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Sample records for esophageal varices distal

  1. Esophageal Varices

    MedlinePlus

    Esophageal varices Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Esophageal varices are abnormal, enlarged veins in the tube that connects the ... often in people with serious liver diseases. Esophageal varices develop when normal blood flow to the liver ...

  2. Esophageal Varices: Symptoms and Causes

    MedlinePlus

    Esophageal varices Symptoms and causes By Mayo Clinic Staff Symptoms Esophageal varices usually don't cause signs and symptoms unless they bleed. Signs and symptoms of bleeding esophageal varices include: Vomiting and seeing significant amounts of blood ...

  3. Post-gastrectomy spleen enlargement and esophageal varices: Distal vs total gastrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Oida, Takatsugu; Mimatsu, Kenji; Kano, Hisao; Kawasaki, Atsushi; Kuboi, Youichi; Fukino, Nobutada; Amano, Sadao

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To study the relationship between platelet count-to-spleen diameter ratio and post-gastrectomy esophageal varices (EVs) development in patients without liver cirrhosis or hepatitis. METHODS: We retrospectively studied 92 patients who underwent gastrectomy. They were divided into 2 groups on the basis of the surgical treatment: the distal gastrectomy (DG) group and total gastrectomy (TG) group. The incidence of EVs was determined and postoperative platelet counts, spleen diameters, and platelet count-to-spleen diameter ratios were compared between the 2 groups. RESULTS: EVs were not detected during the first 6 mo after surgery in either group; however, at 12 mo after surgery, EVs were detected in 2 patients (3%) in the DG group and in 1 patient (3.6%) in the TG group; their mean platelet count-to-spleen diameter ratio was 2628 ± 409, and 2604 ± 360, respectively. CONCLUSION: Endoscopy should be performed to detect EVs when the platelet count-to-spleen diameter ratio is < 2600. PMID:20533601

  4. Endoscopic management of esophageal varices.

    PubMed

    Poza Cordon, Joaquin; Froilan Torres, Consuelo; Burgos García, Aurora; Gea Rodriguez, Francisco; Suárez de Parga, Jose Manuel

    2012-07-16

    The rupture of gastric varices results in variceal hemorrhage, which is one the most lethal complications of cirrhosis. Endoscopic therapies for varices aim to reduce variceal wall tension by obliteration of the varix. The two principal methods available for esophageal varices are endoscopic sclerotherapy (EST) and band ligation (EBL). The advantages of EST are that it is cheap and easy to use, and the injection catheter fits through the working channel of a diagnostic gastroscope. Endoscopic variceal ligation obliterates varices by causing mechanical strangulation with rubber bands. The following review aims to describe the utility of EBL and EST in different situations, such as acute bleeding, primary and secondary prophylaxis.

  5. Radionuclide transit in esophageal varices

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, S.H.; Wang, S.J.; Wu, L.C.; Liu, R.S.; Tsai, Y.T.; Chiang, T.T.

    1985-05-01

    This study assessed esophageal motility in patients with esophageal varices by radionuclide transit studies. Data were acquired in list mode after an oral dose of 0.5 mCi Tc-99m sulfur colloid in 10 ml of water in the supine position above a low-energy all-purpose collimator of a gamma camera. The condensed image (CI) superimposed with a centroid curve was also produced in each case. Twenty-five normal subjects (N) and 32 patients (pts) with esophageal varices by endoscopy (large varices in Grades IV and V in 8 and small varices in Grade III or less in 24) were studied. TMTT, RTT, RF, and RI were all significantly increased in pts as compared to N. Especially, the transit time for the middle third (6.7 +- 2.6 sec vs 3.5 +- 0.9 sec in N, rho < 0.005) had the optimal sensitivy and specificity of 88% each at the cutoff value of 4.2 sec as determined by ROC analysis. In summary, radionuclide transit disorders occur in the majority of pts with esopageal varices. The middle RTT and CI are both optimal in sensitivity and specificity for detecting the abnormalities.

  6. Bleeding esophageal varices

    MedlinePlus

    ... air. This produces pressure against the bleeding veins (balloon tamponade). Once the bleeding is stopped, other varices can be treated with medicines and medical procedures to prevent future bleeding, including: Drugs called ...

  7. High-resolution Manometry Findings in Patients After Sclerotherapy for Esophageal Varices

    PubMed Central

    Herbella, Fernando A M; Colleoni, Ramiro; Bot, Luiz; Vicentine, Fernando P P; Patti, Marco G

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Endoscopic therapy for esophageal varices may lead to esophageal dysmotility. High-resolution manometry is probably the more adequate tool to measure esophageal motility in these patients. This study aimed to evaluate esophageal motility using high resolution manometry following eradication of esophageal varices by endoscopic sclerotherapy. Methods We studied 21 patients (11 women, age 52 [45–59] years). All patients underwent eradication of esophageal varices with endoscopic sclerotherapy and subsequent high resolution manometry. Results A significant percentage of defective lower esophageal sphincter (basal pressure 14.3 [8.0–20.0] mmHg; 43% hypertonic) and hypocontractility (distal esophageal amplitude 50 [31–64] mmHg; proximal esophageal amplitude 40 [31–61] mmHg; distal contractile integral 617 [403–920] mmHg · sec · cm; 48% ineffective) was noticed. Lower sphincter basal pressure and esophageal amplitude correlated inversely with the number of sessions (P < 0.001). No manometric parameter correlated with symptoms or interval between last endoscopy and manometry. Conclusions Esophageal motility after endoscopic sclerotherapy is characterized by: (1) defective lower sphincter and (2) defective and hypotensive peristalsis. Esophageal dysmotility is associated to an increased number of endoscopic sessions, but manometric parameters do not predict symptoms. PMID:26554823

  8. Detachable endoloop vs. elastic band ligation for bleeding esophageal varices.

    PubMed

    Naga, Mazen Ibrahim; Okasha, Hussein Hassan; Foda, Ayman Ragaei; Gomaa, Mohamed Saeed; Fouad, Ayman Mohamed; Masoud, Amgad Gerges; El-din, Hazem Hossam

    2004-06-01

    Variceal bleeding is a serious complication with a mortality rate that ranges from 20% to 50%. Patients who have variceal hemorrhage usually are treated by endoscopic injection sclerotherapy or elastic band ligation to eradicate the varices. Endoloop ligation is a newly developed technique for achieving hemostasis and variceal eradication. This study compared endoloop ligation with elastic band ligation in patients with acute esophageal variceal bleeding. Fifty patients with acute esophageal variceal bleeding were recruited: 25 were treated by elastic band ligation and 25 by endoloop ligation. Although the number of patients in whom bleeding recurred during a follow-up period of 6 months was smaller in the endoloop group (12%) vs. the band group (28%), this difference was not statistically significant. Furthermore, no statistically significant difference was found between the two groups with respect to the number of patients in whom variceal eradication was achieved, the number of treatment sessions required for variceal eradication, or the frequency of variceal recurrence. The total cost for variceal obliteration by endoloop ligation was 342 dollars per patient, whereas, the total cost of variceal eradication by elastic band ligation was 356 dollars per patient. The endoloop had certain technical advantages over band application: a better field of vision, tighter application, good results with junctional varices, and a lack of strain exerted by the device on the endoscope. Endoloop ligation is a promising new technique for management of patients with bleeding esophageal varices.

  9. Secondary prophylaxis for esophageal variceal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Albillos, Agustín; Tejedor, Marta

    2014-05-01

    Combination therapy with beta-blockers and endoscopic band ligation (EBL) is the standard prophylaxis of esophageal variceal rebleeding in cirrhosis. Beta-blockers are the backbone of combination therapy, since their benefit extend to other complications of portal hypertension. EBL carries the risk of post-banding ulcer bleeding, which explains why overall rebleeding is reduced when beta-blockers are added to EBL, and not when EBL is added to beta-blockers. TIPS is the rescue treatment, but it could be considered as first choice in patients that first bleed while on beta-blockers, those with contraindications to beta-blockers or with refractory ascites, and those with fundal varices.

  10. Noninvasive diagnosis of esophageal varices: is it feasible?

    PubMed

    de Franchis, Roberto

    2006-11-01

    The possibility of identifying cirrhotic patients with esophageal varices by noninvasive means is attractive, because it would allow for the restriction of the performance of screening endoscopy to patients at high risk of having varices. Over the years, several studies addressing this issue have been performed with little success. The recently proposed platelet count/spleen diameter ratio appears to be the best noninvasive predictor of esophageal varices developed so far. However, the available evidence is not yet sufficient to allow for the modification of the current policy of screening cirrhotic patients by endoscopy at the time of diagnosis to detect varices.

  11. Achalasia cardia associated with esophageal varices: a therapeutic dilemma.

    PubMed

    Rana, Surinder Singh; Bhasin, Deepak Kumar; Rao, Chalapathi; Sarwal, Rajiv; Singh, Kartar

    2013-01-01

    A 63-year-old male, chronic alcohol consumer, presented with progressively increasing dysphagia of 6 months duration. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed dilated esophagus with residue along with esophageal varices. Esophageal manometry revealed findings suggestive of classic achalasia cardia. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) examination revealed peri-esophageal collaterals as well as prominent perforators at lower end of esophagus. The co-existence of varices with achalasia is very rare and this case posed a difficult therapeutic dilemma as risk of bleeding from the varices limited the treatment options available. This case was successfully treated with EUS-guided botulinum toxin injection.

  12. Achalasia cardia associated with esophageal varices: a therapeutic dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Rana, Surinder Singh; Bhasin, Deepak Kumar; Rao, Chalapathi; Sarwal, Rajiv; Singh, Kartar

    2013-01-01

    A 63-year-old male, chronic alcohol consumer, presented with progressively increasing dysphagia of 6 months duration. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed dilated esophagus with residue along with esophageal varices. Esophageal manometry revealed findings suggestive of classic achalasia cardia. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) examination revealed peri-esophageal collaterals as well as prominent perforators at lower end of esophagus. The co-existence of varices with achalasia is very rare and this case posed a difficult therapeutic dilemma as risk of bleeding from the varices limited the treatment options available. This case was successfully treated with EUS-guided botulinum toxin injection. PMID:24714325

  13. Incidence of HCV induced—Esophageal varices in Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-aty, Mahmoud; Fouad, Mahmoud; Sallam, Mohammad M.; Elgohary, Elsayed A.; Ismael, Ali; Nawara, Abdallah; Hawary, Baha; Tag-Adeen, Mohammed; Khaled, Salama

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Esophageal varices is one of the most important comorbidity related liver cirrhosis, patients usually presented with hematemesis, melena, or both, ultimately 20% is the mortality during the first attack, hence we aimed to investigate the incidence of such esophageal varices related chronic Hepatitis C virus (HCV) in randomized Egyptian population. One thousand eighteen Egyptian patients, aged between 17 and 58 years, positive for Hepatitis C virus genotype 4 (HCV-4) by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay Ab and HCV RNA-polymerase chain reaction were screened for the presence of esophageal varices. Incidence of esophageal varices was 62.3%; 635 patients, those with large Esophageal varices (LEVs) was 47.4%; 301 patients. Model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) score has not been significantly improved post variceal band ligation (VBL). Using 2D U/S was useful for EVs prediction. Incidence of esophageal varices in HCV Egyptian patients still high, valuable knowledge would be helpful in clinical field have been discovered by data mining computational intelligent analysis using in practical medicine to improve overall health care. PMID:28121921

  14. Results of rubber band ligation of esophageal varices.

    PubMed

    Leszczyszyn, J; Łebski, I; Massopust, R; Skoczylas, M; Janus, W

    2001-05-01

    The aim of the paper is to analyze the results of endoscopic rubber band ligation of esophageal varices performed between 1 January 1998 and 1 November 2000 at the Department of GI Surgery of 4th Military University Hospital. Cases of 50 patients with massive upper GI variceal bleeding present on admission or with the history of such a bleeding were reviewed. A total of 85 endoscopic procedures of rubber band ligation were performed. In 9 (18%) cases ligation was performed due to massive variceal bleeding, in 1 case the complementary obliteration of stomach fundus varices with Aethoxysclerol was performed. In 10 (20%) cases in grade C of Child-Pough scale of liver failure, 3 endoscopic procedures were performed, in 15 (30%) in grade B--2 procedures, in the remaining 25 (50%) cases, also in grade B--1 procedure was performed. Procedures were conducted with Wilson-Cook Multi-Band Ligator SAEED SixShooter. In all cases with non-bleeding esophageal varices the overall good result of treatment was achieved, with collapsing of variceal columns. In 8 (88.8%) of 9 cases treated due to variceal bleeding, good hemostasis was achieved and no reintervention was necessary. In 1 case of massive variceal bleeding endoscopic treatment failed and patient eventually died. In 25 (50%) cases the complementary (1 or 2) rubber band ligations were performed. Follow-up period has ranged from 1 to 34 months. No cases of severe complications after the procedure were noted. In early period after the procedure 43 (86%) patients complained of transient, mild retrosternal pain and mild to moderate dysphagia. Endoscopic rubber band ligation is a safe and effective treatment for esophageal varices both in cases of variceal bleeding and as elective procedure.

  15. Endoscopic treatment of esophageal varices in patients with liver cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Triantos, Christos; Kalafateli, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Variceal bleeding is a life-threatening complication of portal hypertension with a six-week mortality rate of approximately 20%. Patients with medium- or large-sized varices can be treated for primary prophylaxis of variceal bleeding using two strategies: non-selective beta-blockers (NSBBs) or endoscopic variceal ligation (EVL). Both treatments are equally effective. Patients with acute variceal bleeding are critically ill patients. The available data suggest that vasoactive drugs, combined with endoscopic therapy and antibiotics, are the best treatment strategy with EVL being the endoscopic procedure of choice. In cases of uncontrolled bleeding, transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) with polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)-covered stents are recommended. Approximately 60% of the patients experience rebleeding, with a mortality rate of 30%. Secondary prophylaxis should start on day six following the initial bleeding episode. The combination of NSBBs and EVL is the recommended management, whereas TIPS with PTFE-covered stents are the preferred option in patients who fail endoscopic and pharmacologic treatment. Apart from injection sclerotherapy and EVL, other endoscopic procedures, including tissue adhesives, endoloops, endoscopic clipping and argon plasma coagulation, have been used in the management of esophageal varices. However, their efficacy and safety, compared to standard endoscopic treatment, remain to be further elucidated. There are safety issues accompanying endoscopic techniques with aspiration pneumonia occurring at a rate of approximately 2.5%. In conclusion, future research is needed to improve treatment strategies, including novel endoscopic techniques with better efficacy, lower cost, and fewer adverse events. PMID:25278695

  16. Distal esophageal spasm: an update.

    PubMed

    Achem, Sami R; Gerson, Lauren B

    2013-09-01

    Distal esophageal spasm (DES) is an esophageal motility disorder that presents clinically with chest pain and/or dysphagia and is defined manometrically as simultaneous contractions in the distal (smooth muscle) esophagus in ≥20% of wet swallows (and amplitude contraction of ≥30 mmHg) alternating with normal peristalsis. With the introduction of high resolution esophageal pressure topography (EPT) in 2000, the definition of DES was modified. The Chicago classification proposed that the defining criteria for DES using EPT should be the presence of at least two premature contractions (distal latency<4.5 s) in a context of normal EGJ relaxation. The etiology of DES remains insufficiently understood, but evidence links nitric oxide (NO) deficiency as a culprit resulting in a disordered neural inhibition. GERD frequently coexists in DES, and its role in the pathogenesis of symptoms needs further evaluation. There is some evidence from small series that DES can progress to achalasia. Treatment remains challenging due in part to lack of randomized placebo-controlled trials. Current treatment agents include nitrates (both short and long acting), calcium-channel blockers, anticholinergic agents, 5-phosphodiesterase inhibitors, visceral analgesics (tricyclic agents or SSRI), and esophageal dilation. Acid suppression therapy is frequently used, but clinical outcome trials to support this approach are not available. Injection of botulinum toxin in the distal esophagus may be effective, but further data regarding the development of post-injection gastroesophageal reflux need to be assessed. Heller myotomy combined with fundoplication remains an alternative for the rare refractory patient. Preliminary studies suggest that the newly developed endoscopic technique of per oral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) may also be an alternative treatment modality.

  17. Evaluation of endoscopic secondary prophylaxis in children and adolescents with esophageal varices.

    PubMed

    Pimenta, Júlio Rocha; Ferreira, Alexandre Rodrigues; Fagundes, Eleonora Druve Tavares; Bittencourt, Paulo Fernando Souto; Moura, Alice Mendes; Carvalho, Simone Diniz

    2017-01-01

    - Bleeding of esophageal varices is the main cause of morbidity and mortality in children and adults with portal hypertension and there are few studies involving secondary prophylaxis in children and adolescents. - To evaluate the efficacy of endoscopic secondary prophylaxis in prevention of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in children and adolescents with esophageal varices. - This is a prospective analysis of 85 patients less than 18 years of age with or without cirrhosis, with portal hypertension. Participants underwent endoscopic secondary prophylaxis with sclerotherapy or band ligation. Eradication of varices, incidence of rebleeding, number of endoscopic sessions required for eradication, incidence of developing gastric fundus varices and portal hypertensive gastropathy were evaluated. - Band ligation was performed in 34 (40%) patients and sclerotherapy in 51 (60%) patients. Esophageal varices were eradicated in 81.2%, after a median of four endoscopic sessions. Varices relapsed in 38 (55.1%) patients. Thirty-six (42.3%) patients experienced rebleeding, and it was more prevalent in the group that received sclerotherapy. Gastric varices and portal hypertensive gastropathy developed in 38.7% and 57.9% of patients, respectively. Patients undergoing band ligation showed lower rebleeding rates (26.5% vs 52.9%) and fewer sessions required for eradication of esophageal varices (3.5 vs 5). - Secondary prophylaxis was effective in eradicating esophageal varices and controlling new upper gastrointestinal bleeding episodes due to the rupture of esophageal varices. Band ligation seems that resulted in lower rebleeding rates and fewer sessions required to eradicate varices than did sclerotherapy.

  18. Hepatic Angiosarcoma Associated with Esophageal Variceal Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Zensho; Kajihara, Mikio; Kobayashi, Yasunobu; Kanai, Tomoya; Matsumoto, Yoshihiro; Takakura, Kazuki; Yukawa, Toyokazu; Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Koyama, Seita; Imazu, Hiroo; Arakawa, Hiroshi; Ohata, Mitsuru; Koido, Shigeo

    2016-01-01

    Primary hepatic angiosarcoma is a very rare malignancy with a poor prognosis. Because patients present with no specific symptoms, the cancer can grow undetected and most cases are diagnosed too late for resection. We present the case of a 78-year-old Japanese man admitted to our hospital with massive hematemesis and melena. A total gastrectomy had previously been performed on the patient to treat gastric cancer. Endoscopic injection sclerotherapy was performed to control the bleeding from varices over the anastomosis. Computed tomography revealed the presence of multiple atypical liver nodules in the enhanced image. Histological diagnosis of hepatic angiosarcoma was obtained by percutaneous ultrasound-guided liver biopsy. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a patient with hepatic angiosarcoma and acute variceal hemorrhage. PMID:27721730

  19. Serum type IV collagen level is predictive for esophageal varices in patients with severe alcoholic disease

    PubMed Central

    Mamori, Satoshi; Searashi, Yasuyuki; Matsushima, Masato; Hashimoto, Kenichi; Uetake, Shinichiro; Matsudaira, Hiroshi; Ito, Shuji; Nakajima, Hisato; Tajiri, Hisao

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To determine factors predictive for esophageal varices in severe alcoholic disease (SAD). METHODS: Abdominal ultrasonography (US) was performed on 444 patients suffering from alcoholism. Forty-four patients found to have splenomegaly and/or withering of the right liver lobe were defined as those with SAD. SAD patients were examined by upper gastrointestinal (UGI) endoscopy for the presence of esophageal varices. The existence of esophageal varices was then related to clinical variables. RESULTS: Twenty-five patients (56.8%) had esophageal varices. A univariate analysis revealed a significant difference in age and type IV collagen levels between patients with and without esophageal varices. A logistic regression analysis identified type IV collagen as the only independent variable predictive for esophageal varices (P = 0.017). The area under the curve (AUC) for type IV collagen as determined by the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) for predicting esophageal varices was 0.78. CONCLUSION: This study suggests that the level of type IV collagen has a high diagnostic accuracy for the detection of esophageal varices in SAD. PMID:18395904

  20. Invasive and noninvasive methods to diagnose portal hypertension and esophageal varices.

    PubMed

    de Franchis, Roberto; Dell'Era, Alessandra

    2014-05-01

    Assessing the presence of clinically significant portal hypertension and esophageal varices is clinically important in cirrhosis. The reference standard techniques to assess the presence of portal hypertension and varices are the measurement of the hepatic vein pressure gradient and esophagogastroduodenoscopy, respectively. Some newer methods have shown a good performance, but none has been proven precise enough to replace hepatic vein pressure gradient measurement or esophagogastroduodenoscopy for the diagnosis of portal hypertension or the presence and grade of esophageal varices.

  1. Factors Associated With Bleeding Secondary to Rupture of Esophageal Varices in Children and Adolescents With Cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Pimenta, Júlio R; Ferreira, Alexandre R; Fagundes, Eleonora D T; Queiroz, Thaís C N; Baptista, Regiane A N; de Araújo Moreira, Eduardo G; de Resende, Camilo B; Bittencourt, Paulo F S; Carvalho, Simone D; Neto, José A F; Penna, Francisco J

    2017-02-01

    Bleeding of esophageal varices is the main cause of morbidity and mortality in children with portal hypertension. It is important to understand the factors related with a bleeding episode to evaluate more effective primary prophylaxis. The present study aims to describe the endoscopic and laboratory findings associated with upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) secondary to esophageal varices. A cross-sectional study with 103 children and adolescents with cirrhosis, divided into a group that had experienced an episode of upper UGIB (35 patients) and a group without a history of UGIB (68 patients), was carried out. The esophageal and gastric varices were classified, and the portal hypertensive gastropathy, laboratory findings, and Child-Pugh classification were measured. Factors observed in univariate analysis to be associated with UGIB were the presence of esophageal varices of medium caliber or larger, portal hypertensive gastropathy, presence of red spots on esophageal varices, Child-Pugh class B or C, and hypoalbuminemia (P < 0.05). After multivariate logistic regression analysis, the significant factors were the presence of red spots on esophageal varices and the presence of gastric varices. When separated the autoimmune hepatitis, nonbiliary atresia patients (all patients except the patients with biliary atresia), and biliary atresia groups the findings in the univariate analysis were the presence of esophageal varices of medium or larger caliber, presence of red spots on varices, and presence of gastric varices in the autoimmune hepatitis patients and nonbiliary atresia patients and presence of red spots on esophageal varices, presence of gastric varices, and Child-Pugh classification B or C in biliary atresia group (P < 0.05). After multivariate logistic regression analysis, no statistical significance was found for any factor analyzed in any groups. The presence of gastric varices and red spots on esophageal varices were related to episodes of UGIB

  2. Changes in Cardiac Varices and Their Clinical Significance after Eradication of Esophageal Varices by Band Ligation

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seung Woon; Lee, Han Ah; Park, Sang Jung; Kim, Tae Hyung; Lee, Jae Min; Suh, Sang Jun; Choi, Hyuk Soon; Kim, Eun Sun; Keum, Bora; Jung, Young Kul; An, Hyonggin; Yim, Hyung Joon; Jeen, Yoon Tae; Yeon, Jong Eun; Lee, Hong Sik; Chun, Hoon Jai; Byun, Kwan Soo; Um, Soon Ho; Kim, Chang Duck

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims. Cardiac varices (CVs) in patients with type 1 gastroesophageal varices (GOV1s) usually disappear with treatment for esophageal varices (EVs) by endoscopic injection sclerotherapy (EIS). However, whether this applies to patients treated with endoscopic band ligation (EBL) for EVs remains unclear. We evaluated the effect of EVs eradication by EBL on CVs. Methods. We included cirrhotic patients whose EVs had been eradicated using EBL and excluded those who had been treated using EIS, those who had received endoscopic therapy for CVs, and those who were combined with hepatocellular carcinoma. Results. A total of 123 patients were enrolled. The age was 59.7 ± 11.7 years, and 96 patients (78.0%) were men. Thirty-eight patients (30.9%) had EVs only, while 85 (69.1%) had GOV1s. After EVs eradication, the CVs disappeared in 55 patients (64.7%). EVs recurred in 40 patients, with recurrence rates at 1, 2, and 3 years of 16.0%, 29.6%, and 35.6%, respectively, the recurrence being more frequent in patients who had undergone EBL for secondary prophylaxis and in those with persisting CVs after EVs eradication (P = 0.003). Conclusions. CVs frequently disappeared when EVs were eradicated using EBL in patients with GOV1s. Persistence of CVs after EVs eradication by EBL was associated with EVs recurrence. PMID:28116285

  3. Changes in Cardiac Varices and Their Clinical Significance after Eradication of Esophageal Varices by Band Ligation.

    PubMed

    Park, Seung Woon; Seo, Yeon Seok; Lee, Han Ah; Park, Sang Jung; Kim, Tae Hyung; Lee, Jae Min; Suh, Sang Jun; Choi, Hyuk Soon; Kim, Eun Sun; Keum, Bora; Jung, Young Kul; Kim, Ji Hoon; An, Hyonggin; Yim, Hyung Joon; Jeen, Yoon Tae; Yeon, Jong Eun; Lee, Hong Sik; Chun, Hoon Jai; Byun, Kwan Soo; Um, Soon Ho; Kim, Chang Duck

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims. Cardiac varices (CVs) in patients with type 1 gastroesophageal varices (GOV1s) usually disappear with treatment for esophageal varices (EVs) by endoscopic injection sclerotherapy (EIS). However, whether this applies to patients treated with endoscopic band ligation (EBL) for EVs remains unclear. We evaluated the effect of EVs eradication by EBL on CVs. Methods. We included cirrhotic patients whose EVs had been eradicated using EBL and excluded those who had been treated using EIS, those who had received endoscopic therapy for CVs, and those who were combined with hepatocellular carcinoma. Results. A total of 123 patients were enrolled. The age was 59.7 ± 11.7 years, and 96 patients (78.0%) were men. Thirty-eight patients (30.9%) had EVs only, while 85 (69.1%) had GOV1s. After EVs eradication, the CVs disappeared in 55 patients (64.7%). EVs recurred in 40 patients, with recurrence rates at 1, 2, and 3 years of 16.0%, 29.6%, and 35.6%, respectively, the recurrence being more frequent in patients who had undergone EBL for secondary prophylaxis and in those with persisting CVs after EVs eradication (P = 0.003). Conclusions. CVs frequently disappeared when EVs were eradicated using EBL in patients with GOV1s. Persistence of CVs after EVs eradication by EBL was associated with EVs recurrence.

  4. The Role of Adjuvant Acid Suppression on the Outcomes of Bleeding Esophageal Varices after Endoscopic Variceal Ligation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Cheng-Kun; Liang, Chih-Ming; Hsu, Chien-Ning; Hung, Tsung-Hsing; Yuan, Lan-Ting; Nguang, Seng-Howe; Wang, Jiunn-Wei; Tseng, Kuo-Lun; Ku, Ming-Kun; Yang, Shih-Cheng; Tai, Wei-Chen; Shih, Chih-Wei; Hsu, Pin-I; Wu, Deng-Chyang; Chuah, Seng-Kee

    2017-01-01

    The impact of adjuvant acid suppression via proton pump inhibitors or histamine-2 receptor antagonists after endoscopic variceal ligation remains uncertain. We therefore aimed to evaluate the effect of adjuvant acid suppression on the rebleeding and mortality rates in patients who received endoscopic variceal ligation and vasoconstrictor therapy for bleeding esophageal varices. Data from 1997 to 2011 were extracted from the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan. A total of 1576 cirrhotic patients aged > 18 years with a primary diagnosis of acute esophageal variceal bleeding who received endoscopic variceal ligation therapy were screened. After strict exclusion, 637 patients were recruited. The exclusion criteria included patients with gastric variceal bleeding, failure in the control of bleeding, mortality within 12 hours, and history of hepatocellular carcinoma or gastric cancer. Patients were divided into two groups: the vasoconstrictors group (n = 126) and vasoconstrictors plus acid suppression group (n = 511). We observed that the rebleeding and mortality rates were not significantly different between 2 groups during hospitalization and the 15-year follow-up period after discharge. A Charlson score ≥3 (odds ratio: 2.42, 95% confidence interval: 1.55 ~3.79, P = 0.0001), presence of hepatitis C virus (odds ratio: 1.70, 95% confidence interval: 1.15 ~2.52, P = 0.0085), and cirrhosis (odds ratio: 1.69, 95% confidence interval: 1.08 ~2.66, P = 0.0229) were the independent risk factors of mortality after discharge. In conclusion, the results of the current study suggest that adjuvant acid suppression prescription to patients who received endoscopic variceal ligation and vasoconstrictor therapy for bleeding esophageal varices may not change the rebleeding and mortality outcomes compared to that for those who received endoscopic variceal ligation and vasoconstrictor agents without acid suppression. PMID:28118373

  5. Detection of risky esophageal varices by two-dimensional ultrasound: when to perform endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Abd Elrazek, Mohammad Ali; Mohammad Ali, Abd El razek; Mahfouz, Hamdy; Afifi, Mohamed; Nafady, Mohamed; Fathy, Abd El wahhab; El azeem, Khaled Abd; Amer, Khaled; El-shamy, Ahmed; Kenji, Uryuhara; Ghibah, A Ammar; Ghiba, Ammar; Bilasy, Shymaa; El-ansary, Nadia; Fakhry, Mohamed; Mansour, Magdy

    2014-01-01

    Esophageal varices are a consequence of portal hypertension in cirrhotic patients. Current guidelines recommend that all cirrhotic patients undergo screening endoscopy at diagnosis to identify patients with varices at high risk of bleeding who will benefit from primary prophylaxis. This practice increases costs, involves a degree of invasiveness and discomfort and places a heavy burden on endoscopy units. Several studies have evaluated possible noninvasive predictors of esophageal varices, but most of these studies remain controversial. The intra-abdominal portion of the esophagus in 673 patients who presented with liver cirrhosis and portal hypertension was examined using standard 2-dimensional (2D) ultrasound. A direct relationship between the degree of varices observed on upper endoscopy and the intra-abdominal esophageal wall thickness was detected using 2D ultrasound. The mean thicknesses of the esophageal wall were 3.7 ± 0.5 mm (mean ± standard deviation) in normal individuals, 7.3 ± 3.3 mm in those with esophageal varices and 8.65 ± 1.98 mm in those with risky esophageal varices. The overall accuracy of 2D ultrasound was 95%. The intra-abdominal esophagus should be observed during abdominal ultrasound examination in patients with liver cirrhosis. Two-dimensional ultrasound can play an important role in screening for esophageal varices.

  6. Esophageal perforation after fiberoptic variceal sclerotherapy.

    PubMed

    Perino, L E; Gholson, C F; Goff, J S

    1987-06-01

    Our experience and review of the literature suggests that perforation follows fiberoptic sclerotherapy at an incidence of 1-6% per patient. Perforation is delayed for 2-14 days after the procedure and is due to chemical necrosis of the esophageal wall. The risk of perforation is higher in Child's class C patients. The use of large volumes or high concentrations of sclerosant may increase the risk of perforation. To reduce this risk, we suggest a cautious approach to Child's class C patients, with no more than two sclerosis sessions during the first 2 weeks of treatment using less than or equal to 10 ml of 1.5% sodium tetradecyl sulfate per session.

  7. Medical expenses in treating acute esophageal variceal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chueh-Ling; Wu, Cheng-Kun; Shi, Hon-Yi; Tai, Wei-Chen; Liang, Chih-Ming; Yang, Shih-Cheng; Wu, Keng-Liang; Chiu, Yi-Chun; Chuah, Seng-Kee

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Acute variceal bleeding in patients with cirrhosis is related to high mortality and medical expenses. The purpose of present studies was to analyze the medical expenses in treating acute esophageal variceal bleeding among patients with cirrhosis and potential influencing clinical factors. A total of 151,863 patients with cirrhosis with International Classification of Diseases-9 codes 456.0 and 456.20 were analyzed from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database from January 1, 1996 to December 31, 2010. Time intervals were divided into three phases for analysis as T1 (1996–2000), T2 (2001–2005), and T3 (2006–2010). The endpoints were prevalence, length of hospital stay, medical expenses, and mortality rate. Our results showed that more patients were <65 years (75.6%) and of male sex (78.5%). Patients were mostly from teaching hospitals (90.8%) with high hospital volume (50.9%) and high doctor service load (51.1%). The prevalence of acute esophageal variceal bleeding and mean length of hospital stay decreased over the years (P < 0.001), but the overall medical expenses increased (P < 0.001). Multiple regression analysis showed that older age, female sex, Charlson comorbidity index (CCI) score >1, patients from teaching hospitals, and medium to high or very high patient numbers were independent factors for longer hospital stay and higher medical expenses. Aged patients, female sex, increased CCI score, and low doctor service volume were independent factors for both in-hospital and 5-year mortality. Patients from teaching hospitals and medium to high or very high service volume hospitals were independent factors for in-hospital mortality, but not 5-year mortality. Medical expenses in treating acute esophageal variceal bleeding increased despite the decreased prevalence rate and length of hospital stay in Taiwan. Aged patients, female sex, patients with increased CCI score from teaching hospitals, and medium to high or very high

  8. An aggressive, nonshunting approach for control of bleeding esophageal varices.

    PubMed

    Wexler, M J; Miller, N; McLean, A P

    1983-10-01

    Morbidity and mortality from variceal hemorrhage can be significantly reduced. A well-defined treatment protocol which obviates delay, procrastination and excessive blood loss is essential. Early aggressive endoscopic sclerotherapy is extremely safe and effective in controlling the acute hemorrhagic event. However, technical details remain to be standardized; rebleeding can be significant and sclerosing until roentgenologic obliteration is essential. Stapled esophageal transection and coronary vein ligation are a reasonable and effective surgical approach when necessary; however, the exact timing and place of this procedure in the therapeutic schema are not yet defined. It requires further phase one studies and not more randomized control trials! It can be difficult after recent sclerotherapy and would appear to require upper gastric devascularization or perhaps percutaneous embolization if gastric varices are venographically prominent. We have recently attempted to modify the procedure in such patients by stapling across the anterior and posterior gastric walls as an alternative or addition to complete esophageal transection. This is accomplished through a small gastrotomy adjacent to the gastroesophageal junction. Shunting procedures or more extensive surgical intervention does not appear necessary, desirable or warranted at this time; however, longer follow-up study is essential.

  9. Complete Esophageal Obstruction after Endoscopic Variceal Band Ligation in a Patient with a Sliding Hiatal Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Mansour, Munthir; Abdel-Aziz, Yousef; Awadh, Hesham; Shah, Nihar

    2017-01-01

    Complete esophageal obstruction is a rare complication of endoscopic variceal banding, with only 6 cases in the English literature since the introduction of endoscopic variceal banding in 1986. We report a case of complete esophageal obstruction following esophageal banding due to entrapment of part of a sliding hiatal hernia. To our knowledge, our case is one of few with esophageal obstruction post-banding, and the first associated with a hiatal hernia. We recommend caution when performing esophageal banding on patients with a hiatal hernia. PMID:28144613

  10. Noninvasive predictors of presence and grade of esophageal varices in viral cirrhotic patients.

    PubMed

    Nada, Lahmidani; Samira, El Fakir; Bahija, Benyachou; Adil, Ibrahimi; Nourdine, Aqodad

    2015-01-01

    Predicting the presence and the grade of varices by non-invasive methods is likely to predict the need for prophylactic beta blockers or endoscopic variceal ligation. The factors related to the presence of varices are not well-defined. Therefore, the present study has been undertaken to determine the appropriateness of the various factors in predicting the existence and also the grade of esophageal varices. Patients with diagnosis of liver cirrhosis due to hepatitis C or B were included in a retrospective study between January 2001 and January 2010. All the patients underwent detailed clinical evaluation, appropriate investigations, imaging studies (ultrasound with Doppler) and endoscopy at our center. Five variables considered relevant to the presence and grade of varices were tested using univariate and multivariate analysis (logistic regression). Three hundred and seventy two patients with viral liver cirrhosis were included, with 192 (51.6%) males. Platelet count and abundance of ascites were significantly associated with the presence of esophageal varices. However, abundance of ascites, prothrombin time, diameter of the spleen and portal vein were significantly associated with a large varice. In multivariate analysis, platelet count inferior to 100000 was associated with presence of varices (p = 0.04) and only abundance of ascites was associated with large varice. Low Platelet count (< or equal 100000) is associated with the presence of varices in viral cirrhotic patients and abundance of ascites is correlated with the presence of large varices.

  11. Noninvasive predictors of presence and grade of esophageal varices in viral cirrhotic patients

    PubMed Central

    Nada, Lahmidani; Samira, El Fakir; Bahija, Benyachou; Adil, Ibrahimi; Nourdine, Aqodad

    2015-01-01

    Predicting the presence and the grade of varices by non-invasive methods is likely to predict the need for prophylactic beta blockers or endoscopic variceal ligation. The factors related to the presence of varices are not well-defined. Therefore, the present study has been undertaken to determine the appropriateness of the various factors in predicting the existence and also the grade of esophageal varices. Patients with diagnosis of liver cirrhosis due to hepatitis C or B were included in a retrospective study between January 2001 and January 2010. All the patients underwent detailed clinical evaluation, appropriate investigations, imaging studies (ultrasound with Doppler) and endoscopy at our center. Five variables considered relevant to the presence and grade of varices were tested using univariate and multivariate analysis (logistic regression). Three hundred and seventy two patients with viral liver cirrhosis were included, with 192 (51.6%) males. Platelet count and abundance of ascites were significantly associated with the presence of esophageal varices. However, abundance of ascites, prothrombin time, diameter of the spleen and portal vein were significantly associated with a large varice. In multivariate analysis, platelet count inferior to 100000 was associated with presence of varices (p = 0.04) and only abundance of ascites was associated with large varice. Low Platelet count (< or equal 100000) is associated with the presence of varices in viral cirrhotic patients and abundance of ascites is correlated with the presence of large varices. PMID:27386022

  12. A modified percutaneous transhepatic variceal embolization with 2-octyl cyanoacrylate versus endoscopic ligation in esophageal variceal bleeding management: randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chun Qing; Liu, Fu Li; Liang, Bo; Sun, Zi Qin; Xu, Hong Wei; Xu, Lin; Feng, Kai; Liu, Zun Chang

    2008-08-01

    Conventional percutaneous transhepatic varices embolization (PTVE) has rarely been used in recent years due to high rates of variceal recurrence and rebleeding. Herein we report a modified PTVE with 2-octyl cyanoacrylate (2-OCA) in which the whole lower esophageal and peri or para-esophageal varices, the submucosal varices, and the advertitial plexus of the cardia and fundus were sufficiently obliterated. We compared this PTVE with endoscopic band ligation (EVL) in the treatment of esophageal variceal bleeding. In this prospective randomized controlled trial, cirrhotic patients with acute or recent esophageal variceal bleeding were assigned randomly to PTVE (52 patients) or EVL (50 patients) groups. Upper gastrointestinal (UGI) rebleeding, esophageal variceal rebleeding, and survival were followed-up. Computerized tomography (CT) scanning and portal venography were used to observe 2-OCA distribution. During the follow-up period (median 24 and 25 months in the PTVE and EVL groups, respectively) UGI rebleeding developed in eight patients in the PTVE group and 21 patients in EVL group (P = 0.004). Recurrent bleeding from esophageal varices occurred in three patients in the PTVE group and twelve in the EVL group (P = 0.012, relative risk 0.24, 95% confidence interval 0.05-0.74). Multivariate Cox analysis indicated that the treatment was the only factor predictive of rebleeding. A Kaplan-Meier curve showed there was no significant difference between survival in the two groups (P = 0.054). With the whole lower esophageal and peri or para-esophageal varices, the submucosal varices, and the adventitial plexus of the cardia and fundus sufficiently obliterated by 2-OCA, this modified PTVE was more effective than EVL in the management of esophageal varices recurrence and rebleeding. Survival in these two groups was not significantly different, however.

  13. Association of Endoscopic Esophageal Variceal Ligation with Duodenal Ulcer.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Ze-Hao; Lin, Ai-Fang; Tang, Du-Peng; Wei, Jing-Jing; Liu, Zheng-Ji; Xin, Xiao-Mei; Pan, Yu-Feng

    2016-04-01

    To determine the frequency of duodenal ulcer (DU), as well as other clinical characteristics occurring after endoscopic variceal ligation (EVL) of the esophagus. Descriptive study. The First Affiliated Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou, China, from April 2012 to April 2013. A total of 47 patients with esophageal varices (EVr) who had also undergone EVL and gastroscopic follow-up within 3 months of the procedure was retrospectively analyzed. The status of Helicobacter pylori(Hp) infection, Child-Pugh classification, and the grades of portal hypertensive gastropathy (PHG) were collected. Sixty EVr patients without EVL treatment, but with clinical data available, served as the control group. The frequency of DU in the EVL group (29.8%, 14/47) was higher than the control group (6.7%, 4/60) (p=0.02). Hp infection rate in EVLgroup was 19.15% (9/47), while in control group was 21.67% (13/60) (p=0.813). Hp positive rate (12.5%, 1/8) in patients exhibited new DUs after EVL was comparable to the patients without DU in the EVL group (12.1%, 4/33) (p=1.00). Patients with DU after EVL received 18.79 &plusmn;8.48 of ligating bands, while in those who did not exhibit DUs received 13.85 &plusmn;6.47 (z = -2.042, p = 0.041). Logistic regression analysis showed that the occurrence of DU was not associated with age, gender, Child-Pugh classification, or the grade of PHG (p &gt; 0.05). Esophageal EVL is associated with a higher frequency of developing DU, which is related to a larger number of applied bands but is not correlated with Hp infection status or other variables.

  14. Endoscopic variceal ligation caused massive bleeding due to laceration of an esophageal varicose vein with tissue glue emboli.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiu-Qing; Gu, Hua-Ying; Wu, Zhi-E; Miao, Hui-Biao; Wang, Pei-Qi; Wen, Zhuo-Fu; Wu, Bin

    2014-11-14

    Endoscopic variceal obturation of gastric varices with tissue glue is considered the first choice for management of gastric varices, and is usually safe and effective. However, there is still a low incidence of complications and some are even fatal. Here, we present a case in which endoscopic variceal ligation caused laceration of the esophageal varicose vein with tissue glue emboli and massive bleeding after 3 mo. Cessation of bleeding was achieved via variceal sclerotherapy using a cap-fitted gastroscope. Methods of recognizing an esophageal varicose vein with tissue glue plug are discussed.

  15. Severe bleeding from esophageal varices resistant to endoscopic treatment in a non cirrhotic patient with portal hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Caronna, Roberto; Bezzi, Mario; Schiratti, Monica; Cardi, Maurizio; Prezioso, Giampaolo; Benedetti, Michele; Papini, Federica; Mangioni, Simona; Martino, Gabriele; Chirletti, Piero

    2008-01-01

    A non cirrhotic patient with esophageal varices and portal vein thrombosis had recurrent variceal bleeding unsuccessfully controlled by endoscopy and esophageal transection. Emergency transhepatic portography confirmed the thrombosed right branch of the portal vein, while the left branch appeared angulated, shifted and stenotic. A stent was successfully implanted into the left branch and the collateral vessels along the epatoduodenal ligament disappeared. In patients with esophageal variceal hemorrhage and portal thrombosis if endoscopy fails, emergency esophageal transection or nonselective portocaval shunting are indicated. The rare patients with only partial portal thrombosis can be treated directly with stenting through an angioradiologic approach. PMID:18644135

  16. Antiviral therapy delays esophageal variceal bleeding in hepatitis B virus-related cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chang-Zheng; Cheng, Liu-Fang; Li, Qing-Shan; Wang, Zhi-Qiang; Yan, Jun-Hong

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of antiviral therapy with nucleoside analogs in hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related cirrhosis and esophageal varices. METHODS: Eligible patients with HBV-related cirrhosis and esophageal varices who consulted two tertiary hospitals in Beijing, China, the Chinese Second Artillery General Hospital and Chinese PLA General Hospital, were enrolled in the study from January 2005 to December 2009. Of 117 patients, 79 received treatment with different nucleoside analogs and 38 served as controls. Bleeding rate, change in variceal grade and non-bleeding duration were analyzed. Multivariate Cox proportional hazard regression was used to identify factors related to esophageal variceal bleeding. RESULTS: The bleeding rate was decreased in the antiviral group compared to the control group (29.1% vs 65.8%, P < 0.001). Antiviral therapy was an independent factor related to esophageal bleeding in multivariate analysis (HR = 11.3, P < 0.001). The mean increase in variceal grade per year was lower in the antiviral group (1.0 ± 1.3 vs 1.7 ± 1.2, P = 0.003). Non-bleeding duration in the antiviral group was prolonged in the Kaplan-Meier model. Viral load rebound was observed in 3 cases in the lamivudine group and in 1 case in the adefovir group, all of whom experienced bleeding. Entecavir and adefovir resulted in lower bleeding rates (17.2% and 28.6%, respectively) than the control (P < 0.001 and P = 0.006, respectively), whereas lamivudine (53.3%) did not (P = 0.531). CONCLUSION: Antiviral therapy delays the progression of esophageal varices and reduces bleeding risk in HBV-related cirrhosis, however, high-resistance agents tend to be ineffective for long-term treatment. PMID:24187460

  17. Comparison of hepatic venous pressure gradient and endoscopic grading of esophageal varices

    PubMed Central

    Lee, EunJi; Kim, Yong Jae; Goo, Dong Erk; Yang, Seung Boo; Kim, Hyun-Joo; Jang, Jae Young; Jeong, Soung Won

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To determine the correlation between the hepatic venous pressure gradient and the endoscopic grade of esophageal varices. METHODS: From September 2009 to March 2013, a total of 176 measurements of hepatic venous pressure gradient (HVPG) were done in 146 patients. Each transjugular HVPG was measured twice, first using an end whole catheter (EH-HVPG), and then using a balloon catheter (B-HVPG). The HVPG was compared with the endoscopic grade of esophageal varices (according to the general rules for recording endoscopic findings of esophagogastric varices), which was recorded within a month of the measurement of HVPG. RESULTS: The study included 110 men and 36 women, with a mean age of 56.1 years (range, 43-76 years). The technical success rate of the pressure measurements was 100% and there were no complication related to the procedures. Mean HVPG was 15.3 mmHg as measured using the end hole catheter method and 16.5 mmHg as measured using the balloon catheter method. Mean HVPG (both EH-HVPG and B-HVPG) was not significantly different among patients with different characteristics, including sex and comorbid factors, except for cases with hepatocellular carcinoma (B-HVPG, P = 0.01; EH-HVPG, P = 0.02). Portal hypertension (> 12 mmHg HVPG) occurred in 66% of patients according to EH-HVPG and 83% of patients according to B-HVGP, and significantly correlated with Child’s status (B-HVPG, P < 0.000; EH-HVGP, P < 0.000) and esophageal varies observed upon endoscopy (EH-HVGP, P = 0.003; B-HVGP, P = 0.006). One hundred and thirty-five endoscopies were performed, of which 15 showed normal findings, 27 showed grade 1 endoscopic esophageal varices, 49 showed grade 2 varices, and 44 showed grade 3 varices. When comparing endoscopic esophageal variceal grades and HVPG using univariate analysis, the P value was 0.004 for EH-HVPG and 0.002 for B-HVPG. CONCLUSION: Both EH-HVPG and B-HVPG showed a positive correlation with the endoscopic grade of esophageal varices, with B

  18. Platelet count/spleen diameter ratio to predict esophageal varices in Mexican patients with hepatic cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    González-Ojeda, Alejandro; Cervantes-Guevara, Gabino; Chávez-Sánchez, Manuela; Dávalos-Cobián, Carlos; Ornelas-Cázares, Susana; Macías-Amezcua, Michel Dassaejv; Chávez-Tostado, Mariana; Ramírez-Campos, Kenia Militzi; Ramírez-Arce, Anaís Del Rocío; Fuentes-Orozco, Clotilde

    2014-02-28

    To validate whether the platelet count/spleen size ratio can be used to predict the presence of esophageal varices in Mexican patients with hepatic cirrhosis. This was an analytical cross-sectional study to validate the diagnostic test for hepatic cirrhosis and was performed between February 2010 and December 2011. Patients with a diagnosis of hepatic cirrhosis were included and stratified using their Child-Pugh score. Biochemical parameters were evaluated, and ultrasound was used to measure the longest diameter of the spleen. The platelet count/spleen diameter ratio was calculated and analyzed to determine whether it can predict the presence of esophageal varices. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was used as the gold standard. Sensitivity and specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and positive and negative likelihood ratios were determined, with the cutoff points determined by receiver-operating characteristic curves. A total of 91 patients were included. The mean age was 53.75 ± 12 years; 50 (54.9%) were men, and 41 (45.0%) women. The etiology of cirrhosis included alcohol in 48 (52.7%), virally induced in 24 (26.3%), alcoholism plus hepatitis C virus in three (3.2%), cryptogenic in nine (9.8%), and primary biliary cirrhosis in seven (7.6%). Esophageal varices were present in 73 (80.2%) patients. Child-Pugh classification, 17 (18.6%) patients were classified as class A, 37 (40.6%) as class B, and 37 (40.6%) as class C. The platelet count/spleen diameter ratio to detect esophageal varices independent of the grade showed using a cutoff value of ≤ 884.3, had 84% sensitivity, 70% specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of 94% and 40%, respectively. Our results suggest that the platelet count/spleen diameter ratio may be a useful tool for detecting esophageal varices in patients with hepatic cirrhosis.

  19. [Treatment of recurrent hemorrhage esophageal varices in schistosomotic patients after surgery].

    PubMed

    Assef, José Cesar; de Capua Junior, Armando; Szutan, Luiz Arnaldo

    2003-01-01

    To standardize the treatment recurrent hemorrhage esophageal varices in schistosomotic patients after non decompressive surgery. We treated 45 patients with schistosomotic portal hypertension who presented recurrent hemorrhage esophageal varices. Performance of abdominal ultrasonography and arteriographic studies and two groups were defined: Group A: Nineteen patients (42.2%) with absence of spleen, occluded splenic artery and patency of left gastric artery and vein, thus characterizing splenectomy at prior operation. Group B: Twenty six patients (57.8%) with absence of spleen image, occluded splenic and left gastric artery and non-opacified left gastric vein, showing splenectomy and some type of gastroesophageal devascularization performed before. Patients of Group A were reoperated to carry out the gastroesophageal devascularization and patients of Group B were submitted to a sclerotherapy program. In Group A, one patient (5.3%) presented recurrent hemorrhage on the late postoperative period. The esophageal varices decreased in number or diameter in 14 patients (73.7%), disappeared in three (15.8%) and remained unchanged in two (10.5%), under final endoscopic evaluation. In Group B, six patients (23.1%) presented recurrent bleeding. In four patients the acute hemorrhagic event were controlled. Two patients who underwent mesocaval shunt owing to unsuccess of these methods died postoperatively. Esophageal varices disappeared in 17 patients (65.4%), decreased in number or diameter in seven (26.9%) and remained unchanged in two (7.7%) after the last endoscopic evaluation. 1) The gastroesophageal devascularization is appropriated to splenectomized patients, with patency of left gastric artery and vein. 2) A long term of esophageal varices endoscopic sclerotherapy may be an option to splenectomized patients, with occluded left gastric artery and non-opacified left gastric vein.

  20. Platelet count/spleen diameter ratio to predict esophageal varices in Mexican patients with hepatic cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    González-Ojeda, Alejandro; Cervantes-Guevara, Gabino; Chávez-Sánchez, Manuela; Dávalos-Cobián, Carlos; Ornelas-Cázares, Susana; Macías-Amezcua, Michel Dassaejv; Chávez-Tostado, Mariana; Ramírez-Campos, Kenia Militzi; Ramírez-Arce, Anaís del Rocío; Fuentes-Orozco, Clotilde

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To validate whether the platelet count/spleen size ratio can be used to predict the presence of esophageal varices in Mexican patients with hepatic cirrhosis. METHODS: This was an analytical cross-sectional study to validate the diagnostic test for hepatic cirrhosis and was performed between February 2010 and December 2011. Patients with a diagnosis of hepatic cirrhosis were included and stratified using their Child-Pugh score. Biochemical parameters were evaluated, and ultrasound was used to measure the longest diameter of the spleen. The platelet count/spleen diameter ratio was calculated and analyzed to determine whether it can predict the presence of esophageal varices. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was used as the gold standard. Sensitivity and specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and positive and negative likelihood ratios were determined, with the cutoff points determined by receiver-operating characteristic curves. RESULTS: A total of 91 patients were included. The mean age was 53.75 ± 12 years; 50 (54.9%) were men, and 41 (45.0%) women. The etiology of cirrhosis included alcohol in 48 (52.7%), virally induced in 24 (26.3%), alcoholism plus hepatitis C virus in three (3.2%), cryptogenic in nine (9.8%), and primary biliary cirrhosis in seven (7.6%). Esophageal varices were present in 73 (80.2%) patients. Child-Pugh classification, 17 (18.6%) patients were classified as class A, 37 (40.6%) as class B, and 37 (40.6%) as class C. The platelet count/spleen diameter ratio to detect esophageal varices independent of the grade showed using a cutoff value of ≤ 884.3, had 84% sensitivity, 70% specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of 94% and 40%, respectively. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that the platelet count/spleen diameter ratio may be a useful tool for detecting esophageal varices in patients with hepatic cirrhosis. PMID:24616574

  1. [Endoscopic rubber band ligation in treatment of esophageal varices bleeding. Personal experience].

    PubMed

    Geraci, G; Arnone, E; Lo Nigro, C; Sciuto, A; Modica, G; Sciumè, C

    2011-03-01

    Bleeding esophageal varices is the most serious complication of the portal hypertension, and the greater cause of dead (25% of the patients). The survival after esophageal varices bleeding depends in wide part from the swiftness and effectiveness of hemostasis and from the degree of functional liver reserve. Aim of our manuscript is to report our experience about hemostasis bleeding esophageal varices with endoscopic rubber band ligation. From January 1999 to January 2008 we performed 302 esofagogastroduodenoscopy (EGDS) for esophageal varices bleeding (M: F ratio = 1.4:1, mean age 56.4 years, 62% of cases with HCV-related cirrhosis, 29% alcoholic cirrhosis and 9% cryptogenic cirrhosis; 20% suffered from chronic renal failure, 15% diabetes mellitus, 10% hepatocellular carcinoma on cirrhosis, 5% systemic encephalopathy and 1% AIDS). RESULTS; All patients were treated within 6 hours after the first reported episode of haematemesis and all received beta-blocker therapy after the episode. In the first phase of our experience were used rechargeable elastic ligator and then multibyte, even in combination with polidocanol sclerotherapy (8%) or injection of cyanoacrylate (5%). The best results were achieved with band ligation, in terms of primitive haemostasis, rebleeding, (3%), intraoperative mortality (1%) and 6 weeks mortality (1%). To date, no single method applicable to all patients with bleeding esophageal varices, but endoscopic rubber band ligation is currently considered the first-line treatment of proper multidisciplinary approach to the patient, both during the acute event than prevention of rebleeding, because it is an effective, safe and repeatable, in experienced hands.

  2. The international normalized ratio does not reflect bleeding risk in esophageal variceal hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Hshieh, Tammy T; Kaung, Aung; Hussain, Syed; Curry, Michael P; Sundaram, Vinay

    2015-01-01

    The international normalized ratio (INR) has not been validated as a predictor of bleeding risk in cirrhotics. The aim of this study was to determine whether elevation in the INR correlated with risk of esophageal variceal hemorrhage and whether correction of the INR prior to endoscopic therapy affects failure to control bleeding. Patient records were retrospectively reviewed from January 1, 2000 to December 31, 2010. Cases were cirrhotics admitted to the hospital due to bleeding esophageal varices. Controls were cirrhotics with a history of non-bleeding esophageal varices admitted with ascites or encephalopathy. All variceal bleeders were treated with octreotide, antibiotics, and band ligation. Failure to control bleeding was defined according to the Baveno V criteria. We analyzed 74 cases and 74 controls. The mean INR at presentation was lower in those with bleeding varices compared to non-bleeders (1.61 vs 1.74, P = 0.03). Those with bleeding varices had higher serum sodium (136.1 vs 133.8, P = 0.02), lower hemoglobin (9.59 vs 11.0, P < 0.001), and lower total bilirubin (2.47 vs 5.50, P < 0.001). Multivariable logistic regression showed total bilirubin to inversely correlate with bleeding (OR = 0.74). Bleeders received a mean of 1.14 units of fresh frozen plasma (FFP) prior to endoscopy (range 0-11 units). Of the 14 patients (20%) with failure to control bleeding, median INR (1.8 vs 1.5, P = 0.02) and median units of FFP transfused (2 vs 0, P = 0.01) were higher than those with hemostasis after the initial endoscopy. The INR reflects liver dysfunction, not bleeding risk. Correction of INR with FFP has little effect on hemostasis.

  3. Multiple esophageal variceal ruptures with massive ascites due to myelofibrosis-induced portal hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Tokai, Koichi; Miyatani, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Yukio; Yamada, Shigeki

    2012-01-01

    A 75-year old man had been diagnosed at 42 years of age as having polycythemia vera and had been monitored at another hospital. Progression of anemia had been recognized at about age 70, and the patient was thus referred to our center in 2008 where secondary myelofibrosis was diagnosed based on bone marrow biopsy findings. Hematemesis due to rupture of esophageal varices occurred in January and February of 2011. The bleeding was stopped by endoscopic variceal ligation. Furthermore, in March of the same year, hematemesis recurred and the patient was transported to our center. He was in irreversible hemorrhagic shock and died. The autopsy showed severe bone marrow fibrosis with mainly argyrophilic fibers, an observation consistent with myelofibrosis. The liver weighed 1856 g the spleen 1572 g, indicating marked hepatosplenomegaly. The liver and spleen both showed extramedullary hemopoiesis. Myelofibrosis is often complicated by portal hypertension and is occasionally associated with gastrointestinal hemorrhage due to esophageal varices. A patient diagnosed as having myelofibrosis needs to be screened for esophageal/gastric varices. Myelofibrosis has a poor prognosis. Therefore, it is necessary to carefully decide the therapeutic strategy in consideration of the patient’s concomitant conditions, treatment invasiveness and quality of life. PMID:22851873

  4. Diagnostic accuracy of abdominal ultrasound in the screening of esophageal varices in patients with cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Sort, Pau; Muelas, Magdalena; Isava, Alvaro; Llaó, Jordina; Porta, Francesc; Puig, Ignasi; Domínguez-Curell, Claudia; Esteve, Enrique; Yanguas, Carles; Vida, Francesc

    2014-12-01

    Abdominal ultrasound (US) may provide data on the presence of esophageal varices in cirrhosis. We assess the diagnostic accuracy of this procedure. Retrospective recording of clinical data was carried out in cirrhotic patients who underwent abdominal US and upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. We compared patients with and without large varices and assessed the value of US in predicting the presence of these lesions as well as other significant variables. Of the 353 patients included, 123 (35%) had esophageal varices. The presence of US signs of portal hypertension independently predicted the existence of esophageal varices with a sensitivity of 87.9%, a specificity of 34.9%, a positive predictive value of 40.6%, and a negative predictive value of 85.1%, which could increase to 91.5% if the patient presented plasma albumin and platelet concentrations above the mean values (3.1 g/dl and 122×10 cells/l, respectively). Plasma albumin and platelet concentrations were the two other variables with independent predictive capacity. Applying these selection criteria, up to 30% of screening endoscopies may not be necessary, and up to 43% in patients with compensated cirrhosis. In patients with decompensated cirrhosis, however, US does not have predictive capacity. The results obtained are comparable with those reported for transient elastography. Abdominal US is a highly reliable technique for detecting patients with a low risk of presenting esophageal varices. Its use may avoid up to 43% of screening endoscopies in patients with compensated cirrhosis. The results obtained are similar to those observed using transient elastography.

  5. Endoscopic ultrasound findings predict the recurrence of esophageal varices after endoscopic band ligation: a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Masalaite, Laura; Valantinas, Jonas; Stanaitis, Juozas

    2015-01-01

    Variceal recurrence following endoscopic band ligation (EBL) is common. Esophageal collateral veins (ECV) are observed by endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) in patients with portal hypertension. The aim of the present study was to assess the role of EUS in predicting the recurrence of esophageal varices following EBL. Forty patients who had undergone EBL for eradication of varices were examined over a 12-month period to detect variceal recurrence. EUS was performed before ligation to detect and describe the type, grade, and the number of ECV. EUS findings obtained prior to EBL were compared in the variceal recurrence and non-recurrence groups. Of the 40 patients, 19 (47.5%) had variceal recurrence within 12 months of EBL. Univariate logistic regression analysis showed that severe peri-ECV (p < 0.001), multiple peri-ECV (p < 0.001), and the presence of perforating veins (p < 0.014) were statistically significantly related to the variceal recurrence after EBL. Multivariate logistic regression model found that only severe peri-ECV (odds ratio [OR] = 24.39; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.34-253.78) and multiple peri-ECV (OR = 24.39; 95% CI: 2.34-253.78) remained as independent prognostic factors for variceal recurrence. The sensitivity and specificity of multivariate logistic regression model in predicting variceal recurrence was 89.2% and 90.5%, respectively (prognostic value (AUC) = 0.946). Recurrence rate of esophageal varices after EBL is high (47.5%). EUS can clearly depict ECV and has a value in predicting variceal recurrence after EBL; severe peri-ECV and multiple peri-ECV were significant and independent prognostic factors associated with variceal recurrence risk.

  6. Ineffective Esophageal Motility Progressing into Distal Esophageal Spasm and Then Type III Achalasia.

    PubMed

    Samo, Salih; Carlson, Dustin A; Kahrilas, Peter J; Pandolfino, John E

    2016-08-01

    The clinical significance of minor esophageal motility disorders is unclear, though they typically carry a benign course. Distal esophageal spasm progressing to achalasia has been reported, although it appears to be rare. We report a case of a patient with dysphagia and chest pain who was found to have ineffective esophageal motility on high-resolution manometry, which developed into distal esophageal spasm and then progressed to type III achalasia.

  7. Ineffective Esophageal Motility Progressing into Distal Esophageal Spasm and Then Type III Achalasia

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Dustin A.; Kahrilas, Peter J.; Pandolfino, John E.

    2016-01-01

    The clinical significance of minor esophageal motility disorders is unclear, though they typically carry a benign course. Distal esophageal spasm progressing to achalasia has been reported, although it appears to be rare. We report a case of a patient with dysphagia and chest pain who was found to have ineffective esophageal motility on high-resolution manometry, which developed into distal esophageal spasm and then progressed to type III achalasia. PMID:28119934

  8. The Role of Spleen Stiffness in Determining the Severity and Bleeding Risk of Esophageal Varices in Cirrhotic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hwi Young; Jin, Eun Hyo; Kim, Won; Lee, Jae Young; Woo, Hyunsik; Oh, Sohee; Seo, Ji-Yeon; Oh, Hong Sang; Chung, Kwang Hyun; Jung, Yong Jin; Kim, Donghee; Kim, Byeong Gwan; Lee, Kook Lae

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Esophageal varix and its hemorrhage are serious complications of liver cirrhosis. Recent studies have focused on noninvasive prediction of esophageal varices. We attempted to evaluate the association of liver and spleen stiffness (LS and SS) as measured by acoustic radiation force impulse imaging, with the presence and severity of esophageal varices and variceal hemorrhage in cirrhotic patients. We measured LS and SS, along with endoscopic examination of esophageal varices for a total of 125 cirrhotic patients at a single referral hospital in this prospective observational study. The diagnostic utility of noninvasive methods for identifying varices and their bleeding risk was compared, including LS, SS, spleen length, Child-Pugh score, and various serum fibrosis indices. Esophageal varices were present in 77 patients (61.6%). SS was significantly higher in patients with varices than in those without varices (3.58 ± 0.47 vs 3.02 ± 0.49; P < 0.001). A tendency toward increasing SS levels was observed with increasing severity of varices (no varix, 3.02 ± 0.49; F1, 3.39 ± 0.51; F2, 3.60 ± 0.42; F3, 3.85 ± 0.37; P < 0.001). SS was significantly higher in patients who experienced variceal hemorrhage than in those who did not (3.80 ± 0.36 vs 3.20 ± 0.51; P = 0.002). An optimal cut-off value of SS for high-risk varices (≥F2) or variceal hemorrhage was 3.40 m/s. SS was significantly correlated with the presence, severity, and bleeding risk of esophageal varices. Prompt endoscopic evaluation of variceal status and prophylactic measures based on the SS may be warranted for cirrhotic patients. PMID:26091449

  9. Emergency management of bleeding esophageal varices: Drugs, bands or sleep?

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Brian M; Lee, Samuel S

    2006-01-01

    Variceal bleeding is a severe complication of cirrhosis leading to significant morbidity and mortality. Treatment of acute variceal bleeding has improved dramatically since the era of the mechanical balloon tamponade. These advances include endoscopic band ligation or sclerotherapy, and vasoactive pharmacological options such as somatostatin, octreotide, vasopressin and terlipressin. Evidence from a multitude of clinical trials and meta-analyses comparing endoscopic and pharmacological treatments suggests near equivalence in efficacy for initial hemostasis, mortality and rate of rebleeding. This raises the question of whether on-call gastroenterologists should be performing emergency endoscopic treatment in the middle of the night or start pharmacological treatment and delay endoscopy until optimal patient and working conditions the next morning. The present review analyzes the available comparative data between endoscopic and pharmacological treatment options. Although the literature cannot yet definitively answer the question posed, the authors suggest that delaying endoscopic treatment until the next morning may be the most reasonable practical approach. PMID:16550260

  10. An update on the management of acute esophageal variceal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, Lourdes; Tandon, Puneeta; Abraldes, Juan G

    2017-01-01

    The mortality rate in acute variceal haemorrhage remains high (around 15%). Treatment is based on the combined use of vasoactive drugs, endoscopic band ligation, and prophylactic antibiotics. Effective resuscitation (haemostasis, volume management) is essential to prevent complications. Treatment failure is best managed by transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS). Balloon tamponade or specifically designed covered oesophageal stents can be used as a bridge to definitive therapy in unstable patients. Early, pre-emptive TIPS should be the first choice in patients at high risk of treatment failure (Child-Pugh B with active bleeding or Child-Pugh C<14). This article reviews the most recent advances in the management of variceal bleeding and discusses the recent recommendations of the Baveno VI consensus conference.

  11. Diagnostic non-invasive model of large risky esophageal varices in cirrhotic hepatitis C virus patients

    PubMed Central

    Elalfy, Hatem; Elsherbiny, Walid; Abdel Rahman, Ashraf; Elhammady, Dina; Shaltout, Shaker Wagih; Elsamanoudy, Ayman Z; El Deek, Bassem

    2016-01-01

    AIM To build a diagnostic non-invasive model for screening of large varices in cirrhotic hepatitis C virus (HCV) patients. METHODS This study was conducted on 124 post-HCV cirrhotic patients presenting to the clinics of the Endemic Medicine Department at Mansoura University Hospital for evaluation before HCV antiviral therapy: 78 were Child A and 46 were Child B (score ≤ 8). Inclusion criteria for patients enrolled in this study was presence of cirrhotic HCV (diagnosed by either biopsy or fulfillment of clinical basis). Exclusion criteria consisted of patients with other etiologies of liver cirrhosis, e.g., hepatitis B virus and patients with high MELD score on transplant list. All patients were subjected to full medical record, full basic investigations, endoscopy, and computed tomography (CT), and then divided into groups with no varices, small varices, or large risky varices. In addition, values of Fibrosis-4 score (FIB-4), aminotransferase-to-platelet ratio index (APRI), and platelet count/splenic diameter ratio (PC/SD) were also calculated. RESULTS Detection of large varies is a multi-factorial process, affected by many variables. Choosing binary logistic regression, dependent factors were either large or small varices while independent factors included CT variables such coronary vein diameter, portal vein (PV) diameter, lieno-renal shunt and other laboratory non-invasive variables namely FIB-4, APRI, and platelet count/splenic diameter. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was plotted to determine the accuracy of non-invasive parameters for predicting the presence of large esophageal varices and the area under the ROC curve for each one of these parameters was obtained. A model was established and the best model for prediction of large risky esophageal varices used both PC/SD and PV diameter (75% accuracy), while the logistic model equation was shown to be (PV diameter × -0.256) plus (PC/SD × -0.006) plus (8.155). Values nearing 2 or more denote

  12. Chronology of histological changes after band ligation of esophageal varices in humans.

    PubMed

    Polski, J M; Brunt, E M; Saeed, Z A

    2001-05-01

    While the histological effects of endoscopic sclerotherapy in humans have been extensively described, the effects of endoscopic ligation have been reported in only two cases. The purpose of this study was to reconstruct the chronological sequence of histological changes after ligation of esophageal varices. Autopsy specimens from six patients who received ligation of varices from nine hours to 22 months ante-mortem were evaluated for gross and microscopic changes. Early after ligation, the appearance was that of a polyp with its base compressed by the band. Variceal thrombosis was seen on day 2. Varying degrees of ischemic necrosis of the polyp were present on days 0-5. If the bands did not remain in situ for two days (premature loss), necrosis of the polyp and dilated variceal vessels were seen. On day 22, superficial ulcers were observed. After complete healing, fibrosis was seen in the submucosa. The changes seen in the present study are similar to those described in animals. The delay in ulcer healing, compared with the gross changes reported during follow-up endoscopic examinations, may be related to the severity of the underlying illness and the compromised immune status of patients in the present series.

  13. Peroral endoscopic myotomy for the treatment of achalasia in a patient with esophageal varices. A case report.

    PubMed

    Shen, Naning; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Xiaoyin; Yao, Liping; Xie, Huahong; Zhang, Hongbo

    2017-06-01

    Achalasia is very uncommon, and rarely does achalasia co-exist with esophageal varices. We present a 62-year-old woman who was diagnosed with both achalasia and esophageal varices in December 2014 and had a past history of hematemesis. The patient's achalasia symptoms' Eckardt score was 9, and her hepatic function was Child-Pugh grade A6. After comprehensive assessment of the patient's health and discussion of the pros and cons of various therapies for achalasia, the patient underwent a peroral endoscopic myotomy. She was symptom-free after the operation and had no recurrence of achalasia symptoms at 20-month follow-up. No adverse events were reported. Peroral endoscopic myotomy for achalasia with esophageal varices has not been previously reported in the English literature.

  14. Esophageal balloon tamponade versus esophageal stent in controlling acute refractory variceal bleeding: A multicenter randomized, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Escorsell, Àngels; Pavel, Oana; Cárdenas, Andrés; Morillas, Rosa; Llop, Elba; Villanueva, Càndid; Garcia-Pagán, Juan C; Bosch, Jaime

    2016-06-01

    Balloon tamponade is recommended only as a "bridge" to definitive therapy in patients with cirrhosis and massive or refractory esophageal variceal bleeding (EVB), but is frequently associated with rebleeding and severe complications. Preliminary, noncontrolled data suggest that a self-expandable, esophageal covered metal stent (SX-ELLA Danis; Ella-CS, Hradec Kralove, Czech Republic) may be an effective and safer alternative to balloon tamponade. We conducted a randomized, controlled trial aimed at comparing esophageal stent versus balloon tamponade in patients with cirrhosis and EVB refractory to medical and endoscopic treatment. Primary endpoint was success of therapy, defined as survival at day 15 with control of bleeding and without serious adverse events (SAEs). Twenty-eight patients were randomized to Sengstaken-Blakemore tube (n = 15) or SX-ELLA Danis stent (n = 13). Patients were comparable in severity of liver failure, active bleeding at endoscopy, and initial therapy. Success of therapy was more frequent in the esophageal stent than in balloon tamponade group (66% vs. 20%; P = 0.025). Moreover, control of bleeding was higher (85% vs. 47%; P = 0.037) and transfusional requirements (2 vs 6 PRBC; P = 0.08) and SAEs lower (15% vs. 47%; P = 0.077) in the esophageal stent group. TIPS was used more frequently in the tamponade group (4 vs. 10; P = 0.12). There were no significant differences in 6-week survival (54% vs. 40%; P = 0.46). Esophageal stents have greater efficacy with less SAEs than balloon tamponade in the control of EVB in treatment failures. Our findings favor the use of esophageal stents in patients with EVB uncontrolled with medical and endoscopic treatment. (Hepatology 2016;63:1957-1967). © 2015 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  15. PillCam ESO versus esophagogastroduodenoscopy in esophageal variceal screening: A decision analysis.

    PubMed

    White, Christopher M; Kilgore, Meredith L

    2009-01-01

    PillCam ESO has been evaluated as a possible strategy to screen patients with cirrhosis for esophageal varices, but current guidelines recommend patients undergo screening with esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD), as it is currently the gold standard. Although recent data have suggested that PillCam ESO may be an acceptable alternative for screening, there is limited data on its cost-effectiveness compared with other screening modalities. This study was performed to compare the cost-effectiveness of PillCam ESO versus EGD for esophageal variceal screening. Markov models were constructed to compare 2 screening strategies: PillCam ESO versus EGD. In each arm, patients were followed for a time horizon of 15 years in 1-year transition intervals. All variables, transition probabilities, and costs were derived from the medical literature, and sensitivity analyses were performed on the different variables in the model. Base-case analysis shows that PillCam ESO is associated with an average expected cost of $22,589 and an average expected effectiveness measure of 12.81 life-years. EGD is associated with an average expected cost of $23,083 and an average expected effectiveness measure of 12.67 life-years. PillCam ESO was found to dominate EGD as a screening strategy for patients with cirrhosis. Sensitivity analyses found several variables within the model to have influential effects on the results. PillCam ESO is the dominant strategy for screening patients with cirrhosis for esophageal varices. However, based on a small difference in costs and effectiveness between each strategy, the results would suggest that PillCam ESO and EGD are essentially equivalent strategies.

  16. Hepatic and Gastric Involvement in a Case of Systemic Sarcoidosis Presenting with Rupture of Esophageal Varices.

    PubMed

    Saito, Hiroaki; Ohmori, Masayasu; Iwamuro, Masaya; Tanaka, Takehiro; Wada, Nozomu; Yasunaka, Tetsuya; Takaki, Akinobu; Okada, Hiroyuki

    2017-10-01

    A 46-year-old woman presented with massive hematemesis, caused by the rupture of esophageal varices. The laboratory investigations showed pancytopenia, and imaging tests revealed hepatosplenomegaly and ascites. A diagnosis of systemic sarcoidosis was made based on biopsies of the liver, stomach, lungs, heart, and skin. Although fat deposition was predominant, non-caseating granuloma and cirrhotic changes were found in the liver. Non-caseating granuloma was also identified in a biopsy specimen from minute depressions of the gastric folds. This case illustrates the rare involvement of the digestive system in a case of systemic sarcoidosis.

  17. Esophagogastric devascularization and transection for bleeding esophageal varices: first case presentation.

    PubMed

    Manzano-Trovamala, F J; Guttierrez, R L; Marquez, G M; Garcia, R A; Christen, J J; Guerrero, M G

    1996-08-01

    We present the first case of esophagogastric devascularization and esophagogastric transection using a stapler through laparoscopic surgery. The procedure was performed in a 71-year-old diabetic woman with alcoholic liver cirrhosis (Child-Pugh B class), portal hypertension, bleeding grade III esophageal varices, and a previous bleeding episode. The surgical technique was carried out without problems, and the patient had an excellent postoperative condition. Esophagogastric devascularization with esophageal transection using a stapler through laparoscopic surgery is a feasible technique that accomplishes the same and all objectives of the open procedure. Operative time in both methods is the same, whereas surgical trauma, inmunologic depletion, amount of transfused blood, pain, use of analgesics, and hospital stay are reduced in the laparoscopic technique.

  18. Pregnancy and delivery in women with esophageal varices due to hepatic vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Jabiry-Zieniewicz, Z; Dabrowski, F A; Suchońska, B; Kowalczyk, R; Nowacka, E; Kociszewska-Najman, B; Pietrzak, B; Malkowski, P; Wielgos, M

    2015-01-01

    Retrospective analysis of the course of pregnancy, labor and mode of anesthesia in women with portal hypertension and esophageal varices induced by portal vein thrombosis. From 2000 to 2012 seven pregnant were admitted. None had liver transplantation (Ltx), the varicose have been in the 1st stage. Each of them has been consulted by the obstetrician, transplant surgeon and anesthetist. The patient condition during pregnancy, labor and postpartum period was analyzed. Pregnancy in five cases proceeded physiologically. In one threatening miscarriage was diagnosed and treated with gestagens, two patients had tocolytic. One required variceal banding twice. In three thrombocytopenia worsened, with platelet count <70 g/L (up to 59 g/L). They received platelet transfusion before delivery. In one case, significant hipoproteinemia (4.7 g/L) occurred. In a case, GDM G1 and oligohydramnios were found. All women delivered at term (37-40 Hbd). In all general anesthesia with the use of remifentanil was done. There were no fluctuations in MAP and HR. Incision to delivery time was 2.5 min. Time from opioid administration to birth was <4 min. All children were born in good condition, weight 10-90 percentile. Regional anesthesia is contraindicated in patients with thrombocytopenia. In patients with esophageal varices sudden increase in heart rate and blood pressure can cause hemorrhage. Patients with portal hypertension can deliver at term. It is a high-risk pregnancy. In this group it is desirable to shorten the second stage of labor or complete it by c-section under general anesthesia with remifentanyl which allows getting desired analgesia without complications in the newborn. Surveillance of pregnant with portal hypertension must include monitoring of liver function and coagulation disorders.

  19. Propranolol associated with endoscopic band ligation reduces recurrence of esophageal varices for primary prophylaxis of variceal bleeding: a randomized-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Bonilha, Danielle Queiroz; Lenz, Luciano; Correia, Lucianna Motta; Rodrigues, Rodrigo Azevedo; de Paulo, Gustavo Andrade; Ferrari, Angelo Paulo; Della Libera, Ermelindo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the recurrence of esophageal varices (EVs) after endoscopic band ligation (EBL) associated with propranolol (PP) versus EBL alone. Sixty-six cirrhotic outpatients (EBL group, n=32 and EBL+PP group, n=34) with high-risk EVs without previous bleeding were studied. The primary outcome was recurrence of EV. The secondary outcomes were EV eradication, bleeding before EV eradication, mortality, and adverse events. Demographic characteristics and the initial endoscopic findings were similar. EV eradication was achieved in all patients. Three patients presented gastrointestinal bleeding before variceal eradication, two in the EBL group and one in the EBL+PP group (P=0.13). Six patients died (liver failure), two in the EBL group and four in the EBL+PP group (P=0.27). Twelve (38%) patients in the EBL group and three (9%) patients in the EBL+PP group had variceal recurrence. The risk of recurrence of EVs after eradication was significantly higher among patients in the EBL group (P=0.003). EBL alone and EBL+PP were effective in the primary prophylaxis of bleeding from EVs in cirrhotic patients (EV eradication, bleeding before EV eradication, mortality, and adverse events were similar in both groups). However, variceal recurrence was lower in the EBL+PP group than band ligation alone.

  20. Regression of esophageal varices and splenomegaly in two patients with hepatitis-C-related liver cirrhosis after interferon and ribavirin combination therapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soon Jae; Cho, Yoo-Kyung; Na, Soo-Young; Choi, Eun Kwang; Boo, Sun Jin; Jeong, Seung Uk; Song, Hyung Joo; Kim, Heung Up; Kim, Bong Soo; Song, Byung-Cheol

    2016-09-01

    Some recent studies have found regression of liver cirrhosis after antiviral therapy in patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related liver cirrhosis, but there have been no reports of complete regression of esophageal varices after interferon/peg-interferon and ribavirin combination therapy. We describe two cases of complete regression of esophageal varices and splenomegaly after interferon-alpha and ribavirin combination therapy in patients with HCV-related liver cirrhosis. Esophageal varices and splenomegaly regressed after 3 and 8 years of sustained virologic responses in cases 1 and 2, respectively. To our knowledge, this is the first study demonstrating that complications of liver cirrhosis, such as esophageal varices and splenomegaly, can regress after antiviral therapy in patients with HCV-related liver cirrhosis.

  1. [Patient evolution in different stages of hepatic failure submitted to eradication of esophageal varices with endoscopic ligation].

    PubMed

    Estela Caldera, Elisa; Reyes Dorantes, Angel Andrés; González Ortiz, Julio Alberto

    2005-01-01

    To know the patients' progress with distinct stages of hepatic failure, according to the Child Pugh classification, who underwent esophageal varices eradication with the use of endoscopic band ligation. Descriptive, longitudinal, prospective and comparative study. CENTRE: Endoscopy Department of the Central Military Hospital, Mexico, D.F. One-hundred twenty-four patients with esophageal varices and a history of bleeding, were submitted to various band ligation sessions every 4 weeks until the varices were eradicated and control sessions every 3 months. A total of 425 endoscopy sessions were performed of which 239 were ligature applications and 187 control sessions. Eradication of varices was achieved in 100% of the patients. Of the Child A, 2/3 of them were eradicated in one session and the other 1/3 with 2 sessions. The patients of the Child B class, 66% of varices were effaced in one session, 22% in two and 12% in three sessions. In the Child C group, 50% were obliterated in two sessions, 47% with three, 2% needed 4 sessions. The follow-up period was from 4 months being the minimum and 13 months the maximum (mean of 7 months). In 15% of the patients varices recurred. None were from the Child A group. Those pertaining to the Child B group varices reappeared in 7.3% of which 2/3 required another ligation session to eradicate them once again and the other 1/3 were removed in two sessions. In the Child C group the incidence of recidivation was 28%, 43% of these needing one session to eliminate them once again, 50% two sessions and 7% three sessions for complete eradication. Rebleeding appeared in 7.7% of the sample, all of them were from the Child C class. The occurrence of congestive gastropathy before ligature was 42%, and 73% at the conclusion of the follow-up period. Congestive gastropathy developed in 11% of the Child A patients after eradication, 34% of the Child B group and 38.5% of the Child C group. The incidence of gastric varices was 21% before ligature

  2. Role of EUS evaluation after endoscopic eradication of esophageal varices with band ligation.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Fred Olavo Aragão Andrade; Retes, Felipe Alves; Matuguma, Sérgio Eiji; Albers, Débora Vieira; Chaves, Dalton Marques; Dos Santos, Marcos Eduardo Lera; Herman, Paulo; Chaib, Eleazar; Sakai, Paulo; Carneiro D'Albuquerque, Luiz Augusto; Maluf Filho, Fauze

    2016-09-01

    Variceal recurrence after endoscopic band ligation (EBL) for secondary prophylaxis is a frequent event. Some studies have reported a correlation between variceal recurrence and variceal rebleeding with the EUS features of paraesophageal vessels. A prospective observational study was conducted to correlate EUS evaluation of paraesophageal varices, azygos vein, and thoracic duct with variceal recurrence after EBL variceal eradication in patients with cirrhosis. EUS was performed before and 1 month after EBL variceal eradication. Paraesophageal varices, azygos vein, and thoracic duct maximum diameters were evaluated in predetermined anatomic stations. After EBL variceal eradication, patients were submitted to endoscopic examinations every 3 months for 1 year. We looked for EUS features that could predict variceal recurrence. Thirty patients completed a 1-year endoscopic follow-up. Seventeen patients (57%) presented variceal recurrence. There was no correlation between azygos vein and thoracic duct diameter with variceal recurrence. Larger paraesophageal varices predicted variceal recurrence in both evaluation periods. Paraesophageal varices diameters that best correlated with variceal recurrence were 6.3 mm before EBL (52.9% sensitivity, 92.3% specificity, and .749 area under the receiver operating characteristic curve [AUROC]) and 4 mm after EBL (70.6% sensitivity, 84.6% specificity, and .801 AUROC). We conclude that paraesophageal varices diameter measured by EUS predicts variceal recurrence within 1 year after EBL variceal eradication. Paraesophageal diameter after variceal eradication is a better recurrence predictor, because it has a lower cut-off parameter, higher sensitivity, and higher AUROC. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Long-term results of the paraesophagogastric devascularization with or without esophageal transection: which is more suitable for variceal bleeding?

    PubMed

    Zhang, He-yun; Li, Wen-bin; Ye, Hua; Xiao, Zhi-yu; Peng, Yao-rong; Wang, Jie

    2014-08-01

    It has been reported that the paraesophagogastric devascularization with esophageal transection procedure, also known as the modified Sugiura procedure, was effective in the treatment of variceal bleeding. However, it was not widely accepted by other surgeons because of the high rate of rebleeding, complications, and mortality. To discover the effects of the paraesophagogastric devascularization procedure and the modified Sugiura procedure, we retrospectively analyzed the outcomes of these two procedures. During January 1990 and December 2009, 278 patients with variceal bleeding underwent devascularization after failed pharmacotherapy and endotherapy. In these 278 patients, 180 underwent paraesophagogastric devascularization without esophageal transection (group I), and the other 98 patients were subjected to the modified Sugiura procedure (group II). Postoperative mortality was 7.2% in group I, and 9.2% in group II (P = 0.563). The postoperative rebleeding rate in the two groups was 2.2 and 3.1%, respectively (P = 0.474). After a mean follow-up of 67.9 ± 37.3 months and 67.4 ± 44.6 months, respectively, esophageal transaction-related morbidity (leak, bleeding, and stricture) was 8.2% (8/98) in group II and 0% (0/180) in group I (P < 0.001). The overall rebleeding rate was 27% (41/152) in group I, and 27.2% (22/81) in group II (P = 0.976). The overall mortality was 28.3% (43/152) in group I, and 28.4% (23/81) in group II (P = 0.986). In the management of variceal bleeding, paraesophagogastric devascularization without esophageal transection is as effective and safe as devascularization with esophageal transaction, but with less esophageal transection-related morbidity.

  4. Potential precipitating factors of esophageal variceal bleeding: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Liao, Wei-Chih; Hou, Ming-Chih; Chang, Chen-Jung; Lee, Fa-Yauh; Lin, Han-Chieh; Lee, Shou-Dong

    2011-01-01

    Valsalva maneuver-associated activities such as straining during defecation, vomiting, and cough are believed to cause abrupt increase in variceal pressure. Whether these actions can precipitate rupture of esophageal varices (EV) is unknown. The association of EV bleeding with these activities and other potential risk factors such as ingestion of alcohol and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs was investigated. Between January 2003 and May 2009, 240 patients with liver cirrhosis and acute EV bleeding (group A) and 240 matched patients with Child-Pugh's class and moderate size EV without bleeding (group B) were included. Each patient was questioned regarding constipation, vomiting, cough, and other potential risk factors in the week prior to index bleeding (group A) or endoscopy (group B) using a standard questionnaire. Group A had more patients with constipation (n=44 vs. n=16, P<0.001) and higher constipation scores (0.79 ± 1.67 vs. 0.25 ± 0.92, P<0.001) than group B. Group A also had more patients with vomiting (n=60 vs. n=33, P=0.002) and higher vomiting scores (3.0 ± 0.86 vs. 1.85 ± 0.87, P<0.001). No difference in cough existed between the two groups (n=77 group A vs. n=73 group B); however, group A had higher cough scores (5.08 ± 2.70 vs. 3.19 ± 2.23, P<0.001). Group A had more patients with excessive alcohol consumption in the week preceding inclusion in the study (n=58 vs. n=5, P<0.001). On multivariate analysis, constipation score and vomiting score and alcohol consumption were independent determinants of first EV bleeding. Constipation, vomiting, severe coughing, and excessive consumption of alcohol may precipitate rupture of EV. A prospective cohort study is required to clarify the causal relationship between potential precipitating factors and EV bleeding.

  5. Liver stiffness as a predictor of esophageal varices requiring therapy in HIV/hepatitis C virus-coinfected patients with cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Pineda, Juan A; Recio, Eva; Camacho, Angela; Macías, Juan; Almodóvar, Carmen; González-Serrano, Mercedes; Merino, Dolores; Tellez, Francisco; Ríos, Maria José; Rivero, Antonio

    2009-08-01

    Liver stiffness (LS) measured by transient elastometry is associated with portal pressure in hepatitis C virus (HCV)-monoinfected patients and could predict the presence of esophageal varices in these subjects. The aim of this study was to assess the ability of LS to predict esophageal varices requiring preventive therapy for bleeding in HIV/HCV-coinfected patients. One hundred two HIV/HCV-coinfected patients with liver cirrhosis (LS >or= 14 kPa) underwent an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy (UGE) examination. The diagnostic performance of LS for esophageal varices requiring therapy (>or=F2 or F1 with red signs or Child-Pugh-Turcotte class C) was assessed by receiver operating receptor characteristic curves. Nineteen patients (19%) harbored varices requiring therapy. LS in patients with and without varices needing treatment was 48 (33-71) kPa and 32 (18-48) kPa (P = 0.004). The area under the receptor operating characteristic curve (95% confidence interval) of LS for the occurrence of varices that should be treated was 0.71 (0.60 to 0.82). There was no cutoff level of LS with good positive predictive value for the presence of varices requiring therapy, but LS of 21 kPa had a negative predictive value of 100%. Twenty-six percent of patients with LS measurement and UGE showed LS <21 KPa. LS is higher in HIV/HCV-coinfected patients with cirrhosis who show esophageal varices requiring therapy than in those who do not. A cutoff value of LS of 21 kPa could be useful to identify patients with very low probability of varices at risk for bleeding. UGE for screening could be spared in these patients until LS increases above 21 kPa.

  6. [Clinical value of acoustic radiation force impulse technique to predict esophageal and gastric varices in patients with biliary atresia].

    PubMed

    Zhang, G Y; Tang, Y; Niu, N N; Wu, H T

    2017-02-21

    Objective: To investigate the clinical value of acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI)technique in predicting esophageal and gastric varices in patients with biliary atresia after Kasai portoenterostomy. Methods: A total of 42 patients with biliary atresia after Kasai portoenterostomy were collected from September 2015 to May 2016 in Tianjin First Central Hospital.ARFI technique was used to measure the stiffness of liver and spleen, and 28 healthy children as control.According to the result of CT examination , patients with biliary atresia were divided into two groups , twenty-three patients with esophageal and gastric varices(A group) and nineteen patients without esophageal and gastric varices (B group), Comparing the difference of liver and spleen stiffness between the two groups.The ROC curve analysis was carried out to test the diagnostic power of effective parameter. Results: The ARFI value of liver (2.98±0.80) m/s and spleen (3.00±0.33) m/s of patients with biliary atresia was significantly higher than that of control group((1.10±0.16) m/s, (2.12±0.32) m/s), the differences had statistical significance (both P<0.01). Between group A and group B, the spleen ARFI value of group A(3.16±0.26) m/s was higher than group B(2.83±0.32) m/s, the difference had statistical significance (P<0.01), whereas there was no statistical difference of liver ARFI value between two group((2.93±0.65), (3.02±0.96) m/s)(P>0.05). The cut-off ARFI value of spleen to diagnose esophageal and gastric varices in biliary atresia was 3.02 m/s, and the biggest area under the ROC curve, sensitivity, and specificity were 0.81, 78.6% and 84.5%, respectively. Conclusion: ARFI can be used as a noninvasive method to predict the presence of esophageal and gastric varices in patients with biliary atresia after Kasai portoenterostomy.

  7. [Primary risk of hemorrhage due to esophageal varices in cirrhotic patients: significance of the associated endoscopic signs and hepatic functional reserve].

    PubMed

    Jmelnitzky, A; Palazzolo, A; Viola, L; Landoni, N; Morgante, P; Chopita, N; Romero, G; Giulioni, P

    1991-01-01

    Significance of endoscopic findings associated to esophageal varices (Japanese Research Society for Portal Hypertension) and hepatic dysfunction (Child-Pough classification) as predictive factors of variceal bleeding in cirrhotic patients is analyzed. In a cooperative prospective experience 137 cirrhotic patients with esophageal varices were examined in the period May 1987/89: 83 out of them had never bled from their varices (VENS group) while 54 recently had (VES group). A highly significative association was found between variceal size over 3 mm (grade II-III) and bleeding: 96.3% vs. 34.9% in VENS group (p = 0.01); similar association was found with regard to endoscopic detection of "red signs": 92.6% in bleeding group vs. 20.5% in VENS one (p = 0.01). "Red signs" were found on grade II-III varices in 98.5% of cases, and this association were related to variceal bleeding in 75.5%. Hepatic dysfunction was not directly related to bleeding episodes but "red signs" endoscopic detection in VENS group increased with liver function deterioration: 9.1% in Child A class, 27.3% in Child B, and 41.2% in Child C (p = 0.01). The strong association founded between bleeding and both grade II-III variceal size and "red signs" detection, suggest the possibility to identify a high risk group of cirrhotic patients candidate to prophylactic methodologies.

  8. Can transient elastography, Fib-4, Forns Index, and Lok Score predict esophageal varices in HCV-related cirrhotic patients?

    PubMed

    Hassan, Eman M; Omran, Dalia A; El Beshlawey, Mohamad L; Abdo, Mahmoud; El Askary, Ahmad

    2014-02-01

    Gastroesophageal varices are present in approximately 50% of patients with liver cirrhosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate liver stiffness measurement (LSM), Fib-4, Forns Index and Lok Score as noninvasive predictors of esophageal varices (EV). This prospective study included 65 patients with HCV-related liver cirrhosis. All patients underwent routine laboratory tests, transient elastograhy (TE) and esophagogastroduodenoscopy. FIB-4, Forns Index and Lok Score were calculated. The diagnostic performances of these methods were assessed using sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, accuracy and receiver operating characteristic curves. All predictors (LSM, FIB-4, Forns Index and Lok Score) demonstrated statistically significant correlation with the presence and the grade of EV. TE could diagnose EV at a cutoff value of 18.2kPa. Fib-4, Forns Index, and Lok Score could diagnose EV at cutoff values of 2.8, 6.61 and 0.63, respectively. For prediction of large varices (grade 2, 3), LSM showed the highest accuracy (80%) with a cutoff of 22.4kPa and AUROC of 0.801. Its sensitivity was 84%, specificity 72%, PPV 84% and NPV 72%. The diagnostic accuracies of FIB-4, Forns Index and Lok Score were 70%, 70% and76%, respectively, at cutoffs of 3.3, 6.9 and 0.7, respectively. For diagnosis of large esophageal varices, adding TE to each of the other diagnostic indices (serum fibrosis scores) increased their sensitivities with little decrease in their specificities. Moreover, this combination decreased the LR- in all tests. Noninvasive predictors can restrict endoscopic screening. This is very important as non invasiveness is now a major goal in hepatology. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  9. Albumin and magnetic resonance imaging-liver volume to identify hepatitis B-related cirrhosis and esophageal varices

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hang; Chen, Tian-Wu; Li, Zhen-Lin; Zhang, Xiao-Ming; Li, Cheng-Jun; Chen, Xiao-Li; Chen, Guang-Wen; Hu, Jia-Ni; Ye, Yong-Quan

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether liver lobe volume and albumin (ALB) could predict the presence and severity of liver cirrhosis, and esophageal varices. METHODS: Seventy-one cirrhotic patients with hepatitis B and 21 healthy individuals were enrolled in this study. All the participants underwent abdominal enhanced magnetic resonance imaging to measure each liver lobe volume, and biochemical workup for testing ALB and Child-Pugh class. All cirrhotic patients underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy to show the presence of cirrhotic esophageal varices. Right liver lobe volume (RV), left medial liver lobe volume (LMV), left lateral liver lobe volume (LLV), and caudate lobe volume (CV) were measured using enhanced magnetic resonance imaging. The ratios of RV to ALB (RV/ALB), LMV to ALB (LMV/ALB), LLV to ALB (LLV/ALB) and CV to ALB (CV/ALB) were calculated. Statistical analyses were performed to determine whether and how the combination of liver lobe volume measured using magnetic resonance imaging and albumin could predict the presence and severity of liver cirrhosis, and the presence of esophageal varices. RESULTS: RV, LMV, LLV and CV decreased (r = -0.51-0.373; all P < 0.05), while RV/ALB increased (r = 0.424; P < 0.05), with the progress of Child-Pugh class of liver cirrhosis. RV, LMV, CV, LLV/ALB and CV/ALB could identify presence of liver cirrhosis; LLV and LMV could distinguish Child-Pugh class A from B; RV, LMV, LLV, CV, RV/ALB and LLV/ALB could distinguish class A from C; RV and LLV/ALB could differentiate B from C; and RV, RV/ALB and CV/ALB could identify presence of esophageal varices (all P < 0.05). Among these parameters, CV/ALB could best identify the presence of liver cirrhosis, with an area under receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.860, a sensitivity of 82.0% and a specificity of 83.0%. LLV could best distinguish class A from B, with an AUC of 0.761, a sensitivity of 74.4% and a specificity of 73.1%. RV could best distinguish class A from C

  10. Argon plasma coagulation is effective for prevention of recurrent esophageal varices after endoscopic injection sclerotherapy: Single-center case-control study.

    PubMed

    Deguchi, Hisanobu; Kato, Jun; Maeda, Yoshimasa; Moribata, Kosaku; Shingaki, Naoki; Niwa, Toru; Inoue, Izumi; Maekita, Takao; Iguchi, Mikitaka; Tamai, Hideyuki; Ichinose, Masao

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal varices are usually treated with endoscopic injection sclerotherapy (EIS) or endoscopic band ligation (EBL). However, frequent recurrences of varices after those procedures have been problematic. Argon plasma coagulation (APC) after EIS may be effective for preventing varix recurrence and, in recent years, we have routinely carried out APC after EIS. The aim of the present study was to verify the effectiveness of APC for preventing recurrence of varices after EIS. A case-control study was carried out using a historical control cohort in a single center. The varix recurrence rate in 62 patients (34 men and 28 women, median age; 69 years) who underwent APC after EIS for hemorrhagic or risky esophageal varices (APC group) was compared with that of control patients who did not undergo APC after EIS (control group). Age-, sex-, and liver function-matched two control subjects were selected for one case subject (control group). Recurrence of varices was defined as rupture of varices or reappearance of risky varices. The 1-year and 2-year recurrence rates of the APC group were 9.7% and 11.3%, respectively. In contrast, the rates of the control group were 29.0% and 34.7%, respectively. Kaplan-Meier curves showed a significantly lower recurrence rate in the APC group (P = 0.013, log-rank test). No APC-related severe adverse events were observed. APC after EIS was safe and could significantly prevent recurrence of esophageal varices. Therefore, the addition of APC should be routinely carried out after EIS. © 2015 Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society.

  11. Early transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt in US patients hospitalized with acute esophageal variceal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Njei, Basile; McCarty, Thomas R; Laine, Loren

    2017-04-01

    Early transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) used as preventive therapy prior to recurrent bleeding has been recommended in patients presenting with acute esophageal variceal bleeding (EVB) who are at high risk of further bleeding and death. We investigated the impact of early TIPS on outcomes of US patients hospitalized with EVB from 2000 to 2010. The Nationwide Inpatient Sample database was queried to identify patients with EVB and decompensated cirrhosis (because early TIPS is recommended only in high-risk patients). The primary outcome was in-hospital death, and secondary outcomes included rebleeding and hepatic encephalopathy. Early preventive TIPS was defined by placement within 3 days of hospitalization for acute EVB after one session of endoscopic therapy. Rescue TIPS was defined as TIPS after two interventions for EVB. The study included 142 539 patients. From 2000 to 2010, the age-adjusted in-hospital mortality rate decreased 37.2% from 656 per 100 000 to 412 per 100 000 (P <0.01), while early and rescue TIPS increased (0.22% to 0.70%; P < 0.01 and 1.1% to 6.1%; P < 0.01). On multivariate analysis, as compared with no TIPS, early TIPS was associated with decreased inpatient mortality (risk ratio [RR] = 0.87; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.84-0.90) and rebleeding (RR = 0.56; 95% CI, 0.45-0.71) without an increase in hepatic encephalopathy (RR = 1.01; 95% CI, 0.93-1.11). Early preventive TIPS in patients with EVB and decompensated cirrhosis was associated with significant in-hospital reductions in rebleeding and mortality without a significant increase in encephalopathy in "real-world" US clinical practice. © 2016 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  12. Medical expenses in treating acute esophageal variceal bleeding: A 15-year nationwide population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chueh-Ling; Wu, Cheng-Kun; Shi, Hon-Yi; Tai, Wei-Chen; Liang, Chih-Ming; Yang, Shih-Cheng; Wu, Keng-Liang; Chiu, Yi-Chun; Chuah, Seng-Kee

    2016-07-01

    Acute variceal bleeding in patients with cirrhosis is related to high mortality and medical expenses. The purpose of present studies was to analyze the medical expenses in treating acute esophageal variceal bleeding among patients with cirrhosis and potential influencing clinical factors.A total of 151,863 patients with cirrhosis with International Classification of Diseases-9 codes 456.0 and 456.20 were analyzed from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database from January 1, 1996 to December 31, 2010. Time intervals were divided into three phases for analysis as T1 (1996-2000), T2 (2001-2005), and T3 (2006-2010). The endpoints were prevalence, length of hospital stay, medical expenses, and mortality rate.Our results showed that more patients were <65 years (75.6%) and of male sex (78.5%). Patients were mostly from teaching hospitals (90.8%) with high hospital volume (50.9%) and high doctor service load (51.1%). The prevalence of acute esophageal variceal bleeding and mean length of hospital stay decreased over the years (P < 0.001), but the overall medical expenses increased (P < 0.001). Multiple regression analysis showed that older age, female sex, Charlson comorbidity index (CCI) score >1, patients from teaching hospitals, and medium to high or very high patient numbers were independent factors for longer hospital stay and higher medical expenses. Aged patients, female sex, increased CCI score, and low doctor service volume were independent factors for both in-hospital and 5-year mortality. Patients from teaching hospitals and medium to high or very high service volume hospitals were independent factors for in-hospital mortality, but not 5-year mortality.Medical expenses in treating acute esophageal variceal bleeding increased despite the decreased prevalence rate and length of hospital stay in Taiwan. Aged patients, female sex, patients with increased CCI score from teaching hospitals, and medium to high or very high patient numbers were

  13. Open, randomized, comparative study of efficacy and safety between Haemopressin and Glypressin in treating acute esophageal varices hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Hu, Rey-Heng; Lee, Po-Huang

    2008-01-01

    Hemorrhage from esophageal varices is a major consequence of liver cirrhosis. Pharmacological treatment can be started immediately by an internist to arrest acute esophageal variceal hemorrhage (EVH). Terlipressin is easy to administer and effective in treating acute EVH, with or without adjuvant endoscopic sclerotherapy, and in reducing mortality in these patients. Due to these potentials, a phase IV bioequivalence study was conducted to compare a new brand of terlipressin (Haemopressin: contains 1 mg tri-glycyl-lysin-vasopressin acetate) with one that is currently available in the market (Glypressin). All cirrhotic patients with acute EVH were randomized to receive Haemopressin (n = 19) or Glypressin (n = 22) 2mg i.v. immediately followed by 1 mg. i.v. q4h for 5 days. The demographics were similar between H-group and G-group. Successful control of acute bleeding within 24 hours was no different between the 2 groups (18/19 vs. 19/22). Failure to control bleeding within 5 days of drug administration was also no different between the 2 groups (4/19 vs. 6/22). Rebleeding events, the requirement for blood transfusions and rescued treatment were also comparative between the 2 groups. Half of the patients in either group had mild, temporary and self-limited side effects. The study confirms that administration of terlipressin, by either Haemopressin or Glypressin, is generally safe and indeed highly effective in the treatment of acute EVH.

  14. [Small diameter porto-caval shunt in patients with bleeding from esophageal varices: a report of twenty cases].

    PubMed

    Orea Martínez, Juan Gerardo; Obregón García, Ana Cristina; Pérez Vergara, Ana María; Márquez Acosta, Alberto

    2005-01-01

    SDPCS (The small diameter portacaval shunt) published originally by Rypins and Sarfeh in Los Angeles in 1983 has recieved little attention in our comunity to control bleeding in patients with portal hypertention. The bleeding of esophageal varices represents the must frequent and dramatic complication caused by cirrhosis, with a 50% of mortality without treatment. Comunicate the indications, thecnique and results with the Small Diameter Portocaval shunt. Prospective trial from April 1992 to November 1998. Twenty patients with bleeding esophageal varices, 6 female, 14 male, ages 31-72 years; Alcoholic Cirrhosis 7 patients; Hepatitis B virus 4 patients, Criptogenic 4 patients, Child A; 13 patients, Child B; 5 patients and Child B-C 2 patients. Direct intraoperatory Inferior Vena Cava and portal pressures was obteined in all cases.14 grafs 10 mm and 6, 8 mm Polytetrafiuoroetehilene (PTFE) grafts were used . Follow up 6 to 68 months; Mortality 5%, morbidity 5%, rebleeding 15%, graft trhombosis 10%, encephalopathy: Mild 5%, Moderated 5%, Severe 10%. Mean surgical time 4.28 h. Mean blood transfussion 1.4 units of red blood cells. The venous pressure pre and post grafting decreased significantly p < 0.01. SDPCS is a easy to apply procedure and results are addecuate; it requires an specialized preoperatory ultrasound. The descensus in portal pressure after grafting and graf permeability was corroborated.

  15. Rates of recurrent variceal bleeding are low with modern esophageal banding strategies: a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Branch-Elliman, Westyn; Perumalswami, Ponni; Factor, Stephanie H; Sled, Sarah M; Flamm, Steven L

    2015-01-01

    Variceal bleeding has a high rate of mortality and recurrence. Endoscopic band ligation (EBL) is the established standard of care for secondary prevention of variceal bleeding. To determine the long-term re-bleeding rate of an EBL protocol similar to current society guidelines. We conducted a retrospective cohort study at a tertiary care center of all patients with a history of a variceal bleed who underwent an aggressive band ligation protocol. At the time of sentinel bleed, all varices, regardless of size, were ligated. EBL was then repeated every 2 weeks until stabilization, and all visible varices were ligated. The interval between banding sessions then increased. The incidence of re-bleeding was calculated as the time between clinical stabilization after the sentinel event until data censoring, which occurred at time of re-bleed, death, transplant or loss-to-follow up. Gastric variceal bleeding was a secondary endpoint. N = 176 patients were treated with aggressive EBL, and followed for a median of 16 months (range, 3 months - 6.9 years). The 6 month incidence of re-bleeding was 2.3%, the 12 month incidence was 3.4%, and the 2 year incidence was 4.6%. Overall, aggressive EBL was well-tolerated. One patient died during follow-up secondary to a gastric variceal bleed. Aggressive EBL yields a low rate of re-bleeding when compared to standard practice. Secondary prophylaxis with aggressive EBL should be a consideration for patients following a sentinel bleeding event.

  16. [Safety and clinical efficacy of TIPS with various stents for treatment of cirrhosis with esophageal gastric varices bleeding].

    PubMed

    Cai, Wei; Zhuge, Yuzheng; Zhang, Jianwu; Li, Zhenlei; He, Qibin; Zhang, Ming; Ni, Jingbin; Li, Yujiang; Ma, Qianyun; Peng, Chunyan

    2015-04-01

    To assess the safety and clinical efficacy of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) with various stents for treating patients with cirrhosis and esophageal gastric varices bleeding. One hundred and five patients were stratified according to stent type: bare stent group, covered stent-grafts group, combined stents group. Rates of success, shunt insufficiency, rebleeding, patient survival, and major complications were observed. The shunt insufficiency rate, rebleeding rate, and survival rate were calculated by the life tables method, the Kaplan-Meier analytical curve, and the log-rank test; a p-value less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. The overall success rate of all TIPS for treating the esophageal gastric varices bleeding was 100%. The overall shunt insufficiency rates at 6-, 12-and 24-months post-TIPS were 8%, 9% and 16%, rebleeding rates were 2%, 6% and 17%, and survival rates were 100%, 97% and 94%. The shunt insufficiency rate was 26% in the bare stent group, 14% in the covered stent-grafis group, and 5% in the combined stents group (x2=1.00, P=0.61). The rebleeding rate was 33% in the bare stent group, 7% in the covered stent-grafts group, and 3%in the combined stents group (x2=1.69, P=0.43). The survival rate was 92% in the bare stent group, 93% in the covered stent-grafts group, and 100% in the combined stents group (x2=1.91, P=0.39). The shunt insufficiency rates were higher in patients with splenectomy than in those without splenectomy (30% vs.14%; x2=4.15, P=0.04). The intraperitoneal hemorrhage rates in the covered stent-grafis group and the combined stents group were significantly lower than that in the bare stent group (0% vs 0% vs 13%; x2=8.88, P=0.01). TIPS with an 8 mm stent effectively treated and prevented esophageal gastric varices bleeding in patients with cirrhosis. Intraperitoneal hemorrhaging caused by TIPS was significantly decreased in the covered stent-grafts group and combined stents group

  17. New insight into the role of NT-proBNP in alcoholic liver cirrhosis as a noninvasive marker of esophageal varices

    PubMed Central

    Ljubičić, Neven; Gomerčić, Marija; Zekanović, Dražen; Bodrožić-, Tomislava; Džakić; Đuzel, Ana

    2012-01-01

    Aim To investigate the association between plasma concentrations of N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and formation of esophageal varices. Methods Thirty-five patients with alcoholic cirrhosis were divided into three groups according to the Child-Pugh classification: grade A (n = 11, 32%), B (n = 12, 34%), and C (n = 12, 34%). System hemodynamic parameters were measured using sphygmomanometry, electrocardiography, and echocardiography. NT-proBNP was analyzed by using an electrochemiluminiscence sandwich immunoassay. Results The presence of esophageal varices was associated with a higher serum NT-proBNP level, with a cut-off value of >101 pg/mL (sensitivity, 87.60% and specificity, 72.73%; P < 0.001). Conclusions NT-proBNP was found to be a marker of the presence of esophageal varices, but not a marker of progression of liver cirrhosis. In cirrhotic patients, NT-proBNP value >101 pg/mL was shown to be a valuable noninvasive parameter in predicting the presence of varices. PMID:22911531

  18. Endoscopic sclerotherapy compared with no specific treatment for the primary prevention of bleeding from esophageal varices. A randomized controlled multicentre trial [ISRCTN03215899].

    PubMed

    van Buuren, Henk R; Rasch, Marijke C; Batenburg, Piet L; Bolwerk, Clemens J M; Nicolai, Jan J; van der Werf, Sjoerd D J; Scherpenisse, Joost; Arends, Lidia R; van Hattum, Jan; Rauws, Erik A J; Schalm, Solko W

    2003-08-15

    Since esophageal variceal bleeding is associated with a high mortality rate, prevention of bleeding might be expected to result in improved survival. The first trials to evaluate prophylactic sclerotherapy found a marked beneficial effect of prophylactic treatment. These results, however, were not generally accepted because of methodological aspects and because the reported incidence of bleeding in control subjects was considered unusually high. The objective of this study was to compare endoscopic sclerotherapy (ES) with nonactive treatment for the primary prophylaxis of esophageal variceal bleeding in patients with cirrhosis. 166 patients with esophageal varices grade II, III of IV according to Paquet's classification, with evidence of active or progressive liver disease and without prior variceal bleeding, were randomized to groups receiving ES (n = 84) or no specific treatment (n = 82). Primary end-points were incidence of bleeding and mortality; secondary end-points were complications and costs. During a mean follow-up of 32 months variceal bleeding occurred in 25% of the patients of the ES group and in 28% of the control group. The incidence of variceal bleeding for the ES and control group was 16% and 16% at 1 year and 33% and 29% at 3 years, respectively. The 1-year survival rate was 87% for the ES group and 84% for the control group; the 3-year survival rate was 62% for each group. In the ES group one death occurred as a direct consequence of variceal bleeding compared to 9 in the other group (p = 0.01, log-rank test). Complications were comparable for the two groups. Health care costs for patients assigned to ES were estimated to be higher. Meta-analysis of a large number of trials showed that the effect of prophylactic sclerotherapy is significantly related to the baseline bleeding risk. In the present trial, prophylactic sclerotherapy did not reduce the incidence of bleeding from varices in patients with liver cirrhosis and a low to moderate bleeding

  19. Advanced Cirrhosis Combined with Portal Vein Thrombosis: A Randomized Trial of TIPS versus Endoscopic Band Ligation Plus Propranolol for the Prevention of Recurrent Esophageal Variceal Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xuefeng; Wang, Zhu; Tsauo, Jiaywei; Zhou, Biao; Zhang, Hailong; Li, Xiao

    2015-07-01

    To compare transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) placement with or without variceal embolization with endoscopic band ligation (EBL) plus propranolol in preventing recurrent esophageal variceal bleeding in patients with advanced cirrhosis and portal vein thrombosis. The present randomized controlled trial was approved by the ethics committee board of West China Hospital. Written informed consent was obtained from each patient. Between January 2010 and December 2012, 73 patients were randomly allocated to receive TIPS (n = 37) or EBL plus propranolol (n = 36). The comparisons of recurrent variceal bleeding, hepatic encephalopathy, and survival rates were based on the Kaplan-Meier method and were compared using the log-rank test. The mean follow-up time was 22.8 months ± 7.7(standard deviation) in the TIPS group and 20.9 months ± 8.9 in the EBL group. The 2-year probability of remaining free of recurrent variceal bleeding was higher in the TIPS group (77.8%) than in the EBL group (42.9%) (P = .002). Overall recanalization was achieved in 24 (64.9%) patients from the TIPS group and seven (19.4%) patients from the EBL group. The hepatic encephalopathy rates exhibited no significant differences between the two groups (P = .53). The 1- and 2-year probability of survival was 86.5% and 72.9%, respectively, in the TIPS group and 83.3% and 57.2%, respectively, in the EBL group, with no significant difference (P = .23). TIPS was more effective than EBL plus propranolol in preventing recurrent esophageal variceal bleeding in patients with advanced cirrhosis and portal vein thrombosis and did not increase the incidence of hepatic encephalopathy. Survival was similar in both groups.

  20. Early TIPS versus endoscopic therapy for secondary prophylaxis after management of acute esophageal variceal bleeding in cirrhotic patients: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Halabi, Shadi Al; Sawas, Tarek; Sadat, Besher; Jandali, Aiyah; Halabi, Hadi Al; Halabi, Fadi Al; Kapoor, Baljendra; Carey, William D

    2016-09-01

    American College of Gastroenterology and American Association for the Study of Liver Disease guidelines recommend endoscopic and pharmacologic treatment for esophageal variceal bleed. Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) placement is reserved for cases of therapeutic failure. Several studies have suggested improved prevention of rebleeding and improved survival without excess hepatic encephalopathy in patients who receive TIPS within the first 5 days after bleeding (early TIPS). In this meta-analysis, we evaluated the safety and efficacy of early TIPS versus endoscopic therapy for secondary prophylaxis after acute esophageal variceal bleeding in cirrhotic patients. Pubmed, Medline, Embase, ClinicalTrials.gov, and ISI Web of Science were searched for randomized controlled trials that compared early TIPS to endoscopic therapy. The primary outcome was mortality at 1 year; secondary outcomes were rebleeding and hepatic encephalopathy at 1 year. Nine randomized controlled trials involving 608 cirrhotic patients were identified. Early TIPS was associated with a significant risk reduction in 1-year mortality (RR, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.49-0.96; P = 0.03) and 1-year incidence of variceal rebleeding (RR, 0.28; 95% CI, 0.20-0.40; P < 0.001) without significant heterogeneity among studies (I(2)  = 30% and 47%, respectively). No significant difference in the incidence of hepatic encephalopathy at 1 year was observed (RR, 1.36; 95% CI, 0.72-2.56; P = 0.34); however, there was significant heterogeneity among studies (I(2)  = 68%). TIPS placed within 5 days after a major esophageal variceal hemorrhage is superior to endoscopic treatment in reducing subsequent bleeding. Early TIPS placement is also associated with superior 1-year survival without significantly increasing the incidence of hepatic encephalopathy. © 2016 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  1. Esophagojejunal Anastomosis Fistula, Distal Esophageal Stenosis, and Metalic Stent Migration after Total Gastrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Al Hajjar, Nadim; Popa, Calin; Al-Momani, Tareg; Margarit, Simona; Graur, Florin; Tantau, Marcel

    2015-01-01

    Esophagojejunal anastomosis fistula is the main complication after a total gastrectomy. To avoid a complex procedure on friable inflamed perianastomotic tissues, a coated self-expandable stent is mounted at the site of the anastomotic leak. A complication of stenting procedure is that it might lead to distal esophageal stenosis. However, another frequently encountered complication of stenting is stent migration, which is treated nonsurgically. When the migrated stent creates life threatening complications, surgical removal is indicated. We present a case of a 67-year-old male patient who was treated at our facility for a gastric adenocarcinoma which developed, postoperatively, an esophagojejunostomy fistula, a distal esophageal stenosis, and a metallic coated self-expandable stent migration. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of an esophagojejunostomy fistula combined with a distal esophageal stenosis as well as with a metallic coated self-expandable stent migration. PMID:25945277

  2. Esophagojejunal anastomosis fistula, distal esophageal stenosis, and metalic stent migration after total gastrectomy.

    PubMed

    Al Hajjar, Nadim; Popa, Calin; Al-Momani, Tareg; Margarit, Simona; Graur, Florin; Tantau, Marcel

    2015-01-01

    Esophagojejunal anastomosis fistula is the main complication after a total gastrectomy. To avoid a complex procedure on friable inflamed perianastomotic tissues, a coated self-expandable stent is mounted at the site of the anastomotic leak. A complication of stenting procedure is that it might lead to distal esophageal stenosis. However, another frequently encountered complication of stenting is stent migration, which is treated nonsurgically. When the migrated stent creates life threatening complications, surgical removal is indicated. We present a case of a 67-year-old male patient who was treated at our facility for a gastric adenocarcinoma which developed, postoperatively, an esophagojejunostomy fistula, a distal esophageal stenosis, and a metallic coated self-expandable stent migration. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of an esophagojejunostomy fistula combined with a distal esophageal stenosis as well as with a metallic coated self-expandable stent migration.

  3. [Frequency and mortality by rebleeding in cirrhotic patients treated for bleeding esophagic varices in two hospitals in Lima Peru during years 2009 to 2011].

    PubMed

    Pichilingue Reto, Catherina; Queirolo Rodriguez, Fiorella Sabrinna; Ruiz Llenque, José Jonathan; Bravo Paredes, Eduar; Guzmán Rojas, Patricia; Gallegos López, Roxana; Corzo Maldonado, Manuel Alejandro; Valdivia Roldán, Mario

    2013-01-01

    During the first 6 weeks after a variceal hemorrhage there is a 30-40% of probability of recurrence and those who rebleed 20- 30% die. Passed this period, the risk of rebleeding is of 60% and reaches a mortality of 60-70% in two years without treatment. Describe the frequency of rebleeding and mortality due to rebleeding in cirrhotic patients treated for variceal hemorrhage at Endoscopic Centers of Hospital Nacional Cayetano Heredia, Lima, Peru and Hospital Nacional Arzobispo Loayza, Lima, Peru during the years 2009-2011. The study type is a transversal, periodic and retrospective one in which were included 176 cirrhotic patients older than 14 years who have bleed for esophageal varices and that have received endoscopic therapy. The instruments used were a data sheet with all the information obtained from the clinical chart of each patient, the CHILD score to assess severity of hepatic disease, endoscopic informs and phone calls. The frequency of rebleeding before 6 weeks was 32.20% (56 patients). Also, the frequency of rebleeding after that time was 22.56% (37 patients). There was a mortality rate of 5.70% (10 patients) and a mortality rate due to rebleeding of 13.33% (6 patients). Variceal hemorrhage is an important cause of mobimortality in peruvian people. The frequency of rebleeding and mortality due to rebleeding resulted slightly lower than in other countries.

  4. Left-sided thoracoscopy in the prone position for surgery of distal esophageal benign pathologies

    PubMed Central

    Issaka, Adamu; Kara, Hasan Volkan; Eldem, Barkin

    2014-01-01

    Exposure of the distal esophagus can be achieved by a wide variety of surgical approaches. The standard procedure is mostly by laparoscopy. In cases where laparoscopy is relatively contraindicated, thoracoscopy is preferred. In this case, exposure of the distal esophagus from the aorta, heart and lung is technically challenging using thoracoscopy in the right lateral decubitus position. Surgery in the prone position for esophageal cancer has been successfully described in previous literature. We present our experience with left-sided thoracoscopy in the prone position in three patients with benign distal esophageal pathologies. This approach provided a much better exposure of the distal esophagus and enabled a successful surgery to be done in all patients with less manipulation of the lung. PMID:27489640

  5. [Usefulness of branched-chain amino acid (BCAA)-enriched nutrient mixture for nutritional treatment undergoing endoscopic treatment for esophageal varices].

    PubMed

    Shibata, Naozumi; Matsui, Hidetaka; Takeshita, Eiji; Yokota, Tomoyuki; Higaki, Naoyuki; Murakami, Hidehiro; Ikeda, Yoshiou; Minami, Hisaka; Matsuura, Bunzo; Onji, Morikazu

    2005-07-01

    We investigated the alteration of nutritional status in 144 patients who were treated for the first time with endoscopic sclerotherapy or endoscopic variceal ligation during their therapies. The serum levels of albumin, cholinesterase and total cholesterol were compared before and after treatment. The serum level of cholinesterase declined significantly. To investigate the impact of aging on the changes of nutritional status we divided all patients into two groups: (1) under 65 years, and (2) over 65 years. The decline of serum albumin of elderly patients (n=65) was significantly greater than that of younger patients (n=79). A branched-chain amino acid (BCAA)-enriched nutrient mixture for nutritional treatment significantly suppressed the decline of serum albumin in elderly patients. Nutritional treatment with a BCAA-enriched nutrient mixture should be considered during endoscopic therapy for esophageal varices, especially in elderly patients.

  6. Thoracoscopic repair of esophageal atresia with a distal fistula – lessons from the first 10 operations

    PubMed Central

    Zaborowska, Kamila; Rogowski, Błażej; Kalińska, Anita; Nosek, Marzena; Golonka, Anna; Lesiuk, Witold; Obel, Marcin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Thoracoscopic esophageal atresia (EA) repair was first performed in 1999, but still the technique is treated as one of the most complex pediatric surgical procedures. Aim The study presents a single-center experience and learning curve of thoracoscopic repair of esophageal atresia and tracheo-esophageal (distal) fistula. Material and methods From 2012 to 2014, 10 consecutive patients with esophageal atresia and tracheo-esophageal fistula were treated thoracoscopically in our center. There were 8 girls and 2 boys. Mean gestational age was 36.5 weeks and mean weight was 2230 g. Four children had associated anomalies. The surgery was performed after stabilization of the patient between the first and fourth day after birth. Five patients required intubation before surgery for respiratory distress. Bronchoscopy was not performed before the operation. Results In 8 patients, the endoscopic approach was successfully used thoracoscopically, while in 2 patients conversion to an open thoracotomy was necessary. In all patients except 1, the anastomosis was patent, with no evidence of leak. One patient demonstrated a leak, which did not resolve spontaneously, necessitating surgical repair. In long-term follow-up, 1 patient required esophageal dilatation of the anastomosis. All patients are on full oral feeding. Conclusions The endoscopic approach is the method of choice for the treatment of esophageal atresia in our center because of excellent visualization and precise atraumatic preparation even in neonates below a weight of 2000 g. PMID:25960794

  7. Results of treatment of esophageal variceal hemorrhage with endoscopic injection of n-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate in patients with Child-Pugh class C cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Joao Paulo; Matuguma, Sérgio Eiji; Cheng, Spencer; Herman, Paulo; Sakai, Paulo; D'Albuquerque, Luiz Augusto Carneiro; Maluf-Filho, Fauze

    2015-01-01

    Background and study aims: The results of endoscopic treatment with elastic band ligation for esophageal variceal bleeding in patients with Child-Pugh class C cirrhosis remain poor. In comparison with treatment with elastic band ligation, we have found lower rates of rebleeding and mortality with n-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate injections. Thus, the aim of the current study was to describe our unit’s 10 years of experience with injection of n-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate to control esophageal variceal ruptures in patients with Child-Pugh class C cirrhosis. Patients and methods: A single-center, retrospective study was conducted. Sixty-three patients with Child-Pugh class C cirrhosis had been admitted to the center with an acute episode of esophageal variceal bleeding. All were treated with injection of n-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate. The patients were assigned to 1 of 2 groups according to their Child-Pugh class C cirrhosis scores: group I (score range, 10 through 13 points) and group II (score, 14 or 15 points). The 3 variables studied were rates of initial failure to control bleeding, failure to prevent rebleeding (secondary prophylaxis), and mortality. Patients in the 2 groups (group I, n = 50; group II, n = 13) had similar characteristics. Results: Bleeding was successfully controlled in almost 75 % of the patients during the first 5 days after treatment, with no significant differences observed between groups I and II. There were no significant differences between the 2 groups with respect to mortality rate for the first 5 days after treatment. Thirty-four patients (54 %) were free of bleeding at 6 weeks after treatment, with a significant difference noted between the groups: group I, 64 %, versus group II, 15.4 % (P < 0.001). The overall mortality rate was 44.4 %, with a significant difference noted between the groups: group I, 34 %, versus group II, 84.6 % (P < 0.001). Conclusion: Endoscopic injection of n-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate is a valid treatment

  8. Spleen Stiffness Is Superior to Liver Stiffness for Predicting Esophageal Varices in Chronic Liver Disease: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiaowen; Wang, Le; Wu, Hao; Feng, Yuemin; Han, Xibiao; Bu, Haoran; Zhu, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Liver stiffness (LS) and spleen stiffness (SS) are two most widely accessible non-invasive parameters for predicting esophageal varices (EV), but the reported accuracy of the two predictors have been inconsistent across studies. This meta-analysis aims to evaluate the diagnostic performance of LS and SS measurement for detecting EV in patients with chronic liver disease (CLD), and compare their accuracy. Methods Pubmed/Medline, Embase, Cochrane Library and Ovid were searched for all studies assessing SS and LS simultaneously in EV diagnosis. A total of 16 studies including 1892 patients were included in this meta-analysis, and the pooled statistical parameters were calculated using the bivariate mixed effects models. Results In detection of any EV, for LS measurement, the summary sensitivity was 0.83 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.78–0.87), and the specificity was 0.66 (95% CI: 0.60–0.72). While for SS measurement, the pooled sensitivity and specificity was 0.88 (95% CI: 0.83–0.92) and 0.78 (95% CI: 0.73–0.83). The summary receiver operating characteristic (SROC) curve values of LS and SS were 0.81 (95% CI: 0.77–0.84) and 0.88 (95% CI: 0.85–0.91) respectively, and the results had statistical significance (P<0.01). The diagnostic odds ratio (DOR) of SS (25.73) was significantly higher than that of LS (9.54), with the relative DOR value was 2.48 (95%CI: 1.10–5.60), P<0.05. Conclusions Under current techniques, SS is significantly superior to LS for identifying the presence of EV in patients with CLD. SS measurement may help to select patients for endoscopic screening. PMID:27829057

  9. Emergency portacaval shunt versus rescue portacaval shunt in a randomized controlled trial of emergency treatment of acutely bleeding esophageal varices in cirrhosis--part 3.

    PubMed

    Orloff, Marshall J; Isenberg, Jon I; Wheeler, Henry O; Haynes, Kevin S; Jinich-Brook, Horacio; Rapier, Roderick; Vaida, Florin; Hye, Robert J

    2010-11-01

    Emergency treatment of bleeding esophageal varices in cirrhosis is of singular importance because of the high mortality rate. Emergency portacaval shunt is rarely used today because of the belief, unsubstantiated by long-term randomized trials, that it causes frequent portal-systemic encephalopathy and liver failure. Consequently, portacaval shunt has been relegated solely to salvage therapy when endoscopic and pharmacologic therapies have failed. Is the regimen of endoscopic sclerotherapy with rescue portacaval shunt for failure to control bleeding varices superior to emergency portacaval shunt? A unique opportunity to answer this question was provided by a randomized controlled trial of endoscopic sclerotherapy versus emergency portacaval shunt conducted from 1988 to 2005. Unselected consecutive cirrhotic patients with acute bleeding esophageal varices were randomized to endoscopic sclerotherapy (n = 106) or emergency portacaval shunt (n = 105). Diagnostic workup was completed and treatment was initiated within 8 h. Failure of endoscopic sclerotherapy was defined by strict criteria and treated by rescue portacaval shunt (n = 50) whenever possible. Ninety-six percent of patients had more than 10 years of follow-up or until death. Comparison of emergency portacaval shunt and endoscopic sclerotherapy followed by rescue portacaval shunt showed the following differences in measurements of outcomes: (1) survival after 5 years (72% versus 22%), 10 years (46% versus 16%), and 15 years (46% versus 0%); (2) median post-shunt survival (6.18 versus 1.99 years); (3) mean requirements of packed red blood cell units (17.85 versus 27.80); (4) incidence of recurrent portal-systemic encephalopathy (15% versus 43%); (5) 5-year change in Child's class showing improvement (59% versus 19%) or worsening (8% versus 44%); (6) mean quality of life points in which lower is better (13.89 versus 27.89); and (7) mean cost of care per year ($39,200 versus $216,700). These differences were

  10. NON-INVASIVE PREDICTORS FOR THE PRESENCE, GRADE AND RISK OF BLEEDING FROM ESOPHAGEAL VARICES IN PATIENTS WITH POST-HEPATITIC CIRRHOSIS.

    PubMed

    El Ray, Ahmed; Azab, Mohamed Mohamed; El-Aziz, Ibrahim Mohamed Abd; El-Aleem, Ahmed Abd; El-Talkawy, Mohamed Darwish; El-Badea, Mohamed Abd El-Hameed Abd; El Ansary, Mahmoud; Safeem, Abdelaziz Ali; Diab, Tarek Mahmoud

    2015-08-01

    Variceal bleeding is the last step of a chain of events initiatedby an increase in portal pressure, followed by the development and progressive dilation ofvarices until these finally rupture and bleed. The ideal method to diagnose portal hypertension should be accurate, noninvasive, objective, and reproducible. The study evaluated the predictive value of two non-invasive parameters for the diagnosis of esophageal varices (EV): 1-Right liver lobe diameter/serum albumin ratios (RLLD/S. albumin), and 2-Platelet count/splenic bipolar diameter ratios (Platelets count/SBPD). This study included eighty Egyptian patients with post-hepatitic cirrhosis (45 males and 35 females). They underwent laboratory ultrasono-graphic and endoscopic examinations within one week. RLLD/S. albumin and Platelets count/SBPD ratios were calculated. The results showed that EV were not detected by upper digestive endoscopy in 25%, while grade I of EV was found in 17.5%, grade II in 17.5%, grade III in 20%, & grade IV in 20%. RLLD/S. albumin concentration ratio diagnosed the varices at cut off value of 3.43 with 95% sensitivity and 80% specificity. Also, it was positively correlated with grading of E.V, when this ratio increased the grading of E.V increases and vice versa. Besides, it predicted bleeding from E.V. at cut off value of 5.096 with 63% sensitivity and 73% specificity. Platelet count/SBPD ratio predicted the presence of varices at cut off value 1847 with 95% sensitivity and 93% specificity, and negatively correlated with grading of EV, when this ratio decreased grading of E.V increase and vice versa. It also predicted bleeding from E.V. at cut off value of 4809 with 50% sensitivity and 93% specificity.

  11. "Downhill" Esophageal Varices due to Dialysis Catheter-Induced Superior Vena Caval Occlusion: A Rare Cause of Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Nayudu, Suresh Kumar; Dev, Anil; Kanneganti, Kalyan

    2013-01-01

    "Downhill" varices are a rare cause of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Rarely these varices are reported in patients receiving hemodialysis as a complication of chronic dialysis vascular access. We present a case of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding in an individual with end-stage renal disease receiving hemodialysis. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed "downhill" varices in the upper third of the esophagus without any active bleeding at the time of the procedure. An angiogram was performed disclosing superior vena caval occlusion, which was treated with balloon angioplasty. Gastroenterologists should have a high index of suspicion for these rare "downhill" varices when dealing with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients receiving hemodialysis and manage it appropriately using endoscopic, radiological, and surgical interventions.

  12. Isolated non-hemorrhagic cecal varices.

    PubMed

    Haddad, James D; Lacey, Brent W

    2014-11-01

    Ectopic varices (those outside of the gastro-esophageal region) are occasionally found on endoscopy in patients with portal hypertension; however they account for a small minority of all variceal bleeds. Cases of isolated cecal varices are quite rare and, when described, often present with acute hemorrhage or evidence of occult bleeding. We present the case of a 29-year-old male with a history of idiopathic portal vein thrombosis and known esophageal varices, who presented for evaluation of abdominal pain. Cecal varices were found on endoscopy, without evidence of bleeding and without varices in the remainder of the colon or rectum. Endoscopic ultrasound and computed tomography were useful in confirming the diagnosis and natural history of these unusual varices. Published by Oxford University Press and the Digestive Science Publishing Co. Limited 2014. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  13. Distinct afferent innervation patterns within the human proximal and distal esophageal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Woodland, Philip; Aktar, Rubina; Mthunzi, Engelbert; Lee, Chung; Peiris, Madusha; Preston, Sean L; Blackshaw, L Ashley; Sifrim, Daniel

    2015-03-15

    Little is known about the mucosal phenotype of the proximal human esophagus. There is evidence to suggest that the proximal esophagus is more sensitive to chemical and mechanical stimulation compared with the distal. This may have physiological relevance (e.g., in prevention of aspiration of gastroesophageal refluxate), but also pathological relevance (e.g., in reflux perception or dysphagia). Reasons for this increased sensitivity are unclear but may include impairment in mucosal barrier integrity or changes in sensory innervation. We assessed mucosal barrier integrity and afferent nerve distribution in the proximal and distal esophagus of healthy human volunteers. In 10 healthy volunteers baseline proximal and distal esophageal impedance was measured in vivo. Esophageal mucosal biopsies from the distal and proximal esophagus were taken, and baseline transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) was measured in Ussing chambers. Biopsies were examined immunohistochemically for presence and location of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-immunoreactive nerve fibers. In a further four healthy volunteers we investigated for colocalization of CGRP and protein gene product (PGP) 9.5 immunoreactivity in nerve fibers. Baseline impedance was higher in the proximal than in the distal esophagus [2,936 Ω (SD578) vs. 2,229 Ω (SD821); P = 0.03], however, baseline TER was not significantly different between them. Mucosal CGRP-immunoreactive nerves were found in the epithelium of both proximal and distal esophagus, but were located more superficially in the proximal mucosa compared with the distal [11.5 (SD7) vs. 21.7 (SD5) cell layers from lumen, P = 0.002] 19% of proximal, and 10% of distal mucosal PGP-immunoreactive fibers colocalized with CGRP. PGP-immunoreactive fibers were also significantly closer to the luminal surface in the proximal compared with the distal esophagus (P < 0.001). We conclude that mucosal barrier integrity is similar in proximal and distal esophagus

  14. Diagnostic Accuracy of APRI, AAR, FIB-4, FI, and King Scores for Diagnosis of Esophageal Varices in Liver Cirrhosis: A Retrospective Study.

    PubMed

    Deng, Han; Qi, Xingshun; Peng, Ying; Li, Jing; Li, Hongyu; Zhang, Yongguo; Liu, Xu; Sun, Xiaolin; Guo, Xiaozhong

    2015-12-20

    BACKGROUND Aspartate aminotransferase-to-platelet ratio index (APRI), aspartate aminotransferase-to-alanine aminotransferase ratio (AAR), FIB-4, fibrosis index (FI), and King scores might be alternatives to the use of upper gastrointestinal endoscopy for the diagnosis of esophageal varices (EVs) in liver cirrhosis. This study aimed to evaluate their diagnostic accuracy in predicting the presence and severity of EVs in liver cirrhosis. MATERIAL AND METHODS All patients who were consecutively admitted to our hospital and underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy between January 2012 and June 2014 were eligible for this retrospective study. Areas under curve (AUCs) were calculated. Subgroup analyses were performed according to the history of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) and splenectomy. RESULTS A total of 650 patients with liver cirrhosis were included, and 81.4% of them had moderate-severe EVs. In the overall analysis, the AUCs of these non-invasive scores for predicting moderate-severe EVs and presence of any EVs were 0.506-0.6 and 0.539-0.612, respectively. In the subgroup analysis of patients without UGIB, their AUCs for predicting moderate-severe varices and presence of any EVs were 0.601-0.664 and 0.596-0.662, respectively. In the subgroup analysis of patients without UGIB or splenectomy, their AUCs for predicting moderate-severe varices and presence of any EVs were 0.627-0.69 and 0.607-0.692, respectively. CONCLUSIONS APRI, AAR, FIB-4, FI, and King scores had modest diagnostic accuracy of EVs in liver cirrhosis. They might not be able to replace the utility of upper gastrointestinal endoscopy for the diagnosis of EVs in liver cirrhosis.

  15. The long-term benefits of nucleos(t)ide analogs in compensated HBV cirrhotic patients with no or small esophageal varices: A 12-year prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Lampertico, Pietro; Invernizzi, Federica; Viganò, Mauro; Loglio, Alessandro; Mangia, Giampaolo; Facchetti, Floriana; Primignani, Massimo; Jovani, Manol; Iavarone, Massimo; Fraquelli, Mirella; Casazza, Giovanni; de Franchis, Roberto; Colombo, Massimo

    2015-11-01

    Esophageal varices (EV) are a marker of disease severity in compensated cirrhosis due to hepatitis B virus (HBV) which predicts also the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), clinical decompensation and anticipated liver related death. The dynamics and prognostic significance of EV in patients under long-term HBV suppression by nucleos(t)ide analogs (NUC), are poorly known. A standardized protocol (Baveno) including 414 upper gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopies was applied to 107 HBeAg-negative compensated cirrhotic patients (93% Child-Pugh A) during a median of 12 (range 2 to 17) years of NUC therapy. Patients who initially started on lamivudine (LMV) and then developed resistance (LMV-R), were rescued by early administration of adefovir, or were switched to tenofovir. Surveillance included serum HBV DNA every three months and abdominal ultrasound every six months. Twenty-seven patients had baseline F1 EV which regressed in 18, remained unchanged in eight and progressed in one patient; the 12-year cumulative incidence of EV regression was 83% (95% CI: 52-92%). De novo F1/F2 EV developed in 6/80 patients with a 12-year cumulative incidence of 10% (95% CI: 5-20%). Six of seven patients with de novo varices or progression of pre-existing varices had either a clinical breakthrough due to LMV-R and/or developed a HCC. No bleedings from ruptured EV occurred, 12 patients died (9 HCC) and 15 were transplanted (13 HCC): the 12-year cumulative incidence of HCC and overall survival was 33% (95% CI: 24-42%) and 76% (95% CI: 67-83%), respectively. Long-term pharmacological suppression of HBV in HBeAg-seronegative patients with compensated cirrhosis leads to a significant regression of pre-existing EV accompanied by a negligible risk of developing de novo EV. Copyright © 2015 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Thoracoscopic treatment of esophageal atresia with distal fistula and of tracheomalacia.

    PubMed

    van der Zee, David C; Bax, Klaas N M A

    2007-11-01

    Single center experience with thoracoscopic repair of esophageal atresia with distal fistula and of tracheomalacia. Between May 2000 and December 2006, 51 neonates with an esophageal atresia were presented for thoracoscopic repair. Gestational age varied from 31 3/7 to 42 2/7 weeks (M = 37 2/7). Birth weight was between 1025 g and 4030 g (mean 2620 g). Concomitant anomalies or VACTERL association were encoutered in 31 patients (61%). Duration of the operation was from 90 minutes to 390 minutes (mean 178 minutes). All but 1 patient had an esophageal atresia with a distal fistula. Six patients had tracheomalacia requiring aortopexia, which was performed thoracoscopically. In 2 patients the thoracoscopic procedure had to be converted to a thoracotomy. All other patients underwent a successful thoracoscopic repair. One patient died in the postoperative period because of sepsis. A total of 22 patients (45%) developed a stenosis in the postoperative follow up (1 month-7y 7 month) requiring 1 to 18 dilatations (mean 1.5). Postoperative leakage occurred in 9 patients (18%). Recurrent fistula was encountered in 2 patients. A total of 11 patients (22%) underwent a laparoscopic antireflux procedure for either recurring stenosis (8) or ALTES (3). Six children (12%) underwent thoracoscopic aortopexy for tracheomalacia. In 2 children symptoms recurred for which a successful repeat thoracoscopic aortopexy was undertaken. The thoracoscopic approach to the treatment of esophageal atresia and tracheomalacia is becoming increasingly accepted. The cosmesis is undoubtedly better. The secundary effects like thoracic cage deformities, winged scapula, or scoliosis have not yet been described and are expected to be reduced in comparison to the open technique. Sequelae like leakage, stenosis, recurrent fistulae, and GERD and ALTES will probably remain the same. Whether thoracoscopic dissection has less detrimental effect on disturbed motility remains to be proven. Thoracoscopic aortopexy

  17. Endoscopic management of esophagogastric varices in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Ichikawa, Tatsuki; Taura, Naota; Miuma, Satoshi; Isomoto, Hajime; Nakao, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-01

    Esophagogastric varices are the most common complication in patients with portal hypertension, and endoscopy plays an important role in their diagnosis and in the prevention of acute bleeding from these structures. Recently, new modalities such as endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) and narrow-band imaging have been introduced for the diagnosis of esophagogastric varices. In Japan, endoscopic therapy has become the first choice for the treatment of acutely bleeding esophageal or gastric varices. The two principal methods used to treat esophageal varices are endoscopic injection sclerotherapy (EIS) and endoscopic variceal ligation (EVL). Recently, combinations of EIS plus EVL and EVL plus argon plasma coagulation were reported to be more effective than EVL or EIS alone. Additionally, endoscopic cyanoacrylate injection is superior to EIS and EVL for the treatment of acutely bleeding gastric varices. PMID:25333017

  18. Endovascular management of gastric varices.

    PubMed

    Saad, Wael E

    2014-11-01

    Bleeding from gastric varices is a major complication of portal hypertension. Although less common than bleeding associated with esophageal varices, gastric variceal bleeding has a higher mortality. From an endovascular perspective,transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunts (TIPS) to decompress the portal circulation and/or balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration (BRTO) are utilized to address bleeding gastric varices. Until recently, there was a clear medical cultural divide between the strategy of decompressing the portal circulation (TIPS creation, for example) and transvenous obliteration for the management of gastric varices. However, the practice of BRTO is gaining acceptance in the United States and its practice is spreading rapidly. Recently, the American College of Radiology has identified BRTO to be a viable alternative to TIPS in particular anatomical and clinical scenarios. However, the anatomical and clinical applications of BRTO were not defined beyond the conservative approach of resorting to BRTO in non-TIPS candidates. The article discusses the outcomes of BRTO and TIPS for the management of gastric varices individually or in combination. Definitions, endovascular technical concepts and contemporary vascular classifications of gastric variceal systems are described in order to help grasp the complexity of the hemodynamic pathology and hopefully help define the pathology better for future reporting and lay the ground for more defined stratification of patients not only based on comorbidity and hepatic reserve but on anatomy and hemodynamic classifications.

  19. Comparison between endoscopic sclerotherapy and band ligation for hemostasis of acute variceal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Luz, Gustavo Oliveira; Maluf-Filho, Fauze; Matuguma, Sérgio Eiji; Hondo, Fábio Yuji; Ide, Edson; Melo, Jeane Martins; Cheng, Spencer; Sakai, Paulo

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To compare band ligation (BL) with endoscopic sclerotherapy (SCL) in patients admitted to an emergency unit for esophageal variceal rupture. METHODS: A prospective, randomized, single-center study without crossover was conducted. After endoscopic diagnosis of esophageal variceal rupture, patients were randomized into groups for SCL or BL treatment. Sclerotherapy was performed by ethanolamine oleate intravascular injection both above and below the rupture point, with a maximum volume of 20 mL. For BL patients, banding at the rupture point was attempted, followed by ligation of all variceal tissue of the distal esophagus. Primary outcomes for both groups were initial failure of bleeding control (5 d), early re-bleeding (5 d to 6 wk), and complications, including mortality. From May 2005 to May 2007, 100 patients with variceal bleeding were enrolled in the study: 50 SCL and 50 BL patients. No differences between groups were observed across gender, age, Child-Pugh status, presence of shock at admission, mean hemoglobin levels, and variceal size. RESULTS: No differences were found between groups for bleeding control, early re-bleeding rates, complications, or mortality. After 6 wk, 36 (80%) SCL and 33 (77%) EBL patients were alive and free of bleeding. A statistically significant association between Child-Pugh status and mortality was found, with 16% mortality in Child A and B patients and 84% mortality in Child C patients (P<0.001). CONCLUSION: Despite the limited number of patients included, our results suggest that SCL and BL are equally efficient for the control of acute variceal bleeding. PMID:21772940

  20. Pediatric gastroesophageal varices: treatment strategy and long-term results.

    PubMed

    Mitsunaga, Tetsuya; Yoshida, Hideo; Kouchi, Katsunori; Hishiki, Tomoro; Saito, Takeshi; Yamada, Shin-ichi; Sato, Yoshiharu; Terui, Keita; Nakata, Mitsuyuki; Takenouchi, Ayako; Ohnuma, Naomi

    2006-12-01

    There are various treatment strategies for gastroesophageal varices in children. We studied the therapeutic value of endoscopic variceal clipping (EVC) and ligation (EVL). Four hundred ninety-nine endoscopic examinations performed between 1991 and 2005 were retrospectively analyzed. F2 and F3 varices with red color signs on follow-up endoscopy were treated with prophylactic EVC. In variceal rupture cases, EVC and EVL were used in combination. Eighty-two prophylactic EVCs were done, and variceal progression was prevented in 89.9%. However, some patients had persistent red color signs and required frequent EVC. Ten emergent procedures were done for variceal rupture, and, in 4 cases, EVL was used to arrest massive variceal bleeding. Five patients developed bleeding during follow-up cause by rupture of gastric fundal varices, which probably had been aggravated by prior treatment for esophageal varices. The control of gastroesophageal varices by routine EVC was satisfactory. However, ruptures during follow-up suggested the importance of controlling gastric fundal varices. Endoscopic variceal ligation is a simple, effective, and safe treatment tool, particularly for ruptured varices. However, it is difficult to treat gastric fundal varices with EVL; this disadvantage of EVL can be overcome by the concomitant use of EVC.

  1. Prediction of esophageal variceal bleeding in B-viral liver cirrhosis using the P2/MS noninvasive index based on complete blood counts.

    PubMed

    Kim, Beom Kyung; Ahn, Sang Hoon; Han, Kwang-Hyub; Park, Jun Yong; Han, Min Seok; Jo, Jung Hyun; Kim, Ja Kyung; Lee, Kwan Sik; Chon, Chae Yoon; Kim, Do Young

    2012-01-01

    Periodic endoscopy for esophageal varices (EVs) and prophylactic treatment of high-risk EVs, i.e., medium/large EVs, small EVs with the red-color sign or decompensation, are recommended in cirrhotic patients. We assessed the cumulative risks for future EV bleeding using the following simple P2/MS index: (platelet count)2/[monocyte fraction (%) × segmented neutrophil fraction (%)]. We enrolled 475 consecutive B-viral cirrhosis patients for 4 years, none of whom experienced EV bleeding. All underwent laboratory work-ups, endoscopy and ultrasonography. Those with EV bleeding took a nonselective β-blocker as prophylaxis. The major endpoint was the first occurrence of EV bleeding, analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression methods. Among patients with EV bleeding (n = 131), 25 experienced their first EV bleeding during follow-up. To differentiate the risk for EV bleeding, we divided them into two subgroups according to their P2/MS value (subgroup 1: P2/MS ≥9 and subgroup 2: P2/MS <9). The risk was significantly higher in subgroup 2 (p = 0.029). From multivariate analysis, a lower P2/MS (p = 0.040) remained a significant predictor for EV bleeding along with large varix size (p = 0.015), red-color sign (p = 0.041) and Child-Pugh classification B/C (p = 0.001). In subgroup 1, the risk for EV bleeding was similar to that of patients with low-risk EVs (p = 0.164). The P2/MS is a reliable predictor for the risk of EV bleeding among patients with EV bleeding. According to risk stratification, different prophylactic treatments should be considered for the subgroup with a P2/MS <9. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy vs. IMRT for the Treatment of Distal Esophageal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Van Benthuysen, Liam Hales, Lee; Podgorsak, Matthew B.

    2011-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) has the ability to reduce monitor units and treatment time when compared with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). This study aims to demonstrate that VMAT is able to provide adequate organs at risk (OAR) sparing and planning target volume (PTV) coverage for adenocarcinoma of the distal esophagus while reducing monitor units and treatment time. Fourteen patients having been treated previously for esophageal cancer were planned using both VMAT and IMRT techniques. Dosimetric quality was evaluated based on doses to several OARs, as well as coverage of the PTV. Treatment times were assessed by recording the number of monitor units required for dose delivery. Body V{sub 5} was also recorded to evaluate the increased volume of healthy tissue irradiated to low doses. Dosimetric differences in OAR sparing between VMAT and IMRT were comparable. PTV coverage was similar for the 2 techniques but it was found that IMRT was capable of delivering a slightly more homogenous dose distribution. Of the 14 patients, 12 were treated with a single arc and 2 were treated with a double arc. Single-arc plans reduced monitor units by 42% when compared with the IMRT plans. Double-arc plans reduced monitor units by 67% when compared with IMRT. The V{sub 5} for the body was found to be 18% greater for VMAT than for IMRT. VMAT has the capability to decrease treatment times over IMRT while still providing similar OAR sparing and PTV coverage. Although there will be a smaller risk of patient movement during VMAT treatments, this advantage comes at the cost of delivering small doses to a greater volume of the patient.

  3. Management of acute variceal bleeding: emphasis on endoscopic therapy.

    PubMed

    Cárdenas, Andrés

    2010-05-01

    Acute variceal bleeding is one of the most serious and feared complications of patients with portal hypertension. The most common cause of portal hypertension is advanced liver disease. Patients with esophageal and gastric varices may bleed because of a progressive increase in portal pressure that causes them to grow and finally rupture. This article will review the current management strategies for acute variceal bleeding with emphasis on endoscopic therapy for the acute episode.

  4. Diagnostic accuracy of transient elastography (FibroScan) in detection of esophageal varices in patients with cirrhosis: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Ke; Shi, Jing-Hong; Wang, Xu; Tang, Qian; Wang, Xin-Jie; Tang, Kai-Lin; Long, Zhong-Qi; Hu, Xing-Sheng

    2017-01-01

    AIM To investigate the diagnostic accuracy of FibroScan (FS) in detecting esophageal varices (EV) in cirrhotic patients. METHODS Through a systemic literature search of multiple databases, we reviewed 15 studies using endoscopy as a reference standard, with the data necessary to calculate pooled sensitivity (SEN) and specificity (SPE), positive and negative LR, diagnostic odds ratio (DOR) and area under receiver operating characteristics (AUROC). The quality of the studies was rated by the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy studies-2 tool. Clinical utility of FS for EV was evaluated by a Fagan plot. Heterogeneity was explored using meta-regression and subgroup analysis. All statistical analyses were conducted via Stata12.0, MetaDisc1.4 and RevMan5. RESULTS In 15 studies (n = 2697), FS detected the presence of EV with the summary sensitivities of 84% (95%CI: 81.0%-86.0%), specificities of 62% (95%CI: 58.0%- 66.0%), a positive LR of 2.3 (95%CI: 1.81-2.94), a negative LR of 0.26 (95%CI: 0.19-0.35), a DOR of 9.33 (95%CI: 5.84-14.92) and an AUROC of 0.8262. FS diagnosed the presence of large EV with the pooled SEN of 0.78 (95%CI: 75.0%-81.0%), SPE of 0.76 (95%CI: 73.0%-78.0%), a positive and negative LR of 3.03 (95%CI: 2.38-3.86) and 0.30 (95%CI: 0.23-0.39) respectively, a summary diagnostic OR of 10.69 (95%CI: 6.81-16.78), and an AUROC of 0.8321. A meta-regression and subgroup analysis indicated different etiology could serve as a potential source of heterogeneity in the diagnosis of the presence of EV group. A Deek’s funnel plot suggested a low probability for publication bias. CONCLUSION Using FS to measure liver stiffness cannot provide high accuracy for the size of EV due to the various cutoff and different etiologies. These limitations preclude widespread use in clinical practice at this time; therefore, the results should be interpreted cautiously given its SEN and SPE. PMID:28127208

  5. Correlation of primary middle and distal esophageal cancers motion with surrounding tissues using four-dimensional computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Li, Jianbin; Zhang, Yingjie; Shao, Qian; Xu, Min; Guo, Bing; Shang, Dongping

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the correlation of gross tumor volume (GTV) motion with the structure of interest (SOI) motion and volume variation for middle and distal esophageal cancers using four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT). Thirty-three patients with middle or distal esophageal carcinoma underwent 4DCT simulation scan during free breathing. All image sets were registered with 0% phase, and the GTV, apex of diaphragm, lung, and heart were delineated on each phase of the 4DCT data. The position of GTV and SOI was identified in all 4DCT phases, and the volume of lung and heart was also achieved. The phase relationship between the GTV and SOI was estimated through Pearson's correlation test. The mean peak-to-peak displacement of all primary tumors in the lateral (LR), anteroposterior (AP), and superoinferior (SI) directions was 0.13 cm, 0.20 cm, and 0.30 cm, respectively. The SI peak-to-peak motion of the GTV was defined as the greatest magnitude of motion. The displacement of GTV correlated well with heart in three dimensions and significantly associated with bilateral lung in LR and SI directions. A significant correlation was found between the GTV and apex of the diaphragm in SI direction (r left=0.918 and r right=0.928). A significant inverse correlation was found between GTV motion and varying lung volume, but the correlation was not significant with heart (r LR=-0.530, r AP=-0.531, and r SI=-0.588) during respiratory cycle. For middle and distal esophageal cancers, GTV should expand asymmetric internal margins. The primary tumor motion has quite good correlation with diaphragm, heart, and lung.

  6. Techniques and short-term outcomes for total minimally invasive Ivor Lewis esophageal resection in distal esophageal and gastroesophageal junction cancers: pooled data from six European centers.

    PubMed

    Straatman, Jennifer; van der Wielen, Nicole; Nieuwenhuijzen, Grard A P; Rosman, Camiel; Roig, Josep; Scheepers, Joris J G; Cuesta, Miguel A; Luyer, Misha D P; van Berge Henegouwen, Mark I; van Workum, Frans; Gisbertz, Suzanne S; van der Peet, Donald L

    2017-01-01

    Esophagectomy for cancer can be performed in a two-stage procedure with an intrathoracic anastomosis: the Ivor Lewis esophagectomy. A growing incidence of distal and gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinomas and increasing use of minimally invasive techniques have prompted interest in this procedure. The aim of this study was to assess short-term results of minimally invasive Ivor Lewis esophagectomy (MIE-IL). A retrospective cohort study was performed from June 2007 until September 2014, including patients that underwent MIE-IL for distal esophageal and gastroesophageal junction cancer in six different hospitals in the Netherlands and Spain. Data were collected with regard to operative techniques, pathology and postoperative complications. In total, 282 patients underwent MIE-IL, of which 90.2 % received neoadjuvant therapy. Anastomotic leakage was observed in 43 patients (15.2 %), of whom 13 patients (4.6 %) had empyema, necessitating thoracotomy for decortication. With an aggressive treatment of complications, the 30-day and in-hospital mortality rate was 2.1 %. An R0-resection was obtained in 92.5 % of the patients. After neoadjuvant therapy, 20.1 % of patients had a complete response. Minimally invasive Ivor Lewis esophagectomy for distal esophageal and gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinomas is an upcoming approach for reducing morbidity caused by laparotomy and thoracotomy. Anastomotic leakage rate is still high possibly due to technical diversity of anastomotic techniques, and a high percentage of patients treated by neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. An aggressive approach to complications leads to a low mortality of 2.1 %. Further improvement and standardization in the anastomotic technique are needed in order to perform a safe intrathoracic anastomosis.

  7. Massive Hemorrhage from Ectopic Duodenal Varices: Importance of a Multidisciplinary Approach

    PubMed Central

    House, Tyler; Webb, Patrick; Baarson, Chad

    2017-01-01

    Duodenal variceal bleeding is an uncommon complication of portal hypertension that can easily go unrecognized and reach mortality rates as high as 40%. Cirrhosis is the most common cause of duodenal varices. In most cases, duodenal varices occur concomitantly with esophageal varices, further complicating identification with initial endoscopy. Although many modalities have been explored with respect to management and treatment approaches, guidelines have yet to be established owing to the infrequency in which bleeding occurs from ectopic duodenal varices. We present a case of massive duodenal variceal hemorrhage that highlights the complexity of initial diagnosis and ultimately required a transesophageal intrahepatic portosystemic shunt with coil embolization for control of bleeding. PMID:28203136

  8. [Digestive hemorrhage caused by gastric varices: usefulness of the techniques of endoscopic sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Endozain Sosa, J C; Muñoz Núñez, F; Rodríguez Blanes, J A; González Murillo, M; González García, D; Berges Magaña, M; Castillo Grau, P; Presa Valle, M; Crespo Sánchez, M

    1992-08-01

    Upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage secondary to gastric varices still has a high death rate. Fourteen patients were admitted to our unit with bleeding gastric varices from November 1989 to August 1991. Endoscopic injection sclerotherapy obtained control of the bleeding in 92.3%; however, recurrences occurred in 33% of these cases in the first 24-48 hours, with a death rate of 50% during the second stage of the upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Total mortality rate was 21.4%. Of the fourteen patients, nine exhibited junctional varices, while five hand fundic varices. In ten of the fourteen patients, gastric varices developed during esophageal sclerotherapy. While hospitalized, it was observed that patients with gastric varices in the fundus had more recurrences and mortality, than those located next to the cardio-esophageal junction. Sclerosis of the varices only obtained temporary control of the bleeding with greater frequency of recurrences and mortality.

  9. Could there be light at the end of the tunnel? Mesocaval shunting for refractory esophageal varices in patients with contraindications to transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Jessica; Chun, Albert K; Borum, Marie L

    2016-01-01

    Cirrhotic patients with recurrent variceal bleeds who have failed prior medical and endoscopic therapies and are not transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt candidates face a grim prognosis with limited options. We propose that mesocaval shunting be offered to this group of patients as it has the potential to decrease portal pressures and thus decrease the risk of recurrent variceal bleeding. Mesocaval shunts are stent grafts placed by interventional radiologists between the mesenteric system, most often the superior mesenteric vein, and the inferior vena cava. This allows flow to bypass the congested hepatic system, reducing portal pressures. This technique avoids the general anesthesia and morbidity associated with surgical shunt placement and has been successful in several case reports. In this paper we review the technique, candidate selection, potential pitfalls and benefits of mesocaval shunt placement. PMID:27429715

  10. Overview of the methods and therapies for the primary prevention of variceal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Dhiraj

    2010-08-01

    Patients with cirrhosis develop varices at a rate of 5% per year, and a third of patients with high-risk varices will bleed. The mortality associated with variceal haemorrhage is typically 20%, and still exceeds that of myocardial infarction. Current options to prevent the first variceal bleed include noncardioselective beta-blockers or variceal band ligation. In patients with medium-to-large esophageal varices, both therapies reduce the risk of bleeding by 50% or more. The choice of therapy should take into account patient choice and local availability; although for most patients drug therapy is the preferred first-line treatment. There has been recent interest in carvedilol, with promising initial data. Further studies are necessary before universal recommendation. There is no role for drug therapy in patients without varices, and the use of beta-blockers for patients with small varices is controversial.

  11. Treatment modalities for bleeding esophagogastric varices.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Hiroshi; Mamada, Yasuhiro; Taniai, Nobuhiko; Yoshioka, Masato; Hirakata, Atsushi; Kawano, Youichi; Mizuguchi, Yoshiaki; Shimizu, Tetsuya; Ueda, Junji; Uchida, Eiji

    2012-01-01

    Bleeding from esophageal varices (EVs) or gastric varices (GVs) is a catastrophic complication of chronic liver disease. In this paper, we review the management of bleeding EVs and GVs. DIAGNOSIS OF EVS AND GVS: The grading system for esophagogastric varices proposed by the Japan Society for Portal Hypertension classifies GVs into those involving the cardia (Lg-c), the fundus (Lg-f), and both the cardia and the fundus (Lg-cf). In this review, we divide GVs into 2 categories: Lg-c (cardiac varices: CVs) and Lg-cf or Lg-f (fundal varices: FVs). TREATMENT MODALITIES FOR EVS AND GVS: Treatment modalities for EVs and GVs include placement of a Sengstaken-Blakemore tube, pharmacologic therapy, surgery, interventional radiology, and endoscopic treatment. MANAGEMENT OF BLEEDING EVS AND GVS: In Japan, endoscopic treatment has recently become the therapy of choice for bleeding EVs or GVs. In other countries, especially the United States, vasoactive drugs and endoscopic treatment are routinely used to manage variceal hemorrhage. BLEEDING EVS: Endoscopic variceal ligation is useful for controlling bleeding from EVs. However, confirmation of ligation precisely at the site of bleeding is usually difficult in patients with massive variceal bleeding. The site of acute bleeding can generally be identified by means of water instillation and suction. Ligation is then performed at the bleeding point. If endoscopic hemostasis is unsuccessful, a Sengstaken-Blakemore tube is used as a temporary bridge to other treatments. Transportal obliteration is useful for blocking variceal blood flow. BLEEDING GVS: Endoscopic injection sclerotherapy with a tissue adhesive, such as N-butyl-cyanoacrylate or isobutyl-2-cyanoacrylate, is effective for acute bleeding from GVs. However, bleeding from the GV injection site and rebleeding from the rupture point have been reported in patients receiving endoscopic injection sclerotherapy. If endoscopic hemostasis is unsuccessful, a Sengstaken-Blakemore tube

  12. MANAGEMENT OF VARICEAL HEMORRHAGE: CURRENT CONCEPTS

    PubMed Central

    COELHO, Fabricio Ferreira; PERINI, Marcos Vinícius; KRUGER, Jaime Arthur Pirola; FONSECA, Gilton Marques; de ARAÚJO, Raphael Leonardo Cunha; MAKDISSI, Fábio Ferrari; LUPINACCI, Renato Micelli; HERMAN, Paulo

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The treatment of portal hypertension is complex and the the best strategy depends on the underlying disease (cirrhosis vs. schistosomiasis), patient's clinical condition and time on it is performed (during an acute episode of variceal bleeding or electively, as pre-primary, primary or secondary prophylaxis). With the advent of new pharmacological options and technical development of endoscopy and interventional radiology treatment of portal hypertension has changed in recent decades. Aim To review the strategies employed in elective and emergency treatment of variceal bleeding in cirrhotic and schistosomotic patients. Methods Survey of publications in PubMed, Embase, Lilacs, SciELO and Cochrane databases through June 2013, using the headings: portal hypertension, esophageal and gastric varices, variceal bleeding, liver cirrhosis, schistosomiasis mansoni, surgical treatment, pharmacological treatment, secondary prophylaxis, primary prophylaxis, pre-primary prophylaxis. Conclusion Pre-primary prophylaxis doesn't have specific treatment strategies; the best recommendation is treatment of the underlying disease. Primary prophylaxis should be performed in cirrhotic patients with beta-blockers or endoscopic variceal ligation. There is controversy regarding the effectiveness of primary prophylaxis in patients with schistosomiasis; when indicated, it is done with beta-blockers or endoscopic therapy in high-risk varices. Treatment of acute variceal bleeding is systematized in the literature, combination of vasoconstrictor drugs and endoscopic therapy, provided significant decline in mortality over the last decades. TIPS and surgical treatment are options as rescue therapy. Secondary prophylaxis plays a fundamental role in the reduction of recurrent bleeding, the best option in cirrhotic patients is the combination of pharmacological therapy with beta-blockers and endoscopic band ligation. TIPS or surgical treatment, are options for controlling rebleeding on

  13. Total volume paracentesis decreases variceal pressure, size, and variceal wall tension in cirrhotic patients.

    PubMed

    Kravetz, D; Romero, G; Argonz, J; Guevara, M; Suarez, A; Abecasis, R; Bildozola, M; Valero, J; Terg, R

    1997-01-01

    It has been suggested that ascites is a risk factor for variceal bleeding in cirrhotic patients. However, no data of total volume paracentesis (TVP) effects on variceal hemodynamics has yet been published. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of TVP on variceal pressure, size, and tension in cirrhotic patients. Before sclerotherapy, 18 cirrhotic patients with grade II esophageal varices were studied. The following measurements were performed on 12 patients at basal condition and after TVP: inferior vena cava pressure, esophageal pressure (EP), and intravariceal pressure (IVP) by direct punction and variceal size at endoscopy. The same measurements were performed at basal condition and 1 hour later without TVP on the other 6 patients used as a control group. Variceal pressure gradient (VPG) and variceal wall tension (WT) were calculated. Paracentesis and intra-abdominal pressure were obtained with a direct punction. No demographic differences were observed between both groups. Paracentesis produced a significant reduction of IVP (from 25.6 +/- 2.4 to 17.9 +/- 2.1 mm Hg, means +/- SEM, -30%, P < .05), VPG (from 16.6 +/- 2.4 to 10.8 +/- 1.4 mm Hg, -35%, P < .05). TVP also reduced variceal size (from 9 +/- 0.3 to 5.6 + 0.4 mm, -38%, P < .05) and WT (from 75.3 +/- 11.6 to 30 +/- 4.7 mm Hg. mm, -60%, P < .05). Intra-abdominal pressure decreased from 18 +/- 2.2 to 4 +/- 0.9 mm Hg (P < .05), and IVC decreased from 15.5 +/- 2.4 to 5.7 +/- 1.5 mm Hg (P < .05). No significant differences were observed in mean arterial pressure and heart rate. The mean ascitic fluid removed was 8 +/- 0.71 L. No significant difference between measurements was observed in the control group. Our results show that TVP significantly decreases variceal pressure and tension. These results suggest that ascites removal can be useful in the treatment of variceal bleeding in cirrhotic patients.

  14. Double tract reconstruction after distal gastrectomy for gastric cancer is effective in reducing reflux esophagitis and remnant gastritis with duodenal passage preservation.

    PubMed

    Namikawa, Tsutomu; Kitagawa, Hiroyuki; Okabayashi, Takehiro; Sugimoto, Takeki; Kobayashi, Michiya; Hanazaki, Kazuhiro

    2011-08-01

    So far, there have been no reports assessing double tract (DT) reconstruction after distal gastrectomy for gastric cancer, which maintains the duodenal passage of food. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical results of DT reconstruction compared with Roux-en-Y (RY) and Billroth I (BI) reconstruction following distal gastrectomy. Outcomes following DT (33 patients), RY (38 patients), or BI (47 patients) reconstructions were investigated retrospectively. These outcomes included postoperative esophagogastroscopic findings, the angle of His measured from postoperative esophagogastrography, and the quality of life, determined by the Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale (GSRS) 1 year after surgery. The degree and extent of gastritis was significantly lower in patients who had undergone DT or RY compared with BI reconstruction (P < 0.05). The angle of His was significantly greater in patients who had undergone BI rather than RY or DT reconstruction (P < 0.05) and was significantly greater in patients with reflux esophagitis (P < 0.05). Using the GSRS, patients who underwent DT or RY reconstructions had significantly lower reflux and indigestion than patients who had undergone BI reconstruction. The length of the lesser curvature of the remnant stomach did not differ significantly between the three reconstruction procedures. DT reconstruction following distal gastrectomy should be considered as a reconstruction technique as it allows future endoscopic investigation in cases with postoperative problems and results in low levels of reflux esophagitis and remnant gastritis.

  15. Efficacy of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy After Surgery in Early Stage of Esophageal Carcinoma;

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-30

    Esophageal Neoplasm; Esophageal Cancer TNM Staging Primary Tumor (T) T2; Esophageal Cancer TNM Staging Primary Tumor (T) T3; Esophageal Cancer TNM Staging Regional Lymph Nodes (N) N0; Esophageal Cancer TNM Staging Distal Metastasis (M) M0

  16. Risk factors for predicting early variceal rebleeding after endoscopic variceal ligation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Liang; Ji, Feng; Xu, Qin-Wei; Zhang, Mie-Qing

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the clinical risk factors for early variceal rebleeding after endoscopic variceal ligation (EVL). METHODS: 342 cirrhotic patients with esophageal varices who received elective EVL to prevent bleeding or rebleeding at our endoscopy center between January 2005 and July 2010. were included in this study. The early rebleeding cases after EVL were confirmed by clinical signs or endoscopy. A case-control study was performed comparing the patients presenting with early rebleeding with those without this complication. RESULTS: The incidence of early rebleeding after EVL was 7.60%, and the morbidity of rebleeding was 26.9%. Stepwise multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that four variables were independent risk factors for early rebleeding: moderate to excessive ascites [odds ratio (OR) 62.83, 95% CI: 9.39-420.56, P < 0.001], the number of bands placed (OR 17.36, 95% CI: 4.00-75.34, P < 0.001), the extent of varices (OR 15.41, 95% CI: 2.84-83.52, P = 0.002) and prothrombin time (PT) > 18 s (OR 11.35, 95% CI: 1.93-66.70, P = 0.007). CONCLUSION: The early rebleeding rate after EVL is mainly affected by the volume of ascites, number of rubber bands used to ligate, severity of varices and prolonged PT. Effective measures for prevention and treatment should be adopted before and after EVL. PMID:21876624

  17. Bleeding due to ectopic varices in a urinary diversion: A multidisciplinary diagnostic and therapeutic challenge

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Eduardo Mariano Albers; Reyes, Alfonsi Friera; Menéndez, Ricardo Brime

    2015-01-01

    The ectopic varices in patients with portal hypertension are those that occur at any level of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, regardless of the varices that occur at the esophageal level. These ectopic varices account for 2–5% of the causes of GI bleeding varices. The risk of bleeding is quadrupled compared to the esophagogastric area, with a mortality of up to 40%. The transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt, should be considered in cases secondary to recurrent bleeding varices. We present a case report of an urological emergency of bleeding in a urinary diversion secondary to ectopic varices successfully treated through the placement of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt. The condition described here is rare, but important, as it can be a life-threatening complication of portal hypertension. This kind of complication should be known by urologic surgeons managing patients with urinary diversions. PMID:26834901

  18. Balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration for recurrent fundal gastric variceal bleeding in an adolescent.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Danya; Chu, Jaime; Patel, Rahul; Moon, Jang; Iyer, Kishore; Arnon, Ronen

    2014-09-01

    Gastric variceal bleeding is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration is a relatively new treatment used to control bleeding gastric varices that involves transvenous sclerosis of gastric varices through a spontaneous gastrorenal shunt. Here, we report on a 14-yr-old patient that underwent balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration for refractory bleeding fundal varices in the setting of esophageal varices and cirrhosis, which did not respond to medical management or endoscopic injection. This case report serves as a reminder that balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration can successfully control fundal variceal bleeding in pediatric patients and may serve as a bridge to liver transplantation. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Vakil, Nimish; Affi, Aboud

    2002-07-01

    Despite advances in our knowledge of esophageal cancer, 50% of patients present with incurable disease, and the overall survival after diagnosis is poor. The incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma of the distal esophagus is rising at a rapid rate in developed countries. Recent advances in the epidemiology of esophageal cancer offer insights into preventive strategies in patients who are at risk. New developments in diagnosis may help detect the disease at an early stage. New diagnostic modalities permit more accurate staging procedures and allow appropriate selection of therapy. New studies provide more information on multimodality therapy for esophageal cancer, and new endoscopic techniques allow resection of small lesions without surgery. New stent designs provide better palliation by providing tumor ingrowth. These developments in the treatment of esophageal cancer are the focus of this review.

  20. CT evaluation of thickened esophageal walls

    SciTech Connect

    Reinig, J.W.; Stanley, J.H.; Schabel, S.I.

    1983-05-01

    A study of 200 consecutive chest computed tomographic (CT) examinations revealed thickened esophageal walls (over 3 mm) in 35%. While this is the earliest finding of carcinoma of the esophagus on CT, only half of the cases of thickened walls were due to esophageal carcinoma. Other mediastinal malignancies as well as benign inflammatory, vascular, and fibrotic conditions such as reflux and monilial esophagitis, esophageal varices, and postirradiation scarring were found to cause thickened esophageal walls. Distension with air and intravenous enhancement aid in the optimal evaluation of the esophagus by CT. The thickened esophageal wall is always abnormal, but it is nonspecific, seen in both malignant and nonmalignant conditions.

  1. Intensity-Modulated Proton Therapy Further Reduces Normal Tissue Exposure During Definitive Therapy for Locally Advanced Distal Esophageal Tumors: A Dosimetric Study

    SciTech Connect

    Welsh, James; Gomez, Daniel; Palmer, Matthew B.; Riley, Beverly A.; Mayankkumar, Amin V.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Dong, Lei; Zhu, X. Ronald; Likhacheva, Anna; Liao, Zhongxing; Hofstetter, Wayne L.; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Cox, James D.

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: We have previously found that {<=} 75% of treatment failures after chemoradiotherapy for unresectable esophageal cancer appear within the gross tumor volume and that intensity-modulated (photon) radiotherapy (IMRT) might allow dose escalation to the tumor without increasing normal tissue toxicity. Proton therapy might allow additional dose escalation, with even lower normal tissue toxicity. In the present study, we compared the dosimetric parameters for photon IMRT with that for intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) for unresectable, locally advanced, distal esophageal cancer. Patients and Methods: Four plans were created for each of 10 patients. IMPT was delivered using anteroposterior (AP)/posteroanterior beams, left posterior oblique/right posterior oblique (LPO/RPO) beams, or AP/LPO/RPO beams. IMRT was delivered with a concomitant boost to the gross tumor volume. The dose was 65.8 Gy to the gross tumor volume and 50.4 Gy to the planning target volume in 28 fractions. Results: Relative to IMRT, the IMPT (AP/posteroanterior) plan led to considerable reductions in the mean lung dose (3.18 vs. 8.27 Gy, p < .0001) and the percentage of lung volume receiving 5, 10, and 20 Gy (p {<=} .0006) but did not reduce the cardiac dose. The IMPT LPO/RPO plan also reduced the mean lung dose (4.9 Gy vs. 8.2 Gy, p < .001), the heart dose (mean cardiac dose and percentage of the cardiac volume receiving 10, 20, and 30 Gy, p {<=} .02), and the liver dose (mean hepatic dose 5 Gy vs. 14.9 Gy, p < .0001). The IMPT AP/LPO/RPO plan led to considerable reductions in the dose to the lung (p {<=} .005), heart (p {<=} .003), and liver (p {<=} .04). Conclusions: Compared with IMRT, IMPT for distal esophageal cancer lowered the dose to the heart, lung, and liver. The AP/LPO/RPO beam arrangement was optimal for sparing all three organs. The dosimetric benefits of protons will need to be tailored to each patient according to their specific cardiac and pulmonary risks. IMPT for

  2. New Variant of Esophageal Atresia

    PubMed Central

    Harne, Swapnil; Pathak, Manish; Rattan, Kamal Nayan

    2017-01-01

    Esophageal atresia with tracheoesophageal fistula (EA/TEF) associated with distal congenital esophageal stenosis (CES) is a well-known entity. We encountered three patients of EA/TEF associated with long and unusual CES. PMID:28083495

  3. Comparison of heart and coronary artery doses associated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy versus three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for distal esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kole, Thomas P; Aghayere, Osarhieme; Kwah, Jason; Yorke, Ellen D; Goodman, Karyn A

    2012-08-01

    To compare heart and coronary artery radiation exposure using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) vs. four-field three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) treatment plans for patients with distal esophageal cancer undergoing chemoradiation. Nineteen patients with distal esophageal cancers treated with IMRT from March 2007 to May 2008 were identified. All patients were treated to 50.4 Gy with five-field IMRT plans. Theoretical 3D-CRT plans with four-field beam arrangements were generated. Dose-volume histograms of the planning target volume, heart, right coronary artery, left coronary artery, and other critical normal tissues were compared between the IMRT and 3D-CRT plans, and selected parameters were statistically evaluated using the Wilcoxon rank-sum test. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy treatment planning showed significant reduction (p < 0.05) in heart dose over 3D-CRT as assessed by average mean dose (22.9 vs. 28.2 Gy) and V30 (24.8% vs. 61.0%). There was also significant sparing of the right coronary artery (average mean dose, 23.8 Gy vs. 35.5 Gy), whereas the left coronary artery showed no significant improvement (mean dose, 11.2 Gy vs. 9.2 Gy), p = 0.11. There was no significant difference in percentage of total lung volume receiving at least 10, 15, or 20 Gy or in the mean lung dose between the planning methods. There were also no significant differences observed for the kidneys, liver, stomach, or spinal cord. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy achieved a significant improvement in target conformity as measured by the conformality index (ratio of total volume receiving 95% of prescription dose to planning target volume receiving 95% of prescription dose), with the mean conformality index reduced from 1.56 to 1.30 using IMRT. Treatment of patients with distal esophageal cancer using IMRT significantly decreases the exposure of the heart and right coronary artery when compared with 3D-CRT. Long-term studies are necessary to determine how this

  4. Comparison of Heart and Coronary Artery Doses Associated With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Versus Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy for Distal Esophageal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kole, Thomas P.; Aghayere, Osarhieme; Kwah, Jason; Yorke, Ellen D.; Goodman, Karyn A.

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To compare heart and coronary artery radiation exposure using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) vs. four-field three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) treatment plans for patients with distal esophageal cancer undergoing chemoradiation. Methods and Materials: Nineteen patients with distal esophageal cancers treated with IMRT from March 2007 to May 2008 were identified. All patients were treated to 50.4 Gy with five-field IMRT plans. Theoretical 3D-CRT plans with four-field beam arrangements were generated. Dose-volume histograms of the planning target volume, heart, right coronary artery, left coronary artery, and other critical normal tissues were compared between the IMRT and 3D-CRT plans, and selected parameters were statistically evaluated using the Wilcoxon rank-sum test. Results: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy treatment planning showed significant reduction (p < 0.05) in heart dose over 3D-CRT as assessed by average mean dose (22.9 vs. 28.2 Gy) and V30 (24.8% vs. 61.0%). There was also significant sparing of the right coronary artery (average mean dose, 23.8 Gy vs. 35.5 Gy), whereas the left coronary artery showed no significant improvement (mean dose, 11.2 Gy vs. 9.2 Gy), p = 0.11. There was no significant difference in percentage of total lung volume receiving at least 10, 15, or 20 Gy or in the mean lung dose between the planning methods. There were also no significant differences observed for the kidneys, liver, stomach, or spinal cord. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy achieved a significant improvement in target conformity as measured by the conformality index (ratio of total volume receiving 95% of prescription dose to planning target volume receiving 95% of prescription dose), with the mean conformality index reduced from 1.56 to 1.30 using IMRT. Conclusions: Treatment of patients with distal esophageal cancer using IMRT significantly decreases the exposure of the heart and right coronary artery when compared with 3D

  5. Percutaneous Trans-hepatic Obliteration for Bleeding Esophagojejunal Varices After Total Gastrectomy and Esophagojejunostomy

    SciTech Connect

    Boku, Michiko; Sugimoto, Koji; Nakamura, Tetsu; Kita, Yasufumi; Zamora, Carlos A. Sugimura, Kazuro

    2006-12-15

    A 72-year-old man who had undergone a total gastrectomy with a Roux-en-Y esophagojejunostomy for gastric cancer 6 years earlier presented to our hospital with massive hematemesis and melena. Endoscopic examination indicated esophageal varices with cherry-red spots and hemorrhage arising from beyond the anastomosis. Abdominal contrast-enhanced computed tomography and angiography revealed a dilated vein in the elevated jejunal limb supplying the varices. Percutaneous trans-hepatic obliteration (PTO) of the varices through the jejunal vein was performed using microcoils, ethanolamine oleate, and gelatin sponge cubes. Ten days after the procedure, endoscopic examination revealed reduction and thrombosis of the varices. We consider PTO to be an effective alternative method for treating ruptured esophagojejunal varices after total gastrectomy.

  6. Percutaneous Transhepatic Embolization of Bleeding Rectal Varices Using A New Embolic And Sclerotic Mixture Augmented By Amplatzer Vascular Plug 2

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Aal, Ahmed Kamel; Dawoud, Nabila; Moustafa, Amr Soliman; Hamed, Maysoon F; Saddekni, Souheil

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of 59-year-old female with non-alcoholic-steato-hepatitis (NASH) induced cirrhosis, who presented with hematochezia. The patient had a history of bleeding esophageal varices treated with endoscopic variceal ligation (EVL). Colonoscopy showed large rectal varices which were the source of her lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGIB). Since endoscopic treatment for LGIB are limited, and because the patient had portal vein thrombosis which contraindicated transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS), we performed percutaneous transhepatic embolization of her rectal varices using a new mixture of embolic and sclerotic agents, followed by Amplatzer plug 2 (AVP 2). To our knowledge, the use of this new mixture with the AVP 2 in the rectal varices treatment has not been previously published in literature. Our case provides an alternative treatment modality that can be used for rectal varices treatment, when TIPS and endoscopic management fails or is contraindicated. PMID:27761198

  7. Diagnostic Accuracy of APRI, AAR, FIB-4, FI, King, Lok, Forns, and FibroIndex Scores in Predicting the Presence of Esophageal Varices in Liver Cirrhosis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Deng, Han; Qi, Xingshun; Guo, Xiaozhong

    2015-10-01

    Aspartate aminotransferase-to-platelet ratio (APRI), aspartate aminotransferase-to-alanine aminotransferase ratio (AAR), FIB-4, FI, King, Lok, Forns, and FibroIndex scores may be simple and convenient noninvasive diagnostic tests, because they are based on the regular laboratory tests and demographic data. This study aimed to systematically evaluate their diagnostic accuracy for the prediction of varices in liver cirrhosis.All relevant papers were searched via PubMed, EMBASE, CNKI, and Wanfang databases. The area under the summary receiver operating characteristic curve (AUSROC), sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative likelihood ratio (PLR and NLR), and diagnostic odds ratio (DOR) were calculated.Overall, 12, 4, 5, 0, 0, 4, 3, and 1 paper was identified to explore the diagnostic accuracy of APRI, AAR, FIB-4, FI, King, Lok, Forns, and FibroIndex scores, respectively. The AUSROCs of APRI, AAR, FIB-4, Lok, and Forns scores for the prediction of varices were 0.6774, 0.7275, 0.7755, 0.7885, and 0.7517, respectively; and those for the prediction of large varices were 0.7278, 0.7448, 0.7095, 0.7264, and 0.6530, respectively. The diagnostic threshold effects of FIB-4 and Forns scores for the prediction of varices were statistically significant. The sensitivities/specificities/PLRs/NLRs/DORs of APRI, AAR, and Lok scores for the prediction of varices were 0.60/0.67/1.77/0.58/3.13, 0.64/0.63/1.97/0.54/4.18, and 0.74/0.68/2.34/0.40/5.76, respectively. The sensitivities/specificities/PLRs/NLRs/DORs of APRI, AAR, FIB-4, Lok, and Forns scores for the prediction of large varices were 0.65/0.66/2.15/0.47/4.97, 0.68/0.58/2.07/0.54/3.93, 0.62/0.64/2.02/0.56/3.57, 0.78/0.63/2.09/0.37/5.55, and 0.65/0.61/1.62/0.59/2.75, respectively.APRI, AAR, FIB-4, Lok, and Forns scores had low to moderate diagnostic accuracy in predicting the presence of varices in liver cirrhosis.

  8. Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography-Based Treatment Planning for Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy and Proton Therapy for Distal Esophageal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Xiaodong; Zhao Kuaile; Guerrero, Thomas M.; Mcguire, Sean E.; Yaremko, Brian; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D.; Hui Zhouguang; Li Yupeng; Newhauser, Wayne D.; Mohan, Radhe; Liao Zhongxing

    2008-09-01

    Purpose: To compare three-dimensional (3D) and four-dimensional (4D) computed tomography (CT)-based treatment plans for proton therapy or intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for esophageal cancer in terms of doses to the lung, heart, and spinal cord and variations in target coverage and normal tissue sparing. Methods and Materials: The IMRT and proton plans for 15 patients with distal esophageal cancer were designed from the 3D average CT scans and then recalculated on 10 4D CT data sets. Dosimetric data were compared for tumor coverage and normal tissue sparing. Results: Compared with IMRT, median lung volumes exposed to 5, 10, and 20 Gy and mean lung dose were reduced by 35.6%, 20.5%, 5.8%, and 5.1 Gy for a two-beam proton plan and by 17.4%, 8.4%, 5%, and 2.9 Gy for a three-beam proton plan. The greater lung sparing in the two-beam proton plan was achieved at the expense of less conformity to the target (conformity index [CI], 1.99) and greater irradiation of the heart (heart-V40, 41.8%) compared with the IMRT plan(CI, 1.55, heart-V40, 35.7%) or the three-beam proton plan (CI, 1.46, heart-V40, 27.7%). Target coverage differed by more than 2% between the 3D and 4D plans for patients with substantial diaphragm motion in the three-beam proton and IMRT plans. The difference in spinal cord maximum dose between 3D and 4D plans could exceed 5 Gy for the proton plans partly owing to variations in stomach gas filling. Conclusions: Proton therapy provided significantly better sparing of lung than did IMRT. Diaphragm motion and stomach gas-filling must be considered in evaluating target coverage and cord doses.

  9. [Variceal upper digestive bleeding--an ever new complication in liver cirrhosis].

    PubMed

    Prelipcean, Cristina Cijevschi; Sporea, I; Mihai, Cătălina; Gogălniceanu, P; Drug, V L

    2007-01-01

    Variceal bleeding in liver cirrhosis is a medical emergency with a high mortality. The therapeutic options in patients with portal hypertension are: treatment of acute bleeding from varices, prevention of the first bleeding episode and prevention of rebleeding. Treatment of acute bleeding from varices includes: blood volume restitution, use of antibiotics for preventing bacterial infections, vasoactive drug therapy (terlipressin, somatostatin, vapreotide, octreotide), endoscopic band ligation for acute esophageal bleeding and endoscopic therapy with tissue adhesive (cyanoacrylate) for acute gastric variceal bleeding. Endoscopic treatments are best used in association with pharmacological therapy. In primary prophylaxis non-selective beta- blocker therapy and endoscopic band ligation are useful. Beta blockers, band ligation or both should be used for prevention of recurrent bleeding. In patients who fail endoscopic and pharmacological treatment for prevention of rebleeding TIPS and transplantation should be considered.

  10. Antireflux versus conventional self-expanding metallic Stents (SEMS) for distal esophageal cancer: results of a multicenter randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Coron, E.; David, G.; Lecleire, S.; Jacques, J.; Le Sidaner, A.; Barrioz, T.; Coumaros, D.; Volteau, C.; Vedrenne, B.; Bichard, P.; Boustière, C.; Touchefeu, Y.; Brégeon, J.; Prat, F.; Le Rhun, M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Self-expanding metal stents (SEMS) are commonly used in the palliation of dysphagia in patients with inoperable esophageal carcinoma. However, they predispose to gastroesophageal reflux when deployed across the gastroesophageal junction. The aims of this study were to: 1) assess the influence of the antireflux valve on trans-prosthetic reflux (primary outcome); and 2) compare the results of SEMS with and without antireflux valve in terms of reflux symptoms, quality of life (QOL), improvement of dysphagia and adverse events (secondary outcomes). Patients and methods: Thirty-eight patients were enrolled in nine centers. Carcinomas were locally advanced (47 %) or metastatic. After randomization, patients received either a covered SEMS with antireflux valve (n = 20) or a similar type of SEMS with no antireflux device but assigned to standard proton pump inhibitor therapy and postural advice (n = 18). Trans-prosthetic reflux was assessed at day 2 using a radiological score based on barium esophagography performed after Trendelenburg maneuver and graded from 0 (no reflux) to 12 (maximum). Monthly telephone interviews were conducted for Organisation Mondiale de la Santé (OMS) scoring from 0 (excellent) to 5 (poor), QOL assessment (based on the Reflux-Qual Simplifié scoring system) from 0 (poor) to 100 (excellent), dysphagia scoring from 0 (no dysphagia) to 5 (complete dysphagia) and regurgitation scoring from 0 (no regurgitation) to 16 (maximum). Results: No difference was noted in terms of age, sex, size of lesion, prosthesis length or need for dilation prior to SEMS placement. No difficulty in placing SEMS nor complications were noted. Radiological scores of reflux were found to be significantly lower in patients with an antireflux stent compared to the conventional stent and associated measures. The regurgitation scores were significantly decreased in patients with antireflux stents during the first 2 months after stent placement and

  11. Prevention of Portal Hypertension: from Variceal Development to Clinical Decompensation

    PubMed Central

    Vorobioff, Julio D.; Groszmann, Roberto J

    2015-01-01

    Pharmacological treatment of portal hypertension (PH) has been exclusively devoted to gastro-esophageal varices related events at different frameworks including prophylactic, emergency or preventive therapy. The goals of treatment are to avoid the first bleeding episode, stop active bleeding and prevent bleeding recurrence, respectively. The objective of pre-primary prophylaxis (PPP) is to avoid variceal development and therefore, it necessarily deals with cirrhotic patients at earlier stages of the disease. At these earlier stages, nonselective beta blocker (NSBB) have been ineffective in preventing the development of varices and other complications of PH. Therefore, treatment should not rely on NSBB. It is possible, that at these earlier stages, etiological treatment of liver disease itself could prevent the progression of PH. This review will focus mainly on early treatment of PH, because if successful, it may translate into histological-hemodynamic improvements, avoiding not only variceal development but also other PH related complications, such as ascites and porto-systemic encephalopathy (PSE). Moreover, the advent of new therapies may allow not only the prevention of the complications of PH, but also the chance of a substantial degree of regression in the cirrhotic process with the possible prevention of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). PMID:24913395

  12. Cyanoacrylate glue in the management of gastric varices.

    PubMed

    Consolo, P; Luigiano, C; Giacobbe, G; Scaffidi, M G; Pellicano, R; Familiari, L

    2009-02-01

    Gastric varices (GV) are less common than esophageal varices, but their management represents a particular challenge. When bleeding occurs is usually severe, requiring immediate supportive intensive care and has a high mortality rate. The best management of GV is supposed to be with a multidisciplinary approach and close cooperation between gastroenterologists, interventional radiologists and the surgical team. Many studies in literature reported high success rates with intravariceal injection of cyanoacrylate in acute GV bleeding. This agent obliterates the variceal lumen by solidification within the vein and more than 80% primary obliteration rates are achieved. In comparison with other endoscopic techniques as variceal band ligation or sclerotherapy with ethanolamine oleate, alcohol and sodium tetradecyl sulphate, cyanoacrylate has shown to be more effective, with a decrease in complications and mortality rates. The cyanoacrylate has shown effective also in the secondary prophylaxis with an incidence of re-bleeding that ranges between 15% and 30%. Actually, there is no scientific evidence supporting the application of cyanoacrylate in primary prophylaxis of bleeding from GV. Significant procedural, septic and embolic complications have been reported with cyanoacrylate glue injection. In conclusion, the endoscopic treatment with cyanoacrylate of actively bleeding GV, as well as the prophylaxis of the re-bleeding, is a safe and effective procedure and should be considered as a first-line therapy, whenever available.

  13. Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt for the management of acute variceal hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Loffroy, Romaric; Estivalet, Louis; Cherblanc, Violaine; Favelier, Sylvain; Pottecher, Pierre; Hamza, Samia; Minello, Anne; Hillon, Patrick; Thouant, Pierre; Lefevre, Pierre-Henri; Krausé, Denis; Cercueil, Jean-Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Acute variceal hemorrhage, a life-threatening condition that requires a multidisciplinary approach for effective therapy, is defined as visible bleeding from an esophageal or gastric varix at the time of endoscopy, the presence of large esophageal varices with recent stigmata of bleeding, or fresh blood visible in the stomach with no other source of bleeding identified. Transfusion of blood products, pharmacological treatments and early endoscopic therapy are often effective; however, if primary hemostasis cannot be obtained or if uncontrollable early rebleeding occurs, transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) is recommended as rescue treatment. The TIPS represents a major advance in the treatment of complications of portal hypertension. Acute variceal hemorrhage that is poorly controlled with endoscopic therapy is generally well controlled with TIPS, which has a 90% to 100% success rate. However, TIPS is associated with a mortality of 30% to 50% in such a setting. Emergency TIPS should be considered early in patients with refractory variceal bleeding once medical treatment and endoscopic sclerotherapy failure, before the clinical condition worsens. Furthermore, admission to specialized centers is mandatory in such a setting and regional protocols are essential to be organized effectively. This review article discusses initial management and then focuses on the specific role of TIPS as a primary therapy to control acute variceal hemorrhage, particularly as a rescue therapy following failure of endoscopic approaches. PMID:24115809

  14. Interobserver Agreement on Endoscopic Classification of Oesophageal Varices in Children.

    PubMed

    D'Antiga, Lorenzo; Betalli, Pietro; De Angelis, Paola; Davenport, Mark; Di Giorgio, Angelo; McKiernan, Patrick J; McLin, Valerie; Ravelli, Paolo; Durmaz, Ozlem; Talbotec, Cecile; Sturm, Ekkehard; Woynarowski, Marek; Burroughs, Andrew K

    2015-08-01

    Data regarding agreement on endoscopic features of oesophageal varices in children with portal hypertension (PH) are scant. The aim of this study was to evaluate endoscopic visualisation and classification of oesophageal varices in children by several European clinicians, to build a rational basis for future multicentre trials. Endoscopic pictures of the distal oesophagus of 100 children with a clinical diagnosis of PH were distributed to 10 endoscopists. Observers were requested to classify variceal size according to a 3-degree scale (small, medium, and large, class A), a 2-degree scale (small and large, class B), and to recognise red wales (presence or absence, class Red). Overall agreement was considered fair if Fleiss and Cohen κ test was ≥0.30, good if ≥0.40, excellent if ≥0.60, and perfect if ≥0.80. Agreement between observers was fair with class A (κ = 0.34) and class B (κ = 0.38), and good with class Red (κ = 0.49). The agreement was good on presence versus absence of varices (class A = 0.53, class B = 0.48). The agreement among the observers was good in class A when endoscopic features of severe PH (medium and large sizes, red marks) were grouped and compared with mild features (absent and small varices) (κ = 0.58). Experts working in different centres show a fairly good agreement on endoscopic features of PH in children, although a better training of paediatric endoscopists may improve the agreement in grading severity of varices in this setting.

  15. Management of acute variceal bleeding using hemostatic powder

    PubMed Central

    El-Mikkawy, Ahmed; Abdalla, Haitham; Mostafa, Ibrahim; Devière, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives This study aimed to test the safety and efficacy of Hemospray® for emergency control of acute variceal bleeding (AVB) due to portal hypertension in cirrhotic patients. Patients and methods This single-arm, prospective trial, conducted at two hospitals in Belgium and Egypt, included patients admitted to the emergency room with hematemesis and/or melena and known or suspected liver cirrhosis. All patients received urgent hemodynamic stabilization, octreotide (50 mcg bolus then 25 mcg/hour for 24 hours) and intravenous ceftriaxone (1 g/hour). Endoscopy to confirm AVB and Hemospray® application (if indicated) was performed within six hours of admission. Patients were kept under observation for 24 hours and underwent second endoscopy and definitive therapy (band ligation and/or cyanoacrylate injection in cases of gastric varices) the next day. Results Thirty-eight patients were admitted for suspected AVB, and 30 of these had confirmed AVB (70% male; mean age 59.5 years (range, 32.0–73 years)). Child-Pugh class C liver disease was present in 53.4%. Esophageal varices were observed in 83.4% of patients, gastric varices in 10%, and duodenal varices in 6.6%. Spurting bleeding at the time of endoscopy was observed in 43.4%. One patient developed hematemesis six hours after Hemospray® application and underwent emergency endoscopic band ligation. No major adverse events or mortalities were observed during 15-day follow-up. Conclusion Hemospray® application was safe and effective at short-term follow-up for emergency treatment of AVB in cirrhotic patients. PMID:26137303

  16. Results of modified Sugiura operation in variceal bleeding in cirrhotic and noncirrhotic patients.

    PubMed

    Haciyanli, Mehmet; Genc, Hudai; Halici, Hakan; Kumkumoglu, Yusuf; Gur, Ozlem S; Ozturk, Tuncay

    2003-01-01

    Esophageal variceal bleeding is a major complication of portal hypertension and the optimal therapeutic modality for each individual patient differs. We reviewed the results of modified Sugiura procedure in patients with variceal bleeding of esophagus. We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 13 patients who were subjected to modified Sugiura procedure (transabdominal esophagogastric devascularization + esophageal stapled transection + splenectomy) for bleeding esophageal varices between 1996 and 2001. Three patients disappeared from routine follow-up and were excluded from the study. Survival, rebleeding and encephalopathy were evaluated. The mean age was 46 (18-56). The etiology of portal hypertension was cirrhosis of liver in six (60%) and portal vein thrombosis in four (40%). One patient had Child-Pugh's Class A, two had Class B and three had Class C cirrhosis. Previous variceal bleeding were confirmed by endoscopy in all patients who had recurrent variceal bleeding despite treatment with beta-blockers (three patients) or endoscopic sclerotherapy +/- band ligation (seven patients). Two were subjected to emergency surgery while the remaining eight were operated on electively. No postoperative mortality was seen. The bleeders were stopped immediately in the emergent cases. During a mean follow-up of 27 (4-53) months, one (10%) patient suffered from encephalopathy and one (10%) from rebleeding at 20th and 28th months after the operation respectively. Three (30%) patients with Child C cirrhosis died due to bleeding (one) and hepatic failure (two) at 4, 25, and 28 months after the surgery. The prognoses of other patients are well at the present time. In our small number of patients, modified Sugiura procedure was found to be a safe and effective procedure for urgent and long-term control of bleeding varices in patients with portal hypertension due to cirrhosis and noncirrhotic etiology. The outcomes are encouraging in noncirrhotic patients and cirrhotic patients

  17. Octreotide in variceal bleeding.

    PubMed Central

    Burroughs, A K

    1994-01-01

    Bleeding from oesophageal varices has a high death rate. Injection sclerotherapy is the most appropriate treatment but facilities for this are not always available. Balloon tamponade and vasoactive therapy may be used as stop gap measures. Somatostatin and octreotide are therapeutic candidates for the treatment of variceal bleeding and there are several trials that have compared somatostatin and octreotide with other treatments for this condition. The results of these trials are summarised and discussed. A meta analysis of the group of trials of placebo or H2 antagonists v somatostatin or octreotide showed a significant advantage of somatostatin or octreotide in terms of efficacy, but no difference in mortality. The trials discussed seem to show that somatostatin and octreotide are at least as effective as other treatments, with the benefit of fewer adverse effects, and thus represent the best vasoactive agents. Additionally, they may have a role as adjuvant treatment to emergency sclerotherapy for active bleeders and this must be further investigated. PMID:8206396

  18. Utility of endoscopic ultrasound in the diagnosis and management of esophagogastric varices

    PubMed Central

    Wang, An-Jiang; Li, Bi-Min; Zheng, Xue-Lian; Shu, Xu; Zhu, Xuan

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has significantly improved our understanding of the complex vascular structural changes in patients with portal hypertension. At present, EUS is a useful diagnostic tool for the evaluation of esophagogastric varices (EGVs) and guidance of endoscopic therapy. Several studies have employed this new technique for the diagnosis and management of esophageal and gastric varices, respectively. In the present review, we have summarized the current status of EUS for the diagnosis and management of EGVs and clarified the clinical feasibility of this procedure. New indications for EUS can be developed in the future after adequate validation. PMID:27503152

  19. Long-term results of balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration for gastric variceal bleeding and risky gastric varices: a 10-year experience.

    PubMed

    Akahoshi, Tomohiko; Hashizume, Makoto; Tomikawa, Morimasa; Kawanaka, Hirofumi; Yamaguchi, Shohei; Konishi, Kouzo; Kinjo, Nao; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2008-11-01

    Balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration (B-RTO) is a new alternative treatment for gastric varices (GVx), but the long-term efficacy is not known. We investigated the long-term effects of B-RTO on rebleeding, prevention of first bleeding, mortality and occurrence of risky esophageal varices (EVx). B-RTO was performed in 68 cirrhotic patients with GVx. Twenty patients had recent bleeding, transiently treated by endoscopic Histoacryl injection or balloon tamponade. Forty-eight patients had varices likely to bleed, but no bleeding. After B-RTO, the recurrent bleeding, occurrence of EVx and mortality over the long-term were evaluated. B-RTO was successfully performed in 63 of 68 patients (92.6%). Varices eradication was confirmed by endoscopy in 61 of 63 patients (96.6%). During follow up, GVx bleeding occurred in two patients (3.2%). The 8-year cumulative rebleeding rates of patients with bleeding and risky GVx were 14% and 0%, respectively. Risky EVx occurred in 10 patients (17%) and the cumulative occurrence rate was 22% in 8 years. The cumulative occurrence rate of risky EVx was higher in GVx with EVx (GOV2-GVx) compared to GVx without EVx (IGV1, P < 0.05). No ectopic variceal bleeding occurred. No patients died from variceal bleeding. Hepatocellular carcinoma was the only significant prognostic factor (P < 0.05). B-RTO is beneficial over the long-term, despite worsening EVx in some patients, because of excellent treatment efficacy and improved mortality. We believe that B-RTO can become a first-choice radical treatment following hemostasis for gastric variceal bleeding and prophylactic treatment for risky GVx.

  20. Hemorrhagic ascites from spontaneous ectopic mesenteric varices rupture in NASH induced cirrhosis and successful outcome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Edula, Raja G R; Qureshi, Kamran; Khallafi, Hicham

    2014-07-07

    Bleeding from gastro-esophageal varices can often present as the first decompensating event in patients with cirrhosis. This can be a potentially life threatening event associated with a 15%-20% early mortality. We present a rare case of new onset ascites due to intra-abdominal hemorrhage from ruptured mesenteric varices; in a 37 years old male with newly diagnosed nonalcoholic steatohepatitis induced cirrhosis as the first decompensating event. The patient was successfully resuscitated with emergent evacuation of ascites for diagnosis, identification and control of bleeding mesenteric varices and eventually orthotopic liver transplantation with successful outcome. Various clinical presentations, available treatment options and outcomes of ectopic variceal bleeding are discussed in this report.

  1. Distal splenorenal shunt

    MedlinePlus

    ... path. As a result, swollen blood vessels called varices form. They develop thin walls that can break ... or x-rays show that you have bleeding varices. DSRS surgery reduces pressure on the varices and ...

  2. The inferior mesenteric vein to the left gonadal vein shunt for gastroesophageal varices and extrahepatic portal vein thrombosis after living donor liver transplantation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, T; Sato, Y; Yamamoto, S; Oya, H; Kokai, H; Hatakeyama, K

    2012-03-01

    This 59-year-old woman underwent living donor liver transplantation using a left lobe graft as an aid for autoimmune hepatitis in 2003. Splenectomy was also performed because of blood type incompatibility. Follow-up endoscopic and computed tomography examinations showed gastroesophageal varices with extra hepatic portal vein thrombosis in 2007 that increased (esophageal varices [EV]: locus superior [Ls], moderately enlarged, beady varices [F2], Blue varices [Cb], presence of small in number and localized red color sign [RC1] and telangiectasia [TE+], gastric varices [GV]: extension from the cardiac orifice to the fornix [Lg-cf], moderately enlarged, beady varices [F2], white varices [Cw], absence of red color sign [RC-]). Portal venous flow to the gastroesophageal varices was also confirmed from a large right gastric vein. The splenic vein was thrombosed. Blood flow to the liver graft was totally supplied from the hepatic artery. The graft was functioning well. Because these gastroesophageal varices had a high risk of variceal bleeding, we decided to proceed with a portal reconstruction of a surgical portosystemic shunt in 2008. Severe adhesions were observed around the portal vein. It was impossible to perform portal reconstruction. There were relatively fewes adhesious in the left lower side of the abdominal cavity. We decided to create an inferior mesenteric vein to left gonadal vein shunt. The portal vein pressure decreased from 31.0 to 21.5 cm H2O thereafter. The postoperative course was smooth without any complication. This patient was discharged on the postoperative day 15. Follow-up endoscopic study showed the improvement in the gastroesophageal varices (EV: Ls, F2, Cb, RC(-), GV: Lg-c, F2, Cw, RC-) at 3 months after the operation. We also comfirmed the patency of the shunt by serial computed tomography examinations.

  3. Functional Esophageal Disorders.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Qasim; Fass, Ronnie; Gyawali, C Prakash; Miwa, Hiroto; Pandolfino, John E; Zerbib, Frank

    2016-02-15

    Functional esophageal disorders consist of a disease category that present with esophageal symptoms (heartburn, chest pain, dysphagia, globus) not explained by mechanical obstruction (stricture, tumor, eosinophilic esophagitis), major motor disorders (achalasia, EGJ outflow obstruction, absent contractility, distal esophageal spasm, jackhammer esophagus), or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). While mechanisms responsible are unclear, it is theorized that visceral hypersensitivity and hypervigilance play an important role in symptom generation, in the context of normal or borderline function. Treatments directed at improving borderline motor dysfunction or reducing reflux burden to sub-normal levels have limited success in symptom improvement. In contrast, strategies focused on modulating peripheral triggering and central perception are mechanistically viable and clinically meaningful. However, outcome data from these treatment options are limited. Future research needs to focus on understanding mechanisms underlying visceral hypersensitivity and hypervigilance so that appropriate targets and therapies can be developed.

  4. Management of rectal varices in portal hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Al Khalloufi, Kawtar; Laiyemo, Adeyinka O

    2015-01-01

    Rectal varices are portosystemic collaterals that form as a complication of portal hypertension, their prevalence has been reported as high as 94% in patients with extrahepatic portal vein obstruction. The diagnosis is typically based on lower endoscopy (colonoscopy or sigmoidoscopy). However, endoscopic ultrasonography has been shown to be superior to endoscopy in diagnosing rectal varices. Color Doppler ultrasonography is a better method because it allows the calculation of the velocity of blood flow in the varices and can be used to predict the bleeding risk in the varices. Although rare, bleeding from rectal varices can be life threatening. The management of patients with rectal variceal bleeding is not well established. It is important to ensure hemodynamic stability with blood transfusion and to correct any coagulopathy prior to treating the bleeding varices. Endoscopic injection sclerotherapy has been reported to be more effective in the management of active bleeding from rectal varices with less rebleeding rate as compared to endoscopic band ligation. Transjugular intrahepatic portsystemic shunt alone or in combination with embolization is another method used successfully in control of bleeding. Balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration is an emerging procedure for management of gastric varices that has also been successfully used to treat bleeding rectal varices. Surgical procedures including suture ligation and porto-caval shunts are considered when other methods have failed. PMID:26730278

  5. Emergency endoscopic variceal ligation in cirrhotic patients with blood clots in the stomach but no active bleeding or stigmata increases the risk of rebleeding

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Su Jin; Choi, Cheol Woong; Kang, Dae Hwan; Kim, Hyung Wook; Park, Su Bum; Hong, Young Mi; Yoon, Ki Tae; Cho, Mong; Nam, Hyung Seok; Islam, SM Bakhtiar UI

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of emergency variceal ligation for the prevention of rebleeding in cirrhotic patients who are found on initial endoscopy to have blood clots in the stomach but no actively bleeding esophageal and gastric varices or stigmata. Methods This study included 28 cirrhotic patients who underwent emergency prophylactic EVL and 41 who underwent an elective intervention between January 2009 and June 2014. Clinical outcomes were analyzed, including the rebleeding, 6-week mortality, and rebleeding-free survival rates. Results The rebleeding rate was higher in the emergency than in the elective group (28.6% vs. 7.3%, P=0.041). Multivariate analysis showed that emergency prophylactic EVL (odds ratio [OR] = 7.4, 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.634.8, P=0.012) and Child-Pugh score C (OR=10.6, 95% CI=1.4-80.8, P=0.022) were associated with rebleeding. In the emergency group, the gastric varices were associated with rebleeding (OR=12.0, 95% CI=1.7-83.5, P=0.012). Conclusion Emergency EVL may be associated with variceal rebleeding when blood clots are present in the stomach without active esophageal and gastric variceal bleeding or stigmata. Elective intervention should be considered as a safer strategy for preventing variceal rebleeding in this situation. PMID:28081590

  6. Portal hypertension in children: High-risk varices, primary prophylaxis and consequences of bleeding.

    PubMed

    Duché, Mathieu; Ducot, Béatrice; Ackermann, Oanez; Guérin, Florent; Jacquemin, Emmanuel; Bernard, Olivier

    2017-02-01

    Primary prophylaxis of bleeding is debated for children with portal hypertension because of the limited number of studies on its safety and efficacy, the lack of a known endoscopic pattern carrying a high-risk of bleeding for all causes, and the assumption that the mortality of a first bleed is low. We report our experience with these issues. From 1989 to 2014, we managed 1300 children with portal hypertension. Endoscopic features were recorded; high-risk varices were defined as: grade 3 esophageal varices, grade 2 varices with red wale markings, or gastric varices. Two hundred forty-six children bled spontaneously and 182 underwent primary prophylaxis. The results of primary prophylaxis were reviewed as well as bleed-free survival, overall survival and life-threatening complications of bleeding. High-risk varices were found in 96% of children who bled spontaneously and in 11% of children who did not bleed without primary prophylaxis (p<0.001), regardless of the cause of portal hypertension. Life-threatening complications of bleeding were recorded in 19% of children with cirrhosis and high-risk varices who bled spontaneously. Ten-year probabilities of bleed-free survival after primary prophylaxis in children with high-risk varices were 96% and 72% for non-cirrhotic causes and cirrhosis respectively. Ten-year probabilities of overall survival after primary prophylaxis were 100% and 93% in children with non-cirrhotic causes and cirrhosis respectively. In children with portal hypertension, bleeding is linked to the high-risk endoscopic pattern reported here. Primary prophylaxis of bleeding based on this pattern is fairly effective and safe. In children with liver disease, the risk of bleeding from varices in the esophagus is linked to their large size, the presence of congestion on their surface and their expansion into the stomach but not to the child's age nor to the cause of portal hypertension. Prevention of the first bleed in children with high-risk varices can

  7. Esophageal epiphrenic diverticulum associated with diffuse esophageal spasm.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Hideo; Kubota, Hisako; Higashida, Masaharu; Manabe, Noriaki; Haruma, Ken; Hirai, Toshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal diverticulum, a relatively rare condition, has been considered to be associated with motor abnormalities such as conditions that cause a lack of coordination between the distal esophagus and lower esophageal sphincter. We herein report a case of esophageal epiphrenic diverticulum associated with diffuse esophageal spasm. A 73-year-old woman presented with dysphagia and regurgitation. Imaging examinations revealed a right-sided esophageal diverticulum located about 10cm above the esophagogastric junction. High-resolution manometry revealed normal esophageal motility. However, 24-h pH monitoring revealed continuous acidity due to pooling of residue in the diverticulum. An esophageal epiphrenic diverticulum was diagnosed and resected thoracoscopically. Her dysphagia recurred 2 years later. High-resolution manometry revealed diffuse esophageal spasm. The diverticulum in the present case was considered to have been associated with diffuse esophageal spasm. The motility disorder was likely not identified at the first evaluation. In this case, the patient's symptoms spontaneously resolved without any treatment; however, longer-term follow-up is needed. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. Esophageal epiphrenic diverticulum associated with diffuse esophageal spasm

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Hideo; Kubota, Hisako; Higashida, Masaharu; Manabe, Noriaki; Haruma, Ken; Hirai, Toshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Esophageal diverticulum, a relatively rare condition, has been considered to be associated with motor abnormalities such as conditions that cause a lack of coordination between the distal esophagus and lower esophageal sphincter. Presentation of case We herein report a case of esophageal epiphrenic diverticulum associated with diffuse esophageal spasm. A 73-year-old woman presented with dysphagia and regurgitation. Imaging examinations revealed a right-sided esophageal diverticulum located about 10 cm above the esophagogastric junction. High-resolution manometry revealed normal esophageal motility. However, 24-h pH monitoring revealed continuous acidity due to pooling of residue in the diverticulum. An esophageal epiphrenic diverticulum was diagnosed and resected thoracoscopically. Her dysphagia recurred 2 years later. High-resolution manometry revealed diffuse esophageal spasm. Discussion The diverticulum in the present case was considered to have been associated with diffuse esophageal spasm. The motility disorder was likely not identified at the first evaluation. Conclusion In this case, the patient’s symptoms spontaneously resolved without any treatment; however, longer-term follow-up is needed. PMID:26143577

  9. Esophageal capsule endoscopy is not the optimal technique to determine the need for primary prophylaxis in patients with cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Krok, Karen L.; Wagennar, Rebecca Rankin; Kantsevoy, Sergey V.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Capsule endoscopy has been suggested as a potential alternative to endoscopy for detection of esophagogastric varices and severe portal hypertensive gastropathy (PHG). The aim of the study was to determine whether PillCam esophageal capsule endoscopy could replace endoscopy for screening purposes. Material and methods Sixty-two patients with cirrhosis with no previous variceal bleeding had PillCam capsule endoscopy and video endoscopy performed on the same day. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values (PPV, NPV) of capsule endoscopy were compared to endoscopy for the presence and severity of esophageal and gastric varices, PHG and the need for primary prophylaxis. Patients’ preference was assessed by a questionnaire. Results Four (6%) patients were unable to swallow the capsule. Sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV of capsule endoscopy for detecting any esophageal varices (92%, 50%, 92%, 50%), large varices (55%, 91%, 75%, 80%), variceal red signs (58%, 87%, 69%, 80%), PHG (95%, 50%, 95%, 50%), and the need for primary prophylaxis (91%, 57%, 78%, 80%) were not optimal, with only moderate agreement (κ) between capsule and upper GI endoscopy. Had only a capsule endoscopy been performed, 12 (21.4%) patients would have received inappropriate treatment. Capsule endoscopy also failed to detect (0/13) gastric varices. The majority of patients ranked capsule endoscopy as more convenient (69%) and their preferred (61%) method. Conclusions Despite the preference expressed by patients for capsule endoscopy, we believe that upper GI endoscopy should remain the preferred screening method for primary prophylaxis. PMID:27186182

  10. Endoscopic band ligation: Beyond prevention and management of gastroesophageal varices

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Jeong-Seon; Cho, Young-Seok

    2013-01-01

    Endoscopic band ligation (EBL) is the preferred endoscopic technique for the endoscopic treatment of acute esophageal variceal bleeding. EBL has also been used to treat nonvariceal bleeding. Recently, Han et al demonstrated that EBL can be a feasible and safe alternate technique for the management of iatrogenic gastric perforation especially in cases in which closure with endoclips is difficult. EBL is technically simpler to perform than other methods and provides a good view of the lesions under direct pressure and suction from the transparent ligation cap. EBL can be used even if the diameter of the perforation is greater than 10 mm or if there is a severe tangential angle. In this commentary, we discuss the efficacy and safety of EBL for the closure of iatrogenic gastrointestinal perforation. We also discuss the advantages and disadvantages of EBL for the treatment of nonvariceal bleeding. PMID:23885137

  11. Endoscopic band ligation: beyond prevention and management of gastroesophageal varices.

    PubMed

    Ji, Jeong-Seon; Cho, Young-Seok

    2013-07-21

    Endoscopic band ligation (EBL) is the preferred endoscopic technique for the endoscopic treatment of acute esophageal variceal bleeding. EBL has also been used to treat nonvariceal bleeding. Recently, Han et al demonstrated that EBL can be a feasible and safe alternate technique for the management of iatrogenic gastric perforation especially in cases in which closure with endoclips is difficult. EBL is technically simpler to perform than other methods and provides a good view of the lesions under direct pressure and suction from the transparent ligation cap. EBL can be used even if the diameter of the perforation is greater than 10 mm or if there is a severe tangential angle. In this commentary, we discuss the efficacy and safety of EBL for the closure of iatrogenic gastrointestinal perforation. We also discuss the advantages and disadvantages of EBL for the treatment of nonvariceal bleeding.

  12. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS) versus Balloon-occluded Retrograde Transvenous Obliteration (BRTO) for the Management of Gastric Varices

    PubMed Central

    Saad, Wael E. A.; Darcy, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    Variceal bleeding is one of the major complications of portal hypertension. Gastric variceal bleeding is less common than esophageal variceal bleeding; however, it is associated with a high morbidity and mortality rate and its management is largely uncharted due to a relatively less-established literature. In the West (United States and Europe), the primary school of management is to decompress the portal circulation utilizing the transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS). In the East (Japan and South Korea), the primary school of management is to address the gastric varices (GVs) specifically by sclerosing them utilizing the balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration (BRTO) procedure. The concept (1970s), evolution, and development (1980s–1990s) of both procedures run parallel to one another; neither is newer than the other is. The difference is that one was adopted mostly by the East (BRTO), while the other has been adopted mostly by the West (TIPS). TIPS is effective in emergently controlling bleeding for GVs even though the commonly referenced studies about managing GVs with TIPS are studies with TIPS created by bare stents. However, the results have improved with the use of stent grafts for creating TIPS. Nevertheless, TIPS cannot be tolerated by patients with poor hepatic reserve. BRTO is equally effective in controlling bleeding GVs as well as significantly reducing the GV rebleed rate. But the resultant diversion of blood flow into the portal circulation, and in turn the liver, increases the risk of developing esophageal varices and ectopic varices with their potential to bleed. Unlike TIPS, the blood diversion that occurs after BRTO improves, if not preserves, hepatic function for 6–9 months post-BRTO. The authors discuss the detailed results and critique the literature, which has evaluated and remarked on both procedures. Future research prospects and speculation as to the ideal patients for each procedure are discussed. PMID

  13. Cost-effectiveness analysis of beta-blockers vs endoscopic surveillance in patients with cirrhosis and small varices

    PubMed Central

    Di Pascoli, Lorenza; Buja, Alessandra; Bolognesi, Massimo; Montagnese, Sara; Gatta, Angelo; Gregori, Dario; Merkel, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the most cost-effectiveness strategy for preventing variceal growth and bleeding in patients with cirrhosis and small esophageal varices. METHODS: A stochastic analysis based on decision trees was performed to compare the cost-effectiveness of beta-blockers therapy starting from a diagnosis of small varices (Strategy 1) with that of endoscopic surveillance followed by beta-blockers treatment when large varices are demonstrated (Strategy 2), for preventing variceal growth, bleeding and death in patients with cirrhosis and small esophageal varices. The basic nodes of the tree were gastrointestinal endoscopy, inpatient admission and treatment for bleeding, as required. All estimates were performed using a Monte Carlo microsimulation technique, consisting in simulating observations from known probability distributions depicted in the model. Eight-hundred-thousand simulations were performed to obtain the final estimates. All estimates were then subjected to Monte Carlo Probabilistic sensitivity analysis, to assess the impact of the variability of such estimates on the outcome distributions. RESULTS: The event rate (considered as progression of varices or bleeding or death) in Strategy 1 [24.09% (95%CI: 14.89%-33.29%)] was significantly lower than in Strategy 2 [60.00% (95%CI: 48.91%-71.08%)]. The mean cost (up to the first event) associated with Strategy 1 [823 £ (95%CI: 106 £-2036 £)] was not significantly different from that of Strategy 2 [799 £ (95%CI: 0 £-3498 £)]. The cost-effectiveness ratio with respect to this endpoint was equal to 50.26 £ (95%CI: -504.37 £-604.89 £) per event avoided over the four-year follow-up. When bleeding episodes/deaths in subjects whose varices had grown were included, the mean cost associated with Strategy 1 was 1028 £ (95%CI: 122 £-2581 £), while 1699 £ (95%CI: 171 £-4674 £) in Strategy 2. CONCLUSION: Beta-blocker therapy turn out to be more effective and less expensive than endoscopic surveillance for

  14. A pictorial presentation of 3.0 Chicago Classification for esophageal motility disorders

    PubMed Central

    Herbella, Fernando Augusto; Armijo, Priscila Rodrigues; Patti, Marco Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT High resolution manometry changed several esophageal motility paradigms. The 3.0 Chicago Classification defined manometric criteria for named esophageal motility disorders. We present a pictorial atlas of motility disorders. Achalasia types, esophagogastric junction obstruction, absent contractility, distal esophageal spasm, hypercontractile esophagus (jackhammer), ineffective esophageal motility, and fragmented peristalsis are depicted with high-resolution manometry plots. PMID:26958977

  15. [Left predominance of varices: myth or reality?].

    PubMed

    Cornu-Thénard, A; Maraval, M; Boivin, P; Parpex, P

    1986-01-01

    The study of 843 legs operated for major varices shows that they are equally distributed between the two lower limbs (48.6% on the right, 51.4% on the left). There is little sex-determined variation in this distribution (410 women - 184 men), the main difference being that found in men: +4.6% on the left. Other studies carried out in Europe come to much the same conclusion. Two of these studies do, however, note a much clearer predominance of left-leg varices in men (+10%). For some studies, the lack of information about the type of varices being considered has proved troublesome (for example the many isolated telangiectasis and varices) and means that it is impossible to come to any exact conclusion. Clinical quantification is therefore desirable: at least it takes into account the diameter of the varices studied.

  16. Esophageal dysmotility is present before surgery in isolated tracheoesophageal fistula.

    PubMed

    Lemoine, Caroline; Aspirot, Ann; Morris, Melanie; Faure, Christophe

    2015-05-01

    After surgical correction of esophageal atresia with or without tracheoesophageal fistula, esophageal body motility dysfunction has been reported in nearly all patients. Using high-resolution esophageal manometry before surgical repair in 2 children with isolated tracheoesophageal fistula, we sought to determine whether dysmotility was present before any surgical insult to test the hypothesis that dysmotility associated with esophageal atresia with or without tracheoesophageal fistula is related to intrinsic primary factors linked to abnormal development of the esophagus. Both had an abnormal esophageal motility: one exhibited hypomotility with distal contraction, whereas the other showed a complete aperistalsis pattern. This suggests that esophageal dysmotility is congenital in nature rather than secondary to surgery.

  17. Esophageal cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - esophagus ... Esophageal cancer is not common in the United States. It occurs most often in men over 50 years old. There are two main types of esophageal cancer: squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma. These two types ...

  18. Esophageal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... from your throat to your stomach. Early esophageal cancer usually does not cause symptoms. Later, you may ... You're at greater risk for getting esophageal cancer if you smoke, drink heavily, or have acid ...

  19. Esophageal hypermotility: cause or effect?

    PubMed

    Crespin, O M; Tatum, R P; Yates, R B; Sahin, M; Coskun, K; Martin, A V; Wright, A; Oelschlager, B K; Pellegrini, C A

    2016-07-01

    Nutcracker esophagus (NE), Jackhammer esophagus (JHE), distal esophageal spasm (DES), and hypertensive lower esophageal sphincter (HTLES) are defined by esophageal manometric findings. Some patients with these esophageal motility disorders also have abnormal gastroesophageal reflux. It is unclear to what extent these patients' symptoms are caused by the motility disorder, the acid reflux, or both. The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication (LNF) on esophageal motility disorders, gastroesophageal reflux, and patient symptoms. Between 2007 and 2013, we performed high-resolution esophageal manometry on 3400 patients, and 221 patients were found to have a spastic esophageal motility disorder. The medical records of these patients were reviewed to determine the manometric abnormality, presence of gastroesophageal symptoms, and amount of esophageal acid exposure. In those patients that underwent LNF, we compared pre- and postoperative esophageal motility, gastroesophageal symptom severity, and esophageal acid exposure. Of the 221 patients with spastic motility disorders, 77 had NE, 2 had JHE, 30 had DES, and 112 had HTLES. The most frequently reported primary and secondary symptoms among all patients were: heartburn and/or regurgitation, 69.2%; respiratory, 39.8%; dysphagia, 35.7%; and chest pain, 22.6%. Of the 221 patients, 192 underwent 24-hour pH monitoring, and 103 demonstrated abnormal distal esophageal acid exposure. Abnormal 24-hour pH monitoring was detected in 62% of patients with heartburn and regurgitation, 49% of patients with respiratory symptoms, 36.8 % of patients with dysphagia, and 32.6% of patients with chest pain. Sixty-six of the 103 patients with abnormal 24-hour pH monitoring underwent LNF. Thirty-eight (13NE, 2JHE, 6 DES, and 17 HTLES) of these 66 patients had a minimum of 6-month postoperative follow-up that included clinical evaluation, esophageal manometry, and 24-hour pH monitoring

  20. Fundoplication improves disordered esophageal motility.

    PubMed

    Heider, T Ryan; Behrns, Kevin E; Koruda, Mark J; Shaheen, Nicholas J; Lucktong, Tananchai A; Bradshaw, Barbara; Farrell, Timothy M

    2003-02-01

    Patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and disordered esophageal motility are at risk for postoperative dysphagia, and are often treated with partial (270-degree) fundoplication as a strategy to minimize postoperative swallowing difficulties. Complete (360-degree) fundoplication, however, may provide more effective and durable reflux protection over time. Recently we reported that postfundoplication dysphagia is uncommon, regardless of preoperative manometric status and type of fundoplication. To determine whether esophageal function improves after fundoplication, we measured postoperative motility in patients in whom disordered esophageal motility had been documented before fundoplication. Forty-eight of 262 patients who underwent laparoscopic fundoplication between 1995 and 2000 satisfied preoperative manometric criteria for disordered esophageal motility (distal esophageal peristaltic amplitude < or =30 mm Hg and/or peristaltic frequency < or =80%). Of these, 19 had preoperative manometric assessment at our facility and consented to repeat study. Fifteen (79%) of these patients had a complete fundoplication and four (21%) had a partial fundoplication. Each patient underwent repeat four-channel esophageal manometry 29.5 +/- 18.4 months (mean +/- SD) after fundoplication. Distal esophageal peristaltic amplitude and peristaltic frequency were compared to preoperative data by paired t test. After fundoplication, mean peristaltic amplitude in the distal esophagus increased by 47% (56.8 +/- 30.9 mm Hg to 83.5 +/- 36.5 mm Hg; P < 0.001) and peristaltic frequency improved by 33% (66.4 +/- 28.7% to 87.6 +/- 16.3%; P < 0.01). Normal esophageal motor function was present in 14 patients (74%) after fundoplication, whereas in five patients the esophageal motor function remained abnormal (2 improved, 1 worsened, and 2 remained unchanged). Three patients with preoperative peristaltic frequencies of 0%, 10%, and 20% improved to 84%, 88%, and 50%, respectively

  1. Varices and Variceal Hemorrhage in Cirrhosis: A New View of an Old Problem.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Tsao, Guadalupe; Bosch, Jaime

    2015-11-01

    The management of portal hypertension in cirrhosis has evolved over time, leading to improvements in the care and survival of patients with varices and variceal hemorrhage, particularly in patients who achieve a significant reduction in portal pressure. In addition to better treatment strategies and improved therapeutic options, the issue of risk stratification has become essential to identify different patient subpopulations that require a different treatment. We now recognize that the management of varices and variceal hemorrhage must be taken in the context of other complications of cirrhosis (ascites, encephalopathy, jaundice) and that the goals of therapy should be based on the presence of such complications. Evolving knowledge of the predominant pathophysiological mechanisms at each of the stages of cirrhosis also has evolved and will continue to lead to improvements in therapy. This review focuses on the management of varices and variceal hemorrhage with respect to refinements in the risk stratification of patients with cirrhosis.

  2. Preventing the development of varices in cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Tsao, Guadalupe

    2007-01-01

    Gastroesophageal varices are a direct consequence of portal hypertension. Nonselective beta-adrenergic blockers decrease portal pressure and are effective in preventing variceal hemorrhage. However, a large multicenter placebo-controlled trial demonstrates that nonselective beta-adrenergic blockers are not effective in preventing the development of varices and are associated with a significant rate of adverse events. This therapy is, therefore, not recommended in compensated cirrhotic patients without varices at large. In this very compensated group of patients with cirrhosis (stage 1, ie, without varices and without ascites or encephalopathy) the predictive value (both for the development of varices and for the development of clinical decompensation) of a baseline hepatic venous pressure gradient greater than 10 mm Hg is confirmed, supporting this threshold level as one that defines a clinically significant portal hypertension. Importantly, reductions in hepatic venous pressure gradient >10% are associated with a significant reduction in the development of varices, a therapeutic goal that could be achieved through the use of beta-blockers or other drugs being developed for the treatment of portal hypertension.

  3. Acute Necrotizing Esophagitis Followed by Duodenal Necrosis.

    PubMed

    Del Hierro, Piedad Magdalena

    2011-12-01

    Acute Necrotizing Esophagitis is an uncommon pathology, characterized by endoscopic finding of diffuse black coloration in esophageal mucosa and histological presence of necrosis in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The first case of acute necrotizing esophagitis followed by duodenal necrosis, in 81 years old woman with a positive history of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus, Hypertension, and usual intake of Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory drugs, is reported. Although its etiology remains unknown, the duodenal necrosis suggests that ischemia could be the main cause given that the branches off the celiac axis provide common blood supply to the distal esophageal and duodenal tissue. The massive gastroesophagic reflux and NSAID intake could be involved.

  4. Can proton pump inhibitors reduce rebleeding following Histoacryl sclerotherapy for gastric variceal hemorrhage?

    PubMed

    Kim, Ka Rham; Jun, Chung Hwan; Cho, Kyu Man; Wi, Jin Woo; Park, Seon Young; Cho, Sung Bum; Lee, Wan Sik; Park, Chang Hwan; Joo, Young Eun; Kim, Hyun Soo; Choi, Sung Kyu; Rew, Jong Sun

    2015-09-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) in reducing rebleeding and bleeding-related death rates after endoscopic gastric variceal obliteration (GVO) using N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate (NBC). This study enrolled 341 patients who were consecutively diagnosed with and treated for bleeding gastric varices. The patients were divided into PPI and non-PPI groups, and their endoscopic findings, initial hemostasis outcomes, rebleeding and bleeding-related death rates, and treatment-related complications were analyzed. The rate of initial hemostasis was 97.1%. rebleeding occurred in 2.2% of patients within 2 weeks, 3.9% of patients within 4 weeks, 18.9% of patients within 6 months, and 27.6% of patients within 12 months of the GVO procedure. A previous history of variceal bleeding (relative risk [RR], 1.955; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.263 to 3.028; p = 0.003) and use of PPIs (RR, 0.554; 95% CI, 0.352 to 0.873; p = 0.011) were associated with rebleeding. Child-Pugh class C (RR, 10.914; 95% CI, 4.032 to 29.541; p < 0.001), failure of initial hemostasis (RR, 13.329; 95% CI, 2.795 to 63.556; p = 0.001), and the presence of red-colored concomitant esophageal varices (RR, 4.096; 95% CI, 1.320 to 12.713; p = 0.015) were associated with bleeding-related death. The prophylactic use of PPIs reduces rebleeding after GVO using NBC in patients with gastric variceal hemorrhage. However, prophylactic use of PPIs does not reduce bleeding-related death.

  5. Can proton pump inhibitors reduce rebleeding following Histoacryl sclerotherapy for gastric variceal hemorrhage?

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ka Rham; Jun, Chung Hwan; Cho, Kyu Man; Wi, Jin Woo; Park, Seon Young; Cho, Sung Bum; Lee, Wan Sik; Park, Chang Hwan; Joo, Young Eun; Kim, Hyun Soo; Choi, Sung Kyu; Rew, Jong Sun

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims: To evaluate the efficacy of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) in reducing rebleeding and bleeding-related death rates after endoscopic gastric variceal obliteration (GVO) using N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate (NBC). Methods: This study enrolled 341 patients who were consecutively diagnosed with and treated for bleeding gastric varices. The patients were divided into PPI and non-PPI groups, and their endoscopic findings, initial hemostasis outcomes, rebleeding and bleeding-related death rates, and treatment-related complications were analyzed. Results: The rate of initial hemostasis was 97.1%. rebleeding occurred in 2.2% of patients within 2 weeks, 3.9% of patients within 4 weeks, 18.9% of patients within 6 months, and 27.6% of patients within 12 months of the GVO procedure. A previous history of variceal bleeding (relative risk [RR], 1.955; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.263 to 3.028; p = 0.003) and use of PPIs (RR, 0.554; 95% CI, 0.352 to 0.873; p = 0.011) were associated with rebleeding. Child-Pugh class C (RR, 10.914; 95% CI, 4.032 to 29.541; p < 0.001), failure of initial hemostasis (RR, 13.329; 95% CI, 2.795 to 63.556; p = 0.001), and the presence of red-colored concomitant esophageal varices (RR, 4.096; 95% CI, 1.320 to 12.713; p = 0.015) were associated with bleeding-related death. Conclusions: The prophylactic use of PPIs reduces rebleeding after GVO using NBC in patients with gastric variceal hemorrhage. However, prophylactic use of PPIs does not reduce bleeding-related death. PMID:26354053

  6. Outcomes in variceal hemorrhage following the use of a balloon tamponade device

    PubMed Central

    Nadler, Jonathan; Stankovic, Nikola; Uber, Amy; Holmberg, Mathias J.; Sanchez, Leon D.; Wolfe, Richard E.; Chase, Maureen; Donnino, Michael W.; Cocchi, Michael N.

    2017-01-01

    Background Variceal hemorrhage is associated with high morbidity and mortality. A balloon tamponade device (BTD), such as the Sengstaken-Blakemore or Minnesota tube, may be used in cases of variceal hemorrhage. While these devices may be effective at controlling acute bleeding, the effect on patient outcomes remains less clear. We sought to describe the number of patients with variceal hemorrhage and a BTD who survive to discharge, survive to one-year, and develop complications related to a BTD. Methods In this retrospective study, we identified patients at a single, tertiary care center who underwent placement of a BTD for upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage between 2003 and 2014. Patient characteristics and outcomes were summarized using descriptive statistics. Results 34 patients with a BTD were identified. Median age was 57.5 (IQR 47–63) and 76% (26/34) were male. Approximately 59% (20/34) of patients survived to discharge, and 41% (13/32) were alive after one year. Two patients were lost to follow-up. Of those surviving to discharge, 95% (19/20) had undergone transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS), while 36% (5/14) of patients who did not survive to discharge had TIPS (p < 0.01). One complication, an esophageal perforation, was identified and managed conservatively. Conclusion In this cohort of patients undergoing BTD placement for variceal hemorrhage, approximately 59% of patients were alive at discharge and 41% were alive after one year. Placement of a BTD as a temporizing measure in the management of acute variceal hemorrhage may be helpful, particularly when utilized as a bridge to more definitive therapy. PMID:28460805

  7. Outcomes in variceal hemorrhage following the use of a balloon tamponade device.

    PubMed

    Nadler, Jonathan; Stankovic, Nikola; Uber, Amy; Holmberg, Mathias J; Sanchez, Leon D; Wolfe, Richard E; Chase, Maureen; Donnino, Michael W; Cocchi, Michael N

    2017-10-01

    Variceal hemorrhage is associated with high morbidity and mortality. A balloon tamponade device (BTD), such as the Sengstaken-Blakemore or Minnesota tube, may be used in cases of variceal hemorrhage. While these devices may be effective at controlling acute bleeding, the effect on patient outcomes remains less clear. We sought to describe the number of patients with variceal hemorrhage and a BTD who survive to discharge, survive to one-year, and develop complications related to a BTD. In this retrospective study, we identified patients at a single, tertiary care center who underwent placement of a BTD for upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage between 2003 and 2014. Patient characteristics and outcomes were summarized using descriptive statistics. 34 patients with a BTD were identified. Median age was 57.5 (IQR 47-63) and 76% (26/34) were male. Approximately 59% (20/34) of patients survived to discharge, and 41% (13/32) were alive after one year. Two patients were lost to follow-up. Of those surviving to discharge, 95% (19/20) had undergone transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS), while 36% (5/14) of patients who did not survive to discharge had TIPS (p<0.01). One complication, an esophageal perforation, was identified and managed conservatively. In this cohort of patients undergoing BTD placement for variceal hemorrhage, approximately 59% of patients were alive at discharge and 41% were alive after one year. Placement of a BTD as a temporizing measure in the management of acute variceal hemorrhage may be helpful, particularly when utilized as a bridge to more definitive therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Bleeding varices: 1. Emergency management.

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, S S; Warren, W D; Galambos, J T; Millikan, W J

    1981-01-01

    The aim of the emergency management of bleeding varices is to stop the hemorrhage nonoperatively if possible, avoiding emergency shunt surgery, an operation that has a higher mortality than elective shunt surgery. Patients with an upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage should undergo endoscopy immediately to verify the diagnosis of bleeding varices. They can then be categorized according to whether they stop bleeding spontaneously (group 1), continue to bleed slowly (group 2) or continue to bleed rapidly (group 3). Group 1 patients are discussed in the second part of this two-part series. Group 2 patients are initially treated with vasopressin given intravenously; those who fail to respond should undergo emergency angiography and receive vasopressin intra-arterially. If this fails, patients at low surgical risk should undergo urgent shunt surgery; those at high risk do better with endoscopic sclerotherapy. Group 3 patients are also given an intravenous infusion of vasopressin. Patients at low surgical risk who continue to bleed then receive tamponade with a Sengstaken--Blakemore tube. If this fails, they undergo emergency creation of an H-shaped mesocaval shunt. Patients at high surgical risk who fail to respond to vasopressin given intravenously are next treated intra-arterially. If this fails they are given either endoscopic or transhepatic sclerotherapy. PMID:7006779

  9. Liver stiffness predicts variceal bleeding in HIV/HCV-coinfected patients with compensated cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Merchante, Nicolás; Rivero-Juárez, Antonio; Téllez, Francisco; Merino, Dolores; Ríos-Villegas, Maria José; Ojeda-Burgos, Guillermo; Omar, Mohamed; Macías, Juan; Rivero, Antonio; Pérez-Pérez, Monserrat; Raffo, Miguel; López-Montesinos, Inmaculada; Márquez-Solero, Manuel; Gómez-Vidal, Maria Amparo; Pineda, Juan A

    2017-02-20

    A liver stiffness below 21 kPa has a high negative predictive value to exclude the presence of esophageal varices at risk of bleeding in HIV/hepatitis C virus (HCV)-coinfected patients. Consequently, upper gastrointestinal endoscopy (UGE) for the screening of esophageal varices could be avoided in these patients. However, this strategy has not been widely accepted due to concerns about its safety. To assess the ability of liver stiffness to predict the risk of portal hypertensive gastrointestinal bleeding (PHGB) in HIV/HCV-coinfected patients with compensated cirrhosis. Prospective study of 446 HIV/HCV-coinfected patients with a new diagnosis of cirrhosis and no previous decompensation. All patients underwent a UGE for the screening of esophageal varices at entry in the cohort before November 2009. From this date, UGE was not recommended in patients with liver stiffness below 21 kPa. The time from diagnosis of cirrhosis to the emergence of PHGB was evaluated. After a median (quartile1-quartile3) follow-up of 49 (25-68) months, 15 (3.4%, 95% confidence interval 1.7-5%) patients developed a first PHGB episode. In all cases, baseline liver stiffness was at least 21 kPa. Thus, the negative predictive value of a liver stiffness below 21 kPa to predict PHGB during follow-up was 100%. At the time of the bleeding episode, liver stiffness was above this threshold in all patients. Liver stiffness identifies HIV/HCV-coinfected patients with compensated cirrhosis with a very low risk of PHGB. In fact, no individual with liver stiffness below 21 kPa developed this outcome. Our results confirm that UGE can be safely spared in patients with liver stiffness below 21 kPa.

  10. Esophageal motility in eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Weiss, A H; Iorio, N; Schey, R

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is characterized by eosinophilic infiltration of the esophagus and is a potential cause of dysphagia and food impaction, most commonly affecting young men. Esophageal manometry findings vary from normal motility to aperistalsis, simultaneous contractions, diffuse esophageal spasm, nutcracker esophagus or hypotonic lower esophageal sphincter (LES). It remains unclear whether esophageal dysmotility plays a significant role in the clinical symptoms of EoE. Our aim is to review the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and effect of treatment on esophageal dysmotility in EoE. A literature search utilizing the PubMed database was performed using keywords: eosinophilic esophagitis, esophageal dysmotility, motility, manometry, impedance planimetry, barium esophagogram, endoscopic ultrasound, and dysphagia. Fifteen studies, totaling 387 patients with eosinophilic esophagitis were identified as keeping in accordance with the aim of this study and included in this review. The occurrence of abnormal esophageal manometry was reported to be between 4 and 87% among patients with EoE. Esophageal motility studies have shown reduced distensibility, abnormal peristalsis, and hypotonicity of the LES in patients with EoE, which may also mimic other esophageal motility disorders such as achalasia or nutcracker esophagus. Studies have shown conflicting results regarding the presence of esophageal dysmotility and symptoms with some reports suggesting a higher rate of food impaction, while others report no correlation between motor function and dysphagia. Motility dysfunction of the esophagus in EoE has not been well reported in the literature and studies have reported conflicting evidence regarding the clinical significance of dysmotility seen in EoE. The correlation between esophageal dysmotility and symptoms of EoE remains unclear. Larger studies are needed to investigate the incidence of esophageal dysmotility, clinical implications, and effect of treatment on

  11. Systemic Mastocytosis Complicated by Non-Cirrhotic Portal Hypertension and Variceal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    McCarty, Thomas R.; Hung, Adelina; Mohanty, Arpan

    2017-01-01

    Systemic mastocytosis is a myeloproliferative disorder characterized by extracutaneous involvement of at least one organ. Although rare, infiltration of inflammatory mast cells within the portal vein may lead to obstruction of the sinusoids resulting in non-cirrhotic portal hypertension. We present a patient with known history of systemic mastocytosis with bone marrow involvement presenting with new-onset esophageal variceal bleeding. Although systemic mastocytosis is uncommon, the subsequent development of hepatic involvement and non-cirrhotic portal hypertension are discussed. Further highlighted is a lack of organization guidelines and the potential for gastrointestinal and hepatic screening of mastocytosis patients with known extracutaneous involvement. PMID:28286795

  12. Value of Adjusted Blood Requirement Index in determining failure to control bleed in patients with variceal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Abid, Shahab; Khalid, Abdullah B; Awan, Safia; Shah, Hasnain A; Hamid, Saeed; Jafri, Wasim

    2015-03-01

    Variceal bleeding is a serious complication in patients with cirrhosis. Among the criteria that were proposed in Baveno conferences, the Adjusted Blood Requirement Index (ABRI) has not been validated prospectively in clinical practice. We therefore aim to evaluate the measurement of ABRI as a marker of failure to control bleeding and to evaluate the consistency of ABRI in relation to other criteria of failure to control variceal bleeding. All patients with variceal bleeding who presented to Aga Khan University Hospital from January 2010 to December 2012 who were administered transfusion of packed red blood cells were included after obtaining informed consent. All patients were managed as per the standard protocol with intravenous terlipressin along with band ligation and injection of cyanoacrylate in cases of esophageal and fundal varices, respectively. Hemoglobin and hematocrit were measured every 6 h for 48 h and then every 12 h until 5 days of index bleed in each patient. Packed cells were transfused if hemoglobin decreased below 8 g/dl. The number of blood units transfused, change in hemoglobin values, and ABRI were calculated after each unit of blood transfusion till 120 h. In patients in whom bleed could not be controlled, an ABRI value of 0.75 or more was compared with other Baveno IV-based parameters that define failure to control variceal bleeding. During the study period, 137 eligible patients with variceal bleed were admitted. The mean age of the patients was 52±12 years. The majority of patients (50.4%) were in Child-Pugh class B, followed by 38% in Child-Pugh class C. According to the Baveno IV criteria, overall failure to control acute variceal bleeding occurred in 52 (37.9%) patients. Excluding ABRI, failure to control bleeding was found in 22/137 (16%) patients, whereas ABRI-based criteria showed that in 34/137 (24.8%) patients, bleeding could not be controlled. There were only four (2.9%) patients with variceal bleeding in whom ABRI and

  13. Esophagitis - infectious

    MedlinePlus

    ... conditions that suppress or weaken your immune system Organisms (germs) that cause esophagitis include fungi, yeast, and viruses. Common organisms include: Candida albicans Cytomegalovirus (CMV) Herpes simplex virus ( ...

  14. Herpetic esophagitis

    SciTech Connect

    Shortsleeve, M.J.; Gauvin, G.P.; Gardner, R.C.; Greenberg, M.S.

    1981-12-01

    Four patients with herpetic esophagitis were examined. In three of them, the presenting symptom was odynophagia. Early in the course of herpetic esophagitis, shallow round and oval ulcers were seen on barium esophagograms. Later, the ulcers filled with fibrinous exudate, forming nodular plaques that projected into the esophageal lumen. Although these findings are diagnostic of esophagitis, they are not specific for a herpes virus infection. The definitive diagnosis must be established by histologic examination, which demonstrates the cytopathic effect of the herpes virus infection within the squamous epithelium.

  15. Prediction of oesophageal varices in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis by non-invasive markers

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Lili; Li, Hanwei; Han, Jun; Zhang, Weihui

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Preliminary data suggested that non-invasive methods could be useful to assess presence of oesophageal varices (OV) in liver cirrhosis. The primary objectives were to investigate non-invasive markers for diagnosing and grading OV in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis. Material and methods This study included a total of 106 consecutive treatment-naive patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC). Results of physical examination, blood tests, and abdominal ultrasound scan (USS) were measured. Performance of non-invasive markers for OV was expressed as sensitivity, specificity, positive, and negative predictive values (PPV, NPV), accuracy, and area under the curve (AUC). Results Oesophageal varices were found in 54 (50.9%) and large OV in 28 of the 106 patients. Variables found to differ significantly between patients with any grade or large and without OV included increased spleen length, increased portal vein diameter, low platelet count, and low levels of albumin or low γ-glutamyltranspeptidase (γ-GTP) values. Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve showed that spleen length (cutoff = 156.0) had AUC 0.753 (95% CI: 0.657–0.849), and high NPV (82.1%) to exclude any grade OV. Large OV could be excluded with NPV 70.6% by spleen length. Conclusions Predictive risk factors that use readily available laboratory results and ultrasound scan results may reliably identify esophageal varices in patients with PBC. PMID:28261290

  16. Spontaneous intramural esophageal dissection: an unusual onset of eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Ibáñez-Sanz, Gemma; Rodríguez-Alonso, Lorena; Romero, Natalia M

    2016-03-01

    A 35-year-old man, with a history of rhinitis, eczema and a dubious achalasia was admitted due to chest pain and sialorrhea. Upper endoscopy showed a little hole and a narrowing of the distal esophagus. A CT-scan with oral contrast exposed a discontinuity of the lumen of the middle third of the esophagus and a dissection of submucosal space 16 cm long. The patient recovered after parenteral nutrition. After four months, an esophageal endoscopic showed transient whitish exudates, longitudinal furrows and esophageal lacerations. The biopsies illustrated significant eosinophilic inflammation, eosinophilic microabscesses and basal cell hyperplasia.

  17. Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Management of Bleeding Rectal Varices.

    PubMed

    Philips, Cyriac Abby; Augustine, Philip

    2017-01-01

    Rectal variceal bleeding, though rare, can pose significant morbidity and mortality in the wake of treatment failure. Conventional treatment utilizing endoscopic glue injection might not be feasible in all cases due to poor visualization and inadvertent missing of variceal source of bleed. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided rectal variceal management is a promising and effective modality. We provide real-time images and a video of EUS-guided precision management of rectal variceal bleed using coiling and glue in a cirrhotic.

  18. Selective shunt in the management of variceal bleeding in the era of liver transplantation.

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, J M; Gilmore, G T; Hooks, M A; Galloway, J R; Dodson, T F; Hood, M M; Kutner, M H; Boyer, T D

    1992-01-01

    This study reports the Emory experience with 147 distal splenorenal shunts (DSRS) and 110 orthotopic liver transplants (OLT) between January 1987 and December 1991. The purpose was to clarify which patients with variceal bleeding should be treated by DSRS versus OLT. Distal splenorenal shunts were selected for patients with adequate or good liver function. Orthotopic liver transplant was offered to patients with end-stage liver disease who fulfilled other selection criteria. The DSRS group comprised 71 Child's A, 70 Child's B, and 6 Child's C patients. The mean galactose elimination capacity for all DSRS patients was 330 +/- 98 mg/minute, which was significantly (p less than 0.01) above the galactose elimination capacity of 237 +/- 82 mg/minute in the OLT group. Survival analysis for the DSRS group showed 91% 1-year and 77% 3-year survival, which was better than the 74% 1-year and 60% 3-year survivals in the OLT group. Variceal bleeding as a major component of end-stage disease leading to OLT had significantly (p less than 0.05) poorer survival (50%) at 1 year compared with patients without variceal bleeding (80%). Hepatic function was maintained after DSRS, as measured by serum albumin and prothrombin time, but galactose elimination capacity decreased significantly (p less than 0.05) to 298 +/- 97 mg/minute. Quality of life, measured by a self-assessment questionnaire, was not significantly different in the DSRS and OLT groups. Hospital charges were significantly higher for OLT (median, $113,733) compared with DSRS ($32,674). These data support a role for selective shunt in the management of patients with variceal bleeding who require surgery and have good hepatic function. Transplantation should be reserved for patients with end-stage liver disease. A thorough evaluation, including tests of liver function, help in selection of the most appropriate therapeutic approach. PMID:1417174

  19. Plug-Assisted Retrograde Transvenous Obliteration for the Treatment of Gastric Variceal Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Min-Yung; Kim, Taehwan; Shin, Wonseon; Shin, Minwoo; Kim, Gyoung Min; Won, Jong Yun; Park, Sung Il; Lee, Do Yun

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the feasibility, safety, and clinical outcomes of plug-assisted retrograde transvenous obliteration (PARTO) to treat gastric variceal hemorrhage in patients with portal hypertension. Materials and Methods From May 2012 to June 2014, 19 patients (11 men and 8 women, median age; 61, with history of gastric variceal hemorrhage; 17, active bleeding; 2) who underwent PARTO using a vascular plug and a gelfoam pledget were retrospectively analyzed. Clinical and laboratory data were examined to evaluate primary (technical and clinical success, complications) and secondary (worsening of esophageal varix [EV], change in liver function) end points. Median follow-up duration was 11 months, from 6.5 to 18 months. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to compare laboratory data before and after the procedure. Results Technical success (complete occlusion of the efferent shunt and complete filling of gastric varix [GV] with a gelfoam slurry) was achieved in 18 of 19 (94.7%) patients. The embolic materials could not reach the GV in 1 patient who had endoscopic glue injection before our procedure. The clinical success rate (no recurrence of gastric variceal bleeding) was the same because the technically failed patient showed recurrent bleeding later. Acute complications included fever (n = 2), fever and hypotension (n = 2; one diagnosed adrenal insufficiency), and transient microscopic hematuria (n = 3). Ten patients underwent follow-up endoscopy; all exhibited GV improvement, except 2 without endoscopic change. Five patients exhibited aggravated EV, and 2 of them had a bleeding event. Laboratory findings were significantly improved after PARTO. Conclusion PARTO is technically feasible, safe, and effective for gastric variceal hemorrhage in patients with portal hypertension. PMID:26957908

  20. Plug-Assisted Retrograde Transvenous Obliteration for the Treatment of Gastric Variceal Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Chang, Min-Yung; Kim, Man-Deuk; Kim, Taehwan; Shin, Wonseon; Shin, Minwoo; Kim, Gyoung Min; Won, Jong Yun; Park, Sung Il; Lee, Do Yun

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility, safety, and clinical outcomes of plug-assisted retrograde transvenous obliteration (PARTO) to treat gastric variceal hemorrhage in patients with portal hypertension. From May 2012 to June 2014, 19 patients (11 men and 8 women, median age; 61, with history of gastric variceal hemorrhage; 17, active bleeding; 2) who underwent PARTO using a vascular plug and a gelfoam pledget were retrospectively analyzed. Clinical and laboratory data were examined to evaluate primary (technical and clinical success, complications) and secondary (worsening of esophageal varix [EV], change in liver function) end points. Median follow-up duration was 11 months, from 6.5 to 18 months. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to compare laboratory data before and after the procedure. Technical success (complete occlusion of the efferent shunt and complete filling of gastric varix [GV] with a gelfoam slurry) was achieved in 18 of 19 (94.7%) patients. The embolic materials could not reach the GV in 1 patient who had endoscopic glue injection before our procedure. The clinical success rate (no recurrence of gastric variceal bleeding) was the same because the technically failed patient showed recurrent bleeding later. Acute complications included fever (n = 2), fever and hypotension (n = 2; one diagnosed adrenal insufficiency), and transient microscopic hematuria (n = 3). Ten patients underwent follow-up endoscopy; all exhibited GV improvement, except 2 without endoscopic change. Five patients exhibited aggravated EV, and 2 of them had a bleeding event. Laboratory findings were significantly improved after PARTO. PARTO is technically feasible, safe, and effective for gastric variceal hemorrhage in patients with portal hypertension.

  1. Clinical, endoscopic and endoscopic ultrasound features of duodenal varices: A report of 10 cases

    PubMed Central

    Rana, Surinder Singh; Bhasin, Deepak Kumar; Sharma, Vishal; Chaudhary, Vinita; Sharma, Ravi; Singh, Kartar

    2014-01-01

    Background: Duodenal varices (DV) although an uncommon cause, are an important cause due to the severe nature of the bleed and associated adverse outcome. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively evaluated patients with DV seen at our institution over past 4 years. Results: A total of 10 patients (nine males; mean age was 35.8 ± 7.68 years) with DV were studied. Five patients had underlying cirrhosis and five had DV because of non-cirrhotic portal hypertension (four patients had extra-hepatic portal venous obstruction and one patient had non-cirrhotic portal fibrosis). Five patients presented with upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleed, whereas in the remaining five patients DV were detected on endoscopy performed for evaluation of portal hypertension. Endoscopy revealed submucosal lesion in nine patients, whereas in one patient an initial endoscopic diagnosis of Dieulafoy's lesion was made. However endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) could clearly identify DV in all patients. Of five patients presenting with upper GI bleed, three had the esophageal varices eradicated and two presented 1st time with bleed form DV and did not have esophagogastric varices. All patients with acute upper GI bleed were initially treated with intravenous terlipressin followed by glue (n-butyl cyanoacrylate) injection in 4/5 patients with one patient refusing further endoscopic therapy. The variceal obliteration was documented by EUS in all these four patients and there has been no recurrence of bleed in these four patients over a follow-up period of 4-46 months. The five non-bleeding DV were already on beta- blockers and the same were continued. Two of these five patients succumbed to progressive liver failure with none of these five patients having GI bleed on follow-up. Conclusion: EUS is a useful investigational modality for evaluating patients with DV and endoscopic injection of glue is an effective therapy for controlling and preventing recurrence of bleed from DV. PMID:24949411

  2. Does sclerotherapy of remnant little oesophageal varices after endoscopic ligation have impact on the reduction of recurrent varices? Prospective study.

    PubMed

    Grgov, Sasa; Stamenković, Perica

    2011-01-01

    Endoscopic band ligation (EBL) is superior to endoscopic injection sclerotherapy (EIS) of oesophageal varices, however, EBL is associated with a higher rate of variceal recurrences. To examine whether the reduction of recurrent varices can be achieved by additional sclerotherapy of remnant little varices after ligation. Forty-eight patients with liver cirrhosis who had previously bled from oesophageal varices were examined. Endoscopic therapy was performed in order to prevent recurrent variceal bleeding. I group: in 23 patients ligation of oesophageal varices with multi band ligation device was applied (EBL group). II group: in 25 patients sclerotherapy using polydocanol or absolute alcohol was applied after reducing the size of varices using ligation (EBL and EIS group). There was no statistically significant difference between the examined groups of patients in relation to the number of sessions for variceal eradication, recurrence of variceal bleeding, deterioration of portal gastropathy and mortality in the observed period from 18.8 +/- 18.6 months (EBL group) and 22.2 +/- 26.2 months (EBL and EIS group). Variceal recurrence was verified in 21.7% of patients of the EBL group and 16% of the EBL and EIS group, but the difference was not statistically important. Several complications, such as dysphagia and chest pain, were statistically more frequent in the EBL and EIS group of patients. The combined method of ligation and extra sclerosing of remnant small oesophageal varices after ligation does not have advantage in relation to the ligation alone.

  3. Computed tomographic recognition of gastric varices

    SciTech Connect

    Balthazar, E.J.; Megibow, A.; Naidich, D.; LeFleur, R.S.

    1984-06-01

    The computed tomographic (CT) findings in 13 consecutive patients with proven gastric varices were analyzed and correlated with the radiographic, angiographic, and gastroscopic evaluations. In 11 patients, CT clearly identified large (five) or smaller (six) varices located mainly along the posteromedial wall of the gastric fundus and proximal body of the stomach. Well defined rounded or tubular densities that enhanced during intravenous administration of contrast material and could not be distinguished from the gastric wall were identified. Dense, enhancing, round or tubular, intraluminal filling defects were seen in the cases where the stomach was distended with water. In seven patients, the CT examination correctly diagnosed the pathogenesis of gastric varices by identifying hepatic cirrhosis, calcific pancreatis, and carcinoma of the pancreas.

  4. Scintigraphic demonstration of gastrointestinal bleeding due to mesenteric varices

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, M.E.; Coleman, R.E. )

    1990-07-01

    Mesenteric varices can appear as massive, acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding. The small bowel or colon may be involved, varices usually developing at sites of previous surgery or inflammation in patients with portal hypertension. Two patients with alcoholic cirrhosis and protal hypertension presented with rectal bleeding. Tc-99m RBC studies demonstrated varices and extravasation into the adjacent bowel. The varices were documented by mesenteric angiography. Characteristic features of Tc-99m labeled RBC studies can identify mesenteric varices as the cause of intestinal bleeding and localize the abnormal vessels.

  5. DISTAL MYOPATHIES

    PubMed Central

    Dimachkie, Mazen M.; Barohn, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Over a century ago, Gowers described two young patients in whom distal muscles weakness involved the hand, foot, sternocleidomastoid, and facial muscles in the other case the shoulder and distal leg musculature. Soon after, , similar distal myopathy cases were reported whereby the absence of sensory symptoms and of pathologic changes in the peripheral nerves and spinal cord at postmortem examination allowed differentiation from Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. In 1951, Welander described autosomal dominant (AD) distal arm myopathy in a large Scandanavian cohort. Since then the number of well-characterized distal myopathies has continued to grow such that the distal myopathies have formed a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders. Affected kindred commonly manifest weakness that is limited to foot and toe muscles even in advanced stages of the disease, with variable mild proximal leg, distal arm, neck and laryngeal muscle involvement in selected individuals. An interesting consequence of the molecular characterization of the distal myopathies has been the recognition that mutation in a single gene can lead to more than one clinical disorder. For example, Myoshi myopathy (MM) and limb girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) type 2B are allelic disorders due to defects in the gene that encodes dysferlin. The six well described distal myopathy syndromes are shown in Table 1. Table 2 lists advances in our understanding of the myofibrillar myopathy group and Table 3 includes more recently delineated and less common distal myopathies. In the same manner, the first section of this review pertains to the more traditional six distal myopathies followed by discussion of the myofibrillar myopathies. In the third section, we review other clinically and genetically distinctive distal myopathy syndromes usually based upon single or smaller family cohorts. The fourth section considers other neuromuscular disorders that are important to recognize as they display prominent

  6. Microbiome in reflux disorders and esophageal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liying; Chaudhary, Noami; Baghdadi, Jonathan; Pei, Zhiheng

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma has increased dramatically in the United States and Europe since the 1970s without apparent cause. Although specific host factors can affect risk of disease, such a rapid increase in incidence must be predominantly environmental. In the stomach, infection with Helicobacter pylori has been linked to chronic atrophic gastritis, an inflammatory precursor of gastric adenocarcinoma. However, the role of H. pylori in the development of esophageal adenocarcinoma is not well established. Meanwhile, several studies have established that a complex microbiome in the distal esophagus might play a more direct role. Transformation of the microbiome in precursor states to esophageal adenocarcinoma-reflux esophagitis and Barrett metaplasia-from a predominance of gram-positive bacteria to mostly gram-negative bacteria raises the possibility that dysbiosis is contributing to pathogenesis. However, knowledge of the microbiome in esophageal adenocarcinoma itself is lacking. Microbiome studies open a new avenue to the understanding of the etiology and pathogenesis of reflux disorders.

  7. Esophageal mucosal damage may promote dysmotility and worsen esophageal acid exposure.

    PubMed

    Meneghetti, Adam T; Tedesco, Pietro; Damani, Tanuja; Patti, Marco G

    2005-12-01

    This study determines the relationship among esophageal dysmotility, esophageal acid exposure, and esophageal mucosal injury in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). A total of 827 patients with GERD (confirmed by ambulatory pH monitoring) were divided into three groups based on the degree of mucosal injury: group A, no esophagitis, 493 patients; group B, esophagitis grades I to III, 273 patients; and group C, Barrett's esophagus, 61 patients. As mucosal damage progressed from no esophagitis to Barrett's esophagus, there was a significant decrease in lower esophageal sphincter pressure and amplitude of peristalsis in the distal esophagus, with a subsequent increase in the number of reflux episodes in 24 hours, the number of reflux episodes longer than 5 minutes, and the reflux score. These data suggest that in patients with GERD, worsening of esophageal mucosal injury may determine progressive deterioration of esophageal motor function with impairment of acid clearance and increase of esophageal acid exposure. These findings suggest that Barrett's esophagus is an end-stage form of gastroesophageal reflux, and that if surgical therapy is performed early in the course of the disease, this cascade of events might be blocked.

  8. Effects of Age on Esophageal Motility: Use of High-resolution Esophageal Impedance Manometry

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Young Kwang; Kim, Nayoung; Park, Yo Han; Lee, Jong-Chan; Sung, Jihee; Choi, Yoon Jin; Yoon, Hyuk; Shin, Cheol Min; Park, Young Soo; Lee, Dong Ho

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims Disturbances of esophageal motility have been reported to be more frequent the aged population. However, the physiology of disturbances in esophageal motility during aging is unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of age on esophageal motility using high-resolution esophageal impedance manometry (HRIM). Methods Esophageal motor function of 268 subjects were measured using HRIM in 3 age groups, < 40 years (Group A, n = 32), 40–65 years (Group B, n = 185), and > 65 years (Group C, n = 62). Lower esophageal sphincter (LES) and upper esophageal sphincter (UES) pressures, integrated relaxation pressure, distal contractile integral, contractile front velocity, distal latency, and pressures and duration of contraction on 4 positions along the esophagus, and complete bolus transit were measured. Results Basal UES pressure was lower in Group C (P < 0.001) but there was no significant difference in the LES pressure among groups. Contractile duration on position 3 (10 cm from proximal LES high pressure zone) was longer in Group C (P = 0.001), and the contractile amplitude on position 4 (5 cm from proximal LES high pressure zone) was lower in Group C (P = 0.005). Distal contractile integral was lower in Group C (P = 0.037). Contractile front velocity (P = 0.015) and the onset velocity (P = 0.040) was lower in Group C. There was no significant difference in impedance values. Conclusions The decrease of UES pressure, distal esophageal motility, and peristaltic velocity might be related with esophageal symptoms in the aged population. PMID:28163259

  9. Direct Percutaneous Embolization of Bleeding Stomal Varices

    SciTech Connect

    Naidu, Sailen G.; Castle, Erik P.; Kriegshauser, J. Scott; Huettl, Eric A.

    2010-02-15

    Stomal variceal bleeding can develop in patients with underlying cirrhosis and portal hypertension. Most patients are best treated with transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) creation because this addresses the underlying problem of portal hypertension. However, some patients are not good candidates for TIPS creation because they have end-stage liver disease or encephalopathy. We describe such a patient who presented with recurrent bleeding stomal varices, which was successfully treated with percutaneous coil embolization. The patient had bleeding-free survival for 1 month before death from unrelated causes.

  10. Idiopathic colonic varices: case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Dina, Ion; Braticevici, Carmen Fierbinteanu

    2014-07-01

    Colonic varices represent a very rare entity, either an incidental finding at colonoscopy or discovered due to its complication, the lower gastrointestinal bleeding. The most common cause of colonic varices is portal hypertension associated with liver disease or secondary to pancreatic conditions, like chronic pancreatitis or malignancies. The incidence of colonic varices is very low, even in liver cirrhosis where the patients frequently develop varices in the upper gastrointestinal tract, but surprisingly uncommon present with varices localized in the colon. We report a case of idiopathic colonic varices, diagnosed at a routine colonoscopy performed for nespecific abdominal disturbances in a female patient without liver disease or pancreatic conditions responsible for portal hypertension development. The development of colonic varices in the absence of a certain trigger represents a major issue for practitioners due to its major complication, lower gastrointestinal bleeding.

  11. Idiopathic Colonic Varices: Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Dina, Ion; Braticevici, Carmen Fierbinteanu

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Colonic varices represent a very rare entity, either an incidental finding at colonoscopy or discovered due to its complication, the lower gastrointestinal bleeding. The most common cause of colonic varices is portal hypertension associated with liver disease or secondary to pancreatic conditions, like chronic pancreatitis or malignancies. The incidence of colonic varices is very low, even in liver cirrhosis where the patients frequently develop varices in the upper gastrointestinal tract, but surprisingly uncommon present with varices localized in the colon. Case Presentation: We report a case of idiopathic colonic varices, diagnosed at a routine colonoscopy performed for nespecific abdominal disturbances in a female patient without liver disease or pancreatic conditions responsible for portal hypertension development. Conclusions: The development of colonic varices in the absence of a certain trigger represents a major issue for practitioners due to its major complication, lower gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:25147571

  12. Duodenal varices successfully treated with cyanoacrylate injection therapy

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Ahsan; Junglee, Naushad; Khan, Anwar; Sutton, Jonathon; Gasem, Jaber; Ahmed, Waqar

    2011-01-01

    Duodenal varices are a rare complication of portal hypertension secondary to liver cirrhosis. Compared to oesophageal varices, they bleed less often but are also more difficult to diagnose and treat. There is no established treatment for bleeding duodenal varices and different treatment strategies have been employed with variable results. The authors present a case of 52-year-old male who was admitted with melaena. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was performed which identified bleeding varices in the second part of duodenum. The varices were injected with cyanoacrylate and the outcome was favourable. Subsequent endoscopies showed complete resolution of the varices. The authors conclude that cyanoacrylate injection is an effective first-line treatment for bleeding duodenal varices. PMID:22694885

  13. Esophageal culture

    MedlinePlus

    Culture - esophageal ... There, it is placed in a special dish (culture) and watched for the growth of bacteria, fungi, ... and Fordtran's Gastrointestinal and Liver Disease Pathophysiology/Diagnosis/Management . 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap ...

  14. Esophageal spasm

    MedlinePlus

    Kahrilas PJ, Pandolfino JE. Esophageal neuromuscular function and motility disorders. In: Feldman M, Friedman LS, Brandt LJ, eds. Sleisenger and Fordtran's Gastrointestinal and Liver Disease . 9th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  15. Esophageal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... is the sixth most common cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Incidence rates vary within different geographic locations. In some regions, higher rates of esophageal cancer cases may be attributed to tobacco and alcohol use or particular nutritional habits and ...

  16. Esophageal atresia

    MedlinePlus

    Esophageal atresia (EA) is a congenital defect. This means it occurs before birth. There are several types. In most cases, the ... the lower esophagus and stomach. Most infants with EA have another defect called tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF). This ...

  17. Esophageal Spasms

    MedlinePlus

    ... or gastroesophageal reflux disease: A systematic review. Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. 2015;13:251. Coss-Adame E, et al. ... esophageal (noncardiac) chest pain: An expert review. Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. 2014;12:1224. Castell DO. Chest ...

  18. Eosinophilic esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Dellon, Evan S.

    2012-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic immune-mediated condition where infiltration of eosinophils into the esophageal mucosa leads to symptoms of esophageal dysfunction. It has rapidly emerged as an important cause of upper GI morbidity in patients of all ages and is encountered in a substantial proportion of patients undergoing diagnostic upper endoscopy. This review discusses the clinical, endoscopic, and histologic features of EoE and presents the most recent guidelines for diagnosis of EoE. It describes selected diagnostic dilemmas including distinguishing EoE from gastroesophageal reflux disease and addressing the newly recognized clinical entity of proton pump inhibitor responsive esophageal eosinophilia. It also highlights evidence to support both pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic treatments, including topical corticosteroids, dietary elimination therapy, and endoscopic dilation. PMID:23452635

  19. Esophageal replacement.

    PubMed

    Kunisaki, Shaun M; Coran, Arnold G

    2017-04-01

    This article focuses on esophageal replacement as a surgical option for pediatric patients with end-stage esophageal disease. While it is obvious that the patient׳s own esophagus is the best esophagus, persisting with attempts to retain a native esophagus with no function and at all costs are futile and usually detrimental to the overall well-being of the child. In such cases, the esophagus should be abandoned, and the appropriate esophageal replacement is chosen for definitive reconstruction. We review the various types of conduits used for esophageal replacement and discuss the unique advantages and disadvantages that are relevant for clinical decision-making. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Esophageal manometry

    MedlinePlus

    ... its ability to move food toward the stomach ( achalasia ) A weak LES, which causes heartburn (GERD) Abnormal ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2010:chap 43. Read More Achalasia Esophageal spasm Gastroesophageal reflux disease Review Date 8/ ...

  1. Prognostic indicators of risk for first variceal bleeding in cirrhosis: a multicenter study in 711 patients to validate and improve the North Italian Endoscopic Club (NIEC) index.

    PubMed

    Merkel, C; Zoli, M; Siringo, S; van Buuren, H; Magalotti, D; Angeli, P; Sacerdoti, D; Bolondi, L; Gatta, A

    2000-10-01

    The best known indicator of risk for first bleeding in patients with cirrhosis without previous bleeding is the index devised by the North Italian Endoscopic Club for the Study and Treatment of Esophageal Varices (NIEC index), which results from the combination of size of esophageal varices, severity of red wale marks, and Child-Pugh class. Its efficiency is far from optimal, and validation studies have reported sensitivities and specificities markedly lower than those reported in the original study. In the present study we analyzed the efficiency of NIEC index in a large series of cirrhotic patients with varices without previous bleeding. In addition, we tried to improve the effectiveness of the index by modifying it, and to validate the modifications in an independent group of patients. A total of 627 patients were enrolled and followed until either a variceal bleeding or for a maximum of 2 yr. During this time, 117 experienced a first variceal Using Cox's regression analysis, size of varices, severity of red wale marks, and Child-Pugh score were significant and independent predictors of first bleeding, as already noted in the original report of the NIEC group. However, coefficients and standard errors were markedly different, and the importance of size of esophageal varices in the regression was much larger, whereas that of Child-Pugh score was much lower. According to these data, a revised index was developed (Rev-NIEC). Using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis, the revised index showed a larger efficiency, and the area under the curve was significantly larger (0.80 +/- 0.02 vs 0.74 +/- 0.02; p < 0.01). In particular, the curve showed that for a specificity of 75%, the new index had a sensitivity of 72% compared to that of 55% of the NIEC index. Validation in an independent sample of 84 patients showed good agreement between predicted and observed risk for bleeding. Validation with the bootstrap technique also showed adequate stability of

  2. Cyanoacrylate injection versus band ligation for bleeding from cardiac varices along the lesser curvature of the stomach

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang Jung; Kim, Yong Kwon; Seo, Yeon Seok; Park, Seung Woon; Lee, Han Ah; Kim, Tae Hyung; Suh, Sang Jun; Jung, Young Kul; Kim, Ji Hoon; An, Hyunggin; Yim, Hyung Joon; Jang, Jae Young; Yeon, Jong Eun; Byun, Kwan Soo

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Practice guidelines recommend endoscopic band ligation (EBL) and endoscopic variceal obturation (EVO) for bleeding from esophageal varices and fundal varices, respectively. However, the optimal treatment for bleeding from cardiac varices along the lesser curvature of the stomach (GOV1) remains undefined. This retrospective study compared the efficacy between EBL and EVO for bleeding from GOV1. Methods Patients treated by EBL or EVO via cyanoacrylate injection for bleeding from GOV1 were enrolled. Patients diagnosed with hepatocellular carcinoma or treated with endoscopic injection sclerotherapy were excluded. Results The study included 91 patients treated for bleeding from GOV1. The mean age was 56.3±10.9 years (mean±SD), and 78 of them (85.7%) were men. Overall, 51 and 40 patients were treated with EBL and EVO, respectively. A trend for a higher hemostasis rate was noted in the EVO group (100%) than in the EBL group (82.6%, P=0.078). Varices rebled in 15 patients during follow-up. The rebleeding rate was significantly higher in the EBL group than in the EVO group (P=0.004). During follow-up, 13 patients died (11 in the EBL group and 2 in the EVO group); the survival rate was marginally significant between two groups (P=0.050). The rebleeding-free survival rate was significantly higher in the EVO group than in the EBL group (P=0.001). Conclusion Compared to EBL, EVO offered significantly lower rebleeding rates, significantly higher rebleeding-free survival rates, and a trend for higher hemostasis and survival rates. EVO appears to be the better therapeutic option for bleeding from GOV1. PMID:28081588

  3. Cyanoacrylate injection versus band ligation for bleeding from cardiac varices along the lesser curvature of the stomach.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang Jung; Kim, Yong Kwon; Seo, Yeon Seok; Park, Seung Woon; Lee, Han Ah; Kim, Tae Hyung; Suh, Sang Jun; Jung, Young Kul; Kim, Ji Hoon; An, Hyunggin; Yim, Hyung Joon; Jang, Jae Young; Yeon, Jong Eun; Byun, Kwan Soo

    2016-12-01

    Practice guidelines recommend endoscopic band ligation (EBL) and endoscopic variceal obturation (EVO) for bleeding from esophageal varices and fundal varices, respectively. However, the optimal treatment for bleeding from cardiac varices along the lesser curvature of the stomach (GOV1) remains undefined. This retrospective study compared the efficacy between EBL and EVO for bleeding from GOV1. Patients treated by EBL or EVO via cyanoacrylate injection for bleeding from GOV1 were enrolled. Patients diagnosed with hepatocellular carcinoma or treated with endoscopic injection sclerotherapy were excluded. The study included 91 patients treated for bleeding from GOV1. The mean age was 56.3±10.9 years (mean±SD), and 78 of them (85.7%) were men. Overall, 51 and 40 patients were treated with EBL and EVO, respectively. A trend for a higher hemostasis rate was noted in the EVO group (100%) than in the EBL group (82.6%, P=0.078). Varices rebled in 15 patients during follow-up. The rebleeding rate was significantly higher in the EBL group than in the EVO group (P=0.004). During follow-up, 13 patients died (11 in the EBL group and 2 in the EVO group); the survival rate was marginally significant between two groups (P=0.050). The rebleeding-free survival rate was significantly higher in the EVO group than in the EBL group (P=0.001). Compared to EBL, EVO offered significantly lower rebleeding rates, significantly higher rebleeding-free survival rates, and a trend for higher hemostasis and survival rates. EVO appears to be the better therapeutic option for bleeding from GOV1.

  4. Fatal variceal haemorrhage after paracetamol overdose.

    PubMed Central

    Thornton, J R; Losowsky, M S

    1989-01-01

    A patient is described where oesophageal varices developed and bled 13 days after a paracetamol overdose. The bleeding was unresponsive to medical management and proved fatal. There was no evidence that the patient had pre-existing liver disease. At necropsy the liver showed severe acute parenchymal necrosis but chronic lesions were absent. The portal vein and hepatic veins were patent. PMID:2583571

  5. Similar rebleeding rate in 3-day and 7-day intravenous ceftriaxone prophylaxis for patients with acute variceal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tzong-Hsi; Huang, Chung-Tsui; Lin, Chien-Chu; Chung, Chen-Shuan; Lin, Cheng-Kuan; Tsai, Kuang-Chau

    2016-07-01

    Although prophylactic antibiotics have been recommended for cirrhotic patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding, the duration of its use remains an inconclusive issue. We designed this study to investigate the duration of antibiotic prophylaxis for cirrhotic patients with acute esophageal variceal bleeding. We enrolled those patients suffering from acute esophageal variceal bleeding and receiving band ligation. They were randomly allocated to two groups to receive prophylactic antibiotics; Group I: receiving intravenous ceftriaxone 500 mg every 12 hours for 3 days, and Group II: same regimen for 7 days. We used rebleeding rate within 14 days as the primary end point and also evaluated the survival rate within 28 days and the amount of transfusion during admission. There were 38 patients in Group I and 33 patients in Group II that completed the study course for analysis. Overall, there was no significant difference in the baseline characteristics between these two groups. There were three patients both in Group I and Group II who developed rebleeding within 14 days (8% vs. 9%, p > 0.99). There was also no difference between Group I and Group II in transfusion amount (2.71 ± 2.84 units vs. 3.18 ± 4.07, p = 0.839) and survival rate in 28 days (100 vs. 97%, p = 0.465). Our small scale study demonstrated that there was no difference in the rebleeding rate between 3-day and 7-day ceftriaxone prophylaxis for cirrhotic patients with acute esophageal variceal bleeding. There was also no difference in 28 day survival rate between these two groups. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Histomorphological and Immunophenotypic Features of Pill-Induced Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Su Hwan; Kim, Won; Lee, Kook Lae; Byeon, Sun-ju; Choi, Euno; Chang, Mee Soo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate histomorphological and immunophenotypic features in pill-induced esophagitis. We comparatively evaluated the histomorphological, immunophenotypic features of pill-induced esophagitis vs. reflux esophagitis, as well as clinical information and endoscopic findings. Fifty-two tissue pieces from 22 cases of pill-induced esophagitis, 46 pieces from 20 reflux esophagitis, and 16 pieces from 14 control samples were subjected to immunohistochemistry for inflammatory infiltrates (CD3 for T lymphocyte, CD20 for B lymphocyte, CD56 for NK cell, CD68 for macrophage, CD117 for mast cell) and eosinophil chemotaxis-associated proteins (Erk, leptin, leptin receptor, pSTAT3, phospho-mTOR). As a result, Histomorphology showed that a diffuse pattern of dilated intercellular spaces was more frequently observed in pill-induced esophagitis, while reactive atypia and subepithelial papillary elongation were more often found in reflux esophagitis (P < 0.05, respectively). Interestingly, intraepithelial eosinophilic microabscess, intraepithelial pustule and diffuse pattern of dilated intercellular spaces were observed in 14% (3 cases), 9% (2 cases) and 32% (7 cases) of pill-induced esophagitis, respectively, but in no cases of reflux esophagitis. Regarding intraepithelial inflammatory infiltrates in pill-induced esophagitis, T lymphocytes were the most common cells, followed by eosinophil; 11 and 7 in one x400 power field, respectively. Intraepithelial pSTAT3-positive pattern was more frequently observed in pill-induced esophagitis than in reflux esophagitis, at 45% (10 cases) versus 10% (2 cases), respectively (P < 0.05). Considering the distal esophageal lesion only, intraepithelial pustule, diffuse dilated intercellular spaces and stromal macrophages were more frequently found in distal pill-induced esophagitis, whereas reactive atypia and intraepithelial mast cells in reflux esophagitis (P < 0.05, respectively). In conclusion, diffuse dilated

  7. Histomorphological and Immunophenotypic Features of Pill-Induced Esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Won; Kim, Byeong Gwan; Kim, Su Hwan; Kim, Won; Lee, Kook Lae; Byeon, Sun-ju; Choi, Euno; Chang, Mee Soo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate histomorphological and immunophenotypic features in pill-induced esophagitis. We comparatively evaluated the histomorphological, immunophenotypic features of pill-induced esophagitis vs. reflux esophagitis, as well as clinical information and endoscopic findings. Fifty-two tissue pieces from 22 cases of pill-induced esophagitis, 46 pieces from 20 reflux esophagitis, and 16 pieces from 14 control samples were subjected to immunohistochemistry for inflammatory infiltrates (CD3 for T lymphocyte, CD20 for B lymphocyte, CD56 for NK cell, CD68 for macrophage, CD117 for mast cell) and eosinophil chemotaxis-associated proteins (Erk, leptin, leptin receptor, pSTAT3, phospho-mTOR). As a result, Histomorphology showed that a diffuse pattern of dilated intercellular spaces was more frequently observed in pill-induced esophagitis, while reactive atypia and subepithelial papillary elongation were more often found in reflux esophagitis (P < 0.05, respectively). Interestingly, intraepithelial eosinophilic microabscess, intraepithelial pustule and diffuse pattern of dilated intercellular spaces were observed in 14% (3 cases), 9% (2 cases) and 32% (7 cases) of pill-induced esophagitis, respectively, but in no cases of reflux esophagitis. Regarding intraepithelial inflammatory infiltrates in pill-induced esophagitis, T lymphocytes were the most common cells, followed by eosinophil; 11 and 7 in one x400 power field, respectively. Intraepithelial pSTAT3-positive pattern was more frequently observed in pill-induced esophagitis than in reflux esophagitis, at 45% (10 cases) versus 10% (2 cases), respectively (P < 0.05). Considering the distal esophageal lesion only, intraepithelial pustule, diffuse dilated intercellular spaces and stromal macrophages were more frequently found in distal pill-induced esophagitis, whereas reactive atypia and intraepithelial mast cells in reflux esophagitis (P < 0.05, respectively). In conclusion, diffuse dilated

  8. Esophageal anastomosis.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Y; Wang, K-N; Chen, L-Q

    2015-01-01

    This review gives an overview of the esophageal anastomosis. The history, various techniques and substitution organs, their advantages and disadvantages, healing mechanism, complications, and actual trend of this essential part of esophageal surgery are described. The history of the esophageal anastomosis extending from the first anastomosis in 1901 to today has undergone more than one century. In the early days, the success rate of the anastomosis was extremely low. As the technology progressed, the anastomosis got significant achievement. Various anastomotic techniques are currently being used. However, controversies exist on the choice of anastomotic method concerning the success rate, postoperative complication and quality of life. How to choose the method, no one can give the best answer. We searched the manuscripts about the esophageal anastomoses in recent years and studied the controversy questions about the anastomosis. Performing an esophageal anastomosis is a technical matter, and suture healing is independent of the patient's biologic situation. Every anastomosis technique has its own merit, but the outcomes were different if it was performed by different surgeons, and we also found that the complication rate of the anastomosis was mainly associated with the surgeons. So the surgeons should learn from their previous experience and others to avoid technical errors.

  9. Esophageal transection

    PubMed Central

    Özçınar, Beyza; Peker, Kıvanç Derya; Demirel, Sertaç; Yanar, Fatih; Tuncer, Koray; İğci, Abdullah

    2016-01-01

    Herein, a case of intramural esophageal dissection is reported and the literature is reviewed. Intramural esophageal dissection is a rare but well described condition that is characterized by a laceration between the esophageal mucosa and submucosa but without perforation. A female patient aged 86 years was hospitalized with a diagnosis of abdominal aortic aneurysm. After placement of an aortic stent, she was started on intravenous heparin. After the procedure, the patient had retching and vomiting due to sedative drugs. On the first day after the procedure, the patient experienced sudden-onset chest pain, hematemesis, back pain and odynophagia. A hematoma was detected in the thoracic esophagus, which was opened during endoscopy and began to bleed suddenly owing to air insufflation. A false lumen was visualized within the esophagus. There was no perforation. The patient was followed up conservatively and discharged from the hospital uneventfully. In conclusion, we propose that esophageal transection, a condition that is widely regarded as relatively benign in the literature, has the potential to lead to perforation. It would be expected that most cases of esophageal transection would be managed conservatively. PMID:28149126

  10. Eosinophilic esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Gupte, Anand R; Draganov, Peter V

    2009-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis is increasingly recognized in adults. The diagnosis is based on the presence of both typical symptoms and pathologic findings on esophageal biopsy. Patients usually present with dysphagia, food impaction and/or reflux-like symptoms, and biopsy of the esophagus shows more than 15 eosinophils per high-power field. In addition, it is essential to exclude the presence of known causes of tissue eosinophilia such as gastroesophageal reflux disease, infections, malignancy, collagen vascular diseases, hypersensitivity, and inflammatory bowel disease. There are no standardized protocols for the therapy of eosinophilic esophagitis. A variety of therapeutic approaches including acid suppression, dietary modifications, topical corticosteroids and endoscopic dilation can be used alone or in combination. PMID:19115464

  11. Effect of total laryngectomy on esophageal motility

    SciTech Connect

    Hanks, J.B.; Fisher, S.R.; Meyers, W.C.; Christian, K.C.; Postlethwait, R.W.; Jones, R.S.

    1981-01-01

    Total laryngectomy for cancer can result in dysphagia and altered esophageal motility. Manometric changes in the upper esophageal sphincter (UES), and in proximal and distal esophageal function have been reported. However, most studies have failed to take into account radiation therapy and appropriate controls. We selected ten male patients (54.3 +/- 1.9 yr) for longitudinal manometric evaluation prior to laryngectomy then at two weeks and again six months later. No patient received preoperative radiation therapy, had a previous history of esophageal surgery, or developed a postoperative wound infection or fistula. Seven of ten patients had positive nodes and received 6,000-6,600 rads postoperative radiation therapy. Preoperatively 4 of 10 patients complained of dysphagia which did not significantly change following surgery and radiation. Two of three patients who did not complain of dysphagia preoperatively and received radiation postoperatively developed dysphagia. No patient without dysphagia preoperatively who received no radiation therapy developed symptoms. Our studies show that laryngectomy causes alterations in the UES resting and peak pressures but not in the proximal or distal esophagus, or the lower esophageal sphincter. These data also imply radiation therapy may be associated with progressive alterations in motility and symptomatology. Further study regarding the effects of radiation on esophageal motility and function are urged.

  12. Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Furuta, Glenn T.; Katzka, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Once considered a rare condition, eosinophilic esophagitis is now one of the most common conditions diagnosed during the assessment of feeding problems in children and during the evaluation of dysphagia and food impaction in adults.1 The entity exists worldwide but has been most extensively studied in Western countries, where its prevalence has been estimated to be 0.4% among all children and adults.2 Whether eosinophilic esophagitis is truly a new disease or simply a recently recognized one is uncertain.3 In this review, we consider the diagnostic criteria, pathophysiological and clinical features, and treatment of this increasingly prevalent disease. PMID:26488694

  13. Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Management of Bleeding Rectal Varices

    PubMed Central

    Augustine, Philip

    2017-01-01

    Rectal variceal bleeding, though rare, can pose significant morbidity and mortality in the wake of treatment failure. Conventional treatment utilizing endoscopic glue injection might not be feasible in all cases due to poor visualization and inadvertent missing of variceal source of bleed. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided rectal variceal management is a promising and effective modality. We provide real-time images and a video of EUS-guided precision management of rectal variceal bleed using coiling and glue in a cirrhotic. PMID:28879206

  14. [Update in the endoscopic management of benign esophageal stenoses].

    PubMed

    De la Garza González, Salvador Javier; García, Rafael Guevara

    2005-07-01

    Correction of dysphagia in benign esophageal stenosis without the need for surgery is a task that has been tried to be resolved for more than three centuries; in the last three decades this management has evolved with the development of pneumatic dilators and, more recently, alternative and adjuvant treatments like local steroid injection, electrocoagulation, use of argon plasma and the use of expandable stents have been added. The most common causes of benign esophageal stenosis are peptic esophagitis in first place followed by the ingestion of caustic substances; other less frequent etiologies are medication ingestion, stenosis secondary to a surgical anastomosis of the esophagus and stenosis related to mediastinal radiotherapy; the rarest causes include esophageal rings and membranes, sclerotherapy for esophageal varices, the prolonged use of a nasogastric tube, Crohn's disease, among others. A complete clinical, radiological and endoscopic evaluation of the patient is required to make the diagnosis, with the respective complimentary histopathologic study. At present, traditional esophageal dilatations, as well as pneumatic dilatations are the most common and effective treatments, the previously mentioned alternative and adjuvant treatments are used in exceptional cases, some with advantages over the others depending on each patient in particular and on the characteristics and etiology of the stenosis. The future seems to be aimed at the use of temporary expandable stents.

  15. Esophageal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease Tricuspid Valve Disease Cardiac Rhythm Disturbances Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Pediatric and Congenital Heart Disease Heart abnormalities that are present at birth in children, as well as in adults Atrial Septal Defect Ventricular Septal ... Arteriosus Single Ventricle Defects Lung, Esophageal, and ...

  16. Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... is to complete a test called an esophageal pH test. In this test, a very thin tube is placed through the nose into the esophagus and stomach, or a temporary sensor is placed in the esophagus via endoscopy. Both allow levels of acid in the esophagus to be monitored ...

  17. Detection of esophageal ulcerations with technetium-99m albumin sucralfate

    SciTech Connect

    Goff, J.S.; Adcock, K.A.; Schmelter, R.

    1986-07-01

    Technetium-99m albumin-sucralfate ((/sup 99m/Tc)Su) can be used to demonstrate peptic ulcer disease in man and animals. We evaluated the usefulness of (/sup 99m/Tc)Su for detecting various grades of esophagitis. (/sup 99m/Tc)Su adhered to the distal esophagus for up to 3 hr in five of six patients with esophageal ulcers but adhered to only two of nine with lesser degrees of esophagitis. No adherence was seen in five patients without esophagitis. Thus, (/sup 99m/Tc)Su may not be useful for detecting any but the most severe grade of esophagitis. Based on these results, we speculate that the previously documented beneficial effects of sucralfate on mild to moderate esophagitis may be due to other mechanisms besides adherence to the ulcerated mucosa.

  18. Segmental high amplitude peristaltic contractions in the distal esophagus.

    PubMed

    Freidin, N; Mittal, R K; Traube, M; McCallum, R W

    1989-06-01

    High amplitude peristaltic contractions in the distal esophagus ("nutcracker esophagus") is the most common manometric disorder seen in patients with noncardiac chest pain. Although this abnormality is found in the distal esophagus, the definition regarding its precise level in the esophagus is unclear. A careful analysis of 99 consecutive manometric tracings performed during a 1-yr period revealed that in patients with noncardiac chest pain and/or dysphagia, the location of the abnormal esophageal contractions varied: 1) in 11 patients the esophageal contractions were abnormal at 2 cm, as well as 7 cm, above the lower esophageal sphincter (LES); 2) the abnormality was limited to the 2-cm location above the LES in six patients; and 3) was confined to the 7-cm location above the LES in five patients. If the conventional criteria of averaging the distal esophageal contraction amplitudes at 2 and 7 cm above the LES were adopted, six of the 11 patients with segmental esophageal contraction abnormality would not have been identified. We suggest that, by inspection of each location of the distal esophagus separately, localized high amplitude contractions can be identified, and the distal 2 cm segment of the esophagus should be routinely included in the manometric evaluation.

  19. Esophageal dilation: simple and effective treatment for adults with eosinophilic esophagitis and esophageal rings and narrowing.

    PubMed

    Bohm, M; Richter, J E; Kelsen, S; Thomas, R

    2010-07-01

    The goal of this article is to present the results of the long-term treatment with esophageal dilation of a consecutive series of adults with eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). EoE in adults is a disease of middle aged white males, with recurrent food impactions and dysphagia. The exact treatment of EoE is unknown due to the uncertainty of the pathogenesis. Currently, the long-term follow-up of adult EoE patients is limited. Sixteen consecutive adult patients (12 males/4 females between ages 27 and 58 years) with EoE underwent a detailed history and baseline upper gastrointestinal endoscopy (EGD) with multiple esophageal biopsies. Thirteen had esophageal dilation. Fifteen were on proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy. After dilation, one patient was treated with a restrictive diet. One patient took prn fluticasone. Most of the patients had allergy testing for food and aeroallergens. Follow-up evaluation with similar testing was on average 22 months (range: 12-40 months). Six patients were not available for follow-up. None of the remaining 10 patients had a food impaction; one required further esophageal dilation. Only two patients had intermittent dysphagia. The average dysphagia score decreased from 2.1 to 0.3 (P < 0.002). The average number of eosinophils at follow-up was not significantly different from baseline (120 eosinophils/HPF proximally and 165 eosinophils/HPF distally (P= 0.75). The gross endoscopy findings were unchanged in all patients except one who normalized. A total of 62% and 75% of patients had positive tests for aeroallergens and food allergens, respectively. Over an average of two years, esophageal dilation provided excellent symptomatic relief among 10 adult EoE patients despite no improvement in the mucosal eosinophilia or gross endoscopic appearance.

  20. Herpetic esophagitis (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Herpetic esophagitis is a herpes simplex infection causing inflammation and ulcers of the esophagus. Symptoms include difficulty swallowing and pain (dysphagia). Herpetic esophagitis can be effectively ...

  1. Colonic varices demonstrated by technetium-99m red cell scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Brill, D.R.

    1987-03-01

    Colonic varices is a rare condition, generally associated with portal hypertension, which normally presents as acute, severe, gastrointestinal blood loss. A case is presented in which the varicosities were observed serendipitously in a patient with a pancreatic tumor, in whom the bleeding was not variceal but due to two small unrelated gastric hemangiomas. The literature is reviewed and scintigraphic features described.

  2. Upper gastrointestinal ectopic variceal bleeding treated with various endoscopic modalities

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang Woo; Cho, Eunae; Jun, Chung Hwan; Choi, Sung Kyu; Kim, Hyun Soo; Park, Chang Hwan; Rew, Jong Sun; Cho, Sung Bum; Kim, Hee Joon; Han, Mingui; Cho, Kyu Man

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Ectopic variceal bleeding is a rare (2–5%) but fatal gastrointestinal bleed in patients with portal hypertension. Patients with ectopic variceal bleeding manifest melena, hematochezia, or hematemesis, which require urgent managements. Definitive therapeutic modalities of ectopic varices are not yet standardized because of low incidence. Various therapeutic modalities have been applied on the basis of the experiences of experts or availability of facilities, with varying results. Patient concerns: We have encountered eight cases of gastrointestinal ectopic variceal bleeding in five patients in the last five years. Diagnoses: All patients were diagnosed with liver cirrhosis presenting melena or hematemesis. Interventions: All patients were treated with various endoscopic modalities (endoscopic variceal obturation [EVO] with cyanoacrylate in five cases, endoscopic variceal band ligation (EVL) in two cases, hemoclipping in one case). Outcomes: Satisfactory hemostasis was achieved without radiologic interventions in all cases. EVO and EVL each caused one case of portal biliopathy, and EVL induced ulcer bleeding in one case. Lessons: EVO generally accomplished better results of variceal obturations than EVL or hemoclipping, without serious adverse events. EVO may be an effective modality for control of ectopic variceal bleeding without radiologic intervention or surgery. PMID:28072750

  3. Vascular Plug-Assisted Retrograde Transvenous Obliteration for the Treatment of Gastric Varices and Hepatic Encephalopathy: A Prospective Multicenter Study.

    PubMed

    Gwon, Dong Il; Kim, Young Hwan; Ko, Gi-Young; Kim, Jong Woo; Ko, Heung Kyu; Kim, Jin Hyoung; Shin, Ji Hoon; Yoon, Hyun-Ki; Sung, Kyu-Bo

    2015-11-01

    To evaluate technical and clinical outcomes of vascular plug-assisted retrograde transvenous obliteration (PARTO) for the treatment of gastric varices (GVs) and hepatic encephalopathy (HE). From March 2012 to June 2014, 73 consecutive patients (47 men, 26 women; mean age, 59 y; range, 28-79 y) who had undergone PARTO were evaluated in a prospective multicenter study. Among 57 patients with GVs, 28 had GVs in danger of rupture, 23 had experienced recent bleeding, and 6 had active variceal bleeding. The 16 patients with HE had been treated unsuccessfully with medical therapies. Placement of the vascular plug and subsequent gelatin sponge embolization were technically successful in all 73 patients. There were no procedure-related complications. Follow-up CT obtained within 1 wk after PARTO showed complete thrombosis of GVs and portosystemic shunts in 72 of 73 patients (98.6%). Sixty patients who underwent follow-up longer than 3 mo showed complete obliteration of GVs and portosystemic shunts. There were no cases of variceal bleeding or HE at the end of follow-up (mean, 544 d). Improvement in Child-Pugh score was observed in 24 patients (40%) at 1-mo follow-up. Worsening of ascites and esophageal varices was observed in 14 (23.3%) and 16 (26.7%) patients at 3-mo follow-up. The present results of PARTO indicate that it can be rapidly performed with high technical success and durable clinical efficacy for the treatment of GVs and HE in the presence of a portosystemic shunt. Therefore, PARTO might be considered a first-line treatment in appropriate patients. Copyright © 2015 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Esophageal involvement in juvenile localized scleroderma: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Guariso, G; Conte, S; Galeazzi, F; Vettorato, M G; Martini, G; Zulian, F

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate the esophageal involvement in patients with juvenile localized scleroderma (JLS). A cohort of patients with JLS underwent esophageal stationary manometry to evaluate esophageal motility and lower esophageal sphincter (LES) function, distal esophagus 24-hour pH-monitoring to detect gastroesophageal reflux (GER) and upper gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy to evaluate the presence of esophagitis. Fourteen patients (10 female, mean age 13.3 yrs, mean disease duration 4.7 yrs), took part in the study. Ten had linear scleroderma, three deep morphea, and one generalized morphea. Esophageal abnormalities were found in 8/14 patients (57%): pathological acid exposure on 24-hour pH-monitoring was found in 7; non-specific esophageal motor abnormalities in 5 and endoscopy-proved esophagitis in 5 symptomatic patients. Interestingly, 5 out of 8 patients with esophageal abnormalities were found to be ANA positive, and 2 were also RF positive. Esophageal involvement is not unusual in patients with juvenile localized scleroderma, even in the absence of specific symptoms. These preliminary findings, if confirmed in a larger cohort of patients, may support the indication for an extensive GI evaluation especially in presence of positive autoantibodies or specific GI symptoms.

  5. Embolization of Large Gastric Varices Using Vena Cava Filter and Coils

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, Jason M.; Shah, Himanshu Stecker, Michael S.; Namyslowski, Jan

    2004-08-15

    A 40-year-old male with alcoholic cirrhosis and portal hypertension presented with acute variceal hemorrhage. Abdominal CT scan and endoscopy revealed large gastric varices. The patient underwent a TIPS procedure. Portal venography demonstrated persistent filling of the large gastric varices with associated high-flow spontaneous splenorenal shunt. Because of the large size of the varices, a Simon-Nitinol filter was used in conjunction with multiple embolization coils to enable successful occlusion of the varices.

  6. Management of esophageal disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, L.D.; Mercer, C.D.; McCallum, R.W.; Kozarek, R.

    1987-01-01

    This book integrates gastroenterology and thoracic surgery to detail the comprehensive management of esophageal disease. It describes radiologic and functional evaluation of the esophagus, endoscopy, medical and surgical treatments, and results and also covers gastroesophageal reflux disease, tumors motility, esophageal replacement, intubation, esophageal diverticula, caustic esophageal injury. It presents Dr. Hill's surgical procedures in detail.

  7. Respiratory function after esophageal replacement in children.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Gabriele; Vrijlandt, Elianne J L E; Arets, Hubertus G M; Koppelman, Gerard H; Van der Zee, David C; Hulscher, Jan B F; Zwaveling, Sander

    2017-03-21

    Children born with esophageal atresia require an anastomosis between the proximal and distal esophagus. When this distance is too wide (long gap esophageal atresia, LGEA) esophageal replacement strategies have to be deployed. The aim of this study was to assess long-term respiratory morbidity and lung function after esophageal replacement with either stomach (gastric pull-up, GPU) or jejunum (jejunal interposition, JI) for LGEA. Retrospective cohort study. Patients operated with GPU and JI for LGEA (1985-2007) underwent a semi-structured interview and lung function testing (LFT). Seven GPU-patients and eight JI-patients were included. Median age was 12years. One patient per group could not perform LFT. Respiratory symptoms were reported by 13/15 patients (7/7 GPU-patients vs 6/8 JI-patients). All LFT items were lower than reference values; 6/13 patients showed restriction and 6/13 obstruction. All six GPU-patients had abnormal TLC and/or FEV1/FVC vs 3/7 after JI. Restriction was noted in 4/6 GPU-patients vs 2/7 JI-patients. After esophageal replacement for LGEA many children have impaired lung function and respiratory symptoms are common. Lung volumes seem decreased after GPU compared to JI. This may be caused by the intrathoracic stomach which may limit normal lung growth. Respiratory follow-up in adult life is important after esophageal replacement. III. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Addition of Somatostatin After Successful Endoscopic Variceal Ligation Does not Prevent Early Rebleeding in Comparison to Placebo: A Double Blind Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ashish; Jha, Sanjeev K.; Mittal, Vibhu V.; Sharma, Praveen; Sharma, Barjesh C.; Sarin, Shiv K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Efficacy of endoscopic sclerotherapy in controlling acute variceal bleeding is significantly improved when vasoactive drug is added. Endoscopic variceal ligation (EVL) is superior to sclerotherapy. Whether efficacy of EVL will also improve with addition of somatostatin is not known. We compared EVL plus somatostatin versus EVL plus placebo in control of acute variceal bleeding. Methods Consecutive cirrhotic patients with acute esophageal variceal bleeding were enrolled. After emergency EVL, patients were randomized to receive either somatostatin (250 mcg/hr) or placebo infusion. Primary endpoint was treatment failure within 5 days. Treatment failure was defined as fresh hematemesis ≥2 h after start of therapy, or a 3 gm drop in Hb, or death. Results 61 patients were enrolled (EVL plus somatostatin group, n = 31 and EVL plus placebo group, n = 30). The baseline characteristics were similar. Within the initial 5-day period, the frequency of treatment failure was similar in both the groups (EVL plus somatostatin group 8/31 [26%] versus EVL plus placebo group 7/30 [23%]; P = 1.000). The mortality was also similar in the two groups (3/31 [10%] vs. 3/30 [10%]; P = 1.000). Baseline HVPG ≥19 mm Hg and active bleeding at index endoscopy were independent predictors of treatment failure. Conclusions Addition of somatostatin infusion to EVL therapy does not offer any advantage in control of acute variceal bleeding or reducing mortality. The reason for this may be its failure to maintain sustained reduction in portal pressure for five days. Active bleeding at index endoscopy and high baseline HVPG should help choose early alternative treatment options. Trial registered with ClincalTrials.gov vide NCT01267669. PMID:26628838

  9. MULTIMODAL IMAGING IN VORTEX VEIN VARICES.

    PubMed

    Veronese, Chiara; Staurenghi, Giovanni; Pellegrini, Marco; Maiolo, Chiara; Primavera, Laura; Morara, Mariachiara; Armstrong, Grayson W; Ciardella, Antonio P

    2017-03-22

    The aim of this study is to describe the clinical presentation of vortex vein varices with multimodal imaging. The authors carried out a retrospective case series of eight patients (7 female, 1 male) with an average age of 60.2 years (min 8, max 84, median 68.5) presenting with vortex vein varices. All patients were evaluated at the Sant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy and at Luigi Sacco Hospital, University of Milan, Milan, Italy. Patients underwent complete ophthalmologic examinations, including best corrected visual acuity, intraocular pressure, anterior segment, and fundus examination. Imaging studies, including fundus color photography, near-infrared reflectance imaging, fundus autofluorescence, fluorescein angiography, indocyanine green angiography, and spectral-domain enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography were also performed. Ultra-widefield fluorescein angiography and ultra-widefield indocyanine angiography using the Heidelberg Retina Angiograph and the Staurenghi 230 SLO Retina Lens were used to demonstrate the disappearance of all retinal lesions when pressure was applied to the globe. All eight cases initially presented to the emergency room. One patient presented secondary to trauma, two patients presented for suspected hemangioma, whereas the other five were referred to the authors' hospitals for suspected retinal lesions. On examination, retinal abnormalities were identified in all 8 patients, with 7 (87.5%) oculus dexter and 1 (12.5%) oculus sinister, and with 1 (12.5%) inferotemporally, 3 (37.5%) superonasally, 3 (37.5%) inferonasally, and 1 (12.5%) inferiorly. Fundus color photography showed an elevated lesion in seven patients and a nonelevated red lesion in one patient. In all patients, near-infrared reflectance imaging showed a hyporeflective lesion in the periphery of the retina. Fundus autofluorescence identified round hypofluorescent rings surrounding weakly hyperfluorescent lesions in all

  10. Embolization of Bleeding Stomal Varices by Direct Percutaneous Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Arulraj, Ramakrishnan; Mangat, Kamarjit S.; Tripathi, Dhiraj

    2011-02-15

    Stomal varices can occur in patients with stoma in the presence of portal hypertension. Suture ligation, sclerotherapy, angiographic embolization, stoma revision, beta blockade, portosystemic shunt, and liver transplantation have been described as therapeutic options for bleeding stomal varices. We report the case of a 21-year-old patient with primary sclerosing cholangitis and colectomy with ileostomy for ulcerative colitis, where stomal variceal bleeding was successfully treated by direct percutaneous embolization. We consider percutaneous embolization to be an effective way of treating acute stomal bleeding in decompensated patients while awaiting decisions regarding shunt procedures or liver transplantation.

  11. Outcomes of TIPS for Treatment of Gastroesophageal Variceal Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Parvinian, Ahmad; Gaba, Ron C.

    2014-01-01

    Variceal hemorrhage is a life-threatening complication of cirrhosis that requires a multidisciplinary approach to management. The transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) procedure is a minimally invasive image-guided intervention used for secondary prevention of bleeding and as salvage therapy in acute hemorrhage. This review focuses on the role of TIPS in the setting of variceal hemorrhage, with emphasis on the pathophysiology and conventional management of variceal hemorrhage, current and emerging indications for TIPS creation, TIPS clinical outcomes, and the role of adjuvant embolotherapy. PMID:25177086

  12. Carvedilol versus propranolol effect on hepatic venous pressure gradient at 1 month in patients with index variceal bleed: RCT.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vipin; Rawat, Ramakant; Shalimar; Saraya, Anoop

    2017-03-01

    Endoscopic variceal ligation (EVL) plus beta blocker is the mainstay treatment after index bleed to prevent rebleed. Primary objective of this study was to compare EVL plus propranolol versus EVL plus carvedilol on reduction of HVPG after 1 month of therapy. Patients of cirrhosis presenting with index esophageal variceal bleed received standard treatment (Somatostatin therapy f/b EVL) following which HVPG was measured and patients were randomized to propranolol or carvedilol group if HVPG was >12 mmHg. Standard endotherapy protocol was continued in both groups. HVPG was again measured at 1 month of treatment. Out of 129 patients of index esophageal variceal bleed, 59 patients were eligible and randomized into carvedilol (n = 30) and propranolol (n = 29). At 1 month of treatment, decrease in heart rate, mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) and HVPG was significant within each group (p = 0.001). Percentage decrease in MAP was significantly more in carvedilol group as compared to propranolol group (p = 0.04). Number of HVPG responders (HVPG decrease >20 % or below 12 mmHg) was significantly more in carvedilol group (22/29) as compared to propranolol group (14/28), p = 0.04. Carvedilol is more effective in reducing portal pressure in patients with cirrhosis with esophageal bleed. Though a larger study is required to substantiate this, the results in this study are promising for carvedilol. Clinical trials online government registry (CTRI/2013/10/004119). Trial registration number CTRI/2013/10/004119.

  13. Dynamic esophageal scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Reilley, J.J.; Malmud, L.S.; Fisher, R.S.; Applegate, G.; DeVegvar, M.L.

    1982-06-01

    Esophageal scintigraphy was developed in order to quantitatively evaluate esophageal transit in patients with a variety of esophageal disorders. The study is performed with orally administered technetium-99m sulfur colloid in water, using a gamma camera on-line to a digital computer. Esophageal transit is expressed as the percent emptying for each of the first 15-sec intervals for 10 min after an initial swallow and at 15-sec intervals after serial swallows. Esophageal transit is significantly decreased in patients with motor disorders of the esophagus, compared to normal controls. In patients with reflux esophagitis, esophageal transit was abnormal when the reflux disease was accompanied by abnormal motor function. The technique we describe is the first quantitative test of esophageal function; it is a useful, sensitive, scintigraphic technique for evaluation of esophageal transit.

  14. Successful endoscopic hemoclipping of an esophageal perforation.

    PubMed

    Sung, H Y; Kim, J I; Cheung, D Y; Cho, S H; Park, S-H; Han, J-Y; Kim, J K; Han, S W; Choi, K Y; Chung, I S

    2007-01-01

    We describe a case of esophageal perforation that resulted from a fishbone. A 71-year-old man had had a fishbone impacted in the lower esophagus for 2 days. At presentation, the bone was dislodged at endoscopy; one round opening in a deep ulceration was detected when the fishbone was removed. The perforation was closed by endoscopic hemoclipping, after the removal of the fishbone. A thoracic computed tomography revealed air around the esophagus, aorta and bronchus and the presence of a pleural effusion. These findings suggested mediastinal emphysema and mediastinitis due to the esophageal perforation after the removal of the fishbone. Esophagography revealed a focal esophageal defect and linear contrast leakage at the distal esophagus. The mediastinal emphysema and pleural effusion successfully resolved after the endoscopic hemoclip application and conservative management of the perforation.

  15. Cellulose fiber diet pills. A new cause of esophageal obstruction.

    PubMed

    Jones, K R; Pillsbury, H C

    1990-09-01

    Cellulose fiber diet pills have recently become a popular form of weight control. In the past 2 months, we have seen two patients in whom ingestion of these pills has resulted in complete distal esophageal obstruction. Further studies revealed that each patient had a previously undiagnosed anatomical abnormality of the distal esophagus; in one case a Schatzki's ring, and in the other a stricture probably secondary to chronic reflux. We conclude that patients with known esophageal narrowing, or with a history of reflux and/or dysphagia, should use cellulose fiber diet pills only with extreme caution.

  16. Stomal Varices: Treatment by Percutaneous Transhepatic Coil Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Kishimoto, Keiko; Hara, Akihiko; Arita, Takeshi; Tsukamoto, Katsuhiko; Matsui, Norichika; Kaneyuki, Toshihiro; Matsunaga, Naofumi

    1999-11-15

    Bleeding from stomal varices in a patient with portal hypertension, uncontrolled by surgical ligation and sclerotherapy, was well controlled by percutaneous transhepatic embolization with platinum and stainless-steel coils.

  17. Esophageal dilation in eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Richter, Joel E

    2015-10-01

    Tissue remodeling with scaring is common in adult EoE patients with long standing disease. This is the major factor contributing to their complaints of solid food dysphagia and recurrent food impactions. The best tests to define the degree of remodeling are barium esophagram, high resolution manometry and endoscopy. Many physicians are fearful to dilate EoE patients because of concerns about mucosal tears and perforations. However, multiple recent case series attest to the safety of esophageal dilation and its efficacy with many patients having symptom relief for an average of two years. This chapter will review the sordid history of esophageal dilation in EoE patients and outline how to perform this procedure safely. The key is graduated dilation over one to several sessions to a diameter of 15-18 mm. Postprocedural pain is to be expected and mucosal tears are a sign of successful dilation, not complications. In some healthy adults, occasional dilation may be preferred to regular use of medications or restricted diets. This approach is now supported by recent EoE consensus statements and societal guidelines.

  18. Lower esophageal sphincter pressure in histologic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Welch, R W; Luckmann, K; Ricks, P; Drake, S T; Bannayan, G; Owensby, L

    1980-06-01

    The fasting lower esophageal sphincter pressure of 18 normal volunteers was compared to 22 patients with symptoms and objective evidence of gastroesophageal reflux. Lower esophageal sphincter pressure was measured by rapid pull-through using an 8-lumen radially perfused catheter that sampled pressure every45 degrees around the circumference of the sphincter. The 22 reflux patients were subdivided for analysis into two groups, those with an acute inflammatory infiltrate on biopsy and those without inflammation. Those patients without inflammatory esophagitis had normal sphincter pressures. Those with a definite inflammatory infiltrate had pressures significantly less than normal. The least reliable separation between normals and those with inflammatory esophagitis occurred in the anterior orientations. We conclude that while basal lower esophageal sphincter pressure measurement may identify patients with reflux and inflammatory esophagitis, it is of no help in identifying those patients with reflux unassociated with inflammation. Decreased basal fasting LESP does not appear to be the most important primary determinant of gastroesophageal reflux.

  19. Prevention and treatment of variceal haemorrhage in 2017.

    PubMed

    Brunner, Felix; Berzigotti, Annalisa; Bosch, Jaime

    2017-01-01

    Variceal haemorrhage is a major complication of portal hypertension that still causes high mortality in patients with cirrhosis. Improved knowledge of the pathophysiology of portal hypertension has recently led to a more comprehensive approach to prevent all the complications of this condition. Thus, optimal treatment of portal hypertension requires a strategy that takes into account the clinical stage of the disease and all the major variables that affect the risk of progression to the next stage and death. In patients with compensated liver disease, the correction of factors influencing the progression of fibrosis, in particular aetiologic factors, is now feasible in many cases and should be achieved to prevent the development or progression of gastroesophageal varices and hepatic decompensation. Once gastroesophageal varices have developed, non-selective beta-blockers remain the cornerstone of therapy. Carvedilol provides a greater decrease in portal pressure and is currently indicated as a first-choice therapy for primary prophylaxis. The treatment of acute variceal haemorrhage includes a combination of vasoactive drugs, antibiotics and endoscopic variceal band ligation. In high-risk patients, the early use of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) lowers the risk of re-bleeding and improves survival. Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt is the choice for uncontrolled variceal bleeding; a self-expandable metal stent or balloon tamponade can be used as a bridging measure. The combination of non-selective beta-blockers and endoscopic variceal band ligation reduces the risk of recurrent variceal bleeding and improves survival. In these cases, statins seem to further improve survival. Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt is indicated in patients who rebleed during secondary prophylaxis.

  20. ENDOSCOPIC DIAGNOSIS AND THERAPY IN GASTRO-ESOPAGEAL VARICEAL BLEEDING

    PubMed Central

    Sanyal, Arun J.

    2016-01-01

    Gastroesophageal variceal hemorrhage is a medical emergency with high morbidity and mortality. Endoscopic therapy is the mainstay of management of bleeding varices. It requires attention to technique and the appropriate choice of therapy for a given patient at a given point in time. Subjects must be monitored continuously after initiation of therapy for control of bleeding and second line definitive therapies introduced quickly if endoscopic and pharmacologic treatment fails. PMID:26142034

  1. The Role of Medical Therapy for Variceal Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Bhutta, Abdul Q; Garcia-Tsao, Guadalupe

    2015-07-01

    Acute variceal hemorrhage (AVH) is a lethal complication of portal hypertension and should be suspected in every patient with liver cirrhosis who presents with upper gastrointestinal bleed. AVH-related mortality has decreased in the last few decades from 40% to 15%-20% due to advances in the general and specific management of variceal hemorrhage. This review summarizes current management of AVH and prevention of recurrent hemorrhage with a focus on pharmacologic therapy.

  2. [Esophageal moniliasis].

    PubMed

    Ramírez Degollado, J; Martínez Aguilar, A; Peniche Bojórquez, J

    1978-01-01

    Esophageal moniliasis is found rarely. It has been described mainly in chronically ill patients, who receive antibiotics and corticoesteroids. Early diagnosis and treatment betters their prognosis. Nine patients, 5 males and 4 females were studies in Hospital General del Centro Medico Nacional in Mexico City. Their agesranged from 26 to 77 years, with a mean of 49 years. All patients were chronically ill and 7 of them were treated in the intensive care unit. Three had disphagia, 3 retrosternal pain, and 2 gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Eight patients had high W.B.C., 3 irregular filling defects on X ray studies, and on endoscopy, all showed a pseudomembranous white yellowish exudate, underneath it the mucosa was inflamed, irregular and bled scantily. In 5 out of 9 patients biopsy and a smear confirmed the diagnosis. Eight patients treated with nystatin were cured. This disorder must be suspected in patients with disphagia and retrosternal pain; esophagoscopy is the prefered procedure to establish this diagnosis.

  3. Esophageal atresia and tracheo-esophageal fistula.

    PubMed

    van der Zee, David C; Tytgat, Stefaan H A; van Herwaarden, Maud Y A

    2017-04-01

    Management of esophageal atresia has merged from correction of the anomaly to the complete spectrum of management of esophageal atresia and all its sequelae. It is the purpose of this article to give an overview of all aspects involved in taking care of patients with esophageal atresia between January 2011 and June 2016, as well as the patients who were referred from other centers. Esophageal atresia is a complex anomaly that has many aspects that have to be dealt with and complications to be solved. By centralizing these patients in centers of expertise it is believed that the best care can be given. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Symptoms and esophageal motility based on phenotypic findings of scleroderma.

    PubMed

    Tang, D M; Pathikonda, M; Harrison, M; Fisher, R S; Friedenberg, F K; Parkman, H P

    2013-01-01

    Scleroderma esophagus is characterized by ineffective peristalsis and reduced esophageal sphincter pressure. Esophageal disease in scleroderma can precede cutaneous manifestations and has been associated with Raynaud's phenomenon (RP) and pulmonary fibrosis (PF). The objective of the study is to evaluate the impact of cutaneous findings, RP, and PF on demographics, symptoms, and esophageal motility in patients with scleroderma. Scleroderma patients with esophageal involvement were included after review of esophageal manometries and charts over a 6-year period. High-resolution esophageal manometry was performed. Patients completed a symptom questionnaire. The study enrolled 28 patients (22 females; mean age 50.3 ± 12.8 years) with scleroderma esophagus. Patients without skin involvement (n= 12) reported more severe heartburn (P= 0.02), while those with cutaneous findings (n= 16) had more frequent dysphagia with solids (P= 0.02). Patients with RP (n= 22) had lower amplitude of distal esophageal contractions (P= 0.01) than those without RP (n= 6). Patients with PF (n= 11) reported more severe coughing and wheezing (both P= 0.03) than those without lung disease (n= 17). This study highlights subgroups of patients with scleroderma esophagus according to phenotypic findings of dermatologic changes, RP, and PF. Heartburn and dysphagia are important symptoms that may be associated with different stages of disease progression based on skin changes in scleroderma. RP was associated with greater esophageal dysmotility. Coughing and wheezing were more severe in patients with PF.

  5. Dabigatran-induced esophagitis: The prevalence and endoscopic characteristics.

    PubMed

    Toya, Yosuke; Nakamura, Shotaro; Tomita, Kazumitsu; Matsuda, Nozomi; Abe, Keinosuke; Abiko, Yukito; Orikasa, Shunsuke; Akasaka, Risaburo; Chiba, Toshimi; Uesugi, Noriyuki; Sugai, Tamotsu; Matsumoto, Takayuki

    2016-03-01

    There have been some descriptions of dabigatran-induced esophagitis in the literature. The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence and endoscopic characteristics of the disease. We reviewed the endoscopic database and medical records of 91 patients with dabigatran internal use who underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. The frequency of dabigatran-induced esophagitis and its endoscopic findings were retrospectively analyzed. In addition, the clinical characteristics were compared between patients with dabigatran-induced esophagitis and those without the disease. Dabigatran-induced esophagitis was found in 19 of 91 (20.9%) patients. Of the 19 patients with the esophagitis, 18 (94.7%) showed longitudinally sloughing epithelial casts in the mid and/or lower esophagus, which may be characteristic endoscopic findings of this disease. Symptomatic patients were more frequent in patients with dabigatran-induced esophagitis (68.4%) than those without (37.5%, P = 0.02). Other factors including age, gender, coexistence of hiatal hernia, gastroesophageal reflux disease, or concomitant other medications did not differ between the two groups. Dabigatran causes the esophageal mucosal injury in approximately 20% of patients. Longitudinally sloughing casts in the distal esophagus are characteristic of dabigatran-induced esophagitis. © 2015 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  6. Assessment and protection of esophageal mucosal integrity in patients with heartburn without esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Woodland, Philip; Lee, Chung; Duraisamy, Yasotha; Duraysami, Yasotha; Farré, Ricard; Dettmar, Peter; Sifrim, Daniel

    2013-04-01

    Intact esophageal mucosal integrity is essential to prevent symptoms during gastroesophageal reflux events. Approximately 70% of patients with heartburn have macroscopically normal esophageal mucosa. In patients with heartburn, persistent functional impairment of esophageal mucosal barrier integrity may underlie remaining symptoms. Topical protection of a functionally vulnerable mucosa may be an attractive therapeutic strategy. We aimed to evaluate esophageal mucosal functional integrity in patients with heartburn without esophagitis, and test the feasibility of an alginate-based topical mucosal protection. Three distal esophageal biopsies were obtained from 22 patients with heartburn symptoms, and 22 control subjects. In mini-Ussing chambers, the change in transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) of biopsies when exposed to neutral, weakly acidic, and acidic solutions was measured. The experiment was repeated in a further 10 patients after pretreatment of biopsies with sodium alginate, viscous control, or liquid control "protectant" solutions. Biopsy exposure to neutral solution caused no change in TER. Exposure to weakly acidic and acidic solutions caused a greater reduction in TER in patients than in controls (weakly acid -7.2% (95% confidence interval (CI) -9.9 to -4.5) vs. 3.2% (-2.2 to 8.6), P<0.05; acidic -22.8% (-31.4 to 14.1) vs. -9.4% (-17.2 to -1.6), P<0.01). Topical pretreatment with alginate but not with control solutions prevented the acid-induced decrease in TER (-1% (-5.9 to 3.9) vs. -13.5 (-24.1 to -3.0) vs. -13.2 (-21.7 to -4.8), P<0.05). Esophageal mucosa in patients with heartburn without esophagitis shows distinct vulnerability to acid and weakly acidic exposures. Experiments in vitro suggest that such vulnerable mucosa may be protected by application of an alginate-containing topical solution.

  7. Alteration of Esophageal Microbiome by Antibiotic Treatment Does Not Affect Incidence of Rat Esophageal Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Akinari; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Nagami, Yasuaki; Tanaka, Fumio; Yamagami, Hirokazu; Tanigawa, Tetsuya; Shiba, Masatsugu; Tominaga, Kazunari; Watanabe, Toshio; Gi, Min; Wanibuchi, Hideki; Arakawa, Tetsuo

    2016-11-01

    Recent studies suggest that chronic inflammation-associated cancer is relevant to microbiome. Esophageal adenocarcinoma arises from an inflammatory condition called Barrett's esophagus, which is caused by gastroesophageal reflux. We hypothesized that esophageal microbiome plays a role in carcinogenesis of esophageal adenocarcinoma. We investigated whether alteration of microbiome using antibiotics affects the development of esophageal adenocarcinoma in a rat model. Seven-week-old male Wistar rats which had undergone esophagojejunostomy were divided into control (n = 21) and antibiotic groups (n = 22) at 21 weeks after surgery. Control animals were given drinking water, while the other group was given penicillin G and streptomycin in drinking water until rats were killed at 40 weeks after operation. Incidence rates of Barrett's esophagus and adenocarcinoma in each group were evaluated by histological analysis. DNA was extracted from a portion of the distal esophagus, and the microbiome was investigated using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis. All rats in both groups developed Barrett's esophagus. Incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma was similar between both groups with a trend to reduced incidence in the antibiotics group (89 % in the control group, 71 % in the antibiotics group, P = 0.365). T-RFLP analysis showed that esophageal microbiome was different between two groups such as the proportion of Lactobacillales was lower in the antibiotics group and Clostridium cluster XIVa and XVIII was higher in the antibiotics group. Alteration of microbiome does not affect the incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma. Microbiome may not contribute to the development of esophageal adenocarcinoma.

  8. Frequency of eosinophilic esophagitis in patients with esophageal symptoms: a single-center Turkish experience.

    PubMed

    Altun, R; Akbas, E; Yıldırım, A E; Öcal, S; Korkmaz, M; Selcuk, H

    2013-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic, immune/antigen-mediated esophageal disease characterized with symptoms related to esophageal dysfunction and eosinophil-predominant inflammation. There has been a dramatic increase in the diagnosis of this disease in recent years. The primary objective of this study was to determine the frequency of EoE in adult patients who were evaluated by gastroenterologists in our clinic with esophageal symptoms. Between November 2010 and May 2011, 311 adult patients who were evaluated in our clinic with esophageal symptoms were enrolled prospectively. All patients underwent endoscopy and had biopsies taken. Gastroesophageal reflux disease was excluded by either proton pump inhibitory treatment or 24-hour ambulatory pH monitorization. The diagnosis was confirmed by one independent pathologist. Frequency of EoE in patients with esophageal symptoms was 2.6% (n = 8; four men and four women). Mean age at diagnosis was 40.2 ± 8 years. Heartburn was the predominant symptom in patients (75% of the patients), and 87.5% (n = 7) of patients had more than one symptom at diagnosis. Nearly 38% of the patients (n = 3) had a history of allergic disease. Endoscopic findings were as follows: transient/fixed esophageal rings (25%), white exudates (25%), and normal appearance (50%). Median number of circulating eosinophils was 208 (93-659)/mm(3) . Median number of intraepithelial eosinophils in proximal-middle 1/3 part and distal 1/3 part of esophagus were 0 (0-50)/hpf and 37 (16-50)/hpf, respectively. In conclusion, EoE is not rare in Turkey, and it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with esophageal symptoms.

  9. The Esophageal Propulsive Force: Esophageal Response to Acute Obstruction*

    PubMed Central

    Winship, Daniel H.; Zboralske, F. Frank

    1967-01-01

    The response of the normal human esophagus to an obstructing intraluminal bolus was investigated and compared to the response evoked by transient intraluminal distention. A balloon, immobilized within the esophagus by external attachment to a force transducer, was inflated with from 3 to 25 ml of air for from 3 to 210 sec. Pressure phenomena occurring in the esophagus were simultaneously recorded from the body of the esophagus above and below the balloon. Transient distention (5 sec or less) with small volumes (5 ml or less) often evoked a secondary peristaltic wave in the esophagus distal to the balloon, but infrequently resulted in the registration of any force exerted upon the balloon to drive it downward. Conversely, distentions of longer duration and with greater volume elicited an esophageal propulsive force exerted upon the balloon oriented to propel it aborally, and much less often evoked a propagated wave of secondary peristalsis. The propulsive force, obviously resulting from esophageal muscular contraction, occurred promptly, and once initiated, was sustained until deflation of the balloon. It varied widely in magnitude, from 4 to 200 g, and was associated with no motor phenomena recorded from the body of the esophagus proximal or distal to the balloon which could account for its presence, onset, magnitude, or duration. The force was inhibited by deglutition, but arrival of the primary peristaltic wave at the bolus resulted in augmentation of the force. When the obstructing balloon was freed from its attachment, the persistent, stationary force was converted to a propagated one that propelled the balloon before it. It the balloon was arrested before entering the stomach, the moving contraction was also arrested and the persistent propulsive force acting upon the balloon was maintained. The velocity of the moving contraction wave was determined in great part by the resistance offered by the bolus. Unrestrained, the balloon was propelled aborally at 4-8 cm

  10. Biomechanics of esophageal function in eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Read, Andrew J; Pandolfino, John E

    2012-10-01

    Eosinophilic Esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the esophagus triggered by an immune response that leads to symptoms of dysphagia, chest pain, and food impaction. EoE is a clinicopathologic syndrome that requires clinical symptoms and pathologic findings for a diagnosis. The inflammatory process and eosinophilic infiltration of the esophagus in EoE lead to fibrosis and structural changes within the esophagus that cause esophageal dysfunction. The biomechanics of the esophageal function in EoE have been explored using manometry, impedance planimetry, barium esophagograms, and endoscopic ultrasound. These studies have identified several biomechanical changes to the esophagus in EoE including pan-esophageal pressurization on manometry, changes in esophageal compliance with decreased distentisbility by impedance planimetry, decreased esophageal luminal diameter by esophagograms, and dysfunction in the esophageal longitudinal muscles by endoscopic ultrasound. Treatments for the disease involve dietary changes, immunosuppressive drugs, and dilation techniques. However, the data regarding the effect of these therapies on altering mechanical properties of the esophagus is limited. As the pathogenesis of esophageal dysfunction in EoE appears multifactorial, further study of the biomechanics of EoE is critical to better diagnose, monitor and treat the disease.

  11. Biomechanics of Esophageal Function in Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Pandolfino, John E

    2012-01-01

    Eosinophilic Esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the esophagus triggered by an immune response that leads to symptoms of dysphagia, chest pain, and food impaction. EoE is a clinicopathologic syndrome that requires clinical symptoms and pathologic findings for a diagnosis. The inflammatory process and eosinophilic infiltration of the esophagus in EoE lead to fibrosis and structural changes within the esophagus that cause esophageal dysfunction. The biomechanics of the esophageal function in EoE have been explored using manometry, impedance planimetry, barium esophagograms, and endoscopic ultrasound. These studies have identified several biomechanical changes to the esophagus in EoE including pan-esophageal pressurization on manometry, changes in esophageal compliance with decreased distentisbility by impedance planimetry, decreased esophageal luminal diameter by esophagograms, and dysfunction in the esophageal longitudinal muscles by endoscopic ultrasound. Treatments for the disease involve dietary changes, immunosuppressive drugs, and dilation techniques. However, the data regarding the effect of these therapies on altering mechanical properties of the esophagus is limited. As the pathogenesis of esophageal dysfunction in EoE appears multifactorial, further study of the biomechanics of EoE is critical to better diagnose, monitor and treat the disease. PMID:23105995

  12. Esophageal duplication and congenital esophageal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Trappey, A Francois; Hirose, Shinjiro

    2017-04-01

    Esophageal duplication and congenital esophageal stenosis (CES) may represent diseases with common embryologic etiologies, namely, faulty tracheoesophageal separation and differentiation. Here, we will re-enforce definitions for these diseases as well as review their embryology, diagnosis, and treatment. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Robotic benign esophageal procedures.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Jennifer M; Onaitis, Mark W

    2014-05-01

    Robotic master-slave devices can assist surgeons to perform minimally invasive esophageal operations with approaches that have already been demonstrated using laparoscopy and thoracoscopy. Robotic-assisted surgery for benign esophageal disease is described for the treatment of achalasia, epiphrenic diverticula, refractory reflux, paraesophageal hernias, duplication cysts, and benign esophageal masses, such as leiomyomas. Indications and contraindications for robotic surgery in benign esophageal disease should closely approximate the indications for laparoscopic and thoracoscopic procedures. Given the early application of the technology and paucity of clinical evidence, there are currently no procedures for which robotic esophageal surgery is the clinically proven preferred approach. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Safety of direct endoscopic necrosectomy in patients with gastric varices

    PubMed Central

    Storm, Andrew C; Thompson, Christopher C

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To determine the feasibility and safety of transgastric direct endoscopic necrosectomy (DEN) in patients with walled-off necrosis (WON) and gastric varices. METHODS: A single center retrospective study of consecutive DEN for WON was performed from 2012 to 2015. All DEN cases with gastric fundal varices noted on endoscopy, computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) during the admission for DEN were collected for analysis. In all cases, external urethral sphincter (EUS) with doppler was used to exclude the presence of intervening gastric varices or other vascular structures prior to 19 gauge fine-needle aspiration (FNA) needle access into the cavity. The tract was serially dilated to 20 mm and was entered with an endoscope for DEN. Pigtail stents were placed to facilitate drainage of the cavity. Procedure details were recorded. Comprehensive chart review was performed to evaluate for complications and WON recurrence. RESULTS: Fifteen patients who underwent DEN for WON had gastric varices at the time of their procedure. All patients had an INR < 1.5 and platelets > 50. Of these patients, 11 had splenic vein thrombosis and 2 had portal vein thrombosis. Two patients had isolated gastric varices, type 1 and the remaining 13 had > 5 mm gastric submucosal varices on imaging by CT, MRI or EUS. No procedures were terminated without completing the DEN for any reason. One patient had self-limited intraprocedural bleeding related to balloon dilation of the tract. Two patients experienced delayed bleeding at 2 and 5 d post-op respectively. One required no therapy or intervention and the other received 1 unit transfusion and had an EGD which revealed no active bleeding. Resolution rate of WON was 100% (after up to 2 additional DEN in one patient) and no patients required interventional radiology or surgical interventions. CONCLUSION: In patients with WON and gastric varices, DEN using EUS and doppler guidance may be performed safely. Successful resolution

  15. A simple technique to remove migrated esophageal stents.

    PubMed

    Noyer, C M; Forohar, F

    1998-09-01

    A 51-yr-old man with a tracheoesophageal fistula from an esophageal carcinoma had two expandable covered stents placed, which migrated distally. After several unsuccessful attempts to remove the stents, we fashioned a homemade snare to entrap and remove the stents under endoscopic and fluoroscopic guidance.

  16. [Update on non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding].

    PubMed

    Lanas, Ángel

    2013-10-01

    This article summarizes the main studies in the field of non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding reported in the last American Congress of Gastroenterology (Digestive Disease Week) in 2013. Some of these studies have provided new knowledge and expertise in areas of uncertainty. In this context and among other findings, it has been reported that the administration of a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) prior to endoscopy or the early performance of endoscopy-within 6 hours of admission in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) (or colonoscopy within 24 hours in patients with lower gastrointestinal bleeding)-does not improve the prognosis of the event. It has also been reported that oral administration of a PPI after endoscopic hemostasis may produce a similar outcome to that of intravenously administered PPI in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB). In the field of endoscopic therapy, the use of radiofrequency ablation for antral vascular ectasia is of interest. Regarding UGIB and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), new data confirm the risk of cardiovascular events by stopping treatment with acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) after an episode of UGIB, the increased risk of UGIB when associating gastrotoxic drugs, and the need to identify both the gastrointestinal and cardiovascular risks of each NSAID and coxib when prescribing these agents. Finally, there is evidence that both environmental and genetic factors are involved in individual susceptibility to gastrointestinal bleeding. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  17. From Reflux Esophagitis to Esophageal Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Souza, Rhonda F

    Reflux esophagitis causes Barrett's metaplasia, an abnormal esophageal mucosa predisposed to adenocarcinoma. Medical therapy for reflux esophagitis focuses on decreasing gastric acid production with proton pump inhibitors. We have reported that reflux esophagitis in a rat model develops from a cytokine-mediated inflammatory injury, not from a caustic chemical (acid) injury. In this model, refluxed acid and bile stimulate the release of inflammatory cytokines from esophageal squamous cells, recruiting lymphocytes first to the submucosa and later to the luminal surface. Emerging studies on acute reflux esophagitis in humans support this new concept, suggesting that reflux-induced cytokine release may be a future target for medical therapies. Sometimes, reflux esophagitis heals with Barrett's metaplasia, a process facilitated by reflux-related nitric oxide (NO) production and Sonic Hedgehog (Hh) secretion by squamous cells. We have shown that NO reduces expression of genes that promote a squamous cell phenotype, while Hh signaling induces genes that mediate the development of the columnar cell phenotypes of Barrett's metaplasia. Agents targeting esophageal NO production or Hh signaling conceivably could prevent the development of Barrett's esophagus. Persistent reflux promotes cancer in Barrett's metaplasia. We have reported that acid and bile salts induce DNA damage in Barrett's cells. Bile salts also cause NF-x03BA;B activation in Barrett's cells, enabling them to resist apoptosis in the setting of DNA damage and likely contributing to carcinogenesis. Oral treatment with ursodeoxycholic acid prevents the esophageal DNA damage and NF-x03BA;B activation induced by toxic bile acids. Altering bile acid composition might be another approach to cancer prevention.

  18. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt Creation With Embolization or Obliteration for Variceal Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Gaba, Ron C

    2016-03-01

    Variceal hemorrhage is a life-threatening sequela of liver cirrhosis that requires a careful and comprehensive approach to management. Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt creation with or without variceal embolization or obliteration represents a minimally invasive image-guided intervention used for the management of varices. This review focuses on the role of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt and embolization or obliteration in the setting of variceal hemorrhage, with an emphasis on the useful aspects of patient evaluation and selection, practical approaches to procedure planning and valuable elements of interventional technique, and clinical outcomes as they pertain to portal venous decompression and variceal embolotherapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Two-Stage Explantation of a Magnetic Lower Esophageal Sphincter Augmentation Device Due to Esophageal Erosion.

    PubMed

    Parmar, Abhishek D; Tessler, Robert A; Chang, Howard Y; Svahn, Jonathan D

    2017-08-01

    Implanting a magnetic lower esophageal sphincter augmentation device (LINX, Torax Medical) has become an increasingly common option in the surgical management of gastroesophageal reflux disease. As the enthusiasm for placing this device increases, experience in the management of device-related complications-including erosion-is necessary. We report a staged approach to LINX removal in a 64-year-old female with symptoms of odynophagia secondary to partial erosion of a LINX device into the esophagus. The patient had a 12-bead LINX device placed in 2011 at an outside, international facility. In late 2013, she began experiencing symptoms of odynophagia. An esophagogastroduodenoscopy at our institution in October 2015 demonstrated two metallic beads eroding through the distal esophageal lumen. An elective endoscopic removal of the two visible beads was performed. A postoperative esophagram confirmed that there was no resulting esophageal perforation. The patient noted mild improvement in her symptoms. After a 12-week period to allow for complete healing, the remaining 10 beads of the LINX device were explanted laparoscopically without complication. No further procedures were undertaken. At 2 months' follow-up, the patient noted complete resolution of her symptoms. Transmural erosion of the LINX device into the esophageal lumen is a rare occurrence, with only five such complications reported in the published literature. We present the first account of LINX explantation for esophageal erosion in the United States. We demonstrated that a staged laparoendoscopic approach to LINX removal in these cases is feasible with minimal morbidity.

  20. An Unusual Reason for Gastric Variceal Hemorrhage: Wandering Spleen.

    PubMed

    Köseoğlu, Hüseyin; Atalay, Roni; Büyükaşık, Naciye Şemnur; Canyiğit, Murat; Özer, Mehmet; Solakoğlu, Tevfik; Akın, Fatma Ebru; Bolat, Aylin Demirezer; Yürekli, Öykü Tayfur; Ersoy, Osman

    2015-12-01

    Wandering spleen is the displacement of the spleen due to the loss or weakening of the ligaments of the spleen and is seen very rarely with an incidence of less than 0.5 %. It can cause portal hypertension, but gastric variceal hemorrhage is a quite rare condition within the spectrum of this uncommon disease. We report a 22-year-old woman with wandering spleen presenting with life-threatening gastric variceal hemorrhage. Her diagnosis was made by computerized tomography. Endoscopic therapy was not adequate to stop the bleeding, and urgent splenectomy was performed. After surgery she has been well with no symptoms until now.

  1. Incidence of large oesophageal varices in patients with cirrhosis: application to prophylaxis of first bleeding.

    PubMed Central

    Calès, P; Desmorat, H; Vinel, J P; Caucanas, J P; Ravaud, A; Gerin, P; Brouet, P; Pascal, J P

    1990-01-01

    Because several studies have suggested that beta blockers are effective in the prophylaxis of first variceal bleeding in cirrhosis, screening for oesophageal varices might be appropriate. We prospectively studied 84 cirrhotic patients without obvious evidence of large oesophageal varices and previous bleeding during a mean follow up of 16 months. At entry to the study 41 patients had no oesophageal varices and in 43 these were grade 1. The subsequent percentages of patients without large oesophageal varices were 74% at one year and 52% at two years. Univariate analysis showed that a longer duration of cirrhosis (p less than 0.05) and grade 1 oesophageal varices at entry (p less than 0.001) were predictive factors for the occurrence of large oesophageal varices, whereas, multivariate analysis showed that the initial size of the oesophageal varices (p less than 0.001), a high initial Child-Pugh score, and a smaller improvement in Child-Pugh score during the study were independent risk factors. Among patients with grades 0 and 1 oesophageal varices at the start of the study the proportions with large oesophageal varices at two years were 31% and 70% respectively. We have calculated that, accepting a maximum risk of first bleeding of 10% without prophylactic treatment, a patient without oesophageal varices should be screened endoscopically every other year, while a patient with grade 1 disease should benefit from one annual upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. PMID:2253916

  2. Laparoscopic splenectomy for a wandering spleen complicating gastric varices: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Sato, Masanori; Miyaki, Yuichiro; Tochikubo, Junpei; Onoda, Takanobu; Shiiya, Norihiko; Wada, Hidetoshi

    2015-12-01

    Wandering spleen is a rare clinical entity, and its chronic torsion of the vascular pedicle result in splenic vein occlusion leading to gastric varices. Here, we present a case of wandering spleen complicating gastric varices in a 40-year-old female. Three-dimensional CT (3D-CT) clearly showed the disruption of the splenic vein at the origin of the vascular pedicle and collateral development of the gastric varices. The patient was electively treated with laparoscopic splenectomy. Difficulty of prediction of the splenic vein recanalization to improve the varices was the reason for the use of splenectomy versus splenopexy. The varices were successfully diminished 3 months after the surgery. After review of cases of complicating gastric varices in the literatures, splenectomy is still a secure way to treat an adult patient with wandering spleen with complicating gastric varices.

  3. Axial force measurement for esophageal function testing

    PubMed Central

    Gravesen, Flemming H; Funch-Jensen, Peter; Gregersen, Hans; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr

    2009-01-01

    The esophagus serves to transport food and fluid from the pharynx to the stomach. Manometry has been the “golden standard” for the diagnosis of esophageal motility diseases for many decades. Hence, esophageal function is normally evaluated by means of manometry even though it reflects the squeeze force (force in radial direction) whereas the bolus moves along the length of esophagus in a distal direction. Force measurements in the longitudinal (axial) direction provide a more direct measure of esophageal transport function. The technique used to record axial force has developed from external force transducers over in-vivo strain gauges of various sizes to electrical impedance based measurements. The amplitude and duration of the axial force has been shown to be as reliable as manometry. Normal, as well as abnormal, manometric recordings occur with normal bolus transit, which have been documented using imaging modalities such as radiography and scintigraphy. This inconsistency using manometry has also been documented by axial force recordings. This underlines the lack of information when diagnostics are based on manometry alone. Increasing the volume of a bag mounted on a probe with combined axial force and manometry recordings showed that axial force amplitude increased by 130% in contrast to an increase of 30% using manometry. Using axial force in combination with manometry provides a more complete picture of esophageal motility, and the current paper outlines the advantages of using this method. PMID:19132762

  4. Diet and esophageal disease

    PubMed Central

    Dawsey, Sanford M.; Fagundes, Renato B.; Jacobson, Brian C.; Kresty, Laura A.; Mallery, Susan R.; Paski, Shirley; van den Brandt, Piet A.

    2014-01-01

    The following, from the 12th OESO World Conference: Cancers of the Esophagus, includes commentaries on macronutrients, dietary patterns, and risk of adenocarcinoma in Barrett’s esophagus; micronutrients, trace elements, and risk of Barrett’s esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma; the role of mate consumption in the development of squamous cell carcinoma; the relationship between energy excess and development of esophageal adenocarcinoma; and the nutritional management of the esophageal cancer patient. PMID:25266021

  5. Rebleeding rates following TIPS for variceal hemorrhage in the Viatorr era: TIPS alone versus TIPS with variceal embolization

    PubMed Central

    Bui, James T.; Cotler, Scott J.; Kallwitz, Eric R.; Mengin, Olga T.; Martinez, Brandon K.; Berkes, Jaime L.; Carrillo, Tami C.; Knuttinen, M. Grace; Owens, Charles A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To compare rebleeding rates following treatment of variceal hemorrhage with TIPS alone versus TIPS with variceal embolization in the covered stent-graft era. Methods In this retrospective study, 52 patients (M:F 29:23, median age 52 years) with hepatic cirrhosis and variceal hemorrhage underwent TIPS insertion between 2003 and 2008. Median Child–Pugh and MELD scores were 8.5 and 13.5. Generally, 10-mm diameter TIPS were created using covered stent-grafts (Viatorr; W.L. Gore and Associates, Flagstaff, AZ). A total of 37 patients underwent TIPS alone, while 15 patients underwent TIPS with variceal embolization. The rates of rebleeding and survival were compared. Results All TIPS were technically successful. Median portosystemic pressure gradient reductions were 13 versus 11 mmHg in the embolization and non-embolization groups. There were no statistically significant differences in Child–Pugh and MELD score, or portosystemic pressure gradients between each group. A trend toward increased rebleeding was present in the non-embolization group, where 8/37 (21.6%) patients rebled while 1/15 (6.7%) patients in the TIPS with embolization group rebled (P = 0.159) during median follow-up periods of 199 and 252 days (P = 0.374). Rebleeding approached statistical significance among patients with acute hemorrhage, where 8/32 (25%) versus 0/14 (0%) rebled in the non-embolization and embolization groups (P = 0.055). A trend toward increased bleeding-related mortality was seen in the non-embolization group (P = 0.120). Conclusions TIPS alone showed a high incidence of rebleeding in this series, whereas TIPS with variceal embolization resulted in reduced recurrent hemorrhage. The efficacy of embolization during TIPS performed for variceal hemorrhage versus TIPS alone should be further compared with larger prospective randomized trials. PMID:21286346

  6. Rebleeding rates following TIPS for variceal hemorrhage in the Viatorr era: TIPS alone versus TIPS with variceal embolization.

    PubMed

    Gaba, Ron C; Bui, James T; Cotler, Scott J; Kallwitz, Eric R; Mengin, Olga T; Martinez, Brandon K; Berkes, Jaime L; Carrillo, Tami C; Knuttinen, M Grace; Owens, Charles A

    2010-08-06

    To compare rebleeding rates following treatment of variceal hemorrhage with TIPS alone versus TIPS with variceal embolization in the covered stent-graft era. In this retrospective study, 52 patients (M:F 29:23, median age 52 years) with hepatic cirrhosis and variceal hemorrhage underwent TIPS insertion between 2003 and 2008. Median Child-Pugh and MELD scores were 8.5 and 13.5. Generally, 10-mm diameter TIPS were created using covered stent-grafts (Viatorr; W.L. Gore and Associates, Flagstaff, AZ). A total of 37 patients underwent TIPS alone, while 15 patients underwent TIPS with variceal embolization. The rates of rebleeding and survival were compared. All TIPS were technically successful. Median portosystemic pressure gradient reductions were 13 versus 11 mmHg in the embolization and non-embolization groups. There were no statistically significant differences in Child-Pugh and MELD score, or portosystemic pressure gradients between each group. A trend toward increased rebleeding was present in the non-embolization group, where 8/37 (21.6%) patients rebled while 1/15 (6.7%) patients in the TIPS with embolization group rebled (P = 0.159) during median follow-up periods of 199 and 252 days (P = 0.374). Rebleeding approached statistical significance among patients with acute hemorrhage, where 8/32 (25%) versus 0/14 (0%) rebled in the non-embolization and embolization groups (P = 0.055). A trend toward increased bleeding-related mortality was seen in the non-embolization group (P = 0.120). TIPS alone showed a high incidence of rebleeding in this series, whereas TIPS with variceal embolization resulted in reduced recurrent hemorrhage. The efficacy of embolization during TIPS performed for variceal hemorrhage versus TIPS alone should be further compared with larger prospective randomized trials.

  7. Ineffective esophageal motility (IEM): the primary finding in patients with nonspecific esophageal motility disorder.

    PubMed

    Leite, L P; Johnston, B T; Barrett, J; Castell, J A; Castell, D O

    1997-09-01

    Nonspecific esophageal motility disorder (NEMD) is a vague category used to include patients with poorly defined esophageal contraction abnormalities. The criteria include "ineffective" contraction waves, ie, peristaltic waves that are either of low amplitude or are not transmitted. The aim of this study was to identify the prevalence of ineffective esophageal motility (IEM) found during manometry testing and to evaluate esophageal acid exposure and esophageal acid clearance (EAC) in patients with IEM compared to those with other motility findings. We analyzed esophageal manometric tracings from 600 consecutive patients undergoing manometry in our laboratory following a specific protocol from April 1992 through October 1994 to identify the frequency of ineffective contractions and the percentages of other motility abnormalities present in patients meeting criteria for NEMD. Comparison of acid exposure and EAC was made with 150 patients who also had both esophageal manometry and pH-metry over the same time period. Sixty-one of 600 patients (10%) met the diagnostic criteria for NEMD. Sixty of 61 (98%) of these patients had IEM, defined by at least 30% ineffective contractions out of 10 wet swallows. Thirty-five of these patients also underwent ambulatory esophageal pH monitoring. Patients with IEM demonstrated significant increases in both recumbent median percentage of time of pH <4 (4.5%) and median distal EAC (4.2 min/episode) compared to those with normal motility (0.2%, 1 min/episode), diffuse esophageal spasm (0%, 0.6 min/episode), hypertensive LES (0%, 1.8 min/episode), and nutcracker esophagus (0.4% 1.6 min/episode). Recumbent acid exposure in IEM did not differ significantly from that in patients with systemic scleroderma (SSc) for either variable (5.4%, 4.2 min/episode). We propose that IEM is a more appropriate term and should replace NEMD, giving it a more specific manometric identity. IEM patients demonstrate a distinctive recumbent reflux pattern

  8. Factors that Determine the Development and Progression of Gastroesophageal Varices in Patients with Chronic Hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Fontana, Robert J.; Sanyal, Arun J.; Ghany, Marc G.; Lee, William M.; Reid, Andrea E.; Naishadham, Deepa; Everson, Gregory T.; Kahn, Jeffrey A.; Di Bisceglie, Adrian M.; Szabo, Gyongyi; Morgan, Timothy R.; Everhart, James E.

    2010-01-01

    Background & Aims We aimed to identify the incidence and predictors of de novo gastroesophageal variceal formation and progression in a large cohort of patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC) and advanced fibrosis. Methods All participants in the HALT-C Trial were offered an endoscopy before treatment and again after 4 years. Patients with varices at baseline also had a endoscopy at 2 years. Baseline laboratory and clinical parameters were analyzed as predictors of de novo variceal formation and variceal progression. Results De novo varices developed in 157 of the 598 (26.2%) patients. Most of the new varices were small (76.4%) and only 1% of patients developed variceal hemorrhage. The likelihood of developing varices was associated with subject race (Hispanic > Caucasian > African American, p= 0.0005), lower baseline levels of albumin (P=0.051), and higher levels of hyaluronic acid (P< 0.001) with an area under the receiver operating characteristic (AUROC) curve=0.70. Among 210 patients with existing gastroesophageal varices, 74 (35.2%) had variceal progression or bleeding during follow-up. Patients with a higher baseline ratios of serum aspartate /alanine aminotransferase (P=0.028) and lower platelet counts (P=0.0002) were at greatest risk of variceal progression (AUROC = 0.72). Prolonged, low-dose peginterferon α2a therapy and β-blockers did not influence the risk of developing new or enlarging varices. Conclusion Development of varices in patients with CHC is associated with patient race/ethnicity and laboratory markers of disease severity. Prolonged low dose peginterferon α2a therapy and β-blockers do not reduce the risk of variceal development nor progression. PMID:20211180

  9. Low mean impedance in 24-hour tracings and esophagitis in children: a strong connection.

    PubMed

    Salvatore, S; Salvatoni, A; Ummarino, D; Ghanma, A; Van der Pol, R; Rongen, A; Fuoti, M; Meneghin, F; Benninga, M Alexander; Vandenplas, Y

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal multiple intraluminal impedance baseline is an additional impedance parameter that was recently related to esophageal integrity. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between mean esophageal impedance value and endoscopic findings in a large group of children. Children with symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux submitted to both endoscopy and impedance were included. Esophagitis was graded according to the Los Angeles classification. Mean impedance value was automatically calculated over 24-hour tracings. Data were adjusted for age through z-score transformation using percentiles normalized by the LMS (Lambda for the skew, Mu for the median, and Sigma for the generalized coefficient of variation) method. Nonparametric Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis tests, multiple, and stepwise regression were used. P-value <0.05 was considered as statistically significant. A total of 298 impedance tracings were analyzed. Endoscopic and histological esophagitis were detected in 30 and 29% patients, respectively. Median baseline z-score was significantly decreased both in proximal (P = 0.02) and distal (P = 0.01) esophagus in patients with endoscopic (but not histological) esophagitis. Patients with more severe esophagitis showed the lowest z-score. Bolus exposure index and the number of reflux episodes were the variables that were significantly associated with the baseline z-score. Impedance z-score is significantly decreased in infants and children with endoscopic esophagitis. Severity of esophagitis, bolus exposure index, and number of reflux episodes are factors influencing mean esophageal impedance. © 2014 International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  10. Vulvar varices: an uncommon entity in surgical pathology.

    PubMed

    Bell, Diana; Kane, Philip B; Liang, Sharon; Conway, Christine; Tornos, Carmen

    2007-01-01

    Varicose veins in the vulvar and perivulvar area are seen in 4% of women. Most of them are secondary to pregnancy and usually regress spontaneously. Vulvar varicose veins are rare in nonpregnant women. When present, they can be seen alone, associated with leg varices or associated with venous malformations of the labia, clitoral area, or vagina with or without arteriovenous malformations on the limbs or trunk (Klippel-Trenaunay-Weber syndrome and Parkes-Weber syndrome). In some cases, vulvar varices are seen as part of the so-called "pelvic congestion syndrome." Clinically, vulvar varices may present as small isolated protrusions, mainly in the labia majora, or as large masses, involving the vulva and even the perivulvar area. The treatment of choice of vulvar varices seen during pregnancy is conservative and symptomatic. Surgical pathologists need to be aware of the existence of vulvar varicose veins and its possible presence in biopsy specimens. Vulvar varicose veins can be misdiagnosed clinically as cysts or masses mainly in the Bartholin gland area. Correct diagnosis of the lesion is important to determine appropriate therapy and to recognize the possibility of associated anatomical or pathological problems.

  11. Bleeding Duodenal: Varices Treatment by TIPS and Transcatheter Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Lopera, Jorge E. Arthurs, Blain; Scheuerman, Christian; Sandoz, Charles; Petersosn, Scott; Castaneda-Zuniga, Wildriodo

    2008-03-15

    We describe our clinical experience in 4 patients with portal hypertension who presented with bleeding mesenteric varices originating from the superior mesenteric vein with retrograde filling of collaterals draining into the inferior vena cava. The clinical presentation, imaging findings, and potential therapeutic management are discussed.

  12. Prospective assessment of the diagnostic utility of esophageal brushings in adults with eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Kern, E; Lin, D; Larson, A; Yang, G-Y; Taft, T; Zalewski, A; Gonsalves, N; Hirano, I

    2016-01-01

    Patients with eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) undergo multiple endoscopies with biopsy for both diagnosis and assessment of treatment response, which is inconvenient and costly. Brush cytology has been examined in Barrett's esophagus to reduce the need for repeated endoscopic biopsies. The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the ability of brush cytology to detect mucosal eosinophilia in patients with EoE. This prospective study included adults with untreated and treated esophageal eosinophilia undergoing endoscopy at a tertiary care center. Patients received paired brushings and biopsies at the proximal and distal esophagus. A blinded pathologist quantified the number of eosinophils and epithelial cells per high-power field (hpf) on the cytology slides. The ratio of eosinophils/epithelial cells was used to normalize the cytology specimens for density of cells collected. The main outcome measures were sensitivity and specificity of brush cytology, and correlation between cytology and histology. Twenty-eight patients enrolled. The average age of the cohort was 37.7 ± 10.4 years; 75% of subjects were male. The sensitivity of cytology was 67-69% at the proximal esophagus and 70-72% at the distal esophagus. The specificity was 61-67% proximally and 70-75% distally. Histology was not significantly correlated with the max ratio of eosinophils/epithelial cells per hpf or the absolute number of eosinophils on cytology slides. Cytology using esophageal brushing has limited sensitivity and specificity for the detection of esophageal mucosal eosinophilia. The presence of exudates on endoscopy increased the detection of eosinophilia, which could make cytology useful in pediatric EoE, which often has a more exudative presentation. Diagnostic yield may improve with alternative acquisition techniques or the incorporation of eosinophil degranulation proteins.

  13. Response of the Upper Esophageal Sphincter to Esophageal Distension is Affected by Posture, Velocity, Volume, and Composition of the Infusate

    PubMed Central

    Babaei, Arash; Dua, Kulwinder; Naini, Sohrab Rahimi; Lee, Justin; Katib, Omar; Yan, Ke; Hoffmann, Raymond; Shaker, Reza

    2012-01-01

    Background & Aims Studies of the pressure response of the upper esophageal sphincter (UES) to simulated or spontaneous gastroesophageal reflux have shown conflicting results. These discrepancies could result from uncontrolled influence of variables such as posture, volume, and velocity of distension. We characterized in humans the effects of these variables on UES pressure response to esophageal distension. Methods We studied 12 healthy volunteers (average 27±5 years old, 6 male) using concurrent esophageal infusion and high-resolution manometry to determine UES, lower esophageal sphincter, and intraesophageal pressure values. Reflux events were simulated by distal esophageal injections of room-temperature air and water (5, 10, 20, and 50 ml) in individuals in 3 positions (upright, supine and semi-supine). Frequencies of various UES responses were compared using χ2 analysis. Multinomial logistical regression analysis was used to identify factors that determine the UES response. Results UES contraction and relaxation were the overriding responses to esophageal water and air distension, respectively, in a volume-dependent fashion (P<.001). Water-induced UES contraction and air-induced UES relaxation were the predominant responses among individuals in supine and upright positions, respectively (P<.001). The prevalence of their respective predominant response significantly decreased in the opposite position. Proximal esophageal dp/dt significantly and independently differentiated the UES response to infusion with water or air. Conclusions The UES response to esophageal distension is affected by combined effects of posture (spatial orientation of the esophagus), physical properties, and volume of refluxate, as well as the magnitude and rate of increase in intraesophageal pressure. The UES response to esophageal distension can be predicted using a model that incorporates these factors. PMID:22248662

  14. Stent-Induced Esophageal Perforation: Treatment by Means of Placing a Second Stent After Removal of the Original Stent

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Gyoo-Sik Park, Sung-Dal; Cho, Young Duk

    2008-05-15

    A case of esophageal perforation caused by a retrievable covered stent is presented. The distal end of the stent was protruding into the mediastinum, which made it impossible to negotiate a guidewire through the stent into the distal esophagus. The stent was successfully removed with use of a stent retrieval set, and esophageal perforation was treated with a second, covered stent with a good result. Fatality associated with this complication might be prevented by virtue of the retrievability of the stent we used. This result points to the effectiveness of a retrievable stent for the palliative treatment of malignant esophageal stricture.

  15. Endoscopic Color Doppler Ultrasonographic Evaluation of GastricVarices Secondary to Left-Sided Portal Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Takahiro; Yamazaki, Katsu; Kimura, Mutsuumi; Toyota, Jouji; Karino, Yoshiyasu

    2014-01-01

    Gastric varices that arise secondary to the splenic vein occlusion can result in gastrointestinal hemorrhaging. Endoscopic color Doppler ultrasonography (ECDUS) was performed in 16 patients with gastric varices secondary to splenic vein occlusion. This study retrospectively evaluated the role of ECDUS in the diagnosis of gastric varices secondary to splenic vein occlusion. Thirteen patients had co-existing pancreatic diseases: 8 with chronic pancreatitis, 4 with cancer of the pancreatic body or tail and 1 with severe acute pancreatitis. Of the remaining 3 patients, 1 had myeloproliferative disease, 1 had advanced gastric cancer, and the third had splenic vein occlusion due to an obscure cause. The endoscopic findings of gastric varices were: variceal form (F) classified as enlarged tortuous (F2) in 12 cases and large, coil-shaped (F3) in 4 cases, and positive for erosion or red color sign of the variceal surface in 4 cases and negative in 12 cases. ECDUS color flow images of gastric variceal flow clearly depicted a round fundal region at the center, with varices expanding to the curvatura ventriculi major of the gastric body in all 16 cases. The velocities of F3 type gastric varices were significantly higher than those of the F2 type. The wall thickness of varices positive for erosion or red color sign was significantly less than the negative cases. I conclude that ECDUS color flow images of gastric variceal flow depicted specific findings of gastric varices secondary to splenic vein occlusion at the round fundal region at the center, with varices expanding to the curvatura ventriculi major of the gastric body. PMID:26852679

  16. Distal Convoluted Tubule

    PubMed Central

    Ellison, David H.

    2014-01-01

    The distal convoluted tubule is the nephron segment that lies immediately downstream of the macula densa. Although short in length, the distal convoluted tubule plays a critical role in sodium, potassium, and divalent cation homeostasis. Recent genetic and physiologic studies have greatly expanded our understanding of how the distal convoluted tubule regulates these processes at the molecular level. This article provides an update on the distal convoluted tubule, highlighting concepts and pathophysiology relevant to clinical practice. PMID:24855283

  17. New method for quantitative evaluation of esophageal sensibility.

    PubMed

    López-Merino, V; Benages, A; Molina, R; Marcos-Buscheck, C; Tomás-Ridocci, M; Mora, F; Moreno-Osset, E; Mínguez, M

    1986-06-01

    A method for quantitating esophagus sensibility by an electric stimulation test is described. Square stimulus waveform at different voltages and durations were transmitted to the esophagus, three series of electric stimuli being used in successive durations (0.5, 1, 2, 4, 8 and 16 ms); in each series the voltage discharge was increased progressively from 0 mV, until the subject noted the first sensation. This procedure was carried out at all esophageal levels. The following parameters were analyzed: sensitive threshold along the esophagus; the relation of threshold sensibility (mV) duration of stimulus (ms), and reobase and cronaxia for each esophageal level. At all esophageal levels, the sensitive threshold was regular and coherent; in the middle esophagus a zone was found having higher sensitive threshold than the proximal and distal esophageal zones. The relationship between sensitive threshold and inverse of the stimulus duration indicated that esophageal sensibility follows the basic law of excitation of WEISS, at least with this type of stimulus, reobase and cronaxia being representative of the sensibility threshold along the esophagus. Quantitative esophageal sensibility, therefore is concluded to be particularly suited to evaluation by electric stimulation.

  18. [Endoscopic ligation in treatment and prevention of bleeding from esophageal varices].

    PubMed

    Gabriel', S A; Guchetl', A Ya; Durleshter, V M; Dyn'ko, V Yu; Murashko, D S; Krushel'nitsky, V S

    2017-01-01

    Введение. Лечение осложнений портальной гипертензии является одной из актуальных, сложных и нерешенных проблем современной медицины. За последние десятилетия во всех странах мира отмечается рост числа больных циррозом печени — наиболее частой причины развития портальной гипертензии. Цель исследования — показать эффективность эндоскопического лигирования в лечении и профилактике кровотечений из ВРВП у больных циррозом печени с синдромом портальной гипертензии различной этиологии. Материал и методы. Нами проведен ретроспективный анализ результатов лечения 338 больных циррозом печени, которым выполняли лигирование за период с 2009 г. по май 2016 г. Среди больных было 209 (61,8%) мужчин и 129 (38,2%) женщин. В этой группе выполнено 511 лигирований. Общее число лигированных узлов составило 4086. Результаты и обсуждение. Лигирование было эффективным в 502 (98,2%) случаях. В 9 (1,8%) случаях эндоскопическое лигирование оказалось неэффективным и закончилось постановкой зонда Блеймора. Основной причиной неудач явилось активное кровотечение из ВРВП, развившееся до или во время лигирования. Осложнениями в рассматриваемой группе можно считать 3 случая возникновения кровотечения при попытке лигирования. Вывод. Эндоскопическое лигирование ВРВП является высокоэффективным (с экономической и медицинской точки зрения) методом лечения и профилактики кровотечения из ВРВП у больных циррозом печени.

  19. [Surgical treatment of hemorrhage of esophageal varices secondary to thrombosis of the portal vein].

    PubMed

    Orozco-Zepeda, H; Takahashi, T; Angel Mercado, M; García-Tsao, G; Hernández-Ortiz, J

    1990-01-01

    The Sugiura Procedure (SP) was performed in 27 patients with hemorrhagic portal hypertension secondary to extrahepatic portal vein thrombosis without associated liver disease (EPVT). There were fourteen females and 13 males. Mean age was 28 +/- 14 years. The causes of EPVT were: protein C deficiency-2 cases, antithrombin III deficiency-1 case, omphalitis history-2 cases, pancreatitis history-1 case and idiopathic-21 cases. The SP was completed with two surgical stages in 14 patients and with one operation in nine. There was one operative death. One patient developed mild postoperative encephalopathy, and two patients re-bled at long-term. Actuarial survival was 82% at five and ten years. It is concluded that the SP is a good alternative for the management of hemorrhagic portal hypertension secondary to EPVT.

  20. Balloon-Occluded Retrograde Transvenous Obliteration for Gastric Varices: A Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Sonomura, Tetsuo; Sato, Morio; Kishi, Kazushi; Terada, Masaki; Shioyama, Yasukazu; Kimura, Masashi; Suzuki, Kenzo; Kutsukake, Yasumichi; Ushimi, Takashi; Tanaka, Junji; Hayashi, Seishu; Tanaka, Satoshi

    1998-01-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical feasibility of balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration (BORTO) for gastric varices. Methods: BORTO was performed in 14 patients with gastric varices due to liver cirrhosis. The gastric varices were confirmed by endoscopy, and their feeding and draining veins were identified by contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) and angiography. A 6 Fr Simmons-shaped balloon catheter was inserted into the gastrorenal shunt. The balloon was inflated, and 5% ethanolamine oleate iopamidol was infused slowly through the catheter. Patients were followed up with endoscopy and enhanced CT at 1 week, 1, 3, and 6 months after the procedure and every 6 months thereafter. Results: The gastric varices completely disappeared in 12 of 14 patients and was partially resolved in the remaining 2 patients. Neither a recurrence nor an aggravation of gastric varices were found. No major complications were experienced. Conclusion: BORTO is a safe and effective treatment for gastric varices.

  1. Percutaneous Retrograde Sclerotherapy for Refractory Bleeding of Jejunal Varices: Direct Injection via Superficial Epigastric Vein

    SciTech Connect

    Nakata, Manabu Nakata, Waka; Isoda, Norio Yoshizawa, Mitsuyo; Sugimoto, Hideharu

    2012-02-15

    Small-bowel varices are rare and almost always occur in cases with portal hypertension. We encountered a patient with bleeding jejunal varices due to liver cirrhosis. Percutaneous retrograde sclerotherapy was performed via the superficial epigastric vein. Melena disappeared immediately after treatment. Disappearance of jejunal varices was confirmed by contrast-enhanced computed tomography. After 24 months of follow-up, no recurrent melena was observed.

  2. Septic Complication After Balloon-Occluded Retrograde Transvenous Obliteration of Duodenal Variceal Bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Akasaka, Thai; Shibata, Toshiya Isoda, Hiroyoshi; Taura, Kojiro; Arizono, Shigeki; Shimada, Kotaro; Togashi, Kaori

    2010-12-15

    We report a 64-year-old woman with duodenal varices who underwent balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration (B-RTO) complicated by intraprocedural variceal rupture. The patient developed shivering and a fever higher than 40{sup o}C 3 days after the B-RTO procedure. A blood culture grew Entereobacter cloacoe. This case represents a rare septic complication of B-RTO for duodenal varices.

  3. Single-port video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery for a huge epiphrenic esophageal diverticulum.

    PubMed

    Kang, Do Kyun

    2017-01-01

    Epiphrenic esophageal diverticulum is uncommon disease, which is defined as the herniation of the mucosa and submucosa through the muscle layers of the esophageal wall in distal third of the esophagus. Traditionally, thoracotomy has been the preferred surgical approach. Recently, many surgeons have attempted minimally invasive surgeries for epiphrenic esophageal diverticula. They reported that minimally invasive surgery (MIS) for epiphrenic esophageal diverticula was a safe and feasible approach which had many advantages. There are various options of surgical approaches for MIS of epiphrenic diverticula. However, the best surgical approach remains uncertain. We report the case of a huge epiphrenic esophageal diverticulum, which was successfully treated by single-port video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS).

  4. Single-port video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery for a huge epiphrenic esophageal diverticulum

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Epiphrenic esophageal diverticulum is uncommon disease, which is defined as the herniation of the mucosa and submucosa through the muscle layers of the esophageal wall in distal third of the esophagus. Traditionally, thoracotomy has been the preferred surgical approach. Recently, many surgeons have attempted minimally invasive surgeries for epiphrenic esophageal diverticula. They reported that minimally invasive surgery (MIS) for epiphrenic esophageal diverticula was a safe and feasible approach which had many advantages. There are various options of surgical approaches for MIS of epiphrenic diverticula. However, the best surgical approach remains uncertain. We report the case of a huge epiphrenic esophageal diverticulum, which was successfully treated by single-port video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS). PMID:28203430

  5. Short segment Barrett's esophagus and distal gastric intestinal metaplasia.

    PubMed

    Dietz, Judite; Chaves-E-Silva, Sílvia; Meurer, Luíse; Sekine, Setsuo; de Souza, Andréa Ribeiro; Meine, Gilmara Coelho

    2006-01-01

    Short segment Barrett's esophagus is defined by the presence of <3 cm of columnar-appearing mucosa in the distal esophagus with intestinal metaplasia on histophatological examination. Barrett's esophagus is a risk factor to develop adenocarcinoma of the esophagus. While Barrett's esophagus develops as a result of chronic gastroesophageal reflux disease, intestinal metaplasia in the gastric cardia is a consequence of chronic Helicobacter pylori infection and is associated with distal gastric intestinal metaplasia. It can be difficult to determine whether short-segment columnar epithelium with intestinal metaplasia are lining the esophagus (a condition called short segment Barrett's esophagus) or the proximal stomach (a condition called intestinal metaplasia of the gastric cardia). To study the association of short segment Barrett's esophagus (length <3 cm) with gastric intestinal metaplasia (antrum or body) and infection by H. pylori. Eight-nine patients with short segment columnar-appearing mucosa in the esophagus, length <3 cm, were studied. Symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease were recorded. Biopsies were obtained immediately below the squamous-columnar lining, from gastric antrum and gastric corpus for investigation of intestinal metaplasia and H. pylori. Forty-two from 89 (47.2%) patients were diagnosed with esophageal intestinal metaplasia by histopathology. The mean-age was significantly higher in the group with esophageal intestinal metaplasia. The two groups were similar in terms of gender (male: female), gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms and H. pylori infection. Gastric intestinal metaplasia (antrum or body) was diagnosed in 21 from 42 (50.0%) patients in the group with esophageal intestinal metaplasia and 7 from 47 (14.9%) patients in the group with esophageal columnar appearing mucosa but without intestinal metaplasia. Intestinal metaplasia is a frequent finding in patients with <3 cm of columnar-appearing mucosa in the distal esophagus. In

  6. Detection of Esophageal Fiducial Marker Displacement During Radiation Therapy With a 2-dimensional On-board Imager: Analysis of Internal Margin for Esophageal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Fukada, Junichi; Hanada, Takashi; Kawaguchi, Osamu; Ohashi, Toshio; Takeuchi, Hiroya; Kitagawa, Yuko; Seki, Satoshi; Shiraishi, Yutaka; Ogata, Haruhiko; Shigematsu, Naoyuki

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To quantify the interfraction displacement of esophageal fiducial markers for primary esophageal cancer radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Orthogonal 2-dimensional (2D) matching records fused to vertebrae were analyzed in clinically staged T1/2N0 esophageal cancer patients undergoing endoscopic clipping as fiducial metal markers. Displacement of the markers between the digitally reconstructed radiographs and on-board kilovoltage images during radiation therapy was analyzed according to direction and esophageal site. Results: Forty-four patients, with 81 markers (10 proximal, 42 middle, and 29 distal), underwent 367 2D matching sessions during radiation therapy. The mean (SD) absolute marker displacement was 0.26 (0.30) cm in the right–left (RL), 0.50 (0.39) cm in the superior–inferior (SI), and 0.24 (0.21) cm in the anterior–posterior (AP) direction. Displacement was significantly larger in the SI than in the RL and AP directions (P<.0001). In the SI direction, mean absolute displacements of the distal, middle, and proximal esophagus were 0.67 (0.45) cm, 0.42 (0.32) cm, and 0.36 (0.30) cm, respectively. Distal esophagus displacement was significantly larger than those of the middle and proximal esophagus (P<.0001). The estimated internal margin to cover 95% of the cases was 0.75 cm in the RL and AP directions. In the SI direction, the margin was 1.25 cm for the proximal and middle esophagus and 1.75 cm for the distal esophagus. Conclusions: The magnitude of interfraction displacement of esophageal clips was larger in the SI direction, particularly in the distal esophagus, but substantial displacement was observed in other directions and at other esophageal sites. It is practical to take estimated movements into account with internal margins, even if vertebrae-based 2D matching is performed.

  7. Detection of esophageal fiducial marker displacement during radiation therapy with a 2-dimensional on-board imager: analysis of internal margin for esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Fukada, Junichi; Hanada, Takashi; Kawaguchi, Osamu; Ohashi, Toshio; Takeuchi, Hiroya; Kitagawa, Yuko; Seki, Satoshi; Shiraishi, Yutaka; Ogata, Haruhiko; Shigematsu, Naoyuki

    2013-03-15

    To quantify the interfraction displacement of esophageal fiducial markers for primary esophageal cancer radiation therapy. Orthogonal 2-dimensional (2D) matching records fused to vertebrae were analyzed in clinically staged T1/2N0 esophageal cancer patients undergoing endoscopic clipping as fiducial metal markers. Displacement of the markers between the digitally reconstructed radiographs and on-board kilovoltage images during radiation therapy was analyzed according to direction and esophageal site. Forty-four patients, with 81 markers (10 proximal, 42 middle, and 29 distal), underwent 367 2D matching sessions during radiation therapy. The mean (SD) absolute marker displacement was 0.26 (0.30) cm in the right-left (RL), 0.50 (0.39) cm in the superior-inferior (SI), and 0.24 (0.21) cm in the anterior-posterior (AP) direction. Displacement was significantly larger in the SI than in the RL and AP directions (P<.0001). In the SI direction, mean absolute displacements of the distal, middle, and proximal esophagus were 0.67 (0.45) cm, 0.42 (0.32) cm, and 0.36 (0.30) cm, respectively. Distal esophagus displacement was significantly larger than those of the middle and proximal esophagus (P<.0001). The estimated internal margin to cover 95% of the cases was 0.75 cm in the RL and AP directions. In the SI direction, the margin was 1.25 cm for the proximal and middle esophagus and 1.75 cm for the distal esophagus. The magnitude of interfraction displacement of esophageal clips was larger in the SI direction, particularly in the distal esophagus, but substantial displacement was observed in other directions and at other esophageal sites. It is practical to take estimated movements into account with internal margins, even if vertebrae-based 2D matching is performed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. [Primary esophageal lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Ximenes, Manoel; Piauilino, Marcos Amorim; Oliveira, Humberto Alves; Vaz Neto, Jorge Pinto

    2012-01-01

    We describe the case of a 54 year old woman seen with an esophageal mass diagnosed as a primary esophageal lymphoma. The main symptom was dysphagia of seven months duration. The treatment consisted in resection of the tumor, and reconstruction of the defect with a reversed pleural flap, followed by a chemotherapy regimen that consisted of five drugs, cyclophosphamid, prednisone, doxorubicin, rituximab and vincristine (R-CHOP). The patient developed an esophageal pleural fistula treated with pleural drainage and irrigation that closed in 45 days. Two and one half years later she is doing well and disease free.

  9. Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt combined with esophagogastric variceal embolization in the treatment of a large gastrorenal shunt

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Qin; Wang, Ming-Quan; Zhang, Guo-Bing; Wu, Qiong; Xu, Jian-Ming; Kong, De-Run

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) combined with stomach and esophageal variceal embolization (SEVE) in cirrhotic patients with a large gastrorenal vessel shunt (GRVS). METHODS: Eighty-one cirrhotic patients with gastric variceal bleeding (GVB) associated with a GRVS were enrolled in the study and accepted TIPS combined with SEVE (TIPS + SEVE), by which portosystemic pressure gradient (PPG), biochemical, TIPS-related complications, shunt dysfunction, rebleeding, and death were evaluated. RESULTS: The PPGs before TIPS were greater than 12 mmHg in 81 patients. TIPS + SEVE treatment caused a significant decrease in PPG (from 37.97 ± 6.36 mmHg to 28.15 ± 6.52 mmHg, t = 19.22, P < 0.001). The percentage of reduction in PPG was greater than 20% from baseline. There were no significant differences in albumin, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, bilirubin, prothrombin time, or Child-Pugh score before and after operation. In all patients, rebleeding rates were 3%, 6%, 12%, 18%, and 18% at 1, 3, 6, 12, and 18 mo, respectively. Five patients (6.2%) were diagnosed as having hepatic encephalopathy. The rates of shunt dysfunction were 0%, 4%, 9%, 26%, and 26%, at 1, 3, 6, 12, and 18 mo, respectively. The cumulative survival rates in 1, 3, 6, 12, and 18 mo were 100%, 100%, 95%, 90%, and 90%, respectively. CONCLUSION: Our preliminary results indicated that the efficacy and safety of TIPS + SEVE were satisfactory in cirrhotic patients with GVB associated with a GRVS (GVB + GRVS). PMID:27458505

  10. Radiation Therapy, Paclitaxel, and Carboplatin With or Without Trastuzumab in Treating Patients With Esophageal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-13

    Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IB Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIA Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIB Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIA Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIB Esophageal Cancer

  11. Application of MPVR and TL-VR with 64-row MDCT in neonates with congenital EA and distal TEF.

    PubMed

    Wen, Yang; Peng, Yun; Zhai, Ren-You; Li, Ying-Zi

    2011-03-28

    To assess the application of multiple planar volume reconstruction (MPVR) and three-dimensional (3D) transparency lung volume rendering (TL-VR) with 64-row multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) in neonates with congenital esophageal atresia (EA) and distal tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF). Twenty neonates (17 boys, 3 girls) with EA and distal TEF at a mean age of 4.6 d (range 1-16 d) were enrolled in this study. A helical scan of 64-row MDCT was performed at the 64 mm × 0.625 mm collimation. EA and TEF were reconstructed with MPVR and TL-VR, respectively. Initial diagnosis of EA was made by chest radiography showing the inserted catheter in the proximal blind-ended esophageal pouch. Manifestations of MDCT images were compared with the findings at surgery. MDCT showed the proximal and distal esophageal pouches in 20 cases. No significant difference was observed in gaps between the proximal and distal esophageal pouches detected by MPVR and TL-VR. The lengths of gaps between the proximal and distal esophageal pouches detected by MPVR and TL-VR correlated well with the findings at surgery (R = 0.87, P < 0.001). The images of MPVR revealed the orifice of TEF in 13 cases, while TL-VR images showed the orifice of TEF in 4 cases. EA and distal TEF can be reconstructed using MPVR and TL-VR of 64-row MDCT, which is a noninvasive technique to demonstrate the distal esophageal pouches and inter-pouch distance in neonates with EA and distal TEF.

  12. Oesophageal and gastric varices: historical aspects, classification and grading: everything in one place

    PubMed Central

    Abby Philips, Cyriac; Sahney, Amrish

    2016-01-01

    Variceal disease and its management are of the utmost importance in the treatment of portal hypertension. Current guidelines are universal for management of variceal disease in portal hypertension. Classification and grading systems are numerous and differ according to geographical location. In this exhaustive review, the historical aspects of variceal disease, its classification and the grading systems in use are discussed, with self-explanatory tables and timelines. A better and clear understanding of the evolution of portal hypertension and variceal disease is provided. PMID:27324725

  13. [Surgical Removal of Migrated Coil after Embolization of Jejunal Variceal Bleeding: A Case Report].

    PubMed

    Kim, Junhwan; Lee, Danbi; Oh, Kyunghwan; Lee, Mingee; So, Seol; Yang, Dong Hoon; Kim, Chan Wook; Gwon, Dong Il; Chung, Young Hwa

    2017-01-25

    Jejunal variceal bleeding is less common compared with esophagogastric varices in patients with portal hypertension. However, jejunal variceal bleeding can be fatal without treatment. Treatments include surgery, transjugular intrahepatic porto-systemic shunt (TIPS), endoscopic sclerotherapy, percutaneous coil embolization, and balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration (BRTO). Percutaneous coil embolization can be considered as an alternative treatment option for those where endoscopic sclerotherapy, surgery, TIPS or BRTO are not possible. Complications of percutaneous coil embolization have been reported, including coil migration. Herein, we report a case of migration of the coil into the jejunal lumen after percutaneous coil embolization for jejunal variceal bleeding. The migrated coil was successfully removed using surgery.

  14. Application of Balloon-Occluded Retrograde Transvenous Obliteration to Gastric Varices Complicating Refractory Ascites

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuda, Tetsuya; Hirota, Shozo; Matsumoto, Shinichi; Sugimoto, Koji; Fujii, Masahiko; Tsurusaki, Masakatsu; Izaki, Kenta; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2004-01-15

    We report two cases of gastric varices complicated by massive ascites that disappeared after balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration (B-RTO). The first patient had progressive gastric varices that continued to enlarge even after three episodes of esophagogastric variceal bleeding, and the second patient was admitted to our hospital because of the bleeding from gastric varices. After B-RTO procedures in both patients, significant improvement of the ascites, hepatic function reserve, and hypoalbuminemia was observed. Although further experience is needed, our experience points to the likelihood of the amelioration of ascites after B-RTO.

  15. Investigation of intra-esophageal air kinetics and esophageal sphincters in patients with total laryngectomy during esophageal speech.

    PubMed

    Bozan, Aykut; Vardar, Rukiye; Akyildiz, Serdar; Kirazli, Tayfun; Ogut, Fatih; Yildirim, Esra; Bor, Serhat

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the air kinetics of well- and poor-speaking patients and their upper (UES) and lower (LES) esophageal sphincter pressures . The esophageal speech capability of 23 total laryngectomy patients was assessed with the Wepman scale. LES and UES points and pressures were measured, and air kinetics were compared. All patients were male, with an average age of 58 years. Both the LES and UES pressures were not statistically different between good-speaking and poor-speaking patients (p > 0.05). The ability to speak was estimated only by looking at tracings. Good speakers are able to retain air successfully and on a long-term basis between the upper and lower esophageal sphincters. During short and/or rapid speech, these patients are able to rapidly suck and then expel the air from their upper esophagus. During long speeches, after sucking the air into their distal esophagus, they used the air in the upper part of the esophagus during the speech, only later seeming to fill the lower esophagus with the air as a possible reserve in the stomach. It has been shown that the basic requirement for speaking is the capacity to suck and store the air within the esophagus. For successful speech, the air should be stored inside the esophagus. MII technology contributes to our understanding of speech kinetics and occupies an important place in patient training as a biofeedback technique.

  16. Eosinophilic Esophagitis: an Emerging Clinicopathologic Disease of Children and Adults

    PubMed Central

    Straumann, Alex

    2006-01-01

    Eosinophililc esophagitis is a clinicopathologic disease characterized clinically by dysphagia and food impaction in adults and nonspecific symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease in children, and histologically by large numbers of eosinophils in the proximal and distal esophageal epithelium. Importantly, these symptoms and histologic abnormalities appear to be unresponsive to proton pump inhibition. Recent clinical and basic studies suggest an allergic etiology but the precise allergen remains unknown and is likely unique for each patient. Endoscopic features suggest ongoing inflammation and range from linear furrowing with whitish exudation to long-segment stricture formation, to a fragile, crepe paper–like mucosa that is easily split open. Treatments include nutritional restrictions, medical management with topical steroids, and, in stenotic circumstances, esophageal dilation. The long-term outcome is still not certain.

  17. Alternative Treatment for Bleeding Peristomal Varices: Percutaneous Parastomal Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Pabon-Ramos, Waleska M.; Niemeyer, Matthew M.; Dasika, Narasimham L.

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: To describe how peristomal varices can be successfully embolized via a percutaneous parastomal approach. Methods: The medical records of patients who underwent this procedure between December 1, 2000, and May 31, 2008, were retrospectively reviewed. Procedural details were recorded. Median fluoroscopy time and bleeding-free interval were calculated. Results: Seven patients underwent eight parastomal embolizations. The technical success rate was 88 % (one failure). All embolizations were performed with coils combined with a sclerosant, another embolizing agent, or both. Of the seven successful parastomal embolizations, there were three cases of recurrent bleeding; the median time to rebleeding was 45 days (range 26-313 days). The remaining four patients did not develop recurrent bleeding during the follow-up period; their median bleeding-free interval was 131 days (range 40-659 days). Conclusion: This case review demonstrated that percutaneous parastomal embolization is a feasible technique to treat bleeding peristomal varices.

  18. Bleeding oesophageal varices with long term follow up.

    PubMed Central

    Spence, R A; Johnston, G W; Odling-Smee, G W; Rodgers, H W

    1984-01-01

    Complete long term follow up was obtained in 27 children who had bled from oesophageal varices. Most presented with haematemesis or melaena at an average age of 5.2 years in the portal vein thrombosis group (20 children) and 9.5 years in the intrahepatic group (7 children). All had splenomegaly. Only 6 of 20 children with portal vein thrombosis had a possible precipitating factor. A total of 182 admissions for bleeding are reported, in 68 of which injection sclerotherapy was used to control bleeding. Control rate with injection sclerotherapy was 97%. Shunts performed below age 10 years were associated with a high thrombosis rate. A conservative approach to bleeding varices in children is recommended with transfusion, pitressin, and injection sclerotherapy. Oesophageal transection may have a role in the emergency management of the few children in whom bleeding is not controlled by injection sclerotherapy. PMID:6609683

  19. Effect of buspirone, a 5-HT1A receptor agonist, on esophageal motility in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Di Stefano, M; Papathanasopoulos, A; Blondeau, K; Vos, R; Boecxstaens, V; Farré, R; Rommel, N; Tack, J

    2012-07-01

    There are limited data concerning the effects of 5-HT(1A) receptor activation on esophageal motility. Sumatriptan, a 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist, was recently reported to enhance esophageal peristalsis after intravenous administration. Buspirone, an orally available 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist, was shown to modulate gastroduodenal motor function. Our aim was to evaluate the effect of buspirone on esophageal motility of healthy volunteers. On two separate visits, 20 healthy volunteers aged 21-29 years (nine women) underwent esophageal manometry before and 10, 30, and 60 minutes after the administration of buspirone 20-mg or placebo capsule, according to a double-blind crossover design. At each time point, we compared buspirone and placebo effects on: resting pressure of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES); residual pressure and duration of LES relaxation; amplitude, duration, and onset velocity of esophageal body contractions, during 10 swallows of 5 mL of water. Significant analysis of variance differences (P < 0.05) are presented as mean ± standard deviation. Buspirone significantly increased mean distal esophageal wave amplitude (151 vs. 87 mmHg, P < 0.05) and duration (6.1 vs. 4.2 seconds, P < 0.05). Similarly, buspirone significantly increased mean LES resting pressure (26 vs. 21 mmHg, P < 0.05) and mean residual LES pressure (7.9 vs. 2 mmHg, P < 0.05), whereas reduced mean LES relaxation duration (7.2 vs. 8.0 seconds, P < 0.05) and mean distal onset velocity (7.6 vs. 14.7 cm/second, P < 0.05). Buspirone enhances esophageal peristalsis and LES function in healthy volunteers. Further study is warranted on the effects of buspirone on esophageal function and symptoms in patients with ineffective esophageal motility.

  20. Impact of total fundoplication on esophageal transit: analysis by combined multichannel intraluminal impedance and manometry.

    PubMed

    Del Genio, Gianmattia; Tolone, Salvatore; Del Genio, Federica; D'Alessandro, Antonio; Brusciano, Luigi; Aggarwal, Rajesh; Conzo, Giovanni; Orditura, Michele; Docimo, Ludovico; Del Genio, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Laparoscopic total fundoplication is considered the most effective surgical option for gastroesophageal reflux (GER) disease. Some authors assume that total fundoplication may expose the patient to delayed transit of the swallowed bolus and increased risk of dysphagia, particularly when peristaltic dysfunction is present. We undertook this study to evaluate by means of combined multichannel intraluminal impedance and esophageal manometry (MII-EM) the impact of fundoplication on esophageal physiology. An objective measurement of the influence of the total wrap on bolus transit may be helpful in refining the optimal antireflux wrap (ie, partial vs. total). In this study, 25 consecutive patients who underwent laparoscopic Nissen-Rossetti fundoplication had MII-EM and combined 24-hour pH and multichannel intraluminal impedance (MII-pH) before and after the surgical procedure. All patients completed preoperative and postoperative symptom questionnaires. The following were calculated for liquid and viscous deglutition lower esophageal sphincter pressure and relaxation, distal esophageal amplitude, the number of complete esophageal bolus transits and the mean total bolus transit time. The acid and nonacid GER episodes were calculated by MII-pH with the patient in both upright and recumbent positions. The postoperative MII-EM showed an increased lower esophageal sphincter pressure (P < 0.05), whereas lower esophageal sphincter relaxation and distal esophageal amplitude did not change after surgery (P = NS). Complete esophageal bolus transits and bolus transit time did not change for liquid swallows (P = NS), but was more rapid for viscous after surgery (P < 0.05). Twenty-four hour pH monitoring confirmed the postoperative reduction of both acid and nonacid reflux (P < 0.05). Laparoscopic Nissen-Rossetti is effective in controlling both acid and nonacid GER without impairment of esophageal function. Appropriate preoperative investigation, meticulous patient selection and

  1. Transcatheter Embolotherapy with N-Butyl Cyanoacrylate for Ectopic Varices

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Jin Woo; Kim, Hyo-Cheol Jae, Hwan Jun Jung, Hyun-Seok; Hur, Saebeom; Lee, Myungsu; Chung, Jin Wook

    2015-04-15

    PurposeTo address technical feasibility and clinical outcome of transcatheter embolotherapy with N-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA) for bleeding ectopic varices.MethodsThe institutional review board approved this retrospective study and waived informed consent. From January 2004 to June 2013, a total of 12 consecutive patients received transcatheter embolotherapy using NBCA for bleeding ectopic varices in our institute. Clinical and radiologic features of the endovascular procedures were comprehensively reviewed.ResultsPreprocedural computed tomography images revealed ectopic varices in the jejunum (n = 7), stoma (n = 2), rectum (n = 2), and duodenum (n = 1). The 12 procedures consisted of solitary embolotherapy (n = 8) and embolotherapy with portal decompression (main portal vein stenting in 3, transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt in 1). With regard to vascular access, percutaneous transhepatic access (n = 7), transsplenic access (n = 4), and transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt tract (n = 1) were used. There was no failure in either the embolotherapy or the vascular accesses (technical success rate, 100 %). Two patients died within 1 month from the procedure from preexisting fatal medical conditions. Only one patient, with a large varix that had been partially embolized by using coils and NBCA, underwent rebleeding 5.5 months after the procedure. The patient was retreated with NBCA and did not undergo any bleeding afterward for a follow-up period of 2.5 months. The remaining nine patients did not experience rebleeding during the follow-up periods (range 1.5–33.2 months).ConclusionTranscatheter embolotherapy using NBCA can be a useful option for bleeding ectopic varices.

  2. Snapshot of Esophageal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... establish common inputs for current and hypothetical screening strategies, chemoprevention and endoscopic therapy. One project aims to advance the understanding of esophageal cancer and the impact of cancer control interventions through a collaborative and comparative modeling project. ...

  3. Esophagitis in Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Putnam, Philip E

    2016-01-01

    Esophagitis is the end result of a variety of insults to epithelial homeostasis. Eosinophilic esophagitis is a manifestation of non-IgE-mediated food allergy that most commonly affects the esophagus of males who have other atopic phenomena. Reflux esophagitis reflects repeated exposure to acidic gastric contents because of failure of the normal protections afforded by the LES. Because certain histologic features can be present in either condition, endoscopic biopsy alone does not distinguish them. Their symptoms overlap, but the treatment options are very different, such that making a formal diagnosis by following consensus guidelines is essential. A treatment protocol designed to manage the inflammation by controlling the provocative factors (acid for GERD and food antigens for EoE) or suppressing the inflammation (ie, topical steroids for EoE) should result in normalization of the mucosa and resolution of symptoms. Eosinophilic esophagitis is a chronic condition that rarely remits spontaneously, so any therapeutic modality will need to be continued indefinitely.

  4. [Congenital esophageal diverticulum].

    PubMed

    Belío-Castillo, C; Bracho-Blanchet, E; Blanco-Rodríguez, G

    1990-08-01

    The congenital or acquired variety of esophageal diverticulum is a rare childhood disease. Reported is a case-study which deals with a five year old patient who arrived at our hospital complaining of a constricture at the cricopharyngeal level. A month later he returned to the hospital with dysphasia and regurgitation; the X-rays and endoscopic diagnosis showed stenosis of the esophagus and the presence of an esophageal diverticulum. Esophageal dilatations were carried out until an acceptable esophageal diameter was reached. Later on, the surgical removal of the diverticulum was performed without any complications. The histopathological study showed the congenital nature of the diverticulum. The patient's recovery went well and is currently considered as cured.

  5. Role of prophylactic antibiotics in cirrhotic patients with variceal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yeong Yeh; Tee, Hoi-Poh; Mahadeva, Sanjiv

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial infections are common in cirrhotic patients with acute variceal bleeding, occurring in 20% within 48 h. Outcomes including early rebleeding and failure to control bleeding are strongly associated with bacterial infection. However, mortality from variceal bleeding is largely determined by the severity of liver disease. Besides a higher Child-Pugh score, patients with hepatocellular carcinoma are particularly susceptible to infections. Despite several hypotheses that include increased use of instruments, greater risk of aspiration pneumonia and higher bacterial translocation, it remains debatable whether variceal bleeding results in infection or vice versa but studies suggest that antibiotic prophylaxis prior to endoscopy and up to 8 h is useful in reducing bacteremia and spontaneous bacterial peritonitis. Aerobic gram negative bacilli of enteric origin are most commonly isolated from cultures, but more recently, gram positives and quinolone-resistant organisms are increasingly seen, even though their clinical significance is unclear. Fluoroquinolones (including ciprofloxacin and norfloxacin) used for short term (7 d) have the most robust evidence and are recommended in most expert guidelines. Short term intravenous cephalosporin (especially ceftriaxone), given in a hospital setting with prevalent quinolone-resistant organisms, has been shown in studies to be beneficial, particularly in high risk patients with advanced cirrhosis. PMID:24587656

  6. Improved Survival with the Patients with Variceal Bleed

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Praveen; Sarin, Shiv K.

    2011-01-01

    Variceal hemorrhage is a major cause of death in patients with cirrhosis. Over the past two decades new treatment modalities have been introduced in the management of acute variceal bleeding (AVB) and several recent studies have suggested that the outcome of patients with cirrhosis and AVB has improved. Improved supportive measures, combination therapy which include early use of portal pressure reducing drugs with low rates of adverse effects (somatostatin, octerotide or terlipressin) and endoscopic variceal ligation has become the first line treatment in the management of AVB. Short-term antibiotic prophylaxis, early use of lactulose for prevention of hepatic encephalopathy, application of early transjugular intrahepatic portasystemic shunts (TIPS), fully covered self-expandable metallic stent in patients for AVB may be useful in those cases where balloon tamponade is considered. Early and wide availability of liver transplantation has changed the armamentarium of the clinician for patients with AVB. High hepatic venous pressure gradient (HVPG) >20 mmHg in AVB has become a useful predictor of outcomes and more aggressive therapies with early TIPS based on HVPG measurement may be the treatment of choice to reduce mortality further. PMID:21994853

  7. Improved survival with the patients with variceal bleed.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Praveen; Sarin, Shiv K

    2011-01-01

    Variceal hemorrhage is a major cause of death in patients with cirrhosis. Over the past two decades new treatment modalities have been introduced in the management of acute variceal bleeding (AVB) and several recent studies have suggested that the outcome of patients with cirrhosis and AVB has improved. Improved supportive measures, combination therapy which include early use of portal pressure reducing drugs with low rates of adverse effects (somatostatin, octerotide or terlipressin) and endoscopic variceal ligation has become the first line treatment in the management of AVB. Short-term antibiotic prophylaxis, early use of lactulose for prevention of hepatic encephalopathy, application of early transjugular intrahepatic portasystemic shunts (TIPS), fully covered self-expandable metallic stent in patients for AVB may be useful in those cases where balloon tamponade is considered. Early and wide availability of liver transplantation has changed the armamentarium of the clinician for patients with AVB. High hepatic venous pressure gradient (HVPG) >20 mmHg in AVB has become a useful predictor of outcomes and more aggressive therapies with early TIPS based on HVPG measurement may be the treatment of choice to reduce mortality further.

  8. Non-invasive (and minimally invasive) diagnosis of oesophageal varices.

    PubMed

    de Franchis, Roberto

    2008-10-01

    Current guidelines recommend screening all cirrhotic patients by endoscopy, to identify patients at risk of bleeding who should undergo prophylactic treatment. However, since the prevalence of varices in cirrhotic patients is variable, universal screening would imply a large number of unnecessary endoscopies and a heavy burden for endoscopy units. In addition, compliance to screening programs may be hampered by the perceived unpleasantness of endoscopy. Predicting the presence of oesophageal varices by non-invasive means might increase compliance and would permit to restrict the performance of endoscopy to those patients with a high probability of having varices. Over the years, several studies have addressed this issue by assessing the potential of biochemical, clinical and ultrasound parameters, transient elastography, CT scanning and video capsule endoscopy. The platelet count/spleen diameter ratio, CT scanning and video capsule endoscopy have shown promising performance characteristics, although none of them is equivalent to EGD. These methods are perceived by patients as preferable to endoscopy and thus might increase adherence to screening programs. Whether this will compensate for the lower sensitivity of these alternative techniques, and ultimately improve the outcomes if more patients undergo screening, is the crucial question that will have to be answered in the future.

  9. Oral and esophageal disorders.

    PubMed

    Noyer, C M; Simon, D

    1997-06-01

    This article focused on the approach to oral and esophageal disorders in patients with AIDS. Most of these disorders respond to various therapeutic regimens. Some of the oral complications can be prevented with dental prophylaxis, whereas recurrent esophageal disease in some patients may require long-term suppressive therapy. As patients with AIDS live longer with lower CD4 counts, gastroenterologists need to become familiar with the approach to and management of the more common lesions of the mouth and esophagus.

  10. Genetics of Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    chemokine production13,18; however, it has been observed that activated mast cells can also express TSLP to similarly drive TH2 responses. 12,19,20 Indeed...including eosinophils 61 and mast cells .62 For instance, TSLP activates dendritic cells to adopt a TH2 prim- ing phenotype through the secretion of the...binding pattern to lysates from esophageal epithelial cells , as well as esophageal tissue from patients with active EE. This analysis has not shown

  11. [Congenital Esophageal Atresia].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Makoto; Kuwano, Hiroyuki

    2015-07-01

    In this report, we describe the esophageal atresia in terms of current surgical management on the basis of our experience and literatures. Traditionally, infants with esophageal atresia have presented shortly after birth because of an inability to pass an orogastric tube, respiratory distress, or an inability to tolerate feeding. And also, an isolated trachea-esophageal fistula (TEF) usually cases coughing, recurrent pneumonia, or choking during feedings. To ignore these symptoms is to risk a delayed diagnosis. The condition may be associated with other major congenital anomalies such as those seen in the vertebral, anal, cardiac, tracheo-esophageal, renal/radial (VACTER) association, or it may be an isolated defect. Therapeutic strategies for esophageal atresia are a prevention of pulmonary complication by TEF closing and an early establishment of enteral alimentation. We promptly repair healthy infants without performing a gastrostomy and delay repair in infants with high-risk factors such as associated severe cardiac anomaly and respiratory insufficiency. Esophageal atresia has been classically approached through a thoracotomy. The disadvantages of such a thoracotomy have been recognized for a long time, for example winged scapula, elevation of fixation of shoulder, asymmetry of the chest wall, rib fusion, scoliosis, and breast and pectoral muscle maldevelopment. To avoid such disadvantages, thoracoscopic repair was recently reported.

  12. Radionuclide imaging for the assessment of esophageal motility disorders in mixed connective tissue disease patients: relation to pulmonary impairment.

    PubMed

    Caleiro, M T C; Lage, L V; Navarro-Rodriguez, T; Bresser, A; da Costa, P A; Yoshinari, N H

    2006-01-01

    Esophageal functional abnormalities may lead to regurgitation, chronic esophagitis and life-threatening conditions such as aspiration pneumonia. In mixed connective tissue disease patients, previous reports showed that esophageal dysfunction varies according to the method employed for investigation. Our study was conceived to: (i) assess esophageal motility and mucosal aspects in patients with mixed connective tissue disease by endoscopy, cine-esophogram and scintigraphy focusing on the prevalence of each exam; and (ii) verify the association between pulmonary and esophageal dysfunctions. Twenty-four mixed connective tissue disease patients were enrolled for this study. Cine-esophogram and upper digestive endoscopy with mucosal biopsy were performed according to previous standardization. Radionuclide esophageal scintigraphy was performed with a semisolid meal with (99m)Tc. Eleven healthy individuals voluntarily submitted to scintigraphy as controls. Cine-esophogram showed esophageal delayed emptying in 90% of patients. At scintigraphy there was a significant delay in total esophageal transit time in the group of patients when compared to healthy controls (35.3 +/- 8.2 s. vs. 13.6 +/- 9.5 s.; P < 0.0001). The whole esophageal body showed dysmotility in 96% of patients. The cine-esophogram detected functional esophageal impairment similar to scintigraphic findings. Histopathologic examination found esophagitis in 95% of studied patients. Reduced lung volumes were associated with esophagitis and delayed esophageal clearance at scintigraphy, observed at the distal portion of the esophagus. Esophageal scintigraphy is easy to perform, with good acceptance by patients with low radiation exposition. It is a useful non-invasive test for follow-up and interventional studies concerning esophagus dysfunction.

  13. Successful Treatment of Mesenteric Varices After Living Donor Liver Transplantation with Retrograde Transvenous Obliteration Via an Abdominal Wall Vein

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Osamu Tamura, Yoshitaka; Nakasone, Yutaka; Yamashita, Yasuyuki; Okajima, Hideaki; Asonuma, Katsuhiro; Inomata, Yukihiro

    2010-06-15

    Balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration is an established treatment for gastric varices; it has been used more rarely to treat mesenteric varices. We report a 12-year-old girl who had received a living donor liver transplant and suffered melena due to ruptured mesenteric varices. We addressed treatment of the mesenteric varices by retrograde transvenous obliteration of an abdominal wall collateral vein detected by superior mesenteric arteriography.

  14. The role of the superior laryngeal nerve in esophageal reflexes.

    PubMed

    Lang, I M; Medda, B K; Jadcherla, S; Shaker, R

    2012-06-15

    The aim of this study was to determine the role of the superior laryngeal nerve (SLN) in the following esophageal reflexes: esophago-upper esophageal sphincter (UES) contractile reflex (EUCR), esophago-lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxation reflex (ELIR), secondary peristalsis, pharyngeal swallowing, and belch. Cats (N = 43) were decerebrated and instrumented to record EMG of the cricopharyngeus, thyrohyoideus, geniohyoideus, and cricothyroideus; esophageal pressure; and motility of LES. Reflexes were activated by stimulation of the esophagus via slow balloon or rapid air distension at 1 to 16 cm distal to the UES. Slow balloon distension consistently activated EUCR and ELIR from all areas of the esophagus, but the distal esophagus was more sensitive than the proximal esophagus. Transection of SLN or proximal recurrent laryngeal nerves (RLN) blocked EUCR and ELIR generated from the cervical esophagus. Distal RLN transection blocked EUCR from the distal cervical esophagus. Slow distension of all areas of the esophagus except the most proximal few centimeters activated secondary peristalsis, and SLN transection had no effect on secondary peristalsis. Slow distension of all areas of the esophagus inconsistently activated pharyngeal swallows, and SLN transection blocked generation of pharyngeal swallows from all levels of the esophagus. Slow distension of the esophagus inconsistently activated belching, but rapid air distension consistently activated belching from all areas of the esophagus. SLN transection did not block initiation of belch but blocked one aspect of belch, i.e., inhibition of cricopharyngeus EMG. Vagotomy blocked all aspects of belch generated from all areas of esophagus and blocked all responses of all reflexes not blocked by SLN or RLN transection. In conclusion, the SLN mediates all aspects of the pharyngeal swallow, no portion of the secondary peristalsis, and the EUCR and ELIR generated from the proximal esophagus. Considering that SLN is not

  15. The role of the superior laryngeal nerve in esophageal reflexes

    PubMed Central

    Medda, B. K.; Jadcherla, S.; Shaker, R.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the role of the superior laryngeal nerve (SLN) in the following esophageal reflexes: esophago-upper esophageal sphincter (UES) contractile reflex (EUCR), esophago-lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxation reflex (ELIR), secondary peristalsis, pharyngeal swallowing, and belch. Cats (N = 43) were decerebrated and instrumented to record EMG of the cricopharyngeus, thyrohyoideus, geniohyoideus, and cricothyroideus; esophageal pressure; and motility of LES. Reflexes were activated by stimulation of the esophagus via slow balloon or rapid air distension at 1 to 16 cm distal to the UES. Slow balloon distension consistently activated EUCR and ELIR from all areas of the esophagus, but the distal esophagus was more sensitive than the proximal esophagus. Transection of SLN or proximal recurrent laryngeal nerves (RLN) blocked EUCR and ELIR generated from the cervical esophagus. Distal RLN transection blocked EUCR from the distal cervical esophagus. Slow distension of all areas of the esophagus except the most proximal few centimeters activated secondary peristalsis, and SLN transection had no effect on secondary peristalsis. Slow distension of all areas of the esophagus inconsistently activated pharyngeal swallows, and SLN transection blocked generation of pharyngeal swallows from all levels of the esophagus. Slow distension of the esophagus inconsistently activated belching, but rapid air distension consistently activated belching from all areas of the esophagus. SLN transection did not block initiation of belch but blocked one aspect of belch, i.e., inhibition of cricopharyngeus EMG. Vagotomy blocked all aspects of belch generated from all areas of esophagus and blocked all responses of all reflexes not blocked by SLN or RLN transection. In conclusion, the SLN mediates all aspects of the pharyngeal swallow, no portion of the secondary peristalsis, and the EUCR and ELIR generated from the proximal esophagus. Considering that SLN is not

  16. Contractile profile of esophageal and gastric fundus strips in experimental doxorubicin-induced esophageal atresia.

    PubMed

    Capeto, F A; Lima, F J B; Okoba, W; Ramos, F L; Messias, T F A; Rigonatto, G A; Sbragia, L; Magalhães, P J C; Melo-Filho, A A

    2015-05-01

    Esophageal atresia (EA) is characterized by esophageal and gastric motility changes secondary to developmental and postsurgical damage. This study evaluated the in vitro contractile profile of the distal esophagus and gastric fundus in an experimental model of EA induced by doxorubicin (DOXO). Wistar pregnant rats received DOXO 2.2 mg/kg on the 8th and 9th gestational days. On day 21.5, fetuses were collected, sacrificed, and divided into groups: control, DOXO without EA (DOXO-EA), and DOXO with EA (DOXO+EA). Strips from the distal esophagus and gastric fundus were mounted on a wire myograph and isolated organ-bath system, respectively, and subjected to increasing concentrations of carbamylcholine chloride (carbachol, CCh). The isolated esophagus was also stimulated with increasing concentrations of KCl. In esophagus, the concentration-effect curves were reduced in response to CCh in the DOXO+EA and DOXO-EA groups compared to the control group (P<0.05). The maximum effect values (Emax) for DOXO+EA and DOXO-EA were significantly lower than control (P<0.05), but the half-maximal effective concentration (EC50) values were not significantly different when the three groups were compared (P>0.05). In response to KCl, the distal esophagus samples in the three groups were not statistically different with regard to Emax or EC50 values (P>0.05). No significant difference was noted for EC50 or Emax values in fundic strips stimulated with CCh (P>0.05). In conclusion, exposure of dams to DOXO during gestation inhibited the contractile behavior of esophageal strips from offspring in response to CCh but not KCl, regardless of EA induction. The gastric fundus of DOXO-exposed offspring did not have altered contractile responsiveness to cholinergic stimulation.

  17. Contractile profile of esophageal and gastric fundus strips in experimental doxorubicin-induced esophageal atresia

    PubMed Central

    Capeto, F.A.; Lima, F.J.B.; Okoba, W.; Ramos, F.L.; Messias, T.F.A.; Rigonatto, G.A.; Sbragia, L.; Magalhães, P.J.C.; Melo-Filho, A.A.

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal atresia (EA) is characterized by esophageal and gastric motility changes secondary to developmental and postsurgical damage. This study evaluated the in vitro contractile profile of the distal esophagus and gastric fundus in an experimental model of EA induced by doxorubicin (DOXO). Wistar pregnant rats received DOXO 2.2 mg/kg on the 8th and 9th gestational days. On day 21.5, fetuses were collected, sacrificed, and divided into groups: control, DOXO without EA (DOXO-EA), and DOXO with EA (DOXO+EA). Strips from the distal esophagus and gastric fundus were mounted on a wire myograph and isolated organ-bath system, respectively, and subjected to increasing concentrations of carbamylcholine chloride (carbachol, CCh). The isolated esophagus was also stimulated with increasing concentrations of KCl. In esophagus, the concentration-effect curves were reduced in response to CCh in the DOXO+EA and DOXO-EA groups compared to the control group (P<0.05). The maximum effect values (Emax) for DOXO+EA and DOXO-EA were significantly lower than control (P<0.05), but the half-maximal effective concentration (EC50) values were not significantly different when the three groups were compared (P>0.05). In response to KCl, the distal esophagus samples in the three groups were not statistically different with regard to Emax or EC50 values (P>0.05). No significant difference was noted for EC50 or Emax values in fundic strips stimulated with CCh (P>0.05). In conclusion, exposure of dams to DOXO during gestation inhibited the contractile behavior of esophageal strips from offspring in response to CCh but not KCl, regardless of EA induction. The gastric fundus of DOXO-exposed offspring did not have altered contractile responsiveness to cholinergic stimulation. PMID:25760030

  18. Esophageal Gunshot Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Symbas, P. N.; Hatcher, C. R.; Vlasis, S. E.

    1980-01-01

    During a 15-year period from August 1964 to August 1979, 48 patients with gunshot wound of the esophagus (24 of the cervical, 17 of the thoracic, and seven of the abdominal) were treated at Grady Memorial Hospital. In the majority of the patients, the initial history, physical findings, and chest roentgenograms were nondiagnostic for esophageal injury. Esophageal perforation was mainly suspected because the bullet tract was in close proximity to the esophagus or the bullet had traversed the mediastinum. The diagnosis of esophageal perforation was made by esophagography (29 patients), at the time of emergency surgical exploration for suspected other organ injuries (17 patients), or by esophagoscopy (one patient). All but one patient were treated surgically. The surgical procedure most commonly used was primary repair of the esophageal wound with wide drainage of the mediastinum. Thirty-eight (79.2%) of the 48 patients survived, 21 (87.5%) of the 24 patients with cervical, 11 (64.7%) of the 17 patients with thoracic, and six (85.7%) of the seven patients with abdominal esophageal wounds. Ten patients died, three with cervical wound, six with thoracic wound, and one with abdominal esophageal wound. Three patients died intraoperatively from major bleeding and the remaining seven died from the esophageal and/or other associated injuries, four to eight days after surgery. None of the seven patients who underwent primary repair with wide drainage and plication of the suture line with pleural flap or other tissue, died or developed leak at the suture line. This study suggests that the physical and roentgenographic findings in patients with esophageal injury are often nondiagnostic and frequently are masked by coincidental injury to other organs. Hence, a high index of suspicion is required for the diagnosis of esophageal injury from gunshot wounds and esophagography should be performed as soon as the patient's condition is stable in all patients who present with a missile

  19. Clinical Implications and Pathogenesis of Esophageal Remodeling in Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Hirano, Ikuo; Aceves, Seema S.

    2014-01-01

    In eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), remodeling changes are manifest histologically in both the epithelium as well as in the subepithelium where lamina propria (LP) fibrosis, expansion of the muscularis propria and increased vascularity occur. The major clinical symptoms and complications of EoE are largely consequences of esophageal remodeling. Important mediators of the process include IL-5, IL-13, TGFβ1, mast cells, fibroblasts and eosinophils. Methods to detect remodeling effects include upper endoscopy, histopathology, barium esophagram, endoscopic ultrasonography, esophageal manometry, and functional luminal imaging. These modalities provide evidence of organ dysfunction that include focal and diffuse esophageal strictures, expansion of the mucosa and subepithelium, esophageal motor abnormalities and reduced esophageal distensibility. Complications of food impaction and perforations of the esophageal wall have been associated with reduction in esophageal caliber and increased esophageal mural stiffness. The therapeutic benefits of topical corticosteroids and elimination diet therapy in resolving mucosal eosinophilic inflammation of the esophagus are evident. Available therapies, however, have demonstrated variable ability to reverse existing remodeling changes of the esophagus. Systemic therapies that include novel, targeted biologic agents have the potential of addressing subepithelial remodeling. Esophageal dilation remains a useful, adjunctive therapeutic maneuver in symptomatic adults with esophageal stricture. As novel treatments emerge, it is essential that therapeutic endpoints account for the fundamental contributions of esophageal remodeling to overall disease activity. PMID:24813517

  20. Esophageal stent fracture: Case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Khara, Harshit S; Diehl, David L; Gross, Seth A

    2014-01-01

    Endoscopic esophageal stent placement is widely used in the treatment of a variety of benign and malignant esophageal conditions. Self expanding metal stents (SEMS) are associated with significantly reduced stent related mortality and morbidity compared to plastic stents for treatment of esophageal conditions; however they have known complications of stent migration, stent occlusion, tumor ingrowth, stricture formation, reflux, bleeding and perforation amongst others. A rare and infrequently reported complication of SEMS is stent fracture and subsequent migration of the broken pieces. There have only been a handful of published case reports describing this problem. In this report we describe a case of a spontaneously fractured nitinol esophageal SEMS, and review the available literature on the unusual occurrence of SEMS fracture placed for benign or malignant obstruction in the esophagus. SEMS fracture could be a potentially dangerous event and should be considered in a patient having recurrent dysphagia despite successful placement of an esophageal SEMS. It usually requires endoscopic therapy and may unfortunately require surgery for retrieval of a distally migrated fragment. Early recognition and prompt management may be able to prevent further problems. PMID:24627608

  1. Occult solitary submucosal jejunal metastasis from esophageal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lindenmann, Joerg; Gollowitsch, Franz; Matzi, Veronika; Porubsky, Christian; Maier, Alfred; Smolle-Juettner, Freyja Maria

    2005-01-01

    Background Metastatic tumors of the intestinal tract from extra-abdominal sites are rare. In esophageal cancer, the liver, lung and the bones are the most common sites of metastases. Metastasis to intestines are very rare. Case presentation A 54-year old male was admitted with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) associated with dysphagia II-III and weight loss of 20 kg. Preoperative routine staging failed to detect any metastases. A transthoracic esophagectomy and orthotopic gastric pull-up with collar esophago-gastrostomy, associated with 2-field lymphadenectomy was perfromed. During the digital placement of the naso-jejunal feeding catheter a submucosal jejunal nodule with a diameter of 1 cm, about 40 cm distal to the duodeno-jejunal fold was detected which was completely resected by jejunotomy. Histopathology of jejunal nodule showed metastasis from esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. Conclusion Because of the extensic esophageal lymphatic system, an occult widespread dissemination of the tumor cells into the abdominal cavity is possible. Additional intraoperative evaluation of the small intestine and the complete abdominal cavity should be performed in every operation of esophageal carcinoma to detect possible occult intraabdominal metastases. PMID:16022736

  2. Esophageal stent fracture: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Khara, Harshit S; Diehl, David L; Gross, Seth A

    2014-03-14

    Endoscopic esophageal stent placement is widely used in the treatment of a variety of benign and malignant esophageal conditions. Self expanding metal stents (SEMS) are associated with significantly reduced stent related mortality and morbidity compared to plastic stents for treatment of esophageal conditions; however they have known complications of stent migration, stent occlusion, tumor ingrowth, stricture formation, reflux, bleeding and perforation amongst others. A rare and infrequently reported complication of SEMS is stent fracture and subsequent migration of the broken pieces. There have only been a handful of published case reports describing this problem. In this report we describe a case of a spontaneously fractured nitinol esophageal SEMS, and review the available literature on the unusual occurrence of SEMS fracture placed for benign or malignant obstruction in the esophagus. SEMS fracture could be a potentially dangerous event and should be considered in a patient having recurrent dysphagia despite successful placement of an esophageal SEMS. It usually requires endoscopic therapy and may unfortunately require surgery for retrieval of a distally migrated fragment. Early recognition and prompt management may be able to prevent further problems.

  3. Role of peripheral reflexes in the initiation of the esophageal phase of swallowing

    PubMed Central

    Medda, Bidyut K.; Babaei, Arash; Shaker, Reza

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the role of peripheral reflexes in initiation of the esophageal phase of swallowing. In 10 decerebrate cats, we recorded electromyographic responses from the pharynx, larynx, and esophagus and manometric data from the esophagus. Water (1–5 ml) was injected into the nasopharynx to stimulate swallowing, and the timing of the pharyngeal and esophageal phases of swallowing was quantified. The effects of transection or stimulation of nerves innervating the esophagus on swallowing and esophageal motility were tested. We found that the percent occurrence of the esophageal phase was significantly related to the bolus size. While the time delays between the pharyngeal and esophageal phases of swallowing were not related to the bolus size, they were significantly more variable than the time delays between activation of muscles within the pharyngeal phase. Transection of the sensory innervation of the proximal cervical esophagus blocked or significantly inhibited activation of the esophageal phase in the proximal cervical esophagus. Peripheral electrical stimulation of the pharyngoesophageal nerve activated the proximal cervical esophagus, peripheral electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve activated the distal cervical esophagus, and peripheral electrical stimulation the superior laryngeal nerve (SLN) had no effect on the esophagus. Centripetal electrical stimulation of the SLN activated the cervical component of the esophageal phase of swallowing before initiation of the pharyngeal phase. Therefore, we concluded that initiation of the esophageal phase of swallowing depends on feedback from peripheral reflexes acting through the SLN, rather than a central program. PMID:24557762

  4. Role of peripheral reflexes in the initiation of the esophageal phase of swallowing.

    PubMed

    Lang, Ivan M; Medda, Bidyut K; Babaei, Arash; Shaker, Reza

    2014-04-15

    The aim of this study was to determine the role of peripheral reflexes in initiation of the esophageal phase of swallowing. In 10 decerebrate cats, we recorded electromyographic responses from the pharynx, larynx, and esophagus and manometric data from the esophagus. Water (1-5 ml) was injected into the nasopharynx to stimulate swallowing, and the timing of the pharyngeal and esophageal phases of swallowing was quantified. The effects of transection or stimulation of nerves innervating the esophagus on swallowing and esophageal motility were tested. We found that the percent occurrence of the esophageal phase was significantly related to the bolus size. While the time delays between the pharyngeal and esophageal phases of swallowing were not related to the bolus size, they were significantly more variable than the time delays between activation of muscles within the pharyngeal phase. Transection of the sensory innervation of the proximal cervical esophagus blocked or significantly inhibited activation of the esophageal phase in the proximal cervical esophagus. Peripheral electrical stimulation of the pharyngoesophageal nerve activated the proximal cervical esophagus, peripheral electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve activated the distal cervical esophagus, and peripheral electrical stimulation the superior laryngeal nerve (SLN) had no effect on the esophagus. Centripetal electrical stimulation of the SLN activated the cervical component of the esophageal phase of swallowing before initiation of the pharyngeal phase. Therefore, we concluded that initiation of the esophageal phase of swallowing depends on feedback from peripheral reflexes acting through the SLN, rather than a central program.

  5. Historical overview and review of current day treatment in the management of acute variceal haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Rajoriya, Neil; Tripathi, Dhiraj

    2014-01-01

    Variceal haemorrhage is one of the most devastating consequences of portal hypertension, with a 1-year mortality of 40%. With the passage of time, acute management strategies have developed with improved survival. The major historical treatment landmarks in the management of variceal haemorrhage can be divided into surgical, medical, endoscopic and radiological breakthroughs. We sought to provide a historical overview of the management of variceal haemorrhage and how treatment modalities over time have impacted on clinical outcomes. A PubMed search of the following terms: portal hypertension, variceal haemorrhage, gastric varices, oesophageal varices, transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt was performed. To complement this, Google™ was searched with the aforementioned terms. Other relevant references were identified after review of the reference lists of articles. The review of therapeutic advances was conducted divided into pre-1970s, 1970/80s, 1990s, 2000-2010 and post-2010. Also, a summary and review on the pathophysiology of portal hypertension and clinical outcomes in variceal haemorrhage was performed. Aided by the development of endoscopic therapies, medication and improved radiological interventions; the management of variceal haemorrhage has changed over recent decades with improved survival from an often-terminating event in recent past. PMID:24914369

  6. UK guidelines on the management of variceal haemorrhage in cirrhotic patients

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Dhiraj; Stanley, Adrian J; Hayes, Peter C; Patch, David; Millson, Charles; Mehrzad, Homoyon; Austin, Andrew; Ferguson, James W; Olliff, Simon P; Hudson, Mark; Christie, John M

    2015-01-01

    These updated guidelines on the management of variceal haemorrhage have been commissioned by the Clinical Services and Standards Committee (CSSC) of the British Society of Gastroenterology (BSG) under the auspices of the liver section of the BSG. The original guidelines which this document supersedes were written in 2000 and have undergone extensive revision by 13 members of the Guidelines Development Group (GDG). The GDG comprises elected members of the BSG liver section, representation from British Association for the Study of the Liver (BASL) and Liver QuEST, a nursing representative and a patient representative. The quality of evidence and grading of recommendations was appraised using the AGREE II tool. The nature of variceal haemorrhage in cirrhotic patients with its complex range of complications makes rigid guidelines inappropriate. These guidelines deal specifically with the management of varices in patients with cirrhosis under the following subheadings: (1) primary prophylaxis; (2) acute variceal haemorrhage; (3) secondary prophylaxis of variceal haemorrhage; and (4) gastric varices. They are not designed to deal with (1) the management of the underlying liver disease; (2) the management of variceal haemorrhage in children; or (3) variceal haemorrhage from other aetiological conditions. PMID:25887380

  7. Bleeding oesophageal varices associated with anabolic steroid use in an athlete.

    PubMed Central

    Winwood, P. J.; Robertson, D. A.; Wright, R.

    1990-01-01

    A 30 year old bodybuilder who had been taking anabolic steroids for 18 months presented with bleeding oesophageal varices. Serious liver disease secondary to anabolic steroids including peliosis hepatis, nodular hyperplasia and malignant change is well recognized. We report what is, to our knowledge, the first case of bleeding oesophageal varices associated with the use of anabolic steroids. PMID:2099434

  8. Tracheal reconstruction by re-inforced Gore-Tex in esophageal submuscular tunneling: An experimental study

    PubMed Central

    Hodjati, Hossein; Baezzat, Saeed Reza; Fazelzadeh, Afsoon; Tanideh, Nader; Geramizadeh, Bita

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tracheal reconstructions are aimed at rearranging or replacing parts of the tracheal tissue by different techniques. Here we introduce a new technique for tracheal reconstruction. METHODS: In 10 adult dogs, after intubation with an endotracheal tube, a segment of trachea including seven tracheal rings was resected circumferentially. A submuscular tunnel was induced between mucosal and muscular layers of the adjacent esophagus lying right next to the trachea. The esophageal submuscular tunnel starts and ends exactly at the level of distal and proximal ends of tracheal resection, respectively. Inforced Gore-Tex passed through the esophageal submuscular tunnel the distal segment of trachea and end-to-end anastomosis were made between distal ends of Gore-Tex and trachea, then endotracheal tube removed and the same procedure was made for proximal ends of Gore-Tex and trachea. Afterward, the proximal and distal ends of the esophageal tunnel were approximated to proximal and distal tracheal parts over the anastomosis. RESULTS: All dogs, except one due to anesthetic problem, survived and tolerated the operation; the first two dogs experienced postoperative fever, aspiration pneumonia, and died due to tracheoesophageal fistula. All survived animals were eating and barking well. We started to scarify dogs at least 6 and 12 weeks after operation for microscopy and pathologic examination. The Gore-Texes were patent and supported externally with fibrous connective tissue in esophageal tunneling, with in growth of respiratory epithelium on inner surfaces. CONCLUSION: Air tightness, good re-epithelialization, and relatively no limitation of esophageal length and no risk of luminal collapse are advantages of tracheal reconstruction by submuscular esophageal tunneling. This new method is worthy of further investigation, as it is technically feasible and easy to implement. PMID:21264166

  9. Complete fundoplication is not associated with increased dysphagia in patients with abnormal esophageal motility.

    PubMed

    Heider, T R; Farrell, T M; Kircher, A P; Colliver, C C; Koruda, M J; Behrns, K E

    2001-01-01

    Abnormal esophageal motility is a relative contraindication to complete (360-degree) fundoplication because of a purported risk of postoperative dysphagia. Partial fundoplication, however, may be associated with increased postoperative esophageal acid exposure. Our aim was to determine if complete fundoplication is associated with increased postoperative dysphagia in patients with abnormal esophageal motor function. Medical records of 140 patients (79 females; mean age 48 +/- 1.1 years) who underwent fundoplication for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) were reviewed retrospectively to document demographic data, symptoms, and diagnostic test results. Of the 126 patients who underwent complete fundoplication, 25 met manometric criteria for abnormal esophageal motility (#30 mm Hg mean distal esophageal body pressure or #80% peristalsis), 68 had normal esophageal function, and 33 had incomplete manometric data and were therefore excluded from analysis. Of the 11 patients who underwent partial fundoplication, eight met criteria for abnormal esophageal motility, two had normal esophageal function, and one had incomplete data and was therefore excluded. After a median follow-up of 2 years (range 0.5 to 5 years), patients were asked to report heartburn, difficulty swallowing, and overall satisfaction using a standardized scoring scale. Complete responses were obtained in 72%. Sixty-five patients who underwent complete fundoplication and had manometric data available responded (46 normal manometry; 19 abnormal manometry). Outcomes were compared using the Mann-Whitney U test. After complete fundoplication, similar postoperative heartburn, swallowing, and overall satisfaction were reported by patients with normal and abnormal esophageal motility. Likewise, similar outcomes were reported after partial fundoplication. This retrospective study found equally low dysphagia rates regardless of baseline esophageal motility; therefore a randomized trial comparing complete versus

  10. High Resolution Esophageal Manometry in Patients with Chagas Disease: A Cross-Sectional Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Montalvá, Adrián; Moris, María; Mego, Marianela; Salvador, Fernando; Accarino, Anna; Ramírez, Kathleen; Azpiroz, Fernando; Ruiz-de-Leon, Antonio; Molina, Israel

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Gastrointestinal involvement affects 30–40% of the patients with chronic Chagas disease. Esophageal symptoms appear once the structural damage is established. Little is known about the usefulness of high resolution manometry to early identification of esophageal involvement. Method We performed a cross-sectional study at the Vall d’Hebron University Hospital (Barcelona, Spain) between May 2011 and April 2012. Consecutive patients diagnosed with Chagas disease in the chronic phase were offered to participate. All patients underwent a structured questionnaire about digestive symptoms, a barium esophagogram (Rezende classification) and an esophageal high resolution manometry (HRM). A control group of patients with heartburn who underwent an esophageal HRM in our hospital was selected. Results 62 out of 73 patients that were included in the study fulfilled the study protocol. The median age of the Chagas disease group (CG) was 37 (IQR 32–45) years, and 42 (67.7%) patients were female. Twenty-seven (43.5%) patients had esophageal symptoms, heartburn being the most frequent. Esophagogram was abnormal in 5 (8.77%). The esophageal HRM in the CG showed a pathological motility pattern in 14 patients (22.6%). All of them had minor disorders of the peristalsis (13 with ineffective esophageal motility and 1 with fragmented peristalsis). Hypotonic lower esophageal sphincter was found more frequently in the CG than in the control group (21% vs 3.3%; p<0.01). Upper esophageal sphincter was hypertonic in 22 (35.5%) and hypotonic in 1 patient. When comparing specific manometric parameters or patterns in the CG according to the presence of symptoms or esophagogram no statistically significant association were seen, except for distal latency. Conclusion The esophageal involvement measured by HRM in patients with chronic Chagas disease in our cohort is 22.6%. All the patients with esophageal alterations had minor disorders of the peristalsis. Symptoms and

  11. How we manage variceal hemorrhage in cirrhotic patients. Key practical messages from the British Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Quraishi, Mohammed N; Khan, Faisal; Tripathi, Dhiraj

    2016-01-01

    Variceal bleeding is a serious complication of portal hypertension with high morbidity and mortality. Advances in our understanding of screening and risk stratification along with evidence-based management strategies for acute variceal bleeding as well as primary and secondary prevention have improved overall outcomes in patients with portal hypertension. The guidelines recently published by the British Society of Gastroenterology (BSG) and Baveno 6 consensus have aimed to enhance the standard of care in the management of varices and their complications. This concise review focuses on the key practical messages for screening and management of varices and variceal bleeding in light of these guidelines. The review also takes into account important evidence published since the BSG guidelines and Baveno 6 consensus.

  12. Colorectal variceal bleeding in patients with extrahepatic portal vein thrombosis and idiopathic portal hypertension.

    PubMed

    Orozco, H; Takahashi, T; Mercado, M A; Prado-Orozco, E; Ferral, H; Hernandez-Ortiz, J; Esquivel, E

    1992-03-01

    We report three patients with colonic variceal bleeding secondary to portal hypertension, 0.5% of all cases with hemorrhagic portal hypertension studied by us in the last 16 years. One patient had idiopathic portal hypertension, and the others had extrahepatic portal vein thrombosis. Colonic varices were documented in all three cases by angiogram; large arteriovenous fistulas in the territory of the superior mesenteric artery and between the inferior mesenteric artery and hemorrhoidal veins were demonstrated in one patient. Two patients underwent colonoscopy; colonic varices were seen in only one. Two patients also had bled from esophagogastric varices. One patient underwent descending colon and sigmoid resection after failure to control bleeding with ligation of arterial supply; one patient underwent the Sugiura procedure, plus transanal ligation of hemorrhoids and rectal varices. At 3 months, 2 years, and 4 years of follow-up, the patients were in good general condition without any evidence of rebleeding.

  13. Esophageal Dysmotility in Chronic Hemodialysis Patients After Ingestion of Liquids With Different Viscosities

    PubMed Central

    Kuwahara, Clovis Massato; Rosa-e-Silva, Lucilene; Mocelin, Altair Jacob; Zebian, Miriam; Pontes, Rose Meire Albuquerque; Dantas, Roberto Oliveira

    2011-01-01

    Background Previous studies assessing esophageal motility in chronic renal failure (CRF) patients had no consistency in their findings. These studies evaluated esophageal contractility in response to dry/water swallows. Our aim was to reassess esophageal motility in CRF patients to better define its abnormalities. To unmask minor defects not seen in conventional dry/water manometry we also evaluated esophageal contractility in response to a highly viscous substance. Methods Fifteen controls and nine asymptomatic CRF patients underwent esophageal manometry with dry swallows, swallows of 5 mL of water (1 centipoise) and 5 mL of sugar cane syrup (24500 centipoise). CRF patients were compared with controls for esophageal motility parameters, considering each type of swallow (dry/water/syrup). Results CRF patients had: tendency for higher lower esophageal sphincter (LES) resting pressure (P = 0.09); shorter LES relaxation duration after dry/water/syrup swallows (P = 0.0001, P < 0.0001, P = 0.0001, respectively); higher amplitude of proximal contractions after dry/water/syrup swallows (P = 0.008, P = 0.01, P = 0.04); tendency for longer duration of distal contractions after dry/water/syrup swallows (P = 0.07, P = 0.04, P = 0.09); lower velocity of distal contractions after dry/water/syrup swallows (P = 0.006, P = 0.09, P = 0.02); and higher incidence of multi-peaked contractions after dry/water/syrup swallows (P = 0.03, P = 0.0001, P < 0.0001). Conclusions Esophageal motility dysfunction can be a sub-clinical manifestation in CRF patients. Data also showed that swallows of a highly viscous liquid did not help to detect minor esophageal dysmotility in these patients. PMID:27942314

  14. A PICTORIAL PRESENTATION OF ESOPHAGEAL HIGH RESOLUTION MANOMETRY CURRENT PARAMETERS.

    PubMed

    Lafraia, Fernanda M; Herbella, Fernando A M; Kalluf, Julia R; Patti, Marco G

    2017-01-01

    High resolution manometry is the current technology used to the study of esophageal motility and is replacing conventional manometry in important centers for esophageal motility with parameters used on esophageal motility, following the Chicago Classification. This classification unifies high resolution manometry interpretation and classifies esophageal disorders. This review shows, in a pictorial presentation, the new parameters established by the Chicago Classification, version 3.0, aimed to allow an easy comprehension and interpretation of high resolution manometry. Esophageal manometries performed by the authors were reviewed to select illustrative tracings representing Chicago Classification parameters. The parameters are: Esophagogastric Morphology, that classifies this junction according to its physiology and anatomy; Integrated Relaxation Pressure, that measures the lower esophageal sphincter relaxation; Distal Contractile Integral, that evaluates the contraction vigor of each wave; and, Distal Latency, that measures the peristalsis velocity from the beginning of the swallow to the epiphrenic ampulla. Clinical applications of these new concepts is still under evaluation. Mostrar, de forma pictórica, os novos parâmetros compilados na versão 3.0 da Classificação de Chicago, buscando facilitar a compreensão e interpretação da manometria de alta resolução. Foram revistas as manometrias da casuística dos autores e selecionados os traçados representativos dos parâmetros da Classificação de Chicago. Entre os parâmetros apresentados foram considerados a Morfologia da Transição Gastroesofágica, que classifica o segmento de acordo com sua fisiologia e anatomia; a Integral da Pressão de Relaxamento, que mede o relaxamento do esfíncter esofagiano inferior; a Integral Contrátil Distal, que avalia o vigor contrátil da onda peristáltica; e, a Latência Distal, que mede o tempo da peristalse, desde o início da deglutição até a ampola epifr

  15. Esophageal tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Luc, Guillaume; Durand, Marlène; Collet, Denis; Guillemot, Fabien; Bordenave, Laurence

    2014-03-01

    Esophageal tissue engineering is still in an early state, and ideal methods have not been developed. Since the beginning of the 20th century, advances have been made in the materials that can be used to produce an esophageal substitute. Three approaches to scaffold-based tissue engineering have yielded good results. The first development concerned non-absorbable constructs based on silicone and collagen. The need to remove the silicone tube is the main disadvantage of this material. Polymeric absorbable scaffolds have been used since the 1990s. The main polymeric material used is poly (glycolic) acid combined with collagen. The problem of stenosis remains prevalent in most studies using an absorbable construct. Finally, decellularized scaffolds have been used since 2000. The promises of this new approach are unfulfilled. Indeed, stenosis occurs when the esophageal defect is circumferential regardless of the scaffold materials. Cell supplementation can decrease the rate of stenosis, but the type(s) of cells and their roles have not been defined. Finally, esophageal tissue engineering cannot provide a functional esophageal substitute, and further development is necessary prior to conducting human clinical studies.

  16. Chemoradiotherapy for Esophageal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ashish; Suntharalingam, Mohan

    2009-01-01

    Radiotherapy and surgery have both played prominent roles in the treatment of esophageal cancer since the beginning of the 20th century. Although the use of radiotherapy alone to treat esophageal cancer has a long history, it has not demonstrated improved outcomes compared with surgery alone. The disappointing rates of survival and local control associated with single-modality therapy and the need for effective nonsurgical management led to the development of definitive chemoradiotherapy paradigms for esophageal cancer. Adding cytotoxic chemotherapy to radiotherapy for additive or synergistic effect was described as early as 1968, and over time, treatment has shifted from single-modality therapy toward combined-modality therapy using chemotherapy and radiotherapy. This approach eventually demonstrated superior outcomes in patients with esophageal cancer when compared to radiotherapy alone. Maximum benefit of this therapy depends on the appropriate addition of surgery and the optimization of radiosensitizing chemotherapy. A burgeoning area of research has focused on improving definitive chemoradiotherapy strategies through the incorporation of newer chemotherapeutic agents and targeted biologic agents. An overview of the history of chemoradiotherapy in the treatment of esophageal cancer is presented, as well as a discussion of ongoing studies and future areas of promising research. PMID:19461907

  17. Intramural esophageal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kozak, Katarzyna; Rębowski, Marek; Kozak, Józef

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Intramural esophageal tumors (IET) are located between unchanged mucous membrane and muscularis mucosae. They can be both benign and malignant. Aim To evaluate diagnostic and therapeutic difficulties of IET. Material and methods During the years 2010–2015, 11 patients with IET were treated in our clinic. Diagnostics included gastroscopy, computed tomography of the chest, endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) guided fine needle biopsy, and positron emission tomography (PET) of the esophagus in cases with no histopathological confirmation. Results Based on the conducted analysis we diagnosed 1 case of gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST), 1 case of adenocarcinoma, and 2 cases of esophageal cysts. In another 7 cases radiological images resembled leiomyoma but with no histopathological confirmation. Esophagectomy was performed in 2 cases of malignant tumors and 1 case of a large benign tumor. In other cases surgical enucleation of tumors was performed. Postoperatively we diagnosed 6 cases of leiomyoma, 1 case of schwannoma, 2 esophageal cysts, 1 case of GIST and 1 of esophageal cancer. Conclusions Intramural esophageal tumors is a very diverse group of tumors, both malignant and benign. In every case of IET we should seek histopathological conformation. Treatment of IET depends on localization, size and histopathological type of lesion. PMID:28096828

  18. Calcium carbonate antacids alter esophageal motility in heartburn sufferers.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Stanley, Sheila; Ahmed, Tanveer; Zubaidi, Sattar; Riley, Susan; Akbarali, Hamid I; Mellow, Mark H; Miner, Philip B

    2004-01-01

    Chewed calcium carbonate (CaCO3) rapidly neutralizes esophageal acid and may prevent reflux, suggesting another mechanism of action independent of acid neutralization. Calcium is essential for muscle tone. Our aim was to determine if luminal calcium released from chewed antacids improved esophageal motor function in heartburn sufferers. Esophageal manometry and acid clearance (swallows and time to raise esophageal pH to 5 after a 15-ml 0.1 N HCl bolus) were performed in 18 heartburn sufferers before and after chewing two Tums EX (1500 mg CaCO3, 600 mg calcium). Subjects with hypertensive esophageal contractions or hypertensive lower esophageal sphincter pressure (LESP) were excluded. Subjects with normal to low LESP were included. Differences between parameters were determined by two-tailed paired t-tests, P < 0.05. Proximal esophageal contractile amplitude was significantly increased after CaCO3 (47.18 vs 52.97 mm Hg; P = 0.02), distal onset velocity was significantly decreased after CaCO3 (4.34 vs 3.71 cm/sec; P = 0.02), and acid clearance was significantly increased 30 min after CaCO3 (20.35 vs 11.7 swallows, [P < 0.005] and 12.19 vs 6.29 min [P < 0.007]). LESP was not altered after CaCO3 (22.70 vs 23.79 mm Hg; P = 0.551), however, LESP increased in 9 of 18 subjects. Depth of LES relaxation, medial and distal esophageal contractile amplitude, and duration of contractions were not altered by CaCO3. CaCO3 did not alter salivary secretion and pH in a subset of these subjects, and CaCO3 with secreted saliva did not neutralize a 15-ml acid bolus. The Ca2+ released after chewing of CaCO3 antacids may be partially responsible for the reduction of heartburn by significantly improving initiation of peristalsis and acid clearance.

  19. Effect of caffeine on lower esophageal sphincter pressure in Thai healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Lohsiriwat, S; Puengna, N; Leelakusolvong, S

    2006-01-01

    Caffeine affects many aspects of body function including the gastrointestinal system. A single-blinded experimental study was performed to evaluate the effect of caffeine on lower esophageal sphincter (LES) and esophageal peristaltic contractions in healthy Thai adults. The volunteers were six men and six women aged 19-31 years. Subjects drank 100 mL of water. Five wet swallows were performed 30 min after the drink. The basal LES pressure was continuously measured using esophageal manometric technique. They then consumed another 100 mL of water containing caffeine at the dose of 3.5 mg/kg body weight. The swallows and basal LES pressure monitoring were repeated. The results showed no change in basal LES pressure after a water drink while caffeine consumption significantly lowered the pressure at 10, 15, 20 and 25 min. The mean amplitude of contractions and peristaltic velocity were decreased at the distal esophagus at 3 and 8 cm above LES. The mean duration of contraction was decreased at the distal part but increased at the more proximal esophagus. The heart rate, systolic and diastolic blood pressures were increased significantly at 10-20 min after caffeine ingestion. This study indicated that caffeine 3.5 mg/kg affected esophageal function, resulting in a decrease in basal LES pressure and distal esophageal contraction, which is known to promote the reflux of gastric contents up into the esophagus.

  20. Creation of an Esophageal Atresia Animal Model Using a Bifurcated Esophagus to Maintain Digestive Tract Continuity.

    PubMed

    Glenn, Ian C; Bruns, Nicholas E; Schomisch, Steve J; Ponsky, Todd A

    2017-09-06

    We previously developed a porcine model of long gap pure esophageal atresia (EA) to aid in the creation of novel devices and techniques for treatment of EA. Shortcomings of the model included difficulty decompressing the proximal esophageal pouch (leading to recurrent aspiration) and a requirement for gastrostomy tube (G-tube) feeds. Therefore, we sought to create a porcine model with a bifurcated esophagus wherein one portion of the esophageal lumen retained patency and the other part mimicked EA. After G-tube placement, thoracotomy was performed with subsequent partial stapled transection of the esophagus in a transverse manner, followed by longitudinal, partial stapled transection of the esophagus proximally and distally. Magnets were placed in the esophageal pouches. Proximal and distal esophageal pouches were created while preserving a parallel, narrower segment of continuous esophagus. G-tube feeds were used initially, but the animal ultimately tolerated full nutrition by mouth. The magnets successfully restored esophageal continuity. The animal regained much of the initial weight lost and survived to planned euthanasia. Necropsy revealed anastomosis formation without evidence of leak. A bifurcated porcine esophagus model was successfully devised, simulating EA while allowing the animal to receive oral feeds and clear oral secretions. This model is anticipated to promote animal well-being and ease of care during future investigations, as well as a platform for the safe development of new therapies for EA.

  1. Esophageal stenting for benign and malignant disease: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) Clinical Guideline.

    PubMed

    Spaander, Manon C W; Baron, Todd H; Siersema, Peter D; Fuccio, Lorenzo; Schumacher, Brigitte; Escorsell, Àngels; Garcia-Pagán, Juan-Carlos; Dumonceau, Jean-Marc; Conio, Massimo; de Ceglie, Antonella; Skowronek, Janusz; Nordsmark, Marianne; Seufferlein, Thomas; Van Gossum, André; Hassan, Cesare; Repici, Alessandro; Bruno, Marco J

    2016-10-01

    recommendation, low quality evidence). 2 ESGE suggests consideration of temporary placement of SEMSs as therapy for refractory benign esophageal strictures (weak recommendation, moderate evidence). Stents should usually be removed at a maximum of 3 months (strong recommendation, weak quality evidence). 3 ESGE suggests that fully covered SEMSs be preferred over partially covered SEMSs for the treatment of refractory benign esophageal strictures, because of their lack of embedment and ease of removability (weak recommendation, low quality evidence). 4 For the removal of partially covered esophageal SEMSs that are embedded, ESGE recommends the stent-in-stent technique (strong recommendation, low quality evidence). 5 ESGE recommends that temporary stent placement can be considered for treating esophageal leaks, fistulas, and perforations. The optimal stenting duration remains unclear and should be individualized. (Strong recommendation, low quality evidence.) 6 ESGE recommends placement of a SEMS for the treatment of esophageal variceal bleeding refractory to medical, endoscopic, and/or radiological therapy, or as initial therapy for patients with massive esophageal variceal bleeding (strong recommendation, moderate quality evidence). © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. Minimally invasive surgery for esophageal achalasia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huan-Wen; Du, Ming

    2016-07-01

    Esophageal achalasia is due to the esophagus of neuromuscular dysfunction caused by esophageal functional disease. Its main feature is the lack of esophageal peristalsis, the lower esophageal sphincter pressure and to reduce the swallow's relaxation response. Lower esophageal muscular dissection is one of the main ways to treat esophageal achalasia. At present, the period of muscular layer under the thoracoscope esophagus dissection is one of the treatment of esophageal achalasia. Combined with our experience in minimally invasive esophageal surgery, to improved incision and operation procedure, and adopts the model of the complete period of muscular layer under the thoracoscope esophagus dissection in the treatment of esophageal achalasia.

  3. Assessing esophageal dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Kruger, Danielle

    2014-05-01

    Dysphagia, or difficulty swallowing, is a common problem. Although most cases are attributable to benign disease processes, dysphagia is also a key symptom in several malignancies, making it an important symptom to evaluate. The differential diagnosis of dysphagia requires an understanding of deglutition, in particular the oropharyngeal versus esophageal stages. Stroke is the leading cause of oropharyngeal dysphagia, which is common in older adults and frequently presents as part of a broader complex of clinical manifestations. In esophageal dysphagia, difficulty swallowing is often the main complaint and is caused by localized neuromuscular disorders or obstructive lesions.

  4. Evaluation of esophageal sensation.

    PubMed

    Nusrat, Salman; Miner, Philip B

    2014-10-01

    Dramatic progress has been made over the past decade in the sophistication and availability of equipment to test esophageal motility and sensation. High-resolution esophageal manometry and impedance have moved from the research clinic into clinical practice. Some of the testing is costly and time consuming, and requires extensive experience to perform the testing and properly interpret the results. These sensory studies are valuable in the interpretation of clinical problems, and provide important research information. Clinicians should evaluate the research studies to advance their understanding of the pathophysiology of the esophagus. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Gastric necrosis after fundoplication: a novel approach for esophageal preservation.

    PubMed

    Bass, K D; Meagher, D P; Haase, G M

    1998-11-01

    An 11-year-old boy presented moribund, with massive abdominal distension. A Nissen fundoplication and gastrostomy tube had been established at age 2 years. After attempts to pass a nasogastric tube were unsuccessful, the old gastrostomy site was used to gain percutaneous access to the stomach resulting in release of gastric contents and stabilization of blood pressure and perfusion. During operation, massive gastric distention with gastric necrosis was found. Subtotal gastrectomy was performed with stapled closure of the distal intraabdominal esophagus and prepyloric region. Sump suction was placed in the proximal esophagus and the abdomen was drained widely. A distal esophageal perforation was apparent on postoperative day 19 confirmed by imaging and endoscopy. A nasoesophageal tube was passed into the abdomen, tied to a Jackson-Pratt drain, and the composite tube repositioned in the midesophagus allowing controlled proximal and distal drainage. Six months later, a Hunt-Laurence esophagojejunal pouch was created. At age 13, the child is clinically well, and enjoys 50% of his nutritional needs orally, with the remainder delivered overnight via tube feedings. This case describes gastric necrosis after gas bloat syndrome as a late complication of Nissen fundoplication. A novel approach to the management of distal esophageal perforation allowed preservation of a functional, intact native esophagus.

  6. Distal median nerve dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Distal median nerve dysfunction is a form of peripheral neuropathy that affects the movement of or sensation in ... and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team. Peripheral Nerve Disorders Read more Latest Health News Read more Health ...

  7. Transphyseal Distal Humerus Fracture.

    PubMed

    Abzug, Joshua; Ho, Christine Ann; Ritzman, Todd F; Brighton, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Transphyseal distal humerus fractures typically occur in children younger than 3 years secondary to birth trauma, nonaccidental trauma, or a fall from a small height. Prompt and accurate diagnosis of a transphyseal distal humerus fracture is crucial for a successful outcome. Recognizing that the forearm is not aligned with the humerus on plain radiographs may aid in the diagnosis of a transphyseal distal humerus fracture. Surgical management is most commonly performed with the aid of an arthrogram. Closed reduction and percutaneous pinning techniques similar to those used for supracondylar humerus fractures are employed. Cubitus varus caused by a malunion, osteonecrosis of the medial condyle, or growth arrest is the most common complication encountered in the treatment of transphyseal distal humerus fractures. A corrective lateral closing wedge osteotomy can be performed to restore a nearly normal carrying angle.

  8. Distal ulnar growth arrest.

    PubMed

    Nelson, O A; Buchanan, J R; Harrison, C S

    1984-03-01

    Four cases of arrest of distal ulnar physeal growth occurring in children ages 7 to 13 years had follow-up for 2 to 10 years. Each patient developed bowing of the radial diaphysis, ulnar translation of the distal radial epiphysis, and increased ulnar angulation of the distal radiocarpal joint surface. Growth discrepancies were documented in both the ulna (range 2.2 to 3.9 cm) and to a lesser extent the radius (range 0.2 to 1.6 cm) when compared to the opposite forearm in each patient. The progression of deformity appeared to be greatest during adolescence. Radial deviation and pronation were limited to varying degrees in each case. No patient had significant pain or functional impairment, but the cosmetic appearance was always displeasing. Indications for surgical treatment include increasing ulnar angulation of the distal radial articular surface, progressive loss of motion, and displeasing cosmetic appearance.

  9. Distal renal tubular acidosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... get better with treatment. When to Contact a Medical Professional Call your health care provider if you have symptoms of distal renal tubular acidosis. Get medical help right away if you develop emergency symptoms ...

  10. Can esophageal dilation be avoided in the treatment of severe esophageal stricture caused by eosinophilic esophagitis?

    PubMed

    Silva, D; Santos, F; Piedade, S; Morais-Almeida, M

    2015-07-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is an inflammatory immune-mediated disease with predominant eosinophilic inflammation characterized by the presence of esophageal dysfunction symptoms. Treatment delay can be associated with disease complications, like esophageal strictures, that can justify the use of invasive procedures which are not deprived of side effects. We present a case report of a 14 year old child with severe esophageal stricture secondary to EoE, that was treated with topical and systemic corticosteroid before any invasive procedure was considered. After 26 weeks of medical treatment, significant improvement of esophageal dysfunction occurred with histological remission and stricture resolution. In patients with severe esophageal strictures secondary to EoE, the need for esophageal dilation procedures should be considered only after anti-inflammatory treatment.

  11. Esophageal pneumatosis in the setting of small bowel ileus with acute resolution after nasogastric tube decompression.

    PubMed

    Tewari, Sanjit O; Wolfe, Allen R; Seguritan, Richard; Faroqui, Raihan; Meshreki, Michael

    2017-09-01

    Esophageal pneumatosis is a rare condition with diverse potential etiologies including traumatic, mechanical, ischemic, obstructive respiratory, autoimmune, immunodeficient, and infectious causes. Here, we present a case of esophageal pneumatosis in the setting of upper gastrointestinal and small bowel ileus, diagnosed on computed tomography (CT), with acute resolution after nasogastric tube decompression. A patient presented to the emergency department with epigastric discomfort. CT of the abdomen/pelvis demonstrated intramural air in the mid-to-distal esophagus, consistent with esophageal pneumatosis, and diffuse dilatation of the visualized esophagus, stomach, and small bowel, consistent with an ileus. Patient was managed with nasogastric tube decompression and bowel rest. Subsequent esophagram did not demonstrate any evidence of perforation and a repeat CT of the abdomen/pelvis, performed 11 hours after initial diagnostic CT, demonstrated interval resolution of patient's esophageal pneumatosis, and improvement of patient's ileus.

  12. Molecular Phenotyping in Predicting Response in Patients With Stage IB-III Esophageal Cancer Receiving Combination Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-18

    Stage IB Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIA Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIB Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIA Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIB Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIC Esophageal Adenocarcinoma

  13. Treatment of symptomatic pelvic varices by ovarian vein embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Capasso, Patrizio; Simons, Christine; Trotteur, Genevieve; Dondelinger, Robert F.; Henroteaux, Denis; Gaspard, Ulysse

    1997-03-15

    Purpose. Pelvic congestion syndrome is a common cause of chronic pelvic pain in women and its association with venous congestion has been described in the literature. We evaluated the potential benefits of lumboovarian vein embolization in the treatment of lower abdominal pain in patients presenting with pelvic varicosities. Methods. Nineteen patients were treated. There were 13 unilateral embolizations, 6 initial bilateral treatments and 5 treated recurrences (a total of 30 procedures). All embolizations were performed with either enbucrilate and/or macrocoils, and there was an average clinical and Doppler duplex follow-up of 15.4 months. Results. The initial technical success rate was 96.7%. There were no immediate or long-term complications. Variable symptomatic relief was observed in 73.7% of cases with complete responses in 57.9%. All 8 patients who had partial or no pain relief complained of dyspareunia. The direct relationship between varices and chronic pelvic pain was difficult to ascertain in a significant number of clinical failures. Conclusion. Transcatheter embolization of lumboovarian varices is a safe technique offering symptomatic relief of pelvic pain in the majority of cases. The presence of dyspareunia seemed to be a poor prognostic factor, indicating that other causes of pelvic pain may coexist with pelvic varicosities.

  14. [Formation of compressive bandage after sclerotherapy for lower limb varices].

    PubMed

    Zatonskikh, B Ia; Banas, N B

    2003-01-01

    Invention concerns compressive sclerotherapy as a treatment modality for lower limb varices. Technical result of investigation is the development of compressive bandage that creates and maintains adequate level of limb compression both in supine position (during bed rest) and standing or walking. Technical result is achieved by formation of two compressive layers of elastic bandage. Highly expansible elastic bandage is used for the first layer aimed for fixation and compression of latex or foam pads at injection sites to create local compression of variceal nodes. Open toe elastic stocking (I compression class) is placed over the bandage to maintain adequate compression during bed rest. The second external layer consists of elastic bandage with moderate expansion (II compression class). It is placed over the first one from toes to thigh upper third and creates optimal compression in patient's vertical position. The patient is permitted to take it off or loose exclusively in supine position, to wash or refresh foot with wet towel, to change it with a new one.

  15. Diagnosis and therapy of non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Biecker, Erwin

    2015-01-01

    Non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) is defined as bleeding proximal to the ligament of Treitz in the absence of oesophageal, gastric or duodenal varices. The clinical presentation varies according to the intensity of bleeding from occult bleeding to melena or haematemesis and haemorrhagic shock. Causes of UGIB are peptic ulcers, Mallory-Weiss lesions, erosive gastritis, reflux oesophagitis, Dieulafoy lesions or angiodysplasia. After admission to the hospital a structured approach to the patient with acute UGIB that includes haemodynamic resuscitation and stabilization as well as pre-endoscopic risk stratification has to be done. Endoscopy offers not only the localisation of the bleeding site but also a variety of therapeutic measures like injection therapy, thermocoagulation or endoclips. Endoscopic therapy is facilitated by acid suppression with proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy. These drugs are highly effective but the best route of application (oral vs intravenous) and the adequate dosage are still subjects of discussion. Patients with ulcer disease are tested for Helicobacter pylori and eradication therapy should be given if it is present. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs have to be discontinued if possible. If discontinuation is not possible, cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors in combination with PPI have the lowest bleeding risk but the incidence of cardiovascular events is increased. PMID:26558151

  16. Combined therapies versus monotherapies for the first variceal bleeding in patients with high-risk varices: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Bai, Ming; Qi, Xingshun; Yang, Man; Han, Guohong; Fan, Daiming

    2014-03-01

    The effect of combined therapies (among non-selected beta-blockers [NSBB], endoscopic therapy, and other treatments) on the first variceal bleeding has been evaluated in several randomized controlled trials previously, and the results were controversial. We performed this meta-analysis to assess the effect of combined therapies in patients with high-risk varices without previous variceal bleeding. The Cochrane Library, The Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Group Controlled Trials Register, MEDLINE, and EMBASE were searched for eligible trials. Manual searches were also performed for additional studies. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding, variceal bleeding, mortality, and adverse events were evaluated as end-points by meta-analysis. Twelve randomized controlled trials with 1571 patients were included. Compared with the NSBB (propranolol or nadolol) or endoscopic therapy alone, all of the combined therapies did not demonstrate significant improvements in variceal bleeding, total upper gastrointestinal bleeding, and mortality. Only the combinations of isosorbide-mononitrate or spironolactone with NSBB tended to decrease the risk of variceal bleeding when compared with the use of NSBB alone (isosorbide-mononitrate plus NSBB vs NSBB: odds ratio = 0.67, 95% confidence interval 0.40-1.13, P = 0.13; spironolactone plus NSBB vs NSBB: odds ratio = 0.41, 95% confidence interval 0.10-1.69, P = 0.22). Adverse events were more frequently observed in the combined therapy groups. Based on the available evidences, no combined therapy can be recommended as the first-line treatment for the primary prevention of variceal bleeding currently. Further studies with large sample sizes and long-term follow up are warranted. © 2013 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  17. Successful endoscopic sclerotherapy for bleeding gastric varices with combined cyanoacrylate and aethoxysklerol

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Bei; Wu, Wei; Zhu, Hui; Wu, Yun-Lin

    2008-01-01

    Two patients with liver cirrhosis and portal hypertension related to hepatitis infection were admitted to Shanghai Ruijin Hospital due to recurrent melena and hematemesis. Isolated gastric varices were observed in the gastric fundus during the retroflexion of gastroscope. We carried out endoscopic sclerotherapy successfully for bleeding gastric varices with combined cyanoacrylate and aethoxysklerol, which disappeared dramatically several months after two courses of sclerotherapy for each patient. No complication and clinical signs of gastrointestinal re-bleeding were observed during the 6-mo endoscopic follow-up. CT portal angiography (CTPA) has been widely used in the assessment of variceal treatment and improves the results of endoscopic injection therapy. PMID:18567095

  18. Duodenal variceal bleed: an unusual cause of upper gastrointestinal bleed and a difficult diagnosis to make

    PubMed Central

    Bhagani, Shradha; Winters, Conchubhair; Moreea, Sulleman

    2017-01-01

    We present a case of recurrent upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding in a man aged 57 years with primary biliary cholangitis who was ultimately diagnosed with an isolated duodenal variceal bleed, which was successfully treated with histoacryl glue injection. Duodenal varices are an uncommon presentation of portal hypertension and can result in significant GI bleeding with a high mortality. Diagnosis can be difficult and therapeutic options limited. Endoscopic variceal sclerotherapy with histoacryl glue provides an effective treatment, though endoscopists need to remain aware of and vigilant for the serious complications of this treatment option. PMID:28242804

  19. Can different subsets of ineffective esophageal motility influence the outcome of nissen fundoplication?

    PubMed

    Simić, Aleksandar P; Skrobić, Ognjan M; Gurski, Richard R; Šljukić, Vladimir M; Ivanović, Nenad R; Peško, Predrag M

    2014-10-01

    Ineffective esophageal motility (IEM) in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease includes three different subsets that may affect symptom profiles. Our aim was to assess symptoms and functional outcome in patients with erosive esophagitis according to different subsets of IEM, before and after Nissen fundoplication (NF). A retrospective study with prospective follow-up of 72 patients with reflux esophagitis and IEM in whom open NF was performed. Based on principal manometric esophageal body motility disorder, patients were divided in three groups: predominantly low-amplitude (LAC, N = 38), non-propulsive (NPC, N = 18), and simultaneous low-amplitude esophageal contractions (SC, N = 16). Patients underwent symptomatic questionnaire and stationary esophageal manometry before and 6 months, 1 year, and 3 years after surgery. Preoperatively, patients in NPC and SC groups had higher mean scores of dysphagia, without statistical significance as opposed to the LAC group (p = 0.239). Postoperative dysphagia occurred in 36 patients, without statistical significance between groups regarding dysphagia grades (p = 0.390). A longer duration of postoperative dysphagia was noted in the SC group (p < 0.05). Improvement of nadir values of contraction amplitudes in distal esophagus occurred postoperatively in all groups, significantly higher in LAC (p < 0.001). Three years after NF, successful symptomatic and functional outcome was achieved in analyzed groups of patients with erosive esophagitis regardless of IEM subtype.

  20. Esophageal verrucous carcinoma arising from hyperkeratotic plaques associated with human papilloma virus type 51.

    PubMed

    Tonna, J; Palefsky, J M; Rabban, J; Campos, G M; Theodore, P; Ladabaum, U

    2010-07-01

    Esophageal verrucous carcinoma is a rare variant of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. We report a case of esophageal verrucous carcinoma associated with human papilloma virus (HPV) type 51. The patient had long-standing dysphagia and odynophagia, and white esophageal plaques showing hyperkeratosis on biopsy. At repeat endoscopy, the esophagus was covered with verrucous white plaques and areas of nodular mucosa with white fronds, with a distal 10-cm smooth mass protruding into the lumen. Biopsies demonstrated an atypical squamoproliferative lesion but no frank malignancy. HPV type 51 DNA was detected in endoscopic biopsy specimens by polymerase chain reaction. Because the size of the lesion favored an underlying verrucous carcinoma, our patient underwent minimally invasive esophagectomy with gastric pull-up and cervical anastomosis. The pathologic diagnosis was a well-differentiated esophageal verrucous carcinoma. One year after esophagectomy, the patient feels well and is free of disease. Although HPV DNA was not detected in the cancer tissue obtained at surgery, our case suggests an association between HPV type 51 and esophageal verrucous carcinoma. The clinical evolution in this case highlights the importance of endoscopic surveillance in patients with exuberant esophageal hyperkeratosis, and of definitive surgical resection when malignancy is suspected even if frank malignancy is not demonstrated on superficial biopsies.

  1. Clinical effects of eosinophilic esophagitis observed using endoscopic ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Yamabe, Akane; Irisawa, Atsushi; Shibukawa, Goro; Abe, Yoko; Saito, Akiko; Imbe, Koh; Hoshi, Koki; Igarashi, Ryo

    2014-08-01

    A 50-year-old woman was referred to our hospital for dysphagia and several episodes of esophageal food impaction during the prior three months. Complete blood count and basic biochemical tests were normal. No eosinophilia was found. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) revealed the presence of concentric rings (esophageal "trachealization") and stenosis along the middle and distal esophagus. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) showed circumferential thickening of all layers in the same part. Cytopathologic evaluation of a specimen obtained by endoscopic biopsy of the thickened area in the distal esophagus showed eosinophilic infiltration (20 eosinophils per high-powered field). She was diagnosed as having eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). Topical steroid therapy was started. A tendency of dysphagia for relief and improvement of characteristic EGD findings began early, but wall thickening in EUS remained. Past reports of the related literature have described that thickness of submucosa and muscularis propria remained after therapy, although significant reduction in the mucosal thickness was provided by short-term steroid therapy. One explanation for early relapse is insufficient reduction in the submucosa and muscularis propria. Consequently, our patient was given steroids until thickness on EUS improved. EUS is regarded as useful for evaluating the curative effect in patients with EoE.

  2. Esophageal laceration with intramural dissection mimics esophageal perforation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hui-Chung; Hsia, Jiun-Yi; Hsu, Chung-Ping

    2008-10-01

    Esophageal laceration with intramural dissection is a rare type of injury but without perforation. It is difficult to differentiate from esophageal perforation at presentation time. We report the case of a 46-year-old man who was admitted to our hospital complaining of progressive chest pain, dysphagia, and odynophagia after swallowing a fish bone three days prior to admission. Esophagoscopy revealed a deep longitudinal laceration with pus discharge in the esophagus. Computed tomography of the chest revealed low posterior mediastinal abscess formation. Surgery was performed under the impression of esophageal perforation. The definite diagnosis was esophageal laceration with intramural dissection.

  3. Esophageal Rupture as a Primary Manifestation in Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Vernon, Natalia; Mohananey, Divyanshu; Ghetmiri, Ehsan; Ghaffari, Gisoo

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic inflammatory process characterized by symptoms of esophageal dysfunction and, histologically, by eosinophilic infiltration of the esophagus. In adults, it commonly presents with dysphagia, food impaction, and chest or abdominal pain. Chronic inflammation can lead to diffuse narrowing of the esophageal lumen which may cause food impaction. Endoscopic procedures to relieve food impaction may lead to complications such as esophageal perforation due to the friability of the esophageal mucosa. Spontaneous transmural esophageal rupture, also known as Boerhaave's syndrome, as a primary manifestation of EoE is rare. In this paper, we present two adult patients who presented with esophageal perforation as the initial manifestation of EoE. This rare complication of EoE has been documented in 13 other reports (11 adults, 2 children) and only 1 of the patients had been previously diagnosed with EoE. A history of dysphagia was present in 1 of our patients and in the majority of previously documented patients. Esophageal perforation is a potentially severe complication of EoE. Patients with a history of dysphagia and patients with spontaneous esophageal perforation should warrant an evaluation for EoE. PMID:24899902

  4. Eosinophilic esophagitis in children with esophageal atresia.

    PubMed

    Dhaliwal, J; Tobias, V; Sugo, E; Varjavandi, V; Lemberg, D; Day, A; Bohane, T; Ledder, O; Jiwane, A; Adams, S; Henry, G; Dilley, A; Shi, E; Krishnan, U

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) has only rarely been reported in esophageal atresia (EA) patients. A retrospective case analysis of all EA patients born at our center between January 1999 and April 2012 was performed. A total of 113 of patients were identified; 10 patients were excluded as a result of inadequate data. Eighteen patients (17%) were diagnosed with EoE. The average number of eosinophilis was 30/high-power field (HPF) (19/HPF-80/HPF). The median age for diagnosis of EoE was 1 year and 6 months (8 months-8 years and 7 months). Children with EoE had a significantly greater incidence of reflux symptoms, dysphagia, tracheomalacia, and 'hypoxic spells' (P < 0.05). EoE patients also underwent significantly more surgery including fundoplication and aortopexy when compared with those without EoE (P < 0.0001). Although the incidence of gastrostomy was greater in the EoE group (33% vs. 13%), this was not statistically significant. Half of the EoE patients had a coexisting atopic condition at time of diagnosis. The commonest condition was asthma 7/18 (38%) followed by specific food allergy 6/18 (33%). EoE was treated in 11 patients with either swallowed fluticasone or budesonide slurry. All improved clinically. Histologically, five had complete resolution and six had partial improvement. Six children with EoE were treated with acid suppression alone. All improved clinically, and 5/6 had subsequent histological resolution. One child who received acid suppression and an exclusion diet also improved. Seven patients (38%) had an esophageal stricture at time of EoE diagnosis. Five were dilated at time of the initial endoscopy, prior to the diagnosis of EoE being available. Two patients had resolution of their strictures on medical treatment of their EoE alone and did not require further dilatation. EoE was seen in 17% of children with EA in this study. EoE should be considered in EA patients with persistent symptoms on standard reflux treatment, increasing

  5. Esophageal motility disorders: medical therapy.

    PubMed

    Lacy, Brian E; Weiser, Kirsten

    2008-01-01

    Symptoms of chest pain and dysphagia are common in the adult population. Most patients initially undergo an evaluation to exclude anatomic causes (ie, esophagitis, stricture) and cardiovascular disease as the etiology of these symptoms. Patients with persistent symptoms may then be referred for specialized testing of the esophagus, including esophageal manometry. Disorders of esophageal motility, which include achalasia, diffuse esophageal spasm, nutcracker esophagus, hypertensive lower esophageal sphincter, and ineffective motility are often identified in these patients. Unfortunately, the etiology of these disorders has not been well characterized and the treatment has not been standardized. This review will briefly discuss the impact, etiology, and diagnosis of esophageal motility disorders, and then focus on the medical management of these disorders using evidence from well-designed, prospective studies, where available.

  6. Effect of gastroesophageal reflux on esophageal speech.

    PubMed

    Mathis, J G; Lehman, G A; Shanks, J C; Blom, E D; Brunelle, R L

    1983-12-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux has been incriminated as a factor-inhibiting acquisition of esophageal speech after laryngectomy. Fourteen proficient esophageal speakers and 10 nonproficient speakers underwent esophageal manometry, esophageal pH probe testing, and Bernstein acid perfusion testing. Additionally, 175 laryngectomized members of Lost Chord Clubs answered mailed questionnaires about the frequency of reflux symptoms. Nonproficient and proficient esophageal speakers had a similar frequency of gastroesophageal reflux by pH probe testing, esophageal mucosal acid sensitivity by Bernstein testing, lower esophageal sphincter pressures, and gastroesophageal reflux symptoms. Gastroesophageal reflux does not appear to be a major factor in preventing esophageal speech.

  7. Esophageal Rupture After Ghost Pepper Ingestion.

    PubMed

    Arens, Ann; Ben-Youssef, Leila; Hayashi, Sandra; Smollin, Craig

    2016-12-01

    The ghost pepper, or "bhut jolokia," is one of the hottest chili peppers in the world. Ghost peppers have a measured "heat" of > 1,000,000 Scoville heat units (SHU), more than twice the strength of a habanero pepper. To our knowledge, no significant adverse effects of ghost pepper ingestion have been reported. A 47-year-old man presented to the Emergency Department (ED) with severe abdominal and chest pain subsequent to violent retching and vomiting after eating ghost peppers as part of a contest. A subsequent chest x-ray study showed evidence of a left-sided pleural effusion and patchy infiltrates. A computed tomography scan of the abdomen and pelvis showed pneumomediastinum with air around the distal esophagus, suggestive of a spontaneous esophageal perforation and a left-sided pneumothorax. The patient was intubated and taken immediately to the operating room, where he was noted to have a 2.5-cm tear in the distal esophagus, with a mediastinal fluid collection including food debris, as well as a left-sided pneumothorax. The patient was extubated on hospital day 14, and was discharged home with a gastric tube in place on hospital day 23. WHY SHOULD AN EMERGENCY PHYSICIAN BE AWARE OF THIS?: Spontaneous esophageal rupture, Boerhaave syndrome, is a rare condition encountered by emergency physicians, with a high mortality rate. This case serves as an important reminder of a potentially life- threatening surgical emergency initially interpreted as discomfort after a large spicy meal. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Metastatic Invasive Lobular Breast Cancer Presenting Clinically with Esophageal Dysphagia

    PubMed Central

    Cuison, Reuben

    2017-01-01

    Background. Intra-abdominal metastases of invasive lobular breast cancer (ILBC) may be insidious. We report a case of metastatic ILBC that presented with dysphagia within weeks of a negative mammogram and before the development of intra-abdominal symptoms. Case. A 70-year-old female developed esophageal dysphagia. She underwent EGD which showed a short segment of stricture of the distal esophagus without significant mucosal changes. Biopsy was unremarkable and patient underwent lower esophageal sphincter (LES) dilation. Severe progressive dysphagia led to esophageal impaction and three LES dilatations. CT scan showed bilateral pleural effusions, more prominent on right side, and ascites. The pleural effusions were transudative. Repeat EGD with biopsy showed lymphocytic esophagitis, and she was started on swallowed fluticasone. Abdominal ultrasound with Doppler showed that the main portal vein had atypical turbulent flow that was felt to possibly be due to retroperitoneal process. The patient underwent diagnostic laparoscopy which revealed diffuse punctate lesions on the peritoneum. Pathology was consistent with metastatic ILBC. Conclusion. Dysphagia in the setting of peritoneal carcinomatosis from metastatic ILBC is a rare finding. The case highlights the importance of metastatic ILBC as a differential diagnosis for female patients with progressive dysphagia and associated ascites or pleural effusions. PMID:28191357

  9. Wandering spleen as a cause of mesenteric and portal varices: a new etiology?

    PubMed

    Zarroug, Abdalla E; Hashim, Yassar; El-Youssef, Mounif; Zeidan, Moiz M; Moir, Christopher R

    2013-03-01

    Wandering spleen is a rare clinical entity characterized by spleen hypermobility due to lack or weakness of one or more splenic ligaments. We report two patients with the diagnosis of wandering spleen with portal and mesenteric varices. A 16 year-old girl presented with abdominal pain, an abdominal mass and pancytopenia. A 12 year-old girl presented with an abdominal mass only. Imaging studies revealed both patients had a viable but torsed wandering spleen in association with portal, splenic and mesenteric varices. Both were treated with splenectomy and had resolution of their symptoms. Imaging confirmed complete resolution of all varices at 30 month and 11 year follow up respectively. These cases represent the first report of a wandering spleen causing portal and mesenteric venous partial obstruction leading to varices; splenectomy resolved these findings post-operatively.

  10. Should we add beta-blockers to band ligation for secondary prophylaxis of variceal bleeding?

    PubMed

    Cotoras, Petre; Faúndez, Jorge; Candia, Roberto

    2017-02-23

    Cirrhotic patients who have had an episode of bleeding from gastroesophageal varices are at high risk of rebleeding, despite treatment with endoscopic variceal ligation. Adding beta-blockers could reduce this risk, but it is associated with adverse effects. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening multiple databases, we identified seven systematic reviews including 21 randomized controlled trials addressing the question of this article. We extracted data, combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings following the GRADE approach. We concluded the addition of beta-blockers to endoscopic variceal ligation as secondary prophylaxis of variceal bleeding reduces the risk of rebleeding, but probably does not lead to any difference in terms of mortality. Even though it is associated to frequent adverse effects, these would be mild and generally do not lead to discontinuation of treatment.

  11. Long-gap esophageal atresia.

    PubMed

    Shieh, Hester F; Jennings, Russell W

    2017-04-01

    The management of long-gap esophageal atresia remains challenging with limited consensus on the definition, evaluation, and surgical approach to treatment. Efforts to preserve the native esophagus have been successful with delayed primary anastomosis and tension-based esophageal growth induction processes. Esophageal replacement is necessary in a minority of cases, with the conduit of choice and patient outcomes largely dependent on institutional expertise. Given the complexity of this patient population with significant morbidity, treatment and long-term follow-up are best done in multidisciplinary esophageal and airway treatment centers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Chicago Classification Criteria of Esophageal Motility Disorders Defined in High Resolution Esophageal Pressure Topography (EPT)†

    PubMed Central

    Bredenoord, Albert J; Fox, Mark; Kahrilas, Peter J; Pandolfino, John E; Schwizer, Werner; Smout, AJPM; Conklin, Jeffrey L; Cook, Ian J; Gyawali, Prakash; Hebbard, Geoffrey; Holloway, Richard H; Ke, Meiyun; Keller, Jutta; Mittal, Ravinder K; Peters, Jeff; Richter, Joel; Roman, Sabine; Rommel, Nathalie; Sifrim, Daniel; Tutuian, Radu; Valdovinos, Miguel; Vela, Marcelo F; Zerbib, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Background The Chicago Classification of esophageal motility was developed to facilitate the interpretation of clinical high resolution esophageal pressure topography (EPT) studies, concurrent with the widespread adoption of this technology into clinical practice. The Chicago Classification has been, and will continue to be, an evolutionary process, molded first by published evidence pertinent to the clinical interpretation of high resolution manometry (HRM) studies and secondarily by group experience when suitable evidence is lacking. Methods This publication summarizes the state of our knowledge as of the most recent meeting of the International High Resolution Manometry Working Group in Ascona, Switzerland in April 2011. The prior iteration of the Chicago Classification was updated through a process of literature analysis and discussion. Key Results The major changes in this document from the prior iteration are largely attributable to research studies published since the prior iteration, in many cases research conducted in response to prior deliberations of the International High Resolution Manometry Working Group. The classification now includes criteria for subtyping achalasia, EGJ outflow obstruction, motility disorders not observed in normal subjects (Distal esophageal spasm, Hypercontractile esophagus, and Absent peristalsis), and statistically defined peristaltic abnormalities (Weak peristalsis, Frequent failed peristalsis, Rapid contractions with normal latency, and Hypertensive peristalsis). Conclusions & Inferences The Chicago Classification is an algorithmic scheme for diagnosis of esophageal motility disorders from clinical EPT studies. Moving forward, we anticipate continuing this process with increased emphasis placed on natural history studies and outcome data based on the classification. PMID:22248109

  13. Portal vein stent placement with or without varix embolization of jejunal variceal bleeding after hepatopancreatobiliary surgery.

    PubMed

    Shim, Dong Jae; Shin, Ji Hoon; Ko, Gi-Young; Kim, Yook; Han, Kichang; Gwon, Dong-Il; Ko, Heung-Kyu

    2017-04-01

    Background Extrahepatic portal hypertension after surgery involving the duodenum or jejunum might result in massive ectopic variceal bleeding. Purpose To report the results of portal vein stent placement with the addition of variceal embolization. Material and Methods Between January 2000 and June 2015, portal vein stent placement was attempted in 477 patients. Of these, 22 patients (age, 63 ± 10 years) with jejunal variceal bleeding caused by portal vein obstruction after surgery were included in this study. Computed tomography (CT) findings before and after treatment and the rates of technical and clinical success, complications, and clinical outcomes were retrospectively evaluated. Results Stent placement was successful in 19 of 22 patients. Additional variceal embolization was performed in five cases. Clinical success, defined as the cessation of bleeding without recurrence within 1 month, was achieved in 18 of 19 patients with technical success. One patient developed recurrent bleeding 4 days after stent placement and was successfully treated with additional variceal embolization. There were no procedure-related complications. A regression of the jejunal varices was noted in 14 of 19 patients on follow-up CT scans. During the follow-up period (258 days; range, 7-1196 days), stent occlusion and recurrent bleeding occurred in six and four patients, respectively, of the 19 patients who achieved technical success. Statistical analyses revealed no significant differences regarding stent patency between benign and malignant strictures. Conclusion Percutaneous, transhepatic, portal vein stent placement with or without jejunal variceal embolization appears to be a safe and effective treatment for jejunal variceal bleeding after surgery.

  14. The application of transabdominal 3D ultrasound for the diagnosis of gastric varices: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Hitoshi; Kamezaki, Hidehiro; Kondo, Takayuki; Sekimoto, Tadashi; Shimada, Taro; Takahashi, Masanori; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility of using transabdominal three-dimensional (3D) colour Doppler ultrasound as a non-invasive tool to demonstrate and quantify gastric varices. A phantom study compared the 3D water flow volume data in a hose with the actual volume inside the hose at three different flow velocities. The prospective clinical study examined the reliability and reproducibility of 3D volume data for gastric varices (mild 28, moderate 26, large 8) in 62 patients. The 3D images were acquired using the colour Doppler with both convex and micro-convex probes. The phantom study showed a 12.4-17.6% difference between the 3D data and the actual volume with no difference between the two types of probes or three velocities. The detectability of gastric varices was identical between the two probes (54/62, 87.1%). However, the scanning efficiency was significantly greater for the micro-convex probe (66.9 ± 14.1%) than the convex probe (57.3 ± 14%, p=0.012). Body mass index was the only factor that had a significant relationship with the detectability of varices. The mean volume (mL) of the 3D signal was 0.82 ± 0.74 for mild varices, 5.48 ± 3.84 for moderate varices, and 10.63 ± 6.67 for large varices with significant differences between different grades. The intra-/inter-rater reliability was excellent. The method of 3D colour Doppler ultrasound is reliable and reproducible in the quantitative assessment of vascular volume and is applicable for grading gastric varices. This study may offer a practical usefulness for 3D ultrasonography as an alternative to endoscopy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. [Achalasia and esophageal cancer].

    PubMed

    Corti, R E; Monastra, L; Fernández Marty, P; Barco, J C; Ferro, F E; Galindo, F; Musi, A O; Kogan, Z

    1992-01-01

    During the period included between January 1970 and December 1990, we studied 242 patients with manometric and radiological diagnosis of esophageal achalasia. Eight of these patients (3.3%) developed during the evolution of their disease an esophageal carcinoma. Eight cases showed histologic type of epidermoid carcinoma: 3 differentiated, 3 semi-differentiated and 2 anaplastic. Therapy for achalasia was: one patient, Heller myotomy, 4 patients, dilatations with bougies in numerous opportunities, and the other two patients receive no treatment for achalasia. Two patients reported tracheobronchial fistulas as complication of carcinoma. Treatment received for carcinoma included: three patients, radiotherapy (4000 rads); one patient, chemotherapy; one patient, chemotherapy and radiotherapy, one resection surgery and two patients feeding gastrostomy. All of the eight patients died within the year of diagnosis of epidermoid carcinoma.

  16. [Giant esophageal fibrovascular polyp].

    PubMed

    Palacios, Fernando; Contardo, Carlos; Guevara, Jorge; Vera, Augusto; Aguilar, Luis; Huamán, Manuel; Palomino, Américo; Yabar, Alejandro

    2003-01-01

    Fibrovascular polyps are extremely rare benign neoplasias of the esophagus, which usually originate in the lower cricoid area. They do not produce any discomfort in the patient for a long time, however it may make itself evident by the patient's regurgitation of the polyp, producing asphyxia or, more frequently, dysphagia. The case of a 58 year old male patient is presented herein, with a 9 month record of dysphagia, weight loss and intermittent melena. The barium x-ray showed a distended esophagus, with a tumor running from the upper esophageal sphincter to the cardia. The endoscopy confirmed the presence of a pediculated tumor, implanted in the cervical esophagus. Surgeons suspected the potential malignancy of the tumor and performed a transhiatal esophagectomy. The final pathologic diagnosis was giant fibrovascular esophageal polyp.

  17. Eosinophilic esophagitis: current treatment.

    PubMed

    Redd, Matthew; Schey, Ron

    2013-03-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a relatively new entity with a significant amount of increased recognition over the last decade. The mainstay treatments of EoE are designed to eliminate the causative allergens or to reduce their effects on the esophageal mucosa. Common treatments include dietary modification, proton pump inhibitors, systemic and topical corticosteroids, and endoscopic treatments. As the pathogenesis of EoE is explored, new and novel treatments are being studied that target specific pathways and chemokines identified in as precipitating agents of EoE. This is a rapidly evolving field with significant ongoing research and clinical studies. Our review will therefore focus on current and novel treatment approaches to the disease.

  18. Mechanism of eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Anil

    2009-02-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a newly recognized disease and is an emerging entity throughout developing and developed countries, including the United States. Therefore, understanding the causes, natural history, diagnosis, and management is important for future therapeutic interventions. The pathogenesis of EoE is still not clear, but a growing body of evidence has established that this condition represents a T-cell-mediated immune response involving several proinflammatory mediators and chemoattractants known to regulate eosinophilic accumulation in the esophagus, such as IL-4, IL-5, IL-3 and eotaxin-1, -2, and -3. Determining the mechanism or mechanisms through which human esophageal-derived factors ultimately induce the functional abnormalities observed, and to which antigens patients who have EoE are sensitized that lead to the manifestation of symptoms, is of significant interest.

  19. Vesical varices and telangiectasias in a patient with ataxia telangiectasia.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Koichi; Tsugawa, Koji; Oki, Eishin; Morio, Tomohiro; Ito, Etsuro; Tanaka, Hiroshi

    2008-06-01

    A Japanese boy with ataxia telangiectasia (AT) developed severe gross hematuria and recurrent bladder tamponade, requiring an extensive blood transfusion. He had received intermittent intravenous cyclophosphamide pulse therapy (cumulative dose of 1.3 g) for refractory steroid-resistant and intravenous immunoglobulin-resistant severe autoimmune thrombocytopenia 3 years previously. A cystoscopy revealed multiple varices and severe telangiectasias in the bladder wall. The intensive treatment, such as repeatedly selective embolization of the vesical arteries, proved to be partially effective. Finally, a surgical cystotomy resulted in a gradual improvement in clinical symptoms. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a patient with AT who developed refractory bladder hemorrhage caused by widespread vesical telangiectasias.

  20. Hypnotherapy for Esophageal Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Riehl, Megan E.; Keefer, Laurie

    2015-01-01

    Hypnotherapy is an evidence based intervention for the treatment of functional bowel disorders, particularly irritable bowel syndrome. While similar in pathophysiology, less is known about the utility of hypnotherapy in the upper gastrointestinal tract. Esophageal disorders, most of which are functional in nature, cause painful and uncomfortable symptoms that impact patient quality of life and are difficult to treat from a medical perspective. After a thorough medical workup and a failed trial of proton pump inhibitor therapy, options for treatment are significantly limited. While the pathophysiology is likely multifactorial, two critical factors are believed to drive esophageal symptoms—visceral hypersensitivity and symptom hypervigilance. The goal of esophageal directed hypnotherapy is to promote a deep state of relaxation with focused attention allowing the patient to learn to modulate physiological sensations and symptoms that are not easily addressed with conventional medical intervention. Currently, the use of hypnosis is suitable for dysphagia, globus, functional chest pain/non-cardiac chest pain, dyspepsia, and functional heartburn. In this article the authors will provide a rationale for the use of hypnosis in these disorders, presenting the science whenever available, describing their approach with these patients, and sharing a case study representing a successful outcome. PMID:26046715

  1. Dermatomyositis and esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Iftikhar, Imran; Abdelmannan, Dima; Daw, Hamed A

    2006-07-01

    A case of dermatomyositis and esophageal cancer is described. A 58-year-old male recently diagnosed with esophageal cancer was admitted to the hospital with complaints of progressive dysphagia, generalized muscle weakness and skin rash. The weakness started symmetrically in the proximal limb muscles. He also developed a characteristic skin rash on the eyelids, the upper chest and around the nails that was thought to be most indicative of dermatomyositis. Creatine kinase, aspartate aminotransferase and aldolase were elevated. A muscle biopsy showed various degrees of degeneration with perivascular interstitial infiltration of lymphoplasma cells, a finding consistent with "dermatomyositis." The patient was started on corticosteroids and within two weeks, his muscle strength was found to be markedly improved and the rash almost disappeared. Dysphagia can be the presenting symptom of both dermatomyositis and esophageal cancer. In the setting of an underlying malignancy, these symptoms can be misleading and one can miss the diagnosis of dermatomyositis. However, recognition of the characteristic skin rash may provide a clue to the diagnosis. Another aspect of our case that is worth acknowledgment is the quick response to treatment with corticosteroids.

  2. Hypnotherapy for Esophageal Disorders.

    PubMed

    Riehl, Megan E; Keefer, Laurie

    2015-07-01

    Hypnotherapy is an evidence based intervention for the treatment of functional bowel disorders, particularly irritable bowel syndrome. While similar in pathophysiology, less is known about the utility of hypnotherapy in the upper gastrointestinal tract. Esophageal disorders, most of which are functional in nature, cause painful and uncomfortable symptoms that impact patient quality of life and are difficult to treat from a medical perspective. After a thorough medical workup and a failed trial of proton pump inhibitor therapy, options for treatment are significantly limited. While the pathophysiology is likely multifactorial, two critical factors are believed to drive esophageal symptoms--visceral hypersensitivity and symptom hypervigilance. The goal of esophageal directed hypnotherapy is to promote a deep state of relaxation with focused attention allowing the patient to learn to modulate physiological sensations and symptoms that are not easily addressed with conventional medical intervention. Currently, the use of hypnosis is suitable for dysphagia, globus, functional chest pain/non-cardiac chest pain, dyspepsia, and functional heartburn. In this article the authors will provide a rationale for the use of hypnosis in these disorders, presenting the science whenever available, describing their approach with these patients, and sharing a case study representing a successful outcome.

  3. Eosinophilic esophagitis: Update in diagnosis and management. Position paper by the Italian Society of Gastroenterology and Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (SIGE).

    PubMed

    de Bortoli, Nicola; Penagini, Roberto; Savarino, Edoardo; Marchi, Santino

    2017-03-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic immune-mediated disease of the esophagus characterized by symptoms related to esophageal dysfunction, as well as significant esophageal eosinophilia. The entity exists worldwide but has been most extensively studied in Western countries. However, a wide range of symptoms has been noticed such as chest pain or gastro-esophageal reflux disease-like symptoms. Upper gastro-intestinal endoscopy and esophageal biopsies are crucial for the diagnosis. Endoscopy might be normal or reveal typical patterns such as rings, furrows, exudates, edema, and stricture. Two to four biopsies should be performed both in the distal and in the proximal esophagus, and 15 eosinophils per high power field within the esophageal epithelium are the minimal threshold to diagnose eosinophilic esophagitis. Allergy testing is recommended, although its impact to orient treatment remains to be demonstrated. Eosinophilic esophagitis treatment includes medical treatment, diet and endoscopic dilation. Proton pump inhibitors are the first-line therapy as up to 50% of patients respond well to proton pump inhibitors irrespective of objective evidence of GERD. Topical viscous corticosteroids or elimination diet are the treatment of choice in case of unresponsiveness to proton pump inhibitors.

  4. Ineffective Esophageal Motility (IEM): the Old-New Frontier in Esophagology.

    PubMed

    Abdel Jalil, Ala' A; Castell, Donald O

    2016-01-01

    Ineffective esophageal motility (IEM) is characterized by distal esophageal contraction amplitude of <30 mmHg on conventional manometry (Blonski et al. Am J Gastroenterol. 103(3):699-704, 2008), or a distal contractile integral (DCI) < 450 mmHg*s*cm on high-resolution manometry (HRM) (Kahrilas et al. Neurogastroenterol Motil. 27(2):160-74, 2015) in≥50 % of test swallows. IEM is the most common abnormality on esophageal manometry, with an estimated prevalence of 20-30 % (Tutuian and Castell Am J Gastroenterol. 99(6):1011-9, 2004; Conchillo et al. Am J Gastroenterol. 100(12):2624-32, 2005). Non-obstructive dysphagia has been considered to be frequently associated with severe esophageal peristaltic dysfunction. Defective bolus transit (DBT) on multichannel intraluminal impedance testing was found in more than half of IEM patients who presented with dysphagia (Tutuian and Castell Am J Gastroenterol. 99(6):1011-9, 2004), highlighting the functional defect of this manometric finding. Treatment of IEM has been challenging because of lack of promotility agents that have a definite effect on esophageal function.

  5. Current Therapeutic Options for Esophageal Motor Disorders as Defined by the Chicago Classification.

    PubMed

    Zerbib, Frank; Roman, Sabine

    2015-07-01

    With the development of high-resolution manometry and specific metrics to characterize esophageal motility, the Chicago Classification has become the gold standard for the diagnosis of esophageal motor disorders. Major and significant disorders, that is, never observed in healthy subjects, are achalasia, esophagogastric junction outflow obstruction, distal esophageal spasm, absent peristalsis, and hypercontractile (Jackhammer) esophagus. Achalasia subtyping is relevant to predict the response to endoscopic and surgical therapies as several studies suggest that, pneumatic dilation is less effective than Heller myotomy, in type III achalasia. Peroral endoscopic myotomy, initially developed in expert centers, is a promising technique for the treatment of achalasia. The medical therapeutic options for distal esophageal spasm and hypercontractile esophagus are smooth muscle relaxants and pain modulators. Intraesophageal injection of botulinum toxin might be an interesting option for treatment of these disorders but further studies are required to determine the optimal injection protocol and the best candidates based on manometric patterns. The treatment of hypotensive motility disorders is disappointing and relies mainly on dietary and lifestyle changes as no effective esophageal prokinetic is currently available.

  6. Laparoscopic Distal Pancreatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Melotti, Gianluigi; Butturini, Giovanni; Piccoli, Micaela; Casetti, Luca; Bassi, Claudio; Mullineris, Barbara; Lazzaretti, Maria Grazia; Pederzoli, Paolo

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To describe the clinical characteristics, indications, technical procedures, and outcome of a consecutive series of laparoscopic distal pancreatic resections performed by the same surgical team. Summary Background Data: Laparoscopic distal pancreatic resection has increasingly been described as a feasible and safe procedure, although accompanied by a high rate of conversion and morbidity. Methods: A consecutive series of patients affected by solid and cystic tumors were selected prospectively to undergo laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy performed by the same surgical team. Clinical characteristics as well as diagnostic preoperative assessment and intra- and postoperative data were prospectively recorded. A follow-up of at least 3 months was available for all patients. Results: Fifty-eight patients underwent laparoscopic resection between May 1999 and November 2005. All procedures were successfully performed laparoscopically, and no patient required intraoperative blood transfusion. Splenic vessel preservation was possible in 84.4% of spleen-preserving procedures. There were no mortalities. The overall median hospital stay was 9 days, while it was 10.5 days for patients with postoperative pancreatic fistulae (27.5% of all cases). Follow-up was available for all patients. Conclusions: Our experience in 58 consecutive patients was characterized by the lack of conversions and by acceptable rates of postoperative pancreatic fistulae and morbidity. Laparoscopy proved especially beneficial in patients with postoperative complications as they had a relatively short hospital stay. Solid and cystic tumors of the distal pancreas represent a good indication for laparoscopic resection whenever possible. PMID:17592294

  7. [Evaluation of gastroesophageal varices with three-dimensional visualization technology].

    PubMed

    Fang, Chihua; Wu, Tianchong; Ye, Rongqiang; Yang, Jian; Fan, Yingfang; Gu, Yang; Zeng, Ning; Liu, Xingxing

    2014-01-01

    To observe the prognostic value of Medical Image Three-dimensional (3D) Visualization System (MI-3DVS) in evaluation of the distribution and blood supply of gastroesophageal varices (EGV). 3D reconstruction was played by MI-3DVS and CT-maximum intensity projection (CT-MIP) respectively on multi slice computed tomography (MSCT) date of 51 patients with EGV from February 2010 to October 2012. The demonstration rate of collateral vessels in spleen and stomach area, EGV typing and the blood supply between the two methods were observed and compared. The demonstration rates of LGV, gastro-renal shunt, splenorenal shunt and PGV showed a high coincidence between the MI-3DVS and CT-MIP (κ = 0.882-1.000), and moderate agreements in SGV and paraesophageal varices (κ = 0.646 and 0.757). The outcome of EGV classification (MI-3DVS vs. CT-MIP) were typeIfor 31 vs. 28 cases, type II for 6 vs. 4 cases, type III for 4 vs. 4 cases and type IV for 6 vs.10 cases, the 2 methods show high agreements (weighted Kappa value of 0.848 and P < 0.01).Significant differences were found in the blood supply distribution among the four types of EGV (χ(2) = 36.647, P < 0.01); and the blood supply of the EGV tended to be a strong correlation with EGV classification (C = 0.769 and 0.744, P = 0.000). There were 12 patients with gastro-renal shunt and 5 patients with Spleno-renal shunt. MI-3DVS can explicitly determine the location, blood vessel diameter and blood supply of the EGV, which is helpful for us to grab the formation of collateral circulation completely. The 3D reconstruction of MI-3DVS has guidance and current significance in optimizing therapeutic schedule or preoperative planning.

  8. Gastroesophageal intussusception: a new cause of acute esophageal obstruction in children.

    PubMed

    Lukish, Jeffrey R; Eichelberger, Martin R; Henry, Len; Mohan, Prati; Markle, Bruce

    2004-07-01

    Gastrointestinal intussusception with obstruction is common in the small bowel and colon; however, such a process is not known to cause esophageal obstruction. Recent experience with gastroesophageal intussusception permits discussion of diagnosis and consideration of treatment options. A 3-year-old child presented with acute esophageal obstruction. Physical examination was significant for epigastric tenderness and excessive salivation. Chest x-ray showed a posterior mediastinal fullness. Esophagram documented a smooth crescent-filling defect, which caused obstruction of the esophagus at the level of the carina with proximal esophageal dilatation. Chest computed tomography of the thorax showed a soft tissue mass of the distal esophagus. Esophagoscopy confirmed occlusion of the midesophagus with the mucosa intact. A right thoracotomy permitted visualization of dilated proximal esophagus and a palpation of an intraluminal mass in the distal esophagus. Mobilization of the distal esophagus and gentle manual pressure cleared the obstruction to a point below the diaphragm. After a normal intraoperative esophagram, final treatment consisted of a longitudinal esophagomyotomy. The child recovered without complication and continues without recurrence for 18 months. This is the first report of gastroesophageal intussusception in children. Management by thoracotomy, manual reduction, and esophageal myotomy reestablished intestinal continuity and appears to eliminate recurrence; fundoplication or gastropexy may be alternative options. Preoperative recognition of gastroesophageal intussusception may allow nonoperative reduction or treatment by minimally invasive surgery.

  9. Esophageal mucosal mast cell infiltration and changes in segmental smooth muscle contraction in noncardiac chest pain.

    PubMed

    Park, S W; Lee, H; Lee, H J; Chung, H; Park, J C; Shin, S K; Lee, S K; Lee, Y C

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells release potent mediators that alter enteric nerve and smooth muscle functions and may contribute to the pathogenesis of functional gastrointestinal disorders. The goal of this study was to determine if mucosal mast cell infiltration was associated with smooth muscle segmental changes in esophageal contraction. All patients with noncardiac chest pain (NCCP) were divided into two groups consisting of patients with non-erosive reflux disease or functional chest pain (FCP) according to the results of ambulatory 24 hours esophageal pH monitoring and high-resolution manometry. Pressure-volume (PV) was calculated by multiplying the length of the esophageal segment, duration of the contraction, and mean pressure over the entire space-time box (P mean). Quantification of mast cells was performed in five consecutive nonoverlapping immunostained sections. Spearman correlation analysis showed that the distal segment PV correlated with the mast cell count in all of the patients combined and in patients with FCP with correlation coefficients of 0.509 and 0.436, respectively (P = 0.004 and P = 0.042). Similar findings were observed for the segmental ratio of distal to proximal smooth muscle PV in all patients and in patients with FCP (correlation coefficients 0.566; P = 0.001 and correlation coefficients 0.525; P = 0.012, respectively). Mucosal mast cell infiltration was associated with distal esophageal contraction as a key pathophysiologic factor of NCCP.

  10. Endoscopic esophageal substitution for pure esophageal atresia and wide gap esophageal atresia: A report of five cases with minimum follow-up of twelve months.

    PubMed

    Chowdhary, Sujit K; Kandpal, Deepak K; Agarwal, Deepak; Balan, Saroja; Jerath, Nameet; Sibal, Anupam; Broor, Sohan L

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the study is to report feasibility and safety of endoscopic esophageal substitution in infants with pure esophageal atresia and wide gap tracheoesophageal fistula with a minimum one year follow-up. This prospective study was conducted from January 2012 for twenty four consecutive months at Apollo Hospital, New Delhi. All babies either followed up or referred for esophageal substitution without any history of mediastinitis or associated major congenital anomaly and weighing greater than 6kg were to be included in the study. The indication, intraoperative details, operative approach, conversion to open, esophageal substitute, postoperative ventilation, ICU and hospital stay, time to solid foods, morbidity and mortality were recorded. Informed consent was obtained from all the parents and ethical clearance was obtained for the study from the hospital ethical committee. Postoperatively babies were followed up monthly for first six months, 3 monthly for next six months and annually thereafter. Between January 2012 and December 2013, in the two year period six infants were admitted for laparoscopic gastric transposition. In five patients the procedure was completed by the laparoscopic approach and one required conversion to open surgery owing to dense adhesions. The age range at the time of surgery was from 8months to 12months with a mean age of 10months. Four patients had pure esophageal atresia (type A) and two had wide gap esophageal atresia with distal tracheoesophageal atresia (type C). Five had primary esophagostomy and gastrostomy as a newborn, the sixth had postoperative anastomotic leak and required subsequent diversion. The mean operating time was 194minutes (range 170-210minutes). The mean stay in ICU was 7days with a range of 4-12days. All patients were ventilated in the postoperative period for an average of 5days with a range of 4-7days. One patient had prolonged gastric ileus which delayed the oral feeds by 14days. The mean time to start the

  11. The Role of Esophageal Hypersensitivity in Functional Esophageal Disorders.

    PubMed

    Farmer, Adam D; Ruffle, James K; Aziz, Qasim

    2017-02-01

    The Rome IV diagnostic criteria delineates 5 functional esophageal disorders which include functional chest pain, functional heartburn, reflux hypersensitivity, globus, and functional dysphagia. These are a heterogenous group of disorders which, despite having characteristic symptom profiles attributable to esophageal pathology, fail to demonstrate any structural, motility or inflammatory abnormalities on standard clinical testing. These disorders are associated with a marked reduction in patient quality of life, not least considerable healthcare resources. Furthermore, the pathophysiology of these disorders is incompletely understood. In this narrative review we provide the reader with an introductory primer to the structure and function of esophageal perception, including nociception that forms the basis of the putative mechanisms that may give rise to symptoms in functional esophageal disorders. We also discuss the provocative techniques and outcome measures by which esophageal hypersensitivity can be established.

  12. Surgical treatment of superficial esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, Mitsuo; Kinugasa, Shoichi; Shibakita, Muneaki; Tonomoto, Yasuhito; Hattori, Shinji; Hyakudomi, Ryoji; Yoshimura, Hiroshi; Dhar, Dipok Kumar; Nagasue, Naofumi

    2006-08-01

    The worldwide incidence of superficial esophageal cancer (SEC) is increasing. The aim of this study is to review the systematic surgical outcomes of esophagectomy for SEC. Only manuscripts written in English and written between 1980 and 2003 were selected from MEDLINE. The keywords consisting of superficial esophageal cancer, early esophageal cancer, and early stage or superficial stage or stage I in esophageal cancer were searched. There were no exclusion criteria for published information relevant to the topics. The most representative articles were selected when there were several articles from the same institution. Case reports were excluded. DATA EXTRACTIONS: Thirty-two manuscripts were finally collected from MEDLINE and eight articles were also added from reference lists of the pertinent literatures. In evaluating the statistical analysis of the complications of the reported literature, collective method was used. The collected information was organized. The conclusions drawn from those articles showed that the overall prevalence of SEC accounted around 10% and increased to 25% in the 2000s. The overall incidence of lymph node metastasis of SEC was about 25% and its incidences in mucosal and submucosal cancer were 5 and 35%, respectively. The percentage of the cases of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) vs adenocarcinoma (AC) widely varied depending on the geographic locations reported; most SCC cases were from the Asian countries and most AC cases were from the European countries. Clinical significance of multimodal treatment for SEC has dramatically developed in the recent era and could provide various potential therapeutic options for SEC. These concepts make it possible to individualize surgical management of SEC as part of various multimodal treatments. The operative approaches for SEC varied from minimally invasive thoracoscopic esophagectomy, limited transabdominal distal esophagectomy, conventional transthoracic esophagectomy, transhiatal esophagectomy

  13. Laparoscopic distal splenoadrenal shunt for the treatment of portal hypertension in children with congenital hepatic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jin-Shan; Cheng, Wei; Li, Long

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: The distal splenorenal shunt is an effective procedure for the treatment of portal hypertension in children. However, there has been no report about laparoscopic distal splenorenal shunt in the treatment of portal hypertension in children. Methods: From December 2015 to August 2016, 4 children with upper gastrointestinal bleeding underwent laparoscopic distal splenoadrenal shunt. Portal hypertension and splenomegaly were demonstrated on the preoperative computed tomography (CT) and sonography. The distal splenic vein was mobilized and anastomosed to the left adrenal vein laparoscopically. All patients were followed-up postoperatively. Results: The laparoscopic distal splenoadrenal shunt was successfully performed in all patients. The liver fibrosis was diagnosed by postoperative liver pathology. The operative time ranged from 180 to 360 minutes. The blood loss was minimal. The length of hospital stay was 6 to 13 days. The duration of following-up was 1 to 9 months (median: 3 months). The portal pressure and splenic size were decreased postoperatively. The complete blood count normalized and the biochemistry tests were within normal range after surgery. Postoperative ultrasound and CT confirmed shunt patency and satisfactory flow in the splenoadrenal shunt in all patients. No patient developed recurrence of variceal bleeding. Conclusions: The laparoscopic splenoadrenal shunt is a feasible treatment of portal hypertension in children. PMID:28099341

  14. The Effect of Acute Stress on Esophageal Motility and Gastroesophageal Reflux in Healthy Humans

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hong Sub; Noh, Chung Kyun; Lee, Kwang Jae

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims Little research has been done to evaluate the effect of stress in exacerbating the symptoms associated with gastroesophageal reflux (GER). We aimed to investigate the effect of acute stress on esophageal motility and GER parameters in healthy volunteers. Methods A total of 10 (M:F = 8:2, median age 34 years-old) healthy volunteers without any recurrent gastrointestinal symptoms participated in this study. They underwent esophageal high-resolution manometry with 10 wet swallows (Experiment I) and esophageal impedance-pH monitoring (Experiment II) in the basal period and in the stress period. In the stress period, either real stress or sham stress was given in a randomized cross-over design. The stress scores, symptom severity, and pulse rates were measured. Results The stress scores and the severity of nausea were significantly greater under real stress, compared with sham stress. The percentages of weak, failed, rapid, premature, and hyper-contractile contractions were not significantly altered during real stress and during sham stress, compared with the basal period. The median resting pressure of the lower esophageal sphincter and distal contractile integral of esophageal contractions did not differ in the stress period, compared with the basal period. Contractile front velocity and distal latency of esophageal peristaltic contractions were significantly changed during real stress, which was not observed during sham stress. GER parameters were not significantly altered during real stress and during sham stress. Conclusion Although acute auditory and visual stress seems to affect esophageal body motility, it does not induce significant motor abnormalities or increase GER in healthy humans. PMID:28049863

  15. Potential Role of the Microbiome in Barrett's Esophagus and Esophageal Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Snider, Erik J; Freedberg, Daniel E; Abrams, Julian A

    2016-08-01

    Esophageal adenocarcinoma and its precursor Barrett's esophagus have been rapidly increasing in incidence for half a century, for reasons not adequately explained by currently identified risk factors such as gastroesophageal reflux disease and obesity. The upper gastrointestinal microbiome may represent another potential cofactor. The distal esophagus has a distinct microbiome of predominantly oral-derived flora, which is altered in Barrett's esophagus and reflux esophagitis. Chronic low-grade inflammation or direct carcinogenesis from this altered microbiome may combine with known risk factors to promote Barrett's metaplasia and progression to adenocarcinoma.

  16. Reconstruction of esophageal defects with microsurgically revascularized jejunal segments: a report of 13 cases.

    PubMed

    Chang, T S; Hwang, O L; Wang-Wei

    1980-12-01

    Experimental free transfer of a jejunal segment to a recipient bed in the neck was successfully performed in 5 mongrel dogs. This was followed by clinical application of 2 different microvascular procedures in 13 patients for repair of esophageal defects. In 7 of these patients a free jejunal transfer was used; in 6 of these patients a pedicled jejunal graft with revascularization of its distal end by microvascular anastomosis was used. The esophageal defects were located in the cervical portion in 7 cases, the cervicothoracic portion in 5 cases, and the thoracic portion in 1 case. Ten (77%) of the 13 procedures were successful.

  17. Esophageal motility disorders after gastric banding.

    PubMed

    O'Rourke, R W; Deveney, C W; McConnell, D B; Wolfe, B M; Jobe, B A

    2007-01-01

    The long-term effects of gastric banding on esophageal function are not well described. This report describes a 28-year-old woman who developed signs and symptoms of abnormal esophageal motility and lower esophageal sphincter hypotension after gastric banding for morbid obesity. The current literature addressing the effects of gastric banding on esophageal function in light of this case report is discussed.

  18. Use of portal pressure studies in the management of variceal haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Addley, Jennifer; Tham, Tony CK; Cash, William Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Portal hypertension occurs as a complication of liver cirrhosis and complications such as variceal bleeding lead to significant demands on resources. Endoscopy is the gold standard method for screening cirrhotic patients however universal endoscopic screening may mean a lot of unnecessary procedures as the presence of oesophageal varices is variable hence a large time and cost burden on endoscopy units to carry out both screening and subsequent follow up of variceal bleeds. A less invasive method to identify those at high risk of bleeding would allow earlier prophylactic measures to be applied. Hepatic venous pressure gradient (HVPG) is an acceptable indirect measurement of portal hypertension and predictor of the complications of portal hypertension in adult cirrhotics. Varices develop at a HVPG of 10-12 mmHg with the appearance of other complications with HPVG > 12 mmHg. Variceal bleeding does not occur in pressures under 12 mmHg. HPVG > 20 mmHg measured early after admission is a significant prognostic indicator of failure to control bleeding varices, indeed early transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) in such circumstances reduces mortality significantly. HVPG can be used to identify responders to medical therapy. Patients who do not achieve the suggested reduction targets in HVPG have a high risk of rebleeding despite endoscopic ligation and may not derive significant overall mortality benefit from endoscopic intervention alone, ultimately requiring TIPS or liver transplantation. Early HVPG measurements following a variceal bleed can help to identify those at risk of treatment failure who may benefit from early intervention with TIPS. Therefore, we suggest using HVPG measurement as the investigation of choice in those with confirmed cirrhosis in place of endoscopy for intitial variceal screening and, where indicated, a trial of B-blockade, either intravenously during the initial pressure study with assessment of response or oral therapy with

  19. Effects of prucalopride on esophageal secondary peristalsis in humans

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Chih-Hsun; Lei, Wei-Yi; Hung, Jui-Sheng; Liu, Tso-Tsai; Chen, Chien-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Prucalopride, a high-affinity 5-hydroxytrypatamine 4 (5-HT4) receptors agonist, has been shown to improve colon motility in adults. Secondary peristalsis helps the clearance of retained food bolus and refluxate from the esophagus, but the effects of prucalopride on esophageal secondary peristalsis are unknown. We aimed to assess the effects of prucalopride on distension-induced secondary peristalsis in healthy adults. Methods: Two separate sessions with prucalopride and placebo were performed in 11 healthy adults to test the effects on secondary peristalsis. Secondary peristalsis was performed with slow and rapid mid-esophageal injections of air after a baseline recording of esophageal motility. Results: Prucalopride significantly decreased the threshold volume to generate secondary peristalsis during slow air injection (9.8±1.4 vs. 14.4±0.9 ml, P=0.005) and rapid air injection (3.9±0.3 vs. 5.2±0.4 ml, P=0.008). Secondary peristalsis was generated more frequently after application of prucalopride (80% (70–100%) vs. 70% (60–73%), P=0.01). Prucalopride increased the wave amplitude of distal esophagus during slow air injection (147.9±28.5 vs. 104.2±16.8 mm Hg, P=0.048) and rapid air injection (128.0±13.3 vs. 105.7±12.3 mm Hg, P=0.016). Primary peristaltic amplitudes were also significantly increased by the application of prucalopride. Conclusions: Acute administration of prucalopride enhances mechanosensitivity of distension-induced secondary peristalsis and promotes esophageal contractility in healthy adults. Whether prucalopride could be a therapeutic option for the treatment of subjects with esophageal hypomotility needs further study. PMID:27831544

  20. Esophageal carcinoma secondary to a chemical injury in a child.

    PubMed

    Schettini, S T; Ganc, A; Saba, L

    1998-09-01

    Twin sisters were clinically and endoscopically followed due to chemical injuries to the esophagus after ingestion of muriatic acid at 10 months of age. One of the girls developed esophageal carcinoma 10 years later and died after esophagectomy because of progression of the disease. Her twin sister has a severe stenosis at the distal esophagus and is waiting for surgical treatment. Malignization of a chemical injury to the esophagus in a child has not yet been described in the literature, emphasizing the role of endoscopic follow-up with periodic biopsies.

  1. Metastatic Esophageal Cancer Presenting as an Orbital Mass

    PubMed Central

    Kabbach, Ghassan; Richter, Seth J.; Chiu, Laura

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of adenocarcinoma of the esophagus presenting as an orbital metastasis prior to the primary diagnosis. A 66-year-old white male presented to his ophthalmologist with right orbital swelling for several months. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a supraorbital infiltrative mass. Pathology from the mass revealed findings consistent with adenocarcinoma of gastrointestinal origin. Upper endoscopy revealed distal esophageal stricture and irregularities. Pathology from the esophagus showed the same malignancy found in the orbit. An orbital swelling can manifest as the initial presentation of metastatic disease and should be taken seriously to avoid delay in diagnosis and treatment. PMID:27921053

  2. Thoracoscopic long myotomy in the prone position to treat rapid esophageal contractions with normal latency.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Tsutomu; Iwakiri, Katsuhiko; Matsutani, Takeshi; Hagiwara, Nobutoshi; Fujita, Itsuro; Nakamura, Yoshiharu; Kawami, Noriyuki; Miyashita, Masao; Uchida, Eiji

    2015-04-01

    A 56-year-old woman with an 8-year history of dysphagia and chest pain received a diagnosis of diffuse esophageal spasm by esophageal high-resolution manometry (HRM). Approximately 2 years of medical therapy was ineffective, and the patient's symptoms were worsening. Therefore, surgery was considered to be the most optimal treatment for this patient. The right thoracoscopic approach was selected because a long myotomy from the distal to proximal level of the esophagus was needed based on the HRM findings. The operation was performed in the prone position with establishment of pneumothorax. The total length of the myotomy was 16 cm, and the operation was finished within 2 hours. After the operation, the symptoms were considerably improved and no contractions were detected by HRM. The HRM findings before the operation were classified as rapid contractions with normal latency based on the 2012 Chicago classification of esophageal motility. Treatment for patients with rapid esophageal contractions with normal latency has not been previously described; however, treatment for diffuse esophageal spasm was considered to be pertinent to this patient. In conclusion, right thoracoscopic esophageal long myotomy in the prone position with establishment of pneumothorax may be useful when a proximal-level esophagomyotomy is required based on preoperative mapping by HRM.

  3. Smooth muscle fascicular reorientation is required for esophageal morphogenesis and dependent on Cdo

    PubMed Central

    Romer, Anthony I.; Singh, Jagmohan; Rattan, Satish

    2013-01-01

    Postnatal maturation of esophageal musculature involves proximal-to-distal replacement of smooth muscle with skeletal muscle by elusive mechanisms. We report that this process is impaired in mice lacking the cell surface receptor Cdo and identify the underlying developmental mechanism. A myogenic transition zone containing proliferative skeletal muscle precursor cells migrated in a proximal–distal direction, leaving differentiated myofibers in its wake. Distal to the transition zone, smooth muscle fascicles underwent a morphogenetic process whereby they changed their orientation relative to each other and to the lumen. Consequently, a path was cleared for the transition zone, and smooth muscle ultimately occupied only the distal-most esophagus; there was no loss of smooth muscle. Cdo−/− mice were specifically defective in fascicular reorientation, resulting in an aberrantly proximal skeletal–smooth muscle boundary. Furthermore, Cdo−/− mice displayed megaesophagus and achalasia, and their lower esophageal sphincter was resistant to nitric oxide–induced relaxation, suggesting a developmental linkage between patterning and sphincter function. Collectively, these results illuminate mechanisms of esophageal morphogenesis and motility disorders. PMID:23569214

  4. Esophageal scintigraphy: applications and limitations in the study of esophageal disorders.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, M K; Byrne, P J; Keeling, P; Hennessy, T P

    1988-01-01

    This study examines the scintigraphic transit pattern in a variety of esophageal disorders. Scintigraphy was performed with a semi solid bolus and the patient in an upright position. Condensed esophageal images were obtained from which we derived the esophageal transit time. The pattern of bolus transit was graded by the duration of transit and by the presence of hold up or retrograde motion. Scintigrams were performed in 11 volunteers and 88 patients whose esophageal function had been confirmed by conventional gastroesophageal techniques. Esophageal disorders examined included achalasia (20), scleroderma (9), esophageal carcinoma (8), Barrett esophagus (5), and reflux esophagitis (27). We also examined the effects of gastroesophageal surgery on esophageal function. Transit times distinguished grossly abnormal esophageal function from normal but did not distinguish between different esophageal disorders. Graded transit patterns were a more sensitive indicator of esophageal function and permitted some differentiation between esophageal disorders and allowed evaluation of the effects of gastroesophageal surgery.

  5. Distal Radioulnar Joint Instability

    PubMed Central

    Mirghasemi, Ali R.; Lee, Daniel J.; Rahimi, Narges; Rashidinia, Shervin

    2015-01-01

    Distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) instability is a common clinical condition but a frequently missed diagnosis. Both surgical and nonsurgical treatments are possible for chronic cases of DRUJ instability. Nonsurgical treatment can be considered as the primary therapy in less active patients, while surgery should be considered to recover bone and ligament injuries if nonsurgical treatment fails to restore forearm stability and function. The appropriate choice of treatment depends on the individual patient and specific derangement of the DRUJ PMID:26328241

  6. [Primary esophageal motility disorders; especially about esophageal achalasia].

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Tatsuya; Sohda, Makoto; Sakai, Makoto; Tanaka, Naritaka; Suzuki, Shigemasa; Yokobori, Takehiko; Inose, Takanori; Nakajima, Masanobu; Fukuchi, Minoru; Kato, Hiroyuki; Kusano, Motoyasu; Kuwano, Hiroyuki

    2011-07-01

    Esophageal motility disorders are classified primary and secondary, and primary esophageal motility disorders are classified esophageal achalasia and other diseases by manometry. An esophageal emptying disorder associated with insufficient relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) and elimination of peristaltic waves on the esophageal body is the major abnormality of achalasia. Esophagogram, endoscopy, and manometry are used for diagnosis. As pharmacological therapy, administration of a calcium channel blocker or nitrate is useful. The pharmacological therapy is not recommended as long-term basic therapy but as a temporary treatment. At 1st, the balloon dilation method is chosen in treatment of achalasia Surgical treatment is indicated in the following cases: (1) Patients uneffected by balloon dilation, (2) Flask type with grade II to III dilation, and sigmoid type, (3) the gradual progression to the pathophysiological stage, (4) young patients, (5) complicated with esophageal cancer. Laparoscopic Heller-Dor procedure is the most popular surgical procedure, recently. It is somewhat difficult to perform surgical treatment for this functional disease. We should select the most suitable individualized treatment with efficient comprehension of the pathophysiological situation.

  7. Stability and Agreement of a Microtransducer and an Air-Filled Balloon Esophageal Catheter in the Monitoring of Esophageal Pressure.

    PubMed

    Augusto, Renan Maloni; Albuquerque, André Luis Pereira; Jaeger, Thomas; de Carvalho, Carlos Roberto Ribeiro; Caruso, Pedro

    2017-02-01

    The use of esophageal catheters with microtransducer promises advantages over traditional catheters with air-filled balloons. However, performance comparisons between these 2 types of catheters are scarce and incomplete. A catheter with a 9.5-cm air-filled balloon at the distal tip and a catheter with a microtransducer mounted within a flexible silicone rubber were tested in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, the response times of both catheters were compared, and the drift of the baseline pressure of the microtransducer catheter was evaluated over a 6-h period. In vivo, 11 healthy volunteers had both catheters inserted, and the drift of the baseline esophageal pressure was measured over a 3-h period. Also, the correlation and agreement of the baseline and changes in the esophageal pressure of both catheters were evaluated. In vitro, the microtransducer catheter had a response time significantly higher (262 × 114 Hz, P < .01) and a good pressure stability, with a mean baseline pressure drift of 1.4 cm H2O. In vivo, both catheters presented a small and similar baseline esophageal pressure drift (P = 0.08). For measurements of baseline and changes in esophageal pressure, the correlation and agreement between the catheters were poor, with a large bias between them. The catheter with the microtransducer had a small baseline pressure drift, similar to the air-filled balloon catheter. The low agreement between the catheters does not allow the microtransducer catheter to be used as a surrogate for the traditional air-filled balloon catheter. Copyright © 2017 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  8. Distal radioulnar joint injuries

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Binu P; Sreekanth, Raveendran

    2012-01-01

    Distal radioulnar joint is a trochoid joint relatively new in evolution. Along with proximal radioulnar joint, forearm bones and interosseous membrane, it allows pronosupination and load transmission across the wrist. Injuries around distal radioulnar joint are not uncommon, and are usually associated with distal radius fractures,fractures of the ulnar styloid and with the eponymous Galeazzi or Essex_Lopresti fractures. The injury can be purely involving the soft tissue especially the triangular fibrocartilage or the radioulnar ligaments. The patients usually present with ulnar sided wrist pain, features of instability, or restriction of rotation. Difficulty in carrying loads in the hand is a major constraint for these patients. Thorough clinical examination to localize point of tenderness and appropriate provocative tests help in diagnosis. Radiology and MRI are extremely useful, while arthroscopy is the gold standard for evaluation. The treatment protocols are continuously evolving and range from conservative, arthroscopic to open surgical methods. Isolated dislocation are uncommon. Basal fractures of the ulnar styloid tend to make the joint unstable and may require operative intervention. Chronic instability requires reconstruction of the stabilizing ligaments to avoid onset of arthritis. Prosthetic replacement in arthritis is gaining acceptance in the management of arthritis. PMID:23162140

  9. Right ovarian vein drainage variant: is there a relationship with pelvic varices?

    PubMed

    Koc, Zafer; Ulusan, Serife; Oguzkurt, Levent

    2006-09-01

    To correlate right ovarian vein (ROV) variations that drain into the right renal vein (RRV) with the presence of pelvic varices. Routine abdominal multidetector-row computed tomography scans of 324 women were analyzed for the presence and type of ROV variations in this retrospective study. The subjects were divided into 2 groups: those with ROV variations and those without such variations. The diameters of the subjects' ROV, left ovarian vein (LOV), and parauterine veins were measured. Pelvic varices and the presence and degree of ovarian vein reflux were noted and compared between the 2 groups. The chi2-test and the Pearson correlation test were used for statistical analysis. Thirty-two (9.9%) of 324 women studied exhibited ROV variant that drained into the right renal vein, and the remaining subjects (90.1%) exhibited a normal pattern of ROV drainage that flowed directly into the inferior vena cava. Pelvic varices were identified in 59 (18%) of the subjects. Reflux was not observed in any patient without pelvic varices. Fifty-seven of 59 women exhibited ovarian vein reflux. In 56 of those 57 individuals, reflux occurred only in the LOV, and in 1 subject, reflux was noted predominantly in the ROV. No significant relationship between the presence of an ROV that drained into the right renal vein and pelvic varices was noted. Although right-sided pelvic varices associated with right ovarian vein drainage variations are rare, anatomic variations of the right ovarian vein are not. This study did not find an association between the presence of right ovarian vein and pelvic varices.

  10. Anti-inflammatory drugs and variceal bleeding: a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    De Ledinghen, V; Heresbach, D; Fourdan, O; Bernard, P; Liebaert-Bories, M; Nousbaum, J; Gourlaouen, A; Becker, M; Ribard, D; Ingrand, P; Silvain, C; Beauchant, M

    1999-01-01

    Background—Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) can have severe gastrointestinal effects and cause peptic ulcers to bleed. Acute bleeding from oesophageal varices is a major complication of cirrhosis of the liver. 
Aims—To investigate the role, using a case-control study, of NSAIDs in first bleeding episodes associated with oesophageal or cardial varices in cirrhotic patients. 
Patients/Methods—A structured interview was conducted of 125cirrhotic patients with bleeding mainly related to oesophageal varices and 75 cirrhotic controls with oesophageal varices who had never bled. 
Results—Cirrhotic patients who were admitted for bleeding related to portal hypertension were more likely to have used NSAIDs during the week before the index day (31 of 125 (25%)) than the cirrhotic controls (eight of 75 (11%); odds ratio = 2.8, p = 0.016). Use of aspirin alone or combined with other NSAIDs was also more prevalent in the cases (21 of 125 (17%)) than in the controls (three of 75 (4%); odds ratio = 4.9, p = 0.007). Logistic regression analysis showed that NSAID use (p = 0.022, odds ratio = 2.9, 95% confidence interval = 1.8 to 4.7) and variceal size (p<0.001, odds ratio = 4.0, 95% confidence interval = 1.4 to 11.5) were the only variables independently associated with the risk of bleeding. 
Conclusions—Aspirin, used alone or combined with other NSAIDs, was associated with a first variceal bleeding episode in patients with cirrhosis. Given the life threatening nature of this complication, the possible benefit of this treatment should be weighed against the risk shown here. No firm conclusions could be drawn on non-aspirin NSAIDs used alone. 

 Keywords: portal hypertension; non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs; variceal bleeding; aspirin; cirrhosis PMID:9895389

  11. Clinical Results of the Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt (TIPS) for the Treatment of Variceal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Han, Sang-Woo; Joo, Young-Eun; Kim, Hyun-Soo; Choi, Sung-Kyu; Rew, Jong-Sun; Kim, Jae-Kyu; Kim, Sei-Jong

    2000-01-01

    Background Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) has been popularized for the treatment of refractory variceal bleeding. The aim of this study was to assess the safety and long-term effect of TIPS in the treatment of variceal bleeding that is not controlled with pharmacological and endoscopic treatment. Methods Thirty-six patients who underwent transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) due to refractory variceal bleeding were included in the study. The effectiveness of portal decompression and bleeding control was evaluated. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was performed to analyse the degree of varices and portal hypertensive gastropathy (PHG) before TIPS procedure and one to three weeks after TIPS. Angiography was performed in surviving patients, if bleeding recurred, or if ultrasonography or endoscopy suggested stent dysfunction. Results TIPS were successfully placed in 36 of 38 patients (94.6%). TIPS achieved hemostasis of variceal bleeding in 34 patients (94.4%). Portal venous pressure decreased from an initial average of 28.7±7.9 to 23.2±9.4 mmHg after TIPS (p < 0.05). The portosystemic pressure gradient was significantly decreased from 15.5±6.3 to 7.8±4.1 mmHg (p < 0.01). The degree of esophagogastric varices and PHG was significantly improved after TIPS. The total length of follow-up was from one day to 54 months (mean: 355 days). The actuarial probability of survival was 83% at one year and 74% at two years. Overall, 16 episodes of stent dysfunction were diagnosed during follow-up. Stent revision by means of angioplasty was successfully performed in 14 of these episodes. Conclusion TIPS is an effective and reliable nonoperative means of lowering portal pressure. This procedure has proved useful in the management of acute variceal bleeding refractory to endoscopic treatment. Surveillance by ultrasonography, endoscopy, and angiographic intervention is useful for the maintenance of shunt patency. PMID:11242805

  12. Partial Splenic Embolization has Beneficial Effects for the Management of Gastroesophageal Variceal Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ping; Liu, Ruibo; Tong, Liquan; Zhang, Yangjing; Yue, Tongyun; Qiao, Haiquan; Zhang, Feng; Sun, Xueying

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: Partial splenic embolization (PSE) is used in the management of gastroesophageal variceal hemorrhage (GEVH). However, it is uncertain whether it has beneficial effects for GEVH patients in preventing variceal recurrence and variceal hemorrhage, as well as promoting overall survival (OS), when it is combined with conventional therapies. Materials and Methods: The databases including PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, Google scholar, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched up to 11th of November, 2015. Meta-analyses were performed by using Review Manager 5.3 software for analyzing the risk of bias, Newcastle-Ottawa Scale for assessing the bias of cohort studies, and GRADEprofiler software for assessing outcomes obtained from the meta-analyses. Results: A total of 1505 articles were reviewed, and 1 randomized controlled trial and 5 cohort studies with 244 participants were eligible for inclusion. The pooled hazard ratio (HR) of variceal recurrence is 0.50 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.37, 0.68; P< 0.00001; I2 = 0%). The pooled HR of variceal hemorrhage is 0.24 (95% CI 0.15, 0.39; P< 0.00001; I2 = 0%). The pooled HR of OS is 0.50 (95% CI 0.33, 0.67; P< 0.00001; I2 = 0%). Meta-analyses demonstrated statistically significant superiority of combinational therapies over conventional therapies in preventing variceal recurrence and variceal hemorrhage and prolonging OS. The complications related to PSE were mild or moderate and nonfatal. Conclusions: The results indicate that PSE has beneficial effects for GEVH patients, however, future investigation with a larger number of subjects in clinical trials is warranted. PMID:27976634

  13. Gastro-esophageal reflux time parameters and esophagitis in children

    SciTech Connect

    Baulieu, F.; Baulieu, J.; Maurage, C.; Casset, D.; Itti, R.

    1985-05-01

    The aim of this work was to study the correlation between the reflux timing and the presence of esophagitis, an inconstant but serious complication of gastro-esophageal reflux (GER). The hypothesis was that reflux occurring late after meal can be incriminated more than early reflux in esophagitis genesis. 32 children with GER (mean age = 10.5 months, 2 to 30 months) had esophagoscopy and scintigraphy in the same week. The children were classified in two groups according to esophagoscopy: group 1 (n = 18) no esophagitis, group 2 (n = 14) esophaqgitis. The scintigraphy involved the ingestion of 0.5 mCi Tc-99m sulfur colloid milk mixture, followed by esophageal and gastric activity recording (one image per minute for 1 hour). The reflux was assessed from contrast enhanced images and esophageal time activity curves. Reflux intensity was quantitated by reflux index (Re). Mean reflux time was calculated as the mean esophageal activity peaks time (t-bar). Finally a composite parameter was calculated as the mean reflux time weighted by the relative intensity of each reflux peak (t-barw). Re was not found to be different between the two groups. t-bar was significantly higher in group 2: t-bar = 29.6 +- 3.0 mn (mean +- SD) than in group 1: t-bar = 24.5 +- 6.8 mn; rho <0.02. The difference between the two groups was enhanced by intensity weighting: group 1: t-barw = 16.6 +- 6.3 mn, group 2: t-barw = 33.5 +- 7.1 mn rho <0.001. t-barw value was not correlated to esophagitis grade. These results suggest that late reflux is more likely responsible of esophagitis.

  14. Seasonal variation in detection of esophageal eosinophilia and eosinophilic esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Elizabeth T.; Shah, Neil D.; Hoffman, Kate; Sonnenberg, Amnon; Genta, Robert M.; Dellon, Evan S.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Seasonal variation has been reported in diagnosis of eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), but results are not consistent across studies and there are no national-level data in the United States. Aim To determine if there is seasonal variation in diagnosis of esophageal eosinophilia and EoE in the U.S., while accounting for factors such as climate zone and geographic variation. Methods This was a cross-sectional study using a U.S. national pathology database. Patients with esophageal eosinophilia (≥15 eosinophils per high-power field) comprised the primary case definition and were compared to those with normal esophageal biopsies. We calculated the crude and adjusted odds of esophageal eosinophilia by season, as well as by day of the year. Sensitivity analyses were performed using more restrictive case definitions of EoE, and after stratification by climate zone. Results 14,524 cases with esophageal eosinophilia and 90,459 normal controls were analyzed. The adjusted odds of esophageal eosinophilia were higher in the late spring and summer months, with the highest odds in July (aOR 1.13; 95%CI: 1.03–1.24). These findings persisted with increasing levels of esophageal eosinophilia, as well as across EoE case definitions. Seasonal variation was strongest in temperate and cold climates, and peak diagnosis varied by climate zone. Conclusions There is a mild but consistent seasonal variation in the diagnosis of esophageal eosinophilia and EoE, with cases more frequently diagnosed during summer months. These findings take into account climate and geographic differences, suggesting that aeroallergens may contribute to disease development or flare. PMID:26059636

  15. EVALUATION OF LYMPHATIC SPREAD, VISCERAL METASTASIS AND TUMORAL LOCAL INVASION IN ESOPHAGEAL CARCINOMAS.

    PubMed

    Tustumi, Francisco; Kimura, Cintia Mayumi Sakurai; Takeda, Flavio Roberto; Sallum, Rubens Antônio Aissar; Ribeiro-Junior, Ulysses; Cecconello, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Knowing esophageal tumors behavior in relationship to lymph node involvement, distant metastases and local tumor invasion is of paramount importance for the best esophageal tumors management. To describe lymph node involvement, distant metastases, and local tumor invasion in esophageal carcinoma, according to tumor topography and histology. A total of 444 patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and 105 adenocarcinoma were retrospectively analyzed. They were divided into four groups: adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma in the three esophageal segments: cervical, middle, and distal. They were compared based on their CT scans at the time of the diagnosis. Nodal metastasis showed great relationship with of primary tumor site. Lymph nodes of hepatogastric, perigastric and peripancreatic ligaments were mainly affected in distal tumors. Periaortic, interaortocaval and portocaval nodes were more commonly found in distal squamous carcinoma; subcarinal, paratracheal and subaortic nodes in middle; neck chains were more affected in cervical squamous carcinoma. Adenocarcinoma had a higher frequency of peritoneal involvement (11.8%) and liver (24.5%) than squamous cell carcinoma. Considering the local tumor invasion, the more cranial neoplasia, more common squamous invasion of airways, reaching 64.7% in the incidence of cervical tumors. Middle esophageal tumors invade more often aorta (27.6%) and distal esophageal tumors, the pericardium and the right atrium (10.4%). Esophageal adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma in different topographies present peculiarities in lymph node involvement, distant metastasis and local tumor invasion. These differences must be taken into account in esophageal cancer patients' care. Conhecer o comportamento das neoplasias esofágicas em relação à disseminação linfonodal, distribuição de metástases e invasão local do tumor, pode auxiliar o manejo dos pacientes. Descrever o envolvimento linfonodal, disseminação metast

  16. Bleeding Duodenal Varices Successfully Treated with Balloon-Occluded Retrograde Transvenous Obliteration (B-RTO) Assisted by CT During Arterial Portography

    SciTech Connect

    Tsurusaki, Masakatsu Sugimoto, Koji; Matsumoto, Shinichi; Izaki, Kenta; Fukuda, Tetsuya; Akasaka, Yoshinobu; Fujii, Masahiko; Hirota, Shozo; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2006-12-15

    A 60-year-old woman with massive hemorrhage from duodenal varices was transferred to our hospital for the purpose of transcatheter intervention. Although digital subtraction arterial portography could not depict the entire pathway of collateral circulation, the efferent route of the duodenal varices was clearly demonstrated on subsequent CT during arterial portography. Balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration (B-RTO) of the varices was performed via the efferent vein and achieved complete thrombosis of the varices.

  17. Clinical results after coil embolization of the ovarian vein in patients with primary and recurrent lower-limb varices with respect to vulval varices.

    PubMed

    Castenmiller, P H; de Leur, K; de Jong, T E A M; van der Laan, L

    2013-08-01

    To study the effect of coil embolization of the insufficient ovarian vein (IOV) on varices of the lower limb (VLL). From December 2005 until May 2008, we selected all patients with phlebograms that were performed in our hospital to confirm the diagnosis of insufficiency of the ovarian vein. The CEAP (clinical, aetiological, anatomical and pathological elements) classification was used to classify the lower-limb venous disease in each patient. All patients with suspected IOV in combination with VLL underwent a phlebography. If IOV was found, coil embolization of the ovarian vein(s) was performed. IOV was found in 43 of 44 patients (98%). After coil embolization of the ovarian vein(s), VLL disappeared in five patients (12%) without any further treatment. Improvement in CEAP classification was measured in 13 patients (31%). In 21 (88%) of 24 patients with vulval varices, coil embolization of the ovarian vein(s) resulted in disappearance of vulval varices. In only 31% of the patients with IOV in combination with VLL, phlebography and coil embolization of the ovarian vein(s) did improve CEAP classification. However, coil embolization of the ovarian vein resulted in disappearance of the vulval varices in 88% of the patients.

  18. Effects of mosapride on secondary peristalsis in patients with ineffective esophageal motility.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chien-Lin; Yi, Chih-Hsun; Liu, Tso-Tsai; Orr, William C

    2013-12-01

    OBJECTIVE. Ineffective esophageal motility is frequently found in patients with gastroesophageal reflux diseases. Secondary peristalsis contributes to esophageal acid clearance. Mosapride improves gastrointestinal (GI) motility by acting on 5-hydroxytrypatamine4 receptors. The authors aimed to evaluate the effect of mosapride on secondary peristalsis in patients with ineffective esophageal motility. MATERIAL AND METHODS. After recording primary peristalsis baseline, secondary peristalsis was stimulated by slowly and rapidly injecting mid-esophageal air in 18 patients. Two separate experiments were randomly performed with 40 mg oral mosapride or placebo. RESULTS. Mosapride had no effect on the threshold volume of secondary peristalsis during slow air distension (9.8 ± 0.97 vs. 10.2 ± 1.0 mL; p = 0.84), but decreased the threshold volume during rapid air distension (4.1 ± 0.2 vs. 4.6 ± 0.3 mL; p = 0.001). The efficiency of secondary peristalsis during rapid air distension increased with mosapride (70% [40-95%]) compared with placebo (60% [10-85%]; p = 0.0003). Mosapride had no effect on the amplitudes of distal pressure wave of secondary peristalsis during slow (94.3 ± 9 vs. 101.9 ± 9.1 mmHg; p = 0.63) or rapid air distension (89.3 ± 9 vs. 95.2 ± 8.3 mmHg; p = 0.24). CONCLUSIONS. Mosapride improves esophageal sensitivity of secondary peristalsis by abrupt air distension but has limited effect on the motor properties of secondary peristalsis in ineffective esophageal motility patients. Despite its well-known prokinetic effect, mosapride enhances the efficiency of secondary peristalsis in patients with ineffective esophageal motility through augmenting esophageal sensitivity instead of motility.

  19. Esophageal impacted dentures.

    PubMed Central

    Nwaorgu, Onyekwere G.; Onakoya, Paul A.; Sogebi, Olusola A.; Kokong, Daniel D.; Dosumu, Oluwole O.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study aims to highlight the problems associated with impacted acrylic dentures and proffers advice to check them. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Retrospective review of all cases of impacted acrylic dentures over a 16-year period. RESULTS: Twenty-two adults had impacted esophageal acrylic dentures of which 16 (72.7%) and six (27.3%) were males and females, respectively (M:F ratio = 2.7:1) with age range 23-77 years. Fourteen patients (63.6%) had worn their dentures for more than 10 years without check-up, and 54.5% presented within 48 hours of impaction. The common symptoms in all the patients were difficulty with swallowing, throat pain and discomfort, followed by tenderness in the neck in 15 (68.2%). Dentures were extracted through esophagoscopy (17 cases) and cervical (three cases) esophagotomy, respectively. Observed complications included pulmonary edema in one and esophageal perforation in five patients. CONCLUSION: Endoscopic extraction of dentures carries a high risk of perforation. Extraction of an impacted denture via esophagoscopy can be undertaken under direct vision and in an ideal situation with judicious use of the Shears forceps. In the absence of these, the safest option is an esophagotomy. Proper treatment planning in the fabrication of dentures with incorporation of radiopaque materials in the dental resins and adequate postdenture delivery instructions are necessary as preventive measures. PMID:15540888

  20. Treatment of advanced esophageal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kelsen, D.

    1982-12-01

    When radiation therapy is used for palliation of obstruction in patients with advanced esophageal carcinoma, an improvement in dysphagia can be expected in approximately 50% of patients. Major objective responses have rarely been quantitied but, in one study, were seen in 33% patients. Recurrence of dysphagia is usually seen within 2-6 months of treatment. Radiation toxicities and complications, even when used with palliative intent, can be substantial and include esophagitis, tracheoesophageal or esophageal-aortic fistula, mediastinitis, hemorrhage, pneumonitis, and myelosuppression. (JMT)

  1. Esophageal Lipoma: A Rare Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Jeremy; Tejerina, Manfred; Hallowell, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Esophageal lipomas are rare tumors, making up 0.4% of all digestive tract benign neoplasms. Most of these lesions are clinically silent as a result of their small size, however, the majority of lesions over 4 cm have been reported to cause dysphagia, regurgitation and/or epigastralgia. We report a case of a 53 year-old African American female who presented with dysphagia. Computed tomography of the chest and esophagram confirmed esophageal lipoma as the cause of the patient’s symptoms. Accurately diagnosing an esophageal lipoma is crucial in order to rule out potential malignant lesions, relieve patient symptoms and plan the appropriate treatment. PMID:23365708

  2. Nuclear medicine and esophageal surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Taillefer, R.; Beauchamp, G.; Duranceau, A.C.; Lafontaine, E.

    1986-06-01

    The principal radionuclide procedures involved in the evaluation of esophageal disorders that are amenable to surgery are illustrated and briefly described. The role of the radionuclide esophagogram (RE) in the diagnosis and management of achalasia, oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy and its complications, tracheoesophageal fistulae, pharyngeal and esophageal diverticulae, gastric transposition, and fundoplication is discussed. Detection of columnar-lined esophagus by Tc-99m pertechnetate imaging and of esophageal carcinoma by Ga-67 citrate and Tc-99m glucoheptonate studies also is presented. 37 references.

  3. Acid corrosive esophagitis: radiographic findings.

    PubMed

    Muhletaler, C A; Gerlock, A J; de Soto, L; Halter, S A

    1980-06-01

    Thirty-nine esophagograms of 24 patients after ingestion of muriatic acid (27% HCI) in suicide attempts were reviewed. All esophagograms were obtained in the acute, subacute, and chronic phases. In the acute and subacute phases, the radiographic findings consisted of mucosal edema, submucosal edema or hemorrhage, ulcerations, sloughing of the mucosa, atony, and dilatation. Strictures of the esophagus were present in the chronic phase. These radiographic findings were not different from those found in alkaline corrosive esophagitis. The severity of the corrosive esophagitis is considered related to the concentration, amount, viscosity, and duration of contact between the caustic agent and the esophageal mucosa.

  4. Is computerised tomography better than fibreoptic gastroscopy for early detection of gastric varices?

    PubMed Central

    Kekilli, Murat; Beyazıt, Yavuz; Okten, Sarper; Tanoglu, Alpaslan; Sasmaz, Nurgul

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Video endoscopic diagnosis of gastric varices is particularly limited, owing to the deep submucosal or subserosal location of the varices and the normal appearance of the overlying mucosa. Aim We present and emphasise the value of computerised tomography (CT) examination in the early detection of gastric varices (GVs). Material and methods In this retrospective study, a total of 216 consecutive patients with cirrhosis were evaluated at the Turkiye Yuksek Ihtisas Training and Research Hospital between September 2008 and March 2011. Results One hundred and thirty patients with cirrhosis were enrolled in the study. The mean age of the male (88 cases) patients was 59.45 ±2.42 years, and the mean age of the female (42 cases) patients was 56.29 ±1.14 years. Computerised tomography identified oesophageal varices (EVs) in 103/130 patients, and endoscopy identified EVs in 103/130 patients. Computerised tomography identified GVs in 86/130 patients, and endoscopy identified GVs in 26/130 patients. After endoscopic elastic band ligation (EBL), CT identified GVs in 22/26 patients, and endoscopy identified GVs in 7/26 patients. Conclusions Gastric varices lie in the submucosa, deeper than EVs, and distinguishing GVs from gastric rugae may be difficult with video endoscopy. This study demonstrated that CT is a sensitive method for early detection of GVs and has been used previously in the evaluation of GVs.

  5. Endoscopic Approaches to the Treatment of Variceal Hemorrhage in Hemodialysis-Dependent Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Lili; Zeng, Xiaoqing; Wang, Jian; Chen, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Background. Esophagogastric variceal hemorrhage leads to challenging situation in chronic kidney disease patients on maintenance hemodialysis. Aims. To determine the safety and efficacy of endoscopic approaches to patients with hemodialysis-dependent concomitant with esophagogastric varices. Methods. Medical records were reviewed from January 1, 2004, to December 31, 2015, in our hospital. Five consecutive hemodialysis-dependent patients with variceal hemorrhage who underwent endoscopic treatments were retrospectively studied. Results. The median age of the patients was 54 years (range 34–67 years) and the median follow-up period was 21.3 months (range 7–134 months). All the patients received a total of three times heparin-free hemodialysis 24 hours before and no more than 24 hours and 72 hours after endoscopic treatment. They successfully had endoscopic variceal ligation, endoscopic injection sclerotherapy, and/or N-butyl cyanoacrylate injection. The short-term efficacy is satisfying and long-term follow-up showed episodes of rebleeding. Conclusions. Endoscopic approaches are the alternative options in the treatment of upper gastroenterology variceal hemorrhage in hemodialysis-dependent patients without severe complications. PMID:28105048

  6. Treatment of gastric varices with partial splenic embolization in a patient with portal vein thrombosis and a myeloproliferative disorder

    PubMed Central

    Gianotti, Robert; Charles, Hearns; Hymes, Kenneth; Chandarana, Hersh; Sigal, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    Therapeutic options for gastric variceal bleeding in the presence of extensive portal vein thrombosis associated with a myeloproliferative disorder are limited. We report a case of a young woman who presented with gastric variceal bleeding secondary to extensive splanchnic venous thrombosis due to a Janus kinase 2 mutation associated myeloproliferative disorder that was managed effectively with partial splenic embolization. PMID:25339837

  7. Treatment of gastric varices with partial splenic embolization in a patient with portal vein thrombosis and a myeloproliferative disorder.

    PubMed

    Gianotti, Robert; Charles, Hearns; Hymes, Kenneth; Chandarana, Hersh; Sigal, Samuel

    2014-10-21

    Therapeutic options for gastric variceal bleeding in the presence of extensive portal vein thrombosis associated with a myeloproliferative disorder are limited. We report a case of a young woman who presented with gastric variceal bleeding secondary to extensive splanchnic venous thrombosis due to a Janus kinase 2 mutation associated myeloproliferative disorder that was managed effectively with partial splenic embolization.

  8. Esophageal squamous papillomas with focal dermal hypoplasia and eosinophilic esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Pasman, Eric A; Heifert, Theresa A; Nylund, Cade M

    2017-01-01

    Focal dermal hypoplasia (FDH) is a rare disorder of the mesodermal and ectodermal tissues. Here we present an eight-year-old female known to have FDH who presents with poor weight gain and dysphagia. She was diagnosed with multiple esophageal papillomas and eosinophilic esophagitis. She was successfully treated with argon plasma coagulation and ingested fluticasone propionate, which has not been described previously in a child. PMID:28405153

  9. Barrett's esophagus: photodynamic therapy for ablation of dysplasia, reduction of specialized mucosa and treatment of superficial esophageal cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overholt, Bergein F.; Panjehpour, Masoud

    1995-03-01

    Fifteen patients with Barrett's esophagus and dysplasia were treated with photodynamic therapy. Four patients also had early, superficial esophageal cancers and 5 had esophageal polyps. Light was delivered via a standard diffuser or a centering esophageal balloon. Eight patients maintained on omeprazole and followed for 6 - 54 months are the subject of this report. Photodynamic therapy ablated dysplastic or malignant mucosa in patients with superficial cancer. Healing and partial replacement of Barrett's mucosa with normal squamous epithelium occurred in all patients and complete replacement with squamous epithelium was found in two. Side effects included photosensitivity and mild-moderate chest pain and dysphagia for 5 - 7 days. In three patients with extensive circumferential mucosal ablation in the proximal esophagus, healing was associated with esophageal strictures which were treated successfully by esophageal dilation. Strictures were not found in the distal esophagus. Photodynamic therapy combined with long-term acid inhibition provides effective endoscopic therapy of Barrett's mucosal dysplasia and superficial (Tis-T1) esophageal cancer. The windowed centering balloon improves delivery of photodynamic therapy to diffusely abnormal esophageal mucosa.

  10. Measuring Cell Free DNA During the Course of Treatment for Esophageal Cancer as a Marker of Response and Recurrence

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-07-03

    Esophageal Neoplasm; Esophageal Neoplasms Malignancy Unspecified; Esophageal Neoplasms Malignant; Cancer of Esophagus; Cancer of the Esophagus; Esophageal Cancer; Esophagus Cancer; Neoplasm, Esophageal

  11. Human esophageal response during chest pain induced by swallowing cold liquids.

    PubMed

    Meyer, G W; Castell, D O

    1981-11-06

    Normal persons often note chest or back pain during rapid ingestion of cold liquids, commonly believed to result from cold-induced "spasm" of esophageal muscle. We studied the effects of swallowing cold liquids on esophageal function in five normal subjects, aged 20 to 44 years, by comparing their response to cold ice cream (-5 degrees C) and room temperature ice cream mix (20 degrees C). Decreased peristaltic amplitude was seen during cold ice cream ingestion, primarily in the midesophagus. When seven subjects rapidly ingested ice cream until chest pain was produced and maintained for at least 60 s, complete absence of motor activity in the distal esophagus occurred, with slow return to normal during the ensuing five minutes. Our studies indicate that ingestion of cold liquids significantly depresses peristaltic amplitudes and frequency of peristalsis in normal persons, and pain is associated with complete absence of motor activity in the body of the esophagus, rather than esophageal "spasm" as commonly believed.

  12. Respiratory function after injection sclerotherapy of oesophageal varices.

    PubMed Central

    Samuels, T; Lovett, M C; Campbell, I T; Makin, C; Davies, J; Jenkins, S A; Baxter, J N

    1994-01-01

    Arterial oxygen tension (Pao2), carbon dioxide tension (PaCO2), and vital capacity were measured preoperatively and one day postoperatively in patients with chronic hepatic cirrhosis having elective oesophageal injection sclerotherapy under general anaesthesia. The results were compared with the same measurements made in patients with chronic cirrhosis anaesthetised and scheduled to have injection sclerotherapy under general anaesthesia but who, because of variceal obliteration, only had an oesophagogastroscopy. In the injected group PaO2 decreased by 9.3 (3.0) mm Hg (1.2 (0.4) kPa) (mean (SEM)) (p < 0.02) but in the controls did not change. The difference between the two groups was significant (p < 0.02). Vital capacity decreased by 0.39 (0.08) litres (BTPS) (p < 0.01) after injection sclerotherapy but in the controls did not change. Again the difference between the two groups was significant (p < 0.02). In the injected group there was a significant correlation between the change in PaO2 and the percentage change in vital capacity (r = 0.787, p < 0.01) but no such relation was seen in control subjects. These results suggest that oesophageal injection sclerotherapy is associated with a restrictive defect in respiratory function one day after the injection caused, possibly, by sclerosant embolising to the lung. PMID:7959205

  13. Worldwide Esophageal Cancer Collaboration: clinical staging data

    PubMed Central

    Rice, T. W.; Apperson-Hansen, C.; DiPaola, L. M.; Semple, M. E.; Lerut, T. E. M. R.; Orringer, M. B.; Chen, L.-Q.; Hofstetter, W. L.; Smithers, B. M.; Rusch, V. W.; Wijnhoven, B. P. L.; Chen, K. N.; Davies, A. R.; D’Journo, X. B.; Kesler, K. A.; Luketich, J. D.; Ferguson, M. K.; Räsänen, J. V.; van Hillegersberg, R.; Fang, W.; Durand, L.; Allum, W. H.; Cecconello, I.; Cerfolio, R. J.; Pera, M.; Griffin, S. M.; Burger, R.; Liu, J.-F; Allen, M. S.; Law, S.; Watson, T. J.; Darling, G. E.; Scott, W. J.; Duranceau, A.; Denlinger, C. E.; Schipper, P. H.; Ishwaran, H.; Blackstone, E. H.

    2017-01-01

    SUMMARY To address uncertainty of whether clinical stage groupings (cTNM) for esophageal cancer share prognostic implications with pathologic groupings after esophagectomy alone (pTNM), we report data—simple descriptions of patient characteristics, cancer categories, and non-risk-adjusted survival—for clinically staged patients from the Worldwide Esophageal Cancer Collaboration (WECC). Thirty-three institutions from six continents submitted data using variables with standard definitions: demographics, comorbidities, clinical cancer categories, and all-cause mortality from first management decision. Of 22,123 clinically staged patients, 8,156 had squamous cell carcinoma, 13,814 adenocarcinoma, 116 adenosquamous carcinoma, and 37 undifferentiated carcinoma. Patients were older (62 years) men (80%) with normal body mass index (18.5–25 mg/kg2, 47%), little weight loss (2.4 ± 7.8 kg), 0–1 ECOG performance status (67%), and history of smoking (67%). Cancers were cT1 (12%), cT2 (22%), cT3 (56%), cNO (44%), cMO (95%), and cG2–G3 (89%); most involved the distal esophagus (73%). Non-risk-adjusted survival for squamous cell carcinoma was not distinctive for early cT or cN; for adenocarcinoma, it was distinctive for early versus advanced cT and for cNO versus cN+. Patients with early cancers had worse survival and those with advanced cancers better survival than expected from equivalent pathologic categories based on prior WECC pathologic data. Thus, clinical and pathologic categories do not share prognostic implications. This makes clinically based treatment decisions difficult and pre-treatment prognostication inaccurate. These data will be the basis for the 8th edition cancer staging manuals following risk adjustment for patient characteristics, cancer categories, and treatment characteristics and should direct 9th edition data collection. PMID:27731549

  14. Worldwide Esophageal Cancer Collaboration: pathologic staging data.

    PubMed

    Rice, T W; Chen, L-Q; Hofstetter, W L; Smithers, B M; Rusch, V W; Wijnhoven, B P L; Chen, K L; Davies, A R; D'Journo, X B; Kesler, K A; Luketich, J D; Ferguson, M K; Räsänen, J V; van Hillegersberg, R; Fang, W; Durand, L; Cecconello, I; Allum, W H; Cerfolio, R J; Pera, M; Griffin, S M; Burger, R; Liu, J-F; Allen, M S; Law, S; Watson, T J; Darling, G E; Scott, W J; Duranceau, A; Denlinger, C E; Schipper, P H; Lerut, T E M R; Orringer, M B; Ishwaran, H; Apperson-Hansen, C; DiPaola, L M; Semple, M E; Blackstone, E H

    2016-10-01

    We report data-simple descriptions of patient characteristics, cancer categories, and non-risk-adjusted survival-for patients with pathologically staged cancer of the esophagus and esophagogastric junction after resection or ablation with no preoperative therapy from the Worldwide Esophageal Cancer Collaboration (WECC). Thirty-three institutions from six continents submitted de-identified data using standard definitions: demographics, comorbidities, clinical cancer categories, and all-cause mortality from first management decision. Of 13,300 patients, 5,631 had squamous cell carcinoma, 7,558 adenocarcinoma, 85 adenosquamous carcinoma, and 26 undifferentiated carcinoma. Patients were older (62 years) men (80%) with normal body mass index (51%), little weight loss (1.8 kg), 0-2 ECOG performance status (83%), and a history of smoking (70%). Cancers were pT1 (24%), pT2 (15%), pT3 (50%), pN0 (52%), pM0 (93%), and pG2-G3 (78%); most involved distal esophagus (71%). Non-risk-adjusted survival for both squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma was monotonic and distinctive across pTNM. Survival was more distinctive for adenocarcinoma than squamous cell carcinoma when pT was ordered by pN. Survival for pTis-1 adenocarcinoma was better than for squamous cell carcinoma, although monotonic and distinctive for both. WECC pathologic staging data is improved over that of the 7th edition, with more patients studied and patient and cancer variables collected. These data will be the basis for the 8th edition cancer staging manuals following risk adjustment for patient, cancer, and treatment characteristics, and should direct 9th edition data collection. However, the role of pure pathologic staging as the principal point of reference for esophageal cancer staging is waning. © 2016 International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  15. Worldwide Esophageal Cancer Collaboration: clinical staging data.

    PubMed

    Rice, T W; Apperson-Hansen, C; DiPaola, L M; Semple, M E; Lerut, T E M R; Orringer, M B; Chen, L-Q; Hofstetter, W L; Smithers, B M; Rusch, V W; Wijnhoven, B P L; Chen, K N; Davies, A R; D'Journo, X B; Kesler, K A; Luketich, J D; Ferguson, M K; Räsänen, J V; van Hillegersberg, R; Fang, W; Durand, L; Allum, W H; Cecconello, I; Cerfolio, R J; Pera, M; Griffin, S M; Burger, R; Liu, J-F; Allen, M S; Law, S; Watson, T J; Darling, G E; Scott, W J; Duranceau, A; Denlinger, C E; Schipper, P H; Ishwaran, H; Blackstone, E H

    2016-10-01

    To address uncertainty of whether clinical stage groupings (cTNM) for esophageal cancer share prognostic implications with pathologic groupings after esophagectomy alone (pTNM), we report data-simple descriptions of patient characteristics, cancer categories, and non-risk-adjusted survival-for clinically staged patients from the Worldwide Esophageal Cancer Collaboration (WECC). Thirty-three institutions from six continents submitted data using variables with standard definitions: demographics, comorbidities, clinical cancer categories, and all-cause mortality from first management decision. Of 22,123 clinically staged patients, 8,156 had squamous cell carcinoma, 13,814 adenocarcinoma, 116 adenosquamous carcinoma, and 37 undifferentiated carcinoma. Patients were older (62 years) men (80%) with normal body mass index (18.5-25 mg/kg(2) , 47%), little weight loss (2.4 ± 7.8 kg), 0-1 ECOG performance status (67%), and history of smoking (67%). Cancers were cT1 (12%), cT2 (22%), cT3 (56%), cN0 (44%), cM0 (95%), and cG2-G3 (89%); most involved the distal esophagus (73%). Non-risk-adjusted survival for squamous cell carcinoma was not distinctive for early cT or cN; for adenocarcinoma, it was distinctive for early versus advanced cT and for cN0 versus cN+. Patients with early cancers had worse survival and those with advanced cancers better survival than expected from equivalent pathologic categories based on prior WECC pathologic data. Thus, clinical and pathologic categories do not share prognostic implications. This makes clinically based treatment decisions difficult and pre-treatment prognostication inaccurate. These data will be the basis for the 8th edition cancer staging manuals following risk adjustment for patient characteristics, cancer categories, and treatment characteristics and should direct 9th edition data collection. © 2016 International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  16. Vagal Afferent Innervation of the Lower Esophageal Sphincter

    PubMed Central

    Powley, Terry L.; Baronowsky, Elizabeth A.; Gilbert, Jared M.; Hudson, Cherie N.; Martin, Felecia N.; Mason, Jacqueline K.; McAdams, Jennifer L.; Phillips, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    To supply a fuller morphological characterization of the vagal afferents innervating the lower esophageal sphincter (LES), specifically to label vagal terminals in the tissues forming the LES in the gastroesophageal junction, the present experiment employed injections of dextran biotin into the nodose ganglia of rats. Four types of vagal afferents innervated the LES. Clasp and sling muscle fibers were directly and prominently innervated by intramuscular arrays (IMAs). Individual IMA terminals subtended about 16° of arc of the esophageal circumference, and, collectively, the terminal fields were distributed within the muscle ring to establish a 360° annulus of mechanoreceptors in the sphincter wall. 3D morphometry of the terminals established that, compared to sling muscle IMAs, clasp muscle IMAs had more extensive arbors and larger receptive fields. In addition, at the cardia, local myenteric ganglia between smooth muscle sheets and striated muscle bundles were innervated by intraganglionic laminar endings (IGLEs), in a pattern similar to the innervation of the myenteric plexus throughout the stomach and esophagus. Finally, as previously described, the principle bundle of sling muscle fibers that links LES sphincter tissue to the antropyloric region of the lesser curvature was innervated by exceptionally long IMAs as well as by unique web ending specializations at the distal attachment of the bundle. Overall, the specialized varieties of densely distributed vagal afferents innervating the LES underscore the conclusion that these sensory projections are critically involved in generating LES reflexes and may be promising targets for managing esophageal dysfunctions. PMID:23583280

  17. Acute acid exposure increases rabbit esophageal cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Carpizo, D R; Reaka, A J; Glaws, W R; Pooley, N; Schmidt, L; Halline, A G; Goldstein, J L; Layden, T J

    1998-02-01

    In the present study we examined whether an acute infusion of HCl into the esophagus of rabbits would cause an increase in esophageal cellular proliferation independent of morphologic evidence of cell injury. To examine this question, the distal two thirds of the rabbit esophagus was infused for 1 hour with either 40 mmol/L HCl or NSS (control), and cellular proliferation was studied 24 and 48 hours later by using bromodeoxyuridine (BrDu) to label the nuclei of dividing cells and ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) enzyme activity as a biochemical index of cell division. Although there was no gross or microscopic evidence of cell necrosis or mucosal inflammation 24 hours after H+ infusion, BrDu labeling of basal cell nuclei was significantly greater 24 hours after H+ infusion (31%+/-6%) as compared with that in control animals infused with NSS (15%+/-4%). This increase in labeling index was paralleled by a threefold greater ODC enzyme activity at 24 hours with H+ infusion. Rete pegs were infrequent in control tissues (4+/-4 rete pegs per 100 microm of esophageal length) or in animals examined 24 hours after acid exposure (4+/-2 rete pegs per 100 microm). However, rete pegs were very prominent 48 hours after acid infusion (22+/-6 rete pegs per 100 microm). A short exposure to acid can cause a significant increase in mucosal proliferation independent of injury, suggesting that esophageal cell acidification either directly or indirectly acts as a tissue mitogen.

  18. The Chicago Classification of Esophageal Motility Disorders, v3.0

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Chicago Classification (CC) of esophageal motility disorders, utilizing an algorithmic scheme to analyze clinical high-resolution manometry (HRM) studies, has gained acceptance worldwide. Purpose This 2014 update, CC v3.0, developed by the International HRM Working Group, incorporated the extensive clinical experience and interval publications since the prior (2011) version. Key results CC v3.0 utilizes a hierarchical approach, sequentially prioritizing: 1) disorders of esophagogastric junction (EGJ) outflow (achalasia subtypes I–III and EGJ outflow obstruction), 2) major disorders of peristalsis (absent contractility, distal esophageal spasm, hypercontractile esophagus), and 3) minor disorders of peristalsis characterized by impaired bolus transit. EGJ morphology, characterized by the degree of overlap between the lower esophageal sphincter and the crural diaphragm and baseline EGJ contractility are also part of CC v3.0. Compared to the previous CC version, the key metrics of interpretation, the integrated relaxation pressure (IRP), the distal contractile integral (DCI), and the distal latency (DL) remain unchanged, albeit with much more emphasis on DCI for defining both hypo- and hypercontractility. New in CC v3.0 are: 1) the evaluation of the EGJ at rest defined in terms of morphology and contractility, 2) ‘fragmented’ contractions (large breaks in the 20-mmHg isobaric contour), 3) ineffective esophageal motility (IEM), and 4) several minor adjustments in nomenclature and defining criteria. Absent in CC v3.0 are contractile front velocity (CFV) and small breaks in the 20-mmHg isobaric contour as defining characteristics. Conclusion CC v3.0 is an updated analysis scheme for clinical esophageal HRM recordings developed by the International HRM Working Group. PMID:25469569

  19. Esophageal pH monitoring

    MedlinePlus

    ... test can also be done during upper GI endoscopy by clipping a pH monitor to the lining of the esophagus. ... esophagitis : Barium swallow Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (also called upper GI endoscopy)

  20. Environmental Causes of Esophageal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kamangar, Farin; Chow, Wong-Ho; Abnet, Christian; Dawsey, Sanford

    2009-01-01

    Synopsis This articles reviews the environmental risk factors and predisposing conditions for the two main histological types of esophageal cancer, esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) and esophageal adenocarcinoma (EA). Tobacco smoking, excessive alcohol consumption, drinking maté, low intake of fresh fruits and vegetables, achalasia, and low socioeconomic status increase the risk of ESCC. Results of investigations on several other potential risk factors, including opium consumption, intake of hot drinks, eating pickled vegetables, poor oral health, and exposure to human papillomavirus, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, N-nitroso compounds, acetaldehyde, and fumonisins are also discussed. Gastroesophageal reflux, obesity, tobacco smoking, hiatal hernia, achalasia, and probably absence of H. pylori in the stomach increase the risk of EA. Results of studies investigating other factors, including low intake of fresh fruits and vegetables, consumption of carbonated soft drink, use of H2 blockers, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and drugs that relax the lower esophageal sphincter are also discussed. PMID:19327566

  1. Drugs Approved for Esophageal Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for esophageal cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  2. Caustic ingestion and esophageal function

    SciTech Connect

    Cadranel, S.; Di Lorenzo, C.; Rodesch, P.; Piepsz, A.; Ham, H.R. )

    1990-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate esophageal motor function by means of krypton-81m esophageal transit scintigraphy and to compare the results with the functional and morphological data obtained by means of triple lumen manometry and endoscopy. In acute and subacute stages of the disease, all clinical, anatomical, and functional parameters were in good agreement, revealing significant impairment. In chronic stages, the severity of the dysphagia was not correlated to the importance of the residual stenosis. Conversely, 81mKr esophageal transit and manometric's findings were in good agreement with the clinical symptoms, during the entire follow-up period ranging between 3 months to 7 years. The 81mKr test is undoubtedly the easiest and probably the most physiological technique currently available for long-term functional evaluation of caustic esophagitis.

  3. Distal tibiofibular radiological overlap

    PubMed Central

    Sowman, B.; Radic, R.; Kuster, M.; Yates, P.; Breidiel, B.; Karamfilef, S.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Overlap between the distal tibia and fibula has always been quoted to be positive. If the value is not positive then an injury to the syndesmosis is thought to exist. Our null hypothesis is that it is a normal variant in the adult population. Methods We looked at axial CT scans of the ankle in 325 patients for the presence of overlap between the distal tibia and fibula. Where we thought this was possible we reconstructed the images to represent a plain film radiograph which we were able to rotate and view in multiple planes to confirm the assessment. Results The scans were taken for reasons other than pathology of the ankle. We found there was no overlap in four patients. These patients were then questioned about previous injury, trauma, surgery or pain, in order to exclude underlying pathology. Conclusion We concluded that no overlap between the tibia and fibula may exist in the population, albeit in a very small proportion. PMID:23610666

  4. Radiation-induced esophagitis in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Sarah; Fairchild, Alysa

    2016-01-01

    Radiation-induced esophagitis is the most common local acute toxicity of radiotherapy (RT) delivered for the curative or palliative intent treatment of lung cancer. Although concurrent chemotherapy and higher RT dose are associated with increased esophagitis risk, advancements in RT techniques as well as adherence to esophageal dosimetric constraints may reduce the incidence and severity. Mild acute esophagitis symptoms are generally self-limited, and supportive management options include analgesics, acid suppression, diet modification, treatment for candidiasis, and maintenance of adequate nutrition. Esophageal stricture is the most common late sequela from esophageal irradiation and can be addressed with endoscopic dilatation. Approaches to prevent or mitigate these toxicities are also discussed. PMID:28210168

  5. Uses of esophageal function testing: dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Yazaki, Etsuro; Woodland, Philip; Sifrim, Daniel

    2014-10-01

    Esophageal function testing should be used for differential diagnosis of dysphagia. Dysphagia can be the consequence of hypermotility or hypomotility of the muscles of the esophagus. Decreased esophageal or esophagogastric junction distensibility can provoke dysphagia. The most well established esophageal dysmotility is achalasia. Other motility disorders can also cause dysphagia. High-resolution manometry (HRM) is the gold standard investigation for esophageal motility disorders. Simultaneous measurement of HRM and intraluminal impedance can be useful to assess motility and bolus transit. Impedance planimetry measures distensibility of the esophageal body and gastroesophageal junction in patients with achalasia and eosinophilic esophagitis.

  6. A case of torsion of the wandering spleen presenting as hypersplenism and gastric fundal varices.

    PubMed

    Irak, Kader; Esen, Irfan; Keskın, Murat; Emınler, Ahmet Tarık; Ayyildiz, Talat; Kaya, Ekrem; Kiyici, Murat; Gürel, Selim; Nak, Selim Giray; Gülten, Macit; Dolar, Enver

    2011-02-01

    Wandering spleen is the displacement of the spleen from its normal location due to the loss or weakening of ligaments that hold the spleen in the left upper quadrant. The possibility of torsion of the spleen is high due to the long and mobile nature of the vascular pedicle. Generally, cases are asymptomatic. Under conditions of delayed diagnosis, symptoms of splenomegaly, left portal hypertension, gastric fundal varices, and hypersplenism may present as a result of development of vascular congestion associated with chronic torsion. There are only a few cases in the literature reporting the association of wandering spleen and fundal varices. We report herein the case of a 55-year-old female who admitted to our clinic with complaints of fatigue and epigastric pain. She was determined to have gastric fundal varices and hypersplenism secondary to the development of left portal hypertension due to chronic splenic torsion.

  7. Tracheal varices caused by mediastinal compression of a large intrathoracic goiter: report of a case

    PubMed Central

    LUCCHINI, R.; SANTOPRETE, S.; TRIOLA, R.; POLISTENA, A.; MONACELLI, M.; AVENIA, S.; SANGUINETTI, A.; PUMA, F.; AVENIA, N.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Tracheal varices are a rare condition but they can be an important source of massive or recurrent haemoptysis. Usually they are related to increased pressure in the pulmonary veins. Mediastinal goiter is often associated to compressive effects on the surrounding structures, including mediastinal vessels with potential superior vena cava syndrome. Case report We describe a case, not previously reported in literature, of mediastinal goiter with hemoptysis as first clinical manifestation. Bleeding was attributed to a superior vena cava syndrome associated to a tracheal fragile mucosa with an easily bleeding intramural nodule which was diagnosed as tracheal varices after total thyroidectomy. The nodule in fact disappeared together with the venous hypertensive signs after venous decompression of the mediastinum. Conclusions Compressive symptoms including tracheal varices, related to mediastinal goiter, can be treated surgically by total thyroidectomy via cervicotomy and when required with associated median sternotomy. PMID:25827666

  8. [Pulmonary embolism after endoscopic injection with N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate for gastric varices].

    PubMed

    Robaina, Gabriela; Albertini, Ricardo; Carranza, Martín; Herrena Najum, Pablo

    Gastric varices occur in one-third of patients with portal hypertension. Bleeding from gastric varices remains a significant cause of death. Currently the first-line of treatment for gastric varices is endoscopic obliteration with N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate. Though relatively safe, this option has several well-known complications. We report the case of a 61-year-old male patient with cryptogenic cirrhosis, who presented with fever, tachycardia and hypoxemia after endoscopic obliteration with N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate. Radiographic findings were consistent with pulmonary embolism of the sclerosing substance. The aim of this case report is to emphasize the clinical and radiological findings of this complication in order to distinguish it from other similar medical conditions and prevent a delay in diagnosis.

  9. Severe gastric variceal bleeding successfully treated by emergency splenic artery embolization.

    PubMed

    Sankararaman, Senthilkumar; Velayuthan, Sujithra; Vea, Romulo; Herbst, John

    2013-06-01

    Bleeding from gastric varices due to splenic vein obstruction is extremely rare in children, but it can be catastrophic. Reported herein is the case of a teenager with splenic vein thrombosis and chronic decompensated liver disease from autoimmune hepatitis who presented with massive gastric variceal bleeding. Standard medical management did not control the bleeding. Due to decompensated liver disease and continuous active bleeding, emergency partial splenic artery embolization was preferred over splenectomy or a shunt procedure. Bleeding was successfully controlled by partial splenic artery embolization by decreasing the inflow of blood into the portal system. It is concluded that emergency partial splenic artery embolization is a safer alternative life-saving procedure to manage severe gastric variceal bleeding due to splenic vein obstruction in a patient with high surgical risk. To our knowledge, only one other patient with similar management has been reported in the pediatric age group. © 2013 The Authors. Pediatrics International © 2013 Japan Pediatric Society.

  10. Open Reduction, Internal Fixation Distal Intraarticular Distal Humerus Fracture.

    PubMed

    Fuller, David A

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this video is to demonstrate the surgical repair of an intraarticular distal humerus fracture. A polytrauma patient with an intraarticular distal humerus fracture is shown. The patient is positioned laterally, with a posterior skin incision and olecranon osteotomy for exposure. An anatomic reduction is achieved, and internal fixation with perpendicular plating of the distal humerus is performed. The video is 18 minutes, 34 seconds duration in time and 2,048,752,000 bytes in size. Open reduction with internal fixation of a distal humerus fracture is demonstrated in this video.

  11. The hypertensive lower esophageal sphincter: a motility disorder with manometric features of outflow obstruction.

    PubMed

    Gockel, Ines; Lord, Reginald V N; Bremner, Cedric G; Crookes, Peter F; Hamrah, Pedram; DeMeester, Tom R

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to define the clinical presentation, motility characteristics, and prevalence and patterns of gastroesophageal reflux in patients with hypertensive lower esophageal sphincter (HTLES). HTLES was defined by a resting pressure measured at the respiratory inversion point on stationary manometry of greater than 26 mm Hg (ninety-fifth percentile of normal). One hundred consecutive patients (80 women, 20 men; mean age 54.7 years, range 23 to 89 years), diagnosed with HTLES at our institution between September 1996 and October 1999, were studied. Patients with achalasia or other named esophageal motility disorders or history of foregut surgery were excluded, but patients with both HTLES and "nutcracker esophagus" were included. The most common symptoms in patients with HTLES were regurgitation (75%), heartburn (71%), dysphagia (71%), and chest pain (49%). The most common primary presenting symptoms were heartburn and dysphagia. The intrabolus pressure, which is a manometric measure of outflow obstruction, was significantly higher in patients with HTLES compared to normal volunteers. The residual pressure measured during LES relaxation induced by a water swallow was also significantly higher than in normal persons. There were no significant associations between any of the relaxation parameters studied (residual pressure, nadir pressure, duration of relaxation, time to residual pressure) and either the presence or severity of any symptoms or the presence of abnormal esophageal acid exposure. Seventy-three patients underwent 24-hour pH monitoring, and 26% had increased distal esophageal acid exposure. Compared to a cohort of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease but no HTLES (n=300), the total and supine periods of distal esophageal acid exposure were significantly lower in the patients with HTLES and abnormal acid exposure. Patients with HTLES frequently present with moderately severe dysphagia and typical reflux symptoms. Approximately one

  12. Neurocognitive processing of esophageal central sensitization in the insula and cingulate gyrus.

    PubMed

    Lawal, Adeyemi; Kern, Mark; Sanjeevi, Arthi; Antonik, Stephen; Mepani, Rachel; Rittmann, Tanya; Hussaini, Syed; Hofmann, Candy; Tatro, Linda; Jesmanowicz, Andrzej; Verber, Matt; Shaker, Reza

    2008-03-01

    The cingulate and insular cortices are parts of the limbic system that process and modulate gastrointestinal sensory signals. We hypothesized that sensitization of these two limbic area may operate in esophageal sensitization. Thus the objective of the study was to elucidate the neurocognitive processing in the cingulate and insular cortices to mechanical stimulation of the proximal esophagus following infusion of acid or phosphate buffer solution (PBS) into the esophagus. Twenty-six studies (14 to acid and 12 to PBS infusion) were performed in 20 healthy subjects (18-35 yr) using high-resolution (2.5 x 2.5 x 2.5 mm(3) voxel size) functional MRI (fMRI). Paradigm-driven, 2-min fMRI scans were performed during randomly timed 15-s intervals of proximal esophageal barostatically controlled distentions and rest, before and after 30-min of distal esophageal acid or PBS perfusion (0.1 N HCl or 0.1 M PBS at 1 ml/min). Following distal esophageal acid infusion, at subliminal and liminal levels of proximal esophageal distentions, the number of activated voxels in both cingulate and insular cortices showed a significant increase compared with before acid infusion (P < 0.05). No statistically significant change in cortical activity was noted following PBS infusion. We conclude that 1) acid stimulation of the esophagus results in sensitization of the cingulate and insular cortices to subliminal and liminal nonpainful mechanical stimulations, and 2) these findings can have ramifications with regard to the mechanisms of some esophageal symptoms attributed to reflux disease.

  13. Radiotherapy Dose Perturbation of Esophageal Stents Examined in an Experimental Model

    SciTech Connect

    Atwood, Todd F.; Hsu, Annie; Ogara, Maydeen M.; Luba, Daniel G.; Tamler, Bradley J.; DiSario, James A.; Maxim, Peter G.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate the radiotherapy dose perturbations caused by esophageal stents in patients undergoing external beam treatments for esophageal cancer. Methods and Materials: Four esophageal stents were examined (three metallic stents: WallFlex, Ultraflex, and Alveolus; one nonmetallic stent with limited radiopaque markers for visualization: Polyflex). All experiments were performed in a liquid water phantom with a custom acrylic stent holder. Radiochromic film was used to measure the dose distributions adjacent to the stents at locations proximal and distal to the radiation source. The stents were placed in an air-filled cavity to simulate the esophagus. Treatment plans were created and delivered for photon energies of 6 and 15 MV, and data analysis was performed on uniform regions of interest, according to the size and geometric placement of the films, to quantify the dose perturbations. Results: The three metallic stents produced the largest dose perturbations with distinct patterns of 'hot' spots (increased dose) measured proximal to the radiation source (up to 15.4%) and both 'cold' (decreased dose) and hot spots measured distal to the radiation source (range, -6.1%-5.8%). The polymeric Polyflex stent produced similar dose perturbations when the radiopaque markers were examined (range, -7.6%-15.4%). However, when the radiopaque markers were excluded from the analysis, the Polyflex stent produced significantly smaller dose perturbations, with maximum hot spots of 7.3% and cold spots of -3.2%. Conclusions: The dose perturbations caused by esophageal stents during the treatment of esophageal cancer using external beam radiotherapy should be understood. These perturbations will result in hot and cold spots in the esophageal mucosa, with varying magnitudes depending on the stent. The nonmetallic Polyflex stent appears to be the most suitable for patients undergoing radiotherapy, but further studies are necessary to determine the clinical significance of the

  14. Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for esophageal/gastroesophageal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Nurkin, Steven J.; Fong, Mei Ka; Groman, Adrienne; Flaherty, Leayn; Malhotra, Usha; LeVea, Charles M.; Yendamuri, Sai; Warren, Graham W.; Nava, Hector R.; May, Kilian S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Esophageal/gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) adenocarcinoma is increasingly treated with trimodality therapy. We present our experience using carboplatin/paclitaxel and radiotherapy followed by surgery. Methods Consecutive patients with distal esophageal/GEJ adenocarcinoma (≥T2 or N+) treated from July 2010 to October 2011 were identified. Treatment included neoadjuvant carboplatin/paclitaxel with concurrent radiotherapy (CRT) to 50.4 Gy using an IMRT technique and then Ivor Lewis esophagogastrectomy (ILE). PET/CT was performed prior to and after CRT. Patient/treatment characteristics and tumor response were analyzed. Results Over this timeframe, 16 patients completed trimodality therapy. All were male, median age of 60 years (45-72 years). All tumors were grade 2-3 with mean tumor length of 4.4 cm (1-9 cm). A median of 6 cycles (5-9 cycles) neoadjuvant carboplatin/paclitaxel were administered. Average time from diagnosis to CRT completion was 76 days (44-141 days) and 60 days (35-92 days) from CRT end to surgery. Neoadjuvant CRT was well tolerated with mean weight loss of 3.9 kg. All pts had R0 resections. No anastomotic leaks or perioperative mortality occurred. Mean hospital stay was 13 days (8-28 days). Pathologic complete response (pCR) was seen in 38% of patients, microscopic residual disease (isolated tumor cells or <2 mm) in 31%, and macroscopic residual disease remained in 31%. Mean SUV reduction was 41% (0-100%). Of 11 patients with ≥35% SUV decrease, 45% had pCR and 27% had microscopic residual disease. Three patients had signet ring features. Of these, 2 had no SUV reduction and all had gross residual disease, including the only patient with positive nodal disease. Conclusions Trimodality therapy utilizing concurrent carboplatin/paclitaxel and radiotherapy to 50.4 Gy followed by surgery was well tolerated and resulted in significant pathologic complete response or minimal residual disease. Further investigation of predictive factors for

  15. Eosinophilic esophagitis: strictures, impactions, dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Khan, Seema; Orenstein, Susan R; Di Lorenzo, Carlo; Kocoshis, Samuel A; Putnam, Philip E; Sigurdsson, Luther; Shalaby, Theresa M

    2003-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis, long known to be a feature of acid reflux, has recently been described in patients with food allergies and macroscopically furrowed esophagus. The pathophysiology and optimal management of patients with eosinophilic esophagitis is unclear. We describe our clinical experience related to eosinophilic esophagitis and obstructive symptoms in children and propose etiopathogenesis and management guidelines. Twelve children with obstructive esophageal symptoms (11 male), median age 5 years, and identified to have eosinophilic esophagitis with > 5 eosinophils per high-power field (eos/hpf) are reported. Of these, four had strictures, six had impactions, and two had only dysphagia. A diagnostic evaluation included esophagogastroduodenoscopy with biopsies in all and upper gastrointestinal series, IgE, radioallergosorbent tests, and skin tests for food allergies in some cases. Esophageal histology specimens were independently analyzed for eosinophil density by two authors. Four of five children with > 20 eos/hpf responded to elimination diets/steroids. The fifth child responded to a fundoplication. Seven children had 5-20 eos/hpf and three of them with no known food allergies responded to antireflux therapy alone. Three others in this group with positive food allergies responded to treatment with elimination diets and/or steroids. The seventh patient in this group was lost to follow-up. In conclusion, on the basis of response to therapy, eosinophilic esophagitis can be subdivided into two groups: those with likely gastroesophageal reflux disease if < 20 eos/hpf and no food allergies, and others with allergic eosinophilic esophagitis associated with food allergies and often with > 20 eos/hpf.

  16. Predictors of a variceal source among patients presenting with upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Alharbi, Ahmad; Almadi, Majid; Barkun, Alan; Martel, Myriam

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) require an early, tailored approach best guided by knowledge of the bleeding lesion, especially a variceal versus a nonvariceal source. OBJECTIVE: To identify, by investigating a large national registry, variables that would be predictive of a variceal origin of UGIB using clinical parameters before endoscopic evaluation. METHODS: A retrospective study was conducted in 21 Canadian hospitals during the period from January 2004 until the end of May 2005. Consecutive charts for hospitalized patients with a primary or secondary discharge diagnosis of UGIB were reviewed. Data regarding demographics, including historical, physical examination, initial laboratory investigations, endoscopic and pharmacological therapies administered, as well as clinical outcomes, were collected. Multivariable logistic regression modelling was performed to identify clinical predictors of a variceal source of bleeding. RESULTS: The patient population included 2020 patients (mean [± SD] age 66.3±16.4 years; 38.4% female). Overall, 215 (10.6%) were found to be bleeding from upper gastrointestinal varices. Among 26 patient characteristics, variables predicting a variceal source of bleeding included history of liver disease (OR 6.36 [95% CI 3.59 to 11.3]), excessive alcohol use (OR 2.28 [95% CI 1.37 to 3.77]), hematemesis (OR 2.65 [95% CI 1.61 to 4.36]), hematochezia (OR 3.02 [95% CI 1.46 to 6.22]) and stigmata of chronic liver disease (OR 2.49 [95% CI 1.46 to 4.25]). Patients treated with antithrombotic therapy were more likely to experience other causes of hemorrhage (OR 0.44 [95% CI 0.35 to 0.78]). CONCLUSION: Presenting historical and physical examination data, and initial laboratory tests carry significant predictive ability in discriminating variceal versus nonvariceal sources of bleeding. PMID:22506257

  17. Ectopic Varices in the Gastrointestinal Tract: Short- and Long-Term Outcomes of Percutaneous Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Macedo, Thanila A. Andrews, James C.; Kamath, Patrick S.

    2005-04-15

    To evaluate the results of percutaneous management of ectopic varices, a retrospective review was carried out of 14 patients (9 men, 5 women; mean age 58 years) who between 1992 and 2001 underwent interventional radiological techniques for management of bleeding ectopic varices. A history of prior abdominal surgery was present in 12 of 14 patients. The interval between the surgery and percutaneous intervention ranged from 2 to 38 years. Transhepatic portal venography confirmed ectopic varices to be the source of portal hypertension-related gastrointestinal bleeding. Embolization of the ectopic varices was performed by a transhepatic approach with coil embolization of the veins draining into the ectopic varices. Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) was performed in the standard fashion. Eighteen procedures (12 primary coil embolizations, 1 primary TIPS, 2 re-embolizations, 3 secondary TIPS) were performed in 13 patients. One patient was not a candidate for percutaneous treatment. All interventions but one (re-embolization) were technically successful. In 2 of 18 interventions, re-bleeding occurred within 72 hr (both embolization patients). Recurrent bleeding (23 days to 27 months after initial intervention) was identified in 9 procedures (8 coil embolizations, 1 TIPS due to biliary fistula). One patient had TIPS revision because of ultrasound surveillance findings. New encephalopathy developed in 2 of 4 TIPS patients. Percutaneous coil embolization is a simple and safe treatment for bleeding ectopic varices; however, recurrent bleeding is frequent and reintervention often required. TIPS can offer good control of bleeding at the expense of a more complex procedure and associated risk of encephalopathy.

  18. Esophageal malignancy: A growing concern

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Jianyuan; Jamal, M Mazen

    2012-01-01

    Esophageal cancer is mainly found in Asia and east Africa and is one of the deadliest cancers in the world. However, it has not garnered much attention in the Western world due to its low incidence rate. An increasing amount of data indicate that esophageal cancer, particularly esophageal adenocarcinoma, has been rising by 6-fold annually and is now becoming the fastest growing cancer in the United States. This rise has been associated with the increase of the obese population, as abdominal fat puts extra pressure on the stomach and causes gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Long standing GERD can induce esophagitis and metaplasia and, ultimately, leads to adenocarcinoma. Acid suppression has been the main strategy to treat GERD; however, it has not been proven to control esophageal malignancy effectively. In fact, its side effects have triggered multiple warnings from regulatory agencies. The high mortality and fast growth of esophageal cancer demand more vigorous efforts to look into its deeper mechanisms and come up with better therapeutic options. PMID:23236223

  19. A pictorial presentation of 3.0 Chicago Classification for esophageal motility disorders.

    PubMed

    Herbella, Fernando Augusto; Armijo, Priscila Rodrigues; Patti, Marco Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    High resolution manometry changed several esophageal motility paradigms. The 3.0 Chicago Classification defined manometric criteria for named esophageal motility disorders. We present a pictorial atlas of motility disorders. Achalasia types, esophagogastric junction obstruction, absent contractility, distal esophageal spasm, hypercontractile esophagus (jackhammer), ineffective esophageal motility, and fragmented peristalsis are depicted with high-resolution manometry plots. RESUMO A manometria de alta resolução mudou vários paradigmas da motilidade digestiva. A Classificação de Chicago, na versão 3.0, definiu critérios manométricos para as doenças da motilidade esofagiana. O presente artigo é um atlas das dismotilidades descritas. Tipos de acalásia, obstrução ao nível da junção esofagogástrica, contrações ausentes, espasmo esofagiano distal, esôfago hipercontrátil, motilidade esofagiana ineficaz e peristalse fragmentada são mostradas em traçados de manometria de alta resolução.

  20. Effect of acid swallowing on esophageal contraction in patients with heartburn related to hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyuk; Lee, Sang Kil; Park, Jun Chul; Shin, Sung Kwan; Lee, Yong Chan

    2013-01-01

    There are heterogeneous subgroups among those with heartburn, and data on these individuals are relatively scant. We aimed to evaluate the effect of acid challenge on the segmental contractions of esophageal smooth muscle in endoscopy-negative patients with normal esophageal acid exposure. High-resolution esophageal manometry (HRM) was performed on 30 endoscopy-negative patients with heartburn accompanied by normal esophageal acid exposure using 10 water swallows followed by 10 acidic pomegranate juice swallows. Patients were classified into functional heartburn (FH) and hypersensitive esophagus (HE) groups based on the results of 24-hr impedance pH testing. HRM topographic plots were analyzed and maximal wave amplitude and pressure volumes were measured for proximal and distal smooth muscle segments. The pressure volume of the distal smooth muscle segment in the HE group measured during acidic swallows was higher than during water swallows (2224.1 ± 68.2 mmHg/cm per s versus 2105.6 ± 66.4 mmHg/cm per s, P = 0.027). A prominent shift in the pressure volume to the distal smooth muscle segment was observed in the HE group compared with the FH group (segmental ratio: 2.72 ± 0.08 versus 2.39 ± 0.07, P = 0.005). Manometric measurements during acidic swallows revealed that this shift was augmented in the HE group. The optimal ratio of pomegranate juice swallowing for discrimination of FH from HE was 2.82, with a sensitivity of 88.9% and a specificity of 100%. Hypercontractile response of distal smooth muscle segment to acid swallowing was more prominent in the HE group than the FH group. © 2012 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  1. Neurogenic claudication without spinal stenosis arising as a result of lumbar epidural varices.

    PubMed

    Dabasia, H; Rahim, N; Marshall, R

    2012-09-01

    Neurogenic claudication is most frequently observed in patients with degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis. We describe a patient with lumbar epidural varices secondary to obstruction of the inferior vena cava by pathological lymph nodes presenting with this syndrome. Following a diagnosis of follicular lymphoma, successful chemotherapy led to the resolution of the varices and the symptoms of neurogenic claudication. The lumbar epidural venous plexus may have an important role in the pathogenesis of spinal stenosis. Although rare, epidural venous engorgement can induce neurogenic claudication without spinal stenosis. Further investigations should be directed at identifying an underlying cause.

  2. Pitfalls in histoacryl glue injection therapy for oesophageal, gastric and ectopic varices: A review

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hillawi, Lulia; Wong, Terence; Tritto, Giovanni; Berry, Philip A

    2016-01-01

    Histoacryl glue is used increasingly for the treatment of gastric and ectopic varices, and there is experience in its use for oesophageal varices. It is an effective treatment, yet numerous reports of complications have accumulated. This review of the literature describes the technique, explores circulatory and vascular consideration unique to portal hypertension and categorises the complications into: “Embolisation”, “local venous thrombosis”, “fistulisation and extravascular injection”, “ulceration, erosion and extrusion”, and “nidus of infection”. A case is then made for standardisation of the technique and the consent process. PMID:27933134

  3. Peristomal variceal bleeding treated by coil embolization using a percutaneous transhepatic approach

    PubMed Central

    Maciel, Macello José Sampaio; Pereira, Osvaldo Ignácio; Motta Leal Filho, Joaquim Maurício; Ziemiecki Junior, Enio; Cosme, Susyanne Lavor; Souza, Moisés Amâncio; Carnevale, Francisco Cesar

    2016-01-01

    Peristomal variceal bleeding due to portal hypertension is an entity that has rarely been reported with 3%-4% risk of death. A 68-year-old woman who had undergone a palliative colostomy (colorectal carcinoma) presented with a massive hemorrhage from the colostomy conduit. Considering her oncological status with medial and right hepatic veins thrombosis due to liver metastasis invasion, an emergency transhepatic coil embolization was successfully performed. Standard treatment modality for these cases has not been established. Percutaneous transhepatic coil embolization of varices is a safe and effective choice in patients who present with life threatening bleeding and exhibit contraindications to transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt. PMID:26798628

  4. Peristomal variceal bleeding treated by coil embolization using a percutaneous transhepatic approach.

    PubMed

    Maciel, Macello José Sampaio; Pereira, Osvaldo Ignácio; Motta Leal Filho, Joaquim Maurício; Ziemiecki Junior, Enio; Cosme, Susyanne Lavor; Souza, Moisés Amâncio; Carnevale, Francisco Cesar

    2016-01-16

    Peristomal variceal bleeding due to portal hypertension is an entity that has rarely been reported with 3%-4% risk of death. A 68-year-old woman who had undergone a palliative colostomy (colorectal carcinoma) presented with a massive hemorrhage from the colostomy conduit. Considering her oncological status with medial and right hepatic veins thrombosis due to liver metastasis invasion, an emergency transhepatic coil embolization was successfully performed. Standard treatment modality for these cases has not been established. Percutaneous transhepatic coil embolization of varices is a safe and effective choice in patients who present with life threatening bleeding and exhibit contraindications to transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt.

  5. Platelet Count to Spleen Diameter Ratio for the Diagnosis of Gastroesophageal Varices in Liver Cirrhosis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Runhua; Deng, Han; Xie, Chune; Wang, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Platelet count to spleen diameter ratio (PSR) was studied extensively as a noninvasive method of diagnosis for varices. The present study aimed to systematically assess the performance of PSR in the diagnosis of varices. PubMed, EMBASE, and article references were searched. The summary receiver operating characteristic curves (AUSROCs), sensitivities, specificities, positive and negative likelihood ratio, and diagnostic odds ratio were calculated. The heterogeneity, quality, and publication bias of studies were evaluated. Subgroup and sensitivity analyses were performed. A total of 49 papers were included. The AUSROCs of PSR for any varices and high-risk varices were 0.8719 and 0.8132, respectively. The summary sensitivities of PSR for any varices and high-risk varices were 0.84 and 0.78, respectively. The summary specificities of PSR for any varices and high-risk varices were 0.78 and 0.67, respectively. The AUSROC of PSR for any varices at the threshold of 909 was 0.8867. The AUSROC of PSR for any varices in viral liver cirrhosis was 0.8675. The overall quality of studies was moderate. Significant heterogeneity and publication bias existed in the study. In conclusion, PSR can be used to identify varices in liver cirrhosis. PSR had a high sensitivity in viral liver cirrhosis. PMID:28270848

  6. Distal arthrogryposis syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, K. P.; Panigrahi, I.; Ray, M.; Marwaha, R. K.

    2008-01-01

    A 5-month-old male infant presented with weak cry, decreased body movements, tightness of whole body since birth, and one episode of generalized seizure on day 4 of life. He was born at term by elective caesarian section performed for breech presentation. The child had failure to thrive, contractures at elbow and knee joints, hypertonia, microcephaly, small mouth, retrognathia, and camptodactyly. There was global developmental delay. Abdominal examination revealed umbilical and bilateral inguinal hernia. Visual evoked response and brainstem evoked response audiometry were abnormal. Nerve conduction velocity was normal. Magnetic resonance imaging of brain revealed paucity of white matter in bilateral cerebral hemispheres with cerebellar and brain stem atrophy. The differential diagnoses considered in the index patient were distal arthrogryposis (DA) syndrome, cerebroculofacioskeletal syndrome, and Pena Shokier syndrome. The index patient most likely represents a variant of DA: Sheldon Hall syndrome. PMID:20300297

  7. Effect of white wine on esophageal peristalsis and acid clearance.

    PubMed

    Pehl, C; Frommherz, M; Wendl, B; Schmidt, T; Pfeiffer, A

    2000-12-01

    In a previous study it was demonstrated that white wine reduces the lower esophageal sphincter pressure and induces gastroesophageal reflux characterized by reflux episodes of long duration. In the present study, it was evaluated whether wine disturbs esophageal peristalsis and acid clearance. Twelve healthy volunteers (7F, 23-37 years) received 300 ml white wine (8% vol/vol; WW), an ethanol solution (8% vol/vol; ET) or tap water (WA) together with a standardized meal in a random order. Acid clearance was tested by instillation of 15 ml 0.1 N HCI into the distal esophagus. The number of swallows (dry swallow every 30 sec) were counted until pH rose again above 5. Five wet swallows (5 ml) were applied to test primary peristalsis and five insufflations of 20 ml of air were performed to test secondary peristalsis. Each test was done immediately after and 60 min after ingestion of the beverages. A significantly higher number of swallows were needed to clear the esophagus immediately after ingestion of wine (P < 0.01; median number: WW 12; ET 8; WA 7) due to an increase in the frequency of failed, simultaneous, and low-amplitude contractions. The frequency of triggered secondary contractions was decreased (P < 0.02; WW 70%; ET 100%; WA 100%) and the latency between air injection and onset of secondary peristalsis was prolonged (P < 0.05; WW 9 sec; ET 7 sec; WA 6 sec) immediately after ingestion of white wine. Wet swallow induced primary peristalsis was not influenced by wine. No significant differences in the measured parameters were seen 60 min after ingestion of the three beverages. White wine disturbs temporarily esophageal clearance due to a disturbance of triggering secondary peristalsis and due to an increase in ineffective contractions. The ethanol content alone is not responsible for the effects of white wine on esophageal peristalsis and acid clearance.

  8. The cardia: esophageal or gastric? Critical reviewing the anatomy and histopathology of the esophagogastric junction.

    PubMed

    Lenglinger, Johannes; See, Stephanie Fischer; Beller, Lukas; Cosentini, Enrico; Asari, Reza; Wrba, Fritz; Riegler, Martin; Schoppmann, Sebastian F

    2012-01-01

    Discrepancy exists regarding the anatomical allocation of the cardia: esophageal or gastric. With this review we aimed to clarify this issue. Using PUB MED, Scopus and Google we analyzed the recent literature (1889-2012) regarding the "esophageal" vs. the "gastric" cardia. The synonymous use of the term cardia to describe the anti reflux mechanism within the distal portion of the esophagus and the proximal segment of the stomach nourished the misunderstanding, that the cardia represents a normal anatomical structure interposed between the tubular esophagus and the body of the stomach. Anatomical, histopathological and physiological studies revealed that what has been taken for gastric cardia in fact represents reflux damaged dilated distal esophagus (DDE). Since DDE is covered by columnar lined esophagus (CLE) it cannot be differentiated from the proximal stomach during regular endoscopy. However, the histopathology of multi level biopsies obtained from the endoscopically suspected esophagogastric junction (EGJ) serves to allocate the origin of the columnar lined foregut, esophageal (cardiac, oxyntocardiac mucosa, intestinal metaplasia) vs. gastric (oxyntic mucosa). Neither the esophagus nor the stomach contains a "cardia". The recent misconceptions regarding the foregut anatomy explain, why the innermost coverage of the reflux damaged esophagus is termed "cardiac mucosa". Thus the term should be reserved to name the histopathology of cardiac and oxyntocardiac mucosa, which develop due to gastroesophageal reflux within the distal esophagus.

  9. 21 CFR 876.5365 - Esophageal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... and weighted with mercury or a metal olive-shaped weight that slides on a guide, such as a string or... esophageal or gastrointestinal bougies and the esophageal dilator (metal olive). (b) Classification. Class...

  10. 21 CFR 876.5365 - Esophageal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... and weighted with mercury or a metal olive-shaped weight that slides on a guide, such as a string or... esophageal or gastrointestinal bougies and the esophageal dilator (metal olive). (b) Classification. Class...

  11. 21 CFR 876.5365 - Esophageal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... and weighted with mercury or a metal olive-shaped weight that slides on a guide, such as a string or... esophageal or gastrointestinal bougies and the esophageal dilator (metal olive). (b) Classification. Class...

  12. Operative timing and patient survival following distal splenorenal shunt.

    PubMed

    Pomerantz, R A; Eckhauser, F E; Knol, J A; Guirre, K; Raper, S E; Turcotte, J G

    1989-06-01

    The importance of "operative timing" in cirrhotic patients with variceal hemorrhage is often underemphasized. To evaluate the effects of immediate versus delayed selective portasystemic decompression on hepatic function, operative mortality, and long-term patient survival, we reviewed the records of 77 patients who underwent distal splenorenal shunts (DSRS) over a 14-year period. A hepatic risk status score was calculated at the time of the index bleed (HRS1) or presentation and again just prior to operation (HRS2). Variables analyzed included age, sex, prior bleeding episodes, time from index bleed to operation, transfusion requirements, and etiology of cirrhosis. Operative mortality rates for immediate versus delayed DSRS