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Sample records for escherichia coli virulence

  1. Fitness, Stress Resistance, and Extraintestinal Virulence in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Bleibtreu, Alexandre; Gros, Pierre-Alexis; Laouénan, Cédric; Clermont, Olivier; Le Nagard, Hervé; Picard, Bertrand; Tenaillon, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    The extraintestinal virulence of Escherichia coli is dependent on numerous virulence genes. However, there is growing evidence for a role of the metabolic properties and stress responses of strains in pathogenesis. We assessed the respective roles of these factors in strain virulence by developing phenotypic assays for measuring in vitro individual and competitive fitness and the general stress response, which we applied to 82 commensal and extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli strains previously tested in a mouse model of sepsis. Individual fitness properties, in terms of maximum growth rates in various media (Luria-Bertani broth with and without iron chelator, minimal medium supplemented with gluconate, and human urine) and competitive fitness properties, estimated as the mean relative growth rate per generation in mixed cultures with a reference fluorescent E. coli strain, were highly diverse between strains. The activity of the main general stress response regulator, RpoS, as determined by iodine staining of the colonies, H2O2 resistance, and rpoS sequencing, was also highly variable. No correlation between strain fitness and stress resistance and virulence in the mouse model was found, except that the maximum growth rate in urine was higher for virulent strains. Multivariate analysis showed that the number of virulence factors was the only independent factor explaining the virulence in mice. At the species level, growth capacity and stress resistance are heterogeneous properties that do not contribute significantly to the intrinsic virulence of the strains. PMID:23690401

  2. Virulence factors in Escherichia coli urinary tract infection.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, J R

    1991-01-01

    Uropathogenic strains of Escherichia coli are characterized by the expression of distinctive bacterial properties, products, or structures referred to as virulence factors because they help the organism overcome host defenses and colonize or invade the urinary tract. Virulence factors of recognized importance in the pathogenesis of urinary tract infection (UTI) include adhesins (P fimbriae, certain other mannose-resistant adhesins, and type 1 fimbriae), the aerobactin system, hemolysin, K capsule, and resistance to serum killing. This review summarizes the virtual explosion of information regarding the epidemiology, biochemistry, mechanisms of action, and genetic basis of these urovirulence factors that has occurred in the past decade and identifies areas in need of further study. Virulence factor expression is more common among certain genetically related groups of E. coli which constitute virulent clones within the larger E. coli population. In general, the more virulence factors a strain expresses, the more severe an infection it is able to cause. Certain virulence factors specifically favor the development of pyelonephritis, others favor cystitis, and others favor asymptomatic bacteriuria. The currently defined virulence factors clearly contribute to the virulence of wild-type strains but are usually insufficient in themselves to transform an avirulent organism into a pathogen, demonstrating that other as-yet-undefined virulence properties await discovery. Virulence factor testing is a useful epidemiological and research tool but as yet has no defined clinical role. Immunological and biochemical anti-virulence factor interventions are effective in animal models of UTI and hold promise for the prevention of UTI in humans. Images PMID:1672263

  3. Role of Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli Virulence Factors in Uropathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Boll, Erik J.; Struve, Carsten; Boisen, Nadia; Olesen, Bente; Stahlhut, Steen G.

    2013-01-01

    A multiresistant clonal Escherichia coli O78:H10 strain qualifying molecularly as enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) was recently shown to be the cause of a community-acquired outbreak of urinary tract infection (UTI) in greater Copenhagen, Denmark, in 1991. This marks the first time EAEC has been associated with an extraintestinal disease outbreak. Importantly, the outbreak isolates were recovered from the urine of patients with symptomatic UTI, strongly implying urovirulence. Here, we sought to determine the uropathogenic properties of the Copenhagen outbreak strain and whether these properties are conferred by the EAEC-specific virulence factors. We demonstrated that through expression of aggregative adherence fimbriae, the principal adhesins of EAEC, the outbreak strain exhibited pronouncedly increased adherence to human bladder epithelial cells compared to prototype uropathogenic strains. Moreover, the strain was able to produce distinct biofilms on abiotic surfaces, including urethral catheters. These findings suggest that EAEC-specific virulence factors increase uropathogenicity and may have played a significant role in the ability of the strain to cause a community-acquired outbreak of UTI. Thus, inclusion of EAEC-specific virulence factors is warranted in future detection and characterization of uropathogenic E. coli. PMID:23357383

  4. Virulence and Fitness Determinants of Uropathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Subashchandrabose, Sargurunathan; Mobley, Harry L T.

    2015-01-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) is a major global public health concern. Increasing antibiotic resistance found in clinical UPEC isolates underscores the immediate need for development of novel therapeutics against this pathogen. Better understanding of the fitness and virulence mechanisms that are integral to the pathogenesis of UTI will facilitate identification of novel strategies to prevent and treat infection with UPEC. Working towards that goal, the global UPEC research community has made great strides at unraveling various virulence and fitness genes. Here, we summarize major findings on virulence and fitness determinants that enable UPEC to successfully survive and colonize the urinary tract of mammalian hosts. Major sections of this chapter are devoted to the role of iron acquisition systems, metabolic pathways, fimbriae, flagella, toxins, biofilm formation, capsule, and strain-specific genes in the initiation and progression of UTIs. Transcriptomes of UPEC during experimental UTI in a murine model and naturally occurring UTI in women are compared to elucidate virulence mechanisms specifically involved in human UTI. Capitalizing on the advances in molecular pathogenesis research by translating these findings will help develop better clinical strategies for prevention and management of UTIs. PMID:26350328

  5. Virulence and Fitness Determinants of Uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Subashchandrabose, Sargurunathan; Mobley, Harry L T

    2015-08-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) is a major global public health concern. Increasing antibiotic resistance found in clinical UPEC isolates underscores the immediate need for development of novel therapeutics against this pathogen. Better understanding of the fitness and virulence mechanisms that are integral to the pathogenesis of UTI will facilitate identification of novel strategies to prevent and treat infection with UPEC. Working towards that goal, the global UPEC research community has made great strides at unraveling various virulence and fitness genes. Here, we summarize major findings on virulence and fitness determinants that enable UPEC to successfully survive and colonize the urinary tract of mammalian hosts. Major sections of this chapter are devoted to the role of iron acquisition systems, metabolic pathways, fimbriae, flagella, toxins, biofilm formation, capsule, and strain-specific genes in the initiation and progression of UTIs. Transcriptomes of UPEC during experimental UTI in a murine model and naturally occurring UTI in women are compared to elucidate virulence mechanisms specifically involved in human UTI. Capitalizing on the advances in molecular pathogenesis research by translating these findings will help develop better clinical strategies for prevention and management of UTIs.

  6. Mechanosensing regulates virulence in Escherichia coli O157:H7.

    PubMed

    Islam, Md Shahidul; Krachler, Anne Marie

    2016-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 is a food-borne pathogen transmitted via the fecal-oral route, and can cause bloody diarrhea and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) in the human host. Although a range of colonization factors, Shiga toxins and a type III secretion system (T3SS) all contribute to disease development, the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE) encoded T3SS is responsible for the formation of lesions in the intestinal tract. While a variety of chemical cues in the host environment are known to up-regulate LEE expression, we recently demonstrated that changes in physical forces at the site of attachment are required for localized, full induction of the system and thus spatial regulation of virulence in the intestinal tract. Here, we discuss our findings in the light of other recent studies describing mechanosensing of the host and force-dependent induction of virulence mechanisms. We discuss potential mechanisms of mechanosensing and mechanotransduction, and the level of conservation across bacterial species. PMID:26939854

  7. Mutual Enhancement of Virulence by Enterotoxigenic and Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Crane, John K.; Choudhari, Shilpa S.; Naeher, Tonniele M.; Duffey, Michael E.

    2006-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) and enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) are common causes of diarrhea in children in developing countries. Dual infections with both pathogens have been noted fairly frequently in studies of diarrhea around the world. In previous laboratory work, we noted that cholera toxin and forskolin markedly potentiated EPEC-induced ATP release from the host cell, and this potentiated release was found to be mediated by the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator. In this study, we examined whether the ETEC heat-labile toxin (LT) or the heat-stable toxin (STa, also known as ST) potentiated EPEC-induced ATP release. We found that crude ETEC culture filtrates, as well as purified ETEC toxins, did potentiate EPEC-induced ATP release in cultured T84 cells. Coinfection of T84 cells with live ETEC plus EPEC bacteria also resulted in enhanced ATP release compared to EPEC alone. In Ussing chamber studies of chloride secretion, adenine nucleotides released from the host by EPEC also significantly enhanced the chloride secretory responses that were triggered by crude ETEC filtrates, purified STa, and the peptide hormone guanylin. In addition, adenosine and LT had additive or synergistic effects in inducing vacuole formation in T84 cells. Therefore, ETEC toxins and EPEC-induced damage to the host cell both enhance the virulence of the other type of E. coli. Our in vitro data demonstrate a molecular basis for a microbial interaction, which could result in increased severity of disease in vivo in individuals who are coinfected with ETEC and EPEC. PMID:16495521

  8. CTX-M β-Lactamase Production and Virulence of Escherichia coli K1

    PubMed Central

    Dubois, Damien; Prasadarao, Nemani V.; Mittal, Rahul; Bret, Laurent; Roujou-Gris, Marie

    2009-01-01

    We report a patient with neonatal meningitis caused by a CTX-M-1–producing Escherichia coli K1 strain. The influence of CTX-M production on virulence was investigated in cell culture and a newborn mouse model of meningitis. CTX-M production had no influence on virulence but was a major factor in clinical outcome. PMID:19961682

  9. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) strains may carry virulence properties of diarrhoeagenic E. coli.

    PubMed

    Abe, Cecilia M; Salvador, Fábia A; Falsetti, Ivan N; Vieira, Mônica A M; Blanco, Jorge; Blanco, Jesús E; Blanco, Miguel; Machado, Antônia M O; Elias, Waldir P; Hernandes, Rodrigo T; Gomes, Tânia A T

    2008-04-01

    To analyze whether Escherichia coli strains that cause urinary tract infections (UPEC) share virulence characteristics with the diarrheagenic E. coli (DEC) pathotypes and to recognize their genetic diversity, 225 UPEC strains were examined for the presence of various properties of DEC and UPEC (type of interaction with HeLa cells, serogroups and presence of 30 virulence genes). No correlation between adherence patterns and serogroups was observed. Forty-five serogroups were found, but 64% of the strains belonged to one of the 12 serogroups (O1, O2, O4, O6, O7, O14, O15, O18, O21, O25, O75, and O175) and carried UPEC virulence genes (pap, hly, aer, sfa, cnf). The DEC genes found were: aap, aatA, aggC, agg3C, aggR, astA, eae, ehly, iha, irp2, lpfA(O113), pet, pic, pilS, and shf. Sixteen strains presented aggregative adherence and/or the aatA sequence, which are characteristics of enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC), one of the DEC pathotypes. In summary, certain UPEC strains may carry DEC virulence properties, mostly associated to the EAEC pathotype. This finding raises the possibility that at least some faecal EAEC strains might represent potential uropathogens. Alternatively, certain UPEC strains may have acquired EAEC properties, becoming a potential cause of diarrhoea.

  10. Origins and Virulence Mechanisms of Uropathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Wiles, Travis J.; Kulesus, Richard R.; Mulvey, Matthew A.

    2008-01-01

    Strains of uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) are the primary cause of urinary tract infections, including both cystitis and pyelonephritis. These bacteria have evolved a multitude of virulence factors and strategies that facilitate bacterial growth and persistence within the adverse settings of the host urinary tract. Expression of adhesive organelles like type 1 and P pili allow UPEC to bind and invade host cells and tissues within the urinary tract while expression of iron chelating factors (siderophores) enable UPEC to pilfer host iron stores. Deployment of an array of toxins, including hemolysin and cytotoxic necrotizing factor 1, provide UPEC with the means to inflict extensive tissue damage, facilitating bacterial dissemination as well as releasing host nutrients and disabling immune effector cells. These toxins also have the capacity to modulate, in more subtle ways, host signaling pathways affecting myriad processes, including inflammatory responses, host cell survival, and cytoskeletal dynamics. Here, we discuss the mechanisms by which these and other virulence factors promote UPEC survival and growth within the urinary tract. Comparisons are also made between UPEC and other strains of extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli that, although closely related to UPEC, are distinct in their abilities to colonize the host and cause disease. PMID:18482721

  11. Heteropathogenic virulence and phylogeny reveal phased pathogenic metamorphosis in Escherichia coli O2:H6

    PubMed Central

    Bielaszewska, Martina; Schiller, Roswitha; Lammers, Lydia; Bauwens, Andreas; Fruth, Angelika; Middendorf, Barbara; Schmidt, M Alexander; Tarr, Phillip I; Dobrindt, Ulrich; Karch, Helge; Mellmann, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Extraintestinal pathogenic and intestinal pathogenic (diarrheagenic) Escherichia coli differ phylogenetically and by virulence profiles. Classic theory teaches simple linear descent in this species, where non-pathogens acquire virulence traits and emerge as pathogens. However, diarrheagenic Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) O2:H6 not only possess and express virulence factors associated with diarrheagenic and uropathogenic E. coli but also cause diarrhea and urinary tract infections. These organisms are phylogenetically positioned between members of an intestinal pathogenic group (STEC) and extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli. STEC O2:H6 is, therefore, a ‘heteropathogen,’ and the first such hybrid virulent E. coli identified. The phylogeny of these E. coli and the repertoire of virulence traits they possess compel consideration of an alternate view of pathogen emergence, whereby one pathogroup of E. coli undergoes phased metamorphosis into another. By understanding the evolutionary mechanisms of bacterial pathogens, rational strategies for counteracting their detrimental effects on humans can be developed. Subject Categories Microbiology, Virology & Host Pathogen Interaction PMID:24413188

  12. Vaginal versus Obstetric Infection Escherichia coli Isolates among Pregnant Women: Antimicrobial Resistance and Genetic Virulence Profile.

    PubMed

    Sáez-López, Emma; Guiral, Elisabet; Fernández-Orth, Dietmar; Villanueva, Sonia; Goncé, Anna; López, Marta; Teixidó, Irene; Pericot, Anna; Figueras, Francesc; Palacio, Montse; Cobo, Teresa; Bosch, Jordi; Soto, Sara M

    2016-01-01

    Vaginal Escherichia coli colonization is related to obstetric infections and the consequent development of infections in newborns. Ampicillin resistance among E. coli strains is increasing, which is the main choice for treating empirically many obstetric and neonatal infections. Vaginal E. coli strains are very similar to extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli with regards to the virulence factors and the belonging to phylogroup B2. We studied the antimicrobial resistance and the genetic virulence profile of 82 E. coli isolates from 638 vaginal samples and 63 isolated from endometrial aspirate, placental and amniotic fluid samples from pregnant women with obstetric infections. The prevalence of E. coli in the vaginal samples was 13%, which was significant among women with associated risk factors during pregnancy, especially premature preterm rupture of membranes (p<0.0001). Sixty-five percent of the strains were ampicillin-resistant. The E. coli isolates causing obstetric infections showed higher resistance levels than vaginal isolates, particularly for gentamicin (p = 0.001). The most prevalent virulence factor genes were those related to the iron uptake systems revealing clear targets for interventions. More than 50% of the isolates belonged to the virulent B2 group possessing the highest number of virulence factor genes. The ampicillin-resistant isolates had high number of virulence factors primarily related to pathogenicity islands, and the remarkable gentamicin resistance in E. coli isolates from women presenting obstetric infections, the choice of the most appropriate empiric treatment and clinical management of pregnant women and neonates should be carefully made. Taking into account host-susceptibility, the heterogeneity of E. coli due to evolution over time and the geographical area, characterization of E. coli isolates colonizing the vagina and causing obstetric infections in different regions may help to develop interventions and avoid the aetiological link

  13. Multilocus sequence typing and virulence gene profiles associated with Escherichia coli from human and animal sources.

    PubMed

    Manges, Amee R; Harel, Josée; Masson, Luke; Edens, Thaddeus J; Portt, Andrea; Reid-Smith, Richard J; Zhanel, George G; Kropinski, Andrew M; Boerlin, Patrick

    2015-04-01

    We investigated whether specific sequence types, and their shared virulence gene profiles, may be associated with both human and food animal reservoirs. A total of 600 Escherichia coli isolates were assembled from human (n=265) and food-animal (n=335) sources from overlapping geographic areas and time periods (2005-2010) in Canada. The entire collection was subjected to multilocus sequence typing and a subset of 286 E. coli isolates was subjected to an E. coli-specific virulence gene microarray. The most common sequence type (ST) was E. coli ST10, which was present in all human and food-animal sources, followed by ST69, ST73, ST95, ST117, and ST131. A core group of virulence genes was associated with all 10 common STs including artJ, ycfZ, csgA, csgE, fimA, fimH, gad, hlyE, ibeB, mviM, mviN, and ompA. STs 73, 92, and 95 exhibited the largest number of virulence genes, and all were exclusively identified from human infections. ST117 was found in both human and food-animal sources and shared virulence genes common in extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli lineages. Select groups of E. coli may be found in both human and food-animal reservoirs.

  14. Defects in polynucleotide phosphorylase impairs virulence in Escherichia coli O157:H7.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jia; Zhu, Mei-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase) is reported to regulate virulence in Salmonella, Yersinia sp. and Campylobacter jejuni, yet its role in Escherichia coli O157:H7 has not been investigated. To gain insights into its roles in E. coli O157:H7 virulence, pnp deletion mutants were generated and the major virulence factors were compared to their parental wild type strains. Deletion of pnp in E. coli O157:H7 dramatically decreased stx2 mRNA expression and Stx2 protein production, and impaired lambdoid prophage activation in E. coli O157:H7. Quantitative PCR further confirmed that the Stx2 phage lytic growth was repressed by pnp deletion. Consistent with reduced Stx2 production and Stx2 phage activation, the transcriptional levels of genes involved in phage lysis and replication were down-regulated. In addition, disruption of pnp in E. coli O157:H7 decreased its adhesion to intestinal epithelial cells as well as cattle colonic explant tissues. On the other hand, PNPase inactivation in E. coli O157:H7 enhanced Tir protein content and the transcription of type three secretion system components, including genes encoding intimin, Tir, and EspB as well as locus of enterocyte and effacement positive regulator, Ler. Collectively, data indicate that PNPase has pleiotropic effects on the virulence of E. coli O157:H7. PMID:26347717

  15. Virulence from vesicles: Novel mechanisms of host cell injury by Escherichia coli O104:H4 outbreak strain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The highly virulent Escherichia coli O104:H4 that caused the large 2011 outbreak of diarrhoea and haemolytic uraemic syndrome secretes blended virulence factors of enterohaemorrhagic and enteroaggregative E. coli, but their secretion pathways are unknown. We demonstrate that the outbreak strain rele...

  16. Prevalence and Persistence of Escherichia coli Strains with Uropathogenic Virulence Characteristics in Sewage Treatment Plants▿

    PubMed Central

    Anastasi, E. M.; Matthews, B.; Gundogdu, A.; Vollmerhausen, T. L.; Ramos, N. L.; Stratton, H.; Ahmed, W.; Katouli, M.

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the prevalence and persistence of Escherichia coli strains in four sewage treatment plants (STPs) in a subtropical region of Queensland, Australia. In all, 264 E. coli strains were typed using a high-resolution biochemical fingerprinting method and grouped into either a single or a common biochemical phenotype (S-BPT and C-BPT, respectively). These strains were also tested for their phylogenetic groups and 12 virulence genes associated with intestinal and extraintestinal E. coli strains. Comparison of BPTs at various treatment stages indicated that certain BPTs were found in two or all treatment stages. These BPTs constituted the highest proportion of E. coli strains in each STP and belonged mainly to phylogenetic group B2 and, to a lesser extent, group D. No virulence genes associated with intestinal E. coli were found among the strains, but 157 (59.5%) strains belonging to 14 C-BPTs carried one or more virulence genes associated with uropathogenic strains. Of these, 120 (76.4%) strains belonged to seven persistent C-BPTs and were found in all four STPs. Our results indicate that certain clonal groups of E. coli with virulence characteristics of uropathogenic strains can survive the treatment processes of STPs. These strains were common to all STPs and constituted the highest proportion of the strains in different treatment tanks of each STP. PMID:20622128

  17. The broadly conserved regulator PhoP links pathogen virulence and membrane potential in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Alteri, Christopher J; Lindner, Jonathon R; Reiss, Daniel J; Smith, Sara N; Mobley, Harry L T

    2011-10-01

    PhoP is considered a virulence regulator despite being conserved in both pathogenic and non-pathogenic Enterobacteriaceae. While Escherichia coli strains represent non-pathogenic commensal isolates and numerous virulent pathotypes, the PhoP virulence regulator has only been studied in commensal E. coli. To better understand how conserved transcription factors contribute to virulence, we characterized PhoP in pathogenic E. coli. Deletion of phoP significantly attenuated E. coli during extraintestinal infection. This was not surprising since we demonstrated that PhoP differentially regulated the transcription of > 600 genes. In addition to survival at acidic pH and resistance to polymyxin, PhoP was required for repression of motility and oxygen-independent changes in the expression of primary dehydrogenase and terminal reductase respiratory chain components. All phenotypes have in common a reliance on an energized membrane. Thus, we hypothesized that PhoP mediates these effects by regulating genes encoding proteins that generate proton motive force. Indeed, bacteria lacking PhoP exhibited a hyperpolarized membrane and dissipation of the transmembrane electrochemical gradient increased susceptibility of the phoP mutant to acidic pH, while inhibiting respiratory generation of the proton gradient restored resistance to antimicrobial peptides independent of lipopolysaccharide modification. These findings demonstrate a connection between PhoP, virulence and the energized state of the membrane. PMID:21854465

  18. Microarray Evaluation of Antimicrobial Resistance and Virulence of Escherichia coli Isolates from Portuguese Poultry

    PubMed Central

    Mendonça, Nuno; Figueiredo, Rui; Mendes, Catarina; Card, Roderick M.; Anjum, Muna F.; da Silva, Gabriela Jorge

    2016-01-01

    The presence of antimicrobial resistance and virulence factors of 174 Escherichia coli strains isolated from healthy Portuguese Gallus gallus was evaluated. Resistance profiles were determined against 33 antimicrobials by microbroth dilution. Resistance was prevalent for tetracycline (70%) and ampicillin (63%). Extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) phenotype was observed in 18% of the isolates. Multidrug resistance was found in 56% of isolates. A subset of 74 isolates were screened by DNA microarrays for the carriage of 88 antibiotic resistance genes and 62 virulence genes. Overall, 37 different resistance genes were detected. The most common were tet(A) (72%), blaTEM (68%), and sul1 (47%), while 21% isolates harbored an ESBL gene (blaCTX-M group 1, group 2, or group 9). Of these, 96% carried the increased serum survival (iss) virulence gene, while 89% presented the enterobactin siderophore receptor protein (iroN), 70% the temperature-sensitive hemagglutinin (tsh), and 68% the long polar fimbriae (lpfA) virulence genes associated with extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli. In conclusion, prevalence of antibiotic resistant E. coli from the microbiota of Portuguese chickens was high, including to extended spectrum cephalosporins. The majority of isolates seems to have the potential to trigger extraintestinal human infection due to the presence of some virulence genes. However, the absence of genes specific for enteropathogenic E. coli reduces the risk for human intestinal infection. PMID:27025519

  19. Virulence genotypes of Escherichia coli canine isolates from pyometra, cystitis and fecal origin.

    PubMed

    Mateus, Luisa; Henriques, Sofia; Merino, Carolina; Pomba, Constança; Lopes da Costa, Luís; Silva, Elisabete

    2013-10-25

    Pyometra is the most common diestrual uterine disease of bitches. Escherichia coli is the most frequent bacterium isolated from the uterine content of pyometra uteri and it is associated with the most severe clinical signs, leading to endotoxemia and sepsis. In this study, canine E. coli isolates from pyometra (n=31), cystitis (n=23) and fecal (n=26) origin were compared regarding the prevalence of 23 potential virulence traits (15 virulence factor (VF) genes and 8 pathogenicity associated islands-PAIs), detected by PCR assays. Overall, there was a considerable overlap between pyometra, cystitis and fecal isolates regarding the phylogenetic grouping and virulence traits. Virulence traits more prevalent in pyometra than in cystitis and fecal isolates included two PAIs (PAI IV536 and PAI ICFT073) and three VF genes (sfa/focDE, fyuA and chuA). Regardless the isolates' origin, the average number of virulence traits per strain was higher in B2 than in the other phylogenetic groups (A, B1 and D). The prevalence of phylogenetic group B2 was significantly higher in pyometra (94%) than in cystitis (48%) and fecal (39%) isolates. In conclusion, pyometra isolates have a high potential of virulence and a broad virulence genotype, although being similar to a subset of cystitis and fecal isolates. This leads to the suggestion that cystitis and fecal isolates may be able to induce pyometra in receptive hosts. PMID:23953028

  20. Biological and physicochemical wastewater treatment processes reduce the prevalence of virulent Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Frigon, Dominic; Biswal, Basanta Kumar; Mazza, Alberto; Masson, Luke; Gehr, Ronald

    2013-02-01

    Effluents discharged from wastewater treatment plants are possible sources of pathogenic bacteria, including Escherichia coli, in the freshwater environment, and determining the possible selection of pathogens is important. This study evaluated the impact of activated sludge and physicochemical wastewater treatment processes on the prevalence of potentially virulent E. coli. A total of 719 E. coli isolates collected from four municipal plants in Québec before and after treatment were characterized by using a customized DNA microarray to determine the impact of treatment processes on the frequency of specific pathotypes and virulence genes. The percentages of potentially pathogenic E. coli isolates in the plant influents varied between 26 and 51%, and in the effluents, the percentages were 14 to 31%, for a reduction observed at all plants ranging between 14 and 45%. Pathotypes associated with extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) were the most abundant at three of the four plants and represented 24% of all isolates, while intestinal pathogenic E. coli pathotypes (IPEC) represented 10% of the isolates. At the plant where ExPEC isolates were not the most abundant, a large number of isolates were classified as both ExPEC and IPEC; overall, 6% of the isolates were classified in both groups, with the majority being from the same plant. The reduction of the proportion of pathogenic E. coli could not be explained by the preferential loss of one virulence gene or one type of virulence factor; however, the quinolone resistance gene (qnrS) appears to enhance the loss of virulence genes, suggesting a mechanism involving the loss of pathogenicity islands. PMID:23160132

  1. RegR virulence regulon of rabbit-specific enteropathogenic Escherichia coli strain E22.

    PubMed

    Srikhanta, Yogitha N; Hocking, Dianna M; Praszkier, Judyta; Wakefield, Matthew J; Robins-Browne, Roy M; Yang, Ji; Tauschek, Marija

    2013-04-01

    AraC-like regulators play a key role in the expression of virulence factors in enteric pathogens, such as enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC), enterotoxigenic E. coli, enteroaggregative E. coli, and Citrobacter rodentium. Bioinformatic analysis of the genome of rabbit-specific EPEC (REPEC) strain E22 (O103:H2) revealed the presence of a gene encoding an AraC-like regulatory protein, RegR, which shares 71% identity to the global virulence regulator, RegA, of C. rodentium. Microarray analysis demonstrated that RegR exerts 25- to 400-fold activation on transcription of several genes encoding putative virulence-associated factors, including a fimbrial operon (SEF14), a serine protease, and an autotransporter adhesin. These observations were confirmed by proteomic analysis of secreted and heat-extracted surface-associated proteins. The mechanism of RegR-mediated activation was investigated by using its most highly upregulated gene target, sefA. Transcriptional analyses and electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that RegR activates the expression of sefA by binding to a region upstream of the sefA promoter, thereby relieving gene silencing by the global regulatory protein H-NS. Moreover, RegR was found to contribute significantly to virulence in a rabbit infection experiment. Taken together, our findings indicate that RegR controls the expression of a series of accessory adhesins that significantly enhance the virulence of REPEC strain E22. PMID:23340312

  2. Whole-genome sequencing of uropathogenic Escherichia coli reveals long evolutionary history of diversity and virulence.

    PubMed

    Lo, Yancy; Zhang, Lixin; Foxman, Betsy; Zöllner, Sebastian

    2015-08-01

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) are phenotypically and genotypically very diverse. This diversity makes it challenging to understand the evolution of UPEC adaptations responsible for causing urinary tract infections (UTI). To gain insight into the relationship between evolutionary divergence and adaptive paths to uropathogenicity, we sequenced at deep coverage (190×) the genomes of 19 E. coli strains from urinary tract infection patients from the same geographic area. Our sample consisted of 14 UPEC isolates and 5 non-UTI-causing (commensal) rectal E. coli isolates. After identifying strain variants using de novo assembly-based methods, we clustered the strains based on pairwise sequence differences using a neighbor-joining algorithm. We examined evolutionary signals on the whole-genome phylogeny and contrasted these signals with those found on gene trees constructed based on specific uropathogenic virulence factors. The whole-genome phylogeny showed that the divergence between UPEC and commensal E. coli strains without known UPEC virulence factors happened over 32 million generations ago. Pairwise diversity between any two strains was also high, suggesting multiple genetic origins of uropathogenic strains in a small geographic region. Contrasting the whole-genome phylogeny with three gene trees constructed from common uropathogenic virulence factors, we detected no selective advantage of these virulence genes over other genomic regions. These results suggest that UPEC acquired uropathogenicity long time ago and used it opportunistically to cause extraintestinal infections.

  3. Antibiotic resistance profile and virulence genes of uropathogenic Escherichia coli isolates in relation to phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Adib, N; Ghanbarpour, R; Solatzadeh, H; Alizade, H

    2014-03-01

    Escherichia coli (E. coli) strains are the major cause of urinary tract infections (UTI) and belong to the large group of extra-intestinal pathogenic E. coli. The purposes of this study were to determine the antibiotic resistance profile, virulence genes and phylogenetic background of E. coli isolates from UTI cases. A total of 137 E. coli isolates were obtained from UTI samples. The antimicrobial susceptibility of confirmed isolates was determined by disk diffusion method against eight antibiotics. The isolates were examined to determine the presence and prevalence of selected virulence genes including iucD, sfa/focDE, papEF and hly. ECOR phylo-groups of isolates were determined by detection of yjaA and chuA genes and fragment TspE4.C2. The antibiogram results showed that 71% of the isolates were resistant to cefazolin, 60.42% to co-trimoxazole, 54.16% to nalidixic acid, 36.45% to gentamicin, 29.18% to ciprofloxacin, 14.58% to cefepime, 6.25% to nitrofurantoin and 0.00% to imipenem. Twenty-two antibiotic resistance patterns were observed among the isolates. Virulence genotyping of isolates revealed that 58.39% isolates had at least one of the four virulence genes. The iucD gene was the most prevalent gene (43.06%). The other genes including sfa/focDE, papEF and hly genes were detected in 35.76%, 18.97% and 2.18% isolates, respectively. Nine combination patterns of the virulence genes were detected in isolates. Phylotyping of 137 isolates revealed that the isolates fell into A (45.99%), B1 (13.14%), B2 (19.71%) and D (21.16%) groups. Phylotyping of multidrug resistant isolates indicated that these isolates are mostly in A (60.34%) and D (20.38%) groups. In conclusion, the isolates that possessed the iucD, sfa/focDE, papEF and hly virulence genes mostly belonged to A and B2 groups, whereas antibiotic resistant isolates were in groups A and D. Escherichia coli strains carrying virulence factors and antibiotic resistance are distributed in specific phylogenetic

  4. Role of virulence factors on host inflammatory response induced by diarrheagenic Escherichia coli pathotypes.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Villamil, Javier; Navarro-Garcia, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Pathogens are able to breach the intestinal barrier, and different bacterial species can display different abilities to colonize hosts and induce inflammation. Inflammatory response studies induced by enteropathogens as Escherichia coli are interesting since it has acquired diverse genetic mobile elements, leading to different E. coli pathotypes. Diarrheagenic E. coli secrete toxins, effectors and virulence factors that exploit the host cell functions to facilitate the bacterial colonization. Many bacterial proteins are delivered to the host cell for subverting the inflammatory response. Hereby, we have highlighted the specific processes used by E. coli pathotypes, by that subvert the inflammatory pathways. These mechanisms include an arrangement of pro- and anti-inflammatory responses to favor the appropriate environmental niche for the bacterial survival and growth. PMID:26059623

  5. Antimicrobial Resistance and Virulence Characterization among Escherichia coli Clinical Isolates Causing Severe Obstetric Infections in Pregnant Women

    PubMed Central

    Guiral, Elisabet; Sáez-López, Emma; Bosch, Jordi; Goncé, Anna; López, Marta; Sanz, Sergi; Vila, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    The virulence markers and the antimicrobial resistance profiles of 78 Escherichia coli isolates causing obstetric infections accompanied by sepsis or not were studied. Adhesion-related virulence factors were the most prevalent markers. Low rates of resistance to the antimicrobial agents used as first-line therapy suggest their correct implementation in stewardship guidelines. PMID:25740771

  6. Type 1 fimbrial expression enhances Escherichia coli virulence for the urinary tract.

    PubMed Central

    Connell, I; Agace, W; Klemm, P; Schembri, M; Mărild, S; Svanborg, C

    1996-01-01

    Type 1 fimbriae are adhesion organelles expressed by many Gram-negative bacteria. They facilitate adherence to mucosal surfaces and inflammatory cells in vitro, but their contribution to virulence has not been defined. This study presents evidence that type 1 fimbriae increase the virulence of Escherichia coli for the urinary tract by promoting bacterial persistence and enhancing the inflammatory response to infection. In a clinical study, we observed that disease severity was greater in children infected with E. coli O1:K1:H7 isolates expressing type 1 fimbriae than in those infected with type 1 negative isolates of the same serotype. The E. coli O1:K1:H7 isolates had the same electrophoretic type, were hemolysin-negative, expressed P fimbriae, and carried the fim DNA sequences. When tested in a mouse urinary tract infection model, the type 1-positive E. coli O1:K1:H7 isolates survived in higher numbers, and induced a greater neutrophil influx into the urine, than O1:K1:H7 type 1-negative isolates. To confirm a role of type 1 fimbriae, a fimH null mutant (CN1016) was constructed from an O1:K1:H7 type 1-positive parent. E. coli CN1016 had reduced survival and inflammatogenicity in the mouse urinary tract infection model. E. coli CN1016 reconstituted with type 1 fimbriae (E. coli CN1018) had restored virulence similar to that of the wild-type parent strain. These results show that type 1 fimbriae in the genetic background of a uropathogenic strain contribute to the pathogenesis of E. coli in the urinary tract. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8790416

  7. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli virulence genes: invaluable approaches for designing DNA microarray probes

    PubMed Central

    Jahandeh, Nadia; Ranjbar, Reza; Behzadi, Elham

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The pathotypes of uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) cause different types of urinary tract infections (UTIs). The presence of a wide range of virulence genes in UPEC enables us to design appropriate DNA microarray probes. These probes, which are used in DNA microarray technology, provide us with an accurate and rapid diagnosis and definitive treatment in association with UTIs caused by UPEC pathotypes. The main goal of this article is to introduce the UPEC virulence genes as invaluable approaches for designing DNA microarray probes. Material and methods Main search engines such as Google Scholar and databases like NCBI were searched to find and study several original pieces of literature, review articles, and DNA gene sequences. In parallel with in silico studies, the experiences of the authors were helpful for selecting appropriate sources and writing this review article. Results There is a significant variety of virulence genes among UPEC strains. The DNA sequences of virulence genes are fabulous patterns for designing microarray probes. The location of virulence genes and their sequence lengths influence the quality of probes. Conclusions The use of selected virulence genes for designing microarray probes gives us a wide range of choices from which the best probe candidates can be chosen. DNA microarray technology provides us with an accurate, rapid, cost-effective, sensitive, and specific molecular diagnostic method which is facilitated by designing microarray probes. Via these tools, we are able to have an accurate diagnosis and a definitive treatment regarding UTIs caused by UPEC pathotypes. PMID:26855801

  8. Virulence characteristics of extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli deletion of gene encoding the outer membrane protein X

    PubMed Central

    MENG, Xianrong; LIU, Xueling; ZHANG, Liyuan; HOU, Bo; LI, Binyou; TAN, Chen; LI, Zili; ZHOU, Rui; LI, Shaowen

    2016-01-01

    Outer membrane protein X (OmpX) and its homologues have been proposed to contribute to the virulence in various bacterial species. But, their role in virulence of extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) is yet to be determined. This study evaluates the role of OmpX in ExPEC virulence in vitro and in vivo using a clinical strain PPECC42 of porcine origin. The ompX deletion mutant exhibited increased swimming motility and decreased adhesion to, and invasion of pulmonary epithelial A549 cell, compared to the wild-type strain. A mild increase in LD50 and distinct decrease in bacterial load in such organs as heart, liver, spleen, lung and kidney were observed in mice infected with the ompX mutant. Complementation of the complete ompX gene in trans restored the virulence of mutant strain to the level of wild-type strain. Our results reveal that OmpX contributes to ExPEC virulence, but may be not an indispensable virulence determinant. PMID:27149893

  9. Distribution of uropathogenic virulence factors among Escherichia coli strains isolated from dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Yuri, K; Nakata, K; Katae, H; Yamamoto, S; Hasegawa, A

    1998-03-01

    A variety of virulence factors (VFs) such as type 1 fimbriae, pilus associated with pyelonephritis, S fimbriae, afimbrial adhesin, alpha-hemolysin, aerobactin and cytotoxic necrotizing factor 1 are associated with uropathogenic Escherichia coli. In this study, 80 uropathogenic E. coli strains in 50 dogs and 30 cats suffering from UTI. In addition, 60 E. coli strains were isolated from fecal samples from 30 each of healthy dogs and cats. The distribution of VFs of uropathogenic E. coli strains isolated from dogs and cats suffering from urinary tract infections (UTI) were examined by the colony hybridization test with seven DNA probes specific for VFs, and the results were compared with those obtained in the studies on strains from humans with UTI. In uropathogenic E. coli strains isolated from dogs and cats suffering from UTI, VFs were detected as frequently as in the strains isolated from humans with UTI. Although less frequently, genes encoding these VFs especially pap, sfa, hly, and cnf 1 genes were also associated with E. coli strains isolated from feces of healthy cats, in contrast to the distribution pattern of uropathogenic E. coli observed in humans. Furthermore, all VFs except pil were significantly more frequently detected in strains isolated from urine of animals with cystitis than in those isolated from feces of healthy humans. These results indicate that VFs of E. coli contribute to the pathogenesis of UTI in dogs and cats.

  10. Associations between the presence of virulence determinants and the epidemiology and ecology of zoonotic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, K M; Low, J C; Denwood, M J; Gally, D L; Evans, J; Gunn, G J; Mellor, D J; Reid, S W J; Matthews, L

    2010-12-01

    The severity of human infection with pathogenic Escherichia coli depends on two major virulence determinants (eae and stx) that, respectively, produce intimin and Shiga toxin. In cattle, both may enhance colonization, but whether this increases fitness by enhancing cattle-to-cattle transmission in the field is unknown. In E. coli O157, the almost uniform presence of the virulence determinants in cattle isolates prevents comparative analysis. The availability to this study of extensive non-O157 E. coli data, with much greater diversity in carriage of virulence determinants, provides the opportunity to gain insight into their potential impact on transmission. Dynamic models were used to simulate expected prevalence distributions for serogroups O26 and O103. Transmission parameters were estimated by fitting model outputs to prevalence data from Scottish cattle using a Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) approach. Despite similar prevalence distributions for O26 and O103, their transmission dynamics were distinct. Serogroup O26 strains appear well adapted to the cattle host. The dynamics are characterized by a basic reproduction ratio (R(0)) of >1 (allowing sustained cattle-to-cattle transmission), a relatively low transmission rate from environmental reservoirs, and substantial association with eae on transmission. The presence of stx(2) was associated with reduced transmission. In contrast, serogroup O103 appears better adapted to the noncattle environment, characterized by an R(0) value of <1 for plausible test sensitivities, a significantly higher transmission rate from noncattle sources than serogroup O26, and an absence of fitness benefits associated with the carriage of eae. Thus, the association of eae with enhanced transmission depends on the E. coli serogroup. Our results suggest that the capacity of E. coli strains to derive fitness benefits from virulence determinants influences the prevalence in the cattle population and the ecology and epidemiology

  11. High-level Multi-Resistant and Virulent Escherichia coli in Abeokuta, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Akinduti, Paul Akinniyi; Aboderin, Bukola W; Oloyede, Rasaq; Ogiogwa, Joseph I; Motayo, Babatunde O; Ejilude, Oluwaseun

    2016-01-01

    Multi-resistant Escherichia coli (E. coli) strains co-harboring virulence genes is a cause of high morbidity in Abeokuta, Nigeria. This study was designed to determine some virulent factors among enteropathogenic E. coli in Abeokuta, Nigeria. Approximately non-repetitive 102 isolates of E. coli were recovered from clinical samples from two health facilities in Abeokuta. Biotyping using API and antibiotic susceptibility was determined, and eae and flic genes were assayed by PCR. Antibiotic resistance relatedness was performed by DendroUPGMA. Results showed that 48.0% and 52.0 % were intestinal and extra-intestinal E. coli, ampicillin recorded 100% resistance, amoxycilli/clavulanic acid 64.7%, cotrimoxazole 57.8% and 56.8% resistance against cefotaxime, at MIC >16 ug/mL, 100%, 57.8%, and 50% have MIC50 to ampicillin, tetracycline, and ceftazidime, while 74.5% and 48.0% have MIC90 to ampicillin and ceftazidime. Significant rates of 4.9%, 7.8%, and 9.8% flic, eae, and flic/eae genes were found in intestinal isolates, while 2.9%, 2.0%, and 3.9% were found in extra-intestinal (P < 0.05). Two major clades of the resistant isolates reveal significant antibiotic relatedness among intestinal and extra-intestinal isolates, at 54% resistance similarities with very high multi-antibiotic resistance index of 1.0 (MARI). A high rate of undetected virulent E. coli pathotypes with high resistance could trigger unprecedented morbidity and mortality, mostly among children and the elderly.

  12. Large scale analysis of virulence genes in Escherichia coli strains isolated from Avalon Bay, CA.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Matthew J; Hadi, Asbah Z; Griffith, John F; Ishii, Satoshi; Sadowsky, Michael J

    2010-10-01

    Contamination of recreational waters with Escherichia coli and Enterococcus sp. is a widespread problem resulting in beach closures and loss of recreational activity. While E. coli is frequently used as an indicator of fecal contamination, and has been extensively measured in waterways, few studies have examined the presence of potentially pathogenic E. coli strains in beach waters. In this study, a combination of high-throughput, robot-assisted colony hybridization and PCR-based analyses were used to determine the genomic composition and frequency of virulence genes present in E. coli isolated from beach water in Avalon Bay, Santa Catalina Island, CA. A total of 24,493 E. coli isolates were collected from two sites at a popular swimming beach between August through September 2007 and from July through August 2008. All isolates were examined for the presence of shiga-like toxins (stx1/stx2), intimin (eaeA), and enterotoxins (ST/LT). Of the 24,493 isolates examined, 3.6% contained the eaeA gene, indicating that these isolates were potential EPEC strains. On five dates, however, greater than 10% of the strains were potential EPEC, suggesting that incidence of virulence genes at this beach has a strong temporal component. No STEC or ETEC isolates were detected, and only eight (<1.0%) of the potential EPEC isolates were found to carry the EAF plasmid. The potential EPEC isolates mainly belonged to E. coli phylogenetic groups B1 or B2, and carried the β intimin subtype. DNA fingerprint analyses of the potential EPEC strains indicated that the isolates belonged to several genetically diverse groups, although clonal isolates were frequently detected. While the presence of virulence genes alone cannot be used to determine the pathogenicity of strains, results from this study show that potential EPEC strains can be found in marine beach water and their presence needs to be considered as one of the factors used in decisions concerning beach closures. PMID:20643468

  13. Diverse Virulence Gene Content of Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli from Finishing Swine

    PubMed Central

    Fratamico, Pina M.; Bagi, Lori; Delannoy, Sabine; Fach, Patrick; Manning, Shannon D.; Funk, Julie A.

    2014-01-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) infections are a critical public health concern because they can cause severe clinical outcomes, such as hemolytic uremic syndrome, in humans. Determining the presence or absence of virulence genes is essential in assessing the potential pathogenicity of STEC strains. Currently, there is limited information about the virulence genes carried by swine STEC strains; therefore, this study was conducted to examine the presence and absence of 69 virulence genes in STEC strains recovered previously from finishing swine in a longitudinal study. A subset of STEC strains was analyzed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) to examine their genetic relatedness. Swine STEC strains (n = 150) were analyzed by the use of a high-throughput real-time PCR array system, which included 69 virulence gene targets. Three major pathotypes consisted of 16 different combinations of virulence gene profiles, and serotypes were determined in the swine STEC strains. The majority of the swine STEC strains (n = 120) belonged to serotype O59:H21 and carried the same virulence gene profile, which consisted of 9 virulence genes: stx2e, iha, ecs1763, lpfAO113, estIa (STa), ehaA, paa, terE, and ureD. The eae, nleF, and nleH1-2 genes were detected in one swine STEC strain (O49:H21). Other genes encoding adhesins, including iha, were identified (n = 149). The PFGE results demonstrated that swine STEC strains from pigs raised in the same finishing barn were closely related. Our results revealed diverse virulence gene contents among the members of the swine STEC population and enhance understanding of the dynamics of transmission of STEC strains among pigs housed in the same barn. PMID:25107960

  14. Escherichia coli Type III Secretion System 2 ATPase EivC Is Involved in the Motility and Virulence of Avian Pathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shaohui; Liu, Xin; Xu, Xuan; Yang, Denghui; Wang, Dong; Han, Xiangan; Shi, Yonghong; Tian, Mingxing; Ding, Chan; Peng, Daxin; Yu, Shengqing

    2016-01-01

    Type III secretion systems (T3SSs) are crucial for bacterial infections because they deliver effector proteins into host cells. The Escherichia coli type III secretion system 2 (ETT2) is present in the majority of E. coli strains, and although it is degenerate, ETT2 regulates bacterial virulence. An ATPase is essential for T3SS secretion, but the function of the ETT2 ATPase has not been demonstrated. Here, we show that EivC is homologous to the β subunit of F0F1 ATPases and it possesses ATPase activity. To investigate the effects of ETT2 ATPase EivC on the phenotype and virulence of avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC), eivC mutant and complemented strains were constructed and characterized. Inactivation of eivC led to impaired flagella production and augmented fimbriae on the bacterial surface, and, consequently, reduced bacterial motility. In addition, the eivC mutant strain exhibited attenuated virulence in ducks, diminished serum resistance, reduced survival in macrophage cells and in ducks, upregulated fimbrial gene expression, and downregulated flagellar and virulence gene expression. The expression of the inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-8 were increased in HD-11 macrophages infected with the eivC mutant strain, compared with the wild-type strain. These virulence-related phenotypes were restored by genetic complementation. These findings demonstrate that ETT2 ATPase EivC is involved in the motility and pathogenicity of APEC. PMID:27630634

  15. Escherichia coli Type III Secretion System 2 ATPase EivC Is Involved in the Motility and Virulence of Avian Pathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shaohui; Liu, Xin; Xu, Xuan; Yang, Denghui; Wang, Dong; Han, Xiangan; Shi, Yonghong; Tian, Mingxing; Ding, Chan; Peng, Daxin; Yu, Shengqing

    2016-01-01

    Type III secretion systems (T3SSs) are crucial for bacterial infections because they deliver effector proteins into host cells. The Escherichia coli type III secretion system 2 (ETT2) is present in the majority of E. coli strains, and although it is degenerate, ETT2 regulates bacterial virulence. An ATPase is essential for T3SS secretion, but the function of the ETT2 ATPase has not been demonstrated. Here, we show that EivC is homologous to the β subunit of F0F1 ATPases and it possesses ATPase activity. To investigate the effects of ETT2 ATPase EivC on the phenotype and virulence of avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC), eivC mutant and complemented strains were constructed and characterized. Inactivation of eivC led to impaired flagella production and augmented fimbriae on the bacterial surface, and, consequently, reduced bacterial motility. In addition, the eivC mutant strain exhibited attenuated virulence in ducks, diminished serum resistance, reduced survival in macrophage cells and in ducks, upregulated fimbrial gene expression, and downregulated flagellar and virulence gene expression. The expression of the inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-8 were increased in HD-11 macrophages infected with the eivC mutant strain, compared with the wild-type strain. These virulence-related phenotypes were restored by genetic complementation. These findings demonstrate that ETT2 ATPase EivC is involved in the motility and pathogenicity of APEC.

  16. Escherichia coli Type III Secretion System 2 ATPase EivC Is Involved in the Motility and Virulence of Avian Pathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shaohui; Liu, Xin; Xu, Xuan; Yang, Denghui; Wang, Dong; Han, Xiangan; Shi, Yonghong; Tian, Mingxing; Ding, Chan; Peng, Daxin; Yu, Shengqing

    2016-01-01

    Type III secretion systems (T3SSs) are crucial for bacterial infections because they deliver effector proteins into host cells. The Escherichia coli type III secretion system 2 (ETT2) is present in the majority of E. coli strains, and although it is degenerate, ETT2 regulates bacterial virulence. An ATPase is essential for T3SS secretion, but the function of the ETT2 ATPase has not been demonstrated. Here, we show that EivC is homologous to the β subunit of F0F1 ATPases and it possesses ATPase activity. To investigate the effects of ETT2 ATPase EivC on the phenotype and virulence of avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC), eivC mutant and complemented strains were constructed and characterized. Inactivation of eivC led to impaired flagella production and augmented fimbriae on the bacterial surface, and, consequently, reduced bacterial motility. In addition, the eivC mutant strain exhibited attenuated virulence in ducks, diminished serum resistance, reduced survival in macrophage cells and in ducks, upregulated fimbrial gene expression, and downregulated flagellar and virulence gene expression. The expression of the inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-8 were increased in HD-11 macrophages infected with the eivC mutant strain, compared with the wild-type strain. These virulence-related phenotypes were restored by genetic complementation. These findings demonstrate that ETT2 ATPase EivC is involved in the motility and pathogenicity of APEC. PMID:27630634

  17. Diagnostic Strategy for Identifying Avian Pathogenic Escherichia coli Based on Four Patterns of Virulence Genes

    PubMed Central

    Schaeffer, Brigitte; Brée, Annie; Mora, Azucena; Dahbi, Ghizlane; Biet, François; Oswald, Eric; Mainil, Jacques; Blanco, Jorge; Moulin-Schouleur, Maryvonne

    2012-01-01

    In order to improve the identification of avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) strains, an extensive characterization of 1,491 E. coli isolates was conducted, based on serotyping, virulence genotyping, and experimental pathogenicity for chickens. The isolates originated from lesions of avian colibacillosis (n = 1,307) or from the intestines of healthy animals (n = 184) from France, Spain, and Belgium. A subset (460 isolates) of this collection was defined according to their virulence for chicks. Six serogroups (O1, O2, O5, O8, O18, and O78) accounted for 56.5% of the APEC isolates and 22.5% of the nonpathogenic isolates. Thirteen virulence genes were more frequently present in APEC isolates than in nonpathogenic isolates but, individually, none of them could allow the identification of an isolate as an APEC strain. In order to take into account the diversity of APEC strains, a statistical analysis based on a tree-modeling method was therefore conducted on the sample of 460 pathogenic and nonpathogenic isolates. This resulted in the identification of four different associations of virulence genes that enables the identification of 70.2% of the pathogenic strains. Pathogenic strains were identified with an error margin of 4.3%. The reliability of the link between these four virulence patterns and pathogenicity for chickens was validated on a sample of 395 E. coli isolates from the collection. The genotyping method described here allowed the identification of more APEC isolates with greater reliability than the classical serotyping methods currently used in veterinary laboratories. PMID:22378905

  18. Chloramphenicol- and tetracycline-resistant uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) exhibit reduced virulence potential.

    PubMed

    Starcic Erjavec, Marjanca; Rijavec, Matija; Krizan-Hergouth, Veronika; Fruth, Angelika; Zgur-Bertok, Darja

    2007-11-01

    It is well documented that uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) isolates resistant to nalidixic acid have reduced virulence potential. Our goal was to assess whether UPEC isolates resistant to chloramphenicol, tetracycline and streptomycin also exhibit reduced virulence potential. Among 110 human UPEC isolates, the prevalences of the virulence factors fimH, papC, papGII, papGIII, sfa/focDE, afa, hlyA, cnf1, usp, ibeA, fyuA, iroN, iucD, ireA, and K1 and K5 capsules as well as of pathotypes, phylogenetic groups, O antigens and a pathogenicity island (PAI) marker were compared between chloramphenicol-, tetracycline-, streptomycin- and, as a control, nalidixic acid-resistant and -susceptible strains. Our findings show that among human UPEC isolates, not only nalidixic acid-resistant but also chloramphenicol- and tetracycline-resistant isolates have reduced virulence potential compared with susceptible strains. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a statistically significant reduction in virulence traits among chloramphenicol- and tetracycline-resistant isolates.

  19. Comparative Genomics Provides Insight into the Diversity of the Attaching and Effacing Escherichia coli Virulence Plasmids

    PubMed Central

    Hazen, Tracy H.; Kaper, James B.; Nataro, James P.

    2015-01-01

    Attaching and effacing Escherichia coli (AEEC) strains are a genomically diverse group of diarrheagenic E. coli strains that are characterized by the presence of the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE) genomic island, which encodes a type III secretion system that is essential to virulence. AEEC strains can be further classified as either enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC), typical enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), or atypical EPEC, depending on the presence or absence of the Shiga toxin genes or bundle-forming pilus (BFP) genes. Recent AEEC genomic studies have focused on the diversity of the core genome, and less is known regarding the genetic diversity and relatedness of AEEC plasmids. Comparative genomic analyses in this study demonstrated genetic similarity among AEEC plasmid genes involved in plasmid replication conjugative transfer and maintenance, while the remainder of the plasmids had sequence variability. Investigation of the EPEC adherence factor (EAF) plasmids, which carry the BFP genes, demonstrated significant plasmid diversity even among isolates within the same phylogenomic lineage, suggesting that these EAF-like plasmids have undergone genetic modifications or have been lost and acquired multiple times. Global transcriptional analyses of the EPEC prototype isolate E2348/69 and two EAF plasmid mutants of this isolate demonstrated that the plasmid genes influence the expression of a number of chromosomal genes in addition to the LEE. This suggests that the genetic diversity of the EAF plasmids could contribute to differences in the global virulence regulons of EPEC isolates. PMID:26238712

  20. Comparative Genomics Provides Insight into the Diversity of the Attaching and Effacing Escherichia coli Virulence Plasmids.

    PubMed

    Hazen, Tracy H; Kaper, James B; Nataro, James P; Rasko, David A

    2015-10-01

    Attaching and effacing Escherichia coli (AEEC) strains are a genomically diverse group of diarrheagenic E. coli strains that are characterized by the presence of the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE) genomic island, which encodes a type III secretion system that is essential to virulence. AEEC strains can be further classified as either enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC), typical enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), or atypical EPEC, depending on the presence or absence of the Shiga toxin genes or bundle-forming pilus (BFP) genes. Recent AEEC genomic studies have focused on the diversity of the core genome, and less is known regarding the genetic diversity and relatedness of AEEC plasmids. Comparative genomic analyses in this study demonstrated genetic similarity among AEEC plasmid genes involved in plasmid replication conjugative transfer and maintenance, while the remainder of the plasmids had sequence variability. Investigation of the EPEC adherence factor (EAF) plasmids, which carry the BFP genes, demonstrated significant plasmid diversity even among isolates within the same phylogenomic lineage, suggesting that these EAF-like plasmids have undergone genetic modifications or have been lost and acquired multiple times. Global transcriptional analyses of the EPEC prototype isolate E2348/69 and two EAF plasmid mutants of this isolate demonstrated that the plasmid genes influence the expression of a number of chromosomal genes in addition to the LEE. This suggests that the genetic diversity of the EAF plasmids could contribute to differences in the global virulence regulons of EPEC isolates.

  1. Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli from humans and animals differ in major phenotypical traits and virulence genes.

    PubMed

    Uber, Ana Paula; Trabulsi, Luiz R; Irino, Kinue; Beutin, Lothar; Ghilardi, Angela C R; Gomes, Tânia A T; Liberatore, Ana Maria A; de Castro, Antônio F P; Elias, Waldir P

    2006-03-01

    Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) is characterized by the expression of the aggregative adherence pattern to cultured epithelial cells. In this study, we determined the phenotypic and genotypic relationships among 86 EAEC strains of human and animal (calves, piglets and horses) feces. Serotypes and the presence of EAEC virulence markers were determined, and these results were associated with ribotyping. Strains harboring aggR (typical EAEC) of human origin were found carrying several of the searched markers, while atypical EAEC harbored none or a few markers. The strains of animal origin were classified as atypical EAEC (strains lacking aggR) and harbored only irp2 or shf. Strains from humans and animals belonged to several different serotypes, although none of them prevailed. Sixteen ribotypes were determined, and there was no association with virulence genes profiles or serotypes. Relationship was not found among the strains of this study, and the assessed animals may not represent a reservoir of human pathogenic typical EAEC.

  2. A study on association of virulence determinants of verotoxic Escherichia coli isolated from cattle calves

    PubMed Central

    Parul, Singh; Bist, Basanti; Sharma, Barkha; Jain, Udit; Yadav, Janardan K.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The present study was conducted to find the association among virulence determinants of verotoxic Escherichia coli (VTEC) isolated from cattle calf feces. Materials and Methods: A total of 216 cattle calf fecal samples were collected aseptically and processed under required conditions for the isolation of E. coli. The isolates were further subjected to multiplex polymerase chain reaction (mPCR) for the detection of virulent genes. All the VTEC isolates were serotyped at the Central Research Institute, Kasauli, Himachal Pradesh. The VTEC isolates were observed for the enterohemolysin production on washed sheep blood agar (wSBA). Results: A total of 177 presumptive E. coli were isolated from 216 calf fecal samples revealing an overall prevalence of E. coli to be 81.94%. A total of 32 (14.81%) isolates were detected as VTEC through mPCR. The prevalence of verotoxin genes vt1, vt2, and combination of vt1+vt2 in the VTEC isolates was found to be 12 (37.5%), 14 (43.75%), and 6 (18.75%), respectively. Other virulent genes eaeA and hlyA were found in 6 and 11 VTEC strains with prevalence values of 18.75% and 34.37%, respectively. A total of 13 different O serogroups were revealed in serotyping of 32 VTEC isolates. Out of 32 VTEC strains, only 26 (81.25%) were enterohemolytic on wSBA as they produced the characteristic small, turbid zone of hemolysis around the streaking line. Although enterohemolysin production has been attributed to the presence of hlyA gene, only 11 of 26 enterohemolysin producing VTEC were found to be harboring the hlyA gene (11/26) 42.03%. Conclusion: The present study concludes that there might be an association between the presence of verotoxin genes and enterohemolysin production in VTEC group of E. coli.

  3. A study on association of virulence determinants of verotoxic Escherichia coli isolated from cattle calves

    PubMed Central

    Parul, Singh; Bist, Basanti; Sharma, Barkha; Jain, Udit; Yadav, Janardan K.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The present study was conducted to find the association among virulence determinants of verotoxic Escherichia coli (VTEC) isolated from cattle calf feces. Materials and Methods: A total of 216 cattle calf fecal samples were collected aseptically and processed under required conditions for the isolation of E. coli. The isolates were further subjected to multiplex polymerase chain reaction (mPCR) for the detection of virulent genes. All the VTEC isolates were serotyped at the Central Research Institute, Kasauli, Himachal Pradesh. The VTEC isolates were observed for the enterohemolysin production on washed sheep blood agar (wSBA). Results: A total of 177 presumptive E. coli were isolated from 216 calf fecal samples revealing an overall prevalence of E. coli to be 81.94%. A total of 32 (14.81%) isolates were detected as VTEC through mPCR. The prevalence of verotoxin genes vt1, vt2, and combination of vt1+vt2 in the VTEC isolates was found to be 12 (37.5%), 14 (43.75%), and 6 (18.75%), respectively. Other virulent genes eaeA and hlyA were found in 6 and 11 VTEC strains with prevalence values of 18.75% and 34.37%, respectively. A total of 13 different O serogroups were revealed in serotyping of 32 VTEC isolates. Out of 32 VTEC strains, only 26 (81.25%) were enterohemolytic on wSBA as they produced the characteristic small, turbid zone of hemolysis around the streaking line. Although enterohemolysin production has been attributed to the presence of hlyA gene, only 11 of 26 enterohemolysin producing VTEC were found to be harboring the hlyA gene (11/26) 42.03%. Conclusion: The present study concludes that there might be an association between the presence of verotoxin genes and enterohemolysin production in VTEC group of E. coli. PMID:27651684

  4. Virulence Factors and O-Serogroups Profiles of Uropathogenic Escherichia Coli Isolated from Iranian Pediatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Dormanesh, Banafshe; Safarpoor Dehkordi, Farhad; Hosseini, Sahar; Momtaz, Hassan; Mirnejad, Reza; Hoseini, Mohammad Javad; Yahaghi, Emad; Tarhriz, Vahideh; Khodaverdi Darian, Ebrahim

    2014-01-01

    Background: Uropathogenic Escherichia coli O- Serogroups with their virulence factors are the most prevalent causes of UTIs. Objectives: The present investigation was performed to study the virulence factors and O-Serogroups profiles of UPEC isolated from Iranian pediatric patients. Patients and Methods: This cross sectional investigation was performed on 100 urine samples collected from hospitalized pediatrics of Baqiyatallah Hospital, Tehran, Iran. Midstream urine was collected to decrease potential bacterial, cellular and artifactual contamination. All samples were cultured and those with positive results were subjected to polymerase chain reactions to detect pap, cnf1, afa, sfa and hlyA genes and various O- Serogroups. Results: We found that 37.5% of boys and 75% of girls had positive results for Escherichia coli. We also found that O1 (19.33%), O2 (13.33%), O6 (13.33%), O4 (11.66%), and O18 (11.66 %) were the most commonly detected Serogroups. Totally, the serogroup of 5% of all strains were not detected. In addition, all of these O- Serogroups were pap+, cnf1+, hlyA+, and afa+. Totally, pap (70 %), cnf1 (56.66 %), and hlyA (43.33 %) were the most commonly detected virulence genes in the both studied groups of children. The sfa (30 %) and afa (26.66 %) genes had the lowest incidence rates. Conclusions: Special health care should be performed on UTIs management in Iranian pediatric patients. Extended researches should be performed to evaluate relation between other O-Serogroups and virulent genes. PMID:24719745

  5. A Survey for Escherichia coli Virulence Factors in Asymptomatic Free-Ranging Parrots.

    PubMed

    Becker Saidenberg, André; Robaldo Guedes, Neiva Maria; Fernandes Seixas, Gláucia Helena; da Costa Allgayer, Mariangela; Pacífico de Assis, Erica; Fabio Silveira, Luis; Anne Melville, Priscilla; Benites, Nilson Roberti

    2012-01-01

    Parrots in captivity are frequently affected by Escherichia coli (E. coli) infections. The objective of this study was to collect information on the carrier state for E. coli pathotypes in asymptomatic free-ranging parrots. Cloacal swabs were collected from nestlings of Hyacinth, Lear's macaws and Blue-fronted Amazon parrots and tested by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for virulence factors commonly found in enteropathogenic, avian pathogenic, and uropathogenic E. coli strains. In total, 44 samples were cultured and E. coli isolates were yielded, from which DNA was extracted and processed by PCR. Genes commonly found in APEC isolates from Blue-fronted Amazon parrots and Hyacinth macaws were expressed in 14 of these 44 samples. One atypical EPEC isolate was obtained from a sample from Lear's macaw. The most commonly found gene was the increased serum survival (iss) gene. This is the first report, that describes such pathotypes in asymptomatic free-living parrots. The findings of this study suggest the presence of a stable host/parasite relationship at the time of the sampling brings a new understanding to the role that E. coli plays in captive and wild parrots. Such information can be used to improve husbandry protocols as well as help conservation efforts of free-living populations.

  6. A Survey for Escherichia coli Virulence Factors in Asymptomatic Free-Ranging Parrots

    PubMed Central

    Becker Saidenberg, André; Robaldo Guedes, Neiva Maria; Fernandes Seixas, Gláucia Helena; da Costa Allgayer, Mariangela; Pacífico de Assis, Erica; Fabio Silveira, Luis; Anne Melville, Priscilla; Benites, Nilson Roberti

    2012-01-01

    Parrots in captivity are frequently affected by Escherichia coli (E. coli) infections. The objective of this study was to collect information on the carrier state for E. coli pathotypes in asymptomatic free-ranging parrots. Cloacal swabs were collected from nestlings of Hyacinth, Lear's macaws and Blue-fronted Amazon parrots and tested by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for virulence factors commonly found in enteropathogenic, avian pathogenic, and uropathogenic E. coli strains. In total, 44 samples were cultured and E. coli isolates were yielded, from which DNA was extracted and processed by PCR. Genes commonly found in APEC isolates from Blue-fronted Amazon parrots and Hyacinth macaws were expressed in 14 of these 44 samples. One atypical EPEC isolate was obtained from a sample from Lear's macaw. The most commonly found gene was the increased serum survival (iss) gene. This is the first report, that describes such pathotypes in asymptomatic free-living parrots. The findings of this study suggest the presence of a stable host/parasite relationship at the time of the sampling brings a new understanding to the role that E. coli plays in captive and wild parrots. Such information can be used to improve husbandry protocols as well as help conservation efforts of free-living populations. PMID:23738135

  7. Environmental phosphate differentially affects virulence phenotypes of uropathogenic Escherichia coli isolates causative of prostatitis.

    PubMed

    Grillo-Puertas, M; Martínez-Zamora, M G; Rintoul, M R; Soto, S M; Rapisarda, V A

    2015-01-01

    K-12 Escherichia coli cells grown in static media containing a critical phosphate (Pi) concentration ≥25 mM maintained a high polyphosphate (polyP) level in stationary phase, impairing biofilm formation, a phenomenon that is triggered by polyP degradation. Pi concentration in human urine fluctuates according to health state. Here, the influence of environmental Pi concentration on the occurrence of virulence traits in uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) isolated from acute prostatitis patients was evaluated. After a first screening, 3 isolates were selected according to differential biofilm formation profiles depending on media Pi concentration. For each isolate, biofilm positive and negative conditions were established. Regardless of the isolate, biofilm formation capacity was accompanied with curli and cellulose production and expression of some key virulence factors associated with adhesion. When the selected isolates were grown in their non-biofilm-forming condition, low concentrations of nalidixic acid and ciprofloxacin induced biofilm formation. Interestingly, similar to laboratory strains, polyP degradation induced biofilm formation in the selected isolates. Data demonstrated the complexity of UPEC responses to environmental Pi and the importance of polyP metabolism in the virulence of clinical isolates. PMID:26083279

  8. Lethal neonatal meningoencephalitis caused by multi-drug resistant, highly virulent Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Junaid; Dufendach, Kevin R; Wellons, John C; Kuba, Maria G; Nickols, Hilary H; Gómez-Duarte, Oscar G; Wynn, James L

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal meningitis is a rare but devastating condition. Multi-drug resistant (MDR) bacteria represent a substantial global health risk. This study reports on an aggressive case of lethal neonatal meningitis due to a MDR Escherichia coli (serotype O75:H5:K1). Serotyping, MDR pattern and phylogenetic typing revealed that this strain is an emergent and highly virulent neonatal meningitis E. coli isolate. The isolate was resistant to both ampicillin and gentamicin; antibiotics currently used for empiric neonatal sepsis treatment. The strain was also positive for multiple virulence genes including K1 capsule, fimbrial adhesion fimH, siderophore receptors iroN, fyuA and iutA, secreted autotransporter toxin sat, membrane associated proteases ompA and ompT, type II polysaccharide synthesis genes (kpsMTII) and pathogenicity-associated island (PAI)-associated malX gene. The presence of highly-virulent MDR organisms isolated in neonates underscores the need to implement rapid drug resistance diagnostic methods and should prompt consideration of alternate empiric therapy in neonates with Gram negative meningitis. PMID:27030919

  9. Environmental phosphate differentially affects virulence phenotypes of uropathogenic Escherichia coli isolates causative of prostatitis

    PubMed Central

    Grillo-Puertas, M; Martínez-Zamora, MG; Rintoul, MR; Soto, SM; Rapisarda, VA

    2015-01-01

    K-12 Escherichia coli cells grown in static media containing a critical phosphate (Pi) concentration ≥25 mM maintained a high polyphosphate (polyP) level in stationary phase, impairing biofilm formation, a phenomenon that is triggered by polyP degradation. Pi concentration in human urine fluctuates according to health state. Here, the influence of environmental Pi concentration on the occurrence of virulence traits in uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) isolated from acute prostatitis patients was evaluated. After a first screening, 3 isolates were selected according to differential biofilm formation profiles depending on media Pi concentration. For each isolate, biofilm positive and negative conditions were established. Regardless of the isolate, biofilm formation capacity was accompanied with curli and cellulose production and expression of some key virulence factors associated with adhesion. When the selected isolates were grown in their non-biofilm-forming condition, low concentrations of nalidixic acid and ciprofloxacin induced biofilm formation. Interestingly, similar to laboratory strains, polyP degradation induced biofilm formation in the selected isolates. Data demonstrated the complexity of UPEC responses to environmental Pi and the importance of polyP metabolism in the virulence of clinical isolates. PMID:26083279

  10. A DNA pooling based system to detect Escherichia coli virulence factors in fecal and wastewater samples

    PubMed Central

    Luz María Chacón, J; Lizeth Taylor, C; Carmen Valiente, A; Irene Alvarado, P; Ximena Cortés, B

    2012-01-01

    The availability of a useful tool for simple and timely detection of the most important virulent varieties of Escherichia coli is indispensable. To this end, bacterial DNA pools which had previously been categorized were obtained from isolated colonies as well as selected in terms of utilized phenotype; the pools were assessed by two PCR Multiplex for the detection of virulent E. coli eaeA, bfpA, stx1, stx2, ipaH, ST, LT, and aatA genes, with the 16S gene used as DNA control. The system was validated with 66 fecal samples and 44 wastewater samples. At least one positive isolate was detected by a virulent gene among the 20 that were screened. The analysis of fecal samples from children younger than 6 years of age detected frequencies of 25% LT positive strains, 8.3% eae, 8.3% bfpA, 16.7% ipaH, as well as 12.5 % aatA and ST. On the other hand, wastewater samples revealed frequencies of 25.7% eaeA positive, 30.3% stx1, 15.1% LT and 19.7% aatA. This study is an initial step toward carrying out epidemiological field research that will reveal the presence of these bacterial varieties. PMID:24031959

  11. Virulence and plasmidic resistance determinants of Escherichia coli isolated from municipal and hospital wastewater treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Calhau, Vera; Mendes, Catarina; Pena, Angelina; Mendonça, Nuno; Da Silva, Gabriela Jorge

    2015-06-01

    Escherichia coli is simultaneously an indicator of water contamination and a human pathogen. This study aimed to characterize the virulence and resistance of E. coli from municipal and hospital wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in central Portugal. From a total of 193 isolates showing reduced susceptibility to cefotaxime and/or nalidixic acid, 20 E. coli with genetically distinct fingerprint profiles were selected and characterized. Resistance to antimicrobials was determined using the disc diffusion method. Extended spectrum β-lactamase and plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes, phylogroups, pathogenicity islands (PAIs) and virulence genes were screened by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). CTX-M producers were typed by multilocus sequence typing. Resistance to beta-lactams was associated with the presence of bla(TEM), bla(SHV), bla(CTX-M-15) and bla(CTX-M-32). Plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance was associated with qnrA, qnrS and aac(6')-Ib-cr. Aminoglycoside resistance and multidrug-resistant phenotypes were also detected. PAI IV(536), PAI II(CFT073), PAI II(536) and PAI I(CFT073), and uropathogenic genes iutA, papAH and sfa/foc were detected. With regard to the clinical ST131 clone, it carried bla(CTX-M-15), blaTEM-type, qnrS and aac(6')-lb-cr; IncF and IncP plasmids, and virulence factors PAI IV(536), PAI I(CFT073), PAI II(CFT073), iutA, sfa/foc and papAH were identified in the effluent of a hospital plant. WWTPs contribute to the dissemination of virulent and resistant bacteria in water ecosystems, constituting an environmental and public health risk.

  12. Virulence Characteristics and Antibiotic Resistance Patterns among Various Phylogenetic Groups of Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Isolates.

    PubMed

    Derakhshandeh, Abdollah; Firouzi, Roya; Motamedifar, Mohammad; Arabshahi, Sina; Novinrooz, Aytak; Boroojeni, Azar Motamedi; Bahadori, Maryam; Heidari, Susan

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the resistance patterns of uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) isolates and to investigate the frequency of several virulence genes, including fimH, papA, hlyD, cnf-1, sitA, and tsh, among various phylogenetic groups of UPEC isolates. A total of 85 E. coli isolates were recovered from urine samples from outpatients with a clinical diagnosis of uncomplicated urinary tract infections. A molecular approach to examine the antimicrobial resistance patterns was employed using PCR and the disc diffusion method. The detected frequencies of the virulence factor genes determined using PCR were: fimH (34.1%), papA (9.4%), hlyD (21.2%), cnf-1 (3.5%), sitA (15.3%), and tsh (27.1%). These results revealed that the isolates were resistant to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (SXT) (74.1%), cefotaxime (CTX) (68.2%), and amoxicillin-clavulanic acid (AMC) (94.1%), and they were relatively less resistant to N (56.5%). According to these results, further investigation is needed to determine exactly whether or not SXT, CTX, and AMC are appropriate antibiotics for the treatment of UPEC infections in southern Iran. Although these results demonstrate that fimH is the most frequent virulence gene among UPEC isolates, the high prevalence of isolates that do not encode fimH (75.9%) and the relatively low frequency of isolates that carry other virulence genes require further investigation to clarify the role of the other potential virulence factors in the pathogenesis of these isolates.

  13. Extraintestinal Pathogenic Escherichia coli: A Combination of Virulence with Antibiotic Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Pitout, Johann D. D.

    2012-01-01

    Escherichia coli represents an incredible versatile and diverse enterobacterial species and can be subdivided into the following; (i) intestinal non-pathogenic, commensal isolates. (ii) Intestinal pathogenic isolates and (iii) extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli or ExPEC isolates. The presence to several putative virulence genes has been positively linked with the pathogenicity of ExPEC. E. coli remains one of the most frequent causes of nosocomial and community-acquired bacterial infections including urinary tract infections, enteric infections, and systemic infections in humans. ExPEC has emerged in 2000s as an important player in the resistance to antibiotics including the cephalosporins and fluoroquinolones. Most importantly among ExPEC is the increasing recognition of isolates producing “newer β-lactamases” that consists of plasmid-mediated AmpC β-lactamases (e.g., CMY), extended-spectrum β-lactamases (e.g., CTX-M), and carbapenemases (e.g., NDM). This review will highlight aspects of virulence associated with ExPEC, provide a brief overview of plasmid-mediated resistance to β-lactams including the characteristics of the successful international sequence types such as ST38, ST131, ST405, and ST648 among ExPEC. PMID:22294983

  14. The serine protease Pic as a virulence factor of atypical enteropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Abreu, Afonso G; Abe, Cecilia M; Nunes, Kamila O; Moraes, Claudia T P; Chavez-Dueñas, Lucia; Navarro-Garcia, Fernando; Barbosa, Angela S; Piazza, Roxane M F; Elias, Waldir P

    2016-01-01

    Autotransporter proteins (AT) are associated with bacterial virulence attributes. Originally identified in enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC), Shigella flexneri 2a and uropathogenic E. coli, the serine protease Pic is one of these AT. We have previously detected one atypical enteropathogenic E. coli strain (BA589) carrying the pic gene. In the present study, we characterized the biological activities of Pic produced by BA589 both in vitro and in vivo. Contrarily to other Pic-producers bacteria, pic in BA589 is located on a high molecular weight plasmid. PicBA589 was able to agglutinate rabbit erythrocytes, cleave mucin and degrade complement system molecules. BA589 was able to colonize mice intestines, and an intense mucus production was observed. The BA589Δpic mutant lost the capacity to colonize as well as the above-mentioned in vitro activities. Thus, Pic represents an additional virulence factor in aEPEC strain BA589, associated with adherence, colonization and evasion from the innate immune system.

  15. Inhibition of expression of virulence genes of Yersinia pestis in Escherichia coli by external guide sequences and RNase P.

    PubMed

    Ko, Jae-hyeong; Izadjoo, Mina; Altman, Sidney

    2008-08-01

    External guide sequences (EGSs) targeting virulence genes from Yersinia pestis were designed and tested in vitro and in vivo in Escherichia coli. Linear EGSs and M1 RNA-linked EGSs were designed for the yscN and yscS genes that are involved in type III secretion in Y. pestis. RNase P from E. coli cleaves the messages of yscN and yscS in vitro with the cognate EGSs, and the expression of the EGSs resulted in the reduction of the levels of these messages of the virulence genes when those genes were expressed in E. coli.

  16. [Avian Escherichia coli virulence factors associated with coli septicemia in broiler chickens].

    PubMed

    Ramirez Santoyo, R M; Moreno Sala, A; Almanza Marquez, Y

    2001-01-01

    In order to detect phenotypic characteristics associated with pathogenicity, 25 strains of Escherichia coli, isolated from clinical cases of colisepticemia in broiler chickens, were examined to determine the following properties: colicinogenicity, colicin V production, type 1 fimbriae, hemolysin expression and motility. Colicinogenicity occurred in 72% of the strains, 56% of all strains produced colicin V, 84% were positive for type 1 fimbriae and 80% were positive for motility. None of the strains had hemolytic activity; however, all of them, expressed at least one of the other characteristics studied. These results suggest that the diversity of phenotypes detected partially explain the multifactorial nature of avian colisepticemia.

  17. In vivo correlates of molecularly inferred virulence among extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) in the wax moth Galleria mellonella model system

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Deborah A; Mills, Grant; Johnson, James R; Porter, Stephen; Wiles, Siouxsie

    2014-01-01

    In contrast to commensal Escherichia coli, extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) strains possess an array of virulence-associated genes. We sought to establish the feasibility of using the invertebrate Galleria mellonella (greater wax moth) for assessing ExPEC virulence and to investigate the correlation between genotypic determinants of virulence and in vivo pathogenicity. We observed a correlation between the number of virulence genes and larval survival, such that ExPEC isolates with higher virulence scores killed larvae significantly faster than isolates with lower virulence scores. By correlating genotypic and phenotypic virulence, we provide preliminary validation of this model for future studies investigating ExPEC virulence. PMID:24518442

  18. Multiple-host sharing, long-term persistence, and virulence of Escherichia coli clones from human and animal household members.

    PubMed

    Johnson, James R; Clabots, Connie; Kuskowski, Michael A

    2008-12-01

    During a 3-year surveillance, six household members (five humans and the family dog) yielded 14 Escherichia coli clones. Virulence genes, group B2, and having caused cystitis (in the mother or dog) corresponded to colonization endpoints (number of samples, colonies, hosts, and dates). The dog's cystitis clone was the most extensively recovered clone.

  19. Adhesion and its role in the virulence of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Law, D

    1994-01-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) organisms are an important cause of diarrheal disease in young children. The virulence of EPEC is a multifactorial process and involves a number of distinct stages. Initial adherence to intestinal mucosa is mediated by fimbriae which bring about a distinct form of adhesion, localized adhesion. Intimate adhesion of the bacterium to the eukaryotic membrane occurs, resulting in the activation of signal transduction pathways. Microvilli are disrupted and effaced from the apical membrane which then cups around the organism to form pedestal structures, the attaching and effacing lesion. Diarrhea may be produced by alteration of the permeability of the apical membrane and also through a malabsorption mechanism. The pathways involved in the production of the attaching and effacing lesion are described. EPEC organisms were originally thought to belong to a number of distinct serogroups; it is now apparent that many isolates belonging to these serogroups are not pathogenic or belong to other pathogenic groups of E. coli. In addition, isolates falling outside of these serogroups are considered to be true EPEC. The definition of EPEC based on serotyping is inaccurate and should be replaced by methods that specifically detect the virulence properties of EPEC. Images PMID:8055465

  20. Role of Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Virulence Factors in Development of Urinary Tract Infection and Kidney Damage

    PubMed Central

    Bien, Justyna; Sokolova, Olga; Bozko, Przemyslaw

    2012-01-01

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) is a causative agent in the vast majority of urinary tract infections (UTIs), including cystitis and pyelonephritis, and infectious complications, which may result in acute renal failure in healthy individuals as well as in renal transplant patients. UPEC expresses a multitude of virulence factors to break the inertia of the mucosal barrier. In response to the breach by UPEC into the normally sterile urinary tract, host inflammatory responses are triggered leading to cytokine production, neutrophil influx, and the exfoliation of infected bladder epithelial cells. Several signaling pathways activated during UPEC infection, including the pathways known to activate the innate immune response, interact with calcium-dependent signaling pathways. Some UPEC isolates, however, might possess strategies to delay or suppress the activation of components of the innate host response in the urinary tract. Studies published in the recent past provide new information regarding how virulence factors of uropathogenic E. coli are involved in activation of the innate host response. Despite numerous host defense mechanisms, UPEC can persist within the urinary tract and may serve as a reservoir for recurrent infections and serious complications. Presentation of the molecular details of these events is essential for development of successful strategies for prevention of human UTIs and urological complications associated with UTIs. PMID:22506110

  1. Sequential Acquisition of Virulence and Fluoroquinolone Resistance Has Shaped the Evolution of Escherichia coli ST131

    PubMed Central

    Alsheikh-Hussain, Areej S.; Ashcroft, Melinda M.; Khanh Nhu, Nguyen Thi; Roberts, Leah W.; Stanton-Cook, Mitchell

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Escherichia coli ST131 is the most frequently isolated fluoroquinolone-resistant (FQR) E. coli clone worldwide and a major cause of urinary tract and bloodstream infections. Although originally identified through its association with the CTX-M-15 extended-spectrum β-lactamase resistance gene, global genomic epidemiology studies have failed to resolve the geographical and temporal origin of the ST131 ancestor. Here, we developed a framework for the reanalysis of publically available genomes from different countries and used this data set to reconstruct the evolutionary steps that led to the emergence of FQR ST131. Using Bayesian estimation, we show that point mutations in chromosomal genes that confer FQR coincide with the first clinical use of fluoroquinolone in 1986 and illustrate the impact of this pivotal event on the rapid population expansion of ST131 worldwide from an apparent origin in North America. Furthermore, we identify virulence factor acquisition events that predate the development of FQR, suggesting that the gain of virulence-associated genes followed by the tandem development of antibiotic resistance primed the successful global dissemination of ST131. PMID:27118589

  2. The Escherichia coli Phosphotyrosine Proteome Relates to Core Pathways and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Jyoti; Díaz-Mejía, J. Javier; Tyagi, Nidhi; Renuse, Santosh; Jacob, Harrys K. C.; Pinto, Sneha M.; Sahasrabuddhe, Nandini A.; Kim, Min-Sik; Delanghe, Bernard; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy; Emili, Andrew; Kaper, James B.; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2013-01-01

    While phosphotyrosine modification is an established regulatory mechanism in eukaryotes, it is less well characterized in bacteria due to low prevalence. To gain insight into the extent and biological importance of tyrosine phosphorylation in Escherichia coli, we used immunoaffinity-based phosphotyrosine peptide enrichment combined with high resolution mass spectrometry analysis to comprehensively identify tyrosine phosphorylated proteins and accurately map phosphotyrosine sites. We identified a total of 512 unique phosphotyrosine sites on 342 proteins in E. coli K12 and the human pathogen enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) O157:H7, representing the largest phosphotyrosine proteome reported to date in bacteria. This large number of tyrosine phosphorylation sites allowed us to define five phosphotyrosine site motifs. Tyrosine phosphorylated proteins belong to various functional classes such as metabolism, gene expression and virulence. We demonstrate for the first time that proteins of a type III secretion system (T3SS), required for the attaching and effacing (A/E) lesion phenotype characteristic for intestinal colonization by certain EHEC strains, are tyrosine phosphorylated by bacterial kinases. Yet, A/E lesion and metabolic phenotypes were unaffected by the mutation of the two currently known tyrosine kinases, Etk and Wzc. Substantial residual tyrosine phosphorylation present in an etk wzc double mutant strongly indicated the presence of hitherto unknown tyrosine kinases in E. coli. We assess the functional importance of tyrosine phosphorylation and demonstrate that the phosphorylated tyrosine residue of the regulator SspA positively affects expression and secretion of T3SS proteins and formation of A/E lesions. Altogether, our study reveals that tyrosine phosphorylation in bacteria is more prevalent than previously recognized, and suggests the involvement of phosphotyrosine-mediated signaling in a broad range of cellular functions and virulence. PMID:23785281

  3. Relationship between Escherichia coli virulence factors and postpartum metritis in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Kassé, F N; Fairbrother, J M; Dubuc, J

    2016-06-01

    The objectives of this study were to report the prevalence of Escherichia coli and Trueperella pyogenes in the uterus of postpartum dairy cows before the onset of postpartum metritis (PPM) and to quantify their association with subsequent occurrence of PPM, to quantify the association between the presence of genes encoding E. coli virulence factors (VF) and PPM, and to determine the accuracy of using early postpartum uterine bacteriology results (bacteria and VF) to identify cows at risk of PPM. A prospective cohort study was conducted on 3 commercial dairy farms. Uterine swabs were collected from 371 Holstein dairy cows (3 commercial herds) at 1 to 7d in milk and submitted to the laboratory for identification of E. coli, T. pyogenes, and E. coli VF. A total of 40 VF were tested using the radioactive probe hybridization method. Postpartum metritis was defined as the presence of a fetid watery red-brown uterine discharge, associated with fever (rectal temperature >39.5°C), and systemic signs of illness (dullness, reduced appetite, and milk production). Surveillance of PPM was done by trained farmers blinded to laboratory results and cows were followed until 21d in milk. Statistical analyses were conducted using 2×2 tables and mixed logistical regression models. Prevalences of E. coli, T. pyogenes, and PPM were 42, 34, and 15%, respectively. A total of 32 VF were found in E. coli isolates. Most prevalent VF were extraintestinal pathogenic genes such as fimH (89%), hlyE (87%), and iss (70%). Cows positive for intrauterine E. coli were 3.2 times more likely to have subsequent PPM compared with bacteriologically negative cows. Cows with VF hra1 in their uterus were 2.7 times more likely to have PPM than cows positive for E. coli and negative for hra1 and 5.9 times more likely than bacteriologically negative cows. Cows with VF kpsMTII in their uterus were 3.2 times more likely to have PPM than cows positive for E. coli and negative for kpsMTII and 6.2 times more likely

  4. Characterization of Shiga Toxin Subtypes and Virulence Genes in Porcine Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Baranzoni, Gian Marco; Fratamico, Pina M; Gangiredla, Jayanthi; Patel, Isha; Bagi, Lori K; Delannoy, Sabine; Fach, Patrick; Boccia, Federica; Anastasio, Aniello; Pepe, Tiziana

    2016-01-01

    Similar to ruminants, swine have been shown to be a reservoir for Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC), and pork products have been linked with outbreaks associated with STEC O157 and O111:H-. STEC strains, isolated in a previous study from fecal samples of late-finisher pigs, belonged to a total of 56 serotypes, including O15:H27, O91:H14, and other serogroups previously associated with human illness. The isolates were tested by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and a high-throughput real-time PCR system to determine the Shiga toxin (Stx) subtype and virulence-associated and putative virulence-associated genes they carried. Select STEC strains were further analyzed using a Minimal Signature E. coli Array Strip. As expected, stx 2e (81%) was the most common Stx variant, followed by stx 1a (14%), stx 2d (3%), and stx 1c (1%). The STEC serogroups that carried stx 2d were O15:H27, O159:H16 and O159:H-. Similar to stx 2a and stx 2c, the stx 2d variant is associated with development of hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic uremic syndrome, and reports on the presence of this variant in STEC strains isolated from swine are lacking. Moreover, the genes encoding heat stable toxin (estIa) and enteroaggregative E. coli heat stable enterotoxin-1 (astA) were commonly found in 50 and 44% of isolates, respectively. The hemolysin genes, hlyA and ehxA, were both detected in 7% of the swine STEC strains. Although the eae gene was not found, other genes involved in host cell adhesion, including lpfAO113 and paa were detected in more than 50% of swine STEC strains, and a number of strains also carried iha, lpfAO26, lpfAO157, fedA, orfA, and orfB. The present work provides new insights on the distribution of virulence factors among swine STEC strains and shows that swine may carry Stx1a-, Stx2e-, or Stx2d-producing E. coli with virulence gene profiles associated with human infections. PMID:27148249

  5. Characterization of Shiga toxin subtypes and virulence genes in porcine Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Baranzoni, Gian Marco; Fratamico, Pina M.; Gangiredla, Jayanthi; Patel, Isha; Bagi, Lori K.; Delannoy, Sabine; Fach, Patrick; Boccia, Federica; Anastasio, Aniello; Pepe, Tiziana

    2016-04-21

    Similar to ruminants, swine have been shown to be a reservoir for Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC), and pork products have been linked with outbreaks associated with STEC O157 and O111:H-. STEC strains, isolated in a previous study from fecal samples of late-finisher pigs, belonged to a total of 56 serotypes, including O15:H27, O91:H14, and other serogroups previously associated with human illness. The isolates were tested by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and a high-throughput real-time PCR system to determine the Shiga toxin (Stx) subtype and virulence-associated and putative virulence-associated genes they carried. Select STEC strains were further analyzed using amore » Minimal Signature E. coli Array Strip. As expected, stx2e (81%) was the most common Stx variant, followed by stx1a (14%), stx2d (3%), and stx1c (1%). The STEC serogroups that carried stx2d were O15:H27, O159:H16 and O159:H-. Similar to stx2a and stx2c, the stx2d variant is associated with development of hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic uremic syndrome, and reports on the presence of this variant in STEC strains isolated from swine are lacking. Moreover, the genes encoding heat stable toxin (estIa) and enteroaggregative E. coli heat stable enterotoxin-1 (astA) were commonly found in 50 and 44% of isolates, respectively. The hemolysin genes, hlyA and ehxA, were both detected in 7% of the swine STEC strains. Although the eae gene was not found, other genes involved in host cell adhesion, including lpfAO113 and paa were detected in more than 50% of swine STEC strains, and a number of strains also carried iha, lpfAO26, lpfAO157, fedA, orfA, and orfB. Furthermore, the present work provides new insights on the distribution of virulence factors among swine STEC strains and shows that swine may carry Stx1a-, Stx2e-, or Stx2d-producing E. coli with virulence gene profiles associated with human infections.« less

  6. Characterization of Shiga Toxin Subtypes and Virulence Genes in Porcine Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Baranzoni, Gian Marco; Fratamico, Pina M.; Gangiredla, Jayanthi; Patel, Isha; Bagi, Lori K.; Delannoy, Sabine; Fach, Patrick; Boccia, Federica; Anastasio, Aniello; Pepe, Tiziana

    2016-01-01

    Similar to ruminants, swine have been shown to be a reservoir for Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC), and pork products have been linked with outbreaks associated with STEC O157 and O111:H-. STEC strains, isolated in a previous study from fecal samples of late-finisher pigs, belonged to a total of 56 serotypes, including O15:H27, O91:H14, and other serogroups previously associated with human illness. The isolates were tested by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and a high-throughput real-time PCR system to determine the Shiga toxin (Stx) subtype and virulence-associated and putative virulence-associated genes they carried. Select STEC strains were further analyzed using a Minimal Signature E. coli Array Strip. As expected, stx2e (81%) was the most common Stx variant, followed by stx1a (14%), stx2d (3%), and stx1c (1%). The STEC serogroups that carried stx2d were O15:H27, O159:H16 and O159:H-. Similar to stx2a and stx2c, the stx2d variant is associated with development of hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic uremic syndrome, and reports on the presence of this variant in STEC strains isolated from swine are lacking. Moreover, the genes encoding heat stable toxin (estIa) and enteroaggregative E. coli heat stable enterotoxin-1 (astA) were commonly found in 50 and 44% of isolates, respectively. The hemolysin genes, hlyA and ehxA, were both detected in 7% of the swine STEC strains. Although the eae gene was not found, other genes involved in host cell adhesion, including lpfAO113 and paa were detected in more than 50% of swine STEC strains, and a number of strains also carried iha, lpfAO26, lpfAO157, fedA, orfA, and orfB. The present work provides new insights on the distribution of virulence factors among swine STEC strains and shows that swine may carry Stx1a-, Stx2e-, or Stx2d-producing E. coli with virulence gene profiles associated with human infections. PMID:27148249

  7. Identification of pathogens and virulence profile of Rhodococcus equi and Escherichia coli strains obtained from sand of parks

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, M.C.; Takai, S.; Leite, D.S.; Pinto, J.P.A.N.; Brandão, P.E.; Santarém, V.A.; Listoni, F.J.P.; Da Silva, A.V.; Ribeiro, M.G.

    2013-01-01

    The identification of pathogens of viral (Rotavirus, Coronavirus), parasitic (Toxocara spp.) and bacterial (Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp., Rhodococcus equi) origin shed in feces, and the virulence profile of R. equi and E. coli isolates were investigated in 200 samples of sand obtained from 40 parks, located in central region of state of Sao Paulo, Brazil, using different diagnostic methods. From 200 samples analyzed, 23 (11.5%) strains of R. equi were isolated. None of the R. equi isolates showed a virulent (vapA gene) or intermediately virulent (vapB gene) profiles. Sixty-three (31.5%) strains of E. coli were identified. The following genes encoding virulence factors were identified in E. coli: eae, bfp, saa, iucD, papGI, sfa and hly. Phylogenetic classification showed that 63 E. coli isolates belonged to groups B1 (52.4%), A (25.4%) and B2 (22.2%). No E. coli serotype O157:H7 was identified. Eggs of Toxocara sp. were found in three parks and genetic material of bovine Coronavirus was identified in one sample of one park. No Salmonella spp. and Rotavirus isolates were identified in the samples of sand. The presence of R. equi, Toxocara sp, bovine Coronavirus and virulent E. coli isolates in the environment of parks indicates that the sanitary conditions of the sand should be improved in order to reduce the risks of fecal transmission of pathogens of zoonotic potential to humans in these places. PMID:24294244

  8. Virulence profiles of enterotoxigenic, shiga toxin and enteroaggregative Escherichia coli in South African pigs.

    PubMed

    Mohlatlole, Ramadimetja Prescilla; Madoroba, Evelyn; Muchadeyi, Farai Catherine; Chimonyo, Michael; Kanengoni, Arnold Tapera; Dzomba, Edgar Farai

    2013-08-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) and shiga toxin E. coli (STEC) are important causes of colibacillosis in piglets. Recently, enteroaggregative E. coli heat-stable enterotoxin 1 (EAST-1) has been implicated in pig diarrhoea. This study investigated the prevalence of enterotoxin [heat-labile toxins (LT), heat-stable toxin a (STa), heat-stable toxin b (STb)], shiga toxins (Stx1, Stx2, Stx2e), enteroaggregative heat-stable E. coli (EAST-1), associated fimbriae (F4, F5, F6, F41, F18ab, F18ac) and non-fimbrial adhesins [adhesin involved in diffuse adherence 1 (AIDA-1), attaching and effacing factor, porcine attaching- and effacing-associated factor] in South African pigs. A total of 263 E. coli strains were isolated from Landrace (n = 24), Large White (n = 126), Duroc (n = 28) and indigenous (n = 85) breeds of piglets aged between 9 and 136 days. PCR was used in the analysis. Virulent genes were detected in 40.3% of the isolates, of which 18.6, 0.4 and 17.5% were classified as ETEC, STEC and enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC), respectively. Individual genes were found in the following proportions: STb (19.01%), LT (0.4%), STa (3.4%), St2xe (1.1%) and EAST-1 (20.2%) toxins. None of the tested fimbriae were detected in ETEC and STEC isolates. About one third of the ETEC and STEC isolates was tested negative for both fimbrial and non-fimbrial adhesins. Twenty-five pathotypes from ETEC-, EAEC- and STEC-positive strains were identified. Pathotypes EAST-1 (30.2%), STb (13.2%) and STb/AIDA-1 (10.4%) were most prevalent. The study provided insight on possible causes of colibacillosis in South African pigs. PMID:23417826

  9. The role of quorum sensing in Escherichia coli (ETEC) virulence factors.

    PubMed

    Sturbelle, Régis Tuchtenhagen; de Avila, Luciana Farias da Costa; Roos, Talita Bandeira; Borchardt, Jéssica Lopes; da Conceição, Rita de Cássia dos Santos; Dellagostin, Odir Antonio; Leite, Fábio Pereira Leivas

    2015-11-18

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a signaling system among bacteria mediated by auto-inducer substances (AI). Whenever the concentration of these molecules reaches a threshold corresponding to a high cell density or quorum, the whole population starts a coordinated expression of specific genes. Studies have shown that epinephrine is also responsible for activating specific bacterial genes. This work aimed to investigate the role of conditioned medium (containing AI), epinephrine and their association on growth, motility, F4 fimbriae and heat-labile toxin (LT) expression on enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC, E68). A significant increase in motility, F4 and LT expression, was observed in the ETEC culture supplemented with conditioned medium and epinephrine. These findings suggest that ETEC uses some components of conditioned medium (e.g., AI molecules), host molecules (epinephrine), and their association to modulate the expression of important virulence genes. PMID:26386492

  10. Reconstitution of acetosyringone-mediated Agrobacterium tumefaciens virulence gene expression in the heterologous host Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Lohrke, S M; Yang, H; Jin, S

    2001-06-01

    The ability to utilize Escherichia coli as a heterologous system in which to study the regulation of Agrobacterium tumefaciens virulence genes and the mechanism of transfer DNA (T-DNA) transfer would provide an important tool to our understanding and manipulation of these processes. We have previously reported that the rpoA gene encoding the alpha subunit of RNA polymerase is required for the expression of lacZ gene under the control of virB promoter (virBp::lacZ) in E. coli containing a constitutively active virG gene [virG(Con)]. Here we show that an RpoA hybrid containing the N-terminal 247 residues from E. coli and the C-terminal 89 residues from A. tumefaciens was able to significantly express virBp::lacZ in E. coli in a VirG(Con)-dependent manner. Utilization of lac promoter-driven virA and virG in combination with the A. tumefaciens rpoA construct resulted in significant inducer-mediated expression of the virBp::lacZ fusion, and the level of virBp::lacZ expression was positively correlated to the copy number of the rpoA construct. This expression was dependent on VirA, VirG, temperature, and, to a lesser extent, pH, which is similar to what is observed in A. tumefaciens. Furthermore, the effect of sugars on vir gene expression was observed only in the presence of the chvE gene, suggesting that the glucose-binding protein of E. coli, a homologue of ChvE, does not interact with the VirA molecule. We also evaluated other phenolic compounds in induction assays and observed significant expression with syringealdehyde, a low level of expression with acetovanillone, and no expression with hydroxyacetophenone, similar to what occurs in A. tumefaciens strain A348 from which the virA clone was derived. These data support the notion that VirA directly senses the phenolic inducer. However, the overall level of expression of the vir genes in E. coli is less than what is observed in A. tumefaciens, suggesting that additional gene(s) from A. tumefaciens may be required for

  11. Molecular epidemiology of adhesin and hemolysin virulence factors among uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Arthur, M; Johnson, C E; Rubin, R H; Arbeit, R D; Campanelli, C; Kim, C; Steinbach, S; Agarwal, M; Wilkinson, R; Goldstein, R

    1989-02-01

    The pap, prs, pil, and hly operons of the pyelonephritic Escherichia coli isolate J96 code for the expression of P, F, and type 1 adhesins and the production of hemolysin, respectively; the afaI operon of the pyelonephritic E. coli KS52 encodes an X adhesin. Using different segments of these operons as probes, colony hybridizations were performed on 97 E. coli urinary tract and 40 fecal clinical isolates to determine (i) the presence in the infecting bacteria of nucleotide sequences related to virulence operons, and (ii) the phenotypic properties associated with such sequences. Coexpression of P and F adhesins encoded by pap-related sequences was detected more frequently among isolates from patients with pyelonephritis (32 of 49, 65%) than among those with cystitis (11 of 48, 23%; P less than 0.0001) or from fecal specimens (6 of 40, 15%; P less than 0.0001). Therefore, the expression of both adhesins appears to be critical in the colonization of the upper urinary tract. In contrast, afaI-related sequences were detected significantly more frequently among isolates from patients with cystitis, suggesting that this class of X adhesin may have a role in lower urinary tract infections. Urinary tract isolates differed from fecal isolates by a low incidence of type 1 adhesin expression among pil probe-positive isolates. hly-related sequences were only detected in pap probe-positive isolates. The frequency of hemolysin production among pap probe-positive isolates was not associated with a particular pattern of infection. The distribution of these virulence factors was similar in the presence or absence of reflux, indicating that structural abnormalities of the urinary tract did not facilitate colonization by adhesin-negative isolates.

  12. Impact of virulence genes on sepsis severity and survival in Escherichia coli bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Mora-Rillo, Marta; Fernández-Romero, Natalia; Francisco, Carolina Navarro-San; Díez-Sebastián, Jesús; Romero-Gómez, Maria Pilar; Fernández, Francisco Arnalich; López, Jose Ramon Arribas; Mingorance, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) are a frequent cause of bacteremia and sepsis, but the role of ExPEC genetic virulence factors (VFs) in sepsis development and outcome is ill-defined. Prospective study including 120 adult patients with E. coli bacteremia to investigate the impact of bacterial and host factors on sepsis severity and mortality. Patients' clinical and demographic data were registered. Phylogenetic background of E. coli isolates was analyzed by SNP pyrosequencing and VFs by PCR. The E. coli isolates presented an epidemic population structure with 6 dominant clones making up to half of the isolates. VF gene profiles were highly diverse. Multivariate analysis for sepsis severity showed that the presence of cnf and blaTEM genes increased the risk of severe illness by 6.75 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.79–24.71) and 2.59 (95% CI 1.04–6.43) times respectively, while each point in the Pitt score increased the risk by 1.34 (95% CI 1.02–1.76) times. Multivariate analysis for mortality showed that active chemotherapy (OR 17.87, 95% CI 3.35–95.45), McCabe-Jackson Index (OR for rapidly fatal category 120.15, 95% CI 4.19–3446.23), Pitt index (OR 1.78, 95% CI 1.25–2.56) and presence of fyuA gene (OR 8.05, 95% CI 1.37–47.12) were associated to increased mortality while the presence of P fimbriae genes had a protective role (OR 0.094, 95%IC 0.018–0.494). Bacteremic E. coli had a high diversity of genetic backgrounds and VF gene profiles. Bacterial VFs and host determinants had an impact on disease evolution and mortality. PMID:25654604

  13. Diversity of CRISPR loci and virulence genes in pathogenic Escherichia coli isolates from various sources.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yun; Yin, Shuang; Dudley, Edward G; Cutter, Catherine N

    2015-07-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) strains, including those of O157:H7 and the "big six" serogroups (i.e., O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, and O145) are food-borne pathogens that pose a serious health threat to humans. Ruminants, especially cattle, are a major reservoir for O157 and non-O157 STEC. In the present study, 115 E. coli strains isolated from small and very small beef processing plants were screened for virulence genes (stx1, stx2, eae) using a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Thirteen (11.3%) of the 115 isolates tested positive for stx1, stx2, or eae genes, but only 4 (3.5%) tested positive for either stx1 or stx2. A multiplex PCR reaction targeting eight O-serogroups (O26, O45, O103, O111, O113, O121, O145, O157) identified 12 isolates as O26, O103, O111, or O145, with E. coli O26 being the most predominant serogroup (61.5%). The thirteen isolates were further analyzed using Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR) subtyping. Consistent with previous studies, CRISPR alleles from strains of the same serogroup were similar in their spacer content and order, regardless of the isolation source. A completely different CRISPR allele was observed in one isolate ("7-J") which exhibited a different O-serogroup (O78). Our results confirmed previous findings that CRISPR loci are conserved among phylogenetically-related strains. In addition, 8 E. coli O26 isolates and a collection of 42 E. coli O26 isolates were screened for 12 enterohemorrhagic E. coli-specific genes. Seven genes (ECs848-Hypothetical Protein, ECs2226-Hypothetical Protein, ECs3857-nleB, ECs3858-Hypothetical Protein, ECs4552-escF, ECs4553-Hypothetical Protein, and ECs4557-sepL) were found in all 50 isolates. An additional 5 genes (ECs1322-ureA urease subunit γ, ECs1323-ureB urease subunit β, ECs1326-ureF, ECs1561-Hypothetical Protein, and ECs1568-Hypothetical Protein) were found to be highly prevalent in isolates from human sources, while lower in

  14. Assessment of Adhesins as an Indicator of Pathovar-Associated Virulence Factors in Bovine Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Valat, Charlotte; Forest, Karine; Auvray, Frédéric; Métayer, Véronique; Méheut, Thomas; Polizzi, Charlène; Gay, Emilie; Haenni, Marisa; Oswald, Eric; Madec, Jean-Yves

    2014-12-01

    The CS31A, F17, and F5 adhesins are usually targeted by serology-based methods to detect pathogenic Escherichia coli associated with calf enteritis. However, the virulence traits of the selected isolates are still poorly described. Here, from a set of 349 diarrheagenic E. coli isolates from cattle, we demonstrated a 70.8% concordance rate (Cohen's kappa, 0.599) between serology- and PCR-based approaches for the detection of adhesins under field conditions. A 79% to 82.4% correspondence between the two methods was found for fimbrial adhesins, whereas major discrepancies (33%) were observed for CS31A-type antigens. Various F17A variants were found, such as F17Ac (20K) (50%), F17Aa (FY) (18.9%), F17Ab (8.1%), and F17Ad (111K) (5.4%), including a high proportion (17.6%) of new F17A internal combinations (F17Aab, F17Aac, and F17Abc) or untypeable variants. In addition, the highest proportion of pathovar-associated virulence factor (VF) genes was observed among E. coli isolates that produced F5/F41 adhesins. A specific link between the heat-stable toxins related to the enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) pathovar and adhesins was identified. STa was significantly linked to F5/F41 and EAST1 to CS31A adhesins (P < 0.001), respectively, whereas NTEC was associated with F17 adhesin (P = 0.001). Clustering between phylogroups according to the adhesin types was also observed. Also, few Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) or enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) pathovars were identified. Finally, no statistically significant difference was observed in the occurrence of extended-spectrum beta lactamase (ESBL) production according to the adhesins expressed by the isolates (P = 0.09). Altogether, this study gives new insights into the relationship between adhesins, VF, and antimicrobial resistance in calf enteritis and supports the need for further standardization of methodologies for such approaches. PMID:25217019

  15. Virulence of Escherichia coli Clinical Isolates in a Murine Sepsis Model in Relation to Sequence Type ST131 Status, Fluoroquinolone Resistance, and Virulence Genotype

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Stephen B.; Zhanel, George; Kuskowski, Michael A.; Denamur, Erick

    2012-01-01

    Escherichia coli sequence type ST131 (O25b:H4) has emerged over the past decade as a globally disseminated, multidrug-resistant pathogen. Unlike traditional antimicrobial-resistant E. coli, ST131 derives from virulence-associated phylogenetic group B2 and exhibits extraintestinal virulence factors. This, plus preliminary evidence of virulence in experimental animals, has suggested that ST131's epidemic emergence may be due to high virulence potential, compared with other E. coli types. To test this hypothesis, we compared a large number of matched ST131 and non-ST131 E. coli clinical isolates, both fluoroquinolone resistant and susceptible, plus isolates from classic extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) sequence types (STs) and case report ST131 household transmission isolates, for virulence in a mouse subcutaneous sepsis model. Overall, in mice, the study isolates produced a wide range of lethality and clinical illness. However, neither ST131 status nor fluoroquinolone phenotype correlated with this diversity of illness severity, which occurred within each of the 6 study groups. In contrast, multiple known or suspected ExPEC virulence genes, including pap (P fimbriae), vat (vacuolating toxin), kpsM II (group 2 capsule), ibeA (invasion of brain endothelium), and clbB/N (colibactin synthesis), plus molecularly defined ExPEC status, were significantly associated with virulence. These findings point away from ST131 isolates as having higher virulence potential compared with other E. coli types in causing invasive extraintestinal infections and suggest instead that ST131's epidemiological success may reflect enhanced fitness for upstream steps in pathogenesis or in colonization and transmission. Additionally, the extensive within-ST virulence diversity suggests an opportunity to compare closely related strains to identify the responsible genetic determinants. PMID:22311928

  16. Virulent bacteriophages can target O104:H4 enteroaggregative Escherichia coli in the mouse intestine.

    PubMed

    Maura, Damien; Galtier, Matthieu; Le Bouguénec, Chantal; Debarbieux, Laurent

    2012-12-01

    In vivo bacteriophage targeting of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) was assessed using a mouse intestinal model of colonization with the O104:H4 55989Str strain and a cocktail of three virulent bacteriophages. The colonization model was shown to mimic asymptomatic intestinal carriage found in humans. The addition of the cocktail to drinking water for 24 h strongly decreased ileal and weakly decreased fecal 55989Str concentrations in a dose-dependent manner. These decreases in ileal and fecal bacterial concentrations were only transient, since 55989Str concentrations returned to their original levels 3 days later. These transient decreases were independent of the mouse microbiota, as similar results were obtained with axenic mice. We studied the infectivity of each bacteriophage in the ileal and fecal environments and found that 55989Str bacteria in the mouse ileum were permissive to all three bacteriophages, whereas those in the feces were permissive to only one bacteriophage. Our results provide the first demonstration that bacterial permissivity to infection with virulent bacteriophages is not uniform throughout the gut; this highlights the need for a detailed characterization of the interactions between bacteria and bacteriophages in vivo for the further development of phage therapy targeting intestinal pathogens found in the gut of asymptomatic human carriers.

  17. Virulence factors in Escherichia coli strains isolated from Swedish piglets with diarrhea.

    PubMed Central

    Söderlind, O; Thafvelin, B; Möllby, R

    1988-01-01

    Parenteral vaccination of sows against Escherichia coli diarrhea in their newborn piglets has become more common during the last decade in Sweden, and the vaccination has generally had positive effects. For more than 20 years we have investigated E. coli strains isolated from piglets and weaned pigs with enteric disorders, noting the presence of O groups, enterotoxins, and adhesins. There has been a continuous change in the frequency of these virulence factors. The present study was performed during 1983 and 1984 to follow this change, since such information is essential for the proper choice of vaccines. A total of 856 E. coli strains were obtained from 683 herds divided into three age groups: 1 to 6 days old, 1 to 6 weeks old, and weaned pigs. O group 149 still dominated in the last two age groups, while O group 101 was, for the first time, the most frequent O group in neonatal piglets. All but four O149 strains carried the K88 antigen, which was found in only one other strain (O group 8). K99 antigen was most often found in O groups 101 and 64, and among all the K99 strains ST mouse was the most common (44 of 57), followed by ST mouse-ST pig strains (12 of 57). The 987P antigen was demonstrated in 26 strains belonging to O groups 141 and OX46 and nontypable strains. Two strains belonging to O group 101 were positive for F41 antigen; one of them also carried the K99 antigen. Among all non-O149 strains, ST mouse was the most common type of enterotoxigenic E. coli ( n = 88), followed in decreasing order by ST mouse-ST pig strains ( n = 69) and ST pig strains ( n = 33). In 114 strains producing enterotoxins no adhesive factor was found. Thus, vaccination of the Swedish sow population for more than 5 years with vaccines containing O149 and K88 antigens has apparently changed the pattern of enterotoxigenic E. coli in neonatal diarrhea. The frequency of O149:K88 strains has been reduced, and O101:K99:ST mouse strains now dominate. However, O149 strains remain the

  18. Pathogenicity island sequences of pyelonephritogenic Escherichia coli CFT073 are associated with virulent uropathogenic strains.

    PubMed

    Kao, J S; Stucker, D M; Warren, J W; Mobley, H L

    1997-07-01

    Urinary tract infection is the most frequently diagnosed kidney and urologic disease, and Escherichia coli is by far the most common etiologic agent. Defined blocks of DNA termed pathogenicity islands have been found in uropathogenic strains to carry genes not generally found in fecal strains. We have identified one of these regions of DNA within the chromosome of the highly virulent E. coli CFT073, isolated from the blood and urine of a woman with acute pyelonephritis. This strain, which is cytotoxic for cultured renal cells and causes acute pyelonephritis in transurethrally infected CBA mice, contains two distinct copies of the pap operon and is hemolytic. One pap operon was localized on a cosmid clone which was used to identify three overlapping cosmid clones. By using restriction mapping, DNA hybridization, sequencing, and PCR amplification, a region of approximately 50 kb was found to be present in this uropathogenic strain and to have no corresponding sequences in E. coli K-12. This gene block also carries hemolysin genes hlyCABD. The pathogenicity island begins 7 bp downstream of dadX (catabolic alanine racemase; 26.55 min) and ends at a position in the K-12 genome 75 bp downstream of the metV tRNA gene (62.74 min); this suggests that a chromosomal rearrangement has occurred relative to the K-12 linkage map. The junctions of the pathogenicity island were verified by PCR amplification directly from the genomic DNA of strain CFT073. DNA sequencing within the boundaries of the junctions revealed genes not previously identified in E. coli or in some cases bearing no known homologs. When used as probes for DNA hybridization, these sequences were found significantly more often in strains associated with the clinical syndromes of cystitis (82%) and acute pyelonephritis (79%) than in fecal strains (19%; P < 0.001).

  19. Virulence Potential of Activatable Shiga Toxin 2d–Producing Escherichia coli Isolates from Fresh Produce

    PubMed Central

    Melton-Celsa, Angela R.; O'Brien, Alison D.; Feng, Peter C. H.

    2016-01-01

    Shiga toxin (Stx)–producing Escherichia coli (STEC) strains are food- and waterborne pathogens that are often transmitted via beef products or fresh produce. STEC strains cause both sporadic infections and outbreaks, which may result in hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic uremic syndrome. STEC strains may elaborate Stx1, Stx2, and/or subtypes of those toxins. Epidemiological evidence indicates that STEC that produce subtypes Stx2a, Stx2c, and/or Stx2d are more often associated with serious illness. The Stx2d subtype becomes more toxic to Vero cells after incubation with intestinal mucus or elastase, a process named “activation.” Stx2d is not generally found in the E. coli serotypes most commonly connected to STEC outbreaks. However, STEC strains that are stx2d positive can be isolated from foods, an occurrence that gives rise to the question of whether those food isolates are potential human pathogens. In this study, we examined 14 STEC strains from fresh produce that were stx2d positive and found that they all produced the mucus-activatable Stx2d and that a subset of the strains tested were virulent in streptomycin-treated mice. PMID:26555533

  20. Virulence Potential of Activatable Shiga Toxin 2d-Producing Escherichia coli Isolates from Fresh Produce.

    PubMed

    Melton-Celsa, Angela R; O'Brien, Alison D; Feng, Peter C H

    2015-11-01

    Shiga toxin (Stx)-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) strains are food- and waterborne pathogens that are often transmitted via beef products or fresh produce. STEC strains cause both sporadic infections and outbreaks, which may result in hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic uremic syndrome. STEC strains may elaborate Stx1, Stx2, and/or subtypes of those toxins. Epidemiological evidence indicates that STEC that produce subtypes Stx2a, Stx2c, and/or Stx2d are more often associated with serious illness. The Stx2d subtype becomes more toxic to Vero cells after incubation with intestinal mucus or elastase, a process named "activation." Stx2d is not generally found in the E. coli serotypes most commonly connected to STEC outbreaks. However, STEC strains that are stx2d positive can be isolated from foods, an occurrence that gives rise to the question of whether those food isolates are potential human pathogens. In this study, we examined 14 STEC strains from fresh produce that were stx2d positive and found that they all produced the mucus-activatable Stx2d and that a subset of the strains tested were virulent in streptomycin-treated mice.

  1. Virulence markers in Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli isolated from cattle.

    PubMed Central

    Sandhu, K S; Clarke, R C; Gyles, C L

    1999-01-01

    This study identified potential virulence markers in 93 eae-positive and 179 eae-negative Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC), isolated from a random sampling of healthy cattle in southwestern Ontario. PCR amplification was used to identify genes for enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC)-hemolysin, the EAF plasmid, and bundle-forming pili (Bfp); adherence to HEp-2 cells and to bovine colonocytes, and the fluorescent actin staining (FAS) test were used to characterize interaction of the bacteria with epithelial cells. The EHEC-hemolysin sequences were detected in 98% of eae-positive isolates compared with 34% of eae-negative isolates. All isolates were negative for EAF and bfp sequences. There was 100% correlation between localized adherence (LA) to HEp-2 cells and the FAS test. Forty-eight (52%) of the eae-positive isolates were LA/FAS-positive, whereas none of the 179 eae-negative isolates was positive in either test. Among the eae-negative isolates, 20 (11%) showed diffuse adherence and 5 (2.8%) showed enteroaggregative adherence to HEp-2 cells. Seventy-three percent of the eae-positive isolates adhered to bovine colonocytes, whereas only 26% of 120 eae-negative isolates that were tested adhered. All 13 O157:H7 isolates were positive for eae and EHEC-hemolysin gene sequences, LA/FAS, and adherence to bovine colonocytes. It is concluded that possession of genes for eae and EHEC hemolysin is correlated with the serotype of STEC, that production of EHEC hemolysin was highly correlated with serotypes implicated in human disease, and that none of the potential markers that were examined can be used to predict the potential virulence of an isolate. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. PMID:10480459

  2. Vaccination with live Escherichia coli expressing Brucella abortus Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase protects mice against virulent B. abortus.

    PubMed

    Oñate, A A; Vemulapalli, R; Andrews, E; Schurig, G G; Boyle, S; Folch, H

    1999-02-01

    Vaccination of mice with Escherichia coli expressing Brucella Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD) [E. coli(pBSSOD)] induced a significant level of protection against virulent Brucella abortus challenge, although this level was not as high as the one reached with B. abortus vaccine strain RB51. In addition, vaccination with E. coli(pBSSOD) induced antibodies to Cu/Zn SOD and a strong proliferative response of splenocytes when stimulated in vitro with a thioredoxin-Cu/Zn SOD fusion protein.

  3. Molecular screening of virulence genes in extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli isolated from human blood culture in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Koga, Vanessa L; Tomazetto, Geizecler; Cyoia, Paula S; Neves, Meiriele S; Vidotto, Marilda C; Nakazato, Gerson; Kobayashi, Renata K T

    2014-01-01

    Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) is one of the main etiological agents of bloodstream infections caused by Gram-negative bacilli. In the present study, 20 E. coli isolates from human hemocultures were characterized to identify genetic features associated with virulence (pathogenicity islands markers, phylogenetic group, virulence genes, plasmid profiles, and conjugative plasmids) and these results were compared with commensal isolates. The most prevalent pathogenicity island, in strains from hemoculture, were PAI IV536, described by many researchers as a stable island in enterobacteria. Among virulence genes, iutA gene was found more frequently and this gene enconding the aerobactin siderophore receptor. According to the phylogenetic classification, group B2 was the most commonly found. Additionally, through plasmid analysis, 14 isolates showed plasmids and 3 of these were shown to be conjugative. Although in stool samples of healthy people the presence of commensal strains is common, human intestinal tract may serve as a reservoir for ExPEC.

  4. Comparative virulence of urinary and bloodstream isolates of extra-intestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli in a Galleria mellonella model.

    PubMed

    Ciesielczuk, Holly; Betts, Jonathon; Phee, Lynnette; Doumith, Michel; Hope, Russell; Woodford, Neil; Wareham, David W

    2015-01-01

    Extra-intestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) are a significant cause of urinary tract infections and bacteraemia worldwide. Currently no single virulence factor or ExPEC lineage has been identified as the sole contributor to severe extra-intestinal infection and/or urosepsis. Galleria mellonella has recently been established as a simple model for studying the comparative virulence of ExPEC. In this study we investigated the virulence of 40 well-characterized ExPEC strains, in G. mellonella, by measuring mortality (larvae survival), immune recognition/response (melanin production) and cell damage (lactate dehydrogenase production). Although mortality was similar between urinary and bloodstream isolates, it was heightened for community-associated infections, complicated UTIs and urinary-source bacteraemia. Isolates of ST131 and those possessing afa/dra, ompT and serogroup O6 were also associated with heightened virulence. PMID:25853733

  5. Structural and Functional Analysis of BipA, a Regulator of Virulence in Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli*

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Haitian; Hahm, Joseph; Diggs, Stephen; Perry, J. Jefferson P.; Blaha, Gregor

    2015-01-01

    The translational GTPase BipA regulates the expression of virulence and pathogenicity factors in several eubacteria. BipA-dependent expression of virulence factors occurs under starvation conditions, such as encountered during infection of a host. Under these conditions, BipA associates with the small ribosomal subunit. BipA also has a second function to promote the efficiency of late steps in biogenesis of large ribosomal subunits at low temperatures, presumably while bound to the ribosome. During starvation, the cellular concentration of stress alarmone guanosine-3′, 5′-bis pyrophosphate (ppGpp) is increased. This increase allows ppGpp to bind to BipA and switch its binding specificity from ribosomes to small ribosomal subunits. A conformational change of BipA upon ppGpp binding could explain the ppGpp regulation of the binding specificity of BipA. Here, we present the structures of the full-length BipA from Escherichia coli in apo, GDP-, and ppGpp-bound forms. The crystal structure and small-angle x-ray scattering data of the protein with bound nucleotides, together with a thermodynamic analysis of the binding of GDP and of ppGpp to BipA, indicate that the ppGpp-bound form of BipA adopts the structure of the GDP form. This suggests furthermore, that the switch in binding preference only occurs when both ppGpp and the small ribosomal subunit are present. This molecular mechanism would allow BipA to interact with both the ribosome and the small ribosomal subunit during stress response. PMID:26163516

  6. Structural and Functional Analysis of BipA, a Regulator of Virulence in Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Fan, Haitian; Hahm, Joseph; Diggs, Stephen; Perry, J Jefferson P; Blaha, Gregor

    2015-08-21

    The translational GTPase BipA regulates the expression of virulence and pathogenicity factors in several eubacteria. BipA-dependent expression of virulence factors occurs under starvation conditions, such as encountered during infection of a host. Under these conditions, BipA associates with the small ribosomal subunit. BipA also has a second function to promote the efficiency of late steps in biogenesis of large ribosomal subunits at low temperatures, presumably while bound to the ribosome. During starvation, the cellular concentration of stress alarmone guanosine-3', 5'-bis pyrophosphate (ppGpp) is increased. This increase allows ppGpp to bind to BipA and switch its binding specificity from ribosomes to small ribosomal subunits. A conformational change of BipA upon ppGpp binding could explain the ppGpp regulation of the binding specificity of BipA. Here, we present the structures of the full-length BipA from Escherichia coli in apo, GDP-, and ppGpp-bound forms. The crystal structure and small-angle x-ray scattering data of the protein with bound nucleotides, together with a thermodynamic analysis of the binding of GDP and of ppGpp to BipA, indicate that the ppGpp-bound form of BipA adopts the structure of the GDP form. This suggests furthermore, that the switch in binding preference only occurs when both ppGpp and the small ribosomal subunit are present. This molecular mechanism would allow BipA to interact with both the ribosome and the small ribosomal subunit during stress response.

  7. Virulence factors profiles and ESBL production in Escherichia coli causing bacteremia in Peruvian children.

    PubMed

    Palma, Noemí; Gomes, Cláudia; Riveros, Maribel; García, Wilfredo; Martínez-Puchol, Sandra; Ruiz-Roldán, Lidia; Mateu, Judit; García, Coralith; Jacobs, Jan; Ochoa, Theresa J; Ruiz, Joaquim

    2016-09-01

    The presence of 25 virulence genes (VGs), genetic phylogroups, quinolone-resistance and Extended Spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-production was assessed in 65 Escherichia coli isolates from blood cultures in children <5 years in Peru. The most frequent VGs were fimA (89.2%), iutA (83.1%), agn43 (72.3%), iucA (67.7%), and fyuA (49.2%). The isolates belonged to D (47.7%), A (26.1%), B1 (21.5%), and B2 (4.6%) phylogroups. D + B2 isolates presented a high number of fimA, hly, papC, sat, and fyuA genes. Quinolone-susceptible (22 isolates - 33.8%) and ESBL-negative (31 isolates - 47.7%) isolates carried more VGs that their respective counterparts (5.7 vs. 4.7 and 5.3 vs. 4.4 respectively); the frequency of the fyuA, aat, aap, and hly genes significantly differed between quinolone-resistant and quinolone-susceptible isolates. Neonatal sepsis isolates tended to be more quinolone-resistant (P = 0.0697) and ESBL-producers (P = 0.0776). Early-onset neonatal sepsis isolates possessed a high number of VGs (5.2 VGs), especially in neonates of ≤1 day (5.9 VGs). PMID:27345125

  8. Virulence Profiles, Phylogenetic Background, and Antibiotic Resistance of Escherichia coli Isolated from Turkeys with Airsacculitis

    PubMed Central

    Cunha, Marcos Paulo Vieira; de Oliveira, Maria Gabriela Xavier; de Oliveira, Mirela Caroline Vilela; da Silva, Ketrin Cristina; Gomes, Cleise Ribeiro; Moreno, Andrea Micke; Knöbl, Terezinha

    2014-01-01

    Avian Pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) has been studied for decades because of its economic impact on the poultry industry. Recently, the zoonotic potential of APEC and multidrug-resistant strains have emerged. The aim of this study was to characterize 225 APEC isolated from turkeys presenting airsacculitis. The results showed that 92% of strains presented a multidrug-resistance (MDR), and the highest levels of resistance were to sulfamethazine (94%) and tetracycline (83%). Half of these strains were classified in phylogenetic group B2, followed by B1 (28.6%), A (17.1%), and D (4.8%). The prevalence of virulence genes was as follows: salmochelin (iroN, 95%), increased serum survival (iss, 93%), colicin V (cvi/cva, 67%), aerobactin (iucD, 67%), temperature-sensitive haemagglutinin (tsh, 56%), iron-repressible protein (irp2, 51%), invasion brain endothelium (ibeA, 31%), vacuolating autotransporter toxin (vat, 24%), K1 antigen (neuS, 19%), enteroaggregative heat-stable cytotoxin (astA, 17%), and pilus associated with pyelonephritis (papC, 15%). These results demonstrate that the majority of the investigated strains belonged to group B2 and were MDR. These data suggest that turkeys may serve as a reservoir of pathogenic and multidrug-resistance strains, reinforcing the idea that poultry plays a role in the epidemiological chain of ExPEC. PMID:25105155

  9. Transcriptional modulation of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli virulence genes in response to epithelial cell interactions.

    PubMed

    Kansal, Rita; Rasko, David A; Sahl, Jason W; Munson, George P; Roy, Koushik; Luo, Qingwei; Sheikh, Alaullah; Kuhne, Kurt J; Fleckenstein, James M

    2013-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality due to diarrheal illness in developing countries. There is currently no effective vaccine against these important pathogens. Because genes modulated by pathogen-host interactions potentially encode putative vaccine targets, we investigated changes in gene expression and surface morphology of ETEC upon interaction with intestinal epithelial cells in vitro. Pan-genome microarrays, quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR), and transcriptional reporter fusions of selected promoters were used to study changes in ETEC transcriptomes. Flow cytometry, immunofluorescence microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy were used to investigate alterations in surface antigen expression and morphology following pathogen-host interactions. Following host cell contact, genes for motility, adhesion, toxin production, immunodominant peptides, and key regulatory molecules, including cyclic AMP (cAMP) receptor protein (CRP) and c-di-GMP, were substantially modulated. These changes were accompanied by visible changes in both ETEC architecture and the expression of surface antigens, including a novel highly conserved adhesin molecule, EaeH. The studies reported here suggest that pathogen-host interactions are finely orchestrated by ETEC and are characterized by coordinated responses involving the sequential deployment of multiple virulence molecules. Elucidation of the molecular details of these interactions could highlight novel strategies for development of vaccines for these important pathogens. PMID:23115039

  10. Virulence potential for extraintestinal infections among commensal Escherichia coli isolated from healthy humans--the Trojan horse within our gut.

    PubMed

    Starčič Erjavec, Marjanca; Žgur-Bertok, Darja

    2015-03-01

    Previous investigations have indicated that the reservoir of extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) strains is the intestinal microbiota. Nevertheless, studies focused on the prevalence of potential ExPEC strains among the bowel microbiota in healthy human individuals practically do not exist and a strong bias towards pathogenic strains among the E. coli data set is obvious. To assess the prevalence of potential ExPEC strains among E. coli from the intestinal microbiota of healthy humans, we performed a search for data on the prevalence of virulence-associated genes and pathogenicity islands among fecal E. coli found in published studies, including studies comparing isolates from patients suffering from extraintestinal E. coli infections with E. coli from feces of healthy humans. An extensive literature search, including more than 500 published papers, revealed 24 papers with data on prevalences of ≥ 5 virulence-associated genes among 21 E. coli collections including ≥ 20 fecal/rectal strains obtained from healthy individuals and 4 papers with prevalences of pathogenicity islands among E. coli collections from healthy humans. The gathered data are presented in this minireview and clearly show that potential ExPEC strains are present among fecal isolates with a prevalence of around ≥ 10%.

  11. Virulence from vesicles: Novel mechanisms of host cell injury by Escherichia coli O104:H4 outbreak strain

    PubMed Central

    Kunsmann, Lisa; Rüter, Christian; Bauwens, Andreas; Greune, Lilo; Glüder, Malte; Kemper, Björn; Fruth, Angelika; Wai, Sun Nyunt; He, Xiaohua; Lloubes, Roland; Schmidt, M. Alexander; Dobrindt, Ulrich; Mellmann, Alexander; Karch, Helge; Bielaszewska, Martina

    2015-01-01

    The highly virulent Escherichia coli O104:H4 that caused the large 2011 outbreak of diarrhoea and haemolytic uraemic syndrome secretes blended virulence factors of enterohaemorrhagic and enteroaggregative E. coli, but their secretion pathways are unknown. We demonstrate that the outbreak strain releases a cocktail of virulence factors via outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) shed during growth. The OMVs contain Shiga toxin (Stx) 2a, the major virulence factor of the strain, Shigella enterotoxin 1, H4 flagellin, and O104 lipopolysaccharide. The OMVs bind to and are internalised by human intestinal epithelial cells via dynamin-dependent and Stx2a-independent endocytosis, deliver the OMV-associated virulence factors intracellularly and induce caspase-9-mediated apoptosis and interleukin-8 secretion. Stx2a is the key OMV component responsible for the cytotoxicity, whereas flagellin and lipopolysaccharide are the major interleukin-8 inducers. The OMVs represent novel ways for the E. coli O104:H4 outbreak strain to deliver pathogenic cargoes and injure host cells. PMID:26283502

  12. Frequency of virulence genes of Escherichia coli among newborn piglets from an intensive pig farm in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Alustiza, Fabrisio E; Picco, Natalia Y; Bellingeri, Romina V; Terzolo, Horacio R; Vivas, Adriana B

    2012-01-01

    The enterotoxigenic and porcine enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EtEc and PEPEc) strains are agents associated with swine neonatal diarrhea, causing economic losses in swine production. The main goal of this study was to identify virulence genes of EtEc, verotoxigenic (VtEc) and PEPEc in intestinal strains responsible for swine diseases, by molecular typing using Pcr in newborn piglets from an intensive farm system. Two hundred and sixty seven rectal swabbings from 7-15 days- old landrace x large White crossbred piglets were taken, and 123 randomly selected samples, biochemically compatible with E. coli, were tested for E. coli virulence genes by Pcr. A frequency (%) compatible with: 68 EtEc, 24 VtEc, and 8 EPEc were found. of all E. coli strains studied, 19.51 % carried at least one virulence gene. These data showed conclusively that, in spite of the application of strict sanitary measures in the intensive farm, genes encoding virulence factors of intestinal pathogens compatible with EtEc are still detected; therefore these strains will probably keep circulating among animals. PMID:23267620

  13. Antibiotic Resistance, Virulence, and Genetic Background of Community-Acquired Uropathogenic Escherichia coli from Algeria.

    PubMed

    Yahiaoui, Merzouk; Robin, Frédéric; Bakour, Rabah; Hamidi, Moufida; Bonnet, Richard; Messai, Yamina

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate antibiotic resistance mechanisms, virulence traits, and genetic background of 150 nonrepetitive community-acquired uropathogenic Escherichia coli (CA-UPEC) from Algeria. A rate of 46.7% of isolates was multidrug resistant. bla genes detected were blaTEM (96.8% of amoxicillin-resistant isolates), blaCTX-M-15 (4%), overexpressed blaAmpC (4%), blaSHV-2a, blaTEM-4, blaTEM-31, and blaTEM-35 (0.7%). All tetracycline-resistant isolates (51.3%) had tetA and/or tetB genes. Sulfonamides and trimethoprim resistance genes were sul2 (60.8%), sul1 (45.9%), sul3 (6.7%), dfrA14 (25.4%), dfrA1 (18.2%), dfrA12 (16.3%), and dfrA25 (5.4%). High-level fluoroquinolone resistance (22.7%) was mediated by mutations in gyrA (S83L-D87N) and parC (S80I-E84G/V or S80I) genes. qnrB5, qnrS1, and aac(6')-Ib-cr were rare (5.3%). Class 1 and/or class 2 integrons were detected (40.7%). Isolates belonged to phylogroups B2+D (50%), A+B1 (36%), and F+C+Clade I (13%). Most of D (72.2%) and 38.6% of B2 isolates were multidrug resistant; they belong to 14 different sequence types, including international successful ST131, ST73, and ST69, reported for the first time in the community in Algeria and new ST4494 and ST4529 described in this study. Besides multidrug resistance, B2 and D isolates possessed virulence factors of colonization, invasion, and long-term persistence. The study highlighted multidrug-resistant CA-UPEC with high virulence traits and an epidemic genetic background.

  14. Clinical Escherichia coli strains carrying stx genes: stx variants and stx-positive virulence profiles.

    PubMed

    Eklund, Marjut; Leino, Kirsikka; Siitonen, Anja

    2002-12-01

    Altogether, 173 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) serotype O157 (n = 111) and non-O157 (n = 62) isolates from 170 subjects were screened by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism for eight different stx genes. The results were compiled according to serotypes, phage types of O157, production of Stx toxin and enterohemolysin, and the presence of eae. The stx genes occurred in 11 combinations; the most common were stx(2) with stx(2c) (42%), stx(2) alone (21%), and stx(1) alone (16%). Of the O157 strains, 64% carried stx(2) with stx(2c) versus 2% of the non-O157 strains (P < 0.001). In the non-O157 strains, the prevailing gene was stx(1) (99% versus 1% in O157 strains; P < 0.001). In addition, one strain (O Rough:H4:stx(2c)) which has not previously been described as associated with hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) was found. Ten stx-positive virulence profiles were responsible for 71% of all STEC infections. Of these profiles, five accounted for 71% of the 21 strains isolated from 20 patients with HUS or thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). The strains having the virulence profile that caused mainly HUS or TTP or bloody diarrhea produced Stx with titers of >/=1:128 (90%) more commonly than did other strains (51%; P < 0.001). These strains were also more commonly enterohemolytic (98% versus 68% for other strains; P < 0.001) and possessed the eae gene (100%) more commonly than did other strains (74%; P < 0.001). A particular virulence profile, O157:H7:PT2:stx(2):stx(2c):eae:Ehly, was significantly more frequently associated with HUS and bloody diarrhea than were other profiles (P = 0.02) and also caused the deaths of two children. In this study, the risk factors for severe symptoms were an age of <5 years and infection by the strain of O157:H7:PT2 mentioned above.

  15. Virulence gene content in Escherichia coli isolates from poultry flocks with clinical signs of colibacillosis in Brazil.

    PubMed

    De Carli, Silvia; Ikuta, Nilo; Lehmann, Fernanda Kieling Moreira; da Silveira, Vinicius Proença; de Melo Predebon, Gabriela; Fonseca, André Salvador Kazantzi; Lunge, Vagner Ricardo

    2015-11-01

    Escherichia coli is a commensal bacterium of the bird's intestinal tract, but it can invade different tissues resulting in systemic symptoms (colibacillosis). This disease occurs only when the E. coli infecting strain presents virulence factors (encoded by specific genes) that enable the adhesion and proliferation in the host organism. Thus, it is important to differentiate pathogenic (APEC, avian pathogenic E. coli) and non-pathogenic or fecal (AFEC, avian fecal E. coli) isolates. Previous studies analyzed the occurrence of virulence factors in E. coli strains isolated from birds with colibacillosis, demonstrating a high frequency of the bacterial genes cvaC, iroN, iss, iutA, sitA, tsh, fyuA, irp-2, ompT and hlyF in pathogenic strains. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the occurrence and frequency of these virulence genes in E. coli isolated from poultry flocks in Brazil. A total of 138 isolates of E. coli was obtained from samples of different tissues and/or organs (spleen, liver, kidney, trachea, lungs, skin, ovary, oviduct, intestine, cloaca) and environmental swabs collected from chicken and turkey flocks suspected to have colibacillosis in farms from the main Brazilian producing regions. Total DNA was extracted and the 10 virulence genes were detected by traditional and/or real-time PCR. At least 11 samples of each gene were sequenced and compared to reference strains. All 10 virulence factors were detected in Brazilian E. coli isolates, with frequencies ranging from 39.9% (irp-2) to 68.8% (hlyF and sitA). Moreover, a high nucleotide similarity (over 99%) was observed between gene sequences of Brazilian isolates and reference strains. Seventy-nine isolates were defined as pathogenic (APEC) and 59 as fecal (AFEC) based on previously described criteria. In conclusion, the main virulence genes of the reference E. coli strains are also present in isolates associated with colibacillosis in Brazil. The analysis of this set of virulence factors can be

  16. Thiophenone Attenuates Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli O103:H2 Virulence by Interfering with AI-2 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Valen Rukke, Håkon; Benneche, Tore; Aamdal Scheie, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Interference with bacterial quorum sensing communication provides an anti-virulence strategy to control pathogenic bacteria. Here, using the Enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) O103:H2, we showed for the first time that thiophenone TF101 reduced expression of lsrB; the gene encoding the AI-2 receptor. Combined results of transcriptional and phenotypic analyses suggested that TF101 interfere with AI-2 signalling, possibly by competing with AI-2 for binding to LsrB. This is supported by in silico docking prediction of thiophenone TF101 in the LsrB pocket. Transcriptional analyses furthermore showed that thiophenone TF101 interfered with expression of the virulence genes eae and fimH. In addition, TF101 reduced AI-2 induced E. coli adhesion to colorectal adenocarcinoma cells. TF101, on the other hand, did not affect epinephrine or norepinephrine enhanced E. coli adhesion. Overall, our results showed that thiophenone TF101 interfered with virulence expression in E. coli O103:H2, suggestedly by interfering with AI-2 mediated quorum sensing. We thus conclude that thiophenone TF101 might represent a promising future anti-virulence agent in the fight against pathogenic E. coli. PMID:27309855

  17. Molecular characterization reveals similar virulence gene content in unrelated clonal groups of Escherichia coli of serogroup O174 (OX3).

    PubMed

    Tarr, Cheryl L; Nelson, Adam M; Beutin, Lothar; Olsen, Katharina E P; Whittam, Thomas S

    2008-02-01

    Most severe illnesses that are attributed to Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli are caused by isolates that also carry a pathogenicity island called the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE). However, many cases of severe disease are associated with LEE-negative strains. We characterized the virulence gene content and the evolutionary relationships of Escherichia coli isolates of serogroup O174 (formerly OX3), strains of which have been implicated in cases of hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic uremic syndrome. A total of 56 isolates from humans, farm animals, and food were subjected to multilocus virulence gene profiling (MVGP), and a subset of 16 isolates was subjected to multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA). The MLSA revealed that the O174 isolates fall into four separate evolutionary clusters within the E. coli phylogeny and are related to a diverse array of clonal groups, including enteropathogenic E. coli 2 (EPEC 2), enterohemorrhagic E. coli 2 (EHEC 2), and EHEC-O121. Of the 15 genes that we surveyed with MVGP, only 6 are common in the O174 strains. The different clonal groups within the O174 serogroup appear to have independently acquired and maintained similar sets of genes that include the Shiga toxins (stx1 and stx2) and two adhesins (saa and iha). The absence of certain O island (OI) genes, such as those found on OI-122, is consistent with the notion that certain pathogenicity islands act cooperatively with the LEE island.

  18. Escherichia Coli

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodsell, David S.

    2009-01-01

    Diverse biological data may be used to create illustrations of molecules in their cellular context. I describe the scientific results that support a recent textbook illustration of an "Escherichia coli cell". The image magnifies a portion of the bacterium at one million times, showing the location and form of individual macromolecules. Results…

  19. Sub-Inhibitory Concentration of Piperacillin-Tazobactam May be Related to Virulence Properties of Filamentous Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    de Andrade, João Paulo Lopes; de Macêdo Farias, Luiz; Ferreira, João Fernando Gonçalves; Bruna-Romero, Oscar; da Glória de Souza, Daniele; de Carvalho, Maria Auxiliadora Roque; dos Santos, Kênia Valéria

    2016-01-01

    Sub-inhibitory concentrations of antibiotics are always generated as a consequence of antimicrobial therapy and the effects of such residual products in bacterial morphology are well documented, especially the filamentation generated by beta-lactams. The aim of this study was to investigate some morphological and pathological aspects (virulence factors) of Escherichia coli cultivated under half-minimum inhibitory concentration (1.0 µg/mL) of piperacillin-tazobactam (PTZ sub-MIC). PTZ sub-MIC promoted noticeable changes in the bacterial cells which reach the peak of morphological alterations (filamentation) and complexity at 16 h of antimicrobial exposure. Thereafter the filamentous cells and a control one, not treated with PTZ, were comparatively tested for growth curve; biochemical profile; oxidative stress tolerance; biofilm production and cell hydrophobicity; motility and pathogenicity in vivo. PTZ sub-MIC attenuated the E. coli growth rate, but without changes in carbohydrate fermentation or in traditional biochemical tests. Overall, the treatment of E. coli with sub-MIC of PTZ generated filamentous forms which were accompanied by the inhibition of virulence factors such as the oxidative stress response, biofilm formation, cell surface hydrophobicity, and motility. These results are consistent with the reduced pathogenicity observed for the filamentous E. coli in the murine model of intra-abdominal infection. In other words, the treatment of E. coli with sub-MIC of PTZ suggests a decrease in their virulence.

  20. HlyF Produced by Extraintestinal Pathogenic Escherichia coli Is a Virulence Factor That Regulates Outer Membrane Vesicle Biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Murase, Kazunori; Martin, Patricia; Porcheron, Gaëlle; Houle, Sébastien; Helloin, Emmanuelle; Pénary, Marie; Nougayrède, Jean-Philippe; Dozois, Charles M; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Oswald, Eric

    2016-03-01

    Escherichia coli can cause extraintestinal infections in humans and animals. The hlyF gene is epidemiologically associated with virulent strains of avian pathogenic E. coli and human neonatal meningitis-associated E. coli. We demonstrated that culture supernatants of E. coli expressing HlyF induced autophagy in eukaryotic cells. This phenotype coincided with an enhanced production of outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) by bacteria expressing HlyF. The HlyF protein displays a predicted catalytic domain of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily. This conserved domain was involved the ability of HlyF to promote the production of OMVs. The increased production of OMVs was associated with the release of toxins. hlyF was shown to be expressed during extraintestinal infection and to play a role in the virulence of extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli in a chicken model of colibacillosis. This is the first evidence that pathogenic bacteria produce a virulence factor directly involved in the production of OMVs.

  1. A Fatal Case of Necrotizing Fasciitis Caused by a Highly Virulent Escherichia coli Strain

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, André; Lin, Alex; Harel, Josée; Côté, Jean-Charles; Tremblay, Cécile

    2016-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a serious disease characterized by the necrosis of the subcutaneous tissues and fascia. E. coli as the etiologic agent of necrotizing fasciitis is a rare occurrence. A 66-year-old woman underwent total abdominal hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy. She rapidly developed necrotizing fasciitis which led to her death 68 hours following surgery. An E. coli strain was isolated from blood and fascia cultures. DNA microarray revealed the presence of 20 virulence genes. PMID:27366162

  2. Serotypes, virulence factors, and antimicrobial susceptibilities of vaginal and fecal isolates of Escherichia coli from giant pandas.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Yan, Qigui; Xia, Xiaodong; Zhang, Yanming; Li, Desheng; Wang, Chengdong; Chen, Shijie; Hou, Rong

    2013-09-01

    Although Escherichia coli typically colonizes the intestinal tract and vagina of giant pandas, it has caused enteric and systemic disease in giant pandas and greatly impacts the health and survival of this endangered species. In order to understand the distribution and characteristics of E. coli from giant pandas, 67 fecal and 30 vaginal E. coli isolates from 21 giant pandas were characterized for O serogroups, phylogenetic groups, antimicrobial susceptibilities, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) profiles. In addition, these isolates were tested for the presence of extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) and diarrheagenic E. coli (DEC) by multiplex PCR detection of specific virulence genes. The most prevalent serogroups for all E. coli isolates were O88, O18, O167, O4, and O158. ExPEC isolates were detected mostly in vaginal samples, and DEC isolates were detected only in fecal samples. Phylogenetic group B1 predominated in fecal isolates, while groups B2 and D were frequently detected in vaginal isolates. Resistance to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole was most frequently observed, followed by resistance to nalidixic acid and tetracycline. All except five isolates were typeable by using XbaI and were categorized into 74 PFGE patterns. Our findings indicate that panda E. coli isolates exhibited antimicrobial resistance, and potentially pathogenic E. coli isolates were present in giant pandas. In addition, these E. coli isolates were genetically diverse. This study may provide helpful information for developing strategies in the future to control E. coli infections of giant pandas. PMID:23793635

  3. Serotypes, Virulence Factors, and Antimicrobial Susceptibilities of Vaginal and Fecal Isolates of Escherichia coli from Giant Pandas

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Xia, Xiaodong; Li, Desheng; Wang, Chengdong; Chen, Shijie; Hou, Rong

    2013-01-01

    Although Escherichia coli typically colonizes the intestinal tract and vagina of giant pandas, it has caused enteric and systemic disease in giant pandas and greatly impacts the health and survival of this endangered species. In order to understand the distribution and characteristics of E. coli from giant pandas, 67 fecal and 30 vaginal E. coli isolates from 21 giant pandas were characterized for O serogroups, phylogenetic groups, antimicrobial susceptibilities, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) profiles. In addition, these isolates were tested for the presence of extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) and diarrheagenic E. coli (DEC) by multiplex PCR detection of specific virulence genes. The most prevalent serogroups for all E. coli isolates were O88, O18, O167, O4, and O158. ExPEC isolates were detected mostly in vaginal samples, and DEC isolates were detected only in fecal samples. Phylogenetic group B1 predominated in fecal isolates, while groups B2 and D were frequently detected in vaginal isolates. Resistance to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole was most frequently observed, followed by resistance to nalidixic acid and tetracycline. All except five isolates were typeable by using XbaI and were categorized into 74 PFGE patterns. Our findings indicate that panda E. coli isolates exhibited antimicrobial resistance, and potentially pathogenic E. coli isolates were present in giant pandas. In addition, these E. coli isolates were genetically diverse. This study may provide helpful information for developing strategies in the future to control E. coli infections of giant pandas. PMID:23793635

  4. Serotypes, virulence factors, and antimicrobial susceptibilities of vaginal and fecal isolates of Escherichia coli from giant pandas.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Yan, Qigui; Xia, Xiaodong; Zhang, Yanming; Li, Desheng; Wang, Chengdong; Chen, Shijie; Hou, Rong

    2013-09-01

    Although Escherichia coli typically colonizes the intestinal tract and vagina of giant pandas, it has caused enteric and systemic disease in giant pandas and greatly impacts the health and survival of this endangered species. In order to understand the distribution and characteristics of E. coli from giant pandas, 67 fecal and 30 vaginal E. coli isolates from 21 giant pandas were characterized for O serogroups, phylogenetic groups, antimicrobial susceptibilities, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) profiles. In addition, these isolates were tested for the presence of extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) and diarrheagenic E. coli (DEC) by multiplex PCR detection of specific virulence genes. The most prevalent serogroups for all E. coli isolates were O88, O18, O167, O4, and O158. ExPEC isolates were detected mostly in vaginal samples, and DEC isolates were detected only in fecal samples. Phylogenetic group B1 predominated in fecal isolates, while groups B2 and D were frequently detected in vaginal isolates. Resistance to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole was most frequently observed, followed by resistance to nalidixic acid and tetracycline. All except five isolates were typeable by using XbaI and were categorized into 74 PFGE patterns. Our findings indicate that panda E. coli isolates exhibited antimicrobial resistance, and potentially pathogenic E. coli isolates were present in giant pandas. In addition, these E. coli isolates were genetically diverse. This study may provide helpful information for developing strategies in the future to control E. coli infections of giant pandas.

  5. Virulence, Antimicrobial Resistance Properties and Phylogenetic Background of Non-H7 Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli O157

    PubMed Central

    Ferdous, Mithila; Kooistra-Smid, Anna M. D.; Zhou, Kai; Rossen, John W. A.; Friedrich, Alexander W.

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli (E.coli) O157 that do not produce Shiga toxin and do not possess flagellar antigen H7 are of diverse H serotypes. In this study, the antibiotic resistance properties, genotype of a set of virulence associated genes and the phylogenetic background of E. coli O157:non-H7 groups were compared. Whole genome sequencing was performed on fourteen O157:non-H7 isolates collected in the STEC-ID-net study. The genomes were compared with E. coli O157 genomes and a typical Enteropathogenic E. coli (tEPEC) genome downloaded from NCBI. Twenty-six (86%) of the analyzed genomes had the intimin encoding gene eae but of different types mostly correlating with their H types, e.g., H16, H26, H39, and H45 carried intimin type ε, β, κ, and α, respectively. They belonged to several E. coli phylogenetic groups, i.e., to phylogenetic group A, B1, B2, and D. Seven (50%) of our collected O157:non-H7 isolates were resistant to two or more antibiotics. Several mobile genetic elements, such as plasmids, insertion elements, and pathogenicity islands, carrying a set of virulence and resistance genes were found in the E. coli O157:non-H7 isolates. Core genome phylogenetic analysis showed that O157:non-H7 isolates probably evolved from different phylogenetic lineages and were distantly related to the E. coli O157:H7 lineage. We hypothesize that independent acquisition of mobile genetic elements by isolates of different lineages have contributed to the different molecular features of the O157:non-H7 strains. Although distantly related to the STEC O157, E. coli O157:non-H7 isolates from multiple genetic background could be considered as pathogen of concern for their diverse virulence and antibiotic resistance properties. PMID:27733849

  6. Effects of selection pressure and genetic association on the relationship between antibiotic resistance and virulence in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lixin; Levy, Karen; Trueba, Gabriel; Cevallos, William; Trostle, James; Foxman, Betsy; Marrs, Carl F; Eisenberg, Joseph N S

    2015-11-01

    Antibiotic selection pressure and genetic associations may lead to the cooccurrence of resistance and virulence in individual pathogens. However, there is a lack of rigorous epidemiological evidence that demonstrates the cooccurrence of resistance and virulence at the population level. Using samples from a population-based case-control study in 25 villages in rural Ecuador, we characterized resistance to 12 antibiotics among pathogenic (n = 86) and commensal (n = 761) Escherichia coli isolates, classified by the presence or absence of known diarrheagenic virulence factor genes. The prevalences of resistance to single and multiple antibiotics were significantly higher for pathogenic isolates than for commensal isolates. Using a generalized estimating equation, antibiotic resistance was independently associated with virulence factor carriage, case status, and antibiotic use (for these respective factors: odds ratio [OR] = 3.0, with a 95% confidence interval [CI] of 1.7 to 5.1; OR = 2.0, with a 95% CI of 1.3 to 3.0; and OR = 1.5, with a 95% CI of 0.9 to 2.5). Virulence factor carriage was more strongly related to antibiotic resistance than antibiotic use for all antibiotics examined, with the exception of fluoroquinolones, gentamicin, and cefotaxime. This study provides epidemiological evidence that antibiotic resistance and virulence factor carriage are linked in E. coli populations in a community setting. Further, these data suggest that while the cooccurrence of resistance and virulence in E. coli is partially due to antibiotic selection pressure, it is also genetically determined. These findings should be considered in developing strategies for treating infections and controlling for antibiotic resistance.

  7. Effects of Selection Pressure and Genetic Association on the Relationship between Antibiotic Resistance and Virulence in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Trueba, Gabriel; Cevallos, William; Trostle, James; Marrs, Carl F.; Eisenberg, Joseph N. S.

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic selection pressure and genetic associations may lead to the cooccurrence of resistance and virulence in individual pathogens. However, there is a lack of rigorous epidemiological evidence that demonstrates the cooccurrence of resistance and virulence at the population level. Using samples from a population-based case-control study in 25 villages in rural Ecuador, we characterized resistance to 12 antibiotics among pathogenic (n = 86) and commensal (n = 761) Escherichia coli isolates, classified by the presence or absence of known diarrheagenic virulence factor genes. The prevalences of resistance to single and multiple antibiotics were significantly higher for pathogenic isolates than for commensal isolates. Using a generalized estimating equation, antibiotic resistance was independently associated with virulence factor carriage, case status, and antibiotic use (for these respective factors: odds ratio [OR] = 3.0, with a 95% confidence interval [CI] of 1.7 to 5.1; OR = 2.0, with a 95% CI of 1.3 to 3.0; and OR = 1.5, with a 95% CI of 0.9 to 2.5). Virulence factor carriage was more strongly related to antibiotic resistance than antibiotic use for all antibiotics examined, with the exception of fluoroquinolones, gentamicin, and cefotaxime. This study provides epidemiological evidence that antibiotic resistance and virulence factor carriage are linked in E. coli populations in a community setting. Further, these data suggest that while the cooccurrence of resistance and virulence in E. coli is partially due to antibiotic selection pressure, it is also genetically determined. These findings should be considered in developing strategies for treating infections and controlling for antibiotic resistance. PMID:26282415

  8. Co-Detection of Virulent Escherichia coli Genes in Surface Water Sources

    PubMed Central

    Ndlovu, Thando; Le Roux, Marcellous; Khan, Wesaal; Khan, Sehaam

    2015-01-01

    McNemar’s test and the Pearson Chi-square were used to assess the co-detection and observed frequency, respectively, for potentially virulent E. coli genes in river water. Conventional multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) assays confirmed the presence of the aggR gene (69%), ipaH gene (23%) and the stx gene (15%) carried by Enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC), Enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC) and Enterohermorrhagic E. coli (EHEC), respectively, in river water samples collected from the Berg River (Paarl, South Africa). Only the aggR gene was present in 23% of samples collected from the Plankenburg River system (Stellenbosch, South Africa). In a comparative study, real-time multiplex PCR assays confirmed the presence of aggR (EAEC) in 69%, stx (EHEC) in 15%, ipaH (EIEC) in 31% and eae (EPEC) in 8% of the river water samples collected from the Berg River. In the Plankenburg River, aggR (EAEC) was detected in 46% of the samples, while eae (EPEC) was present in 15% of the water samples analyzed using real-time multiplex PCR in the Plankenburg River. Pearson Chi-square showed that there was no statistical difference (p > 0.05) between the conventional and real-time multiplex PCRs for the detection of virulent E. coli genes in water samples. However, the McNemar’s test showed some variation in the co-detection of virulent E. coli genes, for example, there was no statistical difference in the misclassification of the discordant results for stx versus ipaH, which implies that the ipaH gene was frequently detected with the stx gene. This study thus highlights the presence of virulent E. coli genes in river water and while early detection is crucial, quantitative microbial risk analysis has to be performed to identify and estimate the risk to human health. PMID:25659126

  9. Virulence repertoire of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) and enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) from diarrhoeic lambs of Arunachal Pradesh, India.

    PubMed

    Bandyopadhyay, Samiran; Mahanti, Achintya; Samanta, I; Dutta, T K; Ghosh, Monoj K; Bera, A K; Bandyopadhyay, Subhasis; Bhattacharya, D

    2011-03-01

    A total of 107 faecal samples were collected from diarrhoeic lambs of high altitude terrains (2,000 to 5,000 m above the mean sea level) of Tawang and West Kameng districts of Arunachal Pradesh, India. Total 234 Escherichia coli were isolated and further subjected to PCR for the study of virulence repertoire characteristics of Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) and enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC). Out of the 234 isolated E. coli, 32% were found positive for STEC, and 9% were carrying virulence gene for ETEC. The isolated STEC serogroups were O159, O127, O120, O113, O60, O30, O25, O8 and O2. Of all the 74 STEC strains, PCR showed that 18% isolates carried stx ( 1 ), 26% possessed stx ( 2 ) and 47% produced positive amplicon for both. Other virulent attributes like intimin (eaeA), enterohaemolysin (ehxA) and STEC auto-agglutinating adhesin (saa) were present in 18%, 43% and 44% of the isolates, respectively. The isolated ETEC serogroups were O172, O170, O159, O146, O127, O120, O113, O86, O75, O60, O30, O25, O8, O2, OR and OUT. Of the 22 ETEC-positive isolates, 23%, 18% and 4.5% possessed the gene only for LT, STa and STb, respectively, whereas 54% carried genes for both LT and STb. Some serogroups of E. coli like O159, O127, O120, O113, O60, O30, O25, O8 and O2 possessed genes for both Shiga toxin and enterotoxin. This study is the first report of ETEC isolation from diarrhoeic lambs in India. The moderately high proportion of STEC and ETEC in the diarrhoeic lambs implicated that these animals are important reservoir of STEC and ETEC. This is really a grave concern for the 'brokpas' and nomads (shepherds) who share a close relationship with this animals for their livelihood. This study also indicates that ETEC may be a major cause for frequent diarrhoeal episodes in lambs of this region. PMID:21104315

  10. Evaluation of Virulence Factors and Antibiotic Sensitivity Pattern of Escherichia Coli Isolated from Extraintestinal Infections

    PubMed Central

    Vaish, Ritu; Pradeep, MSS; Setty, CR

    2016-01-01

    Introduction  Identification of virulence determinants among the clinically isolated microorganisms assumes greater significance in the patient management perspective. Among the hospitalized patients, extremes of age groups (neonatal and geriatric age patients), patients who are debilitated due to other associated medical conditions, patients taking immunosuppressive therapy, and patients undergoing major surgeries are prone to infections with previously nonpathogenic or opportunistic pathogens. Screening of the pathogenic potential of such bacteria and identifying their virulence factors and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns could be instrumental in better patient care and management. Materials & methods  In this study, we evaluated the virulence determinants and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of 100 clinical isolates of E. coli collected from extraintestinal infections and 50 control strains of E. coli. Hemolysin production, serum resistance, cell surface hydrophobicity, and gelatinase production were tested using standard laboratory procedures. Results  Results showed that E. colistrains have a variable pattern of virulence markers that included hemolysin production (9%), cell surface hydrophobicity (9%), serum resistance (93%), and gelatinase production (2%). Antimicrobial susceptibility testing revealed a higher rate of resistance against cephalothin (84%) and ampicillin (98%). Susceptibility to amikacin (80%) and co-trimoxazole (47%) was variable and none of the test strains revealed resistance to imipenem. The control strains in contrast exhibited fewer virulence factors and the least resistance to antibiotics. Conclusion  In conclusion, the study results revealed that E. coli isolated from extraintestinal infections had demonstrated greater virulence and higher resistance to antibiotics as compared to the E. coli strains isolated from healthy individuals. PMID:27330872

  11. Isolation of Escherichia coli from piglets in South Korea with diarrhea and characteristics of the virulence genes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeong Ju; Kim, Ji Hee; Hur, Jin; Lee, John Hwa

    2010-01-01

    Escherichia coli was isolated from the feces of 122 piglets with diarrhea on 55 farms in Korea. The virulence genes of each isolate were characterized by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Of the 562 isolates, 191 carried 1 or more of the virulence genes tested for in this study. Of the 191 isolates, 114 (60%) carried 1 or more of the genes for enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) fimbriae F4, F5, F6, F18, and F41 and ETEC toxins LT, STa, and STb, 57 (30%) carried 1 or more of the genes for the Shiga-toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) toxins Stx1, Stx2, and Stx2e, and 21% and 37% carried the gene for enteropathogenic E. coli intimin and for enteroaggregative E. coli toxin, respectively. Collectively, our results indicate that other pathotypes of E. coli as well as ETEC can be strongly associated with diarrhea in piglets. In addition, detection of the genes for Stx1 and Stx2 indicates that pigs are reservoirs of human pathogenic STEC. PMID:20357961

  12. Pilicide ec240 Disrupts Virulence Circuits in Uropathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Sarah E.; Pinkner, Jerome S.; Chorell, Erik; Dodson, Karen W.; Shaffer, Carrie L.; Conover, Matt S.; Livny, Jonathan; Hadjifrangiskou, Maria; Almqvist, Fredrik

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chaperone-usher pathway (CUP) pili are extracellular organelles produced by Gram-negative bacteria that mediate bacterial pathogenesis. Small-molecule inhibitors of CUP pili, termed pilicides, were rationally designed and shown to inhibit type 1 or P piliation. Here, we show that pilicide ec240 decreased the levels of type 1, P, and S piliation. Transcriptomic and proteomic analyses using the cystitis isolate UTI89 revealed that ec240 dysregulated CUP pili and decreased motility. Paradoxically, the transcript levels of P and S pilus genes were increased during growth in ec240, even though the level of P and S piliation decreased. In contrast, the most downregulated transcripts after growth in ec240 were from the type 1 pilus genes. Type 1 pilus expression is controlled by inversion of the fimS promoter element, which can oscillate between phase on and phase off orientations. ec240 induced the fimS phase off orientation, and this effect was necessary for the majority of ec240’s inhibition of type 1 piliation. ec240 increased levels of the transcriptional regulators SfaB and PapB, which were shown to induce the fimS promoter phase off orientation. Furthermore, the effect of ec240 on motility was abolished in the absence of the SfaB, PapB, SfaX, and PapX regulators. In contrast to the effects of ec240, deletion of the type 1 pilus operon led to increased S and P piliation and motility. Thus, ec240 dysregulated several uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) virulence factors through different mechanisms and independent of its effects on type 1 pilus biogenesis and may have potential as an antivirulence compound. PMID:25352623

  13. Proteome analysis of virulence factor regulated by autoinducer-2-like activity in Escherichia coli O157:H7.

    PubMed

    Kim, Younghoon; Oh, Sangnam; Ahn, Eun Young; Imm, Jee-Young; Oh, Sejong; Park, Sungsu; Kim, Sae Hun

    2007-02-01

    Many pathogenic bacteria, including Escherichia coli O157:H7, can control gene expression in a cell density-dependent manner by producing small signaling molecules (autoinducers) in a process known as quorum sensing. In this study, the effects of the autoinducer-2-like activity on the expression of proteins, including virulence factors, in E. coli O157:H7 were characterized by proteomic analysis. Compared with the control, E. coli O157:H7 strains in the presence of autoinducer-2-like activity exhibited elevated virulence by more rapidly forming cell aggregates on epithelial cells and rapidly killing the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, the surrogate host. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis revealed 18 proteins that were upregulated by autoinducer-2-like activity and 4 proteins that were down-regulated. These proteins were further characterized by matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry and are involved in the metabolic process, adaptation and protection, cell motility, secretion, envelope biogenesis, and protein translation. These results indicate that the newly identified proteins are associated with the control of virulence in E. coli O157:H7 and that these proteins can be potential targets for the development of antibiotics and other antimicrobial agents.

  14. Characterization of shiga toxin subtypes and virulence genes in Porcine shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Similar to ruminants, swine have been shown to be a reservoir for Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC), and pork products have been linked with outbreaks associated with STEC O157 and O111:H-. STEC strains, isolated in a previous study from fecal samples of late-finisher pigs, belonged to a...

  15. OCCURRENCE OF VIRULENCE FACTOR ACTIVITY RELATIONSHIP (VFAR) IN ESCHERICHIA COLI ISOLATED FROM MUNICIPAL WASTEWATER EFFLUENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Escherichia coli O157:H7 has been linked to waterborne outbreaks in the United States and abroad. Methods employed to detect this pathogen typically are cultural based and take advantage of phenotypic traits that are specific for this serotype, including slow sorbitol fermentati...

  16. ``Black Holes" and Bacterial Pathogenicity: A Large Genomic Deletion that Enhances the Virulence of Shigella spp. and Enteroinvasive Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurelli, Anthony T.; Fernandez, Reinaldo E.; Bloch, Craig A.; Rode, Christopher K.; Fasano, Alessio

    1998-03-01

    Plasmids, bacteriophages, and pathogenicity islands are genomic additions that contribute to the evolution of bacterial pathogens. For example, Shigella spp., the causative agents of bacillary dysentery, differ from the closely related commensal Escherichia coli in the presence of a plasmid in Shigella that encodes virulence functions. However, pathogenic bacteria also may lack properties that are characteristic of nonpathogens. Lysine decarboxylate (LDC) activity is present in ≈ 90% of E. coli strains but is uniformly absent in Shigella strains. When the gene for LDC, cadA, was introduced into Shigella flexneri 2a, virulence became attenuated, and enterotoxin activity was inhibited greatly. The enterotoxin inhibitor was identified as cadaverine, a product of the reaction catalyzed by LDC. Comparison of the S. flexneri 2a and laboratory E. coli K-12 genomes in the region of cadA revealed a large deletion in Shigella. Representative strains of Shigella spp. and enteroinvasive E. coli displayed similar deletions of cadA. Our results suggest that, as Shigella spp. evolved from E. coli to become pathogens, they not only acquired virulence genes on a plasmid but also shed genes via deletions. The formation of these ``black holes,'' deletions of genes that are detrimental to a pathogenic lifestyle, provides an evolutionary pathway that enables a pathogen to enhance virulence. Furthermore, the demonstration that cadaverine can inhibit enterotoxin activity may lead to more general models about toxin activity or entry into cells and suggests an avenue for antitoxin therapy. Thus, understanding the role of black holes in pathogen evolution may yield clues to new treatments of infectious diseases.

  17. "Black holes" and bacterial pathogenicity: a large genomic deletion that enhances the virulence of Shigella spp. and enteroinvasive Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Maurelli, A T; Fernández, R E; Bloch, C A; Rode, C K; Fasano, A

    1998-03-31

    Plasmids, bacteriophages, and pathogenicity islands are genomic additions that contribute to the evolution of bacterial pathogens. For example, Shigella spp., the causative agents of bacillary dysentery, differ from the closely related commensal Escherichia coli in the presence of a plasmid in Shigella that encodes virulence functions. However, pathogenic bacteria also may lack properties that are characteristic of nonpathogens. Lysine decarboxylase (LDC) activity is present in approximately 90% of E. coli strains but is uniformly absent in Shigella strains. When the gene for LDC, cadA, was introduced into Shigella flexneri 2a, virulence became attenuated, and enterotoxin activity was inhibited greatly. The enterotoxin inhibitor was identified as cadaverine, a product of the reaction catalyzed by LDC. Comparison of the S. flexneri 2a and laboratory E. coli K-12 genomes in the region of cadA revealed a large deletion in Shigella. Representative strains of Shigella spp. and enteroinvasive E. coli displayed similar deletions of cadA. Our results suggest that, as Shigella spp. evolved from E. coli to become pathogens, they not only acquired virulence genes on a plasmid but also shed genes via deletions. The formation of these "black holes," deletions of genes that are detrimental to a pathogenic lifestyle, provides an evolutionary pathway that enables a pathogen to enhance virulence. Furthermore, the demonstration that cadaverine can inhibit enterotoxin activity may lead to more general models about toxin activity or entry into cells and suggests an avenue for antitoxin therapy. Thus, understanding the role of black holes in pathogen evolution may yield clues to new treatments of infectious diseases.

  18. Antimicrobial resistance, virulence genes and PFGE-profiling of Escherichia coli isolates from South Korean cattle farms.

    PubMed

    Shin, Seung Won; Byun, Jae-Won; Jung, Myounghwan; Shin, Min-Kyoung; Yoo, Han Sang

    2014-09-01

    To estimate the prevalence of Escherichia coli with potential pathogenicity in cattle farm in South Korea, a total of 290 E. coli isolates were isolated from cattle farms over a period of 2 years in South Korea. These were examined for phenotypic and genotypic characteristics including antimicrobial susceptibility, serotype, and gene profiles of virulence and antimicrobial resistance. The most dominant virulence gene was f17 (26.2%), followed by stx2 (15.9%), ehxA (11.0%), stx1 (8.3%), eae (5.2%), and sta (4.1%). Some shiga-toxin producing E. coli isolates possessed eae (15.9%). All isolates except for one showed resistance to one or more antimicrobials, with 152 isolates exhibiting multidrug-resistance. The most prevalent resistance phenotype detected was streptomycin (63.1%), followed by tetracycline (54.5%), neomycin (40.3%), cephalothin (32.8%), amoxicillin (30.0%), ampicillin (29.7%), and sulphamethoxazole/trimethoprim (16.6%). The associated resistance determinants detected were strA-strB (39.0%), tet(E) (80.0%), tet(A) (27.6%), aac(3)-IV (33.1%), aphA1 (21.4%), bla TEM (23.8%), and sul2 (22.1%). When investigated by O serotyping and PFGE molecular subtyping, the high degree of diversity was exhibited in E. coli isolates. These results suggest that E. coli isolates from South Korean cattle farms are significantly diverse in terms of virulence and antimicrobial resistance. In conclusion, the gastroinstestinal flora of cattle could be a significant reservoir of diverse virulence and antimicrobial resistance determinants, which is potentially hazardous to public health.

  19. Phylogroups, virulence determinants and antimicrobial resistance in stx(2) gene-carrying Escherichia coli isolated from aquatic environments.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Aljaro, Cristina; Moreno, Eva; Andreu, Antònia; Prats, Guillem; Blanch, Anicet R

    2009-10-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of antibiotic-resistant stx(2) gene-carrying Escherichia coli isolated from human and animal wastewater with regard to their animal/human origin, serotype, phylogenetic background and virulence factors. The isolates were characterized by PCR in relation to stx variant, phylogenetic group and other virulence genes (stx(1), ehxA and saa). Antibiotic resistance was found in 92% of the stx(2) gene-carrying E. coli strains, with 77% showing intermediate resistance or full resistance to more than one antibiotic. High levels of resistance were observed to chloramphenicol, tetracycline, sulfamethoxazole, streptomycin, trimethoprim, and trimethoprim + sulfamethoxazole, with resistance values of 79%, 69%, 63%, 58%, 47% and 42%, respectively, and a higher prevalence among those strains isolated from animal wastewater. There was no association between the E. coli serotype and/or phylogroup and the antimicrobial resistance profile displayed. However, those strains carrying the stx(2) gene variant alone or in combination with other virulence factors (stx(1), ehxA or saa gene) were susceptible to most of the tested antibiotics.

  20. Heterogenic virulence in a diarrheagenic Escherichia coli: evidence for an EPEC expressing heat-labile toxin of ETEC.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Sanjucta; Pazhani, Gururaja P; Nataro, James P; Ramamurthy, Thandavarayan

    2015-01-01

    We have encountered an Escherichia coli strain isolated from a child with acute diarrhea. This strain harbored eae and elt genes encoding for E. coli attaching and effacing property and heat-labile enterotoxin of EPEC and ETEC, respectively. Due to the presence of these distinct virulence factors, we named this uncommon strain as EPEC/ETEC hybrid. The elt gene was identified in a conjugally transferable plasmid of the EPEC/ETEC hybrid. In addition, several virulence genes in the locus of enterocyte effacement have been identified, which confirms that the EPEC/ETEC has an EPEC genetic background. The hybrid nature of this strain was further confirmed by using tissue culture assays. In the multi locus sequence typing (MLST) analysis, the EPEC/ETEC belonged to the sequence type ST328 and was belonging to ST278 Cplx. Sequence analysis of the plasmid DNA revealed presence of six large contigs with several insertion sequences. A phage integrase gene and the prophages of gp48 and gp49 have been found in the upstream of eltAB. In the downstream of elt, an urovirulence loci adhesion encoding (pap) cluster containing papG, and papC were also identified. Similar to other reports, we have identified a heterogenic virulence in a diarrheagenic E. coli but with different combination of genes. PMID:25465159

  1. Thermoresponsive oligomers reduce Escherichia coli O157:H7 biofouling and virulence.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin-Hyung; Kim, Yong-Guy; Cho, Hyun Seob; Kim, Jintae; Kim, Seong-Cheol; Cho, Moo Hwan; Lee, Jintae

    2014-01-01

    Thermoresponsive polymers have potential biomedical applications for drug delivery and tissue engineering. Here, two thermoresponsive oligomers were synthesized, viz. oligo(N-isopropylacrylamide) (ONIPAM) and oligo(N-vinylcaprolactam) (OVCL), and their anti-biofouling abilities investigated against enterohemorrhagic E. coli O157:H7, which produces Shiga-like toxins and forms biofilms. Biofilm formation (biofouling) is closely related to E. coli O157:H7 infection and constitutes a major mechanism of antimicrobial resistance. The synthetic OVCL (MW 679) and three commercial OVCLs (up to MW 54,000) at 30 μg ml(-1) were found to inhibit biofouling by E. coli O157:H7 at 37 °C by more than 80% without adversely affecting bacterial growth. The anti-biofouling activity of ONIPAM was weaker than that of OVCL. However, at 25 °C, ONIPAM and OVCL did not affect E. coli O157:H7 biofouling. Transcriptional analysis showed that OVCL temperature-dependently downregulated curli genes in E. coli O157:H7, and this finding was in line with observed reductions in fimbriae production and biofouling. In addition, OVCL downregulated the Shiga-like toxin genes stx1 and stx2 in E. coli O157:H7 and attenuated its in vivo virulence in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. These results suggest that OVCL has potential use in antivirulence strategies against persistent E. coli O157:H7 infection.

  2. Virulence determinants in enteroaggregative Escherichia coli from North India and their interaction in in vitro organ culture system.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Deepika; Sharma, Monica; Sarkar, Subendu; Thapa, B R; Chakraborti, Anuradha

    2016-09-01

    Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) is an important diarrhoeal pathogen causing diseases in multiple epidemiological and clinical settings. In developing countries like India, diarrhoeal diseases are one of the major killers among paediatric population and oddly, few studies are available from Indian paediatric population on the variability of EAEC virulence genes. In this study, we examined the distribution of plasmid and chromosomal-encoded virulence determinants in EAEC isolates, and analysed cytokines response generated against EAEC with specific aggregative adherence fimbriae (AAF) type in duodenal biopsies using in vitro organ culture (IVOC) mimicking in vivo conditions. Different virulence marker combinations among strains were reflected as a function of specific adhesins signifying EAEC heterogeneity. fis gene emerged as an important genetic marker apart from aggA and aap Further, EAEC infection in IVOC showed upregulation of IL-8, IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α and TLR-5 expression. EAEC with AAFII induced significant TLR-5 and IL-8 response, conceivably owing to more pathogenicity markers. This study sheds light on the pattern of EAEC pathotypes prevalent in North Indian paediatric population and highlights the presence of unique virulence combinations in pathogenic strains. Thus, evident diversity in EAEC virulence and multifaceted bacteria-host crosstalk can provide useful insights for the strategic management of diarrhoeal diseases in India, where diarrhoeal outbreaks are more frequent. PMID:27493010

  3. Aerobactin and other virulence factor genes among strains of Escherichia coli causing urosepsis: association with patient characteristics.

    PubMed

    Johnson, J R; Moseley, S L; Roberts, P L; Stamm, W E

    1988-02-01

    To assess the role of aerobactin as a virulence factor among uropathogenic Escherichia coli, we determined the prevalence, location, and phenotypic expression of aerobactin determinants among 58 E. coli strains causing bacteremic urinary tract infections. We correlated the presence of the aerobactin system with antimicrobial-agent resistance, the presence and phenotypic expression of other uropathogenic virulence factor determinants (P fimbriae, hemolysin, and type 1 fimbriae), and characteristics of patients. Colony and Southern hybridization of total and plasmid DNA with DNA probes for each virulence factor showed that aerobactin determinants were present in 78% of the strains and were plasmid associated in 21%, whereas P fimbria, hemolysin, and type 1 fimbria determinants were present in 74, 43, and 98% of the strains, respectively, and were always chromosomal. Chromosomal aerobactin, P fimbria, and hemolysin determinants occurred together on the chromosome more often in strains from patients without predisposing urological or medical conditions (P = 0.04). Strains with plasmid-encoded aerobactin lacked determinants for P fimbriae (P = 0.004) and hemolysin (P = 0.0004), were resistant to multiple antimicrobial agents (P = 0.0001), and were found only in compromised patients. Mating experiments demonstrated that some aerobactin plasmids also encoded antimicrobial-agent resistance. These findings suggest that the determinants for aerobactin, P fimbriae, and hemolysin are conserved on the chromosome of the antimicrobial-agent-susceptible uropathogenic strains of E. coli which invade noncompromised patients. In contrast, these chromosomal virulence factors are often absent from E. coli strains causing urosepsis in compromised hosts; these strains may acquire plasmid aerobactin in conjunction with antimicrobial-agent resistance genes.

  4. Hemolysin of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli: structure, transport, biological activity and putative role in virulence.

    PubMed

    Bielaszewska, Martina; Aldick, Thomas; Bauwens, Andreas; Karch, Helge

    2014-07-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) cause diarrhea, bloody diarrhea and hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS), a thrombotic microangiopathy affecting the renal glomeruli, the intestine, and the brain. The pathogenesis of EHEC-mediated diseases is incompletely understood. In addition to Shiga toxins, the major virulence factors of EHEC, the contribution of EHEC hemolysin (EHEC-Hly), also designated EHEC toxin (Ehx), which is a member of the RTX (repeats-in-toxin) family, is increasingly recognized. The toxin and its activation and secretion machinery are encoded by the EHEC-hlyCABD operon, in which EHEC-hlyA is the structural gene for EHEC-Hly and the EHEC-hlyC product mediates post-translational activation of EHEC-Hly; the EHEC-hlyB- and EHEC-hlyD-encoded proteins form, together with genetically unlinked TolC, the type I secretion system that transports EHEC-Hly out of the bacterial cell. EHEC-Hly exists in two biologically active forms: as a free EHEC-Hly, and an EHEC-Hly associated with outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) that are released by EHEC during growth. The OMV-associated form results from a rapid binding of free EHEC-Hly to OMVs upon its extracellular secretion. The OMV association stabilizes EHEC-Hly and thus substantially prolongs its hemolytic activity compared to the free toxin. The two EHEC-Hly forms differ by their mechanism of toxicity toward human intestinal epithelial and microvascular endothelial cells, which are the major targets during EHEC infection. The free EHEC-Hly lyses human microvascular endothelial cells, presumably by pore formation in the cell membrane. In contrast, the OMV-associated EHEC-Hly does not lyse any of these cell types, but after its cellular internalization via OMVs it targets mitochondria and triggers caspase-9-mediated apoptosis. The proinflammatory potential of EHEC-Hly, in particular its ability to elicit secretion of interleukin-1β from human monocytes/macrophages, might be an additional mechanism of its putative

  5. Virulence Genes and the Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Escherichia coli, Isolated from Wild Waterbirds, in the Netherlands and Poland.

    PubMed

    Kuczkowski, Maciej; Krawiec, Marta; Voslamber, Berend; Książczyk, Marta; Płoskońska-Bugla, Gabriela; Wieliczko, Alina

    2016-08-01

    Affiliation to four phylogroups (A, B1, B2, and D) was examined, among 190 Escherichia coli strains, collected from five, wild waterbird species, including the following: the Greylag goose-Anser anser (61) and the Canada goose-Branta canadensis (33) obtained in the Netherlands, and the Mallard-Anas platyrhynchos (38), the Mute swan-Cygnus olor (37), and the Great cormorant-Phalacrocorax carbo (21) obtained in Poland. Moreover, the prevalence of 10 virulence factors: astA, iss, iucD, irp2, papC, tsh, vat, cva/cvi, stx2f, and bfp, as well as antimicrobial susceptibility to amoxicillin, enrofloxacin, and tetracycline (minimum inhibitory concentration [MIC] using E-tests) were investigated, in the examined E. coli strains. Results demonstrated that the greatest number of E. coli strains belonged to phylogenetic groups, B1 (86 strains-45.3%) and D (49 strains-25.8%), whereas 40 (21.0%) and only 15 (7.9%) isolates were classified as being of phylogenetic groups, A and B2, respectively. Among the 10 tested virulence-associated genes, 7 genes were detected in 61 examined strains (32.1%) with highly varying frequency. Virulence profiles showed that astA, iss, and irp2 genes were detected most frequently among all examined E. coli strains, isolated from every chosen bird species. Antimicrobial susceptibility, as detected by MIC for the examined antibiotics, is variable among strains isolated from different species of birds. The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence of E. coli strains, isolated from different species of wild waterbirds and determine their potential pathogenicity to the environment, other birds, and people. PMID:27348207

  6. Occurrence of Intestinal and Extraintestinal Virulence Genes in Escherichia coli Isolates from Rainwater Tanks in Southeast Queensland, Australia ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, W.; Hodgers, L.; Masters, N.; Sidhu, J. P. S.; Katouli, M.; Toze, S.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, 200 Escherichia coli isolates from 22 rainwater tank samples in Southeast Queensland, Australia, were tested for the presence of 20 virulence genes (VGs) associated with intestinal and extraintestinal pathotypes. In addition, E. coli isolates were also classified into phylogenetic groups based on the detection of the chuA, yjaA, and TSPE4.C2 genes. Of the 22 rainwater tanks, 8 (36%) and 5 (23%) were positive for the eaeA (belonging to enteropathogenic E. coli [EPEC] and Shiga-toxigenic E. coli [STEC]) and ST1 (belonging to enterotoxigenic E. coli [ETEC]) genes, respectively. VGs (cdtB, cvaC, ibeA, kpsMT allele III, PAI, papAH, and traT) belonging to extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) were detected in 15 (68%) of the 22 rainwater tanks. Of the 22 samples, 17 (77%) and 11 (50%) contained E. coli belonging to phylogenetic groups A and B1, respectively. Similarly, 10 (45%) and 16 (72%) contained E. coli belonging to phylogenetic groups B2 and D, respectively. Of the 96 of the 200 strains from 22 tanks that were VG positive, 40 (42%) were carrying a single VG, 36 (37.5%) were carrying two VGs, 17 (18%) were carrying three VGs, and 3 (3%) had four or more VGs. This study reports the presence of multiple VGs in E. coli strains belonging to the STEC, EPEC, ETEC, and ExPEC pathotypes in rainwater tanks. The public health risks associated with potentially clinically significant E. coli in rainwater tanks should be assessed, as the water is used for drinking and other, nonpotable purposes. It is recommended that rainwater be disinfected using effective treatment procedures such as filtration, UV disinfection, or simply boiling prior to drinking. PMID:21873477

  7. Occurrence of intestinal and extraintestinal virulence genes in Escherichia coli isolates from rainwater tanks in Southeast Queensland, Australia.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, W; Hodgers, L; Masters, N; Sidhu, J P S; Katouli, M; Toze, S

    2011-10-01

    In this study, 200 Escherichia coli isolates from 22 rainwater tank samples in Southeast Queensland, Australia, were tested for the presence of 20 virulence genes (VGs) associated with intestinal and extraintestinal pathotypes. In addition, E. coli isolates were also classified into phylogenetic groups based on the detection of the chuA, yjaA, and TSPE4.C2 genes. Of the 22 rainwater tanks, 8 (36%) and 5 (23%) were positive for the eaeA (belonging to enteropathogenic E. coli [EPEC] and Shiga-toxigenic E. coli [STEC]) and ST1 (belonging to enterotoxigenic E. coli [ETEC]) genes, respectively. VGs (cdtB, cvaC, ibeA, kpsMT allele III, PAI, papAH, and traT) belonging to extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) were detected in 15 (68%) of the 22 rainwater tanks. Of the 22 samples, 17 (77%) and 11 (50%) contained E. coli belonging to phylogenetic groups A and B1, respectively. Similarly, 10 (45%) and 16 (72%) contained E. coli belonging to phylogenetic groups B2 and D, respectively. Of the 96 of the 200 strains from 22 tanks that were VG positive, 40 (42%) were carrying a single VG, 36 (37.5%) were carrying two VGs, 17 (18%) were carrying three VGs, and 3 (3%) had four or more VGs. This study reports the presence of multiple VGs in E. coli strains belonging to the STEC, EPEC, ETEC, and ExPEC pathotypes in rainwater tanks. The public health risks associated with potentially clinically significant E. coli in rainwater tanks should be assessed, as the water is used for drinking and other, nonpotable purposes. It is recommended that rainwater be disinfected using effective treatment procedures such as filtration, UV disinfection, or simply boiling prior to drinking.

  8. Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli isolated from chicken meat in Iran: serogroups, virulence factors, and antimicrobial resistance properties.

    PubMed

    Momtaz, Hassan; Jamshidi, Alireza

    2013-05-01

    The aim of the current study was to determine the virulence factors, serogroups, and antibiotic resistance properties of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli isolated from chicken meat samples. A total of 422 chicken meat samples were collected from 5 townships of Iran. Specimens were immediately transferred to the laboratory in a cooler with an ice pack. Samples were cultured, and the positive culture samples were analyzed by PCR assays. Finally, the antimicrobial susceptibility test was performed using the disk diffusion method in Mueller-Hinton agar. According to the results, out of 422 samples, 146 (34.59%) were confirmed to be E. coli positive and among E. coli-positive samples, 51 (34.93%) and 31 (21.23%) were from attaching and effacing E. coli (AEEC) and enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) subgroups, respectively. All of the EHEC-positive samples had all stx1, eaeA, and ehly virulence genes, whereas only 5 (9.80%) of AEEC subgroup had all stx1, stx2, and eaeA genes. As the data revealed, O157 was the most prevalent and O111 was the least prevalent strains in the Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) population. Among STEC strains, sulI and blaSHV had the highest and lowest incidence rate, respectively. There was a high resistance to tetracycline (76.82%), followed by chloramphenicol (73.17%) and nitrofurantoin (63.41%), but there was low resistance to cephalotine (7.31%) antibiotics in isolated strains. Results shows that the PCR technique has a high performance for detection of serogroups, virulence genes, and antibiotic resistance genes in STEC strains. This study is the first prevalence report of detection of virulence genes, serogroups, and antibiotic resistance properties of STEC strains isolated from chicken meat samples in Iran. Based on the results, chicken meat is one of the main sources of STEC strains and its virulence factors in Iran, so an accurate meat inspection would reduce disease outbreaks.

  9. MOLECULAR CHARACTERIZATION OF VIRULENCE AND ANTIMICROBIAL SUSCEPTIBILITY PROFILES OF UROPATHOGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI FROM PATIENTS IN A TERTIARY HOSPITAL, SOUTHERN THAILAND.

    PubMed

    Themphachanal, Monchanok; Kongpheng, Suttiporn; Rattanachuay, Pattamarat; Khianngam, Saowapar; Singkhamanan, Kamonnut; Sukhumungoon, Pharanai

    2015-11-01

    Among uropathogens, uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) is the most common cause of urinary tract infection (UTI) worldwide, but clinical aspects due to this bacterial species is not fully understood in southern Thailand. Two hundred fifty-four UPEC isolates from patients admitted to Maharaj Nakhon Si Thammarat Hospital, southern Thailand were examined for crucial virulence genes, showing that 33.5% contained at least one of the virulence, genes tested. Genes encoding P fimbria, cytotoxic necrotizing factor-1 and α-hemolysin constituted the majority (15.8%) carried by UPEC isolates. Phylogenetic group classification revealed that 57.5% of UPEC belonged to group D. Antimicrobial susceptibility tests showed that 70.5% and 65.1% of the isolates were resistant to ciprofloxacin and norfloxacin, respectively. Moreover, 50.0% of UPEC were capable of producing extended spectrum beta-lactamases. These findings should be of benefit for more appropriate treatment of UTI patients in this region of Thailand. Keywords: uropathogenic Escherichia coli, antibiotics resistance, cnfl, hlyA, pap, Thailand PMID:26867360

  10. MOLECULAR CHARACTERIZATION OF VIRULENCE AND ANTIMICROBIAL SUSCEPTIBILITY PROFILES OF UROPATHOGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI FROM PATIENTS IN A TERTIARY HOSPITAL, SOUTHERN THAILAND.

    PubMed

    Themphachanal, Monchanok; Kongpheng, Suttiporn; Rattanachuay, Pattamarat; Khianngam, Saowapar; Singkhamanan, Kamonnut; Sukhumungoon, Pharanai

    2015-11-01

    Among uropathogens, uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) is the most common cause of urinary tract infection (UTI) worldwide, but clinical aspects due to this bacterial species is not fully understood in southern Thailand. Two hundred fifty-four UPEC isolates from patients admitted to Maharaj Nakhon Si Thammarat Hospital, southern Thailand were examined for crucial virulence genes, showing that 33.5% contained at least one of the virulence, genes tested. Genes encoding P fimbria, cytotoxic necrotizing factor-1 and α-hemolysin constituted the majority (15.8%) carried by UPEC isolates. Phylogenetic group classification revealed that 57.5% of UPEC belonged to group D. Antimicrobial susceptibility tests showed that 70.5% and 65.1% of the isolates were resistant to ciprofloxacin and norfloxacin, respectively. Moreover, 50.0% of UPEC were capable of producing extended spectrum beta-lactamases. These findings should be of benefit for more appropriate treatment of UTI patients in this region of Thailand. Keywords: uropathogenic Escherichia coli, antibiotics resistance, cnfl, hlyA, pap, Thailand

  11. Expression of Escherichia coli virulence usher protein attenuates wild-type Salmonella.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xinghong; Suo, Zhiyong; Thornburg, Theresa; Holderness, Kathryn; Cao, Ling; Lim, Timothy; Walters, Nancy; Kellerman, Laura; Loetterle, Linda; Avci, Recep; Pascual, David W

    2012-01-01

    Generation of a live attenuated vaccine for bacterial pathogens often requires prior knowledge of the pathogen's virulence factors. We hypothesized an alternative approach of heterologous gene expression would make a wild-type (wt) pathogen more susceptible to host cell killing, thus, resulting in immunization. As proof of concept, the heterologous expression of enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) colonization factor antigen I (CFA/I) was tested to attenuate Salmonella. The overexpression of CFA/I resulted in significant attenuation of wt Salmonella. In-depth studies revealed the attenuation depended on the co-expression of chaperone (CfaA) and usher (CfaC) proteins. Remarkably, the CfaAC-attenuated Salmonella conferred protection against wt Salmonella challenge. Mechanistic study indicated CfaAC made Salmonella outer membranes permeable, causing Salmonella to be vulnerable to host destruction. Thus, enhancing bacterial permeability via CfaAC represents an alternative method to attenuate pathogens despite the presence of unknown virulence factors. PMID:22286706

  12. Expression of Escherichia coli virulence usher protein attenuates wild-type Salmonella.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xinghong; Suo, Zhiyong; Thornburg, Theresa; Holderness, Kathryn; Cao, Ling; Lim, Timothy; Walters, Nancy; Kellerman, Laura; Loetterle, Linda; Avci, Recep; Pascual, David W

    2012-01-01

    Generation of a live attenuated vaccine for bacterial pathogens often requires prior knowledge of the pathogen's virulence factors. We hypothesized an alternative approach of heterologous gene expression would make a wild-type (wt) pathogen more susceptible to host cell killing, thus, resulting in immunization. As proof of concept, the heterologous expression of enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) colonization factor antigen I (CFA/I) was tested to attenuate Salmonella. The overexpression of CFA/I resulted in significant attenuation of wt Salmonella. In-depth studies revealed the attenuation depended on the co-expression of chaperone (CfaA) and usher (CfaC) proteins. Remarkably, the CfaAC-attenuated Salmonella conferred protection against wt Salmonella challenge. Mechanistic study indicated CfaAC made Salmonella outer membranes permeable, causing Salmonella to be vulnerable to host destruction. Thus, enhancing bacterial permeability via CfaAC represents an alternative method to attenuate pathogens despite the presence of unknown virulence factors.

  13. Uropathogenic virulence factor FimH facilitates binding of uteropathogenic Escherichia coli to canine endometrium.

    PubMed

    Krekeler, N; Marenda, M S; Browning, G F; Holden, K M; Charles, J A; Wright, P J

    2012-09-01

    Pyometra is a potentially life-threatening condition in bitches and is often caused by Escherichia coli infection. Both pathogenic and non-pathogenic E. coli strains commonly carry the genes for type 1 fimbriae that mediate bacterial adhesion onto host epithelium. To investigate whether the type 1 fimbrial adhesin, FimH, facilitates the binding of uropathogenic E. coli to canine endometrium, the fimH gene was insertionally inactivated in a pathogenic E. coli strain. The ability of E. coli to bind to canine endometrial epithelial cells was determined in vitro using canine uterine biopsies. Binding of the fimH mutant was only 0.3% of that of the wild type. Complementation of the mutation restored the phenotype to that of the parent. This study has developed an in vitro model that allows quantitative and qualitative assessment of bacterial binding to canine endometrium and has demonstrated that the fimH gene plays a role in adherence of pathogenic E. coli to canine endometrium. PMID:22554919

  14. Genetic Diversity and Virulence Profiles of Escherichia coli Isolates Causing Spontaneous Bacterial Peritonitis and Bacteremia in Patients with Cirrhosis▿

    PubMed Central

    Bert, Frédéric; Johnson, James R.; Ouattara, Bénédicte; Leflon-Guibout, Véronique; Johnston, Brian; Marcon, Estelle; Valla, Dominique; Moreau, Richard; Nicolas-Chanoine, Marie-Hélène

    2010-01-01

    Among patients with cirrhosis, infections caused by Escherichia coli organisms that translocate from the gut are a frequent and severe complication. One hundred ten E. coli isolates from 110 cirrhotic patients with spontaneous bacterial peritonitis and/or spontaneous bacteremia were characterized for their phylogenetic group and virulence genotype (34 extraintestinal virulence factor genes). Genetic relatedness was investigated by enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus sequence type 2 (ERIC-2) PCR typing and multilocus sequence typing. Phylogenetic groups A, B1, B2, and D accounted for 24%, 4%, 48%, and 24% of the population, respectively. Overall, 68 distinct ERIC-2 profiles were encountered. Eleven clonal groups, represented by multiple isolates (2 to 11) from the same sequence type (ST) or sequence type complex, were identified. These clonal groups accounted for 54 (49%) isolates overall. Membership in one of these clonal groups was more frequent among B2 isolates than non-B2 isolates (67% versus 32%, P < 0.001). The most frequent sequence types were ST95 (n = 13) and ST73 (n = 8), followed by the ST14 and ST10 complexes (n = 7). ST131 and ST69 were represented by three isolates each. Clonal group-associated isolates exhibited a greater prevalence of 11 virulence genes, including pap elements, than the other isolates. However, no association between clonal groups and host factors, type of infection, or mortality was observed. In conclusion, E. coli isolates causing spontaneous bacterial peritonitis and bacteremia in cirrhotic patients are genetically diverse. However, approximately half of the isolates belong to familiar clonal groups and exhibit extensive virulence profiles that may be associated with greater invasive potential. PMID:20519468

  15. LeuO enhances butyrate-induced virulence expression through a positive regulatory loop in enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Takao, Miyuki; Yen, Hilo; Tobe, Toru

    2014-09-01

    Enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) causes bloody diarrhoea and other severe symptoms such as haemorrhagic uraemic syndrome. The expression of virulence genes on the locus for enterocyte effacement (LEE) and associated genes is regulated by a variety of factors, including transcriptional regulators and environmental signals. Butyrate, one of the major short-chain fatty acids present in the intestine, enhances expression of LEE genes and flagella biosynthesis genes in EHEC O157:H7, resulting in increased bacterial adherence and motility. Here, we show that expression of the leuO gene, which encodes a LysR-type transcriptional regulator, is enhanced by butyrate via Lrp, which is also necessary for butyrate-induced responses of LEE genes. LeuO expression induces prolonged activation of the promoter of LEE1 operon, including the ler gene, as well as virulence mechanisms such as microcolony formation. Activation of the LEE1 promoter by LeuO depends on another regulator, called Pch. The response of the leuO promoter to butyrate requires two virulence regulators, Pch and Ler, in addition to Lrp. Pch, Ler and Lrp bind the upstream region of the leuO promoter. Thus, leuO is involved in butyrate-enhanced expression of LEE genes through a positive feedback mechanism, but its expression and action on the LEE1 promoter are dependent on the virulence regulators Pch and Ler.

  16. Siderophore biosynthesis coordinately modulated the virulence-associated interactive metabolome of uropathogenic Escherichia coli and human urine

    PubMed Central

    Su, Qiao; Guan, Tianbing; Lv, Haitao

    2016-01-01

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) growth in women’s bladders during urinary tract infection (UTI) incurs substantial chemical exchange, termed the “interactive metabolome”, which primarily accounts for the metabolic costs (utilized metabolome) and metabolic donations (excreted metabolome) between UPEC and human urine. Here, we attempted to identify the individualized interactive metabolome between UPEC and human urine. We were able to distinguish UPEC from non-UPEC by employing a combination of metabolomics and genetics. Our results revealed that the interactive metabolome between UPEC and human urine was markedly different from that between non-UPEC and human urine, and that UPEC triggered much stronger perturbations in the interactive metabolome in human urine. Furthermore, siderophore biosynthesis coordinately modulated the individualized interactive metabolome, which we found to be a critical component of UPEC virulence. The individualized virulence-associated interactive metabolome contained 31 different metabolites and 17 central metabolic pathways that were annotated to host these different metabolites, including energetic metabolism, amino acid metabolism, and gut microbe metabolism. Changes in the activities of these pathways mechanistically pinpointed the virulent capability of siderophore biosynthesis. Together, our findings provide novel insights into UPEC virulence, and we propose that siderophores are potential targets for further discovery of drugs to treat UPEC-induced UTI. PMID:27076285

  17. Virulence Profiles of Bacteremic Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase-Producing Escherichia coli: Association with Epidemiological and Clinical Features

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Baño, Jesús; Mingorance, Jesús; Fernández-Romero, Natalia; Serrano, Lara; López-Cerero, Lorena; Pascual, Alvaro

    2012-01-01

    There is scarce data about the importance of phylogroups and virulence factors (VF) in bloodstream infections (BSI) caused by extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli (ESBLEC). A prospective multicenter Spanish cohort including 191 cases of BSI due to ESBLEC was studied. Phylogroups and 25 VF genes were investigated by PCR. ESBLEC were classified into clusters according to their virulence profiles. The association of phylogropus, VF, and clusters with epidemiological features were studied using multivariate analysis. Overall, 57.6%, 26.7%, and 15.7% of isolates belonged to A/B1, D and B2 phylogroups, respectively. By multivariate analysis (adjusted OR [95% CI]), virulence cluster C2 was independently associated with urinary tract source (5.05 [0.96–25.48]); cluster C4 with sources other than urinary of biliary tract (2.89 [1.05–7.93]), and cluster C5 with BSI in non-predisposed patients (2.80 [0.99–7.93]). Isolates producing CTX-M-9 group ESBLs and from phylogroup D predominated among cluster C2 and C5, while CTX-M-1 group of ESBL and phylogroup B2 predominantes among C4 isolates. These results suggest that host factors and previous antimicrobial use were more important than phylogroup or specific VF in the occurrence of BSI due to ESBLEC. However, some associations between virulence clusters and some specific epidemiological features were found. PMID:22970186

  18. Siderophore biosynthesis coordinately modulated the virulence-associated interactive metabolome of uropathogenic Escherichia coli and human urine.

    PubMed

    Su, Qiao; Guan, Tianbing; Lv, Haitao

    2016-04-14

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) growth in women's bladders during urinary tract infection (UTI) incurs substantial chemical exchange, termed the "interactive metabolome", which primarily accounts for the metabolic costs (utilized metabolome) and metabolic donations (excreted metabolome) between UPEC and human urine. Here, we attempted to identify the individualized interactive metabolome between UPEC and human urine. We were able to distinguish UPEC from non-UPEC by employing a combination of metabolomics and genetics. Our results revealed that the interactive metabolome between UPEC and human urine was markedly different from that between non-UPEC and human urine, and that UPEC triggered much stronger perturbations in the interactive metabolome in human urine. Furthermore, siderophore biosynthesis coordinately modulated the individualized interactive metabolome, which we found to be a critical component of UPEC virulence. The individualized virulence-associated interactive metabolome contained 31 different metabolites and 17 central metabolic pathways that were annotated to host these different metabolites, including energetic metabolism, amino acid metabolism, and gut microbe metabolism. Changes in the activities of these pathways mechanistically pinpointed the virulent capability of siderophore biosynthesis. Together, our findings provide novel insights into UPEC virulence, and we propose that siderophores are potential targets for further discovery of drugs to treat UPEC-induced UTI.

  19. Frequencies of virulence genes and pulse field gel electrophoresis fingerprints in Escherichia coli isolates from canine pyometra.

    PubMed

    Maluta, Renato P; Borges, Clarissa A; Beraldo, Lívia G; Cardozo, Marita V; Voorwald, Fabiana A; Santana, André M; Rigobelo, Everlon C; Toniollo, Gilson H; Avila, Fernando A

    2014-11-01

    Escherichia coli is the most common bacterial agent isolated from canine pyometra. The frequencies of 24 virulence genes and pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) profiles were determined for 23 E. coli isolates from cases of canine pyometra in Brazil. The frequencies of virulence genes were 91.3% fimH, 91.3% irp-2, 82.6% fyuA, 56.5% iroN, 47.8% traT, 39.1% usp, 34.8% sfaD/E, 34.8% tsh, 30.4% papC, 30.4% hlyA, 26.1% papGIII, 26.1% cnf-1, 21.7% papE/F, 21.7% iss, 17.4% iutA, 17.4% ompT, 17.4% cvaC, 17.4% hlyF, 17.4% iucD, 13.0% iucC, 13.0% astA, 4.3% papGII, 0% afaB/C and 0% papGI. The high frequency of yersiniabactin (fyuA and irp2) and salmochelin (iroN) genes suggests that iron uptake systems might be important in the pathogenesis of canine pyometra. PFGE profiles of 19 isolates were heterogeneous, confirming that E. coli isolates from canine pyometra are unlikely to be epidemic clones. PMID:25201253

  20. Virulence repertoire, characterization, and antibiotic resistance pattern analysis of Escherichia coli isolated from backyard layers and their environment in India.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Indranil; Joardar, Siddhartha N; Das, Pradip K; Das, Palas; Sar, Tapas K; Dutta, Tapan K; Bandyopadhyay, Samiran; Batabyal, Subhasis; Isore, Devi P

    2014-03-01

    This study was undertaken to observe the prevalence, serogroup, avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC)-associated virulence gene, randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) pattern, and antibiotic resistance genes of E. coli in backyard layers and their environment in India. From the 360 samples of healthy layers and their environment, 272 (75.5%) E. coli were isolated. The majority (28.67%) of them were untypeable. Among the studied virulence genes (papC, tsh, iucC, astA), 52 (14.32%) isolates were found to possess astA, including the isolates from the drinking water of the birds (4/272, 1.47%). These strains belonged to 18 different serogroups. Most of the isolates were typeable by RAPD and they produced different patterns. Phenotypic resistance of the isolates was most frequently observed to erythromycin (95.83%), chloramphenicol (87.52%), and cotrimoxazole (78.26%). None of the isolates was found to possess extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (bla(TEM), bla(SHV), bla(CTX-M) or quinolone resistance (qnrA) genes by PCR. The present study was the first attempt in India to assess APEC distribution in backyard poultry production.

  1. Phylogenetic grouping, epidemiological typing, analysis of virulence genes, and antimicrobial susceptibility of Escherichia coli isolated from healthy broilers in Japan

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of our study was to investigate the possible etiology of avian colibacillosis by examining Escherichia coli isolates from fecal samples of healthy broilers. Findings Seventy-eight E. coli isolates from fecal samples of healthy broilers in Japan were subjected to analysis of phylogenetic background, virulence-associated gene profiling, multi-locus sequence typing (MLST), and antimicrobial resistance profiling. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that 35 of the 78 isolates belonged to group A, 28 to group B1, one to group B2, and 14 to group D. Virulence-associated genes iutA, iss, cvaC, tsh, iroN, ompT, and hlyF were found in 23 isolates (29.5%), 16 isolates (20.5%), nine isolates (11.5%), five isolates (6.4%), 19 isolates (24.4%), 23 isolates (29.5%), and 22 isolates (28.2%) respectively. Although the genetic diversity of group D isolates was revealed by MLST, the group D isolates harbored iutA (10 isolates, 71.4%), iss (6 isolates, 42.9%), cvaC (5 isolates, 35.7%), tsh (3 isolates, 21.4%), hlyF (9 isolates, 64.3%), iroN (7 isolates, 50.0%), and ompT (9 isolates, 64.3%). Conclusions Our results indicated that E. coli isolates inhabiting the intestines of healthy broilers pose a potential risk of causing avian colibacillosis. PMID:25061511

  2. FDA Escherichia coli Identification (FDA-ECID) Microarray: a Pangenome Molecular Toolbox for Serotyping, Virulence Profiling, Molecular Epidemiology, and Phylogeny

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Isha R.; Gangiredla, Jayanthi; Lacher, David W.; Mammel, Mark K.; Jackson, Scott A.; Lampel, Keith A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Most Escherichia coli strains are nonpathogenic. However, for clinical diagnosis and food safety analysis, current identification methods for pathogenic E. coli either are time-consuming and/or provide limited information. Here, we utilized a custom DNA microarray with informative genetic features extracted from 368 sequence sets for rapid and high-throughput pathogen identification. The FDA Escherichia coli Identification (FDA-ECID) platform contains three sets of molecularly informative features that together stratify strain identification and relatedness. First, 53 known flagellin alleles, 103 alleles of wzx and wzy, and 5 alleles of wzm provide molecular serotyping utility. Second, 41,932 probe sets representing the pan-genome of E. coli provide strain-level gene content information. Third, approximately 125,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of available whole-genome sequences (WGS) were distilled to 9,984 SNPs capable of recapitulating the E. coli phylogeny. We analyzed 103 diverse E. coli strains with available WGS data, including those associated with past foodborne illnesses, to determine robustness and accuracy. The array was able to accurately identify the molecular O and H serotypes, potentially correcting serological failures and providing better resolution for H-nontypeable/nonmotile phenotypes. In addition, molecular risk assessment was possible with key virulence marker identifications. Epidemiologically, each strain had a unique comparative genomic fingerprint that was extended to an additional 507 food and clinical isolates. Finally, a 99.7% phylogenetic concordance was established between microarray analysis and WGS using SNP-level data for advanced genome typing. Our study demonstrates FDA-ECID as a powerful tool for epidemiology and molecular risk assessment with the capacity to profile the global landscape and diversity of E. coli. IMPORTANCE This study describes a robust, state-of-the-art platform developed from available

  3. Prevalence of Virulence Genes Associated with Pathogenic Escherichia coli Strains Isolated from Domestically Harvested Rainwater during Low- and High-Rainfall Periods

    PubMed Central

    Dobrowsky, P. H.; van Deventer, A.; De Kwaadsteniet, M.; Ndlovu, T.; Khan, S.; Cloete, T. E.

    2014-01-01

    The possible health risks associated with the consumption of harvested rainwater remains one of the major obstacles hampering its large-scale implementation in water limited countries such as South Africa. Rainwater tank samples collected on eight occasions during the low- and high-rainfall periods (March to August 2012) in Kleinmond, South Africa, were monitored for the presence of virulence genes associated with Escherichia coli. The identity of presumptive E. coli isolates in rainwater samples collected from 10 domestic rainwater harvesting (DRWH) tanks throughout the sampling period was confirmed through universal 16S rRNA PCR with subsequent sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. Species-specific primers were also used to routinely screen for the virulent genes, aggR, stx, eae, and ipaH found in enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC), enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC), enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), and enteroinvasive E. coli, respectively, in the rainwater samples. Of the 92 E. coli strains isolated from the rainwater using culture based techniques, 6% were presumptively positively identified as E. coli O157:H7 using 16S rRNA. Furthermore, virulent pathogenic E. coli genes were detected in 3% (EPEC and EHEC) and 16% (EAEC) of the 80 rainwater samples collected during the sampling period from the 10 DRWH tanks. This study thus contributes valuable information to the limited data available regarding the ongoing prevalence of virulent pathotypes of E. coli in harvested rainwater during a longitudinal study in a high-population-density, periurban setting. PMID:24375127

  4. Prevalence of virulence genes associated with pathogenic Escherichia coli strains isolated from domestically harvested rainwater during low- and high-rainfall periods.

    PubMed

    Dobrowsky, P H; van Deventer, A; De Kwaadsteniet, M; Ndlovu, T; Khan, S; Cloete, T E; Khan, W

    2014-03-01

    The possible health risks associated with the consumption of harvested rainwater remains one of the major obstacles hampering its large-scale implementation in water limited countries such as South Africa. Rainwater tank samples collected on eight occasions during the low- and high-rainfall periods (March to August 2012) in Kleinmond, South Africa, were monitored for the presence of virulence genes associated with Escherichia coli. The identity of presumptive E. coli isolates in rainwater samples collected from 10 domestic rainwater harvesting (DRWH) tanks throughout the sampling period was confirmed through universal 16S rRNA PCR with subsequent sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. Species-specific primers were also used to routinely screen for the virulent genes, aggR, stx, eae, and ipaH found in enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC), enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC), enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), and enteroinvasive E. coli, respectively, in the rainwater samples. Of the 92 E. coli strains isolated from the rainwater using culture based techniques, 6% were presumptively positively identified as E. coli O157:H7 using 16S rRNA. Furthermore, virulent pathogenic E. coli genes were detected in 3% (EPEC and EHEC) and 16% (EAEC) of the 80 rainwater samples collected during the sampling period from the 10 DRWH tanks. This study thus contributes valuable information to the limited data available regarding the ongoing prevalence of virulent pathotypes of E. coli in harvested rainwater during a longitudinal study in a high-population-density, periurban setting.

  5. Coordination of Metabolism and Virulence Factors Expression of Extraintestinal Pathogenic Escherichia coli Purified from Blood Cultures of Patients with Sepsis *

    PubMed Central

    Pettersen, Veronika Kuchařová; Mosevoll, Knut Anders; Lindemann, Paul Christoffer; Wiker, Harald G.

    2016-01-01

    One of the trademarks of extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli is adaptation of metabolism and basic physiology to diverse host sites. However, little is known how this common human pathogen adapts to permit survival and growth in blood. We used label-free quantitative proteomics to characterize five E. coli strains purified from clinical blood cultures associated with sepsis and urinary tract infections. Further comparison of proteome profiles of the clinical strains and a reference uropathogenic E. coli strain 536 cultivated in blood culture and on two different solid media distinguished cellular features altered in response to the pathogenically relevant condition. The analysis covered nearly 60% of the strains predicted proteomes, and included quantitative description based on label-free intensity scores for 90% of the detected proteins. Statistical comparison of anaerobic and aerobic blood cultures revealed 32 differentially expressed proteins (1.5% of the shared proteins), mostly associated with acquisition and utilization of metal ions critical for anaerobic or aerobic respiration. Analysis of variance identified significantly altered amounts of 47 proteins shared by the strains (2.7%), including proteins involved in vitamin B6 metabolism and virulence. Although the proteomes derived from blood cultures were fairly similar for the investigated strains, quantitative proteomic comparison to the growth on solid media identified 200 proteins with substantially changed levels (11% of the shared proteins). Blood culture was characterized by up-regulation of anaerobic fermentative metabolism and multiple virulence traits, including cell motility and iron acquisition. In a response to the growth on solid media there were increased levels of proteins functional in aerobic respiration, catabolism of medium-specific carbon sources and protection against oxidative and osmotic stresses. These results demonstrate on the expressed proteome level that expression of

  6. Coordination of Metabolism and Virulence Factors Expression of Extraintestinal Pathogenic Escherichia coli Purified from Blood Cultures of Patients with Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Pettersen, Veronika Kuchařová; Mosevoll, Knut Anders; Lindemann, Paul Christoffer; Wiker, Harald G

    2016-09-01

    One of the trademarks of extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli is adaptation of metabolism and basic physiology to diverse host sites. However, little is known how this common human pathogen adapts to permit survival and growth in blood. We used label-free quantitative proteomics to characterize five E. coli strains purified from clinical blood cultures associated with sepsis and urinary tract infections. Further comparison of proteome profiles of the clinical strains and a reference uropathogenic E. coli strain 536 cultivated in blood culture and on two different solid media distinguished cellular features altered in response to the pathogenically relevant condition. The analysis covered nearly 60% of the strains predicted proteomes, and included quantitative description based on label-free intensity scores for 90% of the detected proteins. Statistical comparison of anaerobic and aerobic blood cultures revealed 32 differentially expressed proteins (1.5% of the shared proteins), mostly associated with acquisition and utilization of metal ions critical for anaerobic or aerobic respiration. Analysis of variance identified significantly altered amounts of 47 proteins shared by the strains (2.7%), including proteins involved in vitamin B6 metabolism and virulence. Although the proteomes derived from blood cultures were fairly similar for the investigated strains, quantitative proteomic comparison to the growth on solid media identified 200 proteins with substantially changed levels (11% of the shared proteins). Blood culture was characterized by up-regulation of anaerobic fermentative metabolism and multiple virulence traits, including cell motility and iron acquisition. In a response to the growth on solid media there were increased levels of proteins functional in aerobic respiration, catabolism of medium-specific carbon sources and protection against oxidative and osmotic stresses. These results demonstrate on the expressed proteome level that expression of

  7. A Conserved Virulence Plasmidic Region Contributes to the Virulence of the Multiresistant Escherichia coli Meningitis Strain S286 Belonging to Phylogenetic Group C

    PubMed Central

    Caro, Valérie; Diancourt, Laure; Bingen, Edouard; Bidet, Philippe; Bonacorsi, Stéphane

    2013-01-01

    Recent isolation of the non-K1 Escherichia coli neonatal meningitis strain S286, belonging to phylogroup C, which is closely related to major group B1, and producing an extended-spectrum beta-lactamase, encouraged us to seek the genetic determinants responsible for its virulence. We show that S286 belongs to the sequence O type ST23O78 and harbors 4 large plasmids. The largest one, pS286colV (∼120 kb), not related to resistance, contains genes characteristic of a Conserved Virulence Plasmidic (CVP) region initially identified in B2 extra-intestinal avian pathogenic E. coli (APEC) strains and in the B2 neonatal meningitis E. coli strain S88. The sequence of this CVP region has a strong homology (98%) with that of the recently sequenced plasmid pChi7122-1 of the O78 APEC strain Chi7122. A CVP plasmid-cured variant of S286 was less virulent than the wild type strain in a neonatal rat sepsis model with a significant lower level of bacteremia at 24 h (4.1±1.41 versus 2.60±0.16 log CFU/ml, p = 0.001) and mortality. However, the mortality in the model of adult mice was comparable between wild type and variant indicating that pS286colV is not sufficient by itself to fully explain the virulence of S286. Gene expression analysis of pS286colV in iron depleted environment was very close to that of pS88, suggesting that genes of CVP region may be expressed similarly in two very different genetic backgrounds (group C versus group B2). Screening a collection of 178 human A/B1 extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) strains revealed that the CVP region is highly prevalent (23%) and MLST analysis indicated that these CVP positive strains belong to several clusters and mostly to phylogroup C. The virulence of S286 is explained in part by the presence of CVP region and this region has spread in different clusters of human A/B1 ExPEC, especially in group C. PMID:24086343

  8. An environmental shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O145 clonal population exhibits high-level phenotypic variation that includes virulence traits

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) serotype O145 is one of the major non-O157 serotypes associated with severe human disease. Here we examined the genetic diversity, population structure, virulence potential, and antibiotic resistance profile of environmental O145 strains isolated from a ...

  9. Characterization of shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli recovered from domestic animals to determine stx variants, virulence genes, and cytotoxicity in mammalian cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) can cause foodborne illnesses ranging from diarrhea to severe diseases such as hemorrhagic colitis (HC), and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) in humans. In this study, we determined virulence genes, stx subtypes and we evaluated the cytotoxicity in mammal...

  10. Quorum sensing transcriptional regulator QseA is essential for the expression of multiple virulence regulons of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction and Objectives: QseA is one of several transcriptional regulators that regulates the virulence gene expression in enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 through quorum sensing. QseA has been shown to regulate the expression of the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE), non-LEE...

  11. Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli strains isolated from dairy products - Genetic diversity and virulence gene profiles.

    PubMed

    Douëllou, T; Delannoy, S; Ganet, S; Mariani-Kurkdjian, P; Fach, P; Loukiadis, E; Montel, Mc; Thevenot-Sergentet, D

    2016-09-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) are widely recognized as pathogens causing food borne disease. Here we evaluate the genetic diversity of 197 strains, mainly STEC, from serotypes O157:H7, O26:H11, O103:H2, O111:H8 and O145:28 and compared strains recovered in dairy products against strains from human, meat and environment cases. For this purpose, we characterized a set of reference-collection STEC isolates from dairy products by PFGE DNA fingerprinting and a subset of these by virulence-gene profiling. PFGE profiles of restricted STEC total DNA showed high genomic variability (0.9976 on Simpson's discriminatory index), enabling all dairy isolates to be differentiated. High-throughput real-time PCR screening of STEC virulence genes were applied on the O157:H7 and O26:H11 STEC isolates from dairy products and human cases. The virulence gene profiles of dairy and human STEC strains were similar. Nevertheless, frequency-wise, stx1 was more prevalent among dairy O26:H11 isolates than in human cases ones (87% vs. 44%) while stx2 was more prevalent among O26:H11 human isolates (23% vs. 81%). For O157:H7 isolates, stx1 (0% vs. 39%), nleF (40% vs 94%) and Z6065 (40% vs 100%) were more prevalent among human than dairy strains. Our data point to differences between human and dairy strains but these differences were not sufficient to associate PFGE and virulence gene profiles to a putative lower pathogenicity of dairy strains based on their lower incidence in disease. Further comparison of whole-genome expression and virulence gene profiles should be investigated in cheese and intestinal tract samples.

  12. Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli strains isolated from dairy products - Genetic diversity and virulence gene profiles.

    PubMed

    Douëllou, T; Delannoy, S; Ganet, S; Mariani-Kurkdjian, P; Fach, P; Loukiadis, E; Montel, Mc; Thevenot-Sergentet, D

    2016-09-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) are widely recognized as pathogens causing food borne disease. Here we evaluate the genetic diversity of 197 strains, mainly STEC, from serotypes O157:H7, O26:H11, O103:H2, O111:H8 and O145:28 and compared strains recovered in dairy products against strains from human, meat and environment cases. For this purpose, we characterized a set of reference-collection STEC isolates from dairy products by PFGE DNA fingerprinting and a subset of these by virulence-gene profiling. PFGE profiles of restricted STEC total DNA showed high genomic variability (0.9976 on Simpson's discriminatory index), enabling all dairy isolates to be differentiated. High-throughput real-time PCR screening of STEC virulence genes were applied on the O157:H7 and O26:H11 STEC isolates from dairy products and human cases. The virulence gene profiles of dairy and human STEC strains were similar. Nevertheless, frequency-wise, stx1 was more prevalent among dairy O26:H11 isolates than in human cases ones (87% vs. 44%) while stx2 was more prevalent among O26:H11 human isolates (23% vs. 81%). For O157:H7 isolates, stx1 (0% vs. 39%), nleF (40% vs 94%) and Z6065 (40% vs 100%) were more prevalent among human than dairy strains. Our data point to differences between human and dairy strains but these differences were not sufficient to associate PFGE and virulence gene profiles to a putative lower pathogenicity of dairy strains based on their lower incidence in disease. Further comparison of whole-genome expression and virulence gene profiles should be investigated in cheese and intestinal tract samples. PMID:27257743

  13. The BarA-UvrY two-component system regulates virulence in avian pathogenic Escherichia coli O78:K80:H9.

    PubMed

    Herren, Christopher D; Mitra, Arindam; Palaniyandi, Senthil Kumar; Coleman, Adam; Elankumaran, Subbiah; Mukhopadhyay, Suman

    2006-08-01

    The BarA-UvrY two-component system (TCS) in Escherichia coli is known to regulate a number of phenotypic traits. Both in vitro and in vivo assays, including the chicken embryo lethality assay, showed that this TCS regulates virulence in avian pathogenic E. coli (APEC) serotype O78:K80:H9. A number of virulence determinants, such as the abilities to adhere, invade, persist within tissues, survive within macrophages, and resist bactericidal effects of serum complement, were compromised in mutants lacking either the barA or uvrY gene. The reduced virulence was attributed to down regulation of type 1 and Pap fimbriae, reduced exopolysaccharide production, and increased susceptibility to oxidative stress. Our results indicate that BarA-UvrY regulates virulence properties in APEC and that the chicken embryo lethality assay can be used as a surrogate model to determine virulence determinants and their regulation in APEC strains.

  14. Outer membrane vesicles induce immune responses to virulence proteins and protect against colonization by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Roy, Koushik; Hamilton, David J; Munson, George P; Fleckenstein, James M

    2011-11-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains are a heterogeneous group of pathogens that produce heat-labile (LT) and/or heat-stable (ST) enterotoxins. Collectively, these pathogens are responsible for hundreds of thousands of deaths annually in developing countries, particularly in children under the age of 5 years. The heterogeneity of previously investigated molecular targets and the lack of complete sustained protection afforded by antitoxin immunity have impeded progress to date toward a broadly protective vaccine. Many pathogens, including ETEC, have the capacity to form outer membrane vesicles (OMV), which often contain one or more virulence proteins. Prompted by recent studies that identified several immunogenic virulence proteins in outer membrane vesicles of ETEC, we sought to examine the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of these structures in a murine model of infection. Here we demonstrate that immunization with OMV impairs ETEC colonization of the small intestine and stimulates antibodies that recognize the heat-labile toxin and two additional putative virulence proteins, the EtpA adhesin and CexE. Similar to earlier studies with EtpA, vaccination with LT alone also inhibited intestinal colonization. Together, these findings suggest that OMV could be exploited to deliver protective antigens relevant to development of ETEC vaccines. PMID:21900530

  15. Antimicrobial Resistance and Virulence Factors of Escherichia coli in Cheese Made from Unpasteurized Milk in Three Cities in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Laryssa Freitas; Barbosa, Mayhara Martins Cordeiro; Pinto, Fernanda de Rezende; Maluta, Renato Pariz; Oliveira, Mônica Costa; de Souza, Viviane; de Medeiros, Maria Izabel Merino; Borges, Lucimara Antonio; do Amaral, Luiz Augusto; Fairbrother, John Morris

    2016-09-01

    The production of cheeses from unpasteurized milk is still widespread in Brazil, even with a legal ban imposed on its marketing. The manufacture of this cheese is a public health problem, due to the use of raw milk and the poor hygienic conditions throughout the supply chain process. Contamination may occur from several sources and involve several different pathogenic microorganisms, such as Escherichia coli. The latter can cause different clinical manifestations depending on the pathotype involved. Furthermore, some isolates manifest antimicrobial resistance and may be a risk for public health. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the presence of potentially pathogenic E. coli in raw-milk cheese in Brazil and their possible risk to public health. A total of 83 cheeses were collected from three different cities and 169 E. coli isolates were characterized for the presence of enteropathogenic E. coli, Shigatoxigenic E. coli, enterotoxigenic E. coli, extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) virulence genes, phylogenetic type, antimicrobial resistance, O serogroup, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. The number of samples positive for E. coli was highest in Aracaju (90.32%, 28/31). The prevalence of samples positive for potential ExPEC genes was similar for Uberaba and Aracaju (23.07%); the most prevalent ExPEC virulence genes were tsh, iucD, and papC. Isolates from Uberaba had a higher prevalence of resistance to tetracycline (38.46%), amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (58.85%), and ampicillin (61.54%) than the other cities. Overall, antimicrobial resistance genes tetB, blaTEM, and blaCMY-2 were the most prevalent genes (26.32%, 15.79%, and 28.95%, respectively) and the most prevalent serotypes were O4 (8%), 018 (12%), and O23 (8%). Clones originating from the same regions and from different regions were observed. These results emphasize the presence of a potential danger for humans in the consumption of raw-milk cheeses in three cities in Brazil due to

  16. Antimicrobial Resistance and Virulence Factors of Escherichia coli in Cheese Made from Unpasteurized Milk in Three Cities in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Laryssa Freitas; Barbosa, Mayhara Martins Cordeiro; Pinto, Fernanda de Rezende; Maluta, Renato Pariz; Oliveira, Mônica Costa; de Souza, Viviane; de Medeiros, Maria Izabel Merino; Borges, Lucimara Antonio; do Amaral, Luiz Augusto; Fairbrother, John Morris

    2016-09-01

    The production of cheeses from unpasteurized milk is still widespread in Brazil, even with a legal ban imposed on its marketing. The manufacture of this cheese is a public health problem, due to the use of raw milk and the poor hygienic conditions throughout the supply chain process. Contamination may occur from several sources and involve several different pathogenic microorganisms, such as Escherichia coli. The latter can cause different clinical manifestations depending on the pathotype involved. Furthermore, some isolates manifest antimicrobial resistance and may be a risk for public health. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the presence of potentially pathogenic E. coli in raw-milk cheese in Brazil and their possible risk to public health. A total of 83 cheeses were collected from three different cities and 169 E. coli isolates were characterized for the presence of enteropathogenic E. coli, Shigatoxigenic E. coli, enterotoxigenic E. coli, extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) virulence genes, phylogenetic type, antimicrobial resistance, O serogroup, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. The number of samples positive for E. coli was highest in Aracaju (90.32%, 28/31). The prevalence of samples positive for potential ExPEC genes was similar for Uberaba and Aracaju (23.07%); the most prevalent ExPEC virulence genes were tsh, iucD, and papC. Isolates from Uberaba had a higher prevalence of resistance to tetracycline (38.46%), amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (58.85%), and ampicillin (61.54%) than the other cities. Overall, antimicrobial resistance genes tetB, blaTEM, and blaCMY-2 were the most prevalent genes (26.32%, 15.79%, and 28.95%, respectively) and the most prevalent serotypes were O4 (8%), 018 (12%), and O23 (8%). Clones originating from the same regions and from different regions were observed. These results emphasize the presence of a potential danger for humans in the consumption of raw-milk cheeses in three cities in Brazil due to

  17. Temperature control of molecular circuit switch responsible for virulent phenotype expression in uropathogenic Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samoilov, Michael

    2010-03-01

    The behavior and fate of biological organisms are to a large extent dictated by their environment, which can be often viewed as a collection of features and constraints governed by physics laws. Since biological systems comprise networks of molecular interactions, one such key physical property is temperature, whose variations directly affect the rates of biochemical reactions involved. For instance, temperature is known to control many gene regulatory circuits responsible for pathogenicity in bacteria. One such example is type 1 fimbriae (T1F) -- the foremost virulence factor in uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC), which accounts for 80-90% of all community-acquired urinary tract infections (UTIs). The expression of T1F is randomly `phase variable', i.e. individual cells switch between virulent/fimbriate and avirulent/afimbriate phenotypes, with rates regulated by temperature. Our computational investigation of this process, which is based on FimB/FimE recombinase-mediated inversion of fimS DNA element, offers new insights into its discrete-stochastic kinetics. In particular, it elucidates the logic of T1F control optimization to the host temperature and contributes further understanding toward the development of novel therapeutic approaches to UPEC-caused UTIs.

  18. Relationship between eae and stx virulence genes and Escherichia coli in an agricultural watershed: implications for irrigation water standards and leafy green commodities.

    PubMed

    Shelton, Daniel R; Karns, Jeffrey S; Coppock, Cary; Patel, Jitu; Sharma, Manan; Pachepsky, Yakov A

    2011-01-01

    The California Leafy Greens Marketing Agreement (LGMA) was adopted in an effort to minimize the risk of contamination of leafy greens with enteric pathogens from a variety of sources, including ground and surface irrigation waters. The LGMA contains standards similar to those established for recreational waters, based on Escherichia coli concentrations. However, no correlation between E. coli and any specific waterborne pathogen(s) has been reported. We conducted this monitoring study in an agricultural watershed to (i) evaluate spatial and temporal fluctuations in E. coli populations and virulence genes associated with pathogenic E. coli and (ii) investigate whether a relationship could be established between E. coli and virulence genes. The virulence genes targeted for analysis were the eae and stx genes, encoding for intimin and Shiga-like toxins, respectively; they were detected with PCR methods. E. coli concentrations and eae and stx prevalence varied both spatially and temporally. In general, both were higher in agricultural than in forested areas and were higher in the summer and fall seasons than in winter. The eae and stx genes were prevalent throughout the watershed. However, in the absence of actual isolates, no conclusions could be drawn regarding the prevalence of specific pathogenic E. coli. No correlation was observed between E. coli concentrations and virulence genes; lower E. coli concentrations were not necessarily associated with decreased prevalence of eae and stx genes. These results suggest that the LGMA standards might not adequately address the issue of waterborne contamination, and that alternative criteria might be required. PMID:21219758

  19. Relationship between eae and stx virulence genes and Escherichia coli in an agricultural watershed: implications for irrigation water standards and leafy green commodities.

    PubMed

    Shelton, Daniel R; Karns, Jeffrey S; Coppock, Cary; Patel, Jitu; Sharma, Manan; Pachepsky, Yakov A

    2011-01-01

    The California Leafy Greens Marketing Agreement (LGMA) was adopted in an effort to minimize the risk of contamination of leafy greens with enteric pathogens from a variety of sources, including ground and surface irrigation waters. The LGMA contains standards similar to those established for recreational waters, based on Escherichia coli concentrations. However, no correlation between E. coli and any specific waterborne pathogen(s) has been reported. We conducted this monitoring study in an agricultural watershed to (i) evaluate spatial and temporal fluctuations in E. coli populations and virulence genes associated with pathogenic E. coli and (ii) investigate whether a relationship could be established between E. coli and virulence genes. The virulence genes targeted for analysis were the eae and stx genes, encoding for intimin and Shiga-like toxins, respectively; they were detected with PCR methods. E. coli concentrations and eae and stx prevalence varied both spatially and temporally. In general, both were higher in agricultural than in forested areas and were higher in the summer and fall seasons than in winter. The eae and stx genes were prevalent throughout the watershed. However, in the absence of actual isolates, no conclusions could be drawn regarding the prevalence of specific pathogenic E. coli. No correlation was observed between E. coli concentrations and virulence genes; lower E. coli concentrations were not necessarily associated with decreased prevalence of eae and stx genes. These results suggest that the LGMA standards might not adequately address the issue of waterborne contamination, and that alternative criteria might be required.

  20. Roles of Putative Type II Secretion and Type IV Pilus Systems in the Virulence of Uropathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Ritwij; Dhakal, Bijaya K.; Slechta, E. Susan; Kurtz, Zachary; Mulvey, Matthew A.; Thanassi, David G.

    2009-01-01

    Background Type II secretion systems (T2SS) and the evolutionarily related type IV pili (T4P) are important virulence determinants in many Gram-negative bacterial pathogens. However, the roles of T2SS and T4P in the virulence of extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli have not been determined. Methodology/Principal Findings To investigate the functions of putative T2SS and T4P gene clusters present in the model uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) strains UTI89 and CFT073, we deleted the secretin gene present in each cluster. The secretin forms a channel in the outer membrane that is essential for the function of T2S and T4P systems. We compared the secretin deletion mutants with their wild type counterparts using tissue culture assays and the CBA/J mouse model of ascending urinary tract infection. No deficiencies were observed with any of the mutants in adherence, invasion or replication in human bladder or kidney cell lines, but UTI89 ΔhofQ and UTI89 ΔgspD exhibited approximately 2-fold defects in fluxing out of bladder epithelial cells. In the mouse infection model, each of the knockout mutants was able to establish successful infections in the bladder and kidneys by day one post-infection. However, UTI89 ΔhofQ and a CFT073 ΔhofQ ΔyheF double mutant both exhibited defects in colonizing the kidneys by day seven post-infection. Conclusions/Significance Based on our results, we propose that the putative T4P and T2S systems are virulence determinants of UPEC important for persistence in the urinary tract, particularly in renal tissues. PMID:19270734

  1. Molecular Evolution of Typical Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli: Clonal Analysis by Multilocus Sequence Typing and Virulence Gene Allelic Profiling▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Lacher, David W.; Steinsland, Hans; Blank, T. Eric; Donnenberg, Michael S.; Whittam, Thomas S.

    2007-01-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) infections are a leading cause of infantile diarrhea in developing nations. Typical EPEC isolates are differentiated from other types of pathogenic E. coli by two distinctive phenotypes, attaching effacement and localized adherence. The genes specifying these phenotypes are found on the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE) and the EPEC adherence factor (EAF) plasmid. To describe how typical EPEC has evolved, we characterized a diverse collection of strains by multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and performed restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of three virulence genes (eae, bfpA, and perA) to assess allelic variation. Among 129 strains representing 20 O-serogroups, 21 clonal genotypes were identified using MLST. RFLP analysis resolved nine eae, nine bfpA, and four perA alleles. Each bfpA allele was associated with only one perA allele class, suggesting that recombination has not played a large role in shuffling the bfpA and perA loci between separate EAF plasmids. The distribution of eae alleles among typical EPEC strains is more concordant with the clonal relationships than the distribution of the EAF plasmid types. These results provide further support for the hypothesis that the EPEC pathotype has evolved multiple times within E. coli through separate acquisitions of the LEE island and EAF plasmid. PMID:17098897

  2. Modulation of virulence genes by the two-component system PhoP-PhoQ in avian pathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Tu, Jian; Huang, Boyan; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Yuxi; Xue, Ting; Li, Shaocan; Qi, Kezong

    2016-01-01

    Avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) infections are a very important problem in the poultry industry. PhoP-PhoQ is a two-component system that regulates virulence genes in APEC. In this study, we constructed strains that lacked the PhoP or PhoQ genes to assess regulation of APEC pathogenicity by the PhoP-PhoQ two-component system. The PhoP mutant strain AE18, PhoQ mutant strain AE19, and PhoP/PhoQ mutant strain AE20 were constructed by the Red homologous recombination method. Swim plates were used to evaluate the motility of the APEC strains, viable bacteria counting was used to assess adhesion and invasion of chick embryo fibroblasts, and Real-Time PCR was used to measure mRNA expression of virulence genes. We first confirmed that AE18, AE19, and AE20 were successfully constructed from the wild-type AE17 strain. AE18, AE19, and AE20 showed significant decreases in motility of 70.97%, 83.87%, and 37.1%, respectively, in comparison with AE17. Moreover, in comparison with AE17, AE18, AE19, and AE20 showed significant decreases of 63.11%, 65.42%, and 30.26%, respectively, in CEF cell adhesion, and significant decreases of 59.83%, 57.82%, and 37.90%, respectively, in CEF cell invasion. In comparison with AE17, transcript levels of sodA, polA, and iss were significantly decreased in AE18, while transcript levels of fimC and iss were significantly decreased in AE19. Our results demonstrate that deletion of PhoP or PhoQ inhibits invasion and adhesion of APEC to CEF cells and significantly reduces APEC virulence by regulating transcription of virulence genes.

  3. Modulation of virulence genes by the two-component system PhoP-PhoQ in avian pathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Tu, Jian; Huang, Boyan; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Yuxi; Xue, Ting; Li, Shaocan; Qi, Kezong

    2016-01-01

    Avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) infections are a very important problem in the poultry industry. PhoP-PhoQ is a two-component system that regulates virulence genes in APEC. In this study, we constructed strains that lacked the PhoP or PhoQ genes to assess regulation of APEC pathogenicity by the PhoP-PhoQ two-component system. The PhoP mutant strain AE18, PhoQ mutant strain AE19, and PhoP/PhoQ mutant strain AE20 were constructed by the Red homologous recombination method. Swim plates were used to evaluate the motility of the APEC strains, viable bacteria counting was used to assess adhesion and invasion of chick embryo fibroblasts, and Real-Time PCR was used to measure mRNA expression of virulence genes. We first confirmed that AE18, AE19, and AE20 were successfully constructed from the wild-type AE17 strain. AE18, AE19, and AE20 showed significant decreases in motility of 70.97%, 83.87%, and 37.1%, respectively, in comparison with AE17. Moreover, in comparison with AE17, AE18, AE19, and AE20 showed significant decreases of 63.11%, 65.42%, and 30.26%, respectively, in CEF cell adhesion, and significant decreases of 59.83%, 57.82%, and 37.90%, respectively, in CEF cell invasion. In comparison with AE17, transcript levels of sodA, polA, and iss were significantly decreased in AE18, while transcript levels of fimC and iss were significantly decreased in AE19. Our results demonstrate that deletion of PhoP or PhoQ inhibits invasion and adhesion of APEC to CEF cells and significantly reduces APEC virulence by regulating transcription of virulence genes. PMID:27096785

  4. Siderophore Biosynthesis Governs the Virulence of Uropathogenic Escherichia coli by Coordinately Modulating the Differential Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Su, Qiao; Guan, Tianbing; He, Yan; Lv, Haitao

    2016-04-01

    Urinary tract infections impose substantial health burdens on women worldwide. Urinary tract infections often incur a high risk of recurrence and antibiotic resistance, and uropathogenic E. coli accounts for approximately 80% of clinically acquired cases. The diagnosis of, treatment of, and drug development for urinary tract infections remain substantial challenges due to the complex pathogenesis of this condition. The clinically isolated UPEC 83972 strain was found to produce four siderophores: yersiniabactin, aerobactin, salmochelin, and enterobactin. The biosyntheses of some of these siderophores implies that the virulence of UPEC is mediated via the targeting of primary metabolism. However, the differential modulatory roles of siderophore biosyntheses on the differential metabolomes of UPEC and non-UPEC strains remain incompletely understood. In the present study, we sought to investigate how the differential metabolomes can be used to distinguish UPEC from non-UPEC strains and to determine the associated regulatory roles of siderophore biosynthesis. Our results are the first to demonstrate that the identified differential metabolomes strongly differentiated UPEC from non-UPEC strains. Furthermore, we performed metabolome assays of mutants with different patterns of siderophore deletions; the data revealed that the mutations of all four siderophores exerted a stronger modulatory role on the differential metabolomes of the UPEC and non-UPEC strains relative to the mutation of any single siderophore and that this modulatory role primarily involved amino acid metabolism, oxidative phosphorylation in the carbon fixation pathway, and purine and pyrimidine metabolism. Surprisingly, the modulatory roles were strongly dependent on the type and number of mutated siderophores. Taken together, these results demonstrated that siderophore biosynthesis coordinately modulated the differential metabolomes and thus may indicate novel targets for virulence-based diagnosis

  5. Biophysical Characterization and Activity of Lymphostatin, a Multifunctional Virulence Factor of Attaching and Effacing Escherichia coli *

    PubMed Central

    Cassady-Cain, Robin L.; Blackburn, Elizabeth A.; Alsarraf, Husam; Dedic, Emil; Bease, Andrew G.; Böttcher, Bettina; Jørgensen, René; Wear, Martin; Stevens, Mark P.

    2016-01-01

    Attaching and effacing Escherichia coli cause diarrhea and typically produce lymphostatin (LifA), an inhibitor of mitogen-activated proliferation of lymphocytes and pro-inflammatory cytokine synthesis. A near-identical factor (Efa1) has been reported to mediate adherence of E. coli to epithelial cells. An amino-terminal region of LifA shares homology with the catalytic domain of the large clostridial toxins, which are retaining glycosyltransferases with a DXD motif involved in binding of a metal ion. Understanding the mode(s) of action of lymphostatin has been constrained by difficulties obtaining a stably transformed plasmid expression clone. We constructed a tightly inducible clone of enteropathogenic E. coli O127:H6 lifA for affinity purification of lymphostatin. The purified protein inhibited mitogen-activated proliferation of bovine T lymphocytes in the femtomolar range. It is a monomer in solution and the molecular envelope was determined using both transmission electron microscopy and small-angle x-ray scattering. Domain architecture was further studied by limited proteolysis. The largest proteolytic fragment containing the putative glycosyltransferase domain was tested in isolation for activity against T cells, and was not sufficient for activity. Tryptophan fluorescence studies indicated thatlymphostatin binds uridine diphosphate-N-acetylglucosamine (UDP-GlcNAc) but not UDP-glucose (UDP-Glc). Substitution of the predicted DXD glycosyltransferase motif with alanine residues abolished UDP-GlcNAc binding and lymphostatin activity, although other biophysical properties were unchanged. The data indicate that lymphostatin has UDP-sugar binding potential that is critical for activity, and is a major leap toward identifying the nature and consequences of modifications of host cell factors. PMID:26786100

  6. Biophysical Characterization and Activity of Lymphostatin, a Multifunctional Virulence Factor of Attaching and Effacing Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Cassady-Cain, Robin L; Blackburn, Elizabeth A; Alsarraf, Husam; Dedic, Emil; Bease, Andrew G; Böttcher, Bettina; Jørgensen, René; Wear, Martin; Stevens, Mark P

    2016-03-11

    Attaching and effacing Escherichia coli cause diarrhea and typically produce lymphostatin (LifA), an inhibitor of mitogen-activated proliferation of lymphocytes and pro-inflammatory cytokine synthesis. A near-identical factor (Efa1) has been reported to mediate adherence of E. coli to epithelial cells. An amino-terminal region of LifA shares homology with the catalytic domain of the large clostridial toxins, which are retaining glycosyltransferases with a DXD motif involved in binding of a metal ion. Understanding the mode(s) of action of lymphostatin has been constrained by difficulties obtaining a stably transformed plasmid expression clone. We constructed a tightly inducible clone of enteropathogenic E. coli O127:H6 lifA for affinity purification of lymphostatin. The purified protein inhibited mitogen-activated proliferation of bovine T lymphocytes in the femtomolar range. It is a monomer in solution and the molecular envelope was determined using both transmission electron microscopy and small-angle x-ray scattering. Domain architecture was further studied by limited proteolysis. The largest proteolytic fragment containing the putative glycosyltransferase domain was tested in isolation for activity against T cells, and was not sufficient for activity. Tryptophan fluorescence studies indicated thatlymphostatin binds uridine diphosphate-N-acetylglucosamine (UDP-GlcNAc) but not UDP-glucose (UDP-Glc). Substitution of the predicted DXD glycosyltransferase motif with alanine residues abolished UDP-GlcNAc binding and lymphostatin activity, although other biophysical properties were unchanged. The data indicate that lymphostatin has UDP-sugar binding potential that is critical for activity, and is a major leap toward identifying the nature and consequences of modifications of host cell factors.

  7. Adhesion of Human and Animal Escherichia coli Strains in Association with Their Virulence-Associated Genes and Phylogenetic Origins

    PubMed Central

    Frömmel, Ulrike; Lehmann, Werner; Rödiger, Stefan; Böhm, Alexander; Nitschke, Jörg; Weinreich, Jörg; Groß, Julia; Roggenbuck, Dirk; Zinke, Olaf; Ansorge, Hermann; Vogel, Steffen; Klemm, Per; Wex, Thomas; Schröder, Christian; Wieler, Lothar H.

    2013-01-01

    Intestinal colonization is influenced by the ability of the bacterium to inhabit a niche, which is based on the expression of colonization factors. Escherichia coli carries a broad range of virulence-associated genes (VAGs) which contribute to intestinal (inVAGs) and extraintestinal (exVAGs) infection. Moreover, initial evidence indicates that inVAGs and exVAGs support intestinal colonization. We developed new screening tools to genotypically and phenotypically characterize E. coli isolates originating in humans, domestic pigs, and 17 wild mammal and avian species. We analyzed 317 isolates for the occurrence of 44 VAGs using a novel multiplex PCR microbead assay (MPMA) and for adhesion to four epithelial cell lines using a new adhesion assay. We correlated data for the definition of new adhesion genes. inVAGs were identified only sporadically, particularly in roe deer (Capreolus capreolus) and the European hedgehog ( Erinaceus europaeus). The prevalence of exVAGs depended on isolation from a specific host. Human uropathogenic E. coli isolates carried exVAGs with the highest prevalence, followed by badger (Meles meles) and roe deer isolates. Adhesion was found to be very diverse. Adhesion was specific to cells, host, and tissue, though it was also unspecific. Occurrence of the following VAGs was associated with a higher rate of adhesion to one or more cell lines: afa-dra, daaD, tsh, vat, ibeA, fyuA, mat, sfa-foc, malX, pic, irp2, and papC. In summary, we established new screening methods which enabled us to characterize large numbers of E. coli isolates. We defined reservoirs for potential pathogenic E. coli. We also identified a very broad range of colonization strategies and defined potential new adhesion genes. PMID:23872574

  8. Adhesion of human and animal Escherichia coli strains in association with their virulence-associated genes and phylogenetic origins.

    PubMed

    Frömmel, Ulrike; Lehmann, Werner; Rödiger, Stefan; Böhm, Alexander; Nitschke, Jörg; Weinreich, Jörg; Groß, Julia; Roggenbuck, Dirk; Zinke, Olaf; Ansorge, Hermann; Vogel, Steffen; Klemm, Per; Wex, Thomas; Schröder, Christian; Wieler, Lothar H; Schierack, Peter

    2013-10-01

    Intestinal colonization is influenced by the ability of the bacterium to inhabit a niche, which is based on the expression of colonization factors. Escherichia coli carries a broad range of virulence-associated genes (VAGs) which contribute to intestinal (inVAGs) and extraintestinal (exVAGs) infection. Moreover, initial evidence indicates that inVAGs and exVAGs support intestinal colonization. We developed new screening tools to genotypically and phenotypically characterize E. coli isolates originating in humans, domestic pigs, and 17 wild mammal and avian species. We analyzed 317 isolates for the occurrence of 44 VAGs using a novel multiplex PCR microbead assay (MPMA) and for adhesion to four epithelial cell lines using a new adhesion assay. We correlated data for the definition of new adhesion genes. inVAGs were identified only sporadically, particularly in roe deer (Capreolus capreolus) and the European hedgehog ( Erinaceus europaeus). The prevalence of exVAGs depended on isolation from a specific host. Human uropathogenic E. coli isolates carried exVAGs with the highest prevalence, followed by badger (Meles meles) and roe deer isolates. Adhesion was found to be very diverse. Adhesion was specific to cells, host, and tissue, though it was also unspecific. Occurrence of the following VAGs was associated with a higher rate of adhesion to one or more cell lines: afa-dra, daaD, tsh, vat, ibeA, fyuA, mat, sfa-foc, malX, pic, irp2, and papC. In summary, we established new screening methods which enabled us to characterize large numbers of E. coli isolates. We defined reservoirs for potential pathogenic E. coli. We also identified a very broad range of colonization strategies and defined potential new adhesion genes.

  9. Antimicrobial Resistance, Virulence Factors and Genetic Diversity of Escherichia coli Isolates from Household Water Supply in Dhaka, Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Talukdar, Prabhat Kumar; Rahman, Mizanur; Rahman, Mahdia; Nabi, Ashikun; Islam, Zhahirul; Hoque, M. Mahfuzul; Endtz, Hubert P.; Islam, Mohammad Aminul

    2013-01-01

    Background Unsafe water supplies continue to raise public health concerns, especially in urban areas in low resource countries. To understand the extent of public health risk attributed to supply water in Dhaka city, Bangladesh, Escherichia coli isolated from tap water samples collected from different locations of the city were characterized for their antibiotic resistance, pathogenic properties and genetic diversity. Methodology/Principal Findings A total of 233 E. coli isolates obtained from 175 tap water samples were analysed for susceptibility to 16 different antibiotics and for the presence of genes associated with virulence and antibiotic resistance. Nearly 36% (n = 84) of the isolates were multi-drug(≥3 classes of antibiotics) resistant (MDR) and 26% (n = 22) of these were positive for extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL). Of the 22 ESBL-producers, 20 were positive for blaCTX-M-15, 7 for blaOXA-1-group (all had blaOXA-47) and 2 for blaCMY-2. Quinolone resistance genes, qnrS and qnrB were detected in 6 and 2 isolates, respectively. Around 7% (n = 16) of the isolates carried virulence gene(s) characteristic of pathogenic E. coli; 11 of these contained lt and/or st and thus belonged to enterotoxigenic E. coli and 5 contained bfp and eae and thus belonged to enteropathogenic E. coli. All MDR isolates carried multiple plasmids (2 to 8) of varying sizes ranging from 1.2 to >120 MDa. Ampicillin and ceftriaxone resistance were co-transferred in conjugative plasmids of 70 to 100 MDa in size, while ampicillin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and tetracycline resistance were co-transferred in conjugative plasmids of 50 to 90 MDa. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis revealed diverse genetic fingerprints of pathogenic isolates. Significance Multi-drug resistant E. coli are wide spread in public water supply in Dhaka city, Bangladesh. Transmission of resistant bacteria and plasmids through supply water pose serious threats to public health in urban

  10. CHARACTERIZATION OF VIRULENCE GENES AND ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE OF LUNG PATHOGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI ISOLATES IN FOREST MUSK DEER (MOSCHUS BEREZOVSKII).

    PubMed

    Luo, Xi; Wang, Peng; Cheng, Jian-guo; Luo, Yan; Dai, Lei; Zhou, Xin; Zou, Li-kou; Li, Bei; Xiao, Jiu-Jin

    2016-06-01

    This study investigated genotypic diversity, 26 virulence genes, and antimicrobial susceptibility of lung pathogenic Escherichia coli (LPEC) isolated from forest musk deer. Associations between virulence factors (VFs) and phylogenetic group, between antimicrobial resistance (AMR) and phylogenetic group, and between AMR and VFs were subsequently assessed. The results showed 30 LPEC isolated were grouped into seven different clusters (A, B, C, D, E, F, and G). The detection rates of crl (90%), kpsMT II (76.67%), mat (76.67%), and ompA (80%) were over 75%. The most frequent types of resistance were to amoxicillin (100%), sulfafurazole (100%), ampicillin (96.67%), and tetracycline (96.67%), with 93.33% (n = 28) of isolates resistant to more than eight types of drugs. There were significant relationships between resistance to cefalotin and the presence of iucD(a) (P < 0.001), papC (P = 0.032), and kpsMT II (P = 0.028); between resistance to chloromycetin and the presence of irp2 (P = 0.004) and vat (P = 0.047); between resistance to nalidixic acid and the presence of crl (P = 0.002) and iucD(a) (P = 0.004); and between resistance to ampicillin/sulbactam and the presence of vat (P = 0.013). These results indicated there could be some association between resistance and VFs, and there is a great need for the prudent use of antimicrobial agents in LPEC. PMID:27468027

  11. CHARACTERIZATION OF VIRULENCE GENES AND ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE OF LUNG PATHOGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI ISOLATES IN FOREST MUSK DEER (MOSCHUS BEREZOVSKII).

    PubMed

    Luo, Xi; Wang, Peng; Cheng, Jian-guo; Luo, Yan; Dai, Lei; Zhou, Xin; Zou, Li-kou; Li, Bei; Xiao, Jiu-Jin

    2016-06-01

    This study investigated genotypic diversity, 26 virulence genes, and antimicrobial susceptibility of lung pathogenic Escherichia coli (LPEC) isolated from forest musk deer. Associations between virulence factors (VFs) and phylogenetic group, between antimicrobial resistance (AMR) and phylogenetic group, and between AMR and VFs were subsequently assessed. The results showed 30 LPEC isolated were grouped into seven different clusters (A, B, C, D, E, F, and G). The detection rates of crl (90%), kpsMT II (76.67%), mat (76.67%), and ompA (80%) were over 75%. The most frequent types of resistance were to amoxicillin (100%), sulfafurazole (100%), ampicillin (96.67%), and tetracycline (96.67%), with 93.33% (n = 28) of isolates resistant to more than eight types of drugs. There were significant relationships between resistance to cefalotin and the presence of iucD(a) (P < 0.001), papC (P = 0.032), and kpsMT II (P = 0.028); between resistance to chloromycetin and the presence of irp2 (P = 0.004) and vat (P = 0.047); between resistance to nalidixic acid and the presence of crl (P = 0.002) and iucD(a) (P = 0.004); and between resistance to ampicillin/sulbactam and the presence of vat (P = 0.013). These results indicated there could be some association between resistance and VFs, and there is a great need for the prudent use of antimicrobial agents in LPEC.

  12. Prevalence of Escherichia coli Virulence Genes in Patients with Diarrhea and a Subpopulation of Healthy Volunteers in Madrid, Spain.

    PubMed

    Cabal, Adriana; García-Castillo, María; Cantón, Rafael; Gortázar, Christian; Domínguez, Lucas; Álvarez, Julio

    2016-01-01

    Etiological diagnosis of diarrheal diseases may be complicated by their multi-factorial nature. In addition, Escherichia coli strains present in the gut can occasionally harbor virulence genes (VGs) without causing disease, which complicates the assessment of their clinical significance in particular. The aim of this study was to detect and quantify nine VGs (stx1, stx2, eae, aggR, ehxA, invA, est, elt and bfpA) typically present in five E. coli enteric pathotypes [enterohaemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC), enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC), enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC), and enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC)] in fecal samples collected from 49 patients with acute diarrhea and 32 healthy controls from Madrid, Spain. In addition, the presence of four serotype-related genes (wzx O104 and fliCH4, rfb O157, and fliCH7) was also determined. Presence of target genes was assessed using a quantitative real-time PCR assay previously developed, and the association of presence and burden of VGs with clinical disease and/or other risk factors was explored. Prevalence of ehxA [typically associated with Shigatoxin producing E. coli (STEC) and (EPEC), invA (EIEC), and the rfb O157+fliCH7 (STEC)] combination were significantly (p < 0.02) higher in the diarrheic group, while the wzx O104+fliCH4 combination was significantly (p = 0.014) more prevalent in the control group. On the other hand, eae was detected in more than 90% of the individuals in both patient and control populations, and it was not associated with bfpA, suggesting the absence of typical EPEC. No significant differences in the quantitative values were detected for any VG among study groups, but the difference in the load of aggR (EAEC) and invA in the patients with respect to the controls was close to the significance, suggesting a potential role of these VGs in the clinical signs observed when they are present at high levels.

  13. Prevalence of Escherichia coli Virulence Genes in Patients with Diarrhea and a Subpopulation of Healthy Volunteers in Madrid, Spain

    PubMed Central

    Cabal, Adriana; García-Castillo, María; Cantón, Rafael; Gortázar, Christian; Domínguez, Lucas; Álvarez, Julio

    2016-01-01

    Etiological diagnosis of diarrheal diseases may be complicated by their multi-factorial nature. In addition, Escherichia coli strains present in the gut can occasionally harbor virulence genes (VGs) without causing disease, which complicates the assessment of their clinical significance in particular. The aim of this study was to detect and quantify nine VGs (stx1, stx2, eae, aggR, ehxA, invA, est, elt and bfpA) typically present in five E. coli enteric pathotypes [enterohaemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC), enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC), enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC), and enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC)] in fecal samples collected from 49 patients with acute diarrhea and 32 healthy controls from Madrid, Spain. In addition, the presence of four serotype-related genes (wzxO104 and fliCH4, rfbO157, and fliCH7) was also determined. Presence of target genes was assessed using a quantitative real-time PCR assay previously developed, and the association of presence and burden of VGs with clinical disease and/or other risk factors was explored. Prevalence of ehxA [typically associated with Shigatoxin producing E. coli (STEC) and (EPEC), invA (EIEC), and the rfbO157+fliCH7 (STEC)] combination were significantly (p < 0.02) higher in the diarrheic group, while the wzxO104+fliCH4 combination was significantly (p = 0.014) more prevalent in the control group. On the other hand, eae was detected in more than 90% of the individuals in both patient and control populations, and it was not associated with bfpA, suggesting the absence of typical EPEC. No significant differences in the quantitative values were detected for any VG among study groups, but the difference in the load of aggR (EAEC) and invA in the patients with respect to the controls was close to the significance, suggesting a potential role of these VGs in the clinical signs observed when they are present at high levels. PMID:27199966

  14. Characterisation of Escherichia coli isolates from the blood of haematological adult patients with bacteraemia: translocation from gut to blood requires the cooperation of multiple virulence factors.

    PubMed

    Krawczyk, B; Śledzińska, A; Szemiako, K; Samet, A; Nowicki, B; Kur, J

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate whether there are unique pathotypes of Escherichia coli capable of transmission from the gastrointestinal tract to the vascular bed. The study included E. coli strains isolated from clinical materials collected from 115 patients suffering from haematologic malignancies diagnosed with bacteraemia. The genotyping techniques established that 89 E. coli isolates from the blood had the same genotype as the E. coli from the patient's bowel. The presence of 21 genes encoding virulence factors typical of various E. coli pathotypes and their relationship with the phylogenetic group was established. One-dimensional analysis showed that the focG gene occurred more frequently in the control bowel group, while the ampicillin-resistant afa/dr E. coli were associated with bacteraemia. Blood isolates with the highest occurrence of virulence factors belonged to pathogenic group B2 and non-pathogenic group A. The co-occurrence of multiple genes encoding papC, sfa, usp and cnf1 virulence factors probably predisposes E. coli to translocation from the gastrointestinal tract to the vascular bed in the group of patients with haematologic malignancies. Based on clustering analysis, dominance of the most virulent strains assigned to the cluster with seven virulence factors encoded by the following genes, papC, sfaD/E, cnf1, usp, agn43, hlyA and iutA, was found. The obtained results enforce the previously proposed concept of bowel-blood translocation and further expand our hypothesis by defining the unique virulence characteristics of E. coli isolates, which predispose them to bowel colonisation or translocation and bacteraemia in this group of patients.

  15. Population structure and uropathogenic virulence-associated genes of faecal Escherichia coli from healthy young and elderly adults.

    PubMed

    Vollmerhausen, Tara L; Ramos, Nubia L; Gündogdu, Aycan; Robinson, Wayne; Brauner, Annelie; Katouli, Mohammad

    2011-05-01

    We investigated the population structures of faecal Escherichia coli in 30 healthy young adults (13 males and 17 females) aged between 20 and 45 years and 29 elderly adults (14 females and 15 males) aged between 65 and 77 years. In all, 1566 strains were typed with the PhPlate system and grouped into biochemical phenotypes (BPTs). Strains with shared BPTs were further typed using randomly amplified polymorphic DNA analysis. Forty-four per cent of the strains were shared between two or more age and gender groups. Elders had a significantly higher (P<0.001) number of BPTs (mean±standard error 3.3±0.27) than younger groups (1.82±0.27). Phylogenetic affiliation and virulence-associated genes (VAGs) of the strains showed that more than 80 % of the strains belonging to dominant types belonged to phylogroups B2 and D. Amongst dominant BPTs, phylogenetic group A was significantly associated with females (P<0.0001), and elders were more likely to carry group D (P<0.0124). Elderly males had a higher prevalence of VAGs than young males (P<0.0001) and young females (P<0.0005). We conclude that there is a lower prevalence of E. coli with uropathogenic properties in healthy young adults than in elders. PMID:21292854

  16. The role of H4 flagella in Escherichia coli ST131 virulence

    PubMed Central

    Kakkanat, Asha; Totsika, Makrina; Schaale, Kolja; Duell, Benjamin L.; Lo, Alvin W.; Phan, Minh-Duy; Moriel, Danilo G.; Beatson, Scott A.; Sweet, Matthew J.; Ulett, Glen C.; Schembri, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli sequence type 131 (ST131) is a globally dominant multidrug resistant clone associated with urinary tract and bloodstream infections. Most ST131 strains exhibit resistance to multiple antibiotics and cause infections associated with limited treatment options. The largest sub-clonal ST131 lineage is resistant to fluoroquinolones, contains the type 1 fimbriae fimH30 allele and expresses an H4 flagella antigen. Flagella are motility organelles that contribute to UPEC colonisation of the upper urinary tract. In this study, we examined the specific role of H4 flagella in ST131 motility and interaction with host epithelial and immune cells. We show that the majority of H4-positive ST131 strains are motile and are enriched for flagella expression during static pellicle growth. We also tested the role of H4 flagella in ST131 through the construction of specific mutants, over-expression strains and isogenic mutants that expressed alternative H1 and H7 flagellar subtypes. Overall, our results revealed that H4, H1 and H7 flagella possess conserved phenotypes with regards to motility, epithelial cell adhesion, invasion and uptake by macrophages. In contrast, H4 flagella trigger enhanced induction of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 compared to H1 and H7 flagella, a property that may contribute to ST131 fitness in the urinary tract. PMID:26548325

  17. The role of H4 flagella in Escherichia coli ST131 virulence.

    PubMed

    Kakkanat, Asha; Totsika, Makrina; Schaale, Kolja; Duell, Benjamin L; Lo, Alvin W; Phan, Minh-Duy; Moriel, Danilo G; Beatson, Scott A; Sweet, Matthew J; Ulett, Glen C; Schembri, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli sequence type 131 (ST131) is a globally dominant multidrug resistant clone associated with urinary tract and bloodstream infections. Most ST131 strains exhibit resistance to multiple antibiotics and cause infections associated with limited treatment options. The largest sub-clonal ST131 lineage is resistant to fluoroquinolones, contains the type 1 fimbriae fimH30 allele and expresses an H4 flagella antigen. Flagella are motility organelles that contribute to UPEC colonisation of the upper urinary tract. In this study, we examined the specific role of H4 flagella in ST131 motility and interaction with host epithelial and immune cells. We show that the majority of H4-positive ST131 strains are motile and are enriched for flagella expression during static pellicle growth. We also tested the role of H4 flagella in ST131 through the construction of specific mutants, over-expression strains and isogenic mutants that expressed alternative H1 and H7 flagellar subtypes. Overall, our results revealed that H4, H1 and H7 flagella possess conserved phenotypes with regards to motility, epithelial cell adhesion, invasion and uptake by macrophages. In contrast, H4 flagella trigger enhanced induction of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 compared to H1 and H7 flagella, a property that may contribute to ST131 fitness in the urinary tract. PMID:26548325

  18. Characterization and Functional Analysis of AatB, a Novel Autotransporter Adhesin and Virulence Factor of Avian Pathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    ZhuGe, Xiangkai; Wang, Shaohui; Fan, Hongjie; Pan, Zihao; Ren, Jianluan; Yi, Li; Meng, Qingmei; Yang, Xuqiu; Lu, Chengping

    2013-01-01

    Autotransporter (AT) proteins constitute a large family of extracellular proteins that contribute to bacterial virulence. A novel AT adhesin gene, aatB, was identified in avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) DE205B via genomic analyses. The open reading frame of aatB was 1,017 bp, encoding a putative 36.3-kDa protein which contained structural motifs characteristic for AT proteins: a signal peptide, a passenger domain, and a translocator domain. The predicted three-dimensional structure of AatB consisted of two distinct domains, the C-terminal β-barrel translocator domain and an N-terminal passenger domain. The prevalence analyses of aatB in APEC indicated that aatB was detected in 26.4% (72/273) of APEC strains and was strongly associated with phylogenetic groups D and B2. Quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR analyses revealed that AatB expression was increased during infection in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, AatB could elicit antibodies in infected ducks, suggesting that AatB is involved in APEC pathogenicity. Thus, APEC DE205B strains with a mutated aatB gene and mutated strains complemented with the aatB gene were constructed. Inactivation of aatB resulted in a reduced capacity to adhere to DF-1 cells, defective virulence capacity in vivo, and decreased colonization capacity in lung during systemic infection compared with the capacities of the wild-type strain. Furthermore, these capacities were restored in the complementation strains. These results indicated that AatB makes a significant contribution to APEC virulence through bacterial adherence to host tissues in vivo and in vitro. In addition, biofilm formation assays with strain AAEC189 expressing AatB indicated that AatB mediates biofilm formation. PMID:23630958

  19. Rapid detection of virulence-associated genes in avian pathogenic Escherichia coli by multiplex polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Ewers, Christa; Janssen, Traute; Kiessling, Sabine; Philipp, Hans-C; Wieler, Lothar H

    2005-06-01

    Based on recently published prevalence data of virulence-associated factors in avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) and their roles in the pathogenesis of colibacillosis, we developed a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) as a molecular tool supplementing current diagnostic schemes that mainly rely on serological examination of strains isolated from diseased birds. Multiple isolates of E. coli from clinical cases of colibacillosis known to possess different combinations of eight genes were used as sources of template DNA to develop the multiplex PCR protocol, targeting genes for P-fimbriae (papC), aerobactin (iucD), iron-repressible protein (irp2), temperature-sensitive hemagglutinin (tsh), vacuolating autotransporter toxin (vat), enteroaggregative toxin (astA), increased serum survival protein (iss), and colicin V plasmid operon genes (cva/cvi). In order to verify the usefulness of this diagnostic tool, E. coli strains isolated from fecal samples of clinically healthy chickens were also included in this study, as were uropathogenic (UPEC), necrotoxigenic, and diarrhegenic E. coli strains. The application of the multiplex PCR protocol to 14 E. coli strains isolated from septicemic poultry showed that these strains harbored four to eight of the genes mentioned above. In contrast, those isolates that have been shown to be nonpathogenic for 5-wk-old chickens possessed either none or, at most, three of these genes. We found only one enterohemorrhagic (EHEC), one enteropathogenic (EPEC), and two enterotoxic (ETEC) E. coli strains positive for irp2, and another two ETEC strains positive for astA. As expected, UPEC isolates yielded different combinations of the genes iss, papC, iucD, irp2, and a sequence similar to vat. However, neither the colicin V operon genes cva/cvi nor tsh were amplified in UPEC isolates. The multiplex PCR results were compared with those obtained by DNA-DNA-hybridization analyses to validate the specificity of oligonucleotide primers, and

  20. Relationship between heat-labile enterotoxin secretion capacity and virulence in wild type porcine-origin enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli strains.

    PubMed

    Wijemanne, Prageeth; Xing, Jun; Berberov, Emil M; Marx, David B; Francis, David H; Moxley, Rodney A

    2015-01-01

    Heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) is an important virulence factor secreted by some strains of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC). The prototypic human-origin strain H10407 secretes LT via a type II secretion system (T2SS). We sought to determine the relationship between the capacity to secrete LT and virulence in porcine-origin wild type (WT) ETEC strains. Sixteen WT ETEC strains isolated from cases of severe diarrheal disease were analyzed by GM1ganglioside enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to measure LT concentrations in culture supernatants. All strains had detectable LT in supernatants by 2 h of culture and 1 strain, which was particularly virulent in gnotobiotic piglets (3030-2), had the highest LT secretion level all porcine-origin WT strains tested (P<0.05). The level of LT secretion (concentration in supernatants at 6-h culture) explained 92% of the variation in time-to-a-moribund-condition (R2 = 0.92, P<0.0001) in gnotobiotic piglets inoculated with either strain 3030-2, or an ETEC strain of lesser virulence (2534-86), or a non-enterotoxigenic WT strain (G58-1). All 16 porcine ETEC strains were positive by PCR analysis for the T2SS genes, gspD and gspK, and bioinformatic analysis of 4 porcine-origin strains for which complete genomic sequences were available revealed a T2SS with a high degree of homology to that of H10407. Maximum Likelihood phylogenetic trees constructed using T2SS genes gspC, gspD, gspE and homologs showed that strains 2534-86 and 3030-2 clustered together in the same clade with other porcine-origin ETEC strains in the database, UMNK88 and UMN18. Protein modeling of the ATPase gene (gspE) further revealed a direct relationship between the predicted ATP-binding capacities and LT secretion levels as follows: H10407, -8.8 kcal/mol and 199 ng/ml; 3030-2, -8.6 kcal/mol and 133 ng/ml; and 2534-86, -8.5 kcal/mol and 80 ng/ml. This study demonstrated a direct relationship between predicted ATP-binding capacity of GspE and LT secretion, and

  1. Whole genome sequencing of diverse Shiga toxin-producing and non-producing Escherichia coli strains reveals a variety of virulence and novel antibiotic resistance plasmids.

    PubMed

    Losada, Liliana; DebRoy, Chitrita; Radune, Diana; Kim, Maria; Sanka, Ravi; Brinkac, Lauren; Kariyawasam, Subhashinie; Shelton, Daniel; Fratamico, Pina M; Kapur, Vivek; Feng, Peter C H

    2016-01-01

    The genomes of a diverse set of Escherichia coli, including many Shiga toxin-producing strains of various serotypes were determined. A total of 39 plasmids were identified among these strains, and many carried virulence or putative virulence genes of Shiga toxin-producing E. coli strains, virulence genes for other pathogenic E. coli groups, and some had combinations of these genes. Among the novel plasmids identified were eight that carried resistance genes to aminoglycosides, carbapenems, penicillins, cephalosporins, chloramphenicol, dihydrofolate reductase inhibitors, sulfonamides, tetracyclines and resistance to heavy metals. Two of the plasmids carried six of these resistance genes and two novel IncHI2 plasmids were also identified. The results of this study showed that plasmids carrying diverse resistance and virulence genes of various pathogenic E. coli groups can be found in E. coli strains and serotypes regardless of the isolate's source and therefore, is consistent with the premise that these mobile elements carrying these traits may be broadly disseminated among E. coli.

  2. Whole genome sequencing of diverse Shiga toxin-producing and non-producing Escherichia coli strains reveals a variety of virulence and novel antibiotic resistance plasmids.

    PubMed

    Losada, Liliana; DebRoy, Chitrita; Radune, Diana; Kim, Maria; Sanka, Ravi; Brinkac, Lauren; Kariyawasam, Subhashinie; Shelton, Daniel; Fratamico, Pina M; Kapur, Vivek; Feng, Peter C H

    2016-01-01

    The genomes of a diverse set of Escherichia coli, including many Shiga toxin-producing strains of various serotypes were determined. A total of 39 plasmids were identified among these strains, and many carried virulence or putative virulence genes of Shiga toxin-producing E. coli strains, virulence genes for other pathogenic E. coli groups, and some had combinations of these genes. Among the novel plasmids identified were eight that carried resistance genes to aminoglycosides, carbapenems, penicillins, cephalosporins, chloramphenicol, dihydrofolate reductase inhibitors, sulfonamides, tetracyclines and resistance to heavy metals. Two of the plasmids carried six of these resistance genes and two novel IncHI2 plasmids were also identified. The results of this study showed that plasmids carrying diverse resistance and virulence genes of various pathogenic E. coli groups can be found in E. coli strains and serotypes regardless of the isolate's source and therefore, is consistent with the premise that these mobile elements carrying these traits may be broadly disseminated among E. coli. PMID:26746359

  3. EXTRAINTESTINAL PATHOGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI (EXPEC)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) possess virulence traits that allow them to invade, colonize, and induce disease in bodily sites outside of the gastrointestinal tract. Human diseases caused by ExPEC include urinary tract infections, neonatal meningitis, sepsis, pneumonia, surgic...

  4. Rapid and Specific Detection, Molecular Epidemiology, and Experimental Virulence of the O16 Subgroup within Escherichia coli Sequence Type 131

    PubMed Central

    Clermont, Olivier; Johnston, Brian; Clabots, Connie; Tchesnokova, Veronika; Sokurenko, Evgeni; Junka, Adam F.; Maczynska, Beata; Denamur, Erick

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli sequence type 131 (ST131), a widely disseminated multidrug-resistant extraintestinal pathogen, typically exhibits serotype O25b:H4. However, certain ST131 isolates exhibit serotype O16:H5 and derive from a phylogenetic clade that is distinct from the classic O25b:H4 ST131 clade. Both clades are assigned to ST131 by the Achtman multilocus sequence typing (MLST) system and a screening PCR assay that targets ST131-specific sequence polymorphisms in the mdh and gyrB genes. However, they are classified as separate STs by the Pasteur Institute MLST system, and an ST131 PCR method that targets the O25b rfb region and an ST131-specific polymorphism in pabB detects only the O25b-associated clade. Here, we describe a novel PCR-based method that allows for rapid and specific detection of the O16-associated ST131 clade. The clade members uniformly contained allele 41 of fimH (type 1 fimbrial adhesin) and a narrow range of alleles of gyrA and parC (fluoroquinolone target genes). The virulence genotypes of the clade members resembled those of classic O25b:H4 ST131 isolates; representative isolates were variably lethal in a mouse subcutaneous sepsis model. Several pulsotypes spanned multiple sources (adults, children, pets, and human fecal samples) and locales. An analysis of recent clinical E. coli collections showed that the O16 ST131 clade is globally distributed, accounts for 1 to 5% of E. coli isolates overall, and, when compared with other ST131 isolates, it is associated with resistance to ampicillin, gentamicin, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and with susceptibility to fluoroquinolones and extended-spectrum cephalosporins. Attention to this O16-associated ST131 clade, which is facilitated by our novel PCR-based assay, is warranted in future epidemiological studies of ST131 and, conceivably, in clinical applications. PMID:24501035

  5. Small Intestine Early Innate Immunity Response during Intestinal Colonization by Escherichia coli Depends on Its Extra-Intestinal Virulence Status.

    PubMed

    Tourret, Jérôme; Willing, Benjamin P; Croxen, Matthew A; Dufour, Nicolas; Dion, Sara; Wachtel, Sarah; Denamur, Erick; Finlay, B Brett

    2016-01-01

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) strains live as commensals in the digestive tract of the host, but they can also initiate urinary tract infections. The aim of this work was to determine how a host detects the presence of a new UPEC strain in the digestive tract. Mice were orally challenged with UPEC strains 536 and CFT073, non-pathogenic strain K12 MG1655, and ΔPAI-536, an isogenic mutant of strain 536 lacking all 7 pathogenicity islands whose virulence is drastically attenuated. Intestinal colonization was measured, and cytokine expression was determined in various organs recovered from mice after oral challenge. UPEC strain 536 efficiently colonized the mouse digestive tract, and prior Enterobacteriaceae colonization was found to impact strain 536 colonization efficiency. An innate immune response, detected as the production of TNFα, IL-6 and IL-10 cytokines, was activated in the ileum 48 hours after oral challenge with strain 536, and returned to baseline within 8 days, without a drop in fecal pathogen load. Although inflammation was detected in the ileum, histology was normal at the time of cytokine peak. Comparison of cytokine secretion 48h after oral gavage with E. coli strain 536, CFT073, MG1655 or ΔPAI-536 showed that inflammation was more pronounced with UPECs than with non-pathogenic or attenuated strains. Pathogenicity islands also seemed to be involved in host detection, as IL-6 intestinal secretion was increased after administration of E. coli strain 536, but not after administration of ΔPAI-536. In conclusion, UPEC colonization of the mouse digestive tract activates acute phase inflammatory cytokine secretion but does not trigger any pathological changes, illustrating the opportunistic nature of UPECs. This digestive tract colonization model will be useful for studying the factors controlling the switch from commensalism to pathogenicity. PMID:27096607

  6. Small Intestine Early Innate Immunity Response during Intestinal Colonization by Escherichia coli Depends on Its Extra-Intestinal Virulence Status.

    PubMed

    Tourret, Jérôme; Willing, Benjamin P; Croxen, Matthew A; Dufour, Nicolas; Dion, Sara; Wachtel, Sarah; Denamur, Erick; Finlay, B Brett

    2016-01-01

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) strains live as commensals in the digestive tract of the host, but they can also initiate urinary tract infections. The aim of this work was to determine how a host detects the presence of a new UPEC strain in the digestive tract. Mice were orally challenged with UPEC strains 536 and CFT073, non-pathogenic strain K12 MG1655, and ΔPAI-536, an isogenic mutant of strain 536 lacking all 7 pathogenicity islands whose virulence is drastically attenuated. Intestinal colonization was measured, and cytokine expression was determined in various organs recovered from mice after oral challenge. UPEC strain 536 efficiently colonized the mouse digestive tract, and prior Enterobacteriaceae colonization was found to impact strain 536 colonization efficiency. An innate immune response, detected as the production of TNFα, IL-6 and IL-10 cytokines, was activated in the ileum 48 hours after oral challenge with strain 536, and returned to baseline within 8 days, without a drop in fecal pathogen load. Although inflammation was detected in the ileum, histology was normal at the time of cytokine peak. Comparison of cytokine secretion 48h after oral gavage with E. coli strain 536, CFT073, MG1655 or ΔPAI-536 showed that inflammation was more pronounced with UPECs than with non-pathogenic or attenuated strains. Pathogenicity islands also seemed to be involved in host detection, as IL-6 intestinal secretion was increased after administration of E. coli strain 536, but not after administration of ΔPAI-536. In conclusion, UPEC colonization of the mouse digestive tract activates acute phase inflammatory cytokine secretion but does not trigger any pathological changes, illustrating the opportunistic nature of UPECs. This digestive tract colonization model will be useful for studying the factors controlling the switch from commensalism to pathogenicity.

  7. Small Intestine Early Innate Immunity Response during Intestinal Colonization by Escherichia coli Depends on Its Extra-Intestinal Virulence Status

    PubMed Central

    Willing, Benjamin P.; Croxen, Matthew A.; Dufour, Nicolas; Dion, Sara; Wachtel, Sarah; Denamur, Erick; Finlay, B. Brett

    2016-01-01

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) strains live as commensals in the digestive tract of the host, but they can also initiate urinary tract infections. The aim of this work was to determine how a host detects the presence of a new UPEC strain in the digestive tract. Mice were orally challenged with UPEC strains 536 and CFT073, non-pathogenic strain K12 MG1655, and ΔPAI-536, an isogenic mutant of strain 536 lacking all 7 pathogenicity islands whose virulence is drastically attenuated. Intestinal colonization was measured, and cytokine expression was determined in various organs recovered from mice after oral challenge. UPEC strain 536 efficiently colonized the mouse digestive tract, and prior Enterobacteriaceae colonization was found to impact strain 536 colonization efficiency. An innate immune response, detected as the production of TNFα, IL-6 and IL-10 cytokines, was activated in the ileum 48 hours after oral challenge with strain 536, and returned to baseline within 8 days, without a drop in fecal pathogen load. Although inflammation was detected in the ileum, histology was normal at the time of cytokine peak. Comparison of cytokine secretion 48h after oral gavage with E. coli strain 536, CFT073, MG1655 or ΔPAI-536 showed that inflammation was more pronounced with UPECs than with non-pathogenic or attenuated strains. Pathogenicity islands also seemed to be involved in host detection, as IL-6 intestinal secretion was increased after administration of E. coli strain 536, but not after administration of ΔPAI-536. In conclusion, UPEC colonization of the mouse digestive tract activates acute phase inflammatory cytokine secretion but does not trigger any pathological changes, illustrating the opportunistic nature of UPECs. This digestive tract colonization model will be useful for studying the factors controlling the switch from commensalism to pathogenicity. PMID:27096607

  8. PCR detection of Shiga toxins, enterohaemolysin and intimin virulence genes of Escherichia coli O157:H7 strains isolated from faeces of Anatolian water buffaloes in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Seker, E; Kuyucuoğlu, Y; Sareyyüpoğlu, B; Yardımcı, H

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this study was to detect Shiga toxins (stx1 and stx2), enterohaemolysin (EhlyA) and intimin (eaeA) virulence genes of 11 Escherichia coli O157:H7 strains isolated from faecal samples of 300 clinically healthy Anatolian water buffaloes by PCR. Multiplex PCR was used for the detection of stx1 and stx2, and singleplex PCRs were used for the detection of EhlyA and eaeA virulence genes respectively. A total of three (27.3%) strains were determined to harbour both of the stx1 and stx2 genes, of these, one (9.1%) only harboured these two genes alone, one (9.1%) also contained the EhlyA gene and one (9.1%) additionally contained the EhlyA and the eaeA genes. EhlyA gene was obtained from eight (72.7%) strains, six (54.5%) of these were alone. eaeA gene was positive in only one (9.1%) strain. Only one (9.1%) of the 11 E. coli O157:H7 strains harboured all the four virulence genes. Two (18.2%) of the isolates had none of the virulence genes. Enterohaemolysin was found to be the most common virulence factor. In conclusion, the virulence factors of E. coli O157:H7 strains isolated from the faeces of Anatolian water buffaloes were investigated and detected for the first time in Turkey.

  9. Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Smith, James L; Fratamico, Pina M; Gunther, Nereus W

    2007-01-01

    Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) possesses virulence traits that allow it to invade, colonize, and induce disease in bodily sites outside of the gastrointestinal tract. Human diseases caused by ExPEC include urinary tract infections, neonatal meningitis, sepsis, pneumonia, surgical site infections, as well as infections in other extraintestinal locations. ExPEC-induced diseases represent a large burden in terms of medical costs and productivity losses. In addition to human illnesses, ExPEC strains also cause extraintestinal infections in domestic animals and pets. A commonality of virulence factors has been demonstrated between human and animal ExPEC, suggesting that the organisms are zoonotic pathogens. ExPEC strains have been isolated from food products, in particular from raw meats and poultry, indicating that these organisms potentially represent a new class of foodborne pathogens. This review discusses various aspects of ExPEC, including its presence in food products, in animals used for food or as companion pets; the diseases ExPEC can cause; and the virulence factors and virulence mechanisms that cause disease.

  10. Characterization of Salmonella enterica and detection of the virulence genes specific to diarrheagenic Escherichia coli from poultry carcasses in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso.

    PubMed

    Kagambèga, Assèta; Barro, Nicolas; Traoré, Alfred S; Siitonen, Anja; Haukka, Kaisa

    2012-07-01

    One hundred chicken carcasses purchased from three markets selling poultry in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso, between June 2010 and October 2010 were examined for their microbiological quality. The presence of Salmonella was investigated using standard bacteriological procedures, and the isolates obtained were serotyped and tested for antimicrobial susceptibility. The presence of virulence-associated genes of the five main pathogroups of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli-Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC), enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC), enterotoxigenic E. coli, and enteroinvasive E. coli-was investigated using 16-plex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) on the mixed bacterial cultures from the poultry samples. Of the 100 chicken carcasses studied, 57 were contaminated by Salmonella; 16 different serotypes were identified, the most frequent being Salmonella Derby, found in 28 samples. Four Salmonella strains were resistant to tetracycline, and two were resistant to streptomycin. Based on the PCR detection of the virulence genes, in total, 45 carcasses were contaminated by three pathogroups of E. coli: STEC, EPEC, or EAEC. The STEC and EPEC virulence genes were detected on six and 39 carcasses, respectively. EAEC virulence genes were only detected in combination with those of EPEC (on 11 carcasses) or STEC (on two carcasses). The STEC-positive carcasses contained the genes stx(1), stx(2), eaeA, escV, and ent in different combinations. None of the EPEC-positive carcasses contained the bfp gene, indicating that only atypical EPEC was present. EAEC virulence genes detected were aggR and/or pic. The high proportion of chicken carcasses contaminated by Salmonella and diarrheagenic E. coli indicates a potential food safety risk for consumers and highlights the necessity of public awareness of these pathogens. PMID:22551070

  11. Identification of Unconventional Intestinal Pathogenic Escherichia coli Isolates Expressing Intermediate Virulence Factor Profiles by Using a Novel Single-Step Multiplex PCR▿

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Daniel; Greune, Lilo; Heusipp, Gerhard; Karch, Helge; Fruth, Angelika; Tschäpe, Helmut; Schmidt, M. Alexander

    2007-01-01

    Intestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli represents a global health problem for mammals, including humans. At present, diarrheagenic E. coli bacteria are grouped into seven major pathotypes that differ in their virulence factor profiles, severity of clinical manifestations, and prognosis. In this study, we developed and evaluated a one-step multiplex PCR (MPCR) for the straightforward differential identification of intestinal pathotypes of E. coli. The specificity of this novel MPCR was validated by using a subset of reference strains and further confirmed by PCR-independent pheno- and genotypic characterization. Moreover, we tested 246 clinical E. coli isolates derived from diarrhea patients from several distinct geographic regions. Interestingly, besides strains belonging to the defined and well-described pathotypes, we identified five unconventional strains expressing intermediate virulence factor profiles. These strains have been further characterized and appear to represent intermediate strains carrying genes and expressing factors associated with enteropathogenic E. coli, Shiga toxin-producing E. coli, enterotoxigenic E. coli, and enteroaggregative E. coli alike. These strains represent further examples of the extraordinary plasticity of the E. coli genome. Moreover, this implies that the important identification of specific pathotypes has to be based on a broad matrix of indicator genes. In addition, the presence of intermediate strains needs to be accounted for. PMID:17400780

  12. Phylogenetic Distribution of Virulence Genes Among ESBL-producing Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Isolated from Long-term Hospitalized Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ruike; Shi, Jinfang; Shen, Yimin; Li, Yanmeng; Han, Qingzhen; Zhang, Xianfeng; Gu, Guohao

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The present study was aimed to investigate the antibiotic resistance, virulence potential and phylogenetic grouping of ESBL-producing uropathogenic Escherichia coli (EP-UPEC) isolated from long-term hospitalized patients. Materials and Methods EP-UPEC isolates from September 2013 to June 2014 at a tertiary care hospital of China were screened for ESBL-production by the double disk diffusion test. Isolates with ESBL-phenotype were further characterized by antibiotic resistance testing, PCR of different ESBL and virulence genes, and phylogenetic grouping. Results One hundred and twenty EP-UPEC were isolated from long-term hospitalized patients. All EP-UPEC isolates were resistant to Ampicillin, Cefazolin, Cefuroxime, Cefotaxime, Cefoperazone and Ceftriaxone, and the majority of EP-UPEC isolates were resistant to Piperacillin (82.5%), Ciprofloxacin (81.2%), Trimethoprim-Sulfamethoxazole (72.5%). The isolates showed the highest sensitivity against Imipenem (98.4%), Piperacillin/tazobactam (96.7%), Cefoperazone/sulbactam (91.7%), Amikacin (90.8%) and Cefepime (75.8%). Nine different ESBL genotype patterns were observed and CTX-M type was the most prevalent ESBL genotype (42.5%, 51/120). Majority of EP-UPEC isolates possess more than one ESBL genes. EP-UPEC isolates belonged mainly to phylogenetic group B2(36.7%) and D(35.0%). The prevalence of traT, ompT, iss, PAI, afa, fimH and papC were 75.8%, 63.3%, 63.3%, 60.8%, 40.8%, 19.2% and 6.7%, respectively. The number of virulence genes (VGs) detected was significantly higher in group B2 than in group A (ANOVA, p<0.001), group B1(ANOVA, p= 0.012) and D (ANOVA, p<0.001). Conclusions EP-UPEC strains showed multidrug resistance and co-resistance to other non β-lactam antibiotics. CTX-M was the most prevalent ESBL genotype and majority of EP-UPEC strains more than one ESBL genes. EP-UPEC strains belonged mainly to phylogenetic group B2 and D, and most of the virulence genes were more prevalent in group B2. PMID

  13. Adenylate cyclase and the cyclic AMP receptor protein modulate stress resistance and virulence capacity of uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Grant T; Norton, J Paul; Bower, Jean M; Mulvey, Matthew A

    2013-01-01

    In many bacteria, the second messenger cyclic AMP (cAMP) interacts with the transcription factor cAMP receptor protein (CRP), forming active cAMP-CRP complexes that can control a multitude of cellular activities, including expanded carbon source utilization, stress response pathways, and virulence. Here, we assessed the role of cAMP-CRP as a regulator of stress resistance and virulence in uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC), the principal cause of urinary tract infections worldwide. Deletion of genes encoding either CRP or CyaA, the enzyme responsible for cAMP synthesis, attenuates the ability of UPEC to colonize the bladder in a mouse infection model, dependent on intact innate host defenses. UPEC mutants lacking cAMP-CRP grow normally in the presence of glucose but are unable to utilize alternate carbon sources like amino acids, the primary nutrients available to UPEC within the urinary tract. Relative to the wild-type UPEC isolate, the cyaA and crp deletion mutants are sensitive to nitrosative stress and the superoxide generator methyl viologen but remarkably resistant to hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and acid stress. In the mutant strains, H(2)O(2) resistance correlates with elevated catalase activity attributable in part to enhanced translation of the alternate sigma factor RpoS. Acid resistance was promoted by both RpoS-independent and RpoS-dependent mechanisms, including expression of the RpoS-regulated DNA-binding ferritin-like protein Dps. We conclude that balanced input from many cAMP-CRP-responsive elements, including RpoS, is critical to the ability of UPEC to handle the nutrient limitations and severe environmental stresses present within the mammalian urinary tract.

  14. Prevalence, genetic characterization and virulence genes of sorbitol-fermenting Escherichia coli O157:H- and E. coli O157:H7 isolated from retail beef.

    PubMed

    Sallam, Khalid Ibrahim; Mohammed, Mahmoud Ahmed; Ahdy, Asmaa Mohammed; Tamura, Tomohiro

    2013-08-01

    Sorbitol-fermenting (SF) Escherichia coli O157:H- strains have emerged as important pathogens and have been associated with a higher incidence of progression to hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) than non-sorbitol fermenting (NSF) E. coli O157:H7. The present study was carried out to determine the prevalence of SF E. coli O157:H- and NSF E. coli O157:H7 strains in retail beef products in Mansoura, Egypt. The contamination rates with rfbEO157-positive E. coli O157 strains were 26.7% (8/30), 10% (3/30) and 3.7% (1/27) in ground beef, beef burger, and fresh beef samples, respectively with an overall mean of 13.8% (12/87) among all meat products tested. SF E. coli O157:H- were the most dominant among the isolated O157 strains. Of the fifteen O157 strains isolated, 11 (73.3%) were SF E. coli O157:H-, while the remaining 4 (26.7%) were NSF E. coli O157:H7. The 11 SF O157H- strains were genetically positive for sfpA gene. Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis for fliC gene demonstrated a similar pattern for both SF and NSF O157 isolates. PCR assays verified the existence of stx1 gene in 7 (46.7%) and stx2 gene in 13 (86.7%) of the 15 O157 strains isolated. Unexpectedly, two of the 15 O157 strains isolated were negative for Shiga toxin genes. The eae gene was identified in all of the 15 O157 strains except in one NSF O157:H7 strain. EHEC-hlyA gene was detected in 14 (93.3%) of the 15 O157 isolates, nonetheless only 11 strains showed enterohemolytic phenotype on blood agar. A combination of the four virulence genes, stx1, stx2, eae and EHEC-hlyA were detected in 7 (46.7%) strains, while six (40%) strains were positive for stx2, eae and hlyA genes. This is the first record for isolation of E. coli O157: H- in Egypt as well as in the African continent.

  15. Urinary tract infection drives genome instability in uropathogenic Escherichia coli and necessitates translesion synthesis DNA polymerase IV for virulence.

    PubMed

    Gawel, Damian; Seed, Patrick C

    2011-01-01

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) produces ~80% of community-acquired UTI, the second most common infection in humans. During UTI, UPEC has a complex life cycle, replicating and persisting in intracellular and extracellular niches. Host and environmental stresses may affect the integrity of the UPEC genome and threaten its viability. We determined how the host inflammatory response during UTI drives UPEC genome instability and evaluated the role of multiple factors of genome replication and repair for their roles in the maintenance of genome integrity and thus virulence during UTI. The urinary tract environment enhanced the mutation frequency of UPEC ~100-fold relative to in vitro levels. Abrogation of inflammation through a host TLR4-signaling defect significantly reduced the mutation frequency, demonstrating in the importance of the host response as a driver of UPEC genome instability. Inflammation induces the bacterial SOS response, leading to the hypothesis that the UPEC SOS-inducible translesion synthesis (TLS) DNA polymerases would be key factors in UPEC genome instability during UTI. However, while the TLS DNA polymerases enhanced in vitro, they did not increase in vivo mutagenesis. Although it is not a source of enhanced mutagenesis in vivo, the TLS DNA polymerase IV was critical for the survival of UPEC during UTI during an active inflammatory assault. Overall, this study provides the first evidence of a TLS DNA polymerase being critical for UPEC survival during urinary tract infection and points to independent mechanisms for genome instability and the maintenance of genome replication of UPEC under host inflammatory stress.

  16. Natural plant products inhibits growth and alters the swarming motility, biofilm formation, and expression of virulence genes in enteroaggregative and enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    García-Heredia, Alam; García, Santos; Merino-Mascorro, José Ángel; Feng, Peter; Heredia, Norma

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of plant products on the growth, swarming motility, biofilm formation and virulence gene expression in enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 and enteroaggregative E. coli strain 042 and a strain of O104:H4 serotype. Extracts of Lippia graveolens and Haematoxylon brassiletto, and carvacrol, brazilin were tested by an antimicrobial microdilution method using citral and rifaximin as controls. All products showed bactericidal activity with minimal bactericidal concentrations ranging from 0.08 to 8.1 mg/ml. Swarming motility was determined in soft LB agar. Most compounds reduced swarming motility by 7%-100%; except carvacrol which promoted motility in two strains. Biofilm formation studies were done in microtiter plates. Rifaximin inhibited growth and reduced biofilm formation, but various concentrations of other compounds actually induced biofilm formation. Real time PCR showed that most compounds decreased stx2 expression. The expression of pic and rpoS in E. coli 042 were suppressed but in E. coli O104:H4 they varied depending on compounds. In conclusion, these extracts affect E. coli growth, swarming motility and virulence gene expression. Although these compounds were bactericidal for pathogenic E. coli, sublethal concentrations had varied effects on phenotypic and genotypic traits, and some increased virulence gene expression.

  17. Comparison of Asymptomatic Bacteriuria Escherichia coli Isolates from Healthy Individuals versus Those from Hospital Patients Shows that Long-Term Bladder Colonization Selects for Attenuated Virulence Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Salvador, Ellaine; Wagenlehner, Florian; Köhler, Christian-Daniel; Mellmann, Alexander; Hacker, Jörg; Svanborg, Catharina

    2012-01-01

    Asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU) is a condition where bacteria stably colonize the urinary tract, in a manner closely resembling commensalism at other mucosal sites. The patients carry >105 CFU/ml for extended periods of time and rarely develop symptoms. Contrasting the properties of ABU strains to those of uropathogenic isolates causing symptomatic infection is therefore highly relevant to understand mechanisms of bacterial adaptation. The prototype ABU strain Escherichia coli 83972 has a smaller genome than uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) strains with deletions or point mutations in several virulence genes, suggesting that ABU strains undergo a programmed reductive evolution within human hosts. This study addressed if these observations can be generalized. Strains causing ABU in outpatients or hospitalized patients after catheterization or other invasive procedures were compared to commensal E. coli isolates from the intestinal flora of healthy individuals. Notably, clonal complex 73 (CC73) was a prominent phylogenetic lineage dominated by ABU isolates. ABU isolates from outpatients and hospitalized patients had a similar overall virulence gene repertoire, which distinguished them from many commensals, but typical UPEC virulence genes were less frequently attenuated in hospital strains than in outpatient strains or commensals. The decreased virulence potential of outpatient ABU isolates relative to that of ABU strains from hospitalized patients supports the hypothesis that loss of expression or decay of virulence genes facilitates long-term carriage and adaptation to host environments. PMID:22104113

  18. Virulence profiling of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli recovered from domestic farm animals in Northwestern Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Amézquita-López, Bianca A.; Quiñones, Beatriz; Lee, Bertram G.; Chaidez, Cristóbal

    2013-01-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) is a zoonotic enteric pathogen that causes human gastrointestinal illnesses. The present study characterized the virulence profiles of O157 and non-O157 STEC strains, recovered from domestic animals in small rural farms within the agricultural Culiacan Valley in Mexico. Virulence genes coding for adhesins, cytotoxins, proteases, subtypes of Shiga toxin (Stx), and other effectors were identified in the STEC strains by PCR. The genotyping analysis revealed the presence of the effectors nleA, nleB, nleE, and nleH1-2, espK, and espN in the O157:H7 and O111:H8 STEC strains. Furthermore, the genes encoding the autoagglutinating adhesin (Saa) and subtilase (SubA) were exclusively identified in the O8:H19 eae-negative strains. The adhesin (iha) and the silent hemolysin (sheA) genes were detected in 79% of the O157 and non-O157 strains. To examine the relative toxicities of the STEC strains, a fluorescent Vero cell line, Vero-d2EGFPs, was employed to measure the inhibition of protein synthesis by Stx. Analysis of culture supernatants from serotype O8:H19 strains with the stx gene profile stx1a, stx2a, and stx2c and serotypes O75:H8 and O146:H8 strains with the stx gene profile stx1a, stx1c, and stx2b, resulted in a significant reduction in the Vero-d2EGFP fluorescent signal. These observations suggest that these non-O157 strains may have an enhanced ability to inhibit protein synthesis in Vero cells. Interestingly, analysis of the stx2c-positive O157:H7 strains resulted in a high fluorescent signal, indicating a reduced toxicity in the Vero-d2EGFP cells. These findings indicate that the O157 and non-O157 STEC strains, recovered in the Culiacan Valley, display distinct virulence profiles and relative toxicities in mammalian cells and have provided information for evaluating risks associated with zoonotic STEC in this agricultural region in Mexico. PMID:24551599

  19. Avirulent K88 (F4)+ Escherichia coli strains constructed to express modified enterotoxins protect young piglets from challenge with a virulent enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli strain that expresses the same adhesion and enterotoxins.

    PubMed

    Santiago-Mateo, Kristina; Zhao, Mojun; Lin, Jun; Zhang, Weiping; Francis, David H

    2012-10-12

    Virulence of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is associated with fimbrial adhesins and enterotoxins such as heat-labile (LT) and/or heat-stable (ST) enterotoxins. Previous studies using a cell culture model suggest that exclusion of ETEC from attachment to epithelial cells requires expression of both an adhesin such as K88 (F4) fimbriae, and LT. To test the ability of non-pathogenic E. coli constructs to exclude virulent ETEC sufficiently to prevent clinical disease, we utilized a piglet ETEC challenge model. Thirty-nine 5-day-old piglets were inoculated with a placebo (control), or with either of the three K88(+)E. coli strains isogenic with regard to modified LT expression: 8017 (pBR322 plasmid vector control), non-toxigenic mutant 8221 (LT(R192G)) in pBR322, or 8488, with the LT gene fused to the STb gene in pBR322 (LT(R192G)-STb). Piglets were challenged with virulent ETEC Strain 3030-2 (K88(+)/LT/STb) 24h post-inoculation. K88ac receptor-positive piglets in the control group developed diarrhea and became dehydrated 12-24h post-challenge. Piglets inoculated with 8221 or 8488 did not exhibit clinical signs of ETEC disease; most piglets inoculated with 8017 showed diarrhea. Control pigs exhibited significant weight loss, increased blood total protein, and higher numbers of colony-forming units of 3030-2 E. coli in washed ileum and jejunum than treated pigs. This study shows for the first time that pre-inoculation with an avirulent strain expressing adhesive fimbriae and a non-toxic form of LT provides significant short term protection from challenge with a virulent ETEC strain that expresses the same fimbrial adhesion and enterotoxin. PMID:22541162

  20. [Detection of virulence genes of the enteroaggregative pathotype in Escherichia coli strains isolated from groundwater sources in the province of Chaco, Argentina].

    PubMed

    Lösch, Liliana S; Gariboglio Vázquez, María L; Rivas, Marta; Merino, Luis A

    2015-01-01

    Groundwater is an important source of drinking water for many communities in Northern Argentina; particularly, in the province of Chaco, where about 14% of households use this natural resource. Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli is an emerging pathogen whose global importance in public health has increased in recent years. Despite the significant risk of disease linked to contaminated water exposure, the prevalence of E. coli pathotypes in aquatic environments is still not so well defined. The aim of the present study was to detect the presence of typical enteroaggregative E. coli through the recognition of its virulence factors aap, AA probe and aggR by molecular techniques. A total of 93 water samples from different small communities of Chaco were analyzed. E. coli was identified in 36 (38.7%) of the tested samples. Six strains isolated from different samples harbored the studied genes. Of these 6 isolates, 3 carried the aap gene, 2 the AA probe and the last one the combination of aap/aggR genes. The prevalence of E. coli isolates harboring enteroaggregative virulence genes in groundwater sources was 6.4%. This work represents the first contribution to the study of the presence and distribution of virulence genes of EAEC in groundwater sources in this region of Argentina.

  1. Multilocus Sequence Typing and Virulence Profiles in Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Isolated from Cats in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaoqiang; Thungrat, Kamoltip; Boothe, Dawn M.

    2015-01-01

    The population structure, virulence, and antimicrobial resistance of uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) from cats are rarely characterized. The aim of this study was to compare and characterize the UPEC isolated from cats in four geographic regions of USA in terms of their multilocus sequence typing (MLST), virulence profiles, clinical signs, antimicrobial resistance and phylogenetic grouping. The results showed that a total of 74 E. coli isolates were typed to 40 sequence types with 10 being novel. The most frequent phylogenetic group was B2 (n = 57). The most frequent sequence types were ST73 (n = 12) and ST83 (n = 6), ST73 was represented by four multidrug resistant (MDR) and eight non-multidrug resistant (SDR) isolates, and ST83 were significantly more likely to exhibit no drug resistant (NDR) isolates carrying the highest number of virulence genes. Additionally, MDR isolates were more diverse, and followed by SDR and NDR isolates in regards to the distribution of the STs. afa/draBC was the most prevalent among the 29 virulence-associated genes. Linking virulence profile and antimicrobial resistance, the majority of virulence-associated genes tested were more prevalent in NDR isolates, and followed by SDR and MDR isolates. Twenty (50%) MLST types in this study have previously been associated with human isolates, suggesting that these STs are potentially zoonotic. Our data enhanced the understanding of E. coli population structure and virulence association from cats. The diverse and various combinations of virulence-associated genes implied that the infection control may be challenging. PMID:26587840

  2. Comparison of Antibiotic Resistance and Virulence Factors among Escherichia coli Isolated from Conventional and Free-Range Poultry

    PubMed Central

    Koga, Vanessa L.; Scandorieiro, Sara; Vespero, Eliana C.; Oba, Alexandre; de Brito, Benito G.; de Brito, Kelly C. T.; Nakazato, Gerson; Kobayashi, Renata K. T.

    2015-01-01

    Microbiological contamination in commercial poultry production has caused concerns for human health because of both the presence of pathogenic microorganisms and the increase in antimicrobial resistance in bacterial strains that can cause treatment failure of human infections. The aim of our study was to analyze the profile of antimicrobial resistance and virulence factors of E. coli isolates from chicken carcasses obtained from different farming systems (conventional and free-range poultry). A total of 156 E. coli strains were isolated and characterized for genes encoding virulence factors described in extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC). Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed for 15 antimicrobials, and strains were confirmed as extended spectrum of β-lactamases- (ESBLs-) producing E. coli by phenotypic and genotypic tests. The results indicated that strains from free-range poultry have fewer virulence factors than strains from conventional poultry. Strains from conventionally raised chickens had a higher frequency of antimicrobial resistance for all antibiotics tested and also exhibited genes encoding ESBL and AmpC, unlike free-range poultry isolates, which did not. Group 2 CTX-M and CIT were the most prevalent ESBL and AmpC genes, respectively. The farming systems of poultries can be related with the frequency of virulence factors and resistance to antimicrobials in bacteria. PMID:26579536

  3. Comparison of Antibiotic Resistance and Virulence Factors among Escherichia coli Isolated from Conventional and Free-Range Poultry.

    PubMed

    Koga, Vanessa L; Scandorieiro, Sara; Vespero, Eliana C; Oba, Alexandre; de Brito, Benito G; de Brito, Kelly C T; Nakazato, Gerson; Kobayashi, Renata K T

    2015-01-01

    Microbiological contamination in commercial poultry production has caused concerns for human health because of both the presence of pathogenic microorganisms and the increase in antimicrobial resistance in bacterial strains that can cause treatment failure of human infections. The aim of our study was to analyze the profile of antimicrobial resistance and virulence factors of E. coli isolates from chicken carcasses obtained from different farming systems (conventional and free-range poultry). A total of 156 E. coli strains were isolated and characterized for genes encoding virulence factors described in extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC). Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed for 15 antimicrobials, and strains were confirmed as extended spectrum of β-lactamases- (ESBLs-) producing E. coli by phenotypic and genotypic tests. The results indicated that strains from free-range poultry have fewer virulence factors than strains from conventional poultry. Strains from conventionally raised chickens had a higher frequency of antimicrobial resistance for all antibiotics tested and also exhibited genes encoding ESBL and AmpC, unlike free-range poultry isolates, which did not. Group 2 CTX-M and CIT were the most prevalent ESBL and AmpC genes, respectively. The farming systems of poultries can be related with the frequency of virulence factors and resistance to antimicrobials in bacteria.

  4. Dynamics of Escherichia coli virulence factors in dairy herds and farm environments in a longitudinal study in the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dairy farms are known reservoirs of enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC). EPEC, or the virulence factors associated with pathogenicity, have been detected in manure, milk, and the farm environment. It is unclear which farm compartments are reservoirs for EPEC and their long-term dynamics are not describe...

  5. Impact of UV and Peracetic Acid Disinfection on the Prevalence of Virulence and Antimicrobial Resistance Genes in Uropathogenic Escherichia coli in Wastewater Effluents

    PubMed Central

    Biswal, Basanta Kumar; Khairallah, Ramzi; Bibi, Kareem; Mazza, Alberto; Gehr, Ronald; Masson, Luke

    2014-01-01

    Wastewater discharges may increase the populations of pathogens, including Escherichia coli, and of antimicrobial-resistant strains in receiving waters. This study investigated the impact of UV and peracetic acid (PAA) disinfection on the prevalence of virulence and antimicrobial resistance genes in uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC), the most abundant E. coli pathotype in municipal wastewaters. Laboratory disinfection experiments were conducted on wastewater treated by physicochemical, activated sludge, or biofiltration processes; 1,766 E. coli isolates were obtained for the evaluation. The target disinfection level was 200 CFU/100 ml, resulting in UV and PAA doses of 7 to 30 mJ/cm2 and 0.9 to 2.0 mg/liter, respectively. The proportions of UPECs were reduced in all samples after disinfection, with an average reduction by UV of 55% (range, 22% to 80%) and by PAA of 52% (range, 11% to 100%). Analysis of urovirulence genes revealed that the decline in the UPEC populations was not associated with any particular virulence factor. A positive association was found between the occurrence of urovirulence and antimicrobial resistance genes (ARGs). However, the changes in the prevalence of ARGs in potential UPECs were different following disinfection, i.e., UV appears to have had no effect, while PAA significantly reduced the ARG levels. Thus, this study showed that both UV and PAA disinfections reduced the proportion of UPECs and that PAA disinfection also reduced the proportion of antimicrobial resistance gene-carrying UPEC pathotypes in municipal wastewaters. PMID:24727265

  6. Impact of UV and peracetic acid disinfection on the prevalence of virulence and antimicrobial resistance genes in uropathogenic Escherichia coli in wastewater effluents.

    PubMed

    Biswal, Basanta Kumar; Khairallah, Ramzi; Bibi, Kareem; Mazza, Alberto; Gehr, Ronald; Masson, Luke; Frigon, Dominic

    2014-06-01

    Wastewater discharges may increase the populations of pathogens, including Escherichia coli, and of antimicrobial-resistant strains in receiving waters. This study investigated the impact of UV and peracetic acid (PAA) disinfection on the prevalence of virulence and antimicrobial resistance genes in uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC), the most abundant E. coli pathotype in municipal wastewaters. Laboratory disinfection experiments were conducted on wastewater treated by physicochemical, activated sludge, or biofiltration processes; 1,766 E. coli isolates were obtained for the evaluation. The target disinfection level was 200 CFU/100 ml, resulting in UV and PAA doses of 7 to 30 mJ/cm(2) and 0.9 to 2.0 mg/liter, respectively. The proportions of UPECs were reduced in all samples after disinfection, with an average reduction by UV of 55% (range, 22% to 80%) and by PAA of 52% (range, 11% to 100%). Analysis of urovirulence genes revealed that the decline in the UPEC populations was not associated with any particular virulence factor. A positive association was found between the occurrence of urovirulence and antimicrobial resistance genes (ARGs). However, the changes in the prevalence of ARGs in potential UPECs were different following disinfection, i.e., UV appears to have had no effect, while PAA significantly reduced the ARG levels. Thus, this study showed that both UV and PAA disinfections reduced the proportion of UPECs and that PAA disinfection also reduced the proportion of antimicrobial resistance gene-carrying UPEC pathotypes in municipal wastewaters. PMID:24727265

  7. Occurrence of virulence genes associated with diarrheagenic Escherichia coli isolated from raw cow's milk from two commercial dairy farms in the Eastern Cape Province, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Caine, Lesley-Anne; Nwodo, Uchechukwu U; Okoh, Anthony I; Ndip, Roland N; Green, Ezekiel

    2014-11-18

    Escherichia coli remains a public health concern worldwide as an organism that causes diarrhea and its reservoir in raw milk may play an important role in the survival and transport of pathogenic strains. Diarrheagenic E. coli strains are diverse food-borne pathogens and causes diarrhea with varying virulence in humans. We investigated the prevalence of pathogenic E. coli in raw milk from two commercial dairy farms. Four hundred raw milk samples, 200 from each dairy farm, were screened for the presence of fliCH7, eagR, ial, eagg, lt, and papC genes. In dairy farm A, 100 E. coli were identified based on culture, oxidase and Gram staining, while 88 isolates from dairy farm B were identified in the same manner. Gene detection showed fliCH7 27 (54%) to be the highest gene detected from farm A and lt 2 (4%) to be the lowest. The highest gene detected in dairy farm B was fliCH7 16 (43.2%) and papC 1 (2.7%) was the least. The amplification of pathogenic genes associated with diarrheagenic E. coli from cows' raw milk demonstrates that potentially virulent E. coli strains are widely distributed in raw milk and may be a cause of concern for human health.

  8. Occurrence of Virulence Genes Associated with Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli Isolated from Raw Cow’s Milk from Two Commercial Dairy Farms in the Eastern Cape Province, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Caine, Lesley-Anne; Nwodo, Uchechukwu U.; Okoh, Anthony I.; Ndip, Roland N.; Green, Ezekiel

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli remains a public health concern worldwide as an organism that causes diarrhea and its reservoir in raw milk may play an important role in the survival and transport of pathogenic strains. Diarrheagenic E. coli strains are diverse food-borne pathogens and causes diarrhea with varying virulence in humans. We investigated the prevalence of pathogenic E. coli in raw milk from two commercial dairy farms. Four hundred raw milk samples, 200 from each dairy farm, were screened for the presence of fliCH7, eagR, ial, eagg, lt, and papC genes. In dairy farm A, 100 E. coli were identified based on culture, oxidase and Gram staining, while 88 isolates from dairy farm B were identified in the same manner. Gene detection showed fliCH7 27 (54%) to be the highest gene detected from farm A and lt 2 (4%) to be the lowest. The highest gene detected in dairy farm B was fliCH7 16 (43.2%) and papC 1 (2.7%) was the least. The amplification of pathogenic genes associated with diarrheagenic E. coli from cows’ raw milk demonstrates that potentially virulent E. coli strains are widely distributed in raw milk and may be a cause of concern for human health. PMID:25411727

  9. Serotyping and virulence genes detection in Escherichia coli isolated from fertile and infertile eggs, dead-in-shell embryos, and chickens with yolk sac infection.

    PubMed

    Rosario, C C; López, A C C; Téllez, I G; Navarro, O A; Anderson, R C; Eslava, C C

    2004-12-01

    Escherichia coli is a common avian pathogen mainly associated with extraintestinal infections such as yolk sac infection (YSI). The aim of this study was to determine the serotypes and the presence of some virulence genes of E. coli strains isolated from different samples in a vertically integrated poultry operation in Mexico. Two hundred sixty-seven E. coli isolates from different samples were serotyped using rabbit serum against the 175 somatic (O) and 56 flagellar (H) antigens of the typing schema. Virulence genes were determined by colony blot hybridization, using DNA probes for st, eae, agg1, agg2, bfp, lt, cdt, slt, and ipaH diarrhea-associated virulence factors. The serogroup of 85% of the strains was determined; O19 (12%), 084 (9%), 08 (6%), and 078 (5%) were the most common. Using the complete antigenic formula (O and H), O19:NM (n = 31) was the serotype most frequently isolated from dead-in-shell embryos and in broilers that had died on the fourth, fifth, sixth, and seventh days after hatch. One hundred ten strains (41.2%) hybridized with one or more of the used probes. Of these, ipaH (72%), eae (30%), and cdt (27%) were the most common. Considering the origin of the respective isolates, 40% of the broiler farm strains were positive for at least one probe. Results show that some avian E. coli strains isolated in Mexico are included in avian pathogenic E. coli serotypes not previously reported, suggesting that they could be specific for this geographic area. The wide distribution of the ipaH gene among nonmotile strains suggests that this invasiveness trait could be important in YSI pathogenesis. On the other hand, some other genes could contribute to E. coli virulence during YSI. PMID:15666860

  10. Evaluation of the Antibiotic Resistance and Virulence of Escherichia coli Strains Isolated from Chicken Carcasses in 2007 and 2013 from Paraná, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Koga, Vanessa L; Rodrigues, Gabriela R; Scandorieiro, Sara; Vespero, Eliana C; Oba, Alexandre; de Brito, Benito G; de Brito, Kelly C T; Nakazato, Gerson; Kobayashi, Renata K T

    2015-06-01

    The frequent use of antimicrobials in commercial poultry production has raised concerns regarding the potential impact of antimicrobials on human health due to selection for resistant bacteria. Several studies have reported similarities between extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) strains isolated from birds and humans, indicating that these contaminant bacteria in poultry may be linked to human disease. The aim of our study was to analyze the frequency of antimicrobial resistance and virulence factors among E. coli strains isolated from commercial chicken carcasses in Paraná, Brazil, in 2007 and 2013. A total of 84 E. coli strains were isolated from chicken carcasses in 2007, and 121 E. coli strains were isolated in 2013. Polymerase chain reaction was used to detect virulence genes (hlyF, iss, ompT, iron, and iutA) and to determine phylogenetic classification. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed using 15 antimicrobials. The strains were also confirmed as extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing E. coli with phenotypic and genotypic tests. The results indicated that our strains harbored virulence genes characteristic of ExPEC, with the iutA gene being the most prevalent. The phylogenetic groups D and B1 were the most prevalent among the strains isolated in 2007 and 2013, respectively. There was an increase in the frequency of resistance to a majority of antimicrobials tested. An important finding in this study was the large number of ESBL-producing E. coli strains isolated from chicken carcasses in 2013, primarily for the group 2 cefotaximase (CTX-M) enzyme. ESBL production confers broad-spectrum resistance and is a health risk because ESBL genes are transferable from food-producing animals to humans via poultry meat. These findings suggest that our strains harbored virulence and resistance genes, which are often associated with plasmids that can facilitate their transmission between bacteria derived from different hosts

  11. Vegetables and Restaurant Salads as a Reservoir for Shiga Toxigenic Escherichia coli: Distribution of Virulence Factors, O-Serogroups, and Antibiotic Resistance Properties.

    PubMed

    Shakerian, Amir; Rahimi, Ebrahim; Emad, Pardis

    2016-07-01

    Close contact of vegetables with soil, polluted water, and animal manure and unsanitary conditions during processing of restaurant salads led us to study the distribution of virulence factors, O-serogroups, and antibiotic resistance properties in Shiga toxigenic Escherichia coli (STEC) isolated from vegetables and salads. Samples of vegetables and salad (n = 420) were collected and evaluated for the presence of E. coli using culture and a PCR assay. Total prevalence of E. coli in studied samples was 49.5%. E. coli was found in 49.6% of vegetable samples and 49% of salad samples. Leek and traditional salad had the highest incidence of E. coli. Significant differences in the incidence of E. coli were found between the hot and cold seasons. Of the 149 E. coli isolates from vegetable samples, 130 (87%) were STEC, and of the 59 E. coli isolates from salad samples, 50 (84%) were STEC. The most commonly detected virulence factors were stx1 and eaeA. A significant difference was found between the frequency of the attaching and effacing and the enterohemorrhagic E. coli subtypes. Serogroups O26 (46% of isolates), O157 (14%), O121 (10%), and O128 (9%) were the most commonly detected serogroups among the STEC strains. The tetA, sul1, aac(3)-IV, dfrA1, blaSHV, and CITM antibiotic resistance genes were found in 96, 47.7, 90, 51, 27, and 93% of isolates, respectively. The highest levels of resistance were found against ampicillin (96.6% of isolates), tetracycline (87%), and gentamicin (90%). This study shows the importance of vegetables and salads as potential sources of E. coli infection.

  12. Vegetables and Restaurant Salads as a Reservoir for Shiga Toxigenic Escherichia coli: Distribution of Virulence Factors, O-Serogroups, and Antibiotic Resistance Properties.

    PubMed

    Shakerian, Amir; Rahimi, Ebrahim; Emad, Pardis

    2016-07-01

    Close contact of vegetables with soil, polluted water, and animal manure and unsanitary conditions during processing of restaurant salads led us to study the distribution of virulence factors, O-serogroups, and antibiotic resistance properties in Shiga toxigenic Escherichia coli (STEC) isolated from vegetables and salads. Samples of vegetables and salad (n = 420) were collected and evaluated for the presence of E. coli using culture and a PCR assay. Total prevalence of E. coli in studied samples was 49.5%. E. coli was found in 49.6% of vegetable samples and 49% of salad samples. Leek and traditional salad had the highest incidence of E. coli. Significant differences in the incidence of E. coli were found between the hot and cold seasons. Of the 149 E. coli isolates from vegetable samples, 130 (87%) were STEC, and of the 59 E. coli isolates from salad samples, 50 (84%) were STEC. The most commonly detected virulence factors were stx1 and eaeA. A significant difference was found between the frequency of the attaching and effacing and the enterohemorrhagic E. coli subtypes. Serogroups O26 (46% of isolates), O157 (14%), O121 (10%), and O128 (9%) were the most commonly detected serogroups among the STEC strains. The tetA, sul1, aac(3)-IV, dfrA1, blaSHV, and CITM antibiotic resistance genes were found in 96, 47.7, 90, 51, 27, and 93% of isolates, respectively. The highest levels of resistance were found against ampicillin (96.6% of isolates), tetracycline (87%), and gentamicin (90%). This study shows the importance of vegetables and salads as potential sources of E. coli infection. PMID:27357034

  13. Detection, Virulence Gene Assessment and Antibiotic Resistance Pattern of O157 Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli in Tabriz, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Akhi, Mohammad Taghi; Ostadgavahi, Ali Toloue; Ghotaslou, Reza; Asgharzadeh, Mohammad; Pirzadeh, Tahereh; Sorayaei Sowmesarayi, Vida; Memar, Mohammad Yousef

    2015-01-01

    Background: Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) is a food-borne pathogen and infection with this organism causes illnesses such as bloody diarrhea, hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic-uremic syndrome. Objectives: Considering the lack of any information about the prevalence rate and the antibiotic resistance pattern of O157:H7 serotype in Tabriz, finding answers to the above mentioned subjects was among the goals of this study. Materials and Methods: Two hundred E. coli strains from diarrheal or non-diarrheal stools of outpatients and hospitalized cases in Tabriz Imam Reza hospital were isolated between September and December 2014 using MacConkey agar and standard biochemical tests and then cultured on sorbitol MacConkey agar. The sorbitol-negative isolates were confirmed as the O157 serotype using O157 antisera. A multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method was used for the detection of stx-1, stx-2, eae, and mdh genes and the antibiotic resistance pattern of these isolates was determined using Kirby-Bauer method and clinical and laboratory standards institute (CLSI) standards. Results: Of the isolates 11 (5.5%) were sorbitol-negative, which were later analyzed by multiplex PCR and the results revealed that 2 (18.18%) isolates contained the stx-1 gene, 10 (90.91%) contained the stx-2 gene, and 5 (45.45%) contained the eae gene. The stx-2 and eae genes were the most commonly encountered virulence factors. All or most of the isolates were susceptible to ceftazidime (100%), gentamicin (100%), ciprofloxacin (100%), nalidixic acid (90.9%), trimetoprim sulfamethoxazole (90.9%), chloramphenicol (90.9%), ampicillin (81.8%), and cephalothin (72.7%). On the contrary, moderate susceptibility of the isolates to doxycycline (54.5%) was observed. Conclusions: Due to the low frequency of STEC O157 and the high susceptibility rates of the isolates to the tested antibiotics in this study, STEC O157 has not become a major problem in Tabriz yet, but comprehensive

  14. Presence of pathogenicity island related and plasmid encoded virulence genes in cytolethal distending toxin producing Escherichia coli isolates from diarrheal cases

    PubMed Central

    Oloomi, Mana; Javadi, Maryam; Bouzari, Saeid

    2015-01-01

    Context: Mobile genetic elements such as plasmids, bacteriophages, insertion elements, and genomic islands play a critical role in virulence of bacterial pathogens. These elements transfer horizontally and could play an important role in the evolution and virulence of many pathogens. A broad spectrum of gram-negative bacterial species has been shown to produce a cytolethal distending toxin (CDT). On the other hand, Shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli are the one carry virulence genes such as stx 1 and stx 2 (Shiga toxin) and these genes can be acquired by horizontal gene transfer. Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of other virulence associated genes among CDT producing E. coli strains. Materials and Methods: Thirty CDT positive strains isolated from patients with diarrhea were characterized. Thereafter, the association with virulent genetic elements in known pathogenicity islands (PAIs) was assessed by polymerase chain reaction. Results: In this study, it was shown that the most CDT producing E. coli isolates express Shiga toxin. Moreover, the presence of prophages framing cdt genes (like P2 phage) was also identified in each cdt-type genomic group. Flanked regions of cdt-I, cdt-IV, and cdt-V-type was similar to plasmid sequences while cdt-II and cdt-III-type regions similarity with hypothetical protein (orf3) was observed. Conclusion: The occurrence of each cdt-type groups with specific virulence genes and PAI genetic elements is indicative of horizontal gene transfer by these mobile genetic elements, which could lead to diversity among the isolates. PMID:26539367

  15. Virulence gene profiles of shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli isolated from fecal samples of finishing swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) are important pathogens responsible for food-borne outbreaks and serious illness including hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic uremic syndrome. Certain STEC serogroups may cause edema disease in swine; and similar to cattle, swine have been shown to be a ...

  16. Characteristics of Plasmids Coharboring 16S rRNA Methylases, CTX-M, and Virulence Factors in Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae Isolates from Chickens in China.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yongqiang; Zhang, Anyun; Lei, Changwei; Wang, Hongning; Guan, Zhongbin; Xu, Changwen; Liu, Bihui; Zhang, Dongdong; Li, Qingzhou; Jiang, Wei; Pan, Yun; Yang, Chunmei

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize plasmids coharboring 16S rRNA methylases, blaCTX-M and virulence-associated genes in Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates from chickens in China. A total of 32 positive transconjugants exhibited coresistance to amikacin and cefotaxime in E. coli (24/281) and K. pneumoniae (8/93), and were identified by conjugation experiments and S1-pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Polymerase chain reaction amplification assay detecting resistance genes showed that rmtB or armA gene accompanied with different blaCTX-M genes coexisted on 32 transferred plasmids. The blaCTX-M-98b gene was identified in chicken-derived E. coli and K. pneumoniae for the first time. The association between resistance genes and virulence genes was observed in the transferred plasmids; 68.8% (22/32) transferred resistance plasmids coharboring various virulence genes including traT, iutA, fyuA, msbB, and vagC genes with diverse proportions. Genetic stability tests revealed that 93.8% (30/32) transferred plasmids continued to exist in the host strain after continuous passage of 30 times in 15 days. Furthermore, 87.5% (28/32) conjugants showed no significant differences in growth rates compared with E. coli J53. Results of the growth competition assay showed that conjugants have low fitness cost, which indicated that there were no obvious negative effects on the host's growth. The combination of blaCTX-M-98b-rmtB-traT on 85-kb transferred IncF plasmids in E. coli, and blaCTX-M-14-rmtB-traT on 95-kb transferred IncF plasmids in K. pneumoniae were first identified in this study. These features of plasmids may contribute to the successful spread of resistance and virulence among pathogens of different sources and geographical origins.

  17. Transcriptional regulation by iron of a Vibrio cholerae virulence gene and homology of the gene to the Escherichia coli fur system.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, M B; Boyko, S A; Calderwood, S B

    1990-12-01

    We have previously described an iron-regulated virulence determinant in Vibrio cholerae. Strain MBG40, which contains a TnphoA insertion mutation in the iron-regulated gene irgA, has reduced virulence in a newborn mouse model and has lost the major 77-kDa iron-regulated outer membrane protein. We report here the cloning of the irgA'-'phoA gene fusion, the sequencing of the 5'-proximal portion of irgA, and the definition of its promoter region by primer extension. The deduced amino acid sequence of the amino-terminal portion of IrgA is homologous to the ferrienterochelin receptor of Escherichia coli (FepA), suggesting that IrgA may be the iron-vibriobactin outer membrane receptor. Iron regulation of irgA in an E. coli background and that of the E. coli gene slt-IA in a V. cholerae background are reciprocal, suggesting a common mechanism of iron regulation. Regulation of irgA by iron in V. cholerae occurs at the transcriptional level, and there is an interrupted dyad symmetric sequence in the vicinity of the promoter that is homologous to Fur binding sites of E. coli. Unlike iron-regulated genes in E. coli, however, transcription of irgA requires an additional 900 bp of upstream DNA that contains an open reading frame in inverse orientation to irgA.

  18. Use of zebrafish to probe the divergent virulence potentials and toxin requirements of extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Wiles, Travis J; Bower, Jean M; Redd, Michael J; Mulvey, Matthew A

    2009-12-01

    Extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) cause an array of diseases, including sepsis, neonatal meningitis, and urinary tract infections. Many putative virulence factors that might modulate ExPEC pathogenesis have been identified through sequencing efforts, epidemiology, and gene expression profiling, but few of these genes have been assigned clearly defined functional roles during infection. Using zebrafish embryos as surrogate hosts, we have developed a model system with the ability to resolve diverse virulence phenotypes and niche-specific restrictions among closely related ExPEC isolates during either localized or systemic infections. In side-by-side comparisons of prototypic ExPEC isolates, we observed an unexpectedly high degree of phenotypic diversity that is not readily apparent using more traditional animal hosts. In particular, the capacity of different ExPEC isolates to persist and multiply within the zebrafish host and cause disease was shown to be variably dependent upon two secreted toxins, alpha-hemolysin and cytotoxic necrotizing factor. Both of these toxins appear to function primarily in the neutralization of phagocytes, which are recruited in high numbers to sites of infection where they act as an essential host defense against ExPEC as well as less virulent E. coli strains. These results establish zebrafish as a valuable tool for the elucidation and functional analysis of both ExPEC virulence factors and host defense mechanisms.

  19. Use of Zebrafish to Probe the Divergent Virulence Potentials and Toxin Requirements of Extraintestinal Pathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Wiles, Travis J.; Bower, Jean M.; Redd, Michael J.; Mulvey, Matthew A.

    2009-01-01

    Extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) cause an array of diseases, including sepsis, neonatal meningitis, and urinary tract infections. Many putative virulence factors that might modulate ExPEC pathogenesis have been identified through sequencing efforts, epidemiology, and gene expression profiling, but few of these genes have been assigned clearly defined functional roles during infection. Using zebrafish embryos as surrogate hosts, we have developed a model system with the ability to resolve diverse virulence phenotypes and niche-specific restrictions among closely related ExPEC isolates during either localized or systemic infections. In side-by-side comparisons of prototypic ExPEC isolates, we observed an unexpectedly high degree of phenotypic diversity that is not readily apparent using more traditional animal hosts. In particular, the capacity of different ExPEC isolates to persist and multiply within the zebrafish host and cause disease was shown to be variably dependent upon two secreted toxins, α-hemolysin and cytotoxic necrotizing factor. Both of these toxins appear to function primarily in the neutralization of phagocytes, which are recruited in high numbers to sites of infection where they act as an essential host defense against ExPEC as well as less virulent E. coli strains. These results establish zebrafish as a valuable tool for the elucidation and functional analysis of both ExPEC virulence factors and host defense mechanisms. PMID:20019794

  20. The primary transcriptome of the Escherichia coli O104:H4 pAA plasmid and novel insights into its virulence gene expression and regulation

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Petya; Knödler, Michael; Förstner, Konrad U.; Berger, Michael; Bertling, Christian; Sharma, Cynthia M.; Vogel, Jörg; Karch, Helge; Dobrindt, Ulrich; Mellmann, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli O104:H4 (E. coli O104:H4), which caused a massive outbreak of acute gastroenteritis and hemolytic uremic syndrome in 2011, carries an aggregative adherence fimbriae I (AAF/I) encoding virulence plasmid, pAA. The importance of pAA in host-pathogen interaction and disease severity has been demonstrated, however, not much is known about its transcriptional organization and gene regulation. Here, we analyzed the pAA primary transcriptome using differential RNA sequencing, which allows for the high-throughput mapping of transcription start site (TSS) and non-coding RNA candidates. We identified 248 TSS candidates in the 74-kb pAA and only 21% of them could be assigned as TSS of annotated genes. We detected TSS for the majority of pAA-encoded virulence factors. Interestingly, we mapped TSS, which could allow for the transcriptional uncoupling of the AAF/I operon, and potentially regulatory antisense RNA candidates against the genes encoding dispersin and the serine protease SepA. Moreover, a computational search for transcription factor binding sites suggested for AggR-mediated activation of SepA expression, which was additionally experimentally validated. This work advances our understanding of the molecular basis of E. coli O104:H4 pathogenicity and provides a valuable resource for further characterization of pAA virulence gene regulation. PMID:27748404

  1. Insight into neonatal septicaemic Escherichia coli from India with respect to phylogroups, serotypes, virulence, extended-spectrum-β-lactamases and association of ST131 clonal group.

    PubMed

    Roy, S; Datta, S; DAS, P; Gaind, R; Pal, T; Tapader, R; Mukherjee, S; Basu, S

    2015-11-01

    The study characterizes a collection of 67 neonatal septicaemic Escherichia coli isolates on the basis of phylogroup, serotype, virulence, antibiotic resistance and also the association of CTX-M-producing E. coli and the ST131 clone in a developing country. Phylogroups B2 and D were predominant (33% and 19%, respectively). The most prevalent virulence factors (VFs) were traT (69%) and iucC (68%) and most VFs were concentrated in the B2 isolates. High levels of resistance (⩾70%) to cefotaxime, ciprofloxacin and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole was recorded but meropenem remained the most active antimicrobial. Six (9%) of the study isolates belonged to the ST131 clone, five of which were from the same hospital, and were either indistinguishable or closely related by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Although the prevalence of CTX-M-15-producing isolates was high (81%), the ST131 clone was relatively infrequent (11%) in extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producers. The ST131 clone was characterized by the presence of bla CTX-M-15, qnrS, aac(6')-Ib-cr, IncF plasmids and virulence determinants such as iucC, papC, traT, usp, hlyA, iroN E.coli , cnf, and sat. We conclude that clonal spread of ST131 did not contribute directly to the high prevalence of CTX-M-15 in our settings.

  2. Virulence characterization and molecular subtyping of typical and atypical Escherichia coli O157:H7 and O157:H(-) isolated from fecal samples and beef carcasses in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Narváez-Bravo, Claudia; Echeverry, Alejandro; Miller, Markus F; Rodas-González, Argenis; Brashears, M Todd; Aslam, Mueen; Brashears, Mindy M

    2015-02-01

    The objective of the study was to characterize virulence genes and subtype Escherichia coli O157:H7 and O157:H( 2 ) isolates obtained from a vertically integrated feedlot slaughter plant in Mexico. A total of 1,695 samples were collected from feedlots, holding pens, colon contents, hides, and carcasses. E. coli O157:H7 detection and confirmation was carried out using conventional microbiology techniques, immunomagnetic separation, latex agglutination, and the BAX system. A total of 97 E. coli O157 strains were recovered and screened for key virulence and metabolic genes using multiplex and conventional PCR. Eighty-eight (91.72%) of the strains carried stx2, eae, and ehxA genes. Ten isolates (8.25%) were atypical sorbitol-fermenting strains, and nine were negative for the flicH7 gene and lacked eae, stx1, stx2, and ehxA. One sorbitol-positive strain carried stx2, eae, tir, toxB, and iha genes but was negative for stx1 and ehxA. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis yielded 49 different PFGE subtypes, showing a high genetic diversity; however, the majority of the typical isolates were closely related (80 to 90% cutoff). Atypical O157 isolates were not closely related within them or to typical E. coli O157:H7 isolates. Identical PFGE subtypes were found in samples obtained from colon contents, feedlots, holding pens, and carcasses. Isolation of a sorbitolfermenting E. coli O157 positive for a number of virulence genes is a novel finding in Mexico. These data showed that genetically similar strains of E. coli O157:H7 can be found at various stages of beef production and highlights the importance of preventing cross-contamination at the pre- and postharvest stages of processing.

  3. Comparative analysis of virulence determinants, antibiotic susceptibility patterns and serogrouping of atypical enteropathogenic Escherichia coli versus typical enteropathogenic E. coli in India.

    PubMed

    Malvi, Supriya; Appannanavar, Suma; Mohan, Balvinder; Kaur, Harsimran; Gautam, Neha; Bharti, Bhavneet; Kumar, Yashwant; Taneja, Neelam

    2015-10-01

    The epidemiology of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) and the significance of isolation of atypical EPEC (aEPEC) in childhood diarrhoea have not been well studied in an Indian context. A comparative study was undertaken to investigate virulence determinants, antibiotic susceptibility patterns and serogrouping of typical EPEC (tEPEC) versus aEPEC causing diarrhoea in children. A total of 400 prospective and 500 retrospective E. coli isolates were included. PCR was performed for eae, bfpA, efa, nleB, nleE, cdt, ehxA and paa genes. The Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute's disc diffusion test was used to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility. Phenotypic screening of extended spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs), AmpC and Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC) production, and molecular detection of bla(NDM-1), bla(VIM), bla(CTX-M-15), bla(IMP) and bla(KPC) were performed. aEPEC (57.6 %) were more common as compared with tEPEC (42.3 %). The occurrence of virulence genes was observed to be three times higher in aEPEC as compared with tEPEC, efa1 (14.7 % of aEPEC, 4 % of tEPEC) being the most common. Most of the isolates did not belong to the classical EPEC O-serogroups. The highest resistance was observed against amoxicillin (93.22 %) followed by quinolones (83 %), cephalosporins (37.28 %), cotrimoxazole (35.59 %) and carbapenems (30.5 %). Overall equal numbers of aEPEC (41.17 %) and tEPEC (40 %) were observed to be multidrug-resistant. Fifteen EPEC strains demonstrated presence of ESBLs, five produced AmpC and four each produced metallo-β-lactamases and KPC-type carbapenemases; eight, seven and one isolate(s) each were positive for bla(VIM), bla(CTX-M-15) and bla(NDM-1), respectively. Here, to the best of our knowledge, we report for the first time on carbapenem resistance and the presence of bla(NDM-1) and bla(CTX-M-15) in EPEC isolates from India. PMID:26233663

  4. Comparative analysis of virulence determinants, antibiotic susceptibility patterns and serogrouping of atypical enteropathogenic Escherichia coli versus typical enteropathogenic E. coli in India.

    PubMed

    Malvi, Supriya; Appannanavar, Suma; Mohan, Balvinder; Kaur, Harsimran; Gautam, Neha; Bharti, Bhavneet; Kumar, Yashwant; Taneja, Neelam

    2015-10-01

    The epidemiology of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) and the significance of isolation of atypical EPEC (aEPEC) in childhood diarrhoea have not been well studied in an Indian context. A comparative study was undertaken to investigate virulence determinants, antibiotic susceptibility patterns and serogrouping of typical EPEC (tEPEC) versus aEPEC causing diarrhoea in children. A total of 400 prospective and 500 retrospective E. coli isolates were included. PCR was performed for eae, bfpA, efa, nleB, nleE, cdt, ehxA and paa genes. The Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute's disc diffusion test was used to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility. Phenotypic screening of extended spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs), AmpC and Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC) production, and molecular detection of bla(NDM-1), bla(VIM), bla(CTX-M-15), bla(IMP) and bla(KPC) were performed. aEPEC (57.6 %) were more common as compared with tEPEC (42.3 %). The occurrence of virulence genes was observed to be three times higher in aEPEC as compared with tEPEC, efa1 (14.7 % of aEPEC, 4 % of tEPEC) being the most common. Most of the isolates did not belong to the classical EPEC O-serogroups. The highest resistance was observed against amoxicillin (93.22 %) followed by quinolones (83 %), cephalosporins (37.28 %), cotrimoxazole (35.59 %) and carbapenems (30.5 %). Overall equal numbers of aEPEC (41.17 %) and tEPEC (40 %) were observed to be multidrug-resistant. Fifteen EPEC strains demonstrated presence of ESBLs, five produced AmpC and four each produced metallo-β-lactamases and KPC-type carbapenemases; eight, seven and one isolate(s) each were positive for bla(VIM), bla(CTX-M-15) and bla(NDM-1), respectively. Here, to the best of our knowledge, we report for the first time on carbapenem resistance and the presence of bla(NDM-1) and bla(CTX-M-15) in EPEC isolates from India.

  5. Prevalence of virulence determinants and antimicrobial resistance among commensal Escherichia coli derived from dairy and beef cattle.

    PubMed

    Bok, Ewa; Mazurek, Justyna; Stosik, Michał; Wojciech, Magdalena; Baldy-Chudzik, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    Cattle is a reservoir of potentially pathogenic E. coli, bacteria that can represent a significant threat to public health, hence it is crucial to monitor the prevalence of the genetic determinants of virulence and antimicrobial resistance among the E. coli population. The aim of this study was the analysis of the phylogenetic structure, distribution of virulence factors (VFs) and prevalence of antimicrobial resistance among E. coli isolated from two groups of healthy cattle: 50 cows housed in the conventional barn (147 isolates) and 42 cows living on the ecological pasture (118 isolates). The phylogenetic analysis, identification of VFs and antimicrobial resistance genes were based on either multiplex or simplex PCR. The antimicrobial susceptibilities of E. coli were examined using the broth microdilution method. Two statistical approaches were used to analyse the results obtained for two groups of cattle. The relations between the dependent (VFs profiles, antibiotics) and the independent variables were described using the two models. The mixed logit model was used to characterise the prevalence of the analysed factors in the sets of isolates. The univariate logistic regression model was used to characterise the prevalence of these factors in particular animals. Given each model, the odds ratio (OR) and the 95% confidence interval for the population were estimated. The phylogroup B1 was predominant among isolates from beef cattle, while the phylogroups A, B1 and D occurred with equal frequency among isolates from dairy cattle. The frequency of VFs-positive isolates was significantly higher among isolates from beef cattle. E. coli from dairy cattle revealed significantly higher resistance to antibiotics. Some of the tested resistance genes were present among isolates from dairy cattle. Our study showed that the habitat and diet may affect the genetic diversity of commensal E. coli in the cattle. The results suggest that the ecological pasture habitat is related to

  6. Prevalence of Virulence Determinants and Antimicrobial Resistance among Commensal Escherichia coli Derived from Dairy and Beef Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Bok, Ewa; Mazurek, Justyna; Stosik, Michał; Wojciech, Magdalena; Baldy-Chudzik, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    Cattle is a reservoir of potentially pathogenic E. coli, bacteria that can represent a significant threat to public health, hence it is crucial to monitor the prevalence of the genetic determinants of virulence and antimicrobial resistance among the E. coli population. The aim of this study was the analysis of the phylogenetic structure, distribution of virulence factors (VFs) and prevalence of antimicrobial resistance among E. coli isolated from two groups of healthy cattle: 50 cows housed in the conventional barn (147 isolates) and 42 cows living on the ecological pasture (118 isolates). The phylogenetic analysis, identification of VFs and antimicrobial resistance genes were based on either multiplex or simplex PCR. The antimicrobial susceptibilities of E. coli were examined using the broth microdilution method. Two statistical approaches were used to analyse the results obtained for two groups of cattle. The relations between the dependent (VFs profiles, antibiotics) and the independent variables were described using the two models. The mixed logit model was used to characterise the prevalence of the analysed factors in the sets of isolates. The univariate logistic regression model was used to characterise the prevalence of these factors in particular animals. Given each model, the odds ratio (OR) and the 95% confidence interval for the population were estimated. The phylogroup B1 was predominant among isolates from beef cattle, while the phylogroups A, B1 and D occurred with equal frequency among isolates from dairy cattle. The frequency of VFs-positive isolates was significantly higher among isolates from beef cattle. E. coli from dairy cattle revealed significantly higher resistance to antibiotics. Some of the tested resistance genes were present among isolates from dairy cattle. Our study showed that the habitat and diet may affect the genetic diversity of commensal E. coli in the cattle. The results suggest that the ecological pasture habitat is related to

  7. Prevalence of virulence determinants and antimicrobial resistance among commensal Escherichia coli derived from dairy and beef cattle.

    PubMed

    Bok, Ewa; Mazurek, Justyna; Stosik, Michał; Wojciech, Magdalena; Baldy-Chudzik, Katarzyna

    2015-01-19

    Cattle is a reservoir of potentially pathogenic E. coli, bacteria that can represent a significant threat to public health, hence it is crucial to monitor the prevalence of the genetic determinants of virulence and antimicrobial resistance among the E. coli population. The aim of this study was the analysis of the phylogenetic structure, distribution of virulence factors (VFs) and prevalence of antimicrobial resistance among E. coli isolated from two groups of healthy cattle: 50 cows housed in the conventional barn (147 isolates) and 42 cows living on the ecological pasture (118 isolates). The phylogenetic analysis, identification of VFs and antimicrobial resistance genes were based on either multiplex or simplex PCR. The antimicrobial susceptibilities of E. coli were examined using the broth microdilution method. Two statistical approaches were used to analyse the results obtained for two groups of cattle. The relations between the dependent (VFs profiles, antibiotics) and the independent variables were described using the two models. The mixed logit model was used to characterise the prevalence of the analysed factors in the sets of isolates. The univariate logistic regression model was used to characterise the prevalence of these factors in particular animals. Given each model, the odds ratio (OR) and the 95% confidence interval for the population were estimated. The phylogroup B1 was predominant among isolates from beef cattle, while the phylogroups A, B1 and D occurred with equal frequency among isolates from dairy cattle. The frequency of VFs-positive isolates was significantly higher among isolates from beef cattle. E. coli from dairy cattle revealed significantly higher resistance to antibiotics. Some of the tested resistance genes were present among isolates from dairy cattle. Our study showed that the habitat and diet may affect the genetic diversity of commensal E. coli in the cattle. The results suggest that the ecological pasture habitat is related to

  8. Bile salts affect expression of Escherichia coli O157:H7 genes for virulence and iron acquisition, and promote growth under iron limiting conditions.

    PubMed

    Hamner, Steve; McInnerney, Kate; Williamson, Kerry; Franklin, Michael J; Ford, Timothy E

    2013-01-01

    Bile salts exhibit potent antibacterial properties, acting as detergents to disrupt cell membranes and as DNA-damaging agents. Although bacteria inhabiting the intestinal tract are able to resist bile's antimicrobial effects, relatively little is known about how bile influences virulence of enteric pathogens. Escherichia coli O157:H7 is an important pathogen of humans, capable of causing severe diarrhea and more serious sequelae. In this study, the transcriptome response of E. coli O157:H7 to bile was determined. Bile exposure induced significant changes in mRNA levels of genes related to virulence potential, including a reduction of mRNA for the 41 genes making up the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE) pathogenicity island. Bile treatment had an unusual effect on mRNA levels for the entire flagella-chemotaxis regulon, resulting in two- to four-fold increases in mRNA levels for genes associated with the flagella hook-basal body structure, but a two-fold decrease for "late" flagella genes associated with the flagella filament, stator motor, and chemotaxis. Bile salts also caused increased mRNA levels for seventeen genes associated with iron scavenging and metabolism, and counteracted the inhibitory effect of the iron chelating agent 2,2'-dipyridyl on growth of E. coli O157:H7. These findings suggest that E. coli O157:H7 may use bile as an environmental signal to adapt to changing conditions associated with the small intestine, including adaptation to an iron-scarce environment.

  9. Simultaneous Presence of Insertion Sequence Excision Enhancer and Insertion Sequence IS629 Correlates with Increased Diversity and Virulence in Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Toro, M.; Rump, L. V.; Cao, G.; Meng, J.; Brown, E. W.

    2015-01-01

    Although new serotypes of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) emerge constantly, the mechanisms by which these new pathogens arise and the reasons emerging serotypes tend to carry more virulence genes than other E. coli are not understood. An insertion sequence (IS) excision enhancer (IEE) was discovered in EHEC O157:H7 that promoted the excision of IS3 family members and generating various genomic deletions. One IS3 family member, IS629, actively transposes and proliferates in EHEC O157:H7 and enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) O139 and O149. The simultaneous presence of the IEE and IS629 (and other IS3 family members) may be part of a system promoting not only adaptation and genome diversification in E. coli O157:H7 but also contributing to the development of pathogenicity among predominant serotypes. Prevalence comparisons of these elements in 461 strains, representing 72 different serotypes and 5 preassigned seropathotypes (SPT) A to E, showed that the presence of these two elements simultaneously was serotype specific and associated with highly pathogenic serotypes (O157 and top non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli [STEC]) implicated in outbreaks and sporadic cases of human illness (SPT A and B). Serotypes lacking one or both elements were less likely to have been isolated from clinical cases. Our comparisons of IEE sequences showed sequence variations that could be divided into at least three clusters. Interestingly, the IEE sequences from O157 and the top 10 non-O157 STEC serotypes fell into clusters I and II, while less commonly isolated serotypes O5 and O174 fell into cluster III. These results suggest that IS629 and IEE elements may be acting synergistically to promote genome plasticity and genetic diversity among STEC strains, enhancing their abilities to adapt to hostile environments and rapidly take up virulence factors. PMID:26292302

  10. Deletion of luxS further attenuates the virulence of the avian pathogenic Escherichia coli aroA mutant.

    PubMed

    Han, Xiangan; Bai, Hao; Tu, Jian; Yang, Lijun; Xu, Da; Wang, Shaohui; Qi, Kezong; Fan, Guobo; Zhang, Yuxi; Zuo, Jiakun; Tian, Mingxing; Ding, Chan; Yu, Shengqing

    2015-11-01

    In this study, an aroA-deletion avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) mutant (strain DE17ΔaroA) and aroA and luxS double deletion APEC mutant (strain DE17ΔluxSΔaroA) were constructed from the APEC DE17 strain. The results showed that as compared to DE17ΔaroA, the virulence of DE17ΔluxSΔaroA was further attenuated by 200- and 31.7-fold, respectively, in ducklings based on the 50% lethal dose. The adherence and invasion abilities of DE17ΔluxSΔaroA and DE17ΔaroA were reduced by 36.5%/42.5% and 25.8%/29.3%, respectively, as compared to the wild-type strain DE17 (p < 0.05 and 0.01, respectively). Furthermore, in vivo studies showed that the bacterial loads of DE17ΔluxSΔaroA were reduced by 8400- and 11,333-fold in the spleen and blood of infected birds, respectively, while those of DE17ΔaroA were reduced by 743- and 1000-fold, respectively, as compared to the wild-type strain DE17. Histopathological analysis showed both that the mutants were associated with reduced pathological changes in the liver, spleen, and kidney of ducklings, and changes in DE17ΔluxSΔaroA-infected ducklings were reduced to a greater degree than those infected with DE17ΔaroA. Real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis further demonstrated that the mRNA levels of virulence-related genes (i.e., tsh, ompA, vat, iucD, pfs, fyuA, and fimC) were significantly decreased in DE17ΔaroA, especially in DE17ΔluxSΔaroA, as compared to DE17 (p < 0.05). In addition, the deletion of aroA or the double deletion of aroA and luxS reduced bacterial motility. To evaluate the potential use of DE17ΔluxSΔaroA as a vaccine candidate, 50 7-day-old ducklings were divided randomly into five groups of ten each for the experiment. The results showed that the ducklings immunized with inactivated DE17, DE17ΔluxS, DE17ΔaroA, and DE17ΔluxSΔaroA were 70.0%, 70.0%, 70.0, and 80.0% protected, respectively, after challenge with strain APEC DE17. The results of this study suggest that the double deletion of

  11. Antibiotic Resistance, Virulence Gene, and Molecular Profiles of Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli Isolates from Diverse Sources in Calcutta, India

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Asis; Das, S. C.; Ramamurthy, T.; Sikdar, A.; Khanam, J.; Yamasaki, S.; Takeda, Y.; Nair, G. Balakrish

    2002-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance, virulence gene, and molecular profiles of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) non-O157 strains isolated from human stool samples, cow stool samples, and beef samples over a period of 2 years in Calcutta, India, were determined. Resistance to one or more antibiotics was observed in 49.2% of the STEC strains, with some of the strains exhibiting multidrug resistance. The dominant combinations of virulence genes present in the strains studied were stx1 and stx2 (44.5% of strains) and stx1, stx2, and hlyA (enterohemorrhagic E. coli hemolysin gene) (19% of strains). Only 6.4% of the STEC strains harbored eae. The diversity of STEC strains from various sources was assessed by random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD). STEC strains that gave identical or nearly similar DNA fingerprints in RAPD-PCR and had similar virulence genotypes were further characterized by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Identical RAPD and PFGE profiles were observed in four sets of strains, with each set comprising two strains. There was no match in the RAPD and PFGE profiles between strains of STEC isolated from cows and those isolated from humans. It appears that the clones present in bovine sources are not transmitted to humans in the Calcutta setting although these strains showed evolutionary relatedness. Maybe for this reason, STEC has still not become a major problem in India. PMID:12037056

  12. Genomic and Functional Portrait of a Highly Virulent, CTX-M-15-Producing H30-Rx Subclone of Escherichia coli Sequence Type 131

    PubMed Central

    Ranjan, Amit; Shaik, Sabiha; Hussain, Arif; Nandanwar, Nishant; Semmler, Torsten; Jadhav, Savita; Wieler, Lothar H.

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli sequence type 131 (ST131) is a pandemic clone associated with multidrug-resistant, extraintestinal infections, attributable to the presence of the CTX-M-15 extended-spectrum β-lactamase gene and mutations entailing fluoroquinolone resistance. Studies on subclones within E. coli ST131 are critically required for targeting and implementation of successful control efforts. Our study comprehensively analyzed the genomic and functional attributes of the H30-Rx subclonal strains NA097 and NA114, belonging to the ST131 lineage. We carried out whole-genome sequencing, comparative analysis, phenotypic virulence assays, and profiling of the antibacterial responses of THP1 cells infected with these subclones. Phylogenomic analysis suggested that the strains were clonal in nature and confined entirely to a single clade. Comparative genomic analysis revealed that the virulence and resistance repertoires were comparable among the H30-Rx ST131 strains except for the commensal ST131 strain SE15. Similarly, seven phage-specific regions were found to be strongly associated with the H30-Rx strains but were largely absent in the genome of SE15. Phenotypic analysis confirmed the virulence and resistance similarities between the two strains. However, NA097 was found to be more robust than NA114 in terms of virulence gene carriage (dra operon), invasion ability (P < 0.05), and antimicrobial resistance (streptomycin resistance). RT2 gene expression profiling revealed generic upregulation of key proinflammatory responses in THP1 cells, irrespective of ST131 lineage status. In conclusion, our study provides comprehensive, genome-inferred insights into the biology and immunological properties of ST131 strains and suggests clonal diversification of genomic and phenotypic features within the H30-Rx subclone of E. coli ST131. PMID:26195517

  13. Association of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) elements with specific serotypes and virulence potential of shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Toro, Magaly; Cao, Guojie; Ju, Wenting; Allard, Marc; Barrangou, Rodolphe; Zhao, Shaohua; Brown, Eric; Meng, Jianghong

    2014-02-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) strains (n = 194) representing 43 serotypes and E. coli K-12 were examined for clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) arrays to study genetic relatedness among STEC serotypes. A subset of the strains (n = 81) was further analyzed for subtype I-E cas and virulence genes to determine a possible association of CRISPR elements with potential virulence. Four types of CRISPR arrays were identified. CRISPR1 and CRISPR2 were present in all strains tested; 1 strain also had both CRISPR3 and CRISPR4, whereas 193 strains displayed a short, combined array, CRISPR3-4. A total of 3,353 spacers were identified, representing 528 distinct spacers. The average length of a spacer was 32 bp. Approximately one-half of the spacers (54%) were unique and found mostly in strains of less common serotypes. Overall, CRISPR spacer contents correlated well with STEC serotypes, and identical arrays were shared between strains with the same H type (O26:H11, O103:H11, and O111:H11). There was no association identified between the presence of subtype I-E cas and virulence genes, but the total number of spacers had a negative correlation with potential pathogenicity (P < 0.05). Fewer spacers were found in strains that had a greater probability of causing outbreaks and disease than in those with lower virulence potential (P < 0.05). The relationship between the CRISPR-cas system and potential virulence needs to be determined on a broader scale, and the biological link will need to be established.

  14. Detection of virulence-associated genes characteristic of intestinal Escherichia coli pathotypes, including the enterohemorrhagic/enteroaggregative O104:H4, in bovines from Germany and Spain.

    PubMed

    Cabal, Adriana; Geue, Lutz; Gómez-Barrero, Susana; Barth, Stefanie; Bárcena, Carmen; Hamm, Katharina; Porrero, M Concepción; Valverde, Aránzazu; Cantón, Rafael; Menge, Christian; Gortázar, Christian; Domínguez, Lucas; Álvarez, Julio

    2015-08-01

    Cattle are reservoirs of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli; however, their role in the epidemiology of other pathogenic E. coli remains undefined. A new set of quantitative real-time PCR assays for the direct detection and quantification of nine virulence-associated genes (VAGs) characteristic of the most important human E. coli pathotypes and four serotype-related genes (wzxO104 , fliCH4 , rbfO157 , fliCH7 ) that can be used as a surveillance tool for detection of pathogenic strains was developed. A total of 970 cattle fecal samples were collected in slaughterhouses in Germany and Spain, pooled into 134 samples and analyzed with this tool. stx1, eae and invA were more prevalent in Spanish samples whereas bfpA, stx2, ehxA, elt, est and the rbfO157 /fliCH7 combination were observed in similar proportions in both countries. Genes characteristic of the hybrid O104:H4 strain of the 2011 German outbreak (stx2/aggR/wzxO104 /fliCH4 ) were simultaneously detected in six fecal pools from one German abattoir located near the outbreak epicenter. Although no isolate harboring the full stx2/aggR/wzxO104 /fliCH4 combination was cultured, sequencing of the aggR positive PCR products revealed 100% homology to the aggR from the outbreak strain. Concomitant detection by this direct approach of VAGs from a novel human pathogenic E. coli strain in cattle samples implies that the E. coli gene pool in these animals can be implicated in de novo formation of such highly-virulent strains. The application of this set of qPCRs in surveillance studies could be an efficient early-warning tool for the emergence of zoonotic E. coli in livestock.

  15. Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Nataro, James P.; Kaper, James B.

    1998-01-01

    Escherichia coli is the predominant nonpathogenic facultative flora of the human intestine. Some E. coli strains, however, have developed the ability to cause disease of the gastrointestinal, urinary, or central nervous system in even the most robust human hosts. Diarrheagenic strains of E. coli can be divided into at least six different categories with corresponding distinct pathogenic schemes. Taken together, these organisms probably represent the most common cause of pediatric diarrhea worldwide. Several distinct clinical syndromes accompany infection with diarrheagenic E. coli categories, including traveler’s diarrhea (enterotoxigenic E. coli), hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic-uremic syndrome (enterohemorrhagic E. coli), persistent diarrhea (enteroaggregative E. coli), and watery diarrhea of infants (enteropathogenic E. coli). This review discusses the current level of understanding of the pathogenesis of the diarrheagenic E. coli strains and describes how their pathogenic schemes underlie the clinical manifestations, diagnostic approach, and epidemiologic investigation of these important pathogens. PMID:9457432

  16. Escherichia coli Strains Isolated from the Uteri Horn, Mouth, and Rectum of Bitches Suffering from Pyometra: Virulence Factors, Antimicrobial Susceptibilities, and Clonal Relationships among Strains.

    PubMed

    Agostinho, Juliana M A; de Souza, Andressa; Schocken-Iturrino, Ruben P; Beraldo, Lívia G; Borges, Clarissa A; Avila, Fernando A; Marin, José M

    2014-01-01

    Pyometra is recognized as one of the main causes of disease and death in the bitch, and Escherichia coli is the major pathogen associated with this disease. In this study, 70 E. coli isolates from the uteri horn, mouth, and rectum of bitches suffering from the disease and 43 E. coli isolates from the rectum of clinically healthy bitches were examined for the presence of uropathogenic virulence genes and susceptibility to antimicrobial drugs. DNA profiles of isolates from uteri horn and mouth in bitches with pyometra were compared by REP, ERIC, and BOX-PCR. Virulence gene frequencies detected in isolates from canine pyometra were as follows: 95.7% fim, 27.1% iss, 25.7% hly, 18.5% iuc, and 17.1% usp. Predominant resistance was determined for cephalothin, ampicillin, and nalidixic acid among the isolates from all sites examined. Multidrug resistance was found on ∼ 50% pyometra isolates. Using the genotypic methods some isolates from uteri, pus, and saliva of the same bitch proved to have identical DNA profiles which is a reason for concern due to the close relationship between household pets and humans.

  17. Presence of pathogenicity islands and virulence genes of extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) in isolates from avian organic fertilizer.

    PubMed

    Gazal, Luís Eduardo S; Puño-Sarmiento, Juan J; Medeiros, Leonardo P; Cyoia, Paula S; da Silveira, Wanderlei D; Kobayashi, Renata K T; Nakazato, Gerson

    2015-12-01

    Poultry litter is commonly used as fertilizer in agriculture. However, this poultry litter must be processed prior to use, since poultry have a large number of pathogenic microorganisms. The aims of this study were to isolate and genotypically and phenotypically characterize Escherichia coli from avian organic fertilizer. Sixty-four E. coli isolates were identified from avian organic fertilizer and characterized for ExPEC virulence factors, pathogenicity islands, phylogenetic groups, antimicrobial resistance, biofilm formation, and adhesion to HEp-2 cells. Sixty-three isolates (98.4%) showed at least one virulence gene (fimH, ecpA, sitA, traT, iutA, iroN, hlyF, ompT and iss). The predominant phylogenetic groups were groups A (59.3%) and B1 (34.3%). The pathogenicity island CFT073II (51.5%) was the most prevalent among the isolates tested. Thirty-two isolates (50%) were resistant to at least one antimicrobial agent. Approximately 90% of isolates adhered to HEp-2 cells, and the predominant pattern was aggregative adherence (74.1%). In the biofilm assay, it was observed that 75% of isolates did not produce biofilm. These results lead us to conclude that some E. coli isolates from avian organic fertilizer could be pathogenic for humans. PMID:26476087

  18. Escherichia coli Strains Isolated from the Uteri Horn, Mouth, and Rectum of Bitches Suffering from Pyometra: Virulence Factors, Antimicrobial Susceptibilities, and Clonal Relationships among Strains

    PubMed Central

    Agostinho, Juliana M. A.; de Souza, Andressa; Schocken-Iturrino, Ruben P.; Beraldo, Lívia G.; Borges, Clarissa A.; Ávila, Fernando A.; Marin, José M.

    2014-01-01

    Pyometra is recognized as one of the main causes of disease and death in the bitch, and Escherichia coli is the major pathogen associated with this disease. In this study, 70 E. coli isolates from the uteri horn, mouth, and rectum of bitches suffering from the disease and 43 E. coli isolates from the rectum of clinically healthy bitches were examined for the presence of uropathogenic virulence genes and susceptibility to antimicrobial drugs. DNA profiles of isolates from uteri horn and mouth in bitches with pyometra were compared by REP, ERIC, and BOX-PCR. Virulence gene frequencies detected in isolates from canine pyometra were as follows: 95.7% fim, 27.1% iss, 25.7% hly, 18.5% iuc, and 17.1% usp. Predominant resistance was determined for cephalothin, ampicillin, and nalidixic acid among the isolates from all sites examined. Multidrug resistance was found on ∼50% pyometra isolates. Using the genotypic methods some isolates from uteri, pus, and saliva of the same bitch proved to have identical DNA profiles which is a reason for concern due to the close relationship between household pets and humans. PMID:24734047

  19. Presence of pathogenicity islands and virulence genes of extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) in isolates from avian organic fertilizer.

    PubMed

    Gazal, Luís Eduardo S; Puño-Sarmiento, Juan J; Medeiros, Leonardo P; Cyoia, Paula S; da Silveira, Wanderlei D; Kobayashi, Renata K T; Nakazato, Gerson

    2015-12-01

    Poultry litter is commonly used as fertilizer in agriculture. However, this poultry litter must be processed prior to use, since poultry have a large number of pathogenic microorganisms. The aims of this study were to isolate and genotypically and phenotypically characterize Escherichia coli from avian organic fertilizer. Sixty-four E. coli isolates were identified from avian organic fertilizer and characterized for ExPEC virulence factors, pathogenicity islands, phylogenetic groups, antimicrobial resistance, biofilm formation, and adhesion to HEp-2 cells. Sixty-three isolates (98.4%) showed at least one virulence gene (fimH, ecpA, sitA, traT, iutA, iroN, hlyF, ompT and iss). The predominant phylogenetic groups were groups A (59.3%) and B1 (34.3%). The pathogenicity island CFT073II (51.5%) was the most prevalent among the isolates tested. Thirty-two isolates (50%) were resistant to at least one antimicrobial agent. Approximately 90% of isolates adhered to HEp-2 cells, and the predominant pattern was aggregative adherence (74.1%). In the biofilm assay, it was observed that 75% of isolates did not produce biofilm. These results lead us to conclude that some E. coli isolates from avian organic fertilizer could be pathogenic for humans.

  20. PATHOGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI

    EPA Science Inventory

    Escherichia coli is a bacterial species which inhabits the gastrointestinal tract of man and warm-blooded animals. Because of the ubiquity of this bacterium in the intestinal flora, it serves as an important indicator organism of fecal contamination. E. coli, aside from serving a...

  1. Identification of Virulence Factors Genes in Escherichia coli Isolates from Women with Urinary Tract Infection in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    López-Banda, Daniela A.; Carrillo-Casas, Erika M.; Orozco-Hoyuela, Gabriel; Manjarrez-Hernández, Ángel H.; Arroyo-Escalante, Sara; Moncada-Barrón, David; Villanueva-Recillas, Silvia; Xicohtencatl-Cortes, Juan; Hernández-Castro, Rigoberto

    2014-01-01

    E coli isolates (108) from Mexican women, clinically diagnosed with urinary tract infection, were screened to identify virulence genes, phylogenetic groups, and antibiotic resistance. Isolates were identified by MicroScan4 system; additionally, the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was assessed. The phylogenetic groups and 16 virulence genes encoding adhesins, toxins, siderophores, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and invasins were identified by PCR. Phylogenetic groups distribution was as follows: B1 9.3%, A 30.6%, B2 55.6%, and D 4.6%. Virulence genes prevalence was ecp 98.1%, fimH 86.1%, traT 77.8%, sfa/focDE 74.1%, papC 62%, iutA 48.1%, fyuA 44.4%, focG 2.8%, sfaS 1.9%, hlyA 7.4%, cnf-1 6.5%, cdt-B 0.9%, cvaC 2.8%, ibeA 2.8%, and rfc 0.9%. Regarding antimicrobial resistance it was above 50% to ampicillin/sulbactam, ampicillin, piperacillin, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, ciprofloxacin, and levofloxacin. Uropathogenic E. coli clustered mainly in the pathogenic phylogenetic group B2. The isolates showed a high presence of siderophores and adhesion genes and a low presence of genes encoding toxins. The high frequency of papC gene suggests that these isolates have the ability to colonize the kidneys. High resistance to drugs considered as first choice treatment such as trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and fluoroquinolones was consistently observed. PMID:24895634

  2. An Environmental Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli O145 Clonal Population Exhibits High-Level Phenotypic Variation That Includes Virulence Traits

    PubMed Central

    Quinones, Beatriz; He, Xiaohua; Zhong, Wayne; Louie, Jacqueline W.; Lee, Bertram G.; Yambao, Jaszemyn C.; Mandrell, Robert E.; Cooley, Michael B.

    2015-01-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) serotype O145 is one of the major non-O157 serotypes associated with severe human disease. Here we examined the genetic diversity, population structure, virulence potential, and antimicrobial resistance profiles of environmental O145 strains recovered from a major produce production region in California. Multilocus sequence typing analyses revealed that sequence type 78 (ST-78), a common ST in clinical strains, was the predominant genotype among the environmental strains. Similarly, all California environmental strains belonged to H28, a common H serotype in clinical strains. Although most environmental strains carried an intact fliC gene, only one strain retained swimming motility. Diverse stx subtypes were identified, including stx1a, stx2a, stx2c, and stx2e. Although no correlation was detected between the stx genotype and Stx1 production, high Stx2 production was detected mainly in strains carrying stx2a only and was correlated positively with the cytotoxicity of Shiga toxin. All environmental strains were capable of producing enterohemolysin, whereas only 10 strains were positive for anaerobic hemolytic activity. Multidrug resistance appeared to be common, as nearly half of the tested O145 strains displayed resistance to at least two different classes of antibiotics. The core virulence determinants of enterohemorrhagic E. coli were conserved in the environmental STEC O145 strains; however, there was large variation in the expression of virulence traits among the strains that were highly related genotypically, implying a trend of clonal divergence. Several cattle isolates exhibited key virulence traits comparable to those of the STEC O145 outbreak strains, emphasizing the emergence of hypervirulent strains in agricultural environments. PMID:26637597

  3. An Environmental Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli O145 Clonal Population Exhibits High-Level Phenotypic Variation That Includes Virulence Traits.

    PubMed

    Carter, Michelle Qiu; Quinones, Beatriz; He, Xiaohua; Zhong, Wayne; Louie, Jacqueline W; Lee, Bertram G; Yambao, Jaszemyn C; Mandrell, Robert E; Cooley, Michael B

    2015-12-04

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) serotype O145 is one of the major non-O157 serotypes associated with severe human disease. Here we examined the genetic diversity, population structure, virulence potential, and antimicrobial resistance profiles of environmental O145 strains recovered from a major produce production region in California. Multilocus sequence typing analyses revealed that sequence type 78 (ST-78), a common ST in clinical strains, was the predominant genotype among the environmental strains. Similarly, all California environmental strains belonged to H28, a common H serotype in clinical strains. Although most environmental strains carried an intact fliC gene, only one strain retained swimming motility. Diverse stx subtypes were identified, including stx1a, stx2a, stx2c, and stx2e. Although no correlation was detected between the stx genotype and Stx1 production, high Stx2 production was detected mainly in strains carrying stx2a only and was correlated positively with the cytotoxicity of Shiga toxin. All environmental strains were capable of producing enterohemolysin, whereas only 10 strains were positive for anaerobic hemolytic activity. Multidrug resistance appeared to be common, as nearly half of the tested O145 strains displayed resistance to at least two different classes of antibiotics. The core virulence determinants of enterohemorrhagic E. coli were conserved in the environmental STEC O145 strains; however, there was large variation in the expression of virulence traits among the strains that were highly related genotypically, implying a trend of clonal divergence. Several cattle isolates exhibited key virulence traits comparable to those of the STEC O145 outbreak strains, emphasizing the emergence of hypervirulent strains in agricultural environments.

  4. Loss of the O4 antigen moiety from the lipopolysaccharide of an extraintestinal isolate of Escherichia coli has only minor effects on serum sensitivity and virulence in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Russo, T A; Sharma, G; Brown, C R; Campagnari, A A

    1995-01-01

    The O-specific antigen in extraintestinal isolates of Escherichia coli is believed to be an important virulence factor. To assess its role in the pathogenic process, proven isogenic derivatives with either a complete (CP921) or nearly complete (CP920) deficiency of the O4 antigen were obtained by TnphoA'1-mediated transposon mutagenesis of an O4/K54/H5 blood isolate (CP9). By utilizing a previously reported isogenic K54 capsule-deficient derivative (CP9.137), additional isogenic derivatives deficient in both the K54 capsular antigen and either all (CP923) or nearly all (CP922) of the O4 antigen were also constructed. These strains and their wild-type parent were evaluated in vitro for serum sensitivity and in vivo by intraperitoneal challenge of outbred mice. The complete or nearly complete loss of the O4 antigen (CP920 and CP921) resulted in only a minor increase in serum sensitivity. In contrast, CP9.137 had a significant increase in serum sensitivity, and CP922 and CP923 were extremely serum sensitive. When tested in vivo, the complete or nearly complete loss of the O4 antigen resulted in a small but significant increase (P < or = 0.05), not the expected decrease, in virulence compared with its wild-type parent. In contrast, CP9.137 and CP922 were significantly less virulent (P < or = 0.05). These studies do not exclude a role for the O4 antigen moiety of lipopolysaccharide in the pathogenesis of extraintestinal E. coli infection; however, they demonstrate that the O4 antigen plays only a minor role in serum resistance in vitro and that its loss does not diminish and perhaps enhances the virulence of CP9 in vivo after intraperitoneal challenge. PMID:7890383

  5. Antimicrobial resistance and virulence gene profiles in multi-drug resistant enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli isolated from pigs with post-weaning diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Smith, M G; Jordan, D; Chapman, T A; Chin, J J-C; Barton, M D; Do, T N; Fahy, V A; Fairbrother, J M; Trott, D J

    2010-10-26

    This study aimed to characterize antimicrobial resistance and virulence genes in multi-drug resistant enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) isolates (n=117) collected from porcine post-weaning diarrhoea cases in Australia (1999-2005). Isolates were serotyped, antibiogram-phenotyped for 12 antimicrobial agents and genotyped by PCR for 30 plasmid-mediated antimicrobial resistance genes (ARGs), 22 intestinal and 38 extraintestinal E. coli virulence genes (VGs). Nine serogroups were identified, the most prevalent being O149 (46.2%), O141 (11.2%) and Ont (31.6%). None of the isolates showed resistance to ceftiofur or enrofloxacin and 9.4% were resistant to florfenicol. No corresponding extended-spectrum/AmpC β-lactamase, fluoroquinolone or floR ARGs were detected. An antimicrobial resistance index (ARI) was calculated from the combined data with a weighting for each antimicrobial agent dependent upon its significance to human health. Serogroup O141 isolates had a significantly higher ARI due to an elevated prevalence of aminoglycoside ARGs and possession of more virulence genes (VGs), including ExPEC or EHEC adhesins (bmaE, sfa/focDE, fimH, ihA) in toxin-producing strains that lacked the normally associated F4 and F18 fimbriae. Few associations between ARGs and VGs were apparent, apart from tetC, sfa/focDE and ompT which, for a sub-set of O141 isolates, suggest possible plasmid acquisition from ExPEC. The multi-drug resistant ETEC ARG/VG profiles indicate a high probability of considerable strain and plasmid diversity, reflecting various selection pressures at the individual farm level rather than emergence and lateral spread of MDR resistant/virulent clones. PMID:20688440

  6. Virulence and antimicrobial resistance determinants of verotoxigenic Escherichia coli (VTEC) and of multidrug-resistant E. coli from foods of animal origin illegally imported to the EU by flight passengers.

    PubMed

    Nagy, B; Szmolka, A; Smole Možina, S; Kovač, J; Strauss, A; Schlager, S; Beutlich, J; Appel, B; Lušicky, M; Aprikian, P; Pászti, J; Tóth, I; Kugler, R; Wagner, M

    2015-09-16

    The aim of this study was to reveal phenotype/genotype characteristics of verotoxigenic Escherichia coli (VTEC) and multidrug resistant E. coli in food products of animal origin confiscated as illegal import at Austrian, German and Slovenian airports. VTEC isolates were obtained by using ISO guidelines 16654:2001 for O157 VTEC or ISO/ TS13136:2012 for non-O157 VTEC, with additional use of the RIDASCREEN® Verotoxin immunoassay. The testing of 1526 samples resulted in 15 VTEC isolates (1.0%) primarily isolated from hard cheese from Turkey and Balkan countries. Genotyping for virulence by using a miniaturized microarray identified a wide range of virulence determinants. One VTEC isolate (O26:H46) possessing intimin (eae) and all other essential genes of Locus of Enterocyte Effacement (LEE) was designated as enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC). None of the other VTEC strains belonged to serogroups O157, O145, O111, O104 or O103. VTEC strains harbored either stx(1) (variants stx1(a) or stx(1c)) or st(x2) (variants stx(2a), stx(2b), stx(2a/d) or stx(2c/d)) genes. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) demonstrated high genetic diversity and identified three new sequence types (STs): 4505, 4506 and 4507. Food samples collected from the Vienna airport were also tested for E. coli quantities using the ISO 16649:2001, and for detection of multidrug resistant phenotypes and genotypes. The resulting 113 commensal E. coli isolates were first tested in a pre-screening against 6 selected antimicrobials to demonstrate multidrug resistance. The resulting 14 multidrug resistant (MDR) E. coli isolates, representing 0.9% of the samples, were subjected to further resistance phenotyping and to microarray analyses targeting genetic markers of antimicrobial resistance and virulence. Genotyping revealed various combinations of resistance determinants as well as the presence of class 1, class 2 integrons. The isolates harbored 6 to 11 antibiotic

  7. Antibiotic resistance, phylogenetic grouping and virulence potential of Escherichia coli isolated from the faeces of intensively farmed and free range poultry.

    PubMed

    Obeng, Akua Serwaah; Rickard, Heather; Ndi, Olasumbo; Sexton, Margaret; Barton, Mary

    2012-01-27

    Antibiotic use in poultry production is a risk factor for promoting the emergence of resistant Escherichia coli. To ascertain differences in different classes of chickens, the resistance profile, some virulence genes and phylogenetic grouping on 251 E. coli isolates from intensive meat (free range and indoor commercial) and free range egg layer chickens collected between December 2008 and June 2009 in South Australia were performed. Among the 251 strains, 102 (40.6%) and 67 (26.7%) were found to be resistant to tetracycline and ampicillin respectively. Resistance was also observed to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (12.4%), streptomycin (10.8%), spectinomycin (9.6%), neomycin (6.0%) and florfenicol (2.0%) but no resistance was found to ceftiofur, ciprofloxacin or gentamicin. Amplification of DNA of the isolates by polymerase chain reaction revealed the presence of genes that code for resistant determinants: tetracycline (tet(A), tet(B) and tet(C)), ampicillin (bla(TEM) and bla(SHV)), trimethoprim (dhfrV and dhfrXIII), sulphonamide (sulI and sulII), neomycin (aph(3)-Ia(aphA1)), and spectinomycin-streptinomycin (aadA2). In addition, 32.3-39.4% of the isolates were found to belong to commensal groups (A and B1) and 11.2-17.1% belonged to the virulent groups (B2 and D). Among the 251 E. coli isolates, 25 (10.0%) carried two or more virulence genes typical of Extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC). Furthermore, 17 of the isolates with multi-resistance were identified to be groups B2 and D. Although no significant difference was observed between isolates from free range and indoor commercial meat chickens (P>0.05), significant differences was observed between the different classes of meat chickens (free range and indoor commercial) and egg layers (P<0.05). While this study assessed the presence of a limited number of virulence genes, our study re emphasises the zoonotic potential of poultry E. coli isolates.

  8. Variation in resistance traits, phylogenetic backgrounds, and virulence genotypes among Escherichia coli clinical isolates from adjacent hospital campuses serving distinct patient populations.

    PubMed

    Drawz, Sarah M; Porter, Stephen; Kuskowski, Michael A; Johnston, Brian; Clabots, Connie; Kline, Susan; Ferrieri, Patricia; Johnson, James R

    2015-09-01

    Escherichia coli sequence type 13 (ST131), an emergent cause of multidrug-resistant extraintestinal infections, has important phylogenetic subsets, notably the H30 and H30Rx subclones, with distinctive resistance profiles and, possibly, clinical associations. To clarify the local prevalence of these ST131 subclones and their associations with antimicrobial resistance, ecological source, and virulence traits, we extensively characterized 233 consecutive E. coli clinical isolates (July and August 2013) from the University of Minnesota Medical Center-Fairview Infectious Diseases and Diagnostic Laboratory, Minneapolis, MN, which serves three adjacent facilities (a children's hospital and low- and high-acuity adult facilities). ST131 accounted for 26% of the study isolates (more than any other clonal group), was distributed similarly by facility, and was closely associated with ciprofloxacin resistance and extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) production. The H30 and H30Rx subclones accounted for most ST131 isolates and for the association of ST131 with fluoroquinolone resistance and ESBL production. Unlike ST131 per se, these subclones were distributed differentially by hospital, being most prevalent at the high-acuity adult facility and were absent from the children's hospital. The virulence gene profiles of ST131 and its subclones were distinctive and more extensive than those of other fluoroquinolone-resistant or ESBL-producing isolates. Within ST131, bla CTX-M-15 was confined to H30Rx isolates and other bla CTX-M variants to non-Rx H30 isolates. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis documented a predominance of globally distributed pulsotypes and no local outbreak pattern. These findings help clarify the epidemiology, ecology, and bacterial correlates of the H30 and H30Rx ST131 subclones by documenting a high overall prevalence but significant segregation by facility, strong associations with fluoroquinolone resistance and specific ESBL variants, and distinctive

  9. Variation in Resistance Traits, Phylogenetic Backgrounds, and Virulence Genotypes among Escherichia coli Clinical Isolates from Adjacent Hospital Campuses Serving Distinct Patient Populations

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Stephen; Kuskowski, Michael A.; Johnston, Brian; Clabots, Connie; Kline, Susan; Ferrieri, Patricia; Johnson, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli sequence type 13 (ST131), an emergent cause of multidrug-resistant extraintestinal infections, has important phylogenetic subsets, notably the H30 and H30Rx subclones, with distinctive resistance profiles and, possibly, clinical associations. To clarify the local prevalence of these ST131 subclones and their associations with antimicrobial resistance, ecological source, and virulence traits, we extensively characterized 233 consecutive E. coli clinical isolates (July and August 2013) from the University of Minnesota Medical Center-Fairview Infectious Diseases and Diagnostic Laboratory, Minneapolis, MN, which serves three adjacent facilities (a children's hospital and low- and high-acuity adult facilities). ST131 accounted for 26% of the study isolates (more than any other clonal group), was distributed similarly by facility, and was closely associated with ciprofloxacin resistance and extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) production. The H30 and H30Rx subclones accounted for most ST131 isolates and for the association of ST131 with fluoroquinolone resistance and ESBL production. Unlike ST131 per se, these subclones were distributed differentially by hospital, being most prevalent at the high-acuity adult facility and were absent from the children's hospital. The virulence gene profiles of ST131 and its subclones were distinctive and more extensive than those of other fluoroquinolone-resistant or ESBL-producing isolates. Within ST131, blaCTX-M-15 was confined to H30Rx isolates and other blaCTX-M variants to non-Rx H30 isolates. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis documented a predominance of globally distributed pulsotypes and no local outbreak pattern. These findings help clarify the epidemiology, ecology, and bacterial correlates of the H30 and H30Rx ST131 subclones by documenting a high overall prevalence but significant segregation by facility, strong associations with fluoroquinolone resistance and specific ESBL variants, and distinctive virulence

  10. Assessment of Virulence Factors Characteristic of Human Escherichia coli Pathotypes and Antimicrobial Resistance in O157:H7 and Non-O157:H7 Isolates from Livestock in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Cabal, A.; Gómez-Barrero, S.; Porrero, C.; Bárcena, C.; López, G.; Cantón, R.; Gortázar, C.; Domínguez, L.

    2013-01-01

    The distribution of virulence factors (VFs) typical of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli and the antimicrobial resistance (AMR) profiles were assessed in 780 isolates from healthy pigs, broilers, and cattle from Spain. VF distribution was broader than expected, although at low prevalence for most genes, with AMR being linked mainly to host species. PMID:23603685

  11. Assessment of virulence factors characteristic of human Escherichia coli pathotypes and antimicrobial resistance in O157:H7 and non-O157:H7 isolates from livestock in Spain.

    PubMed

    Cabal, A; Gómez-Barrero, S; Porrero, C; Bárcena, C; López, G; Cantón, R; Gortázar, C; Domínguez, L; Álvarez, J

    2013-07-01

    The distribution of virulence factors (VFs) typical of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli and the antimicrobial resistance (AMR) profiles were assessed in 780 isolates from healthy pigs, broilers, and cattle from Spain. VF distribution was broader than expected, although at low prevalence for most genes, with AMR being linked mainly to host species.

  12. Differential Virulence of Clinical and Bovine-Biased Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 Genotypes in Piglet and Dutch Belted Rabbit Models

    PubMed Central

    Shringi, Smriti; García, Alexis; Lahmers, Kevin K.; Potter, Kathleen A.; Muthupalani, Sureshkumar; Swennes, Alton G.; Hovde, Carolyn J.; Call, Douglas R.; Fox, James G.

    2012-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 (EHEC O157) is an important cause of food and waterborne illness in the developed countries. Cattle are a reservoir host of EHEC O157 and a major source of human exposure through contaminated meat products. Shiga toxins (Stxs) are an important pathogenicity trait of EHEC O157. The insertion sites of the Stx-encoding bacteriophages differentiate EHEC O157 isolates into genogroups commonly isolated from cattle but rarely from sick humans (bovine-biased genotypes [BBG]) and those commonly isolated from both cattle and human patients (clinical genotypes [CG]). Since BBG and CG share the cardinal virulence factors of EHEC O157 and are carried by cattle at similar prevalences, the infrequent occurrence of BBG among human disease isolates suggests that they may be less virulent than CG. We compared the virulence potentials of human and bovine isolates of CG and BBG in newborn conventional pig and weaned Dutch Belted rabbit models. CG-challenged piglets experienced severe disease accompanied by early and high mortality compared to BBG-challenged piglets. Similarly, CG-challenged rabbits were likely to develop lesions in kidney and intestine compared with the BBG-challenged rabbits. The CG strains used in this study carried stx2 and produced significantly higher amounts of Stx, whereas the BBG strains carried the stx2c gene variant only. These results suggest that BBG are less virulent than CG and that this difference in virulence potential is associated with the Stx2 subtype(s) carried and/or the amount of Stx produced. PMID:22025512

  13. Using Comparative Genomics for Inquiry-Based Learning to Dissect Virulence of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Yersinia pestis

    PubMed Central

    Baumler, David J.; Banta, Lois M.; Hung, Kai F.; Schwarz, Jodi A.; Cabot, Eric L.; Glasner, Jeremy D.; Perna, Nicole T.

    2012-01-01

    Genomics and bioinformatics are topics of increasing interest in undergraduate biological science curricula. Many existing exercises focus on gene annotation and analysis of a single genome. In this paper, we present two educational modules designed to enable students to learn and apply fundamental concepts in comparative genomics using examples related to bacterial pathogenesis. Students first examine alignments of genomes of Escherichia coli O157:H7 strains isolated from three food-poisoning outbreaks using the multiple-genome alignment tool Mauve. Students investigate conservation of virulence factors using the Mauve viewer and by browsing annotations available at the A Systematic Annotation Package for Community Analysis of Genomes database. In the second module, students use an alignment of five Yersinia pestis genomes to analyze single-nucleotide polymorphisms of three genes to classify strains into biovar groups. Students are then given sequences of bacterial DNA amplified from the teeth of corpses from the first and second pandemics of the bubonic plague and asked to classify these new samples. Learning-assessment results reveal student improvement in self-efficacy and content knowledge, as well as students' ability to use BLAST to identify genomic islands and conduct analyses of virulence factors from E. coli O157:H7 or Y. pestis. Each of these educational modules offers educators new ready-to-implement resources for integrating comparative genomic topics into their curricula. PMID:22383620

  14. [Study on an inquiry-based teaching case in genomics curriculum: identifying virulence factors of Escherichia coli by using comparative genomics].

    PubMed

    Jidong, Zhou; Yudong, Li

    2015-02-01

    Genomics is the core subject of various "omics" and it also becomes a topic of increasing interest in undergraduate curricula of biological sciences. However, the study on teaching methodology of genomics courses was very limited so far. Here we report an application of inquiry-based teaching in genomics courses by using virulence factors of Escherichia coli as an example of comparative genomics study. Specially, students first built a multiple-genome alignment of different E. coli strains to investigate the gene conservation using the Mauve tool; then putative virulence factor genes were identified by using BLAST tool to obtain gene annotations. The teaching process was divided into five modules: situation, resources, task, process and evaluation. Learning-assessment results revealed that students had acquired the knowledge and skills of genomics, and their learning interest and ability of self-study were also motivated. Moreover, the special teaching case can be applied to other related courses, such as microbiology, bioinformatics, molecular biology and food safety detection technology.

  15. The impact of oregano (Origanum heracleoticum) essential oil and carvacrol on virulence gene transcription by Escherichia coli O157:H7.

    PubMed

    Mith, Hasika; Clinquart, Antoine; Zhiri, Abdesselam; Daube, Georges; Delcenserie, Véronique

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to determine, via reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) analysis, the effect of oregano essential oil (Origanum heracleoticum) and carvacrol, its major component, on the expression of virulence-associated genes in enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 ATCC strain 35150. Both oregano oil and carvacrol demonstrated their efficacy firstly, by inhibiting the transcription of the ler gene involved in upregulation of the LEE2, LEE3 and LEE4 promoters and of attaching and effacing lesions and secondly by decreasing both Shiga toxin and fliC genes expression. In addition, a decrease in luxS gene transcription involved in quorum sensing was observed. These results were dose dependent and showed a specific effect of O. heracleoticum and carvacrol in downregulating the expression of virulence genes in EHEC O157:H7. These findings suggest that oregano oil and carvacrol have the potential to mitigate the adverse health effects caused by virulence gene expression in EHEC O157:H7, through the use of these substances as natural antibacterial additives in foods or as an alternative to antibiotics. PMID:25790499

  16. Ethanolamine Controls Expression of Genes Encoding Components Involved in Interkingdom Signaling and Virulence in Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7

    PubMed Central

    Kendall, Melissa M.; Gruber, Charley C.; Parker, Christopher T.; Sperandio, Vanessa

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacterial pathogens must be able to both recognize suitable niches within the host for colonization and successfully compete with commensal flora for nutrients in order to establish infection. Ethanolamine (EA) is a major component of mammalian and bacterial membranes and is used by pathogens as a carbon and/or nitrogen source in the gastrointestinal tract. The deadly human pathogen enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 (EHEC) uses EA in the intestine as a nitrogen source as a competitive advantage for colonization over the microbial flora. Here we show that EA is not only important for nitrogen metabolism but that it is also used as a signaling molecule in cell-to-cell signaling to activate virulence gene expression in EHEC. EA in concentrations that cannot promote growth as a nitrogen source can activate expression of EHEC’s repertoire of virulence genes. The EutR transcription factor, known to be the receptor of EA, is only partially responsible for this regulation, suggesting that yet another EA receptor exists. This important link of EA with metabolism, cell-to-cell signaling, and pathogenesis, highlights the fact that a fundamental means of communication within microbial communities relies on energy production and processing of metabolites. Here we show for the first time that bacterial pathogens not only exploit EA as a metabolite but also coopt EA as a signaling molecule to recognize the gastrointestinal environment and promote virulence expression. PMID:22589288

  17. The impact of oregano (Origanum heracleoticum) essential oil and carvacrol on virulence gene transcription by Escherichia coli O157:H7.

    PubMed

    Mith, Hasika; Clinquart, Antoine; Zhiri, Abdesselam; Daube, Georges; Delcenserie, Véronique

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to determine, via reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) analysis, the effect of oregano essential oil (Origanum heracleoticum) and carvacrol, its major component, on the expression of virulence-associated genes in enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 ATCC strain 35150. Both oregano oil and carvacrol demonstrated their efficacy firstly, by inhibiting the transcription of the ler gene involved in upregulation of the LEE2, LEE3 and LEE4 promoters and of attaching and effacing lesions and secondly by decreasing both Shiga toxin and fliC genes expression. In addition, a decrease in luxS gene transcription involved in quorum sensing was observed. These results were dose dependent and showed a specific effect of O. heracleoticum and carvacrol in downregulating the expression of virulence genes in EHEC O157:H7. These findings suggest that oregano oil and carvacrol have the potential to mitigate the adverse health effects caused by virulence gene expression in EHEC O157:H7, through the use of these substances as natural antibacterial additives in foods or as an alternative to antibiotics.

  18. Influence of Season and Feedlot Location on Prevalence and Virulence Factors of Seven Serogroups of Escherichia coli in Feces of Western-Canadian Slaughter Cattle.

    PubMed

    Stanford, Kim; Johnson, Roger P; Alexander, Trevor W; McAllister, Tim A; Reuter, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Pooled feces collected over two years from 1749 transport trailers hauling western-Canadian slaughter cattle were analysed by PCR for detection of Escherichia coli serogroups O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, O145, and O157. Sequential immunomagnetic separation was then used to collect bacterial isolates (n = 1035) from feces positive for target serogroups. Isolated bacteria were tested by PCR to confirm serogroup and the presence of eae, ehxA, stx1, and stx2 virulence genes. Based on PCR screening, serogroup prevalence in feces ranged from 7.0% (O145) to 94.4% (O103) with at least 3 serogroups present in 79.5% of samples. Origin of cattle affected serogroup PCR prevalence and O157 was most prevalent in feces from south-west Alberta (P < 0.001). All serogroups demonstrated seasonal variations in PCR prevalence, with O26, O45, O103, O121, and O157 least prevalent (P < 0.001) in cooler winter months, while uncommon serogroups O111 and O145 increased in prevalence during winter (P < 0.001). However, isolates collected during winter were predominantly from serogroups O103 and O45. No seasonal variation was noted in proportion of isolates which were Shiga toxin containing E. coli (STEC; P = 0.18) or positive for Shiga toxin and eae (enterohemorrhagic E. coli; EHEC; P = 0.29). Isolates of serogroups O111, O145, and O157 were more frequently EHEC than were others, although 37.6-54.3% of isolates from other serogroups were also EHEC. Shiga-toxin genes present also varied by geographic origin of cattle (P < 0.05) in all serogroups except O157. As cattle within feedlots are sourced from multiple regions, locational differences in serogroup prevalence and virulence genes imply existence of selection pressures for E. coli and their virulence in western-Canadian cattle. Factors which reduce carriage or expression of virulence genes, particularly in non-O157 serogroups, should be investigated.

  19. Influence of Season and Feedlot Location on Prevalence and Virulence Factors of Seven Serogroups of Escherichia coli in Feces of Western-Canadian Slaughter Cattle.

    PubMed

    Stanford, Kim; Johnson, Roger P; Alexander, Trevor W; McAllister, Tim A; Reuter, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Pooled feces collected over two years from 1749 transport trailers hauling western-Canadian slaughter cattle were analysed by PCR for detection of Escherichia coli serogroups O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, O145, and O157. Sequential immunomagnetic separation was then used to collect bacterial isolates (n = 1035) from feces positive for target serogroups. Isolated bacteria were tested by PCR to confirm serogroup and the presence of eae, ehxA, stx1, and stx2 virulence genes. Based on PCR screening, serogroup prevalence in feces ranged from 7.0% (O145) to 94.4% (O103) with at least 3 serogroups present in 79.5% of samples. Origin of cattle affected serogroup PCR prevalence and O157 was most prevalent in feces from south-west Alberta (P < 0.001). All serogroups demonstrated seasonal variations in PCR prevalence, with O26, O45, O103, O121, and O157 least prevalent (P < 0.001) in cooler winter months, while uncommon serogroups O111 and O145 increased in prevalence during winter (P < 0.001). However, isolates collected during winter were predominantly from serogroups O103 and O45. No seasonal variation was noted in proportion of isolates which were Shiga toxin containing E. coli (STEC; P = 0.18) or positive for Shiga toxin and eae (enterohemorrhagic E. coli; EHEC; P = 0.29). Isolates of serogroups O111, O145, and O157 were more frequently EHEC than were others, although 37.6-54.3% of isolates from other serogroups were also EHEC. Shiga-toxin genes present also varied by geographic origin of cattle (P < 0.05) in all serogroups except O157. As cattle within feedlots are sourced from multiple regions, locational differences in serogroup prevalence and virulence genes imply existence of selection pressures for E. coli and their virulence in western-Canadian cattle. Factors which reduce carriage or expression of virulence genes, particularly in non-O157 serogroups, should be investigated. PMID:27482711

  20. Influence of Season and Feedlot Location on Prevalence and Virulence Factors of Seven Serogroups of Escherichia coli in Feces of Western-Canadian Slaughter Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Roger P.; Alexander, Trevor W.; McAllister, Tim A.; Reuter, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Pooled feces collected over two years from 1749 transport trailers hauling western-Canadian slaughter cattle were analysed by PCR for detection of Escherichia coli serogroups O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, O145, and O157. Sequential immunomagnetic separation was then used to collect bacterial isolates (n = 1035) from feces positive for target serogroups. Isolated bacteria were tested by PCR to confirm serogroup and the presence of eae, ehxA, stx1, and stx2 virulence genes. Based on PCR screening, serogroup prevalence in feces ranged from 7.0% (O145) to 94.4% (O103) with at least 3 serogroups present in 79.5% of samples. Origin of cattle affected serogroup PCR prevalence and O157 was most prevalent in feces from south-west Alberta (P < 0.001). All serogroups demonstrated seasonal variations in PCR prevalence, with O26, O45, O103, O121, and O157 least prevalent (P < 0.001) in cooler winter months, while uncommon serogroups O111 and O145 increased in prevalence during winter (P < 0.001). However, isolates collected during winter were predominantly from serogroups O103 and O45. No seasonal variation was noted in proportion of isolates which were Shiga toxin containing E. coli (STEC; P = 0.18) or positive for Shiga toxin and eae (enterohemorrhagic E. coli; EHEC; P = 0.29). Isolates of serogroups O111, O145, and O157 were more frequently EHEC than were others, although 37.6–54.3% of isolates from other serogroups were also EHEC. Shiga-toxin genes present also varied by geographic origin of cattle (P < 0.05) in all serogroups except O157. As cattle within feedlots are sourced from multiple regions, locational differences in serogroup prevalence and virulence genes imply existence of selection pressures for E. coli and their virulence in western-Canadian cattle. Factors which reduce carriage or expression of virulence genes, particularly in non-O157 serogroups, should be investigated. PMID:27482711

  1. NrdR Transcription Regulation: Global Proteome Analysis and Its Role in Escherichia coli Viability and Virulence.

    PubMed

    Naveen, Vankadari; Hsiao, Chwan-Deng

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs) play an important role in the synthesis of dNTPs and their expression is regulated by the transcription factors, NrdR and Fur. Recent transcriptomic studies using deletion mutants have indicated a role for NrdR in bacterial chemotaxis and in the maintenance of topoisomerase levels. However, NrdR deletion alone has no effect on bacterial growth or virulence in infected flies or in human blood cells. Furthermore, transcriptomic studies are limited to the deletion strain alone, and so are inadequate for drawing biological implications when the NrdR repressor is active or abundant. Therefore, further examination is warranted of changes in the cellular proteome in response to both NrdR overexpression, as well as deletion, to better understand its functional relevance as a bacterial transcription repressor. Here, we profile bacterial fate under conditions of overexpression and deletion of NrdR in E. coli. Biochemical assays show auxiliary zinc enhances the DNA binding activity of NrdR. We also demonstrate at the physiological level that increased nrdR expression causes a significant reduction in bacterial growth and fitness even at normal temperatures, and causes lethality at elevated temperatures. Corroborating these direct effects, global proteome analysis following NrdR overexpression showed a significant decrease in global protein expression. In parallel, studies on complementary expression of downregulated essential genes polA, eno and thiL showed partial rescue of the fitness defect caused by NrdR overexpression. Deletion of downregulated non-essential genes ygfK and trxA upon NrdR overexpression resulted in diminished bacterial growth and fitness suggesting an additional role for NrdR in regulating other genes. Moreover, in comparison with NrdR deletion, E. coli cells overexpressing NrdR showed significantly diminished adherence to human epithelial cells, reflecting decreased bacterial virulence. These results suggest

  2. NrdR Transcription Regulation: Global Proteome Analysis and Its Role in Escherichia coli Viability and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Naveen, Vankadari; Hsiao, Chwan-Deng

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs) play an important role in the synthesis of dNTPs and their expression is regulated by the transcription factors, NrdR and Fur. Recent transcriptomic studies using deletion mutants have indicated a role for NrdR in bacterial chemotaxis and in the maintenance of topoisomerase levels. However, NrdR deletion alone has no effect on bacterial growth or virulence in infected flies or in human blood cells. Furthermore, transcriptomic studies are limited to the deletion strain alone, and so are inadequate for drawing biological implications when the NrdR repressor is active or abundant. Therefore, further examination is warranted of changes in the cellular proteome in response to both NrdR overexpression, as well as deletion, to better understand its functional relevance as a bacterial transcription repressor. Here, we profile bacterial fate under conditions of overexpression and deletion of NrdR in E. coli. Biochemical assays show auxiliary zinc enhances the DNA binding activity of NrdR. We also demonstrate at the physiological level that increased nrdR expression causes a significant reduction in bacterial growth and fitness even at normal temperatures, and causes lethality at elevated temperatures. Corroborating these direct effects, global proteome analysis following NrdR overexpression showed a significant decrease in global protein expression. In parallel, studies on complementary expression of downregulated essential genes polA, eno and thiL showed partial rescue of the fitness defect caused by NrdR overexpression. Deletion of downregulated non-essential genes ygfK and trxA upon NrdR overexpression resulted in diminished bacterial growth and fitness suggesting an additional role for NrdR in regulating other genes. Moreover, in comparison with NrdR deletion, E. coli cells overexpressing NrdR showed significantly diminished adherence to human epithelial cells, reflecting decreased bacterial virulence. These results suggest

  3. Modulation of Membrane Influx and Efflux in Escherichia coli Sequence Type 131 Has an Impact on Bacterial Motility, Biofilm Formation, and Virulence in a Caenorhabditis elegans Model.

    PubMed

    Pantel, Alix; Dunyach-Remy, Catherine; Ngba Essebe, Christelle; Mesureur, Jennifer; Sotto, Albert; Pagès, Jean-Marie; Nicolas-Chanoine, Marie-Hélène; Lavigne, Jean-Philippe

    2016-05-01

    Energy-dependent efflux overexpression and altered outer membrane permeability (influx) can promote multidrug resistance (MDR). The present study clarifies the regulatory pathways that control membrane permeability in the pandemic clone Escherichia coli sequence type 131 (ST131) and evaluates the impact of efflux and influx modulations on biofilm formation, motility, and virulence in the Caenorhabditis elegans model. Mutants of two uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) strains, MECB5 (ST131; H30-Rx) and CFT073 (ST73), as well as a fecal strain, S250 (ST131; H22), were in vitro selected using continuous subculture in subinhibitory concentrations of ertapenem (ETP), chloramphenicol (CMP), and cefoxitin (FOX). Mutations in genes known to control permeability were shown for the two UPEC strains: MECB5-FOX (deletion of 127 bp in marR; deletion of 1 bp and insertion of an IS1 element in acrR) and CFT073-CMP (a 1-bp deletion causing a premature stop in marR). We also demonstrated that efflux phenotypes in the mutants selected with CMP and FOX were related to the AcrAB-TolC pump, but also to other efflux systems. Alteration of membrane permeability, caused by underexpression of the two major porins, OmpF and OmpC, was shown in MECB5-ETP and mutants selected with FOX. Lastly, our findings suggest that efflux pump-overproducing isolates (CMP mutants) pose a serious threat in terms of virulence (significant reduction in worm median survival) and host colonization. Lack of porins (ETP and FOX mutants) led to a high level of antibiotic resistance in an H30-Rx subclone. Nevertheless, this adaptation created a physiological disadvantage (decreased motility and ability to form biofilm) associated with a low potential for virulence. PMID:26926643

  4. Modulation of Membrane Influx and Efflux in Escherichia coli Sequence Type 131 Has an Impact on Bacterial Motility, Biofilm Formation, and Virulence in a Caenorhabditis elegans Model

    PubMed Central

    Pantel, Alix; Dunyach-Remy, Catherine; Ngba Essebe, Christelle; Mesureur, Jennifer; Sotto, Albert; Nicolas-Chanoine, Marie-Hélène

    2016-01-01

    Energy-dependent efflux overexpression and altered outer membrane permeability (influx) can promote multidrug resistance (MDR). The present study clarifies the regulatory pathways that control membrane permeability in the pandemic clone Escherichia coli sequence type 131 (ST131) and evaluates the impact of efflux and influx modulations on biofilm formation, motility, and virulence in the Caenorhabditis elegans model. Mutants of two uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) strains, MECB5 (ST131; H30-Rx) and CFT073 (ST73), as well as a fecal strain, S250 (ST131; H22), were in vitro selected using continuous subculture in subinhibitory concentrations of ertapenem (ETP), chloramphenicol (CMP), and cefoxitin (FOX). Mutations in genes known to control permeability were shown for the two UPEC strains: MECB5-FOX (deletion of 127 bp in marR; deletion of 1 bp and insertion of an IS1 element in acrR) and CFT073-CMP (a 1-bp deletion causing a premature stop in marR). We also demonstrated that efflux phenotypes in the mutants selected with CMP and FOX were related to the AcrAB-TolC pump, but also to other efflux systems. Alteration of membrane permeability, caused by underexpression of the two major porins, OmpF and OmpC, was shown in MECB5-ETP and mutants selected with FOX. Lastly, our findings suggest that efflux pump-overproducing isolates (CMP mutants) pose a serious threat in terms of virulence (significant reduction in worm median survival) and host colonization. Lack of porins (ETP and FOX mutants) led to a high level of antibiotic resistance in an H30-Rx subclone. Nevertheless, this adaptation created a physiological disadvantage (decreased motility and ability to form biofilm) associated with a low potential for virulence. PMID:26926643

  5. Characterization of Escherichia coli Strains Isolated from Patients with Diarrhea in São Paulo, Brazil: Identification of Intermediate Virulence Factor Profiles by Multiplex PCR▿

    PubMed Central

    Liebchen, Ariane; Benz, Inga; Mellmann, Alexander; Karch, Helge; Gomes, Tânia A. T.; Yamamoto, Denise; Hernandes, Rodrigo T.; Sampaio, Jorge; Sampaio, Suely C. F.; Fruth, Angelika; Schmidt, M. Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Intestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli is a major causative agent of severe diarrhea. In this study the prevalences of different pathotypes among 702 E. coli isolates from Brazilian patients with diarrhea were determined by multiplex PCR. Interestingly, most strains were enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC) strains, followed by atypical EPEC (ATEC) strains. Classical enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) strains were not detected. PMID:21508159

  6. Virulence Gene Profile and Multilocus Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat Analysis (MLVA) of Enteroinvasive Escherichia coli (EIEC) Isolates From Patients With Diarrhea in Kerman, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini Nave, Hossein; Mansouri, Shahla; Taati Moghadam, Majid; Moradi, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background Enteroinvasive Escherichia coli (EIEC) isolates cause dysentery in humans. Several virulence factors associated with EIEC pathogenesis have been characterized. Multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA) is a PCR-based method that has been used for genotyping bacterial pathogens. Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate the distribution of virulence factor genes in EIEC isolates from patients with diarrhea in Kerman, Iran, as well as the genetic relationships between these isolates. Patients and Methods A total of 620 diarrheic stool samples were collected from patients attending two hospitals in Kerman from June 2013 to August 2014. All isolates were confirmed as EIEC by PCR for the ipaH gene. The EIEC isolates were evaluated by PCR for the presence of nine virulence genes (ial, set1A, sen, virF, invE, sat, sigA, pic, and sepA). MLVA was performed for all EIEC isolates. Results A total of 11 EIEC isolates were identified, and all were positive for the ial gene. The invE and virF genes were observed in 81.8% of the isolates, while sen, sigA, and pic were detected in 72.7%, 63.6%, and 27.3% of the isolates, respectively. None of the isolates were positive for the sat, set, and sepA genes. Using MLVA, the 11 total isolates were divided into five types. Conclusions By studying the profiles of virulence genes and MLVA, it can be concluded that EIEC isolates do not have high heterogeneity and are derived from a limited number of clones. PMID:27635212

  7. Virulence genotypes, antibiotic resistance and the phylogenetic background of extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli isolated from urinary tract infections of dogs and cats in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Osugui, L; de Castro, A F Pestana; Iovine, R; Irino, K; Carvalho, V M

    2014-06-25

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is a frequent disease of humans and pets and has extra-intestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) strains as one of the main etiologic agent. ExPEC are characterized by specific virulence factors and are related to a heterogeneous group of human and animal disorders, besides to be a relevant participant in the dissemination of antimicrobial resistance. The purpose of this study was to characterize E. coli strains isolated from UTI of dogs and cats for serotypes, virulence markers, phylogenetic groups and sensitivity to antimicrobial drugs. E. coli was identified as the etiologic agent of UTI in urine samples of 43 pets (7 cats and 36 dogs). Serogroups O2, O4 and O6 corresponded to more than one third of the isolates, being 62% of the total strains classified as B2, 18% as D, 16% as B1 and 4% as A. The iucD (22%), fyuA (80%), traT (51%) and cvaC (20%) genes were distributed among the four phylogenetic groups, whereas the papC/papEF (47%) and malX (67%) genes were found only in groups B2 and D. There were a high number of resistant strains, with 76% of the strains belonging to groups A, B1 and D characterized as multidrug resistant (MDR), whereas only 21% had this phenotype in the group B2. The ExPEC strains isolated in this study displayed pathotypic and phylogenetic similarities with human isolates and high percentages of drug resistance. The finding of MDR ExPEC strains suggests implications for animal and public health and deserves more investigations.

  8. Genetic recombination. [Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Stahl, F.W.

    1987-02-01

    The molecular pathways of gene recombination are explored and compared in studies of the model organisms, Escherichia coli and phase lambda. In the discussion of data from these studies it seems that recombination varies with the genetic idiosyncrasies of the organism and may also vary within a single organism.

  9. Comparison of virulence factors and expression of specific genes between uropathogenic Escherichia coli and avian pathogenic E. coli in a murine urinary tract infection model and a chicken challenge model.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lixiang; Gao, Song; Huan, Haixia; Xu, Xiaojing; Zhu, Xiaoping; Yang, Weixia; Gao, Qingqing; Liu, Xiufan

    2009-05-01

    Avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) and uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) establish infections in extraintestinal habitats of different hosts. As the diversity, epidemiological sources and evolutionary origins of extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) are so far only partially defined, in the present study,100 APEC isolates and 202 UPEC isolates were compared by their content of virulence genes and phylogenetic groups. The two groups showed substantial overlap in terms of their serogroups, phylogenetic groups and virulence genotypes, including their possession of certain genes associated with large transmissible plasmids of APEC. In a chicken challenge model, both UPEC U17 and APEC E058 had similar LD(50), demonstrating that UPEC U17 had the potential to cause significant disease in poultry. To gain further information about the similarities between UPEC and APEC, the in vivo expression of 152 specific genes of UPEC U17 and APEC E058 in both a murine urinary tract infection (UTI) model and a chicken challenge model was compared with that of these strains grown statically to exponential phase in rich medium. It was found that in the same model (murine UTI or chicken challenge), various genes of UPEC U17 and APEC E058 showed a similar tendency of expression. Several iron-related genes were upregulated in the UTI model and/or chicken challenge model, indicating that iron acquisition is important for E. coli to survive in blood or the urinary tract. Based on these results, the potential for APEC to act as human UPEC or as a reservoir of virulence genes for UPEC should be considered. Further, this study compared the transcriptional profile of virulence genes among APEC and UPEC in vivo.

  10. Phylogenetic background, virulence gene profiles, and genomic diversity in commensal Escherichia coli isolated from ten mammal species living in one zoo.

    PubMed

    Baldy-Chudzik, Katarzyna; Mackiewicz, Paweł; Stosik, Michał

    2008-09-18

    Three hundred commensal Escherichia coli recovered from healthy herbivorous, carnivorous, and omnivorous mammals from one zoo were characterized for their phylogenetic origin, intestinal virulence gene (VG) prevalence, and genomic diversity. The phylogenetic structure of the E. coli (groups A, B1, B2, and D) from the herbivores was homogenous, with a prevailing representation of group B1. In the carnivores and omnivores, the phylogenetic diversity was species specific with a higher representation of group A compared to the herbivores. Of 16 intestinal VGs in the whole set, 8 were detected and they formed 13 VG profiles. In the herbivores, all the VG-positive isolates belonged to group B1 and harboured the genes eaeA, eastI, ehxA, stx1, and stx2, which separately or in combination formed 8 VG profiles. In the carnivores and omnivores, the VG-positive isolates frequently belonged to group A and harboured the estI and estII genes or a combination of eastI and estI, forming three VG profiles. Single genes cnf2, in group B2, and eastI, in group D, were found. Similarity analysis of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns revealed closer relatedness between the isolates from carnivores and omnivores than those from herbivores. The comparison between the prevalence of phylogenetic groups and the phylogenetic origin of VG-positive isolates in the examined E. coli suggested, that E. coli from group B1 in herbivores and E. coli from group A rather than B1 in carnivores and omnivores are "best adapted" to the host organism. The groups revealed different preferences in the acquisition and maintenance of intestinal VGs.

  11. The gut bacterium Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron influences the virulence potential of the enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O103:H25.

    PubMed

    Iversen, Hildegunn; Lindbäck, Toril; L'Abée-Lund, Trine M; Roos, Norbert; Aspholm, Marina; Stenfors Arnesen, Lotte

    2015-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) is associated with severe gastrointestinal disease. Upon entering the gastrointestinal tract, EHEC is exposed to a fluctuating environment and a myriad of other bacterial species. To establish an infection, EHEC strains have to modulate their gene expression according to the GI tract environment. In order to explore the interspecies interactions between EHEC and an human intestinal commensal, the global gene expression profile was determined of EHEC O103:H25 (EHEC NIPH-11060424) co-cultured with B. thetaiotaomicron (CCUG 10774) or grown in the presence of spent medium from B. thetaiotaomicron. Microarray analysis revealed that approximately 1% of the EHEC NIPH-11060424 genes were significantly up-regulated both in co-culture (30 genes) and in the presence of spent medium (44 genes), and that the affected genes differed between the two conditions. In co-culture, genes encoding structural components of the type three secretion system were among the most affected genes with an almost 4-fold up-regulation, while the most affected genes in spent medium were involved in chemotaxis and were more than 3-fold up-regulated. The operons for type three secretion system (TTSS) are located on the Locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE) pathogenicity island, and qPCR showed that genes of all five operons (LEE1-LEE5) were up-regulated. Moreover, an increased adherence to HeLa cells was observed in EHEC NIPH-11060424 exposed to B. thetaiotaomicron. Expression of stx2 genes, encoding the main virulence factor of EHEC, was down-regulated in both conditions (co-culture/spent medium). These results show that expression of EHEC genes involved in colonization and virulence is modulated in response to direct interspecies contact between cells, or to diffusible factors released from B. thetaiotaomicron. Such interspecies interactions could allow the pathogen to recognize its predilection site and modulate its behaviour accordingly, thus increasing the

  12. Distribution of classical and nonclassical virulence genes in enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli isolates from Chilean children and tRNA gene screening for putative insertion sites for genomic islands.

    PubMed

    Del Canto, Felipe; Valenzuela, Patricio; Cantero, Lidia; Bronstein, Jonathan; Blanco, Jesús E; Blanco, Jorge; Prado, Valeria; Levine, Myron; Nataro, James; Sommerfelt, Halvor; Vidal, Roberto

    2011-09-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is an important cause of diarrhea. Three adhesins (Tia, TibA, EtpA), an iron acquisition system (Irp1, Irp2, and FyuA), a GTPase (LeoA), and an autotransporter (EatA) are ETEC virulence-related proteins that, in contrast to the classical virulence factors (enterotoxins and fimbrial colonization factors) have not heretofore been targets in characterizing isolates from epidemiological studies. Here, we determined the occurrence of these nonclassical virulence genes in 103 ETEC isolates from Chilean children with diarrhea and described their association with O serogroups and classical virulence determinants. Because tia, leoA, irp2, and fyuA are harbored by pathogenicity islands inserted into the selC and asnT tRNA genes (tDNAs), we analyzed the regions flanking these loci. Ten additional tDNAs were also screened to identify hot spots for genetic insertions. Associations between the most frequent serogroups and classical colonization factor (CF)-toxin profiles included O6/LT-STh/CS1-CS3-CS21 (i.e., O6 serogroup, heat-labile [LT] and human heat-stable [STh] enterotoxins, and CFs CS1, -3 and -21), O6/LT-STh/CS2-CS3-CS21, and O104-O127/STh/CFAI-CS21. The eatA and etpA genes were detected in more than 70% of the collection, including diverse serogroups and virulence profiles. Sixteen percent of the ETEC strains were negative for classical and nonclassical adhesins, suggesting the presence of unknown determinants of adhesion. The leuX, thrW, and asnT tDNAs were disrupted in more than 65% of strains, suggesting they are hot spots for the insertion of mobile elements. Sequences similar to integrase genes were identified next to the thrW, asnT, pheV, and selC tDNAs. We propose that the eatA and etpA genes should be included in characterizations of ETEC isolates in future epidemiological studies to determine their prevalence in other geographical regions. Sequencing of tDNA-associated genetic insertions might identify new ETEC virulence

  13. O-antigen and virulence profiling of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli by a rapid and cost-effective DNA microarray colorimetric method

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) is a leading cause of foodborne illness worldwide. To evaluate better methods to rapidly detect and genotype Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli strains, the present study evaluated the use of the ampliPHOX colorimetric detection technology, based on ...

  14. Distribution of virulence genes and multiple drug-resistant patterns amongst different phylogenetic groups of uropathogenic Escherichia coli isolated from patients with urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Derakhshandeh, A; Firouzi, R; Motamedifar, M; Motamedi Boroojeni, A; Bahadori, M; Arabshahi, S; Novinrooz, A; Heidari, S

    2015-02-01

    A total of 85 Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) isolates were screened against ceftiofur, oxacillin, nitrofurantoin and lincospectin using Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method, following CLSI guidelines. Prevalence of virulent factor genes amongst the isolates was determined by PCR, using gene-specific primers against the different virulent factors. Statistical analysis of the data was performed using SPSS software. The prevalence of traT, ompT, Iss, malX and ibeA genes was 47.1%, 38.8%, 20%, 16.5% and 9.4%, respectively. The most prevalent gene in group A and D was traT, whilst in group B2 was Iss. The highest resistance has been shown against oxacillin (98.8%), followed by ceftiofur (77.6%), whilst resistance to lincospectin (2.4%) and nitrofurantoin (12.9%) had the lowest frequencies. Multidrug resistance was shown in 82.35% of the isolates, whilst this study recommend lincospectin and nitrofurantoin as choice drugs for treatment, but more investigation of the bacterial pathogenicity associated with urinary tract infection (UTI) may contribute to a better medical intervention.

  15. Development of a High Resolution Virulence Allelic Profiling (HReVAP) Approach Based on the Accessory Genome of Escherichia coli to Characterize Shiga-Toxin Producing E. coli (STEC)

    PubMed Central

    Michelacci, Valeria; Orsini, Massimiliano; Knijn, Arnold; Delannoy, Sabine; Fach, Patrick; Caprioli, Alfredo; Morabito, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Shiga-toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC) strains possess a large accessory genome composed of virulence genes existing in multiple allelic variants, which sometimes segregate with specific STEC subpopulations. We analyzed the allelic variability of 91 virulence genes of STEC by Real Time PCR followed by melting curves analysis in 713 E. coli strains including 358 STEC. The 91 genes investigated were located on the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE), OI-57, and OI-122 pathogenicity islands and displayed a total of 476 alleles in the study population. The combinations of the 91 alleles of each strain were termed allelic signatures and used to perform cluster analyses. We termed such an approach High Resolution Virulence Allelic Profiling (HReVAP) and used it to investigate the phylogeny of STEC of multiple serogroups. The dendrograms obtained identified groups of STEC segregating approximately with the serogroups and allowed the identification of subpopulations within the single groups. The study of the allelic signatures provided further evidence of the coevolution of the LEE and OI-122, reflecting the occurrence of their acquisition through a single event. The HReVAP analysis represents a sensitive tool for studying the evolution of LEE-positive STEC. PMID:26941726

  16. MarA, SoxS and Rob of Escherichia coli – Global regulators of multidrug resistance, virulence and stress response

    PubMed Central

    Duval, Valérie; Lister, Ida M.

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria have a great capacity for adjusting their metabolism in response to environmental changes by linking extracellular stimuli to the regulation of genes by transcription factors. By working in a co-operative manner, transcription factors provide a rapid response to external threats, allowing the bacteria to survive. This review will focus on transcription factors MarA, SoxS and Rob in Escherichia coli, three members of the AraC family of proteins. These homologous proteins exemplify the ability to respond to multiple threats such as oxidative stress, drugs and toxic compounds, acidic pH, and host antimicrobial peptides. MarA, SoxS and Rob recognize similar DNA sequences in the promoter region of more than 40 regulatory target genes. As their regulons overlap, a finely tuned adaptive response allows E. coli to survive in the presence of different assaults in a co-ordinated manner. These regulators are well conserved amongst Enterobacteriaceae and due to their broad involvement in bacterial adaptation in the host, have recently been explored as targets to develop new anti-virulence agents. The regulators are also being examined for their roles in novel technologies such as biofuel production. PMID:24860636

  17. Virulence features of atypical enteropathogenic Escherichia coli identified by the eae(+) EAF-negative stx(-) genetic profile.

    PubMed

    Abe, Cecilia M; Trabulsi, Luiz R; Blanco, Jorge; Blanco, Miguel; Dahbi, Ghizlane; Blanco, Jesús E; Mora, Azucena; Franzolin, Marcia R; Taddei, Carla R; Martinez, Marina B; Piazza, Roxane M F; Elias, Waldir P

    2009-08-01

    This study characterized 76 atypical enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (aEPEC) strains, previously classified by the eae(+) EAF-negative stx(-) genotype, isolated from children with diarrhea in Brazil. Presence of bfpA and bfpA/perA was detected in 2 and 6 strains, respectively. The expression of bundle-forming pilus (BFP), however, was observed by immunofluorescence in 1 bfpA and 3 bfpA/perA strains, classifying them as typical EPEC (tEPEC). The remaining 72 aEPEC strains were characterized by serotyping, intimin typing, adherence patterns to HEp-2 cells, capacity to induce actin aggregation (fluorescent actin staining test), and antimicrobial resistance. Our results show that aEPEC comprise a very heterogeneous group that does not present any prevalence or association regarding the studied characteristics. It also suggest that tEPEC and aEPEC must not be classified only by the reactivity with the EAF probe, and that the search of other markers present in pEAF, as well as the BFP expression, must be considered for this matter.

  18. Occurrence of subtilase cytotoxin and relation with other virulence factors in verocytotoxigenic Escherichia coli isolated from food and cattle in Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Velandia, Claudia V. Granobles; Mariel Sanso, A.; Krüger, Alejandra; Suárez, Lorena V.; Lucchesi, Paula M. A.; Parma, Alberto E.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the presence of the gene of subtilase cytotoxin (SubAB), described in certain highly virulent verocytotoxigenic E. coli strains, in isolates from Argentina and its relation with other virulence factors. The gene subA was present in eae-negative strains mostly associated with saa, vt2 and ehxA genes. PMID:24031684

  19. Anti-hemolytic, hemagglutination inhibition and bacterial membrane disruptive properties of selected herbal extracts attenuate virulence of Carbapenem Resistant Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Pallavi; Chawla, Raman; Narula, Alka; Goel, Rajeev; Arora, Rajesh; Sharma, Rakesh Kumar

    2016-06-01

    Expression of a multitude of virulence factors by multi-drug resistant microbial strains, e.g., Carbapenem Resistant Escherichia coli (Family: Enterobacteriaceae; Class: Gammaproteobacteria), is responsible for resistance against beta-lactam antibiotics. Hemolysin production and induction of hemagglutination by bacterial surface receptors inflicts direct cytotoxicity by destroying host phagocytic and epithelial cells. We have previously reported that Berberis aristata, Camellia sinensis, Cyperus rotundus Holarrhena antidysenterica and Andrographis paniculata are promising herbal leads for targeting Carbapenem resistant Escherichia coli. These herbal leads were analyzed for their anti-hemolytic potential by employing spectrophotometric assay of hemoglobin liberation. Anti-hemagglutination potential of the extracts was assessed by employing qualitative assay of visible RBC aggregate formation. Camellia sinensis (PTRC-31911-A) exhibited anti-hemolytic potential of 73.97 ± 0.03%, followed by Holarrhena antidysenterica (PTRC-8111-A) i.e., 68.32 ± 0.05%, Berberis aristata (PTRC-2111-A) i.e., 60.26 ± 0.05% and Cyperus rotundus (PTRC-31811-A) i.e., 53.76 ± 0.03%. Comprehensive, visual analysis of hemagglutination inhibition revealed that only Berberis aristata (PTRC-2111-A) and Camellia sinensis (PTRC-31911-A) exhibited anti-hemagglutination activity. However, Andrographis paniculata (PTRC-11611-A) exhibited none of the inhibitory activities. Furthermore, the pair wise correlation analysis of the tested activities with quantitative phytochemical descriptors revealed that an increased content of alkaloid; flavonoids; polyphenols, and decreased content of saponins supported both the activities. Additionally, flow cytometry revealed that cell membrane structures of CRE were damaged by extracts of Berberis aristata (PTRC-2111-A) and Camellia sinensis (PTRC-31911-A) at their respective Minimum Inhibitory Concentrations, thereby confirming noteworthy antibacterial

  20. Detection of virulence factors of Escherichia coli focused on prevalence of EAST1 toxin in stool of diarrheic and non-diarrheic piglets and presence of adhesion involving virulence factors in astA positive strains.

    PubMed

    Zajacova, Zuzana Sramkova; Konstantinova, Lucie; Alexa, Pavel

    2012-01-27

    Between 2005 and 2009, a total of 800 Escherichia coli strains isolated from piglets with diarrhea were tested for the presence of enteroaggregative heat-stable enterotoxin EAST1, heat-labile (LT) and heat-stable enterotoxins (STa) and shigatoxin (Stx2e) by PCR with the purpose of investigating the present distribution of virulence factors on swine farms in the Czech Republic. The isolates were analyzed for their O-serogroup, fimbrial (K88, K99, 987P, F41, F18) and nonfimbrial adhesins (adhesin involved in diffuse adherence AIDA and porcine attaching and effacing-associated factor PAA). The detection rates of ETEC and STEC isolates were 36.5% and 7.75%, respectively, which implies that ETEC play the major role in E. coli infections in Czech herds. Generally, the most common serotype was O149:K88 which possessed genetic determinants for LT and EAST1. None of the tested E. coli isolates was positive for genes K99, 987P and F41. It was shown that out of 800 E. coli strains isolated from pigs, 277 were EAST1 positive and 74% from the latter were identified as ETEC. Of the fimbrial adhesins, K88 and F18 were commonly detected. Over 80% of K88/EAST1 positive strains possessed the gene for paa. We detected no EAE isolate positive for fimbrial adhesins or PAA and AIDA. The AIDA was more often associated with F18 than with K88. The gene astA was also identified among E. coli isolates of non-diarrheic piglets. We tested rectal swab samples collected from apparently healthy piglets on three farms. On all farms, E. coli astA positive strains (26.66%, 90.00% and 46.66% astA positive animals) were isolated. Our results showed a significantly higher prevalence of astA positive E. coli isolates among apparently healthy piglets in comparison with diarrheic piglets. The question remains as to what is the role of the astA gene in the pathogenesis of porcine colibacillosis and as a virulence factor. PMID:21864997

  1. Invasiveness as a putative additional virulence mechanism of some atypical Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli strains with different uncommon intimin types

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) produce attaching/effacing (A/E) lesions on eukaryotic cells mediated by the outer membrane adhesin intimin. EPEC are sub-grouped into typical (tEPEC) and atypical (aEPEC). We have recently demonstrated that aEPEC strain 1551-2 (serotype O non-typable, non-motile) invades HeLa cells by a process dependent on the expression of intimin sub-type omicron. In this study, we evaluated whether aEPEC strains expressing other intimin sub-types are also invasive using the quantitative gentamicin protection assay. We also evaluated whether aEPEC invade differentiated intestinal T84 cells. Results Five of six strains invaded HeLa and T84 cells in a range of 13.3%–20.9% and 5.8%–17.8%, respectively, of the total cell-associated bacteria. The strains studied were significantly more invasive than prototype tEPEC strain E2348/69 (1.4% and 0.5% in HeLa and T84 cells, respectively). Invasiveness was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. We also showed that invasion of HeLa cells by aEPEC 1551-2 depended on actin filaments, but not on microtubules. In addition, disruption of tight junctions enhanced its invasion efficiency in T84 cells, suggesting preferential invasion via a non-differentiated surface. Conclusion Some aEPEC strains may invade intestinal cells in vitro with varying efficiencies and independently of the intimin sub-type. PMID:19622141

  2. Attenuation of adhesion, quorum sensing and biofilm mediated virulence of carbapenem resistant Escherichia coli by selected natural plant products.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Pallavi; Chawla, Raman; Tanwar, Ankit; Chakotiya, Ankita Singh; Narula, Alka; Goel, Rajeev; Arora, Rajesh; Sharma, Rakesh Kumar

    2016-03-01

    The multi-drug resistance offered by Carbapenem Resistant Escherichia coli (Family: Enterobacteriaceae; Class: Gammaproteobacteria) against third line antibiotics can be attributed towards its ability to develop biofilm. Such process involves adhesion and quorum-sensing induced colonization leading to biomass development. The present study explored the anti-adhesion, anti-quorum sensing and anti-biofilm potential of 05 pre-standardized potent herbals. Berberis aristata (PTRC-2111-A) exhibited maximum potential in all these activities i.e. 91.3% ± 0.05% (Anti-adhesion), 96.06% ± 0.05% (Anti-Quorum sensing) and 51.3% ± 0.07% (Anti-Biofilm formation) respectively. Camellia sinensis (PTRC-31911-A) showed both anti-adhesion (84.1% ± 0.03%) and anti-quorum sensing (90.0%) potential while Holarrhena antidysenterica (PTRC-8111-A) showed only anti-quorum sensing potential as compared to standards/antibiotics. These findings were in line with the molecular docking analysis of phytoligands against Lux S and Pilin receptors. Furthermore, the pairwise correlation analysis of the tested activities with qualitative, quantitative and bioactivity functional descriptors revealed that an increased content of alkaloid, moderate content of flavonoids and decreased content of tannins supported all the three activities. In addition, nitric oxide and superoxide scavenging activity were found to be correlated with anti-quorum sensing activity. The findings indicated clearly that B. aristata (Family: Berberidaceae) and C. sinensis (Family: Theaceae) were potent herbal leads with significant therapeutic potential which further needs to be explored at pre-clinical level in the future.

  3. The Role of Host Factors and Bacterial Virulence Genes in the Development of Pyelonephritis Caused by Escherichia coli in Renal Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Siliano, Priscila Reina; Rocha, Lillian Andrade; Osmar Medina-Pestana, José

    2010-01-01

    Background and objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the role of host factors and bacterial virulence genes in the development of pyelonephritis caused by Escherichia coli in renal transplant (Tx) recipients. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: A total of 328 E. coli isolates from cases of cystitis (Cys; n = 239) or pyelonephritis (PN; n = 89), with 169 from renal Tx recipients, were subjected to molecular analyses to identify P-fimbria subunits (PapC, PapG II, and PapGIII), G- and M-fimbriae, and aerobactin. The presence of antibiotic resistance was also determined. Parameters such as gender, age, immunosuppression regimens, causes of ESRD, kidney donor, intraoperative anastomosis, use of double J stent, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (TMP/SMZ) prophylaxis, and time after Tx were evaluated. Results: A multivariate analysis showed a significant association between PN and renal Tx. In renal Tx recipients, the risk of occurrence of PN was significantly higher among males and for those no longer receiving TMP/SMZ prophylaxis. E. coli strains isolated from PN presented a lower prevalence of papGIII and lower rates of resistance to pipemidic acid. Although papGII was more prevalent in PN than in Cys, it was not independently associated with PN. Conclusions: These findings suggested that renal Tx increases the risk for PN, and the male sex represented a host factor independently associated with risk, whereas the prophylaxis with TMP/SMZ was protective. The lack of papGIII and low resistance to first-generation quinolones were bacterial-independent risk factors for PN in Tx. PMID:20448070

  4. Virulence profiles of Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli and other potentially diarrheagenic E.coli of bovine origin, in Mendoza, Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Pizarro, M.A.; Orozco, J.H.; Degarbo, S.M.; Calderón, A.E.; Nardello, A.L.; Laciar, A.; Rüttler, M.E.

    2013-01-01

    This study described a group of strains obtained from a slaughter house in Mendoza, in terms of their pathogenic factors, serotype, antibiotype and molecular profile. Ninety one rectal swabs and one hundred eight plating samples taken from carcasses of healthy cattle intended for meat consumption were analyzed. Both the swab and the plate samples were processed to analyze the samples for the presence of virulence genes by PCR: stx1, stx2, eae and astA. The Stx positive strains were confirmed by citotoxicity assay in Vero cells. The isolates were subsequently investigated for their O:H serotype, antimicrobial susceptibility and molecular profile by Random Amplification of Polymorphic DNA (RAPD). Twelve E.coli strains were identified by their pathogenicity. Nine were from fecal origin and three from carcasses. Three strains carried the stx1 gene, three the stx2 gene, two carried eae and four the astA gene. The detected serotypes were: O172:H-; O150:H8; O91:H21; O178:H19 and O2:H5. The strains showed a similarity around 70% by RAPD. Some of the E.coli strains belonged to serogroups known for certain life-threatening diseases in humans. Their presence in carcasses indicates the high probability of bacterial spread during slaughter and processing. PMID:24688508

  5. ELECTROPHORETIC MOBILITIES OF ESCHERICHIA COLI 0157:H7 AND WILD-TYPE ESCHERICHIA COLI STRAINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The electrophoretic mobility (EPM) of a number of human-virulent and "wild-type" Escherichia coli strains in phosphate buffered water was measured. The impact of pH, ionic strength, cation type (valence) and concentration, and bacterial strain on the EPM was investigated. Resul...

  6. A C-terminal class I PDZ binding motif of EspI/NleA modulates the virulence of attaching and effacing Escherichia coli and Citrobacter rodentium.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sau Fung; Kelly, Michelle; McAlister, Adrian; Luck, Shelley N; Garcia, Erin L; Hall, Randy A; Robins-Browne, Roy M; Frankel, Gad; Hartland, Elizabeth L

    2008-02-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli induces characteristic attaching-effacing (A/E) lesions on the intestinal mucosa during infection. The locus of enterocyte effacement is essential for A/E lesion formation and encodes a type III secretion system that translocates multiple effector proteins into the host cell. Following translocation, EspI/NleA localizes to the Golgi. Using the yeast two-hybrid system (Y2HS) and PSD-95/Disk-large/ZO-1 (PDZ)-domain protein array overlays, we identified 15 putative host-interacting partners of EspI. All but two of the target proteins contained PDZ domains. Examination of the EspI amino acid sequence revealed a C-terminal consensus class I PDZ binding motif. Deletion of the last 7 amino acids of EspI to generate EspI(DeltaC7) abrogated the Y2HS interaction between EspI and 5 of the 6 putative host cell target proteins tested. Deletion of the EspI PDZ binding motif also resulted in delayed trafficking of EspI to the Golgi. Using a mouse model of infection, we showed that Citrobacter rodentium expressing truncated EspI(DeltaC7) was attenuated when in competition with C. rodentium expressing full-length EspI. Overall, these results suggested that EspI may modulate the virulence of A/E pathogens by binding host PDZ-domain proteins.

  7. Co-expressional conservation in virulence and stress related genes of three Gammaproteobacterial species: Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Hosseinkhan, Nazanin; Zarrineh, Peyman; Rokni-Zadeh, Hassan; Ashouri, Mohammad Reza; Masoudi-Nejad, Ali

    2015-11-01

    Gene co-expression analysis is one of the main aspects of systems biology that uses high-throughput gene expression data. In the present study we applied cross-species co-expressional analysis on a module of biofilm and stress response associated genes. We addressed different kinds of stresses in three most intensively studied members of Gammaproteobacteria including Escherichia coli K12, Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 and Salmonella enterica for which large sets of gene expression data are available. Our aim was to evaluate the presence of common stress response strategies adopted by these microorganisms that may be assigned to the other members of Gammaproteobacteria. Results of functional annotation analysis revealed distinct categories among co-expressed genes, most of which concerned biological processes associated with virulence and stress response. Transcriptional regulatory analysis of genes present in co-expressed modules showed that the global stress sigma factor, RpoS, besides several local transcription factors accounts for the observed co-expressional response, and that several cases of feed-forward loops exist between global regulators, local transcription factors and their targets. Our results lend partial support to our underlying assumption of the conservation of core biological processes and regulatory interactions among these related Gammaproteobacteria members. This has led to the implementation of transferring gene function annotations from well-studied Gammaproteobacterial species to less-characterized members. These findings can shed light on the discovery of new drug targets capable of controlling severe infections caused by these groups of bacteria.

  8. The complete DNA sequence and analysis of the large virulence plasmid of Escherichia coli O157:H7.

    PubMed

    Burland, V; Shao, Y; Perna, N T; Plunkett, G; Sofia, H J; Blattner, F R

    1998-09-15

    The complete DNA sequence of pO157, the large virulence plasmid of EHEC strain O157:H7 EDL 933, is presented. The 92 kb F-like plasmid is composed of segments of putative virulence genes in a framework of replication and maintenance regions, with seven insertion sequence elements, located mostly at the boundaries of the virulence segments. One hundred open reading frames (ORFs) were identified, of which 19 were previously sequenced potential virulence genes. Forty-two ORFs were sufficiently similar to known proteins for suggested functions to be assigned, and 22 had no convincing similarity with any known proteins. Of the newly identified genes, an unusually large ORF of 3169 amino acids has a putative cytotoxin active site shared with the large clostridial toxin (LCT) family and proteins such as ToxA and B of Clostridium difficile . A conserved motif was detected that links the large ORF and the LCT proteins with the OCH1 family of glycosyltransferases. In the complete sequence, the mosaic form can be observed at the levels of base composition, codon usage and gene organization. Insights were obtained from patterns of DNA composition as well as the pathogenic and 'housekeeping' gene segments. Evolutionary trees built from shared plasmid maintenance genes show that even these genes have heterogeneous origins. PMID:9722640

  9. Aging of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Clifton, C. E.

    1966-01-01

    Clifton, C. E. (Stanford University, Stanford, Calif.). Aging of Escherichia coli. J. Bacteriol. 92:905–912. 1966.—The rates of endogenous and exogenous (glucose) respiration decreased much more rapidly than did the viable count during the first 24 hr of aging of washed, C14-labeled cells of Escherichia coli K-12 suspended in a basal salt medium devoid of ammonium salts. The rates of decrease of respiration and of death approached each other as the age of the cells increased, but death was not the only factor involved in decreased respiratory activity of the suspensions. The greatest decrease in cellular contents with aging was noted in the ribonucleic acid fraction, of which the ribose appeared to be oxidized, while uracil accumulated in the suspension medium. The viable count and respiratory activities remained higher in glucose-fed than in nonfed suspensions. Proline-labeled cells fed glucose tended to lose more of their proline and to convert more proline into C14O2 than in unfed controls. On the other hand, uracil-labeled cells fed glucose retained more of the uracil than did nonfed cells, but glucose elicited some oxidation of uracil. An exogenous energy source such as glucose aided in the maintenance of a population, but it was not the only factor needed for such maintenance. PMID:5332874

  10. Expression of Shiga toxin 2 (Stx2) in highly virulent Stx-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) carrying different anti-terminator (q) genes.

    PubMed

    Olavesen, Kristoffer K; Lindstedt, Bjørn-Arne; Løbersli, Inger; Brandal, Lin T

    2016-08-01

    Shiga toxins (Stx) are key virulence factors of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) during development of haemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). It has been suggested that not only specific stx2 subtypes, but also the amount of Stx2 expressed might be essential for STEC pathogenicity. We aimed to investigate if various anti-terminator (q) genes might influence the expression level of Stx2 in highly virulent STEC. A multiplex PCR detecting q933, q21, and qO111 was run on 20 stx2a-positive STEC strains, of which 18 were HUS associated serotypes (HAS) and two non-HAS. Relative expression of Stx2 mRNA was assessed for all strains, both in non-induced and induced (mitomycin C) state. The HAS STEC carried either q933 (n = 8), qO111 (n = 8), or both (n = 2). In basal state, no STEC strains showed higher expression of Stx2 mRNA than the calibrator EDL933 (non-sorbitol fermenting (NSF) O157:H7carrying q933). Variations among strains were not associated with different q genes present, but rather related to specific serogroups. In induced state, O104:H4 strains (q933) showed higher Stx2 mRNA level than EDL933, whereas sorbitol fermenting (SF) O157:H- (qO111) and O121:H? (q933) STEC showed levels comparable with EDL933. An association between the presence of q933 and higher Stx2 level was seen within some HAS, but not all. Interestingly, the O103:H25 STEC strains, responsible for a HUS outbreak in Norway, carried both q933 and qO111. However, the Stx2 mRNA level in these strains was significantly lower than EDL933 in both states, indicating that other factors than the level of Stx2 might explain the aggressiveness of these bacteria. The two non-HAS STEC did not carry any of the examined q genes. In induced state, these bacteria showed the lowest Stx2 mRNA level compared to EDL933. One of the non-HAS STEC was not induced by mitomycin C, suggesting that stx2a might be located on a defect bacteriophage. No association between specific q genes and Stx2 mRNA expression

  11. Genotypic Characterization of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Strains Causing Traveler's Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Fulton P.; Medina, Anicia M.; Aldasoro, Edelweiss; Sangil, Anna; Gascon, Joaquim; Ochoa, Theresa J.; Vila, Jordi

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to characterize the presence of virulence factors of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) causing traveler's diarrhea. Among 52 ETEC isolates, the most common toxin type was STh, and the most frequent colonization factors (CFs) were CS21, CS6, and CS3. On the other hand, the nonclassical virulence factors EAST1 and EatA were frequently present. PMID:23224092

  12. Occurrence of bla CTX-M-1, qnrB1 and virulence genes in avian ESBL-producing Escherichia coli isolates from Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Kilani, Hajer; Abbassi, Mohamed Salah; Ferjani, Sana; Mansouri, Riadh; Sghaier, Senda; Ben Salem, Rakia; Jaouani, Imen; Douja, Gtari; Brahim, Sana; Hammami, Salah; Ben Chehida, Noureddine; Boubaker, Ilhem Boutiba-Ben

    2015-01-01

    Avian ESBL-producing Escherichia coli isolates have been increasingly reported worldwide. Animal to human dissemination, via food chain or direct contact, of these resistant bacteria has been reported. In Tunisia, little is known about avian ESBL- producing E. coli and further studies are needed. Seventeen ESBL-producing Escherichia coli isolates from poultry feces from two farms (Farm 1 and farm 2) in the North of Tunisia have been used in this study. Eleven of these isolates (from farm 1) have the same resistance profile to nalidixic acid, sulfonamides, streptomycin, tetracycline, and norfloxacine (intermediately resistant). Out of the six isolates recovered from farm 2, only one was co-resistant to tetracycline. All isolates, except one, harbored bla CTX-M-1 gene, and one strain co-harbored the bla TEM-1 gene. The genes tetA and tetB were carried, respectively, by 11 and 1 amongst the 12 tetracycline-resistant isolates. Sulfonamides resistance was encoded by sul1, sul2, and sul3 genes in 3, 17, and 5 isolates, respectively. The qnrB1 was detected in nine strains, one of which co-harbored qnrS1 gene. The search for the class 1 and 2 integrons by PCR showed that in farm 1, class 1 and 2 integrons were found in one and ten isolates, respectively. In farm 2, class 1 integron was found in only one isolate, class 2 was not detected. Only one gene cassette arrangement was demonstrated in the variable regions (VR) of the 10 int2-positive isolates: dfrA1- sat2-aadA1. The size of the VR of the class 1 integron was approximately 250 bp in one int1-positive isolate, whereas in the second isolate, no amplification was observed. All isolates of farm 1 belong to the phylogroup A (sub-group A0). However, different types of phylogroups in farm 2 were detected. Each of the phylogroups A1, B22, B23 was detected in one strain, while the D2 phylogroup was found in 3 isolates. The virulence genes iutA, fimH, and traT were detected in 3, 7, and 3 isolates, respectively. Two types of

  13. Occurrence of blaCTX-M-1, qnrB1 and virulence genes in avian ESBL-producing Escherichia coli isolates from Tunisia

    PubMed Central

    Kilani, Hajer; Abbassi, Mohamed Salah; Ferjani, Sana; Mansouri, Riadh; Sghaier, Senda; Ben Salem, Rakia; Jaouani, Imen; Douja, Gtari; Brahim, Sana; Hammami, Salah; Ben Chehida, Noureddine; Boubaker, Ilhem Boutiba-Ben

    2015-01-01

    Avian ESBL-producing Escherichia coli isolates have been increasingly reported worldwide. Animal to human dissemination, via food chain or direct contact, of these resistant bacteria has been reported. In Tunisia, little is known about avian ESBL- producing E. coli and further studies are needed. Seventeen ESBL-producing Escherichia coli isolates from poultry feces from two farms (Farm 1 and farm 2) in the North of Tunisia have been used in this study. Eleven of these isolates (from farm 1) have the same resistance profile to nalidixic acid, sulfonamides, streptomycin, tetracycline, and norfloxacine (intermediately resistant). Out of the six isolates recovered from farm 2, only one was co-resistant to tetracycline. All isolates, except one, harbored blaCTX-M-1 gene, and one strain co-harbored the blaTEM-1 gene. The genes tetA and tetB were carried, respectively, by 11 and 1 amongst the 12 tetracycline-resistant isolates. Sulfonamides resistance was encoded by sul1, sul2, and sul3 genes in 3, 17, and 5 isolates, respectively. The qnrB1 was detected in nine strains, one of which co-harbored qnrS1 gene. The search for the class 1 and 2 integrons by PCR showed that in farm 1, class 1 and 2 integrons were found in one and ten isolates, respectively. In farm 2, class 1 integron was found in only one isolate, class 2 was not detected. Only one gene cassette arrangement was demonstrated in the variable regions (VR) of the 10 int2-positive isolates: dfrA1- sat2-aadA1. The size of the VR of the class 1 integron was approximately 250 bp in one int1-positive isolate, whereas in the second isolate, no amplification was observed. All isolates of farm 1 belong to the phylogroup A (sub-group A0). However, different types of phylogroups in farm 2 were detected. Each of the phylogroups A1, B22, B23 was detected in one strain, while the D2 phylogroup was found in 3 isolates. The virulence genes iutA, fimH, and traT were detected in 3, 7, and 3 isolates, respectively. Two types of

  14. Beyond Serotypes and Virulence-Associated Factors: Detection of Genetic Diversity among O153:H45 CFA/I Heat-Stable Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Strains

    PubMed Central

    Pacheco, A. B. F.; Ferreira, L. C. S.; Pichel, M. G.; Almeida, D. F.; Binsztein, N.; Viboud, G. I.

    2001-01-01

    Characterization of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) has been based almost exclusively on the detection of phenotypic traits such as serotypes and virulence-associated factors: heat-labile (LT) and heat-stable (ST) toxins and colonization factors (CFs). In the present work we show that the analysis of band patterns generated by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) of digested chromosomal DNA can be used to detect genetic diversity among ETEC strains expressing identical phenotypic traits. The study included 29 ETEC isolates from Latin America and Spain expressing the phenotype O153:H45 CFA/I ST plus 1 rough derivative, 2 nonmotile derivatives, and 1 O78:H12 CFA/I ST isolate, and a representative of a genetically distinct ETEC group. The results showed that the O153:H45 CFA/I ST ETEC isolates belong to a single clonal cluster whose isolates share on average, 84% of the RAPD bands and 77% of the PFGE restriction fragments, while the O78:H12 isolate shared only 44 and 4% of the RAPD bands and PFGE fragments, respectively, with the isolates of the O153:H45 group. More relevantly, RAPD and PFGE fingerprints disclosed the presence of different clonal lineages among the isolates of the O153:H45 cluster. Some of the genetic variants were isolated from defined geographic areas, while places like São Paulo City in Brazil and the middle-eastern part of Argentina were populated by several genetic variants of related, but not identical, ETEC strains. These results show that molecular biology-based typing methods can disclose strain diversity, which is usually missed in studies restricted to phenotypic typing of ETEC. PMID:11724869

  15. Serotypes, virulence genes and intimin types of Shiga toxin (verocytotoxin)-producing Escherichia coli isolates from minced beef in Lugo (Spain) from 1995 through 2003

    PubMed Central

    Mora, Azucena; Blanco, Miguel; Blanco, Jesús E; Dahbi, Ghizlane; López, Cecilia; Justel, Paula; Alonso, María Pilar; Echeita, Aurora; Bernárdez, María Isabel; González, Enrique A; Blanco, Jorge

    2007-01-01

    Background Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) have emerged as pathogens that can cause food-borne infections and severe and potentially fatal illnesses in humans, such as haemorrhagic colitis (HC) and haemolytic uraemic syndrome (HUS). In Spain, like in many other countries, STEC strains have been frequently isolated from ruminants, and represent a significant cause of sporadic cases of human infection. In view of the lack of data on STEC isolated from food in Spain, the objectives of this study were to determine the level of microbiological contamination and the prevalence of STEC O157:H7 and non-O157 in a large sampling of minced beef collected from 30 local stores in Lugo city between 1995 and 2003. Also to establish if those STEC isolated from food possessed the same virulence profiles as STEC strains causing human infections. Results STEC were detected in 95 (12%) of the 785 minced beef samples tested. STEC O157:H7 was isolated from eight (1.0%) samples and non-O157 STEC from 90 (11%) samples. Ninety-six STEC isolates were further characterized by PCR and serotyping. PCR showed that 28 (29%) isolates carried stx1 genes, 49 (51%) possessed stx2 genes, and 19 (20%) both stx1 and stx2. Enterohemolysin (ehxA) and intimin (eae) virulence genes were detected in 43 (45%) and in 25 (26%) of the isolates, respectively. Typing of the eae variants detected four types: γ1 (nine isolates), β1 (eight isolates), ε1 (three isolates), and θ (two isolates). The majority (68%) of STEC isolates belonged to serotypes previously detected in human STEC and 38% to serotypes associated with STEC isolated from patients with HUS. Ten new serotypes not previously described in raw beef products were also detected. The highly virulent seropathotypes O26:H11 stx1 eae-β1, O157:H7 stx1stx2 eae-γ1 and O157:H7 stx2eae-γ1, which are the most frequently observed among STEC causing human infections in Spain, were detected in 10 of the 96 STEC isolates. Furthermore, phage typing

  16. [Distribution of phylogenetic groups and virulence factors in CTX-M-15 β-lactamase-producing uropathogenic Escherichia coli strains isolated from patients in the community of Mérida, Venezuela].

    PubMed

    Millán, Ysheth; Hernández, Erick; Millán, Beatriz; Araque, María

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the distribution of phylogenetic groups and the genetic detection of virulence factors in CTX-M-15 β-lactamase-producing uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) strains were analyzed. Twenty eight strains were isolated between January 2009 and July 2011 from patients with urinary tract infection (UTI) who attended the Public Health Laboratory at Mérida, Venezuela. Determination of phylogenetic groups and detection of six virulence genes, fimH, fyuA, kpsMTII, usp, PAI and papAH, were performed by PCR amplification. Fifteen of the 28 isolates were mainly located in the phylogenetic group A, followed by B2 (12/28) and D (1/28). No direct relationship between the severity or recurrence of UTI and the distribution of phylogroups was observed. All studied virulence factors were found in group B2 strains with the highest frequency. The prevalent virulence profile included the combination of three main genes: fimH, kpsMTII and fyuA and, to a lesser extent, the presence of other determinants such as usp, PAI and/or papAH. These results indicate that virulent UPEC incorporated three important properties: adhesion, iron uptake and evasion of phagocytosis, which favored the production of recurrent UTI. This is the first report describing the association of phylogenetic groups with the potential virulence of CTX-M-15 β-lactamase producing UPEC strains in Venezuela.

  17. Serotypes, virulence genes, and PFGE profiles of Escherichia coli isolated from pigs with postweaning diarrhoea in Slovakia

    PubMed Central

    Vu Khac, Hung; Holoda, Emil; Pilipcinec, Emil; Blanco, Miguel; Blanco, Jesús E; Mora, Azucena; Dahbi, Ghizlane; López, Cecilia; González, Enrique A; Blanco, Jorge

    2006-01-01

    Background Postweaning diarrhoea (PWD) in pigs is usually the main infectious problem of large-scale farms and is responsible for significant losses worldwide. The disease is caused mainly by enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) and Shiga-toxin producing E. coli (STEC). In this study a total of 101 E. coli isolated from pigs with PWD in Slovakia were characterized using phenotypic and genotypic methods. Results These 101 isolates belonged to 40 O:H serotypes. However, 57% of the isolates belonged to only six serotypes (O9:H51, O147:H-, O149:H10, O163:H-, ONT:H-, and ONT:H4), including two new serotypes (O163:H- and ONT:H4) not previously found among porcine ETEC and STEC isolated in other countries. Genes for EAST1, STb, STa, LT and Stx2e toxins were identified in 64%, 46%, 26%, 20%, and 5% of isolates, respectively. PCR showed that 35% of isolates carried genes for F18 colonization factor, and further analyzed by restriction endonuclease revealed that all of them were F18ac. Genes for F4 (K88), F6 (P987), F17, F5 (K99), F41, and intimin (eae gene) adhesins were detected in 19 %, 5%, 3%, 0.9%, 0.9%, and 0.9% of the isolates, respectively. The study of genetic diversity, carried out by PFGE of 46 representative ETEC and STEC isolates, revealed 36 distinct restriction profiles clustered in eight groups. Isolates of the same serotype were placed together in the dendrogram, but high degree of polymorphism among certain serotypes was detected. Conclusion Seropathotype O149:H10 LT/STb/EAST1/F4 (14 isolates) was the most commonly detected followed by O163:H- EAST1/F18 (six isolates), and ONT:H4 STa/STb/Stx2e/F18 (five isolates). Interestingly, this study shows that two new serotypes (O163:H- and ONT:H4) have emerged as pig pathogens in Slovakia. Furthermore, our results show that there is a high genetic variation mainly among ETEC of O149:H10 serotype. PMID:16549022

  18. Virulence characterization of non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli isolates from food, humans and animals.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jinling; Rump, Lydia; Ju, Wenting; Shao, Jingdong; Zhao, Shaohua; Brown, Eric; Meng, Jianghong

    2015-09-01

    A total of 359 non-O157 STEC isolates from food, humans and animals were examined for serotypes, Shiga toxin subtypes and intimin subtypes. Isolates solely harboring stx2 from the three sources were selected for Vero cell cytotoxicity test. stx subtypes in eae negative isolates were more diverse than in eae positive isolates primarily carrying stx2a. Four eae subtypes (eaeβ,eaeε1,eaeγ1 and eaeγ2/θ) were observed and correlated with serotypes and flagella. Food isolates showed more diverse serotypes, virulence factors and cell cytotoxicities than human isolates. Some isolates from produce belonged to serotypes that have been implicated in human diseases, carried stx2a or/and stx2dact and exhibited high cell cytotoxicity similar to human isolates. This indicates that foods can be contaminated with potentially pathogenic STEC isolates that may cause human diseases. Given the increased produce consumption and growing burden of foodborne outbreaks due to produce, produce safety should be given great importance.

  19. Simultaneous detection of virulence factors from a colony in diarrheagenic Escherichia coli by a multiplex PCR assay with Alexa Fluor-labeled primers.

    PubMed

    Kuwayama, Masaru; Shigemoto, Naoki; Oohara, Sachiko; Tanizawa, Yukie; Yamada, Hiroko; Takeda, Yoshihiro; Matsuo, Takeshi; Fukuda, Shinji

    2011-07-01

    We have developed simultaneous detection of eight genes associated with the five categories of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli by the multiplex PCR assay with Alexa Fluor-labeled primers. This assay can easily distinguish eight genes based on the size and color of amplified products without gel staining.

  20. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli: Orchestrated host engagement.

    PubMed

    Fleckenstein, James M; Munson, George M; Rasko, David A

    2013-01-01

    The enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli are a pervasive cause of serious diarrheal illness in developing countries. Presently, there is no vaccine to prevent these infections, and many features of the basic pathogenesis of these organisms remain poorly understood. Until very recently most pathogenesis studies had focused almost exclusively on a small subset of known "classical" virulence genes, namely fimbrial colonization factors and the heat-labile (LT) and heat stable (ST) enterotoxins. However, recent investigations of pathogen-host interactions reveal a surprisingly complex and intricately orchestrated engagement involving the interplay of classical and "novel" virulence genes, as well as participation of genes highly conserved in the E. coli species. These studies may inform further rational approaches to vaccine development for these important pathogens. PMID:23892244

  1. Comparison of the microbiological characteristics and virulence factors of ST131 and non-ST131 clones among extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli causing bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Cha, Min Kyeong; Kang, Cheol-In; Kim, So Hyun; Cho, Sun Young; Ha, Young Eun; Wi, Yu Mi; Chung, Doo Ryeon; Peck, Kyong Ran; Song, Jae-Hoon

    2016-02-01

    We evaluated the molecular epidemiology and microbiological characteristics of extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli (ESBL-EC) isolates that cause bacteremia in Korean hospitals, focusing especially on ST131. Our data suggest that ST131 isolates possessed more virulence traits and showed more multidrug resistance patterns than non-ST131 isolates. Among CTX-M-15 producers, the frequency of serum resistance was significantly higher in ST131 than in non-ST131. As in other parts of the world, the ESBL-EC ST131 clone has emerged and disseminated in both community and hospital settings in Korea, including in blood isolates in patients with bacteremia.

  2. Diarrhea, Urosepsis and Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome Caused by the Same Heteropathogenic Escherichia coli Strain.

    PubMed

    Ang, C Wim; Bouts, Antonia H M; Rossen, John W A; Van der Kuip, Martijn; Van Heerde, Marc; Bökenkamp, Arend

    2016-09-01

    We describe an 8-month-old girl with diarrhea, urosepsis and hemolytic uremic syndrome caused by Escherichia coli. Typing of cultured E. coli strains from urine and blood revealed the presence of virulence factors from multiple pathotypes of E. coli. This case exemplifies the genome plasticity of E. coli and the resulting heteropathogenic strains.

  3. Molecular characterization of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli from Libya.

    PubMed

    Ali, Mostafa Mohamed M; Mohamed, Zienat Kamel; Klena, John D; Ahmed, Salwa Fouad; Moussa, Tarek A A; Ghenghesh, Khalifa Sifaw

    2012-05-01

    Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli (DEC) are important enteric pathogens that cause a wide variety of gastrointestinal diseases, particularly in children. Escherichia coli isolates cultured from 243 diarrheal stool samples obtained from Libyan children and 50 water samples were screened by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for genes characteristic of enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC), enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC), enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC), and enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC). The DEC were detected in 21 (8.6%) children with diarrhea; 10 (4.1%) cases were identified as EAEC, 3 (1.2%) as EPEC, and 8 (3.3%) were ETEC; EHEC, and EIEC were not detected. All DEC were grouped phylogenetically by PCR with the majority (> 70%) identified as phylogenetic groups A and B1. The EAEC isolates were also tested for eight genes associated with virulence using PCR. Multi-virulence (≥ 3 virulence factors) was found in 50% of EAEC isolates. Isolated EAEC possessed different virulence traits and belonged to different phylogenetic groups indicating their heterogeneity.

  4. Incidence and Virulence Determinants of Verocytotoxin-Producing Escherichia coli Infections in the Brussels-Capital Region, Belgium, in 2008–2010

    PubMed Central

    De Gheldre, Yves; Dediste, Anne; de Moreau, Anne-Isabelle; Mascart, Georges; Simon, Anne; Allemeersch, Daniël; Scheutz, Flemming; Lauwers, Sabine; Piérard, Denis

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of verocytotoxin-producing Escherichia coli (VTEC) was investigated by PCR in all human stools from Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel (UZB) and in selected stools from six other hospital laboratories in the Brussels-Capital Region, Belgium, collected between April 2008 and October 2010. The stools selected to be included in this study were those from patients with hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS), patients with a history of bloody diarrhea, patients linked to clusters of diarrhea, children up to the age of 6 years, and stools containing macroscopic blood. Verocytotoxin genes (vtx) were detected significantly more frequently in stools from patients with the selected conditions (2.04%) than in unselected stools from UZB (1.20%) (P = 0.001). VTEC was detected most frequently in patients with HUS (35.3%), a history of bloody diarrhea (5.15%), or stools containing macroscopic blood (1.85%). Stools from patients up to the age of 17 years were significantly more frequently vtx positive than those from adult patients between the ages of 18 and 65 years (P = 0.022). Although stools from patients older than 65 years were also more frequently positive for vtx than those from patients between 18 and 65 years, this trend was not significant. VTEC was isolated from 140 (67.9%) vtx-positive stools. One sample yielded two different serotypes; thus, 141 isolates could be characterized. Sixty different O:H serotypes harboring 85 different virulence profiles were identified. Serotypes O157:H7/H− (n = 34), O26:H11/H− (n = 21), O63:H6 (n = 8), O111:H8/H− (n = 7), and O146:H21/H− (n = 6) accounted for 53.9% of isolates. All O157 isolates carried vtx2, eae, and a complete O island 122 (COI-122); 15 also carried vtx1. Non-O157 isolates (n = 107), however, accounted for the bulk (75.9%) of isolates. Fifty-nine (55.1%) isolates were positive for vtx1, 36 (33.6%) were positive for vtx2, and 12 (11.2%) carried both vtx1 and vtx2. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis revealed

  5. Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Etcheverría, Analía Inés; Padola, Nora Lía

    2013-01-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) cause hemorrhagic colitis (HC) and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) in humans. Outbreaks are linked to bovine food sources. STEC O157:H7 has been responsible for the most severe outbreaks worldwide. However, non-O157 serotypes have emerged as important enteric pathogens in several countries. The main virulence factor of STEC is the production of Shiga toxins 1 and 2. Additional virulence markers are a plasmid-encoded enterohemolysin (ehxA), an autoagglutinating adhesin (Saa), a catalase-peroxidase (katP), an extracellular serine protease (espP), a zinc metalloprotease (stcE), a subtilase cytotoxin (subAB), among others. Other virulence factors are intimin and adhesins that had a roll in the adherence of STEC to bovine colon. This review focuses on the virulence traits of STEC and especially on those related to the adhesion to bovine colon. The known of the interaction between STEC and the bovine host is crucial to develop strategies to control cattle colonization. PMID:23624795

  6. Verotoxin-producing Escherichia coli in Spain: prevalence, serotypes, and virulence genes of O157:H7 and non-O157 VTEC in ruminants, raw beef products, and humans.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Jorge; Blanco, Miguel; Blanco, Jesus E; Mora, Azucena; González, Enrique A; Bernárdez, Maria I; Alonso, Maria P; Coira, Amparo; Rodriguez, Asuncion; Rey, Joaquin; Alonso, Juan M; Usera, Miguel A

    2003-04-01

    In Spain, as in many other countries, verotoxin-producing Escherichia coli (VTEC) strains have been frequently isolated from cattle, sheep, and foods. VTEC strains have caused seven outbreaks in Spain (six caused by E. coli O157:H7 and one by E. coli O111:H- [nonmotile]) in recent years. An analysis of the serotypes indicated serological diversity. Among the strains isolated from humans, serotypes O26:H11, O111:H-, and O157:H7 were found to be more prevalent. The most frequently detected serotypes in cattle were O20:H19, O22:H8, O26:H11, O77:H41, O105:H18, O113:H21, O157:H7, O171:H2, and OUT (O untypeable):H19. Different VTEC serotypes (e.g., O5:H-, O6:H10, O91:H-, O117:H-, O128:H-, O128:H2, O146:H8, O146:H21, O156:H-, and OUT:H21) were found more frequently in sheep. These observations suggest a host serotype specificity for some VTEC. Numerous bovine and ovine VTEC serotypes detected in Spain were associated with human illnesses, confirming that ruminants are important reservoirs of pathogenic VTEC. VTEC can produce one or two toxins (VT1 and VT2) that cause human illnesses. These toxins are different proteins encoded by different genes. Another virulence factor expressed by VTEC is the protein intimin that is responsible for intimate attachment of VTEC and effacing lesions in the intestinal mucosa. This virulence factor is encoded by the chromosomal gene eae. The eae gene was found at a much less frequency in bovine (17%) and ovine (5%) than in human (45%) non-O157 VTEC strains. This may support the evidence that the eae gene contributes significantly to the virulence of human VTEC strains and that many animal non-O157 VTEC strains are less pathogenic to humans.

  7. Verotoxin-producing Escherichia coli in Spain: prevalence, serotypes, and virulence genes of O157:H7 and non-O157 VTEC in ruminants, raw beef products, and humans.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Jorge; Blanco, Miguel; Blanco, Jesus E; Mora, Azucena; González, Enrique A; Bernárdez, Maria I; Alonso, Maria P; Coira, Amparo; Rodriguez, Asuncion; Rey, Joaquin; Alonso, Juan M; Usera, Miguel A

    2003-04-01

    In Spain, as in many other countries, verotoxin-producing Escherichia coli (VTEC) strains have been frequently isolated from cattle, sheep, and foods. VTEC strains have caused seven outbreaks in Spain (six caused by E. coli O157:H7 and one by E. coli O111:H- [nonmotile]) in recent years. An analysis of the serotypes indicated serological diversity. Among the strains isolated from humans, serotypes O26:H11, O111:H-, and O157:H7 were found to be more prevalent. The most frequently detected serotypes in cattle were O20:H19, O22:H8, O26:H11, O77:H41, O105:H18, O113:H21, O157:H7, O171:H2, and OUT (O untypeable):H19. Different VTEC serotypes (e.g., O5:H-, O6:H10, O91:H-, O117:H-, O128:H-, O128:H2, O146:H8, O146:H21, O156:H-, and OUT:H21) were found more frequently in sheep. These observations suggest a host serotype specificity for some VTEC. Numerous bovine and ovine VTEC serotypes detected in Spain were associated with human illnesses, confirming that ruminants are important reservoirs of pathogenic VTEC. VTEC can produce one or two toxins (VT1 and VT2) that cause human illnesses. These toxins are different proteins encoded by different genes. Another virulence factor expressed by VTEC is the protein intimin that is responsible for intimate attachment of VTEC and effacing lesions in the intestinal mucosa. This virulence factor is encoded by the chromosomal gene eae. The eae gene was found at a much less frequency in bovine (17%) and ovine (5%) than in human (45%) non-O157 VTEC strains. This may support the evidence that the eae gene contributes significantly to the virulence of human VTEC strains and that many animal non-O157 VTEC strains are less pathogenic to humans. PMID:12671177

  8. Occurrence, virulence genes and antibiotic resistance of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) from twelve bovine farms in the north-east of Ireland.

    PubMed

    Bolton, D J; Ennis, C; McDowell, D

    2014-03-01

    Cattle faecal samples (n = 480) were collected from a cluster of 12 farms, and PCR screened for the presence of the intimin gene (eae). Positive samples were cultured, and colonies were examined for the presence of eae and verocytotoxin (vtx) genes. Colonies which were positive for the intimin gene and negative for the verocytotoxin genes were further screened using PCR for a range of virulence factors including bfpA, espA, espB, tir ehxA, toxB, etpD, katP, saa, iha, lpfAO157/OI-141 and lpfAO157/OI-154. Of the 480 faecal samples, 5.8% (28/480) were PCR positive, and one isolate was obtained from each. All 28 isolates obtained were bfpA negative and therefore atypical EPEC (aEPEC). The serotypes detected included O2:H27, O8:H36, O15:H2, O49:H+, O84:H28, O105:H7 and O132:H34 but half of the isolates could not be serogrouped using currently available antisera. Twenty-two (79%) of the isolates carried the tir gene but only 25% were espB positive, and all other virulence genes tested for were scarce or absent. Several isolates showed intermediate resistance to ciprofloxacin, kanamycin, nalidixic acid, minocycline and tetracycline; full resistance to nalidixic acid or tetracycline with one isolate (O-:H8) displaying resistance to aminoglycosides (kanamycin and streptomycin), quinolones (nalidixic acid) and sulphonamides. This study provides further evidence that cattle are a potential source of aEPEC and add to the very limited data currently available on virulence genes and antibiotic resistance in this pathogenic E. coli group in animals.

  9. Shiga Toxigenic Escherichia coli in Iranian Pediatric Patients With and Without Diarrhea: O-Serogroups, Virulence Factors and Antimicrobial Resistance Properties

    PubMed Central

    Dormanesh, Banafshe; Siroosbakhat, Soheila; Karimi Goudarzi, Peyman; Afsharkhas, Ladan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Shiga-toxigenic Escherichia coli is an important human pathogen cause of diarrhea, hemorrhagic colitis, hemolytic uremic syndrome and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura in humans is a significant public health. Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the molecular characteristics and antimicrobial resistance properties of Shiga toxigenic Escherichia coli (STEC) strains with respect to their seasonal, age and geographical distributions in Iranian pediatric patients with and without diarrhea. Patients and Methods: Four hundred and eighty swab samples were taken from pediatric patients with and without diarrhea of four major provinces of Iran. Swab samples were immediately cultured and the positive culture samples were analyzed by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. Finally, antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed using the disk diffusion method in Mueller-Hinton agar. Results: In total, 118 out of 200 diarrheic stool samples (59%) and 77 out of 280 non-diarrheic stool samples (27.5%) were positive for E. coli. Samples taken from one to ten months old cases (73.33%) and those from Shiraz province (81.13%) were the most commonly infected. Samples taken in the summer season (91.66%) were the most commonly infected. A significant difference was shown between AEEC and EHEC strains of E. coli. The genes encoding Shiga toxins and intimin protein were the most commonly detected in all strains. O26 (33.33%), O111 (18.18%) and O91 (12.12%) serogroups had the highest incidence in patients with and without diarrhea. Prevalence of the genes that encode resistance against ampicillin (CITM), gentamicin (aac(3)-IV) and tetracycline (tetA) were 80.30%, 75.75% and 65.15%, respectively. The STEC strains harbored the highest levels of resistance against ampicillin (84.84%), gentamycin (78.78%), tetracycline (50%) and sulfamethoxazole (40.90%) antibiotics. We found that 55.08% of diarrheic and 1.29% of non-diarrheic E. coli isolates were

  10. Multidrug resistance and high virulence genotype in uropathogenic Escherichia coli due to diffusion of ST131 clonal group producing CTX-M-15: an emerging problem in a Tunisian hospital.

    PubMed

    Ferjani, Sana; Saidani, Mabrouka; Ennigrou, Samir; Hsairi, Mohamed; Slim, Amine Faouzi; Ben Boubaker, Ilhem Boutiba

    2014-05-01

    A collection of 201 Escherichia coli strains isolated from urine of patients in a Tunisian hospital between January 2006 and July 2008 was studied. Microbial identification was done by conventional methods, and antibiotic susceptibility with disk diffusion method was performed according to the Clinical Laboratory and Standards Institute guidelines. Detection of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) was performed by double-disk synergy test (DDST) and identification was done by PCR and sequencing. ESBL-producing isolates were subjected to molecular typing by random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and ST131 detection by PCR. Four phylogenetic groups (A, B1, B2 and D), 18 virulence genes and CTX-M group were individualized using PCR. Statistical analysis was done by Pearson χ2 test and Mann-Whitney U test. The strains were recovered primarily from urology (28%), maternity (19%) and medicine (16%) wards. Antibiotic resistance rates were ampicilin (72.1%), nalidixic acid (41.8%), ciprofloxacin (38.8%), gentamicin (23.9%) and cefotaxime (17.4%). Thirty-one of cefotaxime-resistant isolates (n = 35) had a positive DDST and harboured bla CTX-M-15 gene. Twenty of them (64.5%) belonged to the ST131 clone and showed the same RAPD DNA profile. Ciprofloxacin- and cotrimoxazole-susceptible isolates were significantly associated with phylogenetic group B2, whereas isolates that were resistant to these molecules were associated with B1 and D phylogenetic groups, respectively. Virulence genes were significantly more frequent among ciprofloxacin- and cotrimoxazole-susceptible strains than those resistant to these antibiotics. However, CXT-M-15-producing isolates were associated with many virulence genes. Isolates concomitantly susceptible to the three antimicrobials agents (ciprofloxacin, cefotaxime and cotrimoxazole) were significantly associated with group B2 and high virulence score, whereas isolates with resistance patterns especially those including resistance to

  11. Shiga Toxin Producing Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Bryan, Allen; Youngster, Ilan; McAdam, Alexander J

    2015-06-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) is among the common causes of foodborne gastroenteritis. STEC is defined by the production of specific toxins, but within this pathotype there is a diverse group of organisms. This diversity has important consequences for understanding the pathogenesis of the organism, as well as for selecting the optimum strategy for diagnostic testing in the clinical laboratory. This review includes discussions of the mechanisms of pathogenesis, the range of manifestations of infection, and the several different methods of laboratory detection of Shiga toxin-producing E coli.

  12. Highly Virulent Non-O157 Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) Serotypes Reflect Similar Phylogenetic Lineages, Providing New Insights into the Evolution of EHEC

    PubMed Central

    Eichhorn, Inga; Heidemanns, Katrin; Semmler, Torsten; Kinnemann, Bianca; Mellmann, Alexander; Harmsen, Dag; Anjum, Muna F.; Schmidt, Herbert; Fruth, Angelika; Valentin-Weigand, Peter; Heesemann, Jürgen; Suerbaum, Sebastian; Karch, Helge

    2015-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) is the causative agent of bloody diarrhea and extraintestinal sequelae in humans, most importantly hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). Besides the bacteriophage-encoded Shiga toxin gene (stx), EHEC harbors the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE), which confers the ability to cause attaching and effacing lesions. Currently, the vast majority of EHEC infections are caused by strains belonging to five O serogroups (the “big five”), which, in addition to O157, the most important, comprise O26, O103, O111, and O145. We hypothesize that these four non-O157 EHEC serotypes differ in their phylogenies. To test this hypothesis, we used multilocus sequence typing (MLST) to analyze a large collection of 250 isolates of these four O serogroups, which were isolated from diseased as well as healthy humans and cattle between 1952 and 2009. The majority of the EHEC isolates of O serogroups O26 and O111 clustered into one sequence type complex, STC29. Isolates of O103 clustered mainly in STC20, and most isolates of O145 were found within STC32. In addition to these EHEC strains, STC29 also included stx-negative E. coli strains, termed atypical enteropathogenic E. coli (aEPEC), yet another intestinal pathogenic E. coli group. The finding that aEPEC and EHEC isolates of non-O157 O serogroups share the same phylogeny suggests an ongoing microevolutionary scenario in which the phage-encoded Shiga toxin gene stx is transferred between aEPEC and EHEC. As a consequence, aEPEC strains of STC29 can be regarded as post- or pre-EHEC isolates. Therefore, STC29 incorporates phylogenetic information useful for unraveling the evolution of EHEC. PMID:26231647

  13. Highly Virulent Non-O157 Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) Serotypes Reflect Similar Phylogenetic Lineages, Providing New Insights into the Evolution of EHEC.

    PubMed

    Eichhorn, Inga; Heidemanns, Katrin; Semmler, Torsten; Kinnemann, Bianca; Mellmann, Alexander; Harmsen, Dag; Anjum, Muna F; Schmidt, Herbert; Fruth, Angelika; Valentin-Weigand, Peter; Heesemann, Jürgen; Suerbaum, Sebastian; Karch, Helge; Wieler, Lothar H

    2015-10-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) is the causative agent of bloody diarrhea and extraintestinal sequelae in humans, most importantly hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). Besides the bacteriophage-encoded Shiga toxin gene (stx), EHEC harbors the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE), which confers the ability to cause attaching and effacing lesions. Currently, the vast majority of EHEC infections are caused by strains belonging to five O serogroups (the "big five"), which, in addition to O157, the most important, comprise O26, O103, O111, and O145. We hypothesize that these four non-O157 EHEC serotypes differ in their phylogenies. To test this hypothesis, we used multilocus sequence typing (MLST) to analyze a large collection of 250 isolates of these four O serogroups, which were isolated from diseased as well as healthy humans and cattle between 1952 and 2009. The majority of the EHEC isolates of O serogroups O26 and O111 clustered into one sequence type complex, STC29. Isolates of O103 clustered mainly in STC20, and most isolates of O145 were found within STC32. In addition to these EHEC strains, STC29 also included stx-negative E. coli strains, termed atypical enteropathogenic E. coli (aEPEC), yet another intestinal pathogenic E. coli group. The finding that aEPEC and EHEC isolates of non-O157 O serogroups share the same phylogeny suggests an ongoing microevolutionary scenario in which the phage-encoded Shiga toxin gene stx is transferred between aEPEC and EHEC. As a consequence, aEPEC strains of STC29 can be regarded as post- or pre-EHEC isolates. Therefore, STC29 incorporates phylogenetic information useful for unraveling the evolution of EHEC.

  14. Inhibitor-Resistant TEM- and OXA-1-Producing Escherichia coli Isolates Resistant to Amoxicillin-Clavulanate Are More Clonal and Possess Lower Virulence Gene Content than Susceptible Clinical Isolates

    PubMed Central

    González-López, Juan José; Ortega, Adriana; Quintero-Zárate, J. Natalia; Bou, Germán; Cercenado, Emilia; Conejo, María Carmen; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Navarro, Ferran; Oliver, Antonio; Bartolomé, Rosa M.; Campos, José

    2014-01-01

    In a previous prospective multicenter study in Spain, we found that OXA-1 and inhibitor-resistant TEM (IRT) β-lactamases constitute the most common plasmid-borne mechanisms of genuine amoxicillin-clavulanate (AMC) resistance in Escherichia coli. In the present study, we investigated the population structure and virulence traits of clinical AMC-resistant E. coli strains expressing OXA-1 or IRT and compared these traits to those in a control group of clinical AMC-susceptible E. coli isolates. All OXA-1-producing (n = 67) and IRT-producing (n = 45) isolates were matched by geographical and temporal origin to the AMC-susceptible control set (n = 56). We performed multilocus sequence typing and phylogenetic group characterization for each isolate and then studied the isolates for the presence of 49 virulence factors (VFs) by PCR and sequencing. The most prevalent clone detected was distinct for each group: group C isolates of sequence type (ST) 88 (C/ST88) were the most common in OXA-1 producers, B2/ST131 isolates were the most common in IRT producers, and B2/ST73 isolates were the most common in AMC-susceptible isolates. The median numbers of isolates per ST were 3.72 in OXA-1 producers, 2.04 in IRT producers, and 1.69 in AMC-susceptible isolates; the proportions of STs represented by one unique isolate in each group were 19.4%, 31.1%, and 48.2%, respectively. The sum of all VFs detected, calculated as a virulence score, was significantly higher in AMC-susceptible isolates than OXA-1 and IRT producers (means, 12.5 versus 8.3 and 8.2, respectively). Our findings suggest that IRT- and OXA-1-producing E. coli isolates resistant to AMC have a different and less diverse population structure than AMC-susceptible clinical E. coli isolates. The AMC-susceptible population also contains more VFs than AMC-resistant isolates. PMID:24777096

  15. Inhibitor-resistant TEM- and OXA-1-producing Escherichia coli isolates resistant to amoxicillin-clavulanate are more clonal and possess lower virulence gene content than susceptible clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Oteo, Jesús; González-López, Juan José; Ortega, Adriana; Quintero-Zárate, J Natalia; Bou, Germán; Cercenado, Emilia; Conejo, María Carmen; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Navarro, Ferran; Oliver, Antonio; Bartolomé, Rosa M; Campos, José

    2014-07-01

    In a previous prospective multicenter study in Spain, we found that OXA-1 and inhibitor-resistant TEM (IRT) β-lactamases constitute the most common plasmid-borne mechanisms of genuine amoxicillin-clavulanate (AMC) resistance in Escherichia coli. In the present study, we investigated the population structure and virulence traits of clinical AMC-resistant E. coli strains expressing OXA-1 or IRT and compared these traits to those in a control group of clinical AMC-susceptible E. coli isolates. All OXA-1-producing (n = 67) and IRT-producing (n = 45) isolates were matched by geographical and temporal origin to the AMC-susceptible control set (n = 56). We performed multilocus sequence typing and phylogenetic group characterization for each isolate and then studied the isolates for the presence of 49 virulence factors (VFs) by PCR and sequencing. The most prevalent clone detected was distinct for each group: group C isolates of sequence type (ST) 88 (C/ST88) were the most common in OXA-1 producers, B2/ST131 isolates were the most common in IRT producers, and B2/ST73 isolates were the most common in AMC-susceptible isolates. The median numbers of isolates per ST were 3.72 in OXA-1 producers, 2.04 in IRT producers, and 1.69 in AMC-susceptible isolates; the proportions of STs represented by one unique isolate in each group were 19.4%, 31.1%, and 48.2%, respectively. The sum of all VFs detected, calculated as a virulence score, was significantly higher in AMC-susceptible isolates than OXA-1 and IRT producers (means, 12.5 versus 8.3 and 8.2, respectively). Our findings suggest that IRT- and OXA-1-producing E. coli isolates resistant to AMC have a different and less diverse population structure than AMC-susceptible clinical E. coli isolates. The AMC-susceptible population also contains more VFs than AMC-resistant isolates.

  16. Inhibitor-resistant TEM- and OXA-1-producing Escherichia coli isolates resistant to amoxicillin-clavulanate are more clonal and possess lower virulence gene content than susceptible clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Oteo, Jesús; González-López, Juan José; Ortega, Adriana; Quintero-Zárate, J Natalia; Bou, Germán; Cercenado, Emilia; Conejo, María Carmen; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Navarro, Ferran; Oliver, Antonio; Bartolomé, Rosa M; Campos, José

    2014-07-01

    In a previous prospective multicenter study in Spain, we found that OXA-1 and inhibitor-resistant TEM (IRT) β-lactamases constitute the most common plasmid-borne mechanisms of genuine amoxicillin-clavulanate (AMC) resistance in Escherichia coli. In the present study, we investigated the population structure and virulence traits of clinical AMC-resistant E. coli strains expressing OXA-1 or IRT and compared these traits to those in a control group of clinical AMC-susceptible E. coli isolates. All OXA-1-producing (n = 67) and IRT-producing (n = 45) isolates were matched by geographical and temporal origin to the AMC-susceptible control set (n = 56). We performed multilocus sequence typing and phylogenetic group characterization for each isolate and then studied the isolates for the presence of 49 virulence factors (VFs) by PCR and sequencing. The most prevalent clone detected was distinct for each group: group C isolates of sequence type (ST) 88 (C/ST88) were the most common in OXA-1 producers, B2/ST131 isolates were the most common in IRT producers, and B2/ST73 isolates were the most common in AMC-susceptible isolates. The median numbers of isolates per ST were 3.72 in OXA-1 producers, 2.04 in IRT producers, and 1.69 in AMC-susceptible isolates; the proportions of STs represented by one unique isolate in each group were 19.4%, 31.1%, and 48.2%, respectively. The sum of all VFs detected, calculated as a virulence score, was significantly higher in AMC-susceptible isolates than OXA-1 and IRT producers (means, 12.5 versus 8.3 and 8.2, respectively). Our findings suggest that IRT- and OXA-1-producing E. coli isolates resistant to AMC have a different and less diverse population structure than AMC-susceptible clinical E. coli isolates. The AMC-susceptible population also contains more VFs than AMC-resistant isolates. PMID:24777096

  17. Escherichia coli O157:H7.

    PubMed

    Mead, P S; Griffin, P M

    1998-10-10

    Escherichia coli O157 was first identified as a human pathogen in 1982. One of several Shiga toxin-producing serotypes known to cause human illness, the organism probably evolved through horizontal acquisition of genes for Shiga toxins and other virulence factors. E. coli O157 is found regularly in the faeces of healthy cattle, and is transmitted to humans through contaminated food, water, and direct contact with infected people or animals. Human infection is associated with a wide range of clinical illness, including asymptomatic shedding, non-bloody diarrhoea, haemorrhagic colitis, haemolytic uraemic syndrome, and death. Since laboratory practices vary, physicians need to know whether laboratories in their area routinely test for E. coli O157 in stool specimens. Treatment with antimicrobial agents remains controversial: some studies suggest that treatment may precipitate haemolytic uraemic syndrome, and other studies suggest no effect or even a protective effect. Physicians can help to prevent E. coli O157 infections by counselling patients about the hazards of consuming undercooked ground meat or unpasteurised milk products and juices, and about the importance of handwashing to prevent the spread of diarrhoeal illness, and by informing public-health authorities when they see unusual numbers of cases of bloody diarrhoea or haemolytic uraemic syndrome.

  18. Transport proteins promoting Escherichia coli pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Fengyi; Saier, Milton H.

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli is a genetically diverse species infecting hundreds of millions of people worldwide annually. We examined seven well-characterized E. coli pathogens causing urinary tract infections, gastroenteritis, pyelonephritis and haemorrhagic colitis. Their transport proteins were identified and compared with each other and a non-pathogenic E. coli K12 strain to identify transport proteins related to pathogenesis. Each pathogen possesses a unique set of protein secretion systems for export to the cell surface or for injecting effector proteins into host cells. Pathogens have increased numbers of iron siderophore receptors and ABC iron uptake transporters, but the numbers and types of low-affinity secondary iron carriers were uniform in all strains. The presence of outer membrane iron complex receptors and high-affinity ABC iron uptake systems correlated, suggesting co-evolution. Each pathovar encodes a different set of pore-forming toxins and virulence-related outer membrane proteins lacking in K12. Intracellular pathogens proved to have a characteristically distinctive set of nutrient uptake porters, different from those of extracellular pathogens. The results presented in this report provide information about transport systems relevant to various types of E. coli pathogenesis that can be exploited in future basic and applied studies. PMID:24747185

  19. Genetic diversity and virulence potential of shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O113:H21 strains isolated from clinical, environmental, and food sources.

    PubMed

    Feng, Peter C H; Delannoy, Sabine; Lacher, David W; Dos Santos, Luis Fernando; Beutin, Lothar; Fach, Patrick; Rivas, Marta; Hartland, Elizabeth L; Paton, Adrienne W; Guth, Beatriz E C

    2014-08-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli strains of serotype O113:H21 have caused severe human diseases, but they are unusual in that they do not produce adherence factors coded by the locus of enterocyte effacement. Here, a PCR microarray was used to characterize 65 O113:H21 strains isolated from the environment, food, and clinical infections from various countries. In comparison to the pathogenic strains that were implicated in hemolytic-uremic syndrome in Australia, there were no clear differences between the pathogens and the environmental strains with respect to the 41 genetic markers tested. Furthermore, all of the strains carried only Shiga toxin subtypes associated with human infections, suggesting that the environmental strains have the potential to cause disease. Most of the O113:H21 strains were closely related and belonged in the same clonal group (ST-223), but CRISPR analysis showed a great degree of genetic diversity among the O113:H21 strains.

  20. Toxins and virulence factors of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli associated with strains isolated from indigenous children and international visitors to a rural community in Guatemala.

    PubMed

    Torres, O R; González, W; Lemus, O; Pratdesaba, R A; Matute, J A; Wiklund, G; Sack, D A; Bourgeois, A L; Svennerholm, A-M

    2015-06-01

    Diarrhoea remains a common cause of illness in Guatemala, with children suffering most frequently from the disease. This study directly compared the frequency, enterotoxin, and colonization factor (CF) profiles of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains isolated from children living in a rural community in Guatemala and from Western visitors to the same location during the same seasons, using similar detection methodologies. We found that ETEC accounted for 26% of severe cases of diarrhoea in children requiring hospitalization, 15% of diarrhoea in the community, and 29% of travellers' diarrhoea in visitors staying ⩾2 weeks. The toxin and CF patterns of the ETEC strains isolated from both groups differed significantly (P < 0·0005) as determined by χ 2 = 60·39 for CFs and χ 2 = 35 for toxins, while ETEC phenotypes found in Guatemalan children were comparable to those found in children from other areas of the world. PMID:25233938

  1. Genetic Diversity and Virulence Potential of Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli O113:H21 Strains Isolated from Clinical, Environmental, and Food Sources

    PubMed Central

    Delannoy, Sabine; Lacher, David W.; dos Santos, Luis Fernando; Beutin, Lothar; Fach, Patrick; Rivas, Marta; Hartland, Elizabeth L.; Paton, Adrienne W.; Guth, Beatriz E. C.

    2014-01-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli strains of serotype O113:H21 have caused severe human diseases, but they are unusual in that they do not produce adherence factors coded by the locus of enterocyte effacement. Here, a PCR microarray was used to characterize 65 O113:H21 strains isolated from the environment, food, and clinical infections from various countries. In comparison to the pathogenic strains that were implicated in hemolytic-uremic syndrome in Australia, there were no clear differences between the pathogens and the environmental strains with respect to the 41 genetic markers tested. Furthermore, all of the strains carried only Shiga toxin subtypes associated with human infections, suggesting that the environmental strains have the potential to cause disease. Most of the O113:H21 strains were closely related and belonged in the same clonal group (ST-223), but CRISPR analysis showed a great degree of genetic diversity among the O113:H21 strains. PMID:24858089

  2. Colonization factors of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Madhavan, T P Vipin; Sakellaris, Harry

    2015-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a major cause of life-threatening diarrheal disease around the world. The major aspects of ETEC virulence are colonization of the small intestine and the secretion of enterotoxins which elicit diarrhea. Intestinal colonization is mediated, in part, by adhesins displayed on the bacterial cell surface. As colonization of the intestine is the critical first step in the establishment of an infection, it represents a potential point of intervention for the prevention of infections. Therefore, colonization factors (CFs) have been important subjects of research in the field of ETEC virulence. Research in this field has revealed that ETEC possesses a large array of serologically distinct CFs that differ in composition, structure, and function. Most ETEC CFs are pili (fimbriae) or related fibrous structures, while other adhesins are simple outer membrane proteins lacking any macromolecular structure. This chapter reviews the genetics, structure, function, and regulation of ETEC CFs and how such studies have contributed to our understanding of ETEC virulence and opened up potential opportunities for the development of preventive and therapeutic interventions. PMID:25596032

  3. Escherichia coli mediated urinary tract infections: are there distinct uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) pathotypes?

    PubMed

    Marrs, Carl F; Zhang, Lixin; Foxman, Betsy

    2005-11-15

    A variety of virulence genes are associated with Escherichia coli mediated urinary tract infections. Particular sets of virulence factors shared by bacterial strains directing them through a particular pathogenesis process are called a "pathotype." Comparison of co-occurrence of potential urinary tract infection (UTI) virulence genes among different E. coli isolates from fecal and UTI collections provides evidence for multiple pathotypes of uropathogenic E. coli, but current understanding of critical genetic differences defining the pathotypes is limited. Discovery of additional E. coli genes involved in uropathogenesis and determination of their distribution and co-occurrences will further define UPEC pathotypes and allow for a more detailed analysis of how these pathotypes might differ in how they cause disease.

  4. In-vitro and in-vivo evidence of dose-dependent decrease of uropathogenic Escherichia coli virulence after consumption of commercial Vaccinium macrocarpon (cranberry) capsules.

    PubMed

    Lavigne, J-P; Bourg, G; Combescure, C; Botto, H; Sotto, A

    2008-04-01

    This study evaluated the antibacterial efficacy of the consumption of cranberry capsules vs. placebo in the urine of healthy volunteers. A first double-blind, randomised, crossover trial involved eight volunteers who had followed three regimens, with or without cranberry, with a wash-out period of at least 6 days between each regimen. Twelve hours after consumption of cranberry or placebo hard capsules, the first urine of the morning was collected. Different Escherichia coli strains were cultured in the urine samples. Urinary antibacterial adhesion activity was measured in vitro using the human T24 epithelial cell-line, and in vivo using the Caenorhabditis elegans killing model. With the in-vitro model, 108 mg of cranberry induced a significant reduction in bacterial adherence to T24 cells as compared with placebo (p <0.001). A significant dose-dependent decrease in bacterial adherence in vitro was noted after the consumption of 108 and 36 mg of cranberry (p <0.001). The in-vivo model confirmed that E. coli strains had a reduced ability to kill C. elegans after growth in the urine of patients who consumed cranberry capsules. Overall, these in-vivo and in-vitro studies suggested that consumption of cranberry juice represents an interesting new strategy to prevent recurrent urinary tract infection.

  5. Novel antigens for enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli vaccines.

    PubMed

    Fleckenstein, James; Sheikh, Alaullah; Qadri, Firdausi

    2014-05-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are the most common bacterial pathogens causing diarrhea in developing countries where they lead to hundreds of thousands of deaths, mostly in children. These organisms are a leading cause of diarrheal illness in travelers to endemic countries. ETEC pathogenesis, and consequently vaccine approaches, have largely focused on plasmid-encoded enterotoxins or fimbrial colonization factors. To date these approaches have not yielded a broadly protective vaccine. However, recent studies suggest that ETEC pathogenesis is more complex than previously appreciated and involves additional plasmid and chromosomally encoded virulence molecules that can be targeted in vaccines. Here, we review recent novel antigen discovery efforts, potential contribution of these proteins to the molecular pathogenesis of ETEC and protective immunity, and the potential implications for development of next generation vaccines for important pathogens. These proteins may help to improve the effectiveness of future vaccines by making them simpler and possibly broadly protective because of their conserved nature. PMID:24702311

  6. The different ecological niches of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Gonzales-Siles, Lucia; Sjöling, Åsa

    2016-03-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a water and food-borne pathogen that infects the small intestine of the human gut and causes diarrhoea. Enterotoxigenic E. coli adheres to the epithelium by means of colonization factors and secretes two enterotoxins, the heat labile toxin and/or the heat stable toxin that both deregulate ion channels and cause secretory diarrhoea. Enterotoxigenic E. coli as all E. coli, is a versatile organism able to survive and grow in different environments. During transmission and infection, ETEC is exposed to various environmental cues that have an impact on survivability and virulence. The ability to cope with exposure to different stressful habitats is probably shaping the pool of virulent ETEC strains that cause both endemic and epidemic infections. This review will focus on the ecology of ETEC in its different habitats and interactions with other organisms as well as abiotic factors. PMID:26522129

  7. The different ecological niches of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Gonzales-Siles, Lucia; Sjöling, Åsa

    2016-03-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a water and food-borne pathogen that infects the small intestine of the human gut and causes diarrhoea. Enterotoxigenic E. coli adheres to the epithelium by means of colonization factors and secretes two enterotoxins, the heat labile toxin and/or the heat stable toxin that both deregulate ion channels and cause secretory diarrhoea. Enterotoxigenic E. coli as all E. coli, is a versatile organism able to survive and grow in different environments. During transmission and infection, ETEC is exposed to various environmental cues that have an impact on survivability and virulence. The ability to cope with exposure to different stressful habitats is probably shaping the pool of virulent ETEC strains that cause both endemic and epidemic infections. This review will focus on the ecology of ETEC in its different habitats and interactions with other organisms as well as abiotic factors.

  8. Distribution of Classical and Nonclassical Virulence Genes in Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Isolates from Chilean Children and tRNA Gene Screening for Putative Insertion Sites for Genomic Islands▿†

    PubMed Central

    Del Canto, Felipe; Valenzuela, Patricio; Cantero, Lidia; Bronstein, Jonathan; Blanco, Jesús E.; Blanco, Jorge; Prado, Valeria; Levine, Myron; Nataro, James; Sommerfelt, Halvor; Vidal, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is an important cause of diarrhea. Three adhesins (Tia, TibA, EtpA), an iron acquisition system (Irp1, Irp2, and FyuA), a GTPase (LeoA), and an autotransporter (EatA) are ETEC virulence-related proteins that, in contrast to the classical virulence factors (enterotoxins and fimbrial colonization factors) have not heretofore been targets in characterizing isolates from epidemiological studies. Here, we determined the occurrence of these nonclassical virulence genes in 103 ETEC isolates from Chilean children with diarrhea and described their association with O serogroups and classical virulence determinants. Because tia, leoA, irp2, and fyuA are harbored by pathogenicity islands inserted into the selC and asnT tRNA genes (tDNAs), we analyzed the regions flanking these loci. Ten additional tDNAs were also screened to identify hot spots for genetic insertions. Associations between the most frequent serogroups and classical colonization factor (CF)-toxin profiles included O6/LT-STh/CS1-CS3-CS21 (i.e., O6 serogroup, heat-labile [LT] and human heat-stable [STh] enterotoxins, and CFs CS1, -3 and -21), O6/LT-STh/CS2-CS3-CS21, and O104-O127/STh/CFAI-CS21. The eatA and etpA genes were detected in more than 70% of the collection, including diverse serogroups and virulence profiles. Sixteen percent of the ETEC strains were negative for classical and nonclassical adhesins, suggesting the presence of unknown determinants of adhesion. The leuX, thrW, and asnT tDNAs were disrupted in more than 65% of strains, suggesting they are hot spots for the insertion of mobile elements. Sequences similar to integrase genes were identified next to the thrW, asnT, pheV, and selC tDNAs. We propose that the eatA and etpA genes should be included in characterizations of ETEC isolates in future epidemiological studies to determine their prevalence in other geographical regions. Sequencing of tDNA-associated genetic insertions might identify new ETEC virulence

  9. Measuring Escherichia coli Gene Expression during Human Urinary Tract Infections

    PubMed Central

    Mobley, Harry L. T.

    2016-01-01

    Extraintestinal Escherichia coli (E. coli) evolved by acquisition of pathogenicity islands, phage, plasmids, and DNA segments by horizontal gene transfer. Strains are heterogeneous but virulent uropathogenic isolates more often have specific fimbriae, toxins, and iron receptors than commensal strains. One may ask whether it is the virulence factors alone that are required to establish infection. While these virulence factors clearly contribute strongly to pathogenesis, bacteria must survive by metabolizing nutrients available to them. By constructing mutants in all major metabolic pathways and co-challenging mice transurethrally with each mutant and the wild type strain, we identified which major metabolic pathways are required to infect the urinary tract. We must also ask what else is E. coli doing in vivo? To answer this question, we examined the transcriptome of E. coli CFT073 in the murine model of urinary tract infection (UTI) as well as for E. coli strains collected and analyzed directly from the urine of patients attending either a urology clinic or a university health clinic for symptoms of UTI. Using microarrays and RNA-seq, we measured in vivo gene expression for these uropathogenic E. coli strains, identifying genes upregulated during murine and human UTI. Our findings allow us to propose a new definition of bacterial virulence. PMID:26784237

  10. Virulence profiling and quantification of verocytotoxin-producing Escherichia coli O145:H28 and O26:H11 isolated during an ice cream-related hemolytic uremic syndrome outbreak.

    PubMed

    Buvens, Glenn; Possé, Björn; De Schrijver, Koen; De Zutter, Lieven; Lauwers, Sabine; Piérard, Denis

    2011-03-01

    In September-October 2007, a mixed-serotype outbreak of verocytotoxin-producing Escherichia coli (VTEC) O145:H28 and O26:H11 occurred in the province of Antwerp, Belgium. Five girls aged between 2 and 11 years developed hemolytic uremic syndrome, and seven other coexposed persons with bloody diarrhea were identified. Laboratory confirmation of O145:H28 infection was obtained for three hemolytic uremic syndrome patients, one of whom was coinfected with O26:H11. The epidemiological and laboratory investigations revealed ice cream as the most likely source of the outbreak. The ice cream was produced at a local dairy farm using pasteurized milk. VTEC of both serotypes with indistinguishable pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns were isolated from patients, ice cream, and environmental samples. Quantitative analysis of the ice cream indicated concentrations of 2.4 and 0.03 CFU/g for VTEC O145 and O26, respectively. Virulence typing revealed that the repertoire of virulence genes carried by the O145:H28 outbreak strain was comparable to that of O157 VTEC and more exhaustive as compared to the O26:H11 outbreak strain and nonrelated clinical strains belonging to these serotypes. Taken together, these data suggest that O145:H28 played the most important role in this outbreak.

  11. Transcriptome analysis of Escherichia coli O157:H7 grown in vitro in the sterile-filtrated cecal content of human gut microbiota associated rats reveals an adaptive expression of metabolic and virulence genes.

    PubMed

    Le Bihan, Guillaume; Jubelin, Grégory; Garneau, Philippe; Bernalier-Donadille, Annick; Martin, Christine; Beaudry, Francis; Harel, Josée

    2015-01-01

    In developed countries, enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 is a leading cause of bloody diarrhea and renal failures in human. Understanding strategies employed by EHEC to colonize the intestine is of major importance since to date no cure exists to eradicate the pathogen. In this study, the adaptive response of EHEC to the intestinal milieu conditioned by a human microbiota was examined. A transcriptomic analysis was performed on the EHEC strain EDL933 incubated in vitro in the sterile-filtrated cecal content of human microbiota-associated rats (HMC) compared with EDL933 incubated in the sterile-filtrated cecal content of germ-free rat (GFC). EDL933 switches from a glycolytic metabolic profile in the GFC to an anaplerotic metabolic profile in HMC. The expression of several catabolism genes was strongly affected such as those involved in the utilization of sugars, glycerol, N-acetylneuraminic acid, amino acids and secondary metabolites. Interestingly, expression level of critical EHEC O157:H7 virulence genes including genes from the locus of enterocyte effacement was reduced in HMC. Altogether, these results contribute to the understanding of EHEC adaptive response to a digestive content and highlight the ability of the microbiota to repress EHEC virulence gene expression. PMID:25290220

  12. Transcriptome analysis of Escherichia coli O157:H7 grown in vitro in the sterile-filtrated cecal content of human gut microbiota associated rats reveals an adaptive expression of metabolic and virulence genes.

    PubMed

    Le Bihan, Guillaume; Jubelin, Grégory; Garneau, Philippe; Bernalier-Donadille, Annick; Martin, Christine; Beaudry, Francis; Harel, Josée

    2015-01-01

    In developed countries, enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 is a leading cause of bloody diarrhea and renal failures in human. Understanding strategies employed by EHEC to colonize the intestine is of major importance since to date no cure exists to eradicate the pathogen. In this study, the adaptive response of EHEC to the intestinal milieu conditioned by a human microbiota was examined. A transcriptomic analysis was performed on the EHEC strain EDL933 incubated in vitro in the sterile-filtrated cecal content of human microbiota-associated rats (HMC) compared with EDL933 incubated in the sterile-filtrated cecal content of germ-free rat (GFC). EDL933 switches from a glycolytic metabolic profile in the GFC to an anaplerotic metabolic profile in HMC. The expression of several catabolism genes was strongly affected such as those involved in the utilization of sugars, glycerol, N-acetylneuraminic acid, amino acids and secondary metabolites. Interestingly, expression level of critical EHEC O157:H7 virulence genes including genes from the locus of enterocyte effacement was reduced in HMC. Altogether, these results contribute to the understanding of EHEC adaptive response to a digestive content and highlight the ability of the microbiota to repress EHEC virulence gene expression.

  13. Characterization of two virulence proteins secreted by rabbit enteropathogenic Escherichia coli, EspA and EspB, whose maximal expression is sensitive to host body temperature.

    PubMed Central

    Abe, A; Kenny, B; Stein, M; Finlay, B B

    1997-01-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) and rabbit EPEC (RDEC-1) cause unique histopathological features on intestinal mucosa, including attaching/effacing (A/E) lesions. Due to the human specificity of EPEC, RDEC-1 has been used as an animal model to study EPEC pathogenesis. At least two of the previously identified EPEC-secreted proteins, EspA and EspB, are required for triggering host epithelial signal transduction pathways, intimate adherence, and A/E lesions. However, the functions of these secreted proteins and their roles in pathogenesis have not been characterized. To investigate the function of EspA and EspB in RDEC-1, the espA and espB genes were cloned and their sequences were compared to that of EPEC O127. The EspA proteins showed high similarity (88.5% identity), while EspB was heterogeneous in internal regions (69.8% identity). However, RDEC-1 EspB was identical to that of enterohemorrhagic E. coli serotype O26. Mutations in RDEC-1 espA and espB revealed that the corresponding RDEC-1 gene products are essential for triggering of host signal transduction pathways and invasion into HeLa cells. Complementation with plasmids containing EPEC espA or/and espB genes into RDEC-1 mutant strains demonstrated that they were functionally interchangeable, although the EPEC proteins mediated higher levels of invasion. Furthermore, maximal expression of RDEC-1 and EPEC-secreted proteins occurred at their respective host body temperatures, which may contribute to the lack of EPEC infectivity in rabbits. PMID:9284118

  14. Prevalence of Salmonella enterica, Listeria monocytogenes, and Escherichia coli virulence factors in bulk tank milk and in-line filters from U.S. dairies.

    PubMed

    Van Kessel, Jo Ann S; Karns, Jeffrey S; Lombard, Jason E; Kopral, Christine A

    2011-05-01

    The zoonotic bacteria Salmonella enterica, Listeria monocytogenes, and Escherichia coli are known to infect dairy cows while not always causing clinical signs of disease. These pathogens are sometimes found in raw milk, and human disease outbreaks due to these organisms have been associated with the consumption of raw milk or raw milk products. Bulk tank milk (BTM) samples (536) and in-line milk filters (519) collected from dairy farms across the United States during the National Animal Health Monitoring System's Dairy 2007 study were analyzed by real-time PCR for the presence of S. enterica and pathogenic forms of E. coli and by culture techniques for the presence of L. monocytogenes. S. enterica was detected in samples from 28.1% of the dairy operations, primarily in milk filters. Salmonella was isolated from 36 of 75 PCR-positive BTM samples and 105 of 174 PCR-positive filter samples, and the isolates were serotyped. Cerro, Kentucky, Muenster, Anatum, and Newport were the most common serotypes. L. monocytogenes was isolated from 7.1% of the dairy operations, and the 1/2a complex was the most common serotype, followed by 1/2b and 4b (lineage 1). Shiga toxin genes were detected in enrichments from 15.2% of the BTM samples and from 51.0% of the filters by real-time PCR. In most cases, the cycle threshold values for the PCR indicated that toxigenic strains were not a major part of the enrichment populations. These data confirm those from earlier studies showing significant contamination of BTM by zoonotic bacterial pathogens and that the consumption of raw milk and raw milk products presents a health risk.

  15. Association of Fluoroquinolone Resistance, Virulence Genes, and IncF Plasmids with Extended-Spectrum-β-Lactamase-Producing Escherichia coli Sequence Type 131 (ST131) and ST405 Clonal Groups

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Masaki; Nagao, Miki; Ito, Yutaka; Takakura, Shunji; Ichiyama, Satoshi

    2013-01-01

    The global increase of extended-spectrum-β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli is associated with the specific clonal group sequence type 131 (ST131). In order to understand the successful spread of ESBL-producing E. coli clonal groups, we characterized fluoroquinolone resistance determinants, virulence genotypes, and plasmid replicons of ST131 and another global clonal group, ST405. We investigated 41 ST131-O25b, 26 ST131-O16, 41 ST405, and 41 other ST (OST) ESBL-producing isolates, which were collected at seven acute care hospitals in Japan. The detection of ESBL types, fluoroquinolone resistance-associated mutations (including quinolone resistance-determining regions [QRDRs]), virulence genotypes, plasmid replicon types, and IncF replicon sequence types was performed using PCR and sequencing. blaCTX-M, specifically blaCTX-M-14, was the most common ESBL gene type among the four groups. Ciprofloxacin resistance was found in 90% of ST131-O25b, 19% of ST131-O16, 100% of ST405, and 54% of OST isolates. Multidrug resistance was more common in the ST405 group than in the ST131-O25 group (56% versus 32%; P = 0.045). All ST131-O25b isolates except one had four characteristic mutations in QRDRs, but most of the isolates from the other three groups had three mutations in common. The ST131-O25b and ST405 groups had larger numbers of virulence genes than the OST group. All of the ST131-O25b and ST405 isolates and most of the ST131-O16 and OST isolates carried IncF replicons. The most prevalent IncF replicon sequence types differed between the four clonal groups. Both the ST131-O25b and ST405 clonal groups had a fluoroquinolone resistance mechanism in QRDRs, multidrug resistance, high virulence, and IncF plasmids, suggesting the potential for further global expansion and a need for measures against these clonal groups. PMID:23856781

  16. Sequences of Two Related Multiple Antibiotic Resistance Virulence Plasmids Sharing a Unique IS26-Related Molecular Signature Isolated from Different Escherichia coli Pathotypes from Different Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Venturini, Carola; Hassan, Karl A.; Roy Chowdhury, Piklu; Paulsen, Ian T.; Walker, Mark J.; Djordjevic, Steven P.

    2013-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) and atypical enteropathogenic E. coli (aEPEC) are important zoonotic pathogens that increasingly are becoming resistant to multiple antibiotics. Here we describe two plasmids, pO26-CRL125 (125 kb) from a human O26:H- EHEC, and pO111-CRL115 (115kb) from a bovine O111 aEPEC, that impart resistance to ampicillin, kanamycin, neomycin, streptomycin, sulfathiazole, trimethoprim and tetracycline and both contain atypical class 1 integrons with an identical IS26-mediated deletion in their 3´-conserved segment. Complete sequence analysis showed that pO26-CRL125 and pO111-CRL115 are essentially identical except for a 9.7 kb fragment, present in the backbone of pO26-CRL125 but absent in pO111-CRL115, and several indels. The 9.7 kb fragment encodes IncI-associated genes involved in plasmid stability during conjugation, a putative transposase gene and three imperfect repeats. Contiguous sequence identical to regions within these pO26-CRL125 imperfect repeats was identified in pO111-CRL115 precisely where the 9.7 kb fragment is missing, suggesting it may be mobile. Sequences shared between the plasmids include a complete IncZ replicon, a unique toxin/antitoxin system, IncI stability and maintenance genes, a novel putative serine protease autotransporter, and an IncI1 transfer system including a unique shufflon. Both plasmids carry a derivate Tn21 transposon with an atypical class 1 integron comprising a dfrA5 gene cassette encoding resistance to trimethoprim, and 24 bp of the 3´-conserved segment followed by Tn6026, which encodes resistance to ampicillin, kanymycin, neomycin, streptomycin and sulfathiazole. The Tn21-derivative transposon is linked to a truncated Tn1721, encoding resistance to tetracycline, via a region containing the IncP-1α oriV. Absence of the 5 bp direct repeats flanking Tn3-family transposons, indicates that homologous recombination events played a key role in the formation of this complex antibiotic resistance

  17. The Tip of the Iceberg: On the Roles of Regulatory Small RNAs in the Virulence of Enterohemorrhagic and Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Bhatt, Shantanu; Egan, Marisa; Jenkins, Valerie; Muche, Sarah; El-Fenej, Jihad

    2016-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic and enteropathogenic Escherichia coli are gastrointestinal pathogens that disrupt the intestinal microvilli to form attaching and effacing (A/E) lesions on infected cells and cause diarrhea. This pathomorphological trait is encoded within the pathogenicity island locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE). The LEE houses a type 3 secretion system (T3SS), which upon assembly bridges the bacterial cytosol to that of the host and enables the bacterium to traffic dozens of effectors into the host where they hijack regulatory and signal transduction pathways and contribute to bacterial colonization and disease. Owing to the importance of the LEE to EHEC and EPEC pathogenesis, much of the research on these pathogens has centered on its regulation. To date, over 40 proteinaceous factors have been identified that control the LEE at various hierarchical levels of gene expression. In contrast, RNA-based regulatory mechanisms that converge on the LEE have only just begun to be unraveled. In this minireview, we highlight major breakthroughs in small RNAs (sRNAs)-dependent regulation of the LEE, with an emphasis on their mechanisms of action and/or LEE-encoded targets. PMID:27709103

  18. EutR Is a Direct Regulator of Genes That Contribute to Metabolism and Virulence in Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7

    PubMed Central

    Luzader, Deborah H.; Clark, David E.; Gonyar, Laura A.

    2013-01-01

    Ethanolamine (EA) metabolism is a trait associated with enteric pathogens, including enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 (EHEC). EHEC causes severe bloody diarrhea and hemolytic uremic syndrome. EHEC encodes the ethanolamine utilization (eut) operon that allows EHEC to metabolize EA and gain a competitive advantage when colonizing the gastrointestinal tract. The eut operon encodes the transcriptional regulator EutR. Genetic studies indicated that EutR expression is induced by EA and vitamin B12 and that EutR promotes expression of the eut operon; however, biochemical evidence for these interactions has been lacking. We performed EA-binding assays and electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) to elucidate a mechanism for EutR gene regulation. These studies confirmed EutR interaction with EA, as well as direct binding to the eutS promoter. EutR also contributes to expression of the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE) in an EA-dependent manner. We performed EMSAs to examine EutR activation of the LEE. The results demonstrated that EutR directly binds the regulatory region of the ler promoter. These results present the first mechanistic description of EutR gene regulation and reveal a novel role for EutR in EHEC pathogenesis. PMID:23995630

  19. Escherichia coli O157:H7 Cells Exposed to Lettuce Leaf Lysate in Refrigerated Conditions Exhibit Differential Expression of Selected Virulence and Adhesion-Related Genes with Altered Mammalian Cell Adherence.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Nicole M; Mukherjee, Nabanita; Banerjee, Pratik

    2016-07-01

    Contamination by and persistence of pathogenic bacteria in ready-to-eat produce have emerged as significant food safety and public health concerns. Viable produceborne pathogens cope with several stresses (e.g., temperature fluctuations and lowtemperature storage) during production and storage of the commodities. In this study, we investigated the impact of transient cold shock on Escherichia coli O157:H7 (EcO157) cells in a produce matrix (romaine lettuce leaf lysate). EcO157 cells were exposed to 25°C for 1 h, 4°C for 1 h, and 4°C for 10 min in lettuce lysate. The expression of selected genes coding for virulence, stress response, and heat and cold shock proteins was quantified by real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCR assay. Treated EcO157 cells adhered to MAC-T mammalian cells were enumerated by in vitro bioassay. Expression of the Shiga toxin 1 gene (stx1a) was upregulated significantly (P < 0.05) upon cold shock treatments, but virulence genes related to EcO157 attachment (eaeA, lpfA, and hcpA) were down-regulated. Two key members of the cold shock regulon, cold shock protein (cspA) and gyrA, were significantly induced (P < 0.05) at the refrigeration temperature (4°C). Significant upregulation of an SOS response gene, recA, was also observed. E. coli heat shock regulon member grpE was induced, but a universal stress protein (uspA) was downregulated at the refrigeration temperatures in lettuce lysate. The adhesion assay revealed a temperature-dependent reduction in the attachment of cold-shocked EcO157 cells. The results of the current study indicate a reduction in the attachment of cold-shocked EcO157 to epithelial cells and higher levels of Shiga toxin gene expression at the molecular level.

  20. Escherichia coli O157:H7 Cells Exposed to Lettuce Leaf Lysate in Refrigerated Conditions Exhibit Differential Expression of Selected Virulence and Adhesion-Related Genes with Altered Mammalian Cell Adherence.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Nicole M; Mukherjee, Nabanita; Banerjee, Pratik

    2016-07-01

    Contamination by and persistence of pathogenic bacteria in ready-to-eat produce have emerged as significant food safety and public health concerns. Viable produceborne pathogens cope with several stresses (e.g., temperature fluctuations and lowtemperature storage) during production and storage of the commodities. In this study, we investigated the impact of transient cold shock on Escherichia coli O157:H7 (EcO157) cells in a produce matrix (romaine lettuce leaf lysate). EcO157 cells were exposed to 25°C for 1 h, 4°C for 1 h, and 4°C for 10 min in lettuce lysate. The expression of selected genes coding for virulence, stress response, and heat and cold shock proteins was quantified by real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCR assay. Treated EcO157 cells adhered to MAC-T mammalian cells were enumerated by in vitro bioassay. Expression of the Shiga toxin 1 gene (stx1a) was upregulated significantly (P < 0.05) upon cold shock treatments, but virulence genes related to EcO157 attachment (eaeA, lpfA, and hcpA) were down-regulated. Two key members of the cold shock regulon, cold shock protein (cspA) and gyrA, were significantly induced (P < 0.05) at the refrigeration temperature (4°C). Significant upregulation of an SOS response gene, recA, was also observed. E. coli heat shock regulon member grpE was induced, but a universal stress protein (uspA) was downregulated at the refrigeration temperatures in lettuce lysate. The adhesion assay revealed a temperature-dependent reduction in the attachment of cold-shocked EcO157 cells. The results of the current study indicate a reduction in the attachment of cold-shocked EcO157 to epithelial cells and higher levels of Shiga toxin gene expression at the molecular level. PMID:27357048

  1. Cell-Free Spent Media Obtained from Bifidobacterium bifidum and Bifidobacterium crudilactis Grown in Media Supplemented with 3′-Sialyllactose Modulate Virulence Gene Expression in Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Bondue, Pauline; Crèvecoeur, Sébastien; Brose, François; Daube, Georges; Seghaye, Marie-Christine; Griffiths, Mansel W.; LaPointe, Gisèle; Delcenserie, Véronique

    2016-01-01

    Complex oligosaccharides from human milk (HMO) possess an antimicrobial activity and can promote the growth of bifidobacteria such as Bifidobacterium bifidum and Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis. In addition, fermentation of carbohydrates by bifidobacteria can result in the production of metabolites presenting an antivirulence effect on several pathogenic bacteria. Whey is rich in complex bovine milk oligosaccharides (BMO) structurally similar to HMO and B. crudilactis, a species of bovine origin, is able to metabolize some of those complex carbohydrates. This study focused on the ability of B. bifidum and B. crudilactis to grow in a culture medium supplemented in 3′-sialyllactose (3′SL) as the main source of carbon, a major BMO encountered in cow milk. Next, the effects of cell-free spent media (CFSM) were tested against virulence expression of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. Both strains were able to grow in presence of 3′SL, but B. crudilactis showed the best growth (7.92 ± 0.3 log cfu/ml) compared to B. bifidum (6.84 ± 0.9 log cfu/ml). Then, CFSM were tested for their effects on virulence gene expression by ler and hilA promoter activity of luminescent mutants of E. coli and S. Typhimurium, respectively, and on wild type strains of E. coli O157:H7 and S. Typhimurium using RT-qPCR. All CFSM resulted in significant under expression of the ler and hilA genes for the luminescent mutants and ler (ratios of −15.4 and −8.1 respectively) and qseA (ratios of −2.1 and −3.1) for the wild type strain of E. coli O157:H7. The 3′SL, a major BMO, combined with some bifidobacteria strains of bovine or human origin could therefore be an interesting synbiotic to maintain or restore the intestinal health of young children. These effects observed in vitro will be further investigated regarding the overall phenotype of pathogenic agents and the exact nature of the active molecules. PMID:27713728

  2. Group A Escherichia coli-Related Purpura Fulminans: an Unusual Manifestation Due to an Unusual Strain?

    PubMed Central

    Amara, Marlène; Bonacorsi, Stéphane; Bedel, Jérôme; Mira, Jean-Paul; Laurent, Virginie; Socha, Koryna; Bruneel, Fabrice; Pangon, Béatrice; Bédos, Jean-Pierre

    2014-01-01

    We describe an exceptional case of life-threatening group A Escherichia coli-induced purpura fulminans. Genotyping of common polymorphisms in genes involved in innate immunity or coagulation did not reveal known susceptibility to such a manifestation. Genetic analysis of the strain revealed an unusual conserved virulence plasmidic region, pointing out its potential virulence. PMID:25232165

  3. Molecular evolution of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and pathogenic Escherichia coli: from pathogenesis to therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Lavigne, Jean-Philippe; Blanc-Potard, Anne-Béatrice

    2008-03-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) and certain Escherichia coli are human pathogens that have evolved through the acquisition of multiple virulence determinants by horizontal gene transfer. Similar genetic elements, as pathogenicity islands and virulence plasmids, have driven molecular evolution of virulence in both species. In addition, the contribution of prophages has been recently highlighted as a reservoir for pathogenic diversity. Characterization of horizontally acquired virulence genes has several clinical implications. First, identification of virulence determinants that have a sporadic distribution and are specifically associated with a pathotype and/or a pathology can be useful markers for risk assessment and diagnosis. Secondly, virulence factors widely distributed in pathogenic strains, but absent from non-pathogenic bacteria, are interesting targets for the development of novel antimicrobial chemotherapies and vaccines. Here, we summarize the horizontally acquired virulence factors of S. Typhimurium, enterohemorrhagic E. coli O157:H7 and uropathogenic E. coli, and we describe their use in novel therapeutic approaches.

  4. Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli strain in a novel weaned mouse model: exacerbation by malnutrition, biofilm as a virulence factor and treatment by nitazoxanide.

    PubMed

    Bolick, David T; Roche, James K; Hontecillas, Raquel; Bassaganya-Riera, Josep; Nataro, James P; Guerrant, Richard L

    2013-06-01

    Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) is increasingly recognized as a common cause of diarrhoea in healthy, malnourished and immune-deficient adults and children. There is no reproducible non-neonatal animal model for longitudinal studies of disease mechanism or therapy. Using two strains of human-derived EAEC to challenge weaned C57BL/6 mice, we explored an in vivo model of EAEC infection in mice, in which disease was monitored quantitatively as the growth rate, stool shedding and tissue burden of organisms; nutritional status was varied, and a new class of therapeutics was assessed. A single oral challenge of EAEC strain 042 resulted in significant growth shortfalls (5-8 % of body weight in 12 days), persistent shedding of micro-organisms in stools [>10(3.2) c.f.u. (10 mg stool)(-1) for at least 14 days] and intestinal tissue burden [~10(3) c.f.u. (10 mg tissue)(-1) detectable up to 14 days post-challenge]. Moderate malnourishment of mice using a 'regional basic diet' containing 7 % protein and reduced fat and micronutrients heightened all parameters of infection. Nitazoxanide in subMIC doses, administered for 3 days at the time of EAEC challenge, lessened growth shortfalls (by >10 % of body weight), stool shedding [by 2-3 logs (10 mg stool)(-1)] and tissue burden of organisms (by >75 % in the jejunum and colon). Thus, weaned C57BL/6 mice challenged with EAEC is a convenient, readily inducible model of EAEC infection with three highly quantifiable outcomes in which disease severity is dependent on the nutritional status of the host, and which is modifiable in the presence of inhibitors of pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase such as nitazoxanide.

  5. Assessment of physicochemical parameters and prevalence of virulent and multiple-antibiotic-resistant Escherichia coli in treated effluent of two wastewater treatment plants and receiving aquatic milieu in Durban, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Pillay, Leanne; Olaniran, Ademola O

    2016-05-01

    The poor operational status of some wastewater treatment plants often result in the discharge of inadequately treated effluent into receiving surface waters. This is of significant public health concern as there are many informal settlement dwellers (ISDs) that rely on these surface waters for their domestic use. This study investigated the treatment efficiency of two independent wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in Durban, South Africa and determined the impact of treated effluent discharge on the physicochemical and microbial quality of the receiving water bodies over a 6-month period. Presumptive Escherichia coli isolates were identified using biochemical tests and detection of the mdh gene via PCR. Six major virulence genes namely eae, hly, fliC, stx1, stx2, and rfbE were also detected via PCR while antibiotic resistance profiles of the isolates were determined using Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion assay. The physicochemical parameters of the wastewater samples ranged variously between 9 and 313.33 mg/L, 1.52 and 76.43 NTUs, and 6.30 and 7.87 for COD, turbidity, and pH respectively, while the E. coli counts ranged between 0 and 31.2 × 10(3) CFU/ml. Of the 200 selected E. coli isolates, the hly gene was found in 28 %, fliC in 20 %, stx2 in 17 %, eae in 14 %, with stx1 and rfbE in only 4 % of the isolates. Notable resistance was observed toward trimethoprim (97 %), tetracycline (56 %), and ampicillin (52.5 %). These results further highlight the poor operational status of these WWTPs and outline the need for improved water quality monitoring and enforcement of stringent guidelines.

  6. Assessment of physicochemical parameters and prevalence of virulent and multiple-antibiotic-resistant Escherichia coli in treated effluent of two wastewater treatment plants and receiving aquatic milieu in Durban, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Pillay, Leanne; Olaniran, Ademola O

    2016-05-01

    The poor operational status of some wastewater treatment plants often result in the discharge of inadequately treated effluent into receiving surface waters. This is of significant public health concern as there are many informal settlement dwellers (ISDs) that rely on these surface waters for their domestic use. This study investigated the treatment efficiency of two independent wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in Durban, South Africa and determined the impact of treated effluent discharge on the physicochemical and microbial quality of the receiving water bodies over a 6-month period. Presumptive Escherichia coli isolates were identified using biochemical tests and detection of the mdh gene via PCR. Six major virulence genes namely eae, hly, fliC, stx1, stx2, and rfbE were also detected via PCR while antibiotic resistance profiles of the isolates were determined using Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion assay. The physicochemical parameters of the wastewater samples ranged variously between 9 and 313.33 mg/L, 1.52 and 76.43 NTUs, and 6.30 and 7.87 for COD, turbidity, and pH respectively, while the E. coli counts ranged between 0 and 31.2 × 10(3) CFU/ml. Of the 200 selected E. coli isolates, the hly gene was found in 28 %, fliC in 20 %, stx2 in 17 %, eae in 14 %, with stx1 and rfbE in only 4 % of the isolates. Notable resistance was observed toward trimethoprim (97 %), tetracycline (56 %), and ampicillin (52.5 %). These results further highlight the poor operational status of these WWTPs and outline the need for improved water quality monitoring and enforcement of stringent guidelines. PMID:27037695

  7. Genomic Comparative Study of Bovine Mastitis Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kempf, Florent; Slugocki, Cindy; Blum, Shlomo E; Leitner, Gabriel; Germon, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli, one of the main causative agents of bovine mastitis, is responsible for significant losses on dairy farms. In order to better understand the pathogenicity of E. coli mastitis, an accurate characterization of E. coli strains isolated from mastitis cases is required. By using phylogenetic analyses and whole genome comparison of 5 currently available mastitis E. coli genome sequences, we searched for genotypic traits specific for mastitis isolates. Our data confirm that there is a bias in the distribution of mastitis isolates in the different phylogenetic groups of the E. coli species, with the majority of strains belonging to phylogenetic groups A and B1. An interesting feature is that clustering of strains based on their accessory genome is very similar to that obtained using the core genome. This finding illustrates the fact that phenotypic properties of strains from different phylogroups are likely to be different. As a consequence, it is possible that different strategies could be used by mastitis isolates of different phylogroups to trigger mastitis. Our results indicate that mastitis E. coli isolates analyzed in this study carry very few of the virulence genes described in other pathogenic E. coli strains. A more detailed analysis of the presence/absence of genes involved in LPS synthesis, iron acquisition and type 6 secretion systems did not uncover specific properties of mastitis isolates. Altogether, these results indicate that mastitis E. coli isolates are rather characterized by a lack of bona fide currently described virulence genes.

  8. Genomic Comparative Study of Bovine Mastitis Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Kempf, Florent; Slugocki, Cindy; Blum, Shlomo E.; Leitner, Gabriel; Germon, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli, one of the main causative agents of bovine mastitis, is responsible for significant losses on dairy farms. In order to better understand the pathogenicity of E. coli mastitis, an accurate characterization of E. coli strains isolated from mastitis cases is required. By using phylogenetic analyses and whole genome comparison of 5 currently available mastitis E. coli genome sequences, we searched for genotypic traits specific for mastitis isolates. Our data confirm that there is a bias in the distribution of mastitis isolates in the different phylogenetic groups of the E. coli species, with the majority of strains belonging to phylogenetic groups A and B1. An interesting feature is that clustering of strains based on their accessory genome is very similar to that obtained using the core genome. This finding illustrates the fact that phenotypic properties of strains from different phylogroups are likely to be different. As a consequence, it is possible that different strategies could be used by mastitis isolates of different phylogroups to trigger mastitis. Our results indicate that mastitis E. coli isolates analyzed in this study carry very few of the virulence genes described in other pathogenic E. coli strains. A more detailed analysis of the presence/absence of genes involved in LPS synthesis, iron acquisition and type 6 secretion systems did not uncover specific properties of mastitis isolates. Altogether, these results indicate that mastitis E. coli isolates are rather characterized by a lack of bona fide currently described virulence genes. PMID:26809117

  9. Phage types, virulence genes and PFGE profiles of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O157:H7 isolated from raw beef, soft cheese and vegetables in Lima (Peru).

    PubMed

    Mora, Azucena; León, Santana L; Blanco, Miguel; Blanco, Jesús E; López, Cecilia; Dahbi, Ghizlane; Echeita, Aurora; González, Enrique A; Blanco, Jorge

    2007-03-10

    The present study was conducted in Lima Metropolitana to evaluate the prevalence of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O157:H7 in raw beef, raw ground beef, soft cheese and fresh vegetables, sampled at different markets in the city. Between October 2000 and February 2001, 407 food samples were collected from different markets in the 42 districts of Lima Metropolitana. Samples were assayed for E. coli O157 by selective enrichment in modified Tryptic Soy Broth containing novobiocin, followed by immunomagnetic separation (IMS) and plating onto sorbitol MacConkey agar supplemented with cefixime and potassium tellurite. Fifty (12.3%) of 407 food samples resulted positive for E. coli O157 isolation (23 of 102 ground beef; 15 of 102 beef meat; eight of 102 soft cheese and four of 101 fresh vegetables). Thirty-five E. coli O157 isolates were further analysed for the presence of virulence genes. All 35 were positive by PCR for O157 rfbE, fliCh7, eae-gamma1 and ehxA genes. In addition, genes encoding Shiga toxins were detected in 33 of 35 isolates, five isolates (14%) encoded stx(1), stx(2), and 28 (80%) stx2 only. The isolates were of seven different phage types (PT4, PT8, PT14, PT21, PT34, PT54, and PT87) with three phage types accounting for 80% of isolates: PT4 (15 isolates), PT14 (8 isolates), and PT21 (5 isolates). Interestingly, the majority (31 of 35; 89%) of E. coli O157:H7 isolates characterized in this study belonged mainly to the phage types previously found in STEC O157:H7 strains associated with severe human disease in Europe and Canada. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) of 32 isolates revealed 14 XbaI-PFGE groups (I to XIV) of similarity >85%, with 23 (72%) isolates grouped in five clusters. Some isolates from different districts presented a high clonal relatedness. Thus, PFGE group VIII clustered eleven strains from nine different districts. The broad range of PFGE subtypes found in this study demonstrates the natural occurrence of many

  10. Nonchemotactic Mutants of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, John B.; Adler, Julius; Dahl, Margaret M.

    1967-01-01

    We have isolated 40 mutants of Escherichia coli which are nonchemotactic as judged by their failure to swarm on semisolid tryptone plates or to make bands in capillary tubes containing tryptone broth. All the mutants have normal flagella, a fact shown by their shape and reaction with antiflagella serum. All are fully motile under the microscope and all are sensitive to the phage chi. Unlike its parent, one of the mutants, studied in greater detail, failed to show chemotaxis toward oxygen, glucose, serine, threonine, or aspartic acid. The failure to exhibit chemotaxis does not result from a failure to use the chemicals. The swimming of this mutant was shown to be random. The growth rate was normal under several conditions, and the growth requirements were unchanged. Images PMID:5335897

  11. Development and Validation of an Oligonucleotide Microarray for Detection of Multiple Virulence and Antimicrobial Resistance Genes in Escherichia coli†

    PubMed Central

    Bruant, Guillaume; Maynard, Christine; Bekal, Sadjia; Gaucher, Isabelle; Masson, Luke; Brousseau, Roland; Harel, Josée

    2006-01-01

    An oligonucleotide microarray detecting 189 Escherichia coli virulence genes or markers and 30 antimicrobial resistance genes was designed and validated using DNA from known reference strains. This microarray was confirmed to be a powerful diagnostic tool for monitoring emerging E. coli pathotypes and antimicrobial resistance, as well as for environmental, epidemiological, and phylogenetic studies including the evaluation of genome plasticity. PMID:16672535

  12. Adhesion, biofilm and genotypic characteristics of antimicrobial resistant Escherichia coli isolates

    PubMed Central

    Cergole-Novella, Maria C.; Pignatari, Antonio C.C.; Guth, Beatriz E.C.

    2015-01-01

    Aggregative adherence to human epithelial cells, most to renal proximal tubular (HK-2) cells, and biofilm formation was identified among antimicrobial resistant Escherichia coli strains mainly isolated from bacteremia. The importance of these virulence properties contributing to host colonization and infection associated with multiresistant E. coli should not be neglected. PMID:26221104

  13. THE WIDESPREAD OCCURRENCE OF THE ENTEROHEMOLYSIN GENE EHLYA AMONG ENVIRONMENTAL STRAINS OF ESCHERICHIA COLI

    EPA Science Inventory

    The putative virulence factor enterohemolysin, encoded for by the ehlyA gene, has been closely associated with the pathogenic enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) group. E. coli isolates from effluents from seven geographically dispersed municipal ...

  14. Peptidoglycan Hydrolases of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    van Heijenoort, Jean

    2011-01-01

    Summary: The review summarizes the abundant information on the 35 identified peptidoglycan (PG) hydrolases of Escherichia coli classified into 12 distinct families, including mainly glycosidases, peptidases, and amidases. An attempt is also made to critically assess their functions in PG maturation, turnover, elongation, septation, and recycling as well as in cell autolysis. There is at least one hydrolytic activity for each bond linking PG components, and most hydrolase genes were identified. Few hydrolases appear to be individually essential. The crystal structures and reaction mechanisms of certain hydrolases having defined functions were investigated. However, our knowledge of the biochemical properties of most hydrolases still remains fragmentary, and that of their cellular functions remains elusive. Owing to redundancy, PG hydrolases far outnumber the enzymes of PG biosynthesis. The presence of the two sets of enzymes acting on the PG bonds raises the question of their functional correlations. It is difficult to understand why E. coli keeps such a large set of PG hydrolases. The subtle differences in substrate specificities between the isoenzymes of each family certainly reflect a variety of as-yet-unidentified physiological functions. Their study will be a far more difficult challenge than that of the steps of the PG biosynthesis pathway. PMID:22126997

  15. Antimicrobial resistance-conferring plasmids with similarity to virulence plasmids from avian pathogenic Escherichia coli strains in Salmonella enterica serovar Kentucky isolates from poultry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella enterica, a leading cause of food-borne gastroenteritis worldwide, may be found in any raw food of animal, vegetable, or fruit origin. Salmonella serovars differ in distribution, virulence, and host specificity. Salmonella enterica serovar Kentucky, though often found in the food supply, ...

  16. Structure of Escherichia coli tryptophanase.

    PubMed

    Ku, Shao Yang; Yip, Patrick; Howell, P Lynne

    2006-07-01

    Pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) dependent tryptophanase has been isolated from Escherichia coli and its crystal structure has been determined. The structure shares the same fold with and has similar quaternary structure to Proteus vulgaris tryptophanase and tyrosine-phenol lyase, but is found in a closed conformation when compared with these two enzymes. The tryptophanase structure, solved in its apo form, does not have covalent PLP bound in the active site, but two sulfate ions. The sulfate ions occupy the phosphoryl-binding site of PLP and the binding site of the alpha-carboxyl of the natural substrate tryptophan. One of the sulfate ions makes extensive interactions with both the transferase and PLP-binding domains of the protein and appears to be responsible for holding the enzyme in its closed conformation. Based on the sulfate density and the structure of the P. vulgaris enzyme, PLP and the substrate tryptophan were modeled into the active site. The resulting model is consistent with the roles of Arg419 in orienting the substrate to PLP and acidifying the alpha-proton of the substrate for beta-elimination, Lys269 in the formation and decomposition of the PLP quinonoid intermediate, Arg230 in orienting the substrate-PLP intermediates in the optimal conformation for catalysis, and His463 and Tyr74 in determining substrate specificity and suggests that the closed conformation observed in the structure could be induced by substrate binding and that significant conformational changes occur during catalysis. A catalytic mechanism for tryptophanase is proposed. Since E. coli tryptophanase has resisted forming diffraction-quality crystals for many years, the molecular surface of tryptophanase has been analyzed in various crystal forms and it was rationalized that strong crystal contacts occur on the flat surface of the protein and that the size of crystal contact surface seems to correlate with the diffraction quality of the crystal.

  17. Genetic relatedness and virulence properties of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli strains of serotype O119:H6 expressing localized adherence or localized and aggregative adherence-like patterns on HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Bruna G; Ooka, Tadasuke; Gotoh, Yasuhiro; Vieira, Mônica A M; Yamamoto, Denise; Ogura, Yoshitoshi; Girão, Dennys M; Sampaio, Suely C F; Melo, Alexis Bonfim; Irino, Kinue; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Gomes, Tânia A T

    2016-05-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) induce attaching and effacing (A/E) lesions in enterocytes and produce the bundle-forming pilus (BFP) contributing to the localized adherence (LA) pattern formation on HeLa cells. Enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC) produce aggregative adherence (AA) on HeLa cells and form prominent biofilms. The ability to produce LA or AA is an important hallmark to classify fecal E. coli isolates as EPEC or EAEC, respectively. E. coli strains of serotype O119:H6 exhibit an LA+ phenotype and have been considered as comprising a clonal group of EPEC strains. However, we have recently identified O119:H6 EPEC strains that produce LA and an AA-like pattern concurrently (LA/AA-like+). In this study, we evaluated the relatedness of three LA/AA-like+ and three LA+ O119:H6 strains by comparing their virulence and genotypic properties. We first found that the LA/AA-like+ strains induced actin accumulation in HeLa cells (indicative of A/E lesions formation) and formed biofilms on abiotic surfaces more efficiently than the LA+ strains. MLST analysis showed that the six strains all belong to the ST28 complex. All strains carried multiple plasmids, but as plasmid profiles were highly variable, this cannot be used to differentiate LA/AA-like+ and LA+ strains. We further obtained their draft genome sequences and the complete sequences of four plasmids harbored by one LA/AA-like+ strain. Analysis of these sequences and comparison with 37 fully sequenced E. coli genomes revealed that both O119:H6 groups belong to the E. coli phylogroup B2 and are very closely related with only 58-67 SNPs found between LA/AA-like+ and LA+ strains. Search of the draft sequences of the six strains for adhesion-related genes known in EAEC and other E. coli pathotypes detected no genes specifically present in LA/AA-like+ strains. Unexpectedly however, we found that a large plasmid distinct from pEAF is responsible for the AA-like phenotype of the LA/AA-like+ strains. Although we

  18. Succinate production in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Thakker, Chandresh; Martínez, Irene; San, Ka-Yiu; Bennett, George N.

    2012-01-01

    Succinate has been recognized as an important platform chemical that can be produced from biomass. While a number of organisms are capable of succinate production naturally, this review focuses on the engineering of Escherichia coli for production of the four-carbon dicarboxylic acid. Important features of a succinate production system are to achieve optimal balance of reducing equivalents generated by consumption of the feedstock, while maximizing the amount of carbon that is channeled to the product. Aerobic and anaerobic production strains have been developed and applied to production from glucose as well as other abundant carbon sources. Metabolic engineering methods and strain evolution have been used and supplemented by the recent application of systems biology and in silico modeling tools to construct optimal production strains. The metabolic capacity of the production strain, as well as the requirement for efficient recovery of succinate and the reliability of the performance under scale-up are important in the overall process. The costs of the overall biorefinery compatible process will determine the economical commercialization of succinate and its impact in larger chemical markets. PMID:21932253

  19. Murein segregation in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    de Pedro, M A; Quintela, J C; Höltje, J V; Schwarz, H

    1997-01-01

    Peptidoglycan (murein) segregation has been studied by means of a new labeling method. The method relies on the ability of Escherichia coli cells to incorporate D-Cys into macromolecular murein. The incorporation depends on a periplasmic amino acid exchange reaction. At low concentrations, D-Cys is innocuous to the cell. The distribution of modified murein in purified sacculi can be traced and visualized by immunodetection of the -SH groups by fluorescence and electron microscopy techniques. Analysis of murein segregation in wild-type and cell division mutant strains revealed that murein in polar caps is metabolically inert and is segregated in a conservative fashion. Elongation of the sacculus apparently occurs by diffuse insertion of precursors over the cylindrical part of the cell surface. At the initiation of cell division, there is a FtsZ-dependent localized activation of murein synthesis at the potential division sites. Penicillin-binding protein 3 and the products of the division genes ftsA and ftsQ are dispensable for the activation of division sites. As a consequence, under restrictive conditions ftsA,ftsI,or ftsQ mutants generate filamentous sacculi with rings of all-new murein at the positions where septa would otherwise develop. PMID:9139895

  20. Escherichia coli survival in waters: Temperature dependence

    EPA Science Inventory

    Knowing the survival rates of water-borne Escherichia coli is important in evaluating microbial contamination and making appropriate management decisions. E. coli survival rates are dependent on temperature, a dependency that is routinely expressed using an analogue of the Q10 mo...

  1. Strategies for Protein Overproduction in Escherichia coli.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mott, John E.

    1984-01-01

    Examines heterologous expression in Escherichia coli and the role of regulatory sequences which control gene expression at transcription resulting in abundant production of messenger RNA and regulatory sequences in mRNA which promote efficient translation. Also examines the role of E. coli cells in stabilizing mRNA and protein that is…

  2. Fosfomycin Resistance in Escherichia coli, Pennsylvania, USA.

    PubMed

    Alrowais, Hind; McElheny, Christi L; Spychala, Caressa N; Sastry, Sangeeta; Guo, Qinglan; Butt, Adeel A; Doi, Yohei

    2015-11-01

    Fosfomycin resistance in Escherichia coli is rare in the United States. An extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing E. coli clinical strain identified in Pennsylvania, USA, showed high-level fosfomycin resistance caused by the fosA3 gene. The IncFII plasmid carrying this gene had a structure similar to those found in China, where fosfomycin resistance is commonly described.

  3. Whole genome sequencing of diverse Shiga toxin-producing and non-producing Escherichia coli strains reveals a variety of virulence and novel antibiotic resistance plasmids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genomes of a diverse set of Shiga toxin-producing E. coli strains and the presence of 38 plasmids among all the isolates were determined. Among the novel plasmids found, there were eight that encoded resistance genes to antibiotics, including aminoglycosides, carbapenems, penicillins, cephalosp...

  4. Genetic diversity and virulence potential of Shiga-toxigenic Escherichia coli strains of O113 serogroup isolated from ground beef in the U.S.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: An adherence factor such as intimin is often required for Shiga toxigenic E. coli (STEC) to cause severe diseases. O113:H21 strains do not produce intimin, but have caused HUS in Australia. Analysis of over 4000 ground beef samples in the U.S. found O113:H21 to be the serotype most ...

  5. Molecular screening of pathogenic Escherichia coli strains isolated from dairy neonatal calves in Cordoba province, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Picco, Natalia Y; Alustiza, Fabrisio E; Bellingeri, Romina V; Grosso, María C; Motta, Carlos E; Larriestra, Alejandro J; Vissio, Claudina; Tiranti, Karina I; Terzolo, Horacio R; Moreira, Ana R; Vivas, Adriana B

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to perform a current molecular characterization of bovine pathogenic Escherichia coli strains isolated from random samplings in Argentinean dairy farms. Rectal swabs were obtained from 395 (63.7%) healthy and 225 (36.3%) diarrheic calves, belonging to 45 dairy farms in Cordoba Province, Argentina. E. coli isolates were examined for virulence genes (f5, f41, f17, sta, stb, lt, eae, vt) using PCR and the prevalence of E. coli virulence profiles was spatially described in terms of spatial distribution. A total of 30.1% isolates were found to be positive for at least one of the virulence genes. Depending on the different gene combinations present, 11 virulence profiles were found. Most of the isolates analyzed had a single gene, and no combination of fimbrial and enterotoxin gene was predominant. There was no association between the frequency and distribution of E. coli virulence genes and calf health status. Most of the virulence profiles were compatible with ETEC strains and showed a homogeneous distribution over the sampled area. A clustering pattern for E. coli virulence profiles could not be recognized. This work provides updated information on the molecular characterization of pathogenic E. coli strains from dairy herds in Cordoba, Argentina. These findings would be important to formulate prevention programs and effective therapies for diarrhea in calves caused by E. coli.

  6. Molecular screening of pathogenic Escherichia coli strains isolated from dairy neonatal calves in Cordoba province, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Picco, Natalia Y; Alustiza, Fabrisio E; Bellingeri, Romina V; Grosso, María C; Motta, Carlos E; Larriestra, Alejandro J; Vissio, Claudina; Tiranti, Karina I; Terzolo, Horacio R; Moreira, Ana R; Vivas, Adriana B

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to perform a current molecular characterization of bovine pathogenic Escherichia coli strains isolated from random samplings in Argentinean dairy farms. Rectal swabs were obtained from 395 (63.7%) healthy and 225 (36.3%) diarrheic calves, belonging to 45 dairy farms in Cordoba Province, Argentina. E. coli isolates were examined for virulence genes (f5, f41, f17, sta, stb, lt, eae, vt) using PCR and the prevalence of E. coli virulence profiles was spatially described in terms of spatial distribution. A total of 30.1% isolates were found to be positive for at least one of the virulence genes. Depending on the different gene combinations present, 11 virulence profiles were found. Most of the isolates analyzed had a single gene, and no combination of fimbrial and enterotoxin gene was predominant. There was no association between the frequency and distribution of E. coli virulence genes and calf health status. Most of the virulence profiles were compatible with ETEC strains and showed a homogeneous distribution over the sampled area. A clustering pattern for E. coli virulence profiles could not be recognized. This work provides updated information on the molecular characterization of pathogenic E. coli strains from dairy herds in Cordoba, Argentina. These findings would be important to formulate prevention programs and effective therapies for diarrhea in calves caused by E. coli. PMID:26026231

  7. Phylogenetic Analysis of Enteroaggregative and Diffusely Adherent Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Czeczulin, John R.; Whittam, Thomas S.; Henderson, Ian R.; Navarro-Garcia, Fernando; Nataro, James P.

    1999-01-01

    The phylogenetics of the various pathotypes of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli are not completely understood. In this study, we identified several plasmid and chromosomal genes in the pathogenic enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC) prototype strain 042 and determined the prevalence of these loci among EAEC and diffusely adherent E. coli strains. The distribution of these genes is analyzed within an evolutionary framework provided by the characterization of allelic variation in housekeeping genes via multilocus enzyme electrophoresis. Our data reveal that EAEC strains are heterogeneous with respect to chromosomal and plasmid-borne genes but that the majority harbor a member of a conserved family of virulence plasmids. Comparison of plasmid and chromosomal relatedness of strains suggests clonality of chromosomal markers and a limited transfer model of plasmid distribution. PMID:10338471

  8. Biofilm modifies expression of ribonucleotide reductase genes in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Cendra, Maria del Mar; Juárez, Antonio; Torrents, Eduard

    2012-01-01

    Ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) is an essential enzyme for all living organisms since is the responsible for the last step in the synthesis of the four deoxyribonucleotides (dNTPs) necessary for DNA replication and repair. In this work, we have investigated the expression of the three-RNR classes (Ia, Ib and III) during Escherichia coli biofilm formation. We show the temporal and spatial importance of class Ib and III RNRs during this process in two different E. coli wild-type strains, the commensal MG1655 and the enteropathogenic and virulent E2348/69, the prototype for the enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC). We have established that class Ib RNR, so far considered cryptic, play and important role during biofilm formation. The implication of this RNR class under the specific growth conditions of biofilm formation is discussed. PMID:23050019

  9. Chemotaxis towards autoinducer 2 mediates autoaggregation in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Laganenka, Leanid; Colin, Remy; Sourjik, Victor

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria communicate by producing and sensing extracellular signal molecules called autoinducers. Such intercellular signalling, known as quorum sensing, allows bacteria to coordinate and synchronize behavioural responses at high cell densities. Autoinducer 2 (AI-2) is the only known quorum-sensing molecule produced by Escherichia coli but its physiological role remains elusive, although it is known to regulate biofilm formation and virulence in other bacterial species. Here we show that chemotaxis towards self-produced AI-2 can mediate collective behaviour—autoaggregation—of E. coli. Autoaggregation requires motility and is strongly enhanced by chemotaxis to AI-2 at physiological cell densities. These effects are observed regardless whether cell–cell interactions under particular growth conditions are mediated by the major E. coli adhesin (antigen 43) or by curli fibres. Furthermore, AI-2-dependent autoaggregation enhances bacterial stress resistance and promotes biofilm formation. PMID:27687245

  10. Growth rate of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Marr, A G

    1991-01-01

    It should be possible to predict the rate of growth of Escherichia coli of a given genotype in a specified environment. The idea that the rate of synthesis of ATP determines the rate of growth and that the yield of ATP determines the yield of growth is entrenched in bacterial physiology, yet this idea is inconsistent with experimental results. In minimal media the growth rate and yield vary with the carbon source in a manner independent of the rate of formation and yield of ATP. With acetate as the carbon source, anapleurotic reactions, not ATP synthesis, limit the growth rate. For acetate and other gluconeogenic substrates the limiting step appears to be the formation of triose phosphate. I conclude that the rate of growth is controlled by the rate of formation of a precursor metabolite and, thus, of monomers such as amino acids derived from it. The protein-synthesizing system is regulated according to demand for protein synthesis. I examine the conjecture that the signal for this regulation is the ratio of uncharged tRNA to aminoacyl-tRNA, that this signal controls the concentration of guanosine tetraphosphate, and that the concentration of guanosine tetraphosphate controls transcription of rrn genes. Differential equations describing this system were solved numerically for steady states of growth; the computed values of ribosomes and guanosine tetraphosphate and the maximal growth rate agree with experimental values obtained from the literature of the past 35 years. These equations were also solved for dynamical states corresponding to nutritional shifts up and down. PMID:1886524

  11. Clinical Implications of Enteroadherent Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Arenas-Hernández, Margarita M.P.; Martínez-Laguna, Ygnacio; Torres, Alfredo G.

    2012-01-01

    Pathogenic Escherichia coli that colonize the small intestine primarily cause gastrointestinal illness in infants and travelers. The main categories of pathogenic E. coli that colonize the epithelial lining of the small intestine are enterotoxigenic E. coli enteropathogenic E. coli and enteroaggregative E. coli. These organisms accomplish their pathogenic process by a complex, coordinated multistage strategy, including non-intimate adherence mediated by various adhesins. These so called “enteroadherent E. coli ” categories subsequently produced toxins or effector proteins that are either secreted to the milieu or injected to the host cell. Finally, destruction of the intestinal microvilli results from the intimate adherence or the toxic effect exerted over the epithelia, resulting in water secretion and diarrhea. In this review, we summarize the current state of knowledge regarding these enteroadherent E. coli strains and the present clinical understanding of how these organisms colonize the human intestine and cause disease. PMID:22798032

  12. Infection strategies of enteric pathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Clements, Abigail; Young, Joanna C.; Constantinou, Nicholas; Frankel, Gad

    2012-01-01

    Enteric Escherichia coli (E. coli) are both natural flora of humans and important pathogens causing significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Traditionally enteric E. coli have been divided into 6 pathotypes, with further pathotypes often proposed. In this review we suggest expansion of the enteric E. coli into 8 pathotypes to include the emerging pathotypes of adherent invasive E. coli (AIEC) and Shiga-toxin producing enteroaggregative E. coli (STEAEC). The molecular mechanisms that allow enteric E. coli to colonize and cause disease in the human host are examined and for two of the pathotypes that express a type 3 secretion system (T3SS) we discuss the complex interplay between translocated effectors and manipulation of host cell signaling pathways that occurs during infection. PMID:22555463

  13. Clinical implications of enteroadherent Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Arenas-Hernández, Margarita M P; Martínez-Laguna, Ygnacio; Torres, Alfredo G

    2012-10-01

    Pathogenic Escherichia coli that colonize the small intestine primarily cause gastrointestinal illness in infants and travelers. The main categories of pathogenic E. coli that colonize the epithelial lining of the small intestine are enterotoxigenic E. coli, enteropathogenic E. coli, and enteroaggregative E. coli. These organisms accomplish their pathogenic process by a complex, coordinated multistage strategy, including nonintimate adherence mediated by various adhesins. These so called "enteroadherent E. coli" categories subsequently produce toxins or effector proteins that are either secreted to the milieu or injected to the host cell. Finally, destruction of the intestinal microvilli results from the intimate adherence or the toxic effect exerted over the epithelia, resulting in water secretion and diarrhea. In this review, we summarize the current state of knowledge regarding these enteroadherent E. coli strains and the present clinical understanding of how these organisms colonize the human intestine and cause disease. PMID:22798032

  14. Characterization of Escherichia coli isolates from hospital inpatients or outpatients with urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Toval, Francisco; Köhler, Christian-Daniel; Vogel, Ulrich; Wagenlehner, Florian; Mellmann, Alexander; Fruth, Angelika; Schmidt, M Alexander; Karch, Helge; Bielaszewska, Martina; Dobrindt, Ulrich

    2014-02-01

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) is the most common cause of community- and hospital-acquired urinary tract infections (UTIs). Isolates from uncomplicated community-acquired UTIs express a variety of virulence traits that promote the efficient colonization of the urinary tract. In contrast, nosocomial UTIs can be caused by E. coli strains that differ in their virulence traits from the community-acquired UTI isolates. UPEC virulence markers are used to distinguish these facultative extraintestinal pathogens, which belong to the intestinal flora of many healthy individuals, from intestinal pathogenic E. coli (IPEC). IPEC is a diarrheagenic pathogen with a characteristic virulence gene set that is absent in UPEC. Here, we characterized 265 isolates from patients with UTIs during inpatient or outpatient treatment at a hospital regarding their phylogenies and IPEC or UPEC virulence traits. Interestingly, 28 of these isolates (10.6%) carried typical IPEC virulence genes that are characteristic of enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC), Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC), and atypical enteropathogenic E. coli (aEPEC), although IPEC is not considered a uropathogen. Twenty-three isolates harbored the astA gene coding for the EAEC heat-stable enterotoxin 1 (EAST1), and most of them carried virulence genes that are characteristic of UPEC and/or EAEC. Our results indicate that UPEC isolates from hospital patients differ from archetypal community-acquired isolates from uncomplicated UTIs by their spectrum of virulence traits. They represent a diverse group, including EAEC, as well as other IPEC pathotypes, which in addition contain typical UPEC virulence genes. The combination of typical extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) and IPEC virulence determinants in some isolates demonstrates the marked genome plasticity of E. coli and calls for a reevaluation of the strict pathotype classification of EAEC.

  15. Global dissemination of a multidrug resistant Escherichia coli clone

    PubMed Central

    Petty, Nicola K.; Ben Zakour, Nouri L.; Stanton-Cook, Mitchell; Skippington, Elizabeth; Totsika, Makrina; Forde, Brian M.; Phan, Minh-Duy; Gomes Moriel, Danilo; Peters, Kate M.; Davies, Mark; Rogers, Benjamin A.; Dougan, Gordon; Rodriguez-Baño, Jesús; Pascual, Alvaro; Pitout, Johann D. D.; Upton, Mathew; Paterson, David L.; Walsh, Timothy R.; Schembri, Mark A.; Beatson, Scott A.

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli sequence type 131 (ST131) is a globally disseminated, multidrug resistant (MDR) clone responsible for a high proportion of urinary tract and bloodstream infections. The rapid emergence and successful spread of E. coli ST131 is strongly associated with several factors, including resistance to fluoroquinolones, high virulence gene content, the possession of the type 1 fimbriae FimH30 allele, and the production of the CTX-M-15 extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL). Here, we used genome sequencing to examine the molecular epidemiology of a collection of E. coli ST131 strains isolated from six distinct geographical locations across the world spanning 2000–2011. The global phylogeny of E. coli ST131, determined from whole-genome sequence data, revealed a single lineage of E. coli ST131 distinct from other extraintestinal E. coli strains within the B2 phylogroup. Three closely related E. coli ST131 sublineages were identified, with little association to geographic origin. The majority of single-nucleotide variants associated with each of the sublineages were due to recombination in regions adjacent to mobile genetic elements (MGEs). The most prevalent sublineage of ST131 strains was characterized by fluoroquinolone resistance, and a distinct virulence factor and MGE profile. Four different variants of the CTX-M ESBL–resistance gene were identified in our ST131 strains, with acquisition of CTX-M-15 representing a defining feature of a discrete but geographically dispersed ST131 sublineage. This study confirms the global dispersal of a single E. coli ST131 clone and demonstrates the role of MGEs and recombination in the evolution of this important MDR pathogen. PMID:24706808

  16. Advances in Molecular Serotyping and Subtyping of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Fratamico, Pina M; DebRoy, Chitrita; Liu, Yanhong; Needleman, David S; Baranzoni, Gian Marco; Feng, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli plays an important role as a member of the gut microbiota; however, pathogenic strains also exist, including various diarrheagenic E. coli pathotypes and extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli that cause illness outside of the GI-tract. E. coli have traditionally been serotyped using antisera against the ca. 186 O-antigens and 53 H-flagellar antigens. Phenotypic methods, including bacteriophage typing and O- and H- serotyping for differentiating and characterizing E. coli have been used for many years; however, these methods are generally time consuming and not always accurate. Advances in next generation sequencing technologies have made it possible to develop genetic-based subtyping and molecular serotyping methods for E. coli, which are more discriminatory compared to phenotypic typing methods. Furthermore, whole genome sequencing (WGS) of E. coli is replacing established subtyping methods such as pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, providing a major advancement in the ability to investigate food-borne disease outbreaks and for trace-back to sources. A variety of sequence analysis tools and bioinformatic pipelines are being developed to analyze the vast amount of data generated by WGS and to obtain specific information such as O- and H-group determination and the presence of virulence genes and other genetic markers.

  17. Advances in molecular serotyping and subtyping of Escherichia coli

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fratamico, Pina M.; DebRoy, Chitrita; Liu, Yanhong; Needleman, David S.; Baranzoni, Gian Marco; Feng, Peter

    2016-05-03

    Escherichia coli plays an important role as a member of the gut microbiota; however, pathogenic strains also exist, including various diarrheagenic E. coli pathotypes and extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli that cause illness outside of the GI-tract. E. coli have traditionally been serotyped using antisera against the ca. 186 O-antigens and 53 H-flagellar antigens. Phenotypic methods, including bacteriophage typing and O- and H- serotyping for differentiating and characterizing E. coli have been used for many years; however, these methods are generally time consuming and not always accurate. Advances in next generation sequencing technologies have made it possible to develop genetic-based subtypingmore » and molecular serotyping methods for E. coli, which are more discriminatory compared to phenotypic typing methods. Furthermore, whole genome sequencing (WGS) of E. coli is replacing established subtyping methods such as pulsedfield gel electrophoresis, providing a major advancement in the ability to investigate food-borne disease outbreaks and for trace-back to sources. Furthermore, a variety of sequence analysis tools and bioinformatic pipelines are being developed to analyze the vast amount of data generated by WGS and to obtain specific information such as O- and H-group determination and the presence of virulence genes and other genetic markers.« less

  18. Colonization with Escherichia coli Strains among Female Sex Partners of Men with Febrile Urinary Tract Infection

    PubMed Central

    Sandberg, Torsten; Scheutz, Flemming; Clabots, Connie; Johnston, Brian D.; Thuras, Paul; Johnson, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Of 23 unique Escherichia coli strains from 10 men with febrile urinary tract infections (UTIs) and their female sex partners, 6 strains (all UTI causing) were shared between partners. Molecularly, the 6 shared strains appeared more virulent than the 17 nonshared strains, being associated with phylogenetic group B2, sequence types ST73 and ST127, and multiple specific virulence genes. This indicates that UTIs are sometimes sexually transmitted. PMID:25832302

  19. Native valve Escherichia coli endocarditis following urosepsis

    PubMed Central

    Rangarajan, D.; Ramakrishnan, S.; Patro, K. C.; Devaraj, S.; Krishnamurthy, V.; Kothari, Y.; Satyaki, N.

    2013-01-01

    Gram-negative organisms are a rare cause of infective endocarditis. Escherichia coli, the most common cause of urinary tract infection and gram-negative septicemia involves endocardium rarely. In this case report, we describe infection of native mitral valve by E. coli following septicemia of urinary tract origin in a diabetic male; subsequently, he required prosthetic tissue valve replacement indicated by persistent sepsis and congestive cardiac failure. PMID:23814428

  20. Fosfomycin Resistance in Escherichia coli, Pennsylvania, USA

    PubMed Central

    Alrowais, Hind; McElheny, Christi L.; Spychala, Caressa N.; Sastry, Sangeeta; Guo, Qinglan; Butt, Adeel A.

    2015-01-01

    Fosfomycin resistance in Escherichia coli is rare in the United States. An extended-spectrum β-lactamase–producing E. coli clinical strain identified in Pennsylvania, USA, showed high-level fosfomycin resistance caused by the fosA3 gene. The IncFII plasmid carrying this gene had a structure similar to those found in China, where fosfomycin resistance is commonly described. PMID:26488485

  1. Genomic and Phenomic Study of Mammary Pathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Shlomo E.; Heller, Elimelech D.; Sela, Shlomo; Elad, Daniel; Edery, Nir; Leitner, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli is a major etiological agent of intra-mammary infections (IMI) in cows, leading to acute mastitis and causing great economic losses in dairy production worldwide. Particular strains cause persistent IMI, leading to recurrent mastitis. Virulence factors of mammary pathogenic E. coli (MPEC) involved pathogenesis of mastitis as well as those differentiating strains causing acute or persistent mastitis are largely unknown. This study aimed to identify virulence markers in MPEC through whole genome and phenome comparative analysis. MPEC strains causing acute (VL2874 and P4) or persistent (VL2732) mastitis were compared to an environmental strain (K71) and to the genomes of strains representing different E. coli pathotypes. Intra-mammary challenge in mice confirmed experimentally that the strains studied here have different pathogenic potential, and that the environmental strain K71 is non-pathogenic in the mammary gland. Analysis of whole genome sequences and predicted proteomes revealed high similarity among MPEC, whereas MPEC significantly differed from the non-mammary pathogenic strain K71, and from E. coli genomes from other pathotypes. Functional features identified in MPEC genomes and lacking in the non-mammary pathogenic strain were associated with synthesis of lipopolysaccharide and other membrane antigens, ferric-dicitrate iron acquisition and sugars metabolism. Features associated with cytotoxicity or intra-cellular survival were found specifically in the genomes of strains from severe and acute (VL2874) or persistent (VL2732) mastitis, respectively. MPEC genomes were relatively similar to strain K-12, which was subsequently shown here to be possibly pathogenic in the mammary gland. Phenome analysis showed that the persistent MPEC was the most versatile in terms of nutrients metabolized and acute MPEC the least. Among phenotypes unique to MPEC compared to the non-mammary pathogenic strain were uric acid and D-serine metabolism. This study

  2. Genomic and Phenomic Study of Mammary Pathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Blum, Shlomo E; Heller, Elimelech D; Sela, Shlomo; Elad, Daniel; Edery, Nir; Leitner, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli is a major etiological agent of intra-mammary infections (IMI) in cows, leading to acute mastitis and causing great economic losses in dairy production worldwide. Particular strains cause persistent IMI, leading to recurrent mastitis. Virulence factors of mammary pathogenic E. coli (MPEC) involved pathogenesis of mastitis as well as those differentiating strains causing acute or persistent mastitis are largely unknown. This study aimed to identify virulence markers in MPEC through whole genome and phenome comparative analysis. MPEC strains causing acute (VL2874 and P4) or persistent (VL2732) mastitis were compared to an environmental strain (K71) and to the genomes of strains representing different E. coli pathotypes. Intra-mammary challenge in mice confirmed experimentally that the strains studied here have different pathogenic potential, and that the environmental strain K71 is non-pathogenic in the mammary gland. Analysis of whole genome sequences and predicted proteomes revealed high similarity among MPEC, whereas MPEC significantly differed from the non-mammary pathogenic strain K71, and from E. coli genomes from other pathotypes. Functional features identified in MPEC genomes and lacking in the non-mammary pathogenic strain were associated with synthesis of lipopolysaccharide and other membrane antigens, ferric-dicitrate iron acquisition and sugars metabolism. Features associated with cytotoxicity or intra-cellular survival were found specifically in the genomes of strains from severe and acute (VL2874) or persistent (VL2732) mastitis, respectively. MPEC genomes were relatively similar to strain K-12, which was subsequently shown here to be possibly pathogenic in the mammary gland. Phenome analysis showed that the persistent MPEC was the most versatile in terms of nutrients metabolized and acute MPEC the least. Among phenotypes unique to MPEC compared to the non-mammary pathogenic strain were uric acid and D-serine metabolism. This study

  3. Biochemical characteristic of biofilm of uropathogenic Escherichia coli Dr(+) strains.

    PubMed

    Zalewska-Piątek, Beata; Wilkanowicz, Sabina; Bruździak, Piotr; Piątek, Rafał; Kur, Józef

    2013-07-19

    Urinary tract infections caused by Escherichia coli are very common health problem in the developed countries. The virulence of the uropathogenic E. coli Dr(+) IH11128 is determined by Dr fimbriae, which are homopolymeric structures composed of DraE subunits with the DraD protein capping the fiber. In this study, we have analyzed the structural and biochemical properties of biofilms developed by E. coli strains expressing Dr fimbriae with or without the DraD tip subunit and the surface-exposed DraD protein. We have also demonstrated that these E. coli strains form biofilms on an abiotic surface in a nutrient-dependent fashion. We present evidence that Dr fimbriae are necessary during the first stage of bacterial interaction with the abiotic surface. In addition, we reveal that the DraD alone is also sufficient for the initial surface attachment at an even higher level than Dr fimbriae and that chloramphenicol is able to reduce the normal attachment of the analyzed E. coli. The action of chloramphenicol also shows that protein synthesis is required for the early events of biofilm formation. Additionally, we have identified reduced exopolysaccharide coverage in E. coli that express only Dr fimbrial polyadhesins at the cell surface with or without the DraD capping subunit.

  4. Role of special pathogenicity versus prevalence theory in pathogenesis of acute cystitis caused by Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Richa; Agarwal, Jyotsna; Srivastava, Sugandha; Mishra, Bharti

    2014-08-01

    Escherichia coli is the most common pathogen causing acute cystitis in sexually active women. Human faeces are generally considered the primary reservoir for infection and the faecal-perineal-urethral pathway is the accepted route of infection. Two theories have been proposed for the pathogenesis of acute cystitis: (1) special pathogenicity, where uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) encoding special virulence factors causes infection; and (2) prevalence, wherein ordinary faecal E. coli causes infection by simple mass action. The aim of this study was to compare concurrent urinary E. coli isolates from women with acute cystitis with their own dominant faecal, vaginal E. coli isolates; thus, these patients served as their own control. E. coli isolates from 80 women were analysed by phylotyping, virulence profiling (for 15 putative virulence genes) and enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC) PCR. A virulence score was calculated for each isolate based on the number of virulence genes detected. Four host ecological groups of E. coli were created on the basis of ERIC PCR: group UVF, where vaginal and faecal isolates yielded the infecting urine clone; group UV, where only vaginal isolates yielded the infecting urine clone; group UF, where faecal isolates yielded the infecting urine clone; and group U, where the infecting urine clone was distinct. In the majority of cases the infecting E. coli clone from urine was also the dominant faecal clone (56.3%; groups UVF and UF possessing high virulence scores of 4.6 and 3.9, respectively), indicating that both mechanisms play a role in pathogenesis. Non-dominant yet virulent faecal clones or an external source of E. coli seems a possibility in the UV group (13.7%, VF score 4.8). In 30% of patients (U group) the infecting urine clone was non-dominant and possessed a low virulence score (2.7); suggesting a possible role for host factors in establishing infection.

  5. Bacteriophage resistance in Escherichia coli K-12: general pattern of resistance.

    PubMed Central

    Hancock, R E; Reeves, P

    1975-01-01

    Resistant mutants were isolated to 42 virulent bacteriophages in one strain of Escherichia coli K-12 and tested for resistance or sensitivity to a set of 56 bacteriophages. Most of the mutants fell into 11 groups with respect to their resistance patterns. It was possible to classify the bacteriophages broadly, according to the variety of mutants that were resistant to them. PMID:1090611

  6. Escherichia Coli--Key to Modern Genetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bregegere, Francois

    1982-01-01

    Mid-nineteenth century work by Mendel on plant hybrids and by Pasteur on fermentation gave birth by way of bacterial genetics to modern-day molecular biology. The bacterium Escherichia Coli has occupied a key position in genetic studies leading from early gene identification with DNA to current genetic engineering using recombinant DNA technology.…

  7. Identification of potentially diarrheagenic atypical enteropathogenic Escherichia coli strains present in Canadian food animals at slaughter and in retail meats.

    PubMed

    Comery, Raven; Thanabalasuriar, Ajitha; Garneau, Philippe; Portt, Andrea; Boerlin, Patrick; Reid-Smith, Richard J; Harel, Josée; Manges, Amee R; Gruenheid, Samantha

    2013-06-01

    This study identified and characterized enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) in the Canadian food supply. Eighteen of 450 E. coli isolates from food animal sources were identified as atypical EPEC (aEPEC). Several of the aEPEC isolates identified in this study possessed multiple virulence genes, exhibited adherence and attaching and effacing (A/E) lesion formation, disrupted tight junctions, and were coclassified with the extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) and enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) pathotypes. PMID:23584785

  8. Correlation between the genomic o454-nlpD region polymorphisms, virulence gene equipment and phylogenetic group of extraintestinal Escherichia coli (ExPEC) enables pathotyping irrespective of host, disease and source of isolation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The mutS-rpoS intergenic region in E. coli displays a mosaic structure which revealed pathotype specific patterns. To assess the importance of this region as a surrogate marker for the identification of highly virulent extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) strains we aimed to: (i) characterize the genetic diversity of the mutS gene and the o454-nlpD genomic region among 510 E. coli strains from animals and humans; (ii) delineate associations between the polymorphism of this region and features such as phylogenetic background of E. coli, pathotype, host species, clinical condition, serogroup and virulence associated genes (VAG)s; and (iii) identify the most important VAGs for classification of the o454-nlpD region. Methods Size variation in the o454-nlpD region was investigated by PCR amplification and sequencing. Phylogenetic relationships were assessed by Ecor- and Multilocus sequence- typing (MLST), and a comparative analysis between mutS gene phylogenetic tree obtained with RAxML and the MLST grouping method was performed. Correlation between o454-nlpD patterns and the features described above were analysed. In addition, the importance of 47 PCR-amplified ExPEC-related VAGs for classification of o454-nlpD patterns was investigated by means of Random Forest algorithm. Results Four main structures (patterns I-IV) of the o454-nlpD region among ExPEC and commensal E. coli strains were identified. Statistical analysis showed a positive and exclusive association between pattern III and the ExPEC strains. A strong association between pattern III and either the Ecor group B2 or the sequence type complexes known to represent the phylogenetic background of highly virulent ExPEC strains (such as STC95, STC73 and STC131) was found as well. RF analyses determined five genes (csgA, malX, chuA, sit, and vat) to be suitable to predict pattern III strains. Conclusion The significant association between pattern III and group B2 strains suggested the o454-nlp

  9. Escherichia coli in Europe: an overview.

    PubMed

    Allocati, Nerino; Masulli, Michele; Alexeyev, Mikhail F; Di Ilio, Carmine

    2013-11-25

    Escherichia coli remains one of the most frequent causes of several common bacterial infections in humans and animals. E. coli is the prominent cause of enteritis, urinary tract infection, septicaemia and other clinical infections, such as neonatal meningitis. E. coli is also prominently associated with diarrhoea in pet and farm animals. The therapeutic treatment of E. coli infections is threatened by the emergence of antimicrobial resistance. The prevalence of multidrug-resistant E. coli strains is increasing worldwide principally due to the spread of mobile genetic elements, such as plasmids. The rise of multidrug-resistant strains of E. coli also occurs in Europe. Therefore, the spread of resistance in E. coli is an increasing public health concern in European countries. This paper summarizes the current status of E. coli strains clinically relevant in European countries. Furthermore, therapeutic interventions and strategies to prevent and control infections are presented and discussed. The article also provides an overview of the current knowledge concerning promising alternative therapies against E. coli diseases.

  10. Draft Genome Sequence of Brazilian Escherichia coli Uropathogenic Strain E2

    PubMed Central

    Pieta, Luiza; Prichula, Janira; Sambrano, Gustavo E.; Soares, Renata; Caierão, Juliana; Frazzon, Jeverson; d’Azevedo, Pedro A.

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli is a common pathogen recovered from cystitis infections. In this report, we announce the draft genome sequence of strain E2 isolated from the urine specimen from a female patient in South Brazil. The genome assembly has 5,081,209 bp, a G+C content of 50.57%, and virulence factors associated with both enteroaggregative and uropathogenic E. coli strains. PMID:27795253

  11. Biofilm and fluoroquinolone resistance of canine Escherichia coli uropathogenic isolates

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Escherichia coli is the most common uropathogen involved in urinary tract infection (UTI). Virulence of strains may differ, and may be enhanced by antimicrobial resistance and biofilm formation, resulting in increased morbidity and recurrent infections. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro biofilm forming capacity of E. coli isolates from dogs with UTI, by using fluorescent in situ hybridization, and its association with virulence genes and antimicrobial resistance. Findings The proportion of biofilm-producing isolates significantly increased with the length of incubation time (P < 0.05). Biofilm production was significantly associated with fluoroquinolone resistance at all incubation time points and was independent of the media used (P < 0.05). Biofilm production was not associated with cnf1, hly, pap and sfa genes (P > 0.05), but was significantly associated with afa, aer and the β-lactamase genes (P < 0.05). Conclusions To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report showing significant association between biofilm production and fluoroquinolone resistance in E. coli isolates from dogs with UTI. Biofilm formation may contribute to UTI treatment failure in dogs, through the development of bacterial reservoirs inside bladder cells, allowing them to overcome host immune defenses and to establish recurrent infections. PMID:25099929

  12. Escherichia coli ST131, an Intriguing Clonal Group

    PubMed Central

    Bertrand, Xavier; Madec, Jean-Yves

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY In 2008, a previously unknown Escherichia coli clonal group, sequence type 131 (ST131), was identified on three continents. Today, ST131 is the predominant E. coli lineage among extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) isolates worldwide. Retrospective studies have suggested that it may originally have risen to prominence as early as 2003. Unlike other classical group B2 ExPEC isolates, ST131 isolates are commonly reported to produce extended-spectrum β-lactamases, such as CTX-M-15, and almost all are resistant to fluoroquinolones. Moreover, ST131 E. coli isolates are considered to be truly pathogenic, due to the spectrum of infections they cause in both community and hospital settings and the large number of virulence-associated genes they contain. ST131 isolates therefore seem to contradict the widely held view that high levels of antimicrobial resistance are necessarily associated with a fitness cost leading to a decrease in pathogenesis. Six years after the first description of E. coli ST131, this review outlines the principal traits of ST131 clonal group isolates, based on the growing body of published data, and highlights what is currently known and what we need to find out to provide public health authorities with better information to help combat ST131. PMID:24982321

  13. Survival of Escherichia coli in stormwater biofilters.

    PubMed

    Chandrasena, G I; Deletic, A; McCarthy, D T

    2014-04-01

    Biofilters are widely adopted in Australia for stormwater treatment, but the reported removal of common faecal indicators (such as Escherichia coli (E. coli)) varies from net removal to net leaching. Currently, the underlying mechanisms that govern the faecal microbial removal in the biofilters are poorly understood. Therefore, it is important to study retention and subsequent survival of faecal microorganisms in the biofilters under different biofilter designs and operational characteristics. The current study investigates how E. coli survival is influenced by temperature, moisture content, sunlight exposure and presence of other microorganisms in filter media and top surface sediment. Soil samples were taken from two different biofilters to investigate E. coli survival under controlled laboratory conditions. Results revealed that the presence of other microorganisms and temperature are vital stressors which govern the survival of E. coli captured either in the top surface sediment or filter media, while sunlight exposure and moisture content are important for the survival of E. coli captured in the top surface sediment compared to that of the filter media. Moreover, increased survival was found in the filter media compared to the top sediment, and sand filter media was found be more hostile than loamy sand filter media towards E. coli survival. Results also suggest that the contribution from the tested environmental stressors on E. coli survival in biofilters will be greatly affected by the seasonality and may vary from one site to another.

  14. Escherichia coli in retail processed food.

    PubMed

    Pinegar, J A; Cooke, E M

    1985-08-01

    Four thousand two hundred and forty six samples of retail processed food were examined for the presence of Escherichia coli. Overall 12% of samples contained this organism, cakes and confectionery being more frequently contaminated (28%) than meat and meat based products (9%). Contamination was more frequent in the summer months than in the colder weather and 27% of the contaminated foods contained greater than 10(3) E. coli/g. E. coli from meat and meat based products were more commonly resistant to one or more antibiotics (14%) than were confectionery strains (1%). The significance of these findings in relation to the E. coli population of the human bowel is discussed. PMID:3894508

  15. Single Multiplex PCR Assay To Identify Simultaneously the Six Categories of Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli Associated with Enteric Infections

    PubMed Central

    Vidal, Maricel; Kruger, Eileen; Durán, Claudia; Lagos, Rosanna; Levine, Myron; Prado, Valeria; Toro, Cecilia; Vidal, Roberto

    2005-01-01

    We designed a multiplex PCR for the detection of all categories of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli. This method proved to be specific and rapid in detecting virulence genes from Shiga toxin-producing (stx1, stx2, and eae), enteropathogenic (eae and bfp), enterotoxigenic (stII and lt), enteroinvasive (virF and ipaH), enteroaggregative (aafII), and diffuse adherent (daaE) Escherichia coli in stool samples. PMID:16208019

  16. Prevalence of Escherichia coli in surface waters of Southeast Asian cities.

    PubMed

    Widmer, Kenneth; Van Ha, Nguyen Thi; Vinitnantharat, Soydoa; Sthiannopkao, Suthipong; Wangsaatmaja, Setiawan; Prasetiati, Maria Angela Novi; Thanh, Nguyen Cong; Thepnoo, Kasame; Sutadian, Arief Dhany; Thao, Huynh Thi Thanh; Fapyane, Deby; San, Vibol; Vital, Pierangeli; Hur, Hor-Gil

    2013-11-01

    Surface water samples were collected from rivers which fed into large urban areas within Vietnam, Indonesia, Cambodia, and Thailand and were processed to enumerate Escherichia coli. Selected isolates were further characterized using PCR to detect the presence of specific virulence genes. Analyzing the four countries together, the approximate mean cfu/100 ml for E. coli counts in the dry season were log 4.3, while counts in the wet season were log 2.8. Of the 564 E. coli isolates screened for the presence of pathogenic genes, 3.9 % possessed at least one virulence gene. The most common pathogenic types found were Shiga toxin-producing E. coli isolates. These results reinforce the importance of monitoring urban surface waters for fecal contamination, that E. coli in these water environments may serve as opportunistic pathogens, and may help in determining the impact water usage from these rivers have on the public health of urban populations in Southeast Asia.

  17. Hydrogen production by recombinant Escherichia coli strains

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Toshinari; Sanchez‐Torres, Viviana; Wood, Thomas K.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The production of hydrogen via microbial biotechnology is an active field of research. Given its ease of manipulation, the best‐studied bacterium Escherichia coli has become a workhorse for enhanced hydrogen production through metabolic engineering, heterologous gene expression, adaptive evolution, and protein engineering. Herein, the utility of E. coli strains to produce hydrogen, via native hydrogenases or heterologous ones, is reviewed. In addition, potential strategies for increasing hydrogen production are outlined and whole‐cell systems and cell‐free systems are compared. PMID:21895995

  18. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli-Associated Exotoxins.

    PubMed

    Welch, Rodney A

    2016-06-01

    Escherichia coli are a common cause of infectious disease outside of the gastrointestinal tract. Several independently evolved E. coli clades are common causes of urinary tract and bloodstream infections. There is ample epidemiological and in vitro evidence that several different protein toxins common to many, but not all, of these strains are likely to aid the colonization and immune-evasion ability of these bacteria. This review discusses our current knowledge and areas of ignorance concerning the contribution of the hemolysin; cytotoxic-necrotizing factor-1; and the autotransporters, Sat, Pic, and Vat, to extraintestinal human disease. PMID:27337488

  19. Studies of Escherichia coli Infection in Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Truscott, R. B.; Lopez-Alvarez, J.; Pettit, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    The pathogenesis of infection with Escherichia coli was studied in chickens using live O78:K80 cells and a heat-labile chick lethal toxin. The results obtained were compared with those observed in field outbreaks. The common histological findings of subepicardial edema and congestion, focal necrosis in the spleen and focal necrosis, congestion, edema and accumulation of fibrin in the liver support an active role for chick lethal toxin in the pathogenesis of E. coli disease. ImagesFig. 3.Fig. 4.Fig. 5.Fig. 6.Fig. 7. PMID:4274822

  20. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli-associated exotoxins

    PubMed Central

    Welch, Rodney A.

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli are a common cause of infectious disease outside of the gastrointestinal tract. Several independently evolved E. coli clades are common causes of urinary tract and blood stream infections. There is ample epidemiological and in vitro evidence that several different protein toxins common to many but not all of these strains are likely to aid the colonization and immune evasion ability of these bacteria. This review discusses our current knowledge and areas of ignorance concerning the contribution of the hemolysin, cytotoxic necrotizing factor-1 and the autotransporters, Sat, Pic and Vat to extraintestinal human disease. PMID:27337488

  1. ELECTRON MICROSCOPY OF PLASMOLYSIS IN ESCHERICHIA COLI.

    PubMed

    COTA-ROBLES, E H

    1963-03-01

    Cota-Robles, Eugene H. (University of California, Riverside). Electron microscopy of plasmolysis in Escherichia coli. J. Bacteriol. 85:499-503. 1963.-Escherichia coli cells plasmolyzed in 0.35 m sucrose reveal plasmolysis at one tip of a cell or in the center of dividing cells in which protoplast partition has been complete. Central plasmolysis reveals that protoplast separation can be completed before the invagination of the cell wall is complete. These studies support the concept that these cells divide by constriction. The strength of the union between cell wall and cytoplasm is not uniform around the entire cell. It is strongest along the sides of these rod-shaped cells and weakest at one tip of the single cell. Thus, a single cell generally forms one cup-shaped vacuole in which the cytoplasm has collapsed away from one tip of the cell.

  2. Characteristics of verotoxigenic Escherichia coli from pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Gannon, V P; Gyles, C L; Friendship, R W

    1988-01-01

    Porcine verotoxigenic Escherichia coli were characterized with respect to frequency of occurrence, serogroup, and association with disease, weaning, and selected properties of the bacterium. Of 668 strains of E. coli from southern Ontario pigs with enteric disease, 32 (4.8%) produced verotoxin at 10(3)-10(7) cytotoxic doses per mL of culture supernatant. Of 22 isolates which belonged to O serogroups 138, 139 and 141, 15 produced verotoxin. Among other enterotoxigenic types of E. coli, two of 57 isolates of O157:K"V17" and two of 96 isolates of O149:K91 were verotoxigenic. The remaining 13 verotoxigenic E. coli belonged to O groups 2, 107, 120, 121 and 130. An additional 21 verotoxigenic E. coli belonging to O groups 138, 139 and 141 and three to O157:K"V17" were identified in a collection of 47 E. coli recovered from weaned pigs with enteric disease. Verotoxigenic E. coli were associated with postweaning diarrhea, bloody stools, sudden death and edema disease. They were isolated at similar frequencies (14%) from healthy weaned pigs, and from weaned pigs with enteric disease. Isolation rates from neonates were low and significantly different from rates in weaned pigs. Neutralizing antibody to verotoxin was not detected in the sera of 45 pigs, which included pigs from herds with a history of edema disease. Verotoxin was not associated with production of colicin, hemolysin, or enterotoxins or with any of 23 biochemical properties of the organisms. The serological data indicate that porcine verotoxigenic E. coli are not a common source of verotoxigenic E. coli for humans. Porcine verotoxin may play a role in postweaning diarrhea and absence of detectable neutralizing antibody in serum may be an important aspect of pathogenesis. PMID:3048621

  3. SILAC-based comparative analysis of pathogenic Escherichia coli secretomes.

    PubMed

    Boysen, Anders; Borch, Jonas; Krogh, Thøger Jensen; Hjernø, Karin; Møller-Jensen, Jakob

    2015-09-01

    Comparative studies of pathogenic bacteria and their non-pathogenic counterparts has led to the discovery of important virulence factors thereby generating insight into mechanisms of pathogenesis. Protein-based antigens for vaccine development are primarily selected among unique virulence-related factors produced by the pathogen of interest. However, recent work indicates that proteins that are not unique to the pathogen but instead selectively expressed compared to its non-pathogenic counterpart could also be vaccine candidates or targets for drug development. Modern methods in quantitative proteome analysis have the potential to discover both classes of proteins and hence form an important tool for discovering therapeutic targets. Adherent-invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC) and Enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) are pathogenic variants of E. coli which cause intestinal disease in humans. AIEC is associated with Crohn's disease (CD), a chronic inflammatory condition of the gastrointestinal tract whereas ETEC is the major cause of human diarrhea which affects hundreds of millions annually. In spite of the disease burden associated with these pathogens, effective vaccines conferring long-term protection are still needed. In order to identify proteins with therapeutic potential, we have used mass spectrometry-based Stable Isotope Labeling with Amino acids in Cell culture (SILAC) quantitative proteomics method which allows us to compare the proteomes of pathogenic strains to commensal E. coli. In this study, we grew the pathogenic strains ETEC H10407, AIEC LF82 and the non-pathogenic reference strain E. coli K-12 MG1655 in parallel and used SILAC to compare protein levels in OMVs and culture supernatant. We have identified well-known virulence factors from both AIEC and ETEC, thus validating our experimental approach. In addition we find proteins that are not unique to the pathogenic strains but expressed at levels different from the commensal strain, including the

  4. SILAC-based comparative analysis of pathogenic Escherichia coli secretomes.

    PubMed

    Boysen, Anders; Borch, Jonas; Krogh, Thøger Jensen; Hjernø, Karin; Møller-Jensen, Jakob

    2015-09-01

    Comparative studies of pathogenic bacteria and their non-pathogenic counterparts has led to the discovery of important virulence factors thereby generating insight into mechanisms of pathogenesis. Protein-based antigens for vaccine development are primarily selected among unique virulence-related factors produced by the pathogen of interest. However, recent work indicates that proteins that are not unique to the pathogen but instead selectively expressed compared to its non-pathogenic counterpart could also be vaccine candidates or targets for drug development. Modern methods in quantitative proteome analysis have the potential to discover both classes of proteins and hence form an important tool for discovering therapeutic targets. Adherent-invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC) and Enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) are pathogenic variants of E. coli which cause intestinal disease in humans. AIEC is associated with Crohn's disease (CD), a chronic inflammatory condition of the gastrointestinal tract whereas ETEC is the major cause of human diarrhea which affects hundreds of millions annually. In spite of the disease burden associated with these pathogens, effective vaccines conferring long-term protection are still needed. In order to identify proteins with therapeutic potential, we have used mass spectrometry-based Stable Isotope Labeling with Amino acids in Cell culture (SILAC) quantitative proteomics method which allows us to compare the proteomes of pathogenic strains to commensal E. coli. In this study, we grew the pathogenic strains ETEC H10407, AIEC LF82 and the non-pathogenic reference strain E. coli K-12 MG1655 in parallel and used SILAC to compare protein levels in OMVs and culture supernatant. We have identified well-known virulence factors from both AIEC and ETEC, thus validating our experimental approach. In addition we find proteins that are not unique to the pathogenic strains but expressed at levels different from the commensal strain, including the

  5. Systems Metabolic Engineering of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kyeong Rok; Shin, Jae Ho; Cho, Jae Sung; Yang, Dongsoo; Lee, Sang Yup

    2016-05-01

    Systems metabolic engineering, which recently emerged as metabolic engineering integrated with systems biology, synthetic biology, and evolutionary engineering, allows engineering of microorganisms on a systemic level for the production of valuable chemicals far beyond its native capabilities. Here, we review the strategies for systems metabolic engineering and particularly its applications in Escherichia coli. First, we cover the various tools developed for genetic manipulation in E. coli to increase the production titers of desired chemicals. Next, we detail the strategies for systems metabolic engineering in E. coli, covering the engineering of the native metabolism, the expansion of metabolism with synthetic pathways, and the process engineering aspects undertaken to achieve higher production titers of desired chemicals. Finally, we examine a couple of notable products as case studies produced in E. coli strains developed by systems metabolic engineering. The large portfolio of chemical products successfully produced by engineered E. coli listed here demonstrates the sheer capacity of what can be envisioned and achieved with respect to microbial production of chemicals. Systems metabolic engineering is no longer in its infancy; it is now widely employed and is also positioned to further embrace next-generation interdisciplinary principles and innovation for its upgrade. Systems metabolic engineering will play increasingly important roles in developing industrial strains including E. coli that are capable of efficiently producing natural and nonnatural chemicals and materials from renewable nonfood biomass. PMID:27223822

  6. Interaction between Escherichia coli and lunar fines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johansson, K. R.

    1983-01-01

    A sample of mature lunar fines (10084.151) was solubilized to a high degree (about 17 percent) by the chelating agent salicylic acid (0.01. M). The neutralized (pH adjusted to 7.0) leachate was found to inhibit the growth of Escherichia coli (ATCC 259922) in a minimial mineral salts glucose medium; however, the inhibition was somewhat less than that caused by neutralized salicylic acid alone. The presence of lunar fines in the minimal medium was highly stimulatory to growth of E. coli following an early inhibitory response. The bacterium survived less well in the lunar leachate than in distilled water, no doubt because of the salicylate. It was concluded that the sample of lunar soil tested has nutritional value to E. coli and that certain products of fermentation helped to solubilize the lunar soil.

  7. Prodigiosin - A Multifaceted Escherichia coli Antimicrobial Agent

    PubMed Central

    Zorec, Maša; Stopar, David

    2016-01-01

    Despite a considerable interest in prodigiosin, the mechanism of its antibacterial activity is still poorly understood. In this work, Escherichia coli cells were treated with prodigiosin to determine its antimicrobial effect on bacterial physiology. The effect of prodigiosin was concentration dependent. In prodigiosin treated cells above MIC value no significant DNA damage or cytoplasmic membrane disintegration was observed. The outer membrane, however, becomes leaky. Cells had severely decreased respiration activity. In prodigiosin treated cells protein and RNA synthesis were inhibited, cells were elongated but could not divide. Pre-treatment with prodigiosin improved E. coli survival rate in media containing ampicillin, kanamycin and erythromycin but not phleomycin. The results suggest that prodigiosin acts as a bacteriostatic agent in E. coli cells. If prodigiosin was diluted, cells resumed growth. The results indicate that prodigiosin has distinct mode of antibacterial action in different bacteria. PMID:27612193

  8. Thymineless Death in Escherichia coli: Strain Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, Donald J.; Mondale, Lee

    1967-01-01

    Thymineless death of various ultraviolet (UV)-sensitive strains of Escherichia coli B and K-12 was investigated. It was found that E. coli B, Bs−12, K-12 rec-21, and possibly K-12 Lon−, all sensitive to UV, were also sensitive to thymine starvation. However, other UV-sensitive strains of E. coli were found to display the typical resistant-type kinetics of thymineless death. The correlation of these results with various other cellular processes suggested that the filament-forming ability of the bacteria might be involved in the mechanism of thymineless death. It was apparent from the present results that capacity for host-cell reactivation, recombination ability, thymine dimer excision, and probably induction of a defective prophage had little to do with determining sensitivity to thymine deprivation. Images PMID:5337772

  9. Prodigiosin - A Multifaceted Escherichia coli Antimicrobial Agent.

    PubMed

    Danevčič, Tjaša; Borić Vezjak, Maja; Zorec, Maša; Stopar, David

    2016-01-01

    Despite a considerable interest in prodigiosin, the mechanism of its antibacterial activity is still poorly understood. In this work, Escherichia coli cells were treated with prodigiosin to determine its antimicrobial effect on bacterial physiology. The effect of prodigiosin was concentration dependent. In prodigiosin treated cells above MIC value no significant DNA damage or cytoplasmic membrane disintegration was observed. The outer membrane, however, becomes leaky. Cells had severely decreased respiration activity. In prodigiosin treated cells protein and RNA synthesis were inhibited, cells were elongated but could not divide. Pre-treatment with prodigiosin improved E. coli survival rate in media containing ampicillin, kanamycin and erythromycin but not phleomycin. The results suggest that prodigiosin acts as a bacteriostatic agent in E. coli cells. If prodigiosin was diluted, cells resumed growth. The results indicate that prodigiosin has distinct mode of antibacterial action in different bacteria. PMID:27612193

  10. Prodigiosin - A Multifaceted Escherichia coli Antimicrobial Agent.

    PubMed

    Danevčič, Tjaša; Borić Vezjak, Maja; Zorec, Maša; Stopar, David

    2016-01-01

    Despite a considerable interest in prodigiosin, the mechanism of its antibacterial activity is still poorly understood. In this work, Escherichia coli cells were treated with prodigiosin to determine its antimicrobial effect on bacterial physiology. The effect of prodigiosin was concentration dependent. In prodigiosin treated cells above MIC value no significant DNA damage or cytoplasmic membrane disintegration was observed. The outer membrane, however, becomes leaky. Cells had severely decreased respiration activity. In prodigiosin treated cells protein and RNA synthesis were inhibited, cells were elongated but could not divide. Pre-treatment with prodigiosin improved E. coli survival rate in media containing ampicillin, kanamycin and erythromycin but not phleomycin. The results suggest that prodigiosin acts as a bacteriostatic agent in E. coli cells. If prodigiosin was diluted, cells resumed growth. The results indicate that prodigiosin has distinct mode of antibacterial action in different bacteria.

  11. Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli in Central Greece: prevalence and virulence genes of O157:H7 and non-O157 in animal feces, vegetables, and humans.

    PubMed

    Pinaka, O; Pournaras, S; Mouchtouri, V; Plakokefalos, E; Katsiaflaka, A; Kolokythopoulou, F; Barboutsi, E; Bitsolas, N; Hadjichristodoulou, C

    2013-11-01

    In Greece, Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) have only been sporadically reported. The objective of this study was to estimate the prevalence of STEC and Escherichia coli O157:H7 in farm animals, vegetables, and humans in Greece. A total number of 1,010 fecal samples were collected from farm animals (sheep, goats, cattle, chickens, pigs), 667 diarrheal samples from humans, and 60 from vegetables, which were cultured in specific media for STEC isolates. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to detect toxin-producing colonies, which, subsequently, were subjected to a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for stx1, stx2, eae, rfbE O157, and fliC h7 genes. Eighty isolates (7.9 %) from animal samples were found to produce Shiga toxin by ELISA, while by PCR, O157 STEC isolates were detected from 8 (0.8 %) samples and non-O157 STEC isolates from 43 (4.2 %) samples. STEC isolates were recovered mainly from sheep and goats, rarely from cattle, and not from pigs and chickens, suggesting that small ruminants constitute a potential risk for human infections. However, only three human specimens (0.4 %) were positive for the detection of Shiga toxins and all were PCR-negative. Similarly, all 60 vegetable samples were negative for toxin production and for toxin genes, but three samples (two roman rockets and one spinach) were positive by PCR for rfbE O157 and fliC h7 genes. These findings indicate that sheep, goats, cattle, and leafy vegetables can be a reservoir of STEC and Escherichia coli O157:H7 isolates in Greece, which are still rarely detected among humans. PMID:23677425

  12. Biodegradation of Aromatic Compounds by Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Díaz, Eduardo; Ferrández, Abel; Prieto, María A.; García, José L.

    2001-01-01

    Although Escherichia coli has long been recognized as the best-understood living organism, little was known about its abilities to use aromatic compounds as sole carbon and energy sources. This review gives an extensive overview of the current knowledge of the catabolism of aromatic compounds by E. coli. After giving a general overview of the aromatic compounds that E. coli strains encounter and mineralize in the different habitats that they colonize, we provide an up-to-date status report on the genes and proteins involved in the catabolism of such compounds, namely, several aromatic acids (phenylacetic acid, 3- and 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid, phenylpropionic acid, 3-hydroxyphenylpropionic acid, and 3-hydroxycinnamic acid) and amines (phenylethylamine, tyramine, and dopamine). Other enzymatic activities acting on aromatic compounds in E. coli are also reviewed and evaluated. The review also reflects the present impact of genomic research and how the analysis of the whole E. coli genome reveals novel aromatic catabolic functions. Moreover, evolutionary considerations derived from sequence comparisons between the aromatic catabolic clusters of E. coli and homologous clusters from an increasing number of bacteria are also discussed. The recent progress in the understanding of the fundamentals that govern the degradation of aromatic compounds in E. coli makes this bacterium a very useful model system to decipher biochemical, genetic, evolutionary, and ecological aspects of the catabolism of such compounds. In the last part of the review, we discuss strategies and concepts to metabolically engineer E. coli to suit specific needs for biodegradation and biotransformation of aromatics and we provide several examples based on selected studies. Finally, conclusions derived from this review may serve as a lead for future research and applications. PMID:11729263

  13. AatA Is a Novel Autotransporter and Virulence Factor of Avian Pathogenic Escherichia coli▿

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ganwu; Feng, Yaping; Kariyawasam, Subhashinie; Tivendale, Kelly A.; Wannemuehler, Yvonne; Zhou, Fanghong; Logue, Catherine M.; Miller, Cathy L.; Nolan, Lisa K.

    2010-01-01

    Autotransporters (AT) are widespread in Gram-negative bacteria, and many of them are involved in virulence. An open reading frame (APECO1_O1CoBM96) encoding a novel AT was located in the pathogenicity island of avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) O1's virulence plasmid, pAPEC-O1-ColBM. This 3.5-kb APEC autotransporter gene (aatA) is predicted to encode a 123.7-kDa protein with a 25-amino-acid signal peptide, an 857-amino-acid passenger domain, and a 284-amino-acid β domain. The three-dimensional structure of AatA was also predicted by the threading method using the I-TASSER online server and then was refined using four-body contact potentials. Molecular analysis of AatA revealed that it is translocated to the cell surface, where it elicits antibody production in infected chickens. Gene prevalence analysis indicated that aatA is strongly associated with E. coli from avian sources but not with E. coli isolated from human hosts. Also, AatA was shown to enhance adhesion of APEC to chicken embryo fibroblast cells and to contribute to APEC virulence. PMID:20028805

  14. Genomic anatomy of Escherichia coli O157:H7 outbreaks.

    PubMed

    Eppinger, Mark; Mammel, Mark K; Leclerc, Joseph E; Ravel, Jacques; Cebula, Thomas A

    2011-12-13

    The rapid emergence of Escherichia coli O157:H7 from an unknown strain in 1982 to the dominant hemorrhagic E. coli serotype in the United States and the cause of widespread outbreaks of human food-borne illness highlights a need to evaluate critically the extent to which genomic plasticity of this important enteric pathogen contributes to its pathogenic potential and its evolution as well as its adaptation in different ecological niches. Aimed at a better understanding of the evolution of the E. coli O157:H7 pathogenome, the present study presents the high-quality sequencing and comparative phylogenomic analysis of a comprehensive panel of 25 E. coli O157:H7 strains associated with three nearly simultaneous food-borne outbreaks of human disease in the United States. Here we present a population genetic analysis of more than 200 related strains recovered from patients, contaminated produce, and zoonotic sources. High-resolution phylogenomic approaches allow the dynamics of pathogenome evolution to be followed at a high level of phylogenetic accuracy and resolution. SNP discovery and study of genome architecture and prophage content identified numerous biomarkers to assess the extent of genetic diversity within a set of clinical and environmental strains. A total of 1,225 SNPs were identified in the present study and are now available for typing of the E. coli O157:H7 lineage. These data should prove useful for the development of a refined phylogenomic framework for forensic, diagnostic, and epidemiological studies to define better risk in response to novel and emerging E. coli O157:H7 resistance and virulence phenotypes. PMID:22135463

  15. Genomic anatomy of Escherichia coli O157:H7 outbreaks

    PubMed Central

    Eppinger, Mark; Mammel, Mark K.; Leclerc, Joseph E.; Ravel, Jacques; Cebula, Thomas A.

    2011-01-01

    The rapid emergence of Escherichia coli O157:H7 from an unknown strain in 1982 to the dominant hemorrhagic E. coli serotype in the United States and the cause of widespread outbreaks of human food-borne illness highlights a need to evaluate critically the extent to which genomic plasticity of this important enteric pathogen contributes to its pathogenic potential and its evolution as well as its adaptation in different ecological niches. Aimed at a better understanding of the evolution of the E. coli O157:H7 pathogenome, the present study presents the high-quality sequencing and comparative phylogenomic analysis of a comprehensive panel of 25 E. coli O157:H7 strains associated with three nearly simultaneous food-borne outbreaks of human disease in the United States. Here we present a population genetic analysis of more than 200 related strains recovered from patients, contaminated produce, and zoonotic sources. High-resolution phylogenomic approaches allow the dynamics of pathogenome evolution to be followed at a high level of phylogenetic accuracy and resolution. SNP discovery and study of genome architecture and prophage content identified numerous biomarkers to assess the extent of genetic diversity within a set of clinical and environmental strains. A total of 1,225 SNPs were identified in the present study and are now available for typing of the E. coli O157:H7 lineage. These data should prove useful for the development of a refined phylogenomic framework for forensic, diagnostic, and epidemiological studies to define better risk in response to novel and emerging E. coli O157:H7 resistance and virulence phenotypes. PMID:22135463

  16. Implications of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli genomics for vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Sjöling, Åsa; von Mentzer, Astrid; Svennerholm, Ann-Mari

    2015-04-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality caused by diarrhea in children less than 5 years of age in low- and middle-income countries. Despite a wealth of research elucidating the mechanisms of disease, the immunological responses and vaccine development, ETEC is still relatively uncharacterized when it comes to regulation of virulence and detailed immune mechanisms. The recent emergence of next-generation sequencing now offers the possibility to screen genomes of ETEC strains isolated globally to identify novel vaccine targets in addition to those already established. In this review, we discuss how recent findings on ETEC genomics using novel sequencing techniques will aid in finding novel protective antigens that can be used in vaccine approaches. PMID:25540974

  17. Covert operations of uropathogenic Escherichia coli within the urinary tract.

    PubMed

    Bower, Jean M; Eto, Danelle S; Mulvey, Matthew A

    2005-01-01

    Entry into host cells is required for many bacterial pathogens to effectively disseminate within a host, avoid immune detection and cause disease. In recent years, many ostensibly extracellular bacteria have been shown to act as opportunistic intracellular pathogens. Among these are strains of uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC), the primary causative agents of urinary tract infections (UTIs). UPEC are able to transiently invade, survive and multiply within the host cells and tissues constituting the urinary tract. Invasion of host cells by UPEC is promoted independently by distinct virulence factors, including cytotoxic necrotizing factor, Afa/Dr adhesins, and type 1 pili. Here we review the diverse mechanisms and consequences of host cell invasion by UPEC, focusing also on the impact of these processes on the persistence and recurrence of UTIs.

  18. Implications of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli genomics for vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Sjöling, Åsa; von Mentzer, Astrid; Svennerholm, Ann-Mari

    2015-04-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality caused by diarrhea in children less than 5 years of age in low- and middle-income countries. Despite a wealth of research elucidating the mechanisms of disease, the immunological responses and vaccine development, ETEC is still relatively uncharacterized when it comes to regulation of virulence and detailed immune mechanisms. The recent emergence of next-generation sequencing now offers the possibility to screen genomes of ETEC strains isolated globally to identify novel vaccine targets in addition to those already established. In this review, we discuss how recent findings on ETEC genomics using novel sequencing techniques will aid in finding novel protective antigens that can be used in vaccine approaches.

  19. Covert Operations of Uropathogenic Escherichia coli within the Urinary Tract

    PubMed Central

    Bower, Jean M.; Eto, Danelle S.; Mulvey, Matthew A.

    2008-01-01

    Entry into host cells is required for many bacterial pathogens to effectively disseminate within a host, avoid immune detection and cause disease. In recent years, many ostensibly extracellular bacteria have been shown to act as opportunistic intracellular pathogens. Among these are strains of uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC), the primary causative agents of urinary tract infections (UTIs). UPEC are able to transiently invade, survive and multiply within the host cells and tissues constituting the urinary tract. Invasion of host cells by UPEC is promoted independently by distinct virulence factors, including cytotoxic necrotizing factor, Afa/Dr adhesins, and type 1 pili. Here we review the diverse mechanisms and consequences of host cell invasion by UPEC, focusing also on the impact of these processes on the persistence and recurrence of UTIs. PMID:15569242

  20. Sorbitol-negative phenotype among enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli strains of different serotypes and from different sources.

    PubMed Central

    Ojeda, A; Prado, V; Martinez, J; Arellano, C; Borczyk, A; Johnson, W; Lior, H; Levine, M M

    1995-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) strains detected with DNA probes (for virulence plasmid and Shiga-like toxins) from subjects with hemolytic-uremic syndrome (n = 19) or diarrhea (n = 41) or asymptomatic carriers (n = 29) were examined for sorbitol fermentability, as were enterotoxigenic (n = 40), enteropathogenic (n = 40), and enteroinvasive (n = 40) E. coli and urinary tract infection (n = 40) strains and normal flora E. coli strains (n = 40). Sorbitol negativity was common only in EHEC, particularly among strains from severe clinical infections. All 19 EHEC strains from patients with hemolytic-uremic syndrome, irrespective of O:H serotype or Shiga-like toxin genotype, were sorbitol negative. PMID:7559979

  1. Sorbitol-negative phenotype among enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli strains of different serotypes and from different sources.

    PubMed

    Ojeda, A; Prado, V; Martinez, J; Arellano, C; Borczyk, A; Johnson, W; Lior, H; Levine, M M

    1995-08-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) strains detected with DNA probes (for virulence plasmid and Shiga-like toxins) from subjects with hemolytic-uremic syndrome (n = 19) or diarrhea (n = 41) or asymptomatic carriers (n = 29) were examined for sorbitol fermentability, as were enterotoxigenic (n = 40), enteropathogenic (n = 40), and enteroinvasive (n = 40) E. coli and urinary tract infection (n = 40) strains and normal flora E. coli strains (n = 40). Sorbitol negativity was common only in EHEC, particularly among strains from severe clinical infections. All 19 EHEC strains from patients with hemolytic-uremic syndrome, irrespective of O:H serotype or Shiga-like toxin genotype, were sorbitol negative.

  2. Urovirulence determinants in Escherichia coli isolates causing first-episode and recurrent cystitis in women.

    PubMed

    Stapleton, A; Moseley, S; Stamm, W E

    1991-04-01

    To assess the prevalence of urovirulence determinants among Escherichia coli isolates from women with acute uncomplicated cystitis, 121 isolates from 87 women with first-episode or recurrent cystitis and 156 fecal isolates from 52 women without recent urinary tract infection were tested using DNA probes for P fimbriae, hemolysin, aerobactin, and diffuse adhesin and for expression of hemolysin and P and F adhesins. P fimbrial genotype (P = .002), hemolysin phenotype (P = .007), and the diffuse adhesin determinant (P = .03), but not aerobactin, were found more frequently in E. coli from women with acute cystitis, and expression of the F adhesin (41%) was more common than the P adhesin (24%; P = .001). E. coli isolates that caused cystitis in women using diaphragms had fewer virulence determinants than those from nonusers (P = .04), suggesting that diaphragm use may allow infection with less virulent E. coli.

  3. Logarithmic Sensing in Escherichia coli Bacterial Chemotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Kalinin, Yevgeniy V.; Jiang, Lili; Tu, Yuhai; Wu, Mingming

    2009-01-01

    We studied the response of swimming Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria in a comprehensive set of well-controlled chemical concentration gradients using a newly developed microfluidic device and cell tracking imaging technique. In parallel, we carried out a multi-scale theoretical modeling of bacterial chemotaxis taking into account the relevant internal signaling pathway dynamics, and predicted bacterial chemotactic responses at the cellular level. By measuring the E. coli cell density profiles across the microfluidic channel at various spatial gradients of ligand concentration grad[L] and the average ligand concentration [L]¯near the peak chemotactic response region, we demonstrated unambiguously in both experiments and model simulation that the mean chemotactic drift velocity of E. coli cells increased monotonically with grad [L]/[L]¯ or ∼grad(log[L])—that is E. coli cells sense the spatial gradient of the logarithmic ligand concentration. The exact range of the log-sensing regime was determined. The agreements between the experiments and the multi-scale model simulation verify the validity of the theoretical model, and revealed that the key microscopic mechanism for logarithmic sensing in bacterial chemotaxis is the adaptation kinetics, in contrast to explanations based directly on ligand occupancy. PMID:19289068

  4. Profiling of Escherichia coli Chromosome database.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Yukiko; Niki, Hironori; Kato, Jun-ichi

    2008-01-01

    The Profiling of Escherichia coli Chromosome (PEC) database (http://www.shigen.nig.ac.jp/ecoli/pec/) is designed to allow E. coli researchers to efficiently access information from functional genomics studies. The database contains two principal types of data: gene essentiality and a large collection of E. coli genetic research resources. The essentiality data are based on data compilation from published single-gene essentiality studies and on cell growth studies of large-deletion mutants. Using the circular and linear viewers for both whole genomes and the minimal genome, users can not only gain an overview of the genome structure but also retrieve information on contigs, gene products, mutants, deletions, and so forth. In particular, genome-wide exhaustive mutants are an essential resource for studying E. coli gene functions. Although the genomic database was constructed independently from the genetic resources database, users may seamlessly access both types of data. In addition to these data, the PEC database also provides a summary of homologous genes of other bacterial genomes and of protein structure information, with a comprehensive interface. The PEC is thus a convenient and useful platform for contemporary E. coli researchers. PMID:18392982

  5. tkt1, located on a novel pathogenicity island, is prevalent in avian and human extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli are important pathogens of human and animal hosts. Some human and avian extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli are indistinguishable on the basis of diseases caused, multilocus sequence and phylogenetic typing, carriage of large virulence plasmids and traits known to be associated with extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli virulence. Results The gene tkt1 identified by a previous signature-tagged transposon mutagenesis study, was found on a 16-kb genomic island of avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) O1, the first pathogenic Escherichia coli strain whose genome has been completely sequenced. tkt1 was present in 39.6% (38/96) of pathogenic Escherichia coli strains, while only 6.25% (3/48) of E. coli from the feces of apparently healthy chickens was positive. Further, tkt1 was predominantly present in extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli belonging to the B2 phylogenetic group, as compared to extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli of other phylogenetic groups. The tkt1-containing genomic island is inserted between the metE and ysgA genes of the E. coli K12 genome. Among different extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli of the B2 phylogenetic group, 61.7% of pathogenic Escherichia coli, 80.6% of human uropathogenic E.coli and 94.1% of human neonatal meningitis-causing E. coli, respectively, harbor a complete copy of this island; whereas, only a few avian fecal E. coli strains contained the complete island. Functional analysis showed that Tkt1 confers very little transketolase activity but is involved in peptide nitrogen metabolism. Conclusion These results suggest tkt1 and its corresponding genomic island are frequently associated with avian and human ExPEC and are involved in bipeptide metabolism. PMID:22471764

  6. Starved Escherichia coli preserve reducing power under nitric oxide stress.

    PubMed

    Gowers, Glen-Oliver F; Robinson, Jonathan L; Brynildsen, Mark P

    2016-07-15

    Nitric oxide (NO) detoxification enzymes, such as NO dioxygenase (NOD) and NO reductase (NOR), are important to the virulence of numerous bacteria. Pathogens use these defense systems to ward off immune-generated NO, and they do so in environments that contain additional stressors, such as reactive oxygen species, nutrient deprivation, and acid stress. NOD and NOR both use reducing equivalents to metabolically deactivate NO, which suggests that nutrient deprivation could negatively impact their functionality. To explore the relationship between NO detoxification and nutrient deprivation, we examined the ability of Escherichia coli to detoxify NO under different levels of carbon source availability in aerobic cultures. We observed failure of NO detoxification under both carbon source limitation and starvation, and those failures could have arisen from inabilities to synthesize Hmp (NOD of E. coli) and/or supply it with sufficient NADH (preferred electron donor). We found that when limited quantities of carbon source were provided, NO detoxification failed due to insufficient NADH, whereas starvation prevented Hmp synthesis, which enabled cells to maintain their NADH levels. This maintenance of NADH levels under starvation was confirmed to be dependent on the absence of Hmp. Intriguingly, these data show that under NO stress, carbon-starved E. coli are better positioned with regard to reducing power to cope with other stresses than cells that had consumed an exhaustible amount of carbon. PMID:27207837

  7. Analysis of Genome Plasticity in Pathogenic and Commensal Escherichia coli Isolates by Use of DNA Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Dobrindt, Ulrich; Agerer, Franziska; Michaelis, Kai; Janka, Andreas; Buchrieser, Carmen; Samuelson, Martin; Svanborg, Catharina; Gottschalk, Gerhard; Karch, Helge; Hacker, Jörg

    2003-01-01

    Genomes of prokaryotes differ significantly in size and DNA composition. Escherichia coli is considered a model organism to analyze the processes involved in bacterial genome evolution, as the species comprises numerous pathogenic and commensal variants. Pathogenic and nonpathogenic E. coli strains differ in the presence and absence of additional DNA elements contributing to specific virulence traits and also in the presence and absence of additional genetic information. To analyze the genetic diversity of pathogenic and commensal E. coli isolates, a whole-genome approach was applied. Using DNA arrays, the presence of all translatable open reading frames (ORFs) of nonpathogenic E. coli K-12 strain MG1655 was investigated in 26 E. coli isolates, including various extraintestinal and intestinal pathogenic E. coli isolates, 3 pathogenicity island deletion mutants, and commensal and laboratory strains. Additionally, the presence of virulence-associated genes of E. coli was determined using a DNA “pathoarray” developed in our laboratory. The frequency and distributional pattern of genomic variations vary widely in different E. coli strains. Up to 10% of the E. coli K-12-specific ORFs were not detectable in the genomes of the different strains. DNA sequences described for extraintestinal or intestinal pathogenic E. coli are more frequently detectable in isolates of the same origin than in other pathotypes. Several genes coding for virulence or fitness factors are also present in commensal E. coli isolates. Based on these results, the conserved E. coli core genome is estimated to consist of at least 3,100 translatable ORFs. The absence of K-12-specific ORFs was detectable in all chromosomal regions. These data demonstrate the great genome heterogeneity and genetic diversity among E. coli strains and underline the fact that both the acquisition and deletion of DNA elements are important processes involved in the evolution of prokaryotes. PMID:12618447

  8. Role of wild birds as carriers of multi-drug resistant Escherichia coli and Escherichia vulneris

    PubMed Central

    Shobrak, Mohammed Y.; Abo-Amer, Aly E.

    2014-01-01

    Emergence and distribution of multi-drug resistant (MDR) bacteria in environments pose a risk to human and animal health. A total of 82 isolates of Escherichia spp. were recovered from cloacal swabs of migrating and non-migrating wild birds. All bacterial isolates were identified and characterized morphologically and biochemically. 72% and 50% of isolates recovered from non-migrating and migrating birds, respectively, showed positive congo red dye binding (a virulence factor). Also, hemolysin production (a virulence factor) was showed in 8% of isolates recovered from non-migrating birds and 75% of isolates recovered from migrating birds. All isolates recovered from non-migrating birds were found resistant to Oxacillin while all isolates recovered from migrating birds demonstrated resistance to Oxacillin, Chloramphenicol, Oxytetracycline and Lincomycin. Some bacterial isolates recovered from non-migrating birds and migrating birds exhibited MDR phenotype. The MDR isolates were further characterized by API 20E and 16S rRNA as E. coli and E. vulneris. MDR Escherichia isolates contain ~1–5 plasmids of high-molecular weights. Accordingly, wild birds could create a potential threat to human and animal health by transmitting MDR bacteria to water streams and other environmental sources through their faecal residues, and to remote regions by migration. PMID:25763023

  9. Role of wild birds as carriers of multi-drug resistant Escherichia coli and Escherichia vulneris.

    PubMed

    Shobrak, Mohammed Y; Abo-Amer, Aly E

    2014-01-01

    Emergence and distribution of multi-drug resistant (MDR) bacteria in environments pose a risk to human and animal health. A total of 82 isolates of Escherichia spp. were recovered from cloacal swabs of migrating and non-migrating wild birds. All bacterial isolates were identified and characterized morphologically and biochemically. 72% and 50% of isolates recovered from non-migrating and migrating birds, respectively, showed positive congo red dye binding (a virulence factor). Also, hemolysin production (a virulence factor) was showed in 8% of isolates recovered from non-migrating birds and 75% of isolates recovered from migrating birds. All isolates recovered from non-migrating birds were found resistant to Oxacillin while all isolates recovered from migrating birds demonstrated resistance to Oxacillin, Chloramphenicol, Oxytetracycline and Lincomycin. Some bacterial isolates recovered from non-migrating birds and migrating birds exhibited MDR phenotype. The MDR isolates were further characterized by API 20E and 16S rRNA as E. coli and E. vulneris. MDR Escherichia isolates contain ~1-5 plasmids of high-molecular weights. Accordingly, wild birds could create a potential threat to human and animal health by transmitting MDR bacteria to water streams and other environmental sources through their faecal residues, and to remote regions by migration.

  10. [Recombinant protein production in Escherichia coli].

    PubMed

    Nuc, Przemysław; Nuc, Katarzyna

    2006-01-01

    Growing needs for efficient recombinant production pose new challenges; starting from cell growth optimization under overexpression conditions, improving vectors, gene and protein sequence to suit them to protein biosynthesis machinery of the host, through extending the knowledge of protein folding, fusion protein construction, and coexpression systems, to improvements in protein purification and renaturation technologies. Hitherto Escherichia coli is the most defined and the cheapest protein biosynthesis system. With its wealth of available mutants tested is the best suited to economically test new gene constructs and to scale up the recombinant protein production.

  11. Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli: foe or innocent bystander?

    PubMed

    Hu, J; Torres, A G

    2015-08-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) remain one the most important pathogens infecting children and they are one of the main causes of persistent diarrhoea worldwide. Historically, typical EPEC (tEPEC), defined as those isolates with the attaching and effacement (A/E) genotype (eae(+)), which possess bfpA(+) and lack the stx(-) genes are found strongly associated with diarrhoeal cases. However, occurrence of atypical EPEC (aEPEC; eae(+)bfpA(-)stx(-)) in diarrhoeal and asymptomatic hosts has made investigators question the role of these pathogens in human disease. Current epidemiological data are helping to answer the question of whether EPEC is mainly a foe or an innocent bystander during infection.

  12. Escherichia coli growth under modeled reduced gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Paul W.; Meyer, Michelle L.; Leff, Laura G.

    2004-01-01

    Bacteria exhibit varying responses to modeled reduced gravity that can be simulated by clino-rotation. When Escherichia coli was subjected to different rotation speeds during clino-rotation, significant differences between modeled reduced gravity and normal gravity controls were observed only at higher speeds (30-50 rpm). There was no apparent affect of removing samples on the results obtained. When E. coli was grown in minimal medium (at 40 rpm), cell size was not affected by modeled reduced gravity and there were few differences in cell numbers. However, in higher nutrient conditions (i.e., dilute nutrient broth), total cell numbers were higher and cells were smaller under reduced gravity compared to normal gravity controls. Overall, the responses to modeled reduced gravity varied with nutrient conditions; larger surface to volume ratios may help compensate for the zone of nutrient depletion around the cells under modeled reduced gravity.

  13. Engineering the Escherichia coli Fermentative Metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orencio-Trejo, M.; Utrilla, J.; Fernández-Sandoval, M. T.; Huerta-Beristain, G.; Gosset, G.; Martinez, A.

    Fermentative metabolism constitutes a fundamental cellular capacity for industrial biocatalysis. Escherichia coli is an important microorganism in the field of metabolic engineering for its well-known molecular characteristics and its rapid growth. It can adapt to different growth conditions and is able to grow in the presence or absence of oxygen. Through the use of metabolic pathway engineering and bioprocessing techniques, it is possible to explore the fundamental cellular properties and to exploit its capacity to be applied as industrial biocatalysts to produce a wide array of chemicals. The objective of this chapter is to review the metabolic engineering efforts carried out with E. coli by manipulating the central carbon metabolism and fermentative pathways to obtain strains that produce metabolites with high titers, such as ethanol, alanine, lactate and succinate.

  14. Sharing of Escherichia coli sequence type ST131 and other multidrug-resistant and Urovirulent E. coli strains among dogs and cats within a household.

    PubMed

    Johnson, James R; Miller, Sybille; Johnston, Brian; Clabots, Connie; Debroy, Chitrita

    2009-11-01

    A multidrug-resistant (MDR) Escherichia coli strain from a human-associated pulsotype within sequence type ST131 (O25:H4) colonized three of five dogs and cats within a household. Of the four other colonizing strains identified, two were MDR and two colonized multiple hosts. The ST131 strain uniquely exhibited high resistance and virulence scores.

  15. Escherichia coli as a bioreporter in ecotoxicology.

    PubMed

    Robbens, Johan; Dardenne, Freddy; Devriese, Lisa; De Coen, Wim; Blust, Ronny

    2010-11-01

    Ecotoxicological assessment relies to a large extent on the information gathered with surrogate species and the extrapolation of test results across species and different levels of biological organisation. Bacteria have long been used as a bioreporter for genotoxic testing and general toxicity. Today, it is clear that bacteria have the potential for screening of other toxicological endpoints. Escherichia coli has been studied for years; in-depth knowledge of its biochemistry and genetics makes it the most proficient prokaryote for the development of new toxicological assays. Several assays have been designed with E. coli as a bioreporter, and the recent trend to develop novel, better advanced reporters makes bioreporter development one of the most dynamic in ecotoxicology. Based on in-depth knowledge of E. coli, new assays are being developed or existing ones redesigned, thanks to the availability of new reporter genes and new or improved substrates. The technological evolution towards easier and more sensitive detection of different gene products is another important aspect. Often, this requires the redesign of the bacterium to make it compatible with the novel measuring tests. Recent advances in surface chemistry and nanoelectronics open the perspective for advanced reporter based on novel measuring platforms and with an online potential. In this article, we will discuss the use of E. coli-based bioreporters in ecotoxicological applications as well as some innovative sensors awaited for the future.

  16. Engineering Escherichia coli for methanol conversion.

    PubMed

    Müller, Jonas E N; Meyer, Fabian; Litsanov, Boris; Kiefer, Patrick; Potthoff, Eva; Heux, Stéphanie; Quax, Wim J; Wendisch, Volker F; Brautaset, Trygve; Portais, Jean-Charles; Vorholt, Julia A

    2015-03-01

    Methylotrophic bacteria utilize methanol and other reduced one-carbon compounds as their sole source of carbon and energy. For this purpose, these bacteria evolved a number of specialized enzymes and pathways. Here, we used a synthetic biology approach to select and introduce a set of "methylotrophy genes" into Escherichia coli based on in silico considerations and flux balance analysis to enable methanol dissimilation and assimilation. We determined that the most promising approach allowing the utilization of methanol was the implementation of NAD-dependent methanol dehydrogenase and the establishment of the ribulose monophosphate cycle by expressing the genes for hexulose-6-phosphate synthase (Hps) and 6-phospho-3-hexuloisomerase (Phi). To test for the best-performing enzymes in the heterologous host, a number of enzyme candidates from different donor organisms were selected and systematically analyzed for their in vitro and in vivo activities in E. coli. Among these, Mdh2, Hps and Phi originating from Bacillus methanolicus were found to be the most effective. Labeling experiments using (13)C methanol with E. coli producing these enzymes showed up to 40% incorporation of methanol into central metabolites. The presence of the endogenous glutathione-dependent formaldehyde oxidation pathway of E. coli did not adversely affect the methanol conversion rate. Taken together, the results of this study represent a major advancement towards establishing synthetic methylotrophs by gene transfer.

  17. Typical Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli Is the Most Prevalent Pathotype among E. coli Strains Causing Diarrhea in Mongolian Children

    PubMed Central

    Sarantuya, Jav; Nishi, Junichiro; Wakimoto, Naoko; Erdene, Shirchin; Nataro, James P.; Sheikh, Jalaluddin; Iwashita, Mayumi; Manago, Kunihiro; Tokuda, Koichi; Yoshinaga, Masao; Miyata, Koichiro; Kawano, Yoshifumi

    2004-01-01

    Diarrhea remains one of the main sources of morbidity and mortality in the world, and a large proportion is caused by diarrheagenic Escherichia coli. In Mongolia, the epidemiology of diarrheagenic E. coli has not been well studied. A total of 238 E. coli strains from children with sporadic diarrhea and 278 E. coli strains from healthy children were examined by PCR for 10 virulence genes: enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) eae, tir, and bfpA; enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) lt and st; enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC) ipaH; enterohemorragic E. coli stx1 and stx2; and enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC) aggR and astA. EAEC strains without AggR were identified by the HEp-2 cell adherence test. The detection of EAEC, ETEC, EPEC, and EIEC was significantly associated with diarrhea. The incidence of EAEC (15.1%), defined by either a molecular or a phenotypic assay, was higher in the diarrheal group than any other category (0 to 6.0%). The incidence of AggR-positive EAEC in the diarrheal group was significantly higher than in the control group (8.0 versus 1.4%; P = 0.0004), while that of AggR-negative EAEC was not (7.1 versus 4.3%). Nineteen AggR-positive EAEC strains harbored other EAEC virulence genes—aggA, 2 (5.5%); aafA, 4 (11.1%); agg-3a, 5 (13.8%); aap, 8 (22.2%); aatA, 11 (30.5%); capU, 9 (25.0%); pet, 6 (16.6%); and set, 3 (8.3%)—and showed 15 genotypes. EAEC may be an important pathogen of sporadic diarrhea in Mongolian children. Genetic analysis showed the heterogeneity of EAEC but illustrated the importance of the AggR regulon (denoting typical EAEC) as a marker for virulent EAEC strains. PMID:14715743

  18. GLYCOLATE METABOLISM IN ESCHERICHIA COLI1

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Robert W.; Hayashi, James A.

    1962-01-01

    Hansen, Robert W. (University of Illinois College of Medicine, Chicago) and James A. Hayashi. Glycolate metabolism in Escherichia coli. J. Bacteriol. 83:679–687. 1962.—This study of glycolate-adapted Escherichia coli indicates that the most probable route for utilization of the substrate includes glyceric acid, 3-phosphoglyceric acid, and the tricarboxylic acid cycle. A glyceric acid dehydrogenase, which reduces tartronic semialdehyde to glycerate in the presence of reduced diphosphopyridine nucleotide, and a kinase, which catalyzes the formation of 3-phosphoglycerate from glyceric acid and adenosine triphosphate, were shown to be present. Carbon recoveries in growing cultures and manometric data obtained with resting cells showed the complete oxidation of glycolate to carbon dioxide. Measurements of the oxidation of tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates indicated that these compounds are oxidized without lag and at a rate commensurate with the rate of glycolate oxidation. Assays of the enzymes characteristic of known pathways of terminal oxidation, such as isocitratase, malate synthetase, isocitric dehydrogenase, and condensing enzyme, provided further evidence for an operating tricarboxylic acid cycle. A postulated pathway for the utilization of glycolic acid is as follows: glycolate → glycerate → 3-phosphoglycerate → pyruvate → tricarboxylic acid cycle. PMID:13904441

  19. Identification of five Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli genes by Luminex microbead-based suspension array.

    PubMed

    Son, Insook; Binet, Rachel; Lin, Andrew; Hammack, Thomas S; Kase, Julie A

    2015-04-01

    To rapidly identify the presence of potentially virulent O157:H7 and non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC), a PCR-based Luminex suspension assay was developed to detect the genes coding for four virulence factors (stx1, stx2, eae, and ehxA) plus the O157:H7-specific +93 uidA single nucleotide polymorphism.

  20. Production of glycoprotein vaccines in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Conjugate vaccines in which polysaccharide antigens are covalently linked to carrier proteins belong to the most effective and safest vaccines against bacterial pathogens. State-of-the art production of conjugate vaccines using chemical methods is a laborious, multi-step process. In vivo enzymatic coupling using the general glycosylation pathway of Campylobacter jejuni in recombinant Escherichia coli has been suggested as a simpler method for producing conjugate vaccines. In this study we describe the in vivo biosynthesis of two novel conjugate vaccine candidates against Shigella dysenteriae type 1, an important bacterial pathogen causing severe gastro-intestinal disease states mainly in developing countries. Results Two different periplasmic carrier proteins, AcrA from C. jejuni and a toxoid form of Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin were glycosylated with Shigella O antigens in E. coli. Starting from shake flask cultivation in standard complex medium a lab-scale fed-batch process was developed for glycoconjugate production. It was found that efficiency of glycosylation but not carrier protein expression was highly susceptible to the physiological state at induction. After induction glycoconjugates generally appeared later than unglycosylated carrier protein, suggesting that glycosylation was the rate-limiting step for synthesis of conjugate vaccines in E. coli. Glycoconjugate synthesis, in particular expression of oligosaccharyltransferase PglB, strongly inhibited growth of E. coli cells after induction, making it necessary to separate biomass growth and recombinant protein expression phases. With a simple pulse and linear feed strategy and the use of semi-defined glycerol medium, volumetric glycoconjugate yield was increased 30 to 50-fold. Conclusions The presented data demonstrate that glycosylated proteins can be produced in recombinant E. coli at a larger scale. The described methodologies constitute an important step towards cost-effective in vivo