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Sample records for esophageal stenosis

  1. Esophageal duplication and congenital esophageal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Trappey, A Francois; Hirose, Shinjiro

    2017-04-01

    Esophageal duplication and congenital esophageal stenosis (CES) may represent diseases with common embryologic etiologies, namely, faulty tracheoesophageal separation and differentiation. Here, we will re-enforce definitions for these diseases as well as review their embryology, diagnosis, and treatment. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Congenital esophageal stenosis owing to tracheobronchial remnants

    PubMed Central

    Rebelo, Priscila Guyt; Ormonde, João Victor C.; Ormonde, João Baptista C.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To emphasize the need of an accurate diagnosis of congenital esophageal stenosis due to tracheobronchial remnants, since its treatment differs from other types of congenital narrowing. CASE DESCRIPTION Four cases of lower congenital esophageal stenosis due to tracheobronchial remnants, whose definitive diagnosis was made by histopathology. Except for the last case, in which a concomitant anti-reflux surgery was not performed, all had a favorable outcome after resection and anastomosis of the esophagus. COMMENTS The congenital esophageal stenosis is an intrinsic narrowing of the organâ€(tm)s wall associated with its structural malformation. The condition can be caused by tracheobronchial remnants, fibromuscular stenosis or membranous diaphragm and the first symptom is dysphagia after the introduction of solid food in the diet. The first-choice treatment to tracheobronchial remnants cases is the surgical resection and end-to-end anastomosis of the esophagus. PMID:24142326

  3. Prevention and Treatment of Esophageal Stenosis after Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection for Early Esophageal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Jing; Lu, Zhongsheng; Liu, Qingsen

    2014-01-01

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) for the treatment of esophageal mucosal lesions is associated with a risk of esophageal stenosis, especially for near-circumferential or circumferential esophageal mucosal defects. Here, we review historic and modern studies on the prevention and treatment of esophageal stenosis after ESD. These methods include prevention via pharmacological treatment, endoscopic autologous cell transplantation, endoscopic esophageal dilatation, and stent placement. This short review will focus on direct prevention and treatment, which may help guide the way forward. PMID:25386186

  4. Esophageal Stenosis Associated With Tumor Regression in Radiotherapy for Esophageal Cancer: Frequency and Prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Atsumi, Kazushige; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Arimura, Hidetaka; Terashima, Kotaro; Matsuki, Takaomi; Ohga, Saiji; Yoshitake, Tadamasa; Nonoshita, Takeshi; Tsurumaru, Daisuke; Ohnishi, Kayoko; Asai, Kaori; Matsumoto, Keiji; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Honda, Hiroshi

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To determine clinical factors for predicting the frequency and severity of esophageal stenosis associated with tumor regression in radiotherapy for esophageal cancer. Methods and Materials: The study group consisted of 109 patients with esophageal cancer of T1-4 and Stage I-III who were treated with definitive radiotherapy and achieved a complete response of their primary lesion at Kyushu University Hospital between January 1998 and December 2007. Esophageal stenosis was evaluated using esophagographic images within 3 months after completion of radiotherapy. We investigated the correlation between esophageal stenosis after radiotherapy and each of the clinical factors with regard to tumors and therapy. For validation of the correlative factors for esophageal stenosis, an artificial neural network was used to predict the esophageal stenotic ratio. Results: Esophageal stenosis tended to be more severe and more frequent in T3-4 cases than in T1-2 cases. Esophageal stenosis in cases with full circumference involvement tended to be more severe and more frequent than that in cases without full circumference involvement. Increases in wall thickness tended to be associated with increases in esophageal stenosis severity and frequency. In the multivariate analysis, T stage, extent of involved circumference, and wall thickness of the tumor region were significantly correlated to esophageal stenosis (p = 0.031, p < 0.0001, and p = 0.0011, respectively). The esophageal stenotic ratio predicted by the artificial neural network, which learned these three factors, was significantly correlated to the actual observed stenotic ratio, with a correlation coefficient of 0.864 (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Our study suggested that T stage, extent of involved circumference, and esophageal wall thickness of the tumor region were useful to predict the frequency and severity of esophageal stenosis associated with tumor regression in radiotherapy for esophageal cancer.

  5. [A new surgical management of esophageal stenosis without esophagectomy].

    PubMed

    Uchida, Y; Hashimoto, T; Matsumoto, K; Noguchi, T

    1997-11-01

    In many cases, reflux esophagitis following surgical treatment for esophageal stenosis is caused by the recurrence of that after esophagectomy and esophogogastrostomy. We performed a new management without esophagectomy for a 66-year-old man with sliding hiatal hernia and esophageal stenosis induced by reflux esophagitis. A Expanding Metalic Stent (MES) was inserted to the stenotic portion of the esophagus, and then Collis-Nissen's procedure was done through left thoracotomy and phrenotomy. The postoperative course was satisfactory, and no gastroes-ophageal reflux was detected with the use of 24h pH-monitoring of the esophagus after surgery.

  6. Esophageal stenosis with sloughing esophagitis: A curious manifestation of graft-vs-host disease

    PubMed Central

    Trabulo, Daniel; Ferreira, Sara; Lage, Pedro; Rego, Rafaela Lima; Teixeira, Gilda; Pereira, A Dias

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a 56-year-old woman with a history of allogenic bone marrow transplantation for two years, complaining with dysphagia and weight loss. Upper endoscopy revealed esophageal stenosis and extensive mucosa sloughing. Biopsies confirmed the diagnosis of graft-vs-host disease (GVHD). Balloon dilation, corticosteroids and cyclosporin resulted in marked clinical improvement. Gastrointestinal tract is involved in the majority of patients with chronic GVHD. Esophageal manifestations are rare and include vesiculobullous disease, ulceration, esophageal webs, casts or strictures. Sloughing esophagitis along with severe stenosis requiring endoscopic dilation has never been reported in this context. PMID:26290649

  7. [A treatment to serious esophageal cicatrices stenosi by metal and silica gel dilator].

    PubMed

    Li, J; Chen, X; Sun, C; Liu, H

    1999-12-01

    To find an effective method of treating the esophageal cicatricial stenosis. Six cases with esophageal cicatricial stenosis were treated by mental and silica gel dilator. The effects in all six cases were satisfactory and no any complications were finded. The method is safe, effective and of no complications, the treatment time is shorter also.

  8. [Treatment of esophagopericardial fistula following esophagogastroplasty for esophageal caustic stenosis].

    PubMed

    Michieletto, Silvia; Ruol, Alberto; Cagol, Matteo; Alfieri, Rita; Castoro, Carlo; Marano, Salvatore; Tosolini, Chiara; Ancona, Ermanno

    2007-01-01

    Esophagopericardial fistula is a rare and severe complication, involving several benign, malignant and traumatic pathologies of the esophagus. Only few cases of esophagopericardial fistula have been published so far, as compared to more frequently reported cases of gastropericardial fistula. We report on a 25-year-old female with an esophagopericardial fistula following retrosternal esophagogastroplasty for esophageal caustic stenosis. One month before admission to our hospital, the patient had fever and nonradiating substernal chest pain which was relieved by aspirin, unfortunately without adequate antacid therapy. After 3 weeks, for abdominal pain and worsening chest pain with shock, she was admitted to another hospital and underwent laparotomy: an haemoperitoneum was found, due to a rupture of an ovarian cyst which was removed. For persistent shock, the patient had an echocardiogram which revealed a cardiac tamponade, treated with placement of a pericardic drainage (300 cc of purulent liquid). She was then transferred to our unit: an esophageal swallow with a small amount of methilene blue revealed a fistula between the stomach of the esophagogatroplasty and the pericardium. She eventually underwent surgery. A pericardial window was created, the gastric tube was taken down because of the impossibility to suture the gastric ulcer, and an esophagocoloplasty was used for the reconstruction of the alimentary transit. The postoperative course was unevenqf&l. She is alive and well at 15 months after surgery. Esophagopericardial fistula is a rare complication, with a high mortality rate. A timely decision is mandatory and an aggressive treatment often necessary.

  9. Recurrent cervical esophageal stenosis after colon conduit failure: Use of myocutaneous flap

    PubMed Central

    Sa, Young Jo; Kim, Young Du; Kim, Chi Kyung; Park, Jong Kyung; Moon, Seok Whan

    2013-01-01

    A 53-year-old male developed cervical esophageal stenosis after esophageal bypass surgery using a right colon conduit. The esophageal bypass surgery was performed to treat multiple esophageal strictures resulting from corrosive ingestion three years prior to presentation. Although the patient underwent several endoscopic stricture dilatations after surgery, he continued to suffer from recurrent esophageal stenosis. We planned cervical patch esophagoplasty with a pedicled skin flap of sternocleidomastoid (SCM) muscle. Postoperative recovery was successful, and the patient could eat a solid meal without difficulty and has been well for 18 mo. SCM flap esophagoplasty is an easier and safer method of managing complicated and recurrent cervical esophageal strictures than other operations. PMID:23345956

  10. [Clinical aspects of the post-caustic esophageal stenosis on 116 cases].

    PubMed

    Mihalache, Carmen; Mihalache, S

    2006-01-01

    116 cases of post-caustic esophageal stenosis hospitalized in the Emergency Surgical Clinic of Iaşi during the period 1982-2004 have been analyzed. The patients' ages, the 4th decade of age (24.13%) prevailed. The alkaline substances prevailed (84.48%). Eight patients benefited from an endoscopic examination in the 15th day from the injury, and presented lesion degree 1-2 C. Progressive dysphagia, retrosternal pain and weight loss-symptoms were in all cases. The most of the patients (65.50%) came for a medical consultation within the first 6 months. The diagnosis and localizing the esophageal stenosis were based on the endoscopic examination and radiology. The single or double stenosis esophagus prevailed. The corrosive substances represent a frequent cause of benign esophageal stenosis.

  11. Review of esophageal injuries and stenosis: Lessons learn and current concepts of management

    PubMed Central

    Ramareddy, Raghu Sampalli; Alladi, Anand

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To review the patients with esophageal injuries and stenosis with respect to their etiology, clinical course, management, and the lessons learnt from these. Materials and Methods: Retrospective descriptive observation review of children with esophageal injuries and stenosis admitted between January 2009 and April 2015. Results: Eighteen children with esophageal injuries of varied etiology were managed and included, seven with corrosive injury, five with perforation due to various causes, three with mucosal erosion, two with trachea esophageal fistula (TEF), and one wall erosion. The five children who had perforation were due to poststricture dilatation in a child with esophageal atresia and secondary to foreign body impaction or its attempted retrieval in four. Alkaline button cell had caused TEF in two. Three congenital esophageal stenosis (CES) had presented with dysphagia and respiratory tract infection. Six corrosive stricture and two CES responded to dilatation alone and one each of them required surgery. Four of the children with esophageal perforation were detected early and required drainage procedure (1), diversion (1), and medical management (2). Pseudo diverticulum was managed expectantly. Among TEF, one had spontaneous closure and other one was lost to follow-up. All the remaining nineteen children have recovered well except one CES had mortality. Conclusion: Esophageal injuries though rare can be potentially devastating and life-threatening. PMID:27365909

  12. [Non-neoplastic esophageal stenosis: not always so benign].

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Julie; Vollenweider, Peter; Vuilleumier, Henri; Schwab, Marcos

    2013-10-02

    Esophageal intramural pseudodiverticulosis is a rare pathology whose etiology is unknown, but which is frequently associated with three highly prevalent entities: esophageal reflux disease, esophageal candidosis and alcoholic esophagitis. With conservative treatment the course of these pathologies is usually benign. However, some severe cases are resistant to conservative treatment and may require more aggressive management. We here present the case of patient suffering from a severe esophagitis complicated by chronic mediastinitis with life-threatening repercussions, requiring esophagectomy as treatment.

  13. Endoscopic management for congenital esophageal stenosis: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Terui, Keita; Saito, Takeshi; Mitsunaga, Tetsuya; Nakata, Mitsuyuki; Yoshida, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    Congenital esophageal stenosis (CES) is an extremely rare malformation, and standard treatment have not been completely established. By years of clinical research, evidence has been accumulated. We conducted systematic review to assess outcomes of the treatment for CES, especially the role of endoscopic modalities. A total of 144 literatures were screened and reviewed. CES was categorized in fibromuscular thickening, tracheobronchial remnants (TBR) and membranous web, and the frequency was 54%, 30% and 16%, respectively. Therapeutic option includes surgery and dilatation, and surgery tends to be reserved for ineffective dilatation. An essential point is that dilatation for TBR type of CES has low success rate and high rate of perforation. TBR can be distinguished by using endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS). Overall success rate of dilatation for CES with or without case selection by using EUS was 90% and 29%, respectively. Overall rate of perforation with or without case selection was 7% and 24%, respectively. By case selection using EUS, high success rate with low rate of perforation could be achieved. In conclusion, endoscopic dilatation has been established as a primary therapy for CES except TBR type. Repetitive dilatation with gradual step-up might be one of safe ways to minimize the risk of perforation. PMID:25789088

  14. Esophagojejunal Anastomosis Fistula, Distal Esophageal Stenosis, and Metalic Stent Migration after Total Gastrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Al Hajjar, Nadim; Popa, Calin; Al-Momani, Tareg; Margarit, Simona; Graur, Florin; Tantau, Marcel

    2015-01-01

    Esophagojejunal anastomosis fistula is the main complication after a total gastrectomy. To avoid a complex procedure on friable inflamed perianastomotic tissues, a coated self-expandable stent is mounted at the site of the anastomotic leak. A complication of stenting procedure is that it might lead to distal esophageal stenosis. However, another frequently encountered complication of stenting is stent migration, which is treated nonsurgically. When the migrated stent creates life threatening complications, surgical removal is indicated. We present a case of a 67-year-old male patient who was treated at our facility for a gastric adenocarcinoma which developed, postoperatively, an esophagojejunostomy fistula, a distal esophageal stenosis, and a metallic coated self-expandable stent migration. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of an esophagojejunostomy fistula combined with a distal esophageal stenosis as well as with a metallic coated self-expandable stent migration. PMID:25945277

  15. Esophagojejunal anastomosis fistula, distal esophageal stenosis, and metalic stent migration after total gastrectomy.

    PubMed

    Al Hajjar, Nadim; Popa, Calin; Al-Momani, Tareg; Margarit, Simona; Graur, Florin; Tantau, Marcel

    2015-01-01

    Esophagojejunal anastomosis fistula is the main complication after a total gastrectomy. To avoid a complex procedure on friable inflamed perianastomotic tissues, a coated self-expandable stent is mounted at the site of the anastomotic leak. A complication of stenting procedure is that it might lead to distal esophageal stenosis. However, another frequently encountered complication of stenting is stent migration, which is treated nonsurgically. When the migrated stent creates life threatening complications, surgical removal is indicated. We present a case of a 67-year-old male patient who was treated at our facility for a gastric adenocarcinoma which developed, postoperatively, an esophagojejunostomy fistula, a distal esophageal stenosis, and a metallic coated self-expandable stent migration. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of an esophagojejunostomy fistula combined with a distal esophageal stenosis as well as with a metallic coated self-expandable stent migration.

  16. Endoscopic management of esophageal stenosis in children: New and traditional treatments

    PubMed Central

    Dall’Oglio, Luigi; Caldaro, Tamara; Foschia, Francesca; Faraci, Simona; Federici di Abriola, Giovanni; Rea, Francesca; Romeo, Erminia; Torroni, Filippo; Angelino, Giulia; De Angelis, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Post-esophageal atresia anastomotic strictures and post-corrosive esophagitis are the most frequent types of cicatricial esophageal stricture. Congenital esophageal stenosis has been reported to be a rare but typical disease in children; other pediatric conditions are peptic, eosinophilic esophagitis and dystrophic recessive epidermolysis bullosa strictures. The conservative treatment of esophageal stenosis and strictures (ES) rather than surgery is a well-known strategy for children. Before planning esophageal dilation, the esophageal morphology should be assessed in detail for its length, aspect, number and level, and different conservative strategies should be chosen accordingly. Endoscopic dilators and techniques that involve different adjuvant treatment strategies have been reported and depend on the stricture’s etiology, the availability of different tools and the operator’s experience and preferences. Balloon and semirigid dilators are the most frequently used tools. No high-quality studies have reported on the differences in the efficacies and rates of complications associated with these two types of dilators. There is no consensus in the literature regarding the frequency of dilations or the diameter that should be achieved. The use of adjuvant treatments has been reported in cases of recalcitrant stenosis or strictures with evidence of dysphagic symptoms. Corticosteroids (either systemically or locally injected), the local application of mitomycin C, diathermy and laser ES sectioning have been reported. Some authors have suggested that stenting can reduce both the number of dilations and the treatment length. In many cases, this strategy is effective when either metallic or plastic stents are utilized. Treatment complications, such esophageal perforations, can be conservatively managed, considering surgery only in cases with severe pleural cavity involvement. In cases of stricture relapse, even if such relapses occur following the execution of well

  17. Infantile Hypertrophic Pyloric Stenosis in Postoperative Esophageal Atresia with Tracheoesophageal Fistula.

    PubMed

    R A A, Hassan; Y U, Choo; R, Noraida; I, Rosida

    2015-01-01

    Development of infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis during postoperative period in EA with TEF is rare. Postoperative vomiting or feeding intolerance in EA is more common which is due to esophageal stricture, gastroesophageal reflux and esophageal dysmotility. A typical case of IHPS also presents with non-bilious projectile vomiting at around 3-4 weeks of life. The diagnosis of infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis in this subset is usually delayed because of its rarity. We report a case of IHPS in postoperative EA and emphasize on high index of suspicion to avoid any delay in diagnosis with its metabolic consequences.

  18. Biodegradable stents for the treatment of refractory or recurrent benign esophageal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Imaz-Iglesia, Iñaki; García-Pérez, Sonia; Nachtnebel, Anna; Martín-Águeda, Belén; Sánchez-Piedra, Carlos; Karadayi, Bilgehan; Demirbaş, Ali Rıza

    2016-06-01

    Esophageal stents are used for the treatment of refractory and recurrent dyphagias. In 2007, esophageal biodegradable stents (EBS) were authorised as an alternative to existing metal and plastic stents in Europe. The advantages claimed for EBS are fewer complications concerning tissue ingrowth, stent migration and stent removal. We performed a systematic review to evaluate the efficacy and safety of EBS compared to fully-covered self-expanding metal stents, self-expanding plastic stents, and esophageal dilation for the treatment of refractory or recurrent benign esophageal stenosis. Three comparative studies (one randomized controlled trial and two cohort studies) were assessed. The studies used different inclusion criteria, had a very small (sample) size and the quality of the evidence was very low. Expert commentary: The current evidence is insufficient to determine the relative efficacy or safety of esophageal biodegradable stents. The results of this systematic review should be updated once new evidence is available.

  19. Pyloric stenosis in a patient with pure esophageal atresia: A difficult diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Chattopadhyay, Anindya

    2014-01-01

    Hypertrophic pyloric stenosis is brought to attention by its characteristic non-bilious vomiting. In a patient with pure esophageal atresia and a feeding gastrostomy, the symptoms were modified and the diagnosis was delayed. This case report highlights the clinical features of this rare combination, whose diagnosis was easily established once the entity was considered. PMID:24741218

  20. [Treatment of benign esophageal stenosis: re-evaluation after 20 years].

    PubMed

    Chiocca, J C; Salis; Graciela, B; Stupnik, S; Mazure, P A

    1990-01-01

    In 1972 we described a method for dilatation of esophageal stenosis. The purpose of this paper is to report the results obtained between 1970 and 1989, the patients were studied by X-Rays, "calibration" of the stenosis, endoscopy, biopsy, cytology, gastric analysis and esophageal motility. One hundred and seven patients were treated (mean 60.5 years, M/F 3.9/1). The most frequent etiology was reflux esophagitis (80.3%). Hiatus hernia was present in 84.9%. The stenosis was in the lower third of the esophagus in 92.5%. The BAO was mean: 3.6 mEq/h, and the MAO mean 16.4 mEq/h with a hypersecretion pattern in 33.1% of the cases. Cytology was negative for malignancy in 100%. Biopsy showed esophagitis in 86.9%, Barrett's epithelium in 12.1%, normal tissue in 6.5% and insufficient material in 1.8%. Endoscopy showed 98.1% of grade IV esophagitis. Esophageal motility showed a HPZ of mean 6.5 mmHg. and varying degrees of aperistalsis in 24.3% of the patients. The total number of dilatations was 555 (mean 5.1/pt). The "calibration" of the stenosis previous to the dilatation was mean 8.6 mm, and post dilatation mean 15.6 mm. The result of the procedure was good in 92.5%, regular in 2.8% and bad in 4.6%. The morbidity was 0.9% and the mortality 0.1%. There was relapse of the stenosis in 42% of the cases, the follow-up was mean 3.2 years. Twenty nine patients were submitted to surgery due to failure of the procedure with 68.1% of good results, morbidity of 9% and mortality of 9%. We conclude that this dilatation procedure offers excellent results with a very low morbi-mortality.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Effect of Slip Time in Forming Neo-Esophageal Stenosis After Replacement of a Thoracic Esophagus With Nitinol Artificial Esophagus.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xian-Liang; Liang, Jian-Hui

    2015-07-01

    Attempts have been made to investigate the effect of slip time of nitinol artificial esophagus for forming neo-esophageal stenosis after replacement of a thoracic esophagus with nitinol artificial esophagus in 20 experimental pigs. The pigs whose slip time was less than 90 days postoperatively had severe dysphagia (Bown's III) immediately after they were fed, and the dysphagia aggravated gradually later on (Bown's III-IV). The pigs whose slip time was more than 90 days postoperatively had mild/moderate dysphagia (Bown's I-II) immediately after they were fed, and the dysphagia relieved gradually later on (Bown's II-I-0). The ratios between the diameter of neo-esophagus in different slip time and normal esophagus were 25% (at 2 months postoperatively), 58% (at 4 months postoperatively), and 93% (at 6 months postoperatively), respectively. The relationship between nitinol artificial esophagus slip time and neo-esophageal stenosis showed a positive correlation. After replacement of a thoracic esophagus with nitinol artificial esophagus, the artificial esophageal slip time not only affected the original diameter of the neo-esophagus immediately, but also affected the neo-esophageal scar stricture forming process later on. The narrowing of neo-esophagus is caused by overgrowth of scar tissue. But there is the positive correlation between artificial esophagus slip time and neo-esophageal stenosis, so this can be a way of overcoming neo-esophageal stenosis by delaying slip time of artificial esophagus.

  2. Use of self-expanding nitinol stents in the pediatric management of refractory esophageal caustic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Verónica; Ojha, Devicka; Nalluri, Harsha; de Agustín, Juan Carlos

    2017-10-01

    The treatment of recurrent esophageal stricture secondary to the ingestion of a caustic agent is an arduous task. Self-expanding esophageal stents may be an alternative to repeated endoscopic esophageal dilations. We present the case of a two-year-old male with a severe and long esophageal stricture successfully treated by the combination of dilations and stent placement. After five months of serial pneumatic dilations, three self-expanding nitinol stents internally coated with silicone were introduced through a gastrostomy, covering the entire esophagus. The procedure was performed under endoscopic and radiological guidance. Three months later, the treatment was repeated with a single stent. A new stenosis in the proximal esophagus required surgical resection, and anastomosis followed by two pneumatic dilations for five months resulted in longer intervals where the patient was asymptomatic. The results obtained were satisfactory, allowing the patient to conserve and use his own esophagus. However, this is a unique case and the optimal maintenance time and withdrawal time of the stent must be determined.

  3. [Esophageal stenosis in a patient with primary biliary cirrhosis and mucous membrane pemphigoid].

    PubMed

    Oguri, Hikaru; Miyazawa, Masaki

    2014-01-01

    A 77-year-old man with primary biliary cirrhosis was admitted to our hospital with a complaint of dysphagia. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed multiple ulcers in the oral cavity and pharynx, with circumferential ulceration in the cervical and upper thoracic esophagus. It was difficult to pass the endoscope through the upper thoracic esophagus, indicating stenosis. The patient was referred to the ophthalmology department for ocular lesions, where he was diagnosed with symblepharon due to ocular pemphigoid. Furthermore, direct immunofluorescence microscopy of esophageal biopsy specimens revealed linear deposits of IgG, IgA, and C3 in the epithelial basement membrane zone. On the basis of these findings, a diagnosis of mucous membranous pemphigoid was made.

  4. [Stent implantation in the treatment of pharynx anastomotic stenosis after cervical esophageal resection: a case report].

    PubMed

    Zang, Chuanshan; Sun, Jian; Sun, Yan

    2016-03-01

    We report the treatment of one patient with pharynx anastomotic stenosis after cervical esophagealresection by stent implantation. The patient suffered from serious pharynx anastomotic stenosis after gastric-pha-ryngeal anastomosis. After balloon-dilatation,a domestic self-expanding Z-stents was implanted in the stricture ofthe esophagus under the X-rays. After stent implantation, the patient has been leading a normal life for threeyears. Balloon dilatation and stent implantation is an effective and safe method in the treatment of patients withpharynx anastomotic stenosis.

  5. [Epidermolysis bullosa acquisita complicated by esophageal stenosis. Endoscopic treatment with thermoplastic dilators and intralesional steroid injection].

    PubMed

    Moura, E G; Couto-Júnior, D S; Alvarado-Escobar, H; da Costa-Martins, B; Sallum, R A; Artifon, E L; Sakai, P

    2011-01-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA) is a rare auto-immune dermatologic disease, produced by auto-antibodies against colagen VII. We report a 44 years old male patient with EBA diagnosed 15 years before, who presented with progressive disphagia, being diagnosed an esophageal involvement of EBA. The patient was submitted to endoscopic treatment with thermoplastic bougie dilation and intralesional corticosteroid injection. The patient improved clinically with recovery of nutritional status. Esophageal involvement in EBA is very rare and its reason is still unknown. Endoscopic approach must be cautiously performed with the use of small diameter endoscopes, small caliber dilators, intralesional injection of corticosteroid and enteral tube in order to minimize the risks of complications, as well as esophageal rest from food trauma and better reparatory molding of the epithelium.

  6. Endoscopically placed stents: a useful alternative for the management of refractory benign cervical esophageal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Nogales, Óscar; Clemente, Ana; Caballero-Marcos, Aránzazu; García-Lledó, Javier; Pérez-Carazo, Leticia; Merino, Beatriz; López-Ibáñez, María; Pérez Valderas, María Dolores; Bañares, Rafael; González-Asanza, Cecilia

    2017-07-01

    Benign esophageal strictures are relatively frequent and can severely affect the quality of life of a patient. Stenting has been proposed for the treatment of refractory cases. Lesions affecting the cervical esophagus are more difficult to treat, and the placement of stents in this location has traditionally been restricted due to potential adverse events. The aim of this study was to describe the efficacy and safety of endoscopic stenting in the management of refractory benign cervical esophageal strictures (RBCES) in a single-center cohort study. We analyzed 12 patients with RBCES (Kochman's criteria) and severe dysphagia. We recorded previous endoscopic treatments, stricture characteristics and demographic data. The two types of stents used were fully covered self-expandable metallic stents (FCSEMS) and uncovered biodegradable stents (BDS). FCSEMS were removed eight weeks after placement, and BDS were followed-up until degradation. We assessed technical and clinical success, rate of stricture recurrence and adverse events. The mean age of participants was 64 years (range 30-85). A total of 23 stents (13 FCSEMS and 10 BDS) were placed in 12 patients (median 1.92, range 1-4). The technical success rate was 96% (22/23 stents). Eight patients (66.6%) maintained adequate oral intake at the end of follow-up (median 33.3 months, range 3-84 months). Migration was recorded in 7/23 stents (30.4%) and epithelial hyperplasia in 4/23 stents (17.4%). No severe adverse events were noted. All patients complained of minor cervical pain after placement that was well controlled with mild analgesia. Endoscopic stent therapy seems to be effective and safe in the management of RBCES.

  7. New Variant of Esophageal Atresia

    PubMed Central

    Harne, Swapnil; Pathak, Manish; Rattan, Kamal Nayan

    2017-01-01

    Esophageal atresia with tracheoesophageal fistula (EA/TEF) associated with distal congenital esophageal stenosis (CES) is a well-known entity. We encountered three patients of EA/TEF associated with long and unusual CES. PMID:28083495

  8. [Benign stenosis of the esophagus].

    PubMed

    Salis, G; Lazaroni, F; Chiocca, J C; Mazure, P A; Sferco, A

    1978-09-01

    In the present study 39 patients with benign esphageal stenosis were studied (average age 59,9 years). The most common etiology was refux esofagitis, and the most common associated pathology was esophageal hiatus hernia. Thirty one patients received medical treatment (diet. antireflux drugs and dilatations.) Twenty four were dilated with the slow continuous method, six with metalic bougies. One patient was not dilated. Seven patients were not treated since the stenosis was due to extrinsec compression. One patient was surgically treated from the onset. Seventy percent of the patients had goods results with esophageal dilatation. We propose that patients with benign esophageal stenosis should be treated by the slow continuous dilatation method.

  9. Roux-en-Y augmented gastric advancement: An alternative technique for concurrent esophageal and pyloric stenosis secondary to corrosive intake

    PubMed Central

    Waseem, Talat; Azim, Asad; Ashraf, Muhammad Hasham; Azim, Khawaja M

    2016-01-01

    Select group of patients with concurrent esophageal and gastric stricturing secondary to corrosive intake requires colonic or free jejunal transfer. These technically demanding reconstructions are associated with significant complications and have up to 18% ischemic conduit necrosis. Following corrosive intake, up to 30% of such patients have stricturing at the pyloro-duodenal canal area only and rest of the stomach is available for rather less complex and better perfused gastrointestinal reconstruction. Here we describe an alternative technique where we utilize stomach following distal gastric resection along with Roux-en-Y reconstruction instead of colonic or jejunal interposition. This neo-conduit is potentially superior in terms of perfusion, lower risk of gastro-esophageal anastomotic leakage and technical ease as opposed to colonic and jejunal counterparts. We have utilized the said technique in three patients with acceptable postoperative outcome. In addition this technique offers a feasible reconstruction plan in patients where colon is not available for reconstruction due to concomitant pathology. Utility of this technique may also merit consideration for gastroesophageal junction tumors. PMID:28070231

  10. Spinal stenosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... stenosis; Degenerative spine disease; Back pain - spinal stenosis; Low back pain - stenosis; LBP - stenosis ... Resnick DK, Shaffer WO, Loeser JD. Surgery for low back pain: a review of the evidence for an American ...

  11. Problem: Heart Valve Stenosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... valve . Learn about the different types of stenosis: Aortic stenosis Tricuspid stenosis Pulmonary stenosis Mitral stenosis Outlook for ... Disease "Innocent" Heart Murmur Problem: Valve Stenosis - Problem: Aortic Valve Stenosis - Problem: Mitral Valve Stenosis - Problem: Tricuspid Valve Stenosis - ...

  12. Meatal stenosis

    MedlinePlus

    Urethral meatal stenosis ... Meatal stenosis can affect both males and females. It is more common in males. In males, it is often ... in the urethra may also lead to meatal stenosis. In females, this condition is present at birth ( ...

  13. Esophageal tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Luc, Guillaume; Durand, Marlène; Collet, Denis; Guillemot, Fabien; Bordenave, Laurence

    2014-03-01

    Esophageal tissue engineering is still in an early state, and ideal methods have not been developed. Since the beginning of the 20th century, advances have been made in the materials that can be used to produce an esophageal substitute. Three approaches to scaffold-based tissue engineering have yielded good results. The first development concerned non-absorbable constructs based on silicone and collagen. The need to remove the silicone tube is the main disadvantage of this material. Polymeric absorbable scaffolds have been used since the 1990s. The main polymeric material used is poly (glycolic) acid combined with collagen. The problem of stenosis remains prevalent in most studies using an absorbable construct. Finally, decellularized scaffolds have been used since 2000. The promises of this new approach are unfulfilled. Indeed, stenosis occurs when the esophageal defect is circumferential regardless of the scaffold materials. Cell supplementation can decrease the rate of stenosis, but the type(s) of cells and their roles have not been defined. Finally, esophageal tissue engineering cannot provide a functional esophageal substitute, and further development is necessary prior to conducting human clinical studies.

  14. [Congenital esophageal diverticulum].

    PubMed

    Belío-Castillo, C; Bracho-Blanchet, E; Blanco-Rodríguez, G

    1990-08-01

    The congenital or acquired variety of esophageal diverticulum is a rare childhood disease. Reported is a case-study which deals with a five year old patient who arrived at our hospital complaining of a constricture at the cricopharyngeal level. A month later he returned to the hospital with dysphasia and regurgitation; the X-rays and endoscopic diagnosis showed stenosis of the esophagus and the presence of an esophageal diverticulum. Esophageal dilatations were carried out until an acceptable esophageal diameter was reached. Later on, the surgical removal of the diverticulum was performed without any complications. The histopathological study showed the congenital nature of the diverticulum. The patient's recovery went well and is currently considered as cured.

  15. Spinal Stenosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... and allows you to stand and bend. Spinal stenosis causes narrowing in your spine. The narrowing puts ... and spinal cord and can cause pain. Spinal stenosis occurs mostly in people older than 50. Younger ...

  16. Broken Esophageal Stent Successfully Treated by Interventional Radiology Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Zelenak, Kamil; Mistuna, Dusan; Lucan, Jaroslav; Polacek, Hubert

    2010-06-15

    Esophageal stent fractures occur quite rarely. A 61-year-old male patient was previously treated for rupture of benign stenosis, occurring after dilatation, by implanting an esophageal stent. However, a year after implantation, the patient suffered from dysphagia caused by the broken esophageal stent. He was treated with the interventional radiology technique, whereby a second implantation of the esophageal stent was carried out quite successfully.

  17. Esophageal Varices

    MedlinePlus

    Esophageal varices Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Esophageal varices are abnormal, enlarged veins in the tube that connects the ... often in people with serious liver diseases. Esophageal varices develop when normal blood flow to the liver ...

  18. Pediatric esophageal scintigraphy. Results of 200 studies

    SciTech Connect

    Guillet, J.; Wynchank, S.; Basse-Cathalinat, B.; Christophe, E.; Ducassou, D.; Blanquet, P.

    1983-09-01

    Esophageal transit of a small volume of watery liquid has been observed scintigraphically in 200 studies performed on patients aged between 6 days and 16 years. Qualitative information concerning esophageal morphology and function in the various phases of deglutition, and scintigraphic features of achalasia, stenosis, and other pathologies are described. Measured esophageal transit time and its normal variation, its relevance to the diagnosis of esophagitis, and the monitoring of treatment are discussed. This technique observing distinct deglutitions has proven a useful diagnostic tool. Its advantages and limitations are discussed in comparison with other methods.

  19. Caustic ingestion and esophageal function

    SciTech Connect

    Cadranel, S.; Di Lorenzo, C.; Rodesch, P.; Piepsz, A.; Ham, H.R. )

    1990-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate esophageal motor function by means of krypton-81m esophageal transit scintigraphy and to compare the results with the functional and morphological data obtained by means of triple lumen manometry and endoscopy. In acute and subacute stages of the disease, all clinical, anatomical, and functional parameters were in good agreement, revealing significant impairment. In chronic stages, the severity of the dysphagia was not correlated to the importance of the residual stenosis. Conversely, 81mKr esophageal transit and manometric's findings were in good agreement with the clinical symptoms, during the entire follow-up period ranging between 3 months to 7 years. The 81mKr test is undoubtedly the easiest and probably the most physiological technique currently available for long-term functional evaluation of caustic esophagitis.

  20. Esophageal stent placement as a therapeutic option for iatrogenic esophageal perforation in children

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Alsafadi; Wong Kee Song, Louis M.; Absah, Imad

    2016-01-01

    Iatrogenic esophageal perforation (IEP) is a potentially serious adverse event of interventional endoscopy. The approach to IEP varies from surgical repair for large perforations to conservative treatment for small contained perforations. We report a case of an 18-month-old girl with congenital esophageal stenosis suffering a large esophageal perforation after a trial of stricture dilatation, which was successfully managed by the placement of fully covered stent. Hence, in selected cases, esophageal stent placement is a feasible alternative to invasive surgery in managing IEP. PMID:27144142

  1. Esophageal stent placement as a therapeutic option for iatrogenic esophageal perforation in children.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Alsafadi; Wong Kee Song, Louis M; Absah, Imad

    2016-01-01

    Iatrogenic esophageal perforation (IEP) is a potentially serious adverse event of interventional endoscopy. The approach to IEP varies from surgical repair for large perforations to conservative treatment for small contained perforations. We report a case of an 18-month-old girl with congenital esophageal stenosis suffering a large esophageal perforation after a trial of stricture dilatation, which was successfully managed by the placement of fully covered stent. Hence, in selected cases, esophageal stent placement is a feasible alternative to invasive surgery in managing IEP.

  2. Spinal Stenosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Staff Spinal stenosis is a narrowing of the open spaces within your spine, which can put pressure on ... only on the vertebrae in the neck. It opens up the space within the spinal canal by creating a hinge ...

  3. Glottic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, Kate A; Wyatt, Michelle E

    2016-06-01

    Glottic stenosis is a fixed, focal narrowing at the level of the laryngeal inlet, the true vocal cords. It may be either congenital or acquired and be related to a wide range of etiologies. The stenosis may be either anterior, posterior, or in rare cases, complete. Isolated glottic stenosis is rare; lesions often involve adjacent regions, namely the subglottis. A diagnosis is made from careful history and examination, including evaluation by microlaryngoscopy and bronchoscopy. The management of glottic stenosis is challenging and should be tailored to each individual case. A secure and adequate airway is the treatment priority alongside optimization of voice and laryngeal competence. Endoscopic and open techniques in either single or multiple stages have been described. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Esophageal cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - esophagus ... Esophageal cancer is not common in the United States. It occurs most often in men over 50 years old. There are two main types of esophageal cancer: squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma. These two types ...

  5. Esophageal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... from your throat to your stomach. Early esophageal cancer usually does not cause symptoms. Later, you may ... You're at greater risk for getting esophageal cancer if you smoke, drink heavily, or have acid ...

  6. Esophageal motility in eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Weiss, A H; Iorio, N; Schey, R

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is characterized by eosinophilic infiltration of the esophagus and is a potential cause of dysphagia and food impaction, most commonly affecting young men. Esophageal manometry findings vary from normal motility to aperistalsis, simultaneous contractions, diffuse esophageal spasm, nutcracker esophagus or hypotonic lower esophageal sphincter (LES). It remains unclear whether esophageal dysmotility plays a significant role in the clinical symptoms of EoE. Our aim is to review the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and effect of treatment on esophageal dysmotility in EoE. A literature search utilizing the PubMed database was performed using keywords: eosinophilic esophagitis, esophageal dysmotility, motility, manometry, impedance planimetry, barium esophagogram, endoscopic ultrasound, and dysphagia. Fifteen studies, totaling 387 patients with eosinophilic esophagitis were identified as keeping in accordance with the aim of this study and included in this review. The occurrence of abnormal esophageal manometry was reported to be between 4 and 87% among patients with EoE. Esophageal motility studies have shown reduced distensibility, abnormal peristalsis, and hypotonicity of the LES in patients with EoE, which may also mimic other esophageal motility disorders such as achalasia or nutcracker esophagus. Studies have shown conflicting results regarding the presence of esophageal dysmotility and symptoms with some reports suggesting a higher rate of food impaction, while others report no correlation between motor function and dysphagia. Motility dysfunction of the esophagus in EoE has not been well reported in the literature and studies have reported conflicting evidence regarding the clinical significance of dysmotility seen in EoE. The correlation between esophageal dysmotility and symptoms of EoE remains unclear. Larger studies are needed to investigate the incidence of esophageal dysmotility, clinical implications, and effect of treatment on

  7. [Update in the endoscopic management of benign esophageal stenoses].

    PubMed

    De la Garza González, Salvador Javier; García, Rafael Guevara

    2005-07-01

    Correction of dysphagia in benign esophageal stenosis without the need for surgery is a task that has been tried to be resolved for more than three centuries; in the last three decades this management has evolved with the development of pneumatic dilators and, more recently, alternative and adjuvant treatments like local steroid injection, electrocoagulation, use of argon plasma and the use of expandable stents have been added. The most common causes of benign esophageal stenosis are peptic esophagitis in first place followed by the ingestion of caustic substances; other less frequent etiologies are medication ingestion, stenosis secondary to a surgical anastomosis of the esophagus and stenosis related to mediastinal radiotherapy; the rarest causes include esophageal rings and membranes, sclerotherapy for esophageal varices, the prolonged use of a nasogastric tube, Crohn's disease, among others. A complete clinical, radiological and endoscopic evaluation of the patient is required to make the diagnosis, with the respective complimentary histopathologic study. At present, traditional esophageal dilatations, as well as pneumatic dilatations are the most common and effective treatments, the previously mentioned alternative and adjuvant treatments are used in exceptional cases, some with advantages over the others depending on each patient in particular and on the characteristics and etiology of the stenosis. The future seems to be aimed at the use of temporary expandable stents.

  8. Esophagitis - infectious

    MedlinePlus

    ... conditions that suppress or weaken your immune system Organisms (germs) that cause esophagitis include fungi, yeast, and viruses. Common organisms include: Candida albicans Cytomegalovirus (CMV) Herpes simplex virus ( ...

  9. Herpetic esophagitis

    SciTech Connect

    Shortsleeve, M.J.; Gauvin, G.P.; Gardner, R.C.; Greenberg, M.S.

    1981-12-01

    Four patients with herpetic esophagitis were examined. In three of them, the presenting symptom was odynophagia. Early in the course of herpetic esophagitis, shallow round and oval ulcers were seen on barium esophagograms. Later, the ulcers filled with fibrinous exudate, forming nodular plaques that projected into the esophageal lumen. Although these findings are diagnostic of esophagitis, they are not specific for a herpes virus infection. The definitive diagnosis must be established by histologic examination, which demonstrates the cytopathic effect of the herpes virus infection within the squamous epithelium.

  10. Aortic Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Bakaeen, Faisal G; Rosengart, Todd K; Carabello, Blase A

    2017-01-03

    This issue provides a clinical overview of aortic stenosis, focusing on screening, diagnosis, treatment, and practice improvement. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of additional science writers and physician writers.

  11. Subglottic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Jefferson, Niall D; Cohen, Aliza P; Rutter, Michael J

    2016-06-01

    Subglottic stenosis (SGS) is a congenital or acquired condition characterized by a narrowing of the upper airway extending from just below the vocal folds to the lower border of the cricoid cartilage. With the introduction of prolonged intubation in neonates (mid 1960s), acquired SGS became the most frequent cause of laryngeal stenosis; unlike congenital SGS, it does not improve with time. Laryngeal reconstruction surgery evolved as a consequence of the need to manage these otherwise healthy but tracheotomized children. Ongoing innovations in neonatal care have gradually led to the salvage of premature and medically fragile infants in whom laryngeal pathology is often more severe, and in whom stenosis often involves not only the subglottis, but also the supraglottis or glottis-causing significant morbidity and mortality. The primary objective of intervention in these children is decannulation or preventing the need for tracheotomy. The aim of this article is to present a more detailed description of both congenital and acquired SGS, highlighting the essentials of diagnostic assessment and familiarizing the reader with contemporary management approaches. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Vakil, Nimish; Affi, Aboud

    2002-07-01

    Despite advances in our knowledge of esophageal cancer, 50% of patients present with incurable disease, and the overall survival after diagnosis is poor. The incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma of the distal esophagus is rising at a rapid rate in developed countries. Recent advances in the epidemiology of esophageal cancer offer insights into preventive strategies in patients who are at risk. New developments in diagnosis may help detect the disease at an early stage. New diagnostic modalities permit more accurate staging procedures and allow appropriate selection of therapy. New studies provide more information on multimodality therapy for esophageal cancer, and new endoscopic techniques allow resection of small lesions without surgery. New stent designs provide better palliation by providing tumor ingrowth. These developments in the treatment of esophageal cancer are the focus of this review.

  13. Esophageal tissue engineering: A new approach for esophageal replacement

    PubMed Central

    Totonelli, Giorgia; Maghsoudlou, Panagiotis; Fishman, Jonathan M; Orlando, Giuseppe; Ansari, Tahera; Sibbons, Paul; Birchall, Martin A; Pierro, Agostino; Eaton, Simon; De Coppi, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    A number of congenital and acquired disorders require esophageal tissue replacement. Various surgical techniques, such as gastric and colonic interposition, are standards of treatment, but frequently complicated by stenosis and other problems. Regenerative medicine approaches facilitate the use of biological constructs to replace or regenerate normal tissue function. We review the literature of esophageal tissue engineering, discuss its implications, compare the methodologies that have been employed and suggest possible directions for the future. Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Library, National Research Register and ClinicalTrials.gov databases were searched with the following search terms: stem cell and esophagus, esophageal replacement, esophageal tissue engineering, esophageal substitution. Reference lists of papers identified were also examined and experts in this field contacted for further information. All full-text articles in English of all potentially relevant abstracts were reviewed. Tissue engineering has involved acellular scaffolds that were either transplanted with the aim of being repopulated by host cells or seeded prior to transplantation. When acellular scaffolds were used to replace patch and short tubular defects they allowed epithelial and partial muscular migration whereas when employed for long tubular defects the results were poor leading to an increased rate of stenosis and mortality. Stenting has been shown as an effective means to reduce stenotic changes and promote cell migration, whilst omental wrapping to induce vascularization of the construct has an uncertain benefit. Decellularized matrices have been recently suggested as the optimal choice for scaffolds, but smart polymers that will incorporate signalling to promote cell-scaffold interaction may provide a more reproducible and available solution. Results in animal models that have used seeded scaffolds strongly sug- gest that seeding of both muscle and epithelial cells on scaffolds

  14. Esophageal culture

    MedlinePlus

    Culture - esophageal ... There, it is placed in a special dish (culture) and watched for the growth of bacteria, fungi, ... and Fordtran's Gastrointestinal and Liver Disease Pathophysiology/Diagnosis/Management . 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap ...

  15. Esophageal spasm

    MedlinePlus

    Kahrilas PJ, Pandolfino JE. Esophageal neuromuscular function and motility disorders. In: Feldman M, Friedman LS, Brandt LJ, eds. Sleisenger and Fordtran's Gastrointestinal and Liver Disease . 9th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  16. Esophageal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... is the sixth most common cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Incidence rates vary within different geographic locations. In some regions, higher rates of esophageal cancer cases may be attributed to tobacco and alcohol use or particular nutritional habits and ...

  17. Esophageal atresia

    MedlinePlus

    Esophageal atresia (EA) is a congenital defect. This means it occurs before birth. There are several types. In most cases, the ... the lower esophagus and stomach. Most infants with EA have another defect called tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF). This ...

  18. Esophageal Spasms

    MedlinePlus

    ... or gastroesophageal reflux disease: A systematic review. Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. 2015;13:251. Coss-Adame E, et al. ... esophageal (noncardiac) chest pain: An expert review. Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. 2014;12:1224. Castell DO. Chest ...

  19. Eosinophilic esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Dellon, Evan S.

    2012-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic immune-mediated condition where infiltration of eosinophils into the esophageal mucosa leads to symptoms of esophageal dysfunction. It has rapidly emerged as an important cause of upper GI morbidity in patients of all ages and is encountered in a substantial proportion of patients undergoing diagnostic upper endoscopy. This review discusses the clinical, endoscopic, and histologic features of EoE and presents the most recent guidelines for diagnosis of EoE. It describes selected diagnostic dilemmas including distinguishing EoE from gastroesophageal reflux disease and addressing the newly recognized clinical entity of proton pump inhibitor responsive esophageal eosinophilia. It also highlights evidence to support both pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic treatments, including topical corticosteroids, dietary elimination therapy, and endoscopic dilation. PMID:23452635

  20. Esophageal replacement.

    PubMed

    Kunisaki, Shaun M; Coran, Arnold G

    2017-04-01

    This article focuses on esophageal replacement as a surgical option for pediatric patients with end-stage esophageal disease. While it is obvious that the patient׳s own esophagus is the best esophagus, persisting with attempts to retain a native esophagus with no function and at all costs are futile and usually detrimental to the overall well-being of the child. In such cases, the esophagus should be abandoned, and the appropriate esophageal replacement is chosen for definitive reconstruction. We review the various types of conduits used for esophageal replacement and discuss the unique advantages and disadvantages that are relevant for clinical decision-making. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Esophageal manometry

    MedlinePlus

    ... its ability to move food toward the stomach ( achalasia ) A weak LES, which causes heartburn (GERD) Abnormal ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2010:chap 43. Read More Achalasia Esophageal spasm Gastroesophageal reflux disease Review Date 8/ ...

  2. Esophageal anastomosis.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Y; Wang, K-N; Chen, L-Q

    2015-01-01

    This review gives an overview of the esophageal anastomosis. The history, various techniques and substitution organs, their advantages and disadvantages, healing mechanism, complications, and actual trend of this essential part of esophageal surgery are described. The history of the esophageal anastomosis extending from the first anastomosis in 1901 to today has undergone more than one century. In the early days, the success rate of the anastomosis was extremely low. As the technology progressed, the anastomosis got significant achievement. Various anastomotic techniques are currently being used. However, controversies exist on the choice of anastomotic method concerning the success rate, postoperative complication and quality of life. How to choose the method, no one can give the best answer. We searched the manuscripts about the esophageal anastomoses in recent years and studied the controversy questions about the anastomosis. Performing an esophageal anastomosis is a technical matter, and suture healing is independent of the patient's biologic situation. Every anastomosis technique has its own merit, but the outcomes were different if it was performed by different surgeons, and we also found that the complication rate of the anastomosis was mainly associated with the surgeons. So the surgeons should learn from their previous experience and others to avoid technical errors.

  3. Esophageal transection

    PubMed Central

    Özçınar, Beyza; Peker, Kıvanç Derya; Demirel, Sertaç; Yanar, Fatih; Tuncer, Koray; İğci, Abdullah

    2016-01-01

    Herein, a case of intramural esophageal dissection is reported and the literature is reviewed. Intramural esophageal dissection is a rare but well described condition that is characterized by a laceration between the esophageal mucosa and submucosa but without perforation. A female patient aged 86 years was hospitalized with a diagnosis of abdominal aortic aneurysm. After placement of an aortic stent, she was started on intravenous heparin. After the procedure, the patient had retching and vomiting due to sedative drugs. On the first day after the procedure, the patient experienced sudden-onset chest pain, hematemesis, back pain and odynophagia. A hematoma was detected in the thoracic esophagus, which was opened during endoscopy and began to bleed suddenly owing to air insufflation. A false lumen was visualized within the esophagus. There was no perforation. The patient was followed up conservatively and discharged from the hospital uneventfully. In conclusion, we propose that esophageal transection, a condition that is widely regarded as relatively benign in the literature, has the potential to lead to perforation. It would be expected that most cases of esophageal transection would be managed conservatively. PMID:28149126

  4. Eosinophilic esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Gupte, Anand R; Draganov, Peter V

    2009-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis is increasingly recognized in adults. The diagnosis is based on the presence of both typical symptoms and pathologic findings on esophageal biopsy. Patients usually present with dysphagia, food impaction and/or reflux-like symptoms, and biopsy of the esophagus shows more than 15 eosinophils per high-power field. In addition, it is essential to exclude the presence of known causes of tissue eosinophilia such as gastroesophageal reflux disease, infections, malignancy, collagen vascular diseases, hypersensitivity, and inflammatory bowel disease. There are no standardized protocols for the therapy of eosinophilic esophagitis. A variety of therapeutic approaches including acid suppression, dietary modifications, topical corticosteroids and endoscopic dilation can be used alone or in combination. PMID:19115464

  5. Risk Factors for Esophageal Fistula Associated With Chemoradiotherapy for Locally Advanced Unresectable Esophageal Cancer: A Supplementary Analysis of JCOG0303.

    PubMed

    Tsushima, Takahiro; Mizusawa, Junki; Sudo, Kazuki; Honma, Yoshitaka; Kato, Ken; Igaki, Hiroyasu; Tsubosa, Yasuhiro; Shinoda, Masayuki; Nakamura, Kenichi; Fukuda, Haruhiko; Kitagawa, Yuko

    2016-05-01

    Esophageal fistula is a critical adverse event in patients treated with chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for locally advanced esophageal cancer. However, risk factors associated with esophageal fistula formation in patients receiving CRT have not yet been elucidated.We retrospectively analyzed data obtained from 140 patients who were enrolled in a phase II/III trial comparing low-dose cisplatin with standard-dose cisplatin administered in combination with 5-flurouracil and concomitant radiotherapy. Inclusion criteria were performance status (PS) 0 to 2 and histologically proven thoracic esophageal cancer clinically diagnosed as T4 and/or unresectable lymph node metastasis for which definitive CRT was applicable. Risk factors for esophageal fistula were examined with univariate analysis using Fisher exact test and multivariate analysis using logistic regression models.Esophageal fistula was observed in 31 patients (22%). Of these, 6 patients developed fistula during CRT. Median time interval between the date of CRT initiation and that of fistula diagnosis was 100 days (inter quartile range, 45-171). Esophageal stenosis was the only significant risk factor for esophageal fistula formation both in univariate (P = 0.026) and in multivariate analyses (odds ratio, 2.59; 95% confidence interval, 1.13-5.92, P = 0.025). Other clinicopathological factors, namely treatment arm, age, sex, PS, primary tumor location, T stage, lymph node invasion to adjacent organs, blood cell count, albumin level, and body mass index, were not risk factors fistula formation.Esophageal stenosis was a significant risk factor for esophageal fistula formation in patients treated with CRT for unresectable locally advanced thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

  6. Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Furuta, Glenn T.; Katzka, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Once considered a rare condition, eosinophilic esophagitis is now one of the most common conditions diagnosed during the assessment of feeding problems in children and during the evaluation of dysphagia and food impaction in adults.1 The entity exists worldwide but has been most extensively studied in Western countries, where its prevalence has been estimated to be 0.4% among all children and adults.2 Whether eosinophilic esophagitis is truly a new disease or simply a recently recognized one is uncertain.3 In this review, we consider the diagnostic criteria, pathophysiological and clinical features, and treatment of this increasingly prevalent disease. PMID:26488694

  7. Mitral stenosis (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Mitral stenosis is a heart valve disorder that narrows or obstructs the mitral valve opening. Narrowing of the mitral ... the body. The main risk factor for mitral stenosis is a history of rheumatic fever but it ...

  8. Meatal stenosis (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Meatal stenosis results from irritation of the urethral opening at the end of the penis, which leads to tissue ... also bleeding at the end of urination. Meatal stenosis can usually be treated in the physician's office ...

  9. Esophageal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease Tricuspid Valve Disease Cardiac Rhythm Disturbances Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Pediatric and Congenital Heart Disease Heart abnormalities that are present at birth in children, as well as in adults Atrial Septal Defect Ventricular Septal ... Arteriosus Single Ventricle Defects Lung, Esophageal, and ...

  10. Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... is to complete a test called an esophageal pH test. In this test, a very thin tube is placed through the nose into the esophagus and stomach, or a temporary sensor is placed in the esophagus via endoscopy. Both allow levels of acid in the esophagus to be monitored ...

  11. Clinical evaluation of radiotherapy for advanced esophageal cancer after metallic stent placement

    PubMed Central

    Yu, You-Tao; Yang, Guang; Liu, Yan; Shen, Bao-Zhong

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the therapeutic effect of radiotherapy for esophageal cancer after expandable metallic stent placement. METHODS: Ten cases of advanced esophageal cancer were evaluated, 7 having complete obstruction and 3 with digestive-respiratory fistula. Ten nitinol stents were placed at the site of stenosis. Patients were treated with a total dose of 1200 cGy divided into 3 fractions of 400 cGy 4-7 d after stents placement. RESULTS: All the 10 stents were placed successfully at one time. After radiotherapy for advanced esophageal cancer, the survival period of the cases ranged from 14 to 22 mo, with a mean survival of 17 mo. No re-stenosis occurred among all the 10 cases. CONCLUSION: Stent placement combined with radiotherapy for esophageal cancer is helpful to prolong patients’ survival and reduce occurrence of re-stenosis. PMID:15237455

  12. Herpetic esophagitis (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Herpetic esophagitis is a herpes simplex infection causing inflammation and ulcers of the esophagus. Symptoms include difficulty swallowing and pain (dysphagia). Herpetic esophagitis can be effectively ...

  13. Current knowledge on esophageal atresia

    PubMed Central

    Pinheiro, Paulo Fernando Martins; Simões e Silva, Ana Cristina; Pereira, Regina Maria

    2012-01-01

    Esophageal atresia (EA) with or without tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF) is the most common congenital anomaly of the esophagus. The improvement of survival observed over the previous two decades is multifactorial and largely attributable to advances in neonatal intensive care, neonatal anesthesia, ventilatory and nutritional support, antibiotics, early surgical intervention, surgical materials and techniques. Indeed, mortality is currently limited to those cases with coexisting severe life-threatening anomalies. The diagnosis of EA is most commonly made during the first 24 h of life but may occur either antenatally or may be delayed. The primary surgical correction for EA and TEF is the best option in the absence of severe malformations. There is no ideal replacement for the esophagus and the optimal surgical treatment for patients with long-gap EA is still controversial. The primary complications during the postoperative period are leak and stenosis of the anastomosis, gastro-esophageal reflux, esophageal dysmotility, fistula recurrence, respiratory disorders and deformities of the thoracic wall. Data regarding long-term outcomes and follow-ups are limited for patients following EA/TEF repair. The determination of the risk factors for the complicated evolution following EA/TEF repair may positively impact long-term prognoses. Much remains to be studied regarding this condition. This manuscript provides a literature review of the current knowledge regarding EA. PMID:22851858

  14. Management of esophageal disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, L.D.; Mercer, C.D.; McCallum, R.W.; Kozarek, R.

    1987-01-01

    This book integrates gastroenterology and thoracic surgery to detail the comprehensive management of esophageal disease. It describes radiologic and functional evaluation of the esophagus, endoscopy, medical and surgical treatments, and results and also covers gastroesophageal reflux disease, tumors motility, esophageal replacement, intubation, esophageal diverticula, caustic esophageal injury. It presents Dr. Hill's surgical procedures in detail.

  15. Evaluation of urgent esophagectomy in esophageal perforation

    PubMed Central

    de AQUINO, José Luis Braga; de CAMARGO, José Gonzaga Teixeira; CECCHINO, Gustavo Nardini; PEREIRA, Douglas Alexandre Rizzanti; BENTO, Caroline Agnelli; LEANDRO-MERHI, Vânia Aparecida

    2014-01-01

    Background Esophageal trauma is considered one of the most severe lesions of the digestive tract. There is still much controversy in choosing the best treatment for cases of esophageal perforation since that decision involves many variables. The readiness of medical care, the patient's clinical status, the local conditions of the perforated segment, and the severity of the associated injuries must be considered for the most adequate therapeutic choice. Aim To demonstrate and to analyze the results of urgent esophagectomy in a series of patients with esophageal perforation. Methods A retrospective study of 31 patients with confirmed esophageal perforation. Most injuries were due to endoscopic dilatation of benign esophageal disorders, which had evolved with stenosis. The diagnosis of perforation was based on clinical parameters, laboratory tests, and endoscopic images. ‪The main surgical technique used was transmediastinal esophagectomy followed by reconstruction of the digestive tract in a second surgical procedure. Patients were evaluated for the development of systemic and local complications, especially for the dehiscence or stricture of the anastomosis of the cervical esophagus with either the stomach or the transposed colon. Results Early postoperative evaluation showed a survival rate of 77.1% in relation to the proposed surgery, and 45% of these patients presented no further complications. The other patients had one or more complications, being pulmonary infection and anastomotic fistula the most frequent. The seven patients (22.9%) who underwent esophageal resection 48 hours after the diagnosis died of sepsis. At medium and long-term assessments, most patients reported a good quality of life and full satisfaction regarding the surgery outcomes. Conclusions Despite the morbidity, emergency esophagectomy has its validity, especially in well indicated cases of esophageal perforation subsequent to endoscopic dilation for benign strictures. PMID:25626932

  16. Lymphocytic esophagitis: Report of three cases and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Jideh, Bilel; Keegan, Andrew; Weltman, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Lymphocytic esophagitis (LyE) is a rare condition characterised histologically by high numbers of esophageal intraepithelial lymphocytes without significant granulocytes infiltration, in addition to intercellular edema (“spongiosis”). The clinical significance and natural history of LyE is poorly defined although dysphagia is reportedly the most common symptom. Endoscopic features range from normal appearing esophageal mucosa to features similar to those seen in eosinophilic esophagitis, including esophageal rings, linear furrows, whitish exudates, and esophageal strictures/stenosis. Symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux disease is an inconsistent association. LyE has been associated in paediatric Crohn’s disease, and recently in primary esophageal dysmotility disorder in adults. There are no studies assessing effective treatment strategies for LyE; empirical therapies have included use of proton pump inhibitor and corticosteroids. Esophageal dilatation have been used to manage esophageal strictures. LyE has been reported to run a benign course; however there has been a case of esophageal perforation associated with LyE. Here, we describe the clinical, endoscopic and histopathological features of three patients with lymphocytic esophagitis along with a review of the current literature. PMID:28035315

  17. Dynamic esophageal scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Reilley, J.J.; Malmud, L.S.; Fisher, R.S.; Applegate, G.; DeVegvar, M.L.

    1982-06-01

    Esophageal scintigraphy was developed in order to quantitatively evaluate esophageal transit in patients with a variety of esophageal disorders. The study is performed with orally administered technetium-99m sulfur colloid in water, using a gamma camera on-line to a digital computer. Esophageal transit is expressed as the percent emptying for each of the first 15-sec intervals for 10 min after an initial swallow and at 15-sec intervals after serial swallows. Esophageal transit is significantly decreased in patients with motor disorders of the esophagus, compared to normal controls. In patients with reflux esophagitis, esophageal transit was abnormal when the reflux disease was accompanied by abnormal motor function. The technique we describe is the first quantitative test of esophageal function; it is a useful, sensitive, scintigraphic technique for evaluation of esophageal transit.

  18. Esophageal dilation in eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Richter, Joel E

    2015-10-01

    Tissue remodeling with scaring is common in adult EoE patients with long standing disease. This is the major factor contributing to their complaints of solid food dysphagia and recurrent food impactions. The best tests to define the degree of remodeling are barium esophagram, high resolution manometry and endoscopy. Many physicians are fearful to dilate EoE patients because of concerns about mucosal tears and perforations. However, multiple recent case series attest to the safety of esophageal dilation and its efficacy with many patients having symptom relief for an average of two years. This chapter will review the sordid history of esophageal dilation in EoE patients and outline how to perform this procedure safely. The key is graduated dilation over one to several sessions to a diameter of 15-18 mm. Postprocedural pain is to be expected and mucosal tears are a sign of successful dilation, not complications. In some healthy adults, occasional dilation may be preferred to regular use of medications or restricted diets. This approach is now supported by recent EoE consensus statements and societal guidelines.

  19. Lower esophageal sphincter pressure in histologic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Welch, R W; Luckmann, K; Ricks, P; Drake, S T; Bannayan, G; Owensby, L

    1980-06-01

    The fasting lower esophageal sphincter pressure of 18 normal volunteers was compared to 22 patients with symptoms and objective evidence of gastroesophageal reflux. Lower esophageal sphincter pressure was measured by rapid pull-through using an 8-lumen radially perfused catheter that sampled pressure every45 degrees around the circumference of the sphincter. The 22 reflux patients were subdivided for analysis into two groups, those with an acute inflammatory infiltrate on biopsy and those without inflammation. Those patients without inflammatory esophagitis had normal sphincter pressures. Those with a definite inflammatory infiltrate had pressures significantly less than normal. The least reliable separation between normals and those with inflammatory esophagitis occurred in the anterior orientations. We conclude that while basal lower esophageal sphincter pressure measurement may identify patients with reflux and inflammatory esophagitis, it is of no help in identifying those patients with reflux unassociated with inflammation. Decreased basal fasting LESP does not appear to be the most important primary determinant of gastroesophageal reflux.

  20. [Esophageal moniliasis].

    PubMed

    Ramírez Degollado, J; Martínez Aguilar, A; Peniche Bojórquez, J

    1978-01-01

    Esophageal moniliasis is found rarely. It has been described mainly in chronically ill patients, who receive antibiotics and corticoesteroids. Early diagnosis and treatment betters their prognosis. Nine patients, 5 males and 4 females were studies in Hospital General del Centro Medico Nacional in Mexico City. Their agesranged from 26 to 77 years, with a mean of 49 years. All patients were chronically ill and 7 of them were treated in the intensive care unit. Three had disphagia, 3 retrosternal pain, and 2 gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Eight patients had high W.B.C., 3 irregular filling defects on X ray studies, and on endoscopy, all showed a pseudomembranous white yellowish exudate, underneath it the mucosa was inflamed, irregular and bled scantily. In 5 out of 9 patients biopsy and a smear confirmed the diagnosis. Eight patients treated with nystatin were cured. This disorder must be suspected in patients with disphagia and retrosternal pain; esophagoscopy is the prefered procedure to establish this diagnosis.

  1. Esophageal atresia and tracheo-esophageal fistula.

    PubMed

    van der Zee, David C; Tytgat, Stefaan H A; van Herwaarden, Maud Y A

    2017-04-01

    Management of esophageal atresia has merged from correction of the anomaly to the complete spectrum of management of esophageal atresia and all its sequelae. It is the purpose of this article to give an overview of all aspects involved in taking care of patients with esophageal atresia between January 2011 and June 2016, as well as the patients who were referred from other centers. Esophageal atresia is a complex anomaly that has many aspects that have to be dealt with and complications to be solved. By centralizing these patients in centers of expertise it is believed that the best care can be given. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. [Stenosing esophagitis caused by Trichosporon beigelii: presentation of a rare case].

    PubMed

    Bottari, M; D'Amore, F; Buda, C A; Magnano, A; Melita, G; Dell'Utri, P; Crescenti, S; Casella, G

    1997-01-01

    The Authors describe a rare case of esophageal stenosis complicated by gastroesophageal reflux due to Trichosporon beigelii in the absence of a pathologic predisposition or immunodeficiency. The diagnosis was drawn by embedding membrane fragments obtained endoscopically in Sabouraud and blood-Agar cultures. The patient was treated with antimicotics, immunostimulants, inhibitors of the gastric protonic pump, prokinetics and later underwent endoscopic dilatation combined with Savary-Guillard and pneumatic dilatators of growing diameter, until complete "restitutio ad integrum" of the esophageal lumen.

  3. Aortic Valve Stenosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... evaluation of aortic stenosis in adults. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed April 29, 2014. Mohty D, ... Valvular heart disease in elderly adults. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed May 2, 2014. Bonow RO, ...

  4. Infundibulopelvic stenosis in children

    SciTech Connect

    Lucaya, J.; Enriquez, G.; Delgado, R.; Castellote, A.

    1984-03-01

    Of 11,500 children who underwent excretory urography during a 17-year period, three were found to have the rare renal malformation infundibulopelvic stenosis, characterized by caliceal dilatation, infundibular stenosis, and hypoplasia or stenosis of the renal pelvis. The contralateral kidney was absent in two cases and normal in the other. Voiding cystourethrograms were normal in all three. Renal sonography showed a variable degree of caliceal dilatation without associated pelvic dilatation. The diagnosis was confirmed by retrograde ureteropyelography in one case. Two patients were followed for 12 and 18 months, respectively; both remained asymptomatic with normal renal function, and sequential sonographic examinations of their kidneys have shown no significant changes. The third patient died of an unrelated condition. Infundibulopelvic stenosis has highly characteristic radiographic features, and prognosis is good for most affected patients.

  5. What Is Spinal Stenosis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... To order the Sports Injuries Handout on Health full-text version, please contact NIAMS using the contact information ... publication. To order the Spinal Stenosis Q&A full-text version, please contact NIAMS using the contact information ...

  6. Biomechanics of esophageal function in eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Read, Andrew J; Pandolfino, John E

    2012-10-01

    Eosinophilic Esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the esophagus triggered by an immune response that leads to symptoms of dysphagia, chest pain, and food impaction. EoE is a clinicopathologic syndrome that requires clinical symptoms and pathologic findings for a diagnosis. The inflammatory process and eosinophilic infiltration of the esophagus in EoE lead to fibrosis and structural changes within the esophagus that cause esophageal dysfunction. The biomechanics of the esophageal function in EoE have been explored using manometry, impedance planimetry, barium esophagograms, and endoscopic ultrasound. These studies have identified several biomechanical changes to the esophagus in EoE including pan-esophageal pressurization on manometry, changes in esophageal compliance with decreased distentisbility by impedance planimetry, decreased esophageal luminal diameter by esophagograms, and dysfunction in the esophageal longitudinal muscles by endoscopic ultrasound. Treatments for the disease involve dietary changes, immunosuppressive drugs, and dilation techniques. However, the data regarding the effect of these therapies on altering mechanical properties of the esophagus is limited. As the pathogenesis of esophageal dysfunction in EoE appears multifactorial, further study of the biomechanics of EoE is critical to better diagnose, monitor and treat the disease.

  7. Biomechanics of Esophageal Function in Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Pandolfino, John E

    2012-01-01

    Eosinophilic Esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the esophagus triggered by an immune response that leads to symptoms of dysphagia, chest pain, and food impaction. EoE is a clinicopathologic syndrome that requires clinical symptoms and pathologic findings for a diagnosis. The inflammatory process and eosinophilic infiltration of the esophagus in EoE lead to fibrosis and structural changes within the esophagus that cause esophageal dysfunction. The biomechanics of the esophageal function in EoE have been explored using manometry, impedance planimetry, barium esophagograms, and endoscopic ultrasound. These studies have identified several biomechanical changes to the esophagus in EoE including pan-esophageal pressurization on manometry, changes in esophageal compliance with decreased distentisbility by impedance planimetry, decreased esophageal luminal diameter by esophagograms, and dysfunction in the esophageal longitudinal muscles by endoscopic ultrasound. Treatments for the disease involve dietary changes, immunosuppressive drugs, and dilation techniques. However, the data regarding the effect of these therapies on altering mechanical properties of the esophagus is limited. As the pathogenesis of esophageal dysfunction in EoE appears multifactorial, further study of the biomechanics of EoE is critical to better diagnose, monitor and treat the disease. PMID:23105995

  8. Aqueduct stenosis-?Benign.

    PubMed

    Allan, Rodney; Chaseling, Raymond; Graf, Nicole; Dexter, Mark

    2005-02-01

    'Benign' aqueduct stenosis is a common cause of hydrocephalus in the paediatric population and is frequently treated by endoscopic third ventriculostomy. Occasionally, aqueduct stenosis can be a prelude to the development of other pathology, as is seen in these two cases of pineal tumours developing in patients whose hydrocephalus was successfully treated with endoscopic third ventriculostomy. The case histories are presented, along with the recommendation for increased radiological screening of patients with this usually 'benign' presentation.

  9. Robotic benign esophageal procedures.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Jennifer M; Onaitis, Mark W

    2014-05-01

    Robotic master-slave devices can assist surgeons to perform minimally invasive esophageal operations with approaches that have already been demonstrated using laparoscopy and thoracoscopy. Robotic-assisted surgery for benign esophageal disease is described for the treatment of achalasia, epiphrenic diverticula, refractory reflux, paraesophageal hernias, duplication cysts, and benign esophageal masses, such as leiomyomas. Indications and contraindications for robotic surgery in benign esophageal disease should closely approximate the indications for laparoscopic and thoracoscopic procedures. Given the early application of the technology and paucity of clinical evidence, there are currently no procedures for which robotic esophageal surgery is the clinically proven preferred approach. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Eosinophilic Esophagitis: Current Aspects of a Recently Recognized Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lucendo, Alfredo J.; Gonzalez-Castillo, Sonia; Guagnozzi, Danila; Yague-Compadre, Jose Luis; Arias, Angel

    2010-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic clinicopathological entity characterized by large numbers of intraepithelial eosinophils infiltrating the esophageal mucosa. The inflammation leads to alterations in the caliber and the motility of the organ, which determines esophageal symptoms, especially dysphagia and frequent food impaction. Firstly described in 1978, EoE represents today an increasingly recognized disease, with cases coming from all developed countries and rising epidemiology. The origin of EoE has been related to allergy to food components or inhalants, and a number of studies support a Th2-type reaction in the origin of the disease. Thus, several treatment strategies based on controlling the exposition to triggering allergens or therapies using anti-allergic drugs have demonstrated efficacy in EoE. Since EoE frequently presents with esophageal stenosis, endoscopic dilation has been also used in treating these patients, but a high risk of complications has been documented. However, single treatment strategies have not been compared to a placebo group in most of studies, and we do not know the long-term consequences of eosinophilic inflammation, esophageal fibrous remodeling or its possible modifications using different therapies. Furthermore, we lack of a common accepted therapeutic end-point to assess the efficacy of the treatment: from mere resolution of symptoms to full control of esophageal inflammation. This article summarizes the current knowledge about the epidemiology, origin and pathogenesis of the disease, and discuses several practical questions, especially those related to how the affected patients should be treated. PMID:27956987

  11. From Reflux Esophagitis to Esophageal Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Souza, Rhonda F

    Reflux esophagitis causes Barrett's metaplasia, an abnormal esophageal mucosa predisposed to adenocarcinoma. Medical therapy for reflux esophagitis focuses on decreasing gastric acid production with proton pump inhibitors. We have reported that reflux esophagitis in a rat model develops from a cytokine-mediated inflammatory injury, not from a caustic chemical (acid) injury. In this model, refluxed acid and bile stimulate the release of inflammatory cytokines from esophageal squamous cells, recruiting lymphocytes first to the submucosa and later to the luminal surface. Emerging studies on acute reflux esophagitis in humans support this new concept, suggesting that reflux-induced cytokine release may be a future target for medical therapies. Sometimes, reflux esophagitis heals with Barrett's metaplasia, a process facilitated by reflux-related nitric oxide (NO) production and Sonic Hedgehog (Hh) secretion by squamous cells. We have shown that NO reduces expression of genes that promote a squamous cell phenotype, while Hh signaling induces genes that mediate the development of the columnar cell phenotypes of Barrett's metaplasia. Agents targeting esophageal NO production or Hh signaling conceivably could prevent the development of Barrett's esophagus. Persistent reflux promotes cancer in Barrett's metaplasia. We have reported that acid and bile salts induce DNA damage in Barrett's cells. Bile salts also cause NF-x03BA;B activation in Barrett's cells, enabling them to resist apoptosis in the setting of DNA damage and likely contributing to carcinogenesis. Oral treatment with ursodeoxycholic acid prevents the esophageal DNA damage and NF-x03BA;B activation induced by toxic bile acids. Altering bile acid composition might be another approach to cancer prevention.

  12. Esophageal Varices: Symptoms and Causes

    MedlinePlus

    Esophageal varices Symptoms and causes By Mayo Clinic Staff Symptoms Esophageal varices usually don't cause signs and symptoms unless they bleed. Signs and symptoms of bleeding esophageal varices include: Vomiting and seeing significant amounts of blood ...

  13. Nitinol Esophageal Stents: New Designs and Clinical Indications

    SciTech Connect

    Strecker, Ernst-Peter; Boos, Irene; Vetter, Sylvia; Strohm, Michael; Domschke, Sigurd

    1996-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical use of covered and noncovered, knitted nitinol stents in patients presenting new stent indications. Methods: Self-expandable, knitted nitinol stents were implanted in four patients for treatment of dysphagia. In two patients who had malignant strictures and had esophago-respiratory fistulae and in one patient with an esophagocutaneous fistula, polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)-covered stents were implanted. One patient received a noncovered stent, but a retrograde approach through a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) fistula had to be chosen for recanalization of an esophageal occlusion. Two patients received stents for treatment of benign strictures. Results: Recanalization of the stricture and stent implantation were performed under fluoroscopic control without any procedure-related morbidity or mortality. Dysphagia improved in all patients and the esophageal fistulae could be sealed off by covered stents. During a maximum follow-up of 18 months, there was no stent migration or esophageal perforation. Complications observed were stent stenosis due to food impaction (1/4) and benign stent stenosis (2/2). Most complications could be treated by the interventional radiologist. Conclusion: Self-expandable, covered Nitinol stents provide an option for the treatment of dysphagia combined with esophageal fistulae. In combination with interventional radiology techniques, even complex strictures are accessible. For benign strictures, the value of stent treatment has not yet been proven.

  14. Lumbar spinal stenosis.

    PubMed Central

    Ciricillo, S F; Weinstein, P R

    1993-01-01

    Lumbar spinal stenosis, the results of congenital and degenerative constriction of the neural canal and foramina leading to lumbosacral nerve root or cauda equina compression, is a common cause of disability in middle-aged and elderly patients. Advanced neuroradiologic imaging techniques have improved our ability to localize the site of nerve root entrapment in patients presenting with neurogenic claudication or painful radiculopathy. Although conservative medical management may be successful initially, surgical decompression by wide laminectomy or an intralaminar approach should be done in patients with serious or progressive pain or neurologic dysfunction. Because the early diagnosis and treatment of lumbar spinal stenosis may prevent intractable pain and the permanent neurologic sequelae of chronic nerve root entrapment, all physicians should be aware of the different neurologic presentations and the treatment options for patients with spinal stenosis. Images PMID:8434469

  15. Congenital tracheobronchial stenosis.

    PubMed

    Hewitt, Richard J; Butler, Colin R; Maughan, Elizabeth F; Elliott, Martin J

    2016-06-01

    Congenital tracheobronchial stenosis is a rare disease characterized by complete tracheal rings that can affect variable lengths of the tracheobronchial tree. It causes high levels of morbidity and mortality both due to the stenosis itself and to the high incidence of other associated congenital malformations. Successful management of this complex condition requires a highly individualized approach delivered by an experienced multidisciplinary team, which is best delivered within centralized units with the necessary diverse expertise. In such settings, surgical correction by slide tracheoplasty has become increasingly successful over the past 2 decades such that long-term survival now exceeds 88%, with normalization of quality of life scores for patients with non-syndrome-associated congenital tracheal stenosis. Careful assessment and planning of treatment strategies is of paramount importance for both successful management and the provision of patients and carers with accurate and realistic treatment counseling. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Screening for Carotid Artery Stenosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Task Force learned about the potential benefits and harms of screening for carotid artery stenosis: Health professionals ... blood flow through the arteries. Potential Benefits and Harms of Carotid Artery Stenosis Screening and Treatment The ...

  17. Relapsing cardial stenosis after laparoscopic nissen treated by esophageal stenting.

    PubMed

    Pouderoux, Philippe; Verdier, Eric; Courtial, Philippe; Bapin, Catherine; Deixonne, Bernard; Balmès, Jean-Louis

    2003-01-01

    Dysphagia after antireflux surgery is often a challenging situation. We report the case of a patient with relapsing cardial stricture and a weight loss of 24 kg following a laparoscopic Nissen procedure. Initial presentation was consistent with the diagnosis of pseudoachalasia and was resistant to endoscopic dilatation. Dysphagia was relieved by surgery, which showed cardial strangulation by tightly sutured diaphragmatic pillars. Symptoms and cardial stricture relapsed after a few months with no significant relief after repeated dilatations. Conservative treatment by endoscopic transcardial prosthesis for six weeks allowed a return to normal diet and a weight gain of 10 kg within a 30-month followup period.

  18. Diet and esophageal disease

    PubMed Central

    Dawsey, Sanford M.; Fagundes, Renato B.; Jacobson, Brian C.; Kresty, Laura A.; Mallery, Susan R.; Paski, Shirley; van den Brandt, Piet A.

    2014-01-01

    The following, from the 12th OESO World Conference: Cancers of the Esophagus, includes commentaries on macronutrients, dietary patterns, and risk of adenocarcinoma in Barrett’s esophagus; micronutrients, trace elements, and risk of Barrett’s esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma; the role of mate consumption in the development of squamous cell carcinoma; the relationship between energy excess and development of esophageal adenocarcinoma; and the nutritional management of the esophageal cancer patient. PMID:25266021

  19. Beneficial effects of garlic (Allium sativum) oil in experimental corrosive esophageal burns effects of garlic oil in esophageal burns.

    PubMed

    Şen Tanrıkulu, Ceren; Tanrikulu, Yusuf; Kılınç, Fahriye; Bahadır, Burak; Can, Murat; Köktürk, Füruzan

    2017-05-01

    Corrosive esophageal burns, particularly common in developing countries, lead to different problems in different age groups. The ingestion of corrosive substances can cause such problems as stricture of the esophagus, to acute perforation, and even death. Because stricture formation is related to the severity of the initial injury, the prevention of stricture constitutes a main goal of treatment. The aim of this study was to investigate the protective and anti-inflammatory effects of garlic (Allium sativum) oil in corrosive esophageal burn. Twenty-eight rats were randomly divided into 4 equal groups: group 1 (sham), group 2 (control), group 3 (topical treatment), and group 4 (topical and systemic treatment). In groups 2, 3, and 4, corrosive esophageal burns were generated by applying sodium hydroxide to a 1.5-cm segment of the abdominal esophagus. Normal saline was applied to group 2, topical garlic oil to group 3, and topical and systemic garlic oil were used in group 4. The level of hydroxyproline was lower in the topical treatment groups than in the control group (p=0.023). There was difference in tumor necrosis factor alpha level between the systemic treatment groups and the control group (p=0.044). Treatment with garlic oil decreased stenosis index (SI) and histopathological damage score (HDS) in corrosive esophageal burn rats. The SI in the topical treatment group was significantly lower than that of the control group (p=0.016). The HDS was significantly lower in group 4 when compared with the control group (p=0.019). Garlic oil is an effective agent in promoting the regression of esophageal stenosis and tissue damage caused by corrosive burns. While the protective effect of garlic oil on tissue damage is more significant when applied topically, the anti-inflammatory effect is more pronounced when applied systemically. Therefore, we believe that the application of garlic oil in patients with corrosive esophageal burns can reduce complication rates.

  20. Eosinophilic esophagitis: From pathophysiology to treatment.

    PubMed

    D'Alessandro, Alessandra; Esposito, Dario; Pesce, Marcella; Cuomo, Rosario; De Palma, Giovanni Domenico; Sarnelli, Giovanni

    2015-11-15

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic immune disease, characterized by a dense eosinophilic infiltrate in the esophagus, leading to bolus impaction and reflux-like symptoms. Traditionally considered a pediatric disease, the number of adult patients with EoE is continuously increasing, with a relatively higher incidence in western countries. Dysphagia and food impaction represent the main symptoms complained by patients, but gastroesophageal reflux-like symptoms may also be present. Esophageal biopsies are mandatory for the diagnosis of EoE, though clinical manifestations and proton pump inhibitors responsiveness must be taken into consideration. The higher prevalence of EoE in patients suffering from atopic diseases suggests a common background with allergy, however both the etiology and pathophysiology are not completely understood. Elimination diets are considered the first-line therapy in children, but this approach appears less effective in adults patients, who often require steroids; despite medical treatments, EoE is complicated in some cases by esophageal stricture and stenosis, that require additional endoscopic treatments. This review summarizes the evidence on EoE pathophysiology and illustrates the safety and efficacy of the most recent medical and endoscopic treatments.

  1. Eosinophilic esophagitis: From pathophysiology to treatment

    PubMed Central

    D’Alessandro, Alessandra; Esposito, Dario; Pesce, Marcella; Cuomo, Rosario; De Palma, Giovanni Domenico; Sarnelli, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic immune disease, characterized by a dense eosinophilic infiltrate in the esophagus, leading to bolus impaction and reflux-like symptoms. Traditionally considered a pediatric disease, the number of adult patients with EoE is continuously increasing, with a relatively higher incidence in western countries. Dysphagia and food impaction represent the main symptoms complained by patients, but gastroesophageal reflux-like symptoms may also be present. Esophageal biopsies are mandatory for the diagnosis of EoE, though clinical manifestations and proton pump inhibitors responsiveness must be taken into consideration. The higher prevalence of EoE in patients suffering from atopic diseases suggests a common background with allergy, however both the etiology and pathophysiology are not completely understood. Elimination diets are considered the first-line therapy in children, but this approach appears less effective in adults patients, who often require steroids; despite medical treatments, EoE is complicated in some cases by esophageal stricture and stenosis, that require additional endoscopic treatments. This review summarizes the evidence on EoE pathophysiology and illustrates the safety and efficacy of the most recent medical and endoscopic treatments. PMID:26600973

  2. Lumbar Spinal Canal Stenosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... time. This narrowing is called “stenosis.” As the lumbar spinal canal narrows, the nerves that go through it are squeezed. This squeezing ... chest). It’s thought that these positions “open” the lumbar canal and take the pressure off the nerves that go to the legs. In severe cases, ...

  3. [Congenital aortic stenosis].

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, M

    2001-08-01

    Recent advances in and controversies concerning the management of children with congenital valvular aortic stenosis are discussed. In neonates with critical aortic stenosis, improved survival has recently been reported after surgical open valvotomy and balloon valvuloplasty, although it is difficult at this point to compare the results of the two procedures and determine their differential indications. Good results have also been achieved after extended aortic valvuloplasty for recurrent aortic stenosis and/or insufficiency, but the length of follow-up in these patients is still short. The technique first reported in 1991 for bilateral enlargement fo a small annulus permits the insertion of an aortic valve 3-4 sizes larger than the native annulus. It entails no risk of distorting the mitral valve, damaging the conduction system or important branches of the coronary arteries, or resulting in left ventricular dysfunction. The Ross procedure is now widely applied in the West, with reports of early mortality rates of less than 5% and event-free survival rates of 80-90% during follow-up of 4-8 years. Longer follow-up and continued careful evaluation are required to resolve the issue of possible dilatation and subsequent neoaortic valve dysfunction and pulmonary stenosis due to allograft degeneration after pulmonary autograft root replacement in children.

  4. What Is Spinal Stenosis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and problems with joints. Rheumatoid arthritis:  Affects most people at a younger age than osteoarthritis.  Causes the soft tissues of the joints to swell and can affect the internal organs and systems.  Is not a common cause of spinal ... Conditions Some people are born with conditions that cause spinal stenosis. ...

  5. Stenosis after stapler anastomosis.

    PubMed

    Elliott, T E; Albertazzi, V J; Danto, L A

    1977-06-01

    Two cases of anastomotic stenosis after the use of the GIA Auto Suture Stapler are presented as examples of the potential problem that does exist in using this instrument. Possible causes and a suggestion for eliminating this complication have been outlined.

  6. The Diagnosis of Mitral Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Munroe, D. S.; Rally, C. R.

    1963-01-01

    The diagnosis of classical mitral stenosis is easy, but many pitfalls lead to over-diagnosis or under-diagnosis. These have been considered in detail and variations in symptoms and signs have been illustrated by case histories. Such variations include: (1) Embolism producing the Leriche syndrome; (2) mitral stenosis with insignificant hemodynamic effect; (3) myxoma masquerading as mitral stenosis; (4) mitral stenosis without apical murmurs, and (5) mitral stenosis with a systolic murmur predominant or alone. In cases of combined mitral and aortic stenosis, the history, radiographic configuration, and incidence of hemoptysis, edema, bronchitis, embolism and atrial fibrillation resemble such findings in cases of isolated mitral stenosis, but the auscultatory signs of the latter may be obscured. The degree of aortic stenosis is difficult to determine in cases of combined stenosis. In the diagnosis of re-stenosis the condition of the valve at the first commissurotomy, the precise procedure performed and the degree of regurgitation produced are of prime importance. Congenital mitral stenosis is rare and is associated with a high incidence of other defects. PMID:13936649

  7. Concomitant slide tracheoplasty and cardiac operation for congenital tracheal stenosis associated with VACTERL.

    PubMed

    Wu, En-Ting; Wang, Ching-Chia; Lin, Ming-Tai; Huang, Pei-Ming; Chen, Shyh-Jye; Huang, Chi-Hsiang; Hwang, Haw-Kwei; Chen, Ming-Ren; Huang, Shu-Chien

    2013-10-01

    The association of congenital tracheal stenosis and tracheoesophageal (TE) fistula is rare. Here, we report 2 patients with tracheobronchial stenosis (complete cartilage ring) involving the lower trachea and right bronchus. Both patients had associated VACTERL (vertebral anomalies, anal atresia, cardiovascular anomalies, TE, renal, and limb defects) congenital cardiac defects and tracheal diverticula after repair of the TE fistula in type C esophageal atresia. The stenotic segment began at the orifice of the TE fistula, which became diverticula after the TE fistula was repaired. Concomitant repair of congenital cardiac defects and a slide tracheoplasty with elimination of the diverticula were performed successfully.

  8. Surgical treatment of anal stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Brisinda, Giuseppe; Vanella, Serafino; Cadeddu, Federica; Marniga, Gaia; Mazzeo, Pasquale; Brandara, Francesco; Maria, Giorgio

    2009-01-01

    Anal stenosis is a rare but serious complication of anorectal surgery, most commonly seen after hemorrhoidectomy. Anal stenosis represents a technical challenge in terms of surgical management. A Medline search of studies relevant to the management of anal stenosis was undertaken. The etiology, pathophysiology and classification of anal stenosis were reviewed. An overview of surgical and non-surgical therapeutic options was developed. Ninety percent of anal stenosis is caused by overzealous hemorrhoidectomy. Treatment, both medical and surgical, should be modulated based on stenosis severity. Mild stenosis can be managed conservatively with stool softeners or fiber supplements. Sphincterotomy may be quite adequate for a patient with a mild degree of narrowing. For more severe stenosis, a formal anoplasty should be performed to treat the loss of anal canal tissue. Anal stenosis may be anatomic or functional. Anal stricture is most often a preventable complication. Many techniques have been used for the treatment of anal stenosis with variable healing rates. It is extremely difficult to interpret the results of the various anaplastic procedures described in the literature as prospective trials have not been performed. However, almost any approach will at least improve patient symptoms. PMID:19399922

  9. Surgical treatment analysis of idiopathic esophageal achalasia

    PubMed Central

    de AQUINO, José Luis Braga; SAID, Marcelo Manzano; PEREIRA, Douglas Rizzanti; do AMARAL, Paula Casals; LIMA, Juliana Carolina Alves; LEANDRO-MERHI, Vânia Aparecida

    2015-01-01

    Background Idiopathic esophageal achalasia is an inflammatory disease of unknown origin, characterized by aperistalsis of the esophageal body and failure of the lower esophageal sphincter in response to swallowing, with consequent dysphagia. Aim To demonstrate the results of surgical therapy in these patients, evaluating the occurred local and systemic complications. Methods Were studied retrospectively 32 patients, 22 of whom presented non-advanced stage of the disease (Stage I/II) and 10 with advanced disease (Stage III/IV). All of them had the clinical conditions to be submitted to surgery. The diagnoses were done by clinical, endoscopic, cardiological, radiological and esophageal manometry analysis. Pre-surgical evaluation was done with a questionnaire based on the most predisposing factors in the development of the disease and the surgical indication was based on the stage of the disease. Results The patients with non-advanced stages were submitted to cardiomyotomy with fundoplication, wherein in the post-surgical early assessment, only one (4,4%) presented pulmonary infection, but had a good outcome. In patients with advanced disease, seven were submitted to esophageal mucosectomy preserving the muscular layer, wherein one patient (14,2%) presented dehiscence of gastric cervical esophagus anastomosis as well as pulmonary infection; all of these complications were resolved with proper specific treatment; the other three patients with advanced stage were submitted to transmediastinal esophagectomy; two of them presented hydropneumothorax with good evolution, and one of them also presented fistula of the cervical esophagogastric anastomosis, but with spontaneous healing after conservative treatment and nutritional support. The two patients with fistula of the cervical anastomosis progressed to stenosis, with good results after endoscopic dilations. In the medium and long term assessment done in 23 patients, all of them reported improvement in life quality, with

  10. [Esophageal dilatation by Savary-Guillard bougies in children].

    PubMed

    Asensio Llorente, M; Broto Mangues, J; Gil-Vernet Huguet, J M; Acosta Farina, D; Marhuenda Irastorza, C; Boix-Ochoa, J

    1999-01-01

    Dilatations are considered the election treatment for esophageal stenosis of different etiologies. Different methods of dilatation have been used through the years. Security and effectiveness are the main subjects when we choose a dilatation method. We present the results of the last 3 years that Savary-Guilliard have been used, with a guide wire probe, under endoscopic control. Six patients with postsurgical stenosis and 10 with post lye ingestion stenosis were treated with the above mentioned method. The site of stenosis is localized under flexible endoscopy, and a special guide wire probe is introduced to the stomach. Once the wire is in place, different diameter bougies are introduced until a firm resistance is felt or the desired diameter is reach. In complicated cases the progression of the wire was controlled by X-rays. A total of 208 dilatations have done in 16 patients over the last three years. Six patients with postsurgical stenosis needed from two to six dilatations for their cure. Of the 10 patients who ingest lye, none of them had needed a gastrostomy. Three of them have no dysphagia after 9, 13 and 13 dilatations. The other 7 are under dilatations every 6 weeks in 6 cases and every 4 weeks in one case, been all of them in the second year of treatment. All the dilatations have been performed under general anesthesia, as outpatients. We have not had any complication under this treatment. We have found that the Savary-Guilliard method is adequate for esophageal dilatations in pediatric population. Security and effectiveness are the main points of this procedure, there is no need for a gastrostomy, and the child will have a better quality of life. This procedure is less aggressive, and this will give a shorter postop period, with no complications and the child will have a longer period of normal life between dilatations.

  11. Severe esophageal injuries caused by accidental button battery ingestion in children.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Sara; Cano, Indalecio; Benavent, María Isabel; Gómez, Andrés

    2014-10-01

    Button batteries represent a low percentage of all foreign bodies swallowed by children and esophageal location is even less frequent. However, these cases are more likely to develop severe injuries. The aim of this essay is to report three cases treated in our institution and review previous reports. Chart review and literature search. We treated three children between 2-7- years old with button batteries lodged at esophagus. They all presented esophageal burns (EB), which evolved in esophageal stenosis in two out of the three cases. We found 29 more cases in literature and the injuries included EB, esophageal perforation (EP) and tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF). Swallowed button batteries rarely remain in esophagus, but these cases present a higher risk of tisular damage. Injuries can take place even after few hours; and therefore, endoscopy must be performed as soon as possible. Further study on button batteries' safety and the establishment of a maximum size for them would be good preventive measures.

  12. [Primary esophageal lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Ximenes, Manoel; Piauilino, Marcos Amorim; Oliveira, Humberto Alves; Vaz Neto, Jorge Pinto

    2012-01-01

    We describe the case of a 54 year old woman seen with an esophageal mass diagnosed as a primary esophageal lymphoma. The main symptom was dysphagia of seven months duration. The treatment consisted in resection of the tumor, and reconstruction of the defect with a reversed pleural flap, followed by a chemotherapy regimen that consisted of five drugs, cyclophosphamid, prednisone, doxorubicin, rituximab and vincristine (R-CHOP). The patient developed an esophageal pleural fistula treated with pleural drainage and irrigation that closed in 45 days. Two and one half years later she is doing well and disease free.

  13. Radiation Therapy, Paclitaxel, and Carboplatin With or Without Trastuzumab in Treating Patients With Esophageal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-13

    Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IB Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIA Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIB Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIA Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIB Esophageal Cancer

  14. Total dysphagia after short course of systemic corticotherapy: Herpes simplex virus esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Jetté-Côté, Isa; Ouellette, Denise; Béliveau, Claire; Mitchell, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    A 72 year-old female developed a herpetic esophagitis after 3 d of oral corticotherapy for an acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, presenting as odynophagia and total dysphagia. Biospies were taken during a first esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) and the patient was referred to the thoracic surgery service with a presumptive diagnosis of esophageal cancer. A second EGD was planned for dilatation, but by that time the stenosis was completely resolved. The biopsies taken during the first EGD revealed multiple herpetic viral inclusions and ulcerations without any dysplasia or neoplasia. In front of a severe esophageal stenosis, one must still exclude the usual differential diagnosis peptic stenosis and cancer. Visualization of endoscopic lesions can suggest the diagnosis but must be promptly confirmed by biopsy, viral culture or polymerase chain reaction. Although immune systemic effects of corticotherapy are well known and herpetic esophagitis occurs most frequently in immunocompromised individuals, this case emphasizes the importance of clinical awareness concerning short courses of corticotherapy for immunocompetent individuals. This article discusses the reactivation process of herpetic infection in this context and addresses its diagnostic and therapeutic issues. PMID:23964155

  15. Genetics Home Reference: supravalvular aortic stenosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions supravalvular aortic stenosis supravalvular aortic stenosis Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS) is a heart defect that develops before ...

  16. Snapshot of Esophageal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... establish common inputs for current and hypothetical screening strategies, chemoprevention and endoscopic therapy. One project aims to advance the understanding of esophageal cancer and the impact of cancer control interventions through a collaborative and comparative modeling project. ...

  17. Esophagitis in Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Putnam, Philip E

    2016-01-01

    Esophagitis is the end result of a variety of insults to epithelial homeostasis. Eosinophilic esophagitis is a manifestation of non-IgE-mediated food allergy that most commonly affects the esophagus of males who have other atopic phenomena. Reflux esophagitis reflects repeated exposure to acidic gastric contents because of failure of the normal protections afforded by the LES. Because certain histologic features can be present in either condition, endoscopic biopsy alone does not distinguish them. Their symptoms overlap, but the treatment options are very different, such that making a formal diagnosis by following consensus guidelines is essential. A treatment protocol designed to manage the inflammation by controlling the provocative factors (acid for GERD and food antigens for EoE) or suppressing the inflammation (ie, topical steroids for EoE) should result in normalization of the mucosa and resolution of symptoms. Eosinophilic esophagitis is a chronic condition that rarely remits spontaneously, so any therapeutic modality will need to be continued indefinitely.

  18. Functional Esophageal Disorders.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Qasim; Fass, Ronnie; Gyawali, C Prakash; Miwa, Hiroto; Pandolfino, John E; Zerbib, Frank

    2016-02-15

    Functional esophageal disorders consist of a disease category that present with esophageal symptoms (heartburn, chest pain, dysphagia, globus) not explained by mechanical obstruction (stricture, tumor, eosinophilic esophagitis), major motor disorders (achalasia, EGJ outflow obstruction, absent contractility, distal esophageal spasm, jackhammer esophagus), or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). While mechanisms responsible are unclear, it is theorized that visceral hypersensitivity and hypervigilance play an important role in symptom generation, in the context of normal or borderline function. Treatments directed at improving borderline motor dysfunction or reducing reflux burden to sub-normal levels have limited success in symptom improvement. In contrast, strategies focused on modulating peripheral triggering and central perception are mechanistically viable and clinically meaningful. However, outcome data from these treatment options are limited. Future research needs to focus on understanding mechanisms underlying visceral hypersensitivity and hypervigilance so that appropriate targets and therapies can be developed.

  19. Oral and esophageal disorders.

    PubMed

    Noyer, C M; Simon, D

    1997-06-01

    This article focused on the approach to oral and esophageal disorders in patients with AIDS. Most of these disorders respond to various therapeutic regimens. Some of the oral complications can be prevented with dental prophylaxis, whereas recurrent esophageal disease in some patients may require long-term suppressive therapy. As patients with AIDS live longer with lower CD4 counts, gastroenterologists need to become familiar with the approach to and management of the more common lesions of the mouth and esophagus.

  20. Genetics of Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    chemokine production13,18; however, it has been observed that activated mast cells can also express TSLP to similarly drive TH2 responses. 12,19,20 Indeed...including eosinophils 61 and mast cells .62 For instance, TSLP activates dendritic cells to adopt a TH2 prim- ing phenotype through the secretion of the...binding pattern to lysates from esophageal epithelial cells , as well as esophageal tissue from patients with active EE. This analysis has not shown

  1. Subglottic tracheal stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Venuta, Federico; Rendina, Erino Angelo

    2016-01-01

    Benign subglottic stenosis represents a major therapeutic challenge. Interventional bronchoscopic treatment has a limited role in this setting due to anatomical and technical reasons. The benefit with these techniques is generally temporary, due to frequent recurrences, need for repeated procedures and risk of extending the area of damage. Laryngotracheal resection is at present the curative treatment of choice. Literature data show that surgical treatment may allow very high success rates at long term with low perioperative morbidity and mortality. Technical aspects and results are reported and discussed. PMID:26981264

  2. [Stable fibrous subaortic stenosis].

    PubMed

    Attié, F; Dumont, C; Mispireta, J; Kuri, J; Mata, L A

    1975-01-01

    The authors studied 37 patients belonging to the Pediatric Cardiology Service of the Institute National of Cardiology who were carriers of fixed fibrinous subaortic stenosis. The diagnosis was established by surgery or autopsy. Isolated subvalvular obstruction was found in 24 patients (63%), which represents the most important number of cases in the literature. The analysis of the 24 cases permitted important conclusions: 1. All the patients had systolic thrills in the suprasternal hollow and carotidinous pathways. 2. No case had protosystolic click. In all, the murmur's epicenter was in the 3rd and 4th IIS in the parasternal line, a fact which can lead to a mistaken diagnosis of interventricular septal defect. 66.6% of the patients had a diastolic murmur heard in the aortic focus, a secondary accompaniement to secondary valvular aortic insufficiency. The intensity of the second aortic sound held an inverse relationship to the magnitude of the gradient. The presence of paradoxic splitting of the second heart sound as well as prolongation of the expulsion period in the carotidogram are indexes for the severity of the obstruction. 3. A relationship between the severity of the lesion and the dilatation of the left atrium was found. The cardiomegaly had no relationship to the severity of the obstruction with the increase in ventricular telediastolic pressure or to the evolution time. 4. An adequate hemodynamic study permits evaluating and locating the site of the obstruction. Likewise, precise ventriculography appraises the nature of the narrowing. 5. Aortic regurgitation is located at the valvular level. Aortography permits its affirmation. Probably the stream coming from subvalvular stenosis produces fibrosis or asynchronism in the closing of the aortic valves. 6. Surgical treatment offers excelent perspectives in mortality as well as reducing the gradient. None of our patients operated on had hospital or later death. 7. Postoperatory evaluation was performed on six

  3. [Congenital Esophageal Atresia].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Makoto; Kuwano, Hiroyuki

    2015-07-01

    In this report, we describe the esophageal atresia in terms of current surgical management on the basis of our experience and literatures. Traditionally, infants with esophageal atresia have presented shortly after birth because of an inability to pass an orogastric tube, respiratory distress, or an inability to tolerate feeding. And also, an isolated trachea-esophageal fistula (TEF) usually cases coughing, recurrent pneumonia, or choking during feedings. To ignore these symptoms is to risk a delayed diagnosis. The condition may be associated with other major congenital anomalies such as those seen in the vertebral, anal, cardiac, tracheo-esophageal, renal/radial (VACTER) association, or it may be an isolated defect. Therapeutic strategies for esophageal atresia are a prevention of pulmonary complication by TEF closing and an early establishment of enteral alimentation. We promptly repair healthy infants without performing a gastrostomy and delay repair in infants with high-risk factors such as associated severe cardiac anomaly and respiratory insufficiency. Esophageal atresia has been classically approached through a thoracotomy. The disadvantages of such a thoracotomy have been recognized for a long time, for example winged scapula, elevation of fixation of shoulder, asymmetry of the chest wall, rib fusion, scoliosis, and breast and pectoral muscle maldevelopment. To avoid such disadvantages, thoracoscopic repair was recently reported.

  4. Diabetes, intracranial stenosis and microemboli in asymptomatic carotid stenosis.

    PubMed

    Lam, Thach D; Lammers, Stephanie; Munoz, Claudio; Tamayo, Arturo; Spence, J David

    2013-03-01

    The risk of stroke in patients with asymptomatic carotid stenosis (ACS) is now so low that it is important to have methods to identify those patients most likely to benefit from intervention, or who may require special consideration in choice of medical therapy. We studied the prediction of stroke, death or transient ischemic attacks (stroke/death/TIA) in patients with ACS by intracranial arterial stenosis, and microemboli on transcranial Doppler (TCD), and the effect of diabetes mellitus on microemboli, intracranial stenosis and risk of events. Patients with ACS > 60% by Doppler ultrasound were recruited from the Stroke Prevention Clinic of University Hospital, London, Canada. All 339 participants underwent TCD for detection of intracranial stenosis and detection of microemboli, and carotid ultrasound to measure extracranial stenosis and total carotid plaque area. Participants were followed for three years, to determine the risk of stroke/death/TIA. Stroke/death/TIA occurred in 38% of patients with microemboli versus 10% without (p=0.0001), and in 18% of patients with intracranial stenosis, versus 10% without (p=0.042). Diabetics were significantly more likely to have intracranial stenosis (45% vs. 29%, p =0.014), microemboli (38% vs. 10%, p <0.0001), and had significantly higher risk of stroke/death/TIA over three years (21% vs. 11% without; p=0.024). Survival free of stroke, TIA or death was significantly better without microemboli or intracranial stenosis (p<0.0001). Diabetes, microemboli and intracranial stenosis predicted higher risk of stroke, death or TIA than did extracranial stenosis or total plaque area; diabetics may need more intensive therapy.

  5. Lumbar Spinal Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Genevay, Stephane

    2009-01-01

    Lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) is most commonly due to degenerative changes in older individuals. LSS is being more commonly diagnosed and may relate to better access to advanced imaging and to an aging population. This review focuses on radicular symptoms related to degenerative central and lateral stenosis and updates knowledge of LSS pathophysiology, diagnosis and management. Since patients with anatomic LSS can range from asymptomatic to severely disabled, the clinical diagnosis focuses on symptoms and examination findings associated with LSS. Imaging findings are helpful for patients with persistent, bothersome symptoms in whom invasive treatments are being considered. There is limited information from high quality studies about the relative benefits and harms of commonly used treatments. Interpreting and comparing results of available research is limited by a lack of consensus about the definition of LSS. Nevertheless, evidence supports decompressive laminectomy for patients with persistent and bothersome symptoms. Recommendations favor a shared decision making approach due to important trade-offs between alternative therapies and differences among patients in their preferences and values. PMID:20227646

  6. Esophageal Gunshot Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Symbas, P. N.; Hatcher, C. R.; Vlasis, S. E.

    1980-01-01

    During a 15-year period from August 1964 to August 1979, 48 patients with gunshot wound of the esophagus (24 of the cervical, 17 of the thoracic, and seven of the abdominal) were treated at Grady Memorial Hospital. In the majority of the patients, the initial history, physical findings, and chest roentgenograms were nondiagnostic for esophageal injury. Esophageal perforation was mainly suspected because the bullet tract was in close proximity to the esophagus or the bullet had traversed the mediastinum. The diagnosis of esophageal perforation was made by esophagography (29 patients), at the time of emergency surgical exploration for suspected other organ injuries (17 patients), or by esophagoscopy (one patient). All but one patient were treated surgically. The surgical procedure most commonly used was primary repair of the esophageal wound with wide drainage of the mediastinum. Thirty-eight (79.2%) of the 48 patients survived, 21 (87.5%) of the 24 patients with cervical, 11 (64.7%) of the 17 patients with thoracic, and six (85.7%) of the seven patients with abdominal esophageal wounds. Ten patients died, three with cervical wound, six with thoracic wound, and one with abdominal esophageal wound. Three patients died intraoperatively from major bleeding and the remaining seven died from the esophageal and/or other associated injuries, four to eight days after surgery. None of the seven patients who underwent primary repair with wide drainage and plication of the suture line with pleural flap or other tissue, died or developed leak at the suture line. This study suggests that the physical and roentgenographic findings in patients with esophageal injury are often nondiagnostic and frequently are masked by coincidental injury to other organs. Hence, a high index of suspicion is required for the diagnosis of esophageal injury from gunshot wounds and esophagography should be performed as soon as the patient's condition is stable in all patients who present with a missile

  7. Clinical Implications and Pathogenesis of Esophageal Remodeling in Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Hirano, Ikuo; Aceves, Seema S.

    2014-01-01

    In eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), remodeling changes are manifest histologically in both the epithelium as well as in the subepithelium where lamina propria (LP) fibrosis, expansion of the muscularis propria and increased vascularity occur. The major clinical symptoms and complications of EoE are largely consequences of esophageal remodeling. Important mediators of the process include IL-5, IL-13, TGFβ1, mast cells, fibroblasts and eosinophils. Methods to detect remodeling effects include upper endoscopy, histopathology, barium esophagram, endoscopic ultrasonography, esophageal manometry, and functional luminal imaging. These modalities provide evidence of organ dysfunction that include focal and diffuse esophageal strictures, expansion of the mucosa and subepithelium, esophageal motor abnormalities and reduced esophageal distensibility. Complications of food impaction and perforations of the esophageal wall have been associated with reduction in esophageal caliber and increased esophageal mural stiffness. The therapeutic benefits of topical corticosteroids and elimination diet therapy in resolving mucosal eosinophilic inflammation of the esophagus are evident. Available therapies, however, have demonstrated variable ability to reverse existing remodeling changes of the esophagus. Systemic therapies that include novel, targeted biologic agents have the potential of addressing subepithelial remodeling. Esophageal dilation remains a useful, adjunctive therapeutic maneuver in symptomatic adults with esophageal stricture. As novel treatments emerge, it is essential that therapeutic endpoints account for the fundamental contributions of esophageal remodeling to overall disease activity. PMID:24813517

  8. Tissue engineering interventions for esophageal disorders--promises and challenges.

    PubMed

    Kuppan, Purushothaman; Sethuraman, Swaminathan; Krishnan, Uma Maheswari

    2012-01-01

    The diseases of the esophagus include congenital defects like atresia, tracheoesophageal fistula as well as others such as gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD), Barrett's esophagus, carcinoma and strictures. All esophageal disorders require surgical intervention and reconstruction with appropriate substitutes. Primary anastomosis is used to treat most cases but treatment of long gap atresia still remains a clinical challenge. Autologous graft therapies using tissues from colon, and small and large intestine or gastric transplantations have been attempted but have constraints like leakage, infection and stenosis at the implanted site, which leads to severe morbidity and mortality. An alternative for autologous grafts are allogenic and xenogenic grafts, which have better availability but disease transmission and immunogenicity limit their applications. Use of biodegradable and biocompatible scaffolds to engineer the esophagus promises to be an effective regenerative strategy for treatment of esophageal disorders. Nanotopography of the fibrous scaffolds mimics the natural extracellular matrix (ECM) of the tissue and incorporation of chemical cues and tailoring mechanical properties provide the right microenvironment for co-culture of different cell types. Scaffolds cultured with esophageal cells (epithelial cells, fibroblast and smooth muscle cells) might show enhancement of the biofunctionality in vivo. This review attempts to address the various strategies and challenges involved in successful tissue engineering of the esophagus. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Esophageal carcinoma secondary to a chemical injury in a child.

    PubMed

    Schettini, S T; Ganc, A; Saba, L

    1998-09-01

    Twin sisters were clinically and endoscopically followed due to chemical injuries to the esophagus after ingestion of muriatic acid at 10 months of age. One of the girls developed esophageal carcinoma 10 years later and died after esophagectomy because of progression of the disease. Her twin sister has a severe stenosis at the distal esophagus and is waiting for surgical treatment. Malignization of a chemical injury to the esophagus in a child has not yet been described in the literature, emphasizing the role of endoscopic follow-up with periodic biopsies.

  10. Chemoradiotherapy for Esophageal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ashish; Suntharalingam, Mohan

    2009-01-01

    Radiotherapy and surgery have both played prominent roles in the treatment of esophageal cancer since the beginning of the 20th century. Although the use of radiotherapy alone to treat esophageal cancer has a long history, it has not demonstrated improved outcomes compared with surgery alone. The disappointing rates of survival and local control associated with single-modality therapy and the need for effective nonsurgical management led to the development of definitive chemoradiotherapy paradigms for esophageal cancer. Adding cytotoxic chemotherapy to radiotherapy for additive or synergistic effect was described as early as 1968, and over time, treatment has shifted from single-modality therapy toward combined-modality therapy using chemotherapy and radiotherapy. This approach eventually demonstrated superior outcomes in patients with esophageal cancer when compared to radiotherapy alone. Maximum benefit of this therapy depends on the appropriate addition of surgery and the optimization of radiosensitizing chemotherapy. A burgeoning area of research has focused on improving definitive chemoradiotherapy strategies through the incorporation of newer chemotherapeutic agents and targeted biologic agents. An overview of the history of chemoradiotherapy in the treatment of esophageal cancer is presented, as well as a discussion of ongoing studies and future areas of promising research. PMID:19461907

  11. Intramural esophageal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kozak, Katarzyna; Rębowski, Marek; Kozak, Józef

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Intramural esophageal tumors (IET) are located between unchanged mucous membrane and muscularis mucosae. They can be both benign and malignant. Aim To evaluate diagnostic and therapeutic difficulties of IET. Material and methods During the years 2010–2015, 11 patients with IET were treated in our clinic. Diagnostics included gastroscopy, computed tomography of the chest, endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) guided fine needle biopsy, and positron emission tomography (PET) of the esophagus in cases with no histopathological confirmation. Results Based on the conducted analysis we diagnosed 1 case of gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST), 1 case of adenocarcinoma, and 2 cases of esophageal cysts. In another 7 cases radiological images resembled leiomyoma but with no histopathological confirmation. Esophagectomy was performed in 2 cases of malignant tumors and 1 case of a large benign tumor. In other cases surgical enucleation of tumors was performed. Postoperatively we diagnosed 6 cases of leiomyoma, 1 case of schwannoma, 2 esophageal cysts, 1 case of GIST and 1 of esophageal cancer. Conclusions Intramural esophageal tumors is a very diverse group of tumors, both malignant and benign. In every case of IET we should seek histopathological conformation. Treatment of IET depends on localization, size and histopathological type of lesion. PMID:28096828

  12. Occult lumbar spinal stenosis.

    PubMed Central

    Choudhury, A R; Taylor, J C

    1977-01-01

    Twenty-eight patients presenting with low back pain, associated with sciatic or femoral neuropathy, were found to have lateral recess stenosis occurring as a result of hypertrophy of the facet joints, with preservation within normal limits of the sagittal AP diameter of the lumbar canal. Pathology was believed to be traumatic in origin, and the variable nature of the adhesions suggested recurrent inflammation; the hypertrophy of the facet joints may have been the result of traumatic inflammatory hyperaemia. Radiological investigations were unhelpful. The diagnosis of the condition was made at the time of surgical exploration by the findings of alteration of the facet joints, adhesions and fixity of the nerve roots, normal sagittal AP diameter of the canal, and absence of other significant lesions. Gratifying results were obtained with decompression by wide laminectomy with excision of overhanging facet joints and release of adhesions. PMID:894321

  13. Neuroimaging of Spinal Canal Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Cowley, Peter

    2016-08-01

    Spinal stenosis is common and presents in a variety of forms. Symptomatic lumbar stenosis occurs in approximately 10% of the population and cervical stenosis in 9% over age 70. Imaging is central to the management decision process and first-choice MR imaging may be substituted with CT and CT myelography. A review of the literature is presented with particular emphasis on the clinical-radiologic correlation in both neurogenic intermittent claudication and cervical spondylotic myelopathy. Advanced techniques promise improvements, particularly with radicular compressive lesions, but remain underutilized in routine clinical practice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Minimally invasive surgery for esophageal achalasia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huan-Wen; Du, Ming

    2016-07-01

    Esophageal achalasia is due to the esophagus of neuromuscular dysfunction caused by esophageal functional disease. Its main feature is the lack of esophageal peristalsis, the lower esophageal sphincter pressure and to reduce the swallow's relaxation response. Lower esophageal muscular dissection is one of the main ways to treat esophageal achalasia. At present, the period of muscular layer under the thoracoscope esophagus dissection is one of the treatment of esophageal achalasia. Combined with our experience in minimally invasive esophageal surgery, to improved incision and operation procedure, and adopts the model of the complete period of muscular layer under the thoracoscope esophagus dissection in the treatment of esophageal achalasia.

  15. Assessing esophageal dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Kruger, Danielle

    2014-05-01

    Dysphagia, or difficulty swallowing, is a common problem. Although most cases are attributable to benign disease processes, dysphagia is also a key symptom in several malignancies, making it an important symptom to evaluate. The differential diagnosis of dysphagia requires an understanding of deglutition, in particular the oropharyngeal versus esophageal stages. Stroke is the leading cause of oropharyngeal dysphagia, which is common in older adults and frequently presents as part of a broader complex of clinical manifestations. In esophageal dysphagia, difficulty swallowing is often the main complaint and is caused by localized neuromuscular disorders or obstructive lesions.

  16. Evaluation of esophageal sensation.

    PubMed

    Nusrat, Salman; Miner, Philip B

    2014-10-01

    Dramatic progress has been made over the past decade in the sophistication and availability of equipment to test esophageal motility and sensation. High-resolution esophageal manometry and impedance have moved from the research clinic into clinical practice. Some of the testing is costly and time consuming, and requires extensive experience to perform the testing and properly interpret the results. These sensory studies are valuable in the interpretation of clinical problems, and provide important research information. Clinicians should evaluate the research studies to advance their understanding of the pathophysiology of the esophagus. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Spinal stenosis with meralgia paraesthetica.

    PubMed

    Jiang, G X; Xu, W D; Wang, A H

    1988-03-01

    Of 232 patients with evidence of lumbar spinal stenosis, 13 had symptoms of meralgia paraesthetica. Myelography demonstrated that in all but one of these 13 cases the L3-4 level was involved by stenosis; in 12 matched control patients with spinal stenosis, none had involvement at this level. We found that both the ligamentum flavum and the laminae at L3-4 level were thicker than in a control group. Decompressive laminectomy at the L3-4 level significantly reduced the area of hypo-aesthesia in the thigh, effecting complete cure in seven of the 11 cases. Meralgia paraesthetica is not uncommon in patients with spinal stenosis and is referable to changes at the L3-4 level. It seems that many cases of meralgia may have a spinal origin.

  18. Cervical Stenosis, Myelopathy and Radiculopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... between the vertebrae results in narrowing of the space for the spinal cord and its branches, known ... and cervical stenosis refers to narrowing of the space for the spinal cord or nerve branches in ...

  19. Contemporary management of pyloric stenosis.

    PubMed

    Jobson, Matthew; Hall, Nigel J

    2016-08-01

    Hypertrophic pyloric stenosis is a common surgical cause of vomiting in infants. Following appropriate fluid resuscitation, the mainstay of treatment is pyloromyotomy. This article reviews the aetiology and pathophysiology of hypertrophic pyloric stenosis, its clinical presentation, the role of imaging, the preoperative and postoperative management, current surgical approaches and non-surgical treatment options. Contemporary postoperative feeding regimens, outcomes and complications are also discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Can esophageal dilation be avoided in the treatment of severe esophageal stricture caused by eosinophilic esophagitis?

    PubMed

    Silva, D; Santos, F; Piedade, S; Morais-Almeida, M

    2015-07-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is an inflammatory immune-mediated disease with predominant eosinophilic inflammation characterized by the presence of esophageal dysfunction symptoms. Treatment delay can be associated with disease complications, like esophageal strictures, that can justify the use of invasive procedures which are not deprived of side effects. We present a case report of a 14 year old child with severe esophageal stricture secondary to EoE, that was treated with topical and systemic corticosteroid before any invasive procedure was considered. After 26 weeks of medical treatment, significant improvement of esophageal dysfunction occurred with histological remission and stricture resolution. In patients with severe esophageal strictures secondary to EoE, the need for esophageal dilation procedures should be considered only after anti-inflammatory treatment.

  1. Molecular Phenotyping in Predicting Response in Patients With Stage IB-III Esophageal Cancer Receiving Combination Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-18

    Stage IB Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIA Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIB Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIA Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIB Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIC Esophageal Adenocarcinoma

  2. Management of cervical esophageal strictures with self-expanding metalic stents.

    PubMed

    Cindoruk, Mehmet; Karakan, Tarkan

    2006-12-01

    Esophageal strictures due to malignant diseases are treated with self-expanding metalicic stents. However, experience is limited with these metalic stents in the cervical esophagus. Due to technical difficulties and procedure-related complications, the cervical esophagus has been assigned as a risky area for stenting procedures. Another encountered problem is patient discomfort after the procedure. In this case report, we present three patients with cervical esophageal strictures who were successfully treated with self-expandable metalic stents. Two of these patients had inoperable esophageal carcinoma and the third had benign stenosis due to radiotherapy of larynx carcinoma. The two patients with malignant disease survived four and six months, respectively, after the procedure. The last patient with benign disease is still alive and has been without dysphagia symptom for six months.

  3. Apremilast Is Effective in Lichen Planus Mucosae-Associated Stenotic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Hafner, Jürg; Gubler, Christoph; Kaufmann, Karin; Nobbe, Stephan; Navarini, Alexander A.; French, Lars E.

    2016-01-01

    A 74-year-old woman with extensive lichen planus mucosae (LPM) developed stenotic esophagitis that was refractory to intravenous glucocorticosteroids. Esophageal dilatations to 14 mm width were repeatedly performed without any lasting effect. After introducing oral apremilast, she experienced complete clinical remission within the first 4 weeks of treatment. Control esophagoscopy confirmed a marked recovery of the esophageal mucosa with no recurrence of the former stenosis. Our observation is in line with the case series of Paul et al. [J Am Acad Dermatol 2013;68: 255–261] who first reported on the benefit of apremilast in patients with extensive LPM. Ideally, the effectiveness of apremilast in LPM should be studied in a randomized controlled trial. PMID:27721755

  4. Esophageal laceration with intramural dissection mimics esophageal perforation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hui-Chung; Hsia, Jiun-Yi; Hsu, Chung-Ping

    2008-10-01

    Esophageal laceration with intramural dissection is a rare type of injury but without perforation. It is difficult to differentiate from esophageal perforation at presentation time. We report the case of a 46-year-old man who was admitted to our hospital complaining of progressive chest pain, dysphagia, and odynophagia after swallowing a fish bone three days prior to admission. Esophagoscopy revealed a deep longitudinal laceration with pus discharge in the esophagus. Computed tomography of the chest revealed low posterior mediastinal abscess formation. Surgery was performed under the impression of esophageal perforation. The definite diagnosis was esophageal laceration with intramural dissection.

  5. Esophageal Rupture as a Primary Manifestation in Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Vernon, Natalia; Mohananey, Divyanshu; Ghetmiri, Ehsan; Ghaffari, Gisoo

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic inflammatory process characterized by symptoms of esophageal dysfunction and, histologically, by eosinophilic infiltration of the esophagus. In adults, it commonly presents with dysphagia, food impaction, and chest or abdominal pain. Chronic inflammation can lead to diffuse narrowing of the esophageal lumen which may cause food impaction. Endoscopic procedures to relieve food impaction may lead to complications such as esophageal perforation due to the friability of the esophageal mucosa. Spontaneous transmural esophageal rupture, also known as Boerhaave's syndrome, as a primary manifestation of EoE is rare. In this paper, we present two adult patients who presented with esophageal perforation as the initial manifestation of EoE. This rare complication of EoE has been documented in 13 other reports (11 adults, 2 children) and only 1 of the patients had been previously diagnosed with EoE. A history of dysphagia was present in 1 of our patients and in the majority of previously documented patients. Esophageal perforation is a potentially severe complication of EoE. Patients with a history of dysphagia and patients with spontaneous esophageal perforation should warrant an evaluation for EoE. PMID:24899902

  6. Esophageal epiphrenic diverticulum associated with diffuse esophageal spasm.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Hideo; Kubota, Hisako; Higashida, Masaharu; Manabe, Noriaki; Haruma, Ken; Hirai, Toshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal diverticulum, a relatively rare condition, has been considered to be associated with motor abnormalities such as conditions that cause a lack of coordination between the distal esophagus and lower esophageal sphincter. We herein report a case of esophageal epiphrenic diverticulum associated with diffuse esophageal spasm. A 73-year-old woman presented with dysphagia and regurgitation. Imaging examinations revealed a right-sided esophageal diverticulum located about 10cm above the esophagogastric junction. High-resolution manometry revealed normal esophageal motility. However, 24-h pH monitoring revealed continuous acidity due to pooling of residue in the diverticulum. An esophageal epiphrenic diverticulum was diagnosed and resected thoracoscopically. Her dysphagia recurred 2 years later. High-resolution manometry revealed diffuse esophageal spasm. The diverticulum in the present case was considered to have been associated with diffuse esophageal spasm. The motility disorder was likely not identified at the first evaluation. In this case, the patient's symptoms spontaneously resolved without any treatment; however, longer-term follow-up is needed. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Esophageal epiphrenic diverticulum associated with diffuse esophageal spasm

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Hideo; Kubota, Hisako; Higashida, Masaharu; Manabe, Noriaki; Haruma, Ken; Hirai, Toshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Esophageal diverticulum, a relatively rare condition, has been considered to be associated with motor abnormalities such as conditions that cause a lack of coordination between the distal esophagus and lower esophageal sphincter. Presentation of case We herein report a case of esophageal epiphrenic diverticulum associated with diffuse esophageal spasm. A 73-year-old woman presented with dysphagia and regurgitation. Imaging examinations revealed a right-sided esophageal diverticulum located about 10 cm above the esophagogastric junction. High-resolution manometry revealed normal esophageal motility. However, 24-h pH monitoring revealed continuous acidity due to pooling of residue in the diverticulum. An esophageal epiphrenic diverticulum was diagnosed and resected thoracoscopically. Her dysphagia recurred 2 years later. High-resolution manometry revealed diffuse esophageal spasm. Discussion The diverticulum in the present case was considered to have been associated with diffuse esophageal spasm. The motility disorder was likely not identified at the first evaluation. Conclusion In this case, the patient’s symptoms spontaneously resolved without any treatment; however, longer-term follow-up is needed. PMID:26143577

  8. Eosinophilic esophagitis in children with esophageal atresia.

    PubMed

    Dhaliwal, J; Tobias, V; Sugo, E; Varjavandi, V; Lemberg, D; Day, A; Bohane, T; Ledder, O; Jiwane, A; Adams, S; Henry, G; Dilley, A; Shi, E; Krishnan, U

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) has only rarely been reported in esophageal atresia (EA) patients. A retrospective case analysis of all EA patients born at our center between January 1999 and April 2012 was performed. A total of 113 of patients were identified; 10 patients were excluded as a result of inadequate data. Eighteen patients (17%) were diagnosed with EoE. The average number of eosinophilis was 30/high-power field (HPF) (19/HPF-80/HPF). The median age for diagnosis of EoE was 1 year and 6 months (8 months-8 years and 7 months). Children with EoE had a significantly greater incidence of reflux symptoms, dysphagia, tracheomalacia, and 'hypoxic spells' (P < 0.05). EoE patients also underwent significantly more surgery including fundoplication and aortopexy when compared with those without EoE (P < 0.0001). Although the incidence of gastrostomy was greater in the EoE group (33% vs. 13%), this was not statistically significant. Half of the EoE patients had a coexisting atopic condition at time of diagnosis. The commonest condition was asthma 7/18 (38%) followed by specific food allergy 6/18 (33%). EoE was treated in 11 patients with either swallowed fluticasone or budesonide slurry. All improved clinically. Histologically, five had complete resolution and six had partial improvement. Six children with EoE were treated with acid suppression alone. All improved clinically, and 5/6 had subsequent histological resolution. One child who received acid suppression and an exclusion diet also improved. Seven patients (38%) had an esophageal stricture at time of EoE diagnosis. Five were dilated at time of the initial endoscopy, prior to the diagnosis of EoE being available. Two patients had resolution of their strictures on medical treatment of their EoE alone and did not require further dilatation. EoE was seen in 17% of children with EA in this study. EoE should be considered in EA patients with persistent symptoms on standard reflux treatment, increasing

  9. Esophageal motility disorders: medical therapy.

    PubMed

    Lacy, Brian E; Weiser, Kirsten

    2008-01-01

    Symptoms of chest pain and dysphagia are common in the adult population. Most patients initially undergo an evaluation to exclude anatomic causes (ie, esophagitis, stricture) and cardiovascular disease as the etiology of these symptoms. Patients with persistent symptoms may then be referred for specialized testing of the esophagus, including esophageal manometry. Disorders of esophageal motility, which include achalasia, diffuse esophageal spasm, nutcracker esophagus, hypertensive lower esophageal sphincter, and ineffective motility are often identified in these patients. Unfortunately, the etiology of these disorders has not been well characterized and the treatment has not been standardized. This review will briefly discuss the impact, etiology, and diagnosis of esophageal motility disorders, and then focus on the medical management of these disorders using evidence from well-designed, prospective studies, where available.

  10. Effect of gastroesophageal reflux on esophageal speech.

    PubMed

    Mathis, J G; Lehman, G A; Shanks, J C; Blom, E D; Brunelle, R L

    1983-12-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux has been incriminated as a factor-inhibiting acquisition of esophageal speech after laryngectomy. Fourteen proficient esophageal speakers and 10 nonproficient speakers underwent esophageal manometry, esophageal pH probe testing, and Bernstein acid perfusion testing. Additionally, 175 laryngectomized members of Lost Chord Clubs answered mailed questionnaires about the frequency of reflux symptoms. Nonproficient and proficient esophageal speakers had a similar frequency of gastroesophageal reflux by pH probe testing, esophageal mucosal acid sensitivity by Bernstein testing, lower esophageal sphincter pressures, and gastroesophageal reflux symptoms. Gastroesophageal reflux does not appear to be a major factor in preventing esophageal speech.

  11. Long-gap esophageal atresia.

    PubMed

    Shieh, Hester F; Jennings, Russell W

    2017-04-01

    The management of long-gap esophageal atresia remains challenging with limited consensus on the definition, evaluation, and surgical approach to treatment. Efforts to preserve the native esophagus have been successful with delayed primary anastomosis and tension-based esophageal growth induction processes. Esophageal replacement is necessary in a minority of cases, with the conduit of choice and patient outcomes largely dependent on institutional expertise. Given the complexity of this patient population with significant morbidity, treatment and long-term follow-up are best done in multidisciplinary esophageal and airway treatment centers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Gastric-tube versus whole-stomach esophagectomy for esophageal cancer: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wenxiong; Yu, Dongliang; Peng, Jinhua; Xu, Jianjun; Wei, Yiping

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of studies comparing the gastric-tube vs. whole-stomach for esophageal cancer in order to determine the optimal surgical technique of esophagectomy. Methods A comprehensive literature search was performed using PubMed, EMBASE, ScienceDirect, Ovid MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, Google Scholar, and Scopus. Clinical trials that compared the gastric-tube versus whole-stomach for esophageal cancer were selected. The clinical endpoints included anastomotic leakage, anastomotic stenosis, reflux esophagitis, pneumonia, delayed gastric emptying, and thoracic stomach syndrome. Results A total of 6 articles (1571 patients) were included. Compared to the whole-stomach approach, the gastric-tube approach was associated with a lower incidence of reflux esophagitis (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.16 to 0.81, p = 0.01) and thoracic stomach syndrome (95% CI: 0.17 to 0.55, p < 0.0001). The rates of anastomotic leakage, anastomotic stenosis, pneumonia, and delayed gastric emptying did not significantly differ between the two groups. Conclusions The gastric-tube esophagectomy is superior to the whole-stomach approach, as it is associated with a lower incidence of postoperative reflux esophagitis and thoracic stomach syndrome. Our findings must be validated in large-scale randomized controlled trials. PMID:28267808

  13. Fabrication of human oral mucosal epithelial cell sheets for treatment of esophageal ulceration by endoscopic submucosal dissection.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Ryo; Murakami, Daisuke; Kondo, Makoto; Ohki, Takeshi; Sasaki, Ryo; Mizutani, Manabu; Yamato, Masayuki; Nishida, Kohji; Namiki, Hideo; Yamamoto, Masakazu; Okano, Teruo

    2010-12-01

    Esophageal stenosis is one of the major complications of aggressive endoscopic resection. Tissue-engineered epithelial cell grafts have demonstrated effectiveness in promoting re-epithelialization and suppressing inflammation causing esophageal scarring and stenosis after endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) in an animal model. To confirm the reproducibility and efficacy of a human oral mucosal epithelial cell (hOMEC) sheet cultured on temperature-responsive surface in conformity with Good Manufacturing Practice guidelines. A preclinical study. Good Manufacturing Practice grade cell-processing center, animal laboratory. Canine esophageal ulcer models, which were made by ESD. Oral mucosal specimens were obtained from 7 healthy volunteers. Fabricated and transplanted hOMEC sheets were subjected to histological analysis. The reproducibility of the fabrication of hOMEC sheets was confirmed. In this method, animal-derived materials such as 3T3 feeder layer and fetal bovine serum were successfully excluded from the culture condition. Furthermore, the environment of the culture room and safety cabinet in the cell-processing center was maintained for obtaining sterility assurances during the fabrication. Transplanted hOMEC sheets after ESD were observed to graft onto canine esophageal ulcer surfaces. Small number of subjects, animal model. Cultured hOMEC sheets were fabricated without animal-derived materials and demonstrated efficacy as a medical device that promotes re-epithelialization of an esophageal ulcer after ESD. Copyright © 2010 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Clinical effects of eosinophilic esophagitis observed using endoscopic ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Yamabe, Akane; Irisawa, Atsushi; Shibukawa, Goro; Abe, Yoko; Saito, Akiko; Imbe, Koh; Hoshi, Koki; Igarashi, Ryo

    2014-08-01

    A 50-year-old woman was referred to our hospital for dysphagia and several episodes of esophageal food impaction during the prior three months. Complete blood count and basic biochemical tests were normal. No eosinophilia was found. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) revealed the presence of concentric rings (esophageal "trachealization") and stenosis along the middle and distal esophagus. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) showed circumferential thickening of all layers in the same part. Cytopathologic evaluation of a specimen obtained by endoscopic biopsy of the thickened area in the distal esophagus showed eosinophilic infiltration (20 eosinophils per high-powered field). She was diagnosed as having eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). Topical steroid therapy was started. A tendency of dysphagia for relief and improvement of characteristic EGD findings began early, but wall thickening in EUS remained. Past reports of the related literature have described that thickness of submucosa and muscularis propria remained after therapy, although significant reduction in the mucosal thickness was provided by short-term steroid therapy. One explanation for early relapse is insufficient reduction in the submucosa and muscularis propria. Consequently, our patient was given steroids until thickness on EUS improved. EUS is regarded as useful for evaluating the curative effect in patients with EoE.

  15. Caustic esophageal injury by impaction of cell batteries.

    PubMed

    García Fernández, Francisco José; León Montañés, Rafael; Bozada Garcia, Juan Manuel

    2016-12-01

    The ingestion of cell batteries can cause serious complications (fistula, perforation or stenosis) at the esophageal level. The damage starts soon after ingestion (approximately 2 hours) and is directly related to the amount of time the battery is lodged in said location, the amount of electrical charge remaining in the battery, and the size of the battery itself. Injury is produced by the combination of electrochemical and chemical mechanisms and pressure necrosis. The ingestion of multiple cells and a size > = 20 mm are related with more severe and clinically significant outcomes. A female patient, 39 years old, with a history of previous suicide attempts, was admitted to the Emergency Room with chest pain and dysphagia after voluntary ingestion of 2 cell batteries. Two cell batteries are easily detected in a routine chest X-ray, presenting a characteristic double-ring shadow, or peripheral halo. Urgent oral endoscopy was performed 10 hours after ingestion, showing a greenish-gray lumpy magma-like consistency due to leakage of battery contents. The 2 batteries were sequentially removed with alligator-jaw forceps. After flushing and aspiration of the chemical material, a broad and circumferential injury with denudation of the mucosa and two deep ulcerations with necrosis were observed where the batteries had been. The batteries' seals were eroded, releasing chemical contents. Despite the severity of the injuries, the patient progressed favorably and there was no esophageal perforation. Esophageal impaction of cell batteries should always be considered an endoscopic urgency.

  16. [Subglottic stenosis and gastroesophageal reflux].

    PubMed

    Fligny, I; François, M; Aigrain, Y; Polonovski, J M; Contencin, P; Narcy, P

    1989-01-01

    The authors report the cases of ten children treated for sub-glottic laryngeal stenosis, in the Department of Pr. Narcy in Hospital Robert-Debre. Medical treatment of the laryngeal stenosis had failed in these cases. Treatment, most often surgical, of the gastro-oesophageal reflux present in these ten cases enabled these children to be cured. A review of the literature stresses the role and responsibility of gastro-oesophageal reflux in laryngeal pathology. Based on their experience, the authors suggest: systematic investigation for gastro-oesophageal reflux during management of laryngeal stenosis, especially when laryngeal inflammation is encountered; the adoption of an interventionist attitude vis-a-vis gastro-oesophageal reflux which would seem to have an important pathogenic role in certain laryngeal stenoses.

  17. [Achalasia and esophageal cancer].

    PubMed

    Corti, R E; Monastra, L; Fernández Marty, P; Barco, J C; Ferro, F E; Galindo, F; Musi, A O; Kogan, Z

    1992-01-01

    During the period included between January 1970 and December 1990, we studied 242 patients with manometric and radiological diagnosis of esophageal achalasia. Eight of these patients (3.3%) developed during the evolution of their disease an esophageal carcinoma. Eight cases showed histologic type of epidermoid carcinoma: 3 differentiated, 3 semi-differentiated and 2 anaplastic. Therapy for achalasia was: one patient, Heller myotomy, 4 patients, dilatations with bougies in numerous opportunities, and the other two patients receive no treatment for achalasia. Two patients reported tracheobronchial fistulas as complication of carcinoma. Treatment received for carcinoma included: three patients, radiotherapy (4000 rads); one patient, chemotherapy; one patient, chemotherapy and radiotherapy, one resection surgery and two patients feeding gastrostomy. All of the eight patients died within the year of diagnosis of epidermoid carcinoma.

  18. [Giant esophageal fibrovascular polyp].

    PubMed

    Palacios, Fernando; Contardo, Carlos; Guevara, Jorge; Vera, Augusto; Aguilar, Luis; Huamán, Manuel; Palomino, Américo; Yabar, Alejandro

    2003-01-01

    Fibrovascular polyps are extremely rare benign neoplasias of the esophagus, which usually originate in the lower cricoid area. They do not produce any discomfort in the patient for a long time, however it may make itself evident by the patient's regurgitation of the polyp, producing asphyxia or, more frequently, dysphagia. The case of a 58 year old male patient is presented herein, with a 9 month record of dysphagia, weight loss and intermittent melena. The barium x-ray showed a distended esophagus, with a tumor running from the upper esophageal sphincter to the cardia. The endoscopy confirmed the presence of a pediculated tumor, implanted in the cervical esophagus. Surgeons suspected the potential malignancy of the tumor and performed a transhiatal esophagectomy. The final pathologic diagnosis was giant fibrovascular esophageal polyp.

  19. Eosinophilic esophagitis: current treatment.

    PubMed

    Redd, Matthew; Schey, Ron

    2013-03-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a relatively new entity with a significant amount of increased recognition over the last decade. The mainstay treatments of EoE are designed to eliminate the causative allergens or to reduce their effects on the esophageal mucosa. Common treatments include dietary modification, proton pump inhibitors, systemic and topical corticosteroids, and endoscopic treatments. As the pathogenesis of EoE is explored, new and novel treatments are being studied that target specific pathways and chemokines identified in as precipitating agents of EoE. This is a rapidly evolving field with significant ongoing research and clinical studies. Our review will therefore focus on current and novel treatment approaches to the disease.

  20. Mechanism of eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Anil

    2009-02-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a newly recognized disease and is an emerging entity throughout developing and developed countries, including the United States. Therefore, understanding the causes, natural history, diagnosis, and management is important for future therapeutic interventions. The pathogenesis of EoE is still not clear, but a growing body of evidence has established that this condition represents a T-cell-mediated immune response involving several proinflammatory mediators and chemoattractants known to regulate eosinophilic accumulation in the esophagus, such as IL-4, IL-5, IL-3 and eotaxin-1, -2, and -3. Determining the mechanism or mechanisms through which human esophageal-derived factors ultimately induce the functional abnormalities observed, and to which antigens patients who have EoE are sensitized that lead to the manifestation of symptoms, is of significant interest.

  1. Asymptomatic Stenosis in the Cervical and Thoracic Spines of Patients with Symptomatic Lumbar Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Moon Soo; Moon, Seong-Hwan; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Oh, Jae Keun; Lyu, Ho Dong; Lee, Jae-Hoo; Riew, K. Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective study. Objective Studies on age-related degenerative changes causing concurrent stenoses in the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spines (triple stenosis) are rare in the literature. Our objectives were to determine: (1) the incidence of asymptomatic radiologic cervical and thoracic stenosis in elderly patients with symptomatic lumbar stenosis, (2) the incidence of concurrent radiologic spinal stenosis in the cervical and thoracic spines, and (3) the radiologic features of cervical stenosis that might predict concurrent thoracic stenosis. Methods Whole-spine T2 sagittal magnetic resonance images of patients older than 80 and diagnosed with lumbar spinal stenosis between January 2003 and January 2012 were evaluated retrospectively. We included patients with asymptomatic spondylotic cervical and thoracic stenosis. We measured the anteroposterior diameters of the vertebral body, bony spinal canal, and spinal cord, along with the Pavlov ratio and anterior or posterior epidural stenosis at the level of the disk for each cervical and thoracic level. We compared the radiologic parameters between the subgroups of cervical stenosis with and without thoracic stenosis. Results Among the 460 patients with lumbar stenosis, 110 (23.9%) had concurrent radiologic cervical stenosis and 112 (24.3%) had concurrent radiologic thoracic stenosis. Fifty-six patients (12.1%) had combined radiologic cervical and thoracic stenosis in addition to their symptomatic lumbar stenosis (triple stenosis). Anterior epidural stenosis at C7–T1 was associated with a high prevalence of thoracic stenosis. Conclusions It appears that asymptomatic radiologic cervical and thoracic stenosis is common in elderly patients with symptomatic lumbar stenosis. PMID:26430589

  2. Severe aortic stenosis: forgotten associations.

    PubMed

    Godinho, Ana Rita; Amorim, Sandra; Campelo, Manuel; Martins, Elisabete; Lopez Rodriguez, Elisa; Coelho, Rosa; Macedo, Guilherme; Maciel, Maria Júlia

    2014-09-01

    The authors present the case of a 68-year-old man with predominantly right heart failure in the context of severe aortic stenosis associated with pulmonary hypertension. Anemia was diagnosed which, after endoscopic study, was considered to be secondary to angiodysplasia and a diagnosis of Heyde syndrome was made. After valve replacement surgery the patient's heart failure improved and hemoglobin levels stabilized. We present this case to show the need to recognize less common associations of severe aortic stenosis, in order to provide immediate and appropriate treatment.

  3. Hypnotherapy for Esophageal Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Riehl, Megan E.; Keefer, Laurie

    2015-01-01

    Hypnotherapy is an evidence based intervention for the treatment of functional bowel disorders, particularly irritable bowel syndrome. While similar in pathophysiology, less is known about the utility of hypnotherapy in the upper gastrointestinal tract. Esophageal disorders, most of which are functional in nature, cause painful and uncomfortable symptoms that impact patient quality of life and are difficult to treat from a medical perspective. After a thorough medical workup and a failed trial of proton pump inhibitor therapy, options for treatment are significantly limited. While the pathophysiology is likely multifactorial, two critical factors are believed to drive esophageal symptoms—visceral hypersensitivity and symptom hypervigilance. The goal of esophageal directed hypnotherapy is to promote a deep state of relaxation with focused attention allowing the patient to learn to modulate physiological sensations and symptoms that are not easily addressed with conventional medical intervention. Currently, the use of hypnosis is suitable for dysphagia, globus, functional chest pain/non-cardiac chest pain, dyspepsia, and functional heartburn. In this article the authors will provide a rationale for the use of hypnosis in these disorders, presenting the science whenever available, describing their approach with these patients, and sharing a case study representing a successful outcome. PMID:26046715

  4. Dermatomyositis and esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Iftikhar, Imran; Abdelmannan, Dima; Daw, Hamed A

    2006-07-01

    A case of dermatomyositis and esophageal cancer is described. A 58-year-old male recently diagnosed with esophageal cancer was admitted to the hospital with complaints of progressive dysphagia, generalized muscle weakness and skin rash. The weakness started symmetrically in the proximal limb muscles. He also developed a characteristic skin rash on the eyelids, the upper chest and around the nails that was thought to be most indicative of dermatomyositis. Creatine kinase, aspartate aminotransferase and aldolase were elevated. A muscle biopsy showed various degrees of degeneration with perivascular interstitial infiltration of lymphoplasma cells, a finding consistent with "dermatomyositis." The patient was started on corticosteroids and within two weeks, his muscle strength was found to be markedly improved and the rash almost disappeared. Dysphagia can be the presenting symptom of both dermatomyositis and esophageal cancer. In the setting of an underlying malignancy, these symptoms can be misleading and one can miss the diagnosis of dermatomyositis. However, recognition of the characteristic skin rash may provide a clue to the diagnosis. Another aspect of our case that is worth acknowledgment is the quick response to treatment with corticosteroids.

  5. Hypnotherapy for Esophageal Disorders.

    PubMed

    Riehl, Megan E; Keefer, Laurie

    2015-07-01

    Hypnotherapy is an evidence based intervention for the treatment of functional bowel disorders, particularly irritable bowel syndrome. While similar in pathophysiology, less is known about the utility of hypnotherapy in the upper gastrointestinal tract. Esophageal disorders, most of which are functional in nature, cause painful and uncomfortable symptoms that impact patient quality of life and are difficult to treat from a medical perspective. After a thorough medical workup and a failed trial of proton pump inhibitor therapy, options for treatment are significantly limited. While the pathophysiology is likely multifactorial, two critical factors are believed to drive esophageal symptoms--visceral hypersensitivity and symptom hypervigilance. The goal of esophageal directed hypnotherapy is to promote a deep state of relaxation with focused attention allowing the patient to learn to modulate physiological sensations and symptoms that are not easily addressed with conventional medical intervention. Currently, the use of hypnosis is suitable for dysphagia, globus, functional chest pain/non-cardiac chest pain, dyspepsia, and functional heartburn. In this article the authors will provide a rationale for the use of hypnosis in these disorders, presenting the science whenever available, describing their approach with these patients, and sharing a case study representing a successful outcome.

  6. The Role of Esophageal Hypersensitivity in Functional Esophageal Disorders.

    PubMed

    Farmer, Adam D; Ruffle, James K; Aziz, Qasim

    2017-02-01

    The Rome IV diagnostic criteria delineates 5 functional esophageal disorders which include functional chest pain, functional heartburn, reflux hypersensitivity, globus, and functional dysphagia. These are a heterogenous group of disorders which, despite having characteristic symptom profiles attributable to esophageal pathology, fail to demonstrate any structural, motility or inflammatory abnormalities on standard clinical testing. These disorders are associated with a marked reduction in patient quality of life, not least considerable healthcare resources. Furthermore, the pathophysiology of these disorders is incompletely understood. In this narrative review we provide the reader with an introductory primer to the structure and function of esophageal perception, including nociception that forms the basis of the putative mechanisms that may give rise to symptoms in functional esophageal disorders. We also discuss the provocative techniques and outcome measures by which esophageal hypersensitivity can be established.

  7. Esophageal motility disorders after gastric banding.

    PubMed

    O'Rourke, R W; Deveney, C W; McConnell, D B; Wolfe, B M; Jobe, B A

    2007-01-01

    The long-term effects of gastric banding on esophageal function are not well described. This report describes a 28-year-old woman who developed signs and symptoms of abnormal esophageal motility and lower esophageal sphincter hypotension after gastric banding for morbid obesity. The current literature addressing the effects of gastric banding on esophageal function in light of this case report is discussed.

  8. Thoracoscopic treatment of esophageal atresia with distal fistula and of tracheomalacia.

    PubMed

    van der Zee, David C; Bax, Klaas N M A

    2007-11-01

    Single center experience with thoracoscopic repair of esophageal atresia with distal fistula and of tracheomalacia. Between May 2000 and December 2006, 51 neonates with an esophageal atresia were presented for thoracoscopic repair. Gestational age varied from 31 3/7 to 42 2/7 weeks (M = 37 2/7). Birth weight was between 1025 g and 4030 g (mean 2620 g). Concomitant anomalies or VACTERL association were encoutered in 31 patients (61%). Duration of the operation was from 90 minutes to 390 minutes (mean 178 minutes). All but 1 patient had an esophageal atresia with a distal fistula. Six patients had tracheomalacia requiring aortopexia, which was performed thoracoscopically. In 2 patients the thoracoscopic procedure had to be converted to a thoracotomy. All other patients underwent a successful thoracoscopic repair. One patient died in the postoperative period because of sepsis. A total of 22 patients (45%) developed a stenosis in the postoperative follow up (1 month-7y 7 month) requiring 1 to 18 dilatations (mean 1.5). Postoperative leakage occurred in 9 patients (18%). Recurrent fistula was encountered in 2 patients. A total of 11 patients (22%) underwent a laparoscopic antireflux procedure for either recurring stenosis (8) or ALTES (3). Six children (12%) underwent thoracoscopic aortopexy for tracheomalacia. In 2 children symptoms recurred for which a successful repeat thoracoscopic aortopexy was undertaken. The thoracoscopic approach to the treatment of esophageal atresia and tracheomalacia is becoming increasingly accepted. The cosmesis is undoubtedly better. The secundary effects like thoracic cage deformities, winged scapula, or scoliosis have not yet been described and are expected to be reduced in comparison to the open technique. Sequelae like leakage, stenosis, recurrent fistulae, and GERD and ALTES will probably remain the same. Whether thoracoscopic dissection has less detrimental effect on disturbed motility remains to be proven. Thoracoscopic aortopexy

  9. Esophageal replacement by hydroxylated bacterial cellulose patch in a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Changlai; Liu, Fang; Qian, Wenbo; Wang, Yingjie; You, Qingsheng; Zhang, Tianyi; Li, Feng

    2015-01-01

    To repair esophageal defects by hydroxylated and kombucha-synthesized bacterial cellulose (HKBC) patch in a rabbit model. Semicircular esophageal defects 1 cm in length of the cervical esophagus were initially created in 18 Japanese big-ear rabbits and then repaired with HKBC patch grafts. The clinical outcomes including survival rate, weight change, food intake, and hematological and radiologic evaluation were observed. After X-ray evaluation, the rabbits were sacrificed sequentially at 1, 3, and 6 months for histopathologic analysis with light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Survival rate during the first month was 88.9% (n = 16). Two rabbits died from anastomotic leakage during the entire follow-up. Postoperatively, feeding function and body weight were gradually restored in the surviving animals. No hematological abnormalities were found, and no obvious anastomotic leakage, stenosis, or obstruction was observed under X-ray examination. The histopathologic results showed a progressive regeneration of the esophagus in the graft area, where the neo-esophagus tissue had characteristics similar to native esophageal tissue after 3 months of surgery. HKBC is beneficial for esophageal tissue regeneration and may be a promising material for esophageal reconstruction.

  10. [The efficacy of SEMS for malignant upper gastrointestinal stenosis, evaluated by a "home index"].

    PubMed

    Yonechi, M; Sato, K; Saito, Y; Yamagiwa, T; Kikuchi, T; Kamiya, T; Saito, M; Nagase, K; Kashimura, J; Ikeya, S; Endo, T; Nakayama, H; Sugai, Y

    1999-12-01

    We used a self expandable metalic stent (SEMS) on 24 patients (average age 68.6 years, 20 males, 4 females) with malignant upper gastrointestinal stenosis from August, 1997 to March, 1999. The primary diseases of the 24 patients were gastric cancer (13 cases: 54%), esophageal cancer (10 cases: 42%) and paraesophageal lymph node metastasis of breast cancer (one case: 4%). In this study, we present a "Home Index" as an indicator to evaluate a patient's quality of life, and investigated the efficacy and problem of SEMS.

  11. Multiple huge epiphrenic esophageal diverticula with motility disease treated with video-assisted thoracoscopic and hand-assisted laparoscopic esophagectomy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Yoshiki; Takahashi, Tsuyoshi; Nakajima, Kiyokazu; Higashi, Shigeyoshi; Tanaka, Koji; Miyazaki, Yasuhiro; Makino, Tomoki; Kurokawa, Yukinori; Yamasaki, Makoto; Takiguchi, Shuji; Mori, Masaki; Doki, Yuichiro

    2017-12-01

    Epiphrenic esophageal diverticulum is a rare condition that is often associated with a concomitant esophageal motor disorder. Some patients have the chief complaints of swallowing difficulty and gastroesophageal reflux; traditionally, such diverticula have been resected via right thoracotomy. Here, we describe a case with huge multiple epiphrenic diverticula with motility disorder, which were successfully resected using a video-assisted thoracic and laparoscopic procedure. A 63-year-old man was admitted due to dysphagia, heartburn, and vomiting. An esophagogram demonstrated an S-shaped lower esophagus with multiple epiphrenic diverticula (75 × 55 mm and 30 × 30 mm) and obstruction by the lower esophageal sphincter (LES). Esophageal manometry showed normal peristaltic contractions in the esophageal body, whereas the LES pressure was high (98.6 mmHg). The pressure vector volume of LES was 23,972 mmHg(2) cm. Based on these findings, we diagnosed huge multiple epiphrenic diverticula with a hypertensive lower esophageal sphincter and judged that resection might be required. We performed lower esophagectomy with gastric conduit reconstruction using a video-assisted thoracic and hand-assisted laparoscopic procedure. The postoperative course was uneventful, and the esophagogram demonstrated good passage, with no leakage, stenosis, or diverticula. The most common causes of mid-esophageal and epiphrenic diverticula are motility disorders of the esophageal body; appropriate treatment should be considered based on the morphological and motility findings.

  12. Esophageal scintigraphy: applications and limitations in the study of esophageal disorders.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, M K; Byrne, P J; Keeling, P; Hennessy, T P

    1988-01-01

    This study examines the scintigraphic transit pattern in a variety of esophageal disorders. Scintigraphy was performed with a semi solid bolus and the patient in an upright position. Condensed esophageal images were obtained from which we derived the esophageal transit time. The pattern of bolus transit was graded by the duration of transit and by the presence of hold up or retrograde motion. Scintigrams were performed in 11 volunteers and 88 patients whose esophageal function had been confirmed by conventional gastroesophageal techniques. Esophageal disorders examined included achalasia (20), scleroderma (9), esophageal carcinoma (8), Barrett esophagus (5), and reflux esophagitis (27). We also examined the effects of gastroesophageal surgery on esophageal function. Transit times distinguished grossly abnormal esophageal function from normal but did not distinguish between different esophageal disorders. Graded transit patterns were a more sensitive indicator of esophageal function and permitted some differentiation between esophageal disorders and allowed evaluation of the effects of gastroesophageal surgery.

  13. [Primary esophageal motility disorders; especially about esophageal achalasia].

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Tatsuya; Sohda, Makoto; Sakai, Makoto; Tanaka, Naritaka; Suzuki, Shigemasa; Yokobori, Takehiko; Inose, Takanori; Nakajima, Masanobu; Fukuchi, Minoru; Kato, Hiroyuki; Kusano, Motoyasu; Kuwano, Hiroyuki

    2011-07-01

    Esophageal motility disorders are classified primary and secondary, and primary esophageal motility disorders are classified esophageal achalasia and other diseases by manometry. An esophageal emptying disorder associated with insufficient relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) and elimination of peristaltic waves on the esophageal body is the major abnormality of achalasia. Esophagogram, endoscopy, and manometry are used for diagnosis. As pharmacological therapy, administration of a calcium channel blocker or nitrate is useful. The pharmacological therapy is not recommended as long-term basic therapy but as a temporary treatment. At 1st, the balloon dilation method is chosen in treatment of achalasia Surgical treatment is indicated in the following cases: (1) Patients uneffected by balloon dilation, (2) Flask type with grade II to III dilation, and sigmoid type, (3) the gradual progression to the pathophysiological stage, (4) young patients, (5) complicated with esophageal cancer. Laparoscopic Heller-Dor procedure is the most popular surgical procedure, recently. It is somewhat difficult to perform surgical treatment for this functional disease. We should select the most suitable individualized treatment with efficient comprehension of the pathophysiological situation.

  14. Gastro-esophageal reflux time parameters and esophagitis in children

    SciTech Connect

    Baulieu, F.; Baulieu, J.; Maurage, C.; Casset, D.; Itti, R.

    1985-05-01

    The aim of this work was to study the correlation between the reflux timing and the presence of esophagitis, an inconstant but serious complication of gastro-esophageal reflux (GER). The hypothesis was that reflux occurring late after meal can be incriminated more than early reflux in esophagitis genesis. 32 children with GER (mean age = 10.5 months, 2 to 30 months) had esophagoscopy and scintigraphy in the same week. The children were classified in two groups according to esophagoscopy: group 1 (n = 18) no esophagitis, group 2 (n = 14) esophaqgitis. The scintigraphy involved the ingestion of 0.5 mCi Tc-99m sulfur colloid milk mixture, followed by esophageal and gastric activity recording (one image per minute for 1 hour). The reflux was assessed from contrast enhanced images and esophageal time activity curves. Reflux intensity was quantitated by reflux index (Re). Mean reflux time was calculated as the mean esophageal activity peaks time (t-bar). Finally a composite parameter was calculated as the mean reflux time weighted by the relative intensity of each reflux peak (t-barw). Re was not found to be different between the two groups. t-bar was significantly higher in group 2: t-bar = 29.6 +- 3.0 mn (mean +- SD) than in group 1: t-bar = 24.5 +- 6.8 mn; rho <0.02. The difference between the two groups was enhanced by intensity weighting: group 1: t-barw = 16.6 +- 6.3 mn, group 2: t-barw = 33.5 +- 7.1 mn rho <0.001. t-barw value was not correlated to esophagitis grade. These results suggest that late reflux is more likely responsible of esophagitis.

  15. Seasonal variation in detection of esophageal eosinophilia and eosinophilic esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Elizabeth T.; Shah, Neil D.; Hoffman, Kate; Sonnenberg, Amnon; Genta, Robert M.; Dellon, Evan S.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Seasonal variation has been reported in diagnosis of eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), but results are not consistent across studies and there are no national-level data in the United States. Aim To determine if there is seasonal variation in diagnosis of esophageal eosinophilia and EoE in the U.S., while accounting for factors such as climate zone and geographic variation. Methods This was a cross-sectional study using a U.S. national pathology database. Patients with esophageal eosinophilia (≥15 eosinophils per high-power field) comprised the primary case definition and were compared to those with normal esophageal biopsies. We calculated the crude and adjusted odds of esophageal eosinophilia by season, as well as by day of the year. Sensitivity analyses were performed using more restrictive case definitions of EoE, and after stratification by climate zone. Results 14,524 cases with esophageal eosinophilia and 90,459 normal controls were analyzed. The adjusted odds of esophageal eosinophilia were higher in the late spring and summer months, with the highest odds in July (aOR 1.13; 95%CI: 1.03–1.24). These findings persisted with increasing levels of esophageal eosinophilia, as well as across EoE case definitions. Seasonal variation was strongest in temperate and cold climates, and peak diagnosis varied by climate zone. Conclusions There is a mild but consistent seasonal variation in the diagnosis of esophageal eosinophilia and EoE, with cases more frequently diagnosed during summer months. These findings take into account climate and geographic differences, suggesting that aeroallergens may contribute to disease development or flare. PMID:26059636

  16. Esophageal hypermotility: cause or effect?

    PubMed

    Crespin, O M; Tatum, R P; Yates, R B; Sahin, M; Coskun, K; Martin, A V; Wright, A; Oelschlager, B K; Pellegrini, C A

    2016-07-01

    Nutcracker esophagus (NE), Jackhammer esophagus (JHE), distal esophageal spasm (DES), and hypertensive lower esophageal sphincter (HTLES) are defined by esophageal manometric findings. Some patients with these esophageal motility disorders also have abnormal gastroesophageal reflux. It is unclear to what extent these patients' symptoms are caused by the motility disorder, the acid reflux, or both. The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication (LNF) on esophageal motility disorders, gastroesophageal reflux, and patient symptoms. Between 2007 and 2013, we performed high-resolution esophageal manometry on 3400 patients, and 221 patients were found to have a spastic esophageal motility disorder. The medical records of these patients were reviewed to determine the manometric abnormality, presence of gastroesophageal symptoms, and amount of esophageal acid exposure. In those patients that underwent LNF, we compared pre- and postoperative esophageal motility, gastroesophageal symptom severity, and esophageal acid exposure. Of the 221 patients with spastic motility disorders, 77 had NE, 2 had JHE, 30 had DES, and 112 had HTLES. The most frequently reported primary and secondary symptoms among all patients were: heartburn and/or regurgitation, 69.2%; respiratory, 39.8%; dysphagia, 35.7%; and chest pain, 22.6%. Of the 221 patients, 192 underwent 24-hour pH monitoring, and 103 demonstrated abnormal distal esophageal acid exposure. Abnormal 24-hour pH monitoring was detected in 62% of patients with heartburn and regurgitation, 49% of patients with respiratory symptoms, 36.8 % of patients with dysphagia, and 32.6% of patients with chest pain. Sixty-six of the 103 patients with abnormal 24-hour pH monitoring underwent LNF. Thirty-eight (13NE, 2JHE, 6 DES, and 17 HTLES) of these 66 patients had a minimum of 6-month postoperative follow-up that included clinical evaluation, esophageal manometry, and 24-hour pH monitoring

  17. Esophageal impacted dentures.

    PubMed Central

    Nwaorgu, Onyekwere G.; Onakoya, Paul A.; Sogebi, Olusola A.; Kokong, Daniel D.; Dosumu, Oluwole O.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study aims to highlight the problems associated with impacted acrylic dentures and proffers advice to check them. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Retrospective review of all cases of impacted acrylic dentures over a 16-year period. RESULTS: Twenty-two adults had impacted esophageal acrylic dentures of which 16 (72.7%) and six (27.3%) were males and females, respectively (M:F ratio = 2.7:1) with age range 23-77 years. Fourteen patients (63.6%) had worn their dentures for more than 10 years without check-up, and 54.5% presented within 48 hours of impaction. The common symptoms in all the patients were difficulty with swallowing, throat pain and discomfort, followed by tenderness in the neck in 15 (68.2%). Dentures were extracted through esophagoscopy (17 cases) and cervical (three cases) esophagotomy, respectively. Observed complications included pulmonary edema in one and esophageal perforation in five patients. CONCLUSION: Endoscopic extraction of dentures carries a high risk of perforation. Extraction of an impacted denture via esophagoscopy can be undertaken under direct vision and in an ideal situation with judicious use of the Shears forceps. In the absence of these, the safest option is an esophagotomy. Proper treatment planning in the fabrication of dentures with incorporation of radiopaque materials in the dental resins and adequate postdenture delivery instructions are necessary as preventive measures. PMID:15540888

  18. Treatment of advanced esophageal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kelsen, D.

    1982-12-01

    When radiation therapy is used for palliation of obstruction in patients with advanced esophageal carcinoma, an improvement in dysphagia can be expected in approximately 50% of patients. Major objective responses have rarely been quantitied but, in one study, were seen in 33% patients. Recurrence of dysphagia is usually seen within 2-6 months of treatment. Radiation toxicities and complications, even when used with palliative intent, can be substantial and include esophagitis, tracheoesophageal or esophageal-aortic fistula, mediastinitis, hemorrhage, pneumonitis, and myelosuppression. (JMT)

  19. Esophageal Lipoma: A Rare Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Jeremy; Tejerina, Manfred; Hallowell, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Esophageal lipomas are rare tumors, making up 0.4% of all digestive tract benign neoplasms. Most of these lesions are clinically silent as a result of their small size, however, the majority of lesions over 4 cm have been reported to cause dysphagia, regurgitation and/or epigastralgia. We report a case of a 53 year-old African American female who presented with dysphagia. Computed tomography of the chest and esophagram confirmed esophageal lipoma as the cause of the patient’s symptoms. Accurately diagnosing an esophageal lipoma is crucial in order to rule out potential malignant lesions, relieve patient symptoms and plan the appropriate treatment. PMID:23365708

  20. Fundoplication improves disordered esophageal motility.

    PubMed

    Heider, T Ryan; Behrns, Kevin E; Koruda, Mark J; Shaheen, Nicholas J; Lucktong, Tananchai A; Bradshaw, Barbara; Farrell, Timothy M

    2003-02-01

    Patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and disordered esophageal motility are at risk for postoperative dysphagia, and are often treated with partial (270-degree) fundoplication as a strategy to minimize postoperative swallowing difficulties. Complete (360-degree) fundoplication, however, may provide more effective and durable reflux protection over time. Recently we reported that postfundoplication dysphagia is uncommon, regardless of preoperative manometric status and type of fundoplication. To determine whether esophageal function improves after fundoplication, we measured postoperative motility in patients in whom disordered esophageal motility had been documented before fundoplication. Forty-eight of 262 patients who underwent laparoscopic fundoplication between 1995 and 2000 satisfied preoperative manometric criteria for disordered esophageal motility (distal esophageal peristaltic amplitude < or =30 mm Hg and/or peristaltic frequency < or =80%). Of these, 19 had preoperative manometric assessment at our facility and consented to repeat study. Fifteen (79%) of these patients had a complete fundoplication and four (21%) had a partial fundoplication. Each patient underwent repeat four-channel esophageal manometry 29.5 +/- 18.4 months (mean +/- SD) after fundoplication. Distal esophageal peristaltic amplitude and peristaltic frequency were compared to preoperative data by paired t test. After fundoplication, mean peristaltic amplitude in the distal esophagus increased by 47% (56.8 +/- 30.9 mm Hg to 83.5 +/- 36.5 mm Hg; P < 0.001) and peristaltic frequency improved by 33% (66.4 +/- 28.7% to 87.6 +/- 16.3%; P < 0.01). Normal esophageal motor function was present in 14 patients (74%) after fundoplication, whereas in five patients the esophageal motor function remained abnormal (2 improved, 1 worsened, and 2 remained unchanged). Three patients with preoperative peristaltic frequencies of 0%, 10%, and 20% improved to 84%, 88%, and 50%, respectively

  1. Nuclear medicine and esophageal surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Taillefer, R.; Beauchamp, G.; Duranceau, A.C.; Lafontaine, E.

    1986-06-01

    The principal radionuclide procedures involved in the evaluation of esophageal disorders that are amenable to surgery are illustrated and briefly described. The role of the radionuclide esophagogram (RE) in the diagnosis and management of achalasia, oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy and its complications, tracheoesophageal fistulae, pharyngeal and esophageal diverticulae, gastric transposition, and fundoplication is discussed. Detection of columnar-lined esophagus by Tc-99m pertechnetate imaging and of esophageal carcinoma by Ga-67 citrate and Tc-99m glucoheptonate studies also is presented. 37 references.

  2. Acid corrosive esophagitis: radiographic findings.

    PubMed

    Muhletaler, C A; Gerlock, A J; de Soto, L; Halter, S A

    1980-06-01

    Thirty-nine esophagograms of 24 patients after ingestion of muriatic acid (27% HCI) in suicide attempts were reviewed. All esophagograms were obtained in the acute, subacute, and chronic phases. In the acute and subacute phases, the radiographic findings consisted of mucosal edema, submucosal edema or hemorrhage, ulcerations, sloughing of the mucosa, atony, and dilatation. Strictures of the esophagus were present in the chronic phase. These radiographic findings were not different from those found in alkaline corrosive esophagitis. The severity of the corrosive esophagitis is considered related to the concentration, amount, viscosity, and duration of contact between the caustic agent and the esophageal mucosa.

  3. Evaluation of plaques and stenosis.

    PubMed

    Arnoldi, Elisabeth; Henzler, Thomas; Bastarrika, Gorka; Thilo, Christian; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Schoepf, U Joseph

    2010-07-01

    Cardiac CT scan has emerged from a research tool to a widely used clinical modality in the diagnostic management of coronary artery disease. Based on evidence of numerous clinical studies coronary CT angiography (cCTA) has emerged as a fast, accurate, and noninvasive alternative to conventional angiography in selected patient populations. A major strength of cCTA is its ability to combine information on the coronary artery anatomy, the vessel lumen, and atherosclerotic lesions. Recent investigations on the application of cCTA in myocardial perfusion imaging suggest that cCTA may allow analysis of the hemodynamic relevance of detected stenosis. Data is accumulating that supports its relevance for patient management and outcome. This article examines the role of cCTA for the evaluation of plaques and stenosis.

  4. Association Between Gout and Aortic Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kevin; Yokose, Chio; Tenner, Craig; Oh, Cheongeun; Donnino, Robert; Choy-Shan, Alana; Pike, Virginia C; Shah, Binita D; Lorin, Jeffrey D; Krasnokutsky, Svetlana; Sedlis, Steven P; Pillinger, Michael H

    2017-02-01

    An independent association between gout and coronary artery disease is well established. The relationship between gout and valvular heart disease, however, is unclear. The aim of this study was to assess the association between gout and aortic stenosis. We performed a retrospective case-control study. Aortic stenosis cases were identified through a review of outpatient transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) reports. Age-matched controls were randomly selected from patients who had undergone TTE and did not have aortic stenosis. Charts were reviewed to identify diagnoses of gout and the earliest dates of gout and aortic stenosis diagnosis. Among 1085 patients who underwent TTE, 112 aortic stenosis cases were identified. Cases and nonaortic stenosis controls (n = 224) were similar in age and cardiovascular comorbidities. A history of gout was present in 21.4% (n = 24) of aortic stenosis subjects compared with 12.5% (n = 28) of controls (unadjusted odds ratio 1.90, 95% confidence interval 1.05-3.48, P = .038). Multivariate analysis retained significance only for gout (adjusted odds ratio 2.08, 95% confidence interval 1.00-4.32, P = .049). Among subjects with aortic stenosis and gout, gout diagnosis preceded aortic stenosis diagnosis by 5.8 ± 1.6 years. The age at onset of aortic stenosis was similar among patients with and without gout (78.7 ± 1.8 vs 75.8 ± 1.0 years old, P = .16). Aortic stenosis patients had a markedly higher prevalence of precedent gout than age-matched controls. Whether gout is a marker of, or a risk factor for, the development of aortic stenosis remains uncertain. Studies investigating the potential role of gout in the pathophysiology of aortic stenosis are warranted and could have therapeutic implications. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Expandable polyester silicon-covered stent for malignant esophageal strictures before neoadjuvant chemoradiation: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Ali A; Loren, David; Dudnick, Robert; Kowalski, Thomas

    2007-03-01

    Patients with resectable esophageal cancer often require placement of a surgical jejunostomy tube prior to receiving chemoradiation so as to maintain adequate nutrition due to their inability to swallow and eat. This study reports a single institutional experience with the Polyflex self-expanding silicone stent (Riisch; Kernen. Germany) in patients with malignant stenosis receiving chemoradiation prior to esophagectomy. This was a retrospective, nonrandomized study of 6 patients who underwent Polyflex esophageal stent placement across a malignant stricture prior to receiving neoadjuvant chemoradiation. The study assessed procedural success, restoration of oral nutrition, migration, and removal of the Polyflex stent. The outcomes measured were the efficacy of treatment, stent-related complications, and changes in the nutritional status of the patient after stent placement. Stent placement was successful in 5 of 6 patients (83%). Restoration of oral nutrition after stent placement occurred in 5 of 5 patients (100%). Migration of the stent into the stomach occurred in 3 patients (60%) without occurrence of gastric outlet obstruction; there was no proximal migration. Stents were successfully removed endoscopically or at the time of esophagectomy. This early experience suggests that the removable silicone Polyflex stent is an effective alternative to a surgical jejunostomy tube for the management of malignant esophageal stenosis in patients for whom neoadjuvant chemoradiation is planned prior to esophagectomy.

  6. Management of lumbar spinal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Lurie, Jon; Tomkins-Lane, Christy

    2016-01-04

    Lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) affects more than 200,000 adults in the United States, resulting in substantial pain and disability. It is the most common reason for spinal surgery in patients over 65 years. Lumbar spinal stenosis is a clinical syndrome of pain in the buttocks or lower extremities, with or without back pain. It is associated with reduced space available for the neural and vascular elements of the lumbar spine. The condition is often exacerbated by standing, walking, or lumbar extension and relieved by forward flexion, sitting, or recumbency. Clinical care and research into lumbar spinal stenosis is complicated by the heterogeneity of the condition, the lack of standard criteria for diagnosis and inclusion in studies, and high rates of anatomic stenosis on imaging studies in older people who are completely asymptomatic. The options for non-surgical management include drugs, physiotherapy, spinal injections, lifestyle modification, and multidisciplinary rehabilitation. However, few high quality randomized trials have looked at conservative management. A systematic review concluded that there is insufficient evidence to recommend any specific type of non-surgical treatment. Several different surgical procedures are used to treat patients who do not improve with non-operative therapies. Given that rapid deterioration is rare and that symptoms often wax and wane or gradually improve, surgery is almost always elective and considered only if sufficiently bothersome symptoms persist despite trials of less invasive interventions. Outcomes (leg pain and disability) seem to be better for surgery than for non-operative treatment, but the evidence is heterogeneous and often of limited quality. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd 2015.

  7. Esophageal squamous papillomas with focal dermal hypoplasia and eosinophilic esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Pasman, Eric A; Heifert, Theresa A; Nylund, Cade M

    2017-01-01

    Focal dermal hypoplasia (FDH) is a rare disorder of the mesodermal and ectodermal tissues. Here we present an eight-year-old female known to have FDH who presents with poor weight gain and dysphagia. She was diagnosed with multiple esophageal papillomas and eosinophilic esophagitis. She was successfully treated with argon plasma coagulation and ingested fluticasone propionate, which has not been described previously in a child. PMID:28405153

  8. Measuring Cell Free DNA During the Course of Treatment for Esophageal Cancer as a Marker of Response and Recurrence

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-07-03

    Esophageal Neoplasm; Esophageal Neoplasms Malignancy Unspecified; Esophageal Neoplasms Malignant; Cancer of Esophagus; Cancer of the Esophagus; Esophageal Cancer; Esophagus Cancer; Neoplasm, Esophageal

  9. Esophageal pH monitoring

    MedlinePlus

    ... test can also be done during upper GI endoscopy by clipping a pH monitor to the lining of the esophagus. ... esophagitis : Barium swallow Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (also called upper GI endoscopy)

  10. Environmental Causes of Esophageal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kamangar, Farin; Chow, Wong-Ho; Abnet, Christian; Dawsey, Sanford

    2009-01-01

    Synopsis This articles reviews the environmental risk factors and predisposing conditions for the two main histological types of esophageal cancer, esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) and esophageal adenocarcinoma (EA). Tobacco smoking, excessive alcohol consumption, drinking maté, low intake of fresh fruits and vegetables, achalasia, and low socioeconomic status increase the risk of ESCC. Results of investigations on several other potential risk factors, including opium consumption, intake of hot drinks, eating pickled vegetables, poor oral health, and exposure to human papillomavirus, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, N-nitroso compounds, acetaldehyde, and fumonisins are also discussed. Gastroesophageal reflux, obesity, tobacco smoking, hiatal hernia, achalasia, and probably absence of H. pylori in the stomach increase the risk of EA. Results of studies investigating other factors, including low intake of fresh fruits and vegetables, consumption of carbonated soft drink, use of H2 blockers, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and drugs that relax the lower esophageal sphincter are also discussed. PMID:19327566

  11. Drugs Approved for Esophageal Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for esophageal cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  12. Misconceptions and Facts About Aortic Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Argulian, Edgar; Windecker, Stephan; Messerli, Franz H

    2017-04-01

    Aortic stenosis is the most common valvular heart disease leading to intervention, and it is typically a disease of the elderly. Recent clinical advances have expanded the role of transcatheter aortic valve intervention in patients with severe aortic stenosis, making aortic valve intervention feasible and effective even in patients at intermediate, high, and prohibitive surgical risk. With the rapid advances in treatment, proper diagnosis becomes crucial for a wide range of patients with aortic stenosis: from "concordant" high-gradient aortic stenosis to "discordant" low-gradient aortic stenosis. The latter group commonly presents a clinical challenge requiring thoughtful and comprehensive evaluation to determine eligibility for aortic valve intervention. Providers at all levels should be familiar with basic diagnostic caveats and misconceptions when evaluating patients with possible aortic stenosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Stroke risk and critical carotid stenosis.

    PubMed Central

    Norris, J W; Zhu, C Z

    1990-01-01

    The risk of stroke from carotid stenosis is proportionate to the degree of stenosis, but whether this is a direct and linear relationship is unknown. Using the degree of carotid stenosis in 500 patients with asymptomatic carotid bruits as a continuous variable, we plotted the frequency distribution and related this to the risk of ischaemic cerebral events and the progression of the arterial lesion. There was a bi-modal distribution, with the junction of the two populations at 85% stenosis. The frequency of ischaemic cerebral events was maximal at 75-90% stenosis. Our data suggest that there is a critical degree of carotid stenosis at which stroke risk becomes maximal. This may represent a window of therapeutic opportunity. PMID:2182782

  14. Radiation-induced esophagitis in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Sarah; Fairchild, Alysa

    2016-01-01

    Radiation-induced esophagitis is the most common local acute toxicity of radiotherapy (RT) delivered for the curative or palliative intent treatment of lung cancer. Although concurrent chemotherapy and higher RT dose are associated with increased esophagitis risk, advancements in RT techniques as well as adherence to esophageal dosimetric constraints may reduce the incidence and severity. Mild acute esophagitis symptoms are generally self-limited, and supportive management options include analgesics, acid suppression, diet modification, treatment for candidiasis, and maintenance of adequate nutrition. Esophageal stricture is the most common late sequela from esophageal irradiation and can be addressed with endoscopic dilatation. Approaches to prevent or mitigate these toxicities are also discussed. PMID:28210168

  15. CT evaluation of thickened esophageal walls

    SciTech Connect

    Reinig, J.W.; Stanley, J.H.; Schabel, S.I.

    1983-05-01

    A study of 200 consecutive chest computed tomographic (CT) examinations revealed thickened esophageal walls (over 3 mm) in 35%. While this is the earliest finding of carcinoma of the esophagus on CT, only half of the cases of thickened walls were due to esophageal carcinoma. Other mediastinal malignancies as well as benign inflammatory, vascular, and fibrotic conditions such as reflux and monilial esophagitis, esophageal varices, and postirradiation scarring were found to cause thickened esophageal walls. Distension with air and intravenous enhancement aid in the optimal evaluation of the esophagus by CT. The thickened esophageal wall is always abnormal, but it is nonspecific, seen in both malignant and nonmalignant conditions.

  16. Uses of esophageal function testing: dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Yazaki, Etsuro; Woodland, Philip; Sifrim, Daniel

    2014-10-01

    Esophageal function testing should be used for differential diagnosis of dysphagia. Dysphagia can be the consequence of hypermotility or hypomotility of the muscles of the esophagus. Decreased esophageal or esophagogastric junction distensibility can provoke dysphagia. The most well established esophageal dysmotility is achalasia. Other motility disorders can also cause dysphagia. High-resolution manometry (HRM) is the gold standard investigation for esophageal motility disorders. Simultaneous measurement of HRM and intraluminal impedance can be useful to assess motility and bolus transit. Impedance planimetry measures distensibility of the esophageal body and gastroesophageal junction in patients with achalasia and eosinophilic esophagitis.

  17. Eosinophilic esophagitis: strictures, impactions, dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Khan, Seema; Orenstein, Susan R; Di Lorenzo, Carlo; Kocoshis, Samuel A; Putnam, Philip E; Sigurdsson, Luther; Shalaby, Theresa M

    2003-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis, long known to be a feature of acid reflux, has recently been described in patients with food allergies and macroscopically furrowed esophagus. The pathophysiology and optimal management of patients with eosinophilic esophagitis is unclear. We describe our clinical experience related to eosinophilic esophagitis and obstructive symptoms in children and propose etiopathogenesis and management guidelines. Twelve children with obstructive esophageal symptoms (11 male), median age 5 years, and identified to have eosinophilic esophagitis with > 5 eosinophils per high-power field (eos/hpf) are reported. Of these, four had strictures, six had impactions, and two had only dysphagia. A diagnostic evaluation included esophagogastroduodenoscopy with biopsies in all and upper gastrointestinal series, IgE, radioallergosorbent tests, and skin tests for food allergies in some cases. Esophageal histology specimens were independently analyzed for eosinophil density by two authors. Four of five children with > 20 eos/hpf responded to elimination diets/steroids. The fifth child responded to a fundoplication. Seven children had 5-20 eos/hpf and three of them with no known food allergies responded to antireflux therapy alone. Three others in this group with positive food allergies responded to treatment with elimination diets and/or steroids. The seventh patient in this group was lost to follow-up. In conclusion, on the basis of response to therapy, eosinophilic esophagitis can be subdivided into two groups: those with likely gastroesophageal reflux disease if < 20 eos/hpf and no food allergies, and others with allergic eosinophilic esophagitis associated with food allergies and often with > 20 eos/hpf.

  18. Tandem Spinal Stenosis: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Overley, Samuel C; Kim, Jun S; Gogel, Brooke A; Merrill, Robert K; Hecht, Andrew C

    2017-09-05

    Tandem spinal stenosis refers to spinal canal diameter narrowing in at least 2 distinct regions of the spine, most commonly the lumbar and cervical regions. This entity can be an asymptomatic radiographic finding, or it can present with severe myelopathy and lower-extremity symptoms. Tandem spinal stenosis may impact surgeon decision-making when planning either cervical or lumbar spine surgery, and there is currently no consensus in the literature regarding the treatment algorithm for operative intervention. A MEDLINE literature search was performed using PubMed, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and Embase from January 1980 to February 2015 using Medical Subject Heading queries for the terms "tandem spinal stenosis," "cervical stenosis AND lumbar stenosis," and "concomitant spinal stenosis." We included studies involving adult patients, tandem spinal stenosis of the cervical and lumbar regions, and a minimum of 5 patients. Articles that did not discuss spinal disorders or only explored disorders at a single spinal region were excluded. The initial database review resulted in 234 articles. After abstracts were reviewed, only 17 articles that met inclusion criteria were identified: 2 cadaveric studies, 5 clinical studies of patients with radiographic tandem spinal stenosis, and 10 clinical studies of patients with symptomatic tandem spinal stenosis. Tandem spinal stenosis is a common condition present in up to 60% of patients with spinal stenosis. This disorder, however, is often overlooked, which can lead to serious complications. Identification of tandem spinal stenosis is paramount as a first step in management and, although there is still no preferred intervention, both staged and simultaneous procedures have been shown to be effective. Surgeons may utilize a single, staged, or combined approach to decompression, always addressing cervical myelopathy as a priority.

  19. Carotid Stenosis and Ocular Blood Pressure Modelling

    PubMed Central

    Jullian, M.; Kinsner, W.

    1984-01-01

    A model of the human carotid vascular system was developed to study the effects of carotid stenosis on ocular blood pressure and ocular pulse waveform. The model incorporates a non-linear element representing a stenosis. A state variable representation of a reduced model is used in a computer simulation. Results show that carotid stenosis as low as 20% are detectable in the ocular blood pressure waveform.

  20. Esophageal malignancy: A growing concern

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Jianyuan; Jamal, M Mazen

    2012-01-01

    Esophageal cancer is mainly found in Asia and east Africa and is one of the deadliest cancers in the world. However, it has not garnered much attention in the Western world due to its low incidence rate. An increasing amount of data indicate that esophageal cancer, particularly esophageal adenocarcinoma, has been rising by 6-fold annually and is now becoming the fastest growing cancer in the United States. This rise has been associated with the increase of the obese population, as abdominal fat puts extra pressure on the stomach and causes gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Long standing GERD can induce esophagitis and metaplasia and, ultimately, leads to adenocarcinoma. Acid suppression has been the main strategy to treat GERD; however, it has not been proven to control esophageal malignancy effectively. In fact, its side effects have triggered multiple warnings from regulatory agencies. The high mortality and fast growth of esophageal cancer demand more vigorous efforts to look into its deeper mechanisms and come up with better therapeutic options. PMID:23236223

  1. Circumferential esophageal replacement using a tube-shaped tissue-engineered substitute: An experimental study in minipigs.

    PubMed

    Poghosyan, Tigran; Sfeir, Rony; Michaud, Laurent; Bruneval, Patrick; Domet, Thomas; Vanneaux, Valerie; Luong-Nguyen, Minh; Gaujoux, Sebastien; Gottrand, Frederic; Larghero, Jerome; Cattan, Pierre

    2015-07-01

    Esophageal replacement by the colon or the stomach for malignant and nonmalignant esophageal diseases exposes to significant morbidity and mortality. In this setting, tissue engineering seems to be a seductive alternative. In a porcine model, we performed a 5-cm-long circumferential replacement of the cervical esophagus by a tubulized acellular matrix (small intestinal submucosa) cellularized with autologous skeletal myoblasts and covered by a human amniotic membrane seeded with autologous oral epithelial cells. The substitute was grown for 2 weeks in the great omentum before esophageal replacement. Eighteen minipigs (divided into 3 groups: group A [substitute with esophageal endoprothesis; n = 6], group B [substitute alone; n = 6], and group C [endoprothesis alone; n = 6]) were included. The esophageal endoprothesis was removed at 6 months. Animals were killed sequentially over a 12 month-period. Clinical, endoscopic, radiologic and histologic outcomes were analyzed. All animals except 1 of in groups B and C died during the first 2 months owing to refractory esophageal stenosis or endoprothesis extrusion. Nutritional autonomy without endoprothesis was observed in all animals of group A with a follow-up of >6 months (n = 3). A phenotype similar to that of native esophagus, consisting of a mature epithelium, submucosal glands, and a circular muscular layer, was observed after 9 months. In this model, the circumferential replacement of the cervical esophagus by a tube-shaped tissue-engineered substitute under the temporary cover of an esophageal endoprothesis allowed nutritional autonomy and tissue remodeling toward an esophageal phenotype. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Fabrication of a Delaying Biodegradable Magnesium Alloy-Based Esophageal Stent via Coating Elastic Polymer

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Tianwen; Yu, Jia; Cao, Jun; Gao, Fei; Zhu, Yueqi; Cheng, Yingsheng; Cui, Wenguo

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal stent implantation can relieve esophageal stenosis and obstructions in benign esophageal strictures, and magnesium alloy stents are a good candidate because of biodegradation and biological safety. However, biodegradable esophageal stents show a poor corrosion resistance and a quick loss of mechanical support in vivo. In this study, we chose the elastic and biodegradable mixed polymer of Poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) and poly(trimethylene carbonate) (PTMC) as the coated membrane on magnesium alloy stents for fabricating a fully biodegradable esophageal stent, which showed an ability to delay the degradation time and maintain mechanical performance in the long term. After 48 repeated compressions, the mechanical testing demonstrated that the PCL-PTMC-coated magnesium stents possess good flexibility and elasticity, and could provide enough support against lesion compression when used in vivo. According to the in vitro degradation evaluation, the PCL-PTMC membrane coated on magnesium was a good material combination for biodegradable stents. During the in vivo evaluation, the proliferation of the smooth muscle cells showed no signs of cell toxicity. Histological examination revealed the inflammation scores at four weeks in the magnesium-(PCL-PTMC) stent group were similar to those in the control group (p > 0.05). The α-smooth muscle actin layer in the media was thinner in the magnesium-(PCL-PTMC) stent group than in the control group (p < 0.05). Both the epithelial and smooth muscle cell layers were significantly thinner in the magnesium-(PCL-PTMC) stent group than in the control group. The stent insertion was feasible and provided reliable support for at least four weeks, without causing severe injury or collagen deposition. Thus, this stent provides a new stent for the treatment of benign esophageal stricture and a novel research path in the development of temporary stents in other cases of benign stricture. PMID:28773505

  3. Fabrication of a Delaying Biodegradable Magnesium Alloy-Based Esophageal Stent via Coating Elastic Polymer.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Tianwen; Yu, Jia; Cao, Jun; Gao, Fei; Zhu, Yueqi; Cheng, Yingsheng; Cui, Wenguo

    2016-05-17

    Esophageal stent implantation can relieve esophageal stenosis and obstructions in benign esophageal strictures, and magnesium alloy stents are a good candidate because of biodegradation and biological safety. However, biodegradable esophageal stents show a poor corrosion resistance and a quick loss of mechanical support in vivo. In this study, we chose the elastic and biodegradable mixed polymer of Poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) and poly(trimethylene carbonate) (PTMC) as the coated membrane on magnesium alloy stents for fabricating a fully biodegradable esophageal stent, which showed an ability to delay the degradation time and maintain mechanical performance in the long term. After 48 repeated compressions, the mechanical testing demonstrated that the PCL-PTMC-coated magnesium stents possess good flexibility and elasticity, and could provide enough support against lesion compression when used in vivo. According to the in vitro degradation evaluation, the PCL-PTMC membrane coated on magnesium was a good material combination for biodegradable stents. During the in vivo evaluation, the proliferation of the smooth muscle cells showed no signs of cell toxicity. Histological examination revealed the inflammation scores at four weeks in the magnesium-(PCL-PTMC) stent group were similar to those in the control group (p > 0.05). The α-smooth muscle actin layer in the media was thinner in the magnesium-(PCL-PTMC) stent group than in the control group (p < 0.05). Both the epithelial and smooth muscle cell layers were significantly thinner in the magnesium-(PCL-PTMC) stent group than in the control group. The stent insertion was feasible and provided reliable support for at least four weeks, without causing severe injury or collagen deposition. Thus, this stent provides a new stent for the treatment of benign esophageal stricture and a novel research path in the development of temporary stents in other cases of benign stricture.

  4. Benign esophageal stricture after thermal injury treated with esophagectomy and ileocolon interposition

    PubMed Central

    Kitajima, Toshihiro; Momose, Kota; Lee, Seigi; Haruta, Shusuke; Shinohara, Hisashi; Ueno, Masaki; Fujii, Takeshi; Udagawa, Harushi

    2014-01-01

    Thermal injuries of the esophagus are rare causes of benign esophageal stricture, and all published cases were successfully treated with conservative management. A 28-year-old Japanese man with a thermal esophageal injury caused by drinking a cup of hot coffee six months earlier was referred to our hospital. The hot coffee was consumed in a single gulp at a party. Although the patient had been treated conservatively at another hospital, his symptoms of dysphagia gradually worsened after discharge. An upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and computed tomography revealed a pin-hole like area of stricture located 19 cm distally from the incisors to the esophagogastric junction, as well as circumferential stenosis with notable wall thickness at the same site. The patient underwent a thoracoscopic esophageal resection with reconstruction using ileocolon interposition. The pathological findings revealed wall thickening along the entire length of the esophagus, with massive fibrosis extending to the muscularis propria and adventitia at almost all levels. Treatment with balloon dilation for long areas of stricture is generally difficult, and stent placement in patients with benign esophageal stricture, particularly young patients, is not yet widely accepted due to the incidence of late adverse events. Considering the curability and quality-of-life associated with a long expected prognosis, we determined that surgery was the best treatment option for this young patient. In this case, we decided to perform an esophagectomy and reconstruction with ileocolon interposition in order to preserve the reservoir function of the stomach and to avoid any problems related to the reflux of gastric contents. In conclusion, resection of the esophagus is a treatment option in patients with benign esophageal injury, especially in cases involving young patients with refractory esophageal stricture. In addition, ileocolon interposition may help to improve the quality-of-life of patients. PMID

  5. 21 CFR 876.5365 - Esophageal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... and weighted with mercury or a metal olive-shaped weight that slides on a guide, such as a string or... esophageal or gastrointestinal bougies and the esophageal dilator (metal olive). (b) Classification. Class...

  6. 21 CFR 876.5365 - Esophageal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... and weighted with mercury or a metal olive-shaped weight that slides on a guide, such as a string or... esophageal or gastrointestinal bougies and the esophageal dilator (metal olive). (b) Classification. Class...

  7. 21 CFR 876.5365 - Esophageal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... and weighted with mercury or a metal olive-shaped weight that slides on a guide, such as a string or... esophageal or gastrointestinal bougies and the esophageal dilator (metal olive). (b) Classification. Class...

  8. Covered Biodegradable Stent: New Therapeutic Option for the Management of Esophageal Perforation or Anastomotic Leak

    SciTech Connect

    Cerna, Marie; Koecher, Martin Valek, Vlastimil; Aujesky, Rene; Neoral, Cestmir; Andrasina, Tomas; Panek, Jiri; Mahathmakanthi, Shankari

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to evaluate our experience with the treatment of postoperative anastomotic leaks and benign esophageal perforations with covered biodegradable stents. Materials and Methods: From 2008 to 2010, we treated five men with either an anastomotic leak or benign esophageal perforation by implanting of covered biodegradable Ella-BD stents. The average age of the patients was 60 (range, 38-74) years. Postoperative anastomotic leaks were treated in four patients (1 after esophagectomy, 1 after resection of diverticulum, 2 after gastrectomy). In one patient, perforation occurred as a complication of the treatment of an esophageal rupture (which occurred during a balloon dilatation of benign stenosis) with a metallic stent. Results: Seven covered biodegradable stents were implanted in five patients. Primary technical success was 100%. Clinical success (leak sealing) was achieved in four of the five patients (80%). Stent migration occurred in three patients. In two of these patients, the leak had been sealed by the time of stent migration, therefore no reintervention was necessary. In one patient an additional stent had to be implanted. Conclusion: The use of biodegradable covered stents for the treatment of anastomotic leaks or esophageal perforations is technically feasible and safe. The initial results are promising; however, larger number of patients will be required to evaluate the capability of these biodegradable stents in the future. The use of biodegradable material for coverage of the stent is essential.

  9. Covered biodegradable stent: new therapeutic option for the management of esophageal perforation or anastomotic leak.

    PubMed

    Černá, Marie; Köcher, Martin; Válek, Vlastimil; Aujeský, René; Neoral, Čestmír; Andrašina, Tomáš; Pánek, Jiří; Mahathmakanthi, Shankari

    2011-12-01

    This study was designed to evaluate our experience with the treatment of postoperative anastomotic leaks and benign esophageal perforations with covered biodegradable stents. From 2008 to 2010, we treated five men with either an anastomotic leak or benign esophageal perforation by implanting of covered biodegradable Ella-BD stents. The average age of the patients was 60 (range, 38-74) years. Postoperative anastomotic leaks were treated in four patients (1 after esophagectomy, 1 after resection of diverticulum, 2 after gastrectomy). In one patient, perforation occurred as a complication of the treatment of an esophageal rupture (which occurred during a balloon dilatation of benign stenosis) with a metallic stent. Seven covered biodegradable stents were implanted in five patients. Primary technical success was 100%. Clinical success (leak sealing) was achieved in four of the five patients (80%). Stent migration occurred in three patients. In two of these patients, the leak had been sealed by the time of stent migration, therefore no reintervention was necessary. In one patient an additional stent had to be implanted. The use of biodegradable covered stents for the treatment of anastomotic leaks or esophageal perforations is technically feasible and safe. The initial results are promising; however, larger number of patients will be required to evaluate the capability of these biodegradable stents in the future. The use of biodegradable material for coverage of the stent is essential.

  10. Esophageal human β-defensin expression in eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Shauna; Robinson, Zachary D; Masterson, Joanne C; Hosford, Lindsay; Moore, Wendy; Pan, Zhaoxing; Harris, Rachel; Souza, Rhonda F; Spechler, Stuart Jon; Fillon, Sophie A; Furuta, Glenn T

    2013-05-01

    Defensins are antimicrobial peptides expressed on mucosal surfaces that contribute to maintaining intestinal homeostasis by providing innate defense mechanisms for the epithelia. Defensin expression is altered in a number of diseases that affect mucosal surfaces, such as atopic dermatitis, allergic rhinitis, and inflammatory bowel disease. Similar to atopic dermatitis, eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic disease in which the squamous epithelial surface is affected by a similar TH2 microenvironment and eosinophil-predominant inflammation. Therefore, we hypothesized that defensin expression would be decreased in EoE. To address this, we measured defensin expression in vitro in cell lines derived from patients with EoE (EoE1-T) or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) (NES-G4T cells) and ex vivo in esophageal mucosal biopsy samples from children with EoE or GERD and control children without esophageal disease. Interleukin-5 induced a decrease in human β-defensin (hBD) -1 and hBD3 expression in EoE1-T but not in NES-G4T cells. Compared with esophageal biopsy specimens from GERD and control children, specimens from EoE pediatric patients revealed a significant decrease in mRNA and protein expression for hBD1 and hBD3. Diminished expression of hBD1 and hBD3 may make the esophageal epithelium more susceptible to the development and/or perpetuation of EoE.

  11. Radiation-induced esophageal injury: A spectrum from esophagitis to cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Vanagunas, A.; Jacob, P.; Olinger, E. )

    1990-07-01

    Radiation esophagitis is a common but frequently unrecognized complication of therapeutic radiation to the neck, chest, or mediastinum. The spectrum of injury ranges from acute self-limited esophagitis to life-threatening esophageal perforation. Complications such as stricture or primary esophageal cancer may occur many years after irradiation, and their linkage to radiation may not be considered. Five cases of radiation-induced injury are described, and the spectrum of radiation-induced esophageal injury is reviewed.

  12. [Esophageal atresia type I. Is impossible possible?].

    PubMed

    Ruiz de Temiño, M; Esteban, J A; Elías, J; González, N; Gracia, J; Romeo, M; Escartín, R; Burgués, P; Sainz, A; Pueyo, C

    2006-01-01

    Treatment of esophageal atresia with "long gap" remains difficult and controversial. According to the idea that esophageal anastomosis is imposible in most cases, several esophageal substitution methods have been proposed, as esophagocoloplasty, gastric transposition or reversed gastric tube. Nevertheless reconstruction of native esophagus is accepted as the best option if posible. "Long gap" definition is imprecise, expressed by variability in percent of these cases in total esophageal atresias reported in different series in literature. We report our experience in seven cases type I esophageal atresia with long gap and the different therapeutic options used, with attention to delayed or early esophageal anastomosis feasibility and outcome. We have treated 121 patients with esophageal atresia from whom we analized 7 cases with pure esophageal atresia with "long gap" (5.8%). Six patients underwent gastrostomy and two gastrostomy and esophagostomy. Five patient underwent primary repair with esophageal anastomosis, delayed between 14 days and 4 months in 4 cases. One patient underwent esophageal anastomosis in the first day without gastrostomy. Retroesternal esophagocoloplasty was performed in 2 patients about their first year of life. Esophagogram was done in first month after surgery and pH monitoring of gastroesophageal reflux. Follow-up ranged from 6 months to 28 years. Esophageal anastomosis was feasible in all 5 patients in whom it was tried. Stricture occurred in two patients, one patient underwent anastomotic resection and new esophageal anastomosis. Esophageal reflux was present in two patients, one of them required funduplication. One patient was dead by complications of cardiac malformation. Remaining patients have normal swallowing and are in normal growth curves. Patients with esophagocoloplasty had not relevant early or late complications. In most pure esophageal atresia, delayed or even early esophageal anastomosis is feasible, making use of surgical

  13. Rare tumors of esophageal squamous mucosa.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Monika; Swanson, Paul E

    2016-10-01

    In spite of increasing incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma in the last few decades, esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) still remains the dominant subtype of esophageal cancer worldwide. Apart from conventional SCC, some rare unconventional tumors of esophageal squamous mucosa are also well known. This study provides an introduction to these and presents a brief review of the literature, including the diagnostic and prognostic importance of each variant.

  14. Endoscopic incisional therapy for benign esophageal strictures: Technique and results.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Jayanta; Dhaka, Narendra; Sinha, Saroj Kant; Kochhar, Rakesh

    2015-12-25

    Benign esophageal strictures refractory to the conventional balloon or bougie dilatation may be subjected to various adjunctive modes of therapy, one of them being endoscopic incisional therapy (EIT). A proper delineation of the stricture anatomy is a prerequisite. A host of electrocautery and mechanical devices may be used, the most common being the use of needle knife, either standard or insulated tip. The technique entails radial incision and cutting off of the stenotic rim. Adjunctive therapies, to prevent re-stenosis, such as balloon dilatation, oral or intralesional steroids or argon plasma coagulation can be used. The common strictures where EIT has been successfully used are Schatzki's rings (SR) and anastomotic strictures (AS). Short segment strictures (< 1 cm) have been found to have the best outcome. When compared with routine balloon dilatation, EIT has equivalent results in treatment naïve cases but better long term outcome in refractory cases. Anecdotal reports of its use in other types of strictures have been noted. Post procedure complications of EIT are mild and comparable to dilatation therapy. As of the current evidence, incisional therapy can be used for management of refractory AS and SR with relatively short stenosis (< 1 cm) with good safety profile and acceptable long term patency.

  15. Endoscopic incisional therapy for benign esophageal strictures: Technique and results

    PubMed Central

    Samanta, Jayanta; Dhaka, Narendra; Sinha, Saroj Kant; Kochhar, Rakesh

    2015-01-01

    Benign esophageal strictures refractory to the conventional balloon or bougie dilatation may be subjected to various adjunctive modes of therapy, one of them being endoscopic incisional therapy (EIT). A proper delineation of the stricture anatomy is a prerequisite. A host of electrocautery and mechanical devices may be used, the most common being the use of needle knife, either standard or insulated tip. The technique entails radial incision and cutting off of the stenotic rim. Adjunctive therapies, to prevent re-stenosis, such as balloon dilatation, oral or intralesional steroids or argon plasma coagulation can be used. The common strictures where EIT has been successfully used are Schatzki’s rings (SR) and anastomotic strictures (AS). Short segment strictures (< 1 cm) have been found to have the best outcome. When compared with routine balloon dilatation, EIT has equivalent results in treatment naïve cases but better long term outcome in refractory cases. Anecdotal reports of its use in other types of strictures have been noted. Post procedure complications of EIT are mild and comparable to dilatation therapy. As of the current evidence, incisional therapy can be used for management of refractory AS and SR with relatively short stenosis (< 1 cm) with good safety profile and acceptable long term patency. PMID:26722613

  16. Recurred Post-intubation Tracheal Stenosis Treated with Bronchoscopic Cryotherapy.

    PubMed

    Jung, Ye-Ryung; Taek Jeong, Joon; Kyu Lee, Myoung; Kim, Sang-Ha; Joong Yong, Suk; Jeong Lee, Seok; Lee, Won-Yeon

    Post-intubation tracheal stenosis accounts for the greatest proportion of whole-cause tracheal stenosis. Treatment of post-intubation tracheal stenosis requires a multidisciplinary approach. Surgery or an endoscopic procedure can be used, depending on the type of stenosis. However, the efficacy of cryotherapy in post-intubation tracheal stenosis has not been validated. Here, we report a case of recurring post-intubation tracheal stenosis successfully treated with bronchoscopic cryotherapy that had previously been treated with surgery. In this case, cryotherapy was effective in treating web-like fibrous stenosis, without requiring more surgery. Cryotherapy can be considered as an alternative or primary treatment for post-intubation tracheal stenosis.

  17. Gallium-67 imaging in candidal esophagitis

    SciTech Connect

    Rundback, J.H.; Goldfarb, C.R.; Ongseng, F. )

    1990-01-01

    Ga-67 scanning has been used to evaluate esophageal carcinoma. It has demonstrated candidal infection in other body sites and, in one previous case, in the esophagus. The authors present a case of diffuse esophageal uptake of Ga-67 in esophageal candidiasis.

  18. [Diagnosis and management of esophageal chest pain].

    PubMed

    Hong, Su Jin

    2010-04-01

    Esophageal pain that manifests as heartburn or chest pain, is a prevalent problem. Esophageal chest pain is most often caused by gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), but can also result from inflammatory processes, infections involving the esophagus, and contractions of the esophageal muscle. The mechanisms and pathways of esophageal chest pain are poorly understood. Vagal and spinal afferent pathways carry sensory information from the esophagus. Recently, esophageal hypersensitivity is identified as an important factor in the development of esophageal pain. A number of techniques are available to evaluate esophageal chest pain such as endoscopy and/or proton-pump inhibitor trial, esophageal manometry, a combined impedance-pH study, and esophageal ultrasound imaging. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) have the huge success in the treatment of GERD. Other drugs such as imipramine, trazadone, sertraline, tricyclics, and theophylline have been introduced for the control of esophageal chest pain in partial responders to PPI and the patients with esophageal hypersensitivity. Novel drugs which act on different targets are anticipated to treat esophageal pain in the future.

  19. [Modern diagnostics of tracheal stenosis].

    PubMed

    Müller, A

    2004-06-01

    Numerous new modalities in computertomography (CT), in particular Multislice-Spiral-CT and Virtual Endoscopy, and novel developments in endoscopy and spirometry gave us reason to review the current state of the art in diagnostics of tracheal stenosis (TS). This review evaluates the literature of the last decade regarding new trends and methods in diagnostics of tracheal stenosis. Pros and cons are discussed, and the future trends are highlighted. Spiral-CT scans at collimated slices of < or = 3 mm, PITCH < or = 1.5 and a segmentation level of - 350 HE permit a valid measurement of tracheal lumina. The flow-volume-plot is still the most important investigation to evaluate respiratory function in TS. Peak-Flow-Meters are suitable for patient self monitoring. The selective estimation of the TS related airway resistance using in situ measurements and numerical flow simulation studies are likely to reach importance in future. The ability to obtain exact measures from endoscopic recordings using EndoScan serves quality control in endoscopy. An objective comparison of different treatments becomes possible. Endosonography and methods for in-vitro tissue analysis (Optical Coherence Tomography) are more focused on the early diagnosis of malignant lesions. The Synopsis of endoscopy, CT-scan and spirometry provides the highest diagnostic accuracy today.

  20. [Esophageal diseases: GERD, Barrett, achalasia and eosinophilic esophagitis].

    PubMed

    Calvet, Xavier; Villoria, Albert

    2014-09-01

    At Digestive Disease Week (DDW) 2014, developments in esophageal disease were presented. Highlights include: the usefulness of impedancemetry to diagnose reflux disease, or the effectiveness of PPIs for treating non-cardiac chest pain. Concerning Barrett's esophagus, its prevalence is identical in patients with and without reflux symptoms, Barrett segments less than 1cm probably do not require follow-up, and in older patients with long-segment Barrett, initial endoscopies overlooked up to 2% of significant lesions. Regarding achalasia, surgical myotomy is no more effective than endoscopic dilation and may even be less effective than peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM). In terms of eosinophilic esophagitis, it is important to systematically take biopsies in patients with dysphagia so that cases of eosinophilic esophagitis are not overlooked. In addition, for this condition, routine endoscopic dilations not only do not seem useful in improving the course of the disease, but could also worsen the response to medical treatment.

  1. Esophageal motility disorders in HIV patients.

    PubMed

    Zalar, Alberto E; Olmos, Martín A; Piskorz, Eduardo L; Magnanini, Fernando L

    2003-05-01

    Opportunistic esophageal infections (Candida, cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex virus) and idiophatic esophageal ulcerations are commonly found in HIV patients. However, motility disorders of the esophagus have seldom been investigated in this population. The aim of this prospective study was to determine the presence of motility disorders in HIV patients with esophageal symptoms (with or without associated lesions detected by endoscopy) and in HIV patients without esophageal symptoms and normal esophagoscopy. Eigthteen consecutive HIV patients (10 male, 8 female, ages 20-44 years, mean age 33.5; 8 HIV positive and 10 AIDS) were studied prospectively. Nine patients complained of esophageal symptoms, e.g, dysphagia/odynophagia (group 1) and 9 had symptoms not related to esophageal disease, such as diarrhea, abdominal pain, or gastrointestinal bleeding (group 2). All patients underwent upper endoscopy; mucosal biopsies were taken when macroscopic esophageal lesions were identified or when the patients were symptomatic even if the esophageal mucosa was normal. Esophageal manometry was performed in the 18 patients, using a 4-channel water-perfused system according to a standardized technique. Sixteen of the 18 patients (88.8%) had baseline manometric abnormalities. In group 1, 8/9 patients had esophageal motility disorders: nutcrackeresophagus in 1, hypertensive lower esophageal sphincter (LES) with incomplete relaxation in 2, nonspecific esophageal motility disorders (NEMD) in 3, diffuse esophageal spasm in 1, esophageal hypocontraction with low LES pressure in 1. Six of these 9 patients had lesions detected by endoscopy: CMV ulcers in 2, idiopathic ulcers in 1, candidiasis in 1, idiopathic ulcer + candidiasis in 1, nonspecific esophagitis in 1; and 3/9 had normal endoscopy and normal esophageal biopsies. In group 2, 8/9 patients had abnormal motility: hypertensive LES with incomplete relaxation in 1, nutcracker esophagus in 2, esophageal hypocontraction in 3, and NEMD

  2. The pathophysiology of eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Raheem, Mayumi; Leach, Steven T; Day, Andrew S; Lemberg, Daniel A

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is an emerging disease characterized by esophageal eosinophilia (>15eos/hpf), lack of responsiveness to acid-suppressive medication and is managed by allergen elimination and anti-allergy therapy. Although the pathophysiology of EoE is currently unsubstantiated, evidence implicates food and aeroallergen hypersensitivity in genetically predisposed individuals as contributory factors. Genome-wide expression analyses have isolated a remarkably conserved gene-expression profile irrespective of age and gender, suggesting a genetic contribution. EoE has characteristics of mainly TH2 type immune responses but also some TH1 cytokines, which appear to strongly contribute to tissue fibrosis, with esophageal epithelial cells providing a hospitable environment for this inflammatory process. Eosinophil-degranulation products appear to play a central role in tissue remodeling in EoE. This remodeling and dysregulation predisposes to fibrosis. Mast-cell-derived molecules such as histamine may have an effect on enteric nerves and may also act in concert with transforming growth factor-β to interfere with esophageal musculature. Additionally, the esophageal epithelium may facilitate the inflammatory process under pathogenic contexts such as in EoE. This article aims to discuss the contributory factors in the pathophysiology of EoE.

  3. Eosinophilic esophagitis in an octogenarian

    PubMed Central

    Trifan, Anca; Stoica, Oana; Chihaia, Catalin-Alexandru; Danciu, Mihai; Stanciu, Carol; Singeap, Ana-Maria

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic, immune/antigen-mediated disease characterized clinically by symptoms related to esophageal dysfunction and histologically by a marked eosinophilic infiltrate in the esophageal mucosa. What was once considered a rare disease has nowadays become one of the most frequent esophageal diseases in the Western countries, occupying a place just next to the gastroesophageal reflux disease. EoE etiology and pathogenesis remain largely unknown, although most studies consider that allergic and genetic factors play the most important role. Methods: We report the case of EoE in an elderly male (octogenarian), giving a brief review of the current data related to epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of the disease. Results: Dysphagia to solid foods was the leading symptom, and endoscopic findings included white exudates, longitudinal furrows, and concentric mucosal rings, all suggestive for EoE. Diagnosis relied on histological findings in esophageal mucosal biopsies (>30 eosinophils per high power field). He was treated with topical steroids for 8 weeks, symptoms improved gradually and the patient remained in remission at the 8-month follow-up. Conclusion: This case emphasizes that EoE may occur in very old patients and gastroenterologists should have a high index of suspicion of this disorder in any elderly with dysphagia and endoscopic relevant features. PMID:27741150

  4. Esophageal replacement for end-stage benign esophageal disease.

    PubMed

    Watson, T J; DeMeester, T R; Kauer, W K; Peters, J H; Hagen, J A

    1998-06-01

    Benign esophageal diseases constitute a common group of disorders that are generally managed with medical therapy or surgery designed to improve foregut function. A small subset of patients, however, has advanced disease that requires esophageal replacement to achieve symptomatic relief. One hundred four patients with benign esophageal disease who underwent esophageal reconstruction over a 21-year period (1975 to 1996) were reviewed retrospectively. Dysphagia was the major symptom driving surgery in 80% of the patients. Colon was used to reconstruct the esophagus in 85 patients; stomach, in 10 patients; and jejunum, in 9 patients. Forty-two patients who had lived with their reconstruction for 1 year or more answered a postoperative questionnaire concerning their long-term functional outcome. In the 104 patients, the primary underlying abnormality leading to esophageal replacement was end-stage gastroesophageal reflux (37 patients), an advanced motility disorder (37 patients), traumatic, iatrogenic or spontaneous perforation (15 patients), corrosive injury (8 patients), congenital abnormality (6 patients), or extensive leiomyoma (1 patient). Ninety-eight percent of patients reported that the operation had cured or improved the symptom driving surgery. Ninety-three percent were satisfied with the outcome of the operation. The overall hospital mortality rate was 2%, and the median hospital stay was 17 days. Graft necrosis occurred in 3% of patients, and anastomotic leak occurred in 6% of patients (or 2% of the total number of anastomoses). Esophageal replacement for benign disease can be accomplished with a low mortality rate and a marked improvement in alimentation. Reconstruction restores the pleasure of eating and is viewed by the patient to be highly successful.

  5. Spontaneous intramural esophageal dissection: an unusual onset of eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Ibáñez-Sanz, Gemma; Rodríguez-Alonso, Lorena; Romero, Natalia M

    2016-03-01

    A 35-year-old man, with a history of rhinitis, eczema and a dubious achalasia was admitted due to chest pain and sialorrhea. Upper endoscopy showed a little hole and a narrowing of the distal esophagus. A CT-scan with oral contrast exposed a discontinuity of the lumen of the middle third of the esophagus and a dissection of submucosal space 16 cm long. The patient recovered after parenteral nutrition. After four months, an esophageal endoscopic showed transient whitish exudates, longitudinal furrows and esophageal lacerations. The biopsies illustrated significant eosinophilic inflammation, eosinophilic microabscesses and basal cell hyperplasia.

  6. Esophageal cancer in Yemen.

    PubMed

    Al-Samawi, Abdullah S; Aulaqi, Saleh M

    2014-03-01

    To document the age and gender distribution, histopathologic type as well as grading characteristics of Esophageal Cancer (EC) in Yemen. A case series. Department of Pathology, Sana'a University, Sana'a, Yemen, from January 2005 to December 2011. Three hundred twenty five cases of EC were included for review. The diagnoses were made on hematoxylin and eosin stained sections and the cases were categorized into Squamous Cell Carcinoma (SCC) and adenocarcinoma (ADC). Out of the 325 EC cases, 163 (50%) were SCC (females 67%, males 33%) and 158 (49%) were ADC (females 30%, males 70%). The rest of the cases were 2 adenosquamous carcinoma and 2 non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The mean age, for SCC was 60 years while the mean age for ADC was 65 years. The peak incidence for SCC was found in the age groups of fifth and sixth decades for females and in fifth and seventh decades for males. The maximum number of patients with ADC was seen in sixth and seventh decades for both gender. Well-differentiated histological grading accounted for 247 (77%) for both genders and types. The moderately differentiated and poorly differentiated accounted, for 17% and 6% respectively. The EC in Yemen had a predominance of SCC in female patients and predominance of ADC in male patients which was usually of a well-differentiated grade.

  7. Efficacy and complication of endoscopic submucosal dissection for superficial esophageal carcinoma: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Aim For patients with superficial esophageal carcinoma, ESD was one of treatment modalities to remove the lesion safely and effectively. We perform this meta-analysis to determine the efficacy and incidence of complication of ESD for patients with superficial esophageal carcinoma. Method Articles were searched in MEDLINE (PubMed and Ovid), Cochrane Database of Systemic Reviews, Google scholar, and Web of Science. Two reviewers independently searched and extracted data. Meta-analysis of the efficacy of ESD was analyzed by calculating pooled en bloc and R0 resection rate. Incidence of complications such as perforation, stenosis and mediastinal emphysema was also calculated. Pooling was conducted using either fixed-effects model or random-effects model depending on the heterogeneity across studies. Results 21 studies (1152 patients and 1240 lesions) were included in this analysis. The pooled en bloc resection rate was 99% (95% CI 99%-100%). Stratified by tumor size, en bloc resection rates did not show any significant difference. The pooled R0 resection rate was 90% (95% CI 87%-93%). The pooled R0 resection rate was 85% (95% CI, 80%-90%) for large tumor and 92% (95% CI, 87%-93%) for small tumor (p < 0.001). Stenosis served as the most common reported complication with pooled incidence of 5% (95% CI 3-8%), followed by perforation (1%, 95% CI 0-1%) and mediastinal emphysema (0% CI 0-1%). The incidence of postoperative stenosis decreased significantly after 2011 (2%, 95% CI 0-3%) compared with that before 2011 (9%, 95% CI 3-8%) (p < 0.001). Conclusion ESD was an efficient modality for treating superficial esophageal carcinoma, with perfect en bloc and R0 resection rate and low complication rate. The most common complication of ESD was stenosis. Although recurrence rate was low, patients should be maintained in a scheduled surveillance program. PMID:24885614

  8. Surgical treatments for esophageal cancers

    PubMed Central

    Allum, William H.; Bonavina, Luigi; Cassivi, Stephen D.; Cuesta, Miguel A.; Dong, Zhao Ming; Felix, Valter Nilton; Figueredo, Edgar; Gatenby, Piers A.C.; Haverkamp, Leonie; Ibraev, Maksat A.; Krasna, Mark J.; Lambert, René; Langer, Rupert; Lewis, Michael P.N.; Nason, Katie S.; Parry, Kevin; Preston, Shaun R.; Ruurda, Jelle P.; Schaheen, Lara W.; Tatum, Roger P.; Turkin, Igor N.; van der Horst, Sylvia; van der Peet, Donald L.; van der Sluis, Peter C.; van Hillegersberg, Richard; Wormald, Justin C.R.; Wu, Peter C.; Zonderhuis, Barbara M.

    2015-01-01

    The following, from the 12th OESO World Conference: Cancers of the Esophagus, includes commentaries on the role of the nurse in preparation of esophageal resection (ER); the management of patients who develop high-grade dysplasia after having undergone Nissen fundoplication; the trajectory of care for the patient with esophageal cancer; the influence of the site of tumor in the choice of treatment; the best location for esophagogastrostomy; management of chylous leak after esophagectomy; the optimal approach to manage thoracic esophageal leak after esophagectomy; the choice for operational approach in surgery of cardioesophageal crossing; the advantages of robot esophagectomy; the place of open esophagectomy; the advantages of esophagectomy compared to definitive chemoradiotherapy; the pathologist report in the resected specimen; the best way to manage patients with unsuspected positive microscopic margin after ER; enhanced recovery after surgery for ER: expedited care protocols; and long-term quality of life in patients following esophagectomy. PMID:25266029

  9. Prevalence of Eosinophilic Esophagitis and Lymphocytic Esophagitis in Adults with Esophageal Food Bolus Impaction

    PubMed Central

    Truskaite, Kotryna

    2016-01-01

    Background. The relation of esophageal food bolus impaction (FBI) to eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) and lymphocytic esophagitis (LyE) is unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of EoE and LyE among adults with FBI. Methods. In this retrospective study we analyzed data from all patients referred for gastroscopy during the past 5 years, because of a present or recent episode of FBI. Results. We found 238 patients with FBI (median age 51 (17–96), 71% males). Endoscopic therapy was required in 143 patients. Esophageal biopsies were obtained in 185 (78%) patients. All biopsies were assessed for numbers of eosinophils and lymphocytes. EoE was found in 18% of patients who underwent biopsy. We found 41 patients (22%) who fulfilled the criteria for both EoE and LyE (EoE/LyE). LyE was found in the 9% of patients with FBI. EoE together with EoE/LyE was the leading cause of FBI in patients ≤50 years (64%). GERD was the leading cause of FBI among patients older than 50 years (42%). Conclusions. Our study showed that EoE was the leading cause of FBI in particular among young adults. Our study highlights the need for esophageal biopsies in any patient with FBI. PMID:27547221

  10. Prevalence of Eosinophilic Esophagitis and Lymphocytic Esophagitis in Adults with Esophageal Food Bolus Impaction.

    PubMed

    Truskaite, Kotryna; Dlugosz, Aldona

    2016-01-01

    Background. The relation of esophageal food bolus impaction (FBI) to eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) and lymphocytic esophagitis (LyE) is unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of EoE and LyE among adults with FBI. Methods. In this retrospective study we analyzed data from all patients referred for gastroscopy during the past 5 years, because of a present or recent episode of FBI. Results. We found 238 patients with FBI (median age 51 (17-96), 71% males). Endoscopic therapy was required in 143 patients. Esophageal biopsies were obtained in 185 (78%) patients. All biopsies were assessed for numbers of eosinophils and lymphocytes. EoE was found in 18% of patients who underwent biopsy. We found 41 patients (22%) who fulfilled the criteria for both EoE and LyE (EoE/LyE). LyE was found in the 9% of patients with FBI. EoE together with EoE/LyE was the leading cause of FBI in patients ≤50 years (64%). GERD was the leading cause of FBI among patients older than 50 years (42%). Conclusions. Our study showed that EoE was the leading cause of FBI in particular among young adults. Our study highlights the need for esophageal biopsies in any patient with FBI.

  11. Risk factors for eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Philpott, H; Nandurkar, S; Royce, S G; Thien, F; Gibson, P R

    2014-08-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic antigen driven disease, whereby food and/or aeroallergens result in inflammation and luminal narrowing, and the clinical symptoms of dysphagia and food bolus obstruction events (FBOE). Established risk factors are male gender, Caucasian race and atopy. Increased risk amongst family members, and a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in a gene coding thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) on the pseudoautosomal region of the X and Y chromosomes supports a genetic predisposition. Environmental factors including the timing and nature of food and aeroallergen exposure to the developing immune system may be important, whilst esophageal barrier function integrity and the influence of microbiota are worthy of future research.

  12. [Exfoliative esophagitis while taking dabigatran].

    PubMed

    Scheppach, Wolfgang; Meesmann, Malte

    2015-04-01

    History | A 77-year-old woman was admitted with severe chest pain, heartburn, dysphagia and odynophagia. She had been on dabigatran for 13 months due to atrial fibrillation and arterial hypertension. Investigations and findings | Endoscopy of the esophagus revealed sloughing of mucosal casts, predominantly in the upper half of the organ. Treatment and course | The patient was placed on pantoprazol, local anaesthetic antacid and i. v. fluids. Dabigatran was discontinued. The symptoms disappeared within 3 days. Control endoscopy after 12 days showed complete healing of the esophageal mucosa. Conclusion | The intake of dabigatran was associated with exfoliative esophagitis, possibly due to caustic tissue damage by prolonged drug contact.

  13. Cognitive and emotional effects of carotid stenosis.

    PubMed

    Everts, Regula; Wapp, Manuela; Burren, Yuliya; Kellner-Weldon, Frauke; El-Koussy, Marwan; Jann, Kay; Delameilluer Lenoir, Jessica; Michel, Patrik; Schroth, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    Patients with carotid artery stenosis (CAS) are at risk of ipsilateral stroke and chronic compromise of cerebral blood flow. It is under debate whether the hypo-perfusion or embolism in CAS is directly related to cognitive impairment. Alternatively, CAS may be a marker for underlying risk factors, which themselves influence cognition. We aimed to determine cognitive performance level and the emotional state of patients with CAS. We hypothesised that patients with high grade stenosis, bilateral stenosis, symptomatic patients and/or those with relevant risk factors would suffer impairment of their cognitive performance and emotional state. A total of 68 patients with CAS of ≥70% were included in a prospective exploratory study design. All patients underwent structured assessment of executive functions, language, verbal and visual memory, motor speed, anxiety and depression. Significantly more patients with CAS showed cognitive impairments (executive functions, word production, verbal and visual memory, motor speed) and anxiety than expected in a normative sample. Bilateral and symptomatic stenosis was associated with slower processing speed. Cognitive performance and anxiety level were not influenced by the side and the degree of stenosis or the presence of collaterals. Factors associated with less cognitive impairment included higher education level, female gender, ambidexterity and treated hypercholesterolemia. Cognitive impairment and increased level of anxiety are frequent in patients with carotid stenosis. The lack of a correlation between cognitive functioning and degree of stenosis or the presence of collaterals, challenges the view that CAS per se leads to cognitive impairment.

  14. Low-gradient aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Clavel, Marie-Annick; Magne, Julien; Pibarot, Philippe

    2016-09-07

    An important proportion of patients with aortic stenosis (AS) have a 'low-gradient' AS, i.e. a small aortic valve area (AVA <1.0 cm(2)) consistent with severe AS but a low mean transvalvular gradient (<40 mmHg) consistent with non-severe AS. The management of this subset of patients is particularly challenging because the AVA-gradient discrepancy raises uncertainty about the actual stenosis severity and thus about the indication for aortic valve replacement (AVR) if the patient has symptoms and/or left ventricular (LV) systolic dysfunction. The most frequent cause of low-gradient (LG) AS is the presence of a low LV outflow state, which may occur with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), i.e. classical low-flow, low-gradient (LF-LG), or preserved LVEF, i.e. paradoxical LF-LG. Furthermore, a substantial proportion of patients with AS may have a normal-flow, low-gradient (NF-LG) AS: i.e. a small AVA-low-gradient combination but with a normal flow. One of the most important clinical challenges in these three categories of patients with LG AS (classical LF-LG, paradoxical LF-LG, and NF-LG) is to differentiate a true-severe AS that generally benefits from AVR vs. a pseudo-severe AS that should be managed conservatively. A low-dose dobutamine stress echocardiography may be used for this purpose in patients with classical LF-LG AS, whereas aortic valve calcium scoring by multi-detector computed tomography is the preferred modality in those with paradoxical LF-LG or NF-LG AS. Although patients with LF-LG severe AS have worse outcomes than those with high-gradient AS following AVR, they nonetheless display an important survival benefit with this intervention. Some studies suggest that transcatheter AVR may be superior to surgical AVR in patients with LF-LG AS.

  15. Esophageal dilation: simple and effective treatment for adults with eosinophilic esophagitis and esophageal rings and narrowing.

    PubMed

    Bohm, M; Richter, J E; Kelsen, S; Thomas, R

    2010-07-01

    The goal of this article is to present the results of the long-term treatment with esophageal dilation of a consecutive series of adults with eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). EoE in adults is a disease of middle aged white males, with recurrent food impactions and dysphagia. The exact treatment of EoE is unknown due to the uncertainty of the pathogenesis. Currently, the long-term follow-up of adult EoE patients is limited. Sixteen consecutive adult patients (12 males/4 females between ages 27 and 58 years) with EoE underwent a detailed history and baseline upper gastrointestinal endoscopy (EGD) with multiple esophageal biopsies. Thirteen had esophageal dilation. Fifteen were on proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy. After dilation, one patient was treated with a restrictive diet. One patient took prn fluticasone. Most of the patients had allergy testing for food and aeroallergens. Follow-up evaluation with similar testing was on average 22 months (range: 12-40 months). Six patients were not available for follow-up. None of the remaining 10 patients had a food impaction; one required further esophageal dilation. Only two patients had intermittent dysphagia. The average dysphagia score decreased from 2.1 to 0.3 (P < 0.002). The average number of eosinophils at follow-up was not significantly different from baseline (120 eosinophils/HPF proximally and 165 eosinophils/HPF distally (P= 0.75). The gross endoscopy findings were unchanged in all patients except one who normalized. A total of 62% and 75% of patients had positive tests for aeroallergens and food allergens, respectively. Over an average of two years, esophageal dilation provided excellent symptomatic relief among 10 adult EoE patients despite no improvement in the mucosal eosinophilia or gross endoscopic appearance.

  16. Pathoanatomical characteristics of clinical lumbar spinal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Tomkins-Lane, Christy C; Battié, Michele C; Hu, Richard; Macedo, Luciana

    2014-01-01

    There is no clear picture of pathoanatomy in clinically diagnosed LSS. Findings in the literature regarding imaging in LSS are heterogeneous. Characterize the pathoanatomy of LSS, as reported in the radiology reports, for a large community-based sample of patients with the clinical diagnosis of LSS. Retrospective review of clinical radiology reports. The sample comprised patients 40 years of age or older, with clinically diagnosed LSS. Radiology reports for lumbar MRI were obtained and data were extracted pertaining to the type and location of LSS. 173 subjects with a mean age of 66.2 ± 11.7 years were included (61% women). 68.2% had mixed stenosis, 19.1% had central stenosis only, and 12.7% had lateral stenosis only. By level, the most prevalent findings were at L4/5 (93%), L3/4 (66%) and L5/S1 (49%). This pattern was different in those with lateral stenosis only, where the proportion of findings at L5/S1 was higher than at L3/4. 156 subjects (90.2%) had findings of at least moderate severity. Considering moderate-severe findings only, 31% had mixed stenosis and 40.0% had multi-level findings (90.5% at adjacent segments). When mild findings were included for subjects with at least one moderate-severe finding the rate of mixed stenosis increased to 59%, and multi-level stenosis to 68.6%. The most common multi-level combinations were L3/4 and L4/5 for two-level stenosis and L2/3 through L4/5 for three-level. Results of this study confirm a number of pathoanatomical patterns in people diagnosed with LSS, including a high proportion of stenosis at L4/5, followed by L3/4 and L5/S1. Results also suggest a high prevalence of multi-level stenosis at adjacent segments. The prevalence of mixed stenosis varied from 31% to 68.2%; inclusion of mild findings resulted in a higher rate of both mixed and multi-level stenosis, compared to analysis of moderate-severe findings only. These results may guide future studies on LSS pathophysiology, by focusing attention toward the most

  17. Eosinophilic esophagitis in patients with esophageal atresia and chronic dysphagia

    PubMed Central

    Kassabian, Sirvart; Baez-Socorro, Virginia; Sferra, Thomas; Garcia, Reinaldo

    2014-01-01

    Esophageal atresia (EA) is defined as a discontinuity of the lumen of the esophagus repaired soon after birth. Dysphagia is a common symptom in these patients, usually related to stricture, dysmotility or peptic esophagitis. We present 4 cases of patients with EA who complained of dysphagia and the diagnosis of Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) was made, ages ranging from 9 to 16 years. Although our patients were on acid suppression years after their EA repair, they presented with acute worsening of dysphagia. Esophogastroduodenoscopy and/or barium swallow did not show stricture and biopsies revealed elevated eosinophil counts consistent with EoE. Two of 4 patients improved symptomatically with the topical steroids. It is important to note that all our patients have asthma and 3 out of 4 have tested positive for food allergies. One of our patients developed recurrent anastomotic strictures that improved with the treatment of the EoE. A previous case report linked the recurrence of esophageal strictures in patients with EA repair with EoE. Once the EoE was treated the strictures resolved. On the other hand, based on our observation, EoE could be present in patients without recurrent anastomotic strictures. There appears to be a spectrum in the disease process. We are suggesting that EoE is a frequent concomitant problem in patients with history of congenital esophageal deformities, and for this reason any of these patients with refractory reflux symptoms or dysphagia (with or without anastomotic stricture) may benefit from an endoscopic evaluation with biopsies to rule out EoE. PMID:25548504

  18. Eosinophilic esophagitis in patients with esophageal atresia and chronic dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Kassabian, Sirvart; Baez-Socorro, Virginia; Sferra, Thomas; Garcia, Reinaldo

    2014-12-21

    Esophageal atresia (EA) is defined as a discontinuity of the lumen of the esophagus repaired soon after birth. Dysphagia is a common symptom in these patients, usually related to stricture, dysmotility or peptic esophagitis. We present 4 cases of patients with EA who complained of dysphagia and the diagnosis of Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) was made, ages ranging from 9 to 16 years. Although our patients were on acid suppression years after their EA repair, they presented with acute worsening of dysphagia. Esophogastroduodenoscopy and/or barium swallow did not show stricture and biopsies revealed elevated eosinophil counts consistent with EoE. Two of 4 patients improved symptomatically with the topical steroids. It is important to note that all our patients have asthma and 3 out of 4 have tested positive for food allergies. One of our patients developed recurrent anastomotic strictures that improved with the treatment of the EoE. A previous case report linked the recurrence of esophageal strictures in patients with EA repair with EoE. Once the EoE was treated the strictures resolved. On the other hand, based on our observation, EoE could be present in patients without recurrent anastomotic strictures. There appears to be a spectrum in the disease process. We are suggesting that EoE is a frequent concomitant problem in patients with history of congenital esophageal deformities, and for this reason any of these patients with refractory reflux symptoms or dysphagia (with or without anastomotic stricture) may benefit from an endoscopic evaluation with biopsies to rule out EoE.

  19. Efficacy of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy After Surgery in Early Stage of Esophageal Carcinoma;

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-30

    Esophageal Neoplasm; Esophageal Cancer TNM Staging Primary Tumor (T) T2; Esophageal Cancer TNM Staging Primary Tumor (T) T3; Esophageal Cancer TNM Staging Regional Lymph Nodes (N) N0; Esophageal Cancer TNM Staging Distal Metastasis (M) M0

  20. Hot water swallows improve symptoms and accelerate esophageal clearance in esophageal motility disorders.

    PubMed

    Triadafilopoulos, G; Tsang, H P; Segall, G M

    1998-06-01

    Cold liquid ingestion may precipitate episodes of dysphagia and chest pain in patients with spastic esophageal motility disorders. The effect of hot liquids on esophageal symptoms, esophageal peristalsis, and clearance and any potential therapeutic benefit in such patients has not been examined. Using esophageal scintigraphy and manometry, we have investigated the effects of hot water swallows on dysphagia, chest pain, and esophageal motility and clearance in patients with esophageal motility disorders. We studied 48 men and women with intermittent dysphagia to both solids and liquids, chest pain, and/or regurgitation. All patients underwent upper endoscopy, barium swallow, and esophageal manometry using standard techniques. Esophageal scintigraphy assessed esophageal transit time (ETT) and retrograde intraesophageal movement of bolus at baseline (22 degrees C) and after hot (60 degrees C) water swallows. Esophageal manometry assessed the amplitude and duration of esophageal contractions in response to baseline and hot water swallows. Patients were followed clinically for as long as 6 months to assess symptomatic response. We found that baseline esophageal scintigraphy revealed a mean ETT of 48.5 seconds; after hot water swallow, mean ETT was 27.8 seconds (p < 0.001). The number of secondary peaks at baseline was 3.5; after hot water swallow, it was 2.1 (p < 0.001). Baseline esophageal manometry showed a mean esophageal body contraction amplitude of 188 mm Hg (mean duration, 11.8 seconds) in response to wet swallows and 125 mm Hg (mean duration, 5.7 seconds) with hot water swallows (p < 0.001). Clinically, 28 (58%) of 48 patients noted significant (>50%) improvement of their symptoms and have been ingesting hot water or other hot liquids regularly with their meals. We conclude that hot water accelerates esophageal clearance, decreases the amplitude and duration of esophageal body contractions, and improves symptoms in patients with esophageal motility disorders

  1. [Esophageal histoplasmosis. A case report].

    PubMed

    Henry, M A; Mendes, E F; Saad, L H; Rodrigues, P A; Gonçalves, I

    1996-01-01

    The authors report a case of a patient with complaint of progressive disphagia. Stenoses of lower third of esophagus was revealed by radiological and endoscopic examinations. Fungi were showed in biopsy of lesion, with demonstration of Histoplasm capsulate by tissue culture. Endoscopic dilatation was performed because especific medical treatment failed but esophageal rupture was observed. Partial esophagectomy was performed with symptoms remission.

  2. Achalasia and Esophageal Motility Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease Tricuspid Valve Disease Cardiac Rhythm Disturbances Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Pediatric and Congenital Heart Disease Heart abnormalities that are present at birth in children, as well as in adults Atrial Septal Defect Ventricular Septal ... Arteriosus Single Ventricle Defects Lung, Esophageal, and ...

  3. EoE (Eosinophilic Esophagitis)

    MedlinePlus

    ... 15 or more eosinophils per high-powered microscopic field warrants a diagnosis of EoE. A patient may ... Eosinophilic Esophagitis EoE- How do we diagnose? APFED’s Educational Webinar Series © American Partnership for Eosinophilic Disorders (APFED) ...

  4. Esophageal Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Cancer.gov

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing esophageal cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  5. Esophageal Carcinoma Following Bariatric Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Leeman, Matthew F.; Richardson, J. David

    2004-01-01

    Background: The long-term success of bariatric operations for weight reduction has been well documented, but their potential effects on the risk of esophageal cancer have not been evaluated. Methods: We performed operations on 3 patients for esophageal cancer following bariatric operations: 2 had Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, and 1 underwent vertical banded gastroplasty. All of these patients had adenocarcinoma at the gastroesophageal junction; 1 involved the entire intrathoracic esophagus. Results: The intervals between the weight-loss operations and cancer diagnoses were 21, 16, and 14 years. All 3 patients had symptoms of reflux for many years before dysphagia developed and cancer was diagnosed. We performed a limited esophagogastrectomy, a classic IvorLewis procedure, and a total esophagectomy with jejunal free-tissue transfer from stomach to cervical esophagus. Two patients had positive lymph nodes. One patient is alive at 6 years; 2 died at 13 and 15 months after undergoing operation for recurrent cancer. Conclusion: The effect of bariatric operations on gastroesophageal reflux is not known, although gastric bypass has been advocated as the “ultimate antireflux procedure.” The presence of esophageal cancer in these 3 patients years after the weight loss operation is worrisome. We believe that patients who develop new symptoms should have endoscopic evaluation and that epidemiologic studies on the incidence of esophageal cancer occurring years after bariatric operation should be performed. PMID:15554284

  6. Left coronary artery stenosis causing left ventricular dysfunction in two children with supravalvular aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Yildiz, Okan; Altin, Firat H; Kaya, Mehmet; Ozyılmaz, Isa; Guzeltas, Alper; Erek, Ersin

    2015-04-01

    Congenital supravalvar aortic stenosis (SVAS) is an arteriopathy associated with Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS) and other isolated elastin gene deletions. Cardiovascular manifestations associated with WBS are characterized by obstructive arterial lesions such as SVAS and pulmonary artery stenosis in addition to bicuspid aortic valve and mitral valve prolapse. However, coronary artery ostial stenosis may be associated with SVAS, and it increases the risk of sudden death and may complicate surgical management. In this report, we present our experience with two patients having SVAS and left coronary artery ostial stenosis with associated left ventricular dysfunction. © The Author(s) 2014.

  7. Radionuclide Esophageal Transit Scintigraphy in Primary Hypothyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Shoukat H; Madhu, Vijay P; Rather, Tanveer A; Laway, Bashir A

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims Esophageal dysmotility is associated with gastrointestinal dysmotility in various systemic and neuroregulatory disorders. Hypothyroidism has been reported to be associated with impaired motor function in esophagus due to accumulation of glycosaminoglycan hyaluronic acid in its soft tissues, leading to changes in various contraction and relaxation parameters of esophagus, particularly in the lower esophageal sphincter. In this study we evaluated esophageal transit times in patients of primary hypothyroidism using the technique of radionuclide esophageal transit scintigraphy. Methods Thirty-one patients of primary hypothyroidism and 15 euthyroid healthy controls were evaluated for esophageal transit time using 15–20 MBq of Technetium-99m sulfur colloid diluted in 10–15 mL of drinking water. Time activity curve was generated for each study and esophageal transit time was calculated as time taken for clearance of 90% radioactive bolus from the region of interest encompassing the esophagus. Esophageal transit time of more than 10 seconds was considered as prolonged. Results Patients of primary hypothyroidism had a significantly increased mean esophageal transit time of 19.35 ± 20.02 seconds in comparison to the mean time of 8.25 ± 1.71 seconds in healthy controls (P < 0.05). Esophageal transit time improved and in some patients even normalized after treatment with thyroxine. A positive correlation (r = 0.39, P < 0.05) albeit weak existed between the serum thyroid stimulating hormone and the observed esophageal transit time. Conclusions A significant number of patients with primary hypothyroidism may have subclinical esophageal dysmotility with prolonged esophageal transit time which can be reversible by thyroxine treatment. Prolonged esophageal transit time in primary hypothyroidism may correlate with serum thyroid stimulating hormone levels. PMID:27444283

  8. Radionuclide Esophageal Transit Scintigraphy in Primary Hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Khan, Shoukat H; P, Madhu Vijay; Rather, Tanveer A; Laway, Bashir A

    2017-01-30

    Esophageal dysmotility is associated with gastrointestinal dysmotility in various systemic and neuroregulatory disorders. Hypothyroidism has been reported to be associated with impaired motor function in esophagus due to accumulation of glycosaminoglycan hyaluronic acid in its soft tissues, leading to changes in various contraction and relaxation parameters of esophagus, particularly in the lower esophageal sphincter. In this study we evaluated esophageal transit times in patients of primary hypothyroidism using the technique of radionuclide esophageal transit scintigraphy. Thirty-one patients of primary hypothyroidism and 15 euthyroid healthy controls were evaluated for esophageal transit time using 15-20 MBq of Technetium-99m sulfur colloid diluted in 10-15 mL of drinking water. Time activity curve was generated for each study and esophageal transit time was calculated as time taken for clearance of 90% radioactive bolus from the region of interest encompassing the esophagus. Esophageal transit time of more than 10 seconds was considered as prolonged. Patients of primary hypothyroidism had a significantly increased mean esophageal transit time of 19.35 ± 20.02 seconds in comparison to the mean time of 8.25 ± 1.71 seconds in healthy controls (P < 0.05). Esophageal transit time improved and in some patients even normalized after treatment with thyroxine. A positive correlation (r = 0.39, P < 0.05) albeit weak existed between the serum thyroid stimulating hormone and the observed esophageal transit time. A significant number of patients with primary hypothyroidism may have subclinical esophageal dysmotility with prolonged esophageal transit time which can be reversible by thyroxine treatment. Prolonged esophageal transit time in primary hypothyroidism may correlate with serum thyroid stimulating hormone levels.

  9. Clinical Study of Time Optimizing of Endoscopic Photodynamic Therapy on Esophageal and/or Gastric Cardiac Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-10

    Stage I Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage II Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage III Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage I Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage II Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  10. A complicated case of renal artery stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Chetcuti-Ganado, C; Samuel, A; Grech, V

    2005-01-01

    We present a boy with bilateral renal artery stenosis who presented with severe hypertension and haemorrhagic stroke. The diagnostic workup along with a complication of eventual surgical intervention are demonstrated. PMID:22368652

  11. Sequential probing and dilatation in canalicular stenosis.

    PubMed

    Park, Jongyeop; Kim, Hochang

    2015-11-01

    To assess the usefulness of sequential probing for diagnosing lacrimal canalicular stenosis, and the effectiveness of bicanalicular silicone intubation after sequential dilatation in treatment. Canalicular stenosis was diagnosed by sequential probing in 22 patients (22 eyes) who were misdiagnosed as canalicular obstruction. The patients were treated by bicanalicular silicone intubation after sequential dilatation. Anatomical improvements and functional relief of epiphora were evaluated. In addition, complications were evaluated. The average age of the 22 patients was 57 years, and the average follow-up period was 13 months. The silicone tube was left in place for an average of 14 weeks. The anatomical success rate was 100 %. Fifty-four percent of patients achieved complete relief of epiphora, 32 % partial relief, and 14 % no relief. There were no complications. Sequential probing is an useful diagnostic method for canalicular stenosis. Bicanalicular silicone intubation after sequential dilatation is a simple and effective treatment, and could be performed as primary procedure for canalicular stenosis before invasive surgery.

  12. Treating calcific aortic stenosis: an evolving science.

    PubMed

    Hull, Christine L

    2012-01-01

    Calcific aortic stenosis is a common valvular disease, but its pathophysiology remains undetermined and important considerations exist for treatment. Pathophysiology, treatment by the advanced practice nurse, and literature review are discussed in the context of a case study.

  13. Arteriovenous Access Failure, Stenosis, and Thrombosis.

    PubMed

    MacRae, Jennifer M; Dipchand, Christine; Oliver, Matthew; Moist, Louise; Lok, Charmaine; Clark, Edward; Hiremath, Swapnil; Kappel, Joanne; Kiaii, Mercedeh; Luscombe, Rick; Miller, Lisa M

    2016-01-01

    Vascular access-related complications can lead to patient morbidity and reduced patient quality of life. Some of the common arteriovenous access complications include failure to mature, stenosis formation, and thrombosis.

  14. Arteriovenous Access Failure, Stenosis, and Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    MacRae, Jennifer M.; Dipchand, Christine; Oliver, Matthew; Moist, Louise; Lok, Charmaine; Clark, Edward; Hiremath, Swapnil; Kappel, Joanne; Kiaii, Mercedeh; Luscombe, Rick; Miller, Lisa M.

    2016-01-01

    Vascular access–related complications can lead to patient morbidity and reduced patient quality of life. Some of the common arteriovenous access complications include failure to mature, stenosis formation, and thrombosis. PMID:28270918

  15. The 2-Year Outcomes Comparison between Ischemic Stroke Patients with Intracranial Arterial Stenosis without Significant Extracranial Carotid Stenosis and Patients with Extracranial Carotid Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Methawasin, Kulthida; Suwanwela, Nijasri C; Phanthumchinda, Kamnnant

    2015-10-01

    The risk of recurrent ischemic stroke and acute coronary syndrome increased in the large artery atherosclerotic subtype. The purpose of this study was to compare 2-year outcomes between the ischemic stroke patients with intracranial arterial stenosis without significant extracranial carotid stenosis and the patients with extracranial carotid stenosis. This study prospectively compared 123 ischemic stroke patients: 71 patients with intracranial arterial stenosis without significant extracranial carotid stenosis and 52 patients with extracranial carotid stenosis. Neurologic and radiologic investigations were performed at the beginning of the study. All of them were treated as regular outpatients of the neurology unit with a mean follow-up of 24 months. Recurrent stroke, myocardial infarction, and death were recorded. Fifteen patients of the extracranial carotid stenosis group and eighteen patients ofthe intracranial arterial stenosis without significant extracranial carotid stenosis group developed recurrent stroke during follow-up (p = 0.40). Acute coronary syndrome occurred in eight patients of the extracranial carotid stenosis group and only one of the intracranial arterial stenosis without significant extracranial carotidstenosis group (p = 0.004). Causes of death were end stage cancers, stroke and related conditions, and acute coronary syndrome. The multivariate analysis showed that symptomatic extracranial carotid stenosis is an important risk factor of the acute coronary syndrome (p = 0.03, OR = 10.81, 95% CI 1.23-94.77). There was no significant difference of recurrent ischemic stroke and recurrent stroke between patients with intracranial arterial stenosis without extracranial carotid stenosis and patients with extracranial carotid stenosis. On the other hand, patients with extracranial carotid stenosis had more incidences of acute coronary syndrome significantly than patients with intracranial arterial stenosis.

  16. Suture-induced right coronary artery stenosis.

    PubMed

    Seltmann, Martin; Achenbach, Stephan; Muschiol, Gerd; Feyrer, Richard

    2010-01-01

    An 82-year-old patient developed right heart failure in the days after surgical aortic valve replacement. Coronary CT angiography showed a high-grade stenosis of the mid-right coronary artery. Adjacent suture material seen on noncontrast CT suggested that the lesion was related to surgical closure of the right atrial cannulation site. Invasive angiography confirmed the stenosis, and percutaneous intervention was successfully performed.

  17. Tuberculosis-induced tracheobronchial stenosis during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Shojaee, Samira; Tilluckdharry, Lisa; Manning, Harold

    2012-07-01

    Central airway stenosis is extremely rare in pregnancy and could lead to respiratory and cardiovascular embarrassment, especially at the time of delivery. Initially, patients may not show obvious signs of respiratory difficulty. Early recognition of the disease and anticipatory management of a complicated delivery are very important. We present a pregnant patient with tuberculosis-induced severe tracheobronchial stenosis and discuss the management challenges of her delivery.

  18. Low-gradient aortic stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Clavel, Marie-Annick; Magne, Julien; Pibarot, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    An important proportion of patients with aortic stenosis (AS) have a ‘low-gradient’ AS, i.e. a small aortic valve area (AVA <1.0 cm2) consistent with severe AS but a low mean transvalvular gradient (<40 mmHg) consistent with non-severe AS. The management of this subset of patients is particularly challenging because the AVA-gradient discrepancy raises uncertainty about the actual stenosis severity and thus about the indication for aortic valve replacement (AVR) if the patient has symptoms and/or left ventricular (LV) systolic dysfunction. The most frequent cause of low-gradient (LG) AS is the presence of a low LV outflow state, which may occur with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), i.e. classical low-flow, low-gradient (LF-LG), or preserved LVEF, i.e. paradoxical LF-LG. Furthermore, a substantial proportion of patients with AS may have a normal-flow, low-gradient (NF-LG) AS: i.e. a small AVA—low-gradient combination but with a normal flow. One of the most important clinical challenges in these three categories of patients with LG AS (classical LF-LG, paradoxical LF-LG, and NF-LG) is to differentiate a true-severe AS that generally benefits from AVR vs. a pseudo-severe AS that should be managed conservatively. A low-dose dobutamine stress echocardiography may be used for this purpose in patients with classical LF-LG AS, whereas aortic valve calcium scoring by multi-detector computed tomography is the preferred modality in those with paradoxical LF-LG or NF-LG AS. Although patients with LF-LG severe AS have worse outcomes than those with high-gradient AS following AVR, they nonetheless display an important survival benefit with this intervention. Some studies suggest that transcatheter AVR may be superior to surgical AVR in patients with LF-LG AS. PMID:27190103

  19. Hemodynamics of Curved Vessels with Stenosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boghosian, Michael E.; Cassel, Kevin W.

    2007-11-01

    In hemodialysis access, the brachiocephalic or upper-arm fistula has less than optimal functional rates. The cause of this reduced patency is stenosis due to intimal hyperplasia in the cephalic vein. Stenosis typically leads to thrombosis and ultimately failure of the fistula. To increase our understanding of this process, numerical simulations of the unsteady, two-dimensional, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved for the flow in an infinite channel having curvature and stenosis. Physiologically relevant Reynolds numbers ranging from 300 to 1500 and stenosis percentages of 0, 25, 50, and 75 are modeled. The post-stenotic flow is characterized by strong shear layers and recirculation regions. The largest shear stresses are found just upstream of the stenosis apex. The maximum shear stress increases with increasing Reynolds number and percent stenosis. The results indicate that hemodynamic conditions in the vein after fistula creation combined with curvature of the cephalic arch lead to shear stresses that exceed normal physiological values (both minimum and maximum). In some cases, the shear stresses are sufficiently large to cause damage to the endothelium and possibly denudation.

  20. Intracranial stenosis in cognitive impairment and dementia.

    PubMed

    Hilal, Saima; Xu, Xin; Ikram, M Kamran; Vrooman, Henri; Venketasubramanian, Narayanaswamy; Chen, Christopher

    2017-06-01

    Intracranial stenosis is a common vascular lesion observed in Asian and other non-Caucasian stroke populations. However, its role in cognitive impairment and dementia has been under-studied. We, therefore, examined the association of intracranial stenosis with cognitive impairment, dementia and their subtypes in a memory clinic case-control study, where all subjects underwent detailed neuropsychological assessment and 3 T neuroimaging including three-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography. Intracranial stenosis was defined as ≥50% narrowing in any of the intracranial arteries. A total of 424 subjects were recruited of whom 97 were classified as no cognitive impairment, 107 as cognitive impairment no dementia, 70 vascular cognitive impairment no dementia, 121 Alzheimer's Disease, and 30 vascular dementia. Intracranial stenosis was associated with dementia (age/gender/education - adjusted odds ratios (OR): 4.73, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.93-11.60) and vascular cognitive impairment no dementia (OR: 3.98, 95% CI: 1.59-9.93). These associations were independent of cardiovascular risk factors and MRI markers. However, the association with Alzheimer's Disease and vascular dementia became attenuated in the presence of white matter hyperintensities. Intracranial stenosis is associated with vascular cognitive impairment no dementia independent of MRI markers. In Alzheimer's Disease and vascular dementia, this association is mediated by cerebrovascular disease. Future studies focusing on perfusion and functional markers are needed to determine the pathophysiological mechanism(s) linking intracranial stenosis and cognition so as to identify treatment strategies.

  1. Ineffective Esophageal Motility Progressing into Distal Esophageal Spasm and Then Type III Achalasia.

    PubMed

    Samo, Salih; Carlson, Dustin A; Kahrilas, Peter J; Pandolfino, John E

    2016-08-01

    The clinical significance of minor esophageal motility disorders is unclear, though they typically carry a benign course. Distal esophageal spasm progressing to achalasia has been reported, although it appears to be rare. We report a case of a patient with dysphagia and chest pain who was found to have ineffective esophageal motility on high-resolution manometry, which developed into distal esophageal spasm and then progressed to type III achalasia.

  2. Ineffective Esophageal Motility Progressing into Distal Esophageal Spasm and Then Type III Achalasia

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Dustin A.; Kahrilas, Peter J.; Pandolfino, John E.

    2016-01-01

    The clinical significance of minor esophageal motility disorders is unclear, though they typically carry a benign course. Distal esophageal spasm progressing to achalasia has been reported, although it appears to be rare. We report a case of a patient with dysphagia and chest pain who was found to have ineffective esophageal motility on high-resolution manometry, which developed into distal esophageal spasm and then progressed to type III achalasia. PMID:28119934

  3. Acoustic characteristics of Mandarin esophageal speech.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hanjun; Wan, Mingxi; Wang, Supin; Wang, Xiaodong; Lu, Chunmei

    2005-08-01

    The present study attempted to investigate the acoustic characteristics of Mandarin laryngeal and esophageal speech. Eight normal laryngeal and seven esophageal speakers participated in the acoustic experiments. Results from acoustic analyses of syllables /ma/and /ba/ indicated that, F0, intensity, and signal-to-noise ratio of laryngeal speech were significantly higher than those of esophageal speech. However, opposite results were found for vowel duration, jitter, and shimmer. Mean F0, intensity, and word per minute in reading were greater but number of pauses was smaller in laryngeal speech than those in esophageal speech. Similar patterns of F0 contours and vowel duration as a function of tone were found between laryngeal and esophageal speakers. Long-time spectra analysis indicated that higher first and second formant frequencies were associated with esophageal speech than that with normal laryngeal speech.

  4. Thoracic osteophyte: rare cause of esophageal perforation.

    PubMed

    Rathinam, S; Makarawo, T; Norton, R; Collins, F J

    2010-01-01

    Esophageal perforation is a difficult problem in thoracic surgery. Esophageal perforations can be spontaneous, iatrogenic, or malignant. We report two cases of esophageal perforations caused by thoracic osteophytes and different management strategies leading to successful outcomes. An 80-year-old male presented with chest pain and dysphagia following a fall. On endoscopy, an esophageal perforation and foreign body was noted which was confirmed as a thoracic osteophyte on computed tomography scan. He was managed conservatively as he declined surgery. A 63-year-old male was admitted with dysphagia following a food bolus obstruction. Following esophagoscopy and dilatation, there was clinical and radiological evidence of perforation. During surgery, a thoracic osteophyte was identified as the cause of perforation. The perforation was closed in layers and the osteophyte was trimmed. Both patients recovered well. Thoracic osteophytes are a rare cause of esophageal perforations and a high index of suspicion is required in patients with osteoarthritis who present with esophageal perforations.

  5. Unusual Cause of Esophageal Obstruction in a Neonate Presenting as Esophageal Atresia

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Shirin S; Dhaded, Sangappa M

    2013-01-01

    Esophageal atresia is the commonest cause of obstruction to esophageal lumen in neonates. Foreign bodies in newborns are extremely rare. We report a rare case of esophageal obstruction closely mimicking atresia due to foreign bodies inserted in a female neonate with homicidal intension. PMID:26023467

  6. Aortic Stenosis: Changing Disease Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Rashedi, Nina

    2015-01-01

    Aortic stenosis (AS) occurs in almost 10% of adults over age 80 years with a mortality about 50% at 2 years unless outflow obstruction is relieved by aortic valve replacement (AVR). Development of AS is associated with anatomic, clinical and genetic risk factors including a bicuspid valve in 50%; clinical factors that include older age, hypertension, smoking, diabetes and elevated serum lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] levels; and genetic factors such as a polymorphism in the Lp(a) locus. Early stages of AS are characterized by focal areas of leaflet thickening and calcification. The rate of hemodynamic progression is variable but eventual severe AS is inevitable once even mild valve obstruction is present. There is no specific medical therapy to prevent leaflet calcification. Basic principles of medical therapy for asymptomatic AS are patient education, periodic echocardiographic and clinical monitoring, standard cardiac risk factor evaluation and modification and treatment of hypertension or other comorbid conditions. When severe AS is present, a careful evaluation for symptoms is needed, often with an exercise test to document symptom status and cardiac reserve. In symptomatic patients with severe AS, AVR improves survival and relieves symptoms. In asymptomatic patients with severe AS, AVR also is appropriate if ejection fraction is < 50%, disease progression is rapid or AS is very severe (aortic velocity > 5 m/s). The choice of surgical or transcatheter AVR depends on the estimated surgical risk plus other factors such as frailty, other organ system disease and procedural specific impediments. PMID:26140146

  7. Treatment and long-term outcome of chronic radiation esophagitis after radiation therapy for head and neck tumors: A report of 13 cases

    SciTech Connect

    Silvain, C.; Barrioz, T.; Besson, I.; Babin, P.; Fontanel, J.P.; Daban, A.; Matuchansky, C.; Beauchant, M. )

    1993-05-01

    The natural history of chronic radiation esophagitis occurring in previously normal esophagus is still unknown. The authors describe here the long-term outcome of chronic esophagitis arising after neck irradiation for oropharynx and larynx carcinomas in 13 consecutive adult patients. The first clinical signs of radiation esophagitis were dysphagia or impossibility of oral intake, which appeared within 26 months (range 2--120 months) after the end of radiation for pyriform fossae carcinoma (N = 5), tonsil carcinoma (N = 2), larynx carcinoma (N = 2), pharynx carcinoma (N = 2), base of the tongue (N = 1), and thyroid carcinomas (N = 1). During upper endoscopy, an esophageal stenosis was found in 11 cases and was associated with ulceration in three cases. An isolated esophageal ulceration was present in only two cases. Chronic radiation esophagitis diagnosis was confirmed by histology and surgery in seven cases. In the last six cases, diagnosis was supported by the absence of first cancer relapses within a median follow-up of two years (16 months to nine years) and by endoscopic findings. Seven patients received parenteral or enteral nutrition. Ten patients were treated by peroral dilatations. These treatments allowed nearly normal oral diet in 11/13 patients. Only one patient was lost of follow-up after 20 months. Four patients died from chronic radiation esophagitis. One of these patients died from massive hemorrhage after peroral dilatation. Four patients died of a second carcinoma with no first cancer recurrence. Four patients were alive after six months to nine years of follow-up. Moderate dysphagia was still present, allowing nearly normal oral feeding. In conclusion, chronic radiation esophagitis is a severe disease with an underestimated frequency. In this study, peroral dilatations appeared to be necessary and were not associated with an increased morbidity. 21 refs., 1 tab.

  8. The Kagoshima consensus on esophageal achalasia.

    PubMed

    Triadafilopoulos, G; Boeckxstaens, G E; Gullo, R; Patti, M G; Pandolfino, J E; Kahrilas, P J; Duranceau, A; Jamieson, G; Zaninotto, G

    2012-05-01

    Esophageal achalasia is a primary esophageal motility disorder characterized by lack of peristalsis and a lower esophageal sphincter that fails to relax appropriately in response to swallowing. This article summarizes the most salient issues in the diagnosis and management of achalasia as discussed in a symposium that took place in Kagoshima, Japan, in September 2010 under the auspices of the International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  9. Post-intubation subglottic stenosis in children. Diagnosis, treatment and prevention of moderate and severe stenosis.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Hugo; Cuestas, Giselle; Botto, Hugo; Cocciaglia, Alejandro; Nieto, Mary; Zanetta, Adrián

    2013-01-01

    Subglottic stenosis is one of the most common causes of upper airway obstruction. Almost 90% of them result from endotracheal intubation. Therapy depends on the degree of stenosis, among other factors. Therapeutic approaches range from watchful waiting, in mild stenosis, to complex surgery for severe cases. We report our experience on the surgical management of post-intubation subglottic stenosis in children, emphasising the need for recognition and prevention of predisposing factors of post-intubation stenosis. We retrospectively evaluated 71 patients with moderate to severe post-intubation subglottic stenosis, operated in the Respiratory Endoscopy Service in a period of eight years. The clinical variables analysed were age at surgery, degree of stenosis, surgical technique, complications and outcome. In 84.5% of patients, only 1 surgical approach was required to achieve decannulation. Three surgical techniques were implemented as therapy: laryngotracheal reconstruction, partial cricotracheal resection and anterior cricoid split. Decannulation was achieved in 70 cases. In 71.8%, ventilation, swallowing and voice qualities were good; 23.9% presented dysphonia; and 2.8% presented a mild respiratory distress. One patient died. In patients with subglottic stenosis, selection of the most accurate treatment is the key to success, reducing the number of surgeries and preventing complications. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  10. Esophageal sensation and esophageal hypersensitivity - overview from bench to bedside.

    PubMed

    Miwa, Hiroto; Kondo, Takashi; Oshima, Tadayuki; Fukui, Hirokazu; Tomita, Toshihiko; Watari, Jiro

    2010-10-01

    Noxious stimuli in the esophagus activate nociceptive receptors on esophageal mucosa, such as transient receptor potential, acid-sensing ion channel and the P2X family, a family of ligand-gated ion channels responsive to ATP, and this generates signals that are transmitted to the central nervous system via either spinal nerves or vagal nerves, resulting in esophageal sensation. Among the noxious stimuli, gastric acid and other gastric contents are clinically most important, causing typical reflux symptoms such as heartburn and regurgitation. A conventional acid penetration theory has been used to explain the mechanism of heartburn, but much recent evidence does not support this theory. Therefore, it may be necessary to approach the causes of heartburn symptoms from a new conceptual framework. Hypersensitivity of the esophagus, like that of other visceral organs, includes peripheral, central and probably psychosocial factor-mediated hypersensitivity, and is known to play crucial roles in the pathoegenesis of nonerosive reflux disease, functional heartburn and non-cardiac chest pain. There also are esophagitis patients who do not perceive typical symptoms. This condition is known as silent gastroesophageal reflux disease. Although the pathogenesis of silent gastroesophageal reflux disease is still not known, hyposensitivity to reflux of acid may possibly explain the condition.

  11. Eosinophilic esophagitis: an immune-mediated esophageal disease.

    PubMed

    Weinbrand-Goichberg, Jenny; Segal, Idit; Ovadia, Adi; Levine, Arie; Dalal, Ilan

    2013-07-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is an emerging disease defined by esophageal dysfunction, by typical endoscopic findings and by abnormal eosinophilic inflammation within the esophagus. Eosinophilic accumulation in the esophagus occurs as a result of esophageal overexpression of pro-inflammatory mediators, including T cells and mast cells, cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-13, IL-5 and IL-15, as well as chemoattractants (eotaxin and transforming growth factor-β1, fibroblast growth factor and the newly characterized gene--thymic stromal lymphopoietin, which is a key regulator of allergic sensitization initiation). The role of allergy, particularly food allergy in EoE is indisputable, as elimination diet is a proven commonly used treatment for the disease. However, unlike classical immediate IgE-mediated reaction to allergen, EoE is associated with an altered immune response, characterized by a combination of IgE-mediated and non-IgE-mediated mechanisms. In this review, we aim to discuss the many typical aspects of EoE as opposed to other entities involving the esophagus, with focusing on the aberrant immune-mediated key players contributing to the pathogenesis of this unique disease.

  12. Esophageal motility abnormalities in gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Martinucci, Irene; de Bortoli, Nicola; Giacchino, Maria; Bodini, Giorgia; Marabotto, Elisa; Marchi, Santino; Savarino, Vincenzo; Savarino, Edoardo

    2014-05-06

    Esophageal motility abnormalities are among the main factors implicated in the pathogenesis of gastroesophageal reflux disease. The recent introduction in clinical and research practice of novel esophageal testing has markedly improved our understanding of the mechanisms contributing to the development of gastroesophageal reflux disease, allowing a better management of patients with this disorder. In this context, the present article intends to provide an overview of the current literature about esophageal motility dysfunctions in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. Esophageal manometry, by recording intraluminal pressure, represents the gold standard to diagnose esophageal motility abnormalities. In particular, using novel techniques, such as high resolution manometry with or without concurrent intraluminal impedance monitoring, transient lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxations, hypotensive LES, ineffective esophageal peristalsis and bolus transit abnormalities have been better defined and strongly implicated in gastroesophageal reflux disease development. Overall, recent findings suggest that esophageal motility abnormalities are increasingly prevalent with increasing severity of reflux disease, from non-erosive reflux disease to erosive reflux disease and Barrett's esophagus. Characterizing esophageal dysmotility among different subgroups of patients with reflux disease may represent a fundamental approach to properly diagnose these patients and, thus, to set up the best therapeutic management. Currently, surgery represents the only reliable way to restore the esophagogastric junction integrity and to reduce transient LES relaxations that are considered to be the predominant mechanism by which gastric contents can enter the esophagus. On that ground, more in depth future studies assessing the pathogenetic role of dysmotility in patients with reflux disease are warranted.

  13. Acute Necrotizing Esophagitis Followed by Duodenal Necrosis.

    PubMed

    Del Hierro, Piedad Magdalena

    2011-12-01

    Acute Necrotizing Esophagitis is an uncommon pathology, characterized by endoscopic finding of diffuse black coloration in esophageal mucosa and histological presence of necrosis in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The first case of acute necrotizing esophagitis followed by duodenal necrosis, in 81 years old woman with a positive history of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus, Hypertension, and usual intake of Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory drugs, is reported. Although its etiology remains unknown, the duodenal necrosis suggests that ischemia could be the main cause given that the branches off the celiac axis provide common blood supply to the distal esophageal and duodenal tissue. The massive gastroesophagic reflux and NSAID intake could be involved.

  14. Doxycycline-induced ulceration mimicking esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tahan, Veysel; Sayrak, Hakan; Bayar, Nevzat; Erer, Burak; Tahan, Gulgun; Dane, Faysal

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Doxycycline-induced esophageal ulcer patients are mostly young persons with no history of esophageal dysfunction. Heartburn, midsternal pain and dysphagia are the most common symptoms. It has generally a benign course. The present case is the first report of doxycycline-induced extensive ulcerations, mimicking esophageal cancer in two esophageal segments alongside, in the literature. Case presentation This report describes a 16-year-old Caucasian girl who, while taking doxycycline capsules100 mg twice a day for acne vulgaris for 3 months, developed these symptoms. An upper endoscopy revealed multiple circumferential deep ulcerations surrounding fragile, irregular, hyperemic and hypertrophic mucosa at the level of the mid-esophagus and concomitantly in the lower esophageal sphincter. The lesions were biopsied to exclude esophageal carcinoma because of the suspicious appearance in the endoscopic examination. The histopathological examination, haematoxylin and eosin stained sections showed ulceration with a mixed inflammatory infiltrate. Doxycycline was discontinued and she was given sucralfate 1 g qid and omeprazole 20 mg bid orally. All symptoms of the patient were resolved on the third day of the treatment. After 4 weeks of the therapy, an upper endoscopic control examination demonstrated normal findings. Conclusion The present case has been an uncommon presentation of doxycycline-induced extensive ulcerations, mimicking esophageal cancer in two esophageal segments, concomitantly. Even the lesions were biopsied to exclude esophageal carcinoma. A modification on the behavior of taking drugs can prevent these unpleasant complications. PMID:18778470

  15. Laboratory animal models for esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Dhanya Venugopalan; Reddy, A. Gopala

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of esophageal cancer is rapidly increasing especially in developing countries. The major risk factors include unhealthy lifestyle practices such as alcohol consumption, smoking, and chewing tobacco to name a few. Diagnosis at an advanced stage and poor prognosis make esophageal cancer one of the most lethal diseases. These factors have urged further research in understanding the pathophysiology of the disease. Animal models not only aid in understanding the molecular pathogenesis of esophageal cancer but also help in developing therapeutic interventions for the disease. This review throws light on the various recent laboratory animal models for esophageal cancer. PMID:27956773

  16. Novel stent in the palliation of malignant esophageal strictures: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Chen, H; Ni, Z; Jing, D; He, L; Qiao, L; Liu, L; Wei, X; Jiang, M; Tang, S; Xu, H

    2017-02-01

    The placement of metal stents is often used as a palliative treatment for malignant esophageal stenosis. We designed a novel stent that has been used clinically since 2011, and we therefore performed a retrospective study to compare the therapeutic effects of this novel metal stent to a conventional partially covered metal stent in patients with malignant esophageal strictures. The records of 201 consecutive patients who underwent placement of either the conventional partially covered metal stents (Group A, n = 92) or the new metal stents (Group B, n = 109) in the Endoscopy Center of General Hospital of Chengdu Military Command from October 2008 to March 2013 were reviewed. The median dysphagia score significantly improved in both groups 1 week following stent placement (P < 0.001). No significant differences were observed in success rate (P = 0.910) or the complication rate (P = 0.426) between groups. Six months after stent placement, recurrent dysphagia due to stent migration, tissue ingrowth or overgrowth or food obstruction occurred in 45% and 29% of patients in the conventional stent and new stent groups, respectively. The results of this retrospective study indicate that the new modified self-expandable metal stents (SEMS) is at least as safe and effective as the conventional partially covered SEMS in treatment of malignant esophageal strictures. © 2015 International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  17. Thoracoscopic Esophageal Atresia with Tracheoesophageal Fistula Repair: The First Iranian Group Report, Passing the Learning Curve

    PubMed Central

    Hiradfar, Mehran; Gharavifard, Mohammad; Shojaeian, Reza; Joodi, Marjan; Nazarzadeh, Reza; Sabzevari, Alireza; Yal, Nazila; Eslami, Reza; Mohammadipour, Ahmad; Azadmand, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background: Thoracoscopic treatment of esophageal atresia and tracheoesophageal fistula (EA+TEF) is accepted as a superior technique at least in cosmetic point of view but it is considered as an advance endoscopic procedure that needs a learning curve to be performed perfectly. This is the first report of Iranian group pediatric surgeons in thoracoscopic approach to EA. Methods and Materials: Since 2010, twenty four cases with EA+TEF underwent thoracoscopic approach in Sarvar Children Hospital (Mashhad -Iran). During the first 6 months, thoracoscopic approach to 6 cases of EA+TEF was converted to open procedure because of technical and instrumental problems. The first case of successful thoracoscopic EA repair was accomplished in 2010 and since then, 10 cases of EA+ TEF among 18 patients were treated successfully with thoracoscopic approach Results: Overall conversion rate was 58.3% but conversion rate after the primary learning curve period, was 35.7%. The main conversion causes include difficulties in esophageal anastomosis, limited exposure and deteriorating the patient's condition. Anastomotic leak and stenosis were observed in 20% and 40% respectively. Overall mortality rate was 4.2%. Conclusion: Thoracoscopic repair of esophageal atresia seems feasible and safe with considerable superiorities to the conventional method although acceptable results needs a prolonged learning curve and advanced endoscopic surgical skill. Clear judgment about the best surgical intervention for EA according to all cosmetic and functional outcomes needs further studies. PMID:27471677

  18. Esophageal mucosa exfoliation induced by oxalic acid poisoning: A case report.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jieru; Kan, Baotian; Jian, Xiangdong; Wu, Xiaopeng; Yu, Guancai; Sun, Jing

    2016-01-01

    This study reports the case of a 44-year-old woman with oral oxalic acid poisoning. As the illness progressed, the patient exhibited severe metabolic acidosis, large-area esophageal mucosa injury and acute kidney injury, which required dialysis. A guide wire slipped out of position during the process of hemodialysis and moved back and forth in the veins, but was removed successfully by interventional endovascular treatment. However, the patient's esophageal mucosa exfoliated, which lead to severe benign esophageal stenosis and dysphagia. Balloon distention was conducted twice in the upper digestive tract using X-ray location in combination with a dumb-bell bladder and interventional wire. The patient exhibited convulsions, shock, embolism and loss of consciousness while undergoing the second balloon distention procedure. Following symptomatic treatment, the patient eventually remained in a stable condition, the digestive tract expansion procedure was not resumed and a jejunostomy was performed in order to facilitate enteral nutrition, which was administered via the jejunum and had little stimulatory effect on the pancreas. Following various treatments, the patient's condition improved markedly, with renal function returning to normal.

  19. Protective effect of dimethyl sulfoxide on stricture formation in corrosive esophageal burns in rats.

    PubMed

    Kilincaslan, Huseyin; Karatepe, Hande Ozgun; Sarac, Fatma; Olgac, Vakur; Kemik, Ahu Sarbay; Gedik, Ahmet Hakan; Uysal, Omer

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) on stricture formation in corrosive esophageal burns. A total of 21 male rats were divided equally into three groups. In Group 1 (burn) and Group 2 (burn + DMSO) burns were induced in the distal esophagi with a 30% NaOH solution. In Group 3 (control), a saline solution was applied to the esophageal lumen. In Group 2, DMSO was administered intraperitoneally (3 mg/kg) 15 minutes after the burn was induced and then every 24 hours for 7 days. All rats were humanely killed at the end of Day 22. Distal esophagi were harvested for analysis. The stenosis index (SI) and histopathologic damage score were evaluated in addition to malondialdehyde (MDA), myeloperoxidase (MPO), nitric oxide (NO), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels. DMSO significantly decreased the levels of MDA, NO, TNF-α, and IL-6 in the rats with burned esophagi. Furthermore, the SI and histopathologic scores decreased significantly in the burn + DMSO group relative to the burn group (p < 0.05). Our results suggest that DMSO can decrease the occurrence of stricture formation and could represent a beneficial alternative therapy for the treatment of corrosive esophagitis. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  20. Esophageal mucosa exfoliation induced by oxalic acid poisoning: A case report

    PubMed Central

    WANG, JIERU; KAN, BAOTIAN; JIAN, XIANGDONG; WU, XIAOPENG; YU, GUANCAI; SUN, JING

    2016-01-01

    This study reports the case of a 44-year-old woman with oral oxalic acid poisoning. As the illness progressed, the patient exhibited severe metabolic acidosis, large-area esophageal mucosa injury and acute kidney injury, which required dialysis. A guide wire slipped out of position during the process of hemodialysis and moved back and forth in the veins, but was removed successfully by interventional endovascular treatment. However, the patient's esophageal mucosa exfoliated, which lead to severe benign esophageal stenosis and dysphagia. Balloon distention was conducted twice in the upper digestive tract using X-ray location in combination with a dumb-bell bladder and interventional wire. The patient exhibited convulsions, shock, embolism and loss of consciousness while undergoing the second balloon distention procedure. Following symptomatic treatment, the patient eventually remained in a stable condition, the digestive tract expansion procedure was not resumed and a jejunostomy was performed in order to facilitate enteral nutrition, which was administered via the jejunum and had little stimulatory effect on the pancreas. Following various treatments, the patient's condition improved markedly, with renal function returning to normal. PMID:26889241

  1. Renal artery stenosis: prevalence of, risk factors for, and management of in-stent stenosis.

    PubMed

    Boateng, Frank K; Greco, Barbara A

    2013-01-01

    Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis is common and is associated with hypertension and chronic kidney disease. More frequent use of percutaneous renal artery stent placement for the treatment of renal artery stenosis during the past 2 decades has increased the number of patients with implanted stents. In-stent stenosis is a serious problem, occurring more frequently than earlier reports suggest and potentially resulting in late complications. Currently, there are no guidelines covering the approach to restenosis after renal artery stent placement. This article reviews data on the prevalence of and risk factors for the development of in-stent stenosis and the clinical manifestations, evaluation, and treatment of in-stent stenosis and suggests a strategy for the management of patients after percutaneous renal artery stent placement. Copyright © 2012 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Causes and Consequences of Adult Laryngotracheal Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Gelbard, Alexander; Francis, David O.; Sandulache, Vlad C.; Simmons, John C.; Donovan, Donald T.; Ongkasuwan, Julina

    2015-01-01

    Objective Laryngotracheal stenosis is largely considered a structural entity, defined on anatomic terms (i.e. percent stenosis, distance from vocal folds, overall length). This has significant implications for identifying at-risk populations, devising systems-based preventive strategies, and promoting patient-centered treatment. The present study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that LTS is heterogeneous in regard to etiology, natural history, and clinical outcome. Study Design Retrospective cohort study of consecutive adult tracheal stenosis patients from 1998–2013. Methods Subjects diagnosed with laryngotracheal stenosis (ICD-9: 478.74, 519.19) between January 1, 1998 and January 1, 2013 were identified. Patient characteristics (age, gender, race, follow-up duration), and comorbidities were extracted. Records were reviewed for etiology of stenosis, treatment approach, and surgical dates. Stenosis morphology was derived from intraoperative measurements. The presence of tracheostomy at last follow-up was recorded. Results 150 patients met inclusion criteria. 54.7% had an iatrogenic etiology followed by idiopathic (18.5%), autoimmune (18.5%), and traumatic (8%). Tracheostomy dependence differed based on etiology (p<0.001). Significantly more patients with iatrogenic (66%) and autoimmune (54%) etiologies remained tracheostomy dependent compared to traumatic (33%) or idiopathic (0%) groups. On multivariate regression analysis, each additional point on Charlson Comorbidity Index was associated with a 67% increased odds of tracheostomy dependence (OR 1.67, 95% CI 1.04 – 2.69; p=0.04). Conclusions Laryngotracheal stenosis is not a homogeneous clinical entity. It has multiple distinct etiologies that demonstrate disparate rates of long-term tracheostomy dependence. Understanding the mechanism of injury and contribution of comorbid illnesses is critical to systems-based preventive strategies and patient-centered treatment. PMID:25290987

  3. Long Term Results of Esophageal Bypass for Corrosive Strictures without Esophageal Resection Using a Modified Left Colon Esophagocoloplasty--A Report of 105 Consecutive Patients from a Single Unit Over 30 Years.

    PubMed

    Ananthakrishnan, Nilakantan; Subbarao, Kasturi S V K; Parthasarathy, Govindraj; Kate, Vikram; Kalayarasan, Raja

    2014-06-01

    Esophageal stricture due to corrosive ingestion is a common cause of benign esophageal obstruction in developing countries. The immediate and long-term results of surgical bypass using a modification of the left colon conduit, will be reviewed. From 1977 to 2008, 105 patients underwent esophageal bypass for corrosive esophageal strictures using this procedure which has several modifications, detailed in the text, from the conventional left colon conduit. Acids were the most common corrosive implicated (70.5%). Eighty nine patients underwent a bypass based on the left colic vessel through the substernal route. The subcutaneous route was used in the rest for varying reasons. Postoperatively three patients died. Conduit necrosis was seen in only one patient. Postoperative morbidity included pneumothorax in 15, cervical anastomotic stenosis in one, cervical anastomotic leak in 13 (less than 3% the last 75 cases) and recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy in 6 (5.7%). 72 patients had normal swallowing and 33 had only occasional minor difficulty with solid food on follow-up. Surgical bypass using a modification of the left colon esophagocoloplasty remains a reliable procedure with acceptable morbidity and good relief of dysphagia.

  4. Pradaxa-induced esophageal ulcer.

    PubMed

    Wood, Michele; Shaw, Paul

    2015-10-09

    Pradaxa (dabigatran) is a direct thrombin inhibitor approved for prevention of stroke and systemic embolism in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. We describe a case of esophageal ulceration associated with Pradaxa administration in a 75-year-old man. The patient reported difficulty swallowing and a burning sensation after taking his first dose of Pradaxa. An esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) revealed linear ulcerations in the mid-esophagus. Pradaxa was held beginning the day before the EGD. The patient reported that his pain and difficulty swallowing resolved on stopping Pradaxa. Pradaxa is formulated with a tartaric acid excipient to reduce variability in absorption. We hypothesise that the capsule lodged in the patient's esophagus and the tartaric acid may have caused local damage resulting in an esophageal ulcer. It is important to educate patients on proper administration of Pradaxa, to decrease the risk of this rare, but potentially serious adverse event.

  5. Allergic Mechanisms in Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Wechsler, Joshua B; Bryce, Paul J

    2014-01-01

    Paralleling the overall trend in allergic diseases, Eosinophilic Esophagitis is rapidly increasing in incidence. It is associated with food antigen-triggered, eosinophil-predominant inflammation and the pathogenic mechanisms have many similarities to other chronic atopic diseases, such as eczema and allergic asthma. Studies in animal models and from patients over the last 15 years have suggested that allergic sensitization leads to food-specific IgE and T-helper lymphocyte type 2 cells, both of which appear to contribute to the pathogenesis along with basophils, mast cells, and antigen-presenting cells. This review will outline our current understandings of the allergic mechanisms that drive eosinophilic esophagitis, drawing from clinical and translational studies in humans as well as experimental animal models. PMID:24813516

  6. Neonatal and pediatric esophageal perforation.

    PubMed

    Rentea, Rebecca M; St Peter, Shawn D

    2017-04-01

    Esophageal perforation (EP) is a rare complication that is often iatrogenic in origin. In contrast with adult patients in whom surgical closure of the defect is preferred, nonoperative treatment has become a common therapeutic approach for EP in neonates and children. Principles of management pediatric EP includes rapid diagnosis, appropriate hemodynamic monitoring and support, antibiotic therapy, total parenteral nutrition, control of extraluminal contamination, and restoration of luminal integrity either through time or operative approaches. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Distal esophageal spasm: an update.

    PubMed

    Achem, Sami R; Gerson, Lauren B

    2013-09-01

    Distal esophageal spasm (DES) is an esophageal motility disorder that presents clinically with chest pain and/or dysphagia and is defined manometrically as simultaneous contractions in the distal (smooth muscle) esophagus in ≥20% of wet swallows (and amplitude contraction of ≥30 mmHg) alternating with normal peristalsis. With the introduction of high resolution esophageal pressure topography (EPT) in 2000, the definition of DES was modified. The Chicago classification proposed that the defining criteria for DES using EPT should be the presence of at least two premature contractions (distal latency<4.5 s) in a context of normal EGJ relaxation. The etiology of DES remains insufficiently understood, but evidence links nitric oxide (NO) deficiency as a culprit resulting in a disordered neural inhibition. GERD frequently coexists in DES, and its role in the pathogenesis of symptoms needs further evaluation. There is some evidence from small series that DES can progress to achalasia. Treatment remains challenging due in part to lack of randomized placebo-controlled trials. Current treatment agents include nitrates (both short and long acting), calcium-channel blockers, anticholinergic agents, 5-phosphodiesterase inhibitors, visceral analgesics (tricyclic agents or SSRI), and esophageal dilation. Acid suppression therapy is frequently used, but clinical outcome trials to support this approach are not available. Injection of botulinum toxin in the distal esophagus may be effective, but further data regarding the development of post-injection gastroesophageal reflux need to be assessed. Heller myotomy combined with fundoplication remains an alternative for the rare refractory patient. Preliminary studies suggest that the newly developed endoscopic technique of per oral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) may also be an alternative treatment modality.

  8. Optimal lymphadenectomy for esophageal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Oezcelik, A

    2013-08-01

    Recently published data have shown that an extended lymphadenectomy during the en bloc esophagectomy leads to a significant increased long-term survival for esophageal adenocarcinoma. On the other hand some studies indicate that the increased survival is based on stage migration and that the surgical complication rate is increased after extended lymphadenectomy. The aim of this review was to give an overview about all aspects of an extended lymphadenectomy in patients with esophageal adenocarcinoma. The review of the literature shows clearly that the number of involved lymph nodes is an independent prognostic factor in patients with esophageal adenocarcinoma. Furthermore, an extended lymphadenectomy leads to an increased long-term survival. Some studies describe that 23 lymph nodes should be removed to predict survival; other studies 18 lymph nodes or 15 lymph nodes. Opponents indicate that the survival benefit is based on stage migration. The studies with a large study population have performed a Cox regression analyzes and identified the number of lymph nodes removed as an independent factor for improved survival, which means it is significant independently from other parameters. Under these circumstances is stage migration not an option to explain the survival benefit. An important difficulty is, that there is no standardized definition of an extended lymphadenectomy, which means the localization and number of removed lymph nodes differ depending from the performing centre. The controversies regarding the survival benefit of the lymphadenectomy is based on the lack of standardisation of the lymphadenectomy. The main goal of further studies should be to generate a clear definition of an extended lymphadenectomy in patients with esophageal adenocarcinoma.

  9. Esophageal perforation and mediastinitis after suicidal ingestion of 4.5% sodium hypochlorite [correction of hydrochlorite] bleach.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung Soo; Min, Jin Hong; Kim, Hoon; Lee, Suk Woo

    2011-10-01

    A 16-year-old woman deliberately drank 4.5% sodium hypochlorite bleach. She was transferred to the emergency department after gastric lavage was performed at a local clinic. She experienced chest pain and fever after several vomiting episodes and esophagoscopy. Chest computerized tomography (CT) revealed air bubbles and abnormal soft tissue density at the right lateral aspect of the mid esophagus, a small amount of complicated pleural effusion, and pneumothorax. Barium esophagography revealed abnormal leakage of contrast media at the right wall of the mid esophagus, which indicated acute mediastinitis. The patient received intensive care and underwent delayed esophageal repair and colonic transplant. She was discharged 12 weeks after admission. Sodium hypochlorite is found in household bleaching agents used to disinfect dishes and bleach laundry. Poisoning due to ingestion of sodium hypochlorite bleach usually follows a benign clinical course. Few studies report severe complications such as esophageal stenosis or perforation.

  10. The management of eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Greenhawt, Matthew; Aceves, Seema S; Spergel, Jonathan M; Rothenberg, Marc E

    2013-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a clinicopathologic, chronic esophageal inflammatory disease resistant to acid suppressive therapy and is associated with variable symptoms indicative of upper gastrointestinal dysfunction. Per current guidelines established by The International Group of Eosinophil Researchers (TIGERS), the diagnosis is made in symptomatic patients after a biopsy that confirms a peak eosinophil level of ≥15 eosinophils/high-powered field (HPF). The esophagus is distinguished by pronounced tissue eosinophilia in which dietary antigens are key inciting factors for disease pathogenesis; EoE being reversed by elimination of triggering food allergens suggests that the disease is mediated in part by allergic sensitization to foods. Moreover, experimental EoE in mice can be induced not only via food exposure but also via aeroallergen exposure. Consistent with an allergic etiology rather than an acid-induced esophagitis, swallowed glucocorticoids are effective for the treatment of EoE. Evaluation by an allergist is a recommended part of the diagnostic workup, especially for management of allergic comorbidities. Clinical practice for the evaluation of patients with EoE mainly relies on prick skin tests due to the ease and validation of these tests in the context of immediate hypersensitivity. However, both atopy patch testing and serum IgE testing have been used in EoE. Herein, we reviewed the basic clinical features of EoE with a focus on the approach to diagnosing causative food allergens and to dietary therapy.

  11. Radionuclide transit in esophageal varices

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, S.H.; Wang, S.J.; Wu, L.C.; Liu, R.S.; Tsai, Y.T.; Chiang, T.T.

    1985-05-01

    This study assessed esophageal motility in patients with esophageal varices by radionuclide transit studies. Data were acquired in list mode after an oral dose of 0.5 mCi Tc-99m sulfur colloid in 10 ml of water in the supine position above a low-energy all-purpose collimator of a gamma camera. The condensed image (CI) superimposed with a centroid curve was also produced in each case. Twenty-five normal subjects (N) and 32 patients (pts) with esophageal varices by endoscopy (large varices in Grades IV and V in 8 and small varices in Grade III or less in 24) were studied. TMTT, RTT, RF, and RI were all significantly increased in pts as compared to N. Especially, the transit time for the middle third (6.7 +- 2.6 sec vs 3.5 +- 0.9 sec in N, rho < 0.005) had the optimal sensitivy and specificity of 88% each at the cutoff value of 4.2 sec as determined by ROC analysis. In summary, radionuclide transit disorders occur in the majority of pts with esopageal varices. The middle RTT and CI are both optimal in sensitivity and specificity for detecting the abnormalities.

  12. A Systematic Review of the Risk of Perforation During Esophageal Dilation for Patients with Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, John William

    2011-01-01

    Background Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is associated with tissue remodeling that can result in esophageal mucosal fragility, and esophageal dilation for patients with EoE is known to cause painful mucosal lacerations. Clinicians have been admonished that patients with EoE may be exceptionally predisposed to perforation with esophageal dilation, a notion supported primarily by case reports. We have conducted a systematic review of literature on esophageal dilation in EoE in an attempt to better define the risk of perforation. Methods We searched PubMed and abstracts presented at the annual scientific meetings of the American Gastroenterological Association and the American College of Gastroenterology to identify reports on esophageal dilation in EoE. We analyzed reports meeting the following criteria: (1) the diagnosis was established from esophageal biopsy specimens revealing ≥15 eosinophils/hpf, (2) esophageal dilation was described, (3) esophageal perforations described were the result of esophageal dilation. Results We identified 18 reports for inclusion in our systematic review. The studies comprised 468 patients who underwent a total of 671 endoscopic dilations. Esophageal mucosal tears were described in most cases, but there was only one perforation among the 671 dilations (0.1%). Conclusions Our systematic review does not reveal an inordinate frequency of esophageal perforation from dilation in patients with EoE, and it is not clear that dilation is any more hazardous for patients with EoE than for patients with other causes of esophageal stricture. Although esophageal dilation must be performed with caution in all patients, the risk of perforation in EoE appears to have been exaggerated. PMID:20238250

  13. Postpartum Vaginal Stenosis Due to Chemical Vaginitis

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Gurcharan; Gupta, Ridhima

    2016-01-01

    Acquired vaginal stenosis is a rare obstructing anomaly, which can be caused by use of chemicals in the vagina. A 21-year-old gravida 1 para 1, presented with secondary amenorrhea and inability to have sexual intercourse, after normal spontaneous vaginal delivery complicated by post partum bleeding. The delivery was conducted by untrained traditional birth attendant at home. The wash cloth soaked with caustic soda was packed in the patient’s vagina and was left in situ for 10 days, which ultimately led to the severe scarring and stenosis of the vagina. Patient underwent surgical management and the extensive vaginal adhesions were excised and a patent vagina was reconstructed. Patient then reported successful vaginal intercourse without dyspareunia. Post partum vaginal stenosis due to chemical vaginitis is rare. These cases can be prevented by adequate training of untrained health care workers. PMID:27437311

  14. Peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis in three cats

    PubMed Central

    AOKI, Takuma; SUNAHARA, Hiroshi; SUGIMOTO, Keisuke; ITO, Tetsuro; KANAI, Eiichi; FUJII, Yoko

    2014-01-01

    Case 1 involved a 4-month-old intact male Somali cat in which peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis (PPS) was recognized after a cardiac murmur remained following patent ductus arteriosus ligation. Case 2, which involved a 1-year-old neutered male Norwegian Forest cat, and Case 3, which involved a 6-month-old intact female American Curl cat, were referred, because of cardiac murmurs. Grades III to IV/VI systolic heart murmurs were auscultated at the left heart base in all 3 cats. All cases showed bilateral pulmonary artery stenosis, although there were no associated clinical signs. In Cases 1 and 2, the pressure gradient through the stenosis decreased after treatment with atenolol. PMID:25650057

  15. Percutaneous Valvuloplasty for Bioprosthetic Tricuspid Valve Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, Rohit; Sharma, Anjali; Kakouros, Nikolaos

    2017-01-01

    Percutaneous transcatheter tricuspid balloon valvuloplasty (PTTBV) is an accepted treatment option for symptomatic severe native tricuspid valve stenosis, although surgical tricuspid valve replacement remains the treatment of choice. There have been few reports of successful PTTBV for bioprosthetic tricuspid valve stenosis. We present case reports of 3 patients from our hospital experience. Two of the 3 cases were successful, with lasting clinical improvement, whereas the 3rd patient failed to show a reduction in valve gradient. We describe the standard technique used for PTTBV. We present results from a literature review that identified 16 previously reported cases of PTTBV for bioprosthetic severe tricuspid stenosis, with overall favorable results. We conclude that PTTBV should perhaps be considered for a select patient population in which symptomatic improvement and hemodynamic stability are desired immediately, and particularly for patients who are inoperable or at high surgical risk. PMID:28265212

  16. 21 CFR 878.3610 - Esophageal prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Esophageal prosthesis. 878.3610 Section 878.3610 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3610 Esophageal...

  17. 21 CFR 878.3610 - Esophageal prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Esophageal prosthesis. 878.3610 Section 878.3610 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3610 Esophageal...

  18. 21 CFR 878.3610 - Esophageal prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Esophageal prosthesis. 878.3610 Section 878.3610 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3610 Esophageal...

  19. 21 CFR 878.3610 - Esophageal prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Esophageal prosthesis. 878.3610 Section 878.3610 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3610 Esophageal...

  20. 21 CFR 878.3610 - Esophageal prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Esophageal prosthesis. 878.3610 Section 878.3610 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3610 Esophageal...

  1. Esophageal Impedance Monitoring: Clinical Pearls and Pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Ravi, Karthik; Katzka, David A

    2016-09-01

    The development of intraluminal esophageal impedance monitoring has improved our ability to detect and measure gastroesophageal reflux without dependence on acid content. This ability to detect previously unrecognized weak or nonacid reflux episodes has had important clinical implications in the diagnosis and management of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). In addition, with the ability to assess bolus transit within the esophageal lumen, impedance monitoring has enhanced the recognition and characterization of esophageal motility disorders in patients with nonobstructive dysphagia. The assessment of the intraluminal movement of gas and liquid has also been proven to be of diagnostic value in conditions such as rumination syndrome and excessive belching. Further, alternative applications of impedance monitoring, such as the measurement of mucosal impedance, have provided novel insights into assessing esophageal mucosal integrity changes as a consequence of inflammatory change. Future applications for esophageal impedance monitoring also hold promise in esophageal conditions other than GERD. However, despite all of the clinical benefits afforded by esophageal impedance monitoring, important clinical and technical shortcomings limit its diagnostic value and must be considered when interpreting study results. Overinterpretation of studies or application of impedance monitoring in patients can have deleterious clinical implications. This review will highlight the clinical benefits and limitations of esophageal impedance monitoring and provide clinical pearls and pitfalls associated with this technology.

  2. Esophageal diverticula in Parma wallabies (Macropus parma).

    PubMed

    Okeson, Danelle M; Esterline, Meredith L; Coke, Rob L

    2009-03-01

    Four adult, wild caught Parma wallabies (Macropus parma) presented with intermittent, postprandial, midcervical swellings. Esophageal diverticula were discovered in the four animals. One of two wallabies was managed successfully with surgery. A third animal died of other causes. The fourth animal died with possible complications from the diverticulum. This is the first published report of esophageal diverticula in macropods.

  3. Comparative genomic analysis of esophageal cancers.

    PubMed

    Caygill, Christine P J; Gatenby, Piers A C; Herceg, Zdenko; Lima, Sheila C S; Pinto, Luis F R; Watson, Anthony; Wu, Ming-Shiang

    2014-09-01

    The following, from the 12th OESO World Conference: Cancers of the Esophagus, includes commentaries on comparative genomic analysis of esophageal cancers: genomic polymorphisms, the genetic and epigenetic drivers in esophageal cancers, and the collection of data in the UK Barrett's Oesophagus Registry.

  4. 21 CFR 876.5365 - Esophageal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Esophageal dilator. 876.5365 Section 876.5365 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5365 Esophageal dilator. (a...

  5. 21 CFR 876.5365 - Esophageal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Esophageal dilator. 876.5365 Section 876.5365 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5365 Esophageal dilator. (a...

  6. Erlotinib Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Advanced Esophageal Cancer or Stomach Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    Adenocarcinoma of the Esophagus; Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Recurrent Esophageal Cancer; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Esophagus; Stage III Esophageal Cancer; Stage IV Esophageal Cancer

  7. Coronary Ostial Stenosis after Aortic Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Ziakas, Antonios G.; Economou, Fotios I.; Charokopos, Nicholas A.; Pitsis, Antonios A.; Parharidou, Despina G.; Papadopoulos, Thomas I.; Parharidis, Georgios E.

    2010-01-01

    Coronary ostial stenosis is a rare but potentially serious sequela after aortic valve replacement. It occurs in the left main or right coronary artery after 1% to 5% of aortic valve replacement procedures. The clinical symptoms are usually severe and may appear from 1 to 6 months postoperatively. Although the typical treatment is coronary artery bypass grafting, patients have been successfully treated by means of percutaneous coronary intervention. Herein, we present the cases of 2 patients in whom coronary ostial stenosis developed after aortic valve replacement. In the 1st case, a 72-year-old man underwent aortic valve replacement and bypass grafting of the saphenous vein to the left anterior descending coronary artery. Six months later, he experienced a non-ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction. Coronary angiography revealed a critical stenosis of the right coronary artery ostium. In the 2nd case, a 78-year-old woman underwent aortic valve replacement and grafting of the saphenous vein to an occluded right coronary artery. Four months later, she experienced unstable angina. Coronary angiography showed a critical left main coronary artery ostial stenosis and occlusion of the right coronary artery venous graft. In each patient, we performed percutaneous coronary intervention and deployed a drug-eluting stent. Both patients were asymptomatic on 6-to 12-month follow-up. We attribute the coronary ostial stenosis to the selective ostial administration of cardioplegic solution during surgery. We conclude that retrograde administration of cardioplegic solution through the coronary sinus may reduce the incidence of postoperative coronary ostial stenosis, and that stenting may be an efficient treatment option. PMID:20844624

  8. Lung Pathology in Pediatric Pulmonary Vein Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Pogoriler, Jennifer E; Kulik, Thomas J; Casey, Alicia M; Baird, Christopher W; Mullen, Mary P; Jenkins, Kathy J; Vargas, Sara O

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary vein stenosis is a rare progressive narrowing of the extrapulmonary pulmonary veins, presenting predominantly in infancy and virtually always lethal. It typically arises following repair of congenital heart disease, particularly anomalous pulmonary venous return. Histologic characterization of pediatric pulmonary vein stenosis, not previously well described, may provide insight into the disease pathobiology. We retrieved archival lung specimens (biopsy, explant, or autopsy) from patients with pediatric pulmonary vein stenosis. Medical records were reviewed. Microscopic examination included hematoxylin and eosin (H&E)-stained slides, and for a subset of patients, elastic, trichrome, smooth-muscle actin, and D2-40. Groups with different clinical disease features were compared using Fisher's exact test. A total of 33 patients (median age, 7 months) had available tissue and 52% had congenital heart disease; 18% were premature. Within the lungs, interlobular septal veins showed thickened muscular coats (in 58%), proliferation/tortuosity (in 6%), and fibromyxoid intimal proliferation (in 3%). Associated arterial hypertensive changes were seen in 30 (91%). The one patient with intrapulmonary venous fibromyxoid intimal proliferation was the only patient with apparent primary familial disease. Lymphangiectasia and arterial medial hypertrophy were histologic features that correlated with clinical grouping. We conclude that in pediatric pulmonary vein stenosis, intrapulmonary pulmonary veins commonly show muscular thickening, best interpreted as venous hypertensive remodeling. Fibromyxoid intimal proliferation resembling that of the extrapulmonary pulmonary veins is uncommon. Awareness of intrapulmonary features in various clinical subtypes of pulmonary vein stenosis may be diagnostically and therapeutically informative considering that current catheter-based and surgical therapy is directed at the extrapulmonary component of pulmonary vein stenosis.

  9. Recurred Post-intubation Tracheal Stenosis Treated with Bronchoscopic Cryotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Ye-Ryung; Taek Jeong, Joon; Kyu Lee, Myoung; Kim, Sang-Ha; Joong Yong, Suk; Jeong Lee, Seok; Lee, Won-Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Post-intubation tracheal stenosis accounts for the greatest proportion of whole-cause tracheal stenosis. Treatment of post-intubation tracheal stenosis requires a multidisciplinary approach. Surgery or an endoscopic procedure can be used, depending on the type of stenosis. However, the efficacy of cryotherapy in post-intubation tracheal stenosis has not been validated. Here, we report a case of recurring post-intubation tracheal stenosis successfully treated with bronchoscopic cryotherapy that had previously been treated with surgery. In this case, cryotherapy was effective in treating web-like fibrous stenosis, without requiring more surgery. Cryotherapy can be considered as an alternative or primary treatment for post-intubation tracheal stenosis. PMID:27853078

  10. Carotid stenosis, x-ray of the right artery (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... the right carotid artery showing a severe narrowing (stenosis) of the internal carotid artery just past the ... artery or ulceration in the area after the stenosis in this close-up film. Note the narrowed ...

  11. Microbiome in reflux disorders and esophageal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liying; Chaudhary, Noami; Baghdadi, Jonathan; Pei, Zhiheng

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma has increased dramatically in the United States and Europe since the 1970s without apparent cause. Although specific host factors can affect risk of disease, such a rapid increase in incidence must be predominantly environmental. In the stomach, infection with Helicobacter pylori has been linked to chronic atrophic gastritis, an inflammatory precursor of gastric adenocarcinoma. However, the role of H. pylori in the development of esophageal adenocarcinoma is not well established. Meanwhile, several studies have established that a complex microbiome in the distal esophagus might play a more direct role. Transformation of the microbiome in precursor states to esophageal adenocarcinoma-reflux esophagitis and Barrett metaplasia-from a predominance of gram-positive bacteria to mostly gram-negative bacteria raises the possibility that dysbiosis is contributing to pathogenesis. However, knowledge of the microbiome in esophageal adenocarcinoma itself is lacking. Microbiome studies open a new avenue to the understanding of the etiology and pathogenesis of reflux disorders.

  12. Lumbar stenosis: clinical case☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Sá, Pedro; Marques, Pedro; Alpoim, Bruno; Rodrigues, Elisa; Félix, António; Silva, Luís; Leal, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Lumbar stenosis is an increasingly common pathological condition that is becoming more frequent with increasing mean life expectancy, with high costs for society. It has many causes, among which degenerative, neoplastic and traumatic causes stand out. Most of the patients respond well to conservative therapy. Surgical treatment is reserved for patients who present symptoms after implementation of conservative measures. Here, a case of severe stenosis of the lumbar spine at several levels, in a female patient with pathological and surgical antecedents in the lumbar spine, is presented. The patient underwent two different decompression techniques within the same operation. PMID:26229836

  13. Supravalvular aortic stenosis after arterial switch operation.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Takuya; Koide, Masaaki; Kunii, Yoshifumi; Watanabe, Kazumasa; Kanzaki, Tomohito; Ohashi, Yuko

    2016-07-01

    Supravalvular aortic stenosis as a late complication of transposition of the great arteries is very rare, and only a few cases have been reported. We describe the case of a 14-year-old girl who developed supravalvular aortic stenosis as a late complication of the arterial switch operation for transposition of the great arteries. The narrowed ascending aorta was replaced with a graft. The right pulmonary artery was transected to approach the ascending aorta which adhered severely to the main pulmonary trunk, and we obtained a good operative field.

  14. DEGENERATIVE STENOSIS OF THE LUMBAR SPINE

    PubMed Central

    Zylbersztejn, Sérgio; Spinelli, Leandro de Freitas; Rodrigues, Nilson Rodinei; Werlang, Pablo Mariotti; Kisaki, Yorito; Rios, Aldemar Roberto Mieres; Bello, Cesar Dall

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an update on degenerative stenosis of the lumbar spine, which is a common pathological condition among patients over the age of 65 years. The anamnesis and physical examination need to be precise, since radiography often only provides indirect signs. Magnetic resonance imaging is necessary if the symptoms persist. The treatment for lumbar stenosis is a matter of controversy. However, there seems to be some benefit from surgical treatment rather than conservative treatment, such that surgery brings improvements in symptoms and functions for a period of up to two years. PMID:27042635

  15. Esophageal lung resection and prosthesis placement in a preterm neonate

    PubMed Central

    Parida, Lalit; Pal, Kamalesh; Buainain, Hussah A.; Al-Umran, Khalid U.

    2015-01-01

    This report describes a successful outcome in a preterm baby with an esophageal atresia and tracheo-esophageal fistula, who initially underwent a primary esophageal repair; but a persistent nonexpanding lung on the side of surgery led to further investigations. A further diagnosis of an esophageal lung resulted in pneumonectomy and prophylactic placement of an intra-thoracic prosthesis to prevent post-pneumonectomy syndrome. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a prophylactic placement of an intra-thoracic prosthesis in a neonate with the condition of esophageal atresia and tracheo-esophageal fistula and associated esophageal lung. PMID:25829674

  16. The Esophageal Propulsive Force: Esophageal Response to Acute Obstruction*

    PubMed Central

    Winship, Daniel H.; Zboralske, F. Frank

    1967-01-01

    The response of the normal human esophagus to an obstructing intraluminal bolus was investigated and compared to the response evoked by transient intraluminal distention. A balloon, immobilized within the esophagus by external attachment to a force transducer, was inflated with from 3 to 25 ml of air for from 3 to 210 sec. Pressure phenomena occurring in the esophagus were simultaneously recorded from the body of the esophagus above and below the balloon. Transient distention (5 sec or less) with small volumes (5 ml or less) often evoked a secondary peristaltic wave in the esophagus distal to the balloon, but infrequently resulted in the registration of any force exerted upon the balloon to drive it downward. Conversely, distentions of longer duration and with greater volume elicited an esophageal propulsive force exerted upon the balloon oriented to propel it aborally, and much less often evoked a propagated wave of secondary peristalsis. The propulsive force, obviously resulting from esophageal muscular contraction, occurred promptly, and once initiated, was sustained until deflation of the balloon. It varied widely in magnitude, from 4 to 200 g, and was associated with no motor phenomena recorded from the body of the esophagus proximal or distal to the balloon which could account for its presence, onset, magnitude, or duration. The force was inhibited by deglutition, but arrival of the primary peristaltic wave at the bolus resulted in augmentation of the force. When the obstructing balloon was freed from its attachment, the persistent, stationary force was converted to a propagated one that propelled the balloon before it. It the balloon was arrested before entering the stomach, the moving contraction was also arrested and the persistent propulsive force acting upon the balloon was maintained. The velocity of the moving contraction wave was determined in great part by the resistance offered by the bolus. Unrestrained, the balloon was propelled aborally at 4-8 cm

  17. Esophageal mucosal damage may promote dysmotility and worsen esophageal acid exposure.

    PubMed

    Meneghetti, Adam T; Tedesco, Pietro; Damani, Tanuja; Patti, Marco G

    2005-12-01

    This study determines the relationship among esophageal dysmotility, esophageal acid exposure, and esophageal mucosal injury in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). A total of 827 patients with GERD (confirmed by ambulatory pH monitoring) were divided into three groups based on the degree of mucosal injury: group A, no esophagitis, 493 patients; group B, esophagitis grades I to III, 273 patients; and group C, Barrett's esophagus, 61 patients. As mucosal damage progressed from no esophagitis to Barrett's esophagus, there was a significant decrease in lower esophageal sphincter pressure and amplitude of peristalsis in the distal esophagus, with a subsequent increase in the number of reflux episodes in 24 hours, the number of reflux episodes longer than 5 minutes, and the reflux score. These data suggest that in patients with GERD, worsening of esophageal mucosal injury may determine progressive deterioration of esophageal motor function with impairment of acid clearance and increase of esophageal acid exposure. These findings suggest that Barrett's esophagus is an end-stage form of gastroesophageal reflux, and that if surgical therapy is performed early in the course of the disease, this cascade of events might be blocked.

  18. Efficacy of Surgical Airway Plasty for Benign Airway Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Takahama, Makoto; Nakajima, Ryu; Kimura, Michitaka; Inoue, Hidetoshi; Yamamoto, Ryoji

    2015-01-01

    Background: Long-term patency is required during treatment for benign airway stenosis. This study investigated the effectiveness of surgical airway plasty for benign airway stenosis. Methods: Clinical courses of 20 patients, who were treated with surgical plasty for their benign airway stenosis, were retrospectively investigated. Results: Causes of stenosis were tracheobronchial tuberculosis in 12 patients, post-intubation stenosis in five patients, malacia in two patients, and others in one patient. 28 interventional pulmonology procedures and 20 surgical plasty were performed. Five patients with post-intubation stenosis and four patients with tuberculous stenosis were treated with tracheoplasty. Eight patients with tuberculous stenosis were treated with bronchoplasty, and two patients with malacia were treated with stabilization of the membranous portion. Anastomotic stenosis was observed in four patients, and one to four additional treatments were required. Performance status, Hugh–Jones classification, and ventilatory functions were improved after surgical plasty. Outcomes were fair in patients with tuberculous stenosis and malacia. However, efficacy of surgical plasty for post-intubation stenosis was not observed. Conclusion: Surgical airway plasty may be an acceptable treatment for tuberculous stenosis. Patients with malacia recover well after surgical plasty. There may be untreated patients with malacia who have the potential to benefit from surgical plasty. PMID:26567879

  19. Efficacy of Surgical Airway Plasty for Benign Airway Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Tsukioka, Takuma; Takahama, Makoto; Nakajima, Ryu; Kimura, Michitaka; Inoue, Hidetoshi; Yamamoto, Ryoji

    2016-01-01

    Long-term patency is required during treatment for benign airway stenosis. This study investigated the effectiveness of surgical airway plasty for benign airway stenosis. Clinical courses of 20 patients, who were treated with surgical plasty for their benign airway stenosis, were retrospectively investigated. Causes of stenosis were tracheobronchial tuberculosis in 12 patients, post-intubation stenosis in five patients, malacia in two patients, and others in one patient. 28 interventional pulmonology procedures and 20 surgical plasty were performed. Five patients with post-intubation stenosis and four patients with tuberculous stenosis were treated with tracheoplasty. Eight patients with tuberculous stenosis were treated with bronchoplasty, and two patients with malacia were treated with stabilization of the membranous portion. Anastomotic stenosis was observed in four patients, and one to four additional treatments were required. Performance status, Hugh-Jones classification, and ventilatory functions were improved after surgical plasty. Outcomes were fair in patients with tuberculous stenosis and malacia. However, efficacy of surgical plasty for post-intubation stenosis was not observed. Surgical airway plasty may be an acceptable treatment for tuberculous stenosis. Patients with malacia recover well after surgical plasty. There may be untreated patients with malacia who have the potential to benefit from surgical plasty.

  20. An analysis of early nonmortality outcome prediction in esophageal atresia.

    PubMed

    Alshehri, Abdullah; Lo, Andrea; Baird, Robert

    2012-05-01

    Advances in care for neonates with esophageal atresia (EA) has improved overall survival rates. Disease-specific prognostic scores for EA assess mortality risk without assessing patient morbidity. We undertook an analysis of these and generic scoring systems evaluating their ability to predict early nonmortality outcomes. We conducted a retrospective review of all patients with EA at our tertiary care children's hospital. Disease-specific (Spitz, Waterston, and Montreal) and generic prognostic scores (Score for Neonatal Acute Physiology II and Score for Neonatal Acute Physiology-Perinatal Extension) were calculated. Outcomes investigated included mortality and early nonmortality outcomes (leak, stricture, and recurrent fistula). These were assessed individually and as a composite "poor outcome" score. Correlations were sought, and receiver operating characteristic curves were generated. Fifty patients were included for analysis, with 5 deaths (10%) in our series. Eight patients developed a postoperative leak, 18 developed stenosis requiring dilatation, and 2 developed refistulization. Overall, 51% of survivors had a poor composite outcome. Although no prognostic score achieved statistical significance, the generic scores outperformed the disease-specific scores in predicting early nonmortality outcomes. Postoperative morbidity remains common in patients with EA. Disease-specific, preexisting prognostic scoring systems do not delineate surviving patients at risk for early complications and appears to underperform when compared with generic prognostic scores. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Activity assessment of eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Schoepfer, Alain; Safroneeva, Ekaterina

    2014-01-01

    The activity of eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) can be assessed with patient-reported outcomes and biologic measures. Patient-reported outcomes include symptoms and quality of life, whereas biologic measures refer to endoscopic, histologic, and biochemical activity (e.g. blood biomarkers). So far, a validated tool to assess EoE activity in the above-mentioned dimensions is lacking. Given the lack of a standardized way to assess EoE activity in the various dimensions, the results of different clinical trials may be difficult to compare. For symptom assessment in adult patients, the symptom 'dysphagia' should be evaluated according to different standardized food consistencies. Furthermore, symptom assessment should take into account the following items: avoidance of specific food categories, food modification, and time to eat a regular meal. A distinct symptom recall period (e.g. 2 weeks) has to be defined for symptom assessment. Performing an 'esophageal stress test' with ingestion of a standardized meal to measure symptom severity bears the potential risk of acute food bolus impaction and should therefore be avoided. The description of endoscopic findings in EoE has meanwhile been standardized. Histologic evaluation of EoE activity should report either the size of the high-power field used or count the eosinophils per mm(2). There is a current lack of blood biomarkers demonstrating a good correlation with histologic activity in esophageal biopsies. The development and validation of an adult and pediatric EoE activity index is urgently needed not only for clinical trials and observational studies, but also for daily practice.

  2. Endoscopic management of esophageal varices.

    PubMed

    Poza Cordon, Joaquin; Froilan Torres, Consuelo; Burgos García, Aurora; Gea Rodriguez, Francisco; Suárez de Parga, Jose Manuel

    2012-07-16

    The rupture of gastric varices results in variceal hemorrhage, which is one the most lethal complications of cirrhosis. Endoscopic therapies for varices aim to reduce variceal wall tension by obliteration of the varix. The two principal methods available for esophageal varices are endoscopic sclerotherapy (EST) and band ligation (EBL). The advantages of EST are that it is cheap and easy to use, and the injection catheter fits through the working channel of a diagnostic gastroscope. Endoscopic variceal ligation obliterates varices by causing mechanical strangulation with rubber bands. The following review aims to describe the utility of EBL and EST in different situations, such as acute bleeding, primary and secondary prophylaxis.

  3. Esophagectomy for Superficial Esophageal Neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Watson, Thomas J

    2017-07-01

    Endoscopic therapies have become the standard of care for most cases of Barrett's esophagus with high-grade dysplasia or intramucosal adenocarcinoma. Despite a rapid and dramatic evolution in treatment paradigms, esophagectomy continues to occupy a place in the therapeutic armamentarium for superficial esophageal neoplasia. The managing physician must remain cognizant of the limitations of endoscopic approaches and consider surgical resection when they are exceeded. Esophagectomy, performed at experienced centers for appropriately selected patients with early-stage disease can be undertaken with the expectation of cure as well as low mortality, acceptable morbidity, and good long-term quality of life. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. [Gastric adenomyoma clinically simulating hypertrophic pyloric stenosis].

    PubMed

    Sánchez García, S; Rubio Solís, D; Anes González, G; González Sánchez, S

    2016-01-01

    Gastric adenomyomas are extremely uncommon benign tumors in children. On histologic examination, these tumors have an epithelial component similar to pancreatic ducts. We present a case of a pyloric adenomyoma that clinically simulated hypertrophic pyloric stenosis in a newborn girl. Imaging tests, fundamentally magnetic resonance imaging, were very important in the characterization and diagnosis of this entity.

  5. Nitric oxide transport in an axisymmetric stenosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao; Fan, Yubo; Xu, X Yun; Deng, Xiaoyan

    2012-10-07

    To test the hypothesis that disturbed flow can impede the transport of nitric oxide (NO) in the artery and hence induce atherogenesis, we used a lumen-wall model of an idealized arterial stenosis with NO produced at the blood vessel-wall interface to study the transport of NO in the stenosis. Blood flows in the lumen and through the arterial wall were simulated by Navier-Stokes equations and Darcy's Law, respectively. Meanwhile, the transport of NO in the lumen and the transport of NO within the arterial wall were modelled by advection-diffusion reaction equations. Coupling of fluid dynamics at the endothelium was achieved by the Kedem-Katchalsky equations. The results showed that both the hydraulic conductivity of the endothelium and the non-Newtonian viscous behaviour of blood had little effect on the distribution of NO. However, the blood flow rate, stenosis severity, red blood cells (RBCs), RBC-free layer and NO production rate at the blood vessel-wall interface could significantly affect the transport of NO. The theoretical study revealed that the transport of NO was significantly hindered in the disturbed flow region distal to the stenosis. The reduced NO concentration in the disturbed flow region might play an important role in the localized genesis and development of atherosclerosis.

  6. Hypertensive encephalopathy complicating transplant renal artery stenosis.

    PubMed Central

    McGonigle, R. J.; Bewick, M.; Trafford, J. A.; Parsons, V.

    1984-01-01

    A 26-year-old female diabetic patient developed hypertensive encephalopathy with gross neurological abnormalities complicating renal artery stenosis of her transplant kidney. The elevated blood pressure was unresponsive to medical treatment. Surgical correction of the stenoses in the renal artery cured the hypertension and renal failure and led to the patient's complete recovery. Images Fig. 1 PMID:6377286

  7. Nitric oxide transport in an axisymmetric stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiao; Fan, Yubo; Xu, X. Yun; Deng, Xiaoyan

    2012-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that disturbed flow can impede the transport of nitric oxide (NO) in the artery and hence induce atherogenesis, we used a lumen–wall model of an idealized arterial stenosis with NO produced at the blood vessel–wall interface to study the transport of NO in the stenosis. Blood flows in the lumen and through the arterial wall were simulated by Navier–Stokes equations and Darcy's Law, respectively. Meanwhile, the transport of NO in the lumen and the transport of NO within the arterial wall were modelled by advection–diffusion reaction equations. Coupling of fluid dynamics at the endothelium was achieved by the Kedem–Katchalsky equations. The results showed that both the hydraulic conductivity of the endothelium and the non-Newtonian viscous behaviour of blood had little effect on the distribution of NO. However, the blood flow rate, stenosis severity, red blood cells (RBCs), RBC-free layer and NO production rate at the blood vessel–wall interface could significantly affect the transport of NO. The theoretical study revealed that the transport of NO was significantly hindered in the disturbed flow region distal to the stenosis. The reduced NO concentration in the disturbed flow region might play an important role in the localized genesis and development of atherosclerosis. PMID:22593099

  8. Esophageal hypersensitivity in noncardiac chest pain.

    PubMed

    Min, Yang Won; Rhee, Poong-Lyul

    2016-09-01

    Noncardiac chest pain (NCCP) is an often-encountered clinical problem. Although many patients suffer from persistent or recurrent chest pain, treatment remains a challenge owing to its various possible etiologies. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is the most common cause of NCCP. In GERD-related NCCP, proton pump inhibitor treatment appears to be effective. However, the pathophysiology remains to be fully elucidated in NCCP patients without GERD. Treatment for non-GERD-related NCCP has been aimed at esophageal motility disorders and visceral hypersensitivity. As there is growing evidence that esophageal visceral hypersensitivity plays a role in NCCP, pain modulators have become the mainstay of therapy in patients with non-GERD-related NCCP. However, there is an unmet need for the treatment of esophageal hypersensitivity in NCCP due to modest evidence for the benefit of pain modulators, including antidepressants, in non-GERD-related NCCP. Recent studies have demonstrated that esophageal mast cell infiltration and impaired mucosal integrity are related to visceral hypersensitivity in patients with NCCP. Thus, esophageal mast cell stabilization and restoration of esophageal mucosal integrity could be considered potential therapeutic targets in selected NCCP patients with hypersensitivity. However, further observations are necessary to shed light on esophageal hypersensitivity in NCCP.

  9. Endoscopic vacuum sponge therapy for esophageal defects.

    PubMed

    Loske, Gunnar; Schorsch, Tobias; Müller, Christian

    2010-10-01

    Anastomotic insufficiency in esophageal anastomosis and esophageal defects of other etiology are very severe complications. For anastomotic insufficiency in the rectum, endoscopic vacuum therapy has already been used successfully. The authors used vacuum therapy for anastomotic defects and other lesions of the esophagus. Between November 2006 and September 2009, 10 patients (5 men and 5 women, ages 46-82 years) were treated with endoscopic vacuum sponge therapy for anastomotic insufficiency secondary to esophagectomy or gastrectomy (n = 5), iatrogenic esophageal perforation (n = 2), esophageal wall necrosis (n = 1), Boerhaave's syndrome (n = 1), and perforation of esophageal cancer (n = 1). After one to seven changes of the sponge at intervals of 2-7 days and a mean therapy duration of 12 days, the defects were healed in all the surviving patients. During treatment, the patients were fed via an intestinal tube or percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG), or enterally past the sponge. One patient died of intercurrent severe colitis. In three cases, a revision laparotomy was necessary at the beginning of treatment. No postinterventional stricture or functional relevant scar formation was observed during a follow-up period of 10-380 days after termination of the vacuum therapy. Esophageal anastomotic insufficiency and esophageal wall defects of other causes can be treated successfully with endoscopic vacuum sponge therapy.

  10. Balloon dilation of congenital supravalvular pulmonic stenosis in a dog

    PubMed Central

    Treseder, Julia R.

    2017-01-01

    Percutaneous balloon valvuloplasty is considered the standard of care for treatment of valvular pulmonic stenosis, a common congenital defect in dogs. Supravalvular pulmonic stenosis is a rare form of pulmonic stenosis in dogs and standard treatment has not been established. Although, there have been reports of successful treatment of supravalvular pulmonic stenosis with surgical and stenting techniques, there have been no reports of balloon dilation to treat dogs with this condition. Here, a case of supravalvular pulmonic stenosis diagnosed echocardiographically and angiographically in which a significant reduction in pressure gradient was achieved with balloon dilation alone is presented. PMID:27297421

  11. Management of carotid stenosis. History and today

    PubMed Central

    Jargiełło, Tomasz; Drelich-Zbroja, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Internal carotid stenosis constitutes a significant clinical challenge, since it is the cause of 20–25% of ischemic brain strokes. The management of the internal carotid stenosis for many years has been raising controversies amongst neurologists, vascular surgeons and interventional radiologists mainly due to the introduction of endovascular stenting as an alternative to surgical treatment. Its application, however, requires knowledge of specific selection criteria for this kind of treatment as well as of the methods of monitoring patients after stent implantation into the internal carotid artery. Duplex Doppler ultrasound examination is currently a basis for the diagnosis of the arterial stenosis of precranial segments of the carotid arteries. It allows a reliable assessment of not only the course and morphology of the walls, but also of the hemodynamics of blood flow. Interventional treatment is applicable in patients with internal carotid stenosis of ≥70%, which is accompanied by an increase of the systolic flow velocity above 200 cm/s and the end-diastolic velocity above 50–60 cm/s in the stenotic lumen. In most cases, such a diagnosis in duplex Doppler ultrasound examination does not require any confirmation by additional diagnostic methods and if neurological symptoms are also present, it constitutes a single indication for interventional treatment. When deciding about choice of surgical or endovascular method of treatment, the following factors are of crucial importance: morphology of atherosclerotic plaque, its size, echogenicity, homogeneity of its structure, its surface and outlines. By means of ultrasound examinations, patients can be monitored after endovascular stent implantation. They enable evaluation of the degree of stent patency and allow for an early detection of symptoms indicating stenosis recurrence or presence of in-stent thrombosis. When interpreting the findings of the US checkup, it is essential to refer to the initial examination

  12. [Clinic, diagnosis and treatment of tracheal stenosis].

    PubMed

    Delgado Pecellín, I; González Valencia, J P; Machuca Contreras, M; Pineda Mantecón, M

    2009-05-01

    New surgical techniques have been developed for treatment of tracheal stenosis (TS) over the last few years. The aim of the present study is to examine the clinical, therapeutic characteristics and progress of the cases of TS diagnosed in our hospital from January 2004 to August 2007. We have reviewed the clinical history, focusing on age at diagnosis, clinical signs and symptoms, baseline pathology, previous history of mechanical ventilation, degree of stenosis, diagnostic technique, treatment and progress. A total of 16 cases were found, (2 congenital and 14 acquired). Mean age at diagnosis was 8.8 months (23 days-2.5 years). Of these, 14 patients had been intubated (3-44 days). Clinical suspicion was prompted by inspiratory stridor (44%), difficulty to be extubated or intubated (28%) and recurrent laryngotracheitis (39%). Three patients received CO(2) laser therapy and suffered a high number of restenosis and required re-interventions. Three patients underwent costal cartilage tracheoplasty and tracheal-cricoid split, showing a good prognosis and one patient underwent a slide tracheoplasty. Five patients with only a few clinical signs and mild stenosis, were managed on a wait and see basis. One patient with tracheal membrane underwent resection of the stenosed portion and end-to-end anastomosis with favourable progress. Another patient had a partial cricotracheal resection but suffered three restenoses. Two patients underwent surgical correction of the vascular ring. Asymptomatic patients may receive conservative therapy. In the case of short-segment stenosis, resection and end-to-end anastomosis is the therapy of choice and the long-segment stenosis has obtained good results by means of slide tracheoplasty, which involved no deaths and a very low morbidity.

  13. Management of carotid stenosis. History and today.

    PubMed

    Szczerbo-Trojanowska, Małgorzata; Jargiełło, Tomasz; Drelich-Zbroja, Anna

    2013-03-01

    Internal carotid stenosis constitutes a significant clinical challenge, since it is the cause of 20-25% of ischemic brain strokes. The management of the internal carotid stenosis for many years has been raising controversies amongst neurologists, vascular surgeons and interventional radiologists mainly due to the introduction of endovascular stenting as an alternative to surgical treatment. Its application, however, requires knowledge of specific selection criteria for this kind of treatment as well as of the methods of monitoring patients after stent implantation into the internal carotid artery. Duplex Doppler ultrasound examination is currently a basis for the diagnosis of the arterial stenosis of precranial segments of the carotid arteries. It allows a reliable assessment of not only the course and morphology of the walls, but also of the hemodynamics of blood flow. Interventional treatment is applicable in patients with internal carotid stenosis of ≥70%, which is accompanied by an increase of the systolic flow velocity above 200 cm/s and the end-diastolic velocity above 50-60 cm/s in the stenotic lumen. In most cases, such a diagnosis in duplex Doppler ultrasound examination does not require any confirmation by additional diagnostic methods and if neurological symptoms are also present, it constitutes a single indication for interventional treatment. When deciding about choice of surgical or endovascular method of treatment, the following factors are of crucial importance: morphology of atherosclerotic plaque, its size, echogenicity, homogeneity of its structure, its surface and outlines. By means of ultrasound examinations, patients can be monitored after endovascular stent implantation. They enable evaluation of the degree of stent patency and allow for an early detection of symptoms indicating stenosis recurrence or presence of in-stent thrombosis. When interpreting the findings of the US checkup, it is essential to refer to the initial examination

  14. Esophageal motility abnormalities in gastroesophageal reflux disease

    PubMed Central

    Martinucci, Irene; de Bortoli, Nicola; Giacchino, Maria; Bodini, Giorgia; Marabotto, Elisa; Marchi, Santino; Savarino, Vincenzo; Savarino, Edoardo

    2014-01-01

    Esophageal motility abnormalities are among the main factors implicated in the pathogenesis of gastroesophageal reflux disease. The recent introduction in clinical and research practice of novel esophageal testing has markedly improved our understanding of the mechanisms contributing to the development of gastroesophageal reflux disease, allowing a better management of patients with this disorder. In this context, the present article intends to provide an overview of the current literature about esophageal motility dysfunctions in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. Esophageal manometry, by recording intraluminal pressure, represents the gold standard to diagnose esophageal motility abnormalities. In particular, using novel techniques, such as high resolution manometry with or without concurrent intraluminal impedance monitoring, transient lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxations, hypotensive LES, ineffective esophageal peristalsis and bolus transit abnormalities have been better defined and strongly implicated in gastroesophageal reflux disease development. Overall, recent findings suggest that esophageal motility abnormalities are increasingly prevalent with increasing severity of reflux disease, from non-erosive reflux disease to erosive reflux disease and Barrett’s esophagus. Characterizing esophageal dysmotility among different subgroups of patients with reflux disease may represent a fundamental approach to properly diagnose these patients and, thus, to set up the best therapeutic management. Currently, surgery represents the only reliable way to restore the esophagogastric junction integrity and to reduce transient LES relaxations that are considered to be the predominant mechanism by which gastric contents can enter the esophagus. On that ground, more in depth future studies assessing the pathogenetic role of dysmotility in patients with reflux disease are warranted. PMID:24868489

  15. Esophageal distensibility as a measure of disease severity in patients with eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Nicodème, Frédéric; Hirano, Ikuo; Chen, Joan; Robinson, Kenika; Lin, Zhiyue; Xiao, Yinglian; Gonsalves, Nirmala; Kwasny, Mary J; Kahrilas, Peter J; Pandolfino, John E

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to assess whether measurements of esophageal distensibility, made by high-resolution impedance planimetry, correlated with important clinical outcomes in patients with eosinophilic esophagitis. Seventy patients with eosinophilic esophagitis (50 men; age, 18-68 y) underwent endoscopy with esophageal biopsy collection and high-resolution impedance planimetry using the functional lumen-imaging probe. The patients were followed up prospectively for an average of 9.2 months (range, 3-14 mo), and the risk of food impaction, requirement for dilation, and symptom severity during the follow-up period was determined from medical records. Esophageal distensibility metrics and the severity of mucosal eosinophilia at baseline were compared between patients presenting with and without food impaction and those requiring or not requiring esophageal dilation. Logistic regression and stratification assessments were used to assess the predictive value of esophageal distensibility metrics in assessing risk of food impaction, the need for dilation, and continued symptoms. Patients with prior food impactions had significantly lower distensibility plateau (DP) values than those with solid food dysphagia alone. In addition, patients sustaining food impaction and requiring esophageal dilation during the follow-up period had significantly lower DP values than those who did not. The severity of mucosal eosinophilia did not correlate with risk for food impaction, the requirement for dilation during follow-up evaluation, or DP values. Reduced esophageal distensibility predicts risk for food impaction and the requirement for esophageal dilation in patients with eosinophilic esophagitis. The severity of mucosal eosinophilia was not predictive of these outcomes and had a poor correlation with esophageal distensibility. Copyright © 2013 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. [Dietary and pharmacological aspects of eosinophilic esophagitis].

    PubMed

    Kocsis, Dorottya; Tulassay, Zsolt; Juhász, Márk

    2015-06-07

    Eosinophilic esophagitis is considered to be a chronic antigen-driven disease whereby food and/or aeroallergens induce a chronic inflammatory infiltrate in the esophagus leading to pathological hyperplasia of the epithelial and muscular layers, fibrosis of the lamina propria and symptoms of dysphagia and food impaction. Eosinophilic esophagitis is often associated with other allergic diseases such as asthma or atopic dermatitis. Current first line treatments of the disease include strict dietary modification and topical anti-inflammatory steroids. In this review the authors summarize currently available treatment strategies of eosinophilic esophagitis.

  17. [Oral blastomycosis, laryngeal papillomatosis and esophageal tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Montoya, Manuel; Chumbiraico, Robert; Ricalde, Melvin; Cazorla, Ernesto; Hernández-Córdova, Gustavo

    2012-06-01

    Esophageal involvement is an extremely rare complication of tuberculosis even in countries with high prevalence of infection. We report the case of a 57 year-old hiv-seronegative patient with simultaneous diagnoses of oral blastomycosis and laryngeal papillomatosis. Both were confirmed by anatomopathological analysis. The esophageal biopsy revealed granulomatous esophagitis with necrosis and ziehl-neelsen stain showed acid-fast alcohol resistant bacilli suggestive of tuberculosis. The patient's history included pulmonary tuberculosis twice and previous abandonment of therapy. Thus, it was necessary to use oral itraconazole combined with second-line anti-tuberculosis drugs administered through a gastrostomy tube. The clinical development was favorable.

  18. Oxidative stress from reflux esophagitis to esophageal cancer: the alleviation with antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Song, Ji Hyun; Han, Young-Min; Kim, Won Hee; Park, Jong-Min; Jeong, Migyeong; Go, Eun Jin; Hong, Sung Pyo; Hahm, Ki Baik

    2016-10-01

    The incidence of reflux esophagitis increases in world, affecting approximately 20% of Western populations and its consequent lesion, Barrett's esophagus (BE), established as the primary precursor lesion of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) or Barrett associated adenocarcinoma (BAA), is also increasing in incidence in Asian countries as well as Western countries. The fact that surveillance strategies have not had a major benefit in decreasing the incidence of EAC increased attention to arrest or delay the progression of BE to EAC. Since sustained inflammation and consequent oxidative stress plays core pathogenic role in reflux esophagitis, BE, and BAA, attention paid to anti-inflammatory and antioxidative agents in the treatment of reflux esophagitis. Since the risk of esophagitis is associated with hiatal hernia, body mass index, and duodenogastric reflux, and acid exposure, lifestyle modification and agents to control gastric acidity might be mainstay for treatment, but several studies consistently showed the implication of robust oxidative stress in reflux associated esophageal diseases. In this review article, the pathogenic implication of oxidative stress will be introduced in the development of reflux esophagitis, BE, and EAC. Also, since there is great interest in complete healing of reflux esophagitis and chemoprevention to prevent or slow malignant transformation, the contribution of antioxidants or antioxidative agents, which was delivered during SFRR-Asia 2015 (Chiangmai, Thailand), will be described. Also, the molecular mechanisms how the antioxidative drugs, rebamipide, ecabet sodium, and pantoprazole exerted significant protection from acids or bile acids-associated esophagitis are included.

  19. Esophageal irritation due to alendronate sodium tablets: possible mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Peter, C P; Handt, L K; Smith, S M

    1998-09-01

    Animal studies were done using an in vivo dog model to examine the possible mechanism for the esophageal adverse events reported with alendronate sodium tablets. These studies showed that under low pH conditions alendronate sodium can cause esophageal irritation. No esophageal irritation occurred at pH 3.5 or higher where the drug exists primarily as the sodium salt. The animal studies also showed that alendronate sodium can exacerbate preexisting esophageal damage. Exposure of the esophageal mucosa for a prolonged period to alendronate sodium tablet can also cause mild esophageal irritation. These findings suggest that the esophageal irritation in patients taking Fosamax can be from prolonged contact with the tablet, reflux of acidic gastric contents with alendronate sodium, and exacerbation of preexisting esophageal damage. The findings also suggest that other bisphosphonates can cause esophageal injury under similar conditions.

  20. Proteomic profiling of fetal esophageal epithelium, esophageal cancer, and tumor-adjacent esophageal epithelium and immunohistochemical characterization of a representative differential protein, PRX6

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jun-Hui; Xing, Guo-Lan; Fang, Xin-Hui; Wu, Hui-Fang; Zhang, Bo; Yu, Jin-Zhong; Fan, Zong-Min; Wang, Li-Dong

    2017-01-01

    AIM To understand the molecular mechanism of esophageal cancer development and provide molecular markers for screening high-risk populations and early diagnosis. METHODS Two-dimensional electrophoresis combined with mass spectrometry were adopted to screen differentially expressed proteins in nine cases of fetal esophageal epithelium, eight cases of esophageal cancer, and eight cases of tumor-adjacent normal esophageal epithelium collected from fetuses of different gestational age, or esophageal cancer patients from a high-risk area of esophageal cancer in China. Immunohistochemistry (avidin-biotin-horseradish peroxidase complex method) was used to detect the expression of peroxiredoxin (PRX)6 in 91 cases of esophageal cancer, tumor-adjacent normal esophageal tissue, basal cell hyperplasia, dysplasia, and carcinoma in situ, as well as 65 cases of esophageal epithelium from fetuses at a gestational age of 3-9 mo. RESULTS After peptide mass fingerprint analysis and search of protein databases, 21 differential proteins were identified; some of which represent a protein isoform. Varying degrees of expression of PRX6 protein, which was localized mainly in the cytoplasm, were detected in adult and fetal normal esophageal tissues, precancerous lesions, and esophageal cancer. With the progression of esophageal lesions, PRX6 protein expression showed a declining trend (P < 0.05). In fetal epithelium from fetuses at gestational age 3-6 mo, PRX6 protein expression showed a declining trend with age (P < 0.05). PRX6 protein expression was significantly higher in well-differentiated esophageal cancer tissues than in poorly differentiated esophageal cancer tissues (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION Development and progression of esophageal cancer result from interactions of genetic changes (accumulation or superposition). PRX6 protein is associated with fetal esophageal development and cancer differentiation. PMID:28293090

  1. Objectively Quantifying Radiation Esophagitis with Novel CT-based Metrics

    PubMed Central

    Niedzielski, Joshua S.; Yang, Jinzhong; Stingo, Francesco; Martel, Mary K.; Mohan, Radhe; Gomez, Daniel R.; Briere, Tina M.; Liao, Zhongxing; Court, Laurence E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To study radiation-induced esophageal expansion as an objective measure of radiation esophagitis in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with IMRT. Methods and Materials Eighty-five patients had weekly intra-treatment CT imaging and esophagitis scoring according to Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events 4.0, (24 Grade0, 45 Grade2, and 16 Grade3). Nineteen esophageal expansion metrics based on mean, maximum, spatial length, and volume of expansion were calculated as voxel-based relative volume change, using the Jacobian determinant from deformable image registration between the planning and weekly CTs. An anatomic variability correction method was validated and applied to these metrics to reduce uncertainty. An analysis of expansion metrics and radiation esophagitis grade was conducted using normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) from univariate logistic regression and Spearman rank for grade 2 and grade 3 esophagitis endpoints, as well as the timing of expansion and esophagitis grade. Metrics’ performance in classifying esophagitis was tested with Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) analysis. Results Expansion increased with esophagitis grade. Thirteen of nineteen expansion metrics had ROC area under the curve (AUC) values >0.80 for both grade 2 and grade 3 esophagitis endpoints, with the highest performance from maximum axial expansion (MaxExp1) and esophageal length with axial expansion ≥30% (LenExp30%) with AUCs of 0.93 and 0.91 for grade2, 0.90 and 0.90 for grade3 esophagitis, respectively. Conclusions Esophageal expansion may be a suitable objective measure of esophagitis, particularly maximum axial esophageal expansion and esophageal length with axial expansion ≥30%, with 2.1 Jacobian Value and 98.6mm as the metric value for 50% probability of grade3 esophagitis. The uncertainty in esophageal Jacobian calculations can be reduced with anatomic correction methods. PMID:26675063

  2. Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI): Experimental Quantification of Vascular Stenosis Using Stationary Stenosis Phantoms.

    PubMed

    Vaalma, Sarah; Rahmer, Jürgen; Panagiotopoulos, Nikolaos; Duschka, Robert L; Borgert, Jörn; Barkhausen, Jörg; Vogt, Florian M; Haegele, Julian

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) is able to provide high temporal and good spatial resolution, high signal-to-noise ratio and sensitivity. Furthermore, it is a truly quantitative method as its signal strength is proportional to the concentration of its tracer, superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIOs). Because of that, MPI is proposed to be a promising future method for cardiovascular imaging. Here, an interesting application may be the quantification of vascular pathologies like stenosis by utilizing the proportionality of the SPIO concentration and the MPI signal strength. In this study, the feasibility of MPI based stenosis quantification is evaluated based on this application scenario. Nine different stenosis phantoms with a normal diameter of 10 mm each and different stenoses of 1-9 mm and ten reference phantoms with a straight diameter of 1-10 mm were filled with a 1% Resovist dilution and measured in a preclinical MPI-demonstrator. The MPI signal intensities of the reference phantoms were compared to each other and the change of signal intensity within each stenosis phantom was used to calculate the degree of stenosis. These values were then compared to the known diameters of each phantom. As a second measurement, the 5 mm stenosis phantom was used for a serial dilution measurement down to a Resovist dilution of 1:3200 (0.031%), which is lower than a first pass blood concentration of a Resovist bolus in the peripheral arteries of an average adult human of at least about 1:1000. The correlation of the stenosis values based on MPI signal intensity measurements and based on the known diameters showed a very good agreement, proving the high precision of quantitative MPI in this regard.

  3. Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI): Experimental Quantification of Vascular Stenosis Using Stationary Stenosis Phantoms

    PubMed Central

    Vaalma, Sarah; Rahmer, Jürgen; Panagiotopoulos, Nikolaos; Duschka, Robert L.; Borgert, Jörn; Barkhausen, Jörg; Vogt, Florian M.

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) is able to provide high temporal and good spatial resolution, high signal-to-noise ratio and sensitivity. Furthermore, it is a truly quantitative method as its signal strength is proportional to the concentration of its tracer, superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIOs). Because of that, MPI is proposed to be a promising future method for cardiovascular imaging. Here, an interesting application may be the quantification of vascular pathologies like stenosis by utilizing the proportionality of the SPIO concentration and the MPI signal strength. In this study, the feasibility of MPI based stenosis quantification is evaluated based on this application scenario. Nine different stenosis phantoms with a normal diameter of 10 mm each and different stenoses of 1–9 mm and ten reference phantoms with a straight diameter of 1–10 mm were filled with a 1% Resovist dilution and measured in a preclinical MPI-demonstrator. The MPI signal intensities of the reference phantoms were compared to each other and the change of signal intensity within each stenosis phantom was used to calculate the degree of stenosis. These values were then compared to the known diameters of each phantom. As a second measurement, the 5 mm stenosis phantom was used for a serial dilution measurement down to a Resovist dilution of 1:3200 (0.031%), which is lower than a first pass blood concentration of a Resovist bolus in the peripheral arteries of an average adult human of at least about 1:1000. The correlation of the stenosis values based on MPI signal intensity measurements and based on the known diameters showed a very good agreement, proving the high precision of quantitative MPI in this regard. PMID:28056102

  4. Classification of Esophageal Strictures following Esophageal Atresia Repair.

    PubMed

    Macchini, Francesco; Parente, Giovanni; Morandi, Anna; Farris, Giorgio; Gentilino, Valerio; Leva, Ernesto

    2017-03-06

    Introduction The aim of this study was to stratify anastomotic strictures (AS) following esophageal atresia (EA) repair and to establish predictors for the need of dilations. Material and Methods A retrospective study on children operated on for EA between 2004 and 2014 was conducted. The stricture index (SI) was measured both radiologically (SIXR) and endoscopically (SIEND). A correlation analysis between the SI and the number of dilations was performed using Spearman's test and linear regression analysis. Results In this study, 40 patients were included: 35 (87.5%) presented with Gross's type C EA, 3 (7.5%) type A, 1 (2.5%) type B, and 1 (2.5%) type D. The mean follow-up time was 101 ± 71.1 months (range: 7.8-232.5, median: 97.6). The mean SIXR was 0.56 ± 0.16 (range: 0.15-0.86). The mean SIEND was 0.45 ± 0.22 (range: 0.15-0.85). Twenty-four patients (60%) underwent a mean of 2 endoscopic dilations (range: 1-9). The number of dilations was poorly correlated with SIXR, while significantly correlated with SIEND. Patients who did not need dilations had a SIEND < 0.33, patients who needed only one dilation had 0.33 ≤ SIEND < 0.44, and those with SIEND ≥ 0.44 needed two or more dilations. No significant association with other clinical variables was found. All patients were asymptomatic at the time of the first endoscopy. Conclusion SIEND is a useful tool to classify AS and can represent a predictor of the need for endoscopic dilation. The role of the SIEND becomes even more important as clinical characteristics have a low predictive value for the development of an AS and the need for subsequent endoscopic esophageal dilatations.

  5. Eosinophilic Esophagitis (EE) or (EoE)

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the esophagus. One example is acid reflux . Proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) are medications that help reduce ... other conditions caused by too much stomach acid. Proton-pump inhibitor responsive esophageal eosinophilia or PPI-REE ...

  6. New Device Approved for Esophageal Birth Defect

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_165596.html New Device Approved for Esophageal Birth Defect Condition affects ... 2017 MONDAY, May 15, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A new medical device has been approved by the U.S. ...

  7. Regenerative Medicine Strategies for Esophageal Repair

    PubMed Central

    Londono, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Pathologies that involve the structure and/or function of the esophagus can be life-threatening. The esophagus is a complex organ comprising nonredundant tissue that does not have the ability to regenerate. Currently available interventions for esophageal pathology have limited success and are typically associated with significant morbidity. Hence, there is currently an unmet clinical need for effective methods of esophageal repair. The present article presents a review of esophageal disease along with the anatomic and functional consequences of each pathologic process, the shortcomings associated with currently available therapies, and the latest advancements in the field of regenerative medicine with respect to strategies for esophageal repair from benchtop to bedside. PMID:25813694

  8. Managing eosinophilic esophagitis: challenges and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Nisha A; Albert, Dustin M; Hall, Noah M; Moawad, Fouad J

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic and progressive immune-mediated condition defined by symptoms of esophageal dysfunction and dense eosinophilic infiltration of the esophageal mucosa. Therapies consist of anti-eosinophilic medications and specialized diets aimed to decrease the progression of EoE and alleviate its symptoms, namely, dysphagia and food impaction. Assessing response to therapy remains challenging, as treatment end points are not well defined and currently consist of clinical, histologic, and endoscopic features. Newer validated measures may help standardize treatment end points. Emerging data support the use of maintenance therapy, which may reduce disease progression. Optimal dosages, delivery techniques, and duration of treatment need to be determined. When features of fibrostenosis develop, esophageal dilation is a safe and effective adjunctive strategy for improving symptoms. In EoE cases refractory to conventional treatments, newer therapies targeting inflammatory mediators and cytokines are on the horizon. PMID:27695356

  9. 21 CFR 868.5650 - Esophageal obturator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) Identification. An esophageal obturator is a device inserted through a patient's mouth to aid ventilation of the... that is attached to a face mask. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards). ...

  10. Multidisciplinary management for esophageal and gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Boniface, Megan M; Wani, Sachin B; Schefter, Tracey E; Koo, Phillip J; Meguid, Cheryl; Leong, Stephen; Kaplan, Jeffrey B; Wingrove, Lisa J; McCarter, Martin D

    2016-01-01

    The management of esophageal and gastric cancer is complex and involves multiple specialists in an effort to optimize patient outcomes. Utilizing a multidisciplinary team approach starting from the initial staging evaluation ensures that all members are in agreement with the plan of care. Treatment selection for esophageal and gastric cancer often involves a combination of chemotherapy, radiation, surgery, and palliative interventions (endoscopic and surgical), and direct communication between specialists in these fields is needed to ensure appropriate clinical decision making. At the University of Colorado, the Esophageal and Gastric Multidisciplinary Clinic was created to bring together all experts involved in treating these diseases at a weekly conference in order to provide patients with coordinated, individualized, and patient-centered care. This review details the essential elements and benefits of building a multidisciplinary program focused on treating esophageal and gastric cancer patients. PMID:27217796

  11. Another Obesity Downside: Higher Esophageal Cancer Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... In the United States, esophageal cancer is rare, accounting for only 1 percent of all new cancers ... advanced stage. Stomach cancer, likewise, is also rare, accounting for fewer than 2 percent of all new ...

  12. Esophageal papilloma: Flexible endoscopic ablation by radiofrequency

    PubMed Central

    del Genio, Gianmattia; del Genio, Federica; Schettino, Pietro; Limongelli, Paolo; Tolone, Salvatore; Brusciano, Luigi; Avellino, Manuela; Vitiello, Chiara; Docimo, Giovanni; Pezzullo, Angelo; Docimo, Ludovico

    2015-01-01

    Squamous papilloma of the esophagus is a rare benign lesion of the esophagus. Radiofrequency ablation is an established endoscopic technique for the eradication of Barrett esophagus. No cases of endoscopic ablation of esophageal papilloma by radiofrequency ablation (RFA) have been reported. We report a case of esophageal papilloma successfully treated with a single session of radiofrequency ablation. Endoscopic ablation of the lesion was achieved by radiofrequency using a new catheter inserted through the working channel of endoscope. The esophageal ablated tissue was removed by a specifically designed cup. Complete ablation was confirmed at 3 mo by endoscopy with biopsies. This case supports feasibility and safety of as a new potential indication for BarrxTM RFA in patients with esophageal papilloma. PMID:25789102

  13. Esophageal transit scintigraphy in systemic sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Kobylecka, Małgorzata; Olesińska, Marzena

    2016-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis is a rare connective tissue disease, distinctive features of which are fibrosis and microangiopathy. The esophagus is one of the most commonly involved internal organs. Most patients experience dysphagia, difficulties in swallowing and gastro-esophageal reflux. However, in up to one third of cases, the initial onset of esophageal disease may be clinically silent. There are several diagnostic modalities available for assessing both morphological and functional abnormalities of the esophagus. If structural abnormalities are suspected, endoscopy is the method of choice. Functional evaluation is best achieved with manometry. Both endoscopy and manometry are invasive techniques, with low patient acceptance. Barium-contrast study is well tolerated, but qualitative assessment of functional abnormalities is imprecise. Esophageal scintigraphy is an easy, non-invasive, sensitive and specific diagnostic modality. It can detect esophageal dysfunction even in asymptomatic patients. In patients already diagnosed with systemic sclerosis, scintigraphy is useful in evaluating severity and progression of the disease. PMID:27994270

  14. Esophageal transit scintigraphy in systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Chojnowski, Marek; Kobylecka, Małgorzata; Olesińska, Marzena

    2016-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis is a rare connective tissue disease, distinctive features of which are fibrosis and microangiopathy. The esophagus is one of the most commonly involved internal organs. Most patients experience dysphagia, difficulties in swallowing and gastro-esophageal reflux. However, in up to one third of cases, the initial onset of esophageal disease may be clinically silent. There are several diagnostic modalities available for assessing both morphological and functional abnormalities of the esophagus. If structural abnormalities are suspected, endoscopy is the method of choice. Functional evaluation is best achieved with manometry. Both endoscopy and manometry are invasive techniques, with low patient acceptance. Barium-contrast study is well tolerated, but qualitative assessment of functional abnormalities is imprecise. Esophageal scintigraphy is an easy, non-invasive, sensitive and specific diagnostic modality. It can detect esophageal dysfunction even in asymptomatic patients. In patients already diagnosed with systemic sclerosis, scintigraphy is useful in evaluating severity and progression of the disease.

  15. Esophageal dysmotility is present before surgery in isolated tracheoesophageal fistula.

    PubMed

    Lemoine, Caroline; Aspirot, Ann; Morris, Melanie; Faure, Christophe

    2015-05-01

    After surgical correction of esophageal atresia with or without tracheoesophageal fistula, esophageal body motility dysfunction has been reported in nearly all patients. Using high-resolution esophageal manometry before surgical repair in 2 children with isolated tracheoesophageal fistula, we sought to determine whether dysmotility was present before any surgical insult to test the hypothesis that dysmotility associated with esophageal atresia with or without tracheoesophageal fistula is related to intrinsic primary factors linked to abnormal development of the esophagus. Both had an abnormal esophageal motility: one exhibited hypomotility with distal contraction, whereas the other showed a complete aperistalsis pattern. This suggests that esophageal dysmotility is congenital in nature rather than secondary to surgery.

  16. A case of exfoliative esophagitis with pemphigus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Fukuchi, M; Otake, S; Naitoh, H; Shoji, H; Yamagishi, J; Suzuki, M; Yanoma, T; Kuwano, H

    2011-04-01

    Autoimmune blistering skin diseases, including pemphigus vulgaris, rarely involve the esophagus. We report a case of exfoliative esophagitis with pemphigus vulgaris. A sloughing esophageal cast observed by endoscopy was dissected esophageal squamous epithelium in all layers. Our case is the fifth case of pemphigus vulgaris associated with esophageal cast formation recorded in the medical literature. Prednisolone was administered, and both the pemphigus vulgaris and exfoliative esophagitis improved. Upon findings of exfoliative esophagitis by endoscopic examination, we should consider the coexistence of blistering skin diseases, including pemphigus vulgaris.

  17. Clinical application of endoscopic ultrasonography for esophageal achalasia.

    PubMed

    Minami, Hitomi; Inoue, Haruhiro; Isomoto, Hajime; Urabe, Shigetoshi; Nakao, Kazuhiko

    2015-04-01

    Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) has been widely used for evaluating the nature of diseases of various organs. The possibility of applying EUS for esophageal motility diseases has not been well discussed despite its versatility. At present, peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) for esophageal achalasia and related diseases has brought new attention to esophageal diseases because POEM provides a more direct approach to the inner structures of the esophageal wall. In the present study, we discuss the clinical utility of EUS in evaluating and treating esophageal motility diseases such as esophageal achalasia and related diseases.

  18. Role of diagnostic tests in esophageal evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Silverstein, B.D.; Pope, C.E. II

    1980-06-01

    In the evaluation of esophageal disease, the appropriate question must be asked before the correct tests can be selected. Reflux can be demonstrated by radiologic methods, pH testing or radioisotopic techniques. Esophageal mucosal damage is best evaluated by x-ray, endoscopy, or biopsy. Chest pain is demonstrated by acid infusion or by manometry. Two algorithms are presented for the evaluation of chest pain and reflux symptoms.

  19. Mechanisms of Disease of Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Benjamin P.; Rothenberg, Marc E.

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a recently recognized inflammatory disease of the esophagus with clinical symptoms derived from esophageal dysfunction. The etiology of EoE is now being elucidated, and food hypersensitivity is emerging as the central cornerstone of disease pathogenesis. Herein, we present a thorough picture of the current clinical, pathologic, and molecular understanding of the disease with a focus on disease mechanisms. PMID:26925500

  20. Velopharyngeal and choanal stenosis after radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Jalal; Tan, Teck Soon; Chong, Aun Wee; Narayanan, Prepageran; Omar, Rahmat

    2013-06-01

    Choanal stenosis is a well recognized late complication of radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma. However velopharyngeal stenosis post radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma is rare. We present here a case of bilateral choanal stenosis and velopharyngeal stenosis in a patient treated with radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma. A 58-year-old woman presented to our otolaryngology clinic with a one year history of nasal obstruction. She was diagnosed to have nasopharyngeal carcinoma 12 years ago for which she received radiotherapy. Clinical examination revealed bilateral choanal stenosis and velopharyngeal stenosis. Treatment of choanal stenosis and velopharyngeal stenosis is challenging due to high incidence of recurrence and patients frequently require multiple procedures. The patient underwent a transnasal endoscopic excision of velopharyngeal scar tissue and widening of posterior choana using Surgitron®, mitomycin-C applied topically to the surgical wound and bilateral stenting under general anesthesia. The stents were kept for two weeks, and 3 years post operation velopharyngeal aperture and posterior choana remained patent. As illustrated in this case velopharyngeal stenosis can occur after radiotheraphy and should not be overlooked. Combine modality of transnasal endoscopic excision of velopharyngeal scar tissue, widening of choanal stenosis with Surgitron® followed by the application of mitomycin-C and stenting has been shown to be an effective option. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. [Congenital piriform aperture stenosis and odontogenic disorders].

    PubMed

    Delforge, A; Raoul, G; Fayoux, P; Ferri, J

    2013-04-01

    We had for objective to assess odontogenic disorders associated to a congenital piriform aperture stenosis and to study their various presentations. Twelve patients presenting with a congenital piriform aperture stenosis, 1 week to 3 months of age, were retrospectively included from 1998 to 2008. All patients underwent an initial CT scan to evaluate the temporary dental germs. Deciduous dental germs were abnormal in 75% of the cases. Thirty-three percent had a single median maxillary central incisor. The concept of solitary median maxillary central incisor syndrome makes for a more pathophysiological approach of this type of disease, with various clinical presentations, corresponding to various levels of severity of a same pathological process. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Aortic Stenosis: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, and Therapy.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Jessica; Naqvi, Syed Yaseen; Giri, Jay; Goldberg, Sheldon

    2017-03-01

    The incidence of aortic stenosis increases with age, affecting up to 10% of the population by the eighth decade. Once symptoms develop, aortic stenosis is rapidly fatal. Proper management requires an understanding of the physiology and criteria used to define disease severity. There is no effective pharmacologic treatment. Surgical aortic valve replacement has been the gold standard treatment for decades. However, over the last 10 years transcatheter aortic valve replacement has emerged as an attractive, less-invasive option for appropriately selected patients. Refinements in valve design and delivery systems have led to widespread use of this breakthrough technology in selected patients. We review the pathophysiology, criteria for valve replacement, and the results of the trials comparing transcatheter aortic valve replacement with surgical aortic valve replacement.

  3. Diagnosis and Management of Nasopharyngeal Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Berent, Allyson C

    2016-07-01

    Choanal atresia is rare in small animal veterinary medicine, and most cases are misdiagnosed and are actually a nasopharyngeal stenosis (NPS), which is frustrating to treat because of the high recurrence rates encountered after surgical intervention. Minimally invasive treatment options like balloon dilation (BD), metallic stent placement (MS), or covered metallic stent (CMS) placement have been met with success but are associated with various complications that must be considered. The most common complication with BD alone is stenosis recurrence. The most common complications encountered with MS placement is tissue in-growth, chronic infections and the development of an oronasal fistula. The most common complications with a CMS is chronic infections and the development of an oronasal fistula, but stricture recurrence is avoided. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. [Pulmonary vein stenosis after radio frequency ablation].

    PubMed

    Guzzi, Marcelo; Bouza, Gabriel; Rodríguez, Raquel; Lantos, Jorge; Dubner, Sergio; Mrad, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    Physicians should be alert to the occurrence of respiratory symptoms after radio frequency ablation for the treatment of atrial fibrillation. Pulmonary veins stenosis could appear with an incidence of between 1 and 3% during the two years following the procedure. We present the case of a 41 year-old-male patient admitted with a three weeks old hemoptysis and thoracodinia and a prior history of a radiofrequency ablation procedure performed six months earlier. The angiotomography was not compatible with the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism and the angio-MRI detected hypoperfusion of the left upper pulmonary lobe. Consequently pulmonary veins angiotomography was requested, showing upper pulmonary lobe vein stenosis. An hemodynamic study with vein expansion and stent placement was successfully performed.

  5. Diagnosis and management of esophageal achalasia.

    PubMed

    Stavropoulos, Stavros N; Friedel, David; Modayil, Rani; Parkman, Henry P

    2016-09-13

    Achalasia is a rare esophageal motility disorder that is usually idiopathic in origin. It is characterized by dysphagia, and patients often have chest pain, regurgitation, weight loss, and an abnormal barium radiograph showing esophageal dilation with narrowing at the gastroesophageal junction. Abnormal or absent esophageal peristalsis and impaired relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) are typically seen on esophageal manometry. The advent of high resolution manometry (HRM) has allowed more precise diagnosis of achalasia, subtype designation, and differentiation from other esophageal motor disorders with an initial seminal publication in 2008 followed by further refinements of what has been termed the Chicago classification. Potential treatments include drugs, endoscopic botulinum toxin injection, balloon dilation, traditional surgery (usually laparoscopic Heller myotomy; LHM), and a novel, less invasive, natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) approach to Heller myotomy termed peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM). The first human POEM was performed in 2008, with the first publication appearing in 2010 and evidence now rapidly accumulating showing POEM to be comparable to traditional surgery in terms of clinical success and radiologic and manometric post-therapy outcomes. This review discusses the diagnosis and management of achalasia with particular emphasis on the recent developments of HRM and POEM, which arguably represent the most important advances in the field since the advent of laparoscopic Heller myotomy in the 1990s.

  6. Respiratory function after esophageal replacement in children.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Gabriele; Vrijlandt, Elianne J L E; Arets, Hubertus G M; Koppelman, Gerard H; Van der Zee, David C; Hulscher, Jan B F; Zwaveling, Sander

    2017-03-21

    Children born with esophageal atresia require an anastomosis between the proximal and distal esophagus. When this distance is too wide (long gap esophageal atresia, LGEA) esophageal replacement strategies have to be deployed. The aim of this study was to assess long-term respiratory morbidity and lung function after esophageal replacement with either stomach (gastric pull-up, GPU) or jejunum (jejunal interposition, JI) for LGEA. Retrospective cohort study. Patients operated with GPU and JI for LGEA (1985-2007) underwent a semi-structured interview and lung function testing (LFT). Seven GPU-patients and eight JI-patients were included. Median age was 12years. One patient per group could not perform LFT. Respiratory symptoms were reported by 13/15 patients (7/7 GPU-patients vs 6/8 JI-patients). All LFT items were lower than reference values; 6/13 patients showed restriction and 6/13 obstruction. All six GPU-patients had abnormal TLC and/or FEV1/FVC vs 3/7 after JI. Restriction was noted in 4/6 GPU-patients vs 2/7 JI-patients. After esophageal replacement for LGEA many children have impaired lung function and respiratory symptoms are common. Lung volumes seem decreased after GPU compared to JI. This may be caused by the intrathoracic stomach which may limit normal lung growth. Respiratory follow-up in adult life is important after esophageal replacement. III. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Systematic review: Eosinophilic esophagitis in Asian countries.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Yoshikazu; Ishimura, Norihisa; Oshima, Naoki; Ishihara, Shunji

    2015-07-21

    To investigate the prevalence and the clinical characteristics of Asian patients with eosinophilic esophagitis. We conducted a systematic search of the PubMed and Web of Science databases for original studies, case series, and individual case reports of eosinophilic esophagitis in Asian countries published from January 1980 to January 2015. We found 66 and 80 articles in the PubMed and Web of Science databases, respectively; 24 duplicate articles were removed. After excluding animal studies, articles not written in English, and meeting abstracts, 25 articles containing 217 patients were selected for analysis. Sample size-weighted mean values were determined for all pooled prevalence data and clinical characteristics. The mean age of the adult patients with eosinophilic esophagitis was approximately 50 years, and 73% of these patients were male. They frequently presented with allergic diseases including bronchial asthma, allergic rhinitis, food allergy, and atopic dermatitis. Bronchial asthma was the most frequent comorbid allergic disease, occurring in 24% of patients with eosinophilic esophagitis. Dysphagia was the primary symptom reported; 44% of the patients complained of dysphagia. Although laboratory blood tests are not adequately sensitive for an accurate diagnosis of eosinophilic esophagitis, endoscopic examinations revealed abnormal findings typical of this disease, including longitudinal furrows and concentric rings, in 82% of the cases. One-third of the cases responded to proton pump inhibitor administration. The characteristics of eosinophilic esophagitis in Asian patients were similar to those reported in Western patients, indicating that this disease displays a similar pathogenesis between Western and Asian patients.

  8. Effect of total laryngectomy on esophageal motility

    SciTech Connect

    Hanks, J.B.; Fisher, S.R.; Meyers, W.C.; Christian, K.C.; Postlethwait, R.W.; Jones, R.S.

    1981-01-01

    Total laryngectomy for cancer can result in dysphagia and altered esophageal motility. Manometric changes in the upper esophageal sphincter (UES), and in proximal and distal esophageal function have been reported. However, most studies have failed to take into account radiation therapy and appropriate controls. We selected ten male patients (54.3 +/- 1.9 yr) for longitudinal manometric evaluation prior to laryngectomy then at two weeks and again six months later. No patient received preoperative radiation therapy, had a previous history of esophageal surgery, or developed a postoperative wound infection or fistula. Seven of ten patients had positive nodes and received 6,000-6,600 rads postoperative radiation therapy. Preoperatively 4 of 10 patients complained of dysphagia which did not significantly change following surgery and radiation. Two of three patients who did not complain of dysphagia preoperatively and received radiation postoperatively developed dysphagia. No patient without dysphagia preoperatively who received no radiation therapy developed symptoms. Our studies show that laryngectomy causes alterations in the UES resting and peak pressures but not in the proximal or distal esophagus, or the lower esophageal sphincter. These data also imply radiation therapy may be associated with progressive alterations in motility and symptomatology. Further study regarding the effects of radiation on esophageal motility and function are urged.

  9. Cerebral aqueduct stenosis presenting with limb pain.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, A C; Trounce, J Q

    1998-05-01

    Two children are reported with hydrocephalus and aqueduct stenosis who presented with back and limb pains. Neither had the classic symptoms of headache and vomiting. The children had enlarged heads and later developed ataxic gait and papilloedema. The cause of the pains is uncertain but similar symptoms have been reported in subjects with benign intracranial hypertension and may relate to spinal nerve root pouch distension. Operative ventricular drainage resulted in rapid improvement of all symptoms in both children.

  10. Neurological sequelae from brachiocephalic vein stenosis.

    PubMed

    Herzig, David W; Stemer, Andrew B; Bell, Randy S; Liu, Ai-Hsi; Armonda, Rocco A; Bank, William O

    2013-05-01

    Stenosis of central veins (brachiocephalic vein [BCV] and superior vena cava) occurs in 30% of hemodialysis patients, rarely producing intracranial pathology. The authors present the first cases of BCV stenosis causing perimesencephalic subarachnoid hemorrhage and myoclonic epilepsy. In the first case, a 73-year-old man on hemodialysis presented with headache and blurry vision, and was admitted with presumed idiopathic intracranial hypertension after negative CT studies and confirmatory lumbar puncture. The patient mildly improved until hospital Day 3, when he experienced a seizure; emergency CT scans showed perimesencephalic subarachnoid hemorrhage. Cerebral angiography failed to find any vascular abnormality, but demonstrated venous congestion. A fistulogram found left BCV occlusion with jugular reflux. The occlusion could not be reopened percutaneously and required open fistula ligation. Postoperatively, symptoms resolved and the patient remained intact at 7-month follow-up. In the second case, a 67-year-old woman on hemodialysis presented with right arm weakness and myoclonic jerks. Admission MRI revealed subcortical edema and a possible dural arteriovenous fistula. Cerebral angiography showed venous engorgement, but no vascular malformation. A fistulogram found left BCV stenosis with jugular reflux, which was immediately reversed with angioplasty and stent placement. Postprocedure the patient was seizure free, and her strength improved. Seven months later the patient presented in myoclonic status epilepticus, and a fistulogram revealed stent occlusion. Angioplasty successfully reopened the stent and she returned to baseline; she was seizure free at 4-month follow-up. Central venous stenosis is common with hemodialysis, but rarely presents with neurological findings. Prompt recognition and endovascular intervention can restore normal venous drainage and resolve symptoms.

  11. Punctal stenosis: definition, diagnosis, and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Soiberman, Uri; Kakizaki, Hirohiko; Selva, Dinesh; Leibovitch, Igal

    2012-01-01

    Acquired punctal stenosis is a condition in which the external opening of the lacrimal canaliculus is narrowed or occluded. This condition is a rare cause of symptomatic epiphora, but its incidence may be higher in patients with chronic blepharitis, in those treated with various topical medications, including antihypertensive agents, and especially in patients treated with taxanes for cancer. The purpose of this review is to cover the medical literature, focusing in particular on definition, incidence, risk factors, etiology and treatment options. PMID:22848141

  12. Interventional Therapy of Esophageal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Aiwu

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal cancer (EC) is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in China. Despite a lot of advances in diagnosis and therapy, the survival rate of patients with EC is low. There is urgent need for a variety of methods and techniques to improve the survival time and alleviate the lesions of EC. Nowadays, alternative and less invasive approaches to the treatment of ECs are being identified. Here, we review several main interventional methods at different stages of EC, including endoscopic resection, stent placement, arterial infusion, photodynamic therapy, and radiofrequency ablation. This review will focus on the indications, methods, clinical outcomes, and complications of these methods, which may help guide the way forward. PMID:27904858

  13. Fluid dynamics of aortic valve stenosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keshavarz-Motamed, Zahra; Maftoon, Nima

    2009-11-01

    Aortic valve stenosis, which causes considerable constriction of the flow passage, is one of the most frequent cardiovascular diseases and is the most common cause of the valvular replacements which take place for around 100,000 per year in North America. Furthermore, it is considered as the most frequent cardiac disease after arterial hypertension and coronary artery disease. The objective of this study is to develop an analytical model considering the coupling effect between fluid flow and elastic deformation with reasonable boundary conditions to describe the effect of AS on the left ventricle and the aorta. The pulsatile and Newtonian blood flow through aortic stenosis with vascular wall deformability is analyzed and its effects are discussed in terms of flow parameters such as velocity, resistance to flow, shear stress distribution and pressure loss. Meanwhile we developed analytical expressions to improve the comprehension of the transvalvular hemodynamics and the aortic stenosis hemodynamics which is of great interest because of one main reason. To medical scientists, an accurate knowledge of the mechanical properties of whole blood flow in the aorta can suggest a new diagnostic tool.

  14. Minimally Invasive Laminectomy in Spondylolisthetic Lumbar Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Caralopoulos, Ilias N.; Bui, Cuong J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Degenerative lumbar stenosis associated with spondylolisthesis is common in elderly patients. The most common symptoms are those of neurogenic claudication with leg pain. Surgery is indicated for those who fail conservative management. The generally accepted recommendation is to perform a laminectomy and a fusion at the involved level. Methods We reviewed our results for minimally invasive single-level decompression without fusion performed by the senior author in patients with symptomatic lumbar stenosis with spondylolisthesis with no dynamic instability from 2008 to 2011 at a single institution. Outcomes were measured using the visual analog scale (VAS), Prolo Economic Functional Rating Scale, and revised Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) at initial presentation and at 3-month, 6-month, and 1-year follow-up time points. Results Records for 28 patients (19 males, 9 females) were reviewed. The success rate, defined as improvement in pain and functional outcome without the need for surgical fusion, was 86%. VAS scores decreased by 6.3 points, Prolo scores increased by 3.5 points, and the ODI decreased by 31% at 1 year. All changes were statistically significant. Conclusion Minimally invasive decompression alone can be a reasonable alternative to decompression and fusion for patients with spondylolisthetic lumbar stenosis and neurogenic claudication with leg pain. Decompression without fusion should be considered for older patients and for patients who are not ideal fusion candidates. PMID:24688331

  15. HISTOLOGICAL FEATURES OF EOSINOPHILIC ESOPHAGITIS IN CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, Adriana Elisabeth Aguiar Benavides; Machado, Rodrigo Strehl; Patrício, Francy Reis da Silva; Kawakami, Elisabete

    2017-09-21

    Eosinophilic esophagitis is an emerging disease featured by eosinophilic esophageal infiltrate not responsive to proton pump inhibitors. To characterize histological features of children and adolescents with eosinophilic esophagitis. Cross-sectional study in a tertiary hospital. Biopsies from each esophageal third from 14 patients (median age 7 years) with eosinophilic esophagitis were evaluated. Histological features evaluated included morphometry of esophageal epithelium, esophageal density (per high power field), extracellular eosinophilic granules, eosinophilic microabscesses, surface disposition of eosinophils, epithelial desquamation, peripapillary eosinophilia, basal layer hyperplasia and papillary elongation. Several patients presented a normal esophageal macroscopy in the upper digestive endoscopy (6, 42.8%), and the most common abnormality were vertical lines (7, 50%) and whitish spots over esophageal mucosa (7, 50%). Basal layer hyperplasia was observed in 88.8%, 100% e 80% of biopsies from proximal, middle and lower esophagus, respectively (P=0.22). Esophageal density ranges from 0 to more than 50 per hpf. Extracellular eosinophilic granules (70%-100%), surface disposition of eosinophils (60%-93%), epithelial desquamation (60%-100%), peripapillary eosinophilia (70%-80%) were common, but evenly distributed among each esophageal third. Just one patient did not present eosinophils in the lower third, four in the middle third and four in the upper esophageal third. In the absence of hypereosinophilia, other histological features are present in eosinophilic esophagitis and may contribute to diagnosis. Eosinophilic infiltrate is focal, therefore multiple biopsies are needed for diagnosis.

  16. Evidence of abnormal esophageal motility in syndrome X by radionuclide esophageal transit test.

    PubMed

    Kao, C H; Hsieh, J F; Tsai, C S; Ho, Y J; Lee, J K

    2000-01-01

    In 30 patients with syndrome X, esophageal motility was evaluated by radionuclide esophageal transit test (RETT). Esophageal motility measurements included esophageal mean transit time (MTT), residual fraction (RF), and retrograde index (RI). In comparison with 25 age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers, 66% of the patients with syndrome X had abnormal RETT findings including 50% of cases with longer MTT, 50% of cases with higher RF, and 33% of cases with higher RI. In addition, the mean values of MTT, RF, and RI in patients with syndrome X were significantly higher than those of healthy volunteers. We conclude that abnormal esophageal motility occurred in a large portion of syndrome X patients based on an simple and noninvasive RETT.

  17. Chronic xerostomia increases esophageal acid exposure and is associated with esophageal injury

    SciTech Connect

    Korsten, M.A.; Rosman, A.S.; Fishbein, S.; Shlein, R.D.; Goldberg, H.E.; Biener, A. )

    1991-06-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of chronic xerostomia on parameters of gastroesophageal reflux and esophagitis. DESIGN: Observational study of a cohort of male patients with xerostomia and age-matched control subjects. SETTING: Tertiary-care Veterans Affairs Medical Center. SUBJECTS: Sixteen male patients with chronic xerostomia secondary to radiation for head and neck cancers or medications. Nineteen age-matched male control subjects with comparable alcohol and smoking histories. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Esophageal motility was similar in patients with xerostomia and controls. Clearance of acid from the esophagus and 24-hour intraesophageal pH were markedly abnormal in patients with xerostomia. Symptoms and signs of esophagitis were significantly more frequent in subjects with xerostomia. CONCLUSIONS: Chronic xerostomia may predispose to esophageal injury, at least in part, by decreasing the clearance of acid from the esophagus and altering 24-hour intraesophageal pH. Esophageal injury is a previously unreported complication of long-term salivary deficiency.

  18. Eosinophilic esophagitis after esophageal atresia: is there an association? Case presentation and literature review.

    PubMed

    Gorter, Ramon R; Heij, Hugo A; van der Voorn, J Patrick; Kneepkens, C M Frank

    2012-06-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a relatively new condition resulting in dysphagia or symptoms resembling gastroesophageal reflux disease, symptoms that also are common in patients with a history of esophageal atresia. We present 2 patients with persistent dysphagia after repair of esophageal atresia that was caused by EoE. Although the exact etiology and pathogenesis of EoE remain unclear, it is now generally accepted that it is the result of a T-helper cell 2-type immune response with a crucial role for the eosinophil-specific chemotaxis factor eotaxin 3 and eosinophils. Because there are genetic similarities between esophageal atresia and EoE, we speculate that patients with esophageal atresia are at increased risk for developing EoE.

  19. Changes in the Flow-Volume Curve According to the Degree of Stenosis in Patients With Unilateral Main Bronchial Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Jung-Geun; Yi, Chin A; Lee, Kyung Soo; Jeon, Kyeongman; Um, Sang-Won; Koh, Won-Jung; Suh, Gee Young; Chung, Man Pyo; Kwon, O Jung

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The shape of the flow-volume (F-V) curve is known to change to showing a prominent plateau as stenosis progresses in patients with tracheal stenosis. However, no study has evaluated changes in the F-V curve according to the degree of bronchial stenosis in patients with unilateral main bronchial stenosis. Methods We performed an analysis of F-V curves in 29 patients with unilateral bronchial stenosis with the aid of a graphic digitizer between January 2005 and December 2011. Results The primary diseases causing unilateral main bronchial stenosis were endobronchial tuberculosis (86%), followed by benign bronchial tumor (10%), and carcinoid (3%). All unilateral main bronchial stenoses were classified into one of five grades (I, ≤25%; II, 26%-50%; III, 51%-75%; IV, 76%-90%; V, >90% to near-complete obstruction without ipsilateral lung collapse). A monophasic F-V curve was observed in patients with grade I stenosis and biphasic curves were observed for grade II-IV stenosis. Both monophasic (81%) and biphasic shapes (18%) were observed in grade V stenosis. After standardization of the biphasic shape of the F-V curve, the breakpoints of the biphasic curve moved in the direction of high volume (x-axis) and low flow (y-axis) according to the progression of stenosis. Conclusion In unilateral bronchial stenosis, a biphasic F-V curve appeared when bronchial stenosis was >25% and disappeared when obstruction was near complete. In addition, the breakpoint moved in the direction of high volume and low flow with the progression of stenosis. PMID:26045916

  20. Esophagitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Surgery or radiation to the chest (for example, treatment for lung cancer) Taking certain medicines without drinking plenty of water. These medicines include alendronate, doxycycline, ibandronate, risedronate, tetracycline, ...

  1. Metabolic syndrome and esophageal and gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yulan; Ness-Jensen, Eivind; Hveem, Kristian; Lagergren, Jesper; Lu, Yunxia

    2015-12-01

    The role of the metabolic syndrome in the etiology of esophageal and gastric cancer is unclear. This was a large nationwide cohort study based on data from 11 prospective population-based cohorts in Norway with long-term follow-up, the Cohort of Norway (CONOR) and the third Nord-Trøndelag Health Study (HUNT3). The metabolic syndrome was assessed by objective anthropometric and metabolic biochemical measures and was defined by the presence of at least three of the following five factors: increased waist circumference, elevated triglycerides, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, hypertension and high glucose. Newly diagnosed cases of esophageal adenocarcinoma, esophageal squamous-cell carcinoma and gastric adenocarcinoma were identified from the Norwegian Cancer Registry. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using Cox proportional hazard models with adjustment for potential confounders. Among 192,903 participants followed up for an average of 10.6 years, 62 developed esophageal adenocarcinoma, 64 had esophageal squamous-cell carcinoma and 373 had gastric adenocarcinoma. The metabolic syndrome was significantly associated with an increased risk of gastric adenocarcinoma (HR 1.44, 95% CI 1.14-1.82), but not associated with esophageal adenocarcinoma (HR 1.32, 95% CI 0.77-2.26) or esophageal squamous-cell carcinoma (HR 1.08, 95% CI 0.64-1.83). Increased waist circumference was associated with an increased HR of esophageal adenocarcinoma (HR 2.48, 95% CI 1.27-4.85). No significant association was found between any single component of the metabolic syndrome and risk of esophageal squamous-cell carcinoma. High waist circumference (HR 1.71, 95% CI 1.05-2.80), hypertension (HR 2.41, 95% CI 1.44-4.03) and non-fasting glucose (HR 1.74, 95% CI 1.18-2.56) were also related to an increased risk of gastric adenocarcinoma in women, but not in men. Metabolic syndrome was associated with an increased risk of gastric adenocarcinoma in women. Of

  2. Stent Placement for Portal Vein Stenosis After Pancreaticoduodenectomy.

    PubMed

    Hiyoshi, Masahide; Fujii, Yoshiro; Kondo, Kazuhiro; Imamura, Naoya; Nagano, Motoaki; Ohuchida, Jiro

    2015-09-01

    Portal vein (PV) stenosis is a worrisome late complication following pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) that causes intestinal bleeding from varices, which must be diagnosed correctly and treated promptly. Recent reports advocate the usefulness of stent placement to improve PV stenosis. We evaluated the cause, diagnosis, and treatment method of PV stenosis after PD and the duration of stent patency in our institution. Intestinal bleeding caused by PV stenosis occurred in 5 (2.4%) of 205 patients. A computed tomography scan was useful to diagnose this complication. Four of 5 patients with PV stenosis underwent percutaneous transhepatic PV stent placement. The duration of stent patency was 21-41 months, and no rebleeding occurred. Percutaneous stent placement is viable, less invasive option than laparotomy for the management of PV stenosis after PD.

  3. Arteriovenous Fistulas and Their Characteristic Sites of Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Quencer, Keith Bertram; Arici, Melih

    2015-10-01

    In the United States, more than 250,000 patients with end-stage renal disease are dialyzed through arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs). The three most common AVFs are the radiocephalic fistula, the brachiocephalic fistula, and the brachial artery-to-transposed basilic vein fistula. Although many potential access site stenoses can and do occur within any given fistula, each fistula has a characteristic site of stenosis. This article will discuss the characteristic site of stenosis for each type of fistula including the effects of stenosis at that site on fistula function, and their treatment. The characteristic sites of stenosis in AVFs used for dialysis share in common significant angulation, which likely causes stenosis by leading to turbulent flow and intimal injury. While balloon dilation is considered first-line therapy, further interventions such as stent placement or surgical revision are sometimes needed to treat these recalcitrant areas of stenosis.

  4. Trends in pyloric stenosis incidence, Atlanta, 1968 to 1982.

    PubMed Central

    Lammer, E J; Edmonds, L D

    1987-01-01

    Four studies reported an increasing incidence of pyloric stenosis during the late 1970s from geographically diverse areas of the United Kingdom. It was suggested that the increased incidence might be related to changes in infant feeding practices. We used data from the Metropolitan Atlanta Congenital Defects Program, a population based birth defects registry, to examine the secular trends and descriptive epidemiology of pyloric stenosis in a North American city. For the period 1968 to 1982, the incidence of pyloric stenosis was 1.33 per 1000 live births; there was no evidence of an increasing trend for either race or sex specific rates of pyloric stenosis. The descriptive epidemiology of the pyloric stenosis cases showed higher rates for males, whites, and infants of higher birth weight. We found no increasing trend in pyloric stenosis incidence in Atlanta, despite well documented changes in US infant feeding practices (an increased prevalence of breast feeding) during the 1970s. PMID:3656370

  5. Clinical and dosimetric factors of radiation-induced esophageal injury: Radiation-induced esophageal toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Wen-Bo; Zhao, Yan-Hui; Zhao, Yan-Bin; Wang, Rui-Zhi

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the clinical and dosimetric predictive factors for radiation-induced esophageal injury in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) during three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed 208 consecutive patients (146 men and 62 women) with NSCLC treated with 3D-CRT. The median age of the patients was 64 years (range 35-87 years). The clinical and treatment parameters including gender, age, performance status, sequential chemotherapy, concurrent chemotherapy, presence of carinal or subcarinal lymph nodes, pretreatment weight loss, mean dose to the entire esophagus, maximal point dose to the esophagus, and percentage of volume of esophagus receiving >55 Gy were studied. Clinical and dosimetric factors for radiation-induced acute and late grade 3-5 esophageal injury were analyzed according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) criteria. RESULTS: Twenty-five (12%) of the two hundred and eight patients developed acute or late grade 3-5 esophageal injury. Among them, nine patients had both acute and late grade 3-5 esophageal injury, two died of late esophageal perforation. Concurrent chemotherapy and maximal point dose to the esophagus ≥60 Gy were significantly associated with the risk of grade 3-5 esophageal injury. Fifty-four (26%) of the two hundred and eight patients received concurrent chemotherapy. Among them, 25 (46%) developed grade 3-5 esophageal injury (P = 0.0001<0.01). However, no grade 3-5 esophageal injury occurred in patients who received a maximal point dose to the esophagus <60 Gy (P = 0.0001<0.01). CONCLUSION: Concurrent chemotherapy and the maximal esophageal point dose ≥60 Gy are significantly associated with the risk of grade 3-5 esophageal injury in patients with NSCLC treated with 3D-CRT. PMID:15849822

  6. Esophageal and Small Intestinal Mucosal Integrity in Eosinophilic Esophagitis and Response to an Elemental Diet

    PubMed Central

    Warners, Marijn J; Vlieg-Boerstra, Berber J; Verheij, Joanne; van Hamersveld, Patricia H P; van Rhijn, Bram D; Van Ampting, Marleen T J; Harthoorn, Lucien F; de Jonge, Wouter J; Smout, Andreas J P M; Bredenoord, Albert J

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: The esophageal mucosal integrity is impaired in eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) and it has been suggested that the duodenal permeability is increased. The absence of food allergens may restore the integrity. The aims of this study were to assess duodenal permeability in EoE and to evaluate the effect of an elemental diet on the esophageal and duodenal integrity. Methods: In this prospective study 17 adult EoE patients and 8 healthy controls (HC) were included. Esophageal biopsy specimens were sampled before and after 4 weeks of elemental diet to measure eosinophil counts and gene expression of tight junction and barrier integrity proteins. Esophageal and duodenal impedance were measured by electrical tissue impedance spectroscopy and Ussing chambers were used to measure transepithelial resistance (TER) and transepithelial molecule flux. Small intestinal permeability was measured using a test, measuring lactulose/mannitol (L/M) ratios. Results: In EoE patients, the esophageal but not the duodenal integrity was impaired, compared with HC. We observed no significant difference between L/M ratios of HC and EoE patients. After diet, eosinophil counts decreased significantly, which was paralleled by normalization of esophageal impedance and transepithelial molecule flux. The esophageal TER improved significantly, but did not reach values seen in HC. Esophageal expression of genes encoding for barrier integrity proteins filaggrin and desmoglein-1 was impaired at baseline and restored after diet. Conclusions: An elemental diet restores esophageal integrity, suggesting that it is at least partly secondary to allergen exposure. Duodenal integrity seems not to be affected in EoE, and possibly plays a minor role in its pathophysiology. PMID:28417991

  7. Esophageal and Small Intestinal Mucosal Integrity in Eosinophilic Esophagitis and Response to an Elemental Diet.

    PubMed

    Warners, Marijn J; Vlieg-Boerstra, Berber J; Verheij, Joanne; van Hamersveld, Patricia H P; van Rhijn, Bram D; Van Ampting, Marleen T J; Harthoorn, Lucien F; de Jonge, Wouter J; Smout, Andreas J P M; Bredenoord, Albert J

    2017-07-01

    The esophageal mucosal integrity is impaired in eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) and it has been suggested that the duodenal permeability is increased. The absence of food allergens may restore the integrity. The aims of this study were to assess duodenal permeability in EoE and to evaluate the effect of an elemental diet on the esophageal and duodenal integrity. In this prospective study 17 adult EoE patients and 8 healthy controls (HC) were included. Esophageal biopsy specimens were sampled before and after 4 weeks of elemental diet to measure eosinophil counts and gene expression of tight junction and barrier integrity proteins. Esophageal and duodenal impedance were measured by electrical tissue impedance spectroscopy and Ussing chambers were used to measure transepithelial resistance (TER) and transepithelial molecule flux. Small intestinal permeability was measured using a test, measuring lactulose/mannitol (L/M) ratios. In EoE patients, the esophageal but not the duodenal integrity was impaired, compared with HC. We observed no significant difference between L/M ratios of HC and EoE patients. After diet, eosinophil counts decreased significantly, which was paralleled by normalization of esophageal impedance and transepithelial molecule flux. The esophageal TER improved significantly, but did not reach values seen in HC. Esophageal expression of genes encoding for barrier integrity proteins filaggrin and desmoglein-1 was impaired at baseline and restored after diet. An elemental diet restores esophageal integrity, suggesting that it is at least partly secondary to allergen exposure. Duodenal integrity seems not to be affected in EoE, and possibly plays a minor role in its pathophysiology.

  8. Successful tracheobronchial reconstruction of communicating bronchopulmonary foregut malformation and long segment congenital tracheal stenosis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Takamizawa, Shigeru; Yoshizawa, Katsumi; Machida, Mizuho; Iwade, Tamaki; Abe, Seiki; Ohata, Jun; Takahashi, Daijiro; Nishijima, Eiji

    2012-09-01

    Communicating bronchopulmonary foregut malformation (CBPFM) and congenital tracheal stenosis (CTS) are difficult developmental disorders especially when they are presented simultaneously in a patient. The authors report a case of a newborn boy born at 37 weeks of gestation weighing 2356 g with CBPFM (right esophageal lung) and long segment CTS. Staged surgical repair (by-force endotracheal intubation for securing the airway followed by bronchotracheal anastomosis for CBPFM, tracheostomy with handmade, length-adjustable tracheostomy tube, and slide tracheoplasty) was performed. He has been healthy without tracheostomy for 25 months after slide tracheoplasty. This is the first report of a successful tracheobronchial reconstruction for a patient with a long segment CTS and CBPFM preserving the affected lung function.

  9. Blunt traumatic esophageal injury: Unusual presentation and approach☆

    PubMed Central

    Abdulrahman, Husham; Ajaj, Ahmad; Shunni, Adam; El-Menyar, Ayman; Chaikhouni, Amer; Al-Thani, Hassan; Latifi, Rifat

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Blunt esophageal injury is extremely rare event. However, it is a potential morbid injury unless managed early. PRESENTATION OF CASE We report a rare case of blunt esophageal injury for a 28-year old male who presented with history of fall of heavy object over the right side of the chest. Diagnostic work up including chest X-ray, computerized tomography scans and gastrografin esophagogram revealed lower esophageal rupture. Right mini-thoracotomy with esophageal repair was performed. Postoperative course was uneventful. DISCUSSION The exact mechanism of blunt esophageal injury remains uncertain. This report described a unique location of esophageal rupture after blunt trauma that happened on the right side. Diagnosis of esophageal injury needs high index of suspicion and accurate diagnostic workup. CONCLUSION Prompt diagnosis and management are the key for better prognosis in patients with blunt esophageal injury. PMID:24394856

  10. Endoscopic submucosal dissection for early esophageal cancer associated with achalasia.

    PubMed

    Ohkura, Yu; Iizuka, Toshiro; Kikuchi, Daisuke; Yamashita, Satoshi; Nakamura, Masanori; Matsui, Akira; Mitani, Toshifumi; Hoteya, Shu; Kaise, Mitsuru; Yahagi, Naohisa

    2013-01-01

    Esophageal achalasia is often associated with esophageal cancer. However, in many cases, esophageal cancer tends to be found in an advanced stage, with a poor prognosis. However, early-stage cancer was detected recently due to the advances in endoscopic instruments. In those cases, it is important to facilitate successful treatment by endoscopic submucosal dissection. We analyzed a total of six cases of esophageal cancer with achalasia in four patients treated with endoscopic submucosal dissection. Three features common to all six cases had a bearing on how endoscopic submucosal dissection was performed. First, esophageal dilatation and diminished peristalsis facilitated the performance of successful endoscopic submucosal dissection. Second, the esophageal wall was thickened, primarily with muscular tissue. Third, the submucosal layer contained abundant blood vessels that made it difficult to minimize bleeding during dissection. Those findings suggest that endoscopic submucosal dissection for early esophageal cancer associated with achalasia is a safe and potentially curative procedure. It is important, therefore, to detect esophageal cancer early.

  11. Esophageal intramural pseudodiverticulosis, a rare cause of food impaction: case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Siba, Yahuza; Gorantla, Saritha; Gupta, Anand; Lung, Edward; Culpepper-Morgan, Joan

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal intramural pseudodiverticulosis (EIPD) is a rare, benign condition of uncertain etiology and pathogenesis, which usually presents with either progressive or intermittent dysphagia. Acute presentation with food impaction, requiring emergency esophago-gastroduodenoscopy (EGD), is rare. We report a case of EIPD presenting as food bolus impaction in an elderly black female. The patient had no previous history of dysphagia or odynophagia. Currently accepted risk factors, such as diabetes mellitus, chronic alcoholism, and reflux esophagitis, were not present in our patient. Emergency EGD established the diagnosis and also dislodged the food bolus. Histopathological evaluation of the mucosa diagnosed co-existent acute candidal infection. Medical treatment with proton pump inhibitor and azole antifungal led to resolution of her symptoms. Review of the literature revealed that stenosis, strictures, perforation, gastro-intestinal bleed, and fistula formation are potential complications of EIPD. Multiple motility abnormalities have been described but are not consistent. Treatment of the underlying inflammatory and or infectious condition is the mainstay of management of this unusual condition. PMID:24951515

  12. Model Validation for a Noninvasive Arterial Stenosis Detection Problem

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-09

    Model validation for a noninvasive arterial stenosis detection problem H.T. Banks, Shuhua Hu and Zackary R. Kenz Center for Research in Scientific...invasive method for detection, localization, and characterization of an arterial stenosis (a blockage or partial blockage in an artery). A method has been...proposed to detect shear waves in the chest cavity which have been generated by disturbances in the blood flow resulting from a stenosis . In order to

  13. Stenting for a symptomatic posterior cerebral artery stenosis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Gelin; Zheng, Ling; Zhou, Zhiming; Liu, Xinfeng

    2009-05-01

    Evolvement of endovascular devices and increase of operator expertise have made angioplasty and stenting in intracranial vessels technically possible. Stenting has been reported in treating stenosis in middle and anterior cerebral arteries with favorable outcomes. However, the feasibility of stenting for stenosis in posterior cerebral artery (PCA) has not been established. We report a patient with progressive focal cerebral ischemic symptoms, which were arrested after reconstruction of the associated PCA stenosis with stenting.

  14. Chemoprevention of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Stoner, Gary D. Wang Lishu; Chen Tong

    2007-11-01

    Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is responsible for approximately one-sixth of all cancer-related mortality worldwide. This malignancy has a multifactorial etiology involving several environmental, dietary and genetic factors. Since esophageal cancer has often metastasized at the time of diagnosis, current treatment modalities offer poor survival and cure rates. Chemoprevention offers a viable alternative that could well be effective against the disease. Clinical investigations have shown that primary chemoprevention of this disease is feasible if potent inhibitory agents are identified. The Fischer 344 (F-344) rat model of esophageal SCC has been used extensively to investigate the biology of the disease, and to identify chemopreventive agents that could be useful in human trials. Multiple compounds that inhibit tumor initiation by esophageal carcinogens have been identified using this model. These include several isothiocyanates, diallyl sulfide and polyphenolic compounds. These compounds influence the metabolic activation of esophageal carcinogens resulting in reduced genetic (DNA) damage. Recently, a few agents have been shown to inhibit the progression of preneoplastic lesions in the rat esophagus into tumors. These agents include inhibitors of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and c-Jun [a component of activator protein-1 (AP-1)]. Using a food-based approach to cancer prevention, we have shown that freeze-dried berry preparations inhibit both the initiation and promotion/progression stages of esophageal SCC in F-344 rats. These observations have led to a clinical trial in China to evaluate the ability of freeze-dried strawberries to influence the progression of esophageal dysplasia to SCC.

  15. Review of the Burden of Esophageal Cancer in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Siti-Azrin, Ab Hamid; Wan-Nor-Asyikeen, Wan Adnan; Norsa'adah, Bachok

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal cancer is one of the top leading causes of cancer-related deaths in Malaysia. To date, neither the prevalence nor incidence of esophageal cancer nationally have been recorded. Esophageal cancer remains a major and lethal health problem even if it is not common in Malaysia. The late presentation of esophageal cancer makes it a difficult and challenging medical problem. Therefore, more governmental and non-governmental organizations of Malaysia should emphasize primary and secondary prevention strategies.

  16. Concomitant herpetic and eosinophilic esophagitis--a causality dilemma.

    PubMed

    Monsanto, P; Almeida, N; Cipriano, M A; Gouveia, H; Sofia, C

    2012-09-01

    Eosinophilic and herpetic esophagitis are listed as independent causes of dysphagia, especially in young adult males. However, herpetic esophagitis rarely affects immunocompetent individuals. We report the case of a young, not immunocompromised patient, admitted because of severe dysphagia secondary to herpes simplex virus esophagitis. After complete resolution, an endoscopic and histologic reevaluation established the diagnosis of eosinophilic esophagitis. The potential association between the two conditions is discussed.

  17. Drainage of esophageal leakage using endoscopic vacuum therapy: a prospective pilot study.

    PubMed

    Ahrens, M; Schulte, T; Egberts, J; Schafmayer, C; Hampe, J; Fritscher-Ravens, A; Broering, D C; Schniewind, B

    2010-09-01

    Major leakage from an esophageal anastomosis is a life-threatening surgical complication. Endoscopically guided endoluminal vacuum therapy using polyurethane sponges is a new method for treating such leakage. Between June 2007 and June 2009, five patients (mean age 68 years) who developed anastomotic leakage after esophageal surgery were prospectively evaluated. After endoscopic diagnosis of a major leakage, polyurethane sponges were endoscopically positioned in the wound cavity of the anastomosis. Continuous suction was applied via drainage tubes fixed to the sponges. Initially sponges were endoscopically changed three times per week. In all five patients treatment was successful. Median time to reduce levels of inflammation markers by 50 % was 10 days for white blood cell (WBC) count and 7 days for C-reactive protein (CRP). The smallest initial wound cavity size was 42 cm (3) and the largest was 157 cm (3). The median duration of drainage was 28 days, with a median of 9 sponge changes and a median time to total cavity closure of 42 days. Two patients needed anastomotic dilation by Savary-Miller bougienage due to stenosis found on further follow-up. One of these patients died of acute severe hemorrhage from an aortoanastomotic fistula after the dilation procedure. Endoscopically assisted vacuum therapy is a well-tolerated and effective therapeutic option for treatment of major esophageal leaks after surgery. Additional surgery was avoided in all cases. However, the occurrence of a delayed aortoesophageal fistula calls for careful further investigation of this new technique. Copyright Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart . New York.

  18. Carotid Stenting in a Case of Combined Kinking and Stenosis

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmadi, Ramazan-Ali; Schillinger, Martin; Haumer, Markus; Willfort, Andrea; Minar, Erich

    2001-05-15

    Endarterectomy is currently the preferred treatment for severe carotid stenosis. The technique of eversion endarterectomy allows correction of severe vessel elongation and kinking. The latter is generally believed to be a relative contraindication for endovascular stent placement. We report successful percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and stenting of a left internal carotid artery with high-grade stenosis and severe kinking which was not amenable to endarterectomy because of the distal location of the stenosis. Advanced stent technology with flexible materials makes endovascular treatment of carotid stenosis feasible even in cases of kinking.

  19. Clinical Guideline for Treatment of Symptomatic Thoracic Spinal Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhong-qiang; Sun, Chui-guo

    2015-08-01

    Thoracic spinal stenosis is a relatively common disorder causing paraplegia in the population of China. Until nowadays, the clinical management of thoracic spinal stenosis is still demanding and challenging with lots of questions remaining to be answered. A clinical guideline for the treatment of symptomatic thoracic spinal stenosis has been created by reaching the consensus of Chinese specialists using the best available evidence as a tool to aid practitioners involved with the care of this disease. In this guideline, many fundamental questions about thoracic spinal stenosis which were controversial have been explained clearly, including the definition of thoracic spinal stenosis, the standard procedure for diagnosing symptomatic thoracic spinal stenosis, indications for surgery, and so on. According to the consensus on the definition of thoracic spinal stenosis, the soft herniation of thoracic discs has been excluded from the pathological factors causing thoracic spinal stenosis. The procedure for diagnosing thoracic spinal stenosis has been quite mature, while the principles for selecting operative procedures remain to be improved. This guideline will be updated on a timely schedule and adhering to its recommendations should not be mandatory because it does not have the force of law. © 2015 Chinese Orthopaedic Association and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  20. [Treatment of acquired laryngeal stenosis in pediatrics: case series].

    PubMed

    Cuestas, Giselle; Urquizo, Mauricio; Demarchi, Victoria; Zanetta, Adrián; Lobos, Pablo; Razetti, Juan

    2013-12-01

    Subglottic stenosis is one of the most common causes of upper airway obstruction in children. Even though it may have a congenital origin, most of them are acquired stenosis. This condition should be suspected in any child with a history of intubation, instrumentation or trauma of the airway that is having difficulty breathing. The diagnosis is suspected by clinical, history and cervical radiograph, and is confirmed by endoscopic examination. Among others factors the treatment depends on the stenosis degree. We describe our experience with 6 patients with post-intubation subglottic stenosis treated surgically with expansion technique.

  1. Stenosis differentially affects subendocardial and subepicardial arterioles in vivo.

    PubMed

    Merkus, D; Vergroesen, I; Hiramatsu, O; Tachibana, H; Nakamoto, H; Toyota, E; Goto, M; Ogasawara, Y; Spaan, J A; Kajiya, F

    2001-04-01

    The presence of a coronary stenosis results primarily in subendocardial ischemia. Apart from the decrease in coronary perfusion pressure, a stenosis also decreases coronary flow pulsations. Applying a coronary perfusion system, we compared the autoregulatory response of subendocardial (n = 10) and subepicardial (n = 12) arterioles (<120 microm) after stepwise decreases in coronary arterial pressure from 100 to 70, 50, and 30 mmHg in vivo in dogs (n = 9). Pressure steps were performed with and without stenosis on the perfusion line. Maximal arteriolar diameter during the cardiac cycle was determined and normalized to its value at 100 mmHg. The initial decrease in diameter during reductions in pressure was significantly larger at the subendocardium. Diameters of subendocardial and subepicardial arterioles were similar 10--15 s after the decrease in pressure without stenosis. However, stenosis decreased the dilatory response of the subendocardial arterioles significantly. This decreased dilatory response was also evidenced by a lower coronary inflow at similar average pressure in the presence of a stenosis. Inhibition of nitric oxide production with N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine abrogated the effect of the stenosis on flow. We conclude that the decrease in pressure caused by a stenosis in vivo results in a larger decrease in diameter of the subendocardial arterioles than in the subepicardial arterioles, and furthermore stenosis selectively decreases the dilatory response of subendocardial arterioles. These two findings expand our understanding of subendocardial vulnerability to ischemia.

  2. Recovery of normal esophageal function in a kitten with diffuse megaesophagus and an occult lower esophageal stricture.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Jaycie; Ames, Marisa; DiCicco, Michael; Savage, Mason; Atkins, Clarke; Wood, Michael; Gookin, Jody L

    2015-06-01

    An 8-week-old male domestic shorthair was presented to the Internal Medicine Service at North Carolina State University for regurgitation. Radiographic diagnosis of generalized esophageal dilation and failure of esophageal peristalsis were compatible with diagnosis of congenital megaesophagus. Endoscopic examination of the esophagus revealed a fibrous stricture just orad to the lower esophageal sphincter. Conservative management to increase the body condition and size of the kitten consisted of feeding through a gastrostomy tube, during which time the esophagus regained normal peristaltic function, the stricture orifice widened in size and successful balloon dilatation of the stricture was performed. Esophageal endoscopy should be considered to rule out a stricture near the lower esophageal sphincter in kittens with radiographic findings suggestive of congenital megaesophagus. Management of such kittens by means of gastrostomy tube feeding may be associated with a return of normal esophageal motility and widening of the esophageal stricture, and facilitate subsequent success of interventional dilation of the esophageal stricture.

  3. Black esophagus (acute esophageal necrosis) after spinal anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Román Fernández, A; López Álvarez, A; Fossati Puertas, S; Areán González, I; Varela García, O; Viaño López, P M

    2014-01-01

    Acute esophagic necrosis or black esophagus is an uncommon clinical entity that owes its name to the endoscopic view of the necrotic esophageal mucosa. It is always related with a critical medical condition and usually has an ischemic etiology. We report the first case of acute esophageal necrosis after a spinal anesthetic for partial hip joint arthroplasty. We discuss the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms.

  4. Pure esophageal atresia with normal outer appearance: case report.

    PubMed

    Sanal, Murat; Haeussler, Beatrice; Tabarelli, Walther; Maurer, Kathrin; Sergi, Consolato; Hager, Josef

    2007-08-01

    Isolated esophageal atresia is characterized by a long segment between the 2 esophageal pouches. This article presents a case of pure esophageal atresia with a 1-cm-long segment at the midportion without discontinuity that resembled the subtype II3 according to the Kluth atlas. Resection of the atretic segment and primary anastomosis were performed successfully.

  5. Does the effectiveness of core stability exercises correlate with the severity of spinal stenosis in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis?

    PubMed

    Chen, Chaxiang; Lin, Zhichao; Zhang, Yingjie; Chen, Zemin; Tang, Shujie

    2017-01-01

    To determine whether the effectiveness of core stability exercises correlates with the severity of spinal stenosis in patients with degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis. Forty-two patients with degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis treated in the department of orthopedics of our hospital between May 2013 and January 2016 were included in the study. All the patients performed core stability exercises once daily for six weeks, and the clinical outcomes were evaluated using Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score and self-reported walking capacity. The anteroposterior osseous spinal canal diameter was measured to evaluate the severity of spinal stenosis. The correlation between the stenosis degree and the differences of Japanese Orthopaedic Association score or self-reported walking capacity at baseline and after treatment were analyzed. The patients were divided into three groups according to the spinal stenosis degree. In the three groups, there was no significant difference in JOA or self-reported walking distance at baseline (p>0.05) and after treatment (p>0.05). The JOA scores and self-reported walking distance were significantly increased after treatment (p<0.05) in any of the three groups when compared to the baseline. Also, there was no significant correlation between the stenosis degree and the difference of JOA (p>0.05) or self-reported walking distance (p>0.05). There was no significantcorrelation between the effectiveness of core stability exercises and the severity of spinal stenosis in patients with degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis.

  6. Surgical intervention strategies for congenital tracheal stenosis associated with a tracheal bronchus based on the location of stenosis.

    PubMed

    Morita, Keiichi; Yokoi, Akiko; Fukuzawa, Hiroaki; Hisamatsu, Chieko; Endo, Kosuke; Okata, Yuichi; Tamaki, Akihiko; Mishima, Yasuhiko; Oshima, Yoshihiro; Maeda, Kosaku

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the appropriate surgical intervention strategies for congenital tracheal stenosis (CTS) associated with a tracheal bronchus based on the location of stenosis. The medical records of 13 pediatric patients with CTS associated with a tracheal bronchus at a single institution between January 2006 and December 2015 were retrospectively reviewed. Type 1: tracheal stenosis above the right upper lobe bronchus (RULB) (n = 1). One patient underwent slide tracheoplasty and was successfully extubated. Type 2: tracheal stenosis below the RULB (n = 7). Tracheal end-to-end anastomosis was performed before 2014, and one patient failed to extubate. Posterior-anterior slide tracheoplasty was performed since 2014, and all three patients were successfully extubated. Type 3: tracheal stenosis above the RULB to the carina (n = 5). One patient underwent posterior-anterior slide tracheoplasty and was successfully extubated. Two patients with left-right slide tracheoplasty and another two patients with tracheal end-to-end anastomosis for the stenosis below the RULB could not be extubated. Tracheal end-to-end anastomosis or slide tracheoplasty can be selected for tracheal stenosis above the RULB according to the length of stenosis. Posterior-anterior slide tracheoplasty appears feasible for tracheal stenosis below the RULB or above the RULB to the carina.

  7. Denture mis-swallowing in the sliding esophageal hiatal hernia mimics esophageal perforation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chao-Yang; Lee, Shih-Chun; Chen, Chun-Wen; Chen, Jen-Chih

    2008-08-01

    Mis-swallowing of a foreign body in the esophagus coexisting with sliding hernia might be misdiagnosed as esophageal perforation with mediastinal abscess. We report an 89-year-old woman, bedridden for a long period in a nursing home after a previous cerebrovascular accident, who was sent to our emergency department in a state of sepsis because she had swallowed a radio-opaque partial denture. The retention of the denture as an esophageal foreign body was complicated with mediastinitis and bilateral pleural effusion. The inability of the patient to give a reliable clinical history delayed the diagnosis. This report highlights the difficulty in precisely locating a partial denture because of conflicting radiologic findings and the coexistence of esophageal sliding hernia, all of which led to a misdiagnosis of possible esophageal perforation. A right posterolateral thoracotomy with gastrostomy was performed to remove the lower esophageal foreign body after esophagoscopy failed. The surgical finding of a coincidental sliding esophageal hiatal hernia correlated well with the clinical presentation. Managing such a complicated esophageal foreign body in this elderly patient was challenging.

  8. Use of glucagon in relieving esophageal food bolus impaction in the era of eosinophilic esophageal infiltration.

    PubMed

    Thimmapuram, Jayaram; Oosterveen, Scott; Grim, Rodney

    2013-06-01

    Esophageal food bolus impaction may require an urgent endoscopy. Glucagon is often administered to promote spontaneous passage of the food bolus. Eosinophilic esophagitis is increasingly recognized as a cause of dysphagia, and food impaction is often the presenting symptom. Our study was aimed at determining the effectiveness of glucagon in relieving esophageal foreign body obstruction in general and in the setting of esophageal eosinophilic infiltration (EEI). A retrospective chart review was performed using the ICD codes and the emergency department database of adult patients presenting with symptoms of esophageal food bolus impaction from July 2004 to October 2010. Response to glucagon was defined as symptomatic relief of obstruction prior to endoscopic intervention. A total of 213 episodes of esophageal food bolus obstruction in 192 patients were identified during the study period. Glucagon was given in 125 cases of which 41 had a response (32.8 %). A total of 170 episodes had an Esophagogastroduodenoscopy performed either during the impaction event or at a later date. Of the 60 patients' biopsies, 45 had received glucagon (17 with EEI, 28 without EEI). None of the 17 episodes with EEI as compared to 8 of the 28 without EEI responded to glucagon (0 % vs. 28.5 %, p = 0.017). Glucagon is effective in about one third of patients with esophageal food bolus impaction, which is consistent with historical data. Patients with EEI appear less likely to respond to glucagon.

  9. The Tumor Microenvironment in Esophageal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Eric W.; Karakasheva, Tatiana A.; Hicks, Philip D.; Bass, Adam J.; Rustgi, Anil K.

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal cancer is a deadly disease, ranking sixth among all cancers in mortality. Despite incremental advances in diagnostics and therapeutics, esophageal cancer still carries a poor prognosis, and thus there remains a need to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying this disease. There is accumulating evidence that a comprehensive understanding of the molecular composition of esophageal cancer requires attention to not only tumor cells but also the tumor microenvironment, which contains diverse cell populations, signaling factors, and structural molecules that interact with tumor cells and support all stages of tumorigenesis. In esophageal cancer, environmental exposures can trigger chronic inflammation, which leads to constitutive activation of pro-inflammatory signaling pathways that promote survival and proliferation. Anti-tumor immunity is attenuated by cell populations such as myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) and regulatory T cells (Tregs), as well as immune checkpoints like programmed death-1 (PD-1). Other immune cells such as tumor-associated macrophages can have other pro-tumorigenic functions, including the induction of angiogenesis and tumor cell invasion. Cancer-associated fibroblasts secrete growth factors and alter the extracellular matrix (ECM) to create a tumor niche and enhance tumor cell migration and metastasis. Further study of how these TME components relate to the different stages of tumor progression in each esophageal cancer subtype will lead to development of novel and specific TME-targeting therapeutic strategies, which offer considerable potential especially in the setting of combination therapy. PMID:26923327

  10. Esophageal tissue engineering: Current status and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Poghosyan, T; Catry, J; Luong-Nguyen, M; Bruneval, P; Domet, T; Arakelian, L; Sfeir, R; Michaud, L; Vanneaux, V; Gottrand, F; Larghero, J; Cattan, P

    2016-02-01

    Tissue engineering, which consists of the combination and in vivo implantation of elements required for tissue remodeling toward a specific organ phenotype, could be an alternative for classical techniques of esophageal replacement. The current hybrid approach entails creation of an esophageal substitute composed of an acellular matrix and autologous epithelial and muscle cells provides the most successful results. Current research is based on the use of mesenchymal stem cells, whose potential for differentiation and proangioogenic, immune-modulator and anti-inflammatory properties are important assets. In the near future, esophageal substitutes could be constructed from acellular "intelligent matrices" that contain the molecules necessary for tissue regeneration; this should allow circumvention of the implantation step and still obtain standardized in vivo biological responses. At present, tissue engineering applications to esophageal replacement are limited to enlargement plasties with absorbable, non-cellular matrices. Nevertheless, the application of existing clinical techniques for replacement of other organs by tissue engineering in combination with a multiplication of translational research protocols for esophageal replacement in large animals should soon pave the way for health agencies to authorize clinical trials. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Esophageal surgery in minimally invasive era

    PubMed Central

    Bencini, Lapo; Moraldi, Luca; Bartolini, Ilenia; Coratti, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The widespread popularity of new surgical technologies such as laparoscopy, thoracoscopy and robotics has led many surgeons to treat esophageal diseases with these methods. The expected benefits of minimally invasive surgery (MIS) mainly include reductions of postoperative complications, length of hospital stay, and pain and better cosmetic results. All of these benefits could potentially be of great interest when dealing with the esophagus due to the potentially severe complications that can occur after conventional surgery. Moreover, robotic platforms are expected to reduce many of the difficulties encountered during advanced laparoscopic and thoracoscopic procedures such as anastomotic reconstructions, accurate lymphadenectomies, and vascular sutures. Almost all esophageal diseases are approachable in a minimally invasive way, including diverticula, gastro-esophageal reflux disease, achalasia, perforations and cancer. Nevertheless, while the limits of MIS for benign esophageal diseases are mainly technical issues and costs, oncologic outcomes remain the cornerstone of any procedure to cure malignancies, for which the long-term results are critical. Furthermore, many of the minimally invasive esophageal operations should be compared to pharmacologic interventions and advanced pure endoscopic procedures; such a comparison requires a difficult literature analysis and leads to some confounding results of clinical trials. This review aims to examine the evidence for the use of MIS in both malignancies and more common benign disease of the esophagus, with a particular emphasis on future developments and ongoing areas of research. PMID:26843913

  12. Targeting chemokine pathways in esophageal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Shrivastava, Makardhwaj S; Hussain, Zulfiqar; Giricz, Orsolya; Shenoy, Niraj; Polineni, Rahul; Maitra, Anirban; Verma, Amit

    2014-01-01

    Esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) is one of the fastest growing malignancies in the US and needs newer therapeutic and diagnostic strategies. Chronic inflammation plays a role in the pathogenesis of EAC and contributes to the dysplastic conversion of normal esophageal epithelium to Barrett's esophagus and frank adenocarcinoma. Chemokines play important roles in mediating inflammation and recent evidence implicates these ligands and their receptors in the development and spread of various tumors. We demonstrated that the chemokines IL8, CXCL1 and CXCL3 are significantly overexpressed during esophageal carcinogenesis and accompanied by amplification and demethylation of the chr4q21 gene locus. We also demonstrated that IL8 levels can be detected in serum of patients with EAC and can serve as potential biomarkers. We now demonstrate that inhibition of IL8 receptor, CXCR2, leads to decreased invasiveness of esophageal adenocarcinoma derived cells without affecting cellular proliferation. Taken together, these studies reveal the important roles that chemokines play in development of esophageal cancer and demonstrate that these pathways can serve as potential therapeutic targets. PMID:25485576

  13. Management of Esophageal Perforation in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Kaman, Lileswar; Iqbal, Javid; Kundil, Byju; Kochhar, Rakesh

    2010-01-01

    Perforation of esophagus in the adult is a very morbid condition with high morbidity and mortality. The ideal treatment is controversial. The main causes for esophageal perforation in adults are iatrogenic, traumatic, spontaneous and foreign bodies. The morbidity and mortality rate is directly related to the delay in diagnosis and initiation of optimum treatment. The reported mortality from treated esophageal perforation is 10% to 25%, when therapy is initiated within 24 hours of perforation, but it could rise up to 40% to 60% when the treatment is delayed beyond 48 hours. Primary closure of the perforation site and wide drainage of the mediastinum is recommended if perforation is detected in less than 24 hours. Treatment option for delayed or missed rupture of esophagus is not very clear and is controversial. Recently a substantial number of patients with esophageal perforation are being managed by nonoperative measures. Patients with small perforations and minimal extraesophageal involvement may be better managed by nonoperative treatment Major prognostic factors determining mortality are the etiology and site of the injury, the presence of underlying esophageal pathology, the delay in diagnosis and the method of treatment. For optimum outcome for management of esophageal perforations in adults a multidisciplinary approach is needed. PMID:27942303

  14. The esophageal microbiota in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Di Pilato, Vincenzo; Freschi, Giancarlo; Ringressi, Maria Novella; Pallecchi, Lucia; Rossolini, Gian Maria; Bechi, Paolo

    2016-10-01

    The esophageal mucosa is among the sites colonized by human microbiota, the complex microbial ecosystem that colonizes various body surfaces and is increasingly recognized to play roles in several physiological and pathological processes. Our understanding of the composition of the esophageal microbiota in health and disease is challenged by the need for invasive sampling procedures and by the dynamic nature of the esophageal environment and remains limited in comparison with the information available for other body sites. Members of the genus Streptococcus appear to be the major components of the microbiota of the healthy esophagus, although the presence of several other taxa has also been reported. Dysbiosis, consisting of enrichment in some Gram-negative taxa (including Veillonella, Prevotella, Haemophilus, Neisseria, Campylobacter, and Fusobacterium), has been reported in association with gastroesophageal reflux disease and is hypothesized to contribute to the evolution of this condition toward Barrett's esophagus (which is the most common esophageal precancerous lesion) and, eventually, adenocarcinoma. Some Campylobacter species (mostly C. concisus) are also putatively involved in the progression of disease toward adenocarcinoma. However, variable findings have recently been reported in additional studies. Causative relationships between dysbiosis or specific bacterial species and esophageal diseases remain controversial and warrant further investigations. © 2016 The Authors. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of New York Academy of Sciences.

  15. [Diagnosis and differential therapy of mitral stenosis].

    PubMed

    Fassbender, D; Schmidt, H K; Seggewiss, H; Mannebach, H; Bogunovic, N

    1998-11-01

    Clinical symptoms and diagnostic findings in patients with mitral stenosis are usually determined by the extent of the stenosis. Compared to a normal mitral valve area (MVA) of > 4 cm2, MVA in patients with severe mitral stenosis is usually reduced to < 1.5 cm2. In older patients symptoms are frequently influenced by concomitant diseases (e.g. atrial fibrillation, arterial hypertension or lung disease). An important diagnostic element besides anamnesis, auscultation, ECG and chest X-ray is echocardiography, which is required in order to measure non-invasively and reliably the mitral valve gradient (MVG), the MVA and morphologic changes to the valves, as well as concomitant valvular disease, ventricular functions and, where appropriate, left-atrial thrombi. In addition to the surgical treatment of patients with severe mitral stenosis, which has been an established procedure for 50 years, percutaneous balloon mitral valvuloplasty (MVP) has recently established itself as an alternative option. At the current time, the Inoue technique seems to display the most advantages. Following transseptal puncture, the Inoue balloon is guided transvenously into the left atrium and then into the left ventricle using a special support wire. The balloon is short and soft. Its special unfolding character enables it to be placed securely in the mitral valve without any risk of ventricular perforation (Figure 1). As with surgical commissurotomy, balloon valvuloplasty leads to a separation of fused commissures. This results in a significant reduction of MVG, accompanied by an increase in the MVA (Figure 2). The results and success of MVP are influenced by the morphology of the valves and the changes to the subvalvular apparatus. In randomized studies, the results of surgical commissurotomy were comparable with those of balloon mitral valvulotomy. In our hospital, an increase in MVA from 1.0 to 1.8 cm2 could be achieved in 899 patients (mean age 56 +/- 3 years). In younger patients with

  16. FOLFOX-6 Induction Chemotherapy Followed by Esophagectomy and Post-operative Chemoradiotherapy in Patients With Esophageal Adenocarcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-15

    Adenocarcinoma of the Esophagus; Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Adenocarcinoma of the Gastric Cardia; Stage IIIA Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIB Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIC Esophageal Cancer

  17. A Case of Aorto-Bronchial Fistula After Insertion of Left Main Bronchial Self-Expanding Metallic Stent in a Patient with Recurrent Esophageal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Onishi, Hiroshi Kuriyama, Kengo; Komiyama, Takafumi; Tanaka, Shiho; Marino, Kan; Tsukamoto, Tatsuaki; Araki, Tsutomu

    2004-09-15

    We report a case of aorto-bronchial fistula (ABF) caused by a self-expanding metallic stent (EMS) 51 days after insertion into the left main bronchus. The patient presented with left main bronchial stenosis caused by post-operative local recurrence of esophageal cancer. Post-operative radio therapy totaling 40 Gy and post-recurrence radiotherapy totaling 34 Gy were administered, with daily fractions of 2 Gy. Stenosis of the left main bronchus improved slightly, and was followed with insertion of EMS to prevent re-stenosis. The patient experienced massive hemoptysis for 3 days before sudden death. Autopsy revealed the EMS edge perforating the descending aortic lumen. Tumor infiltration and bacterial infection were observed on the wall of the left bronchus, and atherosclerosis was present on the aortic wall around the fistula. It should be noted that the left main bronchus was at considerable risk of ABF after insertion of EMS for malignant stenosis, and prophylactic stent insertion into the bronchus without imperative need must be avoided.

  18. Effects of Age on Esophageal Motility: Use of High-resolution Esophageal Impedance Manometry

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Young Kwang; Kim, Nayoung; Park, Yo Han; Lee, Jong-Chan; Sung, Jihee; Choi, Yoon Jin; Yoon, Hyuk; Shin, Cheol Min; Park, Young Soo; Lee, Dong Ho

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims Disturbances of esophageal motility have been reported to be more frequent the aged population. However, the physiology of disturbances in esophageal motility during aging is unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of age on esophageal motility using high-resolution esophageal impedance manometry (HRIM). Methods Esophageal motor function of 268 subjects were measured using HRIM in 3 age groups, < 40 years (Group A, n = 32), 40–65 years (Group B, n = 185), and > 65 years (Group C, n = 62). Lower esophageal sphincter (LES) and upper esophageal sphincter (UES) pressures, integrated relaxation pressure, distal contractile integral, contractile front velocity, distal latency, and pressures and duration of contraction on 4 positions along the esophagus, and complete bolus transit were measured. Results Basal UES pressure was lower in Group C (P < 0.001) but there was no significant difference in the LES pressure among groups. Contractile duration on position 3 (10 cm from proximal LES high pressure zone) was longer in Group C (P = 0.001), and the contractile amplitude on position 4 (5 cm from proximal LES high pressure zone) was lower in Group C (P = 0.005). Distal contractile integral was lower in Group C (P = 0.037). Contractile front velocity (P = 0.015) and the onset velocity (P = 0.040) was lower in Group C. There was no significant difference in impedance values. Conclusions The decrease of UES pressure, distal esophageal motility, and peristaltic velocity might be related with esophageal symptoms in the aged population. PMID:28163259

  19. Asymptomatic carotid stenosis is associated with cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Lal, Brajesh K; Dux, Moira C; Sikdar, Siddhartha; Goldstein, Carly; Khan, Amir A; Yokemick, John; Zhao, Limin

    2017-10-01

    Cerebrovascular risk factors (eg, hypertension, coronary artery disease) and stroke can lead to vascular cognitive impairment. The Asymptomatic Carotid Stenosis and Cognitive Function study evaluated the isolated impact of asymptomatic carotid stenosis (no prior ipsilateral or contralateral stroke or transient ischemic attack) on cognitive function. Cerebrovascular hemodynamic and carotid plaque characteristics were analyzed to elucidate potential mechanisms affecting cognition. There were 82 patients with ≥50% asymptomatic carotid stenosis and 62 controls without stenosis but matched for vascular comorbidities who underwent neurologic, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, and comprehensive neuropsychological examination. Overall cognitive function and five domain-specific scores were computed. Duplex ultrasound with Doppler waveform and B-mode imaging defined the degree of stenosis, least luminal diameter, plaque area, and plaque gray-scale median. Breath-holding index (BHI) and microembolization were measured using transcranial Doppler. We assessed cognitive differences between stenosis patients and control patients and of stenosis patients with low vs high BHI and correlated cognitive function with microembolic counts and plaque characteristics. Stenosis and control patients did not differ in vascular risk factors, education, estimated intelligence, or depressive symptoms. Stenosis patients had worse composite cognitive scores (P = .02; Cohen's d = 0.43) and domain-specific scores for learning/memory (P = .02; d = 0.42) and motor/processing speed (P = .01; d = 0.65), whereas scores for executive function were numerically lower (P = .08). Approximately 49.4% of all stenosis patients were impaired in at least two cognitive domains. Precisely 50% of stenosis patients demonstrated a reduced BHI. Stenosis patients with reduced BHI performed worse on the overall composite cognitive score (t = -2.1; P = .02; d = 0.53) and tests for learning

  20. Radiation-induced vaginal stenosis: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Lucinda; Do, Viet; Chard, Jennifer; Brand, Alison H

    2017-01-01

    Treatment of gynecological cancer commonly involves pelvic radiation therapy (RT) and/or brachytherapy. A commonly observed side effect of such treatment is radiation-induced vaginal stenosis (VS). This review analyzed the incidence, pathogenesis, clinical manifestation(s) and assessment and grading of radiation-induced VS. In addition, risk factors, prevention and treatment options and follow-up schedules are also discussed. The limited available literature on many of these aspects suggests that additional studies are required to more precisely determine the best management strategy of this prevalent group after RT. PMID:28496367

  1. Factors associated with infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis.

    PubMed

    Jedd, M B; Melton, L J; Griffin, M R; Kaufman, B; Hoffman, A D; Broughton, D; O'Brien, P C

    1988-03-01

    We examined perinatal factors in relation to the rise in incidence of infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis among children in Olmsted County, Minnesota, during the period from 1950 through 1984. Primogeniture was associated with male infants but not female infants; some factor related to primogeniture, such as breast-feeding, may be etiologically important. Our data did not support a role for maternal disease, use of doxylamine succinate-pyridoxide hydrochloride (Bendectin), or an infectious process. Further study should be directed toward environmental factors associated with primogeniture.

  2. Bovine aortic arch with supravalvular aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Idhrees, Mohammed; Cherian, Vijay Thomas; Menon, Sabarinath; Mathew, Thomas; Dharan, Baiju S; Jayakumar, K

    2016-09-01

    A 5-year-old boy was diagnosed to have supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS). On evaluation of CT angiogram, there was associated bovine aortic arch (BAA). Association of BAA with SVAS has not been previously reported in literature, and to best of our knowledge, this is the first case report of SVAS with BAA. Recent studies show BAA as a marker for aortopathy. SVAS is also an arteriopathy. In light of this, SVAS can also possibly be a manifestation of aortopathy associated with BAA.

  3. [Enlargement in managment of lumbar spinal stenosis].

    PubMed

    Steib, J P; Averous, C; Brinckert, D; Lang, G

    1996-05-01

    Lumbar stenosis has been well discussed recently, especially at the 64th French Orthopaedic Society (SOFCOT: July 1989). The results of different surgical treatments were considered as good, but the indications for surgical treatment were not clear cut. Laminectomy is not the only treatment of spinal stenosis. Laminectomy is an approach with its own rate of complications (dural tear, fibrosis, instability... ).Eight years ago, J. Sénégas described what he called the "recalibrage" (enlargement). His feeling was that, in the spinal canal, we can find two different AP diameters. The first one is a fixed constitutional AP diameter (FCAPD) at the cephalic part of the lamina. The second one is a mobile constitutional AP diameter (MCAPD) marked by the disc and the ligamentum flavum. This diameter is maximal in flexion, minimal in extension. The nerve root proceeds through the lateral part of the canal: first above, between the disc and the superior articular process, then below, in the lateral recess bordered by the pedicle, the vertebral body and the posterior articulation. With the degenerative change the disc space becomes shorter, the superior articular process is worn out with osteophytes. These degenerative events are complicated by inter vertebral instability increasing the stenosis. The idea of the "recalibrage" is to remove only the upper part of the lamina with the ligamentum flavum and to cut the hypertrophied anterior part of the articular process from inside. If needed the disc and other osteophytes are removed. The surgery is finished with a ligamentoplasty reducing the flexion and preventing the extension by a posterior wedge.Our experience in spine surgery especially in scoliosis surgery, showed us that it was possible to cure a radicular compression without opening the canal. The compression is then lifted by the 3D reduction and restoration of an anatomy as normal as possible. Lumbar stenosis is the consequence of a degenerative process. Indeed, hip

  4. Valvular Hemolysis Masquerading as Prosthetic Valve Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Pooja; Murtaza, Ghulam; Rahman, Zia; Zaidi, Syed; Helton, Thomas; Paul, Timir

    2017-04-08

    The evaluation of prosthetic valves can provide a unique challenge, and a thoughtful approach is required. High output states like anemia should be kept in the differential when evaluating elevated gradients across prosthetic valves. We present the case of a 69-year-old man with a Starr-Edwards prosthetic aortic valve who presented with symptoms of congestive heart failure and high transvalvular pressure gradients. These symptoms indicate a potential prosthetic valve stenosis. His laboratory evaluation results were consistent with valve-related hemolysis. Resolving his anemia led to a resolution of the symptoms and lowered the pressure gradient on follow-up.

  5. Hemodialysis catheter-associated central venous stenosis.

    PubMed

    Yevzlin, Alexander S

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to explore the pathophysiology, epidemiology, and interventional treatment of central vein stenosis (CVS) that may result from central vein catheter (CVC) placement. The precise mechanism of CVC-associated CVS remains largely undefined, though anatomic considerations appear to play a prominent pathologic role. The impact of CVC-associated CVS on arteriovenous fistula outcomes is reviewed. The percutaneous treatment of CVS, observation, angioplasty, or angioplasty with stent placement is reviewed, along with potential surgical treatment options. As the treatment outcomes of CVC-associated CVS have been disappointing, catheter avoidance remains the best strategy.

  6. Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis: Current status

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Soon Hyo; Lerman, Lilach O.

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis (ARAS) remains a major cause of secondary hypertension and renal failure. Randomized, prospective trials show that medical treatment should constitute the main therapeutic approach in ARAS. Regardless of intensive treatment and adequate blood pressure control, however, renal and extra-renal complications are not uncommon. Yet, the precise mechanisms, accurate detection, and optimal treatment in ARAS remain elusive. Strategies oriented to early detection and targeting these pathogenic pathways might prevent development of clinical endpoints. Here, we review the results of recent clinical trials, current understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms, novel imaging techniques to assess renal damage in ARAS, and treatment options. PMID:25908472

  7. Photodynamic therapy for esophageal tumors.

    PubMed

    McCaughan, J S; Nims, T A; Guy, J T; Hicks, W J; Williams, T E; Laufman, L R

    1989-01-01

    Between 1982 and 1987, 40 patients with esophageal tumors (19 adenocarcinomas, 19 squamous carcinomas, and two melanomas) in whom conventional treatments were unsuccessful were treated with photodynamic therapy (PDT) after injection with either hematoporphyrin derivative or dihematoporphyrin ether. Patients underwent endoscopy again two to three days and one month after PDT and as needed when symptoms recurred. At one month, the average minimal diameter opening of 28 assessable tumors increased from 6 to 9 mm. Of the 35 patients who could be evaluated one month after PDT, the average improvement in food intake was from a liquid to a soft diet. Average survival time (from time of first treatment) was 7.7 months (n = 17) for adenocarcinoma, 5.8 months (n = 12) for squamous cell carcinoma, and 25 months (n = 2) for melanoma. Two patients with stage I adenocarcinoma were alive with no evidence of disease at 11 and 23 months. One patient with stage I squamous cell cancer died 18 months after PDT, with recurrence of tumor above the treated area noted eight months after treatment. One patient with stage I melanoma died of a synchronous colon cancer 31 months after PDT, with no evidence of residual melanoma.

  8. 2011 update on esophageal achalasia.

    PubMed

    Chuah, Seng-Kee; Hsu, Pin-I; Wu, Keng-Liang; Wu, Deng-Chyang; Tai, Wei-Chen; Changchien, Chi-Sin

    2012-04-14

    There have been some breakthroughs in the diagnosis and treatment of esophageal achalasia in the past few years. First, the introduction of high-resolution manometry with pressure topography plotting as a new diagnostic tool has made it possible to classify achalasia into three subtypes. The most favorable outcome is predicted for patients receiving treatment for type II achalasia (achalasia with compression). Patients with type I(classic achalasia) and type III achalasia (spastic achalasia) experience a less favorable outcome. Second, the first multicenter randomized controlled trial published by the European Achalasia Trial group reported 2-year follow-up results indicating that laparoscopic Heller myotomy was not superior to endoscopic pneumatic dilation (PD). Although the follow-up period was not long enough to reach a convincing conclusion, it merits the continued use of PD as a generally available technique in gastroenterology. Third, the novel endoscopic technique peroral endoscopic myotomy is a promising option for treating achalasia, but it requires increased experience and cautious evaluation. Despite all this good news, the bottom line is a real breakthrough from the basic studies to identify the actual cause of achalasia that may impede treatment success is still anticipated.

  9. Endoscopic treatment of esophageal achalasia.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Dario; Maione, Francesco; D'Alessandro, Alessandra; Sarnelli, Giovanni; De Palma, Giovanni D

    2016-01-25

    Achalasia is a motility disorder of the esophagus characterized by dysphagia, regurgitation of undigested food, chest pain, weight loss and respiratory symptoms. The most common form of achalasia is the idiopathic one. Diagnosis largely relies upon endoscopy, barium swallow study, and high resolution esophageal manometry (HRM). Barium swallow and manometry after treatment are also good predictors of success of treatment as it is the residue symptomatology. Short term improvement in the symptomatology of achalasia can be achieved with medical therapy with calcium channel blockers or endoscopic botulin toxin injection. Even though few patients can be cured with only one treatment and repeat procedure might be needed, long term relief from dysphagia can be obtained in about 90% of cases with either surgical interventions such as laparoscopic Heller myotomy or with endoscopic techniques such pneumatic dilatation or, more recently, with per-oral endoscopic myotomy. Age, sex, and manometric type by HRM are also predictors of responsiveness to treatment. Older patients, females and type II achalasia are better after treatment compared to younger patients, males and type III achalasia. Self-expandable metallic stents are an alternative in patients non responding to conventional therapies.

  10. An Overview of the Diagnosis and Management of Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Singla, Manish B; Moawad, Fouad J

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic inflammatory condition characterized by symptoms of esophageal dysfunction and eosinophilic infiltration of the esophageal mucosa. The diagnosis requires esophageal biopsies demonstrating at least 15 eosinophils per high-powered field following a course of high-dose proton pump inhibitors. Management of EoE consists of the three Ds: drugs, dietary therapy, and esophageal dilation. In this review, we discuss the epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of EoE to include the role of emerging therapies. PMID:26986655

  11. Bench surgical training with lyophilized esophageal segments.

    PubMed

    Sotres-Vega, Avelina; Osorio-Necoechea, María Elba; Salas-Galindo, Gabriela; González-Ramón, Soemi Careli; Guadarrama-Sánchez, Isabel; Villalba-Caloca, Jaime; Santibáñez-Salgado, José Alfredo

    2013-08-01

    To present lyophilized esophageal segments that can be used to learn surgical skills. Four esophagus were harvested from four non-esophagus related research dogs at the moment of euthanasia. Each esophagus was trimmed in 3 cm long segments. They were lyophilized and stored during 30 days. The day programmed for surgical skills practice, they were rehydrated. Sixteen segments have been used. After rehydrating, all the segments kept their normal anatomic shape and structural integrity. One incision was made on every esophageal segment and sutured with running stitches of 3-0 polyglactin 910. There were no complications, such as tissue tears, nor esophageal hardening. The lyophilized esophagus is a high fidelity, practical, reproducible, portable, low-cost bench model. It allows general surgery apprentices to learn how to handle an esophagus, as well as to perfect their surgical and suture abilities before applying them on real patient's esophagus.

  12. Early esophageal carcinoma treated with intracavitary irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hishikawa, Y.; Tanaka, S.; Miura, T.

    1985-08-01

    Five patients with early esophageal carcinoma were treated by 6-12 Gy of intracavitary irradiation following 50-60 Gy of external irradiation as a boost therapy. Surgery was not performed in these cases. None of the patients had local recurrence after radiation therapy, as demonstrated by esophagography and endoscopy. Three patients have been alive for 1-3 years 10 months. Esophageal ulceration induced by intracavitary irradiation has occurred in three of the five patients; however, intracavitary irradiation is still a beneficial treatment because of its efficacy in controlling local lesions and because radiation ulceration can eventually be cured. Intracavitary irradiation is recommended to follow external irradiation as a boost therapy for the treatment of early esophageal carcinoma.

  13. Esophageal liposarcoma: Well-differentiated rhabdomyomatous type

    PubMed Central

    Valiuddin, Hisham M; Barbetta, Arianna; Mungo, Benedetto; Montgomery, Elizabeth A; Molena, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Rhabdomyomatous well-differentiated esophageal liposarcomas are extremely rare. As of August 2016, only one other such case has been reported in the English-language medical literature. Liposarcomas in general are one of the most common soft tissue neoplasms in adults, but the incidence of primary esophageal liposarcomas is exceptionally low. There have been only 42 reported cases of primary liposarcoma of the esophagus worldwide thus far. These malignancies are harbored within giant fibrovascular polyps, which slowly grow within the esophageal lumen causing obstructing symptoms. We hereby present the case of a 68-year-old male patient who came in with a 2-mo history of worsening intermittent dysphagia, persistent cough, and postprandial retrosternal pain. After an esophagogastroduodenoscopy, a computed tomographic scan, and a diagnostic endoscopy, complete endoscopic resection was performed of the 13 cm × 6 cm × 2.6 cm fibrovascular polyp. A literature review was done and results are presented herein. PMID:28035254

  14. Successful endoscopic hemoclipping of an esophageal perforation.

    PubMed

    Sung, H Y; Kim, J I; Cheung, D Y; Cho, S H; Park, S-H; Han, J-Y; Kim, J K; Han, S W; Choi, K Y; Chung, I S

    2007-01-01

    We describe a case of esophageal perforation that resulted from a fishbone. A 71-year-old man had had a fishbone impacted in the lower esophagus for 2 days. At presentation, the bone was dislodged at endoscopy; one round opening in a deep ulceration was detected when the fishbone was removed. The perforation was closed by endoscopic hemoclipping, after the removal of the fishbone. A thoracic computed tomography revealed air around the esophagus, aorta and bronchus and the presence of a pleural effusion. These findings suggested mediastinal emphysema and mediastinitis due to the esophageal perforation after the removal of the fishbone. Esophagography revealed a focal esophageal defect and linear contrast leakage at the distal esophagus. The mediastinal emphysema and pleural effusion successfully resolved after the endoscopic hemoclip application and conservative management of the perforation.

  15. Middle cerebral artery stenosis in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma after radiotherapy: the incidence of stenosis and the risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Lijuan; Xing, Pengfei; Zou, Li; Shen, Junkang; Tian, Ye

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of the present study was to investigate the incidence of middle cerebral artery (MCA) stenosis by contrast-enhanced MR angiography (CE-MRA), and to evaluate the risk factors for significant (>50%) MCA stenosis in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) after radiotherapy. Methods: 116 patients with NPC after radiotherapy were recruited into the irradiation group to investigate the incidence and degree of MCA stenosis by CE-MRA. The results were compared with those of the control group, which comprised 57 newly diagnosed patients with NPC who did not receive radiotherapy. Furthermore, the risk factors for significant MCA stenosis were evaluated. Results: There was a higher incidence of MCA stenosis in the irradiation group than in the control group in terms of patient number (p = 0.000) and vessel involvement (p = 0.000), respectively. The incidence of significant MCA stenosis in the irradiation group was 8.6% (10/116 patients) and 5.2% (12/232 patients) in terms of patient number and vessel involvement, respectively. However, no significant MCA stenosis was found in the control group. Univariate analysis showed that hypercholesterolaemia, T3–4 stage and longer time interval from radiotherapy were the risk factors related to significant MCA stenosis. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that only T stage was the independent risk factor for significant MCA stenosis development. Conclusion: The results showed that radiation can cause MCA stenosis in patients with NPC after radiotherapy, especially in those with T3–4 stage, and further study is needed. Advances in knowledge: Radiation-induced MCA stenosis exists in patients with NPC after radiotherapy, and its prevalence is more common in patients with clinical T3–4 stage. PMID:26934603

  16. Central vein stenosis in an Asian hemodialysis population.

    PubMed

    Thwaites, Stephen E; Robless, Peter A

    2012-10-01

    Central vein stenosis occurs commonly after instrumentation of the major thoracic veins. We aimed to investigate factors that contributed to this condition in an Asian hemodialysis population, and the results of intervention. Hemodialysis patients diagnosed with central vein stenosis between January 2003 and December 2008, were identified from the records of the National University Hospital, Singapore. Eligible controls had a minimum of 2 years of hemodialysis via an arteriovenous fistula and/or central venous catheter, without clinical or radiological evidence of central vein stenosis. Central vein stenosis was diagnosed in 108 patients. The most common presenting features were arm swelling (32%) and failed hemodialysis catheter insertion (28%). The median frequency of permanent hemodialysis catheter insertion in those who subsequently developed venous stenosis (1.44 per patient per year) was 4 times that of controls (0.36 per patient per year; p<0.001). Ischemic heart disease (p = 0.03) and in certain patients, arteriovenous fistula surgery were associated with the development of central vein stenosis; whereas line sepsis, diabetes, and hypertension were not. Central vein angioplasty was attempted in 53 patients; the primary patency was 52% at 1 year. Central vein stenosis is associated with a higher frequency of hemodialysis catheter insertion and access surgery. Efforts to decrease permanent hemodialysis catheter use should reduce the incidence of central vein stenosis.

  17. T-tube insertion for sclerotic subglottic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Goto, Taichiro; Kato, Ryoichi

    2014-02-01

    T-tube insertion is effective treatment for subglottic stenosis, but it is generally difficult due to bending of the T-tube. In a 52-year-old woman with relapsing polychondritis, a T-tube was inserted after predilatation using Hegar dilators. We describe the details of our T-tube insertion methods for sclerotic subglottic stenosis.

  18. Successful correction of unroofed coronary sinus with pulmonary vein stenosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; An, Qi; Zhang, Eryong

    2012-07-01

    We present a case of an infant with an unroofed coronary sinus associated with a persistent left superior vena cava draining into the left atrium, right superior pulmonary vein stenosis, an atretic left superior pulmonary vein and a double-outlet right ventricle. For pulmonary vein stenosis and atresia, we used a sutureless technique with an autologous pericardial patch to create a neoatrium.

  19. Evaluation of Subfoveal Choroidal Thickness in Internal Carotid Artery Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Akçay, Betül İlkay Sezgin; Kardeş, Esra; Maçin, Sultan; Ünlü, Cihan; Özgürhan, Engin Bilge; Maçin, Aydın; Bozkurt, Tahir Kansu; Ergin, Ahmet; Surmeli, Reyhan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the relationship between internal carotid artery (ICA) stenosis and subfoveal choroidal thickness (SFCT) in the elderly population. Methods. A total of 42 eyes of 21 patients with more than 70% ICA stenosis (Group 1) on one side and less than 70% stenosis (Group 2) on the other side were recruited for this study. ICA stenosis was diagnosed using both the B-mode and Doppler ultrasound. The two groups were compared in terms of the percentage of stenosis, SFCT measurements, intraocular pressure, ocular perfusion pressure, refractive error, and peak systolic velocity. Eyes were examined with the RTVue-100 OCT device by the EDI-OCT technique. Results. The mean age of the patients was 71.9 ± 10.8 years. The mean percentage of ICA stenosis was 74 ± 4.9% in Group 1 and 47.5 ± 7.7% in Group 2. The mean SFCT was 231.9 ± 44.6 μm in Group 1 and 216.2 ± 46.8 μm in Group 2, which was significantly lower (P = 0.028). A statistically significant positive correlation was found between the percentage of internal carotid artery stenosis and SFCT (r = 0896, P = 0.001). Conclusions. Compensatory SFCT increase can be seen in ipsilateral internal carotid artery stenosis greater than 70%. PMID:26989500

  20. Angioplasty and Stenting for Intracranial Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    IZUMI, Takashi; IMAMURA, Hirotoshi; SAKAI, Nobuyuki; MIYACHI, Shigeru

    2014-01-01

    Of the patients enrolled in the Japanese Registry of Neuroendovascular Therapy (JR-NET), a surveillance study in Japanese, 1133 patients who underwent intracranial percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA)/stenting for intracranial stenosis during the period from 2005 to 2009 were investigated. A technical success was achieved in 98.3% of the patients, and 70.5% and 7.5% had a residual stenosis of < 30% and ≥ 50%, respectively. The incidence of ischemic complications and hemorrhagic complications was as low as 7.7% and 2.5%, respectively, but tended to increase in patients who underwent stenting. While a significant correlation with ischemic complications was observed in previously untreated patients and patients who underwent stenting followed by post-dilatation, a significant correlation with hemorrhagic complications was observed in patients who received emergency treatment and those treated between 24 hours and 14 days of the onset. Flexible intracranial stents are expected to contribute to improvement in the treatment outcome. PMID:24390191

  1. Eosinophilic esophagitis in adults: An update

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Monjur

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis is a worldwide chronic allergic disease of the esophagus. In the last decade, there is an epidemic of this entity in the western world. Mostly seen in children and young adults, patients present with dysphagia or food impaction in the emergency room. Characteristic endoscopic findings, esophageal eosinophilia and non-responsiveness to proton pump inhibitors help make the diagnosis. Avoidance of food allergens, administration of steroidal anti-inflammatory medications and dilation of the esophagus are the mainstays of treatment. Investigations are ongoing for mucosal healing and optimum maintenance treatment. PMID:27158535

  2. Eosinophilic esophagitis in children: clinical manifestations.

    PubMed

    Putnam, Philip E

    2008-01-01

    During the past decade, the increasing number of recognized cases of eosinophilic esophagitis in children and adults has resulted in a dramatic expansion of the medical literature surrounding it. Clinical and basic research has contributed to a better, but still incomplete, body of knowledge regarding its clinical and histologic manifestations, as well as its immunologic and genetic pathogenesis. This article provides a broad framework for recognizing the remarkable variety of clinical manifestations of eosinophilic esophagitis in children, which must be considered as part of the differential diagnosis in many different clinical situations.

  3. Eosinophilic esophagitis in children: clinical manifestations.

    PubMed

    Putnam, Philip E

    2008-06-01

    During the past decade, the increasing number of recognized cases of eosinophilic esophagitis in children and adults has resulted in a dramatic expansion of the medical literature surrounding it. Clinical and basic research has contributed to a better, but still incomplete, body of knowledge regarding its clinical and histologic manifestations, as well as its immunologic and genetic pathogenesis. This article provides a broad framework for recognizing the remarkable variety of clinical manifestations of eosinophilic esophagitis in children, which must be considered as part of the differential diagnosis in many different clinical situations.

  4. Steroid treatment of eosinophilic esophagitis in adults.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Jeffrey A

    2014-06-01

    Topical steroid therapy has been used to treat eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) for more than 15 years. We review the treatment trials of topical steroid therapy in adult patients with EoE. Currently, there is no commercially available preparation designed to deliver the steroid to the esophagus. Current regimens consist of swallowing steroid preparations designed for inhalation treatment for asthma. In the short term, steroids are associated with an approximately 15% to 25% incidence of asymptomatic esophageal candidiasis, but otherwise appear to be well tolerated.

  5. Esophageal web in Plummer-Vinson syndrome.

    PubMed

    Okamura, H; Tsutsumi, S; Inaki, S; Mori, T

    1988-09-01

    In Plummer-Vinson syndrome, esophagography often reveals a web at the anterior wall of the cervical esophagus. The pathogenesis of the esophageal web and the cause of dysphagia in this syndrome were investigated radiographically, endoscopically, manometrically, and histologically. It was considered that the web seen in the esophagogram may have been formed due to the restriction of dilation of the esophageal wall, which results from repetitive inflammation and the subsequent healing process. Dysphagia in this syndrome may be explained by a decrease in swallowing power. Iron deficiency anemia may play the main role in the above histological changes and the resulting decrease in swallowing power.

  6. Diagnosis of Lumbar Foraminal Stenosis using Diffusion Tensor Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ohtori, Seiji; Suzuki, Munetaka; Oikawa, Yasuhiro; Yamanaka, Hajime; Tamai, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Orita, Sumihisa; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Suzuki, Miyako; Aoki, Yasuchika; Watanabe, Atsuya; Kanamoto, Hirohito; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2016-01-01

    Diagnosis of lumbar foraminal stenosis remains difficult. Here, we report on a case in which bilateral lumbar foraminal stenosis was difficult to diagnose, and in which diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was useful. The patient was a 52-year-old woman with low back pain and pain in both legs that was dominant on the right. Right lumbosacral nerve compression due to a massive uterine myoma was apparent, but the leg pain continued after a myomectomy was performed. No abnormalities were observed during nerve conduction studies. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging indicated bilateral L5 lumbar foraminal stenosis. DTI imaging was done. The extraforaminal values were decreased and tractography was interrupted in the foraminal region. Bilateral L5 vertebral foraminal stenosis was treated by transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion and the pain in both legs disappeared. The case indicates the value of DTI for diagnosing vertebral foraminal stenosis. PMID:26949473

  7. Asymptomatic Pulmonary Vein Stenosis: Hemodynamic Adaptation and Successful Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, Denis

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary vein stenosis is a well-established possible complication following an atrial fibrillation ablation of pulmonary veins. Symptoms of pulmonary vein stenosis range from asymptomatic to severe exertional dyspnea. The number of asymptomatic patients with pulmonary vein stenosis is greater than originally estimated; moreover, only about 22% of severe pulmonary vein stenosis requires intervention. We present a patient with severe postatrial fibrillation (AF) ablation pulmonary vein (PV) stenosis, which was seen on multiple imaging modalities including cardiac computed tomography (CT) angiogram, lung perfusion scan, and pulmonary angiogram. This patient did not have any pulmonary symptoms. Hemodynamic changes within a stenosed pulmonary vein might not reflect the clinical severity of the obstruction if redistribution of pulmonary artery flow occurs. Our patient had an abnormal lung perfusion and ventilation (V/Q) scan, suggesting pulmonary artery blood flow redistribution. The patient ultimately underwent safe repeat atrial fibrillation ablation with successful elimination of arrhythmia. PMID:28105376

  8. Intravascular stent implantation for the management of pulmonary artery stenosis.

    PubMed

    Krisnanda, Charles; Menahem, Samuel; Lane, Geoffrey K

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary artery stenosis is a challenging problem in the management of congenital heart disease. Untreated pulmonary artery stenosis may contribute to increased mortality and morbidity, and lead to suboptimal results following surgical repair of congenital heart disease. Intravascular stent implantation has emerged as one of the preferred treatment options for pulmonary artery stenosis. However, issues regarding the effectiveness and complications of stent implantation for pulmonary artery stenosis need to be identified. In addition, difficulties of stent implantation in the paediatric setting, as a consequence of small vessel size and subsequent vessel growth, are also important considerations. This review will evaluate the short and long-term effectiveness, the outcomes and complications, and discuss the potential problems of stent implantation for pulmonary artery stenosis. Copyright © 2012 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Bilateral adrenal phaeochromocytomas associated with unilateral renal artery stenosis.

    PubMed Central

    Burns, A. P.; O'Connell, P. R.; Murnaghan, D. J.; Brady, M. P.

    1989-01-01

    A 21 year old male was discovered to be severely hypertensive. He was found to have bilateral adrenal phaeochromocytomas and a single renal artery stenosis. More than 40 cases of coexisting renal artery stenosis and phaeochromocytomas have been reported. The aetiology of renal artery stenosis in association with phaeochromocytoma maybe multifactorial and the radiographic appearances are not always clear-cut. Renin levels in this patient were elevated prior to the removal of the phaeochromocytomas but the renal vein renin ratio did not suggest that the renal artery stenosis contributed significantly to his hypertension. The patient's hypertension resolved following successful removal of the phaeochromocytomas despite persistence of the renal artery stenosis. Thus, though renin levels may be misleading in these cases, renal vein renin ratios may still be helpful in deciding on patient management. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:2694147

  10. Pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia mimicking esophageal squamous cell carcinoma in a patient with lye-induced esophageal stricture.

    PubMed

    Han, Jang Soo; Lee, Sang Woo; Suh, Kang Heum; Kim, Seung Young; Hyun, Jong Jin; Jung, Sung Woo; Koo, Ja Seol; Yim, Hyung Joon

    2014-06-01

    Pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia is a benign condition that may be caused by prolonged inflammation, chronic infection, and/or neoplastic conditions of the mucous membranes or skin. Due to its histological resemblance to well-differentiated squamous cell carcinoma, pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia may occasionally be misdiagnosed as squamous cell carcinoma. The importance of pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia is that it is a self-limited condition that must be distinguished from squamous cell carcinoma before invasive treatment. We report here on a rare case of esophageal pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia in a 67-year-old Korean woman with a lye-induced esophageal stricture. Although esophageal pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia is infrequently encountered, pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia should be considered in the differential diagnosis of esophageal lesions.

  11. Assessment and protection of esophageal mucosal integrity in patients with heartburn without esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Woodland, Philip; Lee, Chung; Duraisamy, Yasotha; Duraysami, Yasotha; Farré, Ricard; Dettmar, Peter; Sifrim, Daniel

    2013-04-01

    Intact esophageal mucosal integrity is essential to prevent symptoms during gastroesophageal reflux events. Approximately 70% of patients with heartburn have macroscopically normal esophageal mucosa. In patients with heartburn, persistent functional impairment of esophageal mucosal barrier integrity may underlie remaining symptoms. Topical protection of a functionally vulnerable mucosa may be an attractive therapeutic strategy. We aimed to evaluate esophageal mucosal functional integrity in patients with heartburn without esophagitis, and test the feasibility of an alginate-based topical mucosal protection. Three distal esophageal biopsies were obtained from 22 patients with heartburn symptoms, and 22 control subjects. In mini-Ussing chambers, the change in transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) of biopsies when exposed to neutral, weakly acidic, and acidic solutions was measured. The experiment was repeated in a further 10 patients after pretreatment of biopsies with sodium alginate, viscous control, or liquid control "protectant" solutions. Biopsy exposure to neutral solution caused no change in TER. Exposure to weakly acidic and acidic solutions caused a greater reduction in TER in patients than in controls (weakly acid -7.2% (95% confidence interval (CI) -9.9 to -4.5) vs. 3.2% (-2.2 to 8.6), P<0.05; acidic -22.8% (-31.4 to 14.1) vs. -9.4% (-17.2 to -1.6), P<0.01). Topical pretreatment with alginate but not with control solutions prevented the acid-induced decrease in TER (-1% (-5.9 to 3.9) vs. -13.5 (-24.1 to -3.0) vs. -13.2 (-21.7 to -4.8), P<0.05). Esophageal mucosa in patients with heartburn without esophagitis shows distinct vulnerability to acid and weakly acidic exposures. Experiments in vitro suggest that such vulnerable mucosa may be protected by application of an alginate-containing topical solution.

  12. Increased risk of esophageal eosinophilia and eosinophilic esophagitis in patients with active celiac disease on biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Elizabeth T.; Eluri, Swathi; Lebwohl, Benjamin; Genta, Robert M.; Dellon, Evan S.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims The possible association between eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) and celiac disease (CD) is controversial as prior results have been contradictory. We aimed to determine the relationship between EoE and CD among patients with concomitant esophageal and duodenal biopsies. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study in a U.S. national pathology database, using data from January 2009 and June 2012. Our primary case definition was defined by the presence of esophageal eosinophilia with ≥ 15 eosinophils per high-power field. The crude and adjusted (for age and sex) odds of esophageal eosinophilia for patients with active CD were compared to those without CD. Sensitivity analyses were performed using more stringent case definitions and by estimating the associations between CD and reflux esophagitis, and CD and Barrett's esophagus (BE). Results Of 292,621 patients in the source population, 88,517 with both esophageal and duodenal biopsies were studied. 4,101 (4.6%) met criteria for EoE and 1,203 (1.4%) met criteria for CD. Odds of EoE were 26% higher in patients with CD than patients without CD (aOR: 1.26, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.98 – 1.60). The magnitude of association varied according to EoE case definition (Table 3), but all definitions showed a weak, positive association between the two conditions. There was no association between CD and reflux esophagitis (aOR 0.95, 95% CI: 0.85 – 1.07) or BE (aOR 0.89, 95% CI: 0.69 – 1.14) and CD. Conclusions There is a weak increase in EoE in patients with CD. This association strengthened with increasingly stringent definitions of EoE, and was not observed for other esophageal conditions. In patients with CD, concomitant EoE should be considered in the correct clinical setting. PMID:25724709

  13. Alteration of Esophageal Microbiome by Antibiotic Treatment Does Not Affect Incidence of Rat Esophageal Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Akinari; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Nagami, Yasuaki; Tanaka, Fumio; Yamagami, Hirokazu; Tanigawa, Tetsuya; Shiba, Masatsugu; Tominaga, Kazunari; Watanabe, Toshio; Gi, Min; Wanibuchi, Hideki; Arakawa, Tetsuo

    2016-11-01

    Recent studies suggest that chronic inflammation-associated cancer is relevant to microbiome. Esophageal adenocarcinoma arises from an inflammatory condition called Barrett's esophagus, which is caused by gastroesophageal reflux. We hypothesized that esophageal microbiome plays a role in carcinogenesis of esophageal adenocarcinoma. We investigated whether alteration of microbiome using antibiotics affects the development of esophageal adenocarcinoma in a rat model. Seven-week-old male Wistar rats which had undergone esophagojejunostomy were divided into control (n = 21) and antibiotic groups (n = 22) at 21 weeks after surgery. Control animals were given drinking water, while the other group was given penicillin G and streptomycin in drinking water until rats were killed at 40 weeks after operation. Incidence rates of Barrett's esophagus and adenocarcinoma in each group were evaluated by histological analysis. DNA was extracted from a portion of the distal esophagus, and the microbiome was investigated using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis. All rats in both groups developed Barrett's esophagus. Incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma was similar between both groups with a trend to reduced incidence in the antibiotics group (89 % in the control group, 71 % in the antibiotics group, P = 0.365). T-RFLP analysis showed that esophageal microbiome was different between two groups such as the proportion of Lactobacillales was lower in the antibiotics group and Clostridium cluster XIVa and XVIII was higher in the antibiotics group. Alteration of microbiome does not affect the incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma. Microbiome may not contribute to the development of esophageal adenocarcinoma.

  14. Frequency of eosinophilic esophagitis in patients with esophageal symptoms: a single-center Turkish experience.

    PubMed

    Altun, R; Akbas, E; Yıldırım, A E; Öcal, S; Korkmaz, M; Selcuk, H

    2013-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic, immune/antigen-mediated esophageal disease characterized with symptoms related to esophageal dysfunction and eosinophil-predominant inflammation. There has been a dramatic increase in the diagnosis of this disease in recent years. The primary objective of this study was to determine the frequency of EoE in adult patients who were evaluated by gastroenterologists in our clinic with esophageal symptoms. Between November 2010 and May 2011, 311 adult patients who were evaluated in our clinic with esophageal symptoms were enrolled prospectively. All patients underwent endoscopy and had biopsies taken. Gastroesophageal reflux disease was excluded by either proton pump inhibitory treatment or 24-hour ambulatory pH monitorization. The diagnosis was confirmed by one independent pathologist. Frequency of EoE in patients with esophageal symptoms was 2.6% (n = 8; four men and four women). Mean age at diagnosis was 40.2 ± 8 years. Heartburn was the predominant symptom in patients (75% of the patients), and 87.5% (n = 7) of patients had more than one symptom at diagnosis. Nearly 38% of the patients (n = 3) had a history of allergic disease. Endoscopic findings were as follows: transient/fixed esophageal rings (25%), white exudates (25%), and normal appearance (50%). Median number of circulating eosinophils was 208 (93-659)/mm(3) . Median number of intraepithelial eosinophils in proximal-middle 1/3 part and distal 1/3 part of esophagus were 0 (0-50)/hpf and 37 (16-50)/hpf, respectively. In conclusion, EoE is not rare in Turkey, and it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with esophageal symptoms.

  15. [Pediatric patient in adult age. Long-terms results of esophageal replacement].

    PubMed

    Burgos, L; Martínez, L; Suárez, O; Andrés, A M; Luis, A L; Encinas, J L; Hernández, F; Murcia, J; Olivares, P; Queizán, A; Lassaletta, L; Tovar, J A

    2007-07-01

    Esophagocoloplasty is one of the most used procedures for esophageal replacement in children. Considering high life expectancy in these patients, long-term results must be considered when evaluating this technique. The aim of our study is to evaluate quality of life of adult patients who underwent surgery at pediatric age. We report a retrospective study of 99 patients who underwent esophageal replacement in our institution between 1966 and 2006. Eight of them have died and 63 out of the remaining 91 are over 18 years now and represent our study serie. Long-term results and actual situation of those patients, considering psychological, physic and social aspects, were evaluated through clinical review and telephonic interview. Karnofsky index was applied to mesure functional ability from 0-100% (bad, medium, good-excellent) according to the answers the patients gave to our questions. We also recorded their health personal experience and subjective evaluation of their quality of life. Sixty-three patients were reviewed (43 males and 20 females) with a mean age of 4.3 +/- 3.4 D.S. Mean follow-up time was 29.6 +/-7.7 years. Indications for esophageal replacement were as follows: caustication (n = 32), type III esophageal atresia (n = 15), type I AE (n = 13) and others (n = 3). In 48 patients the graft was placed in retroestenal position and in 15 cases retromediastic location was used. Postoperative period was uneventful in 44% of the patients, being the most frequent early complications in the remaining, cervical leakage and stenosis. Long-term, 56,8% did not have any sequelae, 28.5% required further surgery and the remaining 43.13% presented the following complications: symptomatic graft reflux (22), scoliosis and thoracic asymmetry (12), colonic redundancy or cervical diverticulum (7), food impaction (6) and failure to thrive (5). Only one 38 year old patient does not have intestinal tract continuity nowadays. Thirty-one patients have a Karnofsky index > or = 80

  16. Effect of physical exercise on esophageal motility in patients with esophageal disease.

    PubMed

    Ravi, N; Stuart, R C; Byrne, P J; Reynolds, J V

    2005-01-01

    The most common type of esophageal dysfunction associated with chest pain is gastroesophageal reflux, which may be induced by exercise. The effect of exercise on esophageal function has mainly been investigated in normal subjects or trained athletes. Few studies have investigated exercise and esophageal motility disorders. One hundred and thirty-five patients underwent ambulatory esophageal manometry and pH monitoring, before, during and immediately after moderate exercise. Patients were divided into four groups: Normal, nutcracker, diffuse spasm and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Ambulatory manometry and pH were monitored while exercising on a treadmill during which standardized boluses of water were administered. Nutcracker and diffuse spasm patients demonstrated a significant fall in esophageal wave amplitude during exercise compared to controls, which returned rapidly to pre exercise values after resting. There was no evidence of acid reflux in the non-reflux groups during exercise. Reflux was noted in 13 patients with GERD during exercise, none of whom had evidence of reflux at the onset of exercise. When these patients were classified by reflux type, the majority, 11 patients, were found to come from the combined or supine reflux group. Esophageal amplitude in nutcracker esophagus does not increase during moderate exercise. Moderate exercise provokes reflux in GERD patients with combined or supine reflux.

  17. [Use of the Dynamic Stent in the palliation of carinal and distal tracheal stenosis].

    PubMed

    Ricci, F; Puma, F; Santoprete, S; Urbani, M; Vinci, D; Sanguinetti, A; Ottavi, P; Porcaro, G; Daddi, G

    2002-01-01

    Satisfactory palliation of the lesions involving the carinal region is difficult to achieve because the stenting is conducted in an unsuitable anatomy, in highly symptomatic patients. During the period 1987-2000 we performed 785 operative rigid bronchoscopies in 524 patients, 184 of whom received a respiratory stent. The stenting of the carinal region was carried out in 27 patients with the use of the Frietag Dynamic stent. In this group of patients indication for stenting was as follows:--advanced lung cancer (22);--esophageal cancer invading the lower trachea (1);--severe tracheobronchomalacia (2);--postintubation stenosis of the lower trachea (2). No perioperative mortality was observed. All patients experienced symptomatic improvement. Follow-up ranged from 1 to 60 months: all neoplastic patients died for advanced disease without significant respiratory problems with a median survival of 5.6 months; three patients treated for benign diseases are still alive at 2, 31 and 65 months from stent deployment. No major complications were observed: in two patients the stent was removed after few days due to mucous retention; furthermore we observed symptomatic respiratory infections caused by a residual space between the tracheal wall and the prosthesis in other two patients with severe COPD. Dynamic stent is to be considered the stent of choice for palliation of the carinal region because it is effective and well tolerated with a low complications rate. The main limitations of such prosthesis are the shortness of the right bronchial branch and the size, sometimes inadequate.

  18. Revision Surgery Following Operations for Lumbar Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Deyo, Richard A.; Martin, Brook I.; Kreuter, William; Jarvik, Jeffrey G.; Angier, Heather; Mirza, Sohail K.

    2011-01-01

    Background: For carefully selected patients with lumbar stenosis, decompression surgery is more efficacious than nonoperative treatment. However, some patients undergo repeat surgery, often because of complications, the failure to achieve solid fusion following arthrodesis procedures, or persistent symptoms. We assessed the probability of repeat surgery following operations for the treatment of lumbar stenosis and examined its association with patient age, comorbidity, previous surgery, and the type of surgical procedure. Methods: We performed a retrospective cohort analysis of Medicare claims. The index operation was performed in 2004 (n = 31,543), with follow-up obtained through 2008. Operations were grouped by complexity as decompression alone, simple arthrodesis (one or two disc levels and a single surgical approach), or complex arthrodesis (more than two disc levels or combined anterior and posterior approach). Reoperation rates were calculated for each follow-up year, and the time to reoperation was analyzed with proportional hazards models. Results: The probability of repeat surgery fell with increasing patient age or comorbidity. Aside from age, the strongest predictor was previous lumbar surgery: at four years the reoperation rate was 17.2% among patients who had had lumbar surgery prior to the index operation, compared with 10.6% among those with no prior surgery (p < 0.001). At one year, the reoperation rate for patients who had been managed with decompression alone was slightly higher than that for patients who had been managed with simple arthrodesis, but by four years the rates for these two groups were identical (10.7%) and were lower than the rate for patients who had been managed with complex arthrodesis (13.5%) (p < 0.001). This difference persisted after adjusting for demographic and clinical features (hazard ratio for complex arthrodesis versus decompression 1.56, 95% confidence interval, 1.26 to 1.92). A device-related complication was reported

  19. Human papillomavirus-related esophageal cancer survival

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Lanwei; Liu, Shuzheng; Zhang, Shaokai; Chen, Qiong; Zhang, Meng; Quan, Peiliang; Sun, Xi-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Human papillomavirus (HPV) has been identified to be related to progression of esophageal cancer. However, the results remain controversial. A meta-analysis of epidemiologic studies was therefore conducted to address this issue. Methods: The electronic databases of MEDLINE and Excerpta Medica database were searched till April 30, 2016. Study-specific risk estimates were pooled using a random-effects model. Results: Ten studies involving a total of 1184 esophageal cancer cases were included in this meta-analysis. The pooled hazard ratio comparing HPV-positive to HPV-negative esophageal cancers was 1.03 (95% confidence interval 0.78–1.37), which was not significantly correlated with improved survival. However, HPV-16-positive patients might have a significantly favorable survival (hazard ratio 0.73, 95% confidence interval 0.44–1.21). Conclusion: The meta-analysis indicated that HPV infection may not be of prognostic utility in the evaluation of factors contributing to esophageal cancer. Further large prospective studies are encouraged to stratify survival analysis by HPV type. PMID:27861358

  20. 21 CFR 868.1910 - Esophageal stethoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Esophageal stethoscope. 868.1910 Section 868.1910 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... enable the user to listen to heart and breath sounds. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls)....

  1. 21 CFR 868.1910 - Esophageal stethoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Esophageal stethoscope. 868.1910 Section 868.1910 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... enable the user to listen to heart and breath sounds. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls)....

  2. 21 CFR 868.1910 - Esophageal stethoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Esophageal stethoscope. 868.1910 Section 868.1910 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... enable the user to listen to heart and breath sounds. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls)....

  3. 21 CFR 868.1910 - Esophageal stethoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Esophageal stethoscope. 868.1910 Section 868.1910 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... enable the user to listen to heart and breath sounds. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls)....

  4. The Immunologic Mechanisms of Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Hill, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic allergic inflammatory disease that is triggered by food and/or environmental allergens and is characterized by a clinical and pathologic phenotype of progressive esophageal dysfunction due to tissue inflammation and fibrosis. EoE is suspected in patients with painful swallowing, among other symptoms, and is diagnosed by the presence of 15 or more eosinophils per high-power field in one or more of at least four esophageal biopsy specimens. The prevalence of EoE is increasing and has now reached rates similar to those of other chronic gastrointestinal disorders such as Crohn’s disease. In recent years, our understanding of the immunologic mechanisms underlying this condition has grown considerably. Thanks to new genetic, molecular, cellular, animal, and translational studies, we can now postulate a detailed pathway by which exposure to allergens results in a complex and coordinated type 2 inflammatory cascade that, if not intervened upon, can result in pain on swallowing, esophageal strictures, and food impaction. Here, we review the most recent research in this field to synthesize and summarize our current understanding of this complex and important disease. PMID:26758862

  5. Axial force measurement for esophageal function testing

    PubMed Central

    Gravesen, Flemming H; Funch-Jensen, Peter; Gregersen, Hans; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr

    2009-01-01

    The esophagus serves to transport food and fluid from the pharynx to the stomach. Manometry has been the “golden standard” for the diagnosis of esophageal motility diseases for many decades. Hence, esophageal function is normally evaluated by means of manometry even though it reflects the squeeze force (force in radial direction) whereas the bolus moves along the length of esophagus in a distal direction. Force measurements in the longitudinal (axial) direction provide a more direct measure of esophageal transport function. The technique used to record axial force has developed from external force transducers over in-vivo strain gauges of various sizes to electrical impedance based measurements. The amplitude and duration of the axial force has been shown to be as reliable as manometry. Normal, as well as abnormal, manometric recordings occur with normal bolus transit, which have been documented using imaging modalities such as radiography and scintigraphy. This inconsistency using manometry has also been documented by axial force recordings. This underlines the lack of information when diagnostics are based on manometry alone. Increasing the volume of a bag mounted on a probe with combined axial force and manometry recordings showed that axial force amplitude increased by 130% in contrast to an increase of 30% using manometry. Using axial force in combination with manometry provides a more complete picture of esophageal motility, and the current paper outlines the advantages of using this method. PMID:19132762

  6. Esophageal function testing: beyond manometry and impedance.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Ravinder K

    2014-10-01

    Manometry and impedance provide only surrogate information regarding longitudinal wall function and are focused on contractile amplitude and lumen content. Ultrasound imaging provides a unique perspective of esophageal function by providing important information regarding longitudinal muscle contraction. Laser Doppler assessment of perfusion may be an important complementary tool to assess abnormal wall blood perfusion as a possible mechanism of pain. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Perception of Syllable Stress in Esophageal Speech.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Christopher Niles; Morris, Hughlett L.

    1988-01-01

    Ten esophageal speakers and ten normal speakers produced repetitions of the disyllable /mama/ using five different conditions of syllable stress. Nine normal listeners judged both relative and absolute syllable stress. Reliable judgments were made of the syllable stress, and speakers were able to effect systematic changes in listener perceptions…

  8. Histomorphological and Immunophenotypic Features of Pill-Induced Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Su Hwan; Kim, Won; Lee, Kook Lae; Byeon, Sun-ju; Choi, Euno; Chang, Mee Soo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate histomorphological and immunophenotypic features in pill-induced esophagitis. We comparatively evaluated the histomorphological, immunophenotypic features of pill-induced esophagitis vs. reflux esophagitis, as well as clinical information and endoscopic findings. Fifty-two tissue pieces from 22 cases of pill-induced esophagitis, 46 pieces from 20 reflux esophagitis, and 16 pieces from 14 control samples were subjected to immunohistochemistry for inflammatory infiltrates (CD3 for T lymphocyte, CD20 for B lymphocyte, CD56 for NK cell, CD68 for macrophage, CD117 for mast cell) and eosinophil chemotaxis-associated proteins (Erk, leptin, leptin receptor, pSTAT3, phospho-mTOR). As a result, Histomorphology showed that a diffuse pattern of dilated intercellular spaces was more frequently observed in pill-induced esophagitis, while reactive atypia and subepithelial papillary elongation were more often found in reflux esophagitis (P < 0.05, respectively). Interestingly, intraepithelial eosinophilic microabscess, intraepithelial pustule and diffuse pattern of dilated intercellular spaces were observed in 14% (3 cases), 9% (2 cases) and 32% (7 cases) of pill-induced esophagitis, respectively, but in no cases of reflux esophagitis. Regarding intraepithelial inflammatory infiltrates in pill-induced esophagitis, T lymphocytes were the most common cells, followed by eosinophil; 11 and 7 in one x400 power field, respectively. Intraepithelial pSTAT3-positive pattern was more frequently observed in pill-induced esophagitis than in reflux esophagitis, at 45% (10 cases) versus 10% (2 cases), respectively (P < 0.05). Considering the distal esophageal lesion only, intraepithelial pustule, diffuse dilated intercellular spaces and stromal macrophages were more frequently found in distal pill-induced esophagitis, whereas reactive atypia and intraepithelial mast cells in reflux esophagitis (P < 0.05, respectively). In conclusion, diffuse dilated

  9. Histomorphological and Immunophenotypic Features of Pill-Induced Esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Won; Kim, Byeong Gwan; Kim, Su Hwan; Kim, Won; Lee, Kook Lae; Byeon, Sun-ju; Choi, Euno; Chang, Mee Soo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate histomorphological and immunophenotypic features in pill-induced esophagitis. We comparatively evaluated the histomorphological, immunophenotypic features of pill-induced esophagitis vs. reflux esophagitis, as well as clinical information and endoscopic findings. Fifty-two tissue pieces from 22 cases of pill-induced esophagitis, 46 pieces from 20 reflux esophagitis, and 16 pieces from 14 control samples were subjected to immunohistochemistry for inflammatory infiltrates (CD3 for T lymphocyte, CD20 for B lymphocyte, CD56 for NK cell, CD68 for macrophage, CD117 for mast cell) and eosinophil chemotaxis-associated proteins (Erk, leptin, leptin receptor, pSTAT3, phospho-mTOR). As a result, Histomorphology showed that a diffuse pattern of dilated intercellular spaces was more frequently observed in pill-induced esophagitis, while reactive atypia and subepithelial papillary elongation were more often found in reflux esophagitis (P < 0.05, respectively). Interestingly, intraepithelial eosinophilic microabscess, intraepithelial pustule and diffuse pattern of dilated intercellular spaces were observed in 14% (3 cases), 9% (2 cases) and 32% (7 cases) of pill-induced esophagitis, respectively, but in no cases of reflux esophagitis. Regarding intraepithelial inflammatory infiltrates in pill-induced esophagitis, T lymphocytes were the most common cells, followed by eosinophil; 11 and 7 in one x400 power field, respectively. Intraepithelial pSTAT3-positive pattern was more frequently observed in pill-induced esophagitis than in reflux esophagitis, at 45% (10 cases) versus 10% (2 cases), respectively (P < 0.05). Considering the distal esophageal lesion only, intraepithelial pustule, diffuse dilated intercellular spaces and stromal macrophages were more frequently found in distal pill-induced esophagitis, whereas reactive atypia and intraepithelial mast cells in reflux esophagitis (P < 0.05, respectively). In conclusion, diffuse dilated

  10. Esophageal involvement in juvenile localized scleroderma: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Guariso, G; Conte, S; Galeazzi, F; Vettorato, M G; Martini, G; Zulian, F

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate the esophageal involvement in patients with juvenile localized scleroderma (JLS). A cohort of patients with JLS underwent esophageal stationary manometry to evaluate esophageal motility and lower esophageal sphincter (LES) function, distal esophagus 24-hour pH-monitoring to detect gastroesophageal reflux (GER) and upper gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy to evaluate the presence of esophagitis. Fourteen patients (10 female, mean age 13.3 yrs, mean disease duration 4.7 yrs), took part in the study. Ten had linear scleroderma, three deep morphea, and one generalized morphea. Esophageal abnormalities were found in 8/14 patients (57%): pathological acid exposure on 24-hour pH-monitoring was found in 7; non-specific esophageal motor abnormalities in 5 and endoscopy-proved esophagitis in 5 symptomatic patients. Interestingly, 5 out of 8 patients with esophageal abnormalities were found to be ANA positive, and 2 were also RF positive. Esophageal involvement is not unusual in patients with juvenile localized scleroderma, even in the absence of specific symptoms. These preliminary findings, if confirmed in a larger cohort of patients, may support the indication for an extensive GI evaluation especially in presence of positive autoantibodies or specific GI symptoms.

  11. Does surgery correct esophageal motor dysfunction in gastroesophageal reflux

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, C.O.; Pope, C.E.; Gannan, R.M.; Allen, F.D.; Velasco, N.; Hill, L.D.

    1981-09-01

    The high incidence of dysphagia in patients with symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux (GER) but no evidence of peptic stricture suggests esophageal motor dysfunction. Conventional methods for detecting dysfunction (radiologic and manometric examinations) often fail to detect abnormality in these patients. Radionuclide transit (RT), a new method for detecting esophageal motor dysfunction, was used to prospectively assess function in 29 patients with symptomatic GER uncomplicated by stricture before and three months after antireflux surgery (HILL). The preoperative incidence of dysphagia and esophageal dysfunction was 73% and 52%, respectively. During operation (Hill repair), intraoperative measurement of the lower esophageal sphincter pressure was performed and the LESP raised to levels between 45 and 55 mmHg. The preoperative lower esophageal sphincter pressure was raised from a mean of 8.6 mmHg, to mean of 18.5 mmHg after operation. No patient has free reflux after operation. Postoperative studies on 20 patients demonstrated persistence of all preoperative esophageal dysfunction despite loss of dysphagia. RT has demonstrated a disorder of esophageal motor function in 52% of patients with symptomatic GER that may be responsible for impaired esophageal clearance. This abnormality is not contraindication to surgery. The results indicate that construction of an effective barrier to reflex corrects symptoms of reflux, even in the presence of impaired esophageal transit. Radionuclide transit is a safe noninvasive test for assessment of esophageal function.

  12. Lumbar foraminal stenosis causes leg pain at rest.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Katsutaka; Aota, Yoichi; Higashi, Takayuki; Ishida, Ko; Nimura, Takanori; Konno, Tomoyuki; Saito, Tomoyuki

    2014-03-01

    Lumbar intra-spinal canal stenosis is characterized by leg pain that intensifies during walking and intermittent claudication, while leg pain at rest is a characteristic neurological symptom of lumbar disc herniation. Until now, a correlation between leg pain at rest and symptomatic foraminal stenosis has not been reported. This is a prospective and comparative study of unilateral leg pain from L5 nerve root compression due to spinal canal stenosis to determine clinical characteristics of lumbar foraminal stenosis. Clinical and neurological findings were compared among 38 patients receiving L5-S1 transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion for L5-S1 foraminal stenosis (FS group) and 60 patients receiving L4-5 decompression or/and fusion for L4-5 intra-spinal canal stenosis (CS group). The only significant difference between the FS and CS groups in demographic clinical data was leg pain at rest. The prevalence of leg pain was significantly higher in the FS group compared to the CS group (76 vs. 35%). The visual analogue scale for leg pain at rest was also significantly higher in the FS group than in the CS group (6.6 ± 3.1 vs. 1.3 ± 1.9). Leg pain at rest is characteristic of L5-S1 foraminal stenosis.

  13. FAMM Flap in Reconstructing Postsurgical Nasopharyngeal Airway Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Nangole, Ferdinand Wanjala; Khainga, Stanley Ominde

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Postsurgical nasopharyngeal airway stenosis can be a challenge to manage. The stenosis could be as a result of any surgical procedure in the nasopharyngeal region that heals extensive scarring and fibrosis. Objective. To evaluate patients with nasopharyngeal stenosis managed with FAMM flap. Study Design. Prospective study of patients with nasopharyngeal stenosis at the Kenyatta National Hospital between 2010 and 2013 managed with FAMM flap. Materials and Methods. Patients with severe nasopharyngeal airway stenosis were reviewed and managed with FAMM flaps at the Kenyatta National Hospital. Postoperatively they were assessed for symptomatic improvement in respiratory distress, patency of the nasopharyngeal airway, and donor site morbidity. Results. A total of 8 patients were managed by the authors in a duration of 4 years with nasopharyngeal stenosis. Five patients were managed with unilateral FAMM flaps in a two-staged surgical procedure. Four patients had complete relieve of the airway obstruction with a patent airway created. One patient had a patent airway created though with only mild improvement in airway obstruction. Conclusion. FAMM flap provides an alternative in the management of postsurgical severe nasopharyngeal stenosis. It is a reliable flap that is easy to raise and could provide adequate epithelium for the stenosed pharynx. PMID:25328699

  14. Treatment of anal stenosis: a 5-year review.

    PubMed

    Casadesus, Damian; Villasana, Luis E; Diaz, Hector; Chavez, Mariano; Sanchez, Ines M; Martinez, Pedro P; Diaz, Angelina

    2007-07-01

    Benign anal stenosis is an uncommon, disabling and incapacitating disease, occurring mainly after anorectal surgery. Both non-surgical and surgical treatments have been devised in the treatment of anal stenosis with good results. We described the results of the treatment of this disease in the Coloproctology Department of our institution. A retrospective clinical study was undertaken over a 5-year period for consecutive patients operated on for anal stenosis. Twenty-three patients with benign anal stenosis were treated in our department. Haemorrhoidectomy was the most common cause of anal stenosis (74%). Nineteen patients with moderate to severe symptoms of anal stenosis underwent surgical treatment. Lateral mucosal advancement flap was the most frequently carried out operation (63.1%). Four patients were treated with anal dilatation (17.3%). All patients had remission of the preoperative symptoms. There was no re-operation and only minor complications were present in four patients: three patients with anal pruritus and one patient with temporary incontinence. The easy performance, the absence of major complications and the good results obtained confirm that these methods are effective and safe in the treatment of anal stenosis.

  15. Enucleation in psychosis associated with aqueductal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Mancinelli, Iginia; Pompili, Maurizio; Scapati, Francesco; Lazanio, Simone; Kotzalidis, Giorgio D; Tatarelli, Roberto

    2004-03-01

    Reports of self-enucleation are frequent in medical literature, but cases of enucleation towards another are rare. We report the case of a man, 20 years of age, who suffered from psychosis with hydrocephalus and aqueductal stenosis that required a forensic psychiatric investigation to ascertain whether he was of unsound mind when he assaulted and enucleated the right eye of an officer and led to the surgical enucleation of the victim's left eye. Based on his clinical interviews and hospitalization record, we conclude that at the time of the assault, he was suffering from a delusional disorder with religious and demonic content, visual and auditory hallucinations, illusion phenomena, delusional interpretations, imaginative elements, a feeling of terror, and command hallucinations that compelled him to perform the act of aggression.

  16. Pulmonary vein stenosis: Etiology, diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Pazos-López, Pablo; García-Rodríguez, Cristina; Guitián-González, Alba; Paredes-Galán, Emilio; Álvarez-Moure, María Ángel De La Guarda; Rodríguez-Álvarez, Marta; Baz-Alonso, José Antonio; Teijeira-Fernández, Elvis; Calvo-Iglesias, Francisco Eugenio; Íñiguez-Romo, Andrés

    2016-01-26

    Pulmonary vein stenosis (PVS) is rare condition characterized by a challenging diagnosis and unfavorable prognosis at advance stages. At present, injury from radiofrequency ablation for atrial fibrillation has become the main cause of the disease. PVS is characterized by a progressive lumen size reduction of one or more pulmonary veins that, when hemodynamically significant, may raise lobar capillary pressure leading to signs and symptoms such as shortness of breath, cough, and hemoptysis. Image techniques (transesophageal echocardiography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance and perfusion imaging) are essential to reach a final diagnosis and decide an appropriate therapy. In this regard, series from referral centers have shown that surgical and transcatheter interventions may improve prognosis. The purpose of this article is to review the etiology, assessment and management of PVS.

  17. Pulmonary vein stenosis: Etiology, diagnosis and management

    PubMed Central

    Pazos-López, Pablo; García-Rodríguez, Cristina; Guitián-González, Alba; Paredes-Galán, Emilio; Álvarez-Moure, María Ángel De La Guarda; Rodríguez-Álvarez, Marta; Baz-Alonso, José Antonio; Teijeira-Fernández, Elvis; Calvo-Iglesias, Francisco Eugenio; Íñiguez-Romo, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary vein stenosis (PVS) is rare condition characterized by a challenging diagnosis and unfavorable prognosis at advance stages. At present, injury from radiofrequency ablation for atrial fibrillation has become the main cause of the disease. PVS is characterized by a progressive lumen size reduction of one or more pulmonary veins that, when hemodynamically significant, may raise lobar capillary pressure leading to signs and symptoms such as shortness of breath, cough, and hemoptysis. Image techniques (transesophageal echocardiography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance and perfusion imaging) are essential to reach a final diagnosis and decide an appropriate therapy. In this regard, series from referral centers have shown that surgical and transcatheter interventions may improve prognosis. The purpose of this article is to review the etiology, assessment and management of PVS. PMID:26839659

  18. Clinicopathologic Features and Clinical Outcomes of Esophageal Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Fan; Tian, Yangzi; Liu, Zhen; Xu, Guanghui; Liu, Shushang; Guo, Man; Lian, Xiao; Fan, Daiming; Zhang, Hongwei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Clinicopathologic features and clinical outcomes of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) in esophagus are limited, because of the relatively rare incidence of esophageal GISTs. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to investigate the clinicopathologic features and clinical outcomes of esophageal GISTs, and to investigate the potential factors that may predict prognosis. Esophageal GIST cases were obtained from our center and from case reports and clinical studies extracted from MEDLINE. Clinicopathologic features and survivals were analyzed and compared with gastric GISTs from our center. The most common location was lower esophagus (86.84%), followed by middle and upper esophagus (11.40% and 1.76%). The majority of esophageal GISTs were classified as high-risk category (70.83%). Mitotic index was correlated with histologic type, mutational status, and tumor size. The 5-year disease-free survival and disease-specific survival were 65.1% and 65.9%, respectively. Tumor size, mitotic index, and National Institutes of Health risk classification were associated with prognosis of esophageal GISTs. Only tumor size, however, was the independent risk factor for the prognosis of esophageal GISTs. In comparison to gastric GISTs, the distribution of tumor size, histologic type, and National Institutes of Health risk classification were significantly different between esophageal GISTs and gastric GISTs. The disease-free survival and disease-specific survival of esophageal GISTs were significantly lower than that of gastric GISTs. The most common location for esophageal GISTs was lower esophagus, and most of the esophageal GISTs are high-risk category. Tumor size was the independent risk factor for the prognosis of esophageal GISTs. Esophageal GISTs differ significantly from gastric GISTs in respect to clinicopathologic features. The prognosis of esophageal GISTs was worse than that of gastric GISTs. PMID:26765432

  19. Ineffective esophageal motility (IEM): the primary finding in patients with nonspecific esophageal motility disorder.

    PubMed

    Leite, L P; Johnston, B T; Barrett, J; Castell, J A; Castell, D O

    1997-09-01

    Nonspecific esophageal motility disorder (NEMD) is a vague category used to include patients with poorly defined esophageal contraction abnormalities. The criteria include "ineffective" contraction waves, ie, peristaltic waves that are either of low amplitude or are not transmitted. The aim of this study was to identify the prevalence of ineffective esophageal motility (IEM) found during manometry testing and to evaluate esophageal acid exposure and esophageal acid clearance (EAC) in patients with IEM compared to those with other motility findings. We analyzed esophageal manometric tracings from 600 consecutive patients undergoing manometry in our laboratory following a specific protocol from April 1992 through October 1994 to identify the frequency of ineffective contractions and the percentages of other motility abnormalities present in patients meeting criteria for NEMD. Comparison of acid exposure and EAC was made with 150 patients who also had both esophageal manometry and pH-metry over the same time period. Sixty-one of 600 patients (10%) met the diagnostic criteria for NEMD. Sixty of 61 (98%) of these patients had IEM, defined by at least 30% ineffective contractions out of 10 wet swallows. Thirty-five of these patients also underwent ambulatory esophageal pH monitoring. Patients with IEM demonstrated significant increases in both recumbent median percentage of time of pH <4 (4.5%) and median distal EAC (4.2 min/episode) compared to those with normal motility (0.2%, 1 min/episode), diffuse esophageal spasm (0%, 0.6 min/episode), hypertensive LES (0%, 1.8 min/episode), and nutcracker esophagus (0.4% 1.6 min/episode). Recumbent acid exposure in IEM did not differ significantly from that in patients with systemic scleroderma (SSc) for either variable (5.4%, 4.2 min/episode). We propose that IEM is a more appropriate term and should replace NEMD, giving it a more specific manometric identity. IEM patients demonstrate a distinctive recumbent reflux pattern

  20. Viruses, Other Pathogenic Microorganisms and Esophageal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wenjia; Liu, Zhongshun; Bao, Qunchao; Qian, Zhikang

    2015-01-01

    Background Esophageal cancer (EC) is the eighth most prevalent malignant tumor and the sixth leading cause of cancer mortality throughout the world. Despite the technical developments in diagnosis and treatment, the 5-year survival rate is still low. The etiology of EC remains poorly understood; multiple risk factors may be involved and account for the great variation in EC incidence in different geographic regions. Summary Infection with carcinogenetic pathogens has been proposed as a risk factor for EC. This review explores the recent studies on the association of human papillomavirus (HPV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), Helicobacter pylori and esophageal bacterial biota with EC. Key Message Among the above-mentioned pathogens, HPV most likely contributes to esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) in high-risk populations. New techniques are being applied to studies on the role of infection in EC, which will inevitably bring novel ideas to the field in the near future. Practical Implications Multiple meta-analyses support the finding of a higher HPV detection rate in regions associated with high risk for ESCC compared to low-risk areas. A potential role of HPV in the rise of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) was proposed recently. However, further studies are required before a firm conclusion can be drawn. Less work has been done in studying the association between EBV and ESCC, and the results are quite controversial. H. pylori infection is found to be inversely related to EC, which is probably due to the reduced incidence of gastroesophageal reflux disease. Analysis of the esophageal bacterial biota revealed distinct clusters of bacteria in normal and diseased esophagi. A type II microbiome rich in Gram-negative bacteria potentially contributes to EAC by inducing chronic inflammation. Novel findings from such studies as these may benefit public health by justifying anti-infection measures to prevent EC. PMID:26674173

  1. Determinants of cerebrovascular remodeling: do large brain arteries accommodate stenosis?

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Jose; Goldman, James; Honig, Lawrence S; Elkind, Mitchell S V; Morgello, Susan; Marshall, Randolph S

    2014-08-01

    It is hypothesized that outward remodeling in systemic arteries is a compensatory mechanism for lumen area preservation in the face of increasing arterial stenosis. Large brain arteries have also been studied, but it remains unproven if all assumptions about arterial remodeling can be replicated in the cerebral circulation. The sample included 196 autopsied subjects with a mean age of 55 years; 63 % were men, and 74 % non-Hispanic whites. From each of 1396 dissected cadaveric large arteries of the circle of Willis, the areas of the lumen, intima, media, and adventitia were measured. Internal elastic lamina (IEL) area was defined as the area encircled by this layer. Stenosis was calculated by dividing the plaque area by the IEL area and multiplying by 100. Plotting stenosis against lumen area or stratified by arterial size showed no preservation of the lumen in the setting of growing stenosis. We could not find an association between greater IEL proportion and stenosis (B = 0.44, P = 0.86). Stratifying arteries by their size, we found that smaller arteries have greater lumen reduction at any degree of stenosis (B = -23.65, P ≤ 0.0001), and although larger arteries show a positive association between IEL proportion and stenosis, this was no longer significant after adjusting for covariates (B = 6.0, P = 0.13). We cannot confirm the hypothesis that large brain arteries undergo outward remodeling as an adaptive response to increasing degrees of stenosis. We found that the lumen decreases proportionally to the degree of stenosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Management of leakage and stenosis after sleeve gastrectomy.

    PubMed

    El-Sayes, Islam A; Frenken, Michael; Weiner, Rudolf A

    2017-09-01

    Sleeve gastrectomy is one of the most commonly performed procedures in obesity and metabolic operation with leakage and stenosis being serious complications. The management of these complications is challenging, with different operative options available. The aim of our study was to evaluate the incidence and management strategies of leakage and stenosis after sleeve gastrectomy at our institution and to compare our outcomes with those previously reported in the literature. We conducted a retrospective analysis of the medical records of 49 patients treated for leakage and/or stenosis after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy at our Centre of excellence for bariatric and metabolic operation, including 25 patients referred to our department from other hospitals. Outcomes were evaluated using descriptive statistics. Our study cohort consisted of 49 obese patients, 33 females (66%), with a mean ± standard deviation age of 50 ± 11 years, and body mass index at the time of laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy, 51 ± 8 kg/m(2). Postsleeve gastrectomy leakage was identified in 27 patients (55%), stenosis in 13 (27%), and combined leakage and stenosis in 9 (18%). Leakage, stenosis, and combined leakage/stenosis were managed successfully by interventional methods in 85%, 15%, and 22% of cases, respectively. Conversion into another procedure provided a successful rescue operation for other patients. We had a 0% mortality rate. Most patients with leakage were managed successfully with interventional methods. The majority of patients with stenosis or both leakage and stenosis required rescue operation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Determinants of cerebrovascular remodeling: Do large brain arteries accommodate stenosis?

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, Jose; Goldman, James; Honig, Lawrence S; Elkind, Mitchell SV; Morgello, Susan; Marshall, Randolph S

    2014-01-01

    Objective It is hypothesized that outward remodeling in systemic arteries is a compensatory mechanism for lumen area preservation in the face of increasing arterial stenosis. Large brain arteries have also been studied, but it remains unproven if all assumptions about arterial remodeling can be replicated in the cerebral circulation. Methods The sample included 196 autopsied subjects with a mean age of 55 years; 63 % were men, and 74 % non-Hispanic whites. From each of 1,396 dissected cadaveric large arteries of the circle of Willis, the areas of the lumen, intima, media, and adventitia were measured. Internal elastic lamina (IEL) area was defined as the area encircled by this layer. Stenosis was calculated by dividing the plaque area by the IEL area and multiplying by 100. Results Plotting stenosis against lumen area or stratified by arterial size showed no preservation of the lumen in the setting of growing stenosis. We could not find an association between greater IEL proportion and stenosis (B=0.44, P=0.86). Stratifying arteries by their size, we found that smaller arteries have greater lumen reduction at any degree of stenosis (B=−23.65, P=<0.0001), and although larger arteries show a positive association between IEL proportion and stenosis, this was no longer significant after adjusting for covariates (B=6.0, P=0.13). Conclusions We cannot confirm the hypothesis that large brain arteries undergo outward remodeling as an adaptive response to increasing degrees of stenosis. We found that the lumen decreases proportionally to the degree of stenosis. PMID:24929285

  4. Normal rate of ventricular emptying in valvular aortic stenosis.

    PubMed Central

    Lederman, S M; Gash, A K; Bove, A A; Spann, J F

    1981-01-01

    The delayed upstroke of the arterial pulse in valvular aortic stenosis has been attributed, in part, to prolonged left ventricular emptying. Left ventricular emptying rate, however, has not been measured in aortic stenosis. We assessed the rate of left ventricular emptying by computer analysis of biplane cineangiograms in seven normal subjects, six patients with mild to moderate aortic stenosis, and 12 patients with severe aortic stenosis. As an indicator of delayed arterial pulse rise, T time index (time to half maximum aortic pressure corrected for heart rate) was measured in each group. T time index averaged 0.07 +/- 0.01 units in normal subjects, 0.14 +/- 0.04 units in the patients with mild to moderate aortic stenosis, and 0.13 +/- 0.05 units in those with severe aortic stenosis. Patients with mild to moderate and severe aortic stenosis differed significantly from normal subjects. Relative emptying rates were defined as the percentage of initial systolic volume ejected divided by the percentage of systole elapsed. These relative emptying rates were determined during the first, second, and third thirds of systole in all three groups. No significant decrease in the relative rate of left ventricular emptying was noted when each group of patients with aortic stenosis was compared with the normal subjects. Neither was there slowing in the actual rate of ejection of blood in ml per second throughout systole. We conclude that the rate of ventricular emptying is normal in aortic stenosis and does not explain the arterial pulse delay in this disease. PMID:7295438

  5. Surgical options for lumbar spinal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Machado, Gustavo C; Ferreira, Paulo H; Yoo, Rafael Ij; Harris, Ian A; Pinheiro, Marina B; Koes, Bart W; van Tulder, Maurits W; Rzewuska, Magdalena; Maher, Christopher G; Ferreira, Manuela L

    2016-11-01

    Hospital charges for lumbar spinal stenosis have increased significantly worldwide in recent times, with great variation in the costs and rates of different surgical procedures. There have also been significant increases in the rate of complex fusion and the use of spinal spacer implants compared to that of traditional decompression surgery, even though the former is known to incur costs up to three times higher. Moreover, the superiority of these new surgical procedures over traditional decompression surgery is still unclear. To determine the efficacy of surgery in the management of patients with symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis and the comparative effectiveness between commonly performed surgical techniques to treat this condition on patient-related outcomes. We also aimed to investigate the safety of these surgical interventions by including perioperative surgical data and reoperation rates. Review authors performed electronic searches of the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, AMED, Web of Science, LILACS and three trials registries from their inception to 16 June 2016. Authors also conducted citation tracking on the reference lists of included trials and relevant systematic reviews. This review included only randomised controlled trials that investigated the efficacy and safety of surgery compared with no treatment, placebo or sham surgery, or with another surgical technique in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis. Two reviewers independently assessed the studies for inclusion and performed the 'Risk of bias' assessment, using the Cochrane Back and Neck Review Group criteria. Reviewers also extracted demographics, surgery details, and types of outcomes to describe the characteristics of included studies. Primary outcomes were pain intensity, physical function or disability status, quality of life, and recovery. The secondary outcomes included measurements related to surgery, such as perioperative blood loss

  6. Laryngotracheal stenosis: clinical profile, surgical management and outcome.

    PubMed

    Pookamala, S; Kumar, Rakesh; Thakar, Alok; Venkata Karthikeyan, C; Bhalla, Ashu Seith; Deka, R C

    2014-01-01

    Despite the availability of various surgical options, management of laryngotracheal stenosis (LTS) still remains an enigma. Proper selection of surgical technique in each clinical setting is the key for successful outcome. The purpose of this article is to guide one in selection of appropriate surgical procedures depending upon various stenosis parameters. Aim To record the clinical profile of cases with LTS. To assess the outcome following various surgical interventions based on site, severity, cause of stenosis and to derive conclusions regarding treatment options in various stenosis. Materials and Methods It is a study of 60 cases with chronic LTS. It includes retrospective study of 30 cases treated from 2004 and prospective study of 30 cases from Jan 2007 to Dec 2009. A total of 60 cases with LTS were enrolled in the study. Patients were assessed clinically by eliciting detailed history and analyzing previous records. After assessment of extent of stenosis, they were subjected to surgical interventions (endoscopic/open approach). Outcome after surgical interventions was assessed. Results 60 patients were included in the study, in the age group of 2.5-50 years. There were 46 (77%) male patients and 14 (23%) female patients. Intrinsic trauma, secondary to prolonged intubation was the most common cause of LTS, seen in 23 (38%) cases followed by post traumatic stenosis (strangulation-18 (30%), blunt injury-15 (25%), penetrating neck injury-4 (7%)). Stenosis was divided into 6 types based on subsite involvement. Of which, cervical trachea was the commonest site of involvement (25/60 cases). Majority of cases had fixed vocal cords at presentation (55%), more commonly due to post traumatic injury. 60 cases had undergone a total of 110 surgical procedures (endoscopic-56,open approach-54). In the end, overall decannulation rate is 93.3%. In site wise tracheal stenosis, isolated subglottis, combined glottis and subglottic stenosis had decannulation rate of 100% each and

  7. Difficult to treat recurrent stenosis of the aorta.

    PubMed

    Pawelec-Wojtalik, Małgorzata; Qureshi, Shakeel Ahmed; Weil, Jochen; Mrówczyński, Wojciech; Wojtalik, Michał; Siwińska, Aldona; Surmacz, Rafał; Smoczyk, Wiesław; Kukawczyńska, Elzbieta; Raś, Małgorzata

    2007-01-01

    The risk associated with repeated treatment of aortic stenosis is as high as 5% and increases to as much as 25% in complex heart diseases. Among the methods that are commonly accepted and used in the treatment of recurrent aortic stenosis are balloon dilatation and stent implantation. In this study we describe five patients with recurrent stenosis of the aorta treated with stent implantation. The short-term results of such treatment are promising. However, in some cases it is only palliative in character and does not completely resolve the problems arising from congenital heart disease. (Cardiol J 2007; 14: 186-192).

  8. Esophageal perforation post pneumatic dilatation for achalasia managed by esophageal stenting.

    PubMed

    Elhanafi, Sherif; Othman, Mohamed; Sunny, Joseph; Said, Sarmad; Cooper, Chad J; Alkhateeb, Haider; Quansah, Raphael; McCallum, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Female, 82 FINAL DIAGNOSIS: Achalasia Symptoms: Nocturnal regurgtation • weight loss - Clinical Procedure: Esophageal stenting Specialty: Gastroenterology • Hepatology Objective: Unusual or unexpected effect of treatment. Pneumatic dilatation is one of the most effective methods for treating achalasia. Esophageal perforation is the most serious complication after pneumatic dilatation and has been reported to occur in the range of 1 to 4.3%. The appropriate management of esophageal perforation can range from conservative medical treatment to surgical intervention. We report a case of an 82-year-old male who had an 8 month history of dysphagia for solid and liquids, a 10 lb weight loss and nocturnal regurgitation. The diagnosis of achalasia was established by endoscopic; barium and manometric criteria. He underwent a pneumatic dilation with a 30 mm Rigiflex balloon. A confined or limited esophageal perforation projecting into the mediastinum and located 1-2 cm above the diaphragm was confirmed by a gastrografin swallow study performed immediately after the procedure. There was some accompanying epigastric abdominal pain. PATIENT was treated later that day by placing a fully covered metallic esophageal stent in addition to antibiotics, proton pump inhibitor, and fasting. PATIENT was discharged home 3 days later able to eat liquid-soft foods. Follow up endoscopy 2 weeks later and a gastrografin swallow showed a completely healed perforation and the stent was removed. Symptomatically he has done well, with no dysphagia or heartburn at six and twelve months follow up. Early esophageal stenting for esophageal perforation after pneumatic dilation for achalasia is a treatment option which accelerates healing shortens recovery period, as well as decreasing hospital stay and costs.

  9. Screening pre-bariatric surgery patients for esophageal disease with esophageal capsule endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Ashish; Boettcher, Erica; Fahmy, Marianne; Savides, Thomas; Horgan, Santiago; Jacobsen, Garth R; Sandler, Bryan J; Sedrak, Michael; Kalmaz, Denise

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To determine if esophageal capsule endoscopy (ECE) is an adequate diagnostic alternative to esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) in pre-bariatric surgery patients. METHODS: We conducted a prospective pilot study to assess the diagnostic accuracy of ECE (PillCam ESO2, Given Imaging) vs conventional EGD in pre-bariatric surgery patients. Patients who were scheduled for bariatric surgery and referred for pre-operative EGD were prospectively enrolled. All patients underwent ECE followed by standard EGD. Two experienced gastroenterologists blinded to the patient’s history and the findings of the EGD reviewed the ECE and documented their findings. The gold standard was the findings on EGD. RESULTS: Ten patients with an average body mass index of 50 kg/m2 were enrolled and completed the study. ECE identified 11 of 14 (79%) positive esophageal/gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) findings and 14 of 17 (82%) combined esophageal and gastric findings identified on EGD. Fisher’s exact test was used to compare the findings and no significant difference was found between ECE and EGD (P = 0.64 for esophageal/GEJ and P = 0.66 for combined esophageal and gastric findings respectively). Of the positive esophageal/GEJ findings, ECE failed to identify the following: hiatal hernia in two patients, mild esophagitis in two patients, and mild Schatzki ring in two patients. ECE was able to identify the entire esophagus in 100%, gastric cardia in 0%, gastric body in 100%, gastric antrum in 70%, pylorus in 60%, and duodenum in 0%. CONCLUSION: There were no significant differences in the likelihood of identifying a positive finding using ECE compared with EGD in preoperative evaluation of bariatric patients. PMID:24115815

  10. A striking local esophageal cytokine expression profile in eosinophilic esophagitis1

    PubMed Central

    Blanchard, Carine; Stucke, Emily M.; Rodriguez-Jimenez, Beatriz; Burwinkel, Karen; Collins, Margaret H.; Ahrens, Annette; Alexander, Eileen S.; Butz, Bridget K. Buckmeier; Jameson, Sean C.; Kaul, Ajay; Franciosi, James P.; Kushner, Jonathan P.; Putnam, Philip E.; Abonia, J. Pablo; Rothenberg, Marc E.

    2011-01-01

    Background Eosinophilic esophagitis (EE) is an emerging worldwide disease that mimics gastroesophageal reflux disease. Objective Early studies have suggested that esophageal eosinophilia occurs in association with T helper type 2 allergic responses, yet the local and systemic expression of relevant cytokines has not been well characterized. Methods A human inflammatory cytokine and receptor PCR array containing 84 genes followed by PCR validation and multiplex arrays were used to quantify cytokine mRNA in esophageal biopsies and blood levels. Results Esophageal transcripts of numerous chemokines [e.g. CCL1, CCL23, CCL26 (eotaxin-3), CXCL1, and CXCL2], cytokines (e.g. IL13 and ABCF1), and cytokine receptors (e.g. IL5RA) were induced at least 4-fold in individuals with EE. Analysis of esophageal biopsies (n=288) revealed that eotaxin-3 mRNA level alone had 89% sensitivity for distinguishing EE from non-EE individuals. The presence of allergy was associated with significantly increased esophageal expression of IL4 and IL5 mRNA in active EE patients. We identified 8 cytokines (IL-4, IL-13, IL-5, IL-6, IL-12p70, CD40L, IL-1α, and IL-17) whose blood levels retrospectively distinguished 12 non-EE from 13 EE patients with 100% specificity and 100% sensitivity. When applied to a blinded, prospectively recruited group of 36 patients, the cytokine panel scoring system had a 79% positive predictive value, 68% negative predictive value, 61% sensitivity, and 83% specificity for identifying EE. Conclusion Evidence is presented that IL13 and IL5 associate with eosinophil and eotaxin-3 levels, indicating the key role of adaptive Th2 immunity in regulating eotaxin-3-driven esophageal eosinophilia in the absence of a consistent systemic change in cytokines. PMID:21211656

  11. Pediatric eosinophilic esophagitis is associated with changes in esophageal microRNAs.

    PubMed

    Zahm, Adam M; Menard-Katcher, Calies; Benitez, Alain J; Tsoucas, Daphne M; Le Guen, Claire L; Hand, Nicholas J; Friedman, Joshua R

    2014-10-15

    The incidence of eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) has increased in the past several years, yet our understanding of its pathogenesis remains limited. To test the hypothesis that microRNAs (miRNAs) are altered in children with EoE, miRNAs were profiled in esophageal mucosa biopsies obtained from patients with active disease (n = 5) and healthy control subjects (n = 6). Fourteen miRNAs were significantly altered between groups; four of these miRNAs were decreased in EoE patients. A panel of five miRNAs (miR-203, miR-375, miR-21, miR-223, and miR-142-3p) were selected for validation in an independent set of samples from control (n = 22), active disease (n = 22), inactive disease (n = 22), and gastroesophageal reflux disease (n = 6) patients. Each panel miRNA was significantly altered among groups. miRNA changes in esophageal biopsies were not reflected in the circulating RNA pool, as no differences in panel miRNA levels were observed in sera collected from the four patient groups. In addition, in contrast to previous studies, no change in esophageal miRNA levels was detected following treatment that resolved esophageal eosinophilia. In an effort to identify the ramifications of reduced esophageal miR-203, miR-203 activity was inhibited in cultured epithelial cells via expression of a tough decoy miRNA inhibitor. Luciferase reporter assays demonstrated that miR-203 does not directly regulate human IL-15 through targeting of the IL-15 3'-untranslated region. From these experiments, it is concluded that miRNAs are perturbed in the esophageal mucosa, but not the serum, of pediatric EoE patients. Further investigation is required to decipher pathologically relevant consequences of miRNA perturbation in this context.

  12. Detection of esophageal ulcerations with technetium-99m albumin sucralfate

    SciTech Connect

    Goff, J.S.; Adcock, K.A.; Schmelter, R.

    1986-07-01

    Technetium-99m albumin-sucralfate ((/sup 99m/Tc)Su) can be used to demonstrate peptic ulcer disease in man and animals. We evaluated the usefulness of (/sup 99m/Tc)Su for detecting various grades of esophagitis. (/sup 99m/Tc)Su adhered to the distal esophagus for up to 3 hr in five of six patients with esophageal ulcers but adhered to only two of nine with lesser degrees of esophagitis. No adherence was seen in five patients without esophagitis. Thus, (/sup 99m/Tc)Su may not be useful for detecting any but the most severe grade of esophagitis. Based on these results, we speculate that the previously documented beneficial effects of sucralfate on mild to moderate esophagitis may be due to other mechanisms besides adherence to the ulcerated mucosa.

  13. Fungal Esophagitis in a Child with Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Anjum; Assiri, Asaad; Zaidi, Zafar; Alsheikh, Abdulmalik

    2016-08-01

    Esophagitis in children is not uncommon, mostly due to gastro-esophageal reflux. Other conditions like eosinophilic and infective esophagitis need to be elucidated in differential diagnoses. Fungal orCandida esophagitisusually occurs in high risk children who are immune-compromised, malnourished, on steroid therapy or have uncontrolled diabetes mellitus. An eleven-year girl presented with uncontrolled type I diabetes mellitus and recurrent epigastric pain with vomiting. Her oral intake was satisfactory. There was no dysphagia and odynophagia. Physical examination was normal with good oral hygiene. Failure in responding to conventional medications led to endoscopic evaluation, which revealed white patches and esophageal inflammation and diagnosed as fungal esophagitis on histopathology. Although infective esophagitis is encountered sporadically in pediatric age group, but it should always be considered in high risk individuals and when conventional medication fails to resolve the symptoms.

  14. Hidden aqueductal stenosis associated to bilateral idiopathic foramina of Monro stenosis mimicking a Chiari I malformation? Case report.

    PubMed

    Bartoli, Andrea; Ghinda, Cristina Diana; Radovanovic, Ivan; Momjian, Shahan

    2012-11-01

    A 39-year old man came to our outpatient clinic with long history of unspecific symptoms and signs. Cerebral MRI showed herniation of the cerebellar tonsils of more than 1 cm below the foramen magnum and a triventricular hydrocephalus. A diagnosis of Chiari I malformation was retained. After an osteo-dural decompression of the posterior fossa, post-operative MRI revealed an aqueductal stenosis with triventricular hydrocephalus. An endoscopic-third- ventriculostomy showed an idiopathic stenosis of the right foramen of Monro. Residual symptoms and persistence of biventricular hydrocephalus justified a ventriculo-peritoneal shunt. Aqueductal and foramina of Monro stenosis can mimick a Chiari I malformation.

  15. Isolated proximal esophageal injury from blunt trauma: endoscopic stricture dilatation.

    PubMed

    Pineau, Benoit C; Ott, David J

    2003-01-01

    Blunt neck trauma can cause isolated esophageal injuries that may be difficult to recognize. A high index of suspicion is necessary for optimal identification and management of this condition. We report a case of blunt esophageal trauma resulting from a motor vehicle accident that was initially unrecognized until the patient developed a tight stricture of the cervical esophagus. This was successfully dilated endoscopically. Aerodigestive trauma resulting from neck injuries is reviewed with emphasis on the pathophysiology of esophageal trauma.

  16. A Rare Case of Sunitinib-Induced Exfoliative Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Gayam, Swapna

    2016-01-01

    Sunitinib is a chemotherapeutic agent that has been approved for renal cell carcinoma and gastrointestinal stromal tumors resistant to imatinib. It is usually well tolerated and severe gastrointestinal side effects are rare. There are very few reports of sunitinib causing severe esophagitis, and only one of them was previously reported as exfoliative esophagitis. We describe a case of severe sunitinib-induced exfoliative esophagitis that resulted in overt gastrointestinal bleed. PMID:27921054

  17. Adult-Onset Esophageal Crohn’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kasarala, George; Durrett, Sam

    2016-01-01

    Crohn’s disease (CD) is an idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease that can involve any part of the gastrointestinal tract. Esophageal involvement is rarely seen in adults, especially at the initial diagnosis of CD. Esophageal symptoms as primary manifestations of the disease are extremely rare. We report a case of a CD with esophageal involvement at the time of her initial diagnosis of CD. PMID:27761477

  18. [Clinical effects of FUT-187 in reflux esophagitis after gastrectomy].

    PubMed

    Toge, T; Hirai, T; Takiyama, W; Takashima, N; Kawano, K; Tamura, Y; Nishimawari, K; Iwamori, S; Nakanishi, K; Kono, H

    1995-03-01

    FUT-187 was orally administered to 38 patients with postgastrectomy reflux esophagitis for 4 weeks. The drug reduced the chief subjective symptoms of reflux esophagitis, such as heartburn, chest pain, precordial pain, and dysphagia for solids in 78.1% of patients. Redness, edema and erosion were also reduced in 53.3% of patients as determined endoscopically. Overall, FUT-187 exhibited an excellent therapeutic effect on the reflux esophagitis which was refractory to conventional treatments.

  19. Endoscopic palliation of advanced esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mocanu, A; Bârla, R; Hoara, P; Constantinoiu, S

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal cancer represents one of the most aggressive digestive tumors, with a survival rate at 5 years of only 10%. Globally, during the last three decades, there has been an increasing incidence of the esophageal cancer, approx. 400,000 new esophageal cancers being currently diagnosed annually. This represents the eighth leading cause of cancer incidence and the sixth leading cause of cancer death overall. Taking into account the population’s global aging and thus, the increase in the number of patients who will not bear surgery, PCT and radiation, or the fact that they do not want it especially because of deficiencies and associated pathology, the endoscopic ablative techniques with palliation purposes represent the alternative. If we refer to the Western Europe countries and North America, we notice an increase of esophageal adenocarcinoma rate versus squamous cancer. As for the Asian region, referring in particular to China and Japan, 9 out of 10 esophageal cancers are squamous cell carcinomas. For at least half of the patients with EC (esophageal cancer) there is no hope of healing because of the advanced regional malignant invasion (T3-4, N+, M+) with no chemo and radiotherapy response, poor preoperative patients’ conditions or systemic metastasis. The low life expectancy does not justify the risky medical procedures, the goal of the therapy consisting in the improvement of the quality of life by eliminating dysphagia (reestablishing oral feeding) which represents the most common complication of EC, the respiratory tract complication caused by eso-tracheal fistulas or by eliminating chest pain. To treat dysphagia, which is the main target of palliation, combined methods like endoscopic, chemo and radio-therapy, can be used, each one with indications, benefits and risks. Abbreviations: SEPS = self expanding plastic stent, SREMS = self expanding metal stent, EBRT = Endoscopic brachy radiotherapy, EUS = Ultra sound endoscopy, CT = Computer tomograph, UGE

  20. Tracheal Stenosis Because of Wegener Granulomatosis Misdiagnosed as Asthma.

    PubMed

    O'Hear, Kelley E; Ingrande, Jerry; Brodsky, Jay B; Morton, John M; Sung, Chih-Kwang

    2016-05-15

    We describe a patient with Wegener granulomatosis whose complaint of wheezing was incorrectly attributed to asthma. Anesthesiologists must recognize that tracheal stenosis is extremely common in Wegener granulomatosis and can mimic other causes of wheezing.