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Sample records for eshre pgd consortium

  1. ESHRE PGD consortium best practice guidelines for fluorescence in situ hybridization-based PGD.

    PubMed

    Harton, G L; Harper, J C; Coonen, E; Pehlivan, T; Vesela, K; Wilton, L

    2011-01-01

    In 2005, the European Society for Human Reproduction and Embryology (ESHRE) PGD Consortium published a set of Guidelines for Best Practice PGD to give information, support and guidance to potential, existing and fledgling PGD programmes. The subsequent years have seen the introduction of new technologies as well as evolution of current techniques. Additionally, in light of recent advice from ESHRE on how practice guidelines should be written and formulated, the Consortium believed it was timely to revise and update the PGD guidelines. Rather than one document that covers all of PGD, the new guidelines are separated into four new documents that apply to different aspects of a PGD programme, i.e. organization of a PGD centre, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)-based testing, amplification-based testing and polar body and embryo biopsy for PGD/preimplantation genetic screening (PGS). Here, we have updated the sections that pertain to FISH-based PGD. PGS has become a highly controversial technique. Opinions of laboratory specialists and clinicians interested in PGD and PGS have been taken into account here. Whereas some believe that PGS does not have a place in clinical medicine, others disagree; therefore, PGS has been included. This document should assist everyone interested in PGD/PGS in developing the best laboratory and clinical practice possible. Topics covered in this guideline include inclusion/exclusion criteria for FISH-based PGD testing, referrals and genetic counselling, preclinical validation of tests, FISH-based testing methods, spreading of cells for analysis, set-up of local IVF centre and transport PGD centres, quality control/ quality assurance and diagnostic confirmation of untransferred embryos.

  2. ESHRE PGD consortium best practice guidelines for organization of a PGD centre for PGD/preimplantation genetic screening.

    PubMed

    Harton, G; Braude, P; Lashwood, A; Schmutzler, A; Traeger-Synodinos, J; Wilton, L; Harper, J C

    2011-01-01

    In 2005, the European Society for Human Reproduction and Embryology (ESHRE) PGD Consortium published a set of Guidelines for Best Practice PGD to give information, support and guidance to potential, existing and fledgling PGD programmes. Subsequent years have seen the introduction of new technologies as well as the evolution of current techniques. Additionally, in light of recent advice from ESHRE on how practice guidelines should be written/formulated, the Consortium believed it was timely to update the PGD guidelines. Rather than one document that covers all of PGD, the new guidelines are separated into four documents, including one relating to organization of the PGD centre and three relating to the methods used: DNA amplification, fluorescence in situ hybridization and biopsy/embryology. Here, we have updated the sections on organization of the PGD centre. One area that has continued to expand is Transport PGD, in which patients are treated at one IVF centre, whereas their gametes/embryos are tested elsewhere, at an independent PGD centre. Transport PGD/preimplantation genetic screening (PGS) has a unique set of challenges with respect to the nature of the sample and the rapid turn-around time required. PGS is currently controversial. Opinions of laboratory specialists and clinicians interested in PGD and PGS have been taken into account here. Current evidence suggests that PGS at cleavage stages is ineffective, but whether PGS at the blastocyst stage or on polar bodies might show improved delivery rates is still unclear. Thus, in this revision, PGS has been included. This document should assist everyone interested in PGD/PGS in developing the best laboratory and clinical practice possible.

  3. ESHRE Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis (PGD) Consortium: preliminary assessment of data from January 1997 to September 1998. ESHRE PGD Consortium Steering Committee.

    PubMed

    Geraedts, J; Handyside, A; Harper, J; Liebaers, I; Sermon, K; Staessen, C; Thornhill, A; Vanderfaeillie, A; Viville, S

    1999-12-01

    The first clinical application of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) was reported almost a decade ago. Since then, the range of genetic defects that can be detected at single cell level has increased dramatically. At the 13th Annual Meeting of ESHRE in Edinburgh in 1997, a PGD Consortium was formed to undertake the first systematic and long-term study of the efficacy and clinical outcome of PGD. We report here the first data collection covering the period of January 1997 to September 1998. Referral data on 323 couples have been collected for a variety of monogenic and chromosomal disorders, providing information about which patients, at risk for which genetic diseases, are interested in PGD. Data were collected on 392 PGD cycles, resulting in 302 embryo transfers and 66 clinical pregnancies. Because of the importance of follow-up of the children born after PGD, participating centres were asked to contribute data on the pregnancies achieved and the children born after PGD since the start of their PGD programme. Data on 82 pregnancies and 110 fetal sacs were collected, and information was available on 79 children. Finally, biopsy, fluorescence in-situ hybridization and polymerase chain reaction protocols were collected, clearly showing that no consensus exists on technical aspects such as which culture medium to use, and emphasizing the role the PGD Consortium could play in setting up guidelines for good laboratory practice. In conclusion, it is clear that the effort of gathering data on PGD cycles is worthwhile and will be continued in the future, preferably using electronic data collection.

  4. Evaluation of PCR-based preimplantation genetic diagnosis applied to monogenic diseases: a collaborative ESHRE PGD consortium study.

    PubMed

    Dreesen, Jos; Destouni, Aspasia; Kourlaba, Georgia; Degn, Birte; Mette, Wulf Christensen; Carvalho, Filipa; Moutou, Celine; Sengupta, Sioban; Dhanjal, Seema; Renwick, Pamela; Davies, Steven; Kanavakis, Emmanouel; Harton, Gary; Traeger-Synodinos, Joanne

    2014-08-01

    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for monogenic disorders currently involves polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods, which must be robust, sensitive and highly accurate, precluding misdiagnosis. Twelve adverse misdiagnoses reported to the ESHRE PGD-Consortium are likely an underestimate. This retrospective study, involving six PGD centres, assessed the validity of PCR-based PGD through reanalysis of untransferred embryos from monogenic-PGD cycles. Data were collected on the genotype concordance at PGD and follow-up from 940 untransferred embryos, including details on the parameters of PGD cycles: category of monogenic disease, embryo morphology, embryo biopsy and genotype assay strategy. To determine the validity of PCR-based PGD, the sensitivity (Se), specificity (Sp) and diagnostic accuracy were calculated. Stratified analyses were also conducted to assess the influence of the parameters above on the validity of PCR-based PGD. The analysis of overall data showed that 93.7% of embryos had been correctly classified at the time of PGD, with Se of 99.2% and Sp of 80.9%. The stratified analyses found that diagnostic accuracy is statistically significantly higher when PGD is performed on two cells versus one cell (P=0.001). Se was significantly higher when multiplex protocols versus singleplex protocols were applied (P=0.005), as well as for PGD applied on cells from good compared with poor morphology embryos (P=0.032). Morphology, however, did not affect diagnostic accuracy. Multiplex PCR-based methods on one cell, are as robust as those on two cells regarding false negative rate, which is the most important criteria for clinical PGD applications. Overall, this study demonstrates the validity, robustness and high diagnostic value of PCR-based PGD.

  5. Evaluation of PCR-based preimplantation genetic diagnosis applied to monogenic diseases: a collaborative ESHRE PGD consortium study

    PubMed Central

    Dreesen, Jos; Destouni, Aspasia; Kourlaba, Georgia; Degn, Birte; Mette, Wulf Christensen; Carvalho, Filipa; Moutou, Celine; Sengupta, Sioban; Dhanjal, Seema; Renwick, Pamela; Davies, Steven; Kanavakis, Emmanouel; Harton, Gary; Traeger-Synodinos, Joanne

    2014-01-01

    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for monogenic disorders currently involves polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods, which must be robust, sensitive and highly accurate, precluding misdiagnosis. Twelve adverse misdiagnoses reported to the ESHRE PGD-Consortium are likely an underestimate. This retrospective study, involving six PGD centres, assessed the validity of PCR-based PGD through reanalysis of untransferred embryos from monogenic-PGD cycles. Data were collected on the genotype concordance at PGD and follow-up from 940 untransferred embryos, including details on the parameters of PGD cycles: category of monogenic disease, embryo morphology, embryo biopsy and genotype assay strategy. To determine the validity of PCR-based PGD, the sensitivity (Se), specificity (Sp) and diagnostic accuracy were calculated. Stratified analyses were also conducted to assess the influence of the parameters above on the validity of PCR-based PGD. The analysis of overall data showed that 93.7% of embryos had been correctly classified at the time of PGD, with Se of 99.2% and Sp of 80.9%. The stratified analyses found that diagnostic accuracy is statistically significantly higher when PGD is performed on two cells versus one cell (P=0.001). Se was significantly higher when multiplex protocols versus singleplex protocols were applied (P=0.005), as well as for PGD applied on cells from good compared with poor morphology embryos (P=0.032). Morphology, however, did not affect diagnostic accuracy. Multiplex PCR-based methods on one cell, are as robust as those on two cells regarding false negative rate, which is the most important criteria for clinical PGD applications. Overall, this study demonstrates the validity, robustness and high diagnostic value of PCR-based PGD. PMID:24301057

  6. ESHRE PGD Consortium data collection XIII: cycles from January to December 2010 with pregnancy follow-up to October 2011.

    PubMed

    De Rycke, M; Belva, F; Goossens, V; Moutou, C; SenGupta, S B; Traeger-Synodinos, J; Coonen, E

    2015-08-01

    How do data in the 13th annual data collection (Data XIII) of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology (ESHRE) PGD Consortium compare with the cumulative data for collections I-XII? The 13th retrospective collection represents valuable data on PGD/PGS cycles, pregnancies and children: the main trend observed is the decrease in the routine implementation of PGS. Since 1999, the PGD Consortium has collected, analysed and published 12 data sets and an overview of the first 10 years of data collections. Data were collected from each participating centre using a FileMaker Pro database (versions 5-11). Separate predesigned FileMaker Pro files were used for the cycles, pregnancies and baby records. The study documented cycles performed during the calendar year 2010 and follow-up of the pregnancies and babies born which resulted from these cycles (until October 2011). Data were submitted by 62 centres (full PGD Consortium members). The submitted data were thoroughly analysed to identify incomplete data entries and corrections were requested from the participating centres. Records remaining with incomplete or inconsistent data were excluded from the calculations. Corrections, calculations and tables were made by expert co-authors. For data collection XIII, 62 centres reported data for 5780 cycles with oocyte retrieval (OR), along with details of the follow-up on 1503 pregnancies and 1152 babies born. A total of 1071 OR were reported for chromosomal abnormalities, 108 OR for sexing for X-linked diseases, 1574 OR for monogenic diseases, 2979 OR for preimplantation genetic screening and 48 OR for social sexing. The findings apply to the 62 participating centres and may not represent worldwide trends in PGD. The annual data collections provide an important resource for data mining and for following trends in PGD practice. None. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology. All

  7. Accreditation of the PGD laboratory.

    PubMed

    Harper, J C; Sengupta, S; Vesela, K; Thornhill, A; Dequeker, E; Coonen, E; Morris, M A

    2010-04-01

    Accreditation according to an internationally recognized standard is increasingly acknowledged as the single most effective route to comprehensive laboratory quality assurance, and many countries are progressively moving towards compulsory accreditation of medical testing laboratories. The ESHRE PGD Consortium and some regulatory bodies recommend that all PGD laboratories should be accredited or working actively towards accreditation, according to the internationally recognized standard ISO 15189, 'Medical laboratories-Particular requirements for quality and competence'. ISO 15189 requires comprehensive quality assurance. Detailed management and technical requirements are defined in the two major chapters. The management requirements address quality management including the quality policy and manual, document control, non-conformities and corrective actions, continual improvement, auditing, management review, contracts, referrals and resolution of complaints. Technical requirements include personnel competence (both technical and medical), equipment, accommodation and environment, and pre-analytical, analytical and post-analytical processes. Emphasis is placed on the particular requirements of patient care: notably sample identification and traceability, test validation and interpretation and reporting of results. Quality indicators must be developed to monitor contributions to patient care and continual improvement. We discuss the implementation of ISO 15189 with a specific emphasis on the PGD laboratory, highlight elements of particular importance or difficulty and provide suggestions of effective and efficient ways to obtain accreditation. The focus is on the European environment although the principles are globally applicable.

  8. ESHRE guideline: management of women with endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Dunselman, G A J; Vermeulen, N; Becker, C; Calhaz-Jorge, C; D'Hooghe, T; De Bie, B; Heikinheimo, O; Horne, A W; Kiesel, L; Nap, A; Prentice, A; Saridogan, E; Soriano, D; Nelen, W

    2014-03-01

    What is the optimal management of women with endometriosis based on the best available evidence in the literature? Using the structured methodology of the Manual for ESHRE Guideline Development, 83 recommendations were formulated that answered the 22 key questions on optimal management of women with endometriosis. The European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology (ESHRE) guideline for the diagnosis and treatment of endometriosis (2005) has been a reference point for best clinical care in endometriosis for years, but this guideline was in need of updating. This guideline was produced by a group of experts in the field using the methodology of the Manual for ESHRE Guideline Development, including a thorough systematic search of the literature, quality assessment of the included papers up to January 2012 and consensus within the guideline group on all recommendations. To ensure input from women with endometriosis, a patient representative was part of the guideline development group. In addition, patient and additional clinical input was collected during the scoping and review phase of the guideline. NA. The guideline provides 83 recommendations on diagnosis of endometriosis and on the treatment of endometriosis-associated pain and infertility, on the management of women in whom the disease is found incidentally (without pain or infertility), on prevention of recurrence of disease and/or painful symptoms, on treatment of menopausal symptoms in patients with a history of endometriosis and on the possible association of endometriosis and malignancy. We identified several areas in care of women with endometriosis for which robust evidence is lacking. These areas were addressed by formulating good practice points (GPP), based on the expert opinion of the guideline group members. Since 32 out of the 83 recommendations for the management of women with endometriosis could not be based on high level evidence and therefore were GPP, the guideline group formulated

  9. PGD for inherited cardiac diseases.

    PubMed

    Kuliev, Anver; Pomerantseva, Ekaterina; Polling, Dana; Verlinsky, Oleg; Rechitsky, Svetlana

    2012-04-01

    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) has been applied for more than 200 different inherited conditions, with expanding application to common disorders with genetic predisposition. One of the recent indications for PGD has been inherited cardiac disease, for which no preclinical diagnosis and preventive management may exist and which may lead to premature or sudden death. This paper presents the first, as far as is known, cumulative experience of PGD for inherited cardiac diseases, including familial hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathy, cardioencephalomyopathy and Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy. A total of 18 PGD cycles were performed, resulting in transfer in 15 of them, which yielded nine unaffected pregnancies and the births of seven disease- or disease predisposition-free children. The data open the prospect of PGD for inherited cardiac diseases, allowing couples carrying cardiac disease predisposing genes to reproduce without much fear of having offspring with these genes, which are at risk for premature or sudden death. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) is currently an established clinical procedure in assisted reproduction and genetic practices. Its application has been expanding beyond traditional indications of prenatal diagnosis and currently includes common disorders with genetic predisposition, such as inherited forms of cancer. This applies also to the diseases with no current prospect of treatment, which may manifest despite presymptomatic diagnosis and follow up, when PGD may provide the only relief for the at-risk couples to reproduce. One of the recent indications for PGD has been inherited cardiac disease, for which no preclinical diagnosis and preventive management may exist and which may lead to premature or sudden death. We present here our first cumulative experience of PGD for inherited cardiac diseases, including familial hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathy, cardioencephalomyopathy and Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy. A

  10. PGD: a pangolin genome hub for the research community.

    PubMed

    Tan, Tze King; Tan, Ka Yun; Hari, Ranjeev; Mohamed Yusoff, Aini; Wong, Guat Jah; Siow, Cheuk Chuen; Mutha, Naresh V R; Rayko, Mike; Komissarov, Aleksey; Dobrynin, Pavel; Krasheninnikova, Ksenia; Tamazian, Gaik; Paterson, Ian C; Warren, Wesley C; Johnson, Warren E; O'Brien, Stephen J; Choo, Siew Woh

    2016-01-01

    Pangolins (order Pholidota) are the only mammals covered by scales. We have recently sequenced and analyzed the genomes of two critically endangered Asian pangolin species, namely the Malayan pangolin (Manis javanica) and the Chinese pangolin (Manis pentadactyla). These complete genome sequences will serve as reference sequences for future research to address issues of species conservation and to advance knowledge in mammalian biology and evolution. To further facilitate the global research effort in pangolin biology, we developed the Pangolin Genome Database (PGD), as a future hub for hosting pangolin genomic and transcriptomic data and annotations, and with useful analysis tools for the research community. Currently, the PGD provides the reference pangolin genome and transcriptome data, gene sequences and functional information, expressed transcripts, pseudogenes, genomic variations, organ-specific expression data and other useful annotations. We anticipate that the PGD will be an invaluable platform for researchers who are interested in pangolin and mammalian research. We will continue updating this hub by including more data, annotation and analysis tools particularly from our research consortium.Database URL: http://pangolin-genome.um.edu.my.

  11. PGD: a pangolin genome hub for the research community

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Tze King; Tan, Ka Yun; Hari, Ranjeev; Mohamed Yusoff, Aini; Wong, Guat Jah; Siow, Cheuk Chuen; Mutha, Naresh V.R.; Rayko, Mike; Komissarov, Aleksey; Dobrynin, Pavel; Krasheninnikova, Ksenia; Tamazian, Gaik; Paterson, Ian C.; Warren, Wesley C.; Johnson, Warren E.; O'Brien, Stephen J.; Choo, Siew Woh

    2016-01-01

    Pangolins (order Pholidota) are the only mammals covered by scales. We have recently sequenced and analyzed the genomes of two critically endangered Asian pangolin species, namely the Malayan pangolin (Manis javanica) and the Chinese pangolin (Manis pentadactyla). These complete genome sequences will serve as reference sequences for future research to address issues of species conservation and to advance knowledge in mammalian biology and evolution. To further facilitate the global research effort in pangolin biology, we developed the Pangolin Genome Database (PGD), as a future hub for hosting pangolin genomic and transcriptomic data and annotations, and with useful analysis tools for the research community. Currently, the PGD provides the reference pangolin genome and transcriptome data, gene sequences and functional information, expressed transcripts, pseudogenes, genomic variations, organ-specific expression data and other useful annotations. We anticipate that the PGD will be an invaluable platform for researchers who are interested in pangolin and mammalian research. We will continue updating this hub by including more data, annotation and analysis tools particularly from our research consortium. Database URL: http://pangolin-genome.um.edu.my PMID:27616775

  12. Acceptable applications of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) among Israeli PGD users.

    PubMed

    Zuckerman, Shachar; Zeevi, David A; Gooldin, Sigal; Altarescu, Gheona

    2017-10-01

    The use of PGD technology to select against genetic disorders and traits is increasing. Although PGD may eliminate some of the obstacles related to conservative options of prenatal diagnosis, it can raise personal, social and moral questions. Ethical issues concerning the justified uses of PGD are a subject of ongoing debate among medical and bioethical communities. Although attitudes toward the acceptable uses of PGD were evaluated among population groups worldwide, bioethics councils were criticized for ignoring public perspectives. In the last decade PGD has been widely used in Israel. The ethical guidelines were created solely by medical-bioethics experts and, some felt, totally isolated from public opinions. Semi-structured in-depth interviews of 37 users (carriers of autosomal recessive, dominant and X-linked disorders, and HLA-matching) were performed. The interviews explored attitudes toward ethical and sociological aspects of PGD. The overall results of this study show highly favorable attitudes of Israeli PGD users toward medical applications. Furthermore, our subjects demonstrate a more permissive stand toward the controversial application of social sex selection albeit with strong objection to esthetic means of selection. PGD users are coping with both genetic disease and load of the PGD procedure. Taking into consideration their opinion is important since it reflects the gains and burdens of these procedures alongside the demand for future optional services. Their attitudes should play an important role in the professional discussion concerning the justified uses of PGD and should significantly influence the design of policy making in this field.

  13. ESHRE Guideline: management of women with premature ovarian insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Webber, L; Davies, M; Anderson, R; Bartlett, J; Braat, D; Cartwright, B; Cifkova, R; de Muinck Keizer-Schrama, S; Hogervorst, E; Janse, F; Liao, L; Vlaisavljevic, V; Zillikens, C; Vermeulen, N

    2016-05-01

    What is the optimal management of women with premature ovarian insufficiency (POI) based on the best available evidence in the literature? The guideline development group (GDG) formulated 99 recommendations answering 31 key questions on the diagnosis and treatment of women with POI. NA. This guideline was produced by a multidisciplinary group of experts in the field using the methodology of the Manual for ESHRE Guideline Development, including a thorough systematic search of the literature, quality assessment of the included papers up to September 2014 and consensus within the guideline group on all recommendations. The GDG included a patient representative to ensure input from women with POI. After finalization of the draft, the European Society for Human Reproduction and Embryology (ESHRE) members and professional organizations were asked to review the guideline. NA. The guideline provides 17 recommendations on diagnosis and assessment of POI and 46 recommendations on the different sequelae of POI and their consequences for monitoring and treatment. Furthermore, 24 recommendations were formulated on hormone replacement therapy in women with POI, and two on alternative and complementary treatment. A chapter on puberty induction resulted in five recommendations. The main limitation of the guideline is that, due to the lack of data, many of the recommendations are based on expert opinion or indirect evidence from studies on post-menopausal women or women with Turner Syndrome. Despite the limitations, the guideline group is confident that this document will be able to guide health care professionals in providing the best practice for managing women with POI given current evidence. Furthermore, the guideline group has formulated research recommendations on the gaps in knowledge identified in the literature searches, in an attempt to stimulate research on the key issues in POI. The guideline was developed and funded by ESHRE, covering expenses associated with the

  14. Implementing PGD/PGD-A in IVF clinics: considerations for the best laboratory approach and management.

    PubMed

    Capalbo, Antonio; Romanelli, Valeria; Cimadomo, Danilo; Girardi, Laura; Stoppa, Marta; Dovere, Lisa; Dell'Edera, Domenico; Ubaldi, Filippo Maria; Rienzi, Laura

    2016-10-01

    For an IVF clinic that wishes to implement preimplantation genetic diagnosis for monogenic diseases (PGD) and for aneuploidy testing (PGD-A), a global improvement is required through all the steps of an IVF treatment and patient care. At present, CCS (Comprehensive Chromosome Screening)-based trophectoderm (TE) biopsy has been demonstrated as a safe, accurate and reproducible approach to conduct PGD-A and possibly also PGD from the same biopsy. Key challenges in PGD/PGD-A implementation cover genetic and reproductive counselling, selection of the most efficient approach for blastocyst biopsy as well as of the best performing molecular technique to conduct CCS and monogenic disease analysis. Three different approaches for TE biopsy can be compared. However, among them, the application of TE biopsy approaches, entailing the zona opening when the expanded blastocyst stage is reached, represent the only biopsy methods suited with a totally undisturbed embryo culture strategy (time lapse-based incubation in a single media). Moreover, contemporary CCS technologies show a different spectrum of capabilities and limits that potentially impact the clinical outcomes, the management and the applicability of the PGD-A itself. In general, CCS approaches that avoid the use of whole genome amplification (WGA) can provide higher reliability of results with lower costs and turnaround time of analysis. The future perspectives are focused on the scrupulous and rigorous clinical validations of novel CCS methods based on targeted approaches that avoid the use of WGA, such as targeted next-generation sequencing technology, to further improve the throughput of analysis and the overall cost-effectiveness of PGD/PGD-A.

  15. The ESHRE/ESGE consensus on the classification of female genital tract congenital anomalies†,‡

    PubMed Central

    Grimbizis, Grigoris F.; Gordts, Stephan; Di Spiezio Sardo, Attilio; Brucker, Sara; De Angelis, Carlo; Gergolet, Marco; Li, Tin-Chiu; Tanos, Vasilios; Brölmann, Hans; Gianaroli, Luca; Campo, Rudi

    2013-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION What classification system is more suitable for the accurate, clear, simple and related to the clinical management categorization of female genital anomalies? SUMMARY ANSWER The new ESHRE/ESGE classification system of female genital anomalies is presented. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY Congenital malformations of the female genital tract are common miscellaneous deviations from normal anatomy with health and reproductive consequences. Until now, three systems have been proposed for their categorization but all of them are associated with serious limitations. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE AND DURATION The European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology (ESHRE) and the European Society for Gynaecological Endoscopy (ESGE) have established a common Working Group, under the name CONUTA (CONgenital UTerine Anomalies), with the goal of developing a new updated classification system. A scientific committee (SC) has been appointed to run the project, looking also for consensus within the scientists working in the field. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS The new system is designed and developed based on (i) scientific research through critical review of current proposals and preparation of an initial proposal for discussion between the experts, (ii) consensus measurement among the experts through the use of the DELPHI procedure and (iii) consensus development by the SC, taking into account the results of the DELPHI procedure and the comments of the experts. Almost 90 participants took part in the process of development of the ESHRE/ESGE classification system, contributing with their structured answers and comments. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE The ESHRE/ESGE classification system is based on anatomy. Anomalies are classified into the following main classes, expressing uterine anatomical deviations deriving from the same embryological origin: U0, normal uterus; U1, dysmorphic uterus; U2, septate uterus; U3, bicorporeal uterus; U4, hemi-uterus; U5, aplastic

  16. The ESHRE/ESGE consensus on the classification of female genital tract congenital anomalies.

    PubMed

    Grimbizis, Grigoris F; Gordts, Stephan; Di Spiezio Sardo, Attilio; Brucker, Sara; De Angelis, Carlo; Gergolet, Marco; Li, Tin-Chiu; Tanos, Vasilios; Brölmann, Hans; Gianaroli, Luca; Campo, Rudi

    2013-08-01

    What classification system is more suitable for the accurate, clear, simple and related to the clinical management categorization of female genital anomalies? The new ESHRE/ESGE classification system of female genital anomalies is presented. Congenital malformations of the female genital tract are common miscellaneous deviations from normal anatomy with health and reproductive consequences. Until now, three systems have been proposed for their categorization but all of them are associated with serious limitations. The European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology (ESHRE) and the European Society for Gynaecological Endoscopy (ESGE) have established a common Working Group, under the name CONUTA (CONgenital UTerine Anomalies), with the goal of developing a new updated classification system. A scientific committee (SC) has been appointed to run the project, looking also for consensus within the scientists working in the field. The new system is designed and developed based on (i) scientific research through critical review of current proposals and preparation of an initial proposal for discussion between the experts, (ii) consensus measurement among the experts through the use of the DELPHI procedure and (iii) consensus development by the SC, taking into account the results of the DELPHI procedure and the comments of the experts. Almost 90 participants took part in the process of development of the ESHRE/ESGE classification system, contributing with their structured answers and comments. The ESHRE/ESGE classification system is based on anatomy. Anomalies are classified into the following main classes, expressing uterine anatomical deviations deriving from the same embryological origin: U0, normal uterus; U1, dysmorphic uterus; U2, septate uterus; U3, bicorporeal uterus; U4, hemi-uterus; U5, aplastic uterus; U6, for still unclassified cases. Main classes have been divided into sub-classes expressing anatomical varieties with clinical significance. Cervical and

  17. Gender eugenics? The ethics of PGD for intersex conditions.

    PubMed

    Sparrow, Robert

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses the ethics of the use of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) to prevent the birth of children with intersex conditions/disorders of sex development (DSDs), such as congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) and androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS). While pediatric surgeries performed on children with ambiguous genitalia have been the topic of intense bioethical controversy, there has been almost no discussion to date of the ethics of the use of PGD to reduce the prevalence of these conditions. I suggest that PGD for those conditions that involve serious medical risks for those born with them is morally permissible and that PGD for other "cosmetic" variations in sexual anatomy is more defensible than might first appear. However, importantly, the arguments that establish the latter claim have radical and disturbing implications for our attitude toward diversity more generally.

  18. Reproductive Endocrinologists' Utilization of Genetic Counselors for Oncofertility and Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis (PGD) Treatment of BRCA1/2 Mutation Carriers.

    PubMed

    Goetsch, Allison L; Wicklund, Catherine; Clayman, Marla L; Woodruff, Teresa K

    2016-06-01

    Genetic counselors believe fertility preservation and preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) discussions to be a part of their role when counseling BRCA1/2 mutation-positive patients. This study is the first to explore reproductive endocrinologists' (REI) practices and attitudes regarding involvement of genetic counselors in the care of BRCA1/2 mutation carriers seeking fertility preservation and PGD. A survey was mailed to 1000 REIs from Reproductive Endocrinology & Infertility (SREI), an American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM) affiliate group. A 14.5 % response rate was achieved; data was analyzed using SPSS software. The majority of participating REIs were found to recommend genetic counseling to cancer patients considering fertility preservation (82 %) and consult with a genetic counselor regarding PGD for hereditary cancer syndromes (92 %). Additionally, REIs consult genetic counselors regarding PGD patient counseling (88 %), genetic testing (78 %), and general genetics questions (66 %). Two areas genetic counselors may further aid REIs are: elicitation of family history, which is useful to determine fertility preservation and PGD intervention timing (32 % of REIs utilize a cancer family history to determine intervention timing); and, interpretation of variants of uncertain significance (VOUS) as cancer panel genetic testing becomes more common (36 % of REIs are unfamiliar with VOUS). Given our findings, the Oncofertility Consortium® created an online resource for genetic counselors focused on fertility preservation education and communication strategies.

  19. Reproductive Endocrinologists’ Utilization of Genetic Counselors for Oncofertility and Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis (PGD) Treatment of BRCA1/2 Mutation Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Goetsch, Allison L.; Wicklund, Catherine; Clayman, Marla L.; Woodruff, Teresa K.

    2016-01-01

    Genetic counselors believe fertility preservation and preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) discussions to be a part of their role when counseling BRCA1/2 mutation-positive patients. This study is the first to explore reproductive endocrinologists’ (REI) practices and attitudes regarding involvement of genetic counselors in the care of BRCA1/2 mutation carriers seeking fertility preservation and PGD. A survey was mailed to 1000 REIs from Reproductive Endocrinology & Infertility (SREI), an American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM) affiliate group. A 14.5 % response rate was achieved; data was analyzed using SPSS software. The majority of participating REIs were found to recommend genetic counseling to cancer patients considering fertility preservation (82 %) and consult with a genetic counselor regarding PGD for hereditary cancer syndromes (92 %). Additionally, REIs consult genetic counselors regarding PGD patient counseling (88 %), genetic testing (78 %), and general genetics questions (66 %). Two areas genetic counselors may further aid REIs are: elicitation of family history, which is useful to determine fertility preservation and PGD intervention timing (32 % of REIs utilize a cancer family history to determine intervention timing); and, interpretation of variants of uncertain significance (VOUS) as cancer panel genetic testing becomes more common (36 % of REIs are unfamiliar with VOUS). Given our findings, the Oncofertility Consortium® created an online resource for genetic counselors focused on fertility preservation education and communication strategies. PMID:26567039

  20. Clinical guidelines for IVF with PGD for HLA matching.

    PubMed

    Tur-Kaspa, Ilan; Jeelani, Roohi

    2015-02-01

    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for human leukocyte antigen (HLA) typing is an established procedure for conceiving a child who may donate cord blood or haematopoietic stem cells for transplantation to save an ill sibling. Haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) from related matched donors improves overall survival compared with unrelated or non-matched donors. Since HSCT from related matched-donors is unavailable for 70% of patients, IVF for PGD-HLA is a relevant clinical option. Recent success of HSCT after PGD-HLA, and excellent health and family support of the children born, suggests that debate over this kind of 'designer baby' and 'gift of life' should subside. Discussions about IVF for PGD-HLA should be held with families when a related matched-donor is unavailable, when HSCT can wait at least 9-12 months, within weeks of diagnosis irrespective of prognosis, and when the mother is of reproductive age. Related half-matched egg donors may also be considered. National and international collaborations should be established, and couples choosing this modality should be referred to experienced IVF and PGD centres. Clinical guidelines will improve physician and patient awareness of IVF for PGD-HLA and its role in advancing the clinical care of children in need of HSCT.

  1. Defects in Peroxisomal 6-Phosphogluconate Dehydrogenase Isoform PGD2 Prevent Gametophytic Interaction in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Hölscher, Christian; Lutterbey, Marie-Christin; Lansing, Hannes; Meyer, Tanja; Fischer, Kerstin; von Schaewen, Antje

    2016-05-01

    We studied the localization of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (PGD) isoforms of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Similar polypeptide lengths of PGD1, PGD2, and PGD3 obscured which isoform may represent the cytosolic and/or plastidic enzyme plus whether PGD2 with a peroxisomal targeting motif also might target plastids. Reporter-fusion analyses in protoplasts revealed that, with a free N terminus, PGD1 and PGD3 accumulate in the cytosol and chloroplasts, whereas PGD2 remains in the cytosol. Mutagenesis of a conserved second ATG enhanced the plastidic localization of PGD1 and PGD3 but not PGD2. Amino-terminal deletions of PGD2 fusions with a free C terminus resulted in peroxisomal import after dimerization, and PGD2 could be immunodetected in purified peroxisomes. Repeated selfing of pgd2 transfer (T-)DNA alleles yielded no homozygous mutants, although siliques and seeds of heterozygous plants developed normally. Detailed analyses of the C-terminally truncated PGD2-1 protein showed that peroxisomal import and catalytic activity are abolished. Reciprocal backcrosses of pgd2-1 suggested that missing PGD activity in peroxisomes primarily affects the male gametophyte. Tetrad analyses in the quartet1-2 background revealed that pgd2-1 pollen is vital and in vitro germination normal, but pollen tube growth inside stylar tissues appeared less directed. Mutual gametophytic sterility was overcome by complementation with a genomic construct but not with a version lacking the first ATG. These analyses showed that peroxisomal PGD2 activity is required for guided growth of the male gametophytes and pollen tube-ovule interaction. Our report finally demonstrates an essential role of oxidative pentose-phosphate pathway reactions in peroxisomes, likely needed to sustain critical levels of nitric oxide and/or jasmonic acid, whose biosynthesis both depend on NADPH provision. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  2. Critical issues for dentistry: PGD program directors respond.

    PubMed

    Atchison, Kathryn A; Cheffetz, Susan E

    2002-06-01

    Discussion of critical issues facing postgraduate education in general dentistry (PGD) and dental education in general has been intense in the past decade. This study reports on critical issues raised by directors of PGD programs that may help direct future research and action within dental education and the larger profession. The analysis reports responses to an open-ended question sent to all U.S. PGD program directors regarding critical issues facing their training programs. Of 212 surveys, 169 program directors submitted written responses regarding critical issues. Twelve unique themes were identified: lack of postdoctoral applicants (two subthemes were high student debt and students' preference for private practice); student quality; professionalism and attitudes; number of postdoctoral positions; lack of funding; quality of facilities; special patient care; program curriculum; educator issues; mandatory or encouraged PGD year; value of dental program; and dentist shortage. Significant differences between AEGD and GPR directors were observed for two of the twelve areas: high student debt and value of dental program. The study provided insight into the thoughts of a large proportion of the U.S. PGD program directors "in the trenches." Some consideration of allowable expenses may be needed to align federal training support to best address program director needs.

  3. ESHRE task force on ethics and Law22: preimplantation genetic diagnosis.

    PubMed

    De Wert, G; Dondorp, W; Shenfield, F; Devroey, P; Tarlatzis, B; Barri, P; Diedrich, K; Provoost, V; Pennings, G

    2014-08-01

    This Task Force document discusses some relatively unexplored ethical issues involved in preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD). The document starts from the wide consensus that PGD is ethically acceptable if aimed at helping at-risk couples to avoid having a child with a serious disorder. However, if understood as a limit to acceptable indications for PGD, this 'medical model' may turn out too restrictive. The document discusses a range of possible requests for PGD that for different reasons fall outwith the accepted model and argues that instead of rejecting those requests out of hand, they need to be independently assessed in the light of ethical criteria. Whereas, for instance, there is no good reason for rejecting PGD in order to avoid health problems in a third generation (where the second generation would be healthy but faced with burdensome reproductive choices if wanting to have children), using PGD to make sure that one's child will have the same disorder or handicap as its parents, is ethically unacceptable.

  4. Oncofertility Consortium

    MedlinePlus

    ... Oncofertility Consortium Conference November 14-16, 2017 in Chicago, Illinois Register for the Oncofertility Conference Call the ... Consortium 303 E Superior Street, Suite 10-121 Chicago, IL, 60611 (312) 503-2504 Social Media Parking ...

  5. Critical Issues for Dentistry: PGD Program Directors Respond.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atchison, Kathryn A.; Cheffetz, Susan E.

    2002-01-01

    Surveyed directors of programs in postgraduate education in general dentistry (PGD) about critical issues facing their programs. Identified 12 themes: lack of postdoctoral applicants; student quality; professionalism and attitudes; number of postdoctoral positions; lack of funding; quality of facilities; special patient care; program curriculum;…

  6. Critical Issues for Dentistry: PGD Program Directors Respond.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atchison, Kathryn A.; Cheffetz, Susan E.

    2002-01-01

    Surveyed directors of programs in postgraduate education in general dentistry (PGD) about critical issues facing their programs. Identified 12 themes: lack of postdoctoral applicants; student quality; professionalism and attitudes; number of postdoctoral positions; lack of funding; quality of facilities; special patient care; program curriculum;…

  7. PGD2-CRTH2 Pathway Promotes Tubulointerstitial Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Xiaoxiang; Nagata, Nanae; Aritake, Kosuke; Katsumata, Yoshinori; Matsuhashi, Tomohiro; Nakamura, Masataka; Hirai, Hiroyuki; Urade, Yoshihiro; Asano, Koichiro; Kubo, Masato; Utsunomiya, Yasunori; Hosoya, Tatsuo; Fukuda, Keiichi; Sano, Motoaki

    2012-01-01

    Urinary excretion of lipocalin-type PGD2 synthase (L-PGDS), which converts PG H2 to PGD2, increases in early diabetic nephropathy. In addition, L-PGDS expression in the tubular epithelium increases in adriamycin-induced nephropathy, suggesting that locally produced L-PGDS may promote the development of CKD. In this study, we found that L-PGDS–derived PGD2 contributes to the progression of renal fibrosis via CRTH2-mediated activation of Th2 lymphocytes. In a mouse model, the tubular epithelium synthesized L-PGDS de novo after unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO). L-PGDS-knockout mice and CRTH2-knockout mice both exhibited less renal fibrosis, reduced infiltration of Th2 lymphocytes into the cortex, and decreased production of the Th2 cytokines IL-4 and IL-13. Furthermore, oral administration of a CRTH2 antagonist, beginning 3 days after UUO, suppressed the progression of renal fibrosis. Ablation of IL-4 and IL-13 also ameliorated renal fibrosis in the UUO kidney. Taken together, these data suggest that blocking the activation of CRTH2 by PGD2 might be a strategy to slow the progression of renal fibrosis in CKD. PMID:22997255

  8. Attitudes Toward Pre-implantation Genetic Diagnosis (PGD) for Genetic Disorders Among Potential Users in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Olesen, Angelina Patrick; Nor, Siti Nurani Mohd; Amin, Latifah

    2016-02-01

    While pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) is available and legal in Malaysia, there is an ongoing controversy debate about its use. There are few studies available on individuals' attitudes toward PGD, particularly among those who have a genetic disease, or whose children have a genetic disease. To the best of our knowledge, this is, in fact, the first study of its kind in Malaysia. We conducted in-depth interviews, using semi-structured questionnaires, with seven selected potential PGD users regarding their knowledge, attitudes and decisions relating to the use PGD. The criteria for selecting potential PGD users were that they or their children had a genetic disease, and they desired to have another child who would be free of genetic disease. All participants had heard of PGD and five of them were considering its use. The participants' attitudes toward PGD were based on several different considerations that were influenced by various factors. These included: the benefit-risk balance of PGD, personal experiences of having a genetic disease, religious beliefs, personal values and cost. The study's findings suggest that the selected Malaysian participants, as potential PGD users, were supportive but cautious regarding the use of PGD for medical purposes, particularly in relation to others whose experiences were similar. More broadly, the paper highlights the link between the participants' personal experiences and their beliefs regarding the appropriateness, for others, of individual decision-making on PGD, which has not been revealed by previous studies.

  9. Defects in Peroxisomal 6-Phosphogluconate Dehydrogenase Isoform PGD2 Prevent Gametophytic Interaction in Arabidopsis thaliana1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Hölscher, Christian; Meyer, Tanja; Fischer, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    We studied the localization of 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (PGD) isoforms of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Similar polypeptide lengths of PGD1, PGD2, and PGD3 obscured which isoform may represent the cytosolic and/or plastidic enzyme plus whether PGD2 with a peroxisomal targeting motif also might target plastids. Reporter-fusion analyses in protoplasts revealed that, with a free N terminus, PGD1 and PGD3 accumulate in the cytosol and chloroplasts, whereas PGD2 remains in the cytosol. Mutagenesis of a conserved second ATG enhanced the plastidic localization of PGD1 and PGD3 but not PGD2. Amino-terminal deletions of PGD2 fusions with a free C terminus resulted in peroxisomal import after dimerization, and PGD2 could be immunodetected in purified peroxisomes. Repeated selfing of pgd2 transfer (T-)DNA alleles yielded no homozygous mutants, although siliques and seeds of heterozygous plants developed normally. Detailed analyses of the C-terminally truncated PGD2-1 protein showed that peroxisomal import and catalytic activity are abolished. Reciprocal backcrosses of pgd2-1 suggested that missing PGD activity in peroxisomes primarily affects the male gametophyte. Tetrad analyses in the quartet1-2 background revealed that pgd2-1 pollen is vital and in vitro germination normal, but pollen tube growth inside stylar tissues appeared less directed. Mutual gametophytic sterility was overcome by complementation with a genomic construct but not with a version lacking the first ATG. These analyses showed that peroxisomal PGD2 activity is required for guided growth of the male gametophytes and pollen tube-ovule interaction. Our report finally demonstrates an essential role of oxidative pentose-phosphate pathway reactions in peroxisomes, likely needed to sustain critical levels of nitric oxide and/or jasmonic acid, whose biosynthesis both depend on NADPH provision. PMID:26941195

  10. Ethics of PGD: thoughts on the consequences of typing HLA in embryos.

    PubMed

    Edwards, R G

    2004-08-01

    As with so many fields of study associated with assisted human reproduction, many ethical issues are raised by the practice of preimplantation diagnosis of inherited disease (PGD). Some are part and parcel of assisted conception, e.g.the rights of human embryos in vitro and of embryologists to establish them, carry out research and discard them. Others unique to clinical PGD were discussed at an earlier meeting on PGD (Edwards et al., 2003). Recent developments in PGD are discussed briefly in this Commentary, especially the ethics of designer babies.

  11. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for HLA typing: bases for setting up an open international collaboration when PGD is not available.

    PubMed

    Bellavia, Marina; Von Der Weid, Nicolas; Peddes, Christina; Jacquemont, Sebastien; Liebaers, Inge; Hohlfeld, Patrick; Wunder-Galié, Dorothea; de Ziegler, Dominique

    2010-08-01

    In severe forms of Diamond-Blackfan anemia, preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) of histocompatibility leukocyte antigen-compatible embryos for enabling the next sibling in the family to be a stem-cell transplantation donor constitutes the sole lasting cure capable of terminating the enduring need for iterative transfusions. We report here an open collaboration between two renowned institutions to provide a family desiring this treatment even though they resided where the preimplantation genetic diagnosis procedure is banned. Copyright (c) 2010 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. All rights reserved.

  12. The ESHRE/ASRM consensus on polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)--an extended critical analysis.

    PubMed

    Geisthövel, Franz; Rabe, Thomas

    2007-04-01

    The 'ESHRE/ASRM consensus on diagnosis, nomenclature and long-term health risks of polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS)' (conference in Rotterdam, Netherlands, March, 2003), which was criticized shortly after its oral presentation in 2003, is still being debated following its publication in 2004. Therefore, an extended, intensive analysis of all parameters and their combinations has been performed, differentiating between inclusion and exclusion criteria. By doing this, the profound significance of the endocrinological part of the syndrome is highlighted. The nomenclature, semantic meaning of terms, definitions, structural balancing, specificity, practicability, flexibility, limitations and reproducibility for both individualization, as well as grouping from the clinical and scientific perspective, have been examined in detail. This analysis supports previous critical comments, and reaches the conclusion that the recommendations of the consensus lack accuracy and specificity, a weakness that results in the risk of overdiagnosis and in a lack of reproducibility. Altogether, they fail to fulfil the criteria of universal guidelines on several levels. Instead, a profound paradigm shift is demanded, from an inconsistent perception to a more systematic, balanced and comprehensive view. A short indication on an alternative sweeping concept of a strictly defined, therapy-targeted classification and diagnostic procedure of female functional androgenization is presented.

  13. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for Huntington's disease: the experience of three European centres.

    PubMed

    Van Rij, Maartje C; De Rademaeker, Marjan; Moutou, Céline; Dreesen, Jos C F M; De Rycke, Martine; Liebaers, Inge; Geraedts, Joep P M; De Die-Smulders, Christine E M; Viville, Stéphane

    2012-04-01

    This study provides an overview of 13 years of experience of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for Huntington's disease (HD) at three European PGD centres in Brussels, Maastricht and Strasbourg. Information on all 331 PGD intakes for HD, couples' reproductive history, PGD approach, treatment cycles and outcomes between 1995 and 2008 were collected prospectively. Of 331 couples for intake, 68% requested direct testing and 32% exclusion testing (with a preponderance of French couples). At the time of PGD intake, 39% of women had experienced one or more pregnancies. A history of pregnancy termination after prenatal diagnosis was observed more frequently in the direct testing group (25%) than in the exclusion group (10%; P=0.0027). PGD workup was based on two approaches: (1) direct testing of the CAG-triplet repeat and (2) linkage analysis using intragenic or flanking microsatellite markers of the HTT gene. In total, 257 couples had started workup and 174 couples (70% direct testing, 30% exclusion testing) completed at least one PGD cycle. In total, 389 cycles continued to oocyte retrieval (OR). The delivery rates per OR were 19.8%, and per embryo transfer 24.8%, resulting in 77 deliveries and the birth of 90 children. We conclude that PGD is a valuable and safe reproductive option for HD carriers and couples at risk of transmitting HD.

  14. Reiterative changes in the Italian regulation on IVF: the effect on PGD patients' reproductive decisions.

    PubMed

    Gianaroli, Luca; Crivello, Anna Maria; Stanghellini, Ilaria; Ferraretti, Anna Pia; Tabanelli, Carla; Magli, Maria Cristina

    2014-01-01

    National legislations represent one of the main factors influencing access to assisted reproduction treatment. The Italian situation in the last decade is an example of how the treatment of patients for preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) was more dependent on regulators than on medical choices. This report analysed how the changes in Italian regulation affected the number of PGD referrals to this study centre, as well as their decision to opt for cross-border reproductive care (CBRC). The analysis showed that during the period in which PGD was actually not performed because of the restriction imposed by the Italian law on IVF (from 24 February 2004 to 7 May 2009) there was a significant decrease in the number of referrals asking for PGD (2.5% of total referrals) compared with the previous years (3.3%; P < 0.025) and following years when PGD was legalized (5.1%; P < 0.001). The number of couples opting for CBRC had an opposite trend, reaching a maximum when PGD was banned from Italian centres (55 couples), whereas after the readmission of PGD, only eight couples went abroad for treatment. Concomitantly, since May 2009, the proportion of couples performing a PGD cycle in this centre has constantly increased.

  15. The politics of human embryo research and the motivation to achieve PGD

    PubMed Central

    Theodosiou, Anastasia A.; Johnson, Martin H.

    2011-01-01

    This article reports a historical study of factors influencing the achievement of clinical preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) in 1990, 22 years after its first demonstration in animals. During the 1970s, research on PGD continued in large farm animals, but serious interest in human PGD was not evident until 1986. First, interest in PGD during the 1970s waned with the advent of prenatal testing, which for gynaecologists was clinically more familiar, technically simpler and ethically less challenging than IVF. Indeed, IVF was viewed with widespread suspicion until the first IVF births in 1978. Second, interest in clinical PGD was stimulated by the UK Parliamentary reaction against human embryo research that greeted the Warnock Report in 1984. This hostility led scientists to initiate a pro-research campaign, further galvanized in 1985 by MP Enoch Powell’s bid to ban such research. However, while Powell abhorred embryo research, he approved of PGD, a stance that divided the anti-research lobby. Accordingly, the campaigners for research emphasized that it was needed to achieve PGD. Powell demanded evidence of such projects and PGD research increased from 1986. It is concluded that UK political debates on embryo research played a critical role in stimulating the achievement of clinical PGD. Human pregnancies following preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for embryo sex were announced in 1990, 22 years after the technique was pioneered in animals. PGD in humans required not only technological advances, such as IVF and sensitive diagnostic tests, but also the motivation to develop and apply them. Our historical analysis shows that, although research on PGD continued in large farm animals during the 1970s, and techniques of the required sensitivity were developed on mouse embryo models, interest in clinical PGD was not evident until 1986. Two factors stimulated this sudden change in motivation. First, interest in PGD was depressed during the 1970s by the advent

  16. Guidelines for good practice in PGD: programme requirements and laboratory quality assurance.

    PubMed

    2008-01-01

    The Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis International Society (PGDIS) was organized in October 2002, with the purpose of encouraging and co-ordinating research, education and training in this multidisciplinary field, requiring a close collaboration of obstetricians, fertility specialists, embryologists and human geneticists. One of the major tasks of PGDIS is to advance the safety and accuracy of PGD and to encourage its adoption into clinical practice for improvement of genetic practices and reproductive medicine. In this context, PGDIS published voluntary guidelines applicable for any centre offering PGD in 2004, and these guidelines are now being updated and extended based on the present extensive PGD experience. The application of these guidelines is intended to further benefit patients and provide guidance to the laboratory staff. As in previous guidelines, PGDIS presents this document being aware that differences in national regulations exist that can affect local PGD practice. The document contains recent consensus points of general application that promote quality biopsy procedures and laboratory practice, enabling PGD centres to offer an improved clinical outcome to their patients. A variety of aspects related to a safe working system have been taken into consideration, based on the assumption that a quality programme depends on the cooperation of the whole PGD team.

  17. PGD for all cystic fibrosis carrier couples: novel strategy for preventive medicine and cost analysis.

    PubMed

    Tur-Kaspa, I; Aljadeff, G; Rechitsky, S; Grotjan, H E; Verlinsky, Y

    2010-08-01

    Over 1000 children affected with cystic fibrosis (CF) are born annually in the USA. Since IVF with preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) is an alternative to raising a sick child or to aborting an affected fetus, a cost-benefit analysis was performed for a national IVF-PGD program for preventing CF. The amount spent to deliver healthy children for all CF carrier-couples by IVF-PGD was compared with the average annual and lifetime direct medical costs per CF patient avoided. Treating annually about 4000 CF carrier-couples with IVF-PGD would result in 3715 deliveries of non-affected children at a cost of $57,467 per baby. Because the average annual direct medical cost per CF patient was $63,127 and life expectancy is 37 years, savings would be $2.3 million per patient and $2.2 billion for all new CF patients annually in lifetime treatment costs. Cumulated net saving of an IVF-PGD program for all carrier-couples for 37 years would be $33.3 billion. A total of 618,714 cumulative years of patients suffering because of CF and thousands of abortions could be prevented. A national IVF-PGD program is a highly cost-effective novel modality of preventive medicine and would avoid most births of individuals affected with debilitating genetic disease.

  18. Conceptualizing Couples’ Decision Making in PGD: Emerging Cognitive, Emotional, and Moral Dimensions

    PubMed Central

    Hershberger, Patricia E.; Pierce, Penny F.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To illuminate and synthesize what is known about the underlying decision making processes surrounding couples’ preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) use or disuse and to formulate an initial conceptual framework that can guide future research and practice. Methods This systematic review targeted empirical studies published in English from 1990 to 2008 that examined the decision making process of couples or individual partners that had used, were eligible for, or had contemplated PGD. Sixteen studies met the eligibility requirements. To provide a more comprehensive review, empirical studies that examined healthcare professionals’ perceptions of couples’ decision making surrounding PGD use and key publications from a variety of disciplines supplemented the analysis. Results The conceptual framework formulated from the review demonstrates that couples’ PGD decision making is composed of three iterative and dynamic dimensions: cognitive appraisals, emotional responses, and moral judgments. Conclusion Couples think critically about uncertain and probabilistic information, grapple with conflicting emotions and incorporate moral perspectives into their decision making about whether or not to use PGD. Practice Implications The quality of care and decisional support for couples who are contemplating PGD use can be improved by incorporating focused questions and discussion from each of the dimensions into counseling sessions. PMID:20060677

  19. Conceptualizing couples' decision making in PGD: emerging cognitive, emotional, and moral dimensions.

    PubMed

    Hershberger, Patricia E; Pierce, Penny F

    2010-10-01

    To illuminate and synthesize what is known about the underlying decision making processes surrounding couples' preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) use or disuse and to formulate an initial conceptual framework that can guide future research and practice. This systematic review targeted empirical studies published in English from 1990 to 2008 that examined the decision making process of couples or individual partners that had used, were eligible for, or had contemplated PGD. Sixteen studies met the eligibility requirements. To provide a more comprehensive review, empirical studies that examined healthcare professionals' perceptions of couples' decision making surrounding PGD use and key publications from a variety of disciplines supplemented the analysis. The conceptual framework formulated from the review demonstrates that couples' PGD decision making is composed of three iterative and dynamic dimensions: cognitive appraisals, emotional responses, and moral judgments. Couples think critically about uncertain and probabilistic information, grapple with conflicting emotions, and incorporate moral perspectives into their decision making about whether or not to use PGD. The quality of care and decisional support for couples who are contemplating PGD use can be improved by incorporating focused questions and discussion from each of the dimensions into counseling sessions. (c) 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Niacin and biosynthesis of PGD2 by platelet COX-1 in mice and humans

    PubMed Central

    Song, Wen-Liang; Stubbe, Jane; Ricciotti, Emanuela; Alamuddin, Naji; Ibrahim, Salam; Crichton, Irene; Prempeh, Maxwell; Lawson, John A.; Wilensky, Robert L.; Rasmussen, Lars Melholt; Puré, Ellen; FitzGerald, Garret A.

    2012-01-01

    The clinical use of niacin to treat dyslipidemic conditions is limited by noxious side effects, most commonly facial flushing. In mice, niacin-induced flushing results from COX-1–dependent formation of PGD2 and PGE2 followed by COX-2–dependent production of PGE2. Consistent with this, niacin-induced flushing in humans is attenuated when niacin is combined with an antagonist of the PGD2 receptor DP1. NSAID-mediated suppression of COX-2–derived PGI2 has negative cardiovascular consequences, yet little is known about the cardiovascular biology of PGD2. Here, we show that PGD2 biosynthesis is augmented during platelet activation in humans and, although vascular expression of DP1 is conserved between humans and mice, platelet DP1 is not present in mice. Despite this, DP1 deletion in mice augmented aneurysm formation and the hypertensive response to Ang II and accelerated atherogenesis and thrombogenesis. Furthermore, COX inhibitors in humans, as well as platelet depletion, COX-1 knockdown, and COX-2 deletion in mice, revealed that niacin evoked platelet COX-1–derived PGD2 biosynthesis. Finally, ADP-induced spreading on fibrinogen was augmented by niacin in washed human platelets, coincident with increased thromboxane (Tx) formation. However, in platelet-rich plasma, where formation of both Tx and PGD2 was increased, spreading was not as pronounced and was inhibited by DP1 activation. Thus, PGD2, like PGI2, may function as a homeostatic response to thrombogenic and hypertensive stimuli and may have particular relevance as a constraint on platelets during niacin therapy. PMID:22406532

  1. The comprehensiveness of the ESHRE/ESGE classification of female genital tract congenital anomalies: a systematic review of cases not classified by the AFS system.

    PubMed

    Di Spiezio Sardo, A; Campo, R; Gordts, S; Spinelli, M; Cosimato, C; Tanos, V; Brucker, S; Li, T C; Gergolet, M; De Angelis, C; Gianaroli, L; Grimbizis, G

    2015-05-01

    How comprehensive is the recently published European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology (ESHRE)/European Society for Gynaecological Endoscopy (ESGE) classification system of female genital anomalies? The ESHRE/ESGE classification provides a comprehensive description and categorization of almost all of the currently known anomalies that could not be classified properly with the American Fertility Society (AFS) system. Until now, the more accepted classification system, namely that of the AFS, is associated with serious limitations in effective categorization of female genital anomalies. Many cases published in the literature could not be properly classified using the AFS system, yet a clear and accurate classification is a prerequisite for treatment. The CONUTA (CONgenital UTerine Anomalies) ESHRE/ESGE group conducted a systematic review of the literature to examine if those types of anomalies that could not be properly classified with the AFS system could be effectively classified with the use of the new ESHRE/ESGE system. An electronic literature search through Medline, Embase and Cochrane library was carried out from January 1988 to January 2014. Three participants independently screened, selected articles of potential interest and finally extracted data from all the included studies. Any disagreement was discussed and resolved after consultation with a fourth reviewer and the results were assessed independently and approved by all members of the CONUTA group. Among the 143 articles assessed in detail, 120 were finally selected reporting 140 cases that could not properly fit into a specific class of the AFS system. Those 140 cases were clustered in 39 different types of anomalies. The congenital anomaly involved a single organ in 12 (30.8%) out of the 39 types of anomalies, while multiple organs and/or segments of Müllerian ducts (complex anomaly) were involved in 27 (69.2%) types. Uterus was the organ most frequently involved (30/39: 76.9%), followed

  2. The comprehensiveness of the ESHRE/ESGE classification of female genital tract congenital anomalies: a systematic review of cases not classified by the AFS system

    PubMed Central

    Di Spiezio Sardo, A.; Campo, R.; Gordts, S.; Spinelli, M.; Cosimato, C.; Tanos, V.; Brucker, S.; Li, T. C.; Gergolet, M.; De Angelis, C.; Gianaroli, L.; Grimbizis, G.

    2015-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION How comprehensive is the recently published European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology (ESHRE)/European Society for Gynaecological Endoscopy (ESGE) classification system of female genital anomalies? SUMMARY ANSWER The ESHRE/ESGE classification provides a comprehensive description and categorization of almost all of the currently known anomalies that could not be classified properly with the American Fertility Society (AFS) system. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY Until now, the more accepted classification system, namely that of the AFS, is associated with serious limitations in effective categorization of female genital anomalies. Many cases published in the literature could not be properly classified using the AFS system, yet a clear and accurate classification is a prerequisite for treatment. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE AND DURATION The CONUTA (CONgenital UTerine Anomalies) ESHRE/ESGE group conducted a systematic review of the literature to examine if those types of anomalies that could not be properly classified with the AFS system could be effectively classified with the use of the new ESHRE/ESGE system. An electronic literature search through Medline, Embase and Cochrane library was carried out from January 1988 to January 2014. Three participants independently screened, selected articles of potential interest and finally extracted data from all the included studies. Any disagreement was discussed and resolved after consultation with a fourth reviewer and the results were assessed independently and approved by all members of the CONUTA group. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS Among the 143 articles assessed in detail, 120 were finally selected reporting 140 cases that could not properly fit into a specific class of the AFS system. Those 140 cases were clustered in 39 different types of anomalies. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE The congenital anomaly involved a single organ in 12 (30.8%) out of the 39 types of anomalies, while multiple organs

  3. Pandora's box: ethics of PGD for inherited risk of late-onset disorders.

    PubMed

    Noble, Ray; Bahadur, Gulam; Iqbal, Mohammad; Sanyal, Arnab

    2008-01-01

    Until recently, the primary use of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) has been the selection of embryos to avoid lethal or debilitating gene mutations or abnormal chromosome complement. PGD can be used to reduce the risk of transferring to the uterus an embryo with Down syndrome, and parents who are carriers of severe genetic diseases may choose to avoid having children with these debilitating genetic conditions. The use of PGD is now being extended to include gene mutations that increase the risk of late-onset disorders such as breast and ovarian cancer. This paper argues for caution in advocating reproductive methods that are costly, have a limited chance of success, and for which the long-term outcome is unknown. Counselling should allow women a true choice of declining the option of PGD without recrimination, feelings of guilt or social pressure. There is concern that the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority has approved extension of PGD to late-onset multifactorial diseases without clear guidelines for its use. Guidelines for embryo selection should be revised to deal with potential conflict between reproductive success and genetic screening for disorders that do not profoundly affect the embryo or the children.

  4. Accuracy of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) of single gene and chromosomal disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Verlinsky, Y.; Strom, C.; Rechitsky, S.

    1994-09-01

    We have developed a polar body inferred approach for preconception diagnosis of single gene and chromosomal disorders. Preconception PCR or FISH analysis was performed in a total of 310 first polar bodies for the following genetic conditions: cystic fibrosis, hemophilia A, alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency, Tay Sachs disease, retinitis pigmentosa and common chromosomal trisomies. An important advantage of this approach is the avoidance of sperm (DNA) contamination, which is the major problem of PGD. We are currently applying FISH analysis of biopsied blastomeres, in combination with PCR or separately, and have demonstrated a significant improvement of the accuracy of PGD of X-linked disorders at this stage. Our data have also demonstrated feasibility of the application of FISH technique for PGD of chromosomal disorders. It was possible to detect chromosomal non-disjunctions and chromatid malsegregations in the first meiotic division, as well as to evaluate chromosomal mutations originating from the second meiotic nondisjunction.

  5. An efficient reduced-order method with PGD for solving journal bearing hydrodynamic lubrication problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherabi, Bilal; Hamrani, Abderrachid; Belaidi, Idir; Khelladi, Sofiane; Bakir, Farid

    2016-10-01

    In the present work, a reduced-order method, "Proper Generalized Decomposition (PGD)" is extended and applied to the resolution of the Reynolds equation describing the behavior of the lubricant in hydrodynamic journal bearing. The PGD model is employed to solve the characteristic 'Reynolds' partial differential equation using the separation technique through the alternating direction strategy. The resulting separated-dimension system has a low computation cost compared to classical finite-difference resolution. Several numerical benchmark examples are investigated to verify the validity and accuracy of the proposed method. It has been found that numerical results obtained by the PGD method can achieve an improved convergence rate with a very low computation cost.

  6. Queerin' the PGD clinic : human enhancement and the future of bodily diversity.

    PubMed

    Sparrow, Robert

    2013-06-01

    Disability activists influenced by queer theory and advocates of "human enhancement" have each disputed the idea that what is "normal" is normatively significant, which currently plays a key role in the regulation of pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD). Previously, I have argued that the only way to avoid the implication that parents have strong reasons to select children of one sex (most plausibly, female) over the other is to affirm the moral significance of sexually dimorphic human biological norms. After outlining the logic that generates this conclusion, I investigate the extent to which it might also facilitate an alternative, progressive, opening up of the notion of the normal and of the criteria against which we should evaluate the relative merits of different forms of embodiment. This paper therefore investigates the implications of ideas derived from queer theory for the future of PGD and of PGD for the future of queerness.

  7. ESHRE guideline: routine psychosocial care in infertility and medically assisted reproduction-a guide for fertility staff.

    PubMed

    Gameiro, S; Boivin, J; Dancet, E; de Klerk, C; Emery, M; Lewis-Jones, C; Thorn, P; Van den Broeck, U; Venetis, C; Verhaak, C M; Wischmann, T; Vermeulen, N

    2015-11-01

    Based on the best available evidence in the literature, what is the optimal management of routine psychosocial care at infertility and medically assisted reproduction (MAR) clinics? Using the structured methodology of the Manual for the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology (ESHRE) Guideline Development, 120 recommendations were formulated that answered the 12 key questions on optimal management of routine psychosocial care by all fertility staff. The 2002 ESHRE Guidelines for counselling in infertility has been a reference point for best psychosocial care in infertility for years, but this guideline needed updating and did not focus on routine psychosocial care that can be delivered by all fertility staff. This guideline was produced by a group of experts in the field according to the 12-step process described in the ESHRE Manual for Guideline Development. After scoping the guideline and listing a set of 12 key questions in PICO (Patient, Intervention, Comparison and Outcome) format, thorough systematic searches of the literature were conducted; evidence from papers published until April 2014 was collected, evaluated for quality and analysed. A summary of evidence was written in a reply to each of the key questions and used as the basis for recommendations, which were defined by consensus within the guideline development group (GDG). Patient and additional clinical input was collected during the scoping and the review phase of the guideline development. The guideline group, comprising psychologists, two medical doctors, a midwife, a patient representative and a methodological expert, met three times to discuss evidence and reach consensus on the recommendations. 120 recommendations that aim at guiding fertility clinic staff in providing optimal evidence-based routine psychosocial care to patients dealing with infertility and MAR. The guideline is written in two sections. The first section describes patients' preferences regarding the psychosocial

  8. International Lymphoma Epidemiology Consortium

    Cancer.gov

    The InterLymph Consortium, or formally the International Consortium of Investigators Working on Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma Epidemiologic Studies, is an open scientific forum for epidemiologic research in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

  9. Public Perceptions of Ethical, Legal and Social Implications of Pre-implantation Genetic Diagnosis (PGD) in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Olesen, Angelina P; Mohd Nor, Siti Nurani; Amin, Latifah; Che Ngah, Anisah

    2016-12-19

    Pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) became well known in Malaysia after the birth of the first Malaysian 'designer baby', Yau Tak in 2004. Two years later, the Malaysian Medical Council implemented the first and only regulation on the use of Pre-implantation Genetic Diagnosis in this country. The birth of Yau Tak triggered a public outcry because PGD was used for non-medical sex selection thus, raising concerns about PGD and its implications for the society. This study aims to explore participants' perceptions of the future implications of PGD for the Malaysian society. We conducted in-depth interviews with 21 participants over a period of one year, using a semi-structured questionnaire. Findings reveal that responses varied substantially among the participants; there was a broad acceptance as well as rejection of PGD. Contentious ethical, legal and social issues of PGD were raised during the discussions, including intolerance to and discrimination against people with genetic disabilities; societal pressure and the 'slippery slope' of PGD were raised during the discussions. This study also highlights participants' legal standpoint, and major issues regarding PGD in relation to the accuracy of diagnosis. At the social policy level, considerations are given to access as well as the impact of this technology on families, women and physicians. Given these different perceptions of the use of PGD, and its implications and conflicts, policies and regulations of the use of PGD have to be dealt with on a case-by-case basis while taking into consideration of the risk-benefit balance, since its application will impact the lives of so many people in the society.

  10. Karyomapping allows preimplantation genetic diagnosis of a de-novo deletion undetectable using conventional PGD technology.

    PubMed

    Giménez, Carles; Sarasa, Jonás; Arjona, César; Vilamajó, Ester; Martínez-Pasarell, Olga; Wheeler, Kenny; Valls, Gemma; Garcia-Guixé, Elena; Wells, Dagan

    2015-12-01

    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) was carried out for a couple carrying a de-novo deletion in the TSC2 gene, responsible for tuberous sclerosis. Karyomapping, a method employing genome-wide analysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP), was used as PGD protocol. Analysis of DNA from the affected parent using karyomapping confirmed the region covered by the deletion and revealed more than 30 SNP located within the affected region. These SNP were subsequently used for embryo diagnosis (deletion revealed by hemizygosity and/or reduced probe intensity). Seven blastocyst embryos underwent trophectoderm biopsy followed by vitrification. Biopsied cells were subjected to comprehensive aneuploidy screening using microarray comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH), with karyomapping for the detection of embryos carrying the mutant TSC2 gene carried out in tandem. Two embryo transfers were performed, the second of which resulted in the birth of a child. This study highlights that karyomapping may be applicable to a subset of de-novo mutations undetectable using standard PGD strategies. Additionally, karyomapping results were in complete concordance with aCGH, both methods revealing the same aneuploidies in the embryos tested. It was concluded that karyomapping may represent a valuable advance in cases of PGD for monogenic diseases. Copyright © 2015 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. BLOCKADE OF PGE2, PGD2 RECEPTORS CONFERS PROTECTION AGAINST PREPATENT SCHISTOSOMIASIS MANSONI IN MICE.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Ghany, Rasha; Rabia, Ibrahim; El-Ahwany, Eman; Saber, Sameh; Gamal, Rasha; Nagy, Faten; Mahmoud, Olaa; Hamad, Rabab Salem; Barakat, Walled

    2015-12-01

    Schistosomiasis is a chronic disease with considerable social impact. Despite the availability of affordable chemotherapy, drug treatment has not significantly reduced the overall number of disease cases. Among other mechanisms, the parasite produces PGE2 and PGD2 to evade host immune defenses. To investigate the role of PGE2 and PGD2 in schistosomiasis, we evaluated the effects of L-161,982, Ah6809 (PGE2 receptor antagonists alone of combined with each other) and MK-0524 (PGD2 receptor antagonist) during prepatent Schistosoma mansoni infection. Drugs were administered intraperitoneally an hour before and 24 hours after infection of C57BL/6 mice with 100 Schistosoma mansoni cercariae. L-161,982, Ah6809, their combination and MK-0524 caused partial protection against pre-patent S. mansoni infection which was mediated by biasing the immune response towards Th1 phenotype. These results showed that blockade of PGE2 and PGD2 receptors confers partial protection against pre-patent S. mansoni infection in mice and that they may be useful as adjunctive therapy to current anti-schistosomal drugs or vaccines.

  12. Recurrent miscarriage in translocation carriers: no differences in clinical characteristics between couples who accept and couples who decline PGD.

    PubMed

    De Krom, G; Arens, Y H J M; Coonen, E; Van Ravenswaaij-Arts, C M A; Meijer-Hoogeveen, M; Evers, J L H; Van Golde, R J T; De Die-Smulders, C E M

    2015-02-01

    Do clinical characteristics of recurrent miscarriage couples with a chromosomal abnormality and who opt for PGD differ from couples that decline PGD after extensive genetic counselling? No differences in clinical characteristics are identified between recurrent miscarriage couples carrying a structural chromosomal abnormality who opt for PGD compared with those that decline PGD after extensive genetic counselling. Couples who have experienced two or more miscarriages (recurrent miscarriage) are at increased recurrence risk if one of the partners carries a structural chromosomal abnormality. PGD can be offered to avoid (another) miscarriage or pregnancy termination when (invasive) prenatal diagnosis shows an abnormal result. To date, no reports are available that describe reproductive decision-making after genetic counselling on PGD in these specific couples. Retrospective cohort study of 294 couples carrying a structural chromosomal abnormality seeking genetic counselling on PGD between 1996 and 2012. Participants were recurrent miscarriage couples carrying a structural chromosomal abnormality. They had been referred for genetic counselling to the only national licensed PGD centre. Clinical characteristics analysed included couple associated characteristics, characteristics concerning reproductive history and external characteristics such as type of physician that referred the couple for genetic counselling and the clinical geneticist performing the counselling on PGD. Of 294 couples referred for counselling on PGD, 26 were not accepted because they did not meet the criteria for IVF-PGD. The remaining cohort of 268 couples consisted of two-thirds female and one-third male carriers. Main PGD indications were reciprocal translocations (83.9%) and Robertsonian translocations (16.7%). Following genetic counselling, 76.9% of included couples chose PGD as their reproductive option, the others declined PGD. Reproductive choice is not influenced by sex of the translocation

  13. Ovarian reserve and PGD treatment outcome in women with myotonic dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Srebnik, N; Margalioth, E J; Rabinowitz, R; Varshaver, I; Altarescu, G; Renbaum, P; Levi-Lahad, E; Weintraub, A; Eldar-Geva, T

    2014-07-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM) is the most common form of muscular dystrophy in adults. There are conflicting reports about its effect on female fertility. This study investigated ovarian reserve and IVF-preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) outcome in women with DM1. A total of 21 women undergoing PGD for DM1 were compared with 21 age- and body mass index-matched women undergoing PGD for other diseases. Ovarian reserve markers, response to stimulation, embryo quality and clinical pregnancy and live birth rates were compared. Day-3 FSH concentration was higher, while anti-Müllerian hormone concentration and antral follicle count were lower in the DM1 group (median, range: 6.9 (1.8-11.3) versus 5.7 (1.5-10.7)IU/l; 0.9 (0.17-5.96) versus 2.68 (0.5-9.1)ng/ml; and 13 (0-63) versus 23 (8-40) follicles, respectively, all P < 0.05). Total FSH dose was higher (5200 versus 2250 IU, P = 0.004), while the numbers of oocytes retrieved (10 versus 16, P < 0.04) and metaphase-II oocytes (9 versus 12, P < 0.03) were lower in the DM1 group. The number of cycles with top-quality embryos and the clinical pregnancy rate were lower in the DM1 group. In conclusion, there is evidence of diminished ovarian reserve and less favourable IVF-PGD outcome in women with DM1. Myotonic Dystrophy (DM) is the most common form of muscular dystrophy in adults. There is evidence of subfertility in males affected with the disease but conflicting reports about the effect of the disease on female fertility. The aim of our study was to investigate ovarian reserve and IVF-PGD results in women with DM. Twenty-one women undergoing preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) treatment for DM were compared to 21 age- and BMI matched women undergoing PGD treatment for other diseases. The two groups were compared for antral follicle count (AFC) and serum anti-Mullerian hormone (AMH) levels (the best known markers of ovarian reserve and fertility potential), ovarian response, embryo quality and pregnancy and live birth

  14. Integration of PGD-virtual charts into an engineering design process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courard, Amaury; Néron, David; Ladevèze, Pierre; Ballere, Ludovic

    2016-04-01

    This article deals with the efficient construction of approximations of fields and quantities of interest used in geometric optimisation of complex shapes that can be encountered in engineering structures. The strategy, which is developed herein, is based on the construction of virtual charts that allow, once computed offline, to optimise the structure for a negligible online CPU cost. These virtual charts can be used as a powerful numerical decision support tool during the design of industrial structures. They are built using the proper generalized decomposition (PGD) that offers a very convenient framework to solve parametrised problems. In this paper, particular attention has been paid to the integration of the procedure into a genuine engineering design process. In particular, a dedicated methodology is proposed to interface the PGD approach with commercial software.

  15. Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis (PGD) for Monogenic Disorders: the Value of Concurrent Aneuploidy Screening.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Kara N; Nazem, Taraneh; Berkeley, Alan; Palter, Steven; Grifo, Jamie A

    2016-12-01

    Pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) has changed the landscape of clinical genetics by helping families reduce the transmission of monogenic disorders. However, given the high prevalence of embryonic aneuploidy, particularly in patients of advanced reproductive age, unaffected embryos remain at high risk of implantation failure or pregnancy loss due to aneuploidy. 24-chromosome aneuploidy screening has become widely utilized in routine in vitro fertilization (IVF) to pre-select embryos with greater pregnancy potential, but concurrent 24-chromosome aneuploidy screening has not become standard practice in embryos biopsied for PGD. We performed a retrospective cohort study of patients who underwent PGD with or without 24-chromosome aneuploidy screening to explore the value of concurrent screening. Among the PGD + aneuploidy-screened group (n = 355 blastocysts), only 25.6 % of embryos were both Single Gene Disorder (SGD)-negative (or carriers) and euploid; thus the majority of embryos were ineligible for transfer due to the high prevalence of aneuploidy. Despite a young mean age (32.4 ± 5.9y), 49.9 % of Blastocysts were aneuploid. The majority of patients (53.2 %) had ≥1 blastocyst that was Single Gene Disorder (SGD)-unaffected but aneuploid; without screening, these unaffected but aneuploid embryos would likely have been transferred resulting in implantation failure, pregnancy loss, or a pregnancy affected by chromosomal aneuploidy. Despite the transfer of nearly half the number of embryos in the aneuploidy-screened group (1.1 ± 0.3 vs. 1.9 ± 0.6, p < 0.0001), the implantation rate was higher (75 % vs. 53.3 %) and miscarriage rate lower (20 % vs. 40 %) (although not statistically significant). 24-chromosome aneuploidy screening when performed concurrently with PGD provides valuable information for embryo selection, and notably improves single embryo transfer rates.

  16. A model reduction technique based on the PGD for elastic-viscoplastic computational analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Relun, N.; Néron, D.; Boucard, P. A.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper a model reduction approach for elastic-viscoplastic evolution problems is considered. Enhancement of the PGD reduced model by a new iterative technique involving only elastic problems is investigated and allows to reduce CPU cost. The accuracy of the solution and convergence properties are tested on an academic example and a calculation time comparison with the commercial finite element code Abaqus is presented in the case of an industrial structure.

  17. Radiogenomics Consortium (RGC)

    Cancer.gov

    The Radiogenomics Consortium's hypothesis is that a cancer patient's likelihood of developing toxicity to radiation therapy is influenced by common genetic variations, such as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs).

  18. Failure mode and effects analysis of witnessing protocols for ensuring traceability during PGD/PGS cycles.

    PubMed

    Cimadomo, Danilo; Ubaldi, Filippo Maria; Capalbo, Antonio; Maggiulli, Roberta; Scarica, Catello; Romano, Stefania; Poggiana, Cristina; Zuccarello, Daniela; Giancani, Adriano; Vaiarelli, Alberto; Rienzi, Laura

    2016-09-01

    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis and aneuploidy testing (PGD/PGS) use is constantly growing in IVF, and embryo/biopsy traceability during the additional laboratory procedures needed is pivotal. An electronic witnessing system (EWS), which showed a significant value in decreasing mismatch occurrence and increasing detection possibilities during standard care IVF, still does not guarantee the same level of efficiency during PGD/PGS cycles. Specifically, EWS cannot follow single embryos throughout the procedure. This is however critical when an unambiguous diagnosis corresponds to each embryo. Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (FMEA) is a proactive method generally adopted to define tools ensuring safety along a procedure. Due to the implementation of a large quantitative PCR (qPCR)-based blastocyst stage PGD/PGS programme in our centre, and to evaluate the potential procedural risks, a FMEA was performed in September 2014. Forty-four failure modes were identified, among which six were given a moderate risk priority number (>15) (RPN; product of estimated occurrence, severity and detection). Specific corrective measures were then introduced and implemented, and a second evaluation performed six months later. The meticulous and careful application of such measures allowed the risks to be decreased along the whole protocol, by reducing their estimated occurrence and/or increasing detection possibilities. Copyright © 2016 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Choosing embryos: ethical complexity and relational autonomy in staff accounts of PGD

    PubMed Central

    Ehrich, Kathryn; Williams, Clare; Farsides, Bobbie; Sandall, Jane; Scott, Rosamund

    2007-01-01

    The technique of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) is commonly explained as a way of checking the genes of embryos produced by IVF for serious genetic diseases. However, complex accounts of this technique emerged during ethics discussion groups held for PGD staff. These form part of a study exploring the social processes, meanings and institutions that frame and produce ‘ethical problems’ for practitioners, scientists and others working in the specialty of PGD in the UK. Two ‘grey areas’ raised by staff are discussed in terms of how far staff are, or in the future may be, able to support autonomous choices of women/couples: accepting ‘carrier’ embryos within the goal of creating a ‘healthy’ child; and sex selection of embryos for social reasons. These grey areas challenged the staff's resolve to offer individual informed choice, in the face of their awareness of possible collective social effects that might ensue from individual choices. We therefore argue that these new forms of choice pose a challenge to conventional models of individual autonomy used in UK genetic and reproductive counselling, and that ‘relational autonomy’ may be a more suitable ethical model to describe the ethical principles being drawn on by staff working in this area. PMID:18092985

  20. Enzymatic and mRNA Transcript Response of Ovine 6-Phosphogluconate Dehydrogenase (6PGD) in Respect to Different Milk Yield.

    PubMed

    Trivizaki, Stamatina; Laliotis, George P; Bizelis, Iosif; Charismiadou, Maria A; Rogdakis, Emmanuel

    2010-01-01

    Ovine 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGD) is an enzyme of the pentose phosphate pathway, providing the necessary compounds of NADPH for the synthesis of fatty acids. Much of research has been conducted both on enzymatic level and on molecular level. However, to our knowledge, any correlation between enzymatic activity and 6PGD gene expression pattern related to different physiological stages has not been yet reported. With this report, we tried to highlight if any correlation between enzymatic activity and expression of ovine 6PGD gene exists, in respect to different milk yield. According to the determined enzymatic activities and adipocytes characteristics, ewes with low milk production possessed a greater (P ≤ .001) 6PGD activity and larger adipocytes than the highly productive ewes. Although 6PGD expression pattern was higher in low milk yield ewes than in ewes with high milk production, this difference was not found statistically significant. Thus, 6PGD gene expression pattern was not followed by so rapid and great/sizeable changes as it was observed for its respective enzymatic activity, suggesting that other mechanisms such as post translation regulation may be involved in the regulation of the respective gene.

  1. Enzymatic and mRNA Transcript Response of Ovine 6-Phosphogluconate Dehydrogenase (6PGD) in Respect to Different Milk Yield

    PubMed Central

    Trivizaki, Stamatina; Laliotis, George P.; Bizelis, Iosif; Charismiadou, Maria A.; Rogdakis, Emmanuel

    2010-01-01

    Ovine 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGD) is an enzyme of the pentose phosphate pathway, providing the necessary compounds of NADPH for the synthesis of fatty acids. Much of research has been conducted both on enzymatic level and on molecular level. However, to our knowledge, any correlation between enzymatic activity and 6PGD gene expression pattern related to different physiological stages has not been yet reported. With this report, we tried to highlight if any correlation between enzymatic activity and expression of ovine 6PGD gene exists, in respect to different milk yield. According to the determined enzymatic activities and adipocytes characteristics, ewes with low milk production possessed a greater (P ≤ .001) 6PGD activity and larger adipocytes than the highly productive ewes. Although 6PGD expression pattern was higher in low milk yield ewes than in ewes with high milk production, this difference was not found statistically significant. Thus, 6PGD gene expression pattern was not followed by so rapid and great/sizeable changes as it was observed for its respective enzymatic activity, suggesting that other mechanisms such as post translation regulation may be involved in the regulation of the respective gene. PMID:21188075

  2. Effect of the PGD2-DP signaling pathway on primary cultured rat hippocampal neuron injury caused by aluminum overload

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jie; Yang, Qunfang; Wei, Yuling; Yang, Yang; Ji, Chaonan; Hu, Xinyue; Mai, Shaoshan; Kuang, Shengnan; Tian, Xiaoyan; Luo, Ying; Liang, Guojuan; Yang, Junqing

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, the agonists and antagonists of DP receptor were used to examine whether the PGD2-DP signaling pathway affects neuronal function. Primary cultured hippocampal neuron was prepared and treated with aluminum maltolate (100 μM) to establish the neuronal damage model. PGD2 and cAMP content was detected by ELISA. L-PGDS and DPs mRNA and protein expression were measured by RT-PCR and Western blotting, respectively. The aluminium-load neuron was treated with the DP1 agonist BW245C, the DP1 antagonist BWA868C, the DP2 agonist DK-PGD2, and the DP2 antagonist CAY10471, respectively. Neuronal pathomorphology was observed using H-E staining. The cell viability and the lactate dehydrogenase leakage rates of neurons were measured with MTT and LDH kit, respectively. Ca2+ level was detected by Fluo-3/AM. In the model group, the MTT values obviously decreased; LDH leakage rates and PGD2 content increased significantly; L-PGDS, DP1 mRNA and protein expressions increased, and DP2 level decreased. BW245C reduced the Ca2+ fluorescence intensity and protected the neurons. DK-PGD2 increased the intensity of Ca2+ fluorescence, while CAY10471 had the opposite effect. In conclusion, contrary to the effect of DP2, the PGD2-DP1 signaling pathway protects against the primary cultured rat hippocampal neuronal injury caused by aluminum overload. PMID:27089935

  3. Effect of the PGD2-DP signaling pathway on primary cultured rat hippocampal neuron injury caused by aluminum overload.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jie; Yang, Qunfang; Wei, Yuling; Yang, Yang; Ji, Chaonan; Hu, Xinyue; Mai, Shaoshan; Kuang, Shengnan; Tian, Xiaoyan; Luo, Ying; Liang, Guojuan; Yang, Junqing

    2016-04-19

    In the present study, the agonists and antagonists of DP receptor were used to examine whether the PGD2-DP signaling pathway affects neuronal function. Primary cultured hippocampal neuron was prepared and treated with aluminum maltolate (100 μM) to establish the neuronal damage model. PGD2 and cAMP content was detected by ELISA. L-PGDS and DPs mRNA and protein expression were measured by RT-PCR and Western blotting, respectively. The aluminium-load neuron was treated with the DP1 agonist BW245C, the DP1 antagonist BWA868C, the DP2 agonist DK-PGD2, and the DP2 antagonist CAY10471, respectively. Neuronal pathomorphology was observed using H-E staining. The cell viability and the lactate dehydrogenase leakage rates of neurons were measured with MTT and LDH kit, respectively. Ca(2+) level was detected by Fluo-3/AM. In the model group, the MTT values obviously decreased; LDH leakage rates and PGD2 content increased significantly; L-PGDS, DP1 mRNA and protein expressions increased, and DP2 level decreased. BW245C reduced the Ca(2+) fluorescence intensity and protected the neurons. DK-PGD2 increased the intensity of Ca(2+) fluorescence, while CAY10471 had the opposite effect. In conclusion, contrary to the effect of DP2, the PGD2-DP1 signaling pathway protects against the primary cultured rat hippocampal neuronal injury caused by aluminum overload.

  4. Consortium Proves Adage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seidel, Kim

    1997-01-01

    Describes the Minnesota Preparatory Schools, a secondary-level consortium formed by Cotter High School, Saint Mary's University, the Minnesota Academy of Mathematics and Science, De La Salle Language Institute, and the Minnesota Conservatory for the Arts. Indicates that the consortium provides students with flexible schedules geared toward their…

  5. Consortium Directory, 1986.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baus, Frederick, Comp.; LaRocco, Teresa, Comp.

    Information on 133 higher education consortia is presented in this directory. Each consortium meets the following criteria: voluntary, formal organization; includes at least two member institutions; undertakes more than a single program; is administered by a professional director; and receives continuing membership support. For each consortium,…

  6. Assessing a Consortium's Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Lorna M.

    2002-01-01

    Using the example of the Five Colleges consortium, explores the measuring of benefits and costs involved in intercollegiate cooperation. Discusses how the benefits are often other than cost-savings, which is ostensibly why many institutions join such consortia. (EV)

  7. NCI Cohort Consortium Membership

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI Cohort Consortium membership is international and includes investigators responsible for more than 40 high-quality cohorts who are studying large and diverse populations in more than 15 different countries.

  8. Live birth after PGD with confirmation by a comprehensive approach (karyomapping) for simultaneous detection of monogenic and chromosomal disorders.

    PubMed

    Natesan, Senthilkumar A; Handyside, Alan H; Thornhill, Alan R; Ottolini, Christian S; Sage, Karen; Summers, Michael C; Konstantinidis, Michalis; Wells, Dagan; Griffin, Darren K

    2014-11-01

    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for monogenic disorders has the drawback of time and cost associated with tailoring a specific test for each couple, disorder, or both. The inability of any single assay to detect the monogenic disorder in question and simultaneously the chromosomal complement of the embryo also limits its application as separate tests may need to be carried out on the amplified material. The first clinical use of a novel approach ('karyomapping') was designed to circumvent this problem. In this example, karyomapping was used to confirm the results of an existing PGD case detecting both chromosomal abnormalities and a monogenic disorder (Smith-Lemli-Opitz [SLO] syndrome) simultaneously. The family underwent IVF, ICSI and PGD, and both polar body and cleavage stage biopsy were carried out. Following whole genome amplification, array comparative genomic hybridisation of the polar bodies and minisequencing and STR analysis of single blastomeres were used to diagnose maternal aneuploidies and SLO status, respectively. This was confirmed, by karyomapping. Unlike standard PGD, karyomapping required no a-priori test development. A singleton pregnancy and live birth, unaffected with SLO syndrome and with no chromosome abnormality, ensued. Karyomapping is potentially capable of detecting a wide spectrum of monogenic and chromosome disorders and, in this context, can be considered a comprehensive approach to PGD.

  9. Synthesis and evaluation of 2,3-dinorprostaglandins: Dinor-PGD1 and 13-epi-dinor-PGD1 are peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α/γ dual agonists.

    PubMed

    Sato, Ayato; Dodo, Kosuke; Makishima, Makoto; Hashimoto, Yuichi; Sodeoka, Mikiko

    2013-05-15

    2,3-Dinorprostaglandins (dinor-PGs) have been regarded as β-oxidation products of arachidonic-acid-derived prostaglandins, but their biological activities in mammalian cells remain unclear. On the other hand, C18 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), such as γ-linolenic acid (GLA), have various biological activities, and dinor-PGs are speculated to be biosynthesized from GLA. Here, we synthesized dinor-PGs that may possibly be derived from GLA and examined their activities towards peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs). Dinor-PGD1 (1) and its epimer 13-epi-dinor-PGD1 (epi-1) were found to be dual agonists for PPARα/γ, whereas PGD2 derived from arachidonic acid is selective for PPARγ. Thus, GLA-derived dinor-PGs may have unique biological roles. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The embryo as moral work object: PGD/IVF staff views and experiences

    PubMed Central

    Ehrich, Kathryn; Williams, Clare; Farsides, Bobbie

    2008-01-01

    We report on one aspect of a study that explored the views and experiences of practitioners and scientists on social, ethical and clinical dilemmas encountered when working in the field of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for serious genetic disorders. The study produced an ethnography based on observation, interviews and ethics discussion groups with staff from two PGD/IVF Units in the UK. We focus here on staff perceptions of work with embryos that entails disposing of ‘affected’ or ‘spare’ embryos or using them for research. A variety of views were expressed on the ‘embryo question’ in contrast to polarised media debates. We argue that the prevailing policy acceptance of destroying affected embryos, and allowing research on embryos up to 14 days leaves some staff with rarely reported, ambivalent feelings. Staff views are under-researched in this area and we focus on how they may reconcile their personal moral views with the ethical framework in their field. Staff construct embryos in a variety of ways as ‘moral work objects’. This allows them to shift attention between micro-level and overarching institutional work goals, building on Casper's concept of ‘work objects’ and focusing on negotiation of the social order in a morally contested field. PMID:18444955

  11. Characterization of human PGD blastocysts with unbalanced chromosomal translocations and human embryonic stem cell line derivation?

    PubMed

    Frydman, N; Féraud, O; Bas, C; Amit, M; Frydman, R; Bennaceur-Griscelli, A; Tachdjian, G

    2009-01-01

    Novel embryonic stem cell lines derived from embryos carrying structural chromosomal abnormalities obtained after preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) are of interest to study in terms of the influence of abnormalities on further development. A total of 22 unbalanced blastocysts obtained after PGD were analysed for structural chromosomal defects. Morphological description and chromosomal status of these blastocysts was established and they were used to derive human embryonic stem cell (ESC) lines. An outgrowth of cells was observed for six blastocysts (6/22; 27%). For two blastocysts, the exact morphology was unknown since they were at early stage, and for four blastocysts, the inner cell mass was clearly visible. Fifteen blastocysts carried an unbalanced chromosomal defect linked to a reciprocal translocation, resulting in a positive outgrowth of cells for five blastocysts. One human ESC line was obtained from a blastocyst carrying a partial chromosome-21 monosomy and a partial chromosome-1 trisomy. Six blastocysts carried an unbalanced chromosomal defect linked to a Robertsonian translocation, and one showed a positive outgrowth of cells. One blastocyst carried an unbalanced chromosomal defect linked to an insertion and no outgrowth was observed. The efficiency of deriving human ESC lines with constitutional chromosomal disorders was low and probably depends on the initial morphological aspect of the blastocysts and/or the type of the chromosomal disorders.

  12. The embryo as moral work object: PGD/IVF staff views and experiences.

    PubMed

    Ehrich, Kathryn; Williams, Clare; Farsides, Bobbie

    2008-07-01

    We report on one aspect of a study that explored the views and experiences of practitioners and scientists on social, ethical and clinical dilemmas encountered when working in the field of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for serious genetic disorders. The study produced an ethnography based on observation, interviews and ethics discussion groups with staff from two PGD/IVF Units in the UK. We focus here on staff perceptions of work with embryos that entails disposing of 'affected' or 'spare' embryos or using them for research. A variety of views were expressed on the 'embryo question' in contrast to polarised media debates. We argue that the prevailing policy acceptance of destroying affected embryos, and allowing research on embryos up to 14 days leaves some staff with rarely reported, ambivalent feelings. Staff views are under-researched in this area and we focus on how they may reconcile their personal moral views with the ethical framework in their field. Staff construct embryos in a variety of ways as 'moral work objects'. This allows them to shift attention between micro-level and overarching institutional work goals, building on Casper's concept of 'work objects' and focusing on negotiation of the social order in a morally contested field.

  13. Religious Scholars' Attitudes and Views on Ethical Issues Pertaining to Pre-Implantation Genetic Diagnosis (PGD) in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Olesen, A; Nor, S N; Amin, L

    2016-09-01

    Pre-Implantation Genetic Diagnosis (PGD) represents the first fusion of genomics and assisted reproduction and the first reproductive technology that allows prospective parents to screen and select the genetic characteristics of their potential offspring. However, for some, the idea that we can intervene in the mechanisms of human existence at such a fundamental level can be, at a minimum, worrying and, at most, repugnant. Religious doctrines particularly are likely to collide with the rapidly advancing capability for science to make such interventions. This paper focuses on opinions and arguments of selected religious scholars regarding ethical issues pertaining to PGD. In-depth interviews were conducted with religious scholars from three different religious organizations in the Klang Valley, Malaysia. Findings showed that Christian scholars are very sceptical of the long-term use of PGD because of its possible effect on the value of humanity and the parent-children relationship. This differs from Islamic scholars, who view PGD as God-given knowledge in medical science to further help humans understand medical genetics. For Buddhist scholars, PGD is considered to be new medical technology that can be used to save lives, avoid suffering, and bring happiness to those who need it. Our results suggest that it is important to include the opinions and views of religious scholars when it comes to new medical technologies such as PGD, as their opinions will have a significant impact on people from various faiths, particularly in a multi-religious country like Malaysia where society places high value on marital relationships and on the traditional concepts of family.

  14. The clinical effectiveness of preimplantation genetic diagnosis for aneuploidy in all 24 chromosomes (PGD-A): systematic review.

    PubMed

    Lee, Evelyn; Illingworth, Peter; Wilton, Leeanda; Chambers, Georgina Mary

    2015-02-01

    Is preimplantation genetic diagnosis for aneuploidy (PGD-A) with analysis of all chromosomes during assisted reproductive technology (ART) clinically and cost effective? The majority of published studies comparing a strategy of PGD-A with morphologically assessed embryos have reported a higher implantation rate per embryo using PGD-A, but insufficient data has been presented to evaluate the clinical and cost-effectiveness of PGD-A in the clinical setting. Aneuploidy is a leading cause of implantation failure, miscarriage and congenital abnormalities in humans, and a significant cause of ART failure. Preclinical evidence of PGD-A indicates that the selection and transfer of euploid embryos during ART should improve clinical outcomes. A systematic review of the literature was performed for full text English language articles using MEDLINE, EMBASE, SCOPUS, Cochrane Library databases, NHS Economic Evaluation Database and EconLit. The Downs and Black scoring checklist was used to assess the quality of studies. Clinical effectiveness was measured in terms of pregnancy, live birth and miscarriage rates. Nineteen articles meeting the inclusion criteria, comprising three RCTs in young and good prognosis patients and 16 observation studies were identified. Five of the observational studies included a control group of patients where embryos were selected based on morphological criteria (matched cohort studies). Of the five studies that included a control group and reported implantation rates, four studies (including two RCTs) demonstrated improved implantation rates in the PGD-A group. Of the eight studies that included a control group, six studies (including two RCTs) reported significantly higher pregnancy rates in the PGD-A group, and in the remaining two studies, equivalent pregnancies rates were reported despite fewer embryos being transferred in the PGD-A group. The three RCTs demonstrated benefit in young and good prognosis patients in terms of clinical pregnancy rates

  15. Experiences of Pre-Implantation Genetic Diagnosis (PGD) in Sweden: a Three-Year Follow-Up of Men and Women.

    PubMed

    Järvholm, Stina; Thurin-Kjellberg, Ann; Broberg, Malin

    2017-02-12

    Men and women with a hereditary genetic disease are faced with different options when they wish to become parents. One is pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) which is a combination of in vitro fertilization (IVF) and genetic analysis of the embryo before implantation. The present study focused on men and women's psychological experiences of PGD three years after applying for PGD. Nineteen women and seventeen men (i.e. seventeen couples and two women) participated. The interviews were analysed by thematic method. It is better to have tried was identified as a master theme, under which came three underlying sub-themes, which had the following headings: Practical experience of PGD, Psychological experience of PGD and Goals of PGD. The results show that men and women three years after PGD are still psychologically affected by their experience. The men and women raised concerns that their relationship had been affected, both positively and negatively, and feelings of anxiety and depression still remained. Healthcare services should recognize the heterogeneous nature of the group being studied and therefore the need for counselling can arise at different times and in relation to different areas, regardless of the outcome of the PGD.

  16. Invited commentary: the politics of human embryo research and the motivation to achieve PGD.

    PubMed

    Yovich, John L

    2011-05-01

    The idea that biomedical research can be influenced by political events implies a teleological basis indicating that scientific achievements occur because there is a political need. Such a concept appears to have been the reason PGD was fast-tracked to emerge as a biomedical achievement well before its due date, occurring at a time when human embryology was still struggling to reach a reasonable level of efficiency and become adopted as a clinically relevant advance around the world. One story underlying the historical achievement of the HFE Act 1990, enabling regulated embryo research, steps outside the firm ground of biomedical science and encourages the idea that Reproductive BioMedicine Online should embrace a further section enabling articles dealing with 'History, politics and personalities' where these influence biomedical research.

  17. The Nebraska Instrument Sharing Consortium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, David H.

    1986-01-01

    The Nebraska Instrument Sharing Consortium (NISC) is a group of small colleges that have banded together to provide modern instrumentation to their students at an affordable price. Consortium activities are described, including how the instruments are moved between campuses. (JN)

  18. Gonadotropin releasing hormone agonists or antagonists for preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD)? A prospective randomised trial.

    PubMed

    Verpoest, W; De Vos, A; De Rycke, M; Parikh, S; Staessen, C; Tournaye, H; De Vos, M; Vloeberghs, V; Blockeel, C

    2017-08-08

    Background The use of GnRH analogue medication is essential in reproductive medicine to avoid premature ovulation by pituitary suppression for the duration of ovarian stimulation by gonadotrophins. The type of pituitary suppression by either GnRH agonist analogues versus GnRH antagonist analogues may result in different embryological hence clinical results. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis is a subtype of IVF in which embryos are created for genetic diagnosis of hereditary disorders in order to avoid genetically affected children. Embryological quality hence ovarian stimulation in preimplantation genetic diagnosis is crucial as genetic selection will reduce the number of available embryos to a fraction of the total. • Objective The aim of this study was to assess the efficiency of GnRH antagonist versus GnRH agonist treatment for pituitary suppression in ovarian stimulation for PGD, by proxy of number and quality of embryos at cleavage stage available for biopsy. • Method We conducted a prospective randomised controlled trial comparing pituitary suppression by GnRH antagonist versus GnRH agonist in ovarian stimulation for PGD. The primary outcome measure was the number of embryos of sufficient quality for biopsy at cleavage stage. Secondary outcome parameters were the number of blastocysts available of top quality, and clinical pregnancy rate. • Results There was no difference in number of oocytes retrieved, embryos at cleavage stage available for biopsy or embryo quality. The clinical pregnancy rate was higher in the GnRH agonist group, however the sample size was insufficient to allow conclusions. • Conclusion The use of GnRH agonist versus antagonist treatment does not result in differences in number of oocytes, embryos or embryo quality in ovarian stimulation for preimplantation genetic diagnosis. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  19. Congenital 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGD) deficiency associated with chronic hemolytic anemia in a Spanish family.

    PubMed

    Vives Corrons, J L; Colomer, D; Pujades, A; Rovira, A; Aymerich, M; Merino, A; Aguilar i Bascompte, J L

    1996-12-01

    Clinical and metabolic studies were performed in four members of a Spanish family with partial (50%) 6 phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGD) deficiency. In all cases the activities of 6 phosphogluconolactone (6PGL) and glutathione reductase (GR) were normal, and the molecular characterization performed in the partially purified 6PGD from the propositus showed normal kinetic and electrophoretic patterns. Two females (the propositus and her sister) suffered from a well-compensated chronic nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia (CNSHA) and exhibited decreased RBC glutathione (GSH) stability with increased oxidative susceptibility, defined by enhanced malonyldialdehyde (MDA) generation "in vitro." The other two members of the family (the propositus's mother and brother) were clinically asymptomatic. In the propositus and her sister, RBC metabolism exhibited a markedly abnormal concentration of glycolytic intermediates, mainly characterized by striking increases in fructose 1,6 bisphosphate (50-fold), dihydroxiacetone-phosphate (20-fold) and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate (tenfold). Although the precise mechanism of the hemolysis in the two patients is unknown, the enhanced oxidative threat observed in their RBCs may interfere in some way with the glycolytic pathway function, leading to a marked increase in certain metabolic intermediates located before the glyceraldehyde 3 phosphate dehydrogenase (GA3PD) step. Since it seems that GA3PD half-life is modulated by fluctuations of the cytosolic redox status, an "in situ" approach was simulated by using permeabilized RBCs. In these conditions, GA3PD activity was significantly lower in the propositus and her sister than in the asymptomatic members of the family and the simultaneous normal control.

  20. Media debates and 'ethical publicity' on social sex selection through preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) technology in Australia.

    PubMed

    Whittaker, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    This paper offers a critical discourse analysis of media debate over social sex selection in the Australian media from 2008 to 2014. This period coincides with a review of the National Health and Medical Research Council's Ethical Guidelines on the Use of Assisted Reproductive Technology in Clinical Practice and Research (2007), which underlie the regulation of assisted reproductive clinics and practice in Australia. I examine the discussion of the ethics of pre-implatation genetic diagnosis (PGD) within the media as 'ethical publicity' to the lay public. Sex selection through PGD is both exemplary of and interconnected with a range of debates in Australia about the legitimacy of certain reproductive choices and the extent to which procreative liberties should be restricted. Major themes emerging from media reports on PGD sex selection in Australia are described. These include: the spectre of science out of control; ramifications for the contestation over the public funding of abortion in Australia; private choices versus public authorities regulating reproduction; and the ethics of travelling overseas for the technology. It is concluded that within Australia, the issue of PGD sex selection is framed in terms of questions of individual freedom against the principle of sex discrimination - a principle enshrined in legislation - and a commitment to publically-funded medical care.

  1. The Effect of Ddt on the Polymorphism at the G6pd and Pgd Loci in DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER

    PubMed Central

    Bijlsma, R.; Kerver, J. W. M.

    1983-01-01

    For the degradation of DDT and other chlorohydrocarbon insecticides energy in the form of NADPH is needed which for the greater part is supplied by the pentose phosphate shunt. Therefore the influence of DDT on the polymorphism at the G6pd and Pgd loci in Drosophila melanogaster was investigated by studying its effect on egg to adult survival and adult survival. The results show the existence of significant differences in fitness between the different genotypes of the two loci for both components. It is found that the effect of DDT supplementation differs significantly from the effect of sodium octanoate addition. DDT treatment also increases the activity of the pentose phosphate shunt as measured by the activity of G6PD and 6PGD. In larvae a 50% increase in activity is found and in adults a 100% increase. As there is little doubt that the activities of G6PD and 6PGD are somehow correlated with the fitness of flies, the data are discussed in relation to the in vitro and in vivo differences in activity between the different allozymes of both G6PD and 6PGD. PMID:6404694

  2. BRCA1 mutation carriers have a lower number of mature oocytes after ovarian stimulation for IVF/PGD.

    PubMed

    Derks-Smeets, I A P; van Tilborg, T C; van Montfoort, A; Smits, L; Torrance, H L; Meijer-Hoogeveen, M; Broekmans, F; Dreesen, J C F M; Paulussen, A D C; Tjan-Heijnen, V C G; Homminga, I; van den Berg, M M J; Ausems, M G E M; de Rycke, M; de Die-Smulders, C E M; Verpoest, W; van Golde, R

    2017-08-22

    The aim of this study was to determine whether BRCA1/2 mutation carriers produce fewer mature oocytes after ovarian stimulation for in vitro fertilization (IVF) with preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD), in comparison to a PGD control group. A retrospective, international, multicenter cohort study was performed on data of first PGD cycles performed between January 2006 and September 2015. Data were extracted from medical files. The study was performed in one PGD center and three affiliated IVF centers in the Netherlands and one PGD center in Belgium. Exposed couples underwent PGD because of a pathogenic BRCA1/2 mutation, controls for other monogenic conditions. Only couples treated in a long gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist-suppressive protocol, stimulated with at least 150 IU follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), were included. Women suspected to have a diminished ovarian reserve status due to chemotherapy, auto-immune disorders, or genetic conditions (other than BRCA1/2 mutations) were excluded. A total of 106 BRCA1/2 mutation carriers underwent PGD in this period, of which 43 (20 BRCA1 and 23 BRCA2 mutation carriers) met the inclusion criteria. They were compared to 174 controls selected by frequency matching. Thirty-eight BRCA1/2 mutation carriers (18 BRCA1 and 20 BRCA2 mutation carriers) and 154 controls proceeded to oocyte pickup. The median number of mature oocytes was 7.0 (interquartile range (IQR) 4.0-9.0) in the BRCA group as a whole, 6.5 (IQR 4.0-8.0) in BRCA1 mutation carriers, 7.5 (IQR 5.5-9.0) in BRCA2 mutation carriers, and 8.0 (IQR 6.0-11.0) in controls. Multiple linear regression analysis with the number of mature oocytes as a dependent variable and adjustment for treatment center, female age, female body mass index (BMI), type of gonadotropin used, and the total dose of gonadotropins administered revealed a significantly lower yield of mature oocytes in the BRCA group as compared to controls (p = 0.04). This finding could be fully

  3. NCI Cohort Consortium

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI Cohort Consortium is an extramural-intramural partnership formed by the National Cancer Institute to address the need for large-scale collaborations to pool the large quantity of data and biospecimens necessary to conduct a wide range of cancer studies.

  4. Developmental neuropsychological assessment of 4- to 5-year-old children born following Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis (PGD): A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Sacks, Gilat Chaya; Altarescu, Gheona; Guedalia, Judith; Varshaver, Irit; Gilboa, Tal; Levy-Lahad, Ephrat; Eldar-Geva, Talia

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate developmental neuropsychological profiles of 4- to 5-year-old children born after Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis (PGD). Twenty-seven participants received a neurological examination and a battery of neuropsychological assessments including Wechsler Preschool & Primary Scale of Intelligence - Third Edition (WPPSI-III; cognitive development), Preschool Language Scale, Fourth Edition (PLS-4; language development), Wide Range Assessment of Visual Motor Abilities (visual motor abilities), Childhood Autism Rating Scales II (a screening test for autistic spectrum disorders), and the Miles ABC Test (ocular dominance). Parental questionnaires included the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function Preschool Version (BRIEF-P; executive function), Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) and the Carey Temperament Scales Behavioral Style Questionnaire (socioemotional development and temperament), and the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales, Interview Edition, Second Edition (general adaptive behavior). Subjects' tests results were compared to each test's norms. Children born after PGD demonstrated scores within the normal or above-normal ranges for all developmental outcomes (mean ± SD): WPPSI-III-VIQ 107.4 ± 14.4 (p = .013), PLS-4-Total 113.2 ± 12.4, p < .001), CBCL-Total 41.1 ± 8.6 (p < .001), BRIEF-P-Global Executive Composite 44.8 ± 9.5 (p = .009). Twelve (44%) of the PGD children had a significant difference between their VIQ and PIQ scores (compared to 27% in the general population). One subject was found to show possible signs of autistic spectrum disorder, although a family history of autism was noted. In conclusion, in this pilot study, children assessed at age 4-5 years and conceived after PGD displayed developmental neuropsychological outcomes within normal limits as compared to their chronologic peers. A larger study is needed to evaluate and follow the neuropsychological development of children born after PGD.

  5. Kansas Wind Energy Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Gruenbacher, Don

    2015-12-31

    This project addresses both fundamental and applied research problems that will help with problems defined by the DOE “20% Wind by 2030 Report”. In particular, this work focuses on increasing the capacity of small or community wind generation capabilities that would be operated in a distributed generation approach. A consortium (KWEC – Kansas Wind Energy Consortium) of researchers from Kansas State University and Wichita State University aims to dramatically increase the penetration of wind energy via distributed wind power generation. We believe distributed generation through wind power will play a critical role in the ability to reach and extend the renewable energy production targets set by the Department of Energy. KWEC aims to find technical and economic solutions to enable widespread implementation of distributed renewable energy resources that would apply to wind.

  6. Advanced Separation Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    2006-01-01

    The Center for Advanced Separation Technologies (CAST) was formed in 2001 under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy to conduct fundamental research in advanced separation and to develop technologies that can be used to produce coal and minerals in an efficient and environmentally acceptable manner. The CAST consortium consists of seven universities - Virginia Tech, West Virginia University, University of Kentucky, Montana Tech, University of Utah, University of Nevada-Reno, and New Mexico Tech. The consortium brings together a broad range of expertise to solve problems facing the US coal industry and the mining sector in general. At present, a total of 60 research projects are under way. The article outlines some of these, on topics including innovative dewatering technologies, removal of mercury and other impurities, and modelling of the flotation process. 1 photo.

  7. The BADER Consortium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    will study individuals with upper extremity amputations, a subgroup of injured service people who have been underrepresented in research in the past...external auditing purposes.  Two charges from the BADER Consortium were randomly selected for audit under the annual University of Delaware audit...use at Navy sites.  Fully executed two CRADAs for new research projects. Institution Date of distribution Date of completed agreement

  8. Military Suicide Research Consortium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    Reduction in self- esteem may impact this relationship such that if self-esteem is not reduced as a result of bullying , psychological distress and sui...resources of the military, impact unit morale, and take a large emotional toll on the involved friends, family, and commanders. There is significant...practice that will have a direct impact on suicide-related and other mental health outcomes for military personnel. 3. Disseminate Consortium

  9. Identification of defensin-encoding genes of Picea glauca: characterization of PgD5, a conserved spruce defensin with strong antifungal activity

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Plant defensins represent a major innate immune protein superfamily that displays strong inhibitory effects on filamentous fungi. The total number of plant defensins in a conifer species is unknown since there are no sequenced conifer genomes published, however the genomes of several angiosperm species provide an insight on the diversity of plant defensins. Here we report the identification of five new defensin-encoding genes from the Picea glauca genome and the characterization of two of their gene products, named PgD5 and endopiceasin. Results Screening of a P. glauca EST database with sequences of known plant defensins identified four genes with homology to the known P. glauca defensin PgD1, which were designated PgD2-5. Whereas in the mature PgD2-4 only 7–9 amino acids differed from PgD1, PgD5 had only 64% sequence identity. PgD5 was amplified from P. glauca genomic DNA by PCR. It codes for a precursor of 77-amino acid that is fully conserved within the Picea genus and has similarity to plant defensins. Recombinant PgD5, produced in Escherichia coli, had a molecular mass of 5.721 kDa, as determined by mass spectrometry. The PgD5 peptide exhibited strong antifungal activity against several phytopathogens without any effect on the morphology of the treated fungal hyphae, but strongly inhibited hyphal elongation. A SYTOX uptake assay suggested that the inhibitory activity of PgD5 could be associated with altering the permeability of the fungal membranes. Another completely unrelated defensin gene was identified in the EST library and named endopiceasin. Its gene codes for a 6-cysteine peptide that shares high similarity with the fungal defensin plectasin. Conclusions Screening of a P. glauca EST database resulted in the identification of five new defensin-encoding genes. PgD5 codes for a plant defensin that displays non-morphogenic antifungal activity against the phytopathogens tested, probably by altering membrane permeability. PgD5 has potential for

  10. The Stroke Belt Consortium.

    PubMed

    Alberts, M J

    1996-01-01

    The "Stroke Belt" describes a region of the southeastern United States with a high incidence of stroke and mortality due to stroke. In an effort to address the problem of stroke in this region, we have formed the Stroke Belt Consortium (SBC). This report describes the formation and functions of the SBC. The SBC is a unique organization with representatives from many areas, including health care, government, nonprofit organizations, the pharmaceutical industry, minority groups, educational groups, and managed care. The goals of the consortium are to advance public and professional education about stroke in the Stroke Belt, with a special emphasis on the populations in that region. The first meeting of the consortium was held in November 1994. Many helpful and innovative ideas and initiatives were generated at the first SBC meeting. These included improved techniques for professional education, the development of a mass media campaign for public education, screening of college students for stroke risk factors, and using fast-food restaurants and sporting events as venues to promote stroke education. This type of organized effort may produce cost-effective programs and initiatives, particularly for largescale educational efforts, that will enhance the prevention and treatment of stroke patients. If successful in the Stroke Belt, similar organizations can be formed in other regions of the nation to address specific issues related to stroke prevention, education, and treatment.

  11. The impact of Alpha/ESHRE consensus regarding oocytes with aggregates of smooth endoplasmic reticulum (SERa) on in vitro fertilization outcome.

    PubMed

    Restelli, Liliana; Delle Noci, Silvia; Mangiarini, Alice; Ferrari, Stefania; Somigliana, Edgardo; Paffoni, Alessio

    2015-11-01

    The present study aimed to gather information on the impact of Alpha/European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology (ESHRE) consensus regarding oocytes with aggregates of smooth endoplasmic reticulum (SERa) on in vitro fertilization outcome. In particular, we investigated if patients undergoing intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) and whose oocytes are discarded due to SERa have a higher chance of embryo transfer cancellation compared to patients without SERa oocytes. This is a nested case-control study drawn from the cohort of women referring for in vitro fertilization with ICSI. Cases were patients showing at least one oocyte with SERa at the time of injection. Controls were subsequent patients showing no SERa oocytes and matched ratio 1:1 for age, clinical indication to in vitro fertilization (IVF), and body mass index. The main outcome was the rate of embryo transfer cancellation. The percentage of women experiencing a transfer cancellation (absence of suitable oocytes or viable embryos) in their ICSI cycle were significantly higher in cases (18 %) compared to controls (8 %) (p = 0.02); however, adjusted odds ratio for FSH and number of SERa oocytes, of follicles, of retrieved oocytes, and of inseminated oocytes were not statistically significant. We have shown that the exclusion of SERa oocytes from ICSI cycles causes an increased frequency of transfer cancellation. This effect is mostly due to the reduced number of available oocytes after exclusion of SERa oocytes.

  12. GAS STORAGE TECHNOLGOY CONSORTIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Robert W. Watson

    2004-04-23

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. To accomplish this objective, the project is divided into three phases that are managed and directed by the GSTC Coordinator. Base funding for the consortium is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). In addition, funding is anticipated from the Gas Technology Institute (GTI). The first phase, Phase 1A, was initiated on September 30, 2003, and is scheduled for completion on March 31, 2004. Phase 1A of the project includes the creation of the GSTC structure, development of constitution (by-laws) for the consortium, and development and refinement of a technical approach (work plan) for

  13. GAS STORAGE TECHNOLOGY CONSORTIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Robert W. Watson

    2004-04-17

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. To accomplish this objective, the project is divided into three phases that are managed and directed by the GSTC Coordinator. Base funding for the consortium is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). In addition, funding is anticipated from the Gas Technology Institute (GTI). The first phase, Phase 1A, was initiated on September 30, 2003, and is scheduled for completion on March 31, 2004. Phase 1A of the project includes the creation of the GSTC structure, development of constitution (by-laws) for the consortium, and development and refinement of a technical approach (work plan) for

  14. X-linked glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and autosomal 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGD) polymorphisms in baboons

    SciTech Connect

    VandeBerg, J.L.; Aivaliotis, M.J.; Samollow, P.B. )

    1992-12-01

    Electrophoretic polymorphisms of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGD) were examined in captive colonies of five subspecies of baboons (Papio hamadryas). Phenotype frequencies and family data verified the X-linked inheritance of the G6PD polymorphism. Insufficient family data were available to confirm autosomal inheritance of the 6PGD polymorphism, but the electrophoretic patterns of variant types (putative heterozygotes) suggested the codominant expression of alleles at an autosomal locus. Implications of the G6PD polymorphism are discussed with regard to its utility as a marker system for research on X-chromosome inactivation during baboon development and for studies of clonal cell proliferation and/or cell selection during the development of atherosclerotic lesions in the baboon model. 61 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  15. PKA regulatory IIα subunit is essential for PGD2-mediated resolution of inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yujun; Zuo, Shengkai; Ji, Yong; Nakamura, Masataka; Stratakis, Constantine A.

    2016-01-01

    The kinetic participation of macrophages is critical for inflammatory resolution and recovery from myocardial infarction (MI), particularly with respect to the transition from the M1 to the M2 phenotype; however, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. In this study, we found that the deletion of prostaglandin (PG) D2 receptor subtype 1 (DP1) in macrophages retarded M2 polarization, antiinflammatory cytokine production, and resolution in different inflammatory models, including the MI model. DP1 deletion up-regulated proinflammatory genes expression via JAK2/STAT1 signaling in macrophages, whereas its activation facilitated binding of the separated PKA regulatory IIα subunit (PRKAR2A) to the transmembrane domain of IFN-γ receptor, suppressed JAK2–STAT1 axis–mediated M1 polarization, and promoted resolution. PRKAR2A deficiency attenuated DP1 activation–mediated M2 polarization and resolution of inflammation. Collectively, PGD2–DP1 axis–induced M2 polarization facilitates resolution of inflammation through the PRKAR2A-mediated suppression of JAK2/STAT1 signaling. These observations indicate that macrophage DP1 activation represents a promising strategy in the management of inflammation-associated diseases, including post-MI healing. PMID:27621415

  16. Social welfare, genetic welfare? Boundary-work in the IVF/PGD clinic.

    PubMed

    Ehrich, Kathryn; Williams, Clare; Scott, Rosamund; Sandall, Jane; Farsides, Bobbie

    2006-09-01

    Through the lens of the 'welfare of the child' assessment, this paper explores how staff working in the area of in vitro fertilisation and preimplantation genetic diagnosis (IVF/PGD) balance reflexive relations of legitimacy and accountability between the public and private spheres, and between medicine, the citizen and the state. The wider research of which this analysis is a part uses multiple methods to study two National Health Service Assisted Conception Units in England. Research methods used included observation clinics and interviews with staff from a range of disciplines. We illustrate how the staff reveal tensions between their views that the welfare of the child assessment can be seen as intrusive and discriminatory, and on the other hand that medical intervention in reproduction should be socially and professionally accountable. These tensions can be understood sociologically in terms of a gradual movement from socially based solutions to fertility problems and disabilities, towards a biomedical, and arguably genetically oriented worldview of such problems. Rather than being viewed as discrete, these two orientations should be seen as indicating an emergent direction of travel along a continuum, with elements of both being present in the accounts. We argue that consideration of the welfare of the child involves staff in ethical boundary-work across the two orientations and between the accountabilities and responsibilities of healthcare professionals, individuals and the state.

  17. PKA regulatory IIα subunit is essential for PGD2-mediated resolution of inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kong, Deping; Shen, Yujun; Liu, Guizhu; Zuo, Shengkai; Ji, Yong; Lu, Ankang; Nakamura, Masataka; Lazarus, Michael; Stratakis, Constantine A; Breyer, Richard M; Yu, Ying

    2016-09-19

    The kinetic participation of macrophages is critical for inflammatory resolution and recovery from myocardial infarction (MI), particularly with respect to the transition from the M1 to the M2 phenotype; however, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. In this study, we found that the deletion of prostaglandin (PG) D2 receptor subtype 1 (DP1) in macrophages retarded M2 polarization, antiinflammatory cytokine production, and resolution in different inflammatory models, including the MI model. DP1 deletion up-regulated proinflammatory genes expression via JAK2/STAT1 signaling in macrophages, whereas its activation facilitated binding of the separated PKA regulatory IIα subunit (PRKAR2A) to the transmembrane domain of IFN-γ receptor, suppressed JAK2-STAT1 axis-mediated M1 polarization, and promoted resolution. PRKAR2A deficiency attenuated DP1 activation-mediated M2 polarization and resolution of inflammation. Collectively, PGD2-DP1 axis-induced M2 polarization facilitates resolution of inflammation through the PRKAR2A-mediated suppression of JAK2/STAT1 signaling. These observations indicate that macrophage DP1 activation represents a promising strategy in the management of inflammation-associated diseases, including post-MI healing.

  18. Tumour-derived PGD2 and NKp30-B7H6 engagement drives an immunosuppressive ILC2-MDSC axis.

    PubMed

    Trabanelli, Sara; Chevalier, Mathieu F; Martinez-Usatorre, Amaia; Gomez-Cadena, Alejandra; Salomé, Bérengère; Lecciso, Mariangela; Salvestrini, Valentina; Verdeil, Grégory; Racle, Julien; Papayannidis, Cristina; Morita, Hideaki; Pizzitola, Irene; Grandclément, Camille; Bohner, Perrine; Bruni, Elena; Girotra, Mukul; Pallavi, Rani; Falvo, Paolo; Leibundgut, Elisabeth Oppliger; Baerlocher, Gabriela M; Carlo-Stella, Carmelo; Taurino, Daniela; Santoro, Armando; Spinelli, Orietta; Rambaldi, Alessandro; Giarin, Emanuela; Basso, Giuseppe; Tresoldi, Cristina; Ciceri, Fabio; Gfeller, David; Akdis, Cezmi A; Mazzarella, Luca; Minucci, Saverio; Pelicci, Pier Giuseppe; Marcenaro, Emanuela; McKenzie, Andrew N J; Vanhecke, Dominique; Coukos, George; Mavilio, Domenico; Curti, Antonio; Derré, Laurent; Jandus, Camilla

    2017-09-19

    Group 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s) are involved in human diseases, such as allergy, atopic dermatitis and nasal polyposis, but their function in human cancer remains unclear. Here we show that, in acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL), ILC2s are increased and hyper-activated through the interaction of CRTH2 and NKp30 with elevated tumour-derived PGD2 and B7H6, respectively. ILC2s, in turn, activate monocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells (M-MDSCs) via IL-13 secretion. Upon treating APL with all-trans retinoic acid and achieving complete remission, the levels of PGD2, NKp30, ILC2s, IL-13 and M-MDSCs are restored. Similarly, disruption of this tumour immunosuppressive axis by specifically blocking PGD2, IL-13 and NKp30 partially restores ILC2 and M-MDSC levels and results in increased survival. Thus, using APL as a model, we uncover a tolerogenic pathway that may represent a relevant immunosuppressive, therapeutic targetable, mechanism operating in various human tumour types, as supported by our observations in prostate cancer.Group 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s) modulate inflammatory and allergic responses, but their function in cancer immunity is still unclear. Here the authors show that, in acute promyelocytic leukaemia, tumour-activated ILC2s secrete IL-13 to induce myeloid-derived suppressor cells and support tumour growth.

  19. Genomic standards consortium projects.

    PubMed

    Field, Dawn; Sterk, Peter; Kottmann, Renzo; De Smet, J Wim; Amaral-Zettler, Linda; Cochrane, Guy; Cole, James R; Davies, Neil; Dawyndt, Peter; Garrity, George M; Gilbert, Jack A; Glöckner, Frank Oliver; Hirschman, Lynette; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Knight, Rob; Kyrpides, Nikos; Meyer, Folker; Karsch-Mizrachi, Ilene; Morrison, Norman; Robbins, Robert; San Gil, Inigo; Sansone, Susanna; Schriml, Lynn; Tatusova, Tatiana; Ussery, Dave; Yilmaz, Pelin; White, Owen; Wooley, John; Caporaso, Gregory

    2014-06-15

    The Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC) is an open-membership community that was founded in 2005 to work towards the development, implementation and harmonization of standards in the field of genomics. Starting with the defined task of establishing a minimal set of descriptions the GSC has evolved into an active standards-setting body that currently has 18 ongoing projects, with additional projects regularly proposed from within and outside the GSC. Here we describe our recently enacted policy for proposing new activities that are intended to be taken on by the GSC, along with the template for proposing such new activities.

  20. Federal consortium visit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-02-10

    Members of the Southeast U.S. Federal Laboratory Consortium for Technology Transfer gather at the base of the B-1/B-2 Test Stand during a Feb. 10 visit to John C. Stennis Space Center. The group visited Stennis to tour facilities and receive briefings on work at the rocket engine test site. They also visited the INFINITY at NASA Stennis Space Center site and received a briefing on construction of the new science center. The FLC is a nationwide network of federal laboratories to facilitate technology transfers between federal agencies and commercial companies.

  1. An evaluation of PGD in clinical genetic services through 3 years application for prevention of beta-thalassaemia major and sickle cell thalassaemia.

    PubMed

    Traeger-Synodinos, Joanne; Vrettou, Christina; Palmer, Giles; Tzetis, Maria; Mastrominas, Minas; Davies, Stephen; Kanavakis, Emmanuel

    2003-05-01

    PGD represents an alternative within prenatal diagnosis services, which avoids terminating affected on-going pregnancies. In Greece, prevention programmes for haemoglobinopathies, including the option of prenatal diagnosis, are well established. Following optimization of a single-cell genotyping strategy (designed to be applicable for the majority of beta-thalassaemia major or sickle thalassaemia genotype interactions) along with close collaboration with an IVF unit, we integrated the option of PGD for at-risk couples with a problematic reproductive history. A total of 59 couples requesting PGD were counselled, of whom 41 initiated 63 PGD cycles. Following standard assisted reproduction treatment for oocyte retrieval, 20 cycles were cancelled (too few oocytes and/or poor quality embryos), but in 43 cycles single blastomeres were biopsied from 3 day embryos and genotyped (total 302). Diagnosis was achieved for 236 embryos, and 100 of 125 unaffected embryos were transferred. Sixteen pregnancies were established, although six were lost within the first trimester. Ten pregnancies underwent second trimester prenatal diagnosis, with nine pregnancies (13 babies: six singletons, two twins and one triplet) confirmed unaffected, although one singleton was a PGD misdiagnosis and terminated. The triplet pregnancy was selectively reduced to twins, and nine pregnancies went to term, with 12 healthy babies born. This report highlights advantages, limitations and approaches towards improvement when incorporating PGD within genetic services for a common recessive disease.

  2. Portrait of a Consortium: ANKOS (Anatolian University Libraries Consortium)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erdogan, Phyllis; Karasozen, Bulent

    2009-01-01

    The Anatolian University Libraries Consortium (ANKOS) was created in 2001 with only a few members subscribed to nine e-journal collections and bibliographic databases. This Turkish library consortium had developed from one state and three private universities joining together for the purchase of two databases in 1999. Over time, the numbers of…

  3. Portrait of a Consortium: ANKOS (Anatolian University Libraries Consortium)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erdogan, Phyllis; Karasozen, Bulent

    2009-01-01

    The Anatolian University Libraries Consortium (ANKOS) was created in 2001 with only a few members subscribed to nine e-journal collections and bibliographic databases. This Turkish library consortium had developed from one state and three private universities joining together for the purchase of two databases in 1999. Over time, the numbers of…

  4. The Structural Genomics Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Molly Morgan; Castle-Clarke, Sophie; Brooker, Daniel; Nason, Edward; Huzair, Farah; Chataway, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The Structural Genomics Consortium (SGC) supports drug discovery efforts through a unique, open access model of public-private collaboration. This study presents the results of an independent evaluation of the Structural Genomics Consortium, conducted by RAND Europe with the Institute on Governance. The evaluation aimed to establish the role of the SGC within the wider drug discovery and PPP landscape, assessing the merits of the SGC open access model relative to alternative models of funding R&D in this space, as well as the key trends and opportunities in the external environment that may impact on the future of the SGC. It also established the incentives and disincentives for investment, strengths and weaknesses of the SGC's model, and the opportunities and threats the SGC will face in the future. This enabled us to assess the most convincing arguments for funding the SGC at present; important trade-offs or limitations that should be addressed in moving towards the next funding phase; and whether funders are anticipating changes either to the SGC or the wider PPP landscape. Finally, we undertook a quantitative analysis to ascertain what judgements can be made about the SGC's past and current performance track record, before unpacking the role of the external environment and particular actors within the SGC in developing scenarios for the future. PMID:28560088

  5. The Neuroscience Peer Review Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Saper, Clifford B; Maunsell, John HR

    2009-01-01

    As the Neuroscience Peer Review Consortium (NPRC) ends its first year, it is worth looking back to see how the experiment has worked. In order to encourage dissemination of the details outlined in this Editorial, it will also be published in other journals in the Neuroscience Peer Review Consortium. PMID:19284614

  6. GAS STORAGE TECHNOLOGY CONSORTIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Robert W. Watson

    2004-07-15

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. To accomplish this objective, the project is divided into three phases that are managed and directed by the GSTC Coordinator. Base funding for the consortium is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). In addition, funding is anticipated from the Gas Technology Institute (GTI). The first phase, Phase 1A, was initiated on September 30, 2003, and was completed on March 31, 2004. Phase 1A of the project included the creation of the GSTC structure, development and refinement of a technical approach (work plan) for deliverability enhancement and reservoir management. This report deals with

  7. GAS STORAGE TECHNOLOGY CONSORTIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Robert W. Watson

    2004-10-18

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. To accomplish this objective, the project is divided into three phases that are managed and directed by the GSTC Coordinator. The first phase, Phase 1A, was initiated on September 30, 2003, and was completed on March 31, 2004. Phase 1A of the project included the creation of the GSTC structure, development and refinement of a technical approach (work plan) for deliverability enhancement and reservoir management. This report deals with Phase 1B and encompasses the period July 1, 2004, through September 30, 2004. During this time period there were three main activities. First was the ongoing

  8. Hawaii Space Grant Consortium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, Luke P.

    2005-01-01

    The Hawai'i Space Grant Consortium is composed of ten institutions of higher learning including the University of Hawai'i at Manoa, the University of Hawai'i at Hilo, the University of Guam, and seven Community Colleges spread over the 4 main Hawaiian islands. Geographic separation is not the only obstacle that we face as a Consortium. Hawai'i has been mired in an economic downturn due to a lack of tourism for almost all of the period (2001 - 2004) covered by this report, although hotel occupancy rates and real estate sales have sky-rocketed in the last year. Our challenges have been many including providing quality educational opportunities in the face of shrinking State and Federal budgets, encouraging science and technology course instruction at the K-12 level in a public school system that is becoming less focused on high technology and more focused on developing basic reading and math skills, and assembling community college programs with instructors who are expected to teach more classes for the same salary. Motivated people can overcome these problems. Fortunately, the Hawai'i Space Grant Consortium (HSGC) consists of a group of highly motivated and talented individuals who have not only overcome these obstacles, but have excelled with the Program. We fill a critical need within the State of Hawai'i to provide our children with opportunities to pursue their dreams of becoming the next generation of NASA astronauts, engineers, and explorers. Our strength lies not only in our diligent and creative HSGC advisory board, but also with Hawai'i's teachers, students, parents, and industry executives who are willing to invest their time, effort, and resources into Hawai'i's future. Our operational philosophy is to FACE the Future, meaning that we will facilitate, administer, catalyze, and educate in order to achieve our objective of creating a highly technically capable workforce both here in Hawai'i and for NASA. In addition to administering to programs and

  9. The BADER Consortium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    Research Core and Scientific Technical Cores; approval and establishment of eight clinical research projects;  development  and  implementation of an... developed  research focus (gap) areas in partnership with EACE; established and  implemented a complete process for the call, submission, review and...Bridge Advanced  Developments  for Exceptional Rehabilitation.  The  omnibus consortium model system, as opposed to a project centric model, focuses on the

  10. Advanced Lab Consortium ``Conspiracy''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichert, Jonathan F.

    2006-03-01

    Advanced Laboratory instruction is a time-honored and essential element of an undergraduate physics education. But, from my vantage point, it has been neglected by the two major professional societies, APS and AAPT. At some schools, it has been replaced by ``research experiences,'' but I contend that very few of these experiences in the research lab, particularly in the junior year, deliver what they promise. It is time to focus the attention of APS, AAPT, and the NSF on the advanced lab. We need to create an Advanced Lab Consortium (ALC) of faculty and staff to share experiments, suppliers, materials, pedagogy, ideas, in short to build a professional network for those committed to advanced lab instruction. The AAPT is currently in serious discussions on this topic and my company stands ready with both financial and personnel resources to support the effort. This talk is a plea for co-conspirators.

  11. Nuclear Fabrication Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Levesque, Stephen

    2013-04-05

    This report summarizes the activities undertaken by EWI while under contract from the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) for the management and operation of the Nuclear Fabrication Consortium (NFC). The NFC was established by EWI to independently develop, evaluate, and deploy fabrication approaches and data that support the re-establishment of the U.S. nuclear industry: ensuring that the supply chain will be competitive on a global stage, enabling more cost-effective and reliable nuclear power in a carbon constrained environment. The NFC provided a forum for member original equipment manufactures (OEM), fabricators, manufacturers, and materials suppliers to effectively engage with each other and rebuild the capacity of this supply chain by : Identifying and removing impediments to the implementation of new construction and fabrication techniques and approaches for nuclear equipment, including system components and nuclear plants. Providing and facilitating detailed scientific-based studies on new approaches and technologies that will have positive impacts on the cost of building of nuclear plants. Analyzing and disseminating information about future nuclear fabrication technologies and how they could impact the North American and the International Nuclear Marketplace. Facilitating dialog and initiate alignment among fabricators, owners, trade associations, and government agencies. Supporting industry in helping to create a larger qualified nuclear supplier network. Acting as an unbiased technology resource to evaluate, develop, and demonstrate new manufacturing technologies. Creating welder and inspector training programs to help enable the necessary workforce for the upcoming construction work. Serving as a focal point for technology, policy, and politically interested parties to share ideas and concepts associated with fabrication across the nuclear industry. The report the objectives and summaries of the Nuclear Fabrication Consortium

  12. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2007-06-30

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is crucial in meeting the needs of these new markets. To address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of April 1, 2007 through June 30, 2007. Key activities during this time period included: (1) Organizing and hosting the 2007 GSTC Spring Meeting; (2) Identifying the 2007 GSTC projects, issuing award or declination letters, and begin drafting subcontracts; (3) 2007 project mentoring teams identified; (4) New NETL Project Manager; (5) Preliminary planning for the 2007 GSTC Fall Meeting; (6) Collecting and compiling the 2005 GSTC project final reports; and (7) Outreach and communications.

  13. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Joel Morrison

    2005-09-14

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of April 1, 2005 through June 30, 2005. During this time period efforts were directed toward (1) GSTC administration changes, (2) participating in the American Gas Association Operations Conference and Biennial Exhibition, (3) issuing a Request for Proposals (RFP) for proposal solicitation for funding, and (4) organizing the proposal selection meeting.

  14. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2006-05-10

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of January 1, 2006 through March 31, 2006. Activities during this time period were: (1) Organize and host the 2006 Spring Meeting in San Diego, CA on February 21-22, 2006; (2) Award 8 projects for co-funding by GSTC for 2006; (3) New members recruitment; and (4) Improving communications.

  15. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2007-03-31

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is crucial in meeting the needs of these new markets. To address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created - the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of January1, 2007 through March 31, 2007. Key activities during this time period included: {lg_bullet} Drafting and distributing the 2007 RFP; {lg_bullet} Identifying and securing a meeting site for the GSTC 2007 Spring Proposal Meeting; {lg_bullet} Scheduling and participating in two (2) project mentoring conference calls; {lg_bullet} Conducting elections for four Executive Council seats; {lg_bullet} Collecting and compiling the 2005 GSTC Final Project Reports; and {lg_bullet} Outreach and communications.

  16. REU in the KNAC Consortium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, P. J.

    1996-05-01

    Research for undergraduates has long been an important part of the undergraduate curriculum at the eight colleges of the Keck Northeast Astronomy Consortium (KNAC): Colgate University, Haverford College, Middlebury College, Swarthmore College, Vassar College, Wellesley College, Wesleyan University, and Williams College. We formed the consortium in 1989 and made a proposal to the W. M. Keck Foundation for funds to improve our observational equipment and to provide more and broader research opportunities for our students. During the first two years, each college obtained a CCD camera, filter sets, and a workstation. Since the summer of 1990, the consortium has funded from twelve to fourteen consortium college undergraduates per year to work for the summer at one of the consortium institutions other their own institution. Each fall we have a student symposium where the students present their research to the faculty and students of the consortium. The proceedings of the symposium are published and distributed. Often students are also co-authors on publications. In addition, the Consortium provides funds for the students to travel to professional observatories and to professional meetings. Several new research collaborations have developed among our faculty and students including supernova photometry, parallax of asteroids, and wide-field imaging and mosaicking.

  17. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Joel Morrison; Elizabeth Wood; Barbara Robuck

    2010-09-30

    The EMS Energy Institute at The Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) has managed the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC) since its inception in 2003. The GSTC infrastructure provided a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. The GSTC received base funding from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Oil & Natural Gas Supply Program. The GSTC base funds were highly leveraged with industry funding for individual projects. Since its inception, the GSTC has engaged 67 members. The GSTC membership base was diverse, coming from 19 states, the District of Columbia, and Canada. The membership was comprised of natural gas storage field operators, service companies, industry consultants, industry trade organizations, and academia. The GSTC organized and hosted a total of 18 meetings since 2003. Of these, 8 meetings were held to review, discuss, and select proposals submitted for funding consideration. The GSTC reviewed a total of 75 proposals and committed co-funding to support 31 industry-driven projects. The GSTC committed co-funding to 41.3% of the proposals that it received and reviewed. The 31 projects had a total project value of $6,203,071 of which the GSTC committed $3,205,978 in co-funding. The committed GSTC project funding represented an average program cost share of 51.7%. Project applicants provided an average program cost share of 48.3%. In addition to the GSTC co-funding, the consortium provided the domestic natural gas storage industry with a technology transfer and outreach infrastructure. The technology transfer and outreach were conducted by having project mentoring teams and a GSTC website, and by working closely with the Pipeline Research Council International (PRCI) to jointly host

  18. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production triggered by prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) regulates lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) expression/activity in TM4 Sertoli cells.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Soledad P; Windschüttl, Stefanie; Matzkin, María E; Rey-Ares, Verónica; Terradas, Claudio; Ponzio, Roberto; Puigdomenech, Elisa; Levalle, Oscar; Calandra, Ricardo S; Mayerhofer, Artur; Frungieri, Mónica B

    2016-10-15

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) regulate testicular function in health and disease. We previously described a prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) system in Sertoli cells. Now, we found that PGD2 increases ROS and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) generation in murine TM4 Sertoli cells, and also induces antioxidant enzymes expression suggesting that defense systems are triggered as an adaptive stress mechanism that guarantees cell survival. ROS and specially H2O2 may act as second messengers regulating signal transduction pathways and gene expression. We describe a stimulatory effect of PGD2 on lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) expression via DP1/DP2 receptors, which is prevented by the antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine and the PI3K/Akt pathway inhibitor LY 294002. PGD2 also enhances Akt and CREB/ATF-1 phosphorylation. Our results provide evidence for a role of PGD2 in the regulation of the oxidant/antioxidant status in Sertoli cells and, more importantly, in the modulation of LDH expression which takes place through ROS generation and the Akt-CREB/ATF-1 pathway. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Prenatal diagnosis and preimplantation genetic diagnosis: novel technologies and state of the art of PGD in different regions of the world.

    PubMed

    Peyvandi, F; Garagiola, I; Mortarino, M

    2011-07-01

    Prenatal diagnosis (PND) aims to provide accurate, rapid results as early in pregnancy as possible. Conventional PND involves sampling cells of foetal origin by chorionic villus sampling at 11-14th weeks of pregnancy or amniocentesis after 15th week. These are invasive procedures and have a small but significant rate of 0.5% to 1% for loss of pregnancy. An alternative to existing methods for conventional PND for couples at risk of transmitting a genetic disease to their child is preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD). PGD is a newly emerging form of a very early prenatal diagnosis. The technique combines assisted reproductive technology with molecular genetics and cytogenetics to allow the identification of abnormality in embryos prior to implantation. The diagnosis of genetic disease in human preimplantation embryos was pioneered in the late 1980s for testing of aneuploidy, single gene and X-linked disease, such as cystic fibrosis, haemophilia and chromosomal abnormalities. The PGD-related legal and ethical issues have been debated at many levels both nationally and internationally. The attitude towards PGD varies substantially not only in different parts of the world but also within the Europe, owing to scientific, cultural and religious differences. PGD has become widely practised throughout the world for various indications and can substantially decrease the eventual risks of passing a genetic undesired condition of the offspring. Nevertheless, its extension to some new and non-medical indications has raised ethical concerns, in particular its potential eugenic dimension.

  20. COnsortium of METabolomics Studies (COMETS)

    Cancer.gov

    The COnsortium of METabolomics Studies (COMETS) is an extramural-intramural partnership that promotes collaboration among prospective cohort studies that follow participants for a range of outcomes and perform metabolomic profiling of individuals.

  1. Optoelectronic technology consortium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hibbs-Brenner, Mary

    1992-12-01

    The Optoelectronics Technology Consortium has been established to position U.S. industry as the world leader in optical interconnect technology by developing, fabricating, intergrating and demonstrating the producibility of optoelectronic components for high-density/high-data-rate processors and accelerating the insertion of this technology into military and commercial applications. This objective will be accomplished by a program focused in three areas. (1) Demonstrated performance: OETC will demonstrate an aggregate data transfer rate of 16 Gbit/s between single transmitter and receiver packages, as well as the expandability of this technology by combing four links in parallel to achieve a 64 Gbit/s link. (2) Accelerated development: By collaborating during precompetitive technology development stage, OTEC will advance the development of optical components and produce links for a multiboard processor testbed demonstration; and (3) Producibility: OETC's technology will achieve this performance by using components that are affordable, and reliable, with a line BER less than 10(exp -15) and MTTF greater than 10(exp 6) hours.

  2. Swiss Industrial Biocatalysis Consortium (SIBC).

    PubMed

    Wirz, Beat; Kittelmann, Matthias; Meyer, Hans-Peter; Wohlgemuth, Roland

    2010-01-01

    Taking up the common challenges in biocatalysis, a group of industrialists decided to react with a bottom-up solution, and created the Swiss Industrial Biocatalysis Consortium (SIBC). The Swiss Industrial Biocatalysis Consortium is a pre-competitive working group to better implement and utilize existing know-how and resources in biocatalysis, and to influence and shape the economic and educational political environment. Recent examples of activities are outlined.

  3. Hickory Consortium 2001 Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2003-02-01

    As with all Building America Program consortia, systems thinking is the key to understanding the processes that Hickory Consortium hopes to improve. The Hickory Consortium applies this thinking to more than the whole-building concept. Their systems thinking embraces the meta process of how housing construction takes place in America. By understanding the larger picture, they are able to identify areas where improvements can be made and how to implement them.

  4. PGD2 and PGE2 regulate gene expression of Prx 6 in primary macrophages via Nrf2.

    PubMed

    Erttmann, Saskia F; Bast, Antje; Seidel, Julia; Breitbach, Katrin; Walther, Reinhard; Steinmetz, Ivo

    2011-08-01

    Peroxiredoxin 6 (Prx 6) is a bifunctional enzyme with both glutathione peroxidase and acidic Ca(2+)-independent phospholipase A(2) activities. We have recently shown that exposure of murine bone marrow-derived macrophages to LPS and IFN-γ leads to induction of COX-2 expression and secretion of PGE(2), up-regulating Prx 6 mRNA levels. This study was designed to investigate various prostaglandins (PGs) for their ability to induce gene expression of Prxs, in particular Prx 6, and to determine the underlying regulatory mechanisms. We provide evidence that both conventional and cyclopentenone PGs enhance Prx 6 mRNA expression. Treatment with either activators or inhibitors of adenylate cyclase as well as cAMP analogs indicated that Prx 6 gene expression is regulated by adenylate cyclase in response to PGD(2) or PGE(2). Furthermore, our study revealed that JAK2, PI3K, PKC, and p38 MAPK contribute to the PGD(2)- or PGE(2)-dependent Prx 6 induction. Using stimulated macrophages from Nrf2-deficient mice or activators of Nrf2 and PPARγ, we found that Nrf2, but not PPARγ, is involved in the PG-dependent increase in Prx 6 mRNA expression. In summary, our data suggest multiple signaling pathways of Prx 6 regulation by PGs and identified Nrf2 as a critical player mediating transcriptional induction.

  5. Update on fertility preservation from the Barcelona International Society for Fertility Preservation-ESHRE-ASRM 2015 expert meeting: indications, results and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Francisca

    2017-09-01

    What progress has been made in fertility preservation (FP) over the last decade? FP techniques have been widely adopted over the last decade and therefore the establishment of international registries on their short- and long-term outcomes is strongly recommended. FP is a fundamental issue for both males and females whose future fertility may be compromised. Reproductive capacity may be seriously affected by age, different medical conditions and also by treatments, especially those with gonadal toxicity. There is general consensus on the need to provide counselling about currently available FP options to all individuals wishing to preserve their fertility. An international meeting with representatives from expert scientific societies involved in FP was held in Barcelona, Spain, in June 2015. Twenty international FP experts belonging to the American Society of Reproductive Medicine, ESHRE and the International Society of Fertility Preservation reviewed the literature up to June 2015 to be discussed at the meeting, and approved the final manuscript. At the time this manuscript was being written, new evidence considered relevant for the debated topics was published, and was consequently included. Several oncological and non-oncological diseases may affect current or future fertility, either caused by the disease itself or the gonadotoxic treatment, and need an adequate FP approach. Women wishing to postpone maternity and transgender individuals before starting hormone therapy or undergoing surgery to remove/alter their reproductive organs should also be counselled accordingly. Embryo and oocyte cryopreservation are first-line FP methods in postpubertal women. Metaphase II oocyte cryopreservation (vitrification) is the preferred option. Cumulative evidence of restoration of ovarian function and spontaneous pregnancies after ART following orthotopic transplantation of cryopreserved ovarian tissue supports its future consideration as an open clinical application. Semen

  6. California Space Grant Consortium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosmatka, John; Berger, Wolfgang; Wiskerchen, Michael J.

    2005-01-01

    The organizational and administrative structure of the CaSGC has the Consortium Headquarters Office (Principal Investigator - Dr. John Kosmatka, California Statewide Director - Dr. Michael Wiskerchen) at UC San Diego. Each affiliate member institution has a campus director and an scholarship/fellowship selection committee. Each affiliate campus director also serves on the CaSGC Advisory Council and coordinates CMIS data collection and submission. The CaSGC strives to maintain a balance between expanded affiliate membership and continued high quality in targeted program areas of aerospace research, education, workforce development, and public outreach. Associate members are encouraged to participate on a project-by-project basis that meets the needs of California and the goals and objectives of the CaSGC. Associate members have responsibilities relating only to the CaSGC projects they are directly engaged in. Each year, as part of the CaSGC Improvement Plan, the CaSGC Advisory Council evaluates the performance of the affiliate and associate membership in terms of contributions to the CaSGC Strategic Plan, These CaSGC membership evaluations provide a constructive means for elevating productive members and removing non-performing members. This Program Improvement and Results (PIR) report will document CaSGC program improvement results and impacts that directly respond to the specific needs of California in the area of aerospace-related education and human capital development and the Congressional mandate to "increase the understanding, assessment, development and utilization of space resources by promoting a strong education base, responsive research and training activities, and broad and prompt dissemination of knowledge and technology".

  7. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Ziemkiewicz; Tamara Vandivort; Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Y. Paul Chugh; James Hower

    2008-08-31

    Each year, over 100 million tons of solid byproducts are produced by coal-burning electric utilities in the United States. Annual production of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) byproducts continues to increase as the result of more stringent sulfur emission restrictions. In addition, stricter limits on NOx emissions mandated by the 1990 Clean Air Act have resulted in utility burner/boiler modifications that frequently yield higher carbon concentrations in fly ash, which restricts the use of the ash as a cement replacement. Controlling ammonia in ash is also of concern. If newer, 'clean coal' combustion and gasification technologies are adopted, their byproducts may also present a management challenge. The objective of the Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium (CBRC) is to develop and demonstrate technologies to address issues related to the recycling of byproducts associated with coal combustion processes. A goal of CBRC is that these technologies, by the year 2010, will lead to an overall ash utilization rate from the current 34% to 50% by such measures as increasing the current rate of FGD byproduct use and increasing in the number of uses considered 'allowable' under state regulations. Another issue of interest to the CBRC would be to examine the environmental impact of both byproduct utilization and disposal. No byproduct utilization technology is likely to be adopted by industry unless it is more cost-effective than landfilling. Therefore, it is extremely important that the utility industry provide guidance to the R&D program. Government agencies and private-sector organizations that may be able to utilize these materials in the conduct of their missions should also provide input. The CBRC will serve as an effective vehicle for acquiring and maintaining guidance from these diverse organizations so that the proper balance in the R&D program is achieved.

  8. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Ziemkiewicz, Paul; Vandivort, Tamara; Pflughoeft-Hassett, Debra; Chugh, Y Paul; Hower, James

    2008-08-31

    Each year, over 100 million tons of solid byproducts are produced by coal-burning electric utilities in the United States. Annual production of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) byproducts continues to increase as the result of more stringent sulfur emission restrictions. In addition, stricter limits on NOx emissions mandated by the 1990 Clean Air Act have resulted in utility burner/boiler modifications that frequently yield higher carbon concentrations in fly ash, which restricts the use of the ash as a cement replacement. Controlling ammonia in ash is also of concern. If newer, “clean coal” combustion and gasification technologies are adopted, their byproducts may also present a management challenge. The objective of the Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium (CBRC) is to develop and demonstrate technologies to address issues related to the recycling of byproducts associated with coal combustion processes. A goal of CBRC is that these technologies, by the year 2010, will lead to an overall ash utilization rate from the current 34% to 50% by such measures as increasing the current rate of FGD byproduct use and increasing in the number of uses considered “allowable” under state regulations. Another issue of interest to the CBRC would be to examine the environmental impact of both byproduct utilization and disposal. No byproduct utilization technology is likely to be adopted by industry unless it is more cost-effective than landfilling. Therefore, it is extremely important that the utility industry provide guidance to the R&D program. Government agencies and privatesector organizations that may be able to utilize these materials in the conduct of their missions should also provide input. The CBRC will serve as an effective vehicle for acquiring and maintaining guidance from these diverse organizations so that the proper balance in the R&D program is achieved.

  9. PROTEOMIC PROFILING OF CEREBROSPINAL FLUID IDENTIFIES PROSTAGLANDIN D2 SYNTHASE AS A PUTATIVE BIOMARKER FOR PEDIATRIC MEDULLOBLASTOMA: A PEDIATRIC BRAIN TUMOR CONSORTIUM STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Rajagopal, Meena U.; Hathout, Yetrib; MacDonald, Tobey J.; Kieran, Mark W.; Gururangan, Sri; Blaney, Susan M.; Phillips, Peter; Packer, Roger; Gordish-Dressman, Heather; Rood, Brian R.

    2011-01-01

    The aims of this study were to demonstrate the feasibility of centrally collecting and processing high-quality CSF samples for proteomic studies within a multi-center consortium and to identify putative biomarkers for medulloblastoma in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). We used two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) to investigate the CSF proteome from 33 children with medulloblastoma and compared it against the CSF proteome from 25 age-matched controls. Protein spots were subsequently identified by a combination of in gel-tryptic digestion and MALDI-TOF TOF MS analysis. On average 160 protein spots were detected by 2-DE and 76 protein spots corresponding to 25 unique proteins were identified using MALDI TOF. Levels of prostaglandin D2 synthase were found to be 6 fold decreased in the tumor samples versus control samples (p<0.00001). This data was further validated using ELISA. Close examination of PGD2S spots revealed the presence of complex sialylated carbohydrates at residues Asn78 and Asn87. Total PGD2S levels are reduced 6 fold in the CSF of children with medulloblastoma most likely representing a host response to the presence of the tumor. In addition, our results demonstrate the feasibility of performing proteomic studies on CSF samples collected from patients at multiple institutions within the consortium setting. PMID:21271676

  10. The National Astronomy Consortium (NAC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Von Schill, Lyndele; Ivory, Joyce

    2017-01-01

    The National Astronomy Consortium (NAC) program is designed to increase the number of underrepresented minority students into STEM and STEM careers by providing unique summer research experiences followed by long-term mentoring and cohort support. Hallmarks of the NAC program include: research or internship opportunities at one of the NAC partner sites, a framework to continue research over the academic year, peer and faculty mentoring, monthly virtual hangouts, and much more. NAC students also participate in two professional travel opportunities each year: the annual NAC conference at Howard University and poster presentation at the annual AAS winter meeting following their summer internship.The National Astronomy Consortium (NAC) is a program led by the National Radio Astronomy Consortium (NRAO) and Associated Universities, Inc. (AUI), in partnership with the National Society of Black Physicist (NSBP), along with a number of minority and majority universities.

  11. The ocean sampling day consortium.

    PubMed

    Kopf, Anna; Bicak, Mesude; Kottmann, Renzo; Schnetzer, Julia; Kostadinov, Ivaylo; Lehmann, Katja; Fernandez-Guerra, Antonio; Jeanthon, Christian; Rahav, Eyal; Ullrich, Matthias; Wichels, Antje; Gerdts, Gunnar; Polymenakou, Paraskevi; Kotoulas, Giorgos; Siam, Rania; Abdallah, Rehab Z; Sonnenschein, Eva C; Cariou, Thierry; O'Gara, Fergal; Jackson, Stephen; Orlic, Sandi; Steinke, Michael; Busch, Julia; Duarte, Bernardo; Caçador, Isabel; Canning-Clode, João; Bobrova, Oleksandra; Marteinsson, Viggo; Reynisson, Eyjolfur; Loureiro, Clara Magalhães; Luna, Gian Marco; Quero, Grazia Marina; Löscher, Carolin R; Kremp, Anke; DeLorenzo, Marie E; Øvreås, Lise; Tolman, Jennifer; LaRoche, Julie; Penna, Antonella; Frischer, Marc; Davis, Timothy; Katherine, Barker; Meyer, Christopher P; Ramos, Sandra; Magalhães, Catarina; Jude-Lemeilleur, Florence; Aguirre-Macedo, Ma Leopoldina; Wang, Shiao; Poulton, Nicole; Jones, Scott; Collin, Rachel; Fuhrman, Jed A; Conan, Pascal; Alonso, Cecilia; Stambler, Noga; Goodwin, Kelly; Yakimov, Michael M; Baltar, Federico; Bodrossy, Levente; Van De Kamp, Jodie; Frampton, Dion Mf; Ostrowski, Martin; Van Ruth, Paul; Malthouse, Paul; Claus, Simon; Deneudt, Klaas; Mortelmans, Jonas; Pitois, Sophie; Wallom, David; Salter, Ian; Costa, Rodrigo; Schroeder, Declan C; Kandil, Mahrous M; Amaral, Valentina; Biancalana, Florencia; Santana, Rafael; Pedrotti, Maria Luiza; Yoshida, Takashi; Ogata, Hiroyuki; Ingleton, Tim; Munnik, Kate; Rodriguez-Ezpeleta, Naiara; Berteaux-Lecellier, Veronique; Wecker, Patricia; Cancio, Ibon; Vaulot, Daniel; Bienhold, Christina; Ghazal, Hassan; Chaouni, Bouchra; Essayeh, Soumya; Ettamimi, Sara; Zaid, El Houcine; Boukhatem, Noureddine; Bouali, Abderrahim; Chahboune, Rajaa; Barrijal, Said; Timinouni, Mohammed; El Otmani, Fatima; Bennani, Mohamed; Mea, Marianna; Todorova, Nadezhda; Karamfilov, Ventzislav; Ten Hoopen, Petra; Cochrane, Guy; L'Haridon, Stephane; Bizsel, Kemal Can; Vezzi, Alessandro; Lauro, Federico M; Martin, Patrick; Jensen, Rachelle M; Hinks, Jamie; Gebbels, Susan; Rosselli, Riccardo; De Pascale, Fabio; Schiavon, Riccardo; Dos Santos, Antonina; Villar, Emilie; Pesant, Stéphane; Cataletto, Bruno; Malfatti, Francesca; Edirisinghe, Ranjith; Silveira, Jorge A Herrera; Barbier, Michele; Turk, Valentina; Tinta, Tinkara; Fuller, Wayne J; Salihoglu, Ilkay; Serakinci, Nedime; Ergoren, Mahmut Cerkez; Bresnan, Eileen; Iriberri, Juan; Nyhus, Paul Anders Fronth; Bente, Edvardsen; Karlsen, Hans Erik; Golyshin, Peter N; Gasol, Josep M; Moncheva, Snejana; Dzhembekova, Nina; Johnson, Zackary; Sinigalliano, Christopher David; Gidley, Maribeth Louise; Zingone, Adriana; Danovaro, Roberto; Tsiamis, George; Clark, Melody S; Costa, Ana Cristina; El Bour, Monia; Martins, Ana M; Collins, R Eric; Ducluzeau, Anne-Lise; Martinez, Jonathan; Costello, Mark J; Amaral-Zettler, Linda A; Gilbert, Jack A; Davies, Neil; Field, Dawn; Glöckner, Frank Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Ocean Sampling Day was initiated by the EU-funded Micro B3 (Marine Microbial Biodiversity, Bioinformatics, Biotechnology) project to obtain a snapshot of the marine microbial biodiversity and function of the world's oceans. It is a simultaneous global mega-sequencing campaign aiming to generate the largest standardized microbial data set in a single day. This will be achievable only through the coordinated efforts of an Ocean Sampling Day Consortium, supportive partnerships and networks between sites. This commentary outlines the establishment, function and aims of the Consortium and describes our vision for a sustainable study of marine microbial communities and their embedded functional traits.

  12. The Ocean Sampling Day Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Kopf, Anna; Bicak, Mesude; Kottmann, Renzo; Schnetzer, Julia; Kostadinov, Ivaylo; Lehmann, Katja; Fernandez-Guerra, Antonio; Jeanthon, Christian; Rahav, Eyal; Ullrich, Matthias; Wichels, Antje; Gerdts, Gunnar; Polymenakou, Paraskevi; Kotoulas, Giorgos; Siam, Rania; Abdallah, Rehab Z.; Sonnenschein, Eva C.; Cariou, Thierry; O’Gara, Fergal; Jackson, Stephen; Orlic, Sandi; Steinke, Michael; Busch, Julia; Duarte, Bernardo; Caçador, Isabel; Canning-Clode, João; Bobrova, Oleksandra; Marteinsson, Viggo; Reynisson, Eyjolfur; Loureiro, Clara Magalhães; Luna, Gian Marco; Quero, Grazia Marina; Löscher, Carolin R.; Kremp, Anke; DeLorenzo, Marie E.; Øvreås, Lise; Tolman, Jennifer; LaRoche, Julie; Penna, Antonella; Frischer, Marc; Davis, Timothy; Katherine, Barker; Meyer, Christopher P.; Ramos, Sandra; Magalhães, Catarina; Jude-Lemeilleur, Florence; Aguirre-Macedo, Ma Leopoldina; Wang, Shiao; Poulton, Nicole; Jones, Scott; Collin, Rachel; Fuhrman, Jed A.; Conan, Pascal; Alonso, Cecilia; Stambler, Noga; Goodwin, Kelly; Yakimov, Michael M.; Baltar, Federico; Bodrossy, Levente; Van De Kamp, Jodie; Frampton, Dion M. F.; Ostrowski, Martin; Van Ruth, Paul; Malthouse, Paul; Claus, Simon; Deneudt, Klaas; Mortelmans, Jonas; Pitois, Sophie; Wallom, David; Salter, Ian; Costa, Rodrigo; Schroeder, Declan C.; Kandil, Mahrous M.; Amaral, Valentina; Biancalana, Florencia; Santana, Rafael; Pedrotti, Maria Luiza; Yoshida, Takashi; Ogata, Hiroyuki; Ingleton, Tim; Munnik, Kate; Rodriguez-Ezpeleta, Naiara; Berteaux-Lecellier, Veronique; Wecker, Patricia; Cancio, Ibon; Vaulot, Daniel; Bienhold, Christina; Ghazal, Hassan; Chaouni, Bouchra; Essayeh, Soumya; Ettamimi, Sara; Zaid, El Houcine; Boukhatem, Noureddine; Bouali, Abderrahim; Chahboune, Rajaa; Barrijal, Said; Timinouni, Mohammed; El Otmani, Fatima; Bennani, Mohamed; Mea, Marianna; Todorova, Nadezhda; Karamfilov, Ventzislav; ten Hoopen, Petra; Cochrane, Guy; L’Haridon, Stephane; Bizsel, Kemal Can; Vezzi, Alessandro; Lauro, Federico M.; Martin, Patrick; Jensen, Rachelle M.; Hinks, Jamie; Gebbels, Susan; Rosselli, Riccardo; De Pascale, Fabio; Schiavon, Riccardo; dos Santos, Antonina; Villar, Emilie; Pesant, Stéphane; Cataletto, Bruno; Malfatti, Francesca; Edirisinghe, Ranjith; Silveira, Jorge A. Herrera; Barbier, Michele; Turk, Valentina; Tinta, Tinkara; Fuller, Wayne J.; Salihoglu, Ilkay; Serakinci, Nedime; Ergoren, Mahmut Cerkez; Bresnan, Eileen; Iriberri, Juan; Nyhus, Paul Anders Fronth; Bente, Edvardsen; Karlsen, Hans Erik; Golyshin, Peter N.; Gasol, Josep M.; Moncheva, Snejana; Dzhembekova, Nina; Johnson, Zackary; Sinigalliano, Christopher David; Gidley, Maribeth Louise; Zingone, Adriana; Danovaro, Roberto; Tsiamis, George; Clark, Melody S.; Costa, Ana Cristina; El Bour, Monia; Martins, Ana M.; Collins, R. Eric; Ducluzeau, Anne-Lise; Martinez, Jonathan; Costello, Mark J.; Amaral-Zettler, Linda A.; Gilbert, Jack A.; Davies, Neil; Field, Dawn; Glöckner, Frank Oliver

    2015-06-19

    In this study, Ocean Sampling Day was initiated by the EU-funded Micro B3 (Marine Microbial Biodiversity, Bioinformatics, Biotechnology) project to obtain a snapshot of the marine microbial biodiversity and function of the world’s oceans. It is a simultaneous global mega-sequencing campaign aiming to generate the largest standardized microbial data set in a single day. This will be achievable only through the coordinated efforts of an Ocean Sampling Day Consortium, supportive partnerships and networks between sites. This commentary outlines the establishment, function and aims of the Consortium and describes our vision for a sustainable study of marine microbial communities and their embedded functional traits.

  13. The Twin Cities biomedical consortium.

    PubMed

    Bailey, A S

    1975-07-01

    Twenty-eight health science libraries in the St. Paul-Minneapolis area formed the Twin Cities Biomedical Consortium with the intention of developing a strong network of biomedical libraries in the Twin Cities area. Toward this end, programs were designed to strengthen lines of communication and increase cooperation among local health science libraries; improve access to biomedical information at the local level; and enable the Consortium, as a group, to meet an increasing proportion of its members' needs for biomedical information. Presently, the TCBC comprises libraries in twenty-two hospitals, two county medical societies, one school of nursing, one junior college, and two private corporations.

  14. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Ziemkiewicz; Tamara Vandivort; Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Y. Paul Chugh; James Hower

    2008-08-31

    The Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium (CBRC) program was developed as a focused program to remove and/or minimize the barriers for effective management of over 123 million tons of coal combustion byproducts (CCBs) annually generated in the USA. At the time of launching the CBRC in 1998, about 25% of CCBs were beneficially utilized while the remaining was disposed in on-site or off-site landfills. During the ten (10) year tenure of CBRC (1998-2008), after a critical review, 52 projects were funded nationwide. By region, the East, Midwest, and West had 21, 18, and 13 projects funded, respectively. Almost all projects were cooperative projects involving industry, government, and academia. The CBRC projects, to a large extent, successfully addressed the problems of large-scale utilization of CCBs. A few projects, such as the two Eastern Region projects that addressed the use of fly ash in foundry applications, might be thought of as a somewhat smaller application in comparison to construction and agricultural uses, but as a novel niche use, they set the stage to draw interest that fly ash substitution for Portland cement might not attract. With consideration of the large increase in flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum in response to EPA regulations, agricultural uses of FGD gypsum hold promise for large-scale uses of a product currently directed to the (currently stagnant) home construction market. Outstanding achievements of the program are: (1) The CBRC successfully enhanced professional expertise in the area of CCBs throughout the nation. The enhanced capacity continues to provide technology and information transfer expertise to industry and regulatory agencies. (2) Several technologies were developed that can be used immediately. These include: (a) Use of CCBs for road base and sub-base applications; (b) full-depth, in situ stabilization of gravel roads or highway/pavement construction recycled materials; and (c) fired bricks containing up to 30%-40% F

  15. Resveratrol preferentially inhibits IgE-dependent PGD2 biosynthesis but enhances TNF production from human skin mast cells.

    PubMed

    Shirley, Devon; McHale, Cody; Gomez, Gregorio

    2016-04-01

    Resveratrol, a natural polyphenol found in the skin of red grapes, is reported to have anti-inflammatory properties including protective effects against aging. Consequently, Resveratrol is a common nutritional supplement and additive in non-prescription lotions and creams marketed as anti-aging products. Studies in mice and with mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) have indicated anti-allergic effects of Resveratrol. However, the effects of Resveratrol on human primary mast cells have not been reported. Human mast cells were isolated and purified from normal skin tissue of different donors. The effect of Resveratrol on IgE-dependent release of allergic inflammatory mediators was determined using various immunoassays, Western blotting, and quantitative real-time PCR. Resveratrol at low concentrations (≤10 μM) inhibited PGD2 biosynthesis but not degranulation. Accordingly, COX-2 expression was inhibited but phosphorylation of Syk, Akt, p38, and p42/44 (ERKs) remained intact. Surprisingly, TNF production was significantly enhanced with Resveratrol. At a high concentration (100 μM), Resveratrol significantly inhibited all parameters analyzed except Syk phosphorylation. Here, we show that Resveratrol at low concentrations exerts its anti-inflammatory properties by preferentially targeting the arachidonic acid pathway. We also demonstrate a previously unrecognized pro-inflammatory effect of Resveratrol--the enhancement of TNF production from human mature mast cells following IgE-dependent activation. These findings suggest that Resveratrol as a therapeutic agent could inhibit PGD2-mediated inflammation but would be ineffective against histamine-mediated allergic reactions. However, Resveratrol could potentially exacerbate or promote allergic inflammation by enhancing IgE-dependent TNF production from mast cells in human skin. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Enzymatic and mRNA transcript response of ovine 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGD) in respect to different weights from weaning to four months of age.

    PubMed

    Laliotis, George P; Trivizaki, Stamatina; Bizelis, Iosif; Charismiadou, Maria A; Rogdakis, Emmanuel

    2010-07-01

    Ovine 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGD), an enzyme of the pentose phosphate pathway, provides the necessary compounds of NADPH for the synthesis of fatty acids. Much of research has been conducted not only on the enzymatic level, but also on molecular level elucidating its cDNA sequence. Herein, we tried to elucidate if any correlation between enzymatic activity and expression of ovine 6PGD gene exists, in respect to two different weights from weaning to 4 months old. 18 male and 16 female lambs of Chios breed were randomly selected after weaning and assigned to two groups based on sex in a different experimental open-plan shed. Two subgroups were defined in each sex and they were slaughtered at 25 kg and 30 kg, respectively. Samples of adipose tissue (tail, perirenal and shoulder site) were collected and 6PGD enzymatic activity, gene expression, and characteristics of adipocytes were determined. According to the determined data, tail subcutaneous adipose tissue matures later than the others examined tissues and has a diminished lipogenic activity. A 6PGD gene expression pattern was not followed by analogous changes of its enzymatic activity, suggesting that other mechanisms such as post transcription or/and post translation regulation may be involved.

  17. The Statewide Energy Consortium: A California Concept.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, G. Cleve; Giacosie, Robert V.

    1981-01-01

    Describes the formation and organization of a statewide energy consortium consisting of faculty from 19 campuses of the California State University and Colleges system. Also describes three major consortium activities and reasons for its success. (SK)

  18. The Statewide Energy Consortium: A California Concept.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, G. Cleve; Giacosie, Robert V.

    1981-01-01

    Describes the formation and organization of a statewide energy consortium consisting of faculty from 19 campuses of the California State University and Colleges system. Also describes three major consortium activities and reasons for its success. (SK)

  19. The Virginia Home Visiting Consortium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodkin, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    The Virginia Home Visiting Consortium (HVC) is a collaboration of public and private organizations which work to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of home visiting services throughout the state. The HVC identified service needs and gaps and has focused on increasing the interagency state and local partnerships so that resources are…

  20. East bay fire chiefs' consortium

    Treesearch

    Michael Bradley

    1995-01-01

    The traditional approach to planning for public fire protection has been based on independent actions by each fire department or district. The county fire chiefs’ associations, while providing interagency communication, were not adequate to deal with the regional nature of the wildland urban interface problem. The formation of the East Bay Fire Chiefs’ Consortium grew...

  1. Delaware Occupational Teacher Education Consortium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, John I.

    The Delaware Occupational Teacher Education Consortium is comprised of three colleges: the University of Delaware, Delaware State College, and Delaware Technical and Community College. These schools established a joint program in 1972 for preparing and certifying industrial arts, trade, and industry teachers in B.S. and M.S. degree programs. The…

  2. Brain Tumor Epidemiology Consortium (BTEC)

    Cancer.gov

    The Brain Tumor Epidemiology Consortium is an open scientific forum organized to foster the development of multi-center, international and inter-disciplinary collaborations that will lead to a better understanding of the etiology, outcomes, and prevention of brain tumors.

  3. The Virginia Home Visiting Consortium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodkin, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    The Virginia Home Visiting Consortium (HVC) is a collaboration of public and private organizations which work to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of home visiting services throughout the state. The HVC identified service needs and gaps and has focused on increasing the interagency state and local partnerships so that resources are…

  4. The Role of the Consortium Director.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horgan, Thomas R.

    1999-01-01

    The director of a college consortium must be a strong leader, whose primary duties range from providing leadership to securing resources and to clearly communicating the consortium's mission. The director must keep in mind that the consortium's work is valuable only to the degree that it eases the load on the individual member institutions and…

  5. The Ocean Sampling Day Consortium

    DOE PAGES

    Kopf, Anna; Bicak, Mesude; Kottmann, Renzo; ...

    2015-06-19

    In this study, Ocean Sampling Day was initiated by the EU-funded Micro B3 (Marine Microbial Biodiversity, Bioinformatics, Biotechnology) project to obtain a snapshot of the marine microbial biodiversity and function of the world’s oceans. It is a simultaneous global mega-sequencing campaign aiming to generate the largest standardized microbial data set in a single day. This will be achievable only through the coordinated efforts of an Ocean Sampling Day Consortium, supportive partnerships and networks between sites. This commentary outlines the establishment, function and aims of the Consortium and describes our vision for a sustainable study of marine microbial communities and theirmore » embedded functional traits.« less

  6. [The MEN consortium of Japan].

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Akihiro

    2012-07-01

    Multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) is not as well recognized in Asia, including Japan, as in the West. The clinical features of MEN and management conditions have yet to be clarified in Japan. Thus, we established a MEN study group designated the MEN Consortium of Japan in 2008. Its missions are to: 1) clarify the current status of clinical management of MEN; 2) promote basic research; 3) improve the diagnosis and treatment of MEN; 4) undertake public relations to increase awareness of MEN; and 5) support and collaborate with patient advocacy groups, etc. Clinical and genetic information on more than 1,000 patients was collected and analyzed. The database established by the MEN Consortium of Japan is the first such database for Asian patients and is one of the most extensive MEN databases worldwide. This is anticipated to promote clarification of the current status of MEN in Japan and improve future clinical management.

  7. The AGTSR consortium: An update

    SciTech Connect

    Fant, D.B.; Golan, L.P.

    1995-10-01

    The Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research (AGTSR) program is a collaborative University-Industry R&D Consortium that is managed and administered by the South Carolina Energy R&D Center. AGTSR is a nationwide consortium dedicated to advancing land-based gas turbine systems for improving future power generation capability. It directly supports the technology-research arm of the ATS program and targets industry-defined research needs in the areas of combustion, heat transfer, materials, aerodynamics, controls, alternative fuels, and advanced cycles. The consortium is organized to enhance U.S. competitiveness through close collaboration with universities, government, and industry at the R&D level. AGTSR is just finishing its third year of operation and is sponsored by the U.S. DOE - Morgantown Energy Technology Center. The program is scheduled to continue past the year 2000. At present, there are 78 performing member universities representing 36 states, and six cost-sharing U.S. gas turbine corporations. Three RFP`s have been announced and the fourth RFP is expected to be released in December, 1995. There are 31 research subcontracts underway at performing member universities. AGTSR has also organized three workshops, two in combustion and one in heat transfer. A materials workshop is in planning and is scheduled for February, 1996. An industrial internship program was initiated this past summer, with one intern positioned at each of the sponsoring companies. The AGTSR consortium nurtures close industry-university-government collaboration to enhance synergism and the transition of research results, accelerate and promote evolutionary-revolutionary R&D, and strives to keep a prominent U.S. industry strong and on top well into the 21st century. This paper will present the objectives and benefits of the AGTSR program, progress achieved to date, and future planned activity in fiscal year 1996.

  8. John Glenn Biomedical Engineering Consortium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nall, Marsha

    2004-01-01

    The John Glenn Biomedical Engineering Consortium is an inter-institutional research and technology development, beginning with ten projects in FY02 that are aimed at applying GRC expertise in fluid physics and sensor development with local biomedical expertise to mitigate the risks of space flight on the health, safety, and performance of astronauts. It is anticipated that several new technologies will be developed that are applicable to both medical needs in space and on earth.

  9. The Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Consortium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Michael

    2003-01-01

    I want to discuss both the Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) Consortium and the Human Genome Project. I am afraid most of my presentation will be thin on law and possibly too high on rhetoric. Having been engaged in a personal and direct way with these issues as a trained scientist, I find it quite difficult to be always as objective as I ought to be.

  10. The Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Consortium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Michael

    2003-01-01

    I want to discuss both the Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) Consortium and the Human Genome Project. I am afraid most of my presentation will be thin on law and possibly too high on rhetoric. Having been engaged in a personal and direct way with these issues as a trained scientist, I find it quite difficult to be always as objective as I ought to be.

  11. Appalachian clean coal technology consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Kutz, K.; Yoon, Roe-Hoan

    1995-11-01

    The Appalachian Clean Coal Technology Consortium (ACCTC) has been established to help U.S. coal producers, particularly those in the Appalachian region, increase the production of lower-sulfur coal. The cooperative research conducted as part of the consortium activities will help utilities meet the emissions standards established by the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, enhance the competitiveness of U.S. coals in the world market, create jobs in economically-depressed coal producing regions, and reduce U.S. dependence on foreign energy supplies. The research activities will be conducted in cooperation with coal companies, equipment manufacturers, and A&E firms working in the Appalachian coal fields. This approach is consistent with President Clinton`s initiative in establishing Regional Technology Alliances to meet regional needs through technology development in cooperation with industry. The consortium activities are complementary to the High-Efficiency Preparation program of the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, but are broader in scope as they are inclusive of technology developments for both near-term and long-term applications, technology transfer, and training a highly-skilled work force.

  12. Analysis of the APX, PGD1 and R1G1B constitutive gene promoters in various organs over three homozygous generations of transgenic rice plants.

    PubMed

    Park, Su-Hyun; Bang, Seung Woon; Jeong, Jin Seo; Jung, Harin; Redillas, Mark Christian Felipe Reveche; Kim, Hyung Il; Lee, Kang Hyun; Kim, Youn Shic; Kim, Ju-Kon

    2012-06-01

    We have previously characterized the constitutively active promoters of the APX, PGD1 and R1G1B genes in rice (Park et al. 2010 in J Exp Bot 61:2459-2467). To have potential crop biotechnology applications, gene promoters must be stably active over many generations. In our current study, we report our further detailed analysis of the APX, PGD1 and R1G1B gene promoters in various organs and tissues of transgenic rice plants for three (T₃₋₅) homozygous generations. The copy numbers in 37 transgenic lines that harbor promoter:gfp constructs were determined and promoter activities were measured by real-time qPCR. Analysis of the 37 lines revealed that 15 contained a single copy of one of the three promoter:gfp chimeric constructs. The promoter activity levels were generally higher in multi-copy lines, whereas variations in these levels over the T₃₋₅ generations studied were observed to be smaller in single-copy than in multi-copy lines. The three promoters were further found to be highly active in the whole plant body at both the vegetative and reproductive stages of plant growth, with the exception of the APX in the ovary and R1G1B in the pistil and filaments where zero or very low levels of activity were detected. Of note, the spatial activities of the PGD1 promoter were found to be strikingly similar to those of the ZmUbi1, a widely used constitutive promoter. Our comparison of promoter activities between T₃, T₄ and T₅ plants revealed that the APX, PGD1 and R1G1B promoters maintained their activities at comparable levels in leaves and roots over three homozygous generations and are therefore potentially viable alternative promoters for crop biotechnology applications.

  13. Cognitive and psychomotor development of 5- to 6-year-old singletons born after PGD: a prospective case-controlled matched study.

    PubMed

    Winter, C; Van Acker, F; Bonduelle, M; Desmyttere, S; De Schrijver, F; Nekkebroeck, J

    2014-09-01

    Do preschool preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) children differ in their cognitive and psychomotor development from children born after ICSI and spontaneous conception (SC)? The cognitive development of PGD pre-schoolers was comparable to children born after ICSI and SC but motor development differed between ICSI and SC groups. The cognitive abilities and motor skills of 5- to 6-year-old singletons born after PGD (n = 47) were assessed in comparison with 49 ICSI and 48 SC children in a prospective, case-controlled, matched follow-up study between April 2011 and May 2013. PGD singletons, ICSI and SC children of preschool age were examined with the Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence (WPSSI-III-NL) and the Movement ABC (M ABC). The WPSSI-III-NL revealed scores for Full IQ, Verbal IQ and Performance IQ. The M ABC yields a total score and comprising scores for measurements of balance, dexterity and ball skills. Since embryo biopsy is the only technical difference between the PGD and ICSI procedures, ICSI children were included as controls. These children were part of a Dutch-speaking cohort of children conceived after assisted reproduction technology (ART) at the Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel (UZ Brussel) who received longitudinal follow-up. The SC children acted as a second control group similar to the fertile PGD sample and in contrast to the ICSI group. The SC group was recruited through announcements in a variety of media. The children were matched for age, gender, birth order and educational level of the mother. The assessments carried out for the ART groups were blinded whenever possible. The data were analysed using analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) and partial eta squared (η(2)), which was used as a measurement of effect size. The overall cognitive development of PGD singletons did not differ from controls [P = 0.647, η(2) = 0.006; 95% confidence interval (CI) (0, 0.043)]. The partial IQ scores for Verbal and Performance intelligence

  14. PanScan, the Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium, and the Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium

    Cancer.gov

    The Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium consists of more than a dozen prospective epidemiologic cohort studies within the NCI Cohort Consortium, whose leaders work together to investigate the etiology and natural history of pancreatic cancer.

  15. The Neuroscience Peer Review Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Saper, Clifford B; Maunsell, John HR; Sagvolden, Terje

    2009-01-01

    The Neuroscience Peer Review Consortium (NPRC) was conceived in the summer of 2007 at a meeting of editors and publishers of neuroscience journals. One of the working groups addressed whether it was possible to construct a system for permitting authors whose manuscript received supportive reviews at one journal but was not accepted to send a revised manuscript together with its first round of reviews to a new journal for the second round. This would speed up the review process and reduce the work for reviewers and editors. The working group not only designed a framework for transferring reviews among journals, but also implemented it as the NPRC. By the fall of 2007, more than a dozen major journals had signed onto the NPRC, sufficient to launch the experiment in January, 2008. We invite authors who have not yet used the NPRC to try this method for appropriate manuscripts. In order to encourage dissemination of the details outlined in this Editorial, it will also be published in other journals in the Neuroscience Peer Review Consortium. PMID:19149887

  16. The Salix Consortium in New York

    SciTech Connect

    Wulf, T.; Jones, J.

    1998-09-28

    Energy crops for electrical production are being given a boost by the Salix Consortium, an association of 20 corporations and industrial, government, farming, and research organizations. The consortium supports commercial development of willows for generating electricity, which are being grown for utilities across the Northeast region of the U.S. for use in cofiring with coal in existing power plants.

  17. Detroit MEDLINE Consortium; An Interim Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeSchryver, Victor; And Others

    The Detroit MEDLINE Consortium is an experimental pilot project which is intended to extend use of the on line retrieval system to the hospital environment. The consortium was initiated to increase the capacity for bibliographic information retrieval supportive of the delivery of patient care in the hospital environment. Secondarily, it addresses…

  18. Increasing Sales by Developing Production Consortiums.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Christopher A.; Russo, Robert

    Intended to help rehabilitation facility administrators increase organizational income from manufacturing and/or contracted service sources, this document provides a decision-making model for the development of a production consortium. The document consists of five chapters and two appendices. Chapter 1 defines the consortium concept, explains…

  19. 32 CFR 37.1255 - Consortium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Consortium. 37.1255 Section 37.1255 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE DoD GRANT AND AGREEMENT REGULATIONS TECHNOLOGY INVESTMENT AGREEMENTS Definitions of Terms Used in This Part § 37.1255 Consortium. A group...

  20. Consortium for military LCD display procurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echols, Gregg

    2002-08-01

    International Display Consortium (IDC) is the joining together of display companies to combined their buying power and obtained favorable terms with a major LCD manufacturer. Consolidating the buying power and grouping the demand enables the rugged display industry of avionics, ground vehicles, and ship based display manufacturers to have unencumbered access to high performance AMLCDs while greatly reducing risk and lowering cost. With an unrestricted supply of AMLCD displays, the consortium members have total control of their risk, cost, deliveries and added value partners. Every display manufacturer desires a very close relationship with a display vender. With IDC each consortium member achieves a close relationship. Consortium members enjoy cost effective access to high performance, industry standard sized LCD panels, and modified commercial displays with 100 degree C clearing points and portrait configurations. Consortium members also enjoy proposal support, technical support and long-term support.

  1. Engineering the ligninolytic enzyme consortium.

    PubMed

    Alcalde, Miguel

    2015-03-01

    The ligninolytic enzyme consortium is one of the most-efficient oxidative systems found in nature, playing a pivotal role during wood decay and coal formation. Typically formed by high redox-potential oxidoreductases, this array of enzymes can be used within the emerging lignocellulose biorefineries in processes that range from the production of bioenergy to that of biomaterials. To ensure that these versatile enzymes meet industry standards and needs, they have been subjected to directed evolution and hybrid approaches that surpass the limits imposed by nature. This Opinion article analyzes recent achievements in this field, including the incipient groundbreaking research into the evolution of resurrected enzymes, and the engineering of ligninolytic secretomes to create consolidated bioprocessing microbes with synthetic biology applications.

  2. The AGTSR consortium: An update

    SciTech Connect

    Fant, D.B.; Golan, L.P.

    1995-12-31

    The Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research program is a nationwide consortium dedicated to advancing land-based gas turbine systems for improving future power generation capability. It directly supports the technology-research arm of the ATS program and targets industry- defined research needs in the areas of combustion, heat transfer, materials, aerodynamics, controls, alternative fuels, and advanced cycles. It is organized to enhance U.S. competitiveness through close collaboration with universities, government, and industry at the R&D level. AGTSR is just finishing its third year of operation; it is scheduled to continue past the year 2000. This update reviews the AGTSR triad, which consists of university/industry R&D activities, technology transfer programs, and trial student programs.

  3. Derivation of HVR1, HVR2 and HVR3 human embryonic stem cell lines from IVF embryos after preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for monogenic disorder.

    PubMed

    Hmadcha, Abdelkrim; Aguilera, Yolanda; Lozano-Arana, Maria Dolores; Mellado, Nuria; Sánchez, Javier; Moya, Cristina; Sánchez-Palazón, Luis; Palacios, Jose; Antiñolo, Guillermo; Soria, Bernat

    2016-05-01

    From 106 human blastocyts donate for research after in vitro fertilization (IVF) and preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for monogenetic disorder, 3 human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) HVR1, HVR2 and HVR3 were successfully derived. HVR1 was assumed to be genetically normal, HVR2 carrying Becker muscular dystrophy and HVR3 Hemophilia B. Despite the translocation t(9;15)(q34.3;q14) detected in HVR2, all the 3 cell lines were characterised in vitro and in vivo as normal hESCs lines and were registered in the Spanish Stem Cell Bank.

  4. Effects of Common Pesticides on Prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) Inhibition in SC5 Mouse Sertoli Cells, Evidence of Binding at the COX-2 Active Site, and Implications for Endocrine Disruption.

    PubMed

    Kugathas, Subramaniam; Audouze, Karine; Ermler, Sibylle; Orton, Frances; Rosivatz, Erika; Scholze, Martin; Kortenkamp, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    There are concerns that diminished prostaglandin action in fetal life could increase the risk of congenital malformations. Many endocrine-disrupting chemicals have been found to suppress prostaglandin synthesis, but to our knowledge, pesticides have never been tested for these effects. We assessed the ability of pesticides that are commonly used in the European Union to suppress prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) synthesis. Changes in PGD2 secretion in juvenile mouse Sertoli cells (SC5 cells) were measured using an ELISA. Coincubation with arachidonic acid (AA) was conducted to determine the site of action in the PGD2 synthetic pathway. Molecular modeling studies were performed to assess whether pesticides identified as PGD2-active could serve as ligands of the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) binding pocket. The pesticides boscalid, chlorpropham, cypermethrin, cyprodinil, fenhexamid, fludioxonil, imazalil (enilconazole), imidacloprid, iprodione, linuron, methiocarb, o-phenylphenol, pirimiphos-methyl, pyrimethanil, and tebuconazole suppressed PGD2 production. Strikingly, some of these substances-o-phenylphenol, cypermethrin, cyprodinil, linuron, and imazalil (enilconazole)-showed potencies (IC50) in the range between 175 and 1,500 nM, similar to those of analgesics intended to block COX enzymes. Supplementation with AA failed to reverse this effect, suggesting that the sites of action of these pesticides are COX enzymes. The molecular modeling studies revealed that the COX-2 binding pocket can accommodate most of the pesticides shown to suppress PGD2 synthesis. Some of these pesticides are also capable of antagonizing the androgen receptor. Chemicals with structural features more varied than previously thought can suppress PGD2 synthesis. Our findings signal a need for in vivo studies to establish the extent of endocrine-disrupting effects that might arise from simultaneous interference with PGD2 signaling and androgen action. Kugathas S, Audouze K, Ermler S, Orton F, Rosivatz E

  5. Effects of Common Pesticides on Prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) Inhibition in SC5 Mouse Sertoli Cells, Evidence of Binding at the COX-2 Active Site, and Implications for Endocrine Disruption

    PubMed Central

    Kugathas, Subramaniam; Audouze, Karine; Ermler, Sibylle; Orton, Frances; Rosivatz, Erika; Scholze, Martin; Kortenkamp, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Background: There are concerns that diminished prostaglandin action in fetal life could increase the risk of congenital malformations. Many endocrine-disrupting chemicals have been found to suppress prostaglandin synthesis, but to our knowledge, pesticides have never been tested for these effects. Objectives: We assessed the ability of pesticides that are commonly used in the European Union to suppress prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) synthesis. Methods: Changes in PGD2 secretion in juvenile mouse Sertoli cells (SC5 cells) were measured using an ELISA. Coincubation with arachidonic acid (AA) was conducted to determine the site of action in the PGD2 synthetic pathway. Molecular modeling studies were performed to assess whether pesticides identified as PGD2-active could serve as ligands of the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) binding pocket. Results: The pesticides boscalid, chlorpropham, cypermethrin, cyprodinil, fenhexamid, fludioxonil, imazalil (enilconazole), imidacloprid, iprodione, linuron, methiocarb, o-phenylphenol, pirimiphos-methyl, pyrimethanil, and tebuconazole suppressed PGD2 production. Strikingly, some of these substances—o-phenylphenol, cypermethrin, cyprodinil, linuron, and imazalil (enilconazole)—showed potencies (IC50) in the range between 175 and 1,500 nM, similar to those of analgesics intended to block COX enzymes. Supplementation with AA failed to reverse this effect, suggesting that the sites of action of these pesticides are COX enzymes. The molecular modeling studies revealed that the COX-2 binding pocket can accommodate most of the pesticides shown to suppress PGD2 synthesis. Some of these pesticides are also capable of antagonizing the androgen receptor. Conclusions: Chemicals with structural features more varied than previously thought can suppress PGD2 synthesis. Our findings signal a need for in vivo studies to establish the extent of endocrine-disrupting effects that might arise from simultaneous interference with PGD2 signaling and androgen action

  6. Germline mosaicism is a pitfall in PGD for X-linked disorders. Single sperm typing detects very low frequency paternal gonadal mosaicism in a case of recurrent chondrodysplasia punctata misattributed to a maternal origin.

    PubMed

    Viart, Victoria; Willems, Marjolaine; Ishmukhametova, Aliya; Dufernez, Fabienne; Anahory, Tal; Hamamah, Samir; Schmitt, Sébastien; Claustres, Mireille; Girardet, Anne

    2017-02-01

    This manuscript presents a molecularly demonstrated gonadal mosaicism from paternal origin for X-linked dominant chondrodysplasia punctata by single sperm typing. A couple who had experienced two medical terminations of pregnancy of female fetuses was referred to our pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) centre with the diagnosis of maternally derived gonadal mosaicism. Indeed, genetic analyses of different DNA samples - including semen - from the healthy parents failed to detect the variant found in the fetuses. Six embryos, all male, were obtained during the PGD cycle. The causative variant was not detected in any embryo, whereas five embryos had inherited the 'at-risk' maternal haplotype. The assumption of a maternal gonadal mosaicism was still possible, but this finding allowed us to consider the possibility of a paternal rather than maternal gonadal mosaicism. It prompted us to perform extensive single sperm analyses, demonstrating a low-frequency paternal germline mosaicism, which led to completely different haplotype phasing and PGD counselling. In conclusion, this case further exemplifies that germline mosaicism is a pitfall in PGD where diagnosis largely relies on linkage analysis and suggests that tracing the parental inheritance through polar body analysis and/or single sperm typing experiments is of major importance for adequate genetic counselling and accurate PGD. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. An Exceptional Case of Complete Septate Uterus With Unilateral Cervical Aplasia (Class U2bC3V0/ESHRE/ESGE Classification) and Isolated Mullerian Remnants: Combined Hysteroscopic and Laparoscopic Treatment.

    PubMed

    Di Spiezio Sardo, Attilio; Giampaolino, Pierluigi; Scognamiglio, Marianna; Varelli, Carlo; Nazzaro, Giovanni; Mansueto, Gelsomina; Nappi, Carmine; Grimbizis, Grigoris F

    2016-01-01

    To report the combined hysteroscopic and laparoscopic treatment of a complete septate uterus with unilateral cervical aplasia (class U2bC3V0/ESHRE/ESGE classification) and isolated mullerian remnants. Step-by-step presentation of the surgical treatment (Canadian Task Force classification 4). Complete septate uterus with unilateral cervical aplasia (formally Robert's uterus) is characterized by the presence of a uterine septum completely dividing the endometrial cavity into an obstructed hemicavity and a contralateral nonobstructing hemicavity connected normally to the existing cervix. It has always been described as isolated without any associated anomaly. A 30-year-old woman was referred to our department for dysmenorrhea and primary infertility. Hysterosalpingography showed the presence of a right (RT) hemiuterus with a patent fallopian tube; further evaluation with 2- and 3-dimensional ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging showed an externally normal-appearing uterus, a right normal hemicavity connected normally with the existed cervix and, a left hemicavity fully divided from the right one by a complete septum and not connected with the cervix. Interestingly, a peculiar complex mass with cystic areas, attached posterolaterally from the left side to the uterine wall at the level of the isthmus and the upper cervix, was also diagnosed. The study protocol was approved by our local institutional review board. During outpatient hysteroscopy, a right uterine hemicavity with a single ostium was identified without any communication with the left hemicavity. The patient was then scheduled for combined laparoscopic and hysteroscopic treatment. During laparoscopy, a normal uterine body with multiple myomas and a pseudocystic lesion attached posteriorly and left laterally to the uterus at the level of the isthmus and the upper cervix were shown; no communication between the cystic part of that lesion and the isthmus or the cervicovaginal canal was observed. During

  8. 40 CFR 35.504 - Eligibility of an Intertribal Consortium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Consortium. 35.504 Section 35.504 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER... § 35.504 Eligibility of an Intertribal Consortium. (a) An Intertribal Consortium is eligible to receive grants under the authorities listed in § 35.501 only if the Consortium demonstrates that all members...

  9. 40 CFR 35.504 - Eligibility of an Intertribal Consortium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Consortium. 35.504 Section 35.504 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER... § 35.504 Eligibility of an Intertribal Consortium. (a) An Intertribal Consortium is eligible to receive grants under the authorities listed in § 35.501 only if the Consortium demonstrates that all members...

  10. 24 CFR 943.122 - How is a consortium organized?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false How is a consortium organized? 943... URBAN DEVELOPMENT PUBLIC HOUSING AGENCY CONSORTIA AND JOINT VENTURES Consortia § 943.122 How is a consortium organized? (a) PHAs that elect to form a consortium enter into a consortium agreement among...

  11. 24 CFR 943.122 - How is a consortium organized?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false How is a consortium organized? 943... URBAN DEVELOPMENT PUBLIC HOUSING AGENCY CONSORTIA AND JOINT VENTURES Consortia § 943.122 How is a consortium organized? (a) PHAs that elect to form a consortium enter into a consortium agreement among...

  12. 24 CFR 943.122 - How is a consortium organized?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false How is a consortium organized? 943... URBAN DEVELOPMENT PUBLIC HOUSING AGENCY CONSORTIA AND JOINT VENTURES Consortia § 943.122 How is a consortium organized? (a) PHAs that elect to form a consortium enter into a consortium agreement among...

  13. 40 CFR 35.504 - Eligibility of an Intertribal Consortium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Consortium. 35.504 Section 35.504 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER... § 35.504 Eligibility of an Intertribal Consortium. (a) An Intertribal Consortium is eligible to receive grants under the authorities listed in § 35.501 only if the Consortium demonstrates that all members...

  14. 24 CFR 943.122 - How is a consortium organized?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false How is a consortium organized? 943... URBAN DEVELOPMENT PUBLIC HOUSING AGENCY CONSORTIA AND JOINT VENTURES Consortia § 943.122 How is a consortium organized? (a) PHAs that elect to form a consortium enter into a consortium agreement among...

  15. The LBNL/JSU/AGMUS Science Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    This report discusses the 11 year of accomplishments of the science consortium of minority graduates from Jackson State University and Ana G. Mendez University at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

  16. The international serious adverse events consortium.

    PubMed

    Holden, Arthur L; Contreras, Jorge L; John, Sally; Nelson, Matthew R

    2014-11-01

    The International Serious Adverse Events Consortium is generating novel insights into the genetics and biology of drug-induced serious adverse events, and thereby improving pharmaceutical product development and decision-making.

  17. International Lymphoma Epidemiology Consortium (InterLymph)

    Cancer.gov

    A consortium designed to enhance collaboration among epidemiologists studying lymphoma, to provide a forum for the exchange of research ideas, and to create a framework for collaborating on analyses that pool data from multiple studies

  18. CORAL DISEASE & HEALTH CONSORTIUM: FINDING SOLUTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Department of Interior (DOI) developed the framework for a Coral Disease and Health Consortium (CDHC) for the United States Coral Reef Task Force (USCRTF) through an interag...

  19. CORAL DISEASE & HEALTH CONSORTIUM: FINDING SOLUTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Department of Interior (DOI) developed the framework for a Coral Disease and Health Consortium (CDHC) for the United States Coral Reef Task Force (USCRTF) through an interag...

  20. NASA Space Radiation Transport Code Development Consortium.

    PubMed

    Townsend, Lawrence W

    2005-01-01

    Recently, NASA established a consortium involving the University of Tennessee (lead institution), the University of Houston, Roanoke College and various government and national laboratories, to accelerate the development of a standard set of radiation transport computer codes for NASA human exploration applications. This effort involves further improvements of the Monte Carlo codes HETC and FLUKA and the deterministic code HZETRN, including developing nuclear reaction databases necessary to extend the Monte Carlo codes to carry out heavy ion transport, and extending HZETRN to three dimensions. The improved codes will be validated by comparing predictions with measured laboratory transport data, provided by an experimental measurements consortium, and measurements in the upper atmosphere on the balloon-borne Deep Space Test Bed (DSTB). In this paper, we present an overview of the consortium members and the current status and future plans of consortium efforts to meet the research goals and objectives of this extensive undertaking.

  1. 32 CFR 37.1255 - Consortium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... TECHNOLOGY INVESTMENT AGREEMENTS Definitions of Terms Used in This Part § 37.1255 Consortium. A group of... carry out a research project (see definition of “articles of collaboration,” in § 37.1225). ...

  2. 32 CFR 37.1255 - Consortium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... TECHNOLOGY INVESTMENT AGREEMENTS Definitions of Terms Used in This Part § 37.1255 Consortium. A group of... carry out a research project (see definition of “articles of collaboration,” in § 37.1225). ...

  3. 32 CFR 37.1255 - Consortium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... TECHNOLOGY INVESTMENT AGREEMENTS Definitions of Terms Used in This Part § 37.1255 Consortium. A group of... carry out a research project (see definition of “articles of collaboration,” in § 37.1225). ...

  4. 32 CFR 37.1255 - Consortium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... TECHNOLOGY INVESTMENT AGREEMENTS Definitions of Terms Used in This Part § 37.1255 Consortium. A group of... carry out a research project (see definition of “articles of collaboration,” in § 37.1225). ...

  5. The bioleaching potential of a bacterial consortium.

    PubMed

    Latorre, Mauricio; Cortés, María Paz; Travisany, Dante; Di Genova, Alex; Budinich, Marko; Reyes-Jara, Angélica; Hödar, Christian; González, Mauricio; Parada, Pilar; Bobadilla-Fazzini, Roberto A; Cambiazo, Verónica; Maass, Alejandro

    2016-10-01

    This work presents the molecular foundation of a consortium of five efficient bacteria strains isolated from copper mines currently used in state of the art industrial-scale biotechnology. The strains Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans Licanantay, Acidiphilium multivorum Yenapatur, Leptospirillum ferriphilum Pañiwe, Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans Wenelen and Sulfobacillus thermosulfidooxidans Cutipay were selected for genome sequencing based on metal tolerance, oxidation activity and bioleaching of copper efficiency. An integrated model of metabolic pathways representing the bioleaching capability of this consortium was generated. Results revealed that greater efficiency in copper recovery may be explained by the higher functional potential of L. ferriphilum Pañiwe and At. thiooxidans Licanantay to oxidize iron and reduced inorganic sulfur compounds. The consortium had a greater capacity to resist copper, arsenic and chloride ion compared to previously described biomining strains. Specialization and particular components in these bacteria provided the consortium a greater ability to bioleach copper sulfide ores.

  6. Gene Ontology Consortium: going forward.

    PubMed

    2015-01-01

    The Gene Ontology (GO; http://www.geneontology.org) is a community-based bioinformatics resource that supplies information about gene product function using ontologies to represent biological knowledge. Here we describe improvements and expansions to several branches of the ontology, as well as updates that have allowed us to more efficiently disseminate the GO and capture feedback from the research community. The Gene Ontology Consortium (GOC) has expanded areas of the ontology such as cilia-related terms, cell-cycle terms and multicellular organism processes. We have also implemented new tools for generating ontology terms based on a set of logical rules making use of templates, and we have made efforts to increase our use of logical definitions. The GOC has a new and improved web site summarizing new developments and documentation, serving as a portal to GO data. Users can perform GO enrichment analysis, and search the GO for terms, annotations to gene products, and associated metadata across multiple species using the all-new AmiGO 2 browser. We encourage and welcome the input of the research community in all biological areas in our continued effort to improve the Gene Ontology. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  7. Gene Ontology Consortium: going forward

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The Gene Ontology (GO; http://www.geneontology.org) is a community-based bioinformatics resource that supplies information about gene product function using ontologies to represent biological knowledge. Here we describe improvements and expansions to several branches of the ontology, as well as updates that have allowed us to more efficiently disseminate the GO and capture feedback from the research community. The Gene Ontology Consortium (GOC) has expanded areas of the ontology such as cilia-related terms, cell-cycle terms and multicellular organism processes. We have also implemented new tools for generating ontology terms based on a set of logical rules making use of templates, and we have made efforts to increase our use of logical definitions. The GOC has a new and improved web site summarizing new developments and documentation, serving as a portal to GO data. Users can perform GO enrichment analysis, and search the GO for terms, annotations to gene products, and associated metadata across multiple species using the all-new AmiGO 2 browser. We encourage and welcome the input of the research community in all biological areas in our continued effort to improve the Gene Ontology. PMID:25428369

  8. Reproductive management through integration of PGD and MPS-based noninvasive prenatal screening/diagnosis for a family with GJB2-associated hearing impairment.

    PubMed

    Xiong, WenPing; Wang, DaYong; Gao, Yuan; Gao, Ya; Wang, HongYang; Guan, Jing; Lan, Lan; Yan, JunHao; Zong, Liang; Yuan, Yuan; Dong, Wei; Huang, SeXin; Wu, KeLiang; Wang, YaoShen; Wang, ZhiLi; Peng, HongMei; Lu, YanPing; Xie, LinYi; Zhao, Cui; Wang, Li; Zhang, QiuJing; Gao, Yun; Li, Na; Yang, Ju; Yin, ZiFang; Han, Bing; Wang, Wei; Chen, Zi-Jiang; Wang, QiuJu

    2015-09-01

    A couple with a proband child of GJB2 (encoding the gap junction protein connexin 26)-associated hearing impairment and a previous pregnancy miscarriage sought for a reproductive solution to bear a healthy child. Our study aimed to develop a customized preconception-to-neonate care trajectory to fulfill this clinical demand by integrating preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD), noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT), and noninvasive prenatal diagnosis (NIPD) into the strategy. Auditory and genetic diagnosis of the proband child was carried out to identify the disease causative mutations. The couple then received in-vitro-fertilization treatment, and eight embryos were obtained for day 5 biopsy. PGD was performed by short-tandem-repeat linkage analysis and Sanger sequencing of GJB2 gene. Transfer of a GJB2c.235delC heterozygous embryo resulted in a singleton pregnancy. At the 13th week of gestation, genomic DNA (gDNA) from the trio family and cell-free DNA (cfDNA) from maternal plasma were obtained for assessment of fetal chromosomal aneuploidy and GJB2 mutations. NIPT and NIPD showed the absence of chromosomal aneuploidy and GJB2-associated disease in the fetus, which was later confirmed by invasive procedures and postnatal genetic/auditory diagnosis. This strategy successfully prevented the transmission of hearing impairment in the newborn, thus providing a valuable experience in reproductive management of similar cases and potentially other monogenic disorders.

  9. The Childhood Leukemia International Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Metayer, Catherine; Milne, Elizabeth; Clavel, Jacqueline; Infante-Rivard, Claire; Petridou, Eleni; Taylor, Malcolm; Schüz, Joachim; Spector, Logan G.; Dockerty, John D.; Magnani, Corrado; Pombo-de-Oliveira, Maria S.; Sinnett, Daniel; Murphy, Michael; Roman, Eve; Monge, Patricia; Ezzat, Sameera; Mueller, Beth A.; Scheurer, Michael E.; Armstrong, Bruce K.; Birch, Jill; Kaatsch, Peter; Koifman, Sergio; Lightfoot, Tracy; Bhatti, Parveen; Bondy, Melissa L.; Rudant, Jérémie; O’Neill, Kate; Miligi, Lucia; Dessypris, Nick; Kang, Alice Y.; Buffler, Patricia A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Acute leukemia is the most common cancer in children under 15 years of age; 80% are acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and 17% are acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Childhood leukemia shows further diversity based on cytogenetic and molecular characteristics, which may relate to distinct etiologies. Case–control studies conducted worldwide, particularly of ALL, have collected a wealth of data on potential risk factors and in some studies, biospecimens. There is growing evidence for the role of infectious/immunologic factors, fetal growth, and several environmental factors in the etiology of childhood ALL. The risk of childhood leukemia, like other complex diseases, is likely to be influenced both by independent and interactive effects of genes and environmental exposures. While some studies have analyzed the role of genetic variants, few have been sufficiently powered to investigate gene–environment interactions. Objectives The Childhood Leukemia International Consortium (CLIC) was established in 2007 to promote investigations of rarer exposures, gene–environment interactions and subtype-specific associations through the pooling of data from independent studies. Methods By September 2012, CLIC included 22 studies (recruitment period: 1962–present) from 12 countries, totaling approximately 31 000 cases and 50 000 controls. Of these, 19 case–control studies have collected detailed epidemiologic data, and DNA samples have been collected from children and child–parent trios in 15 and 13 of these studies, respectively. Two registry-based studies and one study comprising hospital records routinely obtained at birth and/or diagnosis have limited interview data or biospecimens. Conclusions CLIC provides a unique opportunity to fill gaps in knowledge about the role of environmental and genetic risk factors, critical windows of exposure, the effects of gene–environment interactions and associations among specific leukemia subtypes in different ethnic

  10. Appalachian Developing Institutions Consortium. Progress Report No. 1: First Six Months of Consortium Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roesler, Elmo V., Ed.

    This paper reports the progress to date and plans of the Appalachian Consortium Special Development Project, funded under Title III of the Higher Education Act. The participating institutions joined the consortium because it was felt that only through a cooperative arrangement could they overcome the limitations of inadequate resources arising…

  11. CFD analysis of pump consortium impeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Gary C.; Chen, Y. S.; Williams, R. W.

    1992-07-01

    Current design of high performance turbopumps for rocket engines requires effective and robust analytical tools to provide design impact in a productive manner. The main goal of this study is to develop a robust and effective computational fluid dynamics (CFD) pump model for general turbopump design and analysis applications. A Navier-Stokes flow solver, FDNS, embedded with the extended k-epsilon turbulence model and with appropriate moving interface boundary conditions, is developed to analyze turbulent flows in the turbomachinery devices. The FDNS code was benchmarked with its numerical predictions of the pump consortium inducer, and provides satisfactory results. In the present study, a CFD analysis of the pump consortium impeller will be conducted with the application of the FDNS code. The pump consortium impeller, with partial blades, is the new design concept of the advanced rocket engine.

  12. Viability of Azotobacter consortium in auxin production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zulaika, Enny; Solikhah, Farihatus; Alami, Nur Hidayatul; Kuswytasari, Nengah Dwianita; Shovitri, Maya

    2017-06-01

    Azotobacter is a kind of rhizobacteria which is abundant in soil and having beneficial for plants due to its ability to produce auxin. Each isolated Azotobacter from Eco Urban Farming ITS were able to produce auxin individually. However, the isolated Azotobacter consortium was prefer to produce more auxin than the individual one. Synergism test were carried out in order to verify non-antagonism among Azotobacter isolates. Auxin production test was conducted by inoculating 100 ml of Azotobacter consortium starter in 400 ml nutrient broth by addition of 1.000 ppm of L-tryptophan while shaking 100 rpm in rotary shaker at room temperature for 8 weeks. Auxin concentration was measured spectrophotometrically according to the Salkowski method. The Azotobacter consortium showed living synergistically and able to produce 1,82 ppm auxin in 2 hours incubation time although the concentration was tend to decrease periodically.

  13. CFD analysis of pump consortium impeller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Gary C.; Chen, Y. S.; Williams, R. W.

    1992-01-01

    Current design of high performance turbopumps for rocket engines requires effective and robust analytical tools to provide design impact in a productive manner. The main goal of this study is to develop a robust and effective computational fluid dynamics (CFD) pump model for general turbopump design and analysis applications. A Navier-Stokes flow solver, FDNS, embedded with the extended k-epsilon turbulence model and with appropriate moving interface boundary conditions, is developed to analyze turbulent flows in the turbomachinery devices. The FDNS code was benchmarked with its numerical predictions of the pump consortium inducer, and provides satisfactory results. In the present study, a CFD analysis of the pump consortium impeller will be conducted with the application of the FDNS code. The pump consortium impeller, with partial blades, is the new design concept of the advanced rocket engine.

  14. Possible involvement of aiPLA2 in the phosphatidylserine-containing liposomes induced production of PGE2 and PGD2 in microglia.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Fumiko; Wu, Zhou; Ma, Hong Mei; Okada, Ryo; Hayashi, Yoshinori; Nakanishi, Hiroshi

    2013-09-15

    Liposomes containing phosphatidylserine (PSL) produce PGE2 after being phagocytosed by microglia, but the precise underlying mechanism behind it still remains unclear. Here, we showed that liposomes consisting of phosphatidylserine and lysophosphatidylcholine, a lipolysis product of phosphatidylcholine by PLA2, were phagocytosed by microglia, but failed to induce secretion of PGE2. Furthermore, PSL-induced PGE2 secretion was significantly inhibited by MJ33, an aiPLA2 inhibitor, but not by AACOCF3, a cPLA2 inhibitor. PSL also produced PGD2 and 15d-PGJ2 in microglia. We thus hypothesize that free arachidonic acid is supplied through aiPLA2-mediated lipolysis of phagocytosed phosphatidylcholine, leading to the production of PGH2 and its downstream metabolites.

  15. Massachusetts Institute of Technology Consortium Agreement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-03-01

    In this, our second progress report of the Phase Two Home Automation and Healthcare Consortium at the Brit and Alex d’Arbeloff Laboratory for...Covered here are the diverse fields of home automation and healthcare research, ranging from human modeling, patient monitoring, and diagnosis to new...sensors and actuators, physical aids, human-machine interface and home automation infrastructure. These results will be presented at the upcoming General Assembly of the Consortium held on October 27-October 30, 1998 at MIT.

  16. The Teleprasenz Consortium: Structure and intentions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blauert, Jens

    1991-01-01

    The Teleprasenz-Consortium is an open group of currently 37 scientists of different disciplines who devote a major part of their research activities to the foundations of telepresence technology. Telepresence technology is basically understood as a means to bridge spatial and temporal gaps as well as certain kinds of concealment, inaccessibility and danger of exposure. The activities of the consortium are organized into three main branches: virtual environment, surveillance and control systems, and speech and language technology. A brief summary of the main activities in these areas is given.

  17. Consortium of institutes for decentralized wastewater treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Loomis, G.W.

    1998-07-01

    The Consortium of Institutes for Decentralized Wastewater Treatment is a group of thirteen (and expanding) North American colleges and universities that formed with the goal of helping to protect public health and maintain a sustainable environment. To accomplish this goal, academicians work closely with private sector partners from industry, manufacturing, consulting, regulatory agencies, and citizen/community groups to transfer research-based information into education and training programs for decentralized wastewater treatment. This document will focus on the mission, organizational structure, and recent grant activities of the Consortium.

  18. THE FEDERAL INTEGRATED BIOTREATMENT RESEARCH CONSORTIUM (FLASK TO FIELD)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Federal Integrated Biotreatment Research Consortium (Flask to Field) represented a 7-year concerted effort by several research laboratories to develop bioremediation technologies for contaminated DoD sites. The consortium structure consisted of a director and four thrust are...

  19. CORAL DISEASE & HEALTH CONSORTIUM; PARTNERS FOR PRESERVATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Presented at EMAP Symposium 2001: Coastal Monitoring Through Partnerships, 24-27 April 2001, Pensacola Beach, FL.

    The Coral Disease and Health Consortium (CDHC) was one recommendation to the U.S. Coral Reef Task Force (CRTF), to conserve the coral reef ecosystems of the U...

  20. Mission Connect Mild TBI Translational Research Consortium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    clearly will produce a scientific publication on this. Due to the enormous number of mild TBis (approximately 1 million every year in the US), we... scientific publication from our results with recognition of the Consortium and CDMRP. If those results are positive, we will seek funding for a much

  1. CORAL DISEASE & HEALTH CONSORTIUM; PARTNERS FOR PRESERVATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Presented at EMAP Symposium 2001: Coastal Monitoring Through Partnerships, 24-27 April 2001, Pensacola Beach, FL.

    The Coral Disease and Health Consortium (CDHC) was one recommendation to the U.S. Coral Reef Task Force (CRTF), to conserve the coral reef ecosystems of the U...

  2. Northeast Technology Education Consortium: Resource Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, W. Tad, Ed.

    This guide is designed to provide additional resources for technology educators who are attempting to shift their programs from industrial arts to technology education. An introduction describes the original demonstration site project, a consortium of Northeastern U.S. schools, the primary goal of which was the advancement of technological…

  3. National STEM Consortium Evaluation. Final Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Acting as the lead agency for the "National STEM Consortium" (NSC), Anne Arundel Community College (AACC) engaged Hezel Associates to provide an independent program and impact evaluation of the U.S. Department of Labor (USDOL)-funded STEM certificate initiative. This report is comprehensive and covers the findings from all 4 years of the…

  4. The Digital Preservation Consortium: Mission and Goals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walters, Donald J.; Kenney, Anne

    The development of the National Information Infrastructure (NII) and the growing use of the Internet are creating a rapidly-changing environment for collaborative preservation and access. Within this environment, the Digital Preservation Consortium (DPC) seeks to advance the use and utility of digital technology for the preservation of and access…

  5. 10 CFR 603.1235 - Consortium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Consortium. 603.1235 Section 603.1235 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS TECHNOLOGY INVESTMENT AGREEMENTS Definitions of Terms Used in... incorporated or that otherwise agrees to jointly carry out a RD&D project (see definition of “articles of...

  6. 10 CFR 603.1235 - Consortium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Consortium. 603.1235 Section 603.1235 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS TECHNOLOGY INVESTMENT AGREEMENTS Definitions of Terms Used in... incorporated or that otherwise agrees to jointly carry out a RD&D project (see definition of “articles of...

  7. 10 CFR 603.1235 - Consortium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Consortium. 603.1235 Section 603.1235 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS TECHNOLOGY INVESTMENT AGREEMENTS Definitions of Terms Used in... incorporated or that otherwise agrees to jointly carry out a RD&D project (see definition of “articles of...

  8. 10 CFR 603.1235 - Consortium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Consortium. 603.1235 Section 603.1235 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS TECHNOLOGY INVESTMENT AGREEMENTS Definitions of Terms Used in... incorporated or that otherwise agrees to jointly carry out a RD&D project (see definition of “articles of...

  9. 10 CFR 603.1235 - Consortium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Consortium. 603.1235 Section 603.1235 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS TECHNOLOGY INVESTMENT AGREEMENTS Definitions of Terms Used in... incorporated or that otherwise agrees to jointly carry out a RD&D project (see definition of “articles of...

  10. Formation of a Human Services Consortium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mehallis, George; And Others

    Background information is provided concerning the efforts of Miami-Dade Community College (M-DCC), under the sponsorship of the National Institute on Drug Abuse, to form a national consortium of two-year colleges for the development of Human Resources programs aimed at training chemical substance abuse workers. The report first presents…

  11. The Consortium Method of Educational Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maynes, Bill; McIntosh, Gordon

    1979-01-01

    In offering an alternative approach to organizing major curriculum changes, this paper presents a case study and analysis of a consortium project in which the need for change, the change process, and the curriculum writing all took place at the local level. (Author/IRT)

  12. Consortium wins major Brazilian gas contract

    SciTech Connect

    O`Driscoll

    1994-08-16

    An international consortium of BHP of Australia, Tenneco Gas of the U.S. and British Gas was selected Monday by Petroleo Braileiro SA (Petrobras) to Monday by Petroleo Brasileiro SA (Petrobras) to develop a $2 billion natural gas pipeline linking reserves in Bolivia with markets in southern and southeastern Brazil.

  13. Retirement Plan Consortium Structures for K-12

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kevin, John

    2012-01-01

    As school districts continue to seek administrative efficiencies and cost reductions in the wake of severe budget pressures, the resources they devote to creating or expanding retirement plan consortia is increasing. Understanding how to structure a retirement plan consortium is paramount to successfully achieving the many objectives of…

  14. 10 CFR 603.515 - Qualification of a consortium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Qualification of a consortium. 603.515 Section 603.515 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS TECHNOLOGY INVESTMENT AGREEMENTS Pre-Award Business Evaluation Recipient Qualification § 603.515 Qualification of a consortium. (a) A consortium...

  15. 24 CFR 943.118 - What is a consortium?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false What is a consortium? 943.118... DEVELOPMENT PUBLIC HOUSING AGENCY CONSORTIA AND JOINT VENTURES Consortia § 943.118 What is a consortium? A consortium consists of two or more PHAs that join together to perform planning, reporting, and...

  16. 24 CFR 943.118 - What is a consortium?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What is a consortium? 943.118... DEVELOPMENT PUBLIC HOUSING AGENCY CONSORTIA AND JOINT VENTURES Consortia § 943.118 What is a consortium? A consortium consists of two or more PHAs that join together to perform planning, reporting, and...

  17. 24 CFR 943.118 - What is a consortium?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false What is a consortium? 943.118... DEVELOPMENT PUBLIC HOUSING AGENCY CONSORTIA AND JOINT VENTURES Consortia § 943.118 What is a consortium? A consortium consists of two or more PHAs that join together to perform planning, reporting, and...

  18. 24 CFR 943.118 - What is a consortium?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false What is a consortium? 943.118... DEVELOPMENT PUBLIC HOUSING AGENCY CONSORTIA AND JOINT VENTURES Consortia § 943.118 What is a consortium? A consortium consists of two or more PHAs that join together to perform planning, reporting, and...

  19. Psychosocial development of full term singletons, born after preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) at preschool age and family functioning: a prospective case-controlled study and multi-informant approach.

    PubMed

    Winter, C; Van Acker, F; Bonduelle, M; Desmyttere, S; Nekkebroeck, J

    2015-05-01

    Do full term singletons born after preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) differ in their psychosocial functioning from children born after intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) and spontaneous conceived controls (SC)? The psychosocial maturation process of 5-6-year-old PGD children is comparable between the three conception groups (PGD, ICSI and SC). In general, a lot of research has been published regarding follow-up of children born after artificial reproductive technologies (ART), which mainly is reassuring. But the ART population itself is marked by broad diversity [IVF, ICSI, gamete donation, preimplantation genetic screening (PGS) or PGD] which complicates comparisons. Some literature concerning the socio-emotional development of PGD/PGS children is available and it suggests a normal maturation process. However, the complex reality of PGD families (e.g. safety of the technique and psychological burden of genetic histories) asks for an exclusive PGD sample with matched control groups and a multi-informant approach. Between April 2011 and May 2013, the psychosocial wellbeing of preschoolers and their families born after PGD was assessed in a prospective case-controlled, matched follow-up study, with a multi-informant approach. A group of 47 PGD, 50 ICSI and 55 SC 5-6-year-old children participated in a follow-up study performed at the Centre for Medical Genetics of the Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel (UZ Brussel). Assessments took place in the hospital and in kindergartens. Children performed the Bene-Anthony family relations test (FRT), yielding their perceptions upon family relationships. Parents and teachers completed the child behaviour checklist (CBCL) and Caregiver Teacher Report Form (C-/TRF), respectively. Parental and family functioning were measured by the NEO-FFi, the parenting stress index (PSI), the Greenberger Work-Parenting Investment Questionnaire and the Marlowe-Crowne Social Desirability Scale (MCSDS). Statistical analysis was performed by

  20. Midwest Nuclear Science and Engineering Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Wynn Volkert; Dr. Arvind Kumar; Dr. Bryan Becker; Dr. Victor Schwinke; Dr. Angel Gonzalez; Dr. DOuglas McGregor

    2010-12-08

    The objective of the Midwest Nuclear Science and Engineering Consortium (MNSEC) is to enhance the scope, quality and integration of educational and research capabilities of nuclear sciences and engineering (NS/E) programs at partner schools in support of the U.S. nuclear industry (including DOE laboratories). With INIE support, MNSEC had a productive seven years and made impressive progress in achieving these goals. Since the past three years have been no-cost-extension periods, limited -- but notable -- progress has been made in FY10. Existing programs continue to be strengthened and broadened at Consortium partner institutions. The enthusiasm generated by the academic, state, federal, and industrial communities for the MNSEC activities is reflected in the significant leveraging that has occurred for our programs.

  1. Overview of the Inland California Translational Consortium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malkas, Linda H.

    2017-05-01

    The mission of the Inland California Translational Consortium (ICTC), an independent research consortium comprising a unique hub of regional institutions (City of Hope [COH], California Institute of Technology [Caltech], Jet Propulsion Laboratory [JPL], University of California Riverside [UCR], and Claremont Colleges Keck Graduate Institute [KGI], is to institute a new paradigm within the academic culture to accelerate translation of innovative biomedical discoveries into clinical applications that positively affect human health and life. The ICTC actively supports clinical translational research as well as the implementation and advancement of novel education and training models for the translation of basic discoveries into workable products and practices that preserve and improve human health while training and educating at all levels of the workforce using innovative forward-thinking approaches.

  2. Developing a statewide nursing consortium, island style.

    PubMed

    Magnussen, Lois; Niederhauser, Victoria; Ono, Charlene K; Johnson, Nancy Katherine; Vogler, Joyce; Ceria-Ulep, Clementina D

    2013-02-01

    This article describes the transformational changes in the scope and pedagogy of nursing education within a state university system through the development of the Hawaii Statewide Nursing Consortium (HSNC) curriculum. Modeled after the Oregon Consortium for Nursing Education, the HSNC used a community-based participatory approach to develop the curriculum to support all students within the state who are eligible to earn a baccalaureate degree. The curriculum was designed as a long-term solution to the anticipated shortage of nurses to care for Hawaii's diverse population. It is also an effort to increase capacity in schools of nursing by making the best use of resources in the delivery of a baccalaureate curriculum that offers exit opportunities after the completion of an associate degree. Finally, it provides new ways of educating students who will be better prepared to meet Hawaii's health needs.

  3. Massachusetts Institute of Technology Consortium Agreement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-03-01

    This is the third progress report of the M.I.T. Home Automation and Healthcare Consortium-Phase Two. It covers majority of the new findings, concepts...research projects of home automation and healthcare, ranging from human modeling, patient monitoring, and diagnosis to new sensors and actuators, physical...aids, human-machine interface and home automation infrastructure. This report contains several patentable concepts, algorithms, and designs.

  4. Midwest superconductivity consortium. 1993 Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    The Midwest Superconductivity Consortium, MISCON, in the fourth year of operations further strengthened its mission to advance the science and understanding of high T{sub c} superconductivity. The goals of the organization and the individual projects continue to reflect the current needs for new knowledge in the field and the unique capabilities of the institutions involved. Group efforts and cooperative laboratory interactions to achieve the greatest possible synergy under the Consortium continue to be emphasized. Industrial affiliations coupled with technology transfer initiatives were expanded. Activities of the participants during the past year achieved an interactive and high level of performance. The number of notable achievements in the field contributed by Consortium investigators increased. The programmatic research continues to focus upon key materials-related problems in two areas. The first area has a focus upon {open_quotes}Synthesis and Processing{close_quotes} while the second is centered around {open_quotes}Limiting Features in Transport Properties of High T{sub c} Materials{close_quotes}.

  5. Removal of triphenylmethane dyes by bacterial consortium.

    PubMed

    Cheriaa, Jihane; Khaireddine, Monia; Rouabhia, Mahmoud; Bakhrouf, Amina

    2012-01-01

    A new consortium of four bacterial isolates (Agrobacterium radiobacter; Bacillus spp.; Sphingomonas paucimobilis, and Aeromonas hydrophila)-(CM-4) was used to degrade and to decolorize triphenylmethane dyes. All bacteria were isolated from activated sludge extracted from a wastewater treatment station of a dyeing industry plant. Individual bacterial isolates exhibited a remarkable color-removal capability against crystal violet (50 mg/L) and malachite green (50 mg/L) dyes within 24 h. Interestingly, the microbial consortium CM-4 shows a high decolorizing percentage for crystal violet and malachite green, respectively, 91% and 99% within 2 h. The rate of chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal increases after 24 h, reaching 61.5% and 84.2% for crystal violet and malachite green, respectively. UV-Visible absorption spectra, FTIR analysis and the inspection of bacterial cells growth indicated that color removal by the CM-4 was due to biodegradation. Evaluation of mutagenicity by using Salmonella typhimurium test strains, TA98 and TA100 studies revealed that the degradation of crystal violet and malachite green by CM-4 did not lead to mutagenic products. Altogether, these results demonstrated the usefulness of the bacterial consortium in the treatment of the textile dyes.

  6. Removal of Triphenylmethane Dyes by Bacterial Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Cheriaa, Jihane; Khaireddine, Monia; Rouabhia, Mahmoud; Bakhrouf, Amina

    2012-01-01

    A new consortium of four bacterial isolates (Agrobacterium radiobacter; Bacillus spp.; Sphingomonas paucimobilis, and Aeromonas hydrophila)-(CM-4) was used to degrade and to decolorize triphenylmethane dyes. All bacteria were isolated from activated sludge extracted from a wastewater treatment station of a dyeing industry plant. Individual bacterial isolates exhibited a remarkable color-removal capability against crystal violet (50 mg/L) and malachite green (50 mg/L) dyes within 24 h. Interestingly, the microbial consortium CM-4 shows a high decolorizing percentage for crystal violet and malachite green, respectively, 91% and 99% within 2 h. The rate of chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal increases after 24 h, reaching 61.5% and 84.2% for crystal violet and malachite green, respectively. UV-Visible absorption spectra, FTIR analysis and the inspection of bacterial cells growth indicated that color removal by the CM-4 was due to biodegradation. Evaluation of mutagenicity by using Salmonella typhimurium test strains, TA98 and TA100 studies revealed that the degradation of crystal violet and malachite green by CM-4 did not lead to mutagenic products. Altogether, these results demonstrated the usefulness of the bacterial consortium in the treatment of the textile dyes. PMID:22623907

  7. Reuse at the Software Productivity Consortium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, David M.

    1989-01-01

    The Software Productivity Consortium is sponsored by 14 aerospace companies as a developer of software engineering methods and tools. Software reuse and prototyping are currently the major emphasis areas. The Methodology and Measurement Project in the Software Technology Exploration Division has developed some concepts for reuse which they intend to develop into a synthesis process. They have identified two approaches to software reuse: opportunistic and systematic. The assumptions underlying the systematic approach, phrased as hypotheses, are the following: the redevelopment hypothesis, i.e., software developers solve the same problems repeatedly; the oracle hypothesis, i.e., developers are able to predict variations from one redevelopment to others; and the organizational hypothesis, i.e., software must be organized according to behavior and structure to take advantage of the predictions that the developers make. The conceptual basis for reuse includes: program families, information hiding, abstract interfaces, uses and information hiding hierarchies, and process structure. The primary reusable software characteristics are black-box descriptions, structural descriptions, and composition and decomposition based on program families. Automated support can be provided for systematic reuse, and the Consortium is developing a prototype reuse library and guidebook. The software synthesis process that the Consortium is aiming toward includes modeling, refinement, prototyping, reuse, assessment, and new construction.

  8. Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium (PIDTC) Report

    PubMed Central

    Griffith, Linda M.; Cowan, Morton J.; Notarangelo, Luigi D.; Kohn, Donald B.; Puck, Jennifer M.; Pai, Sung-Yun; Ballard, Barbara; Bauer, Sarah C.; Bleesing, Jack J. H.; Boyle, Marcia; Brower, Amy; Buckley, Rebecca H.; van der Burg, Mirjam; Burroughs, Lauri M.; Candotti, Fabio; Cant, Andrew J.; Chatila, Talal; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte; Dinauer, Mary C.; Dvorak, Christopher C.; Filipovich, Alexandra H.; Fleisher, Thomas A.; Gaspar, Hubert Bobby; Gungor, Tayfun; Haddad, Elie; Hovermale, Emily; Huang, Faith; Hurley, Alan; Hurley, Mary; Iyengar, Sumathi; Kang, Elizabeth M.; Logan, Brent R.; Long-Boyle, Janel R.; Malech, Harry L.; McGhee, Sean A.; Modell, Fred; Modell, Vicki; Ochs, Hans D.; O'Reilly, Richard J.; Parkman, Robertson; Rawlings, David J.; Routes, John M.; Shearer, William T.; Small, Trudy N.; Smith, Heather; Sullivan, Kathleen E.; Szabolcs, Paul; Thrasher, Adrian; Torgerson, Troy R.; Veys, Paul; Weinberg, Kenneth; Zuniga-Pflucker, Juan Carlos

    2013-01-01

    The Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium (PIDTC) is a network of 33 centers in North America that study the treatment of rare and severe primary immunodeficiency diseases (PID). Current protocols address the natural history of patients treated for Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (SCID), Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome and Chronic Granulomatous Disease through retrospective, prospective and cross-sectional studies. The PIDTC additionally seeks to: encourage training of junior investigators; establish partnerships with European and other International colleagues; work with patient advocacy groups to promote community awareness; and conduct pilot demonstration projects. Future goals include the conduct of prospective treatment studies to determine optimal therapies for PID. To date, the PIDTC has funded two pilot projects: newborn screening for SCID in Navajo Native Americans; and B cell reconstitution in SCID patients following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Ten junior investigators have received grant awards. The PIDTC Annual Scientific Workshop has brought together consortium members, outside speakers, patient advocacy groups, and young investigators and trainees to report progress of the protocols and discuss common interests and goals, including new scientific developments and future directions of clinical research. Here we report the progress of the PIDTC to date, highlights of the first two PIDTC workshops, and consideration of future consortium objectives. PMID:24139498

  9. Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium (PIDTC) report.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Linda M; Cowan, Morton J; Notarangelo, Luigi D; Kohn, Donald B; Puck, Jennifer M; Pai, Sung-Yun; Ballard, Barbara; Bauer, Sarah C; Bleesing, Jack J H; Boyle, Marcia; Brower, Amy; Buckley, Rebecca H; van der Burg, Mirjam; Burroughs, Lauri M; Candotti, Fabio; Cant, Andrew J; Chatila, Talal; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte; Dinauer, Mary C; Dvorak, Christopher C; Filipovich, Alexandra H; Fleisher, Thomas A; Bobby Gaspar, Hubert; Gungor, Tayfun; Haddad, Elie; Hovermale, Emily; Huang, Faith; Hurley, Alan; Hurley, Mary; Iyengar, Sumathi; Kang, Elizabeth M; Logan, Brent R; Long-Boyle, Janel R; Malech, Harry L; McGhee, Sean A; Modell, Fred; Modell, Vicki; Ochs, Hans D; O'Reilly, Richard J; Parkman, Robertson; Rawlings, David J; Routes, John M; Shearer, William T; Small, Trudy N; Smith, Heather; Sullivan, Kathleen E; Szabolcs, Paul; Thrasher, Adrian; Torgerson, Troy R; Veys, Paul; Weinberg, Kenneth; Zuniga-Pflucker, Juan Carlos

    2014-02-01

    The Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium (PIDTC) is a network of 33 centers in North America that study the treatment of rare and severe primary immunodeficiency diseases. Current protocols address the natural history of patients treated for severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, and chronic granulomatous disease through retrospective, prospective, and cross-sectional studies. The PIDTC additionally seeks to encourage training of junior investigators, establish partnerships with European and other International colleagues, work with patient advocacy groups to promote community awareness, and conduct pilot demonstration projects. Future goals include the conduct of prospective treatment studies to determine optimal therapies for primary immunodeficiency diseases. To date, the PIDTC has funded 2 pilot projects: newborn screening for SCID in Navajo Native Americans and B-cell reconstitution in patients with SCID after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Ten junior investigators have received grant awards. The PIDTC Annual Scientific Workshop has brought together consortium members, outside speakers, patient advocacy groups, and young investigators and trainees to report progress of the protocols and discuss common interests and goals, including new scientific developments and future directions of clinical research. Here we report the progress of the PIDTC to date, highlights of the first 2 PIDTC workshops, and consideration of future consortium objectives.

  10. CFD parametric study of consortium impeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Gary C.; Chen, Y. S.; Garcia, Roberto; Williams, Robert W.

    1993-07-01

    Current design of high performance turbopumps for rocket engines requires effective and robust analytical tools to provide design impact in a productive manner. The main goal of this study is to develop a robust and effective computational fluid dynamics (CFD) pump model for general turbopump design and analysis applications. A Finite Difference Navier-Stokes flow solver, FDNS, which includes the extended k-epsilon turbulence model and appropriate moving interface boundary conditions, was developed to analyze turbulent flows in turbomachinery devices. A second-order central difference scheme plus adaptive dissipation terms was employed in the FDNS code, along with a predictor plus multi-corrector pressure-based solution procedure. The multi-zone, multi-block capability allows the FDNS code to efficiently solve flow fields with complicated geometry. The FDNS code has been benchmarked by analyzing the pump consortium inducer, and it provided satisfactory results. In the present study, a CFD parametric study of the pump consortium impeller was conducted using the FDNS code. The pump consortium impeller, with partial blades, is a new design concept of the advanced rocket engines. The parametric study was to analyze the baseline design of the consortium impeller and its modification which utilizes TANDEM blades. In the present study, the TANDEM blade configuration of the consortium impeller considers cut full blades for about one quarter chord length from the leading edge and clocks the leading edge portion with an angle of 7.5 or 22.5 degrees. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the effect and trend of the TANDEM blade modification and provide the result as a design guideline. A 3-D flow analysis, with a 103 x 23 x 30 mesh grid system and with the inlet flow conditions measured by Rocketdyne, was performed for the baseline consortium impeller. The numerical result shows that the mass flow rate splits through various blade passages are relatively uniform

  11. CFD Parametric Study of Consortium Impeller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Gary C.; Chen, Y. S.; Garcia, Roberto; Williams, Robert W.

    1993-01-01

    Current design of high performance turbopumps for rocket engines requires effective and robust analytical tools to provide design impact in a productive manner. The main goal of this study is to develop a robust and effective computational fluid dynamics (CFD) pump model for general turbopump design and analysis applications. A Finite Difference Navier-Stokes flow solver, FDNS, which includes the extended k-epsilon turbulence model and appropriate moving interface boundary conditions, was developed to analyze turbulent flows in turbomachinery devices. A second-order central difference scheme plus adaptive dissipation terms was employed in the FDNS code, along with a predictor plus multi-corrector pressure-based solution procedure. The multi-zone, multi-block capability allows the FDNS code to efficiently solve flow fields with complicated geometry. The FDNS code has been benchmarked by analyzing the pump consortium inducer, and it provided satisfactory results. In the present study, a CFD parametric study of the pump consortium impeller was conducted using the FDNS code. The pump consortium impeller, with partial blades, is a new design concept of the advanced rocket engines. The parametric study was to analyze the baseline design of the consortium impeller and its modification which utilizes TANDEM blades. In the present study, the TANDEM blade configuration of the consortium impeller considers cut full blades for about one quarter chord length from the leading edge and clocks the leading edge portion with an angle of 7.5 or 22.5 degrees. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the effect and trend of the TANDEM blade modification and provide the result as a design guideline. A 3-D flow analysis, with a 103 x 23 x 30 mesh grid system and with the inlet flow conditions measured by Rocketdyne, was performed for the baseline consortium impeller. The numerical result shows that the mass flow rate splits through various blade passages are relatively uniform

  12. Northeast Artificial Intelligence Consortium (NAIC). Volume 1. Executive Summary

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-12-01

    Consortium ( NAIC ) I Volker Weiss and James F. Brule" APPROVED FORPUL/RELEAS" DI/UTION UN.IMI/ED This effort was funded partially by the Laboratory...PERFORMING ORGANIZATION Northeast Artificial Intelligence Consortium ( NAIC ) REPORT NUMBER Science & Technology Center, Rm 2-296 N/A 111 College...Approved for public release; distribution unlimited. 13. ABSTRACT(MPau* = w" The Northeast Artificial Intelligence Consortium ( NAIC ) was created by the Air

  13. International Cancer Proteogenome Consortium | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    The International Cancer Proteogenome Consortium (ICPC), is a voluntary scientific organization that provides a forum for collaboration among some of the world's leading cancer and proteogenomic research centers.

  14. International Robotic Radical Cystectomy Consortium: A way forward.

    PubMed

    Raza, Syed Johar; Field, Erinn; Kibel, Adam S; Mottrie, Alex; Weizer, Alon Z; Wagner, Andrew; Hemal, Ashok K; Scherr, Douglas S; Schanne, Francis; Gaboardi, Franco; Wu, Guan; Peabody, James O; Koauk, Jihad; Redorta, Joan Palou; Pattaras, John G; Rha, Koon-Ho; Richstone, Lee; Balbay, M Derya; Menon, Mani; Hayn, Mathew; Stoeckle, Micheal; Wiklund, Peter; Dasgupta, Prokar; Pruthi, Raj; Ghavamian, Reza; Khan, Shamim; Siemer, Stephan; Maatman, Thomas; Wilson, Timothy; Poulakis, Vassilis; Wilding, Greg; Guru, Khurshid A

    2014-07-01

    Robot-assisted radical cystectomy (RARC) is an emerging operative alternative to open surgery for the management of invasive bladder cancer. Studies from single institutions provide limited data due to the small number of patients. In order to better understand the related outcomes, a world-wide consortium was established in 2006 of patients undergoing RARC, called the International Robotic Cystectomy Consortium (IRCC). Thus far, the IRCC has reported its findings on various areas of operative interest and continues to expand its capacity to include other operative modalities and transform it into the International Radical Cystectomy Consortium. This article summarizes the findings of the IRCC and highlights the future direction of the consortium.

  15. Latest Developments of the Isprs Student Consortium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detchev, I.; Kanjir, U.; Reyes, S. R.; Miyazaki, H.; Aktas, A. F.

    2016-06-01

    The International Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing (ISPRS) Student Consortium (SC) is a network for young professionals studying or working within the fields of photogrammetry, remote sensing, Geographical Information Systems (GIS), and other related geo-spatial sciences. The main goal of the network is to provide means for information exchange for its young members and thus help promote and integrate youth into the ISPRS. Over the past four years the Student Consortium has successfully continued to fulfil its mission in both formal and informal ways. The formal means of communication of the SC are its website, newsletter, e-mail announcements and summer schools, while its informal ones are multiple social media outlets and various social activities during student related events. The newsletter is published every three to four months and provides both technical and experiential content relevant for the young people in the ISPRS. The SC has been in charge or at least has helped with organizing one or more summer schools every year. The organization's e-mail list has over 1,100 subscribers, its website hosts over 1,300 members from 100 countries across the entire globe, and its public Facebook group currently has over 4,500 joined visitors, who connect among one another and share information relevant for their professional careers. These numbers show that the Student Consortium has grown into a significant online-united community. The paper will present the organization's on-going and past activities for the last four years, its current priorities and a strategic plan and aspirations for the future four-year period.

  16. Midwest Superconductivity Consortium: 1994 Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1995-01-01

    The mission of the Midwest Superconductivity Consortium, MISCON, is to advance the science and understanding of high {Tc} superconductivity. During the past year, 27 projects produced over 123 talks and 139 publications. Group activities and interactions involved 2 MISCON group meetings (held in August and January); with the second MISCON Workshop held in August; 13 external speakers; 79 collaborations (with universities, industry, Federal laboratories, and foreign research centers); and 48 exchanges of samples and/or measurements. Research achievements this past year focused on understanding the effects of processing phenomena on structure-property interrelationships and the fundamental nature of transport properties in high-temperature superconductors.

  17. Document delivery by the Jupiter Library Consortium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wessels, Robert H. A.

    1994-01-01

    The Jupiter library consortium consists of 4 of the leading libraries in the Netherlands. During 1993 Jupiter received 600,000 requests for copies of journal articles, or 70 percent of all external article requests in the Netherlands. Over 90 percent of the requested documents were delivered from a collection of 40,000 current international journal subscriptions. Jupiter and its affiliate libraries are non-profit organizations belonging to, and serving, the scientific and technical research community. The usage of the current journal collection of the libraries was analyzed to improve the cost/benefit ratio.

  18. Consortium for materials development in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    During fiscal 1993, the Consortium for Materials Development in Space (CMDS) maintained the organizational structure and project orientation established in prior years. The commercial objectives are improved materials, biomedical applications, and infrastructure and support hardware. Projects include nonlinear optical materials; space materials (specifically polymer foam/films, atomic oxygen and high temperature superconductors); alloyed and blended materials: sintered and alloyed materials; polymer and carbonate blends; electrodeposition; organic separation; materials dispersion and biodynamics; space carriers: Consort, COMET support, Spacehab utilization; and flight services: accelerometers, CMIX, USEC, ORSEP, and Space Experiment Facility (SEF).

  19. Consortium for materials development in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The status of the Consortium for Materials Development in Space (CMDS) is reviewed. Individual CMDS materials projects and flight opportunities on suborbital and orbital carriers are outlined. Projects include: surface coatings and catalyst production; non-linear optical organic materials; physical properties of immiscible polymers; nuclear track detectors; powdered metal sintering; iron-carbon solidification; high-temperature superconductors; physical vapor transport crystal growth; materials preparation and longevity in hyperthermal oxygen; foam formation; measurement of the microgravity environment; and commercial management of space fluids.

  20. External RNA Controls Consortium Beta Version Update.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hangnoh; Pine, P Scott; McDaniel, Jennifer; Salit, Marc; Oliver, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Spike-in RNAs are valuable controls for a variety of gene expression measurements. The External RNA Controls Consortium developed test sets that were used in a number of published reports. Here we provide an authoritative table that summarizes, updates, and corrects errors in the test version that ultimately resulted in the certified Standard Reference Material 2374. We have noted existence of anti-sense RNA controls in the material, corrected sub-pool memberships, and commented on control RNAs that displayed inconsistent behavior.

  1. University Research Consortium annual review meeting program

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-01

    This brochure presents the program for the first annual review meeting of the University Research Consortium (URC) of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). INEL is a multiprogram laboratory with a distinctive role in applied engineering. It also conducts basic science research and development, and complex facility operations. The URC program consists of a portfolio of research projects funded by INEL and conducted at universities in the United States. In this program, summaries and participant lists for each project are presented as received from the principal investigators.

  2. Macrophages programmed by apoptotic cells inhibit epithelial-mesenchymal transition in lung alveolar epithelial cells via PGE2, PGD2, and HGF

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Young-So; Lee, Ye-Ji; Choi, Youn-Hee; Park, Young Mi; Kang, Jihee Lee

    2016-01-01

    Apoptotic cell clearance results in the release of growth factors and the action of signaling molecules involved in tissue homeostasis maintenance. Here, we investigated whether and how macrophages programmed by apoptotic cells inhibit the TGF-β1-induced Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) process in lung alveolar epithelial cells. Treatment with conditioned medium derived from macrophages exposed to apoptotic cells, but not viable or necrotic cells, inhibited TGF-β1-induced EMT, including loss of E-cadherin, synthesis of N-cadherin and α-smooth muscle actin, and induction of EMT-activating transcription factors, such as Snail1/2, Zeb1/2, and Twist1. Exposure of macrophages to cyclooxygenase (COX-2) inhibitors (NS-398 and COX-2 siRNA) or RhoA/Rho kinase inhibitors (Y-27632 and RhoA siRNA) and LA-4 cells to antagonists of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) receptor (EP4 [AH-23848]), PGD2 receptors (DP1 [BW-A868C] and DP2 [BAY-u3405]), or the hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) receptor c-Met (PHA-665752), reversed EMT inhibition by the conditioned medium. Additionally, we found that apoptotic cell instillation inhibited bleomycin-mediated EMT in primary mouse alveolar type II epithelial cells in vivo. Our data suggest a new model for epithelial cell homeostasis, by which the anti-EMT programming of macrophages by apoptotic cells may control the progressive fibrotic reaction via the production of potent paracrine EMT inhibitors. PMID:26875548

  3. The COPD Biomarker Qualification Consortium (CBQC).

    PubMed

    Casaburi, Richard; Celli, Bartolome; Crapo, James; Criner, Gerard; Croxton, Thomas; Gaw, Alasdair; Jones, Paul; Kline-Leidy, Nancy; Lomas, David A; Merrill, Debora; Polkey, Michael; Rennard, Stephen; Sciurba, Frank; Tal-Singer, Ruth; Stockley, Robert; Turino, Gerry; Vestbo, Jorgen; Walsh, John

    2013-06-01

    Knowledge about the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has advanced dramatically over the last 30 years. Unfortunately, this has had little impact in terms of new treatments. Over the same time frame, only one new class of medication for COPD has been introduced. Even worse, the rate at which new treatments are being developed is slowing. The development of new tools for the assessment of new treatments has not kept pace with understanding of the disease. In part, this is because drug development tools require a regulatory review, and no interested party has been in a position to undertake such a process. In order to facilitate the development of novel tools to assess new treatments, the Food and Drug Administration, in collaboration with the COPD Foundation, the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute and scientists from the pharmaceutical industry and academia conducted a workshop to survey the available information that could contribute to new tools. Based on this, a collaborative project, the COPD Biomarkers Qualification Consortium, was initiated. The Consortium in now actively preparing integrated data sets from existing resources that can address the problem of drug development tools for COPD.

  4. Overview of the carbon products consortium (CPC)

    SciTech Connect

    Irwin, C.L.

    1996-08-01

    The Carbon Products Consortium (CPC) is an industry, university, government cooperative research team which has evolved over the past seven years to produce and evaluate coal-derived feedstocks for carbon products. The members of the Carbon Products Consortium are UCAR Carbon Company, Koppers Industries, CONOCO, Aluminum Company of America, AMOCO Polymers, and West Virginia University. The Carbon and Insulation Materials Technology Group at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Fiber Materials Inc., and BASF Corporation are affiliates of the CPC. The initial work on coal-derived nuclear graphites was supported by a grant to WVU, UCAR Carbon, and ORNL from the U.S. DOE New Production Reactor program. More recently, the CPC program has been supported through the Fossil Energy Materials program and through PETC`s Liquefaction program. The coal processing technologies involve hydrogenation, extraction by solvents such as N-methyl pyrolidone and toluene, material blending, and calcination. The breadth of carbon science expertise and manufacturing capability available in the CPC enables it to address virtually all research and development issues of importance to the carbon products industry.

  5. Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium (PIDTC) update.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Linda M; Cowan, Morton J; Notarangelo, Luigi D; Kohn, Donald B; Puck, Jennifer M; Shearer, William T; Burroughs, Lauri M; Torgerson, Troy R; Decaluwe, Hélène; Haddad, Elie

    2016-08-01

    The Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium (PIDTC) is a collaboration of 41 North American centers studying therapy for rare primary immune deficiency diseases (PIDs), including severe combined immune deficiency (SCID), Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS), and chronic granulomatous disease (CGD). An additional 3 European centers have partnered with the PIDTC to study CGD. Natural history protocols of the PIDTC analyze outcomes of treatment for rare PIDs in multicenter longitudinal retrospective, prospective, and cross-sectional studies. Since 2009, participating centers have enrolled more than 800 subjects on PIDTC protocols for SCID, and enrollment in the studies on WAS and CGD is underway. Four pilot projects have been funded, and 12 junior investigators have received fellowship awards. Important publications of the consortium describe the outcomes of hematopoietic cell transplantation for SCID during 2000-2009, diagnostic criteria for SCID, and the pilot project of newborn screening for SCID in the Navajo Nation. The PIDTC Annual Scientific Workshops provide an opportunity to strengthen collaborations with junior investigators, patient advocacy groups, and international colleagues. Funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and the Office of Rare Diseases Research, National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, the PIDTC has recently received renewal for another 5 years. Here we review accomplishments of the group, projects underway, highlights of recent workshops, and challenges for the future.

  6. Consortium for Petroleum & Natural Gas Stripper Wells

    SciTech Connect

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2006-12-31

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), established a national industry-driven Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that is focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. The SWC represents a partnership between U.S. petroleum and natural gas producers, trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the NETL. This document serves as the eleventh quarterly technical progress report for the SWC. Key activities for this reporting period included: (1) Organizing and hosting the Fall SWC Technology Transfer Workshop for the northeastern U.S., in Pittsburgh, PA, on November 9, 2006, and organizing and identifying projects to exhibit during the SWC/Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC) joint reception on November 8, 2006; (2) Distributing a paper copy of the Texas Tech 2004 Final Report and a revised, complete compact disc of all 2004 final reports; (3) Invoicing current and potential members for FY2007; (4) Soliciting nominations for the 2007-2008 Executive Council seats; and (5) Communications and outreach.

  7. 25 CFR 1000.283 - If the Tribe/Consortium or Tribe's/Consortium's employee receives a summons and/or a complaint...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false If the Tribe/Consortium or Tribe's/Consortium's employee receives a summons and/or a complaint alleging a tort covered by FTCA, what should the Tribe/Consortium do...-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ACT Federal Tort Claims § 1000.283 If the Tribe/Consortium or...

  8. 25 CFR 1000.283 - If the Tribe/Consortium or Tribe's/Consortium's employee receives a summons and/or a complaint...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false If the Tribe/Consortium or Tribe's/Consortium's employee receives a summons and/or a complaint alleging a tort covered by FTCA, what should the Tribe/Consortium do...-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ACT Federal Tort Claims § 1000.283 If the Tribe/Consortium or...

  9. 25 CFR 1000.283 - If the Tribe/Consortium or Tribe's/Consortium's employee receives a summons and/or a complaint...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false If the Tribe/Consortium or Tribe's/Consortium's employee receives a summons and/or a complaint alleging a tort covered by FTCA, what should the Tribe/Consortium do...-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ACT Federal Tort Claims § 1000.283 If the Tribe/Consortium or...

  10. 25 CFR 1000.283 - If the Tribe/Consortium or Tribe's/Consortium's employee receives a summons and/or a complaint...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false If the Tribe/Consortium or Tribe's/Consortium's employee receives a summons and/or a complaint alleging a tort covered by FTCA, what should the Tribe/Consortium do...-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ACT Federal Tort Claims § 1000.283 If the Tribe/Consortium or...

  11. Region 10 Tech Prep Consortium. Final Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beilke, Jayne; Dacey, Vickie

    The Tech Prep Region 10 Consortium in Indiana was formed to develop and expand the use of the Tech Prep model adopted by the state to all educational institutions in the region. Involving collaboration among postsecondary institutions, secondary schools, and business and industry within state regions, the consortium design involved three phases:…

  12. ICONE: An International Consortium of Neuro Endovascular Centres.

    PubMed

    Raymond, J; White, P; Kallmes, D F; Spears, J; Marotta, T; Roy, D; Guilbert, F; Weill, A; Nguyen, T; Molyneux, A J; Cloft, H; Cekirge, S; Saatci, I; Bracard, S; Meder, J F; Moret, J; Cognard, C; Qureshi, A I; Turk, A S; Berenstein, A

    2008-06-30

    The proliferation of new endovascular devices and therapeutic strategies calls for a prudentand rational evaluation of their clinical benefit. This evaluation must be done in an effective manner and in collaboration with industry. Such research initiative requires organisation a land methodological support to survive and thrive in a competitive environment. We propose the formation of an international consortium, an academic alliance committed to the pursuit of effective neurovascular therapies. Such a consortium would be dedicated to the designand execution of basic science, device developmentand clinical trials. The Consortium is owned and operated by its members. Members are international leaders in neurointerventional research and clinical practice. The Consortium brings competency, knowledge, and expertise to industry as well as to its membership across aspectrum of research initiatives such as: expedited review of clinical trials, protocol development, surveys and systematic reviews; laboratory expertise and support for research design and grant applications to public agencies. Once objectives and protocols are approved, the Consortium provides a stable network of centers capable of timely realization of clinical trials or pre clinical investigations in an optimal environment. The Consortium is a non-profit organization. The potential revenue generated from clientsponsored financial agreements will be redirected to the academic and research objectives of the organization. The Consortium wishes to work inconcert with industry, to support emerging trends in neurovascular therapeutic development. The Consortium is a realistic endeavour optimally structured to promote excellence through scientific appraisal of our treatments, and to accelerate technical progress while maximizing patients' safety and welfare.

  13. Policy Report of the Physician Consortium on Substance Abuse Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, David C.; Faggett, Walter L.

    This report contains the recommendations of the Physician Consortium for significantly improving medical education and training to enhance the physician's role in early identification, treatment, and prevention of substance abuse. In addition, the consortium subcommittees report on their examination of substance abuse treatment needs of ethnic and…

  14. A Consortium-based Research Education Program for Residents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neale, Anne Victoria; Pieper, David; Hammel, Ernest

    2000-01-01

    Reports on a consortium-based research education seminar program developed by the OHEP Center for Medical Education that presents a yearly research forum in which the best research projects from consortium members are presented by the resident-researchers, who compete for recognition and prize money. Of the 128 presentations to date 25 percent…

  15. Urban Consortium Energy Task Force - Year 21 Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    2003-04-01

    The Urban Consortium Energy Task Force (UCETF), comprised of representatives of large cities and counties in the United States, is a subgroup of the Urban Consortium, an organization of the nation's largest cities and counties joined together to identify, develop and deploy innovative approaches and technological solutions to pressing urban issues.

  16. The Consortium for Higher Education Tax Reform Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Postsecondary and Economic Success, 2014

    2014-01-01

    This White Paper presents the work of the Consortium for Higher Education Tax Reform, a partnership funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation as part of the second phase of its Reimagining Aid Design and Delivery (RADD) initiative. Consortium partners are the Center for Postsecondary and Economic Success at CLASP, the Education Trust, New…

  17. United States Participation in the Pacific Circle Consortium. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest Regional Educational Lab., Portland, OR.

    The goal of the Pacific Circle Project is to improve international and intercultural understanding among the people and nations of the Pacific. Consortium member countries are Australia, Canada, New Zealand, and the United States. Within the countries are chosen member institutions. Two major types of activities of the consortium are the exchange…

  18. 10 CFR 603.515 - Qualification of a consortium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Qualification of a consortium. 603.515 Section 603.515 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS TECHNOLOGY INVESTMENT AGREEMENTS Pre-Award... articles of collaboration, which sets out the rights and responsibilities of each consortium member. This...

  19. 10 CFR 603.515 - Qualification of a consortium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Qualification of a consortium. 603.515 Section 603.515 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS TECHNOLOGY INVESTMENT AGREEMENTS Pre-Award... articles of collaboration, which sets out the rights and responsibilities of each consortium member. This...

  20. 10 CFR 603.515 - Qualification of a consortium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Qualification of a consortium. 603.515 Section 603.515 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS TECHNOLOGY INVESTMENT AGREEMENTS Pre-Award... articles of collaboration, which sets out the rights and responsibilities of each consortium member. This...

  1. 10 CFR 603.515 - Qualification of a consortium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Qualification of a consortium. 603.515 Section 603.515 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS TECHNOLOGY INVESTMENT AGREEMENTS Pre-Award... articles of collaboration, which sets out the rights and responsibilities of each consortium member. This...

  2. 24 CFR 943.118 - What is a consortium?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... DEVELOPMENT PUBLIC HOUSING AGENCY CONSORTIA AND JOINT VENTURES Consortia § 943.118 What is a consortium? A... consortium also submits a joint PHA Plan. The lead agency collects the assistance funds from HUD that would... same fiscal year so that the applicable periods for submission and review of the joint PHA Plan are the...

  3. International Arid Lands Consortium: A synopsis of accomplishments

    Treesearch

    Peter F. Ffolliott; Jeffrey O. Dawson; James T. Fisher; Itshack Moshe; Timothy E. Fulbright; W. Carter Johnson; Paul Verburg; Muhammad Shatanawi; Jim P. M. Chamie

    2003-01-01

    The International Arid Lands Consortium (IALC) was established in 1990 to promote research, education, and training activities related to the development, management, and reclamation of arid and semiarid lands in the Southwestern United States, the Middle East, and elsewhere in the world. The Consortium supports the ecological sustainability and environmentally sound...

  4. Growth behind the Mirror: The Family Therapy Consortium's Group Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wendorf, Donald J.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Charts the development of the Family Therapy Consortium, a group that provides supervision and continuing education in family therapy and explores the peer supervision process at work in the consortium. The focus is on individual and group development, which are seen as complementary aspects of the same growth process. (Author/NRB)

  5. The virtual atomic and molecular data centre (VAMDC) consortium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubernet, M. L.; Antony, B. K.; Ba, Y. A.; Babikov, Yu L.; Bartschat, K.; Boudon, V.; Braams, B. J.; Chung, H.-K.; Daniel, F.; Delahaye, F.; Del Zanna, G.; de Urquijo, J.; Dimitrijević, M. S.; Domaracka, A.; Doronin, M.; Drouin, B. J.; Endres, C. P.; Fazliev, A. Z.; Gagarin, S. V.; Gordon, I. E.; Gratier, P.; Heiter, U.; Hill, C.; Jevremović, D.; Joblin, C.; Kasprzak, A.; Krishnakumar, E.; Leto, G.; Loboda, P. A.; Louge, T.; Maclot, S.; Marinković, B. P.; Markwick, A.; Marquart, T.; Mason, H. E.; Mason, N. J.; Mendoza, C.; Mihajlov, A. A.; Millar, T. J.; Moreau, N.; Mulas, G.; Pakhomov, Yu; Palmeri, P.; Pancheshnyi, S.; Perevalov, V. I.; Piskunov, N.; Postler, J.; Quinet, P.; Quintas-Sánchez, E.; Ralchenko, Yu; Rhee, Y.-J.; Rixon, G.; Rothman, L. S.; Roueff, E.; Ryabchikova, T.; Sahal-Bréchot, S.; Scheier, P.; Schlemmer, S.; Schmitt, B.; Stempels, E.; Tashkun, S.; Tennyson, J.; Tyuterev, Vl G.; Vujčić, V.; Wakelam, V.; Walton, N. A.; Zatsarinny, O.; Zeippen, C. J.; Zwölf, C. M.

    2016-04-01

    The Virtual Atomic and Molecular Data Centre (VAMDC) Consortium is a worldwide consortium which federates atomic and molecular databases through an e-science infrastructure and an organisation to support this activity. About 90% of the inter-connected databases handle data that are used for the interpretation of astronomical spectra and for modelling in many fields of astrophysics. Recently the VAMDC Consortium has connected databases from the radiation damage and the plasma communities, as well as promoting the publication of data from Indian institutes. This paper describes how the VAMDC Consortium is organised for the optimal distribution of atomic and molecular data for scientific research. It is noted that the VAMDC Consortium strongly advocates that authors of research papers using data cite the original experimental and theoretical papers as well as the relevant databases. .

  6. The Black Rock Forest Consortium: A narrative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzzetto-More, Nicole Antoinette

    The Black Rock Forest is a 3,785-acre wilderness area whose richly forested landscape represents the splendor of the Hudson Valley Region of New York State. Although originally intended to become the home of wealthy banker James Stillman, it was his son Ernest whose love of conservation caused him to embrace the then new and revolutionary practice of sustainable forestry and establish Black Rock in 1928. Due to Ernest Stillman's foresight, the property was protected from development and bequeathed to Harvard University following his death for the establishment of an experimental forest. The modern environmental movement in America began when the Black Rock Forest was threatened with development by Consolidated Edison, and the people of the surrounding community banded together, battling tirelessly for over 17 years to stop the degradation of this historic forest. The outcome of this crusade marked a hallmark win for the environment leaving an illustrious and inveterate legacy. The campaign resulted in the watershed legislation the National Environmental Policy Act, the formation of several environmental advocacy groups, the creation of the Council on Environmental Quality of the Executive Office of the President, as well as set a precedent for communities to initiate and win cases against major corporations in order to safeguard natural resources. In the midst of the controversy it became apparent that alternative futures for the Forest needed to be explored. As a result of a committee report and one man's vision, the idea emerged to create a consortium that would purchase and steward the Forest. With a formation that took nearly fifteen years, the Black Rock Forest Consortium was formed, a unique amalgamation of K--12 public and private schools, colleges and universities, and science and cultural centers that successfully collaborate to enhance scientific research, environmental conservation, and education. The Consortium works to bridge the gaps between learners

  7. Midwest Superconductivity Consortium. Progress report, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Bement, A.L. Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Mission of the Midwest Superconductivity Consortium, MISCON, is to advance the science and understanding of high Tc superconductivity. Programmatic research focuses upon key materials-related problems; principally, synthesis and processing and properties limiting transport phenomena. During the past year, 26 projects produced over 133 talks and 113 publications. publications. Two Master`s Degrees and one Ph.D. were granted to students working on MISCON projects. Group activities and interactions involved two MISCON group meetings (held in July and January), twenty external speakers, 36 collaborations, 10 exchanges of samples and/or measurements, and one (1) gift of equipment from industry. Research achievements this past year expanded our understanding of processing phenomena on structure property interrelationships and the fundamental nature of transport properties in high-temperature superconductors.

  8. The Russian/American Fuel Cell Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Sylwester, A.; Baker, R.; Krumpelt, M.

    1996-12-31

    The United States and Russia discovered a mutual interest in fuel cell development during a series of workshops designed to teach entrepreneurial skills to Russian nuclear weapon scientists and engineers to aid them in converting their skill to peaceful applications. The proposal for a Russian/American Fuel Cell Consortium was initiated at the third workshop held in Livermore, CA, in May 1994. Representatives from U.S. fuel cell industries, U.S. research institutes, Russian institutes and ministries, and U.S. national laboratories attended, including those from GAZPROM, the Russian natural gas company. GASPROM needs to provide power for telemetry, cathodic corrosion protection of gas lines, and gas line pumping power in remote areas, and estimates that it needs approximately seventy thousand 1.5 to 15 KW plants to do so. Since the workshop, several direct working relationships have developed between the Russian Nuclear Weapon Institutes and the U.S. fuel cell industry.

  9. Consortium for Petroleum & Natural Gas Stripper Wells

    SciTech Connect

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2007-03-31

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), established a national industry-driven Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that is focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. The SWC represents a partnership between U.S. petroleum and natural gas producers, trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the NETL. This document serves as the twelfth quarterly technical progress report for the SWC. Key activities for this reporting period included: (1) Drafting and releasing the 2007 Request for Proposals; (2) Securing a meeting facility, scheduling and drafting plans for the 2007 Spring Proposal Meeting; (3) Conducting elections and announcing representatives for the four 2007-2008 Executive Council seats; (4) 2005 Final Project Reports; (5) Personal Digital Assistant Workshops scheduled; and (6) Communications and outreach.

  10. Midwest Superconductivity Consortium: 1995 Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-01

    The mission of the Midwest Superconductivity Consortium, MISCON, is to advance the science and understanding of high Tc superconductivity. During the past year, 26 projects produced over 133 talks and 127 publications. Three Master`s Degrees and 9 Doctor`s of Philosophy Degrees were granted to students working on MISCON projects. Group activities and interactions involved 2 MISCON group meetings (held in January and July); the third MISCON Summer School held in July; 12 external speakers; 81 collaborations (with universities, industry, Federal laboratories, and foreign research centers); and 54 exchanges of samples and/or measurements. Research achievements this past year focused on understanding the effects of processing phenomena on structure-property interrelationships and the fundamental nature of transport properties in high-temp superconductors.

  11. The Bholghati (howardite) consortium - An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laul, J.-C.

    1990-01-01

    The Bholghati (howardite) has had a complex history. The consortium studies indicate that eucrite clasts show evidence of rapid crystallization followed by prolonged subsolidus annealing. Dark clasts are carbonaceous CM2 type. Bholghati bulk composition can be modeled by 55 percent eucritic, 45 percent diogenitic, and 3 percent dark clast components. The eucritic clasts show a LREE depleted pattern relative to HREEs, which is not typical of a normal eucrite. The LREE depletion requires two-stage melting from a chondritic source. The Bholghati evolution scenario is (1) early multiple magmatic events (4.53 Ga ago), producing eucrites and diogenites; (2) a metamorphic event (2-3 Ga ago) and prolonged subsolidus annealing; (3) fragmentation and low-temperature mixing of eucrites and diogenites; (4) low-velocity impact and admixing of carbonaceous material; (5) disruption of regolith and ejection of Bholghati 10-17 Ma ago; and (6) Bholghati fell on the earth in 1905.

  12. The International Human Epigenome Consortium Data Portal.

    PubMed

    Bujold, David; Morais, David Anderson de Lima; Gauthier, Carol; Côté, Catherine; Caron, Maxime; Kwan, Tony; Chen, Kuang Chung; Laperle, Jonathan; Markovits, Alexei Nordell; Pastinen, Tomi; Caron, Bryan; Veilleux, Alain; Jacques, Pierre-Étienne; Bourque, Guillaume

    2016-11-23

    The International Human Epigenome Consortium (IHEC) coordinates the production of reference epigenome maps through the characterization of the regulome, methylome, and transcriptome from a wide range of tissues and cell types. To define conventions ensuring the compatibility of datasets and establish an infrastructure enabling data integration, analysis, and sharing, we developed the IHEC Data Portal (http://epigenomesportal.ca/ihec). The portal provides access to >7,000 reference epigenomic datasets, generated from >600 tissues, which have been contributed by seven international consortia: ENCODE, NIH Roadmap, CEEHRC, Blueprint, DEEP, AMED-CREST, and KNIH. The portal enhances the utility of these reference maps by facilitating the discovery, visualization, analysis, download, and sharing of epigenomics data. The IHEC Data Portal is the official source to navigate through IHEC datasets and represents a strategy for unifying the distributed data produced by international research consortia.

  13. ZATPAC: a model consortium evaluates teen programs.

    PubMed

    Owen, Kathryn; Murphy, Dana; Parsons, Chris

    2009-09-01

    How do we advance the environmental literacy of young people, support the next generation of environmental stewards and increase the diversity of the leadership of zoos and aquariums? We believe it is through ongoing evaluation of zoo and aquarium teen programming and have founded a consortium to pursue those goals. The Zoo and Aquarium Teen Program Assessment Consortium (ZATPAC) is an initiative by six of the nation's leading zoos and aquariums to strengthen institutional evaluation capacity, model a collaborative approach toward assessing the impact of youth programs, and bring additional rigor to evaluation efforts within the field of informal science education. Since its beginning in 2004, ZATPAC has researched, developed, pilot-tested and implemented a pre-post program survey instrument designed to assess teens' knowledge of environmental issues, skills and abilities to take conservation actions, self-efficacy in environmental actions, and engagement in environmentally responsible behaviors. Findings from this survey indicate that teens who join zoo/aquarium programs are already actively engaged in many conservation behaviors. After participating in the programs, teens showed a statistically significant increase in their reported knowledge of conservation and environmental issues and their abilities to research, explain, and find resources to take action on conservation issues of personal concern. Teens also showed statistically significant increases pre-program to post-program for various conservation behaviors, including "I talk with my family and/or friends about things they can do to help the animals or the environment," "I save water...," "I save energy...," "When I am shopping I look for recycled products," and "I help with projects that restore wildlife habitat."

  14. [Activity of NTDs Drug-discovery Research Consortium].

    PubMed

    Namatame, Ichiji

    2016-01-01

    Neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) are an extremely important issue facing global health care. To improve "access to health" where people are unable to access adequate medical care due to poverty and weak healthcare systems, we have established two consortiums: the NTD drug discovery research consortium, and the pediatric praziquantel consortium. The NTD drug discovery research consortium, which involves six institutions from industry, government, and academia, as well as an international non-profit organization, is committed to developing anti-protozoan active compounds for three NTDs (Leishmaniasis, Chagas disease, and African sleeping sickness). Each participating institute will contribute their efforts to accomplish the following: selection of drug targets based on information technology, and drug discovery by three different approaches (in silico drug discovery, "fragment evolution" which is a unique drug designing method of Astellas Pharma, and phenotypic screening with Astellas' compound library). The consortium has established a brand new database (Integrated Neglected Tropical Disease Database; iNTRODB), and has selected target proteins for the in silico and fragment evolution drug discovery approaches. Thus far, we have identified a number of promising compounds that inhibit the target protein, and we are currently trying to improve the anti-protozoan activity of these compounds. The pediatric praziquantel consortium was founded in July 2012 to develop and register a new praziquantel pediatric formulation for the treatment of schistosomiasis. Astellas Pharma has been a core member in this consortium since its establishment, and has provided expertise and technology in the area of pediatric formulation development and clinical development.

  15. SEEA SOUTHEAST CONSORTIUM FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Block, Timothy; Ball, Kia; Fournier, Ashley

    2014-01-21

    In 2010 the Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance (SEEA) received a $20 million Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) under the U.S. Department of Energy’s Better Building Neighborhood Program (BBNP). This grant, funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, also included sub-grantees in 13 communities across the Southeast, known as the Southeast Consortium. The objective of this project was to establish a framework for energy efficiency retrofit programs to create models for replication across the Southeast and beyond. To achieve this goal, SEEA and its project partners focused on establishing infrastructure to develop and sustain the energy efficiency market in specific localities across the southeast. Activities included implementing minimum training standards and credentials for marketplace suppliers, educating and engaging homeowners on the benefits of energy efficiency through strategic marketing and outreach and addressing real or perceived financial barriers to investments in whole-home energy efficiency through a variety of financing mechanisms. The anticipated outcome of these activities would be best practice models for program design, marketing, financing, data collection and evaluation as well as increased market demand for energy efficiency retrofits and products. The Southeast Consortium’s programmatic impacts along with the impacts of the other BBNP grantees would further the progress towards the overall goal of energy efficiency market transformation. As the primary grantee SEEA served as the overall program administrator and provided common resources to the 13 Southeast Consortium sub-grantees including contracted services for contractor training, quality assurance testing, data collection, reporting and compliance. Sub-grantee programs were located in cities across eight states including Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Each sub

  16. Establishing an International Soil Modelling Consortium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vereecken, Harry; Schnepf, Andrea; Vanderborght, Jan

    2015-04-01

    -change-feedback processes, bridge basic soil science research and management, and facilitate the communication between science and society . To meet these challenges an international community effort is required, similar to initiatives in systems biology, hydrology, and climate and crop research. We therefore propose to establish an international soil modelling consortium with the aims of 1) bringing together leading experts in modelling soil processes within all major soil disciplines, 2) addressing major scientific gaps in describing key processes and their long term impacts with respect to the different functions and ecosystem services provided by soil, 3) intercomparing soil model performance based on standardized and harmonized data sets, 4) identifying interactions with other relevant platforms related to common data formats, protocols and ontologies, 5) developing new approaches to inverse modelling, calibration, and validation of soil models, 6) integrating soil modelling expertise and state of the art knowledge on soil processes in climate, land surface, ecological, crop and contaminant models, and 7) linking process models with new observation, measurement and data evaluation technologies for mapping and characterizing soil properties across scales. Our consortium will bring together modelers and experimental soil scientists at the forefront of new technologies and approaches to characterize soils. By addressing these aims, the consortium will contribute to improve the role of soil modeling as a knowledge dissemination instrument in addressing key global issues and stimulate the development of translational research activities. This presentation will provide a compelling case for this much-needed effort, with a focus on tangible benefits to the scientific and food security communities.

  17. Consortium for Petroleum & Natural Gas Stripper Wells

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, Joel

    2011-12-01

    The United States has more oil and gas wells than any other country. As of December 31, 2004, there were more than half a million producing oil wells in the United States. That is more than three times the combined total for the next three leaders: China, Canada, and Russia. The Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) is a partnership that includes domestic oil and gas producers, service and supply companies, trade associations, academia, the Department of Energy’s Strategic Center for Natural Gas and Oil (SCNGO) at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), and the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA). The Consortium was established in 2000. This report serves as a final technical report for the SWC activities conducted over the May 1, 2004 to December 1, 2011 timeframe. During this timeframe, the SWC worked with 173 members in 29 states and three international countries, to focus on the development of new technologies to benefit the U.S. stripper well industry. SWC worked with NETL to develop a nationwide request-for-proposal (RFP) process to solicit proposals from the U.S. stripper well industry to develop and/or deploy new technologies that would assist small producers in improving the production performance of their stripper well operations. SWC conducted eight rounds of funding. A total of 132 proposals were received. The proposals were compiled and distributed to an industry-driven SWC executive council and program sponsors for review. Applicants were required to make a formal technical presentation to the SWC membership, executive council, and program sponsors. After reviewing the proposals and listening to the presentations, the executive council made their funding recommendations to program sponsors. A total of 64 projects were selected for funding, of which 59 were fully completed. Penn State then worked with grant awardees to issue a subcontract for their approved work. SWC organized and hosted a total of 14 meetings

  18. Multi-University Southeast INIE Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Ayman Hawari; Nolan Hertel; Mohamed Al-Sheikhly; Laurence Miller; Abdel-Moeze Bayoumi; Ali Haghighat; Kenneth Lewis

    2010-12-29

    2 Project Summary: The Multi-University Southeast INIE Consortium (MUSIC) was established in response to the US Department of Energy’s (DOE) Innovations in Nuclear Infrastructure and Education (INIE) program. MUSIC was established as a consortium composed of academic members and national laboratory partners. The members of MUSIC are the nuclear engineering programs and research reactors of Georgia Institute of Technology (GIT), North Carolina State University (NCSU), University of Maryland (UMD), University of South Carolina (USC), and University of Tennessee (UTK). The University of Florida (UF), and South Carolina State University (SCSU) were added to the MUSIC membership in the second year. In addition, to ensure proper coordination between the academic community and the nation’s premier research and development centers in the fields of nuclear science and engineering, MUSIC created strategic partnerships with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) including the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) project and the Joint Institute for Neutron Scattering (JINS), and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). A partnership was also created with the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute (AFRRI) with the aim of utilizing their reactor in research if funding becomes available. Consequently, there are three university research reactors (URRs) within MUSIC, which are located at NCSU (1-MW PULSTAR), UMD (0.25-MW TRIGA) and UF (0.10-MW Argonaut), and the AFRRI reactor (1-MW TRIGA MARK F). The overall objectives of MUSIC are: a) Demonstrate that University Research Reactors (URR) can be used as modern and innovative instruments of research in the basic and applied sciences, which include applications in fundamental physics, materials science and engineering, nondestructive examination, elemental analysis, and contributions to research in the health and medical sciences, b) Establish a strong technical collaboration between the nuclear engineering

  19. 25 CFR 1000.310 - What information must the Tribe's/Consortium's response contain?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false What information must the Tribe's/Consortium's response.../Consortium's response contain? (a) The Tribe's/Consortium's response must indicate the specific measures that the Tribe/Consortium will take to eliminate the finding of imminent jeopardy. (b) If the...

  20. 25 CFR 1000.310 - What information must the Tribe's/Consortium's response contain?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What information must the Tribe's/Consortium's response.../Consortium's response contain? (a) The Tribe's/Consortium's response must indicate the specific measures that the Tribe/Consortium will take to eliminate the finding of imminent jeopardy. (b) If the...

  1. 25 CFR 1000.310 - What information must the Tribe's/Consortium's response contain?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false What information must the Tribe's/Consortium's response.../Consortium's response contain? (a) The Tribe's/Consortium's response must indicate the specific measures that the Tribe/Consortium will take to eliminate the finding of imminent jeopardy. (b) If the...

  2. 25 CFR 1000.310 - What information must the Tribe's/Consortium's response contain?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What information must the Tribe's/Consortium's response.../Consortium's response contain? (a) The Tribe's/Consortium's response must indicate the specific measures that the Tribe/Consortium will take to eliminate the finding of imminent jeopardy. (b) If the...

  3. 25 CFR 1000.310 - What information must the Tribe's/Consortium's response contain?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false What information must the Tribe's/Consortium's response.../Consortium's response contain? (a) The Tribe's/Consortium's response must indicate the specific measures that the Tribe/Consortium will take to eliminate the finding of imminent jeopardy. (b) If the...

  4. A Consortium Project to Improve Retention and the First Year of College: Results and Recommendations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cutright, Marc

    2006-01-01

    This article examines the operation and perceived effectiveness of a short-term, nine-community-college consortium, a consortium dedicated to the improvement of student retention and first-year education at each of the colleges in the consortium. The consortium was composed of Alabama community colleges, essentially during calendar year 2002. Its…

  5. Men of African Descent and Carcinoma of the Prostate Consortium

    Cancer.gov

    The Men of African Descent and Carcinoma of the Prostate Consortium collaborates on epidemiologic studies to address the high burden of prostate cancer and to understand the causes of etiology and outcomes among men of African ancestry.

  6. Telecommunications Training Consortium: A Working Relationship between Business and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacIntyre, Donald J.

    1984-01-01

    Describes a partnership between a number of corporations involved in telecommunications and Skyline College to develop an industry-specific technical training curriculum. Discusses other functions of the consortium such as fundraising and elements of a successful partnership. (SK)

  7. Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3)

    Cancer.gov

    Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium collaborates with three genomic facilities, epidemiologists, population geneticists, and biostatisticians from multiple institutions to study hormone-related gene variants and environmental factors in breast and prostate cancers.

  8. Pancreatic Cancer Detection Consortium (PCDC) | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Pancreatic Cancer Detection Consortium (PCDC) develops and tests new molecular and imagi | Develops and tests new molecular and imaging biomarkers to detect early stage PDAC and its precursor lesions.

  9. Epidemiology of Endometrial Cancer Consortium (E2C2)

    Cancer.gov

    The Epidemiology of Endometrial Cancer Consortium studies the etiology of this common cancer and build on resources from existing studies by combining data across studies in order to advance the understanding of the etiology of this disease.

  10. A Perspective from the National Consortium for Secondary STEM Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonds, Crystal

    2016-01-01

    This article addresses the role of National Consortium for Secondary STEM Schools in the process of data-informed decision-making for both improving and addressing achievement gaps in participatory specialized STEM high schools.

  11. Consortium--A New Direction for Staff Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cope, Adrienne B.

    1976-01-01

    The shared services and joint planning of the area-wide continuing education program of the Northwest Allegheny Hospitals Corporation (a Consortium of seven acute care and two rehabilitation centers in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania) are described. (LH)

  12. Regional Development and the European Consortium of Innovative Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Saskia Loer; Kokkeler, Ben; van der Sijde, P. C.

    2002-01-01

    The European Consortium of Innovative Universities is a network that shares information not just among universities but with affiliated incubators, research parks, and other regional entities. The learning network contributes to regional development.(JOW)

  13. National Consortium Supports Cities in Evaluating LED Streetlights

    SciTech Connect

    2013-09-30

    Fact sheet that introduces Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium, a group of municipalities, utilities, and energy efficiency organizations who are interested in making investments in LED street and area lighting.

  14. Genome Structure Gallery from the Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Structual Genomics Consortium

    DOE Data Explorer

    The TB Structural Genomics Consortium works with the structures of proteins from M. tuberculosis, analyzing these structures in the context of functional information that currently exists and that the Consortium generates. The database of linked structural and functional information constructed from this project will form a lasting basis for understanding M. tuberculosis pathogenesis and for structure-based drug design. The Consortium's structural and functional information is publicly available. The Structures Gallery makes more than 650 total structures available by PDB identifier. Some of these are not consortium targets, but all are viewable in 3D color and can be manipulated in various ways by Jmol, an open-source Java viewer for chemical structures in 3D from http://www.jmol.org/

  15. Consortium--A New Direction for Staff Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cope, Adrienne B.

    1976-01-01

    The shared services and joint planning of the area-wide continuing education program of the Northwest Allegheny Hospitals Corporation (a Consortium of seven acute care and two rehabilitation centers in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania) are described. (LH)

  16. A Perspective from the National Consortium for Secondary STEM Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonds, Crystal

    2016-01-01

    This article addresses the role of National Consortium for Secondary STEM Schools in the process of data-informed decision-making for both improving and addressing achievement gaps in participatory specialized STEM high schools.

  17. Consortium-Based Genetic Studies of Kawasaki Disease in Korea: Korean Kawasaki Disease Genetics Consortium.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong-Keuk; Hong, Young Mi; Jang, Gi Young; Yun, Sin Weon; Yu, Jeong Jin; Yoon, Kyung Lim; Lee, Kyung-Yil; Kil, Hong-Rang

    2015-11-01

    In order to perform large-scale genetic studies of Kawasaki disease (KD) in Korea, the Korean Kawasaki Disease Genetics Consortium (KKDGC) was formed in 2008 with 10 hospitals. Since the establishment of KKDGC, there has been a collection of clinical data from a total of 1198 patients, and approximately 5 mL of blood samples per patient (for genomic deoxyribonucleic acid and plasma isolation), using a standard clinical data collection form and a nation-wide networking system for blood sample pick-up. In the clinical risk factor analysis using the collected clinical data of 478 KD patients, it was found that incomplete KD type, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) non-responsiveness, and long febrile days are major risk factors for coronary artery lesions development, whereas low serum albumin concentration is an independent risk factor for IVIG non-responsiveness. In addition, we identified a KD susceptibility locus at 1p31, a coronary artery aneurysm locus (KCNN2 gene), and the causal variant in the C-reactive protein (CRP) promoter region, as determining the increased CRP levels in KD patients, by means of genome-wide association studies. Currently, this consortium is continually collecting more clinical data and genomic samples to identify the clinical and genetic risk factors via a single nucleotide polymorphism chip and exome sequencing, as well as collaborating with several international KD genetics teams. The consortium-based approach for genetic studies of KD in Korea will be a very effective way to understand the unknown etiology and causal mechanism of KD, which may be affected by multiple genes and environmental factors.

  18. Consortium-Based Genetic Studies of Kawasaki Disease in Korea: Korean Kawasaki Disease Genetics Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Young Mi; Jang, Gi Young; Yun, Sin Weon; Yu, Jeong Jin; Yoon, Kyung Lim; Lee, Kyung-Yil; Kil, Hong-Rang

    2015-01-01

    In order to perform large-scale genetic studies of Kawasaki disease (KD) in Korea, the Korean Kawasaki Disease Genetics Consortium (KKDGC) was formed in 2008 with 10 hospitals. Since the establishment of KKDGC, there has been a collection of clinical data from a total of 1198 patients, and approximately 5 mL of blood samples per patient (for genomic deoxyribonucleic acid and plasma isolation), using a standard clinical data collection form and a nation-wide networking system for blood sample pick-up. In the clinical risk factor analysis using the collected clinical data of 478 KD patients, it was found that incomplete KD type, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) non-responsiveness, and long febrile days are major risk factors for coronary artery lesions development, whereas low serum albumin concentration is an independent risk factor for IVIG non-responsiveness. In addition, we identified a KD susceptibility locus at 1p31, a coronary artery aneurysm locus (KCNN2 gene), and the causal variant in the C-reactive protein (CRP) promoter region, as determining the increased CRP levels in KD patients, by means of genome-wide association studies. Currently, this consortium is continually collecting more clinical data and genomic samples to identify the clinical and genetic risk factors via a single nucleotide polymorphism chip and exome sequencing, as well as collaborating with several international KD genetics teams. The consortium-based approach for genetic studies of KD in Korea will be a very effective way to understand the unknown etiology and causal mechanism of KD, which may be affected by multiple genes and environmental factors. PMID:26617644

  19. Consortium for Materials Development in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    During FY99 the Consortium for Materials Development in Space (CMDS) was reorganized around the following guidelines: industry driven, product focus, an industry led advisory council, focus on University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) core competencies, linkage to regional investment firms to assist commercialization and to take advantage of space flights. The organizational structure of the CMDS changed considerably during the year. The decision was made to reduce the organization to a Director and an Administrative Assistant. The various research projects, including the employees, were transferred to the appropriate UAH research center or college. In addition, an advisory council was established to provide direction and guidance to the CMDS to ensure a strong commercial focus. The council will (i) review CMDS commercial development plans and provide feedback, (ii) perform an annual evaluation of the Center's progress and present the results of this review to the UAH Vice President for Research, (iii) serve as an avenue of communication between the CMDS and its commercial partners, and (iv) serve as an ambassador and advocate for the CMDS.

  20. SUNrises on the International Plant Nucleus Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Graumann, Katja; Bass, Hank W.; Parry, Geraint

    2013-01-01

    The nuclear periphery is a dynamic, structured environment, whose precise functions are essential for global processes—from nuclear, to cellular, to organismal. Its main components—the nuclear envelope (NE) with inner and outer nuclear membranes (INM and ONM), nuclear pore complexes (NPC), associated cytoskeletal and nucleoskeletal components as well as chromatin are conserved across eukaryotes (Fig. 1). In metazoans in particular, the structure and functions of nuclear periphery components are intensely researched partly because of their involvement in various human diseases. While far less is known about these in plants, the last few years have seen a significant increase in research activity in this area. Plant biologists are not only catching up with the animal field, but recent findings are pushing our advances in this field globally. In recognition of this developing field, the Annual Society of Experimental Biology Meeting in Salzburg kindly hosted a session co-organized by Katja Graumann and David E. Evans (Oxford Brookes University) highlighting new insights into plant nuclear envelope proteins and their interactions. This session brought together leading researchers with expertise in topics such as epigenetics, meiosis, nuclear pore structure and functions, nucleoskeleton and nuclear envelope composition. An open and friendly exchange of ideas was fundamental to the success of the meeting, which resulted in founding the International Plant Nucleus Consortium. This review highlights new developments in plant nuclear envelope research presented at the conference and their importance for the wider understanding of metazoan, yeast and plant nuclear envelope functions and properties. PMID:23324458

  1. Selenium reduction by a denitrifying consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Rege, M.A.; Yonge, D.R.; Mendoza, D.P.; Petersen, J.N.; Bereded-Samuel, Y.; Johnstone, D.L.; Apel, W.A.; Barnes, J.M.

    1999-02-20

    A denitrifying bacterial consortium obtained from the Pullman, Washington wastewater treatment facility was enriched under denitrifying conditions and its ability to reduce selenite and selenate was studied. Replicate experiments at two different experimental conditions were performed. All experiments were performed under electron-acceptor limiting conditions, with acetate as the carbon source and nitrate the electron acceptor, in the first set of experiments, selenite was present, whereas, in the second set, selenate was added. A significant lag period of approximately 150 h was necessary before selenite or selenate reduction was observed. During this lag period, nitrate and nitrite use was observed. Once selenite or selenate reduction had started, nitrate and nitrite reduction was concomitant with selenium species reduction. Trace amounts of selenite were detected during the selenate reduction study. Analysis of the data indicates that, once selenium species reduction was induced, the rate of reduction was proportional to the selenium species concentration and to the biomass concentration. Furthermore, at similar biomass and contaminant concentrations, selenite reduction is approximately four times faster than selenate reduction.

  2. AGRICOH: A Consortium of Agricultural Cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Leon, Maria E.; Beane Freeman, Laura E.; Douwes, Jeroen; Hoppin, Jane A.; Kromhout, Hans; Lebailly, Pierre; Nordby, Karl-Christian; Schenker, Marc; Schüz, Joachim; Waring, Stephen C.; Alavanja, Michael C.R.; Annesi-Maesano, Isabella; Baldi, Isabelle; Dalvie, Mohamed Aqiel; Ferro, Giles; Fervers, Béatrice; Langseth, Hilde; London, Leslie; Lynch, Charles F.; McLaughlin, John; Merchant, James A.; Pahwa, Punam; Sigsgaard, Torben; Stayner, Leslie; Wesseling, Catharina; Yoo, Keun-Young; Zahm, Shelia H.; Straif, Kurt; Blair, Aaron

    2011-01-01

    AGRICOH is a recently formed consortium of agricultural cohort studies involving 22 cohorts from nine countries in five continents: South Africa (1), Canada (3), Costa Rica (2), USA (6), Republic of Korea (1), New Zealand (2), Denmark (1), France (3) and Norway (3). The aim of AGRICOH, initiated by the US National Cancer Institute (NCI) and coordinated by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), is to promote and sustain collaboration and pooling of data to investigate the association between a wide range of agricultural exposures and a wide range of health outcomes, with a particular focus on associations that cannot easily be addressed in individual studies because of rare exposures (e.g., use of infrequently applied chemicals) or relatively rare outcomes (e.g., certain types of cancer, neurologic and auto-immune diseases). To facilitate future projects the need for data harmonization of selected variables is required and is underway. Altogether, AGRICOH provides excellent opportunities for studying cancer, respiratory, neurologic, and auto-immune diseases as well as reproductive and allergic disorders, injuries and overall mortality in association with a wide array of exposures, prominent among these the application of pesticides. PMID:21655123

  3. [Japan Spastic Paraplegia Research Consortium (JASPAC)].

    PubMed

    Takiyama, Yoshihisa

    2014-10-01

    Japan Spastic Paraplegia Research Consortium (JASPAC), a nationwide clinical and genetic survey of patients with hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP), was started in 2006 as a project of the Research Committee for Ataxic Diseases of the Ministry of Health, Labor, and Welfare, Japan. To date (April 4, 2014), 448 indexed patients with HSP have been registered from 46 prefectures in Japan. We are now performing molecular testing of the HSP patients using Sanger sequencing (SPG4, SPG11, SPG31, and ARSACS), comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) array (SPG1, 2, 3A, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 11, 13, 15, 17, 20, 21, 31, 33, 39, 42, ABCD1, alsin, and ARSACS), and resequencing microarray (SPG1, 2, 3A, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 11, 13, 17, 20, 21, 31, 33, and ABCD1). In 206 Japanese families with autosomal dominant HSP, SPG4 was the most common form, accounting for 38%, followed by SPG3A (5%), SPG31 (5%), SPG10 (2%), and SPG8 (1%). In 88 patients with autosomal recessive HSP, although SPG11 was the most common form, accounting for 6%, most showed significant genetic heterogeneity. The results of molecular testing will be applicable to patients in terms of improved positive diagnosis, follow-up, and genetic counseling. JASPAC will contribute to elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying HSP, and will facilitate the development of better treatments for HSP.

  4. The Cardiac Safety Research Consortium ECG database.

    PubMed

    Kligfield, Paul; Green, Cynthia L

    2012-01-01

    The Cardiac Safety Research Consortium (CSRC) ECG database was initiated to foster research using anonymized, XML-formatted, digitized ECGs with corresponding descriptive variables from placebo- and positive-control arms of thorough QT studies submitted to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) by pharmaceutical sponsors. The database can be expanded to other data that are submitted directly to CSRC from other sources, and currently includes digitized ECGs from patients with genotyped varieties of congenital long-QT syndrome; this congenital long-QT database is also linked to ambulatory electrocardiograms stored in the Telemetric and Holter ECG Warehouse (THEW). Thorough QT data sets are available from CSRC for unblinded development of algorithms for analysis of repolarization and for blinded comparative testing of algorithms developed for the identification of moxifloxacin, as used as a positive control in thorough QT studies. Policies and procedures for access to these data sets are available from CSRC, which has developed tools for statistical analysis of blinded new algorithm performance. A recently approved CSRC project will create a data set for blinded analysis of automated ECG interval measurements, whose initial focus will include comparison of four of the major manufacturers of automated electrocardiographs in the United States. CSRC welcomes application for use of the ECG database for clinical investigation.

  5. CEPH consortium map of chromosome 9

    SciTech Connect

    Attwood, J.; Povey, S. ); Chiano, M.; Goudie, D.; Yates, J. ); Collins, A.; Shields, D. ); Donis-Keller, H. ); Dracopoli, N. ); Fountain, J. )

    1994-01-15

    This paper describes the Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain (CEPH) consortium linkage map of chromosome 9. A total of 124 markers were typed in the CEPH family DNAs by 14 contributing laboratories; of these, 42 loci are ordered on the map with likelihood support of at least 1000:1. The uniquely placed markers include 31 that can be typed by PCR. A further 28 markers that can be typed by PCR are approximately positioned on the map. Multilocus linkage analysis with CRI-MAP has produced male, female, and sex-averaged maps extending for 176, 237, and 209 cM, respectively, while sex-averaged maps produced with MAPMAKER and the multiple two-point program MAP extended for 170 and 129 cM, respectively. The male map contains only two intervals greater than 10 cM, and the mean genetic distance between the 42 uniquely placed loci is 4.3 cM. However, no markers were available to anchor the map at either telomere or the centromere. The results confirm the high level of interference suggested by chiasma maps of chromosome 9. Detailed meiotic breakpoints for three of the families are shown. These can be used to provide rapid placement of any new marker without the need for statistical analysis. 36 refs., 6 figs., 6 tabs.

  6. ICONE: An International Consortium of Neuro Endovascular Centres

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, J.; White, P.; Kallmes, D.F.; Spears, J.; Marotta, T.; Roy, D.; Guilbert, F.; Weill, A.; Nguyen, T.; Molyneux, A.J.; Cloft, H.; Cekirge, S.; Saatci, I.; Bracard, S.; Meder, J.-F.; Moret, J.; Cognard, C.; Qureshi, A.I.; Turk, A.S.; Berenstein, A.

    2008-01-01

    Summary The proliferation of new endovascular devices and therapeutic strategies calls for a prudent and rational evaluation of their clinical benefit. This evaluation must be done in an effective manner and in collaboration with industry. Such research initiative requires organisational and methodological support to survive and thrive in a competitive environment. We propose the formation of an international consortium, an academic alliance committed to the pursuit of effective neurovascular therapies. Such a consortium would be dedicated to the design and execution of basic science, device development and clinical trials. The Consortium is owned and operated by its members. Members are international leaders in neurointerventional research and clinical practice. The Consortium brings competency, knowledge, and expertise to industry as well as to its membership across a spectrum of research initiatives such as: expedited review of clinical trials, protocol development, surveys and systematic reviews; laboratory expertise and support for research design and grant applications to public agencies. Once objectives and protocols are approved, the Consortium provides a stable network of centers capable of timely realization of clinical trials or preclinical investigations in an optimal environment. The Consortium is a non-profit organization. The potential revenue generated from client-sponsored financial agreements will be re-directed to the academic and research objectives of the organization. The Consortium wishes to work in concert with industry, to support emerging trends in neurovascular therapeutic development. The Consortium is a realistic endeavour optimally structured to promote excellence through scientific appraisal of our treatments, and to accelerate technical progress while maximizing patients’ safety and welfare. PMID:20557763

  7. Establishment of a multi-state experiential pharmacy program consortium.

    PubMed

    Duke, Lori J; Unterwagner, Whitney L; Byrd, Debbie C

    2008-06-15

    In 2002, a regional consortium was created for schools and colleges of pharmacy in Georgia and Alabama to assist experiential education faculty and staff members in streamlining administrative processes, providing required preceptor development, establishing a professional network, and conducting scholarly endeavors. Five schools and colleges of pharmacy with many shared experiential practice sites formed a consortium to help experiential faculty and staff members identify, discuss, and solve common experience program issues and challenges. During its 5 years in existence, the Southeastern Pharmacy Experiential Education Consortium has coordinated experiential schedules, developed and implemented uniform evaluation tools, coordinated site and preceptor development activities, established a work group for educational research and scholarship, and provided opportunities for networking and professional development. Several consortium members have received national recognition for their individual experiential education accomplishments. Through the activities of a regional consortium, members have successfully developed programs and initiatives that have streamlined administrative processes and have the potential to improve overall quality of experiential education programs. Professionally, consortium activities have resulted in 5 national presentations.

  8. 25 CFR 1000.73 - Once a Tribe/Consortium has been awarded a grant, may the Tribe/Consortium obtain information...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Once a Tribe/Consortium has been awarded a grant, may the Tribe/Consortium obtain information from a non-BIA bureau? 1000.73 Section 1000.73 Indians OFFICE OF THE... § 1000.73 Once a Tribe/Consortium has been awarded a grant, may the Tribe/Consortium obtain...

  9. 25 CFR 1000.73 - Once a Tribe/Consortium has been awarded a grant, may the Tribe/Consortium obtain information...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Once a Tribe/Consortium has been awarded a grant, may the Tribe/Consortium obtain information from a non-BIA bureau? 1000.73 Section 1000.73 Indians OFFICE OF THE... § 1000.73 Once a Tribe/Consortium has been awarded a grant, may the Tribe/Consortium obtain...

  10. 25 CFR 1000.73 - Once a Tribe/Consortium has been awarded a grant, may the Tribe/Consortium obtain information...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Once a Tribe/Consortium has been awarded a grant, may the Tribe/Consortium obtain information from a non-BIA bureau? 1000.73 Section 1000.73 Indians OFFICE OF THE... § 1000.73 Once a Tribe/Consortium has been awarded a grant, may the Tribe/Consortium obtain...

  11. The National Astronomy Consortium (NAC) - Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheth, Kartik; Mills, Elisabeth A. C.; Hooper, Eric; National Astronomy Consortium

    2015-01-01

    The National Astronomy Consortium (NAC; see https://sites.google.com/site/nraonac/) is a growing national partnership between majority and minority universities and institutions with the goal of increasing the numbers of under-represented minorities and students who might otherwise be overlooked by the traditional academic pipeline into STEM, or related, careers. The NAC model is based on the successful 'Posse Foundation' model for undergraduate success and incorporates all its major components: pre-training of cohorts to prepare them for the research experience, joint weekly cohort activities throughout the research summer, peer- and multiple mentoring, weekly discussion of various aspects of professional and career development, continued engagement of students in science after return to home institution and lifelong mentoring. The mentors also form a cohort, exchanging information and learning from each other. With its partner institutions, the NAC aims to build a complete pipeline from undergraduate through career for the next generation of scientists and engineers. Our annual goal is to create two to three cohorts of four to five students at each site (currently NRAO-Charlottesville, NRAO-Socorro and U. Wisconsin - Madison). Recruitment occurs in the fall semester with seminars and colloquia in partnership with faculty at the minority serving institutions and the GRAD-MAP program at the University of Maryland. In this talk we describe in detail all the components of the NAC and report on our progress. We are keen to interact and partner with new universities and institutions and encourage them to contact the NAC at nac4stem@googlegroups.com.

  12. 25 CFR 1000.283 - If the Tribe/Consortium or Tribe's/Consortium's employee receives a summons and/or a complaint...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... receives a summons and/or a complaint alleging a tort covered by FTCA, what should the Tribe/Consortium do...-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ACT Federal Tort Claims § 1000.283 If the Tribe/Consortium or Tribe's/Consortium's employee receives a summons and/or a complaint alleging a tort covered by FTCA, what should the Tribe...

  13. 25 CFR 1000.18 - May a Consortium member Tribe withdraw from the Consortium and become a member of the applicant...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false May a Consortium member Tribe withdraw from the Consortium and become a member of the applicant pool? 1000.18 Section 1000.18 Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT... for Participation in Tribal Self-Governance Eligibility § 1000.18 May a Consortium member...

  14. 25 CFR 1000.18 - May a Consortium member Tribe withdraw from the Consortium and become a member of the applicant...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false May a Consortium member Tribe withdraw from the Consortium and become a member of the applicant pool? 1000.18 Section 1000.18 Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT... for Participation in Tribal Self-Governance Eligibility § 1000.18 May a Consortium member...

  15. 25 CFR 1000.18 - May a Consortium member Tribe withdraw from the Consortium and become a member of the applicant...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false May a Consortium member Tribe withdraw from the Consortium and become a member of the applicant pool? 1000.18 Section 1000.18 Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT... for Participation in Tribal Self-Governance Eligibility § 1000.18 May a Consortium member...

  16. 25 CFR 1000.18 - May a Consortium member Tribe withdraw from the Consortium and become a member of the applicant...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false May a Consortium member Tribe withdraw from the Consortium and become a member of the applicant pool? 1000.18 Section 1000.18 Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT... for Participation in Tribal Self-Governance Eligibility § 1000.18 May a Consortium member...

  17. 25 CFR 1000.18 - May a Consortium member Tribe withdraw from the Consortium and become a member of the applicant...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false May a Consortium member Tribe withdraw from the Consortium and become a member of the applicant pool? 1000.18 Section 1000.18 Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT... for Participation in Tribal Self-Governance Eligibility § 1000.18 May a Consortium member...

  18. Clinical trials in pulmonary hypertension: Time for a consortium.

    PubMed

    Newman, John H; Elliott, Gregory C; Haworth, Glennis S; Zampaglione, Edio; Brar, Satjit; Gibbs, Simon J; Sandoval, Julio

    2013-01-01

    Current and past clinical trials in pulmonary hypertension, while valuable, are limited by the absence of mechanistic aims, by dissatisfaction with endpoints and the inability to share data. Clinical studies in pulmonary hypertension might be enhanced by a consortium approach that utilizes the expertise of academic medicine, the treatment initiatives of the pharmaceutical industry and study design from funding agencies interested in biological mechanisms. A meeting of interested parties, the Pulmonary Hypertension Academic Research Consortium (PHARC), was held from 30 April to 1 May 2012 in Bethesda, Maryland. Members at the conference were from the USA Federal Drug Administration (FDA); pharmaceutical industry (Pfizer, Novartis, Bayer and Gilead); USA National Institutes of Health (NHLBI); the Pulmonary Vascular Research Institute (PVRI), a non-governmental organization (NGO); and research and clinical members of pulmonary hypertension programs of international scope. A recommendation to develop a clinical trials consortium was the product of the working group on academic standards in clinical trials. The working group concluded that clinical trials hold immense promise to move the field of pulmonary hypertension forward if the trials are designed by a consortium with input from multiple groups. This would result in study design, conduct and analysis determined by consortium members with a high degree of independent function. The components of a well-balanced consortium that give it scientific effectiveness are: (1) the consortium can work with multiple companies simultaneously; (2) sponsors with special interests, such as testing biological mechanisms, can add investigations to a study at lower cost than with present granting strategies; (3) data handling including archiving, analysis and future sharing would be improved; (4) ancillary studies supported by the collection and dissemination of tissues and fluids would generate a broader approach to discovery than

  19. Building psychosocial programming in geriatrics fellowships: a consortium model.

    PubMed

    Adelman, Ronald D; Ansell, Pamela; Breckman, Risa; Snow, Caitlin E; Ehrlich, Amy R; Greene, Michele G; Greenberg, Debra F; Raik, Barrie L; Raymond, Joshua J; Clabby, John F; Fields, Suzanne D; Breznay, Jennifer B

    2011-01-01

    Geriatric psychosocial problems are prevalent and significantly affect the physical health and overall well-being of older adults. Geriatrics fellows require psychosocial education, and yet to date, geriatrics fellowship programs have not developed a comprehensive geriatric psychosocial curriculum. Fellowship programs in the New York tristate area collaboratively created the New York Metropolitan Area Consortium to Strengthen Psychosocial Programming in Geriatrics Fellowships in 2007 to address this shortfall. The goal of the Consortium is to develop model educational programs for geriatrics fellows that highlight psychosocial issues affecting elder care, share interinstitutional resources, and energize fellowship program directors and faculty. In 2008, 2009, and 2010, Consortium faculty collaboratively designed and implemented a psychosocial educational conference for geriatrics fellows. Cumulative participation at the conferences included 146 geriatrics fellows from 20 academic institutions taught by interdisciplinary Consortium faculty. Formal evaluations from the participants indicated that the conference: a) positively affected fellows' knowledge of, interest in, and comfort with psychosocial issues; b) would have a positive impact on the quality of care provided to older patients; and c) encouraged valuable interactions with fellows and faculty from other institutions. The Consortium, as an educational model for psychosocial learning, has a positive impact on geriatrics fellowship training and may be replicable in other localities.

  20. Appalachian Clean Coal Technology Consortium. Quarterly technical progress report, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, R.-H.; Phillips, D.I.; Luttrell, G.H.; Basim, B.; Sohn, S.; Jiang, X.; Tao, D.; Parekh, B.K.; Meloy, T.

    1996-10-01

    The Appalachian Clean Coal Technology Consortium (ACCTC) has been established to help U.S. Coal producers, particularly those in the Appalachian region, increase the production of lower-sulfur coal. The cooperative research conducted as part of the consortium activities will help utilities meet the emissions standards established by the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, enhance the competitiveness of U.S. coals in the world market, create jobs in economically-depressed coal producing regions, and reduce U.S. dependence on foreign energy supplies. The consortium has three charter members, including Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, West Virginia University, and the University of Kentucky. The Consortium also includes industry affiliate members that form an Advisory Committee. In keeping with the recommendations of the Advisory Committee, first-year R&D activities were focused on two areas of research: fine coal dewatering and modeling of spirals. The industry representatives to the Consortium identified fine coal dewatering as the most needed area of technology development. Dewatering studies were conducted by Virginia Tech`s Center for Coal and Minerals Processing and a spiral model was developed by West Virginia University. For the University of Kentucky the advisory board approved a project entitled: ``A Study of Novel Approaches for Destabilization of Flotation Froth``. Project management and administration will be provided by Virginia Tech., for the first year. Progress reports for coal dewatering and destabilization of flotation froth studies are presented in this report.

  1. Medical education in Korea: the e-learning consortium.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyong-Jee; Han, Joungho; Park, Ie Byung; Kee, Changwon

    2009-09-01

    This article reports the latest development in e-learning in Korean medical education. The Korean Consortium for e-Learning in Medical Education was formed for collaboration in providing quality online learning resources for medical schools around the nation. This e-learning strategy is aimed at improving the quality of medical education at the national level by providing students with equal access to quality learning resources and fostering students' self-directed learning and, in doing so, enhancing the effectiveness and efficiency of developing online learning resources by sharing necessary resources among the medical schools. The consortium also plans to share e-learning content with medical schools in other countries by engaging more medical schools in the consortium and also by sharing e-learning content developed by other institutions or consortiums. The consortium is also dedicated to the research and development of effective online learning strategies for medical education, including interactive virtual patient cases and other innovative pedagogies using Web 2.0 technologies.

  2. Genesis of an oak-fire science consortium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grabner, K.W.; Stambaugh, M. C.; Guyette, R.P.; Dey, D. C.; Willson, G.D.; Dey, D. C.; Stambaugh, M. C.; Clark, S.L.; Schweitzer, C. J.

    2012-01-01

    With respect to fire management and practices, one of the most overlooked regions lies in the middle of the country. In this region there is a critical need for both recognition of fire’s importance and sharing of fire information and expertise. Recently we proposed and were awarded funding by the Joint Fire Science Program to initiate the planning phase for a regional fire consortium. The purpose of the consortium will be to promote the dissemination of fire information across the interior United States and to identify fire information needs of oak-dominated communities such as woodlands, forests, savannas, and barrens. Geographically, the consortium region will cover: 1) the Interior Lowland Plateau Ecoregion in Illinois, Indiana, central Kentucky and Tennessee; 2) the Missouri, Arkansas, and Oklahoma Ozarks; 3) the Ouachita Mountains of Arkansas and Oklahoma; and 4) the Cross Timbers Region in Texas, Oklahoma, and Kansas. This region coincides with the southwestern half of the Central Hardwoods Forest Region. The tasks of this consortium will be to disseminate fire information, connect fire professionals, and efficiently address fire issues within our region. If supported, the success and the future direction of the consortium will be driven by end-users, their input, and involvement.

  3. ACTS Operations Extended Through a University-Based Consortium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Robert A.; Krawczyk, Richard J.

    2002-01-01

    The Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) program was slated for decommissioning in October 2000. With plans in place to move the spacecraft to an orbital graveyard and then shut the system down, NASA was challenged to consider the feasibility of extending operations for education and research purposes provided that an academic organization would be willing to cover operations costs. This was determined to be viable, and in the fall of 2000, NASA announced that it would consider extending operations. On March 19, 2001, NASA, the Ohio Board of Regents, and the Ohio University signed a Space Act Agreement to continue ACTS operations for 2 more years with options to extend operations up to a total of 4 years. To accomplish this, the Ohio University has formed a university-based consortium, the Ohio Consortium for Advanced Communications Technology (OCACT), and acts as the managing member. The Ohio University is responsible for the full reimbursement of NASA's operations costs, and does this through consortium membership. NASA retains the operating license of the spacecraft and has two contractors supporting spacecraft and master control station operations. This flexible arrangement between NASA and academia allows the education community to access a large communications satellite for learning about spacecraft operations and to use the system's transponders for communications applications. It also allows other organizations, such as commercial companies, to become consortium members and use the ACTS wideband Ka-band (30/20 GHz) payload. From the consortium members, six areas of interest have been identified.

  4. National University Consortium on Microwave Research (NUCOMR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, Robert J.; Agee, Forrest J.

    1995-09-01

    This paper introduces a new cooperative research program of national scale that is focused on crucial research issues in the development of high energy microwave sources. These have many applications in the DOD and industry. The Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR), in coopertaion with the Phillips Laboratory, the Naval Research Laboratory, and the Army Research Laboratory, has established a tri-service research consortium to investigate novel high energy microwave sources. The program is part of the DODs 'Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative' and will be funded at a rate of $DLR3.0M per year for up to five years. All research performed under this program will be unclassified. Under its auspices, HPM scientists at nine US universities will be attacking twenty-two separate research projects under the leadership of Neville Luhmann at UC-Davis, Victor Granatstein at Maryland, Magne Kristiansen at Texas Tech, Edl Schamiloglu at New Mexico, John Nation at Cornell, Ned Birdsall at UC-Berkeley, George Caryotakis at Standord, Ronald Gilgenbach at Michigan, and Anthony Lin at UCLA. To facilitate the rapid transition of research results into the industrial community, formal collaborative subcontracts are already in place with James Benford at Physics International, Carter Armstrong at Northrop, and Glen Huffman at Varian Associates. Although this new program officially only came into existence in mid-March of this year, it builds on over a decade of microwave research efforts funded by the plasma physics office at AFOSR. It also is synergistic with the ongoing Tri-Service Vacuum Electronics Initiative led by Robert Parker of NRL as well as with the AFOSR's and Rome Laboratory's long standing Advanced Thermionic Research Initiative. An overview will be given of the broad spectrum of research objectives encompassed by NUCOMR. Areas of collaboration and technology transfer will be highlighted. The areas in which the three university consortia will conduct

  5. Biodegradation of p-chlorophenol by a microalgae consortium.

    PubMed

    Lima, Sofia A C; Raposo, M Filomena J; Castro, Paula M L; Morais, Rui M

    2004-01-01

    An aquatic community was recovered from a waste discharge container fed with several aromatic pollutants. After 3 months of selective enrichment with p-chlorophenol and p-nitrophenol, two microalgae species, Chlorella vulgaris and Coenochloris pyrenoidosa, were recovered from the microbial consortium. As an axenic culture, this microalgae consortium was able to remove p-chlorophenol under different photo-regimes. Cultures grown under a 24h light regime were capable of biodegrading 50mg l(-1) of p-chlorophenol within 5 days. Addition of zeolite, an adsorbing material, did not improve the p-chlorophenol removal. However, when p-chlorophenol at 150mgl(-1) was fed to the culture supplemented with zeolite, the growth rate of the consortium improved, but the lag phase was longer (16 against 14 days in the absence of zeolite).

  6. The ISPRS Student Consortium: From launch to tenth anniversary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanjir, U.; Detchev, I.; Reyes, S. R.; Akkartal Aktas, A.; Lo, C. Y.; Miyazaki, H.

    2014-04-01

    The ISPRS Student Consortium is an international organization for students and young professionals in the fields of photogrammetry, remote sensing, and the geospatial information sciences. Since its start ten years ago, the number of members of the Student Consortium has been steadily growing, now reaching close to 1000. Its increased popularity, especially in recent years, is mainly due to the organization's worldwide involvement in student matters. The Student Consortium has helped organize numerous summer schools, youth forums, and student technical sessions at ISPRS sponsored conferences. In addition, the organization publishes a newsletter, and hosts several social media outlets in order to keep its global membership up-to-date on a regular basis. This paper will describe the structure of the organization, and it will give some example of its past student related activities.

  7. The TB Structural Genomics Consortium: A decade of progress

    PubMed Central

    Chim, Nicholas; Habel, Jeff E.; Johnston, Jodie M.; Krieger, Inna; Miallau, Linda; Sankaranarayanan, Ramasamy; Morse, Robert P.; Bruning, John; Swanson, Stephanie; Kim, Haelee; Kim, Chang-Yub; Li, Hongye; Bulloch, Esther M.; Payne, Richard J.; Manos-Turvey, Alexandra; Hung, Li-Wei; Baker, Edward N.; Lott, J. Shaun; James, Michael N.G.; Terwilliger, Thomas C.; Eisenberg, David S.; Sacchettini, James C.; Goulding, Celia W.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The TB Structural Genomics Consortium is a worldwide organization of collaborators whose mission is the comprehensive structural determination and analyses of Mycobacterium tuberculosis proteins to ultimately aid in tuberculosis diagnosis and treatment. Congruent to the overall vision, Consortium members have additionally established an integrated facilities core to streamline M. tuberculosis structural biology and developed bioinformatics resources for data mining. This review aims to share the latest Consortium developments with the TB community, including recent structures of proteins that play significant roles within M. tuberculosis. Atomic resolution details may unravel mechanistic insights and reveal unique and novel protein features, as well as important protein-protein and protein-ligand interactions, which ultimately leads to a better understanding of M. tuberculosis biology and may be exploited for rational, structure-based therapeutics design. PMID:21247804

  8. Advances in industrial microbiome based on microbial consortium for biorefinery.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Li-Li; Zhou, Jin-Jie; Quan, Chun-Shan; Xiu, Zhi-Long

    2017-01-01

    One of the important targets of industrial biotechnology is using cheap biomass resources. The traditional strategy is microbial fermentations with single strain. However, cheap biomass normally contains so complex compositions and impurities that it is very difficult for single microorganism to utilize availably. In order to completely utilize the substrates and produce multiple products in one process, industrial microbiome based on microbial consortium draws more and more attention. In this review, we first briefly described some examples of existing industrial bioprocesses involving microbial consortia. Comparison of 1,3-propanediol production by mixed and pure cultures were then introduced, and interaction relationships between cells in microbial consortium were summarized. Finally, the outlook on how to design and apply microbial consortium in the future was also proposed.

  9. Molecular Basis of a Bacterial Consortium: Interspecies Catabolism of Atrazine

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Mervyn L.; Newcombe, David; Alvey, Sam; Crowley, David E.; Hay, Anthony; Sadowsky, Michael J.; Wackett, Lawrence P.

    1998-01-01

    Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP contains the genes, atzA, -B, and -C, that encode three enzymes which metabolize atrazine to cyanuric acid. Atrazine-catabolizing pure cultures isolated from around the world contain genes homologous to atzA, -B, and -C. The present study was conducted to determine whether the same genes are present in an atrazine-catabolizing bacterial consortium and how the genes and metabolism are subdivided among member species. The consortium contained four or more bacterial species, but two members, Clavibacter michiganese ATZ1 and Pseudomonas sp. strain CN1, collectively mineralized atrazine. C. michiganese ATZ1 released chloride from atrazine, produced hydroxyatrazine, and contained a homolog to the atzA gene that encoded atrazine chlorohydrolase. C. michiganese ATZ1 stoichiometrically metabolized hydroxyatrazine to N-ethylammelide and contained genes homologous to atzB and atzC, suggesting that either a functional AtzB or -C catalyzed N-isopropylamine release from hydroxyatrazine. C. michiganese ATZ1 grew on isopropylamine as its sole carbon and nitrogen source, explaining the ability of the consortium to use atrazine as the sole carbon and nitrogen source. A second consortium member, Pseudomonas sp. strain CN1, metabolized the N-ethylammelide produced by C. michiganese ATZ1 to transiently form cyanuric acid, a reaction catalyzed by AtzC. A gene homologous to the atzC gene of Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP was present, as demonstrated by Southern hybridization and PCR. Pseudomonas sp. strain CN1, but not C. michiganese, metabolized cyanuric acid. The consortium metabolized atrazine faster than did C. michiganese individually. Additionally, the consortium metabolized a much broader set of triazine ring compounds than did previously described pure cultures in which the atzABC genes had been identified. These data begin to elucidate the genetic and metabolic bases of catabolism by multimember consortia. PMID:16349478

  10. Midwest Superconductivity Consortium - Final Progress Report October 2001

    SciTech Connect

    Bement, Arden L.

    2001-10-23

    The basic mission of the Consortium was to advance the science and understanding of high-T{sub c} superconductivity and to promote the development of new materials and improved processing technology. Focused group efforts were the key element of the research program. One program area is the understanding of the layered structures involved in candidate materials and the factors that control their formation, stability and relationship superconductor properties. The other program area had a focus upon factors that limit or control the transport properties such as weak links, flux lattice behavior, and interfaces. Interactions among Consortium d with industrial armiates were an integral part of the program.

  11. NASA Nebraska Space Grant Consortium 1995-1999 Self Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaaf, Michaela M.; Bowen, Brent D.; Schaffart, Mary M.

    1999-01-01

    The NASA Nebraska Space Grant Consortium receives funds from NASA to allow Nebraska colleges and universities to implement balanced programs of research, education and public service related to aeronautics, space science and technology. Nebraska is a capability enhancement state which directs efforts and resources toward developing research infrastructure and enhancing the quality of aerospace research and education for all Nebraskans. Furthermore, the Nebraska Space Grant strives to provide national leadership in applied aspects of aeronautics. Nebraska has met, meets and will continue to meet all requirements set forth by NASA. Nebraska is a top-tier consortium and will continue to be a model program.

  12. Terragenome: International Soil Metagenome Sequencing Consortium (GSC8 Meeting)

    ScienceCinema

    Jansson, Janet [LBNL

    2016-07-12

    The Genomic Standards Consortium was formed in September 2005. It is an international, open-membership working body which promotes standardization in the description of genomes and the exchange and integration of genomic data. The 2009 meeting was an activity of a five-year funding "Research Coordination Network" from the National Science Foundation and was organized held at the DOE Joint Genome Institute with organizational support provided by the JGI and by the University of California - San Diego. Janet Jansson of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory discusses the Terragenome Initiative at the Genomic Standards Consortium's 8th meeting at the DOE JGI in Walnut Creek, Calif. on Sept. 9, 2009

  13. Augmentation of a Microbial Consortium for Enhanced Polylactide (PLA) Degradation.

    PubMed

    Nair, Nimisha R; Sekhar, Vini C; Nampoothiri, K Madhavan

    2016-03-01

    Bioplastics are eco-friendly and derived from renewable biomass sources. Innovation in recycling methods will tackle some of the critical issues facing the acceptance of bioplastics. Polylactic acid (PLA) is the commonly used and well-studied bioplastic that is presumed to be biodegradable. Considering their demand and use in near future, exploration for microbes capable of bioplastic degradation has high potential. Four PLA degrading strains were isolated and identified as Penicillium chrysogenum, Cladosporium sphaerospermum, Serratia marcescens and Rhodotorula mucilaginosa. A consortium of above strains degraded 44 % (w/w) PLA in 30 days time in laboratory conditions. Subsequently, the microbial consortium employed effectively for PLA composting.

  14. The Magnetics Information Consortium (MagIC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, C.; Constable, C.; Tauxe, L.; Koppers, A.; Banerjee, S.; Jackson, M.; Solheid, P.

    2003-12-01

    The Magnetics Information Consortium (MagIC) is a multi-user facility to establish and maintain a state-of-the-art relational database and digital archive for rock and paleomagnetic data. The goal of MagIC is to make such data generally available and to provide an information technology infrastructure for these and other research-oriented databases run by the international community. As its name implies, MagIC will not be restricted to paleomagnetic or rock magnetic data only, although MagIC will focus on these kinds of information during its setup phase. MagIC will be hosted under EarthRef.org at http://earthref.org/MAGIC/ where two "integrated" web portals will be developed, one for paleomagnetism (currently functional as a prototype that can be explored via the http://earthref.org/databases/PMAG/ link) and one for rock magnetism. The MagIC database will store all measurements and their derived properties for studies of paleomagnetic directions (inclination, declination) and their intensities, and for rock magnetic experiments (hysteresis, remanence, susceptibility, anisotropy). Ultimately, this database will allow researchers to study "on the internet" and to download important data sets that display paleo-secular variations in the intensity of the Earth's magnetic field over geological time, or that display magnetic data in typical Zijderveld, hysteresis/FORC and various magnetization/remanence diagrams. The MagIC database is completely integrated in the EarthRef.org relational database structure and thus benefits significantly from already-existing common database components, such as the EarthRef Reference Database (ERR) and Address Book (ERAB). The ERR allows researchers to find complete sets of literature resources as used in GERM (Geochemical Earth Reference Model), REM (Reference Earth Model) and MagIC. The ERAB contains addresses for all contributors to the EarthRef.org databases, and also for those who participated in data collection, archiving and

  15. 24 CFR 943.128 - How does a consortium carry out planning and reporting functions?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... HOUSING, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT PUBLIC HOUSING AGENCY CONSORTIA AND JOINT VENTURES... the consortium agreement, the consortium must submit joint five-year Plans and joint Annual Plans for... the joint PHA Plan. ...

  16. Computational Astrophysics Consortium 3 - Supernovae, Gamma-Ray Bursts and Nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Woosley, Stan

    2014-08-29

    Final project report for UCSC's participation in the Computational Astrophysics Consortium - Supernovae, Gamma-Ray Bursts and Nucleosynthesis. As an appendix, the report of the entire Consortium is also appended.

  17. 32 CFR 37.515 - Must I do anything additional to determine the qualification of a consortium?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... relationship is essential to increase the research project's chances of success. (b) The collaboration... things, the consortium's: (1) Management structure. (2) Method of making payments to consortium members...

  18. 32 CFR 37.515 - Must I do anything additional to determine the qualification of a consortium?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... relationship is essential to increase the research project's chances of success. (b) The collaboration... things, the consortium's: (1) Management structure. (2) Method of making payments to consortium members...

  19. 32 CFR 37.515 - Must I do anything additional to determine the qualification of a consortium?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... relationship is essential to increase the research project's chances of success. (b) The collaboration... things, the consortium's: (1) Management structure. (2) Method of making payments to consortium members...

  20. The Bellarmine Outreach Consortium: An Innovative Approach to Nursing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Algren, Chris L.; Hockenberger, Susan

    The Bellarmine Outreach Consortium, which provides access to baccalaureate and masters education in nursing for registered nurses in Kentucky, West Virginia, and Tennessee, is described. The components of a marketing process for colleges are also considered, with attention to product, place, price, and promotion. The nursing department of…

  1. The Worker Rights Consortium Makes Strides toward Legitimacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van der Werf, Martin

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the rapid growth of the Workers Rights Consortium, a student-originated group with 44 member institutions which opposes sweatshop labor conditions especially in the apparel industry. Notes disagreements about the number of administrators on the board of directors and about the role of industry representives. Compares this group with the…

  2. International Arid Lands Consortium's contributions to Madrean Archipelago stewardship

    Treesearch

    Peter F. Ffolliott; Jeffery O. Dawson; Itshack Moshe; Timothy E. Fulbright; E. Carter Johnson; Paul Verburg; Muhannad Shatanawi; Donald F. Caccamise; Jim P. M. Chamie

    2005-01-01

    The International Arid Lands Consortium (IALC) was established in 1990 to promote research, education, and training activities related to the development, management, and reclamation of arid and semiarid lands worldwide. Building on a decade of experience, the IALC continues to increase the knowledge base for managers by funding research, development, and demonstration...

  3. Appeal Resource and Training Consortium (ARTC) 2005-2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Online Submission, 2006

    2006-01-01

    APPEAL (Asia Pacific Programme of Education for All) Resource and Training Consortium (ARTC) was initiated in May 1997 at the Technical Working Group Meeting organized by APPEAL in cooperation with the Indian Institute of Education (IIE) to provide technical support and assistance to the work of APPEAL among the Member States. This booklet is a…

  4. Biomineralization and formulation of endosulfan degrading bacterial and fungal consortiums.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Jayanthi; Silambarasan, Sivagnanam

    2014-11-01

    Microbial degradation offers an effective approach to remove toxicants and in this study, a microbial consortium consisting of bacterial strains and fungal strains were originally obtained from endosulfan contaminated agricultural soils. Identification of the bacterial isolates by 16S rRNA sequences revealed the isolates to be Halophilic bacterium JAS4, Klebsiella pneumoniae JAS8, Enterobacter asburiae JAS5, and Enterobacter cloacae JAS7, whereas the fungal isolates were identified by 18S rRNA sequences and the isolates were Botryosphaeria laricina JAS6, Aspergillus tamarii JAS9 and Lasiodiplodia sp. JAS12. The biodegradation of endosulfan was monitored by using HPLC and FTIR analysis. The bacterial and fungal consortium could degrade 1000 mg l(-1) of endosulfan efficiently in aqueous medium and in soil. The infrared spectrum of endosulfan degraded samples in the aqueous medium by bacterial and fungal consortium showed bands at 1400 and 950 cm(-1) which are the characteristics of COOH group and acid dimer band respectively. In the present investigation, low cost solid materials such as sawdust, soil, fly ash, molasses and nutrients were used for the formulation of microbial consortium and to achieve greater multiplication and survival of the microbial strains. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The Consortium for Advancing Renewable Energy Technology (CARET)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, E. M.; Henderson, D. O.; Buffinger, D. R.; Fuller, C. W.; Uribe, R. M.

    1998-01-01

    The Consortium for Advancing Renewable Energy (CARET) is a research and education program which uses the theme of renewable energy to build a minority scientist pipeline. CARET is also a consortium of four universities and NASA Lewis Research Center working together to promote science education and research to minority students using the theme of renewable energy. The consortium membership includes the HBCUs (Historically Black Colleges and Universities), Fisk, Wilberforce and Central State Universities as well as Kent State University and NASA Lewis Research Center. The various stages of this pipeline provide participating students experiences with a different emphasis. Some emphasize building enthusiasm for the classroom study of science and technology while others emphasize the nature of research in these disciplines. Still others focus on relating a practical application to science and technology. And, of great importance to the success of the program are the interfaces between the various stages. Successfully managing these transitions is a requirement for producing trained scientists, engineers and technologists. Presentations describing the CARET program have been given at this year's HBCU Research Conference at the Ohio Aerospace Institute and as a seminar in the Solar Circle Seminar series of the Photovoltaic and Space Environments Branch at NASA Lewis Research Center. In this report, we will describe the many positive achievements toward the fulfillment of the goals and outcomes of our program. We will begin with a description of the interactions among the consortium members and end with a description of the activities of each of the member institutions .

  6. The Consortium for Integrated Climate Research in Western Mountains (CIRMOUNT)

    Treesearch

    Constance I. Millar

    2004-01-01

    I represent a nascent effort in western North America that is committed to improving integration of climate-related research and its societal implications. We go under the name of CIRMOUNT, that is, Consortium for Integrated Climate-Related Research in Western North American Mountains. In a sense, CIRMOUNT is a North American answer (in the affirmative) to Thomas...

  7. Academic Library Consortium in Jordan: An Evaluation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmed, Mustafa H.; Suleiman, Raid Jameel

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Due to the current financial and managerial difficulties that are encountered by libraries in public universities in Jordan and the geographical diffusion of these academic institutions, the idea of establishing a consortium was proposed by the Council of Higher Education to combine these libraries. This article reviews the reality of…

  8. Health Science Careers: Tech Prep Consortium for New Jersey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maillet, Julie O'Sullivan; D'Anna, Suzanne

    2001-01-01

    A high school health sciences program consists of an interdisciplinary core curriculum, clinical job shadowing, and potential to earn college credit. Interactive television and CD-ROMs enhance teaching. A consortium of high schools offers the tech prep program in collaboration with the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey. (SK)

  9. Appalachian Clean Coal Technology Consortium. Quarterly technical progress report, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, R.-H.; Phillips, D.I.; Luttrell, G.H.; Basim, B.; Sohn, S.

    1996-07-01

    The Appalachian Clean Coal Technology Consortium (ACCTC) has been established to help U.S. Coal producers, particularly those in the Appalachian region, increase the production of lower-sulfur coal. The consortium has three charter members, including Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, West Virginia University, and the University of Kentucky. The Consortium also includes industry affiliate members that form an Advisory Committee. In keeping with the recommendations of the Advisory Committee, first-year R&D activities are focused on two areas of research: fine coal dewatering and modeling of spirals. The industry representatives to the Consortium identified fine coal dewatering as the most needed area of technology development. Dewatering studies will be conducted by Virginia Tech`s Center for Coal and Minerals Processing. A spiral model is developed by West Virginia University. The research to be performed by the University of Kentucky has recently been determined to be: ``A Study of Novel Approaches for Destabilization of Flotation Froth``. Acoomplishments to date are reported.

  10. It Takes a Consortium to Support Open Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Judy

    2009-01-01

    If the Community College Consortium for Open Educational Resources (CCCOER) has its way, expensive textbooks may go the way of typewriters and carbon paper. Ideally, Internet access for all students would allow educators to replace commercially printed textbooks with interactive digital textbooks and personal learning environments. However, until…

  11. Rio Grande Basin Consortium: Mission, goals, and activities

    Treesearch

    Deborah A. Potter; Deborah M. Finch

    1996-01-01

    The Rio Grande Basin Consortium (RGBC) serves as a networking group and clearinghouse for scientific information pertaining to the Rio Grande Basin. Its membership consists of natural and social scientists from New Mexico’s three research universities, administrators, and resource managers from federal, state, and local governmental agencies, members of community and...

  12. Training a New Generation of Biostatisticians: A Successful Consortium Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Judy M.; Ryan, Philip; Carlin, John B.; Gurrin, Lyle; Marschner, Ian

    2009-01-01

    In response to the worldwide shortage of biostatisticians, Australia has established a national consortium of eight universities to develop and deliver a Masters program in biostatistics. This article describes our successful innovative multi-institutional training model, which may be of value to other countries. We first present the issues…

  13. The External RNA Controls Consortium: a progress report.

    PubMed

    Baker, Shawn C; Bauer, Steven R; Beyer, Richard P; Brenton, James D; Bromley, Bud; Burrill, John; Causton, Helen; Conley, Michael P; Elespuru, Rosalie; Fero, Michael; Foy, Carole; Fuscoe, James; Gao, Xiaolian; Gerhold, David Lee; Gilles, Patrick; Goodsaid, Federico; Guo, Xu; Hackett, Joe; Hockett, Richard D; Ikonomi, Pranvera; Irizarry, Rafael A; Kawasaki, Ernest S; Kaysser-Kranich, Tamma; Kerr, Kathleen; Kiser, Gretchen; Koch, Walter H; Lee, Kathy Y; Liu, Chunmei; Liu, Z Lewis; Lucas, Anne; Manohar, Chitra F; Miyada, Garry; Modrusan, Zora; Parkes, Helen; Puri, Raj K; Reid, Laura; Ryder, Thomas B; Salit, Marc; Samaha, Raymond R; Scherf, Uwe; Sendera, Timothy J; Setterquist, Robert A; Shi, Leming; Shippy, Richard; Soriano, Jesus V; Wagar, Elizabeth A; Warrington, Janet A; Williams, Mickey; Wilmer, Frederike; Wilson, Mike; Wolber, Paul K; Wu, Xiaoning; Zadro, Renata

    2005-10-01

    Standard controls and best practice guidelines advance acceptance of data from research, preclinical and clinical laboratories by providing a means for evaluating data quality. The External RNA Controls Consortium (ERCC) is developing commonly agreed-upon and tested controls for use in expression assays, a true industry-wide standard control.

  14. The Worker Rights Consortium Makes Strides toward Legitimacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van der Werf, Martin

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the rapid growth of the Workers Rights Consortium, a student-originated group with 44 member institutions which opposes sweatshop labor conditions especially in the apparel industry. Notes disagreements about the number of administrators on the board of directors and about the role of industry representives. Compares this group with the…

  15. Called to Collaboration: The University Consortium for Catholic Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Molly; Kennedy, Karen

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the University of Consortium for Catholic Education (UCCE) as an example of collaboration between Catholic colleges, universities, schools, and other stakeholders. The UCCE supports a collaborative cadre of primarily Catholic colleges and universities as they design and implement graduate-level teaching service programs for…

  16. AACJC International/Intercultural Consortium Summer Study Programs Overseas, 1978.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobsen, Becky, Comp.

    Responses to a questionnaire sent in December 1977 to members of the American Association of Community and Junior Colleges' International/Intercultural Consortium (IIC) comprise this report on summer 1978 programs offered overseas by community colleges. The programs are listed alphabetically by world region and country. Program listings contain…

  17. Places to Go: OpenCourseWare Consortium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downes, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    In his Places to Go column, Stephen Downes visits the OpenCourseWare Consortium, a Web site that consolidates access to multiple university-based open courseware initiatives and materials. Downes finds, however, that the site's layout and restricted access hinders the development of the very community it proposes to be supporting. Downes'…

  18. Biodegradation of ketoprofen using a microalgal-bacterial consortium.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Maha M; Essam, Tamer M; Ragab, Yasser M; Mourad, Fathia E

    2016-09-01

    To test the toxicity of ketoprofen (a commonly-used NSAIDs) using two microalgal strains and Artemia sp. following the isolation of bacterial and microalgal strains and testing their ability to biodegrade and tolerate ketoprofen. Chlorella sp. was the most resistant to ketoprofen. A defined bacterial consortium (K2) degraded 5 mM ketoprofen as a sole carbon source both in the dark or continuous illumination. Ketoprofen did not undergo photodegradation. In the dark, biodegradation was faster with a lag phase of 10 h, 41% COD removal and 82 % reduction in toxicity. The consortium degraded up to 16 mM ketoprofen. The consortium was composed of four bacterial isolates that were identified. MS/MS analysis suggested a ketoprofen biodegradation pathway that has not been previously reported. Combining Chlorella sp. and the K2 consortium, ketoprofen was degraded within 7 days under a diurnal cycle of 12 h light/12 h dark. The feasibility of using a microalgal-bacterial system to treat pharmaceutical wastewater is promising for the reduction of the process cost and providing a safer technology for pharmaceutical wastewater treatment.

  19. Academic Library Consortium in Jordan: An Evaluation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmed, Mustafa H.; Suleiman, Raid Jameel

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Due to the current financial and managerial difficulties that are encountered by libraries in public universities in Jordan and the geographical diffusion of these academic institutions, the idea of establishing a consortium was proposed by the Council of Higher Education to combine these libraries. This article reviews the reality of…

  20. Training a New Generation of Biostatisticians: A Successful Consortium Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Judy M.; Ryan, Philip; Carlin, John B.; Gurrin, Lyle; Marschner, Ian

    2009-01-01

    In response to the worldwide shortage of biostatisticians, Australia has established a national consortium of eight universities to develop and deliver a Masters program in biostatistics. This article describes our successful innovative multi-institutional training model, which may be of value to other countries. We first present the issues…

  1. The Research Consortium, 1977-2010: Contributions, Milestones, and Trends

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardinal, Bradley J.; Claman, Gayle

    2010-01-01

    Research and innovation are a cornerstone of any progressive organization. The Research Consortium (RC) has served as the principal organization fulfilling this function on behalf of the American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance (AAHPERD) throughout much of its history. The RC is an organization of approximately 5,000…

  2. It Takes a Consortium to Support Open Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Judy

    2009-01-01

    If the Community College Consortium for Open Educational Resources (CCCOER) has its way, expensive textbooks may go the way of typewriters and carbon paper. Ideally, Internet access for all students would allow educators to replace commercially printed textbooks with interactive digital textbooks and personal learning environments. However, until…

  3. AACJC International/Intercultural Consortium Summer Study Programs Overseas, 1979.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobsen, Becky

    Responses are presented to a questionnaire on overseas summer programs that was sent in January 1979 to members of the American Association of Community and Junior Colleges (AACJC) International/Intercultural Consortium (IIC). Program descriptions are listed alphabetically by world region and country. Program information includes: name of program,…

  4. Virginia Space Grant Consortium Upper Atmospheric Payload Balloon System (Vps)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marz, Bryan E.; Ash, Robert L.

    1996-01-01

    This document provides a summary of the launch and post-launch activities of Virginia Space Grant Consortium Upper Atmospheric Payload Balloon System, V(ps). It is a comprehensive overview covering launch activities, post-launch activities, experimental results, and future flight recommendations.

  5. Teach Louisiana Consortium: A Fifth Year Program Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haj-Broussard, Michelle; Stringer, Angelle

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a fifth year program evaluation of a private provider program for teacher certification in Louisiana. The study sought to evaluate the success of the Teach Louisiana Consortium program in terms of teacher placement, teacher retention, administrative satisfaction, teacher attitudes, and teacher pedagogical knowledge. Initial…

  6. Mathematics Education for Hispanic Students in the Border College Consortium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rendon, Laura I.

    The Border College Consortium (BCC), formed by six Texas, California, and Arizona community colleges along the United States and Mexico border, used a survey to derive a profile of its mathematics and science students. The profile revealed that both Hispanic and White students had difficulties with word problems and study habits, wanted…

  7. 47 CFR 54.636 - Eligible participant-constructed and owned network facilities for consortium applicants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... network facilities for consortium applicants. 54.636 Section 54.636 Telecommunication FEDERAL... owned network facilities for consortium applicants. (a) Subject to the funding limitations under §§ 54.675 and 54.638 and the following restrictions, consortium applicants may receive support for network...

  8. 47 CFR 54.636 - Eligible participant-constructed and owned network facilities for consortium applicants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... network facilities for consortium applicants. 54.636 Section 54.636 Telecommunication FEDERAL... owned network facilities for consortium applicants. (a) Subject to the funding limitations under §§ 54.675 and 54.638 and the following restrictions, consortium applicants may receive support for network...

  9. Midwest Mathematics and Science Consortium Final Grant Report, 1995-2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Central Mathematics and Science Consortium, Naperville, IL.

    This report summarizes North Central Mathematics and Science Consortium (NCMSC), previously known as the Midwest Mathematics and Science Consortium (MSC), previously known as the Midwest Mathematics and Science Consortium (MSC), outcomes over a 5-year period. The outcomes of activities designed to meet six objectives are described. Objectives…

  10. The University of Utah Clinical Genetics Research Program as an NF1 Consortium Site

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-02-01

    chair of the Biology Committee, and he organized a symposium of investigators and clinicians who were part of a MPNST (malignant peripheral nerve sheath...tumor) Consortium and the MPNST Committee of the NF1 Consortium that convened as a satellite meeting of the full NF1 Consortium meeting in Atlanta

  11. 24 CFR 943.124 - What elements must a consortium agreement contain?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false What elements must a consortium agreement contain? 943.124 Section 943.124 Housing and Urban Development REGULATIONS RELATING TO HOUSING AND... elements must a consortium agreement contain? (a) The consortium agreement among the participating PHAs...

  12. 24 CFR 943.124 - What elements must a consortium agreement contain?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What elements must a consortium agreement contain? 943.124 Section 943.124 Housing and Urban Development REGULATIONS RELATING TO HOUSING AND... elements must a consortium agreement contain? (a) The consortium agreement among the participating PHAs...

  13. 24 CFR 943.124 - What elements must a consortium agreement contain?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false What elements must a consortium agreement contain? 943.124 Section 943.124 Housing and Urban Development REGULATIONS RELATING TO HOUSING AND... elements must a consortium agreement contain? (a) The consortium agreement among the participating PHAs...

  14. 24 CFR 943.124 - What elements must a consortium agreement contain?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false What elements must a consortium agreement contain? 943.124 Section 943.124 Housing and Urban Development REGULATIONS RELATING TO HOUSING AND... elements must a consortium agreement contain? (a) The consortium agreement among the participating PHAs...

  15. 25 CFR 1000.425 - How does a Tribe/Consortium request an informal conference?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false How does a Tribe/Consortium request an informal... INDIAN SELF-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ACT Appeals § 1000.425 How does a Tribe/Consortium request an informal conference? The Tribe/Consortium shall file its request for an informal conference with the office...

  16. 25 CFR 1000.425 - How does a Tribe/Consortium request an informal conference?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How does a Tribe/Consortium request an informal... INDIAN SELF-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ACT Appeals § 1000.425 How does a Tribe/Consortium request an informal conference? The Tribe/Consortium shall file its request for an informal conference with the office...

  17. 15 CFR 918.6 - Duration of Sea Grant Regional Consortium designation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Consortium designation. 918.6 Section 918.6 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and... REGULATIONS SEA GRANTS § 918.6 Duration of Sea Grant Regional Consortium designation. Designation will be made... consistent with the goals of the Act. Continuation of the Sea Grant Regional Consortium designation...

  18. 15 CFR 918.6 - Duration of Sea Grant Regional Consortium designation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Consortium designation. 918.6 Section 918.6 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and... REGULATIONS SEA GRANTS § 918.6 Duration of Sea Grant Regional Consortium designation. Designation will be made... consistent with the goals of the Act. Continuation of the Sea Grant Regional Consortium designation...

  19. 15 CFR 918.6 - Duration of Sea Grant Regional Consortium designation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Consortium designation. 918.6 Section 918.6 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and... REGULATIONS SEA GRANTS § 918.6 Duration of Sea Grant Regional Consortium designation. Designation will be made... consistent with the goals of the Act. Continuation of the Sea Grant Regional Consortium designation...

  20. 15 CFR 918.6 - Duration of Sea Grant Regional Consortium designation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Consortium designation. 918.6 Section 918.6 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and... REGULATIONS SEA GRANTS § 918.6 Duration of Sea Grant Regional Consortium designation. Designation will be made... consistent with the goals of the Act. Continuation of the Sea Grant Regional Consortium designation...

  1. 15 CFR 918.6 - Duration of Sea Grant Regional Consortium designation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Consortium designation. 918.6 Section 918.6 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and... REGULATIONS SEA GRANTS § 918.6 Duration of Sea Grant Regional Consortium designation. Designation will be made... consistent with the goals of the Act. Continuation of the Sea Grant Regional Consortium designation...

  2. 25 CFR 1000.23 - How is a Tribe/Consortium admitted to the applicant pool?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false How is a Tribe/Consortium admitted to the applicant pool... Admission into the Applicant Pool § 1000.23 How is a Tribe/Consortium admitted to the applicant pool? To be considered for admission in the applicant pool, a Tribe/Consortium must submit an application to the...

  3. 25 CFR 1000.315 - When must the Tribe/Consortium return funds to the Department?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false When must the Tribe/Consortium return funds to the... INDIAN SELF-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ACT Reassumption § 1000.315 When must the Tribe/Consortium return funds to the Department? The Tribe/Consortium must repay funds to the Department as soon as...

  4. 25 CFR 1000.255 - May a Tribe/Consortium reallocate funds among construction programs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false May a Tribe/Consortium reallocate funds among... INDIAN SELF-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ACT Construction § 1000.255 May a Tribe/Consortium reallocate funds among construction programs? Yes, a Tribe/Consortium may reallocate funds among...

  5. 25 CFR 1000.23 - How is a Tribe/Consortium admitted to the applicant pool?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How is a Tribe/Consortium admitted to the applicant pool... Admission into the Applicant Pool § 1000.23 How is a Tribe/Consortium admitted to the applicant pool? To be considered for admission in the applicant pool, a Tribe/Consortium must submit an application to the...

  6. 34 CFR 636.5 - What are the matching contribution and planning consortium requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... consortium requirements? 636.5 Section 636.5 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of... PROGRAM General § 636.5 What are the matching contribution and planning consortium requirements? (a) The... agreed to by the members of a planning consortium. (Authority: 20 U.S.C. 1136b, 1136e)...

  7. 25 CFR 1000.255 - May a Tribe/Consortium reallocate funds among construction programs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false May a Tribe/Consortium reallocate funds among... INDIAN SELF-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ACT Construction § 1000.255 May a Tribe/Consortium reallocate funds among construction programs? Yes, a Tribe/Consortium may reallocate funds among...

  8. 42 CFR 93.306 - Using a consortium or other person for research misconduct proceedings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Using a consortium or other person for research... and Assurances § 93.306 Using a consortium or other person for research misconduct proceedings. (a) An institution may use the services of a consortium or person that the institution reasonably determines to...

  9. 45 CFR 287.25 - May Tribes form a consortium to operate a NEW Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2013-10-01 2012-10-01 true May Tribes form a consortium to operate a NEW... SERVICES THE NATIVE EMPLOYMENT WORKS (NEW) PROGRAM Eligible Tribes § 287.25 May Tribes form a consortium to operate a NEW Program? (a) Yes, as long as each Tribe forming the consortium is an “eligible Indian...

  10. 25 CFR 1000.222 - How does a Tribe/Consortium obtain a waiver?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false How does a Tribe/Consortium obtain a waiver? 1000.222...-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ACT Waiver of Regulations § 1000.222 How does a Tribe/Consortium obtain a waiver? To obtain a waiver, the Tribe/Consortium must: (a) Submit a written request from the designated...

  11. 45 CFR 287.25 - May Tribes form a consortium to operate a NEW Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2014-10-01 2012-10-01 true May Tribes form a consortium to operate a NEW... SERVICES THE NATIVE EMPLOYMENT WORKS (NEW) PROGRAM Eligible Tribes § 287.25 May Tribes form a consortium to operate a NEW Program? (a) Yes, as long as each Tribe forming the consortium is an “eligible Indian...

  12. 25 CFR 1000.169 - How does a Tribe/Consortium initiate the information phase?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false How does a Tribe/Consortium initiate the information... of Initial Annual Funding Agreements § 1000.169 How does a Tribe/Consortium initiate the information phase? A Tribe/Consortium initiates the information phase by submitting a letter of interest to...

  13. 25 CFR 1000.169 - How does a Tribe/Consortium initiate the information phase?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false How does a Tribe/Consortium initiate the information... of Initial Annual Funding Agreements § 1000.169 How does a Tribe/Consortium initiate the information phase? A Tribe/Consortium initiates the information phase by submitting a letter of interest to...

  14. 25 CFR 1000.23 - How is a Tribe/Consortium admitted to the applicant pool?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false How is a Tribe/Consortium admitted to the applicant pool... Admission into the Applicant Pool § 1000.23 How is a Tribe/Consortium admitted to the applicant pool? To be considered for admission in the applicant pool, a Tribe/Consortium must submit an application to the...

  15. 25 CFR 1000.333 - How does a Tribe/Consortium retrocede a program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How does a Tribe/Consortium retrocede a program? 1000.333...-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ACT Retrocession § 1000.333 How does a Tribe/Consortium retrocede a program? The Tribe/Consortium must submit: (a) A written notice to: (1) The Office of Self-Governance for...

  16. 25 CFR 1000.311 - How will the Secretary reply to the Tribe's/Consortium's response?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How will the Secretary reply to the Tribe's/Consortium's... Tribe's/Consortium's response? The Secretary will make a written determination within 10 days of the Tribe's/Consortium's written response as to whether the proposed measures will eliminate the finding...

  17. 25 CFR 1000.333 - How does a Tribe/Consortium retrocede a program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false How does a Tribe/Consortium retrocede a program? 1000.333...-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ACT Retrocession § 1000.333 How does a Tribe/Consortium retrocede a program? The Tribe/Consortium must submit: (a) A written notice to: (1) The Office of Self-Governance for...

  18. 42 CFR 93.306 - Using a consortium or other person for research misconduct proceedings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Using a consortium or other person for research... and Assurances § 93.306 Using a consortium or other person for research misconduct proceedings. (a) An institution may use the services of a consortium or person that the institution reasonably determines to...

  19. 34 CFR 636.5 - What are the matching contribution and planning consortium requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... consortium requirements? 636.5 Section 636.5 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of... PROGRAM General § 636.5 What are the matching contribution and planning consortium requirements? (a) The... agreed to by the members of a planning consortium. (Authority: 20 U.S.C. 1136b, 1136e)...

  20. 25 CFR 1000.333 - How does a Tribe/Consortium retrocede a program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false How does a Tribe/Consortium retrocede a program? 1000.333...-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ACT Retrocession § 1000.333 How does a Tribe/Consortium retrocede a program? The Tribe/Consortium must submit: (a) A written notice to: (1) The Office of Self-Governance for...

  1. 25 CFR 1000.169 - How does a Tribe/Consortium initiate the information phase?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false How does a Tribe/Consortium initiate the information... of Initial Annual Funding Agreements § 1000.169 How does a Tribe/Consortium initiate the information phase? A Tribe/Consortium initiates the information phase by submitting a letter of interest to...

  2. 45 CFR 287.25 - May Tribes form a consortium to operate a NEW Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false May Tribes form a consortium to operate a NEW... SERVICES THE NATIVE EMPLOYMENT WORKS (NEW) PROGRAM Eligible Tribes § 287.25 May Tribes form a consortium to operate a NEW Program? (a) Yes, as long as each Tribe forming the consortium is an “eligible Indian...

  3. 25 CFR 1000.425 - How does a Tribe/Consortium request an informal conference?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false How does a Tribe/Consortium request an informal... INDIAN SELF-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ACT Appeals § 1000.425 How does a Tribe/Consortium request an informal conference? The Tribe/Consortium shall file its request for an informal conference with the...

  4. 45 CFR 287.25 - May Tribes form a consortium to operate a NEW Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false May Tribes form a consortium to operate a NEW... SERVICES THE NATIVE EMPLOYMENT WORKS (NEW) PROGRAM Eligible Tribes § 287.25 May Tribes form a consortium to operate a NEW Program? (a) Yes, as long as each Tribe forming the consortium is an “eligible Indian...

  5. 42 CFR 93.306 - Using a consortium or other person for research misconduct proceedings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Using a consortium or other person for research... and Assurances § 93.306 Using a consortium or other person for research misconduct proceedings. (a) An institution may use the services of a consortium or person that the institution reasonably determines to...

  6. 25 CFR 1000.315 - When must the Tribe/Consortium return funds to the Department?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false When must the Tribe/Consortium return funds to the... INDIAN SELF-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ACT Reassumption § 1000.315 When must the Tribe/Consortium return funds to the Department? The Tribe/Consortium must repay funds to the Department as soon as...

  7. 25 CFR 1000.315 - When must the Tribe/Consortium return funds to the Department?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false When must the Tribe/Consortium return funds to the... INDIAN SELF-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ACT Reassumption § 1000.315 When must the Tribe/Consortium return funds to the Department? The Tribe/Consortium must repay funds to the Department as soon as...

  8. 25 CFR 1000.169 - How does a Tribe/Consortium initiate the information phase?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false How does a Tribe/Consortium initiate the information... of Initial Annual Funding Agreements § 1000.169 How does a Tribe/Consortium initiate the information phase? A Tribe/Consortium initiates the information phase by submitting a letter of interest to...

  9. 25 CFR 1000.315 - When must the Tribe/Consortium return funds to the Department?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false When must the Tribe/Consortium return funds to the... INDIAN SELF-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ACT Reassumption § 1000.315 When must the Tribe/Consortium return funds to the Department? The Tribe/Consortium must repay funds to the Department as soon as...

  10. 25 CFR 1000.222 - How does a Tribe/Consortium obtain a waiver?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false How does a Tribe/Consortium obtain a waiver? 1000.222...-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ACT Waiver of Regulations § 1000.222 How does a Tribe/Consortium obtain a waiver? To obtain a waiver, the Tribe/Consortium must: (a) Submit a written request from the designated...

  11. 25 CFR 1000.222 - How does a Tribe/Consortium obtain a waiver?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false How does a Tribe/Consortium obtain a waiver? 1000.222...-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ACT Waiver of Regulations § 1000.222 How does a Tribe/Consortium obtain a waiver? To obtain a waiver, the Tribe/Consortium must: (a) Submit a written request from the designated...

  12. 25 CFR 1000.333 - How does a Tribe/Consortium retrocede a program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false How does a Tribe/Consortium retrocede a program? 1000.333...-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ACT Retrocession § 1000.333 How does a Tribe/Consortium retrocede a program? The Tribe/Consortium must submit: (a) A written notice to: (1) The Office of Self-Governance for...

  13. 34 CFR 636.5 - What are the matching contribution and planning consortium requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... consortium requirements? 636.5 Section 636.5 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of... PROGRAM General § 636.5 What are the matching contribution and planning consortium requirements? (a) The... agreed to by the members of a planning consortium. (Authority: 20 U.S.C. 1136b, 1136e)...

  14. 25 CFR 1000.311 - How will the Secretary reply to the Tribe's/Consortium's response?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false How will the Secretary reply to the Tribe's/Consortium's... Tribe's/Consortium's response? The Secretary will make a written determination within 10 days of the Tribe's/Consortium's written response as to whether the proposed measures will eliminate the finding...

  15. 25 CFR 1000.311 - How will the Secretary reply to the Tribe's/Consortium's response?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false How will the Secretary reply to the Tribe's/Consortium's... Tribe's/Consortium's response? The Secretary will make a written determination within 10 days of the Tribe's/Consortium's written response as to whether the proposed measures will eliminate the finding...

  16. 25 CFR 1000.255 - May a Tribe/Consortium reallocate funds among construction programs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false May a Tribe/Consortium reallocate funds among... INDIAN SELF-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ACT Construction § 1000.255 May a Tribe/Consortium reallocate funds among construction programs? Yes, a Tribe/Consortium may reallocate funds among...

  17. 34 CFR 636.5 - What are the matching contribution and planning consortium requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... consortium requirements? 636.5 Section 636.5 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of... PROGRAM General § 636.5 What are the matching contribution and planning consortium requirements? (a) The... agreed to by the members of a planning consortium. (Authority: 20 U.S.C. 1136b, 1136e)...

  18. 25 CFR 1000.311 - How will the Secretary reply to the Tribe's/Consortium's response?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false How will the Secretary reply to the Tribe's/Consortium's... Tribe's/Consortium's response? The Secretary will make a written determination within 10 days of the Tribe's/Consortium's written response as to whether the proposed measures will eliminate the finding...

  19. 34 CFR 636.5 - What are the matching contribution and planning consortium requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... consortium requirements? 636.5 Section 636.5 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of... PROGRAM General § 636.5 What are the matching contribution and planning consortium requirements? (a) The... agreed to by the members of a planning consortium. (Authority: 20 U.S.C. 1136b, 1136e)...

  20. 25 CFR 1000.425 - How does a Tribe/Consortium request an informal conference?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false How does a Tribe/Consortium request an informal... INDIAN SELF-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ACT Appeals § 1000.425 How does a Tribe/Consortium request an informal conference? The Tribe/Consortium shall file its request for an informal conference with the...

  1. 25 CFR 1000.222 - How does a Tribe/Consortium obtain a waiver?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false How does a Tribe/Consortium obtain a waiver? 1000.222...-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ACT Waiver of Regulations § 1000.222 How does a Tribe/Consortium obtain a waiver? To obtain a waiver, the Tribe/Consortium must: (a) Submit a written request from the designated...

  2. 25 CFR 1000.311 - How will the Secretary reply to the Tribe's/Consortium's response?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false How will the Secretary reply to the Tribe's/Consortium's... Tribe's/Consortium's response? The Secretary will make a written determination within 10 days of the Tribe's/Consortium's written response as to whether the proposed measures will eliminate the finding...

  3. 25 CFR 1000.23 - How is a Tribe/Consortium admitted to the applicant pool?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false How is a Tribe/Consortium admitted to the applicant pool... Admission into the Applicant Pool § 1000.23 How is a Tribe/Consortium admitted to the applicant pool? To be considered for admission in the applicant pool, a Tribe/Consortium must submit an application to the...

  4. 25 CFR 1000.425 - How does a Tribe/Consortium request an informal conference?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false How does a Tribe/Consortium request an informal... INDIAN SELF-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ACT Appeals § 1000.425 How does a Tribe/Consortium request an informal conference? The Tribe/Consortium shall file its request for an informal conference with the...

  5. 25 CFR 1000.255 - May a Tribe/Consortium reallocate funds among construction programs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false May a Tribe/Consortium reallocate funds among... INDIAN SELF-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ACT Construction § 1000.255 May a Tribe/Consortium reallocate funds among construction programs? Yes, a Tribe/Consortium may reallocate funds among...

  6. 25 CFR 1000.315 - When must the Tribe/Consortium return funds to the Department?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false When must the Tribe/Consortium return funds to the... INDIAN SELF-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ACT Reassumption § 1000.315 When must the Tribe/Consortium return funds to the Department? The Tribe/Consortium must repay funds to the Department as soon as...

  7. 25 CFR 1000.333 - How does a Tribe/Consortium retrocede a program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false How does a Tribe/Consortium retrocede a program? 1000.333...-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ACT Retrocession § 1000.333 How does a Tribe/Consortium retrocede a program? The Tribe/Consortium must submit: (a) A written notice to: (1) The Office of Self-Governance for...

  8. 25 CFR 1000.169 - How does a Tribe/Consortium initiate the information phase?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How does a Tribe/Consortium initiate the information... of Initial Annual Funding Agreements § 1000.169 How does a Tribe/Consortium initiate the information phase? A Tribe/Consortium initiates the information phase by submitting a letter of interest to...

  9. 25 CFR 1000.23 - How is a Tribe/Consortium admitted to the applicant pool?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false How is a Tribe/Consortium admitted to the applicant pool... Admission into the Applicant Pool § 1000.23 How is a Tribe/Consortium admitted to the applicant pool? To be considered for admission in the applicant pool, a Tribe/Consortium must submit an application to the...

  10. 42 CFR 93.306 - Using a consortium or other person for research misconduct proceedings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Using a consortium or other person for research... and Assurances § 93.306 Using a consortium or other person for research misconduct proceedings. (a) An institution may use the services of a consortium or person that the institution reasonably determines to...

  11. The Hills Are Alive: The Appalachian Consortium Approach to Staff Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsons, Michael H.

    This paper describes the formation of the Appalachian Consortium, assesses its impact after one year of operation, and examines its future development. Consortium goals were to provide in-service, staff development opportunities for the instructional faculties of the consortium's member colleges (three community colleges and a state university)…

  12. 77 FR 38770 - Notice of Consortium on “nSoft Consortium”

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-29

    ... National Institute of Standards and Technology Notice of Consortium on ``nSoft Consortium'' AGENCY...@nist.gov , dan.neumann@nist.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: NIST will form the ``nSoft Consortium'' to advance and transfer neutron based measurement methods for soft materials manufacturing. The goals of n...

  13. Improving safety of aircraft engines: a consortium approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brasche, Lisa J. H.

    1996-11-01

    With over seven million departures per year, air transportation has become not a luxury, but a standard mode of transportation for the United States. A critical aspect of modern air transport is the jet engine, a complex engineered component that has enabled the rapid travel to which we have all become accustomed. One of the enabling technologies for safe air travel is nondestructive evaluation, or NDE, which includes various inspection techniques used to assess the health or integrity of a structure, component, or material. The Engine Titanium Consortium (ETC) was established in 1993 to respond to recommendations made by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Titanium Rotating Components Review Team (TRCRT) for improvements in inspection of engine titanium. Several recent accomplishments of the ETC are detailed in this paper. The objective of the Engine Titanium Consortium is to provide the FAAand the manufacturers with reliable and costeffective new methods and/or improvements in mature methods for detecting cracks, inclusions, and imperfections in titanium. The consortium consists of a team of researchers from academia and industry-namely, Iowa State University, Allied Signal Propulsion Engines, General Electric Aircraft Engines, and Pratt & Whitney Engines-who work together to develop program priorities, organize a program plan, conduct the research, and implement the solutions. The true advantage of the consortium approach is that it brings together the research talents of academia and the engineering talents of industry to tackle a technology-base problem. In bringing industrial competitors together, the consortium ensures that the research results, which have safety implications and result from FAA funds, are shared and become part of the public domain.

  14. The Consortium for Student Retention Data Exchange: A Case Study of Consortium Development. AIR 2002 Forum Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Theresa Y.

    The Consortium for Student Retention Data Exchange was established in 1994. Its membership increased from 163 colleges and universities in 1994 to more than 400 in 2001. Over the past 8 years, the routine of working with a large and diverse group of institutions has culminated in a valuable collection of experiences and lessons. The 8-year…

  15. AFT-QuEST Consortium Yearbook. Proceedings of the AFT-QuEST Consortium (April 22-26, 1973).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Federation of Teachers, Washington, DC.

    This document is a report on the proceedings of the 1973 American Federation of Teachers-Quality Educational Standards in Teaching (AFT-QuEST) consortium sponsored by the AFT. Included in this document are the texts of speeches and outlines of workshops and iscussions. The document is divided into the following sections: goals, major proposals,…

  16. 25 CFR 1000.396 - Does a Tribe/Consortium have additional ongoing requirements to maintain minimum standards for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Does a Tribe/Consortium have additional ongoing requirements to maintain minimum standards for Tribe/Consortium management systems? 1000.396 Section 1000.396... minimum standards for Tribe/Consortium management systems? Yes, the Tribe/Consortium must...

  17. 25 CFR 1000.396 - Does a Tribe/Consortium have additional ongoing requirements to maintain minimum standards for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Does a Tribe/Consortium have additional ongoing requirements to maintain minimum standards for Tribe/Consortium management systems? 1000.396 Section 1000.396... minimum standards for Tribe/Consortium management systems? Yes, the Tribe/Consortium must...

  18. 25 CFR 1000.396 - Does a Tribe/Consortium have additional ongoing requirements to maintain minimum standards for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Does a Tribe/Consortium have additional ongoing requirements to maintain minimum standards for Tribe/Consortium management systems? 1000.396 Section 1000.396... minimum standards for Tribe/Consortium management systems? Yes, the Tribe/Consortium must...

  19. 25 CFR 1000.396 - Does a Tribe/Consortium have additional ongoing requirements to maintain minimum standards for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Does a Tribe/Consortium have additional ongoing requirements to maintain minimum standards for Tribe/Consortium management systems? 1000.396 Section 1000.396... minimum standards for Tribe/Consortium management systems? Yes, the Tribe/Consortium must...

  20. 25 CFR 1000.231 - How does a Tribe/Consortium request reconsideration of the Secretary's denial of a waiver?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false How does a Tribe/Consortium request reconsideration of... How does a Tribe/Consortium request reconsideration of the Secretary's denial of a waiver? (a) The Tribe/Consortium may request reconsideration of a waiver denial. To do so, the Tribe/Consortium...

  1. 45 CFR 287.30 - If an eligible consortium breaks up, what happens to the NEW Program grant?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false If an eligible consortium breaks up, what happens... eligible consortium breaks up, what happens to the NEW Program grant? (a) If a consortium should break up or any Tribe withdraws from a consortium, it will be necessary to allocate unobligated funds...

  2. 45 CFR 287.30 - If an eligible consortium breaks up, what happens to the NEW Program grant?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2013-10-01 2012-10-01 true If an eligible consortium breaks up, what happens... eligible consortium breaks up, what happens to the NEW Program grant? (a) If a consortium should break up or any Tribe withdraws from a consortium, it will be necessary to allocate unobligated funds...

  3. 45 CFR 287.30 - If an eligible consortium breaks up, what happens to the NEW Program grant?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2014-10-01 2012-10-01 true If an eligible consortium breaks up, what happens... eligible consortium breaks up, what happens to the NEW Program grant? (a) If a consortium should break up or any Tribe withdraws from a consortium, it will be necessary to allocate unobligated funds...

  4. 25 CFR 1000.231 - How does a Tribe/Consortium request reconsideration of the Secretary's denial of a waiver?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false How does a Tribe/Consortium request reconsideration of... How does a Tribe/Consortium request reconsideration of the Secretary's denial of a waiver? (a) The Tribe/Consortium may request reconsideration of a waiver denial. To do so, the Tribe/Consortium...

  5. 25 CFR 1000.224 - How can a Tribe/Consortium expedite the review of a regulation waiver request?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false How can a Tribe/Consortium expedite the review of a... Tribe/Consortium expedite the review of a regulation waiver request? A Tribe/Consortium may request a... request. (a) To set up a meeting, the Tribe/Consortium should contact: (1) For BIA programs, the...

  6. 45 CFR 287.30 - If an eligible consortium breaks up, what happens to the NEW Program grant?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false If an eligible consortium breaks up, what happens... eligible consortium breaks up, what happens to the NEW Program grant? (a) If a consortium should break up or any Tribe withdraws from a consortium, it will be necessary to allocate unobligated funds...

  7. 25 CFR 1000.221 - Can the Secretary grant a waiver of regulations to a Tribe/Consortium?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Tribe/Consortium? 1000.221 Section 1000.221 Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY, INDIAN AFFAIRS... waiver of regulations to a Tribe/Consortium? Yes, a Tribe/Consortium may ask the Secretary to grant a... part, operated by a Tribe/Consortium under an AFA....

  8. 25 CFR 1000.231 - How does a Tribe/Consortium request reconsideration of the Secretary's denial of a waiver?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false How does a Tribe/Consortium request reconsideration of... How does a Tribe/Consortium request reconsideration of the Secretary's denial of a waiver? (a) The Tribe/Consortium may request reconsideration of a waiver denial. To do so, the Tribe/Consortium...

  9. 25 CFR 1000.221 - Can the Secretary grant a waiver of regulations to a Tribe/Consortium?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Tribe/Consortium? 1000.221 Section 1000.221 Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY, INDIAN AFFAIRS... waiver of regulations to a Tribe/Consortium? Yes, a Tribe/Consortium may ask the Secretary to grant a... part, operated by a Tribe/Consortium under an AFA....

  10. 25 CFR 1000.221 - Can the Secretary grant a waiver of regulations to a Tribe/Consortium?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Tribe/Consortium? 1000.221 Section 1000.221 Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY, INDIAN AFFAIRS... waiver of regulations to a Tribe/Consortium? Yes, a Tribe/Consortium may ask the Secretary to grant a... part, operated by a Tribe/Consortium under an AFA....

  11. 25 CFR 1000.224 - How can a Tribe/Consortium expedite the review of a regulation waiver request?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false How can a Tribe/Consortium expedite the review of a... Tribe/Consortium expedite the review of a regulation waiver request? A Tribe/Consortium may request a... request. (a) To set up a meeting, the Tribe/Consortium should contact: (1) For BIA programs, the...

  12. 25 CFR 1000.221 - Can the Secretary grant a waiver of regulations to a Tribe/Consortium?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Tribe/Consortium? 1000.221 Section 1000.221 Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY, INDIAN AFFAIRS... waiver of regulations to a Tribe/Consortium? Yes, a Tribe/Consortium may ask the Secretary to grant a... part, operated by a Tribe/Consortium under an AFA....

  13. 25 CFR 1000.224 - How can a Tribe/Consortium expedite the review of a regulation waiver request?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false How can a Tribe/Consortium expedite the review of a... Tribe/Consortium expedite the review of a regulation waiver request? A Tribe/Consortium may request a... request. (a) To set up a meeting, the Tribe/Consortium should contact: (1) For BIA programs, the...

  14. 25 CFR 1000.231 - How does a Tribe/Consortium request reconsideration of the Secretary's denial of a waiver?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false How does a Tribe/Consortium request reconsideration of... How does a Tribe/Consortium request reconsideration of the Secretary's denial of a waiver? (a) The Tribe/Consortium may request reconsideration of a waiver denial. To do so, the Tribe/Consortium...

  15. Developing the Oregon Consortium for Nursing Education: the back story.

    PubMed

    Gaines, Barbara C; Spencer, Angela G

    2013-01-01

    The Oregon Consortium for Nursing Education (OCNE) is a collaborative partnership between community colleges and a multicampus university in Oregon that developed in response to an emerging nursing shortage and changing health needs in the population. OCNE has created a redesigned curriculum with shared agreements for academic standards, admission, and seamless transition from associate to baccalaureate programs. Although the schools share pedagogical resources, curriculum, and standards, each partner school retains autonomy and accountability for its degree program. The creation and continued development of the consortium required the participation of people from multiple organizations with diverse concerns. Through a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation-funded evaluation of OCNE, this retrospective analysis was conducted to describe the process of consensus building that resulted in OCNE and to provide an explanatory framework for the benefit of others who are seeking to redesign nursing education in their communities.

  16. A University Consortium on Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition Engine Research

    SciTech Connect

    Assanis, Dennis; Atreya, Arvind; Bowman, Craig; Chen, Jyh-Yuan; Cheng, Wai; Davidson, David; Dibble, Robert; Edwards, Chris; Filipi, Zoran; Golden, David; Green, William; Hanson, Ronald; Hedrick, J Karl; Heywood, John; Im, Hong; Lavoie, George; Sick, Volker; Wooldridge, Margaret

    2007-03-31

    Over the course of this four year project, the consortium team members from UM, MIT, Stanford, and Berkeley along with contributors from Sandia National Labs and LLNL, have produced a wide range of results on gasoline HCCI control and implementation. The work spanned a wide range of activities including engine experiments, fundamental chemical kinetics experiments, and an array of analytical modeling techniques and simulations. Throughout the project a collaborative approach has produced a many significant new insights into HCCI engines and their behavior while at the same time we achieved our key consortium goal: to develop workable strategies for gasoline HCCI control and implementation. The major accomplishments in each task are summarized, followed by detailed discussion.

  17. Learning through collaboration: the NEXus consortium as a winning collaborative.

    PubMed

    Komnenich, Pauline; Hayes, Janice S; Magilvy, Kathy; McNeil, Paula A

    2013-02-01

    The Nursing Education Exchange (NEXus) is a consortium of academic doctoral programs in nursing, initiated in response to a national shortage of well-qualified nurse educators and the need to increase the number of doctoral faculty in nursing programs across the United States. The vision for the consortium was to use distance-accessible delivery methods to provide rural nurse educators and clinical nurses with access to quality doctoral programs in nursing while remaining in their home environments. In addition, smaller or newly established doctoral programs would be able to offer a wider variety of elective coursework without recruiting and hiring additional faculty, further decreasing their limited available resources. This article describes the initiation and implementation of a successful nursing education collaborative that has gained increasing influence across the country and is recognized by its acronym, NEXus. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  18. Meeting Report from the Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC) Workshop 8

    PubMed Central

    Kyrpides, Nikos; Field, Dawn; Sterk, Peter; Kottmann, Renzo; Glöckner, Frank Oliver; Hirschman, Lynette; Garrity, George M.; Cochrane, Guy; Wooley, John

    2010-01-01

    This report summarizes the proceedings of the 8th meeting of the Genomic Standards Consortium held at the Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute in Walnut Creek, CA, USA on September 9-11, 2009. This three-day workshop marked the maturing of Genomic Standards Consortium from an informal gathering of researchers interested in developing standards in the field of genomic and metagenomics to an established community with a defined governance mechanism, its own open access journal, and a family of established standards for describing genomes, metagenomes and marker studies (i.e. ribosomal RNA gene surveys). There will be increased efforts within the GSC to reach out to the wider scientific community via a range of new projects. Further information about the GSC and its activities can be found at http://gensc.org/. PMID:21304696

  19. Military Suicide Research Consortium: Extension to New Opportunities and Challenges

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-04-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-16-2-0004 TITLE: Military Suicide Research Consortium: Extension to New Opportunities and Challenges PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...Peter M. Gutierrez, Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Denver Research Institute Denver, CO 80220 REPORT DATE: April 2017 TYPE OF REPORT: Annual...PREPARED FOR: U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command Fort Detrick, Maryland 21702-5012 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT: Approved for Public

  20. Prostate Cancer Clinical Consortium Clinical Research Site:Targeted Therapies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    Cornell Medical College Prostate Cancer Research Program (WCMC-PCRP) is a Clinical Research Site of the Prostate Cancer Clinical Trials Consortium...effectively bring novel agents and new biomarker driven trials directly to patients 17 Table of Contents Page 1. Introduction...purpose and scope of the research. The Weill Cornell Medical College Prostate Cancer Research Program (WCMC-PCRP) is a Clinical Research Site of the

  1. Delaware Consortium for Undergraduate Minority Training in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-02-01

    in fertilization, and it is best known for its neutral hyaluronidase activity. The human SPAM 1 gene, which is located on chromosome 7q31 , is...AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-06- 1 -0244 TITLE: Delaware Consortium for Undergraduate...DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form Approved OMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per

  2. Transformation of phenol into phenylalanine by a methanogenic consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Lepine, F.; Milot, S.; Beaudet, R.; Villemur, R.

    1996-03-01

    Phenol is a widely used chemical found in many wastewaters of industrial origin. The degradation of phenol by methanogenic bacterial consortia has been reported by many investigators. To better characterise the metabolism of this consortium, a new metabolic pathway of benzoic acid, an intermediary in the degradation of phenol, is reported. This study describes the transformations of benzoic acid into 3-phenylpropionic acid and phenylalanine. 25 refs., 5 figs.

  3. FLYSUB-Consortium Tracking and RICH Performance Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Soha, Aria; Azumoun, Bob; Blatnik, Marie; Pak, Robert; Purschke, Martin; Di Ruzza, Benedetto; Woody, Craig; Bhopatkar, Vallary; Hohlmann, Marcus; Twigger, Jessie; Zhang, Aiwu; Dehmelt, Klaus; Deshpande, Abhay; Feege, Nils; Hemmick, Thomas; Bai, Xinzhang; Gnanvo, Kondo; Gu, Chao; Liyanage, Nilanga; Majka, Richard; Smirnov, Nikolai

    2013-09-23

    This is a technical scope of work (TSW) between the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) and the experiments of FLYSUB-Consortium who have committed to participate in beam tests to be carried out during the 2013-2014 Fermilab Test Beam Facility program. The ultimate goal of this test-beam effort is to test and verify the performance of the individual components according to their expectation.

  4. A Process Research Framework: The International Process Research Consortium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-01

    www.sei.cmu.edu/iprc A Process Research Framework The International Process Research Consortium Eileen Forrester, editor Julia Allen Vic Basili...valuable mix of intuition and imagination. • Julia Allen, Software Engineering Institute • Vic Basili, University of Maryland • Barry Boehm...process. IPRC Framework xvii A colleague from SAIC, Ms. Mary Ann Herndon, attended several of our workshops until she left to form her own company

  5. Clinicians' experiences with the fragile X clinical and research consortium.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jessica A; Hagerman, Randi J; Miller, Robert M; Craft, Lisa T; Finucane, Brenda; Tartaglia, Nicole; Berry-Kravis, Elizabeth M; Sherman, Stephanie L; Kidd, Sharon A; Cohen, Jeffrey

    2016-12-01

    The objectives of the study were to assess the attitudes and experiences of clinicians involved in a consortium of clinics serving people with fragile X-associated disorders to gauge satisfaction with the consortium and its efforts to improve quality of life for patients and the community. An internet survey was sent to 26 fragile X (FX) clinic directors participating in the Fragile X Clinical and Research Consortium (FXCRC). Respondents were asked to complete 19 questions on consortium performance and outcomes relevant for their own clinic. The response rate was 84% (22/26), with two surveys providing incomplete data. Assistance with clinic establishment, opportunities for research collaborations, and access to colleagues and information were highly valued. Approximately 76% of clinicians reported improvements in patient care and 60% reported an increase in patient services. There was a 57% increase in participation in a FX-related clinical trial among clinics since joining the FXCRC (24% vs. 81%). Overall, respondents reported primarily positive experiences from participation in the FXCRC. Common suggestions for improvement included additional financial support and increased utilization of collected patient data for research purposes. Additionally, a Clinic Services Checklist was administered annually to examine changes in services offered over time. There were several important changes regarding the provision of services by clinics, often with multiple clinics changing with respect to a service. In conclusion, the FXCRC has led to the establishment and sustainment of fragile X clinics in the U.S., fostered cooperation among fragile X clinicians, and provided clinics with a platform to share recommendations and best practices to maximize quality of life for their patients and the overall fragile X community. The results from the survey and checklist also provide suggestions to strengthen the FXCRC and enhance future collaborations among FXCRC members. © 2016

  6. The international AGN watch: A multiwavelength monitoring consortium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alloin, D.; Clavel, J.; Peterson, B. M.; Reichert, G. A.; Stirpe, G. M.

    1994-01-01

    The International AGN Watch, an informal consortium of over 100 astronomers, was established to coordinate multiwavelength monitoring of a limited number of active galactic nuclei and thus obtain comprehensive continuum and emission-line variability data with unprecedented temporal and wavelength coverage. We summarize the principal scientific results from two completed space-based and ground-based campaigns on the Seyfert galaxies NGC 5548 and NGC 3783. We describe a project in progress and outline our future plans.

  7. Mission Connect Mild TBI Translational Research Consortium, Post Traumatic Hypopituitarism

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-01

    10 Aug 2010 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The Mission Connect MTBI Translational Research Consortium 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Post traumatic hypopituitarism 5b...distribution unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The purpose of this project is to identify the incidence of post traumatic hypopituitarism ...June 21, 2010; however, none have reached the six month milestone for blood testing 15. SUBJECT TERMS post traumatic hypopituitarism 16. SECURITY

  8. 25 CFR 1000.281 - Does FTCA cover employees of the Tribe/Consortium who are paid by the Tribe/Consortium from funds...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... paid by the Tribe/Consortium from funds other than those provided through the self-governance AFA? 1000... AFA? Yes, FTCA covers employees of the Tribe/Consortium who are not paid from AFA funds as long as the services out of which the claim arose were performed in carrying out the self-governance AFA....

  9. 25 CFR 1000.281 - Does FTCA cover employees of the Tribe/Consortium who are paid by the Tribe/Consortium from funds...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... paid by the Tribe/Consortium from funds other than those provided through the self-governance AFA? 1000... AFA? Yes, FTCA covers employees of the Tribe/Consortium who are not paid from AFA funds as long as the services out of which the claim arose were performed in carrying out the self-governance AFA....

  10. 25 CFR 1000.281 - Does FTCA cover employees of the Tribe/Consortium who are paid by the Tribe/Consortium from funds...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... paid by the Tribe/Consortium from funds other than those provided through the self-governance AFA? 1000... AFA? Yes, FTCA covers employees of the Tribe/Consortium who are not paid from AFA funds as long as the services out of which the claim arose were performed in carrying out the self-governance AFA....

  11. 25 CFR 1000.281 - Does FTCA cover employees of the Tribe/Consortium who are paid by the Tribe/Consortium from funds...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... paid by the Tribe/Consortium from funds other than those provided through the self-governance AFA? 1000... AFA? Yes, FTCA covers employees of the Tribe/Consortium who are not paid from AFA funds as long as the services out of which the claim arose were performed in carrying out the self-governance AFA....

  12. 25 CFR 1000.281 - Does FTCA cover employees of the Tribe/Consortium who are paid by the Tribe/Consortium from funds...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... paid by the Tribe/Consortium from funds other than those provided through the self-governance AFA? 1000... AFA? Yes, FTCA covers employees of the Tribe/Consortium who are not paid from AFA funds as long as the services out of which the claim arose were performed in carrying out the self-governance AFA....

  13. Northern New Jersey Nursing Education Consortium: a partnership for graduate nursing education.

    PubMed

    Quinless, F W; Levin, R F

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the evolution and implementation of the Northern New Jersey Nursing Education consortium--a consortium of seven member institutions established in 1992. Details regarding the specific functions of the consortium relative to cross-registration of students in graduate courses, financial disbursement of revenue, faculty development activities, student services, library privileges, and institutional research review board mechanisms are described. The authors also review the administrative organizational structure through which the work conducted by the consortium occurs. Both the advantages and disadvantages of such a graduate consortium are explored, and specific examples of recent potential and real conflicts are fully discussed. The authors detail governance and structure of the consortium as a potential model for replication in other environments.

  14. Southeast Clinical Oncology Research Consortium, Inc. (SCOR) | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): The SCCC-Upstate is a merger of two successful legacy CCOPs known as Southeast Cancer Control Consortium, Inc. (SCCC) and Upstate Carolina (hereafter the Consortium) comprised of 23 components and 63 sub-components, located in a five-state area of the Southeast US (GA, NC, SC, TN, and VA) with a nonclinical Administrative Office (AO) in Winston-Salem, NC. The Consortium eliminates a critical barrier by supplying service to the rural southeastern area. |

  15. Brain Immune Interactions as the Basis of Gulf War Illness: Gulf War Illness Consortium (GWIC)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-2-0072 TITLE: Brain Immune Interactions as the Basis of Gulf War Illness : Gulf War Illness Consortium (GWIC...Title and Subtitle Brain Immune Interactions as the Basis of Gulf War Illness : Gulf War Illness Consortium (GWIC) 5. Award Number W81XWH-13-2-0072...distribution unlimited 12b. Distribution Code (Leave Blank) 13. Abstract (Maximum 200 Words) The primary function of the Gulf War Illness (GWIC) consortium

  16. Brain Immune Interactions as the Basis of Gulf War Illness: Gulf War Illness Consortium (GWIC)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-2-0072 TITLE: Brain Immune Interactions as the Basis of Gulf War Illness : Gulf War Illness Consortium (GWIC) PRINCIPAL...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Brain Immune Interactions as the Basis of Gulf War Illness : Gulf War Illness Consortium (GWIC) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT...Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The primary function of the Gulf War Illness (GWIC) consortium is to identify the

  17. Kansas Consortium Plug-in Hybrid Medium Duty

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2012-03-31

    On September 30, 2008, the US Department of Energy (DoE), issued a cooperative agreement award, DE-FC26-08NT01914, to the Metropolitan Energy Center (MEC), for a project known as “Kansas Consortium Plug-in Hybrid Medium Duty Certification” project. The cooperative agreement was awarded pursuant to H15915 in reference to H. R. 2764 Congressionally Directed Projects. The original agreement provided funding for The Consortium to implement the established project objectives as follows: (1) to understand the current state of the development of a test protocol for PHEV configurations; (2) to work with industry stakeholders to recommend a medium duty vehicle test protocol; (3) to utilize the Phase 1 Eaton PHEV F550 Chassis or other appropriate PHEV configurations to conduct emissions testing; (4) and to make an industry PHEV certification test protocol recommendation for medium duty trucks. Subsequent amendments to the initial agreement were made, the most significant being a revised Scope of Project Objectives (SOPO) that did not address actual field data since it was not available as originally expected. This project was mated by DOE with a parallel project award given to the South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) in California. The SCAQMD project involved designing, building and testing of five medium duty plug-in hybrid electric trucks. SCAQMD had contracted with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) to manage the project. EPRI provided the required match to the federal grant funds to both the SCAQMD project and the Kansas Consortium project. The rational for linking the two projects was that the data derived from the SCAQMD project could be used to validate the protocols developed by the Kansas Consortium team. At the same time, the consortium team would be a useful resource to SCAQMD in designating their test procedures for emissions and operating parameters and determining vehicle mileage. The years between award of the cooperative

  18. Decolorization and biodegradation of reactive dyes and dye wastewater by a developed bacterial consortium.

    PubMed

    Saratale, R G; Saratale, G D; Chang, J S; Govindwar, S P

    2010-11-01

    A bacterial consortium (consortium GR) consisting of Proteus vulgaris NCIM-2027 and Micrococcus glutamicus NCIM-2168 could rapidly decolorize and degrade commonly-used sulfonated reactive dye Green HE4BD and many other reactive dyes. Consortium GR shows markedly higher decolorization activity than that of the individual strains. The preferable physicochemical parameters were identified to achieve higher dye degradation and decolorization efficiency. The supplementation of cheap co-substrates (e.g., extracts of agricultural wastes) could enhance the decolorization performance of consortium GR. Extent of mineralization was determined with TOC and COD measurements, showing nearly complete mineralization of Green HE4BD by consortium GR (up to 90% TOC and COD reduction) within 24 h. Oxidoreductive enzymes seemed to be involved in fast decolorization/degradation process with the evidence of enzymes induction in the bacterial consortium. Phytotoxicity and microbial toxicity studies confirm that the biodegraded products of Green HE4BD by consortium GR are non-toxic. Consortium GR also shows significant biodegradation and decolorization activities for mixture of reactive dyes as well as the effluent from actual dye manufacturing industry. This confers the possibility of applying consortium GR for the treatment of industrial wastewaters containing dye pollutants.

  19. Detection and identification of rumen bacteria constituting a fibrolytic consortium dominated by Fibrobacter succinogenes.

    PubMed

    Shinkai, Takumi; Ueki, Takaaki; Kobayashi, Yasuo

    2010-02-01

    A fibrolytic consortium, dominated by the rumen cellulolytic bacterium Fibrobacter succinogenes, was artificially constructed on hay stems to detect and identify rumen bacteria that can potentially interact with F. succinogenes. Consortium-bacterial members were determined by DGGE and sequencing analysis targeted bacterial 16S rDNA. An artificial consortium was formed in a 2-step incubation of hay stems; the first step with group 1, 2 or 3 F. succinogenes strains, the second step with rumen fluid. After consortium formation, morphologically different bacteria were observed in association with F. succinogenes. DGGE exhibited more than 30 bands, the pattern of which depended on the F. succinogenes group. Sequencing suggested that Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens, Pseudobutyrivibrio ruminis, Clostridium sp., F. succinogenes group 2, Prevotella ruminicola and unclassified Bacteroides were prominent in the group 1 consortium and that Treponema bryantii, B. fibrisolvens, Acinetobacter sp, and Wolinella succinogenes were prominent in the group 2 consortium. However, in the group 3 consortium, F. succinogenes-like bacteria were microscopically undetectable, whereas cellulolytic Ruminococcus albus and F. succinogenes group 1 were prominent, suggesting that the group 3 cannot be a core member of this consortium. This study is the first attempt to identify bacterial members of a fibrolytic consortium dominated by a specific bacterium.

  20. Biodegradation of propanol and isopropanol by a mixed microbial consortium.

    PubMed

    Bustard, M T; McEvoy, E M; Goodwin, J A; Burgess, J G; Wright, P C

    2000-09-01

    The aerobic biodegradation of high concentrations of 1-propanol and 2-propanol (IPA) by a mixed microbial consortium was investigated. Solvent concentrations were one order of magnitude greater than any previously reported in the literature. The consortium utilized these solvents as their sole carbon source to a maximum cell density of 2.4 x 10(9) cells ml(-1). Enrichment experiments with propanol or IPA as carbon sources were carried out in batch culture and maximum specific growth rates (mumax) calculated. At 20 degrees C, mumax values were calculated to be 0.0305 h(-1) and 0.1093 h(-1) on 1% (v/v) IPA and 1-propanol, respectively. Growth on propanol and IPA was carried out between temperatures of 10 degrees C and 45 degrees C. Temperature shock responses by the microbial consortium at temperatures above 45 degrees C were demonstrated by considerable cell flocculation. An increase in propanol substrate concentration from 1% (v/v) to 2% (v/v) decreased the mumax from 0.1093 h(-1) to 0.0715 h(-1). Maximum achievable biodegradation rates of propanol and IPA were 6.11 x 10(-3)% (v/v) h(-1) and 2.72 x 10(-3)% (v/v) h(-1), respectively. Generation of acetone during IPA biodegradation commenced at 264 h and reached a maximum concentration of 0.4% (v/v). The results demonstrate the potential of mixed microbial consortia in the bioremediation of solvent-containing waste streams.

  1. Geodesy and the UNAVCO Consortium: Three Decades of Innovations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowan, L. R.; Miller, M. M.; Meertens, C. M.; Mattioli, G. S.

    2015-12-01

    UNAVCO, a non-profit, university consortium that supports geoscience research using geodesy, began with the ingenious recognition that the nascent Global Positioning System constellation (GPS) could be used to investigate earth processes. The consortium purchased one of the first commercially available GPS receivers, Texas Instrument's TI-4100 NAVSTAR Navigator, in 1984 to measure plate deformation. This early work was highlighted in a technology magazine, GPSWorld, in 1990. Over a 30-year period, UNAVCO and the community have helped advance instrument design for mobility, flexibility, efficiency and interoperability, so research could proceed with higher precision and under ever challenging conditions. Other innovations have been made in data collection, processing, analysis, management and archiving. These innovations in tools, methods and data have had broader impacts as they have found greater utility beyond research for timing, precise positioning, safety, communication, navigation, surveying, engineering and recreation. Innovations in research have expanded the utility of geodetic tools beyond the solid earth science through creative analysis of the data and the methods. For example, GPS sounding of the atmosphere is now used for atmospheric and space sciences. GPS reflectrometry, another critical advance, supports soil science, snow science and ecological research. Some research advances have had broader impacts for society by driving innovations in hazards risk reduction, hazards response, resource management, land use planning, surveying, engineering and other uses. Furthermore, the geodetic data is vital for the design of space missions, testing and advancing communications, and testing and dealing with interference and GPS jamming. We will discuss three decades (and counting) of advances by the National Science Foundation's premiere geodetic facility, consortium and some of the many geoscience principal investigators that have driven innovations in

  2. p-Cresol biotransformation by a nitrifying consortium.

    PubMed

    Silva, C D; Gómez, J; Houbron, E; Cuervo-López, F M; Texier, A-C

    2009-06-01

    The oxidizing ability of a nitrifying consortium exposed to p-cresol (25 mg CL(-1)) was evaluated in batch cultures. Biotransformation of the phenolic compound was investigated by identifying the different intermediates formed. p-Cresol inhibited the ammonia-oxidizing process with a decrease of 83% in the specific rate of ammonium consumption. After 48 h, ammonium consumption efficiency was 96+/-9% while nitrate yield reached 0.95+/-0.06 g NO(3)(-)-Ng(-1)NH(4)(+)-N consumed. High value for nitrate production yield showed that the nitrifying metabolic pathway was only affected at the specific rate level being nitrate the main end product. The consortium was able to totally oxidize p-cresol at a specific rate of 0.17+/-0.06 mg p-cresol-Cmg(-1) microbial protein h(-1). p-Cresol was first transformed to p-hydroxybenzaldehyde and p-hydroxybenzoate, which were later completely mineralized. In the presence of allylthiourea, a specific inhibitor of ammonia monooxygenase (AMO), p-cresol was oxidized to the same intermediates and in a similar pattern as obtained without the AMO inhibitor. AMO seemed not to be involved in the p-cresol oxidation process. When p-hydroxybenzaldehyde was added (25 mg CL(-1)), the nitrifying process was inhibited in the same way as observed with p-cresol, indicating that p-hydroxybenzaldehyde could be the main compound responsible for nitrification inhibition. p-Hydroxybenzaldehyde was accumulated during 15 h before complete consumption at a specific rate value eight times lower than the p-cresol consumption rate. Results showed that p-hydroxybenzaldehyde oxidation was the limiting step in p-cresol mineralization by the nitrifying consortium.

  3. Protein Interaction Data Curation - The International Molecular Exchange Consortium (IMEx)

    PubMed Central

    Orchard, Sandra; Kerrien, Samuel; Abbani, Sara; Aranda, Bruno; Bhate, Jignesh; Bidwell, Shelby; Bridge, Alan; Briganti, Leonardo; Brinkman, Fiona S. L.; Cesareni, Gianni; Chatr-aryamontri, Andrew; Chautard, Emilie; Chen, Carol; Dumousseau, Marine; Goll, Johannes; Hancock, Robert E. W.; Hannick, Linda I.; Jurisica, Igor; Khadake, Jyoti; Lynn, David J.; Mahadevan, Usha; Perfetto, Livia; Raghunath, Arathi; Ricard-Blum, Sylvie; Roechert, Bernd; Salwinski, Lukasz; Stümpflen, Volker; Tyers, Mike; Uetz, Peter; Xenarios, Ioannis; Hermjakob, Henning

    2013-01-01

    The IMEx consortium is an international collaboration between major public interaction data providers to share curation effort and make a non-redundant set of protein interactions available in a single search interface on a common website (www.imexconsortium.org). Common curation rules have been developed and a central registry is used to manage the selection of articles to enter into the dataset. The advantages of such a service to the user, quality control measures adopted and data distribution practices are discussed. PMID:22453911

  4. Effect of temperature on perchloroethylene dechlorination by a methanogenic consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, J.; Skeen, R.S.; Hooker, B.S.

    1995-04-01

    The effect of temperature on the kinetics of growth, substrate metabolism, and perchloroethylene (PCE) dechlorination by a methanogenic consortium is reported. In all cases, a simple kinetic model accurately reflected experimental data. Values for the substrate and methane yield coefficients, and the maximum specific growth rate are fairly consistent at each temperature. Also, the substrate and methane yield coefficients show little temperature sensitivity. In contrast, both the maximum specific growth rate and the PCE dechlorination yield coefficient (Y{sub PCE}) are temperature dependent.

  5. University of Washington Prostate Cancer Clinical Trials Consortium Application

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-01

    in the radium 223 working group and Dr. Yu is a member of the Imaging Group. Dr. Celestia Higano is the co-chair of the Consortium Publications...09-030 (OGX-011 doc pain), 09-039 (KX2-391), and 09-056 ( radium 223) studies led by other sites. As scientific advisors and/or investigators in...investigators to review toxicity of KX2-391 (09-047) study. Dr. Higano reviewed toxicity data for the Phase I radium 223 trial with the PI (Morris) and joined

  6. WDM module research within the Canadian Solid State Optoelectronics Consortium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallahi, Mahmoud; Koteles, Emil S.; Delage, Andre; Chatenoud, F.; Templeton, Ian M.; Champion, Garth; He, Jian Jun; Wang, Weijian; Dion, Michael M.; Barber, Richard A.

    1995-02-01

    We report on the design, growth, fabrication, and characterization of monolithic wavelength division multiplexed (WDM) modules produced within the Canadian Solid State Optoelectronics Consortium. The transmitter module includes multiple, discrete wavelength, distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) laser diodes monolithically integrated with waveguide combiners fabricated using an InGaAs/GaAs heterostructure. The wavelength demultiplexer unit is based on a Rowland circle grating spectrometer monolithically integrated with a metal- semiconductor-metal (MSM) detector array fabricated on an InGaAs/AlGaAs/GaAs heterostructure. The epitaxial layer wafers for both transmitter and receiver modules were grown in single molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) runs.

  7. The psychiatric GWAS consortium: big science comes to psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Patrick F

    2010-10-21

    The Psychiatric GWAS Consortium was founded with the aim of conducting statistically rigorous and comprehensive GWAS meta-analyses for five major psychiatric disorders: ADHD, autism, bipolar disorder, major depressive disorder, and schizophrenia. In the era of GWAS and high-throughput genomics, a major trend has been the emergence of collaborative, consortia approaches. Taking advantage of the scale that collaborative consortia approaches can bring to a problem, the PGC has been a major driver in psychiatric genetics and provides a model for how similar approaches may be applied to other disease communities.

  8. Inner-City Energy and Environmental Education Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-11

    The numbers of individuals with adequate education and training to participate effectively in the highly technical aspects of environmental site cleanup are insufficient to meet the increasing demands of industry and government. Young people are particularly sensitive to these issues and want to become better equipped to solve the problems which will confront them during their lives. Educational institutions, on the other hand, have been slow in offering courses and curricula which will allow students to fulfill these interests. This has been in part due to the lack of federal funding to support new academic programs. This Consortium has been organized to initiate focused educational effort to reach inner-city youth with interesting and useful energy and environmental programs which can lead to well-paying and satisfying careers. Successful Consortium programs can be replicated in other parts of the nation. This report describes a pilot program in Washington, DC, Philadelphia, and Baltimore with the goal to attract and retain inner-city youth to pursue careers in energy-related scientific and technical areas, environmental restoration, and waste management.

  9. Multiple Syntrophic Interactions in a Terephthalate-Degrading Methanogenic Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Lykidis, Athanasios; Chen, Chia-Lung; Tringe, Susannah G.; McHardy, Alice C.; Copeland, Alex 5; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Hugenholtz, Philip; Liu, Wen-Tso

    2010-08-05

    Terephthalate (TA) is one of the top 50 chemicals produced worldwide. Its production results in a TA-containing wastewater that is treated by anaerobic processes through a poorly understood methanogenic syntrophy. Using metagenomics, we characterized the methanogenic consortium tinside a hyper-mesophilic (i.e., between mesophilic and thermophilic), TA-degrading bioreactor. We identified genes belonging to dominant Pelotomaculum species presumably involved in TA degradation through decarboxylation, dearomatization, and modified ?-oxidation to H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} and acetate. These intermediates are converted to CH{sub 4}/CO{sub 2} by three novel hyper-mesophilic methanogens. Additional secondary syntrophic interactions were predicted in Thermotogae, Syntrophus and candidate phyla OP5 and WWE1 populations. The OP5 encodes genes capable of anaerobic autotrophic butyrate production and Thermotogae, Syntrophus and WWE1 have the genetic potential to oxidize butyrate to COsub 2}/H{sub 2} and acetate. These observations suggest that the TA-degrading consortium consists of additional syntrophic interactions beyond the standard H{sub 2}-producing syntroph ? methanogen partnership that may serve to improve community stability.

  10. The Latin American Consortium of Studies in Obesity (LASO)

    PubMed Central

    Bautista, L. E.; Casas, J. P.; Herrera, V. M.; Miranda, J. J.; Perel, P.; Pichardo, R.; González, A.; Sanchez, J. R.; Ferreccio, C.; Aguilera, X.; Silva, E.; Oróstegui, M.; Gómez, L. F.; Chirinos, J. A.; Medina-Lezama, J.; Pérez, C. M.; Suárez, E.; Ortiz, A. P.; Rosero, L.; Schapochnik, N.; Ortiz, Z.; Ferrante, D.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Current, high-quality data are needed to evaluate the health impact of the epidemic of obesity in Latin America. The Latin American Consortium of Studies of Obesity (LASO) has been established, with the objectives of (i) Accurately estimating the prevalence of obesity and its distribution by sociodemographic characteristics; (ii) Identifying ethnic, socioeconomic and behavioural determinants of obesity; (iii) Estimating the association between various anthropometric indicators or obesity and major cardiovascular risk factors and (iv) Quantifying the validity of standard definitions of the various indexes of obesity in Latin American population. To achieve these objectives, LASO makes use of individual data from existing studies. To date, the LASO consortium includes data from 11 studies from eight countries (Argentina, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, Peru, Puerto Rico and Venezuela), including a total of 32 462 subjects. This article describes the overall organization of LASO, the individual studies involved and the overall strategy for data analysis. LASO will foster the development of collaborative obesity research among Latin American investigators. More important, results from LASO will be instrumental to inform health policies aiming to curtail the epidemic of obesity in the region. PMID:19438980

  11. Electron donor preference of a reductive dechlorinating consortium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lorah, M.M.; Majcher, E.; Jones, E.; Driedger, G.; Dworatzek, S.; Graves, D.

    2005-01-01

    A wetland sediment-derived microbial consortium was developed by the USGS and propagated in vitro to large quantities by SiREM Laboratory for use in bioaugmentation applications. The consortium had the capacity to completely dechlorinate 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethene, tetrachloroethylene, trichloroethylene, 1,1,2-trichloroethane, cis- and trans-1,2-dichoroethylene, 1.1-dichloroethylene, 1,2-dichloroethane, vinyl chloride, carbon tetrachloride and chloroform. A suite of electron donors with characteristics useful for bioaugmentation applications was tested. The electron donors included lactate (the donor used during WBC-2 development), ethanol, chitin (Chitorem???), hydrogen releasing compound (HRC???), emulsified vegetable oil (Newman Zone???), and hydrogen gas. Ethanol, lactate, and chitin were particularly effective with respect to stimulating, supporting, and sustaining reductive dechlorination of the broad suite of chemicals that WBC-2 biodegraded. Chitorem??? was the most effective "slow release" electron donor tested. This is an abstract of a paper presented at the Proceedings of the 8th International In Situ and On-Site Bioremediation Symposium (Baltimore, MD 6/6-9/2005).

  12. Extending ACTS Operations Through a University-Based Consortium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Robert; Krawcyzk, Richard; Irwin, Dennis; Kruse, Hans

    2001-01-01

    The Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) program was slated for decommissioning in October 2000 as was announced at the 6th Ka-band Utilization Conference in May 2000. Quite a celebration was had at that event too centering on the decommissioning of this very successful technology program. With plans in place to move the spacecraft to an orbital graveyard and then shut the system down, NASA was challenged to consider the feasibility of extending operations for education and research purposes provided that an academic organization would be willing to cover operations costs. Continuing operations of the system was determined viable and in the fall of 2000, an announcement was made by NASA to consider extending operations. Plans are now in place to continue the operations of ACTS through a university-based consortium led by Ohio University, Athens, Ohio. Initial plans are for two more years of operations, with options to extend up to a total of four years. This paper will present the change in plans to continue operations of ACTS. A description of the multi-month transition of the spacecraft to its new and final orbital location is provided. With the spacecraft at this new location, an update on its performance is presented as well as estimates of long-term performance. The consortium development will be presented along with its organization, membership, and operations plans for using ACTS.

  13. The Consortium of E-Learning in Geriatrics Instruction.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Jorge G; Teasdale, Thomas A; Hajjar, Ihab; Shaughnessy, Marianne; Mintzer, Michael J

    2007-03-01

    This paper describes the activities of the Consortium of E-Learning in Geriatrics Instruction (CELGI), a group dedicated to creating, using, and evaluating e-learning to enhance geriatrics education. E-learning provides a relatively new approach to addressing geriatrics educators' concerns, such as the shortage of professionals trained to care for older people, overcrowded medical curricula, the move to transfer teaching venues to community settings, and the switch to competency-based education models. However, this innovative education technology is facing a number of challenges as its use and influence grow, including proof of effectiveness and efficiency. CELGI was created in response to these challenges, with the goal of facilitating the development and portability of e-learning materials for geriatrics educators. Members represent medical and nursing schools, the Department of Veterans Affairs healthcare system, long-term care facilities, and other institutions that rely on continuing streams of quality health education. CELGI concentrates on providing a coordinated approach to formulating and adapting specifications, standards, and guidelines; developing education and training in e-learning competencies; developing e-learning products; evaluating the effect of e-learning materials; and disseminating these materials. The vision of consortium members is that e-learning for geriatric education will become the benchmark for valid and successful e-learning throughout medical education.

  14. Microbial physiology of an anaerobic propionate-degrading consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Xun, L.

    1989-01-01

    A methanogenic propionate-degrading consortium, comprised of a strictly anaerobic chemoheterotroph and two types of methanogenic bacteria, is responsible for the complete conversion of propionate to CH{sub 4} and CO{sub 2} via the intermediate formation of acetate, H{sub 2}, and CO{sub 2}. Propionate oxidation by the heterotroph to acetate, H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} proceeds only if H{sub 2} is removed through oxidation by CO{sub 2}-reducing methanogens. Acetate may only be catabolized anaerobically by one specific physiological group of bacteria, the aceticlastic methanogens, which produces CH{sub 4} and CO{sub 2} by cleaving acetate. Representatives of all three of these organisms have been studied. The effects of environmental factors such as temperature, pH, and nutrients on anaerobic propionate degradation was studied by enrichment cultures. From the propionate enrichment, the H{sub 2} using methanogen (strain LX1) and the propionate-degrading organism (strain LX2) were isolated. Both organisms have been characterized. In regard to the aceticlastic reaction, Methanosarcina mazei S-6 isolated by Mah (1980), was studied as the third member of the consortium. By changing the culture conditions, the morphology of M. mazei was manipulated from an aggregated to single cell form.

  15. ESHRE Task Force on Ethics and Law 10: surrogacy.

    PubMed

    Shenfield, F; Pennings, G; Cohen, J; Devroey, P; de Wert, G; Tarlatzis, B

    2005-10-01

    This 10th statement of the Task Force on Ethics and Law considers ethical questions specific to varied surrogacy arrangements. Surrogacy is especially complex as the interests of the intended parents, the surrogate, and the future child may differ. It is concluded that surrogacy is an acceptable method of assisted reproductive technology of the last resort for specific medical indications, for which only reimbursement of reasonable expenses is allowed.

  16. The Launch of the Philadelphia Education Research Consortium: Lessons Learned from the First Year of Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Kate

    2016-01-01

    The Philadelphia Education Research Consortium (PERC) was launched in July 2014 as an innovative place-based consortium of educational research partners from multiple sectors. Its primary objective is to provide research and analyses on some of the city's most pressing education issues. As such, PERC's research agenda is driven by both traditional…

  17. An Industry Consortium Approach to Retirement Planning--A New Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzpatrick, Edmund W.

    1978-01-01

    The National Council on Aging in cooperation with a consortium of nine corporations and four unions is developing a retirement planning approach. Article focuses on preliminary findings of a survey of consortium companies' employees retirement attitudes and preparations. Seventy percent of those 40-65 indicated interest in attending a retirement…

  18. The Bilingual Human Services Educational Consortium of Bangor Community College. Third Year Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bigney, Tracy B.

    This third-party evaluation report, presented in six sections, begins with an introductory section on the procedures used to evaluate the Bilingual Human Services Educational Consortium. (The consortium, a one-year college level program, prepares underemployed and unemployed Franco-Americans for paraprofessional human service jobs.) Also described…

  19. Measuring Consortium Impact on User Perceptions: OhioLINK and LibQUAL+[TM

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gatten, Jeffrey N.

    2004-01-01

    What is the impact of an academic library consortium on the perceptions of library services experienced by users of the member institutions' libraries? What is the impact of an academic library consortium on the perceptions of library services experienced by users of the member institutions libraries? In 2002 and 2003, OhioLINK (Ohio's consortium…

  20. 11th Annual NIH Pain Consortium Symposium on Advances in Pain Research | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The NIH Pain Consortium will convene the 11th Annual NIH Pain Consortium Symposium on Advances in Pain Research, featuring keynote speakers and expert panel sessions on Innovative Models and Methods. The first keynote address will be delivered by David J. Clark, MD, PhD, Stanford University entitled “Challenges of Translational Pain Research: What Makes a Good Model?” |