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Sample records for esophageal varices distal

  1. Pharmacologic influence on esophageal varices

    SciTech Connect

    Lunderquist, A.; Owman, T.; Alwmark, A.; Gullstrand, P.; Hall-Angeras, M.; Joelsson, B.; Tranberg, K.G.; Pettersson, K.I.

    1983-06-01

    Selective catherization of the left gastric vein was performed after percutaneous transhepatic portography (PTP) in patients with portal hypertension and esophageal varices. Following the hypothesis that drugs increasing the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) pressure may obstruct the variceal blood flow throught the lower esophagus, the effect of different drugs (i.e., intravenous injection of vasopressin, pentagastrin, domperidone and somatostatin and subcutaneous injection of metacholine) on the variceal blood flow was examined. Vasopressin did not change the variceal blood flow; pentagastrine, with its known effect of increasing the LES pressure produced a total interruption of the flow in four of eight patients; domperiodone, also known to increase the LES pressure obstructed the variceal blood flow in the only patient examined with this drug; somatostatin has no reported action on the LES but blocked the flow in one of two patients; and metacholine, reported to increase the LES pressure did not produce any change in the flow in the three patients examined. LES pressure was recorded before and during vasopressin infusion in seven patients with portal hypertension and esophageal varices. No reaction on the pressure was found. The patient number in the study is small and the results are nonuniform but still they suggest that drugs increasing the LES tonus might be useful to control variceal blood flow.

  2. Bleeding esophageal varices

    MedlinePlus

    ... air. This produces pressure against the bleeding veins (balloon tamponade). Once the bleeding is stopped, other varices can be treated with medicines and medical procedures to prevent future bleeding, including: Drugs called ...

  3. Bleeding esophageal varices: treatment with vasopressin, transhepatic embolization and selective splenorenal shunting.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, W C; Nabseth, D C; Widrich, W C; Bush, H L; O'Hara, E T; Robbins, A H

    1982-01-01

    The fate of 359 consecutive alcoholic cirrhotic male patients with bleeding esophageal varices was determined through chart review and personal interview. Three historical periods (1966-70; 1971-75; 1976-80) were defined based on availability of different therapeutic modalities. Management of acutely bleeding varices by conservative, nonsurgical means, including embolization, was preferable to emergency surgery when considering 30-day mortality rates. Percutaneous transhepatic embolization of esophagogastric varices significantly improved the rate of control of hemorrhage and 30-day survival over previously employed nonsurgical methods. The combination of nonsurgical management of acute variceal hemorrhage followed by selective distal splenorenal shunting resulted in maximum salvage of the alcoholic cirrhotic patient. PMID:6978109

  4. Distal esophageal spasm: an update.

    PubMed

    Achem, Sami R; Gerson, Lauren B

    2013-09-01

    Distal esophageal spasm (DES) is an esophageal motility disorder that presents clinically with chest pain and/or dysphagia and is defined manometrically as simultaneous contractions in the distal (smooth muscle) esophagus in ≥20% of wet swallows (and amplitude contraction of ≥30 mmHg) alternating with normal peristalsis. With the introduction of high resolution esophageal pressure topography (EPT) in 2000, the definition of DES was modified. The Chicago classification proposed that the defining criteria for DES using EPT should be the presence of at least two premature contractions (distal latency<4.5 s) in a context of normal EGJ relaxation. The etiology of DES remains insufficiently understood, but evidence links nitric oxide (NO) deficiency as a culprit resulting in a disordered neural inhibition. GERD frequently coexists in DES, and its role in the pathogenesis of symptoms needs further evaluation. There is some evidence from small series that DES can progress to achalasia. Treatment remains challenging due in part to lack of randomized placebo-controlled trials. Current treatment agents include nitrates (both short and long acting), calcium-channel blockers, anticholinergic agents, 5-phosphodiesterase inhibitors, visceral analgesics (tricyclic agents or SSRI), and esophageal dilation. Acid suppression therapy is frequently used, but clinical outcome trials to support this approach are not available. Injection of botulinum toxin in the distal esophagus may be effective, but further data regarding the development of post-injection gastroesophageal reflux need to be assessed. Heller myotomy combined with fundoplication remains an alternative for the rare refractory patient. Preliminary studies suggest that the newly developed endoscopic technique of per oral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) may also be an alternative treatment modality. PMID:23892829

  5. [Esophageal carcinoma after the endoscopic sclerotherapy of varices].

    PubMed

    Macías Rodríguez, M A; Soria de la Cruz, M J; Iglesias Arrabal, M; Martín Herrera, L

    1992-07-01

    We report the case of a 52-years-old smoking male, diagnosed of liver cirrhosis, who developed a squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus 36 months after undergoing endoscopic injection sclerotherapy for bleeding esophageal varices. Nine courses with 3% polidocanol were performed along 10 months. It was injected intra and paravariceal at a total dose of 117 ml. The relationship between endoscopic injection sclerotherapy and developing squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus is discussed.

  6. Hepatic Angiosarcoma Associated with Esophageal Variceal Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Zensho; Kajihara, Mikio; Kobayashi, Yasunobu; Kanai, Tomoya; Matsumoto, Yoshihiro; Takakura, Kazuki; Yukawa, Toyokazu; Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Koyama, Seita; Imazu, Hiroo; Arakawa, Hiroshi; Ohata, Mitsuru; Koido, Shigeo

    2016-01-01

    Primary hepatic angiosarcoma is a very rare malignancy with a poor prognosis. Because patients present with no specific symptoms, the cancer can grow undetected and most cases are diagnosed too late for resection. We present the case of a 78-year-old Japanese man admitted to our hospital with massive hematemesis and melena. A total gastrectomy had previously been performed on the patient to treat gastric cancer. Endoscopic injection sclerotherapy was performed to control the bleeding from varices over the anastomosis. Computed tomography revealed the presence of multiple atypical liver nodules in the enhanced image. Histological diagnosis of hepatic angiosarcoma was obtained by percutaneous ultrasound-guided liver biopsy. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a patient with hepatic angiosarcoma and acute variceal hemorrhage. PMID:27721730

  7. Esophageal transection with automatic stapler device for bleeding esophageal varices. Case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Bayer, I; Kyzer, S; Chaimoff, C

    1989-01-01

    The EEA stapler offers a relative easy technique for the control of severe bleeding from esophageal varices. Two cases are reported in which this technique in combination with proximal gastric devascularization and splenectomy was found to be superior to the performance of portosystemic shunt in emergency cases. The results of portocaval shunts created during severe bleeding from esophageal varices are not satisfactory because of the high mortality rate varying between 36% and 47% (1, 2) and the development of postoperative encephalopathy. For these reasons the tendency today, in cases of severe bleeding from esophageal varices where conservative treatment was unsuccessful, is that the surgeon should attack the bleeding area itself (3). Support for this opinion may be found in the publications of Sugiura and Futagawa (4, 5) and of Koyama et al. (6) about their long-term good results obtained after esophageal transection for bleeding esophageal varices. PMID:2785322

  8. A randomized control trial of bi-monthly versus bi-weekly endoscopic variceal ligation of esophageal varices.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Hiroshi; Mamada, Yasuhiro; Taniai, Nobuhiko; Yamamoto, Kazuhito; Kawano, Youichi; Mizuguchi, Yoshiaki; Shimizu, Tetsuya; Takahashi, Tsubasa; Tajiri, Takashi

    2005-09-01

    Endoscopic variceal ligation (EVL) is a safe and simple procedure now being used on a widening scale. Yet most patients who undergo endoscopic treatment for esophageal varices eventually require additional treatment for recurrent varices. In this study, we investigated and compared the efficacy and long-term results of EVL performed in three treatments with a total of sixteen O-rings at two different intervals; bi-weekly (once every 2 wk: the conventional interval) and bi-monthly (once every 2 months). A total of 63 patients with esophageal varices were randomly assigned to groups receiving bi-weekly or bi-monthly EVL treatment. Optimal medical therapy was assessed by one medical doctor who was unaware of the patients' treatment assignments. Three parameters of treatment outcome were evaluated: the rate of recurrence, rate of additional treatment, and overall survival. The overall rates of variceal recurrence and additional treatment were both higher in the bi-weekly group than in the bi-monthly group (p < 0.001). In conclusion, EVL performed for the treatment of esophageal varices at bi-monthly intervals brought about better results than the same treatment performed at bi-weekly intervals. The treatments intercalated by the longer interval obtained a higher total eradication rate, lower recurrence rate, and lower rate of additional treatment. PMID:16128945

  9. Medical expenses in treating acute esophageal variceal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chueh-Ling; Wu, Cheng-Kun; Shi, Hon-Yi; Tai, Wei-Chen; Liang, Chih-Ming; Yang, Shih-Cheng; Wu, Keng-Liang; Chiu, Yi-Chun; Chuah, Seng-Kee

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Acute variceal bleeding in patients with cirrhosis is related to high mortality and medical expenses. The purpose of present studies was to analyze the medical expenses in treating acute esophageal variceal bleeding among patients with cirrhosis and potential influencing clinical factors. A total of 151,863 patients with cirrhosis with International Classification of Diseases-9 codes 456.0 and 456.20 were analyzed from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database from January 1, 1996 to December 31, 2010. Time intervals were divided into three phases for analysis as T1 (1996–2000), T2 (2001–2005), and T3 (2006–2010). The endpoints were prevalence, length of hospital stay, medical expenses, and mortality rate. Our results showed that more patients were <65 years (75.6%) and of male sex (78.5%). Patients were mostly from teaching hospitals (90.8%) with high hospital volume (50.9%) and high doctor service load (51.1%). The prevalence of acute esophageal variceal bleeding and mean length of hospital stay decreased over the years (P < 0.001), but the overall medical expenses increased (P < 0.001). Multiple regression analysis showed that older age, female sex, Charlson comorbidity index (CCI) score >1, patients from teaching hospitals, and medium to high or very high patient numbers were independent factors for longer hospital stay and higher medical expenses. Aged patients, female sex, increased CCI score, and low doctor service volume were independent factors for both in-hospital and 5-year mortality. Patients from teaching hospitals and medium to high or very high service volume hospitals were independent factors for in-hospital mortality, but not 5-year mortality. Medical expenses in treating acute esophageal variceal bleeding increased despite the decreased prevalence rate and length of hospital stay in Taiwan. Aged patients, female sex, patients with increased CCI score from teaching hospitals, and medium to high or very high

  10. Noninvasive predictors of presence and grade of esophageal varices in viral cirrhotic patients.

    PubMed

    Nada, Lahmidani; Samira, El Fakir; Bahija, Benyachou; Adil, Ibrahimi; Nourdine, Aqodad

    2015-01-01

    Predicting the presence and the grade of varices by non-invasive methods is likely to predict the need for prophylactic beta blockers or endoscopic variceal ligation. The factors related to the presence of varices are not well-defined. Therefore, the present study has been undertaken to determine the appropriateness of the various factors in predicting the existence and also the grade of esophageal varices. Patients with diagnosis of liver cirrhosis due to hepatitis C or B were included in a retrospective study between January 2001 and January 2010. All the patients underwent detailed clinical evaluation, appropriate investigations, imaging studies (ultrasound with Doppler) and endoscopy at our center. Five variables considered relevant to the presence and grade of varices were tested using univariate and multivariate analysis (logistic regression). Three hundred and seventy two patients with viral liver cirrhosis were included, with 192 (51.6%) males. Platelet count and abundance of ascites were significantly associated with the presence of esophageal varices. However, abundance of ascites, prothrombin time, diameter of the spleen and portal vein were significantly associated with a large varice. In multivariate analysis, platelet count inferior to 100000 was associated with presence of varices (p = 0.04) and only abundance of ascites was associated with large varice. Low Platelet count (< or equal 100000) is associated with the presence of varices in viral cirrhotic patients and abundance of ascites is correlated with the presence of large varices.

  11. Hemodynamic changes in a patient with esophageal varices after endoscopic injection sclerotherapy evaluated by endoscopic color Doppler ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Sato, Takahiro; Yamazaki, Katsu; Ohmura, Takumi; Suga, Toshihiro

    2007-03-01

    A 46-year-old man with alcoholic cirrhosis was admitted to our hospital for treatment of high-risk esophageal varices in February 2000. Images of the esophageal varices, paraesophageal veins and palisade veins were obtained by endoscopic color Doppler ultrasonography (ECDUS) before endoscopic injection sclerotherapy (EIS). Prophylactic EIS was performed six times per week for esophageal varices, and EIS was continued until the esophageal varices were completely eradicated. In July 2002, endoscopy revealed esophageal varices graded as Cb, F1, Lm, and RC(-), and color flow images of the palisade veins (hepatofugal flow), esophageal varices, and a developed paraesophageal vein were obtained with ECDUS. In April 2003, endoscopy showed esophageal varices graded as Cb, F1, Lm, and RC(-), and color flow images of the palisade veins and esophageal varices were obtained using ECDUS. The blood in the palisade veins flowed in an alternate direction on color flow images, and pulsatile waves were delineated at the gastroesophageal junction. In January 2004, endoscopy revealed esophageal varices graded as F0 and RC(-), and pulsatile waves were delineated in the lower esophagus with ECDUS. However, the esophageal varices and palisade veins had disappeared from color flow images. In conclusion, ECDUS was useful for evaluating hemodynamic changes after EIS.

  12. Low risk of bacteremia after endoscopic variceal therapy for esophageal varices: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Yi; Dwivedi, Alok; Elhanafi, Sherif; Ortiz, Arleen; Othman, Mohamed; Zuckerman, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Background and study aims: Endoscopic variceal ligation (EVL) and endoscopic variceal sclerotherapy (EVS) are the main therapeutic procedures for the emergency treatment and secondary prophylaxis of esophageal varices in cirrhotics. Post-endoscopic bacteremia has been reported after EVS and EVL, but data on the frequency of bacteremia are conflicting. This study aims to provide incidences of bacteremia after EVS and EVL in different settings through meta-analysis. Methods: Only prospective or randomized studies were included in this meta-analysis. Binomial distribution was used to compute variance for each study. Random effects models were used as the final model for estimating the effect size and 95 % confidence interval. Adjusted effects were obtained using meta-regression analysis. Results: Nineteen prospective studies involving 1001 procedures in 587 patients were included in the meta-analysis on the risk of bacteremia after EVS or EVL in cirrhotics with esophageal varices. The frequency of bacteremia after endoscopic variceal therapy was 13 %. The frequency of bacteremia after EVS (17 %) was higher than after EVL (6 %) with no statistically significant difference (P = 0.106). The frequency of bacteremia after elective EVS (14 %) was significantly less than after emergency EVS (22 %) (P < 0.001). The frequency of bacteremia after elective EVL (7.6 %) was not significantly different from after emergency EVL (3.2 %) (P = 0.850). Conclusions: The incidence of bacteremia is low in patients with cirrhosis and varices after esophageal variceal therapy. These results are consistent with our current guidelines that antibiotic prophylaxis before endoscopic variceal therapy is only necessary for bleeding patients. PMID:26528494

  13. Comparison of different methods for endoscopic hemostasis of bleeding canine esophageal varices.

    PubMed

    Jensen, D M; Silpa, M L; Tapia, J I; Beilin, D B; Machicado, G A

    1983-06-01

    Despite advances in the therapy of acute esophageal variceal hemorrhage, morbidity and mortality remain high. Continued severe variceal hemorrhage remains a major clinical problem in poor risk patients who cannot tolerate emergency surgery for hemostasis. Several endoscopic hemostatic methods might be effective for variceal hemostasis, but they have not been systematically evaluated. Using a reproducible canine model of esophageal varices, several hemostatic modalities were tested and compared to determine which were most effective in stopping variceal bleeding. Methods tested were endoscopic sclerotherapy, organ laser, neodymium-yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser, monopolar electro-coagulation, bipolar electrocoagulation, ferromagnetic tamponade, and endoscopic heater probe. Both neodymium-yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser and endoscopic sclerotherapy provided reliable hemostasis in acutely bleeding canine varices. Large heater probe controlled bleeding 50% of the time, and all the other methods stopped bleeding in less than half the trials. Rebleeding after balloon inflation proximal to the coagulated bleeding site did not occur with neodymium-yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser or endoscopic sclerotherapy-treated varices but did occur with the other methods. The principal differences between neodymium-yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser and endoscopic sclerotherapy were the ease of application of neodymium-yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser, the higher frequency of esophageal ulcers or erosions with neodymium-yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser, and the lack of variceal obliteration with neodymium-yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser. PMID:6341157

  14. Comparison of different methods for endoscopic hemostasis of bleeding canine esophageal varices.

    PubMed

    Jensen, D M; Silpa, M L; Tapia, J I; Beilin, D B; Machicado, G A

    1983-06-01

    Despite advances in the therapy of acute esophageal variceal hemorrhage, morbidity and mortality remain high. Continued severe variceal hemorrhage remains a major clinical problem in poor risk patients who cannot tolerate emergency surgery for hemostasis. Several endoscopic hemostatic methods might be effective for variceal hemostasis, but they have not been systematically evaluated. Using a reproducible canine model of esophageal varices, several hemostatic modalities were tested and compared to determine which were most effective in stopping variceal bleeding. Methods tested were endoscopic sclerotherapy, organ laser, neodymium-yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser, monopolar electro-coagulation, bipolar electrocoagulation, ferromagnetic tamponade, and endoscopic heater probe. Both neodymium-yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser and endoscopic sclerotherapy provided reliable hemostasis in acutely bleeding canine varices. Large heater probe controlled bleeding 50% of the time, and all the other methods stopped bleeding in less than half the trials. Rebleeding after balloon inflation proximal to the coagulated bleeding site did not occur with neodymium-yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser or endoscopic sclerotherapy-treated varices but did occur with the other methods. The principal differences between neodymium-yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser and endoscopic sclerotherapy were the ease of application of neodymium-yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser, the higher frequency of esophageal ulcers or erosions with neodymium-yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser, and the lack of variceal obliteration with neodymium-yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser.

  15. [Two cases of esophageal variceal rupture associated with chemotherapy for liver metastasis of breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Mizuyama, Yoko; Shinto, Osamu; Matsutani, Sinji; Arimoto, Yuichi; Nakagawa, Hiroji; Ohno, Yoshioki; Takashima, Tsutomu

    2014-11-01

    A morphological change resembling liver cirrhosis called pseudocirrhosis may be observed following chemotherapy for liver metastasis of breast cancer. Pseudocirrhosis is hypothesized to be caused by retraction of the hepatic capsule along with tumor shrinkage and subsequent scar formation around the metastatic lesion, as a response to the infiltrating tumor or chemotherapy-induced hepatic injury. The progression of cirrhotic changes may result in portal hypertension and esophageal varices. We managed two cases of esophageal variceal rupture during chemotherapy for breast cancer with liver metastasis. Hemostasis was successfully achieved by the endoscopic variceal ligation technique in both cases. We conclude that clinicians should be aware of the risk of pseudocirrhosis during chemotherapy for liver metastasis, and a periodic endoscopic follow-up is recommended along with appropriate management of esophageal varices.

  16. Cerebral and splenic infarctions after injection of N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate in esophageal variceal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Myung, Dae-Seong; Chung, Cho-Yun; Park, Hyung-Chul; Kim, Jong-Sun; Cho, Sung-Bum; Lee, Wan-Sik; Choi, Sung-Kyu; Joo, Young-Eun

    2013-09-14

    Variceal bleeding is the most serious complication of portal hypertension, and it accounts for approximately one fifth to one third of all deaths in liver cirrhosis patients. Currently, endoscopic treatment remains the predominant method for the prevention and treatment of variceal bleeding. Endoscopic treatments include band ligation and injection sclerotherapy. Injection sclerotherapy with N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate has been successfully used to treat variceal bleeding. Although injection sclerotherapy with N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate provides effective treatment for variceal bleeding, injection of N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate is associated with a variety of complications, including systemic embolization. Herein, we report a case of cerebral and splenic infarctions after the injection of N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate to treat esophageal variceal bleeding.

  17. Severe bleeding from esophageal varices resistant to endoscopic treatment in a non cirrhotic patient with portal hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Caronna, Roberto; Bezzi, Mario; Schiratti, Monica; Cardi, Maurizio; Prezioso, Giampaolo; Benedetti, Michele; Papini, Federica; Mangioni, Simona; Martino, Gabriele; Chirletti, Piero

    2008-01-01

    A non cirrhotic patient with esophageal varices and portal vein thrombosis had recurrent variceal bleeding unsuccessfully controlled by endoscopy and esophageal transection. Emergency transhepatic portography confirmed the thrombosed right branch of the portal vein, while the left branch appeared angulated, shifted and stenotic. A stent was successfully implanted into the left branch and the collateral vessels along the epatoduodenal ligament disappeared. In patients with esophageal variceal hemorrhage and portal thrombosis if endoscopy fails, emergency esophageal transection or nonselective portocaval shunting are indicated. The rare patients with only partial portal thrombosis can be treated directly with stenting through an angioradiologic approach. PMID:18644135

  18. Multiple esophageal variceal ruptures with massive ascites due to myelofibrosis-induced portal hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Tokai, Koichi; Miyatani, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Yukio; Yamada, Shigeki

    2012-01-01

    A 75-year old man had been diagnosed at 42 years of age as having polycythemia vera and had been monitored at another hospital. Progression of anemia had been recognized at about age 70, and the patient was thus referred to our center in 2008 where secondary myelofibrosis was diagnosed based on bone marrow biopsy findings. Hematemesis due to rupture of esophageal varices occurred in January and February of 2011. The bleeding was stopped by endoscopic variceal ligation. Furthermore, in March of the same year, hematemesis recurred and the patient was transported to our center. He was in irreversible hemorrhagic shock and died. The autopsy showed severe bone marrow fibrosis with mainly argyrophilic fibers, an observation consistent with myelofibrosis. The liver weighed 1856 g the spleen 1572 g, indicating marked hepatosplenomegaly. The liver and spleen both showed extramedullary hemopoiesis. Myelofibrosis is often complicated by portal hypertension and is occasionally associated with gastrointestinal hemorrhage due to esophageal varices. A patient diagnosed as having myelofibrosis needs to be screened for esophageal/gastric varices. Myelofibrosis has a poor prognosis. Therefore, it is necessary to carefully decide the therapeutic strategy in consideration of the patient’s concomitant conditions, treatment invasiveness and quality of life. PMID:22851873

  19. [Prevention of the 1st bleeding of esophageal varices: review of the literature and clinical experience].

    PubMed

    Di Lecce, F; Contini, S

    1990-01-01

    The authors present a review of the literature on prophylactic sclerosis of esophageal varices in cirrhotics, taking as a starting point their personal experience. The natural history of varices and the criteria of their hemorrhagic risk are described; moreover are presented the results of the most important controlled studies of prophylactic surgery, sclerosis and beta-blocking drugs. In spite of the rather encouraging results after sclerosis at the long-term follow-up and the promising aspects of beta-blocking agents, it is not felt to recommend, according to the literature, a routine application of prophylactic sclerosis, a procedure which should be reserved to leading centers in controlled studies.

  20. The Role of Spleen Stiffness in Determining the Severity and Bleeding Risk of Esophageal Varices in Cirrhotic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hwi Young; Jin, Eun Hyo; Kim, Won; Lee, Jae Young; Woo, Hyunsik; Oh, Sohee; Seo, Ji-Yeon; Oh, Hong Sang; Chung, Kwang Hyun; Jung, Yong Jin; Kim, Donghee; Kim, Byeong Gwan; Lee, Kook Lae

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Esophageal varix and its hemorrhage are serious complications of liver cirrhosis. Recent studies have focused on noninvasive prediction of esophageal varices. We attempted to evaluate the association of liver and spleen stiffness (LS and SS) as measured by acoustic radiation force impulse imaging, with the presence and severity of esophageal varices and variceal hemorrhage in cirrhotic patients. We measured LS and SS, along with endoscopic examination of esophageal varices for a total of 125 cirrhotic patients at a single referral hospital in this prospective observational study. The diagnostic utility of noninvasive methods for identifying varices and their bleeding risk was compared, including LS, SS, spleen length, Child-Pugh score, and various serum fibrosis indices. Esophageal varices were present in 77 patients (61.6%). SS was significantly higher in patients with varices than in those without varices (3.58 ± 0.47 vs 3.02 ± 0.49; P < 0.001). A tendency toward increasing SS levels was observed with increasing severity of varices (no varix, 3.02 ± 0.49; F1, 3.39 ± 0.51; F2, 3.60 ± 0.42; F3, 3.85 ± 0.37; P < 0.001). SS was significantly higher in patients who experienced variceal hemorrhage than in those who did not (3.80 ± 0.36 vs 3.20 ± 0.51; P = 0.002). An optimal cut-off value of SS for high-risk varices (≥F2) or variceal hemorrhage was 3.40 m/s. SS was significantly correlated with the presence, severity, and bleeding risk of esophageal varices. Prompt endoscopic evaluation of variceal status and prophylactic measures based on the SS may be warranted for cirrhotic patients. PMID:26091449

  1. Downhill Esophageal Varices Associated With Central Venous Catheter-Related Thrombosis Managed With Endoscopic and Surgical Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Berkowitz, Joshua C.; Bhusal, Sushma; Desai, Deepak; Cerulli, Maurice A.

    2016-01-01

    Downhill esophageal varices are a rare cause of upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage. We present a case of downhill variceal bleeding due to superior vena cava thrombosis resulting from a prior central venous catheter. The patient was managed with endoscopic band ligation and later with surgical axillary vein to right atrium bypass grafting. Successful long-term resolution of varices was achieved at 1 year of follow-up. This is the longest follow-up described for combined endoscopic and surgical management in the existing literature for catheter-associated downhill varices. PMID:27807564

  2. Sclerotherapy Of Esophageal Varices In Severe Hemophilia A Patient And High Titer Inhibitor--Case Report.

    PubMed

    Szczepanik, Andrzej B; Dąbrowski, Wojciech P; Szczepanik, Anna M; Pielaciński, Konrad; Jaśkowiak, Wojciech

    2015-09-01

    In cirrhotic hemophilia patients bleeding from esophageal varices is a serious clinical condition due to congenital deficiency of clotting factors VIII or IX, decreased prothrombin synthesis and hypersplenic thrombocytopenia. In hemophiliac with high-titer inhibitor bypassing therapy is required with activated prothrombin complex concentrates (aPCC) or recombinant activated coagulation factor VII (rFVIIa). Doses and duration treatment with these agents following endoscopic treatment of esophageal varices have not been yet established. Authors report the first case of a severe hemophilia A patient with high titer inhibitor (40 BU) treated with repeated injection sclerotherapy. The patient was admitted with symptoms of massive esophageal variceal hemorrhage ceased with emergency sclerotherapy. Bypassing therapy was administered with aPCC at initial dose of 72.5 U/kg and then with average daily dose of 162 U/kg through 5 days. To achieved a total eradication of esophageal varices the patient was then subjected to four elective sclerotherapy procedures. Two were covered by aPCC with daily dose of 120 U/kg and 145 U/kg for 4 and 3 days respectively and the following two procedures were covered by rFVIIa with the initial dose of 116 µg/kg and the next doses of 87 µg/kg administered every 3 hours in procedure day and every 4 hours on the next two days. During all procedures excellent hemostasis was achieved and no hemorrhagic or thromboembolic complications were observed. Bypassing regimen therapy with aPCC and rFVIIa we applied have been shown to be safe and effective in this patient subjected to sclerotherapy procedures.

  3. Diagnostic non-invasive model of large risky esophageal varices in cirrhotic hepatitis C virus patients

    PubMed Central

    Elalfy, Hatem; Elsherbiny, Walid; Abdel Rahman, Ashraf; Elhammady, Dina; Shaltout, Shaker Wagih; Elsamanoudy, Ayman Z; El Deek, Bassem

    2016-01-01

    AIM To build a diagnostic non-invasive model for screening of large varices in cirrhotic hepatitis C virus (HCV) patients. METHODS This study was conducted on 124 post-HCV cirrhotic patients presenting to the clinics of the Endemic Medicine Department at Mansoura University Hospital for evaluation before HCV antiviral therapy: 78 were Child A and 46 were Child B (score ≤ 8). Inclusion criteria for patients enrolled in this study was presence of cirrhotic HCV (diagnosed by either biopsy or fulfillment of clinical basis). Exclusion criteria consisted of patients with other etiologies of liver cirrhosis, e.g., hepatitis B virus and patients with high MELD score on transplant list. All patients were subjected to full medical record, full basic investigations, endoscopy, and computed tomography (CT), and then divided into groups with no varices, small varices, or large risky varices. In addition, values of Fibrosis-4 score (FIB-4), aminotransferase-to-platelet ratio index (APRI), and platelet count/splenic diameter ratio (PC/SD) were also calculated. RESULTS Detection of large varies is a multi-factorial process, affected by many variables. Choosing binary logistic regression, dependent factors were either large or small varices while independent factors included CT variables such coronary vein diameter, portal vein (PV) diameter, lieno-renal shunt and other laboratory non-invasive variables namely FIB-4, APRI, and platelet count/splenic diameter. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was plotted to determine the accuracy of non-invasive parameters for predicting the presence of large esophageal varices and the area under the ROC curve for each one of these parameters was obtained. A model was established and the best model for prediction of large risky esophageal varices used both PC/SD and PV diameter (75% accuracy), while the logistic model equation was shown to be (PV diameter × -0.256) plus (PC/SD × -0.006) plus (8.155). Values nearing 2 or more denote

  4. Diagnostic non-invasive model of large risky esophageal varices in cirrhotic hepatitis C virus patients

    PubMed Central

    Elalfy, Hatem; Elsherbiny, Walid; Abdel Rahman, Ashraf; Elhammady, Dina; Shaltout, Shaker Wagih; Elsamanoudy, Ayman Z; El Deek, Bassem

    2016-01-01

    AIM To build a diagnostic non-invasive model for screening of large varices in cirrhotic hepatitis C virus (HCV) patients. METHODS This study was conducted on 124 post-HCV cirrhotic patients presenting to the clinics of the Endemic Medicine Department at Mansoura University Hospital for evaluation before HCV antiviral therapy: 78 were Child A and 46 were Child B (score ≤ 8). Inclusion criteria for patients enrolled in this study was presence of cirrhotic HCV (diagnosed by either biopsy or fulfillment of clinical basis). Exclusion criteria consisted of patients with other etiologies of liver cirrhosis, e.g., hepatitis B virus and patients with high MELD score on transplant list. All patients were subjected to full medical record, full basic investigations, endoscopy, and computed tomography (CT), and then divided into groups with no varices, small varices, or large risky varices. In addition, values of Fibrosis-4 score (FIB-4), aminotransferase-to-platelet ratio index (APRI), and platelet count/splenic diameter ratio (PC/SD) were also calculated. RESULTS Detection of large varies is a multi-factorial process, affected by many variables. Choosing binary logistic regression, dependent factors were either large or small varices while independent factors included CT variables such coronary vein diameter, portal vein (PV) diameter, lieno-renal shunt and other laboratory non-invasive variables namely FIB-4, APRI, and platelet count/splenic diameter. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was plotted to determine the accuracy of non-invasive parameters for predicting the presence of large esophageal varices and the area under the ROC curve for each one of these parameters was obtained. A model was established and the best model for prediction of large risky esophageal varices used both PC/SD and PV diameter (75% accuracy), while the logistic model equation was shown to be (PV diameter × -0.256) plus (PC/SD × -0.006) plus (8.155). Values nearing 2 or more denote

  5. Esophageal Stent for Refractory Variceal Bleeding: A Systemic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xiao-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Background. Preliminary studies suggest that covered self-expandable metal stents may be helpful in controlling esophageal variceal bleeding. Aims. To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of esophageal stent in refractory variceal bleeding in a systematic review and meta-analysis. Methods. A comprehensive literature search was conducted on PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library covering the period from January 1970 to December 2015. Data were selected and abstracted from eligible studies and were pooled using a random-effects model. Heterogeneity was assessed using I2 test. Results. Five studies involving 80 patients were included in the analysis. The age of patients ranged from 18 to 91 years. The mean duration of follow-up was 46.8 d (range, 30–60 d). The success rate of stent deployment was 96.7% (95% CI: 91.6%–99.5%) and complete response to esophageal stenting was in 93.9% (95% CI: 82.2%–99.6%). The incidence of rebleeding was 13.2% (95% CI: 1.8%–32.8%) and the overall mortality was 34.5% (95% CI: 24.8%–44.8%). Most of patients (87.4%) died from hepatic or multiple organ failure, and only 12.6% of patients died from uncontrolled bleeding. There was no stent-related complication reported and the incidence of stent migration was 21.6% (95% CI: 4.7%–46.1%). Conclusion. Esophageal stent may be considered in patients with variceal bleeding refractory to conventional therapy. PMID:27517043

  6. Efficacy of endoscopic variceal ligation for bleeding esophageal varices in patients with tumor thrombus of the portal vein trunk (Vp3) associated with hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kokubu, S; Matsumoto, Y; Murakami, M; Shibata, H; Saigenji, K

    1997-04-01

    We studied the efficacy of endoscopic variceal ligation (EVL) in 16 patients with tumor thrombus of the portal vein trunk (Vp3) associated with hepatocellular carcinoma. The average (+/-SD) number of O rings used was 9.0 +/- 5.0 for the esophageal varices (n = 7) and 16.4 +/- 4.5 for the esophagogastric varices (n = 9). The variceal size was quickly reduced in 11 of the 13 cases whose therapeutic outcome was able to be assessed by endoscopy. The red color sign improved in 10 of the 13 cases, but the therapeutic end point (F0, RC-) was achieved in only two patients, who were also treated by endoscopic injection sclerotherapy. Emergency EVL achieved only short-term survival (17.14 +/- 6.64 days) and transient hemostasis. Elective EVL was associated with a survival duration of 90.0 +/- 64.25 days. The difference in the survival rate between emergency and elective cases was significant (P < .05). With regard to the timing of its application, EVL, being a less-invasive treatment, should be performed electively before variceal rebleeding for those patients with Vp3 hepatocellular carcinoma whose liver function is preserved. PMID:9151930

  7. Endoscopic treatment for esophageal varices complicated by Isaacs' syndrome involving difficulty with conventional sedation.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yuhei; Yamazaki, Yuichi; Hashizume, Hiroaki; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Ohyama, Tatsuya; Horiguchi, Norio; Sato, Ken; Kakizaki, Satoru; Kusano, Motoyasu; Yamada, Masanobu

    2016-02-01

    A 54-year-old male consulted a local doctor with a chief complaint of systemic convulsions and muscle stiffness and was diagnosed with Isaacs' syndrome based on positive findings for antibodies against voltage-gated potassium channels in 2009. He subsequently experienced repeated hematemesis in 2013, at which time he was taken to our hospital by ambulance. Emergent endoscopy revealed esophageal varices with spurting bleeding. The bleeding was stopped with urgent endoscopic variceal ligation. Three days later, the patient developed sudden dyspnea with stridor during inspiration under sedation with an intravenous injection of low-dose flunitrazepam prior to receiving additional treatment and was aroused with intravenous flumazenil, after which his dyspnea immediately improved. Dyspnea may be induced by muscle cramps associated with Isaacs' syndrome exacerbated by sedation. Endoscopic variceal ligation was performed safely using multiple ligation devices in an awake state following pre-medication with hydroxyzine, without sudden dyspnea. Endoscopists should be cautious of the use of sedatives in patients with diseases associated with muscle twitching or stiffness, as in the current case. In addition, it is necessary to administer endoscopic treatment in an awake state or under conscious sedation in patients with a high risk of dyspnea. PMID:26862027

  8. Regression of esophageal varices and splenomegaly in two patients with hepatitis-C-related liver cirrhosis after interferon and ribavirin combination therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Soon Jae; Cho, Yoo-Kyung; Na, Soo-Young; Choi, Eun Kwang; Boo, Sun Jin; Jeong, Seung Uk; Song, Hyung Joo; Kim, Heung Up; Kim, Bong Soo; Song, Byung-Cheol

    2016-01-01

    Some recent studies have found regression of liver cirrhosis after antiviral therapy in patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related liver cirrhosis, but there have been no reports of complete regression of esophageal varices after interferon/peg-interferon and ribavirin combination therapy. We describe two cases of complete regression of esophageal varices and splenomegaly after interferon-alpha and ribavirin combination therapy in patients with HCV-related liver cirrhosis. Esophageal varices and splenomegaly regressed after 3 and 8 years of sustained virologic responses in cases 1 and 2, respectively. To our knowledge, this is the first study demonstrating that complications of liver cirrhosis, such as esophageal varices and splenomegaly, can regress after antiviral therapy in patients with HCV-related liver cirrhosis. PMID:27572075

  9. Self-Expandable Metal Stents for Persisting Esophageal Variceal Bleeding after Band Ligation or Injection-Therapy: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Martin; Seufferlein, Thomas; Perkhofer, Lukas; Wagner, Martin; Kleger, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Background and Study Aims Despite a pronounced reduction of lethality rates due to upper gastrointestinal bleeding, esophageal variceal bleeding remains a challenge for the endoscopist and still accounts for a mortality rate of up to 40% within the first 6 weeks. A relevant proportion of patients with esophageal variceal bleeding remains refractory to standard therapy, thus making a call for additional tools to achieve hemostasis. Self-expandable metal stents (SEMS) incorporate such a tool. Methods We evaluated a total number of 582 patients admitted to our endoscopy unit with the diagnosis “gastrointestinal bleeding” according to our documentation software between 2011 and 2014. 82 patients suffered from esophageal variceal bleeding, out of which 11 cases were refractory to standard therapy leading to SEMS application. Patients with esophageal malignancy, fistula, or stricture and a non-esophageal variceal bleeding source were excluded from the analysis. A retrospective analysis reporting a series of clinically relevant parameters in combination with bleeding control rates and adverse events was performed. Results The initial bleeding control rate after SEMS application was 100%. Despite this success, we observed a 27% mortality rate within the first 42 days. All of these patients died due to non-directly hemorrhage-associated reasons. The majority of patients exhibited an extensive demand of medical care with prolonged hospital stay. Common complications were hepatic decompensation, pulmonary infection and decline of renal function. Interestingly, we found in 7 out of 11 patients (63.6%) stent dislocation at time of control endoscopy 24 h after hemostasis or at time of stent removal. The presence of hiatal hernia did not affect obviously stent dislocation rates. Refractory patients had significantly longer hospitalization times compared to non-refractory patients. Conclusions Self-expandable metal stents for esophageal variceal bleeding seem to be safe and

  10. Sucralfate and Lidocain: Antacid 50:50 solution in Post Esophageal Variceal Band Ligation Pain

    PubMed Central

    Hafeez, Muhammad; Kadir, Ehsan; Aijaz, Anjum

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To compare the effectiveness of pain relief of Sucralfate and lidocain antacid 50:50 solution in post esophageal variceal band ligation pain. Methods: All patients who had under gone Esophageal Variceal Band Ligation (EVBL) were included in the study. Patients un-willing to be included in the study or those who didn’t have post EVBL pain were excluded. Patients with post EVBL pains were divided into two groups: one group was given sucralfate and other was given lidocaine: antacid 50:50 solution. Both were inquired about the duration of the pain relief after the medication. The results were analyzed on SPSS 23. Independent samples T-test was performed to find out whether the difference in duration of pain relief was significantly different in the two groups Results: Out of 110 patients who have EVBL, 66(60.00%) had pain and 44(40.00%) were pain free. In the pain group 46 (69.7%) were given sucralfate and 20 (30.3%) were given lidocain: antacid 50:50 solution. Mean duration of pain relief in two groups was 2.78 (SD ± 2.096) and 2.5 days (SD ±. 0.76) respectively. Independent samples T-test results revealed that there was no statistically significant difference in the duration of pain relief between these two groups with p value 0.426. Conclusion: Both Sucralfate and Lidocain: antacid 50:50 solutions are effective in relieving the post EVBL pain. However, no statistically significant difference in duration of pain relief was detected in separate groups of patients treated with either treatment.

  11. Sucralfate and Lidocain: Antacid 50:50 solution in Post Esophageal Variceal Band Ligation Pain

    PubMed Central

    Hafeez, Muhammad; Kadir, Ehsan; Aijaz, Anjum

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To compare the effectiveness of pain relief of Sucralfate and lidocain antacid 50:50 solution in post esophageal variceal band ligation pain. Methods: All patients who had under gone Esophageal Variceal Band Ligation (EVBL) were included in the study. Patients un-willing to be included in the study or those who didn’t have post EVBL pain were excluded. Patients with post EVBL pains were divided into two groups: one group was given sucralfate and other was given lidocaine: antacid 50:50 solution. Both were inquired about the duration of the pain relief after the medication. The results were analyzed on SPSS 23. Independent samples T-test was performed to find out whether the difference in duration of pain relief was significantly different in the two groups Results: Out of 110 patients who have EVBL, 66(60.00%) had pain and 44(40.00%) were pain free. In the pain group 46 (69.7%) were given sucralfate and 20 (30.3%) were given lidocain: antacid 50:50 solution. Mean duration of pain relief in two groups was 2.78 (SD ± 2.096) and 2.5 days (SD ±. 0.76) respectively. Independent samples T-test results revealed that there was no statistically significant difference in the duration of pain relief between these two groups with p value 0.426. Conclusion: Both Sucralfate and Lidocain: antacid 50:50 solutions are effective in relieving the post EVBL pain. However, no statistically significant difference in duration of pain relief was detected in separate groups of patients treated with either treatment. PMID:27648035

  12. Distal Esophageal Duplication Cyst with Gastro-Esophageal Reflux Disease: A Rare Association and a Management Challenge.

    PubMed

    Jan, Iftikhar Ahmad; Al Nuaimi, Asma; Al Hamoudi, Basma; Al Naqbi, Khalid; Bilal, Mohammad

    2016-02-01

    Esophageal duplication cysts are rare congenital abnormalities of the foregut and may be associated with other conditions. Association of esophageal duplication with Gastro-Esophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) has not been reported in children. We are reporting a case of a 16 months baby who had antenatal diagnosis of diaphragmatic hernia. Postnatal CTchest, however, suggested a distal esophageal duplication cyst and a contrast esophagogram showed grade-IV GER. A thoracoscopy in another hospital excluded esophageal duplication at that time. Later, he presented with hematemesis in our department and was re-evaluated. Repeat CTconfirmed a persistent 2.5 x 1.3 cm cyst in distal esophagus. Upper GI endoscopy suggested grade-II esophagitis with a wide patent gastro-esophageal junction. The child was treated with left thoracotomy, excision of the duplication cyst and thoracic fundoplication. He had an uneventful post-operative recovery and is doing well at 6 months follow-up. PMID:26876405

  13. Primary aorto-esophageal fistula: Great masquerader of esophageal variceal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Kokatnur, Laxmi; Rudrappa, Mohan

    2015-02-01

    Aorto-esophageal fistula is a rare cause of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Thoracic aneurysm, the most common cause of this condition, will slowly increase over time and can erode the wall of the aorta creating a fistula and leading to torrential bleeding. High clinical suspicion is required for timely diagnosis as common investigations routinely done for gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding, including esophagogastroduodenoscopy, fails to detect most cases. The classical triad of midthoracic pain, herald bleeding and fatal hematemesis described in this condition is seen in only one-third of cases. Physician should be wary of this condition, especially in elderly patients with uncontrolled GI bleeding and who are also at risk of thoracic aneurysm. Computed tomography angiogram detects most cases and emergent endovascular repair with stents controls the initial bleeding. Later, both the aorta and the esophagus are repaired and reconstructed in staged procedures. PMID:25722556

  14. Acute management and secondary prophylaxis of esophageal variceal bleeding: A western Canadian survey

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Justin; Wong, Winnie; Zandieh, Iman; Leung, Yvette; Lee, Samuel S; Ramji, Alnoor; Yoshida, Eric M

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acute esophageal variceal bleeding (EVB) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with liver cirrhosis. Guidelines have been published in 1997; however, variability in the acute management and prevention of EVB rebleeding may occur. METHODS: Gastroenterologists in the provinces of British Columbia, Alberta, Manitoba and Saskatchewan were sent a self-reporting questionnaire. RESULTS: The response rate was 70.4% (86 of 122). Intravenous octreotide was recommended by 93% for EVB patients but the duration was variable. The preferred timing for endoscopy in suspected acute EVB was within 12 h in 75.6% of respondents and within 24 h in 24.6% of respondents. Most (52.3%) gastroenterologists do not routinely use antibiotic prophylaxis in acute EVB patients. The preferred duration of antibiotic therapy was less than three days (35.7%), three to seven days (44.6%), seven to 10 days (10.7%) and throughout hospitalization (8.9%). Methods of secondary prophylaxis included repeat endoscopic therapy (93%) and beta-blocker therapy (84.9%). Most gastroenterologists (80.2%) routinely attempted to titrate beta-blockers to a heart rate of 55 beats/min or a 25% reduction from baseline. The most common form of secondary prophylaxis was a combination of endoscopic and pharmacological therapy (70.9%). CONCLUSIONS: Variability exists in some areas of EVB treatment, especially in areas for which evidence was lacking at the time of the last guideline publication. Gastroenterologists varied in the use of prophylactic antibiotics for acute EVB. More gastroenterologists used combination secondary prophylaxis in the form of band ligation eradication and beta-blocker therapy rather than either treatment alone. Future guidelines may be needed to address these practice differences. PMID:16955150

  15. Bleeding from peristomal varices: perspectives on prevention and treatment.

    PubMed

    Fucini, C; Wolff, B G; Dozois, R R

    1991-12-01

    Peristomal variceal bleeding is a serious complication in patients with chronic liver disease undergoing colon surgery with a stoma. Our aim was to examine the morbidity of bleeding for peristomal, perianastomotic, and esophageal varices in a group of patients with chronic liver disease who underwent colectomy at the Mayo Clinic between 1970 and 1988. Morbidity was evaluated in terms of the number of major bleeding episodes and the number of units of blood transfused. The treatment of bleeding was also evaluated. One hundred seventeen patients (74 males and 43 females) aged 11-78 years were studied. Sixty-two patients (53 percent) had a permanent stoma, while 55 patients (47 percent) had a colonic resection and anastomosis. Sixty-seven patients (62 percent) had chronic ulcerative colitis and primary sclerosing cholangitis. In the stoma group, bleeding appeared from stomal and/or esophageal varices in 19 patients (31 percent), while, in the non-stoma group, bleeding exclusively from the esophageal varices occurred in eight patients (15 percent). Perianastomotic variceal bleeding was never observed. The 5-year cumulative probabilities of one major bleed occurring from gastrointestinal varices appeared to be similar between the two groups. Patients who bled from peristomal varices with or without esophageal bleeding (n = 17) rebled more frequently (6.5 +/- 5.5 vs. 3 +/- 1.6; P less than 0.05) and were transfused more often (14.9 +/- 12.3 vs. 7.5 +/- 4.1; P less than 0.05) than patients who bled exclusively from esophageal varices (n = 10). No difference was found in the incidence of recurrent bleeding and the number of units of blood transfused between patients who bled exclusively from peristomal varices (n = 10) and those who bled from both peristomal and esophageal varices (n = 7). Medical and local measures were more effective in controlling esophageal bleeding than in controlling peristomal bleeding. Therefore, patients with chronic liver disease who must undergo

  16. Torsade de pointes complicating the treatment of bleeding esophageal varices: association with neuroleptics, vasopressin, and electrolyte imbalance.

    PubMed

    Faigel, D O; Metz, D C; Kochman, M L

    1995-05-01

    Torsade de pointes is an unusual life-threatening ventricular arrhythmia that has been associated with vasopressin, neuroleptic drugs, and electrolyte imbalances, including hypokalemia and hypomagnesemia. Over a 9-month period, we observed torsade de pointes in three patients with cirrhosis and bleeding esophageal varices who did not have prior cardiac disease. All had received endoscopic sclerotherapy and continuous infusions of vasopressin and nitroglycerin. For sedation, two patients received haloperidol and one droperidol. In addition, two patients had either hypokalemia or hypomagnesemia. In all three patients, there was prolongation of the electrocardiographic QT interval and a "long-short" initiating sequence followed by ventricular tachycardia with torsade de pointes morphology. All were successfully cardioverted; there was one late death due to aspiration and septicemia. We conclude that cirrhotics with variceal hemorrhage may be at increased risk of developing this arrhythmia in the setting of treatment with vasopressin, sedation with neuroleptic drugs, and electrolyte abnormalities. We urge close monitoring of these patients for cardiac arrhythmia and recommend that neuroleptics be used cautiously, if at all.

  17. No difference in mortality between terlipressin and somatostatin treatments in cirrhotic patients with esophageal variceal bleeding and renal functional impairment

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Tsung-Hsing; Tsai, Chen-Chi; Tseng, Kuo-Chih; Hsieh, Yu-Hsi; Tsai, Chih-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Objective To study the differences in mortality between terlipressin and somatostatin treatments in cirrhotic patients with esophageal variceal bleeding (EVB) and renal functional impairment (RFI). Methods The National Health Insurance Database, part of the Taiwan National Health Insurance Program, was used to enroll cirrhotic patients who had received endoscopic variceal ligation plus somatostatin or terlipressin for EVB and who were hospitalized between 1 January 2007 and 31 December 2010. The differences in mortality between the two vasoactive agents were compared and the risk factors for 30-day mortality because of EVB were identified. Results A total of 2324 cirrhotic patients with EVB were enrolled. The 30-day mortality data showed no significant differences between the somatostatin and the terlipressin groups (P=0.232). The risk of 30-day mortality was significantly higher in male patients [hazard ratio (HR): 1.50, P=0.002] and patients with hepatic encephalopathy (HR: 1.82, P<0.001), ascites (HR: 1.32, P=0.008), bacterial infections (HR: 2.10, P<0.001), hepatocellular carcinoma (HR: 2.09, P<0.001), and RFI (HR: 3.89, P<0.001). A subgroup analysis of cirrhotic patients with RFI was carried out. The overall 30-day mortality was higher in patients treated with somatostatin than in those treated with terlipressin (52.6 vs. 42.3%), but the difference failed to reach significance (adjust HR: 1.49, 95% confidence interval: 0.94–2.37, P=0.091). Conclusion RFI was the most important risk factor for 30-day mortality in EVB patients. Terlipressin and somatostatin had similar effects on 30-day mortality in cirrhotic patients with EVB and RFI. PMID:27455080

  18. A Beginning or the End? A Meta-analysis to Assess the Diagnostic Accuracy of Transient Elastography for the Prediction of Esophageal Varices

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Yundong; Li, Tao; Ye, Qian; Zhang, Lixin; Wang, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: To assess the accuracy of transient elastography (TE) in the prediction of esophageal varices (EV). Materials and Methods: The literature search was conducted by using PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, and CENTRAL on The Cochrane Library without time or language restrictions. Terms used were “FibroScan,” “transient elastography,” “stiffness,” and “esophageal varices.” The pooled sensitivity, specificity, and other parameters were obtained using a bivariate mixed-effects regression model. Result: Twenty studies (2530 patients) were identified for inclusion. The pooled sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative likelihood ratios, and diagnostic odds ratio were 0.84 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.79–0.87), 0.68 (95% CI, 0.61–0.73), 2.58 (95% CI, 2.15–3.10), 0.24 (95% CI, 0.19–0.32), and 10.60 (95%CI, 7.20–15.62), respectively. The summary area under receiver operating characteristics (AUROC) curves was 0.82 (95% CI, 0.79–0.86). Especially, for hepatitis C patients, the diagnostic performance of TE for detecting the presence of EV was similar to all other patients with a sensitivity of 0.83 and a specificity of 0.63, but without heterogeneity (I2 = 0.00). For the prediction of large esophageal varices in patients with viral liver cirrhosis, the pooled sensitivity and specificity of TE were 0.82 (95% CI 0.74–0.89) and 0.77 (95% CI 0.65-0.85), respectively, without significant heterogeneity (I2 = 0.00). Conclusion: Transient elastography has good sensitivity and moderate specificity. TE can be used as an effective noninvasive screening tool for the prediction of esophageal varices, especially in hepatitis C patients, and for the prediction of large esophageal varices in patients with viral liver cirrhosis.

  19. Thoracoscopic repair of esophageal atresia with a distal fistula – lessons from the first 10 operations

    PubMed Central

    Zaborowska, Kamila; Rogowski, Błażej; Kalińska, Anita; Nosek, Marzena; Golonka, Anna; Lesiuk, Witold; Obel, Marcin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Thoracoscopic esophageal atresia (EA) repair was first performed in 1999, but still the technique is treated as one of the most complex pediatric surgical procedures. Aim The study presents a single-center experience and learning curve of thoracoscopic repair of esophageal atresia and tracheo-esophageal (distal) fistula. Material and methods From 2012 to 2014, 10 consecutive patients with esophageal atresia and tracheo-esophageal fistula were treated thoracoscopically in our center. There were 8 girls and 2 boys. Mean gestational age was 36.5 weeks and mean weight was 2230 g. Four children had associated anomalies. The surgery was performed after stabilization of the patient between the first and fourth day after birth. Five patients required intubation before surgery for respiratory distress. Bronchoscopy was not performed before the operation. Results In 8 patients, the endoscopic approach was successfully used thoracoscopically, while in 2 patients conversion to an open thoracotomy was necessary. In all patients except 1, the anastomosis was patent, with no evidence of leak. One patient demonstrated a leak, which did not resolve spontaneously, necessitating surgical repair. In long-term follow-up, 1 patient required esophageal dilatation of the anastomosis. All patients are on full oral feeding. Conclusions The endoscopic approach is the method of choice for the treatment of esophageal atresia in our center because of excellent visualization and precise atraumatic preparation even in neonates below a weight of 2000 g. PMID:25960794

  20. LIVER TRANSPLANTATION IN A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL OF EMERGENCY TREATMENT OF ACUTELY BLEEDING ESOPHAGEAL VARICES IN CIRRHOSIS

    PubMed Central

    Orloff, Marshall J.; Isenberg, Jon I.; Wheeler, Henry O.; Haynes, Kevin S.; Jinich-Brook, Horacio; Rapier, Roderick; Vaida, Florin; Hye, Robert J.; Orloff, Susan L.

    2010-01-01

    Background Bleeding esophageal varices (BEV) in cirrhosis has been considered an indication for liver transplantation (LT). This issue was examined in a randomized controlled trial (RCT) of unselected, consecutive patients with advanced cirrhosis and BEV that compared endoscopic sclerotherapy (EST) (n=106) to emergency direct portacaval shunt (EPCS) (n=105). Methods Diagnostic workup and treatment were initiated within 8 hours. Patients were evaluated for LT on admission and repeatedly thereafter. 96% underwent over 10 years of regular follow-up. The analysis was supplemented by 1300 unrandomized cirrhotic patients who previously underwent portacaval shunt (PCS) with 100% follow-up. Results In the RCT, long-term bleeding control was 100% following EPCS, only 20% following EST. 3, 5, 10, and 15-year survival rates were 75%, 73%, 46%, and 46% following EPCS, compared to 44%, 21%, 9%, and 9% following EST (p<0.001). Only 13 RCT patients (6%) were ultimately referred for LT mainly because of progressive liver failure; only 7 (3%) were approved for LT and only 4 (2%) underwent LT. 1- and 5-year LT survival rates were 0.68% and 0, compared to 81% and 73% after EPCS. In the 1300 unrandomized PCS patients. 50 (3.8%) were referred and 19 (1.5%) underwent LT. Five-year survival rate was 53% compared to 72% for all 1300 patients. Conclusions If bleeding is permanently controlled, as occurred invariably following EPCS, cirrhotic patients with BEV seldom require LT. PCS is effective first-line and long-term treatment. Should LT be required in patients with PCS, although technically more demanding, numerous studies have shown that PCS does not increase mortality or complications. EST is not effective emergency or long-term therapy. PMID:21168637

  1. Using Ultrasonic Transient Elastometry (FibroScan) to Predict Esophageal Varices in Patients with Viral Liver Cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhongwei; Li, Yuyuan; Li, Chuo; Huang, Chunming; Ou, Zhitao; Guo, Jiawei; Luo, Hongbin; Tang, Xiaoping

    2015-06-01

    The correlation between liver stiffness (LS), measured by ultrasonic transient elastometry (FibroScan), and the presence and severity of esophageal varices (EV) in patients with viral cirrhosis of the liver has not been well documented to date. The study described here investigated the value of using FibroScan to predict EV. Patients with cirrhosis (200 patients: 167 cases caused by hepatitis B virus and 33 cases caused by hepatitis C virus) underwent both upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and FibroScan. Demographic, clinical, biochemical and endoscopic data and FibroScan-obtained LS parameters were collected. The mean LS value in patients with EV (33.2 kPa) was significantly higher than the mean LS value in patients without EV (18.6 kPa) (p < 0.05). The mean LS value in patients with grade 2 and 3 EV (38.3 kPa) was significantly higher than that in patients with grade 1 EV (24.8 kPa) (p < 0.05). Overall, FibroScan was 86.4% sensitive and 72.2% specific in predicting the presence of EV, with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) of 0.84. The sensitivity and specificity for the patients with grade 2 or 3 EV were 84% and 73% (AUROC = 0.86). When FibroScan was combined with platelet count, the overall sensitivity and specificity of prediction increased to 84% and 80% (AUROC = 0.88), respectively, and 84% and 75% (AUROC = 0.89), respectively, in patients with grade 2 and 3 EV. FibroScan alone or combined with platelet count might predict the presence and severity of EV in patients with hepatitis B or C-related viral cirrhosis.

  2. Emergency Portacaval Shunt Versus Rescue Portacaval Shunt in a Randomized Controlled Trial of Emergency Treatment of Acutely Bleeding Esophageal Varices in Cirrhosis—Part 3

    PubMed Central

    Isenberg, Jon I.; Wheeler, Henry O.; Haynes, Kevin S.; Jinich-Brook, Horacio; Rapier, Roderick; Vaida, Florin; Hye, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Emergency treatment of bleeding esophageal varices in cirrhosis is of singular importance because of the high mortality rate. Emergency portacaval shunt is rarely used today because of the belief, unsubstantiated by long-term randomized trials, that it causes frequent portal-systemic encephalopathy and liver failure. Consequently, portacaval shunt has been relegated solely to salvage therapy when endoscopic and pharmacologic therapies have failed. Question: Is the regimen of endoscopic sclerotherapy with rescue portacaval shunt for failure to control bleeding varices superior to emergency portacaval shunt? A unique opportunity to answer this question was provided by a randomized controlled trial of endoscopic sclerotherapy versus emergency portacaval shunt conducted from 1988 to 2005. Methods Unselected consecutive cirrhotic patients with acute bleeding esophageal varices were randomized to endoscopic sclerotherapy (n = 106) or emergency portacaval shunt (n = 105). Diagnostic workup was completed and treatment was initiated within 8 h. Failure of endoscopic sclerotherapy was defined by strict criteria and treated by rescue portacaval shunt (n = 50) whenever possible. Ninety-six percent of patients had more than 10 years of follow-up or until death. Results Comparison of emergency portacaval shunt and endoscopic sclerotherapy followed by rescue portacaval shunt showed the following differences in measurements of outcomes: (1) survival after 5 years (72% versus 22%), 10 years (46% versus 16%), and 15 years (46% versus 0%); (2) median post-shunt survival (6.18 versus 1.99 years); (3) mean requirements of packed red blood cell units (17.85 versus 27.80); (4) incidence of recurrent portal-systemic encephalopathy (15% versus 43%); (5) 5-year change in Child’s class showing improvement (59% versus 19%) or worsening (8% versus 44%); (6) mean quality of life points in which lower is better (13.89 versus 27.89); and (7) mean cost of care per

  3. Diagnostic Accuracy of APRI, AAR, FIB-4, FI, and King Scores for Diagnosis of Esophageal Varices in Liver Cirrhosis: A Retrospective Study.

    PubMed

    Deng, Han; Qi, Xingshun; Peng, Ying; Li, Jing; Li, Hongyu; Zhang, Yongguo; Liu, Xu; Sun, Xiaolin; Guo, Xiaozhong

    2015-12-20

    BACKGROUND Aspartate aminotransferase-to-platelet ratio index (APRI), aspartate aminotransferase-to-alanine aminotransferase ratio (AAR), FIB-4, fibrosis index (FI), and King scores might be alternatives to the use of upper gastrointestinal endoscopy for the diagnosis of esophageal varices (EVs) in liver cirrhosis. This study aimed to evaluate their diagnostic accuracy in predicting the presence and severity of EVs in liver cirrhosis. MATERIAL AND METHODS All patients who were consecutively admitted to our hospital and underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy between January 2012 and June 2014 were eligible for this retrospective study. Areas under curve (AUCs) were calculated. Subgroup analyses were performed according to the history of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) and splenectomy. RESULTS A total of 650 patients with liver cirrhosis were included, and 81.4% of them had moderate-severe EVs. In the overall analysis, the AUCs of these non-invasive scores for predicting moderate-severe EVs and presence of any EVs were 0.506-0.6 and 0.539-0.612, respectively. In the subgroup analysis of patients without UGIB, their AUCs for predicting moderate-severe varices and presence of any EVs were 0.601-0.664 and 0.596-0.662, respectively. In the subgroup analysis of patients without UGIB or splenectomy, their AUCs for predicting moderate-severe varices and presence of any EVs were 0.627-0.69 and 0.607-0.692, respectively. CONCLUSIONS APRI, AAR, FIB-4, FI, and King scores had modest diagnostic accuracy of EVs in liver cirrhosis. They might not be able to replace the utility of upper gastrointestinal endoscopy for the diagnosis of EVs in liver cirrhosis.

  4. [Low gastrointestinal bleeding due to ectopic varices as a result of adhesions].

    PubMed

    Perea García, J; Lago Oliver, J; Muñoz Jiménez, F; del Valle, E; Duque Pérez, C; Turégano Fuentes, F

    2000-01-01

    Portal hypertension frequently causes the appearance of porto-systemic shunts, such as esophageal varices and also, but with much less frequency, other atypical shunts known as ectopic varices. Despite their infrequency/rarity, ectopic varices can cause serious gastrointestinal bleeding. Intraabdominal adhesions, especially post-operative ones, promote their appearance. The therapeutic management of ectopic varices is initially the same as that for esophageal varices but surgical treatment is usually necessary as a diagnostic and therapeutic procedure. PMID:15324625

  5. Distal Esophageal Adenocarcinoma and Gastric Adenocarcinoma: Time for a Shared Research Agenda.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Marnix; Wright, Nicholas A

    2016-01-01

    The key insight that sparked Darwin's theory of descent with modification was that he compared and contrasted differences between living and extinct species across time and space. He likely arrived on this theory in large part through his culinary experiences, set against the background of the rugged Patagonian landscape of Southern Argentina. We feel that further integration of research into gastric and esophageal adenocarcinoma may benefit both fields and similarly lead to a coherent understanding of cancer progression in the upper gastrointestinal tract across time and space. Although the environmental trigger differs between carcinogenesis of the stomach and distal esophagus, there remain many important lessons to be learned from comparing precursor stages, such as intestinal metaplasia, across anatomic borders. This analysis will absolutely require detailed sampling within and between these related species, but most importantly we need higher resolution clinical phenotyping to relate genomic differences to drivers of morphologic evolution. In the end, this may provide us with a new phylogeny showing key differences between esophageal and gastric adenocarcinoma. PMID:27573764

  6. A case in which danaparoid sodium was effective for portal venous thrombosis developed after endoscopic injection sclerotherapy for esophageal varices.

    PubMed

    Shudo, Ryushi; Yazaki, Yasuyuki; Honda, Mitsunori; Sugawara, Kenji

    2008-10-01

    We report a case of hepatitis C type liver cirrhosis with portal venous thrombosis in which danaparoid sodium was very effective. The patient developed portal venous thrombosis, esophageal ulcer, and esophageal stenosis at the same time after sclerotherapy. Since it was confirmed by abdominal computed tomography that there was no portal venous thrombosis before sclerotherapy, development of the thrombosis was considered to be associated with sclerotherapy. The patient was treated with balloon dilation therapy for esophageal stenosis, and with anticoagulation therapy using danaparoid sodium for portal venous thrombosis. The portal venous thrombosis disappeared 4 weeks after the treatment. Despite the condition of esophageal ulcer being caused by sclerotherapy, the patient was safely treated without any adverse effects and complications, and the clinical course has been good. It was indicated that danaparoid sodium was an anticoagulant unlikely to cause adverse effects such as hemorrhage and might be an effective drug for treatment of portal venous thrombosis. PMID:26193648

  7. Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy vs. IMRT for the Treatment of Distal Esophageal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Van Benthuysen, Liam Hales, Lee; Podgorsak, Matthew B.

    2011-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) has the ability to reduce monitor units and treatment time when compared with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). This study aims to demonstrate that VMAT is able to provide adequate organs at risk (OAR) sparing and planning target volume (PTV) coverage for adenocarcinoma of the distal esophagus while reducing monitor units and treatment time. Fourteen patients having been treated previously for esophageal cancer were planned using both VMAT and IMRT techniques. Dosimetric quality was evaluated based on doses to several OARs, as well as coverage of the PTV. Treatment times were assessed by recording the number of monitor units required for dose delivery. Body V{sub 5} was also recorded to evaluate the increased volume of healthy tissue irradiated to low doses. Dosimetric differences in OAR sparing between VMAT and IMRT were comparable. PTV coverage was similar for the 2 techniques but it was found that IMRT was capable of delivering a slightly more homogenous dose distribution. Of the 14 patients, 12 were treated with a single arc and 2 were treated with a double arc. Single-arc plans reduced monitor units by 42% when compared with the IMRT plans. Double-arc plans reduced monitor units by 67% when compared with IMRT. The V{sub 5} for the body was found to be 18% greater for VMAT than for IMRT. VMAT has the capability to decrease treatment times over IMRT while still providing similar OAR sparing and PTV coverage. Although there will be a smaller risk of patient movement during VMAT treatments, this advantage comes at the cost of delivering small doses to a greater volume of the patient.

  8. Gastric Varices: An Overview for the Gastroenterology Nurse.

    PubMed

    Dale, Cheryl

    2016-01-01

    Gastric varices can occur in as many as one-third of patients with portal hypertension. Within the nursing literature, however, articles focus on the management of esophageal varices and portal hypertensive gastrointestinal bleeding with few publications about management of gastric varices. Given the advancement in therapies, it is prudent for gastroenterology nurses to have an understanding of its management and treatment options. This article reviews the pathophysiology, classification, and management of patients with gastric varices and outlines the importance of the nurse's role in the education and ongoing care for this patient group. PMID:26825559

  9. Esophagitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... swelling of the esophagus. The esophagus is the tube that leads from the back of the mouth to the stomach. Causes Esophagitis is often caused by stomach fluid that flows back into the esophagus. The fluid contains acid ...

  10. [Orbital varices].

    PubMed

    Seceleanu, Andreea; Szabo, I; Călugăru, M; Dudea, S M; Preda, D

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to point out a case with orbital venous abnormalities at the left eye, associated with varices of the legs. The clinical picture of this case was: intermittent exophthalmos, venous malformations at the level of the lids and episclera, elevated ocular pressure. All this signs reveal an abnormality at the level of venous wall, indicating a constitutional weakness of the venous system. The case was investigated by imagistic methods: ultrasound examination, Doppler -ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging. According to the facts offered by clinical and imagistic investigation this case can be included into the first type of orbital varices, associated with secondary glaucoma provoked by an elevated episcleral venous pressure. PMID:15598045

  11. Influence of circumferential resection margin on prognosis in distal esophageal and gastroesophageal cancer approached through the transhiatal route.

    PubMed

    Scheepers, J J G; van der Peet, D L; Veenhof, A A F A; Cuesta, M A

    2009-01-01

    We studied the influence of circumferential resection margin (CRM) involvement on survival in patients with malignancies of the distal esophagus and gastroesophageal junction. One hundred ten consecutive patients undergoing a laparoscopic or open transhiatal esophagectomy for malignancy of the distal 5 cm of the esophagus, or a Siewert I gastroesophageal junction tumor were analyzed, retrospectively. Only patients with potentially resectable tumors were included. CRM status was defined as clear or involved (microscopic tumor within 1 mm of the resection margin). Statistical analysis was done by means of univariate and multivariate analysis using the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox proportional hazard model. One hundred ten patients were analyzed. Sixty patients underwent open transhiatal esophagectomy, and 50 patients underwent laparoscopic transhiatal esophagectomy. There were 6 (5%) T(1), 18 (16%) T(2), and 86 (89%) T(3) tumors. CRM was clear in 68 (62%) patients and involved in 42 (38%) patients. Median survival in these groups was 50 vs. 20 months (P = 0.000). Since CRM involvement was only seen in T(3) tumors, this group was analyzed in detail. Median survival in the T(3)CRM(-) and T(3)CRM(+) group was 33 vs. 19 months (P = 0.004). For T(3)N(0) tumors, median survival in CRM(-) and CRM(+) was 40 and 22 months, respectively (P = 0.036). Median survival for T(3)N(1) tumors in CRM(-) and CRM(+) was 22 and 13 months, respectively (P = 0.049). Involvement of the circumferential resection margin was found to be an independent prognostic factor on survival in our study. It predicts a poor prognosis in patients with potentially resectable malignancies of the distal 5 cm of the esophagus and Siewert I adenocarcinomas of the gastro esophageal junction.

  12. Could there be light at the end of the tunnel? Mesocaval shunting for refractory esophageal varices in patients with contraindications to transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Jessica; Chun, Albert K; Borum, Marie L

    2016-01-01

    Cirrhotic patients with recurrent variceal bleeds who have failed prior medical and endoscopic therapies and are not transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt candidates face a grim prognosis with limited options. We propose that mesocaval shunting be offered to this group of patients as it has the potential to decrease portal pressures and thus decrease the risk of recurrent variceal bleeding. Mesocaval shunts are stent grafts placed by interventional radiologists between the mesenteric system, most often the superior mesenteric vein, and the inferior vena cava. This allows flow to bypass the congested hepatic system, reducing portal pressures. This technique avoids the general anesthesia and morbidity associated with surgical shunt placement and has been successful in several case reports. In this paper we review the technique, candidate selection, potential pitfalls and benefits of mesocaval shunt placement. PMID:27429715

  13. Could there be light at the end of the tunnel? Mesocaval shunting for refractory esophageal varices in patients with contraindications to transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt.

    PubMed

    Davis, Jessica; Chun, Albert K; Borum, Marie L

    2016-07-01

    Cirrhotic patients with recurrent variceal bleeds who have failed prior medical and endoscopic therapies and are not transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt candidates face a grim prognosis with limited options. We propose that mesocaval shunting be offered to this group of patients as it has the potential to decrease portal pressures and thus decrease the risk of recurrent variceal bleeding. Mesocaval shunts are stent grafts placed by interventional radiologists between the mesenteric system, most often the superior mesenteric vein, and the inferior vena cava. This allows flow to bypass the congested hepatic system, reducing portal pressures. This technique avoids the general anesthesia and morbidity associated with surgical shunt placement and has been successful in several case reports. In this paper we review the technique, candidate selection, potential pitfalls and benefits of mesocaval shunt placement. PMID:27429715

  14. [Glypressin and emergency sclerotherapy, deferred emergency shunt (Warren, portacaval, mesocaval): new tactics in the treatment of severe hemorrhage by esophagogastric varices in cirrhotic patients].

    PubMed

    Huscher, C; Biraghi, M; Chiodini, S; Recher, A; Torri, F; Zamboni, F

    1990-01-01

    Transplenic decompression of esophageal varices by distal splenorenal shunt according to Warren (DSRS) aims to a selective detention of the esophago-gastric varices, also assuring an adequate portal perfusion and hypertensive state of the porto-mesenteric district. The DSRS though, should and must not be performed in emergency as a high mortality rate is registered in all cases of emergency porto-systemic derivations. A mortality risk is reported even during endoscopic sclerosis if performed in emergency compared to the elective procedure. The scope of our study was to test the validity of a new approach of the hemorrhagic cirrhotic patient: the end point was to stop the bleeding with Glypressin and deferred sclerotherapy, associating a selective shunt at 40-60 days. Out of 32 patients with esophago-gastric variceal bleeding, 8 were selected also for derivative surgery. Results show Glypressin as the first and best therapeutic approach. The drug in many cases stops bleeding or at least reduces the blood loss allowing an easier endoscopic sclerosis. Further sclerosis and/or surgical therapy may assure variceal eradication.

  15. Efficacy of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy After Surgery in Early Stage of Esophageal Carcinoma;

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-30

    Esophageal Neoplasm; Esophageal Cancer TNM Staging Primary Tumor (T) T2; Esophageal Cancer TNM Staging Primary Tumor (T) T3; Esophageal Cancer TNM Staging Regional Lymph Nodes (N) N0; Esophageal Cancer TNM Staging Distal Metastasis (M) M0

  16. Occurrence of infective endocarditis following endoscopic variceal ligation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuan; Liu, Xiaoli; Yang, Meifang; Dong, Huihui; Xv, Lichen; Li, Lanjuan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Endoscopic variceal ligation (EVL) is the endoscopic treatment of acute esophageal variceal hemorrhage, however, prophylaxis antibiotic during EVL is controversial. Methods: We reported a 60-year-old man with diabetes, liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma who received EVL for esophageal variceal haemorrhage. Results: On the second day after EVL, the patient developed fever and chills. A week after EVL, the blood cultures were viridans streptococcus positive, and echocardiogram showed a vegetation on the cardiac valve. The patient was therefore diagnosed with infective endocarditis (IE). The patient was cured after 7 weeks of intravenous piperacillin sulbactam sodium. No complications were observed during the 3-month follow-up after discharge. Conclusion: To our knowledge, this is the first documented case to report IE caused by viridans streptococcus after EVL. Therefore, whether prophylaxis antibiotic should be administered to cirrhotic patients receiving EVL is worth further research. PMID:27583858

  17. Bleeding due to ectopic varices in a urinary diversion: A multidisciplinary diagnostic and therapeutic challenge

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Eduardo Mariano Albers; Reyes, Alfonsi Friera; Menéndez, Ricardo Brime

    2015-01-01

    The ectopic varices in patients with portal hypertension are those that occur at any level of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, regardless of the varices that occur at the esophageal level. These ectopic varices account for 2–5% of the causes of GI bleeding varices. The risk of bleeding is quadrupled compared to the esophagogastric area, with a mortality of up to 40%. The transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt, should be considered in cases secondary to recurrent bleeding varices. We present a case report of an urological emergency of bleeding in a urinary diversion secondary to ectopic varices successfully treated through the placement of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt. The condition described here is rare, but important, as it can be a life-threatening complication of portal hypertension. This kind of complication should be known by urologic surgeons managing patients with urinary diversions. PMID:26834901

  18. Intensity-Modulated Proton Therapy Further Reduces Normal Tissue Exposure During Definitive Therapy for Locally Advanced Distal Esophageal Tumors: A Dosimetric Study

    SciTech Connect

    Welsh, James; Gomez, Daniel; Palmer, Matthew B.; Riley, Beverly A.; Mayankkumar, Amin V.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Dong, Lei; Zhu, X. Ronald; Likhacheva, Anna; Liao, Zhongxing; Hofstetter, Wayne L.; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Cox, James D.

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: We have previously found that {<=} 75% of treatment failures after chemoradiotherapy for unresectable esophageal cancer appear within the gross tumor volume and that intensity-modulated (photon) radiotherapy (IMRT) might allow dose escalation to the tumor without increasing normal tissue toxicity. Proton therapy might allow additional dose escalation, with even lower normal tissue toxicity. In the present study, we compared the dosimetric parameters for photon IMRT with that for intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) for unresectable, locally advanced, distal esophageal cancer. Patients and Methods: Four plans were created for each of 10 patients. IMPT was delivered using anteroposterior (AP)/posteroanterior beams, left posterior oblique/right posterior oblique (LPO/RPO) beams, or AP/LPO/RPO beams. IMRT was delivered with a concomitant boost to the gross tumor volume. The dose was 65.8 Gy to the gross tumor volume and 50.4 Gy to the planning target volume in 28 fractions. Results: Relative to IMRT, the IMPT (AP/posteroanterior) plan led to considerable reductions in the mean lung dose (3.18 vs. 8.27 Gy, p < .0001) and the percentage of lung volume receiving 5, 10, and 20 Gy (p {<=} .0006) but did not reduce the cardiac dose. The IMPT LPO/RPO plan also reduced the mean lung dose (4.9 Gy vs. 8.2 Gy, p < .001), the heart dose (mean cardiac dose and percentage of the cardiac volume receiving 10, 20, and 30 Gy, p {<=} .02), and the liver dose (mean hepatic dose 5 Gy vs. 14.9 Gy, p < .0001). The IMPT AP/LPO/RPO plan led to considerable reductions in the dose to the lung (p {<=} .005), heart (p {<=} .003), and liver (p {<=} .04). Conclusions: Compared with IMRT, IMPT for distal esophageal cancer lowered the dose to the heart, lung, and liver. The AP/LPO/RPO beam arrangement was optimal for sparing all three organs. The dosimetric benefits of protons will need to be tailored to each patient according to their specific cardiac and pulmonary risks. IMPT for

  19. Comparison of Heart and Coronary Artery Doses Associated With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Versus Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy for Distal Esophageal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kole, Thomas P.; Aghayere, Osarhieme; Kwah, Jason; Yorke, Ellen D.; Goodman, Karyn A.

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To compare heart and coronary artery radiation exposure using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) vs. four-field three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) treatment plans for patients with distal esophageal cancer undergoing chemoradiation. Methods and Materials: Nineteen patients with distal esophageal cancers treated with IMRT from March 2007 to May 2008 were identified. All patients were treated to 50.4 Gy with five-field IMRT plans. Theoretical 3D-CRT plans with four-field beam arrangements were generated. Dose-volume histograms of the planning target volume, heart, right coronary artery, left coronary artery, and other critical normal tissues were compared between the IMRT and 3D-CRT plans, and selected parameters were statistically evaluated using the Wilcoxon rank-sum test. Results: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy treatment planning showed significant reduction (p < 0.05) in heart dose over 3D-CRT as assessed by average mean dose (22.9 vs. 28.2 Gy) and V30 (24.8% vs. 61.0%). There was also significant sparing of the right coronary artery (average mean dose, 23.8 Gy vs. 35.5 Gy), whereas the left coronary artery showed no significant improvement (mean dose, 11.2 Gy vs. 9.2 Gy), p = 0.11. There was no significant difference in percentage of total lung volume receiving at least 10, 15, or 20 Gy or in the mean lung dose between the planning methods. There were also no significant differences observed for the kidneys, liver, stomach, or spinal cord. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy achieved a significant improvement in target conformity as measured by the conformality index (ratio of total volume receiving 95% of prescription dose to planning target volume receiving 95% of prescription dose), with the mean conformality index reduced from 1.56 to 1.30 using IMRT. Conclusions: Treatment of patients with distal esophageal cancer using IMRT significantly decreases the exposure of the heart and right coronary artery when compared with 3D

  20. Long Term Variceal Sclerotherapy: Is Endoscopic Sclerosis a Unique Therapeutic Approach and a True Alternative to Surgery?

    PubMed Central

    Lazar, A.; Rambach, W.

    1991-01-01

    Endoscopic sclerotherapy has been used to control acute variceal haemorrhage which persists despite conservative therapy, prevent recurrent variceal haemorrhage in patients with a history of oesophageal haemorrhage, and to prevent a haemorrhage in patients with oesophageal varices who never bled. In this short paper I will cover our personal experience with more than 2000 patients receiving particularly paravariceal endoscopic sclerotherapy of bleeding esophageal varices, and especially present the results of our prospective and controlled randomized trials (Table 1) and underline the thesis that endoscopic sclerotherapy and surgical procedures for patients with portal hypertension are complementary supporting measures or options. PMID:1911473

  1. Percutaneous Trans-hepatic Obliteration for Bleeding Esophagojejunal Varices After Total Gastrectomy and Esophagojejunostomy

    SciTech Connect

    Boku, Michiko; Sugimoto, Koji; Nakamura, Tetsu; Kita, Yasufumi; Zamora, Carlos A. Sugimura, Kazuro

    2006-12-15

    A 72-year-old man who had undergone a total gastrectomy with a Roux-en-Y esophagojejunostomy for gastric cancer 6 years earlier presented to our hospital with massive hematemesis and melena. Endoscopic examination indicated esophageal varices with cherry-red spots and hemorrhage arising from beyond the anastomosis. Abdominal contrast-enhanced computed tomography and angiography revealed a dilated vein in the elevated jejunal limb supplying the varices. Percutaneous trans-hepatic obliteration (PTO) of the varices through the jejunal vein was performed using microcoils, ethanolamine oleate, and gelatin sponge cubes. Ten days after the procedure, endoscopic examination revealed reduction and thrombosis of the varices. We consider PTO to be an effective alternative method for treating ruptured esophagojejunal varices after total gastrectomy.

  2. Intensity modulated radiation therapy with simultaneous integrated boost based dose escalation on neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy for locally advanced distal esophageal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Ming; Aguila, Fernando N; Patel, Taral; Knapp, Mark; Zhu, Xue-Qiang; Chen, Xi-Lin; Price, Phillip D

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate impact of radiation therapy dose escalation through intensity modulated radiation therapy with simultaneous integrated boost (IMRT-SIB). METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed the patients who underwent four-dimensional-based IMRT-SIB-based neoadjuvant chemoradiation protocol. During the concurrent chemoradiation therapy, radiation therapy was through IMRT-SIB delivered in 28 consecutive daily fractions with total radiation doses of 56 Gy to tumor and 5040 Gy dose-painted to clinical tumor volume, with a regimen at the discretion of the treating medical oncologist. This was followed by surgical tumor resection. We analyzed pathological completion response (pCR) rates its relationship with overall survival and event-free survival. RESULTS: Seventeen patients underwent dose escalation with the IMRT-SIB protocol between 2007 and 2014 and their records were available for analysis. Among the IMRT-SIB-treated patients, the toxicity appeared mild, the most common side effects were grade 1-3 esophagitis (46%) and pneumonitis (11.7%). There were no cardiac events. The Ro resection rate was 94% (n = 16), the pCR rate was 47% (n = 8), and the postoperative morbidity was zero. There was one mediastinal failure found, one patient had local failure at the anastomosis site, and the majority of failures were distant in the lung or bone. The 3-year disease-free survival and overall survival rates were 41% (n = 7) and 53% (n = 9), respectively. CONCLUSION: The dose escalation through IMRT-SIB in the chemoradiation regimen seems responsible for down-staging the distal esophageal with well-tolerated complications. PMID:27190587

  3. Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography-Based Treatment Planning for Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy and Proton Therapy for Distal Esophageal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Xiaodong; Zhao Kuaile; Guerrero, Thomas M.; Mcguire, Sean E.; Yaremko, Brian; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D.; Hui Zhouguang; Li Yupeng; Newhauser, Wayne D.; Mohan, Radhe; Liao Zhongxing

    2008-09-01

    Purpose: To compare three-dimensional (3D) and four-dimensional (4D) computed tomography (CT)-based treatment plans for proton therapy or intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for esophageal cancer in terms of doses to the lung, heart, and spinal cord and variations in target coverage and normal tissue sparing. Methods and Materials: The IMRT and proton plans for 15 patients with distal esophageal cancer were designed from the 3D average CT scans and then recalculated on 10 4D CT data sets. Dosimetric data were compared for tumor coverage and normal tissue sparing. Results: Compared with IMRT, median lung volumes exposed to 5, 10, and 20 Gy and mean lung dose were reduced by 35.6%, 20.5%, 5.8%, and 5.1 Gy for a two-beam proton plan and by 17.4%, 8.4%, 5%, and 2.9 Gy for a three-beam proton plan. The greater lung sparing in the two-beam proton plan was achieved at the expense of less conformity to the target (conformity index [CI], 1.99) and greater irradiation of the heart (heart-V40, 41.8%) compared with the IMRT plan(CI, 1.55, heart-V40, 35.7%) or the three-beam proton plan (CI, 1.46, heart-V40, 27.7%). Target coverage differed by more than 2% between the 3D and 4D plans for patients with substantial diaphragm motion in the three-beam proton and IMRT plans. The difference in spinal cord maximum dose between 3D and 4D plans could exceed 5 Gy for the proton plans partly owing to variations in stomach gas filling. Conclusions: Proton therapy provided significantly better sparing of lung than did IMRT. Diaphragm motion and stomach gas-filling must be considered in evaluating target coverage and cord doses.

  4. Acute bleeding varices: a five-year prospective evaluation of tamponade and sclerotherapy.

    PubMed Central

    Terblanche, J; Yakoob, H I; Bornman, P C; Stiegmann, G V; Bane, R; Jonker, M; Wright, J; Kirsch, R

    1981-01-01

    In a five-year study of massive upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage, 143 patients had esophageal varices diagnosed on emergency endoscopic examination. Seventy-one patients had active bleeding from varices and required Sengstaken tube tamponade during at least one hospital admission. The remaining patients included 33 with variceal bleeding which had stopped and 39 who were bleeding from another source. Sixty-six of the former group of 71 patients were referred for emergency injection sclerotherapy. These 66 patients were followed prospectively to August 1980, and had 137 episodes of endoscopically proven variceal bleeding requiring Sengstaken tube control followed by injection sclerotherapy during 93 separate hospital admissions. Definitive control of hemorrhage was achieved in 95% the patients admitted to the hospital (single injection 70%; two or three injections 22%). The death rate per hospital admission was 28%. No patient died of continued variceal bleeding, and exsanguinating variceal hemorrhage no longer poses a major problem at our hospital. The combined use of initial Sengstaken tube tamponade followed by injection sclerotherapy has simplified emergency treatment in the group of patients who continue to bleed actively from esophageal varices, despite initial conservative treatment. Images Fig. 1. PMID:7025770

  5. Antireflux versus conventional self-expanding metallic Stents (SEMS) for distal esophageal cancer: results of a multicenter randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Coron, E.; David, G.; Lecleire, S.; Jacques, J.; Le Sidaner, A.; Barrioz, T.; Coumaros, D.; Volteau, C.; Vedrenne, B.; Bichard, P.; Boustière, C.; Touchefeu, Y.; Brégeon, J.; Prat, F.; Le Rhun, M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Self-expanding metal stents (SEMS) are commonly used in the palliation of dysphagia in patients with inoperable esophageal carcinoma. However, they predispose to gastroesophageal reflux when deployed across the gastroesophageal junction. The aims of this study were to: 1) assess the influence of the antireflux valve on trans-prosthetic reflux (primary outcome); and 2) compare the results of SEMS with and without antireflux valve in terms of reflux symptoms, quality of life (QOL), improvement of dysphagia and adverse events (secondary outcomes). Patients and methods: Thirty-eight patients were enrolled in nine centers. Carcinomas were locally advanced (47 %) or metastatic. After randomization, patients received either a covered SEMS with antireflux valve (n = 20) or a similar type of SEMS with no antireflux device but assigned to standard proton pump inhibitor therapy and postural advice (n = 18). Trans-prosthetic reflux was assessed at day 2 using a radiological score based on barium esophagography performed after Trendelenburg maneuver and graded from 0 (no reflux) to 12 (maximum). Monthly telephone interviews were conducted for Organisation Mondiale de la Santé (OMS) scoring from 0 (excellent) to 5 (poor), QOL assessment (based on the Reflux-Qual Simplifié scoring system) from 0 (poor) to 100 (excellent), dysphagia scoring from 0 (no dysphagia) to 5 (complete dysphagia) and regurgitation scoring from 0 (no regurgitation) to 16 (maximum). Results: No difference was noted in terms of age, sex, size of lesion, prosthesis length or need for dilation prior to SEMS placement. No difficulty in placing SEMS nor complications were noted. Radiological scores of reflux were found to be significantly lower in patients with an antireflux stent compared to the conventional stent and associated measures. The regurgitation scores were significantly decreased in patients with antireflux stents during the first 2 months after stent placement and

  6. Endoscopic submucosal dissection combined with endoscopic injection sclerotherapy for early gastric cancer on gastric fundal varices.

    PubMed

    Uno, Kaname; Iijima, Katsunori; Koike, Tomoyuki; Abe, Yasuhiko; Asano, Naoki; Yokosawa, Satoshi; Imatani, Akira; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2012-08-01

    Currently, there is little report of treatment strategy for early gastric cancer (EGC) on gastric fundal varices (GFVs), because controlling GFVs was more challenging than controlling gastric cardiac varices associated with esophageal varices. We first report effective endoscopic treatment of EGC on GFVs of a 77-year-old man with Child-B cirrhosis. Endoscopic ultrasound and multidetector-row computed tomography studies revealed intramucosal EGC on variceal components, supplied from posterior gastric vein and drained to subphrenic vein without gastrorenal shunt. With informed consent, we performed endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) after eradication of GFVs by endoscopic injection sclerotherapy (EIS). Histologic assessment revealed curability of ESD and inflammation and fibrosis around EIS site. Thereafter, no recurrence and complication had occurred. To avoid life-threatening bleeding from GFVs, we achieved complete resection by ESD under direct visualization of submucosa after eradication of GFVs by EIS based on the examination of hemodynamics and local relationship between EGC and GFVs.

  7. Prevention of Portal Hypertension: from Variceal Development to Clinical Decompensation

    PubMed Central

    Vorobioff, Julio D.; Groszmann, Roberto J

    2015-01-01

    Pharmacological treatment of portal hypertension (PH) has been exclusively devoted to gastro-esophageal varices related events at different frameworks including prophylactic, emergency or preventive therapy. The goals of treatment are to avoid the first bleeding episode, stop active bleeding and prevent bleeding recurrence, respectively. The objective of pre-primary prophylaxis (PPP) is to avoid variceal development and therefore, it necessarily deals with cirrhotic patients at earlier stages of the disease. At these earlier stages, nonselective beta blocker (NSBB) have been ineffective in preventing the development of varices and other complications of PH. Therefore, treatment should not rely on NSBB. It is possible, that at these earlier stages, etiological treatment of liver disease itself could prevent the progression of PH. This review will focus mainly on early treatment of PH, because if successful, it may translate into histological-hemodynamic improvements, avoiding not only variceal development but also other PH related complications, such as ascites and porto-systemic encephalopathy (PSE). Moreover, the advent of new therapies may allow not only the prevention of the complications of PH, but also the chance of a substantial degree of regression in the cirrhotic process with the possible prevention of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). PMID:24913395

  8. Management of acute variceal bleeding using hemostatic powder

    PubMed Central

    El-Mikkawy, Ahmed; Abdalla, Haitham; Mostafa, Ibrahim; Devière, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives This study aimed to test the safety and efficacy of Hemospray® for emergency control of acute variceal bleeding (AVB) due to portal hypertension in cirrhotic patients. Patients and methods This single-arm, prospective trial, conducted at two hospitals in Belgium and Egypt, included patients admitted to the emergency room with hematemesis and/or melena and known or suspected liver cirrhosis. All patients received urgent hemodynamic stabilization, octreotide (50 mcg bolus then 25 mcg/hour for 24 hours) and intravenous ceftriaxone (1 g/hour). Endoscopy to confirm AVB and Hemospray® application (if indicated) was performed within six hours of admission. Patients were kept under observation for 24 hours and underwent second endoscopy and definitive therapy (band ligation and/or cyanoacrylate injection in cases of gastric varices) the next day. Results Thirty-eight patients were admitted for suspected AVB, and 30 of these had confirmed AVB (70% male; mean age 59.5 years (range, 32.0–73 years)). Child-Pugh class C liver disease was present in 53.4%. Esophageal varices were observed in 83.4% of patients, gastric varices in 10%, and duodenal varices in 6.6%. Spurting bleeding at the time of endoscopy was observed in 43.4%. One patient developed hematemesis six hours after Hemospray® application and underwent emergency endoscopic band ligation. No major adverse events or mortalities were observed during 15-day follow-up. Conclusion Hemospray® application was safe and effective at short-term follow-up for emergency treatment of AVB in cirrhotic patients. PMID:26137303

  9. Imaging and Clinicopathologic Features of Esophageal Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Winant, Abbey J.; Gollub, Marc J.; Shia, Jinru; Antonescu, Christina; Bains, Manjit S.; Levine, Marc S.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this article is to describe the imaging and clinicopathologic characteristics of esophageal gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) and to emphasize the features that differentiate esophageal GISTs from esophageal leiomyomas. MATERIALS AND METHODS A pathology database search identified all surgically resected or biopsied esophageal GISTs, esophageal leiomyomas, and esophageal leiomyosarcomas from 1994 to 2012. Esophageal GISTs were included only if imaging studies (including CT, fluoroscopic, or 18F-FDG PET/CT scans) and clinical data were available. RESULTS Nineteen esophageal mesenchymal tumors were identified, including eight esophageal GISTs (42%), 10 esophageal leiomyomas (53%), and one esophageal leiomyosarcoma (5%). Four patients (50%) with esophageal GIST had symptoms, including dysphagia in three (38%), cough in one (13%), and chest pain in one (13%). One esophageal GIST appeared on barium study as a smooth submucosal mass. All esophageal GISTs appeared on CT as well-marginated predominantly distal lesions, isoattenuating to muscle, that moderately enhanced after IV contrast agent administration. Compared with esophageal leiomyomas, esophageal GISTs tended to be more distal, larger, and more heterogeneous and showed greater IV enhancement on CT. All esophageal GISTs showed marked avidity (mean maximum standardized uptake value, 16) on PET scans. All esophageal GISTs were positive for c-KIT (a cell-surface transmembrane tyrosine kinase also known as CD117) and CD34. On histopathology, six esophageal GISTs (75%) were of the spindle pattern and two (25%) were of a mixed spindle and epithelioid pattern. Five esophageal GISTs had exon 11 mutations (with imatinib sensitivity). Clinical outcome correlated with treatment strategy (resection plus adjuvant therapy or resection alone) rather than risk stratification. CONCLUSION Esophageal GISTs are unusual but clinically important mesenchymal neoplasms. Although esophageal GISTs and

  10. Utility of endoscopic ultrasound in the diagnosis and management of esophagogastric varices

    PubMed Central

    Wang, An-Jiang; Li, Bi-Min; Zheng, Xue-Lian; Shu, Xu; Zhu, Xuan

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has significantly improved our understanding of the complex vascular structural changes in patients with portal hypertension. At present, EUS is a useful diagnostic tool for the evaluation of esophagogastric varices (EGVs) and guidance of endoscopic therapy. Several studies have employed this new technique for the diagnosis and management of esophageal and gastric varices, respectively. In the present review, we have summarized the current status of EUS for the diagnosis and management of EGVs and clarified the clinical feasibility of this procedure. New indications for EUS can be developed in the future after adequate validation. PMID:27503152

  11. 24-hour esophageal pH-monitoring in children suspected of gastroesophageal reflux disease: Analysis of intraesophageal pH monitoring values recorded in distal and proximal channel at diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Semeniuk, Janusz; Kaczmarski, Maciej

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To assess values of 24-h esophageal pH-monitoring parameters with dual-channel probe (distal and proximal channel) in children suspected of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). METHODS: 264 children suspected of gastroesophageal reflux (GER) were enrolled in a study (mean age χ = 20.78 ± 17.23 mo). The outcomes of this study, immunoallerrgological tests and positive result of oral food challenge test with a potentially noxious nutrient, enabled to qualify children into particular study groups. RESULTS: 32 (12.1%) infants (group 1) had physiological GER diagnosed. Pathological acid GER was confirmed in 138 (52.3%) children. Primary GER was diagnosed in 76 (28.8%) children (group 2) and GER secondary to allergy to cow milk protein and/or other food (CMA/FA) in 62 (23.5%) children (group 3). 32 (12.1%) of them had CMA/FA (group 4-reference group), and in remaining 62 (23.5%) children neither GER nor CMA/FA was confirmed (group 5). Mean values of pH monitoring parameters measured in distal and proximal channel were analyzed in individual groups. This analysis showed statistically significant differentiation of mean values in the case of: number of episodes of acid GER, episodes of acid GER lasting > 5 min, duration of the longest episode of acid GER in both channels, acid GER index total and supine in proximal channel. Statistically significant differences of mean values among examined groups, especially between group 2 and 3 in the case of total acid GER index (only distal channel) were confirmed. CONCLUSION: 24-h esophageal pH monitoring confirmed pathological acid GER in 52.3% of children with typical and atypical symptoms of GERD. The similar pH-monitoring values obtained in group 2 and 3 confirm the necessity of implementation of differential diagnosis for primary vs secondary cause of GER. PMID:17876877

  12. Management of rectal varices in portal hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Al Khalloufi, Kawtar; Laiyemo, Adeyinka O

    2015-01-01

    Rectal varices are portosystemic collaterals that form as a complication of portal hypertension, their prevalence has been reported as high as 94% in patients with extrahepatic portal vein obstruction. The diagnosis is typically based on lower endoscopy (colonoscopy or sigmoidoscopy). However, endoscopic ultrasonography has been shown to be superior to endoscopy in diagnosing rectal varices. Color Doppler ultrasonography is a better method because it allows the calculation of the velocity of blood flow in the varices and can be used to predict the bleeding risk in the varices. Although rare, bleeding from rectal varices can be life threatening. The management of patients with rectal variceal bleeding is not well established. It is important to ensure hemodynamic stability with blood transfusion and to correct any coagulopathy prior to treating the bleeding varices. Endoscopic injection sclerotherapy has been reported to be more effective in the management of active bleeding from rectal varices with less rebleeding rate as compared to endoscopic band ligation. Transjugular intrahepatic portsystemic shunt alone or in combination with embolization is another method used successfully in control of bleeding. Balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration is an emerging procedure for management of gastric varices that has also been successfully used to treat bleeding rectal varices. Surgical procedures including suture ligation and porto-caval shunts are considered when other methods have failed. PMID:26730278

  13. Gastric varices: Classification, endoscopic and ultrasonographic management

    PubMed Central

    Wani, Zeeshan Ahmad; Bhat, Riyaz Ahmad; Bhadoria, Ajeet Singh; Maiwall, Rakhi; Choudhury, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Gastric varices (GV) are responsible for 10-30% of all variceal hemorrhage. However, they tend to bleed more severely with higher mortality. Around 35-90% rebleed after spontaneous hemostasis. Approximately 50% of patients with cirrhosis of liver harbor gastroesophageal varices. In this review, new treatment modalities in the form of endoscopic treatment options and interventional radiological procedures have been discussed besides discussion on classification and pathophysiology of GV. PMID:26958057

  14. Simultaneous combined balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration and partial splenic embolization for gastric fundal varices

    PubMed Central

    Osaki, Akihiko; Ikarashi, Shunzo; Ogawa, Masahiro; Kuraoka, Naosuke; Ogawa, Kohei; Sato, Munehiro; Aiba, Tsuneo; Yoneyama, Osamu; Furukawa, Koichi; Sugimura, Kazuhito; Igarashi, Kentarou

    2015-01-01

    Background We previously reported the techniques and usefulness of simultaneous combined balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration (B-RTO) and partial splenic embolization (PSE), based on the hypothesis that concomitant PSE can diminish the increase in portal venous pressure after B-RTO. Objective After experiencing more cases and performing longer-term follow-up, we re-evaluated the efficacy of simultaneous combined B-RTO and PSE for gastric fundal varices (GVs). Methods We performed B-RTO in 36 consecutive patients treated for GVs from 2005 to 2013. Twenty-three patients underwent simultaneous combined B-RTO and PSE (Group 1) and 13 underwent B-RTO monotherapy (Group 2). The outcomes were retrospectively evaluated. Results There were no significant differences in baseline characteristics between the two groups except that the splenic volumes were larger in Group 1 than 2. B-RTO was technically successful in 21 of 23 patients (91.3%) in Group 1 and in 12 of 13 patients (92.3%) in Group 2. In all patients with ruptured GVs (six in Group 1 and five in Group 2), complete hemostasis was obtained by B-RTO. Exacerbation of esophageal varices was significantly less frequent in Group 1 than 2 (p = 0.0017). Conclusion Concomitant PSE with B-RTO may contribute to prevention of the exacerbation of esophageal varices after B-RTO. PMID:26966524

  15. Prospective randomized comparison of sodium tetradecyl sulfate and polidocanol as variceal sclerosing agents.

    PubMed

    Bhargava, D K; Singh, B; Dogra, R; Dasarathy, S; Sharma, M P

    1992-02-01

    A prospective randomized controlled study was designed to evaluate differences in efficacy and complication rate between the two most commonly used sclerosing agents, sodium tetradecyl sulfate (STD) and polidocanol. Of 52 patients with esophageal variceal bleeding, 26 were randomized to receive sclerotherapy with 1.5% STD and 26 to receive 1% polidocanol at weekly intervals. Eradication of varices was achieved in 88% patients each of the STD and polidocanol group. There was no significant difference between patients injected with STD and polidocanol with regard to re-bleeding (27% vs. 15%) and mortality (11.5% in both). The use of STD, in contrast to polidocanol, was associated with a higher incidence of complications in terms of severe retrosternal pain (27% vs. 4%), deep ulceration (53% vs. 23%), dysphagia (88% vs. 46%), and stricture formation (27% vs. 8%). It was concluded that these two agents were similar in efficacy. However, polidocanol was superior due to a lower incidence of complications.

  16. Esophageal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... esophagus, and chest wall Lung Cancer Esophageal Cancer Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Barrett’s Esophagus Chest Wall Tumors Mediastinal Tumors ... Section Navigation Select Topic Lung Cancer Esophageal Cancer Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Barrett’s Esophagus Chest Wall Tumors Mediastinal Tumors ...

  17. Esophageal cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - esophagus ... Esophageal cancer is not common in the United States. It occurs most often in men over 50 years old. There are two main types of esophageal cancer: squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma. These two types ...

  18. Esophageal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... from your throat to your stomach. Early esophageal cancer usually does not cause symptoms. Later, you may ... You're at greater risk for getting esophageal cancer if you smoke, drink heavily, or have acid ...

  19. Downhill varices secondary to HeRO graft-related SVC syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pillai, Unnikrishnan; Roopkiranjot, Kahlon; Lakshminarayan, Nandagopal; Balabhadrapatruni, Krishna; Gebregeorgis, Wihib; Kissner, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Tunneled hemodialysis catheters are well-documented causes of benign central vein stenosis, which can be associated with proximal or downhill esophageal varices due to shunting of blood flow from the upper portion of the body through the esophageal venous plexuses. A majority of these cases remain asymptomatic. As a result, studies are largely limited to symptomatic patients, with incidence rates ranging from 16% to 29%. Recently, Hemodialysis Reliable Outflow (HeRO) graft has been introduced as an effective alternate hemodialysis access in catheter-dependent patients, especially in the presence of significant central venous occlusion. It differs from a conventional arteriovenous graft (AVG) by the fact that its venous outflow end is in the right atrium via one of the central veins, bypassing any significant occlusion upstream. Lower intervention rates and reduced incidence of bacteremia make it comparable to conventional tunneled catheters. However, the incidence of central vein occlusion and associated complications with HeRO grafts is unknown. We present the first case of gastrointestinal bleeding from downhill esophageal varices secondary to HeRO-graft-related SVC occlusion.

  20. Bleeding varices: 1. Emergency management.

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, S S; Warren, W D; Galambos, J T; Millikan, W J

    1981-01-01

    The aim of the emergency management of bleeding varices is to stop the hemorrhage nonoperatively if possible, avoiding emergency shunt surgery, an operation that has a higher mortality than elective shunt surgery. Patients with an upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage should undergo endoscopy immediately to verify the diagnosis of bleeding varices. They can then be categorized according to whether they stop bleeding spontaneously (group 1), continue to bleed slowly (group 2) or continue to bleed rapidly (group 3). Group 1 patients are discussed in the second part of this two-part series. Group 2 patients are initially treated with vasopressin given intravenously; those who fail to respond should undergo emergency angiography and receive vasopressin intra-arterially. If this fails, patients at low surgical risk should undergo urgent shunt surgery; those at high risk do better with endoscopic sclerotherapy. Group 3 patients are also given an intravenous infusion of vasopressin. Patients at low surgical risk who continue to bleed then receive tamponade with a Sengstaken--Blakemore tube. If this fails, they undergo emergency creation of an H-shaped mesocaval shunt. Patients at high surgical risk who fail to respond to vasopressin given intravenously are next treated intra-arterially. If this fails they are given either endoscopic or transhepatic sclerotherapy. PMID:7006779

  1. Successful Management of Neobladder Variceal Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Atwal, Dinesh; Chatterjee, Kshitij; Osborne, Scott; Kakkera, Krishna; Deas, Steven; Li, Ruizong; Erbland, Marcia

    2016-10-01

    Hematuria from a neobladder can occur due to a variety of pathologies including tumors, stones, and fistulas. Variceal bleeding in a neobladder is a very rare condition with only one case reported in literature. We present a case of a patient with cirrhosis and portal hypertension and an ileocolic orthotopic neobladder presenting with hematuria. Computed tomographic angiography showed dilated varices around the neobladder which were successfully embolized. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report case of variceal bleeding in a neobladder successfully managed with the combination of TIPS (transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt) procedure and embolization.

  2. Eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Kedia, Saurabh; Baruah, Bhaskar Jyoti; Makharia, Govind; Ahuja, Vineet

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a clinico-pathological entity characterised by symptoms of esophageal dysfunction and eosinophilia on esophageal mucosal biopsies in the absence of other causes of esophageal eosinophilia. It is a chronic inflammatory condition of esophagus often characterized by refractory reflux symptoms in children and dysphagia in adults. It occurs as a result of Th2 inflammatory response to environmental triggers (food antigens) in genetically predisposed individuals. The diagnostic criteria include symptoms of esophageal dysfunction, esophageal eosinophilia (> 15/hpf), and a PPI trial (persistent eosinophilia after 8 weeks of PPI). Mainstay of treatment at present is topical steroids and dietary therapy. Maintenance treatment should be considered to prevent long term complications. PMID:27522734

  3. The changing spectrum of treatment for variceal bleeding.

    PubMed Central

    Rikkers, L F

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to assess the impact of endoscopic therapy, liver transplantation, and transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) on patient selection and outcome of surgical treatment for this complication of portal hypertension, as reflected in a single surgeon's 18-year experience with operations for variceal hemorrhage. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Definitive treatment of patients who bleed from portal hypertension has been progressively altered during the past 2 decades during which endoscopic therapy, liver transplantation, and TIPS have successively become available as alternative treatment options to operative portosystemic shunts and devascularization procedures. METHODS: Two hundred sixty-three consecutive patients who were surgically treated for portal hypertensive bleeding between 1978 and 1996 were reviewed retrospectively. Four Eras separated by the dates when endoscopic therapy (January 1981), liver transplantation (July 1985), and TIPS (January 1993) became available in our institution were analyzed. Throughout all four Eras, a selective operative approach, using the distal splenorenal shunt (DSRS), nonselective shunts, and esophagogastric devascularization, was taken. The most common indications for nonselective shunts and esophagogastric devascularization were medically intractable ascites and splanchnic venous thrombosis, respectively. Most other patients received a DSRS. RESULTS: The risk status (Child's class) of patients undergoing surgery progressively improved (p = 0.001) throughout the 4 Eras, whereas the need for emergency surgery declined (p = 0.002). The percentage of nonselective shunts performed decreased because better options to manage acute bleeding episodes (sclerotherapy, TIPS) and advanced liver disease complicated by ascites (liver transplantation, TIPS) became available (p = 0.009). In all Eras, the operative mortality rate was directly related to Child's class (A, 2.7%; B, 7.5%; and C, 26

  4. Esophagitis - infectious

    MedlinePlus

    ... conditions that suppress or weaken your immune system Organisms (germs) that cause esophagitis include fungi, yeast, and viruses. Common organisms include: Candida albicans Cytomegalovirus (CMV) Herpes simplex virus ( ...

  5. Esophageal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Alsop, Benjamin R; Sharma, Prateek

    2016-09-01

    Esophageal cancer carries a poor prognosis among gastrointestinal malignancies. Although esophageal squamous cell carcinoma predominates worldwide, Western nations have seen a marked rise in the incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma that parallels the obesity epidemic. Efforts directed toward early detection have been difficult, given that dysplasia and early cancer are generally asymptomatic. However, significant advances have been made in the past 10 to 15 years that allow for endoscopic management and often cure in early stage esophageal malignancy. New diagnostic imaging technologies may provide a means by which cost-effective, early diagnosis of dysplasia allows for definitive therapy and ultimately improves the overall survival among patients. PMID:27546839

  6. [Esophageal dysphagia].

    PubMed

    Thumshirn, M

    2007-04-01

    Dysphagia can be caused by a number of disorders such as benign or malignant obstruction of the esophagus, inflammatory alterations of the mucosa or primary esophageal motility disorders. Endoscopic evaluation is recommended for all patients to exclude malignancy and to establish or confirm a diagnosis. This article provides an overview of the most frequent inflammatory and functional esophageal disorders causing dysphagia. Clinical findings, diagnostic procedures and therapeutic management of primary esophageal motility disorders such as achalasia and diffuse esophageal spasm as well as of GERD and eosinophilic esophagitis are discussed. The diagnosis of achalasia is made by barium swallow with fluoroscopy and by manometry. Therapeutic options for achalasia are pneumatic dilatation of the esophagogastric junction, laparoscopic cardiomyotomy combined with fundoplication and botulinum toxin injection of the lower esophageal sphincter Diffuse esophageal spasm is manometrically characterized by normal peristalsis intermittently interrupted by simultaneous contractions. Potential medical therapies are PPIs for underlying GERD, smooth-muscle relaxants and antidepressant medications. GERD is a multifaceted disease caused by abnormal reflux of gastric contents into the esophagus leading to chronic symptoms or mucosal damage. Therapy includes lifestyle modifications, acid suppressive medications mainly by PPI and laparoscopic fundoplication in selected patients. Eosinophilic esophagitis is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the esophagus diagnosed histologically. The main symptom of eosinophilic esophagitis is dysphagia for solid food with imminent risk of food impaction. Systemic or topical corticosteroids are the therapy of choice.

  7. Esophageal Intramural Pseudodiverticulosis and Concomitant Eosinophilic Esophagitis: A Case Series.

    PubMed

    Scaffidi, Michael A; Garg, Ankit; Ro, Brandon; Wang, Christopher; Yang, Tony T C; Plener, Ian S; Grin, Andrea; Colak, Errol; Grover, Samir C

    2016-01-01

    Background. Esophageal intramural pseudodiverticulosis (EIPD) is an idiopathic benign chronic disease characterized by flask-like outpouchings of the esophageal wall. It is unknown whether there is a genuine association between EIPD and eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). Aims. To investigate a possible relationship between EIPD and EoE. Methods. Patients with radiographic or endoscopic evidence of pseudodiverticulosis were identified from the database at a single academic center. Cases were analyzed in three areas: clinical information, endoscopic findings, and course. Results. Sixteen cases of esophageal pseudodiverticulosis were identified. Five patients had histologic evidence of eosinophilic esophagitis. Patients with EoE had pseudodiverticula in the mid-to-distal esophagus while those with EIPD had pseudodiverticula predominantly in the proximal esophagus (p < 0.001). EoE with pseudodiverticulosis occurred in younger patients (p < 0.019). Food bolus obstructions were more common in patients with EoE and pseudodiverticulosis than in EIPD (p < 0.034). Conclusions. This is the first case series supporting a potential association between EoE and pseudodiverticulosis. We also identify characteristic features of pseudodiverticulosis that may raise clinical suspicion of underlying eosinophilic esophagitis. PMID:27648438

  8. Esophageal Intramural Pseudodiverticulosis and Concomitant Eosinophilic Esophagitis: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Scaffidi, Michael A.; Garg, Ankit; Ro, Brandon; Wang, Christopher; Yang, Tony T. C.; Plener, Ian S.; Grin, Andrea; Colak, Errol

    2016-01-01

    Background. Esophageal intramural pseudodiverticulosis (EIPD) is an idiopathic benign chronic disease characterized by flask-like outpouchings of the esophageal wall. It is unknown whether there is a genuine association between EIPD and eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). Aims. To investigate a possible relationship between EIPD and EoE. Methods. Patients with radiographic or endoscopic evidence of pseudodiverticulosis were identified from the database at a single academic center. Cases were analyzed in three areas: clinical information, endoscopic findings, and course. Results. Sixteen cases of esophageal pseudodiverticulosis were identified. Five patients had histologic evidence of eosinophilic esophagitis. Patients with EoE had pseudodiverticula in the mid-to-distal esophagus while those with EIPD had pseudodiverticula predominantly in the proximal esophagus (p < 0.001). EoE with pseudodiverticulosis occurred in younger patients (p < 0.019). Food bolus obstructions were more common in patients with EoE and pseudodiverticulosis than in EIPD (p < 0.034). Conclusions. This is the first case series supporting a potential association between EoE and pseudodiverticulosis. We also identify characteristic features of pseudodiverticulosis that may raise clinical suspicion of underlying eosinophilic esophagitis. PMID:27648438

  9. Esophageal Intramural Pseudodiverticulosis and Concomitant Eosinophilic Esophagitis: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Scaffidi, Michael A.; Garg, Ankit; Ro, Brandon; Wang, Christopher; Yang, Tony T. C.; Plener, Ian S.; Grin, Andrea; Colak, Errol

    2016-01-01

    Background. Esophageal intramural pseudodiverticulosis (EIPD) is an idiopathic benign chronic disease characterized by flask-like outpouchings of the esophageal wall. It is unknown whether there is a genuine association between EIPD and eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). Aims. To investigate a possible relationship between EIPD and EoE. Methods. Patients with radiographic or endoscopic evidence of pseudodiverticulosis were identified from the database at a single academic center. Cases were analyzed in three areas: clinical information, endoscopic findings, and course. Results. Sixteen cases of esophageal pseudodiverticulosis were identified. Five patients had histologic evidence of eosinophilic esophagitis. Patients with EoE had pseudodiverticula in the mid-to-distal esophagus while those with EIPD had pseudodiverticula predominantly in the proximal esophagus (p < 0.001). EoE with pseudodiverticulosis occurred in younger patients (p < 0.019). Food bolus obstructions were more common in patients with EoE and pseudodiverticulosis than in EIPD (p < 0.034). Conclusions. This is the first case series supporting a potential association between EoE and pseudodiverticulosis. We also identify characteristic features of pseudodiverticulosis that may raise clinical suspicion of underlying eosinophilic esophagitis.

  10. Bleeding Ectopic Varices as the First Manifestation of Portal Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Brij; Raina, Sujeet; Sharma, Rajesh

    2014-01-01

    Ectopic varices are defined as dilated portosystemic collateral veins in locations other than the gastroesophageal region. We present a case of recurrent upper gastrointestinal bleeding as the first manifestation of portal hypertension. We diagnosed ectopic duodenal varices without gastroesophageal varices on upper GI endoscopy and extrahepatic portal venous obstruction (EHPVO) on CT angiography and managed this case. PMID:25374725

  11. Plug-Assisted Retrograde Transvenous Obliteration for the Treatment of Gastric Variceal Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Min-Yung; Kim, Taehwan; Shin, Wonseon; Shin, Minwoo; Kim, Gyoung Min; Won, Jong Yun; Park, Sung Il; Lee, Do Yun

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the feasibility, safety, and clinical outcomes of plug-assisted retrograde transvenous obliteration (PARTO) to treat gastric variceal hemorrhage in patients with portal hypertension. Materials and Methods From May 2012 to June 2014, 19 patients (11 men and 8 women, median age; 61, with history of gastric variceal hemorrhage; 17, active bleeding; 2) who underwent PARTO using a vascular plug and a gelfoam pledget were retrospectively analyzed. Clinical and laboratory data were examined to evaluate primary (technical and clinical success, complications) and secondary (worsening of esophageal varix [EV], change in liver function) end points. Median follow-up duration was 11 months, from 6.5 to 18 months. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to compare laboratory data before and after the procedure. Results Technical success (complete occlusion of the efferent shunt and complete filling of gastric varix [GV] with a gelfoam slurry) was achieved in 18 of 19 (94.7%) patients. The embolic materials could not reach the GV in 1 patient who had endoscopic glue injection before our procedure. The clinical success rate (no recurrence of gastric variceal bleeding) was the same because the technically failed patient showed recurrent bleeding later. Acute complications included fever (n = 2), fever and hypotension (n = 2; one diagnosed adrenal insufficiency), and transient microscopic hematuria (n = 3). Ten patients underwent follow-up endoscopy; all exhibited GV improvement, except 2 without endoscopic change. Five patients exhibited aggravated EV, and 2 of them had a bleeding event. Laboratory findings were significantly improved after PARTO. Conclusion PARTO is technically feasible, safe, and effective for gastric variceal hemorrhage in patients with portal hypertension. PMID:26957908

  12. Implantation of self-expanding metal stent in the treatment of severe bleeding from esophageal ulcer after endoscopic band ligation.

    PubMed

    Mishin, I; Ghidirim, G; Dolghii, A; Bunic, G; Zastavnitsky, G

    2010-09-01

    Endoscopic variceal ligation is superior to sclerotherapy because of its lower rebleeding and complication rates. However, ligation may be associated with life-threatening bleeding from postbanding esophageal ulcer. We report a case of a 49-year-old male with massive hemorrhage from esophageal ulcer on 8th day after successful band ligation of bleeding esophageal varices caused by postviral liver cirrhosis (Child-Pugh class C). A removable polyurethane membrane-covered self-expanding metal stent (SX-ELLA stent Danis, 135 mm × 25 mm, ELLA-CS, Hradec-Kralove, Czech Republic) was inserted in ICU for preventing fatal hemorrhage. Complete hemostasis was achieved and stent was removed after 8 days without rebleeding or any complications. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report in English literature regarding life-threatening hemorrhage from postbanding esophageal ulcer successfully treated by self-expanding metal stent in a patient with portal hypertension.

  13. Do large hiatal hernias affect esophageal peristalsis?

    PubMed Central

    Roman, Sabine; Kahrilas, Peter J; Kia, Leila; Luger, Daniel; Soper, Nathaniel; Pandolfino, John E

    2013-01-01

    Background & Aim Large hiatal hernias can be associated with a shortened or tortuous esophagus. We hypothesized that these anatomic changes may alter esophageal pressure topography (EPT) measurements made during high-resolution manometry (HRM). Our aim was to compare EPT measures of esophageal motility in patients with large hiatal hernias to those of patients without hernia. Methods Among 2000 consecutive clinical EPT, we identified 90 patients with large (>5 cm) hiatal hernias on endoscopy and at least 7 evaluable swallows on EPT. Within the same database a control group without hernia was selected. EPT was analyzed for lower esophageal sphincter (LES) pressure, Distal Contractile Integral (DCI), contraction amplitude, Contractile Front Velocity (CFV) and Distal Latency time (DL). Esophageal length was measured on EPT from the distal border of upper esophageal sphincter to the proximal border of the LES. EPT diagnosis was based on the Chicago Classification. Results The manometry catheter was coiled in the hernia and did not traverse the crural diaphragm in 44 patients (49%) with large hernia. Patients with large hernias had lower average LES pressures, lower DCI, slower CFV and shorter DL than patients without hernia. They also exhibited a shorter mean esophageal length. However, the distribution of peristaltic abnormalities was not different in patients with and without large hernia. Conclusions Patients with large hernias had an alteration of EPT measurements as a consequence of the associated shortened esophagus. However, the distribution of peristaltic disorders was unaffected by the presence of hernia. PMID:22508779

  14. Scintigraphic demonstration of gastrointestinal bleeding due to mesenteric varices

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, M.E.; Coleman, R.E. )

    1990-07-01

    Mesenteric varices can appear as massive, acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding. The small bowel or colon may be involved, varices usually developing at sites of previous surgery or inflammation in patients with portal hypertension. Two patients with alcoholic cirrhosis and protal hypertension presented with rectal bleeding. Tc-99m RBC studies demonstrated varices and extravasation into the adjacent bowel. The varices were documented by mesenteric angiography. Characteristic features of Tc-99m labeled RBC studies can identify mesenteric varices as the cause of intestinal bleeding and localize the abnormal vessels.

  15. Direct Percutaneous Embolization of Bleeding Stomal Varices

    SciTech Connect

    Naidu, Sailen G.; Castle, Erik P.; Kriegshauser, J. Scott; Huettl, Eric A.

    2010-02-15

    Stomal variceal bleeding can develop in patients with underlying cirrhosis and portal hypertension. Most patients are best treated with transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) creation because this addresses the underlying problem of portal hypertension. However, some patients are not good candidates for TIPS creation because they have end-stage liver disease or encephalopathy. We describe such a patient who presented with recurrent bleeding stomal varices, which was successfully treated with percutaneous coil embolization. The patient had bleeding-free survival for 1 month before death from unrelated causes.

  16. Esophageal perforation

    MedlinePlus

    ... object or caustic chemicals, such as household cleaners, disk batteries, and battery acid Trauma or injury to ... may have esophageal perforation. Prevention These injuries are hard to prevent. Alternative Names Perforation of the esophagus ...

  17. Proton Pump Inhibitor Therapy Is Associated With Reduction of Early Bleeding Risk After Prophylactic Endoscopic Variceal Band Ligation

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Seong Hee; Yim, Hyung Joon; Kim, Seung Young; Suh, Sang Jun; Hyun, Jong Jin; Jung, Sung Woo; Jung, Young Kul; Koo, Ja Seol; Lee, Sang Woo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Endoscopic variceal band ligation (EVL) is an effective procedure to control and prevent variceal bleeding in patients with liver cirrhosis, but it can be complicated by bleeding from post-EVL ulcers. Several studies have reported that proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) decrease the size of post-EVL ulcers. However, evidence are limited as to whether PPIs actually reduce the risk of bleeding after EVL. This study aimed to analyze the factors associated with bleeding after prophylactic EVL and to assess the effect of PPI therapy. Five hundred and five cirrhotic patients with high risk esophageal varices who received primary prophylactic EVL were included for this retrospective cohort study. Post-EVL bleeding was defined as bleeding after prophylactic EVL within 8 weeks evidenced by the occurrence of melena or hematemesis, or by a decrease of hemoglobin by >2.0 g/dL. If evidence of bleeding from ulceration of the EVL sites was confirmed by endoscopy, we defined it as post-EVL ulcer bleeding. Fourteen patients developed bleeding after prophylactic EVL. Factors associated with post-EVL bleeding included alcohol as etiology, low albumin, high total bilirubin, high Child-Pugh score, high MELD score, coexistence of gastric varices, and not administrating PPI medication by univariate analysis. In multivariate logistic analysis, Co-existing gastric varix (odds ratio [OR] 5.680, P = 0.005] and not administrating PPIs (OR 8.217, P = 0.002) were associated with bleeding after prophylactic EVL. In the subgroup analysis excluding patients whose gastric varices were treated, not administering PPI medication (OR 8.827, P = 0.008) was the sole factor associated with post-EVL bleeding. We suggest that PPI therapy needs to be considered in patients receiving prophylactic EVL to reduce the risk of bleeding after prophylactic EVL. PMID:26937932

  18. Histomorphological and Immunophenotypic Features of Pill-Induced Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Su Hwan; Kim, Won; Lee, Kook Lae; Byeon, Sun-ju; Choi, Euno; Chang, Mee Soo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate histomorphological and immunophenotypic features in pill-induced esophagitis. We comparatively evaluated the histomorphological, immunophenotypic features of pill-induced esophagitis vs. reflux esophagitis, as well as clinical information and endoscopic findings. Fifty-two tissue pieces from 22 cases of pill-induced esophagitis, 46 pieces from 20 reflux esophagitis, and 16 pieces from 14 control samples were subjected to immunohistochemistry for inflammatory infiltrates (CD3 for T lymphocyte, CD20 for B lymphocyte, CD56 for NK cell, CD68 for macrophage, CD117 for mast cell) and eosinophil chemotaxis-associated proteins (Erk, leptin, leptin receptor, pSTAT3, phospho-mTOR). As a result, Histomorphology showed that a diffuse pattern of dilated intercellular spaces was more frequently observed in pill-induced esophagitis, while reactive atypia and subepithelial papillary elongation were more often found in reflux esophagitis (P < 0.05, respectively). Interestingly, intraepithelial eosinophilic microabscess, intraepithelial pustule and diffuse pattern of dilated intercellular spaces were observed in 14% (3 cases), 9% (2 cases) and 32% (7 cases) of pill-induced esophagitis, respectively, but in no cases of reflux esophagitis. Regarding intraepithelial inflammatory infiltrates in pill-induced esophagitis, T lymphocytes were the most common cells, followed by eosinophil; 11 and 7 in one x400 power field, respectively. Intraepithelial pSTAT3-positive pattern was more frequently observed in pill-induced esophagitis than in reflux esophagitis, at 45% (10 cases) versus 10% (2 cases), respectively (P < 0.05). Considering the distal esophageal lesion only, intraepithelial pustule, diffuse dilated intercellular spaces and stromal macrophages were more frequently found in distal pill-induced esophagitis, whereas reactive atypia and intraepithelial mast cells in reflux esophagitis (P < 0.05, respectively). In conclusion, diffuse dilated

  19. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding caused by a "hypophrenic" diverticulum of the distal esophagus.

    PubMed

    Sam, Albert D; Chaer, Rabih A; Cintron, Jose; Teresi, Miguel; Massad, Malek G

    2005-04-01

    Distal esophageal diverticula are uncommon acquired anomalies of the distal thoracic esophagus. We report a case of an elderly man presenting with a history of upper gastrointestinal bleeding secondary to a distal esophageal diverticulum arising from the intra-abdominal portion of the esophagus. To our knowledge, this is the first report of upper gastrointestinal bleeding from a subdiaphragmatic esophageal diverticulum. We propose the term "hypophrenic diverticulum of the esophagus" for this disease entity, and we would like to bring it to the attention of readers of The American Surgeon. PMID:15943409

  20. Effect of total laryngectomy on esophageal motility

    SciTech Connect

    Hanks, J.B.; Fisher, S.R.; Meyers, W.C.; Christian, K.C.; Postlethwait, R.W.; Jones, R.S.

    1981-01-01

    Total laryngectomy for cancer can result in dysphagia and altered esophageal motility. Manometric changes in the upper esophageal sphincter (UES), and in proximal and distal esophageal function have been reported. However, most studies have failed to take into account radiation therapy and appropriate controls. We selected ten male patients (54.3 +/- 1.9 yr) for longitudinal manometric evaluation prior to laryngectomy then at two weeks and again six months later. No patient received preoperative radiation therapy, had a previous history of esophageal surgery, or developed a postoperative wound infection or fistula. Seven of ten patients had positive nodes and received 6,000-6,600 rads postoperative radiation therapy. Preoperatively 4 of 10 patients complained of dysphagia which did not significantly change following surgery and radiation. Two of three patients who did not complain of dysphagia preoperatively and received radiation postoperatively developed dysphagia. No patient without dysphagia preoperatively who received no radiation therapy developed symptoms. Our studies show that laryngectomy causes alterations in the UES resting and peak pressures but not in the proximal or distal esophagus, or the lower esophageal sphincter. These data also imply radiation therapy may be associated with progressive alterations in motility and symptomatology. Further study regarding the effects of radiation on esophageal motility and function are urged.

  1. Esophageal anastomosis.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Y; Wang, K-N; Chen, L-Q

    2015-01-01

    This review gives an overview of the esophageal anastomosis. The history, various techniques and substitution organs, their advantages and disadvantages, healing mechanism, complications, and actual trend of this essential part of esophageal surgery are described. The history of the esophageal anastomosis extending from the first anastomosis in 1901 to today has undergone more than one century. In the early days, the success rate of the anastomosis was extremely low. As the technology progressed, the anastomosis got significant achievement. Various anastomotic techniques are currently being used. However, controversies exist on the choice of anastomotic method concerning the success rate, postoperative complication and quality of life. How to choose the method, no one can give the best answer. We searched the manuscripts about the esophageal anastomoses in recent years and studied the controversy questions about the anastomosis. Performing an esophageal anastomosis is a technical matter, and suture healing is independent of the patient's biologic situation. Every anastomosis technique has its own merit, but the outcomes were different if it was performed by different surgeons, and we also found that the complication rate of the anastomosis was mainly associated with the surgeons. So the surgeons should learn from their previous experience and others to avoid technical errors.

  2. Esophageal Microbiome in Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Harris, J. Kirk; Fang, Rui; Wagner, Brandie D.; Choe, Ha Na; Kelly, Caleb J.; Schroeder, Shauna; Moore, Wendy; Stevens, Mark J.; Yeckes, Alyson; Amsden, Katie; Kagalwalla, Amir F.; Zalewski, Angelika; Hirano, Ikuo; Gonsalves, Nirmala; Henry, Lauren N.; Masterson, Joanne C.; Robertson, Charles E.; Leung, Donald Y.; Pace, Norman R.; Ackerman, Steven J.; Furuta, Glenn T.; Fillon, Sophie A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The microbiome has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a number of allergic and inflammatory diseases. The mucosa affected by eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is composed of a stratified squamous epithelia and contains intraepithelial eosinophils. To date, no studies have identified the esophageal microbiome in patients with EoE or the impact of treatment on these organisms. The aim of this study was to identify the esophageal microbiome in EoE and determine whether treatments change this profile. We hypothesized that clinically relevant alterations in bacterial populations are present in different forms of esophagitis. Design In this prospective study, secretions from the esophageal mucosa were collected from children and adults with EoE, Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) and normal mucosa using the Esophageal String Test (EST). Bacterial load was determined using quantitative PCR. Bacterial communities, determined by 16S rRNA gene amplification and 454 pyrosequencing, were compared between health and disease. Results Samples from a total of 70 children and adult subjects were examined. Bacterial load was increased in both EoE and GERD relative to normal subjects. In subjects with EoE, load was increased regardless of treatment status or degree of mucosal eosinophilia compared with normal. Haemophilus was significantly increased in untreated EoE subjects as compared with normal subjects. Streptococcus was decreased in GERD subjects on proton pump inhibition as compared with normal subjects. Conclusions Diseases associated with mucosal eosinophilia are characterized by a different microbiome from that found in the normal mucosa. Microbiota may contribute to esophageal inflammation in EoE and GERD. PMID:26020633

  3. Eosinophilic esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Gupte, Anand R; Draganov, Peter V

    2009-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis is increasingly recognized in adults. The diagnosis is based on the presence of both typical symptoms and pathologic findings on esophageal biopsy. Patients usually present with dysphagia, food impaction and/or reflux-like symptoms, and biopsy of the esophagus shows more than 15 eosinophils per high-power field. In addition, it is essential to exclude the presence of known causes of tissue eosinophilia such as gastroesophageal reflux disease, infections, malignancy, collagen vascular diseases, hypersensitivity, and inflammatory bowel disease. There are no standardized protocols for the therapy of eosinophilic esophagitis. A variety of therapeutic approaches including acid suppression, dietary modifications, topical corticosteroids and endoscopic dilation can be used alone or in combination. PMID:19115464

  4. Pill esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Kikendall, J W

    1999-06-01

    Nine hundred seventy-nine cases of pill esophagitis due to nearly 100 different medications are reviewed. Pill-induced injuries occur when caustic medicinal pills dissolve in the esophagus rather than passing rapidly into the stomach as intended. Most patients suffer only self-limited pain, but esophageal hemorrhage, stricture, and perforation may occur, and fatal injuries have been reported. The incidence of this iatrogenic injury can be reduced but not eliminated by emphasizing the importance of taking pills while upright and with plenty of fluids. PMID:10372925

  5. Detection of esophageal ulcerations with technetium-99m albumin sucralfate

    SciTech Connect

    Goff, J.S.; Adcock, K.A.; Schmelter, R.

    1986-07-01

    Technetium-99m albumin-sucralfate ((/sup 99m/Tc)Su) can be used to demonstrate peptic ulcer disease in man and animals. We evaluated the usefulness of (/sup 99m/Tc)Su for detecting various grades of esophagitis. (/sup 99m/Tc)Su adhered to the distal esophagus for up to 3 hr in five of six patients with esophageal ulcers but adhered to only two of nine with lesser degrees of esophagitis. No adherence was seen in five patients without esophagitis. Thus, (/sup 99m/Tc)Su may not be useful for detecting any but the most severe grade of esophagitis. Based on these results, we speculate that the previously documented beneficial effects of sucralfate on mild to moderate esophagitis may be due to other mechanisms besides adherence to the ulcerated mucosa.

  6. Echo-endoscopic analysis of variceal hemodynamics in patient with isolated gastric varices

    PubMed Central

    Imamura, HIdemichi; Irisawa, Atsushi; Shibukawa, Goro; Takagi, Tadayuki; Hikichi, Takuto; Obara, Katsutoshi; Ohira, Hiromasa

    2014-01-01

    Background: It is considered that gastric varices (GVs) which have the large form in endoscopic view should be treated because they are regarded as having high blood flow volume and the risky varices of hemorrhage. However, there is no data of the correlation among the endoscopic view, diameter of GV, and blood flow volume in GV. The aim of this study was to investigate whether GV diameter correlates to blood flow volume or not. In addition, the correlation between the endoscopic findings of GVs, patient status, and blood flow volume was assessed. Materials and Methods: In this study, 24 patients were enrolled. Variceal form and its location were observed using flexible GI endoscopes. Assessment of variceal form and location was according to Japanese society of portal hypertension. Then, the GV diameter (the maximum short axis), the GV flow velocity, and the GV flow volume were measured by echo-endoscope with curved linear array or with electronic radial array. Results: Nineteen of 24 enrolled patients were analyzed. There was strong correlation between the GV diameter and the GV flow volume (rs = 0.85, P < 0.01). No significant difference in the GV diameter and the GV flow volume was found between each location. However, there was no significant difference in the GV diameter between each variceal form. In addition, no significant difference was found among Child–Pugh classifications, and in cases associated with or without hepatocelluer carcinoma. Conclusions: Strong correlation was found between GV diameter and flow volume of GV, regardless of the location. However, since there was no significant difference in the GV diameter between each variceal form in endoscopic view, measuring GV diameter is important to understand its hemodynamics for further treatment. PMID:25485272

  7. ALCOHOLIC VERSUS NONALCOHOLIC CIRRHOSIS IN A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL OF EMERGENCY THERAPY OF BLEEDING VARICES

    PubMed Central

    Orloff, Marshall J.; Isenberg, Jon I.; Wheeler, Henry O.; Haynes, Kevin S.; Jinich-Brook, Horacio; Rapier, Roderick; Vaida, Florin; Hye, Robert J.; Orloff, Susan L.

    2010-01-01

    Background It has been proposed that portal-systemic shunts be avoided in alcoholic cirrhotics because survival rate is allegedly lower in alcoholics than in nonalcoholics. We examined this issue in a randomized controlled trial. Methods 211 unselected, consecutive patients with cirrhosis and bleeding esophageal varices were randomized to endoscopic sclerotherapy (EST) (n=106) or emergency portacaval shunt (EPCS) (105). Treatment was initiated within 8 hours. EST failure was treated by rescue PCS. 10-yr follow-up was 96%. Results Results strongly favored EPCS over EST (p<0.001). Among EPCS patients, 83% were alcoholic and 17% nonalcoholic. Outcomes were (1) permanent control of bleeding 100% vs. 100%; (2) 5-yr survival 71% vs.78%; (3) encephalopathy 14% vs. 19%; (4) yearly charges $38,300 vs. $43,000. Conclusions EPCS results were similar in alcoholic and nonalcoholic cirrhotics. EPCS is an effective first line emergency treatment in all forms of cirrhosis, including alcoholic. PMID:21195430

  8. Esophageal manifestations of celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Lucendo, A J

    2011-09-01

    Celiac disease (CD) may often be associated with various motor disorders affecting the different segments of the digestive tract, including the esophagus. Although it has not been universally reported, some available evidences indicate that pediatric and adult celiac patients could manifest a higher frequency of esophagitis and gastroesophageal reflux disease-related symptoms compared to nonceliac patients. In addition, several published studies have consistently shown the efficacy of a gluten-free diet in rapidly controlling esophageal symptoms and in preventing their recurrence. Since the participation of gluten in the esophageal symptoms of CD seems clear, its intimate mechanisms have yet to be elucidated, and several hypothesis have been proposed, including the specific immune alterations characterizing CD, the reduction in nutrient absorption determining the arrival of intact gluten to distal gastrointestinal segments, and various dysregulations in the function of gastrointestinal hormones and peptides. Recent studies have suggested the existence of a possible relationship between CD and eosinophilic esophagitis, which should be more deeply investigated.

  9. [Cirrhosis of the liver and esophageal bleeding after chronic vitamin A intoxication (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Tholen, W; Paquet, K J; Rohner, H G; Albrecht, M

    1980-08-01

    A female patient with congenital ichthyosis took vitamin A in an uncontrolled manner throughout 3 years totalling 60 Mill. IU. This lead to cirrhosis of the liver confirmed histologically after biopsy; vitamin A could be demonstrated in tissue of liver and spleen by fluorescence microscopy. Bleeding from esophageal varices could not be stopped by conventional means, but only by sclerosing the esophageal mucosa in the areas affected. A relapse of bleeding from varices of the fornix was stopped by disconnection according to Hassab-Paquet. The patient died from hepatic failure in advanced hepatic cirrhosis. A long time treatment with high doses of vitamin A seems to be a doubtful therapeutic procedure, especially in view of the fact, that side effects of this therapy cannot be monitored by laboratory measurements; when a disturbed liver function becomes evident, irreversible damage, e.g. cirrhosis or fibrosis and portal hypertension, is already present.

  10. Colonic varices demonstrated by technetium-99m red cell scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Brill, D.R.

    1987-03-01

    Colonic varices is a rare condition, generally associated with portal hypertension, which normally presents as acute, severe, gastrointestinal blood loss. A case is presented in which the varicosities were observed serendipitously in a patient with a pancreatic tumor, in whom the bleeding was not variceal but due to two small unrelated gastric hemangiomas. The literature is reviewed and scintigraphic features described.

  11. Embolization of Large Gastric Varices Using Vena Cava Filter and Coils

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, Jason M.; Shah, Himanshu Stecker, Michael S.; Namyslowski, Jan

    2004-08-15

    A 40-year-old male with alcoholic cirrhosis and portal hypertension presented with acute variceal hemorrhage. Abdominal CT scan and endoscopy revealed large gastric varices. The patient underwent a TIPS procedure. Portal venography demonstrated persistent filling of the large gastric varices with associated high-flow spontaneous splenorenal shunt. Because of the large size of the varices, a Simon-Nitinol filter was used in conjunction with multiple embolization coils to enable successful occlusion of the varices.

  12. Effects of octreotide on lower esophageal sphincter in patients with cirrhosis and portal hypertension.

    PubMed

    Barrioz, T; Borderie, C; Strock, P; Ingrand, P; Fort, E; Silvain, C; Beauchant, M

    1998-07-01

    We investigated the effects of octreotide infusion on the contractile activity of the esophageal body and lower esophageal sphincter in cirrhotic patients with esophageal varices. Esophageal manometry was performed in 36 alcoholic cirrhotic patients. They were randomly allocated to three groups and received the following treatments blindly for 90 min: an initial 100-microg intravenous bolus followed by a continuous 25 microg/hr octreotide infusion (group I, N= 13), a continuous 25 micro/hr octreotide infusion without an initial bolus (group II, N=13), and a continuous placebo infusion (group III, N=10). Before drug infusion, mean lower esophageal sphincter pressure and mean esophageal body contraction pressure and duration were similar in the three groups. Compared to the placebo group, lower esophageal sphincter pressure increased significantly in groups I and II, 30 min (30%, 22%, 3% respectively; P= 0.006), 60 min (44%, 35%, 0.6%; P=0.0002), and 90 min (67%, 41%, 2.5%; P=0.0001) after octreotide infusion, as did esophageal body contraction pressure and duration. We conclude that octreotide has a potent effect on LES tone in cirrhotic patients.

  13. Addition of Somatostatin After Successful Endoscopic Variceal Ligation Does not Prevent Early Rebleeding in Comparison to Placebo: A Double Blind Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ashish; Jha, Sanjeev K.; Mittal, Vibhu V.; Sharma, Praveen; Sharma, Barjesh C.; Sarin, Shiv K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Efficacy of endoscopic sclerotherapy in controlling acute variceal bleeding is significantly improved when vasoactive drug is added. Endoscopic variceal ligation (EVL) is superior to sclerotherapy. Whether efficacy of EVL will also improve with addition of somatostatin is not known. We compared EVL plus somatostatin versus EVL plus placebo in control of acute variceal bleeding. Methods Consecutive cirrhotic patients with acute esophageal variceal bleeding were enrolled. After emergency EVL, patients were randomized to receive either somatostatin (250 mcg/hr) or placebo infusion. Primary endpoint was treatment failure within 5 days. Treatment failure was defined as fresh hematemesis ≥2 h after start of therapy, or a 3 gm drop in Hb, or death. Results 61 patients were enrolled (EVL plus somatostatin group, n = 31 and EVL plus placebo group, n = 30). The baseline characteristics were similar. Within the initial 5-day period, the frequency of treatment failure was similar in both the groups (EVL plus somatostatin group 8/31 [26%] versus EVL plus placebo group 7/30 [23%]; P = 1.000). The mortality was also similar in the two groups (3/31 [10%] vs. 3/30 [10%]; P = 1.000). Baseline HVPG ≥19 mm Hg and active bleeding at index endoscopy were independent predictors of treatment failure. Conclusions Addition of somatostatin infusion to EVL therapy does not offer any advantage in control of acute variceal bleeding or reducing mortality. The reason for this may be its failure to maintain sustained reduction in portal pressure for five days. Active bleeding at index endoscopy and high baseline HVPG should help choose early alternative treatment options. Trial registered with ClincalTrials.gov vide NCT01267669. PMID:26628838

  14. MITOMYCIN C IN THE MANAGEMENT OF PEDIATRIC CAUSTIC ESOPHAGEAL STRICTURES. A CASE REPORT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although the incidence of caustic ingestion is declining, the management of caustic esophageal strictures remains a challenge. Mitomycin C (MMC) inhibits fibroblast proliferation and is effective in reducing scar in animal experiments. We report the case of a child with a distal esophageal stricture...

  15. Embolization of Bleeding Stomal Varices by Direct Percutaneous Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Arulraj, Ramakrishnan; Mangat, Kamarjit S.; Tripathi, Dhiraj

    2011-02-15

    Stomal varices can occur in patients with stoma in the presence of portal hypertension. Suture ligation, sclerotherapy, angiographic embolization, stoma revision, beta blockade, portosystemic shunt, and liver transplantation have been described as therapeutic options for bleeding stomal varices. We report the case of a 21-year-old patient with primary sclerosing cholangitis and colectomy with ileostomy for ulcerative colitis, where stomal variceal bleeding was successfully treated by direct percutaneous embolization. We consider percutaneous embolization to be an effective way of treating acute stomal bleeding in decompensated patients while awaiting decisions regarding shunt procedures or liver transplantation.

  16. Esophageal pH monitoring

    MedlinePlus

    pH monitoring - esophageal; Esophageal acidity test ... esophagitis You may need to have the following tests if your doctor suspects esophagitis : Barium swallow Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (also called upper GI endoscopy)

  17. Fatal Klebsiella pneumoniae meningitis and emphysematous brain abscess after endoscopic variceal ligation in a patient with liver cirrhosis and diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Shih, Hsin-I; Lee, Hsin-Chun; Chuang, Chiao-Hsiung; Ko, Wen-Chien

    2006-10-01

    Procedure-related bacterial infections may complicate esophageal variceal ligation in cirrhosis patients. Here, we report a 58-year-old man with underlying diabetes and liver cirrhosis who developed Klebsiella pneumoniae meningitis and brain abscess with gas formation in brain parenchyma and ventricles after this procedure. Despite administration of appropriate antimicrobial therapy, he became comatose on the 3rd day of acute illness and died on the 4th day of hospitalization. This case highlights the indication for antimicrobial prophylaxis in cirrhotic patients with gastrointestinal bleeding, and the need for early and heightened awareness of central nervous system infections in cirrhotic patients with hepatic encephalopathy.

  18. Lumbar epidural varices: An unusual cause of lumbar claudication

    PubMed Central

    Subbiah, Meenakshisundaram; Yegumuthu, Krishnan

    2016-01-01

    Lumbar epidural varices can also present with radiculopathy similar to acute intervertebral disc prolapse (IVDP). However as the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in these patients are usually normal without significant compressive lesions of the nerve roots, the diagnosis is commonly missed or delayed leading to persistent symptoms. We present a rare case of acute severe unilateral claudication with a normal MRI unresponsive to conservative management who was treated surgically. The nerve root on the symptomatic side was found to be compressed by large anterior epidural varices secondary to an abnormal cranial attachment of ligamentum flavum. Decompression of the root and coagulation of the varices resulted in complete pain relief. To conclude, lumbar epidural varices should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute onset radiculopathy and claudication in the absence of significant MRI findings. PMID:27512228

  19. ENDOSCOPIC DIAGNOSIS AND THERAPY IN GASTRO-ESOPAGEAL VARICEAL BLEEDING

    PubMed Central

    Sanyal, Arun J.

    2016-01-01

    Gastroesophageal variceal hemorrhage is a medical emergency with high morbidity and mortality. Endoscopic therapy is the mainstay of management of bleeding varices. It requires attention to technique and the appropriate choice of therapy for a given patient at a given point in time. Subjects must be monitored continuously after initiation of therapy for control of bleeding and second line definitive therapies introduced quickly if endoscopic and pharmacologic treatment fails. PMID:26142034

  20. Esophageal dilation in eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Richter, Joel E

    2015-10-01

    Tissue remodeling with scaring is common in adult EoE patients with long standing disease. This is the major factor contributing to their complaints of solid food dysphagia and recurrent food impactions. The best tests to define the degree of remodeling are barium esophagram, high resolution manometry and endoscopy. Many physicians are fearful to dilate EoE patients because of concerns about mucosal tears and perforations. However, multiple recent case series attest to the safety of esophageal dilation and its efficacy with many patients having symptom relief for an average of two years. This chapter will review the sordid history of esophageal dilation in EoE patients and outline how to perform this procedure safely. The key is graduated dilation over one to several sessions to a diameter of 15-18 mm. Postprocedural pain is to be expected and mucosal tears are a sign of successful dilation, not complications. In some healthy adults, occasional dilation may be preferred to regular use of medications or restricted diets. This approach is now supported by recent EoE consensus statements and societal guidelines.

  1. An alternate low risk technique for esophageal transection in the Sugiura-Futagawa procedure.

    PubMed

    Mercado, M A; Takahashi, T; Orozco, H

    1993-07-01

    The Sugiura-Futagawa procedure is an effective non-shunting operation to treat bleeding esophageal varices. The goal of the esophageal transection is the interruption of submucosal varices. The rate of esophageal fistula reported after transection is 5 to 8 per cent. This complication has high morbidity and mortality rates. The technique and results of an alternate variant of the esophageal transection are described. After devascularization of the esophagus is achieved, the anterior muscular layer is opened, and the entire mucosal cylinder is dissected free from the muscular layer. Without opening the mucosa, a circumferential continuous running suture with fine non-absorbable material is placed, involving both mucosa and submucosa, interrupting the varicose veins. Our experience with this technique has been encouraging, having observed no stenosis or fistulization in 10 patients on whom we operated. Re-bleeding rate is low (10% in this series). The advantages of this modification are: 1) since we do not cut open the mucosal layer, we believe that the risk of fistulization is reduced, and 2) it allows an early initiation of oral feeding, thus reducing the hospital stay.

  2. [Morphological changes in esophageal mucosa in children with overweight].

    PubMed

    Dubrovskaia, M I; Tertychnyĭ, A S; Mukhina, Iu G; Volodina, I I; Mamchenko, S I

    2010-01-01

    In present work we studied the morphological features of the esophageal mucosa in 63 children with endoscopic diagnosis of the distal esophagitis having overweight and normal weight of a body. The biopsies were taken at level of 3 cm above a Z-line and at level of 1 cm above a Z-line. Dystrophic and dysregenerative changes were revealed at the majority of children and half of children had inflammatory changes of the esophageal mucosa regardless of weight of a body. These changes are more pronounced at level of 1 cm above a Z-line, their occurrence decreases with a distance from low esophageal sphincter. We used the pathology score system for assess the esophageal biopsies. According our scale we obtained following results: at level of 1 cm above Z-lines at 95% of children had the normal, minimum or mild features of esophagitis regardless of weight of a body. Morphological evidence of a reflux esophagitis was diagnosed statistically more often at level of 1 cm above Z lines in comparison with level of 3 cm above Z-lines (p < 0.01) as among children with overweight of the body (78 and 43% accordingly), and among children with normal weight of the body (78 and 35% accordingly). The obtained data will be allowed to avoid hyperdiagnostics of esophageal lesions in children. PMID:20405708

  3. Chronic Recurrent Esophageal Diverticulitis - A Rare Entity

    PubMed Central

    Manne, Ashish; Smith, Ioana; Hatchett, Jeremy; Juneau, Jeffrey; Kodali, Sudha; Malik, Talha A.; Weber, Fred H.

    2013-01-01

    In this report, we seek to shed light on a 44-year-old Caucasian male with a known history of an esophageal diverticulum, who was transferred to our facility after an upper endoscopy at an outside hospital suggested a purulent discharge emanating from the mouth of a mid-esophageal diverticulum. A barium swallow done at the outside institution had reportedly demonstrated an 8 cm long barium collection parallel to and anterolateral to the mid-and distal esophagus which terminated several centimeters proximal to the gastroesophageal junction. At our facility, antibiotics (piperacillin/tazobactam) were continued, and a double-contrast esophagram was performed. The presence of an unusual mid-esophageal diverticulum was confirmed. He clinically improved after a 3-day course of intravenous broad-spectrum antibiotics. No surgical or endoscopic repair was elected as the patient opted for continued medical management. While esophageal diverticula are not rare in humans, to our knowledge, this is the first report of development of esophageal diverticulitis in humans. We believe that antibiotic coverage in addition to dietary restriction is the logical mainstay of acute therapy. Optimal antibiotic coverage should likely include oral flora aerobes and anaerobes. Once symptoms resolve, diverticula may be managed expectantly.

  4. Esophageal stenting for benign and malignant disease: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) Clinical Guideline.

    PubMed

    Spaander, Manon C W; Baron, Todd H; Siersema, Peter D; Fuccio, Lorenzo; Schumacher, Brigitte; Escorsell, Àngels; Garcia-Pagán, Juan-Carlos; Dumonceau, Jean-Marc; Conio, Massimo; de Ceglie, Antonella; Skowronek, Janusz; Nordsmark, Marianne; Seufferlein, Thomas; Van Gossum, André; Hassan, Cesare; Repici, Alessandro; Bruno, Marco J

    2016-10-01

    recommendation, low quality evidence). 2 ESGE suggests consideration of temporary placement of SEMSs as therapy for refractory benign esophageal strictures (weak recommendation, moderate evidence). Stents should usually be removed at a maximum of 3 months (strong recommendation, weak quality evidence). 3 ESGE suggests that fully covered SEMSs be preferred over partially covered SEMSs for the treatment of refractory benign esophageal strictures, because of their lack of embedment and ease of removability (weak recommendation, low quality evidence). 4 For the removal of partially covered esophageal SEMSs that are embedded, ESGE recommends the stent-in-stent technique (strong recommendation, low quality evidence). 5 ESGE recommends that temporary stent placement can be considered for treating esophageal leaks, fistulas, and perforations. The optimal stenting duration remains unclear and should be individualized. (Strong recommendation, low quality evidence.) 6 ESGE recommends placement of a SEMS for the treatment of esophageal variceal bleeding refractory to medical, endoscopic, and/or radiological therapy, or as initial therapy for patients with massive esophageal variceal bleeding (strong recommendation, moderate quality evidence). PMID:27626318

  5. Desloratadine Induced Pill Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Alkim, Huseyin; Iscan, Mustafa

    2012-01-01

    Pill induced esophagitis is a rare complication mostly seen in patients using tetracycline and its derivatives or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Here we present a 37 years old female patient experiencing pill esophagitis after taking desloratadine without liquid immediately before going to bed. This was the first pill esophagitis case related with desloratadine reported in the literature. Pill esophagitis is a preventable complication that consists of giving simple advice of how and when to take medication.

  6. Challenges of banding jejunal varices in an 8-year-old child

    PubMed Central

    Belsha, Dalia; Thomson, Mike

    2015-01-01

    Endoscoic variceal ligation (EVL) by the application of bands on small bowel varices is a relatively rare procedure in gastroenterology and hepatology. There are no previously reported paediatric cases of EVL for jejunal varices. We report a case of an eight-year-old male patient with a complex surgical background leading to jejunal varices and short bowel syndrome, presenting with obscure but profound acute gastrointestinal bleeding. Wireless capsule endoscopy and double balloon enteroscopy (DBE) confirmed jejunal varices as the source of bleeding. The commercially available variceal banding devices are not long enough to be used either with DBE or with push enteroscopes. With the use of an operating gastroscope, four bands were placed successfully on the afferent and efferent ends of the leads of the 2 of the varices. Initial hemostasis was achieved with obliteration of the varices after three separate applications. This case illustrates the feasibility of achieving initial hemostasis in the pediatric population. PMID:26722617

  7. Combined Uphill and Downhill Varices as a Consequence of Rheumatic Heart Disease: A Unique Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Harwani, Yogesh P.; Kumar, Ajit; Chaudhary, Akash; Kumar, Manoj; Choudeswari, Padmavathi R.; Kankanala, Vishnu V.; Joshi, Nayana; Kansagra, Chintan; Shah, Sandip; Tripathi, Abhisheka

    2014-01-01

    Hemorrhage from downhill varices is a rare manifestation. The etiology of downhill varices is due to superior vena cava obstruction while uphill varices are secondary to portal hypertension. We report a rare case of 55-year-old female with bleeding downhill varices not associated with obstruction or compression of superior vena cava, but was due to severe pulmonary artery hypertension secondary to chronic rheumatic heart disease. PMID:25755536

  8. Molecular Pathways: Pathogenesis and clinical implications of microbiome alteration in esophagitis and Barrett’s esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Liying; Francois, Fritz; Pei, Zhiheng

    2013-01-01

    Esophageal adenocarcinoma is preceded by the development of reflux-related intestinal metaplasia or Barrett’s esophagus which is a response to inflammation of the esophageal squamous mucosa, reflux esophagitis. Gastroesophageal reflux impairs the mucosal barrier in the distal esophagus, allowing chronic exposure of the squamous epithelium to the diverse microbial ecosystem or microbiome, and inducing chronic inflammation. The esophageal microbiome is altered in both esophagitis and Barrett's esophagus, characterized by a significant decrease in Gram-positive bacteria and an increase in Gram-negative bacteria in esophagitis and Barrett's esophagus. Lipopolysaccharides (LPS), a major structure of the outer membrane in Gram-negative bacteria, can up-regulate gene expression of proinflammatory cytokines via activation of the TLR4 and NF-kB pathway. The potential impact of LPS on reflux esophagitis may be through relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter via iNOS and by delaying gastric emptying via COX-2. Chronic inflammation may be play a critical role in the progression from benign to malignant esophageal disease. Therefore analysis of the pathways leading to chronic inflammation in the esophagus may help to identify biomarkers in Barrett's esophagus patients for neoplastic progression and provide insight into molecular events suitable for therapeutic intervention in prevention of esophageal adenocarcinoma development in patients with reflux esophagitis and Barrett's esophagus. PMID:22344232

  9. Validation of an Endoscopic Fibre-Optic Pressure Sensor for Noninvasive Measurement of Variceal Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Bin; Kong, De-Run; Li, Su-Wen; Yu, Dong-Feng; Wang, Ging-Jing; Yu, Fang-Fang; Wu, Qiong; Xu, Jian-Ming

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the authors have developed endoscopic fibre-optic pressure sensor to detect variceal pressure and presented the validation of in vivo and in vitro studies, because the HVPG requires catheterization of hepatic veins, which is invasive and inconvenient. Compared with HVPG, it is better to measure directly the variceal pressure without puncturing the varices in a noninvasive way. PMID:27314010

  10. Validation of an Endoscopic Fibre-Optic Pressure Sensor for Noninvasive Measurement of Variceal Pressure.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bin; Kong, De-Run; Li, Su-Wen; Yu, Dong-Feng; Wang, Ging-Jing; Yu, Fang-Fang; Wu, Qiong; Xu, Jian-Ming

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the authors have developed endoscopic fibre-optic pressure sensor to detect variceal pressure and presented the validation of in vivo and in vitro studies, because the HVPG requires catheterization of hepatic veins, which is invasive and inconvenient. Compared with HVPG, it is better to measure directly the variceal pressure without puncturing the varices in a noninvasive way. PMID:27314010

  11. Safety of direct endoscopic necrosectomy in patients with gastric varices

    PubMed Central

    Storm, Andrew C; Thompson, Christopher C

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To determine the feasibility and safety of transgastric direct endoscopic necrosectomy (DEN) in patients with walled-off necrosis (WON) and gastric varices. METHODS: A single center retrospective study of consecutive DEN for WON was performed from 2012 to 2015. All DEN cases with gastric fundal varices noted on endoscopy, computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) during the admission for DEN were collected for analysis. In all cases, external urethral sphincter (EUS) with doppler was used to exclude the presence of intervening gastric varices or other vascular structures prior to 19 gauge fine-needle aspiration (FNA) needle access into the cavity. The tract was serially dilated to 20 mm and was entered with an endoscope for DEN. Pigtail stents were placed to facilitate drainage of the cavity. Procedure details were recorded. Comprehensive chart review was performed to evaluate for complications and WON recurrence. RESULTS: Fifteen patients who underwent DEN for WON had gastric varices at the time of their procedure. All patients had an INR < 1.5 and platelets > 50. Of these patients, 11 had splenic vein thrombosis and 2 had portal vein thrombosis. Two patients had isolated gastric varices, type 1 and the remaining 13 had > 5 mm gastric submucosal varices on imaging by CT, MRI or EUS. No procedures were terminated without completing the DEN for any reason. One patient had self-limited intraprocedural bleeding related to balloon dilation of the tract. Two patients experienced delayed bleeding at 2 and 5 d post-op respectively. One required no therapy or intervention and the other received 1 unit transfusion and had an EGD which revealed no active bleeding. Resolution rate of WON was 100% (after up to 2 additional DEN in one patient) and no patients required interventional radiology or surgical interventions. CONCLUSION: In patients with WON and gastric varices, DEN using EUS and doppler guidance may be performed safely. Successful resolution

  12. Distal splenorenal shunt

    MedlinePlus

    ... shunt procedure; Renal - splenic venous shunt; Warren shunt; Cirrhosis - distal splenorenal; Liver failure - distal splenorenal ... hepatitis Blood clots Certain congenital disorders Primary biliary cirrhosis When blood cannot flow normally through the portal ...

  13. Distal Convoluted Tubule

    PubMed Central

    Ellison, David H.

    2014-01-01

    The distal convoluted tubule is the nephron segment that lies immediately downstream of the macula densa. Although short in length, the distal convoluted tubule plays a critical role in sodium, potassium, and divalent cation homeostasis. Recent genetic and physiologic studies have greatly expanded our understanding of how the distal convoluted tubule regulates these processes at the molecular level. This article provides an update on the distal convoluted tubule, highlighting concepts and pathophysiology relevant to clinical practice. PMID:24855283

  14. From Reflux Esophagitis to Esophageal Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Souza, Rhonda F

    2016-01-01

    Reflux esophagitis causes Barrett's metaplasia, an abnormal esophageal mucosa predisposed to adenocarcinoma. Medical therapy for reflux esophagitis focuses on decreasing gastric acid production with proton pump inhibitors. We have reported that reflux esophagitis in a rat model develops from a cytokine-mediated inflammatory injury, not from a caustic chemical (acid) injury. In this model, refluxed acid and bile stimulate the release of inflammatory cytokines from esophageal squamous cells, recruiting lymphocytes first to the submucosa and later to the luminal surface. Emerging studies on acute reflux esophagitis in humans support this new concept, suggesting that reflux-induced cytokine release may be a future target for medical therapies. Sometimes, reflux esophagitis heals with Barrett's metaplasia, a process facilitated by reflux-related nitric oxide (NO) production and Sonic Hedgehog (Hh) secretion by squamous cells. We have shown that NO reduces expression of genes that promote a squamous cell phenotype, while Hh signaling induces genes that mediate the development of the columnar cell phenotypes of Barrett's metaplasia. Agents targeting esophageal NO production or Hh signaling conceivably could prevent the development of Barrett's esophagus. Persistent reflux promotes cancer in Barrett's metaplasia. We have reported that acid and bile salts induce DNA damage in Barrett's cells. Bile salts also cause NF-x03BA;B activation in Barrett's cells, enabling them to resist apoptosis in the setting of DNA damage and likely contributing to carcinogenesis. Oral treatment with ursodeoxycholic acid prevents the esophageal DNA damage and NF-x03BA;B activation induced by toxic bile acids. Altering bile acid composition might be another approach to cancer prevention. PMID:27331918

  15. Schistosomal versus nonschistosomal variceal bleeders. Do they respond differently to selective shunt (DSRS)?

    PubMed Central

    Ezzat, F A; Abu-Elmagd, K M; Sultan, A A; Aly, M A; Fathy, O M; Bahgat, O O; el-Fiky, A M; el-Barbary, M H; Mashhoor, N

    1989-01-01

    The distal splenorenal shunt (DSRS) was performed in 125 consecutive variceal bleeders. To date, no patients have been lost to follow-up (mean of 79 +/- 20 months). Liver pathology was documented in 85 patients: 45 patients had schistosomal hepatic fibrosis, 17 had nonalcoholic cirrhosis, and 23 had mixed pattern (hepatic fibrosis and cirrhosis). The preoperative data base for these three groups was matched (p greater than 0.05), with a mean follow-up of 79 +/- 20, 70 +/- 14, and 77 +/- 22 months for each population, respectively. The results showed low operative mortality (4.8%), high cumulative patency rate (94.8%) and low recurrent variceal hemorrhage (5.6%). The biochemical data showed significant increase in serum bilirubin (p less than 0.001) and aspartate transaminase (AST) (p less than 0.05) in the nonschistosomal patients. Chronic hyperbilirubinemia was found in 33% of the schistosomal group. Prograde portal perfusion was detected in 94% of the patients, with development of collaterals in 91%. The angiographic pattern of these collaterals was 50% pancreatic, 45% gastric, and 26% colosplenic. Patients with mixed liver disease had a high incidence of Grade III portal perfusion (57%) and more common pancreatic and gastric collaterals (71%). The cumulative survival for all patients was 74.1%, with hepatic cell failure being the leading cause of death (13 patients, 50% of all deaths). The schistosomal patients had a 91.6% incidence, whereas the cirrhotic and mixed groups had survival rates of 75.6% and 65.2%, respectively. Also, of a 15% total incidence of encephalopathy, 4.4% was related to the schistosomal patients, 23.5% to the cirrhotics, and 21.7% to the mixed population. Statistically, the survival rate was significantly better (p less than 0.05) and encephalopathy was significantly lower (p less than 0.05) in the schistosomal population. In conclusion, this data shows that: 1) DSRS has a high patency rate and a low variceal hemorrhage recurrence rate; 2

  16. The four phases of esophageal bolus transit defined by high-resolution impedance manometry and fluoroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Zhiyue; Yim, Brandon; Gawron, Andrew; Imam, Hala; Kahrilas, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to model esophageal bolus transit based on esophageal pressure topography (EPT) landmarks, concurrent intrabolus pressure (IBP), and esophageal diameter as defined with fluoroscopy. Ten healthy subjects were studied with high-resolution impedance manometry and videofluoroscopy. Data from four 5-ml barium swallows (2 upright, 2 supine) in each subject were analyzed. EPT landmarks were utilized to divide bolus transit into four phases: phase I, upper esophageal sphincter (UES) opening; phase II, UES closure to the transition zone (TZ); phase III, TZ to contractile deceleration point (CDP); and phase IV, CDP to completion of bolus emptying. IBP and esophageal diameter were analyzed to define functional differences among phases. IBP exhibited distinct changes during the four phases of bolus transit. Phase I was associated with filling via passive dilatation of the esophagus and IBP reflective of intrathoracic pressure. Phase II was associated with auxotonic relaxation and compartmentalization of the bolus distal to the TZ. During phase III, IBP exhibited a slow increase with loss of volume related to peristalsis (auxotonic contraction) and passive dilatation in the distal esophagus. Phase IV was associated with the highest IBP and exhibited isometric contraction during periods of nonemptying and auxotonic contraction during emptying. IBP may be used as a marker of esophageal wall state during the four phases of esophageal bolus transit. Thus abnormalities in IBP may identify subtypes of esophageal disease attributable to abnormal distensibility or neuromuscular dysfunction. PMID:24970774

  17. Stent-Induced Esophageal Perforation: Treatment by Means of Placing a Second Stent After Removal of the Original Stent

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Gyoo-Sik Park, Sung-Dal; Cho, Young Duk

    2008-05-15

    A case of esophageal perforation caused by a retrievable covered stent is presented. The distal end of the stent was protruding into the mediastinum, which made it impossible to negotiate a guidewire through the stent into the distal esophagus. The stent was successfully removed with use of a stent retrieval set, and esophageal perforation was treated with a second, covered stent with a good result. Fatality associated with this complication might be prevented by virtue of the retrievability of the stent we used. This result points to the effectiveness of a retrievable stent for the palliative treatment of malignant esophageal stricture.

  18. Characteristics of transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation in humans.

    PubMed

    Mittal, R K; McCallum, R W

    1987-05-01

    Transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations (TLESR) were studied in 10 normal healthy subjects. Electrical activity of mylohyoid muscle measured by an electromyogram (MEMG), pressures from pharynx, three esophageal sites, lower esophageal sphincter, and stomach were simultaneously recorded for 1 h, while fasting and 3 h after an 850 kcal meal. Reflux of acid into esophagus and/or occurrence of belching accompanying a TLESR was also monitored. TLESRs occurred with an equal frequency in fasting and postprandial state (6.2 vs. 6.4 h). However, frequency of an acid reflux during a TLESR was much greater postprandially than after fasting (44.8 vs. 9.6%). Belching coincided with 8% of TLESRs. A small MEMG complex and a small pharyngeal complex were present at onset of TLESR in 41.6 and 26.9% of instances, respectively. TLESRs were then categorized as either postswallow, if it occurred within 10 s of a preceding swallow-induced LES relaxation, or isolated, if its onset to previous swallow was greater than 10 s. Esophageal contractions were noticed at onset of 84% of isolated TLESRs. When present at two distal sites, this contraction was always of a simultaneous nature. Esophageal contractions at onset of postswallow TLESR were less frequent (33.3%) but when present were usually observed at the proximal esophageal site. At completion of a TLESR, the LES never recovered without an associated esophageal contraction, the latter was either swallow mediated or a spontaneous simultaneous esophageal contraction. Our data indicate that 1) MEMG and pharyngeal motor events may accompany TLESRs; and 2) esophageal contraction frequently heralds the onset, and it always occurs at completion of a TLESR.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Bleeding Duodenal: Varices Treatment by TIPS and Transcatheter Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Lopera, Jorge E. Arthurs, Blain; Scheuerman, Christian; Sandoz, Charles; Petersosn, Scott; Castaneda-Zuniga, Wildriodo

    2008-03-15

    We describe our clinical experience in 4 patients with portal hypertension who presented with bleeding mesenteric varices originating from the superior mesenteric vein with retrograde filling of collaterals draining into the inferior vena cava. The clinical presentation, imaging findings, and potential therapeutic management are discussed.

  20. Circadian occurrence of variceal bleeding in patients with liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Siringo, S; Bolondi, L; Sofia, S; Hermida, R C; Gramantieri, L; Gaiani, S; Piscaglia, F; Carbone, C; Misitano, B; Corinaldesi, R

    1996-12-01

    Several clinical events have a rhythmicity over the 24 h period. We assessed the presence of periodic rhythm in the occurrence of haematemesis in patients with liver cirrhosis under different daylight regimens, namely during standard time and during daylight savings. Over a 48 month period there were 212 consecutive admissions of 118 cirrhotics with variceal bleeding. Complete data were available for 181 episodes of bleeding: 121 (66.9%) started with haematemesis and 60 (33.1%) started with melaena. One hundred and two (56%) episodes occurred during daylight savings and 79 (44%) occurred during standard time. The cosinor test showed a 24 h biphasic peak for the occurrence of haematemesis (09.45 and 21.45 h). Moreover, a biphasic diurnal asymmetric frequency was also found by multiple component rhythmometry. The time peaks of onset of variceal haemorrhage did not change significantly during standard time and daylight savings. Patients with more than one haematemesis episode significantly bled over the same time interval. The present study confirms that over the 24 h period variceal bleeding in cirrhotic patients occurs with a predictable rhythmicity that does not seem to be under the control of the light-dark cycle. The finding of a chronorisk for variceal haemorrhage addresses specific questions for pathophysiological studies as well as for new treatment strategies.

  1. Vulvar varices: an uncommon entity in surgical pathology.

    PubMed

    Bell, Diana; Kane, Philip B; Liang, Sharon; Conway, Christine; Tornos, Carmen

    2007-01-01

    Varicose veins in the vulvar and perivulvar area are seen in 4% of women. Most of them are secondary to pregnancy and usually regress spontaneously. Vulvar varicose veins are rare in nonpregnant women. When present, they can be seen alone, associated with leg varices or associated with venous malformations of the labia, clitoral area, or vagina with or without arteriovenous malformations on the limbs or trunk (Klippel-Trenaunay-Weber syndrome and Parkes-Weber syndrome). In some cases, vulvar varices are seen as part of the so-called "pelvic congestion syndrome." Clinically, vulvar varices may present as small isolated protrusions, mainly in the labia majora, or as large masses, involving the vulva and even the perivulvar area. The treatment of choice of vulvar varices seen during pregnancy is conservative and symptomatic. Surgical pathologists need to be aware of the existence of vulvar varicose veins and its possible presence in biopsy specimens. Vulvar varicose veins can be misdiagnosed clinically as cysts or masses mainly in the Bartholin gland area. Correct diagnosis of the lesion is important to determine appropriate therapy and to recognize the possibility of associated anatomical or pathological problems.

  2. Distal Myopathies: Case Studies.

    PubMed

    Shaibani, Aziz

    2016-08-01

    About 15% of myopathies present with distal weakness. Lack of sensory deficit, and preservation of sensory responses and deep tendon reflexes, favors a myopathic cause for distal weakness. Electromyogram confirms this diagnosis. Profuse spontaneous discharges are common in inflammatory, metabolic, and myofibrillar myopathy (MFM). If the clinical picture indicates a specific disease such as facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD), genetic testing provides the quickest diagnosis. Otherwise, muscle biopsy can distinguish specific features. The common causes of myopathic distal weakness are FSHD, myotonic dystrophy, and inclusion body myositis. Other causes include MFM, distal muscular dystrophies, metabolic myopathies, and congenital myopathies. PMID:27445241

  3. An Unusual Case of Foreign Body Lodged in the Laryngopharynx of Neonate with Esophageal Atresia.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Rahul; Saxena, Manisha; Paul, Rozy; Gubbi, Sharan; Mathur, Praveen

    2016-01-01

    A blunt‑tipped red rubber catheter is used to confirm the presence of esophageal atresia in any newborn with drooling of saliva and frothing from the mouth. Failure to pass it beyond 10cms into the esophagus is considered diagnostic. We here in report an extremely rare case of broken tip of red rubber catheter lodged in the laryngopharynx of 2-day-old neonate of esophageal atresia with distal tracheoesophageal fistula. During endotracheal intubation foreign body was accidentally removed. PMID:26793600

  4. Detection of Esophageal Fiducial Marker Displacement During Radiation Therapy With a 2-dimensional On-board Imager: Analysis of Internal Margin for Esophageal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Fukada, Junichi; Hanada, Takashi; Kawaguchi, Osamu; Ohashi, Toshio; Takeuchi, Hiroya; Kitagawa, Yuko; Seki, Satoshi; Shiraishi, Yutaka; Ogata, Haruhiko; Shigematsu, Naoyuki

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To quantify the interfraction displacement of esophageal fiducial markers for primary esophageal cancer radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Orthogonal 2-dimensional (2D) matching records fused to vertebrae were analyzed in clinically staged T1/2N0 esophageal cancer patients undergoing endoscopic clipping as fiducial metal markers. Displacement of the markers between the digitally reconstructed radiographs and on-board kilovoltage images during radiation therapy was analyzed according to direction and esophageal site. Results: Forty-four patients, with 81 markers (10 proximal, 42 middle, and 29 distal), underwent 367 2D matching sessions during radiation therapy. The mean (SD) absolute marker displacement was 0.26 (0.30) cm in the right–left (RL), 0.50 (0.39) cm in the superior–inferior (SI), and 0.24 (0.21) cm in the anterior–posterior (AP) direction. Displacement was significantly larger in the SI than in the RL and AP directions (P<.0001). In the SI direction, mean absolute displacements of the distal, middle, and proximal esophagus were 0.67 (0.45) cm, 0.42 (0.32) cm, and 0.36 (0.30) cm, respectively. Distal esophagus displacement was significantly larger than those of the middle and proximal esophagus (P<.0001). The estimated internal margin to cover 95% of the cases was 0.75 cm in the RL and AP directions. In the SI direction, the margin was 1.25 cm for the proximal and middle esophagus and 1.75 cm for the distal esophagus. Conclusions: The magnitude of interfraction displacement of esophageal clips was larger in the SI direction, particularly in the distal esophagus, but substantial displacement was observed in other directions and at other esophageal sites. It is practical to take estimated movements into account with internal margins, even if vertebrae-based 2D matching is performed.

  5. Case Report: Gallbladder Varices in a Patient with Portal Vein Thrombosis Secondary to Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Gnerre, Jeffrey; Sun, Yankai; Jedynak, Andrzej; Gilet, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Gallbladder varices are a rare form of collateralization that develop in patients with portal hypertension. We present here a case of gallbladder varices accurately diagnosed by contrast enhanced CT imaging of the abdomen and confirmed by Color Doppler Sonography. A 76-year-old patient with hepatocellular carcinoma developed portal vein thrombosis due to tumor extension during the course of treatment and was incidentally discovered to have gallbladder varices. While most commonly asymptomatic, gallbladder varices are associated with increased risk of massive bleeding, either spontaneously or during cholecystectomy. As a result, the existence of such varices should be well documented if the patient is to undergo any abdominal surgical procedures. In addition, because of a particular association with portal vein thrombosis, patients with portal hypertension that are found to possess gallbladder varices should be evaluated for portal vein thrombosis. PMID:27761177

  6. Balloon-Occluded Retrograde Transvenous Obliteration for Gastric Varices: A Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Sonomura, Tetsuo; Sato, Morio; Kishi, Kazushi; Terada, Masaki; Shioyama, Yasukazu; Kimura, Masashi; Suzuki, Kenzo; Kutsukake, Yasumichi; Ushimi, Takashi; Tanaka, Junji; Hayashi, Seishu; Tanaka, Satoshi

    1998-01-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical feasibility of balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration (BORTO) for gastric varices. Methods: BORTO was performed in 14 patients with gastric varices due to liver cirrhosis. The gastric varices were confirmed by endoscopy, and their feeding and draining veins were identified by contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) and angiography. A 6 Fr Simmons-shaped balloon catheter was inserted into the gastrorenal shunt. The balloon was inflated, and 5% ethanolamine oleate iopamidol was infused slowly through the catheter. Patients were followed up with endoscopy and enhanced CT at 1 week, 1, 3, and 6 months after the procedure and every 6 months thereafter. Results: The gastric varices completely disappeared in 12 of 14 patients and was partially resolved in the remaining 2 patients. Neither a recurrence nor an aggravation of gastric varices were found. No major complications were experienced. Conclusion: BORTO is a safe and effective treatment for gastric varices.

  7. Esophageal dissection and hematoma associated with obstruction in an Indian elephant (Elephas maximus indicus).

    PubMed

    Phair, Kristen A; Sutherland-Smith, Meg; Pye, Geoffrey W; Pessier, Allan P; Clippinger, Tracy L

    2014-06-01

    A 42-year-old female Indian elephant (Elephas maximus indicus) developed a sudden onset of excessive salivation and dysphagia. Esophageal obstruction was suspected; possibly related to palm frond ingestion. Esophageal endoscopy revealed a mat of plant material in the distal esophagus. An initial attempt at relieving the obstruction was unsuccessful, but subsequent use of custom-made instruments along with insufflation and hydropulsion enabled partial removal of the material. Postimmobilization care included aggressive intravenous and rectal fluids, anti-inflammatory and antibiotic administration, and fasting. Despite treatment, the dysphagia persisted and the elephant was euthanized due to lack of improvement and grave prognosis. Postmortem examination revealed remaining plant material in the esophagus, complicated by an esophageal dissection, mural hematoma, and secondary bacterial infection. Iatrogenic trauma may have contributed to the extent of esophageal injury. Although treatment was ultimately unsuccessful, the supportive care employed could potentially aid recovery in cases of less severe esophageal trauma. PMID:25000713

  8. Septic Complication After Balloon-Occluded Retrograde Transvenous Obliteration of Duodenal Variceal Bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Akasaka, Thai; Shibata, Toshiya Isoda, Hiroyoshi; Taura, Kojiro; Arizono, Shigeki; Shimada, Kotaro; Togashi, Kaori

    2010-12-15

    We report a 64-year-old woman with duodenal varices who underwent balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration (B-RTO) complicated by intraprocedural variceal rupture. The patient developed shivering and a fever higher than 40{sup o}C 3 days after the B-RTO procedure. A blood culture grew Entereobacter cloacoe. This case represents a rare septic complication of B-RTO for duodenal varices.

  9. Percutaneous Retrograde Sclerotherapy for Refractory Bleeding of Jejunal Varices: Direct Injection via Superficial Epigastric Vein

    SciTech Connect

    Nakata, Manabu Nakata, Waka; Isoda, Norio Yoshizawa, Mitsuyo; Sugimoto, Hideharu

    2012-02-15

    Small-bowel varices are rare and almost always occur in cases with portal hypertension. We encountered a patient with bleeding jejunal varices due to liver cirrhosis. Percutaneous retrograde sclerotherapy was performed via the superficial epigastric vein. Melena disappeared immediately after treatment. Disappearance of jejunal varices was confirmed by contrast-enhanced computed tomography. After 24 months of follow-up, no recurrent melena was observed.

  10. Radiation Therapy, Paclitaxel, and Carboplatin With or Without Trastuzumab in Treating Patients With Esophageal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-02

    Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IB Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIA Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIB Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIA Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIB Esophageal Cancer

  11. Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt combined with esophagogastric variceal embolization in the treatment of a large gastrorenal shunt

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Qin; Wang, Ming-Quan; Zhang, Guo-Bing; Wu, Qiong; Xu, Jian-Ming; Kong, De-Run

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) combined with stomach and esophageal variceal embolization (SEVE) in cirrhotic patients with a large gastrorenal vessel shunt (GRVS). METHODS: Eighty-one cirrhotic patients with gastric variceal bleeding (GVB) associated with a GRVS were enrolled in the study and accepted TIPS combined with SEVE (TIPS + SEVE), by which portosystemic pressure gradient (PPG), biochemical, TIPS-related complications, shunt dysfunction, rebleeding, and death were evaluated. RESULTS: The PPGs before TIPS were greater than 12 mmHg in 81 patients. TIPS + SEVE treatment caused a significant decrease in PPG (from 37.97 ± 6.36 mmHg to 28.15 ± 6.52 mmHg, t = 19.22, P < 0.001). The percentage of reduction in PPG was greater than 20% from baseline. There were no significant differences in albumin, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, bilirubin, prothrombin time, or Child-Pugh score before and after operation. In all patients, rebleeding rates were 3%, 6%, 12%, 18%, and 18% at 1, 3, 6, 12, and 18 mo, respectively. Five patients (6.2%) were diagnosed as having hepatic encephalopathy. The rates of shunt dysfunction were 0%, 4%, 9%, 26%, and 26%, at 1, 3, 6, 12, and 18 mo, respectively. The cumulative survival rates in 1, 3, 6, 12, and 18 mo were 100%, 100%, 95%, 90%, and 90%, respectively. CONCLUSION: Our preliminary results indicated that the efficacy and safety of TIPS + SEVE were satisfactory in cirrhotic patients with GVB associated with a GRVS (GVB + GRVS). PMID:27458505

  12. Loss of secondary esophageal peristalsis is not a contributory pathogenetic factor in posterior laryngitis.

    PubMed

    Ulualp, S O; Gu, C; Toohill, R J; Shaker, R

    2001-02-01

    Secondary esophageal peristalsis helps prevent the entry of gastric acid into the pharynx by clearing the refluxed gastric contents back into the stomach. Because the loss of this mechanism may contribute to the pathogenesis of reflux-induced laryngeal disorders, our aim was to study the frequency of stimulation and parameters of secondary esophageal peristalsis in patients with posterior laryngitis (PL). We studied 14 patients (45 +/- 5 years) with PL documented by videolaryngoscopy and 11 healthy controls (46 +/- 6 years). The upper esophageal sphincter (UES) pressure was monitored by a sleeve assembly incorporating an injection port 5 cm distal to the sleeve. The esophageal body and lower esophageal sphincter (LES) pressures were measured by an LES sleeve assembly. Primary esophageal peristalsis was induced by 5-mL water swallows. Secondary esophageal peristalsis was induced by abrupt injection of volumes of air, incrementally increased by 5 mL, into the esophagus. Secondary esophageal peristalsis could not be elicited by injection of any volume (up to 60 mL) in 3 PL patients and 2 controls. These 5 subjects had normal primary peristalsis. The threshold volume of air required to stimulate secondary esophageal peristalsis in PL patients (median, 15 mL) was similar to that of controls (median, 10 mL). The parameters of the secondary esophageal peristaltic pressure wave were similar in both groups, and in both groups, they were similar to those of primary peristalsis. The UES response to the injection of the threshold volume that induced secondary esophageal peristalsis in PL patients was contraction in 58% of the trials, partial relaxation in 3%, and no response in 39%. The findings were similar to those in the controls. The LES response to injection of the threshold volume was complete relaxation in both the PL patients and the controls. We conclude that the integrity of secondary esophageal peristalsis is preserved in PL patients.

  13. Oesophageal and gastric varices: historical aspects, classification and grading: everything in one place

    PubMed Central

    Abby Philips, Cyriac; Sahney, Amrish

    2016-01-01

    Variceal disease and its management are of the utmost importance in the treatment of portal hypertension. Current guidelines are universal for management of variceal disease in portal hypertension. Classification and grading systems are numerous and differ according to geographical location. In this exhaustive review, the historical aspects of variceal disease, its classification and the grading systems in use are discussed, with self-explanatory tables and timelines. A better and clear understanding of the evolution of portal hypertension and variceal disease is provided. PMID:27324725

  14. Alternative Treatment for Bleeding Peristomal Varices: Percutaneous Parastomal Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Pabon-Ramos, Waleska M.; Niemeyer, Matthew M.; Dasika, Narasimham L.

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: To describe how peristomal varices can be successfully embolized via a percutaneous parastomal approach. Methods: The medical records of patients who underwent this procedure between December 1, 2000, and May 31, 2008, were retrospectively reviewed. Procedural details were recorded. Median fluoroscopy time and bleeding-free interval were calculated. Results: Seven patients underwent eight parastomal embolizations. The technical success rate was 88 % (one failure). All embolizations were performed with coils combined with a sclerosant, another embolizing agent, or both. Of the seven successful parastomal embolizations, there were three cases of recurrent bleeding; the median time to rebleeding was 45 days (range 26-313 days). The remaining four patients did not develop recurrent bleeding during the follow-up period; their median bleeding-free interval was 131 days (range 40-659 days). Conclusion: This case review demonstrated that percutaneous parastomal embolization is a feasible technique to treat bleeding peristomal varices.

  15. Distal biceps brachii.

    PubMed

    Brigido, Monica Kalume; De Maeseneer, Michel; Morag, Yoav

    2013-02-01

    There has been a renewed interest in the recent literature with regard to the normal anatomy of the distal biceps tendon. Cadaveric studies have demonstrated that a large percentage of individuals have two independent muscle bellies, the short and the long head, with two distinct separate tendons attaching at the radial tuberosity. To avoid diagnostic errors that may have an impact on patient management in case of tendon injury, it is important to keep this anatomical variant in mind. Ultrasonography has been shown to be a useful imaging modality in the evaluation of disorders of the distal biceps brachii muscle and tendon. In this article, we review the relevant anatomy of the distal biceps brachii, the ultrasound technique with alternative approaches for optimum visualization of the distal tendon, and the most common pathologies in this region.

  16. Transphyseal Distal Humerus Fracture.

    PubMed

    Abzug, Joshua; Ho, Christine Ann; Ritzman, Todd F; Brighton, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Transphyseal distal humerus fractures typically occur in children younger than 3 years secondary to birth trauma, nonaccidental trauma, or a fall from a small height. Prompt and accurate diagnosis of a transphyseal distal humerus fracture is crucial for a successful outcome. Recognizing that the forearm is not aligned with the humerus on plain radiographs may aid in the diagnosis of a transphyseal distal humerus fracture. Surgical management is most commonly performed with the aid of an arthrogram. Closed reduction and percutaneous pinning techniques similar to those used for supracondylar humerus fractures are employed. Cubitus varus caused by a malunion, osteonecrosis of the medial condyle, or growth arrest is the most common complication encountered in the treatment of transphyseal distal humerus fractures. A corrective lateral closing wedge osteotomy can be performed to restore a nearly normal carrying angle.

  17. Gluing Gastric Varices in 2012: Lessons Learnt Over 25 Years

    PubMed Central

    Saraswat, Vivek A; Verma, Abhai

    2012-01-01

    Bleeding from gastric varices (GV) continues to pose a challenge to the endoscopist and no consensus has been reached on the best way for treating these patients. Gastric variceal obturation (GVO) with the tissue adhesive, N-2-butyl-cyanoacrylate (NBC), is considered the treatment of first-choice for this condition in most parts of the world. The liquid monomer polymerizes into a solid cast, obturating the vessel within 10–20 s of coming in contact with ionic solutions such as blood. Gastric variceal obturation achieves hemostasis in over 90% of patients with active bleeding, eradicates GV in over 80% of these patients, and re-bleeding occurs in 3–30%. These results are comparable with those of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunting (TIPS; over 90% hemostasis in acute bleeding with re-bleeding in 15–30%). Though, there has been no direct comparison with GVO, balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration of GV (BRTO) achieves near 100% obliteration with recurrence in 0–10% and is superior to TIPS for hemostasis in active bleeding when used in combination with transcatheter sclerotherapy. Several complications have been described for GVO including thromboembolic complications which occur in 0.5–4.3% and may be devastating in some. Many of the complications and the variability in results of GVO can be attributed to variations in injection technique. The use of a standardized injection technique has been reported to achieve 100% hemostasis and obliteration with 6.9% re-bleeding and no embolic complications. Gastric variceal obturation with NBC continues to be the first-choice therapy for GV bleeding outside Japan. Adherence to a standard injection technique will maximize hemostasis and eradication of GV while minimizing complications of therapy. PMID:25755406

  18. Transcatheter Embolotherapy with N-Butyl Cyanoacrylate for Ectopic Varices

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Jin Woo; Kim, Hyo-Cheol Jae, Hwan Jun Jung, Hyun-Seok; Hur, Saebeom; Lee, Myungsu; Chung, Jin Wook

    2015-04-15

    PurposeTo address technical feasibility and clinical outcome of transcatheter embolotherapy with N-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA) for bleeding ectopic varices.MethodsThe institutional review board approved this retrospective study and waived informed consent. From January 2004 to June 2013, a total of 12 consecutive patients received transcatheter embolotherapy using NBCA for bleeding ectopic varices in our institute. Clinical and radiologic features of the endovascular procedures were comprehensively reviewed.ResultsPreprocedural computed tomography images revealed ectopic varices in the jejunum (n = 7), stoma (n = 2), rectum (n = 2), and duodenum (n = 1). The 12 procedures consisted of solitary embolotherapy (n = 8) and embolotherapy with portal decompression (main portal vein stenting in 3, transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt in 1). With regard to vascular access, percutaneous transhepatic access (n = 7), transsplenic access (n = 4), and transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt tract (n = 1) were used. There was no failure in either the embolotherapy or the vascular accesses (technical success rate, 100 %). Two patients died within 1 month from the procedure from preexisting fatal medical conditions. Only one patient, with a large varix that had been partially embolized by using coils and NBCA, underwent rebleeding 5.5 months after the procedure. The patient was retreated with NBCA and did not undergo any bleeding afterward for a follow-up period of 2.5 months. The remaining nine patients did not experience rebleeding during the follow-up periods (range 1.5–33.2 months).ConclusionTranscatheter embolotherapy using NBCA can be a useful option for bleeding ectopic varices.

  19. Distal humeral epiphyseal separation.

    PubMed

    Moucha, Calin S; Mason, Dan E

    2003-10-01

    Distal humeral epiphyseal separation is an uncommon injury that is often misdiagnosed upon initial presentation. To make a timely, correct diagnosis, the treating physician must have a thorough understanding of basic anatomical relationships and an awareness of the existence of this injury. This is a case of a child who sustained a separation of the distal humeral epiphysis, as well as multiple other bony injuries, secondary to child abuse.

  20. Symptomatic lumbar epidural varices. Report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, G A; Weingarten, K; Lavyne, M H

    1994-05-01

    Lumbar epidural varices have been infrequently described in the literature and rarely accepted as a primary pathophysiological entity. The authors' total experience with symptomatic lumbar epidural varices over the last 15 years includes four cases (incidence 0.067% of all lumbar spine operations), two of which are described in detail in this paper. The mechanism for their formation is proposed: central disc herniations obstruct the anterior epidural venous flow leading to anterolateral caudal venous distention. Subsequent venous endothelial injury predisposes to varying degrees of phlebothrombosis. Decompression of partially thrombosed varices may occur during operative discectomy or spontaneously during regression of the nonoperated disc prolapse. Regression of the central disc herniation may also explain the "disappearing disc" phenomenon, in which patients with clinical and radiographic evidence of apparently large caudal disc herniations exhibit clinical and radiographic resolution. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging characteristics of the epidural varix depend upon the degree of thrombosis within this anomaly. A thrombosed varix is hyperintense on T1-weighted, proton-density, and T2-weighted images, whereas flowing blood is hypointense. The variable hypo- and hyperintensity on the T2-weighted MR imaging sequences correlate with a partially patent lumen within the varix. PMID:8169634

  1. [Minimal Change Esophagitis].

    PubMed

    Ryu, Han Seung; Choi, Suck Chei

    2016-01-25

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is defined as a condition which develops when the reflux of gastric contents causes troublesome symptoms and long-term complications. GERD can be divided into erosive reflux disease and non-erosive reflux disease based on endoscopic findings defined by the presence of mucosal break. The Los Angeles classification excludes minimal changes as an evidence of reflux esophagitis because of poor interobserver agreement. In the Asian literature, minimal changes are considered as one of the endoscopic findings of reflux esophagitis, but the clinical significance is still controversial. Minimal change esophagitis is recognized quite frequently among patients with GERD and many endoscopists recognize such findings in their clinical practice. This review is intended to clarify the definition of minimal change esophagitis and their histology, interobserver agreement, and symptom association with GERD.

  2. Imaging of esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, R; DuBrow, R

    2004-01-01

    Esophageal cancer is a relatively uncommon gastrointestinal malignancy but carries a poor prognosis unless it is of early stage and can be surgically resected for cure. Resectability is determined by the stage of disease at diagnosis and therefore accurate staging is of importance in patients diagnosed with esophageal cancer. Imaging studies that play a role in the evaluation of esophageal cancer include barium studies, computed tomography, endoscopic ultrasound and positron emission tomography. Imaging provides important information regarding the local extent and any distant spread of disease, which in turn helps in determining optimal management for these patients. This review discusses the imaging findings that may be encountered with various imaging modalities in the diagnosis, staging and follow-up of esophageal cancer. PMID:18250021

  3. Contractile profile of esophageal and gastric fundus strips in experimental doxorubicin-induced esophageal atresia.

    PubMed

    Capeto, F A; Lima, F J B; Okoba, W; Ramos, F L; Messias, T F A; Rigonatto, G A; Sbragia, L; Magalhães, P J C; Melo-Filho, A A

    2015-05-01

    Esophageal atresia (EA) is characterized by esophageal and gastric motility changes secondary to developmental and postsurgical damage. This study evaluated the in vitro contractile profile of the distal esophagus and gastric fundus in an experimental model of EA induced by doxorubicin (DOXO). Wistar pregnant rats received DOXO 2.2 mg/kg on the 8th and 9th gestational days. On day 21.5, fetuses were collected, sacrificed, and divided into groups: control, DOXO without EA (DOXO-EA), and DOXO with EA (DOXO+EA). Strips from the distal esophagus and gastric fundus were mounted on a wire myograph and isolated organ-bath system, respectively, and subjected to increasing concentrations of carbamylcholine chloride (carbachol, CCh). The isolated esophagus was also stimulated with increasing concentrations of KCl. In esophagus, the concentration-effect curves were reduced in response to CCh in the DOXO+EA and DOXO-EA groups compared to the control group (P<0.05). The maximum effect values (Emax) for DOXO+EA and DOXO-EA were significantly lower than control (P<0.05), but the half-maximal effective concentration (EC50) values were not significantly different when the three groups were compared (P>0.05). In response to KCl, the distal esophagus samples in the three groups were not statistically different with regard to Emax or EC50 values (P>0.05). No significant difference was noted for EC50 or Emax values in fundic strips stimulated with CCh (P>0.05). In conclusion, exposure of dams to DOXO during gestation inhibited the contractile behavior of esophageal strips from offspring in response to CCh but not KCl, regardless of EA induction. The gastric fundus of DOXO-exposed offspring did not have altered contractile responsiveness to cholinergic stimulation.

  4. Contractile profile of esophageal and gastric fundus strips in experimental doxorubicin-induced esophageal atresia

    PubMed Central

    Capeto, F.A.; Lima, F.J.B.; Okoba, W.; Ramos, F.L.; Messias, T.F.A.; Rigonatto, G.A.; Sbragia, L.; Magalhães, P.J.C.; Melo-Filho, A.A.

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal atresia (EA) is characterized by esophageal and gastric motility changes secondary to developmental and postsurgical damage. This study evaluated the in vitro contractile profile of the distal esophagus and gastric fundus in an experimental model of EA induced by doxorubicin (DOXO). Wistar pregnant rats received DOXO 2.2 mg/kg on the 8th and 9th gestational days. On day 21.5, fetuses were collected, sacrificed, and divided into groups: control, DOXO without EA (DOXO-EA), and DOXO with EA (DOXO+EA). Strips from the distal esophagus and gastric fundus were mounted on a wire myograph and isolated organ-bath system, respectively, and subjected to increasing concentrations of carbamylcholine chloride (carbachol, CCh). The isolated esophagus was also stimulated with increasing concentrations of KCl. In esophagus, the concentration-effect curves were reduced in response to CCh in the DOXO+EA and DOXO-EA groups compared to the control group (P<0.05). The maximum effect values (Emax) for DOXO+EA and DOXO-EA were significantly lower than control (P<0.05), but the half-maximal effective concentration (EC50) values were not significantly different when the three groups were compared (P>0.05). In response to KCl, the distal esophagus samples in the three groups were not statistically different with regard to Emax or EC50 values (P>0.05). No significant difference was noted for EC50 or Emax values in fundic strips stimulated with CCh (P>0.05). In conclusion, exposure of dams to DOXO during gestation inhibited the contractile behavior of esophageal strips from offspring in response to CCh but not KCl, regardless of EA induction. The gastric fundus of DOXO-exposed offspring did not have altered contractile responsiveness to cholinergic stimulation. PMID:25760030

  5. Successful Treatment of Mesenteric Varices After Living Donor Liver Transplantation with Retrograde Transvenous Obliteration Via an Abdominal Wall Vein

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Osamu Tamura, Yoshitaka; Nakasone, Yutaka; Yamashita, Yasuyuki; Okajima, Hideaki; Asonuma, Katsuhiro; Inomata, Yukihiro

    2010-06-15

    Balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration is an established treatment for gastric varices; it has been used more rarely to treat mesenteric varices. We report a 12-year-old girl who had received a living donor liver transplant and suffered melena due to ruptured mesenteric varices. We addressed treatment of the mesenteric varices by retrograde transvenous obliteration of an abdominal wall collateral vein detected by superior mesenteric arteriography.

  6. [Eosinophilic esophagitis: update 2012].

    PubMed

    Jo, Yunju

    2012-07-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) with adults, as a new disease emerging during the last decade, is a clinicopathologic disorder of the esophagus characterized by a dense esophageal eosinophilic infiltration and typical esophageal symptoms. As numerous studies about EoE had been reported during last several years, updated consensus of EoE was reported in July 2011. The conceptual definition of EoE is coming. EoE is defined as a chronic, immune/antigen-mediated esophageal disease characterized clinically by symptoms related to esophageal dysfunction and histologically by eosinophil-predominat inflammation. Other important addition is genotyping feature that implicates thymic stromal lymphopoietin genes or filagrrin as EoE susceptibility genes. The majority of patients has the concurrent allergic disease, especially food or aeroallergen sensitization. Main therapeutic options include topical steroids and dietary modification. Recent issues of EoE include a new concept for proton pump inhibitor-responsive esophageal eosinophilia that it should be excluded to diagnose EoE.

  7. Role of altered esophageal intraluminal baseline impedance levels in patients with gatroesophageal reflux disease refractory to proton pump inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Liuqin; Ye, Bixing; Lin, Lin; Wang, Ying; Wang, Meifeng

    2016-08-01

    Numerous studies have investigated utility of esophageal intraluminal baseline impedance levels (BILs) in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). However, effect of BILs in refractory GERD (RGERD) has not been well investigated. The aim of this study is to evaluate role of BILs in RGERD patients. Total 62 subjects with refractory gastroesophageal reflux symptoms underwent 24-hour impedance-pH monitoring and gastroendoscopy. Distal BILs in acid reflux type were significantly lower than those in nonacid reflux type and functional heartburn (FH) group. Distal BILs of reflux esophagitis (RE) patients were lower than those of nonerosive reflux disease (NERD) patients, while there were no statistical significance between 2 groups. Patients with severe esophagitis had lower distal BILs than those with mild esophagitis and NERD patients, and patients with severe esophagitis in acid reflux type had the lowest distal BILs. Distal BILs were significantly negatively correlated with DeMeester score, episodes of acid reflux, and acid exposure time, but no correlated with episodes of nonacid reflux. Characteristics of BILs in RGERD patients were similar with those in GERD patients, but might be more complicated. Evaluating BILs in RGERD patients could achieve a better understanding of pathophysiology in RGERD. PMID:27537561

  8. Distal splenorenal shunt with splenopancreatic disconnection for portal hypertension in biliary atresia.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, T; Tamada, H; Fukui, Y; Tanano, H; Okada, A

    1999-01-01

    This study evaluated the long-term effects of distal splenorenal shunt with splenopancreatic disconnection (DSRS-SPD) on portal hypertension (PH) in biliary atresia (BA) patients. Five patients with BA underwent DSRS-SPD at the age of 3.3 to 8.5 years. They had been free from jaundice after hepatic portoenterostomy (HPE); however, they gradually developed gastroesophageal varices and hypersplenism. Portal venous pressure after anastomosis was 37.2 +/- 6.1 cmH2O, as high as that before anastomosis (37.8 +/- 3.3 cmH2O). Postoperatively, liver function tests became worse within 2 weeks; however, they returned to preoperative levels within 1 month without any further treatment. No patient developed a significant encephalopathy throughout the observed period. During follow-up of 4 to 12 years, the shunt was patent in all patients. Spleen size decreased after operation. Abdominal-wall venous dilatation completely disappeared in two of four patients. The platelet counts gradually increased and were significantly higher 3 years (126.6 +/- 59.3 x 10(3)/mm3) after DSRS-SPD than preoperative values (66.0 +/- 24.2 x 10(3)/mm3). White blood cell counts showed no significant changes. No patient developed a gastrointestinal hemorrhage postoperatively, although three had had repeated hemorrhages before the operation. Two patients showed disappearance of varices endoscopically at 2 years and 7 months after DSRS-SPD, respectively, but had recurrent varices at 7 and 11 years, respectively. The endoscopic findings regarding varices 3 to 7 years after DSRS-SPD were as follows: decreased number (80%); decreased length (40%); improvement of form (20%); improvement of fundamental color (60%); disappearance of red-color sign (100%); disappearance of gastric varices (75%); and disappearance of acute gastric mucosal lesions (100%). Although one patient later underwent liver transplantation because of progression of liver cirrhosis, all five are doing well. From these results, DSRS-SPD may

  9. High Resolution Esophageal Manometry in Patients with Chagas Disease: A Cross-Sectional Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Montalvá, Adrián; Moris, María; Mego, Marianela; Salvador, Fernando; Accarino, Anna; Ramírez, Kathleen; Azpiroz, Fernando; Ruiz-de-Leon, Antonio; Molina, Israel

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Gastrointestinal involvement affects 30–40% of the patients with chronic Chagas disease. Esophageal symptoms appear once the structural damage is established. Little is known about the usefulness of high resolution manometry to early identification of esophageal involvement. Method We performed a cross-sectional study at the Vall d’Hebron University Hospital (Barcelona, Spain) between May 2011 and April 2012. Consecutive patients diagnosed with Chagas disease in the chronic phase were offered to participate. All patients underwent a structured questionnaire about digestive symptoms, a barium esophagogram (Rezende classification) and an esophageal high resolution manometry (HRM). A control group of patients with heartburn who underwent an esophageal HRM in our hospital was selected. Results 62 out of 73 patients that were included in the study fulfilled the study protocol. The median age of the Chagas disease group (CG) was 37 (IQR 32–45) years, and 42 (67.7%) patients were female. Twenty-seven (43.5%) patients had esophageal symptoms, heartburn being the most frequent. Esophagogram was abnormal in 5 (8.77%). The esophageal HRM in the CG showed a pathological motility pattern in 14 patients (22.6%). All of them had minor disorders of the peristalsis (13 with ineffective esophageal motility and 1 with fragmented peristalsis). Hypotonic lower esophageal sphincter was found more frequently in the CG than in the control group (21% vs 3.3%; p<0.01). Upper esophageal sphincter was hypertonic in 22 (35.5%) and hypotonic in 1 patient. When comparing specific manometric parameters or patterns in the CG according to the presence of symptoms or esophagogram no statistically significant association were seen, except for distal latency. Conclusion The esophageal involvement measured by HRM in patients with chronic Chagas disease in our cohort is 22.6%. All the patients with esophageal alterations had minor disorders of the peristalsis. Symptoms and

  10. Clinical Implications and Pathogenesis of Esophageal Remodeling in Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Hirano, Ikuo; Aceves, Seema S.

    2014-01-01

    In eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), remodeling changes are manifest histologically in both the epithelium as well as in the subepithelium where lamina propria (LP) fibrosis, expansion of the muscularis propria and increased vascularity occur. The major clinical symptoms and complications of EoE are largely consequences of esophageal remodeling. Important mediators of the process include IL-5, IL-13, TGFβ1, mast cells, fibroblasts and eosinophils. Methods to detect remodeling effects include upper endoscopy, histopathology, barium esophagram, endoscopic ultrasonography, esophageal manometry, and functional luminal imaging. These modalities provide evidence of organ dysfunction that include focal and diffuse esophageal strictures, expansion of the mucosa and subepithelium, esophageal motor abnormalities and reduced esophageal distensibility. Complications of food impaction and perforations of the esophageal wall have been associated with reduction in esophageal caliber and increased esophageal mural stiffness. The therapeutic benefits of topical corticosteroids and elimination diet therapy in resolving mucosal eosinophilic inflammation of the esophagus are evident. Available therapies, however, have demonstrated variable ability to reverse existing remodeling changes of the esophagus. Systemic therapies that include novel, targeted biologic agents have the potential of addressing subepithelial remodeling. Esophageal dilation remains a useful, adjunctive therapeutic maneuver in symptomatic adults with esophageal stricture. As novel treatments emerge, it is essential that therapeutic endpoints account for the fundamental contributions of esophageal remodeling to overall disease activity. PMID:24813517

  11. Achalasia and Esophageal Motility Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... esophagus, and chest wall Lung Cancer Esophageal Cancer Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Barrett’s Esophagus Chest Wall Tumors Mediastinal Tumors ... Section Navigation Select Topic Lung Cancer Esophageal Cancer Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Barrett’s Esophagus Chest Wall Tumors Mediastinal Tumors ...

  12. General Information about Esophageal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Esophageal Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Esophageal Cancer Go to Health Professional Version ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  13. UK guidelines on the management of variceal haemorrhage in cirrhotic patients

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Dhiraj; Stanley, Adrian J; Hayes, Peter C; Patch, David; Millson, Charles; Mehrzad, Homoyon; Austin, Andrew; Ferguson, James W; Olliff, Simon P; Hudson, Mark; Christie, John M

    2015-01-01

    These updated guidelines on the management of variceal haemorrhage have been commissioned by the Clinical Services and Standards Committee (CSSC) of the British Society of Gastroenterology (BSG) under the auspices of the liver section of the BSG. The original guidelines which this document supersedes were written in 2000 and have undergone extensive revision by 13 members of the Guidelines Development Group (GDG). The GDG comprises elected members of the BSG liver section, representation from British Association for the Study of the Liver (BASL) and Liver QuEST, a nursing representative and a patient representative. The quality of evidence and grading of recommendations was appraised using the AGREE II tool. The nature of variceal haemorrhage in cirrhotic patients with its complex range of complications makes rigid guidelines inappropriate. These guidelines deal specifically with the management of varices in patients with cirrhosis under the following subheadings: (1) primary prophylaxis; (2) acute variceal haemorrhage; (3) secondary prophylaxis of variceal haemorrhage; and (4) gastric varices. They are not designed to deal with (1) the management of the underlying liver disease; (2) the management of variceal haemorrhage in children; or (3) variceal haemorrhage from other aetiological conditions. PMID:25887380

  14. Bleeding oesophageal varices associated with anabolic steroid use in an athlete.

    PubMed Central

    Winwood, P. J.; Robertson, D. A.; Wright, R.

    1990-01-01

    A 30 year old bodybuilder who had been taking anabolic steroids for 18 months presented with bleeding oesophageal varices. Serious liver disease secondary to anabolic steroids including peliosis hepatis, nodular hyperplasia and malignant change is well recognized. We report what is, to our knowledge, the first case of bleeding oesophageal varices associated with the use of anabolic steroids. PMID:2099434

  15. Colorectal variceal bleeding in patients with extrahepatic portal vein thrombosis and idiopathic portal hypertension.

    PubMed

    Orozco, H; Takahashi, T; Mercado, M A; Prado-Orozco, E; Ferral, H; Hernandez-Ortiz, J; Esquivel, E

    1992-03-01

    We report three patients with colonic variceal bleeding secondary to portal hypertension, 0.5% of all cases with hemorrhagic portal hypertension studied by us in the last 16 years. One patient had idiopathic portal hypertension, and the others had extrahepatic portal vein thrombosis. Colonic varices were documented in all three cases by angiogram; large arteriovenous fistulas in the territory of the superior mesenteric artery and between the inferior mesenteric artery and hemorrhoidal veins were demonstrated in one patient. Two patients underwent colonoscopy; colonic varices were seen in only one. Two patients also had bled from esophagogastric varices. One patient underwent descending colon and sigmoid resection after failure to control bleeding with ligation of arterial supply; one patient underwent the Sugiura procedure, plus transanal ligation of hemorrhoids and rectal varices. At 3 months, 2 years, and 4 years of follow-up, the patients were in good general condition without any evidence of rebleeding.

  16. Massive duodenal variceal bleed; complication of extra hepatic portal hypertension: Endoscopic management and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Steevens, Christopher; Abdalla, Maisa; Kothari, Truptesh H; Kaul, Vivek; Kothari, Shivangi

    2015-01-01

    Bleeding from duodenal varices is reported to be a catastrophic and often fatal event. Most of the cases in the literature involve patients with underlying cirrhosis. However, approximately one quarter of duodenal variceal bleeds is caused by extrahepatic portal hypertension and they represent a unique population given their lack of liver dysfunction. The authors present a case where a 61-year-old male with history of remote crush injury presented with bright red blood per rectum and was found to have bleeding from massive duodenal varices. Injection sclerotherapy with ethanolamine was performed and the patient experienced a favorable outcome with near resolution of his varices on endoscopic follow-up. The authors conclude that sclerotherapy is a reasonable first line therapy and review the literature surrounding the treatment of duodenal varices secondary to extrahepatic portal hypertension. PMID:26558159

  17. Congenital esophageal stenosis associated with esophageal atresia.

    PubMed

    McCann, F; Michaud, L; Aspirot, A; Levesque, D; Gottrand, F; Faure, C

    2015-04-01

    Congenital esophageal stenosis (CES) is a rare clinical condition but is frequently associated with esophageal atresia (EA). The aim of this study is to report the diagnosis, management, and outcome of CES associated with EA. Medical charts of CES-EA patients from Lille University Hospital, Sainte-Justine Hospital, and Montreal Children's Hospital were retrospectively reviewed. Seventeen patients (13 boys) were included. The incidence of CES in patients with EA was 3.6%. Fifteen patients had a type C EA, one had a type A EA, and one had an isolated tracheoesophageal fistula. Seven patients had associated additional malformations. The mean age at diagnosis was 11.6 months. All but two patients had non-specific symptoms such as regurgitations or dysphagia. One CES was diagnosed at the time of surgical repair of EA. In 12 patients, CES was suspected based on abnormal barium swallow. In the remaining four, the diagnostic was confirmed by esophagoscopy. Eleven patients were treated by dilation only (1-3 dilations/patient). Six patients underwent surgery (resection and anastomosis) because of failure of attempted dilations (1-7 dilations/patient). Esophageal perforation was encountered in three patients (18%). Three patients had histologically proven tracheobronchial remnants. CES associated with EA is frequent. A high index of suspicion for CES must remain in the presence of EA. Dilatation may be effective to treat some of them, but perforation is frequent. Surgery may be required, especially in CES secondary to ectopic tracheobronchial remnants.

  18. Effect of caffeine on lower esophageal sphincter pressure in Thai healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Lohsiriwat, S; Puengna, N; Leelakusolvong, S

    2006-01-01

    Caffeine affects many aspects of body function including the gastrointestinal system. A single-blinded experimental study was performed to evaluate the effect of caffeine on lower esophageal sphincter (LES) and esophageal peristaltic contractions in healthy Thai adults. The volunteers were six men and six women aged 19-31 years. Subjects drank 100 mL of water. Five wet swallows were performed 30 min after the drink. The basal LES pressure was continuously measured using esophageal manometric technique. They then consumed another 100 mL of water containing caffeine at the dose of 3.5 mg/kg body weight. The swallows and basal LES pressure monitoring were repeated. The results showed no change in basal LES pressure after a water drink while caffeine consumption significantly lowered the pressure at 10, 15, 20 and 25 min. The mean amplitude of contractions and peristaltic velocity were decreased at the distal esophagus at 3 and 8 cm above LES. The mean duration of contraction was decreased at the distal part but increased at the more proximal esophagus. The heart rate, systolic and diastolic blood pressures were increased significantly at 10-20 min after caffeine ingestion. This study indicated that caffeine 3.5 mg/kg affected esophageal function, resulting in a decrease in basal LES pressure and distal esophageal contraction, which is known to promote the reflux of gastric contents up into the esophagus.

  19. Calcium carbonate antacids alter esophageal motility in heartburn sufferers.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Stanley, Sheila; Ahmed, Tanveer; Zubaidi, Sattar; Riley, Susan; Akbarali, Hamid I; Mellow, Mark H; Miner, Philip B

    2004-01-01

    Chewed calcium carbonate (CaCO3) rapidly neutralizes esophageal acid and may prevent reflux, suggesting another mechanism of action independent of acid neutralization. Calcium is essential for muscle tone. Our aim was to determine if luminal calcium released from chewed antacids improved esophageal motor function in heartburn sufferers. Esophageal manometry and acid clearance (swallows and time to raise esophageal pH to 5 after a 15-ml 0.1 N HCl bolus) were performed in 18 heartburn sufferers before and after chewing two Tums EX (1500 mg CaCO3, 600 mg calcium). Subjects with hypertensive esophageal contractions or hypertensive lower esophageal sphincter pressure (LESP) were excluded. Subjects with normal to low LESP were included. Differences between parameters were determined by two-tailed paired t-tests, P < 0.05. Proximal esophageal contractile amplitude was significantly increased after CaCO3 (47.18 vs 52.97 mm Hg; P = 0.02), distal onset velocity was significantly decreased after CaCO3 (4.34 vs 3.71 cm/sec; P = 0.02), and acid clearance was significantly increased 30 min after CaCO3 (20.35 vs 11.7 swallows, [P < 0.005] and 12.19 vs 6.29 min [P < 0.007]). LESP was not altered after CaCO3 (22.70 vs 23.79 mm Hg; P = 0.551), however, LESP increased in 9 of 18 subjects. Depth of LES relaxation, medial and distal esophageal contractile amplitude, and duration of contractions were not altered by CaCO3. CaCO3 did not alter salivary secretion and pH in a subset of these subjects, and CaCO3 with secreted saliva did not neutralize a 15-ml acid bolus. The Ca2+ released after chewing of CaCO3 antacids may be partially responsible for the reduction of heartburn by significantly improving initiation of peristalsis and acid clearance.

  20. Endoscopic Management of Anastomotic Esophageal Strictures Secondary to Esophageal Atresia.

    PubMed

    Manfredi, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    The reported incidence of anastomotic stricture after esophageal atresia repair has varied in case series from as low as 9% to as high as 80%. The cornerstone of esophageal stricture treatment is dilation with either balloon or bougie. The goal of esophageal dilation is to increase the luminal diameter of the esophagus while also improving dysphagia symptoms. Once a stricture becomes refractory to esophageal dilation, there are several treatment therapies available as adjuncts to dilation therapy. These therapies include intralesional steroid injection, mitomycin C, esophageal stent placement, and endoscopic incisional therapy. PMID:26616905

  1. Proximal esophageal pH-metry in patients with 'reflux laryngitis'.

    PubMed

    Jacob, P; Kahrilas, P J; Herzon, G

    1991-02-01

    Fiberoptic laryngoscopic examinations were performed on 40 patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease, 25 of whom had persistent laryngeal symptoms (dysphonia, cough, globus sensation, frequent throat clearing, or sore throat) and 15 without laryngeal symptoms who served as disease controls. Ten patients with laryngeal symptoms but none of the controls had laryngoscopic findings consistent with reflux laryngitis. Dual-site ambulatory pH recordings were obtained with the pH electrodes spaced 15 cm apart and with the proximal sensor positioned just distal to the upper esophageal sphincter. Patients in the three groups (disease controls: group 1; patients with symptoms but without laryngoscopic findings: group 2; and patients with both laryngeal symptoms and findings: group 3) were comparable in terms of age, smoking habit, the presence of esophagitis, and distal esophageal acid exposure. Proximal esophageal acid exposure was, however, significantly increased in groups 2 and 3, and nocturnal proximal esophageal acidification occurred in over half of these patients but in none of the group 1 patients. We conclude that the subset of reflux patients who experience laryngeal symptoms show significantly more proximal esophageal acid exposure (especially nocturnally) and often have laryngoscopic findings of posterior laryngitis not observed in control reflux patients.

  2. Esophageal phytobezoar in a horse.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, M H; Richardson, D W; Morse, C C

    1987-12-01

    A 23-year-old Thoroughbred stallion was admitted to the hospital for treatment of acute esophageal obstruction. Clinical examination and contrast radiography confirmed the presence of an esophageal obstruction. The horse was euthanatized, and examination revealed a bolus of feed material occluding the esophageal lumen 6 cm caudal to the thoracic inlet, with underlying necrosis of the esophageal mucosa. A large pulsion diverticulum was identified in the caudocervical portion of the esophagus. Apparently, the phytobezoar was formed within the esophageal diverticulum and subsequently became dislodged, occluding the esophagus.

  3. [Esophageal motility disorders].

    PubMed

    Dughera, L; Battaglia, E; Emanuelli, G

    2001-09-01

    Esophageal motility abnormalities are usually diagnosed when esophageal manometry is performed in patients with unexplained non-cardiac chest pain, non obstructive dysphagia or as a part of the preoperative evaluation for surgery of gastroesophageal reflux. Classification of these abnormalities has been a subject of controversy. These esophageal contraction abnormalities can be separated manometrically from the motor pattern seen in normal subjects, however, their clinical relevance is still unclear and debated. Many patients demonstrate motility abnormalities in the manometry laboratories, but may lack correlation with their presenting symptoms. Medical treatment can decrease symptoms particularly chest pain or acid reflux but there is no significant changes in the manometric patterns. Such motor abnormalities may not reflect a true disease state, but they could be markers of other abnormalities and they can modify the initial manometric findings in time.

  4. National Esophageal Atresia Register.

    PubMed

    Sfeir, Rony; Michaud, Laurent; Sharma, Duyti; Richard, Florence; Gottrand, Frédéric

    2015-12-01

    National Esophageal Atresia was created in 2008 by the National Reference Center for Esophageal Congenital Abnormalities created in 2006. Primary goal was estimation of live birth prevalence in France. A national network of surgeons and pediatricians was initiated and entire teams dealing with esophageal atresia accepted to participate in an exhaustive national register. A questionnaire was validated by a national committee and data were centralized in our center. Scientific exploitation showed that such database is useful for health authorities as for medical professionals. Live birth prevalence in France is at 1.9/10,000 births. Prenatal diagnosis is more common but its effect on prevalence is not yet fully understood. Associated congenital abnormalities are frequent and major malformations with termination of pregnancy can influence prevalence. PMID:26642387

  5. Minimally invasive surgery for esophageal achalasia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Huan-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal achalasia is due to the esophagus of neuromuscular dysfunction caused by esophageal functional disease. Its main feature is the lack of esophageal peristalsis, the lower esophageal sphincter pressure and to reduce the swallow’s relaxation response. Lower esophageal muscular dissection is one of the main ways to treat esophageal achalasia. At present, the period of muscular layer under the thoracoscope esophagus dissection is one of the treatment of esophageal achalasia. Combined with our experience in minimally invasive esophageal surgery, to improved incision and operation procedure, and adopts the model of the complete period of muscular layer under the thoracoscope esophagus dissection in the treatment of esophageal achalasia. PMID:27499977

  6. Assessing esophageal dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Kruger, Danielle

    2014-05-01

    Dysphagia, or difficulty swallowing, is a common problem. Although most cases are attributable to benign disease processes, dysphagia is also a key symptom in several malignancies, making it an important symptom to evaluate. The differential diagnosis of dysphagia requires an understanding of deglutition, in particular the oropharyngeal versus esophageal stages. Stroke is the leading cause of oropharyngeal dysphagia, which is common in older adults and frequently presents as part of a broader complex of clinical manifestations. In esophageal dysphagia, difficulty swallowing is often the main complaint and is caused by localized neuromuscular disorders or obstructive lesions.

  7. Development of chronic hepatocerebral degeneration eight years after a distal splenorenal (Warren) shunt.

    PubMed Central

    Bleasel, A F; Waugh, R C; McCaughan, G W

    1989-01-01

    It is well known that chronic encephalopathy may be a major complication after the establishment of a surgical portal caval shunt for an episode of variceal haemorrhage. In an effort to minimise this problem Warren and colleagues developed the distal splenorenal shunt where the portal and mesenteric blood flow to the liver was left intact. It is now recognised, however, that the longterm incidence of encephalopathy may be no different with this type of shunt compared with conventional surgical portal systemic shunts. Acquired chronic hepatocerebral degeneration has not been reported after such a selective shunt. A patient with primary biliary cirrhosis is reported who developed the clinical features of this syndrome eight years after a successful distal splenorenal shunt. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:2583570

  8. Molecular Phenotyping in Predicting Response in Patients With Stage IB-III Esophageal Cancer Receiving Combination Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-18

    Stage IB Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIA Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIB Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIA Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIB Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIC Esophageal Adenocarcinoma

  9. Diagnosis and therapy of non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Biecker, Erwin

    2015-01-01

    Non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) is defined as bleeding proximal to the ligament of Treitz in the absence of oesophageal, gastric or duodenal varices. The clinical presentation varies according to the intensity of bleeding from occult bleeding to melena or haematemesis and haemorrhagic shock. Causes of UGIB are peptic ulcers, Mallory-Weiss lesions, erosive gastritis, reflux oesophagitis, Dieulafoy lesions or angiodysplasia. After admission to the hospital a structured approach to the patient with acute UGIB that includes haemodynamic resuscitation and stabilization as well as pre-endoscopic risk stratification has to be done. Endoscopy offers not only the localisation of the bleeding site but also a variety of therapeutic measures like injection therapy, thermocoagulation or endoclips. Endoscopic therapy is facilitated by acid suppression with proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy. These drugs are highly effective but the best route of application (oral vs intravenous) and the adequate dosage are still subjects of discussion. Patients with ulcer disease are tested for Helicobacter pylori and eradication therapy should be given if it is present. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs have to be discontinued if possible. If discontinuation is not possible, cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors in combination with PPI have the lowest bleeding risk but the incidence of cardiovascular events is increased. PMID:26558151

  10. Diagnosis and therapy of non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Biecker, Erwin

    2015-11-01

    Non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) is defined as bleeding proximal to the ligament of Treitz in the absence of oesophageal, gastric or duodenal varices. The clinical presentation varies according to the intensity of bleeding from occult bleeding to melena or haematemesis and haemorrhagic shock. Causes of UGIB are peptic ulcers, Mallory-Weiss lesions, erosive gastritis, reflux oesophagitis, Dieulafoy lesions or angiodysplasia. After admission to the hospital a structured approach to the patient with acute UGIB that includes haemodynamic resuscitation and stabilization as well as pre-endoscopic risk stratification has to be done. Endoscopy offers not only the localisation of the bleeding site but also a variety of therapeutic measures like injection therapy, thermocoagulation or endoclips. Endoscopic therapy is facilitated by acid suppression with proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy. These drugs are highly effective but the best route of application (oral vs intravenous) and the adequate dosage are still subjects of discussion. Patients with ulcer disease are tested for Helicobacter pylori and eradication therapy should be given if it is present. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs have to be discontinued if possible. If discontinuation is not possible, cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors in combination with PPI have the lowest bleeding risk but the incidence of cardiovascular events is increased. PMID:26558151

  11. Modified Sugiura Operation for Idiopathic Portal Hypertension with Bleeding Oesophageal Varices. A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Schettini, A-V; Pinheiro, R S; Pescatore, P; Lerut, J

    2015-01-01

    A case of a 36 years old man presenting massive upper GI bleeding due to oesophageal varices developed in the context of an idiopathic portal cavernoma and extensive porto-splenic thrombosis is discussed. He underwent a successful modified Sugiura operation (oesophago-gastric devascularisation and splenectomy [OGDS]) completed with interventional endoscopic treatment of residual oesophageal varices. The benefit of the modified Sugiura procedure proposed for the treatment of upper GI variceal bleeding developed in the context of splanchnic venous thrombosis is discussed. The procedure is a valid therapy in the treatment of symptomatic extra-hepatic hypertension when other options are inapplicable. PMID:26158259

  12. Enteroscopic Management of Ectopic Varices in a Patient with Liver Cirrhosis and Portal Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Watson, G A; Abu-Shanab, A; O'Donohoe, R L; Iqbal, M

    2016-01-01

    Portal hypertension and liver cirrhosis may predispose patients to varices, which have a propensity to bleed and cause significant morbidity and mortality. These varices are most commonly located in the gastroesophageal area; however, rarely ectopic varices may develop in unusual locations outside of this region. Haemorrhage from these sites can be massive and difficult to control; thus early detection and management may be lifesaving. We present a case of occult gastrointestinal bleeding in a patient with underlying alcoholic liver disease where an ectopic varix was ultimately detected with push enteroscopy. PMID:27595025

  13. Embolization therapy for bleeding from jejunal loop varices due to extrahepatic portal vein obstruction.

    PubMed

    Yoshimatsu, Rika; Yamagami, Takuji; Ishikawa, Masaki; Kajiwara, Kenji; Kakizawa, Hideaki; Hiyama, Eiso; Tashiro, Hirotaka; Murakami, Yoshiaki; Ohge, Hiroki; Awai, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Four patients underwent embolization therapy for hemorrhage from varices in the jejunal loop after choledochojejunostomy existing in hepatopetal collateral veins due to chronic extrahepatic portal vein obstruction through the afferent veins using microcoils and/or n-butyl cyanoacrylate. In all four patients, all afferent veins were successfully embolized and successful hemostasis was achieved without liver dysfunction. However, recurrence of the varices and rebleeding occurred within a year in two patients. Embolization for hemorrhage from varices in the jejunal loop after choledochojejunostomy through afferent veins is acceptable in terms of safety and is useful to achieve hemostasis in emergency circumstances. PMID:26330264

  14. Splenic infarction after N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate injection for gastric varices: why does it happen?

    PubMed

    Köksal, Aydin S; Kayaçetin, Ertuğrul; Torun, Serkan; Erkan, Vedat; Ökten, Riza S

    2013-10-01

    Recent guidelines and consensus reports recommend endoscopic injection therapy with N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate as the first-line treatment for bleeding-isolated gastric varices and gastroesophageal varices types 1 and 2. Embolization is a rare but serious complication of cyanoacrylate injection, which may be fatal in some cases. Herein, we present a patient who developed splenic infarction after N-butyl-cyanoacrylate injection for gastroesophageal varices type 2 and discuss the potential reasons and tips to prevent the occurence of embolization.

  15. Enteroscopic Management of Ectopic Varices in a Patient with Liver Cirrhosis and Portal Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Shanab, A.

    2016-01-01

    Portal hypertension and liver cirrhosis may predispose patients to varices, which have a propensity to bleed and cause significant morbidity and mortality. These varices are most commonly located in the gastroesophageal area; however, rarely ectopic varices may develop in unusual locations outside of this region. Haemorrhage from these sites can be massive and difficult to control; thus early detection and management may be lifesaving. We present a case of occult gastrointestinal bleeding in a patient with underlying alcoholic liver disease where an ectopic varix was ultimately detected with push enteroscopy. PMID:27595025

  16. Esophagitis in Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Putnam, Philip E

    2016-01-01

    Esophagitis is the end result of a variety of insults to epithelial homeostasis. Eosinophilic esophagitis is a manifestation of non-IgE-mediated food allergy that most commonly affects the esophagus of males who have other atopic phenomena. Reflux esophagitis reflects repeated exposure to acidic gastric contents because of failure of the normal protections afforded by the LES. Because certain histologic features can be present in either condition, endoscopic biopsy alone does not distinguish them. Their symptoms overlap, but the treatment options are very different, such that making a formal diagnosis by following consensus guidelines is essential. A treatment protocol designed to manage the inflammation by controlling the provocative factors (acid for GERD and food antigens for EoE) or suppressing the inflammation (ie, topical steroids for EoE) should result in normalization of the mucosa and resolution of symptoms. Eosinophilic esophagitis is a chronic condition that rarely remits spontaneously, so any therapeutic modality will need to be continued indefinitely. PMID:27363230

  17. Repair of esophageal atresia with proximal fistula using endoscopic magnetic compression anastomosis (magnamosis) after staged lengthening.

    PubMed

    Dorman, Robert M; Vali, Kaveh; Harmon, Carroll M; Zaritzky, Mario; Bass, Kathryn D

    2016-05-01

    We describe the treatment of a patient with long-gap esophageal atresia with an upper pouch fistula, mircogastria and minimal distal esophageal remnant. After 4.5 months of feeding via gastrostomy, a proximal fistula was identified by bronchoscopy and a thoracoscopic modified Foker procedure was performed reducing the gap from approximately 7-5 cm over 2 weeks of traction. A second stage to ligate the fistula and suture approximate the proximal and distal esophagus resulted in a gap of 1.5 cm. IRB and FDA approval was then obtained for endoscopic placement of 10-French catheter mounted magnets in the proximal and distal pouches promoting a magnetic compression anastomosis (magnamosis). Magnetic coupling occurred at 4 days and after magnet removal at 13 days an esophagram demonstrated a 10 French channel without leak. Serial endoscopic balloon dilation has allowed drainage of swallowed secretions as the baby learns bottling behavior at home. PMID:27012861

  18. Effect of gastroesophageal reflux on esophageal speech.

    PubMed

    Mathis, J G; Lehman, G A; Shanks, J C; Blom, E D; Brunelle, R L

    1983-12-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux has been incriminated as a factor-inhibiting acquisition of esophageal speech after laryngectomy. Fourteen proficient esophageal speakers and 10 nonproficient speakers underwent esophageal manometry, esophageal pH probe testing, and Bernstein acid perfusion testing. Additionally, 175 laryngectomized members of Lost Chord Clubs answered mailed questionnaires about the frequency of reflux symptoms. Nonproficient and proficient esophageal speakers had a similar frequency of gastroesophageal reflux by pH probe testing, esophageal mucosal acid sensitivity by Bernstein testing, lower esophageal sphincter pressures, and gastroesophageal reflux symptoms. Gastroesophageal reflux does not appear to be a major factor in preventing esophageal speech.

  19. Eosinophilic esophagitis in children with esophageal atresia.

    PubMed

    Dhaliwal, J; Tobias, V; Sugo, E; Varjavandi, V; Lemberg, D; Day, A; Bohane, T; Ledder, O; Jiwane, A; Adams, S; Henry, G; Dilley, A; Shi, E; Krishnan, U

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) has only rarely been reported in esophageal atresia (EA) patients. A retrospective case analysis of all EA patients born at our center between January 1999 and April 2012 was performed. A total of 113 of patients were identified; 10 patients were excluded as a result of inadequate data. Eighteen patients (17%) were diagnosed with EoE. The average number of eosinophilis was 30/high-power field (HPF) (19/HPF-80/HPF). The median age for diagnosis of EoE was 1 year and 6 months (8 months-8 years and 7 months). Children with EoE had a significantly greater incidence of reflux symptoms, dysphagia, tracheomalacia, and 'hypoxic spells' (P < 0.05). EoE patients also underwent significantly more surgery including fundoplication and aortopexy when compared with those without EoE (P < 0.0001). Although the incidence of gastrostomy was greater in the EoE group (33% vs. 13%), this was not statistically significant. Half of the EoE patients had a coexisting atopic condition at time of diagnosis. The commonest condition was asthma 7/18 (38%) followed by specific food allergy 6/18 (33%). EoE was treated in 11 patients with either swallowed fluticasone or budesonide slurry. All improved clinically. Histologically, five had complete resolution and six had partial improvement. Six children with EoE were treated with acid suppression alone. All improved clinically, and 5/6 had subsequent histological resolution. One child who received acid suppression and an exclusion diet also improved. Seven patients (38%) had an esophageal stricture at time of EoE diagnosis. Five were dilated at time of the initial endoscopy, prior to the diagnosis of EoE being available. Two patients had resolution of their strictures on medical treatment of their EoE alone and did not require further dilatation. EoE was seen in 17% of children with EA in this study. EoE should be considered in EA patients with persistent symptoms on standard reflux treatment, increasing

  20. Splenic artery embolization for the treatment of bleeding gastric varices secondary to splenic vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Stone, Patrick A; Phang, David; Richmond, Bryan; Gill, Gurpreet; Campbell, John E

    2014-04-01

    Splenic vein thrombosis can lead to gastric varices. Subsequent upper gastrointestinal bleeding may ensue related to the change in venous outflow to the portal system. Vascular surgeons are infrequently asked to assist in the management of this entity. However, with many vascular surgeons providing diverse endovascular-based interventions, understanding catheter-based solutions is imperative. This report presents a case in which arterial embolization was used to treat gastric variceal bleeding.

  1. Eosinophilic esophagitis: current treatment.

    PubMed

    Redd, Matthew; Schey, Ron

    2013-03-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a relatively new entity with a significant amount of increased recognition over the last decade. The mainstay treatments of EoE are designed to eliminate the causative allergens or to reduce their effects on the esophageal mucosa. Common treatments include dietary modification, proton pump inhibitors, systemic and topical corticosteroids, and endoscopic treatments. As the pathogenesis of EoE is explored, new and novel treatments are being studied that target specific pathways and chemokines identified in as precipitating agents of EoE. This is a rapidly evolving field with significant ongoing research and clinical studies. Our review will therefore focus on current and novel treatment approaches to the disease.

  2. Esophageal carcinoma: CT findings

    SciTech Connect

    Quint, L.E.; Glazer, G.M.; Orringer, M.B.; Gross, B.H.

    1985-04-01

    Preoperative CT scans of 33 patients with esophageal cancer were reviewed to assess staging accuracy and define the role of CT in patients being considered for transhiatal blunt esophagectomy. Surgical and pathological verification was obtained in all cases. Only 13 tumors were staged correctly according to the TNM classification. In addition, CT was not useful in assessing resectability because of its low accuracy in evaluating aortic invasion and the fact that few patients had tracheobronchial or aortic invasion or hepatic metastases at presentation.

  3. Hypnotherapy for Esophageal Disorders.

    PubMed

    Riehl, Megan E; Keefer, Laurie

    2015-07-01

    Hypnotherapy is an evidence based intervention for the treatment of functional bowel disorders, particularly irritable bowel syndrome. While similar in pathophysiology, less is known about the utility of hypnotherapy in the upper gastrointestinal tract. Esophageal disorders, most of which are functional in nature, cause painful and uncomfortable symptoms that impact patient quality of life and are difficult to treat from a medical perspective. After a thorough medical workup and a failed trial of proton pump inhibitor therapy, options for treatment are significantly limited. While the pathophysiology is likely multifactorial, two critical factors are believed to drive esophageal symptoms--visceral hypersensitivity and symptom hypervigilance. The goal of esophageal directed hypnotherapy is to promote a deep state of relaxation with focused attention allowing the patient to learn to modulate physiological sensations and symptoms that are not easily addressed with conventional medical intervention. Currently, the use of hypnosis is suitable for dysphagia, globus, functional chest pain/non-cardiac chest pain, dyspepsia, and functional heartburn. In this article the authors will provide a rationale for the use of hypnosis in these disorders, presenting the science whenever available, describing their approach with these patients, and sharing a case study representing a successful outcome. PMID:26046715

  4. Staging Early Esophageal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Old, O J; Isabelle, M; Barr, H

    2016-01-01

    Staging esophageal cancer provides a standardized measure of the extent of disease that can be used to inform decisions about therapy and guide prognosis. For esophageal cancer, the treatment pathways vary greatly depending on stage of disease, and accurate staging is therefore crucial in ensuring the optimal therapy for each patient. For early esophageal cancer (T1 lesions), endoscopic resection can be curative and simultaneously gives accurate staging of depth of invasion. For tumors invading the submucosa or more advanced disease, comprehensive investigation is required to accurately stage the tumor and assess suitability for curative resection. A combined imaging approach of computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET), and endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) offers complementary diagnostic information and gives the greatest chance of accurate staging. Staging laparoscopy can identify peritoneal disease and small superficial liver lesions that could be missed on CT or PET, and alters management in up to 20 % of patients. Optical diagnostic techniques offer the prospect of further extending the possibilities of endoscopic staging in real time. Optical coherence tomography can image superficial lesions and could provide information on depth of invasion for these lesions. Real-time lymph node analysis using optical diagnostics such as Raman spectroscopy could be used to support immediate endoscopic therapy without waiting for results of cytology or further investigations. PMID:27573772

  5. [Gastroesophageal reflux during pregnancy: 24-hour esophageal ph monitoring].

    PubMed

    Anton, C; Anton, E; Drug, V; Stanciu, C

    2001-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) occurs in 30-50% of all pregnancies. The progressive rise in plasma progesterone has been suggested as a possible mediator of GER during pregnancy. Recent advances in technology have made it possible to detect GER through monitoring of esophageal pH for prolonged periods, including sleep. 24-hour pH monitoring is the proper method for diagnosing GER in pregnant women. If 24-hour esophageal pH monitoring is to be a useful diagnostic tool, it must reliably discriminate GER patients despite daily variations in distal esophageal acid exposure. To address this issue, we studied 62 women (30 healthy non-pregnant women without GER symptoms and 32 pregnant women with GER symptoms-heartburn, acid regurgitation) with 24-hour esophageal pH monitoring. Intrasubject reproducibility of three pH parameters to discriminate the presence of abnormal acid reflux was determined (DeMeester score, Kaye score, circadian one hour diagram for pH < 4). Each patient was interviewed, using a reliable questionnaire detailing individual habits, life style characteristics and symptoms, at four time points during the first, second, third trimesters of pregnancy and post-partum period. Symptoms of GER are common in pregnancy and although GER rarely endangers maternal or fetal health, it can significantly affect patient comfort and quality of life. We conclude: 1. GER is almost constantly present during pregnancy, increasing with gestational age. 2. The most important pH--parameter is DeMcester score. 3. Heartburn disappear after delivery. 4. 24-hour esophageal pH monitoring is the gold standard for measuring acid exposure and is a reproducible test for the diagnosis of GER in pregnancy.

  6. Is portal-systemic shunt worthwhile in Child's class C cirrhosis? Long-term results of emergency shunt in 94 patients with bleeding varices.

    PubMed Central

    Orloff, M J; Orloff, M S; Rambotti, M; Girard, B

    1992-01-01

    A prospective evaluation was conducted of 94 unselected patients ("all comers") with biopsy-proven Child's class C cirrhosis (93% alcoholic) and endoscopically proven acutely bleeding esophageal varices who underwent emergency portacaval shunt (EPCS) (85% side-to-side, 15% end-to-side) within 8 hours of initial contact (mean, 6.1 hours) during the past 12 years. Follow-up has been 100% and includes all patients for at least 1 year, and 61 patients (65%) for 5 to 12 years. Incidence of serious risk factors on initial contact was: ascites, 97%; jaundice, 86%; portal-systemic encephalopathy including past history, 71%; severe muscle wasting, 96%; alcohol ingestion within 7 days, 66%; delirium tremens, 16%; serum albumin, less than or equal to 2.5 g/dL 76%; indocyanine green dye retention greater than or equal to 50% in 45 minutes, 66%; serum glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase greater than or equal to 100 units/L, 60%; hyperdynamic cardiac output greater than or equal to 6 L/minute, 98%. Mean Child's point score was 13.7 out of a maximum of 15. EPCS reduced mean corrected free portal pressure from 286 to 23 mm saline, and permanently controlled variceal bleeding in every patient. Of the 94 patients, 74 (80%) left the hospital alive and 68 (72%) survived 1 year. Five-year actuarial survival rate is 64%. Hepatic failure was the main cause of death during initial hospitalization as well as during follow-up, when it was related to continued alcoholism. Portal-systemic encephalopathy, which was present on initial contact in 55% of patients, occurred at some time during follow-up in 18.7%, but was recurrent and required dietary protein restriction in only 9%, all of whom had resumed alcoholism. The low incidence of portal-systemic encephalopathy was attributable to the lifelong program of follow-up with regular dietary counseling and continued emphasis on both protein restriction to 60 g/day and abstinence from alcohol. Abstinence was sustained in 69%, liver function improved

  7. [Endoscopic Therapy for Esophageal Cancer].

    PubMed

    Sakai, Makoto; Kuwano, Hiroyuki

    2016-07-01

    Endoscopic treatment for esophageal neoplasms includes endoscopic resection, argon plasma coagulation(APC), photodynamic therapy( PDT) and stent placement. Endoscopic resection is widely used as an effective, less invasive treatment for superficial esophageal carcinoma in Japan. APC is considered to be safe and effective treatment for superficial esophageal carcinoma which cannot be resected endoscopically because of severe comorbidities, as well as for local recurrence after endoscopic resection or chemoradiotherapy. PDT is thought to be an effective option as salvage treatment for local failure after chemoradiotherapy. Stent placement mainly using self-expanding metallic stents have been used as a minimally invasive and effective modality for the palliative treatment of malignant esophageal obstruction. Endoscopic treatment is expected to have more important role in the treatment of esophageal neoplasms in the future. PMID:27440040

  8. Endoscopic treatment of gastric varices bleeding with the use of n-butyl-2 cyanoacrylate

    PubMed Central

    Kobryń, Konrad; Paluszkiewicz, Rafał; Krawczyk, Marek; Wróblewski, Tadeusz

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Oesophageal varices and gastric varices are naturally-formed, pathological portosystemic shunts that occur in patients with portal hypertension. Gastric varices are responsible for about 10% of variceal bleeding; however, they are also the cause of massive haemorrhage, often with dramatic progress. Aim To assess the results of endoscopic treatment of gastrointestinal bleeding from oesophageal and gastric varices using tissue glue Histoacryl. Material and methods From January 2013 to May 2015 170 patients underwent a total of 244 obliterations with the administration of tissue glue due to gastroesophageal varices. We analysed 35 patients who received urgent endoscopic intervention due to life-threatening gastric variceal bleeding. Results Thirty-five patients underwent 47 endoscopic procedures of haemorrhage management. Immediate haemostasis was achieved in 32 (91.4%) patients. In 3 (8.6%) cases endoscopy failed. In 2 patients a Linton tube was applied before secondary endoscopy. A single trans jugular portosystemic shunt (TIPS) was performed. Permanent haemostasis during the first endoscopy was achieved in 26 (74%) patients. Six (17%) patients presented recurrent bleeding 1–4 days following the initial treatment. Three patients had a splenic artery embolisation performed. One of the embolised patients required surgery, and a splenectomy was carried out. Conclusions If this kind of therapy is unavailable at the time, it is advised that one of the conventional methods of controlling bleeding is used, introducing basic life support and transporting the patient to a specialist centre with adequate endoscopic facilities, radiological possibilities of endovascular intervention, and surgical treatment of liver transplantation. PMID:26759632

  9. Bleeding Duodenal Varices Successfully Treated with Balloon-Occluded Retrograde Transvenous Obliteration (B-RTO) Assisted by CT During Arterial Portography

    SciTech Connect

    Tsurusaki, Masakatsu Sugimoto, Koji; Matsumoto, Shinichi; Izaki, Kenta; Fukuda, Tetsuya; Akasaka, Yoshinobu; Fujii, Masahiko; Hirota, Shozo; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2006-12-15

    A 60-year-old woman with massive hemorrhage from duodenal varices was transferred to our hospital for the purpose of transcatheter intervention. Although digital subtraction arterial portography could not depict the entire pathway of collateral circulation, the efferent route of the duodenal varices was clearly demonstrated on subsequent CT during arterial portography. Balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration (B-RTO) of the varices was performed via the efferent vein and achieved complete thrombosis of the varices.

  10. Gastro-esophageal reflux time parameters and esophagitis in children

    SciTech Connect

    Baulieu, F.; Baulieu, J.; Maurage, C.; Casset, D.; Itti, R.

    1985-05-01

    The aim of this work was to study the correlation between the reflux timing and the presence of esophagitis, an inconstant but serious complication of gastro-esophageal reflux (GER). The hypothesis was that reflux occurring late after meal can be incriminated more than early reflux in esophagitis genesis. 32 children with GER (mean age = 10.5 months, 2 to 30 months) had esophagoscopy and scintigraphy in the same week. The children were classified in two groups according to esophagoscopy: group 1 (n = 18) no esophagitis, group 2 (n = 14) esophaqgitis. The scintigraphy involved the ingestion of 0.5 mCi Tc-99m sulfur colloid milk mixture, followed by esophageal and gastric activity recording (one image per minute for 1 hour). The reflux was assessed from contrast enhanced images and esophageal time activity curves. Reflux intensity was quantitated by reflux index (Re). Mean reflux time was calculated as the mean esophageal activity peaks time (t-bar). Finally a composite parameter was calculated as the mean reflux time weighted by the relative intensity of each reflux peak (t-barw). Re was not found to be different between the two groups. t-bar was significantly higher in group 2: t-bar = 29.6 +- 3.0 mn (mean +- SD) than in group 1: t-bar = 24.5 +- 6.8 mn; rho <0.02. The difference between the two groups was enhanced by intensity weighting: group 1: t-barw = 16.6 +- 6.3 mn, group 2: t-barw = 33.5 +- 7.1 mn rho <0.001. t-barw value was not correlated to esophagitis grade. These results suggest that late reflux is more likely responsible of esophagitis.

  11. Effects of Metoclopramide on Esophageal Motor Activity and Esophagogastric Junction Compliance in Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Mikami, Hironobu; Ishimura, Norihisa; Fukazawa, Kousuke; Okada, Mayumi; Izumi, Daisuke; Shimura, Shino; Okimoto, Eiko; Aimi, Masahito; Ishihara, Shunji; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Prokinetic drugs such as metoclopramide are frequently used as second-line therapy for patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. However, their beneficial effects remain unclear. Esophageal motor activities and compliance of the esophagogastric junction (EGJ) are important for prevention of gastroesophageal reflux. Although metoclopramide has been reported to increase lower esophageal sphincter (LES) pressure, its effects on EGJ compliance have not been evaluated. In the present study, we investigated the effects of metoclopramide on esophageal motor activities and EGJ compliance. Methods Nine healthy male volunteers without abdominal symptoms were enrolled. Peristaltic esophageal contractions and LES pressure were examined using high-resolution esophageal manometry, while EGJ compliance was evaluated with an endoluminal functional lumen-imaging probe. After obtaining baseline values for esophageal motor activities and EGJ compliance, metoclopramide (10 mg) was intravenously administered, then all measurements were repeated at 15 minutes after administration in each subject. Results Following administration of metoclopramide, mean resting LES pressure was significantly increased as compared with the baseline (13.7 ± 9.2 vs 26.7 ± 8.8 mmHg, P < 0.05). In addition, metoclopramide significantly augmented peristaltic contractions, especially in the distal esophageal segment (P < 0.05). On the other hand, distensibility index did not change after administration (4.5 ± 0.5 vs 4.1 ± 0.5 mm2/mmHg), suggesting no significant effect of metoclopramide on EGJ compliance. Conclusions Metoclopramide augmented esophageal contractions without changing EGJ compliance in healthy adults. PMID:26507875

  12. [Prevalence of erosive esophagitis and peptic esophageal strictures].

    PubMed

    Vasilevskiĭ, D I; Skurikhin, S S; Luft, A V; Mednikov, S N; Silant'ev, D S; Kulagin, V I; Dvoretskiĭ, S Iu; Bagnenko, S F

    2015-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease is a widespread among population in economically developed countries including Russia. It was analyzed the results of 34 903 endoscopic examinations of upper gastrointestinal tract in ethnically and socially homogeneous population of Leningrad region with symptoms of gastric dispepsia. Procedures were performed for the period 2007-2013. Prevalence of erosive esophagitis was 4.9%. Peptic esophageal strictures due to chronic reflux-associated inflammation were revealed in 0.2% of examined patients (3.7% of patients with erosive esophagitis). Obtained data allow to considergastroesophageal reflux disease as a socially significant problem in Russia requiring close attention and further study.

  13. Intraluminal esophageal diverticulum.

    PubMed

    Funakoshi, O; Soma, Y; Takasugi, T; Munakata, A; Yoshida, Y

    1990-02-01

    An intraluminal esophageal diverticulum (IED) is an uncommon entity defined as a double-layered mucosal pouch lying within the lumen of the esophagus. Its characteristic radiological finding is an intraluminal barium collection surrounded by a radiolucent halo. True IED, which is different from a transient radiological artifact, has not been previously reported in the international literature. This article describes the first case of true IED. Differential diagnosis between a true lesion and a transient flow artifact on barium meal is discussed. PMID:2106464

  14. Cyanoacrylate Injection Versus Band Ligation in the Endoscopic Management of Acute Gastric Variceal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Weiguang; Ren, Yutang; Bai, Yang; Liu, Side; Zhang, Qiang; Zhi, Fachao

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The evidence for optimal endoscopic management of bleeding gastric varices is lacking. The clinical outcome is controversial in trials comparing cyanoacrylate injection and band ligation. To help guide endoscopic decisions regarding acute gastric variceal bleeding, a meta-analysis was conducted. Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and ScienceDirect were searched for all randomized controlled trials (RCTs) containing the 2 interventions. The main outcomes evaluated in the meta-analysis were active bleeding control, blood transfusion, rebleeding, recurrence of varices, complications, and survival. Three RCTs were identified, which included 194 patients with active gastric variceal bleeding from Taiwan and Romania. Active bleeding control was achieved in 46 of 49 (93.9%) patients in the cyanoacrylate injection group, compared with 35 of 44 (79.5%) in the band ligation group (P = 0.032), for a pooled odds ratio of 4.44 (95% confidence interval, 1.14–17.30). Rebleeding rate was comparable in type 2 gastroesophageal varices (GOV2) between the 2 interventions (35.7% vs 34.8%, P = 0.895), but cyanoacrylate injection seemed superior for reducing rebleeding rate in type 1 gastroesophageal varices (GOV1, 26.1% vs 47.7%, P = 0.035) and type 1 isolated gastric varices (IGV1, 17.6% vs 85.7%, P = 0.015). Cyanoacrylate injection was also superior in controlling recurrence of gastric varices to band ligation (36.0% vs 66.0%, P = 0.002). There was no difference in complications or mortality between the 2 interventions. The major limitation of this meta-analysis is the small number of studies/patients included. Compared with band ligation, injection cyanocrylate have an advantage in the control of acute gastric variceal bleeding, also with lower recurrence rate and rebleeding (except GOV2). The limited amount of studies included attenuates the strength of this meta-analysis; therefore, more high-quality RCTs are needed. PMID

  15. Barrett's esophagus: photodynamic therapy for ablation of dysplasia, reduction of specialized mucosa and treatment of superficial esophageal cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overholt, Bergein F.; Panjehpour, Masoud

    1995-03-01

    Fifteen patients with Barrett's esophagus and dysplasia were treated with photodynamic therapy. Four patients also had early, superficial esophageal cancers and 5 had esophageal polyps. Light was delivered via a standard diffuser or a centering esophageal balloon. Eight patients maintained on omeprazole and followed for 6 - 54 months are the subject of this report. Photodynamic therapy ablated dysplastic or malignant mucosa in patients with superficial cancer. Healing and partial replacement of Barrett's mucosa with normal squamous epithelium occurred in all patients and complete replacement with squamous epithelium was found in two. Side effects included photosensitivity and mild-moderate chest pain and dysphagia for 5 - 7 days. In three patients with extensive circumferential mucosal ablation in the proximal esophagus, healing was associated with esophageal strictures which were treated successfully by esophageal dilation. Strictures were not found in the distal esophagus. Photodynamic therapy combined with long-term acid inhibition provides effective endoscopic therapy of Barrett's mucosal dysplasia and superficial (Tis-T1) esophageal cancer. The windowed centering balloon improves delivery of photodynamic therapy to diffusely abnormal esophageal mucosa.

  16. Esophageal atresia and anal atresia in a newborn with heterotaxia combined with other congenital defects

    PubMed Central

    Smigiel, Robert; Misiak, Blazej; Golebiowski, Waldemar; Lebioda, Arleta; Dorobisz, Urszula; Zielinska, Marzena; Patkowski, Dariusz

    2012-01-01

    Heterotaxia (HTX) is a heterogeneous group of laterality defects characterized by abnormal discordance of asymmetric thoracic and abdominal organs. Esophageal anomalies occur rarely in HTX cases although additional defects associated with esophageal atresia are common. We report on a rare case of a neonate with HTX and multiple congenital malformations as well as specific facial dysmorphism, corresponding only to a few cases described in literature. Clinical examination of the proband revealed esophageal atresia with distal tracheoesophageal fistula, anal atresia, abdominal situs inversus, dextrocardia with complex congenital heart defect and left lung agenesis. A complex genetic analysis revealed no genetic abnormalities. Despite extensive diagnostic procedures, the cause of the laterality sequence disruption remains unclear, indicating its multifactorial etiology.

  17. Esophageal atresia and anal atresia in a newborn with heterotaxia combined with other congenital defects.

    PubMed

    Smigiel, Robert; Misiak, Blazej; Golebiowski, Waldemar; Lebioda, Arleta; Dorobisz, Urszula; Zielinska, Marzena; Patkowski, Dariusz

    2012-03-01

    Heterotaxia (HTX) is a heterogeneous group of laterality defects characterized by abnormal discordance of asymmetric thoracic and abdominal organs. Esophageal anomalies occur rarely in HTX cases although additional defects associated with esophageal atresia are common. We report on a rare case of a neonate with HTX and multiple congenital malformations as well as specific facial dysmorphism, corresponding only to a few cases described in literature. Clinical examination of the proband revealed esophageal atresia with distal tracheoesophageal fistula, anal atresia, abdominal situs inversus, dextrocardia with complex congenital heart defect and left lung agenesis. A complex genetic analysis revealed no genetic abnormalities. Despite extensive diagnostic procedures, the cause of the laterality sequence disruption remains unclear, indicating its multifactorial etiology. PMID:27625802

  18. [Case of cardial varices rupture due to danaparoid sodium with portal venous thrombosis].

    PubMed

    Kawaratani, Hideto; Matsumura, Masahiko; Tsujimoto, Tatsuhiro; Morimoto, Tomoko; Kitade, Mitsuteru; Umemoto, Norie; Sakai, Kyouko; Fukui, Hiroshi

    2008-12-01

    A 54-year-old man had been admitted to Nara city hospital because of hematemesis and dyspnea caused by physical exertion, and was given a diagnosis of esophago-cardial varices and portal venous thrombosis. He was transferred to our hospital for further examinations and treatments. Ultrasonography (US) and computed tomography (CT) revealed the progression of portal venous thrombosis. Danaparoid sodium was administered to treat the portal vein thrombus. 5 days later, the patient was found to have hematemesis resulting from a cardial varices rupture. After endoscopic variceal ligation (EVL) and endoscopic injection sclerotherapy (EIS) was performed, danaparoid sodium was administered for 2 weeks. After the treatment, portal vein thrombus had almost disappeared. Due to an increased risk of bleeding, cases of esophago-cardial varices with portal venous thrombosis must be treated with care. This is the first report of upper gastrointestinal bleeding due to danaparoid sodium. Danaparoid sodium must be carefully administered when patients have portal venous thrombosis with delicate varices. PMID:19057161

  19. Treatment of gastric varices with partial splenic embolization in a patient with portal vein thrombosis and a myeloproliferative disorder.

    PubMed

    Gianotti, Robert; Charles, Hearns; Hymes, Kenneth; Chandarana, Hersh; Sigal, Samuel

    2014-10-21

    Therapeutic options for gastric variceal bleeding in the presence of extensive portal vein thrombosis associated with a myeloproliferative disorder are limited. We report a case of a young woman who presented with gastric variceal bleeding secondary to extensive splanchnic venous thrombosis due to a Janus kinase 2 mutation associated myeloproliferative disorder that was managed effectively with partial splenic embolization.

  20. Esophageal Lipoma: A Rare Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Jeremy; Tejerina, Manfred; Hallowell, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Esophageal lipomas are rare tumors, making up 0.4% of all digestive tract benign neoplasms. Most of these lesions are clinically silent as a result of their small size, however, the majority of lesions over 4 cm have been reported to cause dysphagia, regurgitation and/or epigastralgia. We report a case of a 53 year-old African American female who presented with dysphagia. Computed tomography of the chest and esophagram confirmed esophageal lipoma as the cause of the patient’s symptoms. Accurately diagnosing an esophageal lipoma is crucial in order to rule out potential malignant lesions, relieve patient symptoms and plan the appropriate treatment. PMID:23365708

  1. Eosinophilic gastroenteritis with esophageal involvement.

    PubMed

    Dobbins, J W; Sheahan, D G; Behar, J

    1977-06-01

    A patient with a lifelong history of asthma and hay fever was investigated because of symptoms of esophageal spasm. Esophageal biopsies revealed elongated papillae and basal zone hyperplasia of the epithelial layer with eosinophilic infiltration of the lamina propria and muscularis mucosae. There was no evidence of reflux. Small bowel biopsies revealed a flat mucosal pattern with absent or blunted villi, tall columar surface epithelium, and eosinophilic infiltration of the lamina propria. He did not respond to a gluten-free diet. This patient is thought to have eosinophilic gatroenteritis with esophageal involvement, the first such case reported.

  2. Treatment of advanced esophageal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kelsen, D.

    1982-12-01

    When radiation therapy is used for palliation of obstruction in patients with advanced esophageal carcinoma, an improvement in dysphagia can be expected in approximately 50% of patients. Major objective responses have rarely been quantitied but, in one study, were seen in 33% patients. Recurrence of dysphagia is usually seen within 2-6 months of treatment. Radiation toxicities and complications, even when used with palliative intent, can be substantial and include esophagitis, tracheoesophageal or esophageal-aortic fistula, mediastinitis, hemorrhage, pneumonitis, and myelosuppression. (JMT)

  3. Nuclear medicine and esophageal surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Taillefer, R.; Beauchamp, G.; Duranceau, A.C.; Lafontaine, E.

    1986-06-01

    The principal radionuclide procedures involved in the evaluation of esophageal disorders that are amenable to surgery are illustrated and briefly described. The role of the radionuclide esophagogram (RE) in the diagnosis and management of achalasia, oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy and its complications, tracheoesophageal fistulae, pharyngeal and esophageal diverticulae, gastric transposition, and fundoplication is discussed. Detection of columnar-lined esophagus by Tc-99m pertechnetate imaging and of esophageal carcinoma by Ga-67 citrate and Tc-99m glucoheptonate studies also is presented. 37 references.

  4. Radiotherapy Dose Perturbation of Esophageal Stents Examined in an Experimental Model

    SciTech Connect

    Atwood, Todd F.; Hsu, Annie; Ogara, Maydeen M.; Luba, Daniel G.; Tamler, Bradley J.; DiSario, James A.; Maxim, Peter G.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate the radiotherapy dose perturbations caused by esophageal stents in patients undergoing external beam treatments for esophageal cancer. Methods and Materials: Four esophageal stents were examined (three metallic stents: WallFlex, Ultraflex, and Alveolus; one nonmetallic stent with limited radiopaque markers for visualization: Polyflex). All experiments were performed in a liquid water phantom with a custom acrylic stent holder. Radiochromic film was used to measure the dose distributions adjacent to the stents at locations proximal and distal to the radiation source. The stents were placed in an air-filled cavity to simulate the esophagus. Treatment plans were created and delivered for photon energies of 6 and 15 MV, and data analysis was performed on uniform regions of interest, according to the size and geometric placement of the films, to quantify the dose perturbations. Results: The three metallic stents produced the largest dose perturbations with distinct patterns of 'hot' spots (increased dose) measured proximal to the radiation source (up to 15.4%) and both 'cold' (decreased dose) and hot spots measured distal to the radiation source (range, -6.1%-5.8%). The polymeric Polyflex stent produced similar dose perturbations when the radiopaque markers were examined (range, -7.6%-15.4%). However, when the radiopaque markers were excluded from the analysis, the Polyflex stent produced significantly smaller dose perturbations, with maximum hot spots of 7.3% and cold spots of -3.2%. Conclusions: The dose perturbations caused by esophageal stents during the treatment of esophageal cancer using external beam radiotherapy should be understood. These perturbations will result in hot and cold spots in the esophageal mucosa, with varying magnitudes depending on the stent. The nonmetallic Polyflex stent appears to be the most suitable for patients undergoing radiotherapy, but further studies are necessary to determine the clinical significance of the

  5. Distal convoluted tubule.

    PubMed

    McCormick, James A; Ellison, David H

    2015-01-01

    The distal convoluted tubule (DCT) is a short nephron segment, interposed between the macula densa and collecting duct. Even though it is short, it plays a key role in regulating extracellular fluid volume and electrolyte homeostasis. DCT cells are rich in mitochondria, and possess the highest density of Na+/K+-ATPase along the nephron, where it is expressed on the highly amplified basolateral membranes. DCT cells are largely water impermeable, and reabsorb sodium and chloride across the apical membrane via electroneurtral pathways. Prominent among this is the thiazide-sensitive sodium chloride cotransporter, target of widely used diuretic drugs. These cells also play a key role in magnesium reabsorption, which occurs predominantly, via a transient receptor potential channel (TRPM6). Human genetic diseases in which DCT function is perturbed have provided critical insights into the physiological role of the DCT, and how transport is regulated. These include Familial Hyperkalemic Hypertension, the salt-wasting diseases Gitelman syndrome and EAST syndrome, and hereditary hypomagnesemias. The DCT is also established as an important target for the hormones angiotensin II and aldosterone; it also appears to respond to sympathetic-nerve stimulation and changes in plasma potassium. Here, we discuss what is currently known about DCT physiology. Early studies that determined transport rates of ions by the DCT are described, as are the channels and transporters expressed along the DCT with the advent of molecular cloning. Regulation of expression and activity of these channels and transporters is also described; particular emphasis is placed on the contribution of genetic forms of DCT dysregulation to our understanding.

  6. Genetics Home Reference: distal arthrogryposis type 1

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions distal arthrogryposis type 1 distal arthrogryposis type 1 Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... Open All Close All Description Distal arthrogryposis type 1 is a disorder characterized by joint deformities (contractures) ...

  7. Tracheal varices caused by mediastinal compression of a large intrathoracic goiter: report of a case

    PubMed Central

    LUCCHINI, R.; SANTOPRETE, S.; TRIOLA, R.; POLISTENA, A.; MONACELLI, M.; AVENIA, S.; SANGUINETTI, A.; PUMA, F.; AVENIA, N.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Tracheal varices are a rare condition but they can be an important source of massive or recurrent haemoptysis. Usually they are related to increased pressure in the pulmonary veins. Mediastinal goiter is often associated to compressive effects on the surrounding structures, including mediastinal vessels with potential superior vena cava syndrome. Case report We describe a case, not previously reported in literature, of mediastinal goiter with hemoptysis as first clinical manifestation. Bleeding was attributed to a superior vena cava syndrome associated to a tracheal fragile mucosa with an easily bleeding intramural nodule which was diagnosed as tracheal varices after total thyroidectomy. The nodule in fact disappeared together with the venous hypertensive signs after venous decompression of the mediastinum. Conclusions Compressive symptoms including tracheal varices, related to mediastinal goiter, can be treated surgically by total thyroidectomy via cervicotomy and when required with associated median sternotomy. PMID:25827666

  8. Severe gastric variceal bleeding successfully treated by emergency splenic artery embolization.

    PubMed

    Sankararaman, Senthilkumar; Velayuthan, Sujithra; Vea, Romulo; Herbst, John

    2013-06-01

    Bleeding from gastric varices due to splenic vein obstruction is extremely rare in children, but it can be catastrophic. Reported herein is the case of a teenager with splenic vein thrombosis and chronic decompensated liver disease from autoimmune hepatitis who presented with massive gastric variceal bleeding. Standard medical management did not control the bleeding. Due to decompensated liver disease and continuous active bleeding, emergency partial splenic artery embolization was preferred over splenectomy or a shunt procedure. Bleeding was successfully controlled by partial splenic artery embolization by decreasing the inflow of blood into the portal system. It is concluded that emergency partial splenic artery embolization is a safer alternative life-saving procedure to manage severe gastric variceal bleeding due to splenic vein obstruction in a patient with high surgical risk. To our knowledge, only one other patient with similar management has been reported in the pediatric age group.

  9. Influence of variceal bleeding on natural history of ACLF and management options.

    PubMed

    Al-Mahtab, Mamun; Akbar, Sheikh Mohammad Fazle; Garg, Hitendra

    2016-05-01

    Patients with diagnosed and undiagnosed chronic liver diseases experience one or more acute assaults of a hepatic nature and develop a downhill course of liver diseases, a condition regarded as acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF). It is a medical emergency, the prognosis of ACLF is extremely bad and considerable numbers of patients with ACLF die even after diagnosis and receiving conservative treatment. ACLF is characterized by jaundice, coagulopathy, ascites and encephalopathy. ACLF patients are very sick and associated with different hemodynamic profiles and have very high 3-month mortality. As these groups of patients have high baseline hepatic venous pressure gradients, the chances of variceal bleed are also high, and the impact is also greater in comparison to stable cirrhosis; however, evidence is lacking to substantiate such effects. The aim of this review is to discuss the natural course of variceal bleeding in ACLF patients and to develop insights into the management of variceal bleeding in ACLF.

  10. Environmental Causes of Esophageal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kamangar, Farin; Chow, Wong-Ho; Abnet, Christian; Dawsey, Sanford

    2009-01-01

    Synopsis This articles reviews the environmental risk factors and predisposing conditions for the two main histological types of esophageal cancer, esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) and esophageal adenocarcinoma (EA). Tobacco smoking, excessive alcohol consumption, drinking maté, low intake of fresh fruits and vegetables, achalasia, and low socioeconomic status increase the risk of ESCC. Results of investigations on several other potential risk factors, including opium consumption, intake of hot drinks, eating pickled vegetables, poor oral health, and exposure to human papillomavirus, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, N-nitroso compounds, acetaldehyde, and fumonisins are also discussed. Gastroesophageal reflux, obesity, tobacco smoking, hiatal hernia, achalasia, and probably absence of H. pylori in the stomach increase the risk of EA. Results of studies investigating other factors, including low intake of fresh fruits and vegetables, consumption of carbonated soft drink, use of H2 blockers, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and drugs that relax the lower esophageal sphincter are also discussed. PMID:19327566

  11. Caustic ingestion and esophageal function

    SciTech Connect

    Cadranel, S.; Di Lorenzo, C.; Rodesch, P.; Piepsz, A.; Ham, H.R. )

    1990-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate esophageal motor function by means of krypton-81m esophageal transit scintigraphy and to compare the results with the functional and morphological data obtained by means of triple lumen manometry and endoscopy. In acute and subacute stages of the disease, all clinical, anatomical, and functional parameters were in good agreement, revealing significant impairment. In chronic stages, the severity of the dysphagia was not correlated to the importance of the residual stenosis. Conversely, 81mKr esophageal transit and manometric's findings were in good agreement with the clinical symptoms, during the entire follow-up period ranging between 3 months to 7 years. The 81mKr test is undoubtedly the easiest and probably the most physiological technique currently available for long-term functional evaluation of caustic esophagitis.

  12. Drugs Approved for Esophageal Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for esophageal cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  13. Understanding the sensory irregularities of esophageal disease.

    PubMed

    Farmer, Adam D; Brock, Christina; Frøkjaer, Jens Brøndum; Gregersen, Hans; Khan, Sheeba; Lelic, Dina; Lottrup, Christian; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr

    2016-08-01

    Symptoms relating to esophageal sensory abnormalities can be encountered in the clinical environment. Such sensory abnormalities may be present in demonstrable disease, such as erosive esophagitis, and in the ostensibly normal esophagus, such as non-erosive reflux disease or functional chest pain. In this review, the authors discuss esophageal sensation and the esophageal pain system. In addition, the authors provide a primer concerning the techniques that are available for investigating the autonomic nervous system, neuroimaging and neurophysiology of esophageal sensory function. Such technological advances, whilst not readily available in the clinic may facilitate the stratification and individualization of therapy in disorders of esophageal sensation in the future. PMID:26890720

  14. Understanding the sensory irregularities of esophageal disease.

    PubMed

    Farmer, Adam D; Brock, Christina; Frøkjaer, Jens Brøndum; Gregersen, Hans; Khan, Sheeba; Lelic, Dina; Lottrup, Christian; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr

    2016-08-01

    Symptoms relating to esophageal sensory abnormalities can be encountered in the clinical environment. Such sensory abnormalities may be present in demonstrable disease, such as erosive esophagitis, and in the ostensibly normal esophagus, such as non-erosive reflux disease or functional chest pain. In this review, the authors discuss esophageal sensation and the esophageal pain system. In addition, the authors provide a primer concerning the techniques that are available for investigating the autonomic nervous system, neuroimaging and neurophysiology of esophageal sensory function. Such technological advances, whilst not readily available in the clinic may facilitate the stratification and individualization of therapy in disorders of esophageal sensation in the future.

  15. Uses of esophageal function testing: dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Yazaki, Etsuro; Woodland, Philip; Sifrim, Daniel

    2014-10-01

    Esophageal function testing should be used for differential diagnosis of dysphagia. Dysphagia can be the consequence of hypermotility or hypomotility of the muscles of the esophagus. Decreased esophageal or esophagogastric junction distensibility can provoke dysphagia. The most well established esophageal dysmotility is achalasia. Other motility disorders can also cause dysphagia. High-resolution manometry (HRM) is the gold standard investigation for esophageal motility disorders. Simultaneous measurement of HRM and intraluminal impedance can be useful to assess motility and bolus transit. Impedance planimetry measures distensibility of the esophageal body and gastroesophageal junction in patients with achalasia and eosinophilic esophagitis. PMID:25216909

  16. No Mortality Difference Following Treatment with Terlipressin or Somatostatin in Cirrhotic Patients with Gastric Variceal Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Tsung-Hsing; Tsai, Chen-Chi; Tseng, Kuo-Chih; Hsieh, Yu-Hsi; Tseng, Chih-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of terlipressin versus somatostatin as adjuvants to endoscopic treatment in cirrhotic patients with gastric variceal bleeding. Patients and Methods: The National Health Insurance Database, derived from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Program, was used to enroll patients who were discharged with International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification diagnoses of cirrhosis and who underwent gastric variceal sclerotherapy for gastric variceal bleeding between January 1, 2007, and December 31, 2007. We observed treatment outcomes and identified clinical factors associated with mortality. Results: In total, we enrolled 311 cirrhosis patients who underwent sclerotherapy for active gastric variceal bleeding. Among them, 218 patients received terlipressin, and 93 patients received somatostatin. The overall 30 day mortality rate was 13.2% (41/311). A total of 78 (25.1%) patients underwent second-look endoscopy, but only 12 (7%) needed a second course of gastric variceal sclerotherapy. The overall 30-day mortality rates for patients treated with terlipressin and somatostatin were 13.3% and 12.9%, respectively, showing no statistically significant differences between outcomes in the two treatment groups (P = 0.672). The risk of 30-day mortality was significantly higher in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HR: 3.257, 95% CI: 1.640-6.469, P= 0.001), acute renal failure (HR: 6.261, 95% CI: 2.376-16.499, P < 0.001), or hepatic encephalopathy (HR: 3.091, 95% CI: 1.430-6.680, P= 0.004). Conclusions: Mortality rates did not differ significantly between cirrhosis patients with acute gastric variceal bleeding who received somatostatin or terlipressin as adjuvants to endoscopy. PMID:27184641

  17. Cutaneous Metastases From Esophageal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Triantafyllou, Stamatina; Georgia, Doulami; Gavriella-Zoi, Vrakopoulou; Dimitrios, Mpistarakis; Stulianos, Katsaragakis; Theodoros, Liakakos; Georgios, Zografos; Dimitrios, Theodorou

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to present 2 rare cases of cutaneous metastases originated from adenocarcinoma of the gastro-esophageal junction, thus, underline the need for early diagnosis and possible treatment of suspicious skin lesions among patients with esophageal malignancy. Metastatic cancer to the skin originated from internal malignancies, mostly lung cancer, breast cancer, and colorectal cancer, constitute 0.5 to 9% of all metastatic cancers.5,8,15 Skin metastases, mainly from squamous cell carcinomas of the esophagus, are rarely reported. Cutaneous metastasis is a finding indicating progressiveness of the disease.17 More precisely, median survival is estimated approximately 4.7 months.2,14 This study is a retrospective review of 2 cases of patients with adenocarcinoma of the esophagus and a review of the literature. Two patients aged 60 and 32 years old, respectively, underwent esophagectomy. Both pathologic reports disclosed adenocarcinoma of the gastro-esophageal junction staged T3 N2 M0 (stage IIIB). During follow-up time, the 2 patients were diagnosed with cutaneous metastases originated from the primary esophageal tumor 11 and 4 months after surgery, respectively. The first patient is alive 37 months after diagnosis, while the second one died 16 months after surgery. Cutaneous metastasis caused by esophageal adenocarcinoma is possible. Therefore, follow-up of patients who were diagnosed with esophageal malignancy and underwent esophagectomy is mandatory in order to reveal early surgical stages. PMID:25785344

  18. Esophageal malignancy: A growing concern

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Jianyuan; Jamal, M Mazen

    2012-01-01

    Esophageal cancer is mainly found in Asia and east Africa and is one of the deadliest cancers in the world. However, it has not garnered much attention in the Western world due to its low incidence rate. An increasing amount of data indicate that esophageal cancer, particularly esophageal adenocarcinoma, has been rising by 6-fold annually and is now becoming the fastest growing cancer in the United States. This rise has been associated with the increase of the obese population, as abdominal fat puts extra pressure on the stomach and causes gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Long standing GERD can induce esophagitis and metaplasia and, ultimately, leads to adenocarcinoma. Acid suppression has been the main strategy to treat GERD; however, it has not been proven to control esophageal malignancy effectively. In fact, its side effects have triggered multiple warnings from regulatory agencies. The high mortality and fast growth of esophageal cancer demand more vigorous efforts to look into its deeper mechanisms and come up with better therapeutic options. PMID:23236223

  19. Multichannel intraluminal impedance and esophageal manometry data for unrestricted swallowing: establishing normal values.

    PubMed

    Wilson, J A; Mainie, I; Tutuian, R; Agrawal, A; Castell, D O

    2008-01-01

    Standard esophageal manometric testing evaluates swallowing in the supine position using small boluses, with a recovery period imposed between swallows. Manometric tests of more physiologic unrestricted swallowing have had limited practical application due to highly variable results. The purpose of this study is to apply multichannel intraluminal impedance and manometry (MII-EM) to test esophageal function during unrestricted upright meal consumption, and to assess results in a normal healthy population. Ten healthy volunteers with normal esophageal impedance and manometry by published criteria underwent MII-EM testing using a combined 5-channel catheter. After transnasal placement of the catheter, each subject sat upright and consumed a meal that consisted of two pieces of toasted bread and two ounces of Gatorade. There were no restrictions placed on chewing, swallowing, or eating time. All data assessed by the MII-EM meal test were normally distributed. Impedance results with limited variability included the meal duration, number of swallows, postprandial emptying time and the percent of bolus presence times at 15, 10, and 5 cm above the lower esophageal sphincter. Manometric results with limited variability included the number of peristaltic sequences, mean time between these sequences and their distal esophageal amplitudes. MII-EM can be used to collect data with minimal variability in healthy subjects during unrestricted upright meal consumption. This technique may be used to identify abnormal motility patterns during physiologic swallowing. PMID:18197939

  20. Eosinophilic Esophagitis in Pediatric and Adolescent Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Adolescent Patients Eosinophilic Esophagitis in Pediatric and Adolescent Patients Basics Overview Eosinophilic esophagitis also known as ( ... children may have vomiting and abdominal pain, and adolescents may complain of the feeling of food getting ...

  1. 21 CFR 876.5365 - Esophageal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... and weighted with mercury or a metal olive-shaped weight that slides on a guide, such as a string or... esophageal or gastrointestinal bougies and the esophageal dilator (metal olive). (b) Classification. Class...

  2. 21 CFR 876.5365 - Esophageal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... and weighted with mercury or a metal olive-shaped weight that slides on a guide, such as a string or... esophageal or gastrointestinal bougies and the esophageal dilator (metal olive). (b) Classification. Class...

  3. 21 CFR 876.5365 - Esophageal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... and weighted with mercury or a metal olive-shaped weight that slides on a guide, such as a string or... esophageal or gastrointestinal bougies and the esophageal dilator (metal olive). (b) Classification. Class...

  4. 21 CFR 876.5365 - Esophageal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... and weighted with mercury or a metal olive-shaped weight that slides on a guide, such as a string or... esophageal or gastrointestinal bougies and the esophageal dilator (metal olive). (b) Classification. Class...

  5. Esophageal Helicobacter pylori colonization aggravates esophageal injury caused by reflux

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Yun-Xiang; Wang, Wei-Hong; Dai, Yun; Teng, Gui-Gen; Wang, Shu-Jun

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate esophageal Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) colonization on esophageal injury caused by reflux and the related mechanisms. METHODS: An esophagitis model, with acid and bile reflux, was surgically produced in male rats. The rats were randomly divided into either: (1) an esophagogastroduodenal anastomosis (EGDA) group; (2) an EGDA with H. pylori infection group; (3) a pseudo-operation with H. pylori infection group; or (4) a pseudo-operation group. All rats were kept for 36 wk. Based on the location of H. pylori colonization, the EGDA rats with H. pylori infection were subdivided into those with concomitant esophageal H. pylori colonization or those with only gastric H. pylori colonization. The esophageal injuries were evaluated grossly and microscopically. The expressions of CDX2 and MUC2 were determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry. Ki-67 antigen expression was determined by immunohistochemistry. The mRNA levels of cyclin D1, c-Myc, Bax and Bcl-2 were determined by RT-PCR. Cell apoptosis was evaluated using the TdT-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling method. RESULTS: Esophagitis, Barrett’s esophagus (BE), and esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) developed in rats that underwent EGDA. When comparing rats with EGDA and concomitant esophageal H. pylori colonization to EGDA-only rats, the severity of injury (87.9 ± 5.2 vs 77.2 ± 8.6, macroscopically, 92.5 ± 8.0 vs 83.8 ± 5.5, microscopically, both P < 0.05) and the incidences of BE (80.0% vs 33.3%, P = 0.055) and EAC (60.0% vs 11.1%, P < 0.05) were increased. These increases were associated with upregulation of CDX2 and MUC2 mRNA (10.1 ± 5.4 vs 3.0 ± 2.9, 8.4 ± 4.6 vs 2.0 ± 3.2, respectively, Ps < 0.01) and protein (8.1 ± 2.3 vs 3.3 ± 3.1, 7.3 ± 4.0 vs 1.8 ± 2.7, respectively, all P < 0.05). The expression of Ki-67 (8.9 ± 0.7 vs 6.0 ± 1.7, P < 0.01) and the presence of apoptotic cells (8.3 ± 1.1 vs 5.3 ± 1.7, P < 0.01) were also increased

  6. Prevention and Treatment of Esophageal Stenosis after Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection for Early Esophageal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Jing; Lu, Zhongsheng; Liu, Qingsen

    2014-01-01

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) for the treatment of esophageal mucosal lesions is associated with a risk of esophageal stenosis, especially for near-circumferential or circumferential esophageal mucosal defects. Here, we review historic and modern studies on the prevention and treatment of esophageal stenosis after ESD. These methods include prevention via pharmacological treatment, endoscopic autologous cell transplantation, endoscopic esophageal dilatation, and stent placement. This short review will focus on direct prevention and treatment, which may help guide the way forward. PMID:25386186

  7. A Comprehensive Review of Esophageal Stents

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jinwha; Lam-Tsai, Yvette; Gress, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Esophageal stents are important tools for palliative treatment of inoperable esophageal malignancies. With the development of multiple self-expandable stents, there are now several therapeutic options for managing benign and malignant esophageal diseases. This paper discusses the various types of esophageal stents currently available, indications for their placement, challenges and complications that gastroenterologists face when placing these stents, and some of the innovations that will become available in the near future. PMID:23293566

  8. A severe case of esophageal ulcer causing a tight stricture despite long-term D-penicillamine treatment.

    PubMed

    Yapali, Suna; Turan, Ilker; Ozutemiz, Omer; Tekesin, Oktay

    2014-12-01

    D-penicillamine has long been used in the management of rheumatic diseases due to the effects on inhibition of collagen synthesis. Herein, we report a severe case of esophageal ulcer causing a tight stricture extending through the distal esophagus despite the long-term D-penicillamine treatment in a patient with Wilson's disease. D-penicillamine would theoretically be expected to contribute to the healing of an esophageal ulcer. However, the drug failed to have a favorable outcome, which is notable and worth reporting.

  9. A fourfold increase of oesophageal variceal bleeding in cirrhotic patients with a history of oesophageal variceal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Tsung-Hsing; Tseng, Chih-Wei; Tsai, Chih-Chun; Lay, Chorng-Jang; Tsai, Chen-Chi

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Large, recent population-based data for evaluating the predictors of oesophageal variceal bleeding (OVB) among cirrhotic patients is still lacking. This study aimed to determine the cumulative incidence of OVB among cirrhotic patients and identify the predictors of OVB occurrence. METHODS Patient information on 38,172 cirrhotic patients without a history of OVB, who were discharged between 1 January 2007 and 31 December 2007, was obtained from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Database for this study. All patients were followed up for three years. Death was the competing risk when calculating the cumulative incidences and hazard ratios (HRs) of OVB. RESULTS OVB was present in 2,609 patients (OVB group) and absent in 35,563 patients (non-OVB group) at hospitalisation. During the three-year follow-up period, the cumulative incidence of OVB was 44.5% and 11.3% in the OVB and non-OVB group, respectively (p < 0.001). Modified Cox regression analysis showed that the HR of OVB history was 4.42 for OVB occurrence (95% confidence interval [CI] 4.13–4.74). Other predictors for OVB occurrence included hepatocellular carcinoma (HR 1.16, 95% CI 1.09–1.24), young age (HR 0.98, 95% CI 0.98–0.98), ascites (HR 1.46, 95% CI 1.37–1.56), alcohol-related disorders (HR 1.20, 95% CI 1.12–1.28), peptic ulcer bleeding (HR 1.26, 95% CI 1.13–1.41) and diabetes mellitus (HR 1.14, 95% CI 1.06–1.23). CONCLUSION Cirrhotic patients have a fourfold increased risk of future OVB following the first incidence of OVB. PMID:26768323

  10. Gallium-67 imaging in candidal esophagitis

    SciTech Connect

    Rundback, J.H.; Goldfarb, C.R.; Ongseng, F. )

    1990-01-01

    Ga-67 scanning has been used to evaluate esophageal carcinoma. It has demonstrated candidal infection in other body sites and, in one previous case, in the esophagus. The authors present a case of diffuse esophageal uptake of Ga-67 in esophageal candidiasis.

  11. Pancreatic carcinoma presenting as bleeding from segmental gastric varices: pitfalls in diagnosis.

    PubMed Central

    Mullan, F. J.; McKelvey, S. T.

    1990-01-01

    Splenic vein occlusion leading to gastric variceal haemorrhage should be considered in cases of obscure upper gastrointestinal bleeding. We report an unusual case in which the underlying pathology was a resectable carcinoma of the pancreatic tail. Images Figure 1 PMID:2371194

  12. Outcomes of esophageal surgery, especially of the lower esophageal sphincter.

    PubMed

    Bonavina, Luigi; Siboni, Stefano; Saino, Greta I; Cavadas, Demetrio; Braghetto, Italo; Csendes, Attila; Korn, Owen; Figueredo, Edgar J; Swanstrom, Lee L; Wassenaar, Eelco

    2013-10-01

    This paper includes commentaries on outcomes of esophageal surgery, including the mechanisms by which fundoduplication improves lower esophageal sphincter (LES) pressure; the efficacy of the Linx™ management system in improving LES function; the utility of radiologic characterization of antireflux valves following surgery; the correlation between endoscopic findings and reported symptoms following antireflux surgery; the links between laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy and decreased LES pressure, endoscopic esophagitis, and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD); the less favorable outcomes following fundoduplication among obese patients; the application of bioprosthetic meshes to reinforce hiatal repair and decrease the incidence of paraesophageal hernia; the efficacy of endoluminal antireflux procedures, and the limited efficacy of revisional antireflux operations, underscoring the importance of good primary surgery and diligent work-up to prevent the necessity of revisional procedures. PMID:24117632

  13. Eosinophilic esophagitis in an octogenarian

    PubMed Central

    Trifan, Anca; Stoica, Oana; Chihaia, Catalin-Alexandru; Danciu, Mihai; Stanciu, Carol; Singeap, Ana-Maria

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic, immune/antigen-mediated disease characterized clinically by symptoms related to esophageal dysfunction and histologically by a marked eosinophilic infiltrate in the esophageal mucosa. What was once considered a rare disease has nowadays become one of the most frequent esophageal diseases in the Western countries, occupying a place just next to the gastroesophageal reflux disease. EoE etiology and pathogenesis remain largely unknown, although most studies consider that allergic and genetic factors play the most important role. Methods: We report the case of EoE in an elderly male (octogenarian), giving a brief review of the current data related to epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of the disease. Results: Dysphagia to solid foods was the leading symptom, and endoscopic findings included white exudates, longitudinal furrows, and concentric mucosal rings, all suggestive for EoE. Diagnosis relied on histological findings in esophageal mucosal biopsies (>30 eosinophils per high power field). He was treated with topical steroids for 8 weeks, symptoms improved gradually and the patient remained in remission at the 8-month follow-up. Conclusion: This case emphasizes that EoE may occur in very old patients and gastroenterologists should have a high index of suspicion of this disorder in any elderly with dysphagia and endoscopic relevant features. PMID:27741150

  14. The Pathophysiology of Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Raheem, Mayumi; Leach, Steven T.; Day, Andrew S.; Lemberg, Daniel A.

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is an emerging disease characterized by esophageal eosinophilia (>15eos/hpf), lack of responsiveness to acid-suppressive medication and is managed by allergen elimination and anti-allergy therapy. Although the pathophysiology of EoE is currently unsubstantiated, evidence implicates food and aeroallergen hypersensitivity in genetically predisposed individuals as contributory factors. Genome-wide expression analyses have isolated a remarkably conserved gene-expression profile irrespective of age and gender, suggesting a genetic contribution. EoE has characteristics of mainly TH2 type immune responses but also some TH1 cytokines, which appear to strongly contribute to tissue fibrosis, with esophageal epithelial cells providing a hospitable environment for this inflammatory process. Eosinophil-degranulation products appear to play a central role in tissue remodeling in EoE. This remodeling and dysregulation predisposes to fibrosis. Mast-cell-derived molecules such as histamine may have an effect on enteric nerves and may also act in concert with transforming growth factor-β to interfere with esophageal musculature. Additionally, the esophageal epithelium may facilitate the inflammatory process under pathogenic contexts such as in EoE. This article aims to discuss the contributory factors in the pathophysiology of EoE. PMID:24910846

  15. [Distal humerus fractures in children].

    PubMed

    Schneidmueller, D; Boettger, M; Laurer, H; Gutsfeld, P; Bühren, V

    2013-11-01

    Fractures of the distal humerus belong to the most common injuries of the upper arm in childhood. Most frequently occurring is the supracondylar fracture of the distal humerus. In these cases and in the second most common epicondylar fractures, the metaphysis is affected and these fractures are therefore extra-articular. They have to be distinguished from articular fractures regarding therapy and prognosis. The growth potential of the distal epiphysis is very limited as is the possibility of spontaneous correction so that major dislocations should not be left uncorrected. Unstable and especially dislocated articular fractures must be anatomically reconstructed employing various osteosynthetic techniques, mostly combined with immobilization. Insufficient reconstruction, growth disturbance and non-union can result in axial deformities, such as cubitus valgus and varus, restriction of motion, pain and nerve palsy.

  16. Usefulness of Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt in the Management of Bleeding Ectopic Varices in Cirrhotic Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Vidal, V.; Joly, L.; Perreault, P.; Bouchard, L.; Lafortune, M.; Pomier-Layrargues, G.

    2006-04-15

    Purpose. To evaluate the safety and efficacy of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) in the control of bleeding from ectopic varices. Methods. From 1995 to 2004, 24 cirrhotic patients, bleeding from ectopic varices, mean age 54.5 years (range 15-76 years), were treated by TIPS. The etiology of cirrhosis was alcoholic in 13 patients and nonalcoholic in 11 patients. The location of the varices was duodenal (n = 5), stomal (n = 8), ileocolic (n = 6), anorectal (n = 3), umbilical (n = 1), and peritoneal (n 1). Results. TIPS controlled the bleeding in all patients and induced a decrease in the portacaval gradient from 19.7 {+-} 5.4 to 6.4 {+-} 3.1 mmHg. Postoperative complications included self-limited intra-abdominal bleeding (n = 2), self-limited hemobilia (n = 1), acute thrombosis of the shunt (n = 1), and bile leak treated by a covered stent (n = 1). Median follow-up was 592 days (range 28-2482 days). Rebleeding occurred in 6 patients. In 2 cases rebleeding was observed despite a post-TIPS portacaval gradient lower than 12 mmHg and was controlled by variceal embolization; 1 patient underwent surgical portacaval shunt and never rebled; in 3 patients rebleeding was related to TIPS stenosis and treated with shunt dilatation with addition of a new stent. The cumulative rate of rebleeding was 23% and 31% at 1 and 2 years, respectively. One- and 2-year survival rates were 80% and 76%, respectively. Conclusion. The present series demonstrates that bleeding from ectopic varices, a challenging clinical problem, can be managed safely by TIPS placement with low rebleeding and good survival rates.

  17. [Caustic esophagitis: surgical management].

    PubMed

    Huamán, M; Santibáñez, G; Ayala, L; Jáuregui, F; Madalengoitia, G

    1990-01-01

    The authors present 28 report cases of severe caustic esophagitis who underwent surgery at the Hospital Nacional Edgardo Rebagliati Martins I.P.S.S., from 1987 to February 1991. All were treated by esophagocoloplasty and when the proximal cervical esophagus was injured, by pharingocoloplasty. Eighteen patients (64.28%) were female and 10 (35.72%) male. Whose ages ranged between 15 and 75 years with an average of 34 years. Ten patients (36%) suffered pharingocoloplasty and in the remaining 18 (64%) a esophagocoloplasty (esophagogastric colonic interposition) was made. Postoperative morbidity corresponded in 5 cases (18%) to respiratory Infections, in 3 cases (11%) pneumothorax, in 2 cases (7%) pleural effusions and only one case presented a small cervical leak. All of them were satisfactory solved by conservatory medical treatment. Only two cases (7%) with late postoperative stenosis required reintervention and a simple cervical plasty was made. There were no complications as mediastinitis, necrosis of the colon graft hemorrhage. Operatory mortality was 0% and the long term follow up of all patients is satisfactory, having our first report cases more than 4 years of postoperative follow up.

  18. A Treatment Option for Esophageal Intramural Pseudodiverticulosis.

    PubMed

    Tyberg, Amy; Jodorkovsky, Daniela

    2014-04-01

    Esophageal intramural pseudodiverticulosis (EIPD) is a rare condition often presenting with esophageal strictures. Treatment is often limited to endoscopic dilatation and treatment of the underlying esophageal pathology. We present a case of a patient with longstanding GERD on famotidine (she experienced anaphylaxis with proton pump inhibitors [PPIs]) who presented with dysphagia and weight loss. Work-up revealed a diagnosis of EIPD with a 5-mm mid-esophageal stricture. Therapy with dilatation was unsuccessful until the addition of sucralfate, after which dilatation was successful and symptoms resolved. In patients who are unable to take PPIs, the addition of sucralfate may enhance the success of dilatations of esophageal strictures and EIPD. PMID:26157852

  19. Hyperthermochemoradiotherapy for esophageal cancer (review).

    PubMed

    Maehara, Y; Kuwano, H; Kitamura, K; Matsuda, H; Sugimachi, K

    1992-01-01

    Hyperthermia is effective for the treatment of cancer when applied concomitantly with chemotherapy and irradiation. However, it is difficult to heat deep portions of the body including the esophagus. Cancer of the esophagus still poses considerable treatment problems, with a poor 5-year survival rate after surgery, an even worse outlook after radiation and surgery, and a not very satisfactory response to chemotherapy. We, therefore, devised an electrode for radio frequency, and we have been successfully using this electrode in the treatment of esophageal cancer. The 5-year survival rates of patients with esophageal cancer, given either preoperative hyperthermochemoradiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy, were 43.2 and 14.7%, respectively. Immediate improvement of subjective complaints and decrease or elimination of the cancer lesion are so distinct that this treatment, by means of an endotract antenna, shows promise as a modality for esophageal lesions.

  20. Surgical treatments for esophageal cancers

    PubMed Central

    Allum, William H.; Bonavina, Luigi; Cassivi, Stephen D.; Cuesta, Miguel A.; Dong, Zhao Ming; Felix, Valter Nilton; Figueredo, Edgar; Gatenby, Piers A.C.; Haverkamp, Leonie; Ibraev, Maksat A.; Krasna, Mark J.; Lambert, René; Langer, Rupert; Lewis, Michael P.N.; Nason, Katie S.; Parry, Kevin; Preston, Shaun R.; Ruurda, Jelle P.; Schaheen, Lara W.; Tatum, Roger P.; Turkin, Igor N.; van der Horst, Sylvia; van der Peet, Donald L.; van der Sluis, Peter C.; van Hillegersberg, Richard; Wormald, Justin C.R.; Wu, Peter C.; Zonderhuis, Barbara M.

    2015-01-01

    The following, from the 12th OESO World Conference: Cancers of the Esophagus, includes commentaries on the role of the nurse in preparation of esophageal resection (ER); the management of patients who develop high-grade dysplasia after having undergone Nissen fundoplication; the trajectory of care for the patient with esophageal cancer; the influence of the site of tumor in the choice of treatment; the best location for esophagogastrostomy; management of chylous leak after esophagectomy; the optimal approach to manage thoracic esophageal leak after esophagectomy; the choice for operational approach in surgery of cardioesophageal crossing; the advantages of robot esophagectomy; the place of open esophagectomy; the advantages of esophagectomy compared to definitive chemoradiotherapy; the pathologist report in the resected specimen; the best way to manage patients with unsuspected positive microscopic margin after ER; enhanced recovery after surgery for ER: expedited care protocols; and long-term quality of life in patients following esophagectomy. PMID:25266029

  1. Prevalence of Eosinophilic Esophagitis and Lymphocytic Esophagitis in Adults with Esophageal Food Bolus Impaction.

    PubMed

    Truskaite, Kotryna; Dlugosz, Aldona

    2016-01-01

    Background. The relation of esophageal food bolus impaction (FBI) to eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) and lymphocytic esophagitis (LyE) is unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of EoE and LyE among adults with FBI. Methods. In this retrospective study we analyzed data from all patients referred for gastroscopy during the past 5 years, because of a present or recent episode of FBI. Results. We found 238 patients with FBI (median age 51 (17-96), 71% males). Endoscopic therapy was required in 143 patients. Esophageal biopsies were obtained in 185 (78%) patients. All biopsies were assessed for numbers of eosinophils and lymphocytes. EoE was found in 18% of patients who underwent biopsy. We found 41 patients (22%) who fulfilled the criteria for both EoE and LyE (EoE/LyE). LyE was found in the 9% of patients with FBI. EoE together with EoE/LyE was the leading cause of FBI in patients ≤50 years (64%). GERD was the leading cause of FBI among patients older than 50 years (42%). Conclusions. Our study showed that EoE was the leading cause of FBI in particular among young adults. Our study highlights the need for esophageal biopsies in any patient with FBI.

  2. Prevalence of Eosinophilic Esophagitis and Lymphocytic Esophagitis in Adults with Esophageal Food Bolus Impaction

    PubMed Central

    Truskaite, Kotryna

    2016-01-01

    Background. The relation of esophageal food bolus impaction (FBI) to eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) and lymphocytic esophagitis (LyE) is unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of EoE and LyE among adults with FBI. Methods. In this retrospective study we analyzed data from all patients referred for gastroscopy during the past 5 years, because of a present or recent episode of FBI. Results. We found 238 patients with FBI (median age 51 (17–96), 71% males). Endoscopic therapy was required in 143 patients. Esophageal biopsies were obtained in 185 (78%) patients. All biopsies were assessed for numbers of eosinophils and lymphocytes. EoE was found in 18% of patients who underwent biopsy. We found 41 patients (22%) who fulfilled the criteria for both EoE and LyE (EoE/LyE). LyE was found in the 9% of patients with FBI. EoE together with EoE/LyE was the leading cause of FBI in patients ≤50 years (64%). GERD was the leading cause of FBI among patients older than 50 years (42%). Conclusions. Our study showed that EoE was the leading cause of FBI in particular among young adults. Our study highlights the need for esophageal biopsies in any patient with FBI. PMID:27547221

  3. Prevalence of Eosinophilic Esophagitis and Lymphocytic Esophagitis in Adults with Esophageal Food Bolus Impaction.

    PubMed

    Truskaite, Kotryna; Dlugosz, Aldona

    2016-01-01

    Background. The relation of esophageal food bolus impaction (FBI) to eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) and lymphocytic esophagitis (LyE) is unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of EoE and LyE among adults with FBI. Methods. In this retrospective study we analyzed data from all patients referred for gastroscopy during the past 5 years, because of a present or recent episode of FBI. Results. We found 238 patients with FBI (median age 51 (17-96), 71% males). Endoscopic therapy was required in 143 patients. Esophageal biopsies were obtained in 185 (78%) patients. All biopsies were assessed for numbers of eosinophils and lymphocytes. EoE was found in 18% of patients who underwent biopsy. We found 41 patients (22%) who fulfilled the criteria for both EoE and LyE (EoE/LyE). LyE was found in the 9% of patients with FBI. EoE together with EoE/LyE was the leading cause of FBI in patients ≤50 years (64%). GERD was the leading cause of FBI among patients older than 50 years (42%). Conclusions. Our study showed that EoE was the leading cause of FBI in particular among young adults. Our study highlights the need for esophageal biopsies in any patient with FBI. PMID:27547221

  4. Dietary treatment of eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Gonsalves, Nirmala; Kagalwalla, Amir F

    2014-06-01

    Emerging evidence supports impaired epithelial barrier function as the key initial event in the development of eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) and other allergic diseases. Symptom resolution, histologic remission, and prevention of both disease and treatment-related complications are the goals of treatment. Successful dietary treatments include elemental, empirical elimination and allergy test directed diets. Dietary therapy with exclusive elemental diet offers the best response. Cow's milk, wheat, egg, soy, peanut/tree nut, and fish/shellfish are the 6 food antigens most likely to induce esophageal inflammation.

  5. The effects of acute tension increase on rat esophageal muscle contractions: An in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Soyer, Tutku; Kalkışım, Said; Yalcin, Sule; Müderrisoğlu, Ahmet; Taş, Sadık Taşkın; Tanyel, Feridun Cahit; Ertunç, Mert; Sara, Yıldırım

    2015-10-01

    In long-gap esophageal atresia surgeries, anastomoses can be tensioned by several traction methods in order to establish esophageal continuity. It is unclear whether the etiology of esophageal dysmotility after traction is related with esophageal atresia itself or tensioned esophagus. Therefore, we evaluated the effects of acute in vitro esophageal tension application on esophageal muscle contractility in rats. 26 Wistar rats weighing 250-300 g were included to the study. After diethyl ether anesthesia, proximal segment (PS) and distal segment (DS) of esophagus were removed and suspended in an isolated organ bath kept at 37°C, Krebs-Henseleit solution. Rats were enrolled into four groups including control group (CG, n=14) without tension, 5 g (5G, n=4), 15 g (15G, n=4) and 25 g (25G, n=4) tension groups. In all groups, contractile responses to electrical field stimulation (EFS), carbachol and KCl, and relaxation responses to serotonin were obtained. In CG, higher contractile responses were obtained in PS than DS after EFS. Both PS and DS showed higher contractile amplitudes in 5G with respect to that of CG, 15G and 25G (p<0.05). In 5G, contractile responses to carbachol were significantly increased in both PS and DS with respect to CG (p<0.05). However, contractile amplitudes in response to carbachol were decreased in PS when tension was increased to 15 g and 25 g. In DS, contractile responses in 15G and 25G were lower than 5G, and still higher than CG. Serotonin relaxation responses in PS were decreased when compared to CG at tension levels of 5 g, 15 g and 25 g (p<0.05). In DS, responses to serotonin were also decreased in tension groups. PS had higher contraction amplitudes than DS when contractile responses were obtained by high K(+) (p<0.05). Tension groups of both PS and DS showed increased contractions to high K(+) compared to CG (p<0.05). Increased esophageal tension led to increase in cholinergic responses of smooth muscles as well as in EFS

  6. Expert consensus contouring guidelines for IMRT in esophageal and gastroesophageal junction cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Abraham J.; Bosch, Walter R.; Chang, Daniel T.; Hong, Theodore S.; Jabbour, Salma K.; Kleinberg, Lawrence R.; Mamon, Harvey J.; Thomas, Charles R.; Goodman, Karyn A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose/Objective(s) Current guidelines for esophageal cancer contouring are derived from traditional two-dimensional fields based on bony landmarks, and do not provide sufficient anatomical detail to ensure consistent contouring for more conformal radiotherapy techniques such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Therefore, we convened an expert panel with the specific aim to derive contouring guidelines and generate an atlas for the clinical target volume (CTV) in esophageal or gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) cancer. Methods and Materials Eight expert academically-based gastrointestinal radiation oncologists participated. Three sample cases were chosen: a GEJ cancer, a distal esophageal cancer, and a mid-upper esophageal cancer. Uniform CT simulation datasets and an accompanying diagnostic PET-CT were distributed to each expert, and he/she was instructed to generate gross tumor volume (GTV) and CTV contours for each case. All contours were aggregated and subjected to quantitative analysis to assess the degree of concordance between experts and generate draft consensus contours. The panel then refined these contours to generate the contouring atlas. Results Kappa statistics indicated substantial agreement between panelists for each of the three test cases. A consensus CTV atlas was generated for the three test cases, each representing common anatomic presentations of esophageal cancer. The panel agreed on guidelines and principles to facilitate the generalizability of the atlas to individual cases. Conclusions This expert panel successfully reached agreement on contouring guidelines for esophageal and GEJ IMRT and generated a reference CTV atlas. This atlas will serve as a reference for IMRT contours for clinical practice and prospective trial design. Subsequent patterns of failure analyses of clinical datasets utilizing these guidelines may require modification in the future. PMID:26104943

  7. Expert Consensus Contouring Guidelines for Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy in Esophageal and Gastroesophageal Junction Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Abraham J.; Bosch, Walter R.; Chang, Daniel T.; Hong, Theodore S.; Jabbour, Salma K.; Kleinberg, Lawrence R.; Mamon, Harvey J.; Thomas, Charles R.; Goodman, Karyn A.

    2015-07-15

    Purpose/Objective(s): Current guidelines for esophageal cancer contouring are derived from traditional 2-dimensional fields based on bony landmarks, and they do not provide sufficient anatomic detail to ensure consistent contouring for more conformal radiation therapy techniques such as intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Therefore, we convened an expert panel with the specific aim to derive contouring guidelines and generate an atlas for the clinical target volume (CTV) in esophageal or gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) cancer. Methods and Materials: Eight expert academically based gastrointestinal radiation oncologists participated. Three sample cases were chosen: a GEJ cancer, a distal esophageal cancer, and a mid-upper esophageal cancer. Uniform computed tomographic (CT) simulation datasets and accompanying diagnostic positron emission tomographic/CT images were distributed to each expert, and the expert was instructed to generate gross tumor volume (GTV) and CTV contours for each case. All contours were aggregated and subjected to quantitative analysis to assess the degree of concordance between experts and to generate draft consensus contours. The panel then refined these contours to generate the contouring atlas. Results: The κ statistics indicated substantial agreement between panelists for each of the 3 test cases. A consensus CTV atlas was generated for the 3 test cases, each representing common anatomic presentations of esophageal cancer. The panel agreed on guidelines and principles to facilitate the generalizability of the atlas to individual cases. Conclusions: This expert panel successfully reached agreement on contouring guidelines for esophageal and GEJ IMRT and generated a reference CTV atlas. This atlas will serve as a reference for IMRT contours for clinical practice and prospective trial design. Subsequent patterns of failure analyses of clinical datasets using these guidelines may require modification in the future.

  8. Clinical Study of Time Optimizing of Endoscopic Photodynamic Therapy on Esophageal and/or Gastric Cardiac Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-10

    Stage I Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage II Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage III Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage I Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage II Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  9. Esophageal Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Cancer.gov

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing esophageal cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  10. Persistent bronchography in a newborn with esophageal atresia.

    PubMed

    De Bernardo, Giuseppe; Sordino, Desiree; Giordano, Maurizio; Doglioni, Nicoletta; Trevisanuto, Daniele

    2016-06-01

    Esophageal atresia (EA) with tracheoesophageal fistula occurs in about 1:2,500 births. We report a case of persistent bronchography in a newborn with EA and distal tracheoesophageal fistula. A large amount of barium sulfate was injected for mistake by a tube directly in the right bronchus to evaluate the patency of the esophagus. The infant showed signs of respiratory distress; he was intubated and transported at children's Hospital Santobono Pausilipon. Here, it was performed a chest X-ray that confirmed the opacification of the right bronchial tree, and it was suspected an EA type 3b. The literature recommends that: evaluation of the patency of the esophagus, with an iodinate contrast medium, should be done in a pediatric specialized center for high risk of lung aspiration. PMID:27257464

  11. A rare case of esophageal lung in a neonate.

    PubMed

    Patil, Megharanjini; Sutagatti, Jagadish; Bhavikatti, Mohan; Nayak, Puneet V

    2016-01-01

    We report a rare case of esophageal lung in a neonate who presented with repeated chest infections and respiratory distress. Chest radiograph revealed increased opacification of the right lung with reduced lung volume and air bronchograms. Further evaluation with computed tomography (CT) showed the presence of only left mainstem bronchus at the tracheal bifurcation. Right mainstem bronchus originated from distal esophagus and aerated the right lung. Nasogastric tube was inserted into the stomach with injection of small amount of dilute barium through it, which established the communication of right mainstem bronchus with esophagus. Advanced CT scan imaging by virtual bronchoscopy and volume rendering further delineated the anatomical abnormality precisely prior to surgery. Surgical findings confirmed the diagnosis. PMID:27413267

  12. Esophageal Cancer Dose Escalation Using a Simultaneous Integrated Boost Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Welsh, James; Palmer, Matthew B.; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Liao Zhongxing; Swisher, Steven G.; Hofstetter, Wayne L.; Allen, Pamela K.; Settle, Steven H.; Gomez, Daniel; Likhacheva, Anna; Cox, James D.; Komaki, Ritsuko

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: We previously showed that 75% of radiation therapy (RT) failures in patients with unresectable esophageal cancer are in the gross tumor volume (GTV). We performed a planning study to evaluate if a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) technique could selectively deliver a boost dose of radiation to the GTV in patients with esophageal cancer. Methods and Materials: Treatment plans were generated using four different approaches (two-dimensional conformal radiotherapy [2D-CRT] to 50.4 Gy, 2D-CRT to 64.8 Gy, intensity-modulated RT [IMRT] to 50.4 Gy, and SIB-IMRT to 64.8 Gy) and optimized for 10 patients with distal esophageal cancer. All plans were constructed to deliver the target dose in 28 fractions using heterogeneity corrections. Isodose distributions were evaluated for target coverage and normal tissue exposure. Results: The 50.4 Gy IMRT plan was associated with significant reductions in mean cardiac, pulmonary, and hepatic doses relative to the 50.4 Gy 2D-CRT plan. The 64.8 Gy SIB-IMRT plan produced a 28% increase in GTV dose and comparable normal tissue doses as the 50.4 Gy IMRT plan; compared with the 50.4 Gy 2D-CRT plan, the 64.8 Gy SIB-IMRT produced significant dose reductions to all critical structures (heart, lung, liver, and spinal cord). Conclusions: The use of SIB-IMRT allowed us to selectively increase the dose to the GTV, the area at highest risk of failure, while simultaneously reducing the dose to the normal heart, lung, and liver. Clinical implications warrant systematic evaluation.

  13. Genetics Home Reference: Laing distal myopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... for This Page GeneReview: Laing Distal Myopathy Laing NG, Laing BA, Meredith C, Wilton SD, Robbins P, ... T, Bridges LR, Fabian V, Rozemuller A, Laing NG. Laing early onset distal myopathy: slow myosin defect ...

  14. Impaired Esophageal Mucosal Integrity May Play a Causative Role in Patients With Nongastroesophageal Reflux Disease-Related Noncardiac Chest Pain.

    PubMed

    Min, Yang Won; Choi, Kyu; Pyo, Jeung Hui; Son, Hee Jung; Rhee, Poong-Lyul

    2015-12-01

    Baseline impedance (BI) measurement can be used to evaluate the status of the esophageal mucosa integrity. We hypothesized that impaired esophageal mucosal integrity may play a causative role in patients with nongastroesophageal reflux disease (non-GERD)-related noncardiac chest pain (NCCP). This retrospective study analyzed 24-hour multichannel intraluminal impedance-pH testing data from 77 patients with NCCP and 5 healthy volunteers. BI was calculated at 3 cm (distal esophagus) and 17 cm (proximal esophagus) above the lower esophageal sphincter. GERD was defined by the presence of pathologic acid exposure or reflux esophagitis. Among the 77 patients with NCCP, 16 (20.8%) were classified into the GERD-related NCCP group and 61 (79.2%) into the non-GERD-related NCCP group. BI (median, interquartile range) of the non-GERD-related NCCP group was lower than the control group at the proximal esophagus (2507 Ω, 2156-3217 vs 3855 Ω, 3238-4182, P = 0.001) but was similar at the distal esophagus. The GERD-related NCCP group showed lower BI than the control group at both the distal and proximal esophagus (2024 Ω, 1619-2308 vs 3203 Ω, 2366-3774, P = 0.007 and 2272 Ω, 1896-2908 vs 3855 Ω, 3238-4182, P = 0.003, respectively). At the distal esophagus, BI was lower in the GERD-related NCCP group than the non-GERD-related NCCP group (P = 0.002), whereas it did not differ between the 2 groups at the proximal esophagus. In conclusion, the mucosal integrity is impaired at the proximal esophagus in patients with non-GERD-related NCCP, which might be the pathogenic mechanism of NCCP. PMID:26705212

  15. Altered Esophageal Mucosal Structure in Patients with Celiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pinto-Sánchez, María Inés; Nachman, Fabio D.; Fuxman, Claudia; Iantorno, Guido; Hwang, Hui Jer; Ditaranto, Andrés; Costa, Florencia; Longarini, Gabriela; Wang, Xuan Yu; Huang, Xianxi; Vázquez, Horacio; Moreno, María L.; Niveloni, Sonia; Bercik, Premysl; Smecuol, Edgardo; Mazure, Roberto; Bilder, Claudio; Mauriño, Eduardo C.; Verdu, Elena F.; Bai, Julio C.

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aim. Reflux symptoms (RS) are common in patients with celiac disease (CD), a chronic enteropathy that affects primarily the small intestine. We evaluated mucosal integrity and motility of the lower esophagus as mechanisms contributing to RS generation in patients with CD. Methods. We enrolled newly diagnosed CD patients with and without RS, nonceliac patients with classical reflux disease (GERD), and controls (without RS). Endoscopic biopsies from the distal esophagus were assessed for dilated intercellular space (DIS) by light microscopy and electron microscopy. Tight junction (TJ) mRNA proteins expression for zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) and claudin-2 and claudin-3 (CLDN-2; CLDN-3) was determined using qRT-PCR. Results. DIS scores were higher in patients with active CD than in controls, but similar to GERD patients. The altered DIS was found even in CD patients without RS and normalized after one year of a gluten-free diet. CD patients with and without RS had lower expression of ZO-1 than controls. The expression of CLDN-2 and CLDN-3 was similar in CD and GERD patients. Conclusions. Our study shows that patients with active CD have altered esophageal mucosal integrity, independently of the presence of RS. The altered expression of ZO-1 may underlie loss of TJ integrity in the esophageal mucosa and may contribute to RS generation. PMID:27446827

  16. Altered Esophageal Mucosal Structure in Patients with Celiac Disease.

    PubMed

    Pinto-Sánchez, María Inés; Nachman, Fabio D; Fuxman, Claudia; Iantorno, Guido; Hwang, Hui Jer; Ditaranto, Andrés; Costa, Florencia; Longarini, Gabriela; Wang, Xuan Yu; Huang, Xianxi; Vázquez, Horacio; Moreno, María L; Niveloni, Sonia; Bercik, Premysl; Smecuol, Edgardo; Mazure, Roberto; Bilder, Claudio; Mauriño, Eduardo C; Verdu, Elena F; Bai, Julio C

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aim. Reflux symptoms (RS) are common in patients with celiac disease (CD), a chronic enteropathy that affects primarily the small intestine. We evaluated mucosal integrity and motility of the lower esophagus as mechanisms contributing to RS generation in patients with CD. Methods. We enrolled newly diagnosed CD patients with and without RS, nonceliac patients with classical reflux disease (GERD), and controls (without RS). Endoscopic biopsies from the distal esophagus were assessed for dilated intercellular space (DIS) by light microscopy and electron microscopy. Tight junction (TJ) mRNA proteins expression for zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) and claudin-2 and claudin-3 (CLDN-2; CLDN-3) was determined using qRT-PCR. Results. DIS scores were higher in patients with active CD than in controls, but similar to GERD patients. The altered DIS was found even in CD patients without RS and normalized after one year of a gluten-free diet. CD patients with and without RS had lower expression of ZO-1 than controls. The expression of CLDN-2 and CLDN-3 was similar in CD and GERD patients. Conclusions. Our study shows that patients with active CD have altered esophageal mucosal integrity, independently of the presence of RS. The altered expression of ZO-1 may underlie loss of TJ integrity in the esophageal mucosa and may contribute to RS generation. PMID:27446827

  17. Distal clavicle fractures in children☆

    PubMed Central

    Labronici, Pedro José; da Silva, Ricardo Rodrigues; Franco, Marcos Vinícius Viana; Labronici, Gustavo José; Pires, Robinson Esteves Santos; Franco, José Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Objective To analyze fractures of the distal clavicle region in pediatric patients. Methods Ten patients between the ages of five to eleven years (mean of 7.3 years) were observed. Nine patients were treated conservatively and one surgically. All the fractures were classified using the Nenopoulos classification system. Results All the fractures consolidated without complications. Conservative treatment was used for nine patients, of whom three were in group IIIB, three IIb, two IIa and one IV. The only patient who was treated surgically was a female patient of eleven years of age with a group IV fracture. Conclusion The treatment indication for distal fractures of the clavicle in children should be based on the patient's age and the displacement of the fragments. PMID:26962489

  18. New TNM staging system for esophageal cancer: what chest radiologists need to know.

    PubMed

    Hong, Su Jin; Kim, Tae Jung; Nam, Kyung Bum; Lee, In Sun; Yang, Hee Chul; Cho, Sukki; Kim, Kwhanmien; Jheon, Sanghoon; Lee, Kyung Won

    2014-10-01

    Esophageal cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide, and the 5-year relative survival rate remains less than 20% in the United States. The treatment of esophageal cancer should be stage specific for better clinical outcomes. Recent treatment paradigms tend to involve a multimodality approach to management, which includes surgical resection and preoperative or definitive chemoradiation therapy. Accurate pretreatment staging of esophageal cancer is integral for assessing operability and determining a suitable treatment plan. The American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) and the Union for International Cancer Control (UICC) have published the seventh edition of the staging manual for cancer in the esophagus and esophagogastric junction. Unlike the sixth edition, the revised staging manual is data driven and harmonized with the staging of stomach cancer. Improvements include new definitions for the anatomic classifications Tis, T4, regional lymph node, N, and M and the addition of nonanatomic cancer characteristics (histopathologic cell type, histologic grade, and cancer location). Given the recent increase in the incidence of adenocarcinoma of the distal esophagus, esophagogastric junction, and gastric cardia, the staging of tumors in the esophagogastric junction has been addressed. Radiologists must understand the details of the seventh edition of the AJCC-UICC staging system for esophageal cancer and use appropriate imaging modalities, such as computed tomography (CT), endoscopic ultrasonography, and positron emission tomography/CT, for initial staging.

  19. Esophageal wall blood perfusion during contraction and transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation in humans

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yanfen; Bhargava, Valmik; Kim, Young Sun

    2012-01-01

    We recently reported that esophageal contraction reduces esophageal wall perfusion in an animal study. Our aim was to determine esophageal wall blood perfusion (EWBP) during esophageal contraction and transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations (TLESRs) in humans. We studied 12 healthy volunteers. A custom-designed laser Doppler probe was anchored to the esophageal wall, 4–6 cm above the LES, by use of the Bravo pH system so that the laser light beam stay directed toward the esophageal mucosa. A high-resolution manometry equipped with impedance electrodes recorded esophageal pressures and reflux events. Synchronized pressure, impedance, pH, and EWBP recordings were obtained during dry and wet swallows and following a meal. Stable recordings of laser Doppler EWBP were only recorded when the laser Doppler probe was firmly anchored to the esophageal wall. Esophageal contractions induced by dry and wet swallows resulted in 46 ± 9% and 60 ± 10% reduction in the EWBP, respectively (compared to baseline). Reduction in EWBP was directly related to the amplitude (curvilinear fit) and duration of esophageal contraction. Atropine reduced the esophageal contraction amplitude and decreased the EWBP reduction associated with esophageal contraction. TLESRs were also associated with reduction in the EWBP, albeit of smaller amplitude (29 ± 3%) but longer duration (19 ± 2 s) compared with swallow-induced esophageal contractions. We report 1) an innovative technique to record EWBP for extended time periods in humans and 2) contraction of circular and longitudinal muscle during peristalsis and selective longitudinal muscle contraction during TLESR causes reduction in the EWBP; 3) using our innovative technique, future studies may determine whether esophageal wall ischemia is the cause of esophageal pain/heartburn. PMID:22790599

  20. Heterotopic Gastric Mucosa in the Distal Part of Esophagus in a Teenager

    PubMed Central

    Lupu, Vasile Valeriu; Ignat, Ancuta; Paduraru, Gabriela; Mihaila, Doina; Burlea, Marin; Ciubara, Anamaria

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Heterotopic gastric mucosa (HGM) of the esophagus is a congenital anomaly consisting of ectopic gastric mucosa. It may be connected with disorders of the upper gastrointestinal tract, exacerbated by Helicobacter pylori. The diagnosis of HGM is confirmed via endoscopy with biopsy. Histopathology provides the definitive diagnosis by demonstrating gastric mucosa adjacent to normal esophageal mucosa. HGM located in the distal esophagus needs differentiation from Barrett's esophagus. Barrett's esophagus is a well-known premalignant injury for adenocarcinoma of the esophagus. Malignant progression of HGM occurs in a stepwise pattern, following the metaplasia–dysplasia–adenocarcinoma sequence. We present a rare case of a teenage girl with HGM located in the distal esophagus, associated with chronic gastritis and biliary duodenogastric reflux. Endoscopy combined with biopsies is a mandatory method in clinical evaluation of metaplastic and nonmetaplastic changes within HGM of the esophagus. PMID:26496283

  1. Chondroblastoma of the distal phalanx.

    PubMed

    Gregory, James R; Lehman, Thomas P; White, Jeremy R; Fung, Kar-Ming

    2014-05-01

    Chondroblastoma is a rare, benign primary bone tumor that usually occurs at the epiphysis of long bones. The authors present an example of the diagnosis and successful treatment of this neoplasm in an exceedingly rare location in the distal phalanx. Clinical and radiographic outcomes after 68 months of follow-up are presented. A 15-year-old, right hand-dominant, boy developed painful swelling of the right ring finger. Radiographs revealed a radiolucent lesion of the distal phalanx with expansile remodeling of the bone. An excisional biopsy was performed with curettage and bone grafting of the lesion. The diagnosis of chondroblastoma was made based on pathologic evaluation of the biopsy specimen. Sixty-six months after surgical treatment, the patient was free of recurrence and metastatic disease with excellent clinical and functional outcomes. To the authors' knowledge, this represents only the second reported case of chondroblastoma of the distal phalanx. The diagnosis of chondroblastoma in this rare location was made by pathologic review of the resection specimen. It is imperative to confirm the diagnosis of any resected bone specimen even when the concern for an aggressive or malignant lesion is low. A tumor presenting in an unusual location may require a change in treatment or surveillance.

  2. Chondroblastoma of the distal phalanx.

    PubMed

    Gregory, James R; Lehman, Thomas P; White, Jeremy R; Fung, Kar-Ming

    2014-05-01

    Chondroblastoma is a rare, benign primary bone tumor that usually occurs at the epiphysis of long bones. The authors present an example of the diagnosis and successful treatment of this neoplasm in an exceedingly rare location in the distal phalanx. Clinical and radiographic outcomes after 68 months of follow-up are presented. A 15-year-old, right hand-dominant, boy developed painful swelling of the right ring finger. Radiographs revealed a radiolucent lesion of the distal phalanx with expansile remodeling of the bone. An excisional biopsy was performed with curettage and bone grafting of the lesion. The diagnosis of chondroblastoma was made based on pathologic evaluation of the biopsy specimen. Sixty-six months after surgical treatment, the patient was free of recurrence and metastatic disease with excellent clinical and functional outcomes. To the authors' knowledge, this represents only the second reported case of chondroblastoma of the distal phalanx. The diagnosis of chondroblastoma in this rare location was made by pathologic review of the resection specimen. It is imperative to confirm the diagnosis of any resected bone specimen even when the concern for an aggressive or malignant lesion is low. A tumor presenting in an unusual location may require a change in treatment or surveillance. PMID:24810830

  3. Upper non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding - review the effectiveness of endoscopic hemostasis methods

    PubMed Central

    Szura, Mirosław; Pasternak, Artur

    2015-01-01

    Upper non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding is a condition that requires immediate medical intervention and has a high associated mortality rate (exceeding 10%). The vast majority of upper gastrointestinal bleeding cases are due to peptic ulcers. Helicobacter pylori infection, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and aspirin are the main risk factors for peptic ulcer disease. Endoscopic therapy has generally been recommended as the first-line treatment for upper gastrointestinal bleeding as it has been shown to reduce recurrent bleeding, the need for surgery and mortality. Early endoscopy (within 24 h of hospital admission) has a greater impact than delayed endoscopy on the length of hospital stay and requirement for blood transfusion. This paper aims to review and compare the efficacy of the types of endoscopic hemostasis most commonly used to control non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding by pooling data from the literature. PMID:26421105

  4. Gastric variceal bleeding due to pancreatitis-induced splenic vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Gotto, Antonio; Lieberman, Michael; Pochapin, Mark

    2014-03-24

    Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding is a common clinical scenario. In the upper gastrointestinal tract, gastric varices can be frequently overlooked on endoscopy, particularly if not suspected or volume depleted. We report a case of suspected gastrointestinal bleeding in a patient with a childhood history of pancreatitis, who also experienced severe epigastric pain while in hospital. After transfer to an academic medical centre, the presence of gastric varices was identified and presumed to be due to splenic vein thrombosis. Pancreatitis is the most common cause of splenic vein thrombosis and accords with the patient's history, even though it occurred many years previously. This case highlights the importance of recognising pancreatitis-induced splenic vein thrombosis as a possible aetiology for upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

  5. Gastroesophageal Variceal Bleeding as a Complication of Cystic Fibrosis in a 3-Month-Old Patient.

    PubMed

    Motamed, Farzaneh; Fallahi, Gholamhossein; Ahmadi, Faezeh; Bazvand, Fatemeh; Ahmadi, Maedeh; Eftekhari, Kambiz; Rezaei, Nima

    2016-03-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a hereditary disease of mucous and sweat glands, which affects the respiratory and gastrointestinal systems. Herein, we describe a 3-month-old girl with a history of recurrent episodes of urinary tract infections that required hospitalization. She was referred to our center at the age of three months, with massive gastroesophageal variceal bleeding. In physical examination, she had clubbing, hepatosplenomegaly, and mild ascites. Laboratory studies revealed high serum levels of liver enzymes and low level of Albumin. As of suspicious to CF, sweat tests were performed twice which confirmed the diagnosis of CF. Gastrointestinal bleeding due to gastroesophageal varices is a rare complication of CF, which could result as a consequence of hepatobiliary involvement of disease. Early diagnosis of CF could prevent severe complications and even death in this group of patients. PMID:27107529

  6. The Changing Face of Esophageal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Melhado, Rachel E.; Alderson, Derek; Tucker, Olga

    2010-01-01

    The two main histological esophageal cancer types, adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, differ in incidence, geographic distribution, ethnic pattern and etiology. This article focuses on epidemiology with particular reference to geographic and temporal variations in incidence, along with a review of the evidence supporting environmental and genetic factors involved in esophageal carcinogenesis. Squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus remains predominantly a disease of the developing world. In contrast, esophageal adenocarcinoma is mainly a disease of western developed societies, associated with obesity and gastro-esophageal reflux disease. There has been a dramatic increase in the incidence of adenocarcinoma in developed countries in parallel with migration of both esophageal and gastric adenocarcinomas towards the gastro-esophageal junction. PMID:24281163

  7. Abdominal varices mimicking an acute gastrointestinal hemorrhage during technetium-99m red blood cell scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, A.J.; Byrd, B.F.; Berger, D.E.; Turnbull, G.L.

    1985-04-01

    Abdominal varices consisting of a caput medusae and dilated mesenteric veins resulted in pooling of Tc-99m tagged red blood cells (RBC) within these dilated vessels in a 57-year-old man with severe Laennec's cirrhosis. The atypical radiotracer localization within the abdomen mimicked an acute gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Clinical suspicion and careful evaluation of scintigraphic gastrointestinal bleeding studies will avoid false-positive interpretations.

  8. Intractable oesophageal variceal bleeding caused by splenic arteriovenous fistula: treatment by transcatheter arterial embolization

    PubMed Central

    Hung, C; Tseng, J; Lui, K; Wan, Y; Tsai, C; Shem, C; Wu, C

    1999-01-01

    We describe a rare case of splenic arteriovenous fistula and venous aneurysm which developed after splenectomy in a 40-year-old woman who presented with epigastralgia, watery diarrhoea, repeated haematemesis and melaena caused by hyperkinetic status of the portal system and bleeding of oesophageal varices. It was diagnosed by computed tomography and angiography, and obliterated with giant Gianturco steel coils.


Keywords: splenic arteriovenous fistula; gastrointestinal bleeding; transcatheter arterial embolization PMID:10435172

  9. Ectopic Jejunal Variceal Rupture in a Liver Transplant Recipient Successfully Treated With Percutaneous Transhepatic Coil Embolization

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Satoru; Akamatsu, Nobuhisa; Hoshikawa, Mayumi; Shirata, Chikara; Sakamoto, Yoshihiro; Hasegawa, Kiyoshi; Kokudo, Norihiro

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Here we present the rupture of ectopic jejunal varices developing in a liver transplant recipient without portal hypertension, which was successfully treated with percutaneous transhepatic coil embolization. A 48-year-old man with massive melena was admitted to our department. He had undergone liver transplantation for hepatitis B virus-related liver cirrhosis 8 months before, and his postoperative course was satisfactory except for an acute cellular rejection. No evidence of bleeding was detected by upper endoscopy or colonoscopy, but dynamic multidetector computed tomography of the whole abdomen revealed an intestinal varix protruding into the lumen of the jejunum with suspected extravasation. There was no evidence of portal venous stenosis or thrombosis. Immediately upon diagnosis of the ruptured ectopic jejunal varix, percutaneous transhepatic coil embolization was performed, achieving complete hemostasis. The portal venous pressure measured during the procedure was within normal limits. He was discharged from the hospital 11 days after embolization and remained in stable condition without re-bleeding 6 months after discharge. This is the first report of an ectopic intestinal variceal rupture in an uneventful liver transplant recipient that was successfully treated with interventional percutaneous transhepatic coil embolization. Clinicians encountering liver transplant recipients with melena should be aware of the possibility of late-onset rupture of ectopic varices, even in those having an uneventful post-transplant course without portal hypertension. PMID:26632745

  10. Efficacy of ankaferd blood stopper application on non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Gungor, Gokhan; Goktepe, M Hakan; Biyik, Murat; Polat, Ilker; Tuna, Tuncer; Ataseven, Huseyin; Demir, Ali

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To prospectively assess the hemostatic efficacy of the endoscopic topical use of ankaferd blood stopper (ABS) in active non-variceal upper gastrointestinal system (GIS) bleeding. METHODS: Endoscopy was performed on 220 patients under suspiciency of GIS bleeding. Patients with active non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NVUGIB) with a spurting or oozing type were included. Firstly, 8-10 cc of isotonic saline was sprayed to bleeding lesions. Then, 8 cc of ABS was applied on lesions in which bleeding continued after isotonic saline application. The other endoscopic therapeutic methods were applied on the lesions in which the bleeding did not stop after ABS. RESULTS: Twenty-seven patients had an active NVUGIB with a spurting or oozing type and 193 patients were excluded from the study since they did not have non-variceal active bleeding. 8 cc of ABS was sprayed on to the lesions of 26 patients whose bleeding continued after isotonic saline and in 19 of them, bleeding stopped after ABS. Other endoscopic treatment methods were applied to the remaining patients and the bleeding was stopped with these interventions in 6 of 7 patients. CONCLUSION: ABS is an effective method on NVUGIB, particularly on young patients with no coagulopathy. ABS may be considered as part of a combination treatment with other endoscopic methods. PMID:23293725

  11. Conservative treatment of esophageal perforation related to a peptic ulcer with pyloric stenosis.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Ryo; Kosugi, Shin-Ichi; Sato, Daisuke; Hirukawa, Hiroshi; Tada, Tetsuya; Ichikawa, Hiroshi; Hanyu, Takaaki; Ishikawa, Takashi; Kobayashi, Takashi; Wakai, Toshifumi

    2014-08-01

    We report a case of esophageal perforation (Boerhaave syndrome) caused by vomiting related to a duodenal ulcer with pyloric stenosis. A 45-year-old male presented with left chest pain and dyspnea after forceful vomiting. Chest radiography and computed tomography (CT) revealed a massive left pleural effusion and left tension pneumothorax. Abdominal CT revealed pyloric stenosis with a remarkably dilated stomach. Tube thoracostomy and nasogastric suction were immediately performed and we selected conservative treatment based on the following factors-a stable general condition without sepsis, early diagnosis, and good drainage. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy on hospital day 9 demonstrated a healing ulcer in the lower esophagus and pyloric stenosis. We performed distal gastrectomy as elective surgery for pyloric stenosis due to a duodenal ulcer on hospital day 30. In summary, an esophageal perforation with contamination spreading to the thoracic cavity was successfully treated with conservative treatment.

  12. Multistage resection of esophageal squamous cell cancer of the cardia - successful despite complications.

    PubMed

    Zieliński, Jacek; Ptach, Anna; Sadowski, Andrzej; Chruścicka, Iwona; Pęksa, Rafał; Rak, Piotr

    2015-09-01

    Surgery is the treatment of choice for squamous cell esophageal cancer. Complete resection of the esophagus with reconstruction of the digestive tract is performed for tumors located in the chest or cardia. The aim of the report is to present the case of a complete esophageal and gastric resection complicated by colon graft necrosis. The patient was a 45-year-old woman diagnosed with cancer of the cardia infiltrating the distal section of the esophagus and the body and fundus of the stomach. The initial surgical procedure included the opening of three body cavities followed by resection of the thoracic esophagus, stomach, and a portion of the left hepatic lobe. Right colon interposition was performed to restore digestive tract continuity. On the 8th day, a leak was observed in the esophagointestinal anastomosis. Management consisted in two surgical procedures, one of which ended in the removal of the colon patch. The fourth and final procedure was conducted after 10 months.

  13. From reflux esophagitis to Barrett's esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui-Hua

    2015-05-01

    The occurrence of gastroesophageal reflux disease is common in the human population. Almost all cases of esophageal adenocarcinoma are derived from Barrett's esophagus, which is a complication of esophageal adenocarcinoma precancerous lesions. Chronic exposure of the esophagus to gastroduodenal intestinal fluid is an important determinant factor in the development of Barrett's esophagus. The replacement of normal squamous epithelium with specific columnar epithelium in the lower esophagus induced by the chronic exposure to gastroduodenal fluid could lead to intestinal metaplasia, which is closely associated with the development of esophageal adenocarcinoma. However, the exact mechanism of injury is not completely understood. Various animal models of the developmental mechanisms of disease, and theoretical and clinical effects of drug treatment have been widely used in research. Recently, animal models employed in studies on gastroesophageal reflux injury have allowed significant progress. The advantage of using animal models lies in the ability to accurately control the experimental conditions for better evaluation of results. In this article, various modeling methods are reviewed, with discussion of the major findings on the developmental mechanism of Barrett's esophagus, which should help to develop better prevention and treatment strategies for Barrett's esophagus.

  14. Pradaxa-induced esophageal ulcer.

    PubMed

    Wood, Michele; Shaw, Paul

    2015-10-09

    Pradaxa (dabigatran) is a direct thrombin inhibitor approved for prevention of stroke and systemic embolism in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. We describe a case of esophageal ulceration associated with Pradaxa administration in a 75-year-old man. The patient reported difficulty swallowing and a burning sensation after taking his first dose of Pradaxa. An esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) revealed linear ulcerations in the mid-esophagus. Pradaxa was held beginning the day before the EGD. The patient reported that his pain and difficulty swallowing resolved on stopping Pradaxa. Pradaxa is formulated with a tartaric acid excipient to reduce variability in absorption. We hypothesise that the capsule lodged in the patient's esophagus and the tartaric acid may have caused local damage resulting in an esophageal ulcer. It is important to educate patients on proper administration of Pradaxa, to decrease the risk of this rare, but potentially serious adverse event.

  15. Allergic Mechanisms in Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Wechsler, Joshua B; Bryce, Paul J

    2014-01-01

    Paralleling the overall trend in allergic diseases, Eosinophilic Esophagitis is rapidly increasing in incidence. It is associated with food antigen-triggered, eosinophil-predominant inflammation and the pathogenic mechanisms have many similarities to other chronic atopic diseases, such as eczema and allergic asthma. Studies in animal models and from patients over the last 15 years have suggested that allergic sensitization leads to food-specific IgE and T-helper lymphocyte type 2 cells, both of which appear to contribute to the pathogenesis along with basophils, mast cells, and antigen-presenting cells. This review will outline our current understandings of the allergic mechanisms that drive eosinophilic esophagitis, drawing from clinical and translational studies in humans as well as experimental animal models. PMID:24813516

  16. Acute Esophageal Necrosis: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Inayat, Faisal; Hurairah, Abu; Virk, Hafeez Ul Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Acute esophageal necrosis (AEN) or “black esophagus” is a rare clinical entity with an unclear etiology. It is diagnosed at upper gastrointestinal endoscopy with the presence of strikingly black necrotic esophagus. The treatment is primarily medical, but the prognosis is generally poor due to advanced age and comorbid illnesses in patients who develop AEN. Herein, we discussed the implications of poor glycemic control in regards with AEN and undertook a literature review of this rare diagnosis. PMID:27583242

  17. Acute Esophageal Necrosis: An Update.

    PubMed

    Inayat, Faisal; Hurairah, Abu; Virk, Hafeez Ul Hassan

    2016-07-01

    Acute esophageal necrosis (AEN) or "black esophagus" is a rare clinical entity with an unclear etiology. It is diagnosed at upper gastrointestinal endoscopy with the presence of strikingly black necrotic esophagus. The treatment is primarily medical, but the prognosis is generally poor due to advanced age and comorbid illnesses in patients who develop AEN. Herein, we discussed the implications of poor glycemic control in regards with AEN and undertook a literature review of this rare diagnosis. PMID:27583242

  18. ["Esophageal" angina and angina pectoris].

    PubMed

    Bortolotti, M; Labriola, E; Sarti, P; Brunelli, F; Mazza, M; Barbara, L

    1991-04-15

    In the last few years the non cardiac angina-like chest pain has encompassed more and more agitation not only in many patients but also in cardiologists, gastroenterologists and psychologists, as it involves socio-economic, pathophysiologic and therapeutic problems. The socio-economic aspect is well explained by the fact that in the USA at least 200,000 patients a year suffering from non cardiac angina-like chest pain, even when coronary arteriography has demonstrated normal coronary vessels, nevertheless continue to require cardiologic examinations and, if no one has clearly demonstrated the origin of their pain, they continue to live as invalids in constant fear of myocardial infarction. The discovery that the esophagus may be one of the causes of chest pain in these patients presenting with a previous diagnosis of "atypical" angina pectoris, unfortunately cannot resolve definitively the problem. An association of esophageal angina in patients with angina pectoris treated for long periods of time with Ca-antagonists and nitroderivatives has been described. In addition, the provocative or spontaneous tests to demonstrate the esophageal origin of chest pain give only a "likely" and not a "definite" diagnosis of esophageal angina. This also means to no "gold standard" text exist. Lastly, the "likely" diagnosis of esophageal angina is made in only about 50% of patients leaving the problem of the remaining 50% unanswered. These uncertainties induce some psychologists to assert that the cause of non cardiac angina-like chest pain is in the head ("panic disorder") and not in the esophagus, where the observed motor disorders should be an epiphenomenon.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2067672

  19. Novel device to sample the esophageal microbiome--the esophageal string test.

    PubMed

    Fillon, Sophie A; Harris, J Kirk; Wagner, Brandie D; Kelly, Caleb J; Stevens, Mark J; Moore, Wendy; Fang, Rui; Schroeder, Shauna; Masterson, Joanne C; Robertson, Charles E; Pace, Norman R; Ackerman, Steven J; Furuta, Glenn T

    2012-01-01

    A growing number of studies implicate the microbiome in the pathogenesis of intestinal inflammation. Previous work has shown that adults with esophagitis related to gastroesophageal reflux disease have altered esophageal microbiota compared to those who do not have esophagitis. In these studies, sampling of the esophageal microbiome was accomplished by isolating DNA from esophageal biopsies obtained at the time of upper endoscopy. The aim of the current study was to identify the esophageal microbiome in pediatric individuals with normal esophageal mucosa using a minimally invasive, capsule-based string technology, the Enterotest™. We used the proximal segment of the Enterotest string to sample the esophagus, and term this the "Esophageal String Test" (EST). We hypothesized that the less invasive EST would capture mucosal adherent bacteria present in the esophagus in a similar fashion as mucosal biopsy. EST samples and mucosal biopsies were collected from children with no esophageal inflammation (n = 15) and their microbiome composition determined by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Microbiota from esophageal biopsies and ESTs produced nearly identical profiles of bacterial genera and were different from the bacterial contents of samples collected from the nasal and oral cavity. We conclude that the minimally invasive EST can serve as a useful device for study of the esophageal microbiome. PMID:22957025

  20. Clinical Application of Esophageal High-resolution Manometry in the Diagnosis of Esophageal Motility Disorders

    PubMed Central

    van Hoeij, Froukje B; Bredenoord, Albert J

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal high-resolution manometry (HRM) is replacing conventional manometry in the clinical evaluation of patients with esophageal symptoms, especially dysphagia. The introduction of HRM gave rise to new objective metrics and recognizable patterns of esophageal motor function, requiring a new classification scheme: the Chicago classification. HRM measurements are more detailed and more easily performed compared to conventional manometry. The visual presentation of acquired data improved the analysis and interpretation of esophageal motor function. This led to a more sensitive, accurate, and objective analysis of esophageal motility. In this review we discuss how HRM changed the way we define and categorize esophageal motility disorders. Moreover, we discuss the clinical applications of HRM for each esophageal motility disorder separately. PMID:26631942

  1. Pralatrexate and Oxaliplatin in Treating Patients With Unresectable or Metastatic Esophageal, Stomach, or Gastroesophageal Junction Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-11

    Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Esophageal Undifferentiated Carcinoma; Gastric Adenocarcinoma; Gastric Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Gastric Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIB Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIC Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IV Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Gastric Cancer; Undifferentiated Gastric Carcinoma

  2. Lower esophageal palisade vessels and the definition of Barrett's esophagus.

    PubMed

    Ogiya, K; Kawano, T; Ito, E; Nakajima, Y; Kawada, K; Nishikage, T; Nagai, K

    2008-01-01

    The designated area of the columnar-lined esophagus (CLE) is anatomically defined by the distal limit of the lower esophageal palisade vessels (LEPV) and the term 'Barrett's esophagus' is equally used along with the name CLE in Japan. The aim of this study was to investigate the actual prevalence of CLE based on the Japanese criteria and to evaluate the criteria per se. A total of 42 esophagi consecutively resected at this institute were included. All subjects underwent a surgical resection for squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus. The position of the LEPV, squamocolumnar junction, the prevalence of CLE and intestinal metaplasia were investigated both pre- and postoperatively. Preoperative endoscopy revealed CLE based on the Japanese criteria in half of all patients. In the resected specimens the distal limit of LEPV was lower than the squamocolumnar junction in 95.2%. In other words, almost all cases had CLE (equivalent to Barrett's mucosa in Japanese criteria). However, most of the CLE areas were very short and their average maximum length was only about 5 mm. In addition, no intestinal metaplasia was observed in any of the CLE cases. Almost all individuals might therefore be diagnosed to have CLE or Barrett's mucosa based on precise endoscopic observations in Japan. The CLE located in a small area, e.g. less than 5 mm, defined according to the LEPV criteria without any other factor concerning typical Barrett's esophagus such as signs of gastroesophageal reflux should therefore be excluded from consideration as a high-risk mucosa.

  3. Obesity and outcomes in patients treated with chemoradiotherapy for esophageal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Myles, B; Wei, C; Chang, J Y; Hofstetter, W L; Ajani, J A; Swisher, S G; Cox, J D; Komaki, R; Liao, Z; Lin, S H

    2014-01-01

    Body mass index (BMI) is a risk factor for comorbid illnesses and cancer development. It was hypothesized that obesity status affects disease outcomes and treatment-related toxicities in esophageal cancer patients treated with chemoradiotherapy (CRT). From March 2002 to April 2010, 405 patients with non-metastatic esophageal carcinoma at MD Anderson Cancer Center treated with either definitive or neoadjuvant CRT were retrospectively analyzed. Patients were categorized as either obese (BMI ≥ 25 kg/m(2) ) or nonobese (BMI < 25 kg/m(2) ). Progression-free survival and overall survival times were examined using the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox proportional hazards regression analysis. One hundred fifteen (28.4%) patients were classified as nonobese and 290 (71.6%) as obese. Obese patients were more likely than others to have several comorbid diseases (P < 0.001), adenocarcinoma located distally (P < 0.001), and have undergone surgery (P = 0.004). Obesity was not associated with either worse operative morbidity/mortality (P > 0.05) or worse positron emission tomography tumor response (P = 0.46) on univariate analysis, nor with worse pathologic complete response (P = 0.98) on multivariate analysis. There was also no difference in overall survival, locoregional control, or metastasis-free survival between obese and nonobese patients (P = 0.86). However, higher BMI was associated with reduced risk of chemoradiation-induced high-grade esophagitis (P = 0.021), esophageal stricture (P < 0.001), and high-grade hematologic toxicity (P < 0.001). In esophageal cancer patients treated with CRT, obesity is not predictive of poorer disease outcomes or operative morbidities; instead, data suggest it may be associated with decreased risk of acute chemotherapy- and radiotherapy-related treatment toxicities.

  4. Obesity and Outcomes in Patients Treated with Chemoradiotherapy for Esophageal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jingya; Myles, Bevan; Wei, Caimiao; Chang, Joe Y.; Hofstetter, Wayne L.; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Swisher, Stephen G.; Cox, James D.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Liao, Zhongxing; Lin, Steven H.

    2013-01-01

    Background Body mass index (BMI) is a risk factor for comorbid illnesses and cancer development. We hypothesized that obesity status affects disease outcomes and treatment-related toxicities in esophageal cancer patients treated with chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Methods From March 2002 to April 2010, we retrospectively analyzed 405 patients with non-metastatic esophageal carcinoma at MD Anderson Cancer Center, treated with either definitive or neoadjuvant CRT. Patients were categorized as either obese (BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2) or non-obese (BMI < 25 kg/m2). Progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) times were examined using the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox proportional hazards regression analysis. Results One hundred fifteen (28.4%) patients were classified as non-obese and 290 (71.6%) as obese. Obese patients were more likely than others to have several comorbid diseases (p < 0.001), adenocarcinoma located distally (p < 0.001), and have undergone surgery (p = 0.004). Obesity was not associated with either worse operative morbidity/mortality (p > 0.05) or worse positron emission tomography (PET) tumor response (P = 0.46) on univariate analysis, nor with worse pathologic complete response (pCR) (P = 0.98) on multivariate analysis. There was also no difference in OS, locoregional control, or metastasis-free survival between obese and non-obese patients (P = 0.86). However, higher BMI was associated with reduced risk of chemoradiation-induced high-grade esophagitis (P = 0.021), esophageal stricture (P < 0.001), and high-grade hematologic toxicity (P < 0.001). Conclusions In esophageal cancer patients treated with CRT, obesity is not predictive of poorer disease outcomes or operative morbidities; instead, our data suggest it may be associated with decreased risk of acute chemotherapy and radiotherapy-related treatment toxicities. PMID:23621168

  5. 21 CFR 868.1910 - Esophageal stethoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Esophageal stethoscope. 868.1910 Section 868.1910 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1910 Esophageal stethoscope....

  6. 21 CFR 868.1910 - Esophageal stethoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Esophageal stethoscope. 868.1910 Section 868.1910 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1910 Esophageal stethoscope....

  7. 21 CFR 868.1910 - Esophageal stethoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Esophageal stethoscope. 868.1910 Section 868.1910 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1910 Esophageal stethoscope....

  8. 21 CFR 868.1910 - Esophageal stethoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Esophageal stethoscope. 868.1910 Section 868.1910 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1910 Esophageal stethoscope....

  9. 21 CFR 868.1910 - Esophageal stethoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Esophageal stethoscope. 868.1910 Section 868.1910 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1910 Esophageal stethoscope....

  10. 21 CFR 878.3610 - Esophageal prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Esophageal prosthesis. 878.3610 Section 878.3610 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3610 Esophageal...

  11. 21 CFR 878.3610 - Esophageal prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Esophageal prosthesis. 878.3610 Section 878.3610 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3610 Esophageal...

  12. 21 CFR 878.3610 - Esophageal prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Esophageal prosthesis. 878.3610 Section 878.3610 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3610 Esophageal...

  13. 21 CFR 878.3610 - Esophageal prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Esophageal prosthesis. 878.3610 Section 878.3610 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3610 Esophageal...

  14. 21 CFR 878.3610 - Esophageal prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Esophageal prosthesis. 878.3610 Section 878.3610 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3610 Esophageal...

  15. Esophageal Impedance Monitoring: Clinical Pearls and Pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Ravi, Karthik; Katzka, David A

    2016-09-01

    The development of intraluminal esophageal impedance monitoring has improved our ability to detect and measure gastroesophageal reflux without dependence on acid content. This ability to detect previously unrecognized weak or nonacid reflux episodes has had important clinical implications in the diagnosis and management of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). In addition, with the ability to assess bolus transit within the esophageal lumen, impedance monitoring has enhanced the recognition and characterization of esophageal motility disorders in patients with nonobstructive dysphagia. The assessment of the intraluminal movement of gas and liquid has also been proven to be of diagnostic value in conditions such as rumination syndrome and excessive belching. Further, alternative applications of impedance monitoring, such as the measurement of mucosal impedance, have provided novel insights into assessing esophageal mucosal integrity changes as a consequence of inflammatory change. Future applications for esophageal impedance monitoring also hold promise in esophageal conditions other than GERD. However, despite all of the clinical benefits afforded by esophageal impedance monitoring, important clinical and technical shortcomings limit its diagnostic value and must be considered when interpreting study results. Overinterpretation of studies or application of impedance monitoring in patients can have deleterious clinical implications. This review will highlight the clinical benefits and limitations of esophageal impedance monitoring and provide clinical pearls and pitfalls associated with this technology.

  16. 21 CFR 876.5365 - Esophageal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Esophageal dilator. 876.5365 Section 876.5365 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5365 Esophageal dilator....

  17. Esophageal Impedance Monitoring: Clinical Pearls and Pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Ravi, Karthik; Katzka, David A

    2016-09-01

    The development of intraluminal esophageal impedance monitoring has improved our ability to detect and measure gastroesophageal reflux without dependence on acid content. This ability to detect previously unrecognized weak or nonacid reflux episodes has had important clinical implications in the diagnosis and management of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). In addition, with the ability to assess bolus transit within the esophageal lumen, impedance monitoring has enhanced the recognition and characterization of esophageal motility disorders in patients with nonobstructive dysphagia. The assessment of the intraluminal movement of gas and liquid has also been proven to be of diagnostic value in conditions such as rumination syndrome and excessive belching. Further, alternative applications of impedance monitoring, such as the measurement of mucosal impedance, have provided novel insights into assessing esophageal mucosal integrity changes as a consequence of inflammatory change. Future applications for esophageal impedance monitoring also hold promise in esophageal conditions other than GERD. However, despite all of the clinical benefits afforded by esophageal impedance monitoring, important clinical and technical shortcomings limit its diagnostic value and must be considered when interpreting study results. Overinterpretation of studies or application of impedance monitoring in patients can have deleterious clinical implications. This review will highlight the clinical benefits and limitations of esophageal impedance monitoring and provide clinical pearls and pitfalls associated with this technology. PMID:27325223

  18. Balloon-Occluded Antegrade Transvenous Sclerotherapy to Treat Rectal Varices: A Direct Puncture Approach to the Superior Rectal Vein Through the Greater Sciatic Foramen Under CT Fluoroscopy Guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, Yasuyuki Kariya, Shuji Nakatani, Miyuki Yoshida, Rie Kono, Yumiko Kan, Naoki Ueno, Yutaka Komemushi, Atsushi Tanigawa, Noboru

    2015-10-15

    Rectal varices occur in 44.5 % of patients with ectopic varices caused by portal hypertension, and 48.6 % of these patients are untreated and followed by observation. However, bleeding occurs in 38 % and shock leading to death in 5 % of such patients. Two patients, an 80-year-old woman undergoing treatment for primary biliary cirrhosis (Child-Pugh class A) and a 63-year-old man with class C hepatic cirrhosis (Child-Pugh class A), in whom balloon-occluded antegrade transvenous sclerotherapy was performed to treat rectal varices are reported. A catheter was inserted by directly puncturing the rectal vein percutaneously through the greater sciatic foramen under computed tomographic fluoroscopy guidance. In both cases, the rectal varices were successfully treated without any significant complications, with no bleeding from rectal varices after embolization.

  19. [Endoscopic surgery for benign esophageal diseases].

    PubMed

    Ozawa, Soji

    2006-07-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and esophageal achalasia are common benign esophageal diseases. Today minimally invasive surgery is recommended to treat these diseases. Surgical indications for GERD are failure of medical management, medical complications attributable to a large hiatal hernia, 'atypical' symptoms (asthma, hoarseness, cough, chest pain, aspiration), etc. according to the Society of American Gastrointestinal Endoscopic Surgeons (SAGES) guidelines. Laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication has emerged as the most widely accepted procedure for GERD patients with normal esophageal motility. Partial fundoplication (e.g., Toupet fundoplication) is also considered to decrease the possibility of postoperative dysphagia. Although pneumatic dilatation has been the first line treatment for esophageal achalasia, laparoscopic Heller myotomy and partial fundoplication (e.g., Dor fundoplication) to prevent reflux is preferred by most gastroenterologists and surgeons as the primary treatment modality. Laparoscopic surgery for GERD and esophageal achalasia are effective in most patients and safe in all patients. Finally, laparoscopic surgery should be performed only by skilled surgeons.

  20. Unusual Presentation of a Metastatic Esophageal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Orlicka, Katarzyna; Maynard, Stéphanie; Bouin, Mickael

    2012-01-01

    Esophageal cancer most commonly presents with upper digestive symptoms such as dysphagia. Lymph nodes are among the most common metastatic sites of this type of cancer. We report the case of a 53-year-old man presenting with unusual sole presenting features of esophageal cancer. The patient sought medical attention for abdominal pain without dysphagia, which was first investigated with an abdominal computed tomography scan. A large abdominal mass was discovered on imaging. Biopsies of this mass were in keeping with esophageal squamous cell cancer. With this finding, gastroscopy was performed, confirming the presence of primary esophageal cancer. This is a rare presentation of esophageal cancer without upper gastrointestinal symptoms. This case reinforces the value of biopsy for any neoplastic mass, especially in a context of unusual symptoms. PMID:22679417

  1. [Clinical features and pathophysiology of acute esophageal mucosal lesion].

    PubMed

    Ihara, Yutaro; Hizawa, Kazuoki; Fujita, Kouhei; Matsuno, Yuichi; Sakuma, Tsutomu; Esaki, Motohiro; Iida, Mitsuo

    2016-04-01

    Acute esophageal mucosal lesions (AEMLs) are categorized into black esophagitis (type B) and non-black esophagitis (type NB) on endoscopy. To clarify the distinct pathophysiology, we compared the clinical features and hematological findings at onset among 17 patients with type B esophagitis and 6 patients with type NB esophagitis. In type B esophagitis, time to endoscopy after onset was significantly shorter, and blood levels of lactate, urea nitrogen, creatinine, and glucose were higher than in type NB esophagitis. However, there were no significant intergroup differences in the incidences of other predisposing factors, such as diabetic ketoacidosis or esophageal hernias. These findings suggest that AEMLs are caused by acid reflux and peripheral vascular insufficiency, the latter being more associated with type B esophagitis by its etiology. In addition, blood lactate may indicate the severity of AEML, leading to black esophagitis. PMID:27052393

  2. Peripheral nerve blocks for distal extremity surgery.

    PubMed

    Offierski, Chris

    2013-10-01

    Peripheral nerve block is well suited for distal extremity surgery. Blocking the nerves at the distal extremity is easily done. It does not require ultrasound or stimulators to identify the nerve. Blocking nerves in the distal extremity is safe with low risk of toxicity. The effect of the nerve block is limited to the distribution of the nerve. The distal nerves in the lower extremity are sensory branches of the sciatic nerve. This provides a sensory block only. This has the advantage of allowing the patient to actively contract tendons in the foot and ambulate more quickly after surgery. PMID:24093651

  3. Giant mid-esophageal diverticulum. Conservative treatment of postoperative leakage.

    PubMed

    Dallatomasina, S; Casaccia, M; Chessa, M; Serrano, J; Nardi, I; Troilo, B; Miggino, M; Valente, U

    2009-01-01

    Mid-esophageal diverticula are rare entities. Only symptomatic patients usually receive surgical treatment. Esophageal leakage is one of the most common complications after these procedures. Though in literature, operative management is the preferred treatment for esophageal fistula, conservative approach is described in case of small leaks. We report a case of an operated giant mid-esophageal diverticulum complicated with an esophageal fistula. The patient underwent a surgical treatment and recovered completely.

  4. Characterization of the Distal Esophagus High-Pressure Zone with Manometry, Ultrasound and Micro-Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Vegesna, Anil K.; Sloan, Joshua A.; Singh, Baltej; Phillips, Steven J; Braverman, Alan S.; Barbe, Mary F.; Ruggieri, Michael R.; Miller, Larry S.

    2012-01-01

    Background We sought to determine how the individual components of the distal esophagus and proximal stomach form the gastroesophageal junction high-pressure zone (GEJHPZ) anti-reflux barrier. Methods An endoscopic ultrasound/manometry catheter was pulled through the proximal stomach and distal esophagus in 20 normal subjects. The axial length and width of individual structures on endoscopic ultrasound were measured. The anatomic orientation of gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) components was examined in two organ donor specimens using micro-computed tomography (micro-CT). Key Results The three distinct structures identified within the GEJHPZ, from distal to proximal, were: the gastric clasp and sling muscle fiber complex, crural diaphragm, and lower esophageal circular smooth muscle fibers (LEC). The LEC was statistically significantly thicker than adjacent esophageal muscles. These structures were associated with 3 pressure peaks. The pressure peak produced by the clasp/sling fiber complex often overlapped with the pressure peak from the crural diaphragm. The most proximal peak, associated with the LEC, was significantly greater and bimodal in 9 of 20 subjects. This bimodal LEC pressure peak correlated with two areas of thickened muscle observed with ultrasound. Micro-CT of GEJ from organ donors confirmed the two areas of thickened muscle. Conclusions and inferences Three distinct anatomic structures, the clasp and sling muscle fibers, crural diaphragm, and LEC combine to form the anti-reflux barrier of the proximal stomach and distal esophagus. The clasp and sling muscle fibers combine with the crural diaphragm to form a distal pressure profile. The more proximal LEC has a bimodal pressure profile in some patients. PMID:22998376

  5. Isolated Gastric Varices and Use of Balloon-occlusive Retrograde Transvenous Obliteration: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    McCarty, Thomas R; Bakhit, Mena; Rustagi, Tarun

    2016-03-01

    Isolated gastric varices are far less prevalent in Western countries where the rate of splenic thrombosis is much lower. However, in Asian countries the entity is more common and therefore a more robust treatment approach has been developed. Balloon-occlusive retrograde transvenous obliteration (BRTO) was first described in 1984 and then revived in 1996. The procedure, while uncommon in the U.S. and not recognized by the AASLD practice guidelines, allows for direct exclusion from the portosystemic system. Here we describe the case of a patient with alcoholic cirrhosis decompensated by bleeding gastric varices treated with BRTO.

  6. Isolated Gastric Varices and Use of Balloon-occlusive Retrograde Transvenous Obliteration: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    McCarty, Thomas R; Bakhit, Mena; Rustagi, Tarun

    2016-03-01

    Isolated gastric varices are far less prevalent in Western countries where the rate of splenic thrombosis is much lower. However, in Asian countries the entity is more common and therefore a more robust treatment approach has been developed. Balloon-occlusive retrograde transvenous obliteration (BRTO) was first described in 1984 and then revived in 1996. The procedure, while uncommon in the U.S. and not recognized by the AASLD practice guidelines, allows for direct exclusion from the portosystemic system. Here we describe the case of a patient with alcoholic cirrhosis decompensated by bleeding gastric varices treated with BRTO. PMID:27014763

  7. Adrenal pseudomasses due to varices: angiographic-CT-MRI-pathologic correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, T.M.; Gross, B.H.; Glazer, G.M. Williams, D.M.

    1985-08-01

    Periadrenal and adrenal portosystemic collaterals are a recently reported cause of adrenal pseudotumor on computed tomography (CT). Nine patients with this left adrenal pseudotumor illustrate its typical position and appearance on CT, angiography, CT-angiography, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The anatomic basis for variceal adrenal pseudotumors is the left inferior phrenic vein, which passes immediately anterior to the left adrenal gland and which serves as a collateral pathway from splenic to left renal vein in portal hypertension. Thus, unlike previously described adrenal pseudotumors, these venous collaterals are not anatomically distinguishable from the adrenal gland on CT. Bolus dynamic CT is usually diagnostic, but in equivocal cases, MRI may prove useful.

  8. Role of advanced diagnostics for eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Ikuo

    2014-01-01

    In eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), diagnostic tests aid in the identification of pathophysiologic consequences and accurate detection of the disease. The EoE Endoscopic Reference Score (EREFS) classifies and grades the severity of the five major endoscopically identified esophageal features of EoE (edema, rings, exudates, furrows and strictures). The EREFS may be useful in the evaluation of disease severity and as an objective outcome of response to therapy. pH monitoring identifies the presence of abnormal degrees of acid exposure in the esophagus that characterizes gastroesophageal reflux disease. The presence of acid reflux, however, does not indicate that the reflux is responsible for esophageal eosinophilia. Esophageal manometry has not demonstrated a characteristic abnormality with sufficient sensitivity to make the test of diagnostic value in clinical practice. On the other hand, manometric characteristics of esophageal pressurization and longitudinal muscle dysfunction may help identify important pathophysiologic consequences of EoE. Esophageal impedance testing has demonstrated increased baseline mucosal impedance that correlates with increased epithelial permeability in EoE. Reduced mucosal integrity may provide intraluminal allergens access to antigen-presenting cells, serving as an early event in the pathogenesis of EoE. The functional luminal impedance probe (FLIP) provides quantitative assessment of esophageal mural compliance, a physiologic correlate of remodeling in EoE. Studies using FLIP have associated reductions in esophageal distensibility in EoE with the important outcome of food impaction risk. Finally, confocal endomicroscopy, multiphoton fluorescence microscopy and novel eosinophil-enhancing contrast agents are emerging methods that may allow for in vivo visualization of esophageal eosinophilic inflammation, thereby improving the detection and understanding of this emerging disease. PMID:24603385

  9. Distal metatarsal synostosis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Aspros, Dimitrios; Ananda-Rajan, Ethan; Jnr, Zdenak Klezl; Rajan, Rohan

    2014-09-01

    We report a rare case of distal metatarsal synostosis of the 4th and 5th metatarsals in an 11 year old male. He was referred with forefoot pain. Clinical examination and radiographs have confirmed an osseous connection of the distal 4th and 5th metatarsal. This was treated surgically with bony bridge excision and the patient is now asymptomatic.

  10. [Oral blastomycosis, laryngeal papillomatosis and esophageal tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Montoya, Manuel; Chumbiraico, Robert; Ricalde, Melvin; Cazorla, Ernesto; Hernández-Córdova, Gustavo

    2012-06-01

    Esophageal involvement is an extremely rare complication of tuberculosis even in countries with high prevalence of infection. We report the case of a 57 year-old hiv-seronegative patient with simultaneous diagnoses of oral blastomycosis and laryngeal papillomatosis. Both were confirmed by anatomopathological analysis. The esophageal biopsy revealed granulomatous esophagitis with necrosis and ziehl-neelsen stain showed acid-fast alcohol resistant bacilli suggestive of tuberculosis. The patient's history included pulmonary tuberculosis twice and previous abandonment of therapy. Thus, it was necessary to use oral itraconazole combined with second-line anti-tuberculosis drugs administered through a gastrostomy tube. The clinical development was favorable. PMID:22858774

  11. Updates on esophageal and gastric cancers

    PubMed Central

    Gallo, Amy; Cha, Charles

    2006-01-01

    Esophageal and gastric cancers are both common and deadly. Patients present most often after disease progression and survival is therefore poor. Due to demographic variability and recent changes in disease incidence, much emphasis has been placed on studying risk factors for both esophageal and gastric cancers. However, with increasing understanding of these diseases, low survival rates persist and continued intensive studies are necessary to optimize treatment plans. This review article discusses updates in the evolving epidemiology, clinical presentation, risk factors, and diagnostic and treatment modalities of esophageal and gastric cancers. PMID:16718845

  12. Esophageal stent placement as a therapeutic option for iatrogenic esophageal perforation in children

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Alsafadi; Wong Kee Song, Louis M.; Absah, Imad

    2016-01-01

    Iatrogenic esophageal perforation (IEP) is a potentially serious adverse event of interventional endoscopy. The approach to IEP varies from surgical repair for large perforations to conservative treatment for small contained perforations. We report a case of an 18-month-old girl with congenital esophageal stenosis suffering a large esophageal perforation after a trial of stricture dilatation, which was successfully managed by the placement of fully covered stent. Hence, in selected cases, esophageal stent placement is a feasible alternative to invasive surgery in managing IEP. PMID:27144142

  13. [Laparoscopic surgery for esophageal achalasia].

    PubMed

    Ozawa, S; Ando, N; Ohgami, M; Kitagawa, Y; Kitajima, M

    2000-04-01

    Laparoscopic surgery for esophageal achalasia was first reported by Shimi et al. in 1991. Subsequently the procedure has been performed all over the world and laparoscopic Heller myotomy and Dor fundoplication (Heller and Dor operation) is now thought to be the operation of first choice. It is indicated for patients who are resistant to medical therapy (calcium blocker etc.) or have pneumatic dilatation and those with frequent aspiration at night. As Csendes et al. reported that surgical treatment was better than pneumatic dilatation and as laparoscopic surgery is less invasive, the indications for the laparoscopic Heller and Dor operation can include all achalasia patients except those who respond to medical therapy, do not accept surgery, or cannot tolerate surgery. We successfully performed the laparoscopic Heller and Dor operation on 22 patients, all of whom had an uneventful postoperative course. Manometric evaluation, endoscopic examination, and 24-hour pH monitoring showed good results. There are six important technical points: 1) flexible laparoscopy; 2) pneumoperitoneum; 3) gauze in the abdominal cavity to absorb blood; 4) laparosonic coagulating shears; 5) extracorporeal knot-tying technique; and 6) intracorporeal knot-tying technique. If an experienced surgeon is in charge, the laparoscopic Heller and Dor operation is an ideal, minimally invasive treatment for esophageal achalasia.

  14. Distal symphalangism: a report of two families.

    PubMed

    Poush, J R

    1991-01-01

    This study describes distal symphalangism in 36 individuals in two families, one of which is the largest pedigree of this rare defect yet documented. Distal symphalangism is ankylosis or rigidity of the distal interphalangeal joints of the hands and/or feet. The findings of this report substantiate the mutation as an autosomal dominant phenotype. Several manifestations of distal symphalangism were observed, including the lack of cutaneous creases over affected joints, brachydactyly, fourth-finger hypophalangism, absent nails, and rudimentary nails. Variability ranged from just toes affected, to a single finger affected, to all fingers and all lesser toes affected. The most common expression of the mutant gene was rigid index fingers. Craniosynostosis, premature closure of the sutures of the skull, was encountered twice in the larger of the two families. It is a possible pleiotropic effect of distal symphalangism. PMID:2061594

  15. Distal symphalangism: a report of two families.

    PubMed

    Poush, J R

    1991-01-01

    This study describes distal symphalangism in 36 individuals in two families, one of which is the largest pedigree of this rare defect yet documented. Distal symphalangism is ankylosis or rigidity of the distal interphalangeal joints of the hands and/or feet. The findings of this report substantiate the mutation as an autosomal dominant phenotype. Several manifestations of distal symphalangism were observed, including the lack of cutaneous creases over affected joints, brachydactyly, fourth-finger hypophalangism, absent nails, and rudimentary nails. Variability ranged from just toes affected, to a single finger affected, to all fingers and all lesser toes affected. The most common expression of the mutant gene was rigid index fingers. Craniosynostosis, premature closure of the sutures of the skull, was encountered twice in the larger of the two families. It is a possible pleiotropic effect of distal symphalangism.

  16. Robotic distal pancreatectomy: a valid option?

    PubMed

    Jung, M K; Buchs, N C; Azagury, D E; Hagen, M E; Morel, P

    2013-10-01

    Although reported in the literature, conventional laparoscopic approach for distal pancreatectomy is still lacking widespread acceptance. This might be due to two-dimensional vision and decreased range of motion to reach and safely dissect this highly vascularized retroperitoneal organ by laparoscopy. However, interest in minimally invasive access is growing ever since and the robotic system could certainly help overcome limitations of the laparoscopic approach in the challenging domain of pancreatic resection, notably in distal pancreatectomy. Robotic distal pancreatectomy with and without spleen preservation has been reported with encouraging outcomes for benign and borderline malignant disease. As a result of upgraded endowristed manipulation and three-dimensional visualization, improved outcome might be expected with the launch of the robotic system in the procedure of distal pancreatectomy. Our aim was thus to extensively review the current literature of robot-assisted surgery for distal pancreatectomy and to evaluate advantages and possible limitations of the robotic approach.

  17. Palliative Treatment of Esophageal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ahmad; Goosenberg; Frucht; Coia

    1994-07-01

    Palliative interventions for advanced esophageal cancer include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, chemoradiation, endoscopic procedures, and combinations of the above. Palliative esophagectomy or bypass procedures are difficult to justify in these patients because their life expectancy is so short. Palliative external beam radiation to doses of 50 to 60 Gy is successful in 50% to 70% of patients. The addition of brachytherapy may improve these results. One third to one half of patients treated with radiation develop benign or maglinant stricture. Although response rates to combination chemotherapy are only 50% at best, the majority of patients do have improvement of dysphagia. These regimens are commonly used as part of a multidisciplinary approach with radiation andøor surgery, rather than as a sole modality of treatment. Chemoradiation regimens results in better survival than treatment with radiation alone, and provide palliation of dysphagia in up to 90% of patients. Although acute toxicity of chemoradiation is more severe than radiation alone, this is of limited duration. Chemoradiation may be the treatment of choice for the majority of patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer. Endoscopic techniques are available that provide palliation of dysphagia. The most commonly used technique is esophageal dilatation, either alone or before performing other palliative procedures such as laser therapy or stent placement. The most significant limitation of dilatation alone is that palliation is short-lived and most patients require repeat dilatations. Esophageal stents offer a high degree of palliation, but procedure-related morbidity and mortality rates are not insignificant. Expandable metal stents are associated with few complications but tumor ingrowth through the metallic mesh is frequent. Conventional plastic stents are not affected by tumor ingrowth but can migrate. Endoscopic laser therapy also provides symptoms relief and complication rates are

  18. Association of Oesophageal Varices and Splanchnic Vein Thromboses in Patients with JAK2-Positive Myeloproliferative Neoplasms: Presentation of Two Cases and Data from a Retrospective Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Link, Cornelia S.; Platzbecker, Uwe; Kroschinsky, Frank; Pannach, Sven; Thiede, Christian; Platzek, Ivan; Ehninger, Gerhard; Schuler, Markus K.

    2013-01-01

    Background Oesophageal varices and gastrointestinal bleeding are common complications of liver cirrhosis. More rarely, oesophageal varices occur in patients with non-cirrhotic portal hypertension that results from thromboses of portal or splanchnic veins. Case Report We describe 2 young men who initially presented with varices as a result of portal vein thromboses. In the clinical follow-up, both were tested positive for a JAK2 mutation and consequently diagnosed with myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs). In an attempt to characterise the frequency of gastrointestinal complications in patients with JAK2-positive MPNs, we retrospectively analysed all known affected patients from our clinic for the diagnosis of portal vein thromboses and oesophageal varices. Strikingly, 48% of those who had received an oesophagogastroduodenoscopy had detectable oesophageal or gastric varices, and 82% of those suffered from portal or splanchnic vein thromboses. Conclusion While the association between JAK2, myeloproliferative disease and thrombotic events is well established, patients with idiopathic oesophageal varices are not regularly tested for JAK2 mutations. However, the occurrence of oesophageal varices may be the first presenting symptom of a MPN with a JAK2 mutation, and affected patients may profit from a close haematological monitoring to assure the early detection of developing MPN. PMID:23898274

  19. Beneficial effects of Ankaferd Blood Stopper on caustic esophageal injuries: an experimental model.

    PubMed

    Akbal, E; Köklü, S; Karaca, G; Astarci, H M; Koçak, E; Taş, A; Beyazit, Y; Topcu, G; Haznedaroğlu, I C

    2012-04-01

    Ankaferd Blood Stopper (ABS) is an herbal extract that enhances mucosal healing. The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of ABS on the healing of the esophagus and prevention of stricture development after esophageal caustic injuries in rats. The study included 50 rats. Rats were divided into five groups: group 1 (no injury, sham surgery), group 2 (injury + no ABS + study after 2 weeks of injury), group 3 (injury + ABS + study after 2 weeks of injury), group 4 (injury + no ABS + study after 4 weeks of injury), and group 5 (injury + ABS + study after 4 weeks of injury). Standard esophageal burn injury was created by applying 50% NaOH solution to distal esophagus of about 1.5 cm. To rats in the sham group, isotonic solution was given instead of NaOH. ABS (2 mL/day) was given via oral route to group 3 and 5 rats. Fourteen days (group 2 and 3) and 28 days (group 4 and 5) later, all the live rats were killed. The distal esophageal segments of all rats were removed and divided into two equal parts for biochemical and histopathological examination. Mortality rate, weight changes, inflammation, stenosis index (SI), and biochemical measurements were evaluated. The SI was found as 0.31 ± 0.03 in group 1, 0.533 ± 0.240 in group 2, 0.568 ± 0.371 in group 3, 0.523 ± 0.164 in group 4, and 0.28 ± 0.03 in group 5. The SI and inflammation in ABS-treatment group 5 was significantly lower than that in non-treatment group 4 (P= 0.005). There were no significant differences between inflammation and SI among other groups. The mortality rate was 14.2% in group 1, 37.5% in untreated group 2, 14.2% in ABS-treated group 3, 80% in untreated group 4, and 33.3% in ABS-treated group 5. The mortality rate in group 4 was significantly higher than other groups (P= 0.025). Decrease rates in mean body weights of the groups were as follows: group 1, 1%; group 2, 15%; group 3, 14%; group 4, 46%; and group 5, 15%. Biochemical tests other than albumin and creatinine were

  20. AMC: amyoplasia and distal arthrogryposis.

    PubMed

    Kimber, Eva

    2015-12-01

    Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (AMC) is a heterogeneous condition defined as multiple congenital joint contractures in two or more body areas. The common pathogenesis is impaired fetal movements. Amyoplasia, the most frequent form, is a sporadically occurring condition with hypoplastic muscles and joint contractures. Distal arthrogryposis (DA) syndromes are often hereditary, and joint involvement is predominantly in the hands and feet. In a Swedish study, 131 patients with arthrogryposis were investigated. The most frequent diagnoses were amyoplasia and DA. In amyoplasia, muscle strength was found to be more important than joint range of motion (ROM) for motor function. In DA, muscle weakness was present in 44 % of investigated patients. The clinical findings were found to be highly variable between families and also within families with DA. Fetal myopathy due to sarcomeric protein dysfunction can cause DA. An early multidisciplinary team evaluation of the child with arthrogryposis for specific diagnosis and planning of treatment is recommended. Attention should be directed at the development of muscle strength with early stimulation of active movements. Immobilization should be minimized.

  1. Congenital Esophageal Duplication Cyst: A Rare Cause of Dysphagia in an Adult

    PubMed Central

    Sonthalia, Nikhil; Jain, Samit S.; Surude, Ravindra G.; Mohite, Ashok R.; Rathi, Pravin M.

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal duplication cyst is a rare congenital embryonal gastrointestinal (GI) malformation which is diagnosed most commonly in childhood. In adults, they can present with a variety of symptoms ranging from dysphagia, chest pain, epigastric discomfort, and vomiting to more serious complications including infections, hemorrhage, and ulcerations. A 30-year-old male presented with gradually progressive dysphagia to solids for 4 months without significant weight loss. Clinical examination and routine laboratory examination were unrevealing. Upper GI endoscopy revealed a well-defined submucosal lesion bulging into the esophageal lumen involving the right antero-lateral wall of the distal esophagus. The overlying mucosa was normal with mild luminal narrowing but gastroscope could be negotiated across this narrowing. Differential diagnosis included lipoma, leiomyoma or GI stromal tumors. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography of thorax revealed a 3.5 × 2.3 × 3 cm well-defined homogenous hypodense lesion involving the right antero-lateral wall of the distal thoracic esophagus with likely possibility of submucosal or intramural lesion. Subsequently, endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) revealed a 3.3 × 2.8 cm homogenous hypoechoic lesion without any vascularity involving the distal esophagus wall suggestive of duplication cyst. The lesion was intramural in location as muscularis propria was seen to go around the lesion. Bronchogenic cyst was excluded due to absence of cartilage and close proximity of the cyst to lumen. Fine-needle aspiration was not attempted in view of high risk of introducing infection. Being symptomatic, the patient underwent complete surgical excision of the cyst with exteriorization of the base which on histopathology confirmed duplication cyst. Esophageal duplication cysts are exceedingly rare congenital embryonal malformations with estimated prevalence of 0.0122% arising from aberration of posterior division of embryonic foregut at 3 - 4 weeks of

  2. A rare case of splenic lymphoma in a patient with polymyositis manifesting as gastric variceal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Parekh, Ravish; Walia, Sandeep; Zalawadia, Ashish; Siddiqui, Yousuf

    2015-04-01

    We report an unusual case of upper gastrointestinal bleeding due to isolated gastric variceal bleeding in a patient with splenomegaly who was subsequently diagnosed with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. The patient is a 47-year-old male with a history of polymyositis who presented to the emergency room with complaints of lightheadedness and melena for 2 days. On initial presentation, the patient had positive orthostatic vital signs. He was found to be anemic with presenting hemoglobin of 5.8 g/dl (compared with 13.4 g/dl 4 months prior to presentation). The patient was aggressively resuscitated with intravenous fluid and blood transfusions. An emergency esophagogastroduodenoscopy was performed which showed isolated gastric varices in the fundus of the stomach, with no active bleeding or high-risk stigmata. Abdominal computed tomography revealed focal splenic vein thrombosis and splenomegaly with ill-defined hypodensities. Portal and superior mesenteric veins were patent. Mild edema was seen surrounding the spleen and non-specific abdominal lymphadenopathy was also reported. A surgical consultation recommended an urgent splenectomy. Pathology of the removed spleen revealed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Positron emission tomography-computed tomography revealed lymphomatous disease in the thorax, abdomen, pelvis and bone marrow. The patient was subsequently started on chemotherapy.

  3. Role of self-expanding metal stents in the management of variceal haemorrhage: Hype or hope?

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, Brian J; O’Beirne, James P

    2016-01-01

    Despite the advances of medical, endoscopic and radiological therapy over recent years the mortality rates of acute variceal haemorrhage are still 16%-20% and the medium term outcome has not improved in the last 25 years. Early transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt has proved to be an effective therapy for selected groups of patients with a high risk of re-bleeding and moderate liver disease. However, there is an unmet need for a therapy that can be applied in patients with a high risk of re-bleeding and advanced liver disease either as definitive therapy or as a bridge to permanent therapy. Self-expanding metal stents can be placed without the need for endoscopic or fluoroscopic control and, once in place, will provide effective haemostasis and allow a route for oral fluids and nutrition. They can remain in place whilst liver function recovers and secondary prophylaxis is initiated. We review the results of 6 case series including a total of 83 patients and the first randomised controlled trial of self-expanding metal stents vs balloon tamponade (BT) in the management of refractory variceal haemorrhage. We report that self-expanding metal stents provide effective haemostasis and perform better than BT in refractory bleeding, where they are associated with fewer complications. Whilst the most effective place for self-expanding metal stents in the management algorithm needs to be determined by further randomised controlled trials, currently they provide an effective alternative to BT in selected patients. PMID:26788260

  4. Role of self-expanding metal stents in the management of variceal haemorrhage: Hype or hope?

    PubMed

    Hogan, Brian J; O'Beirne, James P

    2016-01-10

    Despite the advances of medical, endoscopic and radiological therapy over recent years the mortality rates of acute variceal haemorrhage are still 16%-20% and the medium term outcome has not improved in the last 25 years. Early transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt has proved to be an effective therapy for selected groups of patients with a high risk of re-bleeding and moderate liver disease. However, there is an unmet need for a therapy that can be applied in patients with a high risk of re-bleeding and advanced liver disease either as definitive therapy or as a bridge to permanent therapy. Self-expanding metal stents can be placed without the need for endoscopic or fluoroscopic control and, once in place, will provide effective haemostasis and allow a route for oral fluids and nutrition. They can remain in place whilst liver function recovers and secondary prophylaxis is initiated. We review the results of 6 case series including a total of 83 patients and the first randomised controlled trial of self-expanding metal stents vs balloon tamponade (BT) in the management of refractory variceal haemorrhage. We report that self-expanding metal stents provide effective haemostasis and perform better than BT in refractory bleeding, where they are associated with fewer complications. Whilst the most effective place for self-expanding metal stents in the management algorithm needs to be determined by further randomised controlled trials, currently they provide an effective alternative to BT in selected patients.

  5. Managing eosinophilic esophagitis: challenges and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Nisha A; Albert, Dustin M; Hall, Noah M; Moawad, Fouad J

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic and progressive immune-mediated condition defined by symptoms of esophageal dysfunction and dense eosinophilic infiltration of the esophageal mucosa. Therapies consist of anti-eosinophilic medications and specialized diets aimed to decrease the progression of EoE and alleviate its symptoms, namely, dysphagia and food impaction. Assessing response to therapy remains challenging, as treatment end points are not well defined and currently consist of clinical, histologic, and endoscopic features. Newer validated measures may help standardize treatment end points. Emerging data support the use of maintenance therapy, which may reduce disease progression. Optimal dosages, delivery techniques, and duration of treatment need to be determined. When features of fibrostenosis develop, esophageal dilation is a safe and effective adjunctive strategy for improving symptoms. In EoE cases refractory to conventional treatments, newer therapies targeting inflammatory mediators and cytokines are on the horizon. PMID:27695356

  6. Regenerative Medicine Strategies for Esophageal Repair

    PubMed Central

    Londono, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Pathologies that involve the structure and/or function of the esophagus can be life-threatening. The esophagus is a complex organ comprising nonredundant tissue that does not have the ability to regenerate. Currently available interventions for esophageal pathology have limited success and are typically associated with significant morbidity. Hence, there is currently an unmet clinical need for effective methods of esophageal repair. The present article presents a review of esophageal disease along with the anatomic and functional consequences of each pathologic process, the shortcomings associated with currently available therapies, and the latest advancements in the field of regenerative medicine with respect to strategies for esophageal repair from benchtop to bedside. PMID:25813694

  7. Managing eosinophilic esophagitis: challenges and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Nisha A; Albert, Dustin M; Hall, Noah M; Moawad, Fouad J

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic and progressive immune-mediated condition defined by symptoms of esophageal dysfunction and dense eosinophilic infiltration of the esophageal mucosa. Therapies consist of anti-eosinophilic medications and specialized diets aimed to decrease the progression of EoE and alleviate its symptoms, namely, dysphagia and food impaction. Assessing response to therapy remains challenging, as treatment end points are not well defined and currently consist of clinical, histologic, and endoscopic features. Newer validated measures may help standardize treatment end points. Emerging data support the use of maintenance therapy, which may reduce disease progression. Optimal dosages, delivery techniques, and duration of treatment need to be determined. When features of fibrostenosis develop, esophageal dilation is a safe and effective adjunctive strategy for improving symptoms. In EoE cases refractory to conventional treatments, newer therapies targeting inflammatory mediators and cytokines are on the horizon.

  8. Esophageal papilloma: Flexible endoscopic ablation by radiofrequency

    PubMed Central

    del Genio, Gianmattia; del Genio, Federica; Schettino, Pietro; Limongelli, Paolo; Tolone, Salvatore; Brusciano, Luigi; Avellino, Manuela; Vitiello, Chiara; Docimo, Giovanni; Pezzullo, Angelo; Docimo, Ludovico

    2015-01-01

    Squamous papilloma of the esophagus is a rare benign lesion of the esophagus. Radiofrequency ablation is an established endoscopic technique for the eradication of Barrett esophagus. No cases of endoscopic ablation of esophageal papilloma by radiofrequency ablation (RFA) have been reported. We report a case of esophageal papilloma successfully treated with a single session of radiofrequency ablation. Endoscopic ablation of the lesion was achieved by radiofrequency using a new catheter inserted through the working channel of endoscope. The esophageal ablated tissue was removed by a specifically designed cup. Complete ablation was confirmed at 3 mo by endoscopy with biopsies. This case supports feasibility and safety of as a new potential indication for BarrxTM RFA in patients with esophageal papilloma. PMID:25789102

  9. Alcohol, Obesity Could Raise Esophageal Cancer Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160133.html Alcohol, Obesity Could Raise Esophageal Cancer Risk A third ... now linked to 11 types of cancer and alcohol links to six," she said in an institute ...

  10. Multidisciplinary management for esophageal and gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Boniface, Megan M; Wani, Sachin B; Schefter, Tracey E; Koo, Phillip J; Meguid, Cheryl; Leong, Stephen; Kaplan, Jeffrey B; Wingrove, Lisa J; McCarter, Martin D

    2016-01-01

    The management of esophageal and gastric cancer is complex and involves multiple specialists in an effort to optimize patient outcomes. Utilizing a multidisciplinary team approach starting from the initial staging evaluation ensures that all members are in agreement with the plan of care. Treatment selection for esophageal and gastric cancer often involves a combination of chemotherapy, radiation, surgery, and palliative interventions (endoscopic and surgical), and direct communication between specialists in these fields is needed to ensure appropriate clinical decision making. At the University of Colorado, the Esophageal and Gastric Multidisciplinary Clinic was created to bring together all experts involved in treating these diseases at a weekly conference in order to provide patients with coordinated, individualized, and patient-centered care. This review details the essential elements and benefits of building a multidisciplinary program focused on treating esophageal and gastric cancer patients.

  11. Multidisciplinary management for esophageal and gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Boniface, Megan M; Wani, Sachin B; Schefter, Tracey E; Koo, Phillip J; Meguid, Cheryl; Leong, Stephen; Kaplan, Jeffrey B; Wingrove, Lisa J; McCarter, Martin D

    2016-01-01

    The management of esophageal and gastric cancer is complex and involves multiple specialists in an effort to optimize patient outcomes. Utilizing a multidisciplinary team approach starting from the initial staging evaluation ensures that all members are in agreement with the plan of care. Treatment selection for esophageal and gastric cancer often involves a combination of chemotherapy, radiation, surgery, and palliative interventions (endoscopic and surgical), and direct communication between specialists in these fields is needed to ensure appropriate clinical decision making. At the University of Colorado, the Esophageal and Gastric Multidisciplinary Clinic was created to bring together all experts involved in treating these diseases at a weekly conference in order to provide patients with coordinated, individualized, and patient-centered care. This review details the essential elements and benefits of building a multidisciplinary program focused on treating esophageal and gastric cancer patients. PMID:27217796

  12. Clinical application of endoscopic ultrasonography for esophageal achalasia.

    PubMed

    Minami, Hitomi; Inoue, Haruhiro; Isomoto, Hajime; Urabe, Shigetoshi; Nakao, Kazuhiko

    2015-04-01

    Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) has been widely used for evaluating the nature of diseases of various organs. The possibility of applying EUS for esophageal motility diseases has not been well discussed despite its versatility. At present, peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) for esophageal achalasia and related diseases has brought new attention to esophageal diseases because POEM provides a more direct approach to the inner structures of the esophageal wall. In the present study, we discuss the clinical utility of EUS in evaluating and treating esophageal motility diseases such as esophageal achalasia and related diseases. PMID:25573637

  13. Distal phalanges of Eosimias and Hoanghonius.

    PubMed

    Gebo, Daniel L; Beard, K Christopher; Ni, Xijun; Dagosto, Marian

    2015-09-01

    Seven primate distal phalanges have been identified from two middle Eocene fossil localities (Locality 1 and Nanbaotou) in the Yuanqu Basin, China, providing the first evidence of distal phalangeal morphology in Asian Eocene adapiform and eosimiid primates. The bones are best allocated to the basal anthropoid Eosimias centennicus and to hoanghoniine adapiforms. All distal phalangeal specimens display a morphology consistent with nail-bearing fingers and toes. The hallucal distal phalanx of the basal anthropoid Eosimias is more similar to that of primitive tarsiiforms than to crown group anthropoids. The adapiform distal phalanges from Locality 1 are allocated to Hoanghonius stehlini while those from Nanbaotou are tentatively assigned to an indeterminate hoanghoniine because dental remains of adapiforms have yet to be identified from this site. The distal phalangeal anatomy of hoanghoniines differs slightly from that documented for adapines and notharctines. One distal phalanx from Locality 1 shows a second pedal digit "grooming claw" morphology as noted for notharctines by Maiolino et al. (2012) and cercamoniines by Von Koenigswald et al. (2012).

  14. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN ESOPHAGITIS GRADES AND HELICOBACTER PYLORI

    PubMed Central

    RIBEIRO, Patrícia Fernanda Saboya; KUBRUSLY, Luiz Fernandao; NASSIF, Paulo Afonso Nunes; RIBEIRO, Irma Cláudia Saboya; BERTOLDI, Andressa de Souza; BATISTÃO, Venessa Caroline

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: The Helicobacter pylori infection (HP) is related to the development of gastric lesions and lymphoma; however, it is not known if there is a relation with gastroesophageal reflux disease and reflux esophagitis. Aim: To evaluate HP's relationship with esophagitis in patients undergoing upper endoscopy. Methods: Observational, retrospective and cross-sectional study, being evaluated 9576 patients undergoing outpatient endoscopic examination during the period between January and December 2015. Were included patients with any esophageal alteration at the examination; greater than 18; of both genders; independent of the complaint or the reason for the examination, illness or drug use. Were excluded those with active bleeding during the examination and in use of anticoagulants. The variables gender, age, esophagitis and result of the urease test, were studied. For statistical analysis was used the Epi Info software 7.1.5.2. Results: Most of the samples consisted of women and the overall average age was 46.54±16.32 years. The presence of infection was balanced for gender: 1204 (12.56%) women and 952 (13.92%) men. Relating degree of esophagitis HP- and HP+ was observed that the type A was the most common (58.79%, n=1460); 604 (24.32%) had grade B; 334 (13.45%) grade C, and 85 (3.42%) grade D. In the relation between the grade of esophagitis with gender, esophagitis A was predominant in women and present in 929 (63.33%), followed by type B, 282 (46.68%), 136 C (40.71%) and D 30 (35.29%). In men 531 (36.36%) showed type A, 322 (53.31%) B, 198 (59.28%) C, and 55 (64.70%) D. Among the groups 40-50 and over 60 years there was a significant difference in whether have or not have HP+. Conclusion: There is no significant difference between HP infection and the different grades of esophagitis. PMID:27759772

  15. Diagnosis and management of esophageal achalasia.

    PubMed

    Stavropoulos, Stavros N; Friedel, David; Modayil, Rani; Parkman, Henry P

    2016-01-01

    Achalasia is a rare esophageal motility disorder that is usually idiopathic in origin. It is characterized by dysphagia, and patients often have chest pain, regurgitation, weight loss, and an abnormal barium radiograph showing esophageal dilation with narrowing at the gastroesophageal junction. Abnormal or absent esophageal peristalsis and impaired relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) are typically seen on esophageal manometry. The advent of high resolution manometry (HRM) has allowed more precise diagnosis of achalasia, subtype designation, and differentiation from other esophageal motor disorders with an initial seminal publication in 2008 followed by further refinements of what has been termed the Chicago classification. Potential treatments include drugs, endoscopic botulinum toxin injection, balloon dilation, traditional surgery (usually laparoscopic Heller myotomy; LHM), and a novel, less invasive, natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) approach to Heller myotomy termed peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM). The first human POEM was performed in 2008, with the first publication appearing in 2010 and evidence now rapidly accumulating showing POEM to be comparable to traditional surgery in terms of clinical success and radiologic and manometric post-therapy outcomes. This review discusses the diagnosis and management of achalasia with particular emphasis on the recent developments of HRM and POEM, which arguably represent the most important advances in the field since the advent of laparoscopic Heller myotomy in the 1990s. PMID:27625387

  16. Nonbridging external fixation of distal radius fractures.

    PubMed

    Eichenbaum, Matthew D; Shin, Eon K

    2010-08-01

    Surgical management of distal radius fractures continues to evolve because of their high incidence in an increasingly active elderly population. Traditional radiocarpal external fixation relies on ligamentotaxis for fracture reduction but has several drawbacks. Nonbridging external fixation has evolved to provide early wrist mobility in the setting of anatomic fracture reduction. Several studies of the nonbridging technique have demonstrated satisfactory results in isolated nonbridging external fixation series and in comparison with traditional spanning external fixation. Nonbridging external fixation for surgical treatment of distal radius fractures can be technically demanding and requires at least 1 cm of intact volar cortex in the distal fracture fragment for successful implementation.

  17. Distal Peripheral Polyneuropathy in a Great Dane

    PubMed Central

    Henricks, Paul M.; Steiss, Jan; Petterson, Joanne D.

    1987-01-01

    A spayed female five year old Great Dane dog was diagnosed as having a chronic, progressive, symmetrical distal polyneuropathy and concurrent hypothyroidism. Axonal degeneration and segmental demyelination were evident in teased nerve fiber preparations. Clinical signs included hindlimb weakness and muscle atrophy of the head and distal limbs. Diagnosis was based on clinical, electrophysiological, and nerve and muscle biopsy findings. Thyroxine supplementation for one month was of no benefit. The etiology of the polyneuropathy was not established but several causes were considered. The extent of demyelination in our case was of greater magnitude than described in a previous report of a similar idiopathic distal symmetrical polyneuropathy in a Great Dane. PMID:17422753

  18. Influence of Preoperative Radiation Field on Postoperative Leak Rates in Esophageal Cancer Patients after Trimodality Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Juloori, Aditya; Tucker, Susan L.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Liao, Zhongxing; Correa, Arlene M.; Swisher, Stephen G.; Hofstetter, Wayne L.; Lin, Steven H.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Postoperative morbidities, such as anastomotic leaks, are common after trimodality therapy (chemoradiation followed by surgery) for esophageal cancer. We investigated for factors associated with an increased incidence of anastomotic leaks. Methods Data from 285 esophageal cancer patients treated from 2000–2011 with trimodality therapy was analyzed. Anastomotic location relative to preoperative radiation field was assessed using postoperative computed tomographic imaging. Logistic regression was used to evaluate for factors associated with any or clinically relevant (CR) (≥ grade 2) leaks. Results Overall anastomotic leak rate was 11% (31/285), and CR leak rate was 6% (17/285). Multivariable analysis identified body mass index (BMI) (OR 1.09, 95%CI 1.00–1.17; OR 1.11, 95%CI 1.01–1.22), three-field surgery (OR 10.01, 95%CI 3.83–26.21; OR 4.83, 95%CI 1.39–16.71), and within radiation field (“in-field”) anastomosis (OR 5.37, 95%CI 2.21–13.04; OR 8.63, 95%CI 2.90–25.65) as independent predictors of both all grade and CR leaks, respectively. While patients with distal esophageal tumors and Ivor-Lewis surgery had the lowest incidence of all grade (6.5%) and CR leaks (4.2%), most of the leaks were associated with the anastomosis constructed within the field of radiation (in-field: 39% and 30% versus out-of-field: 2.6% and 1.0%, respectively, for total and CR leaks, p<0.0001, Fisher’s Exact test). Conclusions Esophagogastric anastomosis placed within the preoperative radiation field was a very strong predictor for anastomotic leaks in esophageal cancer patients treated with trimodality therapy, among other factors. Surgical planning should include a critical evaluation of the preoperative radiation fields to ensure proper anastomotic placement after chemoradiation therapy. PMID:24736077

  19. The expression of tachykinin receptors in the human lower esophageal sphincter.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ke; Chen, Que T; Li, Jing H; Geng, Xian; Liu, Jun F; Li, He F; Feng, Yong; Li, Jia L; Drew, Paul A

    2016-03-01

    Mammalian tachykinins are a family of neuropeptides which are potent modulators of smooth muscle function with a significant contractile effect on human smooth muscle preparations. Tachykinins act via three distinct G protein-coupled neurokinin (NK) receptors, NK1, NK2 and NK3, coded by the genes TACR1, TACR2 and TACR3 respectively. The purpose of this paper was to measure the mRNA and protein expression of these receptors and their isoforms in the clasp and sling fibers of the human lower esophageal sphincter complex and circular muscle from the adjacent distal esophagus and proximal stomach. We found differences in expression between the different receptors within these muscle types, but the rank order of the receptor expression did not differ between the different muscle types. The rank order of the mRNA expression was TACR2 (α isoform)>TACR2 (β isoform)>TACR1 (short isoform)>TACR1 (long isoform)>TACR3. The rank order of the protein expression was NK2>NK1>NK3. This is the first report of the measurement of the transcript and protein expression of the tachykinin receptors and their isoforms in the muscles of the human lower esophageal sphincter complex. The results provide evidence that the tachykinin receptors could contribute to the regulation of the human lower esophageal sphincter, particularly the TACR2 α isoform which encodes the functional isoform of the tachykinin NK2 receptor was the most highly expressed of the tachykinin receptors in the muscles associated with the lower esophageal sphincter. PMID:26852958

  20. Feasibility of OCT to detect radiation-induced esophageal damage in small animal models (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelvehgaran, Pouya; Alderliesten, Tanja; Salguero, Javier; Borst, Gerben; Song, Ji-Ying; van Leeuwen, Ton G.; de Boer, Johannes F.; de Bruin, Daniel M.; van Herk, Marcel B.

    2016-03-01

    Lung cancer survival is poor and radiotherapy patients often suffer serious treatment side effects. The esophagus is particularly sensitive leading to reduced food intake or even fistula formation. Only few direct techniques exist to measure radiation-induced esophageal damage, for which knowledge is needed to improve the balance between risk of tumor recurrence and complications. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a minimally-invasive imaging technique that obtains cross-sectional, high-resolution (1-10µm) images and is capable of scanning the esophageal wall up to 2-3mm depth. In this study we investigated the feasibility of OCT to detect esophageal radiation damage in mice. In total 30 mice were included in 4 study groups (1 main and 3 control groups). Mice underwent cone-beam CT imaging for initial setup assessment and dose planning followed by single-fraction dose delivery of 4, 10, 16, and 20Gy on 5mm spots, spaced 10mm apart. Mice were repeatedly imaged using OCT: pre-irradiation and up to 3 months post-irradiation. The control groups received either OCT only, irradiation only, or were sham-operated. We used histopathology as gold standard for radiation-induced damage diagnosis. The study showed edema in both the main and OCT-only groups. Furthermore, radiation-induced damage was primarily found in the highest dose region (distal esophagus). Based on the histopathology reports we were able to identify the radiation-induced damage in the OCT images as a change in tissue scattering related to the type of induced damage. This finding indicates the feasibility and thereby the potentially promising role of OCT in radiation-induced esophageal damage assessment.

  1. Inflammatory response of esophageal epithelium in combined-type esophagitis in rats: a transcriptome analysis.

    PubMed

    Naito, Yuji; Kuroda, Masaaki; Uchiyama, Kazuhiko; Mizushima, Katsura; Akagiri, Satomi; Takagi, Tomohisa; Handa, Osamu; Kokura, Satoshi; Yoshida, Norimasa; Ichikawa, Hiroshi; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu

    2006-11-01

    Recent studies have shown that esophageal mucosal inflammatory response is involved in the pathophysiology of gastro-esophageal reflux disease. The aim of the present study was to identify specific gene expression profiles of the esophageal mucosa in a rat model of combined-type chronic reflux esophagitis. Esophagogastroduodenal anastomosis was carried out in male Wistar rats by anastomosing the jejunum to the gastroesophageal junction under diethyl-ether inhalation anesthesia. Esophageal epithelial cells were obtained from esophagi of rats by laser capture microdissection. Preparation of cRNA and target hybridization were performed according to the Affymetrix GeneChip eukaryotic small sample target labeling assay protocol. The gene expression profile was evaluated by the rat toxicology U34 GeneChip. Array data analysis was carried out using Affymetrix GeneChip operating software, ingenuity pathway analysis software, and Gene Springs software. A comparison between esophagitis and sham-operated rats 2 weeks after the operation revealed that 368 probes (36%) were significantly affected, i.e. 185 probes were up-regulated, and 183 probes were down-regulated, both at levels of at least 1.5-fold in the esophagitis rats. Ingenuity signal analysis of 207 affected probes revealed the interleukin-6 signaling pathway as the most significantly affected caronical pathway. In addition, the expression of many genes associated with cytokine and transcription factor was enhanced in the esophagitis rats. This transcriptome approach provided insight into genes and putative genetic pathways thought to be affected by stimulation with gastroduodenal refluxates.

  2. Villous adenoma of the distal appendix.

    PubMed

    Taylor, J V; Thomas, M G; Kelly, S; Sutton, R

    1997-04-01

    Villous adenoma confined to the distal appendix has not been previously reported in conjunction with acute apendicitis. The presence of an adenoma indicates a need for further investigation due to an association with neoplasia elsewhere.

  3. Evaluation of gastric tube with esophageal thermister (Thermosump).

    PubMed

    Koyama, K; Ochiai, R; Takahashi, J; Takeda, J; Sekiguchi, H; Fukushima, K

    1992-07-01

    The accuracy and the feasibility of esophageal temperature measured by a new gastric tube. Thermosump, which is incorporated with a esophageal thermister, was evaluated in anesthetized dogs (n = 6) and men (n = 59). In dogs, esophageal temperature measured by Thermosump was correlated well with the temperatures measured by the conventional esophageal thermister, and also by the pulmonary artery catheter (r = 0.98, 0.98, respectively). In anesthetized men, correlation between esophageal temperature by Thermosump and rectal, or bladder temperature was good during surgery of extremities (r = 0.81, 0.80, respectively). But during abdominal surgery, correlation between esophageal and bladder temperature was relatively poor (r = 0.50). Insertion of the tube, and suction of gastric fluid through the tube were easy without any complication. This newly developed gastric tube with a esophageal thermister was safe, and useful for measuring esophageal temperature.

  4. [FEATURES OF TREATMENT OF EOSINOPHILIC ESOPHAGITIS IN SCHOOLCHILDREN].

    PubMed

    Horodylovska, M I

    2015-01-01

    The inclusion of probiotic L. reuteri into the complex therapy of eosinophilic esophagitis significantly affect the outcomes of children--there was significant decrease in the number of eosinophils in the esophageal mucosa of children. PMID:26118052

  5. [Current status and perspectives of radiotherapy for esophageal cancer].

    PubMed

    Wu, S X; Wang, L H

    2016-09-23

    Esophageal cancer is one of the most common cancers in China. More than 80% of esophageal cancer patients are diagnosed at a late stage and are not eligible for surgery. Radiotherapy is one of the most important modalities in esophageal cancer treatment. Here we reviewed the advances in esophageal cancer radiotherapy and radiotherapy-based combined-modality therapy, such as optimization of radiation dose and target volume, application of precise radiotherapy technique and the integration of radiotherapy with chemotherapy and targeted therapy.

  6. Review of the Burden of Esophageal Cancer in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Siti-Azrin, Ab Hamid; Wan-Nor-Asyikeen, Wan Adnan; Norsa'adah, Bachok

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal cancer is one of the top leading causes of cancer-related deaths in Malaysia. To date, neither the prevalence nor incidence of esophageal cancer nationally have been recorded. Esophageal cancer remains a major and lethal health problem even if it is not common in Malaysia. The late presentation of esophageal cancer makes it a difficult and challenging medical problem. Therefore, more governmental and non-governmental organizations of Malaysia should emphasize primary and secondary prevention strategies. PMID:27644604

  7. Broken Esophageal Stent Successfully Treated by Interventional Radiology Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Zelenak, Kamil; Mistuna, Dusan; Lucan, Jaroslav; Polacek, Hubert

    2010-06-15

    Esophageal stent fractures occur quite rarely. A 61-year-old male patient was previously treated for rupture of benign stenosis, occurring after dilatation, by implanting an esophageal stent. However, a year after implantation, the patient suffered from dysphagia caused by the broken esophageal stent. He was treated with the interventional radiology technique, whereby a second implantation of the esophageal stent was carried out quite successfully.

  8. Concomitant herpetic and eosinophilic esophagitis--a causality dilemma.

    PubMed

    Monsanto, P; Almeida, N; Cipriano, M A; Gouveia, H; Sofia, C

    2012-09-01

    Eosinophilic and herpetic esophagitis are listed as independent causes of dysphagia, especially in young adult males. However, herpetic esophagitis rarely affects immunocompetent individuals. We report the case of a young, not immunocompromised patient, admitted because of severe dysphagia secondary to herpes simplex virus esophagitis. After complete resolution, an endoscopic and histologic reevaluation established the diagnosis of eosinophilic esophagitis. The potential association between the two conditions is discussed.

  9. Evaluation of urgent esophagectomy in esophageal perforation

    PubMed Central

    de AQUINO, José Luis Braga; de CAMARGO, José Gonzaga Teixeira; CECCHINO, Gustavo Nardini; PEREIRA, Douglas Alexandre Rizzanti; BENTO, Caroline Agnelli; LEANDRO-MERHI, Vânia Aparecida

    2014-01-01

    Background Esophageal trauma is considered one of the most severe lesions of the digestive tract. There is still much controversy in choosing the best treatment for cases of esophageal perforation since that decision involves many variables. The readiness of medical care, the patient's clinical status, the local conditions of the perforated segment, and the severity of the associated injuries must be considered for the most adequate therapeutic choice. Aim To demonstrate and to analyze the results of urgent esophagectomy in a series of patients with esophageal perforation. Methods A retrospective study of 31 patients with confirmed esophageal perforation. Most injuries were due to endoscopic dilatation of benign esophageal disorders, which had evolved with stenosis. The diagnosis of perforation was based on clinical parameters, laboratory tests, and endoscopic images. ‪The main surgical technique used was transmediastinal esophagectomy followed by reconstruction of the digestive tract in a second surgical procedure. Patients were evaluated for the development of systemic and local complications, especially for the dehiscence or stricture of the anastomosis of the cervical esophagus with either the stomach or the transposed colon. Results Early postoperative evaluation showed a survival rate of 77.1% in relation to the proposed surgery, and 45% of these patients presented no further complications. The other patients had one or more complications, being pulmonary infection and anastomotic fistula the most frequent. The seven patients (22.9%) who underwent esophageal resection 48 hours after the diagnosis died of sepsis. At medium and long-term assessments, most patients reported a good quality of life and full satisfaction regarding the surgery outcomes. Conclusions Despite the morbidity, emergency esophagectomy has its validity, especially in well indicated cases of esophageal perforation subsequent to endoscopic dilation for benign strictures. PMID:25626932

  10. Chemoprevention of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Stoner, Gary D. Wang Lishu; Chen Tong

    2007-11-01

    Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is responsible for approximately one-sixth of all cancer-related mortality worldwide. This malignancy has a multifactorial etiology involving several environmental, dietary and genetic factors. Since esophageal cancer has often metastasized at the time of diagnosis, current treatment modalities offer poor survival and cure rates. Chemoprevention offers a viable alternative that could well be effective against the disease. Clinical investigations have shown that primary chemoprevention of this disease is feasible if potent inhibitory agents are identified. The Fischer 344 (F-344) rat model of esophageal SCC has been used extensively to investigate the biology of the disease, and to identify chemopreventive agents that could be useful in human trials. Multiple compounds that inhibit tumor initiation by esophageal carcinogens have been identified using this model. These include several isothiocyanates, diallyl sulfide and polyphenolic compounds. These compounds influence the metabolic activation of esophageal carcinogens resulting in reduced genetic (DNA) damage. Recently, a few agents have been shown to inhibit the progression of preneoplastic lesions in the rat esophagus into tumors. These agents include inhibitors of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and c-Jun [a component of activator protein-1 (AP-1)]. Using a food-based approach to cancer prevention, we have shown that freeze-dried berry preparations inhibit both the initiation and promotion/progression stages of esophageal SCC in F-344 rats. These observations have led to a clinical trial in China to evaluate the ability of freeze-dried strawberries to influence the progression of esophageal dysplasia to SCC.

  11. [Acute necrotizing esophagitis (black esophagus) with secondary severe stenosis].

    PubMed

    Gómez, Álvaro A; Guerrero, Diego; Hani, Albis C; Cañadas, Raúl

    2015-01-01

    We report the case of a 67 years old patient with a history of diabetes mellitus, atrial fibrillation and chronic renal failure, who developed diabetic ketoacidosis and severe sepsis, later presenting an acute necrotizing esophagitis, and then a esophageal stenosis requiring treatment with self-expanding esophageal prosthesis with good clinical results. PMID:26802889

  12. Black esophagus (acute esophageal necrosis) after spinal anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Román Fernández, A; López Álvarez, A; Fossati Puertas, S; Areán González, I; Varela García, O; Viaño López, P M

    2014-01-01

    Acute esophagic necrosis or black esophagus is an uncommon clinical entity that owes its name to the endoscopic view of the necrotic esophageal mucosa. It is always related with a critical medical condition and usually has an ischemic etiology. We report the first case of acute esophageal necrosis after a spinal anesthetic for partial hip joint arthroplasty. We discuss the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms.

  13. [Esophageal reconstruction--using gastric tube instead of whole stomach].

    PubMed

    Chen, Keneng

    2014-09-01

    Stomach is the first choice for esophageal reconstruction following esophagectomy. In the earlier days, however, whole stomach pulling-up was the major surgery, which had some shortcomings. Recently, gastric tube has gained wide acceptance for esophageal reconstruction. This paper summarized the anatomical and physiological advantage of stomach, the disadvantage of whole stomach, and benefits of gastric tube for esophageal reconstruction.

  14. Extensive gastric varices demonstrated by technetium-99m red blood cell scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Shih, W.J.; Domstad, P.A.; Loh, F.G.; Pulmano, C.

    1987-04-01

    An alcohol abuse patient complicated by chronic pancreatitis had splenic vein thrombosis leading to gastric varices and underwent abdominal Tc-99m red blood cell scintigraphy. First pass study, sequential images up to 1 hour, and a 2.5 hour image showed abnormal radioactivity in the left side of the abdomen and midabdomen. In 24 hour images, the high level of activity in the left side persisted; in addition, there was accumulation of radioactivity in the cecum, ascending, transverse colon, the splenic flexure, and descending colon. A splenectomy was performed and during the surgical procedure, a large dilated vein in the greater omentum was noted. It is reemphasized that delayed imaging up to 24 hours is important when the results of earlier images are equivocal or negative.

  15. Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt vs endoscopic therapy in preventing variceal rebleeding

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Hui; Zhang, Meng; Pang, Jack XQ; Yan, Fei; Li, Ying-Chao; Lv, Liang-Shan; Yuan, Jia; Palikhe, Muna; Li, Wei-Zhi; Wang, Zhi-Lun

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To compare early use of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) with endoscopic treatment (ET) for the prophylaxis of recurrent variceal bleeding. METHODS: In-patient data were collected from 190 patients between January 2007 and June 2010 who suffured from variceal bleeding. Patients who were older than 75 years; previously received surgical treatment or endoscopic therapy for variceal bleeding; and complicated with hepatic encephalopathy or hepatic cancer, were excluded from this research. Thirty-five cases lost to follow-up were also excluded. Retrospective analysis was done in 126 eligible cases. Among them, 64 patients received TIPS (TIPS group) while 62 patients received endoscopic therapy (ET group). The relevant data were collected by patient review or telephone calls. The occurrence of rebleeding, hepatic encephalopathy or other complications, survival rate and cost of treatment were compared between the two groups. RESULTS: During the follow-up period (median, 20.7 and 18.7 mo in TIPS and ET groups, respectively), rebleeding from any source occurred in 11 patients in the TIPS group as compared with 31 patients in the ET group (Kaplan-Meier analysis and log-rank test, P = 0.000). Rebleeding rates at any time point (6 wk, 1 year and 2 year) in the TIPS group were lower than in the ET group (Bonferroni correction α’ = α/3). Eight patients in the TIPS group and 16 in the ET group died with the cumulative survival rates of 80.6% and 64.9% (Kaplan-Meier analysis and log-rank test χ2 = 4.864, P = 0.02), respectively. There was no significant difference between the two groups with respect to 6-wk survival rates (Bonferroni correction α’ = α/3). However, significant differences were observed between the two groups in the 1-year survival rates (92% and 79%) and the 2-year survival rates (89% and 64.9%) (Bonferroni correction α’ = α/3). No significant differences were observed between the two treatment groups in the occurrence of

  16. Conservative surgical treatment of reflux esophagitis and esophageal stricture.

    PubMed Central

    Herrington, J L; Wright, R S; Edwards, W H; Sawyers, J L

    1975-01-01

    During a recent 3-year period, 17 consecutive patients were seen with advanced fibrotic esophageal strictures secondary to alkaline-acid-pepsin reflux. From detailed preoperative evaluations alone it was impossible to determine whether therapy should consist of excisional surgery, esophagogastroplasty or intra-operative dilatation with correction of reflux. Only at operation could the length, extent, degree and severity of the stricture be fully determined. Each of the 17 patients was treated by controlled dilatation, coupled with an antireflux procedure. This simplified approach proved successful on strictures thought preoperatively to be undilatable. It appears that this conservative approach is applicable to many advanced strictures and excisional and plastic procedures should be reserved for those cases that prove unyielding to intraoperative dilatation. The true appraisal of a reflux stricture and the choice of surgical procedure is best determined at the operating table. Images Fig. 5A. Fig. 5B. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. Fig. 9. Fig. 10. Fig. 11. Fig. 12. Fig. 13. Fig. 14. Fig. 15. Fig. 16. Fig. 17. Fig. 18. Fig. 19. Fig. 20. Fig. 21. PMID:1130874

  17. Correlation of HVPG Level with CTP Score, MELD Score, Ascites, Size of Varices, and Etiology in Cirrhotic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ramanathan, Subramaniam; Khandelwal, Niranjan; Kalra, Naveen; Bhatia, Anmol; Dhiman, Radha K.; Duseja, Ajay K.; Chawla, Yogesh K.

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aim: This study intends to determine the correlation of a patient's hepatic venous pressure gradient (HVPG) measurement with six factors: Child–Turcotte–Pugh (CTP) score, model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) score, presence of ascites, size of varices, presence of variceal bleeding, and an etiology of cirrhosis. The study also aims to identify the predictors of higher HVPG measurements that can indirectly affect the prognosis of cirrhotic patients. Patients and Methods: Thirty patients diagnosed with cirrhosis were enrolled prospectively and each patient's HVPG level was measured by the transjugular catheterization of the right or middle hepatic vein. The wedged hepatic venous pressure (WHVP) and free hepatic venous pressure (FHVP) were measured using a 7F balloon catheter. The HVPG level was calculated as the difference between the WHVP and FHVP measurements. Results: The mean HVPG level was higher in alcoholic than in nonalcoholic cirrhosis (19.5 ± 7.3 vs 15.2 ± 4.5 mm Hg, P = 0.13). The mean HVPG was also higher in bleeders compared with nonbleeders (18.5 ± 5.3 vs 10.7 ± 3.1 mmHg, P = 0.001). Patients with varices had a higher mean HVPG level than those without varices (17.4 ± 5.8 vs 11.7 ± 3.9 mmHg, P = 0.04). The difference among the three categories of varices (small, large, and no varices) was statistically significant (P = 0.03). In addition, the mean HVPG level was higher in patients with ascites than in those without ascites (18.7 ± 4.7 vs 11 ± 5.3 mmHg, P = 0.002), and it was significantly higher in patients in CTP class C (21.8 ± 5.5 mmHg) as compared with those in CTP class B (16.9 ± 2.9 mmHg) and CTP class A (10.5 ± 4.1 mmHg; P ≤ 0.001). Conclusion: HVPG levels were significantly higher in patients in CTP class C as compared with those in CTP classes A and B, thereby indicating that an HVPG measurement correlates with severity of liver disease. A high HVPG level signifies more severe liver disease and can predict the

  18. Does adding variceal status to the Child-Turcotte-Pugh score improve its performance in predicting mortality in cirrhosis?

    PubMed

    Fan, Xiaoli; Wen, Maoyao; Shen, Yi; Wang, Wanqin; Yang, Xiaoxue; Yang, Li

    2016-09-01

    The Child-Turcotte-Pugh (CTP) score is widely used worldwide to predict outcomes across a broad spectrum of liver diseases, mainly cirrhosis. Portal hypertension and variceal bleed are significant causes of morbidity and mortality in cirrhotic patients, although the variceal status is not incorporated into the classical CTP score. We sought to determine whether the inclusion of variceal status, specifically the Child-Turcotte-Pugh-Kumar (CTPK) score, would improve the utility of the classical CTP score to predict the clinical outcomes of cirrhotic patients in a single but high-volume center in China.We retrospectively analyzed the records of 253 patients from January 1, 2014 to December 31, 2014 and performed follow-up for at least 12 months. The CTPK score and the CTP score were obtained as soon as possible after the patient's admission. Telephone follow-up was performed to assess survival situations.At 3 and 12 months, the cumulative number of deaths was 9.1% (n = 23) and 13.8% (n = 35), respectively. In the multivariate Cox proportional hazards models, the CTPK score was independently associated with death within 3 and 12 months after adjusting for potential confounders. The predictive ability related to the 2 scores was evaluated by the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC-ROC) respectively. At 3 months of enrollment, the AUCs of CTPK and CTP were 0.814 and 0.838, respectively. At 12 months of enrollment, the AUCs of CTPK and CTP were 0.825 and 0.840, respectively. No significant difference between time points was observed. Both the CTPK score and the CTP score displayed prognostic value in cirrhotic patients, as the Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that the CTPK score could clearly discriminate patients in the intermediate term (P < 0.001).The CTPK score provides reliable prediction of mortality in Chinese cirrhotic patients for both short-term and medium-term prognoses, although it is not superior to the CTP score. Therefore, the CTP

  19. Does adding variceal status to the Child–Turcotte–Pugh score improve its performance in predicting mortality in cirrhosis?

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Xiaoli; Wen, Maoyao; Shen, Yi; Wang, Wanqin; Yang, Xiaoxue; Yang, Li

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The Child–Turcotte–Pugh (CTP) score is widely used worldwide to predict outcomes across a broad spectrum of liver diseases, mainly cirrhosis. Portal hypertension and variceal bleed are significant causes of morbidity and mortality in cirrhotic patients, although the variceal status is not incorporated into the classical CTP score. We sought to determine whether the inclusion of variceal status, specifically the Child–Turcotte–Pugh–Kumar (CTPK) score, would improve the utility of the classical CTP score to predict the clinical outcomes of cirrhotic patients in a single but high-volume center in China. We retrospectively analyzed the records of 253 patients from January 1, 2014 to December 31, 2014 and performed follow-up for at least 12 months. The CTPK score and the CTP score were obtained as soon as possible after the patient's admission. Telephone follow-up was performed to assess survival situations. At 3 and 12 months, the cumulative number of deaths was 9.1% (n = 23) and 13.8% (n = 35), respectively. In the multivariate Cox proportional hazards models, the CTPK score was independently associated with death within 3 and 12 months after adjusting for potential confounders. The predictive ability related to the 2 scores was evaluated by the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC-ROC) respectively. At 3 months of enrollment, the AUCs of CTPK and CTP were 0.814 and 0.838, respectively. At 12 months of enrollment, the AUCs of CTPK and CTP were 0.825 and 0.840, respectively. No significant difference between time points was observed. Both the CTPK score and the CTP score displayed prognostic value in cirrhotic patients, as the Kaplan–Meier analysis showed that the CTPK score could clearly discriminate patients in the intermediate term (P < 0.001). The CTPK score provides reliable prediction of mortality in Chinese cirrhotic patients for both short-term and medium-term prognoses, although it is not superior to the CTP

  20. FOLFOX-6 Induction Chemotherapy Followed by Esophagectomy and Post-operative Chemoradiotherapy in Patients With Esophageal Adenocarcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-15

    Adenocarcinoma of the Esophagus; Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Adenocarcinoma of the Gastric Cardia; Stage IIIA Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIB Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIC Esophageal Cancer

  1. Influence of everyday bolus consistencies in different body positions on high-resolution esophageal pressure topography (HREPT) parameters.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Y; Go, J; Hashmi, S M; Valestin, J; Schey, R

    2015-04-01

    The standard protocol for esophageal manometry involves placing the patient in the supine position with head turned to left (supine head left [SHL]) while evaluating liquid bolus swallows. Routinely, semisolid or solid boluses are not evaluated. Currently, the daily American diet includes up to 40% solid or semisolid texture. Thus far, the data on the effect of different bolus on high-resolution esophageal pressure topography (HREPT) parameters are scarce. This study aims to evaluate the effect of every day bolus consistencies in different body positions on HREPT variables. HREPT was performed on healthy volunteers with a modified protocol including liquid swallows in the SHL position followed by applesauce (semisolid), cracker (solid), and marshmallow (soft solid) in three different positions (SHL, sitting, and standing). A total of 38 healthy adult subjects (22 males and 16 females, median age = 27, and mean body mass index = 25) were evaluated. The resting upper esophageal sphincter pressure was significantly different while subjects swallowed crackers, applesauce, and marshmallows in most positions compared with liquid SHL (P < 0.05). The lower esophageal sphincter, contractile front velocity, and distal contractile integral pressures did not differ in all different consistencies compared with SHL. The integrated relaxation period was significantly higher with solid bolus compared with liquid bolus only in SHL position. The intrabolus pressure was significantly different with solid and soft solid boluses in all postures compared to liquid SHL. The American diet consistency affects upper esophageal sphincter pressure and partially integrated relaxation period and intrabolus pressure in various positions. Semisolid bolus swallows do not cause substantial pressure changes and are safe for evaluation and maintaining adequate caloric intake in patients with dysphagia who cannot tolerate solids.

  2. Archaic and modern human distal humeral morphology.

    PubMed

    Yokley, Todd R; Churchill, Steven E

    2006-12-01

    The morphology of the proximal ulna has been shown to effectively differentiate archaic or premodern humans (such as Homo heidelbergensis and H. neanderthalensis) from modern humans (H. sapiens). Accordingly, the morphology of adjacent, articulating elements should be able to distinguish these two broad groups as well. Here we test the taxonomic utility of another portion of the elbow, the distal humerus, as a discriminator of archaic and modern humans. Principal components analysis was employed on a suite of log-raw and log-shape distal humeral measures to examine differences between Neandertal and modern human distal humeri. In addition, the morphological affinities of Broken Hill (Kabwe) E.898, an archaic human distal humeral fragment from the middle Pleistocene of Zambia, and five Pliocene and early Pleistocene australopith humeri were assessed. The morphometric analyses effectively differentiated the Neandertals from the other groups, while the Broken Hill humerus appears morphologically similar to modern human distal humeri. Thus, an archaic/modern human dichotomy-as previously reported for proximal ulnar morphology-is not supported with respect to distal humeral morphology. Relative to australopiths and modern humans, Neandertal humeri are characterized by large olecranon fossae and small distodorsal medial and lateral pillars. The seeming disparity in morphological affinities of proximal ulnae (in which all archaic human groups appear distinct from modern humans) and distal humeri (in which Neandertals appear distinct from modern humans, but other archaic humans do not) is probably indicative of a highly variable, possibly transitional population of which our knowledge is hampered by sample-size limitations imposed by the scarcity of middle-to-late Pleistocene premodern human fossils outside of Europe.

  3. Management of distal humeral coronal shear fractures

    PubMed Central

    Yari, Shahram S; Bowers, Nathan L; Craig, Miguel A; Reichel, Lee M

    2015-01-01

    Coronal shear fractures of the distal humerus are rare, complex fractures that can be technically challenging to manage. They usually result from a low-energy fall and direct compression of the distal humerus by the radial head in a hyper-extended or semi-flexed elbow or from spontaneous reduction of a posterolateral subluxation or dislocation. Due to the small number of soft tissue attachments at this site, almost all of these fractures are displaced. The incidence of distal humeral coronal shear fractures is higher among women because of the higher rate of osteoporosis in women and the difference in carrying angle between men and women. Distal humeral coronal shear fractures may occur in isolation, may be part of a complex elbow injury, or may be associated with injuries proximal or distal to the elbow. An associated lateral collateral ligament injury is seen in up to 40% and an associated radial head fracture is seen in up to 30% of these fractures. Given the complex nature of distal humeral coronal shear fractures, there is preference for operative management. Operative fixation leads to stable anatomic reduction, restores articular congruity, and allows initiation of early range-of-motion movements in the majority of cases. Several surgical exposure and fixation techniques are available to reconstruct the articular surface following distal humeral coronal shear fractures. The lateral extensile approach and fixation with countersunk headless compression screws placed in an anterior-to-posterior fashion are commonly used. We have found a two-incision approach (direct anterior and lateral) that results in less soft tissue dissection and better outcomes than the lateral extensile approach in our experience. Stiffness, pain, articular incongruity, arthritis, and ulnohumeral instability may result if reduction is non-anatomic or if fixation fails. PMID:25984515

  4. Esophageal surgery in minimally invasive era

    PubMed Central

    Bencini, Lapo; Moraldi, Luca; Bartolini, Ilenia; Coratti, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The widespread popularity of new surgical technologies such as laparoscopy, thoracoscopy and robotics has led many surgeons to treat esophageal diseases with these methods. The expected benefits of minimally invasive surgery (MIS) mainly include reductions of postoperative complications, length of hospital stay, and pain and better cosmetic results. All of these benefits could potentially be of great interest when dealing with the esophagus due to the potentially severe complications that can occur after conventional surgery. Moreover, robotic platforms are expected to reduce many of the difficulties encountered during advanced laparoscopic and thoracoscopic procedures such as anastomotic reconstructions, accurate lymphadenectomies, and vascular sutures. Almost all esophageal diseases are approachable in a minimally invasive way, including diverticula, gastro-esophageal reflux disease, achalasia, perforations and cancer. Nevertheless, while the limits of MIS for benign esophageal diseases are mainly technical issues and costs, oncologic outcomes remain the cornerstone of any procedure to cure malignancies, for which the long-term results are critical. Furthermore, many of the minimally invasive esophageal operations should be compared to pharmacologic interventions and advanced pure endoscopic procedures; such a comparison requires a difficult literature analysis and leads to some confounding results of clinical trials. This review aims to examine the evidence for the use of MIS in both malignancies and more common benign disease of the esophagus, with a particular emphasis on future developments and ongoing areas of research. PMID:26843913

  5. The Tumor Microenvironment in Esophageal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Eric W.; Karakasheva, Tatiana A.; Hicks, Philip D.; Bass, Adam J.; Rustgi, Anil K.

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal cancer is a deadly disease, ranking sixth among all cancers in mortality. Despite incremental advances in diagnostics and therapeutics, esophageal cancer still carries a poor prognosis, and thus there remains a need to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying this disease. There is accumulating evidence that a comprehensive understanding of the molecular composition of esophageal cancer requires attention to not only tumor cells but also the tumor microenvironment, which contains diverse cell populations, signaling factors, and structural molecules that interact with tumor cells and support all stages of tumorigenesis. In esophageal cancer, environmental exposures can trigger chronic inflammation, which leads to constitutive activation of pro-inflammatory signaling pathways that promote survival and proliferation. Anti-tumor immunity is attenuated by cell populations such as myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) and regulatory T cells (Tregs), as well as immune checkpoints like programmed death-1 (PD-1). Other immune cells such as tumor-associated macrophages can have other pro-tumorigenic functions, including the induction of angiogenesis and tumor cell invasion. Cancer-associated fibroblasts secrete growth factors and alter the extracellular matrix (ECM) to create a tumor niche and enhance tumor cell migration and metastasis. Further study of how these TME components relate to the different stages of tumor progression in each esophageal cancer subtype will lead to development of novel and specific TME-targeting therapeutic strategies, which offer considerable potential especially in the setting of combination therapy. PMID:26923327

  6. Pharmacological Management of Esophageal Food Bolus Impaction

    PubMed Central

    Khayyat, Yasir Mohammed

    2013-01-01

    Background. Soft esophageal bolus impaction is an emergency that requires skilled endoscopic removal if persistent obstructive symptoms do not resolve spontaneously after careful observation. Expedited care of these patients is crucial to avoid respiratory and mechanical complications. Other possible options for management include medical agents used to manage it prior to performing endoscopy if access to endoscopy was not available or declined by the patient. Aim. To review the available pharmacological and other nonmedicinal options and their mechanism of relief for soft esophageal impaction. Method. Pubmed, Medline and Ovid were used for search of MESH terms pertinent including “foreign body, esophageal, esophageal bolus and medical” for pharmacological and non medicinial agents used for management of esophageal soft bolus impaction as well as manual review of the cross-references. Results. Several agents were identified including Buscopan, Glucagon, nitrates, calcium channel blockers, and papaveretum. Non medicinal agents are water, effervescent agents, and papain. No evidence was found to suggest preference or effectiveness of use of a certain pharmacological agent compared to others. Buscopan, Glucagon, benzodiazepines, and nitrates were studied extensively and may be used in selected patients with caution. Use of papain is obsolete in management of soft bolus impaction. PMID:23738071

  7. Distal protection for treatment of complete cervical internal carotid occlusion.

    PubMed

    Hungerford, John P; Chaudry, Imran; Turner, Raymond; Turk, Aquilla S

    2012-01-01

    Distal protection devices (DPD) have been advocated for carotid artery stenting to reduce the risk of distal embolization. These devices were designed for deployment in the straight cervical segment of the internal carotid artery. We present a case of total cervical carotid occlusion recanalized with the aid of a distal protection device deployed 'distally' in the intracranial internal carotid artery.

  8. Sextant of Sapphires for Molar Distalization

    PubMed Central

    Palla, Yudistar Venkata; Ganugapanta, Vivek Reddy

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Space analysis quantifies the amount of crowding within the arches estimating the severity of space discrepancy. The space gaining procedures include extraction and non-extraction procedures like expansion, proximal stripping and molar distalization. Aim To identify features seen in molar distalization cases. Materials and Methods The sample size comprised 20 patients in whom molar distalization was decided as the treatment plan. The study models and lateral cephalograms of all the patients were taken. Occlusograms were obtained. Model analysis and cephalometric analysis were performed. Descriptive statistical analysis like mean, standard deviation, standard error and mode were done. Results The parameters in Question gave following results. The Bolton analysis showed anterior mandibular excess with mean value of 1.56mm±1.07. The first order discrepancy between maxillary central and lateral incisors was 5±1.95. The premolar rotation showed mean value of 16.58±5.12. The molar rotation showed the value of 7.66±2.26. The nasolabial angle showed the mean of 101.25±8.7 IMPA of 101.4±5.74. Conclusion The six features studied in molar distalization cases [First order discrepancy between upper central and lateral incisors; Rotation of premolars and molars; Bolton’s discrepancy in anterior dentition; Average to horizontal growth pattern; Proclined lower incisors and Obtuse nasolabial angle] can be taken as patterns seen in molar distalization cases and considered as a valid treatment plan. PMID:27656572

  9. Failure of distal biceps repair by gapping

    PubMed Central

    Copas, David; Watts, Adam C

    2016-01-01

    Background We describe the clinical, radiological and surgical findings of failed distal biceps repair by gapping and report the functional outcomes following revision repair. Methods A retrospective review of five consecutive patients was conducted. Patients presented with radial-sided forearm pain after their distal biceps fixation. All patients had less than 5 cm of retraction of the biceps muscle belly, a palpable tendon although the manoeuvre was painful with weakness on resisted supination. Flexed abducted supinated magnetic resonance imaging (FABS MRI) showed a gap between the distal end of the tendon and the footprint on the radial tuberosity. Results Mean FEA score at presentation was 44/100 (35 to 49). Mean time to re-operation was 18 months (range 4 months to 36 months). At revision, the distal end of the tendon was retracted and not making contact with the bone. All cases were revised to an in-bone endobutton repair. Mean postoperative Functional Elbow Assessment (FEA) scores undertaken at a mean of 14 months (range 5 months to 22 months) after revision improved to 95/100 (90 to 100). Conclusions Patients presenting with persistent radial sided forearm pain and weakness on provocative testing after distal biceps repair with a seemingly intact repair should be investigated with FABS MRI to look for evidence of failure of repair by gapping. Revision repair with an anatomic in-bone technique can lead to good results. PMID:27583018

  10. Endoscopic treatment of esophageal achalasia

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, Dario; Maione, Francesco; D’Alessandro, Alessandra; Sarnelli, Giovanni; De Palma, Giovanni D

    2016-01-01

    Achalasia is a motility disorder of the esophagus characterized by dysphagia, regurgitation of undigested food, chest pain, weight loss and respiratory symptoms. The most common form of achalasia is the idiopathic one. Diagnosis largely relies upon endoscopy, barium swallow study, and high resolution esophageal manometry (HRM). Barium swallow and manometry after treatment are also good predictors of success of treatment as it is the residue symptomatology. Short term improvement in the symptomatology of achalasia can be achieved with medical therapy with calcium channel blockers or endoscopic botulin toxin injection. Even though few patients can be cured with only one treatment and repeat procedure might be needed, long term relief from dysphagia can be obtained in about 90% of cases with either surgical interventions such as laparoscopic Heller myotomy or with endoscopic techniques such pneumatic dilatation or, more recently, with per-oral endoscopic myotomy. Age, sex, and manometric type by HRM are also predictors of responsiveness to treatment. Older patients, females and type II achalasia are better after treatment compared to younger patients, males and type III achalasia. Self-expandable metallic stents are an alternative in patients non responding to conventional therapies. PMID:26839644

  11. An Overview of the Diagnosis and Management of Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Singla, Manish B; Moawad, Fouad J

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic inflammatory condition characterized by symptoms of esophageal dysfunction and eosinophilic infiltration of the esophageal mucosa. The diagnosis requires esophageal biopsies demonstrating at least 15 eosinophils per high-powered field following a course of high-dose proton pump inhibitors. Management of EoE consists of the three Ds: drugs, dietary therapy, and esophageal dilation. In this review, we discuss the epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of EoE to include the role of emerging therapies. PMID:26986655

  12. Congenital esophageal stenosis owing to tracheobronchial remnants

    PubMed Central

    Rebelo, Priscila Guyt; Ormonde, João Victor C.; Ormonde, João Baptista C.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To emphasize the need of an accurate diagnosis of congenital esophageal stenosis due to tracheobronchial remnants, since its treatment differs from other types of congenital narrowing. CASE DESCRIPTION Four cases of lower congenital esophageal stenosis due to tracheobronchial remnants, whose definitive diagnosis was made by histopathology. Except for the last case, in which a concomitant anti-reflux surgery was not performed, all had a favorable outcome after resection and anastomosis of the esophagus. COMMENTS The congenital esophageal stenosis is an intrinsic narrowing of the organâ€(tm)s wall associated with its structural malformation. The condition can be caused by tracheobronchial remnants, fibromuscular stenosis or membranous diaphragm and the first symptom is dysphagia after the introduction of solid food in the diet. The first-choice treatment to tracheobronchial remnants cases is the surgical resection and end-to-end anastomosis of the esophagus. PMID:24142326

  13. Minimally invasive surgery for esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Santillan, Alfredo A; Farma, Jeffrey M; Meredith, Kenneth L; Shah, Nilay R; Kelley, Scott T

    2008-10-01

    Esophageal cancer represents a major public health problem worldwide. Several minimally invasive esophagectomy (MIE) techniques have been described and represent a safe alternative for the surgical management of esophageal cancer in selected centers with high volume and expertise in them. This article reviews the most recent and largest series evaluating MIE techniques. Recent larger series have shown MIE to be equivalent in postoperative morbidity and mortality rates to conventional surgery. MIE has been associated with less blood loss, less postoperative pain, and decreased intensive care unit and hospital length of stay compared with conventional surgery. Despite limited data, conventional surgery and MIE have shown no significant difference in survival, stage for stage. The myriad of MIE techniques complicates the debate of defining the optimal surgical approach for treating esophageal cancer. Randomized controlled trials comparing MIE with conventional open esophagectomy are needed to clarify the ideal procedure with the lowest postoperative morbidity, best quality of life after surgery, and long-term survival.

  14. Endoscopic options for early stage esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Pari M.

    2015-01-01

    Surgery has traditionally been the preferred treatment for early stage esophageal cancer. Recent advances in endoscopic treatments have been shown to be effective and safe. Endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) and endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) allow endoscopists to remove small, superficial lesions, providing tumor specimen that can be examined for accurate pathologic tumor staging and assessment of adequacy of resection. Endoscopic ablation procedures, including photodynamic therapy (PDT) and radio frequency ablation (RFA), have also been shown to safely and effectively treat esophageal dysplasia and early stage neoplasia, with excellent long-term disease control. Both approaches are becoming more widely available around the world, and provide an alternative, safe, low risk strategy for treating early stage disease, making combined endoscopic therapy the recommended treatment of choice for early stage esophageal cancers. PMID:25642334

  15. Novel predictors for immediate puncture site bleed during endoscopic glue injection for gastric varices without using lipiodol.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekar, T S; Menachery, John; Gokul, B J; Murugesh, M; Vivek Sandeep, T C

    2013-05-01

    Endoscopic obturation of gastric varices using tissue adhesive glues like cyanoacrylate is an accepted modality for the treatment of gastric varices. This study was undertaken to determine whether it was possible to predict immediate puncture site bleed on withdrawal of needle catheter during endoscopic glue injection without lipiodol. We prospectively analyzed 100 consecutive patients with cirrhosis who underwent glue injection. Glue injection was successful in all the patients. Immediate puncture site bleed was observed in only four cases and all of them correlated with negative catheter pull sign and positive red catheter sign. Catheter pull sign and red catheter sign were excellent predictors of immediate puncture site bleed during endoscopic glue injection and should be routinely tested.

  16. Repeated pancreatitis-induced splenic vein thrombosis leads to intractable gastric variceal bleeding: A case report and review.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shan-Hong; Zeng, Wei-Zheng; He, Qian-Wen; Qin, Jian-Ping; Wu, Xiao-Ling; Wang, Tao; Wang, Zhao; He, Xuan; Zhou, Xiao-Lei; Fan, Quan-Shui; Jiang, Ming-De

    2015-10-16

    Gastric varices (GV) are one of the most common complications for patients with portal hypertension. Currently, histoacryl injection is recommended as the initial treatment for bleeding of GV, and this injection has been confirmed to be highly effective for most patients in many studies. However, this treatment might be ineffective for some types of GV, such as splenic vein thrombosis-related localized portal hypertension (also called left-sided, sinistral, or regional portal hypertension). Herein, we report a case of repeated pancreatitis-induced complete splenic vein thrombosis that led to intractable gastric variceal bleeding, which was treated by splenectomy. We present detailed radiological and pathological data and blood rheology analysis (the splenic artery - after a short gastric vein or stomach vein - gastric coronary vein - portal vein). The pathophysiology can be explained by the abnormal direction of blood flow in this patient. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case for which detailed pathology and blood rheology data are available.

  17. Fabrication and Evaluation of a Noncompliant Molar Distalizing Appliance: Bonded Molar Distalizer

    PubMed Central

    Sodagar, A.; Ahmad Akhoundi, M. S.; Rafighii, A.; Arab, S.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Attempts to treat class II malocclusions without extraction in non-compliant patients have led to utilization of intraoral molar distalizing appliances. The purpose of this study was to investigate dental and skeletal effects of Bonded Molar Distalizer (BMD) which is a simple molar distalizing appliance. Materials and Methods Sixteen patients (12 girls, four boys) with bilateral half-cusp class II molar relationship, erupted permanent second molars and normal or vertical growth pattern were selected for bilateral distalization of maxillary molars via BMD. The screws were activated every other day, alternately. Lateral cephalograms and study models were obtained before treatment and after 11 weeks activation of the appliance. Results Significant amounts of molar distalization, molar distal tipping and anchorage loss were observed. The mean maxillary first molar distal movement was 1.22±0.936 mm with a distal tipping of 2.97±3.74 degrees in 11 weeks. The rate of distal movement was 0.48 mm per month. Reciprocal mesial movement of the first premolars was 2.26±1.12 mm with a mesial tipping of 4.25±3.12 degrees. Maxillary incisors moved 3.55±1.46 mm and tipped 9.87±5.03 degrees mesially. Lower anterior face height (LAFH) decreased 1.28±1.36 mm. Conclusion BMD is appropriate for distalizing maxillary molars, especially in patients with critical LAFH, although significant amounts of anchorage loss occur using this appliance. PMID:22457837

  18. Treatment Options for Distal Femur Fractures.

    PubMed

    von Keudell, Arvind; Shoji, Kristin; Nasr, Michael; Lucas, Robert; Dolan, Robert; Weaver, Michael J

    2016-08-01

    Despite advances in implant design, the management of distal femur fractures remains challenging. Fracture comminution and intra-articular extension can make it difficult to obtain an adequate reduction while preserving the soft tissue attachments to bone fragments to allow for bone healing. Many implant manufacturers have developed optimal anatomically contoured, distal femoral locking plates with percutaneous guides. This environment allows for the application of lateral locked plates in a biologically friendly manner. Although initial reports had high success rates, more recently a high rate of nonunion has been found, particularly in elderly patients. Limited literature is available for the treatment of patients with osteoporotic bone and associated ipsilateral total knee replacement and hip replacement. We present a patient with a distal femur fracture with significant comminution in the setting of an ipsilateral total hip replacement. PMID:27441931

  19. [Bleeding oesophageal varices in a seven-year-old boy supposedly as a late complication to neonatal umbilical venous catheter].

    PubMed

    Rogvi, Rasmus Á; Møller, Fie Gregersen; Bergström, Anita; Ifaoui, Inge Bøtker; Jørgensen, Marianna Hørby

    2016-05-30

    A seven-year-old boy was admitted with haematemesis. The boy was originally born at 27 weeks' gestational age. His neonatal period had been complicated by sepsis, for which he was treated with antibiotics through an umbilical venous catheter (UVC). A gastroscopy showed grade III oesophageal varices with bleeding. He was examined thoroughly for other causes of portal hypertension, but none were found. Portal hypertension caused by UVC in the neonatal period is a rare but very serious complication to neonatal UVC.

  20. N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate, iso-amyl-2-cyanoacrylate and hypertonic glucose with 72% chromated glycerin in gastric varices

    PubMed Central

    Elwakil, Reda; Montasser, Mohamed Fawzy; Abdelhakam, Sara M; Ibrahim, Wesam A

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To compare n-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate, iso-amyl-2-cyanoacrylate and a mixture of 72% chromated glycerin with hypertonic glucose solution in management of gastric varices. METHODS: Ninety patients with gastric varices presented to Endoscopy Unit of Ain Shams University Hospital were included. They were randomly allocated into three groups; each group included 30 patients treated with intravariceal sclerosant injections in biweekly sessions till complete obturation of gastric varices; Group I (n-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate; Histoacryl®), Group II (iso-amyl-2-cyanoacrylate; Amcrylate®) and Group III (mixture of 72% chromated glycerin; Scleremo® with glucose solution 25%). All the procedures were performed electively without active bleeding. Recruited patients were followed up for 3 mo. RESULTS: 26% of Scleremo group had bleeding during puncture vs 3.3% in each of the other two groups with significant difference, (P < 0.05). None of Scleremo group had needle obstruction vs 13.3% in each of the other two groups with no significant difference, (P > 0.05). Rebleeding occurred in 13.3% of Histoacryl and Amcrylate groups vs 0% in Scleremo group with no significant difference. The in hospital mortality was 6.6% in both Histoacryl and Amcrylate groups, while it was 0% in Scleremo group with no significant difference. In the first and second sessions, the amount of Scleremo needed for obturation was significantly high, while the amount of Histoacryl was significantly low. Scleremo was the less costly of the two treatments. CONCLUSION: All used sclerosant substances showed efficacy and success in management of gastric varices with no significant differences except in total amount, cost and bleeding during puncture. PMID:25901221

  1. An Unusual Case of Gastrointestinal Bleeding from Isolated Gallbladder Varices in a Patient with Pancreatic Cancer Complicated by Portal Biliopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kubachev, Kubach; Abdullaev, Elbrus; Zarkua, Nonna; Abdullaev, Abakar; Fokin, Artur

    2016-01-01

    Portal biliopathy is the complex of abnormalities of extrahepatic and intrahepatic bile ducts, cystic duct, and gallbladder, arising as a result of extrahepatic portal vein obstruction and noncirrhotic portal fibrosis, which can be caused by coagulopathies, tumors, inflammation, postoperative complications, dehydration, and neonatal umbilical vein catheterization. We report a case of a 55-year-old male patient with the history of pancreatic cancer and cholecystoenteric anastomosis presenting with gastrointestinal bleeding from gallbladder varices via the anastomosis. PMID:27800195

  2. [Endoscopic ultrasonic diagnosis of esophageal cancer].

    PubMed

    Kouzu, T; Ogino, Y; Isono, K

    1986-08-01

    Endoscopic Ultrasonography (EUS) has been developed rapidly and is becoming a new routine examination of the digestive diseases. In this thesis, the usefulness of EUS with reference to the diagnosis of the depth and the margins of the cancer invasion and the metastatic lymph nodes is described. Furthermore, the judgment of the efficacy of the combined therapy including radiotherapy, chemotherapy and immunotherapy will be possible with EUS. The information from EUS is useful to determine the treatment plan of esophageal cancer. Therefore, EUS is expected to become a preoperative necessary examination of cases with esophageal cancer. PMID:3537360

  3. Eosinophilic esophagitis in adults: An update

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Monjur

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis is a worldwide chronic allergic disease of the esophagus. In the last decade, there is an epidemic of this entity in the western world. Mostly seen in children and young adults, patients present with dysphagia or food impaction in the emergency room. Characteristic endoscopic findings, esophageal eosinophilia and non-responsiveness to proton pump inhibitors help make the diagnosis. Avoidance of food allergens, administration of steroidal anti-inflammatory medications and dilation of the esophagus are the mainstays of treatment. Investigations are ongoing for mucosal healing and optimum maintenance treatment. PMID:27158535

  4. Esophageal web in Plummer-Vinson syndrome.

    PubMed

    Okamura, H; Tsutsumi, S; Inaki, S; Mori, T

    1988-09-01

    In Plummer-Vinson syndrome, esophagography often reveals a web at the anterior wall of the cervical esophagus. The pathogenesis of the esophageal web and the cause of dysphagia in this syndrome were investigated radiographically, endoscopically, manometrically, and histologically. It was considered that the web seen in the esophagogram may have been formed due to the restriction of dilation of the esophageal wall, which results from repetitive inflammation and the subsequent healing process. Dysphagia in this syndrome may be explained by a decrease in swallowing power. Iron deficiency anemia may play the main role in the above histological changes and the resulting decrease in swallowing power.

  5. Distal Humerus Fractures: Open Reduction Internal Fixation.

    PubMed

    Mighell, Mark A; Stephens, Brent; Stone, Geoffrey P; Cottrell, Benjamin J

    2015-11-01

    Distal humerus fractures are challenging injuries for the upper extremity surgeon. However, recent techniques in open reduction internal fixation have been powerful tools in getting positive outcomes. To get such results, the surgeon must be aware of how to properly use these techniques in their respective practices. The method of fixation depends on the fracture, taking the degree of comminution and the restoration of the columns and articular surface into account. This article helps surgeons understand the concepts behind open reduction internal fixation of the distal humerus and makes them aware of pitfalls that may lead to negative results.

  6. Exposure of the forearm and distal radius.

    PubMed

    Klausmeyer, Melissa A; Mudgal, Chaitanya

    2014-11-01

    Approaches to the forearm use internervous planes to allow adequate bone exposure and prevent muscle denervation. The Henry approach utilizes the plane between muscles supplied by the median and radial nerves. The Thompson approach utilizes the plane between muscles supplied by the radial and posterior interosseous nerves. The distal radius may be approached volarly. The extended flexor carpi radialis approach is useful for intraarticular fractures, subacute fractures, and malunions. The distal radius can be approached dorsally by releasing the third dorsal compartment and continuing the dissection subperiosteally. Choice of approach depends on the injury pattern and the need for exposure. PMID:25440071

  7. Ectopic Jejunal Variceal Rupture in a Liver Transplant Recipient Successfully Treated With Percutaneous Transhepatic Coil Embolization: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Abe, Satoru; Akamatsu, Nobuhisa; Hoshikawa, Mayumi; Shirata, Chikara; Sakamoto, Yoshihiro; Hasegawa, Kiyoshi; Kokudo, Norihiro

    2015-11-01

    Here we present the rupture of ectopic jejunal varices developing in a liver transplant recipient without portal hypertension, which was successfully treated with percutaneous transhepatic coil embolization.A 48-year-old man with massive melena was admitted to our department. He had undergone liver transplantation for hepatitis B virus-related liver cirrhosis 8 months before, and his postoperative course was satisfactory except for an acute cellular rejection. No evidence of bleeding was detected by upper endoscopy or colonoscopy, but dynamic multidetector computed tomography of the whole abdomen revealed an intestinal varix protruding into the lumen of the jejunum with suspected extravasation. There was no evidence of portal venous stenosis or thrombosis. Immediately upon diagnosis of the ruptured ectopic jejunal varix, percutaneous transhepatic coil embolization was performed, achieving complete hemostasis. The portal venous pressure measured during the procedure was within normal limits. He was discharged from the hospital 11 days after embolization and remained in stable condition without re-bleeding 6 months after discharge.This is the first report of an ectopic intestinal variceal rupture in an uneventful liver transplant recipient that was successfully treated with interventional percutaneous transhepatic coil embolization. Clinicians encountering liver transplant recipients with melena should be aware of the possibility of late-onset rupture of ectopic varices, even in those having an uneventful post-transplant course without portal hypertension. PMID:26632745

  8. A stable acentric marker chromosome: Possible existence of an intercalary ancient centromere at distal 8p

    SciTech Connect

    Ohashi, Hirofumi; Fukushima, Yoshimitsu; Wakui, Keiko; Ogawa, Kioyshi; Okano, Tetsuroh; Niikawa, Norio

    1994-12-01

    A centromere is considered to be an essential chromosomal component where microtubule-kinetochore interaction occurs to segregate sister chromatids faithfully and acentric chromosomes are unstable and lost through cell divisions. We report a novel marker chromosome that was acentric but stable through cell divisions. The patient was a 2-year-old girl with mental retardation, patent ductus arteriosus, and mild dysmorphic features. G-banded chromosome analysis revealed that an additional small marker chromosome was observed in all 100 cells examined. By the reverse-chromosome-painting method, the marker was found to originate from the distal region of 8p, and a subsequent two-color FISH analysis with cosmid probes around the region revealed that the marker was an inverted duplication interpreted as 8pter {yields} p23.1::p23.1 {yields} 8pter. No centromeric region was involved in the marker. By FISH, no {alpha}-satellite sequence was detected on the marker, while a telomere sequence was detected at each end. Anti-kinetochore immunostaining, using a serum from a patient with CREST (calcinosis, Raynaud syndrome, esophageal dismotility, sclerodactyly, and telangiectasia) syndrome, showed a pair of signals on the marker, which indicated that a functional kinetochore was present on the marker. The analysis of this patient might suggest the possibility that an ancient centromere sequence exists at distal 8p (8p23.1-pter) and was activated through the chromosome rearrangement in the patient.

  9. Endoscopic management of bleeding gastric varices with N-butyl, 2-cyanoacrylate glue injection in children with non-cirrhotic portal hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Poddar, Ujjal; Borkar, Vibhor; Yachha, Surender Kumar; Srivastava, Anshu

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: In view of the paucity of literature, we carried out this audit to evaluate the safety and efficacy of N- butyl, 2-cynoacrylate glue injection therapy in secondary prophylaxis of gastric varices in children. Patients and methods: Consecutive children (≤ 18 years) with non-cirrhotic portal hypertension who presented with bleeding from gastric varices and who had undergone cyanoacrylate glue injection therapy were included. They were evaluated for safety, efficacy and complications. Their long-term outcomes and follow-up were recorded. Results: Over 11 years, 28 children with median age 13 (range, 8 to 18) years (68 % boys), underwent cyanoacrylate glue injection for bleeding gastric varices. In 25 (89 %) cases, extrahepatic portal venous obstruction was the etiology and isolated gastric varices were the source of the bleeding. Primary and secondary gastric variceal bleeding was seen in 11 (39 %) and 17 (61 %) children, respectively. A total 36 sessions with median volume of 2 (range, 1 – 5) mL of glue injections were required (2 sessions in 8 children). Hemostasis was achieved in all and 57 % had gastric variceal obliteration. Two children had early (< 1 month) rebleeding and 2 children had late rebleeding. One child had gastric ulcer. Over a median follow-up of 24 (8 – 98) months, 14 children underwent surgery (12 porto-systemic shunt), 2 were lost to follow-up, 1 died and there was no recurrence of bleeding in the remaining 11. Conclusions: Cyanoacrylate glue injection is highly effective mode of secondary prophylaxis of bleeding gastric varices in children with non-cirrhotic portal hypertension. Rebleeding occurred in 14 % but treatment-related complications were uncommon. However, a large controlled clinical trial is required to confirm our findings. PMID:27757413

  10. Comparison of Maxillary Molar Distalization with an Implant-Supported Distal Jet and a Traditional Tooth-Supported Distal Jet Appliance

    PubMed Central

    Cozzani, Mauro; Pasini, Marco; Zallio, Francesco; Ritucci, Robert; Mutinelli, Sabrina; Mazzotta, Laura; Giuca, Maria Rita; Piras, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    Aim. To investigate and compare the efficiency of two appliances for molar distalization: the bone-anchored distal screw (DS) and the traditional tooth-supported distal jet (DJ) for molar distalization and anchorage loss. Methods. Tests (18 subjects) were treated with a DS and controls (18 subjects) were treated with a DJ. Lateral cephalograms were obtained before and at the end of molar distalization and were analysed. Shapiro Wilk test, unpaired t-test, and Wilcoxon rank-sum test were applied according to values distribution. The α level was fixed at 0.05. Results. Maxillary first molars were successfully distalized into a Class I relationship in all patients. The mean molar distalization and treatment time were similar in both groups. The DS group exhibited a spontaneous distalization (2.1 ± 0.9 mm) of the first premolar with control of anchorage loss, distal tipping, extrusion, and skeletal changes. Conclusions. The DS is an adequate compliance-free distalizing appliance that can be used safely for the correction of Class II malocclusions. In comparison to the traditional DJ, the DS enables not only a good rate of molar distalization, but also a spontaneous distalization of the first premolars. PMID:25018770

  11. Family history of esophageal cancer increases the risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tiantian; Cheng, Hongwei; Chen, Xingdong; Yuan, Ziyu; Yang, Xiaorong; Zhuang, Maoqiang; Lu, Ming; Jin, Li; Ye, Weimin

    2015-01-01

    A population-based case-control was performed to explore familial aggregation of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Family history of cancer was assessed by a structured questionnaire, and from which 2 cohorts of relatives of cases and controls were reconstructed. Unconditional logistic regression and Cox proportional hazards regression were applied for case-control design and reconstructed cohort design, respectively. We observed a close to doubled risk of ESCC associated with a positive family history of esophageal cancer among first degree relatives (odds ratio [OR] = 1.85, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.42-2.41), after adjusting age, sex, family size and other confounders. The excess risks of ESCC increased with the increasing of first-degree relatives affected by esophageal cancer (p < 0.001). In particular, those individuals whose both parents with esophageal cancer had an 8-fold excess risk of ESCC (95% CI: 1.74-36.32). The reconstructed cohort analysis showed that the cumulative risk of esophageal cancer to age 75 was 12.2% in the first-degree relatives of cases and 7.0% in those of controls (hazard ratio = 1.91, 95% CI: 1.54-2.37). Our results suggest family history of esophageal cancer significantly increases the risk for ESCC. Future studies are needed to understand how the shared genetic susceptibility and/or environmental exposures contribute to the observed excess risk.

  12. PPI-responsive esophageal eosinophilia and eosinophilic esophagitis: More similarities than differences

    PubMed Central

    Eluri, Swathi; Dellon, Evan S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review To discuss the clinical, endoscopic, and histologic features, pathogenesis, and disease mechanisms of proton pump inhibitor–responsive esophageal eosinophilia (PPI-REE), and to highlight similarities and differences with eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). Recent findings PPI-REE is a condition in which patients have clinical and histologic findings similar to EoE, but achieve complete remission with proton pump inhibitor (PPI) treatment. More than one-third of patients who have esophageal symptoms associated with esophageal eosinophilia respond to PPI treatment. Emerging data elucidating the pathogenesis of PPI-REE have shown that Th2-related inflammatory factors such as IL-13, IL-5, eotaxin-3, and major basic protein (MBP) are elevated in PPI-REE, similar to EoE. PPI-REE also shares a genetic expression signature with EoE that reverses with PPI treatment. Mechanisms proposed to explain the PPI response include an acid-independent, anti-inflammatory action of PPIs and PPI-induced restoration of esophageal barrier function. Summary Multiple features of PPI-REE overlap extensively with EoE. This raises the question of whether PPI-REE is merely a subtype of EoE rather than an independent condition. This similarity may have future implications for algorithms informing evaluation and treatment of esophageal eosinophilia. PMID:26039722

  13. Eosinophilic esophagitis: perspectives of adult and pediatric gastroenterologists.

    PubMed

    King, Jeremy; Khan, Seema

    2010-04-01

    To survey pediatric (PGI) and adult gastroenterologists (AGI) regarding their perceptions about the etiology, diagnosis, and management of eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), and to assess whether differences in the clinical approach to EoE exist between these subspecialists. A 21-item survey related to EoE was emailed to PGI who subscribe to the PEDSGI Bulletin Board, and to two AGI per Electoral College vote in the US, randomly selected from each state. The survey was voluntary, and consent was assumed based on survey submission. The responses were submitted anonymously and results compiled in a secure Web site. A total of 249 physicians from across the globe responded to the survey, 68% of whom were PGI. The majority of respondents worked primarily in an academic institution or teaching hospital. Respondents revealed diagnosing an average of six cases (median 8, range 0-30) of EoE in the past 6 months. Ninety-two percent of AGI who see a patient with dysphagia and suspected EoE proceed to endoscopy with biopsies, compared to only 54% of PGI (P < 0.05); 38% of PGI would first perform an upper GI study. Both subspecialties agreed that biopsies of the proximal and distal esophagus are needed to make a definitive diagnosis of EoE. Fifty-eight percent PGI and 44% AGI defined EoE as an eosinophilic density of > or =20 per high power field (hpf) in esophageal biopsies. Seventy-seven percent of PGI but only 16% of AGI reported routine referral of patients for food allergy evaluation (P < 0.05). While 77% PGI and 91% of AGI would rely on a symptom-based follow-up, 27% PGI versus 9% AGI follow patients with biopsies according to a pre-determined schedule and another 38% repeat biopsies as needed, versus 15% AGI. This survey exposes a few inconsistencies among gastroenterologists in the diagnosis, management, and follow-up of patients with EoE. The currently available practice guidelines for the diagnosis and management of EoE are largely based on retrospective studies and

  14. Eosinophilic esophagitis: perspectives of adult and pediatric gastroenterologists.

    PubMed

    King, Jeremy; Khan, Seema

    2010-04-01

    To survey pediatric (PGI) and adult gastroenterologists (AGI) regarding their perceptions about the etiology, diagnosis, and management of eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), and to assess whether differences in the clinical approach to EoE exist between these subspecialists. A 21-item survey related to EoE was emailed to PGI who subscribe to the PEDSGI Bulletin Board, and to two AGI per Electoral College vote in the US, randomly selected from each state. The survey was voluntary, and consent was assumed based on survey submission. The responses were submitted anonymously and results compiled in a secure Web site. A total of 249 physicians from across the globe responded to the survey, 68% of whom were PGI. The majority of respondents worked primarily in an academic institution or teaching hospital. Respondents revealed diagnosing an average of six cases (median 8, range 0-30) of EoE in the past 6 months. Ninety-two percent of AGI who see a patient with dysphagia and suspected EoE proceed to endoscopy with biopsies, compared to only 54% of PGI (P < 0.05); 38% of PGI would first perform an upper GI study. Both subspecialties agreed that biopsies of the proximal and distal esophagus are needed to make a definitive diagnosis of EoE. Fifty-eight percent PGI and 44% AGI defined EoE as an eosinophilic density of > or =20 per high power field (hpf) in esophageal biopsies. Seventy-seven percent of PGI but only 16% of AGI reported routine referral of patients for food allergy evaluation (P < 0.05). While 77% PGI and 91% of AGI would rely on a symptom-based follow-up, 27% PGI versus 9% AGI follow patients with biopsies according to a pre-determined schedule and another 38% repeat biopsies as needed, versus 15% AGI. This survey exposes a few inconsistencies among gastroenterologists in the diagnosis, management, and follow-up of patients with EoE. The currently available practice guidelines for the diagnosis and management of EoE are largely based on retrospective studies and

  15. Comparative evaluation of molar distalization therapy using pendulum and distal screw appliances

    PubMed Central

    Cafagna, Alessandra; Fontana, Mattia; Cozzani, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare dentoalveolar and skeletal changes produced by the pendulum appliance (PA) and the distal screw appliance (DS) in Class II patients. Methods Forty-three patients (19 men, 24 women) with Class II malocclusion were retrospectively selected for the study. Twenty-four patients (mean age, 12.2 ± 1.5 years) were treated with the PA, and 19 patients (mean age, 11.3 ± 1.9 years) were treated with the DS. The mean distalization time was 7 months for the PA group and 9 months for the DS group. Lateral cephalograms were obtained at T1, before treatment, and at T2, the end of distalization. A Mann-Whitney U test was used for statistical comparisons of the two groups between T1 and T2. Results PA and DS were equally effective in distalizing maxillary molars (4.7 mm and 4.2 mm, respectively) between T1 and T2; however, the maxillary first molars showed less distal tipping in the DS group than in the PA group (3.2° vs. 9.0°, respectively). Moreover, significant premolar anchorage loss (2.7 mm) and incisor proclination (5.0°) were noted in the PA group, whereas premolar distal movement (1.9 mm) and no significant changes at the incisor (0.1°) were observed in the DS group. No significant sagittal or vertical skeletal changes were detected between the two groups during the distalization phase. Conclusions PA and DS seem to be equally effective in distalizing maxillary molars; however, greater distal molar tipping and premolar anchorage loss can be expected using PA. PMID:26258063

  16. A New Distal Radioulnar Joint Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Schuurman, Arnold H.

    2013-01-01

    Pain and instability of the distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) are common sequelae following a fracture of the distal radius. Many soft tissue procedures have been described, not all of which are successful. Ulnar head replacement prostheses are available but do not always provide stability. We designed a two-part, easy to implant, distal radioulnar prosthesis and implanted it in 19 patients. The first prototype was inserted in 2002 and is still in place. During the study, the design was changed twice, resulting in three groups with four patients in group A, five in group B, and ten in group C. Unfortunately all five prostheses in group B had to be removed because of loosening, while only two prostheses in group C had to be removed, for nonprosthetic reasons. For the 12 patients who retained their prosthesis, forearm function increased while grip strength increased significantly. Pain scores decreased and the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) score improved but remained high. We conclude that the prosthesis offers a new treatment option for ulnar instability following distal ulnar resection. PMID:24436843

  17. Preoperative therapy in locally advanced esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Pankaj Kumar; Sharma, Jyoti; Jakhetiya, Ashish; Goel, Aakanksha; Gaur, Manish Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal cancer is an aggressive malignancy associated with dismal treatment outcomes. Presence of two distinct histopathological types distinguishes it from other gastrointestinal tract malignancies. Surgery is the cornerstone of treatment in locally advanced esophageal cancer (T2 or greater or node positive); however, a high rate of disease recurrence (systemic and loco-regional) and poor survival justifies a continued search for optimal therapy. Various combinations of multimodality treatment (preoperative/perioperative, or postoperative; radiotherapy, chemotherapy, or chemoradiotherapy) are being explored to lower disease recurrence and improve survival. Preoperative therapy followed by surgery is presently considered the standard of care in resectable locally advanced esophageal cancer as postoperative treatment may not be feasible for all the patients due to the morbidity of esophagectomy and prolonged recovery time limiting the tolerance of patient. There are wide variations in the preoperative therapy practiced across the centres depending upon the institutional practices, availability of facilities and personal experiences. There is paucity of literature to standardize the preoperative therapy. Broadly, chemoradiotherapy is the preferred neo-adjuvant modality in western countries whereas chemotherapy alone is considered optimal in the far East. The present review highlights the significant studies to assist in opting for the best evidence based preoperative therapy (radiotherapy, chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy) for locally advanced esophageal cancer.

  18. Current Management of Eosinophilic Esophagitis 2015.

    PubMed

    Richter, Joel E

    2016-02-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic inflammatory condition characterized by esophageal dysfunction and eosinophilic infiltrate (≥15/hpf) in the esophageal epithelium and the absence of other potential causes of eosinophilia. The prevalence is increasing and is the most common cause of solid food dysphagia in children and young adults. This article will review the diagnosis and management of EoE based on consensus conferences, systematic reviews, and meta-analysis and highlights seminal studies in our evolving treatment of this disease. However, all answers are not available and I will remark about the lessons learned in my clinical practice seeing EoE patients over the last 25 years. The complicated etiology of the complaint of dysphagia in EoE patients will be reviewed. The importance of utilizing endoscopy, biopsies, and barium esophagram to help define the 2 phenotypes (inflammatory, fibrostenosis) of EoE will be highlighted. The controversy about PPI-responsive esophageal eosinophilia will be discussed and contrasted with idiopathic EoE. Finally, the 3 treatment options for EoE (drugs, diet, dilation) will be reviewed in detail and a useful clinical management algorithm presented.

  19. Esophageal testing: What we have so far

    PubMed Central

    de Bortoli, Nicola; Martinucci, Irene; Bertani, Lorenzo; Russo, Salvatore; Franchi, Riccardo; Furnari, Manuele; Tolone, Salvatore; Bodini, Giorgia; Bolognesi, Valeria; Bellini, Massimo; Savarino, Vincenzo; Marchi, Santino; Savarino, Edoardo Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a common disorder of the gastrointestinal tract. In the last few decades, new technologies have evolved and have been applied to the functional study of the esophagus, allowing for the improvement of our knowledge of the pathophysiology of GERD. High-resolution manometry (HRM) permits greater understanding of the function of the esophagogastric junction and the risks associated with hiatal hernia. Moreover, HRM has been found to be more reproducible and sensitive than conventional water-perfused manometry to detect the presence of transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation. Esophageal 24-h pH-metry with or without combined impedance is usually performed in patients with negative endoscopy and reflux symptoms who have a poor response to anti-reflux medical therapy to assess esophageal acid exposure and symptom-reflux correlations. In particular, esophageal 24-h impedance and pH monitoring can detect acid and non-acid reflux events. EndoFLIP is a recent technique poorly applied in clinical practice, although it provides a large amount of information about the esophagogastric junction. In the coming years, laryngopharyngeal symptoms could be evaluated with up and coming non-invasive or minimally invasive techniques, such as pepsin detection in saliva or pharyngeal pH-metry. Future studies are required of these techniques to evaluate their diagnostic accuracy and usefulness, although the available data are promising. PMID:26909230

  20. 21 CFR 868.5650 - Esophageal obturator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Esophageal obturator. 868.5650 Section 868.5650 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... patient during emergency resuscitation by occluding (blocking) the esophagus, thereby permitting...

  1. 21 CFR 868.5650 - Esophageal obturator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Esophageal obturator. 868.5650 Section 868.5650 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... patient during emergency resuscitation by occluding (blocking) the esophagus, thereby permitting...

  2. Perception of Syllable Stress in Esophageal Speech.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Christopher Niles; Morris, Hughlett L.

    1988-01-01

    Ten esophageal speakers and ten normal speakers produced repetitions of the disyllable /mama/ using five different conditions of syllable stress. Nine normal listeners judged both relative and absolute syllable stress. Reliable judgments were made of the syllable stress, and speakers were able to effect systematic changes in listener perceptions…

  3. Does surgery correct esophageal motor dysfunction in gastroesophageal reflux

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, C.O.; Pope, C.E.; Gannan, R.M.; Allen, F.D.; Velasco, N.; Hill, L.D.

    1981-09-01

    The high incidence of dysphagia in patients with symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux (GER) but no evidence of peptic stricture suggests esophageal motor dysfunction. Conventional methods for detecting dysfunction (radiologic and manometric examinations) often fail to detect abnormality in these patients. Radionuclide transit (RT), a new method for detecting esophageal motor dysfunction, was used to prospectively assess function in 29 patients with symptomatic GER uncomplicated by stricture before and three months after antireflux surgery (HILL). The preoperative incidence of dysphagia and esophageal dysfunction was 73% and 52%, respectively. During operation (Hill repair), intraoperative measurement of the lower esophageal sphincter pressure was performed and the LESP raised to levels between 45 and 55 mmHg. The preoperative lower esophageal sphincter pressure was raised from a mean of 8.6 mmHg, to mean of 18.5 mmHg after operation. No patient has free reflux after operation. Postoperative studies on 20 patients demonstrated persistence of all preoperative esophageal dysfunction despite loss of dysphagia. RT has demonstrated a disorder of esophageal motor function in 52% of patients with symptomatic GER that may be responsible for impaired esophageal clearance. This abnormality is not contraindication to surgery. The results indicate that construction of an effective barrier to reflex corrects symptoms of reflux, even in the presence of impaired esophageal transit. Radionuclide transit is a safe noninvasive test for assessment of esophageal function.

  4. An Unusual Cause of Acute Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding: Acute Esophageal Necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Tokala, Madhusudhan R.; Dhillon, Sonu; Pisoh, Watcoun-Nchinda; Walayat, Saqib; Vanar, Vishwas; Puli, Srinivas R.

    2016-01-01

    Acute esophageal necrosis (AEN), also called “black esophagus,” is a condition characterized by circumferential necrosis of the esophagus with universal distal involvement and variable proximal extension with clear demarcation at the gastroesophageal junction. It is an unusual cause of upper gastrointestinal bleeding and is recognized with distinct and striking mucosal findings on endoscopy. The patients are usually older and are critically ill with shared comorbidities, which include atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, chronic renal insufficiency, and malnutrition. Alcoholism and substance abuse could be seen in younger patients. Patients usually have systemic hypotension along with upper abdominal pain in the background of clinical presentation of hematemesis and melena. The endoscopic findings confirm the diagnosis and biopsy is not always necessary unless clinically indicated in atypical presentations. Herein we present two cases with distinct clinical presentation and discuss the endoscopic findings along with a review of the published literature on the management of AEN. PMID:27642529

  5. Two Cases of Cerebral Air Embolism That Occurred during Esophageal Ballooning and Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography.

    PubMed

    Park, Suyeon; Ahn, Ji Yong; Ahn, Young Eun; Jeon, Sang-Beom; Lee, Sang Soo; Jung, Hwoon-Yong; Kim, Jin-Ho

    2016-03-01

    Cerebral air embolism is an extremely rare complication of endoscopic procedure and often life threatening. We present two cases of cerebral infarction due to air embolization caused by an endoscopic intervention. The first case occurred during esophageal balloon dilatation for the treatment of a stricture of an anastomosis site in a 59-year-old man and the second case occurred during endoscopic papillary balloon dilatation in a 69-year-old man who had distal common bile duct stones. After the procedure, cardiopulmonary instability and altered mental status were observed in both patients, and cerebral air embolism was diagnosed in both cases. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy was started in the first case, and high FiO2 therapy was applied in the second case. Although this complication is rare, patient outcomes can be improved if physicians are aware of this potential complication, and immediately begin proper management. PMID:26898514

  6. An Unusual Cause of Acute Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding: Acute Esophageal Necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Tokala, Madhusudhan R.; Dhillon, Sonu; Pisoh, Watcoun-Nchinda; Walayat, Saqib; Vanar, Vishwas; Puli, Srinivas R.

    2016-01-01

    Acute esophageal necrosis (AEN), also called “black esophagus,” is a condition characterized by circumferential necrosis of the esophagus with universal distal involvement and variable proximal extension with clear demarcation at the gastroesophageal junction. It is an unusual cause of upper gastrointestinal bleeding and is recognized with distinct and striking mucosal findings on endoscopy. The patients are usually older and are critically ill with shared comorbidities, which include atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, chronic renal insufficiency, and malnutrition. Alcoholism and substance abuse could be seen in younger patients. Patients usually have systemic hypotension along with upper abdominal pain in the background of clinical presentation of hematemesis and melena. The endoscopic findings confirm the diagnosis and biopsy is not always necessary unless clinically indicated in atypical presentations. Herein we present two cases with distinct clinical presentation and discuss the endoscopic findings along with a review of the published literature on the management of AEN.

  7. An Unusual Cause of Acute Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding: Acute Esophageal Necrosis.

    PubMed

    Kalva, Nikhil R; Tokala, Madhusudhan R; Dhillon, Sonu; Pisoh, Watcoun-Nchinda; Walayat, Saqib; Vanar, Vishwas; Puli, Srinivas R

    2016-01-01

    Acute esophageal necrosis (AEN), also called "black esophagus," is a condition characterized by circumferential necrosis of the esophagus with universal distal involvement and variable proximal extension with clear demarcation at the gastroesophageal junction. It is an unusual cause of upper gastrointestinal bleeding and is recognized with distinct and striking mucosal findings on endoscopy. The patients are usually older and are critically ill with shared comorbidities, which include atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, chronic renal insufficiency, and malnutrition. Alcoholism and substance abuse could be seen in younger patients. Patients usually have systemic hypotension along with upper abdominal pain in the background of clinical presentation of hematemesis and melena. The endoscopic findings confirm the diagnosis and biopsy is not always necessary unless clinically indicated in atypical presentations. Herein we present two cases with distinct clinical presentation and discuss the endoscopic findings along with a review of the published literature on the management of AEN. PMID:27642529

  8. Eosinophilic esophagitis prevalence in an adult population undergoing upper endoscopy in southeastern Mexico.

    PubMed

    De la Cruz-Patiño, E; Ruíz Juárez, I; Meixueiro Daza, A; Grube Pagola, P; Roesch-Dietlen, F; Remes-Troche, J M

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) prevalence fluctuates according to the population studied and varies from 0.4% in an open population to 6.5% in subjects with esophageal symptoms. Even though this entity has been described in North American and European populations, it is still considered an 'unusual' condition in Latin America. The study aimed to determine EoE prevalence in patients undergoing elective endoscopy in a tertiary referral center in southeastern Mexico. Consecutive patients were evaluated that had been referred to the Medical and Biological Research Institute, Veracruz, Mexico, for upper endoscopy due to gastrointestinal symptoms. Demographic variables and symptoms were analyzed in all the cases. Eight mucosal biopsies of the esophagus (four proximal and four distal) were obtained and were reviewed by a blinded pathologist. Histological diagnosis was established when the mean eosinophil count at a large magnification was ≥15. A total of 235 subjects (137 women, 51.16 years) were evaluated, and EoE prevalence was 1.7% (4/235 95% confidence interval 0.2-3.6%). In all four cases, pH test were normal. Among patients with histological diagnosis of EoE, a greater number of patients with a past history of asthma (50% vs. 19.3%, P = 0.04) and a tendency for a greater frequency of dysphagia (50% vs. 25%, P = 0.10). There were no differences in the endoscopic findings (rings, grooves, plaques, or stricture) when compared with the patients presenting with erosive esophagitis. EoE prevalence among patients undergoing upper endoscopy from southeastern Mexico was 1.7%, which can be regarded as intermediate to low.

  9. Ineffective esophageal motility and the vagus: current challenges and future prospects

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ji-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Ineffective esophageal motility (IEM) is characterized by low to very low amplitude propulsive contractions in the distal esophagus, hence primarily affecting the smooth muscle part of the esophagus. IEM is often found in patients with dysphagia or heartburn and is commonly associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease. IEM is assumed to be associated with ineffective bolus transport; however, this can be verified using impedance measurements or evaluation of a barium coated marshmallow swallow. Furthermore, water swallows may not assess accurately the motor capabilities of the esophagus, since contraction amplitude is strongly determined by the size and consistency of the bolus. The “peristaltic reserve” of the esophagus can be evaluated by multiple rapid swallows that, after a period of diglutative inhibition, normally give a powerful peristaltic contraction suggestive of the integrity of neural orchestration and smooth muscle action. The amplitude of contraction is determined by a balance between intrinsic excitatory cholinergic, inhibitory nitrergic, as well as postinhibition rebound excitatory output to the musculature. This is strongly influenced by vagal efferent motor neurons and this in turn is influenced by vagal afferent neurons that send bolus information to the solitary nucleus where programmed activation of the vagal motor neurons to the smooth muscle esophagus is initiated. Solitary nucleus activity is influenced by sensory activity from a large number of organs and various areas of the brain, including the hypothalamus and the cerebral cortex. This allows interaction between swallowing activities and respiratory and cardiac activities and allows the influence of acute and chronic emotional states on swallowing behavior. Interstitial cells of Cajal are part of the sensory units of vagal afferents, the intramuscular arrays, and they provide pacemaker activity to the musculature that can generate peristalsis in the absence of innervation. This

  10. Esophageal Epithelial-Derived IL-33 Is Upregulated in Patients with Heartburn

    PubMed Central

    Sei, Hiroo; Oshima, Tadayuki; Shan, Jing; Wu, Liping; Yamasaki, Takahisa; Okugawa, Takuya; Kondo, Takashi; Tomita, Toshihiko; Fukui, Hirokazu; Watari, Jiro; Miwa, Hiroto

    2016-01-01

    Background Interleukin-33 (IL-33) is a tissue-derived cytokine that is constitutively expressed in epithelial cells of tissues exposed to the environment and plays a role in sensing damage caused by inflammatory diseases. IL-33 acts as both a traditional cytokine and as a chromatin-associated nuclear factor in both innate and adaptive immunity. We recently showed that IL-33 in esophageal mucosa is upregulated in reflux esophagitis. However, IL-33 expression in patients with heartburn without mucosal injury and its relationship with intercellular space (ICS) have never been examined. We therefore examined the expression of cytokines and ICS in patients with heartburn. Methods The expression of IL-33 in the middle and distal esophageal mucosa of patients with heartburn without mucosal break and control samples was examined using real-time RT-PCR and immunofluorescence. The mRNA expression of IL-6, IL-8, MCP-1, and RANTES, and ICS was also analyzed. Results IL-33 expression and the mean ICS were significantly increased in the mucosa of patients with heartburn compared to that of the control. IL-33 and ICS were not different between the patients who were taking a PPI and those who were not. The upregulated IL-33 expression in the heartburn group was located in the nuclei of the basal cell layer. Although IL-6, IL-8, MCP-1 and RANTES levels were not different between control and patients with heartburn samples, IL-33 mRNA levels were still significantly correlated with IL-6, IL-8, or MCP-1 mRNA levels. Conclusion Nuclear IL-33 is upregulated in patients with heartburn. Upregulated IL-33 in heartburn patients is related to the symptoms. PMID:27111066

  11. Helical Tomotherapy for Radiotherapy in Esophageal Cancer: A Preferred Plan With Better Conformal Target Coverage and More Homogeneous Dose Distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Yijen E-mail: yichen@coh.org; Liu An; Han Chunhui; Tsai, Peter T.; Schultheiss, Timothy E.; Pezner, Richard D; Vora, Nilesh; Lim, Dean; Shibata, Stephen; Kernstine, Kemp H.; Wong, Jeffrey Y.C

    2007-10-01

    We compare different radiotherapy techniques-helical tomotherapy (tomotherapy), step-and-shoot IMRT (IMRT), and 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT)-for patients with mid-distal esophageal carcinoma on the basis of dosimetric analysis. Six patients with locally advanced mid-distal esophageal carcinoma were treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation followed by surgery. Radiotherapy included 50 Gy to gross planning target volume (PTV) and 45 Gy to elective PTV in 25 fractions. Tomotherapy, IMRT, and 3DCRT plans were generated. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs), homogeneity index (HI), volumes of lung receiving more than 10, 15, or 20 Gy (V{sub 10}, V{sub 15}, V{sub 20}), and volumes of heart receiving more than 30 or 45 Gy (V{sub 30}, V{sub 45}) were determined. Statistical analysis was performed by paired t-tests. By isodose distributions and DVHs, tomotherapy plans showed sharper dose gradients, more conformal coverage, and better HI for both gross and elective PTVs compared with IMRT or 3DCRT plans. Mean V{sub 20} of lung was significantly reduced in tomotherapy plans. However, tomotherapy and IMRT plans resulted in larger V{sub 10} of lung compared to 3DCRT plans. The heart was significantly spared in tomotherapy and IMRT plans compared to 3DCRT plans in terms of V{sub 30} and V{sub 45}. We conclude that tomotherapy plans are superior in terms of target conformity, dose homogeneity, and V{sub 20} of lung.

  12. Esophageal Manometry in Patients with Chest Pain and Normal Coronary Arteriogram.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, S C; Hodges, K; Hersh, T; Jinich, H

    1981-02-01

    Evaluation of the esophagus is helpful in determining the source of chest pain. Eighteen per cent of 72 patients with a normal coronary angiogram had esophageal disease as a source of chest pain. Eight had diffuse esophageal spasm, four had reflux esophagitis and one had an esophageal ulcer. Five of eight patients with diffuse esophageal spasm had relief of symptoms with nitroglycerin. Despite normal coronary arteriogram and normal esophageal manometry 42 of 49 other patients had relief of chest pain with nitroglycerin.

  13. Characteristics and frequency of transient relaxations of the lower esophageal sphincter in patients with reflux esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Mittal, R K; McCallum, R W

    1988-09-01

    Electromyogram of the submental muscles, esophageal manometry, and pH studies were simultaneously performed in an unselected group of 12 patients with subjective and objective evidence of gastroesophageal reflux (GER) disease to determine the frequency of transient relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) and mechanisms of GER. Findings from these patients were compared with data from 10 asymptomatic healthy volunteers. Recordings were obtained for 1 h in the fasting state and 3 h after a standard 850-kcal meal. Transient relaxation of the LES was the only mechanism of acid reflux in normal subjects and accounted for 73.0% of the episodes of acid reflux in patients with GER disease. In both normal subjects and patients with GER, a large number of transient relaxations were associated at their onset with an attenuated submental EMG complex, a small pharyngeal contraction, and an esophageal contraction. The incidences of these associated events were similar in the two study populations. The frequency of transient relaxation of the LES in patients with GER was identical to that of controls. The frequency did not differ even in 9 patients with GER disease who had endoscopic esophagitis. Thirty-six percent of transient relaxations in the normal subjects were accompanied by pH evidence of reflux, but in the GER patients with endoscopic esophagitis 65% of the transient LES relaxations resulted in a reflux event. Acid reflux at the moment of deep inspiration was the second most common mechanism of GER in our patients. Four patients who demonstrated this mechanism had hiatal hernias and more severe esophagitis than the rest of the group. Our findings confirm that transient relaxation of the LES is the major mechanism of GER in patients with reflux esophagitis. However, the similar frequency of this relaxation in GER patients and in healthy asymptomatic subjects suggests that factors other than transient LES relaxation play an important role in the pathogenesis of

  14. EGD - esophagogastroduodenoscopy

    MedlinePlus

    ... the liver, to look for swollen veins (called varices) in the walls of the lower part of ... the result of: Celiac disease Esophageal rings Esophageal varices (swollen veins in the lining of the esophagus ...

  15. Novel Therapeutic Strategies in the Management of Non-Variceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Garber, Ari; Jang, Sunguk

    2016-01-01

    Non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding, the most common etiology of which is peptic ulcer disease, remains a persistent challenge despite a reduction in both its incidence and mortality. Both pharmacologic and endoscopic techniques have been developed to achieve hemostasis, with varying degrees of success. Among the pharmacologic therapies, proton pump inhibitors remain the mainstay of treatment, as they reduce the risk of rebleeding and requirement for recurrent endoscopic evaluation. Tranexamic acid, a derivative of the amino acid lysine, is an antifibrinolytic agent whose role requires further investigation before application. Endoscopically delivered pharmacotherapy, including Hemospray (Cook Medical), EndoClot (EndoClot Plus Inc.), and Ankaferd Blood Stopper (Ankaferd Health Products), in addition to standard epinephrine, show promise in this regard, although their mechanisms of action require further investigation. Non-pharmacologic endoscopic techniques use one of the following two methods to achieve hemostasis: ablation or mechanical tamponade, which may involve using endoscopic clips, cautery, argon plasma coagulation, over-the-scope clipping devices, radiofrequency ablation, and cryotherapy. This review aimed to highlight these novel and fundamental hemostatic strategies and the research supporting their efficacy. PMID:27744662

  16. Severe gastric variceal haemorrhage due to splenic artery thrombosis and consecutive arterial bypass

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage is mainly caused by ulcers. Gastric varicosis due to portal hypertension can also be held responsible for upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Portal hypertension causes the development of a collateral circulation from the portal to the caval venous system resulting in development of oesophageal and gastric fundus varices. Those may also be held responsible for upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage. Case presentation In this study, we describe the case of a 69-year-old male with recurrent severe upper gastrointestinal bleeding caused by arterial submucosal collaterals due to idiopathic splenic artery thrombosis. The diagnosis was secured using endoscopic duplex ultrasound and angiography. The patient was successfully treated with a laparoscopic splenectomy and complete dissection of the short gastric arteries, resulting in the collapse of the submucosal arteries in the gastric wall. Follow-up gastroscopy was performed on the 12th postoperative week and showed no signs of bleeding and a significant reduction in the arterial blood flow within the gastric wall. Subsequent follow-up after 6 months also showed no further gastrointestinal bleeding as well as subjective good quality of life for the patient. Conclusion Submucosal arterial collaterals must be excluded by endosonography via endoscopy in case of recurrent upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Laparoscopic splenectomy provides adequate treatment in preventing any recurrent bleeding, if gastric arterial collaterals are caused by splenic artery thrombosis. PMID:21711534

  17. Fungal Esophagitis in a Child with Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Anjum; Assiri, Asaad; Zaidi, Zafar; Alsheikh, Abdulmalik

    2016-08-01

    Esophagitis in children is not uncommon, mostly due to gastro-esophageal reflux. Other conditions like eosinophilic and infective esophagitis need to be elucidated in differential diagnoses. Fungal orCandida esophagitisusually occurs in high risk children who are immune-compromised, malnourished, on steroid therapy or have uncontrolled diabetes mellitus. An eleven-year girl presented with uncontrolled type I diabetes mellitus and recurrent epigastric pain with vomiting. Her oral intake was satisfactory. There was no dysphagia and odynophagia. Physical examination was normal with good oral hygiene. Failure in responding to conventional medications led to endoscopic evaluation, which revealed white patches and esophageal inflammation and diagnosed as fungal esophagitis on histopathology. Although infective esophagitis is encountered sporadically in pediatric age group, but it should always be considered in high risk individuals and when conventional medication fails to resolve the symptoms. PMID:27539771

  18. Genes Regulating Epithelial Polarity Are Critical Suppressors of Esophageal Oncogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiu-Min; Wang, Hui; Zhu, Li-Li; Zhao, Run-Zhen; Ji, Hong-Long

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal cancer is an aggressive disease featured by early lymphatic and hematogenous dissemination, and is the sixth leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. The proper formation of apicobasal polarity is essential for normal epithelium physiology and tissue homeostasis, while loss of polarity is a hallmark of cancer development including esophageal oncogenesis. In this review, we summarized the stages of esophageal cancer development associated with the loss or deregulation of epithelial cell apicobasal polarity. Loss of epithelial apicobasal polarity exerts an indispensable role in the initiation of esophageal oncogenesis, tumor progression, and the advancement of tumors from benign to malignant. In particular, we reviewed the involvement of several critical genes, including Lkb1, claudin-4, claudin-7, Par3, Lgl1, E-cadherin, and the Scnn1 gene family. Understanding the role of apicobasal regulators may lead to new paradigms for treatment of esophageal tumors, including improvement of prognostication, early diagnosis, and individually tailored therapeutic interventions in esophageal oncology. PMID:26185530

  19. Genetics Home Reference: distal hereditary motor neuropathy, type II

    MedlinePlus

    ... hereditary motor neuropathy, type II distal hereditary motor neuropathy, type II Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... Open All Close All Description Distal hereditary motor neuropathy, type II is a progressive disorder that affects ...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: distal hereditary motor neuropathy, type V

    MedlinePlus

    ... hereditary motor neuropathy, type V distal hereditary motor neuropathy, type V Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... Open All Close All Description Distal hereditary motor neuropathy, type V is a progressive disorder that affects ...

  1. Thoracoscopic esophageal atresia repair made easy. An applicable trick.

    PubMed

    Hiradfar, Mehran; Shojaeian, Reza; Gharavi Fard, Mohammad; Joodi, Marjan; Sabzevari, Alireza; Nazarzade, Reza

    2013-03-01

    Thoracoscopic repair of esophageal atresia is becoming more popular but technical difficulties in handsewn anastomosis still remain challenging. This article presents an easy and applicable maneuver by passing the trans-esophageal tube before starting to suture in order to minimize the gap, reduce the tension over primary sutures and provide a better visualization of posterolateral parts of the anastomosis in thoracoscopic esophageal atresia repair. Using this maneuver makes tying easier and minimizes grasping and crushing damages to the anastomotic site.

  2. HER2 amplification, overexpression and score criteria in esophageal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yingchuan; Bandla, Santhoshi; Godfrey, Tony E.; Tan, Dongfeng; Luketich, James D.; Pennathur, Arjun; Qiu, Xing; Hicks, David G.; Peters, Jeffrey; Zhou, Zhongren

    2011-01-01

    The HER2 oncogene was recently reported to be amplified and overexpressed in esophageal adenocarcinoma. However, the relationship of HER2 amplification in esophageal adenocarcinoma with prognosis has not been well defined. The scoring systems for clinically evaluating HER2 in esophageal adenocarcinoma are not established. The aims of the study were to establish a HER2 scoring system and comprehensively investigate HER2 amplification and overexpression in esophageal adenocarcinoma and its precursor lesion. Using a tissue microarray, containing 116 cases of esophageal adenocarcinoma, 34 cases of BE, 18 cases of low grade dysplasia and 15 cases of high grade dysplasia, HER2 amplification and overexpression were analyzed by HercepTest and CISH methods. The amplification frequency in an independent series of 116 esophageal adenocarcinoma samples was also analyzed using Affymetrix SNP 6.0 microarrays. In our studies, we have found that HER2 amplification does not associate with poor prognosis in total 232 esophageal adenocarcinoma patients by CISH and high density microarrays. We further confirm the similar frequency of HER2 amplification by CISH (18.10%; 21/116) and SNP 6.0 microarrays (16.4%, 19/116) in esophageal adenocarcinoma. HER2 protein overexpression was observed in 12.1 % (14/116) of esophageal adenocarcinoma and 6.67% (1/15) of HGD. No HER2 amplification or overexpression was identified in BE or LGD. All HER2 protein overexpression cases showed HER2 gene amplification. Gene amplification was found to be more frequent by CISH than protein overexpression in esophageal adenocarcinoma (18.10% vs 12.9%). A modified two-step model for esophageal adenocarcinoma HER-2 testing is recommend for clinical esophageal adenocarcinoma HER-2 trial. PMID:21460800

  3. Adult-Onset Esophageal Crohn’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kasarala, George; Durrett, Sam

    2016-01-01

    Crohn’s disease (CD) is an idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease that can involve any part of the gastrointestinal tract. Esophageal involvement is rarely seen in adults, especially at the initial diagnosis of CD. Esophageal symptoms as primary manifestations of the disease are extremely rare. We report a case of a CD with esophageal involvement at the time of her initial diagnosis of CD. PMID:27761477

  4. Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy of distal ureteral calculi.

    PubMed

    Miller, K; Bubeck, J R; Hautmann, R

    1986-01-01

    To date, the use of extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) has been limited to renal calculi and ureteral calculi above the pelvic brim. Modifying the position of the patient on the support of the Dornier lithotripter HM3, we were able to localize and treat distal ureteral calculi. Until April 1986, 43 patients with stones in the lower ureter underwent contact-free lithotripsy. Treatment was successful in 39 patients (90%), 2 of these requiring 2 sessions. In 4 patients treatment failed and stone removal was accomplished using ureteroscopy or open surgery. No complications or adverse side effects were encountered in the whole series. ESWL is now the method of choice for the treatment of distal ureteral calculi in our department.

  5. [Fracture endoprosthesis of distal humerus fractures].

    PubMed

    Müller, L P; Wegmann, K; Burkhart, K J

    2013-08-01

    The treatment of choice for fractures of the distal humerus is double plate osteosynthesis. Due to anatomical preshaped angle stable plates the primary stability and management of soft tissues has been improved. However, osteoporotic comminuted fractures in the elderly are often not amenable to stable osteosynthesis and total elbow arthroplasty has been established as an alternative therapy. Although complication rates have been reduced, complications of total elbow arthroplasty are still much more frequent than in total hip replacement. Furthermore, patients are advised not to exceed a weight bearing of 5 kg. Therefore, the indications for elbow arthroplasty must be evaluated very strictly and should be reserved for comminuted distal humeral fractures in the elderly with poor bone quality that are not amenable to stable osteosynthesis or for simple fractures in cases of preexisting symptomatic osteoarthritis. This article introduces and discusses modern concepts of elbow arthroplasty, such as modular convertible prosthesis systems, hemiarthroplasty and radial head replacement in total elbow arthroplasty.

  6. Surgical treatment analysis of idiopathic esophageal achalasia

    PubMed Central

    de AQUINO, José Luis Braga; SAID, Marcelo Manzano; PEREIRA, Douglas Rizzanti; do AMARAL, Paula Casals; LIMA, Juliana Carolina Alves; LEANDRO-MERHI, Vânia Aparecida

    2015-01-01

    Background Idiopathic esophageal achalasia is an inflammatory disease of unknown origin, characterized by aperistalsis of the esophageal body and failure of the lower esophageal sphincter in response to swallowing, with consequent dysphagia. Aim To demonstrate the results of surgical therapy in these patients, evaluating the occurred local and systemic complications. Methods Were studied retrospectively 32 patients, 22 of whom presented non-advanced stage of the disease (Stage I/II) and 10 with advanced disease (Stage III/IV). All of them had the clinical conditions to be submitted to surgery. The diagnoses were done by clinical, endoscopic, cardiological, radiological and esophageal manometry analysis. Pre-surgical evaluation was done with a questionnaire based on the most predisposing factors in the development of the disease and the surgical indication was based on the stage of the disease. Results The patients with non-advanced stages were submitted to cardiomyotomy with fundoplication, wherein in the post-surgical early assessment, only one (4,4%) presented pulmonary infection, but had a good outcome. In patients with advanced disease, seven were submitted to esophageal mucosectomy preserving the muscular layer, wherein one patient (14,2%) presented dehiscence of gastric cervical esophagus anastomosis as well as pulmonary infection; all of these complications were resolved with proper specific treatment; the other three patients with advanced stage were submitted to transmediastinal esophagectomy; two of them presented hydropneumothorax with good evolution, and one of them also presented fistula of the cervical esophagogastric anastomosis, but with spontaneous healing after conservative treatment and nutritional support. The two patients with fistula of the cervical anastomosis progressed to stenosis, with good results after endoscopic dilations. In the medium and long term assessment done in 23 patients, all of them reported improvement in life quality, with

  7. Esophageal Acid Clearance During Random Swallowing Is Faster in Patients with Barrett’s Esophagus Than in Healthy Controls

    PubMed Central

    Lottrup, Christian; Krarup, Anne L; Gregersen, Hans; Ejstrud, Per; Drewes, Asbjørn M

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Impaired esophageal acid clearance may be a contributing factor in the pathogenesis of Barrett’s esophagus. However, few studies have measured acid clearance as such in these patients. In this explorative, cross-sectional study, we aimed to compare esophageal acid clearance and swallowing rate in patients with Barrett’s esophagus to that in healthy controls. Methods A total of 26 patients with histology-confirmed Barrett’s esophagus and 12 healthy controls underwent (1) upper endoscopy, (2) an acid clearance test using a pH-impedance probe under controlled conditions including controlled and random swallowing, and (3) an ambulatory pH-impedance measurement. Results Compared with controls and when swallowing randomly, patients cleared acid 46% faster (P = 0.008). Furthermore, patients swallowed 60% more frequently (mean swallows/minute: 1.90 ± 0.74 vs 1.19 ± 0.58; P = 0.005), and acid clearance time decreased with greater random swallowing rate (P < 0.001). Swallowing rate increased with lower distal esophageal baseline impedance (P = 0.014). Ambulatory acid exposure was greater in patients (P = 0.033), but clearance times assessed from the ambulatory pH-measurement and acid clearance test were not correlated (all P > 0.3). Conclusions More frequent swallowing and thus faster acid clearance in Barrett’s esophagus may constitute a protective reflex due to impaired mucosal integrity and possibly acid hypersensitivity. Despite these reinforced mechanisms, acid clearance ability seems to be overthrown by repeated, retrograde acid reflux, thus resulting in increased esophageal acid exposure and consequently mucosal changes. PMID:27557545

  8. Desmoglein-1 regulates esophageal epithelial barrier function and immune responses in eosinophilic esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Sherrill, J D; KC, K; Wu, D; Djukic, Z; Caldwell, J M; Stucke, E M; Kemme, K A; Costello, M S; Mingler, M K; Blanchard, C; Collins, M H; Abonia, J P; Putnam, P E; Dellon, E S; Orlando, R C; Hogan, S P; Rothenb, M E

    2014-01-01

    The desmosomal cadherin desmoglein-1 (DSG1) is an essential intercellular adhesion molecule that is altered in various human cutaneous disorders; however, its regulation and function in allergic disease remains unexplored. Herein, we demonstrate a specific reduction in DSG1 in esophageal biopsies from patients with eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), an emerging allergic disorder characterized by chronic inflammation within the esophageal mucosa. Further, we show that DSG1 gene silencing weakens esophageal epithelial integrity, and induces cell separation and impaired barrier function (IBF) despite high levels of desmoglein-3 (DSG3). Moreover, DSG1 deficiency induces transcriptional changes that partially overlap with the transcriptome of inflamed esophageal mucosa; notably, periostin, a multipotent pro-inflammatory extracellular matrix molecule, is the top induced overlapping gene. We further demonstrate that IBF is a pathological feature in EoE, which can be partially induced through the downregulation of DSG1 by interleukin-13 (IL-13). Taken together, these data identify a functional role for DSG1 and its dysregulation by IL-13 in the pathophysiology of EoE and suggest that the loss of DSG1 may potentiate allergic inflammation through the induction of pro-inflammatory mediators such as periostin. PMID:24220297

  9. Desmoglein-1 regulates esophageal epithelial barrier function and immune responses in eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Sherrill, J D; Kc, K; Wu, D; Djukic, Z; Caldwell, J M; Stucke, E M; Kemme, K A; Costello, M S; Mingler, M K; Blanchard, C; Collins, M H; Abonia, J P; Putnam, P E; Dellon, E S; Orlando, R C; Hogan, S P; Rothenberg, M E

    2014-05-01

    The desmosomal cadherin desmoglein-1 (DSG1) is an essential intercellular adhesion molecule that is altered in various human cutaneous disorders; however, its regulation and function in allergic disease remains unexplored. Herein, we demonstrate a specific reduction in DSG1 in esophageal biopsies from patients with eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), an emerging allergic disorder characterized by chronic inflammation within the esophageal mucosa. Further, we show that DSG1 gene silencing weakens esophageal epithelial integrity, and induces cell separation and impaired barrier function (IBF) despite high levels of desmoglein-3. Moreover, DSG1 deficiency induces transcriptional changes that partially overlap with the transcriptome of inflamed esophageal mucosa; notably, periostin (POSTN), a multipotent pro-inflammatory extracellular matrix molecule, is the top induced overlapping gene. We further demonstrate that IBF is a pathological feature in EoE, which can be partially induced through the downregulation of DSG1 by interleukin-13 (IL-13). Taken together, these data identify a functional role for DSG1 and its dysregulation by IL-13 in the pathophysiology of EoE and suggest that the loss of DSG1 may potentiate allergic inflammation through the induction of pro-inflammatory mediators such as POSTN. PMID:24220297

  10. Fracture of distal end clavicle: A review

    PubMed Central

    Sambandam, Balaji; Gupta, Rajat; Kumar, Santosh; Maini, Lalit

    2014-01-01

    Management of fracture distal end clavicle has always puzzled the orthopaedic surgeons. Now-a-days with a relatively active lifestyle, patients want better results both cosmetically and functionally. Despite so much literature available for the management of this common fracture, there is no consensus regarding the gold standard treatment for this fracture. In this article, we reviewed the literature on various techniques of management for this fracture, both conservative as well as surgical, and their merits and demerits. PMID:25983473

  11. Fractures of Distal Radius: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Meena, Sanjay; Sharma, Pankaj; Sambharia, Abhishek Kumar; Dawar, Ashok

    2014-01-01

    Fractures of distal radius account for up to 20% of all fractures treated in emergency department. Initial assessment includes a history of mechanism of injury, associated injury and appropriate radiological evaluation. Treatment options include conservative management, internal fixation with pins, bridging and non-bridging external fixation, dorsal or volar plating with/without arthroscopy assistance. However, many questions regarding these fractures remain unanswered and good prospective randomized trials are needed. PMID:25657938

  12. Intramural esophagic hematoma secondary to coumarinic anticoagulation: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Esophagic Intramural Hematoma is an uncommon clinical condition, with a prognosis which is essentially benign. On most cases, a predisposing or precipitating factor may be seen, with the most common ones being the history of esophagic instrumentation, food impactations and thrombocytopenia. In the following manuscript, the authors present the case of a 54-years-old male with history of valve replacement surgery, who was treated at the Clinica Cardiovascular (Medellin, Colombia), with a clinical case of Intramural Esophagic Hematoma that was later confirmed to be due to a Coumarinic overanticoagulation. On this case, it is evidenced that Intramural Esophagic Hematoma is an unrecognized complication of Courmarinic anticoagulation therapy. PMID:20069068

  13. [A case of esophageal achalasia followed by Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Mitani, Maki; Kawamoto, Kunihiko; Funakawa, Itaru; Jinnai, Kenji

    2005-08-01

    In 1992, a 63 year-old woman complained of dysphagia and chest pain, and was diagnosed with esophageal achalasia. Three years later, she developed resting tremor, cog-wheel rigidity, and retro-pulsion, and was diagnosed with Parkinson's disease and given appropriate medication. Several years later, intractable vomitting and aspiration pneumonia developed, and the lower esophageal sphincter was dilated using a pneumatic balloon dilator under gastroscopic guidance in 2004. That procedure improved her symptoms and the esophageal dilation was visualized on chest CT images. Herein, we report this rare case of esophageal achalasia followed by Parkinson's disease and discuss the relationship between the two diseases.

  14. Eosinophilic esophagitis as paraneoplastic syndrome in a patient with ganglioneuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Prader, S; Spalinger, J; Caduff, J; Hürlimann, S; Rischewski, J

    2015-05-01

    A 16-month-old boy presented with failure to thrive despite sufficient caloric intake, hypersalivation, abdominal pain, chronic diarrhea and blepharitis. An eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) was diagnosed by esophageal biopsy. Dietary restrictions and topical steroid treatment lead to no improvement. Further diagnostic work-up revealed an intrathoracal, paraspinal ganglioneuroblastoma. After operative extirpation of the tumour, all initial symptoms resolved. An esophageal control biopsy 4 weeks after tumour resection was normal. This is the first report of eosinophilic esophagitis as part of a paraneoplastic syndrome in a patient with a malignant disease other than a carcinoma. PMID:25985452

  15. Distal Embolic Protection for Renal Arterial Interventions

    SciTech Connect

    Dubel, Gregory J. Murphy, Timothy P.

    2008-01-15

    Distal or embolic protection has intuitive appeal for its potential to prevent embolization of materials generated during interventional procedures. Distal protection devices (DPDs) have been most widely used in the coronary and carotid vascular beds, where they have demonstrated the ability to trap embolic materials and, in some cases, to reduce complications. Given the frequency of chronic kidney disease in patients with renal artery stenosis undergoing stent placement, it is reasonable to propose that these devices may play an important role in limiting distal embolization in the renal vasculature. Careful review of the literature reveals that atheroembolization does occur during renal arterial interventions, although it often goes undetected. Early experience with DPDs in the renal arteries in patients with suitable anatomy suggests retrieval of embolic materials in approximately 71% of cases and renal functional improvement/stabilization in 98% of cases. The combination of platelet inhibition and a DPD may provide even greater benefit. Given the critical importance of renal functional preservation, it follows that everything that can be done to prevent atheroembolism should be undertaken including the use of DPDs when anatomically feasible. The data available at this time support a beneficial role for these devices.

  16. Distal nerve entrapment following nerve repair.

    PubMed

    Schoeller, T; Otto, A; Wechselberger, G; Pommer, B; Papp, C

    1998-04-01

    Failure of nerve repair or poor functional outcome after reconstruction can be influenced by various causes. Besides improper microsurgical technique, fascicular malalignment and unphysiologic tension, we found in our clinical series that a subclinical nerve compression distal to the repair site can seriously impair regeneration. We concluded that the injured nerve, whether from trauma or microsurgical intervention, could be more susceptible to distal entrapment in the regenerative stage because of its disturbed microcirculation, swelling and the increase of regenerating axons followed by increased nerve volume. In two cases we found the regenerating nerve entrapped at pre-existing anatomical sites of narrowing resulting in impaired functional recovery. In both cases the surgical therapy was decompression of the distal entrapped nerve and this was followed by continued regeneration. Thorough clinical and electrophysiologic follow-up is necessary to detect such adverse compression effects and to distinguish between the various causes of failed regeneration. Under certain circumstances primary preventive decompression may be beneficial if performed at the time of nerve coaptation.

  17. Mirrored visual feedback limits distal effect anticipation.

    PubMed

    Sutter, Christine; Ladwig, Stefan

    2012-04-01

    Modern tools in technological environments are often characterized by a spatial separation of hand actions (operating a remote control) and their intended action effects (displayed movements of an unmanned vehicle, a robot, or an avatar on a screen). Often non-corresponding proximal and distal movement effects put high demands on the human information processing system. The present study aimed to investigate how modern technological environments influence processes of planning and controlling actions. Participants performed ipsi- or contralateral movements in response to colored stimuli, while the stimulus location had to be ignored. They did not see the stimuli and hands directly, but received visual feedback (with retained or reversed spatial relations) on a projection screen in front of them. Visual feedback retaining spatial relations led to the usual Simon effect. However, visual feedback reversing spatial relations inverted the Simon effect in ipsilateral responses, and eliminated it in contralateral responses (Exp. 1). Impairing the proximal movement-effect loop so that proprioceptive/tactile information from the moving hand was no longer a reliable source for planning and controlling actions attenuated compatibility effects (Exp. 2). Moreover, distal action effects predominated action control even for opposing body-related effects. It seemed that action control of transformed movements depended on the reliability of proprioceptive/tactile and visual information. When the amount of feature overlap between proprioception and vision was low and proprioceptive (visual) information was no longer reliable, then distal (proximal) action effects stepped forward and became crucial in controlling transformed actions.

  18. Peroral endoscopic myotomy for esophageal achalasia

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Haruhiro; Ikeda, Haruo; Sato, Hiroki; Sato, Chiaki; Hokierti, Chananya

    2014-01-01

    Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) is one of the alternative treatment for achalasia. Due to concept of natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES), it becomes popular and widely accepted. With the endoluminal technique, submucosal tunnel was created followed by endoscopic myotomy. POEM is not only indicated in classical achalasia but also other abnormal esophageal motility disorders. Moreover, failures of endoscopic treatment or surgical attempted cases are not contraindicated for POEM. The second attempted POEM is also safe and technically feasible. Even though the legend of success of POEM is fruitful, the possible complications are very frightened. Good training and delicate practice will reduce rate of complications. This review provides a summary of current state-of-the-art of POEM, including indication equipments, technique and complications. This perfect procedure may become the treatment of choice of achalasia and some esophageal motility disorders in the near future. PMID:25333007

  19. Spontaneous enterogastric reflux gastritis and esophagitis.

    PubMed Central

    Gowen, G F

    1985-01-01

    Enterogastric reflux gastritis and esophagitis is best known after gastric resections and pyloroplasty but it also occurs spontaneously in the nonoperated patient. Forty-two patients are presented who meet the criteria for the diagnosis: constant burning epigastric pain, worse after meals, unrelieved by antacids and diet; endoscopic demonstration of a gastric bile pool; endoscopic biopsy proof of gastritis and esophagitis; and hypochlorhydria. Patients with mild and moderate stages of the disease can benefit from metoclopramide therapy which improves the gastric emptying mechanism. Of the surgical patients with intractable symptoms, 90% were women, 90% had marked hypochlorhydria, 83% had biliary disease, current or remote, and 50% had anemia. With vagotomy, antrectomy, and Roux-Y anastomosis 45-60 cm downstream, the clinical response has been most encouraging. PMID:3970596

  20. Parenteral nutrition in esophageal cancer patients.

    PubMed Central

    Daly, J M; Massar, E; Giacco, G; Frazier, O H; Mountain, C F; Dudrick, S J; Copeland, E M

    1982-01-01

    A review of operative therapy in 244 patients with esophageal cancer from 1960 to 1980 was done to evaluate the impact of TPN in 72 patients treated from 1973 to 1980 with 43 non-TPN patients treated during the same period and to 129 patients operated upon before 1973. Mean age, sex distribution, site, stage, and treatment of the disease were similar for the two study groups. The TPN group lost less weight during treatment (3 lbs vs. 11 lbs) and had fewer overall complications postoperatively (24% vs. 41%). Significant reductions in major wound, infectious, and postoperative complications were noted in these patients who received at least 5 days of preoperative TPN compared with postoperative TPN or the non-TPN groups (4% vs. 24% and 23%). Malnourished esophageal cancer patients can more safely undergo aggressive operative therapy and radiation treatment when adequate perioperative nutritional support is added to the treatment armamentarium. PMID:6807225

  1. Difficult esophageal atresia: trick and treat.

    PubMed

    Conforti, Andrea; Morini, Francesco; Bagolan, Pietro

    2014-10-01

    Although most patients with esophageal atresia (EA) and tracheo-esophageal fistula (TEF) may benefit from "standard" management, which is deferred emergency surgery, some may present unexpected elements that change this paradigm. Birth weight, associated anomalies, and long gap can influence the therapeutic schedule of the patients with EA/TEF and can make their treatment tricky. As a consequence, detailed information on these aspects gives the power to develop a decision-making process as correct as possible. In this article, we will review the most important factors influencing the treatment of patients with EA/TEF and will share our experience on the diagnostic and therapeutic tips that may provide pivotal help in the management of such patients.

  2. Early esophageal cancer screening in China.

    PubMed

    Gao, Qin-Yan; Fang, Jing-Yuan

    2015-12-01

    In China, the incidence of esophageal cancer (EC) and its related mortality are high. Screening strategies aiming at early diagnosis can improve the prognosis. Researches on detection of early EC, especially in China are reviewed. Compared to esophageal balloon cytology or routine endoscopy, chromoendoscopy with Lugol's staining and biopsy appears to be the gold standard for early EC diagnosis in China today. Narrow-band imaging endoscopy, Confocal Laser endomicroscopy and other novel diagnostic approaches are more and more widely used in developed urban areas, but cost and lack of essential training to the endoscopists have made their use limited in rural areas. No specific biomarkers or serum markers were strongly commended to be used in screening strategies currently, which need to be evaluated in future. Trials on organized screening have been proposed in some regions of china with high disease prevalence. Screening in these areas has been shown to be cost effective. PMID:26651250

  3. Current strategies in chemoradiation for esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, Shane

    2014-01-01

    Chemoradiotherapy (CRT) has an important role in the treatment of esophageal cancer in both the inoperable and the pre-operative settings. Pre-operative chemoradiation therapy is generally given to 41.4-50.4 Gy with platinum or paclitaxel based chemotherapy. The most common definitive dose in the U.S. is 50-50.4 Gy. New advances in CRT for esophageal cancer have come from looking for ways to minimize toxicity and maximize efficacy. Recent investigations for minimizing toxicity have focused advanced radiation techniques such as IMRT and proton therapy, have sought to further define normal tissue tolerances, and have examined the use of tighter fields with less elective clinical target volume coverage. Efforts to maximize efficacy have included the use of early positron emission tomography (PET) response directed therapy, molecularly targeted therapies, and the use of tumor markers that predict response. PMID:24982764

  4. Early esophageal cancer screening in China.

    PubMed

    Gao, Qin-Yan; Fang, Jing-Yuan

    2015-12-01

    In China, the incidence of esophageal cancer (EC) and its related mortality are high. Screening strategies aiming at early diagnosis can improve the prognosis. Researches on detection of early EC, especially in China are reviewed. Compared to esophageal balloon cytology or routine endoscopy, chromoendoscopy with Lugol's staining and biopsy appears to be the gold standard for early EC diagnosis in China today. Narrow-band imaging endoscopy, Confocal Laser endomicroscopy and other novel diagnostic approaches are more and more widely used in developed urban areas, but cost and lack of essential training to the endoscopists have made their use limited in rural areas. No specific biomarkers or serum markers were strongly commended to be used in screening strategies currently, which need to be evaluated in future. Trials on organized screening have been proposed in some regions of china with high disease prevalence. Screening in these areas has been shown to be cost effective.

  5. Modified spleen stiffness measurement by transient elastography is associated with presence of large oesophageal varices in patients with compensated hepatitis C virus cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Calvaruso, V; Bronte, F; Conte, E; Simone, F; Craxì, A; Di Marco, V

    2013-12-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of liver transient elastography (TE), spleen TE and other noninvasive tests (AAR, APRI score, platelet count, platelet/spleen ratio) in predicting the presence and the size of oesophageal varices in compensated hepatitis C virus (HCV) cirrhosis, we studied 112 consecutive patients with compensated HCV cirrhosis who underwent biochemical tests, gastrointestinal endoscopy, liver TE and spleen TE by Fibroscan(®) (Echosens, Paris, France) using a modified software version with a range between 1.5 and 150 kPa. Spleen TE was not reliable in 16 patients (14.3%). Among the 96 patients with a valid measurement (69.8% men, mean age: 63.2 ± 9.5 years), 43.7% had no oesophageal varices, 29.2% had grade 1% and 27.1% had grade 2 or grade 3 oesophageal varices. Patients with values of 75 kPa by standard spleen TE had mean values of modified spleen TE of 117 kPa (range: 81.7-149.5). Linear regression revealed a significant correlation between modified spleen TE and oesophageal varix size (r = 0.501; beta: 0.763, SE: 0.144; P < 0.001). On univariate analysis, the variables associated with grade 2/grade 3 oesophageal varices were AAR score, APRI score, platelet/spleen ratio, liver TE and modified spleen TE. On multivariate analysis, only modified spleen TE (OR: 1.026; 95% CI: 1.007-1.046; P = 0.006) and AAR (OR: 14.725; 95% CI: 1.928-112.459; P = 0.010) remained independently associated with grade 2/grade 3 oesophageal varices. Platelet/spleen ratio was the best predictor of oesophageal varices area under the ROC curve (AUROC: 0.763, cut-off: 800, sensitivity: 74%, specificity: 70%), while modified spleen TE was more accurate in predicting grade 2/grade 3 oesophageal varices (AUROC: 0.82, cut-off: 54.0 kPa, sensitivity: 80%, specificity: 70%). Portal hypertension increases spleen stiffness, and the measurement of modified spleen TE is an accurate, noninvasive tool for predicting the presence of large oesophageal varices in patients with compensated HCV

  6. Reversal of lower esophageal sphincter hypotension and esophageal aperistalsis after treatment for hypothyroidism

    SciTech Connect

    Eastwood, G.L.; Braverman, L.E.; White, E.M.; Vander Salm, T.J.

    1982-08-01

    A 65-year-old woman suffered from both chronic gastroesophageal reflux, which was complicated by columnar metaplasia (Barrett's epithelium), and profound hypothyroidism. An esophageal motility tracing showed absence of peristalsis in the lower esophagus and the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) could not be identified. Thyroid replacement therapy, in conjunction with antacid and cimetidine treatment, was associated not only with improvement in the gastroesophageal reflux symptoms, but also with a return of esophageal peristalsis and LES pressure to normal. To support our clinical observations, we rendered four cats hypothyroid with /sup 131/I and documented a fall in LES pressure. We propose that abnormal smooth-muscle function of the esophagus may be another manifestation of the gastrointestinal motility disturbances which are associated with hypothyroidism.

  7. Advances in Clinical Management of Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Dellon, Evan S.; Liacouras, Chris A.

    2014-01-01

    EoE is a chronic immune/antigen-mediated clinicopathologic condition that has become an increasingly important cause of upper gastrointestinal morbidity in adults and children over the past 2 decades. It is diagnosed based on symptoms of esophageal dysfunction, the presence of at least 15 eosinophils/high-power field in esophageal biopsies, and exclusion of competing causes of esophageal eosinophilia, including proton pump inhibitor-responsive esophageal eosinophilia (PPI-REE). We review what we have recently learned about the clinical aspects of EoE, discussing the clinical, endoscopic, and histologic features of EoE in adults and children. We explain the current diagnostic criteria and challenges to diagnosis, including the role of gastroesophageal reflux disease and PPI-REE. It is also important to consider the epidemiology of EoE (current incidence of 1/10,000 new cases per year and prevalence of 0.5-1/1,000 cases per year) and disease progression. We review the main treatment approaches and new treatment options; EoE can be treated with topical corticosteroids such as fluticasone and budesonide, or dietary strategies, such as amino acid-based formulas, allergy test-directed elimination diets, and non-directed empiric elimination diets. Endoscopic dilation has also become an important tool for treatment of fibrostenostic complications of EoE. There are number of unresolved issues in EoE, including phenotypes, optimal treatment endpoints, the role of maintenance therapy, and treatment of refractory EoE. The care of patients with EoE and the study of the disease span many disciplines—EoE is ideally managed by a multidisciplinary team of gastroenterologists, allergists, pathologists, and dieticians. PMID:25109885

  8. Robotic distal pancreatectomy versus conventional laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy: a comparative study for short-term outcomes.

    PubMed

    Lai, Eric C H; Tang, Chung Ngai

    2015-09-01

    Robotic system has been increasingly used in pancreatectomy. However, the effectiveness of this method remains uncertain. This study compared the surgical outcomes between robot-assisted laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy and conventional laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy. During a 15-year period, 35 patients underwent minimally invasive approach of distal pancreatectomy in our center. Seventeen of these patients had robot-assisted laparoscopic approach, and the remaining 18 had conventional laparoscopic approach. Their operative parameters and perioperative outcomes were analyzed retrospectively in a prospective database. The mean operating time in the robotic group (221.4 min) was significantly longer than that in the laparoscopic group (173.6 min) (P = 0.026). Both robotic and conventional laparoscopic groups presented no significant difference in spleen-preservation rate (52.9% vs. 38.9%) (P = 0.505), operative blood loss (100.3 ml vs. 268.3 ml) (P = 0.29), overall morbidity rate (47.1% vs. 38.9%) (P = 0.73), and post-operative hospital stay (11.4 days vs. 14.2 days) (P = 0.46). Both groups also showed no perioperative mortality. Similar outcomes were observed in robotic distal pancreatectomy and conventional laparoscopic approach. However, robotic approach tended to have the advantages of less blood loss and shorter hospital stay. Further studies are necessary to determine the clinical position of robotic distal pancreatectomy.

  9. Critical pitfall: varices in cancer patients mimicking lymphadenopathy; differentiation of varicose veins and enlarged lymph nodes in routine staging.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Tilman; Pansini, Michele; Bongartz, Georg; Niemann, Tilo

    2011-01-01

    Two patients, each with a history of multiple cancers, were referred to our institution for routine cancer staging. Contrast enhanced multislice-CT showed round and oval shaped inguinal and retroperitoneal masses in one patient and inguinal mass lesions in the other patient. The mass lesions were suspicious of lymphadenopathy related to cancer recurrence. Additional MR-Imaging, however, showed tortuous varicose veins as well as suspicious lymph nodes in one patient and solely venous convolutes in the other patient. Regarding the routine contrast enhanced CT-scan in the portovenous phase, varices showed no significant difference in radiodensity compared to enlarged lymph nodes.

  10. [Minimally Invasive Treatment of Esophageal Benign Diseases].

    PubMed

    Inoue, Haruhiro

    2016-07-01

    As a minimally invasive treatment of esophageal achalasia per-oral endoscopic myotomy( POEM) was developed in 2008. More than 1,100 cases of achalasia-related diseases received POEM. Success rate of the procedure was more than 95%(Eckerdt score improvement 3 points and more). No serious( Clavian-Dindo classification III b and more) complication was experienced. These results suggest that POEM becomes a standard minimally invasive treatment for achalasia-related diseases. As an off-shoot of POEM submucosal tumor removal through submucosal tunnel (per-oral endoscopic tumor resection:POET) was developed and safely performed. Best indication of POET is less than 5 cm esophageal leiomyoma. A novel endoscopic treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) was developed. Anti-reflux mucosectomy( ARMS) is nearly circumferential mucosal reduction of gastric cardia mucosa. ARMS is performed in 56 consecutive cases of refractory GERD. No major complications were encountered and excellent clinical results. Best indication of ARMS is a refractory GERD without long sliding hernia. Longest follow-up case is more than 10 years. Minimally invasive treatments for esophageal benign diseases are currently performed by therapeutic endoscopy. PMID:27440038

  11. A Review of Esophageal Chest Pain

    PubMed Central

    Coss-Adame, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Noncardiac chest pain is a term that encompasses all causes of chest pain after a cardiac source has been excluded. This article focuses on esophageal sources for chest pain. Esophageal chest pain (ECP) is common, affects quality of life, and carries a substantial health care burden. The lack of a systematic approach toward the diagnosis and treatment of ECP has led to significant disability and increased health care costs for this condition. Identifying the underlying cause(s) or mechanism(s) for chest pain is key for its successful management. Common etiologies include gastroesophageal reflux disease, esophageal hypersensitivity, dysmotility, and psychological conditions, including panic disorder and anxiety. However, the pathophysiology of this condition is not yet fully understood. Randomized controlled trials have shown that proton pump inhibitor therapy (either omeprazole, lansoprazole, or rabeprazole) can be effective. Evidence for the use of antidepressants and the adenosine receptor antagonist theophylline is fair. Psychological treatments, notably cognitive behavioral therapy, may be useful in select patients. Surgery is not recommended. There remains a large unmet need for identifying the phenotype and prevalence of pathophysiologic mechanisms of ECP as well as for well-designed multicenter clinical trials of current and novel therapies. PMID:27134590

  12. Eosinophilic esophagitis: From pathophysiology to treatment

    PubMed Central

    D’Alessandro, Alessandra; Esposito, Dario; Pesce, Marcella; Cuomo, Rosario; De Palma, Giovanni Domenico; Sarnelli, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic immune disease, characterized by a dense eosinophilic infiltrate in the esophagus, leading to bolus impaction and reflux-like symptoms. Traditionally considered a pediatric disease, the number of adult patients with EoE is continuously increasing, with a relatively higher incidence in western countries. Dysphagia and food impaction represent the main symptoms complained by patients, but gastroesophageal reflux-like symptoms may also be present. Esophageal biopsies are mandatory for the diagnosis of EoE, though clinical manifestations and proton pump inhibitors responsiveness must be taken into consideration. The higher prevalence of EoE in patients suffering from atopic diseases suggests a common background with allergy, however both the etiology and pathophysiology are not completely understood. Elimination diets are considered the first-line therapy in children, but this approach appears less effective in adults patients, who often require steroids; despite medical treatments, EoE is complicated in some cases by esophageal stricture and stenosis, that require additional endoscopic treatments. This review summarizes the evidence on EoE pathophysiology and illustrates the safety and efficacy of the most recent medical and endoscopic treatments. PMID:26600973

  13. Lymphocytic Esophagitis: A Diagnosis of Increasing Frequency

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Shirley; Saxena, Aditi; Waljee, Akbar; Piraka, Cyrus; Purdy, Julianne; Appelman, Henry; McKenna, Barbara; Elmunzer, B. Joseph; Singal, Amit G.

    2012-01-01

    Background Despite being found with increasing frequency on esophageal biopsies, the clinical significance of lymphocytic esophagitis (LE) remains poorly understood. Goals The primary aim of our study was to characterize the clinical presentation and natural history of LE among adult patients. Study We retrospectively reviewed records for all 81 adult patients at the University of Michigan Medical Center who had a histopathological diagnosis of LE between January 1998 and November 2009. Patient demographics, clinical history, laboratory data, and imaging results from the time of diagnosis were obtained through review of computerized medical records. A telephone survey was conducted to collect natural history data. Results The number of LE diagnoses increased over time, with 81.5% (n=66) of patients being diagnosed in the last three years. The most frequent symptoms at the time of presentation were dysphagia (n=54), chest/abdominal pain (n=36), and heartburn (n=38). The majority (58.6%) of patients reported improvement in their initial gastrointestinal symptoms – most commonly associated with initiation of a proton pump inhibitor. Upon follow-up, most patients reported a good quality of life and satisfaction with their current health status. Conclusions Lymphocytic esophagitis is a new clinical entity with an increasing incidence. LE appears to have a benign natural history, with most patients reporting an improvement in symptoms and satisfaction with their health-related quality of life. Prospective studies are needed to better characterize the natural history and potential treatments for this clinical entity. PMID:22751335

  14. Esophageal Stricture Prevention after Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Deepanshu; Singhal, Shashideep

    2016-01-01

    Advances in diagnostic modalities and improvement in surveillance programs for Barrett esophagus has resulted in an increase in the incidence of superficial esophageal cancers (SECs). SEC, due to their limited metastatic potential, are amenable to non-invasive treatment modalities. Endoscopic ultrasound, endoscopic mucosal resection, and endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) are some of the new modalities that gastroenterologists have used over the last decade to diagnose and treat SEC. However, esophageal stricture (ES) is a very common complication and a major cause of morbidity post-ESD. In the past few years, there has been a tremendous effort to reduce the incidence of ES among patients undergoing ESD. Steroids have shown the most consistent results over time with minimal complications although the preferred mode of delivery is debatable, with both systemic and local therapy having pros and cons for specific subgroups of patients. Newer modalities such as esophageal stents, autologous cell sheet transplantation, polyglycolic acid, and tranilast have shown promising results but the depth of experience with these methods is still limited. We have summarized case reports, prospective single center studies, and randomized controlled trials describing the various methods intended to reduce the incidence of ES after ESD. Indications, techniques, outcomes, limitations, and reported complications are discussed. PMID:26949124

  15. Influence of celiac axis lymph nodes in the definitive treatment of esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Frizzell, Bart; Sinha, Debajyoti; Williams, Todd; Reed, Carolyn E; Sherman, Carol A; Turrisi, Andrew

    2003-06-01

    The management of patients with cancer of the distal thoracic esophagus is often made difficult by the presence of disease in the celiac axis lymph nodes. We investigated the outcome of such patients treated for cure in an attempt to better define the best treatment. The charts of all patients with esophageal cancer treated at the Department of Radiation Oncology at the Medical University of South Carolina between 1990 and 1998 were reviewed. Three groups of patients were analyzed: NoMo, N1Mo, and patients with positive celiac axis lymph nodes (M1a). Among 217 patients, 56 patients received radiotherapy with intent to cure, along with surgery, chemotherapy, or some combination of these modalities. Of these, 14 had disease of the distal esophagus with the celiac axis as their only site of distant disease. Comparison of survival curves in the three analyzed groups revealed no statistically significant differences in terms of overall survival (p = 0.3458 by the log-rank test) or disease-free survival (p = 0.5509 by the log-rank test). Patients with positive celiac axis lymph nodes as their only site of "M1" disease experienced a 2-year survival rate similar to "Mo" patients when treated with curative intent. PMID:12796587

  16. Management of non-variceal upper gastrointestinal tract hemorrhage: controversies and areas of uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Trawick, Eric P; Yachimski, Patrick S

    2012-03-21

    Upper gastrointestinal tract hemorrhage (UGIH) remains a common presentation requiring urgent evaluation and treatment. Accurate assessment, appropriate intervention and apt clinical skills are needed for proper management from time of presentation to discharge. The advent of pharmacologic acid suppression, endoscopic hemostatic techniques, and recognition of Helicobacter pylori as an etiologic agent in peptic ulcer disease (PUD) has revolutionized the treatment of UGIH. Despite this, acute UGIH still carries considerable rates of morbidity and mortality. This review aims to discuss current areas of uncertainty and controversy in the management of UGIH. Neoadjuvant proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy has become standard empiric treatment for UGIH given that PUD is the leading cause of non-variceal UGIH, and PPIs are extremely effective at promoting ulcer healing. However, neoadjuvant PPI administration has not been shown to affect hard clinical outcomes such as rebleeding or mortality. The optimal timing of upper endoscopy in UGIH is often debated. Upon completion of volume resuscitation and hemodynamic stabilization, upper endoscopy should be performed within 24 h in all patients with evidence of UGIH for both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. With rising healthcare cost paramount in today's medical landscape, the ability to appropriately triage UGIH patients is of increasing value. Upper endoscopy in conjunction with the clinical scenario allows for accurate decision making concerning early discharge home in low-risk lesions or admission for further monitoring and treatment in higher-risk lesions. Concomitant pharmacotherapy with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and antiplatelet agents, such as clopidogrel, has a major impact on the etiology, severity, and potential treatment of UGIH. Long-term PPI use in patients taking chronic NSAIDs or clopidogrel is discussed thoroughly in this review. PMID:22468078

  17. Aspirin use for primary prophylaxis: Adverse outcomes in non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Souk, Karina M; Tamim, Hani M; Abu Daya, Hussein A; Rockey, Don C; Barada, Kassem A

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To compare outcomes of patients with non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NVUGIB) taking aspirin for primary prophylaxis to those not taking it. METHODS: Patients not known to have any vascular disease (coronary artery or cerebrovascular disease) who were admitted to the American University of Beirut Medical Center between 1993 and 2010 with NVUGIB were included. The frequencies of in-hospital mortality, re-bleeding, severe bleeding, need for surgery or embolization, and of a composite outcome defined as the occurrence of any of the 4 bleeding related adverse outcomes were compared between patients receiving aspirin and those on no antithrombotics. We also compared frequency of in hospital complications and length of hospital stay between the two groups. RESULTS: Of 357 eligible patients, 94 were on aspirin and 263 patients were on no antithrombotics (control group). Patients in the aspirin group were older, the mean age was 58 years in controls and 67 years in the aspirin group (P < 0.001). Patients in the aspirin group had significantly more co-morbidities, including diabetes mellitus and hypertension [25 (27%) vs 31 (112%) and 44 (47%) vs 74 (28%) respectively, (P = 0.001)], as well as dyslipidemia [21 (22%) vs 16 (6%), P < 0.0001). Smoking was more frequent in the aspirin group [34 (41%) vs 60 (27%), P = 0.02)]. The frequencies of endoscopic therapy and surgery were similar in both groups. Patients who were on aspirin had lower in-hospital mortality rates (2.1% vs 13.7%, P = 0.002), shorter hospital stay (4.9 d vs 7 d, P = 0.01), and fewer composite outcomes (10.6% vs 24%, P = 0.01). The frequencies of in-hospital complications and re-bleeding were similar in the two groups. CONCLUSION: Patients who present with NVUGIB while receiving aspirin for primary prophylaxis had fewer adverse outcomes. Thus aspirin may have a protective effect beyond its cardiovascular benefits. PMID:27462392

  18. Upper Gastrointestinal Symptoms Predictive of Candida Esophagitis and Erosive Esophagitis in HIV and Non-HIV Patients

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Yuta; Nagata, Naoyoshi; Shimbo, Takuro; Nishijima, Takeshi; Watanabe, Koji; Aoki, Tomonori; Sekine, Katsunori; Okubo, Hidetaka; Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Sakurai, Toshiyuki; Yokoi, Chizu; Mimori, Akio; Oka, Shinichi; Uemura, Naomi; Akiyama, Junichi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Upper gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms are common in both HIV and non-HIV-infected patients, but the difference of GI symptom severity between 2 groups remains unknown. Candida esophagitis and erosive esophagitis, 2 major types of esophagitis, are seen in both HIV and non-HIV-infected patients, but differences in GI symptoms that are predictive of esophagitis between 2 groups remain unknown. We aimed to determine whether GI symptoms differ between HIV-infected and non-HIV-infected patients, and identify specific symptoms of candida esophagitis and erosive esophagitis between 2 groups. We prospectively enrolled 6011 patients (HIV, 430; non-HIV, 5581) who underwent endoscopy and completed questionnaires. Nine upper GI symptoms (epigastric pain, heartburn, acid regurgitation, hunger cramps, nausea, early satiety, belching, dysphagia, and odynophagia) were evaluated using a 7-point Likert scale. Associations between esophagitis and symptoms were analyzed by the multivariate logistic regression model adjusted for age, sex, and proton pump inhibitors. Endoscopy revealed GI-organic diseases in 33.4% (2010/6.011) of patients. The prevalence of candida esophagitis and erosive esophagitis was 11.2% and 12.1% in HIV-infected patients, respectively, whereas it was 2.9% and 10.7 % in non-HIV-infected patients, respectively. After excluding GI-organic diseases, HIV-infected patients had significantly (P < 0.05) higher symptom scores for heartburn, hunger cramps, nausea, early satiety, belching, dysphagia, and odynophagia than non-HIV-infected patients. In HIV-infected patients, any symptom was not significantly associated with CD4 cell count. In multivariate analysis, none of the 9 GI symptoms were associated with candida esophagitis in HIV-infected patients, whereas dysphagia and odynophagia were independently (P < 0.05) associated with candida esophagitis in non-HIV-infected patients. However, heartburn and acid regurgitation were independently (P < 0

  19. Prospective randomized trial comparing Billroth I and Roux-en-Y procedures after distal gastrectomy for gastric carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Makoto; Kitayama, Joji; Kaizaki, Shoichi; Nakayama, Hiroshi; Ishigami, Hironori; Fujii, Shin; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Inoue, Tomomi; Sako, Akihiro; Asakage, Masahiro; Yamashita, Hiroharu; Hatono, Kenji; Nagawa, Hirokazu

    2005-11-01

    To determine the clinical efficacy of Roux-en-Y reconstruction (RY) after distal gastrectomy, we compared postoperative outcomes of patients who underwent RY or conventional Billroth I reconstruction (B-I). A total of 50 patients were prospectively randomized to either B-I or RY reconstruction, and complications, postoperative course, and nutritional status were compared. Bile reflux and inflammation in the remnant stomach and lower esophagus were evaluated by postoperative follow-up endoscopy at 6 months. Operative time and blood loss as well as postoperative nutrition did not show significant differences between the two groups. As anticipated, 5 of 24 patients with RY reconstruction developed gastrojejunal stasis in the early postoperative period, which led to a longer postoperative hospital stay as compared with the B-I group (mean +/- S.D; B-I; 19.0 +/- 6.2, RY; 31.8 +/- 21.7 days) (P < 0.05). Endoscopic examination revealed that the frequency of bile reflux (P < 0.01) and degree of inflammation in the remnant stomach (P < 0.05) were less in the RY group than in the B-I group. However, inflammatory findings in the lower esophagus were observed in 7 (27%) of B-I, and 8 (35%) of the RY group, suggesting that late phase esophagitis was not improved in the RY group. Roux-en-Y reconstruction was effective in preventing duodenogastric reflux and resulting gastritis, but it did not prevent esophagitis. Because RY reconstruction induces the frequent complication of Roux-en-Y stasis, causing longer postoperative hospital stay, this method has limited advantages over B-I anastomosis after distal gastrectomy.

  20. Circular smooth muscle contributes to esophageal shortening during peristalsis

    PubMed Central

    Vegesna, Anil K; Chuang, Keng-Yu; Besetty, Ramashesai; Phillips, Steven J; Braverman, Alan S; Barbe, Mary F; Ruggieri, Michael R; Miller, Larry S

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To study the angle between the circular smooth muscle (CSM) and longitudinal smooth muscle (LSM) fibers in the distal esophagus. METHODS: In order to identify possible mechanisms for greater shortening in the distal compared to proximal esophagus during peristalsis, the angles between the LSM and CSM layers were measured in 9 cadavers. The outer longitudinal layer of the muscularis propria was exposed after stripping the outer serosa. The inner circular layer of the muscularis propria was then revealed after dissection of the esophageal mucosa and the underlying muscularis mucosa. Photographs of each specimen were taken with half of the open esophagus folded back showing both the outer longitudinal and inner circular muscle layers. Angles were measured every one cm for 10 cm proximal to the squamocolumnar junction (SCJ) by two independent investigators. Two human esophagi were obtained from organ transplant donors and the angles between the circular and longitudinal smooth muscle layers were measured using micro-computed tomography (micro CT) and Image J software. RESULTS: All data are presented as mean ± SE. The CSM to LSM angle at the SCJ and 1 cm proximal to SCJ on the autopsy specimens was 69.3 ± 4.62 degrees vs 74.9 ± 3.09 degrees, P = 0.32. The CSM to LSM angle at SCJ were statistically significantly lower than at 2, 3, 4 and 5 cm proximal to the SCJ, 69.3 ± 4.62 degrees vs 82.58 ± 1.34 degrees, 84.04 ± 1.64 degrees, 84.87 ± 1.04 degrees and 83.72 ± 1.42 degrees, P = 0.013, P = 0.008, P = 0.004, P = 0.009 respectively. The CSM to LSM angle at SCJ was also statistically significantly lower than the angles at 6, 7 and 8 cm proximal to the SCJ, 69.3 ± 4.62 degrees vs 80.18 ± 2.09 degrees, 81.81 ± 1.75 degrees and 80.96 ± 2.04 degrees, P = 0.05, P = 0.02, P = 0.03 respectively. The CSM to LSM angle at 1 cm proximal to SCJ was statistically significantly lower than at 3, 4 and 5 cm proximal to the SCJ, 74.94 ± 3.09 degrees vs 84.04 ± 1

  1. Complications of Distal Biceps Tendon Repair

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Nirav H.; Volpi, Alex; Lynch, T. Sean; Patel, Ronak M.; Cerynik, Douglas L.; Schickendantz, Mark S.; Jones, Morgan H.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Anatomic reinsertion of the distal biceps is critical for restoring flexion and supination strength. Single- and double-incision surgical techniques have been reported, analyzing complications and outcomes measures. Which technique results in superior clinical outcomes and the lowest associated complications remains unclear. Hypothesis: We hypothesized that rerupture rates would be similar between the 2 techniques, while nerve complications would be higher for the single-incision technique and heterotopic ossification would be more frequent with the double-incision technique. Study Design: Systematic review and meta-analysis; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: A systematic review was conducted using the PubMed, MEDLINE, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), SPORTSDiscus, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases to identify articles reporting distal biceps ruptures up to August 2013. We included English-language articles on adult patients with a minimum of 3 cases reporting single- and double-incision techniques. Frequencies of each complication as a percentage of total cases were calculated. Fisher exact tests were used to test the association between frequencies for each repair method, with P < .05 considered statistically significant. Odds ratios with 95% CIs were also computed. Results: A total of 87 articles met the inclusion criteria. Lateral antebrachial cutaneous nerve neurapraxia was the most common complication in the single-incision group, occurring in 77 of 785 cases (9.8%). Heterotopic ossification was the most common complication in the double-incision group, occurring in 36 of 498 cases (7.2%). Conclusion: The overall frequency of reported complications is higher for single-incision distal biceps repair than for double-incision repair. The frequencies of rerupture and nerve complications are both higher for single-incision repairs while the frequency of heterotopic ossification is higher for

  2. Prevention of esophageal strictures after endoscopic submucosal dissection

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Shinichiro; Kanai, Nobuo; Ohki, Takeshi; Takagi, Ryo; Yamaguchi, Naoyuki; Isomoto, Hajime; Kasai, Yoshiyuki; Hosoi, Takahiro; Nakao, Kazuhiko; Eguchi, Susumu; Yamamoto, Masakazu; Yamato, Masayuki; Okano, Teruo

    2014-01-01

    Endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) and endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) have recently been accepted as less invasive methods for treating patients with early esophageal cancers such as squamous cell carcinoma and dysplasia of Barrett’s esophagus. However, the large defects in the esophageal mucosa often cause severe esophageal strictures, which dramatically reduce the patient’s quality of life. Although preventive endoscopic balloon dilatation can reduce dysphagia and the frequency of dilatation, other approaches are necessary to prevent esophageal strictures after ESD. This review describes several strategies for preventing esophageal strictures after ESD, with a particular focus on anti-inflammatory and tissue engineering approaches. The local injection of triamcinolone acetonide and other systemic steroid therapies are frequently used to prevent esophageal strictures after ESD. Tissue engineering approaches for preventing esophageal strictures have recently been applied in basic research studies. Scaffolds with temporary stents have been applied in five cases, and this technique has been shown to be safe and is anticipated to prevent esophageal strictures. Fabricated autologous oral mucosal epithelial cell sheets to cover the defective mucosa similarly to how commercially available skin products fabricated from epidermal cells are used for skin defects or in cases of intractable ulcers. Fabricated autologous oral-mucosal-epithelial cell sheets have already been shown to be safe. PMID:25386058

  3. Distal Renal Tubular Acidosis and Calcium Nephrolithiasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moe, Orson W.; Fuster, Daniel G.; Xie, Xiao-Song

    2008-09-01

    Calcium stones are commonly encountered in patients with congenital distal renal tubular acidosis, a disease of renal acidification caused by mutations in either the vacuolar H+-ATPase (B1 or a4 subunit), anion exchanger-1, or carbonic anhydrase II. Based on the existing database, we present two hypotheses. First, heterozygotes with mutations in B1 subunit of H+-ATPase are not normal but may harbor biochemical abnormalities such as renal acidification defects, hypercalciuria, and hypocitraturia which can predispose them to kidney stone formation. Second, we propose at least two mechanisms by which mutant B1 subunit can impair H+-ATPase: defective pump assembly and defective pump activity.

  4. A Rare Disease of the Digestive Tract: Esophageal Melanosis

    PubMed Central

    Destek, Sebahattin; Gul, Vahit Onur; Ahioglu, Serkan; Erbil, Yesim

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal melanosis which is characterized by melanocytic proliferation in the squamous epithelium of the esophagus and melanin accumulatin of esophageal mucosa (EM) is a rare disease of the digestive system. Although esophageal melanosis is considered to be a benign disease, its etiology is not cleared and has been reported to be the precursor lesion of esophageal primary melanomas. In this report, we aimed to note esophageal melanosis in a 55-year-old female case who applied to our clinic with difficulty in swallowing, burning behind the breastbone in the stomach, heartburn, indigestion, and pain in the upper abdomen after endoscopic and pathologic evaluation. Complaints dropped with anti-acid therapy and case was followed by intermittent endoscopic procedures because of precursor melanocytic lesions. PMID:27785326

  5. Bevacizumab and Combination Chemotherapy Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced Esophageal or Stomach Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the Esophagus; Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Diffuse Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Intestinal Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Mixed Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Esophagus; Stage IA Esophageal Cancer; Stage IA Gastric Cancer; Stage IB Esophageal Cancer; Stage IB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIA Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIB Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIA Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer

  6. Comparison of microcoils and polyvinyl alcohol particles in selective microcatheter angioembolization of non variceal acute gastrointestinal hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Tanveer-Ul-Haq; Idris, Muhammad; Salam, Basit; Akhtar, Waseem; Jamil, Yasir

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To compare the efficacy of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) particles with microcoils in angiembolisation of non variceal acute gastrointestinal haemorrhage. Methods: This is a retrospective cross-sectional study of patients who underwent transcatheter angioembolization from January, 1995 to December, 2013 at Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi. Patients were divided into two groups on basis of use of either microcoils or PVA particles and compared in terms of technical success, clinical success, re-bleeding and ischemic complication rates. Chi (χ2) square and Fisher’s exact tests were applied and a P-value of less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Fifty seven patients underwent angioembolization. Microcoil and PVA particles embolization was performed in 63% (36/57) and 35% (20/57) cases respectively. Technical success was achieved in all cases (100%). Clinical success rate was higher in microcoils group (92%) than PVA particles group (75%) with statistically significant P value (p=0.048). Ischemic complication was seen in one case (3%) in the microcoil group, while no such complications were seen in the PVA particles group. Conclusion: In angioembolization of non variceal acute gastrointestinal haemorrhage microcoils are better than Polyvinyl alcohol particles with higher clinical success and lower re-bleed rates. PMID:26430397

  7. Repeated pancreatitis-induced splenic vein thrombosis leads to intractable gastric variceal bleeding: A case report and review

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Shan-Hong; Zeng, Wei-Zheng; He, Qian-Wen; Qin, Jian-Ping; Wu, Xiao-Ling; Wang, Tao; Wang, Zhao; He, Xuan; Zhou, Xiao-Lei; Fan, Quan-Shui; Jiang, Ming-De

    2015-01-01

    Gastric varices (GV) are one of the most common complications for patients with portal hypertension. Currently, histoacryl injection is recommended as the initial treatment for bleeding of GV, and this injection has been confirmed to be highly effective for most patients in many studies. However, this treatment might be ineffective for some types of GV, such as splenic vein thrombosis-related localized portal hypertension (also called left-sided, sinistral, or regional portal hypertension). Herein, we report a case of repeated pancreatitis-induced complete splenic vein thrombosis that led to intractable gastric variceal bleeding, which was treated by splenectomy. We present detailed radiological and pathological data and blood rheology analysis (the splenic artery - after a short gastric vein or stomach vein - gastric coronary vein - portal vein). The pathophysiology can be explained by the abnormal direction of blood flow in this patient. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case for which detailed pathology and blood rheology data are available. PMID:26488031

  8. Comparison of planning target volumes based on three-dimensional and four-dimensional CT imaging of thoracic esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Li, Jianbin; Zhang, Yingjie; Shao, Qian; Xu, Min; Fan, Tingyong; Wang, Jinzhi

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose To investigate the definition of planning target volumes (PTVs) based on four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) compared with conventional PTV definition and PTV definition using asymmetrical margins for thoracic primary esophageal cancer. Materials and methods Forty-three patients with esophageal cancer underwent 3DCT and 4DCT simulation scans during free breathing. The motions of primary tumors located in the proximal (group A), middle (group B), and distal (group C) thoracic esophagus were obtained from the 4DCT scans. PTV3D was defined on 3DCT using the tumor motion measured based on 4DCT, PTV conventional (PTVconv) was defined on 3DCT by adding a 1.0 cm margin to the clinical target volume, and PTV4D was defined as the union of the target volumes contoured on the ten phases of the 4DCT images. The centroid positions, volumetric differences, and dice similarity coefficients were evaluated for all PTVs. Results The median centroid shifts between PTV3D and PTV4D and between PTVconv and PTV4D in all three dimensions were <0.3 cm for the three groups. The median size ratios of PTV4D to PTV3D were 0.80, 0.88, and 0.71, and PTV4D to PTVconv were 0.67, 0.73, and 0.76 (χ2=−3.18, −2.98, and −3.06; P=0.001, 0.003, and 0.002) for groups A, B, and C, respectively. The dice similarity coefficients were 0.87, 0.90, and 0.81 between PTV4D and PTV3D and 0.80, 0.84, and 0.83 between PTV4D and PTVconv (χ2 =−3.18, −2.98, and −3.06; P=0.001, 0.003, and 0.002) for groups A, B, and C, respectively. The difference between the degree of inclusion of PTV4D in PTV3D and that of PTV4D in PTVconv was <2% for all groups. Compared with PTVconv, the amount of irradiated normal tissue for PTV3D was decreased by 11.81% and 11.86% in groups A and B, respectively, but was increased by 2.93% in group C. Conclusion For proximal and middle esophageal cancer, 3DCT-based PTV using asymmetrical margins provides good coverage of PTV4D; however, for distal

  9. Emerging techniques and efficacy of endoscopic esophageal reconstruction and lumen restoration for complete esophageal obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Perbtani, Yaseen; Suarez, Alejandro L.; Wagh, Mihir S.

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Complete esophageal obstruction (CEO) is a rare occurrence characterized by progressive esophageal stricture, which eventually causes lumen obliteration. With recent advances in flexible endoscopy, various innovative techniques exist for restoring luminal continuity. The primary aim of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of patients undergoing combined antegrade-retrograde endoscopic dilation for CEO at our institution. The secondary aim was to review and highlight emerging techniques, outcomes, and adverse events after endoscopic treatment of CEO. Patients and methods: Our electronic endoscopy database was retrospectively reviewed to identify patients who underwent combined antegrade and retrograde endoscopy for CEO. Patient and procedural data collected included gender, age, technical success, pre- and post-dysphagia scores, and adverse events. Results: Six patients (67 % male, mean age 71.6 years [range 63 – 80]) underwent technically successful esophageal reconstruction with combined antegrade-retrograde endoscopy. All patients noted improvement in dysphagia with mean pre-procedure dysphagia score of 4 reduced to 1.33 (range 0 – 3) post-procedure. There were no adverse events and mean follow-up time was 17.3 months (range 3 – 48). Conclusions: Combined antegrade and retrograde endoscopic therapy for CEO is feasible and safe. We present our experience with endoscopic management of complete esophageal obstruction, and highlight emerging techniques, outcomes and adverse events related to this minimally invasive modality. PMID:26878039

  10. A new approach for the management of esophageal atresia without tracheo-esophageal fistula.

    PubMed

    Bedi, Nandini K; Grewal, Alka G; Rathore, Shubhra; George, Uttam

    2016-01-01

    Long gap esophageal atresia (OA) is a challenging condition. While discussing the various methods of management available to us, we report the use of magnetic resonance imaging in a case of pure OA to judge the gap between two ends of the esophagus. PMID:27365910

  11. Patterns of esophageal inhibition during swallowing, pharyngeal stimulation, and transient LES relaxation. Lower esophageal sphincter.

    PubMed

    Pouderoux, Philippe; Verdier, Eric; Kahrilas, Peter J

    2003-02-01

    Lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxation and esophageal body inhibition co-occur during esophageal peristalsis but not necessarily during pharyngeal stimulation or transient LES relaxation (tLESR). This study examined these relationships and the impact on reflux. Nine young volunteers were studied. An artificial high-pressure zone (HPZ) was established, and pH was recorded 8 and 5 cm proximal to the LES. Pharyngeal stimulation was by water injection and gastric distension with liquid or gas. Peristalsis, pharyngeal stimulation, and spontaneous events were recorded. Swallowing relaxed the LES in 100% of trials (the HPZ in 80%) and caused no reflux. Pharyngeal stimulation relaxed the LES in two-thirds of trials, had no effect on the HPZ, and caused no reflux. Gastric distension was associated with 117 tLESRs, 48% with acid reflux, and 32% with gas reflux; there was no effect on the HPZ. We conclude that LES relaxation is a necessary but not sufficient condition for reflux. LES relaxation and esophageal body inhibition are independent events that may be concurrent (swallowing) or dissociated (tLESR).

  12. Liquid-containing Refluxes and Acid Refluxes May Be Less Frequent in the Japanese Population Than in Other Populations: Normal Values of 24-hour Esophageal Impedance and pH Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Kawamura, Osamu; Kohata, Yukie; Kawami, Noriyuki; Iida, Hiroshi; Kawada, Akiyo; Hosaka, Hiroko; Shimoyama, Yasuyuki; Kuribayashi, Shiko; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Iwakiri, Katsuhiko; Inamori, Masahiko; Kusano, Motoyasu; Hongo, Micho

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Twenty-four-hour esophageal impedance and pH monitoring allows detection of all types of reflux episodes and is considered the best technique for identifying gastroesophageal refluxes. However, normative data for the Japanese population are lacking. This multicenter study aimed to establish the normal range of 24-hour esophageal impedance and pH data both in the distal and the proximal esophagus in Japanese subjects. Methods Forty-two healthy volunteers (25 men and 17 women) with a mean ± standard deviation age of 33.3 ± 12.4 years (range: 22–72 years) underwent a combined 24-hour esophageal impedance and pH monitoring. According to the physical and pH properties, distal or proximal esophageal reflux events were categorized. Results Median 45 reflux events occurred in 24 hours, and the 95th percentile was 85 events. Unlike previous reports, liquid-containing reflux events are median 25/24 hours with the 95th percentile of 62/24 hours. Acidic reflux events were median 11/24 hours with the 95th percentile of 39/24 hours. Non-acidic gas reflux events were median 15/24 hours with the 95th percentile of 39/24 hours. Proximal reflux events accounted for 80% of the total reflux events and were mainly non-acidic gas refluxes. About 19% of liquid and mixed refluxes reached the proximal esophagus. Conclusions Unlike previous studies, liquid-containing and acidic reflux events may be less frequent in the Japanese population. Non-acidic gas reflux events may be frequent and a cause of frequent proximal reflux events. This study provides important normative data for 24-hour impedance and pH monitoring in both the distal and the proximal esophagus in the Japanese population. PMID:27247103

  13. Generation and Characterization of an Immortalized Human Esophageal Myofibroblast Line.

    PubMed

    Niu, Chao; Chauhan, Uday; Gargus, Matthew; Shaker, Anisa

    2016-01-01

    Stromal cells with a myofibroblast phenotype present in the normal human esophagus are increased in individuals with gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD). We have previously demonstrated that myofibroblasts stimulated with acid and TLR4 agonists increase IL-6 and IL-8 secretion using primary cultures of myofibroblasts established from normal human esophagus. While primary cultures have the advantage of reflecting the in vivo environment, a short life span and unavoidable heterogeneity limits the usefulness of this model in larger scale in vitro cellular signaling studies. The major aim of this paper therefore was to generate a human esophageal myofibroblast line with an extended lifespan. In the work presented here we have generated and characterized an immortalized human esophageal myofibroblast line by transfection with a commercially available GFP-hTERT lentivirus. Immortalized human esophageal myofibroblasts demonstrate phenotypic, genotypic and functional similarity to primary cultures of esophageal myofibroblasts we have previously described. We found that immortalized esophageal myofibroblasts retain myofibroblast spindle-shaped morphology at low and high confluence beyond passage 80, and express α-SMA, vimentin, and CD90 myofibroblast markers. Immortalized human esophageal myofibroblasts also express the putative acid receptor TRPV1 and TLR4 and retain the functional capacity to respond to stimuli encountered in GERD with secretion of IL-6. Finally, immortalized human esophageal myofibroblasts also support the stratified growth of squamous esophageal epithelial cells in 3D organotypic cultures. This newly characterized immortalized human esophageal myofibroblast cell line can be used in future cellular signaling and co-culture studies. PMID:27055018

  14. Aqueous outflow: Segmental and distal flow

    PubMed Central

    Swaminathan, Swarup S.; Oh, Dong-Jin; Kang, Min Hyung; Rhee, Douglas J.

    2014-01-01

    A prominent risk factor of primary open-angle glaucoma is ocular hypertension, a pathologic state caused by impaired outflow of aqueous humor through the trabecular meshwork within the iridocorneal angle. The juxtacanalicular region of the trabecular meshwork and the inner wall of Schlemm canal have been identified as the main contributors to aqueous outflow resistance, and both extracellular matrix within the trabecular meshwork and trabecular meshwork cell shape have been shown to affect outflow. Overexpression of multiple ECM proteins in perfused cadaveric human eyes has led to increased outflow resistance and elevated IOP. Pharmacologic agents targeting trabecular meshwork cytoskeletal arrangements have been developed after multiple studies demonstrated the importance of cell shape on outflow. Several groups have shown that aqueous outflow occurs only at certain segments of the trabecular meshwork circumferentially, a concept known as segmental flow. This is based on the theory that aqueous outflow is dependent on the presence of discrete pores within the Schlemm canal. Segmental flow has been described in the eyes of multiple species, including primate, bovine, mouse, and human samples. While the trabecular meshwork appears to be the major source of resistance, trabecular meshwork bypass procedures have been unable to achieve the degree of IOP reduction observed with trabeculectomy, reflecting the potential impact of distal flow, or flow through Schlemm canal and collector channels, on outflow. Multiple studies have demonstrated that outflow occurs preferentially near collector channels, suggesting that these distal structures may be more important to aqueous outflow than previously believed. PMID:25088623

  15. Maxillary molar distalization with first class appliance

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, Namitha; Palukunnu, Biswas; Ravindran, Nidhi; Nair, Preeti P

    2014-01-01

    Non-extraction treatment has gained popularity for corrections of mild-to-moderate class II malocclusion over the past few decades. The distalization of maxillary molars is of significant value for treatment of cases with minimal arch discrepancy and mild class II molar relation associated with a normal mandibular arch and acceptable profile. This paper describes our experience with a 16-year-old female patient who reported with irregularly placed upper front teeth and unpleasant smile. The patient was diagnosed to have angles class II malocclusion with moderate maxillary anterior crowding, deep bite of 4 mm on a skeletal class II base with an orthognathic maxilla and retrognathic mandible and normal growth pattern. She presented an ideal profile and so molar distalization was planned with the first-class appliance. Molars were distalised by 8 mm on the right and left quadrants and class I molar relation achieved within 4 months. The space gained was utilised effectively to align the arch and establish a class I molar and canine relation. PMID:24577171

  16. Distal metatarsal coalition: A rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Vun, Shen Hwa; Drampalos, Efstathios; Shareef, Sajan; Sinha, Satyajit; Bramley, Diane

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Metatarsal coalition is an extremely rare condition. We report the second documented case of 4th and 5th distal metatarsal coalition in the literature. Presentation of case An eight-year-old girl was referred to an orthopaedic clinic with a four-month history of forefoot pain and swelling on the plantar aspect of the right little toe. Radiograph and clinical examination confirmed distal metatarsal coalition between the 4th and 5th metatarsals. Following a period of conservative treatment, excision was eventually performed due to worsening symptoms. Patient re-attended two years later with a recurrence of the coalition confirmed by computed tomography (CT) scan. The case was discussed at a tertiary paediatric orthopaedic insititution. Decision was made to manage patient conservatively with insole and physiotherapy until skeletal maturity. A year later, patient’s symptoms did not worsen, and her foot displayed no evidence of change in the arch and shape. Discussion The timing of ossification of coalition varies from one anatomical site to another. Surgery when performed before ossification is complete runs the risk of recurrence. Conclusion Our case report illustrates the importance of restoring normal weight bearing dynamics and pain relief when managing metatarsal coalition, or synostosis in skeletally immature patients. We recommend persevering with conservative treatment, with operative treatment reserved only as a later option, and ideally, until skeletal maturity is achieved. PMID:25670408

  17. Distal vacuolar myopathy in nephropathic cystinosis.

    PubMed

    Charnas, L R; Luciano, C A; Dalakas, M; Gilliatt, R W; Bernardini, I; Ishak, K; Cwik, V A; Fraker, D; Brushart, T A; Gahl, W A

    1994-02-01

    Nephropathic cystinosis is a lysosomal storage disorder leading to renal failure by age 10 years. Prolonged patient survival following renal transplantation has allowed the development of previously unknown long-term complications. Muscle involvement has been reported in a single posttransplant cystinosis patient, but the range of clinical, electrophysiologic, and histologic features has not been fully described. Thirteen of 54 post-renal-transplant patients that we examined developed weakness and wasting in the small hand muscles, with or without facial weakness and dysphagia. Tendon reflexes were preserved and sensory examinations were normal. Electrophysiologic studies in 11 affected patients showed normal nerve conduction velocities and preserved sensory action potentials. The voluntary motor units in the affected distal muscles had reduced amplitude and brief duration, confirmed with quantitative electromyography in 4 patients. Biopsy of the severely affected abductor digiti minimi or extensor carpi radialis brevis muscles in 2 patients revealed marked fiber size variability, prominent acid phosphatase-positive vacuoles, and absence of fiber type grouping or inflammatory cells. Crystals of cystine were detected in perimysial cells but not within the muscle cell vacuoles. The muscle cystine content of clinically affected muscles was markedly elevated. We conclude that a distal vacuolar myopathy is a common late complication of untreated nephropathic cystinosis. Although the cause is unclear, the general lysosomal defect in this disease may also affect the lysosomes within muscle fibers.

  18. Safety and efficacy of 2-octyl-cyanoacrylate in the management of patients with gastric and duodenal varices who are not candidates for transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunts

    PubMed Central

    Burdick, James; Trotter, James F.

    2016-01-01

    Gastric variceal bleeding is associated with significant morbidity and mortality in patients with portal hypertension and cirrhosis. Options are limited for patients who are not candidates for transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunts (TIPS). Cyanoacrylate injections have been reported to be efficacious in previous case series. The aim of this retrospective study was to report our single-center experience with the safety and efficacy of 2-octyl-cyanoacrylate in patients who were not TIPS candidates. Electronic medical records were reviewed for 16 patients who underwent a total of 18 esophagogastroduodenoscopies for acute gastric or duodenal variceal bleeding and secondary prophylaxis of gastric varices; 14 patients had cirrhosis with an average Model for End-Stage Liver Disease score of 16, and 2 patients had noncirrhotic portal hypertension. Primary endpoints of the study included early and delayed rebleeding rate, complications, and death or liver transplantation. The rebleeding rate (early or delayed) was 7%, and no complications were found. One death was reported (unrelated to the procedure). In conclusion, 2-octyl-cyanoacrylate is a safe and effective alternative for non-TIPS candidates who present with acute gastric variceal bleeding given its low rebleeding and complication rate. PMID:27695164

  19. Successful use of a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic stent shunt to control severe refractory oesophageal variceal haemorrhage in a poor risk patient.

    PubMed Central

    Beales, I. L.; Jackson, J. E.; Rudolf, M.; Arnold, J.

    1993-01-01

    This report describes a 44 year old man with a severe gastrointestinal haemorrhage from oesophageal varices. Bleeding could not be controlled with conservative therapy and sclerotherapy. He was successfully treated with a radiologically guided transjugular intrahepatic stent shunt at a time when his condition was too poor to attempt an open surgical procedure. PMID:8121873

  20. Safety and efficacy of 2-octyl-cyanoacrylate in the management of patients with gastric and duodenal varices who are not candidates for transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunts

    PubMed Central

    Burdick, James; Trotter, James F.

    2016-01-01

    Gastric variceal bleeding is associated with significant morbidity and mortality in patients with portal hypertension and cirrhosis. Options are limited for patients who are not candidates for transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunts (TIPS). Cyanoacrylate injections have been reported to be efficacious in previous case series. The aim of this retrospective study was to report our single-center experience with the safety and efficacy of 2-octyl-cyanoacrylate in patients who were not TIPS candidates. Electronic medical records were reviewed for 16 patients who underwent a total of 18 esophagogastroduodenoscopies for acute gastric or duodenal variceal bleeding and secondary prophylaxis of gastric varices; 14 patients had cirrhosis with an average Model for End-Stage Liver Disease score of 16, and 2 patients had noncirrhotic portal hypertension. Primary endpoints of the study included early and delayed rebleeding rate, complications, and death or liver transplantation. The rebleeding rate (early or delayed) was 7%, and no complications were found. One death was reported (unrelated to the procedure). In conclusion, 2-octyl-cyanoacrylate is a safe and effective alternative for non-TIPS candidates who present with acute gastric variceal bleeding given its low rebleeding and complication rate.