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Sample records for essential gene products

  1. Essential Oils Modulate Gene Expression and Ochratoxin A Production in Aspergillus carbonarius

    PubMed Central

    El Khoury, Rachelle; Atoui, Ali; Verheecke, Carol; Maroun, Richard; El Khoury, Andre; Mathieu, Florence

    2016-01-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a mycotoxin, mainly produced on grapes by Aspergillus carbonarius, that causes massive health problems for humans. This study aims to reduce the occurrence of OTA by using the ten following essential oils (E.Os): fennel, cardamom, anise, chamomile, celery, cinnamon, thyme, taramira, oregano and rosemary at 1 µL/mL and 5 µL/mL for each E.O.As a matter of fact, their effects on the OTA production and the growth of A. carbonarius S402 cultures were evaluated, after four days at 28 °C on a Synthetic Grape Medium (SGM). Results showed that A. carbonarius growth was reduced up to 100%, when cultured with the E.Os of cinnamon, taramira, and oregano at both concentrations and the thyme at 5 µL/mL. As for the other six E.Os, their effect on A. carbonarius growth was insignificant, but highly important on the OTA production. Interestingly, the fennel E.O at 5 µL/mL reduced the OTA production up to 88.9% compared to the control, with only 13.8% of fungal growth reduction. We further investigated the effect of these E.Os on the expression levels of the genes responsible for the OTA biosynthesis (acOTApks and acOTAnrps along with the acpks gene) as well as the two regulatory genes laeA and vea, using the quantitative Reverse Transcription-Polymerase Chain Reaction (qRT-PCR) method. The results revealed that these six E.Os reduced the expression of the five studied genes, where the ackps was downregulated by 99.2% (the highest downregulation in this study) with 5 µL/mL of fennel E.O.As for the acOTApks, acOTAnrps, veA and laeA, their reduction levels ranged between 10% and 96% depending on the nature of the E.O and its concentration in the medium. PMID:27548221

  2. Essential Oils Modulate Gene Expression and Ochratoxin A Production in Aspergillus carbonarius.

    PubMed

    El Khoury, Rachelle; Atoui, Ali; Verheecke, Carol; Maroun, Richard; El Khoury, Andre; Mathieu, Florence

    2016-01-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a mycotoxin, mainly produced on grapes by Aspergillus carbonarius, that causes massive health problems for humans. This study aims to reduce the occurrence of OTA by using the ten following essential oils (E.Os): fennel, cardamom, anise, chamomile, celery, cinnamon, thyme, taramira, oregano and rosemary at 1 µL/mL and 5 µL/mL for each E.O.As a matter of fact, their effects on the OTA production and the growth of A. carbonarius S402 cultures were evaluated, after four days at 28 °C on a Synthetic Grape Medium (SGM). Results showed that A. carbonarius growth was reduced up to 100%, when cultured with the E.Os of cinnamon, taramira, and oregano at both concentrations and the thyme at 5 µL/mL. As for the other six E.Os, their effect on A. carbonarius growth was insignificant, but highly important on the OTA production. Interestingly, the fennel E.O at 5 µL/mL reduced the OTA production up to 88.9% compared to the control, with only 13.8% of fungal growth reduction. We further investigated the effect of these E.Os on the expression levels of the genes responsible for the OTA biosynthesis (acOTApks and acOTAnrps along with the acpks gene) as well as the two regulatory genes laeA and vea, using the quantitative Reverse Transcription-Polymerase Chain Reaction (qRT-PCR) method. The results revealed that these six E.Os reduced the expression of the five studied genes, where the ackps was downregulated by 99.2% (the highest downregulation in this study) with 5 µL/mL of fennel E.O.As for the acOTApks, acOTAnrps, veA and laeA, their reduction levels ranged between 10% and 96% depending on the nature of the E.O and its concentration in the medium. PMID:27548221

  3. Essential Oils Modulate Gene Expression and Ochratoxin A Production in Aspergillus carbonarius.

    PubMed

    El Khoury, Rachelle; Atoui, Ali; Verheecke, Carol; Maroun, Richard; El Khoury, Andre; Mathieu, Florence

    2016-08-19

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a mycotoxin, mainly produced on grapes by Aspergillus carbonarius, that causes massive health problems for humans. This study aims to reduce the occurrence of OTA by using the ten following essential oils (E.Os): fennel, cardamom, anise, chamomile, celery, cinnamon, thyme, taramira, oregano and rosemary at 1 µL/mL and 5 µL/mL for each E.O.As a matter of fact, their effects on the OTA production and the growth of A. carbonarius S402 cultures were evaluated, after four days at 28 °C on a Synthetic Grape Medium (SGM). Results showed that A. carbonarius growth was reduced up to 100%, when cultured with the E.Os of cinnamon, taramira, and oregano at both concentrations and the thyme at 5 µL/mL. As for the other six E.Os, their effect on A. carbonarius growth was insignificant, but highly important on the OTA production. Interestingly, the fennel E.O at 5 µL/mL reduced the OTA production up to 88.9% compared to the control, with only 13.8% of fungal growth reduction. We further investigated the effect of these E.Os on the expression levels of the genes responsible for the OTA biosynthesis (acOTApks and acOTAnrps along with the acpks gene) as well as the two regulatory genes laeA and vea, using the quantitative Reverse Transcription-Polymerase Chain Reaction (qRT-PCR) method. The results revealed that these six E.Os reduced the expression of the five studied genes, where the ackps was downregulated by 99.2% (the highest downregulation in this study) with 5 µL/mL of fennel E.O.As for the acOTApks, acOTAnrps, veA and laeA, their reduction levels ranged between 10% and 96% depending on the nature of the E.O and its concentration in the medium.

  4. Vaccinia virus A17L gene product is essential for an early step in virion morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, D; Esteban, M; Rodríguez, J R

    1995-08-01

    Vaccinia virus (VV) A17L gene encodes a 23-kDa protein that is proteolytically cleaved to generate a 21-kDa product that is incorporated into the viral particles. We have previously shown that the 21-kDa protein forms a stable complex with the VV 14-kDa envelope protein and suggested that the 21-kDa protein may serve to anchor the 14-kDa protein to the envelope of the virion (D. Rodríguez, J. R. Rodríguez, and M. Esteban, J. Virol. 67:3435-3440, 1993). To study the role of the 21-kDa protein in virion assembly, in this investigation we generated a VV recombinant, VVindA17L, that contains an inducible A17L gene regulated by the E. coli repressor/operator system. In the absence of the inducer, shutoff of the A17L gene was complete, and this shutoff correlated with a reduction in virus yields of about 3 log units. Although early and late viral polypeptides are normally synthesized in the absence of the A17L gene product, proteolytic processing of the major p4a and p4b core proteins was clearly impaired under these conditions. Electron microscopy examination of cells infected in the absence of isopropylthiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) revealed that virion morphogenesis was completely arrested at a very early stage, even prior to the formation of crescent-shaped membranes, which are the first distinguishable viral structures. Only electron-dense structures similar to rifampin bodies, but devoid of membranes, could be observed in the cytoplasm of cells infected with VVindA17L under nonpermissive conditions. Considering the most recent assembly model presented by Sodeik et al. (B. Sodeik, R. W. Doms, M. Ericsson, G. Hiller, C. E. Machamer, W. van't Hof, G. van Meer, B. Moss, and G. Griffiths, J. Cell Biol. 121:521-541, 1993), we propose that this protein is targeted to the intermediate compartment and is involved in the recruitment of these membranes to the viral factories, where it forms the characteristic crescent structures that subsequently result in the formation of

  5. A highly conserved baculovirus gene p48 (ac103) is essential for BV production and ODV envelopment

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan Meijin; Wu Wenbi; Liu Chao; Wang Yanjie; Hu Zhaoyang; Yang Kai Pang Yi

    2008-09-15

    Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) p48 (ac103) is a highly conserved baculovirus gene of unknown function. In the present study, we generated a knockout of the p48 gene in an AcMNPV bacmid and investigated the role of P48 in baculovirus life cycle. The p48-null Bacmid vAc{sup P48-KO-PH-GFP} was unable to propagate in cell culture, while a 'repair' Bacmid vAc{sup P48-REP-PH-GFP} was able to replicate in a manner similar to a wild-type Bacmid vAc{sup PH-GFP}. Titration assays and Western blotting confirmed that vAc{sup P48-KO-PH-GFP} was unable to produce budded viruses (BVs). qPCR analysis showed that p48 deletion did not affect viral DNA replication. Electron microscopy indicated that P48 was required for nucleocapsid envelopment to form occlusion-derived viruses (ODVs) and their subsequent occlusion. Confocal analysis showed that P48 prominently condensed in the centre of the nucleus. Our results demonstrate that P48 plays an essential role in BV production and ODV envelopment in the AcMNPV life cycle.

  6. A highly conserved baculovirus gene p48 (ac103) is essential for BV production and ODV envelopment.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Meijin; Wu, Wenbi; Liu, Chao; Wang, Yanjie; Hu, Zhaoyang; Yang, Kai; Pang, Yi

    2008-09-15

    Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) p48 (ac103) is a highly conserved baculovirus gene of unknown function. In the present study, we generated a knockout of the p48 gene in an AcMNPV bacmid and investigated the role of P48 in baculovirus life cycle. The p48-null Bacmid vAc(P48-KO-PH-GFP) was unable to propagate in cell culture, while a 'repair' Bacmid vAc(P48-REP-PH-GFP) was able to replicate in a manner similar to a wild-type Bacmid vAc(PH-GFP). Titration assays and Western blotting confirmed that vAc(P48-KO-PH-GFP) was unable to produce budded viruses (BVs). qPCR analysis showed that p48 deletion did not affect viral DNA replication. Electron microscopy indicated that P48 was required for nucleocapsid envelopment to form occlusion-derived viruses (ODVs) and their subsequent occlusion. Confocal analysis showed that P48 prominently condensed in the centre of the nucleus. Our results demonstrate that P48 plays an essential role in BV production and ODV envelopment in the AcMNPV life cycle.

  7. OGEE: an online gene essentiality database.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Hua; Minguez, Pablo; Lercher, Martin J; Bork, Peer

    2012-01-01

    OGEE is an Online GEne Essentiality database. Its main purpose is to enhance our understanding of the essentiality of genes. This is achieved by collecting not only experimentally tested essential and non-essential genes, but also associated gene features such as expression profiles, duplication status, conservation across species, evolutionary origins and involvement in embryonic development. We focus on large-scale experiments and complement our data with text-mining results. Genes are organized into data sets according to their sources. Genes with variable essentiality status across data sets are tagged as conditionally essential, highlighting the complex interplay between gene functions and environments. Linked tools allow the user to compare gene essentiality among different gene groups, or compare features of essential genes to non-essential genes, and visualize the results. OGEE is freely available at http://ogeedb.embl.de.

  8. Identification and characterization of the bovine herpesvirus 1 UL7 gene and gene product which are not essential for virus replication in cell culture.

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, J; Keil, G M

    1996-01-01

    The UL7 gene of bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV-1) strain Schönböken was found at a position and in a context predicted from the gene order in the prototype alphaherpesvirus herpes simplex virus type 1. The gene and flanking regions were sequenced, the UL7 RNA and protein were characterized, and 98.3% of the UL7 open reading frame was deleted from the viral genome without destroying productive virus replication. Concomitant deletion of nine 3' codons from the BHV-1 UL6 ORF and 77 amino acids from the carboxy terminus of the predicted BHV-1 UL8 protein demonstrated that these domains are also not essential for function of the respective proteins. The UL7 open reading frame encodes a protein of 300 amino acids with a calculated molecular mass of 32 kDa. Comparison with UL7 homologs of other alphaherpesviruses revealed a high degree of homology, the most prominent being to the predicted UL7 polypeptide of varicella-zoster virus, with 43.3% identical amino acids. A monospecific anti-UL7 serum identified the 33-kDa (apparent-molecular-mass) UL7 polypeptide which is translated from an early-expressed 1.7-kb RNA. The UL7 protein was localized in the cytoplasm of infected cells and could not be detected in purified virions. In summary, we describe the first identification of an alphaherpesviral UL7-encoded polypeptide and demonstrate that the UL7 protein is not essential for replication of BHV-1 in cell culture. PMID:8551568

  9. The ATPase domain but not the acidic region of Cockayne syndrome group B gene product is essential for DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Brosh, R M; Balajee, A S; Selzer, R R; Sunesen, M; Proietti De Santis, L; Bohr, V A

    1999-11-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a human genetic disorder characterized by UV sensitivity, developmental abnormalities, and premature aging. Two of the genes involved, CSA and CSB, are required for transcription-coupled repair (TCR), a subpathway of nucleotide excision repair that removes certain lesions rapidly and efficiently from the transcribed strand of active genes. CS proteins have also been implicated in the recovery of transcription after certain types of DNA damage such as those lesions induced by UV light. In this study, site-directed mutations have been introduced to the human CSB gene to investigate the functional significance of the conserved ATPase domain and of a highly acidic region of the protein. The CSB mutant alleles were tested for genetic complementation of UV-sensitive phenotypes in the human CS-B homologue of hamster UV61. In addition, the CSB mutant alleles were tested for their ability to complement the sensitivity of UV61 cells to the carcinogen 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4-NQO), which introduces bulky DNA adducts repaired by global genome repair. Point mutation of a highly conserved glutamic acid residue in ATPase motif II abolished the ability of CSB protein to complement the UV-sensitive phenotypes of survival, RNA synthesis recovery, and gene-specific repair. These data indicate that the integrity of the ATPase domain is critical for CSB function in vivo. Likewise, the CSB ATPase point mutant failed to confer cellular resistance to 4-NQO, suggesting that ATP hydrolysis is required for CSB function in a TCR-independent pathway. On the contrary, a large deletion of the acidic region of CSB protein did not impair the genetic function in the processing of either UV- or 4-NQO-induced DNA damage. Thus the acidic region of CSB is likely to be dispensable for DNA repair, whereas the ATPase domain is essential for CSB function in both TCR-dependent and -independent pathways. PMID:10564257

  10. The potential effects of Zataria multiflora Boiss essential oil on growth, aflatoxin production and transcription of aflatoxin biosynthesis pathway genes of toxigenic Aspergillus parasiticus

    PubMed Central

    Yahyaraeyat, R.; Khosravi, A.R.; Shahbazzadeh, D.; Khalaj, V.

    2013-01-01

    This study aims at evaluating the effects of Zataria multiflora (Z. multiflora) essential oil (EO) on growth, aflatoxin production and transcription of aflatoxin biosynthesis pathway genes. Total RNAs of Aspergillus parasiticus (A.parasiticus) ATCC56775 grown in yeast extract sucrose (YES) broth medium treated with Z. multiflora EO were subjected to reverse transcription- polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Specific primers of nor-1, ver-1, omt-A and aflR genes were used. In parallel mycelial dry weight of samples were measured and all the media were assayed by high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) for aflatoxinB1 (AFB1), aflatoxinB2 (AFB2), aflatoxinG1 (AFG1), aflatoxinG2 (AFG2) and aflatoxin total (AFTotal) production. The results showed that mycelial dry weight and aflatoxin production reduce in the presence of Z. multiflora EO (100 ppm) on day 5 of growth. It was found that the expression of nor-1, ver-1, omt-A and aflR genes was correlated with the ability of fungus to produce aflatoxins on day 5 in YES medium. RT-PCR showed that in the presence of Z.multiflora EO (100 ppm) nor-1, ver-1 and omtA genes expression was reduced. It seems that toxin production inhibitory effects of Z. multiflora EO on day 5 may be at the transcription level and this herb may cause reduction in aflatoxin biosynthesis pathway genes activity. PMID:24294264

  11. Nonribosomal peptide synthetase genes pesL and pes1 are essential for Fumigaclavine C production in Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    O'Hanlon, Karen A; Gallagher, Lorna; Schrettl, Markus; Jöchl, Christoph; Kavanagh, Kevin; Larsen, Thomas O; Doyle, Sean

    2012-05-01

    The identity of metabolites encoded by the majority of nonribosomal peptide synthetases in the opportunistic pathogen, Aspergillus fumigatus, remains outstanding. We found that the nonribosomal peptide (NRP) synthetases PesL and Pes1 were essential for fumigaclavine C biosynthesis, the end product of the complex ergot alkaloid (EA) pathway in A. fumigatus. Deletion of either pesL (ΔpesL) or pes1 (Δpes1) resulted in complete loss of fumigaclavine C biosynthesis, relatively increased production of fumitremorgins such as TR-2, fumitremorgin C and verruculogen, increased sensitivity to H(2)O(2), and increased sensitivity to the antifungals, voriconazole, and amphotericin B. Deletion of pesL resulted in severely reduced virulence in an invertebrate infection model (P < 0.001). These findings indicate that NRP synthesis plays an essential role in mediating the final prenylation step of the EA pathway, despite the apparent absence of NRP synthetases in the proposed EA biosynthetic cluster for A. fumigatus. Liquid chromatography/diode array detection/mass spectrometry analysis also revealed the presence of fumiquinazolines A to F in both A. fumigatus wild-type and ΔpesL strains. This observation suggests that alternative NRP synthetases can also function in fumiquinazoline biosynthesis, since PesL has been shown to mediate fumiquinazoline biosynthesis in vitro. Furthermore, we provide here the first direct link between EA biosynthesis and virulence, in agreement with the observed toxicity associated with EA exposure. Finally, we demonstrate a possible cluster cross-talk phenomenon, a theme which is beginning to emerge in the literature. PMID:22344643

  12. Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase Genes pesL and pes1 Are Essential for Fumigaclavine C Production in Aspergillus fumigatus

    PubMed Central

    O'Hanlon, Karen A.; Gallagher, Lorna; Schrettl, Markus; Jöchl, Christoph; Kavanagh, Kevin; Larsen, Thomas O.

    2012-01-01

    The identity of metabolites encoded by the majority of nonribosomal peptide synthetases in the opportunistic pathogen, Aspergillus fumigatus, remains outstanding. We found that the nonribosomal peptide (NRP) synthetases PesL and Pes1 were essential for fumigaclavine C biosynthesis, the end product of the complex ergot alkaloid (EA) pathway in A. fumigatus. Deletion of either pesL (ΔpesL) or pes1 (Δpes1) resulted in complete loss of fumigaclavine C biosynthesis, relatively increased production of fumitremorgins such as TR-2, fumitremorgin C and verruculogen, increased sensitivity to H2O2, and increased sensitivity to the antifungals, voriconazole, and amphotericin B. Deletion of pesL resulted in severely reduced virulence in an invertebrate infection model (P < 0.001). These findings indicate that NRP synthesis plays an essential role in mediating the final prenylation step of the EA pathway, despite the apparent absence of NRP synthetases in the proposed EA biosynthetic cluster for A. fumigatus. Liquid chromatography/diode array detection/mass spectrometry analysis also revealed the presence of fumiquinazolines A to F in both A. fumigatus wild-type and ΔpesL strains. This observation suggests that alternative NRP synthetases can also function in fumiquinazoline biosynthesis, since PesL has been shown to mediate fumiquinazoline biosynthesis in vitro. Furthermore, we provide here the first direct link between EA biosynthesis and virulence, in agreement with the observed toxicity associated with EA exposure. Finally, we demonstrate a possible cluster cross-talk phenomenon, a theme which is beginning to emerge in the literature. PMID:22344643

  13. New genes in Drosophila quickly become essential.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sidi; Zhang, Yong E; Long, Manyuan

    2010-12-17

    To investigate the origin and evolution of essential genes, we identified and phenotyped 195 young protein-coding genes, which originated 3 to 35 million years ago in Drosophila. Knocking down expression with RNA interference showed that 30% of newly arisen genes are essential for viability. The proportion of genes that are essential is similar in every evolutionary age group that we examined. Under constitutive silencing of these young essential genes, lethality was high in the pupal stage and also found in the larval stages. Lethality was attributed to diverse cellular and developmental defects, such as organ formation and patterning defects. These data suggest that new genes frequently and rapidly evolve essential functions and participate in development.

  14. Genetic interactions between an essential 3' cis-acting RNA pseudoknot, replicase gene products, and the extreme 3' end of the mouse coronavirus genome.

    PubMed

    Züst, Roland; Miller, Timothy B; Goebel, Scott J; Thiel, Volker; Masters, Paul S

    2008-02-01

    The upstream end of the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of the mouse hepatitis virus genome contains two essential and overlapping RNA secondary structures, a bulged stem-loop and a pseudoknot, which have been proposed to be elements of a molecular switch that is critical for viral RNA synthesis. It has previously been shown that a particular six-base insertion in loop 1 of the pseudoknot is extremely deleterious to the virus. We have now isolated multiple independent second-site revertants of the loop 1 insertion mutant, and we used reverse-genetics methods to confirm the identities of suppressor mutations that could compensate for the original insertion. The suppressors were localized to two separate regions of the genome. Members of one class of suppressor were mapped to the portions of gene 1 that encode nsp8 and nsp9, thereby providing the first evidence for specific interactions between coronavirus replicase gene products and a cis-acting genomic RNA element. The second class of suppressor was mapped to the extreme 3' end of the genome, a result which pointed to the existence of a direct base-pairing interaction between loop 1 of the pseudoknot and the genomic terminus. The latter finding was strongly supported by phylogenetic evidence and by the construction of a deletion mutant that reduced the 3' UTR to its minimal essential elements. Taken together, the interactions revealed by the two classes of suppressors suggest a model for the initiation of coronavirus negative-strand RNA synthesis.

  15. The yeast NOP4 gene product is an essential nucleolar protein required for pre-rRNA processing and accumulation of 60S ribosomal subunits.

    PubMed Central

    Sun, C; Woolford, J L

    1994-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae NOP4 gene was isolated by screening a lambda gt11 yeast genomic DNA library with a monoclonal antibody against a yeast nucleolar protein. NOP4 encodes a 78 kDa protein that contains two prototypical RNA recognition motifs (RRMs) flanking an imperfect RRM lacking characteristic RNP1 and RNP2 motifs. In addition, there is a fourth incomplete RRM. NOP4 is a single copy essential gene present on chromosome XVI, between RAD1 and PEP4. To examine the function of Nop4p, we constructed a conditional null allele of NOP4 by placing this gene under the control of the glucose-repressible GAL1 promoter. When cells are shifted from galactose-containing medium to glucose-containing medium, NOP4 transcription is terminated, Nop4 protein is depleted and cell growth is impaired. Nop4 protein depletion results in diminished accumulation of 60S ribosomal subunits, assignable to a defect in ribosome biogenesis arising from a lack of production of mature 25S rRNA from 27S precursor rRNA. Images PMID:8039505

  16. The essential gene set of a photosynthetic organism.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Benjamin E; Wetmore, Kelly M; Price, Morgan N; Diamond, Spencer; Shultzaberger, Ryan K; Lowe, Laura C; Curtin, Genevieve; Arkin, Adam P; Deutschbauer, Adam; Golden, Susan S

    2015-12-01

    Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 is a model organism used for studying photosynthesis and the circadian clock, and it is being developed for the production of fuel, industrial chemicals, and pharmaceuticals. To identify a comprehensive set of genes and intergenic regions that impacts fitness in S. elongatus, we created a pooled library of ∼ 250,000 transposon mutants and used sequencing to identify the insertion locations. By analyzing the distribution and survival of these mutants, we identified 718 of the organism's 2,723 genes as essential for survival under laboratory conditions. The validity of the essential gene set is supported by its tight overlap with well-conserved genes and its enrichment for core biological processes. The differences noted between our dataset and these predictors of essentiality, however, have led to surprising biological insights. One such finding is that genes in a large portion of the TCA cycle are dispensable, suggesting that S. elongatus does not require a cyclic TCA process. Furthermore, the density of the transposon mutant library enabled individual and global statements about the essentiality of noncoding RNAs, regulatory elements, and other intergenic regions. In this way, a group I intron located in tRNA(Leu), which has been used extensively for phylogenetic studies, was shown here to be essential for the survival of S. elongatus. Our survey of essentiality for every locus in the S. elongatus genome serves as a powerful resource for understanding the organism's physiology and defines the essential gene set required for the growth of a photosynthetic organism.

  17. Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus ac142, a core gene that is essential for BV production and ODV envelopment

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, Christina B.; Da, Xiaojiang; Donly, Cam; Theilmann, David A.

    2008-03-15

    Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) ac142 is a baculovirus core gene and encodes a protein previously shown to associate with occlusion-derived virus (ODV). To determine its role in the baculovirus life cycle, we used the AcMNPV bacmid system to generate an ac142 deletion virus (AcBAC{sup ac142KO-PH-GFP}). Fluorescence and light microscopy revealed that AcBAC{sup ac142KO-PH-GFP} exhibits a single-cell infection phenotype. Titration assays and Western blot confirmed that AcBAC{sup ac142KO-PH-GFP} is unable to produce budded virus (BV). However, viral DNA replication is unaffected and the development of occlusion bodies in AcBAC{sup ac142KO-PH-GFP}-transfected cells evidenced progression to very late phases of the viral infection. Western blot analysis showed that AC142 is expressed in the cytoplasm and nucleus throughout infection and that it is a structural component of BV and ODV which localizes to nucleocapsids. Electron microscopy indicates that ac142 is required for nucleocapsid envelopment to form ODV and their subsequent occlusion, a fundamental process to all baculoviruses.

  18. Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus ac142, a core gene that is essential for BV production and ODV envelopment.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Christina B; Dai, Xiaojiang; Donly, Cam; Theilmann, David A

    2008-03-15

    Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) ac142 is a baculovirus core gene and encodes a protein previously shown to associate with occlusion-derived virus (ODV). To determine its role in the baculovirus life cycle, we used the AcMNPV bacmid system to generate an ac142 deletion virus (AcBAC(ac142KO-PH-GFP)). Fluorescence and light microscopy revealed that AcBAC(ac142KO-PH-GFP) exhibits a single-cell infection phenotype. Titration assays and Western blot confirmed that AcBAC(ac142KO-PH-GFP) is unable to produce budded virus (BV). However, viral DNA replication is unaffected and the development of occlusion bodies in AcBAC(ac142KO-PH-GFP)-transfected cells evidenced progression to very late phases of the viral infection. Western blot analysis showed that AC142 is expressed in the cytoplasm and nucleus throughout infection and that it is a structural component of BV and ODV which localizes to nucleocapsids. Electron microscopy indicates that ac142 is required for nucleocapsid envelopment to form ODV and their subsequent occlusion, a fundamental process to all baculoviruses.

  19. AcMNPV ac143 (odv-e18) is essential for mediating budded virus production and is the 30th baculovirus core gene.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Christina B; Theilmann, David A

    2008-05-25

    Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) ac143 (odv-e18) is a late gene that encodes for a predicted 9.6 kDa structural protein that locates to the occlusion derived viral envelope and viral induced intranuclear microvesicles [Braunagel, S.C., He, H., Ramamurthy, P., and Summers, M.D. (1996). Transcription, translation, and cellular localization of three Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus structural proteins: ODV-E18, ODV-E35, and ODV-EC27. Virology 222, 100-114.]. In this study we demonstrate that ac143 is actually a previously unrecognized core gene and that it is essential for mediating budded virus production. To examine the role of ac143 in the baculovirus life cycle, we used the AcMNPV bacmid system to generate an ac143 knockout (KO) virus (AcBAC(ac142)(REP-ac143KO)). Fluorescence and light microscopy showed that infection by AcBAC(ac142)(REP-ac143KO) is limited to a single cell and titration assays confirmed that AcBAC(ac142)(REP-ac143KO) was unable to produce budded virus (BV). Progression to very late phases of the viral infection was evidenced by the development of occlusion bodies in the nuclei of transfected cells. This correlated with the fact that viral DNA replication was unaffected in AcBAC(ac142)(REP-ac143KO) transfected cells. The entire ac143 promoter, which includes three late promoter motifs, is contained within the ac142 open reading frame. Different deletion mutants of this region showed that the integrity of the ac142-ac143 core gene cluster was required for the bacmids to display wild-type patterns of viral replication, BV production and RNA transcription.

  20. AcMNPV ac143 (odv-e18) is essential for mediating budded virus production and is the 30th baculovirus core gene

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, Christina B.; Theilmann, David A.

    2008-05-25

    Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) ac143 (odv-e18) is a late gene that encodes for a predicted 9.6 kDa structural protein that locates to the occlusion derived viral envelope and viral induced intranuclear microvesicles [Braunagel, S.C., He, H., Ramamurthy, P., and Summers, M.D. (1996). Transcription, translation, and cellular localization of three Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus structural proteins: ODV-E18, ODV-E35, and ODV-EC27. Virology 222, 100-114.]. In this study we demonstrate that ac143 is actually a previously unrecognized core gene and that it is essential for mediating budded virus production. To examine the role of ac143 in the baculovirus life cycle, we used the AcMNPV bacmid system to generate an ac143 knockout (KO) virus (AcBAC{sup ac142REP-ac143KO}). Fluorescence and light microscopy showed that infection by AcBAC{sup ac142REP-ac143KO} is limited to a single cell and titration assays confirmed that AcBAC{sup ac142REP-ac143KO} was unable to produce budded virus (BV). Progression to very late phases of the viral infection was evidenced by the development of occlusion bodies in the nuclei of transfected cells. This correlated with the fact that viral DNA replication was unaffected in AcBAC{sup ac142REP-ac143KO} transfected cells. The entire ac143 promoter, which includes three late promoter motifs, is contained within the ac142 open reading frame. Different deletion mutants of this region showed that the integrity of the ac142-ac143 core gene cluster was required for the bacmids to display wild-type patterns of viral replication, BV production and RNA transcription.

  1. The Pichia pastoris PER6 gene product is a peroxisomal integral membrane protein essential for peroxisome biogenesis and has sequence similarity to the Zellweger syndrome protein PAF-1.

    PubMed Central

    Waterham, H R; de Vries, Y; Russel, K A; Xie, W; Veenhuis, M; Cregg, J M

    1996-01-01

    We report the cloning of PER6, a gene essential for peroxisome biogenesis in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris. The PER6 sequence predicts that its product Per6p is a 52-kDa polypeptide with the cysteine-rich C3HC4 motif. Per6p has significant overall sequence similarity with the human peroxisome assembly factor PAF-1, a protein that is defective in certain patients suffering from the peroxisomal disorder Zellweger syndrome, and with car1, a protein required for peroxisome biogenesis and caryogamy in the filamentous fungus Podospora anserina. In addition, the C3HC4 motif and two of the three membrane-spanning segments predicted for Per6p align with the C3HC4 motifs and the two membrane-spanning segments predicted for PAF-1 and car1. Like PAF-1, Per6p is a peroxisomal integral membrane protein. In methanol- or oleic acid-induced cells of per6 mutants, morphologically recognizable peroxisomes are absent. Instead, peroxisomal remnants are observed. In addition, peroxisomal matrix proteins are synthesized but located in the cytosol. The similarities between Per6p and PAF-1 in amino acid sequence and biochemical properties, and between mutants defective in their respective genes, suggest that Per6p is the putative yeast homolog of PAF-1. PMID:8628321

  2. The essential gene set of a photosynthetic organism

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, Benjamin E.; Wetmore, Kelly M.; Price, Morgan N.; Diamond, Spencer; Shultzaberger, Ryan K.; Lowe, Laura C.; Curtin, Genevieve; Arkin, Adam P.; Deutschbauer, Adam; Golden, Susan S.

    2015-01-01

    Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 is a model organism used for studying photosynthesis and the circadian clock, and it is being developed for the production of fuel, industrial chemicals, and pharmaceuticals. To identify a comprehensive set of genes and intergenic regions that impacts fitness in S. elongatus, we created a pooled library of ∼250,000 transposon mutants and used sequencing to identify the insertion locations. By analyzing the distribution and survival of these mutants, we identified 718 of the organism’s 2,723 genes as essential for survival under laboratory conditions. The validity of the essential gene set is supported by its tight overlap with well-conserved genes and its enrichment for core biological processes. The differences noted between our dataset and these predictors of essentiality, however, have led to surprising biological insights. One such finding is that genes in a large portion of the TCA cycle are dispensable, suggesting that S. elongatus does not require a cyclic TCA process. Furthermore, the density of the transposon mutant library enabled individual and global statements about the essentiality of noncoding RNAs, regulatory elements, and other intergenic regions. In this way, a group I intron located in tRNALeu, which has been used extensively for phylogenetic studies, was shown here to be essential for the survival of S. elongatus. Our survey of essentiality for every locus in the S. elongatus genome serves as a powerful resource for understanding the organism’s physiology and defines the essential gene set required for the growth of a photosynthetic organism. PMID:26508635

  3. Identification and characterization of essential genes in the human genome

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tim; Birsoy, Kıvanç; Hughes, Nicholas W.; Krupczak, Kevin M.; Post, Yorick; Wei, Jenny J.; Lander, Eric S.; Sabatini, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale genetic analysis of lethal phenotypes has elucidated the molecular underpinnings of many biological processes. Using the bacterial clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) system, we constructed a genome-wide single-guide RNA (sgRNA) library to screen for genes required for proliferation and survival in a human cancer cell line. Our screen revealed the set of cell-essential genes, which was validated by an orthogonal gene-trap-based screen and comparison with yeast gene knockouts. This set is enriched for genes that encode components of fundamental pathways, are expressed at high levels, and contain few inactivating polymorphisms in the human population. We also uncovered a large group of uncharacterized genes involved in RNA processing, a number of whose products localize to the nucleolus. Lastly, screens in additional cell lines showed a high degree of overlap in gene essentiality, but also revealed differences specific to each cell line and cancer type that reflect the developmental origin, oncogenic drivers, paralogous gene expression pattern, and chromosomal structure of each line. These results demonstrate the power of CRISPR-based screens and suggest a general strategy for identifying liabilities in cancer cells. PMID:26472758

  4. Comparative analysis of essential genes in prokaryotic genomic islands.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xi; Peng, Chong; Zhang, Ge; Gao, Feng

    2015-07-30

    Essential genes are thought to encode proteins that carry out the basic functions to sustain a cellular life, and genomic islands (GIs) usually contain clusters of horizontally transferred genes. It has been assumed that essential genes are not likely to be located in GIs, but systematical analysis of essential genes in GIs has not been explored before. Here, we have analyzed the essential genes in 28 prokaryotes by statistical method and reached a conclusion that essential genes in GIs are significantly fewer than those outside GIs. The function of 362 essential genes found in GIs has been explored further by BLAST against the Virulence Factor Database (VFDB) and the phage/prophage sequence database of PHAge Search Tool (PHAST). Consequently, 64 and 60 eligible essential genes are found to share the sequence similarity with the virulence factors and phage/prophages-related genes, respectively. Meanwhile, we find several toxin-related proteins and repressors encoded by these essential genes in GIs. The comparative analysis of essential genes in genomic islands will not only shed new light on the development of the prediction algorithm of essential genes, but also give a clue to detect the functionality of essential genes in genomic islands.

  5. Exploring the relationship between fractal features and bacterial essential genes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yong-Ming, Yu; Li-Cai, Yang; Qian, Zhou; Lu-Lu, Zhao; Zhi-Ping, Liu

    2016-06-01

    Essential genes are indispensable for the survival of an organism in optimal conditions. Rapid and accurate identifications of new essential genes are of great theoretical and practical significance. Exploring features with predictive power is fundamental for this. Here, we calculate six fractal features from primary gene and protein sequences and then explore their relationship with gene essentiality by statistical analysis and machine learning-based methods. The models are applied to all the currently available identified genes in 27 bacteria from the database of essential genes (DEG). It is found that the fractal features of essential genes generally differ from those of non-essential genes. The fractal features are used to ascertain the parameters of two machine learning classifiers: Naïve Bayes and Random Forest. The area under the curve (AUC) of both classifiers show that each fractal feature is satisfactorily discriminative between essential genes and non-essential genes individually. And, although significant correlations exist among fractal features, gene essentiality can also be reliably predicted by various combinations of them. Thus, the fractal features analyzed in our study can be used not only to construct a good essentiality classifier alone, but also to be significant contributors for computational tools identifying essential genes. Project supported by the Shandong Provincial Natural Science Foundation, China (Grant No. ZR2014FM022).

  6. How to identify essential genes from molecular networks?

    PubMed Central

    del Rio, Gabriel; Koschützki, Dirk; Coello, Gerardo

    2009-01-01

    Background The prediction of essential genes from molecular networks is a way to test the understanding of essentiality in the context of what is known about the network. However, the current knowledge on molecular network structures is incomplete yet, and consequently the strategies aimed to predict essential genes are prone to uncertain predictions. We propose that simultaneously evaluating different network structures and different algorithms representing gene essentiality (centrality measures) may identify essential genes in networks in a reliable fashion. Results By simultaneously analyzing 16 different centrality measures on 18 different reconstructed metabolic networks for Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we show that no single centrality measure identifies essential genes from these networks in a statistically significant way; however, the combination of at least 2 centrality measures achieves a reliable prediction of most but not all of the essential genes. No improvement is achieved in the prediction of essential genes when 3 or 4 centrality measures were combined. Conclusion The method reported here describes a reliable procedure to predict essential genes from molecular networks. Our results show that essential genes may be predicted only by combining centrality measures, revealing the complex nature of the function of essential genes. PMID:19822021

  7. Genetics of germination-arrest factor (GAF) production by Pseudomonas fluorescens WH6: identification of a gene cluster essential for GAF biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Halgren, Anne; Maselko, Maciej; Azevedo, Mark; Mills, Dallice; Armstrong, Donald; Banowetz, Gary

    2013-01-01

    The genetic basis of the biosynthesis of the germination-arrest factor (GAF) produced by Pseudomonas fluorescens WH6, and previously identified as 4-formylaminooxyvinylglycine, has been investigated here. In addition to inhibiting the germination of a wide range of grassy weeds, GAF exhibits a selective antimicrobial activity against the bacterial plant pathogen Erwinia amylovora. We utilized the in vitro response of E. amylovora to GAF as a rapid screen for loss-of-function GAF phenotypes generated by transposon mutagenesis. A Tn5 mutant library consisting of 6364 WH6 transformants was screened in this Erwinia assay, resulting in the identification of 18 non-redundant transposon insertion sites that led to loss of GAF production in WH6, as confirmed by TLC analysis. These insertions mapped to five different genes and four intergenic regions. Three of these genes, including two putative regulatory genes (gntR and iopB homologues), were clustered in a 13 kb chromosomal region containing 13 putative ORFs. A GAF mutation identified previously as affecting an aminotransferase also maps to this region. We suggest that three of the genes in this region (a carbamoyltransferase, an aminotransferase and a formyltransferase) encode the enzymes necessary to synthesize dihydroGAF, the putative immediate precursor of GAF in a proposed GAF biosynthetic pathway. RT-qPCR analyses demonstrated that mutations in the gntR and iopB regulatory genes, as well as in a prtR homologue identified earlier as controlling GAF formation, suppressed transcription of at least two of the putative GAF biosynthetic genes (encoding the aminotransferase and formyltransferase) located in this 13 kb region.

  8. A Penicillium expansum glucose oxidase-encoding gene, GOX2, is essential for gluconic acid production and acidification during colonization of deciduous fruit.

    PubMed

    Barad, Shiri; Horowitz, Sigal Brown; Moscovitz, Oren; Lichter, Amnon; Sherman, Amir; Prusky, Dov

    2012-06-01

    Penicillium expansum, the causal agent of blue mold rot, causes severe postharvest maceration of fruit through secretion of total, d-gluconic acid (GLA). Two P. expansum glucose oxidase (GOX)-encoding genes, GOX1 and GOX2, were analyzed. GOX activity and GLA accumulation were strongly related to GOX2 expression, which increased with pH to a maximum at pH 7.0, whereas GOX1 was expressed at pH 4.0, where no GOX activity or extracellular GLA were detected. This differential expression was also observed at the leading edge of the decaying tissue, where GOX2 expression was dominant. The roles of the GOX genes in pathogenicity were further studied through i) development of P. expansum goxRNAi mutants exhibiting differential downregulation of GOX2, ii) heterologous expression of the P. expansum GOX2 gene in the nondeciduous fruit-pathogen P. chrysogenum, and iii) modulation of GLA production by FeSO(4) chelation. Interestingly, in P. expansum, pH and GLA production elicited opposite effects on germination and biomass accumulation: 26% of spores germinated at pH 7.0 when GOX activity and GLA were highest whereas, in P. chrysogenum at the same pH, when GLA did not accumulate, 72% of spores germinated. Moreover, heterologous expression of P. expansum GOX2 in P. chrysogenum resulted in enhanced GLA production and reduced germination, suggesting negative regulation of spore germination and GLA production. These results demonstrate that pH modulation, mediated by GLA accumulation, is an important factor in generating the initial signal or signals for fungal development leading to host-tissue colonization by P. expansum.

  9. Two Oligopeptide-Permease-Encoding Genes in the Clavulanic Acid Cluster of Streptomyces clavuligerus Are Essential for Production of the β-Lactamase Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzana, Luis M.; Pérez-Redondo, Rosario; Santamarta, Irene; Martín, Juan F.; Liras, Paloma

    2004-01-01

    orf7 (oppA1) and orf15 (oppA2) are located 8 kb apart in the clavulanic acid gene cluster of Streptomyces clavuligerus and encode proteins which are 48.0% identical. These proteins show sequence similarity to periplasmic oligopeptide-binding proteins. Mutant S. clavuligerus oppA1::acc, disrupted in oppA1, lacks clavulanic acid production. Clavulanic acid production is restored by transformation with plasmid pIJ699-oppA1, which carries oppA1, but not with the multicopy plasmid pIJ699-oppA2, which carries oppA2. The mutant S. clavuligerus oppA2::aph also lacks clavulanic acid production, shows a bald phenotype, and overproduces holomycin (5). Clavulanic acid production at low levels is restored in the oppA2-disrupted mutants by transformation with plasmid pIJ699-oppA2, but it is not complemented by the multicopy plasmid pIJ699-oppA1. Both genes encode oligopeptide permeases with different substrate specificities. The disrupted S. clavuligerus oppA2::aph is not able to grow on RPPGFSPFR (Arg-Pro-Pro-Gly-Phe-Ser-Pro-Phe-Arg; bradykinin), but both mutants grow on VAPG (Val-Ala-Pro-Gly) as the only nitrogen source, indicating differences in the peptide bound by the proteins encoded by both genes. The null S. clavuligerus oppA1::acc and S. clavuligerus oppA2::aph mutants are more resistant to the toxic tripeptide phosphinothricyl-alanyl-alanine (also named bialaphos) than the wild-type strain, suggesting that this peptide might be transported by these peptide-binding proteins. PMID:15150229

  10. Why There Are No Essential Genes on Plasmids.

    PubMed

    Tazzyman, Samuel J; Bonhoeffer, Sebastian

    2015-12-01

    Mobile genetic elements such as plasmids are important for the evolution of prokaryotes. It has been suggested that there are differences between functions coded for by mobile genes and those in the "core" genome and that these differences can be seen between plasmids and chromosomes. In particular, it has been suggested that essential genes, such as those involved in the formation of structural proteins or in basic metabolic functions, are rarely located on plasmids. We model competition between genotypically varying bacteria within a single population to investigate whether selection favors a chromosomal location for essential genes. We find that in general, chromosomal locations for essential genes are indeed favored. This is because the inheritance of chromosomes is more stable than that for plasmids. We define the "degradation" rate as the rate at which chance genetic processes, for example, mutation, deletion, or translocation, render essential genes nonfunctioning. The only way in which plasmids can be a location for functioning essential genes is if chromosomal genes degrade faster than plasmid genes. If the two degradation rates are equal, or if plasmid genes degrade faster than chromosomal genes, functioning essential genes will be found only on chromosomes.

  11. Conditional promoters for analysis of essential genes in Zymoseptoria tritici.

    PubMed

    Kilaru, S; Ma, W; Schuster, M; Courbot, M; Steinberg, G

    2015-06-01

    Development of new fungicides, needed for sustainable control of fungal plant pathogens, requires identification of novel anti-fungal targets. Essential fungal-specific proteins are good candidates, but due to their importance, gene deletion mutants are not viable. Consequently, their cellular role often remains elusive. This hindrance can be overcome by the use of conditional mutants, where expression is controlled by an inducible/repressible promoter. Here, we introduce 5 inducible/repressible promoter systems to study essential genes in the wheat pathogen Zymoseptoria tritici. We fused the gene for enhanced green-fluorescent protein (egfp) to the promoter region of Z. tritici nitrate reductase (Pnar1; induced by nitrogen and repressed by ammonium), 1,4-β-endoxylanase A (Pex1A; induced by xylose and repressed by maltodextrin), l-arabinofuranosidase B (PlaraB; induced by arabinose and repressed by glucose), galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase 7 (Pgal7; induced by galactose and repressed by glucose) and isocitrate lyase (Picl1; induced by sodium acetate and repressed by glucose). This was followed by quantitative analysis of cytoplasmic reporter fluorescence under induced and repressed conditions. We show that Pnar1, PlaraB and Pex1A drive very little or no egfp expression when repressed, but induce moderate protein production when induced. In contrast, Pgal7 and Picl1 show considerable egfp expression when repressed, and were strongly induced in the presence of their inducers. Normalising the expression levels of all promoters to that of the α-tubulin promoter Ptub2 revealed that PlaraB was the weakest promoter (∼20% of Ptub2), whereas Picl1 strongly expressed the reporter (∼250% of Ptub2). The use of these tools promises a better understanding of essential genes, which will help developing novel control strategies that protect wheat from Z. tritici. PMID:26092803

  12. Reduced expression of Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus ORF34, an essential gene, enhances heterologous gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Salem, Tamer Z.; Zhang, Fengrui; Thiem, Suzanne M.

    2013-01-20

    Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus ORF34 is part of a transcriptional unit that includes ORF32, encoding a viral fibroblast growth factor (FGF) and ORF33. We identified ORF34 as a candidate for deletion to improve protein expression in the baculovirus expression system based on enhanced reporter gene expression in an RNAi screen of virus genes. However, ORF34 was shown to be an essential gene. To explore ORF34 function, deletion (KO34) and rescue bacmids were constructed and characterized. Infection did not spread from primary KO34 transfected cells and supernatants from KO34 transfected cells could not infect fresh Sf21 cells whereas the supernatant from the rescue bacmids transfection could recover the infection. In addition, budded viruses were not observed in KO34 transfected cells by electron microscopy, nor were viral proteins detected from the transfection supernatants by western blots. These demonstrate that ORF34 is an essential gene with a possible role in infectious virus production.

  13. Gene Essentiality Is a Quantitative Property Linked to Cellular Evolvability.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gaowen; Yong, Mei Yun Jacy; Yurieva, Marina; Srinivasan, Kandhadayar Gopalan; Liu, Jaron; Lim, John Soon Yew; Poidinger, Michael; Wright, Graham Daniel; Zolezzi, Francesca; Choi, Hyungwon; Pavelka, Norman; Rancati, Giulia

    2015-12-01

    Gene essentiality is typically determined by assessing the viability of the corresponding mutant cells, but this definition fails to account for the ability of cells to adaptively evolve to genetic perturbations. Here, we performed a stringent screen to assess the degree to which Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells can survive the deletion of ~1,000 individual "essential" genes and found that ~9% of these genetic perturbations could in fact be overcome by adaptive evolution. Our analyses uncovered a genome-wide gradient of gene essentiality, with certain essential cellular functions being more "evolvable" than others. Ploidy changes were prevalent among the evolved mutant strains, and aneuploidy of a specific chromosome was adaptive for a class of evolvable nucleoporin mutants. These data justify a quantitative redefinition of gene essentiality that incorporates both viability and evolvability of the corresponding mutant cells and will enable selection of therapeutic targets associated with lower risk of emergence of drug resistance. PMID:26627736

  14. Gene Essentiality Is a Quantitative Property Linked to Cellular Evolvability.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gaowen; Yong, Mei Yun Jacy; Yurieva, Marina; Srinivasan, Kandhadayar Gopalan; Liu, Jaron; Lim, John Soon Yew; Poidinger, Michael; Wright, Graham Daniel; Zolezzi, Francesca; Choi, Hyungwon; Pavelka, Norman; Rancati, Giulia

    2015-12-01

    Gene essentiality is typically determined by assessing the viability of the corresponding mutant cells, but this definition fails to account for the ability of cells to adaptively evolve to genetic perturbations. Here, we performed a stringent screen to assess the degree to which Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells can survive the deletion of ~1,000 individual "essential" genes and found that ~9% of these genetic perturbations could in fact be overcome by adaptive evolution. Our analyses uncovered a genome-wide gradient of gene essentiality, with certain essential cellular functions being more "evolvable" than others. Ploidy changes were prevalent among the evolved mutant strains, and aneuploidy of a specific chromosome was adaptive for a class of evolvable nucleoporin mutants. These data justify a quantitative redefinition of gene essentiality that incorporates both viability and evolvability of the corresponding mutant cells and will enable selection of therapeutic targets associated with lower risk of emergence of drug resistance.

  15. Analysis of pan-genome to identify the core genes and essential genes of Brucella spp.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaowen; Li, Yajie; Zang, Juan; Li, Yexia; Bie, Pengfei; Lu, Yanli; Wu, Qingmin

    2016-04-01

    Brucella spp. are facultative intracellular pathogens, that cause a contagious zoonotic disease, that can result in such outcomes as abortion or sterility in susceptible animal hosts and grave, debilitating illness in humans. For deciphering the survival mechanism of Brucella spp. in vivo, 42 Brucella complete genomes from NCBI were analyzed for the pan-genome and core genome by identification of their composition and function of Brucella genomes. The results showed that the total 132,143 protein-coding genes in these genomes were divided into 5369 clusters. Among these, 1710 clusters were associated with the core genome, 1182 clusters with strain-specific genes and 2477 clusters with dispensable genomes. COG analysis indicated that 44 % of the core genes were devoted to metabolism, which were mainly responsible for energy production and conversion (COG category C), and amino acid transport and metabolism (COG category E). Meanwhile, approximately 35 % of the core genes were in positive selection. In addition, 1252 potential essential genes were predicted in the core genome by comparison with a prokaryote database of essential genes. The results suggested that the core genes in Brucella genomes are relatively conservation, and the energy and amino acid metabolism play a more important role in the process of growth and reproduction in Brucella spp. This study might help us to better understand the mechanisms of Brucella persistent infection and provide some clues for further exploring the gene modules of the intracellular survival in Brucella spp.

  16. In Vivo-Validated Essential Genes Identified in Acinetobacter baumannii by Using Human Ascites Overlap Poorly with Essential Genes Detected on Laboratory Media

    PubMed Central

    Umland, Timothy C.; Schultz, L. Wayne; MacDonald, Ulrike; Beanan, Janet M.; Olson, Ruth; Russo, Thomas A.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT A critical feature of a potential antimicrobial target is the characteristic of being essential for growth and survival during host infection. For bacteria, genome-wide essentiality screens are usually performed on rich laboratory media. This study addressed whether genes detected in that manner were optimal for the identification of antimicrobial targets since the in vivo milieu is fundamentally different. Mutant derivatives of a clinical isolate of Acinetobacter baumannii were screened for growth on human ascites, an ex vivo medium that reflects the infection environment. A subset of 34 mutants with unique gene disruptions that demonstrated little to no growth on ascites underwent evaluation in a rat subcutaneous abscess model, establishing 18 (53%) of these genes as in vivo essential. The putative gene products all had annotated biological functions, represented unrecognized or underexploited antimicrobial targets, and could be grouped into five functional categories: metabolic, two-component signaling systems, DNA/RNA synthesis and regulation, protein transport, and structural. These A. baumannii in vivo essential genes overlapped poorly with the sets of essential genes from other Gram-negative bacteria catalogued in the Database of Essential Genes (DEG), including those of Acinetobacter baylyi, a closely related species. However, this finding was not due to the absence of orthologs. None of the 18 in vivo essential genes identified in this study, or their putative gene products, were targets of FDA-approved drugs or drugs in the developmental pipeline, indicating that a significant portion of the available target space within pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria is currently neglected. PMID:22911967

  17. Detection of essential genes in Streptococcus pneumoniae using bioinformatics and allelic replacement mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Song, Jae-Hoon; Ko, Kwan Soo

    2008-01-01

    Although the emergence and spread of antimicrobial resistance in major bacterial pathogens for the past decades poses a growing challenge to public health, discovery of novel antimicrobial agents from natural products or modification of existing antibiotics cannot circumvent the problem of antimicrobial resistance. The recent development of bacterial genomics and the availability of genome sequences allow the identification of potentially novel antimicrobial agents. The cellular targets of new antimicrobial agents must be essential for the growth, replication, or survival of the bacterium. Conserved genes among different bacterial genomes often turn out to be essential (1, 2). Thus, the combination of comparative genomics and the gene knock-out procedure can provide effective ways to identify the essential genes of bacterial pathogens (3). Identification of essential genes in bacteria may be utilized for the development of new antimicrobial agents because common essential genes in diverse pathogens could constitute novel targets for broad-spectrum antimicrobial agents.

  18. Identification of essential genes of the periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Porphyromonas gingivalis is a Gram-negative anaerobic bacterium associated with periodontal disease onset and progression. Genetic tools for the manipulation of bacterial genomes allow for in-depth mechanistic studies of metabolism, physiology, interspecies and host-pathogen interactions. Analysis of the essential genes, protein-coding sequences necessary for survival of P. gingivalis by transposon mutagenesis has not previously been attempted due to the limitations of available transposon systems for the organism. We adapted a Mariner transposon system for mutagenesis of P. gingivalis and created an insertion mutant library. By analyzing the location of insertions using massively-parallel sequencing technology we used this mutant library to define genes essential for P. gingivalis survival under in vitro conditions. Results In mutagenesis experiments we identified 463 genes in P. gingivalis strain ATCC 33277 that are putatively essential for viability in vitro. Comparing the 463 P. gingivalis essential genes with previous essential gene studies, 364 of the 463 are homologues to essential genes in other species; 339 are shared with more than one other species. Twenty-five genes are known to be essential in P. gingivalis and B. thetaiotaomicron only. Significant enrichment of essential genes within Cluster of Orthologous Groups ‘D’ (cell division), ‘I’ (lipid transport and metabolism) and ‘J’ (translation/ribosome) were identified. Previously, the P. gingivalis core genome was shown to encode 1,476 proteins out of a possible 1,909; 434 of 463 essential genes are contained within the core genome. Thus, for the species P. gingivalis twenty-two, seventy-seven and twenty-three percent of the genome respectively are devoted to essential, core and accessory functions. Conclusions A Mariner transposon system can be adapted to create mutant libraries in P. gingivalis amenable to analysis by next-generation sequencing technologies. In silico analysis

  19. Redundancy complicates the definition of essential genes for vaccinia virus.

    PubMed

    Dobson, Bianca M; Tscharke, David C

    2015-11-01

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) genes are characterized as either essential or non-essential for growth in culture. It seems intuitively obvious that if a gene can be deleted without imparting a growth defect in vitro it does not have a function related to basic replication or spread. However, this interpretation relies on the untested assumption that there is no redundancy across the genes that have roles in growth in cell culture. First, we provide a comprehensive summary of the literature that describes the essential genes of VACV. Next, we looked for interactions between large blocks of non-essential genes located at the ends of the genome by investigating sets of VACVs with large deletions at the genomic termini. Viruses with deletions at either end of the genome behaved as expected, exhibiting only mild or host-range defects. In contrast, combining deletions at both ends of the genome for the VACV Western Reserve (WR) strain caused a devastating growth defect on all cell lines tested. Unexpectedly, we found that the well-studied VACV growth factor homologue encoded by C11R has a role in growth in vitro that is exposed when 42 genes are absent from the left end of the VACV WR genome. These results demonstrate that some non-essential genes contribute to basic viral growth, but redundancy means these functions are not revealed by single-gene-deletion mutants.

  20. Methods for identifying an essential gene in a prokaryotic microorganism

    DOEpatents

    Shizuya, Hiroaki

    2006-01-31

    Methods are provided for the rapid identification of essential or conditionally essential DNA segments in any species of haploid cell (one copy chromosome per cell) that is capable of being transformed by artificial means and is capable of undergoing DNA recombination. This system offers an enhanced means of identifying essential function genes in diploid pathogens, such as gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria.

  1. Identification of essential and non-essential genes in Ambystoma tigrinum virus.

    PubMed

    Aron, Mariah M; Allen, Alexander G; Kromer, Mathew; Galvez, Hector; Vigil, Brianna; Jancovich, James K

    2016-06-01

    Members of the genus Ranavirus (family Iridoviridae) are large double-stranded (ds) DNA viruses that are found world-wide infecting fish, amphibian and reptile ectothermic hosts. Ranavirus genomes range from 105 to 155kbp in length and they are predicted to encode around 90-125 genes. Currently, our knowledge of the function of ∼50% of these genes is known or inferred based on homology to orthologous genes characterized in other systems; however, the function of the remaining open reading frames (ORFS) is unknown. Therefore, in order to begin to uncover the function of unknown ORFs in ranaviruses we developed a standardized approach to generate a recombination cassette for any ORF in Ambystoma tigrinum virus (ATV). Our standardized approach quickly and efficiently assembles recombination cassettes and recombinant ATV. We have used this approach to identify two essential, one semi-essential and two non-essential genes in ATV.

  2. Identification of essential and non-essential genes in Ambystoma tigrinum virus.

    PubMed

    Aron, Mariah M; Allen, Alexander G; Kromer, Mathew; Galvez, Hector; Vigil, Brianna; Jancovich, James K

    2016-06-01

    Members of the genus Ranavirus (family Iridoviridae) are large double-stranded (ds) DNA viruses that are found world-wide infecting fish, amphibian and reptile ectothermic hosts. Ranavirus genomes range from 105 to 155kbp in length and they are predicted to encode around 90-125 genes. Currently, our knowledge of the function of ∼50% of these genes is known or inferred based on homology to orthologous genes characterized in other systems; however, the function of the remaining open reading frames (ORFS) is unknown. Therefore, in order to begin to uncover the function of unknown ORFs in ranaviruses we developed a standardized approach to generate a recombination cassette for any ORF in Ambystoma tigrinum virus (ATV). Our standardized approach quickly and efficiently assembles recombination cassettes and recombinant ATV. We have used this approach to identify two essential, one semi-essential and two non-essential genes in ATV. PMID:27025572

  3. The rnh gene is essential for growth of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Kanaya, S; Crouch, R J

    1984-01-01

    We have determined that a functional gene coding for ribonuclease H seems to be essential for cell growth in Escherichia coli. A strain was made with two copies of the rnh gene by lysogenizing an E. coli strain with a lambda phage bearing a copy of the rnh gene. Inactivation of one of the two copies of the rnh gene was accomplished by transformation with a linear DNA molecule that had the gene for chloramphenicol acetyltransferase inserted near the middle of the rnh gene. In recombinants that had an inactive gene replacing the normal chromosomal rnh gene, the lambda rnh prophage supplies an intact functional copy of the rnh gene. Curing the cells of the lambda rnh prophage left the cell with an inactive rnh gene and resulted in cell death. An intact functional rnh gene provided on a plasmid permits normal curing, and cured survivors were readily obtained. The technique described is probably generally applicable for assessing the requirement for other E. coli genes. Images PMID:6233609

  4. Transcriptional landscape and essential genes of Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    PubMed Central

    Remmele, Christian W.; Xian, Yibo; Albrecht, Marco; Faulstich, Michaela; Fraunholz, Martin; Heinrichs, Elisabeth; Dittrich, Marcus T.; Müller, Tobias; Reinhardt, Richard; Rudel, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The WHO has recently classified Neisseria gonorrhoeae as a super-bacterium due to the rapid spread of antibiotic resistant derivatives and an overall dramatic increase in infection incidences. Genome sequencing has identified potential genes, however, little is known about the transcriptional organization and the presence of non-coding RNAs in gonococci. We performed RNA sequencing to define the transcriptome and the transcriptional start sites of all gonococcal genes and operons. Numerous new transcripts including 253 potentially non-coding RNAs transcribed from intergenic regions or antisense to coding genes were identified. Strikingly, strong antisense transcription was detected for the phase-variable opa genes coding for a family of adhesins and invasins in pathogenic Neisseria, that may have regulatory functions. Based on the defined transcriptional start sites, promoter motifs were identified. We further generated and sequenced a high density Tn5 transposon library to predict a core of 827 gonococcal essential genes, 133 of which have no known function. Our combined RNA-Seq and Tn-Seq approach establishes a detailed map of gonococcal genes and defines the first core set of essential gonococcal genes. PMID:25143534

  5. Antibiotics: natural products essential to human health.

    PubMed

    Demain, Arnold L

    2009-11-01

    For more than 50 years, natural products have served us well in combating infectious bacteria and fungi. Microbial and plant secondary metabolites helped to double our life span during the 20th century, reduced pain and suffering, and revolutionized medicine. Most antibiotics are either (i) natural products of microorganisms, (ii) semi-synthetically produced from natural products, or (iii) chemically synthesized based on the structure of the natural products. Production of antibiotics began with penicillin in the late 1940s and proceeded with great success until the 1970-1980s when it became harder and harder to discover new and useful products. Furthermore, resistance development in pathogens became a major problem, which is still with us today. In addition, new pathogens are continually emerging and there are still bacteria that are not eliminated by any antibiotic, e.g., Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In addition to these problems, many of the major pharmaceutical companies have abandoned the antibiotic field, leaving much of the discovery efforts to small companies, new companies, and the biotechnology industries. Despite these problems, development of new antibiotics has continued, albeit at a much lower pace than in the last century. We have seen the (i) appearance of newly discovered antibiotics (e.g., candins), (ii) development of old but unutilized antibiotics (e.g., daptomycin), (iii) production of new semi-synthetic versions of old antibiotics (e.g., glycylcyclines, streptogrammins), as well as the (iv) very useful application of old but underutilized antibiotics (e.g., teicoplanin).

  6. Information dimension analysis of bacterial essential and nonessential genes based on chaos game representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qian; Yu, Yong-ming

    2014-11-01

    Essential genes are indispensable for the survival of an organism. Investigating features associated with gene essentiality is fundamental to the prediction and identification of the essential genes. Selecting features associated with gene essentiality is fundamental to predict essential genes with computational techniques. We use fractal theory to make comparative analysis of essential and nonessential genes in bacteria. The information dimensions of essential genes and nonessential genes available in the DEG database for 27 bacteria are calculated based on their gene chaos game representations (CGRs). It is found that weak positive linear correlation exists between information dimension and gene length. Moreover, for genes of similar length, the average information dimension of essential genes is larger than that of nonessential genes. This indicates that essential genes show less regularity and higher complexity than nonessential genes. Our results show that for bacterium with a similar number of essential genes and nonessential genes, the CGR information dimension is helpful for the classification of essential genes and nonessential genes. Therefore, the gene CGR information dimension is very probably a useful gene feature for a genetic algorithm predicting essential genes.

  7. Identification of essential genes and synthetic lethal gene combinations in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Mori, Hirotada; Baba, Tomoya; Yokoyama, Katsushi; Takeuchi, Rikiya; Nomura, Wataru; Makishi, Kazuichi; Otsuka, Yuta; Dose, Hitomi; Wanner, Barry L

    2015-01-01

    Here we describe the systematic identification of single genes and gene pairs, whose knockout causes lethality in Escherichia coli K-12. During construction of precise single-gene knockout library of E. coli K-12, we identified 328 essential gene candidates for growth in complex (LB) medium. Upon establishment of the Keio single-gene deletion library, we undertook the development of the ASKA single-gene deletion library carrying a different antibiotic resistance. In addition, we developed tools for identification of synthetic lethal gene combinations by systematic construction of double-gene knockout mutants. We introduce these methods herein.

  8. Identification of essential genes and synthetic lethal gene combinations in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Mori, Hirotada; Baba, Tomoya; Yokoyama, Katsushi; Takeuchi, Rikiya; Nomura, Wataru; Makishi, Kazuichi; Otsuka, Yuta; Dose, Hitomi; Wanner, Barry L

    2015-01-01

    Here we describe the systematic identification of single genes and gene pairs, whose knockout causes lethality in Escherichia coli K-12. During construction of precise single-gene knockout library of E. coli K-12, we identified 328 essential gene candidates for growth in complex (LB) medium. Upon establishment of the Keio single-gene deletion library, we undertook the development of the ASKA single-gene deletion library carrying a different antibiotic resistance. In addition, we developed tools for identification of synthetic lethal gene combinations by systematic construction of double-gene knockout mutants. We introduce these methods herein. PMID:25636612

  9. Essential gene profiles in breast, pancreas and ovarian cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Sayad, Azin; Karamboulas, Konstantina; Krzyzanowski, Paul M.; Sircoulomb, Fabrice; Medrano, Mauricio; Fedyshyn, Yaroslav; Koh, Judice L.Y.; van Dyk, Dewald; Fedyshyn, Bodhana; Luhova, Marianna; Brito, Glauber C.; Vizeacoumar, Franco J.; Vizeacoumar, Frederick S.; Datti, Alessandro; Kasimer, Dahlia; Buzina, Alla; Mero, Patricia; Misquitta, Christine; Normand, Josee; Haider, Maliha; Ketela, Troy; Wrana, Jeffrey L.; Rottapel, Robert; Neel, Benjamin G.; Moffat, Jason

    2016-01-01

    Genomic analyses are yielding a host of new information on the multiple genetic abnormalities associated with specific types of cancer. A comprehensive description of cancer-associated genetic abnormalities can improve our ability to classify tumors into clinically relevant subgroups, and, on occasion, identify mutant genes that drive the cancer phenotype (“drivers”). More often, though, the functional significance of cancer-associated mutations is difficult to discern. Genome-wide pooled shRNA screens enable global identification of the genes essential for cancer cell survival and proliferation, providing a “functional genomic” map of human cancer to complement genomic studies. Using a lentiviral shRNA library targeting ~16,000 genes and a newly developed, dynamic scoring approach, we identified essential gene profiles in 72 breast, pancreatic, and ovarian cancer cell lines. Integrating our results with current and future genomic data should facilitate the systematic identification of drivers, unanticipated synthetic lethal relationships, and functional vulnerabilities of these tumor types. PMID:22585861

  10. DNA Methylation is Developmentally Regulated for Genes Essential for Cardiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Chamberlain, Alyssa A.; Lin, Mingyan; Lister, Rolanda L.; Maslov, Alex A.; Wang, Yidong; Suzuki, Masako; Wu, Bingruo; Greally, John M.; Zheng, Deyou; Zhou, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Background DNA methylation is a major epigenetic mechanism altering gene expression in development and disease. However, its role in the regulation of gene expression during heart development is incompletely understood. The aim of this study is to reveal DNA methylation in mouse embryonic hearts and its role in regulating gene expression during heart development. Methods and Results We performed the genome‐wide DNA methylation profiling of mouse embryonic hearts using methyl‐sensitive, tiny fragment enrichment/massively parallel sequencing to determine methylation levels at ACGT sites. The results showed that while global methylation of 1.64 million ACGT sites in developing hearts remains stable between embryonic day (E) 11.5 and E14.5, a small fraction (2901) of them exhibit differential methylation. Gene Ontology analysis revealed that these sites are enriched at genes involved in heart development. Quantitative real‐time PCR analysis of 350 genes with differential DNA methylation showed that the expression of 181 genes is developmentally regulated, and 79 genes have correlative changes between methylation and expression, including hyaluronan synthase 2 (Has2). Required for heart valve formation, Has2 expression in the developing heart valves is downregulated at E14.5, accompanied with increased DNA methylation in its enhancer. Genetic knockout further showed that the downregulation of Has2 expression is dependent on DNA methyltransferase 3b, which is co‐expressed with Has2 in the forming heart valve region, indicating that the DNA methylation change may contribute to the Has2 enhancer's regulating function. Conclusions DNA methylation is developmentally regulated for genes essential to heart development, and abnormal DNA methylation may contribute to congenital heart disease. PMID:24947998

  11. Gene essentiality and synthetic lethality in haploid human cells.

    PubMed

    Blomen, Vincent A; Májek, Peter; Jae, Lucas T; Bigenzahn, Johannes W; Nieuwenhuis, Joppe; Staring, Jacqueline; Sacco, Roberto; van Diemen, Ferdy R; Olk, Nadine; Stukalov, Alexey; Marceau, Caleb; Janssen, Hans; Carette, Jan E; Bennett, Keiryn L; Colinge, Jacques; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Brummelkamp, Thijn R

    2015-11-27

    Although the genes essential for life have been identified in less complex model organisms, their elucidation in human cells has been hindered by technical barriers. We used extensive mutagenesis in haploid human cells to identify approximately 2000 genes required for optimal fitness under culture conditions. To study the principles of genetic interactions in human cells, we created a synthetic lethality network focused on the secretory pathway based exclusively on mutations. This revealed a genetic cross-talk governing Golgi homeostasis, an additional subunit of the human oligosaccharyltransferase complex, and a phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase β adaptor hijacked by viruses. The synthetic lethality map parallels observations made in yeast and projects a route forward to reveal genetic networks in diverse aspects of human cell biology. PMID:26472760

  12. Gene essentiality and synthetic lethality in haploid human cells.

    PubMed

    Blomen, Vincent A; Májek, Peter; Jae, Lucas T; Bigenzahn, Johannes W; Nieuwenhuis, Joppe; Staring, Jacqueline; Sacco, Roberto; van Diemen, Ferdy R; Olk, Nadine; Stukalov, Alexey; Marceau, Caleb; Janssen, Hans; Carette, Jan E; Bennett, Keiryn L; Colinge, Jacques; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Brummelkamp, Thijn R

    2015-11-27

    Although the genes essential for life have been identified in less complex model organisms, their elucidation in human cells has been hindered by technical barriers. We used extensive mutagenesis in haploid human cells to identify approximately 2000 genes required for optimal fitness under culture conditions. To study the principles of genetic interactions in human cells, we created a synthetic lethality network focused on the secretory pathway based exclusively on mutations. This revealed a genetic cross-talk governing Golgi homeostasis, an additional subunit of the human oligosaccharyltransferase complex, and a phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase β adaptor hijacked by viruses. The synthetic lethality map parallels observations made in yeast and projects a route forward to reveal genetic networks in diverse aspects of human cell biology.

  13. Gene 5 of the avian coronavirus infectious bronchitis virus is not essential for replication.

    PubMed

    Casais, Rosa; Davies, Marc; Cavanagh, David; Britton, Paul

    2005-07-01

    The avian coronavirus Infectious bronchitis virus (IBV), like other coronaviruses, expresses several small nonstructural (ns) proteins in addition to those from gene 1 (replicase) and the structural proteins. These coronavirus ns genes differ both in number and in amino acid similarity between the coronavirus groups but show some concordance within a group or subgroup. The functions and requirements of the small ns gene products remain to be elucidated. With the advent of reverse genetics for coronaviruses, the first steps in elucidating their role can be investigated. We have used our reverse genetics system for IBV (R. Casais, V. Thiel, S. G. Siddell, D. Cavanagh, and P. Britton, J. Virol. 75:12359-12369, 2001) to investigate the requirement of IBV gene 5 for replication in vivo, in ovo, and ex vivo. We produced a series of recombinant viruses, with an isogenic background, in which complete expression of gene 5 products was prevented by the inactivation of gene 5 following scrambling of the transcription-associated sequence, thereby preventing the expression of IBV subgenomic mRNA 5, or scrambling either separately or together of the translation initiation codons for the two gene 5 products. As all of the recombinant viruses replicated very similarly to the wild-type virus, Beau-R, we conclude that the IBV gene 5 products are not essential for IBV replication per se and that they are accessory proteins.

  14. Uncovering major genomic features of essential genes in Bacteria and a methanogenic Archaea.

    PubMed

    Grazziotin, Ana Laura; Vidal, Newton M; Venancio, Thiago M

    2015-09-01

    Identification of essential genes is critical to understanding the physiology of a species, proposing novel drug targets and uncovering minimal gene sets required for life. Although essential gene sets of several organisms have been determined using large-scale mutagenesis techniques, systematic studies addressing their conservation, genomic context and functions remain scant. Here we integrate 17 essential gene sets from genome-wide in vitro screenings and three gene collections required for growth in vivo, encompassing 15 Bacteria and one Archaea. We refine and generalize important theories proposed using Escherichia coli. Essential genes are typically monogenic and more conserved than nonessential genes. Genes required in vivo are less conserved than those essential in vitro, suggesting that more divergent strategies are deployed when the organism is stressed by the host immune system and unstable nutrient availability. We identified essential analogous pathways that would probably be missed by orthology-based essentiality prediction strategies. For example, Streptococcus sanguinis carries horizontally transferred isoprenoid biosynthesis genes that are widespread in Archaea. Genes specifically essential in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Burkholderia pseudomallei are reported as potential drug targets. Moreover, essential genes are not only preferentially located in operons, but also occupy the first position therein, supporting the influence of their regulatory regions in driving transcription of whole operons. Finally, these important genomic features are shared between Bacteria and at least one Archaea, suggesting that high order properties of gene essentiality and genome architecture were probably present in the last universal common ancestor or evolved independently in the prokaryotic domains. PMID:26084810

  15. Uncovering major genomic features of essential genes in Bacteria and a methanogenic Archaea.

    PubMed

    Grazziotin, Ana Laura; Vidal, Newton M; Venancio, Thiago M

    2015-09-01

    Identification of essential genes is critical to understanding the physiology of a species, proposing novel drug targets and uncovering minimal gene sets required for life. Although essential gene sets of several organisms have been determined using large-scale mutagenesis techniques, systematic studies addressing their conservation, genomic context and functions remain scant. Here we integrate 17 essential gene sets from genome-wide in vitro screenings and three gene collections required for growth in vivo, encompassing 15 Bacteria and one Archaea. We refine and generalize important theories proposed using Escherichia coli. Essential genes are typically monogenic and more conserved than nonessential genes. Genes required in vivo are less conserved than those essential in vitro, suggesting that more divergent strategies are deployed when the organism is stressed by the host immune system and unstable nutrient availability. We identified essential analogous pathways that would probably be missed by orthology-based essentiality prediction strategies. For example, Streptococcus sanguinis carries horizontally transferred isoprenoid biosynthesis genes that are widespread in Archaea. Genes specifically essential in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Burkholderia pseudomallei are reported as potential drug targets. Moreover, essential genes are not only preferentially located in operons, but also occupy the first position therein, supporting the influence of their regulatory regions in driving transcription of whole operons. Finally, these important genomic features are shared between Bacteria and at least one Archaea, suggesting that high order properties of gene essentiality and genome architecture were probably present in the last universal common ancestor or evolved independently in the prokaryotic domains.

  16. Biosynthesis of Essential Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids in Wheat Triggered by Expression of Artificial Gene.

    PubMed

    Mihálik, Daniel; Klčová, Lenka; Ondreičková, Katarína; Hudcovicová, Martina; Gubišová, Marcela; Klempová, Tatiana; Čertík, Milan; Pauk, János; Kraic, Ján

    2015-12-16

    The artificial gene D6D encoding the enzyme ∆⁶desaturase was designed and synthesized using the sequence of the same gene from the fungus Thamnidium elegans. The original start codon was replaced by the signal sequence derived from the wheat gene for high-molecular-weight glutenin subunit and the codon usage was completely changed for optimal expression in wheat. Synthesized artificial D6D gene was delivered into plants of the spring wheat line CY-45 and the gene itself, as well as transcribed D6D mRNA were confirmed in plants of T₀ and T₁ generations. The desired product of the wheat genetic modification by artificial D6D gene was the γ-linolenic acid. Its presence was confirmed in mature grains of transgenic wheat plants in the amount 0.04%-0.32% (v/v) of the total amount of fatty acids. Both newly synthesized γ-linolenic acid and stearidonic acid have been detected also in leaves, stems, roots, awns, paleas, rachillas, and immature grains of the T₁ generation as well as in immature and mature grains of the T₂ generation. Contents of γ-linolenic acid and stearidonic acid varied in range 0%-1.40% (v/v) and 0%-1.53% (v/v) from the total amount of fatty acids, respectively. This approach has opened the pathway of desaturation of fatty acids and production of essential polyunsaturated fatty acids in wheat.

  17. Biosynthesis of Essential Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids in Wheat Triggered by Expression of Artificial Gene

    PubMed Central

    Mihálik, Daniel; Klčová, Lenka; Ondreičková, Katarína; Hudcovicová, Martina; Gubišová, Marcela; Klempová, Tatiana; Čertík, Milan; Pauk, János; Kraic, Ján

    2015-01-01

    The artificial gene D6D encoding the enzyme ∆6desaturase was designed and synthesized using the sequence of the same gene from the fungus Thamnidium elegans. The original start codon was replaced by the signal sequence derived from the wheat gene for high-molecular-weight glutenin subunit and the codon usage was completely changed for optimal expression in wheat. Synthesized artificial D6D gene was delivered into plants of the spring wheat line CY-45 and the gene itself, as well as transcribed D6D mRNA were confirmed in plants of T0 and T1 generations. The desired product of the wheat genetic modification by artificial D6D gene was the γ-linolenic acid. Its presence was confirmed in mature grains of transgenic wheat plants in the amount 0.04%–0.32% (v/v) of the total amount of fatty acids. Both newly synthesized γ-linolenic acid and stearidonic acid have been detected also in leaves, stems, roots, awns, paleas, rachillas, and immature grains of the T1 generation as well as in immature and mature grains of the T2 generation. Contents of γ-linolenic acid and stearidonic acid varied in range 0%–1.40% (v/v) and 0%–1.53% (v/v) from the total amount of fatty acids, respectively. This approach has opened the pathway of desaturation of fatty acids and production of essential polyunsaturated fatty acids in wheat. PMID:26694368

  18. Interdomain lateral gene transfer of an essential ferrochelatase gene in human parasitic nematodes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bo; Novelli, Jacopo; Jiang, Daojun; Dailey, Harry A; Landmann, Frédéric; Ford, Louise; Taylor, Mark J; Carlow, Clotilde K S; Kumar, Sanjay; Foster, Jeremy M; Slatko, Barton E

    2013-05-01

    Lateral gene transfer events between bacteria and animals highlight an avenue for evolutionary genomic loss/gain of function. Herein, we report functional lateral gene transfer in animal parasitic nematodes. Members of the Nematoda are heme auxotrophs, lacking the ability to synthesize heme; however, the human filarial parasite Brugia malayi has acquired a bacterial gene encoding ferrochelatase (BmFeCH), the terminal step in heme biosynthesis. BmFeCH, encoded by a 9-exon gene, is a mitochondrial-targeted, functional ferrochelatase based on enzyme assays, complementation, and inhibitor studies. Homologs have been identified in several filariae and a nonfilarial nematode. RNAi and ex vivo inhibitor experiments indicate that BmFeCH is essential for viability, validating it as a potential target for filariasis control.

  19. Interdomain lateral gene transfer of an essential ferrochelatase gene in human parasitic nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Bo; Novelli, Jacopo; Jiang, Daojun; Dailey, Harry A.; Landmann, Frédéric; Ford, Louise; Taylor, Mark J.; Carlow, Clotilde K. S.; Kumar, Sanjay; Foster, Jeremy M.; Slatko, Barton E.

    2013-01-01

    Lateral gene transfer events between bacteria and animals highlight an avenue for evolutionary genomic loss/gain of function. Herein, we report functional lateral gene transfer in animal parasitic nematodes. Members of the Nematoda are heme auxotrophs, lacking the ability to synthesize heme; however, the human filarial parasite Brugia malayi has acquired a bacterial gene encoding ferrochelatase (BmFeCH), the terminal step in heme biosynthesis. BmFeCH, encoded by a 9-exon gene, is a mitochondrial-targeted, functional ferrochelatase based on enzyme assays, complementation, and inhibitor studies. Homologs have been identified in several filariae and a nonfilarial nematode. RNAi and ex vivo inhibitor experiments indicate that BmFeCH is essential for viability, validating it as a potential target for filariasis control. PMID:23610429

  20. Towards a compendium of essential genes – From model organisms to synthetic lethality in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Tianzuo; Boutros, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Essential genes are defined by their requirement to sustain life in cells or whole organisms. The systematic identification of essential gene sets not only allows insights into the fundamental building blocks of life, but may also provide novel therapeutic targets in oncology. The discovery of essential genes has been tightly linked to the development and deployment of various screening technologies. Here, we describe how gene essentiality was addressed in different eukaryotic model organisms, covering a range of organisms from yeast to mouse. We describe how increasing knowledge of evolutionarily divergent genomes facilitate identification of gene essentiality across species. Finally, the impact of gene essentiality and synthetic lethality on cancer research and the clinical translation of screening results are highlighted. PMID:26627871

  1. A Comprehensive, CRISPR-based Functional Analysis of Essential Genes in Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Peters, Jason M; Colavin, Alexandre; Shi, Handuo; Czarny, Tomasz L; Larson, Matthew H; Wong, Spencer; Hawkins, John S; Lu, Candy H S; Koo, Byoung-Mo; Marta, Elizabeth; Shiver, Anthony L; Whitehead, Evan H; Weissman, Jonathan S; Brown, Eric D; Qi, Lei S; Huang, Kerwyn Casey; Gross, Carol A

    2016-06-01

    Essential gene functions underpin the core reactions required for cell viability, but their contributions and relationships are poorly studied in vivo. Using CRISPR interference, we created knockdowns of every essential gene in Bacillus subtilis and probed their phenotypes. Our high-confidence essential gene network, established using chemical genomics, showed extensive interconnections among distantly related processes and identified modes of action for uncharacterized antibiotics. Importantly, mild knockdown of essential gene functions significantly reduced stationary-phase survival without affecting maximal growth rate, suggesting that essential protein levels are set to maximize outgrowth from stationary phase. Finally, high-throughput microscopy indicated that cell morphology is relatively insensitive to mild knockdown but profoundly affected by depletion of gene function, revealing intimate connections between cell growth and shape. Our results provide a framework for systematic investigation of essential gene functions in vivo broadly applicable to diverse microorganisms and amenable to comparative analysis. PMID:27238023

  2. Evolutionary conservation analysis between the essential and nonessential genes in bacterial genomes.

    PubMed

    Luo, Hao; Gao, Feng; Lin, Yan

    2015-08-14

    Essential genes are thought to be critical for the survival of the organisms under certain circumstances, and the natural selection acting on essential genes is expected to be stricter than on nonessential ones. Up to now, essential genes have been identified in approximately thirty bacterial organisms by experimental methods. In this paper, we performed a comprehensive comparison between the essential and nonessential genes in the genomes of 23 bacterial species based on the Ka/Ks ratio, and found that essential genes are more evolutionarily conserved than nonessential genes in most of the bacteria examined. Furthermore, we also analyzed the conservation by functional clusters with the clusters of orthologous groups (COGs), and found that the essential genes in the functional categories of G (Carbohydrate transport and metabolism), H (Coenzyme transport and metabolism), I (Transcription), J (Translation, ribosomal structure and biogenesis), K (Lipid transport and metabolism) and L (Replication, recombination and repair) tend to be more evolutionarily conserved than the corresponding nonessential genes in bacteria. The results suggest that the essential genes in these subcategories are subject to stronger selective pressure than the nonessential genes, and therefore, provide more insights of the evolutionary conservation for the essential and nonessential genes in complex biological processes.

  3. Statistical Analysis of Hurst Exponents of Essential/Nonessential Genes in 33 Bacterial Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiao; Wang, Baojin; Xu, Luo

    2015-01-01

    Methods for identifying essential genes currently depend predominantly on biochemical experiments. However, there is demand for improved computational methods for determining gene essentiality. In this study, we used the Hurst exponent, a characteristic parameter to describe long-range correlation in DNA, and analyzed its distribution in 33 bacterial genomes. In most genomes (31 out of 33) the significance levels of the Hurst exponents of the essential genes were significantly higher than for the corresponding full-gene-set, whereas the significance levels of the Hurst exponents of the nonessential genes remained unchanged or increased only slightly. All of the Hurst exponents of essential genes followed a normal distribution, with one exception. We therefore propose that the distribution feature of Hurst exponents of essential genes can be used as a classification index for essential gene prediction in bacteria. For computer-aided design in the field of synthetic biology, this feature can build a restraint for pre- or post-design checking of bacterial essential genes. Moreover, considering the relationship between gene essentiality and evolution, the Hurst exponents could be used as a descriptive parameter related to evolutionary level, or be added to the annotation of each gene. PMID:26067107

  4. Predicting Essential Genes and Proteins Based on Machine Learning and Network Topological Features: A Comprehensive Review

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xue; Acencio, Marcio Luis; Lemke, Ney

    2016-01-01

    Essential proteins/genes are indispensable to the survival or reproduction of an organism, and the deletion of such essential proteins will result in lethality or infertility. The identification of essential genes is very important not only for understanding the minimal requirements for survival of an organism, but also for finding human disease genes and new drug targets. Experimental methods for identifying essential genes are costly, time-consuming, and laborious. With the accumulation of sequenced genomes data and high-throughput experimental data, many computational methods for identifying essential proteins are proposed, which are useful complements to experimental methods. In this review, we show the state-of-the-art methods for identifying essential genes and proteins based on machine learning and network topological features, point out the progress and limitations of current methods, and discuss the challenges and directions for further research. PMID:27014079

  5. Identification of essential Alphaproteobacterial genes reveals operational variability in conserved developmental and cell cycle systems

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Patrick D.; Brun, Yves V.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The cell cycle of Caulobacter crescentus is controlled by a complex signaling network that coordinates events. Genome sequencing has revealed many C. crescentus cell cycle genes are conserved in other Alphaproteobacteria, but it is not clear to what extent their function is conserved. As many cell cycle regulatory genes are essential in C. crescentus, the essential genes of two Alphaproteobacteria, Agrobacterium tumefaciens (Rhizobiales) and Brevundimonas subvibrioides (Caulobacterales), were elucidated to identify changes in cell cycle protein function over different phylogenetic distances as demonstrated by changes in essentiality. The results show the majority of conserved essential genes are involved in critical cell cycle processes. Changes in component essentiality reflect major changes in lifestyle, such as divisome components in A. tumefaciens resulting from that organism’s different growth pattern. Larger variability of essentiality was observed in cell cycle regulators, suggesting regulatory mechanisms are more customizable than the processes they regulate. Examples include variability in the essentiality of divJ and divK spatial cell cycle regulators, and non-essentiality of the highly conserved and usually essential DNA methyltransferase CcrM. These results show that while essential cell functions are conserved across varying genetic distance, much of a given organism’s essential gene pool is specific to that organism. PMID:24975755

  6. Systematic identification of novel, essential host genes affecting bromovirus RNA replication.

    PubMed

    Gancarz, Brandi L; Hao, Linhui; He, Qiuling; Newton, Michael A; Ahlquist, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Positive-strand RNA virus replication involves viral proteins and cellular proteins at nearly every replication step. Brome mosaic virus (BMV) is a well-established model for dissecting virus-host interactions and is one of very few viruses whose RNA replication, gene expression and encapsidation have been reproduced in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Previously, our laboratory identified ∼100 non-essential host genes whose loss inhibited or enhanced BMV replication at least 3-fold. However, our isolation of additional BMV-modulating host genes by classical genetics and other results underscore that genes essential for cell growth also contribute to BMV RNA replication at a frequency that may be greater than that of non-essential genes. To systematically identify novel, essential host genes affecting BMV RNA replication, we tested a collection of ∼900 yeast strains, each with a single essential gene promoter replaced by a doxycycline-repressible promoter, allowing repression of gene expression by adding doxycycline to the growth medium. Using this strain array of ∼81% of essential yeast genes, we identified 24 essential host genes whose depleted expression reproducibly inhibited or enhanced BMV RNA replication. Relevant host genes are involved in ribosome biosynthesis, cell cycle regulation and protein homeostasis, among other cellular processes. BMV 2a(Pol) levels were significantly increased in strains depleted for a heat shock protein (HSF1) or proteasome components (PRE1 and RPT6), suggesting these genes may affect BMV RNA replication by directly or indirectly modulating 2a(Pol) localization, post-translational modification or interacting partners. Investigating the diverse functions of these newly identified essential host genes should advance our understanding of BMV-host interactions and normal cellular pathways, and suggest new modes of virus control.

  7. small ORFs: A new class of essential genes for development

    PubMed Central

    Albuquerque, João Paulo; Tobias-Santos, Vitória; Rodrigues, Aline Cáceres; Mury, Flávia Borges; da Fonseca, Rodrigo Nunes

    2015-01-01

    Genes that contain small open reading frames (smORFs) constitute a new group of eukaryotic genes and are expected to represent 5% of the Drosophila melanogaster transcribed genes. In this review we provide a historical perspective of their recent discovery, describe their general mechanism and discuss the importance of smORFs for future genomic and transcriptomic studies. Finally, we discuss the biological role of the most studied smORF so far, the Mlpt/Pri/Tal gene in arthropods. The pleiotropic action of Mlpt/Pri/Tal in D. melanogaster suggests a complex evolutionary scenario that can be used to understand the origins, evolution and integration of smORFs into complex gene regulatory networks. PMID:26500431

  8. Identification of a new gene, molR, essential for utilization of molybdate by Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, J H; Wendt, J C; Shanmugam, K T

    1990-01-01

    A mutation in a new gene, molR, prevented the synthesis in Escherichia coli of molybdoenzymes, including the two formate dehydrogenase isoenzymes, nitrate reductase and trimethylamine-N-oxide reductase. This phenotype was suppressed by supplementing the media with molybdate. Thus, the molR mutant was phenotypically similar to previously described chlD mutants, thought to be defective in molybdate transport. The molR gene is located at 65.3 min in the E. coli chromosome, in contrast to the chlD gene, which maps at 17 min and thus can be readily distinguished. The molR gene is also cotransducible with a hitherto unidentified gene essential for the production of 2-oxoglutarate from isocitrate, designated icdB (located at 66 min). The molR mutant strain SE1100 also failed to produce the hydrogenase component of formate hydrogenlyase (HYD3) in molybdate-unsupplemented media. The amount of molybdate required by strain SE1100 for the production of parental levels of formate hydrogenlyase activity was dependent on the growth medium. In Luria-Bertani medium, this value was about 100 microM, and in glucose-minimal medium, 1.0 microM was sufficient. In low-sulfur medium, this value decreased to about 50 nM. The addition of sulfate or selenite increased the amount of molybdate needed for the production of formate hydrogenlyase activity. These data suggest that in the absence of the high-affinity molybdate transport system, E. coli utilizes sulfate and selenite transport systems for transporting molybdate, preferring sulfate transport over the selenite transport system. PMID:2156810

  9. The rpf gene of Micrococcus luteus encodes an essential secreted growth factor.

    PubMed

    Mukamolova, Galina V; Turapov, Obolbek A; Kazarian, Konstantin; Telkov, Miroslav; Kaprelyants, Arseny S; Kell, Douglas B; Young, Michael

    2002-11-01

    Micrococcus luteus secretes a small protein called Rpf, which has autocrine and paracrine signalling functions and is required for the resuscitation of dormant cells. Originally isolated from the supernatant of actively growing cultures, Rpf was also detected on the surface of actively growing bacteria. Most molecules may be sequestered non-productively at the cell surface, as a truncated form of the protein, encompassing only the 'Rpf domain' is fully active. The C-terminal LysM module, which probably mediates binding to the cell envelope, is not required for biological activity. Rpf was essential for growth of M. luteus. Washed cells, inoculated at low density into a minimal medium, could not grow in its absence. Moreover, the incorporation of anti-Rpf antibodies into the culture medium at the time of inoculation also prevented bacterial growth. We were unable to inactivate rpf using a disrupted form of the gene, in which most of the coding sequence was replaced with a selectable thiostrepton resistance marker. Gene disruption was possible in the presence of a second, functional, plasmid-located copy of rpf, but not in the presence of a rpf derivative whose protein product lacked the secretory signal sequence. As far as we are aware, Rpf is the first example of a truly secreted protein that is essential for bacterial growth. If the Rpf-like proteins elaborated by Mycobacterium tuberculosis and other mycobacteria prove similarly essential, interference with their proper functioning may offer novel opportunities for protecting against, and treating, tuberculosis and other mycobacterial disease.

  10. Therapeutic switching: from antidermatophytic essential oils to new leishmanicidal products.

    PubMed

    Houël, Emeline; Gonzalez, German; Bessière, Jean-Marie; Odonne, Guillaume; Eparvier, Véronique; Deharo, Eric; Stien, Didier

    2015-02-01

    This study examined whether the antidermatophytic activity of essential oils (EOs) can be used as an indicator for the discovery of active natural products against Leishmania amazonensis. The aerial parts of seven plants were hydrodistilled. Using broth microdilution techniques, the obtained EOs were tested against three strains of dermatophytes (Trichophyton mentagrophytes, Microsporum gypseum and Microsporum canis). To compare the EOs antifungal and antiparasitic effects, the EOs activities against axenic amastigotes of L. amazonensis were concurrently evaluated. For the most promising EOs, their antileishmanial activities against parasites infecting peritoneal macrophages of BALB/c mice were measured. The most interesting antifungal candidates were the EOs from Cymbopogon citratus, Otacanthus azureus and Protium heptaphyllum, whereas O. azureus, Piper hispidum and P. heptaphyllum EOs exhibited the lowest 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) values against axenic amastigotes, thus revealing a certain correspondence between both activities. The P. hispidum EO was identified as the most promising product in the results from the infected macrophages model (IC50: 4.7 µg/mL, safety index: 8). The most abundant compounds found in this EO were sesquiterpenes, notably curzerene and furanodiene. Eventually, the evaluation of the antidermatophytic activity of EOs appears to be an efficient method for identifying new potential drugs for the treatment of L. amazonensis. PMID:25742270

  11. Therapeutic switching: from antidermatophytic essential oils to new leishmanicidal products

    PubMed Central

    Houël, Emeline; Gonzalez, German; Bessière, Jean-Marie; Odonne, Guillaume; Eparvier, Véronique; Deharo, Eric; Stien, Didier

    2015-01-01

    This study examined whether the antidermatophytic activity of essential oils (EOs) can be used as an indicator for the discovery of active natural products against Leishmania amazonensis. The aerial parts of seven plants were hydrodistilled. Using broth microdilution techniques, the obtained EOs were tested against three strains of dermatophytes (Trichophyton mentagrophytes, Microsporum gypseum and Microsporum canis). To compare the EOs antifungal and antiparasitic effects, the EOs activities against axenic amastigotes of L. amazonensis were concurrently evaluated. For the most promising EOs, their antileishmanial activities against parasites infecting peritoneal macrophages of BALB/c mice were measured. The most interesting antifungal candidates were the EOs from Cymbopogon citratus, Otacanthus azureus and Protium heptaphyllum, whereas O. azureus, Piper hispidum and P. heptaphyllum EOs exhibited the lowest 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) values against axenic amastigotes, thus revealing a certain correspondence between both activities. The P. hispidum EO was identified as the most promising product in the results from the infected macrophages model (IC50: 4.7 µg/mL, safety index: 8). The most abundant compounds found in this EO were sesquiterpenes, notably curzerene and furanodiene. Eventually, the evaluation of the antidermatophytic activity of EOs appears to be an efficient method for identifying new potential drugs for the treatment of L. amazonensis. PMID:25742270

  12. Evolutionary Conservation of Bacterial Essential Metabolic Genes across All Bacterial Culture Media.

    PubMed

    Ish-Am, Oren; Kristensen, David M; Ruppin, Eytan

    2015-01-01

    One of the basic postulates of molecular evolution is that functionally important genes should evolve slower than genes of lesser significance. Essential genes, whose knockout leads to a lethal phenotype are considered of high functional importance, yet whether they are truly more conserved than nonessential genes has been the topic of much debate, fuelled by a host of contradictory findings. Here we conduct the first large-scale study utilizing genome-scale metabolic modeling and spanning many bacterial species, which aims to answer this question. Using the novel Media Variation Analysis, we examine the range of conservation of essential vs. nonessential metabolic genes in a given species across all possible media. We are thus able to obtain for the first time, exact upper and lower bounds on the levels of differential conservation of essential genes for each of the species studied. The results show that bacteria do exhibit an overall tendency for differential conservation of their essential genes vs. their non-essential ones, yet this tendency is highly variable across species. We show that the model bacterium E. coli K12 may or may not exhibit differential conservation of essential genes depending on its growth medium, shedding light on previous experimental studies showing opposite trends.

  13. Evolutionary Conservation of Bacterial Essential Metabolic Genes across All Bacterial Culture Media

    PubMed Central

    Ish-Am, Oren; Kristensen, David M.; Ruppin, Eytan

    2015-01-01

    One of the basic postulates of molecular evolution is that functionally important genes should evolve slower than genes of lesser significance. Essential genes, whose knockout leads to a lethal phenotype are considered of high functional importance, yet whether they are truly more conserved than nonessential genes has been the topic of much debate, fuelled by a host of contradictory findings. Here we conduct the first large-scale study utilizing genome-scale metabolic modeling and spanning many bacterial species, which aims to answer this question. Using the novel Media Variation Analysis, we examine the range of conservation of essential vs. nonessential metabolic genes in a given species across all possible media. We are thus able to obtain for the first time, exact upper and lower bounds on the levels of differential conservation of essential genes for each of the species studied. The results show that bacteria do exhibit an overall tendency for differential conservation of their essential genes vs. their non-essential ones, yet this tendency is highly variable across species. We show that the model bacterium E. coli K12 may or may not exhibit differential conservation of essential genes depending on its growth medium, shedding light on previous experimental studies showing opposite trends. PMID:25894004

  14. The pnk/pnl gene (ORF 86) of Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus is a non-essential, immediate early gene.

    PubMed

    Durantel, D; Croizier, L; Ayres, M D; Croizier, G; Possee, R D; López-Ferber, M

    1998-03-01

    Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) ORF 86, located within the HindIII C fragment, potentially encodes a protein which shares sequence similarity with two T4 bacteriophage gene products, RNA ligase and polynucleotide kinase. This AcMNPV gene has been designated pnk/pnl but has yet to be assigned a function in virus replication. It has been classified as an immediate early virus gene, since the promoter was active in uninfected insect cells and mRNA transcripts were detectable from 4 to 48 h post-infection and in the presence of cycloheximide or aphidicolin in virus-infected cells. The extremities of the transcript have been mapped by primer extension and 3' RACE-PCR to positions -18 from the translational start codon and +15 downstream of the stop codon. The function of pnk/pnl was investigated by producing a recombinant virus (Acdel86lacZ) with the coding region replaced with that of lacZ. This virus replicated normally in Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf 21) cells, indicating that pnk/pnl is not essential for propagation in these cells. Virus protein production in Acdel86lacZ-infected Sf 21 cells also appeared to be unaffected, with normal synthesis of the IE-1, GP64, VP39 and polyhedrin proteins. Shut-down of host protein synthesis was not abolished in recombinant infection. When other baculovirus genomes were examined for the presence of pnk/pnl by restriction enzyme digestion and PCR, a deletion was found in AcMNPV 1.2, Galleria mellonella NPV (GmMNPV) and Bombyx mori NPV (BmNPV), suggesting that in many isolates this gene has either never been acquired or has been lost during genome evolution. This is one of the first baculovirus immediate early genes that appears to be nonessential for virus survival.

  15. The role of the 'gearbox' in the transcription of essential genes.

    PubMed

    Vicente, M; Kushner, S R; Garrido, T; Aldea, M

    1991-09-01

    Regulation of transcription occurs at different levels, one being in the presence of sequences specifically recognized by different forms of RNA polymerase, i.e. the promoters. Three different kinds of promoter are defined according, among other things, to their dependence on the growth rate of the cell: the 'house-keeper' promoter of many metabolic genes, the stringent promoter found at several rRNA and ribosomal protein genes, and the 'gearbox' at genes whose products are required at higher relative amounts at lower growth rates. The identified gearbox promoters of Escherichia coli share specific homologies in the -10, -35 and upstream regions. Although there may be different types of gearbox promoters, the -10 sequence of one of these promoters has been found to be essential for functioning as a gearbox. This suggests the existence of specific sigma factors for its transcription. RpoS (KatF) is a likely candidate for being one of these sigma factors. Computer simulation allows us to predict that such sigma factors should, in turn, be expressed following a gearbox mode, which would then imply the existence of self-regulated loops contributing to the expression of some genes of bacterial division.

  16. The Drosophila Couch Potato Gene: An Essential Gene Required for Normal Adult Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Bellen, H. J.; Vaessin, H.; Bier, E.; Kolodkin, A.; D'Evelyn, D.; Kooyer, S.; Jan, Y. N.

    1992-01-01

    Through enhancer detection screens we have isolated 14 insertions in an essential gene that is expressed in embryonic sensory mother cells (SMC), in most cells of the mature embryonic peripheral nervous system (PNS), and in glial cells of the PNS and the central nervous system (CNS). Embryos homozygote for amorphic alleles die, but show no obvious defects in their cuticle, PNS or CNS. The gene has been named couch potato (cpo) because several insertional alleles alter adult behavior. Homozygous hypomorphic cpo flies recover slowly from ether anaesthesia, show aberrant flight behavior, fail to move toward light and do not exhibit normal negative geotactic behavior. However, the flies are able to groom and walk, and some are able to fly when prodded, indicating that not all processes required for behavior are severely affected. A molecular analysis shows that the 14 insertions are confined to a few hundred nucleotides which probably contain key regulatory sequences of the gene. The orientation of these insertions and their position within this DNA fragment play an important role in the couch potato phenotype. In situ hybridization to whole mount embryos suggest that some insertions affect the levels of transcription of cpo in most cells in which it is expressed. PMID:1644278

  17. Correlating traits of gene retention, sequence divergence, duplicability and essentiality in vertebrates, arthropods, and fungi.

    PubMed

    Waterhouse, Robert M; Zdobnov, Evgeny M; Kriventseva, Evgenia V

    2011-01-01

    Delineating ancestral gene relations among a large set of sequenced eukaryotic genomes allowed us to rigorously examine links between evolutionary and functional traits. We classified 86% of over 1.36 million protein-coding genes from 40 vertebrates, 23 arthropods, and 32 fungi into orthologous groups and linked over 90% of them to Gene Ontology or InterPro annotations. Quantifying properties of ortholog phyletic retention, copy-number variation, and sequence conservation, we examined correlations with gene essentiality and functional traits. More than half of vertebrate, arthropod, and fungal orthologs are universally present across each lineage. These universal orthologs are preferentially distributed in groups with almost all single-copy or all multicopy genes, and sequence evolution of the predominantly single-copy orthologous groups is markedly more constrained. Essential genes from representative model organisms, Mus musculus, Drosophila melanogaster, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, are significantly enriched in universal orthologs within each lineage, and essential-gene-containing groups consistently exhibit greater sequence conservation than those without. This study of eukaryotic gene repertoire evolution identifies shared fundamental principles and highlights lineage-specific features, it also confirms that essential genes are highly retained and conclusively supports the "knockout-rate prediction" of stronger constraints on essential gene sequence evolution. However, the distinction between sequence conservation of single- versus multicopy orthologs is quantitatively more prominent than between orthologous groups with and without essential genes. The previously underappreciated difference in the tolerance of gene duplications and contrasting evolutionary modes of "single-copy control" versus "multicopy license" may reflect a major evolutionary mechanism that allows extended exploration of gene sequence space.

  18. An ACC Oxidase Gene Essential for Cucumber Carpel Development.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huiming; Sun, Jinjing; Li, Shuai; Cui, Qingzhi; Zhang, Huimin; Xin, Fengjiao; Wang, Huaisong; Lin, Tao; Gao, Dongli; Wang, Shenhao; Li, Xia; Wang, Donghui; Zhang, Zhonghua; Xu, Zhihong; Huang, Sanwen

    2016-09-01

    Sex determination in plants gives rise to unisexual flowers that facilitate outcrossing and enhance genetic diversity. In cucumber and melon, ethylene promotes carpel development and arrests stamen development. Five sex-determination genes have been identified, including four encoding 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) synthase that catalyzes the rate-limiting step in ethylene biosynthesis, and a transcription factor gene CmWIP1 that corresponds to the Mendelian locus gynoecious in melon and is a negative regulator of femaleness. ACC oxidase (ACO) converts ACC into ethylene; however, it remains elusive which ACO gene in the cucumber genome is critical for sex determination and how CmWIP1 represses development of female flowers. In this study, we discovered that mutation in an ACO gene, CsACO2, confers androecy in cucumber that bears only male flowers. The mutation disrupts the enzymatic activity of CsACO2, resulting in 50% less ethylene emission from shoot tips. CsACO2 was expressed in the carpel primordia and its expression overlapped with that of CsACS11 in female flowers at key stages for sex determination, presumably providing sufficient ethylene required for proper CsACS2 expression. CmACO3, the ortholog of CsACO2, showed a similar expression pattern in the carpel region, suggesting a conserved function of CsACO2/CmACO3. We demonstrated that CsWIP1, the ortholog of CmWIP1, could directly bind the promoter of CsACO2 and repress its expression. Taken together, we propose a presumably conserved regulatory module consisting of WIP1 transcription factor and ACO controls unisexual flower development in cucumber and melon.

  19. An ACC Oxidase Gene Essential for Cucumber Carpel Development.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huiming; Sun, Jinjing; Li, Shuai; Cui, Qingzhi; Zhang, Huimin; Xin, Fengjiao; Wang, Huaisong; Lin, Tao; Gao, Dongli; Wang, Shenhao; Li, Xia; Wang, Donghui; Zhang, Zhonghua; Xu, Zhihong; Huang, Sanwen

    2016-09-01

    Sex determination in plants gives rise to unisexual flowers that facilitate outcrossing and enhance genetic diversity. In cucumber and melon, ethylene promotes carpel development and arrests stamen development. Five sex-determination genes have been identified, including four encoding 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) synthase that catalyzes the rate-limiting step in ethylene biosynthesis, and a transcription factor gene CmWIP1 that corresponds to the Mendelian locus gynoecious in melon and is a negative regulator of femaleness. ACC oxidase (ACO) converts ACC into ethylene; however, it remains elusive which ACO gene in the cucumber genome is critical for sex determination and how CmWIP1 represses development of female flowers. In this study, we discovered that mutation in an ACO gene, CsACO2, confers androecy in cucumber that bears only male flowers. The mutation disrupts the enzymatic activity of CsACO2, resulting in 50% less ethylene emission from shoot tips. CsACO2 was expressed in the carpel primordia and its expression overlapped with that of CsACS11 in female flowers at key stages for sex determination, presumably providing sufficient ethylene required for proper CsACS2 expression. CmACO3, the ortholog of CsACO2, showed a similar expression pattern in the carpel region, suggesting a conserved function of CsACO2/CmACO3. We demonstrated that CsWIP1, the ortholog of CmWIP1, could directly bind the promoter of CsACO2 and repress its expression. Taken together, we propose a presumably conserved regulatory module consisting of WIP1 transcription factor and ACO controls unisexual flower development in cucumber and melon. PMID:27403533

  20. Steroid Hormone Signaling Is Essential for Pheromone Production and Oenocyte Survival.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Yin Ning; Tan, Kah Junn; Chung, Henry; Lavrynenko, Oksana; Shevchenko, Andrej; Yew, Joanne Y

    2016-06-01

    Many of the lipids found on the cuticles of insects function as pheromones and communicate information about age, sex, and reproductive status. In Drosophila, the composition of the information-rich lipid profile is dynamic and changes over the lifetime of an individual. However, the molecular basis of this change is not well understood. To identify genes that control cuticular lipid production in Drosophila, we performed a RNA interference screen and used Direct Analysis in Real Time and gas chromatography mass spectrometry to quantify changes in the chemical profiles. Twelve putative genes were identified whereby transcriptional silencing led to significant differences in cuticular lipid production. Amongst them, we characterized a gene which we name spidey, and which encodes a putative steroid dehydrogenase that has sex- and age-dependent effects on viability, pheromone production, and oenocyte survival. Transcriptional silencing or overexpression of spidey during embryonic development results in pupal lethality and significant changes in levels of the ecdysone metabolite 20-hydroxyecdysonic acid and 20-hydroxyecdysone. In contrast, inhibiting gene expression only during adulthood resulted in a striking loss of oenocyte cells and a concomitant reduction of cuticular hydrocarbons, desiccation resistance, and lifespan. Oenocyte loss and cuticular lipid levels were partially rescued by 20-hydroxyecdysone supplementation. Taken together, these results identify a novel regulator of pheromone synthesis and reveal that ecdysteroid signaling is essential for the maintenance of cuticular lipids and oenocytes throughout adulthood. PMID:27333054

  1. Steroid Hormone Signaling Is Essential for Pheromone Production and Oenocyte Survival

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Yin Ning; Tan, Kah Junn; Shevchenko, Andrej

    2016-01-01

    Many of the lipids found on the cuticles of insects function as pheromones and communicate information about age, sex, and reproductive status. In Drosophila, the composition of the information-rich lipid profile is dynamic and changes over the lifetime of an individual. However, the molecular basis of this change is not well understood. To identify genes that control cuticular lipid production in Drosophila, we performed a RNA interference screen and used Direct Analysis in Real Time and gas chromatography mass spectrometry to quantify changes in the chemical profiles. Twelve putative genes were identified whereby transcriptional silencing led to significant differences in cuticular lipid production. Amongst them, we characterized a gene which we name spidey, and which encodes a putative steroid dehydrogenase that has sex- and age-dependent effects on viability, pheromone production, and oenocyte survival. Transcriptional silencing or overexpression of spidey during embryonic development results in pupal lethality and significant changes in levels of the ecdysone metabolite 20-hydroxyecdysonic acid and 20-hydroxyecdysone. In contrast, inhibiting gene expression only during adulthood resulted in a striking loss of oenocyte cells and a concomitant reduction of cuticular hydrocarbons, desiccation resistance, and lifespan. Oenocyte loss and cuticular lipid levels were partially rescued by 20-hydroxyecdysone supplementation. Taken together, these results identify a novel regulator of pheromone synthesis and reveal that ecdysteroid signaling is essential for the maintenance of cuticular lipids and oenocytes throughout adulthood. PMID:27333054

  2. Identification of Essential and Non-essential Protein Kinases by a Fusion PCR Method for Efficient Production of Transgenic Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    Merritt, Christopher; Stuart, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Manipulation of gene expression has been used to elucidate gene function, explore fundamental biological processes and to identify potential drug targets in Trypanosoma brucei. We show in bloodstream forms that CDC2-related kinase CRK12 (Tb11.01.4130) is essential since transcriptional inactivation in conditional null mutants is lethal but 19 other protein kinases are not essential since null mutants are viable. We did so using efficient methods for the generation of null and conditional null cell lines of T. brucei by approaches that generate transfection constructs with large targeting sequences and which use reliable transfection and selection conditions. These methods, which are described in detail in the supplementary material, employ multiple oligonucleotides and PCR reactions and several transfections but are cost effective and can simultaneously generate 24 transfectants thus shifting the rate limiting experimental steps from the production of cell lines to their analysis. PMID:23685343

  3. Genetics of essential hypertension: from families to genes.

    PubMed

    Barlassina, Cristina; Lanzani, Chiara; Manunta, Paolo; Bianchi, Giuseppe

    2002-11-01

    Family studies demonstrated the contribution of genetic factors to the development of primary hypertension. However, the transition from this phenomenologic-biometric approach to the molecular-genetic one is more difficult. This last approach is mainly based on the Mendel paradigm; that is, the dissection of the poligenic complexity of hypertension is brought about on the assumption that the individual genetic variants underlying the development of hypertension must be more frequent in hypertensive patients than in controls and must cosegregate with hypertension in families. The validity of these assumptions was clearly demonstrated in the so-called monogenic form of hypertension. However, because of the network of the feedback mechanisms regulating BP, it is possible that that the same gene variant may have an opposite effect on BP according to the genetic and environmental backgrounds. Independent groups of observations (acute BP response to saline infusion, incidence of hypertension in a population follow-up of 9 yr, age-related changes on BP) discussed in this review suggest a positive answer to this question. Therefore the impact of a given genetic variant on BP level must be evaluated within the context of the appropriate genetic epistatic interactions. A negative finding or a minor genetic effect in a general population may become a major gene effect in a subset of people with the appropriate genetic and environmental backgrounds.

  4. The Evergreen gene is essential for flower initiation in carnation.

    PubMed

    Scovel, G; Altshuler, T; Liu, Z; Vainstein, A

    2000-01-01

    One of the leading cut-flower crops in the world, the greenhouse carnation (Dianthus caryophyllus), has been subjected to intense breeding efforts for the past few hundred years. As an ornamental crop, flowering and flower architecture are major breeding targets that are constantly in demand. In an ongoing breeding program aimed at improving these characteristics, two mutants heterozygous for a mutation in a gene termed evergreen (e) were identified. In these mutants, spike-like clusters of bracteoles subtend each flower. Genetic analysis of the mutants confirmed the semidominant nature of this nuclear mutation and that the two original mutants were allelic at the evergreen locus. In homozygous mutant plants, a more severe phenotype was observed. Flower formation was completely blocked and spikelike clusters of bracteoles did not subtend any flowers. Morphological characterization of mutant plants revealed that vegetative growth and inflorescence structure are not affected by the mutant allele. In plants heterozygous for the evergreen mutation, fertility, petal and pistil length, calyx diameter, and stamen number were not affected. However, flowers from these heterozygous plants had a reduced number of petals, suggesting an intriguing link between evergreen and the double flower (d) gene that determines petal number in carnation. The control by evergreen of bracteole formation, floral meristem initiation, and petal number in carnation is discussed in comparison to the recessive leafy (lfy) and floricaula (flo) mutants of Arabidopsis and Antirrhinum, respectively.

  5. Investigating essential gene function in Mycobacterium tuberculosis using an efficient CRISPR interference system

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Atul K.; Carette, Xavier; Potluri, Lakshmi-Prasad; Sharp, Jared D.; Xu, Ranfei; Prisic, Sladjana; Husson, Robert N.

    2016-01-01

    Despite many methodological advances that have facilitated investigation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis pathogenesis, analysis of essential gene function in this slow-growing pathogen remains difficult. Here, we describe an optimized CRISPR-based method to inhibit expression of essential genes based on the inducible expression of an enzymatically inactive Cas9 protein together with gene-specific guide RNAs (CRISPR interference). Using this system to target several essential genes of M. tuberculosis, we achieved marked inhibition of gene expression resulting in growth inhibition, changes in susceptibility to small molecule inhibitors and disruption of normal cell morphology. Analysis of expression of genes containing sequences similar to those targeted by individual guide RNAs did not reveal significant off-target effects. Advantages of this approach include the ability to compare inhibited gene expression to native levels of expression, lack of the need to alter the M. tuberculosis chromosome, the potential to titrate the extent of transcription inhibition, and the ability to avoid off-target effects. Based on the consistent inhibition of transcription and the simple cloning strategy described in this work, CRISPR interference provides an efficient approach to investigate essential gene function that may be particularly useful in characterizing genes of unknown function and potential targets for novel small molecule inhibitors. PMID:27407107

  6. Role of Azotobacter vinelandii mucA and mucC Gene Products in Alginate Production

    PubMed Central

    Núñez, Cinthia; León, Renato; Guzmán, Josefina; Espín, Guadalupe; Soberón-Chávez, Gloria

    2000-01-01

    Azotobacter vinelandii produces the exopolysaccharide alginate, which is essential for its differentiation to desiccation-resistant cysts. In different bacterial species, the alternative sigma factor ςE regulates the expression of functions related to the extracytoplasmic compartments. In A. vinelandii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the ςE factor (AlgU) is essential for alginate production. In both bacteria, the activity of this sigma factor is regulated by the product of the mucA, mucB, mucC, and mucD genes. In this work, we studied the transcriptional regulation of the A. vinelandii algU-mucABCD gene cluster, as well as the role of the mucA and mucC gene products in alginate production. Our results show the existence of AlgU autoregulation and show that both MucA and MucC play a negative role in alginate production. PMID:11073894

  7. Transcription factor genes essential for cell proliferation and replicative lifespan in budding yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Kamei, Yuka; Tai, Akiko; Dakeyama, Shota; Yamamoto, Kaori; Inoue, Yamato; Kishimoto, Yoshifumi; Ohara, Hiroya; Mukai, Yukio

    2015-07-31

    Many of the lifespan-related genes have been identified in eukaryotes ranging from the yeast to human. However, there is limited information available on the longevity genes that are essential for cell proliferation. Here, we investigated whether the essential genes encoding DNA-binding transcription factors modulated the replicative lifespan of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Heterozygous diploid knockout strains for FHL1, RAP1, REB1, and MCM1 genes showed significantly short lifespan. {sup 1}H-nuclear magnetic resonance analysis indicated a characteristic metabolic profile in the Δfhl1/FHL1 mutant. These results strongly suggest that FHL1 regulates the transcription of lifespan related metabolic genes. Thus, heterozygous knockout strains could be the potential materials for discovering further novel lifespan genes. - Highlights: • Involvement of yeast TF genes essential for cell growth in lifespan was evaluated. • The essential TF genes, FHL1, RAP1, REB1, and MCM1, regulate replicative lifespan. • Heterozygous deletion of FHL1 changes cellular metabolism related to lifespan.

  8. A Caenorhabditis Elegans RNA Polymerase II Gene, Ama-1 Iv, and Nearby Essential Genes

    PubMed Central

    Rogalski, T. M.; Riddle, D. L.

    1988-01-01

    The amanitin-binding subunit of RNA polymerase II in Caenorhabditis elegans is encoded by the ama-1 gene, located approximately 0.05 map unit to the right of dpy-13 IV. Using the amanitin-resistant ama-1(m118) strain as a parent, we have isolated amanitin-sensitive mutants that carry recessive-lethal ama-1 alleles. Of the six ethyl methanesulfonate-induced mutants examined, two are arrested late in embryogenesis. One of these is a large deficiency, mDf9, but the second may be a novel point mutation. The four other mutants are hypomorphs, and presumably produce altered RNA polymerase II enzymes with some residual function. Two of these mutants develop into sterile adults at 20° but are arrested as larvae at 25°, and two others are fertile at 20° and sterile at 25°. Temperature-shift experiments performed with the adult sterile mutant, ama-1(m118m238ts), have revealed a temperature-sensitive period that begins late in gonadogenesis and is centered around the initiation of egg-laying. Postembryonic development at 25° is slowed by 30%. By contrast, the amanitin-resistant allele of ama-1 has very little effect on developmental rate or fertility. We have identified 15 essential genes in an interval of 4.5 map units surrounding ama-1, as well as four γ-ray-induced deficiencies and two duplications that include the ama-1 gene. The larger duplication, mDp1, may include the entire left arm of chromosome IV, and it recombines with the normal homologue at a low frequency. The smallest deficiency, mDf10, complements all but three identified genes: let-278, dpy-13 and ama-1, which define an interval of only 0.1 map unit. The terminal phenotype of mDf10 homozygotes is developmental arrest during the first larval stage, suggesting that there is sufficient maternal RNA polymerase II to complete embryonic development. PMID:8608933

  9. Transcription factor genes essential for cell proliferation and replicative lifespan in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Kamei, Yuka; Tai, Akiko; Dakeyama, Shota; Yamamoto, Kaori; Inoue, Yamato; Kishimoto, Yoshifumi; Ohara, Hiroya; Mukai, Yukio

    2015-07-31

    Many of the lifespan-related genes have been identified in eukaryotes ranging from the yeast to human. However, there is limited information available on the longevity genes that are essential for cell proliferation. Here, we investigated whether the essential genes encoding DNA-binding transcription factors modulated the replicative lifespan of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Heterozygous diploid knockout strains for FHL1, RAP1, REB1, and MCM1 genes showed significantly short lifespan. (1)H-nuclear magnetic resonance analysis indicated a characteristic metabolic profile in the Δfhl1/FHL1 mutant. These results strongly suggest that FHL1 regulates the transcription of lifespan related metabolic genes. Thus, heterozygous knockout strains could be the potential materials for discovering further novel lifespan genes.

  10. From essential to persistent genes: a functional approach to constructing synthetic life

    PubMed Central

    Acevedo-Rocha, Carlos G.; Fang, Gang; Schmidt, Markus; Ussery, David W.; Danchin, Antoine

    2013-01-01

    A central undertaking in synthetic biology (SB) is the quest for the ‘minimal genome’. However, ‘minimal sets’ of essential genes are strongly context-dependent and, in all prokaryotic genomes sequenced to date, not a single protein-coding gene is entirely conserved. Furthermore, a lack of consensus in the field as to what attributes make a gene truly essential adds another aspect of variation. Thus, a universal minimal genome remains elusive. Here, as an alternative to defining a minimal genome, we propose that the concept of gene persistence can be used to classify genes needed for robust long-term survival. Persistent genes, although not ubiquitous, are conserved in a majority of genomes, tend to be expressed at high levels, and are frequently located on the leading DNA strand. These criteria impose constraints on genome organization, and these are important considerations for engineering cells and for creating cellular life-like forms in SB. PMID:23219343

  11. Candidate Essential Genes in Burkholderia cenocepacia J2315 Identified by Genome-Wide TraDIS

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Yee-Chin; Abd El Ghany, Moataz; Naeem, Raeece; Lee, Kok-Wei; Tan, Yung-Chie; Pain, Arnab; Nathan, Sheila

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia cenocepacia infection often leads to fatal cepacia syndrome in cystic fibrosis patients. However, antibiotic therapy rarely results in complete eradication of the pathogen due to its intrinsic resistance to many clinically available antibiotics. Recent attention has turned to the identification of essential genes as the proteins encoded by these genes may serve as potential targets for development of novel antimicrobials. In this study, we utilized TraDIS (Transposon Directed Insertion-site Sequencing) as a genome-wide screening tool to facilitate the identification of B. cenocepacia genes essential for its growth and viability. A transposon mutant pool consisting of approximately 500,000 mutants was successfully constructed, with more than 400,000 unique transposon insertion sites identified by computational analysis of TraDIS datasets. The saturated library allowed for the identification of 383 genes that were predicted to be essential in B. cenocepacia. We extended the application of TraDIS to identify conditionally essential genes required for in vitro growth and revealed an additional repertoire of 439 genes to be crucial for B. cenocepacia growth under nutrient-depleted conditions. The library of B. cenocepacia mutants can subsequently be subjected to various biologically related conditions to facilitate the discovery of genes involved in niche adaptation as well as pathogenicity and virulence. PMID:27597847

  12. Candidate Essential Genes in Burkholderia cenocepacia J2315 Identified by Genome-Wide TraDIS

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Yee-Chin; Abd El Ghany, Moataz; Naeem, Raeece; Lee, Kok-Wei; Tan, Yung-Chie; Pain, Arnab; Nathan, Sheila

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia cenocepacia infection often leads to fatal cepacia syndrome in cystic fibrosis patients. However, antibiotic therapy rarely results in complete eradication of the pathogen due to its intrinsic resistance to many clinically available antibiotics. Recent attention has turned to the identification of essential genes as the proteins encoded by these genes may serve as potential targets for development of novel antimicrobials. In this study, we utilized TraDIS (Transposon Directed Insertion-site Sequencing) as a genome-wide screening tool to facilitate the identification of B. cenocepacia genes essential for its growth and viability. A transposon mutant pool consisting of approximately 500,000 mutants was successfully constructed, with more than 400,000 unique transposon insertion sites identified by computational analysis of TraDIS datasets. The saturated library allowed for the identification of 383 genes that were predicted to be essential in B. cenocepacia. We extended the application of TraDIS to identify conditionally essential genes required for in vitro growth and revealed an additional repertoire of 439 genes to be crucial for B. cenocepacia growth under nutrient-depleted conditions. The library of B. cenocepacia mutants can subsequently be subjected to various biologically related conditions to facilitate the discovery of genes involved in niche adaptation as well as pathogenicity and virulence.

  13. Candidate Essential Genes in Burkholderia cenocepacia J2315 Identified by Genome-Wide TraDIS.

    PubMed

    Wong, Yee-Chin; Abd El Ghany, Moataz; Naeem, Raeece; Lee, Kok-Wei; Tan, Yung-Chie; Pain, Arnab; Nathan, Sheila

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia cenocepacia infection often leads to fatal cepacia syndrome in cystic fibrosis patients. However, antibiotic therapy rarely results in complete eradication of the pathogen due to its intrinsic resistance to many clinically available antibiotics. Recent attention has turned to the identification of essential genes as the proteins encoded by these genes may serve as potential targets for development of novel antimicrobials. In this study, we utilized TraDIS (Transposon Directed Insertion-site Sequencing) as a genome-wide screening tool to facilitate the identification of B. cenocepacia genes essential for its growth and viability. A transposon mutant pool consisting of approximately 500,000 mutants was successfully constructed, with more than 400,000 unique transposon insertion sites identified by computational analysis of TraDIS datasets. The saturated library allowed for the identification of 383 genes that were predicted to be essential in B. cenocepacia. We extended the application of TraDIS to identify conditionally essential genes required for in vitro growth and revealed an additional repertoire of 439 genes to be crucial for B. cenocepacia growth under nutrient-depleted conditions. The library of B. cenocepacia mutants can subsequently be subjected to various biologically related conditions to facilitate the discovery of genes involved in niche adaptation as well as pathogenicity and virulence. PMID:27597847

  14. Comprehensive identification of essential Staphylococcus aureus genes using Transposon-Mediated Differential Hybridisation (TMDH)

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhuri, Roy R; Allen, Andrew G; Owen, Paul J; Shalom, Gil; Stone, Karl; Harrison, Marcus; Burgis, Timothy A; Lockyer, Michael; Garcia-Lara, Jorge; Foster, Simon J; Pleasance, Stephen J; Peters, Sarah E; Maskell, Duncan J; Charles, Ian G

    2009-01-01

    Background In recent years there has been an increasing problem with Staphylococcus aureus strains that are resistant to treatment with existing antibiotics. An important starting point for the development of new antimicrobial drugs is the identification of "essential" genes that are important for bacterial survival and growth. Results We have developed a robust microarray and PCR-based method, Transposon-Mediated Differential Hybridisation (TMDH), that uses novel bioinformatics to identify transposon inserts in genome-wide libraries. Following a microarray-based screen, genes lacking transposon inserts are re-tested using a PCR and sequencing-based approach. We carried out a TMDH analysis of the S. aureus genome using a large random mariner transposon library of around a million mutants, and identified a total of 351 S. aureus genes important for survival and growth in culture. A comparison with the essential gene list experimentally derived for Bacillus subtilis highlighted interesting differences in both pathways and individual genes. Conclusion We have determined the first comprehensive list of S. aureus essential genes. This should act as a useful starting point for the identification of potential targets for novel antimicrobial compounds. The TMDH methodology we have developed is generic and could be applied to identify essential genes in other bacterial pathogens. PMID:19570206

  15. Cloning of hydrogenase genes and fine structure analysis of an operon essential for H2 metabolism in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Sankar, P; Lee, J H; Shanmugam, K T

    1985-01-01

    Escherichia coli has two unlinked genes that code for hydrogenase synthesis and activity. The DNA fragments containing the two genes (hydA and hydB) were cloned into a plasmid vector, pBR322. The plasmids containing the hyd genes (pSE-290 and pSE-111 carrying the hydA and hydB genes, respectively) were used to genetically map a total of 51 mutant strains with defects in hydrogenase activity. A total of 37 mutants carried a mutation in the hydB gene, whereas the remaining 14 hyd were hydA. This complementation analysis also established the presence of two new genes, so far unidentified, one coding for formate dehydrogenase-2 (fdv) and another producing an electron transport protein (fhl) coupling formate dehydrogenase-2 to hydrogenase. Three of the four genes, hydB, fhl, and fdv, may constitute a single operon, and all three genes are carried by a 5.6-kilobase-pair chromosomal DNA insert in plasmid pSE-128. Plasmids carrying a part of this 5.6-kilobase-pair DNA (pSE-130) or fragments derived from this DNA in different orientations (pSE-126 and pSE-129) inhibited the production of active formate hydrogenlyase. This inhibition occurred even in a prototrophic E. coli, strain K-10, but only during an early induction period. These results, based on complementation analysis with cloned DNA fragments, show that both hydA and hydB genes are essential for the production of active hydrogenase. For the expression of active formate hydrogenlyase, two other gene products, fhl and fdv are also needed. All four genes map between 58 and 59 min in the E. coli chromosome. PMID:3884595

  16. Geptop: A Gene Essentiality Prediction Tool for Sequenced Bacterial Genomes Based on Orthology and Phylogeny

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wen; Ning, Lu-Wen; Ye, Yuan-Nong; Guo, Feng-Biao

    2013-01-01

    Integrative genomics predictors, which score highly in predicting bacterial essential genes, would be unfeasible in most species because the data sources are limited. We developed a universal approach and tool designated Geptop, based on orthology and phylogeny, to offer gene essentiality annotations. In a series of tests, our Geptop method yielded higher area under curve (AUC) scores in the receiver operating curves than the integrative approaches. In the ten-fold cross-validations among randomly upset samples, Geptop yielded an AUC of 0.918, and in the cross-organism predictions for 19 organisms Geptop yielded AUC scores between 0.569 and 0.959. A test applied to the very recently determined essential gene dataset from the Porphyromonas gingivalis, which belongs to a phylum different with all of the above 19 bacterial genomes, gave an AUC of 0.77. Therefore, Geptop can be applied to any bacterial species whose genome has been sequenced. Compared with the essential genes uniquely identified by the lethal screening, the essential genes predicted only by Gepop are associated with more protein-protein interactions, especially in the three bacteria with lower AUC scores (<0.7). This may further illustrate the reliability and feasibility of our method in some sense. The web server and standalone version of Geptop are available at http://cefg.uestc.edu.cn/geptop/ free of charge. The tool has been run on 968 bacterial genomes and the results are accessible at the website. PMID:23977285

  17. Geptop: a gene essentiality prediction tool for sequenced bacterial genomes based on orthology and phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wen; Ning, Lu-Wen; Ye, Yuan-Nong; Guo, Feng-Biao

    2013-01-01

    Integrative genomics predictors, which score highly in predicting bacterial essential genes, would be unfeasible in most species because the data sources are limited. We developed a universal approach and tool designated Geptop, based on orthology and phylogeny, to offer gene essentiality annotations. In a series of tests, our Geptop method yielded higher area under curve (AUC) scores in the receiver operating curves than the integrative approaches. In the ten-fold cross-validations among randomly upset samples, Geptop yielded an AUC of 0.918, and in the cross-organism predictions for 19 organisms Geptop yielded AUC scores between 0.569 and 0.959. A test applied to the very recently determined essential gene dataset from the Porphyromonas gingivalis, which belongs to a phylum different with all of the above 19 bacterial genomes, gave an AUC of 0.77. Therefore, Geptop can be applied to any bacterial species whose genome has been sequenced. Compared with the essential genes uniquely identified by the lethal screening, the essential genes predicted only by Gepop are associated with more protein-protein interactions, especially in the three bacteria with lower AUC scores (<0.7). This may further illustrate the reliability and feasibility of our method in some sense. The web server and standalone version of Geptop are available at http://cefg.uestc.edu.cn/geptop/ free of charge. The tool has been run on 968 bacterial genomes and the results are accessible at the website.

  18. A Survey of Essential Gene Function in the Yeast Cell Division Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lisa; Castillo, Lourdes Peña; Mnaimneh, Sanie

    2006-01-01

    Mutations impacting specific stages of cell growth and division have provided a foundation for dissecting mechanisms that underlie cell cycle progression. We have undertaken an objective examination of the yeast cell cycle through flow cytometric analysis of DNA content in TetO7 promoter mutant strains representing 75% of all essential yeast genes. More than 65% of the strains displayed specific alterations in DNA content, suggesting that reduced function of an essential gene in most cases impairs progression through a specific stage of the cell cycle. Because of the large number of essential genes required for protein biosynthesis, G1 accumulation was the most common phenotype observed in our analysis. In contrast, relatively few mutants displayed S-phase delay, and most of these were defective in genes required for DNA replication or nucleotide metabolism. G2 accumulation appeared to arise from a variety of defects. In addition to providing a global view of the diversity of essential cellular processes that influence cell cycle progression, these data also provided predictions regarding the functions of individual genes: we identified four new genes involved in protein trafficking (NUS1, PHS1, PGA2, PGA3), and we found that CSE1 and SMC4 are important for DNA replication. PMID:16943325

  19. Comparison of inherently essential genes of Porphyromonas gingivalis identified in two transposon-sequencing libraries.

    PubMed

    Hutcherson, J A; Gogeneni, H; Yoder-Himes, D; Hendrickson, E L; Hackett, M; Whiteley, M; Lamont, R J; Scott, D A

    2016-08-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a Gram-negative anaerobe and keystone periodontal pathogen. A mariner transposon insertion mutant library has recently been used to define 463 genes as putatively essential for the in vitro growth of P. gingivalis ATCC 33277 in planktonic culture (Library 1). We have independently generated a transposon insertion mutant library (Library 2) for the same P. gingivalis strain and herein compare genes that are putatively essential for in vitro growth in complex media, as defined by both libraries. In all, 281 genes (61%) identified by Library 1 were common to Library 2. Many of these common genes are involved in fundamentally important metabolic pathways, notably pyrimidine cycling as well as lipopolysaccharide, peptidoglycan, pantothenate and coenzyme A biosynthesis, and nicotinate and nicotinamide metabolism. Also in common are genes encoding heat-shock protein homologues, sigma factors, enzymes with proteolytic activity, and the majority of sec-related protein export genes. In addition to facilitating a better understanding of critical physiological processes, transposon-sequencing technology has the potential to identify novel strategies for the control of P. gingivalis infections. Those genes defined as essential by two independently generated TnSeq mutant libraries are likely to represent particularly attractive therapeutic targets.

  20. Essential gene disruptions reveal complex relationships between phenotypic robustness, pleiotropy, and fitness

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Christopher R; Li, Shuang; Siegal, Mark L

    2015-01-01

    The concept of robustness in biology has gained much attention recently, but a mechanistic understanding of how genetic networks regulate phenotypic variation has remained elusive. One approach to understand the genetic architecture of variability has been to analyze dispensable gene deletions in model organisms; however, the most important genes cannot be deleted. Here, we have utilized two systems in yeast whereby essential genes have been altered to reduce expression. Using high-throughput microscopy and image analysis, we have characterized a large number of morphological phenotypes, and their associated variation, for the majority of essential genes in yeast. Our results indicate that phenotypic robustness is more highly dependent upon the expression of essential genes than on the presence of dispensable genes. Morphological robustness appears to be a general property of a genotype that is closely related to pleiotropy. While the fitness profile across a range of expression levels is idiosyncratic to each gene, the global pattern indicates that there is a window in which phenotypic variation can be released before fitness effects are observable. PMID:25609648

  1. An Approach for Predicting Essential Genes Using Multiple Homology Mapping and Machine Learning Algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Hong-Li; Zhang, Fa-Zhan; Labena, Abraham Alemayehu; Dong, Chuan; Jin, Yan-Ting

    2016-01-01

    Investigation of essential genes is significant to comprehend the minimal gene sets of cell and discover potential drug targets. In this study, a novel approach based on multiple homology mapping and machine learning method was introduced to predict essential genes. We focused on 25 bacteria which have characterized essential genes. The predictions yielded the highest area under receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC) of 0.9716 through tenfold cross-validation test. Proper features were utilized to construct models to make predictions in distantly related bacteria. The accuracy of predictions was evaluated via the consistency of predictions and known essential genes of target species. The highest AUC of 0.9552 and average AUC of 0.8314 were achieved when making predictions across organisms. An independent dataset from Synechococcus elongatus, which was released recently, was obtained for further assessment of the performance of our model. The AUC score of predictions is 0.7855, which is higher than other methods. This research presents that features obtained by homology mapping uniquely can achieve quite great or even better results than those integrated features. Meanwhile, the work indicates that machine learning-based method can assign more efficient weight coefficients than using empirical formula based on biological knowledge. PMID:27660763

  2. An Approach for Predicting Essential Genes Using Multiple Homology Mapping and Machine Learning Algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Hong-Li; Zhang, Fa-Zhan; Labena, Abraham Alemayehu; Dong, Chuan; Jin, Yan-Ting

    2016-01-01

    Investigation of essential genes is significant to comprehend the minimal gene sets of cell and discover potential drug targets. In this study, a novel approach based on multiple homology mapping and machine learning method was introduced to predict essential genes. We focused on 25 bacteria which have characterized essential genes. The predictions yielded the highest area under receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC) of 0.9716 through tenfold cross-validation test. Proper features were utilized to construct models to make predictions in distantly related bacteria. The accuracy of predictions was evaluated via the consistency of predictions and known essential genes of target species. The highest AUC of 0.9552 and average AUC of 0.8314 were achieved when making predictions across organisms. An independent dataset from Synechococcus elongatus, which was released recently, was obtained for further assessment of the performance of our model. The AUC score of predictions is 0.7855, which is higher than other methods. This research presents that features obtained by homology mapping uniquely can achieve quite great or even better results than those integrated features. Meanwhile, the work indicates that machine learning-based method can assign more efficient weight coefficients than using empirical formula based on biological knowledge.

  3. Use of Selected Essential Oils to Control Aflatoxin Contaminated Stored Cashew and Detection of Aflatoxin Biosynthesis Gene

    PubMed Central

    Abd El-Aziz, Abeer R. M.; Mahmoud, Mohamed A.; Al-Othman, Monira R.; Al-Gahtani, Munirah F.

    2015-01-01

    Aspergillus spp. associated with cashew from the regions of Riyadh, Dammam, and Abha were isolated and three different culture media were used to qualitatively measure aflatoxin production by Aspergillus via UV light (365 nm), which was expressed as positive or negative. The obtained data showed that six isolates of A. flavus and four isolates of A. parasiticus were positive for aflatoxin production, while all isolates of A. niger were negative. Five commercially essential oils (thyme, garlic, cinnamon, mint, and rosemary) were tested to determine their influence on growth and aflatoxin production in A. flavus and A. parasiticus by performing high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The results showed that the tested essential oils caused highly significant inhibition of fungal growth and aflatoxin production in A. flavus and A. parasiticus. The extent of the inhibition of fungal growth and aflatoxin production was dependent on the type and concentration of essential oils applied. The results indicate that cinnamon and thyme oils show strong antimicrobial potential. PCR was used with four sets of primer pairs for nor-1, omt-1, ver-1, and aflR genes, enclosed in the aflatoxin biosynthetic pathway. The interpretation of the results revealed that PCR is a rapid and sensitive method. PMID:25705718

  4. Use of selected essential oils to control aflatoxin contaminated stored cashew and detection of aflatoxin biosynthesis gene.

    PubMed

    Abd El-Aziz, Abeer R M; Mahmoud, Mohamed A; Al-Othman, Monira R; Al-Gahtani, Munirah F

    2015-01-01

    Aspergillus spp. associated with cashew from the regions of Riyadh, Dammam, and Abha were isolated and three different culture media were used to qualitatively measure aflatoxin production by Aspergillus via UV light (365 nm), which was expressed as positive or negative. The obtained data showed that six isolates of A. flavus and four isolates of A. parasiticus were positive for aflatoxin production, while all isolates of A. niger were negative. Five commercially essential oils (thyme, garlic, cinnamon, mint, and rosemary) were tested to determine their influence on growth and aflatoxin production in A. flavus and A. parasiticus by performing high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The results showed that the tested essential oils caused highly significant inhibition of fungal growth and aflatoxin production in A. flavus and A. parasiticus. The extent of the inhibition of fungal growth and aflatoxin production was dependent on the type and concentration of essential oils applied. The results indicate that cinnamon and thyme oils show strong antimicrobial potential. PCR was used with four sets of primer pairs for nor-1, omt-1, ver-1, and aflR genes, enclosed in the aflatoxin biosynthetic pathway. The interpretation of the results revealed that PCR is a rapid and sensitive method. PMID:25705718

  5. Use of selected essential oils to control aflatoxin contaminated stored cashew and detection of aflatoxin biosynthesis gene.

    PubMed

    Abd El-Aziz, Abeer R M; Mahmoud, Mohamed A; Al-Othman, Monira R; Al-Gahtani, Munirah F

    2015-01-01

    Aspergillus spp. associated with cashew from the regions of Riyadh, Dammam, and Abha were isolated and three different culture media were used to qualitatively measure aflatoxin production by Aspergillus via UV light (365 nm), which was expressed as positive or negative. The obtained data showed that six isolates of A. flavus and four isolates of A. parasiticus were positive for aflatoxin production, while all isolates of A. niger were negative. Five commercially essential oils (thyme, garlic, cinnamon, mint, and rosemary) were tested to determine their influence on growth and aflatoxin production in A. flavus and A. parasiticus by performing high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The results showed that the tested essential oils caused highly significant inhibition of fungal growth and aflatoxin production in A. flavus and A. parasiticus. The extent of the inhibition of fungal growth and aflatoxin production was dependent on the type and concentration of essential oils applied. The results indicate that cinnamon and thyme oils show strong antimicrobial potential. PCR was used with four sets of primer pairs for nor-1, omt-1, ver-1, and aflR genes, enclosed in the aflatoxin biosynthetic pathway. The interpretation of the results revealed that PCR is a rapid and sensitive method.

  6. Food production & availability - Essential prerequisites for sustainable food security

    PubMed Central

    Swaminathan, M.S.; Bhavani, R.V.

    2013-01-01

    Food and nutrition security are intimately interconnected, since only a food based approach can help in overcoming malnutrition in an economically and socially sustainable manner. Food production provides the base for food security as it is a key determinant of food availability. This paper deals with different aspects of ensuring high productivity and production without associated ecological harm for ensuring adequate food availability. By mainstreaming ecological considerations in technology development and dissemination, we can enter an era of evergreen revolution and sustainable food and nutrition security. Public policy support is crucial for enabling this. PMID:24135188

  7. Food production & availability--essential prerequisites for sustainable food security.

    PubMed

    Swaminathan, M S; Bhavani, R V

    2013-09-01

    Food and nutrition security are intimately interconnected, since only a food based approach can help in overcoming malnutrition in an economically and socially sustainable manner. Food production provides the base for food security as it is a key determinant of food availability. This paper deals with different aspects of ensuring high productivity and production without associated ecological harm for ensuring adequate food availability. By mainstreaming ecological considerations in technology development and dissemination, we can enter an era of evergreen revolution and sustainable food and nutrition security. Public policy support is crucial for enabling this.

  8. Essential Genes in the Core Genome of the Human Pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes

    PubMed Central

    Le Breton, Yoann; Belew, Ashton T.; Valdes, Kayla M.; Islam, Emrul; Curry, Patrick; Tettelin, Hervé; Shirtliff, Mark E.; El-Sayed, Najib M.; McIver, Kevin S.

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (Group A Streptococcus, GAS) remains a major public health burden worldwide, infecting over 750 million people leading to over 500,000 deaths annually. GAS pathogenesis is complex, involving genetically distinct GAS strains and multiple infection sites. To overcome fastidious genetic manipulations and accelerate pathogenesis investigations in GAS, we developed a mariner-based system (Krmit) for en masse monitoring of complex mutant pools by transposon sequencing (Tn-seq). Highly saturated transposant libraries (Krmit insertions in ca. every 25 nucleotides) were generated in two distinct GAS clinical isolates, a serotype M1T1 invasive strain 5448 and a nephritogenic serotype M49 strain NZ131, and analyzed using a Bayesian statistical model to predict GAS essential genes, identifying sets of 227 and 241 of those genes in 5448 and NZ131, respectively. A large proportion of GAS essential genes corresponded to key cellular processes and metabolic pathways, and 177 were found conserved within the GAS core genome established from 20 available GAS genomes. Selected essential genes were validated using conditional-expression mutants. Finally, comparison to previous essentiality analyses in S. sanguinis and S. pneumoniae revealed significant overlaps, providing valuable insights for the development of new antimicrobials to treat infections by GAS and other pathogenic streptococci. PMID:25996237

  9. The essential helicase gene RAD3 suppresses short-sequence recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Bailis, A M; Maines, S; Negritto, M T

    1995-01-01

    We have isolated an allele of the essential DNA repair and transcription gene RAD3 that relaxes the restriction against recombination between short DNA sequences in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Double-strand break repair and gene replacement events requiring recombination between short identical or mismatched sequences were stimulated in the rad3-G595R mutant cells. We also observed an increase in the physical stability of double-strand breaks in the rad3-G595R mutant cells. These results suggest that the RAD3 gene suppresses recombination involving short homologous sequences by promoting the degradation of the ends of broken DNA molecules. PMID:7623796

  10. Functional Study of Genes Essential for Autogamy and Nuclear Reorganization in Paramecium▿§

    PubMed Central

    Nowak, Jacek K.; Gromadka, Robert; Juszczuk, Marek; Jerka-Dziadosz, Maria; Maliszewska, Kamila; Mucchielli, Marie-Hélène; Gout, Jean-François; Arnaiz, Olivier; Agier, Nicolas; Tang, Thomas; Aggerbeck, Lawrence P.; Cohen, Jean; Delacroix, Hervé; Sperling, Linda; Herbert, Christopher J.; Zagulski, Marek; Bétermier, Mireille

    2011-01-01

    Like all ciliates, Paramecium tetraurelia is a unicellular eukaryote that harbors two kinds of nuclei within its cytoplasm. At each sexual cycle, a new somatic macronucleus (MAC) develops from the germ line micronucleus (MIC) through a sequence of complex events, which includes meiosis, karyogamy, and assembly of the MAC genome from MIC sequences. The latter process involves developmentally programmed genome rearrangements controlled by noncoding RNAs and a specialized RNA interference machinery. We describe our first attempts to identify genes and biological processes that contribute to the progression of the sexual cycle. Given the high percentage of unknown genes annotated in the P. tetraurelia genome, we applied a global strategy to monitor gene expression profiles during autogamy, a self-fertilization process. We focused this pilot study on the genes carried by the largest somatic chromosome and designed dedicated DNA arrays covering 484 genes from this chromosome (1.2% of all genes annotated in the genome). Transcriptome analysis revealed four major patterns of gene expression, including two successive waves of gene induction. Functional analysis of 15 upregulated genes revealed four that are essential for vegetative growth, one of which is involved in the maintenance of MAC integrity and another in cell division or membrane trafficking. Two additional genes, encoding a MIC-specific protein and a putative RNA helicase localizing to the old and then to the new MAC, are specifically required during sexual processes. Our work provides a proof of principle that genes essential for meiosis and nuclear reorganization can be uncovered following genome-wide transcriptome analysis. PMID:21257794

  11. Functional study of genes essential for autogamy and nuclear reorganization in Paramecium.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Jacek K; Gromadka, Robert; Juszczuk, Marek; Jerka-Dziadosz, Maria; Maliszewska, Kamila; Mucchielli, Marie-Hélène; Gout, Jean-François; Arnaiz, Olivier; Agier, Nicolas; Tang, Thomas; Aggerbeck, Lawrence P; Cohen, Jean; Delacroix, Hervé; Sperling, Linda; Herbert, Christopher J; Zagulski, Marek; Bétermier, Mireille

    2011-03-01

    Like all ciliates, Paramecium tetraurelia is a unicellular eukaryote that harbors two kinds of nuclei within its cytoplasm. At each sexual cycle, a new somatic macronucleus (MAC) develops from the germ line micronucleus (MIC) through a sequence of complex events, which includes meiosis, karyogamy, and assembly of the MAC genome from MIC sequences. The latter process involves developmentally programmed genome rearrangements controlled by noncoding RNAs and a specialized RNA interference machinery. We describe our first attempts to identify genes and biological processes that contribute to the progression of the sexual cycle. Given the high percentage of unknown genes annotated in the P. tetraurelia genome, we applied a global strategy to monitor gene expression profiles during autogamy, a self-fertilization process. We focused this pilot study on the genes carried by the largest somatic chromosome and designed dedicated DNA arrays covering 484 genes from this chromosome (1.2% of all genes annotated in the genome). Transcriptome analysis revealed four major patterns of gene expression, including two successive waves of gene induction. Functional analysis of 15 upregulated genes revealed four that are essential for vegetative growth, one of which is involved in the maintenance of MAC integrity and another in cell division or membrane trafficking. Two additional genes, encoding a MIC-specific protein and a putative RNA helicase localizing to the old and then to the new MAC, are specifically required during sexual processes. Our work provides a proof of principle that genes essential for meiosis and nuclear reorganization can be uncovered following genome-wide transcriptome analysis. PMID:21257794

  12. The Dlx5 and Dlx6 homeobox genes are essential for craniofacial, axial, and appendicular skeletal development.

    PubMed

    Robledo, Raymond F; Rajan, Lakshmi; Li, Xue; Lufkin, Thomas

    2002-05-01

    Dlx homeobox genes are mammalian homologs of the Drosophila Distal-less (Dll) gene. The Dlx/Dll gene family is of ancient origin and appears to play a role in appendage development in essentially all species in which it has been identified. In Drosophila, Dll is expressed in the distal portion of the developing appendages and is critical for the development of distal structures. In addition, human Dlx5 and Dlx6 homeobox genes have been identified as possible candidate genes for the autosomal dominant form of the split-hand/split-foot malformation (SHFM), a heterogeneous limb disorder characterized by missing central digits and claw-like distal extremities. Targeted inactivation of Dlx5 and Dlx6 genes in mice results in severe craniofacial, axial, and appendicular skeletal abnormalities, leading to perinatal lethality. For the first time, Dlx/Dll gene products are shown to be critical regulators of mammalian limb development, as combined loss-of-function mutations phenocopy SHFM. Furthermore, spatiotemporal-specific transgenic overexpression of Dlx5, in the apical ectodermal ridge of Dlx5/6 null mice can fully rescue Dlx/Dll function in limb outgrowth. PMID:12000792

  13. An Updated Collection of Sequence Barcoded Temperature-Sensitive Alleles of Yeast Essential Genes.

    PubMed

    Kofoed, Megan; Milbury, Karissa L; Chiang, Jennifer H; Sinha, Sunita; Ben-Aroya, Shay; Giaever, Guri; Nislow, Corey; Hieter, Philip; Stirling, Peter C

    2015-07-14

    Systematic analyses of essential gene function using mutant collections in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been conducted using collections of heterozygous diploids, promoter shut-off alleles, through alleles with destabilized mRNA, destabilized protein, or bearing mutations that lead to a temperature-sensitive (ts) phenotype. We previously described a method for construction of barcoded ts alleles in a systematic fashion. Here we report the completion of this collection of alleles covering 600 essential yeast genes. This resource covers a larger gene repertoire than previous collections and provides a complementary set of strains suitable for single gene and genomic analyses. We use deep sequencing to characterize the amino acid changes leading to the ts phenotype in half of the alleles. We also use high-throughput approaches to describe the relative ts behavior of the alleles. Finally, we demonstrate the experimental usefulness of the collection in a high-content, functional genomic screen for ts alleles that increase spontaneous P-body formation. By increasing the number of alleles and improving the annotation, this ts collection will serve as a community resource for probing new aspects of biology for essential yeast genes.

  14. An Updated Collection of Sequence Barcoded Temperature-Sensitive Alleles of Yeast Essential Genes

    PubMed Central

    Kofoed, Megan; Milbury, Karissa L.; Chiang, Jennifer H.; Sinha, Sunita; Ben-Aroya, Shay; Giaever, Guri; Nislow, Corey; Hieter, Philip; Stirling, Peter C.

    2015-01-01

    Systematic analyses of essential gene function using mutant collections in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been conducted using collections of heterozygous diploids, promoter shut-off alleles, through alleles with destabilized mRNA, destabilized protein, or bearing mutations that lead to a temperature-sensitive (ts) phenotype. We previously described a method for construction of barcoded ts alleles in a systematic fashion. Here we report the completion of this collection of alleles covering 600 essential yeast genes. This resource covers a larger gene repertoire than previous collections and provides a complementary set of strains suitable for single gene and genomic analyses. We use deep sequencing to characterize the amino acid changes leading to the ts phenotype in half of the alleles. We also use high-throughput approaches to describe the relative ts behavior of the alleles. Finally, we demonstrate the experimental usefulness of the collection in a high-content, functional genomic screen for ts alleles that increase spontaneous P-body formation. By increasing the number of alleles and improving the annotation, this ts collection will serve as a community resource for probing new aspects of biology for essential yeast genes. PMID:26175450

  15. An Updated Collection of Sequence Barcoded Temperature-Sensitive Alleles of Yeast Essential Genes.

    PubMed

    Kofoed, Megan; Milbury, Karissa L; Chiang, Jennifer H; Sinha, Sunita; Ben-Aroya, Shay; Giaever, Guri; Nislow, Corey; Hieter, Philip; Stirling, Peter C

    2015-09-01

    Systematic analyses of essential gene function using mutant collections in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been conducted using collections of heterozygous diploids, promoter shut-off alleles, through alleles with destabilized mRNA, destabilized protein, or bearing mutations that lead to a temperature-sensitive (ts) phenotype. We previously described a method for construction of barcoded ts alleles in a systematic fashion. Here we report the completion of this collection of alleles covering 600 essential yeast genes. This resource covers a larger gene repertoire than previous collections and provides a complementary set of strains suitable for single gene and genomic analyses. We use deep sequencing to characterize the amino acid changes leading to the ts phenotype in half of the alleles. We also use high-throughput approaches to describe the relative ts behavior of the alleles. Finally, we demonstrate the experimental usefulness of the collection in a high-content, functional genomic screen for ts alleles that increase spontaneous P-body formation. By increasing the number of alleles and improving the annotation, this ts collection will serve as a community resource for probing new aspects of biology for essential yeast genes. PMID:26175450

  16. Detecting horizontally transferred and essential genes based on dinucleotide relative abundance.

    PubMed

    Baran, Robert H; Ko, Hanseok

    2008-10-01

    Various methods have been developed to detect horizontal gene transfer in bacteria, based on anomalous nucleotide composition, assuming that compositional features undergo amelioration in the host genome. Evolutionary theory predicts the inevitability of false positives when essential sequences are strongly conserved. Foreign genes could become more detectable on the basis of their higher order compositions if such features ameliorate more rapidly and uniformly than lower order features. This possibility is tested by comparing the heterogeneities of bacterial genomes with respect to strand-independent first- and second-order features, (i) G + C content and (ii) dinucleotide relative abundance, in 1 kb segments. Although statistical analysis confirms that (ii) is less inhomogeneous than (i) in all 12 species examined, extreme anomalies with respect to (ii) in the Escherichia coli K12 genome are typically co-located with essential genes.

  17. Mineral essential elements for nutrition in different chocolate products.

    PubMed

    Cinquanta, Luciano; Di Cesare, Cinzia; Manoni, Remo; Piano, Angela; Roberti, Piero; Salvatori, Giancarlo

    2016-11-01

    In this work, the essential mineral nutritional elements in cocoa beans, in chocolates at different cocoa percentage (60,70,80 and 90%) and in milk chocolate are evaluated. Dark chocolates are confirmed as an excellent source of magnesium (252.2 mg/100 g) and iron (10.9 mg/100 g): in chocolate containing 90% cocoa, their content corresponds to, respectively, 67.0% and 80.3 of Nutrient Reference Values (NRV) in the European Union. The chocolate containing 90% cocoa is also a good source of zinc (3.5 mg/100 g), which is important for the immune system, and selenium (0.1 mg/100 g). Three main components suitable to explain the mineral concentrations are analyzed by factor analysis. The component 1 can be interpreted as the contribution from the cocoa beans, owing to the mineral characteristics of the soil in which they have grown; the component 2 is mainly due to the manipulation and transformation of the cocoa in chocolate, while the component 3 represents the milk powder.

  18. Mineral essential elements for nutrition in different chocolate products.

    PubMed

    Cinquanta, Luciano; Di Cesare, Cinzia; Manoni, Remo; Piano, Angela; Roberti, Piero; Salvatori, Giancarlo

    2016-11-01

    In this work, the essential mineral nutritional elements in cocoa beans, in chocolates at different cocoa percentage (60,70,80 and 90%) and in milk chocolate are evaluated. Dark chocolates are confirmed as an excellent source of magnesium (252.2 mg/100 g) and iron (10.9 mg/100 g): in chocolate containing 90% cocoa, their content corresponds to, respectively, 67.0% and 80.3 of Nutrient Reference Values (NRV) in the European Union. The chocolate containing 90% cocoa is also a good source of zinc (3.5 mg/100 g), which is important for the immune system, and selenium (0.1 mg/100 g). Three main components suitable to explain the mineral concentrations are analyzed by factor analysis. The component 1 can be interpreted as the contribution from the cocoa beans, owing to the mineral characteristics of the soil in which they have grown; the component 2 is mainly due to the manipulation and transformation of the cocoa in chocolate, while the component 3 represents the milk powder. PMID:27346251

  19. DEG 10, an update of the database of essential genes that includes both protein-coding genes and noncoding genomic elements.

    PubMed

    Luo, Hao; Lin, Yan; Gao, Feng; Zhang, Chun-Ting; Zhang, Ren

    2014-01-01

    The combination of high-density transposon-mediated mutagenesis and high-throughput sequencing has led to significant advancements in research on essential genes, resulting in a dramatic increase in the number of identified prokaryotic essential genes under diverse conditions and a revised essential-gene concept that includes all essential genomic elements, rather than focusing on protein-coding genes only. DEG 10, a new release of the Database of Essential Genes (available at http://www.essentialgene.org), has been developed to accommodate these quantitative and qualitative advancements. In addition to increasing the number of bacterial and archaeal essential genes determined by genome-wide gene essentiality screens, DEG 10 also harbors essential noncoding RNAs, promoters, regulatory sequences and replication origins. These essential genomic elements are determined not only in vitro, but also in vivo, under diverse conditions including those for survival, pathogenesis and antibiotic resistance. We have developed customizable BLAST tools that allow users to perform species- and experiment-specific BLAST searches for a single gene, a list of genes, annotated or unannotated genomes. Therefore, DEG 10 includes essential genomic elements under different conditions in three domains of life, with customizable BLAST tools.

  20. MOB1, an Essential Yeast Gene Required for Completion of Mitosis and Maintenance of Ploidy

    PubMed Central

    Luca, Francis C.; Winey, Mark

    1998-01-01

    Mob1p is an essential Saccharomyces cerevisiae protein, identified from a two-hybrid screen, that binds Mps1p, a protein kinase essential for spindle pole body duplication and mitotic checkpoint regulation. Mob1p contains no known structural motifs; however MOB1 is a member of a conserved gene family and shares sequence similarity with a nonessential yeast gene, MOB2. Mob1p is a phosphoprotein in vivo and a substrate for the Mps1p kinase in vitro. Conditional alleles of MOB1 cause a late nuclear division arrest at restrictive temperature. MOB1 exhibits genetic interaction with three other yeast genes required for the completion of mitosis, LTE1, CDC5, and CDC15 (the latter two encode essential protein kinases). Most haploid mutant mob1 strains also display a complete increase in ploidy at permissive temperature. The mechanism for the increase in ploidy may occur through MPS1 function. One mob1 strain, which maintains stable haploidy at both permissive and restrictive temperature, diploidizes at permissive temperature when combined with the mps1–1 mutation. Strains containing mob2Δ also display a complete increase in ploidy when combined with the mps1-1 mutation. Perhaps in addition to, or as part of, its essential function in late mitosis, MOB1 is required for a cell cycle reset function necessary for the initiation of the spindle pole body duplication. PMID:9436989

  1. Association of T174M polymorphism of angiotensinogen gene with essential hypertension: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Liao, Xiaoyang; Yang, Zhiyi; Peng, Daqing; Dai, Hua; Lei, Yi; Zhao, Qian; Han, Yanbing; Wang, Weiwen

    2014-09-01

    The association between T174M polymorphism of angiotensinogen gene and essential hypertension risk remains controversial. We herein performed a meta-analysis to achieve a reliable estimation of their relationship. All the studies published up to May 2013 on the association between T174M polymorphism and essential hypertension risk were identified by searching the electronic repositories PubMed, MEDLINE and EMBASE, Springer, Elsevier Science Direct, Cochrane Library and Google Scholar. Data were extracted and pooled odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were calculated. Ultimately, nine eligible studies, including 2188 essential hypertension cases and 2459 controls, were enrolled in this meta-analysis. No significant associations were found under the overall ORs for M-allele comparison (M vs. T, pooled OR 0.92, 95% CI 0.62-1.37), MM vs. TT (pooled OR 0.86, 95% CI 0.29-2.51), TM vs. TT n (pooled OR 0.91, 95% CI 0.63-1.32), recessive model (MM vs. TT+TM, pooled OR 0.89, 95% CI 0.35-2.30), dominant model (MM+TM vs. TT, pooled OR 0.91, 95% CI 0.60-1.38) between T174M polymorphism and risk for essential hypertension. This meta-analysis suggested that the T174M polymorphism of the angiotensinogen gene might not be associated with the susceptibility of essential hypertension in Asian or European populations.

  2. Human AZU-1 gene, variants thereof and expressed gene products

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Huei-Mei; Bissell, Mina

    2004-06-22

    A human AZU-1 gene, mutants, variants and fragments thereof. Protein products encoded by the AZU-1 gene and homologs encoded by the variants of AZU-1 gene acting as tumor suppressors or markers of malignancy progression and tumorigenicity reversion. Identification, isolation and characterization of AZU-1 and AZU-2 genes localized to a tumor suppressive locus at chromosome 10q26, highly expressed in nonmalignant and premalignant cells derived from a human breast tumor progression model. A recombinant full length protein sequences encoded by the AZU-1 gene and nucleotide sequences of AZU-1 and AZU-2 genes and variant and fragments thereof. Monoclonal or polyclonal antibodies specific to AZU-1, AZU-2 encoded protein and to AZU-1, or AZU-2 encoded protein homologs.

  3. Effective identification of essential proteins based on priori knowledge, network topology and gene expressions.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Zheng, Ruiqing; Zhang, Hanhui; Wang, Jianxin; Pan, Yi

    2014-06-01

    Identification of essential proteins is very important for understanding the minimal requirements for cellular life and also necessary for a series of practical applications, such as drug design. With the advances in high throughput technologies, a large number of protein-protein interactions are available, which makes it possible to detect proteins' essentialities from the network level. Considering that most species already have a number of known essential proteins, we proposed a new priori knowledge-based scheme to discover new essential proteins from protein interaction networks. Based on the new scheme, two essential protein discovery algorithms, CPPK and CEPPK, were developed. CPPK predicts new essential proteins based on network topology and CEPPK detects new essential proteins by integrating network topology and gene expressions. The performances of CPPK and CEPPK were validated based on the protein interaction network of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The experimental results showed that the priori knowledge of known essential proteins was effective for improving the predicted precision. The predicted precisions of CPPK and CEPPK clearly exceeded that of the other 10 previously proposed essential protein discovery methods: Degree Centrality (DC), Betweenness Centrality (BC), Closeness Centrality (CC), Subgraph Centrality (SC), Eigenvector Centrality (EC), Information Centrality (IC), Bottle Neck (BN), Density of Maximum Neighborhood Component (DMNC), Local Average Connectivity-based method (LAC), and Network Centrality (NC). Especially, CPPK achieved 40% improvement in precision over BC, CC, SC, EC, and BN, and CEPPK performed even better. CEPPK was also compared to four other methods (EPC, ORFL, PeC, and CoEWC) which were not node centralities and CEPPK was showed to achieve the best results. PMID:24565748

  4. Effective identification of essential proteins based on priori knowledge, network topology and gene expressions.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Zheng, Ruiqing; Zhang, Hanhui; Wang, Jianxin; Pan, Yi

    2014-06-01

    Identification of essential proteins is very important for understanding the minimal requirements for cellular life and also necessary for a series of practical applications, such as drug design. With the advances in high throughput technologies, a large number of protein-protein interactions are available, which makes it possible to detect proteins' essentialities from the network level. Considering that most species already have a number of known essential proteins, we proposed a new priori knowledge-based scheme to discover new essential proteins from protein interaction networks. Based on the new scheme, two essential protein discovery algorithms, CPPK and CEPPK, were developed. CPPK predicts new essential proteins based on network topology and CEPPK detects new essential proteins by integrating network topology and gene expressions. The performances of CPPK and CEPPK were validated based on the protein interaction network of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The experimental results showed that the priori knowledge of known essential proteins was effective for improving the predicted precision. The predicted precisions of CPPK and CEPPK clearly exceeded that of the other 10 previously proposed essential protein discovery methods: Degree Centrality (DC), Betweenness Centrality (BC), Closeness Centrality (CC), Subgraph Centrality (SC), Eigenvector Centrality (EC), Information Centrality (IC), Bottle Neck (BN), Density of Maximum Neighborhood Component (DMNC), Local Average Connectivity-based method (LAC), and Network Centrality (NC). Especially, CPPK achieved 40% improvement in precision over BC, CC, SC, EC, and BN, and CEPPK performed even better. CEPPK was also compared to four other methods (EPC, ORFL, PeC, and CoEWC) which were not node centralities and CEPPK was showed to achieve the best results.

  5. The BMP1 gene is essential for pathogenicity in the gray mold fungus Botrytis cinerea.

    PubMed

    Zheng, L; Campbell, M; Murphy, J; Lam, S; Xu, J R

    2000-07-01

    In Magnaporthe grisea, a well-conserved mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase gene, PMK1, is essential for fungal pathogenesis. In this study, we tested whether the same MAP kinase is essential for plant infection in the gray mold fungus Botrytis cinerea, a necrotrophic pathogen that employs infection mechanisms different from those of M. grisea. We used a polymerase chain reaction-based approach to isolate MAP kinase homologues from B. cinerea. The Botrytis MAP kinase required for pathogenesis (BMP) MAP kinase gene is highly homologous to the M. grisea PMK1. BMP1 is a single-copy gene. bmp1 gene replacement mutants produced normal conidia and mycelia but were reduced in growth rate on nutrient-rich medium. bmp1 mutants were nonpathogenic on carnation flowers and tomato leaves. Re-introduction of the wild-type BMP1 allele into the bmp1 mutant restored both normal growth rate and pathogenicity. Further studies indicated that conidia from bmp1 mutants germinated on plant surfaces but failed to penetrate and macerate plant tissues. bmp1 mutants also appeared to be defective in infecting through wounds. These results indicated that BMP1 is essential for plant infection in B. cinerea, and this MAP kinase pathway may be widely conserved in pathogenic fungi for regulating infection processes.

  6. Essential Gene Discovery in the Basidiomycete Cryptococcus neoformans for Antifungal Drug Target Prioritization

    PubMed Central

    Ianiri, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Fungal diseases represent a major burden to health care globally. As with other pathogenic microbes, there is a limited number of agents suitable for use in treating fungal diseases, and resistance to these agents can develop rapidly. Cryptococcus neoformans is a basidiomycete fungus that causes cryptococcosis worldwide in both immunocompromised and healthy individuals. As a basidiomycete, it diverged from other common pathogenic or model ascomycete fungi more than 500 million years ago. Here, we report C. neoformans genes that are essential for viability as identified through forward and reverse genetic approaches, using an engineered diploid strain and genetic segregation after meiosis. The forward genetic approach generated random insertional mutants in the diploid strain, the induction of meiosis and sporulation, and selection for haploid cells with counterselection of the insertion event. More than 2,500 mutants were analyzed, and transfer DNA (T-DNA) insertions in several genes required for viability were identified. The genes include those encoding the thioredoxin reductase (Trr1), a ribosome assembly factor (Rsa4), an mRNA-capping component (Cet1), and others. For targeted gene replacement, the C. neoformans homologs of 35 genes required for viability in ascomycete fungi were disrupted, meiosis and sporulation were induced, and haploid progeny were evaluated for their ability to grow on selective media. Twenty-one (60%) were found to be required for viability in C. neoformans. These genes are involved in mitochondrial translation, ergosterol biosynthesis, and RNA-related functions. The heterozygous diploid mutants were evaluated for haploinsufficiency on a number of perturbing agents and drugs, revealing phenotypes due to the loss of one copy of an essential gene in C. neoformans. This study expands the knowledge of the essential genes in fungi using a basidiomycete as a model organism. Genes that have no mammalian homologs and are essential

  7. Arabidopsis genes essential for seedling viability: isolation of insertional mutants and molecular cloning.

    PubMed Central

    Budziszewski, G J; Lewis, S P; Glover, L W; Reineke, J; Jones, G; Ziemnik, L S; Lonowski, J; Nyfeler, B; Aux, G; Zhou, Q; McElver, J; Patton, D A; Martienssen, R; Grossniklaus, U; Ma, H; Law, M; Levin, J Z

    2001-01-01

    We have undertaken a large-scale genetic screen to identify genes with a seedling-lethal mutant phenotype. From screening approximately 38,000 insertional mutant lines, we identified >500 seedling-lethal mutants, completed cosegregation analysis of the insertion and the lethal phenotype for >200 mutants, molecularly characterized 54 mutants, and provided a detailed description for 22 of them. Most of the seedling-lethal mutants seem to affect chloroplast function because they display altered pigmentation and affect genes encoding proteins predicted to have chloroplast localization. Although a high level of functional redundancy in Arabidopsis might be expected because 65% of genes are members of gene families, we found that 41% of the essential genes found in this study are members of Arabidopsis gene families. In addition, we isolated several interesting classes of mutants and genes. We found three mutants in the recently discovered nonmevalonate isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway and mutants disrupting genes similar to Tic40 and tatC, which are likely to be involved in chloroplast protein translocation. Finally, we directly compared T-DNA and Ac/Ds transposon mutagenesis methods in Arabidopsis on a genome scale. In each population, we found only about one-third of the insertion mutations cosegregated with a mutant phenotype. PMID:11779813

  8. Identification and characterization of Helicobacter pylori genes essential for gastric colonization.

    PubMed

    Kavermann, Holger; Burns, Brendan P; Angermuller, Katrin; Odenbreit, Stefan; Fischer, Wolfgang; Melchers, Klaus; Haas, Rainer

    2003-04-01

    Helicobacter pylori causes one of the most common, chronic bacterial infections and is a primary cause of severe gastric disorders. To unravel the bacterial factors necessary for the process of gastric colonization and pathogenesis, signature tagged mutagenesis (STM) was adapted to H. pylori. The Mongolian gerbil (Meriones unguiculatus) was used as model system to screen a set of 960 STM mutants. This resulted in 47 H. pylori genes, assigned to 9 different functional categories, representing a set of biological functions absolutely essential for gastric colonization, as verified and quantified for many mutants by competition experiments. Identification of previously known colonization factors, such as the urease and motility functions validated this method, but also novel and several hypothetical genes were found. Interestingly, a secreted collagenase, encoded by hp0169, could be identified and functionally verified as a new essential virulence factor for H. pylori stomach colonization. Furthermore, comB4, encoding a putative ATPase being part of a DNA transformation-associated type IV transport system of H. pylori was found to be absolutely essential for colonization, but natural transformation competence was apparently not the essential function. Thus, this first systematic STM application identified a set of previously unknown H. pylori colonization factors and may help to potentiate the development of novel therapies against gastric Helicobacter infections. PMID:12668646

  9. Normalization of transposon-mutant library sequencing datasets to improve identification of conditionally essential genes.

    PubMed

    DeJesus, Michael A; Ioerger, Thomas R

    2016-06-01

    Sequencing of transposon-mutant libraries using next-generation sequencing (TnSeq) has become a popular method for determining which genes and non-coding regions are essential for growth under various conditions in bacteria. For methods that rely on quantitative comparison of counts of reads at transposon insertion sites, proper normalization of TnSeq datasets is vitally important. Real TnSeq datasets are often noisy and exhibit a significant skew that can be dominated by high counts at a small number of sites (often for non-biological reasons). If two datasets that are not appropriately normalized are compared, it might cause the artifactual appearance of Differentially Essential (DE) genes in a statistical test, constituting type I errors (false positives). In this paper, we propose a novel method for normalization of TnSeq datasets that corrects for the skew of read-count distributions by fitting them to a Beta-Geometric distribution. We show that this read-count correction procedure reduces the number of false positives when comparing replicate datasets grown under the same conditions (for which no genuine differences in essentiality are expected). We compare these results to results obtained with other normalization procedures, and show that it results in greater reduction in the number of false positives. In addition we investigate the effects of normalization on the detection of DE genes.

  10. Horizontal gene transfer: essentiality and evolvability in prokaryotes, and roles in evolutionary transitions.

    PubMed

    Koonin, Eugene V

    2016-01-01

    The wide spread of gene exchange and loss in the prokaryotic world has prompted the concept of 'lateral genomics' to the point of an outright denial of the relevance of phylogenetic trees for evolution. However, the pronounced coherence congruence of the topologies of numerous gene trees, particularly those for (nearly) universal genes, translates into the notion of a statistical tree of life (STOL), which reflects a central trend of vertical evolution. The STOL can be employed as a framework for reconstruction of the evolutionary processes in the prokaryotic world. Quantitatively, however, horizontal gene transfer (HGT) dominates microbial evolution, with the rate of gene gain and loss being comparable to the rate of point mutations and much greater than the duplication rate. Theoretical models of evolution suggest that HGT is essential for the survival of microbial populations that otherwise deteriorate due to the Muller's ratchet effect. Apparently, at least some bacteria and archaea evolved dedicated vehicles for gene transfer that evolved from selfish elements such as plasmids and viruses. Recent phylogenomic analyses suggest that episodes of massive HGT were pivotal for the emergence of major groups of organisms such as multiple archaeal phyla as well as eukaryotes. Similar analyses appear to indicate that, in addition to donating hundreds of genes to the emerging eukaryotic lineage, mitochondrial endosymbiosis severely curtailed HGT. These results shed new light on the routes of evolutionary transitions, but caution is due given the inherent uncertainty of deep phylogenies. PMID:27508073

  11. Horizontal gene transfer: essentiality and evolvability in prokaryotes, and roles in evolutionary transitions

    PubMed Central

    Koonin, Eugene V.

    2016-01-01

    The wide spread of gene exchange and loss in the prokaryotic world has prompted the concept of ‘lateral genomics’ to the point of an outright denial of the relevance of phylogenetic trees for evolution. However, the pronounced coherence congruence of the topologies of numerous gene trees, particularly those for (nearly) universal genes, translates into the notion of a statistical tree of life (STOL), which reflects a central trend of vertical evolution. The STOL can be employed as a framework for reconstruction of the evolutionary processes in the prokaryotic world. Quantitatively, however, horizontal gene transfer (HGT) dominates microbial evolution, with the rate of gene gain and loss being comparable to the rate of point mutations and much greater than the duplication rate. Theoretical models of evolution suggest that HGT is essential for the survival of microbial populations that otherwise deteriorate due to the Muller’s ratchet effect. Apparently, at least some bacteria and archaea evolved dedicated vehicles for gene transfer that evolved from selfish elements such as plasmids and viruses. Recent phylogenomic analyses suggest that episodes of massive HGT were pivotal for the emergence of major groups of organisms such as multiple archaeal phyla as well as eukaryotes. Similar analyses appear to indicate that, in addition to donating hundreds of genes to the emerging eukaryotic lineage, mitochondrial endosymbiosis severely curtailed HGT. These results shed new light on the routes of evolutionary transitions, but caution is due given the inherent uncertainty of deep phylogenies. PMID:27508073

  12. The organ-specific expression of terpene synthase genes contributes to the terpene hydrocarbon composition of chamomile essential oils

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The essential oil of chamomile, one of the oldest and agronomically most important medicinal plant species in Europe, has significant antiphlogistic, spasmolytic and antimicrobial activities. It is rich in chamazulene, a pharmaceutically active compound spontaneously formed during steam distillation from the sesquiterpene lactone matricine. Chamomile oil also contains sesquiterpene alcohols and hydrocarbons which are produced by the action of terpene synthases (TPS), the key enzymes in constructing terpene carbon skeletons. Results Here, we present the identification and characterization of five TPS enzymes contributing to terpene biosynthesis in chamomile (Matricaria recutita). Four of these enzymes were exclusively expressed in above-ground organs and produced the common terpene hydrocarbons (−)-(E)-β-caryophyllene (MrTPS1), (+)-germacrene A (MrTPS3), (E)-β-ocimene (MrTPS4) and (−)-germacrene D (MrTPS5). A fifth TPS, the multiproduct enzyme MrTPS2, was mainly expressed in roots and formed several Asteraceae-specific tricyclic sesquiterpenes with (−)-α-isocomene being the major product. The TPS transcript accumulation patterns in different organs of chamomile were consistent with the abundance of the corresponding TPS products isolated from these organs suggesting that the spatial regulation of TPS gene expression qualitatively contribute to terpene composition. Conclusions The terpene synthases characterized in this study are involved in the organ-specific formation of essential oils in chamomile. While the products of MrTPS1, MrTPS2, MrTPS4 and MrTPS5 accumulate in the oils without further chemical alterations, (+)-germacrene A produced by MrTPS3 accumulates only in trace amounts, indicating that it is converted into another compound like matricine. Thus, MrTPS3, but also the other TPS genes, are good markers for further breeding of chamomile cultivars rich in pharmaceutically active essential oils. PMID:22682202

  13. Reversible suppression of an essential gene in adult mice using transgenic RNA interference

    PubMed Central

    McJunkin, Katherine; Mazurek, Anthony; Premsrirut, Prem K.; Zuber, Johannes; Dow, Lukas E.; Simon, Janelle; Stillman, Bruce; Lowe, Scott W.

    2011-01-01

    RNAi has revolutionized loss-of-function genetics by enabling sequence-specific suppression of virtually any gene. Furthermore, tetracycline response elements (TRE) can drive expression of short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) for inducible and reversible target gene suppression. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of transgenic inducible RNAi for suppression of essential genes. We set out to directly target cell proliferation by screening an RNAi library against DNA replication factors and identified multiple shRNAs against Replication Protein A, subunit 3 (RPA3). We generated transgenic mice with TRE-driven Rpa3 shRNAs whose expression enforced a reversible cell cycle arrest. In adult mice, the block in cell proliferation caused rapid atrophy of the intestinal epithelium which led to weight loss and lethality within 8–11 d of shRNA induction. Upon shRNA withdrawal, villus atrophy and weight loss were fully reversible. Thus, shRpa3 transgenic mice provide an interesting tool to study tissue maintenance and regeneration. Overall, we have established a robust system that serves the purpose of temperature-sensitive alleles in other model organisms, enabling inducible and reversible suppression of essential genes in a mammalian system. PMID:21482754

  14. A Genome-wide CRISPR Screen in Toxoplasma Identifies Essential Apicomplexan Genes.

    PubMed

    Sidik, Saima M; Huet, Diego; Ganesan, Suresh M; Huynh, My-Hang; Wang, Tim; Nasamu, Armiyaw S; Thiru, Prathapan; Saeij, Jeroen P J; Carruthers, Vern B; Niles, Jacquin C; Lourido, Sebastian

    2016-09-01

    Apicomplexan parasites are leading causes of human and livestock diseases such as malaria and toxoplasmosis, yet most of their genes remain uncharacterized. Here, we present the first genome-wide genetic screen of an apicomplexan. We adapted CRISPR/Cas9 to assess the contribution of each gene from the parasite Toxoplasma gondii during infection of human fibroblasts. Our analysis defines ∼200 previously uncharacterized, fitness-conferring genes unique to the phylum, from which 16 were investigated, revealing essential functions during infection of human cells. Secondary screens identify as an invasion factor the claudin-like apicomplexan microneme protein (CLAMP), which resembles mammalian tight-junction proteins and localizes to secretory organelles, making it critical to the initiation of infection. CLAMP is present throughout sequenced apicomplexan genomes and is essential during the asexual stages of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. These results provide broad-based functional information on T. gondii genes and will facilitate future approaches to expand the horizon of antiparasitic interventions. PMID:27594426

  15. A CRISPR-Based Screen Identifies Genes Essential for West-Nile-Virus-Induced Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hongming; Dang, Ying; Wu, Yonggan; Jia, Gengxiang; Anaya, Edgar; Zhang, Junli; Abraham, Sojan; Choi, Jang-Gi; Shi, Guojun; Qi, Ling; Manjunath, N; Wu, Haoquan

    2015-07-28

    West Nile virus (WNV) causes an acute neurological infection attended by massive neuronal cell death. However, the mechanism(s) behind the virus-induced cell death is poorly understood. Using a library containing 77,406 sgRNAs targeting 20,121 genes, we performed a genome-wide screen followed by a second screen with a sub-library. Among the genes identified, seven genes, EMC2, EMC3, SEL1L, DERL2, UBE2G2, UBE2J1, and HRD1, stood out as having the strongest phenotype, whose knockout conferred strong protection against WNV-induced cell death with two different WNV strains and in three cell lines. Interestingly, knockout of these genes did not block WNV replication. Thus, these appear to be essential genes that link WNV replication to downstream cell death pathway(s). In addition, the fact that all of these genes belong to the ER-associated protein degradation (ERAD) pathway suggests that this might be the primary driver of WNV-induced cell death.

  16. Non-essential genes in the vaccinia virus HindIII K fragment: a gene related to serine protease inhibitors and a gene related to the 37K vaccinia virus major envelope antigen.

    PubMed

    Boursnell, M E; Foulds, I J; Campbell, J I; Binns, M M

    1988-12-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of a cloned copy of the HindIII K fragment of the WR strain of vaccinia virus has been determined. Eight open reading frames (ORFs) have been identified, on the basis of size and codon usage. The predicted amino acid sequences of the putative genes have been compared to the Protein Identification Resource and to published vaccinia virus sequences. One gene, predicted to encode a 42.2K protein, is highly related to the family of serine protease inhibitors. It shows approximately 25% identity to human antithrombin III and 19% identity to the cowpox virus 38K protein gene which is also related to serine protease inhibitors. The product of another gene shows a similar high level of identity to the 37K vaccinia virus major envelope antigen. The existence of viable deletion mutants and recombinants containing foreign DNA inserted into both these genes indicates that they are non-essential.

  17. Non-essential genes form the hubs of genome scale protein function and environmental gene expression networks in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Salmonella Typhimurium is an important pathogen of human and animals. It shows a broad growth range and survives in harsh conditions. The aim of this study was to analyze transcriptional responses to a number of growth and stress conditions as well as the relationship of metabolic pathways and/or cell functions at the genome-scale-level by network analysis, and further to explore whether highly connected genes (hubs) in these networks were essential for growth, stress adaptation and virulence. Results De novo generated as well as published transcriptional data for 425 selected genes under a number of growth and stress conditions were used to construct a bipartite network connecting culture conditions and significantly regulated genes (transcriptional network). Also, a genome scale network was constructed for strain LT2. The latter connected genes with metabolic pathways and cellular functions. Both networks were shown to belong to the family of scale-free networks characterized by the presence of highly connected nodes or hubs which are genes whose transcription is regulated when responding to many of the assayed culture conditions or genes encoding products involved in a high number of metabolic pathways and cell functions. The five genes with most connections in the transcriptional network (wraB, ygaU, uspA, cbpA and osmC) and in the genome scale network (ychN, siiF (STM4262), yajD, ybeB and dcoC) were selected for mutations, however mutagenesis of ygaU and ybeB proved unsuccessful. No difference between mutants and the wild type strain was observed during growth at unfavorable temperatures, pH values, NaCl concentrations and in the presence of H2O2. Eight mutants were evaluated for virulence in C57/BL6 mice and none differed from the wild type strain. Notably, however, deviations of phenotypes with respect to the wild type were observed when combinations of these genes were deleted. Conclusion Network analysis revealed the presence of hubs in both

  18. Molecular genetic analysis of a vaccinia virus gene with an essential role in DNA replication

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, E.V.A.

    1989-01-01

    The poxvirus, vaccinia, is large DNA virus which replicates in the cytoplasma of the host cell. The virus is believed to encode most or all of the functions required for the temporally regulated transcription and replication of its 186 kilobase genome. Physical and genetic autonomy from the host make vaccinia a useful eukaryotic organism in which to study replication genes and proteins, using a combination of biochemical and genetic techniques. Essential viral functions for replication are identified by conditional lethal mutants that fail to synthesize DNA at the non-permissive temperatures. One such group contains the non-complementing alleles ts17, ts24, ts69 (WR strain). Studies were undertaken to define the phenotype of ts mutants, and to identify and characterize the affected gene and protein. Mutant infection was essentially normal at 32{degree}C, but at 39{degree}C the mutants did not incorporate {sup 3}H-thymidine into nascent viral DNA or synthesize late viral proteins. If mutant cultures were shifted to non-permissive conditions at the height of replication, DNA synthesis was halted rapidly, implying that the mutants are defective in DNA elongation. The gene affected in the WR mutants and in ts6389, a DNA-minus mutant of the IHD strain, was mapped by marker rescue and corresponds to open reading frame 5 (orfD5) of the viral HindIII D fragment.

  19. Metazoan remaining genes for essential amino acid biosynthesis: sequence conservation and evolutionary analyses.

    PubMed

    Costa, Igor R; Thompson, Julie D; Ortega, José Miguel; Prosdocimi, Francisco

    2014-12-24

    Essential amino acids (EAA) consist of a group of nine amino acids that animals are unable to synthesize via de novo pathways. Recently, it has been found that most metazoans lack the same set of enzymes responsible for the de novo EAA biosynthesis. Here we investigate the sequence conservation and evolution of all the metazoan remaining genes for EAA pathways. Initially, the set of all 49 enzymes responsible for the EAA de novo biosynthesis in yeast was retrieved. These enzymes were used as BLAST queries to search for similar sequences in a database containing 10 complete metazoan genomes. Eight enzymes typically attributed to EAA pathways were found to be ubiquitous in metazoan genomes, suggesting a conserved functional role. In this study, we address the question of how these genes evolved after losing their pathway partners. To do this, we compared metazoan genes with their fungal and plant orthologs. Using phylogenetic analysis with maximum likelihood, we found that acetolactate synthase (ALS) and betaine-homocysteine S-methyltransferase (BHMT) diverged from the expected Tree of Life (ToL) relationships. High sequence conservation in the paraphyletic group Plant-Fungi was identified for these two genes using a newly developed Python algorithm. Selective pressure analysis of ALS and BHMT protein sequences showed higher non-synonymous mutation ratios in comparisons between metazoans/fungi and metazoans/plants, supporting the hypothesis that these two genes have undergone non-ToL evolution in animals.

  20. Identification of genes that are essential to restrict genome duplication to once per cell division

    PubMed Central

    Vassilev, Alex; Lee, Chrissie Y.; Vassilev, Boris; Zhu, Wenge; Ormanoglu, Pinar; Martin, Scott E.; DePamphilis, Melvin L.

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear genome duplication is normally restricted to once per cell division, but aberrant events that allow excess DNA replication (EDR) promote genomic instability and aneuploidy, both of which are characteristics of cancer development. Here we provide the first comprehensive identification of genes that are essential to restrict genome duplication to once per cell division. An siRNA library of 21,584 human genes was screened for those that prevent EDR in cancer cells with undetectable chromosomal instability. Candidates were validated by testing multiple siRNAs and chemical inhibitors on both TP53+ and TP53- cells to reveal the relevance of this ubiquitous tumor suppressor to preventing EDR, and in the presence of an apoptosis inhibitor to reveal the full extent of EDR. The results revealed 42 genes that prevented either DNA re-replication or unscheduled endoreplication. All of them participate in one or more of eight cell cycle events. Seventeen of them have not been identified previously in this capacity. Remarkably, 14 of the 42 genes have been shown to prevent aneuploidy in mice. Moreover, suppressing a gene that prevents EDR increased the ability of the chemotherapeutic drug Paclitaxel to induce EDR, suggesting new opportunities for synthetic lethalities in the treatment of human cancers. PMID:27144335

  1. Identification of alcA, a Bordetella bronchiseptica gene necessary for alcaligin production.

    PubMed

    Giardina, P C; Foster, L A; Toth, S I; Roe, B A; Dyer, D W

    1995-12-29

    The alcA gene, essential for the production of the dihydroxamate siderophore, alcaligin, by Bordetella bronchiseptica, was cloned and sequenced. The alcA gene was identified on a 4.7-kb EcoRI genomic fragment adjacent to a Tn5lac transposon insertion that inactivated alcaligin production in strain MBORD846. Analysis of the alcA nucleotide sequence revealed a putative Fur-binding site, suggesting that expression of this gene is repressed by iron. The deduced amino-acid sequence of this open reading frame had significant homology with the Escherichia coli iucD gene product, an enzyme required for biosynthesis of the dihydroxamate siderophore aerobactin.

  2. Insilico analysis of hypothetical proteins unveils putative metabolic pathways and essential genes in Leishmania donovani.

    PubMed

    Ravooru, Nithin; Ganji, Sandesh; Sathyanarayanan, Nitish; Nagendra, Holenarsipur G

    2014-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is a parasitic disease caused by the protozoan Leishmania, which is active in two broad forms namely, Visceral Leishmaniasis (VL or Kala Azar) and Cutaneous Leishmaniasis (CL). The disease is most prevalent in the tropical regions and poses a threat to over 70 countries across the globe. About 200 million people are estimated to be at risk of developing VL in the Indian subcontinent, and this refers to around 67% of the global VL disease burden. The Indian state of Bihar alone accounts for 50% of the total VL cases. While no vaccination exists, several pentavalent antimonials and drugs like Paromomycin, Amphotericin, Miltefosine etc. are used in the treatment of Leishmaniasis. However, due to their low efficacies and the resistance developed by the bug to these medications, there is an urgent need to look into newer species specific targets. The proteome information available suggests that among the 7960 proteins in Leishmania donavani, a staggering 65% remains classified as a hypothetical uncharacterized set. In this background, we have attempted to assign probable functions to these hypothetical sequences present in this parasite, to explore their plausible roles as druggable receptors. Thus, putative functions have been defined to 105 hypothetical proteins, which exhibited a GO term correlation and PFAM domain coverage of more than 50% over the query sequence length. Of these, 27 sequences were found to be associated with a reference pathway in KEGG as well. Further, using homology approaches, four pathways viz., Ubiquinone biosynthesis, Fatty acid elongation in Mitochondria, Fatty Acid Elongation in ER and Seleno-cysteine Metabolism have been reconstructed. In addition, 7 new putative essential genes have been mined with the help of Eukaryotic Database of Essential Genes (DEG). All these information related to pathways and essential genes indeed show promise for exploiting the select molecules as potential therapeutic targets. PMID:25206363

  3. Autographa californica Multiple Nucleopolyhedrovirus ORF11 Is Essential for Budded-Virus Production and Occlusion-Derived-Virus Envelopment

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Xue Ying; Choi, Jae Young; Kim, Woo Jin; An, Saes Byeol; Liu, Qin; Kim, Song Eun; Lee, Seok Hee; Kim, Jong Hoon; Woo, Soo Dong; Jin, Byung Rae

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT ORF11 (ac11) of Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) is a highly conserved gene with unknown function. To determine the role of ac11 in the baculovirus life cycle, an ac11 knockout mutant of AcMNPV, Ac11KO, was constructed. Northern blot and 5′ rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) analyses revealed that ac11 is an early gene in the life cycle. Microscopy, titration assays, and Western blot analysis revealed that budded viruses (BVs) were not produced in Ac11KO-transfected Sf9 cells. However, quantitative PCR (qPCR) analysis demonstrated that the deletion of ac11 did not affect viral DNA replication. Furthermore, electron microscopy revealed that there was no nucleocapsid in the cytoplasm or plasma membrane of Ac11KO-transfected cells, which demonstrates that the defect in BV production in Ac11KO-transfected cells is due to the inefficient egress of nucleocapsids from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. In addition, electron microscopy observations showed that the nucleocapsids in the nucleus were not enveloped to form occlusion-derived viruses (ODVs) and that their subsequent embedding into occlusion bodies (OBs) was also blocked in Ac11KO-transfected cells, demonstrating that ac11 is required for ODV envelopment. These results therefore demonstrate that ac11 is an early gene that is essential for BV production and ODV envelopment. IMPORTANCE Baculoviruses have been extensively used not only as specific, environmentally benign insecticides but also as helper-independent protein expression vectors. Although the function of baculovirus genes in viral replication has been studied by using gene knockout technology, the functions of more than one-third of viral genes, which include some highly conserved genes, are still unknown. In this study, ac11 was proven to play a crucial role in BV production and ODV envelopment. These results will lead to a better understanding of baculovirus infection cycles. PMID:25320313

  4. Genome-Wide Analysis Reveals Novel Genes Essential for Heme Homeostasis in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Anita U.; Cerqueira, Gustavo C.; Mitreva, Makedonka; El-Sayed, Najib M.; Krause, Michael; Hamza, Iqbal

    2010-01-01

    Heme is a cofactor in proteins that function in almost all sub-cellular compartments and in many diverse biological processes. Heme is produced by a conserved biosynthetic pathway that is highly regulated to prevent the accumulation of heme—a cytotoxic, hydrophobic tetrapyrrole. Caenorhabditis elegans and related parasitic nematodes do not synthesize heme, but instead require environmental heme to grow and develop. Heme homeostasis in these auxotrophs is, therefore, regulated in accordance with available dietary heme. We have capitalized on this auxotrophy in C. elegans to study gene expression changes associated with precisely controlled dietary heme concentrations. RNA was isolated from cultures containing 4, 20, or 500 µM heme; derived cDNA probes were hybridized to Affymetrix C. elegans expression arrays. We identified 288 heme-responsive genes (hrgs) that were differentially expressed under these conditions. Of these genes, 42% had putative homologs in humans, while genomes of medically relevant heme auxotrophs revealed homologs for 12% in both Trypanosoma and Leishmania and 24% in parasitic nematodes. Depletion of each of the 288 hrgs by RNA–mediated interference (RNAi) in a transgenic heme-sensor worm strain identified six genes that regulated heme homeostasis. In addition, seven membrane-spanning transporters involved in heme uptake were identified by RNAi knockdown studies using a toxic heme analog. Comparison of genes that were positive in both of the RNAi screens resulted in the identification of three genes in common that were vital for organismal heme homeostasis in C. elegans. Collectively, our results provide a catalog of genes that are essential for metazoan heme homeostasis and demonstrate the power of C. elegans as a genetic animal model to dissect the regulatory circuits which mediate heme trafficking in both vertebrate hosts and their parasites, which depend on environmental heme for survival. PMID:20686661

  5. Current topics in the biotechnological production of essential amino acids, functional amino acids, and dipeptides.

    PubMed

    Mitsuhashi, Satoshi

    2014-04-01

    Amino acids play important roles in both human and animal nutrition and in the maintenance of health. Here, amino acids are classified into three groups: first, essential amino acids, which are essential to nutrition; second, functional amino acids, recently found to be important in the promotion of physiological functions; and third, dipeptides, which are used to resolve problematic features of specific free amino acids, such as their instability or insolubility. This review focusses on recent researches concerning the microbial production of essential amino acids (lysine and methionine), functional amino acids (histidine and ornithine), and a dipeptide (L-alanyl-L-glutamine). PMID:24679256

  6. Chemical Composition and Bioactivity of Essential Oil of Atalantia guillauminii against Three Species Stored Product Insects.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kai; You, Chun-Xue; Wang, Cheng-Fang; Lei, Ning; Guo, Shan-Shan; Geng, Zhu-Feng; Du, Shu-Shan; Ma, Ping; Deng, Zhi-Wei

    2015-01-01

    The toxic and repellent activities of the essential oil extracted from the leaves of Atalantia guillauminii Swingle were evaluated against three stored product insects, red flour beetles (Tribolium castaneum), cigarette beetles (Lasioderma serricorne) and booklice (Liposcelis bostrychophila). The essential oil obtained by hydrodistillation was investigated by GC-MS. The main constituents of the essential oil were β-thujene (27.18%), elemicin (15.03%), eudesma-3, 7(11)-diene (9.64%), followed by (-)-4-terpeniol (6.70%) and spathulenol (5.25%). The crude oil showed remarkable contact toxicity against T. castaneum, L. serricorne adults and L. bostrychophila with LD50 values of 17.11, 24.07 µg/adult and 55.83 µg/cm(2) respectively and it also displayed strong fumigant toxicity against T. castaneum, L. serricorne adults with LC50 values of 17.60 and 12.06 mg/L respectively, while weak fumigant toxicity against L. bostrychophila with a LC50 value of 16.75 mg/L. Moreover, the essential oil also exhibited the same level repellency against the three stored product insects, relative to the positive control, DEET. At the same concentrations, the essential oil was more repellent to T. castaneum than to L. serricorne. Thus, the essential oil of A. guillauminii may be potential to be developed as a new natural fumigant/repellent in the control of stored product insects. PMID:26369599

  7. The Essential Role of the Deinococcus radiodurans ssb Gene in Cell Survival and Radiation Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Lockhart, J. Scott; DeVeaux, Linda C.

    2013-01-01

    Recent evidence has implicated single-stranded DNA-binding protein (SSB) expression level as an important factor in microbial radiation resistance. The genome of the extremely radiation resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans contains genes for two SSB homologs: the homodimeric, canonical Ssb, encoded by the gene ssb, and a novel pentameric protein encoded by the gene ddrB. ddrB is highly induced upon exposure to radiation, and deletions result in decreased radiation-resistance, suggesting an integral role of the protein in the extreme resistance exhibited by this organism. Although expression of ssb is also induced after irradiation, Ssb is thought to be involved primarily in replication. In this study, we demonstrate that Ssb in D. radiodurans is essential for cell survival. The lethality of an ssb deletion cannot be complemented by providing ddrB in trans. In addition, the radiation-sensitive phenotype conferred by a ddrB deletion is not alleviated by providing ssb in trans. By altering expression of the ssb gene, we also show that lower levels of transcription are required for optimal growth than are necessary for high radiation resistance. When expression is reduced to that of E. coli, ionizing radiation resistance is similarly reduced. UV resistance is also decreased under low ssb transcript levels where growth is unimpaired. These results indicate that the expression of ssb is a key component of both normal cellular metabolism as well as pathways responsible for the high radiation tolerance of D. radiodurans. PMID:23951213

  8. Genome Scanning for Conditionally Essential Genes in Salmonella enterica Serotype Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Khatiwara, Anita; Jiang, Tieshan; Sung, Sam-Sun; Dawoud, Turki; Kim, Jeong Nam; Bhattacharya, Dhruva; Kim, Hee-Bal; Ricke, Steven C.

    2012-01-01

    As more whole-genome sequences become available, there is an increasing demand for high-throughput methods that link genes to phenotypes, facilitating discovery of new gene functions. In this study, we describe a new version of the Tn-seq method involving a modified EZ:Tn5 transposon for genome-wide and quantitative mapping of all insertions in a complex mutant library utilizing massively parallel Illumina sequencing. This Tn-seq method was applied to a genome-saturating Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium mutant library recovered from selection under 3 different in vitro growth conditions (diluted Luria-Bertani [LB] medium, LB medium plus bile acid, and LB medium at 42°C), mimicking some aspects of host stressors. We identified an overlapping set of 105 protein-coding genes in S. Typhimurium that are conditionally essential under at least one of the above selective conditions. Competition assays using 4 deletion mutants (pyrD, glnL, recD, and STM14_5307) confirmed the phenotypes predicted by Tn-seq data, validating the utility of this approach in discovering new gene functions. With continuously increasing sequencing capacity of next generation sequencing technologies, this robust Tn-seq method will aid in revealing unexplored genetic determinants and the underlying mechanisms of various biological processes in Salmonella and the other approximately 70 bacterial species for which EZ:Tn5 mutagenesis has been established. PMID:22367088

  9. Identification of candidate genes for familial early-onset essential tremor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinmin; Hernandez, Nora; Kisselev, Sergey; Floratos, Aris; Sawle, Ashley; Ionita-Laza, Iuliana; Ottman, Ruth; Louis, Elan D; Clark, Lorraine N

    2016-07-01

    Essential tremor (ET) is one of the most common causes of tremor in humans. Despite its high heritability and prevalence, few susceptibility genes for ET have been identified. To identify ET genes, whole-exome sequencing was performed in 37 early-onset ET families with an autosomal-dominant inheritance pattern. We identified candidate genes for follow-up functional studies in five ET families. In two independent families, we identified variants predicted to affect function in the nitric oxide (NO) synthase 3 gene (NOS3) that cosegregated with disease. NOS3 is highly expressed in the central nervous system (including cerebellum), neurons and endothelial cells, and is one of three enzymes that converts l-arginine to the neurotransmitter NO. In one family, a heterozygous variant, c.46G>A (p.(Gly16Ser)), in NOS3, was identified in three affected ET cases and was absent in an unaffected family member; and in a second family, a heterozygous variant, c.164C>T (p.(Pro55Leu)), was identified in three affected ET cases (dizygotic twins and their mother). Both variants result in amino-acid substitutions of highly conserved amino-acid residues that are predicted to be deleterious and damaging by in silico analysis. In three independent families, variants predicted to affect function were also identified in other genes, including KCNS2 (KV9.2), HAPLN4 (BRAL2) and USP46. These genes are highly expressed in the cerebellum and Purkinje cells, and influence function of the gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA)-ergic system. This is in concordance with recent evidence that the pathophysiological process in ET involves cerebellar dysfunction and possibly cerebellar degeneration with a reduction in Purkinje cells, and a decrease in GABA-ergic tone. PMID:26508575

  10. Yeast spindle pole body duplication gene MPS1 encodes an essential dual specificity protein kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Lauzé, E; Stoelcker, B; Luca, F C; Weiss, E; Schutz, A R; Winey, M

    1995-01-01

    The MPS1 gene has been previously identified by a mutant allele that shows defects in spindle pole body (SPB) duplication and cell cycle control. The SPB is the centrosome-equivalent organelle in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and it nucleates all the microtubules in the cell. We report the isolation of the MPS1 gene, which encodes an essential protein kinase homolog. The MPS1 open reading frame has been fused to those that encode the LexA protein or the GST protein and both of these constructs function in yeast. The fusion proteins have been affinity-purified from yeast extracts and the GST chimeric protein has been found to be a phosphoprotein. Both proteins have been used to demonstrate intrinsic in vitro protein kinase activity of Mps1p against exogenous substrates and itself (autophosphorylation). A mutation predicted to abolish kinase function not only eliminates in vitro protein kinase activity, but also behaves like a null mutation in vivo, suggesting that kinase activity contributes to the essential function of the protein. Phosphoamino acid analysis of substrates phosphorylated by Mps1p indicates that this kinase can phosphorylate serine, threonine and tyrosine residues, identifying Mps1p as a dual specificity protein kinase. Images PMID:7737118

  11. Regulation of heat-shock genes: a DNA sequence upstream of Drosophila hsp70 genes is essential for their induction in monkey cells.

    PubMed

    Mirault, M E; Southgate, R; Delwart, E

    1982-01-01

    Heat-shock genes coding for heat-shock protein 70 (HSP70) in Drosophila melanogaster were subcloned into an SV40/plasmid recombinant capable of replication in permissive monkey COS cells. Following transfection of COS cells, no significant amount of Drosophila hsp70 RNA was detected at 37 degrees C. In contrast, a heat-shock at 43 degrees C or arsenite poisoning at 37 degrees C induced the massive production of Drosophila hsp70 RNA of correct size and faithful 5' ends. After heat-shock, the efficiency of hsp70 transcription in COS cells containing 2-4 X 10(4) gene copies was found to be 15-30% of that measured in Drosophila, on a per gene basis. By testing a series of 5' deletion mutants in this inducible transcription assay it was found that a sequence less than 70 bp long, directly upstream of the hsp70 gene, was essential for the heat or arsenite induction of transcription.

  12. Contact and Repellent Activities of the Essential Oil from Juniperus formosana against Two Stored Product Insects.

    PubMed

    Guo, Shanshan; Zhang, Wenjuan; Liang, Junyu; You, Chunxue; Geng, Zhufeng; Wang, Chengfang; Du, Shushan

    2016-04-16

    The chemical composition of the essential oil from Juniperus formosana leaves and its contact and repellent activities against Tribolium castaneum and Liposcelis bostrychophila adults were investigated. The essential oil of J. formosana leaves was obtained by hydrodistillation and analyzed by GC-MS. A total of 28 components were identified and the main compounds in the essential oil were α-pinene (21.66%), 4-terpineol (11.25%), limonene (11.00%) and β-phellandrene (6.63%). The constituents α-pinene, 4-terpineol and d-limonene were isolated from the essential oil. It was found that the essential oil exhibited contact activity against T. castaneum and L. bostrychophila adults (LD50 = 29.14 μg/adult and 81.50 µg/cm², respectively). The compound 4-terpineol exhibited the strongest contact activity (LD50 = 7.65 μg/adult). In addition, data showed that at 78.63 nL/cm², the essential oil and the three isolated compounds strongly repelled T. castaneum adults. The compounds α-pinene and d-limonene reached the same level (Class V) of repellency as DEET (p = 0.396 and 0.664) against L. bostrychophila at 63.17 nL/cm² after 2 h treatment. The results indicate that the essential oil and the isolated compounds have potential to be developed into natural insecticides and repellents to control insects in stored products.

  13. Contact and Repellent Activities of the Essential Oil from Juniperus formosana against Two Stored Product Insects.

    PubMed

    Guo, Shanshan; Zhang, Wenjuan; Liang, Junyu; You, Chunxue; Geng, Zhufeng; Wang, Chengfang; Du, Shushan

    2016-01-01

    The chemical composition of the essential oil from Juniperus formosana leaves and its contact and repellent activities against Tribolium castaneum and Liposcelis bostrychophila adults were investigated. The essential oil of J. formosana leaves was obtained by hydrodistillation and analyzed by GC-MS. A total of 28 components were identified and the main compounds in the essential oil were α-pinene (21.66%), 4-terpineol (11.25%), limonene (11.00%) and β-phellandrene (6.63%). The constituents α-pinene, 4-terpineol and d-limonene were isolated from the essential oil. It was found that the essential oil exhibited contact activity against T. castaneum and L. bostrychophila adults (LD50 = 29.14 μg/adult and 81.50 µg/cm², respectively). The compound 4-terpineol exhibited the strongest contact activity (LD50 = 7.65 μg/adult). In addition, data showed that at 78.63 nL/cm², the essential oil and the three isolated compounds strongly repelled T. castaneum adults. The compounds α-pinene and d-limonene reached the same level (Class V) of repellency as DEET (p = 0.396 and 0.664) against L. bostrychophila at 63.17 nL/cm² after 2 h treatment. The results indicate that the essential oil and the isolated compounds have potential to be developed into natural insecticides and repellents to control insects in stored products. PMID:27092485

  14. Effect of commercially available plant-derived essential oil products on arthropod pests.

    PubMed

    Cloyd, Raymond A; Galle, Cindy L; Keith, Stephen R; Kalscheur, Nanette A; Kemp, Kenneth E

    2009-08-01

    Plant-derived essential oil products, in general, are considered minimum-risk pesticides and are exempt from Environmental Protection Agency registration under section 25(b) of the Federal Insecticide Fungicide and Rodenticide Act. However, many of the plant-derived essential products available to consumers (homeowners) have not been judiciously evaluated for both efficacy and plant safety. In fact, numerous plant-derived essential oil products labeled for control of arthropod pests have not been subject to rigorous evaluation, and there is minimal scientific information or supporting data associated with efficacy against arthropod pests. We conducted a series of greenhouse experiments to determine the efficacy and phytotoxicity of an array of plant-derived essential oil products available to consumers on arthropod pests including the citrus mealybug, Planococcus citri (Risso); western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande); twospotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae Koch; sweetpotato whitefly B-biotype, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius); and green peach aphid, Myzus persicae (Sulzer). Although the products Flower Pharm (cottonseed, cinnamon, and rosemary oil) and Indoor Pharm (soybean, rosemary, and lavender oil) provided > 90% mortality of citrus mealybug, they were also the most phytotoxic to the coleus, Solenostemon scutellarioides (L.) Codd, plants. Both GC-Mite (cottonseed, clove, and garlic oil) and Bugzyme (citric acid) were most effective against the twospotted spider mite (> or = 90% mortality). However, SMC (canola, coriander oil, and triethanolamine), neem (clarified hydrophobic extract of neem oil), and Bug Assassin (eugenol, sodium lauryl sulfate, peppermint, and citronella oil) provided > 80% mortality. Monterey Garden Insect Spray, which contained 0.5% spinosad, was most effective against western flower thrips with 100% mortality. All the other products evaluated failed to provide sufficient control of western flower thrips with < 30

  15. Effect of commercially available plant-derived essential oil products on arthropod pests.

    PubMed

    Cloyd, Raymond A; Galle, Cindy L; Keith, Stephen R; Kalscheur, Nanette A; Kemp, Kenneth E

    2009-08-01

    Plant-derived essential oil products, in general, are considered minimum-risk pesticides and are exempt from Environmental Protection Agency registration under section 25(b) of the Federal Insecticide Fungicide and Rodenticide Act. However, many of the plant-derived essential products available to consumers (homeowners) have not been judiciously evaluated for both efficacy and plant safety. In fact, numerous plant-derived essential oil products labeled for control of arthropod pests have not been subject to rigorous evaluation, and there is minimal scientific information or supporting data associated with efficacy against arthropod pests. We conducted a series of greenhouse experiments to determine the efficacy and phytotoxicity of an array of plant-derived essential oil products available to consumers on arthropod pests including the citrus mealybug, Planococcus citri (Risso); western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande); twospotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae Koch; sweetpotato whitefly B-biotype, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius); and green peach aphid, Myzus persicae (Sulzer). Although the products Flower Pharm (cottonseed, cinnamon, and rosemary oil) and Indoor Pharm (soybean, rosemary, and lavender oil) provided > 90% mortality of citrus mealybug, they were also the most phytotoxic to the coleus, Solenostemon scutellarioides (L.) Codd, plants. Both GC-Mite (cottonseed, clove, and garlic oil) and Bugzyme (citric acid) were most effective against the twospotted spider mite (> or = 90% mortality). However, SMC (canola, coriander oil, and triethanolamine), neem (clarified hydrophobic extract of neem oil), and Bug Assassin (eugenol, sodium lauryl sulfate, peppermint, and citronella oil) provided > 80% mortality. Monterey Garden Insect Spray, which contained 0.5% spinosad, was most effective against western flower thrips with 100% mortality. All the other products evaluated failed to provide sufficient control of western flower thrips with < 30

  16. A proposed essential gene discovery pipeline: a Campylobacter jejuni case study.

    PubMed

    Reuter, Mark; Gaskin, Duncan J H; Metris, Aline

    2015-01-01

    Genes required for an organism's growth and survival are termed essential and represent potential intervention targets. Following in the footsteps of the genomics era, the "next-gen" genomic era provides vast amounts of genetic information. Sequencing of a representative bacterial pathogen genome has been superseded by sequencing of whole strain collections, whether from environmental or clinical sources (Harris et al., Science 327:469-474, 2010; Lewis et al., J Hosp Infect 75:37-41, 2010; Beres et al., Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 107:4371-4376, 2010; Qi et al., PLoS Pathog 5:e1000580, 2009; He et al., Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 107:7527-7532, 2010; Barrick et al., Nature 461:1243-1247, 2009; Sheppard et al., Mol Ecol 22:1051-1064, 2013). However, the challenge of using this information to gain biological insight remains. Nonetheless, this information, in combination with experimental data from the literature, can serve as the framework for gaining a better understanding of an organism's biology. Generic metabolic pathways have long been known, and a number of websites (e.g., KEGG and BioCyc) attempt to map information from genome annotation to metabolic pathways (Kanehisa et al., Nucleic Acids Res 40:D109-D114, 2010; Karp et al., Nucleic Acids Res 33:6083-6089, 2005). Extending this analysis to incorporate metabolic flux models further allows in silico prediction of potential essential genes. Such efforts are of value, either to highlight novel generic antimicrobials or to seek novel treatments for non-paradigm organisms. Such in silico approaches are attractive as they can highlight pathways and genes that would otherwise only be identified by costly and time-consuming laboratory methods. PMID:25636619

  17. ZCURVE 3.0: identify prokaryotic genes with higher accuracy as well as automatically and accurately select essential genes.

    PubMed

    Hua, Zhi-Gang; Lin, Yan; Yuan, Ya-Zhou; Yang, De-Chang; Wei, Wen; Guo, Feng-Biao

    2015-07-01

    In 2003, we developed an ab initio program, ZCURVE 1.0, to find genes in bacterial and archaeal genomes. In this work, we present the updated version (i.e. ZCURVE 3.0). Using 422 prokaryotic genomes, the average accuracy was 93.7% with the updated version, compared with 88.7% with the original version. Such results also demonstrate that ZCURVE 3.0 is comparable with Glimmer 3.02 and may provide complementary predictions to it. In fact, the joint application of the two programs generated better results by correctly finding more annotated genes while also containing fewer false-positive predictions. As the exclusive function, ZCURVE 3.0 contains one post-processing program that can identify essential genes with high accuracy (generally >90%). We hope ZCURVE 3.0 will receive wide use with the web-based running mode. The updated ZCURVE can be freely accessed from http://cefg.uestc.edu.cn/zcurve/ or http://tubic.tju.edu.cn/zcurveb/ without any restrictions. PMID:25977299

  18. ZCURVE 3.0: identify prokaryotic genes with higher accuracy as well as automatically and accurately select essential genes.

    PubMed

    Hua, Zhi-Gang; Lin, Yan; Yuan, Ya-Zhou; Yang, De-Chang; Wei, Wen; Guo, Feng-Biao

    2015-07-01

    In 2003, we developed an ab initio program, ZCURVE 1.0, to find genes in bacterial and archaeal genomes. In this work, we present the updated version (i.e. ZCURVE 3.0). Using 422 prokaryotic genomes, the average accuracy was 93.7% with the updated version, compared with 88.7% with the original version. Such results also demonstrate that ZCURVE 3.0 is comparable with Glimmer 3.02 and may provide complementary predictions to it. In fact, the joint application of the two programs generated better results by correctly finding more annotated genes while also containing fewer false-positive predictions. As the exclusive function, ZCURVE 3.0 contains one post-processing program that can identify essential genes with high accuracy (generally >90%). We hope ZCURVE 3.0 will receive wide use with the web-based running mode. The updated ZCURVE can be freely accessed from http://cefg.uestc.edu.cn/zcurve/ or http://tubic.tju.edu.cn/zcurveb/ without any restrictions.

  19. Expression of essential genes for biosynthesis of antimicrobial peptides of Bacillus is modulated by inactivated cells of target microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Leães, Fernanda Leal; Velho, Renata Voltolini; Caldas, Danielle Gregório Gomes; Ritter, Ana Carolina; Tsai, Siu Mui; Brandelli, Adriano

    2016-01-01

    Certain Bacillus strains are important producers of antimicrobial peptides with great potential for biological control. Antimicrobial peptide production by Bacillus amyloliquefaciens P11 was investigated in the presence of heat-inactivated cells of bacteria and fungi. B. amyloliquefaciens P11 exhibited higher antimicrobial activity in the presence of inactivated cells of Staphylococcus aureus and Aspergillus parasiticus compared to other conditions tested. Expression of essential genes related to biosynthesis of the antimicrobial peptides surfactin (sfp), iturin A (lpa-14 and ituD), subtilosin A (sboA) and fengycin (fenA) was investigated by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). The genes lpa-14 and ituD were highly expressed in the presence of S. aureus (inactivated cells), indicating induction of iturin A production by B. amyloliquefaciens P11. The other inducing condition (inactivated cells of A. parasiticus) suppressed expression of lpa-14, but increased expression of ituD. A twofold increase in fenA expression was observed for both conditions, while strong suppression of sboA expression was observed in the presence of inactivated cells of S. aureus. An increase in antimicrobial activity was observed, indicating that synthesis of antimicrobial peptides may be induced by target microorganisms. PMID:26577655

  20. TAF4b Regulates Oocyte-Specific Genes Essential for Meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Grive, Kathryn J.; Gustafson, Eric A.; Seymour, Kimberly A.; Baddoo, Melody; Schorl, Christoph; Golnoski, Kayla; Rajkovic, Aleksandar; Brodsky, Alexander S.; Freiman, Richard N.

    2016-01-01

    TAF4b is a gonadal-enriched subunit of the general transcription factor TFIID that is implicated in promoting healthy ovarian aging and female fertility in mice and humans. To further explore the potential mechanism of TAF4b in promoting ovarian follicle development, we analyzed global gene expression at multiple time points in the human fetal ovary. This computational analysis revealed coordinate expression of human TAF4B and critical regulators and effectors of meiosis I including SYCP3, YBX2, STAG3, and DAZL. To address the functional relevance of this analysis, we turned to the embryonic Taf4b-deficient mouse ovary where, for the first time, we demonstrate, severe deficits in prophase I progression as well as asynapsis in Taf4b-deficient oocytes. Accordingly, TAF4b occupies the proximal promoters of many essential meiosis and oogenesis regulators, including Stra8, Dazl, Figla, and Nobox, and is required for their proper expression. These data reveal a novel TAF4b function in regulating a meiotic gene expression program in early mouse oogenesis, and support the existence of a highly conserved TAF4b-dependent gene regulatory network promoting early oocyte development in both mice and women. PMID:27341508

  1. TAF4b Regulates Oocyte-Specific Genes Essential for Meiosis.

    PubMed

    Grive, Kathryn J; Gustafson, Eric A; Seymour, Kimberly A; Baddoo, Melody; Schorl, Christoph; Golnoski, Kayla; Rajkovic, Aleksandar; Brodsky, Alexander S; Freiman, Richard N

    2016-06-01

    TAF4b is a gonadal-enriched subunit of the general transcription factor TFIID that is implicated in promoting healthy ovarian aging and female fertility in mice and humans. To further explore the potential mechanism of TAF4b in promoting ovarian follicle development, we analyzed global gene expression at multiple time points in the human fetal ovary. This computational analysis revealed coordinate expression of human TAF4B and critical regulators and effectors of meiosis I including SYCP3, YBX2, STAG3, and DAZL. To address the functional relevance of this analysis, we turned to the embryonic Taf4b-deficient mouse ovary where, for the first time, we demonstrate, severe deficits in prophase I progression as well as asynapsis in Taf4b-deficient oocytes. Accordingly, TAF4b occupies the proximal promoters of many essential meiosis and oogenesis regulators, including Stra8, Dazl, Figla, and Nobox, and is required for their proper expression. These data reveal a novel TAF4b function in regulating a meiotic gene expression program in early mouse oogenesis, and support the existence of a highly conserved TAF4b-dependent gene regulatory network promoting early oocyte development in both mice and women.

  2. The Colletotrichum lagenariu Ste12-like gene CST1 is essential for appressorium penetration.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Gento; Fujii, Satoshi; Tsuge, Seiji; Shiraishi, Tomonori; Kubo, Yasuyuki

    2003-04-01

    Colletotrichum lagenarium is the causal agent of anthracnose of cucumber. This fungus produces a darkly melanized infection structure, appressoria, to penetrate the host leaves. The C. lagenarium CMK1 gene, a homologue of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae FUS3/KSS1 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase genes, was shown to regulate conidial germination, appressorium formation, and invasive growth. In S. cerevisiae, Ste12p is known to be a transcriptional factor downstream of Fus3p/Kss1p MAP kinases. To evaluate the CMK1 MAP kinase pathway, we isolated the Ste12 homologue CST1 gene from C. lagenarium and characterized. The cst1delta strains were nonpathogenic on intact host leaves, but could form lesions when inoculated on wounded leaves. Conidia of the cst1delta strains could germinate and form melanized appressoria on both host leaf surface and artificial cellulose membrane, but could not produce infectious hyphae from appressoria, suggesting that CST1 is essential for appressorium penetration in C. lagenarium. In addition, matured appressoria of the cst1delta strains contained an extremely low level of lipid droplets compared with that of the wild-type strain. Lipid droplets were abundant in conidia of the cst1delta strains, but rapidly disappeared during appressorium formation. This misscheduled lipid degradation might be related to the failure of appressorium penetration in the cst1delta strain. PMID:12744460

  3. Intrinsic biocontainment: multiplex genome safeguards combine transcriptional and recombinational control of essential yeast genes.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yizhi; Agmon, Neta; Choi, Woo Jin; Ubide, Alba; Stracquadanio, Giovanni; Caravelli, Katrina; Hao, Haiping; Bader, Joel S; Boeke, Jef D

    2015-02-10

    Biocontainment may be required in a wide variety of situations such as work with pathogens, field release applications of engineered organisms, and protection of intellectual properties. Here, we describe the control of growth of the brewer's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, using both transcriptional and recombinational "safeguard" control of essential gene function. Practical biocontainment strategies dependent on the presence of small molecules require them to be active at very low concentrations, rendering them inexpensive and difficult to detect. Histone genes were controlled by an inducible promoter and controlled by 30 nM estradiol. The stability of the engineered genes was separately regulated by the expression of a site-specific recombinase. The combined frequency of generating viable derivatives when both systems were active was below detection (<10(-10)), consistent with their orthogonal nature and the individual escape frequencies of <10(-6). Evaluation of escaper mutants suggests strategies for reducing their emergence. Transcript profiling and growth test suggest high fitness of safeguarded strains, an important characteristic for wide acceptance. PMID:25624482

  4. Intrinsic biocontainment: Multiplex genome safeguards combine transcriptional and recombinational control of essential yeast genes

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Yizhi; Agmon, Neta; Choi, Woo Jin; Ubide, Alba; Stracquadanio, Giovanni; Caravelli, Katrina; Hao, Haiping; Bader, Joel S.; Boeke, Jef D.

    2015-01-01

    Biocontainment may be required in a wide variety of situations such as work with pathogens, field release applications of engineered organisms, and protection of intellectual properties. Here, we describe the control of growth of the brewer’s yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, using both transcriptional and recombinational “safeguard” control of essential gene function. Practical biocontainment strategies dependent on the presence of small molecules require them to be active at very low concentrations, rendering them inexpensive and difficult to detect. Histone genes were controlled by an inducible promoter and controlled by 30 nM estradiol. The stability of the engineered genes was separately regulated by the expression of a site-specific recombinase. The combined frequency of generating viable derivatives when both systems were active was below detection (<10−10), consistent with their orthogonal nature and the individual escape frequencies of <10−6. Evaluation of escaper mutants suggests strategies for reducing their emergence. Transcript profiling and growth test suggest high fitness of safeguarded strains, an important characteristic for wide acceptance. PMID:25624482

  5. Acidic pH induced STM1485 gene is essential for intracellular replication of Salmonella.

    PubMed

    Allam, Uday Sankar; Krishna, M Gopala; Sen, Minakshi; Thomas, Rony; Lahiri, Amit; Gnanadhas, Divya Prakash; Chakravortty, Dipshikha

    2012-01-01

    During the course of infection, Salmonella has to face several potentially lethal environmental conditions, one such being acidic pH. The ability to sense and respond to the acidic pH is crucial for the survival and replication of Salmonella. The physiological role of one gene (STM1485) involved in this response, which is upregulated inside the host cells (by 90- to 113-fold) is functionally characterized in Salmonella pathogenesis. In vitro, the ΔSTM1485 neither exhibited any growth defect at pH 4.5 nor any difference in the acid tolerance response. The ΔSTM1485 was compromised in its capacity to proliferate inside the host cells and complementation with STM1485 gene restored its virulence. We further demonstrate that the surface translocation of Salmonella pathogenicity island-2 (SPI-2) encoded translocon proteins, SseB and SseD were reduced in the ΔSTM1485. The increase in co-localization of this mutant with lysosomes was also observed. In addition, the ΔSTM1485 displayed significantly reduced competitive indices (CI) in spleen, liver and mesenteric lymph nodes in murine typhoid model when infected by intra-gastric route. Based on these results, we conclude that the acidic pH induced STM1485 gene is essential for intracellular replication of Salmonella.

  6. Processing of coriander fruits for the production of essential oil, triglyceride, and high protein seed meal

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.) is a summer annual traditionally grown for use as a fresh green herb or as a spice. The essential oil extracted from coriander fruit is also widely used as flavoring in a variety of food products. The fatty oil (triglyceride) fraction in the seed is rich in petrosel...

  7. Gene PA2449 Is Essential for Glycine Metabolism and Pyocyanin Biosynthesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1

    PubMed Central

    Lundgren, Benjamin R.; Thornton, William; Dornan, Mark H.; Villegas-Peñaranda, Luis Roberto; Boddy, Christopher N.

    2013-01-01

    Many pseudomonads produce redox active compounds called phenazines that function in a variety of biological processes. Phenazines are well known for their toxicity against non-phenazine-producing organisms, which allows them to serve as crucial biocontrol agents and virulence factors during infection. As for other secondary metabolites, conditions of nutritional stress or limitation stimulate the production of phenazines, but little is known of the molecular details underlying this phenomenon. Using a combination of microarray and metabolite analyses, we demonstrate that the assimilation of glycine as a carbon source and the biosynthesis of pyocyanin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 are both dependent on the PA2449 gene. The inactivation of the PA2449 gene was found to influence the transcription of a core set of genes encoding a glycine cleavage system, serine hydroxymethyltransferase, and serine dehydratase. PA2449 also affected the transcription of several genes that are integral in cell signaling and pyocyanin biosynthesis in P. aeruginosa PAO1. This study sheds light on the unexpected relationship between the utilization of an unfavorable carbon source and the production of pyocyanin. PA2449 is conserved among pseudomonads and might be universally involved in the assimilation of glycine among this metabolically diverse group of bacteria. PMID:23457254

  8. A gene homologous to chloroplast carbonic anhydrase (icfA) is essential to photosynthetic carbon dioxide fixation by Synechococcus PCC7942.

    PubMed Central

    Fukuzawa, H; Suzuki, E; Komukai, Y; Miyachi, S

    1992-01-01

    To understand the CO2-concentrating mechanism in cyanobacteria, a genomic DNA fragment that complements a temperature-sensitive high-CO2 (5%)-requiring mutant of Synechococcus PCC7942 has been isolated. An open reading frame (ORF272) encoding a polypeptide of 272 amino acids (Mr, 30,184) was found within the genomic region located 20 kilobases downstream from the genes for ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (rbcLS). Insertion of a kanamycin-resistance gene cartridge within the ORF272 in wild-type cells led to a high-CO2-requiring phenotype. Strains carrying a gene disabled by insertional mutagenesis accumulated inorganic carbon in the cells, but they could not fix it efficiently, even though ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase activity was comparable to that of the wild-type strain. Therefore, the ORF272 was designated as a gene icfA, which is essential to inorganic carbon fixation. Furthermore, the predicted icfA gene product shared significant sequence similarities with plant chloroplast carbonic anhydrases (CAs) from pea (22%) and spinach (22%) and also with the Escherichia coli cynT gene product (31%), which was recently identified to be E. coli CA. These results indicate that the putative CA encoded by icfA is essential to photosynthetic carbon dioxide fixation in cyanobacteria and that plant chloroplast CAs may have evolved from a common ancestor of the prokaryotic CAs, which are distinct from mammalian CAs and Chlamydomonas periplasmic CAs. PMID:1584776

  9. Repression of Essential Chloroplast Genes Reveals New Signaling Pathways and Regulatory Feedback Loops in Chlamydomonas[W

    PubMed Central

    Ramundo, Silvia; Rahire, Michèle; Schaad, Olivier; Rochaix, Jean-David

    2013-01-01

    Although reverse genetics has been used to elucidate the function of numerous chloroplast proteins, the characterization of essential plastid genes and their role in chloroplast biogenesis and cell survival has not yet been achieved. Therefore, we developed a robust repressible chloroplast gene expression system in the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii based mainly on a vitamin-repressible riboswitch, and we used this system to study the role of two essential chloroplast genes: ribosomal protein S12 (rps12), encoding a plastid ribosomal protein, and rpoA, encoding the α-subunit of chloroplast bacterial-like RNA polymerase. Repression of either of these two genes leads to the arrest of cell growth, and it induces a response that involves changes in expression of nuclear genes implicated in chloroplast biogenesis, protein turnover, and stress. This response also leads to the overaccumulation of several plastid transcripts and reveals the existence of multiple negative regulatory feedback loops in the chloroplast gene circuitry. PMID:23292734

  10. Non-essential and essential trace element concentrations in meat from cattle reared under organic, intensive or conventional production systems.

    PubMed

    Blanco-Penedo, I; López-Alonso, M; Miranda, M; Hernández, J; Prieto, F; Shore, R F

    2010-01-01

    We evaluated if differences in non-essential and essential trace element accumulation in beef-cattle reared under different systems (including organic, conventional and intensive management) were reflected in the meat derived from these animals. Diaphragm muscle from 166 calves from nine farms were analysed. Muscle cadmium concentrations were low (<10 microg/kg wet weight) and muscle arsenic, mercury and lead levels were below the limits of detection (<12, 2 and 3 microg/kg, respectively) in most (77-97%) samples; there were no significant differences between farms. Essential trace element concentrations in muscle were generally within adequate physiological ranges and, although they varied significantly between farms, this was not apparently related to management practices. There were no significant correlations in element concentrations between muscle and liver or kidney (organ concentrations that better reflect exposure), except for cobalt (positive association) and zinc (negative association). Non-essential and essential trace element concentrations in muscle in the studied animals did not generally reflect differences in exposure. This is particularly relevant for animals reared in systems (such as organic farms) where cattle are exposed to higher levels of non-essential elements (probably due to soil ingestion when grazing) but also can suffer from mineral deficiencies.

  11. Insecticidal Activity of the Essential Oils from Different Plants Against Three Stored-Product Insects

    PubMed Central

    Ayvaz, Abdurrahman; Sagdic, Osman; Karaborklu, Salih; Ozturk, Ismet

    2010-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the insecticidal activity of essential oils from oregano, Origanum onites L. (Lamiales: Lamiaceae), savory, Satureja thymbra L. (Lamiales: Lamiaceae), and myrtle, Myrtus communis L. (Rosales: Myrtaceae) against three stored-product insects. Essential oils from three species of plants were obtained by Clevenger-type water distillation. The major compounds in these essential oils were identified using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and their insecticidal activity was tested against adults of the Mediterranean flour moth Ephestia kuehniella Zeller (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), the Indian meal moth Plodia interpunctella Hübner (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) and the bean weevil Acanthoscelides obtectus Say (Coleoptera: Bruchidae). While the major compound found in oregano and savory was carvacrol, the main constituent of the myrtle was linalool. Among the tested insects, A. obtectus was the most tolerant species against the essential oils. However, the insecticidal activity of the myrtle oil was more pronounced than other oils tested against A. obtectus adults. The essential oils of oregano and savory were highly effective against P. interpunctella and E. kuehniella, with 100% mortality obtained after 24 h at 9 and 25 µl/l air for P. interpunctella and E. kuehniella, respectively. LC50 and LC99 values of each essential oil were estimated for each insect species. PMID:20578885

  12. Insecticidal activity of the essential oils from different plants against three stored-product insects.

    PubMed

    Ayvaz, Abdurrahman; Sagdic, Osman; Karaborklu, Salih; Ozturk, Ismet

    2010-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the insecticidal activity of essential oils from oregano, Origanum onites L. (Lamiales: Lamiaceae), savory, Satureja thymbra L. (Lamiales: Lamiaceae), and myrtle, Myrtus communis L. (Rosales: Myrtaceae) against three stored-product insects. Essential oils from three species of plants were obtained by Clevenger-type water distillation. The major compounds in these essential oils were identified using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and their insecticidal activity was tested against adults of the Mediterranean flour moth Ephestia kuehniella Zeller (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), the Indian meal moth Plodia interpunctella Hübner (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) and the bean weevil Acanthoscelides obtectus Say (Coleoptera: Bruchidae). While the major compound found in oregano and savory was carvacrol, the main constituent of the myrtle was linalool. Among the tested insects, A. obtectus was the most tolerant species against the essential oils. However, the insecticidal activity of the myrtle oil was more pronounced than other oils tested against A. obtectus adults. The essential oils of oregano and savory were highly effective against P. interpunctella and E. kuehniella, with 100% mortality obtained after 24 h at 9 and 25 microl/l air for P. interpunctella and E. kuehniella, respectively. LC(50) and LC(99) values of each essential oil were estimated for each insect species. PMID:20578885

  13. Mining predicted essential genes of Brugia malayi for nematode drug targets.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sanjay; Chaudhary, Kshitiz; Foster, Jeremy M; Novelli, Jacopo F; Zhang, Yinhua; Wang, Shiliang; Spiro, David; Ghedin, Elodie; Carlow, Clotilde K S

    2007-01-01

    We report results from the first genome-wide application of a rational drug target selection methodology to a metazoan pathogen genome, the completed draft sequence of Brugia malayi, a parasitic nematode responsible for human lymphatic filariasis. More than 1.5 billion people worldwide are at risk of contracting lymphatic filariasis and onchocerciasis, a related filarial disease. Drug treatments for filariasis have not changed significantly in over 20 years, and with the risk of resistance rising, there is an urgent need for the development of new anti-filarial drug therapies. The recent publication of the draft genomic sequence for B. malayi enables a genome-wide search for new drug targets. However, there is no functional genomics data in B. malayi to guide the selection of potential drug targets. To circumvent this problem, we have utilized the free-living model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans as a surrogate for B. malayi. Sequence comparisons between the two genomes allow us to map C. elegans orthologs to B. malayi genes. Using these orthology mappings and by incorporating the extensive genomic and functional genomic data, including genome-wide RNAi screens, that already exist for C. elegans, we identify potentially essential genes in B. malayi. Further incorporation of human host genome sequence data and a custom algorithm for prioritization enables us to collect and rank nearly 600 drug target candidates. Previously identified potential drug targets cluster near the top of our prioritized list, lending credibility to our methodology. Over-represented Gene Ontology terms, predicted InterPro domains, and RNAi phenotypes of C. elegans orthologs associated with the potential target pool are identified. By virtue of the selection procedure, the potential B. malayi drug targets highlight components of key processes in nematode biology such as central metabolism, molting and regulation of gene expression.

  14. Assessment of inhibitory potential of essential oils on natural mycoflora and Fusarium mycotoxins production in wheat

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In the last years essential oils from different plants were used in the prevention of fungi and mycotoxins accumulation in cereals. The most attractive aspect derived from using of essential oils as seed grains protectants is due to their non-toxicity. This study was focused on assessment the inhibitory effect of some essential oils: Melissa officinalis (O1), Salvia officinalis (O2), Coriandrum sativum (O3), Thymus vulgaris (O4) Mentha piperita (O5) and Cinnamomum zeylanicum (O6) against natural mycoflora and Fusarium mycotoxins production correlated with their antioxidants properties. Results All essential oils showed inhibitory effect on fungal contamination of wheat seeds. This ability was dose-dependent. The highest inhibitory effect on Fusarium and Aspergillus fungi was recorded after 5 days of treatment. Fungi such as yeast (Pichia, Saccharomyces and Hyphopichia) were predominantly on seeds mycoflora after 22 days. Each treatment had a selective inhibitory effect on frequency of fungus genera. After 5 days of treatment the most fungicidal effect was recorder for O4, followed by O1. In terms of essential oils effect on mycotoxins development, the best control on fumonisins (FUMO) production was recorded for O6. The antioxidant properties of essential oils decreased in order: O4 > O1 > O6 > O5 > O2 > O3. Also, our data suggested that there is a significant negative correlation between antioxidant properties and seed contamination index (SCI), but there was not recorded a good correlation between antioxidant properties and FUMO content. Conclusions Based on proven antifungal and antimycotoxin effects as well as their antioxidant properties, the essential oils could be recommended as natural preservatives for stored cereals. The highest inhibition of fungal growth was noted after 5 days of treatment and decreased after 22 days. PMID:23409841

  15. Transcriptional regulation of genes related to progesterone production.

    PubMed

    Mizutani, Tetsuya; Ishikane, Shin; Kawabe, Shinya; Umezawa, Akihiro; Miyamoto, Kaoru

    2015-01-01

    Steroid hormones are synthesized from cholesterol in various tissues, mainly in the adrenal glands and gonads. Because these lipid-soluble steroid hormones immediately diffuse through the cells in which they are produced, their secretion directly reflects the activity of the genes related to their production. Progesterone is important not only for luteinization and maintenance of pregnancy, but also as a substrate for most other steroids. Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (STAR), cytochrome P450 cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc), and 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/Δ(5)-Δ(4) isomerase (3β-HSD) are well-known proteins essential for progesterone production. In addition to them, glutathione S-transferase A1-1 and A3-3 are shown to exert Δ(5)-Δ(4) isomerization activity to produce progesterone in a cooperative fashion with 3β-HSD. 5-Aminolevulinic acid synthase 1, ferredoxin 1, and ferredoxin reductase also play a role in steroidogenesis as accessory factors. Members of the nuclear receptor 5A (NR5A) family (steroidogenic factor 1 and liver receptor homolog 1) play a crucial role in the transcriptional regulation of these genes. The NR5A family activates these genes by binding to NR5A responsive elements present within their promoter regions, as well as to the elements far from their promoters. In addition, various NR5A-interacting proteins including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α), nuclear receptor subfamily 0, group B, member 1 (DAX-1), and CCAAT/enhancer-binding proteins (C/EBP) are involved in the transcription of NR5A target genes and regulate the transcription either positively or negatively under both basal and tropic hormone-stimulated conditions. In this review, we describe the transcriptional regulation of genes related to progesterone production. PMID:26135521

  16. Tescalcin is an essential factor in megakaryocytic differentiation associated with Ets family gene expression.

    PubMed

    Levay, Konstantin; Slepak, Vladlen Z

    2007-09-01

    We show here that the process of megakaryocytic differentiation requires the presence of the recently discovered protein tescalcin. Tescalcin is dramatically upregulated during the differentiation and maturation of primary megakaryocytes or upon PMA-induced differentiation of K562 cells. This upregulation requires sustained signaling through the ERK pathway. Overexpression of tescalcin in K562 cells initiates events of spontaneous megakaryocytic differentiation, such as expression of specific cell surface antigens, inhibition of cell proliferation, and polyploidization. Conversely, knockdown of this protein in primary CD34+ hematopoietic progenitors and cell lines by RNA interference suppresses megakaryocytic differentiation. In cells lacking tescalcin, the expression of Fli-1, Ets-1, and Ets-2 transcription factors, but not GATA-1 or MafB, is blocked. Thus, tescalcin is essential for the coupling of ERK cascade activation with the expression of Ets family genes in megakaryocytic differentiation.

  17. If I am only my genes, what am I? Genetic essentialism and a Jewish response.

    PubMed

    Wolpe, Paul Root

    1997-09-01

    With the advent of the Genetic Age comes a unique new set of problems and ethical decisions. There is a tendency to take the scientific developments presented by modern genetics at face value, as if the science itself were value-neutral and not influenced by cultural and religious images. One example of the fallout of the Genetic Age is the development of a "genetic self," the idea that our essential selfhood lies in our genes. It is important to understand the assumptions of the Genetic Age, the development of genetic selfhood, and the broader cultural trends and assumptions that underlie modern genetic thinking. It is equally important, however, to shape a reaction to the concept of a genetic self. Judaism has long carried on a unique discussion about the nature of selfhood in different times and places and about the relation of the corporeal self to the essential self. Insights from Judaism therefore may help to craft a reaction to the modern genetic self that incorporates the best of modern genetics as well as the integrity of a more transcendent selfhood. PMID:11660355

  18. If I am only my genes, what am I? Genetic essentialism and a Jewish response.

    PubMed

    Wolpe, Paul Root

    1997-09-01

    With the advent of the Genetic Age comes a unique new set of problems and ethical decisions. There is a tendency to take the scientific developments presented by modern genetics at face value, as if the science itself were value-neutral and not influenced by cultural and religious images. One example of the fallout of the Genetic Age is the development of a "genetic self," the idea that our essential selfhood lies in our genes. It is important to understand the assumptions of the Genetic Age, the development of genetic selfhood, and the broader cultural trends and assumptions that underlie modern genetic thinking. It is equally important, however, to shape a reaction to the concept of a genetic self. Judaism has long carried on a unique discussion about the nature of selfhood in different times and places and about the relation of the corporeal self to the essential self. Insights from Judaism therefore may help to craft a reaction to the modern genetic self that incorporates the best of modern genetics as well as the integrity of a more transcendent selfhood.

  19. Retinoic acid inducible gene-I and melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 are induced but not essential for dengue virus induced type I interferon response.

    PubMed

    Qin, Cheng-Feng; Zhao, Hui; Liu, Zhong-Yu; Jiang, Tao; Deng, Yong-Qiang; Yu, Xu-Dong; Yu, Man; Qin, E-De

    2011-08-01

    Dengue viruses (DENVs) are important human pathogens that cause mild dengue fever, and severe dengue hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome, and no vaccine or antiviral therapy are currently available. At the initial stage of DENV infection, host pattern recognition receptors are responsible for sensing viral proteins or nucleic acids and initiating innate antiviral responses, including the activation of type I interferon (IFN) and proinflammatory cytokines. Two RNA helicases, retinoic acid inducible gene-I (RIG-I) and melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA5), are recently identified as cytoplasmic PPRs for virus infection. Here, in this study the involvement of RIG-I and MDA5 in DENV-induced IFN-β response A549 cells were investigated. DENV infection readily up-regulated RIG-I expression, activated IRF-3 and RIG-I mRNA transcription, and induced the production of IFN-β in A549 cells in a strain- and serotype-independent manner. While gene silencing of RIG-I by small interfering RNAs failed to significantly inhibit IFN-β production induced by DENV infection. Further experiments demonstrated that MDA5 was also induced by DENV infection, and MDA5 knockout did not block DENV induced IFN-β production in A549 cells. Our results demonstrated that both RIG-I and MDA5 were induced but neither of the two was essential for DENV induced IFN IFN-β response in A549 cells. These findings suggest that innate immune pathway are involved in the recognition of DENV by human non-immune cells, and provide insights for the understanding of the molecular mechanism for DENV-induced antiviral response.

  20. Getting essential health products to their end users: Subsidize, but how much?

    PubMed Central

    Dupas, Pascaline

    2015-01-01

    Although coverage rates and health outcomes are improving, many poor people around the world still do not benefit from essential health products. An estimated two-thirds of child deaths could be prevented with increased coverage of products such as vaccines, point-of-use water treatment, iron fortification, and insecticide-treated bednets. What limits the flow of products from the producer's laboratory bench to the end users, and what can be done about it? Recent empirical research suggests a crucial role for heavy subsidies. PMID:25214612

  1. Endosymbiosis in trypanosomatids: the genomic cooperation between bacterium and host in the synthesis of essential amino acids is heavily influenced by multiple horizontal gene transfers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Trypanosomatids of the genera Angomonas and Strigomonas live in a mutualistic association characterized by extensive metabolic cooperation with obligate endosymbiotic Betaproteobacteria. However, the role played by the symbiont has been more guessed by indirect means than evidenced. Symbiont-harboring trypanosomatids, in contrast to their counterparts lacking symbionts, exhibit lower nutritional requirements and are autotrophic for essential amino acids. To evidence the symbiont’s contributions to this autotrophy, entire genomes of symbionts and trypanosomatids with and without symbionts were sequenced here. Results Analyses of the essential amino acid pathways revealed that most biosynthetic routes are in the symbiont genome. By contrast, the host trypanosomatid genome contains fewer genes, about half of which originated from different bacterial groups, perhaps only one of which (ornithine cyclodeaminase, EC:4.3.1.12) derived from the symbiont. Nutritional, enzymatic, and genomic data were jointly analyzed to construct an integrated view of essential amino acid metabolism in symbiont-harboring trypanosomatids. This comprehensive analysis showed perfect concordance among all these data, and revealed that the symbiont contains genes for enzymes that complete essential biosynthetic routes for the host amino acid production, thus explaining the low requirement for these elements in symbiont-harboring trypanosomatids. Phylogenetic analyses show that the cooperation between symbionts and their hosts is complemented by multiple horizontal gene transfers, from bacterial lineages to trypanosomatids, that occurred several times in the course of their evolution. Transfers occur preferentially in parts of the pathways that are missing from other eukaryotes. Conclusion We have herein uncovered the genetic and evolutionary bases of essential amino acid biosynthesis in several trypanosomatids with and without endosymbionts, explaining and complementing decades of

  2. Renin-Angiotensin System Genes Polymorphisms and Essential Hypertension in Burkina Faso, West Africa

    PubMed Central

    Tchelougou, Daméhan; Kologo, Jonas K.; Karou, Simplice D.; Yaméogo, Valentin N.; Bisseye, Cyrille; Djigma, Florencia W.; Ouermi, Djeneba; Compaoré, Tegwindé R.; Assih, Maléki; Pietra, Virginio; Zabsonré, Patrice; Simpore, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Objective. This study aimed to investigate the association between three polymorphisms of renin-angiotensin system and the essential hypertension in the population of Burkina Faso. Methodology. This was a case-control study including 202 cases and 204 matched controls subjects. The polymorphisms were identified by a classical and a real-time PCR. Results. The AGT 235M/T and AT1R 1166A/C polymorphisms were not associated with the hypertension while the genotype frequencies of the ACE I/D polymorphism between patients and controls (DD: 66.83% and 35.78%, ID: 28.22% and 50.98%, II: 4.95% and 13.24%, resp.) were significantly different (p < 10−4). The genotype DD of ACE gene (OR = 3.40, p < 0.0001), the increasing age (OR = 3.83, p < 0.0001), obesity (OR = 4.84, p < 0.0001), dyslipidemia (OR = 3.43, p = 0.021), and alcohol intake (OR = 2.76, p < 0.0001) were identified as the independent risk factors for hypertension by multinomial logistic regression. Conclusion. The DD genotype of the ACE gene is involved in susceptibility to hypertension. Further investigations are needed to better monitor and provide individualized care for hypertensive patients. PMID:26351579

  3. AUT1, a gene essential for autophagocytosis in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Schlumpberger, M; Schaeffeler, E; Straub, M; Bredschneider, M; Wolf, D H; Thumm, M

    1997-01-01

    Autophagocytosis is a starvation-induced process responsible for transport of cytoplasmic proteins to the vacuole. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, autophagy is characterized by the phenotypic appearance of autophagic vesicles inside the vacuole of strains deficient in proteinase yscB. The AUT1 gene, essential for autophagy, was isolated by complementation of the sporulation deficiency of a diploid aut1-1 mutant strain by a yeast genomic library and characterized. AUT1 is located on the right arm of chromosome XIV, 10 kb from the centromere, and encodes a protein of 310 amino acids, with an estimated molecular weight of 36 kDa. Cells carrying a chromosomal deletion of AUT1 are defective in the starvation-induced bulk flow transport of cytoplasmic proteins to the vacuole. aut1 null mutant strains are completely viable but show decreased survival rates during starvation. Homozygous delta aut1 diploid cells fail to sporulate. The selective cytoplasm-to-vacuole transport of aminopeptidase I is blocked in logarithmically growing and in starved delta autl cells. Deletion of the AUT1 gene had no obvious influence on secretion, fluid phase endocytosis, or vacuolar protein sorting. This supports the idea of autophagocytosis as being a novel route transporting proteins from the cytoplasm to the vacuole. PMID:9023185

  4. Isolation and characterization of SYN1, a RAD21-like gene essential for meiosis in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed Central

    Bai, X; Peirson, B N; Dong, F; Xue, C; Makaroff, C A

    1999-01-01

    The proper pairing, recombination, and segregation of chromosomes are central to meiosis and sexual reproduction. The syn1 mutation was previously identified as a synaptic mutant in a T-DNA-tagged population of plants. SYN1 has been isolated and found to exhibit similarity to Schizosaccharomyces pombe RAD21 and RAD21-like proteins, which are required for chromosome condensation and sister chromatid cohesion during mitosis. Plants homozygous for syn1 are male and female sterile and show defects in chromosome condensation and pairing beginning at leptonema of meiosis I. Fragmentation of the chromosomes was observed at metaphase I. Alternative promoters produced two SYN1 transcripts. One transcript was expressed at low levels in most tissues, whereas the other was expressed only in prebolting buds. DNA blot analyses suggest that Arabidopsis contains a small RAD21 gene family. Consistent with the DNA blot data, a second Arabidopsis RAD21-like gene has been identified. These results suggest that different RAD21-like proteins play essential roles in chromosome condensation and pairing during both meiosis and mitosis. PMID:10072401

  5. Identification of a Wee1–Like Kinase Gene Essential for Procyclic Trypanosoma brucei Survival

    PubMed Central

    Boynak, Natalia Y.; Rojas, Federico; D’Alessio, Cecilia; Vilchez Larrea, Salomé C.; Rodriguez, Vanina; Ghiringhelli, Pablo D.; Téllez-Iñón, María T.

    2013-01-01

    Regulation of eukaryotic cell cycle progression requires sequential activation and inactivation of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs). Activation of the cyclin B-cdc2 kinase complex is a pivotal step in mitotic initiation and the tyrosine kinase Wee1 is a key regulator of cell cycle sequence during G2/M transition and inhibits mitotic entry by phosphorylating the inhibitory tyrosine 15 on the cdc2 M-phase-inducing kinase. Wee1 degradation is essential for the exit from the G2 phase. In trypanosomatids, little is known about the genes that regulate cyclin B-cdc2 complexes at the G2/M transition of their cell cycle. Although canonical tyrosine kinases are absent in the genome of trypanosomatids, phosphorylation on protein tyrosine residues has been reported in Trypanosoma brucei. Here, we characterized a Wee1-like protein kinase gene from T. brucei. Expression of TbWee1 in a Schizosaccharomyces pombe strain null for Wee1 inhibited cell division and caused cell elongation. This demonstrates the lengthening of G2, which provided cells with extra time to grow before dividing. The Wee1-like protein kinase was expressed in the procyclic and bloodstream proliferative slender forms of T. brucei and the role of Wee1 in cell cycle progression was analyzed by generating RNA interference cell lines. In the procyclic form of T. brucei, the knock-down of TbWee1 expression by RNAi led to inhibition of parasite growth. Abnormal phenotypes showing an increase in the percentage of cells with 1N0K, 0N1K and 2N1K were observed in these RNAi cell lines. Using parasites with a synchronized cell cycle, we demonstrated that TbWee1 is linked to the G2/M phase. We also showed that TbWee1 is an essential gene necessary for proper cell cycle progression and parasite growth in T. brucei. Our results provide evidence for the existence of a functional Wee1 in T. brucei with a potential role in cell division at G2/M. PMID:24223931

  6. Identification and Characterization of the Physiological Gene Targets of the Essential Lytic Replicative Epstein-Barr Virus SM Protein

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Jacob; Verma, Dinesh; Li, DaJiang; Mosbruger, Tim

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) SM protein is an essential lytic cycle protein with multiple posttranscriptional mechanisms of action. SM binds RNA and increases accumulation of specific EBV transcripts. Previous studies using microarrays and PCR have shown that SM-null mutants fail to accumulate several lytic cycle mRNAs and proteins at wild-type levels. However, the complete effect of SM on the EBV transcriptome has been incompletely characterized. Here we precisely identify the effects of SM on all EBV transcripts by high-throughput RNA sequencing, quantitative PCR (qPCR), and Northern blotting. The effect of SM on EBV mRNAs was highly skewed and was most evident on 13 late genes, demonstrating why SM is essential for infectious EBV production. EBV DNA replication was also partially impaired in SM mutants, suggesting additional roles for SM in EBV DNA replication. While it has been suggested that SM specificity is based on recognition of either RNA sequence motifs or other sequence properties, no such unifying property of SM-responsive targets was discernible. The binding affinity of mRNAs for SM also did not correlate with SM responsiveness. These data suggest that while target RNA binding by SM may be required for its effect, specific activation by SM is due to differences in inherent properties of individual transcripts. We therefore propose a new model for the mechanism of action and specificity of SM and its homologs in other herpesviruses: that they bind many RNAs but only enhance accumulation of those that are intrinsically unstable and poorly expressed. IMPORTANCE This study examines the mechanism of action of EBV SM protein, which is essential for EBV replication and infectious virus production. Since SM protein is not similar to any cellular protein and has homologs in all other human herpesviruses, it has potential importance as a therapeutic target. Here we establish which EBV RNAs are most highly upregulated by SM, allowing us to understand why it

  7. Deoxyxylulose 5-phosphate reductoisomerase is not a rate-determining enzyme for essential oil production in spike lavender.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Poudereux, Isabel; Muñoz-Bertomeu, Jesús; Arrillaga, Isabel; Segura, Juan

    2014-11-01

    Spike lavender (Lavandula latifolia) is an economically important aromatic plant producing essential oils, whose components (mostly monoterpenes) are mainly synthesized through the plastidial methylerythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway. 1-Deoxy-D-xylulose-5-phosphate (DXP) synthase (DXS), that catalyzes the first step of the MEP pathway, plays a crucial role in monoterpene precursors biosynthesis in spike lavender. To date, however, it is not known whether the DXP reductoisomerase (DXR), that catalyzes the conversion of DXP into MEP, is also a rate-limiting enzyme for the biosynthesis of monoterpenes in spike lavender. To investigate it, we generated transgenic spike lavender plants constitutively expressing the Arabidopsis thaliana DXR gene. Although two out of the seven transgenic T0 plants analyzed accumulated more essential oils than the controls, this is hardly imputable to the DXR transgene effect since a clear correlation between transcript accumulation and monoterpene production could not be established. Furthermore, these increased essential oil phenotypes were not maintained in their respective T1 progenies. Similar results were obtained when total chlorophyll and carotenoid content in both T0 transgenic plants and their progenies were analyzed. Our results then demonstrate that DXR enzyme does not play a crucial role in the synthesis of plastidial monoterpene precursors, suggesting that the control flux of the MEP pathway in spike lavender is primarily exerted by the DXS enzyme. PMID:25151124

  8. Cloning of the RNA8 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, detection of the RNA8 protein, and demonstration that it is essential for nuclear pre-mRNA splicing.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, S P; Lossky, M; Beggs, J D

    1988-01-01

    Strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that bear the temperature-sensitive mutation rna8-1 are defective in nuclear pre-mRNA splicing at the restrictive temperature (36 degrees C), suggesting that the RNA8 gene encodes a component of the splicing machinery. The RNA8 gene was cloned by complementation of the temperature-sensitive growth defect of an rna8-1 mutant strain. Integrative transformation and gene disruption experiments confirmed the identity of the cloned DNA and demonstrated that the RNA8 gene encodes an essential function. The RNA8 gene was shown to be represented once per S. cerevisiae haploid genome and to encode a low-abundance transcript of approximately 7.4 kilobases. By using antisera raised against beta-galactosidase-RNA8 fusion proteins, the RNA8 gene product was identified in S. cerevisiae cell extracts as a low-abundance protein of approximately 260 kilodaltons. Immunodepletion of the RNA8 protein specifically abolished the activity of S. cerevisiae in vitro splicing extracts, confirming that RNA8 plays an essential role in splicing. Images PMID:2835658

  9. Effects of selected essential oils on the growth and production of ochratoxin A by Penicillium verrucosum.

    PubMed

    Jeršek, Barbara; Poklar Ulrih, Nataša; Skrt, Mihaela; Gavarić, Neda; Božin, Biljana; Smole Možina, Sonja

    2014-06-01

    Essential oils from oregano (Origanum vulgare L.), mint (Mentha piperita L.), fennel (Foeniculum vulgare Mill.), and pine (Abies alba Mill.) needles and cones, and their active substances thymol, carvacrol, menthol, and anisaldehyde were tested for antifungal activity against Penicillium verrucosum. The lowest minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were achieved for essential oil of oregano, followed by carvacrol, thymol, and menthol. These antifungal components were further investigated, as the main aim of our study was to elucidate the effect of natural antifungals on ochratoxin A production. During 21 days of exposure, the growth of P. verrucosum, and subsequently the production of ochratoxin A, was fully inhibited by thymol at ½ MIC (0.0625 mg mL-1), but menthol at ¼ and ½ MIC (0.1875 and 3750 mg mL-1) showed no growth inhibition. After 21 days of incubation, the greatest inhibitory effect on ochratoxin production (inhibition was 96.9 %) was also achieved with thymol at ¼ MIC (0.0313 mg mL-1). Essential oil of oregano (¼ MIC, 0.2930 μL mL-1) and carvacrol (½ MIC, 0.1953 μL mL-1) stimulate production of ochratoxin A at 13.9 % to 28.8 %, respectively. The observed antifungal effects depended on the agent, the concentration used, and the time of interaction between the agent and P. verrucosum. Our results indicate the possibility of using oregano essential oil as a substitute for artificial preservatives in certain foods, but further research is needed. PMID:24945417

  10. MHP1, an essential gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae required for microtubule function

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    The gene for a microtubule-associated protein (MAP), termed MHP1 (MAP- Homologous Protein 1), was isolated from Saccharomyces cerevisiae by expression cloning using antibodies specific for the Drosophila 205K MAP. MHP1 encodes an essential protein of 1,398 amino acids that contains near its COOH-terminal end a sequence homologous to the microtubule-binding domain of MAP2, MAP4, and tau. While total disruptions are lethal, NH2-terminal deletion mutations of MHP1 are viable, and the expression of the COOH-terminal two-thirds of the protein is sufficient for vegetative growth. Nonviable deletion- disruption mutations of MHP1 can be partially complemented by the expression of the Drosophila 205K MAP. Mhp1p binds to microtubules in vitro, and it is the COOH-terminal region containing the tau-homologous motif that mediates microtubule binding. Antibodies directed against a COOH-terminal peptide of Mhp1p decorate cytoplasmic microtubules and mitotic spindles as revealed by immunofluorescence microscopy. The overexpression of an NH2-terminal deletion mutation of MHP1 results in an accumulation of large-budded cells with short spindles and disturbed nuclear migration. In asynchronously growing cells that overexpress MHP1 from a multicopy plasmid, the length and number of cytoplasmic microtubules is increased and the proportion of mitotic cells is decreased, while haploid cells in which the expression of MHP1 has been silenced exhibit few microtubules. These results suggest that MHP1 is essential for the formation and/or stabilization of microtubules. PMID:8947554

  11. The tumor suppressor gene lkb1 is essential for glucose homeostasis during zebrafish early development.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Xia; Liu, Chao; Fang, Junshun; Ma, Weirui; Zhang, Jian; Cui, Sheng

    2016-07-01

    The liver kinase B1 (LKB1) is encoded by tumor suppressor gene STK11, which is mutated in Peutz-Jeghers syndrome patients. Lkb1 plays indispensable roles in energy homeostasis. However, how Lkb1 regulates energy homeostasis in vivo remains to be fully understood. We found that inactivation of zebrafish Lkb1 upregulates pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 2 expression and inactivates pyruvate dehydrogenase complex by increasing phosphorylation of pyruvate dehydrogenase. As a result, glycolysis is significantly enhanced as indicated by increased lactate production, which resembles the Warburg effect in cancer cells. Inhibition of Pdk2 in lkb1 mutants with dichloroacetate, a promising anticancer drug, rescued the lactate production to wild-type level, suggesting the lkb1 mutant may be used to screen compounds targeting aerobic glycolysis in cancer therapy. PMID:27264935

  12. Using Gene Essentiality and Synthetic Lethality Information to Correct Yeast and CHO Cell Genome-Scale Models.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Ratul; Chowdhury, Anupam; Maranas, Costas D

    2015-01-01

    Essentiality (ES) and Synthetic Lethality (SL) information identify combination of genes whose deletion inhibits cell growth. This information is important for both identifying drug targets for tumor and pathogenic bacteria suppression and for flagging and avoiding gene deletions that are non-viable in biotechnology. In this study, we performed a comprehensive ES and SL analysis of two important eukaryotic models (S. cerevisiae and CHO cells) using a bilevel optimization approach introduced earlier. Information gleaned from this study is used to propose specific model changes to remedy inconsistent with data model predictions. Even for the highly curated Yeast 7.11 model we identified 50 changes (metabolic and GPR) leading to the correct prediction of an additional 28% of essential genes and 36% of synthetic lethals along with a 53% reduction in the erroneous identification of essential genes. Due to the paucity of mutant growth phenotype data only 12 changes were made for the CHO 1.2 model leading to an additional correctly predicted 11 essential and eight non-essential genes. Overall, we find that CHO 1.2 was 76% less accurate than the Yeast 7.11 metabolic model in predicting essential genes. Based on this analysis, 14 (single and double deletion) maximally informative experiments are suggested to improve the CHO cell model by using information from a mouse metabolic model. This analysis demonstrates the importance of single and multiple knockout phenotypes in assessing and improving model reconstructions. The advent of techniques such as CRISPR opens the door for the global assessment of eukaryotic models. PMID:26426067

  13. The formulation of an effective topical antibacterial product containing Ocimum gratissimum leaf essential oil.

    PubMed

    Orafidiya, L O; Oyedele, A O; Shittu, A O; Elujoba, A A

    2001-08-14

    The antibacterial potential of Ocimum gratissimum essential oil was explored. Liquid and semisolid formulations of the oil were designed in a variety of bases for topical antiseptic medication. The products were evaluated by agar diffusion assay against type strains and clinical isolates from boil, wound and pimples. Remarkable antibacterial effects, higher than those of commercial antiseptic products, were demonstrated at 2% Ocimum oil concentration in some bases. The properties of base into which the oil was incorporated affected its activity. It was more effective in hydrophilic bases than in lipophilic bases. Solubilization and microemulsification grossly reduced its activity. PMID:11472827

  14. Novel cellular genes essential for transformation of endothelial cells by Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus.

    PubMed

    Raggo, Camilo; Ruhl, Rebecca; McAllister, Shane; Koon, Henry; Dezube, Bruce J; Früh, Klaus; Moses, Ashlee V

    2005-06-15

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is involved in the development of lymphoproliferative diseases and Kaposi's sarcoma. The oncogenicity of this virus is reflected in vitro by its ability to transform B cells and endothelial cells. Infection of dermal microvascular endothelial cells (DMVEC) transforms the cells from a cobblestone-like monolayer to foci-forming spindle cells. This transformation is accompanied by dramatic changes in the cellular transcriptome. Known oncogenes, such as c-Kit, are among the KSHV-induced host genes. We previously showed that c-Kit is an essential cellular component of the KSHV-mediated transformation of DMVEC. Here, we test the hypothesis that the transformation process can be used to discover novel oncogenes. When expression of a panel of KSHV-induced cellular transcripts was inhibited with antisense oligomers, we observed inhibition of DMVEC proliferation and foci formation using antisense molecules to RDC1 and Neuritin. We further showed that transformation of KSHV-infected DMVEC was inhibited by small interfering RNA directed at RDC1 or Neuritin. Ectopic expression of Neuritin in NIH 3T3 cells resulted in changes in cell morphology and anchorage-independent growth, whereas RDC1 ectopic expression significantly increased cell proliferation. In addition, both RDC1- and Neuritin-expressing cells formed tumors in nude mice. RDC1 is an orphan G protein-coupled receptor, whereas Neuritin is a growth-promoting protein known to mediate neurite outgrowth. Neither gene has been previously implicated in tumorigenesis. Our data suggest that KSHV-mediated transformation involves exploitation of the hitherto unrealized oncogenic properties of RDC1 and Neuritin. PMID:15958552

  15. Gene products of corticosteroid action in hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Nichols, N R; Finch, C E

    1994-11-30

    We used two methods to examine altered patterns of gene expression in rat hippocampus in response to administered glucocorticoids: analysis of RNA in vitro translation products on 2-d gels and cloning of cDNAs from a rat hippocampal library by differential hybridization (+/- CORT). We determined that two of the CORT-responsive cDNA clones encoded the 35- and 50-kd RNA translation products and identified them as GPDH and GFAP, respectively, by sequence analysis. Cloned mRNAs that increased and decreased in response to CORT were determined to be under positive and negative regulation by glucocorticoids in intact rats. Despite their similarities in glucocorticoid response characteristics, we found three subsets of hippocampal mRNA responses to CORT and shaking stress which differ in temporal and level-dependent aspects of CORT regulation. In addition, GPDH gene expression represents a glucocorticoid-dependent stress response which is rapidly increased in a dose- and stressor-dependent manner. It is a candidate for a sensitive indicator of stress responsiveness in the brain as a function of neuroendocrine activity. Mechanisms of adaptation to stress in the brain are likely to involve responses that are both mediated by glucocorticoids and opposed by them. GFAP and TGF-beta 1 mRNA responses may be examples of the latter, since they are decreased in response to glucocorticoids, are under negative regulation by glucocorticoids in intact rats, and are increased in response to brain injury and disease and during aging. If these astrocytic and microglial responses are involved in cellular defense mechanisms in the brain, then their regulation by glucocorticoids would be important in maintaining and restoring cellular homeostasis in physiological and pathophysiological states. Future studies using these sensitive probes for glucocorticoid-regulated gene expression may identify new mechanisms by which the brain coordinates acute and chronic responses to stress and disease.

  16. Vitamin D receptor gene polymorphisms and plasma renin activity in essential hypertensive individuals.

    PubMed

    Cottone, S; Guarino, L; Arsena, R; Scazzone, C; Tornese, F; Guarneri, M; Guglielmo, C; Bono, A; Mulè, G

    2015-08-01

    Several studies analyzed 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) and blood pressure (BP) relationship with mixed results. Moreover, a relationship between the risk of hypertension and vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene polymorphisms, FokI and BsmI, was reported. This study was aimed to analyze these relationships in essential hypertensive (EH) patients. Seventy-one EH patients, 18-75 years old, were enrolled. Patients underwent clinical BP, 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring, 25[OH]D and plasma renin activity (PRA) evaluations. FokI and BsmI VDR polymorphisms were analyzed and compared with those of 72 healthy controls. In EH patients, the median 25[OH]D levels were lower than 30 ng ml(-1). We found a significant negative correlation between 25[OH]D and 24-h systolic BP (r = -0.277, P = 0.043). This correlation persisted in backward stepwise multivariate analyses (β = -0.337; P = 0.022), after adjustment for age, gender, body mass index, glomerular filtration rate, and PRA. We did not observe statistically significant correlation between 25[OH]D and PRA. We compared the allelic frequencies and genotype distribution between patients and controls, and FokI and BsmI VDR polymorphisms were not associated either with hypertensive status or with PRA. Further wide studies are needed to clarify this relationship.

  17. Novel essential gene Involved in 16S rRNA processing in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kurata, Tatsuaki; Nakanishi, Shinobu; Hashimoto, Masayuki; Taoka, Masato; Yamazaki, Yukiko; Isobe, Toshiaki; Kato, Jun-ichi

    2015-02-27

    Biogenesis of ribosomes is a complex process mediated by many factors. While its transcription proceeds, ribosomal RNA (rRNA) folds itself into a characteristic three-dimensional structure through interaction with ribosomal proteins, during which its ends are processed. Here, we show that the essential protein YqgF, a RuvC family protein with an RNase-H-like motif, is involved in the processing of pre-16S rRNA during ribosome maturation. Indeed, pre-16S rRNA accumulated in cells of a temperature-sensitive yqgF mutant (yqgF(ts)) cultured at a non-permissive temperature. In addition, purified YqgF was shown to process the 5' end of pre-16S rRNA within 70S ribosomes in vitro. Mass spectrometry analysis of the total proteins in the yqgF(ts) mutant cells showed that the expression of genes containing multiple Shine-Dalgarno-like sequences was observed to be lower than in wild type. These results are interpreted to indicate that YqgF is involved in a novel enzymic activity necessary for the processing of pre-16S rRNA, thereby affecting elongation of translation.

  18. Assessment of FBA Based Gene Essentiality Analysis in Cancer with a Fast Context-Specific Network Reconstruction Method

    PubMed Central

    Tobalina, Luis; Pey, Jon; Rezola, Alberto; Planes, Francisco J.

    2016-01-01

    Motivation Gene Essentiality Analysis based on Flux Balance Analysis (FBA-based GEA) is a promising tool for the identification of novel metabolic therapeutic targets in cancer. The reconstruction of cancer-specific metabolic networks, typically based on gene expression data, constitutes a sensible step in this approach. However, to our knowledge, no extensive assessment on the influence of the reconstruction process on the obtained results has been carried out to date. Results In this article, we aim to study context-specific networks and their FBA-based GEA results for the identification of cancer-specific metabolic essential genes. To that end, we used gene expression datasets from the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia (CCLE), evaluating the results obtained in 174 cancer cell lines. In order to more clearly observe the effect of cancer-specific expression data, we did the same analysis using randomly generated expression patterns. Our computational analysis showed some essential genes that are fairly common in the reconstructions derived from both gene expression and randomly generated data. However, though of limited size, we also found a subset of essential genes that are very rare in the randomly generated networks, while recurrent in the sample derived networks, and, thus, would presumably constitute relevant drug targets for further analysis. In addition, we compare the in-silico results to high-throughput gene silencing experiments from Project Achilles with conflicting results, which leads us to raise several questions, particularly the strong influence of the selected biomass reaction on the obtained results. Notwithstanding, using previous literature in cancer research, we evaluated the most relevant of our targets in three different cancer cell lines, two derived from Gliobastoma Multiforme and one from Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, finding that some of the predictions are in the right track. PMID:27145226

  19. Impact of obesity and nitric oxide synthase gene G894T polymorphism on essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Wrzosek, M; Sokal, M; Sawicka, A; Wlodarczyk, M; Glowala, M; Wrzosek, M; Kosior, M; Talalaj, M; Biecek, P; Nowicka, G

    2015-10-01

    Hypertension is a multifactorial disease caused by environmental, metabolic and genetic factors, but little is currently known on the complex interplay between these factors and blood pressure. The aim of the present study was to assess the potential impact of obesity, and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) I/D polymorphism and endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene (NOS3) 4a/4b, G894T and -T786C variants on the essential hypertension. The study group consisted of 1,027 Caucasian adults of Polish nationality (45.5 ± 13.6 years old), of which 401 met the criteria for hypertension. Body weight, height and blood pressure were measured and data on self-reported smoking status were collected. Fasting blood glucose, total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, triglycerides were determined by standard procedures. The ACE I/D polymorphism and three polymorphisms in NOS3 gene (4a/4b, G894T, -T786C) were detected by the PCR method. Multivariable logistic regression demonstrated that age above 45 years, diabetes, dyslipidemia, smoking and male sex are important risk factors for hypertension and no significant influence of variants in ACE and NOS3 genes on this risk was recognized. Obese subjects had a 3.27-times higher risk (OR = 3.27, 95% CI: 2.37 - 4.52) of hypertension than non-obese, and in obese the NOS3 894T allele was associated with 1.37 fold higher risk of hypertension (P = 0.031). The distribution of NOS3 G894T genotypes supported the co-dominant (OR = 1.35, P = 0.034, Pfit = 0.435) or recessive (OR = 2.00, P = 0.046, Pfit = 0.286), but not dominant model of inheritance (P = 0.100). The study indicates that in obese NOS3 G894T polymorphism may enhance hypertension risk. However, in the presence of such strong risk factors as age, diabetes and smoking, the impact of this genetic variant seems to be attenuated. Further studies are needed to reveal the usefulness of G894T polymorphism in hypertension risk assessment in obese. PMID:26579574

  20. Impact of obesity and nitric oxide synthase gene G894T polymorphism on essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Wrzosek, M; Sokal, M; Sawicka, A; Wlodarczyk, M; Glowala, M; Wrzosek, M; Kosior, M; Talalaj, M; Biecek, P; Nowicka, G

    2015-10-01

    Hypertension is a multifactorial disease caused by environmental, metabolic and genetic factors, but little is currently known on the complex interplay between these factors and blood pressure. The aim of the present study was to assess the potential impact of obesity, and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) I/D polymorphism and endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene (NOS3) 4a/4b, G894T and -T786C variants on the essential hypertension. The study group consisted of 1,027 Caucasian adults of Polish nationality (45.5 ± 13.6 years old), of which 401 met the criteria for hypertension. Body weight, height and blood pressure were measured and data on self-reported smoking status were collected. Fasting blood glucose, total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, triglycerides were determined by standard procedures. The ACE I/D polymorphism and three polymorphisms in NOS3 gene (4a/4b, G894T, -T786C) were detected by the PCR method. Multivariable logistic regression demonstrated that age above 45 years, diabetes, dyslipidemia, smoking and male sex are important risk factors for hypertension and no significant influence of variants in ACE and NOS3 genes on this risk was recognized. Obese subjects had a 3.27-times higher risk (OR = 3.27, 95% CI: 2.37 - 4.52) of hypertension than non-obese, and in obese the NOS3 894T allele was associated with 1.37 fold higher risk of hypertension (P = 0.031). The distribution of NOS3 G894T genotypes supported the co-dominant (OR = 1.35, P = 0.034, Pfit = 0.435) or recessive (OR = 2.00, P = 0.046, Pfit = 0.286), but not dominant model of inheritance (P = 0.100). The study indicates that in obese NOS3 G894T polymorphism may enhance hypertension risk. However, in the presence of such strong risk factors as age, diabetes and smoking, the impact of this genetic variant seems to be attenuated. Further studies are needed to reveal the usefulness of G894T polymorphism in hypertension risk assessment in obese.

  1. The histone-like protein Hlp is essential for growth of Streptococcus pyogenes: comparison of genetic approaches to study essential genes.

    PubMed

    Bugrysheva, Julia V; Froehlich, Barbara J; Freiberg, Jeffrey A; Scott, June R

    2011-07-01

    Selection of possible targets for vaccine and drug development requires an understanding of the physiology of bacterial pathogens, for which the ability to manipulate expression of essential genes is critical. For Streptococcus pyogenes (the group A streptococcus [GAS]), an important human pathogen, the lack of genetic tools for such studies has seriously hampered research. To address this problem, we characterized variants of the inducible Ptet cassette, in both sense and antisense contexts, as tools to regulate transcription from GAS genes. We found that although the three-operator Ptet construct [Ptet(O)3] had low uninduced expression, its induction level was low, while the two-operator construct [Ptet(O)2] was inducible to a high level but showed significant constitutive expression. Use of Ptet(O)3 in the chromosome allowed us to demonstrate previously that RNases J1 and J2 are required for growth of GAS. Here we report that the uninduced level from the chromosomally inserted Ptet(O)2 construct was too high for us to observe differential growth. For the highly expressed histone-like protein (Hlp) of GAS, neither chromosomal insertion of Ptet(O)2 or Ptet(O)3 nor their use on a high-copy-number plasmid to produce antisense RNA specific to hlp resulted in adequate differential expression. However, by replacing the ribosome binding site of hlp with an engineered riboswitch to control translation of Hlp, we demonstrated for the first time that this protein is essential for GAS growth. PMID:21531823

  2. The essential oil of bergamot stimulates reactive oxygen species production in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Cosentino, Marco; Luini, Alessandra; Bombelli, Raffaella; Corasaniti, Maria T; Bagetta, Giacinto; Marino, Franca

    2014-08-01

    Bergamot (Citrus aurantium L. subsp. bergamia) essential oil (BEO) is used in folk medicine as an antiseptic and anthelminthic and to facilitate wound healing. Evidence indicates that BEO has substantial antimicrobial activity; however its effects on immunity have never been examined. We studied the effects of BEO on reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) and the role of Ca(2+) in the functional responses evoked by BEO in these cells. Results show that BEO increased intracellular ROS production in human PMN, an effect that required the contribution of extracellular (and, to a lesser extent, of intracellular) Ca(2+) . Bergamot essential oil also significantly increased ROS production induced by the chemotactic peptide N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe and reduced the response to the protein kinase C activator phorbol myristate acetate. In conclusion, this is the first report showing the ability of BEO to increase ROS production in human PMN. This effect could both contribute to the activity of BEO in infections and in tissue healing as well as underlie an intrinsic proinflammatory potential. The relevance of these findings for the clinical uses of BEO needs careful consideration.

  3. Inhibitory effect of essential oils on Aspergillus ochraceus growth and ochratoxin A production.

    PubMed

    Hua, Huijuan; Xing, Fuguo; Selvaraj, Jonathan Nimal; Wang, Yan; Zhao, Yueju; Zhou, Lu; Liu, Xiao; Liu, Yang

    2014-01-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a mycotoxin which is a common contaminant in grains during storage. Aspergillus ochraceus is the most common producer of OTA. Essential oils play a crucial role as a biocontrol in the reduction of fungal contamination. Essential oils namely natural cinnamaldehyde, cinnamon oil, synthetic cinnamaldehyde, Litsea citrate oil, citral, eugenol, peppermint, eucalyptus, anise and camphor oils, were tested for their efficacy against A. ochraceus growth and OTA production by fumigation and contact assays. Natural cinnamaldehyde proved to be the most effective against A. ochraceus when compared to other oils. Complete fungal growth inhibition was obtained at 150-250 µL/L with fumigation and 250-500 µL/L with contact assays for cinnamon oil, natural and synthetic cinnamaldehyde, L. citrate oil and citral. Essential oils had an impact on the ergosterol biosynthesis and OTA production. Complete inhibition of ergosterol biosynthesis was observed at ≥ 100 µg/mL of natural cinnamaldehyde and at 200 µg/mL of citral, but total inhibition was not observed at 200 µg/mL of eugenol. But, citral and eugenol could inhibit the OTA production at ≥ 75 µg/mL and ≥ 150 µg/mL respectively, while natural cinnamaldehyde couldn't fully inhibit OTA production at ≤ 200 µg/mL. The inhibition of OTA by natural cinnamaldehyde is mainly due to the reduction in fungal biomass. However, citral and eugenol could significant inhibit the OTA biosynthetic pathway. Also, we observed that cinnamaldehyde was converted to cinnamic alcohol by A. ochraceus, suggesting that the antimicrobial activity of cinnamaldehyde was mainly attributed to its carbonyl aldehyde group. The study concludes that natural cinnamaldehyde, citral and eugenol could be potential biocontrol agents against OTA contamination in storage grains. PMID:25255251

  4. Inhibitory Effect of Essential Oils on Aspergillus ochraceus Growth and Ochratoxin A Production

    PubMed Central

    Selvaraj, Jonathan Nimal; Wang, Yan; Zhao, Yueju; Zhou, Lu; Liu, Xiao; Liu, Yang

    2014-01-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a mycotoxin which is a common contaminant in grains during storage. Aspergillus ochraceus is the most common producer of OTA. Essential oils play a crucial role as a biocontrol in the reduction of fungal contamination. Essential oils namely natural cinnamaldehyde, cinnamon oil, synthetic cinnamaldehyde, Litsea citrate oil, citral, eugenol, peppermint, eucalyptus, anise and camphor oils, were tested for their efficacy against A. ochraceus growth and OTA production by fumigation and contact assays. Natural cinnamaldehyde proved to be the most effective against A. ochraceus when compared to other oils. Complete fungal growth inhibition was obtained at 150–250 µL/L with fumigation and 250–500 µL/L with contact assays for cinnamon oil, natural and synthetic cinnamaldehyde, L. citrate oil and citral. Essential oils had an impact on the ergosterol biosynthesis and OTA production. Complete inhibition of ergosterol biosynthesis was observed at ≥100 µg/mL of natural cinnamaldehyde and at 200 µg/mL of citral, but total inhibition was not observed at 200 µg/mL of eugenol. But, citral and eugenol could inhibit the OTA production at ≥75 µg/mL and ≥150 µg/mL respectively, while natural cinnamaldehyde couldn’t fully inhibit OTA production at ≤200 µg/mL. The inhibition of OTA by natural cinnamaldehyde is mainly due to the reduction in fungal biomass. However, citral and eugenol could significant inhibit the OTA biosynthetic pathway. Also, we observed that cinnamaldehyde was converted to cinnamic alcohol by A. ochraceus, suggesting that the antimicrobial activity of cinnamaldehyde was mainly attributed to its carbonyl aldehyde group. The study concludes that natural cinnamaldehyde, citral and eugenol could be potential biocontrol agents against OTA contamination in storage grains. PMID:25255251

  5. Effects of Herbal Essential Oil Mixture as a Dietary Supplement on Egg Production in Quail

    PubMed Central

    Çabuk, Metin; Eratak, Serdar; Alçicek, Ahmet; Bozkurt, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    One hundred and eighty 7-week-old laying quail were fed various diets over a 12-week period. The diets included a control diet (without essential oil mixture (EOM) or antibiotics (ANTs)), a basal diet including EOM (24 mg/kg feed), and a basal diet including an ANT (avilamycin, 10 mg/kg feed). Each treatment comprised 4 replications with 4 cages (15 quail per cage), amounting to 60 quail per treatment group. Diets (in mash form) and water were provided for ad libitum consumption. EOM consisted of 6 different essential oils derived from the following herbs: oregano (Origanum sp.), laurel leaf (Laurus nobilis L.), sage leaf (Salvia triloba L.), myrtle leaf (Myrtus communis), fennel seeds (Foeniculum vulgare), and citrus peel (Citrus sp.). In comparison with the control diet, adding supplements such as EOM and ANTs to the basal diet increased egg production in quail (P < 0.001). However, egg production was similar between EOM and ANT treatment groups. Moreover, there were no differences between the treatment groups with regard to egg weight. Feed intake was not affected by EOM or ANT supplementation, whereas feed conversion ratio was significantly improved by EOM and ANT supplementation. Thus, we concluded that EOM has beneficial effects as a dietary supplement on egg production and feed conversion ratio. PMID:24587729

  6. Effects of herbal essential oil mixture as a dietary supplement on egg production in quail.

    PubMed

    Çabuk, Metin; Eratak, Serdar; Alçicek, Ahmet; Bozkurt, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    One hundred and eighty 7-week-old laying quail were fed various diets over a 12-week period. The diets included a control diet (without essential oil mixture (EOM) or antibiotics (ANTs)), a basal diet including EOM (24 mg/kg feed), and a basal diet including an ANT (avilamycin, 10 mg/kg feed). Each treatment comprised 4 replications with 4 cages (15 quail per cage), amounting to 60 quail per treatment group. Diets (in mash form) and water were provided for ad libitum consumption. EOM consisted of 6 different essential oils derived from the following herbs: oregano (Origanum sp.), laurel leaf (Laurus nobilis L.), sage leaf (Salvia triloba L.), myrtle leaf (Myrtus communis), fennel seeds (Foeniculum vulgare), and citrus peel (Citrus sp.). In comparison with the control diet, adding supplements such as EOM and ANTs to the basal diet increased egg production in quail (P < 0.001). However, egg production was similar between EOM and ANT treatment groups. Moreover, there were no differences between the treatment groups with regard to egg weight. Feed intake was not affected by EOM or ANT supplementation, whereas feed conversion ratio was significantly improved by EOM and ANT supplementation. Thus, we concluded that EOM has beneficial effects as a dietary supplement on egg production and feed conversion ratio. PMID:24587729

  7. Repression of Lateral Organ Boundary Genes by PENNYWISE and POUND-FOOLISH Is Essential for Meristem Maintenance and Flowering in Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Madiha; Ragni, Laura; Tabb, Paul; Salasini, Brenda C.; Chatfield, Steven; Datla, Raju; Lock, John; Kuai, Xiahezi; Després, Charles; Proveniers, Marcel; Yongguo, Cao; Xiang, Daoquan; Morin, Halima; Rullière, Jean-Pierre; Citerne, Sylvie; Hepworth, Shelley R.; Pautot, Véronique

    2015-01-01

    In the model plant Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), endogenous and environmental signals acting on the shoot apical meristem cause acquisition of inflorescence meristem fate. This results in changed patterns of aerial development seen as the transition from making leaves to the production of flowers separated by elongated internodes. Two related BEL1-like homeobox genes, PENNYWISE (PNY) and POUND-FOOLISH (PNF), fulfill this transition. Loss of function of these genes impairs stem cell maintenance and blocks internode elongation and flowering. We show here that pny pnf apices misexpress lateral organ boundary genes BLADE-ON-PETIOLE1/2 (BOP1/2) and KNOTTED-LIKE FROM ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA6 (KNAT6) together with ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA HOMEOBOX GENE1 (ATH1). Inactivation of genes in this module fully rescues pny pnf defects. We further show that BOP1 directly activates ATH1, whereas activation of KNAT6 is indirect. The pny pnf restoration correlates with renewed accumulation of transcripts conferring floral meristem identity, including FD, SQUAMOSA PROMOTER-BINDING PROTEIN LIKE genes, LEAFY, and APETALA1. To gain insight into how this module blocks flowering, we analyzed the transcriptome of BOP1-overexpressing plants. Our data suggest a central role for the microRNA156-SQUAMOSA PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN-LIKE-microRNA172 module in integrating stress signals conferred in part by promotion of jasmonic acid biosynthesis. These data reveal a potential mechanism by which repression of lateral organ boundary genes by PNY-PNF is essential for flowering. PMID:26417006

  8. The Coactivator SRC-1 is an Essential Coordinator of Hepatic Glucose Production

    PubMed Central

    Louet, Jean-Francois; Chopra, Atul R.; Sagen, Jorn V.; An, Jie; York, Brian; Tannour-Louet, Mounia; Saha, Pradip K.; Stevens, Robert D.; Wenner, Brett R.; Ilkayeva, Olga R.; Bain, James R.; Zhou, Suoling; DeMayo, Franco; Xu, Jianming; Newgard, Christopher B.; O'Malley, Bert W.

    2010-01-01

    Gluconeogenesis makes a major contribution to hepatic glucose production, a process critical for survival in mammals. In this study, we identify the p160 family member, SRC-1, as a key coordinator of the hepatic gluconeogenic program in vivo. SRC-1 null mice displayed hypoglycemia secondary to a deficit in hepatic glucose production. Selective re-expression of SRC-1 in the liver restored blood glucose levels to a normal range. SRC-1 was found induced upon fasting to coordinate in a cell-autonomous manner, the gene expression of rate-limiting enzymes of the gluconeogenic pathway. At the molecular level, the main role of SRC-1 was to modulate the expression and the activity of C/EBPα through a feed-forward loop in which SRC-1 used C/EBPα to transactivate pyruvate carboxylase, a crucial gene for initiation of the gluconeogenic program. We propose that SRC-1, acts as a novel and critical mediator of glucose homeostasis in the liver by adjusting the transcriptional activity of key genes involved in the hepatic glucose production machinery. PMID:21109193

  9. The tax gene of human T-cell leukemia virus type 2 is essential for transformation of human T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Ross, T M; Pettiford, S M; Green, P L

    1996-01-01

    The mechanism of human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV)-mediated transformation and induction of malignancy is unknown; however, several studies have implicated the viral gene product, Tax. Conclusive evidence for the role of Tax in the HTLV malignant process has been impeded by the inability to mutate tax in the context of an infectious virus and dissociate viral replication from cellular transformation. To circumvent this problem we constructed a mutant of HTLV type 2 (HTLV-2) that replicates by a Tax-independent mechanism. For these studies, the Tax response element in the viral long terminal repeat was replaced with the cytomegalovirus immediate-early promoter enhancer (C-enh). Transcription of the chimeric HTLV-2 (HTLVC-enh) was efficiently directed by this heterologous promoter. Also, the chimeric virus transformed primary human T lymphocytes with an efficiency similar to that of wild-type HTLV-2. A tax-knockout virus, termed HTLVC-enhDeltaTax, was constructed to directly assess the importance of Tax in cellular transformation. Transfection and infection studies indicated that HTLVC-enhDeltaTax was replication competent; however, HTLVC-enhDeltaTax failed to transform primary human T lymphocytes. We conclude that Tax is essential for HTLV-mediated transformation of human T lymphocytes. Furthermore, this chimeric HTLV, that replicates in the absence of Tax, should facilitate studies to determine the precise mechanism of T-lymphocyte transformation by HTLV. PMID:8764028

  10. Antibacterial Activity of Carum copticum Essential Oil Against Escherichia Coli O157:H7 in Meat: Stx Genes Expression.

    PubMed

    Mahmoudzadeh, Maryam; Hosseini, Hedayat; Nasrollahzadeh, Javad; Khaneghah, Amin Mousavi; Rismanchi, Marjan; Chaves, Rafael Djalma; Shahraz, Farzaneh; Azizkhani, Maryam; Mahmoudzadeh, Leila; Haslberger, Alexander G

    2016-08-01

    This work were aimed to (a) determination of minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of Carum copticum essential oil (EO) against Escherichia. coli O157:H7 in vitro Trypticase Soy Broth, (TSB) and in ground beef; (b) evaluation of the effect of sub-inhibitory concentrations (sub-MICs) of EO on the growth of bacterium in TSB over 72 h (at 35 °C) and ground beef over 9 days (at 4 °C); and (c) investigation of gene expression involved in Shiga toxins production using relative quantitative real-time PCR method. The MIC in broth and ground beef medium were determined as 0.05 (v/v) and 1.75 % (v/w), respectively. In comparison with control cultures, the EO concentration of 0.03 % in broth caused reduction of colony counting as 1.93, 1.79, and 2.62 log10 CFU ml(-1) after 24, 48, and 72 h at 35 °C, and similarly EO (0.75 %) in ground beef resulted to reduction of colony counting as 1.03, 0.92, 1.48, and 2.12 log10 CFU g (-1) after 2, 5, 7, and 9 days at 4 °C, respectively. An increase and decrease in gene expression were observed as result of EO addition (0.03 %) to broth and (0.5 %) to ground beef was noticed, respectively.

  11. Antibacterial Activity of Carum copticum Essential Oil Against Escherichia Coli O157:H7 in Meat: Stx Genes Expression.

    PubMed

    Mahmoudzadeh, Maryam; Hosseini, Hedayat; Nasrollahzadeh, Javad; Khaneghah, Amin Mousavi; Rismanchi, Marjan; Chaves, Rafael Djalma; Shahraz, Farzaneh; Azizkhani, Maryam; Mahmoudzadeh, Leila; Haslberger, Alexander G

    2016-08-01

    This work were aimed to (a) determination of minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of Carum copticum essential oil (EO) against Escherichia. coli O157:H7 in vitro Trypticase Soy Broth, (TSB) and in ground beef; (b) evaluation of the effect of sub-inhibitory concentrations (sub-MICs) of EO on the growth of bacterium in TSB over 72 h (at 35 °C) and ground beef over 9 days (at 4 °C); and (c) investigation of gene expression involved in Shiga toxins production using relative quantitative real-time PCR method. The MIC in broth and ground beef medium were determined as 0.05 (v/v) and 1.75 % (v/w), respectively. In comparison with control cultures, the EO concentration of 0.03 % in broth caused reduction of colony counting as 1.93, 1.79, and 2.62 log10 CFU ml(-1) after 24, 48, and 72 h at 35 °C, and similarly EO (0.75 %) in ground beef resulted to reduction of colony counting as 1.03, 0.92, 1.48, and 2.12 log10 CFU g (-1) after 2, 5, 7, and 9 days at 4 °C, respectively. An increase and decrease in gene expression were observed as result of EO addition (0.03 %) to broth and (0.5 %) to ground beef was noticed, respectively. PMID:27155845

  12. Antagonistic activity of Ocimum sanctum L. essential oil on growth and zearalenone production by Fusarium graminearum in maize grains.

    PubMed

    Kalagatur, Naveen K; Mudili, Venkataramana; Siddaiah, Chandranayaka; Gupta, Vijai K; Natarajan, Gopalan; Sreepathi, Murali H; Vardhan, Batra H; Putcha, Venkata L R

    2015-01-01

    The present study was aimed to establish the antagonistic effects of Ocimum sanctum L. essential oil (OSEO) on growth and zearalenone (ZEA) production of Fusarium graminearum. GC-MS chemical profiling of OSEO revealed the existence of 43 compounds and the major compound was found to be eugenol (34.7%). DPPH free radical scavenging activity (IC50) of OSEO was determined to be 8.5 μg/mL. Minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum fungicidal concentration of OSEO on F. graminearum were recorded as 1250 and 1800 μg/mL, respectively. Scanning electron microscope observations showed significant micro morphological damage in OSEO exposed mycelia and spores compared to untreated control culture. Quantitative UHPLC studies revealed that OSEO negatively effected the production of ZEA; the concentration of toxin production was observed to be insignificant at 1500 μg/mL concentration of OSEO. On other hand ZEA concentration was quantified as 3.23 μg/mL in OSEO untreated control culture. Reverse transcriptase qPCR analysis of ZEA metabolic pathway genes (PKS4 and PKS13) revealed that increase in OSEO concentration (250-1500 μg/mL) significantly downregulated the expression of PKS4 and PKS13. These results were in agreement with the artificially contaminated maize grains as well. In conlusion, the antifungal and antimycotoxic effects of OSEO on F. graminearum in the present study reiterated that, the essential oil of O. sanctum could be a promising herbal fungicide in food processing industries as well as grain storage centers. PMID:26388846

  13. Antagonistic activity of Ocimum sanctum L. essential oil on growth and zearalenone production by Fusarium graminearum in maize grains

    PubMed Central

    Kalagatur, Naveen K.; Mudili, Venkataramana; Siddaiah, Chandranayaka; Gupta, Vijai K.; Natarajan, Gopalan; Sreepathi, Murali H.; Vardhan, Batra H.; Putcha, Venkata L. R.

    2015-01-01

    The present study was aimed to establish the antagonistic effects of Ocimum sanctum L. essential oil (OSEO) on growth and zearalenone (ZEA) production of Fusarium graminearum. GC–MS chemical profiling of OSEO revealed the existence of 43 compounds and the major compound was found to be eugenol (34.7%). DPPH free radical scavenging activity (IC50) of OSEO was determined to be 8.5 μg/mL. Minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum fungicidal concentration of OSEO on F. graminearum were recorded as 1250 and 1800 μg/mL, respectively. Scanning electron microscope observations showed significant micro morphological damage in OSEO exposed mycelia and spores compared to untreated control culture. Quantitative UHPLC studies revealed that OSEO negatively effected the production of ZEA; the concentration of toxin production was observed to be insignificant at 1500 μg/mL concentration of OSEO. On other hand ZEA concentration was quantified as 3.23 μg/mL in OSEO untreated control culture. Reverse transcriptase qPCR analysis of ZEA metabolic pathway genes (PKS4 and PKS13) revealed that increase in OSEO concentration (250–1500 μg/mL) significantly downregulated the expression of PKS4 and PKS13. These results were in agreement with the artificially contaminated maize grains as well. In conlusion, the antifungal and antimycotoxic effects of OSEO on F. graminearum in the present study reiterated that, the essential oil of O. sanctum could be a promising herbal fungicide in food processing industries as well as grain storage centers. PMID:26388846

  14. Accessory Gene Regulator-1 Locus Is Essential for Virulence and Pathogenesis of Clostridium difficile

    PubMed Central

    Odo, Chioma; DuPont, Herbert L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is responsible for most of the definable cases of antibiotic- and hospital-associated diarrhea worldwide and is a frequent cause of morbidity and mortality in older patients. C. difficile, a multidrug-resistant anaerobic pathogen, causes disease by producing toxins A and B, which are controlled by an accessory gene regulator (Agr) quorum signaling system. Some C. difficile strains encode two Agr loci in their genomes, designated agr1 and agr2. The agr1 locus is present in all of the C. difficile strains sequenced to date, whereas the agr2 locus is present in a few strains. The functional roles of agr1 and agr2 in C. difficile toxin regulation and pathogenesis were unknown until now. Using allelic exchange, we deleted components of both agr loci and examined the mutants for toxin production and virulence. The results showed that the agr1 mutant cannot produce toxins A and B; toxin production can be restored by complementation with wild-type agr1. Furthermore, the agr1 mutant is able to colonize but unable to cause disease in a murine CDI model. These findings have profound implications for CDI treatment because we have uncovered a promising therapeutic target for the development of nonantibiotic drugs to treat this life-threatening emerging pathogen by targeting the toxins directly responsible for disease. PMID:27531912

  15. Systematic mutagenesis of the Helicobacter pylori cag pathogenicity island: essential genes for CagA translocation in host cells and induction of interleukin-8.

    PubMed

    Fischer, W; Püls, J; Buhrdorf, R; Gebert, B; Odenbreit, S; Haas, R

    2001-12-01

    Helicobacter pylori (Hp) carries a type IV secretion system encoded by the cag pathogenicity island (cag-PAI), which is used to: (i) translocate the bacterial effector protein CagA into different types of eukaryotic cells; and (ii) induce the synthesis and secretion of chemokines, such as interleukin-8 (IL-8). The cag-PAI in Hp 26695 consists of 27 putative genes, six of which were identified as homologues to the basic type IV secretion system represented by the Agrobacterium tumefaciens virB operon. To define the role and contribution of each of the 27 genes, we applied a precise deletion/insertion mutagenesis procedure to knock out each individual gene without causing polar effects on the expression of downstream genes. Seventeen out of 27 genes were found to be absolutely essential for translocation of CagA into host cells and 14 out of 27 for the ability of Hp fully to induce transcription of IL-8. The products of hp0524 (virD4 homologue), hp0526 and hp0540 are absolutely essential for the translocation of CagA, but not for the induction of IL-8. In contrast, the products of hp0520, hp0521, hp0534, hp0535, hp0536 and hp0543 are not necessary for either translocation of CagA or for IL-8 induction. Our data argue against a translocated IL-8-inducing effector protein encoded by the cag-PAI. We isolated a variant of Hp 26695, which spontaneously switched off its capacity for IL-8 induction and translocation of CagA, but retained the complete cag-PAI. We identified a point mutation in gene hp0532, causing a premature translational stop in the corresponding polypeptide chain, providing a putative explanation for the defect in the type IV secretion system of the spontaneous mutant. PMID:11886563

  16. The expression of the mouse Zic1, Zic2, and Zic3 gene suggests an essential role for Zic genes in body pattern formation.

    PubMed

    Nagai, T; Aruga, J; Takada, S; Günther, T; Spörle, R; Schughart, K; Mikoshiba, K

    1997-02-15

    We examined the expression of Zic1, Zic2, and Zic3 genes in the mouse embryo by means of in situ hybridization. Zic genes were found as a group of genes coding for zinc finger proteins that are expressed in a restricted manner in the adult mouse cerebellum. We showed that the genes are the vertebrate homologues of Drosophila odd-paired, which may play an essential role in parasegmental subdivision and in visceral mesoderm development. The expression of the three Zic genes was first detected at gastrulation in a spatially restricted manner. At neurulation, the expression became restricted to the dorsal neural ectoderm and dorsal paraxial mesoderm. During organogenesis, the three genes were expressed in specific regions of several developing organs, including dorsal areas of the brain, spinal cord, paraxial mesenchyme, and epidermis, the marginal zone of the neural retina and distal regions of the developing limb. For all stages, significant differences in the spatial expression of Zic1, Zic2, and Zic3 were observed. Furthermore, the expression of Zic genes in Pax3, Wnt-1, and Wnt-3a mutant embryos suggested that Zic genes are not primarily regulated by the three genes which were expressed in dorsal areas similar to Zic genes. However, in open brain, a mutant with severe neural tube defects, and in the Wnt-3a mutant mice, the expression of Zic genes was changed. The changed expression pattern in Wnt-3a mutant mice suggests that Zic genes in the neural tube are regulated by the factors from notochord. Our findings suggest that Zic genes are involved in many developmental processes. Furthermore, analysis of gene expression patterns in different mouse mutants indicated that Zic genes may act upstream of many known developmental regulatory genes.

  17. Insecticidal Constituents of Essential Oil Derived from Zanthoxylum armatum against Two Stored-Product Insects.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cheng-Fang; Zhang, Wen-Juan; You, Chun-Xue; Guo, Shan-Shan; Geng, Zhu-Feng; Fan, Li; Du, Shu-Shan; Deng, Zhi-Wei; Wang, Yong-Yan

    2015-01-01

    In the course of our search for natural bioactive chemicals and investigations on their insecticidal activities from some medicinal plants growing in China, the essential oil derived from the twigs of Zanthoxylum armatum (Rutaceae) was found to possess strong insecticidal activities against two stored-product insects, Lasioderma serricorne and Tribolium castaneum. A total of 32 constituents of the essential oil were identified by GC and GC-MS analysis, and it revealed (E)-anethole (20.5%), 1,8-cineole (14.0%), 2-tridecanone (12.5%), limonene (9.0%) and piperitone (8.0%) as major components, followed by β-phellandrene (6.3%), β-pinene (5.1%) and 4-terpineol (4.4%). From the essential oil, five compounds were isolated and identified as (E)-anethole, 1,8-cineole, 2-tridecanone, limonene and piperitone. The results of insecticidal bioassays showed that the essential oil of Z. armatum exhibited strong fumigant toxicity towards L. serricorne and T. castaneum with LC50 values of 13.83 and 4.28 mg/L air, respectively, and also possessed contact toxicity against two insect species with LD50 values of 18.74 and 32.16 μg/adult, respectively. Among the active compounds, piperitone performed the strongest fumigant toxicity against L. serricorne (LC50 = 1.21 mg/L air) and contact toxicity against T. castaneum (LD50 = 3.16 μg/adult). 1,8-Cineole, limonene and piperitone showed similar fumigant toxicity against T. castaneum with LC50 values of 5.47, 6.21 and 7.12 mg/L air, respectively. Meanwhile, L. serricorne was the most sensitive to 2-tridecanone (LD50 = 5.74 μg/adult) in the progress of contact toxicity assay. PMID:26179006

  18. By-product metals are technologically essential but have problematic supply.

    PubMed

    Nassar, N T; Graedel, T E; Harper, E M

    2015-04-01

    The growth in technological innovation that has occurred over the past decades has, in part, been possible because an increasing number of metals of the periodic table are used to perform specialized functions. However, there have been increasing concerns regarding the reliability of supply of some of these metals. A main contributor to these concerns is the fact that many of these metals are recovered only as by-products from a limited number of geopolitically concentrated ore deposits, rendering their supplies unable to respond to rapid changes in demand. Companionality is the degree to which a metal is obtained largely or entirely as a by-product of one or more host metals from geologic ores. The dependence of companion metal availability on the production of the host metals introduces a new facet of supply risk to modern technology. We evaluated companionality for 62 different metals and metalloids, and show that 61% (38 of 62) have companionality greater than 50%. Eighteen of the 38-including such technologically essential elements as germanium, terbium, and dysprosium-are further characterized as having geopolitically concentrated production and extremely low rates of end-of-life recycling. It is this subset of companion metals-vital in current technologies such as electronics, solar energy, medical imaging, energy-efficient lighting, and other state-of-the-art products-that may be at the greatest risk of supply constraints in the coming decades. PMID:26601159

  19. Essential drugs production in Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa (BRICS): opportunities and challenges.

    PubMed

    Ezziane, Zoheir

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this work is to elucidate various essential drugs in the Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa (BRICS) countries. It discusses the opportunities and challenges of the existing biotech infrastructure and the production of drugs and vaccines in member states of the BRICS. This research is based on a systematic literature review between the years 2000 and 2014 of documents retrieved from the databases Embase, PubMed/Medline, Global Health, and Google Scholar, and the websites of relevant international organizations, research institutions and philanthropic organizations. Findings vary from one member state to another. These include useful comparison between the BRICS countries in terms of pharmaceuticals expenditure versus total health expenditure, local manufacturing of drugs/vaccines using technology and know-how transferred from developed countries, and biotech entrepreneurial collaborations under the umbrella of the BRICS region. This study concludes by providing recommendations to support more of inter collaborations among the BRICS countries as well as between BRICS and many developing countries to shrink drug production costs. In addition, this collaboration would also culminate in reaching out to poor countries that are not able to provide their communities and patients with cost-effective essential medicines. PMID:25489593

  20. Essential drugs production in Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa (BRICS): opportunities and challenges.

    PubMed

    Ezziane, Zoheir

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this work is to elucidate various essential drugs in the Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa (BRICS) countries. It discusses the opportunities and challenges of the existing biotech infrastructure and the production of drugs and vaccines in member states of the BRICS. This research is based on a systematic literature review between the years 2000 and 2014 of documents retrieved from the databases Embase, PubMed/Medline, Global Health, and Google Scholar, and the websites of relevant international organizations, research institutions and philanthropic organizations. Findings vary from one member state to another. These include useful comparison between the BRICS countries in terms of pharmaceuticals expenditure versus total health expenditure, local manufacturing of drugs/vaccines using technology and know-how transferred from developed countries, and biotech entrepreneurial collaborations under the umbrella of the BRICS region. This study concludes by providing recommendations to support more of inter collaborations among the BRICS countries as well as between BRICS and many developing countries to shrink drug production costs. In addition, this collaboration would also culminate in reaching out to poor countries that are not able to provide their communities and patients with cost-effective essential medicines.

  1. Essential drugs production in Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa (BRICS): opportunities and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Ezziane, Zoheir

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this work is to elucidate various essential drugs in the Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa (BRICS) countries. It discusses the opportunities and challenges of the existing biotech infrastructure and the production of drugs and vaccines in member states of the BRICS. This research is based on a systematic literature review between the years 2000 and 2014 of documents retrieved from the databases Embase, PubMed/Medline, Global Health, and Google Scholar, and the websites of relevant international organizations, research institutions and philanthropic organizations. Findings vary from one member state to another. These include useful comparison between the BRICS countries in terms of pharmaceuticals expenditure versus total health expenditure, local manufacturing of drugs/vaccines using technology and know-how transferred from developed countries, and biotech entrepreneurial collaborations under the umbrella of the BRICS region. This study concludes by providing recommendations to support more of inter collaborations among the BRICS countries as well as between BRICS and many developing countries to shrink drug production costs. In addition, this collaboration would also culminate in reaching out to poor countries that are not able to provide their communities and patients with cost-effective essential medicines. PMID:25489593

  2. Enzymatic modification of palmarosa essential oil: chemical analysis and olfactory evaluation of acylated products.

    PubMed

    Ramilijaona, Jade; Raynaud, Elsa; Bouhlel, Charfeddine; Sarrazin, Elise; Fernandez, Xavier; Antoniotti, Sylvain

    2013-12-01

    We have developed an enzymatic protocol to modify the composition of palmarosa essential oil by acylation of its alcohol components by three different acyl donors at various rates. The resulting modified products were characterized by qualitative and quantitative analyses by gas chromatography, and their olfactory properties were evaluated by professional perfumers. We showed that our protocol resulted in two types of modifications of the olfactory properties. The first and most obvious effect observed was the decrease of the alcohol content, with the concomitant increase of the corresponding esters, along with their fruity notes (pear, most notably). The second and less obvious effect was the expression of notes from minor components ((E)-β-ocimene, linalool, β-caryophyllene, and farnesene), originally masked by the sweet-floral-rose odor of geraniol, present in 70% in the palmarosa essential oil used, and emergence of citrus, green, spicy and clove characters in the modified products. This methodology might be considered in the future as a sustainable route to new natural ingredients for the perfumer. PMID:24327448

  3. Novel Tissue Level Effects of the Staphylococcus aureus Enterotoxin Gene Cluster Are Essential for Infective Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Stach, Christopher S.; Vu, Bao G.; Merriman, Joseph A.; Herrera, Alfa; Cahill, Michael P.; Schlievert, Patrick M.; Salgado-Pabón, Wilmara

    2016-01-01

    Background Superantigens are indispensable virulence factors for Staphylococcus aureus in disease causation. Superantigens stimulate massive immune cell activation, leading to toxic shock syndrome (TSS) and contributing to other illnesses. However, superantigens differ in their capacities to induce body-wide effects. For many, their production, at least as tested in vitro, is not high enough to reach the circulation, or the proteins are not efficient in crossing epithelial and endothelial barriers, thus remaining within tissues or localized on mucosal surfaces where they exert only local effects. In this study, we address the role of TSS toxin-1 (TSST-1) and most importantly the enterotoxin gene cluster (egc) in infective endocarditis and sepsis, gaining insights into the body-wide versus local effects of superantigens. Methods We examined S. aureus TSST-1 gene (tstH) and egc deletion strains in the rabbit model of infective endocarditis and sepsis. Importantly, we also assessed the ability of commercial human intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) plus vancomycin to alter the course of infective endocarditis and sepsis. Results TSST-1 contributed to infective endocarditis vegetations and lethal sepsis, while superantigens of the egc, a cluster with uncharacterized functions in S. aureus infections, promoted vegetation formation in infective endocarditis. IVIG plus vancomycin prevented lethality and stroke development in infective endocarditis and sepsis. Conclusions Our studies support the local tissue effects of egc superantigens for establishment and progression of infective endocarditis providing evidence for their role in life-threatening illnesses. In contrast, TSST-1 contributes to both infective endocarditis and lethal sepsis. IVIG may be a useful adjunct therapy for infective endocarditis and sepsis. PMID:27124393

  4. GCN5 is essential for IRF-4 gene expression followed by transcriptional activation of Blimp-1 in immature B cells.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Hidehiko; Nakayama, Masami; Kuribayashi, Futoshi; Imajoh-Ohmi, Shinobu; Nishitoh, Hideki; Takami, Yasunari; Nakayama, Tatsuo

    2014-03-01

    During B-cell differentiation, the gene expression of B-cell differentiation-related transcription factors must be strictly controlled by epigenetic mechanisms including histone acetylation and deacetylation, to complete the differentiation pathway. GCN5, one of the most important histone acetyltransferases, is involved in epigenetic events for transcriptional regulation through alterations in the chromatin structure. In this study, by analyzing the homozygous DT40 mutants GCN5(-/-), generated with gene targeting techniques, we found that GCN5 was necessary for transcriptional activation of IRF-4, an essential transcription factor for plasma cell differentiation. GCN5 deficiency caused drastic decreases in both the mRNA and the protein levels of Blimp-1 and IRF-4. The ectopic expression of Blimp-1 and IRF-4 suggests that IRF-4, but not Blimp-1, is the target gene of GCN5 in immature B cells. Moreover, a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed that GCN5 bound to the IRF-4 gene around its 5'-flanking region and acetylated H3K9 residues within chromatin surrounding the region in vivo, suggesting that gene expression of IRF-4 is certainly regulated by GCN5. These results reveal that GCN5 is essential for IRF-4 gene expression, followed by transcriptional activation of Blimp-1, and plays a key role in epigenetic regulation of B-cell differentiation.

  5. The Tumor Suppressor Gene, RASSF1A, Is Essential for Protection against Inflammation -Induced Injury

    PubMed Central

    Fiteih, Yahya; Law, Jennifer; Volodko, Natalia; Mohamed, Anwar; El-Kadi, Ayman O. S.; Liu, Lei; Odenbach, Jeff; Thiesen, Aducio; Onyskiw, Christina; Ghazaleh, Haya Abu; Park, Jikyoung; Lee, Sean Bong; Yu, Victor C.; Fernandez-Patron, Carlos; Alexander, R. Todd; Wine, Eytan; Baksh, Shairaz

    2013-01-01

    Ras association domain family protein 1A (RASSF1A) is a tumor suppressor gene silenced in cancer. Here we report that RASSF1A is a novel regulator of intestinal inflammation as Rassf1a+/−, Rassf1a−/− and an intestinal epithelial cell specific knockout mouse (Rassf1a IEC-KO) rapidly became sick following dextran sulphate sodium (DSS) administration, a chemical inducer of colitis. Rassf1a knockout mice displayed clinical symptoms of inflammatory bowel disease including: increased intestinal permeability, enhanced cytokine/chemokine production, elevated nuclear factor of kappa light polypeptide gene enhancer in B-cells (NFκB) activity, elevated colonic cell death and epithelial cell injury. Furthermore, epithelial restitution/repair was inhibited in DSS-treated Rassf1a−/− mice with reduction of several makers of proliferation including Yes associated protein (YAP)-driven proliferation. Surprisingly, tyrosine phosphorylation of YAP was detected which coincided with increased nuclear p73 association, Bax-driven epithelial cell death and p53 accumulation resulting in enhanced apoptosis and poor survival of DSS-treated Rassf1a knockout mice. We can inhibit these events and promote the survival of DSS-treated Rassf1a knockout mice with intraperitoneal injection of the c-Abl and c-Abl related protein tyrosine kinase inhibitor, imatinib/gleevec. However, p53 accumulation was not inhibited by imatinib/gleevec in the Rassf1a−/− background which revealed the importance of p53-dependent cell death during intestinal inflammation. These observations suggest that tyrosine phosphorylation of YAP (to drive p73 association and up-regulation of pro-apoptotic genes such as Bax) and accumulation of p53 are consequences of inflammation-induced injury in DSS-treated Rassf1a−/− mice. Mechanistically, we can detect robust associations of RASSF1A with membrane proximal Toll-like receptor (TLR) components to suggest that RASSF1A may function to interfere and restrict TLR

  6. Efficacy of Cuminum cyminum essential oil on FUM1 gene expression of fumonisin-producing Fusarium verticillioides strains

    PubMed Central

    Khosravi, Ali Reza; Shokri, Hojjatollah; Mokhtari, Ali Reza

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of Cuminum cyminum (C. cyminum) essential oil on the growth and FUM1 gene expression of fumonisin-producing Fusarium verticillioides (F. verticillioides) strains isolated from maize. Materials and Methods: All fungal strains were cultured on potato dextrose agar (PDA) slopes at 30°C for 7 days. The antifungal activity was evaluated by broth microdilution assay. One set of primers was F. verticillioides species specific, which selectively amplified the intergenic space region of rDNA. The other set of primers was specific to FUM1 gene region of fumonisin-producing F. verticillioides. FUM1 transcript levels were quantified using a reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) protocol. Results: Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of C. cyminum oil against F. verticillioides strains varied from 0.195 to 0.781 µl.ml-1 (mean MIC value: 0.461 µl.ml-1) indicating 54.5% of the fungal strains inhibited at 0.390 µl.ml-1. PCR analysis of FUM1 gene expression revealed that DNA fragment of 183 bp was amplified in all the isolates of F. verticillioides before treatment with C. cyminum essential oil. Based on RT-PCR analyses, reduction in the expression of fumonisin biosynthetic genes was significant only for FUM1 gene (p<0.05), while no effect was observed on ITS gene. Conclusions: This study showed that all F. verticillioides isolates were susceptible to C. cyminum essential oil, indicating a significant reduction in the growth of fungal isolates. In addition, this oil completely inhibited the expression of FUM1 gene in concentrations dose-dependently. PMID:25767755

  7. The Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus ORF78 is essential for budded virus production and general occlusion body formation.

    PubMed

    Tao, Xue Ying; Choi, Jae Young; Kim, Woo Jin; Lee, Joo Hyun; Liu, Qin; Kim, Song Eun; An, Saes Byeol; Lee, Seok Hee; Woo, Soo Dong; Jin, Byung Rae; Je, Yeon Ho

    2013-08-01

    ORF78 (ac78) of Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) is a baculovirus core gene of unknown function. To determine the role of ac78 in the baculovirus life cycle, an AcMNPV mutant with ac78 deleted, Ac78KO, was constructed. Quantitative PCR analysis revealed that ac78 is a late gene in the viral life cycle. After transfection into Spodoptera frugiperda cells, Ac78KO produced a single-cell infection phenotype, indicating that no infectious budded viruses (BVs) were produced. The defect in BV production was also confirmed by both viral titration and Western blotting. However, viral DNA replication was unaffected, and occlusion bodies were formed. An analysis of BVs and occlusion-derived viruses (ODVs) revealed that AC78 is associated with both forms of the virions and is an envelope structural protein. Electron microscopy revealed that AC78 also plays an important role in the embedding of ODV into the occlusion body. The results of this study demonstrate that AC78 is a late virion-associated protein and is essential for the viral life cycle.

  8. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene intron 4, 27 bp repeat polymorphism and essential hypertension in the Kazakh Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Deng, Fengmei; Hu, Qinghua; Tang, Bin; He, Fang; Guo, Shuxia; Chen, Jiang; Li, Feng; Wu, Xuehua; Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Huimin; Zhao, Juan; Zhong, Hua; He, Ling; Li, Jun; Zhang, Le; Wang, Shuren

    2007-05-01

    To investigate the relationship between 27 bp repeat polymorphism in intron 4 in the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS4) gene and essential hypertension in the Kazakh Chinese population, 151 patients with essential hypertension and 138 healthy people were selected from the Boertonggu countryside of Shawan region in the Xinjiang uygur autonomous region of China in 2006. The polymorphism of eNOS in the two groups was detected with polymerase chain reaction assays and the genotype frequencies in each group were calculated following the Hardy-Weinberg law. Four and five tandem 27 bp repeats were designated as "a" and "b", respectively. It was found that the frequencies of b/b, b/a and a/a genotypes of the eNOS4 gene were 84.06%, 15.22% and 0.72% in the control group, and 81.46%, 15.89% and 2.65% in the hypertension group, respectively. The frequencies of gene "a" and "b" were 91.67% and 8.33% in the control group and 89.40% and 10.60% in the hypertension group, respectively. It was found that plasma eNOS activity was not associated with genotypes and alleles of eNOS gene. Plasma eNOS activity in the hypertension group was significantly decreased compared with the control group (P<0.01). The results suggest that eNOS4 gene polymorphisms are unlikely to be the major genetic susceptibility factors for essential hypertension in the Xinjiang Kazakh population. However, a positive association between plasma eNOS activity and essential hypertension has been revealed. PMID:17492127

  9. The Aspergillus nidulans alcA promoter drives tightly regulated conditional gene expression in Aspergillus fumigatus permitting validation of essential genes in this human pathogen.

    PubMed

    Romero, Beatriz; Turner, Geoffrey; Olivas, Israel; Laborda, Fernando; De Lucas, J Ramón

    2003-11-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus causes invasive aspergillosis, a mycosis that is usually fatal in immunocompromised patients. Functional genomics in this fungus will aid the discovery of novel antifungal drugs to treat invasive aspergillosis. However, there is still a need for appropriate molecular genetic tools to facilitate such functional studies. Here, we describe the use of a conditional gene expression system allowing the identification of novel therapeutic targets through validation of essential genes in A. fumigatus. This system is based on the capacity of the Aspergillus nidulans alcA promoter (alcA(p)) to tightly regulate gene expression in this fungus. Conditionally regulated gene expression in A. fumigatus was demonstrated by transcriptional and phenotypic analyses of strains expressing a nuclear migration gene with a terminal phenotype, the A. fumigatus nudC gene, under control of this promoter. This conditional expression system, the first one described in A. fumigatus, will also be useful for investigating the function of essential genes by altering the threonine/glucose ratio in the growth medium.

  10. Combining Hierarchical and Associative Gene Ontology Relations with Textual Evidence in Estimating Gene and Gene Product Similarity

    SciTech Connect

    Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Posse, Christian; Gopalan, Banu; Riensche, Roderick M.; Beagley, Nathaniel; Baddeley, Bob L.; Tratz, Stephen C.; Gregory, Michelle L.

    2007-03-01

    Gene and gene product similarity is a fundamental diagnostic measure in analyzing biological data and constructing predictive models for functional genomics. With the rising influence of the Gene Ontology, two complementary approaches have emerged where the similarity between two genes or gene products is obtained by comparing Gene Ontology (GO) annotations associated with the genes or gene products. One approach captures GO-based similarity in terms of hierarchical relations within each gene subontology. The other approach identifies GO-based similarity in terms of associative relations across the three gene subontologies. We propose a novel methodology where the two approaches can be merged with ensuing benefits in coverage and accuracy, and demonstrate that further improvements can be obtained by integrating textual evidence extracted from relevant biomedical literature.

  11. By-product metals are technologically essential but have problematic supply

    PubMed Central

    Nassar, N. T.; Graedel, T. E.; Harper, E. M.

    2015-01-01

    The growth in technological innovation that has occurred over the past decades has, in part, been possible because an increasing number of metals of the periodic table are used to perform specialized functions. However, there have been increasing concerns regarding the reliability of supply of some of these metals. A main contributor to these concerns is the fact that many of these metals are recovered only as by-products from a limited number of geopolitically concentrated ore deposits, rendering their supplies unable to respond to rapid changes in demand. Companionality is the degree to which a metal is obtained largely or entirely as a by-product of one or more host metals from geologic ores. The dependence of companion metal availability on the production of the host metals introduces a new facet of supply risk to modern technology. We evaluated companionality for 62 different metals and metalloids, and show that 61% (38 of 62) have companionality greater than 50%. Eighteen of the 38—including such technologically essential elements as germanium, terbium, and dysprosium—are further characterized as having geopolitically concentrated production and extremely low rates of end-of-life recycling. It is this subset of companion metals—vital in current technologies such as electronics, solar energy, medical imaging, energy-efficient lighting, and other state-of-the-art products—that may be at the greatest risk of supply constraints in the coming decades. PMID:26601159

  12. Effect of Zingiber officinale essential oil on Fusarium verticillioides and fumonisin production.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto-Ribeiro, Milene Mayumi Garcia; Grespan, Renata; Kohiyama, Cássia Yumie; Ferreira, Flavio Dias; Mossini, Simone Aparecida Galerani; Silva, Expedito Leite; Filho, Benicio Alves de Abreu; Mikcha, Jane Martha Graton; Machinski, Miguel

    2013-12-01

    The antifungal activity of ginger essential oil (GEO; Zingiber officinale Roscoe) was evaluated against Fusarium verticillioides (Saccardo) Nirenberg. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of GEO was determined by micro-broth dilution. The effects of GEO on fumonisin and ergosterol production were evaluated at concentrations of 500-5000 μg/mL in liquid medium with a 5mm diameter mycelial disc of F. verticillioides. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry showed that the predominant components of GEO were α-zingiberene (23.9%) and citral (21.7%). GEO exhibited inhibitory activity, with a MIC of 2500 μg/mL, and 4000 and 5000 μg/mL reduced ergosterol biosynthesis by 57% and 100%, respectively. The inhibitory effect on fumonisin B1 (FB1) and fumonisin B2 (FB2) production was significant at GEO concentrations of 4000 and 2000 μg/mL, respectively. Thus, the inhibition of fungal biomass and fumonisin production was dependent on the concentration of GEO. These results suggest that GEO was able to control the growth of F. verticillioides and subsequent fumonisin production. PMID:23871071

  13. Short communication: Effect of oregano and caraway essential oils on the production and flavor of cow milk.

    PubMed

    Lejonklev, J; Kidmose, U; Jensen, S; Petersen, M A; Helwing, A L F; Mortensen, G; Weisbjerg, M R; Larsen, M K

    2016-10-01

    Many essential oils and their terpene constituents display antimicrobial properties, which may affect rumen metabolism and influence milk production parameters. Many of these compounds also have distinct flavors and aromas that may make their way into the milk, altering its sensory properties. Essential oils from caraway (Carum carvi) seeds and oregano (Origanum vulgare) plants were included in dairy cow diets to study the effects on terpene composition and sensory properties of the produced milk, as well as feed consumption, production levels of milk, and methane emissions. Two levels of essential oils, 0.2 and 1.0g of oil/kg of dry matter, were added to the feed of lactating cows for 24d. No effects on feed consumption, milk production, and methane emissions were observed. The amount and composition of volatile terpenes were altered in the produced milk based on the terpene content of the essential oils used, with the total amount of terpenes increasing when essential oils were added to the diet. Sensory properties of the produced milk were altered as well, and milk samples from animals receiving essential oil treatment were perceived as having a fresher aroma and lower stored aroma and flavor. The levels of essential oils used in this study mimic realistic levels of essential oils in herbs from feed, but were too low to affect milk production and methane emissions, and their inclusion in the animal diet did not adversely affect milk flavor. PMID:27522414

  14. Short communication: Effect of oregano and caraway essential oils on the production and flavor of cow milk.

    PubMed

    Lejonklev, J; Kidmose, U; Jensen, S; Petersen, M A; Helwing, A L F; Mortensen, G; Weisbjerg, M R; Larsen, M K

    2016-10-01

    Many essential oils and their terpene constituents display antimicrobial properties, which may affect rumen metabolism and influence milk production parameters. Many of these compounds also have distinct flavors and aromas that may make their way into the milk, altering its sensory properties. Essential oils from caraway (Carum carvi) seeds and oregano (Origanum vulgare) plants were included in dairy cow diets to study the effects on terpene composition and sensory properties of the produced milk, as well as feed consumption, production levels of milk, and methane emissions. Two levels of essential oils, 0.2 and 1.0g of oil/kg of dry matter, were added to the feed of lactating cows for 24d. No effects on feed consumption, milk production, and methane emissions were observed. The amount and composition of volatile terpenes were altered in the produced milk based on the terpene content of the essential oils used, with the total amount of terpenes increasing when essential oils were added to the diet. Sensory properties of the produced milk were altered as well, and milk samples from animals receiving essential oil treatment were perceived as having a fresher aroma and lower stored aroma and flavor. The levels of essential oils used in this study mimic realistic levels of essential oils in herbs from feed, but were too low to affect milk production and methane emissions, and their inclusion in the animal diet did not adversely affect milk flavor.

  15. PU. 1 is not essential for early myeloid gene expression but is required for terminal myeloid differentiation.

    PubMed

    Olson, M C; Scott, E W; Hack, A A; Su, G H; Tenen, D G; Singh, H; Simon, M C

    1995-12-01

    We have previously shown using gene targeting that PU.1 is essential for the development of lymphoid and myeloid lineages during fetal liver hematopoiesis. We now show that PU.1 is required for the maturation of yolk sac-derived myeloid progenitors and for the differentiation of ES cells into macrophages. The role of PU.1 in regulating target genes, thought to be critical in the development of monocytes and granulocytes, has been analyzed. Early genes such as GM-CSFR, G-CSFR, and myeloperoxidase are expressed in PU.1-/- embryos and differentiated PU.1-/- ES cells. However, the expression of genes associated with terminal myeloid differentiation (CD11b, CD64, and M-CSFR) is eliminated in differentiated PU.1-/- ES cells. Development of macrophages is restored with the introduction of a PU.1 cDNA regulated by its own promoter. The PU.1-/- ES cells represent an important model for analyzing myeloid cell development.

  16. Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus BmP95 plays an essential role in budded virus production and nucleocapsid assembly.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Xingwei; Shen, Yunwang; Yang, Rui; Chen, Lin; Hu, Xiaolong; Wu, Xiaofeng

    2013-07-01

    Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV) BmP95 is a highly conserved gene that is found in all of the baculovirus genomes sequenced to date and is also found in nudiviruses. To investigate the role of BmP95 in virus infection in vitro, a BmP95 deletion virus (vBmP95-De) was generated by homologous recombination in Escherichia coli. Fluorescence and light microscopy and titration analysis indicated that the BmP95 deletion bacmid led to a defect in production of infectious budded virus (BV). However, deletion of BmP95 did not affect viral DNA replication. Electron microscopy showed that masses of aberrant tubular structures were present in cells transfected with the BmP95 deletion bacmid, indicating that deletion of BmP95 affected assembly of the nucleocapsid. This defect could be rescued by insertion of full-length BmP95 into the polyhedrin locus of the BmP95-knockout bacmid but not the N-terminal domain of BmP95. Together, these results showed that full-length BmP95 is essential for BV production and is required for nucleocapsid assembly.

  17. Novel Association of WNK4 Gene, Ala589Ser Polymorphism in Essential Hypertension, and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Ghodsian, Nooshin; Ismail, Patimah; Ahmadloo, Salma; Heidari, Farzad; Haghvirdizadeh, Polin; Ataollahi Eshkoor, Sima; Etemad, Ali

    2016-01-01

    With-no-lysine (K) Kinase-4 (WNK4) consisted of unique serine and threonine protein kinases, genetically associated with an autosomal dominant form of hypertension. Argumentative consequences have lately arisen on the association of specific single nucleotide polymorphisms of WNK4 gene and essential hypertension (EHT). The aim of this study was to determine the association of Ala589Ser polymorphism of WNK4 gene with essential hypertensive patients in Malaysia. WNK4 gene polymorphism was specified utilizing mutagenically separated polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) method in 320 subjects including 163 cases and 157 controls. Close relation between Ala589Ser polymorphism and elevated systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP and DBP) was recognized. Sociodemographic factors including body mass index (BMI), age, the level of fasting blood sugar (FBS), low density lipoprotein (LDL), and triglyceride (TG) in the cases and healthy subjects exhibited strong differences (p < 0.05). The distribution of allele frequency and genotype of WNK4 gene Ala589Ser polymorphism showed significant differences (p < 0.05) between EHT subjects with or without type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and normotensive subjects, statistically. The WNK4 gene variation influences significantly blood pressure increase. Ala589Ser probably has effects on the enzymic activity leading to enhanced predisposition to the disorder. PMID:27314050

  18. Novel Association of WNK4 Gene, Ala589Ser Polymorphism in Essential Hypertension, and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Ghodsian, Nooshin; Ismail, Patimah; Ahmadloo, Salma; Heidari, Farzad; Haghvirdizadeh, Polin; Ataollahi Eshkoor, Sima; Etemad, Ali

    2016-01-01

    With-no-lysine (K) Kinase-4 (WNK4) consisted of unique serine and threonine protein kinases, genetically associated with an autosomal dominant form of hypertension. Argumentative consequences have lately arisen on the association of specific single nucleotide polymorphisms of WNK4 gene and essential hypertension (EHT). The aim of this study was to determine the association of Ala589Ser polymorphism of WNK4 gene with essential hypertensive patients in Malaysia. WNK4 gene polymorphism was specified utilizing mutagenically separated polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) method in 320 subjects including 163 cases and 157 controls. Close relation between Ala589Ser polymorphism and elevated systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP and DBP) was recognized. Sociodemographic factors including body mass index (BMI), age, the level of fasting blood sugar (FBS), low density lipoprotein (LDL), and triglyceride (TG) in the cases and healthy subjects exhibited strong differences (p < 0.05). The distribution of allele frequency and genotype of WNK4 gene Ala589Ser polymorphism showed significant differences (p < 0.05) between EHT subjects with or without type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and normotensive subjects, statistically. The WNK4 gene variation influences significantly blood pressure increase. Ala589Ser probably has effects on the enzymic activity leading to enhanced predisposition to the disorder. PMID:27314050

  19. Methods of double-stranded RNA-mediated gene inactivation in Arabidopsis and their use to define an essential gene in methionine biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Levin, J Z; de Framond, A J; Tuttle, A; Bauer, M W; Heifetz, P B

    2000-12-01

    Controlled down-regulation of endogenous plant gene expression is a useful tool, but antisense and sense silencing lack predictability. Recent studies show that expression of both antisense and sense RNA together is an effective means of inactivating reporter and viral genes in plants. We created transgenic plants expressing antisense and sense RNA together in a single 'double-stranded RNA' (dsRNA) transcript. This approach shows great promise as a highly effective means for reducing gene function. With this approach, we demonstrated that the Arabidopsis cystathionine beta-lyase gene, which encodes a methionine biosynthetic enzyme, is essential for viability. Inactivation of this gene was rescued by the addition of methionine to the growth medium. Compared to antisense and sense constructs, the dsRNA construct showed a much more consistent and complete suppression of gene activity. Additionally, expression of a transcript with a spacer sequence containing an unrelated gene between antisense and sense luciferase gene fragments led to stronger inactivation of a second luciferase transgene than did constructs with a minimal spacing between sense and antisense fragments. However, the gene in the spacer region was neither functionally expressed nor functional in silencing a second, unlinked homologous transgene.

  20. Phyto-products may be essential for sustainability and implementation of phytoremediation.

    PubMed

    Bañuelos, G S

    2006-11-01

    Interest in selenium pollution and remediation technology has escalated during the past two decades. Although not known to be essential for plants, selenium is essential but could be toxic for humans and animals, depending on its concentration. A major selenium controversy in the 1980's emerged in California when the general public and scientific community became aware of selenium's potential as an environmental contaminant. After extensive research on several strategies to reduce loads of mobile Se for entering the agricultural ecosystem a plant-based technology, defined as 'phytoremediation' received increasing recognition, as a low-cost environmentally friendly approach for managing soluble Se in the soil and water environment. Successful long-term field remediation of Se by plants is, however, dependent upon acceptance and widespread use by growers, who are also concerned about potential commercial value from using the plant-based technology. Obtaining products with economic value from plants used in the cleanup of soil would certainly be an additional benefit to phytoremediation, which could help sustain its long-term use.

  1. Gene regulatory networks controlling hematopoietic progenitor niche cell production and differentiation in the Drosophila lymph gland.

    PubMed

    Tokusumi, Yumiko; Tokusumi, Tsuyoshi; Shoue, Douglas A; Schulz, Robert A

    2012-01-01

    Hematopoiesis occurs in two phases in Drosophila, with the first completed during embryogenesis and the second accomplished during larval development. The lymph gland serves as the venue for the final hematopoietic program, with this larval tissue well-studied as to its cellular organization and genetic regulation. While the medullary zone contains stem-like hematopoietic progenitors, the posterior signaling center (PSC) functions as a niche microenvironment essential for controlling the decision between progenitor maintenance versus cellular differentiation. In this report, we utilize a PSC-specific GAL4 driver and UAS-gene RNAi strains, to selectively knockdown individual gene functions in PSC cells. We assessed the effect of abrogating the function of 820 genes as to their requirement for niche cell production and differentiation. 100 genes were shown to be essential for normal niche development, with various loci placed into sub-groups based on the functions of their encoded protein products and known genetic interactions. For members of three of these groups, we characterized loss- and gain-of-function phenotypes. Gene function knockdown of members of the BAP chromatin-remodeling complex resulted in niche cells that do not express the hedgehog (hh) gene and fail to differentiate filopodia believed important for Hh signaling from the niche to progenitors. Abrogating gene function of various members of the insulin-like growth factor and TOR signaling pathways resulted in anomalous PSC cell production, leading to a defective niche organization. Further analysis of the Pten, TSC1, and TSC2 tumor suppressor genes demonstrated their loss-of-function condition resulted in severely altered blood cell homeostasis, including the abundant production of lamellocytes, specialized hemocytes involved in innate immune responses. Together, this cell-specific RNAi knockdown survey and mutant phenotype analyses identified multiple genes and their regulatory networks required for

  2. Essential oil of niaouli preferentially potentiates antigen-specific cellular immunity and cytokine production by macrophages.

    PubMed

    Nam, Sang-Yun; Chang, Mi-Hye; Do, Jeong-Su; Seo, Hyo-Jung; Oh, Hong Keun

    2008-01-01

    In vivo immunomodulatory effect of essential oil of niaouli (EON) was investigated using a mouse model, in which mice were immunized with keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) and intraperitoneally given EON (less than 500 microl kg(-1) body weight). In vivo efficacy of EON for immune potentiation was convinced by significantly higher expression of an activation marker, CD25, on freshly isolated draining lymph node (LN) T cells, but not B cells. However, immunofluoresence analysis failed to show any proportional change in T/B and CD4(+)/CD8(+) T cell ratios. Data of KLH-specific immunoglobulin serum levels showed that EON does not affect humoral immune response. Instead, proliferative response and IFNgamma production of LN T cells ex vivo stimulated with KLH were significantly higher in EON-treated group, but not IL-2 and IL-4 production. These results clearly show that EON preferentially upregulates T-cell mediated cellular immunity. We further clarified the accessory cells' contribution to the EON-mediated potentiation of cellular immunity and found considerably higher production of and TNF-alpha and IL-12 by splenic macrophages from EON-treated mice when stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and IFNgamma. Collectively, in vivo EON treatment potentiates T cell-mediated cellular immunity and macrophage activity, but not humoral immunity. The current study provides a rationale for clinical application of EON to control infectious diseases, in particular, those caused by intracellular pathogens.

  3. Gene Network Rewiring to Study Melanoma Stage Progression and Elements Essential for Driving Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Kaushik, Abhinav; Bhatia, Yashuma; Ali, Shakir; Gupta, Dinesh

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic melanoma patients have a poor prognosis, mainly attributable to the underlying heterogeneity in melanoma driver genes and altered gene expression profiles. These characteristics of melanoma also make the development of drugs and identification of novel drug targets for metastatic melanoma a daunting task. Systems biology offers an alternative approach to re-explore the genes or gene sets that display dysregulated behaviour without being differentially expressed. In this study, we have performed systems biology studies to enhance our knowledge about the conserved property of disease genes or gene sets among mutually exclusive datasets representing melanoma progression. We meta-analysed 642 microarray samples to generate melanoma reconstructed networks representing four different stages of melanoma progression to extract genes with altered molecular circuitry wiring as compared to a normal cellular state. Intriguingly, a majority of the melanoma network-rewired genes are not differentially expressed and the disease genes involved in melanoma progression consistently modulate its activity by rewiring network connections. We found that the shortlisted disease genes in the study show strong and abnormal network connectivity, which enhances with the disease progression. Moreover, the deviated network properties of the disease gene sets allow ranking/prioritization of different enriched, dysregulated and conserved pathway terms in metastatic melanoma, in agreement with previous findings. Our analysis also reveals presence of distinct network hubs in different stages of metastasizing tumor for the same set of pathways in the statistically conserved gene sets. The study results are also presented as a freely available database at http://bioinfo.icgeb.res.in/m3db/. The web-based database resource consists of results from the analysis presented here, integrated with cytoscape web and user-friendly tools for visualization, retrieval and further analysis. PMID

  4. Essential oils nanoformulations for stored-product pest control - characterization and biological properties.

    PubMed

    Werdin González, Jorge Omar; Gutiérrez, María Mercedes; Ferrero, Adriana Alicia; Fernández Band, Beatriz

    2014-04-01

    The lethal and sublethal activity of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) nanoparticles containing essential oils (EO), also the physicochemical characterization, were determined against Tribolium castaneum and Rhizopertha dominica. The 10% ratio EO-PEG nanoparticles showed an average diameter<235 nm (PDI<0.280) and a loading efficacy>75%; after 6 month of storage their size did not change significantly and the amount of the EOs decreased 25%, approximately. Furthermore, during this period, no chemical derivates were observed. The EOs nanoparticles produced a notable increase of the residual contact toxicity apparently due to the slow and persistent release of the active terpenes. In addition, the nanoformulation enhanced the EO contact toxicity and altered the nutritional physiology of both stored product pest. The results indicated that these novel systems could be used in integrated pest management program for T. castaneum and R. dominica control.

  5. Identification of Arabidopsis GPAT9 (At5g60620) as an Essential Gene Involved in Triacylglycerol Biosynthesis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Browse, John

    2016-01-01

    The first step in the biosynthesis of nearly all plant membrane phospholipids and storage triacylglycerols is catalyzed by a glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (GPAT). The requirement for an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-localized GPAT for both of these critical metabolic pathways was recognized more than 60 years ago. However, identification of the gene(s) encoding this GPAT activity has remained elusive. Here, we present the results of a series of in vivo, in vitro, and in silico experiments in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) designed to assign this essential function to AtGPAT9. This gene has been highly conserved throughout evolution and is largely present as a single copy in most plants, features consistent with essential housekeeping functions. A knockout mutant of AtGPAT9 demonstrates both male and female gametophytic lethality phenotypes, consistent with the role in essential membrane lipid synthesis. Significant expression of developing seed AtGPAT9 is required for wild-type levels of triacylglycerol accumulation, and the transcript level is directly correlated to the level of microsomal GPAT enzymatic activity in seeds. Finally, the AtGPAT9 protein interacts with other enzymes involved in ER glycerolipid biosynthesis, suggesting the possibility of ER-localized lipid biosynthetic complexes. Together, these results suggest that GPAT9 is the ER-localized GPAT enzyme responsible for plant membrane lipid and oil biosynthesis. PMID:26586834

  6. Aromatic plants essential oils activity on Fusarium verticillioides Fumonisin B(1) production in corn grain.

    PubMed

    López, A G; Theumer, M G; Zygadlo, J A; Rubinstein, H R

    2004-10-01

    The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of Origanum vulgare, Aloysia triphylla, Aloysia polystachya and Mentha piperita essential oils (EOs) against Fusarium verticillioides M 7075 (F. moniliforme, Sheldon) were assessed, using the semisolid agar antifungal susceptibility (SAAS) technique. O. vulgare, A. triphylla, A. polystachya and M. piperita EOs were evaluated at final concentrations of 10, 20, 40, 50, 100, 200, 250, 500, 1000 and 1500 epsilonl per litre (epsilonl/l) of culture medium. A. triphylla and O. vulgare EOs showed the highest inhibitory effects on F. verticillioides mycelial development. This inhibition was observed at 250 and 500 epsilonl/l for EOs coming from Aloysia triphylla and O. vulgare, respectively. Thus, the effects of EOs on FB(1) production were evaluated using corn grain (Zea mays) as substrate. The EOs were inserted on the 5th, 10th, 15th and 20th day of maize postinoculation with a conidia suspension of F. verticillioides. O. vulgare and A. triphylla were applied to give final concentrations of 30 ppm and 45 ppm, respectively. Different effects were observed in the toxicogenicity at the 20th day treatment. The O. vulgare EO decreased the production level of FB(1) (P < 0.01) while A. triphyla EO increased it (P < 0.001) with respect to those obtained in the inoculated maize, not EOs treated. Results obtained in the present work indicate that fumonisin production could be inhibited or stimulated by some constituents of EOs coming from aromatic plants. Further studies should be performed to identify the components of EOs with modulatory activity on the growth and fumonisins production of Fusarium verticillioides.

  7. Aromatic plants essential oils activity on Fusarium verticillioides Fumonisin B(1) production in corn grain.

    PubMed

    López, A G; Theumer, M G; Zygadlo, J A; Rubinstein, H R

    2004-10-01

    The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of Origanum vulgare, Aloysia triphylla, Aloysia polystachya and Mentha piperita essential oils (EOs) against Fusarium verticillioides M 7075 (F. moniliforme, Sheldon) were assessed, using the semisolid agar antifungal susceptibility (SAAS) technique. O. vulgare, A. triphylla, A. polystachya and M. piperita EOs were evaluated at final concentrations of 10, 20, 40, 50, 100, 200, 250, 500, 1000 and 1500 epsilonl per litre (epsilonl/l) of culture medium. A. triphylla and O. vulgare EOs showed the highest inhibitory effects on F. verticillioides mycelial development. This inhibition was observed at 250 and 500 epsilonl/l for EOs coming from Aloysia triphylla and O. vulgare, respectively. Thus, the effects of EOs on FB(1) production were evaluated using corn grain (Zea mays) as substrate. The EOs were inserted on the 5th, 10th, 15th and 20th day of maize postinoculation with a conidia suspension of F. verticillioides. O. vulgare and A. triphylla were applied to give final concentrations of 30 ppm and 45 ppm, respectively. Different effects were observed in the toxicogenicity at the 20th day treatment. The O. vulgare EO decreased the production level of FB(1) (P < 0.01) while A. triphyla EO increased it (P < 0.001) with respect to those obtained in the inoculated maize, not EOs treated. Results obtained in the present work indicate that fumonisin production could be inhibited or stimulated by some constituents of EOs coming from aromatic plants. Further studies should be performed to identify the components of EOs with modulatory activity on the growth and fumonisins production of Fusarium verticillioides. PMID:15702272

  8. In silico identification of gene amplification targets for improvement of lycopene production.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyung Seok; Lee, Sang Yup; Kim, Tae Yong; Woo, Han Min

    2010-05-01

    The identification of genes to be deleted or amplified is an essential step in metabolic engineering for strain improvement toward the enhanced production of desired bioproducts. In the past, several methods based on flux analysis of genome-scale metabolic models have been developed for identifying gene targets for deletion. Genome-wide identification of gene targets for amplification, on the other hand, has been rather difficult. Here, we report a strategy called flux scanning based on enforced objective flux (FSEOF) to identify gene amplification targets. FSEOF scans all the metabolic fluxes in the metabolic model and selects fluxes that increase when the flux toward product formation is enforced as an additional constraint during flux analysis. This strategy was successfully employed for the identification of gene amplification targets for the enhanced production of the red-colored antioxidant lycopene. Additional metabolic engineering based on gene knockout simulation resulted in further synergistic enhancement of lycopene production. Thus, FSEOF can be used as a general strategy for selecting genome-wide gene amplification targets in silico.

  9. Complementation analysis of Agrobacterium tumefaciens Ti plasmid virB genes by use of a vir promoter expression vector: virB9, virB10, and virB11 are essential virulence genes.

    PubMed Central

    Ward, J E; Dale, E M; Christie, P J; Nester, E W; Binns, A N

    1990-01-01

    The virB gene products of the Agrobacterium tumefaciens tumor-inducing (Ti) plasmid have been proposed to mediate T-DNA transport through the bacterial cell wall into plant cells. Previous genetic analysis of the approximately 9.5-kilobase-pair virB operon has been limited to transposon insertion mutagenesis. Due to the polarity of the transposon insertions, only the last gene in the operon, virB11, is known to provide an essential virulence function. We have now begun to assess the contribution of the other virB genes to virulence. First, several previously isolated Tn3-HoHo1 insertions in the 3' end of the virB operon were precisely mapped by nucleotide sequence analysis. Protein extracts from A. tumefaciens strains harboring these insertions on the Ti plasmid were subjected to immunostaining analysis with VirB4-, VirB10-, and VirB11-specific antisera to determine the effect of the insertion on virB gene expression. In this manner, avirulent mutants containing polar insertions in the virB9 and virB10 genes were identified. To carry out a complementation analysis with these virB mutants, expression vectors were constructed that allow cloned genes to be expressed from the virB promoter in A. tumefaciens. These plasmids were used to express combinations of the virB9, virB10, and virB11 genes in trans in the virB insertion mutants, thereby creating strains lacking only one of these three virB gene products. Virulence assays on Kalanchoe daigremontiana demonstrated that in addition to virB11, the virB9 and virB10 genes are required for tumorigenicity. Images PMID:2203743

  10. Integrating Ontological Knowledge and Textual Evidence in Estimating Gene and Gene Product Similarity

    SciTech Connect

    Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Posse, Christian; Gopalan, Banu; Tratz, Stephen C.; Gregory, Michelle L.

    2006-06-08

    With the rising influence of the Gene On-tology, new approaches have emerged where the similarity between genes or gene products is obtained by comparing Gene Ontology code annotations associ-ated with them. So far, these approaches have solely relied on the knowledge en-coded in the Gene Ontology and the gene annotations associated with the Gene On-tology database. The goal of this paper is to demonstrate that improvements to these approaches can be obtained by integrating textual evidence extracted from relevant biomedical literature.

  11. The essential Escherichia coli msgB gene, a multicopy suppressor of a temperature-sensitive allele of the heat shock gene grpE, is identical to dapE.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, B; Georgopoulos, C; Ang, D

    1992-01-01

    The grpE gene product is one of three Escherichia coli heat shock proteins (DnaK, DnaJ, and GrpE) that are essential for both bacteriophage lambda DNA replication and bacterial growth at all temperatures. In an effort to determine the role of GrpE and to identify other factors that it may interact with, we isolated multicopy suppressors of the grpE280 point mutation, as judged by their ability to reverse the temperature-sensitive phenotype of grpE280. Here we report the characterization of one of them, designated msgB. The msgB gene maps at approximately 53 min on the E. coli chromosome. The minimal gene possesses an open reading frame that encodes a protein with a predicted size of 41,269 M(r). This open reading frame was confirmed the correct one by direct amino-terminal sequence analysis of the overproduced msgB gene product. Genetic experiments demonstrated that msgB is essential for E. coli growth in the temperature range of 22 to 37 degrees C. Through a sequence homology search, MsgB was shown to be identical to N-succinyl-L-diaminopimelic acid desuccinylase (the dapE gene product), which participates in the diaminopimelic acid-lysine pathway involved in cell wall biosynthesis. Consistent with this finding, the msgB null allele mutant is viable only when the growth medium is supplemented with diaminopimelic acid. These results suggest that GrpE may have a previously unsuspected function(s) in cell wall biosynthesis in E. coli. Images PMID:1644751

  12. An essential cell cycle regulation gene causes hybrid inviability in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Phadnis, Nitin; Baker, EmilyClare P; Cooper, Jacob C; Frizzell, Kimberly A; Hsieh, Emily; de la Cruz, Aida Flor A; Shendure, Jay; Kitzman, Jacob O; Malik, Harmit S

    2015-12-18

    Speciation, the process by which new biological species arise, involves the evolution of reproductive barriers, such as hybrid sterility or inviability between populations. However, identifying hybrid incompatibility genes remains a key obstacle in understanding the molecular basis of reproductive isolation. We devised a genomic screen, which identified a cell cycle-regulation gene as the cause of male inviability in hybrids resulting from a cross between Drosophila melanogaster and D. simulans. Ablation of the D. simulans allele of this gene is sufficient to rescue the adult viability of hybrid males. This dominantly acting cell cycle regulator causes mitotic arrest and, thereby, inviability of male hybrid larvae. Our genomic method provides a facile means to accelerate the identification of hybrid incompatibility genes in other model and nonmodel systems.

  13. An essential cell cycle regulation gene causes hybrid inviability in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Phadnis, Nitin; Baker, EmilyClare P; Cooper, Jacob C; Frizzell, Kimberly A; Hsieh, Emily; de la Cruz, Aida Flor A; Shendure, Jay; Kitzman, Jacob O; Malik, Harmit S

    2015-12-18

    Speciation, the process by which new biological species arise, involves the evolution of reproductive barriers, such as hybrid sterility or inviability between populations. However, identifying hybrid incompatibility genes remains a key obstacle in understanding the molecular basis of reproductive isolation. We devised a genomic screen, which identified a cell cycle-regulation gene as the cause of male inviability in hybrids resulting from a cross between Drosophila melanogaster and D. simulans. Ablation of the D. simulans allele of this gene is sufficient to rescue the adult viability of hybrid males. This dominantly acting cell cycle regulator causes mitotic arrest and, thereby, inviability of male hybrid larvae. Our genomic method provides a facile means to accelerate the identification of hybrid incompatibility genes in other model and nonmodel systems. PMID:26680200

  14. An essential cell cycle regulation gene causes hybrid inviability in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Phadnis, Nitin; Baker, EmilyClare P.; Cooper, Jacob C.; Frizzell, Kimberly A.; Hsieh, Emily; de la Cruz, Aida Flor A.; Shendure, Jay; Kitzman, Jacob O.; Malik, Harmit S.

    2015-01-01

    Speciation, the process by which new biological species arise, involves the evolution of reproductive barriers such as hybrid sterility or inviability between populations. However, identifying hybrid incompatibility genes remains a key obstacle in understanding the molecular basis of reproductive isolation. We devised a genomic screen, which identified a cell cycle regulation gene as the cause of male inviability in hybrids between Drosophila melanogaster and D. simulans. Ablation of the D. simulans allele of this gene is sufficient to rescue the adult viability of hybrid males. This dominantly acting cell cycle regulator causes mitotic arrest and, thereby, inviability of male hybrid larvae. Our genomic method provides a facile means to accelerate the identification of hybrid incompatibility genes in other model and non-model systems. PMID:26680200

  15. Regulation of Tetralin Biodegradation and Identification of Genes Essential for Expression of thn Operons

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Pérez, O.; Moreno-Ruiz, E.; Floriano, B.; Santero, E.

    2004-01-01

    The tetralin biodegradation genes of Sphingomonas macrogolitabida strain TFA are clustered in two closely linked and divergent operons. To analyze expression of both operons under different growth conditions, transcriptional and translational gene fusions of the first genes of each operon to lacZ have been constructed in plasmids unable to replicate in Sphingomonas and integrated by recombination into the genome of strain TFA. Expression analysis indicated that the transcription of both genes is induced in similar ways by the presence of tetralin. Gene expression in both operons is also subjected to overimposed catabolic repression. Two additional genes named thnR and thnY have been identified downstream of thnCA3A4 genes. ThnR is similar to LysR-type regulators, and mutational analysis indicated that ThnR is strictly required for expression of the thn operons. Unlike other LysR-type regulators, ThnR does not repress its own synthesis. In fact, ThnR activates its own expression, since thnR is cotranscribed with the thnCA3A4 genes. ThnY is similar to the ferredoxin reductase components of dioxygenase systems and shows the fer2 domain, binding a Cys4[2Fe-2S] iron sulfur center, and the FAD-binding domain, common to those reductases. However, it lacks the NAD-binding domain. Intriguingly, ThnY has a regulatory role, since it is also strictly required for expression of the thn operons. Given the similarity of ThnY to reductases and the possibility of its being present in the two redox states, it is tempting to speculate that ThnY is a regulatory component connecting expression of the thn operons to the physiological status of the cell. PMID:15342579

  16. The role of the Parkinson's disease gene PARK9 in essential cellular pathways and the manganese homeostasis network in yeast.

    PubMed

    Chesi, Alessandra; Kilaru, Austin; Fang, Xiaodong; Cooper, Antony A; Gitler, Aaron D

    2012-01-01

    YPK9 (Yeast PARK9; also known as YOR291W) is a non-essential yeast gene predicted by sequence to encode a transmembrane P-type transport ATPase. However, its substrate specificity is unknown. Mutations in the human homolog of YPK9, ATP13A2/PARK9, have been linked to genetic forms of early onset parkinsonism. We previously described a strong genetic interaction between Ypk9 and another Parkinson's disease (PD) protein α-synuclein in multiple model systems, and a role for Ypk9 in manganese detoxification in yeast. In humans, environmental exposure to toxic levels of manganese causes a syndrome similar to PD and is thus an environmental risk factor for the disease. How manganese contributes to neurodegeneration is poorly understood. Here we describe multiple genome-wide screens in yeast aimed at defining the cellular function of Ypk9 and the mechanisms by which it protects cells from manganese toxicity. In physiological conditions, we found that Ypk9 genetically interacts with essential genes involved in cellular trafficking and the cell cycle. Deletion of Ypk9 sensitizes yeast cells to exposure to excess manganese. Using a library of non-essential gene deletions, we screened for additional genes involved in tolerance to excess manganese exposure, discovering several novel pathways involved in manganese homeostasis. We defined the dependence of the deletion strain phenotypes in the presence of manganese on Ypk9, and found that Ypk9 deletion modifies the manganese tolerance of only a subset of strains. These results confirm a role for Ypk9 in manganese homeostasis and illuminates cellular pathways and biological processes in which Ypk9 likely functions. PMID:22457822

  17. Essential role of the cytochrome P450 CYP4F22 in the production of acylceramide, the key lipid for skin permeability barrier formation

    PubMed Central

    Ohno, Yusuke; Nakamichi, Shota; Ohkuni, Aya; Kamiyama, Nozomi; Naoe, Ayano; Tsujimura, Hisashi; Yokose, Urara; Sugiura, Kazumitsu; Ishikawa, Junko; Akiyama, Masashi; Kihara, Akio

    2015-01-01

    A skin permeability barrier is essential for terrestrial animals, and its impairment causes several cutaneous disorders such as ichthyosis and atopic dermatitis. Although acylceramide is an important lipid for the skin permeability barrier, details of its production have yet to be determined, leaving the molecular mechanism of skin permeability barrier formation unclear. Here we identified the cytochrome P450 gene CYP4F22 (cytochrome P450, family 4, subfamily F, polypeptide 22) as the long-sought fatty acid ω-hydroxylase gene required for acylceramide production. CYP4F22 has been identified as one of the autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis-causative genes. Ichthyosis-mutant proteins exhibited reduced enzyme activity, indicating correlation between activity and pathology. Furthermore, lipid analysis of a patient with ichthyosis showed a drastic decrease in acylceramide production. We determined that CYP4F22 was a type I membrane protein that locates in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), suggesting that the ω-hydroxylation occurs on the cytoplasmic side of the ER. The preferred substrate of the CYP4F22 was fatty acids with a carbon chain length of 28 or more (≥C28). In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that CYP4F22 is an ultra-long-chain fatty acid ω-hydroxylase responsible for acylceramide production and provide important insights into the molecular mechanisms of skin permeability barrier formation. Furthermore, based on the results obtained here, we proposed a detailed reaction series for acylceramide production. PMID:26056268

  18. Highly expressed amino acid biosynthesis genes revealed by global gene expression analysis of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis during growth in whole egg are not essential for this growth.

    PubMed

    Jakočiūnė, Džiuginta; Herrero-Fresno, Ana; Jelsbak, Lotte; Olsen, John Elmerdahl

    2016-05-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) is the most common cause of egg borne salmonellosis in many parts of the world. This study analyzed gene expression of this bacterium during growth in whole egg, and whether highly expressed genes were essential for the growth. High quality RNA was extracted from S. Enteritidis using a modified RNA-extraction protocol. Global gene expression during growth in whole egg was compared to growth in LB-medium using DNA array method. Twenty-six genes were significantly upregulated during growth in egg; these belonged to amino acid biosynthesis, di/oligopeptide transport system, biotin synthesis, ferrous iron transport system, and type III secretion system. Significant downregulation of 15 genes related to formate hydrogenlyase (FHL) and trehalose metabolism was observed. The results suggested that S. Enteritidis is starved for amino-acids, biotin and iron when growing in egg. However, site specific mutation of amino acid biosynthesis genes asnA (17.3 fold upregulated), asnB (18.6 fold upregulated), asnA/asnB and, serA (12.0 fold upregulated) and gdhA (3.7 fold upregulated), did not result in growth attenuation, suggesting that biosynthesis using the enzymes encoded from these genes may represent the first choice for S. Enteritidis when growing in egg, but when absent, the bacterium could use alternative ways to obtain the amino acids. PMID:26945769

  19. Highly expressed amino acid biosynthesis genes revealed by global gene expression analysis of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis during growth in whole egg are not essential for this growth.

    PubMed

    Jakočiūnė, Džiuginta; Herrero-Fresno, Ana; Jelsbak, Lotte; Olsen, John Elmerdahl

    2016-05-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) is the most common cause of egg borne salmonellosis in many parts of the world. This study analyzed gene expression of this bacterium during growth in whole egg, and whether highly expressed genes were essential for the growth. High quality RNA was extracted from S. Enteritidis using a modified RNA-extraction protocol. Global gene expression during growth in whole egg was compared to growth in LB-medium using DNA array method. Twenty-six genes were significantly upregulated during growth in egg; these belonged to amino acid biosynthesis, di/oligopeptide transport system, biotin synthesis, ferrous iron transport system, and type III secretion system. Significant downregulation of 15 genes related to formate hydrogenlyase (FHL) and trehalose metabolism was observed. The results suggested that S. Enteritidis is starved for amino-acids, biotin and iron when growing in egg. However, site specific mutation of amino acid biosynthesis genes asnA (17.3 fold upregulated), asnB (18.6 fold upregulated), asnA/asnB and, serA (12.0 fold upregulated) and gdhA (3.7 fold upregulated), did not result in growth attenuation, suggesting that biosynthesis using the enzymes encoded from these genes may represent the first choice for S. Enteritidis when growing in egg, but when absent, the bacterium could use alternative ways to obtain the amino acids.

  20. An intein-mediated modulation of protein stability system and its application to study human cytomegalovirus essential gene function

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Deng; Xuan, Baoqin; Sun, Yamei; Huang, Shaowu; Xie, Maorong; Bai, Yadan; Xu, Wenjia; Qian, Zhikang

    2016-01-01

    Functional analysis of the essential proteins encoded by human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is hindered by the lack of complementing systems. To overcome this difficulty, we have established a novel approach, termed the intein-mediated modulation of protein stability (imPS), in which a destabilizing domain and part of a split intein are fused to the essential protein. The growth of the mutant virus can then be regulated by the degradation and splicing of the protein. We found that an ultrafast gp41-1 split intein was able to rescue or degrade the protein of interest (POI) by removing or adding a strong degron through protein splicing. As a result, the function of the POI was turned on or off during the process. Using HCMV essential gene IE1/IE2, we confirmed that imPS worked remarkably well in conditionally regulating protein stability during viral infection. This conditional approach is likely to be applicable for dissecting the gene functions of HCMV or other viruses. PMID:27188239

  1. Live imaging RNAi screen reveals genes essential for meiosis in mammalian oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Tischer, Thomas; Santhanam, Balaji; Schuh, Melina

    2015-01-01

    During fertilization, an egg and a sperm fuse to form a new embryo. Eggs develop from oocytes in a process called meiosis. Meiosis in human oocytes is highly error-prone1,2, and defective eggs are the leading cause of pregnancy loss and several genetic disorders such as Down’s syndrome3-5. Which genes safeguard accurate progression through meiosis is largely unclear. Here, we developed high-content phenotypic screening methods for the systematic identification of mammalian meiotic genes. We targeted 774 genes by RNAi within follicle-enclosed mouse oocytes to block protein expression from an early stage of oocyte development onwards. We then analysed the function of several genes simultaneously by high-resolution imaging of chromosomes and microtubules in live oocytes and scored each oocyte quantitatively for 50 phenotypes, generating a comprehensive resource of meiotic gene function. The screen generated an unprecedented annotated dataset of meiotic progression in 2,241 mammalian oocytes, which allowed us to analyse systematically which defects are linked to abnormal chromosome segregation during meiosis, identifying progression into anaphase with misaligned chromosomes as well as defects in spindle organization as risk factors. This study demonstrates how high-content screens can be performed in oocytes, and now allows systematic studies of meiosis in mammals. PMID:26147080

  2. NPY genes play an essential role in root gravitropic responses in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuanting; Dai, Xinhua; Cheng, Youfa; Zhao, Yunde

    2011-01-01

    Plants can sense the direction of gravity and orient their growth to ensure that roots are anchored in soil and that shoots grow upward. Gravitropism has been studied extensively using Arabidopsis genetics, but the exact mechanisms for gravitropism are not fully understood. Here, we demonstrate that five NPY genes play a key role in Arabidopsis root gravitropism. NPY genes were previously identified as regulators of auxin-mediated organogenesis in a genetic pathway with the AGC kinases PID, PID2, WAG1, and WAG2. We show that all five NPY genes are highly expressed in primary root tips. The single npy mutants do not display obvious gravitropism defects, but the npy1 npy2 npy3 npy4 npy5 quintuple mutants show dramatic gravitropic phenotypes. Systematic analysis of all the npy double, triple, and quadruple combinations demonstrates that the five NPY genes all contribute to gravitropism. Our work indicates that gravitropism, phototropism, and organogenesis use analogous mechanisms in which at least one AGC kinase, one NPH3/NPY gene, and one ARF are required.

  3. Live imaging RNAi screen reveals genes essential for meiosis in mammalian oocytes.

    PubMed

    Pfender, Sybille; Kuznetsov, Vitaliy; Pasternak, Michał; Tischer, Thomas; Santhanam, Balaji; Schuh, Melina

    2015-08-13

    During fertilization, an egg and a sperm fuse to form a new embryo. Eggs develop from oocytes in a process called meiosis. Meiosis in human oocytes is highly error-prone, and defective eggs are the leading cause of pregnancy loss and several genetic disorders such as Down's syndrome. Which genes safeguard accurate progression through meiosis is largely unclear. Here we develop high-content phenotypic screening methods for the systematic identification of mammalian meiotic genes. We targeted 774 genes by RNA interference within follicle-enclosed mouse oocytes to block protein expression from an early stage of oocyte development onwards. We then analysed the function of several genes simultaneously by high-resolution imaging of chromosomes and microtubules in live oocytes and scored each oocyte quantitatively for 50 phenotypes, generating a comprehensive resource of meiotic gene function. The screen generated an unprecedented annotated data set of meiotic progression in 2,241 mammalian oocytes, which allowed us to analyse systematically which defects are linked to abnormal chromosome segregation during meiosis, identifying progression into anaphase with misaligned chromosomes as well as defects in spindle organization as risk factors. This study demonstrates how high-content screens can be performed in oocytes, and allows systematic studies of meiosis in mammals.

  4. Conditional silencing of topoisomerase I gene of Mycobacterium tuberculosis validates its essentiality for cell survival.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Wareed; Menon, Shruti; Godbole, Adwait Anand; Karthik, Pullela V D N B; Nagaraja, Valakunja

    2014-04-01

    Topoisomerases are an important class of enzymes for regulating the DNA transaction processes. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is one of the most formidable pathogens also posing serious challenges for therapeutic interventions. The organism contains only one type IA topoisomerase (Rv3646c), offering an opportunity to test its potential as a candidate drug target. To validate the essentiality of M. tuberculosis topoisomerase I (TopoI(Mt) ) for bacterial growth and survival, we have generated a conditionally regulated strain of topoI in Mtb. The conditional knockdown mutant exhibited delayed growth on agar plate. In liquid culture, the growth was drastically impaired when TopoI expression was suppressed. Additionally, novobiocin and isoniazid showed enhanced inhibitory potential against the conditional mutant. Analysis of the nucleoid revealed its altered architecture upon TopoI depletion. These studies establish the essentiality of TopoI for the M. tuberculosis growth and open up new avenues for targeting the enzyme.

  5. MADS domain transcription factors mediate short-range DNA looping that is essential for target gene expression in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Marta Adelina; Guerra, Rosalinda Fiorella; Berns, Markus Christian; Manzo, Carlo; Masiero, Simona; Finzi, Laura; Kater, Martin M; Colombo, Lucia

    2013-07-01

    MADS domain transcription factors are key regulators of eukaryotic development. In plants, the homeotic MIKC MADS factors that regulate floral organ identity have been studied in great detail. Based on genetic and protein-protein interaction studies, a floral quartet model was proposed that describes how these MADS domain proteins assemble into higher order complexes to regulate their target genes. However, despite the attractiveness of this model and its general acceptance in the literature, solid in vivo proof has never been provided. To gain deeper insight into the mechanisms of transcriptional regulation by MADS domain factors, we studied how SEEDSTICK (STK) and SEPALLATA3 (SEP3) directly regulate the expression of the reproductive meristem gene family transcription factor-encoding gene VERDANDI (VDD). Our data show that STK-SEP3 dimers can induce loop formation in the VDD promoter by binding to two nearby CC(A/T)6GG (CArG) boxes and that this is essential for promoter activity. Our in vivo data show that the size and position of this loop, determined by the choice of CArG element usage, is essential for correct expression. Our studies provide solid in vivo evidence for the floral quartet model. PMID:23847151

  6. Essential O2-responsive genes of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and their network revealed by integrating dynamic data from inverted conditions.

    PubMed

    He, Feng Q; Wang, Wei; Zheng, Ping; Sudhakar, Padhmanand; Sun, Jibin; Zeng, An-Ping

    2014-02-01

    Identification of the gene network through which Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 (PA) adapts to altered oxygen-availability environments is essential for a better understanding of stress responses and pathogenicity of PA. We performed high-time-resolution (HTR) transcriptome analyses of PA in a continuous cultivation system during the transition from high oxygen tension to low oxygen tension (HLOT) and the reversed transition from low to high oxygen tension (LHOT). From those genes responsive to both transient conditions, we identified 85 essential oxygen-availability responsive genes (EORGs), including the expected ones (arcDABC) encoding enzymes for arginine fermentation. We then constructed the regulatory network for the EORGs of PA by integrating information from binding motif searching, literature and HTR data. Notably, our results show that only the sub-networks controlled by the well-known oxygen-responsive transcription factors show a very high consistency between the inferred network and literature knowledge, e.g. 87.5% and 83.3% of the obtained sub-network controlled by the anaerobic regulator (ANR) and a quorum sensing regulator RhIR, respectively. These results not only reveal stringent EORGs of PA and their transcription regulatory network, but also highlight that achieving a high accuracy of the inferred regulatory network might be feasible only for the apparently affected regulators under the given conditions but not for all the expressed regulators on a genome scale.

  7. RAP1 Is Essential for Silencing Telomeric Variant Surface Glycoprotein Genes in Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaofeng; Figueiredo, Luisa M.; Espinal, Amin; Okubo, Eiji; Li, Bibo

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Trypanosoma brucei expresses Variant Surface Glycoprotein (VSG) genes in a strictly monoallelic fashion in its mammalian hosts, but it is unclear how this important virulence mechanism is enforced. Telomere position effect (TPE), an epigenetic phenomenon, has been proposed to play a critical role in VSG regulation, yet no telomeric protein has been identified whose disruption led to VSG derepression. We now identify tbRAP1 as an intrinsic component of the T. brucei telomere complex and a major regulator for silencing VSG expression sites (ESs). Knockdown of tbRAP1 led to derepression of all VSGs in silent ESs, but not VSGs located elsewhere, and resulted in stronger derepression of genes located within 10 kb from telomeres than genes located further upstream. This graduated silencing pattern suggests that telomere integrity plays a key role in tbRAP1-dependent silencing and VSG regulation. PMID:19345190

  8. Saccharomyces cerevisiae protein phosphatase 2A performs an essential cellular function and is encoded by two genes.

    PubMed Central

    Sneddon, A A; Cohen, P T; Stark, M J

    1990-01-01

    Two genes (PPH21 and PPH22) encoding the yeast homologues of protein serine-threonine phosphatase 2A have been cloned from a Saccharomyces cerevisiae genomic library using a rabbit protein phosphatase 2A cDNA as a hybridization probe. The PPH genes are genetically linked on chromosome IV and are predicted to encode polypeptides each with 74% amino acid sequence identity to rabbit type 2A protein phosphatase, indicating once again the extraordinarily high degree of sequence conservation shown by protein-phosphatases from different species. The two PPH genes show less than 10% amino acid sequence divergence from each other and while disruption of either PPH gene alone is without any major effect, the double disruption is lethal. This indicates that protein phosphatase 2A activity is an essential cellular function in yeast. Measurement of type 2A protein phosphatase activity in yeast strains lacking one or other of the genes indicates that they account for most, if not all, protein phosphatase 2A activity in the cell. Images Fig. 5. PMID:2176150

  9. Prediction of the Risk for Essential Hypertension among Carriers of C825T Genetic Polymorphism of G Protein β3 (GNB3) Gene

    PubMed Central

    El Din Hemimi, Neveen Salah; Mansour, Amal A.; Abdelsalam, Mona Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The guanine nucleotide-binding protein beta polypeptide 3 (GNB3) 825T allele encodes a product that enhances the activation of heterotrimeric G proteins, which is associated with the occurrence of the splice variant Gβ3 s that could play a role in vascular reactivity and hyperproliferation of smooth muscle cells, that makes such proteins attractive candidate gene products for susceptibility to essential hypertension (EH). OBJECTIVE To predict the risk for EH in individuals with C825T genetic polymorphism of G protein β3 gene. METHODS The study consisted of 222 normotensive individuals and 216 hypertensive patients. Individuals were genotyped for C825T genetic polymorphism of G protein β3 gene rs5443 by using restriction fragment length polymorphism. RESULTS Frequencies of C and T alleles were 58.1% and 41.9%, respectively, in the control group compared with 47.7% and 52.3%, respectively, in the hypertensive group. The carriers of rs5443 (T) allele exhibited a significant greater risk for EH compared with the carriers of rs5443 (C) allele (odds ratio = 1.5, 95% confidence interval = 1.2–2.0). CONCLUSION T allele is a risk factor for EH in the Egyptian population, which may be used as a prognostic and a therapeutic target of prophylaxis. PMID:27226707

  10. Aerosolized essential oils and individual natural product compounds as brown treesnake repellents.

    PubMed

    Clark, Larry; Shivik, John

    2002-08-01

    Chemical irritants useful as repellents for brown treesnakes (Boiga irregularis) were identified. Exposure to various compounds produced a range of intensities for locomotory behavior in snakes. Essential oils comprised of 10 g liter-1 solutions of cedarwood, cinnamon, sage, juniper berry, lavender and rosemary each were potent snake irritants. Brown treesnakes exposed to a 2-s burst of aerosol of these oils exhibited prolonged, violent undirected locomotory behavior. In contrast, exposure to a 10 g liter-1 concentration of ginger oil aerosol caused snakes to locomote, but in a deliberate, directed manner. We also tested specific compounds, all derivative of food and flavor ingredients. 10 g liter-1 solutions delivered as aerosols of m-anisaldehyde, trans-anethole, cineole, cinnamaldehyde, citral, ethyl phenylacetate, eugenol, geranyl acetate or methyl salicylate all acted as potent irritants for brown treesnakes. The individual ingredients were classified using cluster analysis into groups that promoted different levels of response by snakes. This study is the first to systematically investigate the irritant potential of natural products for snakes. These data will be useful in the development of practical pest management tools for snakes.

  11. Formulating essential oil microemulsions as washing solutions for organic fresh produce production.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Linhan; Critzer, Faith; Davidson, P Michael; Zhong, Qixin

    2014-12-15

    Applications of plant-derived organic essential oils (EOs) as antimicrobials for post-harvest produce operations are limited by their low water solubility. To dissolve EOs in water, microemulsions were studied using two surfactants permitted for organic production, sucrose octanoate ester (SOE) and soy lecithin that were mixed at various mass ratios before dilution with water to 40% w/w. EOs were then mixed with the surfactant solution by hand shaking. Based on visual transparency, intermediate lecithin:SOE mass ratios favoured the formation of microemulsions, e.g., up to 4.0% clove bud oil at ratios of 2:8 and 3:7, and 4.0% cinnamon bark oil and 3.0% thyme oil at ratios of 2:8 and 1:9, respectively. Microemulsions with intermediate lecithin:SOE mass ratios had a relatively low viscosity and better ability to wet fresh produce surfaces. The microemulsions established in this work may be used as washing solutions to enhance the microbial safety of organic fresh produce.

  12. Individual Constituents from Essential Oils Inhibit Biofilm Mass Production by Multi-Drug Resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Espina, Laura; Pagán, Rafael; López, Daniel; García-Gonzalo, Diego

    2015-01-01

    Biofilm formation by Staphylococcus aureus represents a problem in both the medical field and the food industry, because the biofilm structure provides protection to embedded cells and it strongly attaches to surfaces. This circumstance is leading to many research programs seeking new alternatives to control biofilm formation by this pathogen. In this study we show that a potent inhibition of biofilm mass production can be achieved in community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA) and methicillin-sensitive strains using plant compounds, such as individual constituents (ICs) of essential oils (carvacrol, citral, and (+)-limonene). The Crystal Violet staining technique was used to evaluate biofilm mass formation during 40 h of incubation. Carvacrol is the most effective IC, abrogating biofilm formation in all strains tested, while CA-MRSA was the most sensitive phenotype to any of the ICs tested. Inhibition of planktonic cells by ICs during initial growth stages could partially explain the inhibition of biofilm formation. Overall, our results show the potential of EOs to prevent biofilm formation, especially in strains that exhibit resistance to other antimicrobials. As these compounds are food additives generally recognized as safe, their anti-biofilm properties may lead to important new applications, such as sanitizers, in the food industry or in clinical settings. PMID:26102069

  13. A mutation in the Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae wxoD gene affects xanthan production and chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Nam, Jae-Young; Kim, Hong-Il; Lee, Chang-Soo; Park, Young-Jin

    2013-11-01

    Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae causes bacterial blight in rice (Oryza sativa L.). The effect of a mutation in the wxoD gene, that encodes a putative O-antigen acetylase, on xanthan production as well as bacterial chemotaxis was investigated. The mutation increased xanthan production by 52 %. The mutant strain was non-motile on semi-solid agar swarm plates. In addition, several genes involved in chemotaxis, including the cheW, cheV, cheR, and cheD genes, were down-regulated by a mutation in the wxoD gene. Thus, the mutation in the wxoD gene affects xanthan production as well as bacterial chemotaxis. However, the wxoD gene is not essential for the virulence of X. oryzae.

  14. Genetic Analysis of the Atrial Natriuretic Peptide Gene Polymorphisms among Essential Hypertensive Patients in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Ghodsian, Nooshin; Ismail, Patimah; Ahmadloo, Salma; Eskandarian, Narges; Etemad, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background. Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) considerably influences blood pressure regulation through water and sodium homoeostasis. Several of the studies have utilized anonymous genetic polymorphic markers and made inconsequent claims about the ANP relevant disorders. Thus, we screened Insertion/Deletion (ID) and G191A polymorphisms of ANP to discover sequence variations with potential functional significance and to specify the linkage disequilibrium pattern between polymorphisms. The relationships of detected polymorphisms with EH with or without Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) status were tested subsequently. Method. ANP gene polymorphisms (I/D and A191G) were specified utilizing mutagenically separated Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) in 320 subjects including 163 EH case subjects and 157 controls. Result. This case-control study discovered a significant association between I/D polymorphisms of ANP gene in EH patient without T2DM. However, the study determined no association between G191A polymorphisms of ANP in EH with or without T2DM. In addition, sociodemographic factors in the case and healthy subjects exhibited strong differences (P < 0.05). Conclusion. As a risk factor, ANP gene polymorphisms may affect hypertension. Despite the small sample size in this study, it is the first research assessing the ANP gene polymorphisms in both EH and T2DM patients among Malaysian population. PMID:27413750

  15. Haploinsufficiency screen highlights two distinct groups of ribosomal protein genes essential for embryonic stem cell fate

    PubMed Central

    Fortier, Simon; MacRae, Tara; Bilodeau, Mélanie; Sargeant, Tobias; Sauvageau, Guy

    2015-01-01

    In a functional genomics screen of mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) with nested hemizygous chromosomal deletions, we reveal that ribosomal protein (RP) genes are the most significant haploinsufficient determinants for embryoid body (EB) formation. Hemizygocity for three RP genes (Rps5, Rps14, or Rps28), distinguished by the proximity of their corresponding protein to the ribosome's mRNA exit site, is associated with the most profound phenotype. This EB phenotype was fully rescued by BAC or cDNA complementation but not by the reduction of p53 levels, although such reduction was effective with most other RP-deleted clones corresponding to non-mRNA exit-site proteins. RNA-sequencing studies further revealed that undifferentiated ESCs hemizygous for Rps5 showed reduced expression levels of several mesoderm-specific genes as compared with wild-type counterparts. Together, these results reveal that RP gene dosage limits the differentiation, not the self-renewal, of mouse ESCs. They also highlight two separate mechanisms underlying this process, one of which is p53 independent. PMID:25646475

  16. Genetic Analysis of the Atrial Natriuretic Peptide Gene Polymorphisms among Essential Hypertensive Patients in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Ghodsian, Nooshin; Ismail, Patimah; Ahmadloo, Salma; Eskandarian, Narges; Etemad, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background. Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) considerably influences blood pressure regulation through water and sodium homoeostasis. Several of the studies have utilized anonymous genetic polymorphic markers and made inconsequent claims about the ANP relevant disorders. Thus, we screened Insertion/Deletion (ID) and G191A polymorphisms of ANP to discover sequence variations with potential functional significance and to specify the linkage disequilibrium pattern between polymorphisms. The relationships of detected polymorphisms with EH with or without Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) status were tested subsequently. Method. ANP gene polymorphisms (I/D and A191G) were specified utilizing mutagenically separated Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) in 320 subjects including 163 EH case subjects and 157 controls. Result. This case-control study discovered a significant association between I/D polymorphisms of ANP gene in EH patient without T2DM. However, the study determined no association between G191A polymorphisms of ANP in EH with or without T2DM. In addition, sociodemographic factors in the case and healthy subjects exhibited strong differences (P < 0.05). Conclusion. As a risk factor, ANP gene polymorphisms may affect hypertension. Despite the small sample size in this study, it is the first research assessing the ANP gene polymorphisms in both EH and T2DM patients among Malaysian population. PMID:27413750

  17. Mode of action for natural products isolated from essential oils of two trees is different from available mosquito adulticides.

    PubMed

    McAllister, Janet C; Adams, Mary F

    2010-11-01

    Insecticidal properties of natural products may present alternatives to the use of synthetic molecule pesticides that are of diminishing effectiveness due to resistance. Three compounds, thymoquinone, nootkatone, and carvacrol, components of Alaska yellow cedar, Chamaecyyparis nootkatensis (D. Don) Spach, and incense cedar, Calocedrus decurrens (Torr.), essential oils, have been shown to have biological activity against a variety of mosquito and tick species. Although these components act as both repellents and insecticides, how they function in either capacity is unknown. Their use as mosquito control insecticides would be greatly increased if their mode of action is not the same as that of currently used commercial products. This study compared the lethal dosages for nootkatone, carvacrol, and thymoquinone by using colony strains of Anopheles gambiae Giles with known mutations at three different target sites. The altered target sites evaluated were the sodium channel para-locus mutation (L1014 F KDR) that confers permethrin resistance, the ACE-1 gene that confers organophosphate and carbamate resistance, and a gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor mutation of the Rdl locus conferring dieldrin resistance. Significant increases in lethal dose were not observed in any of the mosquito strains for any of the compounds tested compared with the doses required of chemicals with known modes of action at the mutated sites. Although the mode of action was not determined, this screening study indicates that none of these compounds interact at the target sites represented in the test mosquito strains. These compounds represent a different mode of action than existing chemicals currently used in mosquito control. PMID:21175062

  18. A cytochrome c biogenesis gene involved in pyoverdine production in Pseudomonas fluorescens ATCC 17400.

    PubMed

    Gaballa, A; Koedam, N; Cornelis, P

    1996-08-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens ATCC 17400 produces pyoverdine under iron-limiting conditions. A Tn5 mutant, 2G11, produced lower amounts of different pyoverdine forms and was unable to grow under iron limitation caused by ethylenediamine-di(o-hydroxy-phenylacetic acid) (EDDHA) or zinc. This mutant was complemented by a 9.6 kb HindIII-BamHI DNA fragment that contained eight contiguous open reading frames (ORFs cytA to cytH). The proteins possibly encoded by this polycistronic gene cluster were all similar to the products of cytochrome c biogenesis genes from, amongst others, Rhodobacter capsulatus and Bradyrhizobium japonicum, not only in terms of amino acid sequence, but also in the overall hydropathy index of these proteins. By TnphoA mutagenesis and site-specific gene replacement it was found that the first three ORFs (cytA to cytC) were essential for cytochrome c production while only the product of cytA was needed for normal pyoverdine production. The presence of a putative haem-binding site in the CytA protein (WGSWWVWD) was confirmed. From analysis of a constructed phoA fusion, a periplasmic location was found for this motif. The ability of the cytA gene to restore both cytochrome c and pyoverdine production suggests the involvement of this particular gene both in haem and in pyoverdine transport in P. fluorescens. PMID:8878040

  19. Genome-wide identification of genes essential for the survival of Streptococcus pneumoniae in human saliva.

    PubMed

    Verhagen, Lilly M; de Jonge, Marien I; Burghout, Peter; Schraa, Kiki; Spagnuolo, Lorenza; Mennens, Svenja; Eleveld, Marc J; van der Gaast-de Jongh, Christa E; Zomer, Aldert; Hermans, Peter W M; Bootsma, Hester J

    2014-01-01

    Since Streptococcus pneumoniae transmits through droplet spread, this respiratory tract pathogen may be able to survive in saliva. Here, we show that saliva supports survival of clinically relevant S. pneumoniae strains for more than 24 h in a capsule-independent manner. Moreover, saliva induced growth of S. pneumoniae in growth-permissive conditions, suggesting that S. pneumoniae is well adapted for uptake of nutrients from this bodily fluid. By using Tn-seq, a method for genome-wide negative selection screening, we identified 147 genes potentially required for growth and survival of S. pneumoniae in saliva, among which genes predicted to be involved in cell envelope biosynthesis, cell transport, amino acid metabolism, and stress response predominated. The Tn-seq findings were validated by testing a panel of directed gene deletion mutants for their ability to survive in saliva under two testing conditions: at room temperature without CO2, representing transmission, and at 37 °C with CO2, representing in-host carriage. These validation experiments confirmed that the plsX gene and the amiACDEF and aroDEBC operons, involved in respectively fatty acid metabolism, oligopeptide transport, and biosynthesis of aromatic amino acids play an important role in the growth and survival of S. pneumoniae in saliva at 37 °C. In conclusion, this study shows that S. pneumoniae is well-adapted for growth and survival in human saliva and provides a genome-wide list of genes potentially involved in adaptation. This notion supports earlier evidence that S. pneumoniae can use human saliva as a vector for transmission.

  20. Functions of the gene products of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Riley, M

    1993-01-01

    A list of currently identified gene products of Escherichia coli is given, together with a bibliography that provides pointers to the literature on each gene product. A scheme to categorize cellular functions is used to classify the gene products of E. coli so far identified. A count shows that the numbers of genes concerned with small-molecule metabolism are on the same order as the numbers concerned with macromolecule biosynthesis and degradation. One large category is the category of tRNAs and their synthetases. Another is the category of transport elements. The categories of cell structure and cellular processes other than metabolism are smaller. Other subjects discussed are the occurrence in the E. coli genome of redundant pairs and groups of genes of identical or closely similar function, as well as variation in the degree of density of genetic information in different parts of the genome. PMID:7508076

  1. Essential genes for astroglial development and axon pathfinding during zebrafish embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Barresi, Michael J.F.; Burton, Sean; DiPietrantonio, Kristina; Amsterdam, Adam; Hopkins, Nancy; Karlstrom, Rolf O.

    2010-01-01

    The formation of the central nervous system depends on the coordinated development of neural and glial cell types that arise from a common precursor. Using an existing group of zebrafish mutants generated by viral insertion, we performed a “shelf-screen” to identify genes necessary for astroglial development and axon scaffold formation. We screened 274 of 315 viral insertion lines using antibodies that label axons (anti-Acetylated Tubulin) and astroglia (anti-Gfap) and identified 25 mutants with defects in gliogenesis, glial patterning, neurogenesis, and axon guidance. We also identified a novel class of mutants affecting radial glial cell numbers. Defects in astroglial patterning were always associated with axon defects, supporting an important role for axon-glial interactions during axon scaffold development. The genes disrupted in these viral lines have all been identified, providing a powerful new resource for the study of axon guidance, glio- and neurogenesis, and neuron-glial interactions during development of the vertebrate CNS. PMID:20806318

  2. The Association of Mitofusion-2 Gene Polymorphisms with Susceptibility of Essential Hypertension in Northern Han Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mei; Zhang, Bei; Li, Chuang; Liu, Jielin; Liu, Ya; Sun, Dongdong; Ma, Hanying; Wen, Shaojun

    2016-01-01

    Background: Mitofusion-2 (Mfn2) played an important role in regulating vascular smooth muscle cells proliferation, insulin resistance and endoplasmic reticulum stress, which were found to be involved in the development of hypertension. So we inferred that the Mfn2 gene may participate in the pathogenesis of hypertension. The aim of this study was to determine whether common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in Mfn2 gene were associated with essential hypertension (EH) in northern Han Chinese. Methods: We genotyped 6 tagging SNPs of Mfn2 gene (rs2336384, rs2295281, rs17037564, rs2236057, rs2236058 and rs3766741) with the TaqMan assay in 626 hypertensive patients and 618 controls. Results: Logistic regression analysis indicated that CC+CA genotype of rs2336384 and AA+AG genotype of rs2236057 were significantly associated with increased risk of EH (OR=1.617, P=0.005; OR=1.418, P=0.031, respectively). GG genotype of rs2236058 and GG+CG genotype of rs3766741 were found to be significantly associated with decreased risk of EH (OR=0.662, P=0.023; OR=0.639, P=0.024).When stratified by gender, for rs2336384, rs2236057 and rs2236058, significant association was observed in males, but not in females. Haplotype analysis indicated that the CCAACC haplotype was positively correlated with EH and there was a negative correlation between ACAGGG haplotype and EH. Conclusions: This study demonstrated that Mfn2 gene polymorphisms were associated with essential hypertension in northern Han Chinese population, especially in male subjects. PMID:26816493

  3. Effects of plants and essential oils on ruminal in vitro batch culture methane production and fermentation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study, plants (14) and essential oils (EO; 88) from plants that are naturalized to, or can be successfully grown in North America were evaluated in a batch culture in vitro screening experiments with ruminal fluid as potential anti-methanogenic additives for ruminant diets. Essential oils we...

  4. Small RNAs: essential regulators of gene expression and defenses against environmental stresses in plants.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hsiao-Lin V; Chekanova, Julia A

    2016-05-01

    Eukaryotic genomes produce thousands of diverse small RNAs (smRNAs), which play vital roles in regulating gene expression in all conditions, including in survival of biotic and abiotic environmental stresses. SmRNA pathways intersect with most of the pathways regulating different steps in the life of a messenger RNA (mRNA), starting from transcription and ending at mRNA decay. SmRNAs function in both nuclear and cytoplasmic compartments; the regulation of mRNA stability and translation in the cytoplasm and the epigenetic regulation of gene expression in the nucleus are the main and best-known modes of smRNA action. However, recent evidence from animal systems indicates that smRNAs and RNA interference (RNAi) also participate in the regulation of alternative pre-mRNA splicing, one of the most crucial steps in the fast, efficient global reprogramming of gene expression required for survival under stress. Emerging evidence from bioinformatics studies indicates that a specific class of plant smRNAs, induced by various abiotic stresses, the sutr-siRNAs, has the potential to target regulatory regions within introns and thus may act in the regulation of splicing in response to stresses. This review summarizes the major types of plant smRNAs in the context of their mechanisms of action and also provides examples of their involvement in regulation of gene expression in response to environmental cues and developmental stresses. In addition, we describe current advances in our understanding of how smRNAs function in the regulation of pre-mRNA splicing. WIREs RNA 2016, 7:356-381. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1340 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  5. Cross-Ontological Analytics: Combining Associative and Hierarchical Relations in the Gene Ontologies to Assess Gene Product Similarity

    SciTech Connect

    Posse, Christian; Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Gopalan, Banu; Riensche, Roderick M.; Beagley, Nathaniel; Baddeley, Bob L.

    2006-05-28

    Gene and gene product similarity is a fundamental diagnostic measure in analyzing biological data and constructing predictive models for functional genomics. With the rising influence of the gene ontologies, two complementary approaches have emerged where the similarity between two genes/gene products is obtained by comparing gene ontology (GO) annotations associated with the gene/gene products. One approach captures GO-based similarity in terms of hierarchical relations within each gene ontology. The other approach identifies GO-based similarity in terms of associative relations across the three gene ontologies. We propose a novel methodology where the two approaches can be merged with ensuing benefits in coverage and accuracy.

  6. Identification of a Gene Essential for Sheathed Structure Formation in Sphaerotilus natans, a Filamentous Sheathed Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Toshihiko; Kanagawa, Takahiro; Kamagata, Yoichi

    2002-01-01

    Sphaerotilus natans, a filamentous bacterium that causes bulking in activated sludge processes, can assume two distinct morphologies, depending on the substrate concentration for growth; in substrate-rich media it grows as single rod-shaped cells, whereas in substrate-limited media it grows as filaments. To identify genes responsible for sheath formation, we carried out transposon Tn5 mutagenesis. Of the approximately 20,000 mutants obtained, 7 did not form sheathed structures. Sequencing of the Tn5-flanking regions showed that five of the seven Tn5 insertions converged at the same open reading frame, designated sthA. The deduced amino acids encoded by sthA were found to be homologous to glycosyltransferase, which is known to be involved in linking sugars to lipid carriers during bacterial exopolysaccharide biosynthesis. Disruption of the gene of the wild-type strain by inserting a kanamycin resistance gene cassette also resulted in sheathless growth under either type of nutrient condition. These findings indicate that sthA is a crucial component responsible for sheath formation. PMID:11772646

  7. Post transcriptional regulation of chloroplast gene expression by nuclear encoded gene products

    SciTech Connect

    Kuchka, M.R.

    1992-01-01

    Many individual chloroplast genes require the products of a collection of nuclear genes for their successful expression. These nuclear gene products apparently work with great specificity, each committed to the expression of a single chloroplast gene. We have chosen as a model nuclear mutants of Chlamydomonas affected in different stages in the expression of the chloroplast encoded Photosystem II polypeptide, D2. We have made the progress in understanding how nuclear gene products affect the translation of the D2 encoding MRNA. Two nuclear genes are required for this process which have been mapped genetically. In contrast to other examples of nuclear control of translation in the chloroplast, these nuclear gene products appear to be required either for specific stages in translation elongation or for the post-translational stabilization of the nascent D2 protein. Pseudoreversion analysis has led us to a locus which may be directly involved in D2 expression. We have made considerable progress in pursuing the molecular basis of psbd MRNA stabilization. psbD 5' UTR specific transcripts have been synthesized in vitro and used in gel mobility shift assays. UV-crosslinking studies are underway to identify the transacting factors which bind to these sequences. The continued examination of these mutants will help us to understand how nuclear gene products work in this specific case of chloroplast gene expression, and will elucidate how two distinct genomes can interact generally.

  8. RIG-I Signaling Is Essential for Influenza B Virus-Induced Rapid Interferon Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Österlund, Pamela; Westenius, Veera; Latvala, Sinikka; Diamond, Michael S.; Gale, Michael; Julkunen, Ilkka

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Influenza B virus causes annual epidemics and, along with influenza A virus, accounts for substantial disease and economic burden throughout the world. Influenza B virus infects only humans and some marine mammals and is not responsible for pandemics, possibly due to a very low frequency of reassortment and a lower evolutionary rate than that of influenza A virus. Influenza B virus has been less studied than influenza A virus, and thus, a comparison of influenza A and B virus infection mechanisms may provide new insight into virus-host interactions. Here we analyzed the early events in influenza B virus infection and interferon (IFN) gene expression in human monocyte-derived macrophages and dendritic cells. We show that influenza B virus induces IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) activation and IFN-λ1 gene expression with faster kinetics than does influenza A virus, without a requirement for viral protein synthesis or replication. Influenza B virus-induced activation of IRF3 required the fusion of viral and endosomal membranes, and nuclear accumulation of IRF3 and viral NP occurred concurrently. In comparison, immediate early IRF3 activation was not observed in influenza A virus-infected macrophages. Experiments with RIG-I-, MDA5-, and RIG-I/MDA5-deficient mouse fibroblasts showed that RIG-I is the critical pattern recognition receptor needed for the influenza B virus-induced activation of IRF3. Our results show that innate immune mechanisms are activated immediately after influenza B virus entry through the endocytic pathway, whereas influenza A virus avoids early IRF3 activation and IFN gene induction. IMPORTANCE Recently, a great deal of interest has been paid to identifying the ligands for RIG-I under conditions of natural infection, as many previous studies have been based on transfection of cells with different types of viral or synthetic RNA structures. We shed light on this question by analyzing the earliest step in innate immune recognition of

  9. Autophagy-related gene Atg5 is essential for astrocyte differentiation in the developing mouse cortex

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shukun; Li, Baoguo; Qiao, Huimin; Lv, Xiaohui; Liang, Qingli; Shi, Zixiao; Xia, Wenlong; Ji, Fen; Jiao, Jianwei

    2014-01-01

    Astrocyte differentiation is essential for late embryonic brain development, and autophagy is active during this process. However, it is unknown whether and how autophagy regulates astrocyte differentiation. Here, we show that Atg5, which is necessary for autophagosome formation, regulates astrocyte differentiation. Atg5 deficiency represses the generation of astrocytes in vitro and in vivo. Conversely, Atg5 overexpression increases the number of astrocytes substantially. We show that Atg5 activates the JAK2-STAT3 pathway by degrading the inhibitory protein SOCS2. The astrocyte differentiation defect caused by Atg5 loss can be rescued by human Atg5 overexpression, STAT3 overexpression, and SOCS2 knockdown. Together, these data demonstrate that Atg5 regulates astrocyte differentiation, with potential implications for brain disorders with autophagy deficiency. PMID:25227738

  10. Bioactivity of essential oil from Artemisia stolonifera (Maxim.) Komar. and its main compounds against two stored-product insects.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen-Juan; Yang, Kai; You, Chun-Xue; Wang, Ying; Wang, Cheng-Fang; Wu, Yan; Geng, Zhu-Feng; Su, Yang; Du, Shu-Shan; Deng, Zhi-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Artemisia stolonifera, a perennial herb, is widely distrbuted in China. The aim of this study was to analyze the essential oil from the aerial parts of Artemisia stolonifera, as well as to evaluate the bioactivity of the oil and its main constituents. The essential oil was analyzed by gas chromatography-flame ionization detector and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry that allowed characterizing 22 compounds. The main components were eucalyptol (32.93%), β-pinene (8.18%), camphor (6.12%) and terpinen-4-ol (6.11%), and obtained from the essential oil after a further isolation. During the contact toxicity tests, the essential oil (LD50 = 8.60 μg/adult) exhibited stronger toxicity against Tribolium castaneum adults than those isolated constituents, however, camphor and terpinen-4-ol showed 1 and 2 times toxicity against Lasioderma serricorne adults than the essential oil (LD50 = 12.68 μg/adult) with LD50 values of 11.30 and 5.42 μg/adult, respectively. In the fumigant toxicity tests, especially on Tribolium castaneum, the essential oil (LC50 = 1.86 mg/L air) showed almost the same level toxicity as positive control, methyl bromide (LC50 = 1.75 mg/L air). Moreover, the essential oil and its four isolated constituents also exhibited strong repellency against two stored-product insects.

  11. Bioactivity of essential oil from Artemisia stolonifera (Maxim.) Komar. and its main compounds against two stored-product insects.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen-Juan; Yang, Kai; You, Chun-Xue; Wang, Ying; Wang, Cheng-Fang; Wu, Yan; Geng, Zhu-Feng; Su, Yang; Du, Shu-Shan; Deng, Zhi-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Artemisia stolonifera, a perennial herb, is widely distrbuted in China. The aim of this study was to analyze the essential oil from the aerial parts of Artemisia stolonifera, as well as to evaluate the bioactivity of the oil and its main constituents. The essential oil was analyzed by gas chromatography-flame ionization detector and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry that allowed characterizing 22 compounds. The main components were eucalyptol (32.93%), β-pinene (8.18%), camphor (6.12%) and terpinen-4-ol (6.11%), and obtained from the essential oil after a further isolation. During the contact toxicity tests, the essential oil (LD50 = 8.60 μg/adult) exhibited stronger toxicity against Tribolium castaneum adults than those isolated constituents, however, camphor and terpinen-4-ol showed 1 and 2 times toxicity against Lasioderma serricorne adults than the essential oil (LD50 = 12.68 μg/adult) with LD50 values of 11.30 and 5.42 μg/adult, respectively. In the fumigant toxicity tests, especially on Tribolium castaneum, the essential oil (LC50 = 1.86 mg/L air) showed almost the same level toxicity as positive control, methyl bromide (LC50 = 1.75 mg/L air). Moreover, the essential oil and its four isolated constituents also exhibited strong repellency against two stored-product insects. PMID:25757434

  12. Essential roles for Mycobacterium tuberculosis Rel beyond the production of (p)ppGpp.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Leslie A; Stallings, Christina L

    2013-12-01

    In Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the stringent response to amino acid starvation is mediated by the M. tuberculosis Rel (RelMtb) enzyme, which transfers a pyrophosphate from ATP to GDP or GTP to synthesize ppGpp and pppGpp, respectively. (p)ppGpp then influences numerous metabolic processes. RelMtb also encodes a second, distinct catalytic domain that hydrolyzes (p)ppGpp into pyrophosphate and GDP or GTP. RelMtb is required for chronic M. tuberculosis infection in mice; however, it is unknown which catalytic activity of RelMtb mediates pathogenesis and whether (p)ppGpp itself is necessary. In order to individually investigate the roles of (p)ppGpp synthesis and hydrolysis during M. tuberculosis pathogenesis, we generated RelMtb point mutants that were either synthetase dead (RelMtb(H344Y)) or hydrolase dead (RelMtb(H80A)). M. tuberculosis strains expressing the synthetase-dead RelMtb(H344Y) mutant did not persist in mice, demonstrating that the RelMtb (p)ppGpp synthetase activity is required for maintaining bacterial titers during chronic infection. Deletion of a second predicted (p)ppGpp synthetase had no effect on pathogenesis, demonstrating that RelMtb was the major contributor to (p)ppGpp production during infection. Interestingly, expression of an allele encoding the hydrolase-dead RelMtb mutant, RelMtb(H80A), that is incapable of hydrolyzing (p)ppGpp but still able to synthesize (p)ppGpp decreased the growth rate of M. tuberculosis and changed the colony morphology of the bacteria. In addition, RelMtb(H80A) expression during acute or chronic M. tuberculosis infection in mice was lethal to the infecting bacteria. These findings highlight a distinct role for RelMtb-mediated (p)ppGpp hydrolysis that is essential for M. tuberculosis pathogenesis.

  13. Essential Roles for Mycobacterium tuberculosis Rel beyond the Production of (p)ppGpp

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Leslie A.

    2013-01-01

    In Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the stringent response to amino acid starvation is mediated by the M. tuberculosis Rel (RelMtb) enzyme, which transfers a pyrophosphate from ATP to GDP or GTP to synthesize ppGpp and pppGpp, respectively. (p)ppGpp then influences numerous metabolic processes. RelMtb also encodes a second, distinct catalytic domain that hydrolyzes (p)ppGpp into pyrophosphate and GDP or GTP. RelMtb is required for chronic M. tuberculosis infection in mice; however, it is unknown which catalytic activity of RelMtb mediates pathogenesis and whether (p)ppGpp itself is necessary. In order to individually investigate the roles of (p)ppGpp synthesis and hydrolysis during M. tuberculosis pathogenesis, we generated RelMtb point mutants that were either synthetase dead (RelMtbH344Y) or hydrolase dead (RelMtbH80A). M. tuberculosis strains expressing the synthetase-dead RelMtbH344Y mutant did not persist in mice, demonstrating that the RelMtb (p)ppGpp synthetase activity is required for maintaining bacterial titers during chronic infection. Deletion of a second predicted (p)ppGpp synthetase had no effect on pathogenesis, demonstrating that RelMtb was the major contributor to (p)ppGpp production during infection. Interestingly, expression of an allele encoding the hydrolase-dead RelMtb mutant, RelMtbH80A, that is incapable of hydrolyzing (p)ppGpp but still able to synthesize (p)ppGpp decreased the growth rate of M. tuberculosis and changed the colony morphology of the bacteria. In addition, RelMtbH80A expression during acute or chronic M. tuberculosis infection in mice was lethal to the infecting bacteria. These findings highlight a distinct role for RelMtb-mediated (p)ppGpp hydrolysis that is essential for M. tuberculosis pathogenesis. PMID:24123821

  14. Association of eNOS gene polymorphisms with essential hypertension in the Han population in southwestern China.

    PubMed

    Li, J; Cun, Y; Tang, W R; Wang, Y; Li, S N; Ouyang, H R; Wu, Y R; Yu, H J; Xiao, C J

    2011-01-01

    Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) plays an important role in maintaining blood pressure homeostasis and vascular integrity. Polymorphisms in the eNOS gene have been found to be associated with hypertension in different human populations, including Northern and Southern Chinese Han populations. To examine the relationship of three eNOS gene polymorphisms, T-786C (rs2070744), G894T (rs1799983), and G10T (rs7830), with hypertension in the Han population in southwestern China, we carried out a study of the genotypes of three SNPs in 510 hypertensive and 510 normotensive subjects from the Yunnan Province by using PCR-RFLP and sequencing. Our SNP analyses showed that the distribution of the T-786C polymorphism did not differ between patients and controls, and that G894T and G10T are significantly associated with hypertension in females, adjusted for covariates. Compared with the other haplotypes, haplotype H1 (TGG), carrying protective 10G and 894G alleles, significantly decreased the risk of increased essential hypertension in females, with an odds ratio of 0.68 (P = 10(-5)). These results suggest that the eNOS polymorphism is one of the factors contributing to the predisposition for essential hypertension in the Han population in southwestern China. PMID:21968727

  15. Circadian Clock Genes Are Essential for Normal Adult Neurogenesis, Differentiation, and Fate Determination.

    PubMed

    Malik, Astha; Kondratov, Roman V; Jamasbi, Roudabeh J; Geusz, Michael E

    2015-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis creates new neurons and glia from stem cells in the human brain throughout life. It is best understood in the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus and the subventricular zone (SVZ). Circadian rhythms have been identified in the hippocampus, but the role of any endogenous circadian oscillator cells in hippocampal neurogenesis and their importance in learning or memory remains unclear. Any study of stem cell regulation by intrinsic circadian timing within the DG is complicated by modulation from circadian clocks elsewhere in the brain. To examine circadian oscillators in greater isolation, neurosphere cultures were prepared from the DG of two knockout mouse lines that lack a functional circadian clock and from mPer1::luc mice to identify circadian oscillations in gene expression. Circadian mPer1 gene activity rhythms were recorded in neurospheres maintained in a culture medium that induces neurogenesis but not in one that maintains the stem cell state. Although the differentiating neural stem progenitor cells of spheres were rhythmic, evidence of any mature neurons was extremely sparse. The circadian timing signal originated in undifferentiated cells within the neurosphere. This conclusion was supported by immunocytochemistry for mPER1 protein that was localized to the inner, more stem cell-like neurosphere core. To test for effects of the circadian clock on neurogenesis, media conditions were altered to induce neurospheres from BMAL1 knockout mice to differentiate. These cultures displayed unusually high differentiation into glia rather than neurons according to GFAP and NeuN expression, respectively, and very few BetaIII tubulin-positive, immature neurons were observed. The knockout neurospheres also displayed areas visibly devoid of cells and had overall higher cell death. Neurospheres from arrhythmic mice lacking two other core clock genes, Cry1 and Cry2, showed significantly reduced growth and increased astrocyte proliferation during

  16. Circadian Clock Genes Are Essential for Normal Adult Neurogenesis, Differentiation, and Fate Determination

    PubMed Central

    Kondratov, Roman V.; Jamasbi, Roudabeh J.

    2015-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis creates new neurons and glia from stem cells in the human brain throughout life. It is best understood in the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus and the subventricular zone (SVZ). Circadian rhythms have been identified in the hippocampus, but the role of any endogenous circadian oscillator cells in hippocampal neurogenesis and their importance in learning or memory remains unclear. Any study of stem cell regulation by intrinsic circadian timing within the DG is complicated by modulation from circadian clocks elsewhere in the brain. To examine circadian oscillators in greater isolation, neurosphere cultures were prepared from the DG of two knockout mouse lines that lack a functional circadian clock and from mPer1::luc mice to identify circadian oscillations in gene expression. Circadian mPer1 gene activity rhythms were recorded in neurospheres maintained in a culture medium that induces neurogenesis but not in one that maintains the stem cell state. Although the differentiating neural stem progenitor cells of spheres were rhythmic, evidence of any mature neurons was extremely sparse. The circadian timing signal originated in undifferentiated cells within the neurosphere. This conclusion was supported by immunocytochemistry for mPER1 protein that was localized to the inner, more stem cell-like neurosphere core. To test for effects of the circadian clock on neurogenesis, media conditions were altered to induce neurospheres from BMAL1 knockout mice to differentiate. These cultures displayed unusually high differentiation into glia rather than neurons according to GFAP and NeuN expression, respectively, and very few BetaIII tubulin-positive, immature neurons were observed. The knockout neurospheres also displayed areas visibly devoid of cells and had overall higher cell death. Neurospheres from arrhythmic mice lacking two other core clock genes, Cry1 and Cry2, showed significantly reduced growth and increased astrocyte proliferation during

  17. Campylobacter jejuni gene cj0511 encodes a serine peptidase essential for colonisation

    PubMed Central

    Karlyshev, A.V.; Thacker, G.; Jones, M.A.; Clements, M.O.; Wren, B.W.

    2014-01-01

    According to MEROPS peptidase database, Campylobacter species encode 64 predicted peptidases. However, proteolytic properties of only a few of these proteins have been confirmed experimentally. In this study we identified and characterised a Campylobacter jejuni gene cj0511 encoding a novel peptidase. The proteolytic activity associated with this enzyme was demonstrated in cell lysates. Moreover, enzymatic studies conducted with a purified protein confirmed a prediction of it being a serine peptidase. Furthermore, cj0511 mutant was found to be severely attenuated in chicken colonisation model, suggesting a role of the Cj0511 protein in infection. PMID:24918062

  18. New LIC Vectors For Production of Proteins from Genes Containing Rare Codons

    PubMed Central

    Eschenfeldt, William H.; Makowska-Grzyska, Magdalena; Stols, Lucy; Donnelly, Mark; Jedrzejczak, Robert; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    In the effort to produce proteins coded by diverse genomes, structural genomics projects often must express genes containing codons that are rare in the production strain. To address this problem, genes expressing tRNAs corresponding to those codons are typically coexpressed from a second plasmid in the host strain, or from genes incorporated into production plasmids. Here we describe the modification of a series of LIC pMCSG vectors currently used in the high-throughput production of proteins to include crucial tRNA genes covering rare codons for Arg (AGG/AGA) and Ile (AUA). We also present variants of these new vectors that allow analysis of ligand binding or co-expression of multiple proteins introduced through two independent LIC steps. Additionally, to accommodate the cloning of multiple large proteins, the size of the plasmids was reduced by approximately one kilobase through the removal of non-essential DNA from the base vector. Production of proteins from core vectors of this series validated the desired enhanced capabilities: higher yields of proteins expressed from genes with rare codons occurred in most cases, biotinylated derivatives enabled detailed automated ligand binding analysis, and multiple proteins introduced by dual LIC cloning were expressed successfully and in near balanced stoichiometry, allowing tandem purification of interacting proteins. PMID:24057978

  19. The ORF012 Gene of Marek's Disease Virus Type 1 Produces a Spliced Transcript and Encodes a Novel Nuclear Phosphoprotein Essential for Virus Growth

    PubMed Central

    Schippers, Timo; Jarosinski, Keith

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Marek's disease virus (MDV), an alphaherpesvirus, is the causative agent of a lethal disease in chickens characterized by generalized nerve inflammation and rapid lymphoma development. The extensive colinearity of the MDV genome with those of related herpesviruses has eased functional characterization of many MDV genes. However, MDV carries a number of unique open reading frames (ORFs) that have not yet been investigated regarding their coding potentials and the functions of their products. Among these unique ORFs are two putative ORFs, ORF011 and ORF012, which are found at the extreme left end of the MDV unique long region. Using reverse transcriptase PCR, we showed that ORF011 and ORF012 are not individual genes but form a single gene through mRNA splicing of a small intron, resulting in the novel ORF012. We generated an ORF012-null virus using an infectious clone of MDV strain RB-1B. The deletion virus had a marked growth defect in vitro and could not be passaged in cultured cells, suggesting an essential role for the ORF012 product in virus replication. Further studies revealed that protein 012 (p012) localized to the nucleus in transfected and infected cells, and we identified by site-directed mutagenesis and green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter fusion assays a nuclear localization signal (NLS) that was mapped to a 23-amino-acid sequence at the protein's C terminus. Nuclear export was blocked using leptomycin B, suggesting a potential role for p012 as a nuclear/cytoplasmic shuttling protein. Finally, p012 is phosphorylated at multiple residues, a modification that could possibly regulate its subcellular distribution. IMPORTANCE Marek's disease virus (MDV) causes a devastating oncogenic disease in chickens with high morbidity and mortality. The costs for disease prevention reach several billion dollars annually. The functional investigation of MDV genes is necessary to understand its complex replication cycle, which eventually could help us to

  20. Sperm-Associated Antigen–17 Gene Is Essential for Motile Cilia Function and Neonatal Survival

    PubMed Central

    Teves, Maria Eugenia; Zhang, Zhibing; Costanzo, Richard M.; Henderson, Scott C.; Corwin, Frank D.; Zweit, Jamal; Sundaresan, Gobalakrishnan; Subler, Mark; Salloum, Fadi N.; Rubin, Bruce K.

    2013-01-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD), resulting from defects in cilia assembly or motility, is caused by mutations in a number of genes encoding axonemal proteins. PCD phenotypes are variable, and include recurrent respiratory tract infections, bronchiectasis, hydrocephaly, situs inversus, and male infertility. We generated knockout mice for the sperm-associated antigen–17 (Spag17) gene, which encodes a central pair (CP) protein present in the axonemes of cells with “9 + 2” motile cilia or flagella. The targeting of Spag17 resulted in a severe phenotype characterized by immotile nasal and tracheal cilia, reduced clearance of nasal mucus, profound respiratory distress associated with lung fluid accumulation and disruption of the alveolar epithelium, cerebral ventricular expansion consistent with emerging hydrocephalus, failure to suckle, and neonatal demise within 12 hours of birth. Ultrastructural analysis revealed the loss of one CP microtubule in approximately one quarter of tracheal cilia axonemes, an absence of a C1 microtubule projection, and other less frequent CP structural abnormalities. SPAG6 and SPAG16 (CP proteins that interact with SPAG17) were increased in tracheal tissue from SPAG17-deficient mice. We conclude that Spag17 plays a critical role in the function and structure of motile cilia, and that neonatal lethality is likely explained by impaired airway mucociliary clearance. PMID:23418344

  1. Further characterization of a non-essential mutator gene in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed Central

    Hoess, R H; Fan, D P

    1975-01-01

    The properties of mutR, a mutator closely linked to thyA, have been further characterized. We have found that the mutator gene is carried on a specialized transducing phage (lambdapcI857 thyA) generated by the excision of lambdacI857 integrated at a secondary attachment site between lysA and thyA. We present three lines of evidence indicating that mutR is a nonessential gene. (i) Deletions of the mutator can be found amoung survivors of heat induction of lambdacI857 when the phage is integrated between lysA and thyA. (ii) Mutations in mutR can be induced with the frameshift mutagen ICR-191. (iii) An amber mutant in mutR has been found. Viable strains could be made by combining the mutator with polB, polA polR, ligts7, and uvrA mutations. The mutator was still able to increase the spontaneous mutation frequency in these genetic backgrounds. When the reversion patterns of a series of well-characterized trpA mutations were analyzed, the results suggested that mutR is more efficient at causing transitions than transversion mutations. PMID:1102526

  2. The RAD7 and RAD16 genes, which are essential for pyrimidine dimer removal from the silent mating type loci, are also required for repair of the nontranscribed strand of an active gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Verhage, R; Zeeman, A M; de Groot, N; Gleig, F; Bang, D D; van de Putte, P; Brouwer, J

    1994-01-01

    The rad16 mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was previously shown to be impaired in removal of UV-induced pyrimidine dimers from the silent mating-type loci (D. D. Bang, R. A. Verhage, N. Goosen, J. Brouwer, and P. van de Putte, Nucleic Acids Res. 20:3925-3931, 1992). Here we show that rad7 as well as rad7 rad16 double mutants have the same repair phenotype, indicating that the RAD7 and RAD16 gene products might operate in the same nucleotide excision repair subpathway. Dimer removal from the genome overall is essentially incomplete in these mutants, leaving about 20 to 30% of the DNA unrepaired. Repair analysis of the transcribed RPB2 gene shows that the nontranscribed strand is not repaired at all in rad7 and rad16 mutants, whereas the transcribed strand is repaired in these mutants at a fast rate similar to that in RAD+ cells. When the results obtained with the RPB2 gene can be generalized, the RAD7 and RAD16 proteins not only are essential for repair of silenced regions but also function in repair of nontranscribed strands of active genes in S. cerevisiae. The phenotype of rad7 and rad16 mutants closely resembles that of human xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group C (XP-C) cells, suggesting that RAD7 and RAD16 in S. cerevisiae function in the same pathway as the XPC gene in human cells. RAD4, which on the basis of sequence homology has been proposed to be the yeast XPC counterpart, seems to be involved in repair of both inactive and active yeast DNA, challenging the hypothesis that RAD4 and XPC are functional homologs. Images PMID:8065346

  3. The Drosophila Clathrin Heavy Chain Gene: Clathrin Function Is Essential in a Multicellular Organism

    PubMed Central

    Bazinet, C.; Katzen, A. L.; Morgan, M.; Mahowald, A. P.; Lemmon, S. K.

    1993-01-01

    The clathrin heavy chain (HC) is the major structural polypeptide of the cytoplasmic surface lattice of clathrin-coated pits and vesicles. As a genetic approach to understanding the role of clathrin in cellular morphogenesis and developmental signal transduction, a clathrin heavy chain (Chc) gene of Drosophila melanogaster has been identified by a combination of molecular and classical genetic approaches. Using degenerate primers based on mammalian and yeast clathrin HC sequences, a small fragment of the HC gene was amplified from genomic Drosophila DNA by the polymerase chain reaction. Genomic and cDNA clones from phage libraries were isolated and analyzed using this fragment as a probe. The amino acid sequence of the Drosophila clathrin HC deduced from cDNA sequences is 80%, 57% and 49% identical, respectively, with the mammalian, Dictyostelium and yeast HCs. Hybridization in situ to larval polytene chromosomes revealed a single Chc locus at position 13F2 on the X chromosome. A 13-kb genomic Drosophila fragment including the Chc transcription unit was reintroduced into the Drosophila genome via P element-mediated germline transformation. This DNA complemented a group of EMS-induced lethal mutations mapping to the same region of the X chromosome, thus identifying the Chc complementation group. Mutant individuals homozygous or hemizygous for the Chc(1), Chc(2) or Chc(3) alleles developed to a late stage of embryogenesis, but failed to hatch to the first larval stage. A fourth allele, Chc(4), exhibited polyphasic lethality, with a significant number of homozygous and hemizygous offspring surviving to adulthood. Germline clonal analysis of Chc mutant alleles indicated that the three tight lethal alleles were autonomous cell-lethal mutations in the female germline. In contrast, Chc(4) germline clones were viable at a rate comparable to wild type, giving rise to viable adult progeny. However, hemizygous Chc(4) males were invariably sterile. The sterility was

  4. Essential Oil of Amomum maximum Roxb. and Its Bioactivities against Two Stored-Product Insects.

    PubMed

    Guo, Shan-Shan; You, Chun-Xue; Liang, Jun-Yu; Zhang, Wen-Juan; Yang, Kai; Geng, Zhu-Feng; Wang, Cheng-Fang; Du, Shu-Shan; Lei, Ning

    2015-01-01

    Amomum maximum Roxb. is a perennial herb distributed in South China and Southeast Asia. The objective of this work was to analyze the chemical constituents and assess insecticidal and repellent activities of the essential oil from Amomum maximum fruits against Tribolium castaneum (Herbst) and Liposcelis bostrychophila (Badonnel). The essential oil was obtained by hydrodistillation and analyzed by gas chromatography-flame ionization detector and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The main components of the essential oil were identified to be β-pinene (23.39%), β-caryophyllene (16.43%), α-pinene (7.55%), sylvestrene (6.61%) and ç-cadinene (4.19%). It was found that the essential oil of A. maximum fruits possessed contact and fumigant toxicities against T. castaneum adults (LD50 = 29.57 μg/adult and LC(50) = 23.09 mg/L air, respectively) and showed contact toxicity against L. bostrychophila (LD(50) = 67.46 μg/cm(2)). Repellency of the crude oil was also evaluated. After 2 h treatment, the essential oil possessed 100% repellency at 78.63 nL/cm(2) against T. castaneum and 84% repellency at 63.17 nL/cm(2) against L. bostrychophila. The results indicated that the essential oil of A. maximum fruits had the potential to be developed as a natural insecticide and repellent for control of T. castaneum and L. bostrychophila. PMID:26582152

  5. The Agrobacterium tumefaciens virD3 gene is not essential for tumorigenicity on plants.

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, A M; Das, A

    1992-01-01

    Genetic studies indicate that three of the four polypeptides encoded within the virD operon of the Agrobacterium tumefaciens Ti plasmid are essential for virulence. In order to determine whether the fourth polypeptide, VirD3, has any role in virulence, complementation analysis was used. An A. tumefaciens strain, A348 delta D, which lacked the entire virD operon in the Ti plasmid pTiA6, was constructed. Plasmids containing defined regions of the virD operon were introduced into this strain, and virulence was tested by the strains' abilities to form tumors on Kalanchoe leaves, tomato stems, and potato tubers. As expected, deletion of the virD operon led to an avirulent phenotype. The virulence of this strain could be restored by providing virD1, virD2, and virD4 in trans. No requirement for virD3 in tumor formation was observed in these assays. Images PMID:1629176

  6. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus ORF6 gene is essential in viral lytic replication.

    PubMed

    Peng, Can; Chen, Jungang; Tang, Wei; Liu, Chunlan; Chen, Xulin

    2014-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is associated with Kaposis's sarcoma (KS), primary effusion lymphoma and multicentric Castleman's disease. KSHV encodes at least 8 open reading frames (ORFs) that play important roles in its lytic DNA replication. Among which, ORF6 of KSHV encodes an ssDNA binding protein that has been proved to participate in origin-dependent DNA replication in transient assays. To define further the function of ORF6 in the virus life cycle, we constructed a recombinant virus genome with a large deletion within the ORF6 locus by using a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) system. Stable 293T cells carrying the BAC36 (wild type) and BACΔ6 genomes were generated. When monolayers of 293T-BAC36 and 293T-BACΔ6 cells were induced with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) and sodium butyrate, infectious virus was detected from the 293T-BAC36 cell supernatants only and not from the 293T- BACΔ6 cell supernatants. DNA synthesis was defective in 293T-BACΔ6 cells. Expression of ORF6 in trans in BACΔ6-containing cells was able to rescue both defects. Our results provide genetic evidence that ORF6 is essential for KSHV lytic replication. The stable 293T cells carrying the BAC36 and BACΔ6 genomes could be used as tools to investigate the detailed functions of ORF6 in the lytic replication of KSHV. PMID:24911362

  7. Regulation of Cell and Gene Therapy Medicinal Products in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi-Chu; Wang, Po-Yu; Tsai, Shih-Chih; Lin, Chien-Liang; Tai, Hsuen-Yung; Lo, Chi-Fang; Wu, Shiow-Ing; Chiang, Yu-Mei; Liu, Li-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Owing to the rapid and mature development of emerging biotechnology in the fields of cell culture, cell preservation, and recombinant DNA technology, more and more cell or gene medicinal therapy products have been approved for marketing, to treat serious diseases which have been challenging to treat with current medical practice or medicine. This chapter will briefly introduce the Taiwan Food and Drug Administration (TFDA) and elaborate regulation of cell and gene therapy medicinal products in Taiwan, including regulatory history evolution, current regulatory framework, application and review procedures, and relevant jurisdictional issues. Under the promise of quality, safety, and efficacy of medicinal products, it is expected the regulation and environment will be more flexible, streamlining the process of the marketing approval of new emerging cell or gene therapy medicinal products and providing diverse treatment options for physicians and patients.

  8. Addition of Escherichia coli K-12 growth observation and gene essentiality data to the EcoCyc database.

    PubMed

    Mackie, Amanda; Paley, Suzanne; Keseler, Ingrid M; Shearer, Alexander; Paulsen, Ian T; Karp, Peter D

    2014-03-01

    The sets of compounds that can support growth of an organism are defined by the presence of transporters and metabolic pathways that convert nutrient sources into cellular components and energy for growth. A collection of known nutrient sources can therefore serve both as an impetus for investigating new metabolic pathways and transporters and as a reference for computational modeling of known metabolic pathways. To establish such a collection for Escherichia coli K-12, we have integrated data on the growth or nongrowth of E. coli K-12 obtained from published observations using a variety of individual media and from high-throughput phenotype microarrays into the EcoCyc database. The assembled collection revealed a substantial number of discrepancies between the high-throughput data sets, which we investigated where possible using low-throughput growth assays on soft agar and in liquid culture. We also integrated six data sets describing 16,119 observations of the growth of single-gene knockout mutants of E. coli K-12 into EcoCyc, which are relevant to antimicrobial drug design, provide clues regarding the roles of genes of unknown function, and are useful for validating metabolic models. To make this information easily accessible to EcoCyc users, we developed software for capturing, querying, and visualizing cellular growth assays and gene essentiality data.

  9. Pinin modulates expression of an intestinal homeobox gene, Cdx2, and plays an essential role for small intestinal morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Jeong-Hoon; Taxter, Timothy J.; Munguba, Gustavo C.; Kim, Yong H.; Dhaduvai, Kanthi; Dunn, Nicholas W.; Degan, William J.; Oh, S. Paul; Sugrue, Stephen P.

    2010-01-01

    Pinin (Pnn), a nuclear speckle-associated protein, has been shown to function in maintenance of epithelial integrity through altering expression of several key adhesion molecules. Here we demonstrate that Pnn plays a crucial role in small intestinal development by influencing expression of an intestinal homeobox gene, Cdx2. Conditional inactivation of Pnn within intestinal epithelia resulted in significant downregulation of a caudal type homeobox gene, Cdx2, leading to obvious villus dysmorphogenesis and severely disrupted epithelial differentiation. Additionally, in Pnn-deficient small intestine, we observed upregulated Tcf/Lef reporter activity, as well as misregulated expression/distribution of β-catenin and Tcf4. Since regulation of Cdx gene expression has been closely linked to Wnt/β-catenin signaling activity, we explored the possibility of Pnn’s interaction with β-catenin, a major effector of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway. Co-immunoprecipitation assays revealed that Pnn, together with its interaction partner CtBP2, a transcriptional co-repressor, was in a complex with β-catenin. Moreover, both of these proteins were found to be recruited to the proximal promoter area of Cdx2. Taken together, our results suggest that Pnn is essential for tight regulation of Wnt signaling and Cdx2 expression during small intestinal development. PMID:20637749

  10. EDS1, an essential component of R gene-mediated disease resistance in Arabidopsis has homology to eukaryotic lipases.

    PubMed

    Falk, A; Feys, B J; Frost, L N; Jones, J D; Daniels, M J; Parker, J E

    1999-03-16

    A major class of plant disease resistance (R) genes encodes leucine-rich-repeat proteins that possess a nucleotide binding site and amino-terminal similarity to the cytoplasmic domains of the Drosophila Toll and human IL-1 receptors. In Arabidopsis thaliana, EDS1 is indispensable for the function of these R genes. The EDS1 gene was cloned by targeted transposon tagging and found to encode a protein that has similarity in its amino-terminal portion to the catalytic site of eukaryotic lipases. Thus, hydrolase activity, possibly on a lipid-based substrate, is anticipated to be central to EDS1 function. The predicted EDS1 carboxyl terminus has no significant sequence homologies, although analysis of eight defective eds1 alleles reveals it to be essential for EDS1 function. Two plant defense pathways have been defined previously that depend on salicylic acid, a phenolic compound, or jasmonic acid, a lipid-derived molecule. We examined the expression of EDS1 mRNA and marker mRNAs (PR1 and PDF1.2, respectively) for these two pathways in wild-type and eds1 mutant plants after different challenges. The results suggest that EDS1 functions upstream of salicylic acid-dependent PR1 mRNA accumulation and is not required for jasmonic acid-induced PDF1.2 mRNA expression.

  11. Association between the C34T polymorphism of the AMPD1 gene and essential hypertension in Malaysian patients.

    PubMed

    Nemati, R; Lu, J; Ramachandran, V; Etemad, A; Heidari, M; Yahya, M J; Roozafzoon, R; Ismail, P

    2016-06-20

    The aim of this study was to determine whether C34T, a common polymorphism of the adenosine monophosphate deaminase 1 gene (AMPD1), is associated with essential hypertension (EH). We hypothesize that C34T is associated with the development of EH. A case-control design was used for this study. The DNA was extracted using a commercial kit from the whole blood of 200 patients with hypertension and 200 subjects without hypertension from selected Malaysian ethnicities (Malays, Chinese, and Indians). Polymerase chain reaction followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and agarose gel electrophoresis were used for genotyping. The C34T gene polymorphism of AMPD1 was significantly associated with EH in the Malaysian subjects (P < 0.0001). The genotype frequencies of CC, CT, and TT were 6%, 79%, and 15%, respectively, among hypertensive subjects, while no TT genotypes were observed in the normotensive subjects. Further, the frequency of hypertension was higher among T allele carriers than C carriers (OD = 9.94; 95%CI = 6.851-14.434). There were significant differences in the systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and pulse pressure (P ˂ 0.05) between the normotensive and hypertensive Malaysian subjects; we believe those difference were caused by the C34T polymorphism. For the first time in Malaysia, the current study provides evidence that a common polymorphism of the AMPD1 gene (C34T) is strongly associated with EH.

  12. Association between the C34T polymorphism of the AMPD1 gene and essential hypertension in Malaysian patients.

    PubMed

    Nemati, R; Lu, J; Ramachandran, V; Etemad, A; Heidari, M; Yahya, M J; Roozafzoon, R; Ismail, P

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether C34T, a common polymorphism of the adenosine monophosphate deaminase 1 gene (AMPD1), is associated with essential hypertension (EH). We hypothesize that C34T is associated with the development of EH. A case-control design was used for this study. The DNA was extracted using a commercial kit from the whole blood of 200 patients with hypertension and 200 subjects without hypertension from selected Malaysian ethnicities (Malays, Chinese, and Indians). Polymerase chain reaction followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and agarose gel electrophoresis were used for genotyping. The C34T gene polymorphism of AMPD1 was significantly associated with EH in the Malaysian subjects (P < 0.0001). The genotype frequencies of CC, CT, and TT were 6%, 79%, and 15%, respectively, among hypertensive subjects, while no TT genotypes were observed in the normotensive subjects. Further, the frequency of hypertension was higher among T allele carriers than C carriers (OD = 9.94; 95%CI = 6.851-14.434). There were significant differences in the systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and pulse pressure (P ˂ 0.05) between the normotensive and hypertensive Malaysian subjects; we believe those difference were caused by the C34T polymorphism. For the first time in Malaysia, the current study provides evidence that a common polymorphism of the AMPD1 gene (C34T) is strongly associated with EH. PMID:27323204

  13. Addition of Escherichia coli K-12 Growth Observation and Gene Essentiality Data to the EcoCyc Database

    PubMed Central

    Mackie, Amanda; Paley, Suzanne; Keseler, Ingrid M.; Shearer, Alexander; Paulsen, Ian T.

    2014-01-01

    The sets of compounds that can support growth of an organism are defined by the presence of transporters and metabolic pathways that convert nutrient sources into cellular components and energy for growth. A collection of known nutrient sources can therefore serve both as an impetus for investigating new metabolic pathways and transporters and as a reference for computational modeling of known metabolic pathways. To establish such a collection for Escherichia coli K-12, we have integrated data on the growth or nongrowth of E. coli K-12 obtained from published observations using a variety of individual media and from high-throughput phenotype microarrays into the EcoCyc database. The assembled collection revealed a substantial number of discrepancies between the high-throughput data sets, which we investigated where possible using low-throughput growth assays on soft agar and in liquid culture. We also integrated six data sets describing 16,119 observations of the growth of single-gene knockout mutants of E. coli K-12 into EcoCyc, which are relevant to antimicrobial drug design, provide clues regarding the roles of genes of unknown function, and are useful for validating metabolic models. To make this information easily accessible to EcoCyc users, we developed software for capturing, querying, and visualizing cellular growth assays and gene essentiality data. PMID:24363340

  14. Estrogen-related receptor {alpha} is essential for the expression of antioxidant protection genes and mitochondrial function

    SciTech Connect

    Rangwala, Shamina M. . E-mail: shamina.rangwala@novartis.com; Li, Xiaoyan; Lindsley, Loren; Wang, Xiaomei; Shaughnessy, Stacey; Daniels, Thomas G.; Szustakowski, Joseph; Nirmala, N.R.; Wu, Zhidan; Stevenson, Susan C.

    2007-05-25

    Estrogen-related receptor {alpha} (ERR{alpha}) is an important mediator of mitochondrial biogenesis and function. To investigate the transcriptional network controlling these phenomena, we investigated mitochondrial gene expression in embryonic fibroblasts isolated from ERR{alpha} null mice. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} coactivator-1{alpha} (PGC-1{alpha}) stimulated mitochondrial gene expression program in control cells, but not in the ERR{alpha} null cells. Interestingly, the induction of levels of mitochondrial oxidative stress protection genes in response to increased PGC-1{alpha} levels was dependent on ERR{alpha}. Furthermore, we found that the PGC-1{alpha}-mediated induction of estrogen-related receptor {gamma} and nuclear respiratory factor 2 (NRF-2), was dependent on the presence of ERR{alpha}. Basal levels of NRF-2 were decreased in the absence of ERR{alpha}. The absence of ERR{alpha} resulted in a decrease in citrate synthase enzyme activity in response to PGC-1{alpha} overexpression. Our results indicate an essential role for ERR{alpha} as a key regulator of oxidative metabolism.

  15. Chemical Composition and Bioactivities of the Essential Oil from Etlingera yunnanensis against Two Stored Product Insects.

    PubMed

    Guo, Shan-Shan; You, Chun-Xue; Liang, Jun-Yu; Zhang, Wen-Juan; Geng, Zhu-Feng; Wang, Cheng-Fang; Du, Shu-Shan; Lei, Ning

    2015-08-28

    The chemical composition of the essential oil of Etlingera yunnanensis rhizomes and its contact and repellent activities against Tribolium castaneum (Herbst) and Liposcelis bostrychophila (Badonnel) were investigated. The essential oil obtained from E. yunnanensis rhizomes with hydrodistillation was performed by gas chromatography-flame ionization detection and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The main components of the essential oil were identified to be estragole (65.2%), β-caryophyllene (6.4%), 1,8-cineole (6.4%), limonene (5.2%), and α-pinene (2.4%). It was found that the essential oil of E. yunnanensis rhizomes possessed contact toxicity against T. castaneum and L. bostrychophila (LD50 = 23.33 μg/adult and LD50 = 47.38 μg/cm², respectively). Estragole, 1,8-cineole, and limonene exhibited stronger contact toxicity (LD50 values of 20.41, 18.86, and 13.40 μg/adult, respectively) than β-caryophyllene (LD50 = 41.72 μg/adult) against T. castaneum adults. Estragole possessed stronger contact toxicity (LD50 = 30.22 µg/cm²) than β-caryophyllene, 1,8-cineole, and limonene (LD50 values of 74.11, 321.20, and 239.62 μg/adult, respectively) against L. bostrychophila adults. Repellency of the crude oil was also evaluated. The essential oil and constituents possessed strong repellent activity against T. castaneum adults. The four individual constituents showed weaker repellent activity than the essential oil against L. bostrychophila adults. The results indicated that the essential oil of E. yunnanensis rhizomes and the individual constituents had the potential to be developed as a natural insecticide and repellent for the control of T. castaneum and L. bostrychophila.

  16. Chemical Composition and Bioactivities of the Essential Oil from Etlingera yunnanensis against Two Stored Product Insects.

    PubMed

    Guo, Shan-Shan; You, Chun-Xue; Liang, Jun-Yu; Zhang, Wen-Juan; Geng, Zhu-Feng; Wang, Cheng-Fang; Du, Shu-Shan; Lei, Ning

    2015-01-01

    The chemical composition of the essential oil of Etlingera yunnanensis rhizomes and its contact and repellent activities against Tribolium castaneum (Herbst) and Liposcelis bostrychophila (Badonnel) were investigated. The essential oil obtained from E. yunnanensis rhizomes with hydrodistillation was performed by gas chromatography-flame ionization detection and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The main components of the essential oil were identified to be estragole (65.2%), β-caryophyllene (6.4%), 1,8-cineole (6.4%), limonene (5.2%), and α-pinene (2.4%). It was found that the essential oil of E. yunnanensis rhizomes possessed contact toxicity against T. castaneum and L. bostrychophila (LD50 = 23.33 μg/adult and LD50 = 47.38 μg/cm², respectively). Estragole, 1,8-cineole, and limonene exhibited stronger contact toxicity (LD50 values of 20.41, 18.86, and 13.40 μg/adult, respectively) than β-caryophyllene (LD50 = 41.72 μg/adult) against T. castaneum adults. Estragole possessed stronger contact toxicity (LD50 = 30.22 µg/cm²) than β-caryophyllene, 1,8-cineole, and limonene (LD50 values of 74.11, 321.20, and 239.62 μg/adult, respectively) against L. bostrychophila adults. Repellency of the crude oil was also evaluated. The essential oil and constituents possessed strong repellent activity against T. castaneum adults. The four individual constituents showed weaker repellent activity than the essential oil against L. bostrychophila adults. The results indicated that the essential oil of E. yunnanensis rhizomes and the individual constituents had the potential to be developed as a natural insecticide and repellent for the control of T. castaneum and L. bostrychophila. PMID:26343627

  17. Fumigant toxicity and oviposition deterrency of the essential oil from cardamom, Elettaria cardamomum, against three stored–product insects.

    PubMed

    Abbasipour, Habib; Mahmoudvand, Mohammad; Rastegar, Fahimeh; Hosseinpour, Mohammad Hossein

    2011-01-01

    Use of insecticides can have disruptive effects on the environment. Replacing the chemical compounds in these insecticides with plant materials, however, can be a safe method with low environmental risk. In the current study, chemical composition and insecticidal activities of the essential oil from cardamom, Elettaria cardamomum L. (Maton) (Zingiberales: Zingiberaceae) on the adults of three stored product pests was investigated. Results indicated that essential oil of E. cardamomum toxic to the bruchid beetle, Callosobruchus maculatus Fabricius (Coleoptera: Bruchidae), the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum Herbst (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae), and the flour moth, Ephestia kuehniella Zeller (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae). Adults of E. kuehniella were more sensitive than the Coleoptera. Also, the highest mortality of these insects was seen after 12 hours. Results of the LT₅₀ tests showed that the lethal time of mortality occurred between 10-20 hours in various test concentrations. Essential oil of E. cardamomum had a good efficacy on oviposition deterrence of C. maculatus females, too. The chemical constituents of the essential oils were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The major constituents of cardamom were identified as 1,8-cineol, α-terpinyl acetate, terpinene and fenchyl alcohol. These results suggest that essential oil of E. cardamomum is a good choice for control of stored product pests. PMID:22242564

  18. Fumigant Toxicity and Oviposition Deterrency of the Essential Oil from Cardamom, Elettaria cardamomum, Against Three Stored—product Insects

    PubMed Central

    Abbasipour, Habib; Mahmoudvand, Mohammad; Rastegar, Fahimeh; Hosseinpour, Mohammad Hossein

    2011-01-01

    Use of insecticides can have disruptive effects on the environment. Replacing the chemical compounds in these insecticides with plant materials, however, can be a safe method with low environmental risk. In the current study, chemical composition and insecticidal activities of the essential oil from cardamom, Elettaria cardamomum L. (Maton) (Zingiberales: Zingiberaceae) on the adults of three stored product pests was investigated. Results indicated that essential oil of E. cardamomum toxic to the bruchid beetle, Callosobruchus maculatus Fabricius (Coleoptera: Bruchidae), the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum Herbst (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae), and the flour moth, Ephestia kuehniella Zeller (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae). Adults of E. kuehniella were more sensitive than the Coleoptera. Also, the highest mortality of these insects was seen after 12 hours. Results of the LT50 tests showed that the lethal time of mortality occurred between 10–20 hours in various test concentrations. Essential oil of E. cardamomum had a good efficacy on oviposition deterrence of C. maculatus females, too. The chemical constituents of the essential oils were analyzed by gas chromatography—mass spectrometry. The major constituents of cardamom were identified as 1,8-cineol, α-terpinyl acetate, terpinene and fenchyl alcohol. These results suggest that essential oil of E. cardamomum is a good choice for control of stored product pests. PMID:22242564

  19. Fumigant toxicity and oviposition deterrency of the essential oil from cardamom, Elettaria cardamomum, against three stored–product insects.

    PubMed

    Abbasipour, Habib; Mahmoudvand, Mohammad; Rastegar, Fahimeh; Hosseinpour, Mohammad Hossein

    2011-01-01

    Use of insecticides can have disruptive effects on the environment. Replacing the chemical compounds in these insecticides with plant materials, however, can be a safe method with low environmental risk. In the current study, chemical composition and insecticidal activities of the essential oil from cardamom, Elettaria cardamomum L. (Maton) (Zingiberales: Zingiberaceae) on the adults of three stored product pests was investigated. Results indicated that essential oil of E. cardamomum toxic to the bruchid beetle, Callosobruchus maculatus Fabricius (Coleoptera: Bruchidae), the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum Herbst (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae), and the flour moth, Ephestia kuehniella Zeller (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae). Adults of E. kuehniella were more sensitive than the Coleoptera. Also, the highest mortality of these insects was seen after 12 hours. Results of the LT₅₀ tests showed that the lethal time of mortality occurred between 10-20 hours in various test concentrations. Essential oil of E. cardamomum had a good efficacy on oviposition deterrence of C. maculatus females, too. The chemical constituents of the essential oils were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The major constituents of cardamom were identified as 1,8-cineol, α-terpinyl acetate, terpinene and fenchyl alcohol. These results suggest that essential oil of E. cardamomum is a good choice for control of stored product pests.

  20. Effect of essential oils on Aspergillus spore germination, growth and mycotoxin production: a potential source of botanical food preservative

    PubMed Central

    Gemeda, Negero; Woldeamanuel, Yimtubezinash; Asrat, Daniel; Debella, Asfaw

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate effect of essential oils on Aspergillus spore germination, growth and mycotoxin production. Method In vitro antifungal and antiaflatoxigenic activity of essential oils was carried out using poisoned food techniques, spore germination assay, agar dilution assay, and aflatoxin arresting assay on toxigenic strains of Aspergillus species. Results Cymbopogon martinii, Foeniculum vulgare and Trachyspermum ammi (T. ammi) essential oils were tested against toxicogenic isolates of Aspergillus species. T. ammi oil showed highest antifungal activity. Absolute mycelial inhibition was recorded at 1 µl/mL by essential oils of T. ammi. The oil also showed, complete inhibition of spore germination at a concentration of 2 µl/mL. In addition, T. ammi oil showed significant antiaflatoxigenic potency by totally inhibiting aflatoxin production from Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus flavus at 0.5 and 0.75 µl/mL, respectively. Cymbopogon martinii, Foeniculum vulgare and T. ammi oils as antifungal were found superior over synthetic preservative. Moreover, a concentration of 5 336.297 µl/kg body weight was recorded for LC50 on mice indicating the low mammalian toxicity and strengthening its traditional reputations. Conclusions In conclusion, the essential oils from T. ammi can be a potential source of safe natural food preservative for food commodities contamination by storage fungi. PMID:25183114

  1. IGF-I Signaling Is Essential for FSH Stimulation of AKT and Steroidogenic Genes in Granulosa Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ping; Baumgarten, Sarah C.; Wu, Yanguang; Bennett, Jill; Winston, Nicola; Hirshfeld-Cytron, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    FSH and IGF-I synergistically stimulate gonadal steroid production; conversely, silencing the FSH or the IGF-I genes leads to infertility and hypogonadism. To determine the molecular link between these hormones, we examined the signaling cross talk downstream of their receptors. In human and rodent granulosa cells (GCs), IGF-I potentiated the stimulatory effects of FSH and cAMP on the expression of steroidogenic genes. In contrast, inhibition of IGF-I receptor (IGF-IR) activity or expression using pharmacological, genetic, or biochemical approaches prevented the FSH- and cAMP-induced expression of steroidogenic genes and estradiol production. In vivo experiments demonstrated that IGF-IR inactivation reduces the stimulation of steroidogenic genes and follicle growth by gonadotropins. FSH or IGF-I alone stimulated protein kinase B (PKB), which is also known as AKT and in combination synergistically increased AKT phosphorylation. Remarkably, blocking IGF-IR expression or activity decreased AKT basal activity and abolished AKT activation by FSH. In GCs lacking IGF-IR activity, FSH stimulation of Cyp19 expression was rescued by overexpression of constitutively active AKT. Our findings demonstrate, for the first time, that in human, mouse, and rat GCs, the well-known stimulatory effect of FSH on Cyp19 and AKT depends on IGF-I and on the expression and activation of the IGF-IR. PMID:23340251

  2. MicroRNA Regulation of Human Genes Essential for Influenza A (H7N9) Replication.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Stefan; Wu, Weilin; Jones, Cheryl; Perwitasari, Olivia; Mahalingam, Suresh; Tripp, Ralph A

    2016-01-01

    Influenza A viruses are important pathogens of humans and animals. While seasonal influenza viruses infect humans every year, occasionally animal-origin viruses emerge to cause pandemics with significantly higher morbidity and mortality rates. In March 2013, the public health authorities of China reported three cases of laboratory confirmed human infection with avian influenza A (H7N9) virus, and subsequently there have been many cases reported across South East Asia and recently in North America. Most patients experience severe respiratory illness, and morbidity with mortality rates near 40%. No vaccine is currently available and the use of antivirals is complicated due the frequent emergence of drug resistant strains. Thus, there is an imminent need to identify new drug targets for therapeutic intervention. In the current study, a high-throughput screening (HTS) assay was performed using microRNA (miRNA) inhibitors to identify new host miRNA targets that reduce influenza H7N9 replication in human respiratory (A549) cells. Validation studies lead to a top hit, hsa-miR-664a-3p, that had potent antiviral effects in reducing H7N9 replication (TCID50 titers) by two logs. In silico pathway analysis revealed that this microRNA targeted the LIF and NEK7 genes with effects on pro-inflammatory factors. In follow up studies using siRNAs, anti-viral properties were shown for LIF. Furthermore, inhibition of hsa-miR-664a-3p also reduced virus replication of pandemic influenza A strains H1N1 and H3N2. PMID:27166678

  3. Silencing Mist1 Gene Expression Is Essential for Recovery from Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Karki, Anju; Humphrey, Sean E.; Steele, Rebecca E.; Hess, David A.; Taparowsky, Elizabeth J.; Konieczny, Stephen F.

    2015-01-01

    Acinar cells of the exocrine pancreas are tasked with synthesizing, packaging and secreting vast quantities of pro-digestive enzymes to maintain proper metabolic homeostasis for the organism. Because the synthesis of high levels of hydrolases is potentially dangerous, the pancreas is prone to acute pancreatitis (AP), a disease that targets acinar cells, leading to acinar-ductal metaplasia (ADM), inflammation and fibrosis—events that can transition into the earliest stages of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Despite a wealth of information concerning the broad phenotype associated with pancreatitis, little is understood regarding specific transcriptional regulatory networks that are susceptible to AP and the role these networks play in acinar cell and exocrine pancreas responses. In this study, we examined the importance of the acinar-specific maturation transcription factor MIST1 to AP damage and organ recovery. Analysis of wild-type and Mist1 conditional null mice revealed that Mist1 gene transcription and protein accumulation were dramatically reduced as acinar cells underwent ADM alterations during AP episodes. To test if loss of MIST1 function was primarily responsible for the damaged status of the organ, mice harboring a Cre-inducible Mist1 transgene (iMist1) were utilized to determine if sustained MIST1 activity could alleviate AP damage responses. Unexpectedly, constitutive iMist1 expression during AP led to a dramatic increase in organ damage followed by acinar cell death. We conclude that the transient silencing of Mist1 expression is critical for acinar cells to survive an AP episode, providing cells an opportunity to suppress their secretory function and regenerate damaged cells. The importance of MIST1 to these events suggests that modulating key pancreas transcription networks could ease clinical symptoms in patients diagnosed with pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. PMID:26717480

  4. MicroRNA Regulation of Human Genes Essential for Influenza A (H7N9) Replication

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Stefan; Wu, Weilin; Jones, Cheryl; Perwitasari, Olivia; Mahalingam, Suresh; Tripp, Ralph A.

    2016-01-01

    Influenza A viruses are important pathogens of humans and animals. While seasonal influenza viruses infect humans every year, occasionally animal-origin viruses emerge to cause pandemics with significantly higher morbidity and mortality rates. In March 2013, the public health authorities of China reported three cases of laboratory confirmed human infection with avian influenza A (H7N9) virus, and subsequently there have been many cases reported across South East Asia and recently in North America. Most patients experience severe respiratory illness, and morbidity with mortality rates near 40%. No vaccine is currently available and the use of antivirals is complicated due the frequent emergence of drug resistant strains. Thus, there is an imminent need to identify new drug targets for therapeutic intervention. In the current study, a high-throughput screening (HTS) assay was performed using microRNA (miRNA) inhibitors to identify new host miRNA targets that reduce influenza H7N9 replication in human respiratory (A549) cells. Validation studies lead to a top hit, hsa-miR-664a-3p, that had potent antiviral effects in reducing H7N9 replication (TCID50 titers) by two logs. In silico pathway analysis revealed that this microRNA targeted the LIF and NEK7 genes with effects on pro-inflammatory factors. In follow up studies using siRNAs, anti-viral properties were shown for LIF. Furthermore, inhibition of hsa-miR-664a-3p also reduced virus replication of pandemic influenza A strains H1N1 and H3N2. PMID:27166678

  5. A haplotype-based case-control study examining human extracellular superoxide dismutase gene and essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Naganuma, Takahiro; Nakayama, Tomohiro; Sato, Naoyuki; Fu, Zhenyan; Soma, Masayoshi; Aoi, Noriko; Usami, Ron

    2008-08-01

    It has been reported that oxidative stress is involved in the pathophysiology of essential hypertension (EH), which is a multifactorial disorder. Extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD) protects the human body from oxidative stress by converting the toxic superoxide anion (O2-) into less toxic hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). In EC-SOD knockout mice, blood pressure was reported to be significantly higher than that seen in wild-type mice. The aim of this study was thus to investigate the relationship between EH and the human EC-SOD gene by using single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a haplotype-based case-control study. We selected 6 SNPs within the human EC-SOD gene (rs13306703, rs699473, rs699474, rs17881426, rs2536512 and rs1799895), and then performed case-control studies in 243 EH patients and 251 age-matched normotensive (NT) subjects. In Japanese subjects, no heterogeneity was found for rs699474, and no significant differences were observed between the EH and NT groups for the overall distribution of the genotypes or the alleles for each of the SNPs. However, in the haplotype-based case-control study that used rs13306703 and rs2536512, significant differences were observed in the overall distribution (chi2=14.26, p=0.003). The frequency of the T-A haplotype was significantly higher in the EH group than in the NT group (2.4% vs. 0.0%, p<0.001). Based on the results of our haplotype-based case-control study, the T-A haplotype may be a genetic marker for EH, and thus the EC-SOD gene might be a susceptibility gene for EH.

  6. Supplementation of essential fatty acids to Holstein calves during late uterine life and first month of life alters hepatic fatty acid profile and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Garcia, M; Greco, L F; Lock, A L; Block, E; Santos, J E P; Thatcher, W W; Staples, C R

    2016-09-01

    Linoleic acid is an essential dietary fatty acid (FA). However, how the supplementation of linoleic acid during uterine and early life may modify the FA profile and transcriptome regulation of the liver, and performance of preweaned dairy calves is unknown. Our objective was to evaluate the effect of supplementation of essential FA to Holstein calves during late uterine and early life on their hepatic FA profile and global gene expression at 30 d of age. During the last 8 wk of pregnancy, Holstein cattle (n=96) were fed either no fat supplement (control), a saturated FA supplement enriched with C18:0, or an unsaturated FA supplement enriched with linoleic acid. Male calves (n=40) born from these dams were fed a milk replacer (MR) with either low (LLA) or high linoleic acid (HLA) concentration as the sole feedstuff during the first 30 d. Liver biopsy was performed at 30 d of age, and microarray analysis was performed on 18 liver samples. Total concentration of FA in liver were greater in calves fed LLA compared with those fed HLA MR (8.2 vs. 7.1%), but plasma concentrations of total FA did not differ due to MR diets. The FA profiles of plasma and liver of calves were affected differently by the prepartum diets. Specifically, the FA profile in liver was affected moderately by the feeding of fat prepartum, but the profiles did not differ due to the type of FA fed prepartum. The type of MR fed during the first 30 d of life had major effects on both plasma and liver FA profiles, resembling the type of fat fed. Plasma and liver of calves fed LLA MR had greater percentage of medium-chain FA (C12:0 and C14:0), whereas plasma and liver from calves fed HLA MR had greater percentages of linoleic and α-linolenic acids. Dams fed fat or a specific type of FA modified the expression of some genes in liver of calves, particularly those genes involved in biological functions and pathways related to upregulation of lipid metabolism and downregulation of inflammatory responses

  7. Supplementation of essential fatty acids to Holstein calves during late uterine life and first month of life alters hepatic fatty acid profile and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Garcia, M; Greco, L F; Lock, A L; Block, E; Santos, J E P; Thatcher, W W; Staples, C R

    2016-09-01

    Linoleic acid is an essential dietary fatty acid (FA). However, how the supplementation of linoleic acid during uterine and early life may modify the FA profile and transcriptome regulation of the liver, and performance of preweaned dairy calves is unknown. Our objective was to evaluate the effect of supplementation of essential FA to Holstein calves during late uterine and early life on their hepatic FA profile and global gene expression at 30 d of age. During the last 8 wk of pregnancy, Holstein cattle (n=96) were fed either no fat supplement (control), a saturated FA supplement enriched with C18:0, or an unsaturated FA supplement enriched with linoleic acid. Male calves (n=40) born from these dams were fed a milk replacer (MR) with either low (LLA) or high linoleic acid (HLA) concentration as the sole feedstuff during the first 30 d. Liver biopsy was performed at 30 d of age, and microarray analysis was performed on 18 liver samples. Total concentration of FA in liver were greater in calves fed LLA compared with those fed HLA MR (8.2 vs. 7.1%), but plasma concentrations of total FA did not differ due to MR diets. The FA profiles of plasma and liver of calves were affected differently by the prepartum diets. Specifically, the FA profile in liver was affected moderately by the feeding of fat prepartum, but the profiles did not differ due to the type of FA fed prepartum. The type of MR fed during the first 30 d of life had major effects on both plasma and liver FA profiles, resembling the type of fat fed. Plasma and liver of calves fed LLA MR had greater percentage of medium-chain FA (C12:0 and C14:0), whereas plasma and liver from calves fed HLA MR had greater percentages of linoleic and α-linolenic acids. Dams fed fat or a specific type of FA modified the expression of some genes in liver of calves, particularly those genes involved in biological functions and pathways related to upregulation of lipid metabolism and downregulation of inflammatory responses

  8. The sf32 Unique Gene of Spodoptera frugiperda Multiple Nucleopolyhedrovirus (SfMNPV) Is a Non-Essential Gene That Could Be Involved in Nucleocapsid Organization in Occlusion-Derived Virions

    PubMed Central

    Beperet, Inés; Barrera, Gloria; Simón, Oihane; Williams, Trevor; López-Ferber, Miguel; Gasmi, Laila; Herrero, Salvador; Caballero, Primitivo

    2013-01-01

    A recombinant virus lacking the sf32 gene (Sf32null), unique to the Spodoptera frugiperda multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (SfMNPV), was generated by homologous recombination from a bacmid comprising the complete viral genome (Sfbac). Transcriptional analysis revealed that sf32 is an early gene. Occlusion bodies (OBs) of Sf32null contained 62% more genomic DNA than viruses containing the sf32 gene, Sfbac and Sf32null-repair, although Sf32null DNA was three-fold less infective when injected in vivo. Sf32null OBs were 18% larger in diameter and contained 17% more nucleocapsids within ODVs than those of Sfbac. No significant differences were detected in OB pathogenicity (50% lethal concentration), speed-of-kill or budded virus production in vivo. In contrast, the production of OBs/larva was reduced by 39% in insects infected by Sf32null compared to those infected by Sfbac. The SF32 predicted protein sequence showed homology (25% identity, 44% similarity) to two adhesion proteins from Streptococcus pyogenes and a single N-mirystoylation site was predicted. We conclude that SF32 is a non-essential protein that could be involved in nucleocapsid organization during ODV assembly and occlusion, resulting in increased numbers of nucleocapsids within ODVs. PMID:24204916

  9. Regulatory Oversight of Cell- and Tissue-Based Therapeutic Products and Gene Therapy Products in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Goh, Choon Wee; Kellathur, Srinivasan N; Ong, Lee Lee; Wu, Xiaofeng

    2015-01-01

    The regulatory environment for cell- and tissue-based therapeutic products and gene therapy products is rapidly evolving and drug regulatory agencies are working towards establishing a risk-based system in the regulatory framework. Similarly in Singapore, a risk-based tiered approach has been applied whereby clinical trials and product licence of high-risk cell- and tissue-based therapeutic products (substantially manipulated products, products intended for nonhomologous use or combined products) and gene therapy products are regulated as medicinal products under the Medicines Act. There is no legal definition for cell- and tissue-based therapeutic and gene therapy products. The current working definition for a cell- and tissue-based therapeutic product is an article containing or consisting of an autologous or allogeneic human cell or tissue that are used for or administered to, or intended to be used for or administered to, human beings for the diagnosis, treatment, or prevention of human diseases or conditions. Gene therapy products are included under the current biological medicinal product definition.

  10. Mouse gene targeting reveals an essential role of mTOR in hematopoietic stem cell engraftment and hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Fukun; Zhang, Shuangmin; Grogg, Matthew; Cancelas, Jose A; Varney, Melinda E; Starczynowski, Daniel T; Du, Wei; Yang, Jun-Qi; Liu, Wei; Thomas, George; Kozma, Sara; Pang, Qishen; Zheng, Yi

    2013-09-01

    mTOR integrates signals from nutrients and growth factors to control protein synthesis, cell growth, and survival. Although mTOR has been established as a therapeutic target in hematologic malignancies, its physiological role in regulating hematopoiesis remains unclear. Here we show that conditional gene targeting of mTOR causes bone marrow failure and defects in multi-lineage hematopoiesis including myelopoiesis, erythropoiesis, thrombopoiesis, and lymphopoiesis. mTOR deficiency results in loss of quiescence of hematopoietic stem cells, leading to a transient increase but long-term exhaustion and defective engraftment of hematopoietic stem cells in lethally irradiated recipient mice. Furthermore, ablation of mTOR causes increased apoptosis in lineage-committed blood cells but not hematopoietic stem cells, indicating a differentiation stage-specific function. These results demonstrate that mTOR is essential for hematopoietic stem cell engraftment and multi-lineage hematopoiesis.

  11. Mouse gene targeting reveals an essential role of mTOR in hematopoietic stem cell engraftment and hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Fukun; Zhang, Shuangmin; Grogg, Matthew; Cancelas, Jose A.; Varney, Melinda E.; Starczynowski, Daniel T.; Du, Wei; Yang, Jun-Qi; Liu, Wei; Thomas, George; Kozma, Sara; Pang, Qishen; Zheng, Yi

    2013-01-01

    mTOR integrates signals from nutrients and growth factors to control protein synthesis, cell growth, and survival. Although mTOR has been established as a therapeutic target in hematologic malignancies, its physiological role in regulating hematopoiesis remains unclear. Here we show that conditional gene targeting of mTOR causes bone marrow failure and defects in multi-lineage hematopoiesis including myelopoiesis, erythropoiesis, thrombopoiesis, and lymphopoiesis. mTOR deficiency results in loss of quiescence of hematopoietic stem cells, leading to a transient increase but long-term exhaustion and defective engraftment of hematopoietic stem cells in lethally irradiated recipient mice. Furthermore, ablation of mTOR causes increased apoptosis in lineage-committed blood cells but not hematopoietic stem cells, indicating a differentiation stage-specific function. These results demonstrate that mTOR is essential for hematopoietic stem cell engraftment and multi-lineage hematopoiesis. PMID:23716557

  12. Functional characterisation of the non-essential protein kinases and phosphatases regulating Aspergillus nidulans hydrolytic enzyme production

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite recent advances in the understanding of lignocellulolytic enzyme regulation, less is known about how different carbon sources are sensed and the signaling cascades that result in the adaptation of cellular metabolism and hydrolase secretion. Therefore, the role played by non-essential protein kinases (NPK) and phosphatases (NPP) in the sensing of carbon and/or energetic status was investigated in the model filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans. Results Eleven NPKs and seven NPPs were identified as being involved in cellulase, and in some cases also hemicellulase, production in A. nidulans. The regulation of CreA-mediated carbon catabolite repression (CCR) in the parental strain was determined by fluorescence microscopy, utilising a CreA::GFP fusion protein. The sensing of phosphorylated glucose, via the RAS signalling pathway induced CreA repression, while carbon starvation resulted in derepression. Growth on cellulose represented carbon starvation and derepressing conditions. The involvement of the identified NPKs in the regulation of cellulose-induced responses and CreA derepression was assessed by genome-wide transcriptomics (GEO accession 47810). CreA::GFP localisation and the restoration of endocellulase activity via the introduction of the ∆creA mutation, was assessed in the NPK-deficient backgrounds. The absence of either the schA or snfA kinase dramatically reduced cellulose-induced transcriptional responses, including the expression of hydrolytic enzymes and transporters. The mechanism by which these two NPKs controlled gene transcription was identified, as the NPK-deficient mutants were not able to unlock CreA-mediated carbon catabolite repression under derepressing conditions, such as carbon starvation or growth on cellulose. Conclusions Collectively, this study identified multiple kinases and phosphatases involved in the sensing of carbon and/or energetic status, while demonstrating the overlapping, synergistic roles of schA and

  13. Properties of a pentapeptide inhibitor of peptidyltransferase that is essential for cat gene regulation by translation attenuation.

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Z; Harrod, R; Rogers, E J; Lovett, P S

    1994-01-01

    Inducible chloramphenicol resistance genes cat and cmlA are regulated by translation attenuation. For both genes, the leader codons that must be translated to deliver a ribosome to the induction site specify a peptide that inhibits peptidyltransferase in vitro. The antipeptidyltransferase activity of the peptides is thought to select the site of ribosome stalling that is essential for induction. Using variations of the cat-86 leader-encoded 5-mer peptide MVKTD, we demonstrate a correlation between the in vitro antipeptidyltransferase activity and the ability of the same peptide to support induction by chloramphenicol in vivo. MVKTD footprints to nucleotides 2058, 2059, and 2060 in 23S rRNA. In vivo methylation of nucleotide 2058 by the ermC methylase interferes neither with cat-86 induction nor with peptide inhibition of peptidyltransferase. The methylation eliminates the competition that normally occurs in vitro between erythromycin and MVKTD. MVKTD inhibits the peptidyltransferase of several eubacteria, a representative Archaea species, and the eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Bacillus stearothermophilus supports the in vivo induction of cat-86, and the RNA that is phenol extracted from the 50S ribosomes of this gram-positive thermophile is catalytically active in the peptidyltransferase assay and sensitive to peptide inhibition. Our results indicate that peptidyltransferase inhibition by a cat leader peptide is essential to induction, and this activity can be altered by minor changes in the amino acid sequence of the peptide. The broad range of organisms shown to possess peptide-inhibitable peptidyltransferase suggests that the target is a highly conserved component of the ribosome and includes 23S rRNA. Images PMID:7928994

  14. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene haplotypes and circulating nitric oxide levels significantly associate with risk of essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Nejatizadeh, Azim; Kumar, Rahul; Stobdan, Tsering; Goyal, A K; Sikdar, Sunandan; Gupta, Mohit; Javed, Saleem; Pasha, M A Qadar

    2008-06-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), a potent vasodilator, plays a pivotal role in blood pressure regulation. Endothelial NO synthase gene (NOS3) polymorphisms influence NO levels. Here, we investigated the role of the -922A/G, -786T/C, 4b/4a, and 894G/T polymorphisms of the NOS3 and NO(x) levels in 800 consecutive unrelated subjects comprising 455 patients of essential hypertension and 345 controls. The polymorphisms were investigated independently and as haplotypes. Plasma NO(x) levels (nitrate and nitrite) were estimated by the Griess method. Genotype frequencies for the -786T/C, 4b/4a, and 894G/T polymorphisms differed significantly (P<0.001) between patients and controls and were associated with an increased risk of hypertension (OR=2.0, OR=3.8, OR=1.6, respectively). The 4-locus haplotypes ATaG (H1), ATaT (H2), and GCaG (H3) were significantly associated with essential hypertension and served as susceptible haplotypes (Pessential hypertension. PMID:18325347

  15. [Structure and function of neural plasticity-related gene products].

    PubMed

    Yamagata, K; Sugiura, H; Suzuki, K

    1998-08-01

    We have isolated novel immediate early genes (IEGs) from the hippocampus by differential cloning techniques. These mRNAs are induced by synaptic activity and translated into proteins that may affect neural function. We have analyzed a variety of "effector" immediate early genes. These mRNAs encode: 1) cytoplasmic proteins, such as cyclooxygenase-2, a small G protein, Rheb, and a cytoskeleton-associated protein, Arc; 2) membrane-bound proteins, such as the cell adhesion protein Arcadlin, and a neurite-outgrowth protein, Neuritin; and 3) a secreted protein, Narp. We hypothesize that physiological stimulation induces "effector" proteins that might strengthen synaptic connections of activated synapses. In contrast, pathological conditions such as epilepsy or drug addiction may accelerate overproduction of these gene products, which cause abnormal synapse formation. Gene targeting and in vivo gene transfer techniques are required to prove this hypothesis. PMID:9866829

  16. Repellent constituents of essential oil of Cymbopogon distans aerial parts against two stored-product insects.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing Song; Zhao, Na Na; Liu, Qi Zhi; Liu, Zhi Long; Du, Shu Shan; Zhou, Ligang; Deng, Zhi Wei

    2011-09-28

    The screening for bioactive principles from several Chinese medicinal herbs showed that the essential oil of Cymbopogon distans aerial parts possessed strong repellency against the booklouse, Liposcelis bostrychophila , and the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum . A total of 36 components of the essential oil were identified by GC and GC-MS. trans-Geraniol (16.54%), (R)-citronellal (15.44%), (+)-citronellol (11.51%), and α-elemol (9.06%) were the main components of the essential oil followed by β-eudesmol (5.71%) and (+)-limonene (5.05%). From the essential oil, four monoterpenes were isolated by bioassay-guided fractionation. The compounds were identified as limonene, citronellol, citronellal, and trans-geraniol. Geraniol and citronellol were strongly repellent against the booklouse, L. bostrychophila, whereas citronellal and limonene exhibited weak repellency against the booklouse. Geraniol and citronellol exhibited comparable repellency against the booklouse relative to the positive control, DEET. Moreover, geraniol and citronellol exhibited stronger repellency against the red flour beetle than DEET, whereas the two other compounds showed the same level of repellency against the red flour beetle compared with DEET.

  17. Novel Essential Role of Ethanol Oxidation Genes at Low Temperature Revealed by Transcriptome Analysis in the Antarctic Bacterium Pseudomonas extremaustralis

    PubMed Central

    Tribelli, Paula M.; Solar Venero, Esmeralda C.; Ricardi, Martiniano M.; Gómez-Lozano, Maria; Raiger Iustman, Laura J.; Molin, Søren; López, Nancy I.

    2015-01-01

    Temperature is one of the most important factors for bacterial growth and development. Cold environments are widely distributed on earth, and psychrotolerant and psychrophilic microorganisms have developed different adaptation strategies to cope with the stress derived from low temperatures. Pseudomonas extremaustralis is an Antarctic bacterium able to grow under low temperatures and to produce high amounts of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs). In this work, we analyzed the genome-wide transcriptome by RNA deep-sequencing technology of early exponential cultures of P. extremaustralis growing in LB (Luria Broth) supplemented with sodium octanoate to favor PHA accumulation at 8°C and 30°C. We found that genes involved in primary metabolism, including tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) related genes, as well as cytochromes and amino acid metabolism coding genes, were repressed at low temperature. Among up-regulated genes, those coding for transcriptional regulatory and signal transduction proteins were over-represented at cold conditions. Remarkably, we found that genes involved in ethanol oxidation, exaA, exaB and exaC, encoding a pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ)-dependent ethanol dehydrogenase, the cytochrome c550 and an aldehyde dehydrogenase respectively, were up-regulated. Along with RNA-seq experiments, analysis of mutant strains for pqqB (PQQ biosynthesis protein B) and exaA were carried out. We found that the exaA and pqqB genes are essential for growth under low temperature in LB supplemented with sodium octanoate. Additionally, p-rosaniline assay measurements showed the presence of alcohol dehydrogenase activity at both 8°C and 30°C, while the activity was abolished in a pqqB mutant strain. These results together with the detection of ethanol by gas chromatography in P. extremaustralis cultures grown at 8°C support the conclusion that this pathway is important under cold conditions. The obtained results have led to the identification of novel components involved

  18. Novel Essential Role of Ethanol Oxidation Genes at Low Temperature Revealed by Transcriptome Analysis in the Antarctic Bacterium Pseudomonas extremaustralis.

    PubMed

    Tribelli, Paula M; Solar Venero, Esmeralda C; Ricardi, Martiniano M; Gómez-Lozano, Maria; Raiger Iustman, Laura J; Molin, Søren; López, Nancy I

    2015-01-01

    Temperature is one of the most important factors for bacterial growth and development. Cold environments are widely distributed on earth, and psychrotolerant and psychrophilic microorganisms have developed different adaptation strategies to cope with the stress derived from low temperatures. Pseudomonas extremaustralis is an Antarctic bacterium able to grow under low temperatures and to produce high amounts of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs). In this work, we analyzed the genome-wide transcriptome by RNA deep-sequencing technology of early exponential cultures of P. extremaustralis growing in LB (Luria Broth) supplemented with sodium octanoate to favor PHA accumulation at 8°C and 30°C. We found that genes involved in primary metabolism, including tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) related genes, as well as cytochromes and amino acid metabolism coding genes, were repressed at low temperature. Among up-regulated genes, those coding for transcriptional regulatory and signal transduction proteins were over-represented at cold conditions. Remarkably, we found that genes involved in ethanol oxidation, exaA, exaB and exaC, encoding a pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ)-dependent ethanol dehydrogenase, the cytochrome c550 and an aldehyde dehydrogenase respectively, were up-regulated. Along with RNA-seq experiments, analysis of mutant strains for pqqB (PQQ biosynthesis protein B) and exaA were carried out. We found that the exaA and pqqB genes are essential for growth under low temperature in LB supplemented with sodium octanoate. Additionally, p-rosaniline assay measurements showed the presence of alcohol dehydrogenase activity at both 8°C and 30°C, while the activity was abolished in a pqqB mutant strain. These results together with the detection of ethanol by gas chromatography in P. extremaustralis cultures grown at 8°C support the conclusion that this pathway is important under cold conditions. The obtained results have led to the identification of novel components involved

  19. Pathogens and gene product normalization in the biomedical literature.

    PubMed

    Vishnyakova, Dina; Pasche, Emilie; Teodoro, Douglas; Lovis, Christian; Ruch, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    We present a new approach for pathogens and gene product normalization in the biomedical literature. The idea of this approach was motivated by needs such as literature curation, in particular applied to the field of infectious diseases thus, variants of bacterial species (S. aureus, Staphyloccocus aureus, ...) and their gene products (protein ArsC, Arsenical pump modifier, Arsenate reductase, ...). Our approach is based on the use of an Ontology Look-up Service, a Gene Ontology Categorizer (GOCat) and Gene Normalization methods. In the pathogen detection task the use of OLS disambiguates found pathogen names. GOCat results are incorporated into overall score system to support and to confirm the decisionmaking in normalization process of pathogens and their genomes. The evaluation was done on two test sets of BioCreativeIII benchmark: gold standard of manual curation (50 articles) and silver standard (507 articles) curated by collective results of BCIII participants. For the cross-species GN we achieved the precision of 46% for silver and 27% for gold sets. Pathogen normalization results showed 95% of precision and 93% of recall. The impact of GOCat explicitly improves results of pathogen and gene normalization, basically confirming identified pathogens and boosting correct gene identifiers on the top of the results' list ranked by confidence. A correct identification of the pathogen is able to improve significantly normalization effectiveness and to solve the disambiguation problem of genes.

  20. Antifungal activity of essential oil of Ziziphora clinopodioides and the inhibition of aflatoxin B1 production in maize grain.

    PubMed

    Moghadam, Hediyeh Davoudi; Sani, Ali Mohamadi; Sangatash, Masoomeh Mehraban

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the antifungal effect of the essential oil obtained from Ziziphora clinopodioides L on two fungi species including Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus using microdilution method. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum fungicidal concentration (MFC) were determined for the essential oil at 10 different concentrations (i.e. 25,000, 12,500, 6250, 3125, 1562.5, 781.25, 390.625, 195.31, 97.65, and 48.82 µg/ml). Finally, the effect of the essential oil at six levels (6250, 3125, 1600, 800, 400, and 196 µg/ml) was investigated on the growth and activity of A. flavus and A. parasiticus, and also toxin production of these species in maize at 0.97 aw and 25°C after 29 days. Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) content was assayed by enzyme linked immuno-sorbent assay technique. Results showed that essential oil of Z. clinopodioides was found more effective on A. parasiticus than A. flavus in both in vitro and in vivo conditions. Z. clinopodioides oil exhibited the same MIC value in the liquid medium against all fungal strains (48.82 µg/ml), while it showed different activity against A. flavus and A. parasiticus with MFC values of 781.25 and 390.625 µg/ml respectively. Under storage condition in maize, AFB1 production was significantly (p < 0.05) repressed at the concentration of 6250 µg/ml for A. flavus and 6250 and 3125 µg/ml for A. parasiticus. At the lower concentrations, the AFB1 production increased gradually. The results of the present study indicated that the essential oil of Z. clinopodioides had significant antifungal activity (p < 0.05); therefore, it can be used as an antifungal agent in the food and medicinal industries.

  1. Conditional-ready mouse embryonic stem cell derived macrophages enable the study of essential genes in macrophage function

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, A. T. Y.; Hale, C.; Xia, J.; Tate, P. H.; Goulding, D.; Keane, J. A.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Forrester, L.; Billker, O.; Skarnes, W. C.; Hancock, R. E. W.; Dougan, G.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to differentiate genetically modified mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells into functional macrophages provides a potentially attractive resource to study host-pathogen interactions without the need for animal experimentation. This is particularly useful in instances where the gene of interest is essential and a knockout mouse is not available. Here we differentiated mouse ES cells into macrophages in vitro and showed, through a combination of flow cytometry, microscopic imaging, and RNA-Seq, that ES cell-derived macrophages responded to S. Typhimurium, in a comparable manner to mouse bone marrow derived macrophages. We constructed a homozygous mutant mouse ES cell line in the Traf2 gene that is known to play a role in tumour necrosis factor-α signalling but has not been studied for its role in infections or response to Toll-like receptor agonists. Interestingly, traf2-deficient macrophages produced reduced levels of inflammatory cytokines in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or flagellin stimulation and exhibited increased susceptibility to S. Typhimurium infection. PMID:25752829

  2. Association of TNF-α G308A gene polymorphism in essential hypertensive patients without type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Ghodsian, N; Akhlaghi, M; Ramachandran, V; Heidari, F; Haghvirdizadeh, P; Eshkoor, S A; Etemad, A; Jamaluddin, J A; Ismail, P

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the effects of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) G308A gene polymorphism on essential hypertension (EHT) with or without type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The project was conducted on buccal epithelial and blood cells for case and control patients, respectively. Epithelial cells were obtained from the inner part of the cheeks. Techniques including DNA extraction, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) were utilized to assess biomarkers of DNA damage. Our results demonstrated significant differences between wild and mutated genotypes among EHT patients without T2DM. We also found a significant association between wild and mutated allele frequencies in EHT patients (P < 0.05). Clinical characteristics between the groups (EHT with or without T2DM and controls) showed statistically significant association (P < 0.05). Overall, we show that G308A polymorphism of the TNF-αgene may be a significant genetic risk factor for EHT without T2DM patients in Malaysia. PMID:26782547

  3. Intrachromosomal tandem duplication and repeat expansion during attempts to inactivate the subtelomeric essential gene GSH1 in Leishmania

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Angana; Langston, Lance D.; Ouellette, Marc

    2011-01-01

    Gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase encoded by GSH1 is the rate-limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis of glutathione and trypanothione in Leishmania. Attempts to generate GSH1 null mutants by gene disruption failed in Leishmania infantum. Removal of even a single allele invariably led to the generation of an extra copy of GSH1, maintaining two intact wild-type alleles. In the second and even third round of inactivation, the markers integrated at the homologous locus but always preserved two intact copies of GSH1. We probed into the mechanism of GSH1 duplication. GSH1 is subtelomeric on chromosome 18 and Southern blot analysis indicated that a 10-kb fragment flanked by 466-bp direct repeated sequences was duplicated in tandem on the same chromosomal allele each time GSH1 was targeted. Polymerase chain reaction analysis and sequencing confirmed the generation of novel junctions created at the level of the 466-bp repeats consequent to locus duplication. In loss of heterozygosity attempts, the same repeated sequences were utilized for generating extrachromosomal circular amplicons. Our results are consistent with break-induced replication as a mechanism for the generation of this regional polyploidy to compensate for the inactivation of an essential gene. This chromosomal repeat expansion through repeated sequences could be implicated in locus duplication in Leishmania. PMID:21693561

  4. Study of the essentiality of the Aspergillus fumigatus triA gene, encoding RNA triphosphatase, using the heterokaryon rescue technique and the conditional gene expression driven by the alcA and niiA promoters.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, M Cândida; De Lucas, J Ramón

    2010-01-01

    The identification of essential genes represents a critical step in the discovery of novel therapeutic targets in Aspergillus fumigatus. Structural analyses of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNA triphosphatase pointed out this enzyme as an attractive therapeutic target for fungal infections. In addition, demonstration of the essentiality of the S. cerevisiae RNA triphosphatase encoding gene enhanced the value of this potential therapeutic target. Nevertheless, consideration of a fungal RNA triphosphatase as an ideal therapeutic target needs confirmation of the essentiality of the respective gene in a fungal pathogen. In this work, we analyzed the essentiality of the A. fumigatus triA gene, encoding RNA triphosphatase, by conditional gene expression and heterokaryon deletion. Using the conditional gene expression driven by the alcA promoter (alcA(P)), we found that TriA depletion causes morphological abnormalities that result in a very strong growth inhibition. Nevertheless, since a strict terminal phenotype was not observed, the essentiality of the triA gene could not be ensured. Accordingly, the essentiality of this gene was analyzed by the heterokaryon rescue technique. Results obtained unequivocally demonstrated the essentiality of the A. fumigatus triA gene, indicating the suitability of the RNA triphosphatase as an ideal therapeutic target to treat A. fumigatus infections. Besides, a second conditional gene expression system, based on the niiA promoter (niiA(P)), was utilized in this work. Although the niiA(P)-mediated repression of triA was less severe than that driven by the alcA(P), a strong growth inhibition was also found in niiA(P)-triA strains. Finally, E-tests performed to determine whether triA down-regulated cells became more sensitive to antifungals suggest a synergic effect between amphotericin B and another antifungal inhibiting the A. fumigatus RNA triphosphatase activity.

  5. liver-enriched gene 1a and 1b Encode Novel Secretory Proteins Essential for Normal Liver Development in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Changqing; Hu, Minjie; Zhu, Zhihui; Lo, Li Jan; Chen, Jun; Peng, Jinrong

    2011-01-01

    liver-enriched gene 1 (leg1) is a liver-enriched gene in zebrafish and encodes a novel protein. Our preliminary data suggested that Leg1 is probably involved in early liver development. However, no detailed characterization of Leg1 has been reported thus far. We undertook both bioinformatic and experimental approaches to study leg1 gene structure and its role in early liver development. We found that Leg1 identifies a new conserved protein superfamily featured by the presence of domain of unknown function 781 (DUF781). There are two copies of leg1 in zebrafish, namely leg1a and leg1b. Both leg1a and leg1b are expressed in the larvae and adult liver with leg1a being the predominant form. Knockdown of Leg1a or Leg1b by their respective morpholinos specifically targeting their 5′-UTR each resulted in a small liver phenotype, demonstrating that both Leg1a and Leg1b are important for early liver development. Meanwhile, we found that injection of leg1-ATGMO, a morpholino which can simultaneously block the translation of Leg1a and Leg1b, caused not only a small liver phenotype but hypoplastic exocrine pancreas and intestinal tube as well. Further examination of leg1-ATGMO morphants with early endoderm markers and early hepatic markers revealed that although depletion of total Leg1 does not alter the hepatic and pancreatic fate of the endoderm cells, it leads to cell cycle arrest that results in growth retardation of liver, exocrine pancreas and intestine. Finally, we proved that Leg1 is a secretory protein. This intrigued us to propose that Leg1 might act as a novel secreted regulator that is essential for liver and other digestive organ development in zebrafish. PMID:21857963

  6. Use of genomics to identify bacterial undecaprenyl pyrophosphate synthetase: cloning, expression, and characterization of the essential uppS gene.

    PubMed

    Apfel, C M; Takács, B; Fountoulakis, M; Stieger, M; Keck, W

    1999-01-01

    The prenyltransferase undecaprenyl pyrophosphate synthetase (di-trans,poly-cis-decaprenylcistransferase; EC 2.5.1.31) was purified from the soluble fraction of Escherichia coli by TSK-DEAE, ceramic hydroxyapatite, TSK-ether, Superdex 200, and heparin-Actigel chromatography. The protein was labeled with the photolabile analogue of the farnesyl pyrophosphate analogue (E, E)-[1-3H]-(2-diazo-3-trifluoropropionyloxy)geranyl diphosphate and was detected on a sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel as a protein with an apparent molecular mass of 29 kDa. This protein band was cut out from the gel, trypsin digested, and subjected to matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometric analysis. Comparison of the experimental data with computer-simulated trypsin digest data for all E. coli proteins yielded a single match with a protein of unassigned function (SWISS-PROT Q47675; YAES_ECOLI). Sequences with strong similarity indicative of homology to this protein were identified in 25 bacterial species, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and in Caenorhabditis elegans. The homologous genes (uppS) were cloned from E. coli, Haemophilus influenzae, and Streptococcus pneumoniae, expressed in E. coli as amino-terminal His-tagged fusion proteins, and purified over a Ni2+ affinity column. An untagged version of the E. coli uppS gene was also cloned and expressed, and the protein purified in two chromatographic steps. We were able to detect Upp synthetase activity for all purified enzymes. Further, biochemical characterization revealed no differences between the recombinant untagged E. coli Upp synthetase and the three His-tagged fusion proteins. All enzymes were absolutely Triton X-100 and MgCl2 dependent. With the use of a regulatable gene disruption system, we demonstrated that uppS is essential for growth in S. pneumoniae R6. PMID:9882662

  7. Effect of Cymbopogon martinii, Foeniculum vulgare, and Trachyspermum ammi Essential Oils on the Growth and Mycotoxins Production by Aspergillus Species

    PubMed Central

    Woldeamanuel, Yimtubezinash; Asrat, Daniel; Debella, Asfaw

    2014-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate effect of essential oils on Aspergillus spore germination, growth, and mycotoxin production. In vitro antifungal and antiaflatoxigenic activities of Cymbopogon martinii, Foeniculum vulgare, and Trachyspermum ammi essential oils were carried out on toxigenic strains of Aspergillus species. Plant materials were hydrodistilled for 4-5 h in Clevenger apparatus. 0.25 μL/mL, 0.5 μL/mL, 1 μL/mL, 2 μL/mL, and 4 μL/mL concentrations of each essential oil were prepared in 0.1% Tween 80 (V/V). T. ammi oil showed highest antifungal activity. Absolute mycelial inhibition was recorded at 1 μL/mL by essential oils of T. ammi. The oil also showed complete inhibition of spore germination at a concentration of 2 μL/mL. In addition, T. ammi oil showed significant antiaflatoxigenic potency by totally inhibiting toxin production from A. niger and A. flavus at 0.5 and 0.75 μL/mL, respectively. C. martinii, F. vulgare, and T. ammi oils as antifungals were found superior over synthetic preservative. Moreover, a concentration of 5336.297 μL/kg body weight was recorded for LC50 on mice indicating the low mammalian toxicity. In conclusion, the essential oils from T. ammi can be a potential source of safe natural food preservative for food commodities contamination by Aspergillus species. PMID:26904653

  8. Investigation of the genes involved in antigenic switching at the vlsE locus in Borrelia burgdorferi: an essential role for the RuvAB branch migrase.

    PubMed

    Dresser, Ashley R; Hardy, Pierre-Olivier; Chaconas, George

    2009-12-01

    Persistent infection by pathogenic organisms requires effective strategies for the defense of these organisms against the host immune response. A common strategy employed by many pathogens to escape immune recognition and clearance is to continually vary surface epitopes through recombinational shuffling of genetic information. Borrelia burgdorferi, a causative agent of Lyme borreliosis, encodes a surface-bound lipoprotein, VlsE. This protein is encoded by the vlsE locus carried at the right end of the linear plasmid lp28-1. Adjacent to the expression locus are 15 silent cassettes carrying information that is moved into the vlsE locus through segmental gene conversion events. The protein players and molecular mechanism of recombinational switching at vlsE have not been characterized. In this study, we analyzed the effect of the independent disruption of 17 genes that encode factors involved in DNA recombination, repair or replication on recombinational switching at the vlsE locus during murine infection. In Neisseria gonorrhoeae, 10 such genes have been implicated in recombinational switching at the pilE locus. Eight of these genes, including recA, are either absent from B. burgdorferi, or do not show an obvious requirement for switching at vlsE. The only genes that are required in both organisms are ruvA and ruvB, which encode subunits of a Holliday junction branch migrase. Disruption of these genes results in a dramatic decrease in vlsE recombination with a phenotype similar to that observed for lp28-1 or vls-minus spirochetes: productive infection at week 1 with clearance by day 21. In SCID mice, the persistence defect observed with ruvA and ruvB mutants was fully rescued as previously observed for vlsE-deficient B. burgdorferi. We report the requirement of the RuvAB branch migrase in recombinational switching at vlsE, the first essential factor to be identified in this process. These findings are supported by the independent work of Lin et al. in the

  9. NODULE INCEPTION Directly Targets NF-Y Subunit Genes to Regulate Essential Processes of Root Nodule Development in Lotus japonicus

    PubMed Central

    Soyano, Takashi; Kouchi, Hiroshi; Hirota, Atsuko; Hayashi, Makoto

    2013-01-01

    The interactions of legumes with symbiotic nitrogen-fixing bacteria cause the formation of specialized lateral root organs called root nodules. It has been postulated that this root nodule symbiosis system has recruited factors that act in early signaling pathways (common SYM genes) partly from the ancestral mycorrhizal symbiosis. However, the origins of factors needed for root nodule organogenesis are largely unknown. NODULE INCEPTION (NIN) is a nodulation-specific gene that encodes a putative transcription factor and acts downstream of the common SYM genes. Here, we identified two Nuclear Factor-Y (NF-Y) subunit genes, LjNF-YA1 and LjNF-YB1, as transcriptional targets of NIN in Lotus japonicus. These genes are expressed in root nodule primordia and their translational products interact in plant cells, indicating that they form an NF-Y complex in root nodule primordia. The knockdown of LjNF-YA1 inhibited root nodule organogenesis, as did the loss of function of NIN. Furthermore, we found that NIN overexpression induced root nodule primordium-like structures that originated from cortical cells in the absence of bacterial symbionts. Thus, NIN is a crucial factor responsible for initiating nodulation-specific symbiotic processes. In addition, ectopic expression of either NIN or the NF-Y subunit genes caused abnormal cell division during lateral root development. This indicated that the Lotus NF-Y subunits can function to stimulate cell division. Thus, transcriptional regulation by NIN, including the activation of the NF-Y subunit genes, induces cortical cell division, which is an initial step in root nodule organogenesis. Unlike the legume-specific NIN protein, NF-Y is a major CCAAT box binding protein complex that is widespread among eukaryotes. We propose that the evolution of root nodules in legume plants was associated with changes in the function of NIN. NIN has acquired functions that allow it to divert pathways involved in the regulation of cell division to

  10. Isolation and identification of precocenes and piperitone from essential oils as specific inhibitors of trichothecene production by Fusarium graminearum.

    PubMed

    Yaguchi, Atsushi; Yoshinari, Tomoya; Tsuyuki, Rie; Takahashi, Haruo; Nakajima, Takashi; Sugita-Konishi, Yoshiko; Nagasawa, Hiromichi; Sakuda, Shohei

    2009-02-11

    Inhibitors of deoxynivalenol production by Fusarium graminearum are useful for protecting crops from deoxynivalenol contamination. We isolated precocenes and piperitone from the essential oils of Matricaria recutita and Eucalyptus dives, respectively, as specific inhibitors of the production of 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol, a biosynthetic precursor of deoxynivalenol. Precocenes I and II and piperitone inhibited 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol production by F. graminearum in a liquid culture with IC(50) values of 16.6, 1.2, and 306 microM, respectively, without inhibiting fungal growth. Precocene II also inhibited deoxynivalenol production by the fungus in a solid culture on rice with an IC(50) value of 2.0 ppm. Precocene II and piperitone decreased the mRNA levels of Tri4, Tri5, Tri6, and Tri10 encoding proteins required for deoxynivalenol biosynthesis. PMID:19191669

  11. Polyamines are essential for virulence in Salmonella enterica serovar Gallinarum despite evolutionary decay of polyamine biosynthesis genes.

    PubMed

    Schroll, Casper; Christensen, Jens P; Christensen, Henrik; Pors, Susanne E; Thorndahl, Lotte; Jensen, Peter R; Olsen, John E; Jelsbak, Lotte

    2014-05-14

    Serovars of Salmonella enterica exhibit different host-specificities where some have broad host-ranges and others, like S. Gallinarum and S. Typhi, are host-specific for poultry and humans, respectively. With the recent availability of whole genome sequences it has been reported that host-specificity coincides with accumulation of pseudogenes, indicating adaptation of host-restricted serovars to their narrow niches. Polyamines are small cationic amines and in Salmonella they can be synthesized through two alternative pathways directly from l-ornithine to putrescine and from l-arginine via agmatine to putrescine. The first pathway is not active in S. Gallinarum and S. Typhi, and this prompted us to investigate the importance of polyamines for virulence in S. Gallinarum. Bioinformatic analysis of all sequenced genomes of Salmonella revealed that pseudogene formation of the speC gene was exclusive for S. Typhi and S. Gallinarum and happened through independent events. The remaining polyamine biosynthesis pathway was found to be essential for oral infection with S. Gallinarum since single and double mutants in speB and speE, encoding the pathways from agmatine to putrescine and from putrescine to spermidine, were attenuated. In contrast, speB was dispensable after intraperitoneal challenge, suggesting that putrescine was less important for the systemic phase of the disease. In support of this hypothesis, a ΔspeE;ΔpotCD mutant, unable to synthesize and import spermidine, but with retained ability to import and synthesize putrescine, was attenuated after intraperitoneal infection. We therefore conclude that polyamines are essential for virulence of S. Gallinarum. Furthermore, our results point to distinct roles for putrescine and spermidine during systemic infection.

  12. Id-1 gene and gene products as therapeutic targets for treatment of breast cancer and other types of carcinoma

    DOEpatents

    Desprez, Pierre-Yves; Campisi, Judith

    2014-08-19

    A method for treatment of breast cancer and other types of cancer. The method comprises targeting and modulating Id-1 gene expression, if any, for the Id-1 gene, or gene products in breast or other epithelial cancers in a patient by delivering products that modulate Id-1 gene expression. When expressed, Id-1 gene is a prognostic indicator that cancer cells are invasive and metastatic.

  13. Mitogen-activated protein kinases play an essential role in oxidative burst-independent expression of pathogenesis-related genes in parsley.

    PubMed

    Kroj, Thomas; Rudd, Jason J; Nürnberger, Thorsten; Gäbler, Yvonne; Lee, Justin; Scheel, Dierk

    2003-01-24

    Plants are continuously exposed to attack by potential phytopathogens. Disease prevention requires pathogen recognition and the induction of a multifaceted defense response. We are studying the non-host disease resistance response of parsley to the oomycete, Phytophthora sojae using a cell culture-based system. Receptor-mediated recognition of P. sojae may be achieved through a thirteen amino acid peptide sequence (Pep-13) present within an abundant cell wall transglutaminase. Following recognition of this elicitor molecule, parsley cells mount a defense response, which includes the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and transcriptional activation of genes encoding pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins or enzymes involved in the synthesis of antimicrobial phytoalexins. Treatment of parsley cells with the NADPH oxidase inhibitor, diphenylene iodonium (DPI), blocked both Pep-13-induced phytoalexin production and the accumulation of transcripts encoding enzymes involved in their synthesis. In contrast, DPI treatment had no effect upon Pep-13-induced PR gene expression, suggesting the existence of an oxidative burst-independent mechanism for the transcriptional activation of PR genes. The use of specific antibodies enabled the identification of three parsley mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) that are activated within the signal transduction pathway(s) triggered following recognition of Pep-13. Other environmental challenges failed to activate these kinases in parsley cells, suggesting that their activation plays a key role in defense signal transduction. Moreover, by making use of a protoplast co-transfection system overexpressing wild-type and loss-of-function MAPK mutants, we show an essential role for post-translational phosphorylation and activation of MAPKs for oxidative burst-independent PR promoter activation.

  14. Production of the Ramoplanin Activity Analogue by Double Gene Inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jungang; Chen, Junsheng; Shao, Lei; Zhang, Junliang; Dong, Xiaojing; Liu, Pengyu; Chen, Daijie

    2016-01-01

    Glycopeptides such as vancomycin and telavancin are essential for treating infections caused by Gram-positive bacteria. But the dwindling availability of new antibiotics and the emergence of resistant bacteria are making effective antibiotic treatment increasingly difficult. Ramoplanin, an inhibitor of bacterial cell wall biosynthesis, is a highly effective antibiotic against a wide range of Gram-positive bacteria, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, vancomycin-intermediate resistant Clostridium difficile and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus sp. Here, two tailoring enzyme genes in the biosynthesis of ramoplanin were deleted by double in-frame gene knockouts to produce new ramoplanin derivatives. The deschlororamoplanin A2 aglycone was purified and its structure was identified with LC-MS/MS. Deschlororamoplanin A2 aglycone and ramoplanin aglycone showed similar activity to ramoplanin A2. The results showed that α-1,2-dimannosyl disaccharide at Hpg11 and chlorination at Chp17 in the ramoplanin structure are not essential for its antimicrobial activity. This work provides new precursor compounds for the semisynthetic modification of ramoplanin. PMID:27149627

  15. Identification of potential target genes for Adr1p through characterization of essential nucleotides in UAS1.

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, C; Kacherovsky, N; Dombek, K M; Camier, S; Thukral, S K; Rhim, E; Young, E T

    1994-01-01

    Adr1p is a regulatory protein in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae that binds to and activates transcription from two sites in a perfect 22-bp inverted repeat, UAS1, in the ADH2 promoter. Binding requires two C2H2 zinc fingers and a region amino terminal to the fingers. The importance for DNA binding of each position within UAS1 was deduced from two types of assays. Both methods led to an identical consensus sequence containing only four essential base pairs: GG(A/G)G. The preferred sequence, TTGG(A/G)GA, is found in both halves of the inverted repeat. The region of Adr1p amino terminal to the fingers is important for phosphate contacts in the central region of UAS1. However, no base-specific contacts in this portion of UAS1 are important for DNA binding or for ADR1-dependent transcription in vivo. When the central 6 bp were deleted, only a single monomer of Adr1p was able to bind in vitro and activation in vivo was severely reduced. On the basis of these results and previous knowledge about the DNA binding site requirements, including constraints on the spacing and orientation of sites that affect activation in vivo, a consensus binding site for Adr1p was derived. By using this consensus site, potential Adr1p binding sites were located in the promoters of genes known to show ADR1-dependent expression. In addition, this consensus allowed the identification of new potential target genes for Adr1p. Images PMID:8196627

  16. Relationship of polypeptide products of the transforming gene of Rous sarcoma virus and the homologous gene of vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Sefton, B M; Hunter, T; Beemon, K

    1980-04-01

    All vertebrate cells have been shown to contain a gene, sarc, that has some homology with the transforming gene of Rous sarcoma virus, src. We have compared the polypeptide products of the sarc gene, p60(sarc), of human, mouse, and chicken cells with the polymorphic polypeptide product of the src gene, p60(src), of several strains of Rous sarcoma virus by two-dimensional peptide mapping. p60(sarc) from chicken cells was clearly related to every viral p60(src). Eleven of its 13 methionine-containing tryptic peptides were present in some viral p60(src). Conversely, the other two peptides were not present in any p60(src) we have examined so far. The 11 peptides from p60(sarc) of chickens that were shared with viral p60(src), however, were not all present in any single viral p60(src). These 11 peptides most closely resemble those in the p60(src)s of B77 virus and the Prague strain of Rous sarcoma virus. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that cellular sarc is the progenitor of viral src. The p60(sarc)s of human, mouse, and chicken cells were so similar in tryptic peptide composition that they were more closely related to each other than were some viral p60(src)s. The two mammalian p60(sarc)s differed from avian p60(sarc) most notably in that they lacked a peptide that chicken p60(sarc) shares with all the viral p60(src)s. The similarity of these maps suggests that the sequence of the p60(sarc) polypeptide has diverged very little during evolution. This may imply that p60(sarc) is an essential cellular component.

  17. The VirA protein of Agrobacterium tumefaciens is autophosphorylated and is essential for vir gene regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, S.; Roitsch, T.; Ankenbauer, R.G.; Gordon, M.P.; Nester, E.W. )

    1990-02-01

    The virA and virG gene products are required for the regulation of the vir regulon on the tumor-inducing (Ti) plasmid of Agrobacterium tumefaciens. VirA is a membrane-associated protein which is homologous to the sensor molecules of other two-component regulatory systems. The authors overproduced truncated VirA proteins in Escherichia coli be deleting different lengths of the 5{prime}-coding region of the virA gene and placing these genes under lacZ control. These proteins were purified from polyacrylamide gels and renatured. The renatured proteins became radiolabeled when they were incubated with ({gamma}-{sup 32}P)ATP but not with ({gamma}-{sup 32}P)GTP or ({alpha}-{sup 32}P)ATP, which suggests an ATP {gamma}-phosphate-specific autophosphorylation. The smallest VirA protein, which retained only the C-terminal half of the protein, gave the strongest autophosphorylation signal, which demonstrates that the C-terminal domain has the autophosphorylation site. The phosphorylated amino acid was identified as phosphohistidine, and a highly conserved histidine was found in all of the VirA homologs. When this histidine was changed to glutamine, which cannot be phosphorylated, the resulting VirA protein lost both its ability to autophosphorylate and its biological function as a vir gene regulator. Results of this study indicate that VirA autophosphorylation is required for the induction of the vir regulon and subsequent tumor induction on plants by A. tumefaciens.

  18. Chemoprevention by essential oil of turmeric leaves (Curcuma longa L.) on the growth of Aspergillus flavus and aflatoxin production.

    PubMed

    Sindhu, S; Chempakam, B; Leela, N K; Suseela Bhai, R

    2011-05-01

    Turmeric is well known for a wide range of medicinal properties. Essential oil of turmeric leaves (Curcuma longa L.) were evaluated at varying concentrations of 0.01, 0.05, 0.1, 0.5, 0.75, 1.0 and 1.5% (v/v) in Yeast Extract Sucrose (YES) broth inoculated with spore suspension of Aspergillus flavus of 10(6)conidia/ml. These were evaluated for their potential in the control of aflatoxigenic fungus A. flavus and aflatoxin production. Turmeric leaf oil exhibited 95.3% and 100% inhibition of toxin production respectively at 1.0% and 1.5%. The extent of inhibition of fungal growth and aflatoxin production was dependent on the concentration of essential oil used. The oil exhibited significant inhibition of fungal growth as well as aflatoxins B(1) and G(1) production. The LD(50) and LD(90) were also determined. GC-MS analysis of the oil showed α-phellandrene, p-cymene and terpinolene as the major components in turmeric leaf oil. The possibility of using these phytochemical components as bio-preservatives for storage of spices is discussed.

  19. Preclinical development strategies for novel gene therapeutic products.

    PubMed

    Pilaro, A M; Serabian, M A

    1999-01-01

    With over 220 investigational new drug applications currently active, gene therapy represents one of the fastest growing areas in biotherapeutic research. Initially conceived for replacing defective genes in diseases such as cystic fibrosis or inborn errors of metabolism with genes encoding the normal, or wild-type, gene product, gene therapy has expanded into other novel applications such as treatment of cancer or cardiovascular disease, where the risk:benefit profiles may be more acceptable in relation to the severity of the disease. Different types of vectors, including modified retroviruses, adenoviruses, adenovirus-associated viruses, and herpesviruses and plasmid DNA, are used to transfer foreign genetic material into patients' cells or tissues. Developing a toxicology program to determine the safety of these agents, therefore, requires a modified approach that encompasses the pharmacology and toxicity of both the gene product itself and the vector system used for delivery in the context of the application for the clinical trial. In general, the issues involved in designing and developing appropriate preclinical testing to determine the safety of these products are similar to those encountered for other recombinant molecules, including protein biotherapeutics. Limitations to some of the typical toxicology studies conducted for a traditional drug development program may exist for these agents, and nontraditional approaches may be required to demonstrate their safety. Many factors may affect the safety and clinical activity of these agents, including the route, frequency, and duration of exposure and the type of vector employed. Other safety considerations include quantitation of the duration and degree of expression of the vector in target and other tissues, the effects of gene expression on organ pathology and/or histology, evaluation of trafficking of gene-transduced cells or vector after injection, and interactions of the host immune system with the

  20. Use of Galerina marginata genes and proteins for peptide production

    DOEpatents

    Hallen-Adams, Heather E.; Scott-Craig, John S.; Walton, Jonathan D.; Luo, Hong

    2016-03-01

    The present invention relates to compositions and methods comprising genes and peptides associated with cyclic peptides and cyclic peptide production in mushrooms. In particular, the present invention relates to using genes and proteins from Galerina species encoding peptides specifically relating to amatoxins in addition to proteins involved with processing cyclic peptide toxins. In a preferred embodiment, the present invention also relates to methods for making small peptides and small cyclic peptides including peptides similar to amanitin. Further, the present inventions relate to providing kits for making small peptides.

  1. Glycerol Production by Fermenting Yeast Cells Is Essential for Optimal Bread Dough Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Aslankoohi, Elham; Rezaei, Mohammad Naser; Vervoort, Yannick; Courtin, Christophe M.; Verstrepen, Kevin J.

    2015-01-01

    Glycerol is the main compatible solute in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. When faced with osmotic stress, for example during semi-solid state bread dough fermentation, yeast cells produce and accumulate glycerol in order to prevent dehydration by balancing the intracellular osmolarity with that of the environment. However, increased glycerol production also results in decreased CO2 production, which may reduce dough leavening. We investigated the effect of yeast glycerol production level on bread dough fermentation capacity of a commercial bakery strain and a laboratory strain. We find that Δgpd1 mutants that show decreased glycerol production show impaired dough fermentation. In contrast, overexpression of GPD1 in the laboratory strain results in increased fermentation rates in high-sugar dough and improved gas retention in the fermenting bread dough. Together, our results reveal the crucial role of glycerol production level by fermenting yeast cells in dough fermentation efficiency as well as gas retention in dough, thereby opening up new routes for the selection of improved commercial bakery yeasts. PMID:25764309

  2. Glycerol production by fermenting yeast cells is essential for optimal bread dough fermentation.

    PubMed

    Aslankoohi, Elham; Rezaei, Mohammad Naser; Vervoort, Yannick; Courtin, Christophe M; Verstrepen, Kevin J

    2015-01-01

    Glycerol is the main compatible solute in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. When faced with osmotic stress, for example during semi-solid state bread dough fermentation, yeast cells produce and accumulate glycerol in order to prevent dehydration by balancing the intracellular osmolarity with that of the environment. However, increased glycerol production also results in decreased CO2 production, which may reduce dough leavening. We investigated the effect of yeast glycerol production level on bread dough fermentation capacity of a commercial bakery strain and a laboratory strain. We find that Δgpd1 mutants that show decreased glycerol production show impaired dough fermentation. In contrast, overexpression of GPD1 in the laboratory strain results in increased fermentation rates in high-sugar dough and improved gas retention in the fermenting bread dough. Together, our results reveal the crucial role of glycerol production level by fermenting yeast cells in dough fermentation efficiency as well as gas retention in dough, thereby opening up new routes for the selection of improved commercial bakery yeasts. PMID:25764309

  3. Glycerol production by fermenting yeast cells is essential for optimal bread dough fermentation.

    PubMed

    Aslankoohi, Elham; Rezaei, Mohammad Naser; Vervoort, Yannick; Courtin, Christophe M; Verstrepen, Kevin J

    2015-01-01

    Glycerol is the main compatible solute in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. When faced with osmotic stress, for example during semi-solid state bread dough fermentation, yeast cells produce and accumulate glycerol in order to prevent dehydration by balancing the intracellular osmolarity with that of the environment. However, increased glycerol production also results in decreased CO2 production, which may reduce dough leavening. We investigated the effect of yeast glycerol production level on bread dough fermentation capacity of a commercial bakery strain and a laboratory strain. We find that Δgpd1 mutants that show decreased glycerol production show impaired dough fermentation. In contrast, overexpression of GPD1 in the laboratory strain results in increased fermentation rates in high-sugar dough and improved gas retention in the fermenting bread dough. Together, our results reveal the crucial role of glycerol production level by fermenting yeast cells in dough fermentation efficiency as well as gas retention in dough, thereby opening up new routes for the selection of improved commercial bakery yeasts.

  4. The VELVET A Orthologue VEL1 of Trichoderma reesei Regulates Fungal Development and Is Essential for Cellulase Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Atanasova, Lea; Fekete, Erzsébet; Paholcsek, Melinda; Sándor, Erzsébet; Aquino, Benigno; Druzhinina, Irina S.; Karaffa, Levente; Kubicek, Christian P.

    2014-01-01

    Trichoderma reesei is the industrial producer of cellulases and hemicellulases for biorefinery processes. Their expression is obligatorily dependent on the function of the protein methyltransferase LAE1. The Aspergillus nidulans orthologue of LAE1 - LaeA - is part of the VELVET protein complex consisting of LaeA, VeA and VelB that regulates secondary metabolism and sexual as well as asexual reproduction. Here we have therefore investigated the function of VEL1, the T. reesei orthologue of A. nidulans VeA. Deletion of the T. reesei vel1 locus causes a complete and light-independent loss of conidiation, and impairs formation of perithecia. Deletion of vel1 also alters hyphal morphology towards hyperbranching and formation of thicker filaments, and with consequently reduced growth rates. Growth on lactose as a sole carbon source, however, is even more strongly reduced and growth on cellulose as a sole carbon source eliminated. Consistent with these findings, deletion of vel1 completely impaired the expression of cellulases, xylanases and the cellulase regulator XYR1 on lactose as a cellulase inducing carbon source, but also in resting mycelia with sophorose as inducer. Our data show that in T. reesei VEL1 controls sexual and asexual development, and this effect is independent of light. VEL1 is also essential for cellulase gene expression, which is consistent with the assumption that their regulation by LAE1 occurs by the VELVET complex. PMID:25386652

  5. Drosophila melanogaster cellular repressor of E1A-stimulated genes is a lysosomal protein essential for fly development

    PubMed Central

    Kowalewski-Nimmerfall, Elisabeth; Schähs, Philipp; Maresch, Daniel; Rendic, Dubravko; Krämer, Helmut; Mach, Lukas

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian cellular repressor of E1A-stimulated genes is a lysosomal glycoprotein implicated in cellular growth and differentiation. The genome of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster encodes a putative orthologue (dCREG), suggesting evolutionarily conserved physiological functions of this protein. In D. melanogaster S2 cells, dCREG was found to localize in lysosomes. Further studies revealed that intracellular dCREG is subject of proteolytic maturation. Processing and turnover could be substantially reduced by RNAi-mediated silencing of cathepsin L. In contrast to mammalian cells, lysosomal delivery of dCREG does not depend on its carbohydrate moiety. Furthermore, depletion of the putative D. melanogaster lysosomal sorting receptor lysosomal enzyme receptor protein did not compromise cellular retention of dCREG. We also investigated the developmental consequences of dCREG ablation in whole D. melanogaster flies. Ubiquitous depletion of dCREG proved lethal at the late pupal stage once a knock-down efficiency of > 95% was achieved. These results demonstrate that dCREG is essential for proper completion of fly development. PMID:25173815

  6. Gene targeting reveals the role of Oc90 as the essential organizer of the otoconial organic matrix

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xing; Yang, Hua; Yamoah, Ebenezer N; Lundberg, Yunxia Wang

    2007-01-01

    A critical part of the functional development of our peripheral balance system is the embryonic formation of otoconia, composite crystals that overlie and provide optimal stimulus input to the sensory epithelium of the gravity receptor in the inner ear. To date neither the functions of otoconial proteins nor the processes of crystal formation are clearly defined. Using gene targeting and protein analysis strategies, we demonstrate that the predominant mammalian otoconin, otoconin-90/95 (Oc90), is essential for formation of the organic matrix of otoconia by specifically recruiting other matrix components, which includes otolin, a novel mammalian otoconin that we identified to be in wildtype murine otoconia. We show that this matrix controls otoconia growth and morphology by embedding the crystallites during seeding and growth. During otoconia development, the organic matrix forms prior to CaCO3 deposition and provides optimal calcification efficiency. Histological and ultrastructural examinations show normal inner ear epithelial morphology but reduced acellular matrices, including otoconial, cupular and tectorial membranes, in Oc90 null mice, likely due to an absence of Oc90 and a profound reduction of otolin. Our data demonstrate the critical roles of otoconins in otoconia seeding, growth and anchoring and suggest mechanistic similarities and differences between otoconia and bone calcification. PMID:17300776

  7. Deduced products of C4-dicarboxylate transport regulatory genes of Rhizobium leguminosarum are homologous to nitrogen regulatory gene products.

    PubMed Central

    Ronson, C W; Astwood, P M; Nixon, B T; Ausubel, F M

    1987-01-01

    We have sequenced two genes dctB and dctD required for the activation of the C4-dicarboxylate transport structural gene dctA in free-living Rhizobium leguminosarum. The hydropathic profile of the dctB gene product (DctB) suggested that its N-terminal region may be located in the periplasm and its C-terminal region in the cytoplasm. The C-terminal region of DctB was strongly conserved with similar regions of the products of several regulatory genes that may act as environmental sensors, including ntrB, envZ, virA, phoR, cpxA, and phoM. The N-terminal domains of the products of several regulatory genes thought to be transcriptional activators, including ntrC, ompR, virG, phoB and sfrA. In addition, the central and C-terminal regions of DctD were strongly conserved with the products of ntrC and nifA, transcriptional activators that require the alternate sigma factor rpoN (ntrA) as co-activator. The central region of DctD also contained a potential ATP-binding domain. These results are consistent with recent results that show that rpoN product is required for dctA activation, and suggest that DctB plus DctD-mediated transcriptional activation of dctA may be mechanistically similar to NtrB plus NtrC-mediated activation of glnA in E. coli. PMID:3671068

  8. Neoplastic transformation of rat thyroid cells requires the junB and fra-1 gene induction which is dependent on the HMGI-C gene product.

    PubMed Central

    Vallone, D; Battista, S; Pierantoni, G M; Fedele, M; Casalino, L; Santoro, M; Viglietto, G; Fusco, A; Verde, P

    1997-01-01

    The expression of the high mobility group I (HMGI)-C chromatin component was shown previously to be essential for the establishment of the neoplastic phenotype in retrovirally transformed thyroid cell lines. To identify possible targets of the HMGI-C gene product, we have analyzed the AP-1 complex in normal, fully transformed and antisense HMGI-C-expressing rat thyroid cells. We show that neoplastic transformation is associated with a drastic increase in AP-1 activity, which reflects multiple compositional changes. The strongest effect is represented by the dramatic junB and fra-1 gene induction, which is prevented in cell lines expressing the antisense HMGI-C. These results indicate that the HMGI-C gene product is essential for the junB and fra-1 transcriptional induction associated with neoplastic transformation. The inhibition of Fra-1 protein synthesis by stable transfection with a fra-1 antisense RNA vector significantly reduces the malignant phenotype of the transformed thyroid cells, indicating a pivotal role for the fra-1 gene product in the process of cellular transformation. PMID:9311991

  9. A Novel Tetrahydrofolate-Dependent O-Demethylase Gene Is Essential for Growth of Sphingomonas paucimobilis SYK-6 with Syringate

    PubMed Central

    Masai, Eiji; Sasaki, Miyuki; Minakawa, Yasunori; Abe, Tomokuni; Sonoki, Tomonori; Miyauchi, Keisuke; Katayama, Yoshihiro; Fukuda, Masao

    2004-01-01

    Sphingomonas paucimobilis SYK-6 degrades syringate to 3-O-methylgallate (3MGA), which is finally converted to pyruvate and oxaloacetate via multiple pathways in which protocatechuate 4,5-dioxygenase, 3MGA dioxygenase, and gallate dioxygenase are involved. Here we isolated the syringate O-demethylase gene (desA), which complemented the growth deficiency on syringate of a Tn5 mutant of the SYK-6 derivative strain. The desA gene is located 929 bp downstream of ferA, encoding feruloyl-coenzyme A synthetase, and consists of a 1,386-bp open reading frame encoding a polypeptide with a molecular mass of 50,721 Da. The deduced amino acid sequence of desA showed 26% identity in a 325-amino-acid overlap with that of gcvT of Escherichia coli, which encodes the tetrahydrofolate (H4folate)-dependent aminomethyltransferase involved in glycine cleavage. The cell extract of E. coli carrying desA converted syringate to 3MGA only when H4folate was added to the reaction mixture. DesA catalyzes the transfer of the methyl moiety of syringate to H4folate, forming 5-methyl-H4folate. Vanillate and 3MGA were also used as substrates for DesA; however, the relative activities toward them were 3 and 0.4% of that toward syringate, respectively. Disruption of desA in SYK-6 resulted in a growth defect on syringate but did not affect growth on vanillate, indicating that desA is essential to syringate degradation. In a previous study the ligH gene, which complements the growth deficiency on vanillate and syringate of a chemical-induced mutant of SYK-6, DC-49, was isolated (S. Nishikawa, T. Sonoki, T. Kasahara, T. Obi, S. Kubota, S. Kawai, N. Morohoshi, and Y. Katayama, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 64:836-842, 1998). Disruption of ligH resulted in the same phenotype as DC-49; its cell extract, however, was found to be able to convert vanillate and syringate in the presence of H4folate. The possible role of ligH is discussed. PMID:15090517

  10. A novel tetrahydrofolate-dependent O-demethylase gene is essential for growth of Sphingomonas paucimobilis SYK-6 with syringate.

    PubMed

    Masai, Eiji; Sasaki, Miyuki; Minakawa, Yasunori; Abe, Tomokuni; Sonoki, Tomonori; Miyauchi, Keisuke; Katayama, Yoshihiro; Fukuda, Masao

    2004-05-01

    Sphingomonas paucimobilis SYK-6 degrades syringate to 3-O-methylgallate (3MGA), which is finally converted to pyruvate and oxaloacetate via multiple pathways in which protocatechuate 4,5-dioxygenase, 3MGA dioxygenase, and gallate dioxygenase are involved. Here we isolated the syringate O-demethylase gene (desA), which complemented the growth deficiency on syringate of a Tn5 mutant of the SYK-6 derivative strain. The desA gene is located 929 bp downstream of ferA, encoding feruloyl-coenzyme A synthetase, and consists of a 1,386-bp open reading frame encoding a polypeptide with a molecular mass of 50,721 Da. The deduced amino acid sequence of desA showed 26% identity in a 325-amino-acid overlap with that of gcvT of Escherichia coli, which encodes the tetrahydrofolate (H(4)folate)-dependent aminomethyltransferase involved in glycine cleavage. The cell extract of E. coli carrying desA converted syringate to 3MGA only when H(4)folate was added to the reaction mixture. DesA catalyzes the transfer of the methyl moiety of syringate to H(4)folate, forming 5-methyl-H(4)folate. Vanillate and 3MGA were also used as substrates for DesA; however, the relative activities toward them were 3 and 0.4% of that toward syringate, respectively. Disruption of desA in SYK-6 resulted in a growth defect on syringate but did not affect growth on vanillate, indicating that desA is essential to syringate degradation. In a previous study the ligH gene, which complements the growth deficiency on vanillate and syringate of a chemical-induced mutant of SYK-6, DC-49, was isolated (S. Nishikawa, T. Sonoki, T. Kasahara, T. Obi, S. Kubota, S. Kawai, N. Morohoshi, and Y. Katayama, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 64:836-842, 1998). Disruption of ligH resulted in the same phenotype as DC-49; its cell extract, however, was found to be able to convert vanillate and syringate in the presence of H(4)folate. The possible role of ligH is discussed.

  11. The rpoN gene product of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is required for expression of diverse genes, including the flagellin gene.

    PubMed Central

    Totten, P A; Lara, J C; Lory, S

    1990-01-01

    The product of the rpoN gene is an alternative sigma factor of RNA polymerase which is required for transcription of a number of genes in members of the family Enterobacteriaceae, including those that specify enzymes of nitrogen assimilation, amino acid uptake, and degradation of a variety of organic molecules. We have previously shown that transcription of the pilin gene of Pseudomonas aeruginosa also requires RpoN (K. S. Ishimoto and S. Lory, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 86:1954-1957, 1989) and have undertaken a more extensive survey of genes under RpoN control. Strains of P. aeruginosa that carry an insertionally inactivated rpoN gene were constructed and shown to be nonmotile because of the inability of these mutants to synthesize flagellin. The mutation in rpoN had no effect on expression of extracellular polypeptides, outer membrane proteins, and the alginate capsule. However, the rpoN mutants were glutamine auxotrophs and were defective in glutamine synthetase, indicating defects in nitrogen assimilation. In addition, the P. aeruginosa rpoN mutants were defective in urease activity. These findings indicate that the sigma factor encoded by the rpoN gene is used by P. aeruginosa for transcription of a diverse set of genes that specify biosynthetic enzymes, degradative enzymes, and surface components. These rpoN-controlled genes include pili and flagella which are required for full virulence of the organism. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 PMID:2152909

  12. Production of geranylgeraniol on overexpression of a prenyl diphosphate synthase fusion gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ohto, Chikara; Muramatsu, Masayoshi; Obata, Shusei; Sakuradani, Eiji; Shimizu, Sakayu

    2010-07-01

    An acyclic diterpene alcohol, (E,E,E)-geranylgeraniol (GGOH), is one of the important compounds used as perfume and pharmacological agents. A deficiency of squalene (SQ) synthase activity allows yeasts to accumulate an acyclic sesquiterpene alcohol, (E,E)-farnesol, in their cells. Since sterols are essential for the growth of yeasts, a deficiency of SQ synthase activity makes the addition of supplemental sterols to the culture media necessary. To develop a GGOH production method not requiring any supplemental sterols, we overexpressed HMG1 encoding hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA reductase and the genes of two prenyl diphosphate synthases, ERG20 and BTS1, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A prototrophic diploid coexpressing HMG1 and the ERG20-BTS1 fusion accumulated GGOH with neither disruption of the SQ synthase gene nor the addition of any supplemental sterols. The GGOH content on the diploid cultivation in a 5-l jar fermenter reached 138.8 mg/l under optimal conditions.

  13. Oregano Essential Oil as an Antimicrobial and Antioxidant Additive in Food Products.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Garcia, I; Silva-Espinoza, B A; Ortega-Ramirez, L A; Leyva, J M; Siddiqui, M W; Cruz-Valenzuela, M R; Gonzalez-Aguilar, G A; Ayala-Zavala, J F

    2016-07-26

    Food consumers and industries urged the need of natural alternatives to assure food safety and quality. As a response, the use of natural compounds from herbs and spices is an alternative to synthetic additives associated with toxic problems. This review discusses the antimicrobial and antioxidant activity of oregano essential oil (OEO) and its potential as a food additive. Oregano is a plant that has been used as a food seasoning since ancient times. The common name of oregano is given to several species: Origanum (family: Lamiaceae) and Lippia (family: Verbenaceae), amongst others. The main compounds identified in the different OEOs are carvacrol and thymol, which are responsible for the characteristic odor, antimicrobial, and antioxidant activity; however, their content may vary according to the species, harvesting season, and geographical sources. These substances as antibacterial agents make the cell membrane permeable due to its impregnation in the hydrophobic domains, this effect is higher against gram positive bacteria. In addition, the OEO has antioxidant properties effective in retarding the process of lipid peroxidation in fatty foods, and scavenging free radicals. In this perspective, the present review analyzes and discusses the state of the art about the actual and potential uses of OEO as an antimicrobial and antioxidant food additives. PMID:25763467

  14. Tropomyosin is essential in yeast, yet the TPM1 and TPM2 products perform distinct functions

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Sequence analysis of chromosome IX of Saccharomyces cerevisiae revealed an open reading frame of 166 residues, designated TPM2, having 64.5% sequence identity to TPM1, that encodes the major form of tropomyosin in yeast. Purification and characterization of Tpm2p revealed a protein with the characteristics of a bona fide tropomyosin; it is present in vivo at about one sixth the abundance of Tpm1p. Biochemical and sequence analysis indicates that Tpm2p spans four actin monomers along a filament, whereas Tpmlp spans five. Despite its shorter length, Tpm2p can compete with Tpm1p for binding to F-actin. Over-expression of Tpm2p in vivo alters the axial budding of haploids to a bipolar pattern, and this can be partially suppressed by co-over-expression of Tpm1p. This suggests distinct functions for the two tropomyosins, and indicates that the ratio between them is important for correct morphogenesis. Loss of Tpm2p has no detectable phenotype in otherwise wild type cells, but is lethal in combination with tpm1 delta. Over-expression of Tpm2p does not suppress the growth or cell surface targeting defects associated with tpm1 delta, so the two tropomyosins must perform an essential function, yet are not functionally interchangeable. S. cerevisiae therefore provides a simple system for the study of two tropomyosins having distinct yet overlapping functions. PMID:7844152

  15. Optimization of ultrasonic emulsification conditions for the production of orange peel essential oil nanoemulsions.

    PubMed

    Hashtjin, Adel Mirmajidi; Abbasi, Soleiman

    2015-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of emulsifying conditions on some physical and rheological properties of orange peel essential oil (OPEO) in water nanoemulsions. In this regard, using the response surface methodology, the influence of ultrasonication conditions including sonication amplitude (70-100 %), sonication time (90-150 s) and process temperature (5-45 °C) on the mean droplets diameter (Z-average value), polydispersity index (PDI), and viscosity of the OPEO nanoemulsions was evaluated. In addition, the flow behavior and stability of selected nanoemulsions was evaluated during storage (up to 3 months) at different temperatures (5, 25 and 45 °C). Based on the results of the optimization, the optimum conditions for producing OPEO nanoemulsions (Z-average value 18.16 nm) were determined as 94 % (sonication amplitude), 138 s (sonication time) and 37 °C (process temperature). Moreover, analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed high coefficients of determination values (R (2) > 0.95) for the response surface models of the energy input and Z-average. In addition, the flow behavior of produced nanoemulsions was Newtonian, and the effect of time and storage temperature as well as their interactions on the Z-average value was highly significant (P < 0.0001). PMID:25892765

  16. Oregano Essential Oil as an Antimicrobial and Antioxidant Additive in Food Products.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Garcia, I; Silva-Espinoza, B A; Ortega-Ramirez, L A; Leyva, J M; Siddiqui, M W; Cruz-Valenzuela, M R; Gonzalez-Aguilar, G A; Ayala-Zavala, J F

    2016-07-26

    Food consumers and industries urged the need of natural alternatives to assure food safety and quality. As a response, the use of natural compounds from herbs and spices is an alternative to synthetic additives associated with toxic problems. This review discusses the antimicrobial and antioxidant activity of oregano essential oil (OEO) and its potential as a food additive. Oregano is a plant that has been used as a food seasoning since ancient times. The common name of oregano is given to several species: Origanum (family: Lamiaceae) and Lippia (family: Verbenaceae), amongst others. The main compounds identified in the different OEOs are carvacrol and thymol, which are responsible for the characteristic odor, antimicrobial, and antioxidant activity; however, their content may vary according to the species, harvesting season, and geographical sources. These substances as antibacterial agents make the cell membrane permeable due to its impregnation in the hydrophobic domains, this effect is higher against gram positive bacteria. In addition, the OEO has antioxidant properties effective in retarding the process of lipid peroxidation in fatty foods, and scavenging free radicals. In this perspective, the present review analyzes and discusses the state of the art about the actual and potential uses of OEO as an antimicrobial and antioxidant food additives.

  17. Spatially explicit measures of production of young alewives in Lake Michigan: Linkage between essential fish habitat and recruitment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hook, Tomas O.; Rutherford, Edward S.; Brines, Shannon J.; Mason, Doran M.; Schwab, David J.; McCormick, Michael; Desorcie, Timothy J.

    2003-01-01

    The identification and protection of essential habitats for early life stages of fishes are necessary to sustain fish stocks. Essential fish habitat for early life stages may be defined as areas where fish densities, growth, survival, or production rates are relatively high. To identify critical habitats for young-of-year (YOY) alewives (Alosa pseud oharengus) in Lake Michigan, we integrated bioenergetics models with GIS (Geographic Information Systems) to generate spatially explicit estimates of potential population production (an index of habitat quality). These estimates were based upon YOY alewife bioenergetic growth rate potential and their salmonine predators’ consumptive demand. We compared estimates of potential population production to YOY alewife yield (an index of habitat importance). Our analysis suggested that during 1994–1995, YOY alewife habitat quality and yield varied widely throughout Lake Michigan. Spatial patterns of alewife yield were not significantly correlated to habitat quality. Various mechanisms (e.g., predator migrations, lake circulation patterns, alternative strategies) may preclude YOY alewives from concentrating in areas of high habitat quality in Lake Michigan.

  18. Redefining body composition: nutrients hormones, and genes in meat production.

    PubMed

    Wray-Cahen, C D; Kerr, D E; Evock-Clover, C M; Steele, N C

    1998-01-01

    Growth rate and body composition of livestock can be optimized to meet consumer needs for a leaner product and to improve the efficiency of meat-animal production. Optimization strategies have traditionally focused on genetic selection and cost-effective ration formulation to achieve the genetic potential. Advances in understanding the mechanisms of growth and its control have led to additional opportunities for its manipulation. These include nutritional manipulation,the use of growth promotants, and, more recently, the ability to change the genetic potential through genetic engineering. Selection of appropriate candidate genes for manipulation depends on understanding the mechanisms underlying differentiation and growth of embryonic muscle cells. Recent advances in genetic engineering techniques, including gene therapy and germline transgenesis, will likely hasten the genetic progress toward a leaner carcass in domestic livestock. Such strategies may prove to be more beneficial then the controlled enhancement of somatotropin expression.

  19. Chemotaxis in Escherichia coli: Methylation of che gene products

    PubMed Central

    Silverman, Michael; Simon, Melvin

    1977-01-01

    The products of three chemotaxis-specific genes in Escherichia coli, cheM, cheD, and cheZ, are methylated. The cheZ gene codes for the synthesis of a 24,000 molecular weight polypeptide that appears in the cytoplasm. cheM codes for the synthesis of a membrane-bound polypeptide with a molecular weight of 61,000. cheD codes for another membrane-bound polypeptide with an apparent molecular weight of 64,000. CheM- mutants show chemotaxis toward some attractants (Tar- phenotype), while CheD- mutants respond to other attractants (Tsr- phenotype). The double mutant (CheD-, CheM-) does not respond to any attractant or repellent tested. Therefore, these polypeptides play a central role in chemotaxis. They collect information from two subsets of chemoreceptors and act as the last step in the chemoreceptor pathway and the first step in the general processing of signals for transmission to the flagellar rotor. It is suggested that they may be involved in both an initial process that reflects the instantaneous state of the chemoreceptors and in an integrative, adaptive process. Two other genes, cheX and cheW, are required for the methylation of the cheD and cheM gene products. Images PMID:333434

  20. Soluble amyloid precursor protein (APP) regulates transthyretin and Klotho gene expression without rescuing the essential function of APP.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongmei; Wang, Baiping; Wang, Zilai; Guo, Qinxi; Tabuchi, Katsuhiko; Hammer, Robert E; Südhof, Thomas C; Zheng, Hui

    2010-10-01

    Amyloidogenic processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) generates a large secreted ectodomain fragment (APPsβ), β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides, and an APP intracellular domain (AICD). Whereas Aβ is viewed as critical for Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis, the role of other APP processing products remains enigmatic. Of interest, the AICD has been implicated in transcriptional regulation, and N-terminal cleavage of APPsβ has been suggested to produce an active fragment that may mediate axonal pruning and neuronal cell death. We previously reported that mice deficient in APP and APP-like protein 2 (APLP2) exhibit early postnatal lethality and neuromuscular synapse defects, whereas mice with neuronal conditional deletion of APP and APLP2 are viable. Using transcriptional profiling, we now identify transthyretin (TTR) and Klotho as APP/APLP2-dependent genes whose expression is decreased in loss-of-function states but increased in gain-of-function states. Significantly, by creating an APP knockin allele that expresses only APPsβ protein, we demonstrate that APPsβ is not normally cleaved in vivo and is fully capable of mediating the APP-dependent regulation of TTR and Klotho gene expression. Despite being an active regulator of gene expression, APPsβ did not rescue the lethality and neuromuscular synapse defects of APP and APLP2 double-KO animals. Our studies identify TTR and Klotho as physiological targets of APP that are regulated by soluble APPsβ independent of developmental APP functions. This unexpected APP-mediated signaling pathway may play an important role in maintaining TTR and Klotho levels and their respective functions in Aβ sequestration and aging. PMID:20855613

  1. Plasmid genes required for microcin B17 production.

    PubMed Central

    San Millán, J L; Kolter, R; Moreno, F

    1985-01-01

    The production of the antibiotic substance microcin B17 (Mcc) is determined by a 3.5-kilobase DNA fragment from plasmid pMccB17. Several Mcc- mutations on plasmid pMccB17 were obtained by both transposon insertion and nitrosoguanidine mutagenesis. Plasmids carrying these mutations were tested for their ability to complement Mcc- insertion or deletion mutations on pMM102 (pMM102 is a pBR322 derivative carrying the region encoding microcin B17). Results from these experiments indicate that at least four plasmid genes are required for microcin production. PMID:2993228

  2. Plasmid genes required for microcin B17 production.

    PubMed

    San Millán, J L; Kolter, R; Moreno, F

    1985-09-01

    The production of the antibiotic substance microcin B17 (Mcc) is determined by a 3.5-kilobase DNA fragment from plasmid pMccB17. Several Mcc- mutations on plasmid pMccB17 were obtained by both transposon insertion and nitrosoguanidine mutagenesis. Plasmids carrying these mutations were tested for their ability to complement Mcc- insertion or deletion mutations on pMM102 (pMM102 is a pBR322 derivative carrying the region encoding microcin B17). Results from these experiments indicate that at least four plasmid genes are required for microcin production.

  3. Stock-outs of essential health products in Mozambique-longitudinal analyses from 2011 to 2013

    PubMed Central

    Wagenaar, Bradley H.; Gimbel, Sarah; Hoek, Roxanne; Pfeiffer, James; Michel, Cathy; Manuel, João Luis; Cuembelo, Fatima; Quembo, Titos; Afonso, Pires; Gloyd, Stephen; Sherr, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    objectives To assess the relationship between health system factors and facility-level EHP stock-outs in Mozambique. methods Service provisions were assessed in 26 health facilities and 13 district warehouses in Sofala Province, Mozambique, from July to August in 2011–2013. Generalised estimating equations were used to model factors associated with facility-level availability of essential drugs, supplies and equipment. results Stock-out rates for drugs ranged from 1.3% for oral rehydration solution to 20.5% for Depo-Provera and condoms, with a mean stock-out rate of 9.1%; mean stock-out rates were 15.4% for supplies and 4.1% for equipment. Stock-outs at the district level accounted for 27.1% (29/107) of facility-level drug stock-outs and 44.0% (37/84) of supply stock-outs. Each 10-km increase in the distance from district distribution warehouses was associated with a 31% (CI: 22–42%), 28% (CI: 17–40%) or 27% (CI: 7–50%) increase in rates of drug, supply or equipment stock-outs, respectively. The number of heath facility staff was consistently negatively associated with the occurrence of stock-outs. conclusions Facility-level stock-outs of EHPs in Mozambique are common and appear to disproportionately affect those living far from district capitals and near facilities with few health staff. The majority of facility-level EHP stock-outs in Mozambique occur when stock exists at the district distribution centre. Innovative methods are urgently needed to improve EHP supply chains, requesting and ordering of drugs, facility and district communication, and forecasting of future EHP needs in Mozambique. Increased investments in public-sector human resources for health could potentially decrease the occurrence of EHP stock-outs. PMID:24724617

  4. Potential of Cultivated Ganoderma lucidum Mushrooms for the Production of Supplements Enriched with Essential Elements.

    PubMed

    Rzymski, Piotr; Mleczek, Mirosław; Niedzielski, Przemysław; Siwulski, Marek; Gąsecka, Monika

    2016-03-01

    Ganoderma lucidum is an important medicinal mushroom species and there is continuous interest in its bioactive properties. This study evaluated whether it may additionally serve as a nutritional supplement for the trace elements: selenium (Se), copper (Cu), and zinc (Zn). Mushrooms were cultivated on substrates enriched with 0.1 to 0.8 mM of inorganic Se alone or in combination with Zn and/or Cu. Supplementation increased accumulation of the elements in fruiting bodies regardless of the applied cultivation model. G. lucidum demonstrated the ability to accumulate significant amounts of organic Se, maximally amounting to (i) over 44 mg/kg when the substrate was supplemented only with Se, (ii) over 20 mg/kg in the Se+Cu model, (iii) over 25 mg/kg in the Se+Zn model, and (iv) 15 mg/kg in the Se+Cu+Zn model. The accumulation of Cu and Zn steadily increased with their initial substrate concentrations. Maximum concentrations found after supplementation with 0.8 mM amounted to over 55 mg/kg (Se+Zn) and 52 mg/kg (Se+Cu+Zn) of Zn, and 29 mg/kg (Se+Cu) and over 31 mg/kg (Se+Cu+Zn) of Cu. The greater the supplemented concentration and number of supplemented elements, the lower the biomass of G. lucidum fruiting bodies. Nevertheless, it still remained high when the substrate was supplemented up to 0.4 mM with each element. These results highlight that G. lucidum can easily incorporate elements from the substrate and that, when biofortified, its dried fruiting bodies may serve as a nutritional source of these essential elements. PMID:26799621

  5. Potential of Cultivated Ganoderma lucidum Mushrooms for the Production of Supplements Enriched with Essential Elements.

    PubMed

    Rzymski, Piotr; Mleczek, Mirosław; Niedzielski, Przemysław; Siwulski, Marek; Gąsecka, Monika

    2016-03-01

    Ganoderma lucidum is an important medicinal mushroom species and there is continuous interest in its bioactive properties. This study evaluated whether it may additionally serve as a nutritional supplement for the trace elements: selenium (Se), copper (Cu), and zinc (Zn). Mushrooms were cultivated on substrates enriched with 0.1 to 0.8 mM of inorganic Se alone or in combination with Zn and/or Cu. Supplementation increased accumulation of the elements in fruiting bodies regardless of the applied cultivation model. G. lucidum demonstrated the ability to accumulate significant amounts of organic Se, maximally amounting to (i) over 44 mg/kg when the substrate was supplemented only with Se, (ii) over 20 mg/kg in the Se+Cu model, (iii) over 25 mg/kg in the Se+Zn model, and (iv) 15 mg/kg in the Se+Cu+Zn model. The accumulation of Cu and Zn steadily increased with their initial substrate concentrations. Maximum concentrations found after supplementation with 0.8 mM amounted to over 55 mg/kg (Se+Zn) and 52 mg/kg (Se+Cu+Zn) of Zn, and 29 mg/kg (Se+Cu) and over 31 mg/kg (Se+Cu+Zn) of Cu. The greater the supplemented concentration and number of supplemented elements, the lower the biomass of G. lucidum fruiting bodies. Nevertheless, it still remained high when the substrate was supplemented up to 0.4 mM with each element. These results highlight that G. lucidum can easily incorporate elements from the substrate and that, when biofortified, its dried fruiting bodies may serve as a nutritional source of these essential elements.

  6. Fis is essential for capsule production in Pasteurella multocida and regulates expression of other important virulence factors.

    PubMed

    Steen, Jason A; Steen, Jennifer A; Harrison, Paul; Seemann, Torsten; Wilkie, Ian; Harper, Marina; Adler, Ben; Boyce, John D

    2010-02-05

    P. multocida is the causative agent of a wide range of diseases of animals, including fowl cholera in poultry and wild birds. Fowl cholera isolates of P. multocida generally express a capsular polysaccharide composed of hyaluronic acid. There have been reports of spontaneous capsule loss in P. multocida, but the mechanism by which this occurs has not been determined. In this study, we identified three independent strains that had spontaneously lost the ability to produce capsular polysaccharide. Quantitative RT-PCR showed that these strains had significantly reduced transcription of the capsule biosynthetic genes, but DNA sequence analysis identified no mutations within the capsule biosynthetic locus. However, whole-genome sequencing of paired capsulated and acapsular strains identified a single point mutation within the fis gene in the acapsular strain. Sequencing of fis from two independently derived spontaneous acapsular strains showed that each contained a mutation within fis. Complementation of these strains with an intact copy of fis, predicted to encode a transcriptional regulator, returned capsule expression to all strains. Therefore, expression of a functional Fis protein is essential for capsule expression in P. multocida. DNA microarray analysis of one of the spontaneous fis mutants identified approximately 30 genes as down-regulated in the mutant, including pfhB_2, which encodes a filamentous hemagglutinin, a known P. multocida virulence factor, and plpE, which encodes the cross protective surface antigen PlpE. Therefore these experiments define for the first time a mechanism for spontaneous capsule loss in P. multocida and identify Fis as a critical regulator of capsule expression. Furthermore, Fis is involved in the regulation of a range of other P. multocida genes including important virulence factors.

  7. Cognate Th2-B cell interaction is essential for the autoantibody production in pemphigus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Haiqin; Chen, Yayuan; Zhou, Yun; Wang, Ying; Zheng, Jie; Pan, Meng

    2012-02-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is a Th2-dominant autoimmune skin disease. We showed that indeed active PV patients had a biased Th2 response and specific IgG4 autoantibodies were dominant. To further investigate the role of antigen-specific Th2 cells in the regulation of pathogenic Dsg3-IgG antibody production, we used recombined Dsg3 protein to immunize wild-type C57BL/6 mice with aluminum hydroxide or complete Freund's adjuvant as adjuvant. CD4(+) T cells from Dsg3-immunized mice were adoptively transferred into TCR-β chain deficient mice. The transferred CD4(+) T cells were readily seen in the peripheral blood and spleen, and interacted with B cells, resulting in B-cell activation. Furthermore, transferred CD4(+) T cells from mice immunized with Dsg3 plus Alum with Th2 phenotype were able to render unprimed B cells to secrete Dsg3-specific IgG1 antibody in vivo. Taken together, these results provide the first demonstration of direct role of Dsg3-reactive CD4(+) T (Th2) cells in the regulation of pathologic anti-Dsg3 antibody production.

  8. Cognate Th2-B cell interaction is essential for the autoantibody production in pemphigus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Haiqin; Chen, Yayuan; Zhou, Yun; Wang, Ying; Zheng, Jie; Pan, Meng

    2012-02-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is a Th2-dominant autoimmune skin disease. We showed that indeed active PV patients had a biased Th2 response and specific IgG4 autoantibodies were dominant. To further investigate the role of antigen-specific Th2 cells in the regulation of pathogenic Dsg3-IgG antibody production, we used recombined Dsg3 protein to immunize wild-type C57BL/6 mice with aluminum hydroxide or complete Freund's adjuvant as adjuvant. CD4(+) T cells from Dsg3-immunized mice were adoptively transferred into TCR-β chain deficient mice. The transferred CD4(+) T cells were readily seen in the peripheral blood and spleen, and interacted with B cells, resulting in B-cell activation. Furthermore, transferred CD4(+) T cells from mice immunized with Dsg3 plus Alum with Th2 phenotype were able to render unprimed B cells to secrete Dsg3-specific IgG1 antibody in vivo. Taken together, these results provide the first demonstration of direct role of Dsg3-reactive CD4(+) T (Th2) cells in the regulation of pathologic anti-Dsg3 antibody production. PMID:22009001

  9. Integrated in silico analyses of regulatory and metabolic networks of Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 reveal relationships between gene centrality and essentiality

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Song, Hyun-Seob; McClure, Ryan S.; Bernstein, Hans C.; Overall, Christopher C.; Hill, Eric A.; Beliaev, Alex S.

    2015-03-27

    Cyanobacteria dynamically relay environmental inputs to intracellular adaptations through a coordinated adjustment of photosynthetic efficiency and carbon processing rates. The output of such adaptations is reflected through changes in transcriptional patterns and metabolic flux distributions that ultimately define growth strategy. To address interrelationships between metabolism and regulation, we performed integrative analyses of metabolic and gene co-expression networks in a model cyanobacterium, Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002. Centrality analyses using the gene co-expression network identified a set of key genes, which were defined here as ‘topologically important.’ Parallel in silico gene knock-out simulations, using the genome-scale metabolic network, classified what we termedmore » as ‘functionally important’ genes, deletion of which affected growth or metabolism. A strong positive correlation was observed between topologically and functionally important genes. Functionally important genes exhibited variable levels of topological centrality; however, the majority of topologically central genes were found to be functionally essential for growth. Subsequent functional enrichment analysis revealed that both functionally and topologically important genes in Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 are predominantly associated with translation and energy metabolism, two cellular processes critical for growth. This research demonstrates how synergistic network-level analyses can be used for reconciliation of metabolic and gene expression data to uncover fundamental biological principles.« less

  10. Integrated in silico analyses of regulatory and metabolic networks of Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 reveal relationships between gene centrality and essentiality

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Hyun-Seob; McClure, Ryan S.; Bernstein, Hans C.; Overall, Christopher C.; Hill, Eric A.; Beliaev, Alex S.

    2015-03-27

    Cyanobacteria dynamically relay environmental inputs to intracellular adaptations through a coordinated adjustment of photosynthetic efficiency and carbon processing rates. The output of such adaptations is reflected through changes in transcriptional patterns and metabolic flux distributions that ultimately define growth strategy. To address interrelationships between metabolism and regulation, we performed integrative analyses of metabolic and gene co-expression networks in a model cyanobacterium, Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002. Centrality analyses using the gene co-expression network identified a set of key genes, which were defined here as ‘topologically important.’ Parallel in silico gene knock-out simulations, using the genome-scale metabolic network, classified what we termed as ‘functionally important’ genes, deletion of which affected growth or metabolism. A strong positive correlation was observed between topologically and functionally important genes. Functionally important genes exhibited variable levels of topological centrality; however, the majority of topologically central genes were found to be functionally essential for growth. Subsequent functional enrichment analysis revealed that both functionally and topologically important genes in Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 are predominantly associated with translation and energy metabolism, two cellular processes critical for growth. This research demonstrates how synergistic network-level analyses can be used for reconciliation of metabolic and gene expression data to uncover fundamental biological principles.

  11. Integrated in silico Analyses of Regulatory and Metabolic Networks of Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 Reveal Relationships between Gene Centrality and Essentiality

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hyun-Seob; McClure, Ryan S.; Bernstein, Hans C.; Overall, Christopher C.; Hill, Eric A.; Beliaev, Alexander S.

    2015-01-01

    Cyanobacteria dynamically relay environmental inputs to intracellular adaptations through a coordinated adjustment of photosynthetic efficiency and carbon processing rates. The output of such adaptations is reflected through changes in transcriptional patterns and metabolic flux distributions that ultimately define growth strategy. To address interrelationships between metabolism and regulation, we performed integrative analyses of metabolic and gene co-expression networks in a model cyanobacterium, Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002. Centrality analyses using the gene co-expression network identified a set of key genes, which were defined here as “topologically important.” Parallel in silico gene knock-out simulations, using the genome-scale metabolic network, classified what we termed as “functionally important” genes, deletion of which affected growth or metabolism. A strong positive correlation was observed between topologically and functionally important genes. Functionally important genes exhibited variable levels of topological centrality; however, the majority of topologically central genes were found to be functionally essential for growth. Subsequent functional enrichment analysis revealed that both functionally and topologically important genes in Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 are predominantly associated with translation and energy metabolism, two cellular processes critical for growth. This research demonstrates how synergistic network-level analyses can be used for reconciliation of metabolic and gene expression data to uncover fundamental biological principles. PMID:25826650

  12. The Flavin-Containing Monooxygenase 3 Gene and Essential Hypertension: The Joint Effect of Polymorphism E158K and Cigarette Smoking on Disease Susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Bushueva, Olga; Solodilova, Maria; Churnosov, Mikhail; Ivanov, Vladimir; Polonikov, Alexey

    2014-01-01

    Gene encoding flavin-containing monooxygenase 3 (FMO3), a microsomal antioxidant defense enzyme, has been suggested to contribute to essential hypertension (EH). The present study was designed to investigate whether common functional polymorphism E158K (rs2266782) of the FMO3 gene is associated with EH susceptibility in a Russian population. A total of 2 995 unrelated subjects from Kursk (1 362 EH patients and 843 healthy controls) and Belgorod (357 EH patients and 422 population controls) regions of Central Russia were recruited for this study. DNA samples from all study participants were genotyped for the FMO3 gene polymorphism through PCR followed by RFLP analysis. We found that the polymorphism E158K is associated with increased risk of essential hypertension in both discovery population from Kursk region (OR 1.36 95% CI 1.09-1.69, P = 0.01) and replication population from Belgorod region (OR 1.54 95% CI 1.07-1.89, P = 0.02) after adjustment for gender and age using logistic regression analysis. Further analysis showed that the increased hypertension risk in carriers of genotype 158KK gene occurred in cigarette smokers, whereas nonsmoker carriers of this genotype did not show the disease risk. This is the first study reporting the association of the FMO3 gene polymorphism and the risk of essential hypertension. PMID:25243081

  13. The Flavin-Containing Monooxygenase 3 Gene and Essential Hypertension: The Joint Effect of Polymorphism E158K and Cigarette Smoking on Disease Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Bushueva, Olga; Solodilova, Maria; Churnosov, Mikhail; Ivanov, Vladimir; Polonikov, Alexey

    2014-01-01

    Gene encoding flavin-containing monooxygenase 3 (FMO3), a microsomal antioxidant defense enzyme, has been suggested to contribute to essential hypertension (EH). The present study was designed to investigate whether common functional polymorphism E158K (rs2266782) of the FMO3 gene is associated with EH susceptibility in a Russian population. A total of 2 995 unrelated subjects from Kursk (1 362 EH patients and 843 healthy controls) and Belgorod (357 EH patients and 422 population controls) regions of Central Russia were recruited for this study. DNA samples from all study participants were genotyped for the FMO3 gene polymorphism through PCR followed by RFLP analysis. We found that the polymorphism E158K is associated with increased risk of essential hypertension in both discovery population from Kursk region (OR 1.36 95% CI 1.09–1.69, P = 0.01) and replication population from Belgorod region (OR 1.54 95% CI 1.07–1.89, P = 0.02) after adjustment for gender and age using logistic regression analysis. Further analysis showed that the increased hypertension risk in carriers of genotype 158KK gene occurred in cigarette smokers, whereas nonsmoker carriers of this genotype did not show the disease risk. This is the first study reporting the association of the FMO3 gene polymorphism and the risk of essential hypertension. PMID:25243081

  14. piRNAs and piRNA-Dependent siRNAs Protect Conserved and Essential C. elegans Genes from Misrouting into the RNAi Pathway.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Carolyn M; Brown, Kristen C; Montgomery, Brooke E; Ruvkun, Gary; Montgomery, Taiowa A

    2015-08-24

    piRNAs silence foreign genes, such as transposons, to preserve genome integrity, but they also target endogenous mRNAs by mechanisms that are poorly understood. Caenorhabditis elegans piRNAs interact with both transposon and nontransposon mRNAs to initiate sustained silencing via the RNAi pathway. To assess the dysregulation of gene silencing caused by lack of piRNAs, we restored RNA silencing in RNAi-defective animals in the presence or absence of piRNAs. In the absence of piRNAs and a cellular memory of piRNA activity, essential and conserved genes are misrouted into the RNAi pathway to produce siRNAs that bind the nuclear Argonaute HRDE-1, resulting in dramatic defects in germ cell proliferation and function such that the animals are sterile. Inactivation of RNAi suppresses sterility, indicating that aberrant siRNAs produced in the absence of piRNAs target essential genes for silencing. Thus, by reanimating RNAi, we uncovered a role for piRNAs in protecting essential genes from RNA silencing. PMID:26279487

  15. CO2 - Intrinsic Product, Essential Substrate, and Regulatory Trigger of Microbial and Mammalian Production Processes.

    PubMed

    Blombach, Bastian; Takors, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Carbon dioxide formation mirrors the final carbon oxidation steps of aerobic metabolism in microbial and mammalian cells. As a consequence, [Formula: see text] dissociation equilibria arise in fermenters by the growing culture. Anaplerotic reactions make use of the abundant [Formula: see text] levels for refueling citric acid cycle demands and for enabling oxaloacetate-derived products. At the same time, CO2 is released manifold in metabolic reactions via decarboxylation activity. The levels of extracellular [Formula: see text] depend on cellular activities and physical constraints such as hydrostatic pressures, aeration, and the efficiency of mixing in large-scale bioreactors. Besides, local [Formula: see text] levels might also act as metabolic inhibitors or transcriptional effectors triggering regulatory events inside the cells. This review gives an overview about fundamental physicochemical properties of [Formula: see text] in microbial and mammalian cultures effecting cellular physiology, production processes, metabolic activity, and transcriptional regulation. PMID:26284242

  16. CO2 – Intrinsic Product, Essential Substrate, and Regulatory Trigger of Microbial and Mammalian Production Processes

    PubMed Central

    Blombach, Bastian; Takors, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Carbon dioxide formation mirrors the final carbon oxidation steps of aerobic metabolism in microbial and mammalian cells. As a consequence, CO2/HCO3− dissociation equilibria arise in fermenters by the growing culture. Anaplerotic reactions make use of the abundant CO2/HCO3− levels for refueling citric acid cycle demands and for enabling oxaloacetate-derived products. At the same time, CO2 is released manifold in metabolic reactions via decarboxylation activity. The levels of extracellular CO2/HCO3− depend on cellular activities and physical constraints such as hydrostatic pressures, aeration, and the efficiency of mixing in large-scale bioreactors. Besides, local CO2/HCO3− levels might also act as metabolic inhibitors or transcriptional effectors triggering regulatory events inside the cells. This review gives an overview about fundamental physicochemical properties of CO2/HCO3− in microbial and mammalian cultures effecting cellular physiology, production processes, metabolic activity, and transcriptional regulation. PMID:26284242

  17. Post transcriptional regulation of chloroplast gene expression by nuclear encoded gene products

    SciTech Connect

    Kuchka, M.R.

    1992-01-01

    The following is a review of research accomplished in the first two years of funding for the above mentioned project. The work performed is a molecular characterization of nuclear mutants of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii which are deficient in different stages in the post-transcriptional expression of a single chloroplast encoded polypeptide, the D2 protein of Photosystem II. Our long-term goals are to understand the molecular mechanisms by which nuclear gene products affect the expression of chloroplast genes. Specifically, we which to understand how specific nuclear gene products affect the turnover rate of the D2 encoding mRNA (psbD), how other nuclear encoded factors work to promote the translation of psbD mRNA and/or stabilize the D2 protein, and what the role of the D2 protein itself is in Photosystem II assembly and in the control of expression of other chloroplast genes. This progress report will be organized into four major sections concerning (I) The characterization of nuclear mutants affected in D2 translation/turnover, (II) The study of trans-acting factors which associate with the 5{prime} end of the psbD mRNA, (III) In vitro mutagenesis of the psbD gene, and (IV) Additional studies.

  18. Identification of acoR, a regulatory gene for the expression of genes essential for acetoin catabolism in Alcaligenes eutrophus H16.

    PubMed Central

    Krüger, N; Steinbüchel, A

    1992-01-01

    Two hundred thirty-nine base pairs upstream from acoXABC, which encodes the Alcaligenes eutrophus H16 structural genes essential for cleavage of acetoin, the 2,004-bp acoR gene was identified. acoR encodes a protein of 668 amino acids with a molecular mass of 72.9 kDa. The amino acid sequence deduced from acoR exhibited homologies to the primary structures of transcriptional activators such as NifA of Azotobacter vinelandii, NtrC of Klebsiella pneumoniae, and HoxA of A. eutrophus. Striking similarities to the central domain of these proteins and the presence of a typical nucleotide-binding site (GETGSGK) as well as of a C-terminal helix-turn-helix motif as a DNA-binding site were revealed. Between acoR and acoXABC, two different types of sequences with dual rotational symmetry [CAC-(N11 to N18)-GTG and TGT-(N10 to N14)-ACA] were found; these sequences are similar to NtrC and NifA upstream activator sequences, respectively. Determination of the N-terminal amino acid sequence of an acoR'-'lacZ gene fusion identified the translational start of acoR. S1 nuclease protection assay identified the transcriptional start site 109 bp upstream of acoR. The promoter region (TTGCGC-N18-TACATT) resembled the sigma 70 consensus sequence of Escherichia coli. Analysis of an acoR'-'lacZ fusion and primer extension studies revealed that acoR was expressed at a low level under all culture conditions, whereas acoXABC was expressed only in acetoin-grown cells. The insertions of Tn5 in six transposon-induced acetoin-negative mutants of A. eutrophus were mapped within acoR. On the basis of these studies, it is probable that AcoR represents a regulatory protein which is required for sigma 54-dependent transcription of acoXABC. Images PMID:1378052

  19. Chemical composition of fennel essential oil and its impact on Staphylococcus aureus exotoxin production.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jiazhang; Li, Hongen; Su, Hongwei; Dong, Jing; Luo, Mingjing; Wang, Jianfeng; Leng, Bingfeng; Deng, Yanhong; Liu, Juxiong; Deng, Xuming

    2012-04-01

    In this study, fennel oil was isolated by hydrodistillation, and the chemical composition was determined by gas chromatography/mass spectral analysis. The antimicrobial activity of fennel oil against Staphylococcus aureus was evaluated by broth microdilution. A haemolysis assay, tumour necrosis factor (TNF) release assay, western blot, and real-time reverse transcription (RT)-PCR were applied to investigate the influence of fennel oil on the production of S. aureus virulence-related exoproteins. The data show that fennel oil, which contains a high level of trans-anethole, was active against S. aureus, with MICs ranging from 64 to 256 μg/ml. Furthermore, fennel oil, when used at subinhibitory concentrations, could dose-dependently decrease the expression of S. aureus exotoxins, including α-toxin, Staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEs) and toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST-1).

  20. Essential Roles of Natural Products and Gaseous Mediators on Neuronal Cell Death or Survival

    PubMed Central

    Mikami, Yoshinori; Kakizawa, Sho; Yamazawa, Toshiko

    2016-01-01

    Although precise cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration still remain enigmatic, key factors associated with degenerative disorders, such as glutamate toxicity and oxidative stress, have been recently identified. Accordingly, there has been growing interest in examining the effects of exogenous and endogenous molecules on neuroprotection and neurodegeneration. In this paper, we review recent studies on neuroprotective and/or neurodegenerative effects of natural products, such as caffeic acid and chlorogenic acid, and gaseous mediators, including hydrogen sulfide and nitric oxide. Furthermore, possible molecular mechanisms of these molecules in relation to glutamate signals are discussed. Insight into the pathophysiological role of these molecules will make progress in our understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying neurodegenerative diseases, and is expected to lead to potential therapeutic approaches. PMID:27690018

  1. Sesquiterpenes from the essential oil of Curcuma wenyujin and their inhibitory effects on nitric oxide production.

    PubMed

    Xia, Guiyang; Zhou, Li; Ma, Jianghao; Wang, Ying; Ding, Liqin; Zhao, Feng; Chen, Lixia; Qiu, Feng

    2015-06-01

    Three new sesquiterpenes including a new elemane-type sesquiterpene, 5βH-elem-1,3,7,8-tetraen-8,12-olide (1), and two new carabrane-type sesquiterpenes, 7α,11-epoxy-6α-methoxy-carabrane-4,8-dione (2) and 8,11-epidioxy-8-hydroxy-4-oxo-6-carabren (3), together with eight known sesquiterpenes (4-11) were isolated from Curcuma wenyujin Y. H. Chen et C. Ling. Their structures were elucidated based on extensive spectroscopic analyses. A possible biogenetic scheme for the related compounds was postulated. All of the isolated compounds were tested for inhibitory activity against LPS-induced nitric oxide production in RAW 264.7 macrophages. Meanwhile, preliminary structure-activity relationships for these compounds are discussed.

  2. Slime production is essential for the adherence of Staphylococcus epidermidis in implant-related infections.

    PubMed

    Nayak, N; Satpathy, G; Nag, H L; Venkatesh, P; Ramakrishnan, S; Nag, T C; Prasad, S

    2011-02-01

    A total of 32 Staphylococcus epidermidis isolates from indwelling device-related infections such as endophthalmitis following intraocular lens (IOL) implantation, intravenous catheter-related sepsis and orthopaedic implant infections, were studied for slime production and adherence to artificial surfaces. Of these, 21 (65.6%) isolates were slime positive by the Congo Red agar method and 24 (75%) were adherent to artificial surfaces by the quantitative slime test. The majority (19 out of 24; 79.1%) of the adherent bacteria were slime producers. Antibody to slime raised in rabbits was able to inhibit the adherence of all 24 bacteria designated as adherent by our quantitative test. It seems that slime is indispensable for the sessile mode of attachment, leading further to the development of biofilms on the indwelling devices.

  3. Determination of elemental toxicity migration limits, bioaccessibility and risk assessment of essential childcare products.

    PubMed

    Aboel Dahab, Ali; Elhag, Dhia Eldin A; Ahmed, Ammar Bourai; Al-Obaid, Humaida A

    2016-02-01

    Children especially infants are particularly sensitive to contaminant exposure, they are exposed to toxic substances including heavy metals via multiple pathways, i.e. food, air, water, soil and childcare products. To date, determination of metal bioaccessibility in teethers and feeding teats is missing in the literature; therefore, it is vitally important to assess their metal bioaccessibility and characterise the risk for children. The aim of this study is to determine the migration levels of toxic elements in teethers and feeding teats of different brands as a measure of metal bioaccessibility and characterise the risk for children exposed to these products. The migration limits of several heavy metals (Al, As, Ba, Cd, Co, Cu, Cr, Mn, Ni, Pb, Se, Sr, Zn) in different brands of teethers and feeding teats were determined simultaneously using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) adopting a protocol in the European standards for safety of toys. With the exception of Pb, the migration limits of all elements in all brands of teethers and feeding teats were below the specified limits. However, in the case of Pb, the migration was above the specified limits in all samples except one brand of feeding teats. Risk assessment expressed as hazard index (HI) was calculated for detected elements and all samples. Although HI was below 1.0 for all samples except one sample, the high Pb concentration would pose a considerable risk to children. Therefore, we recommend a more thorough research and risk characterisation taking into consideration the factors that affect HI values. Graphical Abstract Determination of metal bioaccessibility and risk characterisation of teethers and feeding teats ensure children safety against metal toxicity.

  4. Determination of elemental toxicity migration limits, bioaccessibility and risk assessment of essential childcare products.

    PubMed

    Aboel Dahab, Ali; Elhag, Dhia Eldin A; Ahmed, Ammar Bourai; Al-Obaid, Humaida A

    2016-02-01

    Children especially infants are particularly sensitive to contaminant exposure, they are exposed to toxic substances including heavy metals via multiple pathways, i.e. food, air, water, soil and childcare products. To date, determination of metal bioaccessibility in teethers and feeding teats is missing in the literature; therefore, it is vitally important to assess their metal bioaccessibility and characterise the risk for children. The aim of this study is to determine the migration levels of toxic elements in teethers and feeding teats of different brands as a measure of metal bioaccessibility and characterise the risk for children exposed to these products. The migration limits of several heavy metals (Al, As, Ba, Cd, Co, Cu, Cr, Mn, Ni, Pb, Se, Sr, Zn) in different brands of teethers and feeding teats were determined simultaneously using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) adopting a protocol in the European standards for safety of toys. With the exception of Pb, the migration limits of all elements in all brands of teethers and feeding teats were below the specified limits. However, in the case of Pb, the migration was above the specified limits in all samples except one brand of feeding teats. Risk assessment expressed as hazard index (HI) was calculated for detected elements and all samples. Although HI was below 1.0 for all samples except one sample, the high Pb concentration would pose a considerable risk to children. Therefore, we recommend a more thorough research and risk characterisation taking into consideration the factors that affect HI values. Graphical Abstract Determination of metal bioaccessibility and risk characterisation of teethers and feeding teats ensure children safety against metal toxicity. PMID:26490916

  5. Modular optimization of multi-gene pathways for fumarate production.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiulai; Zhu, Pan; Liu, Liming

    2016-01-01

    Microbial fumarate production from renewable feedstock is a promising and sustainable alternative to petroleum-based chemical synthesis. Here, we report a modular engineering approach that systematically removed metabolic pathway bottlenecks and led to significant titer improvements in a multi-gene fumarate metabolic pathway. On the basis of central pathway architecture, yeast fumarate biosynthesis was re-cast into three modules: reduction module, oxidation module, and byproduct module. We targeted reduction module and oxidation module to the cytoplasm and the mitochondria, respectively. Combinatorially tuning pathway efficiency by constructing protein fusions RoMDH-P160A and KGD2-SUCLG2 and optimizing metabolic balance by controlling genes RoPYC, RoMDH-P160A, KGD2-SUCLG2 and SDH1 expression strengths led to significantly improved fumarate production (20.46 g/L). In byproduct module, synthetizing DNA-guided scaffolds and designing sRNA switchs enabled further production improvement up to 33.13 g/L. These results suggest that modular pathway engineering can systematically optimize biosynthesis pathways to enable an efficient production of fumarate. PMID:26241189

  6. Modular optimization of multi-gene pathways for fumarate production.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiulai; Zhu, Pan; Liu, Liming

    2016-01-01

    Microbial fumarate production from renewable feedstock is a promising and sustainable alternative to petroleum-based chemical synthesis. Here, we report a modular engineering approach that systematically removed metabolic pathway bottlenecks and led to significant titer improvements in a multi-gene fumarate metabolic pathway. On the basis of central pathway architecture, yeast fumarate biosynthesis was re-cast into three modules: reduction module, oxidation module, and byproduct module. We targeted reduction module and oxidation module to the cytoplasm and the mitochondria, respectively. Combinatorially tuning pathway efficiency by constructing protein fusions RoMDH-P160A and KGD2-SUCLG2 and optimizing metabolic balance by controlling genes RoPYC, RoMDH-P160A, KGD2-SUCLG2 and SDH1 expression strengths led to significantly improved fumarate production (20.46 g/L). In byproduct module, synthetizing DNA-guided scaffolds and designing sRNA switchs enabled further production improvement up to 33.13 g/L. These results suggest that modular pathway engineering can systematically optimize biosynthesis pathways to enable an efficient production of fumarate.

  7. Essential Genome of the Metabolically Versatile Alphaproteobacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris

    PubMed Central

    Pechter, Kieran B.; Gallagher, Larry; Pyles, Harley; Manoil, Colin S.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rhodopseudomonas palustris is an alphaproteobacterium that has served as a model organism for studies of photophosphorylation, regulation of nitrogen fixation, production of hydrogen as a biofuel, and anaerobic degradation of aromatic compounds. This bacterium is able to transition between anaerobic photoautotrophic growth, anaerobic photoheterotrophic growth, and aerobic heterotrophic growth. As a starting point to explore the genetic basis for the metabolic versatility of R. palustris, we used transposon mutagenesis and Tn-seq to identify 552 genes as essential for viability in cells growing aerobically on semirich medium. Of these, 323 have essential gene homologs in the alphaproteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus, and 187 have essential gene homologs in Escherichia coli. There were 24 R. palustris genes that were essential for viability under aerobic growth conditions that have low sequence identity but are likely to be functionally homologous to essential E. coli genes. As expected, certain functional categories of essential genes were highly conserved among the three organisms, including translation, ribosome structure and biogenesis, secretion, and lipid metabolism. R. palustris cells divide by budding in which a sessile cell gives rise to a motile swarmer cell. Conserved cell cycle genes required for this developmental process were essential in both C. crescentus and R. palustris. Our results suggest that despite vast differences in lifestyles, members of the alphaproteobacteria have a common set of essential genes that is specific to this group and distinct from that of gammaproteobacteria like E. coli. IMPORTANCE Essential genes in bacteria and other organisms are those absolutely required for viability. Rhodopseudomonas palustris has served as a model organism for studies of anaerobic aromatic compound degradation, hydrogen gas production, nitrogen fixation, and photosynthesis. We used the technique of Tn-seq to determine the essential genes of

  8. Ci-Rga, a gene encoding an MtN3/saliva family transmembrane protein, is essential for tissue differentiation during embryogenesis of the ascidian Ciona intestinalis.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Mayuko; Wada, Shuichi; Kobayashi, Kenji; Satoh, Nori

    2005-09-01

    A novel gene (Ci-Rga) essential for tissue differentiation during embryogenesis of the ascidian Ciona intestinalis is reported here. This gene was identified through functional screening of Ciona genes required for development by translational inhibition experiments with morpholino antisense oligonucleotides. The deduced protein of Ci-Rga contains two copies of a domain with unknown function called the MtN3/saliva domain. Phylogenetic analysis showed that Ci-Rga belongs to the MtN3/saliva family of genes conserved among metazoans and plants, and is an ortholog of mouse Rga (Recombination-activating gene 1 gene activation). During Ciona embryogenesis, both maternal and zygotic transcripts of Ci-Rga were expressed. Translational inhibition of Ci-Rga with specific morpholino resulted in abnormal embryos in which the cleavage pattern became atypical and expression of marker genes for each of the six major tissues, namely the endoderm, muscle, mesenchyme, notochord, neural tissue, and epidermis, was lost or suppressed at the tailbud stage. Although differentiation of all the six major tissues was affected by Ci-Rga knock-down, the degree of abnormalities and the timing of appearance of abnormalities were different among tissues. Expression analysis of developmentally important genes involved in the fate specification, such as Ci-Bra, Ci-Twist-like1a, Ci-Otx, Ci-Fgf9/16/20, Ci-Lhx3, Ci-FoxD, and Ci-Tbx6b, showed that an initial step of the fate specification of notochord, mesenchyme, and neural tissue, but not of endoderm or muscle, is impaired in the knock-down embryo. These results showed that Ci-Rga is a multifunctional gene essential for tissue differentiation during embryogenesis, and is primarily required for the fate specification of notochord, mesenchyme, and neural tissue, and provide some insights into the function of this little-known group of genes.

  9. The Leishmania nicotinamidase is essential for NAD+ production and parasite proliferation.

    PubMed

    Gazanion, E; Garcia, D; Silvestre, R; Gérard, C; Guichou, J F; Labesse, G; Seveno, M; Cordeiro-Da-Silva, A; Ouaissi, A; Sereno, D; Vergnes, B

    2011-10-01

    NAD+ is a central cofactor that plays important roles in cellular metabolism and energy production in all living cells. Genomics-based reconstruction of NAD+ metabolism revealed that Leishmania protozoan parasites are NAD+ auxotrophs. Consequently, these parasites require assimilating NAD+ precursors (nicotinamide, nicotinic acid, nicotinamide riboside) from their host environment to synthesize NAD+ by a salvage pathway. Nicotinamidase is a key enzyme of this salvage pathway that catalyses conversion of nicotinamide (NAm) to nicotinic acid (Na), and that is absent in higher eukaryotes. We present here the biochemical and functional characterizations of the Leishmania infantum nicotinamidase (LiPNC1). Generation of Lipnc1 null mutants leads to a decrease in NAD+ content, associated with a metabolic shutdown-like phenotype with an extensive lag phase of growth. Both phenotypes could be rescued by an add-back construct or by addition of exogenous Na. In addition, Lipnc1 null mutants were unable to establish a sustained infection in a murine experimental model. Altogether, these results illustrate that NAD+ homeostasis is a fundamental component of Leishmania biology and virulence, and that NAm constitutes its main NAD+ source in the mammalian host. The crystal structure of LiPNC1 we solved allows now the design of rational inhibitors against this new promising therapeutic target. PMID:21819459

  10. Dietary essential fatty acids, prostaglandins (PG) production and cellular cytotoxic activity in Balb/c mice

    SciTech Connect

    Fritsche, K.L.; Johnston, P.V.

    1986-03-05

    Several investigators have implicated PG as natural feedback inhibitors of cellular cytotoxic activity. It was of interest to determine if dietarily modulated PG synthesis alters cytotoxic response to a varial challenge. Weanling Balb/c mice were fed ad libitum semi-purified diets with 10% by weight corn oil or linseed oil, providing a 1:42 or 2:1 ratio of 18:3n-3 to 18:2n-6, respectively for 4-5 weeks. Mice were then immunochallenged with an intraperitoneal injection of 10/sup 4/ or 10/sup 5/ vaccinia virus. Peritoneal exudate cells and splenocytes were collected on days 3,6 and 9 post-challenge and assessed for cytotoxic activities using the /sup 51/Cr release assay. Peritoneal macrophage (M0), splenic natural killer and cytotoxic T lymphocyte cytotoxic activities were tested against the SV3T3, YAC-1, and vaccinia virus-infected 3T3 cell lines, respectively. PGE/sub 2/ and PGF/sub 2..cap alpha../ production by M0 and splenocytes from dietarily treated, non-challenged mice was determined by radioimmunoassay of cell supernatants following a 60 minute exposure to the calcium ionophore A23187. Peritoneal M0 and splenocyte populations from the linseed oil fed mice produced approximately 50% of the PGE/sub 2/ and PGF/sub 2..cap alpha../ as compared to the corn oil fed mice. However, no significant differences in cellular cytotoxic activity between the linseed oil and corn oil fed mice were observed.

  11. Angiotensinogen (AGT) M235T, AGT T174M and Angiotensin-1-Converting Enzyme (ACE) I/D Gene Polymorphisms in Essential Hypertension: Effects on Ramipril Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Kolovou, Vana; Lagou, Evangelia; Mihas, Constantinos; Vasiliki, Giannakopoulou; Katsiki, Niki; Kollia, Aikaterini; Triposkiadis, Filippos; Degiannis, Dimitris; Mavrogeni, Sophie; Kolovou, Genovefa

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hypertension, one of the most important risk factors for premature cardiovascular disease, is a major worldwide public health problem. Angiotensin-1-converting enzyme (ACE) and angiotensinogen (AGT) gene polymorphisms are thought to be associated with primary hypertension. In the present study, we examined the frequency of these gene polymorphisms in an adult population with and without essential hypertension. Furthermore, we evaluated the effect of ACE and AGT gene polymorphisms on ramipril treatment efficacy in the hypertensive patients. Methods: A total of 166 adults (83 hypertensives and 83 normotensives) were involved in the study and genotyped for AGTM235T (rs699), AGTT174M (rs4762) and ACEI/D (rs1799752) gene polymorphisms. Results: The genotype and allele distribution of the AGTM235T variant significantly differed between hypertensives and normotensives [odds ratio (OR) = 1.57% (T vs M allele), 95% confidence intervals (CIs): 1.01 - 2.44; p=0.045 for hypertensives]. However, none of the 3 studied Simple Nucleotide Polymorphisms were associated with the blood pressure-lowering response to ramipril. Conclusion: These results suggest that AGTM235T gene polymorphism is associated with essential hypertension. However, none of the AGTM235T, AGTT174M and ACEI/D gene polymorphisms influenced ramipril effectiveness. PMID:27006715

  12. Guidelines for the naming of genes, gene products, and mutants in the opportunistic protists.

    PubMed

    Limper, Andrew H; Weiss, Louis M

    2011-01-01

    The opportunistic protists encompass a wide diversity of organisms including Pneumocystis, Toxoplasma, cryptosporidia, microsporidia, and related genera. Recent advances in the molecular biology and cellular biochemistry of these organisms have led to the identification of an ever growing numbers of key genes and their cognate proteins. Until now, these molecules have not been designated using any consistent nomenclature system, leading to considerable confusion. The participants of the 11th International Workshop on Opportunistic Protists met on August 3, 2010 to reach consensus of a nomenclature system for genes, gene products, and mutants in the opportunistic protists. The following summary reports the consensus agreement to move toward a unified nomenclature system for these organisms. The system is adapted from that used for Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  13. Single gene insertion drives bioalcohol production by a thermophilic archaeon

    SciTech Connect

    Basen, M; Schut, GJ; Nguyen, DM; Lipscomb, GL; Benn, RA; Prybol, CJ; Vaccaro, BJ; Poole, FL; Kelly, RM; Adams, MWW

    2014-12-09

    Bioethanol production is achieved by only two metabolic pathways and only at moderate temperatures. Herein a fundamentally different synthetic pathway for bioalcohol production at 70 degrees C was constructed by insertion of the gene for bacterial alcohol dehydrogenase (AdhA) into the archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus. The engineered strain converted glucose to ethanol via acetate and acetaldehyde, catalyzed by the host-encoded aldehyde ferredoxin oxidoreductase (AOR) and heterologously expressed AdhA, in an energy-conserving, redox-balanced pathway. Furthermore, the AOR/AdhA pathway also converted exogenously added aliphatic and aromatic carboxylic acids to the corresponding alcohol using glucose, pyruvate, and/or hydrogen as the source of reductant. By heterologous coexpression of a membrane-bound carbon monoxide dehydrogenase, CO was used as a reductant for converting carboxylic acids to alcohols. Redirecting the fermentative metabolism of P. furiosus through strategic insertion of foreign genes creates unprecedented opportunities for thermophilic bioalcohol production. Moreover, the AOR/AdhA pathway is a potentially game-changing strategy for syngas fermentation, especially in combination with carbon chain elongation pathways.

  14. Single gene insertion drives bioalcohol production by a thermophilic archaeon

    PubMed Central

    Basen, Mirko; Schut, Gerrit J.; Nguyen, Diep M.; Lipscomb, Gina L.; Benn, Robert A.; Prybol, Cameron J.; Vaccaro, Brian J.; Poole, Farris L.; Kelly, Robert M.; Adams, Michael W. W.

    2014-01-01

    Bioethanol production is achieved by only two metabolic pathways and only at moderate temperatures. Herein a fundamentally different synthetic pathway for bioalcohol production at 70 °C was constructed by insertion of the gene for bacterial alcohol dehydrogenase (AdhA) into the archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus. The engineered strain converted glucose to ethanol via acetate and acetaldehyde, catalyzed by the host-encoded aldehyde ferredoxin oxidoreductase (AOR) and heterologously expressed AdhA, in an energy-conserving, redox-balanced pathway. Furthermore, the AOR/AdhA pathway also converted exogenously added aliphatic and aromatic carboxylic acids to the corresponding alcohol using glucose, pyruvate, and/or hydrogen as the source of reductant. By heterologous coexpression of a membrane-bound carbon monoxide dehydrogenase, CO was used as a reductant for converting carboxylic acids to alcohols. Redirecting the fermentative metabolism of P. furiosus through strategic insertion of foreign genes creates unprecedented opportunities for thermophilic bioalcohol production. Moreover, the AOR/AdhA pathway is a potentially game-changing strategy for syngas fermentation, especially in combination with carbon chain elongation pathways. PMID:25368184

  15. 76 FR 9028 - Guidance for Industry: Potency Tests for Cellular and Gene Therapy Products; Availability

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-16

    ... Industry: Potency Tests for Cellular and Gene Therapy Products'' dated January 2011. The guidance document provides manufacturers of cellular and gene therapy (CGT) products with recommendations for developing... document entitled ``Guidance for Industry: Potency Tests for Cellular and Gene Therapy Products''...

  16. Reference genes selection and relative expression analysis from Shiraia sp. SUPER-H168 productive of hypocrellin.

    PubMed

    Deng, Huaxiang; Gao, Ruijie; Liao, Xiangru; Cai, Yujie

    2016-04-10

    Shiraia bambusicola is an essential pharmaceutical fungus due to its production of hypocrellin with antiviral, antidepressant, and antiretroviral properties. Based on suitable reference gene (RG) normalization, gene expression analysis enables the exploitation of significant genes relative to hypocrellin biosynthesis by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. We selected and assessed nine candidate RGs in the presence and absence of hypocrellin biosynthesis using GeNorm and NormFinder algorithms. After stepwise exclusion of unstable genes, GeNorm analysis identified glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and cytochrome oxidase (CyO) as the most stable expression, while NormFinder determined 18S ribosomal RNA (18S rRNA) as the most appropriate candidate gene for normalization. Tubulin (Tub) was observed to be the least stable gene and should be avoided for relative expression analysis. We further analyzed relative expression levels of essential proteins correlative with hypocrellin biosynthesis, including polyketide synthase (PKS), O-methyltransferase (Omef), FAD/FMN-dependent oxidoreductase (FAD), and monooxygenase (Mono). Compared to PKS, Mono kept a similar expression pattern and simulated PKS expression, while FAD remained constantly expressed. Omef presented lower transcript levels and had no relation to PKS expression. These relative expression analyses will pave the way for further interpretation of the hypocrellin biosynthesis pathway.

  17. Ferulic acid 5-hydroxylase 1 is essential for expression of anthocyanin biosynthesis-associated genes and anthocyanin accumulation under photooxidative stress in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Maruta, Takanori; Noshi, Masahiro; Nakamura, Maki; Matsuda, Shun; Tamoi, Masahiro; Ishikawa, Takahiro; Shigeoka, Shigeru

    2014-04-01

    Anthocyanins are important for preventing photoinhibition and photodamage. By comprehensive reverse genetic analysis of chloroplast-produced H2O2-responsive genes, we isolated here an anthocyanin-deficient mutant under photooxidative stress, which lacked ferulate 5-hydroxylase 1 (FAH1) involved in the phenylpropanoid pathway. Interestingly, the expression of anthocyanin biosynthesis-associated genes was also inhibited in this mutant. These findings suggest that FAH1 is essential for expression of anthocyanin biosynthesis-associated genes and anthocyanin accumulation under photooxidative stress in Arabidopsis. Furthermore, we found that estrogen-inducible silencing of thylakoid membrane-bound ascorbate peroxidase, which is a major H2O2-scavenging enzyme in chloroplasts, enhances the expression of FAH1 and anthocyanin biosynthesis-associated genes and accumulation of anthocyanin without any application of stress. Thus, it is likely that chloroplastic H2O2 activates FAH1 expression to induce anthocyanin accumulation for protecting cells from photooxidative stress.

  18. Inhibition of listeriolysin O and phosphatidylcholine-specific production in Listeria monocytogenes by subinhibitory concentrations of plant essential oils.

    PubMed

    Smith-Palmer, A; Stewartt, J; Fyfe, L

    2002-07-01

    Successful infection by Listeria monocytogenes is dependent upon a range of bacterial extracellular proteins including a cytolysin termed listeriolysin O and phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C. Five plant essential oils--bay, clove, cinnamon, nutmeg and thyme--significantly reduced the production of listeriolysin O by L. monocytogenes. The greatest change was observed after culture with oil of thyme, which reduced haemolysis to 52.1 haemolytic units (HU)/ml compared with 99.8 HU/ml observed with the control. Oil of clove was the only oil that also significantly reduced phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C activity. These changes were observed despite the oils causing no change to the final bacterial concentration or total extracellular protein concentration. PMID:12132773

  19. Stabilization of emulsion and butter like products containing essential fatty acids using kalonji seeds extract and curcuminoids.

    PubMed

    Rege, Sameera A; Momin, Shamim A; Bhowmick, Dipti N; Pratap, Amit A

    2012-01-01

    Owing to the tendency of essential fatty acids (EFAs) to undergo autoxidation, their storage becomes a key problem. Generally, they are stabilized by synthetic antioxidants like TBHQ that are toxic in nature. Recently many studies were reported where these EFAs are stabilized by natural antioxidants. In the present study, curcuminoids and kalonji seeds ethanol extract (KEE) were used to stabilize these EFAs in refined sunflower oil (RSFO), water-in-oil (w/o) emulsion and butter like products (BLPs). In RSFO, though curcuminoids alone exerted pro-oxidant effect, KEE and curcuminoids showed synergistic antioxidant activity that was comparable to TBHQ. KEE exhibited good antioxidant activity in emulsions and BLPs, providing fine physical properties like slipping point, dropping point and spreadability. EFAs increased the nutritional value of BLPs and antioxidants added for their stabilization provided their medicinal benefits. PMID:22188801

  20. Defining essential genes and identifying virulence factors of Porphyromonas gingivalis by massively-parallel sequencing of transposon libraries (Tn-seq)

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Brian A.; Duncan, Margaret J.; Hu, Linden T.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Porphyromonas gingivalis is a keystone pathogen in the development and progression of periodontal disease. Obstacles to the development of saturated transposon libraries have previously limited transposon mutant-based screens as well as essential gene studies. We have developed a system for efficient transposon mutagenesis of P. gingivalis using a modified mariner transposon. Tn-seq is a technique that allows for quantitative assessment of individual mutants within a transposon mutant library by sequencing the transposon-genome junctions and then compiling mutant presence by mapping to a base genome. Using Tn-seq, it is possible to quickly define all the insertional mutants in a library and thus identify non-essential genes under the conditions in which the library was produced. Identification of fitness of individual mutants under specific conditions can be performed by exposing the library to selective pressures. PMID:25636611

  1. Vitreoscilla hemoglobin gene ( vgb) improves lutein production in Chlorella vulgaris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ruijuan; Lin, Xiangzhi

    2014-03-01

    Vitreoscilla hemoglobin is an oxygen-binding protein that promotes oxygen delivery and reduces oxygen consumption under low oxygen conditions to increase the efficiency of cell respiration and metabolism. In this study, we introduced a Vitreoscilla hemoglobin gene ( vgb) into Chlorella vulgaris by Agrobacterium tumefaciens -mediated transformation (ATMT). PCR analysis confirmed that the vgb gene was successfully integrated into the Chlorella vulgaris genome. Analysis of biomass obtained in shake flasks revealed transformant biomass concentrations as high as 3.28 g/L, which was 38.81% higher than that of the wild-type strain. Lutein content of transformants also increased slightly. Further experiments recovered a maximum lutein yield of 2.91 mg/L from the transformants, which was 36.77% higher than that of the wild-type strain. The above results suggest that integrated expression of the vgb gene may improve cell growth and lutein yield in Chlorella vulgaris, with applications to lutein production from Chlorella during fermentation.

  2. Saturating mutagenesis of an essential gene: a majority of the Neisseria gonorrhoeae major outer membrane porin (PorB) is mutable.

    PubMed

    Chen, Adrienne; Seifert, H Steven

    2014-02-01

    The major outer membrane porin (PorB) of Neisseria gonorrhoeae is an essential protein that mediates ion exchange between the organism and its environment and also plays multiple roles in human host pathogenesis. To facilitate structure-function studies of porin's multiple roles, we performed saturating mutagenesis at the porB locus and used deep sequencing to identify essential versus mutable residues. Random mutations in porB were generated in a plasmid vector, and mutant gene pools were transformed into N. gonorrhoeae to select for alleles that maintained bacterial viability. Deep sequencing of the input plasmid pools and the output N. gonorrhoeae genomic DNA pools identified mutations present in each, and the mutations in both pools were compared to determine which changes could be tolerated by the organism. We examined the mutability of 328 amino acids in the mature PorB protein and found that 308 of them were likely to be mutable and that 20 amino acids were likely to be nonmutable. A subset of these predictions was validated experimentally. This approach to identifying essential amino acids in a protein of interest introduces an additional application for next-generation sequencing technology and provides a template for future studies of both porin and other essential bacterial genes.

  3. Inhibition of aflatoxin production and growth of Aspergillus parasiticus by Cuminum cyminum, Ziziphora clinopodioides, and Nigella sativa essential oils.

    PubMed

    Khosravi, Ali Reza; Shokri, Hojjatollah; Minooeianhaghighi, Mohammadhassan

    2011-12-01

    Aflatoxins are highly toxic and carcinogenic metabolites produced by Aspergillus parasiticus on food and agricultural commodities. Natural products may control the production of aflatoxins. The aims of this study were to evaluate the effects of the essential oils (EOs) of Cuminum cyminum, Ziziphora clinopodioides, and Nigella sativa on growth and aflatoxins production by A. parasiticus. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and minimal fungicidal concentrations (MFCs) of the EOs were determined and compared with each other. Determination of aflatoxins (AFB(1), AFB(2), AFG(1), and AFG(2)) was performed by immunoaffinity column extraction using reverse phase-high performance liquid chromatography. The major oil components were α-pinene (30%) in C. cyminum, pulegone (37%) in Z. clinopodioides, and trans-anthol (38.9%) in N. sativa oils. In broth microdilution method, C. cyminum oil exhibited the strongest activity (MIC(90): 1.6; MFC: 3.5 mg/mL), followed by Z. clinopodioides (MIC(90): 2.1; MFC: 5.5 mg/mL) and N. sativa (MIC(90): 2.75; MFC: 6.25 mg/mL) oils against A. parasiticus (p<0.05). Aflatoxin production was inhibited at 0.25 mg/mL of C. cyminum and Z. clinopodioides oils, of which that of C. cyminum was a stronger inhibitor. C. cyminum EO caused significant reductions in values of 94.2% for AFB(1), 100% for AFB(2), 98.9% for AFG(1), 100% for AFG(2), and 97.5% for total aflatoxin. It is concluded that the EOs of C. cyminum, Z. clinopodioides, and N. sativa could be used as natural inhibitors in foods at low concentrations to protect from fungal and toxin contaminations by A. parasiticus.

  4. Identification of genes and pathways involved in the synthesis of Mead acid (20:3n-9), an indicator of essential fatty acid deficiency.

    PubMed

    Ichi, Ikuyo; Kono, Nozomu; Arita, Yuka; Haga, Shizuka; Arisawa, Kotoko; Yamano, Misato; Nagase, Mana; Fujiwara, Yoko; Arai, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    In mammals, 5,8,11-eicosatrienoic acid (Mead acid, 20:3n-9) is synthesized from oleic acid during a state of essential fatty acid deficiency (EFAD). Mead acid is thought to be produced by the same enzymes that synthesize arachidonic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid, but the genes and the pathways involved in the conversion of oleic acid to Mead acid have not been fully elucidated. The levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids in cultured cells are generally very low compared to those in mammalian tissues. In this study, we found that cultured cells, such as NIH3T3 and Hepa1-6 cells, have significant levels of Mead acid, indicating that cells in culture are in an EFAD state under normal culture conditions. We then examined the effect of siRNA-mediated knockdown of fatty acid desaturases and elongases on the level of Mead acid, and found that knockdown of Elovl5, Fads1, or Fads2 decreased the level of Mead acid. This and the measured levels of possible intermediate products for the synthesis of Mead acid such as 18:2n-9, 20:1n-9 and 20:2n-9 in the knocked down cells indicate two pathways for the synthesis of Mead acid: pathway 1) 18:1n-9→(Fads2)→18:2n-9→(Elovl5)→20:2n-9→(Fads1)→20:3n-9 and pathway 2) 18:1n-9→(Elovl5)→20:1n-9→(Fads2)→20:2n-9→(Fads1)→20:3n-9.

  5. Metabolic products of soluble epoxide hydrolase are essential for monocyte chemotaxis to MCP-1 in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Suman; Roome, Talat; Bhattacharjee, Ashish; Carnevale, Kevin A; Yakubenko, Valentin P; Zhang, Renliang; Hwang, Sung Hee; Hammock, Bruce D; Cathcart, Martha K

    2013-02-01

    Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1)-induced monocyte chemotaxis is a major event in inflammatory disease. Our prior studies have demonstrated that MCP-1-dependent chemotaxis requires release of arachidonic acid (AA) by activated cytosolic phospholipase A(2) (cPLA(2)). Here we investigated the involvement of AA metabolites in chemotaxis. Neither cyclooxygenase nor lipoxygenase pathways were required, whereas pharmacologic inhibitors of both the cytochrome-P450 (CYP) and the soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) pathways blocked monocyte chemotaxis to MCP-1. To verify specificity, we demonstrated that the CYP and sEH products epoxyeiscosatrienoic acids (EETs) and dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids (DHETs), respectively, restored chemotaxis in the presence of the inhibitors, indicating that sEH-derived products are essential for MCP-1-driven chemotaxis. Importantly, DHETs also rescued chemotaxis in cPLA(2)-deficient monocytes and monocytes with blocked Erk1/2 activity, because Erk controls cPLA(2) activation. The in vitro findings regarding the involvement of CYP/sEH pathways were further validated in vivo using two complementary approaches measuring MCP-1-dependent chemotaxis in mice. These observations reveal the importance of sEH in MCP-1-regulated monocyte chemotaxis and may explain the observed therapeutic value of sEH inhibitors in treatment of inflammatory diseases, cardiovascular diseases, pain, and even carcinogenesis. Their effectiveness, often attributed to increasing EET levels, is probably influenced by the impairment of DHET formation and inhibition of chemotaxis.

  6. Transition to farming more likely for small, conservative groups with property rights, but increased productivity is not essential.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Elizabeth M; Shennan, Stephen J; Thomas, Mark G

    2015-11-17

    Theories for the origins of agriculture are still debated, with a range of different explanations offered. Computational models can be used to test these theories and explore new hypotheses; Bowles and Choi [Bowles S, Choi J-K (2013) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 110(22):8830-8835] have developed one such model. Their model shows the coevolution of farming and farming-friendly property rights, and by including climate variability, replicates the timings for the emergence of these events seen in the archaeological record. Because the processes modeled occurred a long time ago, it can be difficult to justify exact parameter values; hence, we propose a fitting to idealized outcomes (FIO) method to explore the model's parameter space in more detail. We have replicated the model of Bowles and Choi, and used the FIO method to identify complexities and interactions of the model previously unidentified. Our results indicate that the key parameters for the emergence of farming are group structuring, group size, conservatism, and farming-friendly property rights (lending further support to Bowles and Choi's original proposal). We also find that although advantageous, it is not essential that farming productivity be greater than foraging productivity for farming to emerge. In addition, we highlight how model behaviors can be missed when gauging parameter sensitivity via a fix-all-but-one variation approach.

  7. Metabolic products of soluble epoxide hydrolase are essential for monocyte chemotaxis to MCP-1 in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kundu, Suman; Roome, Talat; Bhattacharjee, Ashish; Carnevale, Kevin A.; Yakubenko, Valentin P.; Zhang, Renliang; Hwang, Sung Hee; Hammock, Bruce D.; Cathcart, Martha K.

    2013-01-01

    Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1)-induced monocyte chemotaxis is a major event in inflammatory disease. Our prior studies have demonstrated that MCP-1-dependent chemotaxis requires release of arachidonic acid (AA) by activated cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2). Here we investigated the involvement of AA metabolites in chemotaxis. Neither cyclooxygenase nor lipoxygenase pathways were required, whereas pharmacologic inhibitors of both the cytochrome-P450 (CYP) and the soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) pathways blocked monocyte chemotaxis to MCP-1. To verify specificity, we demonstrated that the CYP and sEH products epoxyeiscosatrienoic acids (EETs) and dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids (DHETs), respectively, restored chemotaxis in the presence of the inhibitors, indicating that sEH-derived products are essential for MCP-1-driven chemotaxis. Importantly, DHETs also rescued chemotaxis in cPLA2-deficient monocytes and monocytes with blocked Erk1/2 activity, because Erk controls cPLA2 activation. The in vitro findings regarding the involvement of CYP/sEH pathways were further validated in vivo using two complementary approaches measuring MCP-1-dependent chemotaxis in mice. These observations reveal the importance of sEH in MCP-1-regulated monocyte chemotaxis and may explain the observed therapeutic value of sEH inhibitors in treatment of inflammatory diseases, cardiovascular diseases, pain, and even carcinogenesis. Their effectiveness, often attributed to increasing EET levels, is probably influenced by the impairment of DHET formation and inhibition of chemotaxis. PMID:23160182

  8. Vertical stratification of matrix production is essential for physical integrity and architecture of macrocolony biofilms of E scherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Serra, Diego O.; Klauck, Gisela

    2015-01-01

    Summary Bacterial macrocolony biofilms grow into intricate three‐dimensional structures that depend on self‐produced extracellular polymers conferring protection, cohesion and elasticity to the biofilm. In E scherichia coli, synthesis of this matrix – consisting of amyloid curli fibres and cellulose – requires CsgD, a transcription factor regulated by the stationary phase sigma factor RpoS, and occurs in the nutrient‐deprived cells of the upper layer of macrocolonies. Is this asymmetric matrix distribution functionally important or is it just a fortuitous by‐product of an unavoidable nutrient gradient? In order to address this question, the RpoS‐dependent csgD promoter was replaced by a vegetative promoter. This re‐wiring of csgD led to CsgD and matrix production in both strata of macrocolonies, with the lower layer transforming into a rigid ‘base plate’ of growing yet curli‐connected cells. As a result, the two strata broke apart followed by desiccation and exfoliation of the top layer. By contrast, matrix‐free cells at the bottom of wild‐type macrocolonies maintain colony contact with the humid agar support by flexibly filling the space that opens up under buckling areas of the macrocolony. Precisely regulated stratification in matrix‐free and matrix‐producing cell layers is thus essential for the physical integrity and architecture of E . coli macrocolony biofilms. PMID:26234179

  9. Extraction and refining of essential oil from Australian tea tree, Melaleuca alterfornia, and the antimicrobial activity in cosmetic products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huynh, Q.; Phan, T. D.; Thieu, V. Q. Q.; Tran, S. T.; Do, S. H.

    2012-03-01

    Tea tree oil (TTO) comes from the leaves of Melaleuca alternifornia that belongs to the myrtle family (Myrtaceae). It is one of the most powerful immune system stimulants and sorts out most viral, bacterial and fungal infections in a snap, while it is great to heal wounds and acnes. In Vietnam, Melaleuca trees can grow on acid land that stretches in a large portion of lands in the Mekong Delta region. So, there are some Melaleuca plantations developed under the Vietnamese government plans of increasing plantation forests now. However, TTO contains various amounts of 1,8-cineole that causes skin irritant. So TTO purification is very necessary. In this study, the purification of TTO that meet International Standard ISO 4730 was carried out via two steps. The first step is steam distillation to obtain crude TTO (terpinen-4-ol 35% v/v) and the average productivity is among 2.37% (v/wet-wt) or 1.23% (v/dry-wt). In the second step, the cleaned TTO is collected by vacuum distillation column and extraction yield of the whole process is about 0.3% (w/w). Besides, high concentration essential oil was applied in the cosmetic products to increase its commercial value.

  10. Composition and repellency of the essential oils of Evodia calcicola Chun ex Huang and Evodia trichotoma (Lour.) Pierre against three stored product insects.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kai; You, Chun-Xue; Wang, Cheng-Fang; Guo, Shan-Shan; Li, Yin-Ping; Wu, Yan; Geng, Zhu-Feng; Deng, Zhi-Wei; Du, Shu-Shan

    2014-01-01

    During our screening program for agrochemicals from Chinese medicinal herbs and wild plants, the essential oils of Evodia calcicola and Evodia trichotoma leaves were found to possess strong repellency against the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum adults, the cigarette beetle Lasioderma serricorne adults and the booklouse Liposcelis bostrychophila. The two essential oils obtained by hydrodistillation were investigated by GC-MS. The main components of E. calcicola essential oil were identified to be (-)-β-pinene (44.02%), β-phellandrene (20.93%), ocimene (16.49%), and D-limonene (9.87%). While the main components of the essential oil of E. trichotoma were D-limonene (69.55%), 1R-a-pinene (11.48%), caryophyllene (2.80%) and spathulenol (2.24%). Data showed that T. castaneum was the most sensitive than other two stored product insects. Compared with the positive control, DEET (N, N-diethyl-3- methylbenzamide), the two essential oils showed the same level repellency against the red flour beetle. However, the essential oil of E. trichotoma showed the same level repellency against the cigarette beetle, while E. calcicola essential oil possessed the less level repellency against L. serricorne, relative to the positive control, DEET. Moreover, the two crude oils also exhibited strong repellency against L. bostrychophila, but lesser level repellency than the positive control, DEET. Thus, the essential oils of E. calcicola and E. trichotoma may be potential to be developed as a new natural repellent in the control of stored product insects.

  11. Escherichia coli competence gene homologs are essential for competitive fitness and the use of DNA as a nutrient.

    PubMed

    Palchevskiy, Vyacheslav; Finkel, Steven E

    2006-06-01

    Natural genetic competence is the ability of cells to take up extracellular DNA and is an important mechanism for horizontal gene transfer. Another potential benefit of natural competence is that exogenous DNA can serve as a nutrient source for starving bacteria because the ability to "eat" DNA is necessary for competitive survival in environments containing limited nutrients. We show here that eight Escherichia coli genes, identified as homologs of com genes in Haemophilus influenzae and Neisseria gonorrhoeae, are necessary for the use of extracellular DNA as the sole source of carbon and energy. These genes also confer a competitive advantage to E. coli during long-term stationary-phase incubation. We also show that homologs of these genes are found throughout the proteobacteria, suggesting that the use of DNA as a nutrient may be a widespread phenomenon. PMID:16707682

  12. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of gene product 44 from bacteriophage Mu

    SciTech Connect

    Kondou, Youhei; Kitazawa, Daisuke; Takeda, Shigeki; Yamashita, Eiki; Mizuguchi, Mineyuki; Kawano, Keiichi; Tsukihara, Tomitake

    2005-01-01

    Bacteriophage Mu baseplate protein gene product 44 was crystallized. The crystal belongs to space group R3, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 126.6, c = 64.2 Å. Bacteriophage Mu baseplate protein gene product 44 (gp44) is an essential protein required for the assembly of viable phages. To investigate the roles of gp44 in baseplate assembly and infection, gp44 was crystallized at pH 6.0 in the presence of 20% 2-methyl-2,4-pentanediol. The crystals belong to space group R3, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 127.47, c = 63.97 Å. The crystals diffract X-rays to at least 2.1 Å resolution and are stable in the X-ray beam and are therefore appropriate for structure determination. Native data have been collected to 2.1 Å resolution using a DIP6040 image-plate system at beamline BL44XU at the SPring-8 facility in Japan.

  13. Homer1 gene products orchestrate Ca2+-permeable AMPA receptor distribution and LTP expression

    PubMed Central

    Rozov, Andrei; Zivkovic, Aleksandar R.; Schwarz, Martin K.

    2012-01-01

    We studied the role of Homer1 gene products on the presence of synaptic Ca2+-permeable AMPA receptors (AMPARs) and long-term potentiation (LTP) generation in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons, using mice either lacking all Homer1 isoforms (Homer1 KO) or overexpressing the immediate early gene (IEG) product Homer1a (H1aTG). We found that Homer1 KO caused a significant redistribution of the AMPAR subunit GluA2 from the dendritic compartment to the soma. Furthermore, deletion of Homer1 enhanced the AMPAR-mediated component of glutamatergic currents at Schaffer collateral synapses as demonstrated by increased AMPA/NMDA current ratios. Meanwhile, LTP generation appeared to be unaffected. Conversely, sustained overexpression of Homer1a strongly reduced AMPA/NMDA current ratios and polyamine sensitivity of synaptic AMPAR, indicating that the proportion of synaptic GluA2-containing AMPAR increased relative to WT. LTP maintenance was abolished in H1aTG. Notably, overexpression of Homer1a in Homer1 KO or GluA2 KO mice did not affect LTP expression, suggesting activity-dependent interaction between Homer1a and long Homer1 isoforms with GluA2-containing AMPAR. Thus, Homer1a is essential for the activity-dependent regulation of excitatory synaptic transmission. PMID:23133416

  14. Fumigant Toxicity of Essential Oils from Basil and Spearmint Against Two Major Pyralid Pests of Stored Products.

    PubMed

    Eliopoulos, P A; Hassiotis, C N; Andreadis, S S; Porichi, A-E E

    2015-04-01

    The fumigant activity of essential oil vapors distilled from sweet basil Ocimum basilicum L. and spearmint Mentha spicata L. (Lamiaceae) were tested against two major stored products pests Ephestia kuehniella (Zeller) and Plodia interpunctella (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae). Various oil doses (0.5, 2.5, 5, 50, 250, 500, 1,000, and 1,500 µl/liter air), for an exposure period of 24 h, were tested. The essential oils were subjected to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis and revealed that the major compounds were for spearmint oil carvone (67.1%) and limonene (+1,8 cineole; 14.3%) and for basil oil linalool (45.9%), 1,8 cineole (16.7%) and eugenol (10.3%). Apart from a few exceptions, no significant differences in insecticidal action were observed between basil and spearmint oil. Both oils were highly effective against adult moths, given that notable mortality (>80%) was recorded after exposure to low doses such as 2.5 µl/liter. Noteworthy, egg mortality was also recorded, reaching 73-79% for basil and 56-60% for spearmint. Toxicity data indicated that larvae and pupae were the most tolerant stages in all cases. Larval mortality never exceeded 21 and 18%, for basil and spearmint, respectively, irrespective of moth species. Basil and spearmint oils displayed mortalities as high as 38 and 28% in pupae. Lethal doses (LD50 and LD99) values were estimated via probit analysis. Developmental stage proved to be a significant factor, whereas the effect of oil species on insect mortality was insignificant. With the exception of adult individuals, basil and spearmint oils did not show satisfactory overall insecticidal activity against E. kuehniella and P. interpunctella. PMID:26470193

  15. Fumigant Toxicity of Essential Oils from Basil and Spearmint Against Two Major Pyralid Pests of Stored Products.

    PubMed

    Eliopoulos, P A; Hassiotis, C N; Andreadis, S S; Porichi, A-E E

    2015-04-01

    The fumigant activity of essential oil vapors distilled from sweet basil Ocimum basilicum L. and spearmint Mentha spicata L. (Lamiaceae) were tested against two major stored products pests Ephestia kuehniella (Zeller) and Plodia interpunctella (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae). Various oil doses (0.5, 2.5, 5, 50, 250, 500, 1,000, and 1,500 µl/liter air), for an exposure period of 24 h, were tested. The essential oils were subjected to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis and revealed that the major compounds were for spearmint oil carvone (67.1%) and limonene (+1,8 cineole; 14.3%) and for basil oil linalool (45.9%), 1,8 cineole (16.7%) and eugenol (10.3%). Apart from a few exceptions, no significant differences in insecticidal action were observed between basil and spearmint oil. Both oils were highly effective against adult moths, given that notable mortality (>80%) was recorded after exposure to low doses such as 2.5 µl/liter. Noteworthy, egg mortality was also recorded, reaching 73-79% for basil and 56-60% for spearmint. Toxicity data indicated that larvae and pupae were the most tolerant stages in all cases. Larval mortality never exceeded 21 and 18%, for basil and spearmint, respectively, irrespective of moth species. Basil and spearmint oils displayed mortalities as high as 38 and 28% in pupae. Lethal doses (LD50 and LD99) values were estimated via probit analysis. Developmental stage proved to be a significant factor, whereas the effect of oil species on insect mortality was insignificant. With the exception of adult individuals, basil and spearmint oils did not show satisfactory overall insecticidal activity against E. kuehniella and P. interpunctella.

  16. Genes related to xylose fermentation and methods of using same for enhanced biofuel production

    SciTech Connect

    Wohlbach, Dana J.; Gasch, Audrey P.

    2014-08-05

    The present invention provides isolated gene sequences involved in xylose fermentation and related recombinant yeast which are useful in methods of enhanced biofuel production, particularly ethanol production. Methods of bioengineering recombinant yeast useful for biofuel production are also provided.

  17. Genes related to xylose fermentation and methods of using same for enhanced biofuel production

    SciTech Connect

    Wohlbach, Dana J.; Gasch, Audrey P.

    2015-09-29

    The present invention provides isolated gene sequences involved in xylose fermentation and related recombinant yeast which are useful in methods of enhanced biofuel production, particularly ethanol production. Methods of bioengineering recombinant yeast useful for biofuel production are also provided.

  18. Manganese Superoxide Dismutase Gene Expression Is Induced by Nanog and Oct4, Essential Pluripotent Stem Cells’ Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Solari, Claudia; Vázquez Echegaray, Camila; Cosentino, María Soledad; Petrone, María Victoria; Waisman, Ariel; Luzzani, Carlos; Francia, Marcos; Villodre, Emilly; Lenz, Guido; Miriuka, Santiago; Barañao, Lino; Guberman, Alejandra

    2015-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells possess complex systems that protect them from oxidative stress and ensure genomic stability, vital for their role in development. Even though it has been reported that antioxidant activity diminishes along stem cell differentiation, little is known about the transcriptional regulation of the involved genes. The reported modulation of some of these genes led us to hypothesize that some of them could be regulated by the transcription factors critical for self-renewal and pluripotency in embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and in induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). In this work, we studied the expression profile of multiple genes involved in antioxidant defense systems in both ESCs and iPSCs. We found that Manganese superoxide dismutase gene (Mn-Sod/Sod2) was repressed during diverse differentiation protocols showing an expression pattern similar to Nanog gene. Moreover, Sod2 promoter activity was induced by Oct4 and Nanog when we performed a transactivation assay using two different reporter constructions. Finally, we studied Sod2 gene regulation by modulating the expression of Oct4 and Nanog in ESCs by shRNAs and found that downregulation of any of them reduced Sod2 expression. Our results indicate that pluripotency transcription factors positively modulate Sod2 gene transcription. PMID:26642061

  19. Manganese Superoxide Dismutase Gene Expression Is Induced by Nanog and Oct4, Essential Pluripotent Stem Cells' Transcription Factors.

    PubMed

    Solari, Claudia; Vázquez Echegaray, Camila; Cosentino, María Soledad; Petrone, María Victoria; Waisman, Ariel; Luzzani, Carlos; Francia, Marcos; Villodre, Emilly; Lenz, Guido; Miriuka, Santiago; Barañao, Lino; Guberman, Alejandra

    2015-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells possess complex systems that protect them from oxidative stress and ensure genomic stability, vital for their role in development. Even though it has been reported that antioxidant activity diminishes along stem cell differentiation, little is known about the transcriptional regulation of the involved genes. The reported modulation of some of these genes led us to hypothesize that some of them could be regulated by the transcription factors critical for self-renewal and pluripotency in embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and in induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). In this work, we studied the expression profile of multiple genes involved in antioxidant defense systems in both ESCs and iPSCs. We found that Manganese superoxide dismutase gene (Mn-Sod/Sod2) was repressed during diverse differentiation protocols showing an expression pattern similar to Nanog gene. Moreover, Sod2 promoter activity was induced by Oct4 and Nanog when we performed a transactivation assay using two different reporter constructions. Finally, we studied Sod2 gene regulation by modulating the expression of Oct4 and Nanog in ESCs by shRNAs and found that downregulation of any of them reduced Sod2 expression. Our results indicate that pluripotency transcription factors positively modulate Sod2 gene transcription. PMID:26642061

  20. Manganese Superoxide Dismutase Gene Expression Is Induced by Nanog and Oct4, Essential Pluripotent Stem Cells' Transcription Factors.

    PubMed

    Solari, Claudia; Vázquez Echegaray, Camila; Cosentino, María Soledad; Petrone, María Victoria; Waisman, Ariel; Luzzani, Carlos; Francia, Marcos; Villodre, Emilly; Lenz, Guido; Miriuka, Santiago; Barañao, Lino; Guberman, Alejandra

    2015-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells possess complex systems that protect them from oxidative stress and ensure genomic stability, vital for their role in development. Even though it has been reported that antioxidant activity diminishes along stem cell differentiation, little is known about the transcriptional regulation of the involved genes. The reported modulation of some of these genes led us to hypothesize that some of them could be regulated by the transcription factors critical for self-renewal and pluripotency in embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and in induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). In this work, we studied the expression profile of multiple genes involved in antioxidant defense systems in both ESCs and iPSCs. We found that Manganese superoxide dismutase gene (Mn-Sod/Sod2) was repressed during diverse differentiation protocols showing an expression pattern similar to Nanog gene. Moreover, Sod2 promoter activity was induced by Oct4 and Nanog when we performed a transactivation assay using two different reporter constructions. Finally, we studied Sod2 gene regulation by modulating the expression of Oct4 and Nanog in ESCs by shRNAs and found that downregulation of any of them reduced Sod2 expression. Our results indicate that pluripotency transcription factors positively modulate Sod2 gene transcription.

  1. The Podospora rmp1 gene implicated in nucleus-mitochondria cross-talk encodes an essential protein whose subcellular location is developmentally regulated.

    PubMed Central

    Contamine, Véronique; Zickler, Denise; Picard, Marguerite

    2004-01-01

    It has been previously reported that, at the time of death, the Podospora anserina AS1-4 mutant strains accumulate specific deleted forms of the mitochondrial genome and that their life spans depend on two natural alleles (variants) of the rmp1 gene: AS1-4 rmp1-2 strains exhibit life spans strikingly longer than those of AS1-4 rmp1-1. Here, we show that rmp1 is an essential gene. In silico analyses of eight rmp1 natural alleles present in Podospora isolates and of the putative homologs of this orphan gene in other filamentous fungi suggest that rmp1 evolves rapidly. The RMP1 protein is localized in the mitochondrial and/or the cytosolic compartment, depending on cell type and developmental stage. Strains producing RMP1 without its mitochondrial targeting peptide are viable but exhibit vegetative and sexual defects. PMID:15020413

  2. Post transcriptional regulation of chloroplast gene expression by nuclear encoded gene products. Progress report, June 1, 1990--June 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Kuchka, M.R.

    1992-08-01

    Many individual chloroplast genes require the products of a collection of nuclear genes for their successful expression. These nuclear gene products apparently work with great specificity, each committed to the expression of a single chloroplast gene. We have chosen as a model nuclear mutants of Chlamydomonas affected in different stages in the expression of the chloroplast encoded Photosystem II polypeptide, D2. We have made the progress in understanding how nuclear gene products affect the translation of the D2 encoding MRNA. Two nuclear genes are required for this process which have been mapped genetically. In contrast to other examples of nuclear control of translation in the chloroplast, these nuclear gene products appear to be required either for specific stages in translation elongation or for the post-translational stabilization of the nascent D2 protein. Pseudoreversion analysis has led us to a locus which may be directly involved in D2 expression. We have made considerable progress in pursuing the molecular basis of psbd MRNA stabilization. psbD 5` UTR specific transcripts have been synthesized in vitro and used in gel mobility shift assays. UV-crosslinking studies are underway to identify the transacting factors which bind to these sequences. The continued examination of these mutants will help us to understand how nuclear gene products work in this specific case of chloroplast gene expression, and will elucidate how two distinct genomes can interact generally.

  3. 29 CFR 776.17 - Employment in a “closely related process or occupation directly essential to” production of goods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... PROVISIONS OF THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT OF 1938 General Engaging in âthe Production of Goods for Commerceâ... Labor Standards Amendments of 1949, this was true of employees engaged “in any process or occupation... directly essential toâ production of goods. 776.17 Section 776.17 Labor......

  4. 29 CFR 776.17 - Employment in a “closely related process or occupation directly essential to” production of goods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... PROVISIONS OF THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT OF 1938 General Engaging in âthe Production of Goods for Commerceâ... Labor Standards Amendments of 1949, this was true of employees engaged “in any process or occupation... directly essential toâ production of goods. 776.17 Section 776.17 Labor......

  5. 29 CFR 776.17 - Employment in a “closely related process or occupation directly essential to” production of goods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... PROVISIONS OF THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT OF 1938 General Engaging in âthe Production of Goods for Commerceâ... Labor Standards Amendments of 1949, this was true of employees engaged “in any process or occupation... directly essential toâ production of goods. 776.17 Section 776.17 Labor......

  6. 29 CFR 776.17 - Employment in a “closely related process or occupation directly essential to” production of goods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... PROVISIONS OF THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT OF 1938 General Engaging in âthe Production of Goods for Commerceâ... Labor Standards Amendments of 1949, this was true of employees engaged “in any process or occupation... directly essential toâ production of goods. 776.17 Section 776.17 Labor......

  7. 29 CFR 776.17 - Employment in a “closely related process or occupation directly essential to” production of goods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... PROVISIONS OF THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT OF 1938 General Engaging in âthe Production of Goods for Commerceâ... Labor Standards Amendments of 1949, this was true of employees engaged “in any process or occupation... directly essential toâ production of goods. 776.17 Section 776.17 Labor......

  8. Cloning of mouse telomerase reverse transcriptase gene promoter and identification of proximal core promoter sequences essential for the expression of transgenes in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Si, Shao-Yan; Song, Shu-Jun; Zhang, Jian-Zhong; Liu, Jun-Li; Liang, Shuang; Feng, Kai; Zhao, Gang; Tan, Xiao-Qing

    2011-08-01

    Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein complex, whose function is to add motif-specific nucleotides to the end of chromosomes. Telomerase consists of three major subunits, the telomerase RNA template (hTR), the telomerase-associated protein (TEP1) and telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT). TERT is the most important component responsible for the catalytic activity of telomerase and a rate-limiting determinant of the activity. Telomerase activities were at high levels in approximately 90% of mouse cancers or tumor-derived cell lines through TERT transcriptional up-regulation. Unlike human telomerase, telomerase activity exists in colon, liver, ovary and testis but not in brain, heart, stomach and muscle in normal mouse tissues. In this study, we prepared 5' truncations of 1086 bp fragments upstream of the initiating ATG codon of the mTERT gene to construct luciferase reporter gene plasmids, and transfected these plasmids into a normal mouse cell line and several cancer lines to identify the core promoter region essential for transcriptional activation in cancer cells by a luciferase assay. We constructed a eukaryotic expression vector of membrane-expressing staphylococcal endotoxin A (SEA) gene driven by the core promoter region of the mTERT gene and observed if the core promoter region could express the SEA gene in these cancer cells, but not in normal cells following transfection with the construct. The results showed that the transcriptional activities of each fragment of the mTERT gene promoter in the cancer cell lines Hepa1-6, B16 and CT26 were higher than those in NIH3T3 cells, and the proximal 333-bp fragment was the core promoter of the mTERT gene in the cancer cells. The proximal 333-bp fragment was able to make the SEA express on the surface of the cancer cells, but not in NIH3T3 cells. It provides a foundation for cancer targeting gene therapy by using the mTERT gene promoter. PMID:21567104

  9. Identification of the essential EPE1 gene involved in retention of secreted proteins on the cell surface of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells.

    PubMed

    Alexieva, K I; Klis, F; Wedler, H; Wambutt, R; Venkov, P

    1999-09-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells secrete extracellularly low amounts of a few proteins. The reasons for retardation of secreted proteins on the cell surface remain obscure. We describe here a mutant able to export enhanced amount of proteins. Classical genetic methods, nucleic acids manipulations and cloning procedures were used to isolate and characterize the mutant and to clone and sequence the corresponding wild type gene. The isolated Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant MW11, is temperature sensitive and exports on average twenty-fold more proteins at 37 degrees C than parental wild type strain (80 micrograms of proteins/1 x 10(8) mutant cells, SEM +/- 5, n22; versus 3 micrograms of proteins/1 x 10(8) parental cells, SEM +/- 1, n22). Protein overexport in the mutant requires a functional SEC1 pathway and is independent of cell lysis. Cloning and sequencing of the corresponding wild type gene identified an open reading frame of 786 bp coding for a hydrophilic protein with predicted molecular mass of 30 kDa and cytosolic localization. The newly identified gene, designated EPE1, is an essential gene. Its DNA and amino acids sequence showed no homology with other yeast genes and proteins. It is concluded that the function of unknown yet genes, such as EPE1 is needed for retention of secreted proteins on the surface of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells.

  10. The impact of oregano (Origanum heracleoticum) essential oil and carvacrol on virulence gene transcription by Escherichia coli O157:H7.

    PubMed

    Mith, Hasika; Clinquart, Antoine; Zhiri, Abdesselam; Daube, Georges; Delcenserie, Véronique

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to determine, via reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) analysis, the effect of oregano essential oil (Origanum heracleoticum) and carvacrol, its major component, on the expression of virulence-associated genes in enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 ATCC strain 35150. Both oregano oil and carvacrol demonstrated their efficacy firstly, by inhibiting the transcription of the ler gene involved in upregulation of the LEE2, LEE3 and LEE4 promoters and of attaching and effacing lesions and secondly by decreasing both Shiga toxin and fliC genes expression. In addition, a decrease in luxS gene transcription involved in quorum sensing was observed. These results were dose dependent and showed a specific effect of O. heracleoticum and carvacrol in downregulating the expression of virulence genes in EHEC O157:H7. These findings suggest that oregano oil and carvacrol have the potential to mitigate the adverse health effects caused by virulence gene expression in EHEC O157:H7, through the use of these substances as natural antibacterial additives in foods or as an alternative to antibiotics. PMID:25790499

  11. The impact of oregano (Origanum heracleoticum) essential oil and carvacrol on virulence gene transcription by Escherichia coli O157:H7.

    PubMed

    Mith, Hasika; Clinquart, Antoine; Zhiri, Abdesselam; Daube, Georges; Delcenserie, Véronique

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to determine, via reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) analysis, the effect of oregano essential oil (Origanum heracleoticum) and carvacrol, its major component, on the expression of virulence-associated genes in enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 ATCC strain 35150. Both oregano oil and carvacrol demonstrated their efficacy firstly, by inhibiting the transcription of the ler gene involved in upregulation of the LEE2, LEE3 and LEE4 promoters and of attaching and effacing lesions and secondly by decreasing both Shiga toxin and fliC genes expression. In addition, a decrease in luxS gene transcription involved in quorum sensing was observed. These results were dose dependent and showed a specific effect of O. heracleoticum and carvacrol in downregulating the expression of virulence genes in EHEC O157:H7. These findings suggest that oregano oil and carvacrol have the potential to mitigate the adverse health effects caused by virulence gene expression in EHEC O157:H7, through the use of these substances as natural antibacterial additives in foods or as an alternative to antibiotics.

  12. The SCL gene product: a positive regulator of erythroid differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Aplan, P D; Nakahara, K; Orkin, S H; Kirsch, I R

    1992-01-01

    The SCL (tal-1, TCL5) gene is a member of the basic domain, helix-loop-helix (bHLH) class of putative transcription factors. We found that (i) the SCL promoter for exon Ia contains a potential recognition site for GATA-binding transcription factors, (ii) SCL mRNA is expressed in all erythroid tissues and cell lines examined, and (iii) SCL mRNA increases upon induced differentiation of murine erythroleukemia (MEL) cells, and inferred that SCL may play a physiologic role in erythroid differentiation. We used gel shift and transfection assays to demonstrate that the GATA motif in the SCL promoter binds GATA-1 (and GATA-2), and also mediates transcriptional transactivation. To identify a role for SCL in erythroid differentiation, we generated stable transfectants of MEL and K562 (a human chronic myelogenous leukemia cell line that can differentiate along the erythroid pathway) cells overexpressing wild-type, antisense or mutant SCL cDNA. Increasing the level of SCL expression in two independent MEL lines (F4-6 and C19, a 745 derivative) and K562 cells increased the rate of spontaneous (i.e. in the absence of inducer) erythroid differentiation. Conversely, induced differentiation was inhibited in MEL transfectants expressing either antisense SCL cDNA or a mutant SCL lacking the basic domain. Our experiments suggest that the SCL gene can be a target for the erythroid transcription factor GATA-1 and that the SCL gene product serves as a positive regulator of erythroid differentiation. Images PMID:1396592

  13. Non-essential repeats in the promoter region of a Brassica rapa acyl carrier protein gene expressed in developing embryos.

    PubMed

    Scherer, D; Sato, A; McCarter, D W; Radke, S E; Kridl, J C; Knauf, V C

    1992-02-01

    A genomic clone of an acyl carrier protein gene (Bcg4-4) which is highly expressed in developing embryos of Brassica rapa was isolated and sequenced. The promoter and transcription terminator regions of Bcg4-4 were used to express a beta-glucuronidase reporter gene in transgenic rapeseed. Deletion of repeated domains in the promoter region did not lower beta-glucuronidase expression in seeds.

  14. The non-essential left end region of the fowl adenovirus 9 genome is suitable for foreign gene insertion/replacement.

    PubMed

    Corredor, Juan Carlos; Nagy, Eva

    2010-05-01

    The goals of this study were to demonstrate that a non-essential region at the left end of the fowl adenovirus 9 (FAdV-9) genome could be used to generate recombinant viruses, examine their in vitro growth characteristics and determine their ability to transduce non-avian cells. Three FAdV-9 vectors (rFAdV-9s) were generated carrying the enhanced-green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene: FAdV-9inEGFP, FAdV-9 Delta 1-EGFP and FAdV-9 Delta 4-EGFP. FAdV-9inEGFP carried the EGFP cassette inserted into the non-essential region without deletion resulting in an increase of the genome size to 103.7% of the wild-type. FAdV-9 Delta 1-EGFP and FAdV-9 Delta 4-EGFP (rFAdV-9 Delta s) carried the EGFP cassette replacing the non-essential sequences at nucleotides 1194-2342 and 491-2782, respectively. All rFAdV-9s had wild-type growth kinetics and plaque morphology. The rFAdV-9 Delta s replicated in CH-SAH cells with the same titers as the wild-type virus. The FAdV-9inEGFP titers were approximately 1 log lower than those of rFAdV-9 Delta s and wt FAdV-9 at 36 and 48 h post-infection (h.p.i.). EGFP was expressed in avian and mammalian cells infected with rFAdV-9s. EGFP expression, based on spectrofluorometry, was significantly higher in chicken hepatoma cells infected with FAdV-9inEGFP than in those with rFAdV-9 Delta s at 18 and 24h.p.i, suggesting a functional role of some or all non-essential ORFs on foreign gene expression. This study demonstrated the suitability of the non-essential region as an insertion/replacement site for foreign genes to generate FAdV-9-based vectors that can be applied as recombinant vaccines for poultry or gene delivery vehicles for mammalian systems. PMID:20132849

  15. Modulation in vitro of human natural cytotoxicity, lymphocyte proliferative response to mitogens and cytokine production by essential fatty acids.

    PubMed Central

    Purasiri, P; Mckechnie, A; Heys, S D; Eremin, O

    1997-01-01

    Essential fatty acids (EFA) have been shown in animal studies to have a differential effect on various aspects of immune react