However, in a minority of cases, E. coli can cause a persistent intramammary infection. The mechanisms that enable certain strains of E. coli to cause a p...

  19. Comparison of whole genome sequences from human and non-human Escherichia coli O26 strains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O26 is the second leading E. coli serogroup responsible for human illness outbreaks behind E. coli O157:H7. Recent outbreaks have been linked to emerging pathogenic O26:H11 strains harboring stx2 only. Cattle have been recognized as an important reserv...

  20. pH changes during in vitro adherence of Escherichia coli to HeLa cells.

    PubMed Central

    McCabe, K; Mann, M D; Bowie, M D

    1994-01-01

    Escherichia coli-induced acidic pH conditions were observed during the in vitro adherence of E. coli to HeLa cells. No pH changes occurred in the absence of adherence. This suggests that adherence affects the function or interaction of HeLa cells and E. coli. PMID:7927801