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Sample records for espectronodal constante para

  1. Rotational constants and structure of para-difluorobenzene determined by femtosecond Raman coherence spectroscopy: A new transient type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Den, Takuya; Frey, Hans-Martin; Felker, Peter M.; Leutwyler, Samuel

    2015-10-01

    Femtosecond Raman rotational coherence spectroscopy (RCS) detected by degenerate four-wave mixing is a background-free method that allows to determine accurate gas-phase rotational constants of non-polar molecules. Raman RCS has so far mostly been applied to the regular coherence patterns of symmetric-top molecules, while its application to nonpolar asymmetric tops has been hampered by the large number of RCS transient types, the resulting variability of the RCS patterns, and the 103-104 times larger computational effort to simulate and fit rotational Raman RCS transients. We present the rotational Raman RCS spectra of the nonpolar asymmetric top 1,4-difluorobenzene (para-difluorobenzene, p-DFB) measured in a pulsed Ar supersonic jet and in a gas cell over delay times up to ˜2.5 ns. p-DFB exhibits rotational Raman transitions with ΔJ = 0, 1, 2 and ΔK = 0, 2, leading to the observation of J -, K -, A -, and C-type transients, as well as a novel transient (S-type) that has not been characterized so far. The jet and gas cell RCS measurements were fully analyzed and yield the ground-state (v = 0) rotational constants A0 = 5637.68(20) MHz, B0 = 1428.23(37) MHz, and C0 = 1138.90(48) MHz (1σ uncertainties). Combining the A0, B0, and C0 constants with coupled-cluster with single-, double- and perturbatively corrected triple-excitation calculations using large basis sets allows to determine the semi-experimental equilibrium bond lengths re(C1-C2) = 1.3849(4) Å, re(C2-C3) = 1.3917(4) Å, re(C-F) = 1.3422(3) Å, and re(C2-H2) = 1.0791(5) Å.

  2. Rotational constants and structure of para-difluorobenzene determined by femtosecond Raman coherence spectroscopy: A new transient type.

    PubMed

    Den, Takuya; Frey, Hans-Martin; Felker, Peter M; Leutwyler, Samuel

    2015-10-14

    Femtosecond Raman rotational coherence spectroscopy (RCS) detected by degenerate four-wave mixing is a background-free method that allows to determine accurate gas-phase rotational constants of non-polar molecules. Raman RCS has so far mostly been applied to the regular coherence patterns of symmetric-top molecules, while its application to nonpolar asymmetric tops has been hampered by the large number of RCS transient types, the resulting variability of the RCS patterns, and the 10(3)-10(4) times larger computational effort to simulate and fit rotational Raman RCS transients. We present the rotational Raman RCS spectra of the nonpolar asymmetric top 1,4-difluorobenzene (para-difluorobenzene, p-DFB) measured in a pulsed Ar supersonic jet and in a gas cell over delay times up to ∼2.5 ns. p-DFB exhibits rotational Raman transitions with ΔJ = 0, 1, 2 and ΔK = 0, 2, leading to the observation of J -, K -, A -, and C-type transients, as well as a novel transient (S-type) that has not been characterized so far. The jet and gas cell RCS measurements were fully analyzed and yield the ground-state (v = 0) rotational constants A0 = 5637.68(20) MHz, B0 = 1428.23(37) MHz, and C0 = 1138.90(48) MHz (1σ uncertainties). Combining the A0, B0, and C0 constants with coupled-cluster with single-, double- and perturbatively corrected triple-excitation calculations using large basis sets allows to determine the semi-experimental equilibrium bond lengths re(C1-C2) = 1.3849(4) Å, re(C2-C3) = 1.3917(4) Å, re(C-F) = 1.3422(3) Å, and re(C2-H2) = 1.0791(5) Å.

  3. Are Fundamental Constants Really Constant?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swetman, T. P.

    1972-01-01

    Dirac's classical conclusions, that the values of e2, M and m are constants and the quantity of G decreases with time. Evoked considerable interest among researchers and traces historical development by which further experimental evidence points out that both e and G are constant values. (PS)

  4. Are Fundamental Constants Really Constant?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swetman, T. P.

    1972-01-01

    Dirac's classical conclusions, that the values of e2, M and m are constants and the quantity of G decreases with time. Evoked considerable interest among researchers and traces historical development by which further experimental evidence points out that both e and G are constant values. (PS)

  5. Mapas dinamicos de trayectorias rapidas para un valor dado de la constante de Jacobi en el problema de tres cuerpos restringido Tierra-Luna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leiva, A. M.; Briozzo, C. M.

    Starting from the numerical integration of 1736649 trajectories we study the behaviour of 783209 trajectories in the Earth-Moon Circular Restricted Three Body Problem, for a value h=-1.5887 of the Jacobi constant. Many of these trajectories are of great interest because they take place between the primary masses for times shorter than 217 days and show close approaches to the Moon. On a surface of section we show dynamical maps which provide a global description of the main features of these trajectories, and show the optimal regions to search for periodic orbits and for orbits colliding with the Moon. FULL TEXT IN SPANISH

  6. Cosmological constant, fine structure constant and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Hao; Zou, Xiao-Bo; Li, Hong-Yu; Xue, Dong-Ze

    2017-01-01

    In the present work, we consider the cosmological constant model Λ ∝ α ^{-6}, which is well motivated from three independent approaches. As is well known, the hint of varying fine structure constant α was found in 1998. If Λ ∝ α ^{-6} is right, it means that the cosmological constant Λ should also be varying. Here, we try to develop a suitable framework to model this varying cosmological constant Λ ∝ α ^{-6}, in which we view it from an interacting vacuum energy perspective. Then we consider the observational constraints on these models by using the 293 Δ α /α data from the absorption systems in the spectra of distant quasars. We find that the model parameters can be tightly constrained to the very narrow ranges of O(10^{-5}) typically. On the other hand, we can also view the varying cosmological constant model Λ ∝ α ^{-6} from another perspective, namely it can be equivalent to a model containing "dark energy" and "warm dark matter", but there is no interaction between them. We find that this is also fully consistent with the observational constraints on warm dark matter.

  7. Planck's Energy Constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, Juliana

    2010-02-01

    Planck's proportionality constant ``h'' is not an action constant. Re-examination of Planck's work has revealed the numerical value for his famous constant ``h'' is actually an energy constant.* Planck's energy constant is the mean energy of a single oscillation of electromagnetic energy, namely 6.626 X 10-34 J/osc. The misinterpretation of Planck's constant resulted from an inadvertent mathematical procedure in his 1901 black-body derivation. Planck's energy constant is found in his original (1897) quantum relationship: E a ν tm where energy (``E'') is proportional to the product of a constant (``a'', energy per oscillation), the frequency (``ν''), and the measurement time (``tm''). Planck's inadvertence fixed the measurement time variable ``tm'' at a value of one second, and multiplied it by his constant ``a'', resulting in the product ``h'' which Planck proposed as the ``quantum of action''. Planck's black-body derivation and condensed quantum formula E = hν were never knowingly premised on one second time intervals, however. Subsequent development of quantum mechanics thus took place against the back drop of a hidden assumption. Numerous paradoxes, problems and a lack of reality resulted. Recognition of Planck's energy constant provides a richer and more realistic interpretation of quantum mechanics. *Brooks, JHJ, ``Hidden Variables: The Elementary Quantum of Light'', The Nature of Light: What are Photons? III, Proc. of SPIE Vol. 7421, 74210T-3, 2009. )

  8. On the Khinchin Constant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, David H.; Borwein, Jonathan M.; Crandall, Richard E.; Craw, James M. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    We prove known identities for the Khinchin constant and develop new identities for the more general Hoelder mean limits of continued fractions. Any of these constants can be developed as a rapidly converging series involving values of the Riemann zeta function and rational coefficients. Such identities allow for efficient numerical evaluation of the relevant constants. We present free-parameter, optimizable versions of the identities, and report numerical results.

  9. The Presence of Fast-Exchanging Proton Species in Aqueous Solutions of paraCEST Agents Can Impact Rate Constants Measured for Slower Exchanging Species When Fitting CEST Spectra to the Bloch Equations

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    LnDOTA-tetraamide complexes typically exist in solution as a mixture of square-antiprismatic (SAP) and twisted square-antiprismatic (TSAP) coordination isomers. In most cases, the SAP isomer, which is preferred for CEST imaging, predominates, and the presence of the minor TSAP isomer is assumed to have little influence on quantitative measures of the water-exchange rate constant for the SAP isomer. Here, we sought to confirm the validity of this assumption by mixing two chelates with different SAP and TSAP isomer populations while measuring the water-exchange rate constant of the SAP isomer. The results show that an increase in the population of the TSAP isomer in solution results in as much as a 30% overestimation of the water-exchange rate constant for the SAP isomer when CEST spectra are fit to the Bloch equations. This effect was shown to be significant only when the TSAP isomer population exceeded 50%. PMID:25210979

  10. Fundamental Physical Constants

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 121 CODATA Fundamental Physical Constants (Web, free access)   This site, developed in the Physics Laboratory at NIST, addresses three topics: fundamental physical constants, the International System of Units (SI), which is the modern metric system, and expressing the uncertainty of measurement results.

  11. "Recognizing Numerical Constants"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, David H.; Craw, James M. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The advent of inexpensive, high performance computer and new efficient algorithms have made possible the automatic recognition of numerically computed constants. In other words, techniques now exist for determining, within certain limits, whether a computed real or complex number can be written as a simple expression involving the classical constants of mathematics. In this presentation, some of the recently discovered techniques for constant recognition, notably integer relation detection algorithms, will be presented. As an application of these methods, the author's recent work in recognizing "Euler sums" will be described in some detail.

  12. The cosmological constant problem

    SciTech Connect

    Dolgov, A.D.

    1989-05-01

    A review of the cosmological term problem is presented. Baby universe model and the compensating field model are discussed. The importance of more accurate data on the Hubble constant and the Universe age is stressed. 18 refs.

  13. Science Is Constantly Cool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eichinger, John

    1996-01-01

    Presents an activity in which students attempt to keep water at a constant temperature. Helps students in grades three to six hone their skills in prediction, observation, measurement, data collection, graphing, data analysis, and communication. (JRH)

  14. Dielectric Constant of Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendelson, Kenneth S.; Ackmann, James J.

    1997-03-01

    We have used a finite element method to calculate the dielectric constant of a cubic array of spheres. Extensive calculations support preliminary conclusions reported previously (K. Mendelson and J. Ackmann, Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 41), 657 (1996).. At frequencies below 100 kHz the real part of the dielectric constant (ɛ') shows oscillations as a function of the volume fraction of suspension. These oscillations disappear at low conductivities of the suspending fluid. Measurements of the dielectric constant (J. Ackmann, et al., Ann. Biomed. Eng. 24), 58 (1996). (H. Fricke and H. Curtis, J. Phys. Chem. 41), 729 (1937). are not sufficiently sensitive to show oscillations but appear to be consistent with the theoretical results.

  15. Elastic constants of calcite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peselnick, L.; Robie, R.A.

    1962-01-01

    The recent measurements of the elastic constants of calcite by Reddy and Subrahmanyam (1960) disagree with the values obtained independently by Voigt (1910) and Bhimasenachar (1945). The present authors, using an ultrasonic pulse technique at 3 Mc and 25??C, determined the elastic constants of calcite using the exact equations governing the wave velocities in the single crystal. The results are C11=13.7, C33=8.11, C44=3.50, C12=4.82, C13=5.68, and C14=-2.00, in units of 1011 dyncm2. Independent checks of several of the elastic constants were made employing other directions and polarizations of the wave velocities. With the exception of C13, these values substantially agree with the data of Voigt and Bhimasenachar. ?? 1962 The American Institute of Physics.

  16. Redshift in Hubble's constant.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temple-Raston, M.

    1997-01-01

    A topological field theory with Bogomol'nyi solitons is examined. The Bogomol'nyi solitons have much in common with the instanton in Yang-Mills theory; consequently the author called them 'topological instantons'. When periodic boundary conditions are imposed, the field theory comments indirectly on the speed of light within the theory. In this particular model the speed of light is not a universal constant. This may or may not be relevant to the current debate in astronomy and cosmology over the large values of the Hubble constant obtained by the latest generation of ground- and space-based telescopes. An experiment is proposed to detect spatial variation in the speed of light.

  17. Wall of fundamental constants

    SciTech Connect

    Olive, Keith A.; Peloso, Marco; Uzan, Jean-Philippe

    2011-02-15

    We consider the signatures of a domain wall produced in the spontaneous symmetry breaking involving a dilatonlike scalar field coupled to electromagnetism. Domains on either side of the wall exhibit slight differences in their respective values of the fine-structure constant, {alpha}. If such a wall is present within our Hubble volume, absorption spectra at large redshifts may or may not provide a variation in {alpha} relative to the terrestrial value, depending on our relative position with respect to the wall. This wall could resolve the contradiction between claims of a variation of {alpha} based on Keck/Hires data and of the constancy of {alpha} based on Very Large Telescope data. We derive the properties of the wall and the parameters of the underlying microscopic model required to reproduce the possible spatial variation of {alpha}. We discuss the constraints on the existence of the low-energy domain wall and describe its observational implications concerning the variation of the fundamental constants.

  18. Percolation with Constant Freezing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mottram, Edward

    2014-06-01

    We introduce and study a model of percolation with constant freezing ( PCF) where edges open at constant rate , and clusters freeze at rate independently of their size. Our main result is that the infinite volume process can be constructed on any amenable vertex transitive graph. This is in sharp contrast to models of percolation with freezing previously introduced, where the limit is known not to exist. Our interest is in the study of the percolative properties of the final configuration as a function of . We also obtain more precise results in the case of trees. Surprisingly the algebraic exponent for the cluster size depends on the degree, suggesting that there is no lower critical dimension for the model. Moreover, even for , it is shown that finite clusters have algebraic tail decay, which is a signature of self organised criticality. Partial results are obtained on , and many open questions are discussed.

  19. Constant-pressure Blowers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorensen, E

    1940-01-01

    The conventional axial blowers operate on the high-pressure principle. One drawback of this type of blower is the relatively low pressure head, which one attempts to overcome with axial blowers producing very high pressure at a given circumferential speed. The Schicht constant-pressure blower affords pressure ratios considerably higher than those of axial blowers of conventional design with approximately the same efficiency.

  20. The Hubble Constant.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Neal

    2015-01-01

    I review the current state of determinations of the Hubble constant, which gives the length scale of the Universe by relating the expansion velocity of objects to their distance. There are two broad categories of measurements. The first uses individual astrophysical objects which have some property that allows their intrinsic luminosity or size to be determined, or allows the determination of their distance by geometric means. The second category comprises the use of all-sky cosmic microwave background, or correlations between large samples of galaxies, to determine information about the geometry of the Universe and hence the Hubble constant, typically in a combination with other cosmological parameters. Many, but not all, object-based measurements give H0 values of around 72-74 km s(-1) Mpc(-1), with typical errors of 2-3 km s(-1) Mpc(-1). This is in mild discrepancy with CMB-based measurements, in particular those from the Planck satellite, which give values of 67-68 km s(-1) Mpc(-1) and typical errors of 1-2 km s(-1) Mpc(-1). The size of the remaining systematics indicate that accuracy rather than precision is the remaining problem in a good determination of the Hubble constant. Whether a discrepancy exists, and whether new physics is needed to resolve it, depends on details of the systematics of the object-based methods, and also on the assumptions about other cosmological parameters and which datasets are combined in the case of the all-sky methods.

  1. Universe of constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yongquan, Han

    2016-10-01

    The ideal gas state equation is not applicable to ordinary gas, it should be applied to the Electromagnetic ``gas'' that is applied to the radiation, the radiation should be the ultimate state of matter changes or initial state, the universe is filled with radiation. That is, the ideal gas equation of state is suitable for the Singular point and the universe. Maybe someone consider that, there is no vessel can accommodate radiation, it is because the Ordinary container is too small to accommodate, if the radius of your container is the distance that Light through an hour, would you still think it can't accommodates radiation? Modern scientific determinate that the radius of the universe now is about 1027 m, assuming that the universe is a sphere whose volume is approximately: V = 4.19 × 1081 cubic meters, the temperature radiation of the universe (cosmic microwave background radiation temperature of the universe, should be the closest the average temperature of the universe) T = 3.15k, radiation pressure P = 5 × 10-6 N / m 2, according to the law of ideal gas state equation, PV / T = constant = 6 × 1075, the value of this constant is the universe, The singular point should also equal to the constant Author: hanyongquan

  2. Varying constants quantum cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Leszczyńska, Katarzyna; Balcerzak, Adam; Dabrowski, Mariusz P. E-mail: abalcerz@wmf.univ.szczecin.pl

    2015-02-01

    We discuss minisuperspace models within the framework of varying physical constants theories including Λ-term. In particular, we consider the varying speed of light (VSL) theory and varying gravitational constant theory (VG) using the specific ansätze for the variability of constants: c(a) = c{sub 0} a{sup n} and G(a)=G{sub 0} a{sup q}. We find that most of the varying c and G minisuperspace potentials are of the tunneling type which allows to use WKB approximation of quantum mechanics. Using this method we show that the probability of tunneling of the universe ''from nothing'' (a=0) to a Friedmann geometry with the scale factor a{sub t} is large for growing c models and is strongly suppressed for diminishing c models. As for G varying, the probability of tunneling is large for G diminishing, while it is small for G increasing. In general, both varying c and G change the probability of tunneling in comparison to the standard matter content (cosmological term, dust, radiation) universe models.

  3. The Hubble Constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freedman, Wendy; Madore, Barry; Mager, Violet; Persson, Eric; Rigby, Jane; Sturch, Laura

    2008-12-01

    We present a plan to measure a value of the Hubble constant having a final systematic uncertainty of only 3% by taking advantage of Spitzer's unique mid-infrared capabilities. This involves using IRAC to undertake a fundamental recalibration of the Cepheid distance scale and progressively moving it out to pure Hubble flow by an application of a revised mid-IR Tully-Fisher relation. The calibration and application, in one coherent and self-consistent program, will go continuously from distances of parsecs to several hundred megaparsecs. It will provide a first-ever mid-IR calibration of Cepheids in the Milky Way, LMC and Key Project spiral galaxies and a first-ever measurement and calibration of the TF relation at mid-infrared wavelengths, and finally a calibration of Type Ia SNe. Most importantly this program will be undertaken with a single instrument, on a single telescope, working exclusively at mid-infrared wavelengths that are far removed from the obscuring effects of dust extinction. Using Spitzer in this focused way will effectively eliminate all of the major systematics in the Cepheid and TF distance scales that have been the limiting factors in all previous applications, including the HST Key Project. By executing this program, based exclusively on Spitzer data, we will deliver a value of the Hubble constant, having a statistical precision better than 11%, with all currently known systematics quantified and constrained to a level of less than 3%. A value of Ho determined to this level of systematic accuracy is required for up-coming cosmology experiments, including Planck. A more accurate value of the Hubble constant will directly result in other contingently measured cosmological parameters (e.g., Omega_m, Omega_L, & w) having their covariant uncertainties reduced significantly now. Any further improvements using this route will have to await JWST, for which this study is designed to provide a lasting and solid foundation, and ultimately a value of Ho

  4. Cosmology with varying constants.

    PubMed

    Martins, Carlos J A P

    2002-12-15

    The idea of possible time or space variations of the 'fundamental' constants of nature, although not new, is only now beginning to be actively considered by large numbers of researchers in the particle physics, cosmology and astrophysics communities. This revival is mostly due to the claims of possible detection of such variations, in various different contexts and by several groups. I present the current theoretical motivations and expectations for such variations, review the current observational status and discuss the impact of a possible confirmation of these results in our views of cosmology and physics as a whole.

  5. Change is a Constant.

    PubMed

    Lubowitz, James H; Provencher, Matthew T; Brand, Jefferson C; Rossi, Michael J; Poehling, Gary G

    2015-06-01

    In 2015, Henry P. Hackett, Managing Editor, Arthroscopy, retires, and Edward A. Goss, Executive Director, Arthroscopy Association of North America (AANA), retires. Association is a positive constant, in a time of change. With change comes a need for continuing education, research, and sharing of ideas. While the quality of education at AANA and ISAKOS is superior and most relevant, the unique reason to travel and meet is the opportunity to interact with innovative colleagues. Personal interaction best stimulates new ideas to improve patient care, research, and teaching. Through our network, we best create innovation.

  6. Is decay constant?

    PubMed

    Pommé, S; Stroh, H; Altzitzoglou, T; Paepen, J; Van Ammel, R; Kossert, K; Nähle, O; Keightley, J D; Ferreira, K M; Verheyen, L; Bruggeman, M

    2017-09-07

    Some authors have raised doubt about the invariability of decay constants, which would invalidate the exponential-decay law and the foundation on which the common measurement system for radioactivity is based. Claims were made about a new interaction - the fifth force - by which neutrinos could affect decay constants, thus predicting changes in decay rates in correlation with the variations of the solar neutrino flux. Their argument is based on the observation of permille-sized annual modulations in particular decay rate measurements, as well as transient oscillations at frequencies near 11 year(-1) and 12.7 year(-1) which they speculatively associate with dynamics of the solar interior. In this work, 12 data sets of precise long-term decay rate measurements have been investigated for the presence of systematic modulations at frequencies between 0.08 and 20 year(-1). Besides small annual effects, no common oscillations could be observed among α, β(-), β(+) or EC decaying nuclides. The amplitudes of fitted oscillations to residuals from exponential decay do not exceed 3 times their standard uncertainty, which varies from 0.00023 % to 0.023 %. This contradicts the assertion that 'neutrino-induced' beta decay provides information about the deep solar interior. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Unitaxial constant velocity microactuator

    DOEpatents

    McIntyre, Timothy J.

    1994-01-01

    A uniaxial drive system or microactuator capable of operating in an ultra-high vacuum environment. The mechanism includes a flexible coupling having a bore therethrough, and two clamp/pusher assemblies mounted in axial ends of the coupling. The clamp/pusher assemblies are energized by voltage-operated piezoelectrics therewithin to operatively engage the shaft and coupling causing the shaft to move along its rotational axis through the bore. The microactuator is capable of repeatably positioning to sub-manometer accuracy while affording a scan range in excess of 5 centimeters. Moreover, the microactuator generates smooth, constant velocity motion profiles while producing a drive thrust of greater than 10 pounds. The system is remotely controlled and piezoelectrically driven, hence minimal thermal loading, vibrational excitation, or outgassing is introduced to the operating environment.

  8. The Hubble Constant.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Neal

    2007-01-01

    I review the current state of determinations of the Hubble constant, which gives the length scale of the Universe by relating the expansion velocity of objects to their distance. In the last 20 years, much progress has been made and estimates now range between 60 and 75 km s(-1) Mpc(-1), with most now between 70 and 75 km s(-1) Mpc(-1), a huge improvement over the factor-of-2 uncertainty which used to prevail. Further improvements which gave a generally agreed margin of error of a few percent rather than the current 10% would be vital input to much other interesting cosmology. There are several programmes which are likely to lead us to this point in the next 10 years.

  9. When constants are important

    SciTech Connect

    Beiu, V.

    1997-04-01

    In this paper the authors discuss several complexity aspects pertaining to neural networks, commonly known as the curse of dimensionality. The focus will be on: (1) size complexity and depth-size tradeoffs; (2) complexity of learning; and (3) precision and limited interconnectivity. Results have been obtained for each of these problems when dealt with separately, but few things are known as to the links among them. They start by presenting known results and try to establish connections between them. These show that they are facing very difficult problems--exponential growth in either space (i.e. precision and size) and/or time (i.e., learning and depth)--when resorting to neural networks for solving general problems. The paper will present a solution for lowering some constants, by playing on the depth-size tradeoff.

  10. A Constant Pressure Bomb

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, F W

    1924-01-01

    This report describes a new optical method of unusual simplicity and of good accuracy suitable to study the kinetics of gaseous reactions. The device is the complement of the spherical bomb of constant volume, and extends the applicability of the relationship, pv=rt for gaseous equilibrium conditions, to the use of both factors p and v. The method substitutes for the mechanical complications of a manometer placed at some distance from the seat of reaction the possibility of allowing the radiant effects of reaction to record themselves directly upon a sensitive film. It is possible the device may be of use in the study of the photoelectric effects of radiation. The method makes possible a greater precision in the measurement of normal flame velocities than was previously possible. An approximate analysis shows that the increase of pressure and density ahead of the flame is negligible until the velocity of the flame approaches that of sound.

  11. The Hubble constant.

    PubMed

    Tully, R B

    1993-06-01

    Five methods of estimating distances have demonstrated internal reproducibility at the level of 5-20% rms accuracy. The best of these are the cepheid (and RR Lyrae), planetary nebulae, and surface-brightness fluctuation techniques. Luminosity-line width and Dn-sigma methods are less accurate for an individual case but can be applied to large numbers of galaxies. The agreement is excellent between these five procedures. It is determined that Hubble constant H0 = 90 +/- 10 km.s-1.Mpc-1 [1 parsec (pc) = 3.09 x 10(16) m]. It is difficult to reconcile this value with the preferred world model even in the low-density case. The standard model with Omega = 1 may be excluded unless there is something totally misunderstood about the foundation of the distance scale or the ages of stars.

  12. The Hubble constant.

    PubMed Central

    Tully, R B

    1993-01-01

    Five methods of estimating distances have demonstrated internal reproducibility at the level of 5-20% rms accuracy. The best of these are the cepheid (and RR Lyrae), planetary nebulae, and surface-brightness fluctuation techniques. Luminosity-line width and Dn-sigma methods are less accurate for an individual case but can be applied to large numbers of galaxies. The agreement is excellent between these five procedures. It is determined that Hubble constant H0 = 90 +/- 10 km.s-1.Mpc-1 [1 parsec (pc) = 3.09 x 10(16) m]. It is difficult to reconcile this value with the preferred world model even in the low-density case. The standard model with Omega = 1 may be excluded unless there is something totally misunderstood about the foundation of the distance scale or the ages of stars. PMID:11607391

  13. Unitaxial constant velocity microactuator

    DOEpatents

    McIntyre, T.J.

    1994-06-07

    A uniaxial drive system or microactuator capable of operating in an ultra-high vacuum environment is disclosed. The mechanism includes a flexible coupling having a bore therethrough, and two clamp/pusher assemblies mounted in axial ends of the coupling. The clamp/pusher assemblies are energized by voltage-operated piezoelectrics therewithin to operatively engage the shaft and coupling causing the shaft to move along its rotational axis through the bore. The microactuator is capable of repeatably positioning to sub-nanometer accuracy while affording a scan range in excess of 5 centimeters. Moreover, the microactuator generates smooth, constant velocity motion profiles while producing a drive thrust of greater than 10 pounds. The system is remotely controlled and piezoelectrically driven, hence minimal thermal loading, vibrational excitation, or outgassing is introduced to the operating environment. 10 figs.

  14. Philicities, Fugalities, and Equilibrium Constants.

    PubMed

    Mayr, Herbert; Ofial, Armin R

    2016-05-17

    . Benzhydrylium ions (diarylcarbenium ions) with para- and meta-substituents are used as reference compounds for these investigations, because their Lewis acidities and electrophilicities can be varied by many orders of magnitude, while the steric surroundings of the reaction centers are kept constant. The rate constants for their reactions with nucleophiles correlate linearly over a wide range with the Lewis acidities of the benzhydrylium ions: from slow reactions with late transition states to very fast reactions with early, reactant-like transition states (including reactions which proceed without an enthalpic barrier, ΔH(⧧) = 0). Thus, unequivocal evidence is obtained that even within a series of closely related reactions, the Leffler-Hammond α cannot be a measure for the position of the transition state. Differences in intrinsic barriers lead to deviations from the linear rate-equilibrium correlations and give rise to counterintuitive phenomena. Thus, 1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane (DABCO) reacts with lower intrinsic barriers than 4-(dimethylamino)pyridine (DMAP) and, therefore, is a stronger nucleophile as well as a better nucleofuge than DMAP. Common synthetically used SN2 reactions are presented, in which weak nucleophiles replace stronger ones. Whereas solvolysis rates of alkoxy- and alkyl-substituted benzhydryl derivatives correlate linearly with the Lewis acidities of the resulting carbenium ions, this is not the case for amino-substituted benzhydrylium ions, where differences in intrinsic barriers play a major role. The common rule that a structural variation, which increases the electrophilicity of a carbocation at the same time reduces its electrofugality, does not hold any longer. The need to systematically analyze the role of intrinsic barriers is emphasized.

  15. Beyond the Hubble Constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1995-08-01

    about the distances to galaxies and thereby about the expansion rate of the Universe. A simple way to determine the distance to a remote galaxy is by measuring its redshift, calculate its velocity from the redshift and divide this by the Hubble constant, H0. For instance, the measured redshift of the parent galaxy of SN 1995K (0.478) yields a velocity of 116,000 km/sec, somewhat more than one-third of the speed of light (300,000 km/sec). From the universal expansion rate, described by the Hubble constant (H0 = 20 km/sec per million lightyears as found by some studies), this velocity would indicate a distance to the supernova and its parent galaxy of about 5,800 million lightyears. The explosion of the supernova would thus have taken place 5,800 million years ago, i.e. about 1,000 million years before the solar system was formed. However, such a simple calculation works only for relatively ``nearby'' objects, perhaps out to some hundred million lightyears. When we look much further into space, we also look far back in time and it is not excluded that the universal expansion rate, i.e. the Hubble constant, may have been different at earlier epochs. This means that unless we know the change of the Hubble constant with time, we cannot determine reliable distances of distant galaxies from their measured redshifts and velocities. At the same time, knowledge about such change or lack of the same will provide unique information about the time elapsed since the Universe began to expand (the ``Big Bang''), that is, the age of the Universe and also its ultimate fate. The Deceleration Parameter q0 Cosmologists are therefore eager to determine not only the current expansion rate (i.e., the Hubble constant, H0) but also its possible change with time (known as the deceleration parameter, q0). Although a highly accurate value of H0 has still not become available, increasing attention is now given to the observational determination of the second parameter, cf. also the Appendix at the

  16. Is Planck's quantization constant unique?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livadiotis, George

    2016-07-01

    A cornerstone of Quantum Mechanics is the existence of a non-zero least action, the Planck constant. However, the basic concepts and theoretical developments of Quantum Mechanics are independent of its specific numerical value. A different constant h _{*}, similar to the Planck constant h, but ˜12 orders of magnitude larger, characterizes plasmas. The study of >50 different geophysical, space, and laboratory plasmas, provided the first evidence for the universality and the quantum nature of h _{*}, revealing that it is a new quantization constant. The recent results show the diagnostics for determining whether plasmas are characterized by the Planck or the new quantization constant, compounding the challenge to reconcile both quantization constants in quantum mechanics.

  17. QCD coupling constants and VDM

    SciTech Connect

    Erkol, G.; Ozpineci, A.; Zamiralov, V. S.

    2012-10-23

    QCD sum rules for coupling constants of vector mesons with baryons are constructed. The corresponding QCD sum rules for electric charges and magnetic moments are also derived and with the use of vector-meson-dominance model related to the coupling constants. The VDM role as the criterium of reciprocal validity of the sum rules is considered.

  18. Constant-Pressure Hydraulic Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galloway, C. W.

    1982-01-01

    Constant output pressure in gas-driven hydraulic pump would be assured in new design for gas-to-hydraulic power converter. With a force-multiplying ring attached to gas piston, expanding gas would apply constant force on hydraulic piston even though gas pressure drops. As a result, pressure of hydraulic fluid remains steady, and power output of the pump does not vary.

  19. Avogadro's Number and Avogadro's Constant

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, R. O.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses three possible methods of thinking about the implications of the definitions of the Avogadro constant and number. Indicates that there is only one way to arrive at a simple and standard conclusion. (CC)

  20. Oxygen Michaelis constants for tyrosinase.

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-López, J N; Ros, J R; Varón, R; García-Cánovas, F

    1993-01-01

    The Michaelis constant of tyrosinase for oxygen in the presence of monophenols and o-diphenols, which generate a cyclizable o-quinone, has been studied. This constant depends on the nature of the monophenol and o-diphenol and is always lower in the presence of the former than of the latter. From the mechanism proposed for tyrosinase and from its kinetic analysis [Rodríguez-López, J. N., Tudela, J., Varón, R., García-Carmona, F. and García-Cánovas, F. (1992) J. Biol. Chem. 267, 3801-3810] a quantitative ratio has been established between the Michaelis constants for oxygen in the presence of monophenols and their o-diphenols. This ratio is used for the determination of the Michaelis constant for oxygen with monophenols when its value cannot be calculated experimentally. PMID:8352753

  1. Varying Constants, Gravitation and Cosmology.

    PubMed

    Uzan, Jean-Philippe

    2011-01-01

    Fundamental constants are a cornerstone of our physical laws. Any constant varying in space and/or time would reflect the existence of an almost massless field that couples to matter. This will induce a violation of the universality of free fall. Thus, it is of utmost importance for our understanding of gravity and of the domain of validity of general relativity to test for their constancy. We detail the relations between the constants, the tests of the local position invariance and of the universality of free fall. We then review the main experimental and observational constraints that have been obtained from atomic clocks, the Oklo phenomenon, solar system observations, meteorite dating, quasar absorption spectra, stellar physics, pulsar timing, the cosmic microwave background and big bang nucleosynthesis. At each step we describe the basics of each system, its dependence with respect to the constants, the known systematic effects and the most recent constraints that have been obtained. We then describe the main theoretical frameworks in which the low-energy constants may actually be varying and we focus on the unification mechanisms and the relations between the variation of different constants. To finish, we discuss the more speculative possibility of understanding their numerical values and the apparent fine-tuning that they confront us with.

  2. Constant fields and constant gradients in open ionic channels.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, D P; Barcilon, V; Eisenberg, R S

    1992-01-01

    Ions enter cells through pores in proteins that are holes in dielectrics. The energy of interaction between ion and charge induced on the dielectric is many kT, and so the dielectric properties of channel and pore are important. We describe ionic movement by (three-dimensional) Nemst-Planck equations (including flux and net charge). Potential is described by Poisson's equation in the pore and Laplace's equation in the channel wall, allowing induced but not permanent charge. Asymptotic expansions are constructed exploiting the long narrow shape of the pore and the relatively high dielectric constant of the pore's contents. The resulting one-dimensional equations can be integrated numerically; they can be analyzed when channels are short or long (compared with the Debye length). Traditional constant field equations are derived if the induced charge is small, e.g., if the channel is short or if the total concentration gradient is zero. A constant gradient of concentration is derived if the channel is long. Plots directly comparable to experiments are given of current vs voltage, reversal potential vs. concentration, and slope conductance vs. concentration. This dielectric theory can easily be tested: its parameters can be determined by traditional constant field measurements. The dielectric theory then predicts current-voltage relations quite different from constant field, usually more linear, when gradients of total concentration are imposed. Numerical analysis shows that the interaction of ion and channel can be described by a mean potential if, but only if, the induced charge is negligible, that is to say, the electric field is spatially constant. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:1376159

  3. Effective cosmological constant induced by stochastic fluctuations of Newton's constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Cesare, Marco; Lizzi, Fedele; Sakellariadou, Mairi

    2016-09-01

    We consider implications of the microscopic dynamics of spacetime for the evolution of cosmological models. We argue that quantum geometry effects may lead to stochastic fluctuations of the gravitational constant, which is thus considered as a macroscopic effective dynamical quantity. Consistency with Riemannian geometry entails the presence of a time-dependent dark energy term in the modified field equations, which can be expressed in terms of the dynamical gravitational constant. We suggest that the late-time accelerated expansion of the Universe may be ascribed to quantum fluctuations in the geometry of spacetime rather than the vacuum energy from the matter sector.

  4. Optical constants of solid methane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khare, Bishun N.; Thompson, W. R.; Sagan, C.; Arakawa, E. T.; Bruel, C.; Judish, J. P.; Khanna, R. K.; Pollack, J. B.

    1989-01-01

    Methane is the most abundant simple organic molecule in the outer solar system bodies. In addition to being a gaseous constituent of the atmospheres of the Jovian planets and Titan, it is present in the solid form as a constituent of icy surfaces such as those of Triton and Pluto, and as cloud condensate in the atmospheres of Titan, Uranus, and Neptune. It is expected in the liquid form as a constituent of the ocean of Titan. Cometary ices also contain solid methane. The optical constants for both solid and liquid phases of CH4 for a wide temperature range are needed for radiative transfer calculations, for studies of reflection from surfaces, and for modeling of emission in the far infrared and microwave regions. The astronomically important visual to near infrared measurements of solid methane optical constants are conspicuously absent from the literature. Preliminary results are presented of the optical constants of solid methane for the 0.4 to 2.6 micron region. K is reported for both the amorphous and the crystalline (annealed) states. Using the previously measured values of the real part of the refractive index, n, of liquid methane at 110 K n is computed for solid methane using the Lorentz-Lorentz relationship. Work is in progress to extend the measurements of optical constants n and k for liquid and solid to both shorter and longer wavelengths, eventually providing a complete optical constants database for condensed CH4.

  5. Inconstant Planck’s constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangano, Gianpiero; Lizzi, Fedele; Porzio, Alberto

    2015-12-01

    Motivated by the Dirac idea that fundamental constants are dynamical variables and by conjectures on quantum structure of space-time at small distances, we consider the possibility that Planck constant ℏ is a time depending quantity, undergoing random Gaussian fluctuations around its measured constant mean value, with variance σ2 and a typical correlation timescale Δt. We consider the case of propagation of a free particle and a one-dimensional harmonic oscillator coherent state, and show that the time evolution in both cases is different from the standard behavior. Finally, we discuss how interferometric experiments or exploiting coherent electromagnetic fields in a cavity may put effective bounds on the value of τ = σ2Δt.

  6. Optical constants of solid methane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khare, Bishun N.; Thompson, W. R.; Sagan, C.; Arakawa, E. T.; Bruel, C.; Judish, J. P.; Khanna, R. K.; Pollack, J. B.

    1990-01-01

    Methane is the most abundant simple organic molecule in the outer solar system bodies. In addition to being a gaseous constituent of the atmospheres of the Jovian planets and Titan, it is present in the solid form as a constituent of icy surfaces such as those of Triton and Pluto, and as cloud condensate in the atmospheres of Titan, Uranus, and Neptune. It is expected in the liquid form as a constituent of the ocean of Titan. Cometary ices also contain solid methane. The optical constants for both solid and liquid phases of CH4 for a wide temperature range are needed for radiative transfer calculations, for studies of reflection from surfaces, and for modeling of emission in the far infrared and microwave regions. The astronomically important visual to near infrared measurements of solid methane optical constants are conspicuously absent from the literature. Preliminary results are presented on the optical constants of solid methane for the 0.4 to 2.6 micrometer region. Deposition onto a substrate at 10 K produces glassy (semi-amorphous) material. Annealing this material at approximately 33 K for approximately 1 hour results in a crystalline material as seen by sharper, more structured bands and negligible background extinction due to scattering. The constant k is reported for both the amorphous and the crystalline (annealed) states. Typical values (at absorption maxima) are in the .001 to .0001 range. Below lambda = 1.1 micrometers the bands are too weak to be detected by transmission through the films less than or equal to 215 micrometers in thickness, employed in the studies to date. Using previously measured values of the real part of the refractive index, n, of liquid methane at 110 K, n is computed for solid methane using the Lorentz-Lorenz relationship. Work is in progress to extend the measurements of optical constants n and k for liquid and solid to both shorter and longer wavelengths, eventually providing a complete optical constants database for

  7. Vibrational force constants for acetaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolova, B.

    1990-05-01

    The vibrational force field of ethanal (acetaldehyde), CH 3CHO, is refined by using procedures with differential increments for the force constants (Commun. Dep. Chem., Bulg. Acad. Sci., 21/3 (1988) 433). The characteristics general valence force constants of the high-dimensional symmetry classes of ethanal, A' of tenth and A″ of fifth order, are determined for the experimental assignment of bands. The low barrier to hindered internal rotation about the single carbon—carbon bond is quantitatively estimated on the grounds of normal vibrational analysis.

  8. Cosmologies with variable gravitational constant

    SciTech Connect

    Narkikar, J.V.

    1983-03-01

    In 1937 Dirac presented an argument, based on the socalled large dimensionless numbers, which led him to the conclusion that the Newtonian gravitational constant G changes with epoch. Towards the end of the last century Ernst Mach had given plausible arguments to link the property of inertia of matter to the large scale structure of the universe. Mach's principle also leads to cosmological models with a variable gravitational constant. Three cosmologies which predict a variable G are discussed in this paper both from theoretical and observational points of view.

  9. On flows having constant vorticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Paul H.; Wu, Cheng-Chin

    2011-10-01

    Constant vorticity flows of a uniform fluid in a rigid ellipsoidal container rotating at a variable rate are considered. These include librationally driven and precessionally driven flows. The well-known Poincaré solution for precessionally driven flow in a spheroid is generalized to an ellipsoid with unequal principal axes. The dynamic stability of these flows is investigated, and of other flows in which the angular velocity of the container is constant in time. Solutions for the Chandler wobble are discussed. The role of an invariant, called here the Helmholtzian, is examined.

  10. Cosmologies with variable gravitational constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narlikar, J. V.

    1983-03-01

    In 1937 Dirac presented an argument, based on the socalled large dimensionless numbers, which led him to the conclusion that the Newtonian gravitational constant G changes with epoch. Towards the end of the last century Ernst Mach had given plausible arguments to link the property of inertia of matter to the large scale structure of the universe. Mach's principle also leads to cosmological models with a variable gravitational constant. Three cosmologies which predict a variable G are discussed in this paper both from theoretical and observational points of view.

  11. Cosmological constant from quantum spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majid, Shahn; Tao, Wen-Qing

    2015-06-01

    We show that a hypothesis that spacetime is quantum with coordinate algebra [xi,t ]=λPxi , and spherical symmetry under rotations of the xi, essentially requires in the classical limit that the spacetime metric is the Bertotti-Robinson metric, i.e., a solution of Einstein's equations with a cosmological constant and a non-null electromagnetic field. Our arguments do not give the value of the cosmological constant or the Maxwell field strength, but they cannot both be zero. We also describe the quantum geometry and the full moduli space of metrics that can emerge as classical limits from this algebra.

  12. Variación temporal de las constantes fundamentales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landau, S. J.; Vucetich, H.

    La variación temporal de las constantes fundamentales es un problema que ha motivado numerosos trabajos teóricos y experimentales desde la hipótesis de los grandes números de Dirac en 1937. Entre los métodos experimentales y observacionales para establecer restricciones sobre la variación de las constantes fundamentes es importante mencionar: comparación entre relojes atómicos[1], métodos geofísicos[2][3], análisis de sistemas de absorción en quasares[4][5][6] y cotas provenientes de la nucleosíntesis primordial[7]. En un trabajo reciente[5], se reportó una significativa variación en la constante de estructura fina. Intentos de unificar las cuatro interacciones fundamentales dieron como resultado teorías con múltiples dimensiones como las teorías de Kaluza-Klein y teorías de supercuerdas. Estas teorías proporcionan un marco teórico natural para el estudio de la variación temporal de las constantes fundamentales. A su vez, un modelo sencillo para estudiar la variación de la constante de estructura fina, fue propuesto en [8], a partir de premisas muy generales como ser covarianza, invarianza de gauge, causalidad y invarianza ante reversiones temporales en el electromagnetismo. Diferentes versiones de las teorías antes mencionadas coinciden en predecir variaciones temporales de las constantes fundamentales pero difieren en la forma de esta variación[9][10]. De esta manera, las restricciones establecidas experimentalmente sobre la variación de las constantes fundamentales pueden ser una herramienta importante para testear estas diferentes teorías. En este trabajo, utilizamos las cotas provenientes de diversas técnicas experimentales, para testear si las mismas son consistentes con alguna de las teorías antes mencionadas. En particular, establecemos cotas sobre la variación de los parámentros libres de las diferentes teorías como por ejemplo el radio de las dimensiones extras en las teorías tipo Kaluza-Klein.

  13. Variations of the solar constant

    SciTech Connect

    Sofia, S.

    1981-12-01

    The variations in data received from rocket-borne and balloon-borne instruments are discussed. Indirect techniques to measure and monitor the solar constant are presented. Emphasis is placed on the correlation of data from the Solar Maximum Mission and the Nimbus 7 satellites. Abstracts of individual items from the workshop were prepared separately for the data base.

  14. Energy conservation and constants variation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraiselburd, L.; Miller Bertolami, M. M.; Sisterna, P.; Vucetich, H.

    If fundamental constants vary, the internal energy of macroscopic bodies should change. This should produce observable effects. It is shown that those effects can produce upper bounds on the variation of much lower than those coming from Eötvös experiments.

  15. The 1% concordance Hubble constant

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, C. L.; Larson, D.; Weiland, J. L.; Hinshaw, G.

    2014-10-20

    The determination of the Hubble constant has been a central goal in observational astrophysics for nearly a hundred years. Extraordinary progress has occurred in recent years on two fronts: the cosmic distance ladder measurements at low redshift and cosmic microwave background (CMB) measurements at high redshift. The CMB is used to predict the current expansion rate through a best-fit cosmological model. Complementary progress has been made with baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) measurements at relatively low redshifts. While BAO data do not independently determine a Hubble constant, they are important for constraints on possible solutions and checks on cosmic consistency. A precise determination of the Hubble constant is of great value, but it is more important to compare the high and low redshift measurements to test our cosmological model. Significant tension would suggest either uncertainties not accounted for in the experimental estimates or the discovery of new physics beyond the standard model of cosmology. In this paper we examine in detail the tension between the CMB, BAO, and cosmic distance ladder data sets. We find that these measurements are consistent within reasonable statistical expectations and we combine them to determine a best-fit Hubble constant of 69.6 ± 0.7 km s{sup –1} Mpc{sup –1}. This value is based upon WMAP9+SPT+ACT+6dFGS+BOSS/DR11+H {sub 0}/Riess; we explore alternate data combinations in the text. The combined data constrain the Hubble constant to 1%, with no compelling evidence for new physics.

  16. New Quasar Studies Keep Fundamental Physical Constant Constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-03-01

    Very Large Telescope sets stringent limit on possible variation of the fine-structure constant over cosmological time Summary Detecting or constraining the possible time variations of fundamental physical constants is an important step toward a complete understanding of basic physics and hence the world in which we live. A step in which astrophysics proves most useful. Previous astronomical measurements of the fine structure constant - the dimensionless number that determines the strength of interactions between charged particles and electromagnetic fields - suggested that this particular constant is increasing very slightly with time. If confirmed, this would have very profound implications for our understanding of fundamental physics. New studies, conducted using the UVES spectrograph on Kueyen, one of the 8.2-m telescopes of ESO's Very Large Telescope array at Paranal (Chile), secured new data with unprecedented quality. These data, combined with a very careful analysis, have provided the strongest astronomical constraints to date on the possible variation of the fine structure constant. They show that, contrary to previous claims, no evidence exist for assuming a time variation of this fundamental constant. PR Photo 07/04: Relative Changes with Redshift of the Fine Structure Constant (VLT/UVES) A fine constant To explain the Universe and to represent it mathematically, scientists rely on so-called fundamental constants or fixed numbers. The fundamental laws of physics, as we presently understand them, depend on about 25 such constants. Well-known examples are the gravitational constant, which defines the strength of the force acting between two bodies, such as the Earth and the Moon, and the speed of light. One of these constants is the so-called "fine structure constant", alpha = 1/137.03599958, a combination of electrical charge of the electron, the Planck constant and the speed of light. The fine structure constant describes how electromagnetic forces hold

  17. Constant-bandwidth constant-temperature hot-wire anemometer.

    PubMed

    Ligeza, P

    2007-07-01

    A constant-temperature anemometer (CTA) enables the measurement of fast-changing velocity fluctuations. In the classical solution of CTA, the transmission band is a function of flow velocity. This is a minor drawback when the mean flow velocity does not significantly change, though it might lead to dynamic errors when flow velocity varies over a considerable range. A modification is outlined, whereby an adaptive controller is incorporated in the CTA system such that the anemometer's transmission band remains constant in the function of flow velocity. For that purpose, a second feedback loop is provided, and the output signal from the anemometer will regulate the controller's parameters such that the transmission bandwidth remains constant. The mathematical model of a CTA that has been developed and model testing data allow a through evaluation of the proposed solution. A modified anemometer can be used in measurements of high-frequency variable flows in a wide range of velocities. The proposed modification allows the minimization of dynamic measurement errors.

  18. Dielectric-constant gas thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaiser, Christof; Zandt, Thorsten; Fellmuth, Bernd

    2015-10-01

    The principles, techniques and results from dielectric-constant gas thermometry (DCGT) are reviewed. Primary DCGT with helium has been used for measuring T-T90 below the triple point of water (TPW), where T is the thermodynamic temperature and T90 is the temperature on the international temperature scale of 1990 (ITS-90), and, in an inverse regime with T as input quantity, for determining the Boltzmann constant at the TPW. Furthermore, DCGT allows the determination of several important material properties including the polarizability of neon and argon as well as the virial coefficients of helium, neon, and argon. With interpolating DCGT (IDCGT), the ITS-90 has been approximated in the temperature range from 4 K to 25 K. An overview and uncertainty budget for each of these applications of DCGT is provided, accompanied by corroborating evidence from the literature or, for IDCGT, a CIPM key comparison.

  19. Three pion nucleon coupling constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz Arriola, E.; Amaro, J. E.; Navarro Pérez, R.

    2016-08-01

    There exist four pion nucleon coupling constants, fπ0pp, - fπ0nn, fπ+pn/2 and fπ-np/2 which coincide when up and down quark masses are identical and the electron charge is zero. While there is no reason why the pion-nucleon-nucleon coupling constants should be identical in the real world, one expects that the small differences might be pinned down from a sufficiently large number of independent and mutually consistent data. Our discussion provides a rationale for our recent determination fp2 = 0.0759(4),f 02 = 0.079(1),f c2 = 0.0763(6), based on a partial wave analysis of the 3σ self-consistent nucleon-nucleon Granada-2013 database comprising 6713 published data in the period 1950-2013.

  20. Renormalization constants from string theory.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Vecchia, P.; Magnea, L.; Lerda, A.; Russo, R.; Marotta, R.

    The authors review some recent results on the calculation of renormalization constants in Yang-Mills theory using open bosonic strings. The technology of string amplitudes, supplemented with an appropriate continuation off the mass shell, can be used to compute the ultraviolet divergences of dimensionally regularized gauge theories. The results show that the infinite tension limit of string amplitudes corresponds to the background field method in field theory.

  1. WHY IS THE SOLAR CONSTANT NOT A CONSTANT?

    SciTech Connect

    Li, K. J.; Xu, J. C.; Gao, P. X.; Yang, L. H.; Liang, H. F.; Zhan, L. S.

    2012-03-10

    In order to probe the mechanism of variations of the solar constant on the inter-solar-cycle scale, the total solar irradiance (TSI; the so-called solar constant) in the time interval of 1978 November 7 to 2010 September 20 is decomposed into three components through empirical mode decomposition and time-frequency analyses. The first component is the rotation signal, counting up to 42.31% of the total variation of TSI, which is understood to be mainly caused by large magnetic structures, including sunspot groups. The second is an annual-variation signal, counting up to 15.17% of the total variation, the origin of which is not known at this point in time. Finally, the third is the inter-solar-cycle signal, counting up to 42.52%, which is inferred to be caused by the network magnetic elements in quiet regions, whose magnetic flux ranges from (4.27-38.01) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} Mx.

  2. Millikan's measurement of Planck's constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franklin, Allan

    2013-12-01

    Robert Millikan is famous for measuring the charge of the electron. His result was better than any previous measurement and his method established that there was a fundamental unit of charge, or charge quantization. He is less well-known for his measurement of Planck's constant, although, as discussed below, he is often mistakenly given credit for providing significant evidence in support of Einstein's photon theory of light.1 His Nobel Prize citation was "for his work on the elementary electric charge of electricity and the photoelectric effect," an indication of the significance of his work on the photoelectric effect.

  3. Chandra Independently Determines Hubble Constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-08-01

    A critically important number that specifies the expansion rate of the Universe, the so-called Hubble constant, has been independently determined using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. This new value matches recent measurements using other methods and extends their validity to greater distances, thus allowing astronomers to probe earlier epochs in the evolution of the Universe. "The reason this result is so significant is that we need the Hubble constant to tell us the size of the Universe, its age, and how much matter it contains," said Max Bonamente from the University of Alabama in Huntsville and NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Ala., lead author on the paper describing the results. "Astronomers absolutely need to trust this number because we use it for countless calculations." Illustration of Sunyaev-Zeldovich Effect Illustration of Sunyaev-Zeldovich Effect The Hubble constant is calculated by measuring the speed at which objects are moving away from us and dividing by their distance. Most of the previous attempts to determine the Hubble constant have involved using a multi-step, or distance ladder, approach in which the distance to nearby galaxies is used as the basis for determining greater distances. The most common approach has been to use a well-studied type of pulsating star known as a Cepheid variable, in conjunction with more distant supernovae to trace distances across the Universe. Scientists using this method and observations from the Hubble Space Telescope were able to measure the Hubble constant to within 10%. However, only independent checks would give them the confidence they desired, considering that much of our understanding of the Universe hangs in the balance. Chandra X-ray Image of MACS J1149.5+223 Chandra X-ray Image of MACS J1149.5+223 By combining X-ray data from Chandra with radio observations of galaxy clusters, the team determined the distances to 38 galaxy clusters ranging from 1.4 billion to 9.3 billion

  4. Assessing uncertainty in physical constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henrion, Max; Fischhoff, Baruch

    1986-09-01

    Assessing the uncertainty due to possible systematic errors in a physical measurement unavoidably involves an element of subjective judgment. Examination of historical measurements and recommended values for the fundamental physical constants shows that the reported uncertainties have a consistent bias towards underestimating the actual errors. These findings are comparable to findings of persistent overconfidence in psychological research on the assessment of subjective probability distributions. Awareness of these biases could help in interpreting the precision of measurements, as well as provide a basis for improving the assessment of uncertainty in measurements.

  5. Cosmological constant and local gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Bernabeu, Jose; Espinoza, Catalina; Mavromatos, Nick E.

    2010-04-15

    We discuss the linearization of Einstein equations in the presence of a cosmological constant, by expanding the solution for the metric around a flat Minkowski space-time. We demonstrate that one can find consistent solutions to the linearized set of equations for the metric perturbations, in the Lorentz gauge, which are not spherically symmetric, but they rather exhibit a cylindrical symmetry. We find that the components of the gravitational field satisfying the appropriate Poisson equations have the property of ensuring that a scalar potential can be constructed, in which both contributions, from ordinary matter and {Lambda}>0, are attractive. In addition, there is a novel tensor potential, induced by the pressure density, in which the effect of the cosmological constant is repulsive. We also linearize the Schwarzschild-de Sitter exact solution of Einstein's equations (due to a generalization of Birkhoff's theorem) in the domain between the two horizons. We manage to transform it first to a gauge in which the 3-space metric is conformally flat and, then, make an additional coordinate transformation leading to the Lorentz gauge conditions. We compare our non-spherically symmetric solution with the linearized Schwarzschild-de Sitter metric, when the latter is transformed to the Lorentz gauge, and we find agreement. The resulting metric, however, does not acquire a proper Newtonian form in terms of the unique scalar potential that solves the corresponding Poisson equation. Nevertheless, our solution is stable, in the sense that the physical energy density is positive.

  6. Stability constant estimator user`s guide

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, B.P.; Castleton, K.J.; Rustad, J.R.

    1996-12-01

    The purpose of the Stability Constant Estimator (SCE) program is to estimate aqueous stability constants for 1:1 complexes of metal ions with ligands by using trends in existing stability constant data. Such estimates are useful to fill gaps in existing thermodynamic databases and to corroborate the accuracy of reported stability constant values.

  7. Omnidirectional antenna having constant phase

    DOEpatents

    Sena, Matthew

    2017-04-04

    Various technologies presented herein relate to constructing and/or operating an antenna having an omnidirectional electrical field of constant phase. The antenna comprises an upper plate made up of multiple conductive rings, a lower ground-plane plate, a plurality of grounding posts, a conical feed, and a radio frequency (RF) feed connector. The upper plate has a multi-ring configuration comprising a large outer ring and several smaller rings of equal size located within the outer ring. The large outer ring and the four smaller rings have the same cross-section. The grounding posts ground the upper plate to the lower plate while maintaining a required spacing/parallelism therebetween.

  8. Constant magnification optical tracking system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frazer, R. E. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A constant magnification optical tracking system for continuously tracking of a moving object is described. In the tracking system, a traveling objective lens maintains a fixed relationship with an object to be optically tracked. The objective lens was chosen to provide a collimated light beam oriented in the direction of travel of the moving object. A reflective surface is attached to the traveling objective lens for reflecting an image of the moving object. The object to be tracked is a free-falling object which is located at the focal point of the objective lens for at least a portion of its free-fall path. A motor and control means is provided for mantaining the traveling objective lens in a fixed relationship relative to the free-falling object, thereby keeping the free-falling object at the focal point and centered on the axis of the traveling objective lens throughout its entire free-fall path.

  9. Dissociation constant of nitric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levanov, A. V.; Isaikina, O. Ya.; Lunin, V. V.

    2017-07-01

    The composition of nitric acid solutions is investigated by means Raman spectroscopy (RS). The results are compared to critically selected data from other authors. The value of the thermodynamic dissociation constant in an aqueous nitric acid solution at 25°C ( K a = [ {{H^ + }} ]{[ {NO_3^ - } ]_{γ '}}_ ± ^2/[ {HN{O_3}} ]{γ '_{HN{O_3}}} = 35.5 ± 1.5M) is determined by analyzing an extensive set of reliable and consistent literature and original data. Expressions for the dependences of the activity coefficient of undissociated HNO3 molecules ({γ '_{HN{O_3}}} ) and the mean ionic coefficient ({γ '_ ± } = √ {{{γ '}_H} + {{γ '}_{NO_3^ - }}} ) on the stoichiometric concentration of nitric acid in the range of 0-18 M are found.

  10. Quantum electrodynamics and fundamental constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wundt, Benedikt Johannes Wilhelm

    The unprecedented precision achieved both in the experimental measurements as well as in the theoretical description of atomic bound states make them an ideal study object for fundamental physics and the determination of fundamental constants. This requires a careful study of the effects from quantum electrodynamics (QED) on the interaction between the electron and the nucleus. The two theoretical approaches for the evaluation of QED corrections are presented and discussed. Due to the presence of two energy scales from the binding potential and the radiation field, an overlapping parameter has to be used in both approaches in order to separate the energy scales. The different choices for the overlapping parameter in the two methods are further illustrated in a model example. With the nonrelativistic theory, relativistic corrections in order ( Zalpha)2 to the two-photon decay rate of ionic states are calculated, as well as the leading radiative corrections of alpha( Zalpha)2ln[(Zalpha)-2 ]. It is shown that the corrections is gauge-invariant under a "hybrid" gauge transformation between Coulomb and Yennie gauge. Furthermore, QED corrections for Rydberg states in one-electron ions are investigated. The smallness of the corrections and the absence of nuclear size corrections enable very accurate theoretical predictions. Measuring transition frequencies and comparing them to the theoretical predictions, QED theory can be tested more precisely. In turn, this could yield a more accurate value for the Rydberg constant. Using a transition in a nucleus with a well determined mass, acting as a reference, a comparison to transition in other nuclei can even allow to determined nuclear masses. Finally, in order to avoid an additional uncertainty in nuclei with non zero nuclear spin, QED self-energy corrections to the hyperfine structure up to order alpha(Zalpha)2Delta EHFS are determined for highly excited Rydberg states.

  11. Is There a Cosmological Constant?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochanek, Christopher

    2002-07-01

    The grant contributed to the publication of 18 refereed papers and 5 conference proceedings. The primary uses of the funding have been for page charges, travel for invited talks related to the grant research, and the support of a graduate student, Charles Keeton. The refereed papers address four of the primary goals of the proposal: (1) the statistics of radio lenses as a probe of the cosmological model (#1), (2) the role of spiral galaxies as lenses (#3), (3) the effects of dust on statistics of lenses (#7, #8), and (4) the role of groups and clusters as lenses (#2, #6, #10, #13, #15, #16). Four papers (#4, #5, #11, #12) address general issues of lens models, calibrations, and the relationship between lens galaxies and nearby galaxies. One considered cosmological effects in lensing X-ray sources (#9), and two addressed issues related to the overall power spectrum and theories of gravity (#17, #18). Our theoretical studies combined with the explosion in the number of lenses and the quality of the data obtained for them is greatly increasing our ability to characterize and understand the lens population. We can now firmly conclude both from our study of the statistics of radio lenses and our survey of extinctions in individual lenses that the statistics of optically selected quasars were significantly affected by extinction. However, the limits on the cosmological constant remain at lambda < 0.65 at a 2-sigma confidence level, which is in mild conflict with the results of the Type la supernova surveys. We continue to find that neither spiral galaxies nor groups and clusters contribute significantly to the production of gravitational lenses. The lack of group and cluster lenses is strong evidence for the role of baryonic cooling in increasing the efficiency of galaxies as lenses compared to groups and clusters of higher mass but lower central density. Unfortunately for the ultimate objective of the proposal, improved constraints on the cosmological constant, the next

  12. Is There a Cosmological Constant?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kochanek, Christopher; Oliversen, Ronald J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The grant contributed to the publication of 18 refereed papers and 5 conference proceedings. The primary uses of the funding have been for page charges, travel for invited talks related to the grant research, and the support of a graduate student, Charles Keeton. The refereed papers address four of the primary goals of the proposal: (1) the statistics of radio lenses as a probe of the cosmological model (#1), (2) the role of spiral galaxies as lenses (#3), (3) the effects of dust on statistics of lenses (#7, #8), and (4) the role of groups and clusters as lenses (#2, #6, #10, #13, #15, #16). Four papers (#4, #5, #11, #12) address general issues of lens models, calibrations, and the relationship between lens galaxies and nearby galaxies. One considered cosmological effects in lensing X-ray sources (#9), and two addressed issues related to the overall power spectrum and theories of gravity (#17, #18). Our theoretical studies combined with the explosion in the number of lenses and the quality of the data obtained for them is greatly increasing our ability to characterize and understand the lens population. We can now firmly conclude both from our study of the statistics of radio lenses and our survey of extinctions in individual lenses that the statistics of optically selected quasars were significantly affected by extinction. However, the limits on the cosmological constant remain at lambda < 0.65 at a 2-sigma confidence level, which is in mild conflict with the results of the Type la supernova surveys. We continue to find that neither spiral galaxies nor groups and clusters contribute significantly to the production of gravitational lenses. The lack of group and cluster lenses is strong evidence for the role of baryonic cooling in increasing the efficiency of galaxies as lenses compared to groups and clusters of higher mass but lower central density. Unfortunately for the ultimate objective of the proposal, improved constraints on the cosmological constant, the next

  13. Capacitive Cells for Dielectric Constant Measurement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aguilar, Horacio Munguía; Maldonado, Rigoberto Franco

    2015-01-01

    A simple capacitive cell for dielectric constant measurement in liquids is presented. As an illustrative application, the cell is used for measuring the degradation of overheated edible oil through the evaluation of their dielectric constant.

  14. Lepton decay constants of light mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Simonov, Yu. A.

    2016-05-15

    A theory of lepton decay constants based on the path-integral formalism is given for chiral and vector mesons. Decay constants of the pseudoscalar and vector mesons are calculated and compared to other existing results.

  15. Capacitive Cells for Dielectric Constant Measurement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aguilar, Horacio Munguía; Maldonado, Rigoberto Franco

    2015-01-01

    A simple capacitive cell for dielectric constant measurement in liquids is presented. As an illustrative application, the cell is used for measuring the degradation of overheated edible oil through the evaluation of their dielectric constant.

  16. La variación temporal de las constantes fundamentales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bersten, M.; Landau, S.; Vucetich, H.

    Las diferentes teorías que unifican las cuatro interacciones fundamentales coinciden en predecir variaciones temporales y espaciales de las constantes fundamentales pero difieren en la forma de esta variación. Las observaciones astronómicas y geofísicas permiten establecer cotas sobre la variación de dichas constantes. ésto nos proporciona una herramienta importante para testear las diferentes teorías. En particular, se utilizó el modelo de supercuerdas propuesto por Damour y Polyakov. Se obtuvieron límites sobre los parámetros libres de dicho modelo consistentes con un conjunto de datos astronómicos y geofísicos.

  17. Emergent cosmological constant from colliding electromagnetic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Halilsoy, M.; Mazharimousavi, S. Habib; Gurtug, O. E-mail: habib.mazhari@emu.edu.tr

    2014-11-01

    In this study we advocate the view that the cosmological constant is of electromagnetic (em) origin, which can be generated from the collision of em shock waves coupled with gravitational shock waves. The wave profiles that participate in the collision have different amplitudes. It is shown that, circular polarization with equal amplitude waves does not generate cosmological constant. We also prove that the generation of the cosmological constant is related to the linear polarization. The addition of cross polarization generates no cosmological constant. Depending on the value of the wave amplitudes, the generated cosmological constant can be positive or negative. We show additionally that, the collision of nonlinear em waves in a particular class of Born-Infeld theory also yields a cosmological constant.

  18. Constant voltage electro-slag remelting control

    DOEpatents

    Schlienger, M.E.

    1996-10-22

    A system for controlling electrode gap in an electro-slag remelt furnace has a constant regulated voltage and an electrode which is fed into the slag pool at a constant rate. The impedance of the circuit through the slag pool is directly proportional to the gap distance. Because of the constant voltage, the system current changes are inversely proportional to changes in gap. This negative feedback causes the gap to remain stable. 1 fig.

  19. Harmonic undulator radiations with constant magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeevakhan, Hussain; Mishra, G.

    2015-01-01

    Harmonic undulators has been analysed in the presence of constant magnetic field along the direction of main undulator field. The spectrum modifications in harmonic undulator radiations and intensity degradation as a function of constant magnetic field magnitude at fundamental and third harmonics have been evaluated with a numerical integration method and generalised Bessel function. The role of harmonic field to overcome the intensity reduction due to constant magnetic field and energy spread in electron beam has also been demonstrated.

  20. The strong coupling constant at large distances

    SciTech Connect

    Deur, Alexandre

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we discuss effective strong coupling constants. Those are well behaved in the low-$Q^2$ domain, contrarily to $\\alpha_s$ from pQCD. We present an extraction of an effective strong coupling constant from Jefferson Lab polarized data at intermediate and low $Q^2$. We also show how these data, together with spin sum rules, allow us to obtain the effective coupling constant over the entire $Q^2$ range. We then discuss the relation between the experimentally extracted coupling constant and theoretical calculations at low $Q^2$. We conclude on the importance of such study for the application of the AdS/CFT correspondence to QCD.

  1. Why the measured cosmological constant is small

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rostami, T.; Jalalzadeh, S.

    2015-09-01

    In a quest to explain the small value of the today's cosmological constant, following the approach introduced in Jalalzadeh and Rostami (2015), we show that the theoretical value of cosmological constant is consistent with its observational value. In more detail, we study the Friedmann-Lamaître-Robertson-Walker cosmology embedded isometrically in an 11-dimensional ambient space. The field equations determines Λ in terms of other measurable fundamental constants. Specifically, it predicts that the cosmological constant measured today be Λ LPl2 = 2.56 × 10-122, as observed.

  2. Soil-moisture constants and their variation

    Treesearch

    Walter M. Broadfoot; Hubert D. Burke

    1958-01-01

    "Constants" like field capacity, liquid limit, moisture equivalent, and wilting point are used by most students and workers in soil moisture. These constants may be equilibrium points or other values that describe soil moisture. Their values under specific soil and cover conditions have been discussed at length in the literature, but few general analyses and...

  3. On the Geometry of Constant Returns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jehle, Geoffrey A.

    2002-01-01

    States that often constant returns to scale are also much more and that many important results depend on the very special properties of this class of production function. Offers a unified set of simple proofs, employing only familiar diagrams and high school geometry, for most of the crucial analytical properties of constant returns production.…

  4. Water dimer equilibrium constant of saturated vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malomuzh, N. P.; Mahlaichuk, V. N.; Khrapatyi, S. V.

    2014-08-01

    The value and temperature dependence of the dimerization constant for saturated water vapor are determined. A general expression that links the second virial coefficient and the dimerization constant is obtained. It is shown that the attraction between water monomers and dimers is fundamental, especially at T > 350 K. The range of application for the obtained results is determined.

  5. Regularizing cosmological singularities by varying physical constants

    SciTech Connect

    Dąbrowski, Mariusz P.; Marosek, Konrad E-mail: k.marosek@wmf.univ.szczecin.pl

    2013-02-01

    Varying physical constant cosmologies were claimed to solve standard cosmological problems such as the horizon, the flatness and the Λ-problem. In this paper, we suggest yet another possible application of these theories: solving the singularity problem. By specifying some examples we show that various cosmological singularities may be regularized provided the physical constants evolve in time in an appropriate way.

  6. The Constant Feature: Spanning K-12 Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, James E.

    2004-01-01

    Constant feature is the calculator's feature to add subtract, multiply or divide the same number more than once without entering it each time. Application of the power of the constant feature to consumer mathematics, probability and iterative processes with problem solving implications are discussed.

  7. The method of constant stimuli is inefficient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Andrew B.; Fitzhugh, Andrew

    1990-01-01

    Simpson (1988) has argued that the method of constant stimuli is as efficient as adaptive methods of threshold estimation and has supported this claim with simulations. It is shown that Simpson's simulations are not a reasonable model of the experimental process and that more plausible simulations confirm that adaptive methods are much more efficient that the method of constant stimuli.

  8. Cosmological constant from the emergent gravity perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padmanabhan, T.; Padmanabhan, Hamsa

    2014-05-01

    Observations indicate that our universe is characterized by a late-time accelerating phase, possibly driven by a cosmological constant Λ, with the dimensionless parameter Λ {LP2} ˜= 10-122, where LP = (Għ/c3)1/2 is the Planck length. In this review, we describe how the emergent gravity paradigm provides a new insight and a possible solution to the cosmological constant problem. After reviewing the necessary background material, we identify the necessary and sufficient conditions for solving the cosmological constant problem. We show that these conditions are naturally satisfied in the emergent gravity paradigm in which (i) the field equations of gravity are invariant under the addition of a constant to the matter Lagrangian and (ii) the cosmological constant appears as an integration constant in the solution. The numerical value of this integration constant can be related to another dimensionless number (called CosMIn) that counts the number of modes inside a Hubble volume that cross the Hubble radius during the radiation and the matter-dominated epochs of the universe. The emergent gravity paradigm suggests that CosMIn has the numerical value 4π, which, in turn, leads to the correct, observed value of the cosmological constant. Further, the emergent gravity paradigm provides an alternative perspective on cosmology and interprets the expansion of the universe itself as a quest towards holographic equipartition. We discuss the implications of this novel and alternate description of cosmology.

  9. Graviton fluctuations erase the cosmological constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetterich, C.

    2017-10-01

    Graviton fluctuations induce strong non-perturbative infrared renormalization effects for the cosmological constant. The functional renormalization flow drives a positive cosmological constant towards zero, solving the cosmological constant problem without the need to tune parameters. We propose a simple computation of the graviton contribution to the flow of the effective potential for scalar fields. Within variable gravity, with effective Planck mass proportional to the scalar field, we find that the potential increases asymptotically at most quadratically with the scalar field. The solutions of the derived cosmological equations lead to an asymptotically vanishing cosmological ;constant; in the infinite future, providing for dynamical dark energy in the present cosmological epoch. Beyond a solution of the cosmological constant problem, our simplified computation also entails a sizeable positive graviton-induced anomalous dimension for the quartic Higgs coupling in the ultraviolet regime, substantiating the successful prediction of the Higgs boson mass within the asymptotic safety scenario for quantum gravity.

  10. The cosmological constant and cold dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efstathiou, G.; Sutherland, W. J.; Maddox, S. J.

    1990-12-01

    It is argued here that the success of the cosmological cold dark matter (CDM) model can be retained and the new observations of very large scale cosmological structures can be accommodated in a spatially flat cosmology in which as much as 80 percent of the critical density is provided by a positive cosmological constant. In such a universe, expansion was dominated by CDM until a recent epoch, but is now governed by the cosmological constant. This constant can also account for the lack of fluctuations in the microwave background and the large number of certain kinds of objects found at high redshift.

  11. Laser Propulsion and the Constant Momentum Mission

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, C. William; Mead, Franklin B. Jr.; Knecht, Sean D.

    2004-03-30

    We show that perfect propulsion requires a constant momentum mission, as a consequence of Newton's second law. Perfect propulsion occurs when the velocity of the propelled mass in the inertial frame of reference matches the velocity of the propellant jet in the rocket frame of reference. We compare constant momentum to constant specific impulse propulsion, which, for a given specification of the mission delta V, has an optimum specific impulse that maximizes the propelled mass per unit jet kinetic energy investment. We also describe findings of more than 50 % efficiency for conversion of laser energy into jet kinetic energy by ablation of solids.

  12. Latest rocket measurements of the solar constant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, C. H.; Willson, R. C.; Kendall, J. M.; Harrison, R. G.; Hickey, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    Three rocket flights which carried a payload of absolute radiometers to measure the solar constant with an accuracy of plus or minus 0.5 per cent have been accomplished. Several of the rocket radiometers were duplicates of those aboard the Solar Maximum Mission and Nimbus spacecrafts. The values for the solar constant obtained by the rocket sensors for the three flight dates indicate an increase between the first and latter two flights approximately equivalent to the uncertainty of the measurements. The values for the solar constant for the three flights are 1367, 1372 and 1374 W/sq m.

  13. The second acidic constant of salicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Porto, Raffaella; De Tommaso, Gaetano; Furia, Emilia

    2005-01-01

    The second dissociation constant of salicylic acid (H2L) has been determined, at 25 degrees C, in NaCl ionic media by UV spectrophotometric measurements. The investigated ionic strength values were 0.16, 0.25, 0.50, 1.0, 2.0 and 3.0 M. The protolysis constants calculated at the different ionic strengths yielded, with the Specific Interaction Theory, the infinite dilution constant, log beta1(0) = 13.62 +/- 0.03, for the equilibrium L2- + H+ <==> HL-. The interaction coefficient between Na+ and L2-, b(Na+, L2-) = 0.02 +/- 0.07, has been also calculated.

  14. Improved Lebesgue constants on the triangle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrichs, Wilhelm

    2005-08-01

    New sets of points with improved Lebesgue constants in the triangle are calculated. Starting with the Fekete points a direct minimization process for the Lebesgue constant leads to better results. The points and corresponding quadrature weigths are explicitly given. It is quite surprising that the optimal points are not symmetric. The points along the boundary of the triangle are the 1D Gauss-Lobatto points. For all degrees, our points yield the smallest Lebesgue constants currently known. Numerical examples are presented, which show the improved interpolation properties of our nodes.

  15. Constants and Pseudo-Constants of Coupled Beam Motion in the PEP-II Rings

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, F.J.; Colocho, W.S.; Wang, M.H.; Yan, Y.T.; Yocky, G.; /SLAC

    2011-11-01

    Constants of beam motion help as cross checks to analyze beam diagnostics and the modeling procedure. Pseudo-constants, like the betatron mismatch parameter or the coupling parameter det C, are constant till certain elements in the beam line change them. This can be used to visually find the non-desired changes, pinpointing errors compared with the model.

  16. Marshak waves: Constant flux vs constant T-a (slight) paradigm shift

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, M.D.

    1994-12-22

    We review the basic scaling laws for Marshak waves and point out the differences in results for wall loss, albedo, and Marshak depth when a constant absorbed flux is considered as opposed to a constant absorbed temperature. Comparisons with LASNEX simulations and with data are presented that imply that a constant absorbed flux is a more appropriate boundary condition.

  17. The Solar Constant: A Take Home Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eaton, B. G.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Describes a method that uses energy from the sun, absorbed by aluminum discs, to melt ice, and allows the determination of the solar constant. The take-home equipment includes Styrofoam cups, a plastic syringe, and aluminum discs. (MLH)

  18. The Rate Constant for Fluorescence Quenching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Legenza, Michael W.; Marzzacco, Charles J.

    1977-01-01

    Describes an experiment that utilizes fluorescence intensity measurements from a Spectronic 20 to determine the rate constant for the fluorescence quenching of various aromatic hydrocarbons by carbon tetrachloride in an ethanol solvent. (MLH)

  19. Dielectric constant of water in the interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinpajooh, Mohammadhasan; Matyushov, Dmitry V.

    2016-07-01

    We define the dielectric constant (susceptibility) that should enter the Maxwell boundary value problem when applied to microscopic dielectric interfaces polarized by external fields. The dielectric constant (susceptibility) of the interface is defined by exact linear-response equations involving correlations of statistically fluctuating interface polarization and the Coulomb interaction energy of external charges with the dielectric. The theory is applied to the interface between water and spherical solutes of altering size studied by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The effective dielectric constant of interfacial water is found to be significantly lower than its bulk value, and it also depends on the solute size. For TIP3P water used in MD simulations, the interface dielectric constant changes from 9 to 4 when the solute radius is increased from ˜5 to 18 Å.

  20. Vacuum Spacetimes with Constant Weyl Eigenvalues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, A.

    2015-04-01

    Einstein spacetimes (that is vacuum spacetimes possibly with a non-zero cosmological constant Λ) with constant non-zero Weyl eigenvalues are considered. For type Petrov II & D this assumption allows one to prove that the non-repeated eigenvalue necessarily has the value 2Λ/3 and it turns out that the only possible spacetimes are some Kundt-waves considered by Lewandowski which are type II and a Robinson-Bertotti solution of type D. For Petrov type I the only solution turns out to be a homogeneous pure vacuum solution found long ago by Petrov using group theoretic methods. These results can be summarised by the statement that the only vacuum spacetimes with constant Weyl eigenvalues are either homogeneous or are Kundt spacetimes. This result is similar to that of Coley et al. who proved their result for general spacetimes under the assumption that all scalar invariants constructed from the curvature tensor and all its derivatives were constant.

  1. The Cosmological Constant in Quantum Cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Zhongchao

    2008-10-10

    Hawking proposed that the cosmological constant is probably zero in quantum cosmology in 1984. By using the right configuration for the wave function of the universe, a complete proof is found very recently.

  2. Asymptotic safety and the cosmological constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falls, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    We study the non-perturbative renormalisation of quantum gravity in four dimensions. Taking care to disentangle physical degrees of freedom, we observe the topological nature of conformal fluctuations arising from the functional measure. The resulting beta functions possess an asymptotically safe fixed point with a global phase structure leading to classical general relativity for positive, negative or vanishing cosmological constant. If only the conformal fluctuations are quantised we find an asymptotically safe fixed point predicting a vanishing cosmological constant on all scales. At this fixed point we reproduce the critical exponent, ν = 1/3, found in numerical lattice studies by Hamber. Returning to the full theory we find that by setting the cosmological constant to zero the critical exponent agrees with the conformally reduced theory. This suggests the fixed point may be physical while hinting at solution to the cosmological constant problem.

  3. The Solar Constant: A Take Home Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eaton, B. G.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Describes a method that uses energy from the sun, absorbed by aluminum discs, to melt ice, and allows the determination of the solar constant. The take-home equipment includes Styrofoam cups, a plastic syringe, and aluminum discs. (MLH)

  4. How the cosmological constant affects gravastar formation

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, R.; Silva, M.F.A. da; Rocha, P. E-mail: mfasnic@gmail.com

    2009-12-01

    Here we generalized a previous model of gravastar consisted of an internal de Sitter spacetime, a dynamical infinitely thin shell with an equation of state, but now we consider an external de Sitter-Schwarzschild spacetime. We have shown explicitly that the final output can be a black hole, a ''bounded excursion'' stable gravastar, a stable gravastar, or a de Sitter spacetime, depending on the total mass of the system, the cosmological constants, the equation of state of the thin shell and the initial position of the dynamical shell. We have found that the exterior cosmological constant imposes a limit to the gravastar formation, i.e., the exterior cosmological constant must be smaller than the interior cosmological constant. Besides, we have also shown that, in the particular case where the Schwarzschild mass vanishes, no stable gravastar can be formed, but we still have formation of black hole.

  5. The Rate Constant for Fluorescence Quenching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Legenza, Michael W.; Marzzacco, Charles J.

    1977-01-01

    Describes an experiment that utilizes fluorescence intensity measurements from a Spectronic 20 to determine the rate constant for the fluorescence quenching of various aromatic hydrocarbons by carbon tetrachloride in an ethanol solvent. (MLH)

  6. Beyond lensing by the cosmological constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faraoni, Valerio; Lapierre-Léonard, Marianne

    2017-01-01

    The long-standing problem of whether the cosmological constant affects directly the deflection of light caused by a gravitational lens is reconsidered. We use a new approach based on the Hawking quasilocal mass of a sphere grazed by light rays and on its splitting into local and cosmological parts. Previous literature restricted to the cosmological constant is extended to any form of dark energy accelerating the universe in which the gravitational lens is embedded.

  7. A model for solar constant secular changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schatten, Kenneth H.

    1988-01-01

    In this paper, contrast models for solar active region and global photospheric features are used to reproduce the observed Active Cavity Radiometer and Earth Radiation Budget secular trends in reasonably good fashion. A prediction for the next decade of solar constant variations is made using the model. Secular trends in the solar constant obtained from the present model support the view that the Maunder Minimum may be related to the Little Ice Age of the 17th century.

  8. Low-Dielectric-Constant Polyimide Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorogy, William E., Jr.; Proctor, K. Mason; St. Clair, Anne K.

    1994-01-01

    In experiments performed at NASA Langley Research Center, low-dielectric-constant polyimide fibers produced by use of resin extrusion. These fibers also have high thermal stability and good tensile properties. Useful in industrial and aerospace applications in which fibers required to have dielectric constants less than 3, high thermal stability, and tensile properties in range of those of standard textile fibers. Potential applications include use in printed circuit-boards and in aircraft composites.

  9. Inflation with a constant rate of roll

    SciTech Connect

    Motohashi, Hayato; Starobinsky, Alexei A.; Yokoyama, Jun'ichi E-mail: alstar@landau.ac.ru

    2015-09-01

    We consider an inflationary scenario where the rate of inflaton roll defined by {sup ··}φ/H φ-dot remains constant. The rate of roll is small for slow-roll inflation, while a generic rate of roll leads to the interesting case of 'constant-roll' inflation. We find a general exact solution for the inflaton potential required for such inflaton behaviour. In this model, due to non-slow evolution of background, the would-be decaying mode of linear scalar (curvature) perturbations may not be neglected. It can even grow for some values of the model parameter, while the other mode always remains constant. However, this always occurs for unstable solutions which are not attractors for the given potential. The most interesting particular cases of constant-roll inflation remaining viable with the most recent observational data are quadratic hilltop inflation (with cutoff) and natural inflation (with an additional negative cosmological constant). In these cases even-order slow-roll parameters approach non-negligible constants while the odd ones are asymptotically vanishing in the quasi-de Sitter regime.

  10. Inflation with a constant rate of roll

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motohashi, Hayato; Starobinsky, Alexei A.; Yokoyama, Jun'ichi

    2015-09-01

    We consider an inflationary scenario where the rate of inflaton roll defined by ̈phi/H dot phi remains constant. The rate of roll is small for slow-roll inflation, while a generic rate of roll leads to the interesting case of 'constant-roll' inflation. We find a general exact solution for the inflaton potential required for such inflaton behaviour. In this model, due to non-slow evolution of background, the would-be decaying mode of linear scalar (curvature) perturbations may not be neglected. It can even grow for some values of the model parameter, while the other mode always remains constant. However, this always occurs for unstable solutions which are not attractors for the given potential. The most interesting particular cases of constant-roll inflation remaining viable with the most recent observational data are quadratic hilltop inflation (with cutoff) and natural inflation (with an additional negative cosmological constant). In these cases even-order slow-roll parameters approach non-negligible constants while the odd ones are asymptotically vanishing in the quasi-de Sitter regime.

  11. RNA structure and scalar coupling constants

    SciTech Connect

    Tinoco, I. Jr.; Cai, Z.; Hines, J.V.; Landry, S.M.; SantaLucia, J. Jr.; Shen, L.X.; Varani, G.

    1994-12-01

    Signs and magnitudes of scalar coupling constants-spin-spin splittings-comprise a very large amount of data that can be used to establish the conformations of RNA molecules. Proton-proton and proton-phosphorus splittings have been used the most, but the availability of {sup 13}C-and {sup 15}N-labeled molecules allow many more coupling constants to be used for determining conformation. We will systematically consider the torsion angles that characterize a nucleotide unit and the coupling constants that depend on the values of these torsion angles. Karplus-type equations have been established relating many three-bond coupling constants to torsion angles. However, one- and two-bond coupling constants can also depend on conformation. Serianni and coworkers measured carbon-proton coupling constants in ribonucleosides and have calculated their values as a function of conformation. The signs of two-bond coupling can be very useful because it is easier to measure a sign than an accurate magnitude.

  12. (In)validity of the constant field and constant currents assumptions in theories of ion transport.

    PubMed Central

    Syganow, A; von Kitzing, E

    1999-01-01

    Constant electric fields and constant ion currents are often considered in theories of ion transport. Therefore, it is important to understand the validity of these helpful concepts. The constant field assumption requires that the charge density of permeant ions and flexible polar groups is virtually voltage independent. We present analytic relations that indicate the conditions under which the constant field approximation applies. Barrier models are frequently fitted to experimental current-voltage curves to describe ion transport. These models are based on three fundamental characteristics: a constant electric field, negligible concerted motions of ions inside the channel (an ion can enter only an empty site), and concentration-independent energy profiles. An analysis of those fundamental assumptions of barrier models shows that those approximations require large barriers because the electrostatic interaction is strong and has a long range. In the constant currents assumption, the current of each permeating ion species is considered to be constant throughout the channel; thus ion pairing is explicitly ignored. In inhomogeneous steady-state systems, the association rate constant determines the strength of ion pairing. Among permeable ions, however, the ion association rate constants are not small, according to modern diffusion-limited reaction rate theories. A mathematical formulation of a constant currents condition indicates that ion pairing very likely has an effect but does not dominate ion transport. PMID:9929480

  13. Binary Solid Propellants for Constant Momentum Missions

    SciTech Connect

    Pakhomov, Andrew V.; Mahaffy, Kevin E.

    2008-04-28

    A constant momentum mission is achieved when the speed of the vehicle in the inertial frame of reference is equal to the speed of exhaust relative to the vehicle. Due to 100% propulsive efficiency such missions are superior to traditional constant specific impulse missions. A new class of solid binary propellants for constant momentum missions is under development. A typical propellant column is prepared as a solid solution of two components, with composition gradually changing from 100% of a propellant of high coupling coefficient (C{sub m}) to one which has high specific impulse (I{sub sp}). The high coupling component is ablated first, gradually giving way to the high I{sub sp} component, as the vehicle accelerates. This study opens new opportunities for further design of complex propellants for laser propulsion, providing variable C{sub m} and I{sub sp} during missions.

  14. New Series Representation for Madelung Constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyagi, S.

    2005-09-01

    A new series for the Madelung constant M is derived on the basis of a representation given by Crandall [Exp. Math. 8 (1999), 367]. We are able to write it in the form M = C + S, where S is a rapidly convergent series, and the constant C is fundamental: C = -1/8- ln 2/(4π) - 4π /3 + 1/(2√2) + Γ (1/8) Γ (3/8) / (π3/2√2) approx -1.747564594... The remarkable result is that even if S is discarded, the constant C alone gives ten significant figures of M. This result advances the state of the art in the discovery of what Crandall has termed ``close calls" to an exact Madelung evaluation. We present related identities and discuss how this fundamental ten-digit accuracy might be improved further.

  15. Second Yamabe constant on Riemannian products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, Guillermo

    2017-04-01

    Let (Mm , g) be a closed Riemannian manifold (m ≥ 2) of positive scalar curvature and (Nn , h) any closed manifold. We study the asymptotic behaviour of the second Yamabe constant and the second N-Yamabe constant of (M × N , g + th) as t goes to + ∞. We obtain that lim t → + ∞Y2(M × N , [ g + th ]) =2 2/m+n Y(M ×Rn , [ g +ge ]) . If n ≥ 2, we show the existence of nodal solutions of the Yamabe equation on (M × N , g + th) (provided t large enough). When sg is constant, we prove that lim t → + ∞ YN2 (M × N , g + th) =2 2/m+n YRn(M ×Rn , g +ge) . Also we study the second Yamabe invariant and the second N-Yamabe invariant.

  16. Construction and experimental testing of the constant-bandwidth constant-temperature anemometer.

    PubMed

    Ligeza, P

    2008-09-01

    A classical constant-temperature hot-wire anemometer enables the measurement of fast-changing flow velocity fluctuations, although its transmission bandwidth is a function of measured velocity. This may be a source of significant dynamic errors. Incorporation of an adaptive controller into the constant-temperature system results in hot-wire anemometer operating with a constant transmission bandwidth. The construction together with the results of experimental testing of a constant-bandwidth hot-wire anemometer prototype are presented in this article. During the testing, an approximately constant transmission bandwidth of the anemometer was achieved. The constant-bandwidth hot-wire anemometer can be used in measurements of high-frequency variable flows characterized by a wide range of velocity changes.

  17. Microfabricated microengine with constant rotation rate

    DOEpatents

    Romero, Louis A.; Dickey, Fred M.

    1999-01-01

    A microengine uses two synchronized linear actuators as a power source and converts oscillatory motion from the actuators into constant rotational motion via direct linkage connection to an output gear or wheel. The microengine provides output in the form of a continuously rotating output gear that is capable of delivering drive torque at a constant rotation to a micromechanism. The output gear can have gear teeth on its outer perimeter for directly contacting a micromechanism requiring mechanical power. The gear is retained by a retaining means which allows said gear to rotate freely. The microengine is microfabricated of polysilicon on one wafer using surface micromachining batch fabrication.

  18. Microfabricated microengine with constant rotation rate

    SciTech Connect

    Romero, L.A.; Dickey, F.M.

    1999-09-21

    A microengine uses two synchronized linear actuators as a power source and converts oscillatory motion from the actuators into constant rotational motion via direct linkage connection to an output gear or wheel. The microengine provides output in the form of a continuously rotating output gear that is capable of delivering drive torque at a constant rotation to a micromechanism. The output gear can have gear teeth on its outer perimeter for directly contacting a micromechanism requiring mechanical power. The gear is retained by a retaining means which allows said gear to rotate freely. The microengine is microfabricated of polysilicon on one wafer using surface micromachining batch fabrication.

  19. TOPICAL REVIEW The cosmological constant puzzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bass, Steven D.

    2011-04-01

    The accelerating expansion of the Universe points to a small positive vacuum energy density and negative vacuum pressure. A strong candidate is the cosmological constant in Einstein's equations of general relativity. Possible contributions are zero-point energies and the condensates associated with spontaneous symmetry breaking. The vacuum energy density extracted from astrophysics is 1056 times smaller than the value expected from quantum fields and standard model particle physics. Is the vacuum energy density time dependent? We give an introduction to the cosmological constant puzzle and ideas how to solve it.

  20. Atomic weights: no longer constants of nature

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coplen, Tyler B.; Holden, Norman E.

    2011-01-01

    Many of us were taught that the standard atomic weights we found in the back of our chemistry textbooks or on the Periodic Table of the Chemical Elements hanging on the wall of our chemistry classroom are constants of nature. This was common knowledge for more than a century and a half, but not anymore. The following text explains how advances in chemical instrumentation and isotopic analysis have changed the way we view atomic weights and why they are no longer constants of nature

  1. Rate constant for the Cl + Chloroform reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Brahan, K.M.; Hewitt, A.D.; Boone, G.D.

    1995-12-01

    The rate constant for the reaction of Cl with chloroform has been measured relative to the reaction of Cl with methane, methyl chloride, and carbon monoxide using long path FTIR spectroscopy. Our measured rate constant at 298 K and 1 atm of (1.2{plus_minus}0.1)x10{sup -13} cm{sup 3}molecule{sup -1}sec{sup -1} is 50% higher than that recommended for stratospheric modeling; however, it is within experimental error of the values measured by Clyne and Walker and by Watson. The implications of this reaction on the budgets of chloroform and phosgene in the troposphere will be discussed.

  2. Cosmological constant in scale-invariant theories

    SciTech Connect

    Foot, Robert; Kobakhidze, Archil; Volkas, Raymond R.

    2011-10-01

    The incorporation of a small cosmological constant within radiatively broken scale-invariant models is discussed. We show that phenomenologically consistent scale-invariant models can be constructed which allow a small positive cosmological constant, providing certain relation between the particle masses is satisfied. As a result, the mass of the dilaton is generated at two-loop level. Another interesting consequence is that the electroweak symmetry-breaking vacuum in such models is necessarily a metastable ''false'' vacuum which, fortunately, is not expected to decay on cosmological time scales.

  3. Flexible alternatives to constant frequency systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart-Wilson, John

    The use of hybrid systems in which variable frequency is used as generated, with a proportion being converted to constant frequency by electronic conversion, is examined as a flexible alternative to constant frequency systems. Here, some practical solutions to the technical issues raised by adopting the more flexible approach to electrical system generation are presented. In particular, attention is given to the frequency ranges used, impact on aircraft equipment, motor-driven equipment, transformer rectifier units, lighting, and avionics. The discussion also covers fan-assisted galley ovens, system architecture, special airworthiness requirements, and power quality.

  4. Environmental dependence of masses and coupling constants

    SciTech Connect

    Olive, Keith A.; Pospelov, Maxim

    2008-02-15

    We construct a class of scalar field models coupled to matter that lead to the dependence of masses and coupling constants on the ambient matter density. Such models predict a deviation of couplings measured on the Earth from values determined in low-density astrophysical environments, but do not necessarily require the evolution of coupling constants with the redshift in the recent cosmological past. Additional laboratory and astrophysical tests of {delta}{alpha} and {delta}(m{sub p}/m{sub e}) as functions of the ambient matter density are warranted.

  5. Dielectric constants of soils at microwave frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geiger, F. E.; Williams, D.

    1972-01-01

    A knowledge of the complex dielectric constant of soils is essential in the interpretation of microwave airborne radiometer data of the earth's surface. Measurements were made at 37 GHz on various soils from the Phoenix, Ariz., area. Extensive data have been obtained for dry soil and soil with water content in the range from 0.6 to 35 percent by dry weight. Measurements were made in a two arm microwave bridge and results were corrected for reflections at the sample interfaces by solution of the parallel dielectric plate problem. The maximum dielectric constants are about a factor of 3 lower than those reported for similar soils at X-band frequencies.

  6. Reconstruction of constant slow-roll inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Qing

    2017-09-01

    Using the relations between the slow-roll parameters and the power spectra for the single field slow-roll inflation, we derive the scalar spectral tilt n s and the tensor to scalar ratio r for the constant slow-roll inflation, and obtain the constraint on the slow-roll parameter η from the Planck 2015 results. The inflationary potential for the constant slow-roll inflation is then reconstructed in the framework of both general relativity and the scalar-tensor theory of gravity, and compared with the recently reconstructed E model potential. In the strong coupling limit, we show that the η attractor is reached.

  7. Existence of constants in regular splicing languages.

    PubMed

    Bonizzoni, Paola; Jonoska, Nataša

    2015-06-01

    In spite of wide investigations of finite splicing systems in formal language theory, basic questions, such as their characterization, remain unsolved. It has been conjectured that a necessary condition for a regular language L to be a splicing language is that L must have a constant in the Schutzenberger sense. We prove this longstanding conjecture to be true. The result is based on properties of strongly connected components of the minimal deterministic finite state automaton for a regular splicing language. Using constants of the corresponding languages, we also provide properties of transitive automata and pathautomata.

  8. Existence of constants in regular splicing languages

    PubMed Central

    Jonoska, Nataša

    2015-01-01

    In spite of wide investigations of finite splicing systems in formal language theory, basic questions, such as their characterization, remain unsolved. It has been conjectured that a necessary condition for a regular language L to be a splicing language is that L must have a constant in the Schutzenberger sense. We prove this longstanding conjecture to be true. The result is based on properties of strongly connected components of the minimal deterministic finite state automaton for a regular splicing language. Using constants of the corresponding languages, we also provide properties of transitive automata and pathautomata. PMID:27185985

  9. Atomic Weights No Longer Constants of Nature

    SciTech Connect

    Coplen, T.B.; Holden, N.

    2011-03-01

    Many of us grew up being taught that the standard atomic weights we found in the back of our chemistry textbooks or on the Periodic Table of the Chemical Elements hanging on the wall of our chemistry classroom are constants of nature. This was common knowledge for more than a century and a half, but not anymore. The following text explains how advances in chemical instrumentation and isotopic analysis has changed the way we view atomic weights and why they are no longer constants of nature.

  10. Degravitation of the cosmological constant in bigravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platscher, Moritz; Smirnov, Juri

    2017-03-01

    In this article the phenomenon of degravitation of the cosmological constant is studied in the framework of bigravity. It is demonstrated that despite a sizable value of the cosmological constant its gravitational effect can be only mild. The bigravity framework is chosen for this demonstration as it leads to a consistent, ghost-free theory of massive gravity. We show that degravitation takes place in the limit where the physical graviton is dominantly a gauge invariant metric combination. We present and discuss several phenomenological consequences expected in this regime.

  11. Porous low dielectric constant materials for microelectronics.

    PubMed

    Baklanov, Mikhail R; Maex, Karen

    2006-01-15

    Materials with a low dielectric constant are required as interlayer dielectrics for the on-chip interconnection of ultra-large-scale integration devices to provide high speed, low dynamic power dissipation and low cross-talk noise. The selection of chemical compounds with low polarizability and the introduction of porosity result in a reduced dielectric constant. Integration of such materials into microelectronic circuits, however, poses a number of challenges, as the materials must meet strict requirements in terms of properties and reliability. These issues are the subject of the present paper.

  12. f( R) constant-roll inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motohashi, Hayato; Starobinsky, Alexei A.

    2017-08-01

    The previously introduced class of two-parametric phenomenological inflationary models in general relativity in which the slow-roll assumption is replaced by the more general, constant-roll condition is generalized to the case of f( R) gravity. A simple constant-roll condition is defined in the original Jordan frame, and exact expressions for a scalaron potential in the Einstein frame, for a function f( R) (in the parametric form) and for inflationary dynamics are obtained. The region of the model parameters permitted by the latest observational constraints on the scalar spectral index and the tensor-to-scalar ratio of primordial metric perturbations generated during inflation is determined.

  13. Our Universe from the cosmological constant

    SciTech Connect

    Barrau, Aurélien; Linsefors, Linda E-mail: linda.linsefors@lpsc.in2p3.fr

    2014-12-01

    The issue of the origin of the Universe and of its contents is addressed in the framework of bouncing cosmologies, as described for example by loop quantum gravity. If the current acceleration is due to a true cosmological constant, this constant is naturally conserved through the bounce and the Universe should also be in a (contracting) de Sitter phase in the remote past. We investigate here the possibility that the de Sitter temperature in the contracting branch fills the Universe with radiation that causes the bounce and the subsequent inflation and reheating. We also consider the possibility that this gives rise to a cyclic model of the Universe and suggest some possible tests.

  14. Lattice theta constants vs Riemann theta constants and NSR superstring measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunin-Barkowski, P.; Morozov, A.; Sleptsov, A.

    2009-10-01

    We discuss relations between two different representations of hypothetical holomorphic NSR measures, based on two different ways of constructing the semi-modular forms of weight 8. One of these ways is to build forms from the ordinary Riemann theta constants and another — from the lattice theta constants. We discuss unexpectedly elegant relations between lattice theta constants, corresponding to 16-dimensional self-dual lattices, and Riemann theta constants and present explicit formulae expressing the former ones through the latter. Starting from genus 5 the modular-form approach to construction of NSR measures is clearly sick and it seems to fail completely already at genus 6.

  15. Internal machining accomplished at constant radii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gollihugh, T. E.

    1966-01-01

    Device machines fluid passages in workpieces at constant radii through two adjacent surfaces that are at included angles up to approximately 120 degrees. This technique has been used extensively in fabricating engine parts where close control of fluid flow is a requirement.

  16. The Elastic Constants for Wrought Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Templin, R L; Hartmann, E C

    1945-01-01

    There are several constants which have been devised as numerical representations of the behavior of metals under the action of loadings which stress the metal within the range of elastic action. Some of these constants, such as Young's modulus of elasticity in tension and compression, shearing modulus of elasticity, and Poisson's ratio, are regularly used in engineering calculations. Precise tests and experience indicate that these elastic constants are practically unaffected by many of the factors which influence the other mechanical properties of materials and that a few careful determinations under properly controlled conditions are more useful and reliable than many determinations made under less favorable conditions. It is the purpose of this paper to outline the methods employed by the Aluminum Research Laboratories for the determination of some of these elastic constants, to list the values that have been determined for some of the wrought aluminum alloys, and to indicate the variations in the values that may be expected for some of the commercial products of these alloys.

  17. Unified Technical Concepts. Module 12: Time Constants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technical Education Research Center, Waco, TX.

    This concept module on time constants is one of thirteen modules that provide a flexible, laboratory-based physics instructional package designed to meet the specialized needs of students in two-year, postsecondary technical schools. Each of the thirteen concept modules discusses a single physics concept and how it is applied to each energy…

  18. Limitations of Constant-Force-Feedback Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Elms, Phillip J.; Chodera, John D.; Bustamante, Carlos J.; Marqusee, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Single-molecule force spectroscopy has provided important insights into the properties and mechanisms of biological molecules and systems. A common experiment is to measure the force dependence of conformational changes at equilibrium. Here, we demonstrate that the commonly used technique of force feedback has severe limitations when used to evaluate rapid macromolecular conformational transitions. By comparing the force-dependent dynamics of three major classes of macromolecules (DNA, RNA, and protein) using both a constant-force-feedback and a constant-trap-position technique, we demonstrate a problem in force-feedback experiments. The finite response time of the instrument’s force feedback can modify the behavior of the molecule, leading to errors in the reported parameters, such as the rate constants and the distance to the transition state, for the conformational transitions. We elucidate the causes of this problem and provide a simple test to identify and evaluate the magnitude of the effect. We recommend avoiding the use of constant force feedback as a method to study rapid conformational changes in macromolecules. PMID:23062341

  19. Spray Gun With Constant Mixing Ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, William G.

    1987-01-01

    Conceptual mechanism mounted in handle of spray gun maintains constant ratio between volumetric flow rates in two channels leading to spray head. With mechanism, possible to keep flow ratio near 1:1 (or another desired ratio) over range of temperatures, orifice or channel sizes, or clogging conditions.

  20. Man's Size in Terms of Fundamental Constants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Press, William H.

    1980-01-01

    Reviews calculations that derive an order of magnitude expression for the size of man in terms of fundamental constants, assuming that man satifies these three properties: he is made of complicated molecules; he requires an atmosphere which is not hydrogen and helium; he is as large as possible. (CS)

  1. Solution Strategies for Constant Acceleration Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheaton, S. M.; Binder, P.-M.

    2017-01-01

    We discuss strategies for the general solution of single-step 1D constant acceleration problems. In a slightly restricted form, these problems have five variables (?"x," "v[subscript 0]," "v," "a" and "t") and two independent equations, so three variables must be given to solve for the other two,…

  2. Variations of the Solar Constant. [conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sofia, S. (Editor)

    1981-01-01

    The variations in data received from rocket-borne and balloon-borne instruments are discussed. Indirect techniques to measure and monitor the solar constant are presented. Emphasis is placed on the correlation of data from the Solar Maximum Mission and the Nimbus 7 satellites.

  3. Damping constant estimation in magnetoresistive readers

    SciTech Connect

    Stankiewicz, Andrzej Hernandez, Stephanie

    2015-05-07

    The damping constant is a key design parameter in magnetic reader design. Its value can be derived from bulk or sheet film ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) line width. However, dynamics of nanodevices is usually defined by presence of non-uniform modes. It triggers new damping mechanisms and produces stronger damping than expected from traditional FMR. This work proposes a device-level technique for damping evaluation, based on time-domain analysis of thermally excited stochastic oscillations. The signal is collected using a high bandwidth oscilloscope, by direct probing of a biased reader. Recorded waveforms may contain different noise signals, but free layer FMR is usually a dominating one. The autocorrelation function is a reflection of the damped oscillation curve, averaging out stochastic contributions. The damped oscillator formula is fitted to autocorrelation data, producing resonance frequency and damping constant values. Restricting lag range allows for mitigation of the impact of other phenomena (e.g., reader instability) on the damping constant. For a micromagnetically modeled reader, the technique proves to be much more accurate than the stochastic FMR line width approach. Application to actual reader waveforms yields a damping constant of ∼0.03.

  4. Teaching Nanochemistry: Madelung Constants of Nanocrystals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Mark D.; Baker, A. David

    2010-01-01

    The Madelung constants for binary ionic nanoparticles are determined. The computational method described here sums the Coulombic interactions of each ion in the particle without the use of partial charges commonly used for bulk materials. The results show size-dependent lattice energies. This is a useful concept in teaching how properties such as…

  5. Man's Size in Terms of Fundamental Constants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Press, William H.

    1980-01-01

    Reviews calculations that derive an order of magnitude expression for the size of man in terms of fundamental constants, assuming that man satifies these three properties: he is made of complicated molecules; he requires an atmosphere which is not hydrogen and helium; he is as large as possible. (CS)

  6. Teaching Nanochemistry: Madelung Constants of Nanocrystals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Mark D.; Baker, A. David

    2010-01-01

    The Madelung constants for binary ionic nanoparticles are determined. The computational method described here sums the Coulombic interactions of each ion in the particle without the use of partial charges commonly used for bulk materials. The results show size-dependent lattice energies. This is a useful concept in teaching how properties such as…

  7. Asymptotically Vanishing Cosmological Constant in the Multiverse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, Hikaru; Okada, Takashi

    We study the problem of the cosmological constant in the context of the multiverse in Lorentzian space-time, and show that the cosmological constant will vanish in the future. This sort of argument was started by Sidney Coleman in 1989, and he argued that the Euclidean wormholes make the multiverse partition function a superposition of various values of the cosmological constant Λ, which has a sharp peak at Λ = 0. However, the implication of the Euclidean analysis to our Lorentzian space-time is unclear. With this motivation, we analyze the quantum state of the multiverse in Lorentzian space-time by the WKB method, and calculate the density matrix of our universe by tracing out the other universes. Our result predicts vanishing cosmological constant. While Coleman obtained the enhancement at Λ = 0 through the action itself, in our Lorentzian analysis the similar enhancement arises from the front factor of eiS in the universe wave function, which is in the next leading order in the WKB approximation.

  8. Can compactifications solve the cosmological constant problem?

    SciTech Connect

    Hertzberg, Mark P.; Masoumi, Ali

    2016-06-30

    Recently, there have been claims in the literature that the cosmological constant problem can be dynamically solved by specific compactifications of gravity from higher-dimensional toy models. These models have the novel feature that in the four-dimensional theory, the cosmological constant Λ is much smaller than the Planck density and in fact accumulates at Λ=0. Here we show that while these are very interesting models, they do not properly address the real cosmological constant problem. As we explain, the real problem is not simply to obtain Λ that is small in Planck units in a toy model, but to explain why Λ is much smaller than other mass scales (and combinations of scales) in the theory. Instead, in these toy models, all other particle mass scales have been either removed or sent to zero, thus ignoring the real problem. To this end, we provide a general argument that the included moduli masses are generically of order Hubble, so sending them to zero trivially sends the cosmological constant to zero. We also show that the fundamental Planck mass is being sent to zero, and so the central problem is trivially avoided by removing high energy physics altogether. On the other hand, by including various large mass scales from particle physics with a high fundamental Planck mass, one is faced with a real problem, whose only known solution involves accidental cancellations in a landscape.

  9. Spray Gun With Constant Mixing Ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, William G.

    1987-01-01

    Conceptual mechanism mounted in handle of spray gun maintains constant ratio between volumetric flow rates in two channels leading to spray head. With mechanism, possible to keep flow ratio near 1:1 (or another desired ratio) over range of temperatures, orifice or channel sizes, or clogging conditions.

  10. Some relations among engineering constants of wood

    Treesearch

    Jen Y. Liu; Robert J. Ross

    1998-01-01

    Wood may be described as an orthotropic material with unique and independent mechanical properties in the directions of three mutually perpendicular axes– longitudinal ( L ), radial ( R ), and tangential (T ). These mechanical properties are also called engineering constants. Orthotropic materials are of special relevance to composite materials. Therefore, mathematical...

  11. Unified Technical Concepts. Module 12: Time Constants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technical Education Research Center, Waco, TX.

    This concept module on time constants is one of thirteen modules that provide a flexible, laboratory-based physics instructional package designed to meet the specialized needs of students in two-year, postsecondary technical schools. Each of the thirteen concept modules discusses a single physics concept and how it is applied to each energy…

  12. A tunable CMOS constant current source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thelen, D.

    1991-01-01

    A constant current source has been designed which makes use of on chip electrically erasable memory to adjust the magnitude and temperature coefficient of the output current. The current source includes a voltage reference based on the difference between enhancement and depletion transistor threshold voltages. Accuracy is +/- 3% over the full range of power supply, process variations, and temperature using eight bits for tuning.

  13. Spectral curve fitting of dielectric constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruzi, M.; Ennis, C.; Robertson, E. G.

    2017-01-01

    Optical constants are important properties governing the response of a material to incident light. It follows that they are often extracted from spectra measured by absorbance, transmittance or reflectance. One convenient method to obtain optical constants is by curve fitting. Here, model curves should satisfy Kramer-Kronig relations, and preferably can be expressed in closed form or easily calculable. In this study we use dielectric constants of three different molecular ices in the infrared region to evaluate four different model curves that are generally used for fitting optical constants: (1) the classical damped harmonic oscillator, (2) Voigt line shape, (3) Fourier series, and (4) the Triangular basis. Among these, only the classical damped harmonic oscillator model strictly satisfies the Kramer-Kronig relation. If considering the trade-off between accuracy and speed, Fourier series fitting is the best option when spectral bands are broad while for narrow peaks the classical damped harmonic oscillator and the Triangular basis fitting model are the best choice.

  14. Sensing Position With Approximately Constant Contact Force

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturdevant, Jay

    1996-01-01

    Computer-controlled electromechanical system uses number of linear variable-differential transformers (LVDTs) to measure axial positions of selected points on surface of lens, mirror, or other precise optical component with high finish. Pressures applied to pneumatically driven LVDTs adjusted to maintain small, approximately constant contact forces as positions of LVDT tips vary.

  15. Microwave spectrum and molecular constants of indole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesvadba, Radim; Studecký, Tomáš; Uhlíková, Tereza; Urban, Štěpán

    2017-09-01

    Every single person has a certain characteristic group of scent molecules. The microwave spectra of the organic compounds of scent could be useful for the identification of people, but a database of spectra of scent molecules needs to be created first. The spectrum of indole, that is among the human scent molecules, was measured in the frequency range of 7.5-19 GHz under the conditions of supersonic expansion in a pulse emission Fourier Transform Microwave Spectrometer (FTMW) with a Fabry-Perot resonator. The high resolution of the spectrometer enables the detection of rotational transitions with hyperfine splitting. A total of 37 new rotational transitions were measured and analyzed using the PGOPHER software to derive the rotational and centrifugal distortion constants, as well as the 14N nuclear quadrupole coupling constants. The molecular constants were determined with approximately two orders of magnitude greater accuracy as compared with some earlier studies of indole. The obtained data and constants of indole are the first step towards the development of a database of the human scent molecules.

  16. Constant-flow ventilation of apneic dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Lehnert, B.E.; Oberdoerster, G.; Slutsky, A.S.

    1982-01-01

    The adequacy of constant airway gas flow sustenance of arterial blood gas tensions was investigated in anesthetized-paralyzed mongrel dogs. Gas delivery was achieved via a main-stem bronchi cannulation system constructed of two polyethylene tubes bifurcating at the carina, which rested on the posterior surface of the trachea outside of an endotracheal tube positioned in the upper third of the trachea. Equal flows (total flow = Vin) of humidified air were delivered through each limb of the cannulation system at constant flow rates with Vin ranging from 8 to 28 l/min. Intratracheal pressures at these flows characteristically ranged from 0.1 to 1 cmH/sub 2/O. Arterial O/sub 2/ tension varied directly (Pa/sub O/sub 2// = 0.72 Vin + 74.6), and arterial CO/sub 2/ tension varied inversely (Pa/sub CO/sub 2// = -0.73 Vin + 51.2) with Vin during ambient gas, constant-flow ventilation (DFV). During prolonged CFV (>2h), no evidence of CO/sub 2/ accumulation or deterioration of Pa/sub O/sub 2// was observed. This study demonstrates that in apneic dogs normal blood gases can be achieved and maintained over prolonged periods with constant airway flow at low intratracheal pressures.

  17. Constant capacitance in nanopores of carbon monoliths.

    PubMed

    García-Gómez, Alejandra; Moreno-Fernández, Gelines; Lobato, Belén; Centeno, Teresa A

    2015-06-28

    The results obtained for binder-free electrodes made of carbon monoliths with narrow micropore size distributions confirm that the specific capacitance in the electrolyte (C2H5)4NBF4/acetonitrile does not depend significantly on the micropore size and support the foregoing constant result of 0.094 ± 0.011 F m(-2).

  18. Employment of quantum chemical descriptors for Hammett constants: Revision Suggested for the acetoxy substituent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papp, Tamara; Kollár, László; Kégl, Tamás

    2013-11-01

    The Hammett para constant (σp) of the acetoxy group has been estimated by applying widely available quantum chemical descriptors, such as NPA charges, Wiberg bond indices, electron densities at bond critical points, as well as electrostatic potential at nuclei. The revised σp value is predicted to be in the range of [-0.08, -0.02]. Direct evaluation of proton transfer free energies between the substituted benzoic acids and the benzoate anion by employing the SMD solvation model resulted in a reasonable linear correlation with the Hammett constants with a prediction of σp = -0.02 for the OAc group.

  19. When is the growth index constant?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polarski, David; Starobinsky, Alexei A.; Giacomini, Hector

    2016-12-01

    The growth index γ is an interesting tool to assess the phenomenology of dark energy (DE) models, in particular of those beyond general relativity (GR). We investigate the possibility for DE models to allow for a constant γ during the entire matter and DE dominated stages. It is shown that if DE is described by quintessence (a scalar field minimally coupled to gravity), this behaviour of γ is excluded either because it would require a transition to a phantom behaviour at some finite moment of time, or, in the case of tracking DE at the matter dominated stage, because the relative matter density Ωm appears to be too small. An infinite number of solutions, with Ωm and γ both constant, are found with wDE = 0 corresponding to Einstein-de Sitter universes. For all modified gravity DE models satisfying Geff >= G, among them the f(R) DE models suggested in the literature, the condition to have a constant wDE is strongly violated at the present epoch. In contrast, DE tracking dust-like matter deep in the matter era, but with Ωm <1, requires Geff > G and an example is given using scalar-tensor gravity for a range of admissible values of γ. For constant wDE inside GR, departure from a quasi-constant value is limited until today. Even a large variation of wDE may not result in a clear signature in the change of γ. The change however is substantial in the future and the asymptotic value of γ is found while its slope with respect to Ωm (and with respect to z) diverges and tends to ‑∞.

  20. Construction of Lines of Constant Density and Constant Refractive Index for Ternary Liquid Mixtures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tasic, Aleksandar Z.; Djordjevic, Bojan D.

    1983-01-01

    Demonstrates construction of density constant and refractive index constant lines in triangular coordinate system on basis of systematic experimental determinations of density and refractive index for both homogeneous (single-phase) ternary liquid mixtures (of known composition) and the corresponding binary compositions. Background information,…

  1. Time place learning and activity profile under constant light and constant dark in zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Moura, Clarissa de Almeida; Lima, Jéssica Polyana da Silva; Silveira, Vanessa Augusta Magalhães; Miguel, Mário André Leocadio; Luchiari, Ana Carolina

    2017-05-01

    The ability to learn about the signs of variability in space and time is known as time place learning (TPL). To adjust their circadian rhythms, animals use stimuli that change regularly, such as the light-dark cycle, temperature, food availability or even social stimuli. Because light-dark cycle is the most important environmental temporal cue, we asked how a diurnal animal would perform TPL if this cue was removed. Zebrafish has been extensively studied in the chronobiology area due to it diurnal chronotype, thus, we studied the effects of constant light and constant dark on the time-place learning and activity profile in zebrafish. Our data show that while under constant light and dark condition zebrafish was not able of TPL, after 30days under the constant conditions, constant light led to higher activity level and less significant (robust) 24h rhythm.

  2. Cosmic concordance and the fine structure constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battye, Richard A.; Crittenden, Robert; Weller, Jochen

    2001-02-01

    Recent measurements of a peak in the angular power spectrum of the cosmic microwave background suggest that the geometry of the universe is close to flat. But if other accepted indicators of cosmological parameters are also correct then the best fit model is marginally closed, with the peak in the spectrum at slightly larger scales than in a flat universe. If these observations persevere, one way they might be reconciled with a flat universe is if the fine structure constant had a lower value at earlier times, which would delay the recombination of electrons and protons and also act to suppress secondary oscillations as observed. We discuss evidence for a few percent increase in the fine structure constant between the time of recombination and the present.

  3. Mixed quantum states with variable Planck constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Gosson, Maurice A.

    2017-09-01

    Recent cosmological measurements tend to confirm that the fine structure constant α is not immutable and has undergone a tiny variation since the Big Bang. Choosing adequate units, this could also reflect a variation of Planck's constant h. The aim of this Letter is to explore some consequences of such a possible change of h for the pure and mixed states of quantum mechanics. Surprisingly enough it is found that not only is the purity of a state extremely sensitive to such changes, but that quantum states can evolve into classical states, and vice versa. A complete classification of such transitions is however not possible for the moment being because of yet unsolved mathematical difficulties related to the study of positivity properties of trace class operators.

  4. BOREAS RSS-17 Dielectric Constant Profile Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Nickeson, Jaime (Editor); McDonald, Kyle C.; Zimmerman, Reiner; Way, JoBea

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS RSS-17 team acquired and analyzed imaging radar data from the ESA's ERS-1 over a complete annual cycle at the BOREAS sites in Canada in 1994 to detect shifts in radar backscatter related to varying environmental conditions. This data set consists of dielectric constant profile measurements from selected trees at various BOREAS flux tower sites. The relative dielectric constant was measured at C-band (frequency = 5 GHz) as a function of depth into the trunk of three trees at each site, Measurements were made during April 1994 with an Applied Microwave Corporation field PDP fitted with a 0.358-cm (0.141-inch) diameter coaxial probe tip. The data are available in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  5. Some Dynamical Effects of the Cosmological Constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axenides, M.; Floratos, E. G.; Perivolaropoulos, L.

    Newton's law gets modified in the presence of a cosmological constant by a small repulsive term (antigravity) that is proportional to the distance. Assuming a value of the cosmological constant consistent with the recent SnIa data (Λ~=10-52 m-2), we investigate the significance of this term on various astrophysical scales. We find that on galactic scales or smaller (less than a few tens of kpc), the dynamical effects of the vacuum energy are negligible by several orders of magnitude. On scales of 1 Mpc or larger however we find that the vacuum energy can significantly affect the dynamics. For example we show that the velocity data in the local group of galaxies correspond to galactic masses increased by 35% in the presence of vacuum energy. The effect is even more important on larger low density systems like clusters of galaxies or superclusters.

  6. Constant envelope chirped OFDM power efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dida, Mussa A.; Hao, Huan; Anjum, M. R.; Ran, Tao

    2016-10-01

    Fractional Fourier OFDM or simply chirped OFDM performs better in time-frequency selective channel than its convectional OFDM. Although chirped OFDM outperforms OFDM it still inherits Peak to Average Power Ratio (PAPR) drawback as a convectional OFDM. To eliminate PAPR drawback Constant Envelope OFDM was developed and for better performance in time frequency selective channel Constant Envelope Fractional Fourier OFDM (CE-COFDM) is used. Its BER performance is analyzed and compared to chirped OFDM and OFDM in AWGN and Rayleigh channel. The simulations show the BER performance of CE-COFDM is the same as chirped OFDM and OFDM. The power efficiency of CE-COFDM is also studied and different simulations performed shows CE-COFDM is more power efficient than chirped OFDM and convectional OFDM for class A and class B Linear Power Amplifier (LPA).

  7. Black ring with a positive cosmological constant

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, C.-S.; Dai, S.-H.

    2007-03-15

    We consider a black ring with a cosmological constant in the five-dimensional N=4 de Sitter supergravity theory. Our solution preserves half of the de Sitter supersymmetries and has one rotation symmetry. Unlike the flat case, there is no angular momentum and the stability against gravitational self-attraction is balanced by the cosmological repulsion due to the cosmological constant. Our solution describes a singular black ring since, although it has horizons of topology S{sup 1}xS{sup 2}, the horizons are singular. Despite the singularity, our solution displays some interesting regular physical properties: it carries a dipole charge and this charge contributes to the first law of thermodynamics; it has an entropy and mass which conform to the entropic N-bound proposal and the maximal mass conjecture. We conjecture that the Gregory-Laflamme instability leads to a resolution of the singularity and results in a regular black ring.

  8. Cylindrical wormholes with positive cosmological constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richarte, Martín G.

    2013-07-01

    We construct cylindrical, traversable wormholes with finite radii by taking into account the cut-and-paste procedure for the case of cosmic string manifolds with a positive cosmological constant. Under reasonable assumptions about the equation of state of the matter located at the shell, we find that the wormhole throat undergoes a monotonous evolution provided it moves at a constant velocity. In order to explore the dynamical nonlinear behavior of the wormhole throat, we consider that the matter of the shell is supported by anisotropic Chaplygin gas, anti-Chaplygin gas, or a mixture of Chaplygin and anti-Chaplygin gases, implying that wormholes could suffer an accelerated expansion or contraction, but that oscillatory behavior seems to be forbidden.

  9. On determining dose rate constants spectroscopically

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, M.; Rogers, D. W. O.

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: To investigate several aspects of the Chen and Nath spectroscopic method of determining the dose rate constants of {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd seeds [Z. Chen and R. Nath, Phys. Med. Biol. 55, 6089-6104 (2010)] including the accuracy of using a line or dual-point source approximation as done in their method, and the accuracy of ignoring the effects of the scattered photons in the spectra. Additionally, the authors investigate the accuracy of the literature's many different spectra for bare, i.e., unencapsulated {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd sources. Methods: Spectra generated by 14 {sup 125}I and 6 {sup 103}Pd seeds were calculated in vacuo at 10 cm from the source in a 2.7 Multiplication-Sign 2.7 Multiplication-Sign 0.05 cm{sup 3} voxel using the EGSnrc BrachyDose Monte Carlo code. Calculated spectra used the initial photon spectra recommended by AAPM's TG-43U1 and NCRP (National Council of Radiation Protection and Measurements) Report 58 for the {sup 125}I seeds, or TG-43U1 and NNDC(2000) (National Nuclear Data Center, 2000) for {sup 103}Pd seeds. The emitted spectra were treated as coming from a line or dual-point source in a Monte Carlo simulation to calculate the dose rate constant. The TG-43U1 definition of the dose rate constant was used. These calculations were performed using the full spectrum including scattered photons or using only the main peaks in the spectrum as done experimentally. Statistical uncertainties on the air kerma/history and the dose rate/history were Less-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To 0.2%. The dose rate constants were also calculated using Monte Carlo simulations of the full seed model. Results: The ratio of the intensity of the 31 keV line relative to that of the main peak in {sup 125}I spectra is, on average, 6.8% higher when calculated with the NCRP Report 58 initial spectrum vs that calculated with TG-43U1 initial spectrum. The {sup 103}Pd spectra exhibit an average 6.2% decrease in the 22.9 keV line relative to the main peak when

  10. Dielectric Constant Measurements for Characterizing Lunar Soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Robert C.; Buehler, M.; Seshadri, S.; Kuhlman, G.; Schaap, M.

    2005-01-01

    The return to the Moon has ignited the need to characterize the lunar regolith using fast, reliable in-situ methods. Characterizing the physical properties of the rocks and soils can be very difficult because of the many complex parameters that influence the measurements. In particular, soil electrical property measurements are influenced by temperature, mineral type, grain size, porosity, and soil conductivity. Determining the dielectric constant of lunar materials may be very important in providing quick characterization of surface deposits, especially for the Moon. A close examination of the lunar regolith samples collected by the Apollo astronauts indicates that the rocks and soils on the Moon are dominated by silicates and oxides. In this presentation, we will show that determining the dielectric constant measurements can provide a simple, quick detection method for minerals that contain titanium, iron, and water. Their presence is manifest by an unusually large imaginary permittivity.

  11. Lattice Boltzmann model with nearly constant density.

    PubMed

    Fang, Hai-ping; Wan, Rong-zheng; Lin, Zhi-fang

    2002-09-01

    An improved lattice Boltzmann model is developed to simulate fluid flow with nearly constant fluid density. The ingredient is to incorporate an extra relaxation for fluid density, which is realized by introducing a feedback equation in the equilibrium distribution functions. The pressure is dominated by the moving particles at a node, while the fluid density is kept nearly constant and explicit mass conservation is retained as well. Numerical simulation based on the present model for the (steady) plane Poiseuille flow and the (unsteady) two-dimensional Womersley flow shows a great improvement in simulation results over the previous models. In particular, the density fluctuation has been reduced effectively while achieving a relatively large pressure gradient.

  12. Oxygen binding constants for human hemoglobin tetramers.

    PubMed

    Gill, S J; Di Cera, E; Doyle, M L; Bishop, G A; Robert, C H

    1987-06-30

    High-precision studies of oxygen binding in hemoglobin (HbA0) solutions at near-physiological concentrations (2-12 mM heme; pHs 7.0-9.1; various buffers) have led to an unanticipated result: an unmeasurably low contribution from the triply ligated species. We have obtained this result from new differential oxygen-binding measurements for human hemoglobin through the use of a thin-layer apparatus, which enables study of solutions at high Hb concentrations. The effect of tetramer dissociation into dimers, which becomes significant at hemoglobin concentrations below 1 mM in heme, is avoided. The analysis of the binding reactions is thus cast in terms of tetramer-binding polynomial written with overall Adair equilibrium constants which directly reflect the contributions of intermediate ligated species. The unmeasurable contribution of the triply ligated species renders the equilibrium constants of the third and fourth stepwise reactions practically undeterminable.

  13. Optical constants of liquid and solid methane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martonchik, John V.; Orton, Glenn S.

    1994-01-01

    The optical constants n(sub r) + in(sub i) of liquid methane and phase 1 solid methane were determined over the entire spectral range by the use of various data sources published in the literature. Kramers-Kronig analyses were performed on the absorption spectra of liquid methane at the boiling point (111 K) and the melting point (90 K) and on the absorption spectra of phase 1 solid methane at the melting point and at 30 K. Measurements of the static dielectric constant at these temperatures and refractive indices determined over limited spectral ranges were used as constraints in the analyses. Applications of methane optical properties to studies of outer solar system bodies are described.

  14. Cosmological constant in the quantum multiverse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Grant; Nomura, Yasunori; Roberts, Hannes L. L.

    2011-12-01

    Recently, a new framework for describing the multiverse has been proposed which is based on the principles of quantum mechanics. The framework allows for well-defined predictions, both regarding global properties of the universe and outcomes of particular experiments, according to a single probability formula. This provides complete unification of the eternally inflating multiverse and many worlds in quantum mechanics. In this paper, we elucidate how cosmological parameters can be calculated in this framework, and study the probability distribution for the value of the cosmological constant. We consider both positive and negative values, and find that the observed value is consistent with the calculated distribution at an order of magnitude level. In particular, in contrast to the case of earlier measure proposals, our framework prefers a positive cosmological constant over a negative one. These results depend only moderately on how we model galaxy formation and life evolution therein.

  15. Variable energy constant current accelerator structure

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, O.A.

    1988-07-13

    A variable energy, constant current ion beam accelerator structure is disclosed comprising an ion source capable of providing the desired ions, a pre-accelerator for establishing an initial energy level, a matching/pumping module having means for focusing means for maintaining the beam current, and at least one main accelerator module for continuing beam focus, with means capable of variably imparting acceleration to the beam so that a constant beam output current is maintained independent of the variable output energy. In a preferred embodiment, quadrupole electrodes are provided in both the matching/pumping module and the one or more accelerator modules, and are formed using four opposing cylinder electrodes which extend parallel to the beam axis and are spaced around the beam at 90/degree/ intervals with opposing electrodes maintained at the same potential. 12 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Gladstone-Dale constant for CF4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burner, A. W., Jr.; Goad, W. K.

    1980-05-01

    The Gladstone-Dale constant, which relates the refractive index to density, was measured for CF4 by counting fringes of a two-beam interferometer, one beam of which passes through a cell containing the test gas. The experimental approach and sources of systematic and imprecision errors are discussed. The constant for CF4 was measured at several wavelengths in the visible region of the spectrum. A value of 0.122 cu cm/g with an uncertainty of plus or minus 0.001 cu cm/g was determined for use in the visible region. A procedure for noting the departure of the gas density from the ideal-gas law is discussed.

  17. Cosmological constant influence on cosmic string spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbassi, Amir H.; Abbassi, Amir M.; Razmi, H.

    2003-05-01

    We investigate the line element of spacetime around a linear cosmic string in the presence of a cosmological constant. We obtain a static form of the metric and argue that it should be discarded because of asymptotic considerations. Then a time dependent and consistent form of the metric is obtained and its properties are discussed. This may be considered an example of a preferred frame in physics.

  18. Ultrasonic Measurement Of Elastic Constants Of Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Mal, Ajit K.

    1994-01-01

    Ultrasonic testing system yields data on elastic constants of matrix/fiber laminated composite material. Related to one described in "Ultrasonic System Measures Elastic Properties of Composites" (NPO-18729). Tests performed nondestructive, and involve access by ultrasonic probes to only one side of material specimen. In comparison with other available ultrasonic testing systems, this system relatively inexpensive, and based on testing technique that is simpler and rapidly yields more-accurate results.

  19. Fast Constant Weight Codeword to Index Converter

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-01

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Side_channel_attack. [5] D. E. Knuth , The Art of Computer Programming, “Generating all com- binations and partitions,” Vol. 4...Fast Constant Weight Codeword to Index Converter J. T. Butler T. Sasao Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Department of Computer ...represen- tation. The middle column shows how this value is computed according to (1). The rightmost column of Table I shows the corresponding 6 bit

  20. Mars Pathfinder Project: Planetary Constants and Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, Robin

    1995-01-01

    This document provides a common set of astrodynamic constants and planetary models for use by the Mars Pathfinder Project. It attempts to collect in a single reference all the quantities and models in use across the project during development and for mission operations. These models are central to the navigation and mission design functions, but they are also used in other aspects of the project such as science observation planning and data reduction.

  1. Gravitational constant in multiple field gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Abedi, Habib; Abbassi, Amir M. E-mail: amabasi@khayam.ut.ac.ir

    2015-05-01

    In the present study, we consider general form of the Lagrangian  f(R, φ{sup I}, X) , that is a function of the Ricci scalar, multiple scalar fields and non-canonical kinetic terms. We obtain the effective Newton's constant deep inside the Hubble radius. We use Jordan and Einstein frames, and study the conservation of energy-momentum tensor.

  2. High Dielectric Constant Polymer Film Capacitors (PREPRINT)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-01

    film, and the test of our first generation prototype capacitors . High-K Polymeric Dielectrics Commercial polypropylene (PP) capacitor film has a...1994). 2. Maurizio Rabuffi and Guido Picci, “Status Quo and Future Prospects for Metallized Polypropylene Energy Storage Capacitors ”, IEEE Trans...AFRL-RZ-WP-TP-2010-2126 HIGH DIELECTRIC CONSTANT POLYMER FILM CAPACITORS (PREPRINT) Shihai Zhang, Brian Zellers, Dean Anderson, Paul

  3. Universal constant for heat production in protists

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Matthew D.; Völker, Jens; Moeller, Holly V.; Laws, Edward; Breslauer, Kenneth J.; Falkowski, Paul G.

    2009-01-01

    Using a high sensitivity differential scanning calorimeter in isothermal mode, we directly measured heat production in eukaryotic protists from 5 phyla spanning over 5 orders of magnitude in carbon biomass and 8 orders of magnitude in cell volume. Our results reveal that metabolic heat production normalized to cell mass is virtually constant in these organisms, with a median of 0.037 pW pg C−1 (95% confidence interval = 0.022–0.061 pW pg C−1) at 5 °C. Contrary to allometric models, the relationship between heat production and cell carbon content or surface area is isometric (scaling exponents, 1.056 and 1.057, respectively). That heat production per unit cell surface area is constant suggests that heat flux through the cell surface is effectively instantaneous, and hence that cells are isothermal with their environment. The results further suggest that allometric models of metabolism based on metazoans are not applicable to protists, and that the underlying metabolic processes in the latter polyphyletic group are highly constrained by evolutionary selection. We propose that the evolutionary constraint leading to a universally constant heat production in single-celled eukaryotes is related to cytoplasmic packaging of organelles and surface area to volume relationships controlling diffusion of resources to these organelles. PMID:19346469

  4. Measurement of transfer factor during constant exhalation.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, A. F.; Hearne, J.; Brenner, M.; Alfonso, R.

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Transfer factor of the lung for carbon monoxide (TLCO) was measured by a new method based on analysis of the ratio of the concentrations of carbon monoxide to an inert gas (methane) relative to lung volume during a constant exhalation. Since this new technique is based solely upon exhalation, anomalies associated with inspiration and breath holding do not affect results. Additionally, because prolonged breath holding is not required, measurements can readily be made in dyspnoeic patients. METHODS--Exhalation TLCO (TLCO,ex) was compared with the standard (Jones and Meade) 10 second breath holding TLCO (TLCO,bh) in 100 consecutive patients. Patients did not practise the exhalation manoeuvre prior to testing. RESULTS--The comparative results were very close; mean difference (bias) +/- standard deviation (precision) was 0.05 (0.84) mmol/min/kPa. The relation was equally strong in patients with severe pulmonary disease; for patients with FEV1 < 1.51 the mean difference was 0.21 (0.80) mmol/min/kPa. CONCLUSIONS--Since the results were essentially identical between the techniques, it seems that comparable pathophysiological factors affect TLCO during breath holding and constant exhalation. Constant exhalation may therefore be a useful alternative to the breath holding technique for clinical measurement of TLCO. PMID:7831628

  5. Borehole measurement of the Newtonian gravitational constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsui, Albert T.

    1987-08-01

    Gravimetric measurements in a borehole within the Michigan Basin, obtained in September 1983, were utilized to estimate the Newtonian gravitational constant. Gravitational constants are computed using gravity measurements from two stations along the same vertical and by knowing the total rock mass sandwiched between these two stations. The calculation of rock formation density using a gamma-gamma density log is described. The gravity values are analyzed in terms of reference surface values, and it is observed that the gravity increases with depth. Borehole measurement determined gravity constant values ranged from 6.6901 + or - 0.0668 x 10 to the -11th cu m/kg sec sq (at station separation 264.5 + or - 0.5 m) to 6.7000 + or - 0.0650 x 10 to the -11th cu m/kg sec sq (at 1163.5 + or - 0.5 m), which are higher than the laboratory value of Luther and Towler (1982) of 6.672 + or - 0.0004 x 10 to the -11th cu m/kg sec sq. It is noted that the data correlate well with the values of Stacey (1981).

  6. Emergent gravity in spaces of constant curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez, Orlando; Haddad, Matthew

    2017-03-01

    In physical theories where the energy (action) is localized near a submanifold of a constant curvature space, there is a universal expression for the energy (or the action). We derive a multipole expansion for the energy that has a finite number of terms, and depends on intrinsic geometric invariants of the submanifold and extrinsic invariants of the embedding of the submanifold. This is the second of a pair of articles in which we try to develop a theory of emergent gravity arising from the embedding of a submanifold into an ambient space equipped with a quantum field theory. Our theoretical method requires a generalization of a formula due to by Hermann Weyl. While the first paper discussed the framework in Euclidean (Minkowski) space, here we discuss how this framework generalizes to spaces of constant sectional curvature. We focus primarily on anti de Sitter space. We then discuss how such a theory can give rise to a cosmological constant and Planck mass that are within reasonable bounds of the experimental values.

  7. Cosmological constant, near brane behavior and singularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautason, Fridrik Freyr; Junghans, Daniel; Zagermann, Marco

    2013-09-01

    We show that the classical cosmological constant in type II flux compactifications can be written as a sum of terms from the action of localized sources plus a specific contribution from non-trivial background fluxes. Exploiting two global scaling symmetries of the classical supergravity action, we find that the flux contribution can in many interesting cases be set to zero such that the cosmological constant is fully determined by the boundary conditions of the fields in the near-source region. This generalizes and makes more explicit previous arguments in the literature. We then discuss the problem of putting -branes at the tip of the Klebanov-Strassler throat glued to a compact space in type IIB string theory so as to engineer a de Sitter solution. Our result for the cosmological constant and a simple global argument indicate that inserting a fully localized and backreacting -brane into such a background yields a singular energy density for the NSNS and RR 3-form field strengths at the -brane. This argument does not rely on partial smearing of the -brane or a linearization of field equations, but on a few general assumptions that we also discuss carefully.

  8. Time constants of flat superconducting cables

    SciTech Connect

    Takacs, S.; Yamamoto, J.

    1997-06-01

    The frequency dependence of coupling losses is calculated for flat superconducting cables, including the electromagnetic coupling between different current loops on the cable. It is shown that there are two characteristic time constants for both parallel and transverse coupling losses. The values of these time constants {tau}{sub 0} and {tau}{sub 1} are calculated by introducing effective inductances for the current loops. In both cases, {tau}{sub 1} is considerably smaller than {tau}{sub 0}. As the most important methods of determining {tau}{sub 0} from AC losses - namely, the limiting slope of loss/cycle at zero frequency and the position of the maximum loss/cycle vs. frequency - estimate {tau}{sub 0} and {tau}{sub 1}, respectively, the results are important for practical measurements and evaluation of time constants from AC losses. At larger frequencies, the losses are more likely to those in normal conductors (skin effect). The calculation schemes can be applied to cables with closely wound strands (like the cable-in-conduit conductors), too. However, several other effects should be considered being different and/or more important with respect to other cable types (demagnetization factor of strands and cables, larger regions near the cable edges, smaller number of strands and subcables, etc.).

  9. Estimation of hydrolysis rate constants for carbamates ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Cheminformatics based tools, such as the Chemical Transformation Simulator under development in EPA’s Office of Research and Development, are being increasingly used to evaluate chemicals for their potential to degrade in the environment or be transformed through metabolism. Hydrolysis represents a major environmental degradation pathway; unfortunately, only a small fraction of hydrolysis rates for about 85,000 chemicals on the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) inventory are in public domain, making it critical to develop in silico approaches to estimate hydrolysis rate constants. In this presentation, we compare three complementary approaches to estimate hydrolysis rates for carbamates, an important chemical class widely used in agriculture as pesticides, herbicides and fungicides. Fragment-based Quantitative Structure Activity Relationships (QSARs) using Hammett-Taft sigma constants are widely published and implemented for relatively simple functional groups such as carboxylic acid esters, phthalate esters, and organophosphate esters, and we extend these to carbamates. We also develop a pKa based model and a quantitative structure property relationship (QSPR) model, and evaluate them against measured rate constants using R square and root mean square (RMS) error. Our work shows that for our relatively small sample size of carbamates, a Hammett-Taft based fragment model performs best, followed by a pKa and a QSPR model. This presentation compares three comp

  10. Constant load and constant volume response of municipal solid waste in simple shear.

    PubMed

    Zekkos, Dimitrios; Fei, Xunchang

    2017-05-01

    Constant load and constant volume simple shear testing was conducted on relatively fresh municipal solid waste (MSW) from two landfills in the United States, one in Michigan and a second in Texas, at respective natural moisture content below field capacity. The results were assessed in terms of two failure strain criteria, at 10% and 30% shear strain, and two interpretations of effective friction angle. Overall, friction angle obtained assuming that the failure plane is horizontal and at 10% shear strain resulted in a conservative estimation of shear strength of MSW. Comparisons between constant volume and constant load simple shear testing results indicated significant differences in the shear response of MSW with the shear resistance in constant volume being lower than the shear resistance in constant load. The majority of specimens were nearly uncompacted during specimen preparation to reproduce the state of MSW in bioreactor landfills or in uncontrolled waste dumps. The specimens had identical percentage of <20mm material but the type of <20mm material was different. The <20mm fraction from Texas was finer and of high plasticity. MSW from Texas was overall weaker in both constant load and constant volume conditions compared to Michigan waste. The results of these tests suggest the possibility of significantly lower shear strength of MSW in bioreactor landfills where waste is placed with low compaction effort and constant volume, i.e., "undrained", conditions may occur. Compacted MSW specimens resulted in shear strength parameters that are higher than uncompacted specimens and closer to values reported in the literature. However, the normalized undrained shear strength in simple shear for uncompacted and compacted MSW was still higher than the normalized undrained shear strength reported in the literature for clayey and silty soils. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Time-dependent polymer rheology under constant stress and under constant shear conditions.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, K. H.; Brodkey, R. S.

    1971-01-01

    A kinetic rate theory previously presented for describing non-Newtonian phenomena has been further modified to predict the flow behavior of viscoelastic materials under constant stress conditions. The thixotropic shear stress or shear rate is predicted by the kinetic theory, and the experimental stress or shear rate is obtained by modifying the thixotropic value by a stress or shear rate retardation term. The retardation term stems from a Maxwellian approach for stress retardation. In order to test the validity of this approach, transient and steady-state data were obtained for two solutions of polymethylmethacrylate in diethylphthalate. Both constant stress measurements and constant shear rate data were taken over a broad range.

  12. Cosmological constant and quantum gravitational corrections to the running fine structure constant.

    PubMed

    Toms, David J

    2008-09-26

    The quantum gravitational contribution to the renormalization group behavior of the electric charge in Einstein-Maxwell theory with a cosmological constant is considered. Quantum gravity is shown to lead to a contribution to the running charge not present when the cosmological constant vanishes. This reopens the possibility, suggested by Robinson and Wilczek, of altering the scaling behavior of gauge theories at high energies although our result differs. We show the possibility of an ultraviolet fixed point that is linked directly to the cosmological constant.

  13. Gait Control for Redundant Legged Biped Robot at Constant Velocity and Constant Height of the Waist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shima, Ryoichi; Haishi, Masahiko; Shibata, Masaaki

    In this paper, we propose a gait control method for redundant legged biped robot based on leg center of mass (COM) position control at constant velocity and constant height of the waist. The developed biped robot has redundant legs, which have 4 degree-of-freedoms (DOFs) on each in the saggital plane. The redundant DOF enables to move its leg tip position and its leg COM position independently. Therefore proposed robot has structural capability to control the leg COM position for keeping the projection of the total COM inside the support polygon without upper body motion. Such capability enables the stable static walk in the arbitrarily desired velocity and height of the waist motion. The validity of the proposed method for the static walk at constant velocity and constant height of the waist in the leg COM position control for redundant legged biped robot is confirmed by several results of simulation and experiment.

  14. Equilibrium structure and anharmonic potential constants of phosgene derived from rotational constants and electron diffraction intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Satoshi; Nakata, Munetaka; Kuchitsu, Kozo

    1985-07-01

    The third-order anharmonic constants of phosgene are determined from the rotational constants of the six fundamental vibrational states, those of eight isotopic species, and the rz structure obtained from the electron diffraction intensity by analyzing the changes in the average structures. The equilibrium structure is obtained as r e(CCl = 1.7365(12) Å, r e( CO) = 1.1766(22) Å, and ∠ e(ClCCl) = 111.91(12)°.

  15. New improved massive gravity and three-dimensional spacetimes of constant curvature and constant torsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dereli, Tekin; Yetişmişoǧlu, Cem

    2016-09-01

    We derive the field equations for topologically massive gravity coupled with the most general quadratic curvature terms using the language of exterior differential forms and a first order constrained variational principle. We find variational field equations both in the presence and absence of torsion. We then show that spaces of constant negative curvature (i.e. the anti-de Sitter space AdS3) and constant torsion provide exact solutions.

  16. Inflation with a smooth constant-roll to constant-roll era transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odintsov, S. D.; Oikonomou, V. K.

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, we study canonical scalar field models, with a varying second slow-roll parameter, that allow transitions between constant-roll eras. In the models with two constant-roll eras, it is possible to avoid fine-tunings in the initial conditions of the scalar field. We mainly focus on the stability of the resulting solutions, and we also investigate if these solutions are attractors of the cosmological system. We shall calculate the resulting scalar potential and, by using a numerical approach, we examine the stability and attractor properties of the solutions. As we show, the first constant-roll era is dynamically unstable towards linear perturbations, and the cosmological system is driven by the attractor solution to the final constant-roll era. As we demonstrate, it is possible to have a nearly scale-invariant power spectrum of primordial curvature perturbations in some cases; however, this is strongly model dependent and depends on the rate of the final constant-roll era. Finally, we present, in brief, the essential features of a model that allows oscillations between constant-roll eras.

  17. ParaDIS_lib

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, Richard D.

    2016-05-25

    The ParaDIS_lib software is a project that is funded by the DOE ASC Program. Its purpose is to provide visualization and analysis capabilities for the existing ParaDIS parallel dislocation dynamics simulation code.

  18. Frequency-constant Q, unity and disorder

    SciTech Connect

    Hargreaves, N.D.

    1995-12-31

    In exploration geophysics we obtain information about the earth by observing its response to different types of applied force. The response can cover the full range of possible Q values (where Q, the quality factor, is a measure of energy dissipation), from close to infinity in the case of deep crustal seismic to close to 0 in the case of many electromagnetic methods. When Q is frequency-constant, however, the various types of response have a common scaling behavior and can be described as being self-affine. The wave-equation then takes on a generalised form, changing from the standard wave-equation at Q = {infinity} to the diffusion equation at Q = 0, via lossy, diffusive, propagation at intermediate Q values. Solutions of this wave-diffusion equation at any particular Q value can be converted to an equivalent set of results for any other Q value. In particular it is possible to convert from diffusive to wave propagation by a mapping from Q < {infinity} to Q = {infinity}. In the context of seismic sounding this is equivalent to applying inverse Q-filtering; in a more general context the mapping integrates different geophysical observations by referencing them to the common result at Q = {infinity}. The self-affinity of the observations for frequency-constant Q is an expression of scale invariance in the fundamental physical properties of the medium of propagation, this being the case whether the mechanism of diffusive propagation is scattering of intrinsic attenuation. Scale invariance, or fractal scaling, is a general property of disordered systems; the assumption of frequency-constant Q not only implies a unity between different geophysical observations, but also suggests that it is the disordered nature of the earth`s sub-surface that is the unifying factor.

  19. Elucidation of constant current density molecular plating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vascon, A.; Santi, S.; Isse, A. A.; Reich, T.; Drebert, J.; Christ, H.; Düllmann, Ch. E.; Eberhardt, K.

    2012-12-01

    The production of thin layers by means of constant current or constant voltage electrolysis in organic media is commonly known as molecular plating. Despite the fact that this method has been applied for decades and is known to be among the most efficient ones for obtaining quantitative deposition, a full elucidation of the molecular plating is still lacking. In order to get a general understanding of the process and hence set the basis for further improvements of the method, constant current density electrolysis experiments were carried out in a mixture of isopropanol and isobutanol containing millimolar amounts of HNO3 together with [Nd(NO3)3·6H2O] used as a model electrolyte. The process was investigated by considering the influence of different parameters, namely the electrolyte concentrations (i.e., Nd(NO3)3·6H2O: 0.11, 0.22, 0.44 mM, and HNO3: 0.3, 0.4 mM), the applied current (i.e., 2 mA and 6 mA), and the surface roughness of the deposition substrates (i.e., a few tens to several hundreds of nm). The response of the process to changes of these parameters was monitored recording cell potential curves, which showed to be strongly influenced by the investigated conditions. The produced layers were characterized using γ-ray spectroscopy for the evaluation of Nd deposition yields, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy for chemical analysis of the surfaces, and atomic force microscopy for surface roughness evaluation. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results clearly indicate that Nd is present only as Nd3+ on the cathodic surface after molecular plating. The results obtained from this characterization and some basic features inferred from the study of the cell potential curves were used to interpret the different behaviours of the deposition processes as a consequence of the applied variables.

  20. Optical constants of minerals and rocks.

    PubMed

    Aronson, J R; Strong, P F

    1975-12-01

    Lorentz line parameters (and estimates of their standard deviations) have been empirically derived from measured reflectance data for muscovite mica, an anorthosite, a diopsidic pyroxenite, an almandite-pyrope garnet, and a soda lime glass. These parameters provide a useful starting point for computer calculations requiring optical constants as a function of frequency and are therefore given here. A novel method of fitting the reflectance data by least squares is described in detail, as is the statistical procedure for estimating the standard deviations of the parameters found.

  1. On inflation, cosmological constant, and SUSY breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Linde, Andrei

    2016-11-02

    We consider a broad class of inflationary models of two unconstrained chiral superfields, the stabilizer S and the inflaton Φ, which can describe inflationary models with nearly arbitrary potentials. These models include, in particular, the recently introduced theories of cosmological attractors, which provide an excellent fit to the latest Planck data. We show that by adding to the superpotential of the fields S and Φ a small term depending on a nilpotent chiral superfield P one can break SUSY and introduce a small cosmological constant without affecting main predictions of the original inflationary scenario.

  2. Solution strategies for constant acceleration problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheaton, S. M.; Binder, P.-M.

    2017-03-01

    We discuss strategies for the general solution of single-step 1D constant acceleration problems. In a slightly restricted form, these problems have five variables (Δx, v 0, v, a and t) and two independent equations, so three variables must be given to solve for the other two, giving 10 cases. Instead of the haphazard solution of individual problems, we advocate teaching a strategy for tackling the entire class of problems. We enumerate the possible strategies, and present in detail one which reveals a number of interesting special cases and also allows the possibility of developing an automatic problem generator and solver.

  3. TASI Lectures on the cosmological constant

    SciTech Connect

    Bousso, Raphael; Bousso, Raphael

    2007-08-30

    The energy density of the vacuum, Lambda, is at least 60 orders of magnitude smaller than several known contributions to it. Approaches to this problem are tightly constrained by data ranging from elementary observations to precision experiments. Absent overwhelming evidence to the contrary, dark energy can only be interpreted as vacuum energy, so the venerable assumption that Lambda=0 conflicts with observation. The possibility remains that Lambda is fundamentally variable, though constant over large spacetime regions. This can explain the observed value, but only in a theory satisfying a number of restrictive kinematic and dynamical conditions. String theory offers a concrete realization through its landscape of metastable vacua.

  4. On inflation, cosmological constant, and SUSY breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linde, Andrei

    2016-11-01

    We consider a broad class of inflationary models of two unconstrained chiral superfields, the stabilizer S and the inflaton Φ, which can describe inflationary models with nearly arbitrary potentials. These models include, in particular, the recently introduced theories of cosmological attractors, which provide an excellent fit to the latest Planck data. We show that by adding to the superpotential of the fields S and Φ a small term depending on a nilpotent chiral superfield P one can break SUSY and introduce a small cosmological constant without affecting main predictions of the original inflationary scenario.

  5. Solitons in curved space of constant curvature

    SciTech Connect

    Batz, Sascha; Peschel, Ulf

    2010-05-15

    We consider spatial solitons as, for example, self-confined optical beams in spaces of constant curvature, which are a natural generalization of flat space. Due to the symmetries of these spaces we are able to define respective dynamical parameters, for example, velocity and position. For positively curved space we find stable multiple-hump solitons as a continuation from the linear modes. In the case of negatively curved space we show that no localized solution exists and a bright soliton will always decay through a nonlinear tunneling process.

  6. Rugged constant-temperature thermal anemometer.

    PubMed

    Palma, J; Labbé, R

    2016-12-01

    Here we report a robust thermal anemometer which can be easily built. It was conceived to measure outdoor wind speeds and for airspeed monitoring in wind tunnels and other indoor uses. It works at a constant, low temperature of approximately 90 °C, so that an independent measurement of the air temperature is required to give a correct speed reading. Despite the size and high thermal inertia of the probe, the test results show that this anemometer is capable of measuring turbulent fluctuations up to ∼100 Hz in winds of ∼14 m/s, which corresponds to a scale similar to the length of the probe.

  7. Information carrying capacity of a cosmological constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simidzija, Petar; Martín-Martínez, Eduardo

    2017-01-01

    We analyze the exchange of information in different cosmological backgrounds when sender and receiver are timelike separated and communicate through massless fields (without the exchange of light signals). Remarkably, we show that the dominance of a cosmological constant makes the amount of recoverable information imprinted in the field by the sender extremely resilient: it does not decay in time or with the spatial separation of the sender and receiver, and it actually increases with the rate of expansion of the Universe. This is in stark contrast with the information carried by conventional light signals and with previous results on timelike communication through massless fields in matter-dominated cosmologies.

  8. Low-Cost Constant Temperature Heating Block

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevlin, Charles G.; Coppersmith, Ward; Fish, Christopher; Vlock, Stanley; Vellema, William

    1997-08-01

    A simple constant temperature heat block was constructed from readily available materials. The configuration of the heating block can be constructed to meet the needs of any laboratory. Some highlights of this temperature controller include the elimination of dangerous flames and cumbersome water baths, maintenance of temperature over a wide range within 1 °C and compact electronics. In addition, the IC power supply circuit is self-contained thus eliminating the need for bulky transformers and additional power related circuitry. Secondary school and undergraduate laboratories can build many units for the cost of a commercially comparable one while simultaneously putting to practice several electronic principles taught in most instrumental analysis courses.

  9. Constant-Elasticity-of-Substitution Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reiter, G.

    1986-01-01

    Program simulates constant elasticity-of-substitution (CES) production function. CES function used by economic analysts to examine production costs as well as uncertainties in production. User provides such input parameters as price of labor, price of capital, and dispersion levels. CES minimizes expected cost to produce capital-uncertainty pair. By varying capital-value input, one obtains series of capital-uncertainty pairs. Capital-uncertainty pairs then used to generate several cost curves. CES program menu driven and features specific print menu for examining selected output curves. Program written in BASIC for interactive execution and implemented on IBM PC-series computer.

  10. Radiation balances and the solar constant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crommelynck, D.

    1981-01-01

    The radiometric concepts are defined in order to consider various types of radiation balances and relate them to the diabetic form of the energy balance. Variability in space and time of the components of the radiation field are presented. A specific concept for sweeping which is tailored to the requirements is proposed. Finally, after establishing the truncated character of the present knowledge of the radiation balance. The results of the last observations of the solar constant are given. Ground and satellite measurement techniques are discussed.

  11. Axionic band structure of the cosmological constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachlechner, Thomas C.

    2016-01-01

    We argue that theories with multiple axions generically contain a large number of vacua that can account for the smallness of the cosmological constant. In a theory with N axions, the dominant instantons with charges 풬 determine the discrete symmetry of vacua. Subleading instantons break the leading periodicity and lift the vacuum degeneracy. For generic integer charges the number of distinct vacua is given by √{det (풬⊤풬 ) }∝eN. Our construction motivates the existence of a landscape with a vast number of vacua in a large class of four-dimensional effective theories.

  12. Noncommutative approach to the cosmological constant problem

    SciTech Connect

    Garattini, Remo; Nicolini, Piero

    2011-03-15

    In this paper, we study the cosmological constant emerging from the Wheeler-DeWitt equation as an eigenvalue of the related Sturm-Liouville problem. We employ Gaussian trial functionals and we perform a mode decomposition to extract the transverse-traceless component, namely, the graviton contribution, at one loop. We implement a noncommutative-geometry-induced minimal length to calculate the number of graviton modes. As a result, we find regular graviton fluctuation energies for the Schwarzschild, de Sitter, and anti-de Sitter backgrounds. No renormalization scheme is necessary to remove infinities, in contrast to what happens in conventional approaches.

  13. Optical constants of natural and industrial media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolotarev, V. M.; Morozov, V. N.; Smirnova, E. V.

    Data are presented on the refractive and absorption indexes of fresh and sea water, ice, petroleum, aqueous solutions, solvents, metals, crystals, glasses, semiconductors, polymers, and aerosols. In addition, information is presented on the effect of the method of test sample preparation on the optical constants of polysorbed water on the surface of glasses and crystals and also on the optical properties of the surface layers of some materials of practical importance. Commercially available IR spectrometers and various attachments to them used in scientific studies are described.

  14. Time constants in thermal laser medicine: II. Distributions of time constants and thermal relaxation of tissue.

    PubMed

    van Gemert, M J; Lucassen, G W; Welch, A J

    1996-08-01

    The thermal response of a semi-infinite medium in air, irradiated by laser light in a cylindrical geometry, cannot accurately be approximately by single radial and axial time constants for heat conduction. This report presents an analytical analysis of hear conduction where the thermal response is expressed in terms of distributions over radial and axial time constants. The source term for heat production is written as the product of a Gaussian shaped radial term and an exponentially shaped axial term. The two terms are expanded in integrals over eigenfunctions of the radial and axial parts of the Laplace heat conduction operator. The result is a double integral over the coupled distributions of the two time constants to compute the temperature rise as a function of time and of axial and radial positions. The distribution of axial time constants is a homogeneous slowly decreasing function of spatial frequency (v) indicating that one single axial time constant cannot reasonably characterize axial heat conduction. The distribution of radial time constants is a function centred around a distinguished maximum in the spatial frequency (lambda) close to the single radial time constant value used previously. This suggests that one radial time constant to characterize radial heat conduction may be a useful concept. Special cases have been evaluated analytically, such as short and long irradiation times, axial or radial heat conduction (shallow or deep penetrating laser beams) and, especially, thermal relaxation (cooling) of the tissue. For shallow penetrating laser beams the asymptotic cooling rate is confirmed to be proportional to [(t)0.5-(t-tL)0.5] which approaches 1/t0.5 for t > tL, where t is the time and tL is the laser pulse duration. For deep penetrating beams this is proportional to 1/(t-tL). For intermediate penetration, i.e. penetration depths about equal to spot size diameters, this is proportional to 1/(t-tL)1.5. The double integral has been evaluated

  15. Local constants of motion imply information propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friesdorf, M.; Werner, A. H.; Goihl, M.; Eisert, J.; Brown, W.

    2015-11-01

    Interacting quantum many-body systems are expected to thermalize, in the sense that the evolution of local expectation values approaches a stationary value resembling a thermal ensemble. This intuition is notably contradicted in systems exhibiting many-body localisation (MBL). In stark contrast to the non-interacting case of Anderson localisation, the entanglement of states grows without limit over time, albeit slowly. In this work, we establish a novel link between quantum information theory and notions of condensed matter physics, capturing this phenomenon in the Heisenberg picture. We show that the mere existence of local constants of motion, often taken as the defining property of MBL, together with a generic spectrum of the Hamiltonian, is already sufficient to rigorously prove information propagation: these systems can be used to send a classical bit over arbitrary distances, in that the impact of a local perturbation can be detected arbitrarily far away. This counterintuitive result is compatible with and further corroborates the intuition of a slow entanglement growth following global quenches in MBL systems. We perform a detailed perturbation analysis of quasi-local constants of motion and also show that they indeed can be used to construct efficient spectral tensor networks, as recently suggested. Our results provide a detailed and at the same time model-independent picture of information propagation in MBL systems.

  16. A Constant-Force Resistive Exercise Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colosky, Paul; Ruttley, Tara

    2010-01-01

    A constant-force resistive exercise unit (CFREU) has been invented for use in both normal gravitational and microgravitational environments. In comparison with a typical conventional exercise machine, this CFREU weighs less and is less bulky: Whereas weight plates and associated bulky supporting structures are used to generate resistive forces in typical conventional exercise machines, they are not used in this CFREU. Instead, resistive forces are generated in this CFREU by relatively compact, lightweight mechanisms based on constant-torque springs wound on drums. Each such mechanism is contained in a module, denoted a resistive pack, that includes a shaft for making a torque connection to a cable drum. During a stroke of resistive exercise, the cable is withdrawn from the cable drum against the torque exerted by the resistance pack. The CFREU includes a housing, within which can be mounted one or more resistive pack(s). The CFREU also includes mechanisms for engaging any combination of (1) one or more resistive pack(s) and (2) one or more spring(s) within each resistive pack to obtain a desired level of resistance.

  17. Local Pain Dynamics during Constant Exhaustive Exercise.

    PubMed

    Slapsinskaite, Agne; Razon, Selen; Balagué Serre, Natàlia; Hristovski, Robert; Tenenbaum, Gershon

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to delineate the topological dynamics of pain and discomfort during constant exercise performed until volitional exhaustion. Eleven physical education students were tested while cycling and running at a "hard" intensity level (e.g., corresponding to Borg's RPE (6-20) = 15). During the tests, participants reported their discomfort and pain on a body map every 15s. "Time on task" for each participant was divided into five equal non-overlapping temporal windows within which their ratings were considered for analysis. The analyses revealed that the number of body locations with perceived pain and discomfort increased throughout the five temporal windows until reaching the mean (± SE) values of 4.2 ± 0.7 and 4.1 ± 0.6 in cycling and running, respectively. The dominant locations included the quadriceps and hamstrings during cycling and quadriceps and chest during running. In conclusion, pain seemed to spread throughout the body during constant cycling and running performed up to volitional exhaustion with differences between cycling and running in the upper body but not in the lower body dynamics.

  18. Constant-mesh, multiple-shaft transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Rea, J.E.; Mills, D.D.; Sewell, J.S.

    1992-04-21

    This patent describes a multiple-shaft, constant-mesh transmission adapted to establish selectively a reverse torque delivery path and a forward drive torque delivery path and having a torque input means including a torque input shaft, a mainshaft aligned with the input shaft, a countershaft geared to the input shaft in spaced, parallel relationship with respect to the mainshaft, a torque output shaft joined to the mainshaft; multiple mainshaft gear elements journalled on the main airshaft, multiple cluster gear elements carried by the countershaft in meshing engagement with the mainshaft gear elements, one of the cluster gear elements being rotatably journalled on the countershaft; a reverse idle gear, a reverse gear journalled on the countershaft, the reverse idler gear being in constant mesh with the reverse gear and one of the mainshaft gear elements; first clutch means for connecting selectively the reverse gear and the countershaft; second synchronizer clutch means for connecting selectively the one of the mainshaft gear elements to the mainshaft; and third synchronizer clutch means for selectively connecting another of the mainshaft gear elements to the mainshaft; the first clutch means being a double-acting clutch with a first common axially movable clutch element adapted upon movement in one axial direction to drivably connected the reverse gear to the countershaft and adapted upon movement in the opposite axial direction to connect the one cluster gear element to the countershaft.

  19. Holographic dark energy with cosmological constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yazhou; Li, Miao; Li, Nan; Zhang, Zhenhui

    2015-08-01

    Inspired by the multiverse scenario, we study a heterotic dark energy model in which there are two parts, the first being the cosmological constant and the second being the holographic dark energy, thus this model is named the ΛHDE model. By studying the ΛHDE model theoretically, we find that the parameters d and Ωhde are divided into a few domains in which the fate of the universe is quite different. We investigate dynamical behaviors of this model, and especially the future evolution of the universe. We perform fitting analysis on the cosmological parameters in the ΛHDE model by using the recent observational data. We find the model yields χ2min=426.27 when constrained by Planck+SNLS3+BAO+HST, comparable to the results of the HDE model (428.20) and the concordant ΛCDM model (431.35). At 68.3% CL, we obtain -0.07<ΩΛ0<0.68 and correspondingly 0.04<Ωhde0<0.79, implying at present there is considerable degeneracy between the holographic dark energy and cosmological constant components in the ΛHDE model.

  20. Holographic dark energy with cosmological constant

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Yazhou; Li, Nan; Zhang, Zhenhui; Li, Miao E-mail: mli@itp.ac.cn E-mail: zhangzhh@mail.ustc.edu.cn

    2015-08-01

    Inspired by the multiverse scenario, we study a heterotic dark energy model in which there are two parts, the first being the cosmological constant and the second being the holographic dark energy, thus this model is named the ΛHDE model. By studying the ΛHDE model theoretically, we find that the parameters d and Ω{sub hde} are divided into a few domains in which the fate of the universe is quite different. We investigate dynamical behaviors of this model, and especially the future evolution of the universe. We perform fitting analysis on the cosmological parameters in the ΛHDE model by using the recent observational data. We find the model yields χ{sup 2}{sub min}=426.27 when constrained by Planck+SNLS3+BAO+HST, comparable to the results of the HDE model (428.20) and the concordant ΛCDM model (431.35). At 68.3% CL, we obtain −0.07<Ω{sub Λ0}<0.68 and correspondingly 0.04<Ω{sub hde0}<0.79, implying at present there is considerable degeneracy between the holographic dark energy and cosmological constant components in the ΛHDE model.

  1. Local Pain Dynamics during Constant Exhaustive Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Hristovski, Robert; Tenenbaum, Gershon

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to delineate the topological dynamics of pain and discomfort during constant exercise performed until volitional exhaustion. Eleven physical education students were tested while cycling and running at a “hard” intensity level (e.g., corresponding to Borg’s RPE (6–20) = 15). During the tests, participants reported their discomfort and pain on a body map every 15s. “Time on task” for each participant was divided into five equal non-overlapping temporal windows within which their ratings were considered for analysis. The analyses revealed that the number of body locations with perceived pain and discomfort increased throughout the five temporal windows until reaching the mean (± SE) values of 4.2 ± 0.7 and 4.1 ± 0.6 in cycling and running, respectively. The dominant locations included the quadriceps and hamstrings during cycling and quadriceps and chest during running. In conclusion, pain seemed to spread throughout the body during constant cycling and running performed up to volitional exhaustion with differences between cycling and running in the upper body but not in the lower body dynamics. PMID:26421436

  2. Superintegrable systems on spaces of constant curvature

    SciTech Connect

    Gonera, Cezary Kaszubska, Magdalena

    2014-07-15

    Construction and classification of two-dimensional (2D) superintegrable systems (i.e. systems admitting, in addition to two global integrals of motion guaranteeing the Liouville integrability, the third global and independent one) defined on 2D spaces of constant curvature and separable in the so-called geodesic polar coordinates are presented. The method proposed is applicable to any value of curvature including the case of Euclidean plane, sphere and hyperbolic plane. The main result is a generalization of Bertrand’s theorem on 2D spaces of constant curvature and covers most of the known separable and superintegrable models on such spaces (in particular, the so-called Tremblay–Turbiner–Winternitz (TTW) and Post–Winternitz (PW) models which have recently attracted some interest). -- Highlights: •Classifying 2D superintegrable, separable (polar coordinates) systems on S{sup 2}, R{sup 2}, H{sup 2}. •Construction of radial, angular potentials leading to superintegrability. •Generalization of Bertrand’s theorem covering known models, e.g. Higgs, TTW, PW, and Coulomb.

  3. Exercise Device Would Exert Selectable Constant Resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Damon C.

    2003-01-01

    An apparatus called the resistive exercise device (RED) has been proposed to satisfy a requirement for exercise equipment aboard the International Space Station (ISS) that could passively exert a selectable constant load on both the outward and return strokes. The RED could be used alone; alternatively, the RED could be used in combination with another apparatus called the treadmill with vibration isolation and stabilization (TVIS), in which case the combination would be called the subject load device (SLD). The basic RED would be a passive device, but it could incorporate an electric motor to provide eccentric augmentation (augmentation to make the load during inward movement greater than the load during outward movement). The RED concept represents a unique approach to providing a constant but selectable resistive load for exercise for the maintenance and development of muscles. Going beyond the original ISS application, the RED could be used on Earth as resistive weight training equipment. The advantage of the RED over conventional weight-lifting equipment is that it could be made portable and lightweight.

  4. Fundamental Approach to the Cosmological Constant Issue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmeli, Moshe

    We use a Riemannian four-dimensional presentation for gravitation in which the coordinates are distances and velocity rather than the traditional space and time. We solve the field equations and show that there are three possibilities for the Universe to expand. The theory describes the Universe as having a three-phase evolution with a decelerating expansion, followed by a constant and an accelerating expansion, and it predicts that the Universe is now in the latter phase. It is shown, assuming Ωm = 0.245, that the time at which the Universe goes over from a decelerating to an accelerating expansion, occurs at 8.5 Gyr ago, at which time the cosmic radiation temperature was 146K. Recent observations show that the Universe's growth is accelerating. Our theory confirms these recent experimental results. The theory predicts also that now there is a positive pressure in the Universe. Although the theory has no cosmological constant, we extract from it its equivalence and show that Λ = 1.934 × 10-35 s-2. This value of Λ is in excellent agreement with measurements. It is also shown that the three-dimensional space of the Universe is Euclidean, as the Boomerang experiment shows.

  5. Constant domain-regulated antibody catalysis.

    PubMed

    Sapparapu, Gopal; Planque, Stephanie; Mitsuda, Yukie; McLean, Gary; Nishiyama, Yasuhiro; Paul, Sudhir

    2012-10-19

    Some antibodies contain variable (V) domain catalytic sites. We report the superior amide and peptide bond-hydrolyzing activity of the same heavy and light chain V domains expressed in the IgM constant domain scaffold compared with the IgG scaffold. The superior catalytic activity of recombinant IgM was evident using two substrates, a small model peptide that is hydrolyzed without involvement of high affinity epitope binding, and HIV gp120, which is recognized specifically by noncovalent means prior to the hydrolytic reaction. The catalytic activity was inhibited by an electrophilic phosphonate diester, consistent with a nucleophilic catalytic mechanism. All 13 monoclonal IgMs tested displayed robust hydrolytic activities varying over a 91-fold range, consistent with expression of the catalytic functions at distinct levels by different V domains. The catalytic activity of polyclonal IgM was superior to polyclonal IgG from the same sera, indicating that on average IgMs express the catalytic function at levels greater than IgGs. The findings indicate a favorable effect of the remote IgM constant domain scaffold on the integrity of the V-domain catalytic site and provide a structural basis for conceiving antibody catalysis as a first line immune function expressed at high levels prior to development of mature IgG class antibodies.

  6. Do Wormholes Fix the Coupling Constants?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goradia, Shantilal

    2004-05-01

    If Newtonian gravitation is modified to use surface-to-surface separation between particles, it can have the strength of nuclear force between nucleons. This may be justified by possible existence of quantum wormholes in particles. All gravitational interactions would be between coupled wormholes, emitting 1/r graviton flux from their exit mouths as a function of the particle size, allowing the point-like treatment above. When the wormhole exit mouths are 1 Planck length apart, the resultant force is the known strong force coupling constant with an order of magnitude of 40 compared to the normal gravitational strength for nucleons. In addition to being mathematically simple, the above finding is consistent with observations of other coupling constants, Feynman's speculation of "transfusion" of two particles into spin 2 gravitons (published in 1962), Hawking radiation, big-bang theory abundance of quantum wormholes, wormhole theory fine-tuned by Kip S. Thorne and Matt Visser, and recent microscopic gravity measurements. It potentially leads to the holographic principle being promoted by Dr. G. t' Hooft, by naturally pointing out that the mass of the particles is proportional to their diameter squared.

  7. The load dependence of rate constants.

    PubMed

    Walcott, Sam

    2008-06-07

    As experimental techniques in biophysics have progressed at the single molecule level, there has been considerable interest in understanding how external mechanical influences (such as load) affect chemical reactions. The majority of biophysical studies investigating load-dependent kinetics use an equation where the rate constant exponentially depends on force, which is sometimes called Bell's equation. This equation requires the determination of two parameters that describe the potential energy-strain function: k(0), which is the reaction rate in the absence of load, and x(c), which is the difference in strain between the reactant and transition states. However, there have been theoretical studies based on Kramers' theory suggesting that the rate constant should have load-dependent pre-exponential terms and nonlinear load-dependent terms in the exponential. Kramers' theory requires an exact knowledge of the potential energy-strain function, which is in general not known for an experimental system. Here, we derive a general approximation of Kramers' theory where the potential energy-strain function is described by five parameters, which can, for small loads, be reduced to four-, three-, and finally to two parameters (Bell's equation). We then use an idealized physical system to validate our approximations to Kramers' theory and show how they can predict parameters of interest (such as k(0) and x(c)) better than Bell's equation. Finally, we show previously published experimental data that are not well fitted by Bell's equation but are adequately fitted by these more exact equations.

  8. Variable energy constant current accelerator structure

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Oscar A.

    1990-01-01

    A variable energy, constant current ion beam accelerator structure is disclosed comprising an ion source capable of providing the desired ions, a pre-accelerator for establishing an initial energy level, a matching/pumping module having means for focusing means for maintaining the beam current, and at least one main accelerator module for continuing beam focus, with means capable of variably imparting acceleration to the beam so that a constant beam output current is maintained independent of the variable output energy. In a preferred embodiment, quadrupole electrodes are provided in both the matching/pumping module and the one or more accelerator modules, and are formed using four opposing cylinder electrodes which extend parallel to the beam axis and are spaced around the beam at 90.degree. intervals with opposing electrodes maintained at the same potential. Adjacent cylinder electrodes of the quadrupole structure are maintained at different potentials to thereby reshape the cross section of the charged particle beam to an ellipse in cross section at the mid point along each quadrupole electrode unit in the accelerator modules. The beam is maintained in focus by alternating the major axis of the ellipse along the x and y axis respectively at adjacent quadrupoles. In another embodiment, electrostatic ring electrodes may be utilized instead of the quadrupole electrodes.

  9. PREFACE: Fundamental Constants in Physics and Metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klose, Volkmar; Kramer, Bernhard

    1986-01-01

    This volume contains the papers presented at the 70th PTB Seminar which, the second on the subject "Fundamental Constants in Physics and Metrology", was held at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt in Braunschweig from October 21 to 22, 1985. About 100 participants from the universities and various research institutes of the Federal Republic of Germany participated in the meeting. Besides a number of review lectures on various broader subjects there was a poster session which contained a variety of topical contributed papers ranging from the theory of the quantum Hall effect to reports on the status of the metrological experiments at the PTB. In addition, the participants were also offered the possibility to visit the PTB laboratories during the course of the seminar. During the preparation of the meeting we noticed that even most of the general subjects which were going to be discussed in the lectures are of great importance in connection with metrological experiments and should be made accessible to the scientific community. This eventually resulted in the idea of the publication of the papers in a regular journal. We are grateful to the editor of Metrologia for providing this opportunity. We have included quite a number of papers from basic physical research. For example, certain aspects of high-energy physics and quantum optics, as well as the many-faceted role of Sommerfeld's fine-structure constant, are covered. We think that questions such as "What are the intrinsic fundamental parameters of nature?" or "What are we doing when we perform an experiment?" can shed new light on the art of metrology, and do, potentially, lead to new ideas. This appears to be especially necessary when we notice the increasing importance of the role of the fundamental constants and macroscopic quantum effects for the definition and the realization of the physical units. In some cases we have reached a point where the limitations of our knowledge of a fundamental constant and

  10. Computing the dielectric constant of liquid water at constant dielectric displacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chao; Sprik, Michiel

    2016-04-01

    The static dielectric constant of liquid water is computed using classical force field based molecular dynamics simulation at fixed electric displacement D . The method to constrain the electric displacement is the finite-temperature classical variant of the constant D method developed by Stengel, Spaldin, and Vanderbilt [Nat. Phys. 5, 304 (2009), 10.1038/nphys1185]. There is also a modification of this scheme imposing fixed values of the macroscopic field E . The method is applied to the popular SPC/E model of liquid water. We compare four different estimates of the dielectric constant, two obtained from fluctuations of the polarization at D =0 and E =0 and two from the variation of polarization with finite D and E . It is found that all four estimates agree when properly converged. The computational effort to achieve convergence varies, however, with constant D calculations being substantially more efficient. We attribute this difference to the much shorter relaxation time of longitudinal polarization compared to transverse polarization accelerating constant D calculations.

  11. Search for a Variation of Fundamental Constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ubachs, W.

    2013-06-01

    Since the days of Dirac scientists have speculated about the possibility that the laws of nature, and the fundamental constants appearing in those laws, are not rock-solid and eternal but may be subject to change in time or space. Such a scenario of evolving constants might provide an answer to the deepest puzzle of contemporary science, namely why the conditions in our local Universe allow for extreme complexity: the fine-tuning problem. In the past decade it has been established that spectral lines of atoms and molecules, which can currently be measured at ever-higher accuracies, form an ideal test ground for probing drifting constants. This has brought this subject from the realm of metaphysics to that of experimental science. In particular the spectra of molecules are sensitive for probing a variation of the proton-electron mass ratio μ, either on a cosmological time scale, or on a laboratory time scale. A comparison can be made between spectra of molecular hydrogen observed in the laboratory and at a high redshift (z=2-3), using the Very Large Telescope (Paranal, Chile) and the Keck telescope (Hawaii). This puts a constraint on a varying mass ratio Δμ/μ at the 10^{-5} level. The optical work can also be extended to include CO molecules. Further a novel direction will be discussed: it was discovered that molecules exhibiting hindered internal rotation have spectral lines in the radio-spectrum that are extremely sensitive to a varying proton-electron mass ratio. Such lines in the spectrum of methanol were recently observed with the radio-telescope in Effelsberg (Germany). F. van Weerdenburg, M.T. Murphy, A.L. Malec, L. Kaper, W. Ubachs, Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 180802 (2011). A. Malec, R. Buning, M.T. Murphy, N. Milutinovic, S.L. Ellison, J.X. Prochaska, L. Kaper, J. Tumlinson, R.F. Carswell, W. Ubachs, Mon. Not. Roy. Astron. Soc. 403, 1541 (2010). E.J. Salumbides, M.L. Niu, J. Bagdonaite, N. de Oliveira, D. Joyeux, L. Nahon, W. Ubachs, Phys. Rev. A 86, 022510

  12. The Dunkl-Williams constant, convexity, smoothness and normal structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Melado, A.; Llorens-Fuster, E.; Mazcuñán-Navarro, E. M.

    2008-06-01

    In this paper we exhibit some connections between the Dunkl-Williams constant and some other well-known constants and notions. We establish bounds for the Dunkl-Williams constant that explain and quantify a characterization of uniformly nonsquare Banach spaces in terms of the Dunkl-Williams constant given by M. Baronti and P.L. Papini. We also study the relationship between Dunkl-Williams constant, the fixed point property for nonexpansive mappings and normal structure.

  13. Theoretical Evaluation of the Transient Response of Constant Head and Constant Flow-Rate Permeability Tests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhang, M.; Takahashi, M.; Morin, R.H.; Esaki, T.

    1998-01-01

    A theoretical analysis is presented that compares the response characteristics of the constant head and the constant flowrate (flow pump) laboratory techniques for quantifying the hydraulic properties of geologic materials having permeabilities less than 10-10 m/s. Rigorous analytical solutions that describe the transient distributions of hydraulic gradient within a specimen are developed, and equations are derived for each method. Expressions simulating the inflow and outflow rates across the specimen boundaries during a constant-head permeability test are also presented. These solutions illustrate the advantages and disadvantages of each method, including insights into measurement accuracy and the validity of using Darcy's law under certain conditions. The resulting observations offer practical considerations in the selection of an appropriate laboratory test method for the reliable measurement of permeability in low-permeability geologic materials.

  14. Constant-parameter capture-recapture models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brownie, C.; Hines, J.E.; Nichols, J.D.

    1986-01-01

    Jolly (1982, Biometrics 38, 301-321) presented modifications of the Jolly-Seber model for capture-recapture data, which assume constant survival and/or capture rates. Where appropriate, because of the reduced number of parameters, these models lead to more efficient estimators than the Jolly-Seber model. The tests to compare models given by Jolly do not make complete use of the data, and we present here the appropriate modifications, and also indicate how to carry out goodness-of-fit tests which utilize individual capture history information. We also describe analogous models for the case where young and adult animals are tagged. The availability of computer programs to perform the analysis is noted, and examples are given using output from these programs.

  15. Simple Pendulum Determination of the Gravitational Constant

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, Harold V.; Faller, James E.

    2010-09-10

    We determined the Newtonian constant of gravitation G by interferometrically measuring the change in spacing between two free-hanging pendulum masses caused by the gravitational field from large tungsten source masses. We find a value for G of (6.672 34{+-}0.000 14)x10{sup -11} m{sup 3} kg{sup -1} s{sup -2}. This value is in good agreement with the 1986 Committee on Data for Science and Technology (CODATA) value of (6.672 59{+-}0.000 85)x10{sup -11} m{sup 3} kg{sup -1} s{sup -2}[Rev. Mod. Phys. 59, 1121 (1987)] but differs from some more recent determinations as well as the latest CODATA recommendation of (6.674 28{+-}0.000 67)x10{sup -11} m{sup 3} kg{sup -1} s{sup -2}[Rev. Mod. Phys. 80, 633 (2008)].

  16. Molecular dynamics at constant Cauchy stress.

    PubMed

    Miller, Ronald E; Tadmor, Ellad B; Gibson, Joshua S; Bernstein, Noam; Pavia, Fabio

    2016-05-14

    The Parrinello-Rahman algorithm for imposing a general state of stress in periodic molecular dynamics simulations is widely used in the literature and has been implemented in many readily available molecular dynamics codes. However, what is often overlooked is that this algorithm controls the second Piola-Kirchhoff stress as opposed to the true (Cauchy) stress. This can lead to misinterpretation of simulation results because (1) the true stress that is imposed during the simulation depends on the deformation of the periodic cell, (2) the true stress is potentially very different from the imposed second Piola-Kirchhoff stress, and (3) the true stress can vary significantly during the simulation even if the imposed second Piola-Kirchhoff is constant. We propose a simple modification to the algorithm that allows the true Cauchy stress to be controlled directly. We then demonstrate the efficacy of the new algorithm with the example of martensitic phase transformations under applied stress.

  17. Hawking temperature of constant curvature black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Cai Ronggen; Myung, Yun Soo

    2011-05-15

    The constant curvature (CC) black holes are higher dimensional generalizations of Banados-Teitelboim-Zanelli black holes. It is known that these black holes have the unusual topology of M{sub D-1}xS{sup 1}, where D is the spacetime dimension and M{sub D-1} stands for a conformal Minkowski spacetime in D-1 dimensions. The unusual topology and time-dependence for the exterior of these black holes cause some difficulties to derive their thermodynamic quantities. In this work, by using a globally embedding approach, we obtain the Hawking temperature of the CC black holes. We find that the Hawking temperature takes the same form when using both the static and global coordinates. Also, it is identical to the Gibbons-Hawking temperature of the boundary de Sitter spaces of these CC black holes.

  18. Time constants of the polar ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, Martin; Fankhauser, Martin

    A neural network (NN) model for the polar ionosphere from the D-to the F-region is pre-sented which is based on incoherent scattar radar data from EISCAT Svalbard. The various geophysical input parameters defining the NN are not only the ones that represent the time one wants to predict, but also time periods prior to the time of the prediction. The optimum length of these preceding periods are derived for the polar cap model and are compared to the analoguous results from the Arecibo incoherent scatter radar. In addition from the Arecibo data time constants of electron density decay after sundown are derived which arguably are also relevant at other, including polar latitudes.

  19. Flux Renormalization in Constant Power Burnup Calculations

    DOE PAGES

    Isotalo, Aarno E.; Aalto Univ., Otaniemi; Davidson, Gregory G.; ...

    2016-06-15

    To more accurately represent the desired power in a constant power burnup calculation, the depletion steps of the calculation can be divided into substeps and the neutron flux renormalized on each substep to match the desired power. Here, this paper explores how such renormalization should be performed, how large a difference it makes, and whether using renormalization affects results regarding the relative performance of different neutronics–depletion coupling schemes. When used with older coupling schemes, renormalization can provide a considerable improvement in overall accuracy. With previously published higher order coupling schemes, which are more accurate to begin with, renormalization has amore » much smaller effect. Finally, while renormalization narrows the differences in the accuracies of different coupling schemes, their order of accuracy is not affected.« less

  20. Black holes and the positive cosmological constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Sourav

    2013-02-01

    We address some aspects of black hole spacetimes endowed with a positive cosmological constant, i.e. black holes located inside a cosmological event horizon. First we establish a general criterion for existence of cosmological event horizons. Using the geometrical set up built for this, we study classical black hole no hair theorems for both static and stationary axisymmetric spacetimes. We discuss cosmic Nielsen-Olesen strings as hair in Schwarzschild-de Sitter spacetime. We also give a general calculation for particle creation by a Killing horizon using complex path analysis and using this we study particle creation in Schwarzschild-de Sitter spacetime by both black hole and the cosmological event horizons.

  1. Constant field gradient planar coupled cavity structure

    DOEpatents

    Kang, Y.W.; Kustom, R.L.

    1999-07-27

    A cavity structure is disclosed having at least two opposing planar housing members spaced apart to accommodate the passage of a particle beam through the structure between the members. Each of the housing members have a plurality of serially aligned hollows defined therein, and also passages, formed in the members, which interconnect serially adjacent hollows to provide communication between the hollows. The opposing planar housing members are spaced and aligned such that the hollows in one member cooperate with corresponding hollows in the other member to form a plurality of resonant cavities aligned along the particle beam within the cavity structure. To facilitate the obtaining of a constant field gradient within the cavity structure, the passages are configured so as to be incrementally narrower in the direction of travel of the particle beam. In addition, the spacing distance between the opposing housing members is configured to be incrementally smaller in the direction of travel of the beam. 16 figs.

  2. Constant field gradient planar coupled cavity structure

    DOEpatents

    Kang, Yoon W.; Kustom, Robert L.

    1999-01-01

    A cavity structure having at least two opposing planar housing members spaced apart to accommodate the passage of a particle beam through the structure between the members. Each of the housing members have a plurality of serially aligned hollows defined therein, and also passages, formed in the members, which interconnect serially adjacent hollows to provide communication between the hollows. The opposing planar housing members are spaced and aligned such that the hollows in one member cooperate with corresponding hollows in the other member to form a plurality of resonant cavities aligned along the particle beam within the cavity structure. To facilitate the obtaining of a constant field gradient within the cavity structure, the passages are configured so as to be incrementally narrower in the direction of travel of the particle beam. In addition, the spacing distance between the opposing housing members is configured to be incrementally smaller in the direction of travel of the beam.

  3. Constant-force approach to discontinuous potentials.

    PubMed

    Orea, Pedro; Odriozola, Gerardo

    2013-06-07

    Aiming to approach the thermodynamical properties of hard-core systems by standard molecular dynamics simulation, we propose setting a repulsive constant-force for overlapping particles. That is, the discontinuity of the pair potential is replaced by a linear function with a large negative slope. Hence, the core-core repulsion, usually modeled with a power function of distance, yields a large force as soon as the cores slightly overlap. This leads to a quasi-hardcore behavior. The idea is tested for a triangle potential of short range. The results obtained by replica exchange molecular dynamics for several repulsive forces are contrasted with the ones obtained for the discontinuous potential and by means of replica exchange Monte Carlo. We found remarkable agreements for the vapor-liquid coexistence densities as well as for the surface tension.

  4. Automatic gesture analysis using constant affine velocity.

    PubMed

    Cifuentes, Jenny; Boulanger, Pierre; Pham, Minh Tu; Moreau, Richard; Prieto, Flavio

    2014-01-01

    Hand human gesture recognition has been an important research topic widely studied around the world, as this field offers the ability to identify, recognize, and analyze human gestures in order to control devices or to interact with computer interfaces. In particular, in medical training, this approach is an important tool that can be used to obtain an objective evaluation of a procedure performance. In this paper, some obstetrical gestures, acquired by a forceps, were studied with the hypothesis that, as the scribbling and drawing movements, they obey the one-sixth power law, an empirical relationship which connects path curvature, torsion, and euclidean velocity. Our results show that obstetrical gestures have a constant affine velocity, which is different for each type of gesture and based on this idea this quantity is proposed as an appropriate classification feature in the hand human gesture recognition field.

  5. Measuring the RC time constant with Arduino

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, N. S. A.

    2016-11-01

    In this work we use the Arduino UNO R3 open source hardware platform to assemble an experimental apparatus for the measurement of the time constant of an RC circuit. With adequate programming, the Arduino is used as a signal generator, a data acquisition system and a basic signal visualisation tool. Theoretical calculations are compared with direct observations from an analogue oscilloscope. Data processing and curve fitting is performed on a spreadsheet. The results obtained for the six RC test circuits are within the expected interval of values defined by the tolerance of the components. The hardware and software prove to be adequate to the proposed measurements and therefore adaptable to a laboratorial teaching and learning context.

  6. Running cosmological constant with observational tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Chao-Qiang; Lee, Chung-Chi; Zhang, Kaituo

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the running cosmological constant model with dark energy linearly proportional to the Hubble parameter, Λ = σH +Λ0, in which the ΛCDM limit is recovered by taking σ = 0. We derive the linear perturbation equations of gravity under the Friedmann-Lemaïtre-Robertson-Walker cosmology, and show the power spectra of the CMB temperature and matter density distribution. By using the Markov chain Monte Carlo method, we fit the model to the current observational data and find that σH0 /Λ0 ≲ 2.63 ×10-2 and 6.74 ×10-2 for Λ (t) coupled to matter and radiation-matter, respectively, along with constraints on other cosmological parameters.

  7. Induction synchrotron with a constant magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolbilov, G. V.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper the possibility of accelerating charged particles in a "nearly constant" orbit in a timeconstant magnetic field is discussed. The closed trajectories of the accelerated particles are formed by azimuthally set short bending magnet sections, each comprised of two particle-deflecting magnetic dipoles in which the incidence and deflection angles do not depend on the particle energy. The sign-alternating focusing of the beam is carried out by the dipole fields and quadrupole lenses placed between the bending sections. The particles are accelerated by pulses of the electric field of the induction sections. The inductive pulses and the beam pulses are synchronized by a beam-transit time transducer. The stability of the longitudinal oscillations is determined by the shape of the top of the accelerating pulse. The nonresonance acceleration method does not require preaccelerators and boosters.

  8. Constant field gradient planar cavity structure

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Yoon W.; Kustom, R.L.

    1997-12-01

    A cavity structure is described having at least two opposing planar housing members spaced apart to accommodate the passage of a particle beam through the structure between the members. Each of the housing members have a plurality of serially aligned hollows defined therein, and also passages, formed in the members, which interconnect serially adjacent hollows to provide communication between the hollows. The opposing planar housing members are spaced and aligned such that the hollows in one member cooperate with corresponding hollows in the other member to form a plurality of resonant cavities aligned along the particle beam within the cavity structure. To facilitate the obtaining of a constant field gradient within the cavity structure, the passages are configured so as to be incrementally narrower in the direction of travel of the particle beam. In addition, the spacing distance between the opposing housing members is configured to be incrementally smaller in the direction of travel of the beam.

  9. Flux Renormalization in Constant Power Burnup Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Isotalo, Aarno E.; Davidson, Gregory G.; Pandya, Tara M.; Wieselquist, William A.; Johnson, Seth R.

    2016-06-15

    To more accurately represent the desired power in a constant power burnup calculation, the depletion steps of the calculation can be divided into substeps and the neutron flux renormalized on each substep to match the desired power. Here, this paper explores how such renormalization should be performed, how large a difference it makes, and whether using renormalization affects results regarding the relative performance of different neutronics–depletion coupling schemes. When used with older coupling schemes, renormalization can provide a considerable improvement in overall accuracy. With previously published higher order coupling schemes, which are more accurate to begin with, renormalization has a much smaller effect. Finally, while renormalization narrows the differences in the accuracies of different coupling schemes, their order of accuracy is not affected.

  10. New solution of the cosmological constant problems.

    PubMed

    Barrow, John D; Shaw, Douglas J

    2011-03-11

    We extend the usual gravitational action principle by promoting the bare cosmological constant (CC) to a field which can take many possible values. Variation gives a new integral constraint equation for the classical value of the effective CC that dominates the wave function of the Universe. The expected value of the effective CC, is calculated from measurable quantities to be O(t(U)(-2)) as observed, where t(U) is the present age of the Universe in Planck units. This also leads to a falsifiable prediction for the observed spatial curvature parameter of Ω(k0) = -0.0055. Our proposal requires no fine-tunings or extra dark-energy fields but suggests a new view of time evolution.

  11. Statistical Modelling of the Soil Dielectric Constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usowicz, Boguslaw; Marczewski, Wojciech; Bogdan Usowicz, Jerzy; Lipiec, Jerzy

    2010-05-01

    The dielectric constant of soil is the physical property being very sensitive on water content. It funds several electrical measurement techniques for determining the water content by means of direct (TDR, FDR, and others related to effects of electrical conductance and/or capacitance) and indirect RS (Remote Sensing) methods. The work is devoted to a particular statistical manner of modelling the dielectric constant as the property accounting a wide range of specific soil composition, porosity, and mass density, within the unsaturated water content. Usually, similar models are determined for few particular soil types, and changing the soil type one needs switching the model on another type or to adjust it by parametrization of soil compounds. Therefore, it is difficult comparing and referring results between models. The presented model was developed for a generic representation of soil being a hypothetical mixture of spheres, each representing a soil fraction, in its proper phase state. The model generates a serial-parallel mesh of conductive and capacitive paths, which is analysed for a total conductive or capacitive property. The model was firstly developed to determine the thermal conductivity property, and now it is extended on the dielectric constant by analysing the capacitive mesh. The analysis is provided by statistical means obeying physical laws related to the serial-parallel branching of the representative electrical mesh. Physical relevance of the analysis is established electrically, but the definition of the electrical mesh is controlled statistically by parametrization of compound fractions, by determining the number of representative spheres per unitary volume per fraction, and by determining the number of fractions. That way the model is capable covering properties of nearly all possible soil types, all phase states within recognition of the Lorenz and Knudsen conditions. In effect the model allows on generating a hypothetical representative of

  12. Electronic noise in a constant voltage anemometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Julien; Comte-Bellot, Geneviève

    2004-05-01

    The electronic noise and the signal-to-noise ratio in a constant voltage anemometer (CVA) are analyzed in terms of the main constitutive elements of the circuit. It is shown that the output voltage due to electronic noise decreases with the wire resistance, permitting one to know the noise upper limit by using the results of the unheated wire. The noise power spectrum increases at high frequencies as f2, like in other anemometers, because of the need to compensate for the thermal lag of the hot wire, thus leading to a reduced signal-to-noise ratio at high frequencies. Explicit formulas are given in terms of wire, CVA, and flow quantities. Measurements of electronic noise in a CVA prototype confirm the theoretical analysis and illustrate some interesting issues concerning measurements of noise and low levels of flow fluctuations.

  13. Isotope shift constant and nuclear charge model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Z.; Redi, O.; Stroke, H. H.

    1992-04-01

    We use the method of Zimmermann [Z. Phys. A 321 (1985) 23-30], which he used to calculate the isotope shift constant for a uniform nuclear charge distribution, to obtain it for a diffuse nuclear charge model. The two models give results that differ slightly on the level of precision of current experiments. The same parameters are used to calculate the model sensitivity of the contributions to the isotope shifts of higher moments of the nuclear charge distribution as formulated by Seltzer [Phys. Rev. 188 (1969) 1916-1919]. These are found to be essentially model independent. Tables are given of the numerical calculations. Nous employons la méthode de Zimmermann [Z. Phys. A 321 (1985) 23-30], qu'il avait utilisé dans un calcul de la constante du déplacement isotopique pour une distribution de charge uniforme, pour l'obtenir avec un modèle de charge nucléaire avec forme quasi-trapézoïdale. Les deux modèles donnent des résultats dont la difference excède de peu la précision des mesures actuelles. Les mêmes paramètres sont utilisés pour comparer la dépendance aux deux modèles de la contribution au déplacement isotopique des moments plus élevés de la distribution de la charge nucléaire dans la formulation de Seltzer [Phys. Rev. 188 (1969) 1916-1919]. On trouve que ces contributions sont essentiellement indépendantes du modèle. Des tables de calculs numériques sont présentées.

  14. Universal equations and constants of turbulent motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumert, H. Z.

    2013-07-01

    This paper presents a parameter-free theory of shear-generated turbulence at asymptotically high Reynolds numbers in incompressible fluids. It is based on a two-fluids concept. Both components are materially identical and inviscid. The first component is an ensemble of quasi-rigid dipole-vortex tubes (vortex filaments, excitations) as quasi-particles in chaotic motion. The second is a superfluid performing evasive motions between the tubes. The local dipole motions follow Helmholtz' law. The vortex radii scale with the energy-containing length scale. Collisions between quasi-particles lead either to annihilation (likewise rotation, turbulent dissipation) or to scattering (counterrotation, turbulent diffusion). There are analogies with birth and death processes of population dynamics and their master equations and with Landau's two-fluid theory of liquid helium. For free homogeneous decay the theory predicts the turbulent kinetic energy to follow t-1. With an adiabatic wall condition it predicts the logarithmic law with von Kármán's constant as 1/\\sqrt {2\\,\\pi }= 0.399 . Likewise rotating couples form localized dissipative patches almost at rest (→ intermittency) wherein under local quasi-steady conditions the spectrum evolves into an ‘Apollonian gear’ as discussed first by Herrmann (1990 Correlation and Connectivity (Dordrecht: Kluwer) pp 108-20). Dissipation happens exclusively at scale zero and at finite scales this system is frictionless and reminds of Prigogine's (1947 Etude Thermodynamique des Phenomenes Irreversibles (Liege: Desoer) p 143) law of minimum (here: zero) entropy production. The theory predicts further the prefactor of the 3D-wavenumber spectrum (a Kolmogorov constant) as \\frac {1}{3}(4\\,\\pi )^{2/3}=1.802 , well within the scatter range of observational, experimental and direct numerical simulation results.

  15. Spatial and temporal variations of fundamental constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levshakov, S. A.; Agafonova, I. I.; Molaro, P.; Reimers, D.

    2010-11-01

    Spatial and temporal variations in the electron-to-proton mass ratio, μ, and in the fine-structure constant, α, are not present in the Standard Model of particle physics but they arise quite naturally in grant unification theories, multidimensional theories and in general when a coupling of light scalar fields to baryonic matter is considered. The light scalar fields are usually attributed to a negative pressure substance permeating the entire visible Universe and known as dark energy. This substance is thought to be responsible for a cosmic acceleration at low redshifts, z < 1. A strong dependence of μ and α on the ambient matter density is predicted by chameleon-like scalar field models. Calculations of atomic and molecular spectra show that different transitions have different sensitivities to changes in fundamental constants. Thus, measuring the relative line positions, Δ V, between such transitions one can probe the hypothetical variability of physical constants. In particular, interstellar molecular clouds can be used to test the matter density dependence of μ, since gas density in these clouds is ~15 orders of magnitude lower than that in terrestrial environment. We use the best quality radio spectra of the inversion transition of NH3 (J,K)=(1,1) and rotational transitions of other molecules to estimate the radial velocity offsets, Δ V ≡ Vrot - Vinv. The obtained value of Δ V shows a statistically significant positive shift of 23±4stat±3sys m s-1 (1σ). Being interpreted in terms of the electron-to-proton mass ratio variation, this gives Δμ/μ = (22±4stat±3sys)×10-9. A strong constraint on variation of the quantity F = α2/μ in the Milky Way is found from comparison of the fine-structure transition J=1-0 in atomic carbon C i with the low-J rotational lines in carbon monoxide 13CO arising in the interstellar molecular clouds: |Δ F/F| < 3×10-7. This yields |Δ α/α| < 1.5×10-7 at z = 0. Since extragalactic absorbers have gas densities

  16. Kinetic performance limits of constant pressure versus constant flow rate gradient elution separations. Part I: theory.

    PubMed

    Broeckhoven, K; Verstraeten, M; Choikhet, K; Dittmann, M; Witt, K; Desmet, G

    2011-02-25

    We report on a general theoretical assessment of the potential kinetic advantages of running LC gradient elution separations in the constant-pressure mode instead of in the customarily used constant-flow rate mode. Analytical calculations as well as numerical simulation results are presented. It is shown that, provided both modes are run with the same volume-based gradient program, the constant-pressure mode can potentially offer an identical separation selectivity (except from some small differences induced by the difference in pressure and viscous heating trajectory), but in a significantly shorter time. For a gradient running between 5 and 95% of organic modifier, the decrease in analysis time can be expected to be of the order of some 20% for both water-methanol and water-acetonitrile gradients, and only weakly depending on the value of V(G)/V₀ (or equivalently t(G)/t₀). Obviously, the gain will be smaller when the start and end composition lie closer to the viscosity maximum of the considered water-organic modifier system. The assumptions underlying the obtained results (no effects of pressure and temperature on the viscosity or retention coefficient) are critically reviewed, and can be inferred to only have a small effect on the general conclusions. It is also shown that, under the adopted assumptions, the kinetic plot theory also holds for operations where the flow rate varies with the time, as is the case for constant-pressure operation. Comparing both operation modes in a kinetic plot representing the maximal peak capacity versus time, it is theoretically predicted here that both modes can be expected to perform equally well in the fully C-term dominated regime (where H varies linearly with the flow rate), while the constant pressure mode is advantageous for all lower flow rates. Near the optimal flow rate, and for linear gradients running from 5 to 95% organic modifier, time gains of the order of some 20% can be expected (or 25-30% when accounting for

  17. Ortho-para-hydrogen equilibration on Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, Barbara E.; Lacis, Andrew A.; Rossow, William B.

    1992-01-01

    Voyager IRIS observations reveal that the Jovian para-hydrogen fraction is not in thermodynamic equilibrium near the NH3 cloud top, implying that a vertical gradient exists between the high-temperature equilibrium value of 0.25 at depth and the cloud top values. The height-dependent para-hydrogen profile is obtained using an anisotropic multiple-scattering radiative transfer model. A vertical correlation is found to exist between the location of the para-hydrogen gradient and the NH3 cloud, strongly suggesting that paramagnetic conversion on NH3 cloud particle surfaces is the dominant equilibration mechanism. Below the NH3 cloud layer, the para fraction is constant with depth and equal to the high-temperature equilibrium value of 0.25. The degree of cloud-top equilibration appears to depend on the optical depth of the NH3 cloud layer. Belt-zone variations in the para-hydrogen profile seem to be due to differences in the strength of the vertical mixing.

  18. A New Physical Constant And Its Importance To Energy Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angus, Andrew

    2003-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to introduce a new physical constant symbolized by the Greek letter lambda. This paper explains how the new physical constant was derived. This paper also explains the significance of the new physical constant as an alternative explanation to Einstein's Law of Photoelectric Effect. The new physical constant leads to a deeper understanding of the nature of the photon. Furthermore, this new physical constant leads us to the existence of two types of photon, the Planck photon and the Angus photon. Finally, the author also explains the importance of this new physical constant in energy production.

  19. Accurate lineshape spectroscopy and the Boltzmann constant

    PubMed Central

    Truong, G.-W.; Anstie, J. D.; May, E. F.; Stace, T. M.; Luiten, A. N.

    2015-01-01

    Spectroscopy has an illustrious history delivering serendipitous discoveries and providing a stringent testbed for new physical predictions, including applications from trace materials detection, to understanding the atmospheres of stars and planets, and even constraining cosmological models. Reaching fundamental-noise limits permits optimal extraction of spectroscopic information from an absorption measurement. Here, we demonstrate a quantum-limited spectrometer that delivers high-precision measurements of the absorption lineshape. These measurements yield a very accurate measurement of the excited-state (6P1/2) hyperfine splitting in Cs, and reveals a breakdown in the well-known Voigt spectral profile. We develop a theoretical model that accounts for this breakdown, explaining the observations to within the shot-noise limit. Our model enables us to infer the thermal velocity dispersion of the Cs vapour with an uncertainty of 35 p.p.m. within an hour. This allows us to determine a value for Boltzmann's constant with a precision of 6 p.p.m., and an uncertainty of 71 p.p.m. PMID:26465085

  20. Expanding Taylor bubble under constant heat flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voirand, Antoine; Benselama, Adel M.; Ayel, Vincent; Bertin, Yves

    2016-09-01

    Modelization of non-isothermal bubbles expanding in a capillary, as a contribution to the understanding of the physical phenomena taking place in Pulsating Heat Pipes (PHPs), is the scope of this paper. The liquid film problem is simplified and solved, while the thermal problem takes into account a constant heat flux density applied at the capillary tube wall, exchanging with the liquid film surrounding the bubble and also with the capillary tube outside medium. The liquid slug dynamics is solved using the Lucas-Washburn equation. Mass and energy balance on the vapor phase allow governing equations of bubble expansion to be written. The liquid and vapor phases are coupled only through the saturation temperature associated with the vapor pressure, assumed to be uniform throughout the bubble. Results show an over-heating of the vapor phase, although the particular thermal boundary condition used here always ensures an evaporative mass flux at the liquid-vapor interface. Global heat exchange is also investigated, showing a strong decreasing of the PHP performance to convey heat by phase change means for large meniscus velocities.

  1. An Alcohol Test for Drifting Constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, P.; Bagdonaite, J.; Ubachs, W.; Bethlem, H. L.; Kleiner, I.; Xu, L.-H.

    2013-06-01

    The Standard Model of physics is built on the fundamental constants of nature, however without providing an explanation for their values, nor requiring their constancy over space and time. Molecular spectroscopy can address this issue. Recently, we found that microwave transitions in methanol are extremely sensitive to a variation of the proton-to-electron mass ratio μ, due to a fortuitous interplay between classically forbidden internal rotation and rotation of the molecule as a whole. In this talk, we will explain the origin of this effect and how the sensitivity coefficients in methanol are calculated. In addition, we set a limit on a possible cosmological variation of μ by comparing transitions in methanol observed in the early Universe with those measured in the laboratory. Based on radio-astronomical observations of PKS1830-211, we deduce a constraint of Δμ/μ=(0.0± 1.0)× 10^{-7} at redshift z = 0.89, corresponding to a look-back time of 7 billion years. While this limit is more constraining and systematically more robust than previous ones, the methanol method opens a new search territory for probing μ-variation on cosmological timescales. P. Jansen, L.-H. Xu, I. Kleiner, W. Ubachs, and H.L. Bethlem Phys. Rev. Lett. {106}(100801) 2011. J. Bagdonaite, P. Jansen, C. Henkel, H.L. Bethlem, K.M. Menten, and W. Ubachs Science {339}(46) 2013.

  2. Stretching DNA by a Constant Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hori, Yuko

    2005-03-01

    We consider the problem of stretching DNA by a constant field, such as an electric field or a hydrodynamic flow field. We obtain analytical expressions for the elongation of DNA under both weak and strong applied fields, in two and three dimensions. In the weak field limit we consider the effect of self-avoidance, which leads to a 9-fold enhancement of the average end-to-end distance over the result obtained when self-avoidance is ignored in two dimensions, and 3-fold increase in three dimensions. In the strong stretching regime we obtain the exact force-extension relation by mapping the problem to the Schrödinger equation for a simple harmonic oscillator in a time dependent potential. We use our theoretical results to comment on the experiment of Maier et al. ootnotetextB. Maier, U. Seifert, and J. O. Rä'dler, Europhys. Lett., 60, 622 (2002). on DNA adsorbed on a lipid bilayer in the presence of an in-plane electric field. In particular, we find that their estimate for the effective charge density of the DNA molecule, made on the basis of an approximate theory, requires significant corrections in light of our calculations. This work was supported by the NSF through grants DMR-9984471 and DMR-0403997. JK is a Cottrell Scholar of Research Corporation.

  3. Recoupling pulse sequences with constant phase increments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaneja, Navin; Kumar, Ashutosh

    2016-10-01

    The paper studies a family of recoupling pulse sequences in magic angle spinning (MAS) solid state NMR, that are characterized by constant phase increments at regular intervals. These pulse sequences can be employed for both homonuclear and heteronuclear recoupling experiments and are robust to dispersion in chemical shifts and rf-inhomogeneity. The homonuclear pulse sequence consists of a building block (2 π) ϕp , where ϕp =p (n - 1) π/n, where n is number of blocks in a rotor period and p = 0, 1, 2, … . The pulse sequence repeats itself every rotor period when n is odd and every two rotor period when n is even. The heteronuclear recoupling pulse sequence consists of a building block (2 π) ϕ1p and (2 π) ϕ2p on channel I and S, where ϕ1p = p (2 n - 3) π/2 n, ϕ2p = p (2 n - 1) π/2 n and n is number of blocks in a rotor period. The recoupling pulse sequences mix the z magnetization. Experimental quantification of this method is shown for 13Cα -13CO , homonuclear recoupling in a sample of Glycine and 15N -13Cα , heteronuclear recoupling in Alanine. Application of this method is demonstrated on a sample of tripeptide N-formyl-[U-13C ,15N ]- Met-Leu-Phe-OH (MLF).

  4. When Rate Constants Are Not Enough.

    PubMed

    Barker, John R; Frenklach, Michael; Golden, David M

    2015-07-16

    Real-world chemical systems consisting of multiple isomers and multiple reaction channels often react significantly prior to attaining a steady state energy distribution (SED). Detailed elementary reaction models, which implicitly require SED conditions, may be invalid when non-steady-state energy distributions (NSED) exist. NSED conditions may result in reaction rates and product yields that are different from those expected for SED conditions, although this problem is to some extent reduced by using phenomenological models and rate constants. The present study defines pragmatic diagnostics useful for identifying NSED conditions in stochastic master equation simulations. A representative example is presented for each of four classes of common combustion species: RO2 radicals, aliphatic hydrocarbons, alkyl radicals, and polyaromatic radicals. An example selected from the seminal work of Tsang et al. demonstrates that stochastic simulations and eigenvalue methods for solving the master equation predict the same NSED effects. NSED effects are common under relatively moderate combustion conditions, and accurate simulations may require a master equation analysis.

  5. Universal constants and equations of turbulent motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumert, Helmut

    2011-11-01

    For turbulence at high Reynolds number we present an analogy with the kinetic theory of gases, with dipoles made of vortex tubes as frictionless, incompressible but deformable quasi-particles. Their movements are governed by Helmholtz' elementary vortex rules applied locally. A contact interaction or ``collision'' leads either to random scatter of a trajectory or to the formation of two likewise rotating, fundamentally unstable whirls forming a dissipative patch slowly rotating around its center of mass, the latter almost at rest. This approach predicts von Karman's constant as 1/sqrt(2 pi) = 0.399 and the spatio-temporal dynamics of energy-containing time and length scales controlling turbulent mixing [Baumert 2005, 2009]. A link to turbulence spectra was missing so far. In the present contribution it is shown that the above image of dipole movements is compatible with Kolmogorov's spectra if dissipative patches, beginning as two likewise rotating eddies, evolve locally into a space-filling bearing in the sense of Herrmann [1990], i.e. into an ``Apollonian gear.'' Its parts and pieces are are frictionless, excepting the dissipative scale of size zero. Our approach predicts the dimensionless pre-factor in the 3D Eulerian wavenumber spectrum (in terms of pi) as 1.8, and in the Lagrangian frequency spectrum as the integer number 2. Our derivations are free of empirical relations and rest on geometry, methods from many-particle physics, and on elementary conservation laws only. Department of the Navy Grant, ONR Global

  6. Star polymers rupture induced by constant forces.

    PubMed

    García, N A; Febbo, M; Vega, D A; Milchev, A

    2014-10-28

    In this work, we study the breakage process of an unknotted three-arm star-shaped polymer when it is pulled from its free ends by a constant force. The star polymer configuration is described through an array of monomers coupled by anharmonic bonds, while the rupture process is tracked in three-dimensional space by means of Langevin Molecular Dynamics simulations. The interaction between monomers is described by a Morse potential, while a Weeks-Chandler-Anderson energetic contribution accounts for the excluded volume interaction. We explore the effect of the molecular architecture on the distributions of rupture times over a broad interval of pulling forces and star configurations. It was found that the rupture time distribution of the individual star arms is strongly affected by the star configuration imposed by the pulling forces and the length of the arms. We also observed that for large pulling forces the rupture time distributions resemble the dominant features observed for linear polymer chains. The model introduced here provides the basic ingredients to describe the effects of tensile forces on stress-induced degradation of branched macromolecules and polymer networks.

  7. A constant daylength during the Precambrian era?

    PubMed

    Zahnle, K; Walker, J C

    1987-01-01

    The semidiurnal atmospheric thermal tide would have been resonant with free oscillations of the atmosphere when the day was approximately 21 h long, c. 600 Ma ago. Very large atmospheric tides would have resulted, with associated surface pressure oscillations in excess of 10 mbar in the tropics. Near resonance the Sun's gravitational torque on the atmospheric tide--accelerating Earth's rotation--would have been comparable in magnitude to the decelerating lunar torque upon the oceanic tides. The balance of the opposing torques may have long maintained a resonant approximately 21 h day, perhaps for much of the Precambrian. Because the timescale of lunar orbital evolution is not directly affected, a constant daylength would result in fewer days/month. The hypothesis is shown not to conflict with the available (stromatolitic) evidence. Escape from the resonance could have followed a relatively abrupt global warming, such as that occurring at the end of the Precambrian. Alternatively, escape may simply have followed a major increase in the rate of oceanic tidal dissipation, brought about by the changing topography of the world's oceans. We integrate the history of the lunar orbit with and without a sustained resonance, finding that the impact of a sustained resonance on the other orbital parameters of the Earth-Moon system would have not been large.

  8. Accurate lineshape spectroscopy and the Boltzmann constant.

    PubMed

    Truong, G-W; Anstie, J D; May, E F; Stace, T M; Luiten, A N

    2015-10-14

    Spectroscopy has an illustrious history delivering serendipitous discoveries and providing a stringent testbed for new physical predictions, including applications from trace materials detection, to understanding the atmospheres of stars and planets, and even constraining cosmological models. Reaching fundamental-noise limits permits optimal extraction of spectroscopic information from an absorption measurement. Here, we demonstrate a quantum-limited spectrometer that delivers high-precision measurements of the absorption lineshape. These measurements yield a very accurate measurement of the excited-state (6P1/2) hyperfine splitting in Cs, and reveals a breakdown in the well-known Voigt spectral profile. We develop a theoretical model that accounts for this breakdown, explaining the observations to within the shot-noise limit. Our model enables us to infer the thermal velocity dispersion of the Cs vapour with an uncertainty of 35 p.p.m. within an hour. This allows us to determine a value for Boltzmann's constant with a precision of 6 p.p.m., and an uncertainty of 71 p.p.m.

  9. Optical Constants Determined by Genetic Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, David Y.; Karstens, William; Malghani, Shaheen M.

    2005-03-01

    A recent determination^a of the complex refractive index, n(λ) + i κ(λ), of porous silicon employed a genetic^b algorithm to fit the Fresnel equations to reflectance spectra. The procedure appeared to involve more unknowns than explicit equations available for fitting, an indeterminate problem. However, the index values obtained were reasonable, and predicted the properties of porous-silicon multilayes. We have traced this success to the interpolation formulas used for n and κ in the fitting algorithm. They amount to an implicit optical-constant model with the de facto assumption of an analytic complex index that can be approximated by a cubic polynomial. Our analysis suggests the procedure can be improved by explicitly using a more appropriate model, e.g., one that uses wave number as the expansion variable and requires that n and κ be even and odd functions of λ, respectively. ^a V. Torres-Costa, R. J. Mart'in-Palma, and J. M. Mart'inez-Duart, J. Appl. Phys. 96, 4197 (2004). ^b D. E. Goldberg, Genetic Algorithms in Search, Optimization and Machine Learning (Addison-Wesley, Reading, 1989).

  10. On Stochastic Processes with Constant Valuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbas, Ali E.

    2009-12-01

    In the probability literature, a martingale is often referred to as a fair game. A risk neutral decision maker would be indifferent to engaging in a martingale investment for any number of stages or not engaging into it at all if its expected value is equal to his current wealth. But a risk-averse decision maker would not accept a martingale pay-off in exchange for its expected value since his certain equivalent for uncertain deals is less than their mean. Therefore the traditional martingale sequences that are widely studied in probability and finance are not rational investments for risk averse decision makers. A risk seeking decision maker, on the other hand would welcome a martingale investment, since the certain equivalent is larger than the mean. We introduce a class of stochastic processes whose expected utility is constant and equal to the utility of the current wealth. We refer to such processes as risk-adjusted martingales. We show how to construct such processes for any continuous and strictly monotonic utility function.

  11. Backlight illumination design using constant extinction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgart, Jörg

    2013-08-01

    Light guiding backlights are a good solution to attain ambient or display illuminations. Generally, they are attained using intended macroscopic defects (dots). Their size, shape and density are designed using ray tracing software. Smaller defects have the fascinating feature that they may not be perceived by the eye. Such a light guide will therefore look transparent and undisturbed. However, such microscopic or even nanoscaled defects are well beyond the limitations of geometrical optics and therefore need other approaches for their design. An interesting alternative to surface defects are particles inside the material or a well-defined surface roughness. In contrast to a defect structure, particle densities or surface roughness cannot be changed without difficulty. These may, however, be much more easily manufactured. In this paper, a simple analytical method for the design of such light guides will be presented. This method is compared to the results of commercial software and will be used to design a homogeneous illumination adopting constant particle density inside the material.

  12. Simple pendulum determination of the gravitational constant.

    PubMed

    Parks, Harold V; Faller, James E

    2010-09-10

    We determined the Newtonian constant of gravitation G by interferometrically measuring the change in spacing between two free-hanging pendulum masses caused by the gravitational field from large tungsten source masses. We find a value for G of (6.672 34±0.000 14)×10(-11)  m3  kg(-1)  s(-2). This value is in good agreement with the 1986 Committee on Data for Science and Technology (CODATA) value of (6.672 59±0.000 85)×10(-11)   m3  kg(-1)  s(-2) [Rev. Mod. Phys. 59, 1121 (1987)] but differs from some more recent determinations as well as the latest CODATA recommendation of (6.674 28±0.000 67)×10(-11)   m3  kg(-1)  s(-2) [Rev. Mod. Phys. 80, 633 (2008)].

  13. Tunnelling with a negative cosmological constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbons, G. W.

    1996-02-01

    The point of this paper is to see what light new results in hyperbolic geometry may throw on gravitational entropy and whether gravitational entropy is relevant for the quantum origin of the universe. We introduce some new gravitational instantons which mediate the birth from nothing of closed universes containing wormholes and suggest that they may contribute to the density matrix of the universe. We also discuss the connection between their gravitational action and the topological and volumetric entropies introduced in hyperbolic geometry. These coincide for hyperbolic 4-manifolds, and increase with increasing topological complexity of the 4-manifold. We raise the question of whether the action also increases with the topological complexity of the initial 3-geometry, measured either by its 3-volume or its Matveev complexity. We point out, in distinction to the non-supergravity case, that universes with domains of negative cosmological constant separated by supergravity domain walls cannot be born from nothing. Finally we point out that our wormholes provide examples of the type of Perpetual Motion machines envisaged by Frolov and Novikov.

  14. Constant-pressure and constant-surface tension simulations in dissipative particle dynamics.

    PubMed

    Jakobsen, Ask F

    2005-03-22

    We present a method for constant-pressure and constant-surface tension simulations in dissipative particle dynamics using a Langevin piston approach. We demonstrate that the corresponding equations of motion lead to the relevant ensembles and propose an appropriate scheme of integration. After having identified a suitable set of parameters for the approach, we demonstrate the feasibility of the approach by applying it to two different systems, a simple isotropic fluid and an anisotropic fluid lipid-bilayer membrane in water. Results are presented for, respectively, isothermal bulk compressibility, tracer diffusion coefficient, lipid head-group area, and isothermal area compressibility. We find that our Langevin piston approach leads to improvements over other approaches in terms of faster equilibration and shorter correlation times of various system variables.

  15. Variation of stability constants of thorium citrate complexes and of thorium hydrolysis constants with ionic strength

    SciTech Connect

    Choppin, G.R.; Erten, H.N.; Xia, Y.X.

    1995-09-01

    Citrate is among the organic anions that are expected to be present in the wastes planned for deposition in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant repository. In this study, a solvent extraction method has been used to measure the stability constants of Thorium(IV)[Th(IV)] with citrate anions in aqueous solutions with (a) NaClO{sub 4} and (b) NaCl as the background electrolytes. The ionic strengths were varied up to 5 m (NaCl) and 14 m (NaClO{sub 4}). The data from the NaClO{sub 4} solutions at varying pH values were used to calculate the hydrolysis constants for formation of Th(OH){sup 3+} at the different ionic strengths.

  16. Modulation of electromagnetic waves in material with high dielectric constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxena, Shivani; Dixit, Sanjay; Srivastava, Sanjay

    2015-07-01

    The main objective of the paper is to discuss the amplitude modulation and demodulation of the electromagnetic wave in the material with high dielectric constant. The high dielectric constant in PZT materials is developed by the substitution of suitable doping element either at A+ sites or B sites in ABO3 crystal structure. The high dielectric constant of the material is due to the presence of strain in the existing lattice, known as strain dependent dielectric constant (SDDC).

  17. The fine-structure constant before quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kragh, Helge

    2003-03-01

    This paper focuses on the early history of the fine-structure constant, largely the period until 1925. Contrary to what is generally assumed, speculations concerning the interdependence of the elementary electric charge and Planck's constant predated Arnold Sommerfeld's 1916 discussion of the dimensionless constant. This paper pays particular attention to a little known work from 1914 in which G N Lewis and E Q Adams derived what is effectively a numerical expression for the fine-structure constant.

  18. The Not so Constant Gravitational "Constant" G as a Function of Quantum Vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxmilian Caligiuri, Luigi

    Gravitation is still the less understood among the fundamental forces of Nature. The ultimate physical origin of its ruling constant G could give key insights in this understanding. According to the Einstein's Theory of General Relativity, a massive body determines a gravitational potential that alters the speed of light, the clock's rate and the particle size as a function of the distance from its own center. On the other hand, it has been shown that the presence of mass determines a modification of Zero-Point Field (ZPF) energy density within its volume and in the space surrounding it. All these considerations strongly suggest that also the constant G could be expressed as a function of quantum vacuum energy density somehow depending on the distance from the mass whose presence modifies the ZPF energy structure. In this paper, starting from a constitutive medium-based picture of space, it has been formulated a model of gravitational constant G as a function of Planck's time and Quantum Vacuum energy density in turn depending on the radial distance from center of the mass originating the gravitational field, supposed as spherically symmetric. According to this model, in which gravity arises from the unbalanced physical vacuum pressure, gravitational "constant" G is not truly unchanging but slightly varying as a function of the distance from the mass source of gravitational potential itself. An approximate analytical form of such dependence has been discussed. The proposed model, apart from potentially having deep theoretical consequences on the commonly accepted picture of physical reality (from cosmology to matter stability), could also give the theoretical basis for unthinkable applications related, for example, to the field of gravity control and space propulsion.

  19. A Potential Link Between the Cosmological Constant and the Fine-structure Constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goradia, Shantilal

    2008-04-01

    The age of the universe, about 10^60 Planck times, makes the spherical radius (R) of its space 10^60 Planck lengths, as the light moves one Planck length per one Planck time. The fine-structure constant (α) closely equals the natural logarithm of the square root of the reciprocal of the cosmological constant (λ), making α ln (1/λ), where λ = 1/ R^2 as originally introduced by Einstein in equation number (14) in his 1917 paper: Cosmological Considerations on the General Theory of Relativity. This confirms the time-dependent variation of fine-structure constant in [1], but does not address the issue of dark energy. While [1] invokes negative entropy (-Q/T), so it also invokes dark energy simply. The problem still remains that no theory, as yet, combines the probabilistic aspect of quantum mechanics with gravity. In the meanwhile, we can link [1] with the quantum information theory as information links to entropy. [1] Goradia S. Preprint at (http://www.arxiv.org/physics/0210040 v3 (Jan 2007).

  20. Determination of the lumped constant and the kinetic constants for deoxyglucose and fluorodeoxyglucose in man

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, J.H.; Reivich, M.; Alavi, A.; Wolf, A.; Fowler, J.; Russell, J.; Arnett, C.; MacGregor, R.R.; Shiue, C.Y.; Atkins, H.

    1985-01-01

    If both the time course of the arterial plasma radionuclide concentration and the brain tissue radionuclide concentrations are known, it is possible to calculate the kinetic constants (k/sub 1/*, k/sub 2/*, k/sub 3/*, k/sub 4/*) of the glucose analogue. In a series of male subjects, arterial blood samples were obtained at frequent intervals immediately following the bolus administration of /sup 18/F-FDG and then at less frequent intervals for up to 5 hours after the radionuclide administration. The tissue time course was obtained by making positron emission tomographic scans every three minutes for 30 minutes and then at less frequent intervals for 5 hours. These images were used to construct the time course of /sup 18/F activity in gray and white matter structures. Using these values for the lumped constants and the kinetic constants, the values obtained for the global metabolic rate for glucose in two series of young male subjects were 4.99 +- 0.23 and 5.55 +- 0.37 mg/100 g/min when /sup 11/C-DG and /sup 18/F-FDG were used as tracers respectively.

  1. Beauty vector meson decay constants from QCD sum rules

    SciTech Connect

    Lucha, Wolfgang; Melikhov, Dmitri; Simula, Silvano

    2016-01-22

    We present the outcomes of a very recent investigation of the decay constants of nonstrange and strange heavy-light beauty vector mesons, with special emphasis on the ratio of any such decay constant to the decay constant of the corresponding pseudoscalar meson, by means of Borel-transformed QCD sum rules. Our results suggest that both these ratios are below unity.

  2. Reliability concerns with logical constants in Xilinx FPGA designs

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, Heather M; Graham, Paul; Morgan, Keith; Ostler, Patrick; Allen, Greg; Swift, Gary; Tseng, Chen W

    2009-01-01

    In Xilinx Field Programmable Gate Arrays logical constants, which ground unused inputs and provide constants for designs, are implemented in SEU-susceptible logic. In the past, these logical constants have been shown to cause the user circuit to output bad data and were not resetable through off-line rcconfiguration. In the more recent devices, logical constants are less problematic, though mitigation should still be considered for high reliability applications. In conclusion, we have presented a number of reliability concerns with logical constants in the Xilinx Virtex family. There are two main categories of logical constants: implicit and explicit logical constants. In all of the Virtex devices, the implicit logical constants are implemented using half latches, which in the most recent devices are several orders of magnitudes smaller than configuration bit cells. Explicit logical constants are implemented exclusively using constant LUTs in the Virtex-I and Virtex-II, and use a combination of constant LUTs and architectural posts to the ground plane in the Virtex-4. We have also presented mitigation methods and options for these devices. While SEUs in implicit and some types of explicit logical constants can cause data corrupt, the chance of failure from these components is now much smaller than it was in the Virtex-I device. Therefore, for many cases, mitigation might not be necessary, except under extremely high reliability situations.

  3. 18 CFR 806.12 - Constant-rate aquifer testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Constant-rate aquifer... COMMISSION REVIEW AND APPROVAL OF PROJECTS Application Procedure § 806.12 Constant-rate aquifer testing. (a... withdraw or increase a withdrawal of groundwater shall perform a constant-rate aquifer test in...

  4. Beauty vector meson decay constants from QCD sum rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucha, Wolfgang; Melikhov, Dmitri; Simula, Silvano

    2016-01-01

    We present the outcomes of a very recent investigation of the decay constants of nonstrange and strange heavy-light beauty vector mesons, with special emphasis on the ratio of any such decay constant to the decay constant of the corresponding pseudoscalar meson, by means of Borel-transformed QCD sum rules. Our results suggest that both these ratios are below unity.

  5. Systematic harmonic power laws inter-relating multiple fundamental constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakeres, Donald; Buckhanan, Wayne; Andrianarijaona, Vola

    2017-01-01

    Power laws and harmonic systems are ubiquitous in physics. We hypothesize that 2, π, the electron, Bohr radius, Rydberg constant, neutron, fine structure constant, Higgs boson, top quark, kaons, pions, muon, Tau, W, and Z when scaled in a common single unit are all inter-related by systematic harmonic powers laws. This implies that if the power law is known it is possible to derive a fundamental constant's scale in the absence of any direct experimental data of that constant. This is true for the case of the hydrogen constants. We created a power law search engine computer program that randomly generated possible positive or negative powers searching when the product of logical groups of constants equals 1, confirming they are physically valid. For 2, π, and the hydrogen constants the search engine found Planck's constant, Coulomb's energy law, and the kinetic energy law. The product of ratios defined by two constants each was the standard general format. The search engine found systematic resonant power laws based on partial harmonic fraction powers of the neutron for all of the constants with products near 1, within their known experimental precision, when utilized with appropriate hydrogen constants. We conclude that multiple fundamental constants are inter-related within a harmonic power law system.

  6. Constant current load matches impedances of electronic components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, R. M.

    1970-01-01

    Constant current load with negative resistance characteristics actively compensates for impedance variations in circuit components. Through a current-voltage balancing operation the internal impedance of the diodes is maintained at a constant value. This constant current load circuit can be used in simple telemetry systems.

  7. Kinetic performance limits of constant pressure versus constant flow rate gradient elution separations. Part II: experimental.

    PubMed

    Verstraeten, M; Broeckhoven, K; Dittmann, M; Choikhet, K; Witt, K; Desmet, G

    2011-02-25

    We report on a first series of experiments comparing the selectivity and the kinetic performance of constant flow rate and constant pressure mode gradient elution separations. Both water-methanol and water-acetonitrile mobile phase mixtures have been considered, as well as different samples and gradient programs. Instrument pressures up to 1200 bar have been used. Neglecting some small possible deviations caused by viscous heating effects, the experiments could confirm the theoretical expectation that both operation modes should lead to identical separation selectivities provided the same mobile phase gradient program is run in reduced volumetric coordinates. Also in agreement with the theoretical expectations, the cP-mode led to a gain in analysis time amounting up to some 17% for linear gradients running from 5 to 95% of organic modifier at ultra-high pressures. Gains of over 25% were obtained for segmented gradients, at least when the flat portions of the gradient program were situated in regions where the gradient composition was the least viscous. Detailed plate height measurements showed that the single difference between the constant flow rate and the constant pressure mode is a (small) difference in efficiency caused by the difference in average flow rate, in turn leading to a different intrinsic band broadening. Separating a phenone sample with a 20-95% water-acetonitrile gradient, the cP-mode leads to gradient plate heights that are some 20-40% smaller than in the cF-mode in the B-term dominated regime, while they are some 5-10% larger in the C-term dominated regime. Considering a separation with sub 2-μm particles on a 350 mm long coupled column, switching to the constant pressure mode allowed to finish the run in 29 instead of in 35 min, while also a larger peak capacity is obtained (going from 334 in the cF-mode to 339 in the cP-mode) and the mutual selectivity between the different peaks is fully retained. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  8. Does the Newtonian Gravity "Constant" G Vary?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noerdlinger, Peter D.

    2015-08-01

    A series of measurements of Newton's gravity constant, G, dating back as far as 1893, yielded widely varying values, the variation greatly exceeding the stated error estimates (Gillies, 1997; Quinn, 2000, Mohr et al 2008). The value of G is usually said to be unrelated to other physics, but we point out that the 8B Solar Neutrino Rate ought to be very sensitive. Improved pulsar timing could also help settle the issue as to whether G really varies. We claim that the variation in measured values over time (1893-2014 C.E.) is a more serious problem than the failure of the error bars to overlap; it appears that challenging or adjusting the error bars hardly masks the underlying disagreement in central values. We have assessed whether variations in the gravitational potential due to (for example) local dark matter (DM) could explain the variations. We find that the required potential fluctuations could transiently accelerate the Solar System and nearby stars to speeds in excess of the Galactic escape speed. Previous theories for the variation in G generally deal with supposed secular variation on a cosmological timescale, or very rapid oscillations whose envelope changes on that scale (Steinhardt and Will 1995). Therefore, these analyses fail to support variations on the timescale of years or spatial scales of order parsecs, which would be required by the data for G. We note that true variations in G would be associated with variations in clock rates (Derevianko and Pospelov 2014; Loeb and Maoz 2015), which could mask changes in orbital dynamics. Geringer-Sameth et al (2014) studied γ-ray emission from the nearby Reticulum dwarf galaxy, which is expected to be free of "ordinary" (stellar, black hole) γ-ray sources and found evidence for DM decay. Bernabei et al (2003) also found evidence for DM penetrating deep underground at Gran Sasso. If, indeed, variations in G can be tied to variations in gravitational potential, we have a new tool to assess the DM density.

  9. Planck’s constant as a natural unit of measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quincey, Paul

    2013-09-01

    The proposed revision of SI units would embed Planck’s constant into the definition of the kilogram, as a fixed constant of nature. Traditionally, Planck’s constant is not readily interpreted as the size of something physical, and it is generally only encountered by students in the mathematics of quantum physics. Richard Feynman’s path integral formulation of quantum mechanics allows a neat visualization of the constant as the circumference of a surveyor’s wheel for measuring action along each path, making Planck’s constant a natural yardstick, almost literally. This approach is shown to have other benefits in the presentation of other basic quantum phenomena.

  10. Calculation of kinetic rate constants from thermodynamic data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marek, C. John

    1995-01-01

    A new scheme for relating the absolute value for the kinetic rate constant k to the thermodynamic constant Kp is developed for gases. In this report the forward and reverse rate constants are individually related to the thermodynamic data. The kinetic rate constants computed from thermodynamics compare well with the current kinetic rate constants. This method is self consistent and does not have extensive rules. It is first demonstrated and calibrated by computing the HBr reaction from H2 and Br2. This method then is used on other reactions.

  11. The constant displacement scheme for tracking particles in heterogeneous aquifers

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, X.H.; Gomez-Hernandez, J.J.

    1996-01-01

    Simulation of mass transport by particle tracking or random walk in highly heterogeneous media may be inefficient from a computational point of view if the traditional constant time step scheme is used. A new scheme which adjusts automatically the time step for each particle according to the local pore velocity, so that each particle always travels a constant distance, is shown to be computationally faster for the same degree of accuracy than the constant time step method. Using the constant displacement scheme, transport calculations in a 2-D aquifer model, with nature log-transmissivity variance of 4, can be 8.6 times faster than using the constant time step scheme.

  12. Quantum electrodynamics, high-resolution spectroscopy and fundamental constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karshenboim, Savely G.; Ivanov, Vladimir G.

    2017-01-01

    Recent progress in high-resolution spectroscopy has delivered us a variety of accurate optical results, which can be used for the determination of the atomic fundamental constants and for constraining their possible time variation. We present a brief overview of the results discussing in particular, the determination of the Rydberg constant, the relative atomic weight of the electron and proton, their mass ratio and the fine structure constant. Many individual results on those constants are obtained with use of quantum electrodynamics, and we discuss which sectors of QED are involved. We derive constraints on a possible time variation of the fine structure constants and me/mp.

  13. Correlation analysis of solar constant, solar activity and cosmic ray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utomo, Y. S.

    2017-04-01

    Actually, solar constant is not constant but fluctuated by ±1.5% of their average value. Solar constant indicates that the value is not constant but varies with time. Such variation is correlated with solar activity and cosmic ray. Correlation analysis shows a strong correlation between solar activity and cosmic ray and between solar activity and solar constant. Solar activity indicates by sunspot number. Correlations between solar constant variations and sunspot number variations were found to be higher than ones between variations in cosmic ray and solar constant. It was also found a positive correlation between solar constant and sunspot number, with correlation coefficient about +0.77/month and +0.95/year. In other hand, negative correlation between solar constant and cosmic ray flux i.e. -0.50/month and -0.62/year were found for monthly and yearly data respectively. A similar result was also found for the relationship between solar activity and cosmic ray flux with a negative correlation, i.e. -0.61/month and -0.69/year. When solar activities decrease, the clouds cover rate increase due to secondary ions produced by cosmic rays. The increase in the cloud cover rate causes the decrease in solar constant value and solar radiation on the earth’s surface. Solar constant plays an important role in the planning and technical analysis of equipment utilizing solar energy.

  14. FOREWORD: International determination of the Avogadro constant International determination of the Avogadro constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massa, Enrico; Nicolaus, Arnold

    2011-04-01

    This issue of Metrologia collects papers about the results of an international research project aimed at the determination of the Avogadro constant, NA, by counting the atoms in a silicon crystal highly enriched with the isotope 28Si. Fifty years ago, Egidi [1] thought about realizing an atomic mass standard. In 1965, Bonse and Hart [2] operated the first x-ray interferometer, thus paving the way to the achievement of Egidi's dream, and soon Deslattes et al [3] completed the first counting of the atoms in a natural silicon crystal. The present project, outlined by Zosi [4] in 1983, began in 2004 by combining the experiences and capabilities of the BIPM, INRIM, IRMM, NIST, NPL, NMIA, NMIJ and PTB. The start signal, ratified by a memorandum of understanding, was a contract for the production of a silicon crystal highly enriched with 28Si. The enrichment process was undertaken by the Central Design Bureau of Machine Building in St Petersburg. Subsequently, a polycrystal was grown in the Institute of Chemistry of High-Purity Substances of the Russian Academy of Sciences in Nizhny Novgorod and a 28Si boule was grown and purified by the Leibniz-Institut für Kristallzüchtung in Berlin. Isotope enrichment made it possible to apply isotope dilution mass spectroscopy, to determine the Avogadro constant with unprecedented accuracy, and to fulfil Egidi's dream. To convey Egidi's 'fantasy' into practice, two 28Si kilogram prototypes shaped as quasi-perfect spheres were manufactured by the Australian Centre for Precision Optics; their isotopic composition, molar mass, mass, volume, density and lattice parameter were accurately determined and their surfaces were chemically and physically characterized at the atomic scale. The paper by Andreas et al reviews the work carried out; it collates all the findings and illustrates how Avogadro's constant was obtained. Impurity concentration and gradients in the enriched crystal were measured by infrared spectroscopy and taken into

  15. The Hubble constant and dark energy from cosmological distance measures

    SciTech Connect

    Ichikawa, Kazuhide; Takahashi, Tomo E-mail: tomot@cc.saga-u.ac.jp

    2008-04-15

    We study how the determination of the Hubble constant from cosmological distance measures is affected by models of dark energy and vice versa. For this purpose, constraints on the Hubble constant and dark energy are investigated using the cosmological observations of cosmic microwave background, baryon acoustic oscillations and type Ia supernovae. When one investigates dark energy, the Hubble constant is often a nuisance parameter; thus it is usually marginalized over. On the other hand, when one focuses on the Hubble constant, simple dark energy models such as a cosmological constant and a constant equation of state are usually assumed. Since we do not know the nature of dark energy yet, it is interesting to investigate the Hubble constant assuming some types of dark energy and see to what extent the constraint on the Hubble constant is affected by the assumption concerning dark energy. We show that the constraint on the Hubble constant is not affected much by the assumption for dark energy. We furthermore show that this holds true even if we remove the assumption that the universe is flat. We also discuss how the prior on the Hubble constant affects the constraints on dark energy and/or the curvature of the universe.

  16. Energy consumption analysis of constant voltage and constant current operations in capacitive deionization

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, Yatian; Campbell, Patrick G.; Gu, Lei; Knipe, Jennifer M.; Dzenitis, Ella; Santiago, Juan G.; Stadermann, Michael

    2016-09-21

    Here we report our studies to compare energy consumption of a CDI cell in constant voltage (CV) and constant current (CC) operations, with a focus on understanding the underlying physics of consumption patterns. The comparison is conducted under conditions that the CV and CC operations result in the same amounts of input charge and within identical charging phase durations. We present two electrical circuit models to simulate energy consumption in charging phase: one is a simple RC circuit model, and the other a transmission line circuit model. We built and tested a CDI cell to validate the transmission line model, and performed a series of experiments to compare CV versus CC operation under the condition of equal applied charge and charging duration. The experiments show that CC mode consumes energy at 33.8 kJ per mole of ions removed, which is only 28% of CV mode energy consumption (120.6 kJ/mol), but achieves similar level of salt removals. Lastly, together, the models and experiment support our major conclusion that CC is more energy efficient than CV for equal charge and charging duration. The models also suggest that the lower energy consumption of CC in charging is due to its lower resistive dissipation.

  17. Energy consumption analysis of constant voltage and constant current operations in capacitive deionization

    DOE PAGES

    Qu, Yatian; Campbell, Patrick G.; Gu, Lei; ...

    2016-09-21

    Here we report our studies to compare energy consumption of a CDI cell in constant voltage (CV) and constant current (CC) operations, with a focus on understanding the underlying physics of consumption patterns. The comparison is conducted under conditions that the CV and CC operations result in the same amounts of input charge and within identical charging phase durations. We present two electrical circuit models to simulate energy consumption in charging phase: one is a simple RC circuit model, and the other a transmission line circuit model. We built and tested a CDI cell to validate the transmission line model,more » and performed a series of experiments to compare CV versus CC operation under the condition of equal applied charge and charging duration. The experiments show that CC mode consumes energy at 33.8 kJ per mole of ions removed, which is only 28% of CV mode energy consumption (120.6 kJ/mol), but achieves similar level of salt removals. Lastly, together, the models and experiment support our major conclusion that CC is more energy efficient than CV for equal charge and charging duration. The models also suggest that the lower energy consumption of CC in charging is due to its lower resistive dissipation.« less

  18. Determination of acidity constants of curcumin in aqueous solution and apparent rate constant of its decomposition.

    PubMed

    Bernabé-Pineda, Margarita; Ramírez-Silva, María Teresa; Romero-Romo, Mario; González-Vergara, Enrique; Rojas-Hernández, Alberto

    2004-04-01

    The stability of curcumin (H3Cur) in aqueous media is improved when the systems in which it is present are at high pH values (higher than 11.7), fitting a model describable by a pseudo-zero order with a rate constant k' for the disappearance of the Cur3- species of 1.39 (10(-9)) Mmin(-1). There were three acidity constants measured for the curcumin as follows: pKA3 = 10.51 +/- 0.01 corresponding to the equilibrium HCur2- = Cur3- + H+, a pKA2 = 9.88 +/- 0.02 corresponding to the equilibrium H2Cur- = HCur-(2) + H+. These pKA values were attributed to the hydrogen of the phenol part of the curcumin, while the pKA1 = 8.38 +/- 0.04 corresponds to the equilibrium H3Cur = H2Cur- + H+ and is attributed the acetylacetone type group. Formation of quinoid structures play an important role in the tautomeric forms of the curcumin in aqueous media, which makes the experimental values differ from the theoretically calculated ones, depending on the conditions adopted in the study.

  19. Energy consumption analysis of constant voltage and constant current operations in capacitive deionization

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, Yatian; Campbell, Patrick G.; Gu, Lei; Knipe, Jennifer M.; Dzenitis, Ella; Santiago, Juan G.; Stadermann, Michael

    2016-09-21

    Here we report our studies to compare energy consumption of a CDI cell in constant voltage (CV) and constant current (CC) operations, with a focus on understanding the underlying physics of consumption patterns. The comparison is conducted under conditions that the CV and CC operations result in the same amounts of input charge and within identical charging phase durations. We present two electrical circuit models to simulate energy consumption in charging phase: one is a simple RC circuit model, and the other a transmission line circuit model. We built and tested a CDI cell to validate the transmission line model, and performed a series of experiments to compare CV versus CC operation under the condition of equal applied charge and charging duration. The experiments show that CC mode consumes energy at 33.8 kJ per mole of ions removed, which is only 28% of CV mode energy consumption (120.6 kJ/mol), but achieves similar level of salt removals. Lastly, together, the models and experiment support our major conclusion that CC is more energy efficient than CV for equal charge and charging duration. The models also suggest that the lower energy consumption of CC in charging is due to its lower resistive dissipation.

  20. Strong resetting of the mammalian clock by constant light followed by constant darkness

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Rongmin; Seo, Dong-oh; Bell, Elijah; von Gall, Charlotte; Lee, Choogon

    2008-01-01

    The mammalian molecular circadian clock in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) regulates locomotor activity rhythms as well as clocks in peripheral tissues (Reppert and Weaver, 2002; Ko and Takahashi, 2006). Constant light (LL) can induce behavioral and physiological arrhythmicity, by desynchronizing clock cells in the SCN (Ohta et al., 2005). We examined how the disordered clock cells resynchronize by probing the molecular clock and measuring behavior in mice transferred from LL to constant darkness (DD). The circadian locomotor activity rhythms disrupted in LL become robustly rhythmic again from the beginning of DD, and the starting phase of the rhythm in DD is specific, not random, suggesting that the desynchronized clock cells are quickly reset in an unconventional manner by the L:D transition. By measuring mPERIOD protein rhythms, we showed that the SCN and peripheral tissue clocks quickly become rhythmic again in phase with the behavioral rhythms. We propose that this resetting mechanism may be different from conventional phase shifting, which involves light-induction of Period genes (Albrecht et al., 1997; Shearman et al., 1997; Shigeyoshi et al., 1997). Using our functional insights, we could shift the circadian phase of locomotor activity rhythms by 12 hours using a 15-hour LL treatment: essentially producing phase reversal by a single light pulse, a feat that has not been reported previously in wild-type mice and that has potential clinical utility. PMID:19005049

  1. Final determination of the Boltzmann constant by dielectric-constant gas thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaiser, Christof; Fellmuth, Bernd; Haft, Norbert; Kuhn, Axel; Thiele-Krivoi, Bettina; Zandt, Thorsten; Fischer, Joachim; Jusko, Otto; Sabuga, Wladimir

    2017-06-01

    Gaiser et al published in 2013 (Metrologia 50 L7-11) a second, improved value of the Boltzmann constant k determined by dielectric-constant gas thermometry at the triple point of water (k  =  1.380 6509  ×  10-23 J K-1, relative standard uncertainty 4.3 parts per million (4.3 ppm)). Subsequently, the uncertainty was able to be reduced to 4.0 ppm by reanalysing the pressure measurement. Since 2013, further progress regarding this primary-thermometry method has been achieved in terms of the design and the assembly of the measuring capacitors, the determination of their effective compressibility, the sensitivity of the capacitance bridge, and the scattering and the evaluation of the data. Based on a huge amount of data, two new k values have been obtained by applying two different capacitors. The combination of these two values with the 2013 result, fully taking into account the correlations, has yielded a final result of k  =  1.380 6482  ×  10-23 J K-1 with a relative standard uncertainty of 1.9 ppm. This value is about 0.2 ppm smaller than the CODATA 2014 one, which has a relative standard uncertainty of 0.57 ppm.

  2. Physical cosmological constant in asymptotically background-free quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamada, Ken-ji; Matsuda, Mikoto

    2017-07-01

    We study the effective potential in renormalizable quantum gravity with a single dimensionless conformal coupling without a Landau pole. In order to describe a background-free dynamics at the Planck scale and beyond, the conformal-factor field is quantized exactly in a nonperturbative manner. Since this field does not receive renormalization, the field-independent constant in the effective potential becomes itself invariant under the renormalization group flow. That is to say, it gives the physical cosmological constant. We explicitly calculate the physical cosmological constant at the one-loop level in the Landau gauge. We find that it is given by a function of renormalized quantities of the cosmological constant, the Planck mass, and the coupling constant, and it should be the observed value. It will give a new perspective on the cosmological constant problem free from an ultraviolet cutoff.

  3. Estimation of rate constants of PCB dechlorination reactions using an anaerobic dehalogenation model.

    PubMed

    Karakas, Filiz; Imamoglu, Ipek

    2017-02-15

    This study aims to estimate anaerobic dechlorination rate constants (km) of reactions of individual PCB congeners using data from four laboratory microcosms set up using sediment from Baltimore Harbor. Pathway km values are estimated by modifying a previously developed model as Anaerobic Dehalogenation Model (ADM) which can be applied to any halogenated hydrophobic organic (HOC). Improvements such as handling multiple dechlorination activities (DAs) and co-elution of congeners, incorporating constraints, using new goodness of fit evaluation led to an increase in accuracy, speed and flexibility of ADM. DAs published in the literature in terms of chlorine substitutions as well as specific microorganisms and their combinations are used for identification of pathways. The best fit explaining the congener pattern changes was found for pathways of Phylotype DEH10, which has the ability to remove doubly flanked chlorines in meta and para positions, para flanked chlorines in meta position. The range of estimated km values is between 0.0001-0.133d(-1), the median of which is found to be comparable to the few available published biologically confirmed rate constants. Compound specific modelling studies such as that performed by ADM can enable monitoring and prediction of concentration changes as well as toxicity during bioremediation.

  4. Critical damping constant of microwave-assisted magnetization switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaji, Toshiki; Arai, Hiroko; Matsumoto, Rie; Imamura, Hiroshi

    2016-02-01

    Microwave-assisted switching of magnetization in a perpendicularly magnetized disk was theoretically studied and special attention was paid to the effect of a damping constant on the switching field. We found that there exists a critical damping constant above which the switching field suddenly increases. We derived an analytical expression of the critical damping constant and showed that it decreases with increasing frequency of the microwave field, while it increases with increasing amplitude of the microwave field and the effective anisotropy field.

  5. Laboratory measurement of the complex dielectric constant of soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiebe, M. L.

    1971-01-01

    The dielectric constant of a material is an extremely important parameter when considering passive radiometric remote sensing applications. This is because the emitted energy measured by a microwave radiometer is dependent on the dielectric constant of the surface being scanned. Two techniques of measuring dielectric constants are described. The first method involves a dielectric located in air. The second method uses basically the same theoretical approach, but the dielectric under consideration is located inside a section of waveguide.

  6. Numerical values of fundamental constants and the anthropocentric principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikov, I.; Polnarev, A.; Rozental, I.

    The numerical values of fundamental physical constants are analyzed, and it is pointed out that the existence of complex structure and life would be impossible in universe models with constants significantly different in value from the observed. The problem of a search for universe models with the values of the physical constants very much different from the values characteristic of our universe is formulated and an example of such a search is given.

  7. The 400-Hertz constant-speed electrical generation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclung, R.

    1982-01-01

    Materials illustrating a presentation on 400 Hz constant speed generation systems are presented. The system features are outlined, components and functioning described, and display graphics illustrated.

  8. A simple cosmology with a varying fine structure constant.

    PubMed

    Sandvik, Håvard Bunes; Barrow, John D; Magueijo, João

    2002-01-21

    We investigate the cosmological consequences of a theory in which the electric charge e can vary. In this theory the fine structure "constant," alpha, remains almost constant in the radiation era, undergoes a small increase in the matter era, but approaches a constant value when the universe starts accelerating because of a positive cosmological constant. This model satisfies geonuclear, nucleosynthesis, and cosmic microwave background constraints on time variation in alpha, while fitting the observed accelerating Universe and evidence for small alpha variations in quasar spectra. It also places specific restrictions on the nature of the dark matter. Further tests, involving stellar spectra and Eötvös experiments, are proposed.

  9. [Dichotomizing method applied to calculating equilibrium constant of dimerization system].

    PubMed

    Cheng, Guo-zhong; Ye, Zhi-xiang

    2002-06-01

    The arbitrary trivariate algebraic equations are formed based on the combination principle. The univariata algebraic equation of equilibrium constant kappa for dimerization system is obtained through a series of algebraic transformation, and it depends on the properties of monotonic functions whether the equation is solvable or not. If the equation is solvable, equilibrium constant of dimerization system is obtained by dichotomy and its final equilibrium constant of dimerization system is determined according to the principle of error of fitting. The equilibrium constants of trisulfophthalocyanine and biosulfophthalocyanine obtained with this method are 47,973.4 and 30,271.8 respectively. The results are much better than those reported previously.

  10. Negative Dielectric Constant Material Based on Ion Conducting Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Keith L. (Inventor); Kang, Jin Ho (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor); Lillehei, Peter T. (Inventor); Harrison, Joycelyn S. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Metamaterials or artificial negative index materials (NIMs) have generated great attention due to their unique and exotic electromagnetic properties. One exemplary negative dielectric constant material, which is an essential key for creating the NIMs, was developed by doping ions into a polymer, a protonated poly(benzimidazole) (PBI). The doped PBI showed a negative dielectric constant at megahertz (MHz) frequencies due to its reduced plasma frequency and an induction effect. The magnitude of the negative dielectric constant and the resonance frequency were tunable by doping concentration. The highly doped PBI showed larger absolute magnitude of negative dielectric constant at just above its resonance frequency than the less doped PBI.

  11. Measurements of Large Dielectric Constants in Phthalocyanine Tetramers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamam, Khalil; Burns, C. A.; Mezei, G.; Al-Amer, M.

    2011-04-01

    Understanding the dielectric constant of organic materials is important for applications including organic transistors and photovoltaics. We have measured the dielectric constant and dissipation factor of oligomer metal-phthalocyanine (MePcs) pellets. Zn and Cu based tetramers (MeC30H10N8O8)4 are water soluble materials with high dielectric constant. We investigated these materials in the frequency range 20--10^6 Hz and at temperatures up to 110 C. Both the dielectric constant and dissipation factor were found to increase strongly with temperature and to decrease with frequency.

  12. Static, cylindrically symmetric strings in general relativity with cosmological constant

    SciTech Connect

    Linet, B.

    1986-07-01

    The static, cylindrically symmetric solutions to Einstein's equations with a cosmological term describing cosmic strings are determined. The discussion depends on the sign of the cosmological constant.

  13. Negative Dielectric Constant Material Based on Ion Conducting Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Keith L. (Inventor); Kang, Jin Ho (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor); Lillehei, Peter T. (Inventor); Harrison, Joycelyn S. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Metamaterials or artificial negative index materials (NIMs) have generated great attention due to their unique and exotic electromagnetic properties. One exemplary negative dielectric constant material, which is an essential key for creating the NIMs, was developed by doping ions into a polymer, a protonated poly (benzimidazole) (PBI). The doped PBI showed a negative dielectric constant at megahertz (MHz) frequencies due to its reduced plasma frequency and an induction effect. The magnitude of the negative dielectric constant and the resonance frequency were tunable by doping concentration. The highly doped PBI showed larger absolute magnitude of negative dielectric constant at just above its resonance frequency than the less doped PBI.

  14. Scalar-tensor theory of gravitation with negative coupling constant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalley, L. L.; Eby, P. B.

    1976-01-01

    The possibility of a Brans-Dicke scalar-tensor gravitation theory with a negative coupling constant is considered. The admissibility of a negative-coupling theory is investigated, and a simplified cosmological solution is obtained which allows a negative derivative of the gravitation constant. It is concluded that a Brans-Dicke theory with a negative coupling constant can be a viable alternative to general relativity and that a large negative value for the coupling constant seems to bring the original scalar-tensor theory into close agreement with perihelion-precession results in view of recent observations of small solar oblateness.

  15. Scalar-tensor theory of gravitation with negative coupling constant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalley, L. L.; Eby, P. B.

    1976-01-01

    The possibility of a Brans-Dicke scalar-tensor gravitation theory with a negative coupling constant is considered. The admissibility of a negative-coupling theory is investigated, and a simplified cosmological solution is obtained which allows a negative derivative of the gravitation constant. It is concluded that a Brans-Dicke theory with a negative coupling constant can be a viable alternative to general relativity and that a large negative value for the coupling constant seems to bring the original scalar-tensor theory into close agreement with perihelion-precession results in view of recent observations of small solar oblateness.

  16. Are the Truly Constant Constants of Nature? How is the Real Material Space and its Structure?

    SciTech Connect

    Luz Montero Garcia, Jose de la; Novoa Blanco, Jesus Francisco

    2007-04-28

    In a concise and simplified way, some matters of authors' theories -Unified Theory of the Physical and Mathematical Universal Constants and Quantum Cellular Structural Geometry-, an only one theoretical main body MN2. This investigation has as objective the search of the last cells that base the existence, unicity and harmony of matter, as well as its structural-formal and dynamic-functional diversity. The quantitative hypothesis is demonstrated that 'World is one, is one; but it is one Arithmetic-Geometric-Topological-Dimensional and Structural-Cellular-Dynamic one, simultaneously'. In the Frontiers of Fundamental Physics such last cells are the cells of own Real Material Space of whose whole accretion, interactive and staggered all the existing one at all the hierarchic levels arises, cells these below which make no sense to speak of structure and, therefore, of existence. The cells of the Real Material Space are its 'Atoms'. Law of Planetary Systems or '4th Kepler's Law'.

  17. Determination of the Boltzmann constant by dielectric-constant gas thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fellmuth, Bernd; Fischer, Joachim; Gaiser, Christof; Jusko, Otto; Priruenrom, Tasanee; Sabuga, Wladimir; Zandt, Thorsten

    2011-10-01

    Within an international project directed to the new definition of the base unit kelvin, the Boltzmann constant k has been determined by dielectric-constant gas thermometry at PTB. In the pressure range from about 1 MPa to 7 MPa, 11 helium isotherms have been measured at the triple point of water (TPW) by applying a new special experimental setup consisting of a large-volume thermostat, a vacuum-isolated measuring system, stainless-steel 10 pF cylindrical capacitors, an autotransformer ratio capacitance bridge, a high-purity gas-handling system including a mass spectrometer, and traceably calibrated special pressure balances with piston-cylinder assemblies having effective areas of 2 cm2. The value of k has been deduced from the linear, ideal-gas term of an appropriate virial expansion fitted to the combined isotherms. A detailed uncertainty budget has been established by performing Monte Carlo simulations. The main uncertainty components result from the measurement of pressure and capacitance as well as the influence of the effective compressibility of the measuring capacitor and impurities contained in the helium gas. The combination of the results obtained at the TPW (kTPW = 1.380 654 × 10-23 J K-1, relative standard uncertainty 9.2 parts per million) with data measured earlier at low temperatures (21 K to 27 K, kLT = 1.380 657 × 10-23 J K-1, 15.9 parts per million) has yielded a value of k = 1.380 655 × 10-23 J K-1 with uncertainty of 7.9 parts per million.

  18. Acute effects of constant torque and constant angle stretching on the muscle and tendon tissue properties.

    PubMed

    Konrad, Andreas; Budini, Francesco; Tilp, Markus

    2017-08-01

    Static stretching induces acute structural changes of the muscle-tendon unit (MTU) that are related to the intensity or duration of stretching. It has been reported that stretching with a constant torque (CT) leads to greater joint range of motion changes than stretching with a constant angle (CA). Whether or not this difference is due to different structural changes of the MTUs of the lower leg and ankle plantar flexors is not known. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to compare the acute effects of single CA and CT stretching on various muscle and tendon mechanical properties. Seventeen young, healthy volunteers were tested on two separate days using either CT or CA stretching (4 × 30 s each). Before and after stretching, dorsiflexion range of motion (RoM), passive resistive torque (PRT), and maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) were measured with a dynamometer. Ultrasonography of the medial gastrocnemius (GM) muscle-tendon junction (MTJ) displacement allowed us to determine the length changes in the tendon and muscle, respectively, and hence to calculate their stiffness. Maximum dorsiflexion increased while PRT, muscle-tendon stiffness, and muscle stiffness decreased following both CA and CT stretching. There was a greater increase in RoM following CT stretching compared to CA stretching. Moreover, the decline in PRT was greater during CT stretching compared to CA stretching. As expected, several functional adaptations (RoM, PRT) were different between CT and CA stretching due to the higher intensity of CT stretching. However, no structural differences in the adaptations to the stretching modalities could be detected. We suggest that the different functional adaptations between CA and CT stretching are the consequence of different adaptations in the perception of stretch and pain.

  19. Multi-wavelength spectrophotometric determination of acidity constant of some newly synthesized Schiff bases and their QSPR study.

    PubMed

    Hemmateenejad, Bahram; Emami, Leila; Sharghi, Hashem

    2010-01-01

    The acidity constants of some newly synthesized Schiff base derivatives were determined by hard-model based multivariate data analysis of the spectrophotometric data in the course of pH-metric titration in 50% (v/v) methanol-water binary solvent. The employed data analysis method was also able to extract the pure spectra and pH-dependent concentration profiles of the acid-base species. The molecules that possess different substituents (both electron donating and withdrawing) on the ortho-, meta- and para-positions of one of the phenyl ring showed variable acidity constants ranging from 8.77 to 11.07 whereas the parent molecule had an acidity constant of 10.25. To investigate the quantitative effects of changing of substitution pattern on the acidity constant, a quantitative structure-property relation analysis was conducted using substituent constants and molecular descriptor. Some models with high statistical quality (measured by cross-validation Q(2)) were obtained. It was found that the acidity constant of the studied molecules in the methanol-water mixed solvent not only is affected by electronic features of the solutes but also by the lipophilic interaction between methanol part of solvent and the deprotonated solutes. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Note: Determination of torsional spring constant of atomic force microscopy cantilevers: combining normal spring constant and classical beam theory.

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Asencio, R; Thormann, E; Rutland, M W

    2013-09-01

    A technique has been developed for the calculation of torsional spring constants for AFM cantilevers based on the combination of the normal spring constant and plate/beam theory. It is easy to apply and allow the determination of torsional constants for stiff cantilevers where the thermal power spectrum is difficult to obtain due to the high resonance frequency and low signal/noise ratio. The applicability is shown to be general and this simple approach can thus be used to obtain torsional constants for any beam shaped cantilever.

  1. Comparisons of measured rate constants with spectroscopically determined electron-transfer parameters.

    PubMed

    Nelsen, Stephen F; Konradsson, Asgeir E; Weaver, Michael N; Stephenson, Rachel M; Lockard, Jenny V; Zink, Jeffrey I; Zhao, Yi

    2007-06-21

    This work involves comparison of rate constants measured for an intervalence (IV) compound with electron-transfer parameters derived from its optical absorption spectrum. The temperature-dependent rate constants for the radical cation having 3-tert-butyl-2,3-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-2-yl (hydrazine) charge-bearing units attached para to a tetramethylbenzene bridge (1+) were previously measured. In this study, resonance Raman is used to calculate the magnitudes of the distortions of normal modes of vibration caused by excitation into the intervalence absorption band. These data produce a vibrational reorganization energy lambdavsym of 9250 cm(-1), and averaged single-mode omegav for use in the Golden Rule equation of 697 cm(-1). Zhu-Nakamura theory has been used to calculate preexponential factors for analysis of the previously measured variable temperature optical spectra using quartic-enhanced intervalence bands to extract the total reorganization energy and the intramolecular electron-transfer rate constants for intramolecular electron transfer using electron spin resonance. In contrast to using the Golden Rule equation, separation of lambda into solvent and vibrational components is not significant for these data. The Zhu-Nakamura theory calculations produce ln(k/T) versus 1/T slopes that are consistent with the experimental data for electronic couplings that are somewhat larger than the values obtained from the optical spectra using Hush's method.

  2. Equilibrium constants and assay of benzodiazepines in acetic acid.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, J; Barrón, D

    1989-04-01

    The over-all dissociation constants, in anhydrous acetic acid, of a series of benzodiazepines have been determined. A method is described for evaluating the formation constants of the perchlorate salts. From these values simple potentiometric and visual titration methods for the assay of benzodiazepines in acetic acid are described.

  3. Verdet constant dispersion measurement using polarization-stepping techniques.

    PubMed

    Flores, Jorge L; Ferrari, José A

    2008-08-20

    We present a novel method for measuring the Verdet constant dispersion. The proposed method involves spectral polarimetric measurements using three (or more) polarization steps. The procedure has formal similarity with the phase-shifting interferometry (PSI). Thus the Verdet constant in the desired spectral range can be retrieved using well-known PSI algorithms. Validation experiments are presented.

  4. 18 CFR 806.12 - Constant-rate aquifer testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Constant-rate aquifer testing. 806.12 Section 806.12 Conservation of Power and Water Resources SUSQUEHANNA RIVER BASIN COMMISSION REVIEW AND APPROVAL OF PROJECTS Application Procedure § 806.12 Constant-rate aquifer testing. (a...

  5. 18 CFR 806.12 - Constant-rate aquifer testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Constant-rate aquifer testing. 806.12 Section 806.12 Conservation of Power and Water Resources SUSQUEHANNA RIVER BASIN COMMISSION REVIEW AND APPROVAL OF PROJECTS Application Procedure § 806.12 Constant-rate aquifer testing. (a...

  6. 18 CFR 806.12 - Constant-rate aquifer testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Constant-rate aquifer testing. 806.12 Section 806.12 Conservation of Power and Water Resources SUSQUEHANNA RIVER BASIN COMMISSION REVIEW AND APPROVAL OF PROJECTS Application Procedure § 806.12 Constant-rate aquifer testing. (a...

  7. Planck's constant determination from black-body radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dryzek, J.; Ruebenbauer, K.

    1992-03-01

    A method originally described by Crandall and Delord has been improved to measure the ratio of the Planck to the Boltzmann constant with low cost apparatus. Such a system can be easily implemented in high school or college laboratories. These improvements enable one to attain accuracies of 2% for Planck's constant.

  8. Thermal conductivity and dielectric constant of silicate materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, I.; Wechsler, A. E.

    1968-01-01

    Report on the thermal conductivity and dielectric constant of nonmetallic materials evaluates the mechanisms of heat transfer in evacuated silicate powders and establishes the complex dielectric constant of these materials. Experimental measurements and results are related to postulated lunar surface materials.

  9. An Introduction to Collision Theory Rate Constants via Distribution Functions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAlduff, E. J.

    1980-01-01

    Described is an introduction to the collision theory by arriving at the many degrees of freedom rote constant and showing that the (-Ea/RT) is a special case and corresponds to activation in 2 squared terms on the line of center rate constant, which is found through the use of distributed functions. (Author/DS)

  10. Fundamental Insight on Developing Low Dielectric Constant Polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, J. O.; SaintClair, A. K.

    1997-01-01

    Thermally stable, durable, insulative polyimides are in great demand for the fabrication of microelectronic devices. In this investigation dielectric and optical properties have been studied for several series of aromatic polyimides. The effect of polarizability, fluorine content, and free volume on dielectric constant was examined. In general, minimizing polarizability, maximizing free volume and fluorination all lowered dielectric constants in the polyimides studied.

  11. Essential nature of Newton's constant in unimodular gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedetti, Dario

    2016-05-01

    We point out that in unimodular gravity Newton's constant is an essential coupling, i.e. it is independent of field redefinitions. We illustrate the consequences of this fact by a calculation in a standard simple approximation, showing that in this case the renormalization group flow of Newton's constant is gauge and parametrization independent.

  12. Measuring Boltzmann's Constant with Carbon Dioxide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivanov, Dragia; Nikolov, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present two experiments to measure Boltzmann's constant--one of the fundamental constants of modern-day physics, which lies at the base of statistical mechanics and thermodynamics. The experiments use very basic theory, simple equipment and cheap and safe materials yet provide very precise results. They are very easy and…

  13. Using Constant Time Delay to Teach Braille Word Recognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hooper, Jonathan; Ivy, Sarah; Hatton, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Constant time delay has been identified as an evidence-based practice to teach print sight words and picture recognition (Browder, Ahlbrim-Delzell, Spooner, Mims, & Baker, 2009). For the study presented here, we tested the effectiveness of constant time delay to teach new braille words. Methods: A single-subject multiple baseline…

  14. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Coupling Constants and Electronic Structure in Molecules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Venanzi, Thomas J.

    1982-01-01

    Theory of nuclear magnetic resonance spin-spin coupling constants and nature of the three types of coupling mechanisms contributing to the overall spin-spin coupling constant are reviewed, including carbon-carbon coupling (neither containing a lone pair of electrons) and carbon-nitrogen coupling (one containing a lone pair of electrons).…

  15. Using Constant Time Delay to Teach Braille Word Recognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hooper, Jonathan; Ivy, Sarah; Hatton, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Constant time delay has been identified as an evidence-based practice to teach print sight words and picture recognition (Browder, Ahlbrim-Delzell, Spooner, Mims, & Baker, 2009). For the study presented here, we tested the effectiveness of constant time delay to teach new braille words. Methods: A single-subject multiple baseline…

  16. Symmetric and antisymmetric structure constants for SU(6)

    SciTech Connect

    Sarid, U.

    1985-08-01

    The 124 completely antisymmetric f/sub i/jk and 221 completely symmetric d/sub i/jk (nonzero) structure constants for a simple representation of SU(6) are tabulated. The basis matrices lambda/sub i/ used to generate the structure constants are also given.

  17. Constant-Operating-Resistance Hot-Wire Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stainback, P. C.

    1985-01-01

    Effects of lead-wire-resistance changes with temperature nullified. Constant-operating-resistance hot-wire probe uses two sets of leads. Exposed to identical conditions, comparison of resistance gives change in sensing element itself. Data taken in more convenient manner, with advantage of not having to constantly check for possible changes in lead resistance and consequently readjust potentiometer.

  18. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Coupling Constants and Electronic Structure in Molecules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Venanzi, Thomas J.

    1982-01-01

    Theory of nuclear magnetic resonance spin-spin coupling constants and nature of the three types of coupling mechanisms contributing to the overall spin-spin coupling constant are reviewed, including carbon-carbon coupling (neither containing a lone pair of electrons) and carbon-nitrogen coupling (one containing a lone pair of electrons).…

  19. A Simple Apparatus for Determining Ionization and Solubility Product Constants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerardi, Gary

    1977-01-01

    Describes a simple conductivity apparatus for the determination of ionization and solubility product constants of various substances. The uses of the apparatus in determining the ionization constant of a weak monoprotic acid and in measuring the rate of diffusion of ions through a membrane are also presented. (HM)

  20. Measuring Boltzmann's Constant with Carbon Dioxide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivanov, Dragia; Nikolov, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present two experiments to measure Boltzmann's constant--one of the fundamental constants of modern-day physics, which lies at the base of statistical mechanics and thermodynamics. The experiments use very basic theory, simple equipment and cheap and safe materials yet provide very precise results. They are very easy and…

  1. A stabilization algorithm for linear discrete constant systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, E. S.; Rublein, G. T.

    1976-01-01

    A procedure is derived for stabilizing linear constant discrete systems which is a discrete analog to the extended Bass algorithm for stabilizing linear constant continuous systems. The procedure offers a method for constructing a stabilizing feedback without the computational difficulty of raising the unstable open-loop response matrix to powers thus making the method attractive for high order or poorly conditioned systems.

  2. A Simple Apparatus for Determining Ionization and Solubility Product Constants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerardi, Gary

    1977-01-01

    Describes a simple conductivity apparatus for the determination of ionization and solubility product constants of various substances. The uses of the apparatus in determining the ionization constant of a weak monoprotic acid and in measuring the rate of diffusion of ions through a membrane are also presented. (HM)

  3. Analysis of interval constants in calendars affiliated with the Shoushili

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihn, Byeong-Hee; Lee, Ki-Won; Ahn, Young Sook

    2014-04-01

    We study interval constants that are related to motions of the Sun and Moon, i.e., the Qi, Intercalation, Revolution and Crossing interval, in calendars affiliated with the Shoushi calendar (Shoushili), such as Datongli and Chiljeongsannaepyeon. It is known that these interval constants were newly introduced in the Shoushili calendar and revised afterward, except for the Qi interval constant, and the revised values were adopted in later calendars affiliated with the Shoushili. We first investigate the accuracy of these interval constants and then the accuracy of calendars affiliated with the Shoushili in terms of these constants by comparing times for the new moon and the maximum solar eclipse calculated by each calendar with modern methods of calculation. During our study, we found that the Qi and Intercalation interval constants used in the early Shoushili were well determined, whereas the Revolution and Crossing interval constants were relatively poorly measured. We also found that the interval constants used by the early Shoushili were better than those of the later one, and hence better than those of Datongli and Chiljeongsannaepyeon. On the other hand, we found that the early Shoushili is, in general, a worse calendar than Datongli for use in China but a better one than Chiljeongsannaepyeon for use in Korea in terms of times for the new moon and when a solar eclipse occurs, at least for the period 1281 - 1644. Finally, we verified that the times for sunrise and sunset in the Shoushili-Li-Cheng and Mingshi are those at Beijing and Nanjing, respectively.

  4. Constant-Operating-Resistance Hot-Wire Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stainback, P. C.

    1985-01-01

    Effects of lead-wire-resistance changes with temperature nullified. Constant-operating-resistance hot-wire probe uses two sets of leads. Exposed to identical conditions, comparison of resistance gives change in sensing element itself. Data taken in more convenient manner, with advantage of not having to constantly check for possible changes in lead resistance and consequently readjust potentiometer.

  5. Spectroscopic constants and potential energy curves of AsF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latifzadeh, Lida; Balasubramanian, K.

    1996-02-01

    Spectroscopic constants and potential energy curves of 21 electronic states of AsF are computed using the complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) followed by first- and second-order configuration interaction (FOCI, SOCI) and multireference singles and doubles configuration interaction (MRSDCI) methods. The computed spectroscopic constants agree with the experimental values for the observed states.

  6. Performance evaluation of wideband bio-impedance spectroscopy using constant voltage source and constant current source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamadou, Youssoufa; In Oh, Tong; Wi, Hun; Sohal, Harsh; Farooq, Adnan; Woo, Eung Je; McEwan, Alistair Lee

    2012-10-01

    Current sources are widely used in bio-impedance spectroscopy (BIS) measurement systems to maximize current injection for increased signal to noise while keeping within medical safety specifications. High-performance current sources based on the Howland current pump with optimized impedance converters are able to minimize stray capacitance of the cables and setup. This approach is limited at high frequencies primarily due to the deteriorated output impedance of the constant current source when situated in a real measurement system. For this reason, voltage sources have been suggested, but they require a current sensing resistor, and the SNR reduces at low impedance loads due to the lower current required to maintain constant voltage. In this paper, we compare the performance of a current source-based BIS and a voltage source-based BIS, which use common components. The current source BIS is based on a Howland current pump and generalized impedance converters to maintain a high output impedance of more than 1 MΩ at 2 MHz. The voltage source BIS is based on voltage division between an internal current sensing resistor (Rs) and an external sample. To maintain high SNR, Rs is varied so that the source voltage is divided more or less equally. In order to calibrate the systems, we measured the transfer function of the BIS systems with several known resistor and capacitor loads. From this we may estimate the resistance and capacitance of biological tissues using the least-squares method to minimize error between the measured transimpedance excluding the system transfer function and that from an impedance model. When tested on realistic loads including discrete resistors and capacitors, and saline and agar phantoms, the voltage source-based BIS system had a wider bandwidth of 10 Hz to 2.2 MHz with less than 1% deviation from the expected spectra compared to more than 10% with the current source. The voltage source also showed an SNR of at least 60 dB up to 2.2 MHz in

  7. Gravitation and modern cosmology - The cosmological constant problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zichichi, Antonino; de Sabbata, Venzo; Sanchez, Norma

    An updated version of different approaches to the cosmological constant problem discussed at a symposium in honor of Peter Gabriel Bergmann's 75th birthday, that took place in Erice on 17-20 September 1990, is presented. Topics addressed include an effective action model for the cosmological constant revisited; torsion, quantum effects, and the problem of cosmological constant; variations of constants and exact solutions in multidimensional gravity; null surface canonical formalism; qualitative cosmology; and the gravitational field of an arbitrary axisymmetric mass with a magnetic dipole moment. Attention is also given to a simple model of the universe without singularities; string theory and quantization of gravity; and velocity of propagation of gravitational radiation, mass of the gravitation, range of the gravitational force, and the cosmological constant.

  8. Five constants of information technology adoption in healthcare.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Mariel L; McCreless, Tamuchin; Côté, Murray J

    2007-01-01

    The healthcare industry has developed a dependence on information technology (IT) for maintaining and improving both clinical and business operations. Whether IT is used for office automation or for reducing medical errors, there are five constants that routinely influence the successful integration of IT in healthcare. These constants are the proper use and maintenance of the IT budget, the role of supportive leadership, the use of project management, the process of implementation, and the significance of end user involvement. These constants challenge healthcare organizations to efficiently and effectively use their financial and human resources when adopting new IT. These constants also shape how the healthcare industry approaches the adoption and utilization of new IT. A collective understanding of these constants and their interrelationships will enable healthcare organizations to better integrate new IT and achieve organizational goals of developing a solid technological infrastructure to truly enhance the delivery of quality healthcare.

  9. Evolving Lorentzian wormholes supported by phantom matter and cosmological constant

    SciTech Connect

    Cataldo, Mauricio; Campo, Sergio del; Minning, Paul; Salgado, Patricio

    2009-01-15

    In this paper we study the possibility of sustaining an evolving wormhole via exotic matter made of phantom energy in the presence of a cosmological constant. We derive analytical evolving wormhole geometries by supposing that the radial tension of the phantom matter, which is negative to the radial pressure, and the pressure measured in the tangential directions have barotropic equations of state with constant state parameters. In this case the presence of a cosmological constant ensures accelerated expansion of the wormhole configurations. More specifically, for positive cosmological constant we have wormholes which expand forever and, for negative cosmological constant we have wormholes which expand to a maximum value and then recollapse. At spatial infinity the energy density and the pressures of the anisotropic phantom matter threading the wormholes vanish; thus these evolving wormholes are asymptotically vacuum {lambda}-Friedmann models with either open or closed or flat topologies.

  10. Transfer function analysis of the constant voltage anemometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarma, Garimella R.

    1998-06-01

    The transfer function for the constant voltage anemometer (CVA) circuit has been derived in terms of circuit and hot-wire parameters and the expressions for the natural frequency and damping ratio have been obtained. Bandwidth in each case was determined from the plot of the normalized transfer function. The theoretical bandwidth behavior calculated from the transfer function plots for the prototype agrees with independent tests of the prototype using laser radiation heating of the hot wire in an air jet. The near constant value of the bandwidth of the CVA with the variation in the hot-wire overheat and its Reynolds number that were observed with the laser tests have been substantiated with the theoretical values from the transfer function. Bandwidth testing with sine wave injection, in situ time constant measurement for proper compensation setting, method to optimize the design to have nearly a constant bandwidth even with different compensation time constants and the operational advantages of CVA are also discussed.

  11. Tiempo para un cambio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woltjer, L.

    1987-06-01

    En la reunion celebrada en diciembre dei ano pasado informe al Consejo de mi deseo de terminar mi contrato como Director General de la ESO una vez que fuera aprobado el proyecto dei VLT, que se espera sucedera hacia fines de este aAo. Cuando fue renovada mi designacion hace tres aAos, el Consejo conocia mi intencion de no completar los cinco aAos dei contrato debido a mi deseo de disponer de mas tiempo para otras actividades. Ahora, una vez terminada la fase preparatoria para el VLT, Y habiendose presentado el proyecto formalmente al Consejo el dia 31 de marzo, y esperando su muy probable aprobacion antes dei termino de este ano, me parece que el 10 de enero de 1988 presenta una excelente fecha para que se produzca un cambio en la administracion de la ESO.

  12. Calculation of individual isotope equilibrium constants for geochemical reactions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorstenson, D.C.; Parkhurst, D.L.

    2004-01-01

    Theory is derived from the work of Urey (Urey H. C. [1947] The thermodynamic properties of isotopic substances. J. Chem. Soc. 562-581) to calculate equilibrium constants commonly used in geochemical equilibrium and reaction-transport models for reactions of individual isotopic species. Urey showed that equilibrium constants of isotope exchange reactions for molecules that contain two or more atoms of the same element in equivalent positions are related to isotope fractionation factors by ?? = (Kex)1/n, where n is the number of atoms exchanged. This relation is extended to include species containing multiple isotopes, for example 13C16O18O and 1H2H18O. The equilibrium constants of the isotope exchange reactions can be expressed as ratios of individual isotope equilibrium constants for geochemical reactions. Knowledge of the equilibrium constant for the dominant isotopic species can then be used to calculate the individual isotope equilibrium constants. Individual isotope equilibrium constants are calculated for the reaction CO2g = CO2aq for all species that can be formed from 12C, 13C, 16O, and 18O; for the reaction between 12C18 O2aq and 1H218Ol; and among the various 1H, 2H, 16O, and 18O species of H2O. This is a subset of a larger number of equilibrium constants calculated elsewhere (Thorstenson D. C. and Parkhurst D. L. [2002] Calculation of individual isotope equilibrium constants for implementation in geochemical models. Water-Resources Investigation Report 02-4172. U.S. Geological Survey). Activity coefficients, activity-concentration conventions for the isotopic variants of H2O in the solvent 1H216Ol, and salt effects on isotope fractionation have been included in the derivations. The effects of nonideality are small because of the chemical similarity of different isotopic species of the same molecule or ion. The temperature dependence of the individual isotope equilibrium constants can be calculated from the temperature dependence of the fractionation

  13. A Graphical Procedure for the Simultaneous Determination of the Distribution Constant of Iodine and the Stability Constants of Trihalide Anions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahwa, I. A.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses a graphical procedure which allows the distribution constant of iodine to be determined simultaneously with the trihalide anion stability constant. In addition, the procedure extends the experimental chemistry from distribution equilibria to important thermodynamic and bonding features. Advantages of using the procedure are also…

  14. A Graphical Procedure for the Simultaneous Determination of the Distribution Constant of Iodine and the Stability Constants of Trihalide Anions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahwa, I. A.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses a graphical procedure which allows the distribution constant of iodine to be determined simultaneously with the trihalide anion stability constant. In addition, the procedure extends the experimental chemistry from distribution equilibria to important thermodynamic and bonding features. Advantages of using the procedure are also…

  15. Methodology for extracting local constants from petroleum cracking flows

    DOEpatents

    Chang, Shen-Lin; Lottes, Steven A.; Zhou, Chenn Q.

    2000-01-01

    A methodology provides for the extraction of local chemical kinetic model constants for use in a reacting flow computational fluid dynamics (CFD) computer code with chemical kinetic computations to optimize the operating conditions or design of the system, including retrofit design improvements to existing systems. The coupled CFD and kinetic computer code are used in combination with data obtained from a matrix of experimental tests to extract the kinetic constants. Local fluid dynamic effects are implicitly included in the extracted local kinetic constants for each particular application system to which the methodology is applied. The extracted local kinetic model constants work well over a fairly broad range of operating conditions for specific and complex reaction sets in specific and complex reactor systems. While disclosed in terms of use in a Fluid Catalytic Cracking (FCC) riser, the inventive methodology has application in virtually any reaction set to extract constants for any particular application and reaction set formulation. The methodology includes the step of: (1) selecting the test data sets for various conditions; (2) establishing the general trend of the parametric effect on the measured product yields; (3) calculating product yields for the selected test conditions using coupled computational fluid dynamics and chemical kinetics; (4) adjusting the local kinetic constants to match calculated product yields with experimental data; and (5) validating the determined set of local kinetic constants by comparing the calculated results with experimental data from additional test runs at different operating conditions.

  16. Revising your world-view of the fundamental constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ralston, John P.

    2013-10-01

    Fundamental constants" are thought to be discoveries about Nature that are xed and eternal, and not dependent on theory. Actually constants have no de nition outside the theory that uses them. For a century units and constants have been based on the physics of the previous millennium. The constants of physics changed radically with quantum mechanics and modern theory, but their use and interpretation was unfortunately locked in early. By critically re-examining the actual structure of the present system in a new light, we nd that obsolete concepts of Newtonian physics impede the understanding and use of quantum theory. Confronting the di erence nds that Planck's constant cannot be observed in quantum theory, and is entirely a construct of human history and convention. A cascade of seeming paradoxes and contradictions occurs when Plancks constant is eliminated, yet the end result is a simpler and cleaner vision of what quantum mechanics and quantum eld theory really involve. By eliminating redundant holdovers the number and nature of fundamental constants is revised. By avoiding the Newtonian conception of mass and associated experimental errors the electron mass is determined with a relative error 67 times smaller than before. The fundamental unit of electric charge is determined more than 100 times more accurately than the current determination of international committees.

  17. Recommended Values of the Fundamental Physical Constants: A Status Report

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Barry N.; Cohen, E. Richard

    1990-01-01

    We summarize the principal advances made in the fundamental physical constants field since the completion of the 1986 CODATA least-squares adjustment of the constants and discuss their implications for both the 1986 set of recommended values and the next least-squares adjustment. In general, the new results lead to values of the constants with uncertainties 5 to 7 times smaller than the uncertainties assigned the 1986 values. However, the changes in the values themselves are less than twice the 1986 assigned one-standard-deviation uncertainties and thus are not highly significant. Although much new data has become available since 1986, three new results dominate the analysis: a value of the Planck constant obtained from a realization of the watt; a value of the fine-structure constant obtained from the magnetic moment anomaly of the electron; and a value of the molar gas constant obtained from the speed of sound in argon. Because of their dominant role in determining the values and uncertainties of many of the constants, it is highly desirable that additional results of comparable uncertainty that corroborate these three data items be obtained before the next adjustment is carried out. Until then, the 1986 CODATA set of recommended values will remain the set of choice. PMID:28179787

  18. Local elastic constants in thin films of an fcc crystal.

    PubMed

    van Workum, Kevin; de Pablo, Juan J

    2003-03-01

    In this work we present a formalism for the calculation of the local elastic constants in inhomogeneous systems based on a method of planes. Unlike previous work, this formalism does not require the partitioning of the system into a set of finite volumes over which average elastic constants are calculated. Results for the calculation of the local elastic constants of a nearest-neighbor Lennard-Jones fcc crystal in the bulk and in a thin film are presented. The local constants are calculated at exact planes of the (001) face of the crystal. The average elastic constants of the bulk system are also computed and are consistent with the local constants. Additionally we present the local stress profiles in the thin film when a small uniaxial strain is applied. The resulting stress profile compares favorably with the stress profile predicted via the local elastic constants. The surface melting of a model for argon for which experimental and simulation data are available is also studied within the framework of this formalism.

  19. Radial Velocities with PARAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Arpita; Mahadevan, S.; Chakraborty, A.; Pathan, F. M.; Anandarao, B. G.

    2010-01-01

    The Physical Research Laboratory Advanced Radial-velocity All-sky Search (PARAS) is an efficient fiber-fed cross-dispersed high-resolution echelle spectrograph that will see first light in early 2010. This instrument is being built at the Physical Research laboratory (PRL) and will be attached to the 1.2m telescope at Gurushikhar Observatory at Mt. Abu, India. PARAS has a single-shot wavelength coverage of 370nm to 850nm at a spectral resolution of R 70000 and will be housed in a vacuum chamber (at 1x10-2 mbar pressure) in a highly temperature controlled environment. This renders the spectrograph extremely suitable for exoplanet searches with high velocity precision using the simultaneous Thorium-Argon wavelength calibration method. We are in the process of developing an automated data analysis pipeline for echelle data reduction and precise radial velocity extraction based on the REDUCE package of Piskunov & Valenti (2002), which is especially careful in dealing with CCD defects, extraneous noise, and cosmic ray spikes. Here we discuss the current status of the PARAS project and details and tests of the data analysis procedure, as well as results from ongoing PARAS commissioning activities.

  20. Redefinition of SI Units Based on Fundamental Physical Constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Kenichi

    The definitions of some units of the International System are likely to be revised as early as 2011 by basing them on fixed values of fundamental constants of nature, provided experimental realizations are demonstrated with sufficiently small uncertainties. As regards the kilogram, experiments aiming at linking it to the Avogadro constant and the Planck constant are under way in several laboratories. Details are given on the experimental techniques developed to achieve the target. The other units likely to be redefined are the ampere, the kelvin and the mole. Advantages and disadvantages of different alternatives for revised definitions are discussed.

  1. [Optical constants determination of zinc selenide by inversing transmittance spectrogram].

    PubMed

    Li, Dong; Ai, Qing; Xia, Xin-Lin

    2013-04-01

    The transmittance models of single slab and two spliced slabs were built, and a new method to determine optical constants of materials was proposed based on inversing the transmittance spectrograms of single slab and two spliced slabs. The measurements of transmittance spectrogram of zinc selenide glass slabs with different thickness in the infrared wavelength range of 1.33-21 microm at normal incidence were investigated by Bruke V70 FTIR spectrometer. The optical constants of zinc selenide were achieved by the inverse methods. The results indicate that the optical constants of zinc selenide determined by the new inverse method are in good agreement with previous data sets.

  2. Large numbers hypothesis. IV - The cosmological constant and quantum physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, P. J.

    1983-01-01

    In standard physics quantum field theory is based on a flat vacuum space-time. This quantum field theory predicts a nonzero cosmological constant. Hence the gravitational field equations do not admit a flat vacuum space-time. This dilemma is resolved using the units covariant gravitational field equations. This paper shows that the field equations admit a flat vacuum space-time with nonzero cosmological constant if and only if the canonical LNH is valid. This allows an interpretation of the LNH phenomena in terms of a time-dependent vacuum state. If this is correct then the cosmological constant must be positive.

  3. Experimental determination of the effective strong coupling constant

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandre Deur; Volker Burkert; Jian-Ping Chen; Wolfgang Korsch

    2007-07-01

    We extract an effective strong coupling constant from low Q{sup 2} data on the Bjorken sum. Using sum rules, we establish its Q{sup 2}-behavior over the complete Q{sup 2}-range. The result is compared to effective coupling constants extracted from different processes and to calculations based on Schwinger-Dyson equations, hadron spectroscopy or lattice QCD. Although the connection between the experimentally extracted effective coupling constant and the calculations is not clear, the results agree surprisingly well.

  4. Lower Bounding Diffusion Constant by the Curvature of Drude Weight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medenjak, Marko; Karrasch, Christoph; Prosen, Tomaž

    2017-08-01

    We establish a general connection between ballistic and diffusive transport in systems where the ballistic contribution in the canonical ensemble vanishes. A lower bound on the Green-Kubo diffusion constant is derived in terms of the curvature of the ideal transport coefficient, the Drude weight, with respect to the filling parameter. As an application, we explicitly determine the lower bound on the high-temperature diffusion constant in the anisotropic spin-1 /2 Heisenberg chain for anisotropy parameters Δ ≥1 , thus, settling the question of whether or not the transport is subdiffusive. Additionally, the lower bound is shown to saturate the diffusion constant for a certain classical integrable model.

  5. Procedures for determining MATMOD-4V material constants

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, T.C.

    1993-11-01

    The MATMOD-4V constitutive relations were developed from the original MATMOD model to extend the range of nonelastic deformation behaviors represented to include transient phenomena such as strain softening. Improvements in MATMOD-4V increased the number of independent material constants and the difficulty in determining their values. Though the constitutive relations are conceptually simple, their form and procedures for obtaining their constants can be complex. This paper reviews in detail the experiments, numerical procedures, and assumptions that have been used to determine a complete set of MATMOD-4V constants for high purity aluminum.

  6. Boson mapping techniques applied to constant gauge fields in QCD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, Peter Otto; Lopez, J. C.

    1995-01-01

    Pairs of coordinates and derivatives of the constant gluon modes are mapped to new gluon-pair fields and their derivatives. Applying this mapping to the Hamiltonian of constant gluon fields results for large coupling constants into an effective Hamiltonian which separates into one describing a scalar field and another one for a field with spin two. The ground state is dominated by pairs of gluons coupled to color and spin zero with slight admixtures of color zero and spin two pairs. As color group we used SU(2).

  7. Determination of effective optical constants of magnetic multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deeter, M. N.; Sarid, D.; England, C. D.; Bennett, W. R.; Falco, Charles M.

    1989-05-01

    The effective optical and magneto-optical constants of a series of Cu/Co multilayer films are determined experimentally and compared with a theoretical thin-film model based on the bulk optical constants of Cu and Co. In the multilayer series, the atomic percentages of Cu and Co were kept fixed and the period varied from 0.4 to 13.6 nm. Deviations from bulk-like behavior in the effective optical constants are observed for multilayers with periods less than 3 nm.

  8. Evaluation of atomic constants for optical radiation, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kylstra, C. D.; Schneider, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    Atomic constants for optical radiation are discussed which include transition probabilities, line strengths, and oscillator strengths for both dipole and quadrupole transitions, as well as the associated matrix elements needed for line broadening calculations. Atomic constants were computed for a wide selection of elements and lines. An existing computer program was used, with modifications to include, in an approximate manner, the effect of equivalent electrons, and to enable reordering and restructuring of the output for publication. This program is suitable for fast, low cost computation of the optical constants, using the Coulomb approximation formalism for LS coupling.

  9. Multiwavelength spectrophotometric determination of acidity constants of some azo dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamsipur, Mojtaba; Maddah, Bozorgmehr; Hemmateenejad, Bahram; Rouhani, Shohreh; Haghbeen, Kamaladin; Alizadeh, Kamal

    2008-06-01

    A multiwavelength spectrophotometric titration method was applied to study the acidity constants of some azo dyes in water. The UV-vis absorption spectra of azo dye solutions were recorded in the course of their pH-metric titration with a standard base solution. The protolytic equilibrium constants, spectral profiles, concentration diagrams and also the number of components have been calculated. The quantitative effects of the substituents on the acidity of the studied azo dyes were investigated by the linear free energy relationship (LFER) using Hammet sigma constant ( σ) and field and resonance effects of Kamlet and Taft ( f and ℜ, respectively).

  10. Multiwavelength spectrophotometric determination of acidity constants of some azo dyes.

    PubMed

    Shamsipur, Mojtaba; Maddah, Bozorgmehr; Hemmateenejad, Bahram; Rouhani, Shohreh; Haghbeen, Kamaladin; Alizadeh, Kamal

    2008-06-01

    A multiwavelength spectrophotometric titration method was applied to study the acidity constants of some azo dyes in water. The UV-vis absorption spectra of azo dye solutions were recorded in the course of their pH-metric titration with a standard base solution. The protolytic equilibrium constants, spectral profiles, concentration diagrams and also the number of components have been calculated. The quantitative effects of the substituents on the acidity of the studied azo dyes were investigated by the linear free energy relationship (LFER) using Hammet sigma constant (sigma) and field and resonance effects of Kamlet and Taft (f and Re, respectively).

  11. A new upper bound of geometric constant [Formula: see text].

    PubMed

    Li, Jin Huan; Ling, Bo; Liu, San Yang

    2017-01-01

    A new constant [Formula: see text] is introduced into any real [Formula: see text]-dimensional symmetric normed space X. By virtue of this constant, an upper bound of the geometric constant [Formula: see text], which is used to measure the difference between Birkhoff orthogonality and isosceles orthogonality, is obtained and further extended to an arbitrary m-dimensional symmetric normed linear space ([Formula: see text]). As an application, the result is used to prove a special case for the reverse Hölder inequality.

  12. Identification of material constants for a composite shell structure

    SciTech Connect

    Carne, T.G.; Martinez, D.R.

    1987-01-01

    A finite element model of a composite shell was created. The model includes uncertain orthotropic elastic constants. To identify these constants, a modal survey was performed on an actual shell. The resulting modal data along with the finite element model of the shell were used in a Bayes estimation algorithm. Values of the elastic constants were estimated which minimized the differences between the test results and the finite element predictions. The estimation procedure employed the concept of successive linearization to obtain an approximate solution to the original nonlinear estimation problem.

  13. EVALUATION OF CONSTANT CURRENT WELD CONTROL FOR PINCH WELDING

    SciTech Connect

    Korinko, P; STANLEY, S; HOWARD, H

    2005-10-11

    Modern weld controllers typically use current to control the weld process. SRS uses a legacy voltage control method. This task was undertaken to determine if the improvements in the weld control equipment could be implemented to provide improvements to the process control. The constant current mode of operation will reduce weld variability by about a factor of 4. The constant voltage welds were slightly hotter than the constant current welds of the same nominal current. The control mode did not appear to adversely affect the weld quality, but appropriate current ranges need to be established and a qualification methodology for both welding and shunt calibrations needs to be developed and documented.

  14. Large numbers hypothesis. IV - The cosmological constant and quantum physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, P. J.

    1983-01-01

    In standard physics quantum field theory is based on a flat vacuum space-time. This quantum field theory predicts a nonzero cosmological constant. Hence the gravitational field equations do not admit a flat vacuum space-time. This dilemma is resolved using the units covariant gravitational field equations. This paper shows that the field equations admit a flat vacuum space-time with nonzero cosmological constant if and only if the canonical LNH is valid. This allows an interpretation of the LNH phenomena in terms of a time-dependent vacuum state. If this is correct then the cosmological constant must be positive.

  15. a way to Dynamically Overcome the Old Cosmological Constant Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comelli, Denis

    The old cosmological constant problem can be solved once we require that the full standard Einstein-Hilbert Lagrangian, gravity plus matter, is multiplied by a total derivative. We analyze such a picture writing the total derivative as the covariant gradient of a new vector field (bμ). Like in unimodular gravity, integration constants, regenerating an effective cosmological constant, can reenter into the game depending on the dynamics of the bμ field. In order to fit the present universe status without fine-tunings, a full understanding of the scales related to bμ field dynamics has to be settled down.

  16. Spectroscopic Constants and Potential Energy Curves for GeF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, D. W.; Balasubramanian, K.

    1994-01-01

    The spectroscopic constants of the electronic states of GeF lying below the 60000 cm -1 region are obtained using the complete active space multiconfiguration self-consistent field followed by first- and second-order configuration interaction (FOCI. SOCI) methods which included up to a million configurations. The potential energy curves of the low-lying electronic states are also computed. The computed spectroscopic constants confirm the assignments of the X, A, a, C, C', and D' states of GeF. In addition the spectroscopic constants of several electronic states of GeF are predicted which are yet to be observed.

  17. Effects of Constant Flow vs. Constant Pressure Perfusion on Fluid Filtration in Severe Hypothermic Isolated Blood-Perfused Rat Lungs.

    PubMed

    Halsøy, Kathrine; Kondratiev, Timofey; Tveita, Torkjel; Bjertnaes, Lars J

    2016-01-01

    Victims of severe accidental hypothermia are prone to fluid extravasation but rarely develop lung edema. We hypothesize that combined hypothermia-induced increase in pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) and a concomitant fall in cardiac output protect the lungs against edema development. Our aim was to explore in hypothermic-isolated blood-perfused rat lungs whether perfusion at constant pressure influences fluid filtration differently from perfusion at constant flow. Isolated blood-perfused rat lungs were hanging freely in a weight transducer for measuring weight changes (ΔW). Fluid filtration coefficient (Kfc), was determined by transiently elevating left atrial pressure (Pla) by 5.8 mmHg two times each during normothermia (37°C) and during hypothermia (15°C). The lung preparations were randomized to two groups. One group was perfused with constant flow (Constant flow group) and the other group with constant pulmonary artery pressure (Constant PPA group). Microvascular pressure (Pmv) was determined before and during elevation of Pla (ΔPmv) by means of the double occlusion technique. Kfc was calculated with the formula Kfc = ΔW/ΔPmv/min. All Kfc values were normalized to predicted lung weight (PLW), which was based on body weight (BW) according to the formula: PLW = 0.0053 BW - 0.48 and presented as KfcPLW in mg/min/mmHg/g. At cessation, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid/perfusate protein concentration (B/P) ratio was determined photometrically. Data were analyzed with parametric or non-parametric tests as appropriate. p < 0.05 considered as significant. Perfusate flow remained constant in the Constant flow group, but was more than halved during hypothermia in the Constant PPA group concomitant with a more fold increase in PVR. In the Constant flow group, KfcPLW and B/P ratio increased significantly by more than 10-fold during hypothermia concerted by visible signs of edema in the trachea. Hemoglobin and hematocrit increased within the

  18. Measurement of both the equilibrium constant and rate constant for electronic energy transfer by control of the limiting kinetic regimes.

    PubMed

    Vagnini, Michael T; Rutledge, W Caleb; Wagenknecht, Paul S

    2010-02-01

    Electronic energy transfer can fall into two limiting cases. When the rate of the energy transfer back reaction is much faster than relaxation of the acceptor excited state, equilibrium between the donor and acceptor excited states is achieved and only the equilibrium constant for the energy transfer can be measured. When the rate of the back reaction is much slower than relaxation of the acceptor, the energy transfer is irreversible and only the forward rate constant can be measured. Herein, we demonstrate that with trans-[Cr(d(4)-cyclam)(CN)(2)](+) as the donor and either trans-[Cr([15]ane-ane-N(4))(CN)(2)](+) or trans-[Cr(cyclam)(CN)(2)](+) as the acceptor, both limits can be obtained by control of the donor concentration. The equilibrium constant and rate constant for the case in which trans-[Cr([15]ane-ane-N(4))(CN)(2)](+) is the acceptor are 0.66 and 1.7 x 10(7) M(-1) s(-1), respectively. The equilibrium constant is in good agreement with the value of 0.60 determined using the excited state energy gap between the donor and acceptor species. For the thermoneutral case in which trans-[Cr(cyclam)(CN)(2)](+) is the acceptor, an experimental equilibrium constant of 0.99 was reported previously, and the rate constant has now been measured as 4.0 x 10(7) M(-1) s(-1).

  19. ESTIMATION OF CARBOXYLIC ACID ESTER HYDROLYSIS RATE CONSTANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    SPARC chemical reactivity models were extended to calculate hydrolysis rate constants for carboxylic acid esters from molecular structure. The energy differences between the initial state and the transition state for a molecule of interest are factored into internal and external...

  20. Constant-frequency, variable-duty-cycle multivibrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. E.

    1969-01-01

    Circuit provides a pulse source of constant frequency with a duty cycle that is adjustable by an external input signal. It could serve as a switching mode voltage regulator or as a switching source for control systems.

  1. Nonlocal conservation laws of the constant astigmatism equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hlaváč, Adam; Marvan, Michal

    2017-03-01

    For the constant astigmatism equation, we construct a system of nonlocal conservation laws (an abelian covering) closed under the reciprocal transformations. The corresponding potentials are functionally independent modulo a Wronskian type relation.

  2. 18 CFR 806.12 - Constant-rate aquifer testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... withdraw or increase a withdrawal of groundwater shall perform a constant-rate aquifer test in accordance... groundwater availability analysis to determine the availability of water during a 1-in-10-year recurrence...

  3. Convexity and concavity constants in Lorentz and Marcinkiewicz spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminska, Anna; Parrish, Anca M.

    2008-07-01

    We provide here the formulas for the q-convexity and q-concavity constants for function and sequence Lorentz spaces associated to either decreasing or increasing weights. It yields also the formula for the q-convexity constants in function and sequence Marcinkiewicz spaces. In this paper we extent and enhance the results from [G.J.O. Jameson, The q-concavity constants of Lorentz sequence spaces and related inequalities, Math. Z. 227 (1998) 129-142] and [A. Kaminska, A.M. Parrish, The q-concavity and q-convexity constants in Lorentz spaces, in: Banach Spaces and Their Applications in Analysis, Conference in Honor of Nigel Kalton, May 2006, Walter de Gruyter, Berlin, 2007, pp. 357-373].

  4. ESTIMATION OF PHOSPHATE ESTER HYDROLYSIS RATE CONSTANTS - ALKALINE HYDROLYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    SPARC (SPARC Performs Automated Reasoning in Chemistry) chemical reactivity models were extended to allow the calculation of alkaline hydrolysis rate constants of phosphate esters in water. The rate is calculated from the energy difference between the initial and transition state...

  5. Implications of the Cosmological Constant for Spherically Symmetric Mass Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubairi, Omair; Weber, Fridolin

    2013-04-01

    In recent years, scientists have made the discovery that the expansion rate of the Universe is increasing rather than decreasing. This acceleration leads to an additional term in Albert Einstein's field equations which describe general relativity and is known as the cosmological constant. This work explores the aftermath of a non-vanishing cosmological constant for relativistic spherically symmetric mass distributions, which are susceptible to change against Einstein's field equations. We introduce a stellar structure equation known as the Tolman-Oppenhiemer-Volkoff (TOV) equation modified for a cosmological constant, which is derived from Einstein's modified field equations. We solve this modified TOV equation for these spherically symmetric mass distributions and obtain stellar properties such as mass and radius and investigate changes that may occur depending on the value of the cosmological constant.

  6. Dielectric constants by multifrequency non-contact atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Bharat; Bonvallet, Joseph C; Crittenden, Scott R

    2012-01-20

    We present a method to obtain capacitive forces and dielectric constants of ultra-thin films on metallic substrates using multifrequency non-contact atomic force microscopy with amplitude feedback in air. Capacitive forces are measured via cantilever oscillations induced at the second bending mode and dielectric constants are calculated by fitting an analytic expression for the capacitance (Casuso et al 2007 Appl. Phys. Lett. 91 063111) to the experimental data. Dielectric constants for self-assembled monolayers of thiol molecules on gold (2.0±0.1) and sputtered SiO2 (3.6±0.07) were obtained under dry conditions, in good agreement with previous measurements. The high Q-factor of the second bending mode of the cantilever increases the accuracy of the capacitive measurements while the low applied potentials minimize the likelihood of variation of the dielectric constants at high field strength and of damage from dielectric breakdown of air.

  7. Simulating Supercapacitors: Can We Model Electrodes As Constant Charge Surfaces?

    PubMed

    Merlet, Céline; Péan, Clarisse; Rotenberg, Benjamin; Madden, Paul A; Simon, Patrice; Salanne, Mathieu

    2013-01-17

    Supercapacitors based on an ionic liquid electrolyte and graphite or nanoporous carbon electrodes are simulated using molecular dynamics. We compare a simplified electrode model in which a constant, uniform charge is assigned to each carbon atom with a realistic model in which a constant potential is applied between the electrodes (the carbon charges are allowed to fluctuate). We show that the simulations performed with the simplified model do not provide a correct description of the properties of the system. First, the structure of the adsorbed electrolyte is partly modified. Second, dramatic differences are observed for the dynamics of the system during transient regimes. In particular, upon application of a constant applied potential difference, the increase in the temperature, due to the Joule effect, associated with the creation of an electric current across the cell follows Ohm's law, while unphysically high temperatures are rapidly observed when constant charges are assigned to each carbon atom.

  8. Determining Planck's Constant Using a Light-emitting Diode.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sievers, Dennis; Wilson, Alan

    1989-01-01

    Describes a method for making a simple, inexpensive apparatus which can be used to determine Planck's constant. Provides illustrations of a circuit diagram using one or more light-emitting diodes and a BASIC computer program for simplifying calculations. (RT)

  9. ESTIMATION OF PHOSPHATE ESTER HYDROLYSIS RATE CONSTANTS - ALKALINE HYDROLYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    SPARC (SPARC Performs Automated Reasoning in Chemistry) chemical reactivity models were extended to allow the calculation of alkaline hydrolysis rate constants of phosphate esters in water. The rate is calculated from the energy difference between the initial and transition state...

  10. ESTIMATION OF PHOSPHATE ESTER HYDROLYSIS RATE CONSTANTS. I. ALKALINE HYDROLYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    SPARC (SPARC Performs Automated Reasoning in Chemistry) chemical reactivity models were extended to allow the calculation of alkaline hydrolysis rate constants of phosphate esters in water. The rate is calculated from the energy difference between the initial and transition state...

  11. Stoichiometry and Formation Constant Determination by Linear Sweep Voltammetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Franklin A.

    1979-01-01

    In this paper an experiment is described in which the equilibrium constants necessary for determining the composition and distribution of lead (II)-oxalate species may be measured by linear sweep voltammetry. (Author/BB)

  12. ESTIMATION OF CARBOXYLIC ACID ESTER HYDROLYSIS RATE CONSTANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    SPARC chemical reactivity models were extended to calculate hydrolysis rate constants for carboxylic acid esters from molecular structure. The energy differences between the initial state and the transition state for a molecule of interest are factored into internal and external...

  13. ESTIMATION OF PHOSPHATE ESTER HYDROLYSIS RATE CONSTANTS. I. ALKALINE HYDROLYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    SPARC (SPARC Performs Automated Reasoning in Chemistry) chemical reactivity models were extended to allow the calculation of alkaline hydrolysis rate constants of phosphate esters in water. The rate is calculated from the energy difference between the initial and transition state...

  14. Constants of motion in deformed oscillator and Coulomb systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakobyan, Tigran; Nersessian, Armen; Shmavonyan, Hovhannes

    2017-03-01

    In this note we propose a unified description for the constants of motion for superintegrable deformations of the oscillator and Coulomb systems on N-dimensional Euclidean space, sphere and hyperboloid.

  15. Determining Planck's Constant Using a Light-emitting Diode.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sievers, Dennis; Wilson, Alan

    1989-01-01

    Describes a method for making a simple, inexpensive apparatus which can be used to determine Planck's constant. Provides illustrations of a circuit diagram using one or more light-emitting diodes and a BASIC computer program for simplifying calculations. (RT)

  16. The atoms of space, gravity and the cosmological constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padmanabhan, T.

    2016-05-01

    I describe an approach which connects classical gravity with the quantum microstructure of spacetime. The field equations arise from maximizing the density of states of matter plus geometry. The former is identified using the thermodynamics of null surfaces while the latter arises due to the existence of a zero-point length in the spacetime. The resulting field equations remain invariant when a constant is added to the matter Lagrangian, which is a symmetry of the matter sector. Therefore, the cosmological constant arises as an integration constant. A nonzero value (Λ) of the cosmological constant renders the amount of cosmic information (Ic) accessible to an eternal observer finite and hence is directly related to it. This relation allows us to determine the numerical value of (Λ) from the quantum structure of spacetime.

  17. Temperature and size-dependent Hamaker constants for metal nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, K.; Pinchuk, P.

    2016-08-01

    Theoretical values of the Hamaker constant have been calculated for metal nanoparticles using Lifshitz theory. The theory describes the Hamaker constant in terms of the permittivity of the interacting bodies. Metal nanoparticles exhibit an internal size effect that alters the dielectric permittivity of the particle when its size falls below the mean free path of the conducting electrons. This size dependence of the permittivity leads to size-dependence of the Hamaker constant for metal nanoparticles. Additionally, the electron damping and the plasma frequency used to model the permittivity of the particle exhibit temperature-dependence, which lead to temperature dependence of the Hamaker constant. In this work, both the size and temperature dependence for gold, silver, copper, and aluminum nanoparticles is demonstrated. The results of this study might be of interest for studying the colloidal stability of nanoparticles in solution.

  18. ELECTRIC HOLDING FURNACE IN THE MALLEABLE FOUNDRY MAINTAINS CONSTANT TEMPERATURES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ELECTRIC HOLDING FURNACE IN THE MALLEABLE FOUNDRY MAINTAINS CONSTANT TEMPERATURES FOR IRON PRIOR TO FILLING MOBILE LADLES. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Malleable Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  19. Recommending a value for the Newtonian gravitational constant.

    PubMed

    Wood, Barry M

    2014-10-13

    The primary objective of the CODATA Task Group on Fundamental Constants is 'to periodically provide the scientific and technological communities with a self-consistent set of internationally recommended values of the basic constants and conversion factors of physics and chemistry based on all of the relevant data available at a given point in time'. I discuss why the availability of these recommended values is important and how it simplifies and improves science. I outline the process of determining the recommended values and introduce the principles that are used to deal with discrepant results. In particular, I discuss the specific challenges posed by the present situation of gravitational constant experimental results and how these principles were applied to the most recent 2010 recommended value. Finally, I speculate about what may be expected for the next recommended value of the gravitational constant scheduled for evaluation in 2014.

  20. Constant-Magnitude Acceleration on a Curved Path.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrick, David L.

    1996-01-01

    Presents the theory behind a two-dimensional curved path along which the magnitude of the acceleration vector remains constant for an object moving frictionlessly under the influence of gravity. (JRH)

  1. Solving nonlinear heat transfer constant area fin problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    Tables and graphs were compiled for solving nonlinear heat transfer constant area fin problems. The differential equation describing one-dimensional steady-state temperature distribution and heat flow under three modes of heat transfer with heat generation was investigated.

  2. f(R) gravity without a cosmological constant

    SciTech Connect

    Cruz-Dombriz, Alvaro de la; Dobado, Antonio

    2006-10-15

    In this work we consider the possibility of describing the current evolution of the universe, without the introduction of any cosmological constant or dark energy (DE), by modifying the Einstein-Hilbert (EH) action. In the context of the f(R) gravities within the metric formalism, we show that it is possible to find an action without cosmological constant which exactly reproduces the behavior of the EH action with cosmological constant. In addition the f(R) action is analytical at the origin having Minkowski and Schwarzschild solutions as vacuum solutions. The found f(R) action is highly nontrivial and must be written in terms of hypergeometric functions but, in spite of looking somewhat artificial, it shows that the cosmological constant, or more generally the DE, is not a logical necessity.

  3. Anharmonic Potential Constants and Their Dependence Upon Bond Length

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Herschbach, D. R.; Laurie, V. W.

    1961-01-01

    Empirical study of cubic and quartic vibrational force constants for diatomic molecules shows them to be approximately exponential functions of internuclear distance. A family of curves is obtained, determined by the location of the bonded atoms in rows of the periodic table. Displacements between successive curves correspond closely to those in Badger's rule for quadratic force constants (for which the parameters are redetermined to accord with all data now available). Constants for excited electronic and ionic states appear on practically the same curves as those for the ground states. Predictions based on the diatomic correlations agree with the available cubic constants for bond stretching in polyatomic molecules, regardless of the type of bonding involved. Implications of these regularities are discussed. (auth)

  4. Getting through to circadian oscillators: why use constant routines?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, Jeanne F.; Dijk, Derk-Jan

    2002-01-01

    Overt 24-h rhythmicity is composed of both exogenous and endogenous components, reflecting the product of multiple (periodic) feedback loops with a core pacemaker at their center. Researchers attempting to reveal the endogenous circadian (near 24-h) component of rhythms commonly conduct their experiments under constant environmental conditions. However, even under constant environmental conditions, rhythmic changes in behavior, such as food intake or the sleep-wake cycle, can contribute to observed rhythmicity in many physiological and endocrine variables. Assessment of characteristics of the core circadian pacemaker and its direct contribution to rhythmicity in different variables, including rhythmicity in gene expression, may be more reliable when such periodic behaviors are eliminated or kept constant across all circadian phases. This is relevant for the assessment of the status of the circadian pacemaker in situations in which the sleep-wake cycle or food intake regimes are altered because of external conditions, such as in shift work or jet lag. It is also relevant for situations in which differences in overt rhythmicity could be due to changes in either sleep oscillatory processes or circadian rhythmicity, such as advanced or delayed sleep phase syndromes, in aging, or in particular clinical conditions. Researchers studying human circadian rhythms have developed constant routine protocols to assess the status of the circadian pacemaker in constant behavioral and environmental conditions, whereas this technique is often thought to be unnecessary in the study of animal rhythms. In this short review, the authors summarize constant routine methodology and what has been learned from constant routines and argue that animal and human circadian rhythm researchers should (continue to) use constant routines as a step on the road to getting through to central and peripheral circadian oscillators in the intact organism.

  5. Constant Power Allocation Methods for SC-FDMA Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pao, Wei-Cheng; Chen, Yung-Fang; Chang, Dah-Chung

    A simple suboptimal power allocation method is proposed for SC-FDMA systems. It is known that the performance of constant power-based allocation methods is close to that of optimal solutions. In this letter, by utilizing the waterfilling condition inequality derived for SC-FDMA systems, a threshold is set to select subcarriers for loading constant power to these selected subcarriers. It offers competitive performance as confirmed by the simulation results.

  6. A quick method for the determination of inhibition constants.

    PubMed Central

    Waley, S G

    1982-01-01

    The inhibition constant Ki in the common case of competitive inhibition can be obtained by simple comparison of progress curves in the presence and in the absence of inhibitor. The difference between the times taken for the concentration of substrate to fall to the same value is used to obtain Ki. The procedure to use when the product inhibits is described. When there is mixed inhibition, reactions at different substrate concentrations are used to obtain both inhibition constants. PMID:7150236

  7. The fundamental constants of orthotropic affine plate/slab equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brunelle, E. J.

    1984-01-01

    The global constants associated with orthotropic slab/plate equations are discussed, and the rotational behavior of the modulus/compliance components associated with orthotropic slabs/plates are addressed. It is concluded that one cluster constant is less than or equal to unity for all physically possible materials. Rotationally anomalous behavior is found in two materials, and a simple inequality which can be used to identify regular or anomalous behavior is presented and discussed in detail.

  8. Normalized general relativity: Nonclosed universe and a zero cosmological constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, Aharon; Rubin, Shimon

    2014-01-01

    We discuss the cosmological constant problem, at the minisuperspace level, within the framework of the so-called normalized general relativity. We prove that the Universe cannot be closed, and reassure that the accompanying cosmological constant Λ generically vanishes, at least classically. The theory does allow, however, for a special class of Λ ≠0 solutions which are associated with static closed Einstein universe and with Eddington-Lemaître universe.

  9. Optical Constant Determination of Bacterial Spores in the MIR

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-05

    reported by Gurton et al for Bacillus globigii20 (reclassified as a substrain of Bacillus atrophaeus ).21 Obtaining the optical constant spectra with...Constants from Particulates by Infrared Reflectance Microscopy Demonstrated with Polystyrene Microspheres and Bacillus subtilis Spores The potential...system containing Bacillus anthracis, resulting in 17 confirmed cases of inhalation or cutaneous anthrax. Of these cases, 5 proved fatal.1 Due to the

  10. Correlation of characteristic thermal constant and elution temperature in GC.

    PubMed

    Blumberg, L M; Klee, M S

    2001-02-01

    In a temperature-programmed analysis, the solutes that elute at higher temperatures have generally larger characterisitic thermal constants, theta(char). The change approximately matches the temperature-related increase in a carrier gas viscosity. Accounting for the effect allows reduction in the uncertainty of prediction of theta(char) by a factor or f approximately 2 and, in a constant-pressure mode, description of a linear heating ramp by the same dimensionless rate for all solutes.

  11. Role of dielectric constant in electrohydrodynamics of conducting fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, Percy H.; Snyder, Robert S.; Roberts, Glyn O.

    1992-01-01

    Electrohydrodynamic (EHD) flows are driven by the interaction of an electric field with variations in electric conductivity or dielectric constant. In reported EHD experiments on the deformation of drops of immiscible dielectric fluids, the role of conductivity has tended to overshadow the role of dielectric constant. Often, large conductivity contrasts were convenient because the conductivities of the dielectric fluid were relatively uncertain. As a result, the observed effects were always qualitatively the same as if there had been no contrast in dielectric constant. Our early experiments studying the EHC deformations of cylindrical streams readily showed the conductivity effect but the dielectric constant effect was not discernible. We have modified our flow chamber and improved our method of observation and can now see an unequivocal dielectric constant effect which is in agreement with the prior theory. In this paper we first give a brief description of the physics of charge buildup at the interface of an immersed spherical drop or flowing cylindrical sample stream and then show how these charge distributions lead to interface distortions and accompanying viscous flows which constitute EHD. We next review theory and experiment describing the deformation of spherical drops. We show that in the reported drop deformation experiments, the contrast in dielectric constant was never sufficient to reverse the deformation due to the conductivity contrast. We review our work describing the deformation of a cylindrical stream of one fluid flowing in a parallel flow of another, and we compare the deformation equations with those for spherical drops. Finally, we show a definite experimental dielectric constant effect for cylindrical stream of aqueous polystyrene latex suspension. The dielectric constant varies with the frequency of the imposed electric field, and the associated EHD flow change is very apparent.

  12. Elastic constant versus temperature behavior of three hardened maraging steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ledbetter, H. M.; Austin, M. W.

    1985-01-01

    Elastic constants of three maraging steels were determined by measuring ultrasonic velocities. Annealed steels show slightly lower bulk moduli and considerably lower shear moduli than hardened steels. All the elastic constants (Young's modulus, shear modulus, bulk modulus and Poisson's ratio) show regular temperature behavior between 76 and 400 K. Young's modulus and the shear modulus increase with increasing yield strength, but the bulk modulus and Poisson's ratio are relatively unchanged. Elastic anisotropy is quite small.

  13. CODATA recommended values of the fundamental physical constants: 2014*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohr, Peter J.; Newell, David B.; Taylor, Barry N.

    2016-07-01

    This paper gives the 2014 self-consistent set of values of the constants and conversion factors of physics and chemistry recommended by the Committee on Data for Science and Technology (CODATA). These values are based on a least-squares adjustment that takes into account all data available up to 31 December 2014. Details of the data selection and methodology of the adjustment are described. The recommended values may also be found at physics.nist.gov/constants.

  14. Interactions of nanoparticles with proteins: determination of equilibrium constants.

    PubMed

    Treuel, Lennart; Malissek, Marcelina

    2013-01-01

    The behavior of nanoparticles towards proteins is an important aspect across wide areas of nanotoxicology and nanomedicine. In this chapter, we describe a procedure to study the adsorption of proteins onto nanoparticle surfaces. Circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy is utilized to quantify the amount of free protein in a solution, and the experimental information is evaluated to derive equilibrium constants for the protein adsorption/desorption equilibrium. These equilibrium constants are comparable parameters in describing the interactions between proteins and nanoparticles.

  15. Constant Entropy Properties for an Approximate Model of Equilibrium Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, C. Frederick; Hodge, Marion E.

    1961-01-01

    Approximate analytic solutions for properties of equilibrium air up to 15,000 K have been programmed for machine computation. Temperature, compressibility, enthalpy, specific heats, and speed of sound are tabulated as constant entropy functions of temperature. The reciprocal of acoustic impedance and its integral with respect to pressure are also given for the purpose of evaluating the Riemann constants for one-dimensional, isentropic flow.

  16. Conformal Supersymmetry Breaking and Dynamical Tuningof the Cosmological Constant

    SciTech Connect

    Ibe, M.; Nakayama, Y.; Yanagida, T.T.; /Tokyo U.

    2008-03-07

    We propose 'conformal supersymmetry breaking' models, which tightly relate the conformal breaking scale (i.e. R-symmetry breaking scale) and the supersymmetry breaking scale. The both scales are originated from the constant term in the superpotential through the common source of the R-symmetry breaking. We show that dynamical tuning between those mass scales significantly reduces the degree of fine-tuning necessary for generating the almost vanishing cosmological constant.

  17. Determination of Constitutive Model Constants from Cylinder Impact Tests

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-01

    HONEYWELL, INC./ARMAMENT SYSTEMS DIVISION) FOR NAVAL SURFACE WARFARE CENTER RESEARCH AND TECHNOLOGY DEPARTMENT DECEMBER 1988 Approved for public release...primary application is for higher strain rates, and the strain rate constant was therefore selected to give better correlation with the higher strain...to that of the test data. The new constants (C and C2) were obtained in conjunction with the previous values of C. and C4, as talen from Reference 2

  18. Summation properties of the [eta]j and Li constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coffey, Mark W.

    2009-12-01

    We find new summatory and other properties of the constants [eta]j entering the Laurent expansion of the logarithmic derivative of the Riemann zeta function about s=1. We relate these constants to other coefficients and functions appearing in the theory of the zeta function. In particular, connections to the Li equivalence of the Riemann hypothesis are discussed and quantitatively developed. The validity of the Riemann hypothesis is reduced to the condition of the sublinear order of a certain alternating binomial sum.

  19. Planck intermediate results. XXIV. Constraints on variations in fundamental constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Chamballu, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Christensen, P. R.; Clements, D. L.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Couchot, F.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Doré, O.; Dupac, X.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Fabre, O.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Giard, M.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D. L.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jones, W. C.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leonardi, R.; Lesgourgues, J.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Menegoni, E.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Pratt, G. W.; Prunet, S.; Rachen, J. P.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Roudier, G.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Spencer, L. D.; Stolyarov, V.; Sudiwala, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Uzan, J.-P.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2015-08-01

    Any variation in the fundamental physical constants, more particularly in the fine structure constant, α, or in the mass of the electron, me, affects the recombination history of the Universe and cause an imprint on the cosmic microwave background angular power spectra. We show that the Planck data allow one to improve the constraint on the time variation of the fine structure constant at redshift z ~ 103 by about a factor of 5 compared to WMAP data, as well as to break the degeneracy with the Hubble constant, H0. In addition to α, we can set a constraint on the variation in the mass of the electron, me, and in the simultaneous variation of the two constants. We examine in detail the degeneracies between fundamental constants and the cosmological parameters, in order to compare the limits obtained from Planck and WMAP and to determine the constraining power gained by including other cosmological probes. We conclude that independent time variations of the fine structure constant and of the mass of the electron are constrained by Planck to Δα/α = (3.6 ± 3.7) × 10-3 and Δme/me = (4 ± 11) × 10-3 at the 68% confidence level. We also investigate the possibility of a spatial variation of the fine structure constant. The relative amplitude of a dipolar spatial variation in α (corresponding to a gradient across our Hubble volume) is constrained to be δα/α = (-2.4 ± 3.7) × 10-2. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  20. CODATA Recommended Values of the Fundamental Physical Constants: 2014*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohr, Peter J.; Newell, David B.; Taylor, Barry N.

    2016-12-01

    This paper gives the 2014 self-consistent set of values of the constants and conversion factors of physics and chemistry recommended by the Committee on Data for Science and Technology (CODATA). These values are based on a least-squares adjustment that takes into account all data available up to 31 December 2014. Details of the data selection and methodology of the adjustment are described. The recommended values may also be found at http://physics.nist.gov/constants.

  1. Contractivity for nonautonomous logistic equation with piecewise constant delays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakata, Yukihiko; Kuroda, Masataka; Muroya, Yoshiaki

    2009-05-01

    In this paper, we extend the result in [Y. Muroya, Persistence, contractivity and global stability in logistic equations with piecewise constant delays, J. Math. Anal. Appl. 270 (2002) 602-635] to nonautonomous logistic equations with piecewise constant arguments and establish two sufficient conditions for contractivity-like property, from which the global asymptotic stability of the solutions of this equation is derived, even if the effect of delays dominates over the instantaneous feedback. We offer two examples to illustrate our results.

  2. A loading system for creep testing under constant compressive stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobes, F.; Zverina, O.; Cadek, J.

    1987-01-01

    A critical analysis is made of layouts assuring constant stress under creep, pointing out the difficulties of using these layouts for compressive testing. A new mechanical system to maintain stress during creep testing is proposed. Constant stress is achieved by a definite motion of the load. The proposed system can be used in tensile or compressive testing. Practical measurements reveal that the stress constancy error is not greater than plus or minus 1.5 percent up to relative deformation of 30 percent.

  3. Precision Measurement of the Newtonian Gravitational Constant by Atom Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosi, G.; D'Amico, G.; Tino, G. M.; Cacciapuoti, L.; Prevedelli, M.; Sorrentino, F.

    We report on the latest determination of the Newtonian gravitational constant G using our atom interferometry gravity gradiometer. After a short introduction on the G measurement issue we will provide a description of the experimental method employed, followed by a discussion of the experimental results in terms of sensitivity and systematic effects. Finally, prospects for future cold atom-based experiments devoted to the measurement of this fundamental constant are reported.

  4. Gravitational Collapse with Cosmological Constant and Anisotropic Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Zahid; Malik, Sania Abdul

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the gravitational collapse of anisotropic perfect fluid by applying junction conditions and spherically symmetric space-times in the presence of cosmological constant. We show that the cosmological constant slows down the collapsing process and also reduces the size of black hole.This work provides a generalization of the previous studies by Cissoko et al. (arXiv: gr-qc/9809057) for dust and by Sharif and Ahmad (Mod. Phys. Lett. A, 22:1493, 2007) for perfect fluid.

  5. Getting through to circadian oscillators: why use constant routines?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, Jeanne F.; Dijk, Derk-Jan

    2002-01-01

    Overt 24-h rhythmicity is composed of both exogenous and endogenous components, reflecting the product of multiple (periodic) feedback loops with a core pacemaker at their center. Researchers attempting to reveal the endogenous circadian (near 24-h) component of rhythms commonly conduct their experiments under constant environmental conditions. However, even under constant environmental conditions, rhythmic changes in behavior, such as food intake or the sleep-wake cycle, can contribute to observed rhythmicity in many physiological and endocrine variables. Assessment of characteristics of the core circadian pacemaker and its direct contribution to rhythmicity in different variables, including rhythmicity in gene expression, may be more reliable when such periodic behaviors are eliminated or kept constant across all circadian phases. This is relevant for the assessment of the status of the circadian pacemaker in situations in which the sleep-wake cycle or food intake regimes are altered because of external conditions, such as in shift work or jet lag. It is also relevant for situations in which differences in overt rhythmicity could be due to changes in either sleep oscillatory processes or circadian rhythmicity, such as advanced or delayed sleep phase syndromes, in aging, or in particular clinical conditions. Researchers studying human circadian rhythms have developed constant routine protocols to assess the status of the circadian pacemaker in constant behavioral and environmental conditions, whereas this technique is often thought to be unnecessary in the study of animal rhythms. In this short review, the authors summarize constant routine methodology and what has been learned from constant routines and argue that animal and human circadian rhythm researchers should (continue to) use constant routines as a step on the road to getting through to central and peripheral circadian oscillators in the intact organism.

  6. Stability of neutral equations with constant time delays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, L. K.; Whitesides, J. L.

    1976-01-01

    A method was developed for determining the stability of a scalar neutral equation with constant coefficients and constant time delays. A neutral equation is basically a differential equation in which the highest derivative appears both with and without a time delay. Time delays may appear also in the lower derivatives or the independent variable itself. The method is easily implemented, and an illustrative example is presented.

  7. Spectroscopic constants and potential energy curves of GeF +

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hua; Balasubramanian, K.

    1995-05-01

    Spectroscopic constants and potential energy curves of 27 electronic states of GeF + are computed using the complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) followed by first- and second-order configuration interaction (FOCI, SOCI) methods that included up to 1.6 million configurations. Our computed spectroscopic constants of the 1Σ+ electronic state fit well with the experimentally observed X ground state. Other yet to be observed properties of several excited electronic states are reported.

  8. Spectroscopic constants and potential energy curves of SnF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Dingguo; Balasubramanian, K.

    1994-07-01

    Spectroscopic constants and potential energy curves of 20 electronic states of SnF arising from valence dissociation limits are computed using the complete active space MCSCF (CASSCF) followed by first- and second-order configuration interaction (FOCI, SOCI) methods, which included up to one million configurations. Our computed spectroscopic constants of five electronic states fit well with the experimentally observed X, A, a, and C states. The dipole moments and other yet to be observed properties of several electronic states are reported.

  9. Low uncertainty Boltzmann constant determinations and the kelvin redefinition.

    PubMed

    Fischer, J

    2016-03-28

    At its 25th meeting, the General Conference on Weights and Measures (CGPM) approved Resolution 1 'On the future revision of the International System of Units, the SI', which sets the path towards redefinition of four base units at the next CGPM in 2018. This constitutes a decisive advance towards the formal adoption of the new SI and its implementation. Kilogram, ampere, kelvin and mole will be defined in terms of fixed numerical values of the Planck constant, elementary charge, Boltzmann constant and Avogadro constant, respectively. The effect of the new definition of the kelvin referenced to the value of the Boltzmann constant k is that the kelvin is equal to the change of thermodynamic temperature T that results in a change of thermal energy kT by 1.380 65×10(-23) J. A value of the Boltzmann constant suitable for defining the kelvin is determined by fundamentally different primary thermometers such as acoustic gas thermometers, dielectric constant gas thermometers, noise thermometers and the Doppler broadening technique. Progress to date of the measurements and further perspectives are reported. Necessary conditions to be met before proceeding with changing the definition are given. The consequences of the new definition of the kelvin on temperature measurement are briefly outlined.

  10. Spectral Sensitivity Measured with Electroretinogram Using a Constant Response Method

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Fernando Allan de Farias; Gomes, Bruno Duarte; Silveira, Luiz Carlos de Lima; Martins, Sonia Limara; Aguiar, Renata Genaro; de Souza, John Manuel; Ventura, Dora Fix

    2016-01-01

    A new method is presented to determine the retinal spectral sensitivity function S(λ) using the electroretinogram (ERG). S(λ)s were assessed in three different species of myomorph rodents, Gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus), Wistar rats (Ratus norvegicus), and mice (Mus musculus). The method, called AC Constant Method, is based on a computerized automatic feedback system that adjusts light intensity to maintain a constant-response amplitude to a flickering stimulus throughout the spectrum, as it is scanned from 300 to 700 nm, and back. The results are presented as the reciprocal of the intensity at each wavelength required to maintain a constant peak to peak response amplitude. The resulting S(λ) had two peaks in all three rodent species, corresponding to ultraviolet and M cones, respectively: 359 nm and 511 nm for mice, 362 nm and 493 nm for gerbils, and 362 nm and 502 nm for rats. Results for mouse and gerbil were similar to literature reports of S(λ) functions obtained with other methods, confirming that the ERG associated to the AC Constant-Response Method was effective to obtain reliable S(λ) functions. In addition, due to its fast data collection time, the AC Constant Response Method has the advantage of keeping the eye in a constant light adapted state. PMID:26800521

  11. Time constants of spin-dependent recombination processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoehne, Felix; Dreher, Lukas; Suckert, Max; Franke, David P.; Stutzmann, Martin; Brandt, Martin S.

    2013-10-01

    We present experiments to systematically study the time constants of spin-dependent recombination processes in semiconductors using pulsed electrically detected magnetic resonance (EDMR). The combination of time-programmed optical excitation and pulsed spin manipulation allows us to directly measure the recombination time constants of electrons via localized spin pairs and the time constant of spin-pair formation as a function of the optical excitation intensity. Using electron nuclear double resonance, we show that the time constant of spin-pair formation is determined by an electron capture process. Based on these time constants we devise a set of rate equations to calculate the current transient after a resonant microwave pulse and compare the results with experimental data. Finally, we critically discuss the effects of different boxcar integration time intervals typically used to analyze pulsed EDMR experiments on the determination of the time constants. The experiments are performed on phosphorus-doped silicon, where EDMR via spin pairs formed by phosphorus donors and Si/SiO2 interface dangling bond defects is detected.

  12. Dielectric constant of liquid alkanes and hydrocarbon mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sen, A. D.; Anicich, V. G.; Arakelian, T.

    1992-01-01

    The complex dielectric constants of n-alkanes with two to seven carbon atoms have been measured. The measurements were conducted using a slotted-line technique at 1.2 GHz and at atmospheric pressure. The temperature was varied from the melting point to the boiling point of the respective alkanes. The real part of the dielectric constant was found to decrease with increasing temperature and correlate with the change in the molar volume. An upper limit to all the loss tangents was established at 0.001. The complex dielectric constants of a few mixtures of liquid alkanes were also measured at room temperature. For a pentane-octane mixture the real part of the dielectric constant could be explained by the Clausius-Mosotti theory. For the mixtures of n-hexane-ethylacetate and n-hexane-acetone the real part of the dielectric constants could be explained by the Onsager theory extended to mixtures. The dielectric constant of the n-hexane-acetone mixture displayed deviations from the Onsager theory at the highest fractions of acetone. The dipole moments of ethylacetate and acetone were determined for dilute mixtures using the Onsager theory and were found to be in agreement with their accepted gas-phase values. The loss tangents of the mixtures exhibited a linear relationship with the volume fraction for low concentrations of the polar liquids.

  13. PECVD of low-dielectric constant films for ULSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimogaki, Yukihiro

    1998-10-01

    We studied the reduction mechanism of the dielectric constant of F-doped silicon oxide films prepared by PECVD from SiH_4/N_2O/CF4 mixture. From the estimation of the dielectric constant at various frequencies, ranging from 1MHz to 100THz, using CV measurement, Kramers-Kronig relation and the square of the refractive index, we suggest that the dielectric constant due to ionic and electronic polarization is not the dominant factor in decreasing the dielectric constant. It is important to remove -OH in films to obtain very low dielectric constant F-doped silicon oxide films, because Si-OH is the main factor of the orientational polarization in silicon oxide films made by PECVD. To investigate the reaction mechanism which controls the film structure, we changed the residence time of gas in chamber by varying the flow rate. When the residence time in chamber decreases, the film deposition rate increases. We tried to explain flow rate dependency of the deposition rate using a simple CSTR (continuous stirred tank reactor) model. It can be concluded that there are two paths to deposit the films. One route is a deposition by the precursors with poor step coverage profile, and the other route is deposition through intermediates formed by gas phase reactions that contribute to have better step coverage. The overall gas phase reaction rate constant was estimated from these kinetic studies. Same approach was also carried out on the PECVD of C:F film deposition.

  14. How does Planck’s constant influence the macroscopic world?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Pao-Keng

    2016-09-01

    In physics, Planck’s constant is a fundamental physical constant accounting for the energy-quantization phenomenon in the microscopic world. The value of Planck’s constant also determines in which length scale the quantum phenomenon will become conspicuous. Some students think that if Planck’s constant were to have a larger value than it has now, the quantum effect would only become observable in a world with a larger size, whereas the macroscopic world might remain almost unchanged. After reasoning from some basic physical principles and theories, we found that doubling Planck’s constant might result in a radical change on the geometric sizes and apparent colors of macroscopic objects, the solar spectrum and luminosity, the climate and gravity on Earth, as well as energy conversion between light and materials such as the efficiency of solar cells and light-emitting diodes. From the discussions in this paper, students can appreciate how Planck’s constant affects various aspects of the world in which we are living now.

  15. Direct measurement of equilibrium constants for high-affinity hemoglobins.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Suman; Premer, Scott A; Hoy, Julie A; Trent, James T; Hargrove, Mark S

    2003-06-01

    The biological functions of heme proteins are linked to their rate and affinity constants for ligand binding. Kinetic experiments are commonly used to measure equilibrium constants for traditional hemoglobins comprised of pentacoordinate ligand binding sites and simple bimolecular reaction schemes. However, kinetic methods do not always yield reliable equilibrium constants with more complex hemoglobins for which reaction mechanisms are not clearly understood. Furthermore, even where reaction mechanisms are clearly understood, it is very difficult to directly measure equilibrium constants for oxygen and carbon monoxide binding to high-affinity (K(D) < 1 micro M) hemoglobins. This work presents a method for direct measurement of equilibrium constants for high-affinity hemoglobins that utilizes a competition for ligands between the "target" protein and an array of "scavenger" hemoglobins with known affinities. This method is described for oxygen and carbon monoxide binding to two hexacoordinate hemoglobins: rice nonsymbiotic hemoglobin and Synechocystis hemoglobin. Our results demonstrate that although these proteins have different mechanisms for ligand binding, their affinities for oxygen and carbon monoxide are similar. Their large affinity constants for oxygen, 285 and approximately 100 micro M(-1) respectively, indicate that they are not capable of facilitating oxygen transport.

  16. Computational calculation of equilibrium constants: addition to carbonyl compounds.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Bombarelli, Rafael; González-Pérez, Marina; Pérez-Prior, María Teresa; Calle, Emilio; Casado, Julio

    2009-10-22

    Hydration reactions are relevant for understanding many organic mechanisms. Since the experimental determination of hydration and hemiacetalization equilibrium constants is fairly complex, computational calculations now offer a useful alternative to experimental measurements. In this work, carbonyl hydration and hemiacetalization constants were calculated from the free energy differences between compounds in solution, using absolute and relative approaches. The following conclusions can be drawn: (i) The use of a relative approach in the calculation of hydration and hemiacetalization constants allows compensation of systematic errors in the solvation energies. (ii) On average, the methodology proposed here can predict hydration constants within +/- 0.5 log K(hyd) units for aldehydes. (iii) Hydration constants can be calculated for ketones and carboxylic acid derivatives within less than +/- 1.0 log K(hyd), on average, at the CBS-Q level of theory. (iv) The proposed methodology can predict hemiacetal formation constants accurately at the MP2 6-31++G(d,p) level using a common reference. If group references are used, the results obtained using the much cheaper DFT-B3LYP 6-31++G(d,p) level are almost as accurate. (v) In general, the best results are obtained if a common reference for all compounds is used. The use of group references improves the results at the lower levels of theory, but at higher levels, this becomes unnecessary.

  17. Dielectric constant of liquid alkanes and hydrocarbon mixtures.

    PubMed

    Sen, A D; Anicich, V G; Arakelian, T

    1992-01-01

    The complex dielectric constants of n-alkanes with two to seven carbon atoms have been measured. The measurements were conducted using a slotted-line technique at 1.2 GHz and at atmospheric pressure. The temperature was varied from the melting point to the boiling point of the respective alkanes. The real part of the dielectric constant was found to decrease with increasing temperature and correlate with the change in the molar volume. An upper limit to all the loss tangents was established at 0.001. The complex dielectric constants of a few mixtures of liquid alkanes were also measured at room temperature. For a pentane-octane mixture the real part of the dielectric constant could be explained by the Clausius-Mosotti theory. For the mixtures of n-hexane-ethylacetate and n-hexane-acetone the real part of the dielectric constants could be explained by the Onsager theory extended to mixtures. The dielectric constant of the n-hexane-acetone mixture displayed deviations from the Onsager theory at the highest fractions of acetone. The dipole moments of ethylacetate and acetone were determined for dilute mixtures using the Onsager theory and were found to be in agreement with their accepted gas-phase values. The loss tangents of the mixtures exhibited a linear relationship with the volume fraction for low concentrations of the polar liquids.

  18. Dielectric constant of liquid alkanes and hydrocarbon mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sen, A. D.; Anicich, V. G.; Arakelian, T.

    1992-01-01

    The complex dielectric constants of n-alkanes with two to seven carbon atoms have been measured. The measurements were conducted using a slotted-line technique at 1.2 GHz and at atmospheric pressure. The temperature was varied from the melting point to the boiling point of the respective alkanes. The real part of the dielectric constant was found to decrease with increasing temperature and correlate with the change in the molar volume. An upper limit to all the loss tangents was established at 0.001. The complex dielectric constants of a few mixtures of liquid alkanes were also measured at room temperature. For a pentane-octane mixture the real part of the dielectric constant could be explained by the Clausius-Mosotti theory. For the mixtures of n-hexane-ethylacetate and n-hexane-acetone the real part of the dielectric constants could be explained by the Onsager theory extended to mixtures. The dielectric constant of the n-hexane-acetone mixture displayed deviations from the Onsager theory at the highest fractions of acetone. The dipole moments of ethylacetate and acetone were determined for dilute mixtures using the Onsager theory and were found to be in agreement with their accepted gas-phase values. The loss tangents of the mixtures exhibited a linear relationship with the volume fraction for low concentrations of the polar liquids.

  19. Dynamical dark energy and variation of fundamental "constants"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, Steffen

    2008-12-01

    In this thesis we study the influence of a possible variation of fundamental "constants" on the process of Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN). Our findings are combined with further studies on variations of constants in other physical processes to constrain models of grand unification (GUT) and quintessence. We will find that the 7Li problem of BBN can be ameliorated if one allows for varying constants, where especially varying light quark masses show a strong influence. Furthermore, we show that recent studies of varying constants are in contradiction with each other and BBN in the framework of six exemplary GUT scenarios, if one assumes monotonic variation with time. We conclude that there is strong tension between recent claims of varying constants, hence either some claims have to be revised, or there are much more sophisticated GUT relations (and/or non-monotonic variations) realized in nature. The methods introduced in this thesis prove to be powerful tools to probe regimes well beyond the Standard Model of particle physics or the concordance model of cosmology, which are currently inaccessible by experiments. Once the first irrefutable proofs of varying constants are available, our method will allow for probing the consistency of models beyond the standard theories like GUT or quintessence and also the compatibility between these models.

  20. Electrical detection of ortho-para conversion in fullerene-encapsulated water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, Benno; Mamone, Salvatore; Concistrè, Maria; Alonso-Valdesueiro, Javier; Krachmalnicoff, Andrea; Whitby, Richard J.; Levitt, Malcolm H.

    2015-08-01

    Water exists in two spin isomers, ortho and para, that have different nuclear spin states. In bulk water, rapid proton exchange and hindered molecular rotation obscure the direct observation of two spin isomers. The supramolecular endofullerene H2O@C60 provides freely rotating, isolated water molecules even at cryogenic temperatures. Here we show that the bulk dielectric constant of this substance depends on the ortho/para ratio, and changes slowly in time after a sudden temperature jump, due to nuclear spin conversion. The attribution of the effect to ortho-para conversion is validated by comparison with nuclear magnetic resonance and quantum theory. The change in dielectric constant is consistent with an electric dipole moment of 0.51+/-0.05 Debye for an encapsulated water molecule, indicating the partial shielding of the water dipole by the encapsulating cage. The dependence of bulk dielectric constant on nuclear spin isomer composition appears to be a previously unreported physical phenomenon.

  1. High-Temperature Slow Crack Growth of Silicon Carbide Determined by Constant-Stress-Rate and Constant-Stress Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung H.; Salem, J. A.; Nemeth, N. N.

    1998-01-01

    High-temperature slow-crack-growth behaviour of hot-pressed silicon carbide was determined using both constant-stress-rate ("dynamic fatigue") and constant-stress ("static fatigue") testing in flexure at 1300 C in air. Slow crack growth was found to be a governing mechanism associated with failure of the material. Four estimation methods such as the individual data, the Weibull median, the arithmetic mean and the median deviation methods were used to determine the slow crack growth parameters. The four estimation methods were in good agreement for the constant-stress-rate testing with a small variation in the slow-crack-growth parameter, n, ranging from 28 to 36. By contrast, the variation in n between the four estimation methods was significant in the constant-stress testing with a somewhat wide range of n= 16 to 32.

  2. β-Cyclodextrin- para-aminosalicylic acid inclusion complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roik, N. V.; Belyakova, L. A.; Oranskaya, E. I.

    2010-11-01

    Complex formation of β-cyclodextrin with para-aminosalicylic acid in buffer solutions is studied by UV spectroscopy. It is found that the stoichiometric proportion of the components in the β-cyclodextrin-para-aminosalicylic acid inclusion complex is 1:1. The Ketelar equation is used to calculate the stability constants of the inclusion complexes at different temperatures. The thermodynamic parameters of the complex formation process (ΔG, ΔH, ΔS) are calculated using the van't Hoff equation. The 1:1 β-cyclodextrin-para-aminosalicylic acid inclusion complex is prepared in solid form and its characteristics are determined by IR spectroscopic and x-ray diffraction techniques.

  3. Spin-rotation and NMR shielding constants in HCl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaszuński, Michał; Repisky, Michal; Demissie, Taye B.; Komorovsky, Stanislav; Malkin, Elena; Ruud, Kenneth; Garbacz, Piotr; Jackowski, Karol; Makulski, Włodzimierz

    2013-12-01

    The spin-rotation and nuclear magnetic shielding constants are analysed for both nuclei in the HCl molecule. Nonrelativistic ab initio calculations at the CCSD(T) level of approximation show that it is essential to include relativistic effects to obtain spin-rotation constants consistent with accurate experimental data. Our best estimates for the spin-rotation constants of 1H35Cl are CCl = -53.914 kHz and CH = 42.672 kHz (for the lowest rovibrational level). For the chlorine shielding constant, the ab initio value computed including the relativistic corrections, σ(Cl) = 976.202 ppm, provides a new absolute shielding scale; for hydrogen we find σ(H) = 31.403 ppm (both at 300 K). Combining the theoretical results with our new gas-phase NMR experimental data allows us to improve the accuracy of the magnetic dipole moments of both chlorine isotopes. For the hydrogen shielding constant, including relativistic effects yields better agreement between experimental and computed values.

  4. Tuning the Spring Constant of Cantilever-free Probe Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichelsdoerfer, Daniel J.; Brown, Keith A.; Boya, Radha; Shim, Wooyoung; Mirkin, Chad A.

    2013-03-01

    The versatility of atomic force microscope (AFM) based techniques such as scanning probe lithography is due in part to the utilization of a cantilever that can be fabricated to match a desired application. In contrast, cantilever-free scanning probe lithography utilizes a low cost array of probes on a compliant backing layer that allows for high throughput nanofabrication but lacks the tailorability afforded by the cantilever in traditional AFM. Here, we present a method to measure and tune the spring constant of probes in a cantilever-free array by adjusting the mechanical properties of the underlying elastomeric layer. Using this technique, we are able to fabricate large-area silicon probe arrays with spring constants that can be tuned in the range from 7 to 150 N/m. This technique offers an advantage in that the spring constant depends linearly on the geometry of the probe, which is in contrast to traditional cantilever-based lithography where the spring constant varies as the cube of the beam width and thickness. To illustrate the benefit of utilizing a probe array with a lower spring constant, we pattern a block copolymer on a delicate 50 nm thick silicon nitride window.

  5. Spin-rotation and NMR shielding constants in HCl

    SciTech Connect

    Jaszuński, Michał; Repisky, Michal; Demissie, Taye B.; Komorovsky, Stanislav; Malkin, Elena; Ruud, Kenneth; Garbacz, Piotr; Jackowski, Karol; Makulski, Włodzimierz

    2013-12-21

    The spin-rotation and nuclear magnetic shielding constants are analysed for both nuclei in the HCl molecule. Nonrelativistic ab initio calculations at the CCSD(T) level of approximation show that it is essential to include relativistic effects to obtain spin-rotation constants consistent with accurate experimental data. Our best estimates for the spin-rotation constants of {sup 1}H{sup 35}Cl are C{sub Cl}  = −53.914 kHz and C{sub H}  = 42.672 kHz (for the lowest rovibrational level). For the chlorine shielding constant, the ab initio value computed including the relativistic corrections, σ(Cl) = 976.202 ppm, provides a new absolute shielding scale; for hydrogen we find σ(H) = 31.403 ppm (both at 300 K). Combining the theoretical results with our new gas-phase NMR experimental data allows us to improve the accuracy of the magnetic dipole moments of both chlorine isotopes. For the hydrogen shielding constant, including relativistic effects yields better agreement between experimental and computed values.

  6. Critical experiments analysis by ABBN-90 constant system

    SciTech Connect

    Tsiboulia, A.; Nikolaev, M.N.; Golubev, V.

    1997-06-01

    The ABBN-90 is a new version of the well-known Russian group-constant system ABBN. Included constants were calculated based on files of evaluated nuclear data from the BROND-2, ENDF/B-VI, and JENDL-3 libraries. The ABBN-90 is intended for the calculation of different types of nuclear reactors and radiation shielding. Calculations of criticality safety and reactivity accidents are also provided by using this constant set. Validation of the ABBN-90 set was made by using a computerized bank of evaluated critical experiments. This bank includes the results of experiments conducted in Russia and abroad of compact spherical assemblies with different reflectors, fast critical assemblies, and fuel/water-solution criticalities. This report presents the results of the calculational analysis of the whole collection of critical experiments. All calculations were produced with the ABBN-90 group-constant system. Revealed discrepancies between experimental and calculational results and their possible reasons are discussed. The codes and archives INDECS system is also described. This system includes three computerized banks: LEMEX, which consists of evaluated experiments and their calculational results; LSENS, which consists of sensitivity coefficients; and LUND, which consists of group-constant covariance matrices. The INDECS system permits us to estimate the accuracy of neutronics calculations. A discussion of the reliability of such estimations is finally presented. 16 figs.

  7. Positive cosmological constant, non-local gravity and horizon entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solodukhin, Sergey N.

    2012-08-01

    We discuss a class of (local and non-local) theories of gravity that share same properties: (i) they admit the Einstein spacetime with arbitrary cosmological constant as a solution; (ii) the on-shell action of such a theory vanishes and (iii) any (cosmological or black hole) horizon in the Einstein spacetime with a positive cosmological constant does not have a non-trivial entropy. The main focus is made on a recently proposed non-local model. This model has two phases: with a positive cosmological constant Λ>0 and with zero Λ. The effective gravitational coupling differs essentially in these two phases. Generalizing the previous result of Barvinsky we show that the non-local theory in question is free of ghosts on the background of any Einstein spacetime and that it propagates a standard spin-2 particle. Contrary to the phase with a positive Λ, where the entropy vanishes for any type of horizon, in an Einstein spacetime with zero cosmological constant the horizons have the ordinary entropy proportional to the area. We conclude that, somewhat surprisingly, the presence of any, even extremely tiny, positive cosmological constant should be important for the proper resolution of the entropy problem and, possibly, the information puzzle.

  8. The determination of best values of the fundamental physical constants.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Barry N

    2005-09-15

    The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of how a self-consistent set of 'best values' of the fundamental physical constants for use worldwide by all of science and technology is obtained from all of the relevant data available at a given point in time. The basis of the discussion is the 2002 Committee on Data for Science and Technology (CODATA) least-squares adjustment of the values of the constants, the most recent such study available, which was carried out under the auspices of the CODATA Task group on fundamental constants. A detailed description of the 2002 CODATA adjustment, which took into account all relevant data available by 31 December 2002, plus selected data that became available by Fall of 2003, may be found in the January 2005 issue of the Reviews of Modern Physics. Although the latter publication includes the full set of CODATA recommended values of the fundamental constants resulting from the 2002 adjustment, the set is also available electronically at http://physics.nist.gov/constants.

  9. Cosmological constant implementing Mach principle in general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namavarian, Nadereh; Farhoudi, Mehrdad

    2016-10-01

    We consider the fact that noticing on the operational meaning of the physical concepts played an impetus role in the appearance of general relativity (GR). Thus, we have paid more attention to the operational definition of the gravitational coupling constant in this theory as a dimensional constant which is gained through an experiment. However, as all available experiments just provide the value of this constant locally, this coupling constant can operationally be meaningful only in a local area. Regarding this point, to obtain an extension of GR for the large scale, we replace it by a conformal invariant model and then, reduce this model to a theory for the cosmological scale via breaking down the conformal symmetry through singling out a specific conformal frame which is characterized by the large scale characteristics of the universe. Finally, we come to the same field equations that historically were proposed by Einstein for the cosmological scale (GR plus the cosmological constant) as the result of his endeavor for making GR consistent with the Mach principle. However, we declare that the obtained field equations in this alternative approach do not carry the problem of the field equations proposed by Einstein for being consistent with Mach's principle (i.e., the existence of de Sitter solution), and can also be considered compatible with this principle in the Sciama view.

  10. The atoms of spacetime and the cosmological constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padmanabhan, Thanu

    2017-08-01

    I describe an approach which relates classical gravity to the quantum microstructure of spacetime. In this approach, the field equations arise from maximizing the density of states of the matter plus geometry. The former is identified using the thermodynamics of null surfaces. The latter arises from the existence of a zero-point length in the spacetime which associates an internal degree of freedom with each event in the spacetime, in the form of a fluctuating vector of constant norm. The density of states, as well as the resulting field equations, remain invariant under the shift T_ba \\to T_ba + ({{constant}})δ _b^a (arising from the addition of a constant to the matter Lagrangian, which is a symmetry of the matter sector). The cosmological constant (Λ) arises as an integration constant and renders the amount of cosmic information (Ic ) accessible to an eternal observer finite. The relation between Λ and Ic allows us to determine the numerical value of (Λ) from the information content of the quantum spacetime, within the context of cosmology.1

  11. Lattice constant measurement from electron backscatter diffraction patterns.

    PubMed

    Saowadee, N; Agersted, K; Bowen, J R

    2017-02-20

    Kikuchi bands in election backscattered diffraction patterns (EBSP) contain information about lattice constants of crystallographic samples that can be extracted via the Bragg equation. An advantage of lattice constant measurement from EBSPs over diffraction (XRD) is the ability to perform local analysis. In this study, lattice constants of cubic STN and cubic YSZ in the pure materials and in co-sintered composites were measured from their EBSPs acquired at 10 kV using a silicon single crystal as a calibration reference. The EBSP distortion was corrected by spherical back projection and Kikuchi band analysis was made using in-house software. The error of the lattice constant measurement was determined to be in the range of 0.09-1.12% compared to values determined by XRD and from literature. The confidence level of the method is indicated by the standard deviation of the measurement, which is approximately 0.04 Å. Studying Kikuchi band size dependence of the measurement precision shows that the measurement error decays with increasing band size (i.e. decreasing lattice constant). However, in practice, the sharpness of wide bands tends to be low due to their low intensity, thus limiting the measurement precision. Possible methods to improve measurement precision are suggested.

  12. Bimolecular Rate Constants for FAD-Dependent Glucose Dehydrogenase from Aspergillus terreus and Organic Electron Acceptors

    PubMed Central

    Tsuruoka, Nozomu; Sadakane, Takuya; Hayashi, Rika; Tsujimura, Seiya

    2017-01-01

    The flavin adenine dinucleotide-dependent glucose dehydrogenase (FAD-GDH) from Aspergillus species require suitable redox mediators to transfer electrons from the enzyme to the electrode surface for the application of bioelectrical devices. Although several mediators for FAD-GDH are already in use, they are still far from optimum in view of potential, kinetics, sustainability, and cost-effectiveness. Herein, we investigated the efficiency of various phenothiazines and quinones in the electrochemical oxidation of FAD-GDH from Aspergillus terreus. At pH 7.0, the logarithm of the bimolecular oxidation rate constants appeared to depend on the redox potentials of all the mediators tested. Notably, the rate constant of each molecule for FAD-GDH was approximately 2.5 orders of magnitude higher than that for glucose oxidase from Aspergillus sp. The results suggest that the electron transfer kinetics is mainly determined by the formal potential of the mediator, the driving force of electron transfer, and the electron transfer distance between the redox active site of the mediator and the FAD, affected by the steric or chemical interactions. Higher k2 values were found for ortho-quinones than for para-quinones in the reactions with FAD-GDH and glucose oxidase, which was likely due to less steric hindrance in the active site in the case of the ortho-quinones. PMID:28287419

  13. Correction for instrument time constant in determination of reaction kinetics.

    SciTech Connect

    Chilton, Marie; Clark, Jared; Thomas, Nathan; Nicholson, Allen; Hansen, Lee D.; Hansen, Clifford W.; Hansen, Jaron

    2010-02-01

    Rates of reactions can be expressed as dn/dt = kcf(n) where n is moles of reaction, k is a rate constant, c is a proportionality constant, and f(n) is a function of the properties of the sample. When the instrument time constant, ?, and k are sufficiently comparable that measured rates are significantly affected by instrument response, correction for instrument response must be done to obtain accurate reaction kinetics. Correction for instrument response has previously been done by truncating early data or by use of the Tian equation. Both methods can lead to significant errors. We describe a method for simultaneous determination of ?, k, and c by fitting equations describing the combined instrument response and rate law to rates observed as a function of time. The method was tested with data on the heat rate from acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of sucrose.

  14. Quantum hyperbolic geometry in loop quantum gravity with cosmological constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupuis, Maïté; Girelli, Florian

    2013-06-01

    Loop quantum gravity (LQG) is an attempt to describe the quantum gravity regime. Introducing a nonzero cosmological constant Λ in this context has been a standing problem. Other approaches, such as Chern-Simons gravity, suggest that quantum groups can be used to introduce Λ into the game. Not much is known when defining LQG with a quantum group. Tensor operators can be used to construct observables in any type of discrete quantum gauge theory with a classical/quantum gauge group. We illustrate this by constructing explicitly geometric observables for LQG defined with a quantum group and show for the first time that they encode a quantized hyperbolic geometry. This is a novel argument pointing out the usefulness of quantum groups as encoding a nonzero cosmological constant. We conclude by discussing how tensor operators provide the right formalism to unlock the LQG formulation with a nonzero cosmological constant.

  15. Reaction rate constant for radiative association of CF+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ã-ström, Jonatan; Bezrukov, Dmitry S.; Nyman, Gunnar; Gustafsson, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    Reaction rate constants and cross sections are computed for the radiative association of carbon cations (C+) and fluorine atoms (F) in their ground states. We consider reactions through the electronic transition 11Π → X1Σ+ and rovibrational transitions on the X1Σ+ and a3Π potentials. Semiclassical and classical methods are used for the direct contribution and Breit-Wigner theory for the resonance contribution. Quantum mechanical perturbation theory is used for comparison. A modified formulation of the classical method applicable to permanent dipoles of unequally charged reactants is implemented. The total rate constant is fitted to the Arrhenius-Kooij formula in five temperature intervals with a relative difference of <3%. The fit parameters will be added to the online database KIDA. For a temperature of 10-250 K, the rate constant is about 10-21 cm3 s-1, rising toward 10-16 cm3 s-1 for a temperature of 30 000 K.

  16. Advanced concepts for transformers pressboard dielectric constant and mechanical strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1982-03-01

    Of the numerous electrical considerations in a material, the value of the dielectric constant serves as an important criterion in designing proper insulation systems. Ways to reduce the dielectric constant of solid (fibrous) insulating materials were investigated. A literature search was made on cellulosic and synthetic fibers and also additives which offered the potential for dielectric constant reduction of the solid insulation. Sample board structures were produced in the laboratory and tested for electrical, mechanical and chemical characteristics. Electrical tests determined the suitability of the material at transformer test and operating conditions. The mechanical tests established the physical characteristics of the modified board structures. Chemical tests checked the conductivity of the aqueous extract, acidity, and ash content. Further, compatibility with transformer oil and some aging tests were performed. An actual computer transformer design was made based on one of the modified board structures and the reduction in core steel and transformer losses were shown.

  17. Atomic force microscopy spring constant determination in viscous liquids.

    PubMed

    Pirzer, Tobias; Hugel, Thorsten

    2009-03-01

    The spring constant of cantilever in atomic force microscopy (AFM) is often calibrated from thermal noise spectra. Essential for accurate implementation of this "thermal noise method" is an appropriate fitting function and procedure. Here, we survey the commonly used fitting functions and examine their applicability in a range of environments. We find that viscous liquid environments are extremely problematic due to the frequency dependent nature of the damping coefficient. The deviations from the true spring constant were sometimes more than 100% when utilizing the fit routines built into the three investigated commercial AFM instruments; similar problems can arise with homebuilt AFMs. We discuss the reasons for this problem, especially the limits of the fitting process. Finally, we present a thermal noise based procedure and an improved fit function to determine the spring constant with AFMs in fluids of various viscosities.

  18. Atomic force microscopy spring constant determination in viscous liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirzer, Tobias; Hugel, Thorsten

    2009-03-01

    The spring constant of cantilever in atomic force microscopy (AFM) is often calibrated from thermal noise spectra. Essential for accurate implementation of this "thermal noise method" is an appropriate fitting function and procedure. Here, we survey the commonly used fitting functions and examine their applicability in a range of environments. We find that viscous liquid environments are extremely problematic due to the frequency dependent nature of the damping coefficient. The deviations from the true spring constant were sometimes more than 100% when utilizing the fit routines built into the three investigated commercial AFM instruments; similar problems can arise with homebuilt AFMs. We discuss the reasons for this problem, especially the limits of the fitting process. Finally, we present a thermal noise based procedure and an improved fit function to determine the spring constant with AFMs in fluids of various viscosities.

  19. Non-minimally coupled varying constants quantum cosmologies

    SciTech Connect

    Balcerzak, Adam

    2015-04-01

    We consider gravity theory with varying speed of light and varying gravitational constant. Both constants are represented by non-minimally coupled scalar fields. We examine the cosmological evolution in the near curvature singularity regime. We find that at the curvature singularity the speed of light goes to infinity while the gravitational constant vanishes. This corresponds to the Newton's Mechanics limit represented by one of the vertex of the Bronshtein-Zelmanov-Okun cube [1,2]. The cosmological evolution includes both the pre-big-bang and post-big-bang phases separated by the curvature singularity. We also investigate the quantum counterpart of the considered theory and find the probability of transition of the universe from the collapsing pre-big-bang phase to the expanding post-big-bang phase.

  20. Gravitation, Electromagnetism and the Cosmological Constant in Purely Affine Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popławski, Nikodem J.

    The Eddington Lagrangian in the purely affine formulation of general relativity generates the Einstein equations with the cosmological constant. The Ferraris-Kijowski purely affine Lagrangian for the electromagnetic field, which has the form of the Maxwell Lagrangian with the metric tensor replaced by the symmetrized Ricci tensor, is dynamically equivalent to the Einstein-Maxwell Lagrangian in the metric formulation. We show that the sum of the two affine Lagrangians is dynamically inequivalent to the sum of the analogous Lagrangians in the metric-affine/metric formulation. We also show that such a construction is valid only for weak electromagnetic fields. Therefore the purely affine formulation that combines gravitation, electromagnetism and the cosmological constant cannot be a simple sum of terms corresponding to separate fields. Consequently, this formulation of electromagnetism seems to be unphysical, unlike the purely metric and metric-affine pictures, unless the electromagnetic field couples to the cosmological constant.

  1. Atomic force microscopy spring constant determination in viscous liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Pirzer, Tobias; Hugel, Thorsten

    2009-03-15

    The spring constant of cantilever in atomic force microscopy (AFM) is often calibrated from thermal noise spectra. Essential for accurate implementation of this 'thermal noise method' is an appropriate fitting function and procedure. Here, we survey the commonly used fitting functions and examine their applicability in a range of environments. We find that viscous liquid environments are extremely problematic due to the frequency dependent nature of the damping coefficient. The deviations from the true spring constant were sometimes more than 100% when utilizing the fit routines built into the three investigated commercial AFM instruments; similar problems can arise with homebuilt AFMs. We discuss the reasons for this problem, especially the limits of the fitting process. Finally, we present a thermal noise based procedure and an improved fit function to determine the spring constant with AFMs in fluids of various viscosities.

  2. Grothendieck's constant and local models for noisy entangled quantum states

    SciTech Connect

    Acin, Antonio; Gisin, Nicolas; Toner, Benjamin

    2006-06-15

    We relate the nonlocal properties of noisy entangled states to Grothendieck's constant, a mathematical constant appearing in Banach space theory. For two-qubit Werner states {rho}{sub p}{sup W}=p|{psi}{sup -}><{psi}{sup -}|+(1-p)1/4, we show that there is a local model for projective measurements if and only if p{<=}1/K{sub G}(3), where K{sub G}(3) is Grothendieck's constant of order 3. Known bounds on K{sub G}(3) prove the existence of this model at least for p < or approx. 0.66, quite close to the current region of Bell violation, p{approx}0.71. We generalize this result to arbitrary quantum states.

  3. Elastic constants of β -eucryptite studied by density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, Badri; Reimanis, Ivar E.; Fuller, Edwin R., Jr.; Ciobanu, Cristian V.

    2010-03-01

    The five independent elastic constants of hexagonal β -eucryptite have been determined using density functional theory total energy calculations. The calculated values agree well, to within 15%, with the experimental data. Using the calculated elastic constants, the linear compressibility of β -eucryptite parallel to the c axis, χc , and perpendicular to it, χa , have been evaluated. These values are in close agreement to those obtained from experimentally known elastic constants, but are in contradiction to those obtained through direct measurements based on a three-terminal technique. The calculated compressibility parallel to the c axis was found to have a positive value rather than a negative one as obtained from the three-terminal technique. We demonstrate that χc must be positive and discuss the implications of a positive χc in the context of explaining the negative bulk thermal expansion of β -eucryptite.

  4. Cryogenic temperature characteristics of Verdet constant of terbium sesquioxide ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snetkov, I. L.; Palashov, O. V.

    2016-12-01

    The dependence of the Verdet constant on temperature in the (80-300 K) range for a promising magneto-active material terbium sesquioxide Tb2O3 at the wavelengths of 405-1064 nm is considered. For each of the studied wavelengths, the Verdet constant of the material cooled down to the liquid nitrogen temperature increased by more than a factor of 3.2 as compared to the room temperature value. Similarly to the other paramagnetics, the increase follows the law ∼1/T. Approximations for the temperature dependence of the Verdet constant have been obtained and the value of 1/V·(dV/dT) has been estimated. This information is needed to determine the angle of rotation as well as the variation of the extinction ratio of a Faraday isolator with temperature and extremely important at creation a cryogenic Faraday devices.

  5. Constant torque in flagellar bacterial motors optimizes space exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Condat, Carlos A.; di Salvo, Mario E.

    2012-02-01

    Experiments indicate that the torque provided by the bacterial rotary motor is approximately constant over a large range of angular speeds. Constant torque implies that the power spent in active motion is proportional to the instantaneous bacterial speed, if the relation between angular speed and swimming speed is linear. Here we show that a constant torque maximizes the volume of the region explored by a bacterium in a resource-depleted medium. Given that nutrients in the ocean are often concentrated in separate, ephemeral patches, we propose that the observed constancy of the torque may be a trait evolved to maximize bacterial survival in the ocean. We also discuss the dependence of the explored volume with the particular features of the bacterial propulsion mechanism.

  6. A nonlocal approach to the cosmological constant problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, Sean M.; Remmen, Grant N.

    2017-06-01

    We construct a model in which the cosmological constant is canceled from the gravitational equations of motion. Our model relies on two key ingredients: a nonlocal constraint on the action, which forces the spacetime average of the Lagrangian density to vanish, and a dynamical way for this condition to be satisfied classically with arbitrary matter content. We implement the former condition with a spatially constant Lagrange multiplier associated with the volume form and the latter by including a free four-form gauge field strength in the action. These two features are enough to remove the cosmological constant from the Einstein equation. The model is consistent with all cosmological and experimental bounds on modification of gravity and allows for both cosmic inflation and the present epoch of acceleration.

  7. Vapor-phase molar Kerr constant values from solution measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prezhdo, Victor; Olan, Karol; Prezhdo, Oleg; Zubkova, Valentina

    2015-01-01

    A method is proposed for determination of molar Kerr constants (mK) by extrapolation of the values measured in a series of selected solvents. The mK values of 19 organic compounds were calculated. Most of the compounds cannot be studied in the vapor phase. The discrete-continuum solvation model was applied to investigate the influence of solvent nature on solubility of the compounds under investigation. It is shown that universal interactions between the solvent and solute molecules, including the dispersive, inductive, and dipole-dipole interactions, dominate the solvation process. The optimum model of internal field was chosen to determine the Kerr constant. The values of mKgas measured experimentally coincide with the values of mK_φα = 0 ‧ that were obtained by extrapolation of mK‧. Hence, this method can be applied to calculate the values of molar Kerr constants on the basis of measurements in solutions.

  8. Dimensional Analysis of Thermoelectric Modules Under Constant Heat Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Ryosuke O.; Fujisaka, Takeyuki; Ito, Keita O.; Meng, Xiangning; Sui, Hong-Tao

    2015-01-01

    Thermoelectric power generation is examined in the case of radiative heating. A constant heat flux is assumed in addition to consideration of the Seebeck effect, Peltier effect, and Joule heating with temperature-dependent material properties. Numerical evaluations are conducted using a combination of the finite-volume method and an original simultaneous solver for the heat transfer, thermoelectric, and electric transportation phenomena. Comparison with experimental results shows that the new solver could work well in the numerical calculations. The calculations predict that the Seebeck effect becomes larger for longer thermoelectric elements because of the larger temperature difference. The heat transfer to the cold surface is critical to determine the junction temperatures under a constant heat flux from the hot surface. The negative contribution from Peltier cooling and heating can be minimized when the current is smaller for longer elements. Therefore, a thicker TE module can generate more electric power even under a constant heat flux.

  9. Thermal time constant estimation in warming and cooling ectotherms.

    PubMed

    Dzialowski, E M.; O'Connor, M P.

    2001-06-01

    (1) Measurement of physiological control of warming and cooling in reptiles requires calculating the thermal time constant (tau) of the animal. (2) Previously reported methods of estimating tau are sensitive to multiple problems including measurement error in operative environmental temperature and equilibrium body temperature, drift of environmental temperatures, requirements for extremely simple thermal environments, and ill conditioning of the estimation techniques themselves. (3) We propose a physiologically based heat transfer model which is less sensitive to common experimental errors, more numerically robust, and can provide physiologically meaningful estimates of time constants. (4) The method presented here allows time constants to be measured for animals subjected to the traditional step change experiment as well as to shorter periods of warming and cooling such as during shuttling.

  10. Cantilever spring constant calibration using laser Doppler vibrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Ohler, Benjamin

    2007-06-15

    Uncertainty in cantilever spring constants is a critical issue in atomic force microscopy (AFM) force measurements. Though numerous methods exist for calibrating cantilever spring constants, the accuracy of these methods can be limited by both the physical models themselves as well as uncertainties in their experimental implementation. Here we report the results from two of the most common calibration methods, the thermal tune method and the Sader method. These were implemented on a standard AFM system as well as using laser Doppler vibrometry (LDV). Using LDV eliminates some uncertainties associated with optical lever detection on an AFM. It also offers considerably higher signal to noise deflection measurements. We find that AFM and LDV result in similar uncertainty in the calibrated spring constants, about 5%, using either the thermal tune or Sader methods provided that certain limitations of the methods and instrumentation are observed.

  11. Derivative analysis of potentiometric titration data to obtain protonation constants

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.F.; Xia, Y.X.; Choppin, G.R.

    1996-11-15

    A methodology is described to calibrate glass electrodes and to analyze potentiometric titration data to calculate protonation constants. The analysis uses the variation of dV/dpH with titrant addition in terms of two physical parameters which involve the concentrations of H{sup +}, OH{sup -}, and H{sub m}A. The data for titration of acetic acid and 8-hydroxyquinoline in 0.10-5.0 m NaCl media are analyzed by this method to obtain the stoichiometric protonation constants of the acids, the ionization constants of water, and the parameters s and b in the pH electrode calibration equation, pcH = spH{sub m} + b, where pcH = -log[H{sup +}], pH{sub m} is the pH meter reading. 31 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

  12. Measurement of Local Peltier Constant at a Microcontact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyano, Mikio; Akashi, Naoya

    2009-07-01

    Our novel apparatus measures the local Peltier constant at a thermoelectric material microregion. A narrow metal needle probe contacts a sample mounted into a small adiabatic vacuum chamber with a pressure of about 10-4 Pa. A␣stepping-motor-type nano-actuator controls the probe’s contact pressure. We measured DC and AC I- V characteristics at the microcontact to determine thermoelectric properties. We measured I- V characteristics between the probe and a commercial (Bi,Sb)2Te3 surface. Measured values of local Peltier constants are of the same order as the bulk Peltier constant π: ca. 55 mV. They increase with increased contact resistance, suggesting that contact size affects thermoelectricity.

  13. Rate constants for reactions of perhaloalkylperoxyl radicals with alkenes

    SciTech Connect

    Alfassi, Z.B.; Huie, R.E.; Neta, P. )

    1993-07-01

    Trichloro- and tribromomethylperoxyl radicals were produced by radiolytic reduction of CCl[sub 4] and CBr[sub 4] in various aerated solvents. Rate constants for the reactions of these radicals with unsaturated organic compounds were determined in methanol solutions by competition kinetics, using mainly chloropromazine as a reference. The rate constants were in the range k = 10[sup 4]-10[sup 7] L mol[sup [minus]1] s[sup [minus]1], and a good correlation was obtained between log k and the Taft substituent constants [sigma]*. Steric effects were also noticeable in some cases. The reactivities of the radicals were in the order CBr[sub 3]O[sub 2][center dot] < CCl[sub 3]O[sub 2][center dot] < C[sub 4]F[sub 9]O[sub 2][center dot], which is in contrast with the order observed in electron-transfer reactions. The rate constants for reaction of CCl[sub 3]O[sub 2][center dot] with 2,3-dimethyl-2-butene (DMB) and cyclohexene (CH) were studied in 12 solvents. In all cases DMB is considerably more reactive than CH, indicating that at least in the case of DMB the reaction is predominantly via addition. The rate constant for addition of CCl[sub 3]O[sub 2][center dot] to DMB varies by a factor of 7 in the different solvents. No correlation was found between these rate constants and thermodynamic or polarity parameters of the solvents, although viscosity appears to have an effect. 19 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Rate constant for reaction of atomic hydrogen with germane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nava, David F.; Payne, Walter A.; Marston, George; Stief, Louis J.

    1990-01-01

    Due to the interest in the chemistry of germane in the atmospheres of Jupiter and Saturn, and because previously reported kinetic reaction rate studies at 298 K gave results differing by a factor of 200, laboratory measurements were performed to determine the reaction rate constant for H + GeH4. Results of the study at 298 K, obtained via the direct technique of flash photolysis-resonance fluorescence, yield the reaction rate constant, k = (4.08 + or - 0.22) x 10(exp -12) cu cm/s.

  15. Dependence of rate constants on vibrational temperatures - An Arrhenius description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, D. I.; Johnson, R. E.

    1988-01-01

    An interpretation of the variation of rate constants with vibrational temperature is proposed which introduces parameters analogous to those of the classical Arrhenius expression. The constancy of vibrational activation energy is studied for the dissociaton of NO, the ion-molecular reaction of O(+) with N2, and the atom exchange reaction of I with H2. It is found that when a Boltzmann distribution for vibrational states is applicable, the variation of the rate constant with the vibrational temperature can be used to define a vibrational activation energy. The method has application to exchange reactions where a vibrational energy threshold exists.

  16. Solar Constant (SOLCON) Experiment: Ground Support Equipment (GSE) software development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, M. Alan; Thomas, Susan; Wilson, Robert

    1991-01-01

    The Solar Constant (SOLCON) Experiment, the objective of which is to determine the solar constant value and its variability, is scheduled for launch as part of the Space Shuttle/Atmospheric Laboratory for Application and Science (ATLAS) spacelab mission. The Ground Support Equipment (GSE) software was developed to monitor and analyze the SOLCON telemetry data during flight and to test the instrument on the ground. The design and development of the GSE software are discussed. The SOLCON instrument was tested during Davos International Solar Intercomparison, 1989 and the SOLCON data collected during the tests are analyzed to study the behavior of the instrument.

  17. Flame Chemiluminescence Rate Constants for Quantitative Microgravity Combustion Diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luque, Jorge; Smith, Gregory P.; Jeffries, Jay B.; Crosley, David R.; Weiland, Karen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Absolute excited state concentrations of OH(A), CH(A), and C2(d) were determined in three low pressure premixed methane-air flames. Two dimensional images of chemiluminescence from these states were recorded by a filtered CCD camera, processed by Abel inversion, and calibrated against Rayleigh scattering, Using a previously validated 1-D flame model with known chemistry and excited state quenching rate constants, rate constants are extracted for the reactions CH + O2 (goes to) OH(A) + CO and C2H + O (goes to) CH(A) + CO at flame temperatures. Variations of flame emission intensities with stoichiometry agree well with model predictions.

  18. Topological Quantization in Units of the Fine Structure Constant

    SciTech Connect

    Maciejko, Joseph; Qi, Xiao-Liang; Drew, H.Dennis; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., Materials Sci. Dept. /SLAC

    2011-11-11

    Fundamental topological phenomena in condensed matter physics are associated with a quantized electromagnetic response in units of fundamental constants. Recently, it has been predicted theoretically that the time-reversal invariant topological insulator in three dimensions exhibits a topological magnetoelectric effect quantized in units of the fine structure constant {alpha} = e{sup 2}/{h_bar}c. In this Letter, we propose an optical experiment to directly measure this topological quantization phenomenon, independent of material details. Our proposal also provides a way to measure the half-quantized Hall conductances on the two surfaces of the topological insulator independently of each other.

  19. Kinetic Constant Variability in Bacterial Oxidation of Elemental Sulfur▿

    PubMed Central

    Pokorna, Blanka; Mandl, Martin; Borilova, Sarka; Ceskova, Pavla; Markova, Romana; Janiczek, Oldrich

    2007-01-01

    Wide ranges of growth yields on sulfur (from 2.4 × 1010 to 8.1 × 1011 cells g−1) and maximum sulfur oxidation rates (from 0.068 to 1.30 mmol liter−1 h−1) of an Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans strain (CCM 4253) were observed in 73 batch cultures. No significant correlation between the constants was observed. Changes of the Michaelis constant for sulfur (from 0.46 to 15.5 mM) in resting cells were also noted. PMID:17449698

  20. Constant mean curvature slicings of Kantowski-Sachs spacetimes

    SciTech Connect

    Heinzle, J. Mark

    2011-04-15

    We investigate existence, uniqueness, and the asymptotic properties of constant mean curvature (CMC) slicings in vacuum Kantowski-Sachs spacetimes with positive cosmological constant. Since these spacetimes violate the strong energy condition, most of the general theorems on CMC slicings do not apply. Although there are in fact Kantowski-Sachs spacetimes with a unique CMC foliation or CMC time function, we prove that there also exist Kantowski-Sachs spacetimes with an arbitrary number of (families of) CMC slicings. The properties of these slicings are analyzed in some detail.

  1. Effective cosmological constant within the expanding axion universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierpoint, M. P.; Kusmartsev, F. V.

    2014-09-01

    We show that the value of an effective cosmological constant, Λeff, is influenced by the dimensionality of the space. Results were obtained in the framework of the axion model describing expansion of the inhomogeneous universe. Λeff determines the tension of the space (i.e. elasticity), and is relaxed when extra dimensions are accessible. We demonstrate that the effective value of the cosmological constant may be tuned to be consistent with experimental observation. Inhomogeneities considered are representative of temperature fluctuations observed within the cosmic microwave background radiation.

  2. Dependence of rate constants on vibrational temperatures - An Arrhenius description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, D. I.; Johnson, R. E.

    1988-01-01

    An interpretation of the variation of rate constants with vibrational temperature is proposed which introduces parameters analogous to those of the classical Arrhenius expression. The constancy of vibrational activation energy is studied for the dissociaton of NO, the ion-molecular reaction of O(+) with N2, and the atom exchange reaction of I with H2. It is found that when a Boltzmann distribution for vibrational states is applicable, the variation of the rate constant with the vibrational temperature can be used to define a vibrational activation energy. The method has application to exchange reactions where a vibrational energy threshold exists.

  3. Cosmological Constant as a Manifestation of the Hierarchy

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Pisin; Gu, Je-An

    2007-12-21

    There has been the suggestion that the cosmological constant as implied by the dark energy is related to the well-known hierarchy between the Planck scale, M{sub PI}, and the Standard Model scale, M{sub SM}. Here we further propose that the same framework that addresses this hierarchy problem must also address the smallness problem of the cosmological constant. Specifically, we investigate the minimal supersymmetric (SUSY) extension of the Randall-Sundrum model where SUSY-breaking is induced on the TeV brane and transmitted into the bulk. We show that the Casimir energy density of the system indeed conforms with the observed dark energy scale.

  4. Moving-Gradient Furnace With Constant-Temperature Cold Zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gernert, Nelson J.; Shaubach, Robert M.

    1993-01-01

    Outer heat pipe helps in controlling temperature of cold zone of furnace. Part of heat-pipe furnace that includes cold zone surrounded by another heat pipe equipped with heater at one end and water cooling coil at other end. Temperature of heat pipe maintained at desired constant value by controlling water cooling. Serves as constant-temperature heat source or heat sink, as needed, for gradient of temperature as gradient region moved along furnace. Proposed moving-gradient heat-pipe furnace used in terrestrial or spaceborne experiments on directional solidification in growth of crystals.

  5. Evolving extrinsic curvature and the cosmological constant problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capistrano, Abraão J. S.; Cabral, Luis A.

    2016-10-01

    The concept of smooth deformation of Riemannian manifolds associated with the extrinsic curvature is explained and applied to the Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker cosmology. We show that such deformation can be derived from the Einstein-Hilbert-like dynamical principle may produce an observable effect in the sense of Noether. As a result, we show how the extrinsic curvature compensates both quantitative and qualitative differences between the cosmological constant Λ and the vacuum energy {ρ }{vac} obtaining the observed upper bound for the cosmological constant problem at electroweak scale. The topological characteristics of the extrinsic curvature are discussed showing that the produced extrinsic scalar curvature is an evolving dynamical quantity.

  6. The Relation between Fundamental Constants and Particle Physics Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Rodger

    2017-01-01

    The observed constraints on the variability of the proton to electron mass ratio $\\mu$ and the fine structure constant $\\alpha$ are used to establish constraints on the variability of the Quantum Chromodynamic Scale and a combination of the Higgs Vacuum Expectation Value and the Yukawa couplings. Further model dependent assumptions provide constraints on the Higgs VEV and the Yukawa couplings separately. A primary conclusion is that limits on the variability of dimensionless fundamental constants such as $\\mu$ and $\\alpha$ provide important constraints on the parameter space of new physics and cosmologies.

  7. Five-Loop Running of the QCD Coupling Constant.

    PubMed

    Baikov, P A; Chetyrkin, K G; Kühn, J H

    2017-02-24

    We analytically compute the five-loop term in the beta function which governs the running of α_{s}-the quark-gluon coupling constant in QCD. The new term leads to a reduction of the theory uncertainty in α_{s} taken at the Z-boson scale as extracted from the τ-lepton decays as well as to new, improved by one more order of perturbation theory, predictions for the effective coupling constants of the standard model Higgs boson to gluons and for its total decay rate to the quark-antiquark pairs.

  8. Fractional crystallization of iron meteorites: Constant versus changing partition coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. H.

    1994-01-01

    Analyses of magmatic iron meteorites, plotted on LogC(sub i) vs LogC(sub Ni) diagrams, often form linear arrays. Traditionally, this linearity has been ascribed to fractional crystallization under the assumption of constant partition coefficients (i.e., Rayleigh fractionation). Paradoxically, however, partition coefficients in the Fe-Ni-S-P system are decidedly not constant. This contribution provides a rationale for understanding how trends on LogC(sub i) vs LogC(sub Ni) diagrams can be linear, even when partition coefficients are changing rapidly.

  9. Early universe constraints on time variation of fundamental constants

    SciTech Connect

    Landau, Susana J.; Mosquera, Mercedes E.; Scoccola, Claudia G.; Vucetich, Hector

    2008-10-15

    We study the time variation of fundamental constants in the early Universe. Using data from primordial light nuclei abundances, cosmic microwave background, and the 2dFGRS power spectrum, we put constraints on the time variation of the fine structure constant {alpha} and the Higgs vacuum expectation value without assuming any theoretical framework. A variation in leads to a variation in the electron mass, among other effects. Along the same line, we study the variation of {alpha} and the electron mass m{sub e}. In a purely phenomenological fashion, we derive a relationship between both variations.

  10. The sixteen channel CAMAC constant fraction discriminator for APEX

    SciTech Connect

    Maier, M.R.; Robertson, M.; Wolfs, F.L.H.; Perera, P.A.A.

    1991-11-01

    We report on the construction and the performance of a sixteen channel constant fraction discriminator (CFD) for the Atlas Positron Experiment (APEX). We have used an integrated circuit (IC), recently introduced commercially, which contains all the electronic building blocks needed to construct a CFD. We have placed 16 channels of CFD into a CAMAC module. An important feature is the time to charge converter (TQC) that we have included for every CFD channel. Its calibration constant is controlled via CAMAC. The TQC allows the use charge sensitive analog to digital converters (QDC) for timing measurements. Results for CFD walk, resolution and crosstalk as well as for TQC linearity will be presented.

  11. Critique of Coleman's Theory of the Vanishing Cosmological Constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susskind, Leonard

    In these lectures I would like to review some of the criticisms to the Coleman worm-hole theory of the vanishing cosmological constant. In particular, I would like to focus on the most fundamental assumption that the path integral over topologies defines a probability for the cosmological constant which has the form EXP(A) with A being the Baum-Hawking-Coleman saddle point. Coleman argues that the euclideam path integral over all geometries may be dominated by special configurations which consist of large smooth "spheres" connected by any number of narrow wormholes. Formally summing up such configurations gives a very divergent expression for the path integral…

  12. Hyperfine structure constants of atomic bromine (Br I)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Xue; Deng, Lunhua; Wang, Hailing

    2017-07-01

    The absorption spectrum of the neutral bromine (Br I), lying in the region from 11,300 cm-1 to 12,600 cm-1 has been investigated using concentration modulation absorption spectroscopy with a tunable Ti:Sapphire laser. The bromine atoms were excited by discharging the mixture of Helium and bromine vapour in a hollow discharge glass tube. The hyperfine structure spectra of 45 lines were analyzed. Hyperfine structure constants A and B were derived for 20 even and 27 odd levels amongst which constants for 12 even and 21 odd levels were newly reported.

  13. Five-Loop Running of the QCD Coupling Constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baikov, P. A.; Chetyrkin, K. G.; Kühn, J. H.

    2017-02-01

    We analytically compute the five-loop term in the beta function which governs the running of αs—the quark-gluon coupling constant in QCD. The new term leads to a reduction of the theory uncertainty in αs taken at the Z -boson scale as extracted from the τ -lepton decays as well as to new, improved by one more order of perturbation theory, predictions for the effective coupling constants of the standard model Higgs boson to gluons and for its total decay rate to the quark-antiquark pairs.

  14. BF gravity with Immirzi parameter and cosmological constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montesinos, Merced; Velázquez, Mercedes

    2010-02-01

    The action principle of the BF type introduced by Capovilla, Montesinos, Prieto, and Rojas (CMPR) which describes general relativity with Immirzi parameter is modified in order to allow the inclusion of the cosmological constant. The resulting action principle is on the same footing as the original Plebanski action in the sense that the equations of motion coming from the new action principle are equivalent to the Holst action principle plus a cosmological constant without the need of imposing additional restrictions on the fields. We consider this result a relevant step towards the coupling of matter fields to gravity in the framework of the CMPR action principle.

  15. Ab initio calculation of the NMR shielding constants for histamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazurek, A. P.; Dobrowolski, J. Cz.; Sadlej, J.

    1997-12-01

    The gage-independent atomic orbital (GIAO) approach is used within the coupled Hartree-Fock approximation to compute the 1H, 13C and 15N NMR shielding constants in two tautomeric forms of both the histamine molecule and its protonated form. An analysis of the results shows that the protonation on the end of the chain changes its nitrogen shielding constants of the pyridine and pyrrole type. These changes are much higher for the N(3)-H than for the N(1)-H tautomer.

  16. Flavour breaking effects in the pseudoscalar meson decay constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bornyakov, V. G.; Horsley, R.; Nakamura, Y.; Perlt, H.; Pleiter, D.; Rakow, P. E. L.; Schierholz, G.; Schiller, A.; Stüben, H.; Zanotti, J. M.

    2017-04-01

    The SU(3) flavour symmetry breaking expansion in up, down and strange quark masses is extended from hadron masses to meson decay constants. This allows a determination of the ratio of kaon to pion decay constants in QCD. Furthermore when using partially quenched valence quarks the expansion is such that SU(2) isospin breaking effects can also be determined. It is found that the lowest order SU(3) flavour symmetry breaking expansion (or Gell-Mann-Okubo expansion) works very well. Simulations are performed for 2 + 1 flavours of clover fermions at four lattice spacings.

  17. Behavior near constant solutions of functional differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hale, J. K.

    1974-01-01

    Techniques have been developed to determine in a systematic way the local behavior near constant solutions. Local integral manifolds play a very important role in this development, as they have also for ordinary differential equations. An attempt is made to indicate a few more applications of these methods to some problems in bifurcation in the spirit of Sotomayor (to appear) and to a growth model of Cooke and Yorke (to appear). It is also shown how to prove a theorem on stability under constantly acting disturbances using these methods.

  18. Moving-Gradient Furnace With Constant-Temperature Cold Zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gernert, Nelson J.; Shaubach, Robert M.

    1993-01-01

    Outer heat pipe helps in controlling temperature of cold zone of furnace. Part of heat-pipe furnace that includes cold zone surrounded by another heat pipe equipped with heater at one end and water cooling coil at other end. Temperature of heat pipe maintained at desired constant value by controlling water cooling. Serves as constant-temperature heat source or heat sink, as needed, for gradient of temperature as gradient region moved along furnace. Proposed moving-gradient heat-pipe furnace used in terrestrial or spaceborne experiments on directional solidification in growth of crystals.

  19. Functionalised graphene sheets as effective high dielectric constant fillers

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    A new functionalised graphene sheet (FGS) filled poly(dimethyl)siloxane insulator nanocomposite has been developed with high dielectric constant, making it well suited for applications in flexible electronics. The dielectric permittivity increased tenfold at 10 Hz and 2 wt.% FGS, while preserving low dielectric losses and good mechanical properties. The presence of functional groups on the graphene sheet surface improved the compatibility nanofiller/polymer at the interface, reducing the polarisation process. This study demonstrates that functionalised graphene sheets are ideal nanofillers for the development of new polymer composites with high dielectric constant values. PACS: 78.20.Ci, 72.80.Tm, 62.23.Kn PMID:21867505

  20. Motion on constant curvature spaces and quantization using Noether symmetries.

    PubMed

    Bracken, Paul

    2014-12-01

    A general approach is presented for quantizing a metric nonlinear system on a manifold of constant curvature. It makes use of a curvature dependent procedure which relies on determining Noether symmetries from the metric. The curvature of the space functions as a constant parameter. For a specific metric which defines the manifold, Lie differentiation of the metric gives these symmetries. A metric is used such that the resulting Schrödinger equation can be solved in terms of hypergeometric functions. This permits the investigation of both the energy spectrum and wave functions exactly for this system.