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Sample records for esophageal motor function

  1. Functional Esophageal Disorders.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Qasim; Fass, Ronnie; Gyawali, C Prakash; Miwa, Hiroto; Pandolfino, John E; Zerbib, Frank

    2016-02-15

    Functional esophageal disorders consist of a disease category that present with esophageal symptoms (heartburn, chest pain, dysphagia, globus) not explained by mechanical obstruction (stricture, tumor, eosinophilic esophagitis), major motor disorders (achalasia, EGJ outflow obstruction, absent contractility, distal esophageal spasm, jackhammer esophagus), or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). While mechanisms responsible are unclear, it is theorized that visceral hypersensitivity and hypervigilance play an important role in symptom generation, in the context of normal or borderline function. Treatments directed at improving borderline motor dysfunction or reducing reflux burden to sub-normal levels have limited success in symptom improvement. In contrast, strategies focused on modulating peripheral triggering and central perception are mechanistically viable and clinically meaningful. However, outcome data from these treatment options are limited. Future research needs to focus on understanding mechanisms underlying visceral hypersensitivity and hypervigilance so that appropriate targets and therapies can be developed.

  2. Modulation of activity in swallowing motor cortex following esophageal acidification: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Paine, Peter A; Hamdy, Shaheen; Chitnis, Xavier; Gregory, Lloyd J; Giampietro, Vincent; Brammer, Mick; Williams, Steve; Aziz, Qasim

    2008-06-01

    Esophageal acid exposure induces sensory and motility changes in the upper gastrointestinal tract; however, the mechanisms involved and the effects on activity in the brain regions that control swallowing are unknown. The aim of this study was to examine functional changes in the cortical swallowing network as a result of esophageal acidification using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Seven healthy volunteers (3 female, age range=20-30 years) were randomized to receive either a 0.1 M hydrochloric acid or (control) saline infusion for 30 min into the distal esophagus. Postinfusion, subjects underwent four 8 min blocks of fMRI over 1 h. These alternated between 1 min swallowing water boluses and 1 min rest. Three-dimensional cluster analysis for group brain activation during swallowing was performed together with repeated-measures ANOVA for differences between acid and saline. After acid infusion, swallowing-induced activation was seen predominantly in postcentral gyrus (p<0.004). ANOVA comparison of acid with saline showed a significant relative reduction in activation during swallowing of the precentral gyrus (M1) BA 4 (p<0.008) in response to acid infusion. No areas of increased cortical activation were identified with acid vs. saline during swallowing. Esophageal acidification inhibits motor and association cortical areas during a swallowing task, probably via changes in vagal afferent or nociceptive input from the esophagus. This mechanism may play a protective role, facilitating acid clearance by reduced descending central motor inhibition of enteric/spinal reflexes, or by preventing further ingestion of injurious agents.

  3. Caustic ingestion and esophageal function

    SciTech Connect

    Cadranel, S.; Di Lorenzo, C.; Rodesch, P.; Piepsz, A.; Ham, H.R. )

    1990-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate esophageal motor function by means of krypton-81m esophageal transit scintigraphy and to compare the results with the functional and morphological data obtained by means of triple lumen manometry and endoscopy. In acute and subacute stages of the disease, all clinical, anatomical, and functional parameters were in good agreement, revealing significant impairment. In chronic stages, the severity of the dysphagia was not correlated to the importance of the residual stenosis. Conversely, 81mKr esophageal transit and manometric's findings were in good agreement with the clinical symptoms, during the entire follow-up period ranging between 3 months to 7 years. The 81mKr test is undoubtedly the easiest and probably the most physiological technique currently available for long-term functional evaluation of caustic esophagitis.

  4. Does surgery correct esophageal motor dysfunction in gastroesophageal reflux

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, C.O.; Pope, C.E.; Gannan, R.M.; Allen, F.D.; Velasco, N.; Hill, L.D.

    1981-09-01

    The high incidence of dysphagia in patients with symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux (GER) but no evidence of peptic stricture suggests esophageal motor dysfunction. Conventional methods for detecting dysfunction (radiologic and manometric examinations) often fail to detect abnormality in these patients. Radionuclide transit (RT), a new method for detecting esophageal motor dysfunction, was used to prospectively assess function in 29 patients with symptomatic GER uncomplicated by stricture before and three months after antireflux surgery (HILL). The preoperative incidence of dysphagia and esophageal dysfunction was 73% and 52%, respectively. During operation (Hill repair), intraoperative measurement of the lower esophageal sphincter pressure was performed and the LESP raised to levels between 45 and 55 mmHg. The preoperative lower esophageal sphincter pressure was raised from a mean of 8.6 mmHg, to mean of 18.5 mmHg after operation. No patient has free reflux after operation. Postoperative studies on 20 patients demonstrated persistence of all preoperative esophageal dysfunction despite loss of dysphagia. RT has demonstrated a disorder of esophageal motor function in 52% of patients with symptomatic GER that may be responsible for impaired esophageal clearance. This abnormality is not contraindication to surgery. The results indicate that construction of an effective barrier to reflex corrects symptoms of reflux, even in the presence of impaired esophageal transit. Radionuclide transit is a safe noninvasive test for assessment of esophageal function.

  5. Effect of methylnaltrexone and naloxone on esophageal motor function in man.

    PubMed

    Scarpellini, E; Pauwels, A; Vos, R; Rommel, N; Tack, J

    2017-03-01

    Endogenous opioids (EO) acting on μ-opiod receptors in central and enteric nervous system (ENS) control gastrointestinal motility but it is still unclear whether EO in ENS may control esophageal function in man, thus we will study the effects of methylnaltrexone (MNTX), a peripherally selective, and naloxone (NA), a non-selective μ-opiod receptor antagonist, on esophageal motility in healthy subjects. Fifteen HV (6 M; 34.1 ± 0.6 years; BMI: 22.1 ± 0.1 kg/m(2) ) underwent three esophageal high-resolution manometry impedance (HRiM) studies with 10 saline swallows administered every 30 minutes: drug was administered after 30 minutes (MNTX subcutaneously/NA or saline intravenously), a solid meal after 90 minutes; measurements continued for 120 minutes postprandially. Methylnaltrexone did not significantly decrease the upper esophageal sphincter (UES) percentage of relaxation preprandially (72.5 ± 5 vs 66.9 ± 4.6 and 73 ± 3.8%, ANOVA between placebo, MNTX and NA, P=NS) and postprandially (60 minutes: 68.2 ± 5.6 vs 61 ± 5.5 and 67.1 ± 5.6%; 120 minutes: 68 ± 5.9 vs 59.3 ± 5.2 and 67.7 ± 4.7%; ANOVA between placebo, MNTX and NA, P=NS). MNTX and NA did not significantly alter preprandial and postprandial LES resting pressures and integrated relaxation pressure (ANOVA between placebo, MNTX and NA, all P=NS). Peak front velocity and distal contractile integral were not altered pre- and postprandially by MNTX and NA (ANOVA between placebo, MNTX and NA, P=NS). Transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations (TLESRs') number was not altered by MNTX and NA (ANOVA between placebo, MNTX and NA, all P=NS). The peripheral selective and non-selective μ-opioid receptor antagonists MNTX and NA, respectively, do not alter TLESRs occurrence and esophageal peristalsis. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Sucralfate versus cimetidine in the treatment of reflux esophagitis, with special reference to the esophageal motor function

    SciTech Connect

    Jorgensen, F.; Elsborg, L. )

    1991-08-08

    Sixty patients entered a double-blind clinical trial comparing the effect of 1 g of sucralfate granulate given four times daily and cimetidine, 400 mg twice daily. Twenty-six patients treated with sucralfate and 26 treated with cimetidine were examined with short-term pH monitoring before and after 12 weeks of treatment. Thirty patients, 19 treated with cimetidine and 11 treated with sucralfate, had esophageal motility studied by a radionuclide test before and after 12 weeks of treatment. The efficacy of the treatments was judged by symptoms and endoscopic response after 4, 8, and 12 weeks of treatment. The endpoint healing rate was approximately 60% in both groups and symptoms were relieved in half of the patients in both groups (difference not significant). The effect of the treatments on pH and number of spikes reflected the different pharmacodynamic profiles of the drugs, whereas the mean transit time (MTT) was not changed by the treatments. The residual activity after radionuclide transit in the sitting position was significantly increased after treatment with cimetidine. The data support the hypothesis that primary dysmotility might be involved in the pathogenesis of reflux esophagitis in about 33% of the patients. Possibilities for a combination therapy with sucralfate and cimetidine are stressed.

  7. Biomechanics of esophageal function in eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Read, Andrew J; Pandolfino, John E

    2012-10-01

    Eosinophilic Esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the esophagus triggered by an immune response that leads to symptoms of dysphagia, chest pain, and food impaction. EoE is a clinicopathologic syndrome that requires clinical symptoms and pathologic findings for a diagnosis. The inflammatory process and eosinophilic infiltration of the esophagus in EoE lead to fibrosis and structural changes within the esophagus that cause esophageal dysfunction. The biomechanics of the esophageal function in EoE have been explored using manometry, impedance planimetry, barium esophagograms, and endoscopic ultrasound. These studies have identified several biomechanical changes to the esophagus in EoE including pan-esophageal pressurization on manometry, changes in esophageal compliance with decreased distentisbility by impedance planimetry, decreased esophageal luminal diameter by esophagograms, and dysfunction in the esophageal longitudinal muscles by endoscopic ultrasound. Treatments for the disease involve dietary changes, immunosuppressive drugs, and dilation techniques. However, the data regarding the effect of these therapies on altering mechanical properties of the esophagus is limited. As the pathogenesis of esophageal dysfunction in EoE appears multifactorial, further study of the biomechanics of EoE is critical to better diagnose, monitor and treat the disease.

  8. Biomechanics of Esophageal Function in Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Pandolfino, John E

    2012-01-01

    Eosinophilic Esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the esophagus triggered by an immune response that leads to symptoms of dysphagia, chest pain, and food impaction. EoE is a clinicopathologic syndrome that requires clinical symptoms and pathologic findings for a diagnosis. The inflammatory process and eosinophilic infiltration of the esophagus in EoE lead to fibrosis and structural changes within the esophagus that cause esophageal dysfunction. The biomechanics of the esophageal function in EoE have been explored using manometry, impedance planimetry, barium esophagograms, and endoscopic ultrasound. These studies have identified several biomechanical changes to the esophagus in EoE including pan-esophageal pressurization on manometry, changes in esophageal compliance with decreased distentisbility by impedance planimetry, decreased esophageal luminal diameter by esophagograms, and dysfunction in the esophageal longitudinal muscles by endoscopic ultrasound. Treatments for the disease involve dietary changes, immunosuppressive drugs, and dilation techniques. However, the data regarding the effect of these therapies on altering mechanical properties of the esophagus is limited. As the pathogenesis of esophageal dysfunction in EoE appears multifactorial, further study of the biomechanics of EoE is critical to better diagnose, monitor and treat the disease. PMID:23105995

  9. Medical and surgical management of esophageal and gastric motor dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Awad, R A

    2012-09-01

    he occurrence of esophageal and gastric motor dysfunctions happens, when the software of the esophagus and the stomach is injured. This is really a program previously established in the enteric nervous system as a constituent of the newly called neurogastroenterology. The enteric nervous system is composed of small aggregations of nerve cells, enteric ganglia, the neural connections between these ganglia, and nerve fibers that supply effectors tissues, including the muscle of the gut wall. The wide range of enteric neuropathies that includes esophageal achalasia and gastroparesis highlights the importance of the enteric nervous system. A classification of functional gastrointestinal disorders based on symptoms has received attention. However, a classification based solely in symptoms and consensus may lack an integral approach of disease. As an alternative to the Rome classification, an international working team in Bangkok presented a classification of motility disorders as a physiology-based diagnosis. Besides, the Chicago Classification of esophageal motility was developed to facilitate the interpretation of clinical high-resolution esophageal pressure topography studies. This review covers exclusively the medical and surgical management of the esophageal and gastric motor dysfunction using evidence from well-designed studies. Motor control of the esophagus and the stomach, motor esophageal and gastric alterations, treatment failure, side effects of PPIs, overlap of gastrointestinal symptoms, predictors of treatment, burden of GERD medical management, data related to conservative treatment vs. antireflux surgery, and postsurgical esophagus and gastric motor dysfunction are also taken into account.

  10. Esophageal hypomotility and spastic motor disorders: current diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Valdovinos, Miguel A; Zavala-Solares, Monica R; Coss-Adame, Enrique

    2014-11-01

    Esophageal hypomotility (EH) is characterized by abnormal esophageal peristalsis, either from a reduction or absence of contractions, whereas spastic motor disorders (SMD) are characterized by an increase in the vigor and/or propagation velocity of esophageal body contractions. Their pathophysiology is not clearly known. The reduced excitation of the smooth muscle contraction mediated by cholinergic neurons and the impairment of inhibitory ganglion neuronal function mediated by nitric oxide are likely mechanisms of the peristaltic abnormalities seen in EH and SMD, respectively. Dysphagia and chest pain are the most frequent clinical manifestations for both of these dysfunctions, and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is commonly associated with these motor disorders. The introduction of high-resolution manometry (HRM) and esophageal pressure topography (EPT) has significantly enhanced the ability to diagnose EH and SMD. Novel EPT metrics in particular the development of the Chicago Classification of esophageal motor disorders has enabled improved characterization of these abnormalities. The first step in the management of EH and SMD is to treat GERD, especially when esophageal testing shows pathologic reflux. Smooth muscle relaxants (nitrates, calcium channel blockers, 5-phosphodiesterase inhibitors) and pain modulators may be useful in the management of dysphagia or pain in SMD. Endoscopic Botox injection and pneumatic dilation are the second-line therapies. Extended myotomy of the esophageal body or peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) may be considered in highly selected cases but lack evidence.

  11. The Role of Esophageal Hypersensitivity in Functional Esophageal Disorders.

    PubMed

    Farmer, Adam D; Ruffle, James K; Aziz, Qasim

    2017-02-01

    The Rome IV diagnostic criteria delineates 5 functional esophageal disorders which include functional chest pain, functional heartburn, reflux hypersensitivity, globus, and functional dysphagia. These are a heterogenous group of disorders which, despite having characteristic symptom profiles attributable to esophageal pathology, fail to demonstrate any structural, motility or inflammatory abnormalities on standard clinical testing. These disorders are associated with a marked reduction in patient quality of life, not least considerable healthcare resources. Furthermore, the pathophysiology of these disorders is incompletely understood. In this narrative review we provide the reader with an introductory primer to the structure and function of esophageal perception, including nociception that forms the basis of the putative mechanisms that may give rise to symptoms in functional esophageal disorders. We also discuss the provocative techniques and outcome measures by which esophageal hypersensitivity can be established.

  12. Uses of esophageal function testing: dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Yazaki, Etsuro; Woodland, Philip; Sifrim, Daniel

    2014-10-01

    Esophageal function testing should be used for differential diagnosis of dysphagia. Dysphagia can be the consequence of hypermotility or hypomotility of the muscles of the esophagus. Decreased esophageal or esophagogastric junction distensibility can provoke dysphagia. The most well established esophageal dysmotility is achalasia. Other motility disorders can also cause dysphagia. High-resolution manometry (HRM) is the gold standard investigation for esophageal motility disorders. Simultaneous measurement of HRM and intraluminal impedance can be useful to assess motility and bolus transit. Impedance planimetry measures distensibility of the esophageal body and gastroesophageal junction in patients with achalasia and eosinophilic esophagitis.

  13. The effect of water bolus temperature on esophageal motor function as measured by high-resolution manometry.

    PubMed

    Choi, Y J; Park, M I; Park, S J; Moon, W; Kim, S E; Kwon, H J; Kim, J H; Jeon, W S

    2014-11-01

    Ingestion of cold fluids may induce pain in patients with esophageal motility disorders. Hot fluids, on the other hand, may help to relieve pain. We studied changes in esophageal motility as a variable of water bolus temperature using high-resolution manometry (HRM) in healthy human. Thirty-two healthy subjects were recruited at Kosin University Hospital. HRM was performed in a sitting position, with room temperature (RT, 25 °C), hot (45 °C), and cold (2 °C) water swallowed in that order. This exam included single swallowing (10 swallows of 5 mL water, 30 s intervals) and multiple water swallows (MWS; 100 mL water within 30 s). In the single swallowing, hot water caused a decrease in lower esophageal sphincter (LES) residual pressure (5.87 ± 4.20 mmHg vs 7.45 ± 4.17 mmHg (RT), p = 0.001) and duration of esophageal body (EB) contraction (3.01 ± 0.80 s vs 3.15 ± 1.16 s (RT), p = 0.009). Cold water caused an increase in the duration of EB contraction (3.52 ± 0.87 s vs 3.15 ± 1.16 s (RT), p = 0.001) and a decrease in contractile front velocity (CFV) (4.43 ± 1.50 cm/s vs 4.90 ± 2.53 cm/s (RT), p = 0.007). Similarly, in the MWS, hot water caused a decrease in the duration of EB contraction (12.95 ± 5.02 s vs 16.33 ± 5.94 s (RT), p = 0.024) and an increase in the amplitude of EB contraction (114.27 ± 83.36 mmHg vs 82.70 ± 46.77 mmHg (RT), p = 0.007). Cold water caused an increase in the duration of EB contraction (27.38 ± 2.89 s vs 16.33 ± 5.94 s (RT), p = 0.03) and a decrease in the amplitude of EB contraction (51.68 ± 33.94 mmHg vs 82.70 ± 46.77 mmHg (RT), p = 0.001). This study showed changes in esophageal motility to be dependent on water temperature. Especially, MWS showed clear changes in esophageal motility at different temperatures of water. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Respiratory function after esophageal replacement in children.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Gabriele; Vrijlandt, Elianne J L E; Arets, Hubertus G M; Koppelman, Gerard H; Van der Zee, David C; Hulscher, Jan B F; Zwaveling, Sander

    2017-03-21

    Children born with esophageal atresia require an anastomosis between the proximal and distal esophagus. When this distance is too wide (long gap esophageal atresia, LGEA) esophageal replacement strategies have to be deployed. The aim of this study was to assess long-term respiratory morbidity and lung function after esophageal replacement with either stomach (gastric pull-up, GPU) or jejunum (jejunal interposition, JI) for LGEA. Retrospective cohort study. Patients operated with GPU and JI for LGEA (1985-2007) underwent a semi-structured interview and lung function testing (LFT). Seven GPU-patients and eight JI-patients were included. Median age was 12years. One patient per group could not perform LFT. Respiratory symptoms were reported by 13/15 patients (7/7 GPU-patients vs 6/8 JI-patients). All LFT items were lower than reference values; 6/13 patients showed restriction and 6/13 obstruction. All six GPU-patients had abnormal TLC and/or FEV1/FVC vs 3/7 after JI. Restriction was noted in 4/6 GPU-patients vs 2/7 JI-patients. After esophageal replacement for LGEA many children have impaired lung function and respiratory symptoms are common. Lung volumes seem decreased after GPU compared to JI. This may be caused by the intrathoracic stomach which may limit normal lung growth. Respiratory follow-up in adult life is important after esophageal replacement. III. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Esophageal Motor Disorders in Terms of High-Resolution Esophageal Pressure Topography: What Has Changed?

    PubMed Central

    Kahrilas, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    The concept of high-resolution manometry (HRM) is to use sufficient pressure sensors such that intraluminal pressure can be monitored as a continuum along luminal length much as time is viewed as a continuum in conventional manometry. When HRM is coupled with pressure topography plots, pressure amplitude is transformed into spectral colors with isobaric conditions indicated by same-colored regions on the display. Together, these technologies are called high-resolution esophageal pressure topography (HREPT). HREPT has several advantages compared with conventional manometry, the technology that it was designed to replace. (i) The contractility of the entire esophagus can be viewed simultaneously in a uniform format, (ii) standardized objective metrics can be systematically applied for interpretation, and (iii) topographic patterns of contractility are more easily recognized and have greater reproducibility than with conventional manometry. Compared with conventional manometry, HREPT has improved sensitivity for detecting achalasia, largely due to the objectivity and accuracy with which it identifies impaired esophagogastric junction (EGJ) relaxation. In addition, it has led to the subcategorization of achalasia into three clinically relevant subtypes based on the contractile function of the esophageal body: classic achalasia, achalasia with esophageal compression, and spastic achalasia. Headway has also been made in understanding hypercontractile conditions, including diffuse esophageal spasm and a newly described entity, spastic nutcracker. Ultimately, clinical experience will be the judge, but it seems likely that HREPT data, along with its well-defined functional implications, will improve the clinical management of esophageal motility disorders. PMID:20179690

  16. Dynamic esophageal scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Reilley, J.J.; Malmud, L.S.; Fisher, R.S.; Applegate, G.; DeVegvar, M.L.

    1982-06-01

    Esophageal scintigraphy was developed in order to quantitatively evaluate esophageal transit in patients with a variety of esophageal disorders. The study is performed with orally administered technetium-99m sulfur colloid in water, using a gamma camera on-line to a digital computer. Esophageal transit is expressed as the percent emptying for each of the first 15-sec intervals for 10 min after an initial swallow and at 15-sec intervals after serial swallows. Esophageal transit is significantly decreased in patients with motor disorders of the esophagus, compared to normal controls. In patients with reflux esophagitis, esophageal transit was abnormal when the reflux disease was accompanied by abnormal motor function. The technique we describe is the first quantitative test of esophageal function; it is a useful, sensitive, scintigraphic technique for evaluation of esophageal transit.

  17. Esophageal function testing: beyond manometry and impedance.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Ravinder K

    2014-10-01

    Manometry and impedance provide only surrogate information regarding longitudinal wall function and are focused on contractile amplitude and lumen content. Ultrasound imaging provides a unique perspective of esophageal function by providing important information regarding longitudinal muscle contraction. Laser Doppler assessment of perfusion may be an important complementary tool to assess abnormal wall blood perfusion as a possible mechanism of pain. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Axial force measurement for esophageal function testing

    PubMed Central

    Gravesen, Flemming H; Funch-Jensen, Peter; Gregersen, Hans; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr

    2009-01-01

    The esophagus serves to transport food and fluid from the pharynx to the stomach. Manometry has been the “golden standard” for the diagnosis of esophageal motility diseases for many decades. Hence, esophageal function is normally evaluated by means of manometry even though it reflects the squeeze force (force in radial direction) whereas the bolus moves along the length of esophagus in a distal direction. Force measurements in the longitudinal (axial) direction provide a more direct measure of esophageal transport function. The technique used to record axial force has developed from external force transducers over in-vivo strain gauges of various sizes to electrical impedance based measurements. The amplitude and duration of the axial force has been shown to be as reliable as manometry. Normal, as well as abnormal, manometric recordings occur with normal bolus transit, which have been documented using imaging modalities such as radiography and scintigraphy. This inconsistency using manometry has also been documented by axial force recordings. This underlines the lack of information when diagnostics are based on manometry alone. Increasing the volume of a bag mounted on a probe with combined axial force and manometry recordings showed that axial force amplitude increased by 130% in contrast to an increase of 30% using manometry. Using axial force in combination with manometry provides a more complete picture of esophageal motility, and the current paper outlines the advantages of using this method. PMID:19132762

  19. Esophageal motility in eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Weiss, A H; Iorio, N; Schey, R

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is characterized by eosinophilic infiltration of the esophagus and is a potential cause of dysphagia and food impaction, most commonly affecting young men. Esophageal manometry findings vary from normal motility to aperistalsis, simultaneous contractions, diffuse esophageal spasm, nutcracker esophagus or hypotonic lower esophageal sphincter (LES). It remains unclear whether esophageal dysmotility plays a significant role in the clinical symptoms of EoE. Our aim is to review the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and effect of treatment on esophageal dysmotility in EoE. A literature search utilizing the PubMed database was performed using keywords: eosinophilic esophagitis, esophageal dysmotility, motility, manometry, impedance planimetry, barium esophagogram, endoscopic ultrasound, and dysphagia. Fifteen studies, totaling 387 patients with eosinophilic esophagitis were identified as keeping in accordance with the aim of this study and included in this review. The occurrence of abnormal esophageal manometry was reported to be between 4 and 87% among patients with EoE. Esophageal motility studies have shown reduced distensibility, abnormal peristalsis, and hypotonicity of the LES in patients with EoE, which may also mimic other esophageal motility disorders such as achalasia or nutcracker esophagus. Studies have shown conflicting results regarding the presence of esophageal dysmotility and symptoms with some reports suggesting a higher rate of food impaction, while others report no correlation between motor function and dysphagia. Motility dysfunction of the esophagus in EoE has not been well reported in the literature and studies have reported conflicting evidence regarding the clinical significance of dysmotility seen in EoE. The correlation between esophageal dysmotility and symptoms of EoE remains unclear. Larger studies are needed to investigate the incidence of esophageal dysmotility, clinical implications, and effect of treatment on

  20. Endoscopic ultrasound as an adjunctive evaluation in patients with esophageal motor disorders subtyped by high-resolution manometry

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Kumar; Lin, Chen-Yuan; Keswani, Rajesh; Pandolfino, John E; Kahrilas, Peter J; Komanduri, Srinadh

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims Esophageal motor disorders are a heterogenous group of conditions identified by esophageal manometry that lead to esophageal dysfunction. The aim of this study was to assess the clinical utility of endoscopic ultrasound in the further evaluation of patients with esophageal motor disorders categorized using the updated Chicago Classification. Methods We performed a retrospective, single center study of 62 patients with esophageal motor disorders categorized according to the Chicago Classification. All patients underwent standard radial endosonography to assess for extra esophageal findings or alternative explanations for esophageal outflow obstruction. Secondary outcomes included esophageal wall thickness among the different patient subsets within the Chicago Classification Key Results EUS identified 9/62 (15%) clinically relevant findings that altered patient management and explained the etiology of esophageal outflow obstruction. We further identified substantial variability in esophageal wall thickness in a proportion of patients including some with a significantly thickened non-muscular layer. Conclusions EUS findings are clinically relevant in a significant number of patients with motor disorders and can alter clinical management. Variability in esophageal wall thickness of the muscularis propria and non-muscular layers identified by EUS may also explain the observed variability in response to standard therapies for achalasia. PMID:25041229

  1. Esophageal motor disorders: how to bridge the gap between advanced diagnostic tools and paucity of therapeutic modalities?

    PubMed

    Clarke, John O; Pandolfino, John E

    2012-07-01

    High-resolution manometry has added significantly to our current understanding of esophageal motor function by providing improved detail and a data analysis paradigm that is more akin to an imaging format. Esophageal pressure topography provides a seamless dynamic representation of the pressure profile through the entire esophagus and thus, is able to eliminate movement artifact and also assess intrabolus pressure patterns as a surrogate for bolus transit mechanics. This has led to improved identification of anatomic landmarks and measurement of important physiological parameters (esophagogastric junction relaxation, distal latency, and contractile integrity). This research has bridged the gap into clinical practice by defining physiologically relevant phenotypes that may have prognostic significance and improve treatment decisions in achalasia, spasm, and hypercontractile disorders. However, more work is needed in determining the etiology of symptom generation in the context of normal or trivial motor dysfunction. This research will require new techniques to assess visceral hypersensitivity and alterations in central modulation of pain and discomfort.

  2. Recovery of normal esophageal function in a kitten with diffuse megaesophagus and an occult lower esophageal stricture.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Jaycie; Ames, Marisa; DiCicco, Michael; Savage, Mason; Atkins, Clarke; Wood, Michael; Gookin, Jody L

    2015-06-01

    An 8-week-old male domestic shorthair was presented to the Internal Medicine Service at North Carolina State University for regurgitation. Radiographic diagnosis of generalized esophageal dilation and failure of esophageal peristalsis were compatible with diagnosis of congenital megaesophagus. Endoscopic examination of the esophagus revealed a fibrous stricture just orad to the lower esophageal sphincter. Conservative management to increase the body condition and size of the kitten consisted of feeding through a gastrostomy tube, during which time the esophagus regained normal peristaltic function, the stricture orifice widened in size and successful balloon dilatation of the stricture was performed. Esophageal endoscopy should be considered to rule out a stricture near the lower esophageal sphincter in kittens with radiographic findings suggestive of congenital megaesophagus. Management of such kittens by means of gastrostomy tube feeding may be associated with a return of normal esophageal motility and widening of the esophageal stricture, and facilitate subsequent success of interventional dilation of the esophageal stricture.

  3. The impact of bariatric surgery on esophageal function.

    PubMed

    Tolone, Salvatore; Savarino, Edoardo; Yates, Robert B

    2016-10-01

    Obesity is a worldwide epidemic. There is increasing evidence that obesity is associated with benign gastroesophageal disease, including gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and esophageal dysmotility. Bariatric surgery-including sleeve gastrectomy, gastric bypass, and adjustable gastric band placement-can effectively result in weight loss and control of obesity-related conditions, including GERD. However, there is increasing evidence that bariatric surgery itself can have a deleterious effect on esophageal function. In this review, we address the effect of obesity and bariatric surgery on esophageal dysfunction. © 2016 New York Academy of Sciences.

  4. Esophageal peristaltic defects in adults with functional dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Ratuapli, Shiva K; Hansel, Stephanie L; Umar, Sarah B; Burdick, George E; Ramirez, Francisco C; Fleischer, David E; Harris, Lucinda A; Lacy, Brian E; DiBaise, John K; Crowell, Michael D

    2014-08-01

    Functional dysphagia (FD) is characterized by the presence of dysphagia without evidence of mechanical esophageal obstruction, GERD, and histopathology-based esophageal motor disorders. Dysphagia is common in older patients; however, there is a paucity of information regarding the type and frequency of peristaltic abnormalities compared to younger patients. Based on recently validated criteria for classification of weak peristalsis using high-resolution manometry (HRM), we hypothesized that older patients with FD would have more peristaltic defects detected by HRM compared to younger FD patients. A retrospective review of our motility database yielded 65 patients that met inclusion criteria. Patients were divided into two groups based on age (younger: <70 years; older: ≥70 years). Patients were interviewed, completed a quality-of-life questionnaire, and underwent solid-state HRM. The two groups differed in age but in no other demographic characteristics, severity of dysphagia, or quality of life. Dyspeptic symptoms, including nausea (p < 0.001), early satiety (p = 0.01), bloating (p = 0.02), and belching (p = 0.01), were also more prevalent in younger FD patients. Older age was associated with weak peristalsis involving frequent failed peristalsis, small proximal peristaltic defects (2-5 cm), and large proximal peristaltic defects (>5 cm) (p < 0.001). The mean contraction amplitude was also lower in the older group (p < 0.05). These data support the hypothesis that older patients with FD have a higher frequency of peristaltic abnormalities on HRM compared to younger patients. Older age was associated with increased frequency of weak peristalsis with small and large peristaltic defects.

  5. Innovative techniques in evaluating the esophagus; imaging of esophageal morphology and function; and drugs for esophageal disease.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Helmut; Neurath, Markus F; Vieth, Michael; Lever, Frederiek M; Meijer, Gert J; Lips, Irene M; McMahon, Barry P; Ruurda, J P; van Hillegersberg, R; Siersema, P; Levine, Marc S; Scharitzer, Martina; Pokieser, Peter; Zerbib, Frank; Savarino, Vincenzo; Zentilin, Patrizia; Savarino, Edoardo; Chan, Walter W

    2013-10-01

    This paper reporting on techniques for esophageal evaluation and imaging and drugs for esophageal disease includes commentaries on endoscopy techniques including dye-based high-resolution and dye-less high-definition endoscopy; the shift from CT to MRI guidance in tumor delineation for radiation therapy; the role of functional lumen imaging in measuring esophageal distensibility; electrical stimulation of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) as an alternative to fundoduplication for treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD); the morphological findings of reflux esophagitis and esophageal dysmotility on double-contrast esophagography; the value of videofluoroscopy in assessing protecting mechanisms in patients with chronic reflux or swallowing disorders; targeting visceral hypersensitivity in the treatment of refractory GERD; and the symptoms and treatments of nighttime reflux and nocturnal acid breakthrough (NAB).

  6. Current Therapeutic Options for Esophageal Motor Disorders as Defined by the Chicago Classification.

    PubMed

    Zerbib, Frank; Roman, Sabine

    2015-07-01

    With the development of high-resolution manometry and specific metrics to characterize esophageal motility, the Chicago Classification has become the gold standard for the diagnosis of esophageal motor disorders. Major and significant disorders, that is, never observed in healthy subjects, are achalasia, esophagogastric junction outflow obstruction, distal esophageal spasm, absent peristalsis, and hypercontractile (Jackhammer) esophagus. Achalasia subtyping is relevant to predict the response to endoscopic and surgical therapies as several studies suggest that, pneumatic dilation is less effective than Heller myotomy, in type III achalasia. Peroral endoscopic myotomy, initially developed in expert centers, is a promising technique for the treatment of achalasia. The medical therapeutic options for distal esophageal spasm and hypercontractile esophagus are smooth muscle relaxants and pain modulators. Intraesophageal injection of botulinum toxin might be an interesting option for treatment of these disorders but further studies are required to determine the optimal injection protocol and the best candidates based on manometric patterns. The treatment of hypotensive motility disorders is disappointing and relies mainly on dietary and lifestyle changes as no effective esophageal prokinetic is currently available.

  7. Clinical Implications and Pathogenesis of Esophageal Remodeling in Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Hirano, Ikuo; Aceves, Seema S.

    2014-01-01

    In eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), remodeling changes are manifest histologically in both the epithelium as well as in the subepithelium where lamina propria (LP) fibrosis, expansion of the muscularis propria and increased vascularity occur. The major clinical symptoms and complications of EoE are largely consequences of esophageal remodeling. Important mediators of the process include IL-5, IL-13, TGFβ1, mast cells, fibroblasts and eosinophils. Methods to detect remodeling effects include upper endoscopy, histopathology, barium esophagram, endoscopic ultrasonography, esophageal manometry, and functional luminal imaging. These modalities provide evidence of organ dysfunction that include focal and diffuse esophageal strictures, expansion of the mucosa and subepithelium, esophageal motor abnormalities and reduced esophageal distensibility. Complications of food impaction and perforations of the esophageal wall have been associated with reduction in esophageal caliber and increased esophageal mural stiffness. The therapeutic benefits of topical corticosteroids and elimination diet therapy in resolving mucosal eosinophilic inflammation of the esophagus are evident. Available therapies, however, have demonstrated variable ability to reverse existing remodeling changes of the esophagus. Systemic therapies that include novel, targeted biologic agents have the potential of addressing subepithelial remodeling. Esophageal dilation remains a useful, adjunctive therapeutic maneuver in symptomatic adults with esophageal stricture. As novel treatments emerge, it is essential that therapeutic endpoints account for the fundamental contributions of esophageal remodeling to overall disease activity. PMID:24813517

  8. Regulation and dysregulation of esophageal peristalsis by the integrated function of circular and longitudinal muscle layers in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Muscularis propria throughout the entire gastrointestinal tract including the esophagus is comprised of circular and longitudinal muscle layers. Based on the studies conducted in the colon and the small intestine, for more than a century, it has been debated whether the two muscle layers contract synchronously or reciprocally during the ascending contraction and descending relaxation of the peristaltic reflex. Recent studies in the esophagus and colon prove that the two muscle layers indeed contract and relax together in almost perfect synchrony during ascending contraction and descending relaxation of the peristaltic reflex, respectively. Studies in patients with various types of esophageal motor disorders reveal temporal disassociation between the circular and longitudinal muscle layers. We suggest that the discoordination between the two muscle layers plays a role in the genesis of esophageal symptoms, i.e., dysphagia and esophageal pain. Certain pathologies may selectively target one and not the other muscle layer, e.g., in eosinophilic esophagitis there is a selective dysfunction of the longitudinal muscle layer. In achalasia esophagus, swallows are accompanied by the strong contraction of the longitudinal muscle without circular muscle contraction. The possibility that the discoordination between two muscle layers plays a role in the genesis of esophageal symptoms, i.e., dysphagia and esophageal pain are discussed. The purpose of this review is to summarize the regulation and dysregulation of peristalsis by the coordinated and discoordinated function of circular and longitudinal muscle layers in health and diseased states. PMID:27445346

  9. Regulation and dysregulation of esophageal peristalsis by the integrated function of circular and longitudinal muscle layers in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Ravinder K

    2016-09-01

    Muscularis propria throughout the entire gastrointestinal tract including the esophagus is comprised of circular and longitudinal muscle layers. Based on the studies conducted in the colon and the small intestine, for more than a century, it has been debated whether the two muscle layers contract synchronously or reciprocally during the ascending contraction and descending relaxation of the peristaltic reflex. Recent studies in the esophagus and colon prove that the two muscle layers indeed contract and relax together in almost perfect synchrony during ascending contraction and descending relaxation of the peristaltic reflex, respectively. Studies in patients with various types of esophageal motor disorders reveal temporal disassociation between the circular and longitudinal muscle layers. We suggest that the discoordination between the two muscle layers plays a role in the genesis of esophageal symptoms, i.e., dysphagia and esophageal pain. Certain pathologies may selectively target one and not the other muscle layer, e.g., in eosinophilic esophagitis there is a selective dysfunction of the longitudinal muscle layer. In achalasia esophagus, swallows are accompanied by the strong contraction of the longitudinal muscle without circular muscle contraction. The possibility that the discoordination between two muscle layers plays a role in the genesis of esophageal symptoms, i.e., dysphagia and esophageal pain are discussed. The purpose of this review is to summarize the regulation and dysregulation of peristalsis by the coordinated and discoordinated function of circular and longitudinal muscle layers in health and diseased states.

  10. Histological Response to Fluticasone Propionate in Patients With Eosinophilic Esophagitis Is Associated With Improved Functional Esophageal Mucosal Integrity.

    PubMed

    van Rhijn, Bram D; Verheij, Joanne; van den Bergh Weerman, Marius A; Verseijden, Caroline; van den Wijngaard, René M J G J; de Jonge, Wouter J; Smout, Andreas J P M; Bredenoord, Albert J

    2015-09-01

    The esophageal mucosal integrity is impaired in patients with eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). We aimed to evaluate the effect of fluticasone propionate on inflammation and functional and structural markers of esophageal mucosal barrier integrity in adult patients with EoE. In this prospective study, we included 15 EoE patients (median age (IQR), 43 (30-45) years). Patients underwent upper endoscopy before and after an 8-week course of swallowed fluticasone propionate 500 μg BID. Several parameters of esophageal mucosal barrier integrity were evaluated: esophageal electrical tissue impedance in vivo during endoscopy, transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) and transepithelial molecule flux in Ussing chambers using esophageal biopsy specimens, and intercellular spaces as a structural marker of permeability using electron microscopy. Esophageal eosinophils and mast cells were counted, and expression of inflammatory cytokines and barrier integrity proteins was investigated using qPCR. Esophageal symptoms and signs were also assessed. Peak eosinophil and mast cell counts decreased significantly after fluticasone propionate treatment. The esophageal mucosal integrity increased substantially during treatment, as shown by increased extracellular impedance and TER (both P<0.01) and decreased transepithelial molecule flux in Ussing chambers (P<0.05). Whereas expression of genes encoding for inflammatory cytokines (IL5, IL13, eotaxin-3, periostin, TSLP) decreased after treatment, expression of genes encoding for barrier integrity proteins (filaggrin and desmoglein-1) increased. Fluticasone propionate treatment decreases eosinophilic inflammation and improves the esophageal mucosal barrier integrity in adult EoE patients. Improvement of the mucosal barrier integrity correlates with normalization of expression of desmoglein-1 and filaggrin marker genes.

  11. Pressure-flow characteristics of normal and disordered esophageal motor patterns.

    PubMed

    Singendonk, Maartje M J; Kritas, Stamatiki; Cock, Charles; Ferris, Lara F; McCall, Lisa; Rommel, Nathalie; van Wijk, Michiel P; Benninga, Marc A; Moore, David; Omari, Taher I

    2015-03-01

    To perform pressure-flow analysis (PFA) in a cohort of pediatric patients who were referred for diagnostic manometric investigation. PFA was performed using purpose designed Matlab-based software. The pressure-flow index (PFI), a composite measure of bolus pressurization relative to flow and the impedance ratio, a measure of the extent of bolus clearance failure were calculated. Tracings of 76 pediatric patients (32 males; 9.1 ± 0.7 years) and 25 healthy adult controls (7 males; 36.1 ± 2.2 years) were analyzed. Patients mostly had normal motility (50%) or a category 4 disorder and usually weak peristalsis (31.5%) according to the Chicago Classification. PFA of healthy controls defined reference ranges for PFI ≤142 and impedance ratio ≤0.49. Pediatric patients with pressure-flow (PF) characteristics within these limits had normal motility (62%), most patients with PF characteristics outside these limits also had an abnormal Chicago Classification (61%). Patients with high PFI and disordered motor patterns all had esophagogastric junction outflow obstruction. Disordered PF characteristics are associated with disordered esophageal motor patterns. By defining the degree of over-pressurization and/or extent of clearance failure, PFA may be a useful adjunct to esophageal pressure topography-based classification. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Unconventional functions of microtubule motors.

    PubMed

    Muresan, Virgil; Muresan, Zoia

    2012-04-01

    With the functional characterization of proteins advancing at fast pace, the notion that one protein performs different functions - often with no relation to each other - emerges as a novel principle of how cells work. Molecular motors are no exception to this new development. Here, we provide an account on recent findings revealing that microtubule motors are multifunctional proteins that regulate many cellular processes, in addition to their main function in transport. Some of these functions rely on their motor activity, but others are independent of it. Of the first category, we focus on the role of microtubule motors in organelle biogenesis, and in the remodeling of the cytoskeleton, especially through the regulation of microtubule dynamics. Of the second category, we discuss the function of microtubule motors as static anchors of the cargo at the destination, and their participation in regulating signaling cascades by modulating interactions between signaling proteins, including transcription factors. We also review atypical forms of transport, such as the cytoplasmic streaming in the oocyte, and the movement of cargo by microtubule fluctuations. Our goal is to provide an overview of these unexpected functions of microtubule motors, and to incite future research in this expanding field.

  13. Manometric vector volume analysis to assess lower esophageal sphincter function.

    PubMed

    Stein, H J; Korn, O; Liebermann-Meffert, D

    1995-01-01

    The resistance provided by the manometric high pressure zone at the gastroesophageal junction, is the major barrier against gastroesophageal reflux in man. Recent studies have shown that this high pressure zone has its correlate in the architecture of the gastric 'sling' fibres at the gastric notch and the semicircular 'clasps' at the lesser curvature side of the gastroesophageal junction. Pull-back manometry with radially oriented pressure transducers allows to assess these distinct components of the human lower esophageal sphincter. With the recent introduction of personal computers into the manometry laboratory, three-dimensional manometric images of the lower esophageal sphincter can be easily constructed, based on radially oriented pressures. The application of this new technology has shown that calculation of the sphincter pressure vector volume, i.e. the volume circumscribed by the three-dimensional manometric sphincter image, is superior to standard manometric techniques in the assessment of lower esophageal sphincter function. The sphincter pressure vector volume is a particularly helpful parameter to identify patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease who will not benefit from medical therapy and should consequently undergo early antireflux surgery. Vector volume analysis is also helpful in assessing the cause of recurrent symptoms in patients with previous antireflux surgery. In patients with achalasia three-dimensional sphincter imaging and vector volume analysis can illustrate a severely asymmetric and hypertensive sphincter and show the effect of myotomy with or without a concomitant antireflux procedure on the sphincter pressure profile.

  14. Sensory and motor function of the esophagus: lessons from ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Ravinder K; Liu, Jianmin; Puckett, James L; Bhalla, Vikas; Bhargava, Valmik; Tipnis, Neelish; Kassab, Ghassan

    2005-02-01

    Catheter-based high-frequency intraluminal ultrasound imaging is a powerful tool to study esophageal sensory and motor function and dysfunction in vivo in humans. It can be combined with manometry, pH, and impedance measurement techniques to determine the relationships between different physiologic parameters. High-frequency intraluminal ultrasound imaging has provided a number of important insights regarding the longitudinal muscle function of the esophagus. On the basis of the ultrasound images and intraluminal pressure recordings, it seems that there is synchrony in the timing and the amplitude of contraction between the circular and longitudinal muscle layers. A sustained contraction of the longitudinal muscle layer is temporally related to esophageal chest pain and heartburn. The biomechanics of the esophageal wall and its relationship to sensory and motor function can be studied in humans in vivo by using high-frequency intraluminal ultrasound much more precisely than has previously been possible. Achalasia, diffuse esophageal spasm, and nutcracker esophagus are associated with hypertrophy of circular and longitudinal muscle layers. Finally, high-frequency intraluminal ultrasound imaging is the only technique that can detect reflux-related distention of the esophagus and its role in esophageal symptoms. Future approaches to display and quantify ultrasound image data are discussed. The principles of high-frequency intraluminal ultrasound described here are also applicable to study of the motor and sensory function of the other regions of the gastrointestinal tract.

  15. Etiologic factors in long-term respiratory function abnormalities following esophageal atresia repair.

    PubMed

    LeSouëf, P N; Myers, N A; Landau, L I

    1987-10-01

    Recurrent respiratory illnesses are frequent in infants following repair of esophageal atresia and functional abnormalities of respiratory and esophageal function are often seen in older children. Recurrent aspiration is a potential cause of these respiratory abnormalities, but a relationship between abnormalities of gastrointestinal and respiratory mechanics has not been adequately investigated. We sought an association between lower esophageal sphincter (LES) incompetence, gastroesophageal reflux (GER), and respiratory function abnormalities in 18 subjects (age 12 to 21 years) following repair of esophageal atresia (Vogt type 111B). In each subject, measurements were made of spirometry, lung volumes assessed by plethysmography, esophageal manometry recorded using a constantly infused fluid-filled trilumen catheter to assess LES pressure and esophageal motility, and esophageal pH monitoring to detect GER. Subjects were grouped according to the presence or absence of a radiologically supported diagnosis of pneumonia in the first 4 years of life. Lung volumes were mildly but significantly decreased in the "pneumonia" group compared with the "nonpneumonia" group. There was no association between abnormalities of respiratory function and abnormal LES pressure or the presence of GER. These data suggest that pneumonia in esophageal atresia infants is associated with mild long-term lung damage. LES dysfunction and GER do not appear to play a major role in this process.

  16. Motor function in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Vicente-Vytopilova, Pavla; Tavernier, Béatrice; Sabia, Séverine; Dumurgier, Julien; Mazoyer, Bernard; Singh-Manoux, Archana; Tzourio, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The reserve hypothesis accounts for the lack of direct relationship between brain pathology and its clinical manifestations. Research has mostly focused on cognition; our objective is to examine whether the reserve hypothesis applies to motor function. We investigated whether education, a marker of reserve, modifies the association between white matter lesions (WMLs), a marker of vascular brain damage, and maximum walking speed (WS), an objective measure of motor function. We also examined the cross-sectional and longitudinal association between education and WS. Methods: Data are from 4,010 participants aged 65–85 years in the longitudinal Three-City–Dijon Study with up to 4 WS measures over 10 years. We examined the interaction between education and WMLs for baseline WS. We studied the association between education and repeated WS measures using linear mixed models, and the role of covariates in explaining the education-WS association. Results: Education was strongly associated with baseline WS; the difference in mean WS between the high and low education groups (0.145 m/s, 95% confidence interval = 0.125–0.165) was equivalent to 7.4 years of age. WMLs were associated with slow WS only in the low education group (p interaction = 0.026). WS declined significantly over time (−0.194 m/s/10 years, 95% confidence interval = −0.206, −0.182), but education did not influence rate of decline. Anthropometric characteristics, parental education, general health, and cognition had the strongest role in explaining the baseline education-WS association. Conclusions: Participants with more education were less susceptible to WMLs' effect on motor function. Higher education was associated with better motor performances but not with motor decline. These results are consistent with the passive reserve hypothesis. PMID:23803317

  17. Dyspraxia, motor function and visual-motor integration in autism.

    PubMed

    Miller, M; Chukoskie, L; Zinni, M; Townsend, J; Trauner, D

    2014-08-01

    This project assessed dyspraxia in high-functioning school aged children with autism with a focus on Ideational Praxis. We examined the association of specific underlying motor function including eye movement with ideational dyspraxia (sequences of skilled movements) as well as the possible role of visual-motor integration in dyspraxia. We found that compared to IQ-, sex- and age-matched typically developing children, the children with autism performed significantly worse on: Ideational and Buccofacial praxis; a broad range of motor tests, including measures of simple motor skill, timing and accuracy of saccadic eye movements and motor coordination; and tests of visual-motor integration. Impairments in individual children with autism were heterogeneous in nature, although when we examined the praxis data as a function of a qualitative measure representing motor timing, we found that children with poor motor timing performed worse on all praxis categories and had slower and less accurate eye movements while those with regular timing performed as well as typical children on those same tasks. Our data provide evidence that both motor function and visual-motor integration contribute to dyspraxia. We suggest that dyspraxia in autism involves cerebellar mechanisms of movement control and the integration of these mechanisms with cortical networks implicated in praxis.

  18. Dyspraxia, Motor Function and Visual-Motor Integration in Autism

    PubMed Central

    Miller, M.; Chukoskie, L.; Zinni, M.; Townsend, J.; Trauner, D.

    2014-01-01

    This project assessed dyspraxia in high-functioning school aged children with autism with a focus on Ideational Praxis. We examined the association of specific underlying motor function including eye movement with ideational dyspraxia (sequences of skilled movements) as well as the possible role of visual-motor integration in dyspraxia. We found that compared to IQ-, sex- and age-matched typically developing children, the children with autism performed significantly worse on: Ideational and Buccofacial praxis; a broad range of motor tests, including measures of simple motor skill, timing and accuracy of saccadic eye movements and motor coordination; and tests of visual-motor integration. Impairments in individual children with autism were heterogeneous in nature, although when we examined the praxis data as a function of a qualitative measure representing motor timing, we found that children with poor motor timing performed worse on all praxis categories and had slower and less accurate eye movements while those with regular timing performed as well as typical children on those same tasks. Our data provide evidence that both motor function and visual-motor integration contribute to dyspraxia. We suggest that dyspraxia in autism involves cerebellar mechanisms of movement control and the integration of these mechanisms with cortical networks implicated in praxis. PMID:24742861

  19. Fundoplication improves disordered esophageal motility.

    PubMed

    Heider, T Ryan; Behrns, Kevin E; Koruda, Mark J; Shaheen, Nicholas J; Lucktong, Tananchai A; Bradshaw, Barbara; Farrell, Timothy M

    2003-02-01

    Patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and disordered esophageal motility are at risk for postoperative dysphagia, and are often treated with partial (270-degree) fundoplication as a strategy to minimize postoperative swallowing difficulties. Complete (360-degree) fundoplication, however, may provide more effective and durable reflux protection over time. Recently we reported that postfundoplication dysphagia is uncommon, regardless of preoperative manometric status and type of fundoplication. To determine whether esophageal function improves after fundoplication, we measured postoperative motility in patients in whom disordered esophageal motility had been documented before fundoplication. Forty-eight of 262 patients who underwent laparoscopic fundoplication between 1995 and 2000 satisfied preoperative manometric criteria for disordered esophageal motility (distal esophageal peristaltic amplitude < or =30 mm Hg and/or peristaltic frequency < or =80%). Of these, 19 had preoperative manometric assessment at our facility and consented to repeat study. Fifteen (79%) of these patients had a complete fundoplication and four (21%) had a partial fundoplication. Each patient underwent repeat four-channel esophageal manometry 29.5 +/- 18.4 months (mean +/- SD) after fundoplication. Distal esophageal peristaltic amplitude and peristaltic frequency were compared to preoperative data by paired t test. After fundoplication, mean peristaltic amplitude in the distal esophagus increased by 47% (56.8 +/- 30.9 mm Hg to 83.5 +/- 36.5 mm Hg; P < 0.001) and peristaltic frequency improved by 33% (66.4 +/- 28.7% to 87.6 +/- 16.3%; P < 0.01). Normal esophageal motor function was present in 14 patients (74%) after fundoplication, whereas in five patients the esophageal motor function remained abnormal (2 improved, 1 worsened, and 2 remained unchanged). Three patients with preoperative peristaltic frequencies of 0%, 10%, and 20% improved to 84%, 88%, and 50%, respectively

  20. [Functional and motor digestive disorders].

    PubMed

    Mearin, Fermín; Rey, Enrique; Balboa, Agustín

    2013-10-01

    This article discusses the most interesting studies on functional and motility gastrointestinal disorders presented in Digestive Diseases Week (DDW) in 2013. New data were reported on the clinical importance of functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGID) and on how they can produce numerous disturbances such as inflammatory bowel disease. These disturbances are associated with somatic functional disease and particularly with fatigue. In addition, new data have emerged on the physiopathology of these disorders, with some studies reporting that environmental factors and events in early infancy can favor their development. Data were also presented on how bile acids can increase susceptibility to diarrhea in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and on how the type of food intake can favor the development of symptoms. More data are available on the presence of underlying celiac disease in patients with IBS, which should prompt us to investigate this disease in our patients. Likewise, indiscriminate application of a gluten-free diet in patients with IBS has been shown not to produce a clear improvement. Regarding the physiopathology of functional dyspepsia (FD), results have been presented on how psychological factors can modify gastric accommodation and how this is in turn related to visceral hypersensitivity and gastric emptying. Regarding therapy, mirtazapine can improve symptoms and lead to weight gain in patients with severe FD and substantial weight loss. Results were presented on new drugs for IBS such as ibodutant and on old drugs with new applications such as mesalazine and ebastine. The antinociceptive effect of linaclotide is now better understood and a meta-analysis has shown its effectiveness in IBS with constipation as the main symptom. In patients with constipation, pelvic floor dysynergy can be diagnosed by a simple clinical interview and rectal touch. More data are available on the efficacy of prucalopride (which has been shown to accelerate

  1. NFkB and Nrf2 in esophageal epithelial barrier function.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hao; Fang, Yu; Li, Wenbo; Orlando, Roy C; Shaheen, Nicholas; Chen, Xiaoxin Luke

    2013-12-01

    The stratified squamous epithelium of the esophagus forms a tight protective barrier. Defects of the barrier function contribute to gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), which is manifested as damage to the esophageal epithelium due to exposure to the gastrointestinal refluxate. In this review, we discuss the involvement of NFkB and Nrf2 in esophageal epithelial barrier function. Understanding these molecular pathways in the esophagus may help us develop therapeutic strategies to improve clinical outcomes in patients with GERD.

  2. NFkB and Nrf2 in esophageal epithelial barrier function

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hao; Fang, Yu; Li, Wenbo; Orlando, Roy C; Shaheen, Nicholas; Chen, Xiaoxin Luke

    2013-01-01

    The stratified squamous epithelium of the esophagus forms a tight protective barrier. Defects of the barrier function contribute to gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), which is manifested as damage to the esophageal epithelium due to exposure to the gastrointestinal refluxate. In this review, we discuss the involvement of NFkB and Nrf2 in esophageal epithelial barrier function. Understanding these molecular pathways in the esophagus may help us develop therapeutic strategies to improve clinical outcomes in patients with GERD. PMID:24790804

  3. Erosive esophagitis associated with metabolic syndrome, impaired liver function, and dyslipidemia

    PubMed Central

    Loke, Song-Seng; Yang, Kuender D; Chen, Kuang-Den; Chen, Jung-Fu

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether erosive esophagitis is correlated with metabolic syndrome and its components, abnormal liver function, and lipoprotein profiles. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional, case control study of subjects who underwent upper endoscopy during a health examination at the Health Management and Evaluation Center of a tertiary medical care facility located in Southern Taiwan. Metabolic syndrome components, body mass index (BMI), liver function, dyslipidemia, and cardiovascular risk factors, as defined by the ratio of total cholesterol to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and the ratio of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol to HDL-C were compared between individuals with and without erosive esophagitis. Risk factors for erosive esophagitis were evaluated by multivariate logistic regression. RESULTS: Erosive esophagitis was diagnosed in 507 of 5015 subjects who were individually age and sex matched to 507 esophagitis-free control subjects. In patients with erosive esophagitis, BMI, waist circumference, blood pressure, fasting plasma glucose, triglyceride levels, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, the ratio of total cholesterol to HDL-C, and the ratio of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol to HDL-C were significantly higher and HDL-C was significantly lower compared to patients without erosive esophagitis (all P < 0.05). In a multivariate analysis, central obesity (OR = 1.38; 95%CI: 1.0-1.86), hypertension (OR = 1.35; 95%CI: 1.04-1.76), hypertriglyceridemia (OR = 1.34; 95%CI: 1.02-1.76), cardiovascular risk factors as defined by a ratio of total cholesterol to HDL-C > 5 (OR = 1.45; 95%CI: 1.06-1.97), and aspartate aminotransferase (OR = 1.59; 95%CI: 1.08-2.34) were significantly associated with erosive esophagitis. CONCLUSION: Metabolic syndrome, impaired liver function, and a higher ratio of total cholesterol to HDL-C were associated with erosive esophagitis. PMID:24124334

  4. Abnormal cerebral functional connectivity in esophageal cancer patients with theory of mind deficits in resting state.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yin; Xiang, JianBo; Qian, Nong; Sun, SuPing; Hu, LiJun; Yuan, YongGui

    2015-01-01

    To explore the function of the default mode network (DMN) in the psychopathological mechanisms of theory of mind deficits in patients with an esophageal cancer concomitant with depression in resting the state. Twenty-five cases of esophageal cancer with theory of mind deficits (test group) that meet the diagnostic criteria of esophageal cancer and neuropsychological tests, including Beck depression inventory, reading the mind in the eyes, and Faux pas, were included, Another 25 cases of esophageal cancer patients but without theory of mind deficits (control group) were enrolled. Each patient completed a resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging. The functional connectivity intensities within the cerebral regions in the DMN of all the enrolled patients were analyzed. The results of each group were compared. The functional connectivity of the bilateral prefrontal central region with the precuneus, bilateral posterior cingulate gyrus and bilateral ventral anterior cingulate gyrus in the patients of the test group were all reduced significantly (P < 0.05). In the resting state, the functional connectivity is abnormal in the cerebral regions in the DMN of esophageal cancer patients with theory of mind deficits. The theory of mind deficits might have an important function in the pathogenesis of esophageal cancer.

  5. Molecular motors and their functions in plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, A. S.

    2001-01-01

    Molecular motors that hydrolyze ATP and use the derived energy to generate force are involved in a variety of diverse cellular functions. Genetic, biochemical, and cellular localization data have implicated motors in a variety of functions such as vesicle and organelle transport, cytoskeleton dynamics, morphogenesis, polarized growth, cell movements, spindle formation, chromosome movement, nuclear fusion, and signal transduction. In non-plant systems three families of molecular motors (kinesins, dyneins, and myosins) have been well characterized. These motors use microtubules (in the case of kinesines and dyneins) or actin filaments (in the case of myosins) as tracks to transport cargo materials intracellularly. During the last decade tremendous progress has been made in understanding the structure and function of various motors in animals. These studies are yielding interesting insights into the functions of molecular motors and the origin of different families of motors. Furthermore, the paradigm that motors bind cargo and move along cytoskeletal tracks does not explain the functions of some of the motors. Relatively little is known about the molecular motors and their roles in plants. In recent years, by using biochemical, cell biological, molecular, and genetic approaches a few molecular motors have been isolated and characterized from plants. These studies indicate that some of the motors in plants have novel features and regulatory mechanisms. The role of molecular motors in plant cell division, cell expansion, cytoplasmic streaming, cell-to-cell communication, membrane trafficking, and morphogenesis is beginning to be understood. Analyses of the Arabidopsis genome sequence database (51% of genome) with conserved motor domains of kinesin and myosin families indicates the presence of a large number (about 40) of molecular motors and the functions of many of these motors remain to be discovered. It is likely that many more motors with novel regulatory

  6. [Functional and motor gastrointestinal disorders].

    PubMed

    Mearin, Fermín; Rey, Enrique; Balboa, Agustín

    2015-09-01

    This article discusses the most interesting studies on functional and motor gastrointestinal disorders presented at Digestive Diseases Week (DDW), 2015. Researchers are still seeking biomarkers for irritable bowel syndrome and have presented new data. One study confirmed that the use of low-dose antidepressants has an antinociceptive effect without altering the psychological features of patients with functional dyspepsia. A contribution that could have immediate application is the use of transcutaneous electroacupuncture, which has demonstrated effectiveness in controlling nausea in patients with gastroparesis. New data have come to light on the importance of diet in irritable bowel syndrome, although the effectiveness of a low-FODMAP diet seems to be losing momentum with time. Multiple data were presented on the long-term efficacy of rifaximin therapy in patients with irritable bowel syndrome and diarrhoea. In addition, among other contributions, and more as a curiosity, a study evaluated the effect of histamine in the diet of patients with irritable bowel syndrome.

  7. Cerebellar Motor Function in Spina Bifida Meningomyelocele

    PubMed Central

    Dennis, Maureen; Salman, Michael S.; Juranek, Jenifer; Fletcher, Jack M.

    2010-01-01

    Spina bifida meningomyelocele (SBM), a congenital neurodevelopmental disorder, involves dysmorphology of the cerebellum, and its most obvious manifestations are motor deficits. This paper reviews cerebellar neuropathology and motor function across several motor systems well studied in SBM in relation to current models of cerebellar motor and timing function. Children and adults with SBM have widespread motor deficits in trunk, upper limbs, eyes, and speech articulators that are broadly congruent with those observed in adults with cerebellar lesions. The structure and function of the cerebellum are correlated with a range of motor functions. While motor learning is generally preserved in SBM, those motor functions requiring predictive signals and precise calibration of the temporal features of movement are impaired, resulting in deficits in smooth movement coordination as well as in the classical cerebellar triad of dysmetria, ataxia, and dysarthria. That motor function in individuals with SBM is disordered in a manner phenotypically similar to that in adult cerebellar lesions, and appears to involve similar deficits in predictive cerebellar motor control, suggests that age-based cerebellar motor plasticity is limited in individuals with this neurodevelopmental disorder. PMID:20652468

  8. Function of upper esophageal sphincter during swallowing: the grabbing effect.

    PubMed

    Pouderoux, P; Kahrilas, P J

    1997-05-01

    This study investigated deglutitive axial force developed within the pharynx, upper esophageal sphincter (UES), and cervical esophagus. Position and deglutitive excursion of the UES were determined using combined manometry and videofluoroscopy in eight healthy volunteers. Deglutitive clearing force was quantified with a force transducer to which nylon balls of 6- or 8-mm diameter were tethered and positioned within the oropharynx, hypopharynx, UES, and cervical esophagus. Axial force recordings were synchronized with videofluoroscopic imaging. Clearing force was dependent on both sphere diameter (P < 0.05) and location, with greater force exhibited in the hypopharynx and UES compared with the oropharynx and esophagus (P < 0.05). Within the UES, the onset of traction force coincided with passage of the pharyngeal clearing wave but persisted well beyond this. On videofluoroscopy, the persistent force was associated with the aboral motion of the ball caught within the UES. Force abated with gradual slippage of the UES around the ball. The force attributable to the combination of UES contraction and laryngeal descent was named the grabbing effect. The grabbing effect functions to transfer luminal contents distal to the laryngeal inlet at the end of the pharyngeal swallow, presumably acting to prevent regurgitation and/or aspiration of swallowed material.

  9. Functional and motor gastrointestinal disorders.

    PubMed

    Mearin, Fermín; Rey, Enrique; Balboa, Agustín

    2016-09-01

    This article discusses the most interesting presentations at Digestive Disease Week, held in San Diego, in the field of functional and motor gastrointestinal disorders. One of the most important contributions was undoubtedly the presentation of the new Rome IV diagnostic criteria for functional gastrointestinal disorders. We therefore devote some space in this article to explaining these new criteria in the most common functional disorders. In fact, there has already been discussion of data comparing Rome IV and Rome III criteria in the diagnosis of irritable bowel syndrome, confirming that the new criteria are somewhat more restrictive. From the physiopathological point of view, several studies have shown that the aggregation of physiopathological alterations increases symptom severity in distinct functional disorders. From the therapeutic point of view, more data were presented on the efficacy of acotiamide and its mechanisms of action in functional dyspepsia, the safety and efficacy of domperidone in patients with gastroparesis, and the efficacy of linaclotide both in irritable bowel syndrome and constipation. In irritable bowel syndrome, more data have come to light on the favourable results of a low FODMAP diet, with emphasis on its role in modifying the microbiota. Finally, long-term efficacy data were presented on the distinct treatment options in achalasia.

  10. Radionuclide Esophageal Transit Scintigraphy in Primary Hypothyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Shoukat H; Madhu, Vijay P; Rather, Tanveer A; Laway, Bashir A

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims Esophageal dysmotility is associated with gastrointestinal dysmotility in various systemic and neuroregulatory disorders. Hypothyroidism has been reported to be associated with impaired motor function in esophagus due to accumulation of glycosaminoglycan hyaluronic acid in its soft tissues, leading to changes in various contraction and relaxation parameters of esophagus, particularly in the lower esophageal sphincter. In this study we evaluated esophageal transit times in patients of primary hypothyroidism using the technique of radionuclide esophageal transit scintigraphy. Methods Thirty-one patients of primary hypothyroidism and 15 euthyroid healthy controls were evaluated for esophageal transit time using 15–20 MBq of Technetium-99m sulfur colloid diluted in 10–15 mL of drinking water. Time activity curve was generated for each study and esophageal transit time was calculated as time taken for clearance of 90% radioactive bolus from the region of interest encompassing the esophagus. Esophageal transit time of more than 10 seconds was considered as prolonged. Results Patients of primary hypothyroidism had a significantly increased mean esophageal transit time of 19.35 ± 20.02 seconds in comparison to the mean time of 8.25 ± 1.71 seconds in healthy controls (P < 0.05). Esophageal transit time improved and in some patients even normalized after treatment with thyroxine. A positive correlation (r = 0.39, P < 0.05) albeit weak existed between the serum thyroid stimulating hormone and the observed esophageal transit time. Conclusions A significant number of patients with primary hypothyroidism may have subclinical esophageal dysmotility with prolonged esophageal transit time which can be reversible by thyroxine treatment. Prolonged esophageal transit time in primary hypothyroidism may correlate with serum thyroid stimulating hormone levels. PMID:27444283

  11. Radionuclide Esophageal Transit Scintigraphy in Primary Hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Khan, Shoukat H; P, Madhu Vijay; Rather, Tanveer A; Laway, Bashir A

    2017-01-30

    Esophageal dysmotility is associated with gastrointestinal dysmotility in various systemic and neuroregulatory disorders. Hypothyroidism has been reported to be associated with impaired motor function in esophagus due to accumulation of glycosaminoglycan hyaluronic acid in its soft tissues, leading to changes in various contraction and relaxation parameters of esophagus, particularly in the lower esophageal sphincter. In this study we evaluated esophageal transit times in patients of primary hypothyroidism using the technique of radionuclide esophageal transit scintigraphy. Thirty-one patients of primary hypothyroidism and 15 euthyroid healthy controls were evaluated for esophageal transit time using 15-20 MBq of Technetium-99m sulfur colloid diluted in 10-15 mL of drinking water. Time activity curve was generated for each study and esophageal transit time was calculated as time taken for clearance of 90% radioactive bolus from the region of interest encompassing the esophagus. Esophageal transit time of more than 10 seconds was considered as prolonged. Patients of primary hypothyroidism had a significantly increased mean esophageal transit time of 19.35 ± 20.02 seconds in comparison to the mean time of 8.25 ± 1.71 seconds in healthy controls (P < 0.05). Esophageal transit time improved and in some patients even normalized after treatment with thyroxine. A positive correlation (r = 0.39, P < 0.05) albeit weak existed between the serum thyroid stimulating hormone and the observed esophageal transit time. A significant number of patients with primary hypothyroidism may have subclinical esophageal dysmotility with prolonged esophageal transit time which can be reversible by thyroxine treatment. Prolonged esophageal transit time in primary hypothyroidism may correlate with serum thyroid stimulating hormone levels.

  12. Defective upper gastrointestinal function after repair of combined esophageal and duodenal atresia.

    PubMed

    Fragoso, Ana Catarina; Ortiz, Ruben; Hernandez, Francisco; Olivares, Pedro; Martinez, Leopoldo; Tovar, Juan A

    2015-04-01

    Both esophageal atresia (EA) and duodenal atresia (DA) involve deficient anti-reflux barrier, poor esophageal function and eventually, duodenogastric reflux. This study aims at examining the upper gastrointestinal functional status in a cohort of patients with both EA and DA. A retrospective survey of patients treated for EA and DA between 1965 and 2012 was conducted. Clinical charts, office visits, imaging, upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and esophageal pH metry/impedance were used to assess the long-term condition of the esophagus, the presence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and/or the need for fundoplication. Twenty out of 581 patients treated for EA had associated DA. Ten/twenty children survived; 1 had primary esophageal replacement. With a median follow-up of 9 years, 8/9 had complicated outcomes and 5 still suffered digestive ailments: 2 GER; 1 eosinophilic esophagitis; 1 nodular gastritis, and 1 wrap herniation. A total of 10 procedures were performed: 8 fundoplications, 1 esophagogastric dissociation and 1 replacement with colon. The association of EA with DA involves a poor upper digestive function with high risks of GERD and fundoplication failure. The lifelong synergistic play of esophageal, gastric and duodenal dysfunctions in these patients prompts long-term follow-up, and eventually active treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Dysphagia in Children with Esophageal Atresia: Current Diagnostic Options.

    PubMed

    Rayyan, Maissa; Allegaert, Karel; Omari, Taher; Rommel, Nathalie

    2015-08-01

    Dysphagia or swallowing disorder is very common (range, 15-52%) in patients with esophageal atresia. Children present with a wide range of symptoms. The most common diagnostic tools to evaluate esophageal dysphagia, such as upper barium study and manometry, aim to characterize anatomy and function of the esophageal body and the esophagogastric junction (EGJ). Using these technologies, a variety of pathological motor patterns have been identified in children with esophageal atresia. However, the most challenging part of diagnosing patients with esophageal dysphagia lies in the fact that these methods fail to link functional symptoms such as dysphagia with the esophageal motor disorders observed. A recent method, called pressure-flow analysis (PFA), uses simultaneously acquired impedance and manometry measurements, and applies an integrated analysis of these recordings to derive quantitative pressure-flow metrics. These pressure-flow metrics allow detection of the interplay between bolus flow, motor patterns, and symptomatology by combining data on bolus transit and bolus flow resistance. Based on a dichotomous categorization, flow resistance at the EGJ and ineffective esophageal bolus transit can be determined. This method has the potential to guide therapeutic decisions for esophageal dysmotility in pediatric patients with esophageal atresia.

  14. Esophageal mucosal damage may promote dysmotility and worsen esophageal acid exposure.

    PubMed

    Meneghetti, Adam T; Tedesco, Pietro; Damani, Tanuja; Patti, Marco G

    2005-12-01

    This study determines the relationship among esophageal dysmotility, esophageal acid exposure, and esophageal mucosal injury in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). A total of 827 patients with GERD (confirmed by ambulatory pH monitoring) were divided into three groups based on the degree of mucosal injury: group A, no esophagitis, 493 patients; group B, esophagitis grades I to III, 273 patients; and group C, Barrett's esophagus, 61 patients. As mucosal damage progressed from no esophagitis to Barrett's esophagus, there was a significant decrease in lower esophageal sphincter pressure and amplitude of peristalsis in the distal esophagus, with a subsequent increase in the number of reflux episodes in 24 hours, the number of reflux episodes longer than 5 minutes, and the reflux score. These data suggest that in patients with GERD, worsening of esophageal mucosal injury may determine progressive deterioration of esophageal motor function with impairment of acid clearance and increase of esophageal acid exposure. These findings suggest that Barrett's esophagus is an end-stage form of gastroesophageal reflux, and that if surgical therapy is performed early in the course of the disease, this cascade of events might be blocked.

  15. The functional alterations associated with motor imagery training: a comparison between motor execution and motor imagery of sequential finger tapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hang; Yao, Li; Long, Zhiying

    2011-03-01

    Motor imagery training, as an effective strategy, has been more and more applied to mental disorders rehabilitation and motor skill learning. Studies on the neural mechanism underlying motor imagery have suggested that such effectiveness may be related to the functional congruence between motor execution and motor imagery. However, as compared to the studies on motor imagery, the studies on motor imagery training are much fewer. The functional alterations associated with motor imagery training and the effectiveness of motor imagery training on motor performance improvement still needs further investigation. Using fMRI, we employed a sequential finger tapping paradigm to explore the functional alterations associated with motor imagery training in both motor execution and motor imagery task. We hypothesized through 14 consecutive days motor imagery training, the motor performance could be improved and the functional congruence between motor execution and motor imagery would be sustained form pre-training phase to post-training phase. Our results confirmed the effectiveness of motor imagery training in improving motor performance and demonstrated in both pre and post-training phases, motor imagery and motor execution consistently sustained the congruence in functional neuroanatomy, including SMA (supplementary motor cortex), PMA (premotor area); M1( primary motor cortex) and cerebellum. Moreover, for both execution and imagery tasks, a similar functional alteration was observed in fusiform through motor imagery training. These findings provided an insight into the effectiveness of motor imagery training and suggested its potential therapeutic value in motor rehabilitation.

  16. Management of esophageal disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, L.D.; Mercer, C.D.; McCallum, R.W.; Kozarek, R.

    1987-01-01

    This book integrates gastroenterology and thoracic surgery to detail the comprehensive management of esophageal disease. It describes radiologic and functional evaluation of the esophagus, endoscopy, medical and surgical treatments, and results and also covers gastroesophageal reflux disease, tumors motility, esophageal replacement, intubation, esophageal diverticula, caustic esophageal injury. It presents Dr. Hill's surgical procedures in detail.

  17. Nrf2 deficiency impairs the barrier function of mouse esophageal epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hao; Hu, Yuhui; Fang, Yu; Djukic, Zorka; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Shaheen, Nicholas J.; Orlando, Roy C.; Chen, Xiaoxin

    2013-01-01

    Objective As a major cellular defense mechanism, the Nrf2/Keap1 pathway regulates expression of genes involved in detoxification and stress response. Our previous study revealed activation of the Nrf2/Keap1 pathway at the maturation phase during mouse esophageal development, suggesting a potential function in epithelial defense. Here we hypothesize that Nrf2 is involved in the barrier function of esophageal epithelium, and plays a protective role against gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Design Human esophageal biopsy samples, mouse surgical models and Nrf2-/- mice were used to assess the role of the Nrf2/Keap1 pathway in esophageal mucosal barrier function. Trans-epithelial electrical resistance (TEER) was measured with mini-Ussing chambers. Hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining and transmission electron microscopy were used to examine cell morphology, while gene microarray, immunohistochemistry, Western blotting and ChIP analysis were used to assess the expression of pathway genes. Results Nrf2 was expressed in normal esophageal epithelium and activated in GERD of both humans and mice. Nrf2 deficiency and gastroesophageal reflux in mice, either alone or in combination, reduced TEER and increased intercellular space diameter in esophageal epithelium. Nrf2 target genes and gene sets associated with oxidoreductase activity, mitochondrial biogenesis and energy production were down-regulated in the esophageal epithelium of Nrf2-/- mice. Consistent with the antioxidative function of Nrf2, a DNA oxidative damage marker (8OHdG) dramatically increased in esophageal epithelial cells of Nrf2-/- mice compared with those of wild-type mice. Interestingly, ATP biogenesis, Cox IV (a mitochondrial protein) and Claudin-4 (Cldn4) expression were down-regulated in the esophageal epithelium of Nrf2-/- mice, suggesting that energy-dependent tight junction integrity was subject to Nrf2 regulation. ChIP analysis confirmed the binding of Nrf2 to Cldn4 promoter. Conclusion Nrf2

  18. [Functional and motor gastrointestinal disorders].

    PubMed

    Mearin, Fermín; Perelló, Antonia; Balboa, Agustín

    2008-10-01

    on their treatments, is extensive. Consequently, 2008 has been a good year in terms of the useful information gathered for physicians interested in functional GI and motor disorders.

  19. Surface modification of esophageal stent materials by a polyethylenimine layer aiming at anti-cancer function.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kun; Bai, Yuxin; Wang, Xiaofeng; Li, Qian; Guan, Fangxia; Li, Jingan

    2017-08-01

    Esophageal cancer is difficult to cure globally and possesses high mortality rate, and it is generally accepted that palliative care such as stent implantation is the main therapy method for esophageal cancer in later period. However, the restenosis caused by tumor cells and inflammatory cells seriously interferes the stent clinical application and limits its long-term services. To solve this problem, series of drug delivery stents were developed and proven rather effective in the early stage of implantation, but more serious restenosis occurred after the drug delivery was over, which endangered the patients' life. Therefore, endowing the esophageal stent continuous anti-cancer function become an ideal strategy for inhibiting the restenosis. In this contribution, the functional layer composed of polydopamine (PDA) and Poly-ethylenimine (PEI) with series of molecular weights (MW, 1.8 × 10(3), 1 × 10(4), 2.5 × 10(4) and 7 × 10(4) Da) were fabricated onto the esophageal stent material 317L stainless steel (317L SS) surface. The surface characterization including amine quantitative, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and water contact angle measurement indicated successful preparation of the PDA/PEI layer. The Eca109 cells culture results proved that the PDA/PEI layers significantly improve Eca109 cells apoptosis and necrosis, suggesting excellent anti-cancer function. In addition, we also found that the anti-cancer function of the PDA/PEI layers was positively correlated to the immobilized PEIs' MW. All the results demonstrated the potential application of the PDA/PEI layers on the surface modification of esophageal stent for continuous anti-cancer function. It is generally accepted that the restenosis caused by tumor cells seriously interferes the esophageal stent clinical application. Thus, endowing the esophageal stent continuous anti-cancer function is the ideal strategy for inhibiting the restenosis. In this work, we fabricated functional layers

  20. The Functional Lumen Imaging Probe Detects Esophageal Contractility not Observed with Manometry in Patients with Achalasia

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Dustin A.; Lin, Zhiyue; Kahrilas, Peter J.; Sternbach, Joel; Donnan, Erica N.; Friesen, Laurel; Listernick, Zoe; Mogni, Benjamin; Pandolfino, John E.

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims The functional lumen imaging probe (FLIP) could improve characterization of achalasia subtypes by detecting non-occlusive esophageal contractions not observed with standard manometry. We aimed to evaluate for esophageal contractions during volumetric distention in patients with achalasia using FLIP topography. Methods Fifty one treatment-naïve patients with achalasia, defined and sub-classified by high-resolution esophageal pressure topography, and 10 asymptomatic individuals (controls) were evaluated with the FLIP during endoscopy. During stepwise distension, simultaneous intra-bag pressures and 16 channels of cross-sectional areas were measured; data were exported to software that generated FLIP topography plots. Esophageal contractility was identified by noting periods of reduced luminal diameter. Esophageal contractions were further characterized by propagation direction, repetitiveness, and based on whether they were occluding or non-occluding. Results Esophageal contractility was detected in all 10 controls: 8/10 had repetitive, antegrade, contractions and 9/10 had occluding contractions. Contractility was detected in 27% (4/15) of patients with type I achalasia and 65% (18/26, including 9 with occluding contractions) of patients with type II achalasia. Contractility was detected in all 10 patients with type III achalasia; 8 of these patients had a pattern of contractility not observed in controls (repetitive, retrograde contractions). Conclusions Esophageal contractility not observed with manometry can be detected in patients with achalasia using FLIP topography. The presence and patterns of contractility detected with FLIP topography may represent variations in pathophysiology, such as mechanisms of pan-esophageal pressurization in patients with type II achalasia. These findings could have implications for additional sub-classification to supplement prediction of the achalasia disease course. PMID:26278501

  1. Gastroesophageal reflux activates the NF-κB pathway and impairs esophageal barrier function in mice

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Yu; Chen, Hao; Hu, Yuhui; Djukic, Zorka; Tevebaugh, Whitney; Shaheen, Nicholas J.; Orlando, Roy C.; Hu, Jianguo

    2013-01-01

    The barrier function of the esophageal epithelium is a major defense against gastroesophageal reflux disease. Previous studies have shown that reflux damage is reflected in a decrease in transepithelial electrical resistance associated with tight junction alterations in the esophageal epithelium. To develop novel therapies, it is critical to understand the molecular mechanisms whereby contact with a refluxate impairs esophageal barrier function. In this study, surgical models of duodenal and mixed reflux were developed in mice. Mouse esophageal epithelium was analyzed by gene microarray. Gene set enrichment analysis showed upregulation of inflammation-related gene sets and the NF-κB pathway due to reflux. Significance analysis of microarrays revealed upregulation of NF-κB target genes. Overexpression of NF-κB subunits (p50 and p65) and NF-κB target genes (matrix metalloproteinases-3 and -9, IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-8) confirmed activation of the NF-κB pathway in the esophageal epithelium. In addition, real-time PCR, Western blotting, and immunohistochemical staining also showed downregulation and mislocalization of claudins-1 and -4. In a second animal experiment, treatment with an NF-κB inhibitor, BAY 11-7085 (20 mg·kg−1·day−1 ip for 10 days), counteracted the effects of duodenal and mixed reflux on epithelial resistance and NF-κB-regulated cytokines. We conclude that gastroesophageal reflux activates the NF-κB pathway and impairs esophageal barrier function in mice and that targeting the NF-κB pathway may strengthen esophageal barrier function against reflux. PMID:23639809

  2. Endogenous cholecystokinin in postprandial lower esophageal sphincter function and fundic tone in humans.

    PubMed

    Zerbib, F; Bruley Des Varannes, S; Scarpignato, C; Leray, V; D'Amato, M; Rozé, C; Galmiche, J P

    1998-12-01

    Transient lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxations (TLESRs) are the main underlying mechanism of gastroesophageal reflux. Although CCK acts through CCK-A receptors to increase the TLESRs induced by gastric distension, the respective roles of endogenous CCK and fundic tone in triggering postprandial TLESRs remain unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of the CCK-A receptor antagonist, loxiglumide, on postprandial LES function and fundic tone in humans. LES motor events and fundic tone were simultaneously monitored in two groups of healthy volunteers. Recordings were performed during fasting and for 3 h after a liquid meal (200 ml/200 kcal) administered either orally or intraduodenally at a rate mimicking gastric emptying. Each subject received loxiglumide (10 mg. kg-1. h-1) or saline (control) in randomized order, which was started 40 min before the meal and maintained for 3 h thereafter. After the oral meal, loxiglumide significantly reduced TLESRs (P = 0.002) without significantly affecting LES pressure and fundic tone. After duodenal infusion of the meal, loxiglumide totally abolished the increase in TLESRs, reduced LES pressure fall (P < 0.02), and strongly inhibited fundic relaxation (P = 0.0001). We concluded that endogenous CCK is involved in the postprandial control of both LES function and fundic tone through activation of CCK-A receptors.

  3. Motor Coordination and Executive Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michel, Eva

    2012-01-01

    Since Piaget, the view that motor and cognitive development are interrelated has gained wide acceptance. However, empirical research on this issue is still rare. Few studies show a correlation of performance in cognitive and motor tasks in typically developing children. More specifically, Diamond A. (2000) hypothesizes an involvement of executive…

  4. Motor Coordination and Executive Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michel, Eva

    2012-01-01

    Since Piaget, the view that motor and cognitive development are interrelated has gained wide acceptance. However, empirical research on this issue is still rare. Few studies show a correlation of performance in cognitive and motor tasks in typically developing children. More specifically, Diamond A. (2000) hypothesizes an involvement of executive…

  5. Effect of morbid obesity, gastric banding and gastric bypass on esophageal symptoms, mucosa and function.

    PubMed

    Borovicka, Jan; Krieger-Grübel, Claudia; van der Weg, Boudewijn; Thurnheer, Martin; Schultes, Bernd; Sulz, Michael Christian; Gutzwiler, Jean-Pierre; Bisang, Philipp; Pohl, Daniel; Fried, Michael; Meyenberger, Christa; Tutuian, Radu

    2017-02-01

    Obesity and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) are commonly associated diseases. Bariatric surgery has been shown to have various impacts on esophageal function and GERD. Our aim was to evaluate changes in symptoms, endoscopic findings, bolus passage and esophageal function in patients after primary gastric bypass surgery as compared to patients converted from gastric banding to gastric bypass. Obese patients scheduled for laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (naïve-to-bypass) and patients who previously underwent gastric banding and were considered for conversion from gastric banding to gastric bypass (band-to-bypass) were included. Patients rated esophageal and epigastric symptoms (100 point VAS) and underwent upper endoscopy, impedance-manometry, and modified "timed barium swallow" before/after surgery. Data from 66 naïve-to-bypass patients (51/66, 77 % females, mean age 41.2 ± 11.1 years) and 68 band-to-bypass patients (53/68, 78 % females, mean age 43.8 ± 10.0 years) were available for analysis. Esophageal symptoms, esophagitis, esophageal motility abnormalities and impaired esophageal bolus transit were more common in patients that underwent gastric banding compared to those that underwent gastric bypass. The majority of symptoms, lesions and abnormalities induced by gastric banding were decreased by conversion to gastric bypass. Esophagitis was present in 28/68 (41 %) and 13/47 (28 %) patients in the band-to-bypass group, pre- versus postoperatively, respectively, (p < 0.05). The percentage of swallows with normal bolus transit increased following transformation from gastric band to gastric bypass (57.9 ± 4.1 and 83.6 ± 3.4 %, respectively, p < 0.01). From an esophageal perspective, gastric bypass surgery induces less motility disorders and esophageal symptoms and should be therefore favored over gastric banding in difficult to treat obese patients at risk of repeated bariatric surgery.

  6. Feasibility and acceptability of esophageal-directed hypnotherapy for functional heartburn.

    PubMed

    Riehl, M E; Pandolfino, J E; Palsson, O S; Keefer, L

    2016-07-01

    Functional heartburn (FH) is a benign but burdensome condition characterized by painful, burning epigastric sensations in the absence of acid reflux or symptom-reflux correlation. Esophageal hypersensitivity and its psychological counterpart, esophageal hypervigilance (EHv) drive symptom experience. Hypnotherapy (HYP) is an established and preferred intervention for refractory symptoms in functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) and could be applied to FH. The objective of this study was to determine the feasibility, acceptability, and clinical utility of 7 weekly sessions of esophageal-directed HYP (EHYP) on heartburn symptoms, quality of life, and EHv. Similar to other work in FGIDs and regardless of hypnotizability, there were consistent and significant changes in heartburn symptoms, visceral anxiety, and quality of life and a trend for improvement in catastrophizing. We would recommend EHYP in FH patients who are either non-responsive to medications or who would prefer a lifestyle intervention.

  7. Esophageal spasm

    MedlinePlus

    Kahrilas PJ, Pandolfino JE. Esophageal neuromuscular function and motility disorders. In: Feldman M, Friedman LS, Brandt LJ, eds. Sleisenger and Fordtran's Gastrointestinal and Liver Disease . 9th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  8. Esophageal acid sensitivity and mucosal integrity in patients with functional heartburn.

    PubMed

    Weijenborg, P W; Smout, A J P M; Bredenoord, A J

    2016-11-01

    Patients with functional heartburn (FH) experience troublesome heartburn that is not related to gastroesophageal reflux. The etiology of the heartburn sensation in FH patients is unknown. In patients with reflux disease, esophageal hypersensitivity seems associated with impaired mucosal integrity. We aimed to determine esophageal sensitivity and mucosal integrity in FH and non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) patients. In this prospective experimental study, we performed an acid perfusion test and upper endoscopy with biopsies in 12 patients with NERD and nine patients with FH. Mucosal integrity was measured during endoscopy using electrical tissue impedance spectroscopy and biopsy specimens were analyzed in Ussing chambers for transepithelial electrical resistance and transepithelial permeability. Lag time to heartburn perception was significantly longer in FH patients (median 12 min) than in NERD patients (median 3 min). Once perceived, intensity of heartburn was scored equal with median visual analog scale 6.5 and 7.1 respectively. Esophageal mucosal integrity was also comparable between FH and NERD patients, both in vivo extracellular impedance and ex vivo transepithelial resistance and permeability were similar. Patients with FH did not show acid hypersensitivity as seen in patients with NERD. However, once perceived, intensity of heartburn is similar. Esophageal mucosal integrity is similar between NERD and FH patients, and is therefore unlikely to be the underlying cause of the observed difference in esophageal acid perception. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Different sex-related influences of eating habits on the prevalence of reflux esophagitis in Japanese.

    PubMed

    Mizuta, Atsushi; Adachi, Kyoichi; Furuta, Kenji; Ohara, Shunji; Morita, Terumi; Koshino, Kenji; Tanaka, Shino; Moriyama, Mika; Sumikawa, Masuko; Sanpei, Mari; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu

    2011-06-01

    Many types of food have been shown to affect lower esophageal sphincter pressure and esophageal motor function, and thus, the prevalence of reflux esophagitis. The present study was performed to clarify the different eating habits that predominantly affect the prevalence of reflux esophagitis in Japanese. The study included 2303 individuals (males: 1599, females: 704, mean age: 49.9 years) who underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy for gastric cancer screening. The daily dietary contents of the patients were analyzed using a self-administered questionnaire. A total of 201 patients had endoscopically-proven reflux esophagitis, and the percentage of males with reflux esophagitis was significantly higher than their female counterparts (11.3% vs 2.8%). The body mass indexes of individuals with reflux esophagitis were significantly higher than those without, both for males and females. Total energy intake was the most important risk factor for the occurrence of reflux esophagitis in males, but the food content was not a significant risk factor. Dietary habit did not affect the prevalence of reflux esophagitis in the female patients. The age and height of females with reflux esophagitis significantly exceeded those of females without reflux esophagitis, and were independent risk factors for the occurrence of reflux esophagitis only in the female patients. There is a sex-related difference in the influence of eating habits on the prevalence of reflux esophagitis in Japanese. © 2011 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  10. Esophageal Acid Stimulation Alters Insular Cortex Functional Connectivity in Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    PubMed Central

    Siwiec, Robert M.; Babaei, Arash; Kern, Mark; Samuel, Erica A.; Li, Shi-Jiang; Shaker, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Background The insula plays a significant role in the interoceptive processing of visceral stimuli. We have previously shown that GERD patients have increased insular cortex activity during esophageal stimulation, suggesting a sensitized esophago-cortical neuraxis. However, information regarding the functional connectivity (FC) of the insula during visceral stimulation is lacking. The primary aim of this study was to investigate the FC of insular subregions during esophageal acid stimulation. Methods Functional imaging data was obtained from 12 GERD patients and 14 healthy subjects during four steady state conditions: (1) presence of transnasal esophageal catheter (pre-infusion); (2) neutral solution; (3) acid infusion; (4) presence of transnasal esophageal catheter following infusions (post-infusion). The insula was parcellated into 6 regions of interest (ROI). FC maps between each insular ROI and interoceptive regions were created. Differences in FC between GERD patients and healthy subjects were determined across the 4 study conditions. Key Results All GERD patients experienced heartburn during and after esophageal acidification. Significant differences between GERD patients and healthy subjects were seen in: (1) insula-thalamic FC (neutral solution infusion, acid infusion, post-infusion); (2) insula-amygdala FC (acid infusion, post-infusion); (3) insula-hippocampus and insula-cingulate FC (post-infusion). Conclusions & Inferences Esophageal stimulation in GERD patients revealed significant insular cortex FC differences with regions involved in viscerosensation and interoception. The results of our study provide further evidence that the insula, located at the transition of afferent physiologic information to human feelings, is essential for both visceral homeostasis and the experience of heartburn in GERD patients. PMID:25367277

  11. Promoting Motor Function by Exercising the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Perrey, Stephane

    2013-01-01

    Exercise represents a behavioral intervention that enhances brain health and motor function. The increase in cerebral blood volume in response to physical activity may be responsible for improving brain function. Among the various neuroimaging techniques used to monitor brain hemodynamic response during exercise, functional near-infrared spectroscopy could facilitate the measurement of task-related cortical responses noninvasively and is relatively robust with regard to the subjects’ motion. Although the components of optimal exercise interventions have not been determined, evidence from animal and human studies suggests that aerobic exercise with sufficiently high intensity has neuroprotective properties and promotes motor function. This review provides an insight into the effect of physical activity (based on endurance and resistance exercises) on brain function for producing movement. Since most progress in the study of brain function has come from patients with neurological disorders (e.g., stroke and Parkinson’s patients), this review presents some findings emphasizing training paradigms for restoring motor function. PMID:24961309

  12. Shared somatosensory and motor functions in musicians

    PubMed Central

    Hosoda, Moe; Furuya, Shinichi

    2016-01-01

    Skilled individuals are characterized by fine-tuned perceptual and motor functions. Here, we tested the idea that the sensory and motor functions of highly-trained individuals are coupled. We assessed the relationships among multifaceted somatosensory and motor functions of expert pianists. The results demonstrated a positive covariation between the acuity of weight discrimination and the precision of force control during piano keystrokes among the pianists but not among the non-musicians. However, neither the age of starting musical training nor the total amount of life-long piano practice was correlated with these sensory-motor functions in the pianists. Furthermore, a difference between the pianists and non-musicians was absent for the weight discrimination acuity but present for precise force control during keystrokes. The results suggest that individuals with innately superior sensory function had finer motor control only in a case of having undergone musical training. Intriguingly, the tactile spatial acuity of the fingertip was superior in the pianists compared with the non-musicians but was not correlated with any functions representing fine motor control among the pianists. The findings implicate the presence of two distinct mechanisms of sensorimotor learning elicited by musical training, which occur either independently in individual sensorimotor modalities or through interacting between modalities. PMID:27886250

  13. Sport expert's motor imagery: functional imaging of professional motor skills and simple motor skills.

    PubMed

    Wei, Gaoxia; Luo, Jing

    2010-06-23

    Numerous studies provide evidence that motor skill acquisition is associated with dynamic changes in cortical and subcortical regions. Athletes are a professional population who are engaged in extensive motor training for long periods. However, the neural substrates of extreme level motor performance have not been clarified. We used kinesthetic imagery task to induce the mental representation of sport expert's extraordinary performance in view of the shared substrates of executing movement and motor imagery. For the first time, we compared, through functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), the pattern of cerebral activations in 12 professional divers and 12 normal people without extensive training, during imagery of professional skills and imagery of simple motor skills. The sport experts showed significant activation in the parahippocampus during imagery of professional skills relative to the novices, which might reflect the representation adapted to experience-related motor tasks. No significant difference was found between experts and novices when they imagined simple motor skills. These results indicated the experts might utilize their kinesthetic imagery more efficiently than novices, but only for the activity in which they had expertise. The sport experts also demonstrated more focused activation patterns in prefrontal areas in both of imagery tasks, which may be relevant to higher order of motor control during motor imagery. Moreover, this study suggested that the brains of sport experts could be regarded as the ideal subjects to explore the relationship between cerebral plasticity and learning of complex motor skills.

  14. Comparison of Rectal and Esophageal Sensitivity in Women With Functional Heartburn.

    PubMed

    Freede, Margaret; Leasure, A Renee; Proskin, Howard M; Hatch, Daniel; Edwards, Karethy; Pascucci, MaryAnn; Smith, Patsy R

    2016-01-01

    This study tested the primary hypothesis that there is a correlation of maximum pain threshold (MPT) in the esophagus and rectum in persons with functional heartburn. Secondary aims evaluated correlations with initial perception threshold (IPT) and pain threshold (PT). This study explored objective sensory endpoints of IPT, PT, and MPT in the esophagus and rectum of 14 females with functional heartburn to determine whether visceral hypersensitivity is generalized or organ-specific. Data on volume and pressure measurements at IPT, PT, and MPT with esophageal and rectal barostat distention were collected. The relationship of sensation and pain to volume, pressure, and compliance was analyzed. Esophageal and rectal IPT balloon volume scores were highly and significantly correlated (r = .61, p = .02). Esophageal and rectal PT balloon volume scores were highly and significantly correlated (r = .6, p = .02). Esophageal and rectal MPT balloon volume scores were not correlated (r = .35, p = .26). The correlation of visceral sensitivity in the esophagus and rectum in persons with functional heartburn supports the hypothesis that visceral sensory changes in functional gastrointestinal disorders are not organ specific.

  15. Esophageal involvement in juvenile localized scleroderma: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Guariso, G; Conte, S; Galeazzi, F; Vettorato, M G; Martini, G; Zulian, F

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate the esophageal involvement in patients with juvenile localized scleroderma (JLS). A cohort of patients with JLS underwent esophageal stationary manometry to evaluate esophageal motility and lower esophageal sphincter (LES) function, distal esophagus 24-hour pH-monitoring to detect gastroesophageal reflux (GER) and upper gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy to evaluate the presence of esophagitis. Fourteen patients (10 female, mean age 13.3 yrs, mean disease duration 4.7 yrs), took part in the study. Ten had linear scleroderma, three deep morphea, and one generalized morphea. Esophageal abnormalities were found in 8/14 patients (57%): pathological acid exposure on 24-hour pH-monitoring was found in 7; non-specific esophageal motor abnormalities in 5 and endoscopy-proved esophagitis in 5 symptomatic patients. Interestingly, 5 out of 8 patients with esophageal abnormalities were found to be ANA positive, and 2 were also RF positive. Esophageal involvement is not unusual in patients with juvenile localized scleroderma, even in the absence of specific symptoms. These preliminary findings, if confirmed in a larger cohort of patients, may support the indication for an extensive GI evaluation especially in presence of positive autoantibodies or specific GI symptoms.

  16. Neurophysiology and new techniques to assess esophageal sensory function: an update.

    PubMed

    Brock, Christina; McCallum, Richard W; Gyawali, C Prakash; Farmer, Adam D; Frøkjaer, Jens Brøndum; McMahon, Barry P; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr

    2016-09-01

    This review aims to discuss the neurophysiology of the esophagus and new methods to assess esophageal nociception. Pain and other symptoms can be caused by diseases in the mucosa or muscular or sphincter dysfunction, together with abnormal pain processing, either in the peripheral or central nervous systems. Therefore, we present new techniques in the assessment of esophageal function and the potential role of the mucosal barrier in the generation and propagation of pain. We discuss the assessment and role of esophageal sphincters in nociception, as well as imaging and electrophysiological techniques, with examples of their use in understanding the sensory system following noxious stimuli to the esophagus. Additionally, we discuss the mechanisms behind functional diseases of the esophagus. We conclude that the new methods have identified many of the mechanisms behind malfunction of the mucosa, disturbances of muscular and sphincter functions, and the central response to different stimuli. Taken together, this has increased our understanding of esophageal disorders and may lead to new treatment modalities. © 2016 New York Academy of Sciences.

  17. Esophageal replacement.

    PubMed

    Kunisaki, Shaun M; Coran, Arnold G

    2017-04-01

    This article focuses on esophageal replacement as a surgical option for pediatric patients with end-stage esophageal disease. While it is obvious that the patient׳s own esophagus is the best esophagus, persisting with attempts to retain a native esophagus with no function and at all costs are futile and usually detrimental to the overall well-being of the child. In such cases, the esophagus should be abandoned, and the appropriate esophageal replacement is chosen for definitive reconstruction. We review the various types of conduits used for esophageal replacement and discuss the unique advantages and disadvantages that are relevant for clinical decision-making. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. [Changes and implications of esophageal function in patients with chronic cough induced by gastroesophageal reflux].

    PubMed

    Xu, X H; Yu, L; Chen, Q; Huang, Y; Sun, H H; Yi, L S; Xu, S C; Lyu, H J; Qiu, Z M

    2016-11-12

    Objective: To explore the changes in the esophageal function and their association with the therapeutic outcome in patients with gastroesophageal reflux-induced chronic cough (GERC). Methods: One hundred thirty-five patients with definite GERC consecutively referred to our respiratory clinic were recruited into the study between January 2012 and August 2015.Cough was due to acid reflux in 81 patients and non-acid reflux in 54 patients, with the favorable response to the standard antireflux therapy in 88 patients and to the intensified antireflux treatment in 47 patients. The control groups included 26 patients with gastroesphageal reflux disease without cough and 22 healthy volunteers. All the subjects underwent an esophageal manometry from which the parameters were recorded, including the pressure, length and relaxation rate of lower esophageal sphincter, and the peristaltic contractive amplitude, wave velocity and contractive time of esophagus. The data were combined with the results of multi-channel intraluminal impedance combined with pH monitoring to analyze the changes of esophageal function in the patients with acid or non-acid GERC and their relation to the outcomes of antireflux therapy. Results: Compared with healthy volunteers, patients with GERC presented with a lower pressure [(11±5) mmHg vs (15±5) mmHg (1 mmHg=0.133 kPa), q=3.70, P=0.000], shorter overall length [(2.2±0.5) cm vs (3.0±1.0) cm, q=2.78, P=0.017] and similar relaxation rate of lower esophageal sphincter(q=1.14, P=0.258). Furthermore, they also showed a decrease in esophageal peristaltic contractive amplitude [(33±13) mmHg vs (45±11) mmHg, q=2.19, P=0.030] and wave velocity [(2.6±0.8) cm/s vs (3.4±0.6) cm/s, q=2.91, P=0.010] but an increase in esophageal contractive time of esophagus [(4.9±2.2) s vs (3.1±0.8) s, q=3.25, P=0.001] in addition to a linear negative correlation between esophageal peristaltic wave velocity and bolus clearance (r=-0.603, P=0.000). However, these

  19. Motor and sensory function of the esophagus: revelations through ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Ravinder K

    2005-04-01

    Catheter based high frequency intraluminal ultrasound (HFIUS) imaging is a powerful tool to study esophageal sensory and motor function and dysfunction in vivo in humans. It has provided a number of important insights into the longitudinal muscle function of the esophagus. Based on the ultrasound images and intraluminal pressure recordings, it is clear that there is synchrony in the timing as well as the amplitude of contraction between the circular and the longitudinal muscle layers of the esophagus in normal subjects. On the other hand, in patients with spastic disorders of the esophagus, there is an asynchrony of contraction related to the timing and amplitude of contraction of the two muscle layers during peristalsis. Achalasia, diffuse esophageal spasm, and nutcracker esophagus (spastic motor disorders of the esophagus) are associated with hypertrophy of the circular as well as longitudinal muscle layers. A sustained contraction of the longitudinal muscle of the esophagus is temporally related to chest pain and heartburn and may very well be the cause of symptoms. Longitudinal muscle function of the esophagus can be studied in vivo in humans using dynamic ultrasound imaging. Longitudinal muscle dysfunction appears to be important in the motor and sensory disorders of the esophagus.

  20. Deep networks for motor control functions

    PubMed Central

    Berniker, Max; Kording, Konrad P.

    2015-01-01

    The motor system generates time-varying commands to move our limbs and body. Conventional descriptions of motor control and learning rely on dynamical representations of our body's state (forward and inverse models), and control policies that must be integrated forward to generate feedforward time-varying commands; thus these are representations across space, but not time. Here we examine a new approach that directly represents both time-varying commands and the resulting state trajectories with a function; a representation across space and time. Since the output of this function includes time, it necessarily requires more parameters than a typical dynamical model. To avoid the problems of local minima these extra parameters introduce, we exploit recent advances in machine learning to build our function using a stacked autoencoder, or deep network. With initial and target states as inputs, this deep network can be trained to output an accurate temporal profile of the optimal command and state trajectory for a point-to-point reach of a non-linear limb model, even when influenced by varying force fields. In a manner that mirrors motor babble, the network can also teach itself to learn through trial and error. Lastly, we demonstrate how this network can learn to optimize a cost objective. This functional approach to motor control is a sharp departure from the standard dynamical approach, and may offer new insights into the neural implementation of motor control. PMID:25852530

  1. Functional anatomy of motor urgency.

    PubMed

    Thobois, Stéphane; Ballanger, Bénédicte; Baraduc, Pierre; Le Bars, Didier; Lavenne, Franck; Broussolle, Emmanuel; Desmurget, Michel

    2007-08-01

    This PET H(2)(15)O study uses a reaching task to determine the neural basis of the unconscious motor speed up observed in the context of urgency in healthy subjects. Three conditions were considered: self-initiated (produce the fastest possible movement toward a large plate, when ready), externally-cued (same as self-initiated but in response to an acoustic cue) and temporally-pressing (same as externally-cued with the plate controlling an electromagnet that prevented a rolling ball from falling at the bottom of a tilted ramp). Results show that: (1) Urgent responses (Temporally-pressing versus Externally-cued) engage the left parasagittal and lateral cerebellar hemisphere and the sensorimotor cortex (SMC) bilaterally; (2) Externally-driven responses (Externally-cued versus Self-initiated) recruit executive areas within the contralateral SMC; (3) Volitional responses (Self-initiated versus Externally-cued) involve prefrontal cortical areas. These observations are discussed with respect to the idea that neuromuscular energy is set to a submaximal threshold in self-determined situations. In more challenging tasks, this threshold is raised and the first answer of the nervous system is to optimize the response of the lateral (i.e. crossed) corticospinal tract (contralateral SMC) and ipsilateral cerebellum. In a second step, the anterior (i.e. uncrossed) corticospinal tract (ipsilateral SMC) and the contralateral cerebellum are recruited. This recruitment is akin to the strategy observed during recovery in patients with brain lesions.

  2. Function of longitudinal vs circular muscle fibers in esophageal peristalsis, deduced with mathematical modeling

    PubMed Central

    Brasseur, James G; Nicosia, Mark A; Pal, Anupam; Miller, Larry S

    2007-01-01

    We summarize from previous works the functions of circular vs. longitudinal muscle in esophageal peristaltic bolus transport using a mix of experimental data, the conservation laws of mechanics and mathematical modeling. Whereas circular muscle tone generates radial closure pressure to create a local peristaltic closure wave, longitudinal muscle tone has two functions, one physiological with mechanical implications, and one purely mechanical. Each of these functions independently reduces the tension of individual circular muscle fibers to maintain closure as a consequence of shortening of longitudinal muscle locally coordinated with increasing circular muscle tone. The physiological function is deduced by combining basic laws of mechanics with concurrent measurements of intraluminal pressure from manometry, and changes in cross sectional muscle area from endoluminal ultrasound from which local longitudinal shortening (LLS) can be accurately obtained. The purely mechanical function of LLS was discovered from mathematical modeling of peristaltic esophageal transport with the axial wall motion generated by LLS. Physiologically, LLS concentrates circular muscle fibers where closure pressure is highest. However, the mechanical function of LLS is to reduce the level of pressure required to maintain closure. The combined physiological and mechanical consequences of LLS are to reduce circular muscle fiber tension and power by as much as 1/10 what would be required for peristalsis without the longitudinal muscle layer, a tremendous benefit that may explain the existence of longitudinal muscle fiber in the gut. We also review what is understood of the role of longitudinal muscle in esophageal emptying, reflux and pathology. PMID:17457963

  3. Psychological traits influence autonomic nervous system recovery following esophageal intubation in health and functional chest pain.

    PubMed

    Farmer, A D; Coen, S J; Kano, M; Worthen, S F; Rossiter, H E; Navqi, H; Scott, S M; Furlong, P L; Aziz, Q

    2013-12-01

    Esophageal intubation is a widely utilized technique for a diverse array of physiological studies, activating a complex physiological response mediated, in part, by the autonomic nervous system (ANS). In order to determine the optimal time period after intubation when physiological observations should be recorded, it is important to know the duration of, and factors that influence, this ANS response, in both health and disease. Fifty healthy subjects (27 males, median age 31.9 years, range 20-53 years) and 20 patients with Rome III defined functional chest pain (nine male, median age of 38.7 years, range 28-59 years) had personality traits and anxiety measured. Subjects had heart rate (HR), blood pressure (BP), sympathetic (cardiac sympathetic index, CSI), and parasympathetic nervous system (cardiac vagal tone, CVT) parameters measured at baseline and in response to per nasum intubation with an esophageal catheter. CSI/CVT recovery was measured following esophageal intubation. In all subjects, esophageal intubation caused an elevation in HR, BP, CSI, and skin conductance response (SCR; all p < 0.0001) but concomitant CVT and cardiac sensitivity to the baroreflex (CSB) withdrawal (all p < 0.04). Multiple linear regression analysis demonstrated that longer CVT recovery times were independently associated with higher neuroticism (p < 0.001). Patients had prolonged CSI and CVT recovery times in comparison to healthy subjects (112.5 s vs 46.5 s, p = 0.0001 and 549 s vs 223.5 s, p = 0.0001, respectively). Esophageal intubation activates a flight/flight ANS response. Future studies should allow for at least 10 min of recovery time. Consideration should be given to psychological traits and disease status as these can influence recovery. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Impaired motor activity and motor learning function in rat with middle cerebral artery occlusion.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yuchuan; Zhou, Yandong; Lai, Qin; Li, Jie; Park, Hun; Diaz, Fernando G

    2002-04-15

    The poor quality of life after a stroke is largely attributed to deficits in cognitive-motor functioning. The goals of this study were to detect if damaged motor learning function were attributed to motor deficits in rats following a transient middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion. Stroke was induced by a 2-h occlusion of the MCA using an intraluminal filament. Motor functions were evaluated from 5 up to 28 days after reperfusion in ischemic and control rats. Motor function was detected by a series of motor tests (runway traversing and beam balancing, as well as foot fault placing, parallel bar crossing, rope and ladder climbing), and motor learning behavior was determined by analyzing the rate of improvement of impaired function during performance of the motor tasks. Significant (P<0.001) motor deficits were detected in the stroke group (n=10) while performing motor tasks that involve extensive coordination, in comparison to the controls (n=12). Although motor behavior was improved with repeated behavior testing, unparalleled rate of improvement of motor performance on rope and ladder climbing tests was found between the two groups, suggesting an impaired motor learning function. Brain tissue damage was detected in the ischemic animals 28 days after surgery, demonstrated by 40% infarct volume of contralateral hemisphere. Both motor learning and motor function were impaired in ischemic rats. The motor tests used in this study are sensitive, semi-quantitative, and reproducible measurements of functional impairment in rats following an ischemic stroke.

  5. Electrophysiological recording from neurons controlling sensory and motor functions of the esophagus.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, J N

    2001-12-03

    contractions of the distal esophagus. This response undergoes inhibition in response to proximal distension. In addition, there is a second, nonrhythmic firing response that occurs both proximal and distal esophageal distension. This observation suggests that swallow-induced inhibition of the distal esophagus is controlled by the preganglionic motor neurons in the brain stem. Electrophysiological studies allow direct understanding of neuronal activities regulating esophageal functions. In vivo recording has an advantage for studying functional roles of the neurons in regulatory reflexes, whereas in vitro recording is useful for more accurate study of receptor pharmacology. Recordings from the central nervous system allow study of the neurotransmitters involved in neuronal function and the circuitry of different reflex mechanisms.

  6. Practice guidelines on the use of esophageal manometry - A GISMAD-SIGE-AIGO medical position statement.

    PubMed

    Savarino, Edoardo; de Bortoli, Nicola; Bellini, Massimo; Galeazzi, Francesca; Ribolsi, Mentore; Salvador, Renato; Savarino, Vincenzo; Penagini, Roberto

    2016-10-01

    Patients with esophageal symptoms potentially associated to esophageal motor disorders such as dysphagia, chest pain, heartburn and regurgitation, represent one of the most frequent reasons for referral to gastroenterological evaluation. The utility of esophageal manometry in clinical practice is: (1) to accurately define esophageal motor function, (2) to identify abnormal motor function, and (3) to establish a treatment plan based on motor abnormalities. With this in mind, in the last decade, investigations and technical advances, with the introduction of high-resolution esophageal manometry, have enhanced our understanding and management of esophageal motility disorders. The following recommendations were developed to assist physicians in the appropriate use of esophageal manometry in modern patient care. They were discussed and approved after a comprehensive review of the medical literature pertaining to manometric techniques and their recent application. This position statement created under the auspices of the Gruppo Italiano di Studio per la Motilità dell'Apparato Digerente (GISMAD), Società Italiana di Gastroenterologia ed Endoscopia Digestiva (SIGE) and Associazione Italiana Gastroenterologi ed Endoscopisti Digestivi Ospedalieri (AIGO) is intended to help clinicians in applying manometric studies in the most fruitful manner within the context of their patients with esophageal symptoms.

  7. Does impaired gallbladder function contribute to the development of Barrett's esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma?

    PubMed

    Nassr, Ayman O; Gilani, Syeda Nadia Shah; Atie, Mohammed; Abdelhafiz, Tariq; Connolly, Val; Hickey, Neil; Walsh, Thomas Noel

    2011-06-01

    Esophageal adenocarcinoma is aetiologically associated with gastro-esophageal reflux, but the mechanisms responsible for the metaplasia-dysplasia sequence are unknown. Bile components are implicated. Impaired gallbladder function may contribute to duodenogastric reflux (DGR) and harmful GERD. This study aims to compare gallbladder function in patients with Barrett's esophagus, adenocarcinoma, and controls. Three groups of patients, all free of gallstone disease, were studied. Group 1: (n = 15) were normal controls. Group 2: (n = 15) were patients with >3-cm-long segment of Barrett's esophagus. Group 3: (n = 15) were patients with esophageal adenocarcinoma. Using real-time ultrasonography unit, gallbladder volume was measured in subjects following a 10-h fast. Ejection fraction was calculated before and after standard liquid meal and compared between the groups. The mean percentage reduction in gallbladder volume was 50% at 40 min in the adenocarcinoma group compared with 72.4% in the control group (p < 0.001). At 60 min, gallbladder filling had recommenced in the control group to 64.1% of fasting volume while continuing to empty with further reduction to 63% in the Barrett's group and to 50.6% (p = 0.008) in the adenocarcinoma group. The mean gallbladder ejection fraction decreased progressively from controls to Barrett's to adenocarcinoma and was significantly lower in Barrett's group (60.9%; p = 0.019) and adenocarcinoma group (47.9%; p < 0.001) compared with normal controls (70.9%). Gallbladder function is progressively impaired in Barrett's esophagus and adenocarcinoma. Gallbladder malfunction increases duodenogastric reflux, exposing the lower esophagus to an altered chemical milieu which, in turn, may have a role in promoting metaplasia-dysplasia-neoplasia sequence in the lower esophageal mucosa.

  8. Role of a health psychologist in the management of functional esophageal complaints.

    PubMed

    Riehl, M E; Kinsinger, S; Kahrilas, P J; Pandolfino, J E; Keefer, L

    2015-07-01

    Upper gastrointestinal complaints are common among patients in a gastrointestinal clinic. Outside of typical gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms that are treated with medication, the symptom presentations of esophageal patients, particularly those with functional conditions, are often difficult to treat and account for high health-care utilization. This manuscript describes the role of a health psychologist in the treatment of esophageal disorders using behavioral medicine interventions. Observations over the course of a 1-year period indicate that the sample presents with a relatively low level of psychological distress but reports negative effects of their symptoms on health-related quality of life. Five case examples of commonly treated disorders (globus, non-cardiac chest pain, functional dysphagia, rumination syndrome, supragastric belching) are described to highlight how behavioral treatment can improve patients' symptoms, decrease health-care utilization, and improve overall quality of life in a timely and relatively simple manner. Successful treatment outcomes are associated with a collaborative working alliance between patient, health psychologist, and gastroenterologist. Results indicate the benefit of referring appropriate esophageal patients to a health psychologist with specialization in gastroenterology.

  9. Comparisons of Esophageal Function Tests between Chinese and British Patients with Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Feng; Leach, Samantha; Hao, Jian Yu; Shang, Zhan Min; Hobson, Anthony Robert

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the esophageal function tests in British and Chinese patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Methods. Patients with GERD were selected from the functional gut clinic, London, and digestive department, Beijing Chao-Yang Hospital, after taking the examinations of High-resolution Manometry and Impedance (HRiM) and 24-hour Multi-Channel Intraluminal Impedance and pH Recording (MII/pH) between 2013 and 2014. Chinese healthy volunteers who undertook HRiM were also selected as control group. Results. Fifty-nine British and 82 Chinese patients with GERD and 62 Chinese healthy volunteers were entered. Values for British patients, Chinese patients, and healthy volunteers were as follows: Lower esophageal sphincter pressure (LESP) 16.0 ± 8.6, 16.5 ± 10.0, and 26.4 ± 10.9 mmHg, peristalsis (normal/small break/large break) 24/12/23, 44/10/28, and 57/1/4, total bolus transit time (TBTT) 7.3 ± 1.3, 7.6 ± 1.2, and 6.9 ± 0.9 s, and complete bolus transit rate (CBTR) 66.7 ± 37.8, 61.7 ± 36.4, and 90.3 ± 14.0%, respectively. Stepwise linear regression analysis showed that age, gender, and ethnicity did not have significant effect on LESP, TBTT, esophageal peristalsis, and CBTR in patients with GERD. Conclusions. British and Chinese patients with GERD presented similar values of LESP, TBTT, and impaired esophageal peristalsis and CBTR. PMID:25784929

  10. The functional organization of motor nerve terminals.

    PubMed

    Slater, Clarke R

    2015-11-01

    Neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) have long been studied as particularly accessible examples of chemical synapses. Nonetheless, some important features of neuromuscular transmission are still poorly understood. One of these is the low statistical variability of the number of transmitter quanta released from motor nerve terminals by successive nerve impulses. This variability is well-described by a binomial distribution, suggesting that the quanta released are drawn, at high probability, from a small subset of those in the terminals. However, the nature of that subset remains unclear. In an effort to clarify what is understood, and what is not, about quantal release at NMJs, this review addresses the relationship between NMJ structure and function. After setting the biological context in which NMJs operate, key aspects of the variability of release and the structure of the motor nerve terminals are described. These descriptions are then used to explore the functional logic of motor nerve terminal organization and the structural basis of the low variability of release. This analysis supports the suggestion that the probability of release differs significantly at the different 'active zones' from which quanta are released. Finally, after a brief consideration of how release is maintained in the long term, a comparison is made of the features of NMJs with those of some well-studied neuronal synapses. An important conclusion is that NMJs share some important features with neuronal synapses, so continuing efforts to understand how motor nerve terminals work are likely to have much more general implications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Minimally invasive surgery for esophageal achalasia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huan-Wen; Du, Ming

    2016-07-01

    Esophageal achalasia is due to the esophagus of neuromuscular dysfunction caused by esophageal functional disease. Its main feature is the lack of esophageal peristalsis, the lower esophageal sphincter pressure and to reduce the swallow's relaxation response. Lower esophageal muscular dissection is one of the main ways to treat esophageal achalasia. At present, the period of muscular layer under the thoracoscope esophagus dissection is one of the treatment of esophageal achalasia. Combined with our experience in minimally invasive esophageal surgery, to improved incision and operation procedure, and adopts the model of the complete period of muscular layer under the thoracoscope esophagus dissection in the treatment of esophageal achalasia.

  12. Structural equation modeling of motor impairment, gross motor function, and the functional outcome in children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun-Young; Kim, Won-Ho

    2013-05-01

    Physical therapy intervention for children with cerebral palsy (CP) is focused on reducing neurological impairments, improving strength, and preventing the development of secondary impairments in order to improve functional outcomes. However, relationship between motor impairments and functional outcome has not been proved definitely. This study confirmed the construct of motor impairment and performed structural equation modeling (SEM) between motor impairment, gross motor function, and functional outcomes of regarding activities of daily living in children with CP. 98 children (59 boys, 39 girls) with CP participated in this cross-sectional study. Mean age was 11 y 5 mo (SD 1 y 9 mo). The Manual Muscle Test (MMT), the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS), range of motion (ROM) measurement, and the selective motor control (SMC) scale were used to assess motor impairments. Gross motor function and functional outcomes were measured using the Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM) and the Functional Skills domain of the Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory (PEDI) respectively. Measurement of motor impairment was consisted of strength, spasticity, ROM, and SMC. The construct of motor impairment was confirmed though an examination of a measurement model. The proposed SEM model showed good fit indices. Motor impairment effected gross motor function (β=-.0869). Gross motor function and motor impairment affected functional outcomes directly (β=0.890) and indirectly (β=-0.773) respectively. We confirmed that the construct of motor impairment consist of strength, spasticity, ROM, and SMC and it was identified through measurement model analysis. Functional outcomes are best predicted by gross motor function and motor impairments have indirect effects on functional outcomes.

  13. Effects of Age on Esophageal Motility: Use of High-resolution Esophageal Impedance Manometry

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Young Kwang; Kim, Nayoung; Park, Yo Han; Lee, Jong-Chan; Sung, Jihee; Choi, Yoon Jin; Yoon, Hyuk; Shin, Cheol Min; Park, Young Soo; Lee, Dong Ho

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims Disturbances of esophageal motility have been reported to be more frequent the aged population. However, the physiology of disturbances in esophageal motility during aging is unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of age on esophageal motility using high-resolution esophageal impedance manometry (HRIM). Methods Esophageal motor function of 268 subjects were measured using HRIM in 3 age groups, < 40 years (Group A, n = 32), 40–65 years (Group B, n = 185), and > 65 years (Group C, n = 62). Lower esophageal sphincter (LES) and upper esophageal sphincter (UES) pressures, integrated relaxation pressure, distal contractile integral, contractile front velocity, distal latency, and pressures and duration of contraction on 4 positions along the esophagus, and complete bolus transit were measured. Results Basal UES pressure was lower in Group C (P < 0.001) but there was no significant difference in the LES pressure among groups. Contractile duration on position 3 (10 cm from proximal LES high pressure zone) was longer in Group C (P = 0.001), and the contractile amplitude on position 4 (5 cm from proximal LES high pressure zone) was lower in Group C (P = 0.005). Distal contractile integral was lower in Group C (P = 0.037). Contractile front velocity (P = 0.015) and the onset velocity (P = 0.040) was lower in Group C. There was no significant difference in impedance values. Conclusions The decrease of UES pressure, distal esophageal motility, and peristaltic velocity might be related with esophageal symptoms in the aged population. PMID:28163259

  14. Imipramine for Treatment of Esophageal Hypersensitivity and Functional Heartburn: A Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Limsrivilai, Julajak; Charatcharoenwitthaya, Phunchai; Pausawasdi, Nonthalee; Leelakusolvong, Somchai

    2016-02-01

    Tricyclic antidepressants could be effective in the treatment of symptoms related to hypersensitive esophagus through their pain-modulating effect. We therefore assessed the benefit of imipramine in patients with esophageal hypersensitivity and functional heartburn. Patients with normal endoscopy findings and typical reflux symptoms despite standard-dose proton-pump inhibitor therapy underwent 24-h pH-impedance monitoring. Patients with established esophageal hypersensitivity or functional heartburn were randomly assigned to receive 8 weeks of either once-daily imipramine 25 mg (n=43) or placebo (n=40). The primary end point was satisfactory relief of reflux symptoms, defined as a >50% reduction in the gastroesophageal reflux disease score. The secondary end point was improvement in quality-of-life (QoL) as assessed by the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey score. Patients receiving imipramine did not achieve a higher rate of satisfactory relief of reflux symptoms than did patients receiving placebo (intention-to-treat (ITT) analysis: 37.2 vs. 37.5%, respectively; odds ratio (OR), 0.99; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.41-2.41; per-protocol (PP) analysis: 45.5 vs. 41.2%, respectively; OR, 1.19; 95% CI, 0.45-3.13). Subgroup analysis to assess the efficacy of imipramine for either esophageal hypersensitivity or functional heartburn yielded similar results. Treatment with imipramine provided significant improvement of QoL by PP analysis (72±17 and 61±19, respectively; P=0.048), but ITT analysis did not reveal any differences between imipramine and placebo (68±19 and 61±19, respectively; P=0.26). Adverse events were similar in both groups; however, constipation was more common with imipramine than placebo (51.2 vs. 22.5%, respectively; P=0.01). Although low-dose imipramine shows potential QoL benefits, it does not relieve symptoms more effectively than does placebo in patients with either esophageal hypersensitivity or functional heartburn.

  15. Radionuclide transit: a sensitive screening test for esophageal dysfunction

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, C.O.; Hill, L.D.; Holmes, E.R. III; Hull, D.A.; Gannon, R.; Pope, C.E. II

    1981-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to extend existing nuclear medicine techniques for the diagnosis of esophageal motor disorders. A standard homogeneous bolus of 99mtechnetium sulfur colloid in water was swallowed in the supine position under the collimator of a gamma camera linked to a microprocessor. Bolus transit was recorded at 0.4-s intervals, and the movie obtained was used to analyze transit in an objective manner. Ten normal volunteers and 30 subjects with dysphagia not related to mechanical obstruction were studied with this technique. Radionuclide transit studies detected a higher incidence of esophageal motor abnormality than manometry or radiology in the dysphagia group. In addition a definitive description of the functional problem was possible in most cases. Radionuclide transit is a safe noninvasive test and suitable as a screening test for esophageal motor disorders.

  16. Motor cortical function and the precision grip.

    PubMed

    Geevasinga, Nimeshan; Menon, Parvathi; Kiernan, Matthew C; Vucic, Steve

    2014-12-01

    While task-dependent changes in motor cortical outputs have been previously reported, the issue of whether such changes are specific for complex hand tasks remains unresolved. The aim of the present study was to determine whether cortical inhibitory tone and cortical output were greater during precision grip and power grip. Motor cortex excitability was undertaken by using the transcranial magnetic stimulation threshold tracking technique in 15 healthy subjects. The motor-evoked potential (MEP) responses were recorded over the abductor pollicis brevis (APB), with the hand in the following positions: (1) rest, (2) precision grip and (3) power grip. The MEP amplitude (MEP amplitude REST 23.6 ± 3.3%; MEP amplitude PRECISION GRIP 35.2 ± 5.6%; MEP amplitude POWER GRIP 19.6 ± 3.4%, F = 2.4, P < 0.001) and stimulus-response gradient (SLOPEREST 0.06 ± 0.01; SLOPEPRCISION GRIP 0.15 ± 0.04; SLOPE POWER GRIP 0.07 ± 0.01, P < 0.05) were significantly increased during precision grip. Short interval intracortical inhibition (SICI) was significantly reduced during the precision grip (SICI REST 15.0 ± 2.3%; SICI PRECISION GRIP 9.7 ± 1.5%, SICI POWER GRIP 15.9 ± 2.7%, F = 2.6, P < 0.05). The present study suggests that changes in motor cortex excitability are specific for precision grip, with functional coupling of descending corticospinal pathways controlling thumb and finger movements potentially forming the basis of these cortical changes.

  17. Diagnosis of digestive functional disease by the statistics of continuous monitoring of esophageal acidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera Landa, Rogelio; Cardenas Cardenas, Eduardo; Fossion, Ruben; Pérez Zepeda, Mario Ulises

    2014-11-01

    Technological advances in the last few decennia allow the monitoring of many physiological observables in a continuous way, which in physics is called a "time series". The best studied physiological time series is that of the heart rhythm, which can be derived from an electrocardiogram (ECG). Studies have shown that a healthy heart is characterized by a complex time series and high heart rate variability (HRV). In adverse conditions, the cardiac time series degenerates towards randomness (as seen in, e.g., fibrillation) or rigidity (as seen in, e.g., ageing), both corresponding to a loss of HRV as described by, e.g., Golberger et. al [1]. Cardiac and digestive rhythms are regulated by the autonomous nervous system (ANS), that consists of two antagonistic branches, the orthosympathetic branch (ONS) that accelerates the cardiac rhythm but decelerates the digestive system, and the parasympathetic brand (PNS) that works in the opposite way. Because of this reason, one might expect that the statistics of gastro-esophageal time series, as described by Gardner et. al. [2,3], reflects the health state of the digestive system in a similar way as HRV in the cardiac case, described by Minocha et. al. In the present project, we apply statistical methods derived from HRV analysis to time series of esophageal acidity (24h pHmetry). The study is realized on data from a large patient population from the Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador Zubirán. Our focus is on patients with functional disease (symptoms but no anatomical damage). We find that traditional statistical approaches (e.g. Fourier spectral analysis) are unable to distinguish between different degenerations of the digestive system, such as gastric esophageal reflux disease (GERD) or functional gastrointestinal disorder (FGID).

  18. Impedance characteristics of normal oesophageal motor function.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Huan N; Domingues, Gerson R; Winograd, Ron; Koppitz, Patrick; Lammert, Frank; Silny, Jiri; Matern, Siegfried

    2003-07-01

    To obtain detailed data about the correlation between oesophageal peristalsis and bolus transport for clinical oesophageal motility testing. Oesophageal motility testing was performed in 25 healthy subjects by using the newly developed technique of concurrent impedancometry and manometry. Parameters of oesophageal motility and bolus transport as well as the correlation between transit and motility were analysed after swallowing saline or yogurt. Detailed data about bolus transport and oesophageal motility could be obtained during a single investigation step. Air was observed in front of the bolus in 76% of the swallows. Resting baseline impedance was significantly higher in the oesophagus than in the stomach (2832+/-118 Omega vs 688+/-119 Omega). The deglutitive impedance gradient was 222+/-26 Omega for saline and 482+/-38 Omega for yogurt. Bolus propagation velocity and bolus transit time as impedance parameters of bolus transport discriminated fluid from semisolid bolus (4.0+/-0.1 cm/s vs 3.2+/-0.1 cm/s and 9.9+/-0.2 s vs 11.5+/-0.2 s, for saline vs yogurt), while contraction wave amplitude as a manometry parameter of oesophageal motor function did not (91.4+/-7.5 mmHg vs 80.7+/-9.4 mmHg, for saline vs yogurt). There was a poor correlation between bolus propagation velocity and contraction wave amplitude. Impedance parameters of normal oesophageal motor function have been characterized. Impedancometry and manometry provide different but complementary data about oesophageal motor function. Concurrent impedancometry and manometry allows detailed monitoring of oesophageal motility and bolus transit, which may open new perspectives for comprehensive oesophageal motility testing.

  19. Motor Functions of the Superior Colliculus

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Neeraj J.; Katnani, Husam A.

    2013-01-01

    The mammalian superior colliculus (SC) and its nonmammalian homolog, the optic tectum, constitute a major node in processing sensory information, incorporating cognitive factors, and issuing motor commands. The resulting action—to orient toward or away from a stimulus—can be accomplished as an integrated movement across oculomotor, cephalomotor, and skeletomotor effectors. The SC also participates in preserving fixation during intersaccadic intervals. This review highlights the repertoire of movements attributed to SC function and analyzes the significance of results obtained from causality-based experiments (microstimulation and inactivation). The mechanisms potentially used to decode the population activity in the SC into an appropriate movement command are also discussed. PMID:21456962

  20. Acquiring functional object knowledge through motor imagery?

    PubMed

    Paulus, Markus; van Elk, Michiel; Bekkering, Harold

    2012-04-01

    A widely investigated question in the research on the acquisition of novel functional object representations is the role of the action system. Whereas most studies so far have investigated the role of active action training on the acquisition of object representation, we investigated whether people are able to acquire object representations by just imagining the use of novel objects, given that previous findings suggested that executed and imagined actions share a common representational format. To this end, participants trained the use of novel objects in a motor imagery condition. Training comprised the particular grip applied to the objects and the objects' typical end location. Subsequently, participants' object representations were assessed by means of an object detection task. The results show that participants responded slower when the novel objects were presented at functionally incorrect end locations, indicating that the participants had acquired functional knowledge about object use. Yet, there was no effect of correct versus incorrect grip. Altogether, the findings suggest that motor imagery can facilitate the acquisition of novel object representations, but point also to differences between first-hand action training and training by imagery.

  1. Esophageal Varices

    MedlinePlus

    Esophageal varices Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Esophageal varices are abnormal, enlarged veins in the tube that connects the ... often in people with serious liver diseases. Esophageal varices develop when normal blood flow to the liver ...

  2. Esophageal scintigraphy: applications and limitations in the study of esophageal disorders.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, M K; Byrne, P J; Keeling, P; Hennessy, T P

    1988-01-01

    This study examines the scintigraphic transit pattern in a variety of esophageal disorders. Scintigraphy was performed with a semi solid bolus and the patient in an upright position. Condensed esophageal images were obtained from which we derived the esophageal transit time. The pattern of bolus transit was graded by the duration of transit and by the presence of hold up or retrograde motion. Scintigrams were performed in 11 volunteers and 88 patients whose esophageal function had been confirmed by conventional gastroesophageal techniques. Esophageal disorders examined included achalasia (20), scleroderma (9), esophageal carcinoma (8), Barrett esophagus (5), and reflux esophagitis (27). We also examined the effects of gastroesophageal surgery on esophageal function. Transit times distinguished grossly abnormal esophageal function from normal but did not distinguish between different esophageal disorders. Graded transit patterns were a more sensitive indicator of esophageal function and permitted some differentiation between esophageal disorders and allowed evaluation of the effects of gastroesophageal surgery.

  3. Brief Assessment of Motor Function: Content Validity and Reliability of the Upper Extremity Gross Motor Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cintas, Holly Lea; Parks, Rebecca; Don, Sarah; Gerber, Lynn

    2011-01-01

    Content validity and reliability of the Brief Assessment of Motor Function (BAMF) Upper Extremity Gross Motor Scale (UEGMS) were evaluated in this prospective, descriptive study. The UEGMS is one of five BAMF ordinal scales designed for quick documentation of gross, fine, and oral motor skill levels. Designed to be independent of age and…

  4. Brief Assessment of Motor Function: Content Validity and Reliability of the Upper Extremity Gross Motor Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cintas, Holly Lea; Parks, Rebecca; Don, Sarah; Gerber, Lynn

    2011-01-01

    Content validity and reliability of the Brief Assessment of Motor Function (BAMF) Upper Extremity Gross Motor Scale (UEGMS) were evaluated in this prospective, descriptive study. The UEGMS is one of five BAMF ordinal scales designed for quick documentation of gross, fine, and oral motor skill levels. Designed to be independent of age and…

  5. Adhesion dynamics of porcine esophageal fibroblasts on extracellular matrix protein-functionalized poly(lactic acid).

    PubMed

    Cai, Ning; Gong, Yingxue; Chian, Kerm Sin; Chan, Vincent; Liao, Kin

    2008-03-01

    Effective attachment of esophageal cells on biomaterials is one important requirement in designing engineered esophagus substitute for esophageal cancer treatment. In this study, poly(lactic acid) (PLA) was subjected to surface modification by coupling extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins on its surface to promote cell adhesion. Two typical ECM proteins, collagen type I (COL) and fibronectin (FN), were immobilized on the PLA surface with the aid of glutaraldehyde as a cross linker between aminolyzed PLA and ECM proteins. By using confocal reflectance interference contrast microscopy (C-RICM) integrating with phase contrast microscopy, the long-term adhesion dynamics of porcine esophageal fibroblasts (PEFs) on four types of surfaces (unmodified PLA, PLA-COOH, PLA-COL and PLA-FN) was investigated during 24 h of culture. It is demonstrated by C-RICM results that PEFs form strong adhesion contact on all four types of surfaces at different stages of cell seeding. Among the four surfaces, PEFs on the PLA-FN surface reach the maximum adhesion energy (9.5 x 10(-7) J m(-2)) in the shortest time (20 min) during the initial stage of cell seeding. After adhesion energy reaches the maximum value, PEFs maintain their highly deformed geometries till they reached a steady state after 20 h of culture. F-actin immunostaining results show that the evolvement of spatial organization of F-actin is tightly correlated with the formation of adhesion contact and cell spreading. Furthermore, the cell attachment ratio of PEFs on PLA in 2 h is only 26% compared with 88% on PLA-FN, 73% on PLA-COL and 36% on PLA-COOH. All the results demonstrate the effect of surface functionalization on the biophysical responses of PEFs in cell adhesion. Fibronectin-immobilized PLA demonstrates promising potential for application as an engineered esophagus substitute.

  6. Functional localization of the supplementary motor area.

    PubMed

    Hiroshima, Satoru; Anei, Ryogo; Murakami, Noboru; Kamada, Kyousuke

    2014-01-01

    The supplementary motor area (SMA) is a key structure involved in behavioral planning and execution. Although many reports have indicated that SMA is organized somatotopically, its exact organization remains still unclear. This study aimed to functionally map SMA using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and validate the fMRI-SMA by electrocortical stimulation (ECS) and postsurgical symptoms. Total 32 healthy volunteers and 24 patients participated in this study. Motor tasks were right and left finger tapping and language tasks included simple reading, lexical decision for presented words, and verb generating tasks. SPM8 was used to conduct individual and group analyses. In all subjects, the lexical decision task induced the greatest number of active fMRI pixels in SMA. fMRI during the language tasks showed anterior part of SMA compared to finger tapping tasks. We found an overlap spot with all different tasks in posterior part of SMA, which we termed SMA core. Six patients underwent awake craniotomy for ECS mapping for primary regions and SMA. During awake craniotomy, ECS to posterior part of SMA, which might involve the possible SMA core consistently, evoked both speech arrest and flaccid hemiparesis. The SMA mapping suggested posterior part of SMA might play more important roles in any executions, which might involve the SMA core.

  7. Integrative analyses of transcriptome sequencing identify novel functional lncRNAs in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, C-Q; Huang, G-W; Wu, Z-Y; Xu, Y-J; Li, X-C; Xue, Y-J; Zhu, Y; Zhao, J-M; Li, M; Zhang, J; Wu, J-Y; Lei, F; Wang, Q-Y; Li, S; Zheng, C-P; Ai, B; Tang, Z-D; Feng, C-C; Liao, L-D; Wang, S-H; Shen, J-H; Liu, Y-J; Bai, X-F; He, J-Z; Cao, H-H; Wu, B-L; Wang, M-R; Lin, D-C; Koeffler, H P; Wang, L-D; Li, X; Li, E-M; Xu, L-Y

    2017-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have a critical role in cancer initiation and progression, and thus may mediate oncogenic or tumor suppressing effects, as well as be a new class of cancer therapeutic targets. We performed high-throughput sequencing of RNA (RNA-seq) to investigate the expression level of lncRNAs and protein-coding genes in 30 esophageal samples, comprised of 15 esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) samples and their 15 paired non-tumor tissues. We further developed an integrative bioinformatics method, denoted URW-LPE, to identify key functional lncRNAs that regulate expression of downstream protein-coding genes in ESCC. A number of known onco-lncRNA and many putative novel ones were effectively identified by URW-LPE. Importantly, we identified lncRNA625 as a novel regulator of ESCC cell proliferation, invasion and migration. ESCC patients with high lncRNA625 expression had significantly shorter survival time than those with low expression. LncRNA625 also showed specific prognostic value for patients with metastatic ESCC. Finally, we identified E1A-binding protein p300 (EP300) as a downstream executor of lncRNA625-induced transcriptional responses. These findings establish a catalog of novel cancer-associated functional lncRNAs, which will promote our understanding of lncRNA-mediated regulation in this malignancy. PMID:28194033

  8. Specific esophagogram to assess functional outcomes after Heller's myotomy and Dor's fundoplication for esophageal achalasia.

    PubMed

    Tsoukali, E; Gouvas, N; Tsiaoussis, J; Pechlivanides, G; Zervakis, N; Mantides, A; Xynos, E

    2011-09-01

    Esophageal emptying assessed at the 'timed barium' esophagogram correlates well with symptomatic outcomes after pneumatic dilation for esophageal achalasia, although 30% of patients with satisfactory outcome exhibit partial improvement in emptying. The aim of the study was to investigate any correlation of esophageal emptying to symptomatic response after laparoscopic Heller's myotomy and Dor's fundoplication. 'Bread and barium' (transit time of a barium opaque bread bolus) and 'timed barium' (height of esophageal barium column 5 minutes after ingestion of 200-250 mL of barium suspension) esophagogram was used to assess esophageal emptying in 73 patients with esophageal achalasia before 1 and 5 years (31 cases) after laparoscopic myotomy and anterior fundoplication. Symptoms assessment was based to a specific score. At 1-year follow-up, excellent and good symptomatic results were obtained in 95% of the cases. Esophageal maximum diameter, esophageal transit time, and esophageal barium column were significantly correlated to each other and to symptom score postoperatively (P < 0.001). Complete and partial (<90% and 50-90% postoperative reduction in barium column, respectively) emptying was seen in 55% and 31% of patients with excellent result. Patients with a pseudodiverticulum postoperatively had a more delayed esophageal emptying than those without. Symptomatic outcome and esophageal emptying did not deteriorate at 5-year follow-up. Esophageal emptying assessed by 'barium and bread' and 'timed barium' esophagogram correlated well with symptomatic outcome after laparoscopic myotomy for esophageal achalasia. Complete symptomatic relief does not necessarily reflect complete esophageal emptying. Outcomes do not deteriorate by time. Because of wide availability, esophagogram can be applied in follow-up of postmyotomy patients in conjunction with symptomatic evaluation.

  9. Thinking, Walking, Talking: Integratory Motor and Cognitive Brain Function

    PubMed Central

    Leisman, Gerry; Moustafa, Ahmed A.; Shafir, Tal

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we argue that motor and cognitive processes are functionally related and most likely share a similar evolutionary history. This is supported by clinical and neural data showing that some brain regions integrate both motor and cognitive functions. In addition, we also argue that cognitive processes coincide with complex motor output. Further, we also review data that support the converse notion that motor processes can contribute to cognitive function, as found by many rehabilitation and aerobic exercise training programs. Support is provided for motor and cognitive processes possessing dynamic bidirectional influences on each other. PMID:27252937

  10. Esophageal motility disorders after gastric banding.

    PubMed

    O'Rourke, R W; Deveney, C W; McConnell, D B; Wolfe, B M; Jobe, B A

    2007-01-01

    The long-term effects of gastric banding on esophageal function are not well described. This report describes a 28-year-old woman who developed signs and symptoms of abnormal esophageal motility and lower esophageal sphincter hypotension after gastric banding for morbid obesity. The current literature addressing the effects of gastric banding on esophageal function in light of this case report is discussed.

  11. [Esophageal manometry in patients with sliding hiatal hernia].

    PubMed

    Ramírez Mata, M; Ixtepan, L; Peña Ancira, F; de Ramírez, A F; Villalobos, J J; Campuzano, M

    1979-01-01

    This presents the method to be followed for the valuation of the gastro-esophagic function in patients with sliding hiatal hernia, twenty-one patients with this diagnosis were studied through X-Rays. Besides gastric and esophagic endoscopy, a complete clinical examinations was made to compare the information obtained from the studies, with the direct measurement of the contractions of the esophagus and the lower sphincter through conventional manometric methods. The relationship between the simptoms and the clinical procedures done in the patients were observed as was the usefulness of esophagic manometry to detect not only the direct pressure of the gastro-esophagic sphincter, but also to determine the concurrent motor changes that can occur in patients which show hiatal hernia. The benefit of this studies to decide the therapeutic handling, specially surgical, is discussed.

  12. Cytoskeleton Molecular Motors: Structures and Their Functions in Neuron.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Qingpin; Hu, Xiaohui; Wei, Zhiyi; Tam, Kin Yip

    2016-01-01

    Cells make use of molecular motors to transport small molecules, macromolecules and cellular organelles to target region to execute biological functions, which is utmost important for polarized cells, such as neurons. In particular, cytoskeleton motors play fundamental roles in neuron polarization, extension, shape and neurotransmission. Cytoskeleton motors comprise of myosin, kinesin and cytoplasmic dynein. F-actin filaments act as myosin track, while kinesin and cytoplasmic dynein move on microtubules. Cytoskeleton motors work together to build a highly polarized and regulated system in neuronal cells via different molecular mechanisms and functional regulations. This review discusses the structures and working mechanisms of the cytoskeleton motors in neurons.

  13. Cytoskeleton Molecular Motors: Structures and Their Functions in Neuron

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Qingpin; Hu, Xiaohui; Wei, Zhiyi; Tam, Kin Yip

    2016-01-01

    Cells make use of molecular motors to transport small molecules, macromolecules and cellular organelles to target region to execute biological functions, which is utmost important for polarized cells, such as neurons. In particular, cytoskeleton motors play fundamental roles in neuron polarization, extension, shape and neurotransmission. Cytoskeleton motors comprise of myosin, kinesin and cytoplasmic dynein. F-actin filaments act as myosin track, while kinesin and cytoplasmic dynein move on microtubules. Cytoskeleton motors work together to build a highly polarized and regulated system in neuronal cells via different molecular mechanisms and functional regulations. This review discusses the structures and working mechanisms of the cytoskeleton motors in neurons. PMID:27570482

  14. Motor unit recruitment by size does not provide functional advantages for motor performance

    PubMed Central

    Dideriksen, Jakob L; Farina, Dario

    2013-01-01

    It is commonly assumed that the orderly recruitment of motor units by size provides a functional advantage for the performance of movements compared with a random recruitment order. On the other hand, the excitability of a motor neuron depends on its size and this is intrinsically linked to its innervation number. A range of innervation numbers among motor neurons corresponds to a range of sizes and thus to a range of excitabilities ordered by size. Therefore, if the excitation drive is similar among motor neurons, the recruitment by size is inevitably due to the intrinsic properties of motor neurons and may not have arisen to meet functional demands. In this view, we tested the assumption that orderly recruitment is necessarily beneficial by determining if this type of recruitment produces optimal motor output. Using evolutionary algorithms and without any a priori assumptions, the parameters of neuromuscular models were optimized with respect to several criteria for motor performance. Interestingly, the optimized model parameters matched well known neuromuscular properties, but none of the optimization criteria determined a consistent recruitment order by size unless this was imposed by an association between motor neuron size and excitability. Further, when the association between size and excitability was imposed, the resultant model of recruitment did not improve the motor performance with respect to the absence of orderly recruitment. A consistent observation was that optimal solutions for a variety of criteria of motor performance always required a broad range of innervation numbers in the population of motor neurons, skewed towards the small values. These results indicate that orderly recruitment of motor units in itself does not provide substantial functional advantages for motor control. Rather, the reason for its near-universal presence in human movements is that motor functions are optimized by a broad range of innervation numbers. PMID:24144879

  15. Specificity and sensitivity of esophageal motor abnormality in systemic sclerosis (scleroderma) and related diseases: a cineradiographic study.

    PubMed

    Campbell, W L; Schultz, J C

    1986-01-01

    Using cineradiography, we studied esophageal peristalsis in patients with suspected systemic sclerosis and related diseases, and in patients without known esophageal disease who had been referred for upper gastrointestinal series. Patterns of peristaltic abnormality were identified, and specificity and sensitivity values calculated. Esophageal aperistalsis was 100% specific, and consistently weak peristalsis after all, swallows was 88% specific for systemic sclerosis. Specificity decreased to 70% in patients over age 60. Abnormal peristalsis after some, but not all, swallows had only 52% specificity. Consistently abnormal peristalsis (absent or diminished) was 67% sensitive for scleroderma. Although a high sensitivity value (87%) for cineradiography can be obtained by considering any peristaltic abnormality as a sign of scleroderma, this is achieved at the price of an undesirably high number of false positives (specificity 40%).

  16. Motor functioning differentially predicts mortality in men and women.

    PubMed

    Bravell, Marie Ernsth; Finkel, Deborah; Dahl Aslan, Anna; Reynolds, Chandra A; Hallgren, Jenny; Pedersen, Nancy L

    2017-09-01

    Research indicates gender differences in functional performance at advanced ages, but little is known about their impact on longevity for men and women. To derive a set of motor function factors from a battery of functional performance measures and examine their associations with mortality, incorporating possible gender interactions. Analyses were performed on the longitudinal Swedish Adoption/Twin Study of Aging (SATSA) including twenty-four assessments of motor function up to six times over a 19-year period. Three motor factors were derived from several factor analyses; fine motor, balance/upper strength, and flexibility. A latent growth curve model was used to capture longitudinal age changes in the motor factors and generated estimates of intercept at age 70 (I), rates of change before (S1) and after age 70 (S2) for each factor. Cox regression models were used to determine how gender in interaction with the motor factors was related to mortality. Females demonstrated lower functional performance in all motor functions relative to men. Cox regression survival analyses demonstrated that both balance/upper strength, and fine motor function were significantly related to mortality. Gender specific analyses revealed that this was true for women only. For men, none of the motor factors were related to mortality. Women demonstrated more difficulties in all functioning facets, and only among women were motor functioning (balance/upper strength and fine motor function) associated with mortality. These results provide evidence for the importance of considering motor functioning, and foremost observed gender differences when planning for individualized treatment and rehabilitation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Functional connectivity between somatosensory and motor brain areas predicts individual differences in motor learning by observing.

    PubMed

    McGregor, Heather R; Gribble, Paul L

    2017-08-01

    Action observation can facilitate the acquisition of novel motor skills; however, there is considerable individual variability in the extent to which observation promotes motor learning. Here we tested the hypothesis that individual differences in brain function or structure can predict subsequent observation-related gains in motor learning. Subjects underwent an anatomical MRI scan and resting-state fMRI scans to assess preobservation gray matter volume and preobservation resting-state functional connectivity (FC), respectively. On the following day, subjects observed a video of a tutor adapting her reaches to a novel force field. After observation, subjects performed reaches in a force field as a behavioral assessment of gains in motor learning resulting from observation. We found that individual differences in resting-state FC, but not gray matter volume, predicted postobservation gains in motor learning. Preobservation resting-state FC between left primary somatosensory cortex and bilateral dorsal premotor cortex, primary motor cortex, and primary somatosensory cortex and left superior parietal lobule was positively correlated with behavioral measures of postobservation motor learning. Sensory-motor resting-state FC can thus predict the extent to which observation will promote subsequent motor learning.NEW & NOTEWORTHY We show that individual differences in preobservation brain function can predict subsequent observation-related gains in motor learning. Preobservation resting-state functional connectivity within a sensory-motor network may be used as a biomarker for the extent to which observation promotes motor learning. This kind of information may be useful if observation is to be used as a way to boost neuroplasticity and sensory-motor recovery for patients undergoing rehabilitation for diseases that impair movement such as stroke. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  18. Functional Neuroimaging Investigations of Motor Networks in Tourette Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rothenberger, Aribert; Roessner, Veit

    2013-01-01

    Motor and vocal tics are the core symptom of Tourette syndrome (TS). Tic generation seems to develop throughout the known motor pathways. This review focuses on functional neuroimaging in order to check this assumption. Also it elucidates the alterations and interactions of motor networks in TS depending on different contexts and circumstances like resting state, spontaneous tic movements, suppression of tics and premonitory urges, voluntary goal-oriented movements as well as electrophysiological neuronal stimulation. In general, the primary tic generating motor network uses the basic motor pathways differently, interacts with secondary sensorimotor networks and neuronal systems of cognitive behavioural control in a merely hierarchical manner, changing during neurodevelopment. PMID:23187141

  19. T-type Ca2+ Channel Expression in Human Esophageal Carcinomas: A Functional Role in Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Fengmin; Chen, Hairu; Zhou, Chun; Liu, Shuang; Guo, Mingzhou; Chen, Pingping; Zhuang, Hui; Xie, Dong; Wu, Songwei

    2009-01-01

    In the present study the role of T-type Ca2+ channels in cancer cell proliferation was examined. Seventeen human esophageal cancer cell lines were screened for T-type channels using RT-PCR and voltage-clamp recordings. mRNAs for all three T-type channel α1-subunits (α1G, α1H, and α1I) were detected in all 17 cell lines: either α1H alone, α1H and α1G, or all three T-type α1 subunits. Eleven cell lines were further subjected to voltage-clamp recordings: one, i.e. the TE8 cell line, was found to exhibit a typical T-type current while others exhibited a minimal or no T-type current. Cell proliferation assays were performed in the presence or absence of T-type channel blocker mibefradil in KYSE150, KYSE180 and TE1 cells expressing mRNA for T-type channel α1-subunits but lacking T-type current, and TE8 cells exhibiting T-type current. Only TE8 cell proliferation was reduced by mibefradil. Silencing the α1G-gene that encodes functional T-type Ca2+ channels in TE8 cells with type-specific shRNA transduction also significantly decreased TE8 cell proliferation. The reduction of cell proliferation in TE8 cells was found to be associated with an up-regulation of p21CIP1. Moreover, p53 silencing nearly abolished the up-regulation of p21CIP1 resulting from mibefradil T-type channel blockade. Together, these findings suggest a functional role of T-type channels in certain esophageal carcinomas, and that pharmacological inhibition of T-type channels reduces cell proliferation via a p53-dependent p21CIP1 pathway. PMID:17532042

  20. Motor execution and motor imagery: a comparison of functional connectivity patterns based on graph theory.

    PubMed

    Xu, L; Zhang, H; Hui, M; Long, Z; Jin, Z; Liu, Y; Yao, L

    2014-03-07

    Motor execution and imagery (ME and MI), as the basic abilities of human beings, have been considered to be effective strategies in motor skill learning and motor abilities rehabilitation. Neuroimaging studies have revealed several critical regions from functional activation for ME as well as MI. Recently, investigations have probed into functional connectivity of ME; however, few explorations compared the functional connectivity between the two tasks. With betweenness centrality (BC) of graph theory, we explored and compared the functional connectivity between two finger tapping tasks of ME and MI. Our results showed that using BC, the key node for the ME task mainly focused on the supplementary motor area, while the key node for the MI task mainly located in the right premotor area. These results characterized the connectivity patterns of ME and MI and may provide new insights into the neural mechanism underlying motor execution and imagination of movements. Copyright © 2013 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Microscopic esophagitis distinguishes patients with non-erosive reflux disease from those with functional heartburn.

    PubMed

    Savarino, Edoardo; Zentilin, Patrizia; Mastracci, Luca; Dulbecco, Pietro; Marabotto, Elisa; Gemignani, Lorenzo; Bruzzone, Luca; de Bortoli, Nicola; Frigo, Anna Chiara; Fiocca, Roberto; Savarino, Vincenzo

    2013-04-01

    Microscopic esophagitis (ME) is common in patients with non-erosive reflux disease (NERD), and dilation of intercellular spaces (DIS) has been regarded as the potential main mechanism of symptom generation. We aimed to compare these histological abnormalities in healthy volunteers (HVs) and patients with erosive esophagitis (EE), NERD, and functional heartburn (FH). Consecutive patients with heartburn prospectively underwent upper endoscopy and impedance-pH off-therapy. Twenty EE patients and fifty-seven endoscopy-negative patients (NERD), subclassified as 22 with pH-POS (positive for abnormal acid exposure), 20 with hypersensitive esophagus (HE; normal acid/symptom association probability [SAP]+ or symptom index [SI]+), and 15 with FH (normal acid/SAP-/SI-/ proton pump inhibitor [PPI] test-), were enrolled. Twenty HVs were also included. In each patient/control, multiple specimens (n = 5) were taken from the distal esophagus and histological alterations were evaluated. ME was diagnosed when the global histological score was >0.35. The prevalence of ME was higher (p < 0.0001) in EE (95 %), pH-POS (77 %), and HE (65 %) NERD patients than in FH patients (13 %) and HVs (15 %). Also, basal cell hyperplasia (p < 0.0023), DIS (p < 0.0001), and papillae elongation (p < 0.0002) showed similar rates of prevalence in the above populations (p < 0.0001). ME, including each histological lesion, had similar low frequencies in FH and HVs (p = 0.9990). Considering the histological abnormalities together, they permitted us to clearly differentiate EE and NERD from FH and HVs (p < 0.0001 and p < 0.0001, respectively). The lack of ME in the esophageal distal biopsies of FH patients indicates a limited role of these histological abnormalities in symptom generation in them. ME can be considered as an accurate and reliable diagnostic marker for distinguishing FH patients from GERD patients and has the potential to be used to guide the correct therapy.

  2. Parietofrontal motor pathways and their association with motor function after stroke.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Robert; Koch, Philipp; Zimerman, Maximo; Wessel, Maximilian; Bönstrup, Marlene; Thomalla, Götz; Cheng, Bastian; Gerloff, Christian; Hummel, Friedhelm C

    2015-07-01

    Corticocortical interactions between the primary motor cortex, the ventral premotor cortex and posterior parietal motor areas, such as the anterior and caudal intraparietal sulcus, are relevant for skilled voluntary hand function. It remains unclear to what extent these brain regions and their interactions also contribute to basic motor functions after stroke. We hypothesized that white matter integrity of the underlying parietofrontal motor pathways between these brain regions might relate to residual motor function after stroke. Twenty-five chronic stroke patients were recruited (aged 64 ± 8.8 years, range 46-75, 17 males, one left-handed) and evaluated 34 months after stroke (range 12-169 months) by means of grip force, pinch force and the Fugl-Meyer assessment of the upper extremity. Based on these measures, motor function was estimated applying a factor analysis with principal component extraction. Using diffusion tensor imaging and probabilistic tractography we reconstructed probable intrahemispheric trajectories between the primary motor cortex, the ventral premotor cortex and the anterior and caudal intraparietal sulcus in each patient. White matter integrity was estimated for each individual tract by means of fractional anisotropy. Generalized linear modelling was used to relate tract-related fractional anisotropy to the motor function. We found that the white matter integrity of the fibre tracts connecting the ventral premotor cortex and the primary motor cortex (P < 0.001) and the anterior intraparietal sulcus and the ventral premotor cortex (P < 0.01) positively correlated with motor function. The other tracts investigated did not show a similar structure-behaviour association. Providing first structural connectivity data for parietofrontal connections in chronic stroke patients, the present results indicate that both the ventral premotor cortex and the posterior parietal cortex might play a relevant role in generating basic residual motor output after

  3. Efficacy of peroral endoscopic myotomy vs other achalasia treatments in improving esophageal function

    PubMed Central

    Sanaka, Madhusudhan R; Hayat, Umar; Thota, Prashanthi N; Jegadeesan, Ramprasad; Ray, Monica; Gabbard, Scott L; Wadhwa, Neha; Lopez, Rocio; Baker, Mark E; Murthy, Sudish; Raja, Siva

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To assess and compare the esophageal function after peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) vs other conventional treatments in achalasia. METHODS: Chart review of all achalasia patients who underwent POEM, laparoscopic Heller myotomy (LHM) or pneumatic dilation (PD) at our institution between January 2012 and March 2015 was performed. Patient demographics, type of achalasia, prior treatments, pre- and post-treatment timed barium swallow (TBE) and high-resolution esophageal manometry (HREM) findings were compared between the three treatment groups. Patients who had both pre- and 2 mo post-treatment TBE or HREM were included in the final analysis. TBE parameters compared were barium column height, width and volume of barium remaining at 1 and 5 min. HREM parameters compared were basal lower esophageal sphincter (LES) pressures and LES-integrated relaxation pressures (IRP). Data are presented as mean ± SD, median [25th, 75th percentiles] or frequency (percent). Analysis of variance, Kruskal-Wallis test, Pearsons χ2 test and Fishers Exact tests were used for analysis. RESULTS: A total of 200 achalasia patients were included of which 36 underwent POEM, 22 underwent PD and 142 underwent LHM. POEM patients were older (55.4 ± 16.8 years vs 46.5 ± 15.7 years, P = 0.013) and had higher BMI than LHM (29.1 ± 5.9 kg/m2 vs 26 ± 5.1 kg/m2, P = 0.012). More number of patients in POEM and PD groups had undergone prior treatments compared to LHM group (72.2% vs 68.2% vs 44.3% respectively, P = 0.003). At 2 mo post-treatment, all TBE parameters including barium column height, width and volume remaining at 1 and 5 min improved significantly in all three treatment groups (P = 0.01 to P < 0.001) except the column height at 1 min in PD group (P = 0.11) . At 2 mo post-treatment, there was significant improvement in basal LES pressure and LES-IRP in both LHM (40.5 mmHg vs 14.5 mmHg and 24 mmHg vs 7.1 mmHg respectively, P < 0.001) and POEM groups (38.7 mmHg vs 11.4 mmHg and 23.6 mm

  4. Upregulation of cortico-cerebellar functional connectivity after motor learning.

    PubMed

    Mehrkanoon, Saeid; Boonstra, Tjeerd W; Breakspear, Michael; Hinder, Mark; Summers, Jeffery J

    2016-03-01

    Interactions between the cerebellum and primary motor cortex are crucial for the acquisition of new motor skills. Recent neuroimaging studies indicate that learning motor skills is associated with subsequent modulation of resting-state functional connectivity in the cerebellar and cerebral cortices. The neuronal processes underlying the motor-learning-induced plasticity are not well understood. Here, we investigate changes in functional connectivity in source-reconstructed electroencephalography (EEG) following the performance of a single session of a dynamic force task in twenty young adults. Source activity was reconstructed in 112 regions of interest (ROIs) and the functional connectivity between all ROIs was estimated using the imaginary part of coherence. Significant changes in resting-state connectivity were assessed using partial least squares (PLS). We found that subjects adapted their motor performance during the training session and showed improved accuracy but with slower movement times. A number of connections were significantly upregulated after motor training, principally involving connections within the cerebellum and between the cerebellum and motor cortex. Increased connectivity was confined to specific frequency ranges in the mu- and beta-bands. Post hoc analysis of the phase spectra of these cerebellar and cortico-cerebellar connections revealed an increased phase lag between motor cortical and cerebellar activity following motor practice. These findings show a reorganization of intrinsic cortico-cerebellar connectivity related to motor adaptation and demonstrate the potential of EEG connectivity analysis in source space to reveal the neuronal processes that underpin neural plasticity.

  5. Motor function domains in alternating hemiplegia of childhood.

    PubMed

    Masoud, Melanie; Gordon, Kelly; Hall, Amanda; Jasien, Joan; Lardinois, Kara; Uchitel, Julie; Mclean, Melissa; Prange, Lyndsey; Wuchich, Jeffrey; Mikati, Mohamad A

    2017-08-01

    To characterize motor function profiles in alternating hemiplegia of childhood, and to investigate interrelationships between these domains and with age. We studied a cohort of 23 patients (9 males, 14 females; mean age 9y 4mo, range 4mo-43y) who underwent standardized tests to assess gross motor, upper extremity motor control, motor speech, and dysphagia functions. Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS), Gross Motor Function Measure-88 (GMFM-88), Manual Ability Classification System (MACS), and Revised Melbourne Assessment (MA2) scales manifested predominantly mild impairments; motor speech, moderate to severe; Modified Dysphagia Outcome and Severity Scale (M-DOSS), mild-to moderate deficits. GMFCS correlated with GMFM-88 scores (Pearson's correlation, p=0.002), MACS (p=0.038), and MA2 fluency (p=0.005) and accuracy (p=0.038) scores. GMFCS did not correlate with motor speech (p=0.399), MA2 dexterity (p=0.247), range of motion (p=0.063), or M-DOSS (p=0.856). Motor speech was more severely impaired than the GMFCS (p<0.013). There was no correlation between any of the assessment tools and age (p=0.210-0.798). Our data establish a detailed profile of motor function in alternating hemiplegia of childhood, argue against the presence of worse motor function in older patients, identify tools helpful in evaluating this population, and identify oropharyngeal function as the more severely affected domain, suggesting that brain areas controlling this function are more affected than others. © 2017 Mac Keith Press.

  6. [Visual and motor functions in schizophrenic patients].

    PubMed

    Del Vecchio, S; Gargiulo, P A

    1992-12-01

    In the present work, visual and motor functions have been explored in 26 chronic schizophrenic patients, and 7 acute schizophrenic patients, compared with 26 normal controls, by means of the Bender-Gestalt Test. Parameters under consideration were: Form distortion, rotation, integration, perseveration, use of space, subtle motricity, score (global parameter), and time employed. As regards distortion and rotation there have been highly significant differences between chronic patients and control group. Among acute patients, it was observed that perseveration was also highly significant. Conversely, integration and use of space did not differ significantly among the three groups involved. The global score, resulting from all the above mentioned parameters showed important differences between both patient groups on the one hand, and control group on the other hand. Taking into account that patients were being administered neuroleptic drugs, it can safely be said, however, that the Bender-Gestalt Test allows to recognize alteration in perceptual closure consistent with a loss of the objective structure of perceived phenomena, in both chronic and acute patients.

  7. Complete fundoplication is not associated with increased dysphagia in patients with abnormal esophageal motility.

    PubMed

    Heider, T R; Farrell, T M; Kircher, A P; Colliver, C C; Koruda, M J; Behrns, K E

    2001-01-01

    Abnormal esophageal motility is a relative contraindication to complete (360-degree) fundoplication because of a purported risk of postoperative dysphagia. Partial fundoplication, however, may be associated with increased postoperative esophageal acid exposure. Our aim was to determine if complete fundoplication is associated with increased postoperative dysphagia in patients with abnormal esophageal motor function. Medical records of 140 patients (79 females; mean age 48 +/- 1.1 years) who underwent fundoplication for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) were reviewed retrospectively to document demographic data, symptoms, and diagnostic test results. Of the 126 patients who underwent complete fundoplication, 25 met manometric criteria for abnormal esophageal motility (#30 mm Hg mean distal esophageal body pressure or #80% peristalsis), 68 had normal esophageal function, and 33 had incomplete manometric data and were therefore excluded from analysis. Of the 11 patients who underwent partial fundoplication, eight met criteria for abnormal esophageal motility, two had normal esophageal function, and one had incomplete data and was therefore excluded. After a median follow-up of 2 years (range 0.5 to 5 years), patients were asked to report heartburn, difficulty swallowing, and overall satisfaction using a standardized scoring scale. Complete responses were obtained in 72%. Sixty-five patients who underwent complete fundoplication and had manometric data available responded (46 normal manometry; 19 abnormal manometry). Outcomes were compared using the Mann-Whitney U test. After complete fundoplication, similar postoperative heartburn, swallowing, and overall satisfaction were reported by patients with normal and abnormal esophageal motility. Likewise, similar outcomes were reported after partial fundoplication. This retrospective study found equally low dysphagia rates regardless of baseline esophageal motility; therefore a randomized trial comparing complete versus

  8. Alteration of Motor Network Function Following Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    unlikely system for spinal cord injury: namely crustacean motor networks such as the stomatogastric ganglion (STG)6. While the STG is an invertebrate...typically modify activity by regulating the properties or expression levels of subsets of ionic channels. In the stomatogastric system of crustaceans ...conductances preserves output in a computational model of a crustacean cardiac motor neuron. J Neurosci 30: 8637–8649, 2010. Baro DJ, Levini RM, Kim MT

  9. Esophageal cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - esophagus ... Esophageal cancer is not common in the United States. It occurs most often in men over 50 years old. There are two main types of esophageal cancer: squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma. These two types ...

  10. Esophageal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... from your throat to your stomach. Early esophageal cancer usually does not cause symptoms. Later, you may ... You're at greater risk for getting esophageal cancer if you smoke, drink heavily, or have acid ...

  11. Esophageal epiphrenic diverticulum associated with diffuse esophageal spasm.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Hideo; Kubota, Hisako; Higashida, Masaharu; Manabe, Noriaki; Haruma, Ken; Hirai, Toshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal diverticulum, a relatively rare condition, has been considered to be associated with motor abnormalities such as conditions that cause a lack of coordination between the distal esophagus and lower esophageal sphincter. We herein report a case of esophageal epiphrenic diverticulum associated with diffuse esophageal spasm. A 73-year-old woman presented with dysphagia and regurgitation. Imaging examinations revealed a right-sided esophageal diverticulum located about 10cm above the esophagogastric junction. High-resolution manometry revealed normal esophageal motility. However, 24-h pH monitoring revealed continuous acidity due to pooling of residue in the diverticulum. An esophageal epiphrenic diverticulum was diagnosed and resected thoracoscopically. Her dysphagia recurred 2 years later. High-resolution manometry revealed diffuse esophageal spasm. The diverticulum in the present case was considered to have been associated with diffuse esophageal spasm. The motility disorder was likely not identified at the first evaluation. In this case, the patient's symptoms spontaneously resolved without any treatment; however, longer-term follow-up is needed. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Esophageal epiphrenic diverticulum associated with diffuse esophageal spasm

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Hideo; Kubota, Hisako; Higashida, Masaharu; Manabe, Noriaki; Haruma, Ken; Hirai, Toshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Esophageal diverticulum, a relatively rare condition, has been considered to be associated with motor abnormalities such as conditions that cause a lack of coordination between the distal esophagus and lower esophageal sphincter. Presentation of case We herein report a case of esophageal epiphrenic diverticulum associated with diffuse esophageal spasm. A 73-year-old woman presented with dysphagia and regurgitation. Imaging examinations revealed a right-sided esophageal diverticulum located about 10 cm above the esophagogastric junction. High-resolution manometry revealed normal esophageal motility. However, 24-h pH monitoring revealed continuous acidity due to pooling of residue in the diverticulum. An esophageal epiphrenic diverticulum was diagnosed and resected thoracoscopically. Her dysphagia recurred 2 years later. High-resolution manometry revealed diffuse esophageal spasm. Discussion The diverticulum in the present case was considered to have been associated with diffuse esophageal spasm. The motility disorder was likely not identified at the first evaluation. Conclusion In this case, the patient’s symptoms spontaneously resolved without any treatment; however, longer-term follow-up is needed. PMID:26143577

  13. Motor Function and Social Participation in Kindergarten Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bar-Haim, Yair; Bart, Orit

    2006-01-01

    This study focused on the associations between individual variations in children's motor abilities and individual differences in social participation and play behavior. Indoor and outdoor play behavior patterns of 88 kindergarten children were observed, and a battery of standard assessments of basic motor functions was administered. The findings…

  14. Assessment of Motor Development and Function in Preschool Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tieman, Beth L.; Palisano, Robert J.; Sutlive, Ann C.

    2005-01-01

    The process of identification of children with delays or disorders in motor development includes developmental screening, examination, and reexamination. Throughout this process, various types of measures are used, including discriminative and evaluative measures. Discriminative and evaluative measures of motor development and function that are…

  15. Motor assessment in pediatric neuropsychology: relationships to executive function.

    PubMed

    Shaheen, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    Executive function often refers to control behaviors such as "initiating," "sustaining," "inhibiting," and "switching." These mechanisms contribute to regulation of thinking and emotion but can be observed most clearly in the motor system. Neuropsychology has been influenced by "top-down" models of cognitive control that emerged from information-processing theories of cognition. In fact, neural models provide evidence that control processes are highly interactive within the cortico-striatal-cerebellar circuits. Cognition unfolds in response to motor-driven adaptation, and evidence exists for similar firing of brain cells and circuits during "imagined action" as in actual motor behavior. The motor system develops early and yet is not routinely assessed in neuropsychological evaluation of children with neurodevelopmental disorders. This article reviews some of the approaches to motor assessment that have sensitivity to neurodevelopmental disorders, and advocates for inclusion of motor assessment, particularly in evaluating control processes independent of culture, language, and other confounders.

  16. Microtubule motors mediate endosomal sorting by maintaining functional domain organization.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Sylvie D; Townley, Anna K; Danson, Chris M; Cullen, Peter J; Stephens, David J

    2013-06-01

    Many microtubule motors have been shown to couple to endosomal membranes. These motors include dynein in addition to many different kinesin family members. Sorting nexins (SNXs) are central to the organization and function of endosomes. These proteins can actively shape endosomal membranes and couple directly or indirectly to the minus-end microtubule motor dynein. Motor proteins acting on endosomes drive their motility, dictate their morphology and affect cargo segregation. We have used well-characterized members of the SNX family to elucidate motor coupling using high-resolution light microscopy coupled with depletion of specific microtubule motors. Endosomal domains labelled with SNX1, SNX4 and SNX8 couple to discrete combinations of dynein and kinesin motors. These specific combinations govern the structure and motility of each SNX-coated membrane in addition to the segregation of distinct functional endosomal subdomains. Taken together, our data show that these key features of endosome dynamics are governed by the same set of opposing microtubule motors. Thus, microtubule motors help to define the mosaic layout of endosomes that underpins cargo sorting.

  17. Functional aging impairs the role of feedback in motor learning.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Cao, Chunmei; Yan, Jin H

    2013-10-01

    Optimal motor skill acquisition frequently requires augmented feedback or knowledge of results (KR). However, the effect of functional declines on the benefits of KR remains to be determined. The objective of this research was to examine how cognitive and motor deficits of older adults influence the use of KR for motor skill learning. A total of 57 older adults (mean 73.1 years; SD 4.2) received both cognitive and eye-hand coordination assessments, whereas 55 young controls (mean 25.8 years; SD 3.8) took only the eye-hand coordination test. All young and older participants learned a time-constrained arm movement through KR in three pre-KR and post-KR intervals. In the subsequent no-KR skill retests, absolute and variable time errors were not significantly reduced for the older learners who had KR during skill practice, especially for those with cognitive and motor dysfunctions. The finding suggests that KR results in no measureable improvement for older adults with cognitive and motor functional deficiencies. More importantly, for the older adults, longer post-KR intervals showed greater detrimental effects on feedback-based motor learning than shorter pauses after KR delivery. The findings support the hypothesis about the effects of cognitive and motor deficits on KR in motor skill learning of older adults. The dynamics of cognitive and motor aging, external feedback and internal control mechanisms collectively explain the deterioration in the sensory-motor learning of older adults. The theoretical implications and practical relevance of functional aging for motor skill learning are discussed. © 2013 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  18. Motor system evolution and the emergence of high cognitive functions.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, Germán; Merchant, Hugo

    2014-11-01

    In human and nonhuman primates, the cortical motor system comprises a collection of brain areas primarily related to motor control. Existing evidence suggests that no other mammalian group has the number, extension, and complexity of motor-related areas observed in the frontal lobe of primates. Such diversity is probably related to the wide behavioral flexibility that primates display. Indeed, recent comparative anatomical, psychophysical, and neurophysiological studies suggest that the evolution of the motor cortical areas closely correlates with the emergence of high cognitive abilities. Advances in understanding the cortical motor system have shown that these areas are also related to functions previously linked to higher-order associative areas. In addition, experimental observations have shown that the classical distinction between perceptual and motor functions is not strictly followed across cortical areas. In this paper, we review evidence suggesting that evolution of the motor system had a role in the shaping of different cognitive functions in primates. We argue that the increase in the complexity of the motor system has contributed to the emergence of new abilities observed in human and nonhuman primates, including the recognition and imitation of the actions of others, speech perception and production, and the execution and appreciation of the rhythmic structure of music. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Oral-Motor Function and Feeding Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garber, June

    2013-01-01

    This article presents the elements of the Oral Motor Intervention section of the Infant Care Path for Physical Therapy in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). The types of physical therapy interventions presented in this path are evidence based as well as infant driven and family focused. In the context of anticipated maturation of…

  20. Oral-Motor Function and Feeding Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garber, June

    2013-01-01

    This article presents the elements of the Oral Motor Intervention section of the Infant Care Path for Physical Therapy in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). The types of physical therapy interventions presented in this path are evidence based as well as infant driven and family focused. In the context of anticipated maturation of…

  1. The value of early wireless esophageal pH monitoring in diagnosing functional heartburn in refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun-Young; Choi, Myung-Gyu; Baeg, Meonggi; Lim, Chul-Hyun; Kim, Jinsu; Cho, Yukyung; Park, Jaemyung; Lee, Inseok; Kim, Sangwoo; Choi, Kyuyong

    2013-10-01

    It is difficult to differentiate functional heartburn from proton pump inhibitor (PPI) failure. The aims of this study were to assess the role of early wireless esophageal pH monitoring in patients referred with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and to identify differences in the clinical spectrum among GERD subtypes. We enrolled consecutive referred patients with suspected GERD. After endoscopy on the first visit, all underwent wireless esophageal pH monitoring when off the PPI. Two hundred thirty patients were enrolled. These patients were classified into a reflux esophagitis group (20, 8.7 %) and a normal endoscopic findings group (210, 91.3 %). Among the 210 patients in the normal endoscopic findings group, 63 (27.4 %) were diagnosed with pathological reflux, 35 (15.2 %) with hypersensitive esophagus, 87 (37.8 %) with normal acid exposure with negative symptom association, and 25 (10.9 %) with test failure. These groups did not differ in age, body mass index, smoking habit, alcohol consumption, symptom severity, quality of life, presence of atypical symptoms, overlap with irritable bowel syndrome, and the frequency of somatization, depression, and anxiety. PPI responses were evaluated in 135 patients. Fifty patients (37.0 %) were not responsive to the 4-week treatment; 26 (19.3 %) were diagnosed with refractory non-erosive gastroesophageal disease, and 24 (17.8 %) with functional heartburn. The demographics and clinical and psychological characteristics did not differ between the two groups. Demographic characteristics and symptom patterns alone cannot differentiate functional heartburn from various subtypes of GERD. Wireless esophageal pH monitoring should be considered for the initial evaluation of GERD in the tertiary referral setting.

  2. Efficacy of peroral endoscopic myotomy compared with other invasive treatment options for the different esophageal motor disorders.

    PubMed

    Estremera-Arévalo, Fermín; Albéniz, Eduardo; Rullán, María; Areste, Irene; Iglesias, Rosa; Vila, Juan José

    2017-08-01

    Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) has been performed since 2008 on more than 5,000 patients. It has proven to be highly effective in the treatment of achalasia and has shown promising outcomes for other esophageal motility spastic disorders. A literature review of the efficacy of POEM compared to the previous invasive treatments for different esophageal motility disorders was performed. The application in the pediatric and elderly populations and its role as a rescue therapy after other procedures are also outlined. Short-term outcomes are similar to laparoscopic Heller myotomy (LHM) and pneumatic endoscopic dilation (PD) (clinical success > 90%) for achalasia subtypes I and II. Mid-term outcomes are comparable to LHM and overcome the results obtained after PD (> 90% vs ~50%). With regard to type III achalasia, POEM efficacy is 98% compared to 80.8% for LHM and the PD success remains at 40%. With regard to spastic esophageal disorders (SED), POEM has an effectiveness of 88% and 70% for distal esophageal spasm (DES) and jackhammer esophagus (JE) respectively. A response of 95% in patients with sigmoid esophagus has been reported. POEM has been performed in pediatric and elderly populations and has obtained a higher efficacy than PD in pediatric series (100% vs 33%) without greater adverse events. Previous treatments do not seem to hinder POEM results with excellent response rates, including 97% in post LHM and 100% in a re-POEM series. Final considerations: POEM has shown excellent short and mid-term results for all subtypes of achalasia but long-term results are not yet available. The promising results in SED may make POEM the first-line treatment for SED. A high-safety profile and efficacy have been shown in elderly and pediatric populations. Previous treatments do not seem to diminish the success rate of POEM. Core tip: POEM has emerged as an efficient treatment option for all subtypes of achalasia and other scenarios (including previous treatments and elderly

  3. Hemispheric Asymmetry of Supplementary Motor Area Proper: A Functional Connectivity Study of the Motor Network.

    PubMed

    Dinomais, Mickael; Chinier, Eva; Richard, Isabelle; Ricalens, Emmanuel; Aubé, Christophe; N'Guyen The Tich, Sylvie; Ter Minassian, Aram

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral asymmetry is a common feature of human functions. However, there are discrepancies in the literature about functional hemispheric asymmetries in the supplementary motor area (SMA), specifically in the posterior part (SMA-proper). We used resting state functional connectivity MRI to investigate the left-right asymmetries of the functional networks associated with primary motor cortex (M1) and SMA-proper using a "seed"-based correlation analysis in 30 healthy right-handed subjects. We showed that left M1 was more connected with areas involved in the motor system than right M1, and that right SMA-proper had more functional connections than its left counterpart. Our results are in agreement with a leftward asymmetry for M1 connectivity, whereas there is a rightward asymmetry of the SMA-proper connectivity.

  4. Alteration of Motor Network Function Following Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    onine protein phosphatases (Cohen et al., 1990). While application of okadaic acid alone did not affect baseline levels of IHTK (data not shown), co...change in baseline levels of IHTK when applied alone (Fig. 5C). Therefore, combined application of 4AP and staurosporine results in a relative decrease in...parallels to the organization of motor networks in mammalian systems, yet offers a substantial level of manipulation that is currently unachievable

  5. Effect of buspirone, a 5-HT1A receptor agonist, on esophageal motility in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Di Stefano, M; Papathanasopoulos, A; Blondeau, K; Vos, R; Boecxstaens, V; Farré, R; Rommel, N; Tack, J

    2012-07-01

    There are limited data concerning the effects of 5-HT(1A) receptor activation on esophageal motility. Sumatriptan, a 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist, was recently reported to enhance esophageal peristalsis after intravenous administration. Buspirone, an orally available 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist, was shown to modulate gastroduodenal motor function. Our aim was to evaluate the effect of buspirone on esophageal motility of healthy volunteers. On two separate visits, 20 healthy volunteers aged 21-29 years (nine women) underwent esophageal manometry before and 10, 30, and 60 minutes after the administration of buspirone 20-mg or placebo capsule, according to a double-blind crossover design. At each time point, we compared buspirone and placebo effects on: resting pressure of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES); residual pressure and duration of LES relaxation; amplitude, duration, and onset velocity of esophageal body contractions, during 10 swallows of 5 mL of water. Significant analysis of variance differences (P < 0.05) are presented as mean ± standard deviation. Buspirone significantly increased mean distal esophageal wave amplitude (151 vs. 87 mmHg, P < 0.05) and duration (6.1 vs. 4.2 seconds, P < 0.05). Similarly, buspirone significantly increased mean LES resting pressure (26 vs. 21 mmHg, P < 0.05) and mean residual LES pressure (7.9 vs. 2 mmHg, P < 0.05), whereas reduced mean LES relaxation duration (7.2 vs. 8.0 seconds, P < 0.05) and mean distal onset velocity (7.6 vs. 14.7 cm/second, P < 0.05). Buspirone enhances esophageal peristalsis and LES function in healthy volunteers. Further study is warranted on the effects of buspirone on esophageal function and symptoms in patients with ineffective esophageal motility.

  6. Combining afferent stimulation and mirror therapy for rehabilitating motor function, motor control, ambulation, and daily functions after stroke.

    PubMed

    Lin, Keh-chung; Huang, Pai-chuan; Chen, Yu-ting; Wu, Ching-yi; Huang, Wen-ling

    2014-02-01

    Mirror therapy (MT) and mesh glove (MG) afferent stimulation may be effective in reducing motor impairment after stroke. A hybrid intervention of MT combined with MG (MT + MG) may broaden aspects of treatment benefits. To demonstrate the comparative effects of MG + MT, MT, and a control treatment (CT) on the outcomes of motor impairments, manual dexterity, ambulation function, motor control, and daily function. Forty-three chronic stroke patients with mild to moderate upper extremity impairment were randomly assigned to receive MT + MG, MT, or CT for 1.5 hours/day, 5 days/week for 4 weeks. Outcome measures were the Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA) and muscle tone measured by Myoton-3 for motor impairment and the Box and Block Test (BBT) and 10-Meter Walk Test (10 MWT) for motor function. Secondary outcomes included kinematic parameters for motor control and the Motor Activity Log and ABILHAND Questionnaire for daily function. FMA total scores were significantly higher and synergistic shoulder abduction during reach was less in the MT + MG and MT groups compared with the CT group. Performance on the BBT and the 10 MWT (velocity and stride length in self-paced task and velocity in as-quickly-as-possible task) were improved after MT + MG compared with MT. MT + MG improved manual dexterity and ambulation. MT + MG and MT reduced motor impairment and synergistic shoulder abduction more than CT. Future studies may integrate functional task practice into treatments to enhance functional outcomes in patients with various levels of motor severity. The long-term effects of MG + MT remain to be evaluated.

  7. Obesity Reduces Cognitive and Motor Functions across the Lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chuanming; Chan, John S. Y.; Ren, Lijie; Yan, Jin H.

    2016-01-01

    Due to a sedentary lifestyle, more and more people are becoming obese nowadays. In addition to health-related problems, obesity can also impair cognition and motor performance. Previous results have shown that obesity mainly affects cognition and motor behaviors through altering brain functions and musculoskeletal system, respectively. Many factors, such as insulin/leptin dysregulation and inflammation, mediate the effect of obesity and cognition and motor behaviors. Substantial evidence has suggested exercise to be an effective way to improve obesity and related cognitive and motor dysfunctions. This paper aims to discuss the association of obesity with cognition and motor behaviors and its underlying mechanisms. Following this, mechanisms of exercise to improve obesity-related dysfunctions are described. Finally, implications and future research direction are raised. PMID:26881095

  8. Role of motor unit structure in defining function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monti, R. J.; Roy, R. R.; Edgerton, V. R.

    2001-01-01

    Motor units, defined as a motoneuron and all of its associated muscle fibers, are the basic functional units of skeletal muscle. Their activity represents the final output of the central nervous system, and their role in motor control has been widely studied. However, there has been relatively little work focused on the mechanical significance of recruiting variable numbers of motor units during different motor tasks. This review focuses on factors ranging from molecular to macroanatomical components that influence the mechanical output of a motor unit in the context of the whole muscle. These factors range from the mechanical properties of different muscle fiber types to the unique morphology of the muscle fibers constituting a motor unit of a given type and to the arrangement of those motor unit fibers in three dimensions within the muscle. We suggest that as a result of the integration of multiple levels of structural and physiological levels of organization, unique mechanical properties of motor units are likely to emerge. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  9. Effects of blueberries on inflammation, motor performance and cognitive function

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Motor and cognitive function decrease with age, to include deficits in balance, coordination, gait, processing speed, executive function, memory, and spatial learning. These functional declines may be caused by long term increases in and susceptibility to oxidative stress and inflammation. Research ...

  10. Parieto-motor functional connectivity is impaired in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Palomar, Francisco J; Conde, Virginia; Carrillo, Fátima; Fernández-del-Olmo, Miguel; Koch, Giacomo; Mir, Pablo

    2013-03-01

    Bradykinesia in Parkinson's disease is associated with a difficulty in selecting and executing motor actions, likely due to alterations in the functional connectivity of cortico-cortical circuits. Our aims were to analyse the functional interplay between the posterior parietal cortex and the ipsilateral primary motor area in Parkinson's disease using bifocal transcranial magnetic stimulation, to evaluate its modulation by dopaminergic treatment and its relationship to a simple choice reaction task. We studied 12 Parkinson's disease patients with and without dopaminergic treatment and 12 healthy controls. A paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation protocol was applied over the right posterior parietal cortex and the right primary motor area using different conditioning stimulus intensities and interstimulus intervals. Reaction and movement times were studied by a simple choice reaction task. In controls, we observed a significant facilitation of motor evoked potential amplitudes at 4 ms interstimulus interval when conditioning stimulus intensity was set to 90% of resting motor threshold. This functional interaction was not observed in Parkinson's disease patients without dopaminergic treatment and was not restored with treatment. Moreover, correlation analyses revealed that Parkinson's disease patients with less impaired parieto-motor interaction were faster in executing reaching movements in a choice reaction time task, suggesting that the functional parieto-motor impairment described here could be related to bradykinesia observed in Parkinson's disease patients. Parieto-motor functional connectivity is impaired in Parkinson's disease. The reduced efficacy of this connection could be related to presence of bradykinesia previously observed in Parkinson's disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Methylphenidate improves motor functions in children diagnosed with Hyperkinetic Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Stray, Liv Larsen; Stray, Torstein; Iversen, Synnøve; Ruud, Anne; Ellertsen, Bjørn

    2009-01-01

    Background A previous study showed that a high percentage of children diagnosed with Hyperkinetic Disorder (HKD) displayed a consistent pattern of motor function problems. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of methylphenidate (MPH) on such motor performance in children with HKD Methods 25 drug-naïve boys, aged 8–12 yr with a HKD-F90.0 diagnosis, were randomly assigned into two groups within a double blind cross-over design, and tested with a motor assessment instrument, during MPH and placebo conditions. Results The percentage of MFNU scores in the sample indicating 'severe motor problems' ranged from 44–84%, typically over 60%. Highly significant improvements in motor performance were observed with MPH compared to baseline ratings on all the 17 subtests of the MFNU 1–2 hr after administration of MPH. There were no significant placebo effects. The motor improvement was consistent with improvement of clinical symptoms. Conclusion The study confirmed our prior clinical observations showing that children with ADHD typically demonstrate marked improvements of motor functions after a single dose of 10 mg MPH. The most pronounced positive MPH response was seen in subtests measuring either neuromotor inhibition, or heightened muscular tone in the gross movement muscles involved in maintaining the alignment and balance of the body. Introduction of MPH generally led to improved balance and a generally more coordinated and controlled body movement. PMID:19439096

  12. Motor function-related maladaptive plasticity in stroke: a review.

    PubMed

    Jang, Sung Ho

    2013-01-01

    Brain plasticity can be classified as adaptive and maladaptive. Maladaptive plasticity indicates hindered functional recovery or the development of an unwanted symptom. Although a considerable amount is known about adaptive plasticity in stroke, relatively little is known of maladaptive plasticity. In the current study, previous studies on motor function-related maladaptive plasticity in stroke are reviewed in terms of compensatory movement pattern (CMP), delayed-onset involuntary abnormal movements (IAMs), and the ipsilateral motor pathway as a motor recovery mechanism. For successful stroke rehabilitation, it is important that the characteristics of maladaptive plasticity are accurately recognized. However, there is a lack of definitive evidence regarding the recognition of motor function-related maladaptive plasticity, although it seems that each of the three above-mentioned topics are involved. As for CMP, patients with a good neurological state as much as having a normal movement pattern, should be considered to have maladaptive plasticity, and in terms of the ipsilateral motor pathway, patients with bilateral innervations can be considered to have maladaptive plasticity. On the other hand, IAMs due to delayed neuronal degeneration should be ruled out in patients with delayed-onset IAMs. Therefore, for the accurate recognition of motor function-related maladaptive plasticity in stroke, a thorough evaluation of neurological state using brain mapping techniques is necessary, and subsequently, the prevention or intensive management of maladaptive plasticity is needed.

  13. Neurofeedback-based functional near-infrared spectroscopy upregulates motor cortex activity in imagined motor tasks.

    PubMed

    Lapborisuth, Pawan; Zhang, Xian; Noah, Adam; Hirsch, Joy

    2017-04-01

    Neurofeedback is a method for using neural activity displayed on a computer to regulate one's own brain function and has been shown to be a promising technique for training individuals to interact with brain-machine interface applications such as neuroprosthetic limbs. The goal of this study was to develop a user-friendly functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS)-based neurofeedback system to upregulate neural activity associated with motor imagery, which is frequently used in neuroprosthetic applications. We hypothesized that fNIRS neurofeedback would enhance activity in motor cortex during a motor imagery task. Twenty-two participants performed active and imaginary right-handed squeezing movements using an elastic ball while wearing a 98-channel fNIRS device. Neurofeedback traces representing localized cortical hemodynamic responses were graphically presented to participants in real time. Participants were instructed to observe this graphical representation and use the information to increase signal amplitude. Neural activity was compared during active and imaginary squeezing with and without neurofeedback. Active squeezing resulted in activity localized to the left premotor and supplementary motor cortex, and activity in the motor cortex was found to be modulated by neurofeedback. Activity in the motor cortex was also shown in the imaginary squeezing condition only in the presence of neurofeedback. These findings demonstrate that real-time fNIRS neurofeedback is a viable platform for brain-machine interface applications.

  14. Visual and motor functions in graphically gifted savants.

    PubMed

    Hermelin, B; Pring, L; Heavey, L

    1994-08-01

    Savant artists represent a conundrum to our understanding of the nature of high level specific talents as well as to the concept of general intellectual impairment. In the present paper, we are particularly concerned with the relationship between general perceptual-motor functions in relation to drawing aptitude. Drawing is by definition a perceptual-motor operation, yet mental handicap tends to be associated with some degree of impairment in this area. The following study seeks to isolate such aspects of performance on general perceptual-motor skills that might be associated with drawing ability, and may thus be regarded as building blocks underlying the manifestation of graphic talent. The results are discussed in terms of the relationships between graphic talent, non-verbal intelligence and visual-motor functions.

  15. Selected Interventions in Nuclear Medicine: Gastrointestinal Motor Functions

    PubMed Central

    Odunsi, Suwebatu T.; Camilleri, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Measurement of gastrointestinal functions by scintigraphy is established in clinical practice and research. The most commonly used test is the gastric emptying test. This is acknowledged as the gold standard and is conducted according to a consensus statement from the national nuclear medicine and motility societies. Other techniques are somewhat more esoteric (e.g. measurement of gastric accommodation with SPECT) or the scintigraphic approach is not the acknowledged gold standard (e.g. colonic transit, recto-anal angle and emptying, esophageal transit). The performance characteristics of many of the scintigraphic measurements have been published and the pros and cons established in the literature. Gastrointestinal scintigraphy is an integral and important component of the assessment of gastrointestinal function. PMID:19341838

  16. Arsenic Exposure and Motor Function among Children in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Parvez, Faruque; Wasserman, Gail A.; Factor-Litvak, Pam; Liu, Xinhua; Slavkovich, Vesna; Siddique, Abu B.; Sultana, Rebeka; Sultana, Ruksana; Islam, Tariqul; Levy, Diane; Mey, Jacob L.; van Geen, Alexander; Khan, Khalid; Kline, Jennie; Ahsan, Habibul

    2011-01-01

    Background: Several reports indicate that drinking water arsenic (WAs) and manganese (WMn) are associated with children’s intellectual function. Very little is known, however, about possible associations with other neurologic outcomes such as motor function. Methods: We investigated the associations of WAs and WMn with motor function in 304 children in Bangladesh, 8–11 years of age. We measured As and Mn concentrations in drinking water, blood, urine, and toenails. We assessed motor function with the Bruininks-Oseretsky test, version 2, in four subscales—fine manual control (FMC), manual coordination (MC), body coordination (BC), and strength and agility—which can be summarized with a total motor composite score (TMC). Results: Log-transformed blood As was associated with decreases in TMC [β = –3.63; 95% confidence interval (CI): –6.72, –0.54; p < 0.01], FMC (β = –1.68; 95% CI: –3.19, –0.18; p < 0.05), and BC (β = –1.61; 95% CI: –2.72, –0.51; p < 0.01), with adjustment for sex, school attendance, head circumference, mother’s intelligence, plasma ferritin, and blood Mn, lead, and selenium. Other measures of As exposure (WAs, urinary As, and toenail As) also were inversely associated with motor function scores, particularly TMC and BC. Square-transformed blood selenium was positively associated with TMC (β = 3.54; 95% CI: 1.10, 6.0; p < 0.01), FMC (β = 1.55; 95% CI: 0.40, 2.70; p < 0.005), and MC (β = 1.57; 95% CI: 0.60, 2.75; p < 0.005) in the unadjusted models. Mn exposure was not significantly associated with motor function. Conclusion: Our research demonstrates an adverse association of As exposure and a protective association of Se on motor function in children. PMID:21742576

  17. Motor cortex electrical stimulation augments sprouting of the corticospinal tract and promotes recovery of motor function.

    PubMed

    Carmel, Jason B; Martin, John H

    2014-01-01

    The corticospinal system-with its direct spinal pathway, the corticospinal tract (CST) - is the primary system for controlling voluntary movement. Our approach to CST repair after injury in mature animals was informed by our finding that activity drives establishment of connections with spinal cord circuits during postnatal development. After incomplete injury in maturity, spared CST circuits sprout, and partially restore lost function. Our approach harnesses activity to augment this injury-dependent CST sprouting and to promote function. Lesion of the medullary pyramid unilaterally eliminates all CST axons from one hemisphere and allows examination of CST sprouting from the unaffected hemisphere. We discovered that 10 days of electrical stimulation of either the spared CST or motor cortex induces CST axon sprouting that partially reconstructs the lost CST. Stimulation also leads to sprouting of the cortical projection to the magnocellular red nucleus, where the rubrospinal tract originates. Coordinated outgrowth of the CST and cortical projections to the red nucleus could support partial re-establishment of motor systems connections to the denervated spinal motor circuits. Stimulation restores skilled motor function in our animal model. Lesioned animals have a persistent forelimb deficit contralateral to pyramidotomy in the horizontal ladder task. Rats that received motor cortex stimulation either after acute or chronic injury showed a significant functional improvement that brought error rate to pre-lesion control levels. Reversible inactivation of the stimulated motor cortex reinstated the impairment demonstrating the importance of the stimulated system to recovery. Motor cortex electrical stimulation is an effective approach to promote spouting of spared CST axons. By optimizing activity-dependent sprouting in animals, we could have an approach that can be translated to the human for evaluation with minimal delay.

  18. Functional Plasticity in Somatosensory Cortex Supports Motor Learning by Observing.

    PubMed

    McGregor, Heather R; Cashaback, Joshua G A; Gribble, Paul L

    2016-04-04

    An influential idea in neuroscience is that the sensory-motor system is activated when observing the actions of others [1, 2]. This idea has recently been extended to motor learning, in which observation results in sensory-motor plasticity and behavioral changes in both motor and somatosensory domains [3-9]. However, it is unclear how the brain maps visual information onto motor circuits for learning. Here we test the idea that the somatosensory system, and specifically primary somatosensory cortex (S1), plays a role in motor learning by observing. In experiment 1, we applied stimulation to the median nerve to occupy the somatosensory system with unrelated inputs while participants observed a tutor learning to reach in a force field. Stimulation disrupted motor learning by observing in a limb-specific manner. Stimulation delivered to the right arm (the same arm used by the tutor) disrupted learning, whereas left arm stimulation did not. This is consistent with the idea that a somatosensory representation of the observed effector must be available during observation for learning to occur. In experiment 2, we assessed S1 cortical processing before and after observation by measuring somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) associated with median nerve stimulation. SEP amplitudes increased only for participants who observed learning. Moreover, SEPs increased more for participants who exhibited greater motor learning following observation. Taken together, these findings support the idea that motor learning by observing relies on functional plasticity in S1. We propose that visual signals about the movements of others are mapped onto motor circuits for learning via the somatosensory system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Gli function is essential for motor neuron induction in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Vanderlaan, Gary; Tyurina, Oksana V; Karlstrom, Rolf O; Chandrasekhar, Anand

    2005-06-15

    The Gli family of zinc-finger transcription factors mediates Hedgehog (Hh) signaling in all vertebrates. However, their roles in ventral neural tube patterning, in particular motor neuron induction, appear to have diverged across species. For instance, cranial motor neurons are essentially lost in zebrafish detour (gli1(-)) mutants, whereas motor neuron development is unaffected in mouse single gli and some double gli knockouts. Interestingly, the expression of some Hh-regulated genes (ptc1, net1a, gli1) is mostly unaffected in the detour mutant hindbrain, suggesting that other Gli transcriptional activators may be involved. To better define the roles of the zebrafish gli genes in motor neuron induction and in Hh-regulated gene expression, we examined these processes in you-too (yot) mutants, which encode dominant repressor forms of Gli2 (Gli2(DR)), and following morpholino-mediated knockdown of gli1, gli2, and gli3 function. Motor neuron induction at all axial levels was reduced in yot (gli2(DR)) mutant embryos. In addition, Hh target gene expression at all axial levels except in rhombomere 4 was also reduced, suggesting an interference with the function of other Glis. Indeed, morpholino-mediated knockdown of Gli2(DR) protein in yot mutants led to a suppression of the defective motor neuron phenotype. However, gli2 knockdown in wild-type embryos generated no discernable motor neuron phenotype, while gli3 knockdown reduced motor neuron induction in the hindbrain and spinal cord. Significantly, gli2 or gli3 knockdown in detour (gli1(-)) mutants revealed roles for Gli2 and Gli3 activator functions in ptc1 expression and spinal motor neuron induction. Similarly, gli1 or gli3 knockdown in yot (gli2(DR)) mutants resulted in severe or complete loss of motor neurons, and of ptc1 and net1a expression, in the hindbrain and spinal cord. In addition, gli1 expression was greatly reduced in yot mutants following gli3, but not gli1, knockdown, suggesting that Gli3 activator

  20. Esophageal motor dysfunction plays a key role in GERD with globus sensation--analysis of factors promoting resistance to PPI therapy.

    PubMed

    Tsutsui, Hideaki; Manabe, Noriaki; Uno, Masako; Imamura, Hiroshi; Kamada, Tomoari; Kusunoki, Hiroaki; Shiotani, Akiko; Hata, Jiro; Harada, Tamotsu; Haruma, Ken

    2012-09-01

    Patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) also have various extra-esophageal symptoms. Laryngopharyngeal reflux disease (LPRD) is a subtype of GERD associated with globus sensation, but proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy achieves disappointing results. This study investigated esophageal motility in GERD patients with globus sensation who were resistant to PPI therapy. The subjects were 350 patients with globus sensation. All patients underwent both laryngoscopy and upper gastrointestinal endoscopy to exclude organic disease. After 4 weeks of treatment with rabeprazole sodium (20 mg daily), the patients were divided into PPI-responsive and PPI-resistant groups. Then we investigated esophageal motility in the PPI-resistant group by a multichannel intraluminal impedance and manometry study. A total of 119 patients (55.6%) were resistant to PPI therapy, among whom 57 patients (47.9%) had abnormal esophageal motility. They included 36 patients (66.4%) with ineffective esophageal motility, 9 patients (14.4%) with achalasia, 6 patients (9.6%) with diffuse esophageal spasm, 5 patients (8%) with nutcracker esophagus, and 1 patient (1.6%) with hypertensive lower esophageal sphincter. There were significant differences of upper esophageal sphincter pressure and esophageal body peristalsis between the patients with PPI-resistant LPRD and healthy controls matched for age and sex. Among patients with PPI-resistant LPRD, 47.9% had abnormal esophageal motility.

  1. Esophagitis - infectious

    MedlinePlus

    ... conditions that suppress or weaken your immune system Organisms (germs) that cause esophagitis include fungi, yeast, and viruses. Common organisms include: Candida albicans Cytomegalovirus (CMV) Herpes simplex virus ( ...

  2. Herpetic esophagitis

    SciTech Connect

    Shortsleeve, M.J.; Gauvin, G.P.; Gardner, R.C.; Greenberg, M.S.

    1981-12-01

    Four patients with herpetic esophagitis were examined. In three of them, the presenting symptom was odynophagia. Early in the course of herpetic esophagitis, shallow round and oval ulcers were seen on barium esophagograms. Later, the ulcers filled with fibrinous exudate, forming nodular plaques that projected into the esophageal lumen. Although these findings are diagnostic of esophagitis, they are not specific for a herpes virus infection. The definitive diagnosis must be established by histologic examination, which demonstrates the cytopathic effect of the herpes virus infection within the squamous epithelium.

  3. Motor function in microgravity: movement in weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lackner, J. R.; DiZio, P.

    1996-01-01

    Microgravity provides unique, though experimentally challenging, opportunities to study motor control. A traditional research focus has been the effects of linear acceleration on vestibular responses to angular acceleration. Evidence is accumulating that the high-frequency vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) is not affected by transitions from a 1 g linear force field to microgravity (<1 g); however, it appears that the three-dimensional organization of the VOR is dependent on gravitoinertial force levels. Some of the observed effects of microgravity on head and arm movement control appear to depend on the previously undetected inputs of cervical and brachial proprioception, which change almost immediately in response to alterations in background force levels. Recent studies of post-flight disturbances of posture and locomotion are revealing sensorimotor mechanisms that adjust over periods ranging from hours to weeks.

  4. Motor function in microgravity: movement in weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lackner, J. R.; DiZio, P.

    1996-01-01

    Microgravity provides unique, though experimentally challenging, opportunities to study motor control. A traditional research focus has been the effects of linear acceleration on vestibular responses to angular acceleration. Evidence is accumulating that the high-frequency vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) is not affected by transitions from a 1 g linear force field to microgravity (<1 g); however, it appears that the three-dimensional organization of the VOR is dependent on gravitoinertial force levels. Some of the observed effects of microgravity on head and arm movement control appear to depend on the previously undetected inputs of cervical and brachial proprioception, which change almost immediately in response to alterations in background force levels. Recent studies of post-flight disturbances of posture and locomotion are revealing sensorimotor mechanisms that adjust over periods ranging from hours to weeks.

  5. Esophageal baseline impedance levels in patients with pathophysiological characteristics of functional heartburn.

    PubMed

    Martinucci, I; de Bortoli, N; Savarino, E; Piaggi, P; Bellini, M; Antonelli, A; Savarino, V; Frazzoni, M; Marchi, S

    2014-04-01

    Recently, it has been suggested that low esophageal basal impedance may reflect impaired mucosal integrity and increased acid sensitivity. We aimed to compare baseline impedance levels in patients with heartburn and pathophysiological characteristics related to functional heartburn (FH) divided into two groups on the basis of symptom relief after proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). Patients with heartburn and negative endoscopy were treated with esomeprazole or pantoprazole 40 mg daily for 8 weeks. According to MII-pH (off therapy) analysis, patients with normal acid exposure time (AET), normal reflux number, and lack of association between symptoms and refluxes were selected; of whom 30 patients with a symptom relief higher than 50% after PPIs composed Group A, and 30 patients, matched for sex and age, without symptom relief composed Group B. A group of 20 healthy volunteers (HVs) was enrolled. For each patient and HV, we evaluated the baseline impedance levels at channel 3, during the overnight rest, at three different times. Group A (vs Group B) showed an increase in the following parameters: mean AET (1.4 ± 0.8% vs 0.5 ± 0.6%), mean reflux number (30.4 ± 8.7 vs 24 ± 6.9), proximal reflux number (11.1 ± 5.2 vs 8.2 ± 3.6), acid reflux number (17.9 ± 6.1 vs 10.7 ± 6.9). Baseline impedance levels were lower in Group A than in Group B and in HVs (p < 0.001). Evaluating baseline impedance levels in patients with heartburn and normal AET could achieve a better understanding of pathophysiology in reflux disease patients, and could improve the distinction between FH and hypersensitive esophagus. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Gastroesophageal reflux disease after peroral endoscopic myotomy: Analysis of clinical, procedural and functional factors, associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease and esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Familiari, Pietro; Greco, Santi; Gigante, Giovanni; Calì, Anna; Boškoski, Ivo; Onder, Graziano; Perri, Vincenzo; Costamagna, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) does not include any antireflux procedure, resulting in a certain risk of iatrogenic gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The aim of the present study was to evaluate the incidence of iatrogenic GERD after POEM and identify preoperative, perioperative and postoperative factors associated with GERD. All patients treated at a single center who had a complete GERD evaluation after POEM were included in the study. Demographics, preoperative and follow-up data, results of functional studies and procedural data were collected and analyzed. A total of 103 patients (mean age 46.6 years, 47 males) were included. Postoperative altered esophageal acid exposure was attested in 52 patients (50.5%). A total of 19 patients (18.4%) had heartburn and 21 had esophagitis (20.4%). Overall, a clinically relevant GERD (altered esophageal acid exposure, associated with heartburn and/or esophagitis) was diagnosed in 30 patients (29.1%). Correlation between the severity of esophageal acid exposure with heartburn and esophagitis after POEM was found. Patients with heartburn had a lower postoperative 4-second integrated relaxation pressure compared to patients without symptoms (7.6 ± 3.8 mmHg vs 10.01 ± 4.4 mmHg, p<0.05). No correlations were identified with patient sex, age, postoperative body mass index, esophageal shape (sigmoid vs non sigmoid), lower esophageal sphincter pressure, length of myotomy, previous therapies and type of achalasia at high-resolution manometry. Preoperative, perioperative or postoperative factors minimally correlated with GERD after POEM. Clinically relevant GERD was identified in less than one-third of patients, but all patients were well controlled with medical therapy. © 2015 The Authors Digestive Endoscopy © 2015 Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society.

  7. Impairments of Motor Function While Multitasking in HIV

    PubMed Central

    Kronemer, Sharif I.; Mandel, Jordan A.; Sacktor, Ned C.; Marvel, Cherie L.

    2017-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) became a treatable illness with the introduction of combination antiretroviral therapy (CART). As a result, patients with regular access to CART are expected to live decades with HIV. Long-term HIV infection presents unique challenges, including neurocognitive impairments defined by three major stages of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). The current investigation aimed to study cognitive and motor impairments in HIV using a novel multitasking paradigm. Unlike current standard measures of cognitive and motor performance in HIV, multitasking increases real-world validity by mimicking the dual motor and cognitive demands that are part of daily professional and personal settings (e.g., driving, typing and writing). Moreover, multitask assessments can unmask compensatory mechanisms, normally used under single task conditions, to maintain performance. This investigation revealed that HIV+ participants were impaired on the motor component of the multitask, while cognitive performance was spared. A patient-specific positive interaction between motor performance and working memory recall was driven by poor HIV+ multitaskers. Surprisingly, HAND stage did not correspond with multitask performance and a variety of commonly used assessments indicated normal motor function among HIV+ participants with poor motor performance during the experimental task. These results support the use of multitasks to reveal otherwise hidden impairment in chronic HIV by expanding the sensitivity of clinical assessments used to determine HAND stage. Future studies should examine the capability of multitasks to predict performance in personal, professional and health-related behaviors and prognosis of patients living with chronic HIV. PMID:28503143

  8. Impairments of Motor Function While Multitasking in HIV.

    PubMed

    Kronemer, Sharif I; Mandel, Jordan A; Sacktor, Ned C; Marvel, Cherie L

    2017-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) became a treatable illness with the introduction of combination antiretroviral therapy (CART). As a result, patients with regular access to CART are expected to live decades with HIV. Long-term HIV infection presents unique challenges, including neurocognitive impairments defined by three major stages of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). The current investigation aimed to study cognitive and motor impairments in HIV using a novel multitasking paradigm. Unlike current standard measures of cognitive and motor performance in HIV, multitasking increases real-world validity by mimicking the dual motor and cognitive demands that are part of daily professional and personal settings (e.g., driving, typing and writing). Moreover, multitask assessments can unmask compensatory mechanisms, normally used under single task conditions, to maintain performance. This investigation revealed that HIV+ participants were impaired on the motor component of the multitask, while cognitive performance was spared. A patient-specific positive interaction between motor performance and working memory recall was driven by poor HIV+ multitaskers. Surprisingly, HAND stage did not correspond with multitask performance and a variety of commonly used assessments indicated normal motor function among HIV+ participants with poor motor performance during the experimental task. These results support the use of multitasks to reveal otherwise hidden impairment in chronic HIV by expanding the sensitivity of clinical assessments used to determine HAND stage. Future studies should examine the capability of multitasks to predict performance in personal, professional and health-related behaviors and prognosis of patients living with chronic HIV.

  9. Immunonutrition improves functional capacities in head and neck and esophageal cancer patients undergoing radiochemotherapy: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Vasson, M-P; Talvas, J; Perche, O; Dillies, A-F; Bachmann, P; Pezet, D; Achim, A-C; Pommier, P; Racadot, S; Weber, A; Ramdani, M; Kwiatkowski, F; Bouteloup, C

    2014-04-01

    Malnutrition is frequent in head and neck (HN) and esophageal cancer patients and aggravated by radiochemotherapy (RCT), increasing morbi-mortality and treatment toxicity. Our goal was to investigate the effect of immunonutrition consisting of an arginine, omega-3 fatty acid, nucleotides-enriched diet on nutritional status, and functional capacity in HN or esophageal cancer patients undergoing RCT. 37 patients were randomized in a double-blind clinical trial. 5 days before and until the end of RCT (5-7 weeks), they received either an Immunomodulating Enteral Nutrition (IEN) or an isonitrogenous, isoenergetic Standard Enteral Nutrition (SEN). Anthropometrical parameters, nutritional risk index (NRI), serum albumin, plasma antioxidant capacity, and functional capacity were recorded between the beginning and the end of RCT. A significant gain in total body weight (+2.1 ± 3.1 kg) was observed in IEN patients. Albuminemia and NRI were improved concomitantly in IEN malnourished patients. Plasma antioxidant capacity was improved (+100 ± 13 μM EqTrolox) in IEN patients. Functional capacity measured by WHO Performance Status and Karnofsky index was maintained in IEN patients but significantly reduced in SEN patients. These preliminary data show that immunonutrition could improve the nutritional status together with functional capacity in HN and esophageal cancer patients undergoing RCT. This clinical trial promoted by the University Hospital Center of Clermont-Ferrand has been registered at ClinicalTrial.gov website under the following reference: NCT00333099. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  10. ATF3 expression improves motor function in the ALS mouse model by promoting motor neuron survival and retaining muscle innervation.

    PubMed

    Seijffers, Rhona; Zhang, Jiangwen; Matthews, Jonathan C; Chen, Adam; Tamrazian, Eric; Babaniyi, Olusegun; Selig, Martin; Hynynen, Meri; Woolf, Clifford J; Brown, Robert H

    2014-01-28

    ALS is a fatal neurodegenerative disease characterized by a progressive loss of motor neurons and atrophy of distal axon terminals in muscle, resulting in loss of motor function. Motor end plates denervated by axonal retraction of dying motor neurons are partially reinnervated by remaining viable motor neurons; however, this axonal sprouting is insufficient to compensate for motor neuron loss. Activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) promotes neuronal survival and axonal growth. Here, we reveal that forced expression of ATF3 in motor neurons of transgenic SOD1(G93A) ALS mice delays neuromuscular junction denervation by inducing axonal sprouting and enhancing motor neuron viability. Maintenance of neuromuscular junction innervation during the course of the disease in ATF3/SOD1(G93A) mice is associated with a substantial delay in muscle atrophy and improved motor performance. Although disease onset and mortality are delayed, disease duration is not affected. This study shows that adaptive axonal growth-promoting mechanisms can substantially improve motor function in ALS and importantly, that augmenting viability of the motor neuron soma and maintaining functional neuromuscular junction connections are both essential elements in therapy for motor neuron disease in the SOD1(G93A) mice. Accordingly, effective protection of optimal motor neuron function requires restitution of multiple dysregulated cellular pathways.

  11. ATF3 expression improves motor function in the ALS mouse model by promoting motor neuron survival and retaining muscle innervation

    PubMed Central

    Seijffers, Rhona; Zhang, Jiangwen; Matthews, Jonathan C.; Chen, Adam; Tamrazian, Eric; Babaniyi, Olusegun; Selig, Martin; Hynynen, Meri; Woolf, Clifford J.; Brown, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    ALS is a fatal neurodegenerative disease characterized by a progressive loss of motor neurons and atrophy of distal axon terminals in muscle, resulting in loss of motor function. Motor end plates denervated by axonal retraction of dying motor neurons are partially reinnervated by remaining viable motor neurons; however, this axonal sprouting is insufficient to compensate for motor neuron loss. Activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) promotes neuronal survival and axonal growth. Here, we reveal that forced expression of ATF3 in motor neurons of transgenic SOD1G93A ALS mice delays neuromuscular junction denervation by inducing axonal sprouting and enhancing motor neuron viability. Maintenance of neuromuscular junction innervation during the course of the disease in ATF3/SOD1G93A mice is associated with a substantial delay in muscle atrophy and improved motor performance. Although disease onset and mortality are delayed, disease duration is not affected. This study shows that adaptive axonal growth-promoting mechanisms can substantially improve motor function in ALS and importantly, that augmenting viability of the motor neuron soma and maintaining functional neuromuscular junction connections are both essential elements in therapy for motor neuron disease in the SOD1G93A mice. Accordingly, effective protection of optimal motor neuron function requires restitution of multiple dysregulated cellular pathways. PMID:24474789

  12. Rebuilding motor function of the spinal cord based on functional electrical stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Xiao-yan; Du, Wei; Huang, Wei; Chen, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Rebuilding the damaged motor function caused by spinal cord injury is one of the most serious challenges in clinical neuroscience. The function of the neural pathway under the damaged sites can be rebuilt using functional electrical stimulation technology. In this study, the locations of motor function sites in the lumbosacral spinal cord were determined with functional electrical stimulation technology. A three-dimensional map of the lumbosacral spinal cord comprising the relationship between the motor function sites and the corresponding muscle was drawn. Based on the individual experimental parameters and normalized coordinates of the motor function sites, the motor function sites that control a certain muscle were calculated. Phasing pulse sequences were delivered to the determined motor function sites in the spinal cord and hip extension, hip flexion, ankle plantarflexion, and ankle dorsiflexion movements were successfully achieved. The results show that the map of the spinal cord motor function sites was valid. This map can provide guidance for the selection of electrical stimulation sites during the rebuilding of motor function after spinal cord injury. PMID:27651782

  13. Rebuilding motor function of the spinal cord based on functional electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xiao-Yan; Du, Wei; Huang, Wei; Chen, Yi

    2016-08-01

    Rebuilding the damaged motor function caused by spinal cord injury is one of the most serious challenges in clinical neuroscience. The function of the neural pathway under the damaged sites can be rebuilt using functional electrical stimulation technology. In this study, the locations of motor function sites in the lumbosacral spinal cord were determined with functional electrical stimulation technology. A three-dimensional map of the lumbosacral spinal cord comprising the relationship between the motor function sites and the corresponding muscle was drawn. Based on the individual experimental parameters and normalized coordinates of the motor function sites, the motor function sites that control a certain muscle were calculated. Phasing pulse sequences were delivered to the determined motor function sites in the spinal cord and hip extension, hip flexion, ankle plantarflexion, and ankle dorsiflexion movements were successfully achieved. The results show that the map of the spinal cord motor function sites was valid. This map can provide guidance for the selection of electrical stimulation sites during the rebuilding of motor function after spinal cord injury.

  14. Longitudinal muscle of the esophagus: its role in esophageal health and disease.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Ravinder K

    2013-07-01

    The muscularis propria of the esophagus is organized into circular and longitudinal muscle layers. The function of the longitudinal muscle and its role in bolus propulsion are not clear. The goal of this review is to summarize what is known of the role of the longitudinal muscle in health, as well as in sensory and motor disorders of the esophagus. Simultaneous manometry and ultrasound imaging reveal that, during peristalsis, the two muscle layers of the esophagus contract in perfect synchrony. On the contrary, during transient lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxation, longitudinal muscle contracts independent of the circular muscle. Recent studies have provided novel insights into the role of the longitudinal muscle in LES relaxation and descending relaxation of the esophagus. In certain diseases (e.g. some motility disorders of the esophagus), there is discoordination between the two muscle layers, which likely plays an important role in the genesis of dysphagia and delayed esophageal emptying. There is close temporal correlation between prolonged contractions of the longitudinal muscles of the esophagus and esophageal 'angina-like' pain. Novel techniques to record longitudinal muscle contraction are reviewed. Longitudinal muscles of the esophagus play a key role in the physiology and pathophysiology of esophageal sensory and motor function. Neuro-pharmacologic controls of circular and longitudinal muscle are different, which provides an opportunity for the development of novel pharmacological therapies in the treatment of esophageal sensory and motor disorders.

  15. [Videomimicography: a new objective evaluation of facial motor function].

    PubMed

    Wang, De-sheng; Dulguerov, Pavel; Lehmann, Willy

    2004-01-01

    To develop a new method, videomimicography (VMG), to evaluate facial motor function. During VMG, 11 landmarks were placed on the face, and 5 movements (forehead lifting, eye closure, nose wrinkling, lip puckering and smiling) with maximal contraction were requested. A digital video film was recorded then fed in a computer to be analyzed. Ten normal subjects were used as normal control. Area measures were found better than distance measures in evaluating facial movements. The best measure for each movement was determined. Then a global index of facial motor function was derived from these measures. This index was found well correlated with the facial paralysis House-Brackmann grade in 48 patients with facial paralysis (r = -0.928). VMG is an objective, quantitative, relative simple method. It has good reproducibility. So it can be used in clinic for evaluating facial motor function.

  16. Effects of gross motor function and manual function levels on performance-based ADL motor skills of children with spastic cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Park, Myoung-Ok

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine effects of Gross Motor Function Classification System and Manual Ability Classification System levels on performance-based motor skills of children with spastic cerebral palsy. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-three children with cerebral palsy were included. The Assessment of Motor and Process Skills was used to evaluate performance-based motor skills in daily life. Gross motor function was assessed using Gross Motor Function Classification Systems, and manual function was measured using the Manual Ability Classification System. [Results] Motor skills in daily activities were significantly different on Gross Motor Function Classification System level and Manual Ability Classification System level. According to the results of multiple regression analysis, children categorized as Gross Motor Function Classification System level III scored lower in terms of performance based motor skills than Gross Motor Function Classification System level I children. Also, when analyzed with respect to Manual Ability Classification System level, level II was lower than level I, and level III was lower than level II in terms of performance based motor skills. [Conclusion] The results of this study indicate that performance-based motor skills differ among children categorized based on Gross Motor Function Classification System and Manual Ability Classification System levels of cerebral palsy. PMID:28265171

  17. Effects of gross motor function and manual function levels on performance-based ADL motor skills of children with spastic cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Park, Myoung-Ok

    2017-02-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine effects of Gross Motor Function Classification System and Manual Ability Classification System levels on performance-based motor skills of children with spastic cerebral palsy. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-three children with cerebral palsy were included. The Assessment of Motor and Process Skills was used to evaluate performance-based motor skills in daily life. Gross motor function was assessed using Gross Motor Function Classification Systems, and manual function was measured using the Manual Ability Classification System. [Results] Motor skills in daily activities were significantly different on Gross Motor Function Classification System level and Manual Ability Classification System level. According to the results of multiple regression analysis, children categorized as Gross Motor Function Classification System level III scored lower in terms of performance based motor skills than Gross Motor Function Classification System level I children. Also, when analyzed with respect to Manual Ability Classification System level, level II was lower than level I, and level III was lower than level II in terms of performance based motor skills. [Conclusion] The results of this study indicate that performance-based motor skills differ among children categorized based on Gross Motor Function Classification System and Manual Ability Classification System levels of cerebral palsy.

  18. Ocular Motor Function in Children with Spastic Hemiplegia Evaluated by the Ocular Motor Score.

    PubMed

    Rydberg, A; Ygge, J; Olsson, M

    2017-08-03

    To assess the ocular motor functions in children with spastic hemiplegia by using the Ocular Motor Score (OMS). This study included 34 children, median age 11 years. The children were divided into 3 groups according to the underlying brain lesion; group 1 malformations, group 2 white matter damage of immaturity (WMDI), and group 3 cortical/subcortical lesions. The OMS protocol consists of 15 different subtests evaluating ocular motor functions. The OMS is divided into 2 parts, a static and a dynamic. The results from each subtest are scored 0, 0.3, 0.5, or 1, according to the level of disturbance, where 0 corresponds to normal function and 1 represents the maximum disability in the certain subtest. A total OMS (tOMS) between 0 and 15 can be obtained. The median tOMS in the whole spastic hemiplegia group was 2.5 (range 1.3-5.8). The highest median tOMS 5.2 was seen in group 1, in the children with malformations. Strabismus was found in 45% (15/34) of the children, with an equal percentage in all 3 groups. The children with spastic hemiplegia had a median tOMS of 2.7 and the highest median tOMS was seen in children with malformations. The OMS protocol is easy to use clinically and gives a quick overview of the patient´s ocular motor functions.

  19. Structural Equation Modeling of Motor Impairment, Gross Motor Function, and the Functional Outcome in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Eun-Young; Kim, Won-Ho

    2013-01-01

    Physical therapy intervention for children with cerebral palsy (CP) is focused on reducing neurological impairments, improving strength, and preventing the development of secondary impairments in order to improve functional outcomes. However, relationship between motor impairments and functional outcome has not been proved definitely. This study…

  20. Structural Equation Modeling of Motor Impairment, Gross Motor Function, and the Functional Outcome in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Eun-Young; Kim, Won-Ho

    2013-01-01

    Physical therapy intervention for children with cerebral palsy (CP) is focused on reducing neurological impairments, improving strength, and preventing the development of secondary impairments in order to improve functional outcomes. However, relationship between motor impairments and functional outcome has not been proved definitely. This study…

  1. Infant motor and cognitive abilities and subsequent executive function.

    PubMed

    Wu, Meng; Liang, Xi; Lu, Shan; Wang, Zhengyan

    2017-09-23

    Although executive function (EF) is widely considered crucial to several aspects of life, the mechanisms underlying EF development remain largely unexplored, especially for infants. From a behavioral or neurodevelopmental perspective, motor and general cognitive abilities are linked with EF. EF development is a multistage process that starts with sensorimotor interactive behaviors, which become basic cognitive abilities and, in turn, mature EF. This study aims to examine how infant motor and general cognitive abilities are linked with their EF at 3 years of age. This work also aims to explore the potential processes of EF development from early movement. A longitudinal study was conducted with 96 infants (55 girls and 41 boys). The infants' motor and general cognitive abilities were assessed at 1 and 2 years of age with Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development, Second and Third Editions, respectively. Infants' EFs were assessed at 3 years of age with Working Memory Span task, Day-Night task, and Wrapped Gift task. Children with higher scores for cognitive ability at 2 years of age performed better in working memory, and children with higher scores for gross motor ability at 2 years performed better in cognitive inhibitory control (IC). Motor ability at 1year and fine/gross motor ability at 2 years indirectly affected cognitive IC via general cognitive ability at 2 years and working memory. EF development is a multistage process that originates from physical movement to simple cognitive function, and then to complex cognitive function. Infants and toddlers can undergo targeted motor training to promote EF development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Distance training for the restoration of motor function.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, H; Hermens, H J

    2004-01-01

    We reviewed the literature on distance training for the restoration of motor function. Computerized literature searches were performed using the MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cinahl and Cochrane databases. Articles that met the criteria for inclusion were divided into three general areas concerning the type of training in relation to motor functions--muscle/joint, balance and cognition. From the publications identified in the literature search, 11 articles met the selection criteria. Six were related to muscle/joint functions, four to balance functions and one to cognitive functions. The articles were graded according to the strength of the scientific evidence they offered. The review revealed some promising applications of distance motor training, such as virtual reality (VR) and robotic devices. The strength of the evidence from these studies was poor, however, probably because the technology is relatively new. In contrast to the studies using VR and robotic devices, those using electromyographic (EMG) biofeedback showed a good to fair strength of scientific evidence. This can be explained by the substantial history of research on the restoration of motor function through the use of EMG biofeedback techniques. When implemented in clinical practice, these applications could reduce the pressure on scarce health-care resources.

  3. Esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Vakil, Nimish; Affi, Aboud

    2002-07-01

    Despite advances in our knowledge of esophageal cancer, 50% of patients present with incurable disease, and the overall survival after diagnosis is poor. The incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma of the distal esophagus is rising at a rapid rate in developed countries. Recent advances in the epidemiology of esophageal cancer offer insights into preventive strategies in patients who are at risk. New developments in diagnosis may help detect the disease at an early stage. New diagnostic modalities permit more accurate staging procedures and allow appropriate selection of therapy. New studies provide more information on multimodality therapy for esophageal cancer, and new endoscopic techniques allow resection of small lesions without surgery. New stent designs provide better palliation by providing tumor ingrowth. These developments in the treatment of esophageal cancer are the focus of this review.

  4. Form and Function in Motor Mimicry: Topographic Evidence that the Primary Function is Communicative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bavelas, Janet Beavin; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Proposes that motor mimicry functions as a nonverbal, analogic, relationship message about similarity between observer and other, and that this message is encoded according to Gestalt principles of form. Concludes that the primary function of motor mimicry must be communicative and that any relationship to vicarious processes is secondary. (RAE)

  5. Motor preparation, motor execution, attention, and executive functions in attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

    PubMed

    Klimkeit, Ester I; Mattingley, Jason B; Sheppard, Dianne M; Lee, Paul; Bradshaw, John L

    2005-04-01

    Attention and executive functions were investigated in medicated and unmedicated children with ADHD combined type using a novel selective reaching task. This task involved responding as rapidly as possible to a target while at times having to ignore a distractor. Results indicated that unmedicated children with ADHD showed slow and inaccurate responding. Slow responding reflected problems at the stage of movement preparation but not movement execution. An attentional impairment, rather than a motor planning problem per se, appeared to underlie the slow movement preparation. Inaccurate responding reflected problems with response inhibition and selective attention, impulsivity, set-shifting, and difficulties in maintaining vigilance. Although medicated children with ADHD did not show slow movement preparation, they did show some response inaccuracy, resulting especially from impulsive responding. These findings suggest that ADHD is characterized by slow motor preparation (but not motor execution), and deficits in selective attention, vigilance, and executive functions. Preliminary results suggest that stimulant medication may resolve some of these motor, attentional and executive function deficits.

  6. The influence of motor function on processing speed in preterm and term-born children.

    PubMed

    Schneider, L A; Burns, N R; Giles, L C; Nettelbeck, T J; Hudson, I L; Ridding, M C; Pitcher, J B

    2017-04-01

    This study investigates the relationship between motor function and processing speed in preterm children. Processing speed was compared in 145 adolescents, born 25-41 weeks gestational age, utilizing tasks including differing motor demands. The influence of motor cortex excitability and functional motor skills on task performance was assessed. For tasks with motoric demands, differences in performance between preterm and term-born children were mediated by the relationship between gestational age, corticomotor excitability, and motor function. There were no differences in non-motor processing speed task performance between preterm and term-born children. Measures of processing speed may be confounded by a timed motor component.

  7. Sensory and motor integration during mandibular function.

    PubMed

    Davidson, R M; Mohl, N D

    1987-10-01

    The subject of pain is intimately related to that of mandibular function. It is now clear that certain types of temporomandibular disorders, particularly myofascial pain dysfunction, result, in part, from rhythmic muscle activity produced by parafunctional oral habits such as diurnal or nocturnal bruxism. Furthermore, in addition to phasic hyperactivity, evidence also suggests that masticatory muscles of patients with MPD are tonically hyperactive. The pain associated with such hyperactive musculature prompts many patients to seek professional help. This article provides an updated historical review of one important aspect of mandibular function and gives insight into the general "state of the art."

  8. Esophageal intraluminal baseline impedance differentiates gastroesophageal reflux disease from functional heartburn.

    PubMed

    Kandulski, Arne; Weigt, Jochen; Caro, Carlos; Jechorek, Doerthe; Wex, Thomas; Malfertheiner, Peter

    2015-06-01

    Mucosal integrity can be assessed in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) by measuring intraluminal baseline impedance (BI). However, it is not clear whether BI is abnormal in patients with functional heartburn (FH), or can be used to distinguish them from patients with GERD. We compared differences in BI between patients with FH vs GERD. We performed a prospective study of 52 patients (16 men; mean age, 55 y; range, 23-78 y) seen at a tertiary university hospital from February 2009 through December 2012. Thirty-five patients had GERD (19 had nonerosive reflux disease [NERD], 16 had erosive reflux disease [ERD]) and 17 had FH. All patients discontinued proton pump inhibitor therapy and then underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy and multichannel intraluminal impedance and pH monitoring. BI was assessed at 3, 5, 7, 9, 15, and 17 cm proximal to the lower esophageal sphincter in recumbent patients. Biopsy specimens were taken from 3 cm above the gastroesophageal junction; histology analysis was performed to identify and semiquantitatively score (scale, 0-3) dilated intercellular spaces. Baseline impedance in the distal esophagus was significantly lower in patients with NERD or erosive reflux disease (ERD) than FH (P = .0006). At a cut-off value of less than 2100 Ω, BI measurements identified patients with GERD with 78% sensitivity and 71% specificity, with positive and negative predictive values of 75%. Also in the proximal esophagus, reduced levels of BI levels were found only in patients with ERD. There were negative correlations between level of BI and acid exposure time (r = -0.45; P = .0008), number of acidic reflux episodes (r = -0.45; P = .001), and proximal extent (r = -0.40; P = .004). Biopsy specimens from patients with NERD or ERD had significant increases in dilation of intercellular spaces, compared with those from patients with FH; there was an inverse association between dilated intercellular spaces and BI in the distal esophagus

  9. The Gemin Associates of Survival Motor Neuron Are Required for Motor Function in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Borg, Rebecca; Cauchi, Ruben J.

    2013-01-01

    Membership of the survival motor neuron (SMN) complex extends to nine factors, including the SMN protein, the product of the spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) disease gene, Gemins 2–8 and Unrip. The best-characterised function of this macromolecular machine is the assembly of the Sm-class of uridine-rich small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP) particles and each SMN complex member has a key role during this process. So far, however, only little is known about the function of the individual Gemin components in vivo. Here, we make use of the Drosophila model organism to uncover loss-of-function phenotypes of Gemin2, Gemin3 and Gemin5, which together with SMN form the minimalistic fly SMN complex. We show that ectopic overexpression of the dead helicase Gem3ΔN mutant or knockdown of Gemin3 result in similar motor phenotypes, when restricted to muscle, and in combination cause lethality, hence suggesting that Gem3ΔN overexpression mimics a loss-of-function. Based on the localisation pattern of Gem3ΔN, we predict that the nucleus is the primary site of the antimorphic or dominant-negative mechanism of Gem3ΔN-mediated interference. Interestingly, phenotypes induced by human SMN overexpression in Drosophila exhibit similarities to those induced by overexpression of Gem3ΔN. Through enhanced knockdown we also uncover a requirement of Gemin2, Gemin3 and Gemin5 for viability and motor behaviour, including locomotion as well as flight, in muscle. Notably, in the case of Gemin3 and Gemin5, such function also depends on adequate levels of the respective protein in neurons. Overall, these findings lead us to speculate that absence of any one member is sufficient to arrest the SMN-Gemins complex function in a nucleocentric pathway, which is critical for motor function in vivo. PMID:24391840

  10. Development of the Gross Motor Function Classification System (1997)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    To address the need for a standardized system to classify the gross motor function of children with cerebral palsy, the authors developed a five-level classification system analogous to the staging and grading systems used in medicine. Nominal group process and Delphi survey consensus methods were used to examine content validity and revise the…

  11. Development of the Gross Motor Function Classification System (1997)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    To address the need for a standardized system to classify the gross motor function of children with cerebral palsy, the authors developed a five-level classification system analogous to the staging and grading systems used in medicine. Nominal group process and Delphi survey consensus methods were used to examine content validity and revise the…

  12. Decreased function of survival motor neuron protein impairs endocytic pathways

    PubMed Central

    Dimitriadi, Maria; Derdowski, Aaron; Kalloo, Geetika; Maginnis, Melissa S.; O’Hern, Patrick; Bliska, Bryn; Sorkaç, Altar; Nguyen, Ken C. Q.; Cook, Steven J.; Poulogiannis, George; Atwood, Walter J.; Hall, David H.; Hart, Anne C.

    2016-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is caused by depletion of the ubiquitously expressed survival motor neuron (SMN) protein, with 1 in 40 Caucasians being heterozygous for a disease allele. SMN is critical for the assembly of numerous ribonucleoprotein complexes, yet it is still unclear how reduced SMN levels affect motor neuron function. Here, we examined the impact of SMN depletion in Caenorhabditis elegans and found that decreased function of the SMN ortholog SMN-1 perturbed endocytic pathways at motor neuron synapses and in other tissues. Diminished SMN-1 levels caused defects in C. elegans neuromuscular function, and smn-1 genetic interactions were consistent with an endocytic defect. Changes were observed in synaptic endocytic proteins when SMN-1 levels decreased. At the ultrastructural level, defects were observed in endosomal compartments, including significantly fewer docked synaptic vesicles. Finally, endocytosis-dependent infection by JC polyomavirus (JCPyV) was reduced in human cells with decreased SMN levels. Collectively, these results demonstrate for the first time, to our knowledge, that SMN depletion causes defects in endosomal trafficking that impair synaptic function, even in the absence of motor neuron cell death. PMID:27402754

  13. KLF4 is downregulated but not mutated during human esophageal squamous cell carcinogenesis and has tumor stage-specific functions

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yizeng; Katz, Jonathan P.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The transcriptional regulator Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) is decreased in human esophageal squamous cell cancer (ESCC), and Klf4 deletion in mice produces squamous cell dysplasia. Nonetheless the mechanisms of KLF4 downregulation in ESCC and the functions of KLF4 during ESCC development and progression are not well understood. Here, we sought to define the regulation of KLF4 and delineate the stage-specific effects of KLF4 in ESCC. We found that KLF4 expression was decreased in human ESCC and in 8 of 9 human ESCC cell lines. However, by genomic sequencing, we observed no KLF4 mutations or copy number changes in any of 52 human ESCC, suggesting other mechanisms for KLF4 silencing. In fact, KLF4 expression in human ESCC cell lines was increased by the DNA methylation inhibitor 5-azacytidine, suggesting an epigenetic mechanism for KLF4 silencing. Surprisingly, while KLF4 decreased in high-grade dysplasia and early stage tumors, KLF4 increased with advanced cancer stage, and KLF4 expression in ESCC was inversely correlated with survival. Interestingly, KLF4 promoted invasion of human ESCC cells, providing a functional link to the stage-specific expression of KLF4. Taken together, these findings suggest that KLF4 loss is necessary for esophageal tumorigenesis but that restored KLF4 expression in ESCC promotes tumor spread. Thus, the use of KLF4 as a diagnostic and therapeutic target in cancer requires careful consideration of context. PMID:26934576

  14. KLF4 is downregulated but not mutated during human esophageal squamous cell carcinogenesis and has tumor stage-specific functions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yizeng; Katz, Jonathan P

    2016-04-02

    The transcriptional regulator Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) is decreased in human esophageal squamous cell cancer (ESCC), and Klf4 deletion in mice produces squamous cell dysplasia. Nonetheless the mechanisms of KLF4 downregulation in ESCC and the functions of KLF4 during ESCC development and progression are not well understood. Here, we sought to define the regulation of KLF4 and delineate the stage-specific effects of KLF4 in ESCC. We found that KLF4 expression was decreased in human ESCC and in 8 of 9 human ESCC cell lines. However, by genomic sequencing, we observed no KLF4 mutations or copy number changes in any of 52 human ESCC, suggesting other mechanisms for KLF4 silencing. In fact, KLF4 expression in human ESCC cell lines was increased by the DNA methylation inhibitor 5-azacytidine, suggesting an epigenetic mechanism for KLF4 silencing. Surprisingly, while KLF4 decreased in high-grade dysplasia and early stage tumors, KLF4 increased with advanced cancer stage, and KLF4 expression in ESCC was inversely correlated with survival. Interestingly, KLF4 promoted invasion of human ESCC cells, providing a functional link to the stage-specific expression of KLF4. Taken together, these findings suggest that KLF4 loss is necessary for esophageal tumorigenesis but that restored KLF4 expression in ESCC promotes tumor spread. Thus, the use of KLF4 as a diagnostic and therapeutic target in cancer requires careful consideration of context.

  15. Human esophageal response during chest pain induced by swallowing cold liquids.

    PubMed

    Meyer, G W; Castell, D O

    1981-11-06

    Normal persons often note chest or back pain during rapid ingestion of cold liquids, commonly believed to result from cold-induced "spasm" of esophageal muscle. We studied the effects of swallowing cold liquids on esophageal function in five normal subjects, aged 20 to 44 years, by comparing their response to cold ice cream (-5 degrees C) and room temperature ice cream mix (20 degrees C). Decreased peristaltic amplitude was seen during cold ice cream ingestion, primarily in the midesophagus. When seven subjects rapidly ingested ice cream until chest pain was produced and maintained for at least 60 s, complete absence of motor activity in the distal esophagus occurred, with slow return to normal during the ensuing five minutes. Our studies indicate that ingestion of cold liquids significantly depresses peristaltic amplitudes and frequency of peristalsis in normal persons, and pain is associated with complete absence of motor activity in the body of the esophagus, rather than esophageal "spasm" as commonly believed.

  16. Role of corpus callosum integrity in arm function differs based on motor severity after stroke.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Jill Campbell; Dewanjee, Pritha; Tran, George; Quinlan, Erin Burke; Dodakian, Lucy; McKenzie, Alison; See, Jill; Cramer, Steven C

    2017-01-01

    While the corpus callosum (CC) is important to normal sensorimotor function, its role in motor function after stroke is less well understood. This study examined the relationship between structural integrity of the motor and sensory sections of the CC, as reflected by fractional anisotropy (FA), and motor function in individuals with a range of motor impairment level due to stroke. Fifty-five individuals with chronic stroke (Fugl-Meyer motor score range 14 to 61) and 18 healthy controls underwent diffusion tensor imaging and a set of motor behavior tests. Mean FA from the motor and sensory regions of the CC and from corticospinal tract (CST) were extracted and relationships with behavioral measures evaluated. Across all participants, FA in both CC regions was significantly decreased after stroke (p < 0.001) and showed a significant, positive correlation with level of motor function. However, these relationships varied based on degree of motor impairment: in individuals with relatively less motor impairment (Fugl-Meyer motor score > 39), motor status correlated with FA in the CC but not the CST, while in individuals with relatively greater motor impairment (Fugl-Meyer motor score ≤ 39), motor status correlated with FA in the CST but not the CC. The role interhemispheric motor connections play in motor function after stroke may differ based on level of motor impairment. These findings emphasize the heterogeneity of stroke, and suggest that biomarkers and treatment approaches targeting separate subgroups may be warranted.

  17. The Motor Function Neurological Assessment (MFNU) as an indicator of motor function problems in boys with ADHD

    PubMed Central

    Stray, Liv Larsen; Stray, Torstein; Iversen, Synnøve; Ruud, Anne; Ellertsen, Bjørn; Tønnessen, Finn Egil

    2009-01-01

    Background The paper presents the Motor Function Neurological Assessment (MFNU), as a tool for identifying typical motor function problems in children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). The study investigated motor functions in boys diagnosed with Hyperkinetic Disorder (HKD, F.90.0). HKD corresponds to the ADHD-combined (ADHD-C) diagnosis in the DSM-IV. The paper addresses the ability of the instrument to discriminate between non-medicated boys with HKD and a control group consisting of normal non-referred boys without any clinical significant ADHD symptoms. Methods 25 drug-naïve boys, aged 8–12 years and recently diagnosed as HKD F90.0, were compared with 27 controls, all boys in the same age range, on 17 MFNU subtests, and with a 'Total score' parameter. Results On the individual subtests 80–96% (median 88%) of the ADHD group showed 'moderate' to 'severe' problems, compared to 0–44% (median 14.8%) within the control group. The percentage of 'severe problems' ranged from 44–84%, (median 64%) in the ADHD group, and 0–44% (median 0%) in the control group. The highly significant differences found between the groups on all subtests, and on the Total score scores, indicated that the MFNU had a high discriminative power when children with ADHD and normal controls were compared. The Total score parameter seemed to be a meaningful discriminator of a common underlying factor of the 17 subtests used in the study. Conclusion The study confirms our clinical findings that the MFNU measures a consistent pattern of motor function problems in children with HKD, and that these problems are rarely represented in individuals without ADHD. Further research is needed to investigate to what extent the MFNU taps motor problems that are truly specific to ADHD, in contrast to motor problems common to children with DCD or other clinical problems. PMID:19450246

  18. SMN is required for sensory-motor circuit function in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Imlach, Wendy L.; Beck, Erin S.; Choi, Ben Jiwon; Lotti, Francesco; Pellizzoni, Livio; McCabe, Brian D.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a lethal human disease characterized by motor neuron dysfunction and muscle deterioration due to depletion of the ubiquitous Survival Motor Neuron (SMN) protein. Drosophila SMN mutants have reduced muscle size and defective locomotion, motor rhythm and motor neuron neurotransmission. Unexpectedly, restoration of SMN in either muscles or motor neurons did not alter these phenotypes. Instead, SMN must be expressed in proprioceptive neurons and interneurons in the motor circuit to non-autonomously correct defects in motor neurons and muscles. SMN depletion disrupts the motor system subsequent to circuit development and can be mimicked by the inhibition of motor network function. Furthermore, increasing motor circuit excitability by genetic or pharmacological inhibition of K+ channels can correct SMN-dependent phenotypes. These results establish sensory-motor circuit dysfunction as the origin of motor system deficits in this SMA model and suggest that enhancement of motor neural network activity could ameliorate the disease. PMID:23063130

  19. SMN is required for sensory-motor circuit function in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Imlach, Wendy L; Beck, Erin S; Choi, Ben Jiwon; Lotti, Francesco; Pellizzoni, Livio; McCabe, Brian D

    2012-10-12

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a lethal human disease characterized by motor neuron dysfunction and muscle deterioration due to depletion of the ubiquitous survival motor neuron (SMN) protein. Drosophila SMN mutants have reduced muscle size and defective locomotion, motor rhythm, and motor neuron neurotransmission. Unexpectedly, restoration of SMN in either muscles or motor neurons did not alter these phenotypes. Instead, SMN must be expressed in proprioceptive neurons and interneurons in the motor circuit to nonautonomously correct defects in motor neurons and muscles. SMN depletion disrupts the motor system subsequent to circuit development and can be mimicked by the inhibition of motor network function. Furthermore, increasing motor circuit excitability by genetic or pharmacological inhibition of K(+) channels can correct SMN-dependent phenotypes. These results establish sensory-motor circuit dysfunction as the origin of motor system deficits in this SMA model and suggest that enhancement of motor neural network activity could ameliorate the disease.

  20. Esophageal culture

    MedlinePlus

    Culture - esophageal ... There, it is placed in a special dish (culture) and watched for the growth of bacteria, fungi, ... and Fordtran's Gastrointestinal and Liver Disease Pathophysiology/Diagnosis/Management . 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap ...

  1. Esophageal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... is the sixth most common cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Incidence rates vary within different geographic locations. In some regions, higher rates of esophageal cancer cases may be attributed to tobacco and alcohol use or particular nutritional habits and ...

  2. Esophageal atresia

    MedlinePlus

    Esophageal atresia (EA) is a congenital defect. This means it occurs before birth. There are several types. In most cases, the ... the lower esophagus and stomach. Most infants with EA have another defect called tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF). This ...

  3. Esophageal Spasms

    MedlinePlus

    ... or gastroesophageal reflux disease: A systematic review. Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. 2015;13:251. Coss-Adame E, et al. ... esophageal (noncardiac) chest pain: An expert review. Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. 2014;12:1224. Castell DO. Chest ...

  4. Eosinophilic esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Dellon, Evan S.

    2012-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic immune-mediated condition where infiltration of eosinophils into the esophageal mucosa leads to symptoms of esophageal dysfunction. It has rapidly emerged as an important cause of upper GI morbidity in patients of all ages and is encountered in a substantial proportion of patients undergoing diagnostic upper endoscopy. This review discusses the clinical, endoscopic, and histologic features of EoE and presents the most recent guidelines for diagnosis of EoE. It describes selected diagnostic dilemmas including distinguishing EoE from gastroesophageal reflux disease and addressing the newly recognized clinical entity of proton pump inhibitor responsive esophageal eosinophilia. It also highlights evidence to support both pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic treatments, including topical corticosteroids, dietary elimination therapy, and endoscopic dilation. PMID:23452635

  5. Esophageal manometry

    MedlinePlus

    ... its ability to move food toward the stomach ( achalasia ) A weak LES, which causes heartburn (GERD) Abnormal ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2010:chap 43. Read More Achalasia Esophageal spasm Gastroesophageal reflux disease Review Date 8/ ...

  6. Robotic Characterization of Ipsilesional Motor Function in Subacute Stroke.

    PubMed

    Semrau, Jennifer A; Herter, Troy M; Kenzie, Jeffrey M; Findlater, Sonja E; Scott, Stephen H; Dukelow, Sean P

    2017-06-01

    Poststroke impairments of the ipsilesional arm are often discussed, but rarely receive focused rehabilitation. Ipsilesional deficits may affect daily function and although many studies have investigated them in chronic stroke, few characterizations have been made in the subacute phase. Furthermore, most studies have quantified ipsilesional deficits using clinical measures that can fail to detect subtle, but important deficits in motor function. We aimed to quantify reaching deficits of the contra- and ipsilesional limbs in the subacute phase poststroke. A total of 227 subjects with first-time, unilateral stroke completed a unilateral assessment of motor function (visually guided reaching) using a KINARM robot. Subjects completed the task with both the ipsi- and contralesional arms. Subjects were assessed on a variety of traditional clinical measures (Functional Independence Measure, Chedoke-McMaster Stroke Assessment, Purdue Pegboard, Behavioral Inattention Test) to compare with robotic measures of motor function. Ipsilesional deficits were common and occurred in 37% (n = 84) of subjects. Impairments of the ipsilesional and contralesional arm were weakly to moderately correlated on robotic measures. Magnitude of impairment of the contralesional arm was similar for subjects with and without ipsilesional deficits. Furthermore, we found that a higher percentage of subjects with right-hemisphere stroke had ipsilesional deficits and more subjects with left-hemisphere subcortical strokes did not have ipsilesional deficits. Magnitude of contralesional impairment and lesion location may be poor predictors of individuals with ipsilesional impairments after stroke. Careful characterization of ipsilesional deficits could identify individuals who may benefit from rehabilitation of the less affected arm.

  7. Limb distribution, motor impairment, and functional classification of cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Gorter, Jan Willem; Rosenbaum, Peter L; Hanna, Steven E; Palisano, Robert J; Bartlett, Doreen J; Russell, Dianne J; Walter, Stephen D; Raina, Parminder; Galuppi, Barbara E; Wood, Ellen

    2004-07-01

    This study explored the relationships between the Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS), limb distribution, and type of motor impairment. Data used were collected in the Ontario Motor Growth study, a longitudinal cohort study with a population-based sample of children with cerebral palsy (CP) in Canada (n=657; age 1 to 13 years at study onset). The majority (87.8%) of children with hemiplegia were classified as level I. Children with a bilateral syndrome were represented in all GMFCS levels, with most in levels III, IV, and V. Classifications by GMFCS and 'limb distribution' or by GMFCS and 'type of motor impairment' were statistically significantly associated (Pearson's chi2 p<0.001), though the correlation for limb distribution (two categories) by GMFCS was low (tau-b=0.43). An analysis of function (GMFCS) by impairment (limb distribution) indicates that the latter clinical characteristic does not add prognostic value over GMFCS. Although classification of CP by impairment level is useful for clinical and epidemiological purposes, the value of these subgroups as an indicator of mobility is limited in comparison with the classification of severity with the GMFCS.

  8. Motor function in the elderly: evidence for the reserve hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Elbaz, Alexis; Vicente-Vytopilova, Pavla; Tavernier, Béatrice; Sabia, Séverine; Dumurgier, Julien; Mazoyer, Bernard; Singh-Manoux, Archana; Tzourio, Christophe

    2013-07-30

    The reserve hypothesis accounts for the lack of direct relationship between brain pathology and its clinical manifestations. Research has mostly focused on cognition; our objective is to examine whether the reserve hypothesis applies to motor function. We investigated whether education, a marker of reserve, modifies the association between white matter lesions (WMLs), a marker of vascular brain damage, and maximum walking speed (WS), an objective measure of motor function. We also examined the cross-sectional and longitudinal association between education and WS. Data are from 4,010 participants aged 65-85 years in the longitudinal Three-City-Dijon Study with up to 4 WS measures over 10 years. We examined the interaction between education and WMLs for baseline WS. We studied the association between education and repeated WS measures using linear mixed models, and the role of covariates in explaining the education-WS association. Education was strongly associated with baseline WS; the difference in mean WS between the high and low education groups (0.145 m/s, 95% confidence interval = 0.125-0.165) was equivalent to 7.4 years of age. WMLs were associated with slow WS only in the low education group (p interaction = 0.026). WS declined significantly over time (-0.194 m/s/10 years, 95% confidence interval = -0.206, -0.182), but education did not influence rate of decline. Anthropometric characteristics, parental education, general health, and cognition had the strongest role in explaining the baseline education-WS association. Participants with more education were less susceptible to WMLs' effect on motor function. Higher education was associated with better motor performances but not with motor decline. These results are consistent with the passive reserve hypothesis.

  9. Mirror therapy for improving motor function after stroke.

    PubMed

    Thieme, Holm; Mehrholz, Jan; Pohl, Marcus; Behrens, Johann; Dohle, Christian

    2012-03-14

    Mirror therapy is used to improve motor function after stroke. During mirror therapy, a mirror is placed in the patient's midsagittal plane, thus reflecting movements of the non-paretic side as if it were the affected side. To summarise the effectiveness of mirror therapy for improving motor function, activities of daily living, pain and visuospatial neglect in patients after stroke. We searched the Cochrane Stroke Group's Trials Register (June 2011), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2011, Issue 2), MEDLINE (1950 to June 2011), EMBASE (1980 to June 2011), CINAHL (1982 to June 2011), AMED (1985 to June 2011), PsycINFO (1806 to June 2011) and PEDro (June 2011). We also handsearched relevant conference proceedings, trials and research registers, checked reference lists and contacted trialists, researchers and experts in our field of study. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and randomised cross-over trials comparing mirror therapy with any control intervention for patients after stroke. Two review authors independently selected trials based on the inclusion criteria, documented the methodological quality of studies and extracted data. We analysed the results as standardised mean differences (SMDs) for continuous variables. We included 14 studies with a total of 567 participants that compared mirror therapy with other interventions. When compared with all other interventions, mirror therapy may have a significant effect on motor function (post-intervention data: SMD 0.61; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.22 to 1.0; P = 0.002; change scores: SMD 1.04; 95% CI 0.57 to 1.51; P < 0.0001). However, effects on motor function are influenced by the type of control intervention. Additionally, mirror therapy may improve activities of daily living (SMD 0.33; 95% CI 0.05 to 0.60; P = 0.02). We found a significant positive effect on pain (SMD -1.10; 95% CI -2.10 to -0.09; P = 0.03) which is influenced by patient population

  10. Esophageal tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Luc, Guillaume; Durand, Marlène; Collet, Denis; Guillemot, Fabien; Bordenave, Laurence

    2014-03-01

    Esophageal tissue engineering is still in an early state, and ideal methods have not been developed. Since the beginning of the 20th century, advances have been made in the materials that can be used to produce an esophageal substitute. Three approaches to scaffold-based tissue engineering have yielded good results. The first development concerned non-absorbable constructs based on silicone and collagen. The need to remove the silicone tube is the main disadvantage of this material. Polymeric absorbable scaffolds have been used since the 1990s. The main polymeric material used is poly (glycolic) acid combined with collagen. The problem of stenosis remains prevalent in most studies using an absorbable construct. Finally, decellularized scaffolds have been used since 2000. The promises of this new approach are unfulfilled. Indeed, stenosis occurs when the esophageal defect is circumferential regardless of the scaffold materials. Cell supplementation can decrease the rate of stenosis, but the type(s) of cells and their roles have not been defined. Finally, esophageal tissue engineering cannot provide a functional esophageal substitute, and further development is necessary prior to conducting human clinical studies.

  11. Effects of cerebellar transcranial alternating current stimulation on motor cortex excitability and motor function.

    PubMed

    Naro, Antonino; Bramanti, Alessia; Leo, Antonino; Manuli, Alfredo; Sciarrone, Francesca; Russo, Margherita; Bramanti, Placido; Calabrò, Rocco Salvatore

    2017-01-07

    The cerebellum regulates several motor functions through two main mechanisms, the cerebellum-brain inhibition (CBI) and the motor surround inhibition (MSI). Although the exact cerebellar structures and functions involved in such processes are partially known, Purkinje cells (PC) and their surrounding interneuronal networks may play a pivotal role concerning CBI and MSI. Cerebellar transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) has been proven to shape specific cerebellar components in a feasible, safe, effective, and non-invasive manner. The aim of our study was to characterize the cerebellar structures and functions subtending CBI and MSI using a tACS approach. Fifteen healthy individuals underwent a cerebellar tACS protocol at 10, 50, and 300 Hz, or a sham-tACS over the right cerebellar hemisphere. We measured the tACS aftereffects on motor-evoked potential (MEP) amplitude, CBI induced by tACS (tiCBI) at different frequencies, MSI, and hand motor task performance. None of the participants had any side effect related to tACS. After 50-Hz tACS, we observed a clear tiCBI-50Hz weakening (about +30%, p < 0.001) paralleled by a MEP amplitude increase (about +30%, p = 0.001) and a reduction of the time required to complete some motor task (about -20%, p = 0.01), lasting up to 30 min. The 300-Hz tACS induced a selective, specific tiCBI-300Hz and tiCBI-50Hz modulation in surrounding muscles (about -15%, p = 0.01) and MSI potentiation (about +40%, p < 0.001). The 10-Hz tACS and the sham-tACS were ineffective (p > 0.6). Our preliminary data suggest that PC may represent the last mediator of tiCBI and that the surrounding interneuronal network may have an important role in updating MSI, tiCBI, and M1 excitability during tonic muscle contraction, by acting onto the PC. The knowledge of these neurophysiological issues offers new cues to design innovative, non-invasive neuromodulation protocols to shape cerebellar-cerebral functions.

  12. Detailed esophageal function and morphological analysis shows high prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease and Barrett's esophagus in patients with cervical inlet patch.

    PubMed

    Rosztóczy, A; Izbéki, F; Németh, I B; Dulic, S; Vadászi, K; Róka, R; Gecse, K; Gyökeres, T; Lázár, G; Tiszlavicz, L; Wittmann, T

    2012-08-01

    Although the pathogenesis of cervical inlet patch (CIP) is not fully understood, most authors consider it as a congenital abnormality, whereas others surmise it to be related to gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). We aimed to evaluate esophageal function and the prevalence of GERD and Barrett's esophagus in patients with CIP. GERD is defined by the presence of erosive esophagitis or an abnormal pH monitoring. Seventy-one consecutive patients with endoscopic and histological evidence of CIP were prospectively evaluated. Esophageal symptom analysis, 24-hour simultaneous biliary reflux and double-channel pH-monitoring, and esophageal manometry were carried out in 65/71 (92%) patients and in 25 matched controls. Six patients were not suitable for testing and were, therefore, excluded. The histological evaluation of the heterotopic islands showed cardia and/or oxyntic mucosa in 64/65 (98%) patients and specialized intestinal metaplasia (SIM) in one patient (2%). The cardia and/or oxyntic mucosa was accompanied by focally appearing pancreatic acinar metaplasia and pancreatic ductal metaplasia in 7/64 (11%) and in 1/64 (2%), superficial mucous glands in 6/64 (9%), and SIM in 2/64 (3%) cases. In total, SIM was present in three patients (5%), and one of them had low-grade dysplasia. At the gastroesophageal junction, 28 (43%) patients had columnar metaplasia, including nine (14%) patients with SIM. Erosive esophagitis was present in 37 (57%) cases. Thirty-two patients (49%) had abnormal acid reflux in the distal and 25 (38%) in the proximal esophagus. Abnormal biliary reflux was present in 25 (38%) cases. On the basis of endoscopic and pH studies, GERD was established in 44/65 (68%) patients. Typical reflux symptoms were common (33/65, 51%). The combined 24-hour biliary and double-channel pH-monitoring detected significantly more significant acidic reflux at both measurement points and significantly longer bile exposure time in the distal esophagus in patients with CIP

  13. The functional role of motor activation in language processing: motor cortical oscillations support lexical-semantic retrieval.

    PubMed

    van Elk, M; van Schie, H T; Zwaan, R A; Bekkering, H

    2010-04-01

    There is increasing experimental evidence that processing action-related language results in the automatic activation of associated regions of the motor and premotor cortex. However, the functional significance of motor activation in language processing is still under debate. In the present EEG study, we set out to investigate if language-induced motor activation primarily reflects the retrieval of lexical-semantic information or post-lexical motor imagery. The processing of action verbs was found accompanied by an early activation of motor-related brain areas, as reflected by a desynchronization in the mu- and beta-frequency bands which was localized to motor and premotor areas. A stronger motor activation was observed for verbs presented in an animal context (e.g. "The deer jumped over the stream") compared to a human context (e.g. "The athlete jumped over the fence") and motor resonance was directly modulated by the cloze probability of the noun-verb pairs. The onset of the motor effects preceded classical measures of semantic integration (i.e. the N400 component) and the strength of motor activation was found inversely related to the size of the N400 effect. These findings support the hypothesis that motor activation in language processing primarily supports the retrieval and integration of lexical-semantic information. Copyright 2009. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Motor skills training promotes motor functional recovery and induces synaptogenesis in the motor cortex and striatum after intracerebral hemorrhage in rats.

    PubMed

    Tamakoshi, Keigo; Ishida, Akimasa; Takamatsu, Yasuyuki; Hamakawa, Michiru; Nakashima, Hiroki; Shimada, Haruka; Ishida, Kazuto

    2014-03-01

    We investigated the effects of motor skills training on several types of motor function and synaptic plasticity following intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) in rats. Male Wistar rats were injected with collagenase into the left striatum to induce ICH, and they were randomly assigned to the ICH or sham groups. Each group was divided into the motor skills training (acrobatic training) and control (no exercise) groups. The acrobatic group performed acrobatic training from 4 to 28 days after surgery. Motor functions were assessed by motor deficit score, the horizontal ladder test and the wide or narrow beam walking test at several time points after ICH. The number of ΔFosB-positive cells was counted using immunohistochemistry to examine neuronal activation, and the PSD95 protein levels were analyzed by Western blotting to examine synaptic plasticity in the bilateral sensorimotor cortices and striata at 14 and 29 days after ICH. Motor skills training following ICH significantly improved gross motor function in the early phase after ICH and skilled motor coordinated function in the late phase. The number of ΔFosB-positive cells in the contralateral sensorimotor cortex in the acrobatic group significantly increased compared to the control group. PSD95 protein expression in the motor cortex significantly increased in the late phase, and in the striatum, the protein level significantly increased in the early phase by motor skills training after ICH compared to no training after ICH. We demonstrated that motor skills training improved motor function after ICH in rats and enhanced the neural activity and synaptic plasticity in the striatum and sensorimotor cortex. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Influence of mental practice and movement observation on motor memory, cognitive function and motor performance in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Altermann, Caroline D. C.; Martins, Alexandre S.; Carpes, Felipe P.; Mello-Carpes, Pâmela B.

    2014-01-01

    Background With aging, it is important to maintain cognitive and motor functions to ensure autonomy and quality of life. During the acquisition of motor skills, it is necessary for the elderly to understand the purpose of the proposed activities. Physical and mental practice, as well as demonstrations, are strategies used to learn movements. Objectives To investigate the influence of mental practice and the observation of movement on motor memory and to understand the relationship between cognitive function and motor performance in the execution of a sequence of digital movements in the elderly. Method This was a cross-sectional study conducted with 45 young and 45 aged subjects. The instruments used were Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), Manual Preference Inventory and a Digital Motor Task (composed of a training of a sequence of movements, an interval and a test phase). The subjects were divided into three subgroups: control, mental practice and observation of movement. Results The elderly depend more strongly on mental practice for the acquisition of a motor memory. In comparing the performances of people in different age groups, we found that in the elderly, there was a negative correlation between the MMSE score and the execution time as well as the number of errors in the motor task. Conclusions For the elderly, mental practice can advantage motor performance. Also, there is a significant relationship between cognitive function, learning and the execution of new motor skills. PMID:24839046

  16. Influence of mental practice and movement observation on motor memory, cognitive function and motor performance in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Altermann, Caroline D C; Martins, Alexandre S; Carpes, Felipe P; Mello-Carpes, Pâmela B

    2014-01-01

    With aging, it is important to maintain cognitive and motor functions to ensure autonomy and quality of life. During the acquisition of motor skills, it is necessary for the elderly to understand the purpose of the proposed activities. Physical and mental practice, as well as demonstrations, are strategies used to learn movements. To investigate the influence of mental practice and the observation of movement on motor memory and to understand the relationship between cognitive function and motor performance in the execution of a sequence of digital movements in the elderly. This was a cross-sectional study conducted with 45 young and 45 aged subjects. The instruments used were Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), Manual Preference Inventory and a Digital Motor Task (composed of a training of a sequence of movements, an interval and a test phase). The subjects were divided into three subgroups: control, mental practice and observation of movement. The elderly depend more strongly on mental practice for the acquisition of a motor memory. In comparing the performances of people in different age groups, we found that in the elderly, there was a negative correlation between the MMSE score and the execution time as well as the number of errors in the motor task. For the elderly, mental practice can advantage motor performance. Also, there is a significant relationship between cognitive function, learning and the execution of new motor skills.

  17. Esophageal anastomosis.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Y; Wang, K-N; Chen, L-Q

    2015-01-01

    This review gives an overview of the esophageal anastomosis. The history, various techniques and substitution organs, their advantages and disadvantages, healing mechanism, complications, and actual trend of this essential part of esophageal surgery are described. The history of the esophageal anastomosis extending from the first anastomosis in 1901 to today has undergone more than one century. In the early days, the success rate of the anastomosis was extremely low. As the technology progressed, the anastomosis got significant achievement. Various anastomotic techniques are currently being used. However, controversies exist on the choice of anastomotic method concerning the success rate, postoperative complication and quality of life. How to choose the method, no one can give the best answer. We searched the manuscripts about the esophageal anastomoses in recent years and studied the controversy questions about the anastomosis. Performing an esophageal anastomosis is a technical matter, and suture healing is independent of the patient's biologic situation. Every anastomosis technique has its own merit, but the outcomes were different if it was performed by different surgeons, and we also found that the complication rate of the anastomosis was mainly associated with the surgeons. So the surgeons should learn from their previous experience and others to avoid technical errors.

  18. Esophageal transection

    PubMed Central

    Özçınar, Beyza; Peker, Kıvanç Derya; Demirel, Sertaç; Yanar, Fatih; Tuncer, Koray; İğci, Abdullah

    2016-01-01

    Herein, a case of intramural esophageal dissection is reported and the literature is reviewed. Intramural esophageal dissection is a rare but well described condition that is characterized by a laceration between the esophageal mucosa and submucosa but without perforation. A female patient aged 86 years was hospitalized with a diagnosis of abdominal aortic aneurysm. After placement of an aortic stent, she was started on intravenous heparin. After the procedure, the patient had retching and vomiting due to sedative drugs. On the first day after the procedure, the patient experienced sudden-onset chest pain, hematemesis, back pain and odynophagia. A hematoma was detected in the thoracic esophagus, which was opened during endoscopy and began to bleed suddenly owing to air insufflation. A false lumen was visualized within the esophagus. There was no perforation. The patient was followed up conservatively and discharged from the hospital uneventfully. In conclusion, we propose that esophageal transection, a condition that is widely regarded as relatively benign in the literature, has the potential to lead to perforation. It would be expected that most cases of esophageal transection would be managed conservatively. PMID:28149126

  19. Motor function improvement following intrathecal baclofen pump placement in a patient with locked-in syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cairns, Kevin; Stein, Joel

    2002-04-01

    We describe a patient with locked-in syndrome who had minimal volitional motor function and severe spasticity in all four extremities. The patient showed a significant improvement in volitional motor function following intrathecal baclofen pump therapy to control spasticity. This case study suggests that intrathecal baclofen pump therapy might improve motor function in select patients with locked-in syndrome.

  20. Mirror therapy for improving motor function after stroke.

    PubMed

    Thieme, Holm; Mehrholz, Jan; Pohl, Marcus; Behrens, Johann; Dohle, Christian

    2013-01-01

    This systematic review summarizes the effectiveness of mirror therapy for improving motor function, activities of daily living, pain, and visuospatial neglect in patients after stroke. We searched the Cochrane Stroke Group’s Trials Register (June 2011), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2011, Issue 2), MEDLINE (1950 to June 2011), EMBASE (1980 to June 2011), CINAHL (1982 to June 2011), AMED (1985 to June 2011), PsycINFO (1806 to June 2011), and PEDro (June 2011). We also handsearched relevant conference proceedings, trials, and research registers; checked reference lists; and contacted trialists, researchers, and experts in our field of study. We included randomized controlled trials and randomized crossover trials comparing mirror therapy with any control intervention for patients after stroke. Two review authors independently selected trials based on the inclusion criteria, documented the methodological quality of studies, and extracted data. The primary outcome was motor function. We analyzed the results as standardized mean differences (SMDs) for continuous variables. We included 14 studies with a total of 567 participants, which compared mirror therapy with other interventions. When compared with all other interventions, mirror therapy was found to have a significant effect on motor function (postintervention data: SMD 0.61; 95% CI 0.22 to 1.0; P=0.002; change scores: SMD 1.04; 95% CI 0.57 to 1.51; P<0.0001) ; Figure). However, effects on motor function are influenced by the type of control intervention. Additionally, mirror therapy was found to improve activities of daily living (SMD 0.33; 95% CI 0.05 to 0.60; P=0.02). We found a significant positive effect on pain (SMD −1.10; 95% CI −2.10 to −0.09; P=0.03), which is influenced by patient population. We found limited evidence for improving visuospatial neglect (SMD 1.22; 95% CI 0.24 to 2.19; P=0.01). The effects on motor function were stable at follow

  1. Motor function of infants with athetoid cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Yokochi, K; Shimabukuro, S; Kodama, M; Kodama, K; Hosoe, A

    1993-10-01

    The motor function of 35 children with athetoid cerebral palsy was examined retrospectively using videotape recordings made at five to eight months of age. Many infants showed asymmetric tonic neck, Moro and Galant reflexes. Movements shown to be difficult included: keeping a symmetric supine posture, isolated movements of the hips and knees, forward extension of the upper extremity, extension of neck and trunk in the prone position and in ventral suspension, flexion of the neck in the traction response, and weight support by the upper extremities. Asymmetric or excessive opening of the mouth was present in all infants. The grade of difficulty for each posture and movement might reflect subsequent motor disability at three years of age.

  2. Differential functioning of Bender Visual-Motor Gestalt Test items.

    PubMed

    Sisto, Fermino Fernandes; Dos Santos, Acácia Aparecida Angeli; Noronha, Ana Paula Porto

    2010-02-01

    Differential Item Functioning (DIF) refers to items that do not function the same way for comparable members of different groups. The present study focuses on analyzing and classifying sex-related differential item functioning in the Bender Visual-Motor Gestalt Test. Subjects were 1,052 children attending public schools (513 boys, 539 girls, ages 6-10 years). The protocols were scored using the Bender Graduated Scoring System, which evaluates only the distortion criterion using the Rasch logistic response model. The scoring system fit the Rasch model, although two items were found to be biased by sex. When analyzing differential functioning of items for boys and girls separately, the number of differentially functioning items was equal.

  3. Eosinophilic esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Gupte, Anand R; Draganov, Peter V

    2009-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis is increasingly recognized in adults. The diagnosis is based on the presence of both typical symptoms and pathologic findings on esophageal biopsy. Patients usually present with dysphagia, food impaction and/or reflux-like symptoms, and biopsy of the esophagus shows more than 15 eosinophils per high-power field. In addition, it is essential to exclude the presence of known causes of tissue eosinophilia such as gastroesophageal reflux disease, infections, malignancy, collagen vascular diseases, hypersensitivity, and inflammatory bowel disease. There are no standardized protocols for the therapy of eosinophilic esophagitis. A variety of therapeutic approaches including acid suppression, dietary modifications, topical corticosteroids and endoscopic dilation can be used alone or in combination. PMID:19115464

  4. Early functional impairment of sensory-motor connectivity in a mouse model of spinal muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Mentis, George Z; Blivis, Dvir; Liu, Wenfang; Drobac, Estelle; Crowder, Melissa E; Kong, Lingling; Alvarez, Francisco J; Sumner, Charlotte J; O'Donovan, Michael J

    2011-02-10

    To define alterations of neuronal connectivity that occur during motor neuron degeneration, we characterized the function and structure of spinal circuitry in spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) model mice. SMA motor neurons show reduced proprioceptive reflexes that correlate with decreased number and function of synapses on motor neuron somata and proximal dendrites. These abnormalities occur at an early stage of disease in motor neurons innervating proximal hindlimb muscles and medial motor neurons innervating axial muscles, but only at end-stage disease in motor neurons innervating distal hindlimb muscles. Motor neuron loss follows afferent synapse loss with the same temporal and topographical pattern. Trichostatin A, which improves motor behavior and survival of SMA mice, partially restores spinal reflexes, illustrating the reversibility of these synaptic defects. Deafferentation of motor neurons is an early event in SMA and may be a primary cause of motor dysfunction that is amenable to therapeutic intervention.

  5. Early functional impairment of sensory-motor connectivity in a mouse model of spinal muscular atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Mentis, George Z.; Blivis, Dvir; Liu, Wenfang; Drobac, Estelle; Crowder, Melissa E.; Kong, Lingling; Alvarez, Francisco J.; Sumner, Charlotte J.; O'Donovan, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY To define alterations of neuronal connectivity that occur during motor neuron degeneration, we characterized the function and structure of spinal circuitry in spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) model mice. SMA motor neurons show reduced proprioceptive reflexes that correlate with decreased number and function of synapses on motor neuron somata and proximal dendrites. These abnormalities occur at an early stage of disease in motor neurons innervating proximal hindlimb muscles and medial motor neurons innervating axial muscles, but only at end-stage disease in motor neurons innervating distal hindlimb muscles. Motor neuron loss follows afferent synapse loss with the same temporal and topographical pattern. Trichostatin A, which improves motor behavior and survival of SMA mice, partially restores spinal reflexes illustrating the reversibility of these synaptic defects. De-afferentation of motor neurons is an early event in SMA and may be a primary cause of motor dysfunction that is amenable to therapeutic intervention. PMID:21315257

  6. [Primary esophageal motility disorders; especially about esophageal achalasia].

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Tatsuya; Sohda, Makoto; Sakai, Makoto; Tanaka, Naritaka; Suzuki, Shigemasa; Yokobori, Takehiko; Inose, Takanori; Nakajima, Masanobu; Fukuchi, Minoru; Kato, Hiroyuki; Kusano, Motoyasu; Kuwano, Hiroyuki

    2011-07-01

    Esophageal motility disorders are classified primary and secondary, and primary esophageal motility disorders are classified esophageal achalasia and other diseases by manometry. An esophageal emptying disorder associated with insufficient relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) and elimination of peristaltic waves on the esophageal body is the major abnormality of achalasia. Esophagogram, endoscopy, and manometry are used for diagnosis. As pharmacological therapy, administration of a calcium channel blocker or nitrate is useful. The pharmacological therapy is not recommended as long-term basic therapy but as a temporary treatment. At 1st, the balloon dilation method is chosen in treatment of achalasia Surgical treatment is indicated in the following cases: (1) Patients uneffected by balloon dilation, (2) Flask type with grade II to III dilation, and sigmoid type, (3) the gradual progression to the pathophysiological stage, (4) young patients, (5) complicated with esophageal cancer. Laparoscopic Heller-Dor procedure is the most popular surgical procedure, recently. It is somewhat difficult to perform surgical treatment for this functional disease. We should select the most suitable individualized treatment with efficient comprehension of the pathophysiological situation.

  7. Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Furuta, Glenn T.; Katzka, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Once considered a rare condition, eosinophilic esophagitis is now one of the most common conditions diagnosed during the assessment of feeding problems in children and during the evaluation of dysphagia and food impaction in adults.1 The entity exists worldwide but has been most extensively studied in Western countries, where its prevalence has been estimated to be 0.4% among all children and adults.2 Whether eosinophilic esophagitis is truly a new disease or simply a recently recognized one is uncertain.3 In this review, we consider the diagnostic criteria, pathophysiological and clinical features, and treatment of this increasingly prevalent disease. PMID:26488694

  8. The relationship between motor function, cognition, independence and quality of life in myelomeningocele patients.

    PubMed

    Luz, Carolina Lundberg; Moura, Maria Clara Drummond Soares de; Becker, Karine Kyomi; Teixeira, Rosani Aparecida Antunes; Voos, Mariana Callil; Hasue, Renata Hydee

    2017-08-01

    Motor function, cognition, functional independence and quality of life have been described in myelomeningocele patients, but no study has investigated their relationships. We aimed to investigate the relationships between motor function, cognition, functional independence, quality of life, age, and lesion level in myelomeningocele patients, and investigate the influence of hydrocephalus on these variables. We assessed 47 patients with the Gross Motor Function Measure (motor function), Raven's Colored Progressive Matrices (cognition), Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory (functional independence) and the Autoquestionnaire Qualité de vie Enfant Imagé (quality of life). Spearman's correlation tests determined relationships between the variables. The Friedman ANOVAs determined the influence of hydrocephalus. Motor function was strongly related to mobility and lesion level, and moderately related to cognition, self-care and social function. Cognition and quality of life were moderately related to functional independence. Age correlated moderately with functional independence and quality of life. Hydrocephalus resulted in poorer motor/cognitive outcomes and lower functional independence.

  9. Changes in motor function in the unaffected hand of stroke patients should not be ignored

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lingli; Li, Peihong; Mao, Zhibang; Qi, Xiang; Zou, Jun; Yu, Zhusheng

    2014-01-01

    Motor function changes in the unaffected hand of stroke patients with hemiplegia. These changes are often ignored by clinicians owing to the extent of motor disability of the affected hand. Finger tapping frequency and Lind-mark hand function score showed that the motor function of unaffected hands in stroke patients was poorer than that of a healthy control hand. After 2 weeks of rehabilitation treatment, motor function of the unaffected hand of stroke patients was obviously improved. Therefore, attention should also be paid to motor function in the unaffected hand of stroke patients with hemiplegia during rehabilitation. PMID:25221586

  10. Functional magnetic resonance imaging of the primary motor cortex in humans: response to increased functional demands.

    PubMed

    Khushu, S; Kumaran, S S; Tripathi, R P; Gupta, A; Jain, P C; Jain, V

    2001-06-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have been performed on 20 right handed volunteers at 1.5 Tesla using echo planar imaging (EPI) protocol. Index finger tapping invoked localized activation in the primary motor area. Consistent and highly reproducible activation in the primary motor area was observed in six different sessions of a volunteer over a period of one month. Increased tapping rate resulted in increase in the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signal intensity as well as the volume/area of activation (pixels) in the contralateral primary motor area up to tapping rate of 120 taps/min (2 Hz), beyond which it saturates. Activation in supplementary motor area was also observed. The obtained results are correlated to increased functional demands.

  11. Motor and somatosensory conversion disorder: a functional unawareness syndrome?

    PubMed

    Perez, David L; Barsky, Arthur J; Daffner, Kirk; Silbersweig, David A

    2012-01-01

    Although conversion disorder is closely connected to the origins of neurology and psychiatry, it remains poorly understood. In this article, the authors discuss neural and clinical parallels between lesional unawareness disorders and unilateral motor and somatosensory conversion disorder, emphasizing functional neuroimaging/disease correlates. Authors suggest that a functional-unawareness neurobiological framework, mediated by right hemisphere-lateralized, large-scale brain network dysfunction, may play a significant role in the neurobiology of conversion disorder. The perigenual anterior cingulate and the posterior parietal cortices are detailed as important in disease pathophysiology. Further investigations will refine the functional-unawareness concept, clarify the role of affective circuits, and delineate the process through which functional neurologic symptoms emerge.

  12. Impaired orofacial motor functions on chronic temporomandibular disorders.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Cláudia Lúcia Pimenta; Machado, Bárbara Cristina Zanandréa; Borges, Carina Giovana Pissinatti; Rodrigues Da Silva, Marco Antonio M; Sforza, Chiarella; De Felício, Cláudia Maria

    2014-08-01

    Because temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) rehabilitation continues to be a challenge, a more comprehensive picture of the orofacial functions in patients with chronic pain is required. This study assessed the orofacial functions, including surface electromyography (EMG) of dynamic rhythmic activities, in patients with moderate-severe signs and symptoms of chronic TMD. It was hypothesized that orofacial motor control differs between patients with moderate-severe chronic TMD and healthy subjects. Seventy-six subjects (46 with TMD and 30 control) answered questionnaires of severity of TMD and chewing difficulties. Orofacial functions and EMG during chewing were assessed. Standardized EMG indices were obtained by quantitative analysis of the differential EMG signals of the paired masseter and temporal muscles, and used to describe muscular action during chewing. TMD patients showed significant greater difficulty in chewing; worse orofacial scores; longer time for free mastication; a less accurate recruitment of the muscles on the working and balancing sides, reduced symmetrical mastication index (SMI) and increased standardized activity during EMG test than healthy subjects. SMI, TMD severity and orofacial myofunctional scores were correlated (P<0.01). Impaired orofacial functions and increased activity of the muscles of balancing sides during unilateral chewing characterized the altered orofacial motor control in patients with moderate-severe chronic TMD. Implications for rehabilitation are discussed.

  13. Measurement Structure of the Wolf Motor Function Test: Implications for Motor Control Theory

    PubMed Central

    Woodbury, Michelle; Velozo, Craig A.; Thompson, Paul A.; Light, Kathye; Uswatte, Gitendra; Taub, Edward; Winstein, Carolee J.; Morris, David; Blanton, Sarah; Nichols-Larsen, Deborah S.; Wolf, Steven L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Tools chosen to measure poststroke upper-extremity rehabilitation outcomes must match contemporary theoretical expectations of motor deficit and recovery because an assessment’s theoretical underpinning forms the conceptual basis for interpreting its score. Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate the theoretical framework of the Wolf Motor Function Test (WMFT) by (1) determining whether all items measured a single underlying trait and (2) examining the congruency between the hypothesized and the empirically determined item difficulty orders. Methods Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and Rasch analysis were applied to existing WMFT Functional Ability Rating Scale data from 189 participants in the EXCITE (Extremity Constraint-Induced Therapy Evaluation) trial. Fit of a 1-factor CFA model (all items) was compared with the fit of a 2-factor CFA model (factors defined according to item object-grasp requirements) with fit indices, model comparison test, and interfactor correlations. Results One item was missing sufficient data and therefore removed from analysis. CFA fit indices and the model-comparison test suggested that both models fit equally well. The 2-factor model yielded a strong interfactor correlation, and 13 of 14 items fit the Rasch model. The Rasch item difficulty order was consistent with the hypothesized item difficulty order. Conclusion The results suggest that WMFT items measure a single construct. Furthermore, the results depict an item difficulty hierarchy that may advance the theoretical discussion of the person ability versus task difficulty interaction during stroke recovery. PMID:20616302

  14. Upstream effect of esophageal distention: effect on airway.

    PubMed

    Jadcherla, Sudarshan R

    2006-06-01

    The pharyngoesophageal segment of the foregut has an important function in steering clear of luminal contents from the airway, across the age spectrum from a premature neonate to an aging adult. This complex neuromuscular interaction between the esophagus and the airway is maintained by a variety of mechanisms mediated by the parasympathetic and sympathetic afferent and efferent outflows involving the myenteric plexus, glossopharyngeal and vagus cranial nerves, phrenic nerve, and brainstem nuclei. The esophageal provocation during gastroesophageal reflux events results in esophageal distention, followed by responses in the esophagus, the airway, or both. Studies involving esophageal provocation in human adults and animal models are beginning to illuminate the pathogenetic mechanisms associated with aerodigestive tract disease. However, studies pertinent to this topic in infants or children have been lacking. In this paper, we review recent advances concerning the motor responses of the esophagus and the airway ensuing upon esophageal distention. Recent advances in methods to evaluate aerodigestive responses in infants that have been validated are discussed.

  15. Upstream Effect of Esophageal Distention: Effect on Airway

    PubMed Central

    Jadcherla, Sudarshan R.

    2014-01-01

    The pharyngoesophageal segment of the foregut has an important function in steering clear of luminal contents from the airway, across the age spectrum from a premature neonate to an aging adult. This complex neuromuscular interaction between the esophagus and the airway is maintained by a variety of mechanisms mediated by the parasympathetic and sympathetic afferent and efferent outflows involving the myenteric plexus, glossopharyngeal and vagus cranial nerves, phrenic nerve, and brainstem nuclei. The esophageal provocation during gastroesophageal reflux events results in esophageal distention, followed by responses in the esophagus, the airway, or both. Studies involving esophageal provocation in human adults and animal models are beginning to illuminate the pathogenetic mechanisms associated with aerodigestive tract disease. However, studies pertinent to this topic in infants or children have been lacking. In this paper, we review recent advances concerning the motor responses of the esophagus and the airway ensuing upon esophageal distention. Recent advances in methods to evaluate aerodigestive responses in infants that have been validated are discussed. PMID:16764784

  16. Myosin motor isoforms direct specification of actomyosin function by tropomyosins

    PubMed Central

    Clayton, Joseph E.; Pollard, Luther W.; Murray, George G.; Lord, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Myosins and tropomyosins represent two cytoskeletal proteins that often work together with actin filaments in contractile and motile cellular processes. While the specialized role of tropomyosin in striated muscle myosin-II regulation is well characterized, its role in non-muscle myosin regulation is poorly understood. We previously showed that fission yeast tropomyosin (Cdc8p) positively regulates myosin-II (Myo2p) and myosin-V (Myo52p) motors. To understand the broader implications of this regulation we examined the role of two mammalian tropomyosins (Tpm3.1cy/Tm5NM1 and Tpm4.2cy/Tm4) recently implicated in cancer cell proliferation and metastasis. Like Cdc8p, the Tpm3.1cy and Tpm4.2cy isoforms significantly enhance Myo2p and Myo52p motor activity, converting non-processive Myo52p molecules into processive motors that can walk along actin tracks as single molecules. In contrast to the positive regulation of Myo2p and Myo52p, Cdc8p and the mammalian tropomyosins potently inhibited skeletal muscle myosin-II, while having negligible effects on the highly processive mammalian myosin-Va. In support of a conserved role for certain tropomyosins in regulating non-muscle actomyosin structures, Tpm3.1cy supported normal contractile ring function in fission yeast. Our work reveals that actomyosin regulation by tropomyosin is dependent on the myosin isoform, highlighting a general role for specific isoforms of tropomyosin in sorting myosin motor outputs. PMID:25712463

  17. Differential sensitivity of cranial and limb motor function to nigrostriatal dopamine depletion.

    PubMed

    Plowman, Emily K; Maling, Nicholas; Rivera, Benjamin J; Larson, Krista; Thomas, Nagheme J; Fowler, Stephen C; Manfredsson, Fredric P; Shrivastav, Rahul; Kleim, Jeffrey A

    2013-01-15

    The present study determined the differential effects of unilateral striatal dopamine depletion on cranial motor versus limb motor function. Forty male Long Evans rats were first trained on a comprehensive motor testing battery that dissociated cranial versus limb motor function and included: cylinder forepaw placement, single pellet reaching, vermicelli pasta handling; sunflower seed opening, pasta biting acoustics, and a licking task. Following baseline testing, animals were randomized to either a 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) (n=20) or control (n=20) group. Animals in the 6-OHDA group received unilateral intrastriatal 6-OHDA infusions to induce striatal dopamine depletion. Six-weeks following infusion, all animals were re-tested on the same battery of motor tests. Near infrared densitometry was performed on sections taken through the striatum that were immunohistochemically stained for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH). Animals in the 6-OHDA condition showed a mean reduction in TH staining of 88.27%. Although 6-OHDA animals were significantly impaired on all motor tasks, limb motor deficits were more severe than cranial motor impairments. Further, performance on limb motor tasks was correlated with degree of TH depletion while performance on cranial motor impairments showed no significant correlation. These results suggest that limb motor function may be more sensitive to striatal dopaminergic depletion than cranial motor function and is consistent with the clinical observation that therapies targeting the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system in Parkinson's disease are more effective for limb motor symptoms than cranial motor impairments. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Psychometric Comparisons of Three Measures for Assessing Motor Functions in Preschoolers with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wuang, Y-P.; Su, C-Y.; Huang, M-H.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Deficit in motor performance is common in children with intellectual disabilities (ID). A motor function measure with sound psychometric properties is indispensable for clinical and research use. The purpose of this study was to compare the psychometric properties of three commonly used clinical measures for assessing motor function in…

  19. Psychometric Comparisons of Three Measures for Assessing Motor Functions in Preschoolers with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wuang, Y-P.; Su, C-Y.; Huang, M-H.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Deficit in motor performance is common in children with intellectual disabilities (ID). A motor function measure with sound psychometric properties is indispensable for clinical and research use. The purpose of this study was to compare the psychometric properties of three commonly used clinical measures for assessing motor function in…

  20. Sociability and Motor Functions in Shank1 Mutant Mice

    PubMed Central

    Silverman, Jill L.; Turner, Sarah M.; Barkan, Charlotte L.; Tolu, Seda S.; Saxena, Roheeni; Hung, Albert Y.; Sheng, Morgan; Crawley, Jacqueline N.

    2010-01-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by aberrant reciprocal social interactions, impaired communication, and repetitive behaviors. While the etiology remains unclear, strong evidence exists for a genetic component, and several synaptic genes have been implicated. SHANK genes encode a family of synaptic scaffolding proteins located postsynaptically on excitatory synapses. Mutations in SHANK genes have been detected in several autistic individuals. To understand the consequences of SHANK mutations relevant to the diagnostic and associated symptoms of autism, comprehensive behavioral phenotyping on a line of Shank1 mutant mice was conducted on multiple measures of social interactions, social olfaction, repetitive behaviors, anxiety-related behaviors, motor functions, and a series of control measures for physical abilities. Results from our comprehensive behavioral phenotyping battery indicated that adult Shank1 null mutant mice were similar to their wildtype and heterozygous littermates on standardized measures of general health, neurological reflexes and sensory skills. Motor functions were reduced in the null mutants on open field activity, rotarod, and wire hang, replicating and extending previous findings (Hung et al., 2008). A partial anxiety-like phenotype was detected in the null mutants in some components of the light ↔ dark task, as previously reported (Hung et al., 2008) but not in the elevated plus-maze. Juvenile reciprocal social interactions did not differ across genotypes. Interpretation of adult social approach was confounded by a lack of normal sociability in wildtype and heterozygous littermates. All genotypes were able to discriminate social odors on an olfactory habituation/dishabituation task. All genotypes displayed relatively high levels of repetitive self-grooming. Our findings support the interpretation that Shank1 null mice do not demonstrate autism-relevant social deficits, but confirm and extend a role for Shank1 in motor

  1. The mirror therapy program enhances upper-limb motor recovery and motor function in acute stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myung Mo; Cho, Hwi-Young; Song, Chang Ho

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of the mirror therapy program on upper-limb motor recovery and motor function in patients with acute stroke. Twenty-six patients who had an acute stroke within 6 mos of study commencement were assigned to the experimental group (n = 13) or the control group (n = 13). Both experimental and control group members participated in a standard rehabilitation program, but only the experimental group members additionally participated in mirror therapy program, for 25 mins twice a day, five times a week, for 4 wks. The Fugl-Meyer Assessment, Brunnstrom motor recovery stage, and Manual Function Test were used to assess changes in upper-limb motor recovery and motor function after intervention. In upper-limb motor recovery, the scores of Fugl-Meyer Assessment (by shoulder/elbow/forearm items, 9.54 vs. 4.61; wrist items, 2.76 vs. 1.07; hand items, 4.43 vs. 1.46, respectively) and Brunnstrom stages for upper limb and hand (by 1.77 vs. 0.69 and 1.92 vs. 0.50, respectively) were improved more in the experimental group than in the control group (P < 0.05). In upper-limb motor function, the Manual Function Test score (by shoulder item, 5.00 vs. 2.23; hand item, 5.07 vs. 0.46, respectively) was significantly increased in the experimental group compared with the control group (P < 0.01). No significant differences were found between the groups for the coordination items in Fugl-Meyer Assessment. This study confirms that mirror therapy program is an effective intervention for upper-limb motor recovery and motor function improvement in acute stroke patients. Additional research on mirror therapy program components, intensity, application time, and duration could result in it being used as a standardized form of hand rehabilitation in clinics and homes.

  2. Esophageal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease Tricuspid Valve Disease Cardiac Rhythm Disturbances Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Pediatric and Congenital Heart Disease Heart abnormalities that are present at birth in children, as well as in adults Atrial Septal Defect Ventricular Septal ... Arteriosus Single Ventricle Defects Lung, Esophageal, and ...

  3. Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... is to complete a test called an esophageal pH test. In this test, a very thin tube is placed through the nose into the esophagus and stomach, or a temporary sensor is placed in the esophagus via endoscopy. Both allow levels of acid in the esophagus to be monitored ...

  4. Functional contributions of electrical synapses in sensory and motor networks.

    PubMed

    Szczupak, Lidia

    2016-12-01

    Intercellular interactions in the nervous system are mediated by two types of dedicated structural arrangements: electrical and chemical synapses. Several characteristics distinguish these two mechanisms of communication, such as speed, reliability and the fact that electrical synapses are, potentially, bidirectional. Given these properties, electrical synapses can subserve, in addition to synchrony, three main interrelated network functions: signal amplification, noise reduction and/or coincidence detection. Specific network motifs in sensory and motor systems of invertebrates and vertebrates illustrate how signal transmission through electrical junctions contributes to a complex processing of information.

  5. A mechatronic device for the rehabilitation of ankle motor function.

    PubMed

    Bucca, Giuseppe; Bezzolato, Alberto; Bruni, Stefano; Molteni, Franco

    2009-12-01

    This paper presents the main results from a research aiming at the design of an electromechanical actuator for use in the rehabilitation of ankle motor function in patients suffering due to neurological diseases. Motivations for the research project are discussed within the framework of the application of mechatronic concepts for rehabilitation practice. The entire design process is then described, from the definition of project targets through the mechanical concept and control design steps until design validation by means of numerical simulations and tests on a prototype.

  6. Ciliobrevins as tools for studying dynein motor function

    PubMed Central

    Roossien, Douglas H.; Miller, Kyle E.; Gallo, Gianluca

    2015-01-01

    Dyneins are a small class of molecular motors that bind to microtubules and walk toward their minus ends. They are essential for the transport and distribution of organelles, signaling complexes and cytoskeletal elements. In addition dyneins generate forces on microtubule arrays that power the beating of cilia and flagella, cell division, migration and growth cone motility. Classical approaches to the study of dynein function in axons involve the depletion of dynein, expression of mutant/truncated forms of the motor, or interference with accessory subunits. By necessity, these approaches require prolonged time periods for the expression or manipulation of cellular dynein levels. With the discovery of the ciliobrevins, a class of cell permeable small molecule inhibitors of dynein, it is now possible to acutely disrupt dynein both globally and locally. In this review, we briefly summarize recent work using ciliobrevins to inhibit dynein and discuss the insights ciliobrevins have provided about dynein function in various cell types with a focus on neurons. We temper this with a discussion of the need for studies that will elucidate the mechanism of action of ciliobrevin and as well as the need for experiments to further analyze the specificity of ciliobreviens for dynein. Although much remains to be learned about ciliobrevins, these small molecules are proving themselves to be valuable novel tools to assess the cellular functions of dynein. PMID:26217180

  7. Differential changes in the development of motor coordination and executive functions in children with motor coordination impairments.

    PubMed

    Michel, Eva; Molitor, Sabine; Schneider, Wolfgang

    2016-09-13

    Cognitive and motor coordination skills of children with and without motor coordination impairments were examined with a one-year follow-up investigation. Initially, children were between 4 and 6 years old. Age-appropriate tests of executive functions (updating, switching, inhibition, interference control), motor coordination (the Movement Assessment Battery for Children-2) and fitness (the Körperkoordinations-Test für Kinder) were administered in two consecutive years. Several background variables (age, socioeconomic status, medical support, clinical interventions, leisure activities) and potential moderators (nonverbal intelligence, reaction time, visual perception) were controlled. The matched sample consisted of 48 control children and 48 children with motor coordination impairments. The children's executive functions dramatically improved during the one-year period. With regard to motor coordination performance, half of the impaired children caught up to the control children's level ("remission group"), while the remaining half showed no improvement ("persisting group"). Compared to the persisting group, the children in the remission group showed markedly better interference control at both measurement points. The correlation between executive functions and motor coordination is significant in the persisting group, but not in the remission group. The results of the study are discussed in the light of the role of executive functions, especially inhibition processes, for the automatization of motor coordination tasks.

  8. [Opioid mechanism of regulation of the autonomic and motor functions in rabbits].

    PubMed

    Grigor'ian, R A; Sollertinskaia, T N

    2002-12-01

    In rabbits, effects of s.c. administration of met-enkephaline (MET) and stimulation of hypothalamic nuclei upon vegetative and motor functions are similar and involve changes of the breathing rate, heart rate, and diminishing of the motor component of orienting responses. MET acts mainly upon cardiac parameters. Administration of naloxone eliminates the MET effect upon the vegetative and motor parameters. The role of opioid mechanism in regulation of the brain's visceral-motor function regulation, is emphasized.

  9. Motor network changes associated with successful motor skill relearning after acute ischemic stroke: a longitudinal functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Askim, Torunn; Indredavik, Bent; Vangberg, Torgil; Håberg, Asta

    2009-01-01

    . Motor learning mechanisms may be operative in stroke recovery and possibly reinforced by rehabilitative training. . To assess early motor network changes after acute ischemic stroke in patients treated with very early mobilization and task-oriented physical therapy in a comprehensive stroke unit, to investigate the association between neuronal activity and improvements in hand function, and to qualitatively explore the changes in neuronal activity in relation to motor learning. . Patients were assessed by functional magnetic resonance imaging and by clinical tests within the first week after stroke and 3 months later. After discharge, all participants were offered functional training of the affected arm according to individual needs. . A total of 359 patients were screened, with 12 patients experiencing first-ever stroke, excluding primary sensorimotor cortex (MISI), with severe to moderately impaired hand function fulfilling the inclusion criteria. Laterality indexes (LIs) for MISI increase significantly during follow-up. There is increased cerebellar and striatal activation acutely, replaced by increased activation of ipsilesional MISI in the chronic phase. Bilateral somatosensory association areas and contralesional secondary somatosensory cortex (SII) area are also more active in the chronic phase. Activation of the latter region also correlates positively with improved hand function. . Restoration of hand function is associated with highly lateralized MISI. Activity in bilateral somatosensory association area and contralesional SII may represent cortical plasticity involved in successful motor recovery. The changes in motor activity between acute and chronic phases seem to correspond to a motor learning process.

  10. Calcium carbonate antacids alter esophageal motility in heartburn sufferers.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Stanley, Sheila; Ahmed, Tanveer; Zubaidi, Sattar; Riley, Susan; Akbarali, Hamid I; Mellow, Mark H; Miner, Philip B

    2004-01-01

    Chewed calcium carbonate (CaCO3) rapidly neutralizes esophageal acid and may prevent reflux, suggesting another mechanism of action independent of acid neutralization. Calcium is essential for muscle tone. Our aim was to determine if luminal calcium released from chewed antacids improved esophageal motor function in heartburn sufferers. Esophageal manometry and acid clearance (swallows and time to raise esophageal pH to 5 after a 15-ml 0.1 N HCl bolus) were performed in 18 heartburn sufferers before and after chewing two Tums EX (1500 mg CaCO3, 600 mg calcium). Subjects with hypertensive esophageal contractions or hypertensive lower esophageal sphincter pressure (LESP) were excluded. Subjects with normal to low LESP were included. Differences between parameters were determined by two-tailed paired t-tests, P < 0.05. Proximal esophageal contractile amplitude was significantly increased after CaCO3 (47.18 vs 52.97 mm Hg; P = 0.02), distal onset velocity was significantly decreased after CaCO3 (4.34 vs 3.71 cm/sec; P = 0.02), and acid clearance was significantly increased 30 min after CaCO3 (20.35 vs 11.7 swallows, [P < 0.005] and 12.19 vs 6.29 min [P < 0.007]). LESP was not altered after CaCO3 (22.70 vs 23.79 mm Hg; P = 0.551), however, LESP increased in 9 of 18 subjects. Depth of LES relaxation, medial and distal esophageal contractile amplitude, and duration of contractions were not altered by CaCO3. CaCO3 did not alter salivary secretion and pH in a subset of these subjects, and CaCO3 with secreted saliva did not neutralize a 15-ml acid bolus. The Ca2+ released after chewing of CaCO3 antacids may be partially responsible for the reduction of heartburn by significantly improving initiation of peristalsis and acid clearance.

  11. The Relationship between Motor Function and Behavioral Function in Infants with Low Birth Weight

    PubMed Central

    AMINI, Malek; ALIABADI, Faranak; ALIZADE, Mehdi; KALANI, Majid; QORBANI, Mostafa

    2016-01-01

    Objective Nowadays, the evaluation of all aspects of infant development is important. However, in practice, some of these assessments, especially those requiring more manipulation on high-risk infants, may impose additional stress on them. Therefore, sometimes it is essential to utilize the results of a developmental assessment for the prediction of some other aspects of development. This study evaluated the relationship between the scores of the behavioral tests and the motor function test. Materials & Methods This cross-sectional study and was undertaken in the Neonatal Intensive Care Center and Clinic of Shahid Akbar Abadi Hospital, Tehran, Iran. A group of 50 infants with low birth weights was selected based on the easy non-contingency method and the inclusion criteria, and served as the participants. In order to assess the motor function and the behavioral performance, the motor function test (a test of infant motor performance (TIMP)) and the neonatal behavioral assessment scale (neonatal behavioral assessment scale (NBAS)) were used respectively. TIMP has both stimulation and observation sections. The items include habituation, social interaction, motor system, state organization, state regulation, autonomic system, smile, supplementary items, and the reflex. Results No significant association was found between the items of the habituation of behavioral testing and the observation of the movement test. There was no statistically significant relationship between the habituation and stimulation sections as well as between the system autonomous of the behavioral test and the observation section of the motor test (P>0.05). The relationship between other variables was statistically significant (P<0.05). Conclusion The scores of some behavioral performance items could be a good predictor of the scores of the motor function items for low birth weight infants in the neonatal period. PMID:27843466

  12. Motor response complications and the function of striatal efferent systems.

    PubMed

    Chase, T N; Mouradian, M M; Engber, T M

    1993-12-01

    Motor response complications eventually appear in most patients with advanced Parkinson's disease being treated with levodopa. The interval between onset of parkinsonism and emergence of these adverse events appears independent of the dose or the duration of therapy. Current evidence suggests that "wearing-off" fluctuations largely reflect the loss of normally functioning dopaminergic terminals, although postsynaptic alterations contribute somewhat to the underlying decline in the duration of levodopa's antiparkinsonian action. "On-off" fluctuations and peak-dose dyskinesias, on the other hand, appear to arise mainly as a consequence of postjunctional alterations that follow exposure to nonphysiologic intrasynaptic dopamine fluctuations in patients who have lost the buffering afforded by dopaminergic terminals. Studies in rats with 6-hydroxydopamine lesions indicate that striking functional alterations occur in striatal dopaminoceptive systems as a result of dopaminergic denervation and that levodopa replacement, particularly when given intermittently, fails to normalize these changes. To the extent that similar alterations contribute to the appearance of motor complications, the successful symptomatic therapy of Parkinson's disease may require continuous dopaminergic stimulation, as well as direct pharmacologic targeting of striatal dopaminoceptive systems.

  13. Tapping into spinal circuits to restore motor function.

    PubMed

    Barbeau, H; McCrea, D A; O'Donovan, M J; Rossignol, S; Grill, W M; Lemay, M A

    1999-07-01

    Motivated by the challenge of improving neuroprosthetic devices, the authors review current knowledge relating to harnessing the potential of spinal neural circuits, such as reflexes and pattern generators. If such spinal interneuronal circuits could be activated, they could provide the coordinated control of many muscles that is so complex to implement with a device that aims to address each participating muscle individually. The authors' goal is to identify candidate spinal circuits and areas of research that might open opportunities to effect control of human limbs through electrical activation of such circuits. David McCrea's discussion of the ways in which hindlimb reflexes in the cat modify motor activity may help in developing optimal strategies for functional neuromuscular stimulation (FNS), by using knowledge of how reflex actions can adapt to different conditions. Michael O'Donovan's discussion of the development of rhythmogenic networks in the chick embryo may provide clues to methods of generating rhythmic activity in the adult spinal cord. Serge Rossignol examines the spinal pattern generator for locomotion in cats, its trigger mechanisms, modulation and adaptation, and suggests how this knowledge can help guide therapeutic approaches in humans. Hugues Barbeau applies the work of Rossignol and others to locomotor training in human subjects who have suffered spinal cord injury (SCI) with incomplete motor function loss (IMFL). Michel Lemay and Warren Grill discuss some of the technical challenges that must be addressed by engineers to implement a neuroprosthesis using electrical stimulation of the spinal cord, particularly the control issues that would have to be resolved.

  14. Isolated proximal esophageal injury from blunt trauma: endoscopic stricture dilatation.

    PubMed

    Pineau, Benoit C; Ott, David J

    2003-01-01

    Blunt neck trauma can cause isolated esophageal injuries that may be difficult to recognize. A high index of suspicion is necessary for optimal identification and management of this condition. We report a case of blunt esophageal trauma resulting from a motor vehicle accident that was initially unrecognized until the patient developed a tight stricture of the cervical esophagus. This was successfully dilated endoscopically. Aerodigestive trauma resulting from neck injuries is reviewed with emphasis on the pathophysiology of esophageal trauma.

  15. Herpetic esophagitis (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Herpetic esophagitis is a herpes simplex infection causing inflammation and ulcers of the esophagus. Symptoms include difficulty swallowing and pain (dysphagia). Herpetic esophagitis can be effectively ...

  16. Resection of Navigated Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation-Positive Prerolandic Motor Areas Causes Permanent Impairment of Motor Function.

    PubMed

    Moser, Tobias; Bulubas, Lucia; Sabih, Jamil; Conway, Neal; Wildschutz, Noémie; Sollmann, Nico; Meyer, Bernhard; Ringel, Florian; Krieg, Sandro M

    2017-07-01

    Navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (nTMS) helps to determine the distribution of motor eloquent areas prior to brain surgery. Yet, the eloquence of primary motor areas frontal to the precentral gyrus identified via nTMS is unclear. To investigate the resection of nTMS-positive prerolandic motor areas and its correlation with postsurgical impairment of motor function. Forty-three patients with rolandic or prerolandic gliomas (WHO grade I-IV) underwent nTMS prior to surgery. Only patients without ischemia within the motor system in postoperative MRI diffusion sequences were enrolled. Based on the 3-dimensional fusion of preoperative nTMS motor mapping data with postsurgical MRI scans, we identified nTMS points that were resected in the infiltration zone of the tumor. We then classified the resected points according to the localization and latency of their motor evoked potentials. Surgery-related paresis was graded as transient (≤6 weeks) or permanent (>6 weeks). Out of 43, 31 patients (72%) showed nTMS-positive motor points in the prerolandic gyri. In general, 13 out of 43 patients (30%) underwent resection of nTMS points. Ten out of these patients showed postoperative paresis. There were 2 (15%) patients with a transient and 8 (62%) with a permanent surgery-related paresis. In 3 cases (23%), motor function remained unimpaired. After resection of nTMS-positive motor points, 62% of patients suffered from a new permanent paresis. Thus, even though they are located in the superior or middle frontal gyrus, these cortical areas must undergo intraoperative mapping.

  17. Motor Planning, Imagery, and Execution in the Distributed Motor Network: A Time-Course Study with Functional MRI

    PubMed Central

    Hanakawa, Takashi; Dimyan, Michael A.

    2008-01-01

    Activation of motor-related areas has consistently been found during various motor imagery tasks and is regarded as the central mechanism generating motor imagery. However, the extent to which motor execution and imagery share neural substrates remains controversial. We examined brain activity during preparation for and execution of physical or mental finger tapping. During a functional magnetic resonance imaging at 3 T, 13 healthy volunteers performed an instructed delay finger-tapping task either in a physical mode or mental mode. Number stimuli instructed subjects about a finger-tapping sequence. After an instructed delay period, cue stimuli prompted them either to execute the tapping movement or to imagine it. Two types of planning/preparatory activity common for movement and imagery were found: instruction stimulus–related activity represented widely in multiple motor-related areas and delay period activity in the medial frontal areas. Although brain activity during movement execution and imagery was largely shared in the distributed motor network, imagery-related activity was in general more closely related to instruction-related activity than to the motor execution–related activity. Specifically, activity in the medial superior frontal gyrus, anterior cingulate cortex, precentral sulcus, supramarginal gyrus, fusiform gyrus, and posterolateral cerebellum likely reflects willed generation of virtual motor commands and analysis of virtual sensory signals. PMID:18359777

  18. Epigenetic inactivation of SPINT2 is associated with tumor suppressive function in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Yue, Dongli; Fan, Qingxia; Chen, Xinfeng; Li, Feng; Wang, Liping; Huang, Lan; Dong, Wenjie; Chen, Xiaoqi; Zhang, Zhen; Liu, Jinyan; Wang, Fei; Wang, Meng; Zhang, Bin [The Biotherapy Center, the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450052, Henan; The Department of Hematology and others

    2014-03-10

    Hepatocyte growth factor activator inhibitor type 2 (SPINT2), a Kunitz-type serine proteinase inhibitor, has been identified as a putative tumor suppressor gene silenced by promoter methylation. We aimed to investigate whether SPINT2 might act as an esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) tumor suppressor gene. Four ESCC cell lines, Fifty-two ESCC tissues and twenty-nine neighboring non-cancerous tissues were included in this study. The expression of SPINT2 was monitored by real time PCR. Bisulfite genomic sequencing and methylation-specific PCR were used to analyze methylation status. The effect of SPINT2 on cell proliferation and apoptosis in EC109 and EC9706 cells was observed by CCK-8 assay and flow cytometric analysis. We found that silencing of SPINT2 was associated with promoter methylation in ESCC cell lines. The densely methylated SPINT2 promoter region was confirmed by bisulfite genomic sequencing. Ectopic expression of SPINT2 inhibited cell proliferation through inducing cell apoptosis in vitro. Furthermore, methylation-specific PCR analysis revealed that SPINT2 promoter methylation was prominent in carcinoma tissues (52.08%) compared with neighboring non-cancerous tissues (22.58%). Kaplan–Meier analysis showed that patients with SPINT2 hypermethylation had shorter survival time. The tumor suppressor gene of SPINT2 is commonly silenced by promoter hypermethylation in human ESCC and SPINT2 hypermethylation is correlated with poor overall survival, implicating SPINT2 is an underlying prognostic marker for human ESCC. - Highlights: • We firstly found SPINT2 gene may be transcriptionally repressed by promoter hypermethylation in ESCC cells. • SPINT2 overexpressing cells induced proliferation inhibition through promoting apoptosis. • mRNA expression of SPINT2 was significantly higher in ESCC tissues than in neighboring non-cancerous tissues. • Promoter hypermethylation of SPINT2 is significantly linked to TNM stage and poor overall survival.

  19. A functional epidermal growth factor (EGF) polymorphism, EGF serum levels, and esophageal adenocarcinoma risk and outcome.

    PubMed

    Lanuti, Michael; Liu, Geoffrey; Goodwin, Jonathan M; Zhai, Rihong; Fuchs, Bryan C; Asomaning, Kofi; Su, Li; Nishioka, Norman S; Tanabe, Kenneth K; Christiani, David C

    2008-05-15

    The epidermal growth factor (EGF) pathway is important in esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) tumorigenesis. We hypothesized that the EGF A61G homozygous variant genotype (GG) is (a) both a risk and poor prognostic factor for EAC and (b) associated with higher EGF serum levels in individuals with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Using unconditional logistic regression, we compared EGF A61G in 312 EAC cases and 447 GERD-free controls, adjusting for age, gender, smoking history, and healthy adult body mass index. Using the method of Kaplan and Meier, log-rank tests, and Cox proportional hazard models, we correlated EGF A61G with overall and failure-free survival in the EAC cases. Serum EGF levels and EGF genotype (G/G versus others) were correlated in 144 GERD patients using Wilcoxon rank sum tests. The EGF A61G G/G genotype conferred increased EAC risk, with an adjusted odds ratio of 1.81 (95% confidence interval, 1.2-2.7), and was even higher in the subgroup of EAC patients with concurrent Barrett's esophagus (adjusted odds ratio, 2.18; 95% confidence interval, 1.3-3.7). However, EGF A61G was not associated with a more aggressive phenotype or prognosis in EAC patients. Higher serum EGF levels were found in GERD patients carrying G/G compared with A/A or A/G (P = 0.03, Wilcoxon rank sum test). The EGF A61G G/G genotype is associated with a near 2-fold greater risk of EAC. The G/G allele was also associated with higher EGF levels in tumor-free patients with GERD. EGF genotyping can potentially identify high-risk patients with GERD and Barrett's metaplasia who might benefit from increased surveillance.

  20. A functional EGF polymorphism, EGF serum levels and esophageal adenocarcinoma risk and outcome

    PubMed Central

    Lanuti, Michael; Liu, Geoffrey; Goodwin, Jonathan M.; Zhai, Rihong; Fuchs, Bryan C.; Asomaning, Kofi; Su, Li; Nishioka, Norman S.; Tanabe, Kenneth K.; Christiani, David C.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The epidermal growth factor (EGF) pathway is important in esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) tumorigenesis. We hypothesized that the EGF A61G homozygous variant genotype (GG) (i) is both a risk and poor prognostic factor for EAC; and (ii) is associated with higher EGF serum levels in individuals with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Experimental Design: Using unconditional logistic regression, we compared EGF A61G in 312 EAC cases and 447 GERD-free controls, adjusting for age, gender, smoking history and healthy adult body mass index. Using the method of Kaplan&Meier, log rank tests, and Cox proportional hazard models, we correlated EGF A61G with overall and failure-free survival in the EAC cases. Serum EGF levels and EGF genotype (G/G vs. others) were correlated in 144 GERD patients using Wilcoxon rank sum tests. Results: The EGF A61G G/G genotype conferred increased EAC risk with an adjusted odds ratio (AOR) of 1.81 (95% CI, 1.2-2.7), and was even higher in the subgroup of EAC patients with concurrent Barrett's esophagus (BE): AOR 2.18 (95%CI 1.3-3.7). However, EGF A61G was not associated with a more aggressive phenotype or prognosis in EAC patients. Higher serum EGF levels were found in GERD patients carrying G/G compared with A/A or A/G (p=0.03, Wilcoxon rank test). Conclusion: The EGF A61G G/G genotype is associated with a near 2-fold greater risk of EAC. The G/G allele was also associated with higher EGF levels in tumor free patients with GERD. EGF genotyping can potentially identify high risk patients with GERD and Barrett's metaplasia who might benefit from increased surveillance. PMID:18483390

  1. Delayed motor function and results of vestibular function tests in children with inner ear anomalies.

    PubMed

    Tsuzuku, T; Kaga, K

    1992-05-01

    The relation between the results of vestibular function tests and gross motor development was examined in 4 children with inner ear anomalies. CT scans demonstrated the absence of lateral semicircular canals in both ears in all 4 cases. None responded to caloric stimulation using 40 ml of icewater. In contrast, the damped rotation test elicited per-rotatory nystagmus in all cases. Per-rotatory nystagmus was provoked in only two cases by the Bárány rotation test. Development of gross motor function, especially independent walking, was more delayed in the two children in whom the Bárány rotation test failed to elicit per-rotatory nystagmus.

  2. Effect of feeding regulation measures for establishing esophageal channel function in neoesophagus created with a nitinol artificial esophagus.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jian-hui; Cai, Pin; Luo, Zhon-ran; Liang, Xian-liang; Zhou, Xing

    2012-09-01

    This study attempted to observe the effect of feeding regulation measures (FRM) for the construction of an esophageal channel function in a neoesophagus using an artificial nitinol esophagus. Experiments were divided among groups: group 1, receiving FRM; and group 2, the non-feeding regulation measures (NFRM) group. Ten pigs survived for 6 months without any complications such as anastomotic leakage. The shedding time of the artificial esophagus in group 1 was significantly delayed in comparison with group 2 (>180 ± 0.0 days vs. 75.6 ± 27.1 days, respectively, p<0.05). In group 1, the weight changes at 3 and 6 months postoperation were significantly different in comparison with preoperative values (t = 14.86, 9.17 > 2.78, respectively; p<0.05). In group 2, the weight changes at 3 and 6 months postoperation were significantly different in comparison with preoperative values (t = 7.95, 11.37 > 2.78, respectively; p<0.05). FRM not only effectively delayed the shedding time of the artificial esophagus but also played a role in protecting the neoesophagus from stenosis, by functioned as a bougienage after artificial esophagus sloughing. Therefore, FRM is an effective way for establishing a stable eating channel in the neoesophagus when using a nitinol composite artificial esophagus to replace the resected segment of an intrathoracic esophagus.

  3. Functional connectivity in the resting-state motor networks influences the kinematic processes during motor sequence learning.

    PubMed

    Bonzano, Laura; Palmaro, Eleonora; Teodorescu, Roxana; Fleysher, Lazar; Inglese, Matilde; Bove, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies support the involvement of the cerebello-cortical and striato-cortical motor loops in motor sequence learning. Here, we investigated whether the gain of motor sequence learning could depend on a-priori resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC) between motor areas and structures belonging to these circuits. Fourteen healthy subjects underwent a resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging session. Afterward, they were asked to reproduce a verbally-learned sequence of finger opposition movements as fast and as accurately as possible. All subjects increased their movement rate with practice, by reducing the touch duration and/or intertapping interval. The rsFC analysis showed that, at rest, the left and right primary motor cortex (M1) and left and right supplementary motor area (SMA) were mainly connected with other motor areas. The covariate analysis taking into account the different kinematic parameters indicated that the subjects achieving greater movement rate increase were those showing stronger rsFC of the left M1 and SMA with the right lobule VIII of the cerebellum. Notably, the subjects with greater intertapping interval reduction showed stronger rsFC of the left M1 and SMA with the association nuclei of the thalamus. Conversely, the regression analysis with the right M1 and SMA seeds showed only a few significant clusters for the different covariates not located in the cerebellum and thalamus. No common clusters were found between the right M1 and SMA. All of these findings indicated important functional connections at rest of those neural circuits responsible for motor learning improvement, involving the motor areas related to the hemisphere directly controlling the finger movements, the thalamus and cerebellum.

  4. Combinatorial Motor Training Results in Functional Reorganization of Remaining Motor Cortex after Controlled Cortical Impact in Rats.

    PubMed

    Combs, Hannah L; Jones, Theresa A; Kozlowski, Dorothy A; Adkins, DeAnna L

    2016-04-15

    Cortical reorganization subsequent to post-stroke motor rehabilitative training (RT) has been extensively examined in animal models and humans. However, similar studies focused on the effects of motor training after traumatic brain injury (TBI) are lacking. We previously reported that after a moderate/severe TBI in adult male rats, functional improvements in forelimb use were accomplished only with a combination of skilled forelimb reach training and aerobic exercise, with or without nonimpaired forelimb constraint. Thus, the current study was designed to examine the relationship between functional motor cortical map reorganization after experimental TBI and the behavioral improvements resulting from this combinatorial rehabilitative regime. Adult male rats were trained to proficiency on a skilled reaching task, received a unilateral controlled cortical impact (CCI) over the forelimb area of the caudal motor cortex (CMC). Three days post-CCI, animals began RT (n = 13) or no rehabilitative training (NoRT) control procedures (n = 13). The RT group participated in daily skilled reach training, voluntary aerobic exercise, and nonimpaired forelimb constraint. This RT regimen significantly improved impaired forelimb reaching success and normalized reaching strategies, consistent with previous findings. RT also enlarged the area of motor cortical wrist representation, derived by intracortical microstimulation, compared to NoRT. These findings indicate that sufficient RT can greatly improve motor function and improve the functional integrity of remaining motor cortex after a moderate/severe CCI. When compared with findings from stroke models, these findings also suggest that more intense RT may be needed to improve motor function and remodel the injured cortex after TBI.

  5. Gastric Motor Dysfunction in Patients With Functional Gastroduodenal Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Park, Seon-Young; Acosta, Andrés; Camilleri, Michael; Burton, Duane; Harmsen, W Scott; Fox, Jean; Szarka, Lawrence A

    2017-09-12

    The pathophysiology of dyspeptic symptoms is complex. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of gastric emptying (GE), gastric accommodation (GA), and respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA, to assess vagal dysfunction) in a large cohort with functional gastroduodenal symptoms. We reviewed demographic, clinical features, and results of gastric motor and vagal function studies of 1,287 patients (74.0% females, mean age 43.1±15.4 years) who had undergone both single photon emission computed tomography GA and scintigraphic GE. Accommodation was based on postprandial to fasting gastric volume ratio (VR). Electrocardiograms were available and analyzed for RSA in 300 patients. There were 29.8% patients with normal GE and GA, 21.9% with abnormal GA only, 27.1% with abnormal GE only, and 21.1% with abnormal GA and GE. There were numerical differences in GA among patients with normal, accelerated, and delayed GE (P=0.062, by χ(2)). Increased GA (VR >3.85) was more prevalent in patients with delayed GE compared to accelerated GE (14.0% vs. 6.8%, P=0.004). Decreased VRs (median 2.9) were observed with accelerated GE compared to normal GE (median 3.1, P<0.05). Nausea and vomiting were more prevalent (in contrast to the less prevalent bloating) in patients with delayed compared to accelerated or normal GE (all P<0.05). In patients with diminished RSA, there was higher prevalence of reduced GA (41.5%) compared to those with preserved RSA (29.2%, P=0.031). Multivariable analysis showed associations of the main abdominal symptoms with gender, body mass index, gastric emptying, diabetes, and prior abdominal surgery. Patients with symptoms of functional gastroduodenal disorders may have one or more gastric motor dysfunctions and reduced RSA; among the patients with abnormal gastric motor functions, vomiting suggests delayed GE, whereas reduced RSA is associated with reduced GA.Am J Gastroenterol advance online publication, 12 September 2017; doi:10.1038/ajg.2017.264.

  6. Ocular Motor and Sensory Function in Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Almer, Zina; Klein, Kathyrn S.; Marsh, Laura; Gerstenhaber, Melissa; Repka, Michael X.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the effect of dopaminergic medication and deep brain stimulation on ocular function in Parkinson disease (PD) and to measure vision-related quality of life in subjects with PD. Design Prospective comparative case series. Participants and Controls Twenty-seven PD and 16 control subjects were recruited. Methods We measured visual acuity, ocular motor function, convergence, and vision-related quality of life using the Visual Function Questionnaire–25 (VFQ-25). Visual sensory and motor measurements were made during the “on” and “off” states of PD dopaminergic treatment. Main Outcome Measures Convergence ability and vision related quality of life. Results The PD subjects had a mean age of 58.8 years; 30% were female. Their mean duration of PD was 10.9 ± 6.8 years. The control subjects had a mean age of 61.6 years; 56% were female. There was no difference in visual acuity, contrast sensitivity or color vision of the PD subjects in their “on” state compared with controls. Convergence amplitudes measured with base-out prism were significantly poorer in PD subjects compared with controls (24.1 ± 8 Δ vs 14.8 ±10.3 Δ; P=0.003). The mean composite VFQ-25 score was significantly worse in the PD subjects compared with the controls (87.1 ± 8.69 vs 96.6 ± 3.05; P=0.0001). Comparing the PD subjects in their “on” with their “off” states, there was no difference in distance exodeviation, near exodeviation or ocular ductions. Mean convergence amplitudes and near point of convergence were better in the “on” state compared with the “off” state, 14.8±10.3 Δ vs 10.7±9.0 Δ, (P=0.0006), and 13.1±9.1 cm vs 18.1±12.2, (P=0.002), respectively. Conclusions Convergence ability is significantly poorer in PD subjects in both their “on” and “off” states compared with controls, but significantly improves with systemic dopaminergic treatment. Ocular motor function in PD subjects fluctuates in response to treatment, which

  7. Acoustic characteristics of Mandarin esophageal speech.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hanjun; Wan, Mingxi; Wang, Supin; Wang, Xiaodong; Lu, Chunmei

    2005-08-01

    The present study attempted to investigate the acoustic characteristics of Mandarin laryngeal and esophageal speech. Eight normal laryngeal and seven esophageal speakers participated in the acoustic experiments. Results from acoustic analyses of syllables /ma/and /ba/ indicated that, F0, intensity, and signal-to-noise ratio of laryngeal speech were significantly higher than those of esophageal speech. However, opposite results were found for vowel duration, jitter, and shimmer. Mean F0, intensity, and word per minute in reading were greater but number of pauses was smaller in laryngeal speech than those in esophageal speech. Similar patterns of F0 contours and vowel duration as a function of tone were found between laryngeal and esophageal speakers. Long-time spectra analysis indicated that higher first and second formant frequencies were associated with esophageal speech than that with normal laryngeal speech.

  8. Can Clinical Assessment of Locomotive Body Function Explain Gross Motor Environmental Performance in Cerebral Palsy?

    PubMed

    Sanz Mengibar, Jose Manuel; Santonja-Medina, Fernando; Sanchez-de-Muniain, Paloma; Canteras-Jordana, Manuel

    2016-03-01

    Gross Motor Function Classification System has discriminative purposes but does not assess short-term therapy goals. Locomotion Stages (LS) classify postural body functions and independent activity components. Assessing the relation between Gross Motor Function Classification System level and Locomotion Stages will make us understand if clinical assessment can explain and predict motor environmental performance in cerebral palsy. A total of 462 children were assessed with both scales. High reliability and strong negative correlation (-0.908) for Gross Motor Function Classification System and Locomotion Stages at any age was found. Sensitivity was 83%, and specificity and positive predictive value were 100% within the same age range. Regression analysis showed detailed probabilities for the realization of the Gross Motor Function Classification System depending on the Locomotion Stages and the age group. Postural body function measure with Locomotion Stages is reliable, sensitive, and specific for gross motor function and able to predict environmental performance.

  9. Hypnotherapy for Esophageal Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Riehl, Megan E.; Keefer, Laurie

    2015-01-01

    Hypnotherapy is an evidence based intervention for the treatment of functional bowel disorders, particularly irritable bowel syndrome. While similar in pathophysiology, less is known about the utility of hypnotherapy in the upper gastrointestinal tract. Esophageal disorders, most of which are functional in nature, cause painful and uncomfortable symptoms that impact patient quality of life and are difficult to treat from a medical perspective. After a thorough medical workup and a failed trial of proton pump inhibitor therapy, options for treatment are significantly limited. While the pathophysiology is likely multifactorial, two critical factors are believed to drive esophageal symptoms—visceral hypersensitivity and symptom hypervigilance. The goal of esophageal directed hypnotherapy is to promote a deep state of relaxation with focused attention allowing the patient to learn to modulate physiological sensations and symptoms that are not easily addressed with conventional medical intervention. Currently, the use of hypnosis is suitable for dysphagia, globus, functional chest pain/non-cardiac chest pain, dyspepsia, and functional heartburn. In this article the authors will provide a rationale for the use of hypnosis in these disorders, presenting the science whenever available, describing their approach with these patients, and sharing a case study representing a successful outcome. PMID:26046715

  10. Hypnotherapy for Esophageal Disorders.

    PubMed

    Riehl, Megan E; Keefer, Laurie

    2015-07-01

    Hypnotherapy is an evidence based intervention for the treatment of functional bowel disorders, particularly irritable bowel syndrome. While similar in pathophysiology, less is known about the utility of hypnotherapy in the upper gastrointestinal tract. Esophageal disorders, most of which are functional in nature, cause painful and uncomfortable symptoms that impact patient quality of life and are difficult to treat from a medical perspective. After a thorough medical workup and a failed trial of proton pump inhibitor therapy, options for treatment are significantly limited. While the pathophysiology is likely multifactorial, two critical factors are believed to drive esophageal symptoms--visceral hypersensitivity and symptom hypervigilance. The goal of esophageal directed hypnotherapy is to promote a deep state of relaxation with focused attention allowing the patient to learn to modulate physiological sensations and symptoms that are not easily addressed with conventional medical intervention. Currently, the use of hypnosis is suitable for dysphagia, globus, functional chest pain/non-cardiac chest pain, dyspepsia, and functional heartburn. In this article the authors will provide a rationale for the use of hypnosis in these disorders, presenting the science whenever available, describing their approach with these patients, and sharing a case study representing a successful outcome.

  11. Expanded functional coupling of subcortical nuclei with the motor resting-state network in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Dogonowski, Anne-Marie; Siebner, Hartwig R; Sørensen, Per Soelberg; Wu, Xingchen; Biswal, Bharat; Paulson, Olaf B; Dyrby, Tim B; Skimminge, Arnold; Blinkenberg, Morten; Madsen, Kristoffer H

    2013-04-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) impairs signal transmission along cortico-cortical and cortico-subcortical connections, affecting functional integration within the motor network. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during motor tasks has revealed altered functional connectivity in MS, but it is unclear how much motor disability contributed to these abnormal functional interaction patterns. To avoid any influence of impaired task performance, we examined disease-related changes in functional motor connectivity in MS at rest. A total of 42 patients with MS and 30 matched controls underwent a 20-minute resting-state fMRI session at 3 Tesla. Independent component analysis was applied to the fMRI data to identify disease-related changes in motor resting-state connectivity. Patients with MS showed a spatial expansion of motor resting-state connectivity in deep subcortical nuclei but not at the cortical level. The anterior and middle parts of the putamen, adjacent globus pallidus, anterior and posterior thalamus and the subthalamic region showed stronger functional connectivity with the motor network in the MS group compared with controls. MS is characterised by more widespread motor connectivity in the basal ganglia while cortical motor resting-state connectivity is preserved. The expansion of subcortical motor resting-state connectivity in MS indicates less efficient funnelling of neural processing in the executive motor cortico-basal ganglia-thalamo-cortical loops.

  12. Pediatric esophageal scintigraphy. Results of 200 studies

    SciTech Connect

    Guillet, J.; Wynchank, S.; Basse-Cathalinat, B.; Christophe, E.; Ducassou, D.; Blanquet, P.

    1983-09-01

    Esophageal transit of a small volume of watery liquid has been observed scintigraphically in 200 studies performed on patients aged between 6 days and 16 years. Qualitative information concerning esophageal morphology and function in the various phases of deglutition, and scintigraphic features of achalasia, stenosis, and other pathologies are described. Measured esophageal transit time and its normal variation, its relevance to the diagnosis of esophagitis, and the monitoring of treatment are discussed. This technique observing distinct deglutitions has proven a useful diagnostic tool. Its advantages and limitations are discussed in comparison with other methods.

  13. Clinical functional MRI of sensorimotor cortex using passive motor and sensory stimulation at 3 Tesla.

    PubMed

    Blatow, Maria; Reinhardt, Julia; Riffel, Katharina; Nennig, Ernst; Wengenroth, Martina; Stippich, Christoph

    2011-08-01

    To establish a passive motor paradigm for clinical functional MRI (fMRI) that could be beneficial for patients with motor or attention deficits who are not able to perform active motor tasks. A novel standardized sensorimotor fMRI protocol was applied in 16 healthy volunteers at 3 Tesla (T) using active and passive motor tasks as well as sensory stimulation of hands and feet. Data analysis was carried out individually using a dynamic thresholding routine. Active motor tasks yielded time efficient and robust blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signals in primary motor cortex. Noteworthy, it was possible to achieve equal activation levels within identical anatomical localization for passive and active motor tasks with these paradigms. Patients unable to perform active movements can benefit from paradigms with passive motor and sensory stimulation. Therefore, we recommend these paradigms for functional somatotopic mapping of the central region at 3T in clinical routine. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Cortical Stimulation Concurrent With Skilled Motor Training Improves Forelimb Function and Enhances Motor Cortical Reorganization Following Controlled Cortical Impact.

    PubMed

    Jefferson, Stephanie C; Clayton, Elyse Renee; Donlan, Nicole A; Kozlowski, Dorothy Annette; Jones, Theresa A; Adkins, DeAnna Lynn

    2016-02-01

    Electrical and magnetic brain stimulation can improve motor function following stroke in humans, rats, and nonhuman primates, especially when paired with rehabilitative training (RT). Previously, we found in rodent stroke models that epidural electrical cortical stimulation (CS) of the ipsilesional motor cortex (MC) combined with motor RT enhances motor function and motor cortical plasticity. It was unknown whether CS following experimental traumatic brain injury (TBI) would have similar effects. To test the effects of CS combined with motor training after moderate/severe TBI on behavioral outcome and motor cortical organization. Following unilateral controlled cortical impact (CCI) over the caudal forelimb area of the MC in adult male rats, forelimb reach training was administered daily for 9 weeks concurrently with subthreshold, 100-Hz monopolar CS or no-stimulation control procedures. The rate and magnitude of behavioral improvements and changes in forelimb movement representations in the injured MC as revealed by intracortical microstimulation were measured. CCI resulted in severe motor impairments persisting throughout the 9 weeks of training in both groups, but CS-treated animals had significantly greater behavioral improvements. CS also increased wrist motor cortical representation, one of the main movements used in the training task, when compared with RT alone. However, the overall recovery level was modest, leaving animals still extremely impaired. These data suggest that CS may be useful for improving rehabilitation efficacy after TBI but also raise the possibility that the CS parameters that are highly effective following stroke are suboptimal after moderate/severe TBI. © The Author(s) 2015.

  15. Relationship between muscle strength and motor function in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Milene F; Hukuda, Michele E; Favero, Francis M; Oliveira, Acary B; Voos, Mariana C; Caromano, Fátima A

    2016-07-01

    To investigate the relationship between muscle strength and motor function and between these variables and age. Muscle strength was measured by Medical Research Council (MRC) scale and motor function, by Motor Function Measure (MFM), in 40 non-ambulatory patients. Spearman tests investigated the relationships between muscle strength, motor function and age. Total MRC and MFM scores were strongly related to each other (r = 0.94; p < 0.001), but not to age (r = -0.19, r = -0.31, respectively; p > 0.05). Strong and moderate relationships between partial muscle strength and motor function scores were found. Higher correlation coefficients were found between total scores and Dimensions 2 (axial/ proximal control) and 3 (distal control) of MFM. Muscle strength and motor function are strongly correlated and seem to decrease proportionally in DMD.

  16. Motor and mental training in older people: Transfer, interference, and associated functional neural responses.

    PubMed

    Boraxbekk, C J; Hagkvist, Filip; Lindner, Philip

    2016-08-01

    Learning new motor skills may become more difficult with advanced age. In the present study, we randomized 56 older individuals, including 30 women (mean age 70.6 years), to 6 weeks of motor training, mental (motor imagery) training, or a combination of motor and mental training of a finger tapping sequence. Performance improvements and post-training functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) were used to investigate performance gains and associated underlying neural processes. Motor-only training and a combination of motor and mental training improved performance in the trained task more than mental-only training. The fMRI data showed that motor training was associated with a representation in the premotor cortex and mental training with a representation in the secondary visual cortex. Combining motor and mental training resulted in both premotor and visual cortex representations. During fMRI scanning, reduced performance was observed in the combined motor and mental training group, possibly indicating interference between the two training methods. We concluded that motor and motor imagery training in older individuals is associated with different functional brain responses. Furthermore, adding mental training to motor training did not result in additional performance gains compared to motor-only training and combining training methods may result in interference between representations, reducing performance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Presurgical functional MR imaging of language and motor functions: validation with intraoperative electrocortical mapping.

    PubMed

    Bizzi, Alberto; Blasi, Valeria; Falini, Andrea; Ferroli, Paolo; Cadioli, Marcello; Danesi, Ugo; Aquino, Domenico; Marras, Carlo; Caldiroli, Dario; Broggi, Giovanni

    2008-08-01

    To prospectively determine the sensitivity and specificity of functional magnetic resonance (MR) imaging for mapping language and motor functions in patients with a focal mass adjacent to eloquent cortex, by using intraoperative electrocortical mapping (ECM) as the reference standard. The ethics committee approved the study, and patients gave written informed consent. Thirty-four consecutive patients (16 women, 18 men; mean age, 43.2 years) were included who met the following three criteria: They had a focal mass in or adjacent to eloquent cortex of the language or motor system, they had the ability to perform the functional MR imaging task, and they had to undergo surgery with intraoperative ECM. Functional MR imaging with verb generation (n = 17) or finger tapping of the contralateral hand (n = 17) was performed at 1.5 T with a block design and an echo-planar gradient-echo T2*-weighted sequence. Cortex essential for language or hand motor functions was mapped with ECM. A site-by-site comparison between functional MR imaging and ECM was performed with the aid of a neuronavigational device. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated according to task performed, histopathologic findings, and tumor grade. Exact 95% confidence intervals were calculated for each sensitivity and specificity value. For 34 consecutive patients, there were 28 with gliomas, two with metastases, one with meningioma, and three with cavernous angiomas. A total of 251 cortical sites were tested with ECM; overall functional MR imaging sensitivity and specificity were 83% and 82%, respectively. Sensitivity (65%) was lower and specificity (93%) was higher in World Health Organization grade IV gliomas compared with grade II (sensitivity, 93%; specificity, 79%) and III (sensitivity, 93%; specificity, 76%) gliomas. At 3 months after surgery, language proficiency was unchanged in 15 patients; functionality of the contralateral arm was unchanged in 14 patients and improved in one patient. Functional

  18. Relation between hand function and gross motor function in full term infants aged 4 to 8 months

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira, Solange F.; Figueiredo, Elyonara M.; Gonçalves, Rejane V.; Mancini, Marisa C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: In children, reaching emerges around four months of age, which is followed by rapid changes in hand function and concomitant changes in gross motor function, including the acquisition of independent sitting. Although there is a close functional relationship between these domains, to date they have been investigated separately. Objective: To investigate the longitudinal profile of changes and the relationship between the development of hand function (i.e. reaching for and manipulating an object) and gross motor function in 13 normally developing children born at term who were evaluated every 15 days from 4 to 8 months of age. Method: The number of reaches and the period (i.e. time) of manipulation to an object were extracted from video synchronized with the Qualisys(r) movement analysis system. Gross motor function was measured using the Alberta Infant Motor Scale. ANOVA for repeated measures was used to test the effect of age on the number of reaches, the time of manipulation and gross motor function. Hierarchical regression models were used to test the associations of reaching and manipulation with gross motor function. Results: Results revealed a significant increase in the number of reaches (p<0.001), the time of manipulation (p<0.001) and gross motor function (p<0.001) over time, as well as associations between reaching and gross motor function (R2=0.84; p<0.001) and manipulation and gross motor function (R2=0.13; p=0.02) from 4 to 6 months of age. Associations from 6 to 8 months of age were not significant. Conclusion: The relationship between hand function and gross motor function was not constant, and the age span from 4 to 6 months was a critical period of interdependency of hand function and gross motor function development. PMID:25714437

  19. Physical activity, motor function, and white matter hyperintensity burden in healthy older adults

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jingyun; Arfanakis, Konstantinos; Arvanitakis, Zoe; Leurgans, Sue E.; Turner, Arlener D.; Barnes, Lisa L.; Bennett, David A.; Buchman, Aron S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To test the hypothesis that physical activity modifies the association between white matter hyperintensity (WMH) burden and motor function in healthy older persons without dementia. Methods: Total daily activity (exercise and nonexercise physical activity) was measured for up to 11 days with actigraphy (Actical; Philips Respironics, Bend, OR) in 167 older adults without dementia participating in the Rush Memory and Aging Project. Eleven motor performances were summarized into a previously described global motor score. WMH volume was expressed as percent of intracranial volume. Linear regression models, adjusted for age, education, and sex, were performed with total WMH volume as the predictor and global motor score as the outcome. Terms for total daily physical activity and its interaction with WMH volume were then added to the model. Results: Higher WMH burden was associated with lower motor function (p = 0.006), and total daily activity was positively associated with motor function (p = 0.002). Total daily activity modified the association between WMH and motor function (p = 0.007). WMH burden was not associated with motor function in persons with high activity (90th percentile). By contrast, higher WMH burden remained associated with lower motor function in persons with average (50th percentile; estimate = −0.304, slope = −0.133) and low (10th percentile; estimate = −1.793, slope = −0.241) activity. Conclusions: Higher levels of physical activity may reduce the effect of WMH burden on motor function in healthy older adults. PMID:25762710

  20. Physical activity, motor function, and white matter hyperintensity burden in healthy older adults.

    PubMed

    Fleischman, Debra A; Yang, Jingyun; Arfanakis, Konstantinos; Arvanitakis, Zoe; Leurgans, Sue E; Turner, Arlener D; Barnes, Lisa L; Bennett, David A; Buchman, Aron S

    2015-03-31

    To test the hypothesis that physical activity modifies the association between white matter hyperintensity (WMH) burden and motor function in healthy older persons without dementia. Total daily activity (exercise and nonexercise physical activity) was measured for up to 11 days with actigraphy (Actical; Philips Respironics, Bend, OR) in 167 older adults without dementia participating in the Rush Memory and Aging Project. Eleven motor performances were summarized into a previously described global motor score. WMH volume was expressed as percent of intracranial volume. Linear regression models, adjusted for age, education, and sex, were performed with total WMH volume as the predictor and global motor score as the outcome. Terms for total daily physical activity and its interaction with WMH volume were then added to the model. Higher WMH burden was associated with lower motor function (p = 0.006), and total daily activity was positively associated with motor function (p = 0.002). Total daily activity modified the association between WMH and motor function (p = 0.007). WMH burden was not associated with motor function in persons with high activity (90th percentile). By contrast, higher WMH burden remained associated with lower motor function in persons with average (50th percentile; estimate = -0.304, slope = -0.133) and low (10th percentile; estimate = -1.793, slope = -0.241) activity. Higher levels of physical activity may reduce the effect of WMH burden on motor function in healthy older adults. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  1. Inhibition of the contralesional dorsal premotor cortex improves motor function of the affected hand following stroke.

    PubMed

    Lüdemann-Podubecká, J; Bösl, K; Nowak, D A

    2016-04-01

    Numerous studies have shown that repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) over the primary motor cortex (M1) may improve motor function of the affected hand after stroke. The effects of 1 Hz rTMS applied over the contralesional dorsal premotor cortex (PMd) on hand function and cortical neurophysiology in subacute stroke were examined. Ten subacute stroke patients with mild hand motor impairment were enrolled in a prospective, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover study with two intervention sessions. 1 Hz rTMS was applied over the contralesional PMd (real rTMS, 900 pulses at 110% of the motor threshold; sham rTMS, 900 pulses at 0% of the motor threshold). Tests of hand function (Jebsen-Taylor hand function test, box and block test) and neurophysiological evaluations (resting motor threshold, motor evoked potentials, cortical silent period, ipsilateral silent period) were obtained from both hands and hemispheres prior to (baseline) and after each treatment. Hand function tests revealed significant improvement of motor function of the affected but not of the unaffected hand after real rTMS only. Neither intervention changed the neurophysiological measures in comparison to baseline. One hertz rTMS over the contralesional PMd improves motor function of the affected hand in subacute stroke. The PMd may be a novel rTMS target to treat motor impairment after stroke. © 2016 EAN.

  2. Functional adaptation between yeast actin and its cognate myosin motors.

    PubMed

    Stark, Benjamin C; Wen, Kuo-Kuang; Allingham, John S; Rubenstein, Peter A; Lord, Matthew

    2011-09-02

    We employed budding yeast and skeletal muscle actin to examine the contribution of the actin isoform to myosin motor function. While yeast and muscle actin are highly homologous, they exhibit different charge density at their N termini (a proposed myosin-binding interface). Muscle myosin-II actin-activated ATPase activity is significantly higher with muscle versus yeast actin. Whether this reflects inefficiency in the ability of yeast actin to activate myosin is not known. Here we optimized the isolation of two yeast myosins to assess actin function in a homogenous system. Yeast myosin-II (Myo1p) and myosin-V (Myo2p) accommodate the reduced N-terminal charge density of yeast actin, showing greater activity with yeast over muscle actin. Increasing the number of negative charges at the N terminus of yeast actin from two to four (as in muscle) had little effect on yeast myosin activity, while other substitutions of charged residues at the myosin interface of yeast actin reduced activity. Thus, yeast actin functions most effectively with its native myosins, which in part relies on associations mediated by its outer domain. Compared with yeast myosin-II and myosin-V, muscle myosin-II activity was very sensitive to salt. Collectively, our findings suggest differing degrees of reliance on electrostatic interactions during weak actomyosin binding in yeast versus muscle. Our study also highlights the importance of native actin isoforms when considering the function of myosins.

  3. Effect of physical therapy frequency on gross motor function in children with cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Park, Eun-Young

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study attempted to investigate the effect of physical therapy frequency based on neurodevelopmental therapy on gross motor function in children with cerebral palsy. [Subjects and Methods] The study sample included 161 children with cerebral palsy who attended a convalescent or rehabilitation center for disabled individuals or a special school for children with physical disabilities in South Korea. Gross Motor Function Measure data were collected according to physical therapy frequency based on neurodevelopmental therapy for a period of 1 year. [Results] The correlation between physical therapy frequency and Gross Motor Function Measure scores for crawling and kneeling, standing, walking, running and jumping, and rolling, and the Gross Motor Function Measure total score was significant. The differences in gross motor function according to physical therapy frequency were significant for crawling, kneeling, standing, and Gross Motor Function Measure total score. The differences in gross motor function according to frequency of physical therapy were significant for standing in Gross Motor Function Classification System Level V. [Conclusion] Intensive physical therapy was more effective for improving gross motor function in children with cerebral palsy. In particular, crawling and kneeling, and standing ability showed greater increases with intensive physical therapy. PMID:27390440

  4. Effect of physical therapy frequency on gross motor function in children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun-Young

    2016-06-01

    [Purpose] This study attempted to investigate the effect of physical therapy frequency based on neurodevelopmental therapy on gross motor function in children with cerebral palsy. [Subjects and Methods] The study sample included 161 children with cerebral palsy who attended a convalescent or rehabilitation center for disabled individuals or a special school for children with physical disabilities in South Korea. Gross Motor Function Measure data were collected according to physical therapy frequency based on neurodevelopmental therapy for a period of 1 year. [Results] The correlation between physical therapy frequency and Gross Motor Function Measure scores for crawling and kneeling, standing, walking, running and jumping, and rolling, and the Gross Motor Function Measure total score was significant. The differences in gross motor function according to physical therapy frequency were significant for crawling, kneeling, standing, and Gross Motor Function Measure total score. The differences in gross motor function according to frequency of physical therapy were significant for standing in Gross Motor Function Classification System Level V. [Conclusion] Intensive physical therapy was more effective for improving gross motor function in children with cerebral palsy. In particular, crawling and kneeling, and standing ability showed greater increases with intensive physical therapy.

  5. Motor Imagery-Based Rehabilitation: Potential Neural Correlates and Clinical Application for Functional Recovery of Motor Deficits after Stroke.

    PubMed

    Tong, Yanna; Pendy, John T; Li, William A; Du, Huishan; Zhang, Tong; Geng, Xiaokun; Ding, Yuchuan

    2017-05-01

    Motor imagery (MI), defined as the mental implementation of an action in the absence of movement or muscle activation, is a rehabilitation technique that offers a means to replace or restore lost motor function in stroke patients when used in conjunction with conventional physiotherapy procedures. This article briefly reviews the concepts and neural correlates of MI in order to promote improved understanding, as well as to enhance the clinical utility of MI-based rehabilitation regimens. We specifically highlight the role of the cerebellum and basal ganglia, premotor, supplementary motor, and prefrontal areas, primary motor cortex, and parietal cortex. Additionally, we examine the recent literature related to MI and its potential as a therapeutic technique in both upper and lower limb stroke rehabilitation.

  6. Mechanism of eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Anil

    2009-02-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a newly recognized disease and is an emerging entity throughout developing and developed countries, including the United States. Therefore, understanding the causes, natural history, diagnosis, and management is important for future therapeutic interventions. The pathogenesis of EoE is still not clear, but a growing body of evidence has established that this condition represents a T-cell-mediated immune response involving several proinflammatory mediators and chemoattractants known to regulate eosinophilic accumulation in the esophagus, such as IL-4, IL-5, IL-3 and eotaxin-1, -2, and -3. Determining the mechanism or mechanisms through which human esophageal-derived factors ultimately induce the functional abnormalities observed, and to which antigens patients who have EoE are sensitized that lead to the manifestation of symptoms, is of significant interest.

  7. Effects of hippotherapy on gross motor function and functional performance of children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun Sook; Rha, Dong Wook; Shin, Jung Soon; Kim, Soohyeon; Jung, Soojin

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of our study was to investigate the effects of hippotherapy on gross motor function and functional performance in children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP). We recruited 34 children (M:F=15:19, age: 3-12 years) with spastic CP who underwent hippotherapy for 45 minutes twice a week for 8 weeks. Twenty-one children with spastic CP were recruited for control group. The distribution of gross motor function classification system level and mean age were not significantly different between the two groups. Outcome measures, including the Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM)-66, GMFM-88 and the Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory: Functional Skills Scale (PEDI-FSS), were assessed before therapy and after the 8-weeks intervention as outcome measures. There were no significant differences between intervention and control groups in mean baseline total scores of GMFM-66, GMFM-88 or PEDI-FSS. After the 8-weeks intervention, mean GMFM-66 and GMFM-88 scores were significantly improved in both groups. However, the hippotherapy group had significantly greater improvement in dimension E and GMFM-66 total score than the control group. The total PEDI-FSS score and the sub-scores of its 3 domains were significantly improved in the hippotherapy group, but not in the control group. The results of our study demonstrate the beneficial effects of hippotherapy on gross motor function and functional performance in children with CP compared to control group. The significant improvement in PEDI-FSS scores suggests that hippotherapy may be useful to maximize the functional performance of children with CP.

  8. Effects of Hippotherapy on Gross Motor Function and Functional Performance of Children with Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Park, Eun Sook; Rha, Dong-Wook; Shin, Jung Soon; Kim, Soohyeon

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of our study was to investigate the effects of hippotherapy on gross motor function and functional performance in children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP). Materials and Methods We recruited 34 children (M:F=15:19, age: 3-12 years) with spastic CP who underwent hippotherapy for 45 minutes twice a week for 8 weeks. Twenty-one children with spastic CP were recruited for control group. The distribution of gross motor function classification system level and mean age were not significantly different between the two groups. Outcome measures, including the Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM)-66, GMFM-88 and the Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory: Functional Skills Scale (PEDI-FSS), were assessed before therapy and after the 8-weeks intervention as outcome measures. Results There were no significant differences between intervention and control groups in mean baseline total scores of GMFM-66, GMFM-88 or PEDI-FSS. After the 8-weeks intervention, mean GMFM-66 and GMFM-88 scores were significantly improved in both groups. However, the hippotherapy group had significantly greater improvement in dimension E and GMFM-66 total score than the control group. The total PEDI-FSS score and the sub-scores of its 3 domains were significantly improved in the hippotherapy group, but not in the control group. Conclusion The results of our study demonstrate the beneficial effects of hippotherapy on gross motor function and functional performance in children with CP compared to control group. The significant improvement in PEDI-FSS scores suggests that hippotherapy may be useful to maximize the functional performance of children with CP. PMID:25323914

  9. Pediatric aquatic therapy on motor function and enjoyment in children diagnosed with cerebral palsy of various motor severities.

    PubMed

    Lai, Chih-Jou; Liu, Wen-Yu; Yang, Tsui-Fen; Chen, Chia-Ling; Wu, Ching-Yi; Chan, Rai-Chi

    2015-02-01

    This study investigates the effects of pediatric aquatic therapy on motor function, enjoyment, activities of daily living, and health-related quality of life for children with spastic cerebral palsy of various motor severities. Children with spastic cerebral palsy were assigned to a pediatric aquatic therapy group (n = 11; mean age = 85.0 ± 33.1 months; male : female = 4 : 7) or a control group (n = 13; mean age = 87.6 ± 34.0 months; male : female = 9 : 4). The statistic results indicate that the pediatric aquatic therapy group had greater average 66-item Gross Motor Function Measure following intervention than the control group (η(2) = 0.308, P = .007), even for children with Gross Motor Function Classification System level IV (5.0 vs 1.3). The pediatric aquatic therapy group had higher Physical Activity Enjoyment Scale scores than the control group at post-treatment (P = .015). These findings demonstrate that pediatric aquatic therapy can be an effective and alternative therapy for children with cerebral palsy even with poor Gross Motor Function Classification System level.

  10. Functional connectivity in the resting-state motor networks influences the kinematic processes during motor sequence learning

    PubMed Central

    Bonzano, Laura; Palmaro, Eleonora; Teodorescu, Roxana; Fleysher, Lazar; Inglese, Matilde; Bove, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies support the involvement of the cerebello-cortical and striato-cortical motor loops in motor sequence learning. Here, we investigated whether the gain of motor sequence learning could depend on a priori resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC) between motor areas and structures belonging to these circuits. Fourteen healthy subjects underwent a resting-state fMRI session. Afterward, they were asked to reproduce a verbally-learned sequence of finger opposition movements as fast and accurate as possible. All subjects increased their movement rate with practice, by reducing touch duration and/or inter tapping interval. The rsFC analysis showed that at rest left and right M1 and left and right supplementary motor cortex (SMA) were mainly connected with other motor areas. The covariate analysis taking into account the different kinematic parameters indicated that the subjects achieving greater movement rate increase were those showing stronger rsFC of the left M1 and SMA with the right lobule VIII of the cerebellum. Notably, the subjects with greater inter tapping interval reduction showed stronger rsFC of the left M1 and SMA with the association nuclei of the thalamus. Conversely, the regression analysis with the right M1 and SMA seeds showed only few significant clusters for the different covariates not located in the cerebellum and thalamus. No common clusters were found between right M1 and SMA. All these findings indicate important functional connections at rest of those neural circuits responsible of motor learning improvement, involving the motor areas related to the hemisphere directly controlling the finger movements, the thalamus and the cerebellum. PMID:25328043

  11. Structure and Function Study of Phi29 DNA packaging motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Huaming

    molecules were required to bind to one short dsDNA molecule. The inhibitive curve of Walker B mutant gp16 analyzed by binomial distribution model showed that one inactive mutant gp16 in the gp16 ring could block the function of the motor and the stoichiometry of gp16 was six. These findings facilitate our understanding of the molecular mechanism of viral DNA packaging: a novel viral DNA packaging model "push through a one-way valve" was proposed. In this model, the connector functioned as a valve to allow DNA to enter but prevented it from sliding out during DNA packaging; the six subunits in the gp16 ring acted sequentially to push DNA into the connector channel. ATP binding of gp16 induced a conformation change with a high affinity for dsDNA. Then, the ATP was hydrolyzed which resulted in the movement of subdomains in this individual gp16 subunit and DNA was pushed forward, followed by the double helix of dsDNA being brought forward to the adjacent subunit in the gp16 ring. The elucidation of the viral DNA packaging mechanism holds great potential for developing artificial motors for delivering drugs and other molecular cargos.

  12. Robotic assessment of upper limb motor function after stroke.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, Sivakumar; Colombo, Roberto; Sterpi, Irma; Sanguineti, Vittorio; Burdet, Etienne

    2012-11-01

    Traditional assessment of a stroke subject's motor ability, carried out by a therapist who observes and rates the subject's motor behavior using ordinal measurements scales, is subjective, time consuming and lacks sensitivity. Rehabilitation robots, which have been the subject of intense inquiry over the last decade, are equipped with sensors that are used to develop objective measures of motor behaviors in a semiautomated way during therapy. This article reviews the current contributions of robot-assisted motor assessment of the upper limb. It summarizes the various measures related to movement performance, the models of motor recovery in stroke subjects and the relationship of robotic measures to standard clinical measures. It analyses the possibilities offered by current robotic assessment techniques and the aspects to address to make robotic assessment a mainstream motor assessment method.

  13. Differential Light Chain Assembly Influences Outer Arm Dynein Motor Function

    PubMed Central

    DiBella, Linda M.; Gorbatyuk, Oksana; Sakato, Miho; Wakabayashi, Ken-ichi; Patel-King, Ramila S.; Pazour, Gregory J.; Witman, George B.; King, Stephen M.

    2005-01-01

    Tctex1 and Tctex2 were originally described as potential distorters/sterility factors in the non-Mendelian transmission of t-haplotypes in mice. These proteins have since been identified as subunits of cytoplasmic and/or axonemal dyneins. Within the Chlamydomonas flagellum, Tctex1 is a subunit of inner arm I1. We have now identified a second Tctex1-related protein (here termed LC9) in Chlamydomonas. LC9 copurifies with outer arm dynein in sucrose density gradients and is missing only in those strains completely lacking this motor. Zero-length cross-linking of purified outer arm dynein indicates that LC9 interacts directly with both the IC1 and IC2 intermediate chains. Immunoblot analysis revealed that LC2, LC6, and LC9 are missing in an IC2 mutant strain (oda6-r88) that can assemble outer arms but exhibits significantly reduced flagellar beat frequency. This defect is unlikely to be due to lack of LC6, because an LC6 null mutant (oda13) exhibits only a minor swimming abnormality. Using an LC2 null mutant (oda12-1), we find that although some outer arm dynein components assemble in the absence of LC2, they are nonfunctional. In contrast, dyneins from oda6-r88, which also lack LC2, retain some activity. Furthermore, we observed a synthetic assembly defect in an oda6-r88 oda12-1 double mutant. These data suggest that LC2, LC6, and LC9 have different roles in outer arm assembly and are required for wild-type motor function in the Chlamydomonas flagellum. PMID:16195342

  14. Embedding dual function into molecular motors through collective motion

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Nen; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2017-01-01

    Protein motors, such as kinesins and dyneins, bind to a microtubule and travel along it in a specific direction. Previously, it was thought that the directionality for a given motor was constant in the absence of an external force. However, the directionality of the kinesin-5 Cin8 was recently found to change as the number of motors that bind to the same microtubule is increased. Here, we introduce a simple mechanical model of a microtubule-sliding assay in which multiple motors interact with the filament. We show that, due to the collective phenomenon, the directionality of the motor changes (e.g., from minus- to plus- end directionality), depending on the number of motors. This is induced by a large diffusive component in the directional walk and by the subsequent frustrated motor configuration, in which multiple motors pull the filament in opposite directions, similar to a game of tug-of-war. A possible role of the dual-directional motors for the mitotic spindle formation is also discussed. Our framework provides a general mechanism to embed two conflicting tasks into a single molecular machine, which works context-dependently. PMID:28281683

  15. Embedding dual function into molecular motors through collective motion.

    PubMed

    Saito, Nen; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2017-03-10

    Protein motors, such as kinesins and dyneins, bind to a microtubule and travel along it in a specific direction. Previously, it was thought that the directionality for a given motor was constant in the absence of an external force. However, the directionality of the kinesin-5 Cin8 was recently found to change as the number of motors that bind to the same microtubule is increased. Here, we introduce a simple mechanical model of a microtubule-sliding assay in which multiple motors interact with the filament. We show that, due to the collective phenomenon, the directionality of the motor changes (e.g., from minus- to plus- end directionality), depending on the number of motors. This is induced by a large diffusive component in the directional walk and by the subsequent frustrated motor configuration, in which multiple motors pull the filament in opposite directions, similar to a game of tug-of-war. A possible role of the dual-directional motors for the mitotic spindle formation is also discussed. Our framework provides a general mechanism to embed two conflicting tasks into a single molecular machine, which works context-dependently.

  16. Motor imagery learning modulates functional connectivity of multiple brain systems in resting state.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hang; Long, Zhiying; Ge, Ruiyang; Xu, Lele; Jin, Zhen; Yao, Li; Liu, Yijun

    2014-01-01

    Learning motor skills involves subsequent modulation of resting-state functional connectivity in the sensory-motor system. This idea was mostly derived from the investigations on motor execution learning which mainly recruits the processing of sensory-motor information. Behavioral evidences demonstrated that motor skills in our daily lives could be learned through imagery procedures. However, it remains unclear whether the modulation of resting-state functional connectivity also exists in the sensory-motor system after motor imagery learning. We performed a fMRI investigation on motor imagery learning from resting state. Based on previous studies, we identified eight sensory and cognitive resting-state networks (RSNs) corresponding to the brain systems and further explored the functional connectivity of these RSNs through the assessments, connectivity and network strengths before and after the two-week consecutive learning. Two intriguing results were revealed: (1) The sensory RSNs, specifically sensory-motor and lateral visual networks exhibited greater connectivity strengths in precuneus and fusiform gyrus after learning; (2) Decreased network strength induced by learning was proved in the default mode network, a cognitive RSN. These results indicated that resting-state functional connectivity could be modulated by motor imagery learning in multiple brain systems, and such modulation displayed in the sensory-motor, visual and default brain systems may be associated with the establishment of motor schema and the regulation of introspective thought. These findings further revealed the neural substrates underlying motor skill learning and potentially provided new insights into the therapeutic benefits of motor imagery learning.

  17. Motor imagery after subcortical stroke: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Nikhil; Simmons, Lucy H; Jones, P Simon; Day, Diana J; Carpenter, T Adrian; Pomeroy, Valerie M; Warburton, Elizabeth A; Baron, Jean-Claude

    2009-04-01

    In recovered subcortical stroke, the pattern of motor network activation during motor execution can appear normal or not, depending on the task. Whether this applies to other aspects of motor function is unknown. We used functional MRI to assess motor imagery (MI), a promising new approach to improve motor function after stroke, and contrasted it to motor execution. Twenty well-recovered patients with hemiparetic subcortical stroke (14 males; mean age, 66.5 years) and 17 aged-matched control subjects were studied. Extensive behavioral screening excluded 8 patients and 4 control subjects due to impaired MI abilities. Subjects performed MI and motor execution of a paced finger-thumb opposition sequence using a functional MRI paradigm that monitored compliance. Activation within the primary motor cortex (BA4a and 4p), dorsal premotor, and supplementary motor areas was examined. The pattern of activation during affected-hand motor execution was not different from control subjects. Affected-hand MI activation was also largely similar to control subjects, including involvement of BA4, but with important differences: (1) unlike control subjects and the nonaffected hand, activation in BA4a and dorsal premotor was not lower during MI as compared with motor execution; (2) the hemispheric balance of BA4p activation was significantly less lateralized than control subjects; and (3) ipsilesional BA4p activation positively correlated with motor performance. In well-recovered subcortical stroke, the motor system, including ipsilesional BA4, is activated during MI despite the lesion. It, however, remains disorganized in proportion to residual motor impairment. Thus, components of movement upstream from execution appear differentially affected after stroke and could be targeted by rehabilitation in more severely affected patients.

  18. Motor Imagery Learning Modulates Functional Connectivity of Multiple Brain Systems in Resting State

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hang; Long, Zhiying; Ge, Ruiyang; Xu, Lele; Jin, Zhen; Yao, Li; Liu, Yijun

    2014-01-01

    Background Learning motor skills involves subsequent modulation of resting-state functional connectivity in the sensory-motor system. This idea was mostly derived from the investigations on motor execution learning which mainly recruits the processing of sensory-motor information. Behavioral evidences demonstrated that motor skills in our daily lives could be learned through imagery procedures. However, it remains unclear whether the modulation of resting-state functional connectivity also exists in the sensory-motor system after motor imagery learning. Methodology/Principal Findings We performed a fMRI investigation on motor imagery learning from resting state. Based on previous studies, we identified eight sensory and cognitive resting-state networks (RSNs) corresponding to the brain systems and further explored the functional connectivity of these RSNs through the assessments, connectivity and network strengths before and after the two-week consecutive learning. Two intriguing results were revealed: (1) The sensory RSNs, specifically sensory-motor and lateral visual networks exhibited greater connectivity strengths in precuneus and fusiform gyrus after learning; (2) Decreased network strength induced by learning was proved in the default mode network, a cognitive RSN. Conclusions/Significance These results indicated that resting-state functional connectivity could be modulated by motor imagery learning in multiple brain systems, and such modulation displayed in the sensory-motor, visual and default brain systems may be associated with the establishment of motor schema and the regulation of introspective thought. These findings further revealed the neural substrates underlying motor skill learning and potentially provided new insights into the therapeutic benefits of motor imagery learning. PMID:24465577

  19. Digestive and respiratory tract motor responses associated with eructation.

    PubMed

    Lang, Ivan M; Medda, Bidyut K; Shaker, Reza

    2013-06-01

    We studied the digestive and respiratory tract motor responses in 10 chronically instrumented dogs during eructation activated after feeding. Muscles were recorded from the cervical area, thorax, and abdomen. The striated muscles were recorded using EMG and the smooth muscles using strain gauges. We found eructation in three distinct functional phases that were composed of different sets of motor responses: gas escape, barrier elimination, and gas transport. The gas escape phase, activated by gastric distension, consists of relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter and diaphragmatic hiatus and contraction of the longitudinal muscle of the thoracic esophagus and rectus abdominis. All these motor events promote gas escape from the stomach. The barrier elimination phase, probably activated by rapid gas distension of the thoracic esophagus, consists of relaxation of the pharyngeal constrictors and excitation of dorsal and ventral upper esophageal sphincter distracting muscles, as well as rapid contraction of the diaphragmatic dome fibers. These motor events allow esophagopharyngeal air movement by promoting retrograde airflow and opening of the upper esophageal sphincter. The transport phase, possibly activated secondary to diaphragmatic contraction, consists of a retrograde contraction of the striated muscle esophagus that transports the air from the thoracic esophagus to the pharynx. We hypothesize that the esophageal reverse peristalsis is mediated by elementary reflexes, rather than a coordinated peristaltic response like secondary peristalsis. The phases of eructation can be activated independently of one another or in a different manner to participate in physiological events other than eructation that cause gastroesophageal or esophagogastric reflux.

  20. Electrophysiological and functional connectivity of the human supplementary motor area.

    PubMed

    Narayana, Shalini; Laird, Angela R; Tandon, Nitin; Franklin, Crystal; Lancaster, Jack L; Fox, Peter T

    2012-08-01

    Neuro-imaging methods for detecting functional and structural inter-regional connectivity are in a rapid phase of development. While reports of regional connectivity patterns based on individual methods are becoming common, studies comparing the results of two or more connectivity-mapping methods remain rare. In this study, we applied transcranial magnetic stimulation during PET imaging (TMS/PET), a stimulation-based method, and meta-analytic connectivity modeling (MACM), a task-based method to map the connectivity patterns of the supplementary motor area (SMA). Further, we drew upon the behavioral domain meta-data of the BrainMap® database to characterize the behavioral domain specificity of two maps. Both MACM and TMS/PET detected multi-synaptic connectivity patterns, with the MACM-detected connections being more extensive. Both MACM and TMS/PET detected connections belonging to multiple behavioral domains, including action, cognition and perception. Finally, we show that the two connectivity-mapping methods are complementary in that, the MACM informed on the functional nature of SMA connections, while TMS/PET identified brain areas electrophysiologically connected with the SMA. Thus, we demonstrate that integrating multimodal database and imaging techniques can derive comprehensive connectivity maps of brain areas.

  1. Respiratory Motor Function in Individuals with Centronuclear Myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Barbara K.; Renno, Markus S.; Green, Meghan M.; Sexton, Terry M.; Lawson, Lee Ann; Martin, Anatole D.; Corti, Manuela; Byrne, Barry J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Individuals with X-linked myotubular myopathy (XLMTM) and other centronuclear myopathies (CNMs) frequently have profound respiratory insufficiency that requires support early in life. Still, few quantitative data exist to characterize respiratory motor function in CNM. Methods We evaluated the reliance upon mechanical ventilation (MV), ventilatory kinematics, unassisted tidal volumes, and maximal respiratory pressures in 14 individuals with CNMs, including 10 boys with XLMTM. Results Thirteen participants required full-time, invasive MV. Maximal inspiratory pressures were higher in subjects who breathed unsupported at least 1 hour per day than 24-hour MV users [33.7 (11.9–42.3) vs 8.4 (6.0–10.9) cm H2O, P<0.05]. Years of MV dependence significantly correlated with MEP (r=−0.715, P<0.01). Discussion Respiratory function in CNMs may be related to deconditioning from prolonged MV and/or differences in residual respiratory muscle strength. Results from this study may assist in evaluating severe respiratory insufficiency in neuromuscular clinical care and research. PMID:26351754

  2. Electrophysiological and Functional Connectivity of the Human Supplementary Motor Area

    PubMed Central

    Narayana, Shalini; Laird, Angela R.; Tandon, Nitin; Franklin, Crystal; Lancaster, Jack L.; Fox, Peter T.

    2012-01-01

    Neuro-imaging methods for detecting functional and structural inter-regional connectivity are in a rapid phase of development. While reports of regional connectivity patterns based on individual methods are becoming common, studies comparing the results of two or more connectivity-mapping methods remain rare. In this study, we applied transcranial magnetic stimulation during PET imaging (TMS/PET), a stimulation-based method, and meta-analytic connectivity modeling (MACM), a task-based method to map the connectivity patterns of the supplementary motor area (SMA). Further, we drew upon the behavioral domain meta-data of the BrainMap® database to characterize the behavioral domain specificity of two maps. Both MACM and TMS/PET detected multi-synaptic connectivity patterns, with the MACM-detected connections being more extensive. Both MACM and TMS/PET detected connections belonging to multiple behavioral domains, including action, cognition and perception. Finally, we show that the two connectivity-mapping methods are complementary in that, the MACM informed on the functional nature of SMA connections, while TMS/PET identified brain areas electrophysiologically connected with the SMA. Thus, we demonstrate that integrating multimodal database and imaging techniques can derive comprehensive connectivity maps of brain areas. PMID:22569543

  3. The structure and function of serially homologous leg motor neurons in the locust. I. Anatomy.

    PubMed

    Wilson, J A

    1979-01-01

    Twenty-one prothoracic and 17 mesothoracic motor neurons innervating leg muscles have been identified physiologically and subsequently injected with dye from a microelectrode. A tract containing the primary neurites of motor neurons innervating the retractor unquis, levator and depressor tarsus, flexor tibiae, and reductor femora is described. All motor neurons studied have regions in which their dendritic branches overlap with those of other leg motor neurons. Identified, serially homologous motor neurons in the three thoracic ganglia were found to have: (1) cell bodies at similar locations and morphologically similar primary neurites (e.g., flexor tibiae motor neurons), (2) cell bodies at different locations in each ganglion and morphologically different primary neurites in each ganglion (e.g., fast retractor unguis motor neurons), or (3) cell bodies at similar locations and morphologically similar primary neurites but with a functional switch in one ganglion relative to the function of the neurons in the other two ganglia. As an example of the latter, the morphology of the metathoracic slow extensor tibiae (SETi) motor neurons was similar to that of pro- and mesothoracic fast extensor tibiae (FETi) motor neurons. Similarly the metathoracic FETi bears a striking resemblance to the pro- and the mesothoracic SETi. It is proposed that in the metathoracic ganglion the two extensor tibiae motor neurons have switched functions while retaining similar morphologies relative to the structure and function of their pro- and mesothoracic serial homologues.

  4. Functional MRI evidence for fine motor praxis dysfunction in children with persistent speech disorders

    PubMed Central

    Redle, Erin; Vannest, Jennifer; Maloney, Thomas; Tsevat, Rebecca K.; Eikenberry, Sarah; Lewis, Barbara; Shriberg, Lawrence D.; Tkach, Jean; Holland, Scott K.

    2014-01-01

    Children with persistent speech disorders (PSD) often present with overt or subtle motor deficits; the possibility that speech disorders and motor deficits could arise from a shared neurological base is currently unknown. Functional MRI (fMRI) was used to examine the brain networks supporting fine motor praxis in children with PSD and without clinically identified fine motor deficits. Methods This case-control study included 12 children with PSD (mean age 7.42 years, 4 female) and 12 controls (mean age 7.44 years, 4 female). Children completed behavioral evaluations using standardized motor assessments and parent reported functional measures. During fMRI scanning, participants completed a cued finger tapping task contrasted passive listening. A general linear model approach identified brain regions associated with finger tapping in each group and regions that differed between groups. The relationship between regional fMRI activation and fine motor skill was assessed using a regression analysis. Results Children with PSD had significantly poorer results for rapid speech production and fine motor praxis skills, but did not differ on classroom functional skills. Functional MRI results showed that children with PSD had significantly more activation in the cerebellum during finger tapping. Positive correlations between performance on a fine motor praxis test and activation multiple cortical regions were noted for children with PSD but not for controls. Conclusions Over-activation in the cerebellum during a motor task may reflect a subtle abnormality in the non-speech motor neural circuitry in children with PSD. PMID:25481413

  5. Disentangling the relationship between children's motor ability, executive function and academic achievement.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Mirko; Egger, Fabienne; Benzing, Valentin; Jäger, Katja; Conzelmann, Achim; Roebers, Claudia M; Pesce, Caterina

    2017-01-01

    Even though positive relations between children's motor ability and their academic achievement are frequently reported, the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. Executive function has indeed been proposed, but hardly tested as a potential mediator. The aim of the present study was therefore to examine the mediating role of executive function in the relationship between motor ability and academic achievement, also investigating the individual contribution of specific motor abilities to the hypothesized mediated linkage to academic achievement. At intervals of ten weeks, 236 children aged between 10 and 12 years were tested in terms of their motor ability (t1: cardiovascular endurance, muscular strength, motor coordination), core executive functions (t2: updating, inhibition, shifting), and academic achievement (t3: mathematics, reading, spelling). Structural equation modelling revealed executive function to be a mediator in the relation between motor ability and academic achievement, represented by a significant indirect effect. In separate analyses, each of the three motor abilities were positively related to children's academic achievement. However, only in the case of children's motor coordination, the mediation by executive function accounted for a significance percentage of variance of academic achievement data. The results provide evidence in support of models that conceive executive function as a mechanism explaining the relationship that links children's physical activity-related outcomes to academic achievement and strengthen the advocacy for quality physical activity not merely focused on health-related physical fitness outcomes, but also on motor skill development and learning.

  6. Disentangling the relationship between children’s motor ability, executive function and academic achievement

    PubMed Central

    Egger, Fabienne; Benzing, Valentin; Jäger, Katja; Conzelmann, Achim; Roebers, Claudia M.; Pesce, Caterina

    2017-01-01

    Even though positive relations between children’s motor ability and their academic achievement are frequently reported, the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. Executive function has indeed been proposed, but hardly tested as a potential mediator. The aim of the present study was therefore to examine the mediating role of executive function in the relationship between motor ability and academic achievement, also investigating the individual contribution of specific motor abilities to the hypothesized mediated linkage to academic achievement. At intervals of ten weeks, 236 children aged between 10 and 12 years were tested in terms of their motor ability (t1: cardiovascular endurance, muscular strength, motor coordination), core executive functions (t2: updating, inhibition, shifting), and academic achievement (t3: mathematics, reading, spelling). Structural equation modelling revealed executive function to be a mediator in the relation between motor ability and academic achievement, represented by a significant indirect effect. In separate analyses, each of the three motor abilities were positively related to children’s academic achievement. However, only in the case of children’s motor coordination, the mediation by executive function accounted for a significance percentage of variance of academic achievement data. The results provide evidence in support of models that conceive executive function as a mechanism explaining the relationship that links children’s physical activity-related outcomes to academic achievement and strengthen the advocacy for quality physical activity not merely focused on health-related physical fitness outcomes, but also on motor skill development and learning. PMID:28817625

  7. Obsessive-compulsive disorder: a disorder of pessimal (non-functional) motor behavior.

    PubMed

    Zor, R; Keren, H; Hermesh, H; Szechtman, H; Mort, J; Eilam, D

    2009-10-01

    To determine whether in addition to repetitiveness, the motor rituals of patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) involve reduced functionality due to numerous and measurable acts that are irrelevant and unnecessary for task completion. Comparing motor rituals of OCD patients with behavior of non-patient control individuals who were instructed to perform the same motor task. Obsessive-compulsive disorder behavior comprises abundant acts that were not performed by the controls. These acts seem unnecessary or even irrelevant for the task that the patients were performing, and therefore are termed 'non-functional'. Non-functional acts comprise some 60% of OCD motor behavior. Moreover, OCD behavior consists of short chains of functional acts bounded by long chains of non-functional acts. The abundance of irrelevant or unnecessary acts in OCD motor rituals represents reduced functionality in terms of task completion, typifying OCD rituals as pessimal behavior (antonym of optimal behavior).

  8. Parallel Alterations of Functional Connectivity during Execution and Imagination after Motor Imagery Learning

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rushao; Hui, Mingqi; Long, Zhiying; Zhao, Xiaojie; Yao, Li

    2012-01-01

    Background Neural substrates underlying motor learning have been widely investigated with neuroimaging technologies. Investigations have illustrated the critical regions of motor learning and further revealed parallel alterations of functional activation during imagination and execution after learning. However, little is known about the functional connectivity associated with motor learning, especially motor imagery learning, although benefits from functional connectivity analysis attract more attention to the related explorations. We explored whether motor imagery (MI) and motor execution (ME) shared parallel alterations of functional connectivity after MI learning. Methodology/Principal Findings Graph theory analysis, which is widely used in functional connectivity exploration, was performed on the functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data of MI and ME tasks before and after 14 days of consecutive MI learning. The control group had no learning. Two measures, connectivity degree and interregional connectivity, were calculated and further assessed at a statistical level. Two interesting results were obtained: (1) The connectivity degree of the right posterior parietal lobe decreased in both MI and ME tasks after MI learning in the experimental group; (2) The parallel alterations of interregional connectivity related to the right posterior parietal lobe occurred in the supplementary motor area for both tasks. Conclusions/Significance These computational results may provide the following insights: (1) The establishment of motor schema through MI learning may induce the significant decrease of connectivity degree in the posterior parietal lobe; (2) The decreased interregional connectivity between the supplementary motor area and the right posterior parietal lobe in post-test implicates the dissociation between motor learning and task performing. These findings and explanations further revealed the neural substrates underpinning MI learning and supported that

  9. Dissociated functional connectivity profiles for motor and attention deficits in acute right-hemisphere stroke.

    PubMed

    Baldassarre, Antonello; Ramsey, Lenny; Rengachary, Jennifer; Zinn, Kristi; Siegel, Joshua S; Metcalf, Nicholas V; Strube, Michael J; Snyder, Abraham Z; Corbetta, Maurizio; Shulman, Gordon L

    2016-07-01

    Strokes often cause multiple behavioural deficits that are correlated at the population level. Here, we show that motor and attention deficits are selectively associated with abnormal patterns of resting state functional connectivity in the dorsal attention and motor networks. We measured attention and motor deficits in 44 right hemisphere-damaged patients with a first-time stroke at 1-2 weeks post-onset. The motor battery included tests that evaluated deficits in both upper and lower extremities. The attention battery assessed both spatial and non-spatial attention deficits. Summary measures for motor and attention deficits were identified through principal component analyses on the raw behavioural scores. Functional connectivity in structurally normal cortex was estimated based on the temporal correlation of blood oxygenation level-dependent signals measured at rest with functional magnetic resonance imaging. Any correlation between motor and attention deficits and between functional connectivity in the dorsal attention network and motor networks that might spuriously affect the relationship between each deficit and functional connectivity was statistically removed. We report a double dissociation between abnormal functional connectivity patterns and attention and motor deficits, respectively. Attention deficits were significantly more correlated with abnormal interhemispheric functional connectivity within the dorsal attention network than motor networks, while motor deficits were significantly more correlated with abnormal interhemispheric functional connectivity patterns within the motor networks than dorsal attention network. These findings indicate that functional connectivity patterns in structurally normal cortex following a stroke link abnormal physiology in brain networks to the corresponding behavioural deficits. © The Author (2016). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please

  10. A Strategy for Embedding Functional Motor and Early Numeracy Skill Instruction into Physical Education Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whinnery, Stacie B.; Whinnery, Keith W.; Eddins, Daisy

    2016-01-01

    This article addresses the challenges educators face when attempting to find a balance between both functional and academic skill instruction for students with severe, multiple disabilities including motor impairments. The authors describe a strategy that employs embedded instruction of early numeracy and functional motor skills during physical…

  11. Effect of a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists and antagonists on motor function in mice

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) are ligand-gated cation channels found throughout the body, and serve to mediate diverse physiological functions. Muscle-type nAChR located in the motor endplate region of muscle fibers play an integral role in muscle contraction and thus motor function. The...

  12. The influence of motor expertise on the brain activity of motor task performance: A meta-analysis of functional magnetic resonance imaging studies.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie

    2015-06-01

    Previous research has investigated the influence of long-term motor training on the brain activity of motor processes, but the findings are inconsistent. To clarify how acquiring motor expertise induces cortical reorganization during motor task performance, the current study conducted a quantitative meta-analysis on 26 functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies that investigate motor task performance in people with long-term motor training experience (e.g., athletes, musicians, and dancers) and control participants. Meta-analysis of the brain activation in motor experts and novices showed similar effects in the bilateral frontal and parietal regions. The meta-analysis on the contrast between motor experts and novices indicated that experts showed stronger effects in the left inferior parietal lobule (BA 40) than did novices in motor execution and prediction tasks. In motor observation tasks, experts showed stronger effects in the left inferior frontal gyrus (BA 9) and left precentral gyrus (BA 6) than novices. On the contrary, novices had stronger effects in the right motor areas and basal ganglia as compared with motor experts. These results indicate that motor experts have effect increases in brain areas involved in action planning and action comprehension, and suggest that intensive motor training might elaborate the motor representation related to the task performance.

  13. Interrater reliability of the Wolf Motor Function Test-Functional Ability Scale: why it matters.

    PubMed

    Duff, Susan V; He, Jiaxiu; Nelsen, Monica A; Lane, Christianne J; Rowe, Veronica T; Wolf, Steve L; Dromerick, Alexander W; Winstein, Carolee J

    2015-06-01

    One important objective for clinical trialists in rehabilitation is determining efficacy of interventions to enhance motor behavior. In part, limitation in the precision of measurement presents a challenge. The few valid, low-cost observational tools available to assess motor behavior cannot escape the variability inherent in test administration and scoring. This is especially true when there are multiple evaluators and raters, as in the case of multisite randomized controlled trials (RCTs). One way to enhance reliability and reduce variability is to implement rigorous quality control (QC) procedures. This article describes a systematic QC process used to refine the administration and scoring procedures for the Wolf Motor Function Test (WMFT)-Functional Ability Scale (FAS). The QC process, a systematic focus-group collaboration, was developed and used for a phase III RCT, which enlisted multiple evaluators and an experienced WMFT-FAS rater panel. After 3 staged refinements to the administration and scoring instructions, we achieved a sufficiently high interrater reliability (weighted κ = 0.8). A systematic focus-group process was shown to be an effective method to improve reliability of observational assessment tools for motor behavior in neurorehabilitation. A reduction in noise-related variability in performance assessments will increase power and potentially lower the number needed to treat. Improved precision of measurement can lead to more cost-effective and efficient clinical trials. Finally, we suggest that improved precision in measures of motor behavior may provide more insight into recovery mechanisms than a single measure of movement time alone. © The Author(s) 2014.

  14. Relationships among cognitive function, fine motor speed and age in the rhesus monkey.

    PubMed

    Lacreuse, Agnès; Espinosa, Paola M; Herndon, James G

    2006-09-01

    Declines in fine motor skills and cognitive function are well known features of human aging. Yet, the relationship between age-related impairments in motor and cognitive function remains unclear. Rhesus monkeys, like humans, show marked decline in cognitive and fine motor function with age and are excellent models to investigate potential interactions between age-related declines in cognitive and motor functioning. We investigated the relationships among cognition, motor function and age in 30 male and female rhesus monkeys, 5-28 years of age, tested on a battery of cognitive tasks [acquisition of the delayed non-matching-to-sample (DNMS), DNMS-120s, DNMS-600s, acquisition of delayed recognition span test (DRST), spatial-DRST and object-DRST] and a fine motor task (Lifesaver test). Global cognitive ability, as assessed by the cognitive performance index (CPI), was impaired with age in both sexes, while age-related motor slowing was found only in males. After age was controlled for, half the variance in CPI was predicted by motor speed, with better cognitive ability associated with slower motor skills. Analyses at the level of each cognitive task revealed that motor speed and age predicted the rate of acquisition of the DNMS. This relationship was robust in males and absent in females. Motor speed was not a significant predictor of any other cognitive variable. We conclude that the relationship between cognition and motor function (1) may be limited to non-spatial tasks; (2) exists independently of age; (3) may reflect different contributions of the fronto-striatal system; (4) may be particularly evident in males.

  15. Towards dynamic control of wettability by using functionalized altitudinal molecular motors on solid surfaces.

    PubMed

    London, Gábor; Chen, Kuang-Yen; Carroll, Gregory T; Feringa, Ben L

    2013-08-05

    We report the synthesis of altitudinal molecular motors that contain functional groups in their rotor part. In an approach to achieve dynamic control over the properties of solid surfaces, a hydrophobic perfluorobutyl chain and a relatively hydrophilic cyano group were introduced to the rotor part of the motors. Molecular motors were attached to quartz surfaces by using interfacial 1,3-dipolar cycloadditions. To test the effect of the functional groups on the rotary motion, photochemical and thermal isomerization studies of the motors were performed both in solution and when attached to the surface. We found that the substituents have no significant effect on the thermal and photochemical processes, and the functionalized motors preserved their rotary function both in solution and on a quartz surface. Preliminary results on the influence of the functional groups on surface wettability are also described.

  16. A SMN-Dependent U12 Splicing Event Essential for Motor Circuit Function

    PubMed Central

    Lotti, Francesco; Imlach, Wendy L.; Saieva, Luciano; Beck, Erin S.; Hao, Le T.; Li, Darrick K.; Jiao, Wei; Mentis, George Z.; Beattie, Christine E.; McCabe, Brian D.; Pellizzoni, Livio

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a motor neuron disease caused by deficiency of the ubiquitous survival motor neuron (SMN) protein. To define the mechanisms of selective neuronal dysfunction in SMA, we investigated the role of SMN-dependent U12 splicing events in the regulation of motor circuit activity. We show that SMN deficiency perturbs splicing and decreases the expression of a subset of U12 intron-containing genes in mammalian cells and Drosophila larvae. Analysis of these SMN target genes identifies Stasimon as a novel protein required for motor circuit function. Restoration of Stasimon expression in the motor circuit corrects defects in neuromuscular junction transmission and muscle growth in Drosophila SMN mutants and aberrant motor neuron development in SMN-deficient zebrafish. These findings directly link defective splicing of critical neuronal genes induced by SMN deficiency to motor circuit dysfunction, establishing a molecular framework for the selective pathology of SMA. PMID:23063131

  17. A Functional Taxonomy of Bottom-Up Sensory Feedback Processing for Motor Actions.

    PubMed

    Scott, Stephen H

    2016-08-01

    Humans are adept at performing an extraordinary breadth of voluntary motor actions that allow us to rapidly move around and interact with the environment. While voluntary motor actions necessarily include top-down intention to generate a motor act, a key to voluntary control is the selective use of bottom-up sensory feedback to select and guide motor actions. This review classifies the many ways in which sensory feedback is used by the motor system and highlights regularities in the timing of each class of motor responses to sensory stimuli, revealing a functional hierarchical organization of motor control. The highly automatic way in which feedback is typically used in goal-directed action blurs the distinction between reflexes and voluntary control. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Cognitive and motor function are associated following mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Sosnoff, Jacob J; Broglio, Steven P; Ferrara, Michael S

    2008-06-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) causes deficits in motor and cognitive function. There is a dearth of research examining the association between these deficits. The purpose of this investigation was to examine the effect of mTBI on the association between cognitive and motor function. Thirty-six individuals completed a neurocognitive test battery and postural control assessment at baseline and were retested 24-h post mTBI. Reaction time and accuracy to various cognitive tasks was assessed. Postural control was indexed with the somatosenory organization test. This test allows for the decomposition of postural control resulting from the integration of visual, somatosensory and vestibular information. The association between cognitive and motor function was assessed with correlational analyses. Overall, it was found that mTBI resulted in increased simple and choice reaction time as well as deficits in verbal and visual memory. mTBI was also found to reduce overall postural control, especially when visual information was utilized. Prior to injury there was no association between cognitive and motor function-indicating minimal association between cognitive and motor function. After injury there were significant positive correlations between cognitive and motor function. The findings suggest that transient neural insults resulting from mTBI lead to increased cognitive-motor association. It is speculated that a shared neural process, such as visuospatial attention is damaged resulting in similar deficits in cognitive and motor function.

  19. Functional connectivity for somatosensory and motor cortex in spastic diplegia

    PubMed Central

    Burton, Harold; Dixit, Sachin; Litkowski, Patricia; Wingert, Jason R.

    2009-01-01

    Functional connectivity (fcMRI) was analyzed in individuals with spastic diplegia and age-matched controls. Pearson correlations (r-values) were computed between resting state spontaneous activity in selected seed regions (sROI) and each voxel throughout the brain. Seed ROI were centered on foci activated by tactile stimulation of the second fingertip in somatosensory and parietal dorsal attention regions. The group with diplegia showed significantly expanded networks for the somatomotor but not dorsal attention areas. These expanded networks overran nearly all topological representations in somatosensory and motor areas despite a sROI in a fingertip focus. A possible underlying cause for altered fcMRI in the group with dipegia, and generally sensorimotor deficits in spastic diplegia, is that prenatal third trimester white-matter injury leads to localized damage to subplate neurons. We hypothesize that intracortical connections become dominant in spastic diplegia through successful competition with diminished or absent thalamocortical inputs. Similar to the effects of subplate ablations on ocular dominance columns (Kanold and Shatz, Neuron 2006;51:627–638), a spike timing-dependent plasticity model is proposed to explain a shift towards intracortical inputs. PMID:20047510

  20. Functional connectivity for somatosensory and motor cortex in spastic diplegia.

    PubMed

    Burton, Harold; Dixit, Sachin; Litkowski, Patricia; Wingert, Jason R

    2009-12-01

    Functional connectivity (fcMRI) was analyzed in individuals with spastic diplegia and age-matched controls. Pearson correlations (r-values) were computed between resting state spontaneous activity in selected seed regions (sROI) and each voxel throughout the brain. Seed ROI were centered on foci activated by tactile stimulation of the second fingertip in somatosensory and parietal dorsal attention regions. The group with diplegia showed significantly expanded networks for the somatomotor but not dorsal attention areas. These expanded networks overran nearly all topological representations in somatosensory and motor areas despite a sROI in a fingertip focus. A possible underlying cause for altered fcMRI in the group with dipegia, and generally sensorimotor deficits in spastic diplegia, is that prenatal third trimester white-matter injury leads to localized damage to subplate neurons. We hypothesize that intracortical connections become dominant in spastic diplegia through successful competition with diminished or absent thalamocortical inputs. Similar to the effects of subplate ablations on ocular dominance columns (Kanold and Shatz, Neuron 2006;51:627-638), a spike timing-dependent plasticity model is proposed to explain a shift towards intracortical inputs.

  1. Neurotechnology for monitoring and restoring sensory, motor, and autonomic functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Pae C.; Knaack, Gretchen; Weber, Douglas J.

    2016-05-01

    The rapid and exponential advances in micro- and nanotechnologies over the last decade have enabled devices that communicate directly with the nervous system to measure and influence neural activity. Many of the earliest implementations focused on restoration of sensory and motor function, but as knowledge of physiology advances and technology continues to improve in accuracy, precision, and safety, new modes of engaging with the autonomic system herald an era of health restoration that may augment or replace many conventional pharmacotherapies. DARPA's Biological Technologies Office is continuing to advance neurotechnology by investing in neural interface technologies that are effective, reliable, and safe for long-term use in humans. DARPA's Hand Proprioception and Touch Interfaces (HAPTIX) program is creating a fully implantable system that interfaces with peripheral nerves in amputees to enable natural control and sensation for prosthetic limbs. Beyond standard electrode implementations, the Electrical Prescriptions (ElectRx) program is investing in innovative approaches to minimally or non-invasively interface with the peripheral nervous system using novel magnetic, optogenetic, and ultrasound-based technologies. These new mechanisms of interrogating and stimulating the peripheral nervous system are driving towards unparalleled spatiotemporal resolution, specificity and targeting, and noninvasiveness to enable chronic, human-use applications in closed-loop neuromodulation for the treatment of disease.

  2. Physiotherapy for functional motor disorders: a consensus recommendation

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Glenn; Stone, Jon; Matthews, Audrey; Brown, Melanie; Sparkes, Chris; Farmer, Ross; Masterton, Lindsay; Duncan, Linsey; Winters, Alisa; Daniell, Laura; Lumsden, Carrie; Carson, Alan; David, Anthony S; Edwards, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with functional motor disorder (FMD) including weakness and paralysis are commonly referred to physiotherapists. There is growing evidence that physiotherapy is an effective treatment, but the existing literature has limited explanations of what physiotherapy should consist of and there are insufficient data to produce evidence-based guidelines. We aim to address this issue by presenting recommendations for physiotherapy treatment. Methods A meeting was held between physiotherapists, neurologists and neuropsychiatrists, all with extensive experience in treating FMD. A set of consensus recommendations were produced based on existing evidence and experience. Results We recommend that physiotherapy treatment is based on a biopsychosocial aetiological framework. Treatment should address illness beliefs, self-directed attention and abnormal habitual movement patterns through a process of education, movement retraining and self-management strategies within a positive and non-judgemental context. We provide specific examples of these strategies for different symptoms. Conclusions Physiotherapy has a key role in the multidisciplinary management of patients with FMD. There appear to be specific physiotherapy techniques which are useful in FMD and which are amenable to and require prospective evaluation. The processes involved in referral, treatment and discharge from physiotherapy should be considered carefully as a part of a treatment package. PMID:25433033

  3. Influence of transposed stomach on cardiac function in patients with resected esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Coral, R P; Constant-Neto, M; Silva, I S; Barros, S; Jawetz, J

    2004-01-01

    Although the use of the posterior mediastinum and the stomach as a reconstruction option after esophagectomy has wide acceptance, there are concerns about the potential cardiac impairment it could cause. We prospectively studied 27 patients regarding the function and the systolic diameter, diastolic diameter, shortening fraction, ejection fraction and the presence of extrinsic compression. The patients were studied preoperatively and between the 45th and 60th postoperative days. The parameters were still within normal clinical ranges. We concluded that this type of reconstruction does not harm the patients in terms of their cardiac function.

  4. Predicting the performance of motor imagery in stroke patients: multivariate pattern analysis of functional MRI data.

    PubMed

    Park, Chang-hyun; Chang, Won Hyuk; Lee, Minji; Kwon, Gyu Hyun; Kim, Laehyun; Kim, Sung Tae; Kim, Yun-Hee

    2015-01-01

    In a brain-computer interface for stroke rehabilitation, motor imagery is a preferred means for providing a gateway to an effector action or behavior. However, stroke patients often exhibit failure to comply with motor imagery, and therefore their motor imagery performance is highly variable. We sought to identify motor cortical areas responsible for motor imagery performance in stroke patients, specifically by using a multivariate pattern analysis of functional magnetic resonance imaging data. We adopted an imaginary finger tapping task in which motor imagery performance could be monitored for 12 chronic stroke patients with subcortical infarcts and 12 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. We identified the typical activation pattern elicited for motor imagery in healthy controls, as computed over the voxels within each searchlight in the motor cortex. Then we measured the similarity of each individual's activation pattern to the typical activation pattern. In terms of activation levels, the stroke patients showed no activation in the ipsilesional primary motor cortex (M1); in terms of activation patterns, they showed lower similarity to the typical activation pattern in the area than the healthy controls. Furthermore, the stroke patients were better able to perform motor imagery if their activation patterns in the bilateral supplementary motor areas and ipsilesional M1 were close to the typical activation pattern. These findings suggest functional roles of the motor cortical areas for compliance with motor imagery in stroke, which can be applied to the implementation of motor imagery-based brain-computer interface for stroke rehabilitation. © The Author(s) 2014.

  5. Platysma Motor Nerve Transfer for Restoring Marginal Mandibular Nerve Function

    PubMed Central

    Jensson, David; Weninger, Wolfgang J.; Schmid, Melanie; Meng, Stefan; Tzou, Chieh-Han John

    2016-01-01

    Background: Injuries of the marginal mandibular nerve (MMN) of the facial nerve result in paralysis of the lower lip muscle depressors and an asymmetrical smile. Nerve reconstruction, when possible, is the method of choice; however, in cases of long nerve gaps or delayed nerve reconstruction, conventional nerve repairs may be difficult to perform or may provide suboptimal outcomes. Herein, we investigate the anatomical technical feasibility of transfer of the platysma motor nerve (PMN) to the MMN for restoration of lower lip function, and we present a clinical case where this nerve transfer was successfully performed. Methods: Ten adult fresh cadavers were dissected. Measurements included the number of MMN and PMN branches, the maximal length of dissection of the PMN from the parotid, and the distance from the anterior border of the parotid to the facial artery. The PMN reach for direct coaptation to the MMN at the level of the crossing with the facial artery was assessed. We performed histomorphometric analysis of the MMN and PMN branches. Results: The anatomy of the MMN and PMN was consistent in all dissections, with an average number of subbranches of 1.5 for the MMN and 1.2 for the PMN. The average maximal length of dissection of the PMN was 46.5 mm, and in every case, tension-free coaptation with the MMN was possible. Histomorphometric analysis demonstrated that the MMN contained an average of 3,866 myelinated fiber counts per millimeter, and the PMN contained 5,025. After a 3-year follow-up of the clinical case, complete recovery of MMN function was observed, without the need of central relearning and without functional or aesthetic impairment resulting from denervation of the platysma muscle. Conclusions: PMN to MMN transfer is an anatomically feasible procedure for reconstruction of isolated MMN injuries. In our patient, by direct nerve coaptation, a faster and full recovery of lower lip muscle depressors was achieved without the need of central

  6. Esophageal dilation in eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Richter, Joel E

    2015-10-01

    Tissue remodeling with scaring is common in adult EoE patients with long standing disease. This is the major factor contributing to their complaints of solid food dysphagia and recurrent food impactions. The best tests to define the degree of remodeling are barium esophagram, high resolution manometry and endoscopy. Many physicians are fearful to dilate EoE patients because of concerns about mucosal tears and perforations. However, multiple recent case series attest to the safety of esophageal dilation and its efficacy with many patients having symptom relief for an average of two years. This chapter will review the sordid history of esophageal dilation in EoE patients and outline how to perform this procedure safely. The key is graduated dilation over one to several sessions to a diameter of 15-18 mm. Postprocedural pain is to be expected and mucosal tears are a sign of successful dilation, not complications. In some healthy adults, occasional dilation may be preferred to regular use of medications or restricted diets. This approach is now supported by recent EoE consensus statements and societal guidelines.

  7. Impact of a Community-Based Programme for Motor Development on Gross Motor Skills and Cognitive Function in Preschool Children from Disadvantaged Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Draper, Catherine E.; Achmat, Masturah; Forbes, Jared; Lambert, Estelle V.

    2012-01-01

    The aims of the studies were to assess the impact of the Little Champs programme for motor development on (1) the gross motor skills, and (2) cognitive function of children in the programme. In study 1, 118 children from one Early Childhood Development Centre (ECDC) were tested using the Test of Gross Motor Development-2, and in study 2, 83…

  8. Impact of a Community-Based Programme for Motor Development on Gross Motor Skills and Cognitive Function in Preschool Children from Disadvantaged Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Draper, Catherine E.; Achmat, Masturah; Forbes, Jared; Lambert, Estelle V.

    2012-01-01

    The aims of the studies were to assess the impact of the Little Champs programme for motor development on (1) the gross motor skills, and (2) cognitive function of children in the programme. In study 1, 118 children from one Early Childhood Development Centre (ECDC) were tested using the Test of Gross Motor Development-2, and in study 2, 83…

  9. Non-motor function of the midbrain dopaminergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Da Cunha, Claudio; Wietzikoski, Evellyn Claudia; Bortolanza, Mariza; Dombrowski, Patricia Andréia; dos Santos, Lucélia Mendes; Boschen, Suelen Lúcio; Miyoshi, Edmar; Vital, Maria Aparecida Barbato Frazão; Boerngen-Lacerda, Roseli; Andreatini, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    The roles of the nigrostriatal pathway are far beyond the simple control of motor functions. The tonic release of dopamine in the dorsal and ventral striatum controls the choice of proper actions toward a given environmental situation. In the striatum, a specific action is triggered by a specific stimulus associated with it. When the subject faces a novel and salient stimulus, the phasic release of dopamine allows synaptic plasticity in the cortico-striatal synapses. Neurons of different regions of cortical areas make synapses that converge to the same medium spine neurons of the striatum. The convergent associations form functional units encoding body parts, objects, locations, and symbolic representations of the subject's world. Such units emerge in the striatum in a repetitive manner, like a mosaic of broken mirrors. The phasic release of dopamine allows the association of units to encode an action of the subject directed to an object or location with the outcome of this action. Reinforced stimulus-action-outcome associations will affect future decision making when the same stimulus (object, location, idea) is presented to the subject in the future. In the absence of a minimal amount of striatal dopamine, no action is initiated as seen in Parkinson's disease subjects. The abnormal and improper association of these units leads to the initiation of unpurposeful and sometimes repetitive actions, as those observed in dyskinetic patients. The association of an excessive reinforcement of some actions, like drug consumption, leads to drug addiction. Improper associations of ideas and unpleasant outcomes may be related to traumatic and depressive symptoms common in many diseases, including Parkinson's disease. The same can be said about the learning and memory impairments observed in demented and nondemented Parkinson's disease patients.

  10. Changes in visual and sensory-motor resting-state functional connectivity support motor learning by observing

    PubMed Central

    McGregor, Heather R.

    2015-01-01

    Motor learning occurs not only through direct first-hand experience but also through observation (Mattar AA, Gribble PL. Neuron 46: 153–160, 2005). When observing the actions of others, we activate many of the same brain regions involved in performing those actions ourselves (Malfait N, Valyear KF, Culham JC, Anton JL, Brown LE, Gribble PL. J Cogn Neurosci 22: 1493–1503, 2010). Links between neural systems for vision and action have been reported in neurophysiological (Strafella AP, Paus T. Neuroreport 11: 2289–2292, 2000; Watkins KE, Strafella AP, Paus T. Neuropsychologia 41: 989–994, 2003), brain imaging (Buccino G, Binkofski F, Fink GR, Fadiga L, Fogassi L, Gallese V, Seitz RJ, Zilles K, Rizzolatti G, Freund HJ. Eur J Neurosci 13: 400–404, 2001; Iacoboni M, Woods RP, Brass M, Bekkering H, Mazziotta JC, Rizzolatti G. Science 286: 2526–2528, 1999), and eye tracking (Flanagan JR, Johansson RS. Nature 424: 769–771, 2003) studies. Here we used a force field learning paradigm coupled with resting-state fMRI to investigate the brain areas involved in motor learning by observing. We examined changes in resting-state functional connectivity (FC) after an observational learning task and found a network consisting of V5/MT, cerebellum, and primary motor and somatosensory cortices in which changes in FC were correlated with the amount of motor learning achieved through observation, as assessed behaviorally after resting-state fMRI scans. The observed FC changes in this network are not due to visual attention to motion or observation of movement errors but rather are specifically linked to motor learning. These results support the idea that brain networks linking action observation and motor control also facilitate motor learning. PMID:25995349

  11. Changes in visual and sensory-motor resting-state functional connectivity support motor learning by observing.

    PubMed

    McGregor, Heather R; Gribble, Paul L

    2015-07-01

    Motor learning occurs not only through direct first-hand experience but also through observation (Mattar AA, Gribble PL. Neuron 46: 153-160, 2005). When observing the actions of others, we activate many of the same brain regions involved in performing those actions ourselves (Malfait N, Valyear KF, Culham JC, Anton JL, Brown LE, Gribble PL. J Cogn Neurosci 22: 1493-1503, 2010). Links between neural systems for vision and action have been reported in neurophysiological (Strafella AP, Paus T. Neuroreport 11: 2289-2292, 2000; Watkins KE, Strafella AP, Paus T. Neuropsychologia 41: 989-994, 2003), brain imaging (Buccino G, Binkofski F, Fink GR, Fadiga L, Fogassi L, Gallese V, Seitz RJ, Zilles K, Rizzolatti G, Freund HJ. Eur J Neurosci 13: 400-404, 2001; Iacoboni M, Woods RP, Brass M, Bekkering H, Mazziotta JC, Rizzolatti G. Science 286: 2526-2528, 1999), and eye tracking (Flanagan JR, Johansson RS. Nature 424: 769-771, 2003) studies. Here we used a force field learning paradigm coupled with resting-state fMRI to investigate the brain areas involved in motor learning by observing. We examined changes in resting-state functional connectivity (FC) after an observational learning task and found a network consisting of V5/MT, cerebellum, and primary motor and somatosensory cortices in which changes in FC were correlated with the amount of motor learning achieved through observation, as assessed behaviorally after resting-state fMRI scans. The observed FC changes in this network are not due to visual attention to motion or observation of movement errors but rather are specifically linked to motor learning. These results support the idea that brain networks linking action observation and motor control also facilitate motor learning. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  12. Functional diversity of ES cell derived motor neuron subtypes revealed through intraspinal transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Peljto, Mirza; Dasen, Jeremy S.; Mazzoni, Esteban O.; Jessell, Thomas M.; Wichterle, Hynek

    2010-01-01

    Summary Cultured ES cells can form different classes of neurons, but whether these neurons can acquire specialized subtype features typical of neurons in vivo remains unclear. We show here that mouse ES cells can be directed to form highly specific motor neuron subtypes in the absence of added factors, through a differentiation program that relies on endogenous Wnts, FGFs, and Hh – mimicking the normal program of motor neuron subtype differentiation. Molecular markers that characterize motor neuron subtypes anticipate the functional properties of these neurons in vivo: ES motor neurons grafted isochronically into chick spinal cord settle in appropriate columnar domains and select axonal trajectories with a fidelity that matches that of their in vivo generated counterparts. ES motor neurons can therefore be programmed in a predictive manner to acquire molecular and functional properties that characterize one of the many dozens of specialized motor neuron subtypes that exist in vivo. PMID:20804971

  13. Analysis of functional networks involved in motor execution and motor imagery using combined hierarchical clustering analysis and independent component analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuqing; Chen, Huafu; Gong, Qiyong; Shen, Shan; Gao, Qing

    2010-06-01

    Cognitive experiments involving motor execution (ME) and motor imagery (MI) have been intensively studied using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). However, the functional networks of a multitask paradigm which include ME and MI were not widely explored. In this article, we aimed to investigate the functional networks involved in MI and ME using a method combining the hierarchical clustering analysis (HCA) and the independent component analysis (ICA). Ten right-handed subjects were recruited to participate a multitask experiment with conditions such as visual cue, MI, ME and rest. The results showed that four activation clusters were found including parts of the visual network, ME network, the MI network and parts of the resting state network. Furthermore, the integration among these functional networks was also revealed. The findings further demonstrated that the combined HCA with ICA approach was an effective method to analyze the fMRI data of multitasks. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Lower esophageal sphincter pressure in histologic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Welch, R W; Luckmann, K; Ricks, P; Drake, S T; Bannayan, G; Owensby, L

    1980-06-01

    The fasting lower esophageal sphincter pressure of 18 normal volunteers was compared to 22 patients with symptoms and objective evidence of gastroesophageal reflux. Lower esophageal sphincter pressure was measured by rapid pull-through using an 8-lumen radially perfused catheter that sampled pressure every45 degrees around the circumference of the sphincter. The 22 reflux patients were subdivided for analysis into two groups, those with an acute inflammatory infiltrate on biopsy and those without inflammation. Those patients without inflammatory esophagitis had normal sphincter pressures. Those with a definite inflammatory infiltrate had pressures significantly less than normal. The least reliable separation between normals and those with inflammatory esophagitis occurred in the anterior orientations. We conclude that while basal lower esophageal sphincter pressure measurement may identify patients with reflux and inflammatory esophagitis, it is of no help in identifying those patients with reflux unassociated with inflammation. Decreased basal fasting LESP does not appear to be the most important primary determinant of gastroesophageal reflux.

  15. [Esophageal moniliasis].

    PubMed

    Ramírez Degollado, J; Martínez Aguilar, A; Peniche Bojórquez, J

    1978-01-01

    Esophageal moniliasis is found rarely. It has been described mainly in chronically ill patients, who receive antibiotics and corticoesteroids. Early diagnosis and treatment betters their prognosis. Nine patients, 5 males and 4 females were studies in Hospital General del Centro Medico Nacional in Mexico City. Their agesranged from 26 to 77 years, with a mean of 49 years. All patients were chronically ill and 7 of them were treated in the intensive care unit. Three had disphagia, 3 retrosternal pain, and 2 gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Eight patients had high W.B.C., 3 irregular filling defects on X ray studies, and on endoscopy, all showed a pseudomembranous white yellowish exudate, underneath it the mucosa was inflamed, irregular and bled scantily. In 5 out of 9 patients biopsy and a smear confirmed the diagnosis. Eight patients treated with nystatin were cured. This disorder must be suspected in patients with disphagia and retrosternal pain; esophagoscopy is the prefered procedure to establish this diagnosis.

  16. Executive functions as predictors of visual-motor integration in children with intellectual disability.

    PubMed

    Memisevic, Haris; Sinanovic, Osman

    2013-12-01

    The goal of this study was to assess the relationship between visual-motor integration and executive functions, and in particular, the extent to which executive functions can predict visual-motor integration skills in children with intellectual disability. The sample consisted of 90 children (54 boys, 36 girls; M age = 11.3 yr., SD = 2.7, range 7-15) with intellectual disabilities of various etiologies. The measure of executive functions were 8 subscales of the Behavioral Rating Inventory of Executive Function (BRIEF) consisting of Inhibition, Shifting, Emotional Control, Initiating, Working memory, Planning, Organization of material, and Monitoring. Visual-motor integration was measured with the Acadia test of visual-motor integration (VMI). Regression analysis revealed that BRIEF subscales explained 38% of the variance in VMI scores. Of all the BRIEF subscales, only two were statistically significant predictors of visual-motor integration: Working memory and Monitoring. Possible implications of this finding are further elaborated.

  17. Methamphetamine abuse impairs motor cortical plasticity and function

    PubMed Central

    Huang, X; Chen, Y-Y; Shen, Y; Cao, X; Li, A; Liu, Q; Li, Z; Zhang, L-B; Dai, W; Tan, T; Arias-Carrion, O; Xue, Y-X; Su, H; Yuan, T-F

    2017-01-01

    Exposure to addictive drugs triggers synaptic plasticity in reward-related brain regions, such as the midbrain, nucleus accumbens and the prefrontal cortex. Effects of chronic drug exposure on other brain areas have not been fully investigated. Here, we characterize synaptic plasticity in motor cortex after methamphetamine self-administration in rats. We show that this causes a loss of corticostriatal plasticity in rat brain slices and impaired motor learning in the rotarod task. These findings are paralleled by the observation of a lack of transcranial magnetic stimulation-induced potentiation or depression of motor evoked potentials in human patients with addiction, along with poor performance in rotary pursuit task. Taken together, our results suggest that chronic methamphetamine use can affect behavioral performance via drug-evoked synaptic plasticity occluding physiological motor learning. PMID:28831198

  18. Methamphetamine abuse impairs motor cortical plasticity and function.

    PubMed

    Huang, X; Chen, Y-Y; Shen, Y; Cao, X; Li, A; Liu, Q; Li, Z; Zhang, L-B; Dai, W; Tan, T; Arias-Carrion, O; Xue, Y-X; Su, H; Yuan, T-F

    2017-09-01

    Exposure to addictive drugs triggers synaptic plasticity in reward-related brain regions, such as the midbrain, nucleus accumbens and the prefrontal cortex. Effects of chronic drug exposure on other brain areas have not been fully investigated. Here, we characterize synaptic plasticity in motor cortex after methamphetamine self-administration in rats. We show that this causes a loss of corticostriatal plasticity in rat brain slices and impaired motor learning in the rotarod task. These findings are paralleled by the observation of a lack of transcranial magnetic stimulation-induced potentiation or depression of motor evoked potentials in human patients with addiction, along with poor performance in rotary pursuit task. Taken together, our results suggest that chronic methamphetamine use can affect behavioral performance via drug-evoked synaptic plasticity occluding physiological motor learning.

  19. Overexpression of survival motor neuron improves neuromuscular function and motor neuron survival in mutant SOD1 mice.

    PubMed

    Turner, Bradley J; Alfazema, Neza; Sheean, Rebecca K; Sleigh, James N; Davies, Kay E; Horne, Malcolm K; Talbot, Kevin

    2014-04-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy results from diminished levels of survival motor neuron (SMN) protein in spinal motor neurons. Low levels of SMN also occur in models of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) caused by mutant superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) and genetic reduction of SMN levels exacerbates the phenotype of transgenic SOD1(G93A) mice. Here, we demonstrate that SMN protein is significantly reduced in the spinal cords of patients with sporadic ALS. To test the potential of SMN as a modifier of ALS, we overexpressed SMN in 2 different strains of SOD1(G93A) mice. Neuronal overexpression of SMN significantly preserved locomotor function, rescued motor neurons, and attenuated astrogliosis in spinal cords of SOD1(G93A) mice. Despite this, survival was not prolonged, most likely resulting from SMN mislocalization and depletion of gems in motor neurons of symptomatic mice. Our results reveal that SMN upregulation slows locomotor deficit onset and motor neuron loss in this mouse model of ALS. However, disruption of SMN nuclear complexes by high levels of mutant SOD1, even in the presence of SMN overexpression, might limit its survival promoting effects in this specific mouse model. Studies in emerging mouse models of ALS are therefore warranted to further explore the potential of SMN as a modifier of ALS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Cognitive and motor function of neurologically impaired extremely low birth weight children

    PubMed Central

    Bernardo, Janine; Friedman, Harriet; Minich, Nori; Taylor, H Gerry; Wilson-Costello, Deanne; Hack, Maureen

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Rates of neurological impairment among extremely low birth weight children (ELBW [<1 kg]) have decreased since 2000; however, their functioning is unexamined. OBJECTIVE: To compare motor and cognitive functioning of ELBW children with neurological impairment, including cerebral palsy and severe hypotonia/hypertonia, between two periods: 1990 to 1999 (n=83) and 2000 to 2005 (n=34). METHODS: Measures of function at 20 months corrected age included the Mental and Psychomotor Developmental Indexes of the Bayley Scales of Infant Development and the Gross Motor Functional Classification System as primary outcomes and individual motor function items as secondary outcomes. RESULTS: Analysis failed to reveal significant differences for the primary outcomes, although during 2000 to 2005, sitting significantly improved in children with neurological impairment (P=0.003). CONCLUSION: Decreases in rates of neurological impairment among ELBW children have been accompanied by a suggestion of improved motor function, although cognitive function has not changed. PMID:26435676

  1. Cognitive and motor function of neurologically impaired extremely low birth weight children.

    PubMed

    Bernardo, Janine; Friedman, Harriet; Minich, Nori; Taylor, H Gerry; Wilson-Costello, Deanne; Hack, Maureen

    2015-01-01

    Rates of neurological impairment among extremely low birth weight children (ELBW [<1 kg]) have decreased since 2000; however, their functioning is unexamined. To compare motor and cognitive functioning of ELBW children with neurological impairment, including cerebral palsy and severe hypotonia/hypertonia, between two periods: 1990 to 1999 (n=83) and 2000 to 2005 (n=34). Measures of function at 20 months corrected age included the Mental and Psychomotor Developmental Indexes of the Bayley Scales of Infant Development and the Gross Motor Functional Classification System as primary outcomes and individual motor function items as secondary outcomes. Analysis failed to reveal significant differences for the primary outcomes, although during 2000 to 2005, sitting significantly improved in children with neurological impairment (P=0.003). Decreases in rates of neurological impairment among ELBW children have been accompanied by a suggestion of improved motor function, although cognitive function has not changed.

  2. Esophageal replacement for end-stage benign esophageal disease.

    PubMed

    Watson, T J; DeMeester, T R; Kauer, W K; Peters, J H; Hagen, J A

    1998-06-01

    Benign esophageal diseases constitute a common group of disorders that are generally managed with medical therapy or surgery designed to improve foregut function. A small subset of patients, however, has advanced disease that requires esophageal replacement to achieve symptomatic relief. One hundred four patients with benign esophageal disease who underwent esophageal reconstruction over a 21-year period (1975 to 1996) were reviewed retrospectively. Dysphagia was the major symptom driving surgery in 80% of the patients. Colon was used to reconstruct the esophagus in 85 patients; stomach, in 10 patients; and jejunum, in 9 patients. Forty-two patients who had lived with their reconstruction for 1 year or more answered a postoperative questionnaire concerning their long-term functional outcome. In the 104 patients, the primary underlying abnormality leading to esophageal replacement was end-stage gastroesophageal reflux (37 patients), an advanced motility disorder (37 patients), traumatic, iatrogenic or spontaneous perforation (15 patients), corrosive injury (8 patients), congenital abnormality (6 patients), or extensive leiomyoma (1 patient). Ninety-eight percent of patients reported that the operation had cured or improved the symptom driving surgery. Ninety-three percent were satisfied with the outcome of the operation. The overall hospital mortality rate was 2%, and the median hospital stay was 17 days. Graft necrosis occurred in 3% of patients, and anastomotic leak occurred in 6% of patients (or 2% of the total number of anastomoses). Esophageal replacement for benign disease can be accomplished with a low mortality rate and a marked improvement in alimentation. Reconstruction restores the pleasure of eating and is viewed by the patient to be highly successful.

  3. Ocular Motor Score (OMS): a clinical tool to evaluating ocular motor functions in children. Intrarater and inter-rater agreement.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Monica; Teär Fahnehjelm, Kristina; Rydberg, Agneta; Ygge, Jan

    2015-08-01

    Ocular motor score (OMS) is a new clinical test protocol for evaluating ocular motor functions in children and young adults. OMS is a set of 15 important and relevant non-invasive ocular motor function parameters derived from clinical practice. The aim of the study was to evaluate OMS according to intrarater and inter-rater agreement. Forty children aged 4-10 years, 23 girls median age 6.5 (range 4.3-9.3) and 17 boys median age 5.8 (range 4.1-9.8) were included. The ocular motor functions were assessed and scored according to the OMS protocol. The examinations were videotaped. To obtain the intrarater agreement, the first author examined and scored the children twice, first in the clinic and 2 weeks later by watching the videotape. To obtain the inter-rater agreement, three other raters independently scored the ocular motor function of the children by watching the videotapes. The overall observed intrarater agreement was 88%, and the observed inter-rater agreement between the three raters was 80%. For none of the subtests was there an observed intrarater agreement lower than 65%. Three of the subtests had an observed inter-rater agreement of 65% or below. Overall there was high observed intra- and inter-rater agreement for the OMS test protocol. Subtests such as saccades and smooth pursuit were more difficult for raters to score similarly according the clinical OMS test protocol. © 2015 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Maturation of Sensori-Motor Functional Responses in the Preterm Brain.

    PubMed

    Allievi, Alessandro G; Arichi, Tomoki; Tusor, Nora; Kimpton, Jessica; Arulkumaran, Sophie; Counsell, Serena J; Edwards, A David; Burdet, Etienne

    2016-01-01

    Preterm birth engenders an increased risk of conditions like cerebral palsy and therefore this time may be crucial for the brain's developing sensori-motor system. However, little is known about how cortical sensori-motor function matures at this time, whether development is influenced by experience, and about its role in spontaneous motor behavior. We aimed to systematically characterize spatial and temporal maturation of sensori-motor functional brain activity across this period using functional MRI and a custom-made robotic stimulation device. We studied 57 infants aged from 30 + 2 to 43 + 2 weeks postmenstrual age. Following both induced and spontaneous right wrist movements, we saw consistent positive blood oxygen level-dependent functional responses in the contralateral (left) primary somatosensory and motor cortices. In addition, we saw a maturational trend toward faster, higher amplitude, and more spatially dispersed functional responses; and increasing integration of the ipsilateral hemisphere and sensori-motor associative areas. We also found that interhemispheric functional connectivity was significantly related to ex-utero exposure, suggesting the influence of experience-dependent mechanisms. At term equivalent age, we saw a decrease in both response amplitude and interhemispheric functional connectivity, and an increase in spatial specificity, culminating in the establishment of a sensori-motor functional response similar to that seen in adults. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  5. Maturation of Sensori-Motor Functional Responses in the Preterm Brain

    PubMed Central

    Allievi, Alessandro G.; Arichi, Tomoki; Tusor, Nora; Kimpton, Jessica; Arulkumaran, Sophie; Counsell, Serena J.; Edwards, A. David; Burdet, Etienne

    2016-01-01

    Preterm birth engenders an increased risk of conditions like cerebral palsy and therefore this time may be crucial for the brain's developing sensori-motor system. However, little is known about how cortical sensori-motor function matures at this time, whether development is influenced by experience, and about its role in spontaneous motor behavior. We aimed to systematically characterize spatial and temporal maturation of sensori-motor functional brain activity across this period using functional MRI and a custom-made robotic stimulation device. We studied 57 infants aged from 30 + 2 to 43 + 2 weeks postmenstrual age. Following both induced and spontaneous right wrist movements, we saw consistent positive blood oxygen level–dependent functional responses in the contralateral (left) primary somatosensory and motor cortices. In addition, we saw a maturational trend toward faster, higher amplitude, and more spatially dispersed functional responses; and increasing integration of the ipsilateral hemisphere and sensori-motor associative areas. We also found that interhemispheric functional connectivity was significantly related to ex-utero exposure, suggesting the influence of experience-dependent mechanisms. At term equivalent age, we saw a decrease in both response amplitude and interhemispheric functional connectivity, and an increase in spatial specificity, culminating in the establishment of a sensori-motor functional response similar to that seen in adults. PMID:26491066

  6. Esophageal atresia and tracheo-esophageal fistula.

    PubMed

    van der Zee, David C; Tytgat, Stefaan H A; van Herwaarden, Maud Y A

    2017-04-01

    Management of esophageal atresia has merged from correction of the anomaly to the complete spectrum of management of esophageal atresia and all its sequelae. It is the purpose of this article to give an overview of all aspects involved in taking care of patients with esophageal atresia between January 2011 and June 2016, as well as the patients who were referred from other centers. Esophageal atresia is a complex anomaly that has many aspects that have to be dealt with and complications to be solved. By centralizing these patients in centers of expertise it is believed that the best care can be given. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Esophageal distensibility as a measure of disease severity in patients with eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Nicodème, Frédéric; Hirano, Ikuo; Chen, Joan; Robinson, Kenika; Lin, Zhiyue; Xiao, Yinglian; Gonsalves, Nirmala; Kwasny, Mary J; Kahrilas, Peter J; Pandolfino, John E

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to assess whether measurements of esophageal distensibility, made by high-resolution impedance planimetry, correlated with important clinical outcomes in patients with eosinophilic esophagitis. Seventy patients with eosinophilic esophagitis (50 men; age, 18-68 y) underwent endoscopy with esophageal biopsy collection and high-resolution impedance planimetry using the functional lumen-imaging probe. The patients were followed up prospectively for an average of 9.2 months (range, 3-14 mo), and the risk of food impaction, requirement for dilation, and symptom severity during the follow-up period was determined from medical records. Esophageal distensibility metrics and the severity of mucosal eosinophilia at baseline were compared between patients presenting with and without food impaction and those requiring or not requiring esophageal dilation. Logistic regression and stratification assessments were used to assess the predictive value of esophageal distensibility metrics in assessing risk of food impaction, the need for dilation, and continued symptoms. Patients with prior food impactions had significantly lower distensibility plateau (DP) values than those with solid food dysphagia alone. In addition, patients sustaining food impaction and requiring esophageal dilation during the follow-up period had significantly lower DP values than those who did not. The severity of mucosal eosinophilia did not correlate with risk for food impaction, the requirement for dilation during follow-up evaluation, or DP values. Reduced esophageal distensibility predicts risk for food impaction and the requirement for esophageal dilation in patients with eosinophilic esophagitis. The severity of mucosal eosinophilia was not predictive of these outcomes and had a poor correlation with esophageal distensibility. Copyright © 2013 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Predictive Effects of Lung function test on Postoperative Pneumonia in Squamous Esophageal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ran; Dong, Wei; Shen, Hongchang; Ni, Yang; Zhang, Tiehong; Wang, Yibing; Du, Jiajun

    2016-03-23

    Pulmonary function tests had prospective implications for postoperative pneumonia, which occurred frequently after esophagectomy. Understanding factors that were associated with pulmonary infection may help in patient selection and postoperative management. We performed a retrospective review of 2 independent cohorts including 216 patients who underwent esophagectomy between November 2011 and May 2014, aiming at identifying predictors of primary pneumonia. Univariate analysis was used to identify potential covariates for the development of primary pneumonia. Adjustments for multiple comparisons were made using False Discovery Rate (FDR) (Holm-Bonferroni method). Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to identify independent predictors and construct a regression model based on a training cohort (n = 166) and then the regression model was validated using an independent cohort (n = 50). It showed that low PEF (hazard ratio 0.97, P = 0.009) was independent risk factors for the development of primary pneumonia in multivariate analyses and had a predictive effect for primary pneumonia (AUC = 0.691 and 0.851 for training and validation data set, respectively). Therefore, PEF has clinical value in predicting postoperative pneumonia after esophagectomy and it may serve as an indicator of preoperative lung function training.

  9. Risk factors for eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Philpott, H; Nandurkar, S; Royce, S G; Thien, F; Gibson, P R

    2014-08-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic antigen driven disease, whereby food and/or aeroallergens result in inflammation and luminal narrowing, and the clinical symptoms of dysphagia and food bolus obstruction events (FBOE). Established risk factors are male gender, Caucasian race and atopy. Increased risk amongst family members, and a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in a gene coding thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) on the pseudoautosomal region of the X and Y chromosomes supports a genetic predisposition. Environmental factors including the timing and nature of food and aeroallergen exposure to the developing immune system may be important, whilst esophageal barrier function integrity and the influence of microbiota are worthy of future research.

  10. Functional electrostimulation of muscles as a method for restoring motor functions.

    PubMed

    Vitenzon, A S; Mironov, E M; Petrushanskaya, K A

    2005-09-01

    The main functions of a method of functional electrical stimulation of muscles (FES) are described: diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic. The main indication for using the FES method is a deficiency of muscle function, which may be organic (due to lesions to neuromuscular structures) or functional (associated with relaxation of the muscular apparatus). The five most significant functions of the FES method were established: 1) identification of correctable movements and stimulable muscles; 2) identification of the amplitude and time program for stimulation; 3) stimulation regimes for pathological gaits; 4) stimulation parameters; 5) positioning of skin electrodes on the human body. Using the example of two severe central nervous system pathologies (spinal cord lesions in the lumbosacral area and hemiparesis of cerebral origin), the positive effects of FES on the process of motor rehabilitation of this category of patients were demonstrated.

  11. Motor Cortical Functional Geometry in Cerebral Palsy and its Relationship to Disability

    PubMed Central

    Kesar, T.M.; Sawaki, L.; Burdette, J. H.; Cabrera, N.; Kolaski, K.; Smith, B.P.; O’Shea, T. M.; Koman, L. A.; Wittenberg, G. F.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate motor cortical map patterns in children with diplegic and hemiplegic cerebral palsy (CP), and the relationships between motor cortical geometry and motor function in CP. Methods Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was used to map motor cortical representations of the first dorsal interosseus (FDI) and tibialis anterior (TA) muscles in 13 children with CP (age 9–16 years, 6 males.) The Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM) and Melbourne upper extremity function were used to quantify motor ability. Results In the hemiplegic participants (N=7), the affected (right) FDI cortical representation was mapped on the ipsilateral (N=4), contralateral (N=2), or bilateral (N=1) cortex. Participants with diplegia (N=6) showed either bilateral (N=2) or contralateral (N=4) cortical hand maps. The FDI and TA motor map center-of-gravity mediolateral location ranged from 2–8 cm and 3–6 cm from the midline, respectively. Among diplegics, more lateral FDI representation locations were associated with lower Melbourne scores, i.e. worse hand motor function (Spearman’s Rho = −0.841, p=0.036) Conclusions Abnormalities in TMS-derived motor maps cut across the clinical classifications of hemiplegic and diplegic CP. The lateralization of the upper and lower extremity motor representation demonstrates reorganization after insults to the affected hemispheres of both diplegic and hemiplegic children. Significance The current study is a step towards defining the relationship between changes in motor maps and functional impairments in CP. These results suggest the need for further work to develop improved classification schemes that integrate clinical, radiologic, and neurophysiologic measures in CP. PMID:22153667

  12. Neural pathways mediating cross education of motor function

    PubMed Central

    Ruddy, Kathy L.; Carson, Richard G.

    2013-01-01

    Cross education is the process whereby training of one limb gives rise to enhancements in the performance of the opposite, untrained limb. Despite interest in this phenomenon having been sustained for more than a century, a comprehensive explanation of the mediating neural mechanisms remains elusive. With new evidence emerging that cross education may have therapeutic utility, the need to provide a principled evidential basis upon which to design interventions becomes ever more pressing. Generally, mechanistic accounts of cross education align with one of two explanatory frameworks. Models of the “cross activation” variety encapsulate the observation that unilateral execution of a movement task gives rise to bilateral increases in corticospinal excitability. The related conjecture is that such distributed activity, when present during unilateral practice, leads to simultaneous adaptations in neural circuits that project to the muscles of the untrained limb, thus facilitating subsequent performance of the task. Alternatively, “bilateral access” models entail that motor engrams formed during unilateral practice, may subsequently be utilized bilaterally—that is, by the neural circuitry that constitutes the control centers for movements of both limbs. At present there is a paucity of direct evidence that allows the corresponding neural processes to be delineated, or their relative contributions in different task contexts to be ascertained. In the current review we seek to synthesize and assimilate the fragmentary information that is available, including consideration of knowledge that has emerged as a result of technological advances in structural and functional brain imaging. An emphasis upon task dependency is maintained throughout, the conviction being that the neural mechanisms that mediate cross education may only be understood in this context. PMID:23908616

  13. Somatotopic mapping of the human primary sensorimotor cortex during motor imagery and motor execution by functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Stippich, Christoph; Ochmann, Henrik; Sartor, Klaus

    2002-10-04

    The human primary sensorimotor cortex was investigated for somatotopic organization during motor imagery (IM) which was compared to motor execution (EM). Block designed BOLD (blood oxygen level dependent)-functional magnetic resonance imaging at 1.5 Tesla was applied in 14 right handed volunteers during imagined and executed tongue, finger and toe movements. BOLD-clusters were assessed for anatomically correct sensorimotor localization. Euklidian coordinates, relative signal change and correlation to the applied reference function were determined. Statistical means were calculated. IM recruited somatotopically organized primary sensorimotor representations of the precentral gyrus that reflected the homunculus and overlapped in part with EM representations. Mean BOLD-signals ranged from 1.93 to 3.18% for EM, and from 0.73 to 1.47% for IM. The results support the hypothesis that the primary sensorimotor cortex is active during IM and that IM and EM share common functional circuits.

  14. Motor function and incident dementia: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Kueper, Jacqueline Kathleen; Speechley, Mark; Lingum, Navena Rebecca; Montero-Odasso, Manuel

    2017-09-01

    cognitive and mobility decline are interrelated processes, whereby mobility decline coincides or precedes the onset of cognitive decline. to assess whether there is an association between performance on motor function tests and incident dementia. electronic database, grey literature and hand searching identified studies testing for associations between baseline motor function and incident dementia in older adults. of 2,540 potentially relevant documents, 37 met the final inclusion criteria and were reviewed qualitatively. Three meta-analyses were conducted using data from 10 studies. Three main motor domains-upper limb motor function, parkinsonism and lower limb motor function-emerged as associated with increased risk of incident dementia. Studies including older adults without neurological overt disease found a higher risk of incident dementia associated with poorer performance on composite motor function scores, balance and gait velocity (meta-analysis pooled HR = 1.94, 95% CI: 1.41, 2.65). Mixed results were found across different study samples for upper limb motor function, overall parkinsonism (meta-analysis pooled OR = 3.05, 95% CI: 1.31, 7.08), bradykinesia and rigidity. Studies restricted to older adults with Parkinson's Disease found weak or no association with incident dementia even for motor domains highly associated in less restrictive samples. Tremor was not associated with an increased risk of dementia in any population (meta-analysis pooled HR = 0.80, 95% CI 0.31, 2.03). lower limb motor function was associated with increased risk of developing dementia, while tremor and hand grip strength were not. Our results support future research investigating the inclusion of quantitative motor assessment, specifically gait velocity tests, for clinical dementia risk evaluation.

  15. Diagnosis and management of esophageal achalasia.

    PubMed

    Stavropoulos, Stavros N; Friedel, David; Modayil, Rani; Parkman, Henry P

    2016-09-13

    Achalasia is a rare esophageal motility disorder that is usually idiopathic in origin. It is characterized by dysphagia, and patients often have chest pain, regurgitation, weight loss, and an abnormal barium radiograph showing esophageal dilation with narrowing at the gastroesophageal junction. Abnormal or absent esophageal peristalsis and impaired relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) are typically seen on esophageal manometry. The advent of high resolution manometry (HRM) has allowed more precise diagnosis of achalasia, subtype designation, and differentiation from other esophageal motor disorders with an initial seminal publication in 2008 followed by further refinements of what has been termed the Chicago classification. Potential treatments include drugs, endoscopic botulinum toxin injection, balloon dilation, traditional surgery (usually laparoscopic Heller myotomy; LHM), and a novel, less invasive, natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) approach to Heller myotomy termed peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM). The first human POEM was performed in 2008, with the first publication appearing in 2010 and evidence now rapidly accumulating showing POEM to be comparable to traditional surgery in terms of clinical success and radiologic and manometric post-therapy outcomes. This review discusses the diagnosis and management of achalasia with particular emphasis on the recent developments of HRM and POEM, which arguably represent the most important advances in the field since the advent of laparoscopic Heller myotomy in the 1990s.

  16. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Neurofeedback-guided Motor Imagery Training and Motor Training for Parkinson’s Disease: Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Leena; Morris, Monica Busse; Brosnan, Meadhbh; Turner, Duncan L.; Morris, Huw R.; Linden, David E. J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging (rt-fMRI) neurofeedback (NF) uses feedback of the patient’s own brain activity to self-regulate brain networks which in turn could lead to a change in behavior and clinical symptoms. The objective was to determine the effect of NF and motor training (MOT) alone on motor and non-motor functions in Parkinson’s Disease (PD) in a 10-week small Phase I randomized controlled trial. Methods: Thirty patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD; Hoehn and Yahr I-III) and no significant comorbidity took part in the trial with random allocation to two groups. Group 1 (NF: 15 patients) received rt-fMRI-NF with MOT. Group 2 (MOT: 15 patients) received MOT alone. The primary outcome measure was the Movement Disorder Society—Unified PD Rating Scale-Motor scale (MDS-UPDRS-MS), administered pre- and post-intervention “off-medication”. The secondary outcome measures were the “on-medication” MDS-UPDRS, the PD Questionnaire-39, and quantitative motor assessments after 4 and 10 weeks. Results: Patients in the NF group were able to upregulate activity in the supplementary motor area (SMA) by using motor imagery. They improved by an average of 4.5 points on the MDS-UPDRS-MS in the “off-medication” state (95% confidence interval: −2.5 to −6.6), whereas the MOT group improved only by 1.9 points (95% confidence interval +3.2 to −6.8). The improvement in the intervention group meets the minimal clinically important difference which is also on par with other non-invasive therapies such as repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS). However, the improvement did not differ significantly between the groups. No adverse events were reported in either group. Interpretation: This Phase I study suggests that NF combined with MOT is safe and improves motor symptoms immediately after treatment, but larger trials are needed to explore its superiority over active control conditions. PMID:27375451

  17. A form of motor cortical plasticity that correlates with recovery of function after brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Ramanathan, Dhakshin; Conner, James M.; H. Tuszynski, Mark

    2006-01-01

    To investigate functional mechanisms underlying cortical motor plasticity in the intact and injured brain, we used “behaviorally relevant,” long-duration intracortical microstimulation. We now report the existence of complex, multijoint movements revealed with a 500-msec duration intracortical stimulation in rat motor cortex. A consistent topographic distribution of these complex motor patterns is present across the motor cortex in naïve rats. We further document the plasticity of these complex movement patterns after focal cortical injury, with a significant expansion of specific complex movement representations in response to rehabilitative training after injury. Notably, the degree of functional recovery attained after cortical injury and rehabilitation correlates significantly with a specific feature of map reorganization, the ability to reexpress movement patterns disrupted by the initial injury. This evidence suggests the existence of complex movement representations in the rat motor cortex that exhibit plasticity after injury and rehabilitation, serving as a relevant predictor of functional recovery. PMID:16837575

  18. Observing functional actions affects semantic processing of tools: evidence of a motor-to-semantic priming.

    PubMed

    De Bellis, Francesco; Ferrara, Antonia; Errico, Domenico; Panico, Francesco; Sagliano, Laura; Conson, Massimiliano; Trojano, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence shows that activation of motor information can favor identification of related tools, thus suggesting a strict link between motor and conceptual knowledge in cognitive representation of tools. However, the involvement of motor information in further semantic processing has not been elucidated. In three experiments, we aimed to ascertain whether motor information provided by observation of actions could affect processing of conceptual knowledge about tools. In Experiment 1, healthy participants judged whether pairs of tools evoking different functional handgrips had the same function. In Experiment 2 participants judged whether tools were paired with appropriate recipients. Finally, in Experiment 3 we again required functional judgments as in Experiment 1, but also included in the set of stimuli pairs of objects having different function and similar functional handgrips. In all experiments, pictures displaying either functional grasping (aimed to use tools) or structural grasping (just aimed to move tools independently from their use) were presented before each stimulus pair. The results demonstrated that, in comparison with structural grasping, observing functional grasping facilitates judgments about tools' function when objects did not imply the same functional manipulation (Experiment 1), whereas worsened such judgments when objects shared functional grasp (Experiment 3). Instead, action observation did not affect judgments concerning tool-recipient associations (Experiment 2). Our findings support a task-dependent influence of motor information on high-order conceptual tasks and provide further insights into how motor and conceptual processing about tools can interact.

  19. An Examination of the Relationship between Motor Coordination and Executive Functions in Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rigoli, Daniela; Piek, Jan P.; Kane, Robert; Oosterlaan, Jaap

    2012-01-01

    Aim: Research suggests important links between motor coordination and executive functions. The current study examined whether motor coordination predicts working memory, inhibition, and switching performance, extending previous research by accounting for attention-deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptomatology and other confounding factors,…

  20. Stimulation through Simulation? Motor Imagery and Functional Reorganization in Hemiplegic Stroke Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson-Frey, Scott H.

    2004-01-01

    A key factor influencing reorganization of function in damaged neural networks of the adult brain is stimulation. How to stimulate motor areas of patients with paralyses is a formidable challenge. One possibility is to use internal movement simulations, or motor imagery, as an alternative to conventional therapeutic interventions that require…

  1. Motor Performance of Children with Mild Intellectual Disability and Borderline Intellectual Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vuijk, P. J.; Hartman, E.; Scherder, E.; Visscher, C.

    2010-01-01

    Background: There is a relatively small body of research on the motor performance of children with mild intellectual disabilities (MID) and borderline intellectual functioning (BIF). Adequate levels of motor skills may contribute to lifelong enjoyment of physical activity, participation in sports and healthy lifestyles. The present study compares…

  2. Motor Performance of Children with Mild Intellectual Disability and Borderline Intellectual Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vuijk, P. J.; Hartman, E.; Scherder, E.; Visscher, C.

    2010-01-01

    Background: There is a relatively small body of research on the motor performance of children with mild intellectual disabilities (MID) and borderline intellectual functioning (BIF). Adequate levels of motor skills may contribute to lifelong enjoyment of physical activity, participation in sports and healthy lifestyles. The present study compares…

  3. On the Relationship between Motor Performance and Executive Functioning in Children with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartman, E.; Houwen, S.; Scherder, E.; Visscher, C.

    2010-01-01

    Background: It has been suggested that children with intellectual disabilities (ID) have motor problems and higher-order cognitive deficits. The aim of this study was to examine the motor skills and executive functions in school-age children with borderline and mild ID. The second aim was to investigate the relationship between the two performance…

  4. On the Relationship between Motor Performance and Executive Functioning in Children with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartman, E.; Houwen, S.; Scherder, E.; Visscher, C.

    2010-01-01

    Background: It has been suggested that children with intellectual disabilities (ID) have motor problems and higher-order cognitive deficits. The aim of this study was to examine the motor skills and executive functions in school-age children with borderline and mild ID. The second aim was to investigate the relationship between the two performance…

  5. An Examination of the Relationship between Motor Coordination and Executive Functions in Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rigoli, Daniela; Piek, Jan P.; Kane, Robert; Oosterlaan, Jaap

    2012-01-01

    Aim: Research suggests important links between motor coordination and executive functions. The current study examined whether motor coordination predicts working memory, inhibition, and switching performance, extending previous research by accounting for attention-deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptomatology and other confounding factors,…

  6. Fine Motor Skills and Executive Function Both Contribute to Kindergarten Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cameron, Claire E.; Brock, Laura L.; Murrah, William M.; Bell, Lindsay H.; Worzalla, Samantha L.; Grissmer, David; Morrison, Frederick J.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the contribution of executive function (EF) and multiple aspects of fine motor skills to achievement on 6 standardized assessments in a sample of middle-socioeconomic status kindergarteners. Three- and 4-year-olds' (n = 213) fine and gross motor skills were assessed in a home visit before kindergarten, EF was measured at fall…

  7. Relationship between Motor Skill Competency and Executive Function in Children with Down's Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schott, N.; Holfelder, B.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Previous studies suggest that children with Down's syndrome (DS), a genetically based neurodevelopmental disorder, demonstrate motor problems and cognitive deficits. The first aim of this study was to examine motor skills and executive functions (EFs) in school-age children with DS. The second aim was to investigate the relationship…

  8. Relationship between Motor Skill Competency and Executive Function in Children with Down's Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schott, N.; Holfelder, B.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Previous studies suggest that children with Down's syndrome (DS), a genetically based neurodevelopmental disorder, demonstrate motor problems and cognitive deficits. The first aim of this study was to examine motor skills and executive functions (EFs) in school-age children with DS. The second aim was to investigate the relationship…

  9. Failure of capsaicin-containing red pepper sauce suspension to induce esophageal motility response in patients with Barrett's esophagus.

    PubMed

    Király, A; Süto, G; Czimmer, J; Horváth, O P; Mózsik, G

    2001-01-01

    The physiologic importance of afferent sensory pathways in the esophageal motor functions has been recently recognised. Capsaicin-sensitive sensory afferents were shown to play a role in the maintenance of mucosal integrity of the GI tract, and regulation of human esophageal motility. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of topical application of capsaicin-containing red pepper sauce (Tabasco, 25%v/v, pH:7.0) suspension on the phasic activity of the human esophagus of healthy volunteers and patients with Barrett's esophagus. The diagnosis of Barrett's esophagus was based on the findings of esophagoscopy and histology taken from the squamocolumnar junction of the esophagus. Esophageal motility was measured by perfusion manometry before and after application of red pepper sauce. Capsaicin containing red pepper sauce increases the motility response (LES tone, contraction amplitude, propagation velocity) of the human esophagus in healthy volunteers. This response failed in patients with Barrett's esophagus. Impaired esophageal sensory motor function may serve as one etiologic role in the development of Barrett's esophagus.

  10. Intermittent Hypoxia Elicits Prolonged Restoration of Motor Function in Human SCI

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-10-1-0831 TITLE: Intermittent Hypoxia Elicits Prolonged Restoration of Motor Function in...Sep 30 2010 – Sep 29 2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Intermittent Hypoxia Elicits Prolonged Restoration of Motor 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Function in...injured (SCI) subjects designed to test the effects of a novel therapy, termed acute intermittent hypoxia (AIH), on voluntary limb function

  11. Global motion perception is associated with motor function in 2-year-old children.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Benjamin; McKinlay, Christopher J D; Chakraborty, Arijit; Anstice, Nicola S; Jacobs, Robert J; Paudel, Nabin; Yu, Tzu-Ying; Ansell, Judith M; Wouldes, Trecia A; Harding, Jane E

    2017-08-31

    The dorsal visual processing stream that includes V1, motion sensitive area V5 and the posterior parietal lobe, supports visually guided motor function. Two recent studies have reported associations between global motion perception, a behavioural measure of processing in V5, and motor function in pre-school and school aged children. This indicates a relationship between visual and motor development and also supports the use of global motion perception to assess overall dorsal stream function in studies of human neurodevelopment. We investigated whether associations between vision and motor function were present at 2 years of age, a substantially earlier stage of development. The Bayley III test of Infant and Toddler Development and measures of vision including visual acuity (Cardiff Acuity Cards), stereopsis (Lang stereotest) and global motion perception were attempted in 404 2-year-old children (±4 weeks). Global motion perception (quantified as a motion coherence threshold) was assessed by observing optokinetic nystagmus in response to random dot kinematograms of varying coherence. Linear regression revealed that global motion perception was modestly, but statistically significantly associated with Bayley III composite motor (r(2)=0.06, P<0.001, n=375) and gross motor scores (r(2)=0.06, p<0.001, n=375). The associations remained significant when language score was included in the regression model. In addition, when language score was included in the model, stereopsis was significantly associated with composite motor and fine motor scores, but unaided visual acuity was not statistically significantly associated with any of the motor scores. These results demonstrate that global motion perception and binocular vision are associated with motor function at an early stage of development. Global motion perception can be used as a partial measure of dorsal stream function from early childhood. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Motor Function Is Associated With Incident Disability in Older African Americans.

    PubMed

    Buchman, Aron S; Wilson, Robert S; Yu, Lei; Boyle, Patricia A; Bennett, David A; Barnes, Lisa L

    2016-05-01

    Disability in older African American adults is common, but its basis is unclear. We tested the hypothesis that the level of motor function is associated with incident disability in older African Americans after adjusting for cognition. A prospective observational cohort study of 605 older community-dwelling African American adults without dementia was carried out. Baseline global motor score summarized 11 motor performances, cognition was based on 19 cognitive tests, and self-reported disability was obtained annually. We examined the association of motor function with incident disability (instrumental activities of daily living [IADL], activities of daily living [ADL], and mobility disability) with a series of Cox proportional hazards models which controlled for age, sex, and education. Average follow-up was about 5 years. In proportional hazards models, a 1-SD increase in baseline level of global motor score was associated with about a 50% decrease in the risk of subsequent IADL, ADL, and mobility disability (all p values < .001). These associations were unchanged in analyses controlling for cognition and other covariates. Further, the association of global motor score and incident ADL disability varied with the level of cognition (estimate -5.541, SE 1.634, p < .001), such that higher motor function was more protective at higher levels of cognition. Mobility and dexterity components of global motor score were more strongly associated with incident disability than strength (all p values < .001). Better motor function in older African Americans is associated with a decreased risk of developing disability. Moreover, the association of motor function and disability is stronger in individuals with better cognitive function. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Prognostic significance and function of the vacuolar H+-ATPase subunit V1E1 in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Son, Sung Wook; Kim, Seok-Hyung; Moon, Eun-Yi; Kim, Dong-Hoon; Pyo, Suhkneung; Um, Sung Hee

    2016-08-02

    Vacuolar H+-ATPase (V-ATPase), a hetero-multimeric ATP-driven proton pump has recently emerged as a critical regulator of mTOR-induced amino acid sensing for cell growth. Although dysregulated activity of cell growth regulators is often associated with cancer, the prognostic significance and metabolic roles of V-ATPase in esophageal cancer progression remain unclear. Here, we show that high levels of V-ATPase subunit V1E1 (V-ATPase V1E1) were significantly associated with shortened disease-free survival in patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Multivariate analysis identified the V-ATPase V1E1 as an independent adverse prognostic factor (hazard ratio;1.748, P = 0.018). In addition, depletion of V-ATPase V1E1 resulted in reduced cell motility, decreased glucose uptake, diminished levels of lactate, and decreased ATP production, as well as inhibition of glycolytic enzyme expression in TE8 esophageal cancer cells. Consistent with these results, the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) data and Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) showed a high frequency of copy number alterations of the V-ATPase V1E1 gene, and identified a correlation between levels of V-ATPase V1E1 mRNA and Pyruvate Kinase M2 (PKM2) in ESCC. High expression levels of both V-ATPase V1E1 and phosphorylated PKM2 (p-PKM2), a key player in cancer metabolism, were associated with poorer prognosis in ESCC. Collectively, our findings suggest that expression of the V-ATPase V1E1 has prognostic significance in ESCC, and is closely linked to migration, invasion, and aerobic glycolysis in esophageal cancer cells.

  14. Prognostic significance and function of the vacuolar H+-ATPase subunit V1E1 in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong-Hoon; Pyo, Suhkneung; Um, Sung Hee

    2016-01-01

    Vacuolar H+-ATPase (V-ATPase), a hetero-multimeric ATP-driven proton pump has recently emerged as a critical regulator of mTOR-induced amino acid sensing for cell growth. Although dysregulated activity of cell growth regulators is often associated with cancer, the prognostic significance and metabolic roles of V-ATPase in esophageal cancer progression remain unclear. Here, we show that high levels of V-ATPase subunit V1E1 (V-ATPase V1E1) were significantly associated with shortened disease-free survival in patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Multivariate analysis identified the V-ATPase V1E1 as an independent adverse prognostic factor (hazard ratio;1.748, P = 0.018). In addition, depletion of V-ATPase V1E1 resulted in reduced cell motility, decreased glucose uptake, diminished levels of lactate, and decreased ATP production, as well as inhibition of glycolytic enzyme expression in TE8 esophageal cancer cells. Consistent with these results, the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) data and Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) showed a high frequency of copy number alterations of the V-ATPase V1E1 gene, and identified a correlation between levels of V-ATPase V1E1 mRNA and Pyruvate Kinase M2 (PKM2) in ESCC. High expression levels of both V-ATPase V1E1 and phosphorylated PKM2 (p-PKM2), a key player in cancer metabolism, were associated with poorer prognosis in ESCC. Collectively, our findings suggest that expression of the V-ATPase V1E1 has prognostic significance in ESCC, and is closely linked to migration, invasion, and aerobic glycolysis in esophageal cancer cells. PMID:27384996

  15. Complexity of Motor Sequences and Cortical Reorganization in Parkinson's Disease: A Functional MRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Caproni, Stefano; Muti, Marco; Principi, Massimo; Ottaviano, Pierfausto; Frondizi, Domenico; Capocchi, Giuseppe; Floridi, Piero; Rossi, Aroldo; Calabresi, Paolo; Tambasco, Nicola

    2013-01-01

    Motor impairment is the most relevant clinical feature in Parkinson's disease (PD). Functional imaging studies on motor impairment in PD have revealed changes in the cortical motor circuits, with particular involvement of the fronto-striatal network. The aim of this study was to assess brain activations during the performance of three different motor exercises, characterized by progressive complexity, using a functional fMRI multiple block paradigm, in PD patients and matched control subjects. Unlike from single-task comparisons, multi-task comparisons between similar exercises allowed to analyse brain areas involved in motor complexity planning and execution. Our results showed that in the single-task comparisons the involvement of primary and secondary motor areas was observed, consistent with previous findings based on similar paradigms. Most notably, in the multi-task comparisons a greater activation of supplementary motor area and posterior parietal cortex in PD patients, compared with controls, was observed. Furthermore, PD patients, compared with controls, had a lower activation of the basal ganglia and limbic structures, presumably leading to the impairment in the higher levels of motor control, including complexity planning and execution. The findings suggest that in PD patients occur both compensatory mechanisms and loss of efficiency and provide further insight into the pathophysiological role of distinct cortical and subcortical areas in motor dysfunction. PMID:23825570

  16. Complexity of motor sequences and cortical reorganization in Parkinson's disease: a functional MRI study.

    PubMed

    Caproni, Stefano; Muti, Marco; Principi, Massimo; Ottaviano, Pierfausto; Frondizi, Domenico; Capocchi, Giuseppe; Floridi, Piero; Rossi, Aroldo; Calabresi, Paolo; Tambasco, Nicola

    2013-01-01

    Motor impairment is the most relevant clinical feature in Parkinson's disease (PD). Functional imaging studies on motor impairment in PD have revealed changes in the cortical motor circuits, with particular involvement of the fronto-striatal network. The aim of this study was to assess brain activations during the performance of three different motor exercises, characterized by progressive complexity, using a functional fMRI multiple block paradigm, in PD patients and matched control subjects. Unlike from single-task comparisons, multi-task comparisons between similar exercises allowed to analyse brain areas involved in motor complexity planning and execution. Our results showed that in the single-task comparisons the involvement of primary and secondary motor areas was observed, consistent with previous findings based on similar paradigms. Most notably, in the multi-task comparisons a greater activation of supplementary motor area and posterior parietal cortex in PD patients, compared with controls, was observed. Furthermore, PD patients, compared with controls, had a lower activation of the basal ganglia and limbic structures, presumably leading to the impairment in the higher levels of motor control, including complexity planning and execution. The findings suggest that in PD patients occur both compensatory mechanisms and loss of efficiency and provide further insight into the pathophysiological role of distinct cortical and subcortical areas in motor dysfunction.

  17. Mitochondrial pyruvate carrier function is negatively linked to Warburg phenotype in vitro and malignant features in esophageal squamous cell carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yaqing; Li, Xiaoran; Kan, Quancheng; Zhang, Mingzhi; Li, Xiaoli; Xu, Ruiping; Wang, Junsheng; Yu, Dandan; Goscinski, Mariusz Adam; Wen, Jian-Guo; Nesland, Jahn M.; Suo, Zhenhe

    2017-01-01

    Aerobic glycolysis is one of the emerging hallmarks of cancer cells. In this study, we investigated the relationship between blocking mitochondrial pyruvate carrier (MPC) with MPC blocker UK5099 and the metabolic alteration as well as aggressive features of esophageal squamous carcinoma. It was found that blocking pyruvate transportation into mitochondria attenuated mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) and triggered aerobic glycolysis, a feature of Warburg effect. In addition, the HIF-1α expression and ROS production were also activated upon UK5099 application. It was further revealed that the UK5099-treated cells became significantly more resistant to chemotherapy and radiotherapy, and the UK5099-treated tumor cells also exhibited stronger invasive capacity compared to the parental cells. In contrast to esophageal squamous epithelium cells, decreased MPC protein expression was observed in a series of 157 human squamous cell carcinomas, and low/negative MPC1 expression predicted an unfavorable clinical outcome. All these results together revealed the potential connection of altered MPC expression/activity with the Warburg metabolic reprogramming and tumor aggressiveness in cell lines and clinical samples. Collectively, our findings highlighted a therapeutic strategy targeting Warburg reprogramming of human esophageal squamous cell carcinomas. PMID:27911865

  18. Cellular transformation by cigarette smoke extract involves alteration of glycolysis and mitochondrial function in esophageal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myoung Sook; Huang, Yiping; Lee, Juna; Zhong, Xiaoli; Jiang, Wei-Wen; Ratovitski, Edward A; Sidransky, David

    2010-07-15

    Cigarette-smoking increases the risk of developing various types of human cancers including esophageal cancers. To test the effects of chronic cigarette smoke exposure directly on esophageal epithelium, cellular resistance to mainstream extract (MSE), or sidestream smoke extract (SSE) was developed in chronically exposed nonmalignant Het-1A cells. Anchorage-independent growth, in vitro invasion capacity and proliferation of the resistant cells increased compared with the unexposed, sensitive cells. An epithelial marker E-cadherin was down-regulated and mesenchymal markers N-cadherin and vimentin were up-regulated in the resistant cells. Het-1A cells resistant to MSE or SSE consumed more glucose, and produced more lactate than the sensitive cells. The increased anchorage-independent cell growth of the resistant cells was suppressed by a glycolysis inhibitor, 2-deoxy-D-glucose, indicating that these cells are highly dependent on the glycolytic pathway for survival. Decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP production in the resistant cells indicate the presence of mitochondrial dysfunction induced by chronic exposure of cigarette smoke extract. Increased expression of nuclear genes in the glycolytic pathway and decreased levels of mitochondrial genes in the resistant cells support the notion that cigarette smoking significantly contributes to the transformation of nonmalignant esophageal epithelial cells into a tumorigenic phenotype.

  19. ALS-associated mutant FUS induces selective motor neuron degeneration through toxic gain of function.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Aarti; Lyashchenko, Alexander K; Lu, Lei; Nasrabady, Sara Ebrahimi; Elmaleh, Margot; Mendelsohn, Monica; Nemes, Adriana; Tapia, Juan Carlos; Mentis, George Z; Shneider, Neil A

    2016-02-04

    Mutations in FUS cause amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), including some of the most aggressive, juvenile-onset forms of the disease. FUS loss-of-function and toxic gain-of-function mechanisms have been proposed to explain how mutant FUS leads to motor neuron degeneration, but neither has been firmly established in the pathogenesis of ALS. Here we characterize a series of transgenic FUS mouse lines that manifest progressive, mutant-dependent motor neuron degeneration preceded by early, structural and functional abnormalities at the neuromuscular junction. A novel, conditional FUS knockout mutant reveals that postnatal elimination of FUS has no effect on motor neuron survival or function. Moreover, endogenous FUS does not contribute to the onset of the ALS phenotype induced by mutant FUS. These findings demonstrate that FUS-dependent motor degeneration is not due to loss of FUS function, but to the gain of toxic properties conferred by ALS mutations.

  20. Esophageal duplication and congenital esophageal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Trappey, A Francois; Hirose, Shinjiro

    2017-04-01

    Esophageal duplication and congenital esophageal stenosis (CES) may represent diseases with common embryologic etiologies, namely, faulty tracheoesophageal separation and differentiation. Here, we will re-enforce definitions for these diseases as well as review their embryology, diagnosis, and treatment. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Motor neuron disease. SMN2 splicing modifiers improve motor function and longevity in mice with spinal muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Naryshkin, Nikolai A; Weetall, Marla; Dakka, Amal; Narasimhan, Jana; Zhao, Xin; Feng, Zhihua; Ling, Karen K Y; Karp, Gary M; Qi, Hongyan; Woll, Matthew G; Chen, Guangming; Zhang, Nanjing; Gabbeta, Vijayalakshmi; Vazirani, Priya; Bhattacharyya, Anuradha; Furia, Bansri; Risher, Nicole; Sheedy, Josephine; Kong, Ronald; Ma, Jiyuan; Turpoff, Anthony; Lee, Chang-Sun; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Moon, Young-Choon; Trifillis, Panayiota; Welch, Ellen M; Colacino, Joseph M; Babiak, John; Almstead, Neil G; Peltz, Stuart W; Eng, Loren A; Chen, Karen S; Mull, Jesse L; Lynes, Maureen S; Rubin, Lee L; Fontoura, Paulo; Santarelli, Luca; Haehnke, Daniel; McCarthy, Kathleen D; Schmucki, Roland; Ebeling, Martin; Sivaramakrishnan, Manaswini; Ko, Chien-Ping; Paushkin, Sergey V; Ratni, Hasane; Gerlach, Irene; Ghosh, Anirvan; Metzger, Friedrich

    2014-08-08

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a genetic disease caused by mutation or deletion of the survival of motor neuron 1 (SMN1) gene. A paralogous gene in humans, SMN2, produces low, insufficient levels of functional SMN protein due to alternative splicing that truncates the transcript. The decreased levels of SMN protein lead to progressive neuromuscular degeneration and high rates of mortality. Through chemical screening and optimization, we identified orally available small molecules that shift the balance of SMN2 splicing toward the production of full-length SMN2 messenger RNA with high selectivity. Administration of these compounds to Δ7 mice, a model of severe SMA, led to an increase in SMN protein levels, improvement of motor function, and protection of the neuromuscular circuit. These compounds also extended the life span of the mice. Selective SMN2 splicing modifiers may have therapeutic potential for patients with SMA. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  2. Kinesin-2: a family of heterotrimeric and homodimeric motors with diverse intracellular transport functions.

    PubMed

    Scholey, Jonathan M

    2013-01-01

    Kinesin-2 was first purified as a heterotrimeric, anterograde, microtubule-based motor consisting of two distinct kinesin-related subunits and a novel associated protein (KAP) that is currently best known for its role in intraflagellar transport and ciliogenesis. Subsequent work, however, has revealed diversity in the oligomeric state of different kinesin-2 motors owing to the combinatorial heterodimerization of its subunits and the coexistence of both heterotrimeric and homodimeric kinesin-2 motors in some cells. Although the functional significance of the homo- versus heteromeric organization of kinesin-2 motor subunits and the role of KAP remain uncertain, functional studies suggest that cooperation between different types of kinesin-2 motors or between kinesin-2 and a member of a different motor family can generate diverse patterns of anterograde intracellular transport. Moreover, despite being restricted to ciliated eukaryotes, kinesin-2 motors are now known to drive diverse transport events outside cilia. Here, I review the organization, assembly, phylogeny, biological functions, and motility mechanism of this diverse family of intracellular transport motors.

  3. Non-Invasive Electrical Brain Stimulation Montages for Modulation of Human Motor Function.

    PubMed

    Curado, Marco; Fritsch, Brita; Reis, Janine

    2016-02-04

    Non-invasive electrical brain stimulation (NEBS) is used to modulate brain function and behavior, both for research and clinical purposes. In particular, NEBS can be applied transcranially either as direct current stimulation (tDCS) or alternating current stimulation (tACS). These stimulation types exert time-, dose- and in the case of tDCS polarity-specific effects on motor function and skill learning in healthy subjects. Lately, tDCS has been used to augment the therapy of motor disabilities in patients with stroke or movement disorders. This article provides a step-by-step protocol for targeting the primary motor cortex with tDCS and transcranial random noise stimulation (tRNS), a specific form of tACS using an electrical current applied randomly within a pre-defined frequency range. The setup of two different stimulation montages is explained. In both montages the emitting electrode (the anode for tDCS) is placed on the primary motor cortex of interest. For unilateral motor cortex stimulation the receiving electrode is placed on the contralateral forehead while for bilateral motor cortex stimulation the receiving electrode is placed on the opposite primary motor cortex. The advantages and disadvantages of each montage for the modulation of cortical excitability and motor function including learning are discussed, as well as safety, tolerability and blinding aspects.

  4. Shaping Early Reorganization of Neural Networks Promotes Motor Function after Stroke.

    PubMed

    Volz, L J; Rehme, A K; Michely, J; Nettekoven, C; Eickhoff, S B; Fink, G R; Grefkes, C

    2016-06-01

    Neural plasticity is a major factor driving cortical reorganization after stroke. We here tested whether repetitively enhancing motor cortex plasticity by means of intermittent theta-burst stimulation (iTBS) prior to physiotherapy might promote recovery of function early after stroke. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to elucidate underlying neural mechanisms. Twenty-six hospitalized, first-ever stroke patients (time since stroke: 1-16 days) with hand motor deficits were enrolled in a sham-controlled design and pseudo-randomized into 2 groups. iTBS was administered prior to physiotherapy on 5 consecutive days either over ipsilesional primary motor cortex (M1-stimulation group) or parieto-occipital vertex (control-stimulation group). Hand motor function, cortical excitability, and resting-state fMRI were assessed 1 day prior to the first stimulation and 1 day after the last stimulation. Recovery of grip strength was significantly stronger in the M1-stimulation compared to the control-stimulation group. Higher levels of motor network connectivity were associated with better motor outcome. Consistently, control-stimulated patients featured a decrease in intra- and interhemispheric connectivity of the motor network, which was absent in the M1-stimulation group. Hence, adding iTBS to prime physiotherapy in recovering stroke patients seems to interfere with motor network degradation, possibly reflecting alleviation of post-stroke diaschisis.

  5. Induction of mice adult bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells into functional motor neuron-like cells.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, Rafal H; Yaseen, Nahi Y; Salih, Shahlaa M; Al-Juboory, Ahmad Adnan; Hassan, Ayman; Al-Shammari, Ahmed Majeed

    2016-11-01

    The differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) into acetylcholine secreted motor neuron-like cells, followed by elongation of the cell axon, is a promising treatment for spinal cord injury and motor neuron cell dysfunction in mammals. Differentiation is induced through a pre-induction step using Beta- mercaptoethanol (BME) followed by four days of induction with retinoic acid and sonic hedgehog. This process results in a very efficient differentiation of BM-MSCs into motor neuron-like cells. Immunocytochemistry showed that these treated cells had specific motor neural markers: microtubule associated protein-2 and acetylcholine transferase. The ability of these cells to function as motor neuron cells was assessed by measuring acetylcholine levels in a culture media during differentiation. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) showed that the differentiated cells were functional. Motor neuron axon elongation was then induced by adding different concentrations of a nerve growth factor (NGF) to the differentiation media. Using a collagen matrix to mimic the natural condition of neural cells in a three-dimensional model showed that the MSCs were successfully differentiated into motor neuron-like cells. This process can efficiently differentiate MSCs into functional motor neurons that can be used for autologous nervous system therapy and especially for treating spinal cord injuries. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Shaping Early Reorganization of Neural Networks Promotes Motor Function after Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Volz, L. J.; Rehme, A. K.; Michely, J.; Nettekoven, C.; Eickhoff, S. B.; Fink, G. R.; Grefkes, C.

    2016-01-01

    Neural plasticity is a major factor driving cortical reorganization after stroke. We here tested whether repetitively enhancing motor cortex plasticity by means of intermittent theta-burst stimulation (iTBS) prior to physiotherapy might promote recovery of function early after stroke. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to elucidate underlying neural mechanisms. Twenty-six hospitalized, first-ever stroke patients (time since stroke: 1–16 days) with hand motor deficits were enrolled in a sham-controlled design and pseudo-randomized into 2 groups. iTBS was administered prior to physiotherapy on 5 consecutive days either over ipsilesional primary motor cortex (M1-stimulation group) or parieto-occipital vertex (control-stimulation group). Hand motor function, cortical excitability, and resting-state fMRI were assessed 1 day prior to the first stimulation and 1 day after the last stimulation. Recovery of grip strength was significantly stronger in the M1-stimulation compared to the control-stimulation group. Higher levels of motor network connectivity were associated with better motor outcome. Consistently, control-stimulated patients featured a decrease in intra- and interhemispheric connectivity of the motor network, which was absent in the M1-stimulation group. Hence, adding iTBS to prime physiotherapy in recovering stroke patients seems to interfere with motor network degradation, possibly reflecting alleviation of post-stroke diaschisis. PMID:26980614

  7. Structural and Functional Cortical Connectivity Mediating Cross Education of Motor Function

    PubMed Central

    Woolley, Daniel G.

    2017-01-01

    Cross-education (CE) is the process whereby training with one limb leads to subsequent improvement in performance by the opposite untrained limb. We used multimodal neuroimaging in humans to investigate the mediating neural mechanisms by relating quantitative estimates of functional and structural cortical connectivity to individual levels of interlimb transfer. Resting-state (rs)-fMRI and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) scans were undertaken before unilateral ballistic wrist flexion training. The rs-fMRI sequence was repeated immediately afterward. The increase in performance of the untrained limb was 83.6% of that observed for the trained limb and significantly greater than that of a control group who undertook no training. Functional connectivity in the resting motor network between right and left supplementary motor areas (SMA) was elevated after training. These changes were not, however, correlated with individual levels of transfer. Analysis of the DWI data using constrained spherical deconvolution-based tractography indicated that fractional anisotropy and apparent fiber density in tracts connecting bilateral SMA were negatively correlated with and predictive of transfer. The findings suggest that interhemispheric interactions between bilateral SMA play an instrumental role in CE and that the structural integrity of the connecting white matter pathways influences the level of transfer. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Strength or skill training with one limb also brings about improvements in the performance of the opposite, untrained limb. This phenomenon, termed cross-education (CE), has obvious potential for the rehabilitation of functional capacity that has been lost through brain insult or musculoskeletal injury. The neural mechanisms that give rise to CE are, however, poorly understood. We used a combination of neuroimaging methods to investigate the pathways in the human brain that mediate CE. We determined that the supplementary motor area (SMA) plays an

  8. Esophageal tissue engineering: A new approach for esophageal replacement

    PubMed Central

    Totonelli, Giorgia; Maghsoudlou, Panagiotis; Fishman, Jonathan M; Orlando, Giuseppe; Ansari, Tahera; Sibbons, Paul; Birchall, Martin A; Pierro, Agostino; Eaton, Simon; De Coppi, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    A number of congenital and acquired disorders require esophageal tissue replacement. Various surgical techniques, such as gastric and colonic interposition, are standards of treatment, but frequently complicated by stenosis and other problems. Regenerative medicine approaches facilitate the use of biological constructs to replace or regenerate normal tissue function. We review the literature of esophageal tissue engineering, discuss its implications, compare the methodologies that have been employed and suggest possible directions for the future. Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Library, National Research Register and ClinicalTrials.gov databases were searched with the following search terms: stem cell and esophagus, esophageal replacement, esophageal tissue engineering, esophageal substitution. Reference lists of papers identified were also examined and experts in this field contacted for further information. All full-text articles in English of all potentially relevant abstracts were reviewed. Tissue engineering has involved acellular scaffolds that were either transplanted with the aim of being repopulated by host cells or seeded prior to transplantation. When acellular scaffolds were used to replace patch and short tubular defects they allowed epithelial and partial muscular migration whereas when employed for long tubular defects the results were poor leading to an increased rate of stenosis and mortality. Stenting has been shown as an effective means to reduce stenotic changes and promote cell migration, whilst omental wrapping to induce vascularization of the construct has an uncertain benefit. Decellularized matrices have been recently suggested as the optimal choice for scaffolds, but smart polymers that will incorporate signalling to promote cell-scaffold interaction may provide a more reproducible and available solution. Results in animal models that have used seeded scaffolds strongly sug- gest that seeding of both muscle and epithelial cells on scaffolds

  9. Associations between Manual Abilities, Gross Motor Function, Epilepsy, and Mental Capacity in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    GAJEWSKA, Ewa; SOBIESKA, Magdalena; SAMBORSKI, Włodzimierz

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to evaluate gross motor function and hand function in children with cerebral palsy to explore their association with epilepsy and mental capacity. Material & Methods The research investigating the association between gross and fine motor function and the presence of epilepsy and/or mental impairment was conducted on a group of 83 children (45 girls, 38 boys). Among them, 41 were diagnosed with quadriplegia, 14 hemiplegia, 18 diplegia, 7 mixed form, and 3 athetosis. A neurologist assessed each child in terms of possible epilepsy and confirmed diagnosis in 35 children. A psychologist assessed the mental level (according to Wechsler) and found 13 children within intellectual norm, 3 children with mild mental impairment, 18 with moderate, 27 with severe, and 22 with profound. Children were then classified based on Gross Motor Function Classification System and Manual Ability Classification Scale. Results The gross motor function and manual performance were analysed in relation to mental impairment and the presence of epilepsy. Epilepsy was found to disturb conscious motor functions, but also higher degree of mental impairment was observed in children with epilepsy. Conclusion The occurrence of epilepsy in children with cerebral palsy is associated with worse manual function. The occurrence of epilepsy is associated with limitations in conscious motor functions. There is an association between epilepsy in children with cerebral palsy and the degree of mental impairment. The occurrence of epilepsy, mainly in children with hemiplegia and diplegia is associated with worse mental capacities. PMID:24949051

  10. Changes in structural integrity are correlated with motor and functional recovery after post-stroke rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yang-teng; Lin, Keh-chung; Liu, Ho-ling; Chen, Yao-liang; Wu, Ching-yi

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) studies indicate the structural integrity of the ipsilesional corticospinal tract (CST) and the transcallosal motor tract, which are closely linked to stroke recovery. However, the individual contribution of these 2 fibers on different levels of outcomes remains unclear. Here, we used DTI tractography to investigate whether structural changes of the ipsilesional CST and the transcallosal motor tracts associate with motor and functional recovery after stroke rehabilitation. Ten participants with post-acute stroke underwent the Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA), the Wolf Motor Function Test (WMFT), the Functional Independence Measure (FIM), and DTI before and after bilateral robotic training. All participants had marked improvements in motor performance, functional use of the affected arm, and independence in daily activities. Increased fractional anisotropy (FA) in the ipsilesional CST and the transcallosal motor tracts was noted from pre-treatment to the end of treatment. Participants with higher pre-to-post differences in FA values of the transcallosal motor tracts had greater gains in the WMFT and the FIM scores. A greater improvement on the FMA was coupled with increased FA changes along the ipsilesional CST. These findings suggest 2 different structural indicators for post-stroke recovery separately at the impairment-based and function-based levels.

  11. Significance of intraoperative motor function monitoring using transcranial electrical motor evoked potentials (MEP) in patients with spinal and cranial lesions near the motor pathways.

    PubMed

    Krammer, Matthias Johannes; Wolf, Stefan; Schul, David Baruch; Gerstner, Werner; Lumenta, Christianto Bernardo

    2009-02-01

    Intraoperative motor evoked potential (MEP) monitoring in patients with spinal and cranial lesions is thought to be a valuable tool for prevention of postoperative motor deficits. Aim of this study was to investigate its diagnostic value in a spinal and a cranial patient group. Ninety-six patients, 31 with spinal and 65 with intracranial lesions, were studied. Transcranial stimulation was performed with a high-frequency electrical train stimulation using two subdermal needle electrodes. MEPs were recorded from the pathology-related muscles. Decreasing amplitudes of 50% or more, increasing stimulus intensities of 20% or more or increased latencies were taken as warning criteria. MEP recording was possible in 90% of the spinal and 98% of the cranial group. With two further exclusions, 28 patients of the spinal and 62 of the cranial group were analyzed. We saw a temporary maximum amplitude reduction of 50% or more and an increase in stimulation intensity of 20% or more in 8 spinal and 29 cranial patients. Five of the spinal and nine of the cranial patients deteriorated in motor function postoperatively. One patient with normal MEP monitoring showed a temporary motor weakness postoperatively. Latencies were normal in all patients. Given both warning criteria, intraoperative MEP changes had a sensitivity of 83%/ 100% and a specificity of 86%/ 62% (spinal/ cranial group). The positive predictive value of MEP changes for postoperative motor function deterioration was 63%/ 31%, and the negative predictive value was 95%/ 100%. Transcranial electrical monitoring of MEP is a practicable and safe method. However, there are many events, which can cause amplitude changes of MEP independent from surgical manipulations. Although sensitivity is high for both groups, this results in a moderate specificity for the cranial group and a low positive predictive value for both groups.

  12. Acai fruit improves motor and cognitive function in aged rats

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Aged rats show impaired performance on motor and cognitive tasks that require the use of spatial learning and memory. In previous studies, we have shown the beneficial effects of various berry fruits (blueberries, strawberries, and blackberries) in reversing age-related deficits in behavioral and ne...

  13. Robotic benign esophageal procedures.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Jennifer M; Onaitis, Mark W

    2014-05-01

    Robotic master-slave devices can assist surgeons to perform minimally invasive esophageal operations with approaches that have already been demonstrated using laparoscopy and thoracoscopy. Robotic-assisted surgery for benign esophageal disease is described for the treatment of achalasia, epiphrenic diverticula, refractory reflux, paraesophageal hernias, duplication cysts, and benign esophageal masses, such as leiomyomas. Indications and contraindications for robotic surgery in benign esophageal disease should closely approximate the indications for laparoscopic and thoracoscopic procedures. Given the early application of the technology and paucity of clinical evidence, there are currently no procedures for which robotic esophageal surgery is the clinically proven preferred approach. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Visual-motor and executive functions in children born preterm: the Bender Visual Motor Gestalt Test revisited.

    PubMed

    Böhm, Birgitta; Lundequist, Aiko; Smedler, Ann-Charlotte

    2010-10-01

    Visual-motor development and executive functions were investigated with the Bender Test at age 5½ years in 175 children born preterm and 125 full-term controls, within the longitudinal Stockholm Neonatal Project. Assessment also included WPPSI-R and NEPSY neuropsychological battery for ages 4-7 (Korkman, 1990). Bender protocols were scored according to Brannigan & Decker (2003), Koppitz (1963) and a complementary neuropsychological scoring system (ABC), aimed at executive functions and developed for this study. Bender results by all three scoring systems were strongly related to overall cognitive level (Performance IQ), in both groups. The preterm group displayed inferior visual-motor skills compared to controls also when controlling for IQ. The largest group differences were found on the ABC scoring, which shared unique variance with NEPSY tests of executive function. Multiple regression analyses showed that hyperactive behavior and inattention increased the risk for visual-motor deficits in children born preterm, whereas no added risk was seen among hyperactive term children. Gender differences favoring girls were strongest within the preterm group, presumably reflecting the specific vulnerability of preterm boys. The results indicate that preterm children develop a different neurobehavioral organization from children born at term, and that the Bender test with a neuropsychological scoring is a useful tool in developmental screening around school start.

  15. PHENOTYPIC VARIATION OF COLONIC MOTOR FUNCTIONS IN CHRONIC CONSTIPATION

    PubMed Central

    Ravi, Karthik; Bharucha, Adil E.; Camilleri, Michael; Rhoten, Deborah; Bakken, Timothy; Zinsmeister, Alan R.

    2009-01-01

    Background & Aims Colonic motor disturbances in chronic constipation (CC) are heterogeneous and incompletely understood; the relationship between colonic transit and motor activity is unclear. We sought to characterize the phenotypic variability in chronic constipation. Methods Fasting and postprandial colonic tone and phasic activity and pressure–volume relationships were assessed by a barostat manometric assembly in 35 healthy women and 111 women with CC who had normal colon transit (NTC, n=25), slow transit (STC, n=19), and defecatory disorders with normal (DD-normal, n=34) or slow transit (DD-slow, n=33). Logistic regression models assessed whether motor parameters could discriminate among these groups. Among CC, phenotypes were characterized by principal components analysis of these measurements. Results Compared to 10th percentile values in healthy subjects, fasting and/or postprandial colonic tone and/or compliance were reduced in 40% with NTC, 47% with STC, 53% with DD-normal, and 42% with DD-slow transit. Compared to healthy subjects, compliance was reduced (p ≤ 0.05) in isolated STC and DD but not in NTC. Four principal components accounted for 85% of the total variation among patients; factors 1 and 2 were predominantly weighted by fasting and postprandial colonic phasic activity and tone respectively; factor 3 by postprandial high-amplitude propagated contractions, and factor 4 by postprandial tonic response. Conclusions Fasting and/or postprandial colonic tone are reduced, reflecting motor dysfunctions, even in NTC. Colonic motor assessments allow chronic constipation to be characterized into phenotypes. Further studies are needed to evaluate the relationship between these phenotypes, enteric neuropathology and response to treatment in CC. PMID:19660461

  16. Functional organization and restoration of the brain motor-execution network after stroke and rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, Sahil; Butler, Andrew J.; Drake, Daniel; Dhamala, Mukesh

    2015-01-01

    Multiple cortical areas of the human brain motor system interact coherently in the low frequency range (<0.1 Hz), even in the absence of explicit tasks. Following stroke, cortical interactions are functionally disturbed. How these interactions are affected and how the functional organization is regained from rehabilitative treatments as people begin to recover motor behaviors has not been systematically studied. We recorded the intrinsic functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) signals from 30 participants: 17 young healthy controls and 13 aged stroke survivors. Stroke participants underwent mental practice (MP) or both mental practice and physical therapy (MP+PT) within 14–51 days following stroke. We investigated the network activity of five core areas in the motor-execution network, consisting of the left primary motor area (LM1), the right primary motor area (RM1), the left pre-motor cortex (LPMC), the right pre-motor cortex (RPMC) and the supplementary motor area (SMA). We discovered that (i) the network activity dominated in the frequency range 0.06–0.08 Hz for all the regions, and for both able-bodied and stroke participants (ii) the causal information flow between the regions: LM1 and SMA, RPMC and SMA, RPMC and LM1, SMA and RM1, SMA and LPMC, was reduced significantly for stroke survivors (iii) the flow did not increase significantly after MP alone and (iv) the flow among the regions during MP+PT increased significantly. We also found that sensation and motor scores were significantly higher and correlated with directed functional connectivity measures when the stroke-survivors underwent MP+PT but not MP alone. The findings provide evidence that a combination of mental practice and physical therapy can be an effective means of treatment for stroke survivors to recover or regain the strength of motor behaviors, and that the spectra of causal information flow can be used as a reliable biomarker for evaluating rehabilitation in stroke survivors. PMID

  17. Functional MRI evidence for fine motor praxis dysfunction in children with persistent speech disorders.

    PubMed

    Redle, Erin; Vannest, Jennifer; Maloney, Thomas; Tsevat, Rebecca K; Eikenberry, Sarah; Lewis, Barbara; Shriberg, Lawrence D; Tkach, Jean; Holland, Scott K

    2015-02-09

    Children with persistent speech disorders (PSD) often present with overt or subtle motor deficits; the possibility that speech disorders and motor deficits could arise from a shared neurological base is currently unknown. Functional MRI (fMRI) was used to examine the brain networks supporting fine motor praxis in children with PSD and without clinically identified fine motor deficits. This case-control study included 12 children with PSD (mean age 7.42 years, four female) and 12 controls (mean age 7.44 years, four female). Children completed behavioral evaluations using standardized motor assessments and parent reported functional measures. During fMRI scanning, participants completed a cued finger tapping task contrasted passive listening. A general linear model approach identified brain regions associated with finger tapping in each group and regions that differed between groups. The relationship between regional fMRI activation and fine motor skill was assessed using a regression analysis. Children with PSD had significantly poorer results for rapid speech production and fine motor praxis skills, but did not differ on classroom functional skills. Functional MRI results showed that children with PSD had significantly more activation in the cerebellum during finger tapping. Positive correlations between performance on a fine motor praxis test and activation multiple cortical regions were noted for children with PSD but not for controls. Over-activation in the cerebellum during a motor task may reflect a subtle abnormality in the non-speech motor neural circuitry in children with PSD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Esophageal transit scintigraphy in systemic sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Kobylecka, Małgorzata; Olesińska, Marzena

    2016-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis is a rare connective tissue disease, distinctive features of which are fibrosis and microangiopathy. The esophagus is one of the most commonly involved internal organs. Most patients experience dysphagia, difficulties in swallowing and gastro-esophageal reflux. However, in up to one third of cases, the initial onset of esophageal disease may be clinically silent. There are several diagnostic modalities available for assessing both morphological and functional abnormalities of the esophagus. If structural abnormalities are suspected, endoscopy is the method of choice. Functional evaluation is best achieved with manometry. Both endoscopy and manometry are invasive techniques, with low patient acceptance. Barium-contrast study is well tolerated, but qualitative assessment of functional abnormalities is imprecise. Esophageal scintigraphy is an easy, non-invasive, sensitive and specific diagnostic modality. It can detect esophageal dysfunction even in asymptomatic patients. In patients already diagnosed with systemic sclerosis, scintigraphy is useful in evaluating severity and progression of the disease. PMID:27994270

  19. Esophageal transit scintigraphy in systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Chojnowski, Marek; Kobylecka, Małgorzata; Olesińska, Marzena

    2016-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis is a rare connective tissue disease, distinctive features of which are fibrosis and microangiopathy. The esophagus is one of the most commonly involved internal organs. Most patients experience dysphagia, difficulties in swallowing and gastro-esophageal reflux. However, in up to one third of cases, the initial onset of esophageal disease may be clinically silent. There are several diagnostic modalities available for assessing both morphological and functional abnormalities of the esophagus. If structural abnormalities are suspected, endoscopy is the method of choice. Functional evaluation is best achieved with manometry. Both endoscopy and manometry are invasive techniques, with low patient acceptance. Barium-contrast study is well tolerated, but qualitative assessment of functional abnormalities is imprecise. Esophageal scintigraphy is an easy, non-invasive, sensitive and specific diagnostic modality. It can detect esophageal dysfunction even in asymptomatic patients. In patients already diagnosed with systemic sclerosis, scintigraphy is useful in evaluating severity and progression of the disease.

  20. Immediate improvement of motor function after epilepsy surgery in congenital hemiparesis.

    PubMed

    Pascoal, Tharick; Paglioli, Eliseu; Palmini, André; Menezes, Rafael; Staudt, Martin

    2013-08-01

    Hemispherectomy often leads to a loss of contralateral hand function. In some children with congenital hemiparesis, however, paretic hand function remains unchanged. An immediate improvement of hand function has never been reported. A 17-year-old boy with congenital hemiparesis and therapy-refractory seizures due to a large infarction in the territory of the middle cerebral artery underwent epilepsy surgery. Intraoperatively, electrical cortical stimulation of the affected hemisphere demonstrated preserved motor projections from the sensorimotor cortex to the (contralateral) paretic hand. A frontoparietal resection was performed, which included a complete disconnection of all motor projections originating in the sensorimotor cortex of the affected hemisphere. Surprisingly, the paretic hand showed a significant functional improvement immediately after the operation. This observation demonstrates that, in congenital hemiparesis, crossed motor projections from the affected hemisphere are not always beneficial, but can be dysfunctional, interfering with ipsilateral motor control over the paretic hand by the contralesional hemisphere. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2013 International League Against Epilepsy.

  1. Optical control of muscle function by transplantation of stem cell-derived motor neurons in mice.

    PubMed

    Bryson, J Barney; Machado, Carolina Barcellos; Crossley, Martin; Stevenson, Danielle; Bros-Facer, Virginie; Burrone, Juan; Greensmith, Linda; Lieberam, Ivo

    2014-04-04

    Damage to the central nervous system caused by traumatic injury or neurological disorders can lead to permanent loss of voluntary motor function and muscle paralysis. Here, we describe an approach that circumvents central motor circuit pathology to restore specific skeletal muscle function. We generated murine embryonic stem cell-derived motor neurons that express the light-sensitive ion channel channelrhodopsin-2, which we then engrafted into partially denervated branches of the sciatic nerve of adult mice. These engrafted motor neurons not only reinnervated lower hind-limb muscles but also enabled their function to be restored in a controllable manner using optogenetic stimulation. This synthesis of regenerative medicine and optogenetics may be a successful strategy to restore muscle function after traumatic injury or disease.

  2. Environmental Exposure to Manganese in Air: Associations with Tremor and Motor Function

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND: Manganese (Mn) inhalation has been associated with neuropsychological and neurological sequelae in exposed workers. Few environmental epidemiologic studies have examined the potentialy neurotoxic effects of Mn exposure in ambient air on motor function and han...

  3. Intentional Movement Performance Ability (IMPA): a method for robot-aided quantitative assessment of motor function.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sung Yul; Kim, Jung Yoon; Lee, Sanghyeop; Lee, Junwon; Kim, Seung-Jong; Kim, ChangHwan

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to propose a new assessment method for evaluating motor function of the patients who are suffering from physical weakness after stroke, incomplete spinal cord injury (iSCI) or other diseases. In this work, we use a robotic device to obtain the information of interaction occur between patient and robot, and use it as a measure for assessing the patients. The Intentional Movement Performance Ability (IMPA) is defined by the root mean square of the interactive torque, while the subject performs given periodic movement with the robot. IMPA is proposed to quantitatively determine the level of subject's impaired motor function. The method is indirectly tested by asking the healthy subjects to lift a barbell to disturb their motor function. The experimental result shows that the IMPA has a potential for providing a proper information of the subject's motor function level.

  4. Environmental Exposure to Manganese in Air: Associations with Tremor and Motor Function

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND: Manganese (Mn) inhalation has been associated with neuropsychological and neurological sequelae in exposed workers. Few environmental epidemiologic studies have examined the potentialy neurotoxic effects of Mn exposure in ambient air on motor function and han...

  5. Executive Functions and Motor Ability Contribute to Children's Participation in Daily Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenberg, Limor; Jacobi, Shani; Bart, Orit

    2017-01-01

    Executive functions are crucial for efficient daily functioning. However, the contribution of executive functions to the participation in daily life activities of children, have been inadequately studied. The study aimed to examine the unique contribution of executive functions, beyond motor ability, to the diversity and independence of children's…

  6. Physical activity and obesity mediate the association between childhood motor function and adolescents' academic achievement.

    PubMed

    Kantomaa, Marko T; Stamatakis, Emmanuel; Kankaanpää, Anna; Kaakinen, Marika; Rodriguez, Alina; Taanila, Anja; Ahonen, Timo; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Tammelin, Tuija

    2013-01-29

    The global epidemic of obesity and physical inactivity may have detrimental implications for young people's cognitive function and academic achievement. This prospective study investigated whether childhood motor function predicts later academic achievement via physical activity, fitness, and obesity. The study sample included 8,061 children from the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1986, which contains data about parent-reported motor function at age 8 y and self-reported physical activity, predicted cardiorespiratory fitness (cycle ergometer test), obesity (body weight and height), and academic achievement (grades) at age 16 y. Structural equation models with unstandardized (B) and standardized (β) coefficients were used to test whether, and to what extent, physical activity, cardiorespiratory fitness, and obesity at age 16 mediated the association between childhood motor function and adolescents' academic achievement. Physical activity was associated with a higher grade-point average, and obesity was associated with a lower grade-point average in adolescence. Furthermore, compromised motor function in childhood had a negative indirect effect on adolescents' academic achievement via physical inactivity (B = -0.023, 95% confidence interval = -0.031, -0.015) and obesity (B = -0.025, 95% confidence interval = -0.039, -0.011), but not via cardiorespiratory fitness. These results suggest that physical activity and obesity may mediate the association between childhood motor function and adolescents' academic achievement. Compromised motor function in childhood may represent an important factor driving the effects of obesity and physical inactivity on academic underachievement.

  7. Evidence for cerebellar motor functional reorganization in brain tumor patients: An fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Kurabe, Satoshi; Itoh, Kosuke; Nakada, Tsutomu; Fujii, Yukihiko

    2016-05-27

    Functional reorganization of the motor system following brain damage has been studied extensively in stroke patients, in which not only the cerebrum but also the cerebellum (Cbll) undergoes substantial reorganization. However, the role of Cbll in motor functional reorganization in brain tumor patients remains poorly investigated. Because brain damages in brain tumor patients occur much more slowly than in stroke patients, the neural mechanisms for motor functional reorganization might differ between these two disease conditions. This functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study investigated whether Cbll constitutes the neural substrates for motor functional reorganization in eighteen supratentorial brain tumor patients who exhibited no clinical signs of paresis. The patients and normal volunteers underwent a unilateral hand movement task. In the patients, the locus of primary sensory motor (SM1) activation during contralesional hand movement was significantly displaced by the tumor, suggesting functional compromise and/or reorganization in the central sulcus region. In addition, their contralesional Cbll activation during contralesional hand movement was substantially increased as compared to normal controls. The finding represents the first conclusive evidence that Cbll is involved in the motor-related functional reorganization in patients with brain tumor. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Physical activity and obesity mediate the association between childhood motor function and adolescents’ academic achievement

    PubMed Central

    Kantomaa, Marko T.; Stamatakis, Emmanuel; Kankaanpää, Anna; Kaakinen, Marika; Rodriguez, Alina; Taanila, Anja; Ahonen, Timo; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Tammelin, Tuija

    2013-01-01

    The global epidemic of obesity and physical inactivity may have detrimental implications for young people’s cognitive function and academic achievement. This prospective study investigated whether childhood motor function predicts later academic achievement via physical activity, fitness, and obesity. The study sample included 8,061 children from the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1986, which contains data about parent-reported motor function at age 8 y and self-reported physical activity, predicted cardiorespiratory fitness (cycle ergometer test), obesity (body weight and height), and academic achievement (grades) at age 16 y. Structural equation models with unstandardized (B) and standardized (β) coefficients were used to test whether, and to what extent, physical activity, cardiorespiratory fitness, and obesity at age 16 mediated the association between childhood motor function and adolescents’ academic achievement. Physical activity was associated with a higher grade-point average, and obesity was associated with a lower grade-point average in adolescence. Furthermore, compromised motor function in childhood had a negative indirect effect on adolescents’ academic achievement via physical inactivity (B = –0.023, 95% confidence interval = –0.031, –0.015) and obesity (B = –0.025, 95% confidence interval = –0.039, –0.011), but not via cardiorespiratory fitness. These results suggest that physical activity and obesity may mediate the association between childhood motor function and adolescents’ academic achievement. Compromised motor function in childhood may represent an important factor driving the effects of obesity and physical inactivity on academic underachievement. PMID:23277558

  9. DTI measures track and predict motor function outcomes in stroke rehabilitation utilizing BCI technology

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jie; Nair, Veena A.; Young, Brittany M.; Walton, Leo M.; Nigogosyan, Zack; Remsik, Alexander; Tyler, Mitchell E.; Farrar-Edwards, Dorothy; Caldera, Kristin E.; Sattin, Justin A.; Williams, Justin C.; Prabhakaran, Vivek

    2015-01-01

    Tracking and predicting motor outcomes is important in determining effective stroke rehabilitation strategies. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) allows for evaluation of the underlying structural integrity of brain white matter tracts and may serve as a potential biomarker for tracking and predicting motor recovery. In this study, we examined the longitudinal relationship between DTI measures of the posterior limb of the internal capsule (PLIC) and upper-limb motor outcomes in 13 stroke patients (median 20-month post-stroke) who completed up to 15 sessions of intervention using brain–computer interface (BCI) technology. Patients’ upper-limb motor outcomes and PLIC DTI measures including fractional anisotropy (FA), axial diffusivity (AD), radial diffusivity (RD), and mean diffusivity (MD) were assessed longitudinally at four time points: pre-, mid-, immediately post- and 1-month-post intervention. DTI measures and ratios of each DTI measure comparing the ipsilesional and contralesional PLIC were correlated with patients’ motor outcomes to examine the relationship between structural integrity of the PLIC and patients’ motor recovery. We found that lower diffusivity and higher FA values of the ipsilesional PLIC were significantly correlated with better upper-limb motor function. Baseline DTI ratios were significantly correlated with motor outcomes measured immediately post and 1-month-post BCI interventions. A few patients achieved improvements in motor recovery meeting the minimum clinically important difference (MCID). These findings suggest that upper-limb motor recovery in stroke patients receiving BCI interventions relates to the microstructural status of the PLIC. Lower diffusivity and higher FA measures of the ipsilesional PLIC contribute toward better motor recovery in the stroke-affected upper-limb. DTI-derived measures may be a clinically useful biomarker in tracking and predicting motor recovery in stroke patients receiving BCI interventions. PMID

  10. Prevalence of secondary impairments of adults with cerebral palsy according to gross motor function classification system

    PubMed Central

    Park, Eun-Young; Kim, Won-Ho

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of secondary impairments in adults with cerebral palsy. [Subjects and Methods] The study sample included 52 adults with cerebral palsy who attended a convalescent or rehabilitation center for disabled individuals or a special school for physical disabilities in South Korea. [Results] The univariate analysis showed that the Gross Motor Functional Classification System level was a significant predictor of spondylopathies, general pain, arthropathies, and motor ability loss. The prevalence of these impairments at Gross Motor Functional Classification System level I and II was low compared with the prevalence found at Gross Motor Functional Classification System level III–V. The prevalence of secondary impairments among adults with cerebral palsy at Gross Motor Functional Classification System level III–V was high: loss of motor ability, 42.3%; spondylopathies, 38.4%; general pain, 32.7%; and arthropathies, 28.8%. [Conclusion] In this study, adults with severe cerebral palsy showed a high prevalence of motor ability loss, spondylopathies, arthropathies, and pain. It is necessary to develop intervention programs to prevent secondary impairments in adults with cerebral palsy. PMID:28265154

  11. Exercise alters resting-state functional connectivity of motor circuits in parkinsonian rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhuo; Guo, Yumei; Myers, Kalisa G; Heintz, Ryan; Peng, Yu-Hao; Maarek, Jean-Michel I; Holschneider, Daniel P

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have examined changes in functional connectivity after long-term aerobic exercise. We examined the effects of 4 weeks of forced running wheel exercise on the resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC) of motor circuits of rats subjected to bilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesion of the dorsal striatum. Our results showed substantial similarity between lesion-induced changes in rsFC in the rats and alterations in rsFC reported in Parkinson's disease subjects, including disconnection of the dorsolateral striatum. Exercise in lesioned rats resulted in: (1) normalization of many of the lesion-induced alterations in rsFC, including reintegration of the dorsolateral striatum into the motor network; (2) emergence of the ventrolateral striatum as a new broadly connected network hub; and (3) increased rsFC among the motor cortex, motor thalamus, basal ganglia, and cerebellum. Our results showed for the first time that long-term exercise training partially reversed lesion-induced alterations in rsFC of the motor circuits, and in addition enhanced functional connectivity in specific motor pathways in the parkinsonian rats, which could underlie recovery in motor functions observed in these animals.

  12. Effect of Hippotherapy on Motor Proficiency and Function in Children with Cerebral Palsy Who Walk.

    PubMed

    Champagne, Danielle; Corriveau, Hélène; Dugas, Claude

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate the effects of hippotherapy on physical capacities of children with cerebral palsy. Thirteen children (4-12 years old) with cerebral palsy classified in Gross Motor Function Classification System Level I or II were included in this prospective quasi-experimental ABA design study. Participants received 10 weeks of hippotherapy (30 min per week). Gross motor function and proficiency were measured with the Bruininks-Oseretski Motor Proficiency short form [BOT2-SF]) and the Gross Motor Function Measure-88 [GMFM-88] (Dimension D and E) twice before the program (T1 and T1'), immediately after (T2), and 10 weeks following the end of the program (T3). Mean scores for dimensions D and E of the GMFM-88 Dimension scores (p = .005) and three out of the eight items of the BOT2-SF (fine motor precision (p = .013), balance (p = .025), and strength (p = .012) improved between baseline and immediately after intervention; mean scores immediately following and 10 weeks following intervention did not differ. Hippotherapy provided by a trained therapist who applies an intense and graded session for 10 weeks can improve body functions and performance of gross motor and fine motor activities in children with cerebral palsy.

  13. Exercise alters resting state functional connectivity of motor circuits in Parkinsonian rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhuo; Guo, Yumei; Myers, Kalisa G.; Heintz, Ryan; Peng, Yu-Hao; Maarek, Jean-Michel I.; Holschneider, Daniel P.

    2014-01-01

    Few studies have examined changes in functional connectivity after long-term aerobic exercise. We examined the effects of 4 weeks of forced running wheel exercise on the resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC) of motor circuits of rats subjected to bilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesion of the dorsal striatum. Our results showed substantial similarity between lesion-induced changes in rsFC in the rats and alterations in rsFC reported in Parkinson’s disease subjects, including disconnection of the dorsolateral striatum. Exercise in lesioned rats resulted in: (a) normalization of many of the lesion-induced alterations in rsFC, including reintegration of the dorsolateral striatum into the motor network; (b) emergence of the ventrolateral striatum as a new broadly connected network hub; (c) increased rsFC among the motor cortex, motor thalamus, basal ganglia, and cerebellum. Our results showed for the first time that long-term exercise training partially reversed lesion-induced alterations in rsFC of the motor circuits, and in addition enhanced functional connectivity in specific motor pathways in the Parkinsonian rats, which could underlie recovery in motor functions observed in these rats. PMID:25219465

  14. Prevalence of secondary impairments of adults with cerebral palsy according to gross motor function classification system.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun-Young; Kim, Won-Ho

    2017-02-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of secondary impairments in adults with cerebral palsy. [Subjects and Methods] The study sample included 52 adults with cerebral palsy who attended a convalescent or rehabilitation center for disabled individuals or a special school for physical disabilities in South Korea. [Results] The univariate analysis showed that the Gross Motor Functional Classification System level was a significant predictor of spondylopathies, general pain, arthropathies, and motor ability loss. The prevalence of these impairments at Gross Motor Functional Classification System level I and II was low compared with the prevalence found at Gross Motor Functional Classification System level III-V. The prevalence of secondary impairments among adults with cerebral palsy at Gross Motor Functional Classification System level III-V was high: loss of motor ability, 42.3%; spondylopathies, 38.4%; general pain, 32.7%; and arthropathies, 28.8%. [Conclusion] In this study, adults with severe cerebral palsy showed a high prevalence of motor ability loss, spondylopathies, arthropathies, and pain. It is necessary to develop intervention programs to prevent secondary impairments in adults with cerebral palsy.

  15. Improving Survival and Promoting Respiratory Motor Function after Cervical Spinal Cord Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0378 TITLE: Improving Survival and Promoting Respiratory Motor Function after Cervical Spinal Cord Injury PRINCIPAL...Aug 2015 - 14 Aug 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE CordCorInjury 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Improvi g Survival and Promoting Respiratory Motor Function After... respiratory complications. This application proposes to help improve survival, decrease early dependence on mechanical ventilation, and restore breathing

  16. Measurement and Modification of Sensorimotor System Function during Visual-Motor Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-08-21

    SYSTEM FUNCTION DURING ViSUAL-MOTOR PERFORMANCE ___________________________ 12 PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) IIB traP.DGJ cumr Ph.D., T.W. Dushenko. Ph.D. and J.C...monitoring as a means of identifying central nervous system correlates of performance and C-force effects during military flight operations. Four studies...CLASSIFICATION OP -HIS PAGE All other edrtiont are obsl.Oete. Neasuremtent and Modification of Sansorimotor System Function During Visual-Motor Performance

  17. Tumor-promoting function and prognostic significance of the RNA-binding protein T-cell intracellular antigen-1 in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Yuji; Naruto, Takuya; Kohmoto, Tomohiro; Miyakami, Yuko; Watanabe, Miki; Kudo, Yasusei; Fujiwara, Hitoshi; Ichikawa, Daisuke; Otsuji, Eigo; Imoto, Issei

    2016-01-01

    T-cell intracellular antigen-1 (TIA1) is an RNA-binding protein involved in many regulatory aspects of mRNA metabolism. Here, we report previously unknown tumor-promoting activity of TIA1, which seems to be associated with its isoform-specific molecular distribution and regulation of a set of cancer-related transcripts, in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Immunohistochemical overexpression of TIA1 ectopically localized in the cytoplasm of tumor cells was an independent prognosticator for worse overall survival in a cohort of 143 ESCC patients. Knockdown of TIA1 inhibited proliferation of ESCC cells. By exogenously introducing each of two major isoforms, TIA1a and TIA1b, only TIA1a, which was localized to both the nucleus and cytoplasm, promoted anchorage-dependent and anchorage-independent ESCC cell proliferation. Ribonucleoprotein immunoprecipitation, followed by microarray analysis or massive-parallel sequencing, identified a set of TIA1-binding mRNAs, including SKP2 and CCNA2. TIA1 increased SKP2 and CCNA2 protein levels through the suppression of mRNA decay and translational induction, respectively. Our findings uncover a novel oncogenic function of TIA1 in esophageal tumorigenesis, and implicate its use as a marker for prognostic evaluation and as a therapeutic target in ESCC. PMID:26958940

  18. Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate)-based nanofibrous scaffolds to support functional esophageal epithelial cells towards engineering the esophagus.

    PubMed

    Kuppan, Purushothaman; Sethuraman, Swaminathan; Krishnan, Uma Maheswari

    2014-01-01

    Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV) and PHBV-gelatin were electrospun to obtain defect-free nanofibers by optimizing various process and solution parameters. Tensile strength, Young's modulus, and wettability of PHBV-gelatin nanofibrous scaffold were determined and compared with PHBV nanofibrous scaffold. Our results demonstrate that PHBV-gelatin nanofibers exhibited higher tensile strength and Young's modulus than the PHBV nanofibers. Human esophageal epithelial cells (HEEpiC) were cultured on PHBV and PHBV-gelatin nanofiber showed better cell proliferation in PHBV nanofibrous scaffold than the PHBV-gelatin scaffold after 7 days of culture. HEEpiC cultured on PHBV and PHBV-gelatin nanofibrous scaffold exhibited characteristic epithelial cobblestone morphology after 3 days of culture. Further, the HEEpiC extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins (collagen type IV and laminin) and phenotypic marker proteins (cytokeratin-4 and 14) expressions were significantly higher in PHBV-gelatin nanofibrous scaffold than the PHBV nanofiber scaffold. However, the long-term stability and functional state of the cells on the PHBV scaffold give it an edge over the blend scaffolds. Thus, PHBV-based nanofibrous scaffolds could be explored further as ECM substitutes for the regeneration of esophageal tissue.

  19. [Primary risk of hemorrhage due to esophageal varices in cirrhotic patients: significance of the associated endoscopic signs and hepatic functional reserve].

    PubMed

    Jmelnitzky, A; Palazzolo, A; Viola, L; Landoni, N; Morgante, P; Chopita, N; Romero, G; Giulioni, P

    1991-01-01

    Significance of endoscopic findings associated to esophageal varices (Japanese Research Society for Portal Hypertension) and hepatic dysfunction (Child-Pough classification) as predictive factors of variceal bleeding in cirrhotic patients is analyzed. In a cooperative prospective experience 137 cirrhotic patients with esophageal varices were examined in the period May 1987/89: 83 out of them had never bled from their varices (VENS group) while 54 recently had (VES group). A highly significative association was found between variceal size over 3 mm (grade II-III) and bleeding: 96.3% vs. 34.9% in VENS group (p = 0.01); similar association was found with regard to endoscopic detection of "red signs": 92.6% in bleeding group vs. 20.5% in VENS one (p = 0.01). "Red signs" were found on grade II-III varices in 98.5% of cases, and this association were related to variceal bleeding in 75.5%. Hepatic dysfunction was not directly related to bleeding episodes but "red signs" endoscopic detection in VENS group increased with liver function deterioration: 9.1% in Child A class, 27.3% in Child B, and 41.2% in Child C (p = 0.01). The strong association founded between bleeding and both grade II-III variceal size and "red signs" detection, suggest the possibility to identify a high risk group of cirrhotic patients candidate to prophylactic methodologies.

  20. Tumor-promoting function and prognostic significance of the RNA-binding protein T-cell intracellular antigen-1 in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Junichi; Shoda, Katsutoshi; Masuda, Kiyoshi; Fujita, Yuji; Naruto, Takuya; Kohmoto, Tomohiro; Miyakami, Yuko; Watanabe, Miki; Kudo, Yasusei; Fujiwara, Hitoshi; Ichikawa, Daisuke; Otsuji, Eigo; Imoto, Issei

    2016-03-29

    T-cell intracellular antigen-1 (TIA1) is an RNA-binding protein involved in many regulatory aspects of mRNA metabolism. Here, we report previously unknown tumor-promoting activity of TIA1, which seems to be associated with its isoform-specific molecular distribution and regulation of a set of cancer-related transcripts, in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Immunohistochemical overexpression of TIA1 ectopically localized in the cytoplasm of tumor cells was an independent prognosticator for worse overall survival in a cohort of 143 ESCC patients. Knockdown of TIA1 inhibited proliferation of ESCC cells. By exogenously introducing each of two major isoforms, TIA1a and TIA1b, only TIA1a, which was localized to both the nucleus and cytoplasm, promoted anchorage-dependent and anchorage-independent ESCC cell proliferation. Ribonucleoprotein immunoprecipitation, followed by microarray analysis or massive-parallel sequencing, identified a set of TIA1-binding mRNAs, including SKP2 and CCNA2. TIA1 increased SKP2 and CCNA2 protein levels through the suppression of mRNA decay and translational induction, respectively. Our findings uncover a novel oncogenic function of TIA1 in esophageal tumorigenesis, and implicate its use as a marker for prognostic evaluation and as a therapeutic target in ESCC.

  1. Difference of neural connectivity for motor function in chronic hemiparetic stroke patients with intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Jang, Sung Ho; Kwon, Yong Hyun; Lee, Mi Young; Lee, Dong Yeop; Hong, Ji Heon

    2012-12-07

    Difference of neural connectivity for motor function had been studied by observation of neural activity within gray matter and nucleus using functional neuroimaging techniques. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) by a probabilistic tracking is useful for exploration of structural connectivity in the brain. We attempted to investigate difference of neural connectivity for motor function of the affected hand in chronic hemiparetic patients with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Forty-four patients with ICH and 31 normal control subjects were recruited. Diffusion tensor imaging was acquired using a sensitivity-encoding head coil at 1.5 T. Motor function was evaluated using the motricity index (MI) for hand and Modified Brunnstrom Classification (MBC). The presence or absence of a connection was confirmed between the precentral knob of the affected hemisphere and seven areas. Compared with healthy subjects, the patient group showed lower connectivity to the contralesional primary motor cortex, ipsilesional basal ganglia, ipsilesional thalamus, contralesional cerebellum, and ipsilesional medullary pyramid in the affected hemisphere (p<0.05). Connections to the ipsilesional basal ganglia, ipsilesional thalamus, and ipsilesional medullary pyramid showed positive correlation with MI and MBC (p<0.05). We found difference of neural connectivity for motor function between chronic hemiparetic patients with ICH and control subjects. Our results suggest that the motor function of the stroke patient is related to neural connectivity between the ipsilesional M1 and the ipsilesional medullary pyramid, ipsilesional basal ganglia, and ipsilesional thalamus.

  2. Endoscopic vacuum sponge therapy for esophageal defects.

    PubMed

    Loske, Gunnar; Schorsch, Tobias; Müller, Christian

    2010-10-01

    Anastomotic insufficiency in esophageal anastomosis and esophageal defects of other etiology are very severe complications. For anastomotic insufficiency in the rectum, endoscopic vacuum therapy has already been used successfully. The authors used vacuum therapy for anastomotic defects and other lesions of the esophagus. Between November 2006 and September 2009, 10 patients (5 men and 5 women, ages 46-82 years) were treated with endoscopic vacuum sponge therapy for anastomotic insufficiency secondary to esophagectomy or gastrectomy (n = 5), iatrogenic esophageal perforation (n = 2), esophageal wall necrosis (n = 1), Boerhaave's syndrome (n = 1), and perforation of esophageal cancer (n = 1). After one to seven changes of the sponge at intervals of 2-7 days and a mean therapy duration of 12 days, the defects were healed in all the surviving patients. During treatment, the patients were fed via an intestinal tube or percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG), or enterally past the sponge. One patient died of intercurrent severe colitis. In three cases, a revision laparotomy was necessary at the beginning of treatment. No postinterventional stricture or functional relevant scar formation was observed during a follow-up period of 10-380 days after termination of the vacuum therapy. Esophageal anastomotic insufficiency and esophageal wall defects of other causes can be treated successfully with endoscopic vacuum sponge therapy.

  3. Functional Near Infrared Spectroscopy of the Sensory and Motor Brain Regions with Simultaneous Kinematic and EMG Monitoring During Motor Tasks

    PubMed Central

    Sukal-Moulton, Theresa; de Campos, Ana Carolina; Stanley, Christopher J.; Damiano, Diane L.

    2014-01-01

    There are several advantages that functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) presents in the study of the neural control of human movement. It is relatively flexible with respect to participant positioning and allows for some head movements during tasks. Additionally, it is inexpensive, light weight, and portable, with very few contraindications to its use. This presents a unique opportunity to study functional brain activity during motor tasks in individuals who are typically developing, as well as those with movement disorders, such as cerebral palsy. An additional consideration when studying movement disorders, however, is the quality of actual movements performed and the potential for additional, unintended movements. Therefore, concurrent monitoring of both blood flow changes in the brain and actual movements of the body during testing is required for appropriate interpretation of fNIRS results. Here, we show a protocol for the combination of fNIRS with muscle and kinematic monitoring during motor tasks. We explore gait, a unilateral multi-joint movement (cycling), and two unilateral single-joint movements (isolated ankle dorsiflexion, and isolated hand squeezing). The techniques presented can be useful in studying both typical and atypical motor control, and can be modified to investigate a broad range of tasks and scientific questions. PMID:25548919

  4. Motor and Executive Function Profiles in Adult Residents ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Objective: Exposure to elevated levels of manganese (Mn) may be associated with tremor, motor and executive dysfunction (EF), clinically resembling Parkinson’s disease (PD). PD research has identified tremor-dominant (TD) and non-tremor dominant (NTD) profiles. NTD PD presents with bradykinesia, rigidity, and postural sway, and is associated with EF impairment with lower quality of life (QoL). Presence and impact of tremor, motor, and executive dysfunction profiles on health-related QoL and life satisfaction were examined in air-Mn exposed residents of two Ohio, USA towns. Participants and Methods: From two Ohio towns exposed to air-Mn, 186 residents (76 males) aged 30-75 years were administered measures of EF (Animal Naming, ACT, Rey-O Copy, Stroop Color-Word, and Trails B), motor and tremor symptoms (UPDRS), QoL (BRFSS), life satisfaction (SWLS), and positive symptom distress (SCL-90-R). Air-Mn exposure in the two towns was modeled with 10 years of air-monitoring data. Cluster analyses detected the presence of symptom profiles by grouping together residents with similar scores on these measures. Results: Overall, mean air-Mn concentration for the two towns was 0.53 µg/m3 (SD=.92). Two-step cluster analyses identified TD and NTD symptom profiles. Residents in the NTD group lacked EF impairment; EF impairment represented a separate profile. An unimpaired group also emerged. The NTD and EF impairment groups were qualitatively similar, with relatively lo

  5. Developmental regulation of motor function: an uncharted sea.

    PubMed

    O'Donovan, M J

    1985-02-01

    The field of developmental neurobiology is entering a very exciting phase, in which the application of new techniques promises to lead to major advances in our understanding of basic developmental processes. There is a need to apply much of this new knowledge to problems of spinal cord and muscle development, about which little is known at present. An understanding of the development of muscle fiber types and the spinal circuitry controlling locomotion would have a major impact on fundamental problems in motor control and exercise physiology. Significant progress is likely to be made in these areas in the next few years, but only if researchers interested in motor control and related areas take an interest in development. Among the most immediate problems that need to be addressed are: the lineage analysis of spinal neurons; identification of the factors controlling neuron differentiation; identification of the molecular basis for directed axon growth; and analysis of the factors controlling network assembly in the spinal cord. In muscle development, an understanding of how fiber type proportions are generated would have great significance for disciplines related to motor performance. The interaction and exchange of ideas between developmental biologists and exercise scientists promises to accelerate understanding and progress in both fields of endeavor.

  6. Threat effects on human oculo-motor function.

    PubMed

    Naranjo, E N; Cleworth, T W; Allum, J H J; Inglis, J T; Lea, J; Westerberg, B D; Carpenter, M G

    2017-09-17

    Neuro-anatomical evidence supports the potential for threat-related factors, such as fear, anxiety and vigilance, to influence brainstem motor nuclei controlling eye movements, as well as the vestibular nuclei. However, little is known about how threat influences human ocular responses, such as eye saccades (ES), smooth pursuit eye tracking (SP), and optokinetic nystagmus (OKN), and whether these responses can be facilitated above normal baseline levels with a natural source of threat. This study was designed to examine the effects of height-induced postural threat on the gain of ES, SP and OKN responses in humans. Twenty participants stood at two different surface heights while performing ES (ranging from 8° to 45° from center), SP (15, 20, 30°/s) and OKN (15, 30, 60°/s) responses in the horizontal plane. Height did not significantly increase the slope of the relationship between ES peak velocity and initial amplitude, or the gain of ES amplitude. In contrast height significantly increased SP and OKN gain. Significant correlations were found between changes in physiological arousal and OKN gain. Observations of changes with height in OKN and SP support neuro-anatomical evidence of threat-related mechanisms influencing both oculo-motor nuclei and vestibular reflex pathways. Although further study is warranted, the findings suggest that potential influences of fear, anxiety and arousal/alertness should be accounted for, or controlled, during clinical vestibular and oculo-motor testing. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Motor network disruption in essential tremor: a functional and effective connectivity study.

    PubMed

    Buijink, Arthur W G; van der Stouwe, A M Madelein; Broersma, Marja; Sharifi, Sarvi; Groot, Paul F C; Speelman, Johannes D; Maurits, Natasha M; van Rootselaar, Anne-Fleur

    2015-10-01

    Although involvement of the cerebello-thalamo-cortical network has often been suggested in essential tremor, the source of oscillatory activity remains largely unknown. To elucidate mechanisms of tremor generation, it is of crucial importance to study the dynamics within the cerebello-thalamo-cortical network. Using a combination of electromyography and functional magnetic resonance imaging, it is possible to record the peripheral manifestation of tremor simultaneously with brain activity related to tremor generation. Our first aim was to study the intrinsic activity of regions within the cerebello-thalamo-cortical network using dynamic causal modelling to estimate effective connectivity driven by the concurrently recorded tremor signal. Our second aim was to objectify how the functional integrity of the cerebello-thalamo-cortical network is affected in essential tremor. We investigated the functional connectivity between cerebellar and cortical motor regions showing activations during a motor task. Twenty-two essential tremor patients and 22 healthy controls were analysed. For the effective connectivity analysis, a network of tremor-signal related regions was constructed, consisting of the left primary motor cortex, premotor cortex, supplementary motor area, left thalamus, and right cerebellar motor regions lobule V and lobule VIII. A measure of variation in tremor severity over time, derived from the electromyogram, was included as modulatory input on intrinsic connections and on the extrinsic cerebello-thalamic connections, giving a total of 128 models. Bayesian model selection and random effects Bayesian model averaging were used. Separate seed-based functional connectivity analyses for the left primary motor cortex, left supplementary motor area and right cerebellar lobules IV, V, VI and VIII were performed. We report two novel findings that support an important role for the cerebellar system in the pathophysiology of essential tremor. First, in the effective

  8. Altered Resting-State Functional Connectivity in the Hand Motor Network in Glioma Patients.

    PubMed

    Mallela, Arka N; Peck, Kyung K; Petrovich-Brennan, Nicole M; Zhang, Zhigang; Lou, William; Holodny, Andrei I

    2016-08-22

    To examine the functional connectivity of the primary and supplementary motor areas (SMA) in glioma patients using resting-state functional MRI (rfMRI). To correlate rfMRI data with tumor characteristics and clinical information to characterize functional reorganization of resting-state networks (RSN) and the limitations of this method. This study was IRB approved and in compliance with Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act. Informed consent was waived in this retrospective study. We analyzed rfMRI in 24 glioma patients and 12 age- and sex-matched controls. We compared global activation, interhemispheric connectivity, and functional connectivity in the hand motor RSNs using hemispheric voxel counts, pairwise Pearson correlation, and pairwise total spectral coherence. We explored the relationship between tumor grade, volume, location, and the patient's clinical status to functional connectivity. Global network activation and interhemispheric connectivity were reduced in gliomas (p < 0.05). Functional connectivity between the bilateral motor cortices and the SMA was reduced in gliomas (p < 0.01). High-grade gliomas had lower functional connectivity than low-grade gliomas (p < 0.05). Tumor volume and distance to ipsilateral motor cortex demonstrated no association with functional connectivity loss. Functional connectivity loss is associated with motor deficits in low-grade gliomas, but not in high-grade gliomas. Global reduction in resting-state connectivity in areas distal to tumor suggests that radiological tumor boundaries underestimate areas affected by glioma. Association between motor deficits and rfMRI suggests that rfMRI may accurately reflect functional changes in low-grade gliomas. Lack of association between rfMRI and clinical motor deficits implies decreased sensitivity of rfMRI in high-grade gliomas, possibly due to neurovascular uncoupling.

  9. Altered structural and functional connectivity between the bilateral primary motor cortex in unilateral subcortical stroke

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong; Li, Kuang-Shi; Ning, Yan-Zhe; Fu, Cai-Hong; Liu, Hong-Wei; Han, Xiao; Cui, Fang-Yuan; Ren, Yi; Zou, Yi-Huai

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A large number of functional imaging studies have focused on the understanding of motor-related neural activities after ischemic stroke. However, the knowledge is still limited in the structural and functional changes of the interhemispheric connections of the bilateral primary motor cortices (M1s) and their potential influence on motor function recovery following stroke. Twenty-four stroke patients with right hemispheric subcortical infarcts and 25 control subjects were recruited to undergo multimodal magnetic resonance imaging examinations. Structural impairments between the bilateral M1s were measured by fractional anisotropy. Functional changes of the bilateral M1s were assessed via M1-M1 resting-state functional connectivity. Task-evoked activation analysis was applied to identify the roles of the bilateral hemispheres in motor function recovery. Compared with control subjects, unilateral subcortical stroke patients revealed significantly decreased fractional anisotropy and functional connectivity between the bilateral M1s. Stroke patients also revealed higher activations in multiple brain regions in both hemispheres and that more regions were located in the contralesional hemisphere. This study increased our understanding of the structural and functional alterations between the bilateral M1s that occur in unilateral subcortical stroke and provided further evidence for the compensatory role played by the contralesional hemisphere for these alterations during motor function recovery. PMID:27495109

  10. Abnormal Localization and Tumor Suppressor Function of Epithelial Tissue-Specific Transcription Factor ESE3 in Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Xing, Jie; Cheng, Rui; Shao, Ying; Li, Peng; Zhu, Shengtao; Zhang, Shutian

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal cancer is one of the most common malignant cancers worldwide. The molecular mechanism of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is still poorly understood. ESE3 is a member of the Ets transcription family, which is only expressed in epithelial tissues and acts as a tumor suppressor gene in prostate cancer. Our study aim was to confirm whether ESE3 is involved in the carcinogenesis of ESCC. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that ESE3 was mainly located in cell nuclei of normal tissues and the cytoplasm in ESCC tissues. Immunofluorescence and western blot analyses of the normal esophageal cell line HEEpiC and ESCC cell lines EC9706 TE-1, KYSE150, and KYSE410 confirmed these results. pEGFP-ESE3 and pcDNA3.1-V5/HisA-ESE3 plasmids were constructed for overexpression of ESE3 in EC9706 and KYSE150 cells. The stably transfected cells showed restoration of the nuclear localization of ESE3. EC9706 cells with re-localization of ESE3 to the nucleus showed inhibition of proliferation, colony formation, migration, and invasion. To explore the possible mechanism of the differences in localization of ESE3 in normal esophageal cells and ESCC cells, ESCC cell lines were treated with the nuclear export inhibitor leptomycin B, transcription inhibitor actinomycin D, PKC inhibitor sphinganine, P38 MAPK inhibitor SB202190, and CK II inhibitor TBCA. These reagents were chosen according to the well-known mechanisms of protein translocation. However, the localization of ESE3 was unchanged after these treatments. The sequence of ESE3 cDNA in ESCC cells was identical to the standard sequence of ESE3 in the NCBI Genebank database, indicating that there was no mutation in the coding region of ESE3 in ESCC. Taken together, our study suggests that ESE3 plays an important role in the carcinogenesis of ESCC through changes in subcellular localization and may act as a tumor suppressor gene in ESCC, although the mechanisms require further study.

  11. Action in Perception: Prominent Visuo-Motor Functional Symmetry in Musicians during Music Listening

    PubMed Central

    Burunat, Iballa; Brattico, Elvira; Puoliväli, Tuomas; Ristaniemi, Tapani; Sams, Mikko; Toiviainen, Petri

    2015-01-01

    Musical training leads to sensory and motor neuroplastic changes in the human brain. Motivated by findings on enlarged corpus callosum in musicians and asymmetric somatomotor representation in string players, we investigated the relationship between musical training, callosal anatomy, and interhemispheric functional symmetry during music listening. Functional symmetry was increased in musicians compared to nonmusicians, and in keyboardists compared to string players. This increased functional symmetry was prominent in visual and motor brain networks. Callosal size did not significantly differ between groups except for the posterior callosum in musicians compared to nonmusicians. We conclude that the distinctive postural and kinematic symmetry in instrument playing cross-modally shapes information processing in sensory-motor cortical areas during music listening. This cross-modal plasticity suggests that motor training affects music perception. PMID:26422790

  12. MotomiRs: miRNAs in Motor Neuron Function and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hawley, Zachary C. E.; Campos-Melo, Danae; Droppelmann, Cristian A.; Strong, Michael J.

    2017-01-01

    MiRNAs are key regulators of the mammalian transcriptome that have been increasingly linked to degenerative diseases of the motor neurons. Although many of the miRNAs currently incriminated as participants in the pathogenesis of these diseases are also important to the normal development and function of motor neurons, at present there is no knowledge of the complete miRNA profile of motor neurons. In this review, we examine the current understanding with respect to miRNAs that are specifically required for motor neuron development, function and viability, and provide evidence that these should be considered as a functional network of miRNAs which we have collectively termed MotomiRs. We will also summarize those MotomiRs currently known to be associated with both amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), and discuss their potential use as biomarkers. PMID:28522960

  13. MotomiRs: miRNAs in Motor Neuron Function and Disease.

    PubMed

    Hawley, Zachary C E; Campos-Melo, Danae; Droppelmann, Cristian A; Strong, Michael J

    2017-01-01

    MiRNAs are key regulators of the mammalian transcriptome that have been increasingly linked to degenerative diseases of the motor neurons. Although many of the miRNAs currently incriminated as participants in the pathogenesis of these diseases are also important to the normal development and function of motor neurons, at present there is no knowledge of the complete miRNA profile of motor neurons. In this review, we examine the current understanding with respect to miRNAs that are specifically required for motor neuron development, function and viability, and provide evidence that these should be considered as a functional network of miRNAs which we have collectively termed MotomiRs. We will also summarize those MotomiRs currently known to be associated with both amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), and discuss their potential use as biomarkers.

  14. [Peculiarities of the structural-functional organization of motor neuropil of dragonfly thoracic ganglia].

    PubMed

    Plotnikova, S I; Sviderskiĭ, V L; Gorelkin, V S

    2012-01-01

    The work considers the structural-functional relations existing in the motor neuropil of thoracic ganglia of dragonflies - the animals able to perform very complex and fast maneuvers in the flight. The motor neuropil in dragonflies is shown to be more differentiated than in the lees mobile insects, while motor nuclei in neuropil are more clearly outlined and closer to each other. There are revealed dendrites of motoneurons of pedal muscles (the middle nucleus), which are running into the anterior and posterior nuclei that contain dendrites of motoneurons of wing muscles. A possible role of such approaching is discussed for close functional interaction of wing and foot muscles, which is necessary to dragonflies during flight at their catching of large insects with aid of legs. Peculiarities are considered in structural organization of motoneurons of wing muscles dragonflies and locusts, which indicate the greater functional possibilities peculiar to motoneurons of the dragonflies motor apparatus.

  15. Regenerative Medicine Strategies for Esophageal Repair

    PubMed Central

    Londono, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Pathologies that involve the structure and/or function of the esophagus can be life-threatening. The esophagus is a complex organ comprising nonredundant tissue that does not have the ability to regenerate. Currently available interventions for esophageal pathology have limited success and are typically associated with significant morbidity. Hence, there is currently an unmet clinical need for effective methods of esophageal repair. The present article presents a review of esophageal disease along with the anatomic and functional consequences of each pathologic process, the shortcomings associated with currently available therapies, and the latest advancements in the field of regenerative medicine with respect to strategies for esophageal repair from benchtop to bedside. PMID:25813694

  16. Enantiopure Functional Molecular Motors Obtained by a Switchable Chiral-Resolution Process.

    PubMed

    van Leeuwen, Thomas; Gan, Jefri; Kistemaker, Jos C M; Pizzolato, Stefano F; Chang, Mu-Chieh; Feringa, Ben L

    2016-05-17

    Molecular switches, rotors, and motors play an important role in the development of nano-machines and devices, as well as responsive and adaptive functional materials. For unidirectional rotors based on chiral overcrowded alkenes, their stereochemical homogeneity is of crucial importance. Herein, a method to obtain new and functionalizable overcrowded alkenes in enantiopure form is presented. The procedure involves a short synthesis of three steps and a solvent-switchable chiral resolution by using a readily available resolving agent. X-ray crystallography revealed the mode of binding of the motor with the resolving agent, as well as the absolute configuration of the motor. (1) H NMR and UV/Vis spectroscopy techniques were used to determine the dynamic behavior of this molecular motor. This method provides rapid access to ample amounts of enantiopure molecular motors, which will greatly facilitate the further development of responsive molecular systems based on chiral overcrowded alkenes.

  17. Lack of association of morphologic and functional retinal changes with motor and non-motor symptoms severity in Parkinson’s disease.

    PubMed

    Cubo, Esther; López Peña, María Jesús; Diez-Feijo Varela, Elio; Pérez Gil, Olga; Garcia Gutierrez, Pablo; Araus González, Elena; Prieto Tedejo, Rosa; Mariscal Pérez, Natividad; Armesto, Diana

    2014-02-01

    Visual symptoms are common among the nonmotor symptoms in Parkinson’s disease. The aims of this study were to assess the diagnostic accuracy and relationship of retinal morphologic and functional changes with motor and non-motor symptoms disturbances in Parkinson’s disease. Thirty patients with Parkinson’s disease, with a median Hoehn-Yahr stage of 2 (1-4), were compared to 30 age- and gender-matched controls. Retinal thinning and function were measured using optical coherence tomography (OCT), visual evoked potentials (VEP), and pattern electroretinography. Motor impairment and motor laterality were measured using the Short Parkinson’s Evaluation Scale/Scales for Outcomes in Parkinson’s disease, and non-motor symptoms severity using the nonmotor symptoms questionnaire. Only pattern electroretinography, P50 and N95 amplitudes, were lower in patients with Parkinson’s disease, compared to controls (p = 0.01, respectively). Age, disease duration, levodopa dose, motor, and non-motor impairment were not significantly associated with retinal thinning and functional changes. The patients vs. controls area under the curve of OCT, VEP, and pattern electroretinography receiver-operating-characteristic curves were<0.50. In conclusion, morphologic and functional retina changes are not significantly correlated with motor and non-motor symptoms impairment severity, and do not discriminate between Parkinson’s disease and controls.

  18. Motor cortex excitability and connectivity in chronic stroke: a multimodal model of functional reorganization.

    PubMed

    Volz, Lukas J; Sarfeld, Anna-Sophia; Diekhoff, Svenja; Rehme, Anne K; Pool, Eva-Maria; Eickhoff, Simon B; Fink, Gereon R; Grefkes, Christian

    2015-03-01

    Cerebral ischemia triggers a cascade of cellular processes, which induce neuroprotection, inflammation, apoptosis and regeneration. At the neural network level, lesions concomitantly induce cerebral plasticity. Yet, many stroke survivors are left with a permanent motor deficit, and only little is known about the neurobiological factors that determine functional outcome after stroke. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are non-invasive approaches that allow insights into the functional (re-) organization of the cortical motor system. We here combined neuronavigated TMS, MRI and analyses of connectivity to investigate to which degree recovery of hand function depends on corticospinal tract (CST) damage and biomarkers of cerebral plasticity like cortical excitability and motor network effective connectivity. As expected, individual motor performance of 12 stroke patients with persistent motor deficits was found to depend upon the degree of CST damage but also motor cortex excitability and interhemispheric connectivity. In addition, the data revealed a strong correlation between reduced ipsilesional motor cortex excitability and reduced interhemispheric inhibition in severely impaired patients. Interindividual differences in ipsilesional motor cortex excitability were stronger related to the motor deficit than abnormal interhemispheric connectivity or CST damage. Multivariate linear regression analysis combining the three factors accounted for more than 80 % of the variance in functional impairment. The inter-relation of cortical excitability and reduced interhemispheric inhibition provides direct multi-modal evidence for the disinhibition theory of the contralesional hemisphere following stroke. Finally, our data reveal a key mechanism (i.e., the excitability-related reduction in interhemispheric inhibition) accounting for the rehabilitative potential of novel therapeutic approaches which aim at modulating cortical

  19. From Reflux Esophagitis to Esophageal Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Souza, Rhonda F

    Reflux esophagitis causes Barrett's metaplasia, an abnormal esophageal mucosa predisposed to adenocarcinoma. Medical therapy for reflux esophagitis focuses on decreasing gastric acid production with proton pump inhibitors. We have reported that reflux esophagitis in a rat model develops from a cytokine-mediated inflammatory injury, not from a caustic chemical (acid) injury. In this model, refluxed acid and bile stimulate the release of inflammatory cytokines from esophageal squamous cells, recruiting lymphocytes first to the submucosa and later to the luminal surface. Emerging studies on acute reflux esophagitis in humans support this new concept, suggesting that reflux-induced cytokine release may be a future target for medical therapies. Sometimes, reflux esophagitis heals with Barrett's metaplasia, a process facilitated by reflux-related nitric oxide (NO) production and Sonic Hedgehog (Hh) secretion by squamous cells. We have shown that NO reduces expression of genes that promote a squamous cell phenotype, while Hh signaling induces genes that mediate the development of the columnar cell phenotypes of Barrett's metaplasia. Agents targeting esophageal NO production or Hh signaling conceivably could prevent the development of Barrett's esophagus. Persistent reflux promotes cancer in Barrett's metaplasia. We have reported that acid and bile salts induce DNA damage in Barrett's cells. Bile salts also cause NF-x03BA;B activation in Barrett's cells, enabling them to resist apoptosis in the setting of DNA damage and likely contributing to carcinogenesis. Oral treatment with ursodeoxycholic acid prevents the esophageal DNA damage and NF-x03BA;B activation induced by toxic bile acids. Altering bile acid composition might be another approach to cancer prevention.

  20. Excitability of spinal neural function during motor imagery in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Toshiaki; Bunno, Yoshibumi; Onigata, Chieko; Tani, Makiko; Uragami, Sayuri; Yoshida, Sohei

    2014-01-01

    the median nerve at the wrist in subjects during two motor imagery conditions: holding and not holding the sensor of a pinch meter between the thumb and index finger. Our aim was to determine whether mental simulation without the muscle contraction associated with motion can increase the excitability of spinal neural function in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). F-waves of the left thenar muscles were examined in 10 patients with PD under resting, holding and motor imagery conditions. For the holding condition, the subjects held the sensor of the pinch meter between their thumb and index finger. For the motor imagery conditions, the subjects were asked to imagine a 50% maximal voluntary isometric contraction holding and not holding the sensor of the pinch meter between their thumb and index finger (motor imagery "with"/"without sensor"). Persistence during motor imagery under the "with sensor" condition increased significantly compared with persistence during resting (n=10, z=2.2509, p=0.0244, Wilcoxon test). The F/M amplitude ratio during motor imagery under the "with sensor" condition increased significantly compared with that during resting (n=10, z=2.1915, p=0.0284, Wilcoxon test). Excitability of spinal neural function during motor imagery in Parkinson's disease Motor imagery under the "with the sensor" condition increased excitability of the spinal neural output to the thenar muscles. Because excitability of the spinal neural output to the thenar muscles during motor imagery "with the sensor" was significantly higher than that during resting, we suggest that movement preparation for a motor imagery task is important in patients with PD.

  1. Long-term Outcome of Motor Function in a Child with Moyamoya Disease: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Nam, Ki Seok

    2013-12-01

    [Purpose] This observational study provides a retrospective description of changes in motor function of a 10 year old child who suffered from motor weakness caused by Moyamoya disease (MMD) over an approximately 3 year follow-up observation period. [Methods] The child was diagnosed as MMD due to multifocal encephalomalacia in both frontal and parietal cortices. After the ischemic attack, the child received physical therapy the based on stroke rehabilitation, including muscle strengthening exercises, training of functional activity/ADL, and neurodevelopmental treatment. [Results] The child's MRI showed areas of ischemic infarction in both the frontal and parietal lobes. Steno-occlusive findings for both the anterior cerebral artery and middle cerebral artery were observed on cerebral angiography. Regarding changes of motor function during the three-year follow-up, significant improvements, in the Motricity index, Modified Brunnstrom Classification, manual function test, and functional ambulatory category were observed. [Conclusion] The basic motor function and functional abilities of the child showed improvement with conservative treatment over approximately three years. The functional motor ability of children with MMD may be similar to the recovery progression of pediatric stroke patients, if there is no re-occurrence of ischemia.

  2. So close yet so far: Motor anomalies impacting on social functioning in autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Casartelli, Luca; Molteni, Massimo; Ronconi, Luca

    2016-04-01

    Difficulties in the social domain and motor anomalies have been widely investigated in Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). However, they have been generally considered as independent, and therefore tackled separately. Recent advances in neuroscience have hypothesized that the cortical motor system can play a role not only as a controller of elementary physical features of movement, but also in a complex domain as social cognition. Here, going beyond previous studies on ASD that described difficulties in the motor and in the social domain separately, we focus on the impact of motor mechanisms anomalies on social functioning. We consider behavioral, electrophysiological and neuroimaging findings supporting the idea that motor cognition is a critical "intermediate phenotype" for ASD. Motor cognition anomalies in ASD affect the processes of extraction, codification and subsequent translation of "external" social information into the motor system. Intriguingly, this alternative "motor" approach to the social domain difficulties in ASD may be promising to bridge the gap between recent experimental findings and clinical practice, potentially leading to refined preventive approaches and successful treatments.

  3. Dopamine Inactivation Efficacy Related to Functional DAT1 and COMT Variants Influences Motor Response Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Bender, Stephan; Rellum, Thomas; Freitag, Christine; Resch, Franz; Rietschel, Marcella; Treutlein, Jens; Jennen-Steinmetz, Christine; Brandeis, Daniel; Banaschewski, Tobias; Laucht, Manfred

    2012-01-01

    Background Dopamine plays an important role in orienting, response anticipation and movement evaluation. Thus, we examined the influence of functional variants related to dopamine inactivation in the dopamine transporter (DAT1) and catechol-O-methyltransferase genes (COMT) on the time-course of motor processing in a contingent negative variation (CNV) task. Methods 64-channel EEG recordings were obtained from 195 healthy adolescents of a community-based sample during a continuous performance task (A-X version). Early and late CNV as well as motor postimperative negative variation were assessed. Adolescents were genotyped for the COMT Val158Met and two DAT1 polymorphisms (variable number tandem repeats in the 3′-untranslated region and in intron 8). Results The results revealed a significant interaction between COMT and DAT1, indicating that COMT exerted stronger effects on lateralized motor post-processing (centro-parietal motor postimperative negative variation) in homozygous carriers of a DAT1 haplotype increasing DAT1 expression. Source analysis showed that the time interval 500–1000 ms after the motor response was specifically affected in contrast to preceding movement anticipation and programming stages, which were not altered. Conclusions Motor slow negative waves allow the genomic imaging of dopamine inactivation effects on cortical motor post-processing during response evaluation. This is the first report to point towards epistatic effects in the motor system during response evaluation, i.e. during the post-processing of an already executed movement rather than during movement programming. PMID:22649558

  4. Effect of early enteral nutrition on postoperative nutritional status and immune function in elderly patients with esophageal cancer or cardiac cancer.

    PubMed

    Yu, Guiping; Chen, Guoqiang; Huang, Bin; Shao, Wenlong; Zeng, Guangqiao

    2013-06-01

    To explore the effect of early enteral nutrition (EN) on postoperative nutritional status, intestinal permeability, and immune function in elderly patients with esophageal cancer or cardiac cancer. A total of 96 patients with esophageal cancer or cardiac cancer who underwent surgical treatment in our hospital from June 2007 to December 2010 were enrolled in this study. They were divided into EN group (n=50) and parenteral nutrition (PN) group (n=46) based on the nutrition support modes. The body weight, time to first flatus/defecation, average hospital stay, complications and mortality after the surgery as well as the liver function indicators were recorded and analyzed. Peripheral blood samples were collected on the days 1, 4 and 7 after surgery. The plasma diamine oxidase (DAO) activity and D-lactate level were determined to assess the intestinal permeability. The plasma endotoxin levels were determined using dynamic turbidimetric assay to assess the protective effect of EN on intestinal mucosal barrier. The postoperative blood levels of inflammatory cytokines and immunoglobulins were determined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). After the surgery, the time to first flatus/defecation, average hospital stay, and complications were significantly less in the EN group than those in the PN group (P<0.05), whereas the EN group had significantly higher albumin levels than the PN group (P<0.05). On the 7th postoperative day, the DAO activity, D-lactate level and endotoxin contents were significantly lower in the EN group than those in the PN group (all P<0.05). In addition, the EN group had significantly higher IgA, IgG, IgM, and CD4 levels than the PN group (P<0.05) but significantly lower IL-2, IL-6, and TNF-α levels (P<0.05). In elderly patients with esophageal cancer or cardiac cancer, early EN after surgery can effectively improve the nutritional status, protect intestinal mucosal barrier (by reducing plasma endoxins), and enhance the immune function.

  5. Esophageal Varices: Symptoms and Causes

    MedlinePlus

    Esophageal varices Symptoms and causes By Mayo Clinic Staff Symptoms Esophageal varices usually don't cause signs and symptoms unless they bleed. Signs and symptoms of bleeding esophageal varices include: Vomiting and seeing significant amounts of blood ...

  6. Facilitating skilled right hand motor function in older subjects by anodal polarization over the left primary motor cortex.

    PubMed

    Hummel, Friedhelm C; Heise, Kirstin; Celnik, Pablo; Floel, Agnes; Gerloff, Christian; Cohen, Leonardo G

    2010-12-01

    Healthy ageing is accompanied by limitations in performance of activities of daily living and personal independence. Recent reports demonstrated improvements in motor function induced by noninvasive anodal direct current stimulation (tDCS) of the primary motor cortex (M1) in young healthy adults. Here we tested the hypothesis that a single session of anodal tDCS over left M1 could facilitate performance of right upper extremity tasks required for activities of daily living (Jebsen-Taylor hand function test, JTT) in older subjects relative to Sham in a double-blind cross-over study design. We found (a) significant improvement in JTT function with tDCS relative to Sham that outlasted the stimulation period by at least 30 min, (b) that the older the subjects the more prominent this improvement appeared and (c) that consistent with previous results in younger subjects, these effects were not accompanied by any overt undesired side effect. We conclude that anodal tDCS applied over M1 can facilitate performance of skilled hand functions required for activities of daily living in older subjects.

  7. Visual-motor integration functioning in a South African middle childhood sample.

    PubMed

    Lotz, Leslie; Loxton, Helene; Naidoo, Anthony V

    2005-10-01

    Visual-motor integration functioning has been identified as playing an integral role in different aspects of a child's development. Sensory-motor development is not only foundational to the physical maturation process, but is also imperative for progress with formal learning activities. Deficits in visual-motor integration have been identified as precursors of later learning disabilities and other neurological conditions. The primary aim of this study was to determine the status of visual-motor integration functioning of a group of learners from a disadvantaged peri-urban South African community. Visual-motor integration functioning was assessed using the Developmental Test of Visual-Motor Integration (VMI) and the Goodenough-Harris Drawing Test (GHD). Three hundred and thirty-nine learners in grades 1-4 were assessed and results for the group relative to gender, chronological age and socioeconomic status are reported. For the group, the mean test age fell 16 months below the mean chronological age on the VMI. The mean GHD score for the group was about a half a standard deviation below the GHD's test norm. At school entry level, visual-motor integration was more than one standard deviation below the mean. Compared to female learners, male learners achieved significantly higher scores on the test age score of the VMI (mean difference = 8.69 months), and the intelligence coefficient score of the GHD (mean difference = 4.68). Scores on both measures increased as a function of socioeconomic status. The VMI and GHD scores were significantly correlated (r = 0.45; P < 0.01) suggesting that visual-motor integration is integral to intellectual functioning.

  8. The effect of subclinical infantile thiamine deficiency on motor function in preschool children.

    PubMed

    Harel, Yael; Zuk, Luba; Guindy, Michal; Nakar, Orly; Lotan, Dafna; Fattal-Valevski, Aviva

    2017-10-01

    We investigated the long-term implications of infantile thiamine (vitamin B1) deficiency on motor function in preschoolers who had been fed during the first 2 years of life with a faulty milk substitute. In this retrospective cohort study, 39 children aged 5-6 years who had been exposed to a thiamine-deficient formula during infancy were compared with 30 age-matched healthy children with unremarkable infant nutritional history. The motor function of the participants was evaluated with The Movement Assessment Battery for Children (M-ABC) and the Zuk Assessment. Both evaluation tools revealed statistically significant differences between the exposed and unexposed groups for gross and fine motor development (p < .001, ball skills p = .01) and grapho-motor development (p = .004). The differences were especially noteworthy on M-ABC testing for balance control functioning (p < .001, OR 5.4; 95% CI 3.4-7.4) and fine motor skills (p < .001, OR 3.2; 95% CI 1.8-4.6). In the exposed group, both assessments concurred on the high rate of children exhibiting motor function difficulties in comparison to unexposed group (M-ABC: 56% vs. 10%, Zuk Assessment: 59% vs. 3%, p < .001). Thiamine deficiency in infancy has long-term implications on gross and fine motor function and balance skills in childhood, thiamine having a crucial role in normal motor development. The study emphasizes the importance of proper infant feeding and regulatory control of breast milk substitutes. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Relationship between communication skills and gross motor function in preschool-aged children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Andrea; Weir, Kelly A; Ware, Robert S; Boyd, Roslyn N

    2013-11-01

    To explore the communication skills of children with cerebral palsy (CP) at 24 months' corrected age with reference to typically developing children, and to determine the relationship between communication ability, gross motor function, and other comorbidities associated with CP. Prospective, cross-sectional, population-based cohort study. General community. Children with CP (N=124; mean age, 24mo; functional severity on Gross Motor Function Classification System [GMFCS]: I=47, II=14, III=22, IV=19, V=22). Not applicable. Parents reported communication skills on the Communication and Symbolic Behavior Scales Developmental Profile (CSBS-DP) Infant-Toddler Checklist. Two independent physiotherapists classified motor type, distribution, and GMFCS. Data on comorbidities were obtained from parent interviews and medical records. Children with mild CP (GMFCS I/II) had mean CSBS-DP scores that were 0.5 to 0.6 SD below the mean for typically developing peers, while those with moderate-severe impairment (GMFCS III-V) were 1.4 to 2.6 SD below the mean. GMFCS was significantly associated with performance on the CSBS-DP (F=18.55, P<.001), with gross motor ability accounting for 38% of the variation in communication. Poorer communication was strongly associated with gross motor function and full-term birth. Preschool-aged children with CP, with more severe gross motor impairment, showed delayed communication, while children with mild motor impairment were less vulnerable. Term-born children had significantly poorer communication than those born prematurely. Because a portion of each gross motor functional severity level is at risk, this study reinforces the need for early monitoring of communication development for all children with CP. Copyright © 2013 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Functional MRI and motor behavioral changes obtained with constraint-induced movement therapy in chronic stroke.

    PubMed

    Könönen, M; Tarkka, I M; Niskanen, E; Pihlajamäki, M; Mervaala, E; Pitkänen, K; Vanninen, R

    2012-04-01

    The clinical benefits of intensive stroke rehabilitation vary individually. We used multimodal functional imaging to assess the relationship of clinical gain and imaging changes in patients with chronic stroke whose voluntary motor control improved after constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT). Eleven patients (37.6 ± 36.8 months from stroke) were studied by functional MRI (fMRI), transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), and behavioral assessment of hand motor control (Wolf Motor Function Test) before and after 2 weeks of CIMT. Individual and group-level changes in imaging and behavioral parameters were investigated. Increase in fMRI activation in the sensorimotor areas was greater amongst those subjects who had poor hand motor behavior before therapy and/or whose motor behavior improved notably because of therapy than amongst subjects with relatively good motor behavior already before therapy. The magnitude of CIMT-induced changes in task-related fMRI activation differed between lesioned and non-lesioned hemispheres, and the fMRI laterality index was different for paretic and non-paretic hand tasks. The corticospinal conduction time in TMS was significantly decreased after CIM therapy. Alterations in sensorimotor cortical activations (fMRI) and corticospinal conductivity (TMS) were observed after intensive rehabilitation in patients with chronic stroke. Activation and functional changes in fMRI and TMS correlated significantly with the degree of clinical improvement in hand motor behavior. The present data advance the understanding of the functional underpinnings of motor recovery, which may be obtained even years after the stroke. © 2011 The Author(s). European Journal of Neurology © 2011 EFNS.

  11. The relationship between executive function and fine motor control in young and older adults.

    PubMed

    Corti, Emily J; Johnson, Andrew R; Riddle, Hayley; Gasson, Natalie; Kane, Robert; Loftus, Andrea M

    2017-01-01

    The present study examined the relationship between executive function (EF) and fine motor control in young and older healthy adults. Participants completed 3 measures of executive function; a spatial working memory (SWM) task, the Stockings of Cambridge task (planning), and the Intra-Dimensional Extra-Dimensional Set-Shift task (set-shifting). Fine motor control was assessed using 3 subtests of the Purdue Pegboard (unimanual, bimanual, sequencing). For the younger adults, there were no significant correlations between measures of EF and fine motor control. For the older adults, all EFs significantly correlated with all measures of fine motor control. Three separate regressions examined whether planning, SWM and set-shifting independently predicted unimanual, bimanual, and sequencing scores for the older adults. Planning was the primary predictor of performance on all three Purdue subtests. A multiple-groups mediation model examined whether planning predicted fine motor control scores independent of participants' age, suggesting that preservation of planning ability may support fine motor control in older adults. Planning remained a significant predictor of unimanual performance in the older age group, but not bimanual or sequencing performance. The findings are discussed in terms of compensation theory, whereby planning is a key compensatory resource for fine motor control in older adults. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Determinants of Functional Disability in Huntington’s Disease: Role of Cognitive and Motor Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Christopher A.; Pantelyat, Alex; Kogan, Jane; Brandt, Jason

    2014-01-01

    The clinical syndrome of Huntington’s disease is notable for a triad of motor, cognitive and emotional features. All HD patients eventually become occupationally disabled; however the factors that render HD patients unable to maintain employment have not been extensively studied. This review begins by discussing the clinical triad of HD, highlighting the distinction in the motor disorder between involuntary movements such as chorea, and voluntary movement impairment, with the latter contributing more to functional disability. Cognitive disorder clearly contributes to disability, though the relative contribution compared to motor is difficult to unravel, especially since many of the tests used to asses “cognition” have a strong motor component. The role of emotional changes in disability needs more study. The literature on contributions to functional disability, driving impairment and nursing home placement is reviewed. Relevant experience is presented from the longstanding JHU HD observational study on motor vs cognitive onset, and on cognitive and motor features at the time when ind